The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00024

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
I/ -f 67 -1 -


THE


WoOL-43


US DEPOS TPIY

SITUATION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
JULY


II. 1940


PRODUCTION AND APPARENT CONSUMPTION OF RAW WOOL (INCLUDING
CARPET WOOL) IN SPECIFIED COUNTRIES, AVERAGE 1934-38
POUNDS
(MILLIONS I
DEFICIT COUNTRIES- SURPLUS-PRODUCING -
COUNTRIES

800

Consumption
600 Production


400


200 -- -


0
BELGIUM GERMANY U.. URUGUAY i N.ZEALAND AUSTRALIA
JAPAN ITALY PRANCE UNITED STATES ARGENTINA S.AFRICA


U.S DEPARTMENTOF AGRICULTURE


NEG 23397 BUREAU OP AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


UNDER NORMAL COODITIOBS A LARGE PART OF THE WOOL PRODUCED IN THE
SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE 18 EXPORTED TO THE UNITED STATES, EUROPE, AND JAPAN.
AT THE OUTBREAK OF THE EUROPEAN WAR THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT ARRANGED FOR
THE PURCHASE OF THE ENTIRE SURPLUS OF AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND WOOL.
ALL IMPORTANT IMPORTING COUNTRIES, EXCEPT GERMANY, CONTINUED TO PURCHASE
SOUTH AMERICAN AND SOUTH AFRICAN WOOL AND ALSO PURCHASED SOME AUSTRALIAN
WOOL FROM THE BRITISH WOOL CONTROL. WITH MOST CONTINENTAL EUROPEAN
COUNTRIES NOW INCLUDED IN THE BRITISH BLOCKADE THE UNITED STATES, JAPAN,
AND THE UNITED KINGDOM ARE LIKELY TO BE THE ONLY IMPORTANT WOOL IMPORTERS
SO LONG AS THE BLOCKADE 16 MAINTAINED.






WOcL-4 3


THE WOOL SITUATI ON
I-----------------------I--------

Sum-arc

An increase in domestic mill consumption of wool is in prospect for

the second half of this year. This will be a strengthening influence on

domestic wool prices. The increase in mill cc.nsumption is expected to re-

sult from larger Government purchases of wool goods under the National De-

fense Program, from improvement in general industrial activity in this

country, and from increased retail sales of wool goods. But price changes

in coming months will depend largely upon foreign developments.

After declining sharply from October through April, domestic mill

consumption of apparel wool turned upward in May. The May rate of consumption

was 22 percent higher than in April, but 16 percent lower tha in May 1939.

Consumption on a scoured basis, in the first 5 months of this year was 7

percent smaller than in the same months last year, but about 7 percent

larger than average January-May consumption in the 10 years 1929-38.

Domestic wool prices advanced 1 to 5 cents a pound, grease basis,

at Boston in June. The advance in prices accon-alied increased mill buying

of raw wool to fill Government contracts for wool cloth and blankets. Aver-

age prices at Boston in June were mostly 25 to 30 percent higher than a year

earlier.

Recent EL-ropean developments have considerably altered the situation

in South American wool markets. With most continental Euroaean countries

now included in the British blockade, the United States, Japan and possibly

the United Kingdon are likely to be the only important buyers of South Amer-

ican wool, so l:rr.g as the blockade is maintained. About half of the exports

from Argentina and Unijguny usually are shipped to continental European

countries.


- 2 -






WOOL-43


-3-


Supplies of wool remaining for export in Argentina and Uruguay on

June 1, totaling 115 to 120 million pounds., were smaller than estimated

average June 1 supplies of the last 5 years. But recent European develop-

ments probably will prevent further shipments to continental European

countries in the remainder of the current season. Hence, the carry-over

on September 30 may exceed the 5-year (1935-39) average of about 32 million

po';nds.

Sales have been small in South American. markets since the German

invasion of western Europe. The decline in sales was accompanied by a drop

in prices of most grades of wool in Argentina.

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Wool sales increased, prices advanced
in domestic market in June

The advance in wool prices in June accompanied increased mill buying
of raw wool to fill Government contracts for wool cloth and blankets. With
mill needs on Army orders generally covered, sales declined in the latter
part of June and prices became somewhat irregular. The decline in prices of
South American wools contributed to the irregularity in domestic prices late
in the month, according to reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service.

The price advance in June was greatest on medium fleece wools.
Country packed 3/8 and 1/4 blood mixed lots of bright fleece wools sold at
39-40 cents a pound, in the grease delivered to users in the last week of
June compared with 34-36 cents a month earlier. Prices of graded low 1/4
blood.bright fleece wools averaged 41 cents a pound, grease basis, in the
last week of June, an advance of 5 cents a pound compared with a month
earlier. Prices of graded fine fleece wools advanced 1 to 2 cents a pound
in June.

Boston quotations on graded fine combing (staple) territory wool
averaged 91 cents a pound, scoured basis, in the last week of June compared
with 88.5 cents a month earlier. Quotations for combing 3/8 blood territory
wool averaged 77 cents a pound in the last week of June and 72.5 cents a
month earlier. Prices at Boston in June were mostly 25 to 30 percent higher
thLn in June 1939. The advance was greatest on medium wools, grading 1/4
blood or lower.

The United States average price of wool received by farmers was 28.6
cents a pound on June 15. It was 27.6 cents on May 15 and 21.9 cents on
June 15, 1939. Wool is one of the few farm commodities which has sold at
prices substantially above the parity price in 1940.





TOOL-43


Wool imports further reduced in May

United States imports for consumption of apparel wool totaled 9.7
million pounds in May compared with 12 million pounds in April. Although
imports in May were smaller than in April they were considerably larger than
in May 1939 and were much larger than average May imports in recent years.
Imports in the first 5 months of this year totaling 87*5 million pounds
were larger than imports for the same months of any recent year, except
1937, when 111 million pounds were imported.

Imports of carpet wool in the first 5 months of this year totaled
72.9 million pounds comnr.rod with 67.5 million pounds in the same months of
1939 and a 5-year (1934-38) average for those months of 52 million pounds.

Domestic mill consumption increased in May

Weekly average mill consumption of apparel wool in the United States
in May was 4,266,000 pounds, scoured basis. The rate of consunmotio in May
was 22 percent higher than in A-ril but was 16 percent lower than in Mvy
1939. Consumption on a scoured basis, in the ftit 5 months of this year
was 7 percent smaller than in the sane months last year but was about 7
percent larger than av'-rcge January-May consumption in the 10 years 1929-38.

,ill consumption on a grease basis from January through May was
equivalent to 170 million pounds of shorn wool and 28 million pounds of
pullol wool. In the same months of 1939 mill consumption on a grease basis
was equivalent to 199 million pounds of shorn wool and 32 million pounds of
pulled wool.

Army placed relatively sr.r-e contracts for wool
cloth and blankets in June

Contracts ilnced by the United. States Army in June provided for
delivery within 4 or 5 months of about 550,'1"0 wool blankets, 4 million
yards of overcoating, 4.8 million yards of 18 ounce serge and 1.5 million
yards of 10-1/2 ounce worsted shirting. Bids were opened on an additional
300,000 blankets for which orders may be placed in the near future. Un-
official estimates indicate that the contracts placed in June would require
close to 50 million pounds of grease wool, all of domestic origin.

Sales small, prices lower in South American wool
na.rket in May Snd carly, June

Sales in the Arr~-ntine wool market were sharply curtailed following
the Gernan offensive in western r:.T e in 2.-,'. The decline in salzs ias
been accompanied by a ir'p in prices of most grades of wool. Recent sales
in the Buenos Aires market have been almost entirely of coarse crossbred or
native wools which are used by carpet manufacturers. There has been little
activity in the Uriui.uay wool market since March. Quotations for most types
of wool have been nominal.







WOOL-43


South American exports about average
United States largest purchaser

Exports from Argentina in the first 8 months (October-May) of the
current season totaled 250 million pounds, grease basis, compared with 299
million pounds exported in the same months last year and an average of 253
million pounds for those months in the five seasons 1934-35 through 1938-39.
Exports from Uruguay from October through May totaled 90 million pounds
compared with 82 million pounds for those months last season and a 5-year
average of 87 million pounds.

The United States has replaced the United Kingdom in the current
season as the largest purchaser of wool in South America. More than 40 per-
cent of exports so far reported in the current season were shipped to the
United States. In the five seasons ended 1938-39 the United States took
only 16 percent of the total exports from Argentina and Uruguay. Italy,
Sweden, the Netherlands and Japan also have taken larger quantities of wool
in the current season but exports to the United Kingdom, France, Belgium and
Germany have been sharply reduced.- Recent European developments probably
will prevent further shipments to continental European countries for the
present. Exports by countries in the current season are shown in table 4.

Stocks in South America below average on June 1

Supplies of wool available for export in Argentina and Uruguay
totaled 115-120 million pounds on June 1 according to statistics from of-
ficial and commercial sources. About 75 million pounds were available for
export in Argentina and 40-45 million pounds in Uruguay. Combined stocks
in these countries were about 15 percent smaller than a year earlier and
about 8 percent smaller than average June 1 stocks in the 5 years 1935-39.

The combined exportable surplus of Argentina and Uruguay for the
entire 1939-40 season which ends September 30 was estimated at about 460
million pounds. The exportable surplus for the current season was esti-
mated to be more than 10 percent smaller than that of last season and about
2 percent smaller than the 5-year average (1934-35 through 1938-39). The
reduction in the exportable surplus this season as compared with the
1934-38 average was chiefly the result of the small carry-over and an
estimated increase in domestic consumption in Argentina. Production in
Argentina and Uruguay inthe 1939-40 season was estimated to be slightly
larger than the 5-year average. Production in both countries is estimated
to be smaller than in the 1938-39 season.

Sales small in South Africa as 1939-40 season ends

The 1939-40 season in the Union of South Africa closed on June 30.
Sales to foreign countries were small in the last 2 months of the season,
following the German drive into western Europe. Prices declined on most
grades of wool in May and June. Offerings in the final months of the
season are chiefly short wools of the second clip. Long wools of the
1940-41 clip will not be available in quantity before September.


- 5 -





WOOL-43 6 -

Disposals of wool at South African selling centers in the first 11
months (July-l.Wy) of the 1939-40 season totaled about 222 million pounds
compared with 244 million pounds for the same months last season. Unsold
stocks at selling centers totaled 7 million pounds at the end of May,
about the same as a year earlier and also b.-ut equal to the 5-year average
(1935-39). Stocks of wool already sold rid awaiting shipment were relatively
large.

Exports to the United States in the 1939-40 season were larger than
in any recent year but shipments to Eurcper.n countries have been much smaller
than usual. Exp-rts by countries from July through .MTc' are shown in tnble- 3.

Union of South Africa: Wool movement in the first 11 months
(July-May) of the 193F-40 season, with cor.parisons

Item July 1- June 30 : July 1-May 31
3Item 7- : : 197-38. 1938-39: 1939-40 1,'
SMillion million Million Million Villion
Pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds

Receipts at ports 2/ .,: 232 248 228 242 225
Disposals 3/ ..........: 227 252 221 244 222
Stocks at ports, end
of period -
Unsold ............. 8 5 11 7 7
Sold ...............: 13 14 18 22 4/

Exports 5/ ............: 218 241 208 226 168

CLrp 1-d f'r.m South Africa Cr-ps arni '-,rkt t: -in'] c~n sbles fr.:m the Lordo!-:
office of Foreign Agricultural Relations.
1/ Preliminary.
-/ Under normal marketing conditions, receipts at ports for the entir:-
season are representative of production.
3/ Auction and private sales and wool shipped unsold.
4/ Not yet available. Such stocks totaled 64 million pounds at the end
of March.
5/ Weight of greasy and scoured combined.

Australian wool production in 1939-40
largest on record

Production of wool in Australia in the 1939-40 season which ended
June 30 apparently was the largest on record. A total of 1,112 million
pounds of shorn and pulled wool were appraised in the 1939-40 season under
the wool purchase agreement with the British Government, according; t_
statistics received by the New York Daily News Record from Sydney,
Australia. About 8 million pounds of wool wore sold at Australian selling
centers in the first 3 months of the season (July-September) before
Government purchase beg-n in early October, ranking g a total supply of
approximately 1,120 million pounds. If the carry-over from the previous









season, totaling 35 million pounds is deducted from this total, production
of shorn and pulled wool for the 1939-40 season may be estimated at
approximately 1,085 million pounds. This estimate does not include the
quantity of wool exported on skins which has averaged about 55 million
pounds annually in recent years.

Total Australian production in 1938-39 was officially estimated at
985 million pounds. The largest production previously reported was that
of 1932-33 which totaled 1,063 million pounds. These estimates include
wool exported on skins as well as production of shorn and pulled wool.

Wool production in Australia, 1932-33 to 1939-40



Season Shorn and Wool exported Total
July-June pulled wool on skins

Million pounds Million pounds Million pounds

1932-33 : 1,009 54 1,063
1933-34 :942 54 996
1934-35 962 53 1,015
1935-36 917 54 971
1936-37 :928 55 983
1937-38 963 60 1,023
1938-39 1/ 1/ 2/ 985
1939-40 1,085 3/ 55 4/ 1,140

Australian Bureau of Census and Statistics except 1939-40 which is based
on data on appraisals, sales and carry-over.
i/ Not separately reported.
/ Preliminary.
/ 5-year (1933-37) average.
/ Includes estimate for wool on skins equivalent to average production in
5 years 1933-34 through 1937-38. Reported exports of wooled sheepskins in
the first 6 months (July-December) of the 1939-40 season were 25 percent
smaller than in the same months of the previous season.

OUTLOOK

BACKGROUND.- Mill consumption of wool in the United States was
large in the latter part of 1938 and in 1939. The relatively
large domestic consumption resulted in a marked decrease in
stocks of wool in the United States. Because of the small
stocks and European war developments, imports of wool in-
creased materially in the last half of 1939 and in early 1940.
Despite the large increase in imports, the carry-over of wool
into the 1940 season which began about April 1 was relatively
small.

Because stocks of wool goods in the hands of manufac-
turers and dealers tended to accumulate during 1939, mill con-
sumption of wool was reduced in the early pert of 1940.


WOOL-43


- 7 -






WOOL-43


Improvement in mill consumption in
last half of year appears lik lTy

After declining sharply from October thro'.igh April, dornctic mill
consumption of wool turned upward in May, and consumption is likely to
increase further in coming months. The increase in mill con'.npti-in in
the last half of the year is expected to result from larger Governient
purchases of wool cloth and blankets for military purposes under the
National Defense Program and fron improvement in industrial activity in
this country and increased retail sales of wool goods. An early termina-
tion of the war in Europe, of course, night check the present upward trend
in industrial activity and consnuer demand in this country. But purchases
of wool goods under the National Defense Program are likely to increase,
regardless of peace moves in Europe.

Wool imports may increase in
Tall and winter of 1940-41

Imports of apparel wool into the United States declined sharply in
the second quarter of this yepr and are expected to continue fairly sni1ll
during the summer, as the domestic clip enters manufacturing chtunnels. In
view of the relatively small carry-over of wool in the Unit--d States :n
April 1 and the probability of some recov'.-ry in mill c.-nsunptiolr of wnol
in the last half of 1940, stocks of wool at the end of this y:c'r pr)oblbly
will not be large. Consequently, imports probably will incrurse in the
fall and winter of 1940-41.

National Defense Program will be a
strengthening influence on Tdomestic prices

The prospect of increased domestic mill consumption :-f w"ol in the
second half of this year will be a strengthening influence in domestic wool
prices. Relatively large purchases of wool goods by the Arny have already
been reflected in price advances of 1 to 5 cents a pound, grease basis, on
raw wool. The price advance was gre-st.st on medium grades -jf w-ol which are
produced in relatively small quantities in this country. Statistics of mill
consumption by rrnaes indicate that only 10 to 12 million p-.und', of wools
of domestic origin grading 36s to 46s ond 60 to 65 million rFpunds jf wools
grading 48s to 50s are available annually. These are the graLe ordinarily
used in overcoatings anC in some uniform cloths in the military service.
At the present time the use of foreign wools in the mraufactur.- of go-ds
for the Army and Navy is prohibited by law.


- 8 -






WOOL-43 9 -

Mill consumption of apparel wool by grades,
United States, average 1935-39
(greasy shorn basis)
Grade Domestic Foreign Total
i: l. lb. Mi. lb. Mil. b.

64s, 70s, SOs 258 23 281
58s, 60s :2 8 90
56s 111 12 123
4Ss, 50s 66 12 7
46s 8 6 14
44s / 1 4 5
36s, Ts l/ : 2 15 17
Total 528 80 608

Compiled from Bureau of the Census Raw Wool Consumption Reports. Con-
verted from scoured to greasy shorn basis, assuming average yields vary-
ing with origin and grade. These statistics have been compiled directly
from monthly reports and have not been revised on the basis of the bi-
ennial Census of Manufactures. Revised data are not available by grade
and origin.
l/ 3-year average 1937-39; not separately reported in earlier years.

Price changes in last half of year will depend
considerably on foreign developments

Domestic price changes in coming months will depend to a considerable
extent upon foreign developments. Although present supplies available for
export in the Southern Hemisphere are not large, the new Southern Hemisphere
clip will be available in the fall.

The purchase agreement of the British Government with Australia and
New Zealand provides for the purchase of the entire wool surplus of those
countries for the duration of the war and one clip thereafter. Restrictions
on the resale of Australian wool to the United States have not been severe
and the British Government has offered to make available sufficient Australian
wool to meet all reasonable United States requirements. Selling prices of
Australian wool are fixed by the British Wool Control. The British Government
also supported wool prices in the South African market in the 1939-40 season.
As the New Zealand production is almost entirely medium and coarse wools,
which are used largely in military requirements no New Zealand wools have been
resold to neutral countries.

Recent developments in Europe, have considerably altered the situation
in South American markets. As shown in the chart on the cover page, France,
Germany, Belgium and Italy usually import about 800 million pounds of wool
annually. Export statistics indicate that about 200 million pounds or almost
half of the exports from Argentina and Uruguay usually are shipped to these
4 continental European countries. (See table 4 at end of report.) With most
continental European countries now included in the British blockade, these
countries will be able to secure little, if any, South American wool so long





WOOL-43


- 10 -


as Great Britain is successful in resisting assault. This would leave the
United States, Japan and possibly the United Kirgdom as the only important
importers of South American wool.

The production of South America, is chiefly medium and coarse (carpet)
wools. Fine apparel wools, which constitute the bulk of the United States
production, are produced in relatively small quantities in South America.
The principal foreign sources of supply of fine apparel wools are Australia
and the Union of South Africa.

Production and apparent consumption of wool (including cnrpct wool)
in specified countries, 5-year average 1934-38
Country Production : Apparent
: _: consumption
: Mil. lb. Mil. lb.
Surplus-producing countries:
Australia 996 98
Union of South Africa : 239
New Zealand 299 7
Argentina : 370 5r
Uruguay 118 6
Deficit countries:
United States 431 629
United Kingdom 108 661
France : 424
Germany 15 32
Italy 124
Belgium :0.8 122
Japan --- 204
Compiled from official sources, reliable commercial estimates and data
published by the Imperial Economic Committee, United Kingdom.
Termination of European War
would change foreign outlook

The foreign wool situation as indicated above might be entirely altered
by early termination of the European War. Dcvelopnents abroad would then de-
pend upon conditions under which the war ended, arrangement made for the dis-
posal of the Australian, South African and New Zealand clips b;y the British
Government, the time required to adjust trade and industrial activity of
foreign countries to the post-war basis and other factors which can not be
anticipated at this time.
Carry-over in Southern Hemisphere may be
larger than previously anticipated

It was indicated in earlier issues of the Wool Situation that the carry-
over of wool in South American countries at the end of the 1939-40 season pro-
bably would be small. Sunplics remaining for export in Argentina and Uruguay
on June 1, totaling 115 to 120 million pounds, were smaller than estimated
average June 1 supplies of the last 5 years. But recent developments in the
European War probably will prevent further shipments to continental European
countries in the remainder of the current season. Hence, the carry-over on
September 30 may exceed the 5-year (1935-39) average of about 32 million pounds




WOOL-43


11 -
Table 1.- Prices of wool per pound in specified markets and prices of
textile raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1938-40


IMarket and description Average : 1939 : 10
:_ 1938 : 1939 : May : June : Apr. : May : June


United States
Boston market
Territory, scoured basis
64s, 70s, 80s (fine) staple
56s (3/8 blood) combing .....
46s (lov: 1/4 blood) .........
Dri !ht, fleece, greasy
6Ls, 70s, 80s (fine) delaine
56s (3/8 blood) combing .....
46s (low 1/4 blood) .........


: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


82.7
69.3
62.6

32.9
36.2
35.5


69.8
58.5
52.0

27.7
30.4
26.6


70.8
59.8
53.9

29.4
31.5
31.1


88.5
73.2
72.2

33.9
36.1
35.6


88.5
73.5
71.2

33.5
37.1
36.0


90.4
77.1
75.1

34.5
39.5
39.5


70.4
58.9
52.4

29.0
29.5
28.3


Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of month ....

Te:tiile fibers
'Woc.li territory fine staple 2 ..:
C.- tton 7/8 Middling 3/ .........
Sil: Japanese 4/ ...............:
Ray.on yarn 150 denier I/ .......:
rFv-nr staple fiber 6/ ..........
Viscose 1-1/2 denier .........
Acetate 5 denier .............:


19.2


70.4
8.58
170.6
52.2


22.3 21.0 21.9 26.1 27.6 28.6


82.7
9.04
272.6
51.5


69.8
9.16
268.9
51.0


70.8
9.50
253.4
51.0


88.5
10.45
263.1
53.0


88.5
9.93
279.4
53.0


90.4
10.29
272.4
53.0


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
46.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0


Union of South Africa
Aver3ae export price, greasy wool: 16.6
Price at selling centers
70s warp clean cost ...........:7/46.2
64-70s combing clean cost ..... "0/41.0


16.0 13.5. 14.5 19.9 21.6


8/45.0
10/40.1


2/
34.9


9/
35.7


61.4
58.0


Uruguay Montevideo
Crossbred greasy
Fine 50/56s 60s ..............
Coarse 32/36s 44s ...........


18.8 10/18.8
17.0 0/16.9


17.7 17.7
15.8 16.1


Compiled as follows:
United States -
Reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service except as otherwise noted.
Union of South Africa -
Sciith Africa Crops and Markets and report of the South Africa ministryy for
Agriculture.
Urnui.ay -
Camara Mercantil de Productos del Pais. Prices are monthly averages of weekly
range quotations.
Yearly averages are averages of monthly prices except United States farm price,
which is a weighted average.
Foreign prices have been converted at prevailing rates of exchange.
i/ Prices for foreign markets for 1940 are preliminary. 2/ Scoured basis, Boston
mar':et. 3/ Average at ten markets. 4/ Thite 13-15 denier at New York, Bureau of La-
.bor Statistics. 5/ Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
6/ F.o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 7/ Eigcht-month average, no
quotations, May through August. / Seven-month average, no quotations, May through
September. 9/ No quotations. 10/ Ten-month average, no quotations, July and A.i.-rt.
11/ Eight-month average, no quotations, August through !o.v:-mb:-r.






- 12 -


Table 2.- United States: v:ool imports, consumption and machinery activity,
selected periods 1938-40


tem : Year : Jan.-Ma : May : Apr. : May
: 193 : 1939 193 9 : 1939 10 : 1939 : 1940 : 1940
: 1.000 1.000 1.000 1,000 1.000 1,000 1,000


pound


Imports for consumption,
actual weight i-::
Apparel ...................: 30,S11
Finer than 40s ...........: 1e,443
Not finer than 40s .......: 12,369
Carpet, including cmels :
hair ....................: 71,908

.iill consuliption 2/:
Grease basis :/
Apparel ...................:474,527
Carpet .................: 92,736
Scoured basis
Aggregat e
Apparel ...................:219,565
Carpet .............:64,9 5
Weekly average
Apparel .................: 4,143
Carpet ..................: 1,225


pounds


9S,194
74,612
23,582


pounds


33,491
23,378
10,113


pounds


87,486
78,104
9,382


pounds


6,536
4,165
2,371


pounds


12,038
10,259
1,779


I


pounds


9,658
8,163
1,495


144,874 67,534 72,901 13,797 9,337 8,540



630,150 230,961 197;451 42,148 33,823 32,715
148,513 60,912 57,318 8,440 11,733 8,804


293,083 109,311 101 736 20,244 17,471 17,065
103,421 42,427 40,769 5,852 8,544 6,524


5,630
1,989


4,969
1,928


4,624
1, 53


5,061
1,463


3,494 4,266
1,308 1,631


Iiachinery activity 2/:
Hours operated per machine
in place '
?'orsted coi.bs .............:
Worsted spindles .........:
Woolen spindles ..........:
Woolen and worsted looms
Broad ...................:
Narrow ..................:
Carpet and rug looms
Broad ...................:
Narrow ..................


:Weekly avera.Je in hours


39.8
26.9
30.6

28.1
10.5

23.4
15.9


51.8
39.6
39.8


46.1
36.9
35.7


42.1
29.4
35.8


44.9
37.3
35.0


40.7 38.5 32.5 36.6
13.2 11.0 12.4 10.5


37.4 36.2
22.7 23.L


33.6
24.8
31.2


36.4
29.6
35.0


25.6 28.6
10.1 11.6


39.1 32.7 3E.1 31.8
21.6 20.7 22.5 18.6


Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign anrc DFomestic Crommncrcc.
machinery activity frcm the Bureau of the Census.
1/ 7;ei-ht. of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
/ Figures for February and larch based on 4 vi.ceks, January-'ilarch
1938 figures for 53 we.:-':s ended December 31. No adjustments made
V/ Total of shorn and pullec1 wool. Pulled '.:ool, grease basis, is
received from pullerics and is mostly washed.


Consumption and


on 13 weeks.
for holidays.
in condition


'OOL-43





WOOL-43


- 13 -


Table 3.- Union of South Africa: Wool exports in the first 11 months
(July.May) of the 1939-40 exporting season, with comparisons 1/

: July 1-June 30 :July 1-May 30
: : A 1939-40 2/
Average
Country 1934-35
to : 1938-39 1938-39 : July- : : July-
1938-39 : : April : May : M
: 1938-39 :
: Million Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds

United States .: 2.0 0.7 0.6 34.0
United Kingdom : 44.4 45.9 41.7 29.2
France ........: 49.6 51.2 48.1 28.7
Germany .......: 63.9 86.0 82.0 1.0
Belgium .......: 21.2 20.2 18.3 12.8
Italy ......... 15.5 22.6 22.0 18.3
Japan .........: 20.8 1.8 1.8 13.6
Other ........: 13.3 12.6 11.6 17.5
Total : 230.7 241.0 226.1 155.1 3/ 13.1 1/ 168.2
Compiled from South Africa Crops and Markets and cabled reports from London
and Pretoria.
1/ Weight of grease and scoured wool combined.
SPreliminary.
Data by countries not yet available for May.

Table 4.- Wool exports from Argentina and Uruguay in the 1939-40 export
season, with comparisons

: Argentina : Uruguay
S Season : Oct. Apr. Season : Oct. May
:(Oct. Sept.) : :(Oct. Sept.) :____ __
Country :Avcrago: : :Average:
193)- 35! 1938-39 193-39 1939-40: 193-35193-39 1938-39 1939-40
t o / t o /
:1938-39: :: :1938-39: --
:Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds ds pounds undpou pounds po s ounds uds pounds
United States 2/: 53.5 65.6 49.2 99.5 14.7 16.6 7.2 27.3
United Kingdom ..: 85.0 119.5 74.6 11.5 20.5 10.8 8.S 1.0
France ..........: 4S.4 57.4 41.0 29.0 7.2 6.5 5.7 1.1
Germany .........: 49.0 44.7 37.2 -- 30.5 36.2 28.0 4.4
Belgium .........: 20.5 22.7 16.3 11.1 10.5 18.3 5.0 3.5
Italy ...........: 19.0 7.2 3.3 15.2 13.5 16.1 12.4 13.3
Sweden ..........: 3/ 3V/ / 2.2 3.1 2.1 12.5
Netherlands .....: 3.4 2.4 10.2 4.0 8.4 3.8 13.6
Japan ...........: 7.1 1.5 0.9 12.6 7.9 1.4 1.4 4.4
Other ...........: 25.5 38.7 23.6 21.6 4.1 10.6 7.6 8.9
Total ...... : 308. 357.3 248.5 210.7 115.1 128.0 82.0 90.0
Compiled from commercial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires Office of Foreign
Agricultural Relations.
1/ Preliminary. 2/ Argentine figures include small quantities shipped to Canada.
3/ If any, included with "other."




UNIVERSiTY OF FLORIDA
3 1262 0886III III58II III IIIII 1 11111
3 1262 08861 5819




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