The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00029

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
/T : -


U.S. DEPOSITORY


SIT NATION
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

0R DECEMBER 1940


WOOL APPAREL: MILL CONSUMPTION AND IMPORTS FOR
CONSUMPTION IN THE UNITED STATES, 1933-40
POUNDS 1
I MILLIONS I
80 Consumption.
grease basis


60



40 -

Imports.
actual weight 1r
20 :__, _, _..',,
20

A \
... [^-.; .., [,. ... ",,.i..
1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940
C OInI.uP.FFTI.', E N-TIMr 4T~ OF NEW YORK WOOL TOP EXCHANGE SERVICE
IfrPO'RT S C' EAL' OF FOr;EIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULIUJR


NEG. 32651 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


DOMESTIC MILL COrNS'UMPTION OF APPAREL WOOL HAS IN-
CREASED RAPIDLY SINCE MAY, REFLECTING LARGE ARMY CONTRACTS
FOR WOOL GOODS. CONSUMPTION IN OCTOBER WAS AT THE HIGHEST
LEVEL SINCE 1918, AND IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE AT A RELATIVE-
LY HIGH LEVEL IN THE NEXT SEVERAL MONTHS. IMPORTS OF APPAREL
WOOL FOR THE CURRENT WOOL SEASON (TO APRIL I, 1941) ARE LIKE-
LY TO BE LARGER THAN FOR ANY RECENT YEAR..


WoOL-48


THE







WOOL-48


- 2-


THE WOOL SITUATION




Ur._c r the stimulus of -',T e orders for Army materials, domestic mill

consumption of apparel wool has reached the highest level since 1918 aUnd

is :i-1ly to continue at a high level into 1941. T!:e hi, rate of consump-

tion in prospect vill tend to 3u;:-.ort prices of domestic wools. But with

imports entrilr: the Unit -i States in relatively large quantities, prices of

domestic wools in the next several months will be influ.-nci to a considerable

extent also I'- the prices paid for imported wools.

:T:.ited States imports of t~parel wool for constiption tol..lcJd 158.5

million pr-unJs in the first 10 months of this year. The January-October im-

ports were l,-re-:' than those for the sane months of any recent year. Imports

of ai.-,aIc-l wool in October, moujnt.-' to 25.6 million pounds, were the- largest

monthly total since early 1937.

Mlill cn.'-i.r:tion of ; y:-'rel wool in the Urited St:L'es in October con-

tinued the improvement which b1._an M in May. Consumption was 15 rco:'cnt larger

than a year earlier, and the r.onthl:,' total was the lar,-r,:t since June 1918.

Conmamption on a scoured basis in the first 10 months of this year "was about

the same as in the corrcor,.ini g period last ;'i, r.

On ... -erIt r 20 bids were invit .: for substanti illy all wool o'ods to

be purchased .:,- the Army during the remainder of the fiscal --car ending

June 30, 19111. It is ri--.-l-.r estir:' -- that the new orders will rc-:,uire 30

to 40 million pounds of grease wool. T-tal wool f~'trics ordered for the Army

from Ju--. 1, 140 to Junr.: 30, 1941 probably will require about 200 million

pound- of wool, gr..-azy shorn basis, chiefly fine domestic wools.






WOOL- 48


Production of wool in the five principal producing countries of the

Southern Hemisphere in 1940-41 is estimated to be about 4 percent smaller

than in 1939-40, but about 5 percent larger than the average for the 5 years

li94-3. MI.ost of the, apparel wool entering international trade is produced

in there countries. The decline this year is chiefly in Australia, where

almost half of the Southern Hemisphere clip is produced. The carry-over of

wool into the current season in the Southern Hemisphere was somewhat larger

than that of a year earlier.

-- December 11, 1940

.-. REVIIEW OF RCETiT SDVELCPMENTS

Pri ces firm-at.Boston in November

Ux.rember sales.of domestic wools at Boston were relatively small,
Prices r.-mained quite firm. The greater part of the wool sold at Boston in
IUv3.cmbcr was South. merican wool, principally fine and 1/2 blood ,r-. es.
Prices of such wools advanced moderately in the-early prt of-the month.
Tho Boston office of'the Agricultural Marketing Service reports that South
Am.ericen r-ools received the greater part of the demand in i7,hv-:,br largely
becaasc. they comprised the bulk of the immediately available supply of fine
and 1/2 blood 7i-.i.s at Boston. Offerings of fih'e"rWad 1/2 blood domestic
wools were very light and many of the wools on hand were held at prices con-
siderably above prices users were willing to pay.

Boston quotations on graded fine combing (staple) territory wools aver-
aged $1.08 a pound throughout November, and prices of combing 3/9 blood terri-
tory 7001 averaged 88.5 cents a pound. Country packed lots of 3/8 and 1/4
blood bright fleece wools sold at 43-45 cents a pound at the end of November,
compared with 45-46 cents a month earlier. Prices of domestic wool at Boston
at the c;,d of November were higher than a year earlier.

The Uhited States average price of wool received by farmers was 31.5
cents a ,ouna on INovember 15 compared with 29.9 cents on October 15 and 27.6
cents on November 15, 1939.

Imoor-t. up shaitply in October

Imports of apparel wool for consumption 1/ totaled 25.6 million pounds
in October compared with 15.2 million pounds in September and 9.4 million
pounds in October 1939. Imports in the first 10 months of this year, totaling

I/ Wool c-ntcred for immediate consumption plus wool withdrawn from bonded
warehoeses for consumption.






WOOL-C8


158.5 million pounds, were larger than in ay recent year. Imports from
January through October last year totaled 70 million pounds. Imports of
carpet wool for consumption increased slightly in October but were smaller
than in October 1939. Imports of carpet wool in the first 10 months of
this year totaled 109 million pounds compared -xith 124 million pounds in
the same months last year and a 5-year (1934-38) average for those months
of 106 million pounds.

Wools grading finer than 56s continued in October to form the greater
part of the apparel wool imports. Imports of such grades in the first 10
months of this year were more than three times as large as in the same months
of last year, and imports of wools grading 44s to 56s were more than twice
as large, but imports of wools grading 36s to 44s inclusive were smaller than
in the same months last year.

A-.arel wool: Imports for consumption by grades, United States,
January-October 1939-40 and October 1940


: _Actu:.l -.:eiht I/
Grades : J'.-Oct. : Oct.
: 1939 : 19_ O : 1940
S1,000 pounds 1 ,0 pounds 1,0'O pounds

Finer than 56s ..........: 30,327 102,659 17,155
46s-56s .................. 13,644 32, 1146 5,146
40-44s "............... 5,965 5,136 517
Not finer than 40s ......: 20,493 1,575_ 2,70

Total apparel ........: 70,429 15,516 25,598

Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.
I/ Weight of greasy scoured and skin wool added together.

October mill consumption highest since 1918

The weekly average mill consumption of apnarel wool in October was
7,848,000 pounds, scoured basis. The October consumption was 15 percent larger
than a year earlier and the monthly total was the largest since Jiune 1918.
Mill consumption of apparel wool has more than doubled since April the low
point of this year. Consumption from January through October of this year was
equivalent to 498 million pounds greasy shorn and pulled. In the same months
of last year consumption on a grease basis totaled 525 millionn pounds. Con-
sumption of carpet wool increased in October and exceeded that of the corre-
spondir.ng month a year earlier for the first time since May.

Unfilled orders for wool goods relatively
large as result of Ary orders

Unfilled orders for woven cloth reported by mills on September 28 were
only slightly larger than a year earlier but were almost twice as large as
orders held at the end of September 1913, according to statistics published
by the Ihtional Association of Wool MPanufacturers. Unfilled orders were


1 4 4






WOOL-4 _


relatively: hizh at the ern- of September last year, as a result of the heavy
buyrin.' which fc allowed tie ci.!thre, of the European war. Orders declined
during the iinal ou-.1r-.rt of 1939 and first quarter of 1940.

A consi.erible i.Lr of the unfilled orders for men's wear material
reported --it the cn cri Scf member consisted of Army contracts. Orders for
men's 7C:.i rm:4.t.rial for civilian use were much smaller than a year earlier,
but ord.;.rs ir r omrn' s wa-.r 'were slightly larger than at the end of September
last :.' r. With ridyitirn:. Army contracts for about 16 million yards of wool
ser.-o a)Ld s-:ir'tiig -p!J.7L.d in October and with an increase in orders for ci-
viliran \,--..r rt.F.,*:'rt d b:.'. commercial sources, it is likely that unfilled orders
for -,.n'Is '.7Ci.i' at the e ii of October exceeded 50 million yards.

Unfill .d. orders for woven cloth reported by 119 mills beginning
.I each quarter, 1938-40 1j


:7-- !.n' -7ear : :
-t T--.- Women's Auto
rbm-.I thr** t 0Total
buinnin, v, Other car -cloths 2/ "
: o1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:lin-.r :--!,i linear yards linear yards linear yards liner .:-.rds

J vi. -: '4 10,924 6,043 2,055 22,966
A-:'. : 2 6,293 4,139 l,S94 14,619
July : c,'5 13,286 8,041 1,315 23.,637
Oct. t 13,777 6,541 1,968 23,071

Jmn. : 24,456 8,951 1,782 36,033
Apr. :5 22,905 5,252 834 29,556
Jul:.- : :1 19,913 11,526 1,824 33,924
Oc'.. -.",* 31,887 9,260 3,244 45,026
1940
Jan. : 1,371 23,438 9,204 2,005 36,023
AOr. : 74. 21,297 4,429 1,136 27,610
Ju-,y : ,6 17,564 12,933 3,064 42,997
Oct. l : 19,200 10,919 2,927 45,852

Cor:-.ild. ri' :.-. :,nt"l.:-' St ; istics of Wool Manufact-ure, published by the National
Ass' i :,.n f .7-cl 1': ...f.curers. Statitiics are for cloth containing by
wei:..t ,-,-._r 2. i:. r'e-". f yarns spun on the woolen and worsted system. .Cloth
ls ..-: -- i,-.' j..,: :'.:poorted in equivalent 5-Iinch yardage.
I/ ;..r: "' -: ._'-- -: c_'ied dates, near the beginning of each quarter.
2/ clu'.., l:.>h it,. :,ile or jacquard design.
,I ,-** 'j. '.. -'- .

Un irit t St-.r r,:. .ri"'ci,:,. ..j or in
Ar.':nt i *, -. r::,: n ', .. -:b r::

iritd.'. S't:- s buyers continued to purchase relatively large quantities
of '-ool iL Ae.rnti:na in I,.- member. Denand was particularly strong for fine
wools, P:'ic.:s :.d.v-;a.cd n ool of all grades in the early part of November,
but prices of co-irs.e crossbred wools declined slightly in the latter part of


- 5 -









the .i-th. '- S.i:'i. Government Purchasinoi Board contracted for fine
m'nd medium crorsclre, wools in l11o.-e-,n er for shiip.,ent via 1Isliv;stik, and
J:-.p.in ojt.rc!'c.ed small quantities of inferior coarse crossbrec vools.
Arrivals of new clip wools were more liberal in r:o'ember.

S'.i:-.i:-i companies reported !e- *. to?-in-s for shipment of wv:-)ol to the
United Stites in December and Januay E-.p)rts of wo-.] in October by coun-
tries of destination were reported as follows: United Sttcs 17,gL9,000
pounds, Jr--.n 137,000 p-. ~d, :c:-ico ''-,0' pounds, Brazil ard Chil.e 15,00C
prcun..s, a total of 17,725,000 pour.ls E;r:or-ts in Octob-r ;iS9 t :t.led
14,956,> p,.il. /d were s'hip:-l d dciex'ly to the Uritc-.: States.

Prices firm in UiLu_TLZ, clip uD'.'in
rr ill.: out of first ]L.--ls

Sales of wool in Urugaay were large in October a.nd the e`rly art of
ITcvembe-', and prices advanced moderately. In the lat'-r :rt of ITovenmber
activity was curtailed, prob-abl. as a result of a sho .rt-ea of -hippiing space
to the United Stp.tes. Prices remained firm thryovi N- .i:-.'. Coi.nercial
sources estimated in late i'o-_: 4 -- that about 50 milli.)n :o;d.s had already
been sold in the current season, of which about 40 million roun2'.s v:erc for
Ur.ited States account.

':-jorts from Ur.IL.ay in October by countries of d:.ti~nation wore. as
follows: United States 8,797,0 pounds, Japan 12,OC'" pjoulids, Hc:-ico 116,000
pourn-'.s, and 3 ;r':cc 63,CCOi pounds, a total of 9,301,00C0 po,.'n. In October
1939 exports totaled 4,-43.,000 cO0O:i's, and were shipped chi -'1,.' to the United
Stat s.

OUTLC OK

BAC7C-R,'.Qi.- -Mill consumption of apparel vool in th.- U'nited
States declined sharply from October 1937, t].rou4h April 14C,
and wool rices declined in the first half of '.' -'0. Si -:c
I:>Z', wool consumption has increased rac.pi.ly, r:il.:cti,;, in
part the manufacture of materials for l2aIr Arnmy contracts.
This increase in consumption hfis been accompanied in rcc..nt
months by an increase in domestic wool prices.

United Statos imports of ap)-arel wool w..re rel-tively
large in the latter part of 1939 r.d inl9Q but stocks in
this country remained smaller than the average zt-lcks of re-
cent years.

As the wool outlook has not ch:i.g.:., materially in th.- p.st month, the
follo-wirn important points have been sunnarized from the 1November issue of
Th- Wool Situation:

(1) Mill consumption of -I-".r'l- wool during the rcnm.indor of the
current wool season (to April 1, 191) will be considerably greater than in
the corresp-on.ding period a year earlier. This increase in consuimtion will
reflect chie-fly the large Army contracts for wool Joods aw-a'ded in recent
months.






WOOL-4.


(2) The increase in mill consumption will be accompanied by a lar'-e
increase- in imports durirn- tF' co.mi::- winter and spring. Because of the
larg: use -i fine wools in Army materials, United States im ,ri't requirements
in the ie:-:.. several months will be for relatively large quantities of fine
woels.

(3) For the calendar year 1941 domestic mill consumption of wool
probably -ill be larger than it was in 1940. The increase is .:.*- .ted. to re-
sult in ,-.-t from a greater consumption of wool for civilian purposes in 1941,
but cnri.nmution for Army requirements will be relatively large. The hig
l-vel of mill conzumilti'n in prospect for next year will be an important
suppnitil. factor to prices of wool from the 1941 clip in the United States.

Arm,: annou'i.ccs wool purchases planned
fo:'r icr1-iirnrir of 15 -K41 season

n0: UlrCeb r 20 bids were invited by the Quartermaster Depot at
Philadelphini for substantially all vool gogds to be purchased by the Army
rd Civili n-i Conservation Corps during the remainder of the fiscal year end-
ing June:c TC, 1941. The announcement of the total requirements made by the
Office of .-the Coordinator of National Defense Purchases is expected to permit
ma-uI'fnct.ui'C'rs of wool gods to mnke necessary arrangements to take care of
Gov.:-rr-i,.t .-*nd civilian needs for the next several months with assurance that
no fDlgethir i'.rge orders are planned during that time.

Tleh terms of this offering require no deliveries before March and will
permit m-~.:ufacturers to spread deliveries at the rate of 20 or 25 percent
nor.thl.y in-itil about August 1, 1941. This delivery schedule is expected to
peinit th.-h '.so, to some extent, of wool from the new domestic clip.

W7,ol r:.ui--d. for Amy orders
larie, in current season

The invitations issued on November 20 covered bids for 5,750,000 yards
of s,:-rg, .,C',"C. yards of IS ounce elastique, 2,100,000 yards of flannel shirt-
ir.g and c million yards of overcoating for Army use, and 2,225,000 yards of
s-itinT -n 1,100,000 yards of overcoating for the Civilian Conservation Corps.
It is ror.u.jly estimated that these contracts will require 30 to 40 million
po ,id. f r7-.'.:-ase wool, depending up6n the proportion of foreign and domestic
wo'ol srccified. This estimate does not include reworked wools which may be
u.:ed in .,-- rcoat materials. The requirement that orders be filled entirely
with dor:,-Etic wools has been ro laxed nd the Army may now purchase materials
rni.d of f:roigrn as well as domestic wool.

Or.i -rs placed by the Army from June through October were estimated to
require 10: to 170 million pounds of wool, greasy shorn basis. Hence, re-
quirec-ments f-,r Arny fabrics through June 30, 1941 will total about 200 million
pounds, greasy shorn basis, chiefly fine domestic wools.

ArcLu-,l wool goods requirements of the Army under the National Defense
Progr-.in ~,s rnow constituted are likely to be smaller in the next few y.-nrs
than in thil- current year, according to the Coordinator of National Defense
P'rchas,-.E. In the present situation it was necessary to provide complete


- 7 -







7C.OL.L 4 1

initial :-n'LLi'-- :t a ns well as ".tA-i'stcnce and reser-.e .st cks for the cr.tire
Army in tr'lni'.i:. In the f.'.LUrcI it -;ill be .eciess:ry to rr..i-'e .*:mly for
replacement of article s as t:-Y.i" ear out.

D. cl.in,? n 3- th i'". He: inJ, I .r-..l1
pr"-,ict i n indicated; c-.'r ---". r '"-r -r

F--'.:ct.ion of wool in the five .ri:,cial duci. -.d.uci: c'urtrirc :f the
Southern H-{ :isphere in the lrC'-l41 season probably will. bc .'ut-.t 4 pcrccA;t
smaller than in the 19 9-.;O0 season but r-1bout 5 pcrccnt l-i-r'.j-- th-jn the avcx-
age for the 5 years 19'-.385S, according to prcliniin.ry c i'l.tcz. Tctal pro-
duction in the five coLutrios, Australia, Nov Zoal.nd, Su..th AAirica., Argentina,
and Ur.71i-7;' in the current season is estimated at 2,1214 million : pnoun.li con-
parod i ith 2,223 million pounds last ;-ari i.:loct of tc w'.F-,rcl .l oI cntcring
international tr".de is -:l duc.~-d in these countries.

7,i. decline in production in the 1Cl;C-41 ses.jr. i- chi.:-fly in Australia,
where alrnst half of the Southern Hcnirphere wool clip is rz'd.-ccd. Produc-
tion in Australia is c-r :ct:l to be .0 percent snr.ll..r tli n :"i. re.coi'd clip
of 1,130 million pounds produced last season, An- inci.-..c ir. -,rrduction is
indicated for South Africa a:. 1eO: Zclanld. The '.":cl clip l, t.hse three
British Eipire c.:?-ntrios will be purchL.sod by the Britich 3.-n'.r'uc:nt, and
sales to neutral c-lur.t.ries are under control of the. British .-..ire Vc7ol Control.

Production of wool in Ar -.".ti.i" and Ur u--. in 1]40-41 is ec.tir'atcd
.:'t 51 .'illi-r pounds. Thiis is 3 "ercont -.rll c r th-n the i. '- 0 production
but is 6 percent lrr.;cr than the -r."-" .e for the 5 -:c 'r 193-'.3

The carry-over of wool into tl-e 19, -1:-1 se.con in th.; S-uthi.rrn Honi-
sphere nws sonew;hat larger than in the previous se:rn. Soj.e -.f thr.e ool re-
naining in Ar,-,'-;tina and Unti,.-u-.v at the close of t:,.- -.?asc~i l..'. ben con-
tracted for by r.pc-n countries and was still a, i';i:-.; zhip..: 1t. All stocks
in .i.u.sral .., New Zealand, nard the Union of South .'fric .cill 1e purchased
by the British 7-'1 Control, acco-':Jin: to present .-rrr;r ener.ts, but -wol front
Australia and the UnTion of South A.rica vrill be .rL..1. ava'tilaL1lc to United States
p.-ircha3 :rs.






WOOL-48


'ool production in principal Southern Hemisphere
L.rodi. cin 0A countries, 1935-40


Country : 19.5-36 : 1936-37: 1937-38: 1938-39: 1939-40: 1940-41
_______ ______ : / : 1/
: Mil.Tb. M~ T. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.


Argentina 2/ .... ..........:
Uruguay 3/ ................:

Total 2 countries ....a

Brazil ...................
Peru 6/ ....................
Chile .....................
Other South America .......


565.0 374.0 366.0 399.0 403.0 397.0
112.6 116.2 116.3 125.4 133.9 4/122.0


477.6 490.2 482.3

37.5 37.5 39.7
10.1 12.3 12.5
7/ 55.2 7/ .5.7 7/ 33.0
(20.O'1 -- (20.0) -(20.0)


524.4 536.9 519.0

5/ 40.5
10.3 11.3
6/ 35.0
-(20.0)


5.0.4 595.7 587.5 630.2


Australia .................: 971.1 982.8 1,023.4
South Africa ..............: 3 .0 21:.4.0 233.0
New Zeala ui ...............: .30..3 7502.9 296.8
Total 3 Lritish iire:
countries .........: 1,513.4 1,549.7 1,553.2


985.08/1,130.09/1,020.0
248.0 246.2 270.5
327.7 310.0 5/ 315.0

1,560.7 1,686.2 1,605.5


Compiled .'rom o '''i:ial sources except as otherwise noted. Estimates for Australia
and Few L' a-vv d include wvo;l exportr- on skins. 1/ Preliminary. 2/ Estimates of
the Pueros Aires Branch of the First iiStional Bank of Boston. Bared on exports,
domes tic c.onFsuption, and carry-ovrer. 3/ Estimates of Camara Mercantil, Montevideo.
Based on exports, domestic consuciTption, and stocks. 4/ Commercial estimate cabled
front A-eri,~can Legation st i'ontevideo. 5/ Estimate based on sheep numbers. 6/ Esti-
mat-cs bUjd on exports. 7, Ir:perial Ebcnomic Committee. 8/ Estimate based on
carry'-over, private sales, aid a ppraissls. 9/ Decline of TO percent from 1939-40
(unofficial).

Vlool carry-over in principal Southern Hemisphere producing countries, 1935-40

: Australia : IInion of outh Africa : New Uru
Australia : Zealand : Argentina Uruguay
ear JJne 300 September 30: September 30
,/ Sold Unsold Total 3/ 4/ 5/
i: Mi. lb. -ii. lb. I0il. lb. Jil. lb. Mil. lb. Iil. lb. Mil. lb.

1935: 27 4 4 8 85 13 11
1936 : 22 13 7 20 41 18 11
1937 : 14 13 4 17 29 24 3
1938: 71 13 8 21 43 40 21
1939: 34 14 5 19 37 53 9
1940 : 6/ 49 2 51 43 84 7/ 20

17 Estimates of the U'.;tional Council of 0ool Selling Brokers. 2/ Stocks at ports.
Official. 3/ Official. 4/ Estimates of Buenos Aires Branch FiFst National Bank of
Boston. 5/tEstimates of Tamara IPercantil, P.ontevideo. 6/ Not available. 7/ Com-
mercial estimate.


Total South Amnerica ..:


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- 11 -


Prices of wool per -ound in specified miarLets arid prices of textile
rarw materials in the U.nited States, 'selected periods, 1938-40


."- Average : 193 : 4O
1Larket sand description
: 1938 : 199 e : Oct. : n ov. : Sept.- : Oct. : Nov.
United States: : e"- nts Cents Cents Cents Cents Ce-ts Cents


Boston market -
Territor,,, scoured 1ssis -:
64s, 70s, C? 's fine)
staple ..............:
56s (3/ blooc) combinr .:
46s (loir 1/4 blood) .....:
Bright fleece, greasy -
64s, 70s, 'C's finee
delaine ................:
56s (3/'c blood) combin;L .:
46s clow 1/4 blood) .....:
Foreign wool in bond at :
Boston 1/ -
S*rdne- scoured basisE
64s, 70is, coT in. .......:
Cape scoured basis
12 months, corrinii ...... :
Montevideo grease basi; :
1'eri:os (6c:-64E) ........ :
lI (56s) ................ :
Prices received b"' -'reiers, :
grease basis, 15th of .lc
Tex:tile fibers:
T;ooi, territor'- fin- sZ ile:
2/ ............ ... ..... .:
Cotton, 15/16" iddli'.g 3 :
Silk, Japanese 4,' .........:
Rayor yarn, 150 denier 5/ .:
.,ayon staple fiber /
Viscose 1-1/2 deniir .....:
Acetate 5 denier .........:


70.4
58.9
52.4


29.0
29.5
28.3



54.8


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5


109.5
94.1
87.5


43.0
.48.8
49.0


105.4
87.9
81.7


40.6
47.0
46.6


58.6 79.2 76.3


53.6 53.7


73.8 60.1


22.4 26.1 36.5 35.5
26.1 .28.3 38.5 37.5

19.2 22.3 28.7 27.6


70.4
8.95
170.6
52.2


82.7
9.30
271.8
51.5


109.5
9.03
327.1
53.0


105.4
9.41
339.4
53.0


25.0 25;0 -
46.0 46.0


92.4
78.5
76.0


36.0
41.2
41.2


104.5
87.2
78.5


42.1
45.0
43.6


108.5
80.5
79.5


45.0
46.4
44.5


63.5 63.5 65.2

61.6 63.5 63.5


26.8
28.8

28.0


92.4
9.48
256.1
,53.0

25.0
43.0


32.5 33.5
31.5 32.5

29.9 31.5


104.5
.9.38
229*.8
53,0


10.5
9 9.66
258.5
53.0


25.0 25.0
43.0 43.0


Compiled from report: of t:e. Agricultural marketing Service except as otherwise
noted.
1/ Before payment of diuty. Coorpiled from the Boston Commercial Bulletin.
2/ Scoured basis, r.ctoi-i Tcr-ket..
3/ Average at 10 rar.:,ts. 'eW series, 15/16" in-place of 7/8" previously quoted.
4/ V.1-ite, 13-15 denier, at !? York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
5/ Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
6/ F.o.b. producing plants, '.reau of Labor Statistics.


WOOL-48


~- ---~ -- --







- 12 -


United States: Wool imports, cc.sLmption and machinery activity,
select-d oc iods, 13.3-40


: Yea : Jan.-Cct._ Oct. : Sept. : Oct.
: 19:3. 139 q 1. : 17' : c l_ : 1940
: 1,00 1, C00 1,000 1,000 1,3000 1,000 1,000
: -.n'n.s pounds pounds oc unids pounds pounds pounds


Imports for consumption,:
actual s eht 1/; :
Acparel ......... ...: 3 .,3li
Finer than 40s .......: j2 4
Not finer then 40s ...: 12,7.J
Carpet, including l
camels hair .......: 71 ,908

Mill consumption 2/:
Grease basis 3/ -
Apparel ... ......... :4 ,5
Carpet .............. : 2,7e .
Scoured basis -
Aggregate -
Apparel ............. 219, 5C
Carpet .............: 4,945
Weekly average -
Apparel ............: h,14
Carpet ..............: ,


03, 1?L.
74,6r12
23,532


70, 2
23,?^)


15 ,51.6
13 9,9 i
1l,) l


144,s74 124,435 103,751.


f:30, 5,C
149,513



525,' 14
124,1- 7


495, 325
111,1 0


29'3,o0 244,29' 242,188
103,421 86, 1 79,527


5,636
1,39


5,552 5,504
1 ,96 1,s07


3,330
7,77
1,602


1,194
13,319
1,375


25,598
22,818
2,780


10,266 6,423 8,1%7 1
4


74,215
16,343


33,5g4
11,274

6,797
2,255


61,644
11,503


28,609
7,941

7, 52
1,985


g4,618
16,329


39,240
11,387

7, 48
2,277


Weekly everage in hours


Machinery activity 2/: :
Hours operated per ma- :
chine in place -
Worsted combs ........
WorstEd srindles .....
Woolen spindles ......:
Woolen and worst :
looms -
Broad ..............
Narrow ..............
Carpet and rug Icoms -:
Broad ...............:
Narrow ............ ..


39.
26.9
30.6


28.1
10.5

23.4
15.9


51.8
39.o
39.8


4o.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


51. .
39.7
39.1


'1.7
'5.2
41.0


39.4 36.2
12.4 13.3


64.5
50.9
45.7


62.6
43.1
49.6


72.5
51.o
52.0


42.0 42.3 45..9
1s.6 12.7 16.5


S3.5 37.0 44.1 37.5 44.6
22.6 21.3 26.3 23.2 25.7


Imrort figures from the Bureau of Fore.in and Domestic Commerce. Consumption
and machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census.
I/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
2/ Figures for September based on 4 ,.eeks, October an 5 weeks, January-October
on 44 weeks. 1938 figures for 53 weeks ended December 31. No adjustments made
for holidays.
3/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mostly washed.


.70OL-4 3


UNIVERiiTY OF FLORIDA

I3 262 08861 5652
3 1262 08861 5652


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