The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00022

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text







THE


SITUATION


WOOL-41


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

6 MA)


STOCKS OF APPAREL WOOL REPORTED IN
UNITED STATES, APRIL 1, 1935-40
(GREASE BASIS)
POUNDS
I MILLIONS 1 I
Foreign-
250
Domestic

200


150 ...


100 _


50 ...


0


THE


1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940
STOCKS HELD BY DEALERS AND MA NLFACTURERS. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS. STOCKS ON
FARMS AND RANCHES AND IN LOCAL WAREHOUSES IN WESTERN STATES, A. M.S. DATA;NOT
REPORTED IN 196,5. AND LESS THAD I MILLIfON POUNDS IN 1956 AND 19S7.


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 38267 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


THE CARRYOVER OF WOOL ON A GREASE BASIS IN THE UNITED STATES ON
APRIL I THIS YEAR WAS THE SMALLEST IN THE LAST SIX YEARS OF RECORD. THE
PERCENTAGE OF FDREICGN WOOLS, WHICH ARE LIGHT SHRINKING, IN THE CARRYOVER
THIS YEAR WAS CONSIDERABLY LARGER THAN IT WAS LAST YEAR. BECAUSE OF
THIS, APRIL I, 1940 STOCKS (CARRYOVER) ON A SCOURED BASIS WERE SLIGHTLY
LARGER THAN STOCKS A VEAR EARLIER.
UNiv OF FL L!B
DOCUMENTS DEPT




U.S. DEPOSITORY


S10, 1940


: 3.. '. 44











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WOOL-41


- 3. -.


------------m --------------, -------,
THE WOOL SITUATION
--;,-------,---- ----------------

Summary

The wool outlook has not changed materially in the past month. As

stated in the April issue of The Wool Situation, favorable factors affect-

ing domestic prices of wool in the next few months will be the relatively

small wool supply in this country and the strong foreign demand arising

from war conditions. The prospect for a lower level of domestic mill con-

sumption this year than last, however, will be a :;:-enini influence upon

domestic prices.

Stocks of apparel wool held by United States dealers and manufac-

turers, including wool afloat, totaled 169 million pounds, grease basis, on

March 30. An additional 11 million pounds of domestic shorn wool was esti-

mated to be on ranches and farms and in local warehouses in the 13 Western

sheep States on March 30. Total stocks, on a grease basis, reported at the

end of March were 7 million pounds smaller than a year earlier, and were the

smallest in the last 6 years of record.

United States imports of apparel wool for consumption totaled 66

million pounds in the first quarter of this year. The January-March imports

this year were much larger than imports for the same period of any recent

year except 1937, when 76 million pounds were imported. Although stocks in

the United States on April 1 were small, such stocks plus the new domestic

clip now being marketed probably will be in excess of mill requirements

for the next several months. Consequently, imports are expected to decline

substantially in the late spring and summer.

Mill consumption of apparel wool in March was 17 percent lower than

in February and was 35 percent below the peak of October 1939. But March






Wc,:'l-41 4 -

consumption was slightly lor,:er than avrane March consuriction for the 10

years 1929-3g. Consumption of apparel wool in the first 3 months of this

year was 3 percent smaller than in the same months last year.

Domestic prices of most wools declined moderately in errly Anril

"ut later in the month, advances were reported on a few lines. 'ool prices

in foreign markets did not change materially in April. The bulk rf supplies

of combing wools of the 1939--'-_ clip have been sold in South Afric a.nd

South America, and it appears likely thot the c-ir:-y-over of g)r-.d quality

>rools into the 1940-4l season in those countries will be small.

R .CT.T ..LLC:~:.; TS IN DrES'ITC SITUATION

Wool prices at Boston i.r.' -1it.nr; most
Lr-iLe ds .r:1t. lower in Arril

Sales of domestic wool at Boston continued relatively 7rn.ll in Arril
and the early part of May. Prices declined moderately on most grades of
wool in the early part of April, but later in the month advances '.--re re-
por-:.d on a few lines, chiefly short wools rnd 3/g and 1/4 bl:..:d fleece
wools. Declines in domestic wool prices in Anril were much so.niller, on the
whole, than in March, according to the Agricultural Marketting SErvice.

Prices of ":- ld fine staple combir.l territory wool a'.err-Ad S8.5
cents a r--in.' scoured basis in the first week of -::i, u,.ch!:. -1 from a
month earlier. Prices of such wool averaged 69 cents a nound y'--r earlier
quotations for combing 3/8 blood territory wool avera.,:.Jl 73 can:ts a round,
coredd basis, in the first week of MY!y comoered with 74 cents a month
earlier and 57 cents a ".'.-.r earlier. In the latter rrt of Acril, small
rales of new clip, good French comb-:.. length fine territory ;:ols, in
original bag, were made for future delivery at 82 cents a pound, scoured
'asis, delivered to mills. A few sales of such wool at 78 cents a pound
.iere r.r- :.rted in the early part of April. Similar wools were sold a yer
earlier at 64 cents a pound.

Quotations on country packed mixed grade lots of 3/8 and 1/4 blood
1-ri4ht .fleece wools offerdrl for direct shiorer.ct from country -i-,,nts were
mostly 35-36 cents a pound, grease basis, in the first ':eeek of I.:iy, compared
with 34-31 cents a month earlier. Similar wools sold in May 10'39 at 27-
28 cents a pound.

Wool imports lar-e in :.:-.rh

United States imports for consumption of apparel wool totaledd 20.7
million p,-.uads in March, about the sane as a m'nth earlier, an'.d ..wecre more than
twice as h.~ir-e as in March 1939. Imports in the first .ni;nrter rf this year,
totaling 66 million T.r:.is, were much larger than i-rorts for the same period
of cny recent :y,'r, .xcernt 1937, then 76 million pounds were innrrted.





- 5 -


Imports of carpet wool in the first 3 months of this year totaled 54
million pounds compared with 43 million pounds in the first quarter of 1939
and the 5-year (1934-38) average for those months of 31 million pounds.

Mill consumption declines further in March

Weekly average mill consumption of aumoirel w.ol in March was 4,427,000
pounds, scoured basis. 'The March rate of con-sumti n w0;as 17 percent lower
than that of February and 35 percent below the peak of October 1939. Although
consumption in February was 16 percent smaller than a year earlier,'it ras
about 4 percent larger than av: r!-.: February consumption in the 10 years 1929-p3

Mill consumption on a grease basis in the first quarter of this year
was equivalent to 114 million pounds of shorn wool cnd 17 million pounds of
pulled wool. In the first quarter of 1939 mill consumption on a grease basis
was equivalent to 129 million pounds of shorn wool end 19 million pounds of
pulled wool.

'arry-over of wool on April 1 smallest in recent yeers

Stocks of apparel wool held by dealers and manufacturers, including
wool afloat to the United States totaled 169 million pounds, grease basis,
on March 30 according to reports to the Bureau of the Census. In addition,
the Department of Agriculture estimates that there -.-ere 11 million pounds
of domestic shorn wool on ranches and farms and in local warehouses in 13
.sstern sheep States on March 30. Reported stocks, on a grease basis, on
.iarch 30 were 7 million pounds smaller than a year earlier and were the
smallest 'March 30 stocks in the 6 years of record.

The percentage of foreign ,cools, which are light shrinking, in the
carry-over was considerably larger this year than l:st. Because of this,
the April 1, 1940 stocks (carry-over) on a scoured basis were slightly larger
than stocks a year earlier. But stocks were smaller than on April 1 in any
of the 4 years 1935-38. Stocks of foreign vmol in the United States on April 1
this year were much larger than the 5-year (1935-39) average for that date
but were smaller than stocks of foreign wool roport,.d on April 1, 1937.

Stocks of apparel wool reported by dealers and manufacturers and stocks
on farms in Western States April 1, 1935-40 (grease basis)


April 1
/ : On far
: 2/
: 1,000 po


Domestic
'ns : Dealers and
: manufacturer!
unds 1,000 pnd


: Foreign
:Dealers and : Total
s : manufacturers :__
1,000 -ounds 1,000 pounds


1935 I/ 261,285 28,105 2
1936 350 122,417 67,y08 1
1937 : 330 116,361 96,389 2
1938 22,500 180,622 36,150 2
1939 6,290 132,899 48,040 1
1940 10,786 96,922 72,154 1
Stocks held by dealers and manufacturers, Bureau of the Census, s
farms and ranches and in local warehouses in Western States, Agri
Marketing Service.
1/ Apopro-ximate. Reporting dates vary slightly from year to year.
2/ Not including any wool of tho new clip. 31 Ibt reported.


89,390
89,855
13,080
39,272
87,229
79,862
stocks on
cultural






- 6 -


Stocks of raw wool, top and noil held by dealers, manufacturers
and topmakers in the United States March 30, 1940 with
comparisons (scoured basis)

:e 139 : 1940
Ite : Arril 1 1 : Dec. -' ._ : March 30
: 1,000 pounds 1,000 ,.o-.jdd 1,, pounds

Ar-'ral wool, total ...........: 94,506 10 q6 ,14q
Dealers ...................061 43,ec: 6 6,7S..14
Domestic .................: 32,487 23,603 22,53
Foreiin on hand ........: 12,604 13,480 15,377
Foreign afloat ...........: 970 5,' 1,018
Manufacturers s:? topmakers : 48,445 66,4y0 57,401
Domestic ................: 30,423 37,275 27,877
Foreign on hand .......... 13,885 19,810 26,496
F. ren afloat ..........: 4,137 9,TS 3,028

Carpet wool, total ............: 44, 67,51 46,89
Dealers ......... ...........: 2,725 2,859
Manufacturers ........$ ..... : 30,808 34,787. 44, 03

Tops .......................... 23,953 22,902 26,823
Koils ......................... 10,061 11,397 11,295

Compiled from Bureau of the Census Quarteri;! Wo.:l St ..ck Report, 1March 30,

!/ Revised.

D::: STIC OUTLOOK

The wool outlook has not changed materially in the .at month. As
stated in earlier issues of The Wool Situation, mill consumption for the
year 1940 probably will not be so large as in 1939. Some recovery in in-
dustrial activity is in -rospect during the last half of 1940, and this may
result in an increase in domestic rill consumption of wool in the late sum-
mer and fall of this 'sir. But consumption in the last half of the year
Mny be smaller than in the last half of 1939.

Stocks (.pr-:y-ver) of wool in the United States on April 1 were not
Greatly different, on a scoured basis, from stocks a year earlier. But
SApril 1 stocks were smaller than in any of the 4 years 1935-32. Dealers'
stocks on April 1 were the smallest in recent years with the exception of
stocks held by dealers on April 1, 1937. Consequently, .1E-lcrE are likely
to purchase considerable wool to replenish inventories as the ne, clip be-
comes available in quantity.

The relatively large domestic mill consumption of wool in the last
half of 1938 and in 1939 resulted in a marked decrease in sto-cks of wool
in the United States. B ments, imports of wool increased materially in the last half of 1959 and
in-early 14'. Although stocks in the United States on April 1, 1940 were
relatively small, such stocks plus the new domestic clip probably rill be
in excess of mill requirements for the next several months. Consequently,
imports are expected to decrease substantially in the late spring and summer.


WOOL-41






WooL-41


- 7 -


With the possibility of some recovery in mill consumption in the last
half of 1940, stocks of wool at the end of this year probably will not be
large, and imports may again increase in the fall ond winter of 19140-41.

Although the relatively small stocks of wool in this country and
the strength in foreign wool prices are iy:roortant price-suoporting factors,
the prospects for a lower level of domestic mill consrE'ntion will be a
weakening influence on domestic prices in the next few months.

--..- prices in foreign markets continue relatively firm. It appears
likely that the carry-over into the 1940-41 season of good quality wools,
other than those held by the United :i ru.:. in Australia and New Zealand,
will be small in the Souithern Hemisphere. Sales of Australian wool to
neutral countries have b.;en relatively small. Every effort is being made
by the United Kingdom to increase export trade in manufactured products
rather than in raw materials. As New Zealand production is almost entirely
medium and coarse wools, which are used largely in military requirements,
little or none of this wool is likely to be available for export to neutral
countries under present conditions of incroised military activity.

South American wool markets auiet in March

Sales of wool in Argentina and rurni'vr were small in March and the
early -urt of April. Prices for most grades of wool were reported to be
largely nominal and :-.c:n.ied. Supplies available for the remainder of
the current season are believed to be relatively small. Commercial factors
estimate that about S5 percent of the Uruguay clip and 75 percent of the
exportable surplus in Argentina had been sold by the end of February.

Ocean shipping space continues scarce, and shipments from interior
points have been delayed because of lack of storage space in Montevideo,
according to a report from Vice Consul Morris. Receipts at Montevideo
from October through March, however, totaled 124 million pounds and were
the largest for those months since the 1930-31 season.

Exports from Urlm-n-" in the first 6 months (October-March) of the
current season totaled 74 million pounds. The October-March exports this
year were 15 percent larger than a year earlier and were about 10 percent
larger than ~,-:ri- o exports for those months in the five seasons 1934-35
through 1938-39. Shinments to the United States from October thro-- .-l March
totaled 24 million pounds, compared with only 4.6 million -pounds for the
same months last season and an average of 15 million pounds for the entire
season in the 5 years 1934-38.

Exports from Argentina in the first 6 months of the current season
totaled'190 million pounds, ,-r:"*:*e basis, compared with 231 million pounds
exported in the same months last soas n, when exports were relatively
large. The October-4arch exports this year were about equal to average
exports for those months in the five seasons 1934-35 through 1938-39.






WOOL-41


- 8 -


Exports from Arje-. ina and iir..:uar by countries of ccstination
are.shown on ,pa te 14.

ScuiL- America: W-ol movement in the first 6 months (October-March)
of 'he 1939-40 season, with comparisons


October l-September 30 : *ct:tr 1-March 31
Country and item 939 '-----40 :1?-
1937 -9:-c.: 13 ;1937-3-.~Q3-39; /
_. 1. I i 1 i.il. .:. '-. l.lb. j Il. b.


Iru:-ua-r
Production .... .......
Carry-over fro pre-
vious season .........
Receipts at fntevideo
Exports .at Montevideo .:

Argentina
Productio:- ............
,CLrry-ov r from pre-
vious : eason .........
Local consumption n .....:

Expos, crease basis .:


116

3
115
93


366

24
57


125

21
133
128


399

40
55

375


114 124.
64. 74


8


1.19


231


190


Compiled as follows;
Uruguay -
Production, carry-over, and
products del Pais.


receipts front. Camara Mlerc~itil de


Experts front corimercial reports supplied by io'l'ice of Foreign
Agricultural Relati -ns.
Argentina -
Production, carry-over, and local consumption estimates of the
Buenos Aires Branch, First lJatir.ial Bank of Boston.
E:. r-ts -roi Argentine Bureau of Statistics,
Production estimates for Uru-IrL: and Argentina are based chiefly
on export.
I/ Prelirinary.

Union of South A"rica ales and exports

Prices of short v:ools advanced at South African sales in April.
The United :indom and Fr-r,. e were the pri.cil b.uer::. Supplies of
long combing wools were about exhausted in most centers in 1March and
qu'tatio.ns on such wools were lar-:r nominal. Sales to the United
States have been small since February.

Disposals 1/ of wool at S-ith African selling centers from July
through March totaled about 187 million pounds compared with 210 million
po'-n-ds for the same months last season. Unsold stocks at selling
L/ Inl.id~:-s auction and private sales and wool shipped unsold.


_L 1 _I~_


~ _






- 9 -


centers at the end of March totaled about 5 million pounds compared with
*8 mni.l1ion a year earlier. Unsold stocks at selling centers at the end
of March were the smallest for that date in the last 10 years.

ExrI-':rts from South Africa continue mIr:ch sm,-llir than the quantity
sold, and stocks at ports awaiting shipr;ont are large. :.:. rts from
July through March of the cuirent season totaled 128 million pounds com-
pared with 195 million pounds exported in lihe sa:e month s last season
and an average of 180 million pounds for t'ios3 months in the five seasons
1934-35 through 1938-39.

:.:r:t- s to the United States in the current season have been
larger than in any; recent year. Exports by countrfies. from July through
March are shown on page 14.

Union of South Africa: ?icol movement in the first 9 months
(July-March) of the 1939-40 season, with comparisons

July 1-June 30 July 1-March 31
item le :: :1 1939-40
19-38 : 1938-39 1937-38 1938-39 : 1/
b. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Hil. lb. Mil. lb.
1b s ... !-il. 1b Mii. lb.

Receipts at pcrts 2 ..: 232 248 19S 209 188
D.-Ir.sals 3/ ..........: 227 252 187 210 187
Stcl':J at ports end of :
period
Unsold ............. 8 5 14 8 5
Sold ...............: 13 14 27 21 64

E.:,: or.,s / ............: 218 241 167 195 128

-Compiled fronr South Africa Crops .and .-:_Lets and cables from the London
SOffice of Foreign Agricultural Relations.
1/ Preliminary.
.2/ Under normal marketing conditions, receipts at ports for the entire
season are representative of production. The preliminary estimate of
- production for 1939-40 is 270 million pounds.
S2 Auction and private sales and wool shipped unsold.
/ Greasy and scoured combined.

. Purchases of Australian clip proceeding rapidly;
shpments smaller than last season

Purchase of the 1939-40 Australian wool clip by the United King-
dom has proceeded rapidly under the Governmient purchase plan inaugurated
Sin September. About 3,104,000 bales had been appraised by the latter
part of April, according to L. R. !MacGregor, Australian Trade Cormission-
er in the United States. Sales reported by Australian Wool Brokers to
the end of April last season (1938-39) totaled 2,625,000 bales. Under
-normal selling conditions about 90 percent of the Australian clip is
disposed of through reporting brokers.


weocI,.1





WOOL-41 10 -

The 1939-40 clip, exclusive of wool exported on skins, is esti-
mated at 3,371,500 bales, or slightly more than 1 billion pounds. This
is about 11 percent lar.r than last season's clip. The basic price to
be paid by the United Ki'-d:F. for the current clip is 13.4 pence (Aus-
tralian) per pound, abcut 18 cents at the current controlled r--te of ex-
c1'7:L The average price paid for 7- -"a'r wool at Australian sales in
the 19."-39 season was 10.4 p -.,-', equivalent to about 16 contO a pound
at prevailing rates of c:.h n'e.

About 2 million bales (600 million pounds) had been r-,hipped by
the latter part cf April, according to Mr. MacGrc -or. An earli r report
of the Central V'ool Coi.muittee of Australia indicated that of a total of
approximately 4-7"C- million pounds shipped from July 1 t".rou. .1 Lmarch 13 of
the current season about IC,' million pounds had been shi..pp.ed to ~ rance
and to neutral countries, the balance going direct to the Unitod Kingdom.
Exports from Australia from July through March last season (1938-39) to-
taled 710 million pounds, of which about 300 million pounds were shipped
to the United Kingdom and 150 million pounds to France.




- 11 -


Prices of wool per pound in specified markets and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1938-40


Market and description


: Av rage:
: 193e8 : 1939 :


United SG:tes .: 'Centts
Boston market
Territory, scoured basis
6", 70s, C": (fine) staple .,..: 70.4
:. (3/8 blood) combing ........: 58.9
L6s (low 1/4 blood) .............: 52.4
Bri ylht fleece, greasy
i6s, 70s, 8^,s (fine) delaine ...: 29.0
56 (3/8 blood) combing ........: 29.5
46s (low 1/4 blood) ............: 28.3

Price : received by farmers,
r>ea..3 basis, 15th of month ....: 19.2


939 :


Mar. : Apr. :


Ce-Its Cents Cents


82.7
69.3
62.6

32.9
36.2
35.5


71.8
60.1
52.8

28.7
30.7
29.7


69,0
57.1
50.0

27.0
23.5
27.4


1940 1/


Feb.: Mar. : Apr.
Cents Cents Cents


99.0
81.0
76.6

38.5
42.4
42.0


93.6
77.0
76.0

36.6
38.5
39.5


22.3 20.0 19.7 27.8 27.3 26.1


Te.tile fibers
Wool territory fine staple 2/ ..:
Cotton 7/8 Middling 3/ ........
Silk Japanese 4/ ............. :
Ray3;-:r yarn 150 denier 5/ ....... :
Rayon staple fiber 6/
Viscose 1-1/2 denier .........:
Acetate 5 denier .............:


70.4
8.58
170.6
52.2


82.7 71.8
9.04 -8.64
272.6 221.8
51.5 51.0


69.0
8.51
239.3
51.0


99.0
10.63
306.1
53.0

25.0
43.0


25.0 25.0
43.0 43.0


Jnion of South Africa
Average export price, greasy wool : 16.6
Price at selling centers
70s wap clean cost ............. :7/46.2
64-70s combing clean cost .,...:29/41.0


16.0 15.5 14.0 19.9 19.1


8/45. 0
;/40.1


40.6
35.7


39.1 58.9 59.9
35.1 53.2 53.9


Jricu .:- Montevideo
Cro. -bred greasy
Fine 50/56s.- 60s ..............:
Cco~rs..32/36s 44s ............:


18.8 1,0/18.8
17.0 lo/16.9


17.9
15.7


17.9 28.4 29.3
15.6 28.7 30.0


compiledd as follows:
United States -
Reports-of the Agricultural Marketing Service except as otherwise noted.
Union of South Africa -
South Africa Crops and Markets and report of the South Africa Ministry for
Agriculture.
Uruguay -
Camara Mercantil de Productos del Pais. Prices are monthly averages of
weekly range quotations.
Yearly averages are averages of monthly prices except United States farm price,
which is a weighted average.
Foreign prices have been converted at prevailing rates of exchan-e.
j Prices for foreign markets for 1940 are prcliiinary. 2/ '..:ed basis, Boston
:.rk-t. Y/ Average at 10 markets. 4/- "eie 13-15 denier at :I York, Bureau of La-
..r Statistics. 5/ Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
W F.o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 7/ Eight-month average, no
.Ptt.icrn, I ;- through August. 8 Seven-month average, no quotations, May through
-t, 9/ Ten-month average, no quotations, July and August. 10/ Eight-month
.-:;r-g, no quotations, August through November.


88.5
73.2
72.2

33.9
36.1
35.6


93.6
10.142
295.1
53.0


88.5
10.45
268.1
53.0


58.0


---


---'


--'-'----




WOOL-41


United States: Wool imports, conraumptio.i a.n machinery activity,
selected periods 1933-40


Item


: Yer : Jan.-Mai. : lar. i Feb. a Mar.
_ :938 : 13Q : 1oq 1-40 1 939 : 1940 : 1940
: ,0" I,,1 1, '., 1, 3001' ,0'0 1,0'i0 1,000
: b. lb. l 1 -. lb. -b. lb.


Imports for consumption,
actual weight 2I/:
Apparel ....................: 30 9,11
Finer than 40's ...........: 1,443
Not finer than 40's ....... 12,369
Carpet, including caemls
hair .....................: 71,908

Mill consLunr.tion 2i/:
Grease basia / /
Anor.-el ................... ...:474,527
Carpet ................ ......: 92,736
Scoured basis
Aggregate r
Apparel .................. 219,565
CGer et ................... 64,945
Weekly Average
Apparel ................: 4,l 3
Carpet ...................: 1.225

Machinery activity 2/: t__
Hours operated per machine :
in place
Worsted combs ............. 39.8
Worsted epi~dles ........ : 26.9
Woolen s' -i'dla ........... s 30.6
Woole eand worsted looms
Broad .................... 28.1
UTrrow ..... .. ...........: 10.5
Carpet and rug looms
Broad .................... 23.4
,N-rrow ...................: 15.9


98,194
74,612
23,552


20,651
14,363
6,2L7


65,790
59,'!32
tIl'


9,316
7,047
2,269


20,791
l3,563
2,228


20,733
19,009
1,724


144,874 4L3,380 54,21-4 15,904 16,149 17,617


630,150
148,513


293,083
103,421

5,636
1,929


14S,713
43,627


69,500
23, 41'

5,?-z4
I --
2


13' 1,:13
3o,7?l3


67,20O
25,701:


1,977
1_'l

7 2,5 0


44,2616
14,292


'0,915
12,303


33,578
10,423


21,110 21.302 17,709
9,.356 ,653 7,340

5,275 5,326 4,427
2, 4,h 2,165 1,835-


Weekly av-rojLe in h -ours ____


51.8
39.6
39.8

40.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


50.1

37.9

L2.0
:1.7


37.'


13.3
13.6


4;. o
3o.3

1 ..9

11.9


4c5.9
32.7
39.9


37.5
25.1
31.5


37.2 26.5
15.7 11.5


5o.3 41.7 38.5 42.6 40.3
24.4 22.1 25.S 22.1 21.1


Import fi ,;res from the Bureau of Forei;gn and Domestic C;.z-'x-ce. Consumption and
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census.
/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
F/ Fires for FT'bnrary ond March based on 4 vwel:s, J .nrr:y-Larch on 13 weeks.
135-3 ficurcs for 53 weeks ended December 31. No adjuct-melrtr made for holidays.
3/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, griec-; bazis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mi)tly washed.


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WOOL-41


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIIIIIII IIII I ll II I II Iiilli l illI ll
14 3 1262 08861 5645

Union of South Africa: Wool exports in the first 9 months
(July-March) of the 1939-40 exporting season, with comparisons /


: July 1 June 30 : July 1- March 31


: Average :
Country : 1934-35 : : : 13-
to 1938-39 : 1938-39 : July- :
: 1938-39 : : : February:
: Million Million million Million


1939-40


March
Million


: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


United States .:
United Kingdom :
France ........:
Germany .......:
Belgium .......:
Italy ......... :
Japan .........:
Other .........:
Total ....


2.0
44.4
49.6
63.9
21.2
15.5
20.8
13.3


230.7


0.7
45.9
51.2
86.0
20.2
22.6
1.8
12.6


241.0


0.6
32.6
39.9
77.5
15.2
18.8
1.8
9.0


195.4


33.1
19.7
15.3
1.0
6.0
6.9
11.9
13.9


107.8


0.7
5.8
3.1

3.7
3.8
1.0
2.6


20.7


July-
March
Million
pounds


33.8
25.5
18.4
1.0
9.7
10.7
12.9
16.5


128.5


Compiled from South Africa Crops and
Pretoria.
1/ Weight of grease and scoured wool
2/ If any, included with "other."


Markets and cabled reports from London and

combined.


Wool exports from Argentina and Uruguay in the first 6
months of the 1938-40 export season, with comparisons


: Argentina Uruguay
: Oct. 1 Oct. 1 : Oct. 1 : Oct. 1 -
Sept. 30 March 31 Sept. 30 March 31
Country :Average: : :Average:
:1934-35: :: 1934-35: :
:to 193-39.1938-39.1938-40. to .1938-39.1938-39.1939-40
:1938-39: : : I/ 1938-39: : : /
:Million million Million Million Million Million Million Million
:rounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds

United States 2/: 53.5 65.6 44.8 94.7 14.7 16.6 4.6 24.2
United Kingdom ..: 85.0 119.5 62.7 2.2 20.5 10.8 7.1 0.4
France ..........: 4P.4 57.4 37.4 25.9 7.2 6.5 4.3 1.1
Germany ......... 49.0 41.7 29.3 --- 30.5 36.2 23.4 4.4
Belgium .........: 20.5 2?.7 14.8 4.4 10.5 18.3 3.1 1.9
Italy ........... 19.0 7.2 3.3 10.5 13.5 16.1 10.0 8.3
Sweden ..........: 3/ 3/ 3/ 3/ 2.2 3.1 1.6 11.2
Netherlands .....: / ~.4 2.2 8.6 4.0 8.4 2.5 11.3
Japan ...........: 7.1 1.5 0.7 12.4 7.9 1.4 1.3 4.0
Other ...........: 25.5 35 .7 19.7 19.6 4.1 10.6 6.0 6.9
Total...... 308.0 357.3 214.9 178.4 115.1 128.0 63.9 73.7
Compiled from commercial reports supplied by Buenos Aires Office of Foreign Agri-
cultural Relations.
V Preli..inary. ,/ Argentine figures include small quantities shipped to Canada.
SIf any, included with "other."




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