The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00025

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text

SITUATION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

6g Au


GUST 1940


WOOL. APPAREL: MILL CONSUMPTION AND IMPORTS FOR
CONSUMPTION IN THE UNITED STATES. 1933-40
POUNDS
I MILLIONS I
80 Consumption.
grease basis


60 --



40 -- -

Imports.
actual weight "i ,
20 -



d ... a I I, .,T I I liT'- "1. '11
1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940
GONSuMPTION. ESTIMATES OF NEW YORK WOOL TOP EXCHANGE SERVICE
IMPORTS. BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG 32651 BUREAUOF AGRICULIuRAL ECONOMICS


AFTER DECLINING SHARPLY FROM OCTOBER THROUGH APRIL, DOMESTIC MILL CON-
SUMPTION OF APPAREL WOOL TURNED UPWARD IN MAY AND A FURTHER INCREASE IS
IN PROSPECT FOR THE SECOND HALF OF THE YEAR. THE IMPROVEMENT IN MILL CON-
SUMPTION IS EXPECTED TO RESULT FROM LARGER GOVERNMENT PURCHASES OF WOOL
GOODS UNDER THE NATIONAL DEFENSE PROGRAM AND IMPROVEMENT IN CONSUMER IN-
COMES IN THIS COUNTRY. UNITED STATES IMPORTS OF APPAREL WOOL DECLINED
SHARPLY AS THE NEW DOMESTIC CLIP BECAME AVAILABLE IN THE SPRING.


THE


WOOL-44


ND8rI MF FLS




U S DEPOSITORY






WOOL-44


THE TOOL S ITUAT I N


Summary

The wool outlook has not changed materially in the past month. Follow-

ing increased buying in June, to fill Government contracts, wool sales at

Boston declined in July and prices weakened slightly. As a result of the de-

fense program and improvement in consumer incomes in this country, the outlook

for domestic mill consumption of wool continues favorable; but the favorable

factors in the domestic situation are largely offset at present by uncertainty

as to future developments in the foreign wool situation.

The quantity of wool shorn, or to be shorn, in the United States in 1940

is estimated by the Agricultural Marketing Service at 389 million pounds. Pro-

duction in 1940 is 11 million pounds, or 3 percent larger than the quantity

shorn in 1939 and is the largest output of shorn wool on record. The estimate

does not include wool pulled from slaughtered sheep and lambs, which has aver-

aged 65 million pounds annually in recent years.

Stocks of apparel wool held by United States dealers and manufacturers

on June 29 totaled 259 million pounds, grease basis. Such stocks were about 3

million pounds larger than a year earlier but were considerably smaller than

end-of-June stocks in the years 1935-38. This total does not include wool held

on farms and ranches in producing States, which are fairly large at this time of

year. Supplies in the United States on July 1, including the 194C production,

probably totaled about 545 million pounds. The total supply as of July 1

probably was about equal to average July 1 supplies in the 5 years 1935-39.

United States imports of apparel wool for consumption totaled 98 million

pounds in the first half of this year. The January-June imports were much


- 2 -








larger than imports for the same months of any recent year, except 1937, when

121 million pounds were imported. Receipts of foreign apparel wool at principal

United States ports in June, totaling about 3 million pounds, were the smallest

since late 1938.

MTll consumption of apparel wool in the United States in June continued

the improvement which began in Yay. The June rate of consumption was 14 percent

higher than in May but 19 percent lower than in June 1939. Consumption on a

scoured basis in the first half of this year was 9 percent smaller than in the

same months last year.

Supplies of wool available for export from Argentina and Uruguay on

July 1 are estimated at 90-100 million pounds, or about the same as a year

earlier. The extension of the blockade has limited sales of wool in South

America largely to United States buyers.
REVIEW OF. RECENT DEVELOPi! [ETS
Wool sales small in July, prices down
slightly at Boston

Tool sales at Boston were relatively small during most of July. A slight
picl-up in sales occurred in the latter part of the month but was not maintain-,
ed into August. Prices at Boston weakened in July but the June advance in
prices, which had accompanied increased mill buying of wool to fill Government
contracts, was not entirely lost. Prices of most grades of wool at the end of
July were 20 to 25 percent higher than a year earlier.

Boston quotations on graded fine combing (staple) territory wool averaged
88 cents a pound, scoured basis, in the last week of July compared with 91 cents
a month earlier. Quotations for combing 3/8 blood territory wool averaged 75
cents a pound in the last week of July and 77 cents a month earlier. At the end
of Iay such wool sold at 72.5 cents a pound.

Country packed 3/8 and 1/4 blood mixed lots of bright fleece wools sold
at 37-39 cents a pound, in the grease, delivered to users in the last week of
July compared with 39-40 cents a month earlier, and 34-36 cents at the end of
I ay.

Western wool auctions inaugurated in July

Public wool auctions were inaugurated in western wool centers in July.
Sales were held at Denver, July 22-27, and at Ogden, Utah, July 29 and 30.


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Oi00L-4-4








Sales at auction .~Pre relatively small but a considerable quantity of wool was
sold privately after auction bids had been rejected, according to reports of the
Agricultural Marketing Service. I.Most private sales were closed at prices 1/2
to 2 cents a pound, grease basis, above auction bids.

Computed on a scoured basis, delivered Boston, prices at Ogden ranged
mostly 77-83 cents for original bag and graded fine wools, 77-81 cents for 1/2
blood, 72-75 cents for 3/8 blood, and 63-68 cents for 1/4 blood. Grease basis
prices of most types of wool at Ogden were slightly higher than at Denver.

Sales were held early in August at Billings, Montana, "iles City, Utah,
and Portland, Oregon. Commercial sources reported increased competition at
August sales but most bids were below owners' limits.

The United States average price of wool received by farmers was 27.0
cents a pound on July 15. It was 28.6 cents a month earlier and 21.8 cents on
July 15, 1939.

1940 domestic wool clip largest on record

The quantity of wool shorn or to be shorn in the United States in 1940
is estimated by the Agricultural Ierketing Service at 3?8,692,CC0 pounds the
largest production on record. This preliminary estimate is 11 million pounds
(3 percent) larger than shorn wool production in 1939, and 8 percent above the
10-year (1929-38) average. These estimates do not include the quantity of wool
pulled from slaughtered -'hecp. Production of pulled wool totaled 64.5 million
pounds in 1939 and averaged 64 million pounds for the year 1929-38.

The ostirated number of sheep shorn or to be shorn this year is
48,414,000 head about 1 million head (2 percent) nore than ir 1939. The aver-
age weight of wool per sheep is estimated at 8.03 pounds this year compared with
7.96 pounds last year. The accompanying table shows, by States ard regions,
the estimates of shorn wool production for 1940 and 1939 and the 10-year (1929-
38) average.

Dealers and manufacturers' stocks slightly
larger than a year ago

Stocks of apparel wool held by United States dealers and manufacturers,
including wool afloat, totaled 259 million pounds,-grease basis, on June 29,
according to reports to the Bureau of the Census. Such stocks were about 3
million pounds larger than a year earlier but were considerably smaller than
end-of-June stocks in the years 19,5-38. This total does not include wool held
on farms ard riches and in local warehouses in producing States. Because most
of the new cli: was sho-'n by July 1 and a considerable quantity of the clip is
still in the hLnd&2 of producers, stocks held by dealers and manufacturers do
not include early all of the total supply of wool in the country at the begin-
ning of July. The stocks reported by dealers and manufacturers on June 29 this
year, with comnarisons, are shown on a scoured equivalent basis in the accompa-
nying table.


WOOL-44


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WOOL-44


Wool shnrn in the United States, by States,
average 1929-38, ar-nual 1939-40

State and :Avera 'e : :: St-.te and :A7erge: :
.:1939 1840 1939 1940
division :1929-38: 19 :: division :192-38: 19 19
: 1,000 1,000 1,00o :: : 1,000 1,000 1,0.0
: pounds pou-ds pounds : : pounds pounds pounds

Maine ............: 379 267 240::Del. ..........: 21 20 27
N II. H ... .......: 87 59 5c6::d. ...........: 508 416 416
Vt. .............. 204 143 12: :Va. ....... .....: 2,044 1,760 1,794
Mass. ............: 53 44 42::U. Va. .........: 2,332 2,564 2,494
R. I. ............ : 12 12 12::i C. ....... .. : 532 239 226
Con. ............ : 41 28 34::S. r. ..........: 47 33 40
J. Y ...........: 2,706 2,301 2,257::ra. ............: 106 101 111
N. J. ............: 37 CO 32::Fla. ....... ...: 111 96 99
Pa. ..............: 3,155 2,842 2,834-: hlLtic
South Atlntic 6,r 1 5,234 5,207
Ilorth Atlantic ... 6,674 5,726 5,637 ............ ',6 5,b8l 5,908
II -- -----::Ky ...: 5,b81 5,908
Ohio .............: 17,954 18,063 16,20'::Tenn ..........: 1,530 1,620 1,C59
Ind. ............: 5,160 5,0C2 5,198::Ala. ...........: 152 143 148
Ill. ............. : 5,279 5,776 5,570::is. ...........: 228 195 201
Mich. ............: 8,488 1,448 8,725::ArL. ........... : 250 292 277
Yiis. .............: 3,054 ,2,91 2,918::L ............ : 738 776 792
:01:1. 1 .........: 1,353 2,106 2,144
East. Iorth- Central 39,935 40,297 40,420 la ........... .33 2,106 2,
:_Tex. .......: 61,980 77,290 -3,348
Minn. ............: 6,C83 7,840 7,54::
Iova .............:: 8,C80 9,875 10,616:.South Central ..: 70,8.11 88,116 94,777
Mo. ..............: 7,329 9J,37 9,910:: ont. ........ 7.: 31,795 26,&85 20,384T
N. Dak. ...........: E,52 6,4-3 69,56::daho ......... 13,0S50 16,606 16,454
S. Dakl. ..........: E,813 i1,287 11,249::Wfyo ......... 30,539 32,932 32,456
Nebr. ............: 2,766 3,157 2,860::Colo .......... : 12,386 13,244 14,170
Kans. ............: 5,346 3,755 3,674;::i. le::. ........: 16,291 15,168 15,756

West Uorth Central: 44,819 50,702 52,906 Ariz ..........: 5,157 4,856 4,841
S:Utah .......... : 20,657 19,444 21,213
:llov. ......... : 6,74 6,080 6,144
::Wash .......... : 6,014 6,074 5,304
::0rc ........ : 19,23F 16,9"1 16,198
.:Calif. .........: 25,420 29,132 28,325
".;etern ...... :1C3,23; 137,322 189,745

::TUnjt-: d Staies ..:361.,528 37'i,377 388,692
Agricultural Marketing Service. "


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WOOL-44


Total supplies on July 1 about average

whilee stocks held by dealers and nan.ufacturers on July 1 were relatively
small, it is probable that stocl:s of the 1940 clip still on farms and ranches
on Jul,- 1 this year ,wre somewhat larger than the 5-year (1985-39) average. If
it is assumed that the stocks in the hands of dealers and manufacturers and on
farms and ranches in Western States at the erd of Iarch represent the total
supply of wool in tl-e United States at that tine, the estimated supply of ap-
parel wool, including 140 production, on July 1, 194C: was about 545 million
pounds, greasy shorn aid pulled basis. The July 1 supply on this basis was
about 35 million pounds (.7 percent) larger than a year earlier but was about
the sarl.e as average July 1 supply in the 5 years 1935-39.

Stocks of raw wool, tops, ard noils held by dealers, manufacturers
and topmalers, United States, June 29, 1940
with comparisons, scoured basis

: 1939 : 1940
Item
tem .uly 1 17 : 'arch 301/ : June 29
1: l,00 lb. 1,000 Ilb. 1,000 lb.

Apparel wool, total .............: 123,C90 98,860 126,280
Dealers ....................: 56,971 38,748 60,291
Domestic .................: 46,669 22,353 48,025
Foreign-on hand .........: 8,763 15,377 10,982
Foreign afloat ..........: 1,339 1,018 1,284
Manufacturers and tormal:ers : 66,125 60,112 65,989
Domestic .................: 47,616 28,655 45,861
ForeiEgnon hand ..........: 16,3C0 23,431 18,139
Foreign afloat .........: 2,119 3,028 1,989

Carpet wool, total ......... : 2,661 46,689 46,248
Dealers ....................: 3,206 2, 59 2,598
Manufacturers ..............: 29C,460 44,030 43,650

Tops ....... ..................... : 17,575 27,177 22,711

Poils ........................... : ,411 11,431 10,743

Compiled from Bureau of the Census Quarterly lool Stock Ferort, June 29, 1940.
l/ Revised.

Wool imports for consumption
relatively larLe in June

United States imports for consuLmption 1/ of apparel wool totaled 10.6
million pounds in June compared with 9.7 millTon pounds in May and 5.3 million
pounds in June 1939. Imports in the first 6 months of this year, totaling 98
million pounds, were larger than imports for the same months of any recent

7 Wool entered for immediate consumption plus wool vrithdrawn from bonded
warehouses for consumption.


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WOOL-44


year, except 1937, when 121 million pounds were imported. A considerable part
of the June imports consisted of foreign wool withdrawn from bonded warehouses
in this country. Receipts of foreign apparel wool at principal ports in June,
totaling about 3 million pounds, were the smallest since late 1938.

Imports of carpet wool in the first half of this year totaled 80.7 mil-
lion pounds compared with 76.7 million pounds in the first half of 1939 and a
5-year (1934-38) average for those months of 62 million pounds.

1ill consumption increased further in June

Weekly average mill consumption of apparel wool in the United States in
June was 4,843,000 pounds, scoured basis. The rate of consumption in June was
14 percent higher than in May but was 19 percent lower than in June 1939. Con-
sumption on a scoured basis, in the first half of this year, was 9 percent
smaller than in the same months last year but was 5 percent larger than average
January-June consumption in the 10 years 1929-38.

Till consumption on a grease basis from January through June was equiva-
lent to 205 million pounds of shorn wool and 33 million pounds of pulled wool.
In the sa~e months of 1939 mill consumption, on a grease basis, was equivalent
to 243 million pounds of shorn wool and 39 million pounds of pulled wool.

Wool sales small, prices lower in South
American markets in June

The extension of the British blockade to all of the important wool-
importing countries of continental Europe has limited recent sales of South
American wool largely to United States buyers. Sales have been relatively
small since Say and have consisted chiefly of Argentine coarse crossbred or
native wools. Prices have declined since Kay, but quotations on many grades
are nominal.

To aid in the disposal of remaining stocks of raw wool in Uruguay under
present adverse conditions, export premiums have been decreed by the Government
of Uruguay. Under this authorization the ZaNk: of the Republic will pay local
exporters for 15 percent of the value of the wool exported, at the free rate of
exchange of 2.70 pesos to the dollar (current rate). Bills of exchange on wool
ordinarily are liquidated entirely at the controlled rate of 1.519 pesos to the
dollar. The difference between the free and controlled rates on 15 percent of
the invoice value of the goods will result in a premium of approximately 10
percent on all exports of wool. The decree will remain in effect until October
31, when the new wool clip comes on the market.

South American exports small in May and June

Exports from Argentina and Uruguay in Pay and June were much smaller
than average exports for those months in recent years. But exports were above
average in the early months of the current season, and total exports for the
first 9 months (October-June) of this season were only slightly smaller than
the 5-year average.


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Exports from Argentina in the first 9 months of the current season total-
ed 270 million pounds, grease basis, compared with 528 million pounds exported
in the same months last year and an average of 277 million pounds for those
months in the five seasons 1954-35 through 1938-3c. E:y,,orts from Uruguay from
October through June totaled 92 million pounds cnmptrerl with 58 million pounds
for those months last season and a 5-year average of 96 million pounds.

Exports to the United States from Argentina totaled lul million pounds in
the first 8 months (Cctober-I'ay) of the 1039-40 season. Such exports vere al-
most twice as large as in the same months of the previous season. Argentine
exports to the United States are chiefly carpet wool and wool trading "not finer
than 40s.". E:xorts to the United States from Uruguay totaled 28 million pounds
from October through June compared with 11 million pounds in the same months
last season. Exports by countries in the current season are shown in table 4.

Stocks in South America about average on July 1

Supplies of wool available for export in Argentina and Ururuay probably
totaled 90-100 million pounds on July 1. Calculations based on the estimated
exportable surplus for the entire season, and exports to July 1, indicate that
about 55-65 million pounds remained available for export in Argentina and about
35 million pounds in Uruguay. Combined stocks in these countries on July 1 were
about the same as a year earlier and about equal to average Jul.- 1 stocks in
the 5 years 1935-39.

The bulk of unsold stocks in ArLentina were reported to be fine and
medium crossbred wools, and merino wools. Unsold stocks of coarse crossbred
and native wools were believed to be small.

South Africa production and carry-over, 1943-40

Approximately 230 million pounds of wool were received at South African
ports in the 1939-40 season which ended June 30. T.he official estimate of wool
production for 159-40 is not yet available. In recent years, however, the of-
ficial production estimate has closely approximated total receipts for the sea-
son. Hence production for 1939-40 may be estimated at 230 million pounds, com-
pared with 248 million pounds produced in 1938-39 and a 5-year (1934-38) average
of 239 million pounds.

Disposals 2/ in the 1:39-40 season were slightly larger than receipts,
and unsold stocks at selling centers on June 30 were reduced to 2 million pounds
compared with 5 million pounds a year earlier and average June 30 stocks of 5
million pounds in the 5 years 1935-39. Stocks of wool sold but awaiting ship-
ment at the end of the season were relatively large, probably in excess of 50
million pounds. While the bulk of this wool probably consisted of wool sold to
the British Wool Commission it is likely that a part of the tool av.aiting ship-
ment on June 30 was destined to Auropean countries now included in the blockade.
Cancellation of orders on such wool would result in a larger carry-over into the
1940-41 season than is now indicated.


2/ Auction and private sales and wool shipped unsold.


WOOL-44


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Only 121 million pounds of woool (greasy and scoured combined) were ex-
ported from the Union of South Africa in the 199'c-401 season compared with 241
million pounds in the season ended June SC, 939' and a 5-year (1935-39) average
of 230 million pounds. Exports by principal countries of destination in the
first 11 months of t,.; season are .homw in table 3.

Union of South Afric-: oVol oroluction, exports and
carry-over, greass basi-, 1935-40

Year: S ocks at ports :
Yer ended : Froduction end ,of season : x ts
June 30 : insoid : Sold I/
S M1. lb. I1. lb. 141. lb. I1]. lb.

19.34-35 : 210 4 4 222
1955-36 : 235 7 13 216
1936-37 : 264 !5 255
1937-39 : 2335 !, 218
1938-39 : 248 5 14 241
1939-40 : 2/ 250 2 3/ 50 181

Compiled from official sources and cables from the London office of Foreign
Agricultural Felations.
1/ Exports are ws'ight of 7roasy and scoured wool coiibined. 2/ Receipts at
ports. 3/ Approximate.

CLTLC OK

EACrKGrO!ul1D.- Iill consunmrtion of' 'tool in tle United States was large
in the latter part of 198' snd in 19 9,. The relatively large do-
mestic consumption resulted in a rTerk:ed decrease in stocks of wool
in the United States. because of thie smr.ll stoclks and European war
developments, imports of vwol increased materially in the last half
of 1939 and in early 1940. Despite the la'ere increase in imports,
the carry-over of wool into the l~', sev.son lwich began about April 1
was relatively small.

Because stocks of wool rods tended to accumulate during 1939,
mill consumption was reduced in the latter part of 1939 and the
early pi-t of 1940. After declining s larply from October through
April, consumption turned upward in Fay.. Imports o.? apparel wool
declined sharply in the second quarter of this year as the new do-
mestic clip became .available.

As the irool outlook Ihas not changed r;aterially in t!-he past month, the
following important points have been su1rinarized from the J-.ly.r issue of the Wool
Situation.

(1) An increase in domestic mill consun ption of twool is in prospect for
the second half of this year. The increase is e:.ected to result from larger
Government purchases of wool goods under the ilktional Defense Frogram, and from
improvement in incomes of consumers accompanied by increased retail sales of
wool goods.


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VIOOL-44






(2) The prospective increase in domestic mill consumption will be a
strengthening influence on domestic wool prices, but price changes in coming
months will depend largely upon foreign developments.


States
in the
not be
winter


(3) In vieWr of the relatively small carry-over of wool in the United
on April 1 and the probability of an increase in will consumption of wool
last half of 1940, stocks of wool at the end of this year probably will
large. Consequently, imports probably will increase in the fall and
of 1940-41.


(4) Recent dcJeloDments in Europe have considerably altered the situation
in Southern Fe.iis'here i.arklets. With most continental European countries now
included in th- blcciade, the United States, Japan, and the United Kingdom are
likely to be the only important importers of Southern Hemisphere wool so long
as the blockade is maintained.

(5) Because the blockade probably will prevent further shipments to con-
tinental European countries in the remainder of the current season, the carry-
over in South America on September 30 may be above average.

Table 1.- Frices of wool per pound in specified markets and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1938-40


Average : 19
Market and description 1958 : 1939 : June
United States: : Cents Cents Cents
Boston market-
.. Territory, scoured basis
64s, 70s, 80s (fine) staple: 7'.4 82.7 70.8
56s (3/8 blood) coTbirg ...: 58.9 69.3 59.8
46s (low 1/4 blood) .......: 52.4 62.G 53.9
Bright fleece, -reasy
64s, 70s, 8Cs ('fine)delaine: 29.0 32.9 29.4
56s (3/8 blood) combing ...: 29.5 36.2 31.5
46s (low 1/4 blood) .......: 20.3 35.5 31.1


39 : ..1940


July : May
Cents Cents


71.9
60.4
54.5

29.5
32.1
31.5


88.5
73.5
71.2

33.5
37.1
36.0


: June : July
Cents Cents


90.4 88.4
77.1 75.4


75.1

34.5
39.5
39.5


76.0

34.4
39.5
41.0


Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of north .: 1.2

Textile fibers:
Vjool, territory fine staple 1/: 70.4
Cotton, 7/8 :iddlin 2/ .....: 8.53
Silk, Japanese 3/ ...........:170.6
Rayon yarn, 150 -enier 4/ ...: 52.2
Rayon staple fib'r 5,/
Viscose 1-1/2 denier .......:
Acetate 5 denier ...........:

Southern hemisphere ..........:


22.3 21.9 21.8 27.6 28.6 27.9


82.7
9.04
272.6
51.5


7f,.8
9.50
253.4
51.0


71.9
9.37
264.8
51.0


88.5
9.93
279.4
53.0


90.4
10.29
272.4
53.0


88.4
10.19
254.0
53.0 ;


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
46.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0

Between seasons current quotations
largely nominal J


Compiled from reports of the Agricultural marketingg Service except as otherwi
noted.
l/ Scoured basis, Boston market.
SAverage at 10 markets.
3/White, 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
/Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
F.o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics,


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YJOOL-44






- 11 -


Table 2.- United States: 'iool imports, consumption and
machinery activity, selected periods 1958-40


Item


: Y
: 1938
: 1,I"<0


Imports for consumption, : pounds
actual weight 1/:
Apparel ................: 30,811
Finer than 40s ........: 18,443
ITot finer than 40s ....: 12,3 9
Carpet, including camels:
hair ..................: 71, .'8

T'ill consumption 2/:
Grease basis 3/
Apparel ................:474,527
Carpet .................: 92,736
Scoured basis
Aggregate
Apparel ............... :21 ,565
Carpet ................: 64,945
V.eeLly average
Apparel ...............: 4,143
Carpet .. .............. : 1,225


ear Jan.-June : une : ay : June
: 1939 : 1939 : 1940 : 1939 : 1940 : 1940
1,070 1,00, 1,''00 1,000 1,000 1,000
pounds Dcunds pounds pounds pounds pound.


98,194
74,612
23,582


38,802
27,066
11,736


98,052
87,157
10,895


144,874 76,738 80,661



630,150 281,397 237,492
148,513 70,136 64,920


293,083 155,083 121,109
103,421 48,719 46,567


5,311
3,688
1,623


9,658
3,163
1,495


9,204 8,540 7,760



50,936 32,715 40,041
9,224 8,804 7,602


23,772 17,065 19,373
6,292 6,524 5,798


5,636 5,119 4,658 5,943 4,266 4,843
1,0C9 1,874 1,791 1,573 1,631 1,450


Machinery activity 2/:
Hours operated per
machine in place
liorsted combs .........:
Worsted spindles ......:
Woolen spindles ......:
Woolen and v:orsted looms
Broad ...*..........:
Farrow ...............:
Carpet and rug looms :
Broad .............,..:
U rrow 6.............:


''eel:ly average in hours


39.8
26.9
30.6

28.1
11':.5

23.4
15.9


51.8
59.6
39.8


47.1
37.3
36.4


44.0
29.9
36.4


52.3
3E.1
40.2


36.4
29.6
35.0


54.4
32.6
59.5


40.7 39.0 32.7 41.8 28.6 33.5
13.2 11.0 12.7 10.9 11.6 14.5

37.4 35.7 38.0 33.4 31.8 32.2
22.7 23.C 21.0' 21.2 18.6 17.8


Import figures from the Fureau of Foreign and
and machinery activity from the Bureau of the


Domestic Cormerce. Consumption
Census.


1/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin v.ool added together.
2/ Figures for ?ay and June based on. 4 weeks, January-June on 26 weeks. 1938
figures for 53 weeks ended December 31. ?io adjustments made for holidays.
3/ Total of shorn and pulled vool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mostly washed.


WOOL-44


3





WOOL-44


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1111 III1262 08861 5504llI llll1
3 1262 08861 5504


- 12 -


Table 3.- Union of South Africa: Wool exports in the 1939-40
season, with comparisons 1/

: Season
: Average : : : 1939-40 2
Country 1939-40 97
:1934-35 to: 1a37-57 : 1938-39 : July- : : July-
: 1938-39 : : : Hay : Jun June
: Eillin ilio n ITillion Pillion Million Million
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds.


United States ......
United kingdom ......
France .............:
Germany ..............:
Belgium .............:
Italy ...............
Japan ..............
Other ... ..........:


2.0
44.4
46.6
65.9
21.2
15.5
20.8
13.3


Cu.5
40.4
43.6
79.4
19.5
17.9
5.2
11.9


Total ........... : 230.7 218.4
Compi: 1.i -rjm South Africa Crcps and liarkets
Pretoria,
l/ Veihit of greasy and scoured wool combine
2/ Preliminary.
Data by countries not yet available for


0.7 34.7
45.9 31.5
51.2 33.4
86.0 1.0
20.2 13.8
22.6 21.4
1.8 13.6
12.6 18.8
241.0 168.2 3/ 12.9 3/ 181.1
and cabled reports from London and

ed.

June.


Table 4.- I.ool exports from' Argentina and U'ruruay in the 1939-40
export season, vith comoaricons


___ Argc n .na T Uruguay
: Seasn : eason : Oc
: .ct.-pt.) y (ct,-Sept.) : Oct.-June
:Aver e: : : :Average: :
:134-5 :1i38-3:1198-3:193-41034-35:1938-39:193-39:1939-4
to : : / : to : : : 1/
:19 -3': : 9: :.,3-39:_________
:i'illion millionn millionn Million million. millionn million Mlliop
:pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


United States 2/
United Kingdom ..:
France ..........
Germany ....,...:
Belgium .........:
Italy ...........
Sveden ..........
Netherlands ,,,..
Japan ..........
Other ..........:


53.5
85.0
48.4e
49.0
20.5
19.0
3/

7.1
25.5


Total ........: 30'8.0


65.6 52.4 102.9 14,7 16.6 10.7 28.0


119.5
57.4
44.7
22.7
7.2
3/
3.4
1.5

757.3


68.1
44.7
42.3
18.1
3.3
1.9
2.6
0.9
24.4
278.7


Compiled from commercial reports supplied
Agricultural Relations.


15.8
32.3
3/
iT.1
18.8
8.2
10.2
13.6
17.4


20.5
7.2
33.5
10.5
13.5
2.2
4.0
7.9
4.1


10.8
6.5
36.2
18.3
16.1
3.1
8.4
1.4
10.6


9.6
6.1
31.1
8.6
13.5
2.4
5.0
1.4
9.3


1.4
1.1
4.4
3.6
.134
12j

4


230.3 115.1 128.0 97.7 920C

by the Buenos Aires Office of Foreign


/ Preliminary. 2/ Argentine figures include small quantities shipped to
If any, included with "other".


Country