The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00026

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text














SITUATION

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

SEPTEMBER 1940




WOOL. SHORN: PRODUCTION, PRICES, AND CASH
INCOME. UNITED STATES. 1924-40


P CO JIC ,
FOuN cr
UNIV OF FL LIB .-'"'" :'
DOCUMENTS DEPT 40



300

U S. DEPOSITORY

;00C




100



0
Noo
iN COME C
DOLLtNA


1924 1926 1928


PRICE
(CENTS PER
POUN I
40



30




2d



10



0
INCOME
DOLLARS
I MILLIONS I


100




75




50


1930 1932 1934 1936 1938 1940
*PRELIMINARY


u r I;* .ar Il r .... lu I NiEt sI8 BUREAU OrAGIOCULTURALECONOMICS



SHORN WOOL PRODUCTION IN 1940 WAS THE LARGEST'ON RECORD.
THE TREND IN PRODUCTION HAS BEEN UPWARD DURING THE PAST 15 YEARS.
WOOL PRICES IN 1939 AVERAGED HIGHER THAN IN 1938, AND CASH IN-
COME FROM WOOL WAS ABOUT 18 PERCENT GREATER IN 1939 THAN IN THE
PREVIOUS YEAR. INCOME FROM WOOL IN 1940 IS EXPECTED TO BE LARGER
THAN IT WAS LAST YEAR.


- *u U -


THE


WOOL-45





vWOOL-45


THE WOOL SIT UAT I0 1


Summary

Domestic wool prices in the next several ircaths will be supported by

strong demand for wool in this country. But with imports of v.ool entering the

United States in relatively large quantities, price" of vwool in the United

States during the next several months will depend to a considerable extent

on the prices paid for imported wools. Prices paid for imriorted vwool, in

turn, will depend partly upon the quan: itie.s of Australian and South African

wools released for export and the prices fixed for such iwocols by the British

Government. Relatively large supplies of apparel wool vill be available for

United. States buyers in Argentina and UrJpFay.

'iith the taking over of the wool output c.f t-hc Unln cf South Africa

(announced in late August), the British Governmrent nor- h as c,-ntr-:.l over a

major portion of the world' s export surplus of wool. In C-rt-n mber 1939 the

British Government acquired the Australian and :']wvj Zealand wool clips for

the duration of the war and one clip thereafter.

Mill consumption of apparel wool in the Unit,-d C-ates in late 1940

and early 1941 is expected to be considerably gr.--c r tlhi- a -'ear earlier,

as Government orders are filled for clothing and blanket s fir military use.

Prospects for the manufacture of wool oods for civilian iuse- for the next

several months are rather uncertain. Should a dccr,-ase iLn ruch consumption

from last year' s level occur, it probably would be more than offsett by the

increased volume of manufacture for Government orders.

Consumption in July exceeded that of -the correspc.nding month a year

earlier for the first time since last January. The increasing rate of

consumption in July reflects partly the manufacture of materials fcr large


- 2 -





WOOL-45 -3 -

army contracts placed in June. Consumption, on a scoured basis, in the first

7 months of 194,0 was 7 percent smaller than in the same months last year.

The supply of wool in all positions in the L'rj'i'd States on August 1

is estimated to be about 40 million pounds larger than a year earlier, but the

supply is small in relation to probable domestic consumption during the next

several months. If mill consumption in the remainder of the 1940 season

(to April 1, 1941) is to exceed that of the same period a year earlier by a

substantial margin, and if stocks at the end of March are to be fairly well

maintained, a larger volume of imports of apparel wool will be necessary in

the coming 6 or 7 months than was imported in the same months of last season.

In the period August 1939 through March 1940 imports of apparel wool totaled

about 120 million pounds.

September 10, 1940.

REVIEW OF LCEIT DLVCI CPMENTS

7Tool prices advance in Au.ust

The domestic wool :.iah:.:t was somewhat irregular in August, but prices
of most. grades of domestic wool advanced 1 to 3 cents a pound, scoured basis,
during the month. Principal factors in the price increase were increased
bu,-ing of domestic wool to fill new Government orders for wool goods for
military use and the announcement that the British Government will take over
the current wool clip of the Union of South Africa in addition to the clips
of Australia and New Zealand.

Early in August country packed lots of 3/8 and 1/4 blood bright fleece
wools sold at Boston at 37-38 cents a pound, grease basis. By the end of
August such wools were sold at 39-40 cents a pound with only small quantities
available at 39 cents. Country holders were asking 40-42 cents for these
wools at the end of August. Boston quotations on graded fine combing (staple)
territory wool averaged 90 cents a pound, scoured basis, in the last week of
August compared with 88 cents a month earlier. Quotations for combing 3/8
blood territory wool averaged 76.5 cents a pound in the last week of August
and 75 cents a month earlier.

Wool imports continue relatively large

Apparel wool imports for consumption 1/ totaled 9.8 million pounds in
July compared with 10.6 million pounds in June and 5.6 million-pounds in July

I/ ,Wol entered for immediate consumption plus wool withdrawn from bonded
warehouses for c':L-,iUiojtiC -L.





WOOL-45


- -


1939. Imports in t!eL fir_-.t 7 i'.ntl-. .,.s' -th.s .ye-r, Lotaling 108 million pounds,
were more than twice as 1"1.'c.::s in tIh.L -... !.criod a ycar earli,-r nnd wore
larger than import;- "'r tl s--.lC m'li h :." ;ia: rc.c:nt 'ye-Lr oxczpt 1937, when
126 million pounds -.rc ir.or:.cd. Iip...rts o' carpeit wool in the first 7 months
of this year totale-d $_ mrilli n pci:'Lu~ c:lil:r..:o ;iLh 85 million in the same
months of 1939 and 5-ye.r (L'?-3) ar... for those m:rntis r 71 million
pounds.

TmIor t.v countri- s

United Stats 3 i-ip.crts .f A parceli ':.-1 in t:h. first hlU' iof this ycir
c-tro principally fr-r t.h- l.ir..,n of Sc 2th Af ri-a, ,Ar lnt in -., -.nd Uruguay. The
relatively small imi..,o-t' r.:a. A.istr-.li'., r.I....' :-.l d, .-nd th. United Kingdom
reflect thu purchanr -. f cOnlLr'.l of th.. ctiti ';Ool prudu'ctiLn of those
countries in the 1' -40 ': as:n byv the BritiL-h C-ovrrLL:.nt.

Wool: Imports frr c-nsu-rption, b:" principal. c"urntri-:s of production,
'nit..-i State 1-t3 and ,] .u-ry-.:u.- 1"..0


Country of
production


: 1939 Janu.r.yr-Junr'i 1940
:C-.:.:t L:;..: ;_ .pi i 'wo. Cap-.t rao.ui: ArFparcl .ool
:i.iclidingii.it fin.r: Fincr :including: it finer: Finer
: cm s : than : t1.an : c'.1els than : thca
: -..ir : 1 : ACs : hair 4Os 40s


:'1.O b1-. 1 000 lb. 1 000 ].b. 1,000 lb.


Ar : nt i na ............ :


4' ","'"01
2. ".


1 3


Australia .............. 2';
New 1Z;' lard .... ....... *,01? '.'
UruNu.ay..............: ...... ,,
r u . .,
Chile ................: 0 0
1.inion of S.- h Africa : 1,19'-. 0
British India ........: .3. 552
United Ki gd' m .......: 1017 1,4..
Ireland ..............: 2,51 17"'
Syria ................ : L .. u 1 ",
Iraq ..... ..........: 10,20
France ...............: 4,C52 290
China ............. .. : 2.66t. 1 ,
Egypt .................: 12 3
Canada ............... 70 13
All other ............: .,.7 > h_'_
Total .............: 1l -' ,.T 2- ,582


1,000 'lb. 1, 0O lb.


6,079 40,172 9,.3 23,277
',113 0 31 13,615
o7 7'1 40- 2 ,920
D'., 2 99 533 17, e5
1217 0 0 1,582
c,329 329 2/ 2L,413
0 16, 72 1.02 0
2. 21 4,05. 202 724
217 1,608 213 94
G 4,931 0 0
0 4,33F 6 0
13 :2 7 16 0
0 3,,20 67 0
C. 1577 27 0
2,01'5 1 59 98'0
6 5. 2, 2 8 1,6,9
. li ..O,U,-i 130,895 87,156


C:-.pil. d frir.: .i..:ntl: Sumwy1y f F or-ig C ., ..rc D-c .mb.r '1 -3 and June 1940.
l/ V:cols grading "not finer t'-:.n 43- .y b." .ot.d fi.; ._f duty if used in the
manufacture of floor covering, pr-L-: cloth, knit or felt boots, or heavy fulled
lunabermen' s socks. In the last 5 years about one-fifth of the ixipo-ts of such wool
have been duty free. 2/ Less than 500 o'rinds.

Unfilled orders for woven fabrics

Unfilled crders for woven cloth hold by 119 mills reporting :-n June 29
were about 25 percent larger than a year earlier and were 80 p,:rc,.nt larger








than unfilled orders reported at the beginning of the third quarter in 1938,
according to statistics published by the National Association of Wool.
Manufacturers.

The increase in orders, compared with a year earlier, was entirely in
orders for Government use. On June 29, this ycar, reporting mills held
Government orders for 9.4 million linear yards of wool cloth, reflecting the
large orders placed in June. Unfilled orders for civilian wear were slightly
smaller than a year earlier.

Unfilled orders for woven cloth reported by 119 mills beginning of
each quarter, 1938-40 1/

SMen's war Auto
Quarter Men Ise Women's lots : Total
beginning Government Other wear Total
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
l: T: r 'j. linar yd linear vd. linear yd. linear yd.
1938-
Jan. 3,944 10,924 6,043 2,055 22,966
Apr. 2,293 6293 4,139 1,894 14,619
July 995 13,286 8,041 1,315 23,637
Oct. 785 13,777 6,541 1,968 23,071
1939-
Jan. 844 24,456 8,951 1,782 36,033
Apr. 565 22,905 5,252 834 29,556
July 661 19,913 11,526 1,824 33,924
Oct. 635 31,887 9,260 3,244 45,026
1940-
Jan. 1,376 23,438 9,204 2,005 36,023
Apr. 74fr 21,297 4,429 1,136 27,610
July 9,436 17,564 12,933 3,064 42,997

Compiled from Monthly Statistics of Wool manufacture, published.by the
National Association of Jool ..: .-. facturers. Statistics are for cloth con-
taining by weight over 25 percent of yrarns spun on the woolen and worsted
system. Cloth less than 50 inches wide rcportcd in equivalent 54-inch yard-
age. The 119 mills are equipped with 27,000 looms.
J/ Reports are for specified dates, near the b-f-rni'-n:; C. each quarter.
2/ Excludes cloth with pile or jacquard design.

Mill consumption up in July

Mill consumption of apparel wool increased sharply in July. The veekly
average rate of consumption for the month was 17 percent greater than in June
and 3.5 percent larger than in July last ;,-.-r. Consumption in July exceeded
that of the corres;pending month a year earlier for the first time since last
January. The increasing rate of consumption in July reflects partly the
manufacture of rmatcrials for large aliy contracts placed in June. For the first
7 months of 1940 mill consumption of apparel wool totaled 298.5 million pounds,
greasy shorn and greasy pulled. This compared with 341.7 million pounds in the
corresponding months of 1939. The weekly rate of consumption of carpet wool in
July was loss than in Juno and it was much smaller than in July last year.


WOOL-45


- 5 -





WOOL-45


British Government takes over South African wool

It Was announced in late August that the British Govera.rn..nt :,ad taken
over the wool output of the Union of South Africa. It is reportLd t.j-ha the
basis is about the same as for the Australian clip, an avcr.go: rice of
10-3/4 pence (18 cents) per pound is indicated as the purch1:sc rate for vA-iich
South African wool will be acquired by the British Wocl Contr-1. In Scptc:r.bcr
1939 the British Governmont acquired the Australian ond New 1.-aland woe.l clips
for the duration .' the war and one clip th.trcafter.

The British Governme nt now has control over a major pr r rtiLn :,f
world's export surplus of wool. In 1039 Australia, 1'..- Zoal nd, and South
Africa produced nearly 1.7 billion pounds of wool. Australi: .-:d th,. 'Tni.on of
South Africa produce mostly fine wool, whereas Nov. Zealand pr *.uc': I chifily
medium or crossbred wools. In 1939 wool production n Arg'nt. r: .a-,nl Urugu-y
(the only two important exporting countries not under British c.nitrol) tuL :.l.d
a little over 500 million o unds.

The carry-over of old wool in the Union of South Afric.a at th!- berLining
of the 1940-41 season, July 1, was considerably l1'r.,.r than a ::.;~i.r earlier.
Exports frou South Airica vere sharply curtailed in July parti;' as a r..~ult
of the lack of shipping facilities. Th. total 1940-41 South .frican suppll:, on
August 1, including the now clip, was cstinat:d to be about 50 .iillicn pounds
greater than that of a yur earlier. No fifurus are available :-n the carry-
over in Australia and New Z..;al:.i'd.

Large G:vcr -i.nnt _rd-.r.rs ji AhiaFt

The United States Army received bids and issued proposals for bids f:r
a considerable quantity of wool goods during August. On Au'.u:lt 31 awards w\rc
made for 1,000,000 blankets. On Au'ast 22 invitations wure ir.'u-d for bids
to be opened Scpteibor 3 on about 7,840,000 yards of cloth, including .vcr-
coatingi, :-.r-.., and flannel. It is rL.ahlvr estimated that a L't 45 million
pounds of grease wool will be required for the cloth and blanki.t c.rC' rs. Bid.ds
also were opened during August for woolun underwear and woolen s-.c'--s for the
arry. About mid-A.uigust, bids were opened for 1,300,OU0 yard.: ;' cl-th for the
Navy and Marine Corps.

Contracts placed by the Unite.d Stats An-.: in June als,: .r.c-r large.
R~ugh cstimatcs indic-tod that about 50 million pounds of gre.asc wool would
be nc:.c-sr;,- to fill the June orders.

Outlook

BACKGROUND.- Prices of wcol in this country rose sharply following
the outbreak -f the Eur,.p-;-.n war in September 1939. Thi- rise was
brought about by the prospects for a strong war demand f,:r wool in
certain forcing countries and the small stocks and relatively high
mill consumption .f raw wool in the United St.-.t:L;. Irn .- rt, o-f "ool
were fairly large in late 1939 and early 1940. mill c a'-inw i..n was
r,-duc.d after October 1939, and domestic -wol prices declined :.iodcratcly
during the first half of 1940. Howcvcr, wool prices c .nt Lnued sub-
stantially higher than these prcvailin.:: before Scpteier 1939.


- 6 -







Strong domestic demand for wool expected

Govcrnnmnt orders for wool goods are expected to continue relatively
large during the next several months, as orders are filled for clothing and
blankets purchased for the increasing number of non placed under military
tr-ininr- under the p.rdilng Selective Service Act. Because of this, rill
consumption of wool in the United States in late 1940 and early 1941 is cx-
pected to be considerably greater than that of a year earlier.

Prospects for the manufacture of wool goods for civilian uses arc
rather uncertain. Up to early Septenber the volume of mill orders for
civilian requirements apparently was smaller than that of last summer. In-
creases in incomes of consumers and a greater volume of retail trade later
this year mnay stimulate mill consumption fcr civilian uses to s~me extent.
Should a decrease in such consumption from last year's level occur, it
probably would be much neoro than offset by increased volume of manufacture
for Government orders.

Larger imports expected

The supply of col in all positions in the United States cn August 1
is estimated at about 495 million pounds, grease basis. This estimate includes
all the wool now on hand in the .Ji"it .d States, plus the a.nshorn portion of the
1940 clip. Alth-'. the supply on Au-ust 1 this year v:as about 40 million
pounds greater than that of a year earlier, it is snall in relation to probable
domestic consumption during the next several months. Mill consumption from
August 1939 through Larch 1940 totaled about 420 million p.:':rids. If .i11
consumption in the .'.a-ist-Miarch 1940-41 period, is to exceed that of a year
earlier by a substantial margin and if stocks at the end of next lMarch arc to
be fairly well maintained, a larger volume of imports of apparel wel will be
necessary in the coclrin 6 or 7 I'-nths than was imported in the same norths of
last season. In the period August 1939 through ,i-clci 1940 imports of -:'.rl
wool totaled about 120 million pounds.

During the periods when i-ports of v:ool are entering the United States
in largo quantities, doncstic prices of -;ools are maintained at a level about
equal to the landed cost of similar foreign wools in the United States plus
the wool duty. Under such c-nditions prices of wocl in the United States
during the next several months will depend to a considerable extent on the
prices paid for imported wools.

The prc.spects for prices of foreign wool for export to the United States
in the next several months will depend partly upon qu-.nittis of Australian and
South African wo;. s released for export and prices fixed for such wools by the
British Governi'n:t. Relatively large supplies If apparel wool will be available
for United States buyers in Argentina and Uruguay. In the 1939-40 season United
States imports ,f apparel wools cane chiefly from Scuth America and South Africa
although some Australian wool was released for export to the United States.

International trado in wool has boen greatly disrupted by the present
European war. In 1:.? (the last full yeor before the war) imports of wool
(apparel and carpet) by the principal importing countries totaled about 1.8
billion pounds. Out cf this total, 613 million pounds were imported by the
United Kingdom, 117 million by Japan, and 103 million by the United States.


- 7 -


WOOL-45






V' :'L-L


-~ L -


I..-.orts int t- L ;"iv 1:-.:i-,,- c:ntin..nl*, F, ur,-c.I countries, Fr:cc, Gcrmanry,
FP.clgi. ', Itl:.;', "? d 7l:-in :cL-.'.it :L t '.'. nilli':n rp:unds, :r r.:.rc than half
. th. t-.t-.l L. : -*f t1', pr;rnc1..I c-un*l i-s. l'onr as the British block-
adc fI c. ntr-. ntil Eui':.c -ntinu. list.ti .. '. 11 b j i. t d into'this


I.- c -i. --i-i t:, ,r:.habl c..ursc .:.c :tic n..d f. r .. ign prices -f
u-..:1, it Ah lL r ccC i i- d t h-t th.. -tiiJul-t-lnI .f .cts u...n Irices of the
r.i I-ig ,illit"-.r -l d i' -.r v'c..-.ls jin, Gr n."t Pritao. c.nd *th Lji t, i 'd Stat:s will
b ff'. :t .rt. b'" l..- fact t1, L 1 w:-c 1 .uprli: s a.va -laI'- t Cr..at Britain
S-. n'.t: -t A- -:..rc n.- .....ch a-oatcr t.-n b- .f r. th.. v-:r. Tlhe avail-
-.:1 ..- 1, .1. i t th- t i:. t.J tr .. c .r.. 11.J d p d up
. int.:l-r : .:.' id,. q -.t.. sit pp ,.? 1: tili i: f-r-. 2-. "t '.in h-_' .ish: re ux-pcrting
count:rit .. I ; .L.r. 2t .n is avt.il-:bl. .:,; ',.: yt. t .f ritr..sh 1i sses of
.',.1 I,'urLt t ,, .p,...r :.c r :s r,-:'.Lt .f v:,.]. 7ri ,.r-' .1 ;',rf..rc.


F:'ic- .f'


.L r. r .'Iui in' L1:2 nr t sna rn'ic .- f t.cxtil1


r- t r r. h. in.+.d St -Lc -, -. cL-ct..'- .. r -:, 1 ':.3-O40


Marl-:>. '41r CCi~t I


United States:
Boston n:arkt-
T ri-itory, scourc. s
64s, 70s, 80s (fil. .)t-- ,
56s (3/8 blood) e:.: .I .....
46s (low 1/4 bl: -d) .........
Bright fleece, gr' :LS7
64s, 70s, 80s (fi..:) ,.l- 1 ,
56s (3/8 blood) c .1i.i .....
46s (low 1/4 bl ........


*.?.


2"'I.
2n. c
2z, '
,', 4 C


1999 ___


1946
J'.in : Jul" :-.ug. ^st


,.t r,:it. Cot..: CcintL C,:nt s Cents


- ',
c. 3


'2.

c.5


1.2
62.
C' C
-'-4* -
50L 'z
*25 -


61.0
C5 .0
.2. 0
29.5
32.5
S32.5


90.4
77.1
75.1

31. 5
39.5
30 .5


," ,. I.
75.


34.4
35.5
41.0


Prices received by fr".:'r ,
grease basis, 15t' *i' :.' r:.n ...... 1 .2

Taxiile fibers:
Wool, territory fin .t-,l, 1 .. 70..'
Cotton, 7/8 :i..il- ....... .
Silk, Jipanese 3/ ....... ....,:':..
Rayon yarn, 150 dcr._r 4 .......: 52.2
Rayon staple fiber 5,'
Viscose 1-1/2 doer i ..........
Acetate 5 denier ...............:

Soithe-rn Henispherc ..............


22 :. 21..: 22.0 2 .. 27. 27.3


82.7

2"2.-
51.C


71.9
51.37

51.0


74.0
26'. 1
26'.1
51.0


*-. '-I


"-'5 I


c3.4
10.19
234.0
53.0


89.0
9.72
252.9
53.0


25.0 2 5.0 2".0 25.0 25.0
4.0c 4..0 4'.0 43.0 43.0

E'.-t:i.:cr .- ea n current quotations
l-rr' r' n *.inal


Compiled fron rn.r .rt:.- L t.. .'. riultr-..i 1.r'.Ktin:g Srv.ic- ..-o_
noted.
I Scoured basis, Boston r:arket.
2/ Aver-rT:. at 10 markets.
/" ';i,-ta,J 13-15 denier, at :,r. York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
4/ Domestic ::.rn, first quality, Bureau rf Lnbcr statisticss.
/ F.o.b. Fpr.-cin-: plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


t. :, *thorwiJSc


E9.0
75.4
7'5.0


39.5
41.0


__




WOOL-45


United States:


Item


Wool imports, consumption and machinery activity,
selected periods 193'-40


Year _: JCn.-ol y : Jl;".' June : Jul
: ls: : : i6q : : 139 : lY40 : 1940


1,000
pounds
Imports for consumption,
actual weight 1/:
Apparel ....................: 30C,11
Finer than 40's ............: 1S,443
Not finer than 40's ......... 1,369
Carpet, including camels
hair ...................: 71,903

Mill consumption 2/:
Grease basis /
Apparel ,................,:474,527
Carpet ..................... : 32,73
Scoured basis
Aggregate
Apparel...................:219,565
Carpet ..................... ; 6,945
Weekly average
Apparel ................: 4,143
Carpet ................. .: 1,225


1,'000
pounds


9,19S4
74,612
23,532


1,000
pounds


44,5395
30, 417
13, 957


, no0
pounds


107, 59
95,410
12,44.


I ;O i,o000 1,000
pouunis o Lds pounds


5,596
3,375
2,221
9, T5
L^ C-1.


1.c,566
9,053
1,513


9,C18
8,264
1,554


1 4,s874 5,00o 83,121 c,26s 7,760 7,460


630,150
14,,513


341,71)0
81,44 .


233,5~E 59,820 40,041 61,050
73,236 11,37o 7,602 8,315


293,033 160,572 149,54C 27,49 19,373 28,431
103,421 5',793 ;52, T,, -14 5,798 6,061


5,636
1.959


5,150 4,3.4
1, 32 1,i693


5,49 .
1,597


4,843
1,450


5,6:36
1,212


Machinery activity 2/:
Hours operated per machine :
in place
Worsted combs ..............:
Worsted spindles ...........:
Woolen spindles ............:
Woolen and worsted looms
Broad .................... :
Narrow ....................
Carpet and rug looms
Broad .....................:
Narrow ...................


Uckl" average in hours


39.S
26 .9
30.6 '

2?,.
10.5

23.4
15.9


51.3



40.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


47.7

37.2

3-1.4
10.9


46.1
30.:
371 U

33.4
12.9


34.7 3-.o
22.1 20.2


34.2
41.2


54.4
32.
39.5


41.2 3 .5
10.4 14.5


29.4
17.5


57.1
35.6
42.5

37.2
15.9


32.2 25.6
17.3 15.9


Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commrco. Consumption and
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census,
1/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and s-kin wool adied together,
2/ Figures for June based on 4 woes, July 1 on 5 weeks, January-July on 31 weeks.
1933 figures for 53 wec!:s on-ed December 31, No adjustmentr made for holidays.
3/ Total of shorn and pulled iool. Pulled wo.ol, grease basis, is in condition
received from pullorias andi-r i mostly washeldi.


- Q -





WOOL-15


United States 2/ .:
United Kingdom ...:
France ........ ..:
Germany ......... :
Belgium ........:
Italy ..........:
Sweden ...........:
ITetherlands ......
Japan ........ ..:
Other ............:


pounds

53.5
85.0
4804
4s.4
49.0
20.5
19.0


7.1
25.5


pounds pounds pounds


65.6
119.5
57.4
44.7
22.7
7.2
/3-
3.4
1.5
38.7


55.9
1001S
49.6
446
20.7
3.7
7/
2o9
0.9
29q2


110.1
24.6
34.1
I1/
11.1


10.2
13.7
26.0


Total ........: 30i&..


357.3 308.3 2'48.6 115.1 12..0 111.9 97.9


Compiled from commercial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires Office of Foreign
Agricultural Relations.
1/ Preliminary. 2/ Argentine figures include small quantities shipped to Canada.
5/ If any, included with "other".






'






I






A


Wool


10 3 1262 08861 5975

exports from Argentina and Uruguay in the 1939-40
e:port season, with comparisons


: Argentina Uruguay
: Season : Oct.-June eason Oct.-July
: (Cct.-Sept.) :. (Oct.-Sept.)
:Averae; : :Average:
:1934-3 -3 1938-3 l939-n 1 193-39 1938-39:1939-4
illito million Million Million Million Million Million Milli
1_" :___________L iq/:s__39: : : 1/.
:Million Plillion Million Million Million Million Million Milliao


Country


pounds

14.7
20.
7.2
30.5
10.5
13.5
2.2
4.0
7.5
4.1


pounds

16.6
10.8
6.5
36.2
18.3
16.1
3.1
8.4
1.4
10.6


pounds

11.6
10.3
6.3
33.3
15.1
14.g
2.5
6.,
1.4
10.1


pound

30.5

1.1
.4,4
3.6
13.3
15.0

4.9
10.1