The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03137

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
f f
3 Si I
Throughout the world B
more people buy J
1
AN INDEPENDENT CHIjN PAILY NEWSPAPER
"Let fte people know the truth and the country is safe' Abraham Lincoln
than any other
imported whisky.
'A
SITH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER iO, 1969
FIVE CENTS

fctartaH
SB

W PANAMA 3-097S COLON 779 I I

lent

CZers Congratulate Cotton
On Diablo Quarters Victory

' Balboa postmaster Arthur
phone and on the street, for

Heights home
" Assignment of the home to Supply Division general manager John J. Barton last
week set off a local uproar when the Pacific Civic Councils, led by president Sam Roe,
Jr. blasted the administration for official favoritism in giving the house to garton, who
has two years service here, rather than Cotton, who has worked for the Canal since
1926.
Balboa Heights officials today pointed out that although Barton yesterday formal.
y relenquished the Diablo house, neither yet has an official assignment.

Barton's boss, Supply chief L.
A. Ferguson, has requested Bar Barton
ton Barton be assigned one of the new La
Boca houses, pending a possibility
of giving him a Ridge Road as assignment
signment assignment en Balboa Heights later.
At least e"t of the plush, exe executive
cutive executive hornet on the Heights is
xpcttd to be available in
bout 18 months.
Tae contested Diablo house, of officials
ficials officials pointed out, will not appear
on the quarters vacancy list until,
.next Wednesday. Retiring assistant
teincipal Harold J. (Zip) Zierten,
of'' Balboa High School, is expect expected
ed expected to surredder the key today
- Cotton, aid today he would file
bis official request as soon as the
vacancy uppears, but that the
Bousing office has not confirmed
the house will be his.
v Cotton wants the house because
'it is admirably .suited to needs 01
hi 79 year old infirm parents, who;
live withhis faUyri
Observer weref donfiden tht
Cotton asianmnt to Hit Diablo
: house wowid .- iwHiwWjftel
the five day oublle qulirrel If
provoked.
-t MDnw.hila kt Ralhon Heights.

v nffieial aookesman said the ad-"

ministratioh feels yesterday s
meeting 'between Gov. William E.
Pote? and the Civic Council was
"efective in clearing up misun misunderstandings
derstandings misunderstandings on both sides" and
tvii result in a revision of pro proceed
ceed proceed 'ires under which key execut executives
ives executives are assigned preferred
hous'ng.
At- present 57 jobs are so- de designated,
signated, designated, Balboa Heights;, has
greed to revise the list and bring
it up to date, a well as to give
the Civic Council a list of specific
houses earmarked for "official as assignments".
signments". assignments". ; Both sides appeared satisfied
wltH the results of yesterday's
meeting, but the abrupt end of
the controversy did not come
until some hours later.
Roe made public Barton's letter
to Ferguson (housing chief as well
ii supply boss), in which the con contested
tested contested quarters were, relinquished.
The final outcome irt the dis
pute had not been Mentioned at
roe Baiooa neigms meeting.
Rank and" file Zonians were
openly pleated at the outcome,
. regarding It as major victory
Hew Split Foreseen
In Coalition Ranks
As Grouns Reoisfer
Political sources today predicted
a possible new split in the ranks
of. ,the National Patriotic Coali Coalition.
tion. Coalition.
.The prediction were based on
the announcement hat certain
members of the CPN headed by
Mario Cal, Secretary General of
the Presidencia, plan to start reg registering
istering registering for the old Renovador
(Reform) Party next month.
The announcement said the
party would be called the Partido
Renovador Autentico.
Observers are of the opinion the
move could provoke .mother cab cabinet
inet cabinet crisis similar to the one
Which occurred when Education
Minister of Government and Jus Justice
tice Justice Jose D. Bazan announced
they would register their own par parties.
ties. parties. However, there is some specula speculation
tion speculation that the Renovador registra registration
tion registration move may be sponsored by
the CPN in a move to get mort
Uepresentatives on orovincial and
municipal Juries during the 1960
election.
" On the other hand, the CPN's
first vice presidential candidate,
Heraclio Barletta, has also an announced
nounced announced that he would register
his own party if the Renovador
faction does so.
'.Barletta represents the Partido
ftaclonal Revolucionario (PNR)
faction In the Coalition, while
presidential candidate Ricardo
Arlaa represent the Renovador
faction and aecond vice presiden presidential
tial presidential candidate Alberto Boyd, the
Democratic group.

T. Cotton today
was
still
his apparent victory
in a
in the never-ending battle be between
tween between the man-on-the-treet and
Balboa Heights, between the
"little man" and "privileged
authority."
"Potter and Company took a
Dr. R. J. Allaro
Voted Membership
On World Court
UNITED NATIONS, Sept. 30
fUPD Dr. Ricavdo J Alfare, a
former President of Panama, was
elected to the International Court
of Justice yesterday py both the
General Assembly and the Securjj
ty Council.
FoRhe,. first time ii the histo histoid
id histoid of the-tSnitetf Nations, the Sec Security
urity Security Council vote oh the world
court "was, unanimous..
-) j fxr?-;:: 'JfcAr; x 1
Itf he Knral ASisembiy? Alf a a-ro
ro a-ro received 75 out of 82 votes.
Milan Bartos of Yugoslavia. Ju-
tvIib Lopez Olivan of Spain and Ah-
maa anne-uaiiari 01 nan gin
two vftes each and Peruvian ex ex-President
President ex-President 1 Dr. Jose Luis Busta Busta-mante,
mante, Busta-mante, one.
,AWaro was elected '0 fill T va vacancy
cancy vacancy caused by the death sOf Jo Jose
se Jose Gustavo Guerrero of Salvador,
who died1 on Oct. 25 last year.
Applauding Alfaro's election, I I-talian
talian I-talian Ambassador Egid'o Ortona
described the Panamanian jurist
as "one of the most outstanding
representatives of legal tradition
m the Americas."
Panamanian Foreign Minister
Miguel J. Moreno Jr. and Dr.
Jorge Illueca, Panama's represen representative
tative representative on the Security Council,
thanked the delegates to the world
organization for Alfaro's election.
Traffic Offender
Not An Employe
Of Boyd Brothers
Heinz Strein, 22, the German
who last Friday was fined $30 and
got a five-day suspended sentence
for a triple traffic offense, is not
an employe of Boyd Brothers ship
ping agency as was stated in The
Panama American on the day of
th court hearing.
The agency's only German em
ploye, who arrived here recently
has a clean traffic record both in
Panama atut the Canal Zone.
Proof Positive
SIDNEY, Australia (UPl)-Nick
Jones today had proof that Billy
irranam s recent crusade here
was at least partially successful
Jones lost his wallet several
fays go. Sunday night he got
back his driver's license -plus a
Billy Grahsm tract but there was
no sign of his walW or hs mi
ey.

USARCARIB Puts First Service Gift
On United Line; New Units 100
U.S. Army Caribbean wag the first of the armed services
to turn in contributions to the 1959 United Fund Drive, and
among Army Installations, the post of Fort Amador took the
early bird award."
" On Monday, opening day of the campaign, Richard R.
Saul, USARCARIB United Fund treasurer, received the initial
Army donations from MaJ. Howard A. Smith, area manager
for Fort, Amador.
Two units of the Civil Affairs Bureau went over the top
with 100 percent participation in the Canal Zone United
Fund yesterday.
The teachers, Janitors and other employe of the Paraiso
High School were the first school unit to send In 100 percent
returns. Ashton M. Parchment was keyman and A. H. Byrd
was division chairman.
The office of the Civil Affairs Director and the License
Section also forwarded complete returns yesterday. Mrs. An Annie
nie Annie R, Rathgeber is both keyman and chairman for these
units.

n

sductooin

getting congratulations, by
dispute over a choice Diablo
real drubbing on this one, said a
20-year veteran, with evident rel
ish.
Another said: "They'll think
twice next time they try kicking
us around," but neglected to ex
plain when, how often and under
what circumstances he had been
kicked around previously.
There was also unanimous a
greement that the Civic Council
had been an unrelenting and ad
mirable protagonist in the housing
fray.
Poller Takes Off
For San Francisco
Shionino Meeting
Gov. William E. Potter left by
ttlane yesterday for an extended
trp to the United States, e fana
ma vanal gorapany wainesa.
Ml livst -iato "fte Sarf fiYan
Cisco where, be'-Will attend his an
nual meeting witb')fepresentatives
of the shipping industry. He will
also confer with -representatives
of the Pacific-American Steamship
Conference.
From California, the Governor
will go to Washington to meet
with officials of the. Bureau of the
Budget.
Before he returns to the Canal
Zone, the Governor will attend the
quarterly meeting -of the Panama
Canal Company Board of Direc
tors in Washington Oct. 17.
During the Governor's absence,
Col. John D. McElheny, Lieuten
ant GoveFnor-Vice President, will
act as Governor and perform such
duties of the President, Panama
Canal Company, as related to the
operation of the Company on the
Isthmus.
Bail-Jumner Held
Bv Secrela Pending
Extradition Action
Panama Secret Police officials
today con'imed they are holding
Albino RoHan, Jr., pending For Foreign
eign Foreign Office action on an extradi extradition
tion extradition request filed by Canal Zone
officials.
Roldan is wanted by Canal Zone
police on a charge of committing
an indecent act before a six year
old child.
At the time his case was sched
uled for trial before District Judge
Guthrie F. Crowe. Roldan skipoed
the country, forfeiting $700 bail.
Later he was reported to have
been requested to leRve Venezue Venezuela
la Venezuela by authorities in Caracas, and
finally made his way to Costa
Rica.
According to reliable sources,
the wanted man returned to Pan Panama
ama Panama City by bus from David.
When the bus reached Thatcher
Ferry landing Roldan draped a
'owe! over his face, apparently In
an attempt to escape detection
while passing through the Zone.

L., -1

SMILING CHIEF, SOBER PAPOOSE Even a visit to Pan Panama
ama Panama City's Central Fire Station and top-seating on the big white
fire engine fail to bring a smile to the face of three-year-old
Jimmy Meehan, son of Navy Yeoman and Mrs. James A. Mee Mee-han
han Mee-han of the Fifteenth Naval District. The cheek-pinching guide
, is Panama's No. 1 bombero, Fire Chief Raul Arango. Fire-
fighting Jtmits from Panatna and the Canal, -ZoneT, will cooperate
once a&fn next week for the annal observance, of fire Pre Pre-venUoif
venUoif Pre-venUoif Week. Special fi lUleweMe ete't.iidiool eHiW -J,
dj-eh inoVleMrTcs re Aeing fylarined b?Arang, nd Canal Zone
Fire Marsjt4l:W. G. Ddlan."

Tuberculin, Histoplasmosin Testing
Starts For US Elementary Classes

Tuberculin and bistoplasmosin
skin tests, similar to those given
some Canal Zone school children
in February, will be started next
week among pupils in Canal Zone
elementary grades, it was an
nounced by the Health Bureau.
The tests, were carried out first
among the students in the junior
and senior U.S. citizen high schools
on both sides of the Isthmus and
were continued during the sum summer
mer summer months in the Latin Ameri American
can American Schools.
Conducted by the Health Bu Bureau
reau Bureau in coordination with the Mid-
City Councilmen
Must Stand Trial,
On Fund Charges
District Attorney Gerardo de
TrSn u exnec.ted todav to order
ail nf the fiounr.ilmen elected to
the Panama City Council in
1956 to stand trial an cnarges
of mishandling city funds.
It was understood that the
indictment, which is to be pre
sented some time .ractay, win
also include two former mayors
ar,A nthor Mt.v officials alleeed-
ly Involved in the municipal
scandal which came to ngm
last February.
Th former mavors and offi
cials to be indicted include Ma
vors Jose Calar Escaia and Al
berto Aleman (now Governor
Municipal Engineer George Hil Hil-bert,
bert, Hil-bert, City Treasurer Victor. D' D'-Anello
Anello D'-Anello and Municipal Auditor
Leonardo Conte.
Cand To Grant
Leave To Observe
Jewish Holidays
A liberal leave policy will be
followed by the Canal organization
in the case of employes of Jewish
faith who wish to observe the
Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah
and Yom Kippur, it was announc
ed by Gov. W. R. Potter in a me memorandum
morandum memorandum to Bureau Heads and
Divisions.
These employe will be granted
time off wherever possible when it
does not interfere with the essen essential
tial essential operations of the Panama Ca Canal.
nal. Canal. The time will be charged to
annual leave.
Rosh Hashanah, or the Jewish
New Year begins at sundown,
Friday, and continues until sun sundown,
down, sundown, Sunday, Oct. 4. Yom Kip Kippur,
pur, Kippur, or the Jewish Day of Atone Atonement,
ment, Atonement, begins at sundown, Sunday,
Oct. 11, and continues until sun sundown,
down, sundown, Monday, Oct, It-

5 W

die American Research Unit of
the Public Health Service, the
tests will be started Monday
among pupils in grades one
through six in U.S. citizen schools
on the Atlantic side. They will be
continued in October among chil children
dren children in those grades in the U.S.
citizen schools on the Pacific side.
Forms which parents are to
sign to indicate their willingness
to havetheir children particip participate
ate participate in the program have already
been sent out by the school
authorities.
Parents have been asked to fill
out the forms and return them as
soon as possible.
As was explained earlier this
year, the tests are not inoculations
They are simply skin tests no de determine
termine determine whether a child has beeD
exposed to tuberculosis or histo
plasmosis, a fungus disease of
the lungs.
As before, they will be conduct conducted
ed conducted simultaneously by two teams,
one headed by Canal Zone school
physicians and the other by mem members
bers members of the Middle American Re
search Unit.
If the result it positive In the
cast of the tuberculin 'est, ex exhaustive
haustive exhaustive laboratory studies will
be carried out and a survey will
be conducted of parents and fa family
mily family contacts.
The histoplasmosin test is a sur survey
vey survey to determine the extent of this
ailment among school children in
the Canal Zone.
The
Judge's Bench
Nkasio A. Vargas, 41, Panama Panamanian,
nian, Panamanian, was cited on two consecutive
days for not having a Canal Zone
driver's license. At Balboa Magis
trate's Court he was fined $10 for
the first citation and $15 for the
second. He was also cited for
driving his car without headlights,
oh which count he was placed on
a year's probation and told to put
his car in proper order.
Another Panamanian, Rolando
Burgos. 25, also appeared on more
than one traffic count. He was
fined $10 for not having a Zone
drivver's license, placed on six
monChs probation and given 30
days in which to obtain one. He
was also fined $15 for speeding on
a curve.
Martin Nunez, 37, Panamanian,
had his year's probation revoked
and was ordered to serve five
davs in jail for loitering. Nunez
received a suspended sentence
when he appeared on the charge
Sept. 8. When he repeated the of
fense Sept. 29, the court ordered
him to serve the previously sue
pended sentence

Airman Guilty
Of Indecent
Exposure
Balboa Magistrate John E. Dem-
ing today instructed a 23-year-old
American airman to get psychia psychiatric
tric psychiatric aid to help him cope with a
behavior problem which Deming
termed "a public nuisance
Doming had found the airman,
Cpl. Benjamin L. Lapko, Jr.,
guilty of lewd and indecent ex ex-posurt,
posurt, ex-posurt, fined him $25 and en-
fenced him to a 30 day jail term.
The jail sentence was suspended
for one year on condition the sol soldier
dier soldier commits no similar acts.
Police prosecution foHowed a
complaint filed by a Balboa
Heights employe.
The complaining witness, an
attractive blond, testified that she
was confronted by Lepko on two
mornings just beyond Balboa
grade school while she was en
route to work when he lewd ex exhibition
hibition exhibition took place.
On another occasion, she said, a
car stopped alongside her and a
man she believed was Lepko en engaged
gaged engaged in the same lewd exhibi exhibition.
tion. exhibition. Deming told the good-looking
young soldier that under ancient
Anglo-Saxon law such persons
were regarded at a public nui nuisance
sance nuisance and prosecuted at tuch.
"In modern society," Deming
said, we cannot tolerate such be behavior
havior behavior in public, and I must in instruct
struct instruct you to seek medical help in
curbing this kind of abnormal ac action."
tion." action." Lepke is stationed at,, Albrook
I4eleL;",iH' 44 marrieC and his
pregnant wife attended, the pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings In court.
Hit superior officers said Lep Lepko,
ko, Lepko, who offered no defense a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the charge, pottestet out out-ttanding
ttanding out-ttanding abilitiet and mentali mentality.
ty. mentality. A psychiatrist's report introduc introduced
ed introduced in court said Lepko was able
to distinguish between right and
wrong while engaged in the lewd
exhibitions, but probably was not
able to control the impulse.
Argentine Offers
Here For IWeflno
At Albrook School
Brig. Gen. Roberto Garcia Ral Ral-tar.
tar. Ral-tar. Argentinian Air Force Chief
of Staff: Bri Gen "Meban Os
car Facio. director of the Air In Institute
stitute Institute and ten other ranking Air
Force Officers arrived at Albrook
Sunday to begin a week's indoc indoctrination
trination indoctrination of the Caribbean Air
Command and the ITSAF School
for Latin America.
Their visit began with a brief brief-ins
ins brief-ins by Maj. Gen. Leland S. Stran Stran-athan,
athan, Stran-athan, rommander of the Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Air Command in his head headquarters.
quarters. headquarters. Col. Phil B. Cage. Commandant
of the ITSAF School of Latin Ame America,
rica, America, briefed th" officers on the
schools ooeraiion and conducted
a tonr of the classrooms and other
facilities. TVey were then eiven a
bribing conernine nhysioloeical
aspects of high speed-high altitude
flight in prenaration for flights to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow in T-3 aircraft operating
from Howard Air Force Base
v The oartv visited Lt Gen. Ridg Ridg-ely
ely Ridg-ely Gaither Commander in Ch'pf,
Caribbean Command for an in informal
formal informal exchang" of views on air airborne
borne airborne operations. While there the
group toured the operational facil facilities
ities facilities of tt-e headmiarfers.
Stranathan will conduct a final
brWing for Baltar and his group
Fndav morninc The Argentinian
visitors will return home Sunday.
4
Today's Transits
(scheduled)
Northbound 14
Southbeund 15
TOTAL t
(Cleer Cut: 3)

Strong

AFGE's Attorney
Says Not All Is
Favorable, Though

A strong case can be made for rulings that will per permit
mit permit Panama Canal employes to exclude rentals from their

gross income reported for tax
the American Federation of
counsel in Washington.
This view was expressed
in reply to an inquiry made

through the federation's national director of legislation.
Merriman warned that the picture is not all favor

able. The issues are complex.

Unsettled political conditions in Panama, where rents
are "extremely high" and quarters scarce or nonexistent
were among the factors noted in 1956 by a US Circuit
(jourt of Appeals in upholding a Canal Zone District

Court ruling that Canal employes are captive tenants
of their government landlord.
So far, union officials know of no recent rulings on
a number of tax claims filed by Zonians for refunds. Sev Several
eral Several Zonians have been asked to re-file their claims on
standard Internal Revenue form 843.
Meanwhile, Ross V. Thompson, chief of field opera
Hons of the International Operations Division of the US
Internal Revenue Service, has' been on the Isthmus thit
week advising Americans of tkVCortZbriv' well,-iii
those in Panama, about their tax problems.

This is Thompson's second trip
to the Isthmus to consult with
Americans about their tax prob problems.
lems. problems. He is spending part of today!
in the Canal Zone.
A spokesman for the US Embas-
sy said today on Thompson's be behalf
half behalf that he. will be available for
brief appointments tomorrow and
Friday, within the limits of his a a-vailahle
vailahle a-vailahle time.
American business people in
Panama or Federal employes in
the Canal Zone may call Exten Extension
sion Extension 4fi at the Embassy to seek
appointments.
Betides iking Washington
headquarters for a legal opinion
on the general subject of rent
exclusion, Rufut M. Lovelady,
president of Local 14, alto rait raited
ed raited the question at to whether
utilitiet could be excluded from
taxable income.
AFGE director of legislation
John A. McCart discussed the
point with Merriam. who feels
that a case can be made for these
exclusions also.
The nlea would be made on the
basis that utilities are part of the
oremises rented and are neces necessary
sary necessary expenses coincident to occu occupying
pying occupying the housing available
The case for the exclusion of the
rent naid by cantive tenants rests
chiefly on the decisions made in
a claim filed hy a Dr. Boykin who
was emnlnyed at Veterans Hospi Hospitals
tals Hospitals in Virginia and Nebraska.
Boykin's claim was unheld on
the basis that he was required to
occupy quarters on. or conve convenient
nient convenient to, hosnital grounds
Boykin. however, was not per permitted
mitted permitted to exclude WO monthly
naid for garage rental, since the
Veterans Adrninistartion did nr,t
require thai he rent a garage.
Nor was this rental deducted from
his salary.
Merrigan went on to note that
the decision in the captive-tenant
case of the Panama Canal Com Company
pany Company vtrut Wagner it no tl tl-togother
togother tl-togother favorahlt to Canal ton ton-iiin't
iiin't ton-iiin't tax cluimt generally "bu
It will certainly he helpful."
In this case. Wagner, a tenant,
sued the Canal for accident dam damages.
ages. damages. The Circuit Judge whose
ruling stands in the matter stated
in his concurring opinion:
"In the Canal 7nne there exists
an unusual situation is to tenan tenancy.
cy. tenancy. The emplove"; of the Panama
Canal Companv also look to it for
housing, and although the" exer
cise some preference in making
application for availahle housing
. they are still subiect to as assignment
signment assignment and must take what they
are told to take by the housin
authorities and have no rights o'
select'on such as exist in a local
ity where everything is not gov
ernment-owned The Cnmnan Cnmnan-is
is Cnmnan-is the sole owner and tenan'
must deal with the Cnmnany t t-get
get t-get a new assignment or in fac'
any assignment at all
Merrigan'i letter foes on to ob
serve:

purposes, in the opinion of

Government Employes legal
by attorney E. L Merrigan
by local AFGE Lodge 14
"Thit decision gees en te point
out that the employe's only al alternative
ternative alternative if te live in a foreign
country, where conditions art)
untettled, rents extremely high,
and quarters scarce and in many
instances, (son-ex tttent. Thut, in
reality. It would appear that the
quartert are furnithed by the
Company In the Canal Zone.
"(i) By reason of necessity
1,
"(ii) B yreason of lack of other',
living accommodations and high
rents in a foreign country, and
"t iiH For the mutual conve
nience of employer and employe.
"These circumstances would ap
pear to be somewhat different
fro'-ii the simple situation pre
sented in the Boykin case, where1
the employe was plainly directed
to live at the VA hospital to per
form his job.
"But, certainly, the prevalent
condition are not altogether
different; and It it tny epwfdlT
that a vary ttrong case, if prop
erly presented, could be md
for the Canal Zone employet.
"I therefore, suggest that AFGE
might make a very strong request
for a ruling from the Internal
Revenue Service here in Washinf Washinf-ton
ton Washinf-ton on behalf of all AFGE mera mera-hers
hers mera-hers so situated in the Canal Zone;
or in the alternative, the individ individual
ual individual members might request such
a ruling, in which event AFGE
here could take appropriate steps
to support same."
Nikila k Peking
Uroes Promotion
Of Universal Peace
TOKYO, Sept. 30 (ITI)-Sovict
Premier Nikita Khrushchev arriv arrived
ed arrived todav in Peinine and told ld.
ers of the Communist world we
must do everything witnin our
power to clear the atmosphere and
create conditions for friendship
"Exerting all our efforts we
must at'ain a situation in which
universal peace is made secure,
he told an airport gathering which
included suh notable communist
leaders as Mao Tse tung of Bed
China, Ho Chi Minh of North Viet
Nam and leaders of the satellite
in Europe.
Khrushchev arrived to help ce!
cbrate Communist China's I0'h
anniversary tomorrow. Thtre wa
videsnread speculation the Peip
ng regime would use the day to
ree five imprisoned American!
ind perhaps to fire a rocket-mis.
sile in a token gesture ef China's
growing power.

0
21

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TUX f AJiAJrUi AM1JUCAJI AH INO EFEKD EJfT PAILI KEVTSrAVlB
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER M X9S1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
"They Even Gave Ms Plans for It''

fn "rt.e Washington
p 1 Merry-Go-Round

Labor News
And
(Comments

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FOMION PrHfNTATIvr JOSHUA B POWIl INC
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PVR MOWTM IM ABVNC1

991 Oil MONTH IH. ADVANCE.
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THIS IS YOUR FOUUM THI pIAMRS OWN COLUMN
Tkt Mul Be it tm open rorum toi rwdtricP PmiAmric.
letters ar nfiy4 iriMully ind r iidli,1ij'tv wKell tidntll
" M r contribute i letter don't bt imparltrttH 4f$t I'pui K
MBl dy. Letttn art publishtd in th rder receir0?
Pleas rrr re keep t't letters limited to orr 9 Itnxtk.
Identity or letter writer is held in strictest cMidence.
This newspaper assumes no responsibility for stetenents er eeiniont
expressed in letters from readers. tj
THE MAIL BOX

COLON'S CHILDREN
Sir:
'Spitting Mads' letter (Mail Box. Sept 26 1 left me confused.
First, he said that some waiter ordered some children out of a bar
IB Colon and got a coke bottle thrown at him. Then he askert what
would have happened if the waiter had slapped these children, and
went on to answer his own question.
A couple of paragraphs later he said the -children were no big bigger
ger bigger thin six or eight years old. It seems to me that if a crown man
can't take 4 six or eight year-old and give him a good old fashioned
spanking then something should he done about the poor man's
strength.
Was the waiter the only person in the bar" If the spanking had
brought any other troublesome children to the scene 1 suggest the
bartender, the owner and the customers could have taken a force forceful
ful forceful hand in effectively reminding them that they wcrt still children.
I doubt whether this would be necessary in such a case anyway, as
my guess is that the others will run when they see one of their
number being disciplined as a child should be.
It seems to me that "Spitting Mad" has let a lot happen before
he said his piece. Why didn't he speak up sooner0
He may have helped the people of Colon realize the buck pass passing
ing passing that was going on. He could have pointed out to them what it
would mean for everyone in Colon to work as a unit on this problem.
Why did he delay writing till land had already been donated
Ws il because he was waiting to see what Mrs. Behringer. the po police,
lice, police, Celis or Pastor Ramos were going to do with the children" Or
Joes it mean he will be the first to offer to help to do something
with the land donated
i It's typiraj of so many people in the world today to sit ba(k and
Ad nothing except criticize those who are trying to do some good.
Instead of criticizing, it would be far better for "Spittins Mad" to
help raise funds for equipment to put on the land which has been
donated, or funds for the purchase of more land if it is needed.
He could also contact the restaurants in which the children have
been giving trouble and have them set aside a certain amount of
food daily for those needy kids.
- "Spitting- Mad'-' was right in describing them as having nowhere
to go and nothing to do Now. though, they have a place to to Let
fiim help in giving them something to do. Let them heln build their
fvn place, even f it's only handing out nails or actini as water
boys. Then also teach them something useful gardeninr. or things
jjurh as children do in the 4 H clubs Stateside so that they may
earn a little spending money.
! "Spitting Mad" is nol from Colon and does nol feel like of offering
fering offering to help there, then he would do well to keep -further criti criticism
cism criticism to himself.
If he is from Colon. 1 suggest he get out and work with the kids.
Then, if he still feels the need for criticizing, he could direct it to
thrce people of Colon who were not doing their part along with him
jn this much-neded proic'
Less Talk and More Work

JOBS FOR
Sir;

The "Five Ex-G.I.s" (Mail Box, Sept. 27) and any others like
them who may be around must realize that the US government does
not owe them or anyone else a .job. If they are qualified for a .joH
ftty can apply for it just as the rest do. They get five points just
any other vet gets under the Yelerans Preference Act. That is,
!nnle?s any of them is a wounded vet. ....',

No one told the "Five Ex-G 1
I There was no contract saying a
ijfos way out. Was it because thev

3tltey did not Ukr out US citizenship?-. v

SV Thev are lurkv to have 0nt

WTWJt TTill A,. ,,, J

tM,ijsy. iyu. nir uir.v nm in mm rnnnn

fcisjTTrrnai c.uaro. as some 01 their

think the civic conucils or

n$yrirm : 11 uiey nvr a uaiir. lucre is. a yacancv -sr-oil; every week
oY so. Why don't they apply for these vacancies just as evervone
else has to even US-citizen ex-G I ; Then if the US government
can I'lace these men. I'm sure it w'll.
The "Five Ex-G.I.s" say they don't want anv handouts or fa fa-vori'ism.
vori'ism. fa-vori'ism. I know some local rat" e C, S s working for Uncle Sam
in the Canal Zone. They must have been on the ball and passed
their job qualification exams. Could it he that the "Five Fx-G.S."
are flunkies?
US ex-O.I.

AL 1 it 41 1... .1

if. COPOZAL HOSPITAL
Sir:
The time has come for public discussion of Corozl Hospital.
For 4(1 years it has existed as a place for the mentalh' ill and, with without
out without "discrimination. For the human refuse of the Canal Zone
In these days when mental illness is so much more respecta
bk, e.H it were, than in the prejudiced days of 40 years ago should
nm the stigma of Corozal be removed0 After all. tomorrow vou or
I may be affb-ted. Why should wc nol be attended at Gorgas, as
re those-suffering from any other illness'1
Every time you apply for a driver's license, you are asked a a-botil
botil a-botil mental illness. Will insurance companies pay on it" Hospital Hospitalization
ization Hospitalization Are the old prejudices still with us? Can you tell your
rrtijhbor, "I was in Corozal""
Former Patient
BOOK LEARNING
Sir:
I see where stones are being thrown at me. Well that's the wav
it is, but it's a pity that individuals who claim to be so educated can't
refute another person's remarks or views without using insults or
name -calling. However, it is more fun answering letters from Grin Gringos
gos Gringos than those from my over-educatd or semi illiterate countrymen.
These countrymen of mind don't seem to know that when the
government of Panama asks for equal wages in the Canal it is fight fighting
ing fighting for their lights. What's so hurtful is that many of them pretend
toh? so patriotic, yet time and gain they keep selling their country
and their flag in some political argument, hut mostlv for some luxury
Bke commissary privileges.
I Well, the Lord Jesus had his Judas, and the American revolu revolutionaries
tionaries revolutionaries their Benedict Arnold in the New World, so a small, up-and-tommg
nation hk:- Panama should not be surprised. Yt)u can mal maltreat
treat maltreat and heal fid percent of the Negroes of Panama and even kick
them in the rear, and then give them a plate of food and a pint of
turn and all is forgotten
"Ringa da Bell" (Mail Box. Sept 22 1 should have seen one of
the better-educated Americans on the Isthmus instead of just looking
into a book V) find answers to my questions. It's very easy to fool
many of my countrymen of Negro parentage, and evr'n a few Latins,
put 75 percent of the Americans know that answers to the problems'
between Panama and the US men like Judge Crow?, who proved
his guts in his speech to the Rotary Club.
I will give "Ringa Da Bell" a little information that he might be
able to use. It's not fair to believe some facts in a book and disbe disbelieve
lieve disbelieve the other part. I am sure he read the World Almanac for his
ansyers It would take up too much space to' give a detailed explan explanation,
ation, explanation, so I am suggesting that he try tn get copies of Darwin's "Ori "Origin
gin "Origin of the Species," "The Story of Mankind" and the "Story of the
World."
Ancient relics and human bones have been found which prove
that Bible historians were a way off on the story of CreAtion. Many
individuals believe that Christians are -the. only ones who -believe in
God. This is a farfetched idea, because every'living being believes in
God and worships Him in (heir own manner,
Call me a Ripleyile if vou like, hut that.lale genius proved that
all names of Cod have four letters Lord. 'English; Jhvh, Hebrew;
Deus, Latin; Dion, French: Alia. Mohammedan; Cod, German;
Godl, Dutch; Rama, Hindu; Dins. Spaimh; Knmi, Japanese; Amen.
Egypt, and so on.
f.'inc? "Ringa da Bell" r; so miijtI 111. i lie c;m explain why this
world is known as America instead of Columbus, who according to
l i'tory was the discoverer, or who was trie first President of the
United Sta'es.
' --erding to the l ite Diplev. John H inw-n of Marvland was
!':tcd President of the US, by Congress in 17."
Ginger Know All.

4 'jr.

2-
14 OC
EX-G.l.s
s" to join. Thev volunteered.
job would be waiting for them on
were afraid of income tax that
tnmp fuHhrr prjiir3tinn mirlor (lw
1. f ,u.: .... M- ...
in u'eil rumm y m join ine JNB
ex dl 'buddies did? What makes
anv other agency should helD
... .

By VICTOR RIISIL

SAN-FKAAC1SCO With the
heat ofl, wmmsy has overwhelm
eu tne ola Capone crowu. une of
scanace Al s 010 cuiiiKues in
arms an cauoic now is
opening suop in Caiuornia and is
auverusing in ihe pre ior cu
ems. his jpecialy in tne protec protection
tion protection business na oeen pusninji
hoid anu restaurant unions
round. Chicago got 100 not alter
the Mctleuaii racnels committee
rippeu me innkeeping ana ea.ery
business wiue open.
5o now tnat riou Kennedy is
an auuior and noi an investiga investigator,
tor, investigator, tne old Lapone arm, oy uie
name of Abe leiteloauin, has
sniiieu to taluornia. wiui cos
Angeies as a base, he is nolding
open nouse ior inenus anu Cli Clients.
ents. Clients. Ai atui Wilsflire Blvd. No
less. TeueiDtium was tne $125,-Ooo-a
jear laoor relations aaviser
to CiiiCdgos restaurateurs ior a
long whne.
Now he is leiiing the public
braze, ,ly tnal ne uas moveu to
lievero Inns and tnat ne nas
"lepresonieu lor 15 years the Cni Cni-ca,u
ca,u Cni-ca,u nesiauiam rtssn. as labor
relations counsel, also represent represented
ed represented Greater Lniugo noiei Assn.,
togewater eeacn Hoiei, Arring Arring-tou
tou Arring-tou note,, oiin ft. inompsou
hestauranis, loiieneili inaug.e
Kcs.dUi anis, Aiorzi r urnuure vo.(
Lnicago canoy nssn., ateinway
Drug oiores and numerous oiners
. .. iitnus anu clients are "cor
uuii.. iiniitu iu ant-iiu up en
House, loruidi upcUiUg uu Moiiuay,
tne iisu uay u oejyeinoer, irum
io p.m. to uve p.m.
i.,ut as iioluiii,, wiuinsicai,
howev li, duuu, uie I'eaction 01
some u, tiit ia oui leaueis at Uie
iidiU'iiai 1 h tiu t-ouv t-nnou iieue
10 i,ie ulSuiliiiiUt UUirL lUuilullg
oi uujiueaa uy ai 01U capoue
mail, niy leuisiili'ueu. aU,
SU'an0v ,,) t-iiUtlj,!., oiti c ils OetU
no u.., uja.ou t, uie iiiou at una
pane.) a uiitcussioil wiiicu ooini ooini-ndie,.
ndie,. ooini-ndie,. lite idM conv eiinou vvneii
me 1 lu.iiii it'i a were uouted out
111 0 l. it Kj i-i.iulKiC CI. J ..eti,
ucii.iiu 1, n iiiCiice on i.ie moo,
W.l.tn anii ,.Uililis avtuOilA Ox
pUvvli.ui una ill ciln.nfcu, aCw
lOlrt, ol-VVl-lll liClCj tl.K., atiine
f e,.ufljivdnio alead anu suciChl'j
Ui nit niiiivyai, in tuniuaioil Uvci
ine ltai tueci Oi me new ia.oor ia.oor-luoiidbeiiieiit
luoiidbeiiieiit ia.oor-luoiidbeiiieiit nepoi'ung anu uis-
ciosuie rtCi. i-vliu ueojyue All mt
uoist yuu near ovei cnairnian
i.iii usnntv dim uie steei tiike
it 3 laoui a leattiou lu me new
aw w iii u is uie uasic story 01
illia llttlu Wuinii.g COUVcUilOU.
cnuer tne new iaw, uie govern government
ment government tdii 0 into uik private iue
anu aciivtues 01 aaiy iaoor- ot ot-ncial
ncial ot-ncial ciean or crooKea. T h e
governmeiu can as any union
iiian any question. 11 union 01 01-lKial
lKial 01-lKial rfeiuses 10 answer ana akes
tne i-iUii Ainenuineni, ne is uu uu-aoie
aoie uu-aoie to ton,.nue 10 noia oifice un un-uer
uer un-uer wit .ii Liuu coue 01 i,uicai
i iacmei mis puis tne Onion 01 01-nciais
nciais 01-nciais on ine spot.
. Thus il is Uidi Walter Reutber
has ioiu his ovVii "people tnat lie
wants uie eUncai prdcuces coae
reused 10 t,.v.-ait aniau-inen ue
rigiii 10 idKt ine Fitin Amend Amend-uieiit
uieiit Amend-uieiit to cover ineir private iiyes
anu sinl retain pUDhc office in-
j tne unions.
mere are other powerful lead leaders
ers leaders who warn to kill oil laoor g
own M.iiidi raciices Committee
coiiipieieiy.
Some 01 the committee member
queried oy uns column, believe
mat the ethical Practices Com Com-miuee
miuee Com-miuee now coula -" inadvertently
prepare evidence whion would
senu labor leaders to jail, instead
ol jusi disciplining them and di directing
recting directing tnem 10 aw-an up a union.
Tnis, they bel.eve, could hap happen
pen happen n e.aon toi ot the new
labor law is eniorceu. This ec ec-Hon
Hon ec-Hon gives sne becre.ary ot Labor
terrnic power 10 subpena all rec records,
ords, records, minutes, even notes taken
at Ethical Practices Committee
sessions. Cnoer ine still unexplor unexplored
ed unexplored law, (ne Secre.ary of Labor
has the power to oroer members
of labor's own policing force even
to report their private, conversa conversations
tions conversations to him.
The Justice Dept. coud use the
notes or minutes or private talks
as evidence of wrongdoine in 1
union. The Labor Secretary and
the Attorney General emild then
go into court seeking heavy finei
and jail sentences for offending
officials.
Under these curcumstances, aome
of the Ethical Practices Commit Committeemen
teemen Committeemen are saying angrily, "Let
the government now police the u-
i nions. We just won't meet." They
point oui, ior example, they un under
der under the law, AFL-CIO President
George Meany could be aubpena aubpena-ed.
ed. aubpena-ed. At present he receives special
reports from his observers who
keep their eyes on the Operating
Enginers, Ihe old AFL Textile
Workers, the Jewelry Workers and
the Distillery Workers. Soon there
will be an observer inside t h
eastern Longshoremen.
These are confidential reports.
Some such as those covering lie
old Johnny Dio union, the Al Allied
lied Allied Industrial Workers lay that
the union now ia clean and the
racket forces are out. Otharg,
such as those covering th Ope Operating
rating Operating Engineer! and the later later-national
national later-national Longshoremen'i Asm.,
report progresi, but atate that
there are still aome corruption
pockets. The labor people believe
they can clean these up. But
they say that the private reports
could be the evidence for a swift
move by (he Justice Dept. which
could stymie the work on the E E-Ituchal
Ituchal E-Ituchal Practices Committee.
So th,e labor people are quietly
awaiting clarification of the new
law There is no McClellan rack
et busting committee. The new
law won't he functioning for a
wnile. So the heat's off and the
mys are back. Small wonder wWch
.hey're whimsical.

To

Unless a miracle happens, Mrs.
Nicolina Castagna, 89, will not go
home to Sicily to die. It is ach ach-ingiy
ingiy ach-ingiy important to her that she
be allowed to die in Sicily, her
native land, among the few rela
tives still alive.
Bui justice, blind and impartial,
has caught up with Mrs. Casta Castagna,
gna, Castagna, a tiny shriveled creature who
stands less than five feet tall and
weighs scarcely 80 pounds.
It has taken away from her the
$3,500 she had squirreled away or
received from friends who under understood
stood understood her longing to go home to
die. Or so she told the court
through an interpreter.
Justice, through tha courts of
New Brunswick, N. J., has given
the $3,500 back to the Middlesex
-County Wctfarr Department. For
the past 15 years, Mrs. Caatagna
has received an average of $66
per month from the department
on which to live or exist.
Justice and the Welfare Depart Department
ment Department could not believe that an
old Jady, determined to die in her
homeland, could live on bread
and onions, as she testified, and
save, penny by penny, the aum
to take her back to Sicily.
Or that the neighbors, in the
squalid neighborhood in which she
lived in one room, would help her
realize her ambition or, in turn,
trust her, with little sums of mon money
ey money to take home to their own
relatives.
The court did not believe Mrs.
Castagna although, as she sat in
the witness chair, she looked as
ancient, and her garments as
wretched, as poverty itself.
Only her young lawyer, Antho Anthony
ny Anthony Arico, appointed by. the court
to defend the old lady, believed
her.
He had seen the apartment in
which sine lived, ao baleful ly shab shabby
by shabby that recently she had, been or ordered
dered ordered to find another and move.
Shocked by the pinch-penny, pe penurious
nurious penurious wvay in which Mrs. Casta Castagna
gna Castagna lived, Arico could envision
the long years in which she had
denied herself every comfort, ev every
ery every pleasure, and dieted on bread
and onions to buy the ticket home
and save the money that would
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-.

Sicily, To Die
By INEZ ROBB

prevent her from being a burden
to her relatives in Sicily.
Except for the insistence of an
anonymous informer, Mrs. Casta Castagna
gna Castagna and her small hoard would
now be nearing Sicily.
She was to have sailed on the
Olympia on the very day she was
arraigned in courv. Police search searching
ing searching the dreadful little apartment,
found the money.
So the wheels of Justice began
to grind. There was no relative
on this side of the Atlantic to help
her; she has been alone since her
blind husband died in 1948.'
The Welfare Department was
properly indignant. But for the
life of me I cannot understand,
if the department was doing its
job, why it was unaware of the
wretched regime the semi-sai;ya-tion
diet Mrs. Castagna imposed
upon herself.
At the trial, It' did norgood for
her lawyer to point out that ac

DAILY MEDITATION

(Presented by the Department
of Christian Education of 'he
Episcopal Church in the Mis Missionary
sionary Missionary Diocese ot the Panama
Canal Zona.)
Your Evening Bible loading:
St. Matt 4:11-17
JE$US AND JOHN
"John verily baptized with the
baptism of repentance, saying
unto the people, that they should
believe pi him which would
come afttr. him, thaaf 1, on
Christ Joatrs."
Acts lt:4
It was only after John "-as jail jailed
ed jailed that Jesus returned to Galilee
to begin His ministry there. At
first His preaching was almost an
echo of John's stem message:
"Repent, for the Kingdom of God
is at hand!"

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FAMILY nrl
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CHLORINE
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cording to mortality tables, a wo woman
man woman of 89 can expect toree years,
seven months more of life.
And that is would cost the Wel

fare Department, at its current
payment of $85 a month to the
old lady, more than the dis disputed
puted disputed $3,500 to maintain her in
wretchedness in New Brunswick
in that period.
In the end, Mrs. Castagna was
found guilty of obtaining money
under false- pretenses. Probably
because of her age, she escaped
a Jail sentence. The $3,500 was
confiscatd and turned over to the
Welfare Department.
Mrs. Castagna left court with
$7 and anxious questions as to
how she could explain the disap disappearance
pearance disappearance of the v fund to friends
who has enruJteAsher with mon money
ey money foY elative
Justice may hi,vt been served
in this case. But was Charity, the
greatest of these?
Always afterward Jesus spoke of
"John in terms of highest praise,
and condemned the Pharisees and
Sadducees for rejecting him.
"Among them that are born of
women there' hath not risen, a
greater than John the Baptist,"
said Jccua..,
Most Christians themselves re recognized
cognized recognized John's baptism, and
maintained that the distinguishing
mark of Christianity was addi
tional "baptism" by the Holy
pwk
When the apostles ea.me to
choose a successor to the traitor
Judas, they said that it must be
one w"ho had "companied ith us
all the time that the Lord Jesus
went in and out among us, begin beginning
ning beginning from the baptism of John."
It is not always clear just how
they conceived their close rela relationship
tionship relationship to John, but that they re revered
vered revered him is abundantly evident.
YOUR
GUESTS
A. for the aprevej
Recommendations 1st
Gat
Liquid
Powder
Tablet

WASHINGTON. Because of the

Khrushchev visit nobodv noticed
it, but some significant backstage
Jockeying has been taking, place
' the WSute House affecting the
cenomy of the nation.
The iockeyine was between .Tim
Mitchell, Ike's hard-working but
sometimes frustrated Secretary
of Labor on one side, and nme
of Ike's closest advisr on the
other, each pulling in opposite di
rections regarding the steel
strike.
Mitchell had DersuadeH the
President to propose that both la labor
bor labor and big steel agree to a fact factfinding
finding factfinding board.
Ex-Secretarv nf the Tranr
Georee Humnhrev nnm nt
National Steel, advisfd Ike not to
propose .t. But the President sided
with his Secretary of Labor and
wrote letters to both th itnii.w
Steel Workers and the industry
proposing it.
The Steel industry doesn't want
a faet-findinp board herno (t
would have the power to make
specific recommendations on
wages for the strike's settlement
So steel industry s n n k e me n
promptly voiced objection.
Mitcneii was out of town at the
time and in no oositmn to ner.
suade the President. So the Pres President
ident President immediately announced in
press conference that he was
drooping the fact-finding idea.
Tne man who killed it in this
case was not Humnhrev hut the
No. 2 man on the White House
Staff. Gerald Morean.
Morgan sold the President on
dropping the idea and even draft drafted
ed drafted the letter withdrawing his pro proposal
posal proposal for a fact-finding board.
But what most people don't
know is 'hat Morean used to work
for U.S. Steel. Furthermore, he
worked direct'y under Roger
Rloueh when Blough was solicitor
for the giant steel comoany.
Today, Blough Is head of U.S.
Steel and some claim that Morgan
U still indirectly working for him.
At any rate, there would be a ter terrific
rific terrific outerv from business is a
former labor union reores?nta reores?nta-live,
live, reores?nta-live, while serving on the White
House staff, wrote a letter for the
Pres;dent of the United States
vitally affectint? an all-imnortant
'abor dispute.
TAFT-HARTLEY AUTHOR
There's another interesting bit
of history in Jerry M 0 r g a n's
background He was the real au author
thor author of the Taft-Hartley Act.
Though tbs late Sen. Bob Taft
and ex-Congressman Fred Hartley
of New Jersey put ft e act through
Congress, Morgan admitted under
oath before the House TJibor F,-
dueation"; commit en Tvrh 18,
1949 that he was paid $7500 by the
Republican National Committee
to draft the act.
He made the further amazing
admission that h was the only
outsider who sat in on all execut executive
ive executive sessions of the House commute
during th drafting of the act. He
?ot assistance, he said, from Jer Jerry
ry Jerry Riley. 300-a-month consultant
or General KWr'c. and from
Theodore Tsernv of Chrysler.
It is highly unusual for anv Con Congressional
gressional Congressional committee to oermit
an interested oarty to attend an
"xeci'Kve session, and the late
Sen. Hiram Binham of Connecti Connecticut
cut Connecticut was once nfficia'lv. eensiired
by the Senate for permitting this.
However, Morgan had worked

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for 10 years under the Democrat!
as legislative counsel of the House
of Representatives and knew how
to draft laws. He was also consid considered
ered considered a Democrat.
But in 1945 he left the Demo Democrats
crats Democrats to set up a highly lucrative
law practice and in 1947 wa paid
by the Republican National Com Committee
mittee Committee to write the Taft-Hartley

Act.
BIG XMAS FREEZI
Eisenhower is now taking pre preliminary
liminary preliminary steps to invoke the Taft Taft-Hartley
Hartley Taft-Hartley Act which his assistant
drafted.
This requires that the President
appoint a board of inquiry fo see
whether continuation of the -etrike
is hurting the nation's economy.
Unlike a fact-findine hoard the
board of inquiry cannot make re
commendations for s e 1 1 1 i n g the
strike. There is no objection to
this from the steel induatrv In
fact, it very much wants the Taft-
Maruey Act invoked
Reason why it wants the Taft Taft-Hartley
Hartley Taft-Hartley Acf invoked is quite
simple.
If the steel workers are forced
to go back to work for 80 days,
the industry can get its ore boats
running on the Great Lakes until
the winter freeze sets in.
The boat crews, also mem here
of -the United Steel Workers, art
on strike too. But if th boatg can
operate for 80 flays, this bringl
this industry right up to Christ Christmas
mas Christmas Eve, and enough ore can he
piled up to last the mills the rest
of the winter. After Christmas the
lakes freeze over.
It was expected that there
would be enough steel on hand to
last the auto industry and most
other key industries through Oc October.
tober. October. However, big steel wants the
ore boats to begin running by
Oct. 6 so as to pile up plenty of
ore before he freeze. And this is
what the White House o'ans to do.
Note The strike will begin all
over again after the o-day Taft Taft-Hartley
Hartley Taft-Hartley moratorium. But steel
executives figure there will be
great rank-and-file resistance to
union president Dave McDonald
against renewing the strike on
Christmas Eve. Thev h 0 p. by
that time union morale will be
broken. Then they will have plan plan-ty
ty plan-ty of ore on hand to operate
through the winter.
TOisrwmittflcr
nawur
The Classified Ads of
The Panama American
Are Sales' Giants!



TD FAX IMA AMXXICAH AX EKDEnXDDT BAJXY MTWSrAfEa

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER SO, 1959
- I

Steelworkers, Industry Negotiators To Resume

Bargaining Following Talk With Eisenhower
- WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 (UPI) United Staeiworkers' president David J. McDonald proposed after a meetinj
With President Eisenhower today that negotiations with industry leaders resume at 2 p.m. m an effort Jo eid the
steel strike.
. The president earlier had won agreement from industry representatives to resume bargaining talks Immediately
and do their best to achieve" a negotiated settlement."
McDonald said he would call Roger M. Blouch, U.S. Steel board ehairman and industry spokesman, and try to
et up new contract talks in Washington.
This statement practically assured that the talks, broken off last Friday, when the union walked out, would start
up again today.

"It would only take us an hour to make a labor agreement if they wanted to do it, tr union ieaoer,wa.

Both union and industry leaders
were called to the White House to today
day today by the President to urge them
to resume negoiiations and settle
the 78-day old strike.
McDonald said he told the pre president
sident president he hoped ue could send him

NEW NAVY RESEARCH SCIEN SCIENTIST
TIST SCIENTIST at the Gorgas Memorial
Labmoratory in Panama City is
U. Cdr. Allan C. Pipkin from
Austin, Texas. Holder of a
Ph.D. in parasitology from Tu Tu-lane
lane Tu-lane University, he was sent
here to reactivate the Naval
Medical Science Liaison Unit at
the laboratory, where he will di direct
rect direct the study of parasites caus causing
ing causing two diseases common to
Panama, Chagres disease and
American leishmaniasis. A vet vet-er'
er' vet-er' i nf 17 yc:irs naval service,
' vp from the Na Na-'
' Na-' tsl Medical Research Institute
. cuiesda, Md.

a message tonigni inai n bi ce cement
ment cement had been reached.

Rnf his nthpr comments to news

mpn aftpr seine the President in

dicated both sides were still far
apart.

"Cn far thev have offered uk ab

solutely nothing," McDonald, said.

The industry has saia u onerea

insurance and pension improve

ment and modest wage increases

in a two-year contract.

MrDnna d said he would stay in

negotiations until "either we get
a contract or reaeh the avenue
of futility."

h aiH hp honed industry lead

ers will 'take heed of the urgings

of the president of the United

States.

Rnth McDonald and Bloueh told

reporters the President did not

discuss invoking tne ian narurj

law to halt the strike for u days.

Tod executives of fivemajor steel

companies said in a statement
they hoped the separate White
iinncp discussions 'will create an

atmosphere in which the issues

can be settled promptly tnrougn

collective bargaining.
Tht industry ItatUr actdad:

"W tr kanly iwiri of th
grtit injury this ndUss strik
is causing to tha staal workers,
tha companies and tha nation at
large. Wo shall continue our ef efforts
forts efforts to bring it to a conclusion
at the earlierst possible date."
Kisenhower nprsonallv t e 1 e-

nhnnpH an invitation to the ODDOS-

ing leaders to meet with him sep

arately this morning. Ji was a
sharp turnabout in Eisenhower's
previous hands-off policy.
Tha President's decision aDPar-

ently was a last-ditch effort to-

avoid invoking the Taft Hartley,
law nndpr which thp government

could seek a court order ending.

the strike lor 80 oays. Aiier mat
period, the union woould be free to

strike again.

Eisenhower maintained a per personal
sonal personal hands-off policy all during
the negotiations that preceded the
walkout of 500,00 steal workers

July 16, and during sporadic talks
since them. He said it was p ro
m ana ffomanf nnH la-hAI jtV. WA1k

out their own solution withottt gov government
ernment government meddling.-'
At Monday morning's news con conference,
ference, conference, however, the President

NEW, FOR CHRISTMAS

NEW YORK (UPI) New color

photography processes have made
possible the latest in Christmas
greetings color portrait cards.
Introduced four years ago, they
will be available throughout the
United States this year for the
first time.
The portrait photographs are
takpn hv studio Dhotoeraohers.

They make reproductions in bril

liant color tor use in specia
Christmas folders.

V
j :-f

cM '"fro p11ft!t--iljrManine-

the logi(ar recourse of irflree peo people
ple people in settling industrial disputes

has apparently oroiten'oown.
I m nnt 0niri tft trV to SS-

sess any blame but J nf getting
sick and tired of -the apparent im

passe hi tne seniemn w mis
mllr' and ,1 lhrflk.sif Jtte the

American people,' ffie 'president

said in a special statement reaa

to the newsmen.

"This i an intolerable situa

tion," he said. 'It must not con

tinue. I shall use every conceiv

able personal and official influ influence
ence influence available to me to break the

Gmpasse.

i The President noted that the
strike already had idled 160,000

workers besides the half million

steel workers directly involved.
He said the number of workers
out of jobs because steel is not

being made would continue to

grow.
"So far as governmental action
can be brought to bear in this
matter, I am not going to permit
the economy of the nation to suf suffer,
fer, suffer, with its inevitable Injuries to
all," Eisenhower said.

Dear Friends

A I am continuing; to make
improvements In My service
to you, I'll hay to suspend
electrical service tomorrow,
October 1st, a4 the following
areas.

COMMAND PILOT WINGS Capt. Allen E. Snyder, Flight Test
Maintenance Officer for the 5700th Materiel Squadren (right),
receives congratulations and a handshake from squadron com commander
mander commander Lt. Col. Malcolm C. Sponenbe"Tgh for making Command
Pilot status. The laurel wreath and star-topped winys are a a-warded
warded a-warded officres with 15 years rated service and 3000 hours fly flying
ing flying time. As quality control officer, Snyder is responsible for
all aircraft maintenance performed here. The captain and his
wife Marjorie, arrived on the Isthmus in Nov., 1957. (Official
USAF Photo)

HOUR: 2:00 a.m. -- 6:00 a.m.
All of Calle Q, from Ave. Central
to the Esso building md from
. Call P to Calle1 ;
Thanks for y.our operation,
K LFSTO KIL0VAT1O

SBS

l team ttU tt la Afo UmumiU eaa iimmuj

i iviiiiiaiiiiliiiH,. ' ,nS "'"

I

NOW
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at your

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1E

Sterling Candlesticks and Candelabra
very large selection
from $5.00 a pair many of these items down to Vi price

SibsVi Plain JlaiwaAn
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Service for 8-52 pieces
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WATCHES
Ladies' and Men's from $5.00
14K Ladies' watches, 17 jewels,
Swiss movements with band
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Men's waterproof watches,
17 jewels from $10.00

TUVENIA AUTOMATIC WATERPROOF WATCHES SOME OF THE MOST STUNMNtf
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LADIES' 14K GOLD BRACELET-WATCHES AT V2 PRICE
m WATCHBAND5 SACRIFICED AT 7S AND $1.00 OTHERS REDUCED BY JO.

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a 12 price take a4
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Select your Christmas Gift
Now Bay now for Christ

CHINA SETS CULTURED PEARL JEWELRY FROM 50
Complete 99 pieces NECKLACES Fantastic lwtion of
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n

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Control ,Avtn

8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Central Ave. next to Central Theater

, '4

V



WEDNESDAY, IOTTMBE M, lW
Be
octai and Oti
134,
4
THE VOICE OF (
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen
xerwi&e
anama
2
NEWS OF ENGAGEMENTS, MARRIAGES. BIRTHS, PARTIES AHCS- TRAVEL SHOULD BE MAILED
PROMPTLY TO BOX-NUMBER SHOWN. IT WILL f'Bt R ECEIVED BY TELEPHONE OVER
PANAMA 2-0740 OR 2-0741 BETWEEty 8:00 AND 10 A.M. ONLY.

Tin PANAMA AMERICAN AH 1NUEPEABENT DAILY KEWtTATKB

I

hi

i:
i

WWWIMUIMlWIIIIIimiia Ill

ENGAGEMENT OF MISS VIRGINIA ROSITA KAM
TO MR. ROGELIO FONG OF COLON IS ANNOUNCED
Mr. and Mrs. William B. Kam announce the engagement of hii
sister, Mix Virginia Resita Kam, to Mr. Rogelio Fong, tan of Mr.
and Mrs. Fong Pou of Colon. Miss Kam is a daughter of the lata
Mr. and Mrs. William Kam of Colon.

Miss Kam Is a graduate of the
Canal Zone Junior College, Class
of '56, and at present is a senior
nursing student at St Louis Uni University,
versity, University, St. Louis. Mo She is
working toward her bachelor of
science degree in nursing and a
registered nurse's certificate,
j Mr. Fong is also a graduate of
' the Canal Zone Jun.or College,
1 Class of '56. He was graduated
from the University ot California
at Los Angeles, Class of '58, with
a bachelor of science degree in
business administration and at

ANNUAL SALE
continues at
Shaw's

PANAMA
Ave. Tivoli

p&mo Rim

Is Taking Panama
By Storm
the BELLA VISTA ROOM

in

rwf j4 I mMMiniwitoiiin ii i "" ""-sTS
' V -'

NO COVER OR MINIMUM CHARfiF.
Appearing Nightly At 0:15 & 11:15

. .vysA-vs.-'Mevw So

present is enrolled at the Univer University
sity University of Southern Caluornia work working
ing working toward his master's degree.
The wedding is being planned
for the autumn of 1960.
Dinner Dance Too Honor
Police Sgl. Thompson
Canal Zone Police Sgt
Paul D. Thompson will
ed at a dinner dance
members of the police
tober 17 at the police
and Mrs.
be tonor tonor-given
given tonor-given by
force Oc-
lodge on
Chiva Chiva.
Sgt. Thompson will retire In late
COLON i
Front St.- 'V-

October. He has been a member
of the Zone police force since 1935
and a servant for 17 years.
Grilled tenderloin steaks and
fried chicken will be served at
the party. The price of tickets in includes
cludes includes dinner, refreshments and
gifts for the Thompsons. Ticket
sales are being handled by E. W.
Bierbaum at the Balboa Police
Station.

Cristobal Rainbow Girls
Install New Officers
Miss lrBne Meehan. worthy ad advisor,
visor, advisor, and other officers of Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal Assembly Two. Order of
Rainbow for Girls, were installed
in an open ceremony last week
at the Cristobal Masonic Tempi?.
The event was attended by more
than 150 persons, including Rain Rainbow
bow Rainbow Girls, DeMolay boys, their
parents and friends.
Miss Marion Leach, who was
completing her term as worthy
advisor, was the installing officer
with Judy Griffon, marshal: Di Dimity
mity Dimity Pearce. chaplain; Joan Page,
recorder; Brenda Collins, treasur
er; and Carol Bruland, musician.
Mrs. Edwin C. Webster was guest
soloist.
Miss Meehan was escorted to
the altar by her sister. Miss Car Car-la
la Car-la Meehan. then installed as wor worthy
thy worthy advisor by her mother, Mrs.
Finley J. Meehan.
Officers who will serve with her
include Ellen Chite. worthy asso associate
ciate associate advisor; Marvel Davison,
Charity; Ramona Anderson, Hope;
Andre Nash, Faith; Brenda Col Collins,
lins, Collins, treasurer; Joan Page, rec recorder;
order; recorder; Stephanie Dreyer, chaplain;
Marion Smith, drill leader, Andre
Terrell, Love; Becky McLeod, re religion.
ligion. religion. Diana Smith, nature; Elizabeth
McLaren. Immortality: Pamela
Johnston, Fidelity; Mary Alice
Engelke, Patriotism: Elizabeth
Hewitt. Service; Vickie Fettler,
confidential observer; Emily
Hearnn outer observer; Sharon
Cooper, musician; Diane Shore,
choir director.
The new worthy advisor pre presented
sented presented a past worthy advisor's
iewel to Miss Leach, then intro introduced
duced introduced the substitute officers. They
are Carla Meehan. Veronica Blen Blen-nerhassett.
nerhassett. Blen-nerhassett. Marriet Hewitt. Sue
Barfield, Rita Gyer Libbie Pear Pearson,
son, Pearson, Lenore Smith, Alberta Wild Wilder,
er, Wilder, Carolyn Rowley, Diane Ros Ros-coe,
coe, Ros-coe, Helen George. Susan Mathie Mathie-son
son Mathie-son and Virginia Faris.
Guest soeaker for the occasion
was Rev. Edwin C. Webster of St.
Margaret's Church,, who sooke on
Miss Meehan's' them for her
term, Love.
An Inscribed gavel of native
wood was presented to the new
worthy advisor by her father, and
Hugh MarPherson presented to
the assembly a 'Pot of Gold"
brought from Scotland and minia miniatures
tures miniatures to the outgoing and Incom Incoming
ing Incoming officers.
Service bars earned during the
past term were presented by Mrs.
Olea Roe acting chairman of the
Rainbow advisorv board. The Pot
M Gold was presented to Miss
Emily Hearn.
Honored guests attending the
installation were Mrs. Peggy
Smith of Royal Palm Chanter
Two. OE.S.: Mrs. Richard Pen Pen-r'ngton
r'ngton Pen-r'ngton of Coral Chanter Three;
1 rov Barfield of Atlantic Chap Chapter,
ter, Chapter, DMolay; Rev. Webster: Mrs.
Olga Roe; Mr. and Mrs; F. J.
meehan; John Leach, Raibow
Daddy: and Mrs Jean Judge, act acting
ing acting mother advisor of the Cristo
bal assembly.
The assembly room was decor decorated
ated decorated with red ginger, arranged by
Carjp Meehan anH her commit committee.
tee. committee. Mrs. Virginia Faris and mem members
bers members of her committee served re refreshments
freshments refreshments in banquet follow following
ing following the ceremony.
(Continued on Pare fi)
CHUCKLES IN THE NEWS
BUSING EXPANSION
I.ONDON-A hhine boy In
Hyde Park has expanded his busi business
ness business by offering a new service to
wrrnien customers.
Pat Downs said he's offering
toenail polish in ;fht colors.
SC'WTFD CTAIOG I
CHICAGO (UPT)-A mail orVr
house todav ent out a rato? I
thM tmfiu o' something besides
printer's ink.
One oige of the Christmas book
irpileH by Sni"rel Inc.. ws scent
ed i"'fh a prfume called "Dan-ger.

MEXANA FOR
EVERYONE p Athlete's
,-V sg.y FOOt
' Prickly
- Heat
xyf- Baby
Rash
r'tP-r I i

Thar h aoth-
I n finer than
J0f MKXJLNA Mrd-
alltvlai orickly
kHt.
With MITXANA
Medicated Pew Pew-dil
dil Pew-dil jm hahy
will he free
from diaper raih.
MF.XANA Med Medicated
icated Medicated Pewder 1
anttifrpaesed far
Athlrte'i feel.

pOLVO

TJ

THRIFT SHOP WORKERS Volunteer workers staff the Fort Gulick Thrift Shop, which ben benefits
efits benefits cnmmunitv charities and recreational activities for children of the military. From left are
Mrs. Molly Barbar, Mrs. Dorothy Frazier, chairman of the Thrift Shop, Mrs. Viola Hlrn and
Mrs. Nora Perry, manager-custodian. (U.S. Army Photo)

United Fund Gets Crisp Bill
From Former Zonian On Visit

Positive proof that old ties are
strong ties was presented yesterday
by Col. Richardson Selee, former
Canal official, when he dropped in
at the Balboa Heights Administra Administration
tion Administration Building to visit some of his
old friends and associates.
When Selee arrived last week
from Peru, where he has headed
a $2,250,000 construction project,
one of the first things he saw in
local newspapers was advance no notice
tice notice of the Canal Zone United Fund
drive. When he reached the Ad Administration
ministration Administration Building he was con confronted
fronted confronted by a huge signboard to
record the progress of the drive.
So by the time he had arrived
at the second floor he had ready
a crisp bill, his contribution to
the United Fund, through the Gov
ernor's Committee on Voluntary
Giving, as a donation "from a for
mer Zonian to the activities of
present Zonians."
Selee has held three top Jobs In
the Canal administration. He was
assistant Engineer of Mainten Maintenance,
ance, Maintenance, a post comparable to that of
the present Engineering and con construction
struction construction director, from 1945-48. In
1948 he became assistant to the
general manager of the Panama
Engagement of
Miss Aldama
1$ Announced
Miss Olga Yolanda Aldama
Announcement is made today of
the engagement of Miss Olga Yo Yo-landa
landa Yo-landa Aldama, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Alvaro Aldama of Pa Panama
nama Panama City, to Mr. Robert Thorn Thornton,
ton, Thornton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
H. Thornton of Ontario, Calif.
The wedding is being planned
for December.
Mr. Aldama is a consultant in
health statistics for the World
Health Organization (WHO).

SPECIAL SPANISH COURSE AT
UNIVERSITY
A new intensive Spanish course for English.speak.
rng people at University of Panama has been sched.
uled from October 5 to November 26. Classes on
Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. Beginners: 5:30;
Intermediate: 6:30; Advanced: 7:30 p.m. Credits
will be given for this course. Registration at Secre Secretary's
tary's Secretary's Office. (Top Building of University).

Gxorjng
and
new

We've just unpacked the most complete assortment
of laces from Europe and the United States.
Prices? The lowest in Panama
NOVEDADES LACIIMAN
No. 51 Central Ave, near Santa Ana Plata Tel. 2-2785

Railroad. And in 1950 he was ap

pointed Public Affairs director, a
short-lived title which soon be became
came became Civil Affairs director.
He headed the Civil Affairs Bu Bureau
reau Bureau until his resignation in No November
vember November 1953. Selee is now with the
Utah Construction Company. This
company, in joint venture with
Morrison-Knudsen has just com completed
pleted completed a huge project near Toque Toque-pala,
pala, Toque-pala, Peru, for the Southern Peru
Copper Co. It involved not only
the construction of smelters, con converters
verters converters and all equipment needed
at a copper mine, hut also con construction
struction construction of a 190-kilometer rail railroad,
road, railroad, hospitals, schools and hous housing
ing housing for the company's employes.
He is now en route to his new
headquarters in San Francisco,
from where he will be in charge
of the company's Latin American
projects.
Little Augie Pisano
Got Mysterious Call
Before Gang Ride
NEW YORK (UPD A mysteri mysterious
ous mysterious telephone cH-nd a last,
whispered conference with a fel fellow
low fellow racketeer were the principal
clues today to the gang ride mur mur-er
er mur-er of Little Augie Pisano.
Pisano and the blonde former
beauty queen who was his date
for the evening were found shot
to death in his 1959 Cadillac fri fri-day
day fri-day night shortly after they had
left a Manhattan restaurant for
the woman's home, a few blocks
from the murder scene.
Police said the 62-year-old mobs mobster
ter mobster had received the telephone
call in the restaurant less than
a hour before the killing.
They theorizef that it had led
him to pick up somewhere en
route, possibly at;La Guardia Air
port, the two men who shot him
down from the back seat of his
car and killed Mrs. Janiece Drake,
32. to keep her from telling.
Top on the list of underworld
figures scheduled for police ques questioning
tioning questioning was the man with whom
Pisano was known to have con conversed
versed conversed privately 5n the same
restaurant Anthony (Tony Bend
er) Strol'o, reputed1 rackets boss
in Greenwich Village and the
waterfront.
The New York World Tele Telegram
gram Telegram and Sun reported today that
it had learned two Texas gunmen,
identified as Nick Cassio and
Johnny Luke, had been in the city
Friday night and have left. A Dal Dallas
las Dallas investigator was auoted by the
newsnaper as saying the men "are
capable of anything, including
murder."
New York Investieators said
Cassio and Luke would be sought
for qustionine. 'if they were in
town Friday night."

World's Finest
Laces
Delicate workmanship
in all width, patterns
and colors.

NEWLY ASSIGNED as the
Ambassador of the Republic
of China to Panama is Ma
Hsin-yeh. After receiving his
B.A. in Journalism from the
University of Missouri in 1934
he becaroe professor of jour journalism
nalism journalism at the National Cheng Cheng-chi
chi Cheng-chi University in Chunking
and Nanking. For a time, he
was director of the press sec section
tion section in the Ministry of In Information
formation Information in Chunking and
later was publisher of the
Central Daily News In Nan Nanking
king Nanking arid Taipei, Taiwan. Af After
ter After serving as a delegate to
several United Natioju meet meet-1
1 meet-1 lngs, he was adviser to the
Chinese delegation In 1957.
The new ambasasdor has pub published
lished published various works on jour journalism
nalism journalism and freedom of the
press.
Rail WstU Says...
What do you do while you
wau; in mis age ot hurry, iiu.ry,
hurry most of us have odd mi minutes;
nutes; minutes; 20 here, 30 there, that
add up to hours each week while
waiting for somebody else.
Waiting in the dentist's outer
office, waiting at home for a
friend to pay a promised call,
waiting for a husband to get
home for dinner, for a service serviceman
man serviceman to. come: to look at the
washing machine. We hurry, hur hurry,
ry, hurry, hurry, hurry and then we
wait and. wait and wait.
Do you' simply pace the foor or
sit and tap your foot nervously
or watch a clock while all those
waiting minutes tick by? Or have
yoir learned the relaxing and pro
ductive art of making use of
waiting minutes?
What can you do with an un
expected 10 or 15 minutes besides
pace the floor and fume because
so-and-so is late. Is usual?
People who get a lot done and
who stay calm through periods of
waiting put those stray minutes
to use.
"I'm writen this letter under
the hair drier," or "on the bus"
or "in the doctor's waiting room,'
letters from my best and most
faithful correspondtnt often be begin.
gin. begin. Obolously, she keeps pen and
writing paper in her purse to
make use of such brief periods
of time.
Others use these tiny gifts of
time for making telephone calls
reading (just keep a book mark
in a book and see how much
reading you can get done while
you wa(t on first one thing and
then anottier) menu planning,
list making, and problem solving.
Still others use such extra mi
nutes for really noticing t h e
world about them, watching storm
clouds gather in the sky. li'n li'n-ing
ing li'n-ing to a bird's song, watchine
children at play or studying the
people wno pass by.
Ti 1 1
reopie wno say tney lovt a
realroad station because it is so
interesting to watch people know
now to use their waiting mo
ments. They are always full of
stories about the amusing and
curious and touching things they
see while rhey happened to be
waiting for a train or stand standing
ing standing In line at a ticket window.
So don't be a clock watcher
a pacer, or a foot tapper next
time you have to wait. Instead
Tuf your waiting minutes to work
for you. You'll be surprised at
how interesting, entertaining and
productive those waiting minutes
can become.
WOMAN KILLED
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UPD A
Greyhound bus skidded out of con control
trol control and crashed into a utility pole
here yesterday killing one woman
and Injuring 15 other persons.

Ronald Reaean's much-publicix-

ed refusal to attend the Hollywood
luncheon for Premier Khrushchev
brought him stacks of approving
letters from fans all over the USA
the New York Athletic Club is
still rocking from the shook of dis
covering that a respected member
was cheating at cards. He, used
amazing equipment not only
marked cards, but glasses with
infra-red lenses and enjoyed a
long run of 'luck before ttey
nailed him...EUa names once one
of the movie colony's brightest
clamor cirli. is seriously ill in.
Florida.
The first version (A Errol Flynn's
memoirs ig so hot the publishers
are handling it with fire tongs
and looking for a writer-editor to
eliminate or tone down the more
purple passages. ..Tony Martin gets
this week's award as the perfect
husband. He cancelled a lucrative
booking at the Elmwood Club in
Windsor, Ontario, because Cyd
Charisse said she wanted him to
stay by her side.. .Pity the poor
songwriter. Most of the critics
who reviewed Giselle Macenzie's
act at the Waldorf raved about
her rendition of "April in Fair Fairbanks,"
banks," Fairbanks," but didn't mention that
the clever ditty was written by
Murray Grand. He just got his
royalty check for the song
magnificent $1.79!
Custom inspectors peering into
millionaire Jorge Guinle's luggage
as he travels between here and
Rio de Janeiro may lift an eye eyebrow
brow eyebrow Or two or three. One of his
suitcases contain, nothing butpret-
rv feminine hats and fancy veils
from one of New York's smartest
shops souvenirs he bought for his
favorite South American ladies
(who must be legion).
Artist John Groth and his wife,
w nne, have called it a day. She
won a California decree. .. n,very
now and then a Gotham, nightery
decides to enliven things by show-
ins silent movies. The R.S.V.P
will try the policy on Sunday
nights starting in October... Few
outside his intimate social circle
know that Sidney Kingsley, the
Pulitzer Prize-winning p'aywright.
is also a sculptor of considerable
talent. He's proud that one of his
works is reproduced in the latest
columns of Art In America.
A book titled "King Of Crime,"
by Dom Frasca. is bound to be
best-seller among mobsters and
local politicians, but average ci citizens
tizens citizens should latch onto it, too. as
soon as it hits the stalls. It's fas
cinating and frightening.
Jonathan winters, the comedian
who suffered a tragic crack-up on
the west Coast, is on the mend
but still resisting offers from New
York night clubs. Apparently his
management wants to see how he
weathers engagements in smaller
cities before returning him to the
Gotham scene. When the McGuire
Sisters cancelled a scheduled Dal
as date, the rumors started fly
ing. Happy, stork-type rumors.
Ray Ventura, owner of the fam
ed Olympia Theatre in Paris, is
'n New York looking for talent
'or his hue vaudeville housem He
was particularly impressed by
Ronnie Hawkins a new rock 'n
ro'l favorite whose recording of
"Mary Lou is a big hit Monsieur
Ventura (also known as the uncle
of Brieitte Bsrdot's ex-fiance, Sa
.ha DisteH tHnks he twangv
voune sineer from Arkansas win
cl'ck instantanously with Fan
sians.
Jack Carter's Broadway pals
were more than somewhat lm
oressed by his elegant British doll,
Susan Hampshire bill, alas! She
ios to return to London... Count on
comedian Lennie Bruce to remain
sead-fastly unpredictable. Adver
tised as a new contributor to i
national magazine, he confides
:hst the first three manuscripts
ne$ You Know
ACROSS
1 Princess
Margaret
8 Heap
8 Paul
Hindenburg
12 Persia
13 Soon
U Ostrich
15 Poisonious
spider
17 Girl's
nickname
18 in
Wonderland"
ISCnti
21 Story
23 Head Dart
3 Spoken
3 Indian
garment
4 Make into law
5 Singer,
Boone
6 Accustomed
7 "What
wants"
(Growing out
9 Reveraa
10
Khayyam
11 Sisters
16 Closer
20 More
domesticated
22 Misplaces
11. fnr.lMrf 24
n p1 Sandburg
29 Queen
of Scots
32 Straighten!
34 Mountain
ridges
3 Go to bed
37 Cylindrical
38 Old Xng Ush
court
i 39 Slender
29 Nautical term
: 41 Indian weight
42 Skelton
1 44 Geraint's wife
. 48 Leanest
48 "Home on
the
; 53 favorite
i 54 Pitchers end
; catchers
I 58 Consumed
! 57 Eye part
58 Daah
I 59 Legal matters
80 Sea bird
81 Withered
DOWN
Harworth

he wrote were rejected, to hl

not quite sure what's going t
nis literary career.
Claude Marchand is irked with
Ava Gardner but the siory be
lund the tift is so amusing be can
dine out on it... Rock Hudson's at attractive
tractive attractive companion at the Quad
rille in Greenwich Village last
night was Margaret Lindsay. Whe
looked as chic and pretty as she
uiu in me movies oi iwo aecaaei:
ago.. .Ray Shaw, impresario at:
tte Copper Door, thinks Archk.
Mbofe is seriously considerinf hi
offer of a jineint.mater nt rem.
monies job. If the prizefighter ic-
cepts, snaw wui build a whole
new show around him.
Jimmie Rodcers will embark on
his Australian concert tour with-,
out the little woman, becsuie
she's expecting another baby a.nd
me doctors won t permit her to
travel .. .me anti-Triuillo troooi
within the Dominican Republie
now number more than 4,000.
They expect re inforcements from
. v. j i . .
uum aim uuier sympaineuC. Hi
tiong in the near future ... Good
luck, Charlie, department: In that
flicker "The Southern 500." an e-
tress named Helen Downey is re
quired to play several drinking
scenes. The producers report thai
Miss Downey has demanded real
alcohol, instead of the usual tea
or soda pop, "to help her act the
part."
Gore Vidal Comedy
Rehearsinq At Guild
Ribs Pentagon Brass
One of the characters in "Visit
to a Small Planet," the Gore W
dal comedy currently in rehearsal
at the Theatre Guild, is General
Tom Powers of the Laundry
Corps.
In play after play since World
War II, commanders have been
the butt of playwrights' scorn. In
"The Caine Mutiny" and "Mister
Roberts" the men in command
were portraved with angry indig indignation;
nation; indignation; in "Teahouse of the Aug August
ust August Moon" "No Time for Ser?
geants" and now "Visit to a Small
Planet" they are ridicultd.
Playwright Vidal feels a writer
can get away with ordinarily ta taboo
boo taboo subjects by treating them
humorously. If he had nidi i
scatching denunciation el the- in incompetence
competence incompetence and fatuousness el
some Pentagon generals he might
have been denounced as subver subversive.
sive. subversive. But by his comk portrayal
of General Powers, to be played
in the Guild's production by Len
Wnrpter h vnkH nnlv liualh.
ter.
Completing the cast of Vidal'i
comedy are John Mayless as the
visitor, G. B. Merchant as a tele television
vision television commentator,. Kathy Wil Wil-ber
ber Wil-ber as his dithery wife and Ruth
Anne Larsen as their daughter.
Nike Wilson is the' suitor,
Joe Daffin General Powers aide
and Bud Stewart the visiter's
aide.-
The play, under the direction ef
Adela Bettis, will open on Oet. 12
for a six-night run.
FAILS HOLDUP ATT I MPT
LONDON (UPD-Office cleaner
Mrs. Phyllis Ward foiled a bank
raid yesterday and saved her em employers
ployers employers $108,000. Mrs. Ward .said
she went to the Putney Branch of
the National Provincial Bank yes yesterday
terday yesterday after the bank closed for
the week end and found four men
armed with safe-breaking equip equipment
ment equipment there. Mrs. Wara sum.
moned help and police surround surrounded
ed surrounded the bank. But, the raiders es escaped,
caped, escaped, leaving their safe-cracking
tools behind.
Answer to Previous Puzzttt
28 Those who 45 Ventures
read and write 48 Box
28 Shiny fabric 47 Boy's
30 Network nickname
31 Belgian river 48 Rescue
33 Saltpeter
50 Cleopatra's
river
II Equipment
52 Anglo-Saxon
alave
55 Brown
35 Bog down
again
40 Miaaive
43 Introduction
to society

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WTDKZSDAY. SEPTEMBER 151

TBX PANAMA AMERICA! AH INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PA6I FlVf,

v-V,

CfRflFICATE AWARD MSgt. Thornley T. Gladden, S-2, Fort Clayton, who arrived at U.S. Carib Carib-betn'last
betn'last Carib-betn'last month for duty, receives a Certificate of Achievement for outstanding performance while
with'the Aviation Center, fort Rucker, Ala. Gladden held the job of operations sergeant for the
Alabama post from January 1958 to May 1959. He lives at Fort Clayton with his family. Presenting
tyie certificate is Col. John D. Coney, post comma nder of Fort Clayton, as Maj. John H. Rooney,

Castro Breaks Up
Allempt To Airdrop
Arms To Rebels
"HAVANA (UPI) Government
troops broke up an attempted
airdrop of arms lo American-led
rebels in Consolation del Sur dur dur-'fag
'fag dur-'fag the weekend and arrested an
tindisclosed number of "counter "counterrevolutionaries,"
revolutionaries," "counterrevolutionaries," it was reported
today.
More than 40 persons arrested
fat the West Cuban town after two
ikirmishes last week include two
Americans described as leaders of
the rebel 'Cuban Democratic Le Le-gion"Col.
gion"Col. Le-gion"Col. Austin Young, of In Indianapolis,
dianapolis, Indianapolis, and Maj. Peter. J.
Lambton, of Nassau, Bahamas
,. The most recent arrests includ included
ed included a number of prominent local
residents, among them Consola Consola-cion's
cion's Consola-cion's ex-Mayor Francisco San Sanchez
chez Sanchez Gonzalez and a number of
business-men.
Reports said a light plane of un undetermined
determined undetermined origin dropped two
parachutes carring 11 Spring Springfield
field Springfield rifles and a sizeable quantity
f ammunition.
Government troops captured the
parachuted, arms and arrested a
number of persons who appeared
to be waiting for the airdrop.
'Young, who has used the aliases
Jim Smith and Austin John dur during
ing during his stay in Cuba, was released
last month from Havana's Cabana
fortress-fHr i o n, where he had
been held ftfr "month.
When he was set free, Young
told his wife who has been living
In Havana with their three chil childrenthat
drenthat childrenthat he planned to leave
Cuba for good.
; Lambton. an E n g 1 i s h-born
American citizen, is believed to
have been employed as a pilot by
American" Airlines. Government
sources say he had planned to go
to Miami to collect arms and sup supplies
plies supplies for the rebels hiding in the
hills of Pinar del Rio province.
Both'Ydung and Lambton in in-jisted
jisted in-jisted under interrogation they
were working without oulside
help, but authorities here believe
the legion has international ties.
Grievina Ceylonese
Pavinq I art Pesnecls
To Murderer Premier
COLOMBO, Ceylon (VV1) A
million grieving Ceylonese
jammed the streets today, waiting
for a chance to pay their last re respects
spects respects to assassinated Premier
Solomon W. R. D. Bandaranaike.
People "began lining un four
breast before dawn outside Par Parliament
liament Parliament TTall. where Bandaran Bandaran-sike's
sike's Bandaran-sike's body. Was lying in state
By 10 a.m. when the cortege bring bringing
ing bringing the body from the premier's
home, reached the hall, the line
was five mi'es long.
Most of th mourners carried
black umbrellas to shelter them
from the scorching sun.
A wave of antaeonism to the
Buddhist clergy, with threatening
overtones of possible violence,
was reported throughout Cevlon
i; a result of the fact that Ban Ban-daranaike
daranaike Ban-daranaike was slain by a Budd Buddhist
hist Buddhist monk.
His widow Sirimavo appealed to
tre' nation 'in the name of my
late husband" to let Buddhist
' churchmen "participate freely in
various cep monies."
Reoorts from Colombo and the
pny'jnces indicated, however, that
feeling is running high although
there have been no major attacks
on clergymen so far Most of the
Buddhist officials, who normally
play an active part in affairs,
prudently trpt out of sight.
In Colombo crowds ejected
monks from city buses and taxi
drivel's refused to carry them.
Reoorts from other nar' "f the
country said clergymen had been
reviled and even manhandled by
an?ry crowds.
The chief priest of one of Co Colombo's
lombo's Colombo's temples called on new
Premier Wijayanada Dahanayake
today to complain that his monks
been treated with disrespect.
Dahanayake advised him to lie
low until the excilement dies
down.
MN?T THIS F
"JT.FFALO. N.Y. (UPI) While
C'- '.vford Johnston was pacing up
r ''own the hill in Genera!
Hospital waiting for his daughter
to 'e 'born, somebody stole his
eW parked in front of the place
It was rebvered quickly, though.

Govt Predicts Americans
Will Smoke More Cigarettes

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
government predicted yesterday
that Americans would smoke a
record 465,900,0p0,000 cigarettes
this year despite charges linking
tobacco use to cancer.
The Agriculture Department al also
so also estimated that the nation's 58
ryllion smokers would spend 6 bil billion
lion billion dollars on cigarettes, a 500
million dollar increase over last
year.
The department said overall U.
S. cigarette production would to total
tal total 485 billion smokes but that an
estimated 19,100 000,000 cigarettes
would be exported for foreign use.
Agriculture experts said the big
figures were only a foretaste of
the future. They predicted cigar cigarette
ette cigarette production would jump an another
other another 18 per cent by 1965 and
shoot up 53 oer cent over current
levels by 1975.
The experts noted that the fore forecasts,
casts, forecasts, contained in the de department's
partment's department's annual tobacco outlook
report, were based on "trends in
the 1955-59 period, a time when

r -TifltaiHriiiiiiiiMiiiiTii mini hi mm
I 9-25
J VISIT THE
f STATE FAIR
HI Something for Everyone!
Thousands of exhibits! Fashion Shows I I
Car shows Pan American Livestock show I
International Trade Exhibit and of course I
Top Names of the Entertainment Worldl I

the relation of smoking to health
received widespread publicity."
This was a ref"rence to charges,
denied by tobacco spokesmen, that
cigarette smoking is connected
with some types of cancer.
Department officials warned,
however, that their forecasts could
be affected by future findings of
smoking and health reserach reserach-ers.
ers. reserach-ers. Cigar and cigarillo production
in 1959, the department said, prob probably
ably probably be near 6,900,000,000, or 350
million above 1958 and the highest
since 1923.
The output of pipe and "roll-vour-own'
probably will be about
74 million Dounds. down 2 per
cent from 1958. No increase was
expected in 1960, the department
said.
The outlook report estimated
that some 58 million persons in
the continental United States and
the armed forces overseas now
smoke ciearettes regularly. This
incluH"s 5 ner cent of all men
-)H "c n"- nt of women over
the age of 15.

Fly BRANIFF
to the FAIR
in DALLAS, TEXAS
For Special Terms!
accommodations on
all flights.

For Special Tones!
See your TRAVEL AGENT
or BRANIFF!
Braniff officer.
Avtnida U (Kvoli) 21-A-38, Jtltphent J-097J
El Panama Hilton, Mphont: 3-1660, 3-4726
In Colon: 10th St. I Front Av:
Telephone. 779 or 797
tianiH serves mart major citiu in lh U.S.A. and
SOUTH AMHICA . than any otficr airlintl

Housebreaker Laid
Tea In London Daily
For Princess Meg
LONDON (UPI) The Sunday
Pictorial reported this week that
a reformed housebreaker worked
for five months as a footman at

Clarence House. London home of
Queen Mother Elizabth and Prin Princess
cess Princess Margaret.
The tabloid printed an interview
with 27-year-old George L. Sav
age, who said he was fired after
an argument with the Clarence
House steward.
'I often had the key to the
Clarence House wine locker, and
there were times when I was left
alone with the silver safe ooen so
I could return the table silver,"
Savage said.
"I could have walked off with
the lot, but I went straight and
do not regret it."
He said he got to know a foot footman
man footman at Clarence House while he
was working for the Duke of
Marlborough, a cousin of Sir Win Winston
ston Winston Churchill. When Marlborough
fired him because he got into a
fight with an Italian servent, he
asked for and got a job at the
royal residence.
"Every afternoon I laid tea for
Princess Margaret," he said.
Savage's criminal record, which
he kept secret, included convic convictions
tions convictions for breaking and entering
and possessing stolen property.
He once served seven months in
jail.
Donald M. Nelson,
Former FDR Aide,
Dies Al Age 70
LOS ANGELES. Sept. SO (UPI)
Donald M. Nelson, former
War Production Board chief
and head of a motion picture
producer's association, died yes
terdav at the age of 70.
The late Presideht Franklin
D. Roosevelt appointed .Nelson
as head of the War Production
Board during World War II, a
nnst which he held for three
vears. When he resigned in
1944, Nelson was appointed as
personal presidential represent
ative to foriegn governments.
After the war, he became
Dresident of the Society of In
dependent Motion Picture Pro Producers
ducers Producers and later was chairman
of the board of the Electro Electrochemical
chemical Electrochemical Research Co. of New
York.

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PANTIES
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COTTON TEE SHIRT
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4



4& tlX

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER S, 1951
Social and Oti
New Activities, New Faces
Next Month At Cristobal Y
xerwise
pr- ( --7 V -'
mmmm Imm I

Luncheon Te Hener
Mr. Derethy Allen
Mrs. Dorothy Allen who in soon
to move to Guam will be honor
d tomorrow at a 12 30 no-host
luncheon and silver shower at the
Fort Amador Officers Open M?s
Mrs. G. 0. Parker is in charge
of reservations.
Alprayn Spregut Exhibit
Opens Tomorrow Noon
A Panama Hilton Salon
An exhibit of 39 paintings by
Is hmian artist Alwayn Snraeuei
will be oD"ned tomorrow in the
Balboa Salon t tie Panama Hil Hilton
ton Hilton Hotel The show will include
portraits, landscapes and scenes
of aried locale

The paintings will be on display
for five days from noon to 3 p m.
and from 7 to K, p m
The artist, son nf Mr and Mrs
Howard Sprague of th Canal
Zone, was born herp lr 193. and
attended Canal Zon schools. He
is the grandson of Rudolph
Hampel. who was until his death i
last year an outstanding designer
ofjewelry and medals in New
Yrk.
Tjfit Shop Committee
To Meet Next Monday
The Thrift Shop Committee of
the Inter-American Woman's Club
hat scheduled an important meet meeting
ing meeting for next Monday morning at
9:30 at the home of Mrs. Virginia
Jude, 0309 Cable Heights.

AS BASIC AS BLACK
OR WHITE... BUT
TWICE AS EXCITING

VlTH( NEW

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COLOR BY
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Fashion-featured in "Vogue", ht atitifnlly
executed by Formfit, Ivory Rose underfashio is
add feminine flair to your wardrob .
blend beautifully v.ith every color .
do wonderful tilings for your morale becau c
you know you're beautiful from the tkiii nut.
See Ivory Rose by Formfit and add
new color agic to your fathkm life.
Ivery Rose Remonte Bra No. 363. Nyfc l0c eeps,
nylon bock bond. Two-inch elastic fro Vf ffes
end moves with you, assures perfect
m. 32A to 38C.
Ivory Rese Long Uf Skipplei No. lL Nylon loci
front panel, sotin elastic bock pone tng leg for
xtr thigh control. 2 Vi -inch woistbond
nips waist. S.M.L.
MANUFACTURER'S RU'RESWTATIVES
A. A. SASSO CIA., Ltda.
Box n Teleohonr 1-2267

All merabrs art urged to at at-end.
end. at-end. .
Pres., Mrs. do la Goardia
To Attend Inauguration
The Panama Bnsior. Company
wii inaugurate its modern new
plant in Paitilla this evening with
a reception from five to seven.
Psnama's President and Mrs Kr
nesto de la Guardia are expected
to attend.

Bet Sigma Phi
Holds Model Meeting
Th? model meeting of Canal
Zone Be;a Chapter. Beta Sigma
Phi, was held at ll e home of Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Ramey in Gatun Anna May
Butcher, president, welcomed new
rushees and introduced officers of
the sorori'y.
Claire Welty was elected Valen Valentine
tine Valentine Girl for this year, and the
cultural program on Man'ey P.
Hall's "Philosophy of Life-' was
given by Barbara Ramey.
Talks were given by Claire Wel Welty,
ty, Welty, Kathy Mika Marv Ann Scott,
Jean Brandl awl Marion Green
on the three degrees of the sorori
ty, the International Loan Fund,
highlights of the Beta Chapter,
the International Endowment Fund
and the aims, purpose and scope
of Beta Sigma Phi.
The "while elephant" donated
by the hostess was won bv Claire
Welty.
Others attending the meeting
were Terry Frazier. Jean Judge,
Jo McDonnell and five rushees.

Jormtit

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written far NEA Service

NORTH (D) 2
J973
V AK76
J
AK103
WEST EAST
A A 10 8 2 AKQ6 5
t 52
K 10 6 4 2 Q 9 5 3
Q82 J75
SOUTH
4
VQJ 10 8 6 3
A87
884
Both vulnerable
North Eaat South Weet
1 A Pass 1 V Pass
3 V Pass 4 NT. Pass
5 Pass 6 Pass
Pass Iss
Opening lead S A
Raymond Balfe of New York
was one of the four or live great
est auction bridge placers of all
time. He overbid today's hand
but he always overbids and relies
on superlative play 'o pull him
out. This time he needed superla superlative
tive superlative play plus a little help from
the defense.
West opened the an- f spades
and continued with the deuce A
shift to any suit would hac beat
en Raymond.
Now Raymond executed a bnl
liant trump squeeze He ruffed
the spade continuation, plaved
ace and another diamond, ruffed
high in dummy, came l-aek to his
hand with a trump, ruffed his last
diamond high and played three
rounds of trumps.
He discarded the three and ten
of clubs from dummy anf' watehed
Fast and West squirm If neither
nna thrnv a cnadp Tiavmnnd WOllId
have cashed dummv's pep and
king of clubs, ruffed ba'-k to his
own hand and made Ihe last trick
with his last club since each nppo
nent would have had to unguard
his club honor.
Actually West let tV eight of
snades go. Raymond played a
club to dummy and led H-p iaek
of snadeSj East nlayed the kins
and Raymond ruffed, "'p-t's 'en
drooped and that was all for that
rubber.
' vt SrThe bidding has been
T1" f South West
1 2 Double 2
3 Pass
You. South, hold-
4" ?' 4AKSJ2
What do you dd?
ABid four elnbs. You have
J roed elDb suit and there mlrht
be a elnb ilsm.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Yaur partner continues -with
bid of iour ipadei. What do you
do now?
Anewer Tomorrow
Meeting
Isthmian Medical Assn
The Medical Association of the
Is'hmian Canal 7.mt will mcr
next Tuesday evening at 7 in Ihe
C'nnfTnce Room at florgas Hos Hos-oital.
oital. Hos-oital. A buffet will precede the scien scien-ific
ific scien-ific nroqram to be presented by
Dr. Micl ael Jordon, ass slant at at-nding
nding at-nding gynecologist of Alemorial
"nsTiital and associat' professor,
Clinieal Obstetrics and Gynreoin Gynreoin-"v.
"v. Gynreoin-"v. New York l'nivrritv Relle Relle-i
i Relle-i p Hospital Hospital Medical Col College.
lege. College. Retired Workers Assn.
Th' regulT monthlv m ot i n of
'he Can Zone Retired Workers
scocialinn. Pacific Pecion. will
K held ne1 Tuesday evenins. Oc Oc-'noer
'noer Oc-'noer fi, at fi:30 in th annex of
'h" Ancon Laundry.
Information of special interest
'o all person on cash relief w'll
'ii given. William H. Sinclair, in in-'ernationa'
'ernationa' in-'ernationa' representative. AFS AFS-'
' AFS-' ME. AFL-CIO, will b- guest of
honor.
All members of the association
ind non-members on cash relief
a 'e invited to attend.
V.vly Guild
The Wesley Guild nf th- Pana Panama
ma Panama Methodist Church will ave a
business meeting this evenin? at
',-ddes Hall. Miss Mola Anhonse
mil preside All officers rommit-
tee heads and members are ask-
d to attend.
Ike Asks Juonor!
Of Other Nations
On Foreign Aid
WASHINGTON (UPI) Presi President
dent President F.is'nhower called on other
industrial nations today to pro pro-"
" pro-" de more economic aid to spur
the growth of less developed coun countries.
tries. countries. Th" President, addressing the
nooning session of the 14th annual
neetinr of thp WorM 'Bank and
tn'crnational Monetary Fund,
iirsed the fiR mfmher nations to
iioiior' a new billion dollar Inter International
national International Development Assn. nrn nrn-nosed
nosed nrn-nosed by the United States. Rus Russia
sia Russia is not a member.
F.isenhower said the prosperity
he saw on hi! recent trip to
Europe was a sign that industrial
rounlries have rf covered from
wartime setbacks and can do
more in the international aid area.
There is among many nations.
Ihe President said in his brief
talk, a general desire for econo economic
mic economic development and a need for
international capital investment.
"In our view no other mecha mechanism
nism mechanism ran perform this task for
,thr free world ? well as the
'proposed Idea," Elsenhower laid.

New faces will be seen and
many new activities arc complet completed
ed completed at the Cristobal A.r r.icn Sen Sen-ices
ices Sen-ices YMCA according to the pro program
gram program bulletin for October issued
today.
Among the new faces w!! be
that of Mrs. William Livinston.
who opens a class in iialca decor decorating
ating decorating every Thursday evening be beginning
ginning beginning Oct. 8. All materials vi 1
be supplied at cost anj this is
just the time to get busy and
make some things to be used for
Christmas gifts, according to -Mrs.
Livington.
Ballroom dancing classes are
also on the list to be ncld every
Saturday evening at 7 p.m. un

yj- --j
V '"PtW f

DOCTOR'S DILEMMA
.lungle doctor Thomas A. Dboley
has reluctantly left turbulent
southeast Asia to check in as
a patient at the Sloan-Ketter-ing
Cancer Research Center in
New York. Dr. Dooley, 32, had
to leave the hospital he founded
in l!).rifi on 1hi border- of Laos
and Red China. The hospital is
about mi null's tcom the area
wlu i e .serious Laotian Com Communist
munist Communist Jinliling is now goiug on.
Established
iD

.Ineiiiii Am

SCOTCH WHISKY

.illlll!ll!("''''rtiM

flACDONALD & MUIR LTD
The lipstick on his

NTRAL has I

CE

"M :w PRICES:
' fek V i -:00SHVS-:6:19
A -UU gS NM. l1 8:59 p.m.
CARY RANT. (
tVA MARIE SAINT V XkX nlgK
I ... X. tap tnlei
' i s v : fi of tusprnie
rfrT11''"" ""J"',,,in' i .. II '" jf'fl Id
j..iijj.,idli.is mi I

V'.iMfnby E RNtST LEHMAN HSUfHW HCWMOlIt, t OirKlfd by ALFRED HITCHCOCK

der the direction of M a g d r
Locke. This is in response to ma many
ny many requests which have been re
ceived for this kind of activity.
Members of tne Girls Service Or Organization
ganization Organization will be on hand to act
as asis.ants.
On Saturday of this week comes
the monthly "Girl of the Month"
dance at which time one of the
members of the Girls Service Or Organization
ganization Organization will be designated as
the September "Girl of the
Mon'h". Tae one chosen to re-

,-eive the honor will also receive
gifts and will be selected on the
basis of hours of volunteer serv service,
ice, service, promptness in arriving at
program events, attractiveness of
dress and her ability to get around
and be a good hostess smile
and make those present feel wel welcome.
come. welcome. Tuesday marks the beginning of
a square dance session each
Tuesday evening following the
movie. Under the direction of Jim
Wooten, it is expected that men
attending will soon be heard "Hon
oring yu'podner" for some delight delightful
ful delightful sessions. The old favorite kit kitchen
chen kitchen nights will continue during
the month with candy making
scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 29.
The members of 'the GSO will be
on hand to conduct informal danc
ing.
On Friday, Madge Locke will
continue her school of Ballet ses
sions which are open to children
of the military and others. There
arc still a few openings for stud students
ents students and military folks with young
daughters are urged to investig
ate this activity for their children.
PASS DRIVING LAW
FRANKFURT, Germany (UPI)
Germai.y has made it illegal for
persons suffering severe pain or
under the uitluence of narcotics
to drive an automobile. A Ham Hamburg
burg Hamburg court, in passing on a tence
on a doctor yesterday, said
such persons "are in no way dif different
ferent different from those who drive when
drunk." The doctor, Alfred Weber,
39, drove while suffering severe
pain in his kidneys.
1893
DsffMer Ltith Scotland
collar

HlCHLQ
QUEEHI

t"

DURING A VISIT to the Isthmus by the Rev. Eugene R. Bettennan, of St. Louis, MO., director
of the Lutheran Foundation second to right, he held many conferences with local leaders.
Others in the picture, left to right, are ReV. Andrew Melendez, the regular speaker for the
Spanish-language Lutheran hour; Napoleon Artigas, O., who Is in training for servlec as a
Lutheran missionary In the Panarr area; Rev Arthur W. Meyer and Rev. Robert F. Gusslck.

Panama Group Hears Historian Tell

Of Lincoln;
Abraham Lincoln's sense of
humor, his love for mocraey and
his awareness of ".angers from
within a democracy, were stres stressed
sed stressed in an illuminating lecture by
Professor Jav J. Monaehan of the
lecture was presented at the Pan Panamanian
amanian Panamanian North American Associa Association
tion Association in Avenida Peru. He will give
a second lecture on Lincoln today
at 8 p.m. The public is invited.
Monaghan has written 11 books
about Lincoln and the Civil War
wind in the United States. His
twelfth book, a biography of Gen.
George A. luster who was kiliea
hv the Indians at the Battle of the
Little Big Horn, was published last
week.
Monaehan heeame familiar with
Lincoln manuscripts while he was
State historian of the State of Hv
linois where Lincoln" was born. He-
is now consultant for the Wyles
collection of Lineolniana at the
University of California In Santa
Barbara.
T.ineoln. acordins to Monaghan,
was not a solemn, brooding figure.
Instead, he was a man ot mirtn.
The funny stories for which he
was famous were always enhanced
by humorous facial expressions,
for Lincoln was a born mimic, an
excellent actor.
As a poor young man running
for a political office for the first
time, 'Abe" amused his audiences
with jokes which have been less
publicized than those he told in
later life. Lincoln's wit in debate

1

tssammtmimnim
Second Talk
was as swift and devastating as
the "wise-crack" of today's "gag
writer." Once, when his political
opponent waved his arms in wild
gesticulations, Lincoln ruined the
dramatic scene by whispering so
everyone could hear, "Cut his gal galluses
luses galluses and let him fly."
This was part of the greatness
of Lincoln as a politician. Like all
politicians, he had to refuse the
requests of many of his support supporters,
ers, supporters, but those who went away
empty-handed always took with
a chuckle, 'Now I have something
I can give to everybody."
He pointed out that when a par party
ty party was defeated at the polls, it
should never change its appeal
from ballots to bullets, and that
parties which did this must expect
to lose Jfreir case., ;
But Lincoln also insisted thai no
malice be felt for people who voted
against him or his party. Mon Monaghan
aghan Monaghan read some Lincoln letters on
this subject, letters which are not
well known and wl ich are not in included
cluded included in the usual Lincoln bio biographies.
graphies. biographies. In one letter which Lincoln
wrote to a friend who had con congratulated
gratulated congratulated him on his election to
the Presidency, Lincoln thanked
his friend and added: "Yet in all
our rejoicing let us neither ex express,
press, express, nor cherish, any harsh feel feeling
ing feeling toward any citizen who. try his
vot, has differed with us."
Three years later, after dealing
with treacherous citizens and
some cowardly officers, President
Lincoln could still write in another
letter, "I shall do nothing through
malice; what I deal with is too
vas' for malice.
After reading this letter, Dr.
Monaghan exp'ained that Lincoln
realized he was dealing with the
future of democracy. The eman emancipator
cipator emancipator consider V' democracy the
safest and most just form of gov government,
ernment, government, but he was much too
wise a man to believe that de democracy
mocracy democracy would cure the political
troubles of mankind.
He realized that the success of
democracy depended on the intel intelligence
ligence intelligence of the people. He said that
some people were 'too ignorant
and vicious" to know how to gov govern
ern govern themselves, but by giving all
a chanc? he "expected the weak
to grow s'ronge1- wiser; and all
better, and happier together."
Lincoln saw clearlv lhal demo democracy
cracy democracy in a n'ry of uninlcllitrnt
people one a great opportunity
for drma' "s A rabblcri"cer
'who had no constructive program
and who dared not lake a stand on
anv issue mi"ht gel volt's by
raising prejudics agains' out outsiders,
siders, outsiders, against "foreigners."
Lincoln considered this trick one
of the mjst dangeroik lo a demo democracy.
cracy. democracy. During the decad" before h"
was elec'ed Presiden1 vmy nli nli-'ieians
'ieians nli-'ieians of this stamp were cmp cmp-"ifning
"ifning cmp-"ifning igainst Jews Ca'olics, ?nd
"other f"reirners." Th s ivas
same schemp to get vo'es which
''itler wuld use in Germany al almost
most almost a cen'nry later
In a sneech which Lincoln ei'ht
months h-forr he was elected Pi"
sident, he pointed nut l ow easy i
"us for dr')iPTO"U"s to use Ihe
"foreign"' isr" to gel svnipthv.
ind he siid tha' errn of tV hi"'i
'-s' fpnet'ons of rjvil'zalion was to
err 'el this nreiudic
T.fhor onions vere ne"- in t in
e'n' dnv. Purinf tht C'vil "'ar
th organized vnrkers in N"w
York went on strike. Inroln spoke
i tr them. Hp said he thanked God
that workinc men in tie North
jwere free to strike instead of
heinc slave. as laborers were n
i the South. Put he also warned the
strikers:
'Let not him who is houseless
"ll down the bouse nf another, but
let h'm work dilint1" h -'
'one for limseK. thus hv o.-arnn'"
Insuring that his own shall be saf?
I fr-rn violence when built."
j The prnner treatment nf sub
jvrrsivrs who tried secret 'v f
'overturn the government caused

Set Tonight
Lincoln constant concern. He be believed
lieved believed that every man was entitled
to the maximum i'reed6m and li liberty
berty liberty but he pointed out that the
word "liberty" might be abused,
that it meant different things to
different people.
To a woli, liberty meant the
right to kill sheep, and a. man who
prevented him from doiiig so was
a tyrant but to the sheep the man
was not a tyrant, but a protector
who assured the sheep's freedom
and liberty. Thus the proper defl-
mtion of liberty. Lincoln said, wu
perplexing problem.
When applied in wartime he
said, "It has long been a grave
question whether any government,
not too strong for the liberties ox
its people, can be enough to main
tain its own existence in great
emergencies."
Acording to Monaghan, Lincoln
is revered more today for saving
democracy than tor freeing the
slaves. Mncoln said very plainly
that if democracy was saved
slavery was doomed, while an at attempt
tempt attempt to abolish-slavery at the -cost
of democracy would accom accomplish
plish accomplish nothing. Therefore, he al always
ways always placed the salvation of the
American Union ahead of aboli abolition.
tion. abolition. Lincoln was assassinated just
when everything he had worked
for seemed to be achieved. This
great acomplishment and his
tragic death combined to make
him the great North American
hero The UU. SS has not always
lived up lo Lincoln's high ideals,
but a majority of the people have
always revered his teachings, his
wisdom, and his humanity. They
agree wi.h Ralph Waldo Emerson,
who said:
"The mass of mankind worry,
themselves into nameless graves",,
while here and there an unselfish?
soul like e Lincoln) forgets him-;
self into immortality."
Gatun Union Church

To Install New
Paslor On Sunday
The Rev. Cyril V. Roberts, who ;.
has accepted a call to the Gatun i
Union Church, will be installed a

Sunday, on October 4.
The Rev. Roberts was born in

Liverpool tngiana ana eaucaieu j
at Manchester Grammar School, J
Manchester Collegiate School, the
Royal College of Music and
Chancellor's College. Following :
his ordination he held several
pastorates in England, was chap chaplain
lain chaplain of Lambeth Hospital in Lon London
don London and master of Streatham
Grammar School. For the past
year he has been assistant pastor
of the Community Methodist
Church in Chicago.
Widely travelled throughout Eu Europe
rope Europe and the Middle East, the
clergyman served as chaplain of
the Embassy in Bagdad, Iraq, and
held various church posts in Jeru Jerusalem,
salem, Jerusalem, Iraq Arabia.
Active in the field of music, he
is interested in choir training
conducting, organ playing and
teaching.
The activities in connection
with the in.slnllatinn will hepin at

4:30 followed by a covered dish
dinner at 6 p.m. in the church
parlors.
Members and friends of the
church are invited to participate
and asked to bring a vegetable or
salad.
MODERN CONVENIENCE
BURLINGTON. Vt. (UPI)- The
lot lunch program at a high
school here was delayed for thou thousands
sands thousands of students because an au au-omatic
omatic au-omatic dishwasher had not been
istalled when the school year
started.

V



$ : v.

4WZSKESDAT, SEPTEMBER 30, 1959
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPf
PA6I IIVIN
Lawmaker Expects
Conpress To Pass
Credit Controls

SS8 yS.,v. ammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmfmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmamammmmmmmmm;f...y;-.
fr" i ;f fTtxu.

' vV in in Hi,,!

rHC FIRST DIVISION of the Comptroller's Office to achieve 100 7c participation In the United
: rund Xrive was the Budget and Rates Division! Not only was the goal reached speedllv, but the
fMaion achieved better than 150 of Its financial goal. In the cture above, Janice Dreltlein,
' JCtyman, Is shown handing the donations to Lo uis Caldwell of the Mail Opening Unit. At left 13
. Xenð ft. Booth who Is chairman, and at right Is Leroy B. Magnuson, chief of the division.

T0DAY-mE-T0DAY

TIVOLI
25c. 15c.
BANK I $125.00
SADDLE THE WIND
..with Robert Taylor
C Also:
RANSOM
with Glenn Ford

C APIT OLIO
35c. 20c.
Spanish Program!
MIS PADRES SE
DIVORCIAN
- Also: -EL
CARINOSO
with Miguel Aceves
Mejia

VICTORIA
15c.
MAN WITH THE
GOLDEN ARM
with Frank Sinatra
- Also: -MAN
WITH THE
GUN
Robert Mitchum

R I O

25c.

BANK! $330.00

I ACUSE
with Jose Ferrer
- Also: -HOT
SUMMER
NIGHT
wlthh Coleen Miller

B1BDOT
" imi Iifeoppww
i caaas y j
S " I
,E:;: doH8 French life :3-?fZITIHC
ntMCHiw I rlf .'HJ "A treotment
J I IT olh bold end hontjt
y I V I of the percnnioll
f SEMENONTS yl popular subject of

f.

ttanfifiwfi JEAN GABIN EDWIGE FEUILLEREAranco interlengw m nicole bergb

OPENING

tahte PRESIDENTEntoh

E AT R E

2 Peru Ave.

FOR ADULTS ONLY!

7

Shows: 3.00 5.00 7:00 9:00 Adm. Price: 75c.
ENGLISH DIALOGUES
This picture will not be shown in the Canal Zone!

Cub Pck 5 Mcn
Tonight At St. Lukt's
The opening meeting of Cub
Pack 5 will be held t the Cathed Cathedral
ral Cathedral of St. Luke in Ancon this
evening at 7.
The Pack, adjourned during the
summer, is now reaay to continue
its program lor the yer. Robert
B. Elmore, Cubmaster, is urging
all Cubs and their parents to at attend
tend attend this meeting, as it concerns
the setting up of the commit. ees
which function during the year.
The program will include a hob
by and pet show, in which the
boys will bring their hobbies and
pets for display. This will be fol followed
lowed followed by a motion picture which
will show the ideal set up for
work in Cib Scouting. Achieve Achievement
ment Achievement awards will be presented by
the Cub Master, followed by the
appointment of members to the
finance, awards, leadership, and
refreshments committees.
The Cub Scout program for boys
8 to 11 years of age has been en endorsed
dorsed endorsed by churches and organiza organizations
tions organizations thoughout our country. It
requires the support of the
parents, who are an active part
of the program. Parents are urged
to enroll their boys in this pro program,
gram, program, either at the C'atheJral or
in other centers.
Those who are interested in Cub
Park 5 are invited to attend (Tie
program and inquire of the Cub
Master or the Institut'onal Re Representative.
presentative. Representative. Edward J. Lucas,
about joining the oranization.

Organizational Meeting
At Coco Solo Scout Shack
A Boy Scout organi z a t i o n a 1

NEW YORK (UPD Rep Thom Thom-;s
;s Thom-;s Curtis (RMu) said yesterday
there is a strong po -s i b i 1 1 1 y that

the next session of Congress wi1

overide a presidential veto in en-ac-tinsr
stand-by credit and pr.ee
con rols.
The lawmaker said he expects
Congress to vote such legislation
because "inflation is apt to be out
in the open before the second ses session
sion session is too far along."
At the same time Curtis pre predicted
dicted predicted Co'isres "unquestionably"
will lift the interest ceiling on
img-term federal onds "The
money market may become so
acute in the next month that a
special sess nn will be called to
accomplish this purpose," he add added.
ed. added. The congressman mae these
cas's in a review of the 1960
legislative outlook as it affects
business in a speech prepared for
delivery at the annual sales con conference
ference conference of the American Manage Management
ment Management Association.
In discussing the prospect for
tax legislation, he said he does
not look for tax revision or re reduction
duction reduction "of any consequence
next year.
"I re?ret lo make thi.i predic prediction."
tion." prediction." Curtis declared, "because
if basic tax reform does not come
soon, we are going lo have an another
other another recession, largely as a re

sult of our lax structure
meeting will be held next Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday evening at 7 in the Coco Solo
Scout Shack.
All boys 11 to 14 years of age
and their parents are invited to
attend.

: I iu 1 i -"-

J ,rfss.- I USD
mmmmmK,f

fll ftii u I 1

I

TODAY ENCANTO 35-20

George Marshall in
"THE REVOLT OF THE
GLADIATORS"
in SuperScope & Color!
Barbara Shelley in
"THE CAT GIRL"

DRIVE-IN

I 7:00 Today! 9.00 1

run iuMTi
$1.10 per CAR!
Jeff Chandler
I. ana Turner in
THE LADY TAKES
A FLYER

T

Tomorrow

CAPT. FRANCISCO MEJIA, assigned 1o the Command and Staff
Section Of the US Army Caribbean School, Fort Gluick, takes
the oatJl 61 allegiance in the Regular Army from Col. Cecil
Himes, Commandant of the school. Mejia was integrated in the

Keplr,( Armj ai a

Captain in the Signal Corps. (U.S. Army
Photo)

d

SHOWS
2:43 4:38
6:51 9:07

P

II

Lvjunivinn i i wvi ml
LAREDO" i

ONE DAY RELEASE!
A Great Action Picture!
Robert PRAT in

"GUNMAN FROM

7

,75c. WEEKEND 40c.

RELEASE OF THE HIGHEST EXCELLENCE!
FIRST FILM WITH THE AMAZING NEW WONDER
E M E R G O
SPECIALLY INSTALLED FOR THIS ENGAGEMENT

m

fa t

SEE IT WITH SOMEONE
WITH WARM HANDS!

m

EMDiiDODBa

The objects leave the screen, float over the audience and
return to the screen to continue In their role In tbo picture I

COCO SOLO 7;00
Fully Air Conditioned

IJack Hawkins Dianne Foster

"Gideon of Scotland Yard

Service Center Theatres
Tonight!
BALBOA 6:15 8:10
Fully Air Conditioned
NIGHT
OF
THE
QUARTER
MOON

DIABLO HTS. 7:00
"THE ADVENTURES OF
. RSENE LUPIN"

GAMBOA 7:00

Sidney Poitier Eartha Kltt

THE MARK of THE HAWK

MARGARITA 7:00
Double Feature Program
"New Orleans After Dark"
and "JOYRIDF"

PARAISO 7:00
Victor Mature Diana Dors
"THE LONG HAUL"

SANTA CRUZ 7:00
Double Feature Program
"Gideon of Scotland Yard"
and "KILL HER GENTLY"

CAMP BIERD 7:00
Double Feature Proeram
"ARMORED ATTACK" and
STOLEN FACE"

Comlne Oct. 8th
BALBOA THEATRE
SAMMY STEVENS &
HIS ORCHESTRA
At a NEW low PRICE
Adults 0.75 Children 0.25

THE USO-JWB Armed Forces Service Center's Amateur Radio Station is "on the air" as
serviceman speaks to his folks back home over station KZ5JW. Hundreds of calls and mes messages
sages messages are relayed to various parts of the US yearly for servicemen and their families from th'
USO Club, one of the 19 agencies of this year's Canal Zone United Fund Drive. (US Army Photo'

BIG OAKS FROM
NEW YORK tl'l'Il -The domes
tic yield of tree nuts has in
creased steadily since 1910. The
United States now grown more
nuts than it imports althougn
imports of nuts also have grown

A rug is not just a rug...

NOW the 2 in-1 Rug & Pad.
The luxury of a firm but resilient foam
ruhher pad right with your room-size rug!
Yes! the tiigs are actually backed (all in
one piece) with foam rubber padding.
Good selection of colors
Room Size ONLY $ 1.85 WEEK

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR
BATHROOM ACCESSORIES
Featured this week

Kleenex Boxes . QS cents

I

Brush Holders ...$.4()

Shelves $2 S

r I

Mr. toni.

CHOOSE YOUR CREDIT TERMS
trillion orii limnting Slort
4th of July Ave. & "H" St. Tel. 2-0725

Mr. CLEVELAND SOl'EK
and
LLOYD SMITH
were also winners in our
FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE THE PAST WEEK
Sorry .. .their names were inadvertently left off
of our list published last Monday

IN ADDITION TO DOUBLING YOl'R MONEY
IN OUR FREK WEEKLY RAFFLE
YOU CAN' WIN $1,500.00 ON THE XMAS DEAJ,

7"!" 5

Sensational vjGifts and Surprises for Everyone!

During the GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION of

STT IDDBESU Bo-cancihi Store Him gaaDScOonDca

V
Located in the brand new building on Central Ave. & M St.
Today we opened our new store with a fantastic assortment of yardgoods at the same, low, low PUERTO LIBRE prices!
Perfect for all pocketbooks Come in soon and get your RAFFLE TICKET for the Second Chalet Drawing on December 27

SENSATIONAL GIFTS AND SURPRISES FOREVERYONE!

s
at

-
3
ca



! vr

PAG I EIGHT

SPEEDY AQUAVION This is the
has a speed of from 33 to 65 knots
of the same size. 01 light and rust

VEGETABLE OIL TANKS Panama's newest vegetable oils, Pabo and ,IVoro. are stored in these
and other huge tanks of Industrias Panama Boston during various steps of its refining process. The
new, modern plant will be inaugurated today.

Modern Vegetable

To Be Inaugurated Here Today

Paitilla, that section of Panama
City area which once meant to
most residents only a civil air
nor; and a few sheltered coves
for bathing, is rapidly assuming
another character in keeping wiili
tlie clanging face ami hopes u.
P; nania.
Today I'aildla is eh iracler,.ed
bv maiiv new buildings iimM ol
llicin constructed with.nu Ihe past'
1'iree or lour e;-r.. .: ir.'w
buddings house the education and j
indus rial clioi'ls ol l ;e rig
country.
Among Ihe var imi.-, indulr csl
which li.uc opened in the past'
frw ears .n i'an.imi', i.ml l rli
culaiiy in I'aUilla is Industries
Panama Hoslon. .s. in u .or
mally .naugurale lis iiui.icni eg
e a le od procesing phni lodi.
1 ne event will he a ended In o
f'c a Is of Panama and the (anal
Zoi. in addition the .-;'
ho'der: reprcsenlaliM's ol press
an l r ulio. and other p e c i a i
S" s s.
The corporation was lounded b
Jo iquin J. Vallanno. .It. now
president, with Jorge Kndara, and
pom nic V. Anlonelli o( Hoslon.
Prominent local businessmen lig
lire on Ihe hoard of director whic''
include I.ois Mait.'n l.nc il I
all Rod' I o Cam. i 're
Chiari. Rol-crt Novey i'...l:..m
V sque. ( i ; h i,.-- . r.
holders, the corporalion was aide
to raise a capital ol SI .?oii.uii:i.
and capital'ze its plant at $!IH".

Th plant area covers, 3,600
v square meters of the company's
'' land area of 18,000 square me meter";.
ter";. meter";. The building itself houses
the stock from which the oils
area orocessed, 'he machinery
4 which insures the highest quali quali-k'
k' quali-k' ty products, and plenty of space
for finished stock storaqe.
No effort was spared to secure
J Ihe (most equ'pinenl, consonant

FARfcWELL PARTY

. poited for duty at Patrick Air Force Base in Florida

typr of esscl that will ho put
which enables it to cover short
proof construction, the Aquavion

Willi the realities of Ibe world
market. Plants and experts in ma
ny countries were consulted and
the choice finally was made ol
the t Im ago firm YVurster and
Sanger, Inc., to oraw the plans
for nslailaliim. Krcclion was su supervised
pervised supervised by Carter Poster, Jr., of
Temple. Texas, who has assisted
a! the erection ol plants in more
thai, .'ill co.inlr es.
Poster hinisell qualifies Ihe Pa Panama
nama Panama plan; a.s 'more up-to-date
than aintlung anywhere including
the Stall's, fhere may be larger
one. 'ait none belter."
CYI I SA of Panama construct constructed
ed constructed the building. Javier Cuardi;i.
Panamanian chemical engineer
has horn named technical direc director.
tor. director. ll.iM'. pi i.lucl.ml
present i, L'." iocs
call I e .nrrr.iM'd
own doubled- .f
cap. icily a
ol Oil. which
considerably
noco.ss.irv,
Willi I
or changes in the present
si'! up
The oils, marketed under the
nanie ol Paoo, an economical,
smokeles. odorless oil. and D'oro.
ihe high grade sesame and peanui
oil equal to and better t hi n the
be.! imported o; have to pas-Ihi'on--'i
a lung rocess ol relin ng
i.i re e 1 1 : 1 lift will he fin
! '' i n in in the most exact
ma s '.' if. calions nf sanitation
! and iin 1 1 or m il v of the product.
Complete deodorizing and
I bleachinq facilities which gua gua-I
I gua-I ranee highest standards of pur pur-!
! pur-! ity also round out the plant. In
1 all these installations the com com-j
j com-j pany follows the modern sys sys-I
I sys-I tern of distinguishing with dif
ferent colors the equipment,
tanks and tubing of each de department,
partment, department, which besides being
a practical thing also injects a
bright note irto the usual mono monotonous
tonous monotonous plant background.
.Manager Jorge Kndara look.'
forward to expansion into other

Airman Second Class John Stucchio Jr. was honored last week at a farewell party
given by employes of Fuerza y Luz at the company's club in Paitilla. The serviceman

THE

into operation shortly between Panama and Taboga. The Aquavion
distances in one third of the time it would take other type vessels
consumes very little fuel and has tremendous braking power.

Oil Plant
sidelines in the near future with
derivations of the materials now
being used.
Industrias Panama Boston, S.A.
is one of the lew industries in Pa Panama
nama Panama which long before installing
.Is plant has concerned itself
about the local production of its
raw material. As a result of this
p-ilicy it has stimulated the grow grow-ng
ng grow-ng of peaiiuls and sesame in Pa Pali
li Pali una and at present 400 hectares
of sesame are cultivated in dif different
ferent different parts of Ihe country under
the direction of the firm's tech technicians.
nicians. technicians. Seed for the program was
provided by the company after
two years experimentation on a
farm in the Tocumen area to find
the vanelrs best suilod to good
grow 111 here.
Tl e company
a bright future
looks forward to
is it proves to its
consumers m Panama and the
( anal Zane that il can produce
top quality products that all will
be will ng and proud to buy as
"made. in Panama."
SHIP PASSES TESTS 3
MOSCOW it'Pl) The Soviet
government newspaper Izvestia
said yesterday that Ihe giant Sov Soviet
iet Soviet whaling ship, "Sovelskaya
I'krama" had successfully passed
running tests. Izvestia aid the
tl.tiod ion vessel, "the world's big biggest
gest biggest whaling ship," is designed
for operation in pack-ice where
blue whales abound.
BEST OF EVERYTHING
UK KYVTON. Ala. in'K Har Harold
old Harold Hill escaped in style from
Kscamhia County Jail.
He grabbed an absent deputy s
gun. look the officer's idjn.ifica idjn.ifica-lion
lion idjn.ifica-lion papers and $79 in cash, hail hailed
ed hailed a taxi and rode away. He was
caught four hours later.
after" spending hii leave at his

PANAMA AMERICA AM INDEPEKDENT DAILY KTWS?APE1

m
men can
enu
One of the country's leading re research
search research scientists, Dr. Charles
Glen King, executive director of
the Nutrition Foundation, sees
great social value in family
meals.
"To each member of the family,
mealtime can he a time of bright brightness,"
ness," brightness," he said. "It involves per personal
sonal personal cleanliness the wash-up
before dinner. It provides release
from hunger, thereby easing ten tensions.
sions. tensions. As we eat a normal jfieal
surrounded by our family, we get
an inner feeling of self-assurance.''
King, raised on a farm, noted
that animals usually feed together.
"Group feeding seems to induce
more normal relaxation. Certainly
the best time to influence people
is when they are grouped around
a dinner table. It is ideal time
also for parents to instill not only
good eating habits but also the
habit of getting along with other
people."
The aesthetic surroundings of
the family meal have definite im importance,
portance, importance, he believes. When the
plates are attractive, when there
are flowers or some ornament
on the table, when the room is
orderly and restful, the total en enjoyment
joyment enjoyment of the meal is increased.
This distinguished biochemist
and professor of chemistry at Co Columbia
lumbia Columbia University believes grace
before meals can add to group
solidarity. "When a blessing is
asked with quiet sincerity, I have
found that it induces a note of
thanksgiving a cheerful note
and more or less adapts the group
to the importance of the family
meal," he explained.
Every time you break down the
feeling of psychological security
and happiness a home can give,
something vital is lost, this scienti scientific
fic scientific father of three and grandfa grandfather
ther grandfather of six children, states. "In
homes where there is a fine sens
of human values, homes that give
a lift to their members, you will
find that the mother is careful of
the environment of her family
meals," he said.
"Physiologically, the good fam family
ily family meal is vastly important. In
terms of the father and mother,
it is their opportunity to carry
on their responsibility to maintain
the strength and vitality of their
children. It also enables them to
help a child with a genetic handi handicap,
cap, handicap, such as a digestive deficien deficiency,
cy, deficiency, or need for a restricted or
special diet, or a bad heart, ad adjust
just adjust to daily life despite physical
limitation," King explained.
"One of the most exciting areas
in modern science is the identify identifying
ing identifying of genetic handicaps in infants.
A well trained pediatrician can,
with co-operation of parents, help
the genetically handicapped child
develop and achieve maximum
physical development," he said.
"Generally speaking, the home
with regular, well planned meals
in a relaxed enviroment offers the
handicapped child the best hope
of normal development," he add added.
ed. added. He said one of the greatest fac factory
tory factory in the well-being of children
and the maintenance of nutritional nutritionally
ly nutritionally balanced meals is our supply
of good quality milk. "That is a
blessing American mothers and
fathers should never cease to be
grateful for. I know of no other
country where the over-all stand standard
ard standard and supply is so high," he
concluded.
Other students of belter family
living likewise recommend great greater
er greater attenlion to the enviroment of
family meals. If the budget per permits,
mits, permits, they suggest investment in
good china and sterling silver to
add an extra sense of importance
and dignity to the gathering. Ei Either
ther Either heirloom or modern sterling
is practical because it never
wears out and is kept glowing and
in best condition with constant
home in Panama City

j jiir UCAn TABIC Among high-ranking Naval officers and their wives attending the Naval Officer
Al me ritAU I ABLE Wives Club's buffetparty last Friday were, from left, Capt. A, M Savage, Mrs i

Lewis S. Parks, Rear Adm.

Capt. and Mrs. Kenneth Hines.

GENIAL PARTY-GOERS
Among Navy couples who en.
joyed the informal festivities
at the Rodman Officers Club
party wee, from left, Lt. Cdr
Charles T. Fontaine, Mrs.
Ernest S. Bathke, Mrs. Fon.
taine, Capt. Bathke.

jjjj. RiirrrT TADIC Anticipation of sampling the Smorgasbord buffet
Al IHt bUrrtl IAdLC wives Club party brings smiles to, from I eft, Mrs.

J. Fetzer, Lt. (jg) William

1 !miii jJi
f- isfSW m ki' i, : ? y i f"'. 1 m mm m) t

(UjKi ii 4 ,!

CURUNDU CLUB FIESTA

K. Worley, representing the Balboa Women's Club; Mrs. Phil B. Cage, wife of the commandant of the U.S. Air Fbr'cl
School for Latin America; Mrs. John D. Coney, wife of the Fort Clayton post commander; E. Rafael Urdaneta, Mexl.
can Ambassador to Panama; Mrs. Abel Guibert, president of the Curundu club; Mrs. Urdaneta; Mrs. James E. DaylS
Jr., wife of the Fort Clayton post adjutant: and Manuel S. Castillo, guest speaker for the program. .Army PWto)

Parks, Mrs. Robert P. Shimp,

A ,...,..-.-Af. t-M-.---1-lYiY 1

Jil

Mutter, Mrs. Harold Brennaman, Mrs. James Mercer and

Set to enjoy a post-luncheon program at the Mexican fiesta sponsored by l;hf
Curundu Women's Club is this group at the head table. From left are Mrs,, 0,;

i .Urn in m Hi r

;

president of the club, Capt.
,

- i'i -tf ift--"1-' Tti-ir,,,trir,'frii-flWiiii"iifMrtiiBijii i,fmi iOi 4 rmtm.mimM,,

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBES IsVlSSf

and Mrs. William 8. Ho.Welf'
supper at the Naval Officer!
Charles A. Reed, Ens. MilrvirV
Cdr. Mercer.
- j

i



m TAX AM A AMERICAN A5 IKDEfPfPPtT DAILT KIWSPAP
AS! NINI

' HTDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1959

g J -ll v. fit 11 P

iiL hmuwMummmm wwwuifmiinwi wrmnninFi nwimn winmir n nr nnn ffrrrtimtwnrwn i1 "" 1 nr -.- Hmm a n nmn nrtiitiiinnf nnnnrfl Mmnm in nnwwfw n mwiwwnww

AMADOR CLUDWUMtN term are these officers and board 'members. From left are Mrs. Ray Hilton, Mrs.

rAlexander J. Sutherland, Mrs. James E. Williams., Mrs. E. E. Knight, Mrs. John F. Schmelzer, president; Mrs.
I Charles L. Dasher, honorary president; Mrs. James A. Moore, Mrs. J. A. Pena, Mrs. F. 0. Hamilton, Mrs. M. F..
?Moucha, Mrs. Blaine W. Butters and Mrs. H. C. Barnes. Also on the board is Mrs. T. E. Cole. (Army Photo)

. ... r .. a 1 1 n. r r 1 H 11 mm

DICUVCklinA 'flatting at a welcoming conee given by the i-ort uuiick unicers wives uud are, Trom ictt, ivir.
w DltNYtNILA Bainbridge Davis, Mrs. Elena Lyon, Mrs. Olga Lcignadier, Mrs. Philip Judson, Mrs. Ldtta Kil.
zAWrn, Mrs. Lawrence A. Clark, Mrs.. Melva Fernandez, honorary club president; Mrs. Cecil Himes and Mrs. Leo F.
5-Ernahue. Thirty new members were welcomed by club president Mrs. Charles C. Early, including wives of Latin
;:: Ajmrican guest Instructors assigned to the USARCARIB School. (Army Photo)

I

IdirirANIKl ANNIYtKAKY 20th Imantry and his company commanders toast the 20th Infantry at Its 93rd

Anniversary. In the background are come of the organization's battle streamers. Company commanders pictured,
Jrom left to right, are Capts. John C. Oliver, Phillip R. Hertz, Alistair D. Munro and Richard L. Murnighan, 1st Lt.
'"Jdbn W. King, Capt. Rupert E. Odom, 1st Lt. John C. Thompson, Capt. James J. Boyle and 1 3t Lt. Fermin C.
"Casiano. (Army Photo)

LAN COME
Beauty, in all its many aspects, is of concern to every woman.
It is her natural heritage and certainly merits careful attention
all the time. But beauty never poses a problem when you use

ADIEU RIDES
Eliminates
unsightly
wrinkles. This
anti-wrinkle
cream is specially
prepared to
smooth out
"crows' feet" and
other tell-tale lines
near the eye-lids,
temples and
forehead... $1.50
and $3.50.

LANCOME
LIMPIDIS
Soothlnf eye
lotion relieves
tired, strained
eyes in a matter of
minutes. Most
helpful for eves
irritated by hay
feyfr. lonr hours
of traveling,
driving etc... $2.50.

NUTRIX
Penetrating cream
conditioner
rejuvenates skin by
stimulating the
cultaneous cells. It
restores dry
sensitive skin to a
natural healthy
condition and gives
your skin the
supple, soft
elasticity of youth.

L

With every $1.00 cash purchase or credit payment you receive
a FREE TICKET in our Double Christmas Raffle.
Over $4,500.00 in prizes!

MAIN STORE: 22-06 Central Ave.

BRANCH STORE: 18-60 Tivoli Ave.

Ladies' Blouses
Fine, top. quality blouses.
Flattering styles, short short-sleeved.
sleeved. short-sleeved. White only,
sizes 32 38.
Formerly $1-48
NOW 97c.

Ladies' Shorts
Long.lasting gabardine for
comfortable, active wear.
Black, aqui, yellow and
olive green. Sizes 10 18.
Formerly $2 38
NOW $1.95

CHILDREN'S SHIRTS 7Q
Washable, color-fast. Styled just for the
kiddies. Sizes 4 14. Formerly 98c.
GIRLS' CAN-CAN SLIPS $1-00
Eyelet trimmed bodice, cotton sateen. Three ruffles.
Sizes 3 6X. Formerly Jl.Si.

CENTRAL AVE. CALIDONIA

Admiral

The most outstanding refrigerator
to grace any home
So Easy To Own
Buy yours on our Easy -Payment
or Club Plan
CHOOSE FROM NEW MODELS THAT HAVE
JUST ARRIVED!

CaoaolbDorfs "ELL DAffit"

No. 16 26 Central Ave. Next to the Cecilia Theater
House of Linoleums, Picture Frames, Mirrors and Glass

SMOOT & PAREDES
PRESENTS

m

PAMDE



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AH OOimSDIT DAILY NCWSTAPES
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER M, imZTT
Los Angeles Dodgers Cop National League Fla
Take Care Of Braves 6-5
In Final Playoff Game;
Promise To Whip Sox Too
Editor: CONRADO SARCEANT

PAGI TIN

Hv LEO H. PETERSEN
CHICAGO. Sept. 30 (I TI) The Dodders final finally
ly finally took care of the Braves and their promise today
was, "Now we'll take tare of the White Sox."
Thy pianed in here ailor hav Irom second wilt: the run which
Mg dfiealeri Milwaukee. 6-0. in 12 ; completed the Dodger dssev
innings al 1...? Angeles last ntphi jand sent them winins off to ( hi hi-to
to hi-to win the National League pen cago for the Series,
nar.t and their first pla off in, There it will be another knock knock-three
three knock-three tries !riowri brawl a?ains' an Am?r;nn
M Titer Wa't A! -tori who said League champion White Sox. who
"T thought we'u in it all 1hehae had time to r,M thei stall
Hme hfcri : World Series pitch-land will send 22 game v inner
lug rlans al! nv,-.ped nut F.arlv W.wir, against them in the

"I don 1 kn.,i n usi me ou.ci
J'iv is joins If il. "I'' 1 m Enrl2
with m" hi? w r'" si,il! "T113'
mear.s Ro;-v Craig ;n the firs!
fame tomorrow
'Af:er 'ha! it will V I arrv
51,01-rv .Tnli'uiv r,i-"s ard Don
P

rvtoXe T1 rv -i -.11 the i-.V" .Williams won i, wiir. :-nee ..m,,.
yhf rivJo'.-t di-' the hard wavjof shutout relief pitching.
-n.. .. ; .-.:,,: l.rw Roniette. the loose and

,r and .,x .m.oii.- .-'-raihon atje m,-n Nm the mountains o
vmw, then ftrsrVvrf' T..:Wet Virginia, almost squared it
rPlrc r.l,.,.", v.-Oerrl-v tnj against the D,.dvrs :n that sec

fh
rtMax or f it- r ( wnc
hks in h.Mlo" hi.torv
For no mher V;'ion ,l League
f.am ever hrfove had fou"ht its
,v t,,rk- from seventh Place to
ttie fla" m one brief :rasnn s
jump. And il was a battle be be-rune
rune be-rune a Ip1 5 t'-e I'd 1'alf of
the ninth innin" the nndn'-s
VetMI fHe 1eore In nlivn'fs for
tVio flan anain fired failure

But. after '"ir cam -mH ninejHodces

lnnin": 'hev had inn
a ;i .in,

on, 0f thoe wild and wonderful i bases. Don Mcivianon can.. ...
finihec which were the- trad-'an attempt to stem Lie tide but
marl- W in the old d-vs in ; Norm Larker singled off the
Brnoklvn And after 1? inning screen in left to send Moon and
which ended a rP--:.. no camnaiffn ninch runner Boh Lillis racin.
In ear -i-aruin" jubilation, thev had, 'home and Hodges 1o third
,..,H hn ri"ht to face the rested The Braves came next with

wv.il. in tv,r Kri.iif sr. en
r'acsio opening tomorrow at Chi Chi-ea"n
ea"n Chi-ea"n Tt was in the final anahsis
pift as well as a hard won pri7e.
For there were two out and
two on when Carl Furillo crash crashed
ed crashed in Infield smnle just wide
ef second base. Felix Mantilla
had no play on what should hav
fceen a bases-filling sinqle. still
leaving reliever Bob Rush and
the Braves elive.
But the slender Puerto Rican
fnok a darinr gamble and fired to
first fired it into 'he dirt and
past strainin" Frank Torre as Gil
Hodges trundled all the wav home
LEADING
PITCHERS
(Bated en II er Mare Decisions)
National LeuvM
W L
1R 1
1R 9
. 19 10
. 12 7
15 9
Pet
Face.
Pirates
97 1
La
Pirates
Antonelli. Giants
Conley. Phils
Buhl. Rraves
American League
Shaw. White Sox . 18 fi
MrLish. Indians ... 19 R
' .... '-itr Sox ... 22 in
Mossl, Tigem 17 9
''aas. Yankees 14 R

cmiiEiEes
(CHEERS)

it ...itethe
$ It 1.' Si

Oislrlbutors:

FELIPt MOTTA e HIJO

Tel. X-700R
Ralboa

uip nei

I'm' the Dodgers it will lie
Craig the 28-year "In l isltiall
pi'chcr who has an 115 reeotd
this season and who sat in the
h' H pen idly yeslr'dav as five
Dodger pitchers traitred to the
n,-l hefr.re 23 -.ear-old Stan
mn.l fame yesterdav -atmosi man,
it .i-e,s.,rv lor Cr".,g to go ou
land face Milwaukee -n an end ol
the road third game today
But Burdatt., staggered ott.n
yet nvr quite put dewn, finally
took th count in a dramatic
ninth inning which turned the
tide and set up the heroics end
collapse in the 12th.
w-jIIv Moon Duke Snider and
.haed him with three
utrainht singles which lined tne
Warren Soahn. tnen srtai i n
bander, and Kurillo flied deep to
right. Hodges scoring after tne
catch with the tying run.
Now it was sudden death and
the crowd of 36.528 groaned as the
Braves filled the bases with two
out in the 11th. Williams got them
out. though, and the groans chane
ed to cheers as the Dodgers filled
m up in their half and then could
not pull it off.
Then it was the 12th -anil, aftex
the Rraves went down in order,
so. too. did the first pair of Dodg Dodgers
ers Dodgers Now it was Hodges and he drew
a walk. Pieriatano stepped in next
and singled to left. Hodges going
to second.
That put Furillo, one of the old
Flatbush heroes, in the box and
he rapped that hit on which Man Man-till
till Man-till took the greatest losing
gamble of the season.
Buried in the memories of that
madcap ninth inning and the ex
plosion in the 12th were the home
runs of Charlie Neal, who lofted
i,:- mil, nnmor nf thp vear a mere
200 feet over the scorned screen

.607 in left field, and the one wttn
655 1 which Kddie Mathews won the
632 league home run title in the fifth.
625! Mathews was tied, with Frnie
(Ranks of the Cubs, each having 45
! homers, when he went into the
j playoff in which averages count
750 in the final standings. He sliced
.704 j his title winner just inside the
6RR right field foul pole to win the
654 1 first annual Mel Ott Memorial
.6.16 Award.

Boulevard. Panami

National League

TEAMS W L Pet. GB
Lot Angtlti 18 48 .544
Milwaukee U 70 .551 7
San Francisco 83 71 .539 4
Pittsburgh 71 74 .504
Chicago .74 80 .481 13
Cincinnati 74 80 .481 13
St. Louii 71 83 .441 14
Philadelphia 44 W .414 23
American League
TEAMS W L Pet. GB
Chicago 4 40 .410
ICIivtlind 89 45 .578 5
New York ... 79 75 .513 15
Dttroit ... 74 78 .494 18
Boston .... 75 79 .487 19
Baltimort 74 80 .481 20
Kansas Cit 4 18 .429 28
Washington 43 91 .409 31

THURSDAY'S GAME
(World Series)
Los Angeles (Dodgerst vs Chicago
(White Sox) at Chicago
YESTERDAY'S RESULT
NATIONAI LFAGUE PLAYOFF
(12 Innings)
Milwaukee 210 010 010 0005 10 2
Los Angeles 100 1 00 003 0016 15 2
Burriette. McMahon (9). Snahn
(Si .lay (91. Rush (Hi and Cran Cran-dall;
dall; Cran-dall; rirvsdale. Podres (5). Churn
(7),' Koufax (9), Labine (ft). Wil Williams
liams Williams (10) and Rosehoro. Pigna Pigna-tano
tano Pigna-tano (10). W Williams (5-51. L
Rush (5-fiV Homers Milwaukee.
Mathews (4fi). Los Angeies. ic-ai
(19).
LEADING
HITTERS
National
G
Aaron, Mil. 154
Cun'ham, S. L. 144
Cepeda, S. F. 151
Pinson, Cinci. 154
Mays, S. F. 151
Temple. Cin. 149
Robinson, Cm. 146
League
AB R H Pet.
629 116 223 .355
458 65 158 .345
605 92 192 .317
648 131 205 .316
575 125 180 .313
598 102 18G .311
540 106 168 .311
563 86 174 .309
Bover, St. L. 149
Mathews. Mil. 148
Banks, Chita. 154
594 118 182 .306
589 97 179 .304
American l eague
Kucnn, Detroit 139 56! 99 198 353
Kaline, Del roil 136 511 86 167 .327
Runnels, Bos. 147 560 95 176 .314
Fox Chicago 156 624 84 191 .306
Mihoso Cleve. 148 570 92 172 .302
Rich'son. N. Y. 134 469 53 141 .301
Tuttle K. C. 126 463 74 139 .300
Woodling, Bal. 140 440 63 132 .300
Bower Cleve. 147 595 102 172 .289
Mantle. N. Y. 144 541 104 154 .285
Cerv, K. C. 125 463 60 132 .285
Runs Batted Tn
National League
Banks, Cubs .' M
Robinson. Reds 125
Aaron, Braves
Bell. Reds H-"
Mathews, Braves 114
American League
.lenscn. Red Sox H2
Colavilo, Indians HI
Killebrew. Senalors 105
Lemon. Senators 100
Maxwell, Tigers 95
Home Runs
National League
Malhews. Braves fi
Banks, Cubs 4S
Aaron, Braves 38
Robinson. Reds 36
Mays, Giants 34
American League
Cnlavito. Indians 42
Killebrew, Senators 42
Lemon. Senators jj3
Mantle. Yankees 31
Maxwell, Tigers 31
Alona Th? Fairways
SUMMIT HILLS
Vella Sharp and Frank Malava
sik took top I onors in the regular
monthlv mixed scotch foursome
golf tournament at the Summit
Hills Golf and Country Club when
they turned in a low net score
of 57. Saturday afternoon. Rcun Rcun-ners
ners Rcun-ners up were Kdna Lang and Bip
Nelson who trailed the winners
by one stroke.
Low gross score was turned in
by the team of Ruth Powell nd
George Riley who had jki 86.
The third low net score was
shot by Faye Day and Al Zon who
had a net score of BO with Mur Mur-rel
rel Mur-rel Mitchuson and Bill Jamison
taking home fourth place with a
net 62.
Summit officials have set Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, Oct 24 as the date for the
next regular mixed scotch four foursome
some foursome with tee off time set for 1
p m.
If von anfrr r.rtm r.n.. T
Nlchlj, RM'kirh. I,n Pln., I,o of
.our, rvoiiiior WMlcneaa, yod
hould hlp your Prott r,ln1 Im.
mfrtUMy with Rootna. Thla mrtlrln
mkyou ynunr, atronrr, and
Wa to alrtp without Intormpilon.
a Heiana from j eur ckemte toriir.

Getting Up Night?

TAINTED VICTORY Azabache, with apprentice rider Juan Pablo Diaz furiously waving hi., whip
in front of runnerup Edimburgo, hangs on to score by a head in last Sunday's second race. Venenoso,
which raced in entrv with Azabache, wound up third. Leading jockey Braulio Baeza, up on Edim Edim-burgo,
burgo, Edim-burgo, lodged a foul claim hut, as is custemry at the President Remon racetrack because, of a faulty
rule on disqualifications, it was disallowed. Sandino Hernandez rode El Venenoso.
Athletic Club Vs. Bulldogs
At Balboa Tomorrow Night

If ( ' rr

KNOCKDOWN Panama's Carlos Martinez stands over Chil Chilean
ean Chilean Reinaldo Seguel whom he floored with a left right combi combi-nalion
nalion combi-nalion to the head in the second round of a three-round ama amateur
teur amateur flyweight bout at the National Gym last night. Seguel, who
took a mandatory eight-count, lost by a unanimous decision
(Photo McClean)
Chilean Amateur Boxing Team
Outscores Panamanians 3 to 2

A visiting five-man amaletir box boxing
ing boxing team from Chile oulscored
Panamanian fighters 3-2 in three three-round
round three-round bonis heid at the National
Gym last night.
Carlos Lucas, Chile. 164, gain gained
ed gained a unanimous decision over
Humberto Salazar, Panama. 158.
Alfredo Corncjo. Chile. 146, took
a unanimous verdict from Onel
Essfman. Panama, 151
Luis Si 1 v a Chile, 134-' '2 was a
unanimous winner over Rafael Ji Jimenez.
menez. Jimenez. Panama, 136.
Pole Belgrado, Panama, 119 took

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a unanimous verdict from Sergio
Roblcs, Chile, 120. Robles injured
his rigft hand in the first and did
most of his fighting with his left
after that.
Carlos Martinez, Panama, 113-1-5.
gained a unanimous verdict
over Reinaldo Seguel, Chile, 112.
Seguel, who took an eight-count
in the second, was the only fight fighter
er fighter to suffer a knockdown on the
program.
The visitors fight local, boxers
again tomorrow at He National
Gym and plan to leave for home
over the weekend by plane.

1
you bought
has the
YOUR CAR
Renault Rolls-Royce
Vauxhail Volkswagen

AX

V 1

M

By TREVOR SIMONS
Balboa Hiph School uill haue

the first shot at the favored Ath
letic Club Rams in the first regul regular
ar regular game of the 1959 grid season.
The Rams, more experience experience-laden
laden experience-laden than they have been in prev previous
ious previous season, are the favorite to
break out in front in All-CZ play
and predictions are that they
should have an undefeated sea season.
son. season. But the word "underdog"
has been deleted from the football
vocabulary for 1959.
Despite the fact that the Bull Bulldogs,
dogs, Bulldogs, the favorite in most of the
previous football season, are be being
ing being listed as the team with the
least chance of winning this year,
the margin of diflerence between
all four teams is so slim that one
break at the right time could com completely
pletely completely change the outcome of
any single game and consequent consequently
ly consequently of the entire season.
AC's Billy Rankin and Joe Ci Cicero
cero Cicero look care of most of the ball
carrying in the Jamboree and
both fleet-footed backs turned in
creditable performances despite
lack of conditioning and erratic
training schedules.
Jim Morris, juggernaught full full-hack
hack full-hack wi;h plenty of drive behind
his 185-pound frame, did little in
tke line of offensive duty; but that
situation is expected to undergo
somo revision for tomorrow night's
encounter with the Bulldogs.
The older, Athletfc Club Rams
have a strong defense on which
thiy will rely greatly to hold ti e
school boys at bay if they are able
to take the lead early in the game.
FamiUar names to Canal Zone
football are Tony Dyer, Ben Fav Favorite,
orite, Favorite, Bob Fearon. Irl Sanders
cd to form an impregnable wall
and Burt Mead. They are expect expect-Cninst
Cninst expect-Cninst any Balboa attack while
nniviriing the punch needed to
give the AC break-away artis's a
cV.nce to scoot down the grid to towards
wards towards pay dirt.
Without a real good passer in
their midst and no one reallv re
; uted as an adequate pass receiv receiver
er receiver tl'e AC is expected to stay on
the ground; this thev did in the
Limboree to when Jim McKeown
tossed the only Ram's pass.
Their formidable opponents are
Cage and Co., but th? Bulldogs
too boast a few heavies that could
make the goings a bit rough on
tle'r opponents tomorrow 'night.
Well aware that they can run the
Athlrtic Club into submission, the
Bulldogs are expected to dish out
a generous helping of assorted
plays with a good array of long
passes to keep A C. moving until
their weary legs rebel.
Here again Cage comes into the
picture, a capable tosser with
plenty of accuracy. And the Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs have some speedy runners
in top condition for the '59 sea season.
son. season. Dick Scott, Buzzy Rathgeb?r
and Worden French to name a few.
Doug Pajak, Balboa's end with
a good pair of hands, could be on
the receiving end of many of the
Bulldog tosses and on the Bulldog
line there are a few big lads too
that could make an exhausted AC
eleven buckle under constant
pounding.
The Bulldogs are not as deep
in reserve power as they have
been in previous years, but they
are eyeing hopefully a good crop
of newcomers lhat might just
come around to surprise the pro pro-nosticators
nosticators pro-nosticators of 1959.
Armed Forces Vs.
Los Guaracheros
Cage Game Oct. 3
The basketball team of Los Gua
raeheros de Colon is all set for
the forthcoming United Fund
game with the United States Arm Armed
ed Armed Forces All Stars selected by
the PAF weekly newspaper "Buc "Buccaneer."
caneer." "Buccaneer." The game will be held at the
Reeders Gymnasium in Fort Clay Clayton,
ton, Clayton, on Saturday. Oct. 3, com commencing
mencing commencing at 7 p.m. Their final
practice and briefing will be
held tonight, al 7 p.m. in the Rain Rainbow
bow Rainbow City gymnasium.
The following members are
hereby notified to attedn. on time:
Arluro Agard. Frnesto Davey, Hu Hugo
go Hugo Amadee, Anastasio S.ingtiillen,
Patricio Harrison. Roberto Smith
Contreras. Humberto Hnl. Carlos
Hyacinth, Roberto March, Reynold
Smith.

LATIN AMERICA SCHOOL
LEAGUE
ALBROOK AIR FOR.CE BASE
Teams Standinoi Wan Lail
Cerveza Balboa 8'A
Gulf pride 20 12
La Mascota 18 14
Volkswagen 16 is
Cia. America 14 18
Marlboro l3Vi igA
Cyrca Free Zone 13 18
Mercurio 8 23
By HENRY L. HERVEY
CERVEZA BALBOA 4,
MARLBORO 0
It seems as if some teams are
determined to make me a liar.
Last week I voced the opinion thai
it was very hard to take 4 points
anymore and they must have
taken it as a challenge because
this week that is the story of our
league.
Tne Beermert increased their
lead by 3V2 points by whitewashing
the Smokers. One thing remains
true. It was no pushover. Every
team member rolled over his
average but the Beermen rolled
just a little bit better. For in
stance, the most exiting ame
was the third, the smokers lost
it by 12 pins. Naturally, in the
last frame. Credit for this win
goes to Maymi who bowled a
game 30 pins over his average.
Top series for the Beermen
were poduced by Garcia with a
466, and 4 pins behind was Serna
with a 462. For Marlboro Hervey
cut 464 maples down and Trevino
swept 418 sticks of the apron.
GULFPRIDE 4
MERCURIO JEWELERS 0
The second whitewash of the
evening was handed to the Jewel Jewelers
ers Jewelers by the Wildcatters. By so
doing the Peloters now claim
secona piace. Here is one of those
hard luck stories. Actually the
Jewelers have had nothing but
bad luck. They lose the closest
games by the narrowest of marg margins,
ins, margins, but the way it looks, they are
about ready to get in a winning
streak and then watch out.
Leading Oilmen in to second
place were Martinez with a 440
.series and Capt. Valenzuela with
an oustanding 417. For Mercurio,
the Standard bearers were Di
Paulo with a 410 series and Bloom Bloomer
er Bloomer with a 405 series.
VOLKSWAGEN 3,
CIA. AMERICA S.A. 1
After the last ball rolled, Volks Volkswagen
wagen Volkswagen managed to stay in fourtn
place by taking 3 points from
the Hardware men. In the first
game Cia. America put its best
loot forward and thanks to Ro Roberts'
berts' Roberts' oustanding 158 ame, over overwhelmed
whelmed overwhelmed the Car-Men to take the
lirst game.
The second and third were
strictly Volkswagen show, they
took the second by 27 pins and
the third by 56, enough to claim
the fourth point. For the Car-men,
Hansel led his team with a 455
series and Larrazabal helped with
a 403. For Cia America Gomez
came thru with a 430 and Vargas
rolled a 415 for the night.
CYRCA FREE ZONE 3,
LA MASCOTA 1.
A couple of weeks ago team
captain Chavez informed his
team that their sponsor offered to
give them a party if they shap shap-ped
ped shap-ped up and began bowling riht
and since then Cyrca has been on
a winning rampeage. Last week
they took 3 points from the
Haberdashers.
They lost the first by 40 pins to
the Custom Tailors but came back
strong to take the second by 82
pins and the third by 18, with
100 pins extra they automaticly
took the fourth point.
For the Free Zoners Spiros ad added
ded added 437 pins to his total score,
and Chavez contribute 383 pins to
the nights kitty. For La Mascota
Russell had a 456 series and Shaf Shaffer
fer Shaffer a 389.
$700 MATERIEL MIXED OF
ALBROOK
By LOU

Tumi' W L
Honey Bears 11 5
Rolling Five 10 6
Sloths 8 S
Alley Cats 8 8
Eagles 7 9
Tigers 7 9
Sharpshooters 7 9
Panthers S 10

Honoy Bears 3 Panthers 1
The musical chair game contin continues
ues continues in the loop. This week the
Honey Bears grabbed the. choice
seat in the standings. Four weeks
of bowling and four different oc
cupants in first place. The Honey
Bears sweetened their position by
squeezing the Panthers for three
of four credits.
The Bruins who starred were
Artie McRae 532, Jim McRae and
Marv Freda. 512 all handicap. For
the Panthers that are now trapped
in the cellar, Lym Ball was the
only one to be rough with 531,
handicap.
ALLEY CATS 3
ROLLING FIVE 1
The Alley Felines, after drop
ping the first game turned on the
Rolling Five and stopped them
cold for the next three points. The
tussle for Ihe total pin marker was
close, with the rats snarina it by

I only twenty pins.

Ores

Bill Fish ana Gerry Sines wera
the standard bearers for the Al Al-ley
ley Al-ley Cats, with 524 and 501, handi.
cap. For the Rollers, Jack BuUer
and Shirley Ingram had the pund
with 519 and 500 handicap.
SLOTHS 1 SHARPSHOOTERS
With the Gomez family being
mighty sharp, the Sharpshooter!
shot the Sloths full of three holes.
Mary Gomez put together" a 505
hdep and her man Julio was sJigHt
ly better with 518 handicap! For
the Sloths who managed to win flit
last game and nearly won tha
TP, which went to- the Sharpshbot
ers by mere 6 pieces of wocki.
Ike Worthen was the onfy Sloth
who was able to solve the lanes
for any amount of pins, an even
500.
EAGLES 4 TIGERS 6
After being kkjeed around for
three weeks the Eagles reversed
the usual treatment, and, dished
out a apanking to the Tigers for
all four points. This was thV Ijest
showing of the young season or
the birds, and took them, louj Arf
the cellar and put them iff at
for fifth place. ,1 -M
The Uffelmans contributed
best pinfall for the soaring fcaglili,
Maiden Marcella made an evaj
500, and hubby Hal hit 530 handi handicap.
cap. handicap. Bert Moss and his hep, was
tops for the tamed Tigers'.

PACIFIC WOMEN'S LEAGUIf I
COFFEE AND DONUTS. ?

By LOU
Teams
Kool Kats
Strikettes
Splitarikes
4 Hits and a Miss
Five Gals
Lucky Strikes
Unlucky Five
Torpedoes
W
11
10
9
8
t
7

t a
.la :r:

KOOL KATS 4
UNl I if lev bivk a

The Coffee and Donut Loop ha"" "?
a new leader when the Kool Kata
swept all four games against tht ""'
Unlucky Five while the Striketies ''5
dropped three to slide into second"'"
place.
Only in the opening rot-ntl did t
the Unlucky Five offer any re--.-
sistance to the Kool Kats, losing.-'
by only 22 pins. Although on pa i
per, the Unlucky Five had to girt
the Kool Kats 59 pins handicap,"
the Kats went on to trounce 'tha "'-y
Five on the scratch basis. U i
AH of the Kittys were rough.""?
Daphne Tolley tallied 524, Nita
Schuller 568, Thelma Fussell 539,
Eddie Bathke 516 and Mimi Metzga VI
er 507. For the Unlucky, Five tafcB-,
ly Marcella Plucker, had anjr J

tucK with a 505. All hdep.
LUCKY STRIKES 3
STRIKETTES 1
With Eva Lee having a whix
bang of a series, the former
league leaders never had achance,
Mrs. Lee started out with a 171
and her Lucky Strikes won by $4.
Eva Slipped a little in tha secoid
to a 158 game, and her team lost
by 14, but Dona Lee came bak'
with a booming 195 game and'it,
was all over for the Strikettesr 3
to 1. Eva Lee's scratch series was
a 531 and her handicap set a 654;
Lois Traynor and Polly Hamilton
assisted the star of the morning,
with 511 and 522 handicap sets:, It
was a hard pill for the Strikettes
to swallow, because four of their
ladies hit over 500 handicap way.
Lois Wells 515, Regina Konvicka
525, Jean Saylor 527 and Betty
Friese 519.
SPLITARIKES 3
HITS AND A MISS 1
While the Splitarikes, walked
away with the lion share of tht
iuui poims. j to i, tney knew thev

were in a bowling match all tha I

way. in rne nrst game, Dolores
Taylor, joined the ranks of ex exclusive,
clusive, exclusive, when she rolled an honor

the score aheet. This 189) iimi

helped immensely in the Split
arikes winning by 33 maplesf
In a good team effort, the 4 rfiti I
and A Miss, evened the count at
one all by winning by ten. Tht
next game also went down 'to tht
last frame, but the Splitarikes bad
the slight edge, of 28 pins to-pick.
up two more points. Each side had I
four of the 5C kind.
Splitarikes four consisted af-fto- J
lores Taylor 550. Cnnni. R-i.Wf

538, Marion Gibbons 534 and Pria
Reade 532. For the Hits and Miss;
Rennie Dopazo 506, Jean Earn Earn-est
est Earn-est 543. Steve Piper 511 and Msrgt
Mc Clelland 536. f
-
TORPEDOES 1 t
FIVE GALS 3 i
The Torpedoes dug thetngelvci
deeper into the basement, when
they hit the mark once and msfired
three times against the Five Gals.
The Five Gals, put an 850 gam
on the line to open the proceed'
ings and this was good for ont
point.
They dropped to 875, and tht
Toroedoes hlasled thm anri xvixit

ed the match. However, tie Gal J
came back strong, with a 897 set, i
and this meant two more points. J
Louise Broadhurst, Anita PaisonS
and Jean Sullivan contributed
most to the Five Gals efforts with J
530 514 and "520 handicap sets.
Margaret Hicks' 531 handicap, and S
Jean Sanborn's 510 hdep, wtra Jjja
best for tha basement tennants.

S I,



WED yZSDAT, SI

SO, 1959
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAPEB
PAOl tLIVIN
kite Sox Will Win If Ball Stays Jn Park

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Grid Coach
To Produce
o
By BOB SERLING
WASHINGTON (UPI) Coach
Mike" Nixon, a nice guy threat
ened, with finishing last, told his
Waahlngton Redskins Monday to
produce or get fired.
Jolted by his club's 49-21 Sun Sunday
day Sunday clobbering at the hands of
the iWeedy Chicagp Cardinals,
Nrxotf warned the tribe only 15
Siir3rts safe.'
"The other 21," Mike said, "are
playing football for us on a week-
to-weK oasis.
Nixon ordered the team to ob
serve ; a trick Monday-tnrougn-Satutday
curfew of 11 p.m.
"Ther are too many guys on
(Ma chib who are out of shape,"
m Mid. "We won t stand for any
carousing around and we'll know
wfce'a guilty."
("Narnt Lead Carriers
Nixeo went to the unusual

t A Double Treat s

BY
FiEii
s
D
9i5 Double
,.P,M. 0
ON

:nn nil SM

You Asked For It"

MANAMA'S MOST POPULAR REQUEST SHOW

AND

"Record Session"
THE HIT TUNES OF THE DAY

a

ANNUAL DISRUPTION

Tells Players
Or Get Fired
lengths of namin the 15 players
he said "are carrying the load
for the other 21."
He listed them as quarterbacks
Eddie Lebaron and Ralph Gug Gug-lielmi;
lielmi; Gug-lielmi; ends Joe Walton, John
Carson and Bill Anderson; half halfback
back halfback Dick James; fullbacks Don
Bosseler and Johny Olzewski:
guards Red Stephens and don
Boll; defensive end John Paluck;
linebacker Ralph Felton; rookie
wipgback Ben scotti, rookie
tackle Don Lawrence and center
Jim Schrader.
Thus, the "produce or get
fired" ultimatum went to such es established
tablished established stars as halfbacks Jim
Podoley and Ed Sutton, and vet veteran
eran veteran defensive standouts like
Chuck Drazemovich, Chet Ostrow Ostrow-ski
ski Ostrow-ski and Bob Hudson.
"I've played ball with this team
but it hasn't played ball with
me," Nixon said. "I'm through
being a nice guy. I don't care if
A
T
u
R
D
A
Y
Cola 1215
NOON
0
F
C
0
U
R
S
E

a man is a star or a rookie, if
he doesn't try out he goes either

through suspension or waivers. If
1 have to field a squad with only
22 men 11 for defense and 11 for
offense I'd rather do that than
suffer with guys who aren't try trying."
ing." trying." 11 Trying Evtry Second
Nixon's blast came after the
Redskins dropped their opener
against the Cardinals following a
wretched 1-5 exhibition season.
Significantly, 11 out of the 15
men he praised as "trying every
second' are on the offensive unit
Nixon said he expected the de defense
fense defense to have trouble against the
Cards, but not to colapse.
"The defensive unit had eight
new faces and it was inevitable
we were going,. to get hurt," Mike
said. "But we wouldn't have been
hurt as badly as we were if some
of the guys had gotten off their
buttr and hit.
"The reason our rookie backs
in the secondary looked so bad
is because the more experienced
men were goofing up. You can'r
expect kids like (Dick) Haley and
Scotti to cover fast ends if no
body's rushing the passer."
The Sports
Patrol
By STEVE SNIDER
NEW YORK UPK) All-Ameri
ca football memo:
Quarterback Joe Caldwell, the
"trigger man in Army s swiit swiit-striking
striking swiit-striking offense, hit the high road
in a hurry in his bid for a bertn
on the 1959 All-America team.
Squeezing the trigger on four
touchdown passes against Boston
College, the eagle-eyed Cadet turn turned
ed turned in the top performance of the
college football week end and was
named yesterday in the Unwed
Press International backiieia oi-the-week
along with Ron Burton
of Northwestern, Red Braselton
of Georgia Tech and Ken Talk Talk-ineton
ineton Talk-ineton of Texas Tech.
Caldwell figures to make it
tough on his hot-shot teammate teammate-Bob
Bob teammate-Bob Anderson in the scramble
for All-America honors. Anderson
made it as a sophomore, but miss
ed last year wnen Pete Dawkins
did the headline-making.
TALENTED RUNNING MATE
Burton, talented running male
of Northwestern quarterback Dick
Thornton, ran for touchdowns ot
62 and seven yards against Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma and set up a third score
with a 27 yard gallop as the Wild
cats completed a 45-13 upset lor
which the stage had been set ear
lier when several Oklahoma regu regulars
lars regulars were hit by food poisoning.
Braselton, veteran Georgia Tech
quarterback, not only passed for
the two touchdowns' that brougnt
down Southern Methodist but he
set up the decisive tally by dash dashing
ing dashing 33 yards to SMU's. 12 yard
line.
Talkington, a 160 pound quarter quarterback,
back, quarterback, had a hand in all his team's
points as Texas Tech upsat Ore Oregon
gon Oregon State, 15-14. He scored two
touchdowns, passed for one two two-point
point two-point conversion and kicked a one one-pointer.
pointer. one-pointer. Don Meredith of SMU, standout
candidate for the All-America, hit
two touchdown passes against
Georgia Tech but he failed on
both his attempted conversion
pssscs.
MULTIPLE-TD PRODUCERS
Among the multiple-touchdown
producers were Dave Poweli of
Oregon, who scored three against
Utah, Clay White of Nebraska,
who scored three in the second
half against Minnesota, and
Dwight Nichols of Iowa State, who
scored (wo and passed for two
against Denver.
Richie Lucas of Penn State,

By HARRY GRAYSON
CHICAGO (NEA)-Breakinf the

Yankees' spell this season, the
White Sox did something for base baseball
ball baseball that even Babe Ruth wouldn't
ind.
The Chicago Singles Wonders
play baseball the way it was
meant to be played not only for
a man with a bat in his hand.
Watching batters do nothing but
swing ior distant stands is as un unsatisfactory
satisfactory unsatisfactory to the old-time faja as
viewing a troupe of dancing ele ele-ohants
ohants ele-ohants would be to a balletomane.
It may be a thrill to see an Ernie
Banks, an Eddie Mathews or a
Rocky Colavito swat the ball out
of sight, but everybody old enough
to remember the skill ,nd execu execution
tion execution before the ja-ck rabbit ball ap appreciates
preciates appreciates the Sox.
They brought scientific baseball
back to high estate. Luis Apari Apari-cio
cio Apari-cio is so great that he can make
the beautiful infield play despite
the lively ball. The Singles Wond Wonders,
ers, Wonders, blessed with remarkable over-all
speed and paced by Apari Apari-cio,
cio, Apari-cio, the slickest base thief in years
show what still can be done by
properly running the bases.
The play that clinched Chicago's
first American League pennant in
40 years was typical. With three
Indians on base and one out in
the ninth, a hit would have tied
the score. But Vic Power made
the mistake of hitting a ball on
the ground that Aparicio could get
his hands on. Gauging the distanc distances
es distances perfectly, the tremendous lit
tle shortstop made for the bag
himself and rifled the ball to Ted
Kluszewski to nio Pow '1 by a
gnat s eyelash. Winning on de defense,
fense, defense, the Singles Wonders reviv revived
ed revived the era when the poet could
sing the prowess of the double
play combination.
That's why American League
managers, coaches and players
and a lot of other people say the
Singles Wonders will win the World
Series "if the ball stays In the
park." They see the National
Leaguers' long ball the Singles
Wonders' biggest obstacle. There
is no way to outsmart a ball past pasted
ed pasted into the next precinct.
The Singles Wonders' attack
consists lareelv of hnrrvin? thp
other sidp into mistakes nr tak.
ing advantage of the element of
surprise, un tne go irom first base
with three-and-two on the batter
and two outs, Aparicio, Jim Land Land-is,
is, Land-is, Jim Rivera, Al Smith and Bub Bub-ba
ba Bub-ba Phillips score on t routine hit
to right-center field. George Mc Mc-Bride,
Bride, Mc-Bride, who played considerable
Shortstop for the Senators r.
ago, sat fascinated with this type
oi piay at tne Washington old old-timers'
timers' old-timers' reunion P ant Kis irib
out of Landis scoring from first
uase on a loppea Dili to Roy S1V S1V-ers
ers S1V-ers and the first baseman's toss
to the bitrher whn invrf
Thia-Ja how the Singles' Wond-
en won sa a;amea oy one run
One-third of thii im nu
cided by one run, by the way
im mey Daggea zi in tihe last in inning,
ning, inning, 12 of 15 and on tie In extra
innings.
The SinCflpS Wonfar krri,0kf In
side baseball barek to those who
iikb io see a game played not on only
ly only with a bat, but with a glove, a
DBir of feet anH hA
The Singles Wonders may not
ur evie io siug em to death, but
they certainly pester them to
pieces.
SUGAR RAY SIGNC
HOLYOKE, Mass. (UPI)Sugar
"j iiuuinson toaay signed to
meet Andre Tessier of Spring Springfield
field Springfield in a 10-round match here
Oct. 26 as the first of two tune tune-ups!
ups! tune-ups! prior to his middleweight bout
wiin raui renaer.
who made Ihe baickfield-of-tht-
week last week, had another good
day against Virginia Military with
two touchdown passes and 119
yards on eight completions. Ger
Schwedes of Syracuse scored two
and passed for one against Kan Kansas.
sas. Kansas. Bill Majors, Tennessee tail tailback,
back, tailback, rates a special mention
though he failed to score in a 3-0
victory over mighty Auburn. Maj
ors set up a field goal by running
21 yards and passing for nine
more and made two pass inter
ceptions that thwarted Auburn at
critical moments.
Other standouts were Jim Crot
ty of Notre Dame, Dick Thornton
of Northwestern, Joe Bellino and
Joe Matalavage Of Navy, Warren
Rabb of Louisiana State and Ron
nie Bull of Baylor.
Linemen mentioned prominent
ly:
Ends Bill Carpenter, Army
Bob Simms, Rutgers; Monty Stick Stickles,
les, Stickles, Notre Dajne; Norm Neff,
Penn State.
Tackles Toby Deese, Georgia
Tech; Danny Royal, Florida.
Guard Howard Bronson, Air
Force; Buddy Johlhaas, Penn
State.
Center Walt Klinker, Colorado
VIGOUR RESTORED,
GLANDS MADE YOUNG
tf yeu fl old before your tint r
uffer lrom nrv, br&ln or phyilctl
wwikneit. you will nnrt ha.pplneta anl
health In e new American Laboratory
method which reitoree youthful rigour
and vitality. It I a almple home treat treatment
ment treatment In tablet form prepared by an
Ameiioan Laboratory and la very eeay
to take. It acta directly on your
flandu, nervea and vital organs, and
work ao well you can aee and feel
new bodily power and vigour In a
hort time. Becaiim of Itn natural ac action
tion action on glands and nervei your brain
power and memory often improve
notably.
Thie new gland and vigour reitorer
called Vl-Tabe ha been tested and
proved In the United State and I
now available at all drugitorei here.
Oet vl-Tib tablets from your drug druggist
gist druggist today, put them to test and see
the big improvement Take the full
bottle, which lasts eight days. It will
make you full of vigour, energy and
vitality, and you will feel yeara
younger. The large silt which last a 14
lay la very oconomiosX

FRIDAY, OCT. J
X-Chattanooga vs. Furman
x -Detroit vs. Kentucky

x-Doane vs. Chadron St.
x-Drake vs. Iowa Tchrs.
x-Eastern Michigan vs. Illinois
Normal
xGoerge Washington vs. West Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia x-Nottjhern Michigan vs. Youngs
town
x-Soutnern California vs. Ohio St.
x-Upsala vs. Hofstra
SATURDAY, OCT. 3
x-Abilene Christian vs Lamar
Tech
x-Akron vs. Ohio Wesleyan
Alabama A and M vs. Morehouse
x-Albany (Ga.) St. vs. Bethune-
Cookman
Albion vs. Kalamazoo
x-Alma vs. Hope
x-,Amona st. vs. Keaianas
x-Ariiona St. U. vs. Montani St.
x-Arizona vs. Idaho
Arkansas vs. Texas Christian
x-Arkansas St. vs. Florence St.
Auburn vs. Hardin-simmons
Augustana (111.) vs. North Cen Central
tral Central x-Augustana (S.D.) vs. South Da
kota St.
Bates vs. Tufts
Beloit vs. Cornell College
Bishop vs. Dillard
Bluelield St. vs. Virginia St.
Bluffton vs. Ashland
Bowdoin vs. Wesleyan
Bowling Green vs. Dayton
Bradley vs. Louisville
Bridewater vs. Guilford
x-Brigham Young vs. Montana
Buena Vista, vs. Westmar
Buffalo vs. Cortland Tchrs.
x-California Aggies vs. occidental
Pomona Poly vs. San Diego U.
California Tech vs. Riverside
California Western vs. Pomona
College
Centrl Michigan vs. Western Il Illinois
linois Illinois Central (Ohio) St. vs. Manchest Manchester
er Manchester Central Washington vs. Puget
Sound
x-Citadel vs. Davidson
Coast Guard vs. Norwich
Coe vs. Grinnell
Colby vs. Williams
Colorado College vs. Fort Hays
x-Colorado Mines vs. Omaha
x-Colorado St. vs. Adams St.
x-Colorado T. U. vs. Denver
x-Colorado St. U. vs. Denver
Columbia vs. Princeton
Concordia (111.) vs. Northw'st'n
(Minn.)
Cornell vs. Lehigh
C. W. Post vs. Kings Point
Defiance vs. Wilmington
Drexel Tech vs. Gettysburg
Dubuque vs. Luther
Duke vs. Rice
Eastern Illinois vs. Ball St.
x-Elizabeth City vs. Winston-Sa
tern Tchrs.
Elmhurst vs. Wheaton
x-Emporta St. vs. Southwestern
(Kan.)
Florida A and M vs. Benedict
x-Florida St. vs. Miami (Fla.)
Florida vs. Virgnia
Franklin and Marshall vs. Johns
Hopkins
x-Fresno St. vs. Santa Barbara
Gallaudet vs. Randolph-Maeon
Georgia Tech. vs. Clemson
x-Grambling vs. Southern U.
Grove City vs. Marietta
Hamline vs. Duluth Branch
Minn. U.
Hampton Institute vs. Delaware
St.
Harvard vs. Bucknell
x-Heidelberg vs. Wittengerg
Hiram vs. Capital
Holy Cross vs. Villanova
x-Houston vs. Cincinnati
Howard (D.C.) vs. Virginia U-
nion'
x-Huron vs. Winona St.
Idaho St. vs. Colorado Western
Illinois vs. Army
Indiana (Ind.) St. vs. Depauw
Iowa St. vs. Missouri
Iowa vs. Brockport Tchrs.
Jacksonville St. vs. East Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee John Carroll vs. Bethany (W.
Va.)
Juniata vs. Alfred
Kansas St. vs. Oklahoma St.
Kansas vs. Boston U.
Kentucky St. vs. Knox"ille
Kenyon vs. Otterbein
Kutztown St. vs. Miilersville
Tchrs.
Lake Forest vs. Illinois Wesley Wesleyan
an Wesleyan x-Lane vs. Mississippi Industrial
SATURDAY, OCT. 3
Lebanon Valley vs. Albright
Leland vs. Philander Smith
Lewis and Clark vs. College
of Idaho
x-Lincoln (Mo.) U. vs. Central
Missouri
Lincoln (Pa.) U. vs Trenton St.
linfield vs. Southern Oregon
Lock Haven Tchrs. vs. Cal. (Pa.)
Tchrs.
x-Long Beach vs. San Francisco
St.
x Los Angeles St. vs. Pepperdine
Louisiana St. vs. Baylor (1)
x-Lycoming vs. American Interna International
tional International x-Macalester vs. Augsburg
Maine vs. Vermont
X-Mankato St. vs. Moorhead St.
Mansfield St. vs. BloomSBurg
Tchrs.
Massachusetts vs. Delaware
Miami (Ohio) vs. Xavier (Ohje)
x-Michigan Teen vs. Ferris "isti "isti-tutc
tutc "isti-tutc Michigan vs. Michigan State
Middle Tenncessee vs. Westers
Kentucky
Millikin vs. Carroll
Millsaps va. Stwanee
Minnesota vs. Indiana
x -Mississippi College vs. Austin
Mississippi Vocational vs. Jack Jackson
son Jackson St.
Missouri Mines va. Pittsburgh
(Kan.) St.
Missouri Valley vs. Southwest
Missouri
Monmouth vs. Lawrence
x-Morningside vs. North Dakota
St.
Morris Brown vs. Tennessa A
and I

Football Schedule

Mt. Union va. Wooster
MnMnkro lit 1 ifv.H
x-Murray St. vs. Eastern Ken
tucgy t
x-Muskiiigum vs. Denison
Nebraska va". Oregon St.
x-Nevada vs. Chico St.
New Haven St. vs. Bridgeport
New Mexico St. vs McMiirrv
x-New Mexico vs. Texas Western
Norfolk St. vs. Friendship
North Carolina Colleee vs Mor
gan St.
North Carolina vs. North Caro
lina St.
Northeastprn vs SnrinzfipM
x North Texas St. vs. West Texas
St.
x-Oberlin s. Swarthmore
Ohio U. vs. Kent St.
Oklahoma vs. Colorado
Oreson vs. Washington St
x-Pacific Lutheran vs. East'n
Washington
x-Panhandle A and M vs. New
Mexico West n
x-Parsons vs. Iowa Wesleyan
renn m. vs. Colgate
Pennsylvania vs. Dartmouth
Pittsburgh vs. II.C I. a
x-Portland St. vs. Oregon Tech
ruraue vs. iNolre Dame
Rensselaer Poly vs. Hamilton
Rhode Island vs. New Hamp Hampshire
shire Hampshire x-Richmond vs. V.M.I. (2)
Kipon vs. St. Olaf
Rochester vs. Hobart
RuUers VS. Cnnnprtimt
x-St. Ambrose vs. Northeast Mis
souri
St. Augustine vs. Shaw
St. Joseph's (Ind.) vs. Butler U
St. Paul's (Va.) vs. J.C. Smith
X San Diezn St vs Palifnrni. cl,.
x-San Jose St. vs. Hawaii
Ship'sb'g Tchrs. vs. E. Strouds Strouds-burg
burg Strouds-burg Tchrs.
Sliperry Rock Tchrs. vs Cla Clarion
rion Clarion Tchrs.
x-South Carolina St. vs. Allen
bouth Carolina vs. Georgia
x-South Dakota vs. North Dakota
x-Southeast Missouri vs. Hillsdale
Southern Illinois vs. Northern
Illinois
Southern Methodist vs. Navy
Southwestern (Tenn.) vs. Hen Hen-drix
drix Hen-drix Stanford vs. College of the Pa Pa-cilic
cilic Pa-cilic x-Superior St. vs. River Falls
Syracuse vs. Maryland
Temple vs. Scranton
x-Tennessee Tech vs. Morehead
St.
Tenneessee vs. Mississippi St.
x-Texas A and M vs. Mississippi
Southern (3)
x-Texas Tech vs. Tulsa
Texas vs. California
x-Toledo vs. Baldwin-Wallace

ll'lifj :!'. -' ''
'A ;H LJ
V: & -KJf a M

Grant's Scotch Whisky is the ideal
companion to the happier moments.
Distilled by an old family concern whose
whisky is the first choice ol
Scots themselves.

Distribuidorest

x-Trinity Te(x.) vs. Air force A-
cademy
x-Tulane vs. Wake Forest
Tuskegee Institute vs. Fisk
x-Upper Iowa vs. Wariburg
Ursinus vs. Susquehanna
x Valparaiso vs. Evansville
x-Vanderbilt vs. Alabama
Virginia Tech vs. William and
Mary (4)
Wagner vs. Havertord
Washington and Jefferson vs. Al Allegheny
legheny Allegheny Washington and Lee vs. Dick Dickson
son Dickson Washington (Mo.) vs. Wabash
Washington vs. Utah
Waynesburg vs. Westminster
(r'a.J
Wayne St. U. vs. Case Tech
Western Maryland vs. Penn Mi Military
litary Military Western Michigan vs. Mar
shall
Western Reserve vs. Thiel
x-Western Washington vs. Whit Whit-worth
worth Whit-worth x Whittier vs. Sacramento St.
x-Wiley vs. Alcorn A and M
Wilkes vs. Moravian
x Willamette vs. Pacific U.
x-William Jewell vs. Northwest
Missouri
x Wisconsin vs. Marquette
Worcester Tech vs. Middlebury
Yoming vs. Utah St.
Yale vs. Brown
(1) at Shreveport, La.
2M at Portsmouth, Va.
(3) at Mobile, Ala.
(4) at Roanoke, Va.

SUNDAY, OCT.
Loras vs. St. Norbert
MONDAY, OCT. J
x-Texas Southern vs Brooke Me Medical
dical Medical Ctr.
TIGERS CHANCING SPOTS
LEICESTER, England (UPI)
The Tigers are changing their
spots, and they're finding it is not
so easy. The 11 drummers and
buglers of the royal Leicester Leicestershire
shire Leicestershire Regiment known from time
immemorial as "the Tigers"
have appealed for a new set of
tiger skins to wear with their
dress uniform. But not anv old
tiger skins, said Col. J. Atcher.
They want them from medium medium-sized
sized medium-sized tigers. "The skin of a big
tiffpr would makp mall Hmm.
met look ridiculous," he ex
plainer.

Beads are to catch
the eye
Grant's is. to highlight
the moment

IN THE TALL TRIANGULAR BOTTLB

MOTTA y MOTTA Ltda.

Charlie Grimm
Back For Third
Term With Cub
By ED SAINSBURY

CHICAGO (UPI) Charlie
Grimm, a happy-go-lucky banjo
player who three times piloted the
Chicago Cubs to National League
pennants, came back for a third
time as manager of the team
yesterday.
Grimm, wiio has been a vice
president of the club, working
with the farm system, for two
years, will replace Bob Scheffing,
whose resignation was "negotiat "negotiated"
ed" "negotiated" by club owner Philip K. Wrif Wrif-ley
ley Wrif-ley after the close of the season.
Sunday.
Seheffing will remain with the
Cub organization, in the baseball
riase, perhaps as a farm team
manager, or perhaps working with
the farm organization. He said he
was "satisfied" with the arrange arrange-me
me arrange-me it.
Grimm indicated there would be be-changes
changes be-changes in the make-up of the -team,
but he said that he did not
know what they would be and that
he would "sit down witn John Ho)-"
land and Seheffing soon to see
what's to be done."
Holland, vice president and gen general
eral general manager, will continue "mak "making
ing "making the trades," Grimm said, "but
he'll consult with me and I'll ap approve
prove approve them too.
"I don't know what we'll have
to have to make us a contender,"
h said, "but if anybody is
dropped, we're going to do it fast
enough for them to catch on
somewhere else. I'm very much
in favor of this inter-league trad trading
ing trading and we've been s;out:ng the
American League to what we
might be able to get."
Grimm's first whirl at manag-.
ing the Cubs began Aug. 4, 1932,
when he replaced Rogers Horns Horns-by.
by. Horns-by. His teams won pennints in'
1932 and 1935 before he was suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded by Gabby Hartnctt on July
20. 1938.
On May 7, 1944, he became
manager a second time, ronlacing
Jimmy Wilson, and the 1945 Cuba
won a pennant under ,iis direction.
He was replaced by F r a n k i e
Frisch on June 10, 1949.
Grimm, now 61, later juined the
Boston Braves and May 31, 1952,
he was named manager to suc succeed
ceed succeed Tommy Holmes. In turn
Fred Haney repla-ced him on June
17, 1956, and trie following year ha
came to the Cubs as a front of office
fice office worker.

SCOTCH WHISKY



TEX PANAMA AMERICAN All INDEPEKDEVT DAILY KIWAPAPEB
WEDNESDAY. SEETEMEg Sf195t
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
AGENTS:
, uone Panama 1-0740 for
information aboat Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Chart roar ad if
you have a commercial
contract
Classified Pais elotes 11
a.m. Mob, U Fri, 11 aJn.
Sat, 2 SJn. fat, far Sub,
Office open t-l weekdays.
LEAVS SOCB AD WITH ON' I OT OU1 AGENTS O U CmCM AT U-J. "HT 8TSEXT. PANAMA LIBREK1 PBECIAAO-T ttreet He. IS AQKNCIAS
INTERN AlToF rtBI K A CIO F9-No I L.tt7 Plana CAS A tALDO-CJr,l Ave. LOURDE8 PHAMACV-I82 U Cams,!!!. FAEKACIA LOM-
BARDO j?o U Street MORElSQV-4th of Ave. J 8W LEWIS SEBV1CK Ave. TivoU Ma. 4 PARMA CIA E8TADOS UNIDOS let Cra
f A R MAC 1 A LUX -Iw cJVal HOL8 TO OLD EXCHAHGE-J fee. ee la Ose Are. It.. 41 FOTO DOMY-Jmrt. Aimmn Are. and St
. ASS r,Vi .itTu TfrlL 1. m rtnuint ri BATURROPeraa Leferre I Street a F ABM Ad A "SAS"-Via Fume 111 NOVaJlADES
14 t Mitral At.
FAS
THIS
Baric BcOa Tina Theatre ane Snack at Mtnlmax Super Market a Til Eaaate COLON OF KICK: 15ta mat Amador Gtcmn Ma. 142X1 TeL 431.

PACE TWELVE

Resorts

Baldwin's apartments at Sent!
Clara Beatn. Telephone Balbos
1622 or Coco Solo 36-728
Bliss' priete euest house, over overlooking
looking overlooking Sants Clara Beach Phone
Nivy 3812
Foster's cottages, near Santa
Clara Reasonable rates Phone
Balboa 1866
PHILLIPS Oeeensioe CottafOi
Santa Car.
anas 1-1 IT? Cristobal s-1671.
Houses
FOR RENT: Comfortable three
bedroom thalet. No 24 on 37th
St Between Ave Juste Arose Arose-mena
mena Arose-mena and Ave Cuba, avj"?be
October th. 12th. Tell. 3-0746
or 3-3099.
FOR RENT: Chalet. Newly
constructed Three bedrooms,
studio, garage, large fenced yard,
hot water Calle G Lome Alegre
phone Balboa 3228.
FOR RENT: Modern chalet in
residential section, three bed bedrooms.
rooms. bedrooms. 2 baths, hot water, gar garage,
age, garage, maid's quarters, etc., 800
meters land Rent $185 a month
plus water. Inquire Basilio Ford
Hijos, S A telephone 3-6372.
ROOM FOR RENT: Larg bright
furnished Studio room, semi semi-private
private semi-private bath, independent en entrance
trance entrance near Bellavista Theatre
$35 00. Call 2-2542 oHic
hours.

Rooms

-Al Lopez Signs
: Biggest Chisox
fContract Ever

!' CHICAGO, Sept. 30 (UPI) -Al
Lopez will be oack i ext season
''to manage the pennant winning
Z Chicago White Sox at the largest
lalary ever paid by the club to
L'-player or manager, an estimated
r $60,000.
Lop!-iiBid th agreement
yesterday t a ceremonial press
!' conference arranged by elub
I owner Bill Veeek, and one h
' hd signed th eontriet without

looking t it, he stuffed his eo eo-nv
nv eo-nv into his Docket.

IT 'TH find out the amount later,"
p'he said. "I know it's satisfacto
4 Lopez signri what Veerk nes nes-t
t nes-t criberl as "the largest contract ev ev-i
i ev-i it offered by the White Sox." a
' 7 x 10 foo blowup of the stand stand-l
l stand-l Rid American League player con-
tract.
Veeck later confirmed that the
, amount wk the highest ever paid
'by the club and said. "It's much
"less tran the g?ntleman in ques question
tion question Is entitled to."
Veck said Lopet could have
had lonoer term contract, had
h wished, but Looi said, Tv
always worked on a on year
; contract and I like it that way.
t, This dotn't mean I won't b
hack in Wl, or 196? orr 1943 or
jj even 1970."
"It's ecn a greal year, and
I m tickled tc death to come
Z back," Looez said 'I'll keep all
Jjcur coaches.'

MILD WEATHER IN CHICAGO
CHICAGO. Sept. 30 (ITI)-The
1959 World Series will onen under
cloudy skies but otherwise the
wealher will be generally mild
the U.S. Weather Bureau said to to-dav.
dav. to-dav. Officials said a 10 m.p.h. soulh
to southeasterly wind, which would
blow from home plat- at Comis Comis-koy
koy Comis-koy Park out to right center field,
is expected tomorrow along with
highs in the fiO's.

Commercial Guide

ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
Ads only cost $0.85 per col. inch

I Ads accepted for a minimum of one month.
"""" rAO itirnnuiTinu fm i in-tart

run uirunmn i
Canal Zone Society For
The Prevention Of Cruelty
To Animals
Box 24fi. Balhna. (' 1
Phnnr: Clininilu SI 13
The following nlmh it the
Coroial Vetrrlnsry Hniplial
need gmmi h(m:
1 very pretty orange and uhite fe female
male female kitten. 3 menth nlrt, hmiftr hmiftr-brnken,
brnken, hmiftr-brnken, sperlil pet
t Black kittens. .1 rrk olrl
Call the above telephone number
for the fnllnwlnf:
i Female klttenii, blark and white,
mos. old
1 Female cat, Mark and nhita. 1
years old.
SUPPORT YOliR SP A.
VOW NfiKI) IT. IT NIHS YOll.
DIG HE MUST
FORT K1LKY. Kansas (t'l'lt -Digging
foxholes holds no terrors
for Army Pvt. Clyde IV Marring
ton of Lead, S. I). He was a gold
miner in the Black Hills anrl
worked as deep as a mile in the
earth.

Apartments

FOR RINT: Furnish' an- an an-furniihed
furniihed an-furniihed apartments. Alhsmjua
Apartments. 10th street 8061,
Tel 1386. Colon.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment. El Cangrejo. maid's
room with service, garage, hot
water. Alberto Navsrro Street
No. 48 Tel 3-4734 and 2 2-2883
2883 2-2883 FOR RENT: La CVesta, two
bedroom apartment, living, din dining
ing dining room, maid room, two bal balconies,
conies, balconies, 3-1586
FOR RENT: Three bedroom
apartment, two baths, dining
living room, kitchen, porch, hot
water installation, independent
maid's room, bath, laundry. DO DO-NICHITA
NICHITA DO-NICHITA building, two blocks
from Minimas and Santuario Na Na-cienal
cienal Na-cienal $130 00. Ask gardener
for keys. Tel. 2-0481.
FOR RENT: Lsrge three bd-
rooms apartment, livinsjroom,
diningroom, 3 bathrooms, hot
water, maid's room, garage, etc.
Manuel Maria Icaia Street, "For "For-mentor
mentor "For-mentor Building. $185.00. Tel.
3-4994.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, very cool, all comfort. Via
Espana. house before Mini-Max.
FOR RENT: Army inspected
one bedroom furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, kitchenette, hot water,
No. 17-18, 4th of July Ave.
Across from Ancon bus stop.
Phono 2-5347, ask for Mrs. Iv Iv-lia.
lia. Iv-lia. FOR RENT: Apartment large large-room,
room, large-room, diningroom, bedroom,
washing place. Bath. Ave. Jose
de Fabrega. In front to Mosaicoe
Noriega Factory,
FOR RENT: Newly built apart apartment,
ment, apartment, three large bedrooms, liv living,
ing, living, dining, maid's room, three
baths, porch, terrace, garage in
Nuevo Campo Alegre. 2-3405.
FOR RENT: Especially furnish furnished
ed furnished aparment, for 6.1. hot wa water,
ter, water, washing machine, Parqu
Lefevre 7rh No. 24, Rio Theater
entrance.
FOR RENT: Campo Alegr.
Fully furnished, on bdroom
apartment, hot water, balcony,
garage, t. Call 3-1789.
Miami Jackson
dridders Play
Here Nov. 25
The Canal Zone and Panama
will have an opportunity to see
high school football as it is played
in the United States when Miami
Jackson High Schooi meets a Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone High Schools All-Star
team in 'he second annual Palm
Bowl football game for the United
Fund.
The game will be played on
Nov. 5, a l 7:30 p.m. in the Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Stadium.
Miami .larksim was the first
high school football team from the
United States ever to play in the
Generals, as they are known in
Florida, met Balboa High School
in a Thanksgiving eve game at
Ralhoa Stadium In that contest
the boys from Miam. marked up
a 27 12 victory over the Balboa
team.
The Canal Zone High Schools
All-Star team will be made up of
plavers selected from the squads
of the Balboa and Cristobal High
School teams.
Regulations of the National Fe Federation
deration Federation of State High School
Athletic Associations, of which
Florida is a member, make it
necessary to restrict the Canal
Zone team to tigh school players
conseotiently Junior College and
Athletic Club players cannot be
selected (or participation in this
game.
lull
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo
on new ear
AGENCY DEHLINUER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-49R4 3-49X5
All Trpee of Ante Insurance
GIBRALTAR LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Jim Ridge
Harry Cornell
Davis Stevenson
Telephone Pan. 2-M52

Automobiles

Wl PAY CASH FOR
GOOD LATE MODEL CARS.
Autos Eisenman. J A
Neat to Coca Cola Plant
phone a If day Panama 2-2616,
2-4966
66
FOR SALE: 1951 jeep station
wagon. Engine and transmission
completely overhauled. New
clutch. A bargain at $395. Can
be seen at Qtrs. 21, Quarry Hts.
or call Q, H. 4148 and will de deliver
liver deliver after 1700.
FOR SALE: 1957 Citroen 2
CV, 4 door stdfan, semi-automatic,
50 miles per gallon. Run
5500 miles. Desarce, Metores
Nacionales, Automovile Row.
Telephone 2-0787.
FOR SALE: 1950 Olds Good
condition. Recently overhauled.
Best offer 36 -567, 252 A. Coco
Solo.
FOR SALE: 1957 Wolkswagen,
excellent condition. Phone 83 83-3227,
3227, 83-3227, Quarters 2104-C, Curun Curun-du.
du. Curun-du. Car Rentals
Your car being repaired? Rent a
dependable Hertscar, call Fiesta
Tel 3-4568, lobby El Panama
Hilton.
Boats b Motors
FOR SALE: 12 ft. boat, 5'i h.
p. motor, trailer and equipment,
asking $300.00. Call 83-5173.
Arriving soon 1960 BUCCAN BUCCANEER
EER BUCCANEER outboard motors: 3, 5, 15,
25, 35 and 60 h p. Manufactur Manufactured
ed Manufactured by the same makers of John Johnson
son Johnson and Evinrude, with same fine
features. Place your order now,
many others have. We buy, sell,
trade. WE WILL NOT BE UN UNDERSOLD
DERSOLD UNDERSOLD IN PANAMA OR THE
CANAL ZONE. Your patronage
appreciated and all transactions
guaranteed satisfactory. ABER ABER-NATHY.
NATHY. ABER-NATHY. Arriving in October. The most
beautiful 18 ft. 100 fiberglass
cruiser even shown in Panama,
Canal Zone. Six already sold.
Place your order now at promo promotional
tional promotional discount. Open all day Sat Saturday
urday Saturday until 5:00 p.m.. Sunday
by appointment. ABERNATHY,
across side street Panama Hotel.
Phone 3-6895. 3-0264.
Frank Hirfs Dad
Dies In Pittsburgh;
Visited Son Here
Word has been received of the
death in Pittsburgh, Pa., on Sept.
26 of Frank F. Hirt, a busines busines-man
man busines-man who had visited the Isthmus
as the guest of relatives on the
Canal Zone.
Mr. Hirt was the f a t h e r of
Frank E. Hirt of the Balboa
Heights post office staff, a Diablo
resident.
With his wife and family, the
son was on vacation in Pittsburgh
at the time of Mr. Hirt's death.
A high requiem mass was
scheduled for today at St. Mary
of the Mount Church, in Pitts Pittsburgh.
burgh. Pittsburgh. It will be followed by bu burial
rial burial in Calvary Cemetery there.

Winner, Sponsor Will Get Prizes

In Christ Church Federation Rally

COLON, Announced today that
the Parish Council of Christ
Church By-the Sea, the parochial
organization sponsoring the win winning
ning winning candidate In the rally of the
Federation of the West Indies will
be presented with a trophy. A
prize will also be awarded to the
winner as well as to the candid candidates
ates candidates running second and third.
Seven organisations represent representing
ing representing seven islands within the Fede Federation
ration Federation of the West Indies, with a
corresponding number of candi candidates.
dates. candidates. Leading at the last count

aaaiBsssssaBBSssBBSssssBBBSsssssssBaa ''Ty

HIGH SCCSiER AT J.W.T.C. Colonel John R. Wright Jr.,
commanding officer of the 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, pre pre-snits
snits pre-snits the Jungle Expert Certificate to Sp.4 Douglas P. Maddox
of the 77th Special Forces Group, Airborne, Fort Bragg, N.C.,
as be was graduated from the Jungle Warfare Training Center.
The 19 year-old soldier achieved thesjop rating in his class 9ft3
out of a possible 1000 points. Members of the Special Forces
Group are scheduled to leave the Canal Zone today after four
weeki, of jungle training and participation in Exercise Black
Black Palm. (U.S. Army Photo)

Home Articles

FOR SALE Old but very ser serviceable
viceable serviceable Wajtjnghous retriger retriger-artor,
artor, retriger-artor, porcelain boi, low price.
5824-D Diablo. Tel. 2-2837.
FOR SALE: Hollywood 30 inch
bed and mattress $15.00; new
metal card table with four chairs,
$25 00; Bell portable sewing
machine, $25.00. Tel. Panama
3-6779.
FOR SALE: Metal bed. dresser
and nrte stand $40.00. Dark ma mahogany
hogany mahogany five piece, bedroom set
(twin beds I. Eleven piece blond
mahoganq dining room set. Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2676.
Services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
SERVICE. Our new service plan
gives you faster, more econo economical
mical economical and better service. Phone
2-1905 Crawford Agencies. Tivo Tivo-li
li Tivo-li Avenue.
Protect your home end proper property
ty property against Insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment on
mergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777.
If your T.V., isn't on the ball,
U.S. TELEVISION is the one to
call. 3-7607 Panama. From 9
a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday to
6 p.m.
WANTED: To place feithfull
maid and cook, 3-4676.
Early Wynn,
Roger Craig
Open Series
CHICAGO, Sept. W (UPI)-The
Chicago White Sox today named
big Early Wynn ttieir starter in
the 1959 World Series opener a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the Los Angeles Dodgers,
playoff conquerors of the Milwau Milwaukee
kee Milwaukee Braves for th N a t i n a 1
League crown.
Manager Al Lopez svade his
choice definite when he announc announced
ed announced that Wynn, with a 22-10 record
in the Sox' march to their first
American League pennant in 40
years, would open at Comiskey
Park at 1 p.m. (EST) tomorrow a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the Dodgers.
Walt Alston, Dodgers pilot, al already
ready already had announced Roger Craig,
with an 11-5 record, as his choice
far nneninu rfav. Alston said short
ly after the Dodgers' 6-5 playoff
victm-v Avr the Kraves at los An
geles yesterday that he had his
pitching plans all mapped out.
Meanwhile, the Sox announced
that the &ale of bleacher seats and
atanrfinff room limit two admis
sions to a customer would begin
at 8 a.m. ( EST) at uomisicey i-arn
tomorrow, five) hour before game
time.
Ghiraort weathermen were coo
perating, although they were not
promising ideal baseball weatnet.
Thov fnrervast tnmnrrnw would he
partly cloudy, with a high in the
50 s.
was Antigua, followed by Trini
dad, Barbados, Jamaica, St. Lu
cia, St. Vincent and brenaaa.
The final count will be at Christ
Church Academy on Friday even evening,
ing, evening, when a specially organized
"federation combo" will furnish
the music from 8 o'clock. Children
of the parish and their friends
will be entertained with a party
beginning at 5 p.m.
A fishing well will be a feature
of the children's party, and in the
evening refreshments will sold by
the sponsoring organizations.

Wanted

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE) Aged natural ma manure
nure manure at five-awiy price by th
truckloasf. Call 2-2641.
FOR SALE f Three (3) "Yor.
nado' air conditioners, A h p. at
$125.00 each. Tel. 3-3936.
FOR SALE WEBCOR tape Re Recorder
corder Recorder and Blupont all wave bat battery
tery battery and direct current radio.
Good condition. Tivoli Ave. No.
18-64, Apt. 11 between 9:00 -12:00
and 2:00 to 4:10.
FOR SALE: Fabulous Fooderam
refrigerator of $979.00 for
$674.00; like new. Warranty
still outstanding 4 years.
It is the Paramount household
refrigerator today. Has 2 doors;
one of which opens unto a large
vertical freeiing compartment.
Come and see this unusual value
at Casa Admirable, nest to the
Lottery Building.
FOR SALE: 1955 Buick sedan,
4 door, hardtop, office desk, pia piano
no piano blond color. Call Curundu
83-3180.
FOR SALE: Chrome dinette set
$25.00, living room set, $25.00,
Wheeler, Amador 3297, before
6 p.m. Panama 3-7813 after 7
p.m.
FOR SALE: Closing "Stork",
maternity clothes at cost price,
all the furniture, clothes hang hangers,
ers, hangers, paper bags, boxes, babies
garments and shoes. Justo Aro Aro-semena,
semena, Aro-semena, across from Royal
Crown.
FOR SALE: 1 Fodders, 1 ton air
conditioner, $175, 1 Bendix
automatic washer $125. Both
used Ins than 3 months. 2 Si I
vertone Coaxial speakers. Unused
and in original cartons, $20
each. Phone Quarry Hts. 4148.
FOR SALE: Getxen trombone.
Brownie movie camera, Kodak
F4.5 101 MM "Monitor" with
flash attachment. Balboa 1761.
SPECIAL PRICES FOR THIS
WEEK ONLY!
Brand new living room suites
98.00. Lovely dinette sets 65.00.
Dining Room Table and 4 chairs
(mahogany) 59.00. New double
mattresses 19.00, Hollywood
Beds 35.00. Large Desk 20.00.
End tables, 10 00. Swivel chair,
7.50. A'my Cots 5.25. Pillows
0 95. HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE,
National Ave. 41 (Auto. Row
41). Tel. 3-4911 & 3-7348.
We buy Used Furniture W
recondition mattresses pick
up and delivery same Jay.
FOR SALE: 1 cash register
"National" 6000 series, suitable
for supermarket or large retail
trade, custom built 2 drawers,
electric operated. 1 cash register
"National" 100 series, hand
operated, for small retail trade.
Both in new operating condition.
1 Morris Minor, 2 door sedan.
Good cheap transportation, duty
paid, bargain. Telephone Panama
3-4985.
FOR SALE: Nine cubic feet
Westinghouse refrigerator, new
unit. Good condition, Balboa
2639
Personals
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z,
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
Animals
FOR SALE: Boxer female 13
months old, $60, Hallicrafters
S40-A. radio $25. Wheeler, Ft.
Amador 3297.
FOR SALE: Easy riding saddle
horse. $40.00. Tel. Balboa 1772.

(liarcoalel Filet Steak 1.75
Chicken Sancocho 0.60
Barbecued Rabbit 1.50
Barbecued Venison. ..... 1.50
Hash with Yucca & Green
Plantain 1.25
Crisp Fried Chicken 1.25
Spaghetti with Goat Meat. . 1.25
Saturday & Sunday
Delicious Chicken Tamales 1.00

Wide Choice
Wines

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Leti SOO and 1.000
meters, ia th Necvs Hipodrom
Urban tzatlee aeraea the Ramos
lacatrack. Ail lets vtrb street
fronts. swati water main and
electricity. Cal W. McBantett.
Tel. 4.0976.
FOR SALE: Case Kerch, 210,
2nd St., Las Cumbres, concrete
and tile, $15,000, bargain.
UNION CHURCH
BALBOA
World-wide Communion will be
observed at the Balboa U a i o n
Church on Sunday at the 10:30
service with the Rev. Orville Jay
Hine officiating assisted by the
Board of Elders.
Music at the service will'be by
the adult choir with Mrs. Maxwell
T. Smith directing and Mrs. M.
H. Turner at the console of the
organ. The choir will, sing "Pams
Aji'gelicus" by Franck as well as
the various responsives.
World-wide Communion Sunday
has become over the past 15 years
a universal observance when
Christmas through our the world
bear witness to their common
faith by participation in the sa sacrament
crament sacrament of Holy Comunion. All
over the world, people of many
different nations, races, and lan languages
guages languages wil be realizing that they
confess one faith and serve one
Lord.
On Sunday evening at 6:30 p.m.
there will be a special parents
and family night for all interested
in knowing more about the youth
and christian education work of
the church. A set of slides depict depicting
ing depicting the various youth camps, con conferences,
ferences, conferences, Vacation Bible Schol
activities and other events will be
presented by Miss Lois McClure,
the director of Christian Educa Education
tion Education and Paul Leavit. Refresh Refreshments
ments Refreshments will be served by the Board
of Christian Education and the
Junior High Youth Fellowship.
NJ Students Seek
Monster In Woods
With Weapons
NEPTUNE, N.J. (UPJ)-Police
begged school officials today to
convince their students "there isn't
any monster" in the local woods
and that anyone caught hunting
for one with weapons is liable to
arrest.
Eleven teen-agers are already
under arrest for monster-hunting"
with knives, blank-firing pis pistols
tols pistols and a variety of bludgeons.
Several hundred more gave po police
lice police the jitters over the weekend
as they alternately roared and
sneaked about n acki looking
for "creatures.
Police Supt. Edwin Fletcher
said the tory apparently was
started last week by a pair of
Manasquan High School students
who reported their car was stoned
in a lonely are by a big mov
ing creature,"
: Tlie "11, .youngsters under arrest
were, rounded up on a rural road
Friday night, heavily armed
with knives, wrenches and pistols
Three, over 18, were held on dis
orderly c o n d u c t charges, the
others as juvenile delinquents.
Fletcher said he ha'd appealed
to high school officials in Nep Neptune,
tune, Neptune, Manasquan and Wall to slay
the monster rumor, fast.
Sombrero
(Drive Inn)
Via Espana
just 300 ft. from tha
San Francisco entrance.
Daily Specials
of Your Favorit
and Liquors

Tdfe a jubVW aT

A

J

INVESTOR'S
GUIDE

y SAM SHULSKY Ji
'ting Features Syndicate, -235
E 45 St., New York
Q. Why do so many people, who
have the good sense to accumul accumulate
ate accumulate a fairly large amount of mon money
ey money and goods, turn to a total
stranger for guidance in handling
that accumulation. I have no
doubt that you are honest and sin sincere,
cere, sincere, and that you would not steer
anyone wrong if you could help
it. But hell is paved with good in intentions
tentions intentions and the best of us will
eventually make mistakes in
judgment, which at times are ve,
ry: costly.
Handling money is a complicat
ed, risky piece of work... But any
one who can build large capital...
should also be able to use his
head. It is a puzzle to me.
A. Thank you for an interesting
letter and a provocative question.
I can and do make mistakes
both in my own affairs and in ad
vising others. I merely try to be
right more times than I am wrong.
(Which, incidentally, is as much
as you can expect from your doc
tor, your lawyer and your auto
mechanic.)
Handling money is the chanciest
bit of business I know. And I a a-gree.with
gree.with a-gree.with you that the best inten intentions"
tions" intentions" will often prove wrong.
And so, to answer your implied
question: What ca I do?
It seems to m&, several things:
1. I can try to keep people from
obvious errors. (99 percent of the
stock sold over the telephone or
by high pressure mailing promo
tions are either outlandish risks
or outright swindles.)
2. I can try to supply specific
information that is not generally
known to the layman, but which
can be helpful i.e., the use of
convertible preferreds, debentur debentures;
es; debentures; tax-exempt bonds, etc.
3. I can preach quality and
regularity in investment. (Some (Somehow
how (Somehow even those who have made a
fortune selling ethical drugs or
diamonds seem to discard their
business sensa when they turn to
securities.)
4. Not all people who have mon money
ey money to invest made that money by
their own business acumen. Ma Many
ny Many have inherited it and, in some
cases, have absolutely no expe experience
rience experience in finance, or ny ether
business.
But none of these points dis discounts
counts discounts your original statement: I
realize full well (and hope read
ers realize) that there is no royal
road to riches. And that a dollar
saved is a dollar out at risk no
matter what you do with it no
matter what anyone does with rt.
Q. I bought 20 shares of New
England Tel and Tel at 132. Now
they propose to split the stock
five for one, into $20 par, but say
nothing about the dividend. Can
we expect $1.60 (one-fifth of $8)
on the $20 shares? Should we
sell now and repurchase the
snares at $20? I am a retired
man Of 71 and cannot afford to
lose my meagre savings.
A. You are worryirig urmeces
sarily.
The stockholders vote on the
split is set for late this month
(Sept. 29). It Will, no doubt, be
approved. The new dividend rate
has not yet been announced,

but

oDviously your total income will
be as large, if not larger than be
fore the SDlit.
The $20 you refer to is the oar
value of the new shares and has
nothing more to do wiin the
market pice than the present
$100 par has to do with current
market of around $185.
I repeat, you are worrying un
necessarily. You have nothing to
sen or repurchase. This is nothing
but a bookkeeping transaction as
far as you are concerned. Hold
your stock, en excellent securi
ty for your needs.
WHITE SOX 6-5 FAVORITE
CHICAGO, Sept. 30 (UPI)-The
Chicago White Sox are favored at
6-5 to defeat the Los Angeles Dod
gers tomorrow in the first game
of the World Series.
The White Sox also are 6-5 fav favorites
orites favorites to win the best-of-seven

classic. atnVjH

,r 'jr.

LT. COL. ALDEN P. SHIPLEY, director of instruclion at th

US Army Caribbean School, Fort Gulick, presents Cadet Arte
mio Diaz Sanchez of Peru with the honor student plaque at re

cent graduation ceremonies.
small arms repair

Today's Opening

STOCK PRICES

NEW YORK Rant an rtroTY I

Sotcks opened mixed today lid
quiet trading. c
Caution was the by word in Warf

OtrtfL as invCtf.rc awaits mm.1, I

er developments on the steel

ACF Ind
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium Ltd
Amer Cyanamid
Amer Motors
Amer Te land Tel
Anaeonda Copper
. Arkansas Fuel
. AVCO Mfg
Beth Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bicroft Uranium
Blauknox
British Pet
Burroughs
Celanese
S2Vi
260b
12
34 V
j 58
5744
79
60V
303.)
12H
56
14Mb
60b
50
7V
31
29 V
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler
Cities Service
Coastal Caribe
Colgate Palmolive
35
42b
62V4
4814
1
38 Mb
Colorado Fuel
Cons Electro Dynamics
Creole Pet
33
33 I
42 I
Crown Cork and Seal
Cera Metals
Charmers
Cuban Venezuelan Oil
Bu Pont
El Paso. Natural Gas
Fargo Oil
Felmont Pet
General Dynamics
General Electric
General Motors
General Plywood
G-ulf Oil
Harsco Steel
Howe Sound
Imperial Oil
Intl Pet
Lockheed
Magellan Pet
Montrose Chem
New Eng Tel and Tel
Northrop Air
Olin Mathieson
Paneoastal
Phillips Pet
Pure Oil
Royal Dutch Shell
RCA
Reynolds Metal
San Jacinto
Servo Corp
Signal Oil ami Cat
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobile
Sperry Rand
Standard Oil NJ
Studebaker-Packard
Superior Oil
Texas Gulf Prods
Textron
Underwood
United Canso Oil
US Rubber .
US Steel "
Westinghouse Elee
Wheeling Steel
33b
3val
36V4
5 18 1
2571
29H
4
48
78
56V4
17b
114V4
40V4
20V I
S8V4bl
82b
26V
15161
13
1901
28
49 I
2V,bl
431
37
58
108H
42
6b
22b
19l
53I
42l
22f
49l
181
1510b!
29V4I
241
21l
S9f
103!
S04
62
Doe Saved Al Sea
Has Tall Tale
For Grand-fawns
MALIBU. Calif. riJPnA J
iiea aoe, attacked by a parr
snarKs two miles at sea, was ref
cued yesterday bh three fisherrm
who had to chase here three mil
and lasso her.
The deer arjnarentlv urarufor
into the ocean from nearhv nmJ
ed hill areas and was unable
return to shore. Barney Blattma
oi i,os Angeles, and his wife,
her brt her. nonalrl Millpr cJ
the doe being pursued by t
snarKs when they were two mil
on snore
"We were fishing for seabass
our 14-foot outboard motor boatl
she said. "The poor, firehtenl
doe was being chased bv tl
sharks. We scared off the shark!
but then our steering gear brow
By the time we fixed it. the del
was further out at sea and swij
ming weakly."
Miller and Mrs. Blattman mal
a lasso of rope and looped
around the panicky doe's nedj
The two men and woman mal
aged to drag the doe into thd
boat.
Diaz won the honor in the school
course. (U.S. Army Photo.)



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AH tOTETEXDENf DAILY KEWSPAPOt
PACf TMIHTr
U GEORGE WUN. 1
Anonymous Donor
IY WILSON SCRUCQSj TEERT AND THE PIRATES
WHEW.' MAC IT AM7
THE WATCH NEVER i
PEEPEP.'
star,
'RISOLLA'S POP
Undtr Hii Spl!
r AL VIRMIII

.WtPxiSDAT, SETTIMBElt SI, 1S59
THI STORY OF MARTHA WAYH I

mam

'careful, no )V

IF YOU PIVE, RYAN, I'LL PUT ENOUGH LEAP- W
IN lOU 5EFORE YOU HIT THE WATER lOft,. SS

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HEY, WHAT'S THE IDEA, COMPLICATED

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LOOK TERRIBLE.' OOP! I'VE JUST

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Wall That, Too

kY ID6AR MARTIN

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I 1

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V W0RD...H0W THE EUtRCISeS M 5eLF-HvrN05l5!
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RUN, -TO VISIT

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I'M DRIVING OVER

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PERFUMP1 10U LIKE ITf 7 VERY

uch:

FOOD MONEY DOESN'T

OO FAR TWESE DAYS,

J1

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andv'eTwheTTI
run short, we always
blANAQE TO 1

(AM, WE KNOW WHOM)
TO TWANK FOR
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V PRISCILLA 1-

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UGS BUNNY

f-

With Pliasuro
I (Uj.Oct'j I yrs. (CYNTHIA BROKE HER LEA5HA J &Mft

TJjlUfeAcI ventures

LEFT in the LURCH

'lit

TO KAI6E SfeVERAU BROOP8 THEIR

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kit 1

MeR COMPLITE AMNE5IA CONFIRMED
BY THE AMHWNIATE5T, MB WAKE
A VITAL royr-HYPNOTIC 5U6&ESTI0K

Mild Attack

Y DICK CAVALLI

VOU'ReTX CAN HE?
WROh4G.V 1 I HE CAN'T 1
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AGREE WITH

ME

AN

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V THROUGH.' J

I HAVE THE
TRANG6T KNACK )
"v FDR GETTING INTO
m ( TROUBLE WHEN )
1M6OUND

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Sometime the )N6Tinct to misrate

WINS OUT OVER THEIR PARENTAL FEELINGS,
ANP THE LAST NEST IS ABANPONEU.
DlrtribuUd K Klnf FtntorM St mile t.

aim!!

i

SIDE GLANCES

By Cclbraith

f I

Tir TV!no m.Wvnl. riehL ue

on "of hi Yellowstone Lake cutthroat trout, FascmatM ob observer
server observer is Sen. Edmund S. Muskie (D-Mame).

BOARDINO HOUi

with

MAJOR HOOPLR OUT OUR WAV

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

HEM-HeHiT''? No illP0t?icE-ruM-

VOU FAILPDTO tfproANInre MK caii?

LflUT HI JUKI ( ISTOAA API V

IMOVe M MORE CLASSICAL CIRCLES

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iu mim IH& MONOK OF INTRO

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41 RP-D(?AW1 -TAriyki

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mot Stuff

w.-;en was

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2 6&

(CONNENIEMT;

F0R YOU?

COWTKARV TO ALL i
OP1MIOJ, IT AtKJ'T
HARMOWV THAT
MAKES SOCCtiS SOCCtiS-FUL
FUL SOCCtiS-FUL COMPAWIC--

rT'S WORKIU',ASIN
EACH OTHER...!
KWOWOf A Bl&

CCWAU1 THAT HIE5
THAT HATE
EACH OTHER AMP

WORK THEIR HEAR

OFF TRVIW TO

SHOW EACH

OTHER UP.'

3lT7 P YOU LOOK AT IT Y LOOK AT
i)R6ALIZE M AMP Okie OF 'EM RUBBlW T
rv WHAT IT A TH1 PUMBEST I IT IN.' VOU' P I
WOULP HAVe MEM IW TH' THIKJK 6UVS
COST TH' COM L SHOP CALI6HT AS HI6H UP
RAWY IP WE TH' MISTAKE A THEY

H HAPM T CAU6HT RI&HT AWAV.' ARE WOULP EACH OTHER ... 1

I rA VOLPR MISTAKE WHO MAP6 1 TRV TO
IN THAT BLUE THAT PRAW- ? WORK IN
M T PRINT y rut,, WJR V. HARMONV.' I
I v y ) OFFIC6 V. A

,J-..'vv3Vv'

LgSwiirl a I ffilp

; UMMMM GOOD! Two German girls and thousands of
others had their first opportunity to sample U.S. fried chicken
at the International Trade Fairs in Cologne and Munich. The
exhibits offered chicken, a bun, some fruit, and honey for the
equivalent of 25 cents. Thousands took advantage of the offer.

: "Joe will do anything to get out of house cleaning. This
niorninfcne went to the dentist!"

I U A b

PANAMA-MIAMI 55.00
MIAMI-NEW ORLEANS 35.30

PANAMA

NEW ORLEANS

30

Today's JY Program

GFN NF.WS
Pnlkn Purarl
Mr. Wlaard
Cnpf. KftriRaroo
PANORAMA
Hnyal Playhouse
Jimmy Heywrtod Show

8 00 Mid-Wwk Movlr
The Kennel Mur4r Cas
9 3(1 Traffic Court
in 00 Wed. Night riight
1100 CFN NEWS
1 1 i ETic : Peter Gunn and
Hlghwny Pitrol.

Courtesy of Aerovias Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573.16983.1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p,.m.

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SiO Jia. (pananui 1090 Xu. Colon
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'THgATHTAPPtFArTMBMT VSZ?



vs. Wynn in Series Opener

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Kecrc story on page 10:
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9

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rrnin of fight retinnE Canal workers pay their respects to
H?Dood. M Thelma s. Rand, Capt. P. F. Graham and Potter.

Florida Gains Three Families, California Gets Two,
Oklahoma, Texas One Each As Pan Canal ers Retire

More than 190 years of Pana Pana-Canal
Canal Pana-Canal service it represented by
toe seven men and one woman
bo retired from the Company Company-Government
Government Company-Government organization during
to month of September. A nunv
ber have had service with other
Government agencies or with the
military services. Four of the re re-S
S re-S employes had more than 30
JESS with the Canal organization.
7 Th0Sr who retired during Sep Sep-toJber.
toJber. Sep-toJber. their Positions and thc.r
length of service follows
Carl G. Breitenbach, .General
r&man, Navigation Division; 12
ars six months and 28 days.
Murrel L. Dodd, Lead Foreman,
PublkWorks. Maintenance Divi Divi-tyil
tyil Divi-tyil years, nine months and
Walter W. Fox, Automotive Ma Ma-Jrist
Jrist Ma-Jrist Motor Transportation DI DISK;
SK; DISK; i y-flve mon,hs an
eight days.
Cot Pre f. Graham, Fir
Pir. Division; 35 year,
nine months ami 28 day-
Mrs: Thelma S. Rand, Nurse Su Superior
perior Superior Health Bureau; 31 years.
lYinntns anu co
i anu to uaJ

i, x Schuberg, ripenucj 'vpiane ann nas mane pians to live
LAJU15 i. u o .. fiveJ t..i rvi,iu

THimt,rial Division

llVlSlOn; lo jcaLsi "-Tin

TrLead Foreman,
Motor Transportation Division; 3
ears and four days.
'Harold J. Zierten, Assistant Prin Principal.
cipal. Principal. Balboa High School. Div,
ion of Schools; 30 years.
Breitenbach, a native of Utita,
New York, served 30 years in the
United States Navy before he join joined
ed joined the Canal organization and was
with the Navy during both the
&st:and second World Wars. H.
was employed by the Canal in 194
as ah engineering aide in the Ma Marine
rine Marine Bureau. The following year
he was promoted to dock tore
man in Cristobal and since 1955
Therapeutic Trip
To California
To Be Taken By ike
WASHINGTON. Sept. 30-lUPI)
President Eisenhower plans to
fly by jet plane this after
noon to Palm Springs, Calif for
an eight-day sunny climate treat treatment
ment treatment of 8 nagg'" cold' ,ne VVhl,P
House announced today.
Press Secretary James C. Hag
erty said the president would stay
ajL'-fhe home of George E Allen
longtime Eisenhower friend, at
La Quintal nbnut 15 m,,P,! frnm
PeEM Springs.
Bwentially, the president was
iIwii r a mini shine scneo
iUU"""
ute'Which caused him to bp hailert
top' coast to coast as "the new
Elwnhower." a man of hurstine
energy- o ,
IDnn-ing his recent 12 day whir.
Mft- trip into n'est Germany.
QfMt Britain and France, the
Cbtef executive naturally expen
enCel some degree of lowered re
sirtwjre due to fatigue. He flew
Wlf from Eurone m his jet
tftnsport nursing an early rase of
"th" sniffle.
P'e got back from Europe on
tW Day and. had only one week
for Intensive conferences nrppar
lfirfor the visit of Soviet Premier
jNiklta S. Khrushchev There was
?-JWuJitain of legislation left for
'''i,f hv the deoarting ronnress
.d"ne was in almost daily
con
keMlce on the teel strike
Fnlieral Services
Tomorrow For
Harry
C. Levine
I- Fuaeral tervices for Ham
v George Levine, U.S. Army Canh Canh-"been
"been Canh-"been civilian employe who med
.Monday morning, will be held at
3 pJm. tomorrow. Chaplain
J(MJr) Carroll G. Charlie, Pro
testant chaplain at Fort Guhrk.
vWHl-xonduct graveside rites at
iMoufit, Hope Cemetery.
1 k. Friehdi may haVe tributes de
hlVered directly to the cemetery.

has been general dock foreman
on the Cristobal docks.
Mr. and Mrs. Braitenbach plan
to maka tbeir noma in San Dia Dia-90,
90, Dia-90, California, for tha prasent.
Dodd was born in Star, Oklaho Oklahoma
ma Oklahoma and served with the U.S. Na Navy
vy Navy for four years. He was employ employed
ed employed by the Canal organization in
1939 as general operator in the
Maintenance Division in Cristobal,
fie was promoted to principal
foreman in 1942 and has been lead
foreman in road construction sirfce
1955.
Mr. and Mrs. Dodd will leave
Saturday on the Panama Line for
New York and will travel across
country by train fc California
where they will live in Project Ci City.
ty. City. Fox is a nativt of Hasktll,
Taxas, and cam to the Isth Isthmus
mus Isthmus in 1941. Ha was employed
by the Canal as an auto machin machinist
ist machinist in the Motor Transportation
Garage in Ancon and has re remained
mained remained with the same unit dur during
ing during all the years of his employ employment
ment employment with the Canal.

He is leaving the Isthmus by
AlK lo nit "wiiiiui "j
xuiad, vMdiiwiim.
uranam, a second generation
Extension Classes
Of Junior College
To Open Tomorrow
First semester Canal Zone Jun Junior
ior Junior College Extension Division
classes will begin iomorrow. Dean
Roger C. Hacked has announced.
Eleven courses will be given on the
Pacific Side; one, on the Atlantic
Side.
The Pacific Side courses arc
elementary accounting, 7:30-9!30;
elementary shorthand, 6:30-7:30;
intermediate shorthand, 6:30-7:30;
advanced shorthand, 7.30 8:30;
first and second semester element elementary
ary elementary typing, and advanced typing,
7:30 8:30; elementary conversation
al Spanish, 6:30-7:30; first and sec second
ond second semester selection and con construction
struction construction of clothing, 6:30-9:30, and
introduction to psychology, 6:30 6:30-7:30.
7:30. 6:30-7:30. With the exception of the clothing
classes, which will meet on Mon Mondays
days Mondays only, all classes will meet
on Mondays and Thursdays.
The Atlantif Side class is ele elementary
mentary elementary conversational Spanish.
Mondays and Thursdays, 7:30 9:30
at Cristobal High School.
Courses not listed above which
were on the registration schedule
have been cancelled due to insuf insufficient
ficient insufficient enrollments.
Tuition will be payable at the
third meeting of classes that meet
twice a week; at the second meet meeting
ing meeting of the ones that meet only once
a week, hut classes in which .ew
er than ten students pay their tui tuition
tion tuition at the times stated will be
cancelled, school officials said.
Dave Markun Back
From Spanish Study
AtMevico School
I Dvirl .1 Marbim Accictant Gen
eral Counsel of the Panama Canal
Company, re'urned to the Canal
Zone this week after completing an
intensive t? week course in con
versational Spanish at the U.S.
Foreign Sen ires Spanish Lan
guage School in Mexico City.
He took the advanced Spanish
course and at the end of 'he
term, was chosen to make the
"despedida" speech at the grad graduation
uation graduation exercises.
A native of Minnesota. Markun
has been with the office of the
Cenrral Counsel since 1948 and has
been Assistant General Counrel
since 1953.
He is the second merflber of the
Canal organization to attend the
Foreign Language School in Mexi
ro. The first was Paul M Runnes
trand. F.xecutive Secretary, who
took the 12-week course last year.

I r J -I

Gov. W. Potter, Left to right

Canal employe, was born in Man
asquan, New Jersey, but came to
the Isthmus with his family whe
he was a boy. He held summer
vacation jobs with the Cristobal
Coaling Plant and the former
Quartermaster Divis.on and in 1933
was employed as a chauffeur in
the Motor Transportation Garage
in Cristobal.
Two years later, he was trans transferred
ferred transferred to the Fire Division as a
fireman and was promoted through
the ranks from fire sergeant to
fire captain, a position he has held
since 1956. In 1958, he was appoint appointed
ed appointed assistant to the chief of the
Balboa Fire District.
Capt. and Mrs. Graham plan
to make their home in Florida.
Mrs. Rand, the only woraan on
the retirement list for September,
was born in Detroit, Michigan and
took nursing training in Lakewood
Hospital in Lakewood, Ohio. She
came to the Isthmus in 1928 as a
nurse in Gorgas, then Ancon Hos Hospital,
pital, Hospital, and was promoted to head
nurse in 1939. She has been a nurse
supervisor at Gorgas for the past
year.
Mrs. Rand plans to remain in
the Canal Zone where her hus husband,
band, husband, Jacob Rand, is employed in
the Postal Division.
Schuberg was born in Kingston,
New York and served with the
U.S. Army during World War I.
He was employed by the Canal
organization in 1941 as a pipefit pipefitter
ter pipefitter in the Balboa Shops and was
transferred in the same position
to Cristobal with the Industrial Di Division
vision Division in 1950.
Mr. and Mr. Schuberg will
live in Florida after his retire retirement.
ment. retirement. Witt, a native of McKinney, Tex Texas,
as, Texas, came to the Isthmus with th
U.S. Navy and was attached to
the 15th Naval District until 1927
when he was employed by the
Canal as a signalman.
Military Honors
For Walter Harris
Al Coroza' Friday
Full military honors will be
given Friday morning at to'
clock at funeral services at Corn Corneal
eal Corneal Cemetery for Walter A. Har Harris,
ris, Harris, former emnloye of the Main Maintenance
tenance Maintenance Division.
Mr. Harris, who was 68 years
old. died Sept. 22 en Gorgas Hos Hospital
pital Hospital affpr a long illness.
The military honors will be ac accorded
corded accorded in funeral rites in the Vet Veterans'
erans' Veterans' Section at Corozal Cemete Cemetery.
ry. Cemetery. Mr Harris nativ nf San An
tonio. Texas, served in the United
States Army from 1913 to 1918. At
the time of his discharge, he was
a cadet in the Fifth Aviation
Squadron
He worked with the Maintenance
Division from 1940 to 1942. For
several years he has been living
in F.l Kspino, near Chorrera.
He is survived by a brother, in
the United States, and by a sister.
Mrs. Harriet Harris Unwin,. of
Santiago. Chile
Graveside Services
For Amos W Fox
At Corozal Thurs.
,.ev. Orville Jay Hine of the
Balboa Union Church will conduct
graveside funeral services at 10
a.m. tomorrow at Corozal Ceme Cemetery
tery Cemetery for Amos W. Fox, retired em em-plovp
plovp em-plovp of the Personnel Bureau.
Mr. Fox, who was 73 years, old,
collapsed Sept. 22 at the Balboa
Service Center. He died the fol following
lowing following morning at Gorgas Hospi Hospital.
tal. Hospital. Mr. Fox came to the Canal Zone
in 1912, during the latter part of
the construction period. He work
ed for two years as a clerk with
the Isthmian Canal Commission.
In 1917, he was reemployed as a
clerk, in personnel work. At the
time of his retirement in 1946, he
was Administrative Assistant in
the Perionnel Bureau

are Harold J. Zierten Muriel

He wat hired as a chauffeur in
the Motor Transportation Division
in Ancon in 1928 and in 1934 was
transferred to the former Muni
cipal Engineering Division in Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal as a foreman. He was em employed
ployed employed by the former Receiving
and Forwarding Agency in Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal as a battery repairman in
1939 and became foreman of the
Agency's repair shop in 1949. He
nas held this position with the Mo
tor Transportation Division since
1957.
Mr. and Mrs. Witt and their
family plan to live in Mathis,
Texas, after his retirement.
Zierten a native ef St. Cloud
Minnesota, has been a teacher in
uaiDoa High hcnool since 1929. He
was graduated from Bradley Uni
versity in Peoria. Illinois, and
taught school in Sistersville, West
Virginia, for several yearg before
coming to the Canal Zone.
He was assigned to Balboa Hieh
School and was made Assistant
Principal of Balboa High School
in 1951.
Mr. and Mrs. Ziprtrwi will mairA
their home in St. Petersburg, Fio
rina.
Parents Of Malambo
Students Visit
AtbrookUSAF School
More than 250 parents of ehil-
rlrpni attending thm fian .Tnp Ma.
lambo School in Panama recent
ly visited the USAF Scnoolfor La Latin
tin Latin America, at Albrook.
The parents were guests of Class
59 A and 59b as well as the stu student
dent student section. The Latin American
students have been donating funds
to financially assist orphans at attend
tend attend the San Jose Malambo
School.
The visitors were guided
through the facilities of the school.
They were greeted on their ar arrival
rival arrival by Capt. Victor Bolado, di director
rector director of training and operations,
who explained the mission and
purpose of the USAF School for
Latin America. M-Sgt. Louis Ote Otero,
ro, Otero, student first sergeant, inform informed
ed informed the parents on off-duty and
sports activities of the Latin A A-merican
merican A-merican Students.
The visitors then toured the
quarters of the Panamanian stu students
dents students and listened to Sgt. Ricardo
Bermudez of Panama d i s e u s s
methods of inspection.
The parents fihen visited seve several
ral several classrooms of the Latin Amer Amer-ican
ican Amer-ican School among them were air aircraft
craft aircraft radio, electronic instrument
repairman and the enlisted supply
j-umses. iney were men taken to
hangar "A" whr th.v
- .. ..... w j i:wnj
students actually working on en-
ana ouier systems for air
craft.
Guides for the tour were: M
!f ic"'.' C.havez- M st' L- Ote Ote-ro
ro Ote-ro M-Sgt. Arturo Zapata, M-Sgt
Andrew Ortega, M-Sgt. Richard
Ortega, M-Sgt. Carlos Maymi, T T-Sgt.
Sgt. T-Sgt. Jesus Morado and S-Sgt Al Albert
bert Albert Garcia.
World Series
Games Schedule
CHICAGO, Sept. 30-(UPI)-Schedule
of World Series game
between the Chicago White Sox
and Lot Angeles Dodgers:
Thuraday, Oct. 1, at Chicago, 1
p.m. Panama time.
Friday, Oct. J, at Chleago, 1
l.m. Panama time.
Saturday, off for travel.
Sunday, Oct. 4, at Los Ange Angeles,
les, Angeles, 4 p.m. Panama time.
Monday, Oct. $, at Los Ange Ange-lei,
lei, Ange-lei, 4 p.m. Panama time.
Tuesday, Oct. i (If necessary)
at Los Angeles, 4 p.m. Panama
time.
Wednesday, off for travel.
Thursday, Oct. I, (If necessa necessary)
ry) necessary) at qilcage, 1 p.m. Panama
time.
Friday, Oct. (M necessary)
at Chicago, 1 p.m. Panama
time

Panama Liner Cristobal
Near Hurricane Grade
Balboa Heights today failed to establish radio contact
with the Panama liner Cristobal, whose normal course this
morning would put her just about opposite Cape Hatteras
near the violent storm center of hurricane Cracie, which is
cutting a devastating swath through South Carolina.
Officials here doubted the silence indicated trouble,
since the Panama Line ships normally report to the Zone
until Haiff, and from that point onwards they report to
New York.
But to check on the ship's safety, Balboa Heights has
scheduled a direct call to New York later this afternoon for
a report from the Canal Company's New York office.
The Cristobal left here last Saturday and would be
due at New York Friday.

Usual procedure for a ship at
sea is to give a wide berth to
violent storm areas if at all pos possible,
sible, possible, or heave to until the storm
abates.
Meanwhile the Panama Line
announced the Ancon, outbound
from New York, wiJI arrive at
Cristobal about four hours late
tomorrow due to a delay caused
at Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
Gracie, a once-killer tropical
hurricane converted into a storm storm-sized
sized storm-sized flood threat, bored through
North Carolina today after taking
at least two lives farther south.
It was impossible to estimate
damage and, as one official put it,
"anything put out up to now is
like pulling a figure out of the
air."
W. D. Dibrell, assistant director
Ralph K. Skinner
Named To Assist
PC Comptroller
The appointment of Ralph K
Skinner to the position of Staff
Assistant to the Comptroller,, ef
foctive Oct. 4, was announced by
Phillip L. Steers, Jr., Comptroller
for the Panama Canal Company.
Skinner succeeds Miguel Corco
who retired the end of July.
Skinner has nearly 24 years of
service with the Panama Canal
Company, most of it with the Of Office
fice Office of the Comptroller. Early
this year he completed a five five-month
month five-month assignment in Washington
where he attended the Civil Serv
ice Commission's Financial Man Management
agement Management Intern Program.
A native of West Fairlee, Ver
mont, he served in the Army here
from 1932 to 1934. After his dis discharge
charge discharge in the United States, he
returned to the Isthmus and since
then has been employed contin contin-ously
ously contin-ously with the Panama Canal
Company except for a two-year
period during World War II when
he was with the Panama Air
Depot.
For the past four and one-half
years, he has been with the Ac Accounting
counting Accounting Policies and Procedures
Staff as publications editor ard
systems accountant.
In his off-duty hours, Skinner
has done a considerable amount of
newspaper photography and feat feature
ure feature writing.
Lino
Oalllnoo
Sixty-one passengers from Cris
tobal to New Y ork and one for
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, will sail Sa Saturday,
turday, Saturday, on the Ancon of the Pana Panama
ma Panama Line.
The advance passenger list Is
as follows:
Miss M. Elizabeth Alston; Mr.
and Mrs. A. Dwing Anderson; Mr.
and Mrs. Kazimierz Bazan; Dr.
and Mrs. George W. Bland; Mrs.
Belarmina Block; Mr. and Mrs.
Eugene H. Bunnell; Miss Emily
Cass; Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Gum Gum-pus;
pus; Gum-pus; Mr. and Mrs. Leslie W.
Croft, Jr.; Mr. and Mrs. Leonidas
Critides and mother, Olympia Cri-
tides.
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Dille and
two children; Mr. and Mrs. Mur Mur-rel
rel Mur-rel L. Dodd; Mrs. Blanche Finley
and daughter; Mr. and Mrs. Wii Wii-liam
liam Wii-liam Gillespie and two children;
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Groves and
two children; and Mrs. Nita B.
Hartman.
Herbert Ingram; Miss Florence
Ingram; Mrs. Frances Irwin;
Miss Josephine Kawkiel; Miss Cla Clara
ra Clara Kirchner; and Mr. and Mrs.
William E. Lundy.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. Mitten.
Jr., Walter S. Newhouse' Mr. and
Mrs. William J. Nickisher; Mr.
and Mrs. William J. Probst; Pa Patrick
trick Patrick J. Ridge; Miss Agnes K.
Spilker, and Mr. and Mrs. Roy M.
Steele.
Mr. and Mrs. Ross P Tillman;
Miss Lillian Wartman; Mr. and
Mrs. James W. Watson; Mrs. A A-dele
dele A-dele N. Werner; and Mr. and Mrs.
Perry C. Wicks.
Cristobal o Port-au-Prince; Al Albert
bert Albert M. Jenkins.
YOUTHS ASAULT COPS
SAYREVILLE N.J (UPH A
dozen teen-agers assaulted two po policemen
licemen policemen yesterday when they ques questioned
tioned questioned the group about a motor motorcycle
cycle motorcycle theft. Five of the youths
were charged with assault and
battery and interference after Po Police
lice Police Capt. Edward Hartman and
Detective Sgt. Raymond Sweeney
fought off their attackers and ra radioed
dioed radioed far help.

of disaster services for the Red
Cross, was likely to get the first
accurate estimate in a flight over
the storm path today.
Although only two deaths were
directly attributed to the punish punishing
ing punishing blows of the year's seventh
tropical storm, at least eight
others were killed in Gerogia,
Florida and North Carolina in
traffic and the boating accidents
indirectly attributed to
the storm.
A 9 am. weather bulletin said
the storm, with winds that drop dropped
ped dropped from a high yesterday of 140
mph down to 40 mph would swing
northeast on a jaunt across North
Carolina and move into Virginia
this afternoon or early tonight.
Heavy rain and local flood con conditions
ditions conditions were forecast and persons
living on streams in the area were
urged to be watchful. The French
Broad River in the mountains of
western North Carolina was lap lapping
ping lapping at its banks.
Gale warnings were up as far
north as New Jersey, Delaware
and Rhode Island. Heavy rain
and possible flash floods during
the next 24 hours forecast for
western North Carolina, western
Virginia, Wrst Virginia, western
Maryland and central Pennsyl Pennsylvania.
vania. Pennsylvania. As Gracie swept toward oblivion

another hurricane, named Hannah
gained strength 907 miles :ast of
Palm Beach, Fla. Hannah was
moving at 12 mph in a westerly
direction.
Gracie was moving at 12 mph
but was due to pick up speed
later in the day to about 15 niph.
Hannah thrashing the Atlantic,
began a gradual turn toward the
north today and forecasters said it
might follow the same path as
Gracie. 1
After two days of barreling due
west, hurricane-hunter planes
found Hannah on a west-northwest
course.
Hannah so far has menaced on
ly ships at sea. It was expected
to noid its west-northwest course
for 12 to 24 hours
However,' with time, Hannah is
expected to acquire gradually a
greater northward component in
its west northwestward move movement,"
ment," movement," the Weather Bureau said.
Death Toll Rises,
Dysentery Spreads
In Stricken
Japan
NAGOYA, Japan, Sept. 38 -(UFI)-The
toll of dead and miss missing
ing missing in typhoon-ravaged Japan
soared above the 5,000 mark to today.
day. today. Dysentery spread through the
area, padding new despair to a
stricken people unable even to
bury their dead.
Japanese police released new
casualty figures from Tylen Vera,
the worst in Japan's recorded
history showing 3,265 dead and 1,
707 missing. More than 10,000 per persons
sons persons were injured and a million
and a half were homeless.
Equine Encephalitis
Kills Five More
In New Jersey
TRENTON, N. J.. Sept. 30 -(UPD
New Jersey today report reported
ed reported five new deaths from Eastern
equine encephalitis. They raised
New Jersey's death toll from the
mysterious mosquito borne out-b-eak
to 18.
State Health Commissioner Dr.
Roscoe P. Kandle said the newly
reported deaths included two per persons
sons persons from Pennsvlvania who were
visiting in New Jersey when they
oecame ill.
He said the five latest victims
had become ill before Sept. 10 and
therefore did not change his be belief
lief belief that the outbreak was declin declining
ing declining from the peak it hit three
Ufeks ago.
A total of 28 cases of suspected
or proven cases has been reported
in the state. There is no known
cure for the disease and prev previous
ious previous outbreaks indicate it is fatal
in 75 per cent of all cases.
SUING IS PERCEIVING
NEW YORK, (UPI)-Trying to
anticipate conditions which may
confront astronauts, nu t r 1 1 1 o n
scientists at the Air Force Aerc
Medical Laboratory put volun
teers in a black-out room and fed
them. The subjects could not de
tect any difference In the taste o'
white and whole wheat n r e a i
They found all kinds of meat tast tasted
ed tasted the same.

'r" imi'iiMMiMjii I
N(jg v.fm't
r
4

CRUISING
CRISTOBAL

TO

have headed their seagoing yacht, The Francis and Marion, to-,'
ward Cuba and the Yucatan Peninsula. They are expected to'l
arrive at the Isthmus in two or three weeks to visit Mrs. Gil-'!
lis' parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Harper of Margarita
, ,:
Former Canal Zone Girl, Husband,
Yachting Back Here To See Folks

Many girls sail back to the
Isthmus to visit their parents, but
few do it on their own boat.
Shirley Giliis, the former Shir Shirley
ley Shirley Herring, and her husband,
Walter F. Gillis of Avon by the
Sea, N.J., and Fort Lauderdale,
Fla., have set to sea on their sea seagoing
going seagoing yacht, The Francis and Ma Marion.
rion. Marion. They have planned their voyage
via Cuba and the Yucatan Penin Peninsula,
sula, Peninsula, and will visit several Latin
American countries enroute.
Mrs. E. T. Harper of Margarita
said today that she and her hus husband
band husband are expecting the sea travel-
Weather Or Not
This weather report for the 24
hours ending 8 a.m. today Is
prepared by the Meteorological
and Hvdrograrthln Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE :
High 87 82
Low 74 76
HTTMIDITY:
High 95 95
Low 69 85
WIND:
(max. mph) NW-10 NW-12
RAIN (inches) 0 .33
WATER TEMP:
(Inner harbors) 81 82
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake 84.13
Madden Dam 228.12
BALBOA TIDES
THURSDAY, OCT. 1
High
Time
2:25 a.m.
2:45 p.m.
Ht.
15.5 ft.
15.6 ft.
Low
Time Ht.
8:49 a.m 1.3 ft.
9:08 p.m. 0.7 ft.

He made her
the most desirable
woman in the world

-for everybody

AH,

but himself!

1 1 .11

lev t&Mm atn

3. rnEWJr.tej

H:o tr$&CToeDl3o.M2:rj

CESARE DANOVA Z1

,coio tv oe unc CiNaMASeovE wmontmo km;

Mr. and Mrs.Walter F.

ers to arrive at Gristobal hi-t
or three weeks.
The Francis and Marion, is a J.
foot converted New England ttvw
ler built in Somerset, Mass. Itjit
fit with "all the comforts of
home," and is indeed "home",.' t
the young Gillis', who married
last March.
The young couple's four-footed
passenger is their Labrador re retriever
triever retriever Rufus, whose sea training
now includes a taste for raw fish
and occasional dips in the sea.
Gillis, former president of Boun Bounty
ty Bounty Entreprises, Inc., an experi experimental
mental experimental commercial fishing con concern
cern concern in New Jersey, has been en--,
gaged in island cargo and salvege
work in Florida. On their cruise.
he plans to invesitgate business
possibilities in the Caribbean and
Central America.
THE ALMANAC
Today is Wednesddf, Sept. 30.
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92 more days in 1959.
The moon is approaching iti
new phase.
The morning star is Venus..
The evening stars are Jupiter'
and Sturn. ,1
On this date in history:
In 1932, depression disorder!
broke out in London as hunger
marchers stormed Whitehall..
In 1938, ttie Munich Conference)
ended with an announcement that
Britain and France had, agreed t9
Hitler's demand for annexation of
Czechoslovkia's Sudetenland. 5
In 1942, Adolf Hitler predicted
that the occupation of Stalingrid
would be a gigantic success.
In 1946, the International Mill-'
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many found 22 top German .Nazi
leaders guilty of war crimes aftd v
sentenced 11 of them to deathV
In 1953, President Eisenhowjr
named Governor Earl Warren
California chief justice of ffle
U. S. Supreme Court.
A thought for today: Adlof Id Idler
ler Idler wrote: "Every movement with
great aims has anxiously to wafih
that it does not lose connection
with the great masses."
If
PRICES: 75c. 40c.
TODAY :
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1
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