The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00032

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text














WOoL-51


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


0MA


RCH 1941


WOOL. SHORN: PRODUCTION. PRICE. AND CASH
FARM INCOME. UNITED STATES. 1924-40


SHORN WOOL PRODUCTION IN 1940 WAS THE LARGEST ON RECORD. THE
TREND IN PRODUCTION HAS BEEN UPWARD SINCE 1923. 'WOOL PRICES IN 1940
AVERAGED MUCH HIGHER THAN IN 1939, AND CASH INCOME FROM WOOL WAS ABOUT
30 PERCENT GREATER.' THE 1940 CASH INCOME WAS MUCH LARGER THAN IN
MOST RECENT YEARS. WOOL PRICES THIS SPRING AND SUMMER ARE EXPECTED TO
AVERAGE HIGHER THAN A YEAR EARLIER, AND FARMERS PROBABLY WILL RECEIVE
A LARGER INCOME FROM WOOL THIS YEAR THAN LAST.


A 3 ; q. j-l


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S. O r aGRIaIuLyL r.o...IcS







WOOL-51


-m ---------- m----- mm mm mm-m-- ---
TH~E WOOL SITUAT ION


Summary

Interest in the domestic wool market has shifted to the Western States

where contracting of the 1941 clip has begun in volume. Prices of new clip

wool are considerably higher than in the early months of the 1940 wool market-

ing season. With domestic demand and supply conditions favorable to the

marketing of the new clip, farmers probably will receive a larger income from

wool this year than last. The 1940 farm income from shorn wool was about 30

percent greater than in 1939; it was larger than in most recent years.

Mill consumption of apparel wool in January, though slightly smaller

than the record consumption in December, was 42 percent larger than in

January 1940 and was the largest January consumption on record. Army orders

now held by mills call for the delivery of large quantities of wool cloth in

the first half of 1941, and recent proposals for bids indicate that mill con-

sumption for military uses will be large in the second half of the year also.

With further increases in consumer incomes and retail sales also in prospect,

total consumption in 1941 is expected to be larger than in 1940. A large part

of the increase over the 1940 consumption is expected in the first half of

the year.

Imports of apparel wool for consumption totaled 51.8 million pounds in

January compared with 41.2 million pounds in December. Imports in recent

months have been larger than at any time since 1923* But mill consumption

also has been large and the carry-over of wool in this country into the 1941

season which begins about April 1 probably will be relatively small.

As a result of large exports in the first 4 months (October-January) of

the current marketing season, supplies of wool available for export from


- 2 -







WOOL-51 3 -

Argentina and Uruguay on February 1 were estimated to be smaller than average

February 1 supplies in the 5 years 1936-40. *And in view of shipping diffi-

culties reported in the South American ports, it is likely that the calculated

stocks on February 1 include a relatively large quantity of wool already sold

but not yet' shipped. LMore than 80 percent of the shipments from Argentina

and Uruguay from October through January were to the United States.

Total supplies of wool in foreign countries available for shipment to

the United States, however, are still relatively large. Since last May,

shipments of wool to European countries have been largely cut off by the

British blockade, and the United States, Great Britain, and Japan are the

only important markets for exports from the Southern Hemisphere. The avail-

ability of this wool to the United States, of course, is dependent upon the

maintenance of adequate shipping facilities.

Production of wool in the five principal producing 'countries of the

Southern Hemisphere in the 1940-41 season, totaling 2,104 million pounds, is

estimated to be about 4 percent smaller than in the previous season, but

about 4 percent larger than the average for the 5 years 1934-38. The decline

in production is chiefly in Australia, where almost half of the Southern

Hemisphere clip is produced. The 1940 production of wool in the United States,

both shorn and pulled, totaled 449,763,000 pounds and was the largest on

record.

-- March 11, 1941

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMElETS

Boston wool market quiet in February;
interest shifts to Western States

Prices of domestic wool at Boston were somewhat irregular in February.
Sales of spot domestic wools were limited to small lots needed to complete
orders on hand. On such sales prices of fine and 1/4 blood territory wools






WOOL-51


-.4 -._


advanced 2 cents a pound, scoured basis, during February but quotations on
1/2 blood territory wools declined slightly.

Interest in domestic wools has now shifted to the contrLcting of the
new 1941 clip in Texas and the \!estcrnL States. In the early part of February,
Boston wool dealers were contracting 1941 wool in several Viestarn States at
prices equivalent to about 95., cents to $lc00 a pound, scoured basis, for fine
territory wools in original bags, according to reports of the Agricultural
Marketing Service. By the end of February, dealers estimated that prices on
such wools were mostly l1.00-Il .05 a pound, scoured basis. Tioderr.te
amounts of the coa'tracted wools have been resold to manufacturers for 'delivery
as soon as available. Contracting of wool this year has been much earlier
than usual.. .

The Unite4 States average price of wool received by farmers was 32.1
cents a pound on February 15 compared with 31.3 cents on January 15 and 27.8
cents on February 15, 1940.

Prices of foreign v-olok st Poston
continue firn ii. e' Fi' ~ry

Foreign wools continued to predominate in snot sales on the Boston
market in Feb'ru'~-: The bulk of sales were of the finer grades of wool from
South A: erica, T! :'e wfas a fair der.and for merino wools from .Astralia and
South Africa. The medium and coarse grades of South American ;wools were less
active. At the end of February, spot South American fine coj bl.ng %.ools sold
at 95 cents to $1C. a,.: o'i:.d, scoured basis, duty raid, C or-,,Erd with 95-97
cents a pound a month earlier, according to reports of the Agricultural
Marketing Service. Good combjin 1/2 blood wools sold at 85-93 cents a pound.
Prides of fine Australian wools, scoured basis, including duty were about 98
cents to $1,02 for r--erage combing length and $1.02-41.05 for good top-
making types.

New Zealand wool available to the
United States buyers

The British M1inistry of Supply has advised that it will make available
for direct sale to the United States limited quantities of New Zealand cross-
bred crutchings for cri'et manufacture and specialty crossbreds for the paper-
felting industry. Crutchir'-s, however, will not be available in any quantity
until May or June, and paper felting wools will be available only in very
limited quantities tlis season (through June). American buyers are directed
to place orders %ith the lNew Zealand 2'.r:cting Board. About 8.5 million
pounds of 56s-58s -rre made available for shipment in January. New Zealand
wools previously had not been availa l.. to United States buyers, as the
entire production of that country was required by the British Government.

Imports increase further in January

Imports of a 'arel wool for consumption l/ totaled 51.8 million pounds
in January compared with 41.2 million pounds in December and 24.3 million
/ Tool entered for Lii.'rediate consumption plus wool withdrawn from bonded
warehouses on which duty has been paid.









pounds in January 1940. The January imports were the largest for any month
since April 1923. Of the total imports in: January, 38 million pounds were
wools grading finer than 56s. Imports of carpet wool for consumption totaled
20.4 million pounds in January, 14.9 million pounds in December, and 20.5
million pounds in January 1940.

Imports of apparel wool for the entire year 1940 totaling 223 million
pounds were the largest since 1923, when imports totaled 266 million pounds.

Mill consumption continues high
in January

nMll consumption of apparel wool averaged 8,023,000 pounds a week,
scoured basis, during January compared.with the revised rate of 8,503,000
pounds in December and 5,638,000 pounds in January 1940. The January consump-
tion was the largest on record for that month. Mill consumption of apparel
wool has been at a record level since November. Revised data show that con-
sumption in December exceeded that of November and reached a new high for the
13 years of record.

Consumption in the 5 weeks ended February 1 was equivalent to 79.8
million pounds, greasy shorn and pulled. About 48.9 million pounds were do-
mestic wool and 30.9 million pounds were foreign. In the entire year 1940
consumption on a grease basis totaled 487 million pounds of domestic wool
and 154 million pounds of foreign.

Unfilled orders for army cloth large;
civilian orders increase

Unfilled orders for woven cloth reported by mills at the beginning of
1941 were almost twice as large as at the beginning of 1939 and 1940, and were
three times as large as on January 1, 1938, according to statistics published
by the National Association of Wool Manufacturers. A considerable part of the
unfilled orders for men's-wear material reported at the beginning of 1941
consisted of Army contracts. But unfilled orders for material for civilian
uses were the largest reported since October 1939.

No large orders for woven cloth were placed by the Government in
January and February, and it is likely that unfilled orders had been reduced
somewhat by the beginning of March. With further Army orders in prospect in
the next few months, mills have not been active in soliciting business on
civilian fabrics, according to commercial reports.


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WOOL-51






- 6 -


Unfilled orders for woven cloth" :-.:orted by 119 mills, beinrninin
of each'quarter, I' 3-41 _/

Qr Men's swear ns
Quarter : I.es s :P
'beinii.Lin(; : wear cloths /: Tta
G: government .. Otherclos
: 1,000 1,000 1, 1000
linear yards linear linear yards lineaear .r&' line lii'r ri 1ards
1938
January 3,944 10,924 6,043 2;055 22,966
A--ril 2,293 6;293 4,139 1,894 14;619
July 995 13,.. 6 8,041 1,315 23;637
October 785 13,777 6,541 1,968 23,071

1939
January 844 24,456 8;951 1,82 36;033
April : 565 22,905 5;252 834 29;556
July 661 19,913 11,' 26 1,:24 33,924
Oct:t.-r 635 31,887 9,260 3,244 45,j26

1940
January : 1,376 23,438 9,204 2,005 36,023
April : 748- 21; '7 4,429 1,136 27;610
July 9,436 17,564 12,933 3,.064 42,997
October 12,806 19,200 10,919 2,?7 45, 852

1941
January 2/: 28,457 25,799 11,403 2,494 6-,153

ComAi led from '-'!r.thi.-y '1'it ice cf i'0ool Manufacture, published by thp
i:.tic.:-il Association of -u ol : -ii.ifacturers. Statistics are for cl.:th con-
t .ir-in by i:ei.-ht over 25 percent, of yarns spun on the woolen and worsted
system. Cloth less than 50 inches wide reported in equivalent :4-inch

/ Reports are for specified dates, near the b.'rL uLinr of each quarter.
Excludes cloth with pile or jacquard 'eign.
SDecember 28.

Bids invited on 1.:';, quantities of
wool goods for '~ -use.

The United Statzs ..i". issued pro-osals .f-or I, for a c-nsiderable
quantity of wool ,.c .ds durir.- F.- rua-, follow' i,- .-e of an srpropria-
tion for'such items. Bids wil be c--nod *:'ing laarch for'2 million wool
blankets, 3.2 million :ds of 32-ounco melton c9v.'c.:-'ting, 9.9 million
yards of 18-ounce .-r--., and 10.2 million ;, .ds of 10-1/2 ounce shirting
flannel. In addition, bids will be received on large quantities of wool
gloves, underwear, and socks and on small quanttitis of miscellaneous
cloths such as elastiq'.a, and lining cloth.

Delivery of the cloth and blanket orders will be permitted over a
period of 6 to 9 months. Specifications for the wool sc.-re and rhirting


.::C0OL-51









flannel call for delivery of 10 percent of purchases by August 31 and an
additional 30 percent in each of the 3 following months, delivery to be
completed by November 30. Delivery requirements on overcoats are 2 per-
cent within 110 days, 10 percent additional in the next 30 days, and in
general 20 percent additional per month with delivery completed within
260 days. One-half of the blanket deliveries are required within 110 days
and the remaining half within an additional 75-day period.

It is roughly estimated that the orders on blankets, overcoating,
serge elastique, and shirting flannel will require about 45 million pounds
of clean wool, equivalent to about 100 million pounds of greasy domestic
wool.

Prices firm in South American
markets in February

Wool markets in Argentina and Uruguay were active in February. De-
mand from the United States was not as strong as in January but sales were
fairly large. Prices remained firm. Purchases by United States buyers in
February included considerable scoured wool in Argentina and lamb's wool
in Uruguay. Declining supplies of some grades and descriptions are likely
to be a factor in the volume of sales during the remainder of the current
season. Wool brokers in Uruguay predicted late in February that the sell-
ing season in that market would be practically over in a few weeks.

Prices of South American wool in the current season are shown in
table 5.

South American shipments large
in current season

Despite shipping difficulties, and the loss of most European markets,
shipments of wool from Argentina and Uruguay in the first 4 months of the
current export season were much larger than in most recent years. United
States buyers have purchased the greater part of the South American wool
sold thus far in the current season. More than 80 percent of the shipments
from Argentina and Uruguay from October through January were to United
States ports. In the 5 years 1934-38 only about 20 percent of the October-
January shipments wore to the United States. Most of the Eurco p..an coun-
tries which previously purchased large quantities of South American wools
are now cut off from the market by the British blockade. Wool requirements
of the United Kingdom are being filled largely with wools from Empire
sources.

Supplies below average in Ar-.- ntin. and Uruguay;
large quantities await shipment

Supplies of wool available for export from Argentina in the current
season were estimated at 415 million pounds, grease basis, compared with
390 million pounds in the 1939-40 season. 2/ Exports to February 1, 1941

/ Estimates of the Buenos Aires Branch, First National Bank of Boston.


WOOL-51


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WOOL-51 8 -

totaled about 165 million pounds, grease basis, and it is estimated that
about ,50 million ru:.z,'s remained available for er.,o t or carry-over as of
February 1. This was about 10 percent smaller than -eI:-ae February 1 sup-
plies in the 5 years 1936-40, Lcl ir s available for export fr:.m Uruguay
on :e-.ru':'y 1 are estimated at 78 million pc.inds. The i'',ru'r 1 supplies
in Ur-uguAsy were about 7 percent smaller th;n the 5-year (1936-40) aver-Tge
for Febru ~ :- 1.

In vie of shipping difficulties reported in the South A-eric,1n wool
trade, it is likely th.t the calculated stocks on February 1 include a rela-
tiv. ly; large ouant:'ty of wool already sold but not yet shipped. I cc.it
cabled reports advise that many export houses in Buenos ,-dres were about
3 weeks behind on s 'irints. This was due to lack of local fci cities to
handle the large volume of sales and to inadequate shipping space.

Rapidly advancing freight rates have put a premium on early s.irj~mnt
from South American markets. Rates from Buenos Aires which had b'.-en $12 a
ton advanced to ?16 a ton on February 1. A further advance to -20 a ton
has been announced effective Aoril 1.

Supplies and distribution of wool to Febr 'r:- 1 in the current export
season in Ar. ~ntina and Urugu:y, with comparisons

I t e m Lr 1 0/ 3 9 4 0 i L ___,
Item : 1939-40 190-411 1939-40 .1940-41 1/

:11. lblb. '11.b1 lii. lb. ~I1. lb.

Stocks Oct. 1 ............... 52.9 83.8 9.4 26.5
Production ................ 403.0 397.0 17 .: 12.0
Total supply ........... 455.9 480.6 143.3 14 .5


For domestic consumption 2/ .: 66.1 66.1
Available for export ......... 389.8 414.7
Exports Oct.-Jan. 3/ ........: 117.2 4/ 165.0
Stocks Feb. 1 (calculated) ..: 272.6 249.7


_. 7.0
136.7 141.5
10?. 63.0
103.5 78.5


Compiled from official sources and reliable conmmrcial sources.
Y/ Fr- irP '.. ry.
SEstimated dom -stic requirements for entire season.
SExport wji-.t of scoured and skin wool converted to a grease b:sis
for Argentina, and Uli ': ,o: exports as r... -'etd.
4/ Partly es imated.







WOOL-51 -9 -

Exports of wool from Argentina and"Uruguay in the first 4 months
(October-January) of the export season, 1934-40 1/

Period : Argentina : Uruguay : Tzo countries
beginning: United : : United ; United :
Oct. 1 : States .: Ttal States Totl States :Ttal
: Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil1. .. Mil b 13. :il. lb. Mil. lb.

1934 : 5.8 aS.4 0o4 34.6 62. 123.0
1935 : 22.4 918 12.1 50.4 34.5 142.2
1936 : 39.3 130.9 19;0 66.9 58.3 197.8
1937 : 2.3 57.5 0.2 24.1 2.5 81.6
1938 : 33.2 140.9 1.g 36.5 35.0 177.4
1939 : 63.2 107.7 16.1 33.2 79.3 140.9
1940 : 122.2 148.7 52.5 63.0 175.0 211.7

Compiled from commercial- reports supplied by the Buenos Aires Office of.
Foreign Agricultural Relations.
I/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool as reported.

South African wool. shipments to the United States
smaller,this season

Wool declared at American Consulates in South Africa for export to
the United States totaled 11.6 million pounds in the first 7 months
(July-January) of the 1940-41 export season. In the same months of the
previous season 30.7 million pounds were shipped to the United States.
The shipments last season, however, were relatively large; in earlier years
only small quantities of South African wool were purchased by United States
buyers. The South African clip of the current season has been purchased by
the British Government under arrangements similar to those inaugurated in
Australia and New Zealand in 1939-40. Sales to United States buyers are
made through the British Wool Commission. ,To control was exercised in the
South African wool market in the 1939-'40 season.



BAOCEKG1RID.- Mill consumption of e~:parol wool in the United
States which had been at a relatively high level since the
middle of 1938 declined sharply from October 1939 through
April 1940, and wool prices declined in the first half.of
1940. Beginning in May 1940, consumption increased rapidly,
reflecting in part the manufacture of materials for large
Army contracts. Consumption in the final quarter of 1940
was larger than at any time since 1918, and despite the
relatively small consumption in the early part of the year
total consumption in 1940 was larger than in any recent
year except 1935.

The increase in mill consumption was accompanied in the lat-
ter part of 1940 by an increase of 15 to 20 percent in domes-
tic wool prices. At the end of 1940, prices on the Boston








tOL-51


- 10 -


market were slightly below the peak of 1939 but with that
e:.-ep.tion h.iher than at any time since early 1937,

United States imports of apparel -oul were large in the
latter part of 1939 and in 1940. The 1940 jinorts, tOal.'r.rg
223 million pounds, were the largest sizce 1923. But stocks
in this country remained smaller than the average of recent
years.

The w~ool outl-ck has not chlrnrdE materially in the past ,- nth, and
the follo-wi:.: important points have been surmarizcd largely from the February
issue of The Wool Situation.

(1) The carry-over of dcestic wool into the 194l season which begins
about April 1 is expected to be the smallest in recent years, and the total
carry-over cf domestic a-nd imported wool in this country also will be rela-
tively small. Total st:css of domestic and imported wool in the United
States on December 31 were about as large as those of a year earlier but
they-were much smaller than end-of-Docember stocks in the years 1935-3g.
Although imports of wool for the first quarter of 1941 will be much larger
than in any recent year, mill consumption also will be larger.

(2) Mill consun.ption of wool in the United States in 1941 is expected
to be larger than in 194C, with most of the increase in the first half of
the-year. With fih~-.c: increases in consumer incomes in prospect, consump-
tion of wool for civilian uses is likely to increase in 1941. Army orders
now held by :ills call for delivery of large quantities of wool cloth in the
first half of 1941 and recent proposals for bids indicate that consumption
for military uses will be large in the second half of the year also.

(3) The relatively small carr:--over of wool in this country and
prospects for a large mill consumption of wool in 1941 will be ztrorg sup-
porting factors to domestic wool prices. Wool prices in the United Str.tef!
are expected to a,.-::- .-e l:ighe- this Fprirn and sumor than they did a year
earlier. Since last :-ri:.., however, wool prices h.ve advanced materially
and any advance from present levels during the active marketing season for
the 1941 clip is likely to be moderate.

(4) IWool r-upp._li in foreign countries available for shipment to the
United States are still relatively large. Since last s!ny, shipments of wool
to continental European countries have been largely cut off by the British
blockade, and the United States, Great Britain, and Japan are now the only
i-portant markets for wool exTo.rts from the Southern Hemisphere. The avail-
ability of the wool to the United States, of course, is dpc:endent upon the
maintenance of adequate shipping facilities front Southorn Hemisphere
exporting countries.











WOOL PrDUCTIC.i IN 1940-4l1

Domestic production sets new record in 1940:
farm income frcm --c '. up l" a. 1I

The 1940 prod.uca.n of wool in the United States, botuh shcrn an;d
pulled, totaled. 449,7'3,000 pounds and was the largest on rec'-rd, the
Agricultural Marketing Se.vice reports, Of this total 387,763,000 -,-mds
were shorn wool ;:aid 62;003,000 pounds pulled wool. In 1939 ,.rn :.l
production totaled 3773597,000 pounds, and 6),500,000 pounds p .l'd
wool were produced. Thb trencL in production has been upw-ar since 3123.

Wool prices in 1940 averaged much iigLer than in 1939, and cash
income from shorn wool was about 30 percent greater in 19~0 than in 1939.
Cash income was mucli ..'.:.2 in 1940 than in most record years, Wool prices
this spring and sumner are expected to average higher than a year earlier,
and farmers probably will receive a larger income from wool this year than
last,

Estimates of production, price nor pound, and farm income from shorn
wool, by States, for 1939 and 1940 are shown in table 1.

Smaller wool nrodustion
in Sr-uth:- r.i Hemiso .re

Production of wool in the five principal : r'r.'ii: countries of the
Southern Hemisphere in the 1940-41 season is estimated to be about 4 percent
smaller than in the 1939-40 season but about 4 percent larger than the
average for the 5 years 1934-38. Total production in the five countries,
Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Argentina, and UTr-_c ;.', in the 1940-41
season is estimated at 2,104 million pounds compared with 2,202 million
pounds last year,

The decline in production in the 1940-41 season is chiefly in
Australia, where almost half of the Southern Hemisphero clip is produced.
Prol--c.tioi in Australia is estimated to be 10 percent smaller than the
record production of 1,109 million pounds last season. Production is
smaller this season than last in Argentina and Uruguay also. An increase
is indicated in South Africa and New Zealand.

Wool production in the five Southern. Hemisphere countries, the
United States, and the Uniitel Kingdom, 1909-40, is shown in table 2.


WooL-51


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Table 1.- Wool productionprices,and cash farm income in the United States,
1939 and 1940
S1939 1940
Stat Sheep We t Price I Cash Sheep eight Price Cash
S: shorn I per Pro- t : 1 p,
division t fleece duction p irm fleece ductoni p d I
pound income pound income
SThou- 1,000 1,000 : Thou- 1,000 1,000
I sands Pounds pounds Cents dollars : sands Pounds pounds Cents dollars
Me. 1 43 6.2 267 22 59 41 6.2 254 32 81
N. H. 9 6.6 59 23 14: 8 6.2 50 28 14
Vt. 21 6.8 143 23 33 ls 6.8 122 30 37
Mass. 1 7 6.3 21 11 7 6.0 42 28 12
R. I. 1 2 6.0 12 26 3 1 2 6.0 12 28 3
Conn. 1 5 5.6 28 26 7 6 5.6 34 29 10
N. Y. t 311 7,4 2.301 23 529 305 7.4 2.257 30 677
.J. 5 6.0 0 23 7 5 6.3 32 32 10
Pa. 3 379 7.5 242 25 710 368 7.7 2.834 31 879
N. A. 782 73 5.726 24.0 1.373 1 760 7.4 5.637 T3.6 1,72
Ohio 2,230 8.1 18,063 21 4,335 2.230 8.0 17,84 2 5,174
Ind. 679 7.5 5,092 24 1,222 t 679 7.5 5,092 30 1,528
Ill. 1 738 7.8 5,776 23 1,328 : 733 7.8 5,686 30 1,706
Mich. 1,03 8.1 8,148 24 2,028 1,064 8.2 8,725 32 2,792
Wia. 1 3 7.6 2.918 22 642 384 7.6 2.918 29 146
E.N.C. 1 5.074 7.9 40.297 23.7 9.555 5.090 7.9 40.261 29.9 12.046
Minn. I 980 8.0 7,840 21 1,646 : 1,020 8.1 8,262 28 2,313
Iowa 1 1,250 7.9 9,875 22 2,172 1 1,327 8.0 10,616 30 3,185
Mo. : 1,380 6.8 9,387 23 2,159 1 1,480 6.7 9,928 30 2,978
I. Dak. 3 736 8.7 6,403 18 1,153 : 817 8.7 7,108 26 1. 48
S. Dak. t 1.143 9.0 10,287 20 2,057 1 1,355 8.6 11,706 28 3,278
Nebr. 3 396 8.0 3,157 18 568 : 405 8.1 3,274 24 786
Sans. 456 8.2 3.753 18 676 : 525 7.7 4.o03 ?5 1 013
W.N.C. 0 6.341 8.0 50.702 20.6 10.431 : 6.929 7.9 54.,947 .o =. -n
Del. : 3 6.7 2 25 5 3 6.7 20 31 6
Md. 66 6.3 416 25 104 66 6.3 416 31 129
Va. 1 352 5.0 1,760 26 458 345 5.2 1.794 32 574
Va. 493 5.2 2564 25 641 464 5.1 2,366 32 757.
c. 52 4.6 239 24 57 4 4.8 211 29 61
S. : 9 4.2 38 25 10 : 9 4.4 40 30 12
a. : 28 3.6 101 23 23 : 30 3.7 111 24 27
?Pa. 32 3.0 96 22 21 32 3.1 99 26 26
S. A 1.035 5.1 5.234 25.2 1.319 993 51 5,057 11. 1,;59
Ky. 1,052 5.4 5,681 25 1,42 1,094 5.4 5,90s 1 ,B1
Tenn. t 370 4.4 1,628 24 391 377 4.1 1,659 31 514
Ala. 1 40 3.7 148 21 31: 40 3.7 148 24 36
Miss. 61 3.2 195 20 39 61 201 2 50
Ark. 65 4.5 292 20 58 63 4. 277 26 72
La. 235 3.3 776 21 163 240 3.3 792 24 190
Okla. 260 8.1 2,106 16 337 : 268 8.0 2,144 22 472
Tex. 9,844 7.9 77.290 24 18.550 10.336 7.8 80.352 29 23.302
S. C. : 11.927 7.4 88.116 23.8 20.989 12.479 7.3 91. 81 29.0 26,527
Mont. 2,830 9.5 26,885 22 5,915 i 3,220 9.3 29,946 29 8,684
Idaho 1 1,805 9.2 16,606 22 3,653 : 1,732 9.6 16,627 29 4,822
Wyo. 3.395 9.7 32,932 21 6,916 1 3,430 9.7 33,271 28 9,316
Colo. 1,635 8.1 13,244 22 2,914 1,657 8.5 14,170 28 396
Mex. : 2133 7.1 15,168 21 3,185 : 2,159 7.4 15.94 26 4,145
Ari. 769 6.3 4,856 21 1,020 : 695 6.4 4,471 26 '1,162
Utah 2,235 8.7 19,444 21 4,083 2,213 9.3 20,581 27 5,557
Nev. 760 .0 6,080 21 1,277: 730 8.0 5.840 27 I.177
Wash. 654 9.3 6,074 21 1.276 629 9.2 5,804 27 1,567
Oreg. 1,899 8.9 16,901 22 3,718 1,842 8.9 16,446 2 4,605
Calif. : 4.120 7.1 29.132 23 6.700 3.911 7.0 27.20 27 7.366
Western 22235 84 187.322 21.7 40657 22228 8.6 190380 27. 52769
U. S. : 47394 7.96 37 7 22.3 8432 479 800 387763 28.
U. S.3/1 64.500 62.000
1/ Includes sheep shorn at commercial feeding yards. 2/ For Texas and California the weight per
fleece is the amount of wool shorn per sheep and lamb shorn during the year. I/ Pulled wool.
Agricultural Marketing Service.





WOOL-51


Table 2.- Wool production in five Southern Hemisphere countries,
the United States, and the United Kingdom, 1909-40


Principal exporting countries
Fine wool : Medium and coarse wool:


United States


principally : predominates :
Year : :Union of: :
:Aus- : South : New Argen-:Uruguay: :Pulled :
: tralia:Africa .Zealand, tina : 4/ Shorn 5/ : Total
S : I/ 2/ 3/ :
:Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Million
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


1909 :
1910 :
1911 :
1912
1913 :
1914 :
1915
1916
1917 :
1918
1919
1920 :
1921 :
1922 :
1923 :
1924 :
1925 :
1926
1927 :
1928
1929
1930 :
1931 :
1932
1933
1934 :
1935 :
1936 :
1937 :
1938
1939 :
194010/


740
788
798
687
771
735
636
637
654
736
762
625
723
'727
663
777
'834
924
888
968
938
913
1,007
1,063
996
1,015
971
983
1,023
984
1,109
1,000


132
132
162
169
175
182
175
179
(175)
(180)
177
182
188
184
198
210
225
260
291
311
304
305
305
319
275
210
238
2.64
233
248
246
270


221
S212-
219
224
224
234
(232)
S.213
230
255
-237
208
219
246
235
8/ 254
8/ 238
/ 256
253
263
262
259
270
277
290
265
304
303
297
328
310
315


354
369
356
326
302
275
322
370
7/380
7/418
7/355
7/315
316
332
312
313
312
309
322
331
331
342
364
364
364
348
365
374
366
399
403
397


103
113
133
123
102
82
61
79
77
119
'118
113
108
96
106
92'
116
132
134
130
151
153
106
110
105
119
113
116
116
125
134
122


310
306
302
278
266
251
241
244
237
254
270
251
242
228
230
238.
253
269
290
315
328
352
376
351
374
370
365
361
367
372
377
388


41
40
41
41
43
43
40
44
40
42
48
.43
48
42'
43
44
47
50
50
52
54
62
66
67
64
61
66
66
66-
64
64
62


351
346
343
319
309
294
28.1
288
277
296
318
294
290
270
273
282
300
319
340
367
382
414
442
418
438
431
431
427
433
436
442
450


Continued -


_


: United
* Kingdom
Sand
: Irish
Free
* State
Million
pounds

142
143
1 7
133
125
121
122
124
125
120
116
108
108
109
109
115
122
128
132
132
131
130
132
139
140
129
122
122
123
129
129





WOOL-51


Table 2.*- Wool : pr-odauction in- five Southern. Hemisphere countries,
the u'nited.States, and the United T'indom, 1909-40 Continued

Official: publications and r-e6 li cble' commercial' Ourtes. usd-i;v the prepra'ition- of
these estimates. Estimates for Southern iHemisphere; ,countries-.are based-bn ex-
ports al-one or on exports, carry-over, domestic consumption, and other available
information. All estimates subject to revision on the basis of later infor Tation.

Except as otherwise noted, this -table includes wool shorn during the calendar
. year in the United States and the United inrLLdomn and that shorn during -he season
beginning July 1 of the same calendar year in Australia, Union *of South Africa
and New Zealand; October 1 in Argentina and Uruguay.

Pulled wool included for most important countries .at its grease equivalent.

I/ Semon 'beginning September 1 up to and including 1916. Subsequent years season
beginning.July 1. Lztimates exclude wool exported oh skins. Such wool' aersaed
about 20 million pounds a year in the last 10 years.
2/ Season beginning October 1 up:to and including 1925-26; subsequent years season
beginning July 1. Exports of wool and wool on skins plus quantities of'wool pur-
chased by domestic mills, all converted to a grease basis. Adjustment hade for
stocks in 1926-27 and subsequent years. .
3/ Computed from exports converted to a grease basis ard consumption. Adjustment
made for stocks subsequent to 1911.
4/ Seasons 1909-10 to 1930-31, shipments from Montevideo... Subsequent years, esti-
mates of production taking consumption and stocks into account.
5/ Published as reported by pulleries and is mostly washed.
5 Estimates for seasons 1916-17. to 1923-24 are those of Dalgety and Company.
fOwing to lack of estimates of carry-over during the war when stocks accumulated
greatly, exports plus local consumption do not represent production adequately
for those years. It is assumed that in these estimates some adjustment was made
'for carry-over, although scoured and pulled wool have not been converted to a
gr..ase basis.
7/ Stocls accumulated during these years, especially at the close of the JWorld
War, and official estimates are not available. These estimates are based on ex-
ports, local consumption, and carry-over as reported unofficially,
8/ Estimates of Imperial Economic Committee based on exports of wool aid wool on
skins, wool consumption, and carry-over, all converted to a grease'basis.
9/ Estimates for this and subsequent years recently officially revised: on basis
of more: exact conversion of scoured, pulled, and washed wool to': grease basis.
10/ Preliminary.







WOL-51


Table 3.- United States: Wool imports, 6onsumpti6n, and machinery activity
selected periods 1938-41

ItemYear : 40 : 1941
S: 1938 1939 140 : Jan. : Dec. : Jan.
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000


Imports for consumption,
actual'weight 1/:
Apparel ................:
Finer than 40s ........
Not finer than 40s ....:
Carpet, including
camels hair ........

Mill consumption 2/: :
Grease basis 3/ -
Apparel ...............:
Carpet ........... ......:
Scoured basis-
Aggregate -
SApparel ...............
Carpet ...............:
Weekly average -
Apparel ... ...........
Carpet ...............


: pounds pounds pounds pounds


30,811
12,443
12,369


98,194
74,612
23,582


222,983
199,149
23,834


71,908 144,875 134,691


474,527
92,736


219,565
64,945

4,143
1,225


630,150
148,513


293,083
103,421

5,636
1,989


4/ .
64o, 71
137,494


310,021
97,852

5,962
1,882


24,266'
22,110
2,156


pounds pounds


41,175
38,445
2,730


51,809
49,o47
2,762


20,498 14,S59 20,354


56,420
14,050


28,189
9,703

5,638
1,941


4/
70,936
13,356


34,012
9,356

8,503
2,339


79,755
15,720


40,115
10,965

8,023
2,193


Weekly average in hours


Machinery activity 2/:
Hours.operated per ma- :
chine in place -
Worsted combs .........
Worsted s :indles ....:
Woolen :pidles ......:
Woolen ani worsted :
loons :
Broad ...............:
Narrow .............:
Carpet and rug looms -:
Broad .............
Narrow ...............


39.8
26.9
30.6


51.8
39.6
39.8


28.1 40.7
10.5 13.2


23.4
15.9


37.4
22.7


55.1
37.8
43 .1


52.8
34.5
41.3


38.8 43.4
13.5 13.6

37.8 42.0
22.0 23.0


Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Consumption
and machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census. 1/ Weight of greasy,
scoured, and skin wool added together. 2/ Figures for December based on
4 weeks, January on 5 weeks, 1938 figures for 53 weeks ended December 31.
No adjustments made for holidays. 3/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled
wool, grease basis, -is in condition received from pulleries and is mostly
washed, 4/ Consumption and machinery activity figures for December have been
revised.


75.6
53.0
56.3


54.6
13.3


42.5
26.6


77.3
51.3
53.4


52.9
15.7

43.2
26.4





T00L-51


Table 4.- Prices of wool per ,-'al. in specified markets, and prices of textile
raw materials in the Uilnte! States, selected periods, 197q-41


ir.4 ___


Market and description
United States:
Boston mn.rket-
Territory, scoured basis-:
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
staple .................
56s (3/8 blood) combine.:
46s (low 1/4 blood) ....:
Bright fleece, l:rr...--
64s, 70s, 20s (fine)
delaine .......I.......:
56s (3/3 blood) combing .
46s (low 1/4 blood) .....:
FcTrci-n wool in bond at
BOston 2/
S:raley *. scoured basis
6hs, 70s, combing ......:
Cape -, scoured basis
12 months, coA.ing.......:
Montevideo Srease basis:
Merinos (50- 54s) .......:
1s (56 ) ...... ... ....
Prices received by.farmers,:
grease basis,15th of nonth:

T-xtile fibers:
Tool, territory fine
staple 4/ ............
Cotton, 15/16" Ti.ddiling 5/:
'Si- 1., Jagcnese / .......:
R s on :,--- 150 3enioaZ ./.:
R? on sta-ple fiber j 7
Vistcoe .-1/2 ocn icr ....*
Acetate 5 denier ........*


-e-t C: n :___ e;-h C 1e.
Cents onts Cents Cent
C ent s C en s cCrlts Cent s


S2.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5



58.6

53.7

26.1
28.3


CS. 7
10.3
79.7
76.1


38.0
41.2
4i~o


109.5
94.1
s7.5


43.0

49.0


104.7
82.8
76.1


)'.-. 7
.44.5
S'44.0o


67.9 79.2 73.5'


Feb. : JCn. : Feb.
Ceits Cents Cents


99.0
81.0
76.6


38.5
42,4
42.0



734.5
73-5


108.1
85.5
79.5


43.3
43.9
43.9


107.5
S6.2
79.5


43.c
44.c
43.5


73.3 74.c


62.9 73.8 63.2 66.0 70.5 72.5


31.2 36.5
32.4 3?.5


22.3 7/28.4


82.7
9.30
271.2.
51.5

25.0
-4 .)


96,3
10.17
275.1
53.0


33.1
34.3


32.8
35,5


28.7 28.1 *27.8


109.5.
10.84

55o0 .


104.7
10, 0
5 3.*
. 5_*'o


99.0
10,80

53.0


34..7
33.5


37.4
35.8


31.3 32.1


10,10
256,0
53.0


107.5
10.13
25?.9
53.0


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0 43.0


Comiled. from reports of the Agricultural Marketing. Service except as otherwise
not *.
I/ Pi-":'t monthly average pri.ce.
2/ .--oro y-T,:.:t of duty. Compiled from the Bos-ton Commercial Bulletin.
/ Prel imin .....
4/ S,..o;:-d basis, Boston market.
5/ -.-'---je at 10 markets, i.'7 series, 15/16" in place of 7/8" previously quoted.
6/ T'iite, 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
7/ Domestic yarn, first quality, T-;..urlu of Labor Statistics.
/ F.o.b, pr:u.inr, plants, Bu r.-u of Labor Statistics,


-I .





OOL-f51


Table 5.- Prices per pound, -reose basis, of domestic and Uruguayan
medium wools, and spread between these prices, 1939-41


Season : Boston


and :


month

1939-40
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan. :
Feb. :
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug :
Sept.
1940-41
Oct. :
Nov.
Dec. :
Week
ended
Jan, 4
11 :
18 :
25 :
Feb. 1:
8:
15
22 :
Mar. 1 :


--


: At Boston
Spread : Domestic :Uruguayan : Spread
_: : 4/ :
Cents Cents Cents Cents


1/
Cents



46.0
44.6
42.4
38.5






45.0
46.4
45.2


45.0
45.5
44.5
44.5


Montevideo:
2/ :
: :
Cent s



24.9
25.3
28.8
29.6







5/25.9
28.2
29.0


29.0
29.0
29.6
30.8


48.8
47.0
46.0
44.5
42.4
38.5
36.1
37.1
39.5
39.5
39.5
41.2

45.0
46.4
45.2


45.0
45.5
44,5
44.5
44.5
44.o
44.0
44.0
44.0


38.5
37.5
34.5
34.3
35.5
35.5
33.0
33.0
33.0
29.5
28,8
28,8

31.5
32.5
33.5


33.5
33.5
33.5
33.5
33.5
35.5
35.5
35.5
36.5


Compiled as follows: Prices of domestic wool at Boston f:
Agricultural Marketing Service, Prices of Uruguayan (Mon
bond, at Boston from The Boston Commercial Bulletin. Pri
from Revista Semanal, Camara Mercantel de Productos del P1
All prices are averages of weekly range quotations. Stat:
published in The Wool Situation for October 1940.
/ Average of domestic 3/8 and 1/4 blood combing, bright
g Uruguayan fine crossbreds, superior.
SDomestic 3/8 blood combing, bright fleece wools.
Montevideo Is (56s) in bond (before payment of duty).
5/ Two weeks only,


rom reports of the
tevideo) wool, in
ces at Montevideo
ais Montevideo.
istics for 1936-39

fleece wools,


'----~------


21.1
19.3
13.6
8.9







19.1
18.2
16.2


16.0
16.5
14.9
13.7


10.3
9.5
11.5
10.2
6,9
3.0
3.1
4.1
6.5
10.0
10.7
12.4

13.5
13.9
11.7


11.5
12.0
11.0
11.0
11,0
8.5
8.5
8.5
7.5




LIUIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
3 1262 08861 5520


14




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