The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00021

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



THE


SITUATION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

APRIL


II, 1940


WOOL: PRICE RECEIVED BY FARMERS, PRODUCTION,AND
MILL CONSUMPTION, UNITED STATES. 1927-40


S.. aSS. GREASY.SH8ORN.ASS BUREAU OF CNSUS DATA
NEG. 3r0o8 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


PRODUCTION OF WOOL IN THE UNITED STATES HAS NOT CHANCED MATERIALLY
SINCE 1933. DOMESTIC MILL CONSUMPTION, HOWEVER, HAS FLUCTUATED CONSID-
ERABLY IN RECENT YEARS AND THE CHANGES IN CONSUMPTION HAVE HAD AN IMPOR-
TANT BEARING UPON DOMESTIC WOOL PRICES. AS CONSIDERABLE QUANTITIES OF
WOOL ARE IMPORTED INTO THE UNITED STATES, FOREIGN SUPPLY AND DEMAND CON-
DITIONS ARE MAJOR FACTORS AFFECTING DOMESTIC WOOL PRICES.
THE INCREASE IN DOMESTIC MILL CONSUMPTION IN 1939 WAS ACCOMPANIED
BY AN INCREASE IN WOOL PRICES. THE SHARP ADVANCE IN PRICES IN SEPTEMBER
FOLLOWING THE OUTBREAK OF THE EUROPEAN WAR WAS CHIEFLY THE RESULT OF
THE RELATIVELY SMALL SUPPLIES OF WOOL ON HAND IN THIS COUNTRY AND THE
STRONG FOREIGN DEMAND FOR WOOL ARISING FROM WAR CONDITIONS. PRICES DE-
CLINED MODERATELY FROM OCTOBER THROUGH MARCH BUT PRICES IN MARCH WERE
ABOUT 35 PERCENT HIGHER THAN A YEAR EARLIER.


WooL-40


A 3 -, -






WOOL-40


---------------------------I------
THE WOOL SITUAT ION
-,1----1------1---I---------------

Summary

Favorable factors affecting domestic prices of wool in the next few

months will be the relatively small wool supply in this country and the strong

foreign demand arising from war conditions. The prospect for a lower level of

domestic mill consumption this year than last, however, will be a weakening

influence upon domestic prices. Some recovery in industrial activity is ex-

pected during the last half of 1940, and this may result in an increase in

domestic mill consumption of wool in the late sunier and fall of this year.

Although the carry-over of stocks of wool at the beginning of April this

year was small, it is probable thet such stocks plus the now domestic clip

(which will be marketed this spring and summer) will bo somewhat in excess of

mill requirements for the next several months. Consequently, a substantial

decline in in :rts of wool from the current high level is cxpnLctod. With the

possibility of some recovery in mill consumption in the last half of 1940,

stocks of wool at the end of this year probably will not be largo, and imports

may again increase in the fcll and winter of 1940-41.

S- .:s of domestic wool continued small in 7'arch. Quotations on graded

territory wools (old clip) at Boston declined 3 to 10 cents a pound, scoured

basis, during March, but quotations w6re almost ontiroly nominal. Country-

packed 3/8 and 1/4 blood bright fleece ools of the now clip were jfforod in

March at 35-36 cents a pound, groaso basis, delivered to mills. In March last

year similar wools fr.:, the 1939 clip wore offered at 27 cents a pound.

.ill conu'inrtion of al[:-'Lrr-1 wool in Fc'bru'Lry was 20 percent below the

peak of October 1939 and was 5 porcont smaller than a. year earlier, but it was


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about 10 percent larger than the average February consumption in the 10 years

1929-38. United States imports of apparel wool for consumption totaled 45

million pounds in the first 2 months of 1940 compared with 11 million pounds in

the same months of 1939. Imports in the first 2 months of this year were much

larger than in any recent year except 1937.

Wool prices in foreign markets did not change materially in March, after

advancing in January and February. The bulk of supplies of combing wools of

the 1939-40 clip have now been sold in South Africa and South America.

;:-CE!T DtEVELC'PMENTS IN DOMESTIC SITUATION

Wool sales small; prices of domestic
wool decline further in March

Sales of domestic wool at Boston continued small in March. !Mll buying
was limited chiefly to small quantities of spot wool needed for immediate use.
Quotations on graded territory wools (old clip) at Boston declined 3 to 10
,cents a pound, scoured basis, in March, but quotations wore largely nominal,
according to reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service. Moderate quan-
tities of fine Australian and South African wools were sold at Boston in March.
Prices on foreign wools declined slightly during the month.

Good French combing length fine territory wools in original bags (old
clip) were quoted at 82-85 cents a pound, scoured basis, the last week of March
compared with 90-93 cents a month earlier and 65-68 cents a year earlier. A
few dealers were soliciting orders for fine territory wools to be delivered in
July from the new clip at about 78-80 cents a pound, scoured basis, delivered
to mills. Sales at this basis were reported to be small.

Quotations on country-packed mixed grade lots of 3/8 and 1/4 blood
bright fleece wools (old clip).romained unchanged at 36-38 cents a pound,
grease basis, in March. Similar country-packed now clip wools wore offered in
carload lots at 35-36 cents in the grease, delivered to mills. In March last
year similar wools from the 1939 clip wore offered at 27 cents a pound do-
livered to eastern markets.

Prices for graded combing domestic wools at Boston at the end of March
wore about 20 percent below the high point reached in September, but average
prices for Iarch wore 30 percent higher than in March 1939. Wool prices at
Boston in 1939 were lowest in April. Prices advanced moderately through
August and then rose sharply in Sopt.cmbor.

The United States average price of wool received by farmers was 27.3
cents a pound on March 15. It was 27.8 cents a pound a month earlier and 20
cents on March 15, 1939.


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WOOL-40






WOOL-40


Wool irn'orts continue lar:-' in February

United States imports for cons:.mption of apparel wool totaled 20.8
million pounds in FtbruLry, compared vith 24.3 million pounds in January and
5.2 million nouLnd in February 1939. The January-February imports this year,
totaling 45 million pounds, were much larger than imports for th.e same months
of any recent year except 1937, when 51 million pounds were imported.

T-operts for consumption of carpet wool totaled 16.1 million pounds in
February compared with 20.5 million pounds in January and 11.8 million pounds
in February 1939. The January-February imports of carpet wool also were much
larger than usual.

Mill consumption declines in February

The trend of domestic mill consumption of apparel wool continued down-
ward in February. The veekly rate of consumption of 5,326,000 pounds, score.
basis, in February was 5 percent lov.er thon in January and was about 20 percent
below the peak of October 1.93. Mill consumption in ir',bruary W.Las 5 percent
lower than a year enrlior but vwas about 10 percent higher than the average
February consumption in the 10 years 1',[-38.

Mill consumption on a grease basis in the 9 weeks ended March 2 was
equivalent, to 84 million pounds of shorn wool and 13 million pounds of pulled
wool. In the first 2 months of 1939 mill consumption on a grease basis was
equivalent to 91 million pounds rf shorn wool and 13 million 'o)unds of pulled
wool.

.iyr -TTIC OUTLOOK..

Consumption pri:.,.. c*: for 1940

Mill consumption of wool in the second half of 1940 is likely to show an
improvement over the consumption of the early part of the year, but it may be
smaller than in the last half of 1939. Ccnsur.mtion for the entire year 1940
probably will not be so large as in 1939. The decline in mill cor.su:noti.n in
the first quarter of this year probably was due in part to seasonal frcto-rs in
the industry. ill1 production of spring-wear fabrics was corplcted relatively
early in the current season and operations for the fall ,cag.r.n w-ill nct Leril'
in volume before May, according to the L.ikv York V'c.'l Top Exchn.nge Service. Ur--
filled orders for wool fabrics held by mills on March 1 i. rc slightly larger
than a year earlier.

Domestic mill consumption has been m-xintained at a rel]..tively high lov
since August 193,. For the entire year 1939 mill c. ;-:ur--tion of apparel vool
was larger than in -a.,', recent yoer, except 1i.t Although cor.nsumption in
February 1940 declined 20 porcont below the peak of October ]939, the rate of
consumption was. till well above the avorago of the last 10 years. In recent
years thoro has boon a decided tendency for a docroc.so in consumption to fcllori
a your of increasing consumption such :s 1C'3. If this tcnduncy continues,
mill consumption for 1940 will be somewhat smaller than in 1939.


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WOOL-40


Carry-over smallest in recent years

Preliminary calculations indicate that the carry-over of wool into
the 1940 season phich began April 1 was slightly smaller than a year earlier
and probably was the --m1llest carry-over in recent years. IMill consumption
for the first 11 months (April-February) of the 1939 season was slightly
larger than domestic production of shorn and pulled wool in 1939 plus im-
ports through February 29. Consumption probably exceeded imports in March.

Although stocks of wool at the beginning of April were undoubtedly
small, it is probable that such stocks, plus the new domestic clip (which
will be marketed this spring and summer) will be somewhat in excess of mill
requirements for the next several months. As a consequence, imports of wool
into the United States are likely to be reduced sharply in the next few
months.


Production, imports, and mill consumption of apparel wool,
grease basis, in the United States, annual 1935-38
and April-February 1938-40


Year and
month


Production General Mill
imports / consumption /


Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.


1935-36 :431 83 673
1936-37 : 427 164 582
1937-38 :433 60 407
1938-39 : 436 49 j/ 544

Apr.-Feb. 1938-39 4 436 38 499
Apr.-Feb. 1939-40 : 442 134 579


Production from the Agricultural Marketing Service. Export figures from
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Consumption figures from the
Bureau of the Census.
I/ Weight as reported, greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
2/ These are preliminary consumption figures. Final figures are not avail-
able on a basis comparable with production statistics.
3/ Bure.-:u of the Census figures adjusted to 52-wrek basis.
4/ Production for entire year.

Although the relatively small stocks of wool in this country and
the strength in foreign wool prices are important price-supporting factors,
the prospects for a lower level of domestic mill consumption will be a
wev:Jening influence on domestic prices in the next few months. Ordinarily
when the United States is importing considerable quantities of wool, as in
the past 4 months, domestic prices are equal to the foreign prices plus the
duty and other costs of importation. But in periods when imports are rela-
tively small, as seems probable for the next few months, domestic prices of
wool may be somewhat lower than the foreign prices plus the duty and other
costs of importation.


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WOOL-40


FOREIG'T SITUL'IOI

South African sales and exports

Wool prices in South Africa did not change much during March. England,
France, Italy, Belgium, and Japan purcias.-d considerable wool, but sales to
the United States declined in February and March. The long wool season is
about over in South Africa. Offerings for the balance of the season will be
chiefly short wools.

Prices of 64-70s wools in South African markets in
the 1939-40 season, with comparisons 1/

: 1938-3940
Item :season 2/: 1939-40 season 2/ 3/
:__ Feb. : Mar. : Oct. : !!ov. : Lic'. : Jin. : Feb. : I'ar.
:Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents
64-70s
Super combine ....: 39.4 38.6 50.2 47.6 47.7 52.4 57.7 57.2
Combing .........: 36.7 35.7 46.9 44.3 45.0 49.4 53.2 53.9
Short combing ....: 34.8 34.6 38.1 35.6 39.4 42.9 44.4 45.6
Super shorts .....: 33.2 32.8 33.7 31.9 34.9 38.8 40.6 44.4

Compiled from South Africa Crops and Markets and cabled reports from the
American Legation in South Africa.
SQuotations are in cents per pound, clean basis.
SSeason begins July 1.
Preliminary.

Exports of wool from South Africa in the first 8 months (July-February)
of the current season totaled 108 million pounds compared with 174 million
pounds exported in the same months last season and an average of 153 million
pounds for those months in the 5 seasons 193-i-3J through 1938-39. Total
sales in the current season, however, have been much larger than exports.
Stocks awaiting shipment were relatively lar'e in February.

Disposals I/ of wool at South African selling centers from July through
February totaled about 170 million pounds compared wiith 190 million pounds
for the same months last year. Unsold stocks at sc-lling center.- on Feb.uary
29 were about 7 million pounds, the same as a year earlier, a.nd vwore only
half as largo as average February 29 stocks in the 5 years 1935-33.

Expi-r- of wool from South Africa by countries of destination, in the
first 8 months of the 1939-40 season, are shown in table 3.

Three-fourths of Argentine clip zold by 1:'-.rch;
prices 50 percent higher than a year earlier

Commercial factors in Argerntina estimate that about 75 percent of the
19'9-40 exportable surplus of Argentine wool had been sold by the middle

I/ Includes auction and private sales and wool chipped unsold.


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of March, according to a report from Agricultural Attache Paul 0. Nyhus at
Buenos Aires. The quantity of wool available. for export in Argentina this
season is estimatel;by the'First National Bank of.Boston at 325 million
pounds.

Prices at Buenos Aires since January have averaged about 50 percent
higher than a year earlier. The demand for coarse wools has been especially
strong and March-April; second clip wool of coarse grade was contracted for
in advance in Cordoba and the northwestern provinces. As a result of the
present high prices, the second clip this year probably will.be much larger
than that of last year.

Wool exports from Argentina 'from October through February of the
current export season totaled 155 million pounds.,.-grease. basis. The October-
February exports were about 3.5 percent smaller than in the same months last
season, but they were slightly larger than average exports for those months
in the 5 seasons 1934-35 through 1938-39 ..Because of th-: difficulty ...of..
securing shipping space, particularly to European countries, c::portz in the
current season have been considerably smaller than the volume -of sales.

Approximately 60 percent of the Argentine exports through February of
the.current season were shipped to the United .States,. compared with, only
20 percent in the same months last season. In the 5 seasons ended 1938-39
about 17 percent of total Argentine exports were taken by the United States.
united States imports from Argentina are -chiefly.carpet class wools, and
apparel wools grading "not finer than 40's.".

The United Kingdom and continental European countries usually pur-
chase the bulk-of South American wool exports. The United Kingdom has pur-
chased only small quantities of wool in Argentina in the current season,
and Germany has made .io purchases. It-is reported that France has bought
large quantities of wool in'rdcent monthsthat have not been shipped as
yet. Export stati-stics. by countries from October through March 7 of the
current season, with figures for earlier:yc~rs for comparison, are shown
in table 4.

Uruguay exports about- average

Exports of wool from Uruguay in the first 5 months (October-February)
of the current season totaled 52 million pounds, compared with 51 million
pound. exported in the same months last season. Exports from October through
February this season were about equal to .average exports for those months
in the 5 seasons 1934-35 through 1938-39.. Shipments to the United States in
the first 5 months of the season totaled 22 million pounds. United States
purchases in Uruguay in the current season have been larger than usual.
Exports of wool by countries, from October through February of the current
season, with figures for earlier years for comparison, are shown in table 4.


WOOL-40


- 7 -







Table 1.-,Prices of wool per pound in specified, markets and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1938-40


Market and description
United States


Boston market
Territory, scoured basis
64s, 70s, 80s (fine) staple ...
56s (3/8 blood) combing .......:
46s (low blood) .............
Bright fleece, greasy
64s, 70s, 80s (fine) delaine ..
56s (3/8 blood) combing .......:
46s (low blood) .............

Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of month ...:

Textile fibers
Wool territory fine staple 2/..:
Cotton 7/3 middling /.........
Silk Japanese /...............:
Rayon yarn 150 denier 5/.......
Rayon staple fiber 6/
Viscose 14 denier ...........
Acetate 5 denier ............:

Union of South Africa
Average export price, greasy wo0l:
Price at selling centers


: vera td .: 13 __ : 1940 1/
S193' : lio3: fob. : Mar. : Jan. : Feb. : Mar.
: Cents Conts Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


70.4
58.9
52.4

29.0
29.5
28.3


19.2


70.4
8.53
170.6
52.2


S2.7
69.3
62.6

32.9
36.2
35.5


73.8
61.0
54.0

29.5
32.0
30.5


22.3 20.2


82.7 73.8
9.04 8.52
272.6 211.4
51.5 51.0


71.8
60.1
52.8

28.7
30.7
29.7


104.7
82.8
76.1

40.7
44.5
44.o0


99.0
31.0
76.6

38.5
42.4
42.0


93.6
77.0
76.0

36.6
38.5
39.5


20.0 28.1 27.8 27.3


71.8
s.64
221.3
51.0


104.7
10.62
368.3
53.0


99.0
10.63
306.1
53.0


93.6
10.42
295.1
53.0


25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 43.0 43.0


1.6


70s warp clean cost ...........:7/46.3
64-70s combinr- cloan cost .....:./4l.0


Uruguay Montevideo
Crossbred greasy
Fine 50/56s 60s .............:
Coarse 32/30s 44s ...........:


16.0 15.9 15.5 19.9 19.9


/:44.9
/4o0.o


1.0 iO/18 .3
17.0 i/,163.9


41.8
36.7



17.9
15.7


o..6
35.7


C4. 0
49..4


58.9
53.2


17.9 24.6 28.4
15.7 24.S 20.7


Compiled as follows:
United States reports of the Agricultural Marketing
noted.


Service except as other


Union of South Africa: South Africa Crops and Markets and report of
Africa Ministry for Agriculture.


the Sout


Uruguay Camara IMercantil de Productor del Pais. Prices are monthly averages of
weekly range quotations.
Yearly averages are averages of monthly prices except United States farm price,
which is a weighted average.
Foreign prices have been converted at prevailing rates of exchange.
1/Prices for foreign markets for 1940 are preliminary. 2/Scoured basis, Boston
market. 3/Average at 10 markets. 4/White 13-15 denier at New York, Bureau of Labox
Statistics. 5/Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 6/F.o.b.
producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 7/Eight-month average, no quotations,
May through August. S/Seven-month average, no quotations, May through Soptember.
9/Ten-month average, no quotations, July and August. 10/Eight-month average, no
quotations, August through November.


53..






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h


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WOOL-40


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-~--` --~--- --~-





W'C'OL-40


STable 2.- United States: Wool imports, .consuption, and machinery activity,
selected periods, 1938-40


Item :1938

1,000
pound,
Imp:'v't s for. consumption
actual weight 1/:
Aipar-l .... ..................: 30,81
'Finer than 40s ...........: 18,44
loL finer than 40s ....... : 12,36
Carpet, including csmel's
hair .................. : 71,903


Si939 :
S Jan. .
1,000 1,000
s pounds poj1)r


1
3
C.


98,194
74,612
23,582


S 144,874


6,099
3,849
2,250


1939 : 1940


* F b.
1,000
pounds


5,236
3,467
1,769


Jan.
1,000
pounds


24,266
22,-110
2,156


15,669 11,807 20,498


MillC con su_ tir on 2:
Grease basis
Ar{ arel ................:
CarpoTt .................:
Sccured basis
Aggregate
Apparel ..............:
Carpet ...............:
Wee':il average
Apparel ..............:
Ca pet ...............:


Machiner- activity 2/:
Hours .operated per machine
in place
IJcrsted combs ..........:
'WoJrsted spindles .......:
.c.olen spindles ........:
Vioolen and vworsted looms:
Broad ....... .......:
,larrou, ................ :
Carl-r.t and rug looms
E'iroad ................:
:arri.:w ............... :


474,527
92,736


219,565
64,945


4,143
1,225


630,150
148,513


293,083
103,421


5,636
1,989


56,025
14,035


43,072 56,420,
12,500 14,050


25,941 22,449 28,189
9,784 8,776 '9,703


5,188
1,957


5,612
2,194


5,638
1,941


_Wreekly average in hours


39.8
26.9
30.6

28.1
10.5

23.4
15.9


51.8
39.5
39.7

40.6
13.2

37.4
22.9


49.5
40.9
40.0


52.8
38.4
40.0


44.3 44.6
11.7 12.1

34.1 38.2
22.4 25.4


52.8
34.5
41.3

43.4
13.6

42.0
23.0


Import fi.-ur' 'r. r '.i-i i .. f F- ',ei :ir:- e ,.c Go;iLr. ".-* .-.rti:.n ar-nd
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census.
1.' W-eir-ht of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
22' Fi'ures for January based on 5 weeks, February on 4 weeks ; 1938 figures for 53
weeks ended December 31. No adjustment made for holidays.
3/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition re-
Sceived from pulleries and is mostly washed.
.Ik


Feb.
1,000
pounds


20,791
18,563
2,228

16,149


40,915
12,308


21,302
8,658

5,326
2,165


48.9
32.7
39.9

37.2
15.7

42.6
22.1


--


- 9 -


:




UNIVERSITY OF Ft ORIDA
:IIIII JII I III I IIII iIIH I Ii I Iii II1111 11
10 3 1262 08861 5496

Table 3.- Union of South Africa: Wool axnorts in the first S months
(July-February) of the 1939-40 exporting season, with comparisons 1/ I


: July 1 June 30 July 1 February 29
:Average : :1939-0
: 1934-35 :
: to : 1938-39 1938-9 Jul- : Feb. July-
: 1938-39 : : Jan. Feb.
:Million Million Million Million Million Million
pounds pounds pound pounds pounds pounds


United States ....: 2.0 0.7 0.6 30*7
United Kingdom ...: 44.4 45.9 28.4 11.7
France ...........: 49.6 51.2 37.0 15
Germany ..........: 63.9 86.0 69.9 1.0
Belgium ..........: 21.2 20.2 14.0 5.1
Italy ,..........: 15.5 22.6 15.8 4.1
Japan ............: 20.8 1.8 1.3 8.5
Other ... .......1..: 13.3 12.6 7.3 10.6


2.4 33.1
8.0 19.7
2/ 15.3
--- 1.0
0.9 6.0
2.8 6.9
3.4 11.9
3.3 13.9


Total ....... 230.7 241.0 174.3 S7.0 20.8 107.8
Compiled from South Africa Crops and Markets and cabled reports from London and
Pretoria.
1l Weight of grease and scoured wool combined.
2/ If any, included with "other."

Table 4.- Wool exports from Argentina and Urug.ay in the 1939-40
export season, with comparisons

: Argentina : Uruguay
: Oct. 1 : Oct. 1 Oct. 1 : Oct. 1 -
St,. 30 : Mar. 7 SCet. 30 Feb. 29
Country :Average: :Av rago :
193 -35: -39 1938-39 1939-40 193-35 1 938-39 938-39'1939-40
: to to
:1938-39: _: : 1938-39 ____
:Million Million Million Million Iillion Million Million
:pounds pounds pounds' pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds
United States ....: 53.5 65.6 38.1 87.7 4.7 l6.6 3.6 22.2
Unitl Kinrgdom ...: 85.0 119.5 55.7 2.7 20.5 10.8 .9 --
France ...........: .h4 57.4 32.5 14.5 7.? 6.5 3-8
er an: ..........: 49.0 44.7 23.1 --- 30.5 36.2 19.6
Belgium .......... 20.5 22.7 10.3 1.- 10.5 18.3 2.3 1.2
Italy ...........: 19.0 7.2 4.6 10.3 13.5 16.1 7.7 7.0
Sweden ..........: l/ l/ 1.5 5.7 2.2 3.1 1.2 8.5
Netherlands ......: / 1/ 1.6 6.6 4.0 8.4 2.4 5.3
Japan ............ 7.1 1.5 0.2 10.3 7.9 1.4 0.2 2.6
Other ............: 25.5 38.7 11.3 59 4.1 10.6 5.0 5.4
Total ....... 3.0 357.3 178.9 145,. 115.1 128.o 50.7 52.2
Compiled from commercial reports supplied by Buenos Aires Office of Foreign Agri-
cultural Relations.
l/ If any, included with "other."


WOOL-40


Country




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REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E2IH3W6QO_TEW6KI INGEST_TIME 2012-07-16T15:40:31Z PACKAGE AA00011232_00021
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES