The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00019

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text





UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASHINGTON


FEBRUARY 12, 1940


UNIV OF FL LIB
DOCuMENTS DEPT



"' ITORY


E W O O L S I T U A T I ON


WOOL, APPAREL, GREASY SHORN BASIS: CONSUMPTION
BY MILLS IN THE UNITED STATES. 1918-39
POUNDS
I MILLIONS) TOTAL&
600 -

400 -

200 ...--.- --- --

0
POUNDS
PER CAPITAL
6

4 - -



0 tII
1918 1920 1922 1924 1926 1928 1930 1932 1934 1936 1938
a COMPILED FROM THE REPORTS OF THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


U. 5 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 32650 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


IN 1939 MILL CONSUMPTION OF APPAREL WOOL, GREASE BASIS, IN THE
UNITED STATES, WAS 30 PERCENT LARGER THAN IN 1938; AND IT WAS LARGER
THAN IN ANY RECENT YEAR, EXCEPT 1935.
IN RECENT YEARS THERE HAS BEEN A DECIDED TENDENCY FOR A DECREASE
IN CONSUMPTION TO FOLLOW A YEAR OF INCREASING CONSUMPTION, SUCH AS
1939. IF THIS TENDENCY CONTINUES, MILL CONSUMPTION IN 1940 WILL BE
SOMEWHAT SMALLER THAN IN 1939.


WOOL-38


'/) 9 5 ,





WOOL-38 2 -
-----------------------------,,,,,
THE WOO L SITUATION




Domestic su-ply conditions are relatively favorable for the market-

ing of the 1940 wool clip in the United States in that the carry-over of

wool in this country into the new marketing season, which begins about

April 1, is ex-pected to be smaller than that of a year earlier.

Domestic mill conumrotion in 1940, on the other hand, may not be so

large as in 1939. For several years there has been a decided tendency for

a decrease in consumption to follow a year of increasing consumption. Con-

sumption has been large for the last 1S months. In 1939 mill consumption

was 30 percent greater than in 1938; except for 1935, it was larger than in

any recent year. Consumer incomes in 1940 probably will be greater than

in 1939, however, and the stirmlatiing effect of this upon retail sales will

be a strengthening influence on domestic mill consumption of wool.

United States imports of apparel wool for consumption totaled 98

million pounds in 1939 compared with 31 million pounds in 193S and a 5-year

1933-37 average of 78 million pounds. Because of the small supplies of

domestic wool available, imports of wool into the United States in the

early part of 1940 are likely to be larger than at any time sirce early

1937.

Stocks of -iprarel wool held by United States dealers and manufac-

turers, including wool afloat, totaled 205 million pounds, grease basis,

on December 31, 1939. An additional 1.4 million pounds of domestic shorn

wool was estimated to be on ranches and farms and in local country ware-

houses in the 13 Western sheep States on December 31. Total stocks report-

ed at the end of December 1939 were 32 million pounds smaller than a year






WOOL-38 3 -

earlier and were the Smallest December 31 stocks in the 6 years of record.

Production of wool in Australia in the 1939-40 season is expected

to total about 1,090 million pounds.. This preliminary estimate is 11 per-

cent larger than the 1939-39 clip, which was officially estimated at. 95

million pounds. The largest production previously reported for Australia

was that of 1932-33, when 1,063 million pounds were produced. The entire

Australian clip for 1939-40, exclusive of the quantity needed for Australian

consumption, was purchased by the British Government. Small shipments were

made in December to France and to the United States.

Sales of domestic wool ?at Boston were small in January, and prices

declined in the latter part of the month. Chief interest in the wool

market was in foreign wools, which are now arriving in quantity. Prices

of domestic wools in recent months have been higher than prices (duty paid)

of similar wools from South Africa and South America.

RECENT. DEVELOPI,.-iTS IN DOIFS'ITIC SITUATION

Domestic wool prices decline in January

Sales of domestic wool at Boston were small in January, and prices
declined in the latter part of the month. Chief interest in the wool
market was in foreign wools, which are now arriving in quantity. Prices
of domestic wools in recent months have been higher than prices (duty paid)
of similar wools from South Africa and South America.

Good French combing length fine territory wools in original bags
sold at 95-97 cents a pound, scoured basis, in the week ended February 3.
This was 5 cents a pound lower than prices reported a month earlier.
Prices of territory 3/8 blood graded combing wools averaged Sl cents a
pound, scoured basis, the last week of January compared with 84 cents a
pound a month earlier. Average prices of graded conbing territory wools
at the end of January were about 15 percent below the high point reached
at the end of September but were about 35 percent higher than before the
sharp rise in 'September.

Sales of fleece wool-were. very siall in January, and prices on
many grades were largely nominal. C.zunt2r'. packed mixed grade lots of 3/8
and 1/4 blood bright fleece wools were quoted at 41-42 cents a pound,
grease basis, in the week ended February 3 compared with 43-45 cents a





WOOL-38


month earlier. Prices of graded fine combine (delaine) averaged 39.5
-cents a pound, grease basis, for the week ended Febrary 3 and 41.5 cents
a month earlier.

The United States ave.'n-e priee of wool received by farmers was
28.1 cents a pound on January 15. It-was 27.5 cents a pound on December
15 and 20 cents on January 15, 1939.

Demand for forei.-r wools at Boston imoe crate,
prices firm, in J.nurLLu

Fori'-n wools continued to sell in moderate quantities at Boston
in January. Prices of fine grades of foreign wool were firm or slightly
higher during the month. South African 10-12 months wools of 64-70s
grader sold at 90-96 cents a nound, scoured basis, incluTin- duty. Sales
of South American merino and fine crozsbred wools were made to United
States mills in January.

Canadian buyers purchased South American crossbred wools at Boston
in January. Difficulty in obtaining New Zealand wools needed for military
purposes led to the temporary suspension of the Canadian duty on certain
wools, and Canadian buyers entered the Boston market to fill immediate
needs.

Additional allotment of Australian wool available
for United States importers

An additional 50,000 bales (15,000,000 pounds) of Australian wool
are now available to United States importers, according to information
from the British Wool Control, cabled from the American 3nb,:.ssy, at London
on January 22. The ori.;:nal allotment of 75,000 bales (22,500,000 pounds)
was announced in December. Details concerning arrangements for the re-
lease of Australian wool to the United States were reported in The Wool
Situation for January.

Several thousand bales of Australian wool of the original allot-
ment were landed in Boston and in San Francisco late in January, accord-
in. to commercial reports.

Wool imports increase in December

United States imports for consumption of apparel wool totaled 15.9
million pourj*. in December compared with 11.9 million pounris in Nove:iber
and 4.4 million pounds in December 1938. The December inrorts were the
large,-t for -r.- month since May 1937. Imports of apparel wool for the
entire year 1939 totaled 98 million pounds compared with 31 million pounds
in 1938 and a 5-year 1933-37 av:irae of 78 million pounds.

Imports for consumption of carpet wool totaled 145 million pounds
in 1939. The 1939 imports were twice as lIrge as those of 1938 and were
slightly lar.cr than the av:rg--. of 134 million pounds for the 5 yeaLrs
1933-37.







Stocks of wool relatively small

Stocks of apparel wool held by United States dealers, mrnufactur-
ers and toprakers, ircltudi... wool afloat to the United States, totaled
205 million pounds, grease basis, on Deceaber 30, 1939, according to re-
ports to the Bureau of,the Census. In addition, the Department of Agri-
culture estimates that there were 14 million pounds of domestic shorn
wool on ranches and farms and in local country warehouses in the 13 West-
ern sheep States on December 31. Total stocks of both foreign and domestic
wool reported at the end of December 1939 were 32 million pounds smaller
than a year earlier and were the smallest December 31 stocks in the 6
years of record.

Manufacturers held a much larger percentage of reported stocks at
the end of D: c previous. The stocks reported by dealers and mi-nufacturers on Decenber
30, 1939, with comparisons, are shown on a scoured equivalent basis in the
acconponying table. Stocks reported by quarters, 1935 to date, arc shown
on a grease basis on page 14.


Stocks of raw wool, top -nd noil, hold by dealers, manufacturers
and topnakers in the United States, scoured basis,
December 30, 1939, with comparisons


Item


: 1938
: Dec. 31 1/
: 1,000
: pounds


Apparel wool, total ...........:
Dealers ....... ...........:
Domestic ..................:
Foreign on hand ...........:
Foreign afloat ............:
Manufacturers and topm-ruers .:
Domestic ............... :
Foreign on hand ...........:
Foreign afloat ............:
Carpet wool, total ............:
Dealers ...................:
Manufacturers .............:

Tops ..........................:
Noils ..... ................... :


115,655
65,115
51,928
10,497
2,690
50,540o
37,654
10,201
2,685
29,966
3,641
26,325

23,248
9,337


Sept. 30
1,000
pounds


1/


11, 514
41,673
33,954
6,456
1,263
76,841
55,507
17,547
3,787
37,411
1,271
36,140


19,891
S,S9


Compiled from ic'u of the Census Qaarterly Wool Stock I
30, 1939.
1/ Revised.


SDec. 30
1,C0
pounds
111,28d _
45, c o
25,540
13,4 so
5,9S0
66,289
37,131
19,773
9,385
57.529
2,725
;4,804


22,543
11,340

report, Decelber


WOOLS-38


---- ---`----~----`-~-


----


- 5 -





WOOL-38


Mill consumption declines in December
but remains above average

The weekly rate of mill consumption of apparel wool in the United
States was 5,595,000 pounds, scoured basis, in December. This was 15 percent
lower than the November rate of consumption and was 6 percent lower than
that of December 1938. But the consumption in December was 30 percent
larger than the average December consumption in the 10 years 1928-37. Con-
sumption in December was lower than a year earlier for the first time since
June 1938.

Mill consumption of apparel wool on a grease basis in 1939 was e-
quivalent to 551 million pounds of shorn wool and 79 million pounds of pulled
wool, Consumption on a grease basis in 1938 was equivalent to 406 million
pounds of shorn wool and 68 million pounds of pulled wool. Consumption in
1939 was about 24 percent larger than the average yearly consumption in the
10 years 1928-37.

The decline in mill consumption in December was partly seasonal.
Larre orders for men's wear fabrics for the 1940 spring season were placed
in September and October. Mill sales in November were much smaller than the
quantity of cloth invoiced to buyers, and unfilled orders were sharply reduced.

DOMESTIC OUTLOOK

Domestic supply conditions are relatively favorable for the marketing
of the 1940 wool clip in the United States. The carry-over of wool in this
country into the new marketing season which begins about April 1 is expected
to be smaller than a year earlier.

Stocks of domestic wool reported on December 31, 1939 were about 70
million pounds grease basis smaller than a year earlier and were by far the
smallest December 31 stocks in recent years.. ,Stocks .of foreign apparel wool
in the United States on December 31 were somewhat l.rer than the average for
that date in the last 5 years. But total stocks of domestic and foreign
apparel wool on December 31, exclusive of wool afloat,, were the smallest
reported for any date in the last 5 years with the exception of April 1
stocks in 1936 and 1939.

Imports will be large in early months of 1940

Imports of wool' into the United St:l.tos in the early part of 1940 are
likely to be larger than at any time since 1937. (General imports of apparel
wool in the first 3 months of 1937 totaled 110 million pounds.)

United States purchases of South African wool through January 15 were
estimated by commercial sources to total about 45 million pounds. About
21 million pounds had been shipped by the end of December. Allotments of
Australian wool by the British Government to the United States now total
about 37.5 million pounds. It is not known how much of the Australian
allotment has been purchased to date. United States buyers were active in
the South American markets in late December and in January.


- 6 -








Mill conlcurption prospects for 1940

Prospects for mill consumption in 1940 are somewhat uncertain.
Consumer incomes in 1940 probably will be greater than in 1939, and this may
stimulate retail sales of wool goods. But mill consumption of wool has been
large for the last 18 months, and in recent years thero has been a decided
tendency for a decrease in consumption to follow a year of increasing
consumption such as 1939. If this tendency continues, mill consumption in
1940 will be somewhat smaller than in 1939.

FOREIGN SITI .ATIOT!

Australian wool production for 1939-40 expected to set new record

Production of wool in Australia in the current season, which ends
Tune 30, 1940,.is expected to reach a record total of 1090 million pounds.
This is an increase of 11 percent over the 1938-39 production, which was
officially estimated at 985 million pounds. The largest production previously
reported for Australia was that of 1932-33, which totaled 1063 million pounds.
Production averaged 998 million pounds in the 5 seasons 1933-34 to 1937-38.
These estimates include the quantity of wool exported on skins as well as
production of shorn and pulled wool.

Wool production in Australia 1932-33 to date

Season Shorn Skin : Wool :
July-June wool wool : exported : Total
: : : on skins
:Million pounds Million pounds Million pounds Million pounds

1932-33 ......: 943.0 66.2 53.4 1,062.6
1933-34 ......: 870.1 72.0 53.8 995.9
1934-35 ......: 908.1 54.5 52.8 1,015.4
1935-36 ......: 867.3 49.6 54.2 971.1
1936-37 ......: 877.5 50.0 55.3 982.8
1937-38 ......: 914.8 48.2 60.4 1,023.4
1938-39 1/ ...: 2/ :2 / 985.0
1939-4o 1/ ...: 2/ 2/ 2/ 1,090.0

Australian Bureau of Census and Statistics, except 1939-40, which is based
on the December estimate of the Australian Council of Wool Selling
Brokers.
I/ Preliminary.
/ Not yet available.

Small shipments of Australian wool for non-British countries in December

The entire clip of Australian wool for the 1939-40 season, exclusive
of the quantity needed for domestic consumption, was purchased by the
British Government. Resale of wool to allied and neutral countries is
under the direction of the Central Wool Committee of Australia. Statistics
of sales and shipments have not been published during the current season.


W*OOL-38


- 7 -








The Central Wool Committee reports, however, that about one-half of the
clip had been appraised by the end of Decembe'r, and about 816,000 bales
(245,000,000 pounds) had been loaded for shipment. Exports were almost
entirely to the United Kingdom, but small shipmmnts were made in December
to France and to the United States.

South Africa sales and shipments

Wool prices continued to advance in thu South African markets in
January. Representatives of the British Government purchased additional
quantities of wool ur.dor the British-South African price airerc-ment. France,
Belgium, Italy, Japan, and the United St.tos wero active buyers in January.

Rofipts of wool at South African selling centers in the first 6
months (July-Dec mber) of the 1939-40 season w ,lonu 6 percent smaller
than ;.:i -ie same months last coason. Disposal] .:' ':- i y through December,
howev r*, vore 20 percent smaller than a year ec -:-ir. soldd stocks at
sell. ::it ers on December 31 were much lart: i than a year earlier and
were 30 p.:-cir larger than average December 31 stocks in the 5 years 1933-37.

Enorts of wool from the Union of South Vfrica in the first half
(July-Detr :"' er) of the 1939-40 season totaled 7.7 million rpovud, compared
with 111 i. ,'.io:n pounds exported in the same months last season, Stocks
sold and :L ,:i ins shipment were lr,;p in December, and it is likely that the
decline ir. e'r.-.rts compared with last season is due, in part, to difficulty
in obtalini;'; a"h.:pin spc-e.

La.r',Frt '.m -r:ts from South Africa in the current season have been
to the Un2is.' -. es. reports to the United St:tes from July through
December toc;-l.;1 bout 21 million pounds compared with 0.4 million pounds
in the same loaics last season. Exports to the United States averaged only
2 million pounds annually from 1933 throu.r h 1937.

Prices of 64-70s wools in South African markets in
the 1939-40 season, vith comparisons 1/

S1937 : 1938-39 1939-40 2/
Item high
SApr. : Dec. Jan. : Oct. : Nov. : Dec. J an.
S_______ ____I I
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents
64-70s
Super combing ....: 68.0 40.1 38.9 50.2 47.5 47.7 52.4
CoLbij. ..........: 65.9 37.6 36.8 46.9 44.1 45.0 49.4
Short c-,Lbi.- ....: 62.9 35.6 33.9 38.1 34.s 39.4 D2.9
Super shorts ..... 56.8 32.6 31.6 33.7 31.3 34.9 38.8

CoupilEd from South Africa Crops and Markets and cabled reports from the
American LeEatio:i in South Africa.
1/ Quotations are in cents per pound, clean basis.
2/ Pr-liminary.


- g -


*TOOL-38




W5OO-38 9-

Wool exports from the Union of South Africa in the first 6 months
(July-December) of the 1939-40 exporting season, with comparisons

Country to which : 1938 1939 1/
exported. : July-Dec. : July-Nov. : Dec. : July-Dec.
:Mil. lb. Mil. Ib. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.

United States ........: 0.4 14.4 6.8 21.2
United Kingdom ....... 17.5 4,7 1.2 5-9
France ...............: 25.7 3.5 6,2 9.7
Germany ............... 44.2 1.0 1.0
Belgium ..............: 9.2 1.4 1.6 3.0
Italy ................: 9.4 2.2 1.2 3.4
Japan ............... : -- 2.0 4.5 6.5
Other .................: 5.1 3.7 3.3 7.0
Total ..............: 111.5 32.9 24.8 57.7
Compiled from South Africa Crops and Markets and cabled reports from London
and Pretoria.
1/ Preliminary.

South American Markets

The South American wool markets were fairly active in the latter part
of December and in January. Largest sales were made to th$ United States and
France. Demand was particularly go'd for medium and coarse crossbred wools.
Prices advanced on most grades of wool in January.

Exports from Argentina and Uruguay in the first 3 months (October-
December) of the current season were about 27 percent smaller than in the
same months last year. But the October-December exports were about equal
to the average exports for those months in the 5 years 1933-37. Exports
from Argentina so far this season have been above the 5-year average, but
exports from Uruguay have been below average. Exports to the United States
from October through December 1939 were more than twice as large as a year
earlier.

Wool exports from Argentina and Uruguay in the first 3 months
(October-December) of the 1939-40 season, with comparisons

Country to which Argentina Uruguay Total
exported 1938 1939 1/: 1938 : 1939 1/: 1938 : 1939
SMil.lb. Mil. b. Mil. Mil. b. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.

United States 2/ 24.4 45.2 1.2 11.1 25.6 56.3
United Kingdom ..: 32.0 .2 3.7 --- 5.7 .2
France ..........: 17.9 8.4 1.7 --- 19.6 s.4
Germany .........: 4,6 --- 12.6 --- 17.2 --
Belgium .........: 4.6 1.2 1.6 01 6.2 1.3
Italy ............: 2.2 2.5 4.9 2.9 7.1 5,4
Sweden ..........: --- --- 7 2.0 .7 2.0
Netherlands .....: 1.2 2.3 1.6 1.0 2.8 3.3
Japan ............. --- 4.7 --- --. 4.7
Other ...........: 7.5 7.0 2.5 2.3 10.0 9.3
Total ......... 94.4 71.5 30.5 194 124.9 90.9
Compiled from commercial reports supplied by the American Agricultural Attache
at Buenos Aires.
I/ Preliminary. 2/ Includes small shipments to Canada.






WOOr-l0


- 10 -


United Kingdom Wool Control announces sharp increase
in prices to rEglisn buyers

New issue prices to British manufacturers for wool, tops and noils
for the rationing period which begins March 1 will be mostly 35 to 45 percent
higher than current prices, according to a recent announcement of the British
Wool Control. While these prices do not apply to wool and semi-manufactures
to be expor:.3d without further processing, they do represent prices to be paid
by British manufacturers for raw materials to be used in the manufacture of
goods for export.

The Wool Control states that there will be no wools of 44s to 50s
grades available for civilian use. The quaftity of 56s available in the
new r.tion'ir, period, March 1 to June 30, will be small.

The new issue prices for certain grades of wool, tops and noils are
shown in the nrccrmpnying table. Prices prevailing at the end of August
before the outbreak of war, Government purchase prices, and previous issue
prices are shown for comparison.

Manufactures for export to have priority
in wool swplies

To rcrourafe exports of wool cloth by British manufacturers the Wool
Control announced in January that for every 100 pounds of wool exported in
the form of cloth during any rationing period the manufacturer will be
entitled to an allocation of 125 pounds of wool. Such allocations will hold
precedence over supplies for civilian use in the United Kingdom.

The Wool Control does not guarantee that issue prices will remain un-
changed during the ratirninbg period March 1 to June 30, 1940. But such
prices are guaranteed on the allocation of 125 pounds for each 100 pounds
exported in the form of cloth up to April 30, 1940.





WCoo -38


- 11 -


United Kingdom: Prices per pound of wool and semi-
manufactures specified periods 1939-40


Control period
Market Issue price
.Maximum .Government.
: price (home trade)
Item and description Aug. 1 : price : purchase : effective
l/ :.schedule. price O. r
I Sept.5 0Oct.23 2/. Oct23Ma
:-: 1940
Colonial wool, combing type Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents
clean scoured basis
64s warp .................... 39-3 36.0 39.3 42.1 56.2
56s super ................... 31-7 28.8 31.3 33.9 49.1
Colonial wool, clothing type
Australian scoured fleeces,70s: 36.6 38.1 39.7 42.5 58.6
Cape scoured, average 64-70s : 31.3 29.2 30.5 32.6
Tops, Colonial, oil combed
64s warp ........... ........: 47.3 44.9 48.4 52.4 70.2
56s super ................... 38.4 36.4 39.3 42.5 60.7
Noils
White, Noble-Australian 64s .: 28.6 28.4 29.7 31.8 42.1
carded 56s average ...: 22.8 22.9 24.2 25.6 34.7

Compiled from official reports and from the Yorkshire Observer.
Prices converted from pence to cents as follows: Market prices August 31,
maximum price schedule September 5 and Government purchase price October 23
converted at noon buying rate, New York cable for dates specified; issue
prices, effective October 23 and March 1 converted at average rate of ex-
change for month of January 1940.

1/ Prices for wool are those quoted for the last London Auction Sales,
July 26. These prices are approximately equal to prices ruling just prior
to outbreak of war.
2/ Delivered Bradford, or any other consuming area. All stocks of wool
and semi-manufactures were taken over by the British Government from
private holders at the above price schedule.





WOOL-3


- 12 -


Prices of wool and textile raw materials in the United States,
Specified periods, 1 8g-O4


Average High : 1939 1L40
Item 1939 :
1938 1939 1/ Jan. Nov. Dec. Jan.
SCents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents C:nts

Boston market t
Territory, scoured basis
64s, 70s, 80s(fine)staole ..: 70.4 82.7 109.5 72.2 105.4 105.8 104.7
56s (3/8 blood) combing ....: 58.9 69.3 94. 60.8o 87.9 85.9 82.3
46s (Low 1/4 blood) ........: 52.4 62.6 87.5 54.0 81.7 790 76.1
Bright fleece, greasy
64s,70s,80s(fine) delaine ..: 29.0 32.9 .43.0 29-5 40.6 41.2 4o.7
56s (3/8 blood) combing ....: 29-5 36.2 48.8 31.5 47.0 46.0 44.5
46s (Low 1/4 blood) ........: 28.3 35.5 49.0 30.5 46.6. 45.5 44.0

Price received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of month : 19.4 22.9 28.7 20.0 27.6 27.5 28.1

Textile fibers
Wool, Terr. fine staple 2/ .: 70.4 82.7 109.5 72.2 105.4 105.8 104.7
Cotton 7/8 Middlinr 3/ ..... 8.58 9.04 10.39 8.54 9.22 10.39 10.62
Silk, Japanese 4/ ..........: 170.6 272.6 392.1 190.0 339.4 392.1 36z.3
Rayon yarn, 150 denier 5/ ..: 52.2 51.5 53.0 51.0 53.0 53.0 53.0



Compiled from reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service, except as otherwise
specified.

Yearly averages are averages of monthly prices except United States farm price,
1938, which is a weighted. average.

/ Monthly average.
Scoured basis, Boston market.
/ Average at 10 markets.
SWhite 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
SDomestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.






- 13 -


United States: Wool imports, consumption and machinery activity,
specified periods, 1937-39

*~~~,~ -r-jf \-r


Item 193 1938 199
Nov. Dec. Nov. Dec.
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000


Imports for consumption :
actual weight: 1/ :
Apnarel ................:
Finer than 4os .........:
Not finer than 40s ....:
Carpet, including camel's
hair .................

Consumo-tion, scoured
basis: 2/
Weekly average-
Apparejl ..............:
Carpet ...............

Apparel .. .......... .:
Carpet ...............:


pounds pounds' pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


150,160
126,601
23,559

172,091


30,811
18,443
12,369


98,i94
74,612
23,582


4,140
2,714
1,426


4,371
2,751
1,620


71,908 144,874 11,963- 13,649


5,273 4,143
2,050 1,225


274,217
106,620


219,565
64,945


5,636
1,989

293,083
103,421


5,878 5,938
1,918 1,900


23,512
7,716


29,688
9,501


11,874
9,977
1,897

10,602


6,609
2,310

26,436
9,238


15,891
14,699
1,192


5,595
1,916

22,378
7,665


-I '0


9L'- 9


Weekly average in hours


Machinery activity: 2/ :
Hours operated per
machine in place/ :
Worsted combs ........: 46.1 39.8 51.8 56.5 57.6 60.7
Worsred spindles .....: 32.9 26.9 39.5 40.1 45.4 49.6
Woolen spindles ......: 4.3.1 30.6 39.7 39.o0 39.9 44.9
Woolen and worsted :
looms-
Broad ...............: 39.0 28.1 4o.6 35.5 41.3 47.8
Narrow ..............: 20.4 10.5 13.2 12.8 12.3 19.7
Carpet and rug looms- :
Broad ...............: ) 286 23.4 37.4 32.4 32.5 43.8
Narrow .............. ) 15.9 22.9 19.2 20.8 24.4
Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Consumption
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census.


4.7.8
15.4

41.7
21.8
and


1/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
2/ Figures for November and December 1939 and November 1938 based on 4 weeks,
December 1938 on 5 weeks; 1938 totals based on 53 weeks. No adjustment made for
holidays.
1/ "Weekly average hours operated por machine or spindle in place" will take the
place of "Percentage of maximum single shift capacity" previously reported. The
percentage of single shift capacity (40 hours) may be obtained by dividing the
above figures by 40.


WOOL-38






WOOL-38


- 14 -


Wool: Stocks held by dealers and manufacturers, and stocks
on farms and ranches in 13 Western sheep States,
grease basis, Urited States, 1935-39

Apparel wool : Carpet
Date Domestic : Foreign / :Total : On farms :wool, all
Dealers :anufac- : :Manufac- : and : foreign
::i:turers 2/: le :turers 2/:r :ranches 3/: I/
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
1935
Mar. 30 4/: 170,887 90,398 13,597 14,508 289,390 41,907
June 29 : 183,818 112,758 11,783 11,116 319,475 43,004
Sept. 28 : 161,945 155,708 11,401 15,755 344,809 51,795
Dec. 31 : 76,861 114,239 23,067 20,366 234,533 -4,500 51,772
1936
Mar. 28 :41,836 80,581 27,852 39,236 189,505 350 55,049
June 27 : 136,325 105,108 20,663 33,050 295,146 49,060
Sept. 26 : 128,845 93,696 13,764 25,293 261,598 47,462
Dec. 31 : 67,353 102,208 33,509 43,811 246,881 1,800 53,959
1937
Mar..27 : 34,873 81,488 27;527 68,862 212,750 330 53,923
June 26 : 131,967 87,989 16,038 51,393 287,387 51,172
Sept. 25 : 139,085 85,303 16,925 34,865 276,178 59,846
Dec. .31 : 134,623 66,03.7 14,859 23,968 239,487: 31,600 63,471
1938
Mar. 26 : 117,226 63,396 12,993 23,157 216,772. 22,500 49,640
June 25 : 169,043 95,397 11,940 21,342 297,722 43,927
Sept. 24 : 181,847 104,559 14,316 20,435 321,157 37,969
Dec. 31 : 116,635 82,225 19,893 19,650 238,403 13,340 43,137
1939
Apr. 1 :68,554 64,345 19,965 28,075 180,939 6,290 48,527
July 1 : 107,910 103,857 15,114 28,886 255,767 46,860
Sept. 30 : 75,245 125,084 11,556 32,977 244,862 53,705
Dec. 31 5/: 47,252 81,223 29,508 47,437 205,420 14,384 53,965

Compiled from Bureau of the Census Quarterly Wool Stocks Reportse -These statistics
are believed to include over 95 percent of the total stocks held by and afloat to
all dealers, manufacturers and topmakers in the United States.

1/ Includes foreign wool afloat to the United States.
Includes topmakers' stocks.
/ Estimated by the Department of Agriculture. No estimates available for dates
where no figures are shown.
4/ Grease basis figures for :larch 30, 1935, calculated from statistics of condition
in which reported. Stock figures were not reported on a grease basis by the Bureau
of the Census until June 1935.
j Preliminary.








WOOL-38


- 15 -


Mill consumption of apparel wool, greasy shorn basis, total
and per capital, United States 1918-39


Year Total Per capital Year Total" Per capital
Million :: Million
pounds Pounds :pounds Pounds

1918 : 676.0 6.5 : 1929 : 554.7 4.6
1919 : 563.7 5.4 : 1930 : 447.9 3.6
1920 : 510.9 4.8 : 1931 : 545.2 4.4
1921 : 597.4 5.5 :: 1932 439.8 3.5
1922 : 640,4 5.8 : 1933 : 572.2 4.5
1923 : 603.1 5.4 : 1934 : 381.4 3.0
1924 : 518.0 4.6 : 1935 : 748.4 5.9
1925 : 525.2 4.6 : 1936 : 666.4 6.2
1926 : 524.1 4.5 : 1937 : 579.5 4.5
1927 : 551.1 4.7 : 1938 _/ : 513.9 3.9
1928 : 511.9 4.3 :: 1939 : 673.9 5.1


Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census.


1/ Preliminary.




UN4iVERSIT OF FLORIDA
111IIIIII III 111 1111111111111111111111111111
3 1262 08861 5801






I