The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00020

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text
A 4.kQ: 31


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON


WoOL-39


MARCH 12,


1940


THE WOOL S I TU A TI ON


WOOL, APPAREL: PRODUCTION AND NET
IMPORTS, UNITED STATES, 1900-1939
POUNDS
MILLIONSI
Production

400 Net imports
A

300 _



200 I It



5 19
100 -

SI l l i I I I I I I I I I Il li l l I, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1900 1905 1910 1915 1920 1925 1930 1935 1940


U. 5 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG.19803 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


PRODUCTION OF WOOL IN THE UNITED STATES INCREASED SHARPLY FROM
1922 TO 1931, BUT HAS NOT CHANGED MUCH SINCE 1933. THIS LARGER
DOMESTIC PRODUCTION HAS GREATLY REDUCED IMPORT REQUIREMENTS. BUT
IN PERIODS OF RELATIVELY LARGE DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION SUCH AS 1935-37
AND 1939, ANNUAL IMPORTS OF APPAREL WOOL INTO THE UNITED STATES
HAVE BEEN AS MUCH AS 100 MILLION POUNDS.


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WOOL-39


THE W 0 0 L S ITUATI ON


SummTary

Domestic supply conditions continue relatively favorable for the mar-

keting of the 1940 domestic wool clip. Even if imports in February and March

are relatively large, the carry-over in the United States into the new season

which begins April 1 is likely to be the smallest in recent years. Domestic

mill consumption in 1940, on the other hand, may not be so large as in 1939,

when consumption of apparel wool exceeded domestic production of shorn and

pulled wool by about 190 million pounds.

Developments in foreign wool markets in the next few months are not

likely to weaken the domestic situation. Prices have advanced sharply in

South America and South Africa since the early part of January. Supplies of

good quality wools in those countries are reported to be clearing rapidly.

Only small quantities of Australian wool are being released to neutral coun-

tries, and selling Drices of such wool are fixed by the British Government

Wool Control.

Mill consumption of apparel *'ool in the United States in January was

slightly larger than in December and was 9 percent larger than in January 1939.

Unfilled orders for woven cloth held by reporting mills on January 1 were about

equal to those of a year earlier and were about 50 percent larger than orders

held at the beginning of 1938.

Sales of domestic wool at Boston continued small in February. Prices

were somewhat irregular but quotations on most grades were largely nominal.

Interest in the domestic market has shifted to the 1940 clip, but as yet there

is little information concerning prices for new clip wools.

World wool production apparently reached a newpeak 1in 1939. Production

in 1939, exclusive of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and China, is





w:O: L-39


provisionally estimated at 3.6 billion pounds. The 1939 estimate is about

3 percent -rpater than production in 193g and is about 7 p-rcrnt larger than

the 5-year (1933-37) ":-r.-" The increase in production in 1939 was due

chiefly to the estimated increase of 125 million pounds in the production of

Australia and the Union of South Africa. Production declined slightly in Ilew

Zealand, Argentina, ald Ur. i,-.; .- in 1939.

3r-.'T 'ZLPENTS IN rTC'I3IC SITUATIOIT

Sales of domestic wool small in February,
prices irre:.-,ljr

Domestic wool price s were somewhat irregular in February. Prices of
fine r-',- i;s of territory and bright fleece wools declined during the month,
but hih r prices were reported for low 1/4 blo:,i and coarser gr:.des sold at
Boston. Sales of wool at Boston were smr.ll nd quotations on many grades were
largely nominal. Interest in the domestic wool market is now shifting to the
1940 clip. Early shearing has bc: n in Arizona and California, but as yet
there is little information concerning prices for new clip wools.

Good French combing length fine territory wools in ori-'-i-l braLs were
quoted at 90-93 cents a -ound, scoured basin, in the we'k eI'.d i.-rch 2 com-
pared with 95-97 cents a pound a month earlier. Prices of territory 3/8 bclod
graded combing vools aver;:.gd 81 cents a nound the last week of February, un-
changed from a month earlier. Prices of lo'" 1/4 blood territory wools aver-
aged 78.5 c -nts a pound, scoured basis, the week ended March 2. This was 5*5
cents a round higher th-n prices reported for the week ended February 3.

Country backed mi::ed grande lots of 3/8 and 1/4 blood bright fleece wcols
were available at 36-38 cents a n.o';' ', -rr-.~ basis, in the week ended March 2
compared with 41-42 cents a month earlier. Quotations for Frn.ed fine combi..r
(dolaine) bright fleece wools averaged g38. cents a pound, grease basis, for
the week ended March 2 :.nd 39.5 cents a month earlier.

Prices for graded domestic wools on the Boston market at the end of
F.-bruary were about 15 percent below the high point reached in Septr-mb'r but
were about 35 percent higher than 1 -ore the sharp rise in September. February
prices were about 35 percent L.i<'. r than a year earlier.

Foreign wools sold at Boston

Sales of fi.l and medium grades of foreign wool at Boston wore small in
February but there; wrs a moderate demand for South American coarse crossbred
wools. Prices of medium tnd coarse gr 'Cs of South American wools advanced
during February.






- 5 -


Mill consumption relatively large in January

Weekly average mill consumption of apparel wool in January was
5,638,000 pounds, scoured basis. The January rate of consumption was slightly
higher than that of December and was'9 percent higher than that of January
1939. Consumption in January'was about 25 percent larger than average January
consumption in the 10 years 1929-38.

Mill consumption on a grease basis in the 5 weeks ended February 3 was
equivalent to 49 million pounds of shorn wool and 7 million pounds of pulled
wool. In the entire year 1939 consurAntion on a grease basis was equivalent to
551 million pounds of shorn wool and 79 million pounds of pulled wool.

Mill orders for woven fabrics

Unfilled orders for woven cloth held by 119 mills reporting on
January 1 were about equal to those of a year earlier and were about 50 per-
cent larger than orders reported at the beginning of 1938, according to
statistics reported by the National Association of Wool Manufacturers. Mill
sales of woven fabrics de61ined sharply in November and December following
the rush of orders in September. Sales of men's wear fabrics continued
seasonally small through February. New fall lines of men's wear fabrics will
be offered by mills in March.

Unfilled orders for woven cloth reported by 119 mills,
beginning of each quarter, 1938-40 1/

Men's wear :
Quarter M : Womenl's Auto : Total
beginning Government Other wear -- cloths 2/
: 1,000 linear 1,000 linear 1,000 linear 1,000 linear 1,000 linear
: yards, yards yards yards yards
1938
Jan .... 3,944 10,924 6,43. 2,055 22,966
Apr. ....: 2,293 6,293 4,139 1,894 14,619
July ....: 995 13,286 8,041 1,315 23,637
Oct. ....: 785 13,777 6,541 1,968 23,071
1939
Jan. ..... 844 24,456 8,951 1,782 36,033
Apr .... 565 22,905 5,252 834 29,556
July ....: 661 19,913 11,526 .... 1,824 33,924
Oct ..... 635 31,887 9,260 3,244 45,026
1940
Jan. ....: 1,376 23,438 9,204 2,005 36,023

Compiled from Monthly Statistics of Wool Manufacture., published by the National
Association of Wool Manufacturers.
Statistics are for cloth containing by weight over 25 percent of yarns spun on
the woolen and worsted system. Cloth less than 50 inches wide reported in
equivalent 54-inch yardage. The 119 mills are equipped with 27,000 looms.
1/ Reports are for specified dates near the begi !.ii-,g of each quarter.
2/ Excludes cloth with pile or jacquard design,





7"':1- 39


Wool imports largo in January

United States i'.rcrts for consumption of a-rirel wool totaled 24.3
million pounds in January compared with 15.9 million. p.ouris in recewtler and
6.1 million pounds in January 1939. Imports for consum'-tion of car.c.t wool
totaled -"'5 million .: .L. s in January, 9.8 million ncunds in recemb,.r and
15.7 million pounds in January 1939. January imports, both of PTruirel and
carpet wool, were the largest for any month since March 1937.

United States imports of wools Er'~1r. "finer than 40s" came chiefly
from Australia :;n Ur..- in 1 39, but imports from the Union of South Africa
were much larger than in any recent year. Imports of carpet wool and other
wools -.r ~'i17 "not finer than 40s" came chiefly from Argentina and British
India. Imports by countries of production in 1939 are shown in the accomnlan;'-
i'. table.

Wool: Imports for conSumption, by prir.ciip:. countries of production,
United States, 1939

: Carpet wool : Arpr -1 'o
Country of production : including Odamel : fi r : Finer than
___hai-r _: than 40s / :'4__
: 1,CO pounds 1,C:1 pounds 1,,' pounds


Argentina ................... 45,609
Australia ...................:, 34
:ie'" Zealand .................: 8, 019
Uru-'.: .. ........ .. .. 598
Chile ...................... ..: 0
Union of South Africa ........: 1, ,.6
British India ......-..........: .38,236
United Kingdom ............. 10,157
Ireland .....................: 2,513
Syria ......................... :.6
Iraq ........................: 10,520
France ....................: 4,052
ChinI .......... ............ :: 2,663
E;.-, t .......... ........ ... 4,126
Canada ....................... : 70
All other ..................: 8,695


13,932
257
5,640
634
0
0
552
1,475
177
167
0

156
38
135
129


8,079
.2,ll3
6,697
16,c62
1,217
8,329
0
2,211
217
... 0

. 13
0

2,015
65G


Total ..................: 144,874 23,582 74,611

Cm,-iled from Monthly S3-,-- r.r of Foreign Commerce, December 1939.

I/ Wools .il'li..: "not finer than 4Cs" may be imported fr-e of duty if us.d for
floor coverir--,, press cloths, knit or felt boots, or heavy fulled lumbermen's
socks., In the last 5 years about one-fifth of the imnorts of such wool have bren
duty free.


. 6 -








rn: STIC. OUTLOOK

Carry-over into 1940 smallest in recent years

Domestic supply conditions continue relatively favorable for the market-
ing of the 1940 wool clip in the United States. Till consumption of apparel
wool in the first 10 months (April-January) of the 1939-40 season was about
equal to the estimated production of shorn and pulled wool for 1939 plus im-
ports through January 31. Domestic mill consumption of apparel wool averaged
more than 50 million pounds (grease basis) a month, from April through January.
Even if imports of apparel wool in February and March are considerably above
average, the carry-over of wool into the new season which begins April 1 is
likely to be smaller than a year earlier and the smallest carry-over in recent
years.

Production, imports, and mill consumption of apparel wool,
grease basis, in the United States, annual 1935-38
and April-January 1938-40

: General : ill
Year and
month Production : imports consumption
__/ 2/
: i b.lb. l. lb. Mil. lb.

1935-36 : 431 83 673
1936-37 427 164 582
1937-38 : 433 60 407
1938-39 : 436 49 3/ 544
Apr.-Jan. 1938-39 4/ 436 33 451
Apr.-Jan. 1939-40 4/ 442 5/ 107 538

Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Consumption
figures from the Bureau of the Census.
1/ Weight as reported, greasy, scoured and skin wool added together.
2/ These are preliminary consumption figures. The revised totals, which are
somewhat larger than preliminary figures, are not available on a clip-year
basis.
/ Bureau of the Census figure adjusted to 52-week basis.
Production for entire year.
/ Partly estimated.

Prospects for consumption in 1940

It was stated in the February issue of the Wool Situation that domestic
mill consumption in 1940 may not be so large as in 1939. In recent years
there has been a decided tendency for a decrease in consumption to follow'a
year of increasing consumption such as 1939. In 1939 mill consumption was 30
percent greater than in 1938; except for 1935 it was larger than in any recent
year. Consumer incomes in 1940 probably will be greater than in 1939, however,
and the stimulating effect of this on retail sales will be a strengthening
influence on domestic mill consumption of wool.


WOOL-39


- 7-





WOOL-39


Moderate decline in consumption in lf-ir would not
necessarily increase carry-over

lill consumption of app-rcl wool in the United States in 1939 exceeded
domestic production of shorn and pulled wool by about 190 million pounds. No
material change in wool production is in prospect for 1940. As previously
stated, the carry-over into the 1940 season, is likely to be the smallest in
recent years. Hence a moderate decline in mill consumption in 1940 would not
result in a large carry-over of wool at the end of the 1940 season, unless im-
ports in 1940 are relatively largo.

Developments in foreign markets not expected to
weaken domestic market

Developments in foreign wool markets in the next few months are not
likely to weaken the domestic situation. Supplies of good quality wools in
South America and South Africa arc reported to be clearing rapidly. While such
reports are not fully supported by export statistics through January of the
current season, the difficulty of securing shipping space, particularly to
European countries, probably has caused the volume of sales to bo considerably
larger than exports. Prices have advanced sharply in South Africa and South
America since the early part of January. Production of wool in Australia in
the 1939-40 season was estimated to be the largest on record. But the entire
Australian production has been purchased by the United Kingdom. Only small
quantities of this wool are being released to neutral countries at the
present time, and selling prices are fixed by the British Government Wool
Control. The United Kingdom has purchased the entire clip of 7.'u Zealand also.
As New Zealand production is almost entirely medium and coarse wools, which
are used largely in military requirements, little of this wool is likely to be
available for export to neutral countries.

Fr, EIGN SITUATION

South African sales and exports

Wool prices in South Africa continued to advance in February. England,
France and Italy vere the principal buyers. Sales to the United States de-
clined in February. Th.. long wool season in South Africa is about over. Wools
now arriving at selling centers are chiefly short wools.

Disposals 1/ of wool at South African selling centers in the first 7
months (July-JanuTry) of the 1T.7F-40 season wore about 10 percent smaller th.n
in the same months last season. Recoipts also were smaller than a y.c-.r earlier.
.ns:.ld stocks at selling centers on January 31 wore about the sameno as a year
earlier, when 17 million pounds were reported, and wore about 40 Fp;rcnt
smaller than averIgc January 31 stocks in the 5 years 1934-38.

Exports of wool from the !'ni.:n of South Africa from July through
January totaled 87 million pounds compared with 143 million pounds exported in

1- Irlud- ..'.icsl'.c rid private sales and wool shipped unsold.


- -









the same months last season and an avcrago of 121 million pounds for those
months in the 5 seasons 1933-34 to 1937--::. Stocks of wool at ports, awaiting
shipment, wor lgo in Janwuay.

Exp:orts f;-m South Africa to tho United Statos from July through
January -c::i 1( L::C :. ,L!.. po- r.nds, or a little more than one-third of
the total .queLcil..i. t:" od Ordi.na'ily the Tnited States imports only small
quantities oi Sortlh i j.cani woel Expiorts to the United States averaged only
2 million pounds annual-l.y from 1933 through 1937.

Prices of 64-70s wools in South African markets in
the 1939-40 season, with comparisons I/

: 1937 : 1938-39 199 2
Item : high : season 2/ : season
: Apr : Jan. : Feb. : Oct. : 1cv. : D. Jan : Feb.
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


64-70s
Super combing ....:
Combing .........:
Short combing ....:
Super shorts .....:


68.0
65.9 '
62.9
56.8


38.9
36.8
33.9
31.6


39.4
36,7
34.8
33.2


50.2
46.9
38.1
'33.7


47.6
44.3
35.6
31.9


47.7
45.0
39.4
34.9


52.4
49.4
42.9
38.8


57.7
53.2
44.4
40.6


Compiled from South Africa Crops and 'Markets 'and cabled reports from the
American Legation in South Africa.
I/ Quotations are in cents per pound, clean basis.
T/ Season begins July 1.
_/ Preliminary.

Wool exports from the Union of South Africa in the first 7 months
(July-January) of the 1939-40 exporting season, with comparisons

Country to which 1938-39 : 1939-40 1/
exported: July-Jan. July-Doc. : Jan. 2/ : July-Jan. 2/
: Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.

United States ........: 0.4 21.2 9.4 30.6
Unit .d Kingdom .......: 22,4 5.9 5.7 11.6
France ..............: 32.0 9.7 5.5 15.2
Germany ............ 57.9 1.0 --- 1.0
Belgium .............: 11.9 3.0 2.2 5.2
Italy ................: 12.6 3.4 0.6 4.0
Japan ................: 0.3 6.5 1.9 8.4
Other ...............: 5.7 7.0 3.2 10.2
Total ...........: 143.2 57.7 329.3 3/ 87.0
Compiled from South Africa Crops and Markets and cabled reports from London
and Pretoria.
1/ Preliminary.
2/ January exports by countries are for grease wool only. Data for scoured
wool, totaling 824,000 pounds not yet available by countries.
3/ Includes exports of scoured wool not reported by countries, for January.


- 9 -


WOOL-39






WOOL-39


- 10 -


Prices higher in South Americaz i markets

Nool prices advanced sharply in South American markets in January and
the early part of February. Prices in Ururnay currency in the week ended
February 16 were about 20 percent higher than in the first week of January.
Demand has been particularly strong for medium and coarse crossbred '"ools, and
stocks of these grades at Montevideo were reported to be small.

Prices per pound of g-easy wool at Montevideo in the 1939-40
season

Description: Dec. : Jan. : Week ended
: 1~ 9 ._ -1940 : Feb. 2: Feb. 9 Feb7 16
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents

Merinos ........... .....: // /
Fine crossbreds:
Best (Supras) .... ........: 2 25.5 26.0 27.2 27.S 30.8
Good (Buenos) .............: 24.3 24.4 25.4 26.0 2.5
Medium crossbreds:
Best ......................: 25.5 25.9 26.6 27.8 31.1
Good ......................: 25.1 25.1 25.4 26.0 29.1
Coarse crossbreds:
Best .......................: 25.4 26.2 26.6 27.8 31.5
Good ......................: 24.7 25.3 25.4 26.0 30.5

Compiled from weekly reports of Cn-asara r.I-rcantil de Productos del Pais.
Prices are averages of weekly rani. quotations, converted to cents at con-
trolled rate of oech f .i:- for Urun i peso as reported by Federal Reserve
(65.8300 cents per peso for period shown).
I/ No quotations available. 2/ T:o 'eoks only.

South American exports smaller than last year

Exports from Uru -u..: in the first 4 months (October-JInluary) of the
1939-40 season totaled 33.2 million pounds. Exports from October through
January were slightly smaller than in the sane months last year and rere 35
percent smaller than the 5-year (1933-34 to 1937-38) average. Difficulties
in securing shipping space are said to be responsible, in part, for the de-
cline in exports. About one-half of the quantity shipped from Uru.iu.'.-r in the
first 4 months of the season -,as consigned to the United States. United States
purchases in Uruguay in the current season have been larger than '..uil.

Exports from Argentina from October through January of the current
season were about 20 percent smaller th n in the same months of the 1938-39
season, but they were larger than in the 1937-38 season. Largest shipments
from Arg: iti:, in the current season h.ve been to the United States. Exports
by classes from October th:.-o :i. January of the last three seasons are shove.
in the 'ccoup-.'.yi g table.






WOOL-39


Argentina: Exports of 'oool by classes in the first 4 months of
the 1939-40 season, with comparisons


: Oct. 1 Sept.3Q0~ Oct. 1 Jan., 31
Class : 1937-33: 1938-39 : 1937-38 1938-39: 1939-40
: : 1_ / 1/
:Mil. "b. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.


Grease wool:
Fine (merino) ..............
Crossbred-
Fine ......................
Medium ...................
Low ......................
Criollo or native ............:
Bellies ......................
Washed wool(grease equivalent):
2/ ..........
Scoured wool(grease equivalent)
2/ ........... .
Total all wool, grease basis;
Argentine Bureau of Statistics.
l/ Preliminary.
2/ Not reported by classes.


29.9

89.3
23.6
75.0
5.6
9.9

19.0


24.9

S5.0
29.7
130.4
10.7
14.8

25.4


9o.2 375.4
293.2 75.4


7.5

16.o
7.1
13.2
.2
2.0

6.7


62.9


2. 09
11.0
66.1
4.1
5.6

9.6


18.6
15.3
39.4
5.7
2.0

9.2


21.8 22.5
151.7 117.2


World Wool Production

World wool production apparently reached a new peak in 1939. Production
in 1939 exclusive of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and China, is
provisionally estimated at 3.6 billion pounds, on the basis of reports from 24
countries which in 1938 produced 85 percent of the world total (excluding the
Soviet Union and China)4 The 1939 estimate is an increase of 3 percent over
production in 1938 and is about 7 percent larger than the 5-year (1933-37)
average.

World wool production (including the Soviet Union and China which produce
mostly carpet wool) increased from 3.0 billion pounds in 1923 to 3.8 billion
pounds in 1929. Production declined from 1930 through 1934 but the recovery
which followed carried production in 1938 to the highest amount on record. The
1938 total apparently was exceeded in 1939.

The increase in world production in 1939 compared with 1938 ;as due
chiefly to the estimated increase of 125 million pounds in the production of
Australia and the Union of South Africa, the principal fine wool-producinjg
countries of the Southern Hemisphere. If the preliminary estimates I'e *'-
firmed, total production in these t'.o countries in 1939 will be close to the
record quantity produced in 1932. Production in Australia in 1939 was estimated
to be about 30 million pounds larger than in 1932. But production in the Union
of South Africa was about 50 million pounds smaller than in 1932.

Production declined slightly in 1939 in Now Zealand, Argentina, and Uru-
guay, the Southern Hemisphere countries which produce mostly medium and coarse


- 11 -





- 12 -


wool. But exce-ot for i93g, total -roduction in these countries in 1939 was
the highest on record. The 1939 production in hrulay has been exceeded in
earlier years, but increased production in New Zealand has more than offset
the decline in Uruguay.

'bse;-.s in world sun-olies of raw wool, other than carpet wool, are de-
termined largely Ty the production in five Southern Hemisohere countries, Ans-
tralia, Union of South Africa, Now Zealand, Argentina, ,nd Uruguay. The bulk
of the production of these countries is exported each season. Production of
fine and medium grades of wool in U.'rthern Hemisphere countries is utilized
largely in the country where produced.

S.;:rmlios of wool, other than carpet wool, available for unrestricted ex-
port in the current season are limited I-r,e'-ly to the production of South
Americar countri~n and the Union of South Africa. The United Kin1.-: nm has
airrr.ad to purchase the entire wool production of Australia and iHw Zealand
during the period of the '.ir. -an wanr rnd one clip thereafter. Limited quan-
tities of Australian wool hav) been sold to neutral countries since Dl2ceclirr,
however, and it. r.r.rr likely, that additional quantities of Australian wool
will be available in the future. The wool clip of !He,. Zealand, which is almost
entirely medium and coarse wools, will be used largely in the prod.icticon of
military supplies. Little of this wool is likely to be available for export
to neutral countries.

T trend in production in five Southern Hemisphere countries, the
United States, fnd the United :inZLdom, 1l'y:'-39, is shown in table 3. World
wool production by countries, 1934-39, is show in table 2.

Unr it States wool production. 1939

W.-. p-roduction in the United Strtes in 1939 totaled '41,897,0'O pounds
compared with 437',472,000 -nounds produced in 193S, according to estimates of
the Agricultural Marketing Service. Production of shorn -cool totaled.
377,7`7,000 pounds in 1939 and production of pulled wool 64,C'0,000 pounds.
Pr- i.-ticn of shorn -ocol in 1939 was about 5 million pounds 1-rger than in
1938,*-ith the greater -t of the increase in the native shecp States.

E-tin.tes of -roduction, price per pound, and cash farm income from
shorn wool, by States for 193S and 1939 are given in the -cco~mp.'anying table.






-13-


Table l.-Wool production and income in the United States, 19 8 and 1939


1938 t 1939
State : Sheen : Weight : Price Cash : Sheen : Weight I :Price I Cash
and I shorn : per : Pro- : per farm : shorn : per : Pro- : per I farm
division: : fleece :duction found income / : fleece :duction : pound income
S : 2/ : 8 : 2/ : : -


I Thou-
: sands

Maine : 43
N.H. H 9
Vt. : 22
Mass. : 7
R.. 2
Conn. 5
N. Y. 320
N. J. : 5
Pa. : 412
N.. :. 825
Ohio 2,276
Ind. 700
Ill. 698
Mich. 1,043
Wis. 396
E.N.C. : 5.113
Minn. : 1,000
Iowa 1,228
Mo. 1,332
N. Dak. : 722
S. Dak. : 1,078
Nebr. 326
Kans. 485
W.N.C. 6.171
Del. 3
Md. 70
Va. 364
T. Va. 503
N. C. : 54
S. C. 9
Ga. : 27
Fla. : 32
S. A.: 1.062
Ky. : 1,021
Tenn. 349
Ala. 42
Miss. : 62
Ark. : 62
La. : 225
Okla. : 228
Tex. : 9.742
S. C. : 11.731
Mont. : 2,550
Idaho : 1,920
yo. : 3,236
Colo. 1,588
N. Mex. 2,169
Ariz. 781
Utah 2,237
Nev. 7
Wash. :
Oreg. 1,923
Calif. : 3.900
Western: 21707
U. S. : 46,609
U. S.3/:


Lb.

6.0
6.3
6.7
6.1
6.0
6.0
7.2
6.1
7.3
7.1
7.8
7.0
7.8
7.7

7.5
7.9
6.5
8.5
8.4
7.6
7.4

6.5
6.0
4.8
5.0
:1
3.6
.3 6
4.9
5.2
4.4
3.6

3.4
8.5
8.1
7.6
9.9
9.1
9.7
8.1
7.1
6.5
8.9
7.8
9.3
9.1
7.2
8.5
7.98


1,000 : Thou-
dol. I sand


1,000
lb. Cents

258 21
7 21
147 21
43 22
12 22
30 22
2,304 20
30 23
3.008 22
5,889 21.2
17,753 19
4,000 18
5,419 18
8,031 18
2.970 18
39.073 18.5
7,800 18
9,701 18
8,635 19
6,137 16
9,055 17
2.456 15
3,566 15
47,350 17.3A
20 22
420 22
1,747 22
2,515 23
275 22
39 23
97 22
106 22
5,219 22.4
5,309 21
1,536 21
151 22
205 20
273 18
765 20
1,938 16
79.o05 21
89,482 20.9
25,245 19
17,463 19
31,389 18
12,862 18
15,400 18
5,04o 18
19,909 19
5,920 19
5,995 18
17,499 19
28.237 20
184.959 18.8
371.972 19.2
fil. 80n


54: 43
12: 9
31: 21
9: 7
3: 2
7: 5
461: 311
7: 5
662: 379
1,246: 782
3,373: 2,230
882: 679
975: 738
1,446: 1,o4
535: 38
7.211: 5.074
1,404: 980
1,746: 1,250
1,641: 1,380
982: 736
1,539: 1,13

8,215: 6,341
3: 3
92: 66
384: 352
578: 493
60: 52
9: 9
21: 28
23: 32
1.171: 1.035
1,115: 1,052
323: 370
33: 4o
1 61
49: 65
153: 235
310: 260
16,654: 9.844
18,678: 11,927
4,797: 2,830
3,318: 1,805
5,650: 3,395
2,315: 1,635
2,772: 2,133
907: 769
3,783: 2,235
1,125: 760
1,079: 654
3,325: 1.899
5,647: 4,120
34.718: 22,235
71-.39: TQ U7


Lb.
6.2
6.6
6.8
6.3
6.0
5.6
7.4
6.0
7.5
7.3
L
8.1
7.5
7.8
8.1
7.6
7.9
8.0
7.9
6.8
8.7
9.0
8.0
8.2
8.0
6.7
6.3
5.0
5.2
4.6
4.2
3.6
3.0
5.1
5.4
4.4
3.7
3*2
1.5
3.3
8.1
7.9
7.4
9.5
9.2
9.7
8.1
7.1
6.3
8.7
8.0
9.3
8.9
7.1
8.4
7.96


1,000
lb. Cents

267 22
59 23
l43 23
44 24
12 26
28 26
2,301 23
0 23
2842 25
5,726 24.0
18,063 24
5,092 24
5,776 2
8,448 24
2,918 22
40,297 23.7
7,840 21
9,875 22
9,387 23
6,403 18
10,287 20
3,157 18
3,753 1s
50.702 20.6
20 25
416 25
1,760 26
2,564 25
239 24
38 25
101 23
96 22
5,234 25.2
5,681 2
1,628 2
148 21
195 20
292 20
776 21
2,106 16
77.290 24
88,116 23.8
26,885 22
16,606 22
32,92 21
13,244 22
15,168 21
4,856 21
19,4 21
6,080 21
6,074 21
16,901 22
29.132 23
187.322 21.7
377.397 22.3
Qt.00


1,000
dol.


33
11
3
7
529
7
710
1.373
4,335
1,222
1,328
2,028
642

1,646
2,172
2,159
1,153
2,057






57
10
57
23
21
1.319
1, 20
391
31
39
58
163
337
18.550
20.989
5,915
3,653
6,916
2,914
3,185
1,020
4,083
1,277
1,276
3,718
6,700
4O,57
894 24


I/ Includes sheep shorn at commercial feeding yards.
2/ For Texas and California the weight per fleece is the amount of wool shorn per sheep and lamb
shorn during the year.
V/ Pulled wool.
Agricultural Marketing Service.


Z


I


I


I


r


,


7!QQ 7 a


64. FjO


~


~


Z


.


I


r


Z





WOOL-39


Table 2.- Wool:


Production in specified countries and estimated
world production, 1934-3Z


Country


: -1"Z : 1935 : 1936 : 1-37 : 1938 :1939

:" llio I 11:r. !illi.on I 11licn Million Million


!lorth and Central America :pc'.uds r:rs rpund I pc'u.nds Founds pounds
and WVest Indies
United States
Shorn ................ ....: 570.3 76C4.,7 3C0.3 5F... 372.0 377.4
Pulled 2/ ...................: 0 6 .? 6. 64.5 64.5
Total ............. 43'0.S 'x^.7 42C.-E 1 .8 4l 6.5 441.9
Canada ............ ......: .1 17.8 17.4 17.6 17.7 17.6
1exico ........ .... ..........: i.3 10.3 ( 0. 3 (10.3) (10.3
Other ........ ..... ... ...... 0.4 ) (0.4) ...4 ) (0.4 (0.4
Total North and Central
America and West Indies: .9.1 459.2 45~4.G 461.1 464.9
South America
Peru 3/ .....................: 11.2 10.1 12.3 12.5 10.3
Chile ..........................: 57.0 35. 35 33.0 3 29.0
Brazil ......................: 35 .4 3,7.5 37.5 39.7 T/40.5
Uruguay ..................: 119.7 112.C i16. 116.3 12?5.4 122.0
Ar'enir.r... .. .................: C':..0 C, 3.C 574-.0' 5 .J .0 Z .0 334H ,0
Falkland T1-r d .......... ..: 1.0 i. 1.0 -.. 4.6
Other .......................: (le6. ) 16 .O l16 .01 (1 :. (16.0)
Tc;-'l ou 1iri .r ..: 571-. 5., .- 6:,5.7 5.' 6 24..


England -c- V'i l : ...........
Scotland ..... ..... .......
Yortherrn Tr: 1' ........ .
Total Ir. it: d V!:in dcr .
Irish Fr e "tnte ............:
Iceland .....................

Sweden ................. :
Sweden
Denr .ark ....... .............. :
;.*therl ; .. ..............
Belgiur. . . .
Fr c ...................... :
. inr .......... ........ ...... :
Portug ... ................... :


It; ly ..................
SwitzerL .- .............
Germ7;any ...............
Au'tria ................
Czcchosl; '.i:.ki, .........
Hungary ................


Yugoslai..'i- 4/ ...............
Greece ......................:
Albania .....................


83~ .fl
'.. Q
L~


7P .r
2-.(
1.6


27.1
2.6


80.0
28.7
2.8


112. .1..6 i 10 '.7 111.5 4 '111.9
1i7.. 16.5 17.6 4 1':.4 4 17.9 4 17.0
2.0 l. 1." 1,6 (1.6
i-n 5.7 .? 5.9
1.3- 1.72 1.; 1.2
S1. 1 i ) ( 1.. 1.1 ) .9 P.O
3.1 .1;. .2 3.2 3.4
Sr.:* (0.,) (0. -;) '. =) (0.8) (0.8)
,:, 3 .8 .?'. -J"., 4.. 40.5 4 40.0
I '.E .0 7 0 71.0 (71. (710 Ir (71.r<''-
7.7 7.2 .5 1 .. ) (9,.5
5 .1 ,7.5 / 5G '7' '; ." 4 ; .,

0.. f o:1.. r(.. ) .. )--
r.8 '',., 5- -.6 039.2 *,1.5 2.-
1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1
21 2. .0 3.1 / 3.3 /?,
11. 1 .0 1 e:.6 I 1 .0 17.6 19.
31.1 2.1 33. 34.6 25.8 .
16.7 17.5 18.5 18.5 4/ 17.7 4/ 17.1
1. 4.5 4.7 (4,5 1 4.4


Continueda-


I_~


~II_


- 14 -







WOOL-39


- 15 -


Table 2.- Wool: Production in.specified countries and estimated
world production, 1934-39 -Continued


Country


: 1934 : 1935 : 1936 : 1937 : 1938 :1939 i/

:Million Million millionn Million Million Million
:pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


Europe Cont'd.
Bulgaria 4/ ................: 23.2 23.2
Rumania ..... .............. .: 68.0 .60.3.
Lithuania ...... ............... : 3.8 3.8
Latvia ............... .. .... : 4.6 5.3
Estonia ...... .......... .: 2.1 2.0
Poland 4/ ..................: 9.6 10.8
Finland .....................: 3.6 3.7
Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics ................... 130.0 160.0
Total Europe excluding


Soviet Union ..........
Africa
Forocco .... ......... .........
Algeria 4/ .................
Tunisia 7 ... ................
French West Africa and
French Sudan 4/ ............
Egypt 4/ ...................
British South Africa .......
Other .. ..... ...... ..........
Total Africa ...........
Asia 7/
Turkey 8/ ...................
Iraq .........................
Palestine ...................
Iran (Persia) ..............
Syria ......................
Afghanistan .................
India 4/ .......... ........
China '/ ..... ..............
Other ....... ...............
Total Asia excluding
Soviet Union and China
Oceania
Australia ...................
New Zealand .................
Other ........ ... ..........
Total Oceania ..........


23.5
61.0)
3.7
5.3
2.3
11.1
3.7


22.7
60.2
3.7
5.6
2.5
11.7
(3.9)


200.0 260.0 300.0


S504.8 499.4 512.6 521.1 540.2

: 29.1 33.4 33.4 37.3 4/ 36.6
: 41.2 43,6 47.9 46.8 44.5
S 5.5 5.5 5.2 5.8 5.5

: 2.5 2.3 2.3 2.8 (2.8)
: 5.6 5.7 6.0 .7.7 (5.0)
: 210.0 238.0 264.0 233,0 248.0 270.0
: (4.0) (4.)0 ) (4.0) (40) (4.0)
: 297.9 332.5 362.8 337.4 346.4

S30.9 35,3 48.9 54.2 59.5 4/ 63.5
S17.7 18.5 19.4 17.2 3/ 10.1
S 0.7 (0.7) 0.7 0.8- (0.8)
S47.0 50.0 50.0 50,0 50.0
9.8 6.8 8.4 8.0 6.4 5.3
(15.0) (15.0) (15.0) (15.0) (15.0)
87.7 84.3 84.3 84.3 (84.3)
80.0 80.0 80.0 80.0 80.0
(1.0) (1.0) (1.0) (1.0) -(1.0)

: 209.8 211.6 227.7 230.5 227.1


:1,015.4
: 265.0
: (0.1
:1,280.5


971,1
304.3
(0.1)


982.8 1,023.4
302.9 296.8
(0.1) (0.1)


985.010/4,090.0
327.7 4/ 522,
(0.1)-


1,275.5 1,285.8 1,320.3 1,312.8


Continued-


23.6
65.1
3.5
6.3
2.7


23.0
63.1 4/
3.5 4/
5.8 /
2.5 /
12.5
(3.9)





Wvr.-L-.9 1. -

] *: .- l!:.i: Pr- c 1ti '. n', -i .cifi r ccuil. ri.L '..nd t.- im-ated
S1 r i r J i ?t I i: .' d

.......: : ; .- : 1 : i '. : l 1 S I


: 1 :j 1 .r>n i _ll i.:n 11 :.1i a !i icn i-il i:.ir Pilli nr:
Estimated world total :,n. -. :.. r .i -..n :r js c.undj
exclu''...- Soviet Union
and China / ....1.. .... ,-.: ., :.... 7, ,.._ r ._, r,.l ... ,._ .r K /3, 3 .O
Estimated wcrld total in-
cluding Soviet Union an-i
China 11/ ................... .:, *- ,.r ...i f.,.::. 5, 7:'r..- ',-r ,:, '.,ir'..

Compiled from official sources except as otherwise noted. Since many countries
do not publish official wool production f1-'..-: production has been estlim;:ted.
In sdme cases reliable commercial estimates hae; been used. -his table in-
clu :i wool shorn during the calendar year in the Northern Hemisphere, and that
shorn duri: the season I: -i:?-.n< July 1 or October 1 of the given 'ai.i'';tr
year in the Southern Hemis.:!;:-. Pulled wool is included for most important
countries at its grease equivalent. Figures in parentheses interpolated.
Owing to unsettled conditions in Europe in 1.1:-, it is not certain that
estimates contained data for the total territories included in the former
boundaries of Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Eungary and Poland.

1/ Preliminary. Figures for" earlier years may be revised on the basis :-.
Tater in.! r -ion.
2/ Weight reported by pulleries and is mostly washed. 3/ Estimates ba.cid on
exports alone, or on exrcrts, carry-over, domestic consumption and any ot'.er
available information. 4/ Estimates- based on sheeb numbers at date near!e-t
shearing time and other available information. 5/ Estimates of Camara
Mercantile de Productos del Pais. Based on exports, stocks and domestic son-
sumption.
6/ Estimates of the Buenos Aires Branch of the First Natibnal Bank of BPostn.
:,- ze on exports, domestic consumption and carry-over.
/ Estimates for Asiatic countries are rough approximations.
8/ Estimates published by the Banquo Centrale de la Turquie.
/ Estimates based on sheep numbers, 1i --35 and estimate published in
Chinese Economic IUll.-!tin June 1937. Former Manchuria, Turkestan and Inner
Mongolia included vith China.-
10/ Based on Decor.ber estimate of the National Council of Wool Selling
Brokers of Australia.
II/ Totals rounded to tens of millions.
12/ Estimate based on reports from 24- countries which produced ?5 percent :.f
the world production excludingg Soviet Union and China) in 1-,..





WOOL-39


- 17 -


Table 3.-Wool production in 5 Southern Hemisphere countries, the United States,
and the United Kingdom, 1909-39

-- -- --
: Princjial exporting countries :United
Fine wool :Medium and coarse wool : United States :Kingdom
: principally :_ predoinates__ : and
Year : Union f: New :Argen- : :: Irish
Aus- : South :Zealand: tinra :Uruguay: Shorn :Pulled : Total : Free
:tralia :Africa : 2/ : 4/ / : : State
11/ .
:Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds pounds r nou.ds v pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds

1909 : 740 132 221 354 103 310 41 351 142
1910 788 132 212 369 113 306 40 346 143
1911 : 798 162 219 356 133 302 41 343 137
1912 : 687 169 224 326 123 278 41 319 133
1913 : 771 175 224 302 102 266 43 309 125
1914 : 735 182 234 275 82 251 43 294 121
1915 : 636 175 (232) 322 61 241 40 281 122
1916 : 637 179 6/ 213 370 79 244 44 288 124
191 : 654 (175) 230 1/380 77 237 40 277 125
1918 : 736 (180) 255 1/418 119 .254 42 296 120
1919 :, 762 177 237 1/355 118 270 48 318 116
1920 : 625 182 208 V/315 113 251 43 294 108
1921 : 723 188 219 316 108 242 48 290 108
1922 : 727 184 246 332 96 228 42 270 109
1923 : 663 198 235 312 106 230 43 273 109
1924 : 777 210 254 313 92 238 44 282 115
1925 : 834 225 / 238 312 116 253 47 300 122
1926 : 924 260 9/ 256 309 132 269 50 319 128
1927 : 888 291 253 322 134 290 .50 34o 132
1928 : 968 311 263 331 130 315 52 367 132
1929 : 938 304 262 331 151 328 54 382 131
1930 : 913 305 259 342 153 352 62 414 130
1931 : 1,007 305 270 364 106 376 66 442 132
1932 : 1,063 319 277 -364 110 351 67 418 139
1933 996 275 290 364 105 374 64 438 140
1934 : 1,015 210 265 348 119 370 61 431 129
1935 : 971 238 304 365 113 365 66 431 122
1936 : 983 264 303 374 ll6 361 66 427 122
1937 : 1,023 233 297 366 116 367 66 433 123
193 : 985 248 328 399 125 372 64 436 129
1939 10: 1,090 270 322 384 122 377 64 442 129


Continued -


__ _______







Table 3.-Wool production in 5 Southern Hemisphere countries, the United States,
and the United KiLicdom, 1909-39 Continued



Official publications and reliable commercial sources used in the preparation
of these estimates. Estimates. for Southern Heminphere countries are based on
exports alone or on exports, carry-over, domestic consumption, And other avail-
able information. All estimates subject to revision on the basis of later
information.

Except as otherwise notod, this table includes wool shorn during the calendar
year in the United States and the United Kingdom and that shorn'during the
season beginning July 1 of the same calendar year in Australia, Union of South
Africa and I::L. Zealand; October 1 in Argoiti.-a and Uruguay.

Pulled wool included for most important countries at its grease equivalent.

l/ Season beginning September 1 up to and including 1916. Subsequent years
season beLg.!irni July 1. Estimates exclude wool exported on skins. Such
wool averaged about 20 million pounds a year in the last 10 years.
2/ Season -diiL:ivm October 1 up to and including 1925-26; subsequent years
orason begi' linm July 1. Exports of wool and wool on skins plus quantities
of wool purcAased by domestic mills, all converted to a ,rT .'r basis.
Adjustment made for stocks in 1926-27 and subsequent yoers.
3/ Computed f-: exports converted to a grease basis and consumption. 'Adjustment
made for stock's subsequent to 1911.
4/ Seasons 190C-10 to 1930-31 shipments from Montevideo. Subsequent years esti-
mates of production taking consumption and stocks into account.
SPublished as reported by oulleries and is mostly washed.
Estimates for seasons 191'-17 to 1923-24 are those of Dalgety and Company.
Owing to l-ck of estim-t:3 of carry-over during the war when stocks accumu-
lated greatly, exports plus local consumption do not represent production
adequately for those years. It is assumed that in these estimates some
aidj.stnent was made for carry-over, alth :ugh scoured and pulled wool have
not been converted to a grease besis.
7/ Stocks accumulated during these years, especially at the close of the World
War and official E=timates are not available. These estimrat's are based on
exports, local consumption and carry-over as reported unofficially.
8/ Estimates of Imperial Economic Conn-ittee based on exports of wool Ind wool on
skins, wool consumption and carry-over all converted to a grease basis.
2/ Setimates for this and subsequent years.recently officially revised on
basis of more exact conversion of scoured, pulled and washed wool to a grease
basis.
10/ Preliminary.


- 18 A


W00L-39





WOOL-39


Table 4.- Prices of wool and. textile raw materials in the United States,
specified periods, 193-'J


SAverage :High: 1939 1940
Item __: 1939 : :
:1938: 1939: j/' Feb.: Dec.: Jan. :Feb.
: ''- : t .. .. ":


:Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


Boston market
Territory, scoured basis
64s, 70s, g0s(fine)staple ..
56s (3/8 blood) combing ...
46s (low 1/4 blood) ........
Bright fleece, greasy
64s, 70s,80s(fine) delaine .
56s (3/g blood) combing ...:
46s (Low 1/4 blood) .......:


70 .4
58.9
52.4

29.0
29-5
29.5
28.3


82.7
69.3
62.6

32.9
36.2
35.5


109.5
94.1
87.5

43.0
48.8
49.0


.73.g
61.0o
54.0

29.5
32.0
30.5


105.8
85.9
79.0

41.2
46.0
45.5


Cents



104.7
52.8
76.1

40.7
44.5
44.0


Cents


99.0
81.0
76,6

38-5
42.4
42.0


Price received by farmers,
gTease basis, 15th of month : 19.2 22.3

Textile fibers
Wool, Terr. fine staple 2/..: 70.4 82.7
Cotton 7/8 Middling 3,......: 858 9.04
Silk, Japanese W_.......... :170.6 272.6
Rayon yarn, 150 denier 5/...: 52.2 51.5


28.7 20.2 27.5 28.1 27.8


109.5 73.8 105.8
10.39 8.52 10.39
392.1:211.4 392.1
53.0 51.0 53.0


Compiled from reports of the Agricultural .:-I-ketig 'Service, except as other-
wise specified.

Yearly averages are averages of monthly prices except United States farm price,
which is a weighted average.

1/ Monthly average.
/Scoured basis, Boston market.
SAverage at 10 markets.
SWhite 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
5/ Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


104.7
10.62
365.3
53.o0


99.0
10.63
306.1
53.0


- 19 -




urNlVER rlT OF FLORIDA
1111111IIIJIIIII IIIUI I III I l II IIl II lI
3 1262 08861 5637
Wc :'L-,9 20 -


Tnble 5.- United States: Wonl imports, consumption nrid machinery activity,
specified periods, 1937-O0


I : 1939 1940
Item 1937 1 1939 _
Jan. Dec. Jan.
..., *


: 1,000
Imports for consumption : pounds
actual weight: I/
Apparel ..................: 150, 16
Finer than 4Ls .........:126,601
Not finer than 4Os .....: 23,559
Carpet, including csmel's
hair .................... :172,091

Oonsumpticn, scoured
basis: 2/
Weekly ~' r,' -:
Aparrel .......... ...... 5,273
Carpet ................. 2,050
Aggre at e-
Apparel .. .............:274,217
Carpet .. ........... : 106,620


1,000 1,000
iound s pounds


30,11i
18, 443
12,369


93,194
74,612
23,5E.


71,908 144, 874


4,143
1,225


5, 636
1,9,9


219,565 293,083
64,945 103, 21


1,000
pounds

6,099
3, g49
2,250

15,669


1,000
pounds

15,891
14,699
1,192


1 ;000
pounds

24,266
22,110
2,156


9,839 20,498


5,189 5,595 5,638
1,957 1,916 1,941

25,941 22,378 28,189
9,794 7,665 9,703


Weekly rcrnage in hours


Machinery activity: 2/
Hours operated per
machi:.e in p1' ice
Worsted coLr ............:
Worsted rr llcs ........:
IWoc -n. spl ? Es ........:
W c :' 1anI .rsts d
lo: s-
Er-.?ad ............ ....
Nr!r.cw ................
Carpet -r. '.r looms-
Broad ... ............ :)
Narrow ......... .....:


46.1
32.9
143.1


39.8
26.9
30.5


51.8
39.5
3957


39.0 2S.1 40.6
20.4 '1,.5 13.2

22.6 23.4 37.4
15.9 22.9


Import fig.''w: from the Bureau cf Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Consumption and
machinery ti.it;r from the Eureau of the Census.
L/ Weifit of c-re-y, scoured, and skin wool added toz thc-r.
2/ Figures for J-nu-ry, blo-ed on 5 weeks, Dec-mtber on 4 wcekt; 1938 tatVls
based on 53 weeks. I0o adjustmentt made for holidays.


49.5
40.9
40o.


44.3
11.7

34.1
22.4


51.1
40.5
41.8


47.8
15.4

41.7
21.8


52.8
34.5
41.3


43.4
13.6

42.0
23.0