The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00031

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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DOCUMENTS DEPT



THE .
U S DEPOSITORY _

SITUAT ION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FEBRU


IARY 1941


APPAREL WOOL: IMPORTS FOR CONSUMPTION BY
GRADE GROUPS. UNITED STATES. 1936-40


POUNDS
(MILLIONS)


200



150



100



50



0


Not finer than 40s ( coarse)
44s-56s (medium)
Finer than 56s (fine)


I 1b


I JI


1938


1 aoi


Iy4u


U.S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 38947 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


UNITED STATES IMPORTS OF APPAREL v.nOL IN 1940 WERE 125 MILLION POUNDS
LARGER THAN IN 1939. THEY WERE THE LARGEST SINCE 1923. THE MARKED IK-
CREASE IN IMPORTS IN 1940 REFLECTED CHIEFLY THE LARGE REQUIREMENTS FnR
WOOLS FOR ARMY MATERIALS.

IN RECENT YEARS THE UNITED STATES HAS IMPORTED MOSTLY FINE AND MEDIUM
WOOLS, AND IN 1940 MOST OF THE INCREASE WAS IN FINE WOOLS GRADINGG FINER
THAN 3/8 BLOOD OR 56s). IMPORTS OF MEDIUM WOOLS ALSO ItCREASED, BUT IM-
PORTS OF COARSE WOOLS SHOWED LITTLE CHANGE FROM 1939. rTE FROFPORPTI-N OF
FINE WOOLS IN TOTAL IMPORTS Il 1940 WAS THE LARGEST IN SEVERAL YEARS,
WHEREAS THE PROPORTION OF COARSE W'OLS BAS SMALL.


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'T H'E W O 0 L S I TU A T I'0 N


Summary

Domestic supply and demand conditions are favorable for the market-

ing of the 1941 domestic wool clip. The carry-over of domestic wool into

the new season, which begins about April 1, is expected to be the smallest

in recent years. Although imports of wool in the first quarter of 1941

will be large, mill consumption also will be large, and total stocks of

domestic and imported wool in the United States on April 1 probably will be

relatively small.

Mill consumption of wool in the United States in 1941 is expected to

be larger than in 1940, with most of the increase in the first half of the

year. The large consumption is expected to result in part from greater

consumption of wool for civilian uses in 1941, but consumption for military


uses also will be large.


Consumption in 1940 was slightly larger than in


1939; except for 1935 it was larger than for any recent year.

The relatively small carry-over of wool in this country and pros-

pects for a large mill consumption of wool in 1941 will be strong

supporting factors to domestic wool prices. Wool prices in the United

States are expected to average higher this spring and summer than they did

a year earlier. Since last spring, however, wool prices have.advanced

materially and any advance from present levels is likely to-be moderate.

Wool supplies available for shipment from foreign countries to the United

States, are relatively large '

Stocks of apparel wool reported by dealers and manufacturers:,, and

stocks on farms and ranches and in local warehouses in. Western Sheep States

totaled 261 million pounds, grease basis, on December 31, 1940. compared


WOOL-50.


- 3 -





T'OOL-50 -4 -

with 217 million pounds a. yar. ear.lier. The 1940 stocks included 68 million

pounds of wool afloat to. the United States. If wool afloat is excluded the

stocks held in this country on December 31 totaled 193 million pounds.

"Stocks, excluding f :ol afloat, were about equal to those of a year earlier

but were much smaller than December 31 stocks in the years 1935-38.

United States'imports of apparel wool for consumption in 1940 totaled

223 million pounds. -Imports in 1940 were 125 million pounds larger than in

1939 and were the largest since 1923, when imports totaled 266 million pounds.

Imports of carpet wool in 1940: were slightly smaller than in 1939.

Demand wa. good in South American wool markets in January. A further

increase was reported in prices of fine grades of wool. Supplies of fine

wools in Uruguay were reported to be practically exhausted by the end of

January. United States buyers continued to purchase most of the wool sold.

Of a total of 130 million pounds exported from Argentina and Uruguay from

October through December, 114 million pounds were shipped to the United

States.

S-- February 10, 1941


REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Sales of spot domestic wool small in January;
cont'facgtin of new cTlp beins i. West

Sales of spot domestic wools at Boston were small in January. Prices
declined slightly in the latter part'of the month but quotations on most
grades were largely nominal. Interest in the domestic market is shifting
to the western n States, where contracting of the 1941 clip is now'under way.
As yet, there is little information concerning prices for new clip wool.

Boston quotations on graded fine combing (staple) territory wools
declined to $1.065 per pound in the last week of January after remaining
unchanged at $1.085 since the latter part of October. Prices of 3/8 blood
combing territory wools remained unchanged at 86.5 cents a pound in
January. Spot prices of most grades of bright fleece wools declined one-
half cent a pound, grease basis, during January. Prices of representative
*grades of territory wool, scoured basis, at Boston in January were 3 to 4
cents a pound higher than a year earlier.






WOOL-50 5 -

The United States. average price of wool received by farmers was 31.3
cents a .pound on .January 15 compared with 31.2 cents on December 15 and
28.1 cents on January 15, .1940.

Prices of foreign wools at Boston
f' rmrrTn January

Foreign apparel wools continued to predominate in'spot sales on the
Boston-market in January. South American wools provided the bulk of the
available supply,of fine and 1/2 blood.wools. .A persistent spot demand
and strengthening prices in South America kept.prices of these wools very
firm in Boston despite. heavy receipts. Prices of Montevideo wools grading
S56s-and finer advanced about 2 cents a pound., grease basis, at Boston
during January. Prices of best Australian wools advanced 2 to 3 cents a
.pound, scoured basis.. At the end of January, spot South American wools
sold at 95-97 cents scoured basis, including duty, for fine, and 'at
90-93 cents for 1/2 blood, according to reports of the Agricultural Market-
ing Service. Prices of fine Australian wools, scoured basis, including
duty, were .about 1.00-$1.02 for average combing.length and $1.03-$1.05 for
good topmaking types. ..

Stocks of apparel wool in the United States on December 31
relatively small; ,large s-upplTiesafloat- t'o United Stat-es ....

Stocks of apparel~-w6ol repo rted by dealers and manufacturers and
stocks on farms and ranches and in local warehouses in Western Sheep States
totaled 261 million pounds,"grease basis on December 31, 1940 compared with
217 million pounds a year earlier, according to reports of the Bureau of
* 'the Census. .The stocks reported on December 31 included 68 million pounds
of wool afloat to the United' States. If wool afloat is excluded, the stocks
held in this country on December 31 totaled 13 million pounds. This figure
is about equal to stocks held-on December 31, 1939 and is mach smaller than
December 31 stocks in the years 1935-38.

United States: .Wool stocks reported on
SDecember.31,. 1935-40


Year : Including wool afloat : Excluding wool.afloat

: millionn pounds Million pounds.

1935 : 239 ......" .29 .
1936 249 208
1937 : 271 270
1938 : '2S 244 ."
1939 217 192

1940 : 261 193

Compiled from Wool Stocks Reports, Bureau of the Census.
1/ Partly estimated.







WOOL-50


Stocks of domestic wool reported on December 31, including stocks
in Western Sheep States, totaled 122 million pounds, grease basis, compared
with 140 million pounds reported a year earlier. The bulk of the domestic
wool was held by manufacturers. Only 35 million rounds of domestic wool
were held by dealers and about 1.5 million pounds were held on farms and
ranches and in local warehouses in 13 Western Sheep States. (See table 2
at end of report.)

Stocks of carpet wool reported by dealers and manufacturers, includ-
in, wool afloat, totaled 57 million pounds, grease basis, on December 31
compared with 54 million pounds a year earlier. December 31 stocks of
carpet wool averaged 53 million pounds in the 5 years 1935-39. The ac-
companying table shows stocks of apparel and carpet wool reported by dealers
and manufacturers on December 31, 1940 with comparisons, on a scoured-
equivalent basis. Stocks reported by quarters, 1935 to date, are shown on
a grease basis in table 2 at end of report.


Stocks of raw wool, tops, and noils held by dealers,
manufacturers and topmakers, United States,
December 31, 1940 with comparisons

S" Scoured basis

SItem 1939 1940

SDec. 30 1/ Sept. 28 1/ Dec. 31
S1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib.

Apparel wool, total ..............., 109,533 127,546 140,628
Dealers ..................... 43,063 52,784 47,084
Domestic 2.......................: 23,603 39,152 17,538
foreign on hand ................: 13,480 9,208 15,833
Foreign afloat ................. 5,980 4,424 13,713
:iL-.ifaacturers and topmakers .......: 66,470 74,762 93,544
Domestic 3.. ............ ...: 37,275 47,517 38,146
Foreign on hand .................: 19,810 19,397 28,922
Foreign afloat ................: 9,385 7,848 26,476

Carpet wool, total .................. 37,512 40,082 39,933
Dealers .......................... 2,725 1,114 1,281
Manufacturers *...3................: 34,787 38,968 38,652

Tops ...........,.... .............. 22,902 20,912 17,645
Noils 660........... .................. 11,397 10,914 11,874

Compiled from Eureau of the Census Quarterly Wool Stocks Report,
December 31, 1940. .
1/ Revised.


- 6 -









1940 i iports of 'apparel wool- -
largest since 1923 -

'Imparts .of. a prrel wool for consumption /' in Decenber continued the
increase which began in September'li The Decembel 1940 imports totaled 41,2
million pounds; they were more than twice as large as the 15e9 million- pounds
imported in December 1939 and the largest reported for any month since April
1923. Imports for. the enxtird year 1940, totaling 223 million, pounds, were 125
million pounds larger than'1 imports in 1939. T-ie 1940 imports T'ere the largest
since 1923, when imports totaled. 266 million pounds. .

Imports of carpet'.wol incr'ease- in December to 14..9 million pounds,
compared with 111 million pounds. in :Tovember and 9..8 million pounds -in
December-1939. : Imports of carpet wool in 1940 totaled 134.7 million pounds,
and were slightly smaller than in 1939, :'-i -

Imports by grade groups

The increase in imports of apparel wool in 1940 was chiefly -in the
finer grades. Imports of wools grading 'iner than 56s (fine Wo'ols).were 10C
million pounds larger in 1940 than in 1939 Imports of wools grading 44s to
56s '(medium wools) were 24 million pounds la-ger in 1940 than in : 1939, and
imports of wools grading "not finer than 40s"'.(.oarse wools-) were about the
same as in 1939. The increase in imports of fine wools in 1940 reflected the
demand for fire. grades of wool for Army materials.. Consumption of wool for
civilian uses -was smaller in 1940 than in 1939.

-Impprts -of fine wools in 1940 represented a much larger than usual
proportion of the total imports, Imports of coarse wool ini actual quantity
in 1940 were.about the same as in 1939, but they were a.much smaller propor-
ti'on bf the -total than in most other years. Because of the relatively small
doie'stic production of coarse grades of crossbred wool in the-United States a
considerable part of the mill requirements for such wools is imported, but
the quantity imported does not change greatly from year to year.

Imports of apparel' wool for consumption, by grade groups,
United States, 1936-40


: Not f
Yeaj
S than
S- 1 .


i
4


ner : F
44s-56s
Os : :


lbh


dil. lb,


iner t:han
56s
Mil,, lb.


Total

a.l. lb.


1936 ...........: 26.0 .48.1- 36.6 110.7
1937 ...... .,.. 23,6- 42.1' 84.5 150,2
1938 ............: 124. 9.3 .1 30,8
1939 ...........: 23.6 26.3 48,3 98,2
1940 1/ ........: 23.8 50.6 -. 1486 223.0

Compiled from reports of the Bureau -of Foreign and Domestic Comnrerce.
1/ Preliminary,

/ Wool entered for immediate consumption plus wool withdraw from bonded
warehouses for consumption.


--


'----


WOOL-50


- 7 -


Mil
1."


1





WOCL-50


Mill consumption continues near
record level in December

The weekly average mill consumption of apparel wool in-December was
8,360,000 pounds, scoured basis, compared with the record consumption of
8,455,000 pounds in November. The December consumption was 49 percent larger
than a year earlier and was the largest December consumption on record.

Mill consumption of aDparel wool, on a scoured basis, in 1940 was 5.6
percent larger than in 1939 and with the exception of 1935 was the largest
consumption since 1923. Because of the larger consumption of foreign wools,
which are light shrinking, the consumption on a grease basis in 1940 was only
1.5 percent larger than in 1939. Consumption in 1940 was equivalent to 640
million pounds, greasy shorn and. pulled. In 1939 consumption on a grease
basis totaled 630 million pounds.

Consumption of carpet wool in December was slightly larger than in
November and was larger than in December 1939. Consumption of carpet wool in
S1940, 'totaling 187 million pounds grease basis, was 8 percent smaller than
in 1939.

South American wool markets active
in January; prices firm

Demand for fine grades of wool continued strong in South American
markets in January. Sales were made to Japan, Sweden, Russia, and a few
other countries but United States buyers continued to take the greater part
of the wool sold in Buenos Aires and Mortevideo. United States carpet mills
were active buyers of coarse crossbred wols in Argentina. Prices of all
wools were firm in January and further small increases were reported on some
grades. Supplies of fine wools in Uruguay vere reported to be practically
exhausted by the end of January. The question of shipping space apparently
continues to be a major problem in the South American wool markets. Un-
certainty over shipping facilities to the United States was reported to be a
restraining influence on forward sales in both Argentina and Uruguay in the
latter part of January.

Exports from Argentina and Uruguay
above average in current season

Exports from Argentina in the first 3 months '(Cctober-December) of the
current season totaled. 87,5 million pounds, compared with 71.5 million pounds
exported in the same months last year .ahd an average, pf 61.2 million pounds
for those months in the 5 pre-war years 1934-38.. .About 90 percent 78
million pounds of the October-December exports .in 1940 were shipped to the
United States. In the 5 years 1934-38 only 20.percent of the October-December
shipments were.to the United States, the remainder. going chiefly to the Unite'1
Kingdom and continental Europe.

Exports from Uruguay from October through December 1940 totaled 42.7
million pounds compared vith 19.4 million pounds in the same months last year
and a 5-year (1934-38) average for those months of 26.8 million pounds. The


"..8 k






WOOL-50


United States took 35.9 million pounds or 84 percent of the October-December
shipnDnts in 1940 compared with only 14 percent in 1934-38.

Shipments were -made from Argentina and..-Uruguay to Japan and-to. .a few
neutral continentall Eur'opean countries'from.October through December 1940.
Most of th- European countries which previously purchased large.. quantities of
South AaeriRne1 wools, however, are now'crlt off from the market by the British
blockade. The UiTTed 17ngdom, formerly a leading buyer, has not made any
important -purchases bf South American wools so far. this season. Wool require-
ments of the United Kingdom are being filled largely with wools, from Empire
sources. The entire clips of New Zealand,. Astralia, and the Union of South
Africa will be purchased by the British Governmeni for the duration of the war.

Wool exports from Argentina and Uruguay.- in the current season, with
earlier years for comparison, are shown by countries of- destination in tables
5 and 6.
CTJ C LOC-"'

BAP.C::TRC-!TD M19ill consumption of apparel wool in the United
States declined sharply, from October 1939 through April 1940,
and wool prices declined in'the first, half of 1940. Since
last May, consumption has increased rapidly, reflecting in
part the manufacture -of materials for large Army contracts.
Consumption in the final quarter of 1940 was larger than at
any time since 1918. The increase in consumption was ac-
companied in the latter part of 1940 by an increase of 15
to 20 percent in domestic wool prices.

United States imports of apparel wool were large in.
the latter part of 1939 and in 1940, but stocks in this
country remained smaller than the average stocks? of recent
years.

Domestic supply conditions favorable
to marketing of 194l1woo.l clip

The..carry-over of domestic wool into the 1941 season which begins about
April 1 is expected to be the smallest in recent years, and the total carry-
over of domestic and imported wool also will be relatively small. With 3
months remaining of the current season stocks of domestic wool reported on
December $1, 1940 totaled 122 million pounds of shorn and pulled wool, com-
pared with 140 mili ion pounds a year earlier and 212 million pounds on
December 31, 1938. These stocks will be supplemented by the production of
pulled wool during the remainder of the season. 1ill consumption of domestic
wool in the first 9 months (April-December), of the current season averaged
about 45 million pounds a month.

Total stocks of domestic and imported wool in the United States on
December 31, 1940 were about -as large as a year earlier but they were much
smaller than end-of-Deceniber -stocks. in the years 1955-38. Although imports
of wool in the first quarter of 1941 will be much -larger than in any recent
year, mill consumptibon also will be larger,


-9 -





WOCL-50


- 10 -


Larger consumption in 1941 expected

Mill-consumption of wool in the United States in 1941 is expected to be
larger than in 1940, with most of the increase in the first half of the year.
The large consumption is expected to result in part from greater consumption
of wool for civilian purposes in 1941 but consumption for military uses also
will be large. I.ti1 sales of wool fabrics for civilian uses were about 10
percent smaller in 1940 than in 1939, although incomes of consumers increased
in 1940. The decline in mill sales probably is reflected in reduced stocks
in consuming channels. With further increases in consumer income in prospect,
consumption of wool for civilian uses is likely to increase in 1941. Army
orders now held by mills call for delivery of large quantities of wool cloth
in the first half of 1941. .

Army may place new orders
in near future

On January 29 the House approved a deficiency appropriation of 175
million dollars for the procurement of articles of clothing and equipment for
Army enlisted personnel. The appropriation will permit additional contracts
during the current fiscal year, but the purpose ;of-the appropriation is to
permit a program of long-time planning for future demands.

In requesting the appropriation at this time it was stated that "in
order to do a well-planned buying job which will keep costs at a minimum, give
labor continuous employment, ]eep consumer prices down and obtain deliveries
on schedule, orders must be placed from 6 months to 1 year in advance of the
time the merchandise is needed."

It is expected that contracts will be let during the next few months
but delivery will be permitted over a period of at least 6 to 10 months.
"The extended dates of delivery should enable contractors to fit production
of Army materials into the slack periods in production for civilian use. ...
Early buying will also benefit the American wool grower because if contracts
are placed in the near future the purchase of wool for Army uses will be made
while the clip is still in the hands of the wool grower and the grower will
get the maximum benefit of any market condition created by these purchases."

Wool items included in the appropriation,..with approximate values,
were as follows:

Dollars

Wool cloth 69,500,000
Wool blankets 13,500,000
Wool shirts and drawers 12,200,000
Wool gloves 1,600,000
Wool socks 4,400,000

Higher prices expected for 1941 clip

The relatively small carry-over of wool in this country and prospects
fcr a large mill consumption of.-wool- in 1941 will be strong supporting factors
to domestic wool prices. As indicated in the January issue of the Wool







WOOL-5 0


- 11 -


Situation, wool prices in the United States are expected to average higher
this spring and summer than they did a year earlier. Since last spring, how-
ever, wool prices have advanced materially and any advance from present
levels is likely to be moderate. Wool supplies in foreign countries, avail-
able for shipment to the United States, are relatively large. As the United
States is importing wool -in large quantities domestic prices will be affect-
ed to a considerable extent by prices of foreign wool.

Data for chart on page 2:

Table 1.- Till consumption of apparel wool, greasy shown basis,
total and per capital, United States 1918-40


Year Total Per capital
: Million
S pounds Pounds

1918 : 67EC. 6.5
1919 : 563.7 5.4
1920 : 510.9 4.8
1921 : 597.4 5.5
1922 : 640.4 5.8
1923 : 603.1 5.4
1924 : 518.0 4.6
1925 : 525.2 4.6
1926 : 524.1 4.5
1927 : 551.1 4.7
1928 : 511.9 4.3
1929 : 554.7 4.6


Year


1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938 1/
1939 I/
1940 2/


Total
1Million
pounds .

447.9
545.2
439.8
572.2
381.4
748.4
666.4
579.5
513.9
673.9
682.3


Per capital


Pounds

3.6
4.4
3.5
4.6
3.0
5.9
5.2
4.5
4.0
5.1
5.2


Compiled from reports of the Bureau


of the Census.


Subject to revision on the basis of the 1939 Census of manufactures.
Preliminary.


-i----







Table 2.-Stocks of wool held by dealers and manufacturers, and stocks on
farms and ranches in Western States, United States, 1935-40
Grease basis
: Apparel wool_ __ : Carpet
: Domestic : Foreig___ : On farms: wool
Date : Manu- : : Total : and : all
:Dealers :facturers: On hand : Afloat :reported : ranches : foreign
: : 2/ j/
:1,000 lb. 1.000 lb. 1,QO0 lb. 1,o00 lb. 1 OC lb. 1. 000 lb. 1,000 b.


1935
Mar. 30 4/:
June 29 :
Sept. 28
Dec. 31 :
1936
Mar. 28 a
June 27
Sept. 26 :
Dec. 31
1937
Mar. 27
June 26
Sept. 25 :
Dec. 31
1938
Mar. 26
June 25
Sept. 24
Dec. 31 :
1939-
Apr. 1
July 1
Sept. 30
Dec. 31
1940
Mar. 30 ..
June 29
Sept. 28
Dec. 31 6/:


170,887
183,818
161,945
76,861

41,836
136,325
128,845
67,353

34,873
131,967
139,085
134,623

117,226
169,043
181,847
116,635

68,554
107,910
75,245
44,051

40,392
110,783
91,110
35,055


5/ 28,105
22,899
27,156
43,433


90,398
112,753
155,708
114,239

80,581
105,108
93,696
102,208

81,3 14
87,989
85,303
66,037

63,396
95,397
104,559
82,225

64,345
103,857
125,084
S1,491

58,017
99,3'3
108,031
85,283


1,265
3,145
40,783

18,804
4,407
2,069
1,259

2,640
1,213
2,445
8,178

8,276
5, 25
7,896
25,243

6,656
5,111
20,141
67,779


289,390
319,475
344,809
234,533

189,505
295,146
261,598
246,881

212,750
287,3!7
276,178
239,4S7

216,772
297,722
321,157
238,403

180,939
255,767
244,862
20?,534

173,683
262,942
263,593
259,130


41,9o7
43,oo4
51,795
4,500 51,772

350 55,049
49,o06
47,462
1,800 53,959

330 53,923
51,17?
59, 46
31,600 63,471

22,500 49,640
43,927
37,969
13,340 43,137
6,290 48,527
46,860
53,705
14,384 53,942

10,786 66,971
63,789
53,624
1,463 57,253


Compiled from Bureau of the Census, Quarterly Wool Stocks Reports. These
statistics are believed to include over 95 percent of the total stocks held by,
and afloat to all dealers, manufacturers and topmakers in the United States.
I/ Includes topmakers stocks.
2/ Estimated by the Department of Agriculture. Estimates are of wool on farms
and ranches and in local country warehouses in 13 Western Sheep States, not in-
cluding any wool of the next season's clip. No estimates available for dates
where no figures are shown.
Includes carpet wool afloat to the United States.
Grease basis figures for March 30, 1935 calculated from statistics of con-
dition in which reported. Stocks figures were not reported on a grease basis
by the Bureau of the Census until June 1935.
/ Wool afloat not separately reported until June 1936.
Preliminary.


52,448
35,912
36,537

77,585
63,024
49,721
37,568

33,510
32,069
32,306
31,365

39,764
38,575
36,637
51,749
68,618
47,165
44,311
71,013


WOOL-50


- 12 -









Table 3.- Prices of wool per pound in specified markets, and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods 1938-41


Market and desc


-ripti Average : High : 1940 : 1941
ription 198 9 : 1940 : 1939 1/: Jan. : Dec. : Jan.


United States: : Cernt;
Boston market -
Territory, scoured basis -
64s, 70s, ROs (fine)
staple ...................: 70.4
56s (3/8 blood) combing ...: 58.9
46s (low 1/4 blood) .......: 52.4
Bright fleece, greasy, -
64s, 70s, 680 (fine)
delaine ..................: 29.0
56s (3/8 blood) combing ...: 29.5
46s (low 1/4 blood) .......: 28.3
Foreign wool in bond at
Boston 2/
Sydney scoured basis
64s, 70s, combing .........: 54.8
Cape scoured basis
12 months, combing ........: 53.6
Montevideo gr--"se besis
I'erinos (60-64-) ..........: 22.4
Is (56s) ................. : 26.1
Prices received b;, farmers,
grease basis, 15th of month .: 19.2


Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine staple
4/ .... .....
Cotton, 15/16" 1.iddling 5/ ..:
Silk, Japanese 6,/ ..........:
Rayon yarn, 150 denier 7/ ...:
Rayon staple fiber 8/ -
Viscose 1-1/2 denier .......:
Acetate 5 denier ............:


Cernts Cen-ts


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5


96.3
79.7. .
76.:1.


38 ..0
41-.2
41.0


Cents



109.5
94 i1
87.5.


43.0
S' 48.8
49.0


58.6 67.9'" -79.2.

53.7 ;62.9 73.8-

26.1 :31.2'' 36.5


28.3


.32.4


22.3 3/28.4


70.4 82.7 -
8.95 9.30
170.6 271.8
52.2 51.5.

25.0 25.0
46.5 46.0


96.3
10.17
278.1
53.01

43.0
43.0


38.5 -.


28.7.



109.5
10..84
392.1
53.0


Cents Cents Cents


104.7 108.5
82.8 86.8
76.1 79.5


40.7 45.5
44.5 45.2
44.0 44.5



73.5 -70.5


108.1
86.5
79.5


43.3
44.8
43.9



73.3


63.2 65.2 70.5

33.1- 33.5 34.7
34.3 33.5 33.5


28.1



104.7
10.98
:368.3
' 53.0


31.2 31.3



108.5 108.1
9.94 10.10
256.2
53.0


25.0 25.0 25.0
46.0 43.0 43.0


Compiled from reports of the Agricultural arketi'g Service except as otherwise
noted. .
1/ Highest monthly average price.
Before payment of duty. Compiled from the Boston -Commercial Bulletin.
/ Preliminary unweighted.
4/ Scoured basis, Boston market.
/ Average at 10 markets. Hew series, 15/16" in place of 7/8" previously quoted.
/White, 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
/ Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
/ F.o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


WOOL-50


- 13 -






WOOL-50


Table 4.- United States: Wool imports, consumption, and machinery activity,
selected periods, 1938-40


Item


: Yeqr __
: lqg1 : loq : 1940


: 1,000
: pounds
Imports for consumption, :
actual weight: / :
Apparel ................ 30,811
Finer than 0s........: 18,443
Not finer than 40s ....: 12,369
Carpet, including
camels hair ........: 71,908

Mill consumption: 2/
Grease basis- 3/
Apparel ...............: 474,527
Carpet ................ 92,736
Scoured basis-
Aggregate-
Apparel ...............:219,565
Carpet ..............: 64,945
Weekly average-
Apparel ..............: 4,143
Carpet .............: 1,225


1,000
piou ds


98,194
74,612
23,582


1,000
pounds


222,983
199,149
23,s34


144,875 134,691


630,150
148,513


639,861
137,103


293,083 309,449
103,421 97,554


5,636
1,989


: 1939


: 1940


: Nov. : Dec. : Nov. : Dec.
1,000 ,000 1,000 1,000


pounds


11,874
9,977
1,897


pounds pounds


15,891
14,699
1,192


23,293
20,765
2,528


10,602 9,840 11,081


57,750 46,986
13,401 10,925


26,436
9,238


5,951 6,609
1,876 2,310


22,378
7.S65


71,610
12,958


33,821
..,969


5,595 ,455
1,916 2,242


pounds


41,175
38, L45
2,730

14,859



69,926
12,965


33,440
9,058

E,360
2,265


-eekly average in hours


Machinery activity: 2/ :
Hours operated per
machine in place-
Worsted combs ..........:
Worsted spindles ......:
Woolen spindles .......:
Woolen and worsted
looms-
Broad ..............:
Narrow ................
Carpet and rug looms- :
Broad ................:
Narrow ...............:


39.8
26.9
30.6


51.8
39.6
39.8


28.1 40.7
10.5 13.2


23.4
15.9


37.4
22.7


55.0
37.7
43.0


38.8
13.6

37.8
21.9


60.7
49.7
45.1


47.7
20.0


51.1
LP-J. 4
41.9


47.9
15.3


71.8
50.6
53.6


74.7
52.6
55.0


52.1 54.2
15.3 14.6


43.8 41.7 42.3
24.4 21.8 25.1


42.3
26.0


Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Cunmerce. Consumption and
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census. ./ Weight of greasy, scoured,
and skin wool added together. 2/ Figures for November and December based on 4
weeks. 1938 figures for 53 weeks ended December 31. Io adjustments ;.ade for
holidays. 3/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in
condition received from pulleries and is mostly washed.


~ _


- 14 -







WOOL-50


Table 5.- Argentina: Wool e:-oorts by principal countries of
destination, specified periods, 1934-40


Count r" of
destination


: Yepr beginning : Oct.-D:-c.
: Oct. 1 :
: Average : Average : 1 140
: 1934-3S 1 :1934-38 : 1
: 1,000 !b. 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib. 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib.


United Stes .........:
Japan .................
United Kingdom .........
France .................:
Belgium ..... ...........:
Italy ..................:
Germany .................:
Netherlands ............:
Sweden .................
Finland ................:
Russia ................:
Other countries ........:


53,45o 136,914
7,0o7 15,o66
S5,0 25 26,277
4s, 367 J.,aoss
20,45 11.0091
1, 962 18,303 3
4,9, ---c
2,150 10,227
1,230 S,21l
57 253

Ig. 57 202, 72


Total ................: r 4,j 2g12 l,185 71,469 87,514
Compiled from corniercial rept'rs supplied b:, the Buenos Aires office of
Foreign Asricultural Relations.

Table b.- Uruuay: Wool exports by principal countries of
destination, specified periods, 1934-40


Cou try o f
dest nation


United States ..........:
Japan ..................:
United Kingdom .........:
France .................:
Belgium ...... .......:
Italy ..................:
Germany I,,,,............:
Netherlands ,...........:
Sweden ......,........:
Finland ............. :
Russia .'., ;... .......:
Other countries ........:

Total .. ............:
Compiled frqmcoLiercial
Foreign Agricultural Rela
1i 1938 only.


: Year beginning :
: Oct. 1 :
: Average :
: 1934-3 : 1939 :
: 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.


14,718
7,890
20,4~7,
7,225
10,465
13,484
30,511
3,968
2,178
Il 149

4.125


115,083


36,880
5,531
1,423
1,137
3,628
13,341
4,416
13,552
15,841
894

9.759


106.402


Oct.-Dec.


Average :
1934-38 :
1,000 lb.

3,797
2,293
5,457
1,305
1,670
2,644
7,464
1,094
467
1/ 11

654


26. 47


1939 194o
1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib.


11,081
540


128
2,905

968
1,976
35

1,483

19.416


reports supplied by: the Buenos Aires office of


35,926
2,732






3,370
278
172
264

42.742


12,338
2,480
18,843
9,709
3,290
2,471
7,611
530
165
99

3.649


45,230
4,683
176
8,377
1,157
2,478

2,286
2,456
71

4,555


77,569
4,559
4





1,528
368
2,586
871


, J ,


-- i I I


" ,


- 15 -





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