The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00023

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text
p 3, ?: -


THE


SITUATION


WooL-42


UNLV OF FL LIB
DOC NTS DEPT




U.S DEPOSITORY
' WOOL.


CENTS
PER
POUND


140

120

100

80

60

40

20


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

,JUNE II


.1940


TERRITORY, SCOURED BASIS: AVERAGE
PRICES AT BOSTON, 1924-40


U.S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG.19684 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


THE SHARP ADVANCE IN PRICES OF DOMESTIC WOOL IN SEPTEMBER 1939, FOLLOWING
THE OUTBREAK OF THE EUROPEAN WAR, WA5 CHIEFLY THE RESULT OF THE RELATIVELY SMALL
SUPPLIES OF WOOL ON HAND IN THIS COUNTRY AND THE STRONG FOREIGN DEMAND FOR WOOL
ARISING FROM WAR CONDITIONS. THE DECLINE IN DOMESTIC MILL CONSUMPTION SINCE
OCTOBER HAS BEEN ACCOMPANIED BY A DROP IN WOOL PRICES, BUT PRICES AT BOSTON IN
MAY WERE ABOUT 25 PERCENT' HIGHER THAN A YEAR EARLIER.






WOOL-42


THE WOOL SITUATION




: A discussion of the comparability of statistics
: of United States wool production, stocks ani con- :
: sumption, is contained in this issue.


Summary

Recent developments favorable to the disposal of the 19,40 domestic

wool clip now being marketed include the upturn in domestic industrial

activity, the announcement that the United States War Department will pur-

chase relatively large quantities of wool cloth in the near future, and

the sharp decline in imnncrts of apparel wool into the United States. Offer-

ings of wool in most foreign markets are likely to be restricted until the

new Southern Hemisphere clip is available in the fall. The sharp decline

in domestic mill consumption of wool in recent months is an unfavorable

factor in the domestic wool situation, but this condition may be improved

in coming months.

United States imports (for consumption) of apparel wool totaled 12

million pounds in A-ril compared with 21 million pounds in March and 6

million pounds in April 1939. Imports in the first 4 months of this year,

totaling 7g million pounds, were larger than imports for the same months

of any recent year, except 1937.

Mill consumption of apparel wool in the United States in Aoril was

21 p:rerent smaller than in March and was 11 percent smaller than in April

1939. Consumption on a scoured basis in the first 4 months of this year

was 5 percent smaller than in the same months last year.

Sales of wool at Bc.ton continued small in May and prices were ir-

regular. Uncertainties due to the war abroad, and the relatively low level


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of domestic mill consumption appear to have restricted mill purchases largely

to immediate requirements. Prices strengthened in the first week of June

following the announcement of War Department purchases to be made in the

near future. Wool prices at Boston in May were about 25 percent higher than

a year earlier.

The bulk of the 1939-40 clip in South America and the Union of South

Africa has been sold. Exports from Argentina and Uruguay in the first 7

months (October-April) of the current season were 5 percent larger than aver-

age exports for those months in the 5 seasons 1934-35 through 1938-39. Ex-

ports from the Union of South Africa in the current season have been smaller

than the 5-year average. The 1939-40 clips of Australia and New Zealand were

purchased by the United Kingdom and resale of this wool to neutral countries

has been relatively small.

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOP'.2"TS

Wool trading at Boston restricted, prices irregular in May;
prices strengthen in first week of June

Sales of wool at Boston continued small in May. Uncertainties due
to the war abroad, and a relatively low level of domestic mill consumption,
acted to restrict mill purchases largely to immediate requirements. Prices
on small lots of spot wool purchased for immediate needs were unchanged or
only slightly lower than prices reported in April. Prices strengthened in
the first week of June following the announcement that the War Department
will buy relatively large quantities of wool cloth and blankets in the near
future.

Boston quotations on graded fine combing (staple) territory wool aver-
aged 88.5 cents a pound, scoured basis in the last week of May, unchanged
from a month earlier. Prices of such wool averaged 71 cents a pound a year
earlier. Quotations for combing 3/8 blood territory wool averaged 72.5 cents
a pound, scoured basis, in the last week of May compared with 73 cents a
month earlier and 59 cents a year earlier. Boston quotations in May were
largely nominal.

Asking prices on country packed 3/8 and 1/4 blood mixed lots of bright
fleece wools offered for direct shipment from country points declined to
34-36 cents in the grease, delivered to users, in the last week of May. By
the end of the following week, however, these grades were quoted at 38 cents.
Similar wools sold at 35-36 cents in the first week of May.


WOOL-42


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Prices received by farmers advance in May

The United States average price of wool received by farmers was 27.6
cents a pound on May 15. It was 26.1 cents a pound on April 15 and 21 cents
a pound on May 15, 1939. Increases of 1 to 3 cents in the average price for
May 15, as compared with April 15, were reported from most of the Western
States and bright fleece wool producing States. Prices received by farmers,
for wools of the 1940 clip sold thus far, have been about 30 percent higher
than prices received a year earlier.

Wool imports decline sharply in April

United States imports for consumption of apparel wool totaled 12
million pounds in April compared with 20.7 million pounds in March. Although
imports in April were much smaller than in the previous month they were almost
twice as large as in April 1939 and were much larger than average April
imports in recent years. Imports in the first 4 months of this year total-
ing 77.8 million pounds were larger than imports for the same months of any
recent year, except 1937, when 95 million pounds were ir.iportod.

Imports of carpet wool in the first 4 months of this year totaled
64.4 million pounds compared with 53*7 million pounds in the same months
of 1939 and the 5-year (1934-38) average for those months of 43 million
pounds.

Imports by countries in first quarter of 1940

United States imports of apparel wool in the first quarter of this
year came chiefly from the Union of South Africa, Argentina cnd Uruguay.
Imports of apparel wool zr-rding "not finer than 40s" from the Union of
South Africa and Argentina in the first 3 months of this year werc more
than twice as larne as imports from those countries in the entire year 1939.
The relatively small innorts front Australia, New Zealand and the United
Kingdom reflect the Government purchase and control of the entire wool pro-
duction of those countries.

Imports of wool into the United States by classes, and by countries
of production, in 1939 and in the first .urrtor of 1940 are sho'.n in the
accompanying table.


WOOL-42


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WOOL-42


-5-


Wool: Imports for consumption, by principal countries of production,
United States, calendar year 1939 and January-March 1940


Country of
production


: 1939 : January-March 1940
: Carpet,: Apparel wool : Carpet,: Apparel wool
:exclud- : Not : :exclud- : Not :


;: ing
: camels
Shair
:1,000
pound


Argentina ............:
Australia ............ :
New Zealand .........:
Uruguay .,..........:
Chile ................:
Union of South Africa
British India. ........:
United Kingdom .......:
Ireland ..............:
Syria ................:
Iraq .. ..............:
France ..............
China ................:
Egypt ...............
Canada ............:
All other ............:
Total ..........:


Compiled
"Textile
Vol. II,


45,609
34
8,019
598
0
1,196
38,236
10,157
2,513
8,376
10,510
4,052
2,443
4,126
70
8,693
144,632


from MIonthly Summary of
Raw Materials" United
No, 19.


: finer
': than
: 40s 1/:
1,000
s pounds


13,932
257
5,640
634
0
0
552
1,475
177
167
o
290
156
38
135
129
23,582
Foreign
States


Finer
than
40s
1,000
pounds


ing
camels':
hair
1,000
pounds


Finer
finer : ner
than than
40s / : 40
1,000 1,000
pounds pounds


8,079 28,739 5,388 17,837
29,113 2/ 19 7,986
6,697 751 161 1,005
16,062 40 296 11,425
1,217 2/ 0 402
8,329 200 0 19,374
0 10,271 33 0
2,211 1,469 94 380
217 779 2/ 2/
0 3,852 o 0
0 2,864 0 0
13 2/ 2/
0 2,618 20 0'.
0 700 24 0
2,015 2/ 51 496
658 2,149 21 778
47 .611 54.432 6_107 59,683
Commerce, December 1939, 'and
Department of Commerce, May 6, 1940,


1/ Wool grading "not finer than 40s" may be imported free of duty if used
for floor covering, press cloths, knit or felt boots, or heavy fulled lumber-
men's socks. In the last 5 years about one-fifth of the imports of such wool
have been duty free.
2/ If any, included in "other countries."

Mill consumption further reduced in April

Weekly average mill consumption of apparel wool in the United States
in April was 3,494,000 pounds, scoured basis. The April rate of consumption
was 21 percent lower than that of March and was the lowest rate reported
since May 1938. The April consumption was 15 percent smaller than average
April consumption in the 10 years 1929-38. Mill consumption on a scoured
basis, in the first 4 months of this year, however, was only 5 percent
smaller than in the same months last year.

Mill consumption on a grease basis from January through April was
equivalent to 142 million pounds of shorn wool and 23 million pounds of
pulled wool. In the sane months of 1939 mill consumption on a grease basis
was equivalent to 163 million pounds of shorn wool and 26 million pounds of
pulled wool,






WOOL-:42


Mill orders for woven fabrics

Unfilled orders for woven cloths hold by 119 mills rc-ort4.ng on
March 30 were about 7 percent smaller than a year earlier but 'e:'oe almostt
twice as I'Lrie as orders reported at -the be.-inninf of the second quarter in
1938, according to statistics publish d by the H.Ttional AssociLtion of Wool.
Manufacturers. Mill sales of 'covwrn f-.bbics ih.April and NIay".7-cre restricted,
prob-bly as a result of the war uncertainties and unr.ttlcd situ-tion in
the markets ,r'ncr .lly. Commercial sources report thr-.t dv-nc. fill ordering
by garment manufa.tunr.coand sellers has been rclitively small..

Unfilled orders for woven cloth reported by 119 mills b,.inning of
each quarter, 1938-40 i]


Quarter Mon's wear : Women's s Auto : Ttal
beJirLin wear :' cloths :
'- : '.jrnni nt Other 2/
:1,000 1,000 G00 1, OOC 1,000
: linear yd. lir:-r 'd. linear yd. linear -d. line~ r -:d.
1938-
Jan. 3,944 10,924 6,043 2,055 .. 22,966
Apr. 2,293 6,293 4,139 1,6.4 1.4,619
July 995 13,26 8,041 1,315. 23,637
Oct. 785 13,777- 6,541 1, ... 23,071
1939-
Jan. S: 4 4h, 56 8,951 1,782 36,033
Apr. 565 :2,. 5 5,22 S2L 29,556
July : 661 19?,913 11,526 1,24 33,924
Oct. 635 1, 1940-
Jan. 1,376 2,- 9,20c4 2,005 36,023
Apr. : 74 21,297 4,29 1,13 27,610
Compiled from Honthly S atist iL, '-i .-.1 i.; .nfc.-i.cturc, nublisshed by the
National Association of 7,:.1 !I ruf-'ct ..c:rs. Statist,-s ar for cloth con-
taining by -eight over 'f:' ".rc.l;t f :-.rr.s opu: or. th.: ":'oolcn 7ind worsted
system. Cloth lces than 0 Lich.:L : l.'.e r-nD:rtcd in qui-.'nalent 54-inch yard-
age. The 119 mills are qui,;:-..i :'it: 27,000 looms.
1/ Reports are for specified dates,, noar the begr'in-in of .each quarter.
2/ Excludes cloth with pile or j.aciquni-i design.

South American wool markets quiot in'A.ril;
exports in current season above a"_r'_e

The bulk of the 1939-40 wool clip in South Aomrican markets has boon
sold. Activity in these markets probably will be restricted until the 1940-41
clip is available in the late fallP and winter.

Prices declined in Ari-,tin'. in April on all wools except merinos and
fine croEzbrcis but the qurtntity -,f wool sold at the lower prices wr.s relatively


-6 -





WOOL-12


small. United States buyers have p-rch-ired only small quantities of wool
since February. Sales to the United States were large in the first few
months of the season. The United States has been the principal buyer of
Argeitine wool in the current season and has taken fully half of the wool
shipped to date.

Exports from Argentina in the first 7 months (October-April) of the
current season totaled 229 million pounds, grease basis, compared with 266
million pounds exported in the same months last year, and an average of 222
million pounds for those months in the five seasons 193)-35 through 1939-39.
Exports of merino wool and fine crossbred wool so far this season have been
smaller than the average for recent years but shipments of medium and coarse
wools have been above a". rvje. Shipments of scoured wool have been much
large than usual. Exports by classes, in the first 7 months of the current
seCson, with figures for earlier years are shown in the accompanying table.


Argentina: Exports of wool by classes, in the first 7
months of the 1939-40 season, with comparisons

Season 7 months
: (Oct.-Sept.) : (Oct.-Apr.)
Class :.A ':- c : :Average :
:1934-35 :193g-39 :1934-35 :193g-39 :1939-40 l/
: to : to
:1938-39 : :1938-39 :
:Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds
Grease wool:
Fine (nerino) ..............: 25.2 24.9 18.2 18.7 10.5
Crossbred-
Fine ............. .......: 8.0 85.0 :62.8 57.2 40.2
M .diur ...................: 25.3 29.7 1S.5 21.2 24.1
Low ................. .... 95.1 130.4 67.6 99.6 67.9
Criollo or native ........: g.5 10. 5.4 7.2 10.4
Bellies .................: 12.0 l4.b s.4 10.4 5.9
Total grease wool ......: 254.1 295.6 1g0.9 214.3 159.0
Washed wool, grease equiv. / : 20.6 25.4 13.0" 15.6 IS.6
Scoured wool, grease equiv.2/ : 47.3 54.4 28.5 35.6 51.3
Total all wool on a :
grease basis ...... 322.0 375.4 222 4 265.5 228.9
Ar-gntina Bureau of Statistics.
1/ Preliminary.
2/ iTot reported by classes.

There was little activity in the Uruguay wool market in April.
Quotations for most classes of wool were nominal. Exports from Uruguay in
the first 7 months (October-April) of the current season totaled g6 million
pounds compared with 73 million pounds shipped in those months last year


-7-







WOOL-4 2


and an averse of 77 million po.unJs -for those months in the five seasons
193'--35 through 1937-39. Shipments to the United States from October
through April, totaling 27 million pounds, were larger than in any recent
year. Reports from Uruguay by countries of destination are shown in table 7.

19-140 season about over in South Africa

Wool Tri-ces advanced in South African selling cente-'s in April.
Sales were suspended on the inv.-Lsic.n of Holland and Eelgiun but were re-
sumud later in May. ForeiT r count-ri:'s nurchaised very little wool in the
latter nar.t of the morth. Pri :s vec:e i'r.gutlar. The 19539-40 season is
now about ovr.- in South Africa and ':ools of the 190lq-41 clip will not be
available in quarntity before Se.ter:ber.

Disposals of wool at South African selling centers froi July through
April t.ot? lr. about 209 million prun,!s compared with 231 million pounds for
the z.rec months la-t season. Unsold stocks at rolling centcr.rs totaled only
7 million pounds at the cnd of April compared with 13 million pounds a year
earlier.

Ex:,orts from South Africa c-ntinue much smaller than the quantity
sold. Ex-ports to -he iUnited Stat s in the current season have been larger
than in s y recent yea-r but shipment: to European courtrics havcre boee much
smaller tihan ,usual. po.orts b,- c.,-unt.ri:re from July. through April are shown
in t. ble 6.

Union of South Africa: 7:,ol mo.-c.icnt in the first 10 months
(July -Apr.il) of t:ro 1') -i-4C, season, 7it.h comp-.risons

Iem : Jul: 1 Junc 30 : July 1 Apr. 30
: 1937-3Z : 3--39 :1937-38 :. 19,-39 1939-40 I/
: Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds pounds poundrds pounds pounds

Receipts at port 2/ ..: 232 24 214 231 209
Disposals / ..........: 227 252 20 229 206
Stocks at port:, :nd :
of period-
Unsold ..............: v 5 13 11 7
Sold .................: 13 14 21 23

Exports J/ ............. 21. 21h 190 211 155

Compiled from Smuth Africa Crops and I;-rk--:cts -and cables from the London office
of ForeiTn Agricultural Relationcs.
I/ Proliminc.ry.
2/ Under normal mar.rkting, conditions, receipts at ports for the entire season
are representative of production. The preliminary estimate of production for
1939-40 is 270 million pou.ids.
SAuction and private c-les .d.nd wvool shipped unsold.
SNot yet ec-.-ilatlo. Such stocks totaled 64 million pounds at the end of
March.
5/ 17Wi~iit of grcasy a nd scoured combined.


- F -






WOOL- 42


- 9 -


OUTLOOK '

FACKGROUND.- Mill 'consumption of vIool. in the United States was
l-.rge in the latter part of 1938 and in 1939. The relatively
large domestic consum_~tion resulted, in a marked decrease in stocks
of wool in the United States.:-Because of the small stocks and
ELr'opean war developmentss, imports of wool increased materially in
the last half of 1939 and in early 1940. Despite the large in-
cr.ase in imports, the carry-over of wool into the 1940 season,
.Hich began about April 1, was relatively small. Mill consumption
ha,. declined sharply since October 1939. Consumption for the
fiLrst 4 months of this year was 5 percent smaller than in the same
Lo.,-ths last year. The decline in domestic mill consumption since
October has been accompanied by a drop in wool prices, but prices
.t Boston in May wore about -25 percent higher than a year earlier.

InLi'.ustrial activity .in the United States, which had been declining
irnce r-c:mbor, turned upiwrd in May. If the improvement continues, this
rna r1'..ul. in an increase in domesticmill .consumption' of wool for civilian
purpo in the late suimror and fall of.this year. The development of the
nv:ti..n 1 defense program in this country is likely to result in a considerable
irncicrc. in Government pu r .:;-.:. of..wool cloth for military purposes.

Th.: War Department announced on June 4 that invitations to bidders
will 7 .1. out in the immediate future for quotations on .more than 10 million
,y..rd.1.s f oool cloth and 500,000 blankets. When contracts are awarded they
will pr-.-.ide that delivery for blankets will be within 4 months after date
of aw-i'd. .nd all. other cloth within 5 months.

Alt".o.-h an increase in domestic mill consumption in the second half
of this -: ar seems probable, consumption has declined sharply since the be-
gi nnir.M : the year and total consumption for 1940 probably will not be so
lar.ice in 1939. In 1939 mill consumption of apparel wool was larger than
in n y reccont year, except 1935,

To.l imports into the United States, which declined sharply in April,
are C:..:_-cted to be further reduced during the late spring and summor as the
1940 do-ec tic clip enters manufacturing channels. In view.of the relatively
mall cr.--y-over of wool in the United States on April 1 and the probability
of s.:':- r:covory in mill consumption in the last half of 19140, stocks of wool
a.t the ::-d of this year probably will not be large C* -:c,..-lultly, imports
n1,y g -_1inr increase in the fall nnd winter of 1940l-41.







Carry-over, production eand imports of apparel wool, United States,
1935-40 (greasy, shorn and pulled)

Year : Stocks Dome c Carry-over : Imports
beginning : April 1 : o i plus : for
April 1 : 1/ production production cons mtption 2/
i Million Million Million Million
Pounds pounds pounds pounds

1935 .. 289 431 720 70
1936 190 427 617 151
1937 213 433 646 79
1938 239 436 675 47
1939 g187? 442 629 143
Average 224 434 657 98
1940 118 0

Stocks from the Bureau of the Census, imports from the Bureau of Foreign
and Domestic Commerce, production from the Agricultural Iarketing Service.
l/ Stocks reported by dealers and manufacturers, including wool afloat,
and stocks on farms and ranches and in local warehouses in 13 Western
States, not including any wool of the new clip.
2/ Actual weight of greasy, scoured and skin wool added together.
3/ Not yet available. Private estimates show an increase of 5 to 10
million pounds above 1939 production. The first official estimate of pro-
duction for 1940 will be released on August 2.

United Kingdom wool textile industry
operating at high level

The English wool manufacturing industry is being speeded up to
supply the requirements of the allied military forces, according to
reports from commercial sources. In recent months, output of the English
mills for civilian consumption (at home) has been sharply curtailed.
Every effort has been made to increase export trade in manufactured
products. Mill consumption of wool in the United Kingdom in recent
years probably has averaged close to 700 million pounds.

Wool manufacturing centers of Belgium and
France in invaded territory

The occupation of Belgium and invasion of northern France has
deprived the Allies of an important center of wool manufacturing. The
Roubaix-Tourcoing center of the French wool textile industry apparently
is in invaded territory. In France and Belgium combined, retained
imports of wool have averaged nore than 500 million pounds in recent
years. Belgium alone has imported about 140 million pounds a year.
Practically all of the wool consumed in these countries is imported.
It is likely that the Australian wool previously allocated to Belgium
will now be available for other disposal.

In the World War of 1914-18 the Belgian and French textile
centers were occupied by the Gerans early in the conflict and outfitting


WOOL-42


M 10 u






of the Allies was chiefly the work of the United Kingdom. Before enter-
ing the war in 1917, the United States shipped large quantities of mili-
tary cloth to the allied powers. These exports, however, included large
shipments to Russia and Italy, then fighting with the Allies.

The absence of a duty on United States wool imports from 1914 to
1920 greatly facilitated exports of wool manufactures from this country.
The bulk of the apparel wool imported by the United States at present
is subject to a duty of 34 cents a pound clean content.

COMPARABILITY OF DATA ON PRODUCTION, STOCKS AND CONSUMPTION
OF WOOL IN THE UNITED STATES

Statistics of United States wool production, prepared by the
Agricultural Marketing Service are estimates of the quantity of wool
shorn from live sheep (shorn wool) plus the quantity of wool pulled from
the pelts of slaughtered sheep (pulled wool). The weight of the shorn
wool in these estimates is "greasy shorn" weight, the weight of the
wool as it comes from the live sheep, including all grease and foreign
matter in it. The weight of the pulled wool is "greasy pulled" weight
as reported by wool pulling establishments. Before the wool is pulled
from the pelt the polt is washed and a considerable amount of dirt and
grease is removed from the wool. The weight of the wool pulled from the
pelt (greasy pulled weight) is much less than it would be if the wool
had been shorn from live sheep.

United States statistics of mill consumption, and stocks held by
dealers and manufacturers are compiled by the Bureau of the Census from
reports made to the Bureau by wool manufacturers and wool dealers. Manu-
facturers and dealers report the actual weight of wool held, or consumed,
classified as to grade and condition (greasy or scoured). Conversion to
a scoured and greasy basis is made by the Bureau of the Census, on the
basis of average yields varyirg with origin and grade.

Because ills did not separate scoured shorn wool and scoured
pulled wool in consumption reports prior to 1933, the annual figures on
mill consumption in the United States, 1918-39, are reported by the
Bureau of the Census on a greasy shorn basis for both shorn and pulled
wool. In these statistics, pulled wool, both greasy and scoured, has
been converted to its equivalent weight of greasy shorn wool. Hence,
these statistics are not comparable with United States production esti-
mates in which pulled wool is in greasy pulled weight (mostly washed).

In order to make the United States production estimates comparable
with the final consumption data described above (greasy shorn basis) the
estiratcs of pulled wool production should be converted to a greasy shorn
basis. This has been done by the New York Wool Top Exchange Service and
their estimates, together with the estimates of the Agricultural Marketing
Service are shown in table 1. Table 1 also shows mill consumption on a
greasy shorn basis, 1920-39.

Beginning with 1935 the Bureau of the Census has reported preliminary
monthly statistics of United States mill consumption on a greasy shorn and


WOOL-42


- 11 -






WOOL-42


pulled basis. In these estimates, pulled wool is on a greasy pulled basis,
as received from pulling establishments. Thus the monthly consumption
figures are on the same basis as the production estimates of the Agricul-
tural L:arketing Service.

For the period 1935-37, the annual estimates of mill consumption
on a greasy shorn basis as originally published were the came as the total
of monthly figures for each year, except that consumption of pulled wool
was converted to a greasy shorn basis. In Docember 1939 revised annual
figures of mill consumption of wool on a greasy shorn baris were published
by the Bureau of the Cen:ous for the years 1935-37. The revised figures for
these years are substantially h1pgh-er than the preliminary estimates based
on the monthly figures. Data on mill consumption obtained from the Census
of Manufactures for 1935 and 1937 formed the basis for the revisions.

Figures on consumption on a greasy shorn and greasy pulled basis
are not reported by the Cenlss of Manufactures. The data on consumption
on a greasy shorn and greasy pulled basis for 1935-37, as reported monthly
by the Bureau of the Census, therefore, can not be revised an the annual
figures on total mill consumption on a greasy shorn basic have been. The
annual totals on mill consumption compiled from the monthly data are given
in table 2 along with the estimates of production of shorn end pulled wool
in the United States, for the years 1935-39.

Data on wool stocks held by dealers and nr2nufacturers arre ported
by the Bureau of the Census on a greasy shorn and pulled basis. The
stocks figures are on a comparable basis with wool production' estimates
of the Agricultural Marketing Service ond.with unrovised monthly corn-
sumption data reported by the Bureau of the Census. BeciJse stocks of
pulled wool are reported in greasy pulled weight, the stocks data are
not on a comparable basis with final revised consumption data, greasy
shorn basis. Stocks reported by dealers and manufacturers, 1935-39
are shown in table 3.

It appears that the Nev York Wool Top Exchange Service converts
the reported stocks of pulled wool held by dealers and nar.uf.acurers to a
greasy shorn basis.

Final revised mill consumption statistics and d 'ta on stocks held
by dealers and manufacturers are avnilablo on a sc-urc. brsic in the Burean
of the Census reports. Because of the wide variations in shrinkago of the
various types and grades of domestic- wool, it has not been practicable to
estimate the United States production on a scoured basis.


- 12 -






TOOL-42 13 -

Table 1.- Apparel wool: Production 2nd mill consumption in the United
States, 19Z0-39


:Shorn wool :
* :


Greasy
shorn


Ful 1 ed


: Greasy
: pulled


: !1 lb. Mil. lb.


251
24:'
2?8
230
238
253
269
289
315
3?y

352
3796
351
37,
37.C




377


Production
wnol : Tnal: 1 111 con-
: Greasy : Gresr :, : siumpticn
: shorA : horn iKr : s' : greasy shorn
:equivalent : pulled : horn basis
: / l basis l
~Ril. lb. i:il. l7. hil. lb. ril. lb.


294
290,
?73C

282
500
;19
?40
3j7
362

414
442

.I 5.:J
51i

j.27
43F

.-42


321
319
297
299
309
329
550
371
399
416

453
483
460
078
168
472
-468
474
470
178


510.9
597.4
640.4
603.1
518.
525.2
524.1
551.1
511.9
554.7

447.9
645.2
439.8
572.2
381.1
748.4
666.4
579.5
513.9
67,.9


Shorn wool production, aril pulled wool prodnetio'n "gressy; pull-d" from the
Agricultural [arketirng Service. Total produitiLon "gr-asy; snorn" basis from the
New York Wool Top E:chan, s service. ;ill o.:nsumption fr.. the Lurecau of the
Census.

Consumption d ato sre for cal=rnd r "earr, 192'C-5, there after totals cover
52-week peri'os pprozimiating c-l enau.r yerrs, except 19 w;i.icri is for 53 wceks
ended December 31.

Production statistics rounded from thojusarids, h-.'v not been -ad~justed to
totals.

1/ Obtained by subtracting shorn wool production from tot.l production greas',
shorn bosis.
2/ Data for 1935-57 are revisions b:;-d on the biennial Consus of Panufactures.
3/ Preliminary da'ta compiled from monthly rrocrts.


Year


1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939







V'OOL-4 2


Table 2.- Apparel vwool: Production and mill consumption in the United
States, 1935-39


(Greasy: shorn and pulled basis)

Product tion
Year -----
Shorn Pulled 2/ Total. Sho-n


;ulill consumption 1/
(unreviseJd)
-- ------ ----- ----


SPulled 2/


: 1,0 1,0 1,O 000 1,000 1,000
: pounds pounds s pounds pounds pounds

1935 : 64,667 66 ,000 430,667 566,976 92,344
1936 : 360,5327 C6,200 426,u27 496,41 79,305
1937 : 366,609 6 ,2'00 432,609 423,1.57 68,377
1938 : ?71,972 64,500 4,36 7 406,427 68,099
1939 : 377,397 61,500 441,,897 551 3 78,814
er, LC


Total
1,000
pounds

659,320
575,723
491,514
474,527
630,150


Production from the Agricultural Marketing Service. Mill consumption from the
Bureau of the Census.

Mill consumption statistics have been compiled directly from the monthly
reports for each year. The monthly figures are too low, according to data ob-
tained in the Census of Manufactures, 1935 and 1937. Final d:ta based on the
biennial Census of Manufactures, are not reported on a shorn and pulled basis.

Conversion to a grease basis is made by the Bureau of the Census, assuming
average yields varying with origin and grade.

1/ Mill consumption for 52-week periods approximating calendar ycers, except
T938 which is for 53 weeks ended December 31.
2/ Pulled wool as reported by pulleries and is mostly washed.


- 14 -






WOOL- 42


Table 7.- Stocks of apparel wool reported b:; dealers aind r..aiufacturers
-xid stocks in 13 7estein sheep Stt.s, United. Stat 3, 1i5,-i9
(G-r,.- shurn and null ,-u] -- sis)

S Held c ;' .-Les1er anjd mnrl.Y.factcur-.:l5 faris
Date ------ --- --- ---- -----' in 1-3 Uzetrn
Shorn i/ Pull-d T lSl : she,, Stot..:s /
1: .,C lb. 1.C.-. i bl,' 0 lb. 1,':". lb.
1935
Mar. 31 :/ 2s9390
Ju.:e 2q S l,': 0,J .l.7 5
Sept. 2 310,. i.J :4,": .L, 309 /
Dec. 31 196,0 2 3 3,4q1 2"1,' 4,00


1936
}.ar. 2S
June 27
Se,)t. 2
Dec. 31
19 '7
Mar. 27
Jun e 26
Sept. 25
Dec. 31

Mar. 26
Jun e 25
Sept. 24
Dec. 31
1939
Apr. 1
JulJ7 1
__Seot.30
Dec. 30

Compiled from
to a grcq.~


147, 'L52
253, 3
0o6,7 06


165, '54

234,339
196,576

166,904
252,341
281,776
201,77S

143,,186
222,047
213,264
167,8&1
1 01~T


quarterly wool


41,. 6:5
-.- -.,-
40.175

47.5
4; l,^ilL
41, 39
42,911

49, g58
45,381
39,381
36,625

37,753
33,720
31,598
37,539


stocks reports,


basi s is made by the Bureau of


1'9 505 ;

.-',593 46


312.750

276., 178 5
..239,487 31,6

216,772 22,5
297,722 5
S 321,157 5
238,403- 13,3

1SO,939 6,2
255,767 5
244,862 5
S205, 420- 14,3

Bureau of the Census.


.!


I00

./

00
00oo


00

I


90

/
94


Conversion


the Census assuming average yields


varying with origin and grade.
1/ Shorn wool reported "greasy" plus shorn wool reported "scoured" raised
to a groasy shorn basis.
2/ Pulled wool reported "greasy" plus pulled wool reported "scoured" raised
to a "Gcasy pulled" basis. A "greasy pulled" basis represents- wool as re-
ceiv,:d frro pulleries and is mostly washed.
3/ Estimated by the Agricultural Marketing Service. Includes wool. on farms
and rnnc hes and in local country warehouses.
4/ Grease basis figures for March 30, 1935 calculated from statistics of
condition in which reported. Stocks figures were not reported on a grease
basis by the Bureau of the Census until Juno 1935.
51 ITo .estimate available.


------


- 15 -




WOOL-42


Table 4.- Prices of wool per pound in specified markets and prices of
textile raw materials in the United Status, selected periods, 1938-40


Market and description
United States
Boston market
Territory, scoured basis
64s, 70s, SOs (fine) staple .....:
56s (3/8 blood) combing .........:
46s (low 1/4 blood) ..............
Bright fleece, greasy
64s, 70s, 80s (fine) delaine ....:
56s (3/8 blood) combing .........:
46s (low 1/4 blood) .............

Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of month ......:

Textile fibers
Wool territory fine staple 2/ ....:
Cotton 7/8 Middling 3/ ............
Silk Japanese 4/ .................:
Rayon yarn 150 denier 5/ .........:
Rayon staple fiber 6/ ............:
Viscose 1-1/2 denier ............:
Acetate 5 denier .............. :


Average : 1939 1940 1/
193 939 Anpr. ': My : MLar. : Ar. : May
Cents Cents Cent's Cert.s Geats Cents Cent_


70.4 82.7 69.0 69.8 93.6 88.5 sg8.
.58.9 69.3 57.1 58.5 77.0 73.2 73.5
52.4 62.6 50.0 52.0 76.0 72.2 71.2

29.0 32.9 27.0 27.7 36.6 33-9 33-.
29.5 36.2 28.5 30.4 38.5 36.1 37.3
28.3 35.5 27.4 28.6 39.5 35.6 36.G


19.2


70.4
8.58
170.6
52.2


Union of South Africa
Average export price, greasy wool .: 16.6
Price at selling centers


22.3 19.7 21.0 27.3 26.1 27.1


82.7
9.o4
272.6
51.5


16.0


70s warp clean cost .........../46.2 8/45.0
64-70s combing clean cost .......10/41.0 1/40.1


69.0
8.51
239.3
51.0


69.q
9.16
268.9
51.0


93.6
10.42
295.1
53.0


8S*5
10.45
26g.1
53.0


9-9.
279.
53 .


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
46.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0


14.0 13.5 19-1 19.9


39.1
35.1


3~.9


59.9
53-9


58.0


Uruguay Montevideo
Crossbred Frcasy
Fine 50/56s 60s ..............:
Coarse 32/36s 44s ............


18.8 o/18.8
17.0 10/16.9


17.9 17.7 29.3 3/
15.6 15.8 30.0 a/


Compiled as follovr3:
United States -
Reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service
Union of South Africa -


except as otherwise noted.


South Africa Crops and Markets and report of the South Africa Ministry for
Agriculture.
Uruguay -
Camara Mercantil de Productae del Pais. Prices are monthly averages of weekly
range quotations.
Yearly averages are averages of monthly prices except United States farm price,
which is a weighted average.
Foreign prices have been converted at prevailing rates of exchange.
IJ Prices for foreign markets for 1940 are preliminary. 2/ Scoured basis, Boston
market. 3J Average at ten markets. 4/ White 13-15 denier at New York, Bureau of
Labor Statistics. 5/ Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
/ P.o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 7/ Eight-month average, no
lTotations, May through August. 8/ Seven-month average, no quotations, May through
September. 2/ No quotations. 107 Ten-month average, no quotations, July and August.
J .Eipht,-month average, no quotations, August through November.


- Ib





WOOL.42


Table 5.- United States:


Wool imports, consumption and machinery activity,
selected periods 1938-40


Item


Imports for consumption, :
actual-weight 1/ :.
Apparel ... ........ ... ... 30,81i
Finer than 4o's ...,........: 18,443
Iot finer than 4h's ........: 12,369
Carpet, includir-g camels
hair ................ ... .: 71,908

Mill consumption 2/ .
Grease basis / :
Apparel ....:...... ........:474,527
Carpet ...... ..............: 92,736
Scoured basis
Aggregate
Apparel ....... ............:219,565
Carpet ..................: 64,945
Weekly average
Apparel ...................: 4,143
Carpet .................. : 1,225


: Teal : Jan ,-Apr. : Apr.
: 193s .: 19 1 40 C,:_193 :
: 1,000. 1,000 ", 000 1,000 1,000
: lb. lb. lb. lb. 1b.


98,194
74,612
23,582


26,955
19,213
7,742


77,828
69.941
7,887


144,874 53,737 .64,361


630,150
148,513


293,083
103,421

5,636
1,989


188,813 164,736
52,472 48,514


89,067
36,575

4,948
2,032


84,671
34,245

4,704
1,902


6,304
4,851
1,453


Mar, : Apr.
"1940 : 1940
1,000 1,000
Ib. lb.


20,733
19,009
1,724


12,038
10,259
1,779


10,357 17,878 9,837


40,100
11,645


19,567
8,159

3,914
1,631


33,578 33,823
10,423 11,733


17,709
7,340

4,427
1,35


17,471
8,544

3,494
1,308


Machinery activity 2/:
Hours operated per machine
in place
Worsted combs ..............:
Worsted spindles ...........:
Woolen spindles ............:
Woolen and worsted looms
Broad ...... .................
Narrow ................ :
Carpet and rug looms
road .......... .........
Narrow .....................:


Weekly average in hours


39.8
26.9
30.6

28.1
10.5

23.4
15.9


51.8
39.6
39.8

40.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


46.4
36.8
35.9


43.4
29.3
36.0


39.0 33.3
11.1 12.6


36.9
24.0


o'4.7
22.2


Import figures from the Bureau'of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; Consumption and
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census.
1/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together, .........
2/ Figures for March based on 4 weeks, April on 5 weeks, January-April on 18 weeks.
1938 figures for 53 weeks ended December 31. N, adjustments made for holidays.
1/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled.wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mostly washed.


36.8
31.9
30.6

31.0
9.6

37.4
22.9


38.5
25.1
31.5

26.5
11.5

40.3
21.1


33.6
24.8
31.2

25.6
10.1

38.1
22.5


- 17 -






- 18 -


UNIVERSITY OP FLORIDA II


SII I 1262 I 0 6II I II 596IIIIII
3 1262 08861 5967


Table U.- Union of South Afr;ca: 7ool exports in the first 10
months (July:April) of the 1-.39-110 exporting se-son, nith
comparisons 1/


: Jul 1 June 5 3 : Jily 1 . : Avera.:e : : :
": 19]5- : 40 2/
to : l73dg : 197-39 :
: 1?93-39 : : : July- : r. : July-
:: ::r : l"a. : : Arr.


: million
: rO' tnds


Itillior Iiillion I.illion l:illion IMillion
pouds poutcl.s pou ids rounds pounds


United St.':n 3 ...: 2.0 0.7 0.
Un-itel in K in ..: 4.4 45.9 36.2
France ..........: 4q." 51.2 44.1
Germany ........... : 63.9 .0 g0.5
Belgium .........: 21.2 2. 2 1.2.7
Ital: ........... 15,5 22.6 21.4
Japan ........... : 20.F l. 1.
O'Ther ........... : 1. 12.6 10.2


3.7 C2 33.9
21.4 3.7 29.1
1.7 9.9 28.6
1.0 --- 1.0
9. 3.0 12.8
10.7 7.6 18.3
12.9 0.7 13.6
1..2 1.6 17.8


Total .........: ~ 2_.L 2'1.0 211.5 .12-S. __ 26.7 155.1
Co-,pild fi'rn Soith Af rica Croop in d Ii-rkets an5. cabled r:portits ron London
and Pr-tori'a.
1/ 7ei Tht ':f tree rnd o scourd 2r'o'l c cined. J/ relimin:.ry.

Table 7.- Wool e::-ortz front Ururauay in the first 7 months of
thle 1939-i40c c:,rot s-:ai-on, rrith cn;. ocuri.sons

: Oct. 1- S,. t.-jt : Oct. 1 A::r. 30
: Averi"Le : : :
Country : 134-35 to : 1933-39 : 193-~39 : 1939-40 1/
: 1_ q_ -_7q : : :
: !il. lb. .i'. lb. I1il. lb. Hil. lb.

United Stztes ...... 14.7 16.6 53 b.9
Unit-d Kin--don .....: 20.5 10. S.0 0.9
France .............: 7.2 6.5 5.3 1.1
Germnny ............. 30.5 36.2 25.8 4.4
Belgium .............: ]0.5 1.3" 3.6 3.2
Ztaly ..............: 13.5 16.1 11.6 10.8
S'weden .............: 2.2 .1 2.0 12.5
IT .therl-- ,d ........: 4.0 8.4 2.9 13.6
Japan ..............: 7.9 1.4 1.3 4.3
Other ..............: 4.1 10.6 7.3 8.2
Total ............: 115.1 128,.0 7 1____ 5.9_
Compiled froai conrnercial reports nu!clied by Buenos Aires office of Foreign
Agricultural Relations.
1/ Prelininmar;.


7WOOL-42


Cu: t ry