The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00030

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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THE


WfOL-49


IJriV OF FL LIB
DO CyMENTS DEPT




U S DEPOSITORY



sIT NATION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

QF1 JANUARY


1941


WOOL. TERRITORY. SCOURED BASIS: AVERAGE
PRICES AT BOSTON. 1924-40


CENTS
PER
POUND


140

120

100

80

60

40

20


1924 '26 '28 '30 32 '34 *36 '38 '40


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG 19684 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


DOMESTIC WOOL PRICES ADVANCED SHARPLY IN THE FALL OF 1940,
AND PRICES AT THE END OF THE YEAR WERE SLIGHTLY HIGHER THAN A
YEAR EARLIER. THE GREATER RISE IN PRICES OF FINE AND MEDIUM
GRADES OF DOMESTIC WOOL REFLECTED LARGELY THE INCREASED MILL
DEMAND FOR THESE GRADES TO FILL ARMY CONTRACTS FOR UNIFORM CLOTH,
AND THE RELATIVELY SMALL SUPPLIES OF WOOL ON HAND IN THIS COUNTRY.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT IN NOVEMBER THAT THE ARMY WOULD ACCEPT CLOTH
MADE FROM FOREIGN WOOLS AND THE RECEIPT OF FOREIGN WOOLS IN LARGE
QUANTITY TO SUPPLEMENT THE DOMESTIC SUPPLY HAVE CHECKED THE AD-
VANCE IN PRICES OF DOMESTIC WOOL.
















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WOOL-49


~-----------------------------
THE WOOL SI TUATIO
--------c------DI----I-----I---

Summary

The limited offerings of fine and 1/2 blood domestic wools and the

relatively lower prices of foreign wools which are now arriving in quantity

were important factors restricting the sale of domestic wools in December.

Sales of domestic wool at Boston were small. Prices did not change

materially.

Imoorts of wool probably will continue large in the first quarter of

1941. But with a hiz-h level of wool consumption in prospect in the next

several months the carry-over of wool in the United States at the beginning

of the new marketing season (April 1, 1941) is likely to be relatively small.

Mill consumption of apparel wool in November continued the upward

trend of earlier months. The November rate of c-rinsTumtntion was 8 percent

higher than that of October and was the highest on record for the industry.

Consumption on a scoured basis in the first 11 months of 1940 was about 2

percent larger than in the same months of 1939, and with the exception of

1935 was the largest consumption for the 11-month period since 1923.

United States imports of apparel wool for consumption totaled 181.g

million rounds in the first 11 months of 1940, compared with 82.3 million

pounds in the same months of the previous year. The January-HIovcrmb-r im-

ports were the lerrDst for those months since 1923. Imports of carpet wool

in the first 11 months of 1940 were smaller than in the same months of 1939.

The South American wool markets were moderately active in December

and further -orice advances were rnr.nrted on fine grades of wool. The

United States has been the principal buyer in South American markets in

the new season which opened October 1. Of a total of 57 million pounds


- 3 -






WOOL-49


of wool ex-orted from Argentina and Uruguay in October and November, 54

million pounds were shipped to the United States.

January 10, 1941

S REVIEW OF RCEIET DEVELOPMENTS

Prices of domestic wool show little
change in December

Wool prices at Boston did not change materially during December,
although slight declines were reported on some 7raies. The relatively
small market supplies of fine and 1/2 blood domestic wools, and the rela-
tively lower prices of forpinrL wools, were important factors restricting
the movement of domestic wools in December.

Boston quotations on graded fine cor.ting (staTle) territory wools
remained unchanged at $1.085 per pound throughout Decernter, but prices of
most territory wools declined 1 to 2 cents a pourd, scoured basis, during
the month. Prices of 3/S blood combing territcr;,y wool' cveraied 86.5 cents
a pound the last week of December, compared with .73.- cents a month earlier
and 84 cents a year earlier. Ccuntr:. packed mixed lots of 3/9 and 1/4
blood bright fleece wools, stored in Boston and available for immediate use,
were sold in small quantities in December It 4, cents ra pcund grease basis.
Similar wools stored in the Midwest were sold at 42-43 cents in the grease,
delivered to eastern markets. Prices of :'r*jed flouce wrools "ere largely
nominal in December because of the small sales.

The United States av-ra,-e price of v'wol received by farmers was
31.2 cents a pound on December 15 compared with 71.5 co-nts on Novombcr 15
and 27.5 cents on December 15, 1939.

Forei,;n wools sold at higher
prices at Boston

Forci: r apparel wools predominated in the sales on the Poston
market in December. South American wools provided the bulk of the avail-
able supply of fine and 1/2 blood wools. Receinrts of S''uth American wools
have been fairly. : large in recent weeks and vriccs at Boston have not
charged meteri.-ll:' on these wools. Arrivals of Australian wools were de-
layed in late 1940 and. -rices of soot Austr-liar ,n;o.'l. at Boston advanced
3 to 6 cents a po,.u.d, scoured basis, in the .:nrl; part of December. Aus-
tralin 'ools b',n to arrive at Unit-e Stat. s -orts in considerable
ou:antitios in December, and prices at the ernd -of the month v'ere slightly
below the peak.

Imports continue lnrg; in November

Imports of apparel wool for consumption 1/ totaled 27.3 million
pounds in November compared with 25.6 million pounds in October and 11.9

/ Wool entered for immediate consumption nlus wool withdrawn from bonded
warehouses for cornsum.tion.







million pounds in November 1939. Imports from January through November
1940 totaling 181.8 million pounds were about 100 million pounds larger
than imports in the corresponding period in 1939, and were larger than
in any recent year. Wools grading finer than 56s continued in November
to form the greater part of the apparel wool imports. About 118 million
pounds of wools grading finer than 56s were imported in the first 11
months of 1940.

Imports of carpet wool increased in ITovember and were slightly
larger than in November 1939. Imports of carpet wool in the first 11
months .of 1940 totaled 119.8 million pounds compared with 135 million
pounds in thq same months last year and a 5-year (1934-38) average for
those umoinths of 116 million pounds;

Mill cons-umption of apparel wool.
high in IIovcmber

The weekly average mill consumption of apparel wool in November was
8,455,000 pounds, scoured basis. The November rate of consumption was-
percent higher than that of October and was the highest rate for any month
in the 13 years of record. The highest rate previously reported was that
of March i918, when consumption averaged 8o410,000 pounds per week. Be-
cause of the smaller number of worki-ng days in -I:.v~b:r, total consumption
for the month was slightly smaller than in October.

Consumption of apparel wool, on a scoured basis, in the first 11
months of 1940 7was about 2 percent lory-r than in the same months of 1939,
and with the.exception of 1935 was the largest consumption for the 11-month
period since 1923. Because of the larger consumption of foreign wools,
which ar, light shrinking, the consumption on a grease basis from January
through Hovember 1940 was slightly smaller than in the same months of 1939.
Consumpntion from January through November 1940 was equivalent to 570 mil-
lion no.unds, greasy shorn and pulled. In the same months of 1939 consump-
tion on *a grease basis totaled 583 million pounds. Consumption of carpet
wool declined slightly in November. The November consumption was smaller
th-n that of a year earlier.

Arm:y lr, lcs orders for uniform
cloth in D.ccm::.1.r

Orders were placed on December 20 for substantially all wool goods
to be r-,rchased by the Army during-the remainder of the fiscal year ended
June 7 41. Offerir:n of materials to be made from domestic wool were
relati-;vel, small in the'bids submitted early in December, and the greater
part .f the materials ordered will be made from foreign wools. The con-
tr-cts covered 1,100,000 yards of overcoating end 2,-225,000 yards of suit-
ing for the Civilian Conservation Corps, and 2,087,500 yards of flannel
shirting, 6,122,000 yards of serge, 60,000 yards of elastique cloth, and
2,0,' :,001, :rards of overcoating for Army use. Delivery on these orders
will extend to about August 1, 1941.


WOOL-49


- 5 -





iWOL-4~ 6-

Prices highr for fine wools
in South American markets

The South American wool markets were moderately active during De-
cember. Demand for fine grades of wool continued strong, and further price
advances were reported on these grades. Prices of medium ard coarse cross-
bred wools declined slightly. The United States has been the principal
buyer in South American markets so far this season. Japan has purchased
defective burry wools in considerable quantity, and the Swedish Government
Purchase Board has bought fine and medium crossbreds to be shinped vin,
Vladivostck.

Prices per pound, grease basis, of domestic and Uruguay.an
medium wools, and spread between these prices, 193q-43

Season : n i At Boston
and : Boston Montevideo-
and : : : Spread : Domestic : Uruguayaan:
month : 1/ 2/ 4 Sprend
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents
19394-0:
Oct. : 4g8. 35.5 10.3
Nov. : 47.0 37.5 9.5
Dec. : 46.0 24.9 21.1 46.0 34.5 11.5
Jan. : 44.6 25.3 19.3 44.5 34.3 10.2
Feb. : 42.4 28.8 13.6 42.4 35.5 6.9
Mar., 3g*5 29.6 8.9 3g-5 35.5 3.0
Apr. : 36.1 33.0 3.1
May : 37.1 33.C 4.1
June : 39-5 33.0 6.5
July : 39.5 29.5 10'.
Aug. : 39-5 28.8 10.7
Sept.: 41.2 28.8 12.4
140-41:
Week
ended
Oct. 5: 43.0 5/ -- 43.0 31.5 11.5
12: 43.5 5/--- 43.5 31.5 12.0
19: 45.5 2.0 19.5 45.5 31.5 14.0
26: 46.5 25.8 20.7 46.5 31.5 15.*
Nov. 2: 46.5 --- 46.5 31.5 15.0
9: 46.5 25.8 20.7 46.5 31.5 15.0
16: 46.5 29.0 17.5 46.5 32.5 14.0
23: 46.8 46.5 32.5 14.0
30: 46.0 46.0 33.5 12.5

Conr.piled as follows: Prices of wom.stic wool at Boston from rnorts of
the Agricultural Marketing Service. Prices of Uru. aynn (Montevideo)
wool, in bond, at Boston from The Boston Commercial .ulletin. Prices at
Montevideo from Revista Senanal, Camara Mercantel de Productos del Pais -
Montevideo. All prices are averages of weekly range Quotations. Statis-
tics for 1936-39 published in The W:ol Situation for October 1940.
L/Av-rI.e of domestic 3/8 and 1/4 blood combing, bright fleece wools.
/ Uruguayan fine crossbreds, superior. / Domestic 3/8 blood combing,
hr'i.ht fleece wools. 4/ Montevideo Is (5bs) in bond (before payment of
duty). 5/ Not quoted.






WOOL-49


Exports from South America above average
in first 2 months of reason ..

E-xoort3 of -wool from Argentina in the first 2 months (October-
Hovembe-r) of the current season. totaled 40.4 million pounds, compared with
33.5 million pounds exr.orted in the same months.last year and a 5-year
(1935-39) average for those months of 29.1 million pounds, About 39.2
million pounds or 97 percent of the total shipments in October and November
1940 went to the United States. Shipments to Japan totaled less than a
million pounds.

Exports from Uruguay in October and November by principal countries
of destiratiorn were as follows: United States 14,887,000 pounds, Sweden
938,0j00 pounds, and Japan 509,000 pounds. Small quantities were shipped to
Rus:ia, Greece, and Mexico. Total exports in October and November were
tvrice as larze as in the same months of 1939.

Exports of wool from Argentina and Uruguay in the
first 2 months of the export season 1936-40

Argentina : Uruguay : Two countries
'ct.-lo. :JUnited States: Total :United States Total United States: Total

Iil. lb. Mil. lb. MiMil. b. il. lb. Mil. lb. Mil.lb.

1935 : 7.8 21.2 3.4 12.3 11.2 33.5
1936 9.5 31.8 3.9 11.6 13.4 43.4
197 : 1.1 15.0 -- 2.6 1.1 17.6
193 13.7 43.9 0.3 14.6 14.0 58.5
939 : 22.4 33.5 5.2 8.2 27.6 41.7
19 : 39..2 40.4 14.9 16.7 54.1 57.1

Crmpilijd fromT commercial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires Office of Foreign
Agricultral FRelations.

Australian wio-l production

'Vr.n prod.iuction in Australia for the 1939-40 season is officially
estimated at 1,10.9 million pounds. This is an increase of 13 percent com-
pared with pro-uiction in 1938-39 and is the largest production on record
for Australia. The official estimate is slightly' smaller than had been
estimated on t~he basis of appraisals and private sales during 1939-40.
Production in the current season (1940-41) is expected to be about 10 per-
cent smaller than in 1939-40 and should total about 1 billion pounds. This
would be a little larger than the 1934-38 average of 995 million pounds.

For preliminary estimates of production for 1940-41 in other Southern
Hemisphere countries see The 7'ol Situation for December, pages 8 and 9.


- 7'--






WOOL-49 8 -

Wool production in Australia 1932-40


Season
: Shorn wool
July-June
: Mil. lb.

1932-33 : 943.0
1i33-34 : 870.1
1934-35 : 908.1
1935-36 : 867.3
1936-37 877.5
1937-38 : 914.8
1,38-39 1/

1940-41


: S'in wool


"ool
exrortedr' n : Total
s1iLn? __


Mil. lb. :.i. lb. fil. lb.

66.2 53.4 1,062.6
72.0 53.* *5 .'5
54.5 52.P 1,01 5.
49.6 54.2 971.1
50.0 55.3 982.8
48.2 60.4 1,023.4
_/ 9/ 9P3.6
S!1. 1,109.0
2 1,X0O.O.


Australian Bureau of Consus rn:' :,t-t.-t.'ic7 excct 19 ,i',-4 '-hich is un-
official est-nate based on 10 percent decline from 1'''3-i-'.
-r':,tt separately reported.
SPreliminary.

OUTLOOK

BAC.1:GD'TTID.- As indicated in earlier issues .of The UWool Situation
mill consumption of wool in the United States' i. ej;-pected to
continue at a high level into 1941, and the lar,- c.;-insu.mtptiori will
be accompanied by lar.-,: imports during the ?cnmidi-' .Jinter and spring.
The ra i.d increase in consumption since June has reflected largely
the manufacture of wool for Army orders for unri-ncr. cIcth and
blankets. Since S ho4tcmber, however, there ha- be-:en, a substantial
increase in mill orders for cloth for civilian ue. .'ith production
of wool good: for civilian uses in 1940 down sha-rply and v;ith in-
creased incomes of consumers in prospect, mill cnriun-.itior. of wool
for civilian uses is likely to increase in 19"1.

Carry-over on April 1, 1941 expected
to be rel-t i-'el- snall

'"ith 4 months re-.,inn,' until the opening of tIn 1i'41 domestic wool
season, the supply of wool in all positions in the U:i.it.- d ,t tes on
December 1 was estimated at about 235 million pounds, -rease basis. ?.ill
co,.nlur--tion of wool since July has -.'.r --d abcut 66 million pounds a month
and in November consumption exceeded 75 million pounsJ. Foreign wools are
now arriving in 1: r-ry quantity to sunrlement the domestic -upply. But with
a high rate of consumption in prospect for the first quart le of 1941 the
carry-over of -irpprel wool into the 1941 season is lii:..-i', to be relatively
small. The carry-over of wool on Anril 1, 1940, totaling IflO million
pounds, 5r -.Z basis, was the smallest in recent years.






'TlOCL-49


Higher prices expected for 1941
domestic clip ..

IMill consumpticn of' wool in the United States in 1941 will be larger
than in 19405, rith most of :the-incr:se in the first half of the year.
This ~will be a sEtr.:niit su sorting -factor to domestic wool prices. Prices in
this cou.ntr;,., however, will be affected to a considerable extent by prices
of foreign wc:..l since the United States is importing wool in large quantities.
.',rool produced in Australia, New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa
(3 of the 5. major wool-exporting countries) is under control of the British
Governrci-nti and is being sold at prices fixed by that Government. In the
past :,'ear, the British ",'r.;l Control has followed a policy of' maintaining a
relati.v;,'y iigh level of prices for wool released for export'to other
countrie-.. In view of these considerations, it is expected that wool prices
in the United States will average higher this spring and summer than they
did a year earlier.

Since last spring, however, wool prices have advanced materially,
anr a maintenance of the current level of prices would mean higher average
prices for the 1941 domestic clip than for the 1940 clip. Advances in wool
prices from. present levels are likely to be moderate, despite the prospects
for a strr.n~, demand ':'i.-il supplies in foreign countries are relatively
laree. FrLi:r to the beginning of the war, the countries of the European
conti--nent Liported about half of the wool entering international trade.
Since. ilast Oiay shipments of wool to the -Continent have been largely cut off
by blc.cad-:. And the United States, Great Britain, and Japan are now the
only: im~.prtant markets for wool exports from the Southern hemisphere.


- 9 -






-- ".':L-49 10 -

Production, imports, and mill consimiption of a'.,arel vool, crease basis,
in the United States, annual 1-35-3,-', and April-!Jov-mber 1'39-40


Anril-March


Production


: .l1. lb.


3--ncral imports" 6dill consumption


:.:il. b.


:il. lb.


1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
193P-39
19-? -40 '-
April-November
1939
1940 /


431
427
433
436
442


673
582
407
32'551
612

434
439"


e/442
/454


Frojduction frc n A '.r-icu,-tural Marketir- S rvi'ce. Consu.-: ti.rn from the
Bureau of the Census. Imports from the ir a'. r.f Foreign and Domenstic
Commerce. / Actual weight of grease sc-urc.-. -n, s3,in v:wooi add.2d to-
gether. 2/j Th.-e.. are preliminary ccinaumptir fiur;=3 ba':d on monthly
reports. The revised totals which ar-. 3'o':erl.it lrger than pr-lL'.iinary
figures are not comparable with prodc.jti-.r, statistics. ;, 53 weeks.
4/ Production for entire -- ar. / Fr liLiniry.


Worsted combs: l ,..i:iy av.

Year : : :
and : Jan.: Feb.: Mar.
type : : :


1937
Bradford: 49.7
French : 77.5

1938
Bradford: 17.0
French 47.

1939
Bradford: 40.7
French : 6 8

1940
Bradford: |.u
French ?,


Data for chart -.i r.-, 2.


r"g-e hours of


Apr.:


May


52.2 53.4 52.5 46.8 sl.O ,1.L
81.6 03.4 78.8 77.5 74.' i.


7 L 317.8 21.1 27.4 3-2.1_ 36.6
.43,.3 29.7 32.7 43.3 54.0 66.3


42.8 42.1 30.? 36.0
74.8 61.5 49.6 64.4


37.0 32.2 25.3 28.7
74.8 52.5 51.8 53.1


-" -.4


Auz.:S3 rt.: 'ct.: Iov.: Dec.



35.: 30.3 24. 17.1 17.7
62.1 ._3.6 41.3 41.3 43.7


45.2 37. 41.7 4?.9 47.8
7 .- r:,0.7 56.1 75.0 79.0


4 ).0I 53.4 50.5 42.6
;2.2 2. S .- 33.1 69.6


.5.3 4 ,7.4 57.2
S .- l. 1 3.1 1-1.8

th. Census.


Compil. d i.0on t achin-ry -ctivi L re ,orts, B3ir-j c.f


'lil:


ac'ivit;,- p r .mncr.in, ir. r-,lac 1937-40






WOOL-49


- 11 -


United States: Wool imports, ccnsunpt ion, and machinery activity,
selected periods 1938-40


: Year : an.-Nov; : iov. : Oct. : Nov.
: 1938 : 1'9 : 1939 : 1940 : 1939 : 1940 : 1940
: 1,000 1,000 1000 1-,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


Imports for '-cr .nsumpt in, :
actual u.;ei-,ht 'l, :
Apparel .............. : 30,811
Finer than 4, ........:18,443
Hot firn-r tl .an 40s ....: 12,369
Carpet, inclTdr1.ing
-'irr els iLsir ........: 71,908

Mill onrsuLmption Ji :
Grease basis ,' -
Apparel ................ :474,527
Carpet ................: 92,736
Scoured basis -
Aggreate -
Apparel ..............:219,565
Carpet ...............: 64,945
Weef :iy aI V,: -
Apparel ..............: 4,143
Carpet ...............: 1,225


98,194
'74,612'
'23,582


82,303 181,808
59,913'160,704
22,390 21,104


144,874 135,035 119,832



630,150 583,164 569,935
148,513 137,588 124,138


293,083 270,705 276,009
103,421 95,756 88,496


5,636
1,989


5,640 5,750
1,995 1,844


11,874
9,977
1,897


25,598
22,818
2,780


23,293
20,765
2,528


10,602 8,147 11,081



57,750 84,618 71,610
13,401 16,329 12,958


26,436 39,240 33,821
9,238 11,387 8,969

6,609 7,848 8,455
2,310 2,277 2,242


Weekly average in hours


Machinery altivit-, : :
Hours operated per ma-
chine in place -
Worsted comb ......... :
WTorsted rindrles ...... :
Woolen spir dles .......:
'Ioolen and ;:-orsted
loomr o -
Broad ...............:
Harrow ..............:
Carpet and ru ioo;r.s -
Broad ................ :
hsrrow ............... :


39.8
26.9
30.6


28.1
10.5

23.4
15.9


51.8
39.6
39.8


51.8
39.6
39.6


53.4
36.5
42.0


60.7
49.7
45.1


72.5
51.0
52.0


71.8
50.6
55.6


40.7 40.1 37.5 47.7 45.9 52.1
13.2 13.0 13.5 20.0 16.5 15.3

37.4 37.1 37.4 43.8 44.6 42,3
22.7 22.8 21.6 24.4 25.7 25.1


Import figures frcor the Bureau of Forei,,D1 and Domestic Commerce. Consumption
and mrchinrery acti-ity from the Bureau of the Census.' / Weight of greasy,
scoured, -and skin wool dided together. 2/ Figures for November based on 4 weeks
October onr 5 we,-:s, January-November on 48 weeks.' 1938 figures for'53 weeks
ended December 31. ice adjustments made for holidays. 3/ Total of shorn and
pulled wvjoo. Pulled wol, grease basis, is in condition received from pulleries
and is mostly washed.


Item




tll'ivERSITy OF FIORIDA

Illilllll lI i i li i i illlMlllllIIII IIlll
12 3 1262 08861 5512

Prices of wool per pound in specified markets and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods 1938-40


I'arket and description

United States:
Boston market -
Territory, scoured basis -
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
staple ..................
56s (3/8 blocd) combing ..:
46s (low 1/4 blood) .....:
Bright fleece, greasy -
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
delaine .................
56s, (3/8 blood) noibing .:
468 'low 1/4 blood) .?...:
Foreign a ool in bond at
Boston 1/ -
Sydney r scoured basis
64s, 70s, combinr ........
Cape scoured basis
12 months, coribing .......:
Montevideo riesA basis
Merinos (60-64s) .........
ls (56s) .................
Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of month.:

Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine staple
2/ ........................ :
Cotton, 15/16" Middling 3/..:
Silk, Jaa nese 4/ .........
Raycn yarn, 150 denier 5/ ..:


Average : 1939 : 1940
1938: 1339 : Iov.: Lec. : Oct. : lov. : Dec.
Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


70.4
59.9
52.4


29.0
29.5
28.3


54.8

53.6

22.4
26.1

19.2


32.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5


105.4
97.9
91.7


40.6
47.0
46.6


105.8
65.9
79.0


41.2
46.0
45.5


104.5
97.2
73.5


42.1
45.0
43.6


109.5
88.5
79.5


45.0
46.4
44,.5


108.5
86.8
79.5


45.5
45.2
44.5


5.6 7"6.3 74.8 63.5 65.2 70.5

53.7 60.1 61.0 63.5 63.5 65.2


26.1 35.5 32.5 32.5
2e.Z 5Z?. 34.5 31.5


37.5
32.5


33.5
33.5


22 .2 27.6 27.5 29.9 31.5 31.2


70.4 82.7
8.95 9.3C
170.6 ,"1.8
52.2 51.5


105.4 105.E
9.41 10.56
339.4 392.1
53.0 53.0


104.5
9.38
269.8
53.0


108.5
9.66
258.5
53.0


108.5
9.86
256.2
53.0


Raycri staple'fiber 6/ :
Viscose 1-1/2 denier ....: 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
Acetate 5 denier ..........: 46.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0

Compiled from'reports of the Ari-ultlural :!ar':eting Service except as otherwise
noted.
1/ Before payment of duty. Compiled fromL the Boston Connr-rcial Bulletin.
8/ Scoured basis, Boston r :et.
3/ Average at 10 markets. 1 Uew series, 15,'16" in place of 7/S" previously quoted.
W/ White, 13-15 denier, at New York, ,Pur'-au of Labor Statistics.
r/ Domestic yarn, first quality Bureau of Labor Statistics.
6/ F.o.b, producing plants, Bureau of Lator StAtistics.




..H


WOOL-49


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