The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03136

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
5 i

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AN' INDEPENDENT $5Vtf U I XSKfc. DAILY NEWSPAPER
VO.
lai&ma Mttr am
"Let the people know the truth and the country i$ safe" Abraham Lincoln
CANADIAN WHISKY
S4TH YIAR
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER t, 1S59
FIVI CENTS

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XUCHOAXCARRAGA gets thronged by autograph seekers; at Coco Solo Theatre where he played yesterday for the United Fund
ffid Galyp sos
(ccotf $722,000 anfee Fund Drive
, ; .Freeloaders gathered at Balboa Theater last night for the United Fund launching got more than their money's
. jMrorth for th cost of shoe-leather and gasoline,
( ; The show was a wham-bang climax to a successful kick off day. A big audience who oarne for an hour.and.a.half
j thow ftayed to applaud an extra hour of entertainment.

Speakers didn't take up

- Brig. Gen.,' James W. Coutts, delivering a prepared text, was suocint. Referring to the start ef the United Fund
Wea, he brought it lip.to-date for local application,
I Gov, W. E. Potter told a few jokes on himself, referred to the 19 participating agencfes, recommended to don.
rs their reading of the brochure about these agencies, and told how tiny a donation in terms of daily pennies would
1 swell to a sum sufficient to reach the goal of $122,000.

?' Ooatee-wearing Phil Sanders
. as master of ceremonies, in in-t
t in-t traduced the Governor as the
"Canal Zone's best known TV
personality'' after last Friday
evening's show.
1 Then Potter told how a boy
. aittmir behind him, hearing the

introductory reference, said,
That's Lucho."
, In a sly reference to a cur cur-v
v cur-v tent community controversy,
"the Governor said the magi magi-,
, magi-, eian on the program could
make things disappear, but
he (Potter) couldn't even get
rid of "that house in Diablo."
Potter also remarked that he
- couldn't wear a beard "like Phil,

because the flashbulbs would set
ft afire,"
In the line of entertainment,

There was something to please
', most every one. Programmed
acts were the Naturals, (Bill
Aldrich with Gregory and Paul
Marvenko), guitar-playing vo vo-ealist
ealist vo-ealist Claire A. Ugelstad, ballad
singer "Bud" Stewart, magician
"Woodie", Woodruff and his eye eyecatching
catching eyecatching daughter Sandra, and
calypso eutie Shirley Ann Meyer.
' Also, Pianist Peter Duchin
,with 'progressive jazz, the 70th
Army Band combo, dramatic
baritone Fred Thompson and
: the incomparable Lucho Azcar Azcar-raga
raga Azcar-raga and his conjunto.
In addition. there were Dick

Massie and his gang made up
of Jack Cate, Arnold Russell
and Eddie Davidson. The Gay
Crooners also appeared. They
were Rudolph Charles, Carlos
Garnett, Leroy Worrell, David
Campbell, Ferdinand Thompson
and Beresford Gittens.
1 Helping them were George
"The Baron" Bryan, drummer
Randolph Jacobs and Bass "Eg
bert Chery. Pianist Francisco
, Crnmmond accompanied Miss
Meyer, leading his trio.
An' added attraction at Bal
boa Theater was the Army Band
ehorus.
At the end of the program,
Lucho outdid himself with the

liveliest organ beating, pound pounding,
ing, pounding, slapping, elbowing and
? (laying seen and heard In a
ong time. His boys and "cou-
kin" xounded out a st-llar act.
Lucho surprised everyone,
V Including the target of his
at'tntion, when he called on
the audience to tanrt and
applaud Poter. They did.
The 79th Army Band played
f khe accompaniments for most

much time.
of the show as well as the over overtures.
tures. overtures. hill Mallory had the Balboa
H eater so decked out in Unit United.
ed. United. Fund publicity that ni or:e
could forget the import behind
Hl:e bisr free show.
Balboa High School furnish furnished
ed furnished the ROTC ushers who were
Kevin Sheridan, Vincent Lom-

if
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I " I
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(LP
T--ir-nrr-iiriliiiiiiiiiriTiriiii-iiiiiiirr ililiiiiiiiiM miiimiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiimii

GOV. WILLIAM POTTER braves ttie rain to plug Waited
. Fund -at Paralso wtiUs a good crowd Msiens.

o o j
L

broia, Albert White, Selso Ali Ali-ponga,
ponga, Ali-ponga, Robert D. Brown, Peter
Greene, Bill Camp, Thomas
Bright and Kenenth Major. Also
Willis Beardall, James Freeman,
Dale Clarke, Archie Carroll
Herbert Prescott, John -Zelnick
Julio Barba, Ronnie Willoughby
and Louis Andino.
Yesterday's special train of

two coacheev and a flat car in
between was, decorated by
Paul Coleman with the help

of Carlos Payrs and Cleve Cleveland
land Cleveland Piggott, Al Baldwin was
in overall charge.
The Coco Solo audience, as a
group, was younger than the
Balboa Theater audience. But
they gasped at the magician's
deception, loved the music,
swamped Lucho for autographs
and generally had a wonderful
time.
Even the rainy day take-off
of Potter and Coutts in a
helicopter right by the theater
drew rapt attention. They had
to be back on the Pacific side
for a like TV. show over CFN
at 5:45 pm. X
The kickoff special train yes yesterday
terday yesterday was a mass of music.
The 33 members of the 79th
Armv Band were merelv the
nucleus of a much larger group
A typical scene on the return
trip was Dick Massie and his
guitar and violin companions
playing in the aisle, with Lucho
Azcarragas conjunto memters
clapping hands In time to the
music; Bricky Journey, Nellie
Holgerson and Maggi Jansen
jumping with glee and swaying
in time; Army Dancismen grin grinning
ning grinning appreciatively; Fred Sill
practically 'doing a jig in the
aisle: Ed McVittie. Jimmy
Lvons. Bettv Haberstick, Leo
Farlow and T. J. Wilber enjoy enjoy-iner
iner enjoy-iner it all: some people perched
on the backs of the car seats
to see better and Air Force pho photographer
tographer photographer Al Frisby grabbing a
candid shot of it all.

Local Union Official Cites Need For Member,

By WILLIAM H. SINCLAIR
International Representative,
AFSCME, AFL-CIO
At Us third biennial convention
recently held at San Francisco,
Calif, the AFL-CIO approved a
resolution directing all its affili affiliates
ates affiliates to expand and improve pub public
lic public relations programs to tell -labor's
story to union members and
the general public,
Improved communications be between
tween between unions and their members
and between the labor movement
and the rest of the community
should be a must the AFL-CIO
leaders said,
Thoee ef as the Caaal Zone

Assignee.

Says Cotton: 1
Never Know I Had
So Many Friends
The roaring Canal Zone dispute over trie official as assignment
signment assignment of a choice Diablo home to Supply Division gen general
eral general manager John J. Barton (two years Isthmian service)
ended abruptly this afternoon as Barton relinquished the
quarters 5418 in favor of Balboa postmaster, Arthur T.
Cotton (33 years Isthmian service).
Barton relinquished the quarters assignment on

grounds of the "personal

elderly, infirm parents live with bin.
Cotton said this afternoon he was highly pleased
with the outcome of the housing hassle. "I never knew I
had so many friends on the Canal Zone," he said.
Barton's action was made public by Pacific Civic
Council president Sam Roe Jr. The iivic .council had led
the fight against Barton's assignment, claiming it con contravened,
travened, contravened, undertaking! given by Gov.;Wiliam E. Potter.
Before Barton's move was known today, Potter got
together with the full Pacific Civic Council in a housing
meeting at Balboa Heights. The session was inconclusive
except for a discussion of changes governing "officials for

quarters' job designations and
The announcement came in a
signed memo, dated today, to
Supply and Community Service
Director, L. A. Ferguson, with
copies for Potter and Roe.
Barton's brief letter said:
"Reference the d e s i gnation
which has been made of Quarters
5418, Diablo Heights, 'as official
quarters for the General Manager
of the Supply Division, I request
that an alternate assignment be
considered to meet my needs in
time for occupancy upon arrival
of my family within the next 90
days.
"This rqutt It baid upon
Hi circumstances brought to
light relative to tht personal
necessity of Mr. Arthur Cotton
for this particular typo house
and the fact that he apparently
would be likely to secure an as assignment
signment assignment to quarters 5418 en his
seniority or possibly en the
hardship ef his case except for
the official designation."
The outcome of the battle, which
kept tempers boiling for five days,
was clearly a victory for the Civic
Council, which initiated the vigor

'1 2rfM
, -jJ sJL .r;'. '- w

SEATED AROUND THE CONFERENCE TABLE at today's housing meeting at Balboa Heights
Arey, W. H. Essllnger, Poser Hatchett, Jack Randall, L. A. Ferguson. Gov. W. E. Potter, Sam
Civic Councils, Rufus Lovelady, Mrs. Margaret Rennie and Arthur T. Cotten.

labor scsne can fully appreciate
the position of tne AFL-CIO Too
often we are being bombarded by
members and non-members with
one blunt question: What is the
union doing?
Those who claim to know what
the union is doing always seem to
have their own ideas of who did
what, how it was done and why it
wag done.
Just before ex-Governor John S.
Seybold left the Isthmus he au authorized
thorized authorized a 4-cent across-the- board
wage Increase for all non-US mi mile
le mile n workers. The union had been
fighting for u this increase for
nearly two ye ars. However, when
tb increase Wat granted a work-

necessity" of Cotton, whose

the setting aside of select-
ous protest over Barton's assign assignment
ment assignment to the Diablo house.
First made public after a stormy
session between Potter and the
Council last Tuesday, when the
Administration backed the execu executive
tive executive assignment, civic battle vet
eran Roe and the council took the
question to the public.
Potter and his staff were accus
ed of using "official doubletalk"
to cloak what began as a "tact "tactless"
less" "tactless" error but what was judged
by many Zonians to be outright
"official favoritism."
'In making today's announce announcement,
ment, announcement, Roe said:
"On behalf of the Pacific Civic
Council and the entire Canal Zone
community. I would like to thank
Mr. Barton, whose initiative and
good grace in giving up the Dia Diablo
blo Diablo quarters have kept a small
matter from becoming a commu community
nity community vs. Balboa Heights feud."
And happiest of all was post
master Cotton, who also went on
record to tnank uarton, and was
happier still the drawn-out public
quarrel was at an end.
Barton paid a courtesy call on
er told me that the governor gave
the 4-cent increase ag a farewell
-rift to local raters. According to
this worker, Seybold gave one
cent for eath year he served on
the Isthmus as ;overnor.
No wonder we have no choice
but to join the AFL-CIO in re redoubling
doubling redoubling our efforts to bring be before
fore before the general public a full and
accurate picture of our actions
and our aims.
We do realize, however, that
this will be as difficult a task as
it has always been everywhere.
The United Auto Workers, AFL AFL-CIO,
CIO, AFL-CIO, spends several million dol dollars
lars dollars every year te tell its story

Federal Workers Can Get
Health Ins. From $1.25

Word was received today from
the National Office of the Ameri American
can American Federation of Government
Employes that Presidpnt Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower had signed into law the Act
to provide a health insurance pro program
gram program for government employes.
The signing brings to a close
a 12-year battle for this impor important
tant important insurance coverage.
The AFL-CIO affiliated unions,
lead by the AFGE, urged Congress
over the years to provide Federal
employes with prepaid health
benefits now enjoyed by many em employes
ployes employes in private industry, a un
ion spokesman said today.
Extensive hearings were held in
June of 1956 by the House Post Of Office
fice Office and Civil Service Committee.
These hearings pointed up the dif differences
ferences differences in thinking between the
many interested groups. Through
the continued efforts of the gov government
ernment government employes unions, legisla legislation
tion legislation satisfactory to all groups, was
written and introduced this year
by Seii. Olin D. Johnston (D SC)
and Sen. Richard L. Neuberger
(D-Ore.) The bill was S-2162.
Hearing held this year indicat indicated
ed indicated that the interested groups
including the Administration,
Federal employe unions, the
American Medical Association,
the American Hospital Associa Association,
tion, Association, Blue Cross and Blue Shield,
group practice plans, and the
insurance industry had reached
an agreement.
The problem of cost and financ
ing was finally resolved by the
gfrvMnment and the -' employes
sharing the cost on a 50-50 basis.
The problem of type of coverage'
was solved by allowing the em.
ploye the right to elect the cover
age most suitable to his needs. He
may choose a service benefit plan,
indemnity benefit plan, employe
organization plan, or a compre
hensive medical plan of either the
group or individual-practice type.
The coverage selected will cost
the employe and the government
between the following minimum
and maximum figures:
a. For an employe who enrolls
himself only SI. 25 minimum
and $1 .75 maximum biweekly.
b. For a nemploye who enrolls
himself and his family S3
Cotton at the post office shortly
before public release ef his me memo.
mo. memo. The celebrated house Diablo
quarters 5418 is due to be va
cated tomorrow by Balboa High
assistant principal Harold J. (Zip)
Zierten, who is retiring.
' Friends of the popular teacher
today vehemently denied he had
been in hiding while his house wa?
being fought for so bitterly.

Community Communications

through the press, radio and tele television
vision television services, in addition to
scores of local and national publi publications.
cations. publications. Despite this, Walter P.
Reuther found out that his union
members were still asking. "What
ig the union doing?
Reuther finally found out that
people weren't reading union pub publications,
lications, publications, they weren't attending
union meetings and apparently
uerc not listening to union pro pro-grjms
grjms pro-grjms on the radio and TV ei ei-II
II ei-II cr.
This reminds me of a meeting
Lloyd P. Vaughan, former Canal
Zone CIO director, and I attended
m Cristobal. About 40 stewards
aimed their attacks at us and ac

ntause

minimum and $4.23 maximum"
biweekly. ...
c. A female employ who en
roHi herself and her family In
eluding a non-dependent hus
band $1.7$ minimum and ffs
50 maximum biweekly.
A stipulation in the law require)
that the minimum contribution bj
the employe and government b
used in full to buy health insuT
ance benefits except that a re
serve fund not to exceeds percefil
will be established.
The law becomes effective on
July 1, 1960.
Owners of HOA-TV
Take (losing Order
To RP High Court
--tat-

A formal appeal to the- Su
preme Court against an execu executive
tive executive order banning the opera operation
tion operation of HOA-TV, which begaa
test telecasts Saturday, was be being
ing being prepared today for presen presentation.
tation. presentation. Yesterday. President de la
Guardia and Minister of Gov-
ernment and Justice Hectr
Valdes turned down a request :
by Dr. Gllberto Arias and Dr.
Harmodio Arias, Jr., seeking re revocation
vocation revocation of an order which pro- ;
bjbited the installation and use
of certain television equipment, A
Shortly afterwards, acting on
orders of Valdeay t Iriformatlon
Secretary Salust 1 a n o (Tano)
Chacon ordered Radio Pana-
mericana to suspend its tesf
telecasts.

IT
Today's Transits
TODAY' STRANSIT
(scheduled)
Northbound ; W
Southbound i 13
TOTAL
were,
Roe,
left to right. William, O.
president of the Pacific
cused us of not doing snythinf.1'
When we told them what wa
were doing, they ssked, "Why
don't you publish those things la
the newspapers?"
Vaughan and I returned to Pa
nama City and for 10 consecutive
weeks we flooded the Isthmian
press, both Spanish and English,
with everything we did and some
of what wc did not do.
The 1th wtck we reutrned to
Cristobal to receive our w?ll-earn
ed praises. The most outspoken
steward got up again and aftffr
15 minutes of condemnation wt
asked him if he had not read tht
newspapers. "What mwipV1
persr" be asked

06

!'
(Clear Cut: 1) .?

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TU1 PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWfPVPEB
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, MSf

PA6I TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNIB no pulimo y TMt eNAA
FOUNOIO v NtLMN MOUNaBVILL h
HARM9DM ABIAS. iditch
13-17 M TKtlt P O 0 '' m P
TtLIFMONt 1 -02i 'S Lt
Cli adokim pNAnie AN. PnH
rw aw Crrici 'I i7 Cintrh Avikui ini! '2-h nb iJ'h tii"
fonN HrmeNTTivf josmua b 'otl inc
349 MABiaoN Ave Nlw YORK M7 N. V

ftll MOtfTM IN ABVAMCI
Po Six Montmi in abvancb.
o Onv Va in Advance

THII IS YOU FORUM THI MADIAS OWN COLUMN
The Mail (aa n erua tei reaaen The American
UtNrt are received irarefiillv and art bandied ra a wbolb: aeatieeiitiel
ajRf.
If contribute a latter alon't be impaHeit If II doeaa I eapeii tht
et day. Lattan ar published in tKa efder received.
, Please tr re ktte Me letters limited ana lemth.
Identity el lift at writer it held in ttrrttart ceoftdeace.
Tkii newiM" etaamai r raiaaniieilrty far tteremeirtt at oatmeal
CSCrautd in letters Iran reedora.
; THE MAIL BOX

THAT HOUSING
iir

Now that the bailie of the housing assignments has been joined

It is the dut of every loyal Zonun tn come to the aid ol ine civic
councils.
Tl,c arbitrary assignment of a Diablo house to Barton over the
protests of the civic councils should demonstrate the efficacy of those
groups What do thev do? What service do they perform"1 Aside
from whetting the ego of Flashbulb Willie, do they accomplish any anything0
thing0 anything0 Roe's resignation is a futile gesture.
A real protest would be the voluntary disbanding of the councils
with a strong letter of protest signed by each member and sent di directly
rectly directly to Eisenhower. That would certainly fix that gleam of a third
tttr which has been in Willie's eye ever since he got the second one.
If we want to get even with Barton, let's boycott the commissar commissaries.
ies. commissaries. That'll fix him. He'll probably get so mad he'll leave and then
Cotton can have the house. And everyone will he happy.
How stupid can people get? Aside from Cotton ,who has suffered
a personal disappointment, who cares where Rjrton lives or how he
got the house0 1 don't, and it strikes me that there are more impor important
tant important things from which to make headlines than the one which ap appeared
peared appeared on the front page of last Friday's Panama American.
Fad Up

Sir:
Of one admonition of the Governor concerning the current con controversy
troversy controversy most women are well aware, I.e. W have got to stand
behind our management people.
Any Mist

Sir.
Lookout girls, now I know how
seven rears I've been trying tn get
I'm still living like a peon. Now I'll
learned the secret.

Sir:
If youepat around here and there and most anywhere you can
jet that house that your little heart desires.
aldy

Hr
1! must be wonderful to be an emnlove with long service and
t look forward to moving into the widely publicized new housing
at La Boca. But alas 1 am one of those employes with more than
SO years service who are adversely affected by F.xec.itive Regula Regulation
tion Regulation No. Ifi.
We can admire, look and swoon but cannot apply for th's hous hous-lnj
lnj hous-lnj Wp are comnelleri by this outdated regulation to exist in the
game old wooden houses in Gamhna.
Why is Gamboa 1 using still segregated from 'he Southern
District?
Dredging Divisien Impleye

PEN PAIS WANTID
Sir:
My sixth grade class at I.oara Klementary School, Anaheim,
Calif., has formed a Ten Pal Club The children would like to cor correspond
respond correspond with children of their own age in your community.
These are the names and interests of six sixth graders:
Jerry Stanger, 715 Pythias, Anaheim. Calif. He is 11 years old,
and is interested in sports and coin collections.
Gailand Van Fasten, lilt Locust Avenue, Anaheim, Calif. He
Is If) vears old and likes sports and chemistrv.
Varn Friesen, 1818 South West St., Anaheim, Calif. He is 11
years old and his interests are cooking and snorts.
Thalma Osberna, 10fi Ajate Place. Anaheim, Calif. This 11 year year-old
old year-old eirl is interested in music and sewing.
Harvay Martin Rica Jr., 428 South Euclid Avenue, Anaheim,
Calif. Harvey is 11 years old and I'kes tn collect stamps and rocks
and niirticinale in sports.
Garry Packel. 636 Wilde Place, Anaheim, Calif. H is 11 years
old nd is interested in model ships and nianes and itoHs.
William Patrick Flynn
' Sixth Grade Teacher
Loara Klementary School
Anaheim, Calif.

ALBROOK'S DOGS
Sir
I'm wondering whether someone will one day awake the Albrook
Air Police to their duty of preventing doss from running loose. The
Vnvp is beginning to look like a haven for homeless, mangy mutts.

T ,r. ,.Kr.
r::

the owners of these mutts to nlease remove their dogs from the

middle of the road to complete their sleep somewhere else, so that
traffic may continue.
Several of the dog owners take even lesa care of their mutt s
than they do of their footloose infants, and that is saying a lot. I'm
a dog lover myself, but there are no quarters on the base where it
is suitable to keep a dog. Thus 1 prefer not to pester others with
any mutt of mine.
Many of the Albrook dogs look mangy and underfed, and are
forever turning over garbage cans in their search for food. The
SPCA should contact the Air Tolice and have badly-kept dogs

destroyed

tske a look at the corner of Doucett and wolbert streets it you
want to see a group of flea bitten hounds. And it's just as had at

sereral other Albrook corners.
i iahid dog. 1 hear the paper hoy

MARKSMANSHIP UNIT

Sir,
Could be I'm wrong, but it looks to me that there is some drag
ging rf feet, likewise golf clubs, regarding the Advance Marksman
ship I'nit the Commanding General has said he wants formed.
" It has always been my belief that the first objective of the Ar Army
my Army was to teach the soldier how tn use his basic weaoons effective effectively
ly effectively "and efficiently. Now th-,' our Armed Forces are being reduced
In .number it would seem that this objective woul dbe brought out
that much more.
. Or is it more important tn have tennis matches, football, or golf
games' Are golf clubs going to be carried into combat along with
baseball hats and footballs''
"All these athletics are important and have their place, but 1 do
think that first things should come first.
An Interested Person

DAILY MEDITATION

(Presented by the Department
f Christian Education of tha
Episcopal Church In hSa Mis Missionary
sionary Missionary Diocese of the Panama
Canal Zona.)
Your Evening Bible Reading:
St. Matt. a:17 M Saint Michael
and All Angels.
HEROD AND JOHN
''For Horod foarod John, know knowing
ing knowing that ho wjs a ust man
and an holy.".
Do not confuse this king with
Herod the Great who had reigned
(under Roman supervision) when
Jesus was born. After Herod the
Great died in 4 B.C. his kingdom
WM broken up
During Jesus' ministry the great

$ t SO
IS 00
14 00
ASSISNMtNT
tn get a house in the Zone For
a house tn suit my station but
have a cottage in a month. I've
atrial
vn.i hv. In lnn vnr i-tr In alt
:
Soon some child will set Ditten ry
gets chased regular'y.
Not Funny
central of Palestine had no king
but was governed by a Roman
named Pontius Pilate. A section
to Ihe north east was under a king
named Philip. Herod Antipas was
Philip's brother, and his domain
included Galilee and 1 small strip
easl of the Jordan where John was
baptizing
Herod Antipas had stolen his
brother's wife. The Gospels say
that John bad strongly condemn
ed him for this, and that was why
John was imprisoned.
Josephus, the great Jewish his
lorain, gives another reason.
Herod Animas was afraid John
would excite the people loo much
and that there might be rlolin'.
Roth reasons may well have
moved the king.

' TO
t 0
1 50

Labor News
And
Comments

By VICTOR RIESIL
SAN FRANCISCO H-dden deep
in Hie documents of labor's giam
skuh session here is the clue to
the strategy of their pUe-dnving
campaign 10 place a trusted poli political
tical political lnend in the White House
next year. In s mass concentra concentration
tion concentration of the nation's labor leaders
win aemand a Dept. ot Justice
investigation of all political spend spending
ing spending by uiousands ol ousiness nrms
on industry's new national pol.t
ical machine.
This would mean an FBI probe
of such corporations as General
Electric most politically active
oi all firms in the land Guif
Oil, Sears Roebuck, Johnson and
Jonnson, Standard Oil and F. W.
Woolworth. These compan.es are
among others specifically men
tioneci in a special report prepar prepared
ed prepared for ihe AFL-CIO's third cons
i titutional convention by such na
tionai leaders as George Meany,
Wiiliam Schnitzler, Jim Carey
and Walter Reuthcr.
The special report, revealing
labor s concern over the sudden
success of Industry's competing
national political operation, says:
" Tha American labor
mavemant will also poopoia vig vigorously
orously vigorously tha usa at corporate
fundi In an illegal manner in
he new political adventures
proposed by management. This
includes the use of tax-exempt
funds for political advertising,
as has already been dona by
General Electric. And it is to
be hoped tha Dept. of Justice
davotas as much time and at attention
tention attention to business in politics as
it has to our activities."
A GE official, reached by this
column, said simply that ail was
strictly within the law and he re returned
turned returned thai labor's political ma machine,
chine, machine, known as COPE, used mil millions
lions millions of dollars of union dues cam cam-pa
pa cam-pa gning for .national officials. He
pointed to the salaries paid to
union leaders and the office, auto
and other expenses which were
poured out during campaigns.
Other industry spokesmen at
the Chamber oi Commerce and
the National Assn. of Manufactur Manufacturers,
ers, Manufacturers, which have little known poli political
tical political departments, told Ih s re reporter
porter reporter that Ihe labor push lor a
Dept. of Justice probe was an ef effort
fort effort lo frighten the businessmen
out of compeling with the AFL AFL-CIO's
CIO's AFL-CIO's Committee on Political E E-ducation.
ducation. E-ducation. A GE official reported he be believes
lieves believes that many induslr.alists
now think they have lie formula
for successful political action out
side both parties a tactic first
used by the stormy CIO Political
Action Committee, lannrhen hv
! Sidney Hillman.
j Businessmen and Cose trained
hi me special husinesc nnimai
courses have already begun to
defeat candidates backed bv la labor.
bor. labor. The AFLCIO report here re-1
fers to the first such business
victories. They occurred recently
in towns in the suburbs of Syra Syracuse,
cuse, Syracuse, New York ndustries' pi pilot
lot pilot political area. William Jo:w
son, elitor of Ihe General Electric
News, circulating among 15,000
GE employes there each week
was elected a town trustee, for
example. This is the equivalent
of a city council member. This is
the fore-runner of scores of o.her
direct labor management battles
right on the political line next No
vember.
With Tovarisrh Khrushchev Khrushchev-romping
romping Khrushchev-romping all over Ihe country, this
development will he little not ced
here That's how it was when Hil Hil-Iman's
Iman's Hil-Iman's Political Action fftm m it
tee was launched in 1943. But this
political move by the AFLCIO
convention and the recognit on of
.......... '."f "" Pr'
uii&iness s direct uimn nln
piuic one. of the
big stories of
has disturbed labor's politcal
strategists, who began meeting
eie juesoay afternoon, is the
npaign ior the city common
council in the Syracuse area of a
oanKer, ii. iewcomb Sleuart Jr
He is with the First Trust and
Deposit Co., according to records
here. Th s is the first bank in the
! n"i seminar for busines-
i-n s practical politics." This
pieaoing tnroughout the U.S.
V ould frustrate the angry labor
leaders' effort to punish both Re
yuuncans and Democrats who
passed the new labor reform act.
The businessmen o p t r a f a
their practical politics inside
Hn portios. By bolstering the
more conservative elements in
the Democratic Party, business businessman
man businessman could cut heavily into la labor's
bor's labor's Influence at tha Democrat Democratic
ic Democratic National Nominating Con van.
tion.
At thai parley down in Los An
ge es next year, the labor leaders
will try to get one of their close
friends nominated and at the
moment Missouri's Sen. S t u a r 1
Symington leads all the rest in
support in labor's private sane sane-tus
tus sane-tus in hotel suites here. Sen. Sym Symington's
ington's Symington's champion and promoter
here is the influential Railway
Clerks leader George Harrison,
lormer delegate to the UN. He is
close to Harry Truman. The two
have ,a( with Symington and dis discussed
cussed discussed strategy.
Harrison has told Mr. Truman
and the .Senator he believes th
powerful labor delegation would
be for the M ssounan at the July
convention. There are some dif
ferences on this "support here. But
one thing is certain. If the indus industry
try industry people come in with a strini
of successful local victories over
lahor endorsed candidates, the
union people may tnd themaelve
wnn no real friend on the nation
al ticket.
VICE KING DIES
LINGL'AuLv, ... Sicily (UPI)
Former London vice king Car
melo Messina died in exile in this
little village on the slopes of the
Volcano Etna. He was 44. Carmelo
Messina was deporied from Brit
ain lo Italy last March.

Mr. Bohlen, Please Come Down to the
Chart room"

Walter Winthell In

GIVE MY REGARDS TO
BROADWAY
George M. Cohan stands in the
valley of light. His statue in the
heart of Broadway gives a touch touch-of
of touch-of beauty and dignity la the Big
Street. He is home again a a-mong
mong a-mong the Main Stem constellation
where he functioned as one ol the
biggest and brightest stars. .
While strolling through Central
Park he once observed: "Look at
that Fifth Avenue skyline. When
I started walking here twenty five
years ago those buildings weren't
there. Funny thing, life stone
goes up, men go down." And now
he has been immortalized in stone.
Nevertheless, his rock image is
not as enduring as his .creative
efforts. Such lilts as "Over There
and "Give My Regards to. Broad
way" are more durable than gra granite.
nite. granite. Although he was one of Broad Broadway's
way's Broadway's titans gold and glory never
gave him the satisfaction of
striving to gain them. He frequent
ly confessed that the only type of
theatre life he really loved was
the one-night stand in small towns.
The greater part of his autobio autobiography
graphy autobiography is devoted to fond recol recollections
lections recollections of the small-time circuits.
Success is never as exciting as
the desire for it,
Cohan insisted that his success
as a showman was the result of
his experience in vaudeville. "1
learned," he said, "by playing one one-night
night one-night stands. Those broken down
theatres were my university."
Of course, Vaude U. was a ri
gorous university. It demanded a
great deal but it gave a great
oeal to those willing to learn.
Cohan once pointed out: "As a
kid in vaudeville I was often on
the same bill with a hoofer that
I thought was the best in the
world, so I spent all my time
trying to match him. It was the
same way with songwritin" play-
wrighting and acting there was
always somebody a lot better than
I and I worked to close up the
gap. My notion is that the guy
who thinks he's tops isn't going
to do much climbing."
Vaudeville also offered a me memorable
morable memorable lesson in humility. Conan
often told this story: When he was
a youngster in vaudeville he fin finished
ished finished his work on Saturday even
ing and breathlessly opened his
pay envelope. He didn't always
know what the management was
going to pay him. Cohan discover discovered
ed discovered six dollars. "It's a raw deal,"
he groaned. "Albee said !.e would
give me what I was worth, and
he hands me six dollars."
Another performer on the bill
who heard the squawk wasn't sym
pathetic. His withering inquiry:
"What's the extra dollar for?"
For several decades Cohan was
the most beloved figure in show
business. He had dignity, respect
and that indefinable quality called
class. Nevertheless, he was stab
bed by ingratitude. .Of course,
fame creates dangerous illusions.
Luminaries frequently mistake no
pularity for friendship. They ex
pect their devotion to Ihe public
lo be returned in the form of in
dividual affection. And many ev eventually
entually eventually learn, as Jimmy Walker
said, that cheers have brief e e-choes.
choes. e-choes. .George M. Cohan (lis
covered that fact during the ac actors
tors actors strike. He was a producer
then and he stepped into the role
of an actor who joined the picket
line. The consequences broke
his hearl. There were adlines
and recriminations. Many of his
best false friends turned against
him.
A Variety edilorul summed up
the story: "George M. Cohan, ui
Ltil, the Equity strike broke, was
on a pedestal second to none, ine
old-timers loved him And the new
timers admired him because the
old-timers educated them. .Three

v V

" v. V
weeks ago, if someone put Cohan
on the pan to the average show showman,
man, showman, he either went away with a
good bawling out or a busted face.
But the stike came along. The
very fellows whom he helped, the
very fellows who called him
Georgie (and bragged about know
ihg him when he was a chump
kiu ), the very fellows wno often
had only Cohan between them and
the morning pork chops, started
to call him names at the top of
their voices."
Cohan sought to forgive many
of the ingratcs but he never real really
ly really forgot. In the sunset years,
while recalling the bitter experi experience,
ence, experience, he noted: "It has been said
that gratitude has a short memo memory.
ry. memory. Ingratitude, however, leaves
a lasting momory."
Cohan's success as a showman
is graphically illustrated by the
following: During one year his
royalties (on plays, sketches and
songs) exceeded one million dol dollars.
lars. dollars. And during that period, folks,
taxes were practically zero. Na Naturally,
turally, Naturally, he made mistakes. And
he was quick to admit them. For
example, he spurned opportunities
lo soonsor such massive clicks
as "Broadway," "Peg 0' My
Heart" and many others.
The most accurate size-up of
Cohan's genius was made by col colleague
league colleague William Collier: "He is
not' the best frctor or author or
composer or dancer or playwright.
But he can dance better than any
author, write better than aiiy ac actor,
tor, actor, compose better than any
manager and manage better than
any other playwrignt. That
nwes him a very great man."

Peace Jitters
By INEZ ROBB

The cosmic thinkers keep re re-minuing
minuing re-minuing us that 20ui-Century man
.s evenastingly confronted with a
ser.es oi impossible choices.
At times, it isn't even certain
that man has any choice. At the
moment, man is faced with the
possib.lity I'm not certain he has
much choice of being (1) rich and
dead or (2) al.ve and broke.
At this writing, Wall Street is
agitated by what its specialists
keep referring to as "the peace
jitters," incident to the visit oi
President Eisenhower and Pre Premier
mier Premier Khrushchev.
The Street has been enjoying a
number of sinking spells, not help helped
ed helped by the raise ot the prime rate
of bank loans from 4Vi to 5 per percent.
cent. percent. (For a despotic, ruthless in institution
stitution institution that, in Communist eyes,
rules the American people, Wall
Street is certainly a delicate,
shrinking flower that droops on
even a hint of "bad" news.)
The financial community seems
to believe that if peace breaks out,
Ihe bacon is out the window and
defense contractors up the flue.
Defense now pours some i40,000, i40,000,-000,000
000,000 i40,000,-000,000 annually into the nation's
economy. While that amounts to ?
little less than 10 percent of the
gross national product (1 love the
sound of these phrases coming trip trippingly
pingly trippingly off the Underwood!), n
is, still and all, the cream in our
coffee.
The sudden advent of peace
would force a great deal of un
employment while the nation's eco economy
nomy economy turned around, the experts
say, ana reaajusiea linen io j
world that could foreago arma
emnts and tranquilizers.
The sacred American slandar.)
of living would contract temporar
ily, and a new every year nvgh'
be out of the question for a while.
On the other hand, or alterna
live, the Congressional Joint Com
mittea on Atomic Energy has just

Vv 0

NEA Se'mct, lac. J
'
New York
Nothing is as impenetrable as
the mystery that makes songs suc successful.
cessful. successful. Each composer's work,
however, is motivated by a fun fundamental,
damental, fundamental, sytle. He composed the
rousing "Over There" in a half half-hour.
hour. half-hour. Hie wrote it to fulfill Nora
Bayes' request for a patriotic tune
to sing at a Liberty Loan rally.
Cohan tinkled the piano keys ex experimentally,
perimentally, experimentally, hit the three-note
bugle call, swiftly inscribed lyrics
and that was it.
Whe he was honored for writing
the great war song he modestly
explained: "All 1 wrote was a
bugle call."
Although he was Broadway's
brightest light for many years
Cohan failed to cateh fire in-'Iol-lywood.
After a brief, unhappy
fling before the Movieville came cameras,
ras, cameras, he vowed never to return.
"If I had my choice between Hol Hollywood
lywood Hollywood and Atlanta," he stated,
"I'd take Leavenworth." Ironic Ironically,
ally, Ironically, one of the greatest flickers
ever produced, "Yankee Doodle
Dandy," was based on Cohan's
life.
Despite his immense success
Cohan was constantly nagged by
a sense of inferiority. He scorned
himself as "an ignorant little guy,"
and was hurt and bewildered by
alleged sohpisticates who dismiss
ed his works as corny, in a
very real sense he never recon
ciled himself to the impressive
public image of George M. Cohan
It took him twenty years to be become
come become a Broadway star. And he
knew what sparklers always learn.
Stars, who represent the royalty
of show business, discover that the
reported that in case of surprise
nuclear attack on the United
States, 50,000,000 of us would find
ourselves stone dead as the after
math, and 20,000,000 more ot us
would be ser.ously injured.
Furthermore, 50 percent of all
American dwellings would be de
stroyed or made unusable for long
periods.
It occurs to me that if we coud
have our druthers, that is, an
honorable iron-clad peace with
justice, 99.4 percent of us would
plug for peace and temporary eco economic
nomic economic hardship rather than atom atomic
ic atomic war and a sizable estate either
not worth collecting or with no
next of kin left to inherit it.
If the burden of war could be
lifted from the minds and backs
mankind, the struggle to accom accom-mode
mode accom-mode the world's economy to peace
and plenty, no matter what the In Interim
terim Interim turmoil, would be a small
price to pay.
But, I don't think we Americans
are going to have to make any
such choices.
The Eisenhower-Khrushchev con
versations could be the beginning
of the lessening of world tensions.
But suspicions on both sides are
so (deeply ingrained that neither of
us is going to liwer his guard,
either suddenly or drastically.
1 don't say that 50,000,000 of us
are going to be blotted out in an
atomic war.
But if and when peace comet its
process will probably be slow and
almost Imperceptible, and peoples
and nations will adjust to it the
same way.
There isn't an American alive,
in one woman's opinion, who
wouldn't prefer peace and a figur-
itive crust while the world ab-
;orbed the shock.
But the crust isnt visible on the
lorizm.. And the current peace
fantods in Wall Street prove again
what a Nervous Nellie rather than
Nero the old gal is.

riie
fin

MERRY-GO-ROUND
--i a. DMBMf HaMnu

WASHINGTON, Explaining t;
famous remark, "We wdj bui.
you," before the National Pre.
Cluo, Nikuta Khrushchev content
ed that feudalism gave way to tii tii-oetter
oetter tii-oetter system of capitalism, ani
capitalism then gave way to the
Deiter system of communism. He
also advised American newsmen
"You should read as well as
write."
I followed Khrushchev's advice.
I went out and read the "Com "Communist
munist "Communist Manifesto" published in
1848 by Karl Marx in collabora collaboration
tion collaboration with Friednch Engels, both
of whom Khrushchev quoted and
both regarded as the fathers of
communism.
Their "Communist Manifesto"
isthe bible of communism.
The manifesto is about the same
length as tne Republican party
platform, -and reading it convinc convinced
ed convinced me that Mr. K. is all wet.
In the first place, the Unitec
States has already adopted the
majority of Marx's maniiesto. In
the second place, Khrushchev, on
one vital point, has become a de deserter
serter deserter to the Marxian theory.
Marx taught that the proletar proletarian!
ian! proletarian! could not emancipate itself
except by breaking all the chains
of bondage, by reconstituting the
whole of constituted society. "The
day of German resurrection will
be announced by the crowing of
the Gallican cock," he proclaim proclaimed.
ed. proclaimed. Mr. K however has become a
traitor to Marx. He announced
that communism and capitalism
would "compete." He deserted
the Marxian doctrine of revolu revolution.
tion. revolution. If the capitalistic system is
able to give people more than the
communistic system, he said, "I
will be the first to come to you
and ask you for a job for which
I am fitted.
This statement should make
Karl Marx turn over in his grave.
A comparison of the Communist
Manifesto with the way the Unit United
ed United States has followed it would
also make many stanch Repub
licans of the 1900's turn over in
their graves.
And it might give present-day
Republicans political ammunition
against the Democrats who in incorporated
corporated incorporated most of the manifes manifesto's
to's manifesto's main points into law except
for one thing. The present Repub Republicans
licans Republicans administration has contin continued
ued continued these reforms.
Here are the 10 points of Marx's
Communist Manifesto and how we
have or have not followed it.
1. Expropriation Of Landed
Property and The Use of Land
Rents to Defray State Education
No feudalist state over existed
in the United States, so no land
has been expropriated until re recently
cently recently to build highways, hydro hydro-olectric
olectric hydro-olectric projects, and civic im improvements.
provements. improvements. However, most state
colleges get their revenue from
the leasing of government -owned
land, as Marx advocated; while
Texas follows the Marxian doc doctrine
trine doctrine by using revenue from tide tide-lands
lands tide-lands oil for its schools.
crown is as much of a burden
as it is an accolade. Many hills
must be surmounted before the
heights are scaled. The numerous
qualities essential to stardom
are difficult to define. But one
fact is clear: Stardom is never
easy to achieve or retain. .After
he clicked on Broadway, he was
congratulated by friends. Cohan
thanked them and intoned: "This
is Heaven, but I went through Hell
to get here."
George M. Cohan stands in the
valley of light. .It's good to
know he is again starring
Broadway.
on
HERE COME THE BRIDES
NEW YORK, (UPD During the
next 10 years there will be more
than 25 million new brides in A A-merica,
merica, A-merica, reports the Bridal Fasn Fasn-ion
ion Fasn-ion Council. The prediction is bas based
ed based on birth statistics from 1940 io
the present.
ACROSS
1 spaniel
dot;
11 Made a speech
7,Chill fog
(var.)
8 Heroic
9 Feminine
appellation
13 Faitenmr io Nuisance
device u Small
14 Deduction depressions
lSHaiards 13 Celerity
1 Numbers (ab.) jg Juana,
17 Bury Mexico
It Feline animal jo Manifest
20 Long suffering 2i violent dread
22 Ancient Irish
22 High in
stature
23 Wings
24 Cosmic order
27 Darling
28 Indolent
capital
23 Sorrowful
Jfl Redact
30 Dismounted
31 Interpret
32 Tardy
33 Chest rattle
34 Lank
35 Youn dof
3 Native metali
39 Clydesdale
42 Paid notices
45 French annual
income
46 Goddess of
. the dawn
49 Lariats
81 Fawn
63 Fondle
54 Deter
53 Slip
M Worms
DOWN
1 Tattered
2 Martian
(comb, form)
3 Little flapa
4 Greek letter
; (Anatomical
networks
(Austere

A Dog's Life

Washington

2. A Vigorously Graduated Irv r
ame Tax Our income taxes arg
raduated up to 91 per cent. Sov-
ct Russia's go up to only 13 per
ent.
3. Abolition of Tha Right of
.nheritance American estates a a-ove
ove a-ove $66,000, with some excep exceptions,
tions, exceptions, are subjected to a graduat graduated
ed graduated inheritance tax, going up to 77
.jer' cent. Soviet inheritance tax taxes
es taxes are piddling in comparison.
4. Confiscation of Property Of
All Emigres and Rebols This re refers
fers refers to the flight of royalty and
aristocrats from European coun countries.
tries. countries. No such flights have taken
place from the United States. On
the contrary we have become a
haven for refugees.
5. Centralization of Credit In
The Hands of The State Credit
has long been loosely centralized
under the Federal Reserve Banks.
It was much more tightly central centralized
ized centralized during 'the Roosevelt and
Truman administrations. All bank
accounts in banks participating in
Federal Deposit Insurance art
also guaranteed up to $10,009
which probably goes uch fur further
ther further than Marx ever dreamed.
4. Centralixation. of Tha Meant
of Transport In Tha Hands of Tha
State All transport in the USA
rail, water, air, highway ii
regulated by federal agencies.
Some cities, such as New York,
own their own subways and tran transit
sit transit lines.
7. Increase of National Factor
ios and Moans of Production, Cut
tivation of Uncultivated Land, tni
Improvement of Cultivated Lane
The Soil Bank, first proposes
by Henry Wallace, sometimes con considered
sidered considered socialistic, has taken land
cut of cultivation and therefore
run counter to Marx. The TVA,
Bonneville Dam, Grand Coulee,
the Panama Canal, and Navy-Interior
Department ownership oi
oil lands go along with Marx.
I. Universal and Equal Obliga Obligation
tion Obligation to Work; Organisation of In Industrial
dustrial Industrial Armies Especially for Ag-

riculture This was aimed at tha
then large idle claM in Europe.
The desire to work is the general
fact, rather than the exception is
this country. Gov. Nelson Rock Rockefeller
efeller Rockefeller of New York, not exactly
a Socialist, recently proposed a
youth army to work in rural a a-reas;
reas; a-reas; while the Senate last month
passed a bill reinstating the Youth
Conservation' Corps. Armies for
agriculture are organized ever
summer in the south to harvest
crops in the north, and Secretary
of Labor Mitchell recently closed
a California camp because it was
unsanitary.
9. Agriculture And Urban In Industry
dustry Industry to Work Hand-in-Hand So
At, To Obliterate The Distinction,
Between Them TV, radio, graft!
roads, the automobile, motion
pictures, have practically wiped
out differences between our rural
and city populations. Mechaniza Mechanization
tion Mechanization has also changed the percent,
age of farm population from
around 50 per cent in the 1900'i
to around 17 per cent today. Main
Street and Fifth Ave. now think,
dress, speak and act alike..
10. Public Education of All
Children; Abolition of Factory
Work For Children; Education
and Material Production To Bo
Combined Free public schools,
with compulsory attendance, have
been the fact in the USA for over
a century. Child labor laws hav
outlawed work by children. There)
are vocational high schools in all
industrial states.
In addition, this country ha$
gone far beyond Marx's manifest
in providing old age pensions,
workmen's compensation unem unemployment
ployment unemployment insurance, protection of
workers against industrial haz hazards.
ards. hazards. All this has come about, by
peaceful evolution, not the violent
revolution advocated by Karl
Marx. And while some Americans
don't agree' with all of this pro program,
gram, program, it has been voted by major majority
ity majority rule, so they abide by it.
Maybe Nikita should have ap applied
plied applied for that job before he went
home.
Answer to Previous Puiilt
I,.. I l Ii I, I'
s
PA
m
m
IRK
WW
m
1
29 Golf mounds
35 Iron
46 Concludes
47 Curved Curved-molding
molding Curved-molding 48 Weights of
India
50 Scatter,
as hay
52 Insurance-
(ab.)
36 Footed vase
37 Tar
40 Expunge
41 Weird
42 Circle parts
43 Transaction
44 Hindu robe

I Z h Ii 1 I l 7 8 1 H
i? F
Ir11 "IrJT
r- iliilfi
p ppjj u
A
1 1 1 11 nl 1 I u



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 195

TKZ PANAMA AMERICAN AH DfDVFCNDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PA01 TMRII
Watch Tower Socie!
To Hold Four-Day
District Assembly
LANCOME

Si"' "1 v )J ) i ,. If; ; 'I
.Jp II
t """ M I I )
It? ; J 1 jJ fi 1

ARTILLERYMEN RECEIVE CERTIFICATES US Armed Forces Institute high school equivalency certificates were presented to men of A Battery, 4th Gun
Battalion, 517th Artillery, Fort Davis, who successfully completed studies and tests which qualified them for the award. Pictured standing, left to right,
are 1st Lt. Frank R. Shinn III, platoon leader who made the presentations, Sgt. Wayne Smith, Sp-4 Carlos Perez, Pfc. Edwin A. Os, Pfc. Buddie Brltton,
Sp-5 Guy S. Trask, Sgt. Roberto Negron and Sfc. Richard P. Weir. Front row, Pfc. Villarin Hernandez, Pfc. Herbert Lacy, Pfc. Homer B. McCoy, Pfc. Brent
L. Crawford, Pfc. Wayne R. Bprch, Pfc. Richard J. Elllstad and Sp-4 Jimmie Bass. (S Army Photo)

The Watch Tower Bible ind
j ract Society will sponsor a four
day distri'' assembly in Panama
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and
Sunday. The convention will be
held in the Kingdom Hali, El Can- 1
giijo. and is for the purpose of j
Sible instruction and concentrated
spel-preaching in this area, i
:pokesm-n for the group an- j
nounced tooay.
Opening Thursday evening at i
1:50 p.m. the assembly will con
Urue throuph Friday, Saturday,
and Sunday with morning and
(venine sessions of Bible talks,

disf-ussions and demonstrations to

which the public are welcome. A

baptismal ceremony will take
(iace on Saturday morning 9 a.m. j
There new min'sters who have
dedicated their lives to Jehovah i
Will be immersed. j
A. V. Rnper, supervisor for the
Wrtch Tower Society's branch in
Panama will be the featured

sneaker of the event. His topic,
'When Go1 Speaks Peace To All
Nations" will be given world wide.

This talk will be delivered on Sun

day at 7 p.m. and will climax the
assembly.
Delegates from all parts of the
republic including the Canal Zone
will attend.

TRACES ALCOHOLISM
SALEM, Va. (UPI)-Dr. Albert
J. Russo, medical director of Sa Salem's
lem's Salem's White Cross Hospital for
Alcoholics, puts much of the
blame for alcoholism on parents
who do not let children "accept
the challenges of day-to-day liv living."
ing." living." Talks with 13,000 alcoholics,
he said, have made it plain that
most of them apparently missed
"the adventure of self-reliance."

Algerian Rebels

Announce Readiness

To Negotiate
TUNIS. Tunisia (UPI) The

Algerian rebel government-in-exile

announced yesterday us readiness
to negotiate with France on con
ditions for an "immediate" peace
in "revolt-torn Algeria.
The rebel "provisional govern government,"
ment," government," in a formal statement is issued
sued issued here, declared it was pre-

Dared to begin talks with the

French on a cease-fire and Presi

dent Charles de Gaulle's offer of

Algerian self-determination.
The rebel statement specified,
however, that political as well as
military conditions should be is is-cussed
cussed is-cussed in any talks to end the
bloody five-year-old revolt in Al Al-sefia.
sefia. Al-sefia. '.

tt Thi offer was contained in a

statement read to a news confer conference
ence conference here by rebel "premier"
Ferhat Abbas in response to the
dramatic Algerian peace plan out outlined
lined outlined 12 days ago by De Gaulle.
Abbas read the rebel statement

and foreign newsmen in the Ma Majestic
jestic Majestic Hotel in downtown Tunis.
The rebels had announced be beforehand
forehand beforehand that they would answer
no questions 'following the reading
of the statement. Their idea was
that French and world judgment
on their reply should be based
strictly on the words of the statement.

ON HER UPPERS
BUFFALO, N. Y. (UPI) The
Citizens Advisory Award Com Committee
mittee Committee included the price of an
upper denture, which a woman
lost during a flood, in its reha rehabilitation
bilitation rehabilitation award to her family.

NEW FISCAL AND DISBURS DISBURSING
ING DISBURSING OFFICER at the Rodman
Naval Station is Lt. George V.
Zeberlein of Baltimore. Md. The
Navy's new paymaster is a 1954
graduate of the Naval Academy.
He came here from the U.S. Na Naval
val Naval Ordnance Supply Office at
Mechanicsburg, Pa. A graduate
of the Navy's Supply Corps
School, he has logged duty a a-board
board a-board the destroyer Hyman as
supply officer. He and his wife
Joan have two girls, Pat, 4, and.
Pam, IVi, and a son, Tom, 16
months.

Norfolk Cheers As Venturesome Crew
Raises, Tows In Oil Tanker's Stern

o

NORFOLK, Va. (UPI)- Eight
men who risked their lives to
salvage a stricken oil tanker the
experts said couldn't be saved,
prepared today to negotiate the
sale of their prize for a sum ol
up to two million dollars.
The hulk of the once proud 21,-000-ton
"African Queen,, aban abandoned
doned abandoned by its owners after it hit
a shoal and split in two off Ocean
City, Md.. last December, was
towed into Norfolk Harbor early
yesterday after a painfully slow
UO-rhile journey that lasted al almost
most almost 54 hours.

Teamsters Union
Maps Bigtime Plan
On Political Front

WASHINGTON, Sept; 29 (UPI)
Leaders of the Teamsters Union
were reported ready today to ap approve
prove approve a new, multi-million dollar
political action program to light
their congressional enemies at the
polls.
The program was one of a num number
ber number of issues listed for discussion
at the fall meeting of the union's
general executive board starting
this afternoon.
It envisions a national political
fund of from one to two million
dollars, volunteered by rank- and and-fie
fie and-fie members, for lobbying and

election campaign contributions.
Similar funds would be estab established
lished established at the state and local level
by Teamsters' locals and joint
councils.
The anticipated plunge Into poli politics
tics politics was a reaction to the stiff
new labor reform law approved
by Congress ovtr the bitter op opposition
position opposition of Teamsters' President
James R. Hoffa.
In other sessions, 30 lawyers
were scheduled to tell the Teams Teamsters'
ters' Teamsters' high command what they
must do and what they can't do
under terms of the new law.

The venturesome am ateurs,
who boarded the vessel after
others had tried and failed to
raise it, unfurled an Amerku
flag as their vessel entered Nor
folk Harbor.
Hundreds ot persons lined the
shore and honked car horns as the
crippled vessel, soaked wih oil
and filth, loomed into sight.
Thus ended a stranger-thah-fic-tion
episode, which had claimed
one man's life.
After the tanker went down with
its cargo of oil, Paul Brady and
Lloyd Deir of Suffolk, Va. and
Belden Little of Holland, Va
boarded it with oWminc ...--j ,j

off other would-be salvagers and

wound uie vessel s 4w-ioot stern
section as theirs under interna international
tional international law.
Another waterman had tried to
salvage the vessel's bow section,
but lost his life in he process
The trio hired five men to help
them, promised them a $1 000
bonus if the vessel came in, then
spent months trying to raise the
"Queen." They finally got it afloat
last Mnnriav an1 hiJ n ..-j

j IInu n unuer iuw
Thursday.
But as the tugboat Mary L. Mc McAllister,
Allister, McAllister, a Coast Guard cutter es-

tun., dim we wounded "Queen"

J?lk- Hurricane Grace bad turned

juuiuey inio a race against
time.

Rockefeller's Trip
To See Classmates
Looks Like Politics

CONCORD, N. H. (UPI)-Ne1.-son
Rockefeller's "non-political"
weekend trip to New Hampshire
and Vermont left observers today
with the distinct feeling that he
has decided to enter the presi presidential
dential presidential race.
The New York governor met
with GOP groups here, in Han Hanover
over Hanover and in Woodstock, Vt., Sun Sunday
day Sunday in a windup to his trip which
he said was made primarily to
see his old Dartmouth classmates
at a reunion Saturday.
The governor did visit with his
classmates, soma of whom are
reportedly among the group de demanding
manding demanding that he rim -for the Re Republican
publican Republican presidential nomination
in 1960.
It would be hard to believe that
the governor was entertaining no
political ambitions beyond the
state of New York. From the
time he bounced off a plane to
the blare of a brass band until
the minute he left, there was a
grin for all, a handshake for
every adult within reach, and
numerous pats on the heads of
little children.
A prepared statement said,
"The governor indicated, as he
has done on so many previous
occasions, that until his legislative
program is completed for n e x t
year, it would not be possible for
him to .determine his future politi political
cal political COUTM.",

Only Guest flies non-stop to
RflEXICO CBTY

jlif

Only

6 hours
in non-stop

Comfort

n7&

west

THE ROUTE OF THE SUN
for md .rvoftoo. ... yow .gM(.
OuMt Atrovlm Mexico, corner of Jmlo AroMmtna Avenue and 12 Street
Vallarino Bulldinf Boa 7334 Tel. 1-036

Altamira Readies
For Pre-Halloween
Dance Saturday
Interest mounted dnrin? the

week for the "Pre-IIaloween Gra Gratification
tification Gratification Dance" ulateri for tho

Jarding Vina del Mar in San

rrancisco de la Caleta Saturday
evening ax the dims tn the Pliih

Altamira anniversary celebration.
The event, or which a slight
chfUfce will be made for those

who did not attend the recent sev

- unu, 1 ana-
ma Hilton Hotel. i slated to PAt

underway at 9 p.m. featuring Al

iviamn ana nis comDo anrt tho

Jets.

The DTe-Ha klnwppn ouont lc niu

of the feature of Club Altamira in
entertaining its large following of

supparcers.

SATINA CARRIES YOU SMOOTHLY

THRU THE IRONING HOUR I

Sotino

Iht BIO honing

eld In th littU box,

ACT NOW!!
The first twenty-one exciting new

are leaving New York just before the
crippling dock strike.
STAKE YOUR CLAIM NOW!
Come see us today or tomorrow for guaranteed
early October Canal Zone delivery.
Your friendly FORD dealer

QJMKI

TEL. 2-0625

7

IZj

The French have
a word for it...
"NATURAL BEAUTY"
Discover the secret of a neic and youtK youtK-ful
ful youtK-ful complexion... the soft radiance of a
smooth skin. Discover "Natural Beauty
for a lovelier you.
L'ANCOME formula ronmetics are care carefully
fully carefully prepared to five you the subtle,
natural glow you want In your complexion.
Beautify with LANCOME creams, base
make-ups, powders and lipsticks.
Use LANCOME "NUTRIX" (illustrated

young skin tone and reduces dryness. Just

o little every other night and your skin Is
abundant with youthful loveliness.
MADEMOISELLE EMILIE R. DE LYONS
Expert Beautician from LANCOME'S Paria Beauty
Salon will be available for free consultations:

PANAMA CITY
Felix B. Maduro
Main Store A
Branch Store
Alda's
Tony's Beauty Salon
Bruno's Beautv Parlor
COLON
I. L. Maduro, Jr.

DAVID
Carmen Luz
Beauty Salon
Gonzalez Revilla
Drug Store
CHITRE
Almacen Rosita

FXCI llSfVE DISTRIBUTORS



FAS I F0U1

TBI PANAMA AMIKICA AN IKDEPXKDKNT DAILY KIWIPATSB
TUESDAY, 8EFTEMBZ1 29, 1959

Social and Other

NEWS OF ENS AG CM EN TS, MARRIAGES, BIRTHS, PARTIES AND TRAVEL SHOULD BE MAILED
PROMPTLY TO BOX-NUMBER SHOWN. IT WiLL EE RECEIVED BY TELEPHONE OVER
PANAMA 2-0740 OR 2-0741 BETWEEN 8 00 AND 10 A.M. ONL.

PANAMA'S AMBASADOR TO HOLY SEE FETED
AT DINNER PARTY B YMR. AND MRS. MOTTA
! Panama's Ambassador to the Holy See, Adolfo Arias, and
Mrs. Arias were guests of honor at dinner party last evening.
The event was boated by Mr. and Mrs. Arturo Motta at their
residence.

Mow Officers Slated
For Naval '0' Wives
The slate of ne officers was
presented to the membership of
the Naval Officers Wives Club
during a partv Friday evening at
the Rodman Officers Club.
Named for the presidency were
Noreen Jones and Dorothy Cunha;
Olga Draper and Mildred Fox,
vice president; Marge Sottak and
Tina Staub recording secretary;
Carol Ann Walker and Rosemary
Reynolds, corresponding secreta secretary;
ry; secretary; Joan Zeberlein and Jane Hal Hal-lisey,
lisey, Hal-lisey, treasurer.
The par'v was attended by 131
members, 'husbands and guests.
The event was arranged by Mary
Eastwood. Bert Wade and Noreen
Jones.
Pedro Miguel Assembly
Of Rainbow For Girls
Plans Public Installation
Pedro Miguel Assembly Three.
Order of Rainbow for Girls, will
have a public installation of offic officers
ers officers Saturday evening at 7:30 st
th? Ancon Masonic Temple.
Miss Diana Hoenke of Lo Rios
will be installed as worthy advisor
and Miss Danielle Harned will be
the installing officer.
Balboa YMCA Announces
Plans For Coming Weok
Tomorrow evening the weekly
dance at the BsIdos Armed Serv Service.
ice. Service. YMCA will feature Ross Cun Cunningham
ningham Cunningham as caller. Members of
the Girls Service Organization will
be hostesses and refreshments
will be served.
All square dance enthusiasts, ex experts
perts experts or novices, are invited to
participate in the free evening's
entertainment.
AFTER EVERY
DIAPER CHANGt
I'se Mexana and
see how happily
your baby plays
...free from
prickly heat
and Irritable
diaper rash.
Medicated Powder
Ifl m
Your

n, mm M
5 I'fj t

COKI FLOAT I NOTHING HTTIR FOR A DILICIOUJ,
REFRESHING LIFT I THE WONDERFUL COMBINATION
OF TWO TERRIFIC TASTI FAVORITES COCA COLA
AND A SCOOP OF ICE CREAM! ORDER "COKI
FLOAT" AT YOUR FAVORITE SODA FOUNTAIN .
YOU CAN MAKE IT AT HOME TOO. OUICK AS A
WINK. WHIN THI GANG GITS TOGETHER FOR A
(CSSION.

OLc Panama
Celebrating

ivi5e

The second meeting of the
Skindiving Club will be held Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. The 'Y' has
announced that the class is filled
to capacity but anyone interested
may telephone Balboa 2839 for in information
formation information on the next scheduled
class.
Expert instruction is available
each Monday and Wednesday
from 4 to 6 p.m. for men in interested
terested interested in weightligting or body
building.
Thursday evening the religious,
film and iecture series will begin
with the showing of a color movie,
"Dust or Destiny Under the
guidance of the Religious Em Emphasis
phasis Emphasis Committee, a series of
three movies and lectures by pro prominent
minent prominent clergymen and chaplains
of the area is planned Starting
time is 7:30 p.m. and admittance
is free of charge to all.
The free dances, lectures and
movie series are made possible
by donations to the United Fund
drive now being conducted The
Balboa Armed Services YMCA is
one of the 19 agencies participating
in the drive.
St. Mary's Sodality
Corporate Communion
The Altar Rosary Soda'ily of St.
Mary's Church in Balboa will
snonsor a cornonle Communion at
the 10 a.m. Mass Sunday at St.
Mary's Church.
Following the Mass. a luncheon
iv.ii be held in the Fern Room
of the Tivoli Guest House at 11:30.
luesi speaker will be .Mother
Marv Mani'ia. Moiher Superior of
'iie Mary!;noll Orler.
Ail Caiholic women arp invited
lo parlici ale in bolh the Common
on and the luncheon. Reservations
'T the luncheon must be made bv
Friday with Mrs R. E. Cox. Bal Bal-Dos
Dos Bal-Dos 1738: Mrs. W. G. Mum maw.
R.-lbon 2844: Mrs. James G.
'Irimble. Balboa 3419: Mrs. K R.
A Booth. Balhoa 1317: or Mrs.
I'. J. Aspesi. Balboa 435.
Gamboa Women's Club
To Honor Teachers
A reception for the Gamboa
school teachers will be given hy
ihe Gamboa Women's Club Thurs Thurs-r'ay
r'ay Thurs-r'ay evening at 8:15 in the Civic
(enter. Mrs. Jean Karch of the
Purposeful Activity for Handican Handican-oed
oed Handican-oed Children will be guest speak speaker.
er. speaker. The reception will be preceded
m m in!!...

choice anytime anywhere

2)

Siin of
la 1M

((wl Hot I La Company
AUTHORIZED BOTTLERS
HO Yearg of Coca-Cola in Panama

Box 134,

Y)
anama
'by the club's regular monthly
meeting at 7:30 p.m
Ci. rondo Women's Club
oHm It Tomorrow
The Curundu Women's Club will
have a coflee meeting tomorrow
1 naming at 9 in the Community
Pjilding. Hostesses for the event
I will be Mrs. Jo Therrell and Mrs.
jEva Chancey.
All members are urged to at-
end.
Balboa Woman's Club
Board Meeting Tomorrow
A board meeting of the Balboa
Woman's Club is scheduled for to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow morning at 9 at the Bal Balboa
boa Balboa USO-JEB.
Retirement Party To Pete
Opt. Perc Graham
Fire Division Capt. Perc Gra Graham,
ham, Graham, who retired last week with
more than 35 years service with
the Panama Canal Company, will
be honored Saturday evening with
a retirement party at the Fort
Amador Officers Open Mess.
Cocktails will be served at 6:30
p.m., and dinner at 7:30.
Tickets for the party are avail available
able available at any Canal Zone Fire Sta Station,
tion, Station, the Summit Golf Club or the
Balboa American Legion Club. Re Reservations
servations Reservations mav be mtde by calling
Balboa 2128.
Mt. and Mrs. Croft
To Sail For States
Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Croft Jr. of
Ancon plan to sail aboard the An An-on
on An-on October 3 for Norfolk, Va.,
lo visit relatives and vacation for
a month.
They will be staying with Mr.
Croft's elder brother. Carlton
Utoft, who lived on the Zone for
15 years before becoming a sales
representative for the Ford Mo Motor
tor Motor Company.
New 'Adventure1
Series Begins
Tonight At YMCA
A new 'Outdoor Adventure"
series will begin at the Balboa
YMCAUSO tonight, starting at
7:30.
This evening's program will be
"Columbus' Stamping Ground
the Panama Gold Coast", and will
be presented by Benneth Vinton.
In addition to his talk, Vinton
will refer to a large Panoramic
map of Panama to further Illus Illustrate
trate Illustrate his topic.
The public is invited. There is no
charge.
ld lU
ettatiS
sUrula

Scientists Proudly Display
Photo Of Earth From Space

WASHINGTON (UPI) Scien Scientists
tists Scientists yesterday proudly displayed
the first photograph ever taken
of the earth from space.
The admittedly crude picture
was taken by a television camera
aboard Explorer VI. the Paddle Paddle-wheel
wheel Paddle-wheel satellite, at an altitude of
19,550 statute miles and a dis distance
tance distance of 23,000 miles from the
scene photographed.
Scientists and officials of the
National Aeronautics Jc Space Ad Administration
ministration Administration (NASA) said the pic picture,
ture, picture, covering a broad crescsnt crescsnt-shaped
shaped crescsnt-shaped area of the central Pa Pacific,
cific, Pacific, proved the feasibility of TV
exploration of the moon and
planets.
Space experts also reported at
an Nasa news conference that:
The 142 pound satellite
launched Aug. 7 has discovered a
new, narrow region of highly pen penetrating
etrating penetrating particles fairly close to
Ihe earth.
This and the previously re reported
ported reported radiation zones (in reality
one field" of varying intensities)
appear to be no bar to space
travelers of the future.
Micrometeorites, none larger
than a cigaret ash, scored 56 hits
on Explorer VI between Aug. 7
and Sept. 1.
The Paddlewheel's TV cam camera
era camera could be easily modified to
take useful storm and cloud cover
pictures from a weather satellite.
NASA plans fo launch such
a space weather station early
next year.
The picture was taken An m
and transmitted to a erounrl trart.
ing station at South Point. Hawaii
At the time, the satellite was
crossing over Mexico, its TV eye
aimed northwest toward Hidu
Scientists interpret the picture
as showing it the top the reflec-
Seeing-Eye Dog
Leads Mistress
To Church Alfar
SOUTH PASADENA
Sept. 29 (UPI)-A blind
Calif.,
.Navy
sweetheart' honeymooned t o d a v
wim iirr Marine nusDand and se
eing-eye dog.
Joiene banner, 21, and CplJ
oieiung Vinson, 22, were married
yesterday in simple Latter Day
Saint ceremonies at the home of
his water, Mrs. Margo Trimbath.
About 35 friends and members
of the families attended the cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies officiated by Bishop Wil William
liam William M. Raddatz of the Pasadena
Ward.
Asked where they wera going on
their honeymoon, Joiene said:
"We're going to try to keep it
a secret." They did.
Joiene was accompanied down
the aisle by her stepfather, Rich Richard
ard Richard Tate, and Barry her two-year-
imu utrrain anepnero seeing eye
dog.
. Actress Ida Lupino and her actor-husband,
Howard Duff, attend attended
ed attended the ceremony as members of
the Eye Dog Foundation's adviso advisory
ry advisory council. They planned the reception.

.pbnuto m
Is Taking Panama
By Storm
in the BELLA VISTA ROOM
appearing nightly
at 9:15 and 11:15
SPARKLING
in his presentation
MAGNIFICENT!

I

Tflr "Angel nf Spain
NO COVER OR MINIMUM CHARGE

tion of sunlight from clouds known
to have covered the area covered
at the time.
They believe a bright region on
the left toward the bottom of the
photo may be the reflection of the
sun from the Pacific Ocean.
Richard E. Homer, associate ad administrator
ministrator administrator of the space agency,
termed the Paddlewheel satellite
"overwhelmingly suceasful." For
one thing, he said it represented
the first successful effort in space
to regenerate batteries from solar
cells.

Apostolic Delegate
Pays Courtesy Call
At White House
WASHINGTON (UPI) Arch Archbishop
bishop Archbishop Ekidio Vagnozzi, new apos apostolic
tolic apostolic delegate to the United
States, paid a "courtesy call" on
President Eisenhower yesterday.
He said he relayed "warm
greetings" from Pope John XXIII
ajvd the President asked him to
extend his greetings to the Pope.
The Roman Catholic prelate
spent about 25 minutes with the
President in his White House of office.
fice. office. He told reporters afterwards
that "it was simply a courtesy
call this was my first chance to
see the President since I came."
The archbishop arrived here
May 6 to succeed Amleto Cardi Cardinal
nal Cardinal Cicognani as the Vatican top
U. S. representative. Cardinal
Cicognani, who had held the post
for 25 years, was called back to
Rome to serve on the Curia, cen central
tral central governing body of the church.
Archbishop Vagnozzi said that
he had an earlier appointment but
it had to be postponed because
of the President's heavy f'tedule.
Khrushy's Yen
For Helicopter
Is Real Thing
WASHINGTON (UPI) Soviet
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev's
yen to buy an American helicopt helicopter
er helicopter is more than a passing fancy.
President Eisenhower made this
plain yesterday at his news confer conference
ence conference in recounting how the Krem Kremlin
lin Kremlin leader was capitavted by heli helicopter
copter helicopter travel during his visit
here.
Eisenhower reported with a
grin that Khrushchev told him he
wanted to buy a helicopter exact exactly
ly exactly like the Marine Cors 'copter
which carried him and the Presi President
dent President on three occasions.
Furthermore, the President add
ed, the Premier even asked Under Under-Secretary
Secretary Under-Secretary of State C. Douglas Dil Dillon
lon Dillon to represent him in negotia negotiations
tions negotiations for buying such a craft for
his personal use.
Eisenhower noted that Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev became a helicopier im
even though his own government
advisers wera against his travel traveling
ing traveling in them.

Waistlines Drop, Hems Lift
By Mainbocher, Who Avoided

NEW YORK (UPI)-Mainbocher
the designer who refused to
tamper with the waistline dur
ing the chemise craze, now low
ers it for fall.
"By lowering the waistline, I
do not mean that a line has been
tied around the hips. This is not
being done in one fell swoop," the
designer said at showing of his
fall and winter collection.
"I consider that bi-annual revo
lutions, although dramatic and
lots of fun for the designer, ask
entirely too much, even of the
ultra-chic woman. And in the long
run, I very much doubt that they
mignt appear to be," he said.
"The mode, however, absolute absolutely
ly absolutely never stays still," he added.
"It invitably follows the rhythm
of modem life, which also chances
constantly. So, in this collection,
nothing is quite the iam again."
All emphasis on the lower waist
was done subtly through devices
oi seaming and fullness. Suit
waistlines were easy-fitting. Soma
jackets had half belts slightly
lower than the waist. One jacket
was cut lower in front, with the
jacket hamline reaching below the
waistline.
Tunics were unbelted or loose in
back.
Suit jackets war longer, al although
though although Mi inbee bar said thay ara
net harder fa arear. 'I da net
think a novelty should b shewn
until it is so balanced that the
wearer Is neither a martyr for
an exhibitionist," ho commented.
Skirts were short, although the
designer considers hemlines "quite
unimportant."
"An abnormally short skirt is
a sad thing without abnormally
beautifully legs," he said.
In general, the slihouette deli-
Dim
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
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When both partners overbid
the
result is not likely to be good.
North's two diamonds was the
first overbid for his side. South's
three hearts and North's four
hearts continued the trend and to
punish them properly East decided
to double.
West's king of spades was allow
ed to hold the first trick and he
shifted to the ten of diamonds.
East won with the queen and play played
ed played a second spade which South won
with the ace.
The ten of clubs lost to East's
king and a third spade lead was
ruffed in dummy. South cashed
dummy's three aces and discarded
his losing diamond on the queen of
clubs. West ruffed and still made
hit high trump for a two-trick set.
North thought his partner could
have saved a trick by winning
the first spade. Actually, he could
not. There were lots of wsyt to
olay the hand but with good de
fense they all wind up with the
same 500 point deficit.
Q The bidding has boon:
jtfortk XMt bow w-
1 24 Double I T
2 N.T. Pass T
You, South, hold:
lt V75 Q1M1 AKII
What do you dot
A Bid. three a-tnM r
hope lor the best
TODAT S QCimON
Instead of bidding two tic
trump your partner bide twit
diamonds. What do you do now?
Anawer T

mmm

LANCQME

FELIX cordially Invites you to consult with
Mademoisslls Emilia R. da Lson, expert beautlolan
from the world-famous LANC0ME Paris Beauty
Salon.
She will be at our Main Store on Central Avenue
today and tomorrow.
H6U14S t:M a.sa. to II noon
IjM p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Her TKK& consultations will be conducted In
English, Spanish and French

MAIN STORE
tt-01 Central Ave.
Phone 1-1771

cately outlined the bust and soft

ly obscured the line of the back.
Most suit skirts were slim, al although
though although a few were gathered
slightly at the waist and fell in into
to into a soft fullness.
Evening attire included long,
alim sinnwe sewaawa ns dull dull-skirted
skirted dull-skirted ball gowns. Evening coats
were extravagant pastel and bl
brocades, limed with fuzzy wool
or fur.
Tne designer showed some black
for daytime but much more for
cocktails and evening. Colors in included
cluded included red, shocking pink, yellow,
chartreuse, brown, gold, fo r e s t
green, and "mirror green," which
Stripper Blaze Starr is the talk
of Bourbon St. in New OrleJans be
cause of ner ismous uiimc,
Louisiana's colorful Governor
Long . .Cocclnelle, most beauti
ful of all the entertainers in
Oaree t Carousset snow, is in me
U.S. now, being courted by an En
glish millionaire. .Valerie Bettis
of the Broaaway musical siage uc-
rnme a Drme in ianas. mc
lucky fellow is Arthur Schmidt, a
prominent Madison flt, persuad persuader.
er. persuader. Rex Harrison, still understand
ably disconsolate over Kay Ken Kendall's
dall's Kendall's death, is eipected to arrive
in New York earlier than sched
uled to begin rehearsals for his
upcoming Broadway snow.
Friends say he's counting on a
deeD Dlunae into hard work to
help him recover from the blow...
American scientists may oecioe 10
bypass the moon and aim for Mars,
to accomplish two purposes; it
would be a swell scoop to hit the
planet, and it would save us the
embarrassment of "catching up
to the Russians in the headlines.
Call it cosmic one-upsmanship.
Members of the film company ot
The Fugitive Kind" confirm the
reoorts that Marlon Brando and
Anna Magnani clashed frequently
during the shooting. Magnani had
way of summ'ng Marion to
confer with her on the set, and
he had a way of replying: "You
come here!" But it does look as
though she won one point, and
will be given top billing "for sen
timental reasons" in Italy.
Gina Lnllobrleida. who isn't
given much space in the European r
Communist magazinet they
don't dig capitalist glamor queens
finally made the front pages of
the East German gazettes with
big photographs featuring her fa famous
mous famous decolletage, all because she
made the profound statement that
she hoped President Eisenhower'!
meeting with Khrushchev would re
suit in a more peaceful world. .
And speaking of Mr. K., some re residents
sidents residents of the Waldorf still fuming
over the inconveniences they had
to endure for the sake of his "se "security."
curity." "security." For example, one small
child had a box of toys taken
away from him and practically
dismantled, and a couple car carrying
rying carrying some ice cream lo their
apartment were forced to wait
while the sleuths X-rayed it.
Count on "The Caretaker," a
book slated for release by Simon
and Schuster in November, to be
the literary shocker of the season.
It's the first novel of a Colorado
housewife, Dariel Teller, and her
portrayal of the staff of a large
mental hospital is strong stuff.
.The fun-loving blonde handing out
Sherman Billingsley lipsticks at
the Stork Club the other night was
actress Elaine Stritch.
A local rock 'n' roll singer,
whose latest hit sold more than
20,000 records, hasn't received a
penny from his triumph. The disc
company figures somehow prove
it didn't make any money. .Jazz
drummer Charlie Smith has
written a volume of poetry which
Alfred Knopf will publish this fall
. .Lonnls Sattin is first to come
up with a potential click version
of "Take Me Along," the title
song from the toon-due Broadway
musical.
Scenic designer Oliver Messel is
staying in Katharine Hepburn's
New York house, busily engaged
in unpacking the oils and sketches
he'll show at the Sagittarious Gal Gallery
lery Gallery in November and preparing
for rehearsals of the new produc production
tion production of "The Marriage of Figaro"
which he designed for the Metro

In Collection
Chemise Craze

he described ai "like reflection la
antique glass:"
Winter white and winter prints
also were shown.
Fabrics included brocades,
lames, lame linen, matelesse,
printed jersies and satins, cut
and printed velvet, satin and sa satin
tin satin shantung.
Not one outfit fur trimming,
which was to prevalent in other
collections this fall. The only fura
shown were an oppossum stole
lined in plaid wool to match a
dress, a removable mink neck
piece, coat, and chinchilla lining
in a white tailored coat.

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgalkn

politan Opera. .Wealthy Cy Feld Feld-man,
man, Feld-man, who spent quite a bit of
time and money on Anita Ekberg
before she became Mrt. Anthony
Steele, hat been reviving the ro romance
mance romance on the Continent now that
the's no longer bound by a wed wedding
ding wedding band.
Eartha Kilt's temperamental
outbursts and fits of depression
are giving her managers reason to
buy headache pills in large quan quantities.
tities. quantities. ..Nat King Cole will be tht
special guest on the Eydie Gorme Gorme-Steve
Steve Gorme-Steve Lawrence Thanksgiving
spectacular (ABC-TV) with a eg.
ment filmed in advance of the
Nov. 24 date.
Jimmy Komack, back at the Bon
Soir after two years, gratefully
credits French comedian Jacques
Tati with his improvement in style.
Tati became intrigued with Jim
mie during a Las Vegas engage engagement
ment engagement and spent a week working
with him on the nuances of comic
conception. . Lou Levin, pro proprietor
prietor proprietor of Gilmore't credits Eli Eli-zabeth
zabeth Eli-zabeth Taylor with a rather leaden
sense of humor says she told
him she was working up a singing
night club act, and planned to
feature "Tammy" (Debbie Rey.
nolds' hit ballad) as her big num number.
ber. number. The Den in the Duane hasn't ad advertised
vertised advertised Lenny Bruce's return en engagement
gagement engagement yet he'll be back Oct,
21 but 240 aficionados have tele
phoned reservations for the first
week. .The French Riviera didn't
do too well this tummer. Pricei
were up, business down.
NEW CONTROL DIVISION OF OFFICER
FICER OFFICER at the Rodman Naval
Station is Lt. James D. Ethridge
of Kopperl, Texas. A former
' Navy enlisted man, he rose
through the ranks from store storekeeper
keeper storekeeper to an OCS commission in
1953. Holder of five battle stars
for action in Korea, he formerly
was Navy Exchange Officer at
the Pt. Hueneme, Calif., Seabe
Center. He is a graduate of
North Texas State College with
a degree in business administra administration.
tion. administration. He and his wife Joan have
two daughters, Joleen, 4V4 and
Mary Jo, 2.
TO RECEIVE PRIZE
COPENHAGEN (UPI)-Dr. Al Albert
bert Albert Schweitzer has arrived here
to receive the "Sonnlng Prize" of
$14,000 from Copenhagen Univer University.
sity. University. Schweitzer also will recelva
$7,000 representing taxes collected
in Denmark from the showing of
a movie on his African jungle hos hospital.
pital. hospital. The 84-year-old Schweitzer
saM the money would be tpent
on his Lambarene Hospital.

ft) 1
If 'v?Tj L
tew.
ft'-' py.

if ..

Mademoiselle Emilie R. de Leon



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1958

TBS PJjrlHJI AMHICA AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAPEB
PAS I PfVi

Ike Extends Civil
Rights Commission
For Two Years
WASHINGTON (UPI) Presi President
dent President Eisenhower yesterday signed
legislation providing $3,225,813,000
in new foreign aid funds and ex extending
tending extending the federal Civil' Rights
Commission for another two
years.
Completing action on the big ac accumulation
cumulation accumulation of bills left behind by
Congress, the President Also
signed a bill setting up a new
health insurance program for gov government
ernment government workers.
In all Eisenhower acted on 638
bills passed by the recently ad adjourned
journed adjourned Democratic controlled
Congress. He signed 618 and ve vetoed
toed vetoed 20. A public works money
bill was approved over his veto,
the first time Congress had en enacted
acted enacted a law despite his disapprov disapproval.
al. disapproval. Both the foreign aid funds and
?the civil rights provision were
contained in a catch-all $3,626,718, $3,626,718,-137
137 $3,626,718,-137 appropriations bill. It was the
last measure to clear Congress
before it adjounred at dawn on
Sept 15.
' During an all-night session Con Congress
gress Congress tacked onto the bill a rider
providing for a two-year extension
of the Civil Rights Commission
which otherwise would have died
Nov. 8. It also included $500,000
requested by the President to fi finance
nance finance the commission's work
through next June 30.

Biologists Determine To Learn
Causes Of Wrinkles, Baldness

NEW BRUNSWIC, N.J. (UPI)
Baldness gray hair and wrin wrinkles,
kles, wrinkles, and other marks of aging
are being studied from the inside
out at a research laboratory on
the Rutgers Prep School campus.
Dr. Joseph F. Migliarese and
associates in the biological re research
search research laboratories, dissatisfied
with current explanations for the
fading blush of youth, are using
a "what-dun-it" approach.
They want to know:
What body chemical makes
hair gray; what causes baldness;
what withers skin.
Combining efforts in the multi multi-pronged
pronged multi-pronged research venture are sci scientists
entists scientists from the fields of physiolo physiology,
gy, physiology, dermatology pharmacology,
histopathology, biochemistry, en en-zymology
zymology en-zymology and bionucleonics.
Tfce laboratories, operated by
Colgate-Palmolive Co., have, in
effect, a blank check to speed
them along the road to new
knowledge about man's and
woman's thorniest problems.
Dr. Migliarese isn't certain that
agalng positively explains balding
and leatherened skin He said;
"If it does, then how do you
acount for the fact that some el elder
der elder persons have relatively few
wrinkles, hair that isn't gray and
hairlines that don't recede?"
The scientists first will work at

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the test tube level and with lab laboratory
oratory laboratory animals Eventually, they
will study human volunteers.
Dr. Migliarese said animals get
gray and even bald in older age.
During the studies, the sci scientists
entists scientists expect to put a "sweat
shop" to work, Inducing perspira perspiration
tion perspiration in subjects volunteers from
Rutgers University willing to
work up a sweat for science and,
incidentally, $5 session.
Dr. Migliarese scotched the
idea that baldness, by the way,
is a mark of manliness. Recent
research, he said, has more or
less exploded this "mythi"
He explained that there is no
scientifically demonstrated cure
for the kind of baldness that af affects
fects affects most naked-domed men.
This is believed to be caused by
an hereditary characteristic trans transmitted
mitted transmitted through mother to son. But
the loss of hair that sometimes
follows a disease will usually be
restored once the disease spends
itself.
There is no cure either for gray
hair. The color of hair is set by
pigment in the calls of the cen central
tral central shaft of the hair before it
ookes through the skin. It's no
longer living tissue once it
emerges.
Skin, stretched in youth and
robust days, loses its lubricating

O'ls in old age. As the body frame

shrinks and lubricant wells run

dry, it sags and wrinkles.

These are the marks of aging

the scientists hone basic research

will help to blot out.

tftmn't

0bSKSk)8
witkhis
aistrtst

SIMENC.S

US Has Sixth
Missile Failure
In Two Weeks
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (UPI)

A Polaris test rocket soiraleri

out of control 'urned end over
end into the Atlantic Ocean yes yesterday
terday yesterday America's sixth missile

failure in two weeks.

The solid propellant rocket, pro prototype
totype prototype of a missile expected to
become a most potent weapon for
Amer o submarine fleet, rum rumbled
bled rumbled from its pad at 1:06 p.m.
e.d.t. and climbed steeply ahead

of a brilliant white vapor trail.

But when its first-stage booster
droppnl28 less than a minute
later, the Polaris began spiraling
upward a few miles offshore, and
as it arched high above fluffy
white clouds, the missile began
turning end over end.
It disappeared behind the
clouds. Bt seconds after the
booster stage splashed into the
nrean off the- cane. the. Polaris

'plunged ack into view. It hit the

water somewnat soutn ot its doosi doosi-er,
er, doosi-er, but still within view from the
beaches.
The Department of Defense an announced
nounced announced that the "flight test ve vehicle
hicle vehicle in the Polaris, ballistic mis missile
sile missile development program. . de developed
veloped developed a malfunction and after
second-stage separation impacted

(landed) in the Atlantic Ocean off
Cape Canaveral."
No cause was given immediate immediately
ly immediately for the malfunction, responsible
or only the third failure in 39
iries for the Polaris test rockets.

V iiiM '? t )itmmmm imiiimiiiiTiiu ift-iif,innniMiiTriiHoniiiwiii'ii'rJTiiiininttl'-r'ftmimnt'"- rr-T rr ir- m

MSGT. ENGELBERT J. BERGER, trial observer, Judge Advocate's Section, USARCARIBB, sta stationed
tioned stationed at Fort Gullck, receives his license to practice law in the Canal Zone from Judge Guthrie
F. Crowe, Federal district court judge. Berger was graduated from Northeastern University, Bos Boston,
ton, Boston, Mass., In 1937 and has been admitted to the bars of Supreme Judicial Court of Massachu Massachusetts,
setts, Massachusetts, United States Supreme Court and the United States Court of Military Appeals. Berger has
been a member of the Judge Advocate General's Corps for 10 years and presently holds a com commission
mission commission in the U.S. Army Reserve. From left to right are Mrs. Berger, Samuel T. Frankel, at attorney
torney attorney at law; Berger; Judge Loren B. Hlllsinger, Magistrate's Court, Cristobal and Crowe
(US. Army Photo)

Massive Relief Program
To Aid Typhoon Victims

TOKYO (UPI) A massive re

lief program yesterday rushed
help by truck and boat to a mil million
lion million victims of the worst typhoon
in Japan's recorded history. There

were more than 8,00 casualties.

As the government mobilized to

aid the living and to repair the
damage, police reported 1.322 peo people
ple people dead, 1,210 missing and 5,603
injured by the 135 m.p.h. winds,
floods and landslides broueht by

Typhoon Vera Saturday night and

Sunday, morning

At least three towns were wiped

out. Some 350 000 homes were

flooded and an estimated 970,000
people were homeless.

The U.S. Tachikawa Air rorce
Base suffered one million dollars

damage. One American was hurt
by flying glass.

A Northwest Airlines plane
loaded 17,00 pounds of relief sup

plies for victims In the Nagoya

area of central Honshu, tne harci-

est-hit region. The goods were
contributed by the Church World
Service, Catholic Relief Services
and the American Friends Serv

ice committee.

Hundreds of trucks and boats

loaded with food, clothing, drink

ing water and blankets fanned out

through the devastated areas of
A 1 c h e and Mle Prefectures

(states).
The government was expected

to draw un a special budget for

typhoon relief and allocate 27 mil

lion dollars to help rebuild shat

tered areas.
Damage was estimated at 29

rDTvT-7rn

million dollars to homes and prop property
erty property and 83 million dollars to
roads, bridges and other public
works.
Casualty figures were rising as
floodwaters receopri and rescuers
found more victims in shattered
homes.
The industrial city of Nagoya
appeared hardest hit, with 120
persons killed within a few min minutes.
utes. minutes. Another 280 wers missing.
The village of Nadashima was
10 to 20 feet under water. About
250 townspeople huddled cold and
hungry in a school house on a
dry knoll.
Kamezaki and Kimiyoshi vil villages
lages villages were destroyed.

Quote Unquote

QUOTE UNQUOTE INSIDE
FT. LAUDERDALE James
Plouff, 45, after spending the
night in the ocean when his small
boat capsized:
"Tire water was cold and small
fish nibbled at me. It was the
longest night of my life."

Love Is My

Profession

JEAN GABIN wmrmim SauoFautantlara raouli levy mo i

PRESIDENTE Theatre

FOR ADULTS
ONLY!

No. 2 Peru Ave.
AIR-CONDITIONED
Starts TOMORROW!

IT'S BRIGITTE'S BOLDEST!... ENGLISH DIALOGUES!!!
This Picture Will Not Be Shown At The Canal Zone!

Memphis Woman
Says Negro Raped,
Threatened Her
MEMPHIS (UPI) Police here
yesterday quoted a 24-year old
white housewife as saying she was
raped by a young, masked Negro
with a lisp who threatened to kill
her Saturday night if she "made
any noise."
The woman told officers the
Negro forced his way into her her-apartment
apartment her-apartment while her husband
was at work and hit her "on the
head with a piece of iron when I
screamed."
She said the Negro tried to rob
her and then pushed her into a
vacant yard in the back of her
house where he attacked her.
"He tied me with some rags he
found hanging on a tree," the
woman said, "then he said he was

going back to mv apartment to
look for money. He said he'd kill
me If I made any noise."

TODAY ENCANTO -25 -15
WAHOO! $115.00
John Wayne In
"RED RIVER"
Frank Sinatra in

'Man with The Golden Arm"!

MILWAUKEE, Wis. Sen. Hu Hubert
bert Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Minn.) on
civil rights:
"I think we need a civil rights
bill which will recognize the de decision
cision decision of the Supreme Court and
that will empower the attorney
general to protect the rights of
citizens."
WOODSTOC, Vt. New York
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller when
asked what he had accompl:shed
on his two-day trip into New Eng England:
land: England: "1 found a lot of friends."

ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE
Nikita Khrushchev just before he
boarded his pjane for the return
trip to Moscow:
'The Soviet people want friend friendly
ly friendly relations. We are convinced the
American people also want
peace."

BALBOA

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Lana Turner in

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In The Dust
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Don Murray, Patricio Owen in
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Montgomery Cliff
Paul Douglas in
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Hugh O'Brian Robert Evans

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DIABLO HTS. 7:00

Sidney Poitler Eartha Kltt

"THE MARK of THE HAWK

GAMBOA 7:00
Jack Hawkins Gia Scala
"THE TWO HEADED SPY"

GATUN 7:00
Double Feature Program
"New Orleans After Dark"
and "JOYRIDE"

MARGARITA 7:00
Gary cooper
Dorothy McGuIre
"FRIENDLY PERSUASION"
In Color Repeat Run

PARAISO 7:00
Double Feature Program
"Gideon of Scotland Yard"
and "KILL HER GENTLY"

SANTA CRUZ 7:00
Double Feature Program
'TARAWA BEACHHEAD"
and "CANNIBAL ATTACK"

CAMP BIERD 7:00
Jack Palance
Barbara Lang
THE HOUSE Of NUMBERS"
In CtnemaBcoDe!

Coming; Oct. 8th
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SAMMY STEVENS &
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TUB PAWAMA AJOTtlClN AH lHUPMUmr DAILY KIWOTAPW
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBEE tt, US V
Bodgers Try To Close Out Playoff Series

PAGI SIX

loday

Send Side-Armer Drysdale
To Make 3rd Try A Charm;
LA Nips Braves In Opener

By LEO H. PETERSEN
LOS ANGELES, Sept. 29 (UPI)-The Dodgers,
trying to make their third try a charm, called on
side-wheeling- Don Drysdale today in an effort to
win the National League championship playoffs and
go on to meet the Chicago White Sox in the World
Series.

Now based here after a lot of
golden years at Brooklyn, the
Dodgers were favored to break
the jinx which has seen them lose
two previous playoffs. They got
eff on the right foot yesterday
when they beat the Braves, 3 2, In
the first game at Milwaukee.
Drysdale ,a strong-armed right righthander,
hander, righthander, usually is more effective
gainst the Braves than any other
club, although his season's recora
this year against Milwaukee is an
even 3-3.
So the Dodgers hone to close it
out today, and then fly to Chicago
for the opening of the World Se Series
ries Series Thursday. If a third game is
necessary, in this best two out-of
three series, it will be played here
tomorrow, delaying the start of
the Series until Friday.
The Braves, who have been
short-enders on the odds before
this season, rested their hopes
on Lew Burdette, their World
Series hero of two years aqo.
They pointed out hopefully that
they had beatend the Dodgers
in six of the 11 lames played
this season in this vast football
Stadium.
"We've been coming from be behind
hind behind all year long," said Braves
manager Fred Haney, "We might
as well keep on doing It."
The Dodgers had d i f ferent
Ideas.
"We're on top," Peewee lleese.
one of the former Dodger great
and now one of their coaches, ex explained.
plained. explained. "I have a hunch we're
going to stay there."
The Dodgers today were hailing
catcher John Roseboro, whose
sixth inning home run in the dark
drenched County Stadium in Mil
waukee yesterday proved to be
io deciding rup; and pitcher
La y Sherry, who came on in re
lief of starter Danny McDevitt in
the second Inning when the Braves
scored both their runs, and turned
back the Braves on four hits from
that point. He made Roseboro's
home run stand up.
The game wasn't as exciting as
the score indicated. There was onl
ly a small crowd of 18.297 and
thv sat through a steady rain and
mist that delayed the start for al almost
most almost an hour.
And the Braves' fans had lit little
tle little to cheer about.
Thev had come out In droves
. 48,815 to see the Braves tie

P 1
5

9 Cpi

YARDLEY Cologne

for the pennant en Sunday. But
those who showed up yesterday
didn't seem to care.
The Dodgers got the jump in the
first inning when Charlie Neal
singled, advanced to second on an
infield out and scored on Norm
Larker's single. But the Braves
roared back in the second with an
assault to rout McDevitt. Johnny
T.npan walked, moved to second

on Del Crandall's single, and scor
ed on Bruton s single over secona
base. Sherry replaced McDevitt
An fn mnnnH hilt X bobble Of
Carleton Will'ey's hot grounder
loaded the bases.
Tnhhv A vial slammed a ground
er in thp hole to Maurv Wills who
forced Willey at second while
Crandall scored to put the Braves
in front, 2-1.
Lns Aneeles. however, tied the
score in the third when Wally
Moon was safe on a fielder s
choice, advanced to second on
Larker's sinele and scored on Gil
Hodges hit to left field.
Playoff Series
Probable Lineuo
LOS ANGELES, Sept. 29 (UPI)
The probable lineup for today's
playoff game between the Los An Angeles
geles Angeles Dodgers and Milwaukee
Braves:
Los Angeels
Gilliam. 3b
Neal, 2b
Moon, If
Larker, rf
Hodges, lb
Demeter, cf
Roseboro, c
Wills, ts
Dryia!i, p
Milwaukee
Avila, 2b
Mathews, 3b
Aaron, rf
Torre, lb
Pafko or Slaughter, If
Logan, ss
Crandall, c
Bruton, ef
Burdette, p
Umpires Donatelli, plate;
Gowan, lb; Barlick, 2b; Conlan,
3b; Jackowski and Beggest, left
and right field foul lines, respec
tively.

Finishing touch

for the
vs well-groomed man

Whenever you want to
teel your impeccable
best, use Vardley Cologne
The fragrance is bracing,
masculine and discreet discreet-approved
approved discreet-approved by distinguished
men throughout the world.

I I 1

PLAYOFF SERIES
Teams
Lot Angeles
Milwaukee
Won Lost Pet.
1 0 1.000
0 1 .000
TODAY'S GAME
At Los Angeles Coliseum: Mil Milwaukee
waukee Milwaukee (Burdette) vt Let Angeles
(Drysdale).
Game starts at 4 p.m. (Panama
Time).
NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFF
(First Game, Bett-Of-J)
Los Angeles 101 001 000-3 1 0 1
Milwaukee 020 000 0002 4 0
McDevitt, Sherry (2) and Rose Roseboro;
boro; Roseboro; Willey, McMahon (7) and
Crandall. W Sherry (7-2). L
Willey ($-). Home Run Let An Angeles,
geles, Angeles, Roseboro (10).
Amateur Boxing
At Panama Gym
This Evening
A five-bout amateur boxing pro program
gram program between Chilean and Pana Panama
ma Panama fighters will be held tonight at
the National Gym beginning at
8:30.
Tonight's will be the first of two
apnearances of the visitors, who
will see action again Thursday
night at the Gym.
The Chileans have had remark remarkable
able remarkable success in the recent Third
Panamerican Games in Chicago
and in the Diamond Belt cham championships
pionships championships in Mexico.
Welterweight Alfredo Cornejo,
who has been SouthAmerican
champion In 1956, 1957 and 1958,
took titles in Chicago and Mexico.
Carlos Lucas was middleweight
king in the Golden Betl tourna tournament;
ment; tournament; lightweight Luis Silva was
thind in Chicago and Mexico and
featherweight Sereio R o b 1 e s
wound ud third in Mexico.
The fifth member of the team,
flyweight Reinaldo Seguel, failed
to oualify in Chicago and Mexico.
The complete orogram follows:
Carlos Lucas, Chile, vs Hum Hum-berto
berto Hum-berto Salazar, Panama, 165
pounds.
Alfredo Cornejo, Chile, vs Onel
Eastman. Panama, 147 pounds.
Lnis Silva, Chile, vs. Humberto
Herman, Panama, 135 pounds.
Sergio Robles, Chicle, vs. Pole
Belgrado. Panama, 118 pounds.
Reinaldo Seguel, Chile vs. Leo Leo-ooldo
ooldo Leo-ooldo Campbell, Panama, 112
pounds.
Admission prices are general
admission, 75 cents: ringside, $1;
and children, 50 cents.
for men

" m x..

BAEZA WINS ANOTHER Leading; Jockey Braulio Baeza displays perfect form as he boots
Cleron home first ahead of Now Then (5). Festival, barely visible on the inner rail, wound
up third a neck behind Now Then in Sunday's sixth race at the President Remon racetrack.

Sylva Carpenter Medalist
In Isthmian Championship

Tiger
By TREVOR SIMONS
This year's Jamboree was in inconclusive
conclusive inconclusive in that it failed to pro produce
duce produce any stand-out among the
three School teams, nor the
Athletic Club for that matter, and
this column is, therefore, hesitant
to name a favorite to cop the 1959
Interscholastic football title.
Junior College won the Jam Jamboree,
boree, Jamboree, their third such victory
since its inception ten years ago;
they scored their victory against
the other three competing teams
with only one touchdown and when
the final results were tabulated
that was all they actually needed.
JC's touchdown, the only score
of the night, was not the results
of a concerted drive, for they ne never
ver never actually put one together. (The
final accounting showed that the
Green Devils only scored three
first downs) Instead they used one
shock movement, with Bill Gibson
sweeping far around to his right
and, escaping the outstretched
arms of the Balboa defenders,
went 74 yards, for the score.
The 6-pointer was made against
Balboa High and might not even
happened had not Steve Gorham
miscalculated and lunged a bit
early. The Bulldog linesman was
gaining on Gibson and, from this
writer's viewpoint, would have
overtaken him in another couple
of strides to halt the drive on
about the 30 yard-line; but instead
Gorham made his early lunge and
was just short of halting the fleet fleeting
ing fleeting College back.
One bit of infomation was de derived
rived derived from the 1959 jamboree;
Football fans are in for one of the
closest fought Interschool races
since tackle football made it bow
on the Canal Zone.
. Junior College must get the nod
as only slight favorites and, in
great contrast to last year's pre preseason
season preseason predictions, Balboa High
must be named as the underdog;
but the margin between the three
school teams, JC, CHS and BHS,
is so small that this column pre predicts
dicts predicts that no team will defeat an another
other another by more than a single touch touchdown
down touchdown this year.
Junior College is solid an all de departments,
partments, departments, and their experience,
plus adequate substitutions, makes
them a good challenger to de dethrone
throne dethrone Cristobal High.
The Tigers were runners-up in
the Jamboree with 5 first down;
they have Dewey Whitaker in the
backfield to team up with George
Cotton, Gary Irving and Jim Will.
But Cristobal's greatest asset is
the fact that their line looks
strong topped by 195-pounder Jim Jimmy
my Jimmy Palumbo and ably bolstered
by Don Bruce, No. 183, Wally
Woodruff, No. 150, Donald Bon Bon-neau.
neau. Bon-neau. No. 166, Brian Lutr, No. 153,
and Pete Ender, No. 210.

lLAKai"jHiiTI

SCOTCH WHISKY

ii

1- ...pf n ii ..Jlllllilllll

DISTRIBUTORS

AGENCIAS Y.
19-15 Automobile

Rags

These lads give Cristobal what
is probably one of the best over overall
all overall lines they have had in some
time.
Balboa didn't show too well in
the Jamboree, but there is little
quesuon in anybody's mind but
that Phil Cage had a bad night
and cannot be relied upon to do so
again. Joe Garcea showed well in
a couple of carries fnday nignt
and so did Dick Scott and Ralph
Belevens so the Bulldogs are not
exactly hurting for a good attack,
though none will actually fill the
shoes of Gary Ness and Charlie
French.
Buzzy Rathgeber was out of the
Jamboree with an injured ankle,
but should be ready for Balboa's
first Intershool game scheduled for
October 9 against Canal Zone
Junior College.
This coming Friday night, Oct.
2, Cristobal High and Canal Zone
Junior College get the interschool
league underway at Balboa Stadi Stadium
um Stadium with again a no-faaorite tab
on the outcome of the event.
Stu Brown's college, like CHS,
has a strong and heavy line and
it would be no surprise if this
eame resulted in a scoreless tie.
Against the Tiger's heavies, JC has
Charlie Latz, No. 160, Russ Favor Favorite,
ite, Favorite, No. 210., Jack Willoughby, No.
185, Gene Burch, No. 200, George
Trimble, No. 190 and Tom Ashton,
all experienced, older players
capable of make things rough for
all comers during the 1959 grid
season.
Russia's Novikov
Wins Pentathlon
HERSHEY, Pa. (UPI) Russia
and its big Red star, Igor Novikov,
captured the team and individual
fencing titles Sunday in the second
event of the World Modern Pen Pentathlon
tathlon Pentathlon championship meet.
But the real surprise of the day
was turned in by Capt. Antonio
Almada of Mexico, who came
from out of nowhere to take the
lead in the race for individual
scoring honors. He passed Wens Wens-ceslau
ceslau Wens-ceslau Malta, a paratrooper from
Brazil and winner of the Pan
American Games, and went in
front by 36 points with a total of
1,940 in the two events. Malta,
with 1,904 points, remained in
second, leading Novikov by three
points.
Russia, riding on the superb
arm of Novikov, the defending
fencing titlist, rolled up 2,47a
points. The United States finished
a surprising second, with Mexico
third. Sweden, which got off to a
fast start in the fencing, could do
no better than tie Argentina for
fourth in the 14-hour competition.
BUCHANAN'S
H. DOEL, S. A.
Row Tel. S-7175

Of the twenty nine lady golfers
who qualified for the 1960 Isthm Isthmian
ian Isthmian Championship Tournament last
week at the Panama Golf Club,
Sylva Carpenter turned in the
lowest score and took the medal medalist
ist medalist honors.
Competition will be by match
play without handicap. Since this
is the most important tournament
sponsored by the Panama Wo Women's
men's Women's Golf Association during the
year, considerable interest will be
generated as the rounds progress.
The first rounds must be com completed
pleted completed before Sunday evening
(Oct. 4)
Lineup is as follows:
Championship Flight;
(Handicap 8.13)
Sylva Carpenter (medalist) vs.
Louise Jones.
Ruth Tortoricci vs. Connie bish bishop.
op. bishop. Kay Purdy vs. Ethel Perantie.
Cleo Burns (defending champion
vs. bye.
First Flight:
(Handicap 14-17)
Edith Mathieson vs. Phyllis
Mansfield.
Helen Stempel vs. Jean Sullivan.
Jane Huldquist vs. Alyce French
Helen vs. Pat Waring.
Second Flight
(Handicap 18-24)
Marie St. Malo vs. Dottie La
Croix.
Ruth Wallace vs. Wilma Riley
Margaret Dalton vs. H e 1 e n
Owens.
Kelsey Garces vs. bye.
Third Flight
(Handicap 2S-J)
Marion Mallory vs. Ruth Powell
Fran Twomey vs. Velta Sharpe'
ay Day vs. Dee Dee Mannix.
r oy Frauenheim vs. bye.
Heclor Lopez Day
Committee Plans
Welcoming Parade
By HERBERT MOISE
Mambers of the "Htctor Lo Lo-pti
pti Lo-pti Day" committee mat Friday
night and drafted tentative plans
for homecoming ceremonies of
the New York Yankee infioldar infioldar-outfialder.
outfialder. infioldar-outfialder. Meeting and making plans were
Alfredo Cragwell, Ernesto Este Este-noz.
noz. Este-noz. Spencer Joseph, Roberto
Puello and Herbert Moist.
Tentative plans call for pa parade
rade parade down the main streets ef
Colon leading to the Municipal
building where Lopex will be a a-warded
warded a-warded the highest honors of
the city. It was revealed also
that the Cerveceria Naclonal,
owners ef the Professional
League team for which Lopei
plays, will also give him an
award.
The committee meets next
Thursday in the study hall of
the Rainbow City School as this
community will also play a key
role In the organization and
preparation ef this testimonial to
L6pez.
Individuals and business es establishments
tablishments establishments are invited to con contribute
tribute contribute te the "Hector Lopez
Day" fund by contacting Ernesto
Estenoz at the National Brewery
in Colon or any other member
of the committee.

Ruth Tortoricci
September PWGA
Tourney Winner
Ruth Tortoricci turned In a
fine 82 thus winning low gross
honors In the September PWGA
tournament held last Saturday at
the Brazos Brook Golf and Coun Country
try Country Club.
Louise Jones was just behind
Ruth with an 13 and tied for low
net honors wfth Ruth.
Close te 24 players enjoyed the
hospitality ef the Brazes club and
PWGA members always enjoy
the matches held there.

Editor: CONRADO SARGEANT

HOOFBEATS
By Conrado Sargeant

Heliodoro Gustines and Jose Ta
lavera topped the list of jockeys
suspended over the weekend with
eight meets for rough riding.
Others suspended were Juan Pa Pablo
blo Pablo Diaz and R. Tejada with four
meets each.
Gustines was set down for crowd crowding
ing crowding Puerto Madero wioh Gong in
the Panama Jockey Club Classic.
Gong won by a nose over Miss
Brunette which, in turn, wound
up three-quarters of a length in
front of the affected Puerto Ma
dero.
Talavera got bis penalty for
moving from the inside to the
outside with Folletito and bump bumping
ing bumping into Bugaba in Sunday's third
race.
Teiada got set down for failing
to snow up to ride Pastel Poose
in Sunday's first race.
Diai was penalized for push pushing
ing pushing Sonico through a narrow
opening on the first turn in Sun
day's tenth race, ceusing Sanc Sanctimonious
timonious Sanctimonious te bump into Michlrl Michlrl-pa,
pa, Michlrl-pa, knocking him elf stride.
Don Luis, Bugaba, Michiripa,
Vergniaux, Blue Paint and Dis Dis-tingo
tingo Dis-tingo were all suspended because
of lameness.
Manuel L e g a 1 1, Tanganica's
trainer, was fined $5 for not using
the correct colors on the mare.
oOo
Six of the best three-year-olds
now in training at the local oval
were nominated yesterday for the
$2,000 added one mile Horse Own Owners
ers Owners Association Classic which is
scheduled to be run on Oct. 18.
Miss Brunette, Atrayente, Sta Sta-catto,
catto, Sta-catto, Gong, Piccolino and Puerto
Madero are the racers catered
for the big race.
oOo
The Panama American's selec selector
tor selector repeated in the monthly tip tipsters
sters tipsters contest with 291 points as
compared to 278 for runnerup Cri Critics
tics Critics and 275 for third place La
Fija.
Critica and La Fija were dead deadlocked
locked deadlocked for first place in the tri tri-mestral
mestral tri-mestral contest with 129 winners
each. La Estrella de Panama
finished third with 128.
oOo
An added attraction on Oct, 18
will be the Panama Professors
Association Handicap. The profes professors
sors professors have promised to donate s
trophy for the owner of the win winning
ning winning racer and a whip for the
triumphant rider.
oOo
This coming Sunday's main ev event
ent event will be the $3,000 added one
mile Arturo Delvalle Classic lor
three-year-old natives. Only four
have been entered for this race
the colt Mohicano and the fillies
Nirvana, Titita and Jabalina.
The secondary attraction will
be the Panama Radio Workers
Silver Anniversary Handicap. Pan Pan-taleon
taleon Pan-taleon Henriquez Bernal, president
of the Panama Radio Announc Announcers
ers Announcers Association, has appointed
Isthmian radio pioneer Fernando
CLASSIC LEAGUE
By LOU
Teams
Lucky Strike
Elga Electric
Seymour Agency
W L
10 2
8 4
5 7
1 11
Carta Vieja
Leading averages: Balcer 203,
Soyster 189 Karry and Damian
186.
The league leading Lucky "trike
Cigarettes fattened their advant advantage
age advantage at the expense of the last
place Carta Vieja Rum, when
they swept the four points. The
Luckies were not extended and
while they rolled below their team
average, they won all games. On Only
ly Only one game went over the 900
mark and that was in the mid
game when Lucky Strike hit 906,
and beat the Rums by 68 sticks.
The Carta Vieia team just can
not click, and everyone is in a
slump. The team average oasea
on last year's performances is 916
and right now the team is aver averaging
aging averaging 67 pins below their expect expected
ed expected output, with an 849 figure. The
team has one only one point in
three weeks of rolling, and unless
it perks up, it will be left at the
post, as far as the big mdney is
concerned.
In this match between Lucky
Strike and Carta Vieja, Phil Ves Ves-cio
cio Ves-cio made the best showing with
221-590. Dick Soyster the number
two man in the loop was next wan
a 203-557. Ted Melanson, captain
of the Carta Vieja tried to spark
his team, with a 236-558 set.
In the tussle between Elga Elec Electric
tric Electric and Seymour Agency, two
bugaboo games cropped up in the
Elga lineup, and despite games of
221 by Balcer and 238 by Andy
Fistonich, the Elgas went down to
Seymour by 17 pins. Herb Zost's
205 and Mac Lane's 229 helped to
stem the tide in faver of the Sey Seymours.
mours. Seymours. Balcer again came back
with a strong game, a 214, and
the Elgas wrapped it up in the
win column. For the third straight
time, Balcer registered a 200 iine,
and Don Rudy supported him with
a 203. and Elgas took the third
and TP points.
Balcer with his three 200's went
on te a 836 series, and following

jouy to present a trophy to the) y.J.
owuer oi the winning horse. j.s
oOo jing,
The rule that leaves disqualifi- Ik. Ik.-cations
cations Ik.-cations up to the stewards "if in ib
their opinion there has been a foul i
that affected the result of the',
race," probably caused the local! 59
track to lose at least two fans lastjftfc
Sunday. 79
They seem to be of the opinioi -that
Panama will have clean ridiniH 4
only when horses are disqualified vj
automatically for fouling at any U
stage of the final two furlongs.
Most fouling occurs in the all-im-
portant final quarter and a foul .
at this stage of the race, no mat-
ter how slight, should be severe-
ly penalized. 1
U.S. racing adopted the etrhv
marie disqualifying rule because
authorities arrived at the logi logical
cal logical conclusion that no expert
can possibly tell whet the re result
sult result ef a rece would have been
after a fowl is committed.
Last Sunday there were two
cases in the opinion of many, war-
ranted disqualifications. Instead,
the stewards only suspended the
guilty riders because "in their
opinion" the fouling did not af affect
fect affect the result of the races.
In one instance, bad-legged Bu Bugaba
gaba Bugaba (Gustines up) was bumped
into by Folletito (Talavera up)
when she was making her final
bid at the beginning of the home homestretch.
stretch. homestretch. In the other, mutueli
favorite Puerto Madero (Baeza

up) was deliberately knocked of
stride and carried by Gong (Gus (Gustines
tines (Gustines up) from the outside '0 the
slower inside going finishing up
against the inner rail.
The lucky fans who bet their
hard-earned money on Folletito
and Gong are probably still ap-
nlaiiVlin.cr fit atAiuarHa' Htfvjsinne
but how do they think the ones
who lost on Bugaba and Puerto
Mariern fMl?

heatedly voicing their disgust at
the failure of the stewards to dis disqualify
qualify disqualify with a parting remark,
"This is the last time they'll see
me out at this racetrack."
The powers that be should ra rapidly
pidly rapidly do something about chang-
. 1 t l. 1 -t 1 1 :

wg mis ruie iim uie guuu ui, iv-
racing. ,;-!
CASIY WILL RETURN
NEW YORK (UPI) Casey Sten Stengel
gel Stengel will have to pay his way into
the World Series this week but he
isn't going to be made to pay for
the collapse of the New York
Yankees. General Manager
George Weiss, wishing to "put to
rest all reports about Stengel not
being back next year,' issued a
formal statement Sunday which
stated the Yankees had "no
thought" of replacing him as
manager.

jJRES

him on the Elga team was Andy
Fistonich's 561. For the losers,
Bruce Hassler kept up his clas classic
sic classic league tempo, with a 211-562
mark.
Although the Elga team is re relegated
legated relegated to second place, it sports
the highest team average. It went
into the league with a 918 aver average,
age, average, and now as a team is up to
923. Seymour, is also below their
entrance average, having 890
whereas their entry tab was 913.
The hotttest consistent bowler on
the Isthmus right now is Bud Bal Bal-cer,
cer, Bal-cer, who in the two leagues he is
rolling has an average of over 200
in both. Father time has no ef effect
fect effect on Mr. Bowler himself.
ELGA
Balcer (203 ) 221 214 201" 631
Fistonich (179 ) 238 .181 142 561.
Rarey (186) 168 172 186 "52
Schmidt (175) 136 169 168 473
Rudy (180) 147 191 208 541
Totals 10 m W0 2937
SEYMOUR
Zost (183 ) 205 195 160 560
Hassler (183) 157 194 211 562
Gleichman (182) 191 163 180 534
Toland (162) 145 135 166 448
Lane (180 ) 229 178 152 559
Totals 927 85 849 2641
LUCKY STRIKE
Vescio (182) 192 221 177 590
A. Damian (169) 137 199 168 504
J. Soto (176) 175 159 159 483
Soyster (189) 188 166 203 557
J. Damian (186) 196 16r 171, 528
Totals 881 904 178 2672
CARTA VIEJA
Graham (166) 129 160 158, 44T
Burgoon (160) 159 175, 165 499
King (169) 173 139 197 509
Melanson (182) 236 166 156' 553
Kunkel (172) 144 198 162 504
Totals 941 131 938 2517
This week's matches In the
Classic League have been post postponed
poned postponed because many of the league
members are rolling in the Pana Panama
ma Panama Area Armed Forces tourna tournament
ment tournament at Ft. Gulick. With the Com Commercial
mercial Commercial league pulling ut of Dia Diablo
blo Diablo Bowling Center in favor of Bal
boa, gives bowlers the opportunity
to practice at Diablo cm. Friday
evenings.

1
5 'is



TUISDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1959

THE PANAMA AMEBIC AN LH INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPE
FA6I (EVEN
Louisiana State Tigers Again Tops UPI Football Ratings

Vi A ' X" J'"-r t T
V ' f f' I

IIIIIIIIIWNIMinllirffr MMMMMIWMMMMIMIIMIMIIIIIM1. IW' '3

Northwestern
Second; Iowa
Rated Third

by
JOE WILLIAMS

FOR UF GOLFERS... William E. Potter, governor of theCanal Zone and Colonel John D.
Coney, Fort Clayton's post commander, look over the batch of trophies earmarked for win winners
ners winners of the 1959 United Fund Golf tournament. Military and civilian golf enthusiasts of the
CZ, are expected to be on hand when the tournament officially opens with the qualifying
rounds to be played on the Fort Amador course from September 29 through October 4. La Ladies,
dies, Ladies, also invited to participate, will not be required to play qualifying rounds. Entry fees for
the all handicap tourney is a $3 donation to the UF drive. The trophies were donated by
merchants of Panama City. (US Army Photo)

Gun Club iSotes

o

BALBOA GUN CLUB

he September smallbore rifle match was held at the Far
Ftfl range on Saturday, Sept. 19. This was a 40-shot, dewar match
In two stages, 20 shots at 50 yards and 20 shots at 100 yards,
fired in the prone position, using any type of sight.

Twenty shooters turned out representing the Balboa Gun

Club, the U.S. Army advanced Marksmanship unit trom Doth tne
Atlantic and Pacific sides, and Junior shooters from the Balboa
6un Club and from Cristobal. With 20 shooters on hand it was
possible to shoot both junior and senior divisions. The senior
division was run in two relays and the junior division of five
shooters in one relay.
Firing commenced at 9:30 a.m. under the able direction of
match supervisor MSgt. Russel K. Haight. The big guns of the
day, and winners in the Senior and Junior divisions, respectively,
were Fred Wells of the Balboa Gun Club, and Richard Carpenter
of Cristobal. The Senior division competition was such that the
scores for 1st .and 2nd place were identical, with old bench-rest
Wells winning over Dave Parsons on X's.
The Juniors, who ordinarily shoot at 50's did an outstanding
Job considering that this is the second time they had shot in
dewar course competition.
Prizes consisting of trophies and medals were awarded after
the' match by Duncan Laird, Jr., Smallbore Manager of the Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Gun Club. A special award wa4 irfeserited by Major T "Par "Par-tons
tons "Par-tons to JosSe" Barreto, for being the only foreign national to com compete
pete compete In this match.
Next months match will be a four-position, iron sight, match,
fired at 50 yards; so watch your club bulletin board and this
paper for further infprmation.
The following is a list of the competitors in this months
match and their scores:

SENIOR DIVISION
Name 50 vards .100 yards
J. Barnes 174- 3X 160- ?X
M. Millards 192- 4X 191- 7X
D. Writesman 189- 3X 190- 7X
C. Soliz 182- 7X 18'- 3X
M. Crowder : 194- 2X 195- 7X
J. Barreto 126- ox 153- ox
D. Parsons 199- 8X 197- 9X
A. Aflleje 184- 4X 189- ?X
N. Gibson 183- ex 177- 2X
W. Newton 186- 3X 195- 4X
T. Metcalf 163- 0X 181- IX
F. Wells' 199-13X 197-lX
H. "ole 180- 2X 191- 6X
D. Laird, Jr. 197- 8X 197- fiX
R. Little ': ;.. 180- 4X ; 188- 2X
Senior Division Winners

Aggregate
334- 5X s
383-11X
379-10X
363-10X
389- 9X
279- OX
396-17X
373- 6X
360- 8X
381- 7X
346- IX
396-21X
371- 8X
3P4-1X
368- 6X

1st Place F. Wells 396-27X
2nd Place D. Parsons 396-17X
3rd Place D. Laird, Jr 394-14X

JUNIOR DIVISION

Name
J. Blaney .
D. Brown .
R. Parpenter
W. Brians .
J. Burns

50 yards
178- IX"
187- 2X
195- 7X
186- 5X
187- 3X

100 vards
167- OX
188- 1X
193- 3X
180- 3X
180- IX

Aggregate
345- IX
375- 3X
388-10X
366- 8X
367- 4X

Junior Division Winners

1st Place R. Carpenter 388-10X
2nd Place ....... D. Brown 375- 3X
3rd Place J. Burns 367- 4X

Major League
Attendance Up
9.1 Per Cent

NEW YORK, Sept.' 29 (UPI)
.Major league a .tendance
sparked by the line of the White
Sox and Indians in the American
League and the three cornered
pennant light in the National
rose 9.1 per tent this year to top
tbe 19-million mark.
The two-league total of 19,063,
5fi8 was 1 602.938 more than .the

total of 1,7460,630 for the 1958

The American League, its fans

delighted at the astonishing col collapse
lapse collapse of the New York Yankees,
experienced a 25.1 per cent rise

from 7,296,034 to 9,121,100. The

Indians experienced an amazing

rise of 834,171 admissions to 1, 1,-497,976
497,976 1,-497,976 and the White Sox rose
597,627 to 1,395,078.
Every other club except the
Red Sox gained over 1958 and the
Yankees themselves totaled 1,552,-

030 a rise of 123,592 for taeir

highest total since 1952.
National League attendance to totaled
taled totaled 9,942,468 lor the third largest
total in its. history even though it
represented a 2.1 per cent drop
from the near-record total of 10, 10,-164,596
164,596 10,-164,596 in 1958.
The Los Angeles Dodgers easily
topped both leagues with a season
total of 2,037,284 admissions. The
Braves ranked second at 1 730,815
and the Yankees were third.
Attendances in both leagues and
change frpm 1958:
National League Chicago 858, 858,-256,
256, 858,-256, minus 121,648; Cincinnati
801,298, plus 12,176; Los Angeles
2,037,284, plus 191,728; Milwaukee
1,730,815 minus 240,286; Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia 802815, minus 128,295; Pitts
burgh 1,359,917, plus 47,929; St.
Louis 929,953, minus 133,777; San
Francisco 1,422,130, plus 149,505.
Totals 9942,468 minus 222,128.
American League Chicago 1, 1,-395,078,
395,078, 1,-395,078, plus 597,627; Kansas City
963,683, plus 38,593; Detroit 1,221, 1,221,-221,
221, 1,221,-221, plus 122,29;7 Cleveland 1,497 1,497-976
976 1,497-976 plus 834,171; Washington 615, 615,-084,
084, 615,-084, plus 140,084; Baltimore 891, 891,-926,
926, 891,-926, plus 61,935; New York 1,552, 1,552,-030,
030, 1,552,-030, plus 123,592; Boston 984,102,
minus 92945.
Totals 9,121,100 plus, 1,825.066.
Two league totals: 19,063,568,
plus 1,602,938.

r cr-i
a
0
o

AND AWAY WE GO Roberto Murlllo (left) is hit halfway across the ring by Melvln Bourne
('v-rlng their scheduled ten-roundrr at the Olympic Stadium Sunday night. Murlllo did not go
down for a count but he lost by TKO In the fifth when the match was halted by referee Vi Vidian
dian Vidian Stewart after Murillo suffered a cut on th e side of his left eye in the fourth heat.

By EARL WRIGHT
NEW YORK (UPI) The Lou Louisiana
isiana Louisiana State Tigers, who gave up
only three points in their first two
1959 football games, again topped
Lmted Press International's ma major
jor major college ratings today tu! tu!-upses
upses tu!-upses shuffled most of the other
teams in .the top 10.
Oklahoma, Auburn, Wisconsin
and Ohio State lost the high rank rankings
ings rankings Uiey held last week. North Northwestern,
western, Northwestern, Iowa, Southern Califor California
nia California and Notre Dame made the
biggest advances in the balloting
by the 35 outstanding coaches
who comprise the UPI rating
board.
Oklahoma, which took a 4513
thumping Saturday from coach
Ara Parseghian's Northwestern
team, dropped from second to
18th. Northwestern advanced
from 14th to second. Iowa moved
from 10th to third in the wake
of a 42-12 road victory over Cali California
fornia California and entertains North wesl wesl-crn
crn wesl-crn next Saturday.
Army Movti Up
Army moved from sixth to
fourth. Mississippi remained fifth.
Southern California, a 23-0 victor
over Pittsburgh, moved from 12th
to sixth. Clemson was seventh,
Texas remained eighth and Wis Wisconsin
consin Wisconsin Was ninth. Notre Dame
and Ohio State jed for 10th.
Wisconsin slipped from third to
ninth after edging Stanford, 16-14.
Notre Dame, tied for 23rd in the
first week's ratings, moved up
after opening its season with a
28 8 victory over North Carolina.
Ohio State dropped from fourth
after barely downing Duke, 14-13.
Auburn, seven last week, skidded
down to a tie for 25lh after Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee snapped ilj 24 game un unbeaten
beaten unbeaten string. 3-0.
Louisiana Slate, a 10-0 victor
over Txas Crhsitian Saturday al alter
ter alter opening wiih a 26-3 triumph
over Rice, was the No. 1 choice of
25 coaches. Northwestern received
six first-place votes and Iowa two.
The other two first-place votes
went to Southern California and
Texas.
Rtclvi 330 Of 350
In points distributed on a 10-
9 8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1- basis for otes
from first to 10th place Louisiana
State received 330 of a maximum
possible total of 350. Northwestern
received 243 and Iowa 208. Army
drew 146, Mississippi 128, Southern
California 124, Clemson 98, Texas
94 and Wisconsin 90. Notre Dame
and Ohio State each received 81.
Georgia Tech was 12th with 73
points. Tennessee, Syracuse, Navy,
Georgia, Indiana, Oklahoma, Pur Purdue
due Purdue and Penn State rounded out
the first 20 in that order. Only
28 teams were mentioned on this
week's ballots.
The big ten dominated the top
10 by filling Uie second, third and
ninth berths and sharing 10th
place with Notre Dame, another
midwest team. The South filled
there places and the east, south southwest
west southwest and west each placed one
team.

Hilma Cooke Third
In Girls Junior
Tennis Tournament
Twlv-y ear-eld Hilma Colk
was th winnr ef third plact
trophy in tM Cirlt Junior Ton Ton-nii
nii Ton-nii Tournamont which ttrmlnat ttrmlnat-d
d ttrmlnat-d Sunday at th Panama Olym Olympic
pic Olympic swimming pool courts.
'mitt Cook dofoatod Botiy
Fottor in an all-Canal Zono girl
consolation match, 1-, 4-4, T-.7
Mii Fottor alio got a trophy
for fourth placo.
Both girls had advanced to
th tomif-inals, only to lo to
titlist Joannin Hbrt and run run-nrup
nrup run-nrup Mrcods Argot.
Sunday's Cook-Fostr battl
for third plac was a titanic
struggl that was decided only
after sixteen hard-fought garnet
in the third end deciding tet.
The tournament, which hat
been adjudged a tuccett, at attracted
tracted attracted 14 playert. Btidt th
winner, rvmnrup and temifin: temifin:-ittt,
ittt, temifin:-ittt, the following glrlt partici participated:
pated: participated: Anabel Vlllarreal, Caro Carolyn
lyn Carolyn David, Mitil Sucre, Efige Efige-nia
nia Efige-nia Vouttelalcot, Btity Reyna,
Carmen Castillo, Irma Ojedit,
Ruth Phillips, Odilli Blendiche
and Mary Ettlinger.

Th post-mortem examination
of the June heavyweight cham championship
pionship championship cadaver, conaucled by
Messrs. Snooie, Snore and Slum Slumber,
ber, Slumber, nebulously identified as ihe
Boxing Commission, was not as
complete as might have been de desired.
sired. desired. Two vitaJ missing parts
Were missing.
Cus (The Messiah) DAmalo
Floyd Patterson's crusading man manager,
ager, manager, took a runout powder, and
Kat Tony Salerno, described as
the bank roll (or front) man for
promoters of record, has been on
the lam for weeks. Since Mes
siahs and hoodlums do not ordi ordinarily
narily ordinarily react to public inquiry in
like manner, the puzzlement of
the cauliflower tribunal was un understandable.
derstandable. understandable. Eventually, it was dev eloped
that The Messiah, masquerading
as "Carl Dudley,'' had sailed for
Puerto Rico a week ago to pre preside
side preside over the corner rituals of
one of his ersatz tigers, blandly
ignoring official summons and
inferentially expressing contempt
for the tribunal's authority. Tne
gentlemen are pretty milled a a-bout
bout a-bout it, too.
It was to be hoped Vincent J.
Velella, who claims promotional
lights to the if and- when rematch
with lngema.r Johnsson, might be
able to shed light, not only on
Fat Tony's present wnereabout but
on his murky functions in the
original promotion.
The East Harlem barrister has
been Fat Tony's mounthpieoe for
10 years and has known him for
30-some. But Velella, like sn
many of us, is plagued with a
faulty memory. Dates and identi identities
ties identities elude him. The tribunal, while
disappointed, was (we like to feel)
properly sympathetic.
From the testimony, it appears
most anyone can drop in from ths
street and use the barrister's of office
fice office phones. Under the circum circumstances,
stances, circumstances, in all fairness, the gen
tleman can not be expected to
know precisely who called whom
unit fur what purpose.
FATZO PAID FOR 'EM
Calls were traced from Velella's
office to Gilbert U'e Berkley, a
big-lime Miami gambler, who
was also reportedly connected
with the first promotion. Fat Tony
probably made the calls, the bar barrister
rister barrister testified, adding quickly
almost admiringly thaUFat Tony
always paid for his calls at the
end of each month. Good for
Fatzo! So many people don't.
Velella-, hitherto totally -unknown
to boxing, stated he had come
into the promotion at the urging
of Clfarlie Antonucci '('D'Amato's
closest friend and confidant"), a
convicted bookmaker who, like

The Messiah, has an affinity for

patriotic masquerades. His work
ing title is Charlie Black.
A heavyweight championsh i p
promotion entails many confer
ences, and the iecorci shows
Velella, Fat Tony and D'Amatos's
alter ego generally were in group
attendance. Velella thought Fat

Tony was there merely by coin

ciaence. black, nee Antonu c c i,
put Fat Tony away as a kibitzer.
"The guy never said nothing al
none of the meetings," D'Amato's
great pal assured te tribunal.
"And how about you?" asked
Messrs. Snooie, Snore and Slum Slumber.
ber. Slumber. "What would a guy like me
talk about?" was the response.
"I wasn't no partner."
Apparently, lhe commission, in
its belated investigation, has rea

son to believe otherwise, for pre previous
vious previous testimony had indicated a
rewarding business association be between
tween between D Amato and the old book
maker in most, if no; all, of i'ai i'ai-terson's
terson's i'ai-terson's fights.

TV MOGUL NAILS CUS
Biack or Anlonuixi, as you
will got $3200 out ol Lie 57 I'ai
terson Hurricane Jackson fight in
the form of a loan from I he
promoter, which he admits lie
never paid back. He denies he
was in the Patterson Roy Harris
fight for 50 percent, Patterson
Jouansson for 30.
The old bookermaker does ad
nut, however, D' Amato set him
up lor 10 percent of Harris' earn earnings
ings earnings if the Cut 'n' Shoot pnenom
iioii won. D'Amato's Carbo-li k e
practice ot muscling in on fat fat-cerson's
cerson's fat-cerson's opponents is one of sev sev-aral
aral sev-aral quaint items the commis commission
sion commission wished to interrogate The
Messiah about.

Another was his dual capacity 1

as promoter-manager, in viola
tion of boxing law. And on tnal
one commissioner Julian Helfand
virtually nailed him dead, any any-mogul
mogul any-mogul Irvin Kalm to admit his
mogul Irvin Kahn to admit is
contract was negotiaied through
D'Ainato instead of the promoter.
. . So what happens now?

GUN CLUB
NOTES

CIRSTOBAL
Cristobal Gun Huh Skeet shoot
ers scalierea snalterea clay at a
great rate last Wednesday alter alter-noon,
noon, alter-noon, per tneir regular scneuuie,
vaner Johnston mgn gunning 4.
joe Kueier and Art auiton snow snowed
ed snowed tiieir usual apliluoe witn li
each on Uieir beat tries, pressed
uy ioi in i i rciIit aim W Vv iiow
l.uiu, lieu a i
L. 1. julic.l a.id II. II. SiiAleil

pci uji'iiieu i i euuaiiiy, uowiung ji
iiiu i espi-cliveiy. Geoi'tji;
Loop's leading laggen, souiciiuw,
aim i educed nis normally belter
score lo 1. r Cnoilar pumped
hard, but couldn't connect witn
more than 11.
skeet occurs at the Cristobal
club every Wednesday at 4:30 p.m.
Trapshooung is added if request requested
ed requested oy sullicienl niaiKsmen, anu is
shot regularly on the lirst Sunday
morning ot every month.

rl 111

TENNIS CHAMPIONS Jeanmne Hebert (left) and Mercedes
Argnte are shown just before beginning their champ ionshlfj
malrh in the girls tennis tournament Sunday M the Panama
Olympic swimming pool court. Jeannine, a Balboa High School
student, turned hack Mercedes, a Panama University co-ed, in
three sels to take lhe title.

J. C. Iron Men
Stand Out In
Grid Jamboree

One criteria often used in eval evaluating
uating evaluating the value of an individual
to his team is that player's abili ability
ty ability to play the entire game. At J.
C. no higher complement can be
paid a player than that on "Iron
Man".
During the Jamboree four Junior
College warriors played every
minute of every quarier and earn
ed the exclusive title. They were
Charlie Laatz, Gary Alexander,
Harry Keepers and Russ Favor Favorite.
ite. Favorite. The JC coaching staff is hope hopeful
ful hopeful thai as the season, progres progresses
ses progresses many more Devils will prove
that they too can operate in high
gear for four full quarters.

LOCKED IN COMBAT Former bantamweight champion
Melvin Bourne left) and Roberto Murillo are shown literally
locked In combat during their scheduled ten-rounder at the
National Gym Sunday night. Referee Vivian Stewart, who is
trying to break the pair apart in the photo, stopped the bout,
In the fifth and awarded Bourne a TKO victory because of an
ugly cut Murlllo received on the side of the left eye In the
fourth round.

MATTHEWS VS ARMSTEAD
PHILADELPHIA ihpti i

Matthews, .explosive young light lightweight
weight lightweight contender from Philadel Philadelphia,
phia, Philadelphia, will get his long desired

cnance i reverse his, first pro
fessional defeat tonight when he
meets Paulie Armstead of Los An
geles In a 10-round, non-televised
bout.

Rheumatism
Wh.nvr th paint of Rlieumatltm.
Ailhrltlt, Neurltit. l,umbo. flol-
illr, etlff mucl. and ,ollt
PAllT'Sv' you mlrhU. fat
LOMIND from ynur drucalit al
onr. ROMIND quickly brln. fn fn-tlli;
tlli; fn-tlli; rllf an yon can lp, work
nil lv In comfort Don't M0

p nr. auaiMu tMar.

mmm. mwm

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TBI PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NTW8PAFEB
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
AGENTS:
Phone Panama 2-074 for
information about Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Chart your ad if
70a have a commercial
contract.
Classified Par close 11:38
a.m. Mon. to TrL, 11 ajn.
Sat, 2 pjn. gat. for San.
Officii open t-S weekday.
LEA VT VOCE AO WITH ONE Or OTJB AGEPfTS Oil OUK OFF11EB AT IS-ST M" BTBEET, PANAMA LIBKERIA MtECIADO T IM Me. It O AGENCIAS
INTERNAL. DE PL'BLICACIONES No. J Latter; Plaza CASA ZALUO central Ave. 45 a) LOURDES PHARMACY 182 L Carraaajuilla FARNACIA LOM
A
tre
BAKDO No. ZS Street MUHK1SUN 4tn or July ve. J en. a umti-w. Ttvon No. 4 r AJIMACIA fJSTAOOS mill
DOS 14 Central Ave.
FARMAC1A LUX 164 ten Ira 1 Ave 0- HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE i res. ae la ueea Ave. No. 41 FOTO DOMY Juste Araeaaena Ave. and 11 St.
FAR-
MACIA VAN DER J1S 54) Street No 53 EARMACIA EL BATURRO Parana Lefevre 7 Street FARMAC1A '"eAS" VU Punas 111 NOTED ADES ATHIS
Beside Bella Vista Theatre end Branch at Minimal Super Market oa Via Ope Ha COLON OFFICE: 15th and Amador Gaerrere Ne. 1421 XeL 412.

PAG I llftHT

Resorts

Apartments

PHILLIPS OcejMiOe CoHaees
Santa Cure eie P. Pkone Pe Pe-am
am Pe-am 1-1877 Crrsrofcal S-167J

Baldwin's apartments at Santa
Clara Beach. Telephone Balboa
1622 or Coto Solo 36-728

FOR RENT: Furnished and un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished apartment!. Alhjmbra
Apartmentt. I Oth street 8061,
Tel 1386, Colon

Fetter! eortaaei, near Santa
Clara Reasonable rates Phone
Balboa 1866.

FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment, kitchen and bath bathroom
room bathroom Information Metropole Bar.
Tel 2-5590, mornings.

Houses

FOR RENT Private home in
Golf Heights offer airconditioned
bedroom, meals, laundry for cou couple
ple couple at attractive price Phone
4-1 389

FOR RENT: Beautiful eclunve
property Transisthmian highway
No 9 Vallarine. Important come
personally Phone 4-1016, 1 P m
4 6

- mmmm "" 1
Rooms

FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment, El Cangrejo, maid's
room with service, garage, hot
water Alberto Navarro Street
No 48. Tel 3-4734 and 2 2-2883
2883 2-2883 POR RENT: La Crest, two
bedroom apartment, living, din dining
ing dining room, maid room, two bal balconies,
conies, balconies, 3-1 586
FOR RENT: Three bedroom
apartment, two baths, dining
living room, kitchen, porch, hot
water installation, independent
maid's room, bath, laundry. DO DO-NICHITA
NICHITA DO-NICHITA building, two blocks
from Mlnimax and Santuario Ni Ni-cional
cional Ni-cional $130.00. Ask gardener
for keys. Tel. 2-0481.

Automobiles I

FOR SALE: 1958 Ferd "300"
tudor blue, auto shift, radio,
17.000 miles. Phone Kobba
7169, Navy 3543.

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Plymouth 4 door,
station wagon, 6 cyl., 4 month
old Excellent, $2400. Tel. 6-
165.

FOR SALE: 4 burner gas stove
used 6 months, $125. Fedders,
2 ton air conditioner, utad i
months, 300. White, wooden
hi-boy dresser $5. Metal bad bad-side
side bad-side tabl $3.00. Call Panama 3-6260.

ROOM FOR RENT: Large bright
furnished Studio room, semi semi-private
private semi-private bth, independent en entrance
trance entrance ner Bellavista Theatre
$35 00. Call 2-2542 office
hours.

Commercial Sites

FOR RENT: Furnished prt prt-ment
ment prt-ment in Carrasquill. Tel. 3-
3589.
FOR RENT: Small, clean fur furnished
nished furnished apartment in El Cangrejo,
near El Panama. Tel. 3-5692,
apply 2034 Sabanas.

FOR RENT: OHin space,
Mercedes building, above Aveni Aveni-da
da Aveni-da Balboa's Post Office, with
private bathroom, watchman,
very reasonable rent. Telephone
1-8054.

NJ's Gov. Mcyner
Says Encaphililis
Epidemic Serious
TRENTON. N. J. Sept. 29 (UPI)
Gov Robert B." Meyner describ described
ed described a "serious" today an epide epidemic
mic epidemic of deadly encephalitis that
has taken 12 lives in southern and
en tral New Jersey
However, he said it should be
treated 'without creating undue
alarm." The governor noted that
several state agencies were ba tting
the outbreak that nag hit
five counties.
Latest figures from the State
Health Department show that 1Z
persons, most of them children,
have died as a result of a disease
believed to be eastern equine en encephalitis.
cephalitis. encephalitis. The department s a 1 d
that five of 22 suspected eases
have been confirmed as encepha encephalitis
litis encephalitis including four deaths.
Meyner said he has "been tn
touch" with health authorities
from the onset. He expressed a
"great deal of confidence" in Dr.
Rsocoe P. Kandle, State Health
Commissioner who is directing
the drive against the dread dis disease
ease disease Meyner said the health de department
partment department was "doing everything
possible" to stamp out the di-
He noted that in addition to the
Health Department, the Agricul Agriculture
ture Agriculture and Conservation Depart Departments
ments Departments and State Fish and Game
Division also were fighting the
outbreak.
Kandle said through a spokes spokesman
man spokesman yesterday that the spread of
the disease could now be con considered
sidered considered an "epidemic of moder moderate
ate moderate proportions."
GILDED CAGES
ITHACA, N. Y. (UPI) Hens
kept in cages averaged 230 eggs
it year, compared with 189 for
those who did their laying on
the floor, according to a study
conducted by Prof. Kendall Car Carpenter,
penter, Carpenter, agricultural econominist
at Cornell University.
Carpenter also reported that
faged hens needed only 95 pounds
of feed, as against 104 pounds
for the "floor birds." The death
rate was six per cent among the
former compared with 15 per
cent for the latter.

FOR RENT: Campo Alegre.
Fully furnished, one bedroom
apartment, hot water, balcony
garage, etc. Call 3-1789.
FOR RENT: Large three bed bedrooms
rooms bedrooms apartment, livingroom,
diningroom, 3 bathrooms, hot
water, maid's room, garage, etc.
Manuel Maria Icaia Street, "Fsr "Fsr-mentor"
mentor" "Fsr-mentor" Building. $185.00. Tel.
3-4994.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, very cool, all comfort. Via
Espana, house before Mini-Max.

Billy Graham Opens
Eight-Day Crusade
Al Wheafon College

WHEATON, 111. (UPI)-Evan-

gelist Billy Graham opened an
eight-day crusade before about
18,000 persons on the campus of
his alma mater, Wheaton College,
Sunday.
Graham, who was graduated
here in 1943, was invited back for
the independent Christian col college's
lege's college's centennial celebration, as
its best known alumnus. A series
of evangelistic meetings is held
here at the beginning of each
semester.
The college's new $500,000 cen centennial
tennial centennial gymnasium was dedicated
before the start of the rally in a
brief ceremony.
About 4"i0 persons in the crowd
composed of Wheaton students,
faculty members, community res residents,
idents, residents, and visitors declared
themselves for Christ.
Graham based his sermon on
the difficulties Paul encountered
when he preached to the people
of Athens and the citizens of the
intellectual capital of the ancient
world met his message with de derision
rision derision and -self-righteousness.
"We serve Jesus with our lips,"
Graham said, 'but our testimon testimonies
ies testimonies are not backed up by our be behaviour."
haviour." behaviour." He said sin Is "a defect
in righteousness."
'You mav not be a drunkard
immoral, lie, steal, or commit
murder," Graham told the rally,
"but you are still a sinner."
The audience broke inlo ap applause,
plause, applause, forgetting the religious re reserve
serve reserve of the meeting just once,
when Graham praised President
Eisenhower for leaving Nikita
Khrushchev and going to church
before starting the day.
TIME TO RETIRE
WASHINGTON, (I'PI) "If
medical progress continues, there
is no basic reason why human be
ings cannot live to the age of
125," Sen. Pat MoNamara ( D. D.Mich.
Mich. D.Mich. 1 said recently.

FOR SALE 1950 Ford V-8
grey and black 2 door sedan,
radio with extra speaker in
back, lowered, skirts. Good
tires Phone 6-256 189-A,
Gam boa

FOR SALE Kenmor eemi-auto-matic
washer, excellent condi conditionNorth
tionNorth conditionNorth American $75. 00.
Tel 3-7387, 12 pound load.

WE PAY CASH FOR
GOOD LATE MODEL CARS.
Autos Eisenman, S.A
Next to Coca Cola Plant
phone all day Panama 2-2616.
2-4966

FOR SALE: 1951 jeep station
wagon. Engine and transmission
completely overhauled. New
clutch. A bargain at $395. Can
be seen at Qtrs. 21, Quarry Hts.
or call Q H. 4148 and will de deliver
liver deliver after 1700
FOR SALE: 1957 Citroen 2
CV, 4 door std'an, semi-automatic,
50 miles per gallon. Run
5500 miles. Desarce, Motores
Nacionales, Automovile Row.
Telephone 2-0787.

FOR SALE Old but very ser serviceable
viceable serviceable Westinghouse refriger refriger-artor,
artor, refriger-artor, porcelain box, low price.
5824-D Diablo. Tel. 2-2837.
FOR SALE: Hollywood 30 inch
bed and mattress $15.00; new
metal card table with four chairs,
$25. 00; Bell portable sewing
machine. $25.00. Tel. Panama
3-6779.

FOR SALE: Modern dining
room set, night tables, all maho mahogany
gany mahogany Perejil, 2nd Street No. 7 7-14.7,
14.7, 7-14.7, Apt. J.

I

.
Services j
i
1 i

FOR SALE: 195' Volkswagen,
like new. Call Miss Neal at of office
fice office Coroxal 4210, home Balboa
1864.

TELEVISION AND RADIO
SERVICE. Our new service plan
gives you faster, more econo economical
mical economical and better service. Phone
2-1905 Crawford Agencies. Tivo Tivo-ti
ti Tivo-ti Avenue.

Car Rentals

TELEVISION troubles? Don't pull
your hair, give us a call and we
will ba there. U. S. TELEVISION
Phone 3-7607 Panama. From 9
a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday te 6
p.m.

Business trip to the interior?
Rent a dependable Herticar from
Fiesta Car Rentals. Tel. 3-4568.
Lobby El Panama Hilton.

D o m

e s t i c

Protect your home and proper property
ty property against insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment en
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Sarvica,
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777.

WANTED: Maid to live in
0932 Amador Road.

Boats Er Motors

FOR SALE: 12 ft. boat, 5'i h.
p. motor, trailer and equipment,
asking $300.00. Call 83-5173.

FOR RADIO, TELEVISION and
Hi-Fi too, no other service but
ourt will do U. S. TELEVISION
Phone 3-7607 Panama. From 9
a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday ta 6
p.m.

Wanted

WANTED: To place falthfull
maid and cook, 3-4676.

Two Major Upsets Open
Pro Grid League Season

Commercial Guide

ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION

Ads only cost $0.85 per col. inch

Ads accepted for a minimum of one month. I
FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740

By EARL WRIGHT
The National Football League

season is just three days old, but
George Halas and his Chicago
Bears already are sorry Vince
Lombardi left the New York
Giants to take over the stumbling
Green Bay Packers.

And Paul Brown's Cleveland

Browns are equally sorry quarter quarterback
back quarterback Bobby Layne ever switched

Irom the Detroit Lions to the
Pittsburgh Steelers.
The Baltimore Colts and Giants

began defense of their division ti titles
tles titles with hard-earned victories,
but Lomardi's Packers and the

Layne-inspired Steelers stole the

opening week end show by upset upset-ling
ling upset-ling two of the other title favor-

Kes.
Green Bay. which had Ihe worst

season (1-10 1) in its history in

1958, shocked the Bears Sunday,

9 6. It was a tremendous opening
triumph for Lombardi, Who be became
came became head coach and general

manager of the Packers this year

.liter five seasons as offense
coach for the Giants. It was

. cored before a capacity crowd of
2, 150 victory-starved Packer fans

al Green Bay.

Cleveland, seeking its eighth

lslern crown in 10 tries was up

set hy Pittsburgh, 17-7. The Steel Steel-ers
ers Steel-ers haven.'t lost since Layne be been
en been clicking after joining them
during the 1958 campaign. He
fired two touchdown passes and
;i(ked a field goal and two extra
points to erase a 7-0 Cleveland
i.'ad Saturday night and boost
"ittsburgh's unbeaten string to
ciCht games.
The Colls, defending league and
Western Division champions,
trailed the Lions, 9-0, late in the

third period but rallied for a 21-9
victory. While their defense throt throttled
tled throttled the Lions before a record
Baltimore opening day crowd of
55,558 the Colts won on Alan
Ameche's scoring plunge and two
touchdown passes from Johnny
Unilas to Ray Berry and Jim
Mutscheller.
New York, defending Eastern
Division champion, frittered away
a 17-0 lead Saturday night in the
Los Angeles Coliseum, then
stunned 71,297 Ram rooters by
rallying to win. 23-21. The Giants
won on two Pat Summerall field
goals in the final period, the de decisive
cisive decisive boot traveling 18 yardg with
only 1:58 remaining.
In Sunday's other openers. Bob Bobby
by Bobby Joe Conrad of the Chicago
Cardinals scored 25 points on
three touchdowns and seven con conversions
versions conversions to spark a 49-21 triumph
over the Washington Redskins and
punt returns by Abe Woodson (56
yards) and Eddie Dove (62)
helped the San Francisco Forty Forty-Niners
Niners Forty-Niners down the Philadelphia
Eagles, 24-14.
The Standings.

r-asern Division

New York
Chicago Cards
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Washington
Cleveland

W. L. T.

10 8
1 0 0
10 9
0 1 0
0 1 0
8 10

Western Division
San Francisco 10 0
Baltimore 10 0
Green Bay 10 0
Chicago Bears 0 10
Detroit 0 10
Los Angeles 0 10

Canal Zone Society For
The Prevention Of Cruelty
To Animals
Box 2415. Balboa. C. 7..
Phone: Curiinriu M13
The following animal at the
Cornzal Veterinary Hospital
need good homes:
1 very pretty orange end while fe female
male female kitten, .1 months old, houae houae-hroken,
hroken, houae-hroken, a sperial pet
3 Blark kittens, 3 weeks nil)
Call the above telephone number
for the following:
I Female Kittens, Mark and white,
3 moa. old
1 Female eat. Mark and white, t
rears nlrl.
WPrOBT YOUR 8PCA.
TOtl NF.FD IT. IT NEEDS YOU.

Mtlbf MaMB If To THEM

ITHACA, N.Y. (UPI) Cor Cornell
nell Cornell University psychologist have
found a way of judging person
ality by the way a person grabs a
knob, dial or handle.
They sax they can tell hy the
hand grasp whether the person is
aggressive or deferential.

AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Person np
Finance Your New Or
I'sed Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone.3-498 3-4985
All Type of Anto Insurance

GIBRALTAR LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Jim Ridgg
Harry Cornell
Davis Stevenson
Telephone Pan. 2-0552

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
(INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840)
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGFR SERVICES
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SARMFENTO" Oct 1
M.V. "SALINAS" Oct. 9
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA,
KINGSTON. HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. SPAIN
AND FRANCE
S.S. "REINA DEL MAR" (20,225 Tons)
(Alr-conditloned) ox. 29
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
M.V. "SALAMANCA" Oct. 1
S.S. "POTOSr oct, 9
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTDHOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "LOCH AVON" Oct S
S.S. "APPINGEDYK" Oft". 1
TO UKCONTINENT
S.S. "DINTELDYK" Oct S
MV. "PARIMA" ""Oct! 14
M l SAILINGS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
TELEPHONES:
Cristobal 3-16545 Panama 3-12578 Balboa J-1905

Miscellaneous

FOR tALIAtae! natural ma.
aura ar five-awav prices by rha
trucklea Call 2-2641.

FOR SALE: Three (31 "Vor "Vor-nado'
nado' "Vor-nado' air conditioners, k.a. at
$125.00 each. Tel. 3-3936.
FOR SALE WEBCOR tape Re Recorder
corder Recorder and Blupont all wave bat battery
tery battery and direct current radia.
Good condition. Tivoli Ave. No.
18 64, Apt. 1 1 between 9:00 -12:00
and 2:00 to 4:10.

Real Estate

III. "aaaaSBeaBiaBl

a n

FOR SALE: Fabulous Foodarama
refrigerator ef $979.00 for
$674 00; like new. Warranty
still outstanding 4 years.
It it the Paramount household
refrigerator today. Has 2 doors;
one ef which opens unto a large
vertical fraeiing compartment.
Come and tee thii unusual value
at Case Admirable, next ta tha
Lattery Bi ding.

FOR SALE: 1955 Buick sedan,
4 door, hardtop, office desk, pia piano
no piano blonrf color. Call Curundu
83-31 SO.

FOR SALE: Chrome dinette set
$25 00, living room set, $25.00,
Wheeler, Amador 3297, before
6 a.m. Panama 3-7813 after 7
IK.
FOR SALE: Closing "Stork",
maternity clothes at cost price,
all the furniture, clothes hang hangers,
ers, hangers, paper bags, boxes, babies
garments and shoes. Justo Aro Aro-semena,
semena, Aro-semena, across from Royal
Crown.

FOR SALE: Lara 500 ami 1.000
anatare, in tha Nuava Hipe drome
Urbaalutio ecreea rha Renea
Xacarrack. AU rati with ttraat
fronts, sewage, water aula and
electricity. Call W. McBaraart.
Tel. 4-0976.

FOR SALE: Case Kerch, 210,
2nd St., Las Cumbres, concrete
and tile, $15,000, bargain.

Personals

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.

Animals

Baby parrot for sale. Good condi condition,
tion, condition, easy to handle. $5.00. Call
2-6426.

FOR SALE: Bexar female 13
months eld, $60, Hallicrafters
S40-A, radio $25, Whealar, Ft.
Amador 3297.

FOR SALE: I Fedders, 1 ton air
conditional, $175, 1 Bandix
automatic washer $125. Both
used less than 3 months. 2 Si I -vertona
Coaxial speakers. Unused
and in original cartons, $20
each. Phone Quarry Hts. 4148.

FOR SALE: Gatxen trombone,
Brownie movie camera, Kodak
M.5 101 MM "Monitor" with
flash attachment. Balboa 1761.

FOR SALE: Easy riding saddle
horse. $40.00. Tel. Balboa 1772.

THE ALMANAC
Today is Tuesday, Sept. 29, the
272nd day of the year, with 93
more days in 1959.
The moon is approaching Its
new phase.
The morning star is Venus.
The evening stars are Jupiter
and Saturn.
On this data In history:
In 1789, the U S-War Depart Department
ment Department established a regular Army
with a strength of 970 mn to
servo three years.
In 1758, Horatio, Lord Nelson,
English admiral and hero of the
Battle of Trafalgar, was born.
In 1862, Prussian Prince Otto
Von Bismarck declared a new
state policy that earned him the
name of th 'blood and iron
chancellor."
In 1899, New York City welcom welcomed
ed welcomed Admiral George Dewey, hero
of the Spanish American War,
back from Manila.
In 1902, theatrical impresario
David Belasco opened his own
theater in New York.
In 1923, Great Britain began to
govern Palestine under a mandate
from the League of Nations.
A thought for today: PRussian
Princo Otto Von Bismarck said:
"not by speeches and decisions of
majorities will th greatest prob problems
lems problems of the time be decided ...
but by blood and iron."

PLAN COW PROTECTION
LOCKPORT, N. Y. (UPI) Civil
Defense officials in western New
York's Niagara County are mak making
ing making plans for a big eattle round roundup.
up. roundup. They want to make sure the
area's 2,000 dairy cattle are herd

ed to safety in the event of a

nuclear attack.

Second Putt Putt

Tourney Underway
The .second Putt Putt tourna tournament
ment tournament is causing a great sensation.
The first game was a terrific
success. There are four teams this
time, and ehe olavers ar uarv

enthusiastic because thes teams

nave experience now and ar in
equal conditions to compete.

There is only one women's
team, the Panama Insurance Com

pany team which is as good as

me rest oi tnem with the six
stroke handicap that each girl re receives
ceives receives thus making Uii team a
threat.
The lowest score this week was
made by Miss Ernie Ramirez and
Juan A. Vallarino each having
taken 62 strokes.
The best five players this week
are:
Strokes
Ernie Ramirez 62
Juan A. Vallarino 62
R. Romero 67
Augusto Lindo 67
R. Duran 68
Here are she iuM at! the
teams:
Team W L Totals
Amado Engineering l 0 589
Marlboro 1 6?7
Panama Insurance Co. 0 1 634
Avianca fl 1 577

Utile League
Boys 6, Girls 3

Six boys and three girls were
born at Coco Solo Hospital dur during
ing during the week that ended Sept.
23. Seventy-three patients were
admitted during the same week
end the same number discharg discharged.
ed. discharged. Boys were born to; Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Ennis, cf Colon;
Mr. and Mrs. Nicols Forde, of
Colon; Mr. and Mrs. Rudolf

Sharpe, of Colon; Mr. and Mrs
Julio Heraldez, of Colon- Mr
and Mrs. John Smith of Coco
Solo; and Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
Waterman, of Colon.
Parents of daughters are- Lt
and Mrs Donald Shelby, of Fort
Davis; Mr. and Mrs. Luther
Brown, of Rainbow City; and
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Bennett, of
Colon.

INVESTOR'S

GUIDE

y SAM iHULSKY
King Features Syndicate,
235 E 45 St., Now York
Q. As a widow, I am somewhat
dependent for advice nn niiteiriatra

I am eettine os much, from sn

many people. I am confused Uv

total assets are IlO.OfiO So far

I have boucrht some chare, nt ai.

ns-cnaimers, carDorundum, Gen General
eral General Telephone and Electric- t

still have half mv mnnev tn in.

vest. I have been advised to put
some in second mortcaBes. but I

am afraid. Would vmi .nrl m a a

list of quality stocks?
A. ''As a widow, I am somewhat
dependent for advice on outsiders."

That's a freouentlv heard

ment and widely-held belief.

It even sounds logical nn a

sort of storybook basis.

HUt I don't believe it'e true

and I do think that the

who adopts that helpless philoso philosophy
phy philosophy is doing herself a disservice
She automatically makes hercelf

ill the mora vulnerahle tn iu

sales pitch on some di s h o n e s t
stock seller.

Attenintin? tn v 1 1 u

many letters received horo

widows, widowers, husbands, wives
and single nennlo I a

... f x UUU L
think its possible to mate nv

generalizations.

Some have used nnfiia In4al

. - "nue IlllCJ.-
ugence m making investments or,
more importantly, used food sense
in obtaining sound guidance, and
have done well nth.,-, v.... i

t ... 1... i 0 nave pecn
follisn and knew they were be-

uig louusn an trie tame

certainty there i i

the mere fact that one person is
l l nT aavaJ 1 1. m

" anomer lemaie, or one
married and another single or

wiuuweu wn en mate r. r;

ciai wisdom in one nr fn .0:

w juri ijai
vete in the other

As a matter of fnt ti,. v.-

- cue IU1 CC
stocks you have lral h,.,.M

jvu cieuu. rou nave a fair

mixture of quality, income and

gi'umn potential.

I assume vou have ate

$5,000 into the market at one

time. This is a natural reaction

on the part nf a wnmn rui.

iy widowed who ka

- eVt7 JUU91
put her money to work; at once.
Still, I would hold the remianing
$5,000 for a few months- feed

ing into the marker M'-lbout

mree more purcnases nver ne.

riod of a half vear or even w

I am sending mi li.t Jt

a wu list wi

quality companies. Not one of

inese issues as you mav have

observed in recent

decline-resistant. No security is.

But you will have the comfort of
a quality investment which, over
the years, should do well for vou

If you fear second mnrtcosec

and I do. too and are nnt

a real estate exDert. nr rln tint

have access to expert advice, stay

way irom tnem.

Wall Street
CHATTER

uuoya upening

STOCK PRICES

6W YORK, Sept. 29 (UPI

" marxet opened

w.imiji in quiet tn

Atr ma -Advocate
Asbestor
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium JUd
Amer Cyanamid
Amer Motors
Amer Tel and Tei
Anaconda Copper
Arkansas Fuel
AVCO Mfg
Beth Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bicrort Uranium
Blauknox
British Pet
Burroughs
Ceianese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler
Cities Service
Coastal Carioe
Colgate PaJmolive
Colorado Fuel
Cons Electro Dynamics
Oreol Pet
Crown Cork and Seal
Cera Metals
Chalmers
Cuban Venezuelan Oil
Du Pont
El Paso Natural 6-a-t

Fargo Oil
Felmont Pet
General Dynamics
General Electric
General Motors
General Plywood
Gulf Oil
Harsco Steel
Howe Sound
Lmperial o&
Intl Pet
Lockheed
Magellan Pet
Montrose Chem
New Eng Tel and Tei
Northrop Air
Ol'ki Mathieson
Pancoastal
Phillips Pet
Pure Oil
Royal Dutch ftiefl
RCA
Reynolds Metal
San Jacinto
Servo Corp
Signal Oil and fttf
Sinclair OM
Socony Mobil
Sperry Rand
Standard Oil NH
Studebaker-PackaftJ
Superior Oftl
Texa s Gulf Pvork
Textron
Underwootl
United Canwe Of
US Rubber
US Steed
Westingihouo lieo
Wheeling Steel

56

621
T 1-18
am
35141
42b

6344

48
Wat
32? t

3214
4lHb
33V4b
I '4 b

36 J

5-16b
257 I

20 1

4 7-18 i

fib
46
78
55
IT
118
40b
20
38
I2b
26
:

12b

lWVa.
20b
48Mi
2
43
lib
86
107
tlb
197.
30
13
W W-48
48 W-48 19b
1500b.
. 19
14
31
11-16H
59
103
90
88

EDUCATIONAL

NEW YORK. (Wl) In tW

for Halloween a "aalelv firwt

costume: The mask says, "Stop:
on red; go on green." One eye is
red: one. sreen. The costume i

idecorated with traffic si ens I

ar . a

ifrcaution, stop 3tvooi lone, bo o

lift urn, cross on the green.

(Drive Inn)
Via Espafia
just JOO ft. from the.
San Francisco antranca.
Daily Special t

Charcoaled Filet Steak 1.75
Chicken Sancocho 0.60
Barbecued Rabbit 1.50
Barbecued Venison. . . 1.50
Hash with Yucca & Green

Plantain.

1.2:

Crisp Fried Chicken 1.25
Spaghetti with Goat Meat. . 1.25
Saturday & Sunday
Delicious Chicken Tamale l.OO-
Widc Choice of Your Favorite
Wines and Liquor

NEW YORK, (UPI) Styles In I

..peculation, as in clothes, change
constantly and the emphasis now J

is on reality rather than fantasy,

says Sidney B, Lune of Joseph Joseph-thai
thai Joseph-thai and Co.

The market's "soberer" nvi-l

romnent might make the once-bitr

ten speculator twice as shytoday.i

ne points .out.
"Time, and a healthy price ad

justment, have taken care of many!

problems in a market which

doesn't move in unison," he adds.

It is probably true, he notes, that!

the average-wide lows have been)
recorded for the balance of the'

year and that there are many in-.4

livldual candidates for
lighs.

19Stt

Hemphill, Noyes and Co. gay!

laluminium shares have been ablet

jto command a good market fol

lowing this yeir stemming iif

arge measure from new usee

hich are developing., Rm

'opper and Brass appears to fa

le of the best ways to invest 1

le future of this dynamic mdtts

y, rt adds.

Walston and Co. say General

i t net or 1959 is expected, w

more than douDie last year

S.06 a share. Motorola also looks.

a record 1959 net, it notes,

Wholesalers Stock Up For Christmas ;
As Statistics Point To Big Season

NEW YORK (UPI) It's
Christmas in the wholesale
markets with merchants prepar.
ing for a record holiday season
and a record sales total for all of
1959.
Income of consumers Is high.
The experts estimate that disposa disposable
ble disposable income for the nation will ap approximate
proximate approximate dollars in the fourth
quarter, a gain of 21 billion dollars
over a year ago. Disposable in income
come income is personal income after
taxes-spending money.
International Statistical Bureau
looks for consumer spending for
the remainder of the year to ex exceed
ceed exceed the gain in income.
It is expected the general public
will buy heavily of both durable
and non-durable good with the
greater gain in the durables. This
is a sign of prosperity. In times
of recession, consumers switch
their buying to necessities and
avoid pliances and automobiles.
Automobile men look), for an in increase
crease increase of 12 per cent (or more in
sales for December.
In the areas which haven't Tieen
hit by the steel strike merchants
look for heavier buying of higher
priced items generally and a ten tendency
dency tendency to buy more luxury Items.
Not a small amount of the buy buying
ing buying for thV remainder of the year
will add .0 consumer credit totals.

including department store rff

accounts and instalment, credit. I
Prof. Thomas G. Gies ef thf

University of Michigan, discussini
consumer credit, has "reduced, ai
interesting figure on the value o
durable goods now held by eon

sumers. Allowing for depreciation!

he places this figure at -an Vast
founding 20 billion dollars. 'Ci,. I

Professor Gies looks for shsrf

advances in installment credil

and wouldn't be surprised to tei

the figure mount to 100 billion doll

lars in the next two decades, mon
than double the current figure.

consumer credit currently 1

around 45 billion dollars and rh

experts look for it to mount durf

mg the remainder of the yesr af

a rapid rate despite tight men

at high rates of iifterest. All

which reflect, confidence by th

consumers, the economists bom
out. . ; J

Should there be a lessening of

liitciiiauuiiai leuBiuiie, as 'man

think may come, the tendency. ol
the part of consumers would be ti

spend more and save less, accord

mg to mercantile economists. ; I

Helping the retail trade voluml
this year, the several factors art

topped by increasing employmei
which has generated better, eo
sumer psychology. Store exec

tives find consumers in a bait

buying moos' .



TBI PANAMA AMERICAN AK IXT) F P END FVT DATET KFWSPAPEB
PAGI NINI
6Kupr.it nM'
THi ifotv op "'Martha wayni
Vic li Sutpklout
IY WILSON SCRUGGS. TEREY AND TUE PIKA7LS
RIS:iLLA'S POP
Stay In Thtrt
ly AL VI (.MI II

TCTSlUt, SEPTEMBER 19, 1959

"'y i-:, '"' f$$f all crr?ru. jdinN

1 1 jSCT WV SJFPEKO A HEART U VMOUR FATNR WILL STOP X."'
m 31UX' rM 50ja TOOLt J V4 AT HOTHIU6 TO PKEVEtfTOlK V'
. t HtTM BULAklCt nK I MAeRlAGE DltXTT ME LIE IU J
- -1 Wlf,.

I7"UI,1mi.,.i..,. ... A .'

ILLIY 00

UPTAIN IASY

pRTY MIIKLI

rtlCKLIf AND fit PtIINM

Friendly Goitur

Y MERRILL BLOSSl'R

EVMSY.'ftfcTOO SEUT COWARD

ME Tb APOLOOLE

RX. HIM

Tgowaad J

ULMV

IF HE CAME W PEKON

I'D I'D DO THIS

1

1

AMD I'D BEAT UP
ON HIM, AND SOWTCH

WIM.AND

lEr "1

US IN On
THIS, TOO,

daisy

P0660rJe HiM.' I TOLD HlM MOT

10 REPORT &ACK Tb ME IP HE WHS

FOLLOWED

LNOT i

LRi

N

tm. T.M H.1M

Chng In Plint

1Y V. T. HAMLlM

(Pa
IBS

...I'LL COOPERATE I'LL HELP WELL, NOW, THATX

von m in o axi nwTi-fiRAviTY different.

UMIT LIKE WE MOON PEOPLE ,'cXAY; OOP, TURN

USED INI OUR SPACE SHIPS; V IM LOOSE

BUT WHAT ABOUT AW, T'HECK WITH THAT NOW,
OUR TRIP BACK THIS THING OF OXYS IS WORTH
THERE AFTER V A LOT MORE THAN ANY OLD
THAT MILLION- HUNK OF GOLD BURIED IN

vfi n ft 1 1 i. rrJ I 111' k Dl 'A klnC D II CD I

100TI AND HIR RUDWRI

Thtir Lucky Diy

fcV IDGAR MARTIN

I

i

n

Improving

Y LiSLII TURNER

roue to $hawpu'
P05T-HVPMOTIC
5iweTiow Ar
THt parts pewNy
IS HVPMOTIZEP
JUlCKLy.5TUPIB
PHOHB 600k U5T-
matron thres
MIWUTE5.THEM-

NOW WRITE POWN ALL THE
I NAKAESiWITH APPKE$5E AkJP
JnUWBERi VOI CAN RECALL.

HEN SHE I

THRU

WAKE5 I

I .c a4ilit I ( tiffynw THAT sOU WIULiMtUT TmE-WHEN
k?r tXmSLJ m AvXkE 1 DON'T I KAKE THE POST-HYPUflnc I

m TllAmc kECALLAm OVSK TO

YOU'RE MUCH
TOO YOUNG
FOB DRIVING )

Undw not anotmer-

WORD ON TME SUBJECT.'

UNDERSTAND?

jp

1

V

1

v

A BOY SHOULDN'T,

GIVE UP SO r-V

EASILY.'

V.

ft,

JUGS BUNNY

Widt Awaktf

wax : e up and I
BWINfl ME A TfiiW J
NCW6PAPEg jy I Xg

I LIKE V WERE VAV
TO WEAPlARE, ELMER!
WITH MY WviAujNO
mAIASTjX

'now jdJ I"
1 more r3m
coffee! baTW

toDfsife True Life Adventures

ancy FOOTWORK &4

Wtt THunf PrnHnrti
WoriuRirhtiRuirk

TALL- OFP HIS BOU&H
WHILfe HE IS ASUEEP ?

0o KEET TKOM

WHILE SLEEPIMcS
3N THE WATER, GREBES
PAPPL.E 6LOWLV )M A
.CIRCLE WITH OKIE POOT.

The vek&ht
OF1 HIS
TIOKTEMS
THE LA,T?(SE
LEG TENDONS
IN SUCH A WAtV

THAT HIS TOES AKS
L.OCKEC7 INWAKP.
' Tfus PLAMINSO

HAS AM INCLINE!?, WSIC BOP WHEN HE
STANP6 OM ONE LE6.THE cCEMTETR Or OKAVnV
IS flRETU iOVER THE SUPFWriNS MEMBER.
THUS, HE iAN HOLE? THIS POSE FOR HOUR6.
fo-Zh Iitiibirte(J by King Fwtum SyndleaU,

Semtthlns Wrong

Y DICK CAVALLI

-s ii jt meem.e'6 been at x
Lal?i work: on time everv j
fa (&S MORNING FDR OVER
Ifcfl A MNTH AND HE )
Wl( NEVER LEAVES EARLV
WKV. ANYMORE J

HE 6WP6ALLHI6

COFFEE BREAK6, ANP

HE OFTEN WORKS RIGHT

THROUGH H 16 LUNCH

HOUR. HE'S BEEN
DOING THE WORK

OF TWO MEN.

DUX I
f IWONDEP
.t n WHAT HE '5

SIDE GLANCES

By Colbraith

MAJOR HOOPLi OUT OUR WAY

bY J. R. WILLIAMS

At lft ClM iCMTI tlitll

HlMK OF THIS WHITE-HAIRED

WLL LUY CsKfcfcTINi HEK

irftiR-TLlnnALiT ajii i Air-i

lMP TIMbKe TO YOU K TON t;

K&ADy, ERNEST? kEAD;

LMUSt A-ONfc, A" ViU.'

.. fUMBYMAD
lT-ltlklS.

TA6AIN l
crAn;Fr

RMEST cW

KIED"

fll'':lliiy NO NEVER MIWP--1LL JUST V WELL, DO ME A FAVOR AND 1
l l '!'!'!' DO THIS JOB MYSELF NOW.' WAIT FOR J1ST FIVE MORE
I I vOU PROMIiEP 1 DON'T KNOW ) SECONDS TILL I GET OUT
I h LOW6AS0 THAT VOLT P J OF RAN6E YOU'VE COT J
I HANfl THIS PICTURE POR ,A WORE FAITH IN YOUR AIM
I IMS. I'M SICK AND TlREP 1 THAN I HAVE, AN' 1 DON'T
V!! OF WAITING.' J WANT TO BE AROUND ,
A X. WHEN YOU PROVE A
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4, (VI Mr Vl7nir1
4 3d Amalfui Hour
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5 30 PANORAMA

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7 00

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10 30 Thf WhlMlfr
11 on (.FN NEWS
11 IS Fn Jirk Bennv and
Voir o? Flrfyton.

7:30 Jimmy Rorlgr

(ourtrsv of Arrnvla Tanama Alrv Alrv-PHONES:
PHONES: Alrv-PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1C57 3.1698 3.1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8a.m. to 6 p.m



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Khrushchev Pledges Eternal Friendship
Between Russia And Communist China

TOKYO Sept. 29 (UP1) Communist China opened its 10th anniversary celebration
miei. Njkita Khrushchev pledging "eternal friendship" between the two giant Communist

New China News Agency

regime, opened in Peiping's new and elaborate assembly hall of the Peoples Congress.
u-.L.iintr thp first dav was a message from Khrushchev. The Russian leader is not

m&MII' 'b ..... j

ping from Washington until tomorrow. His greetings were
committee of the Soviet Communist Party, who headed the

In, si ot ,WU .A li'um ulhrrl
Communis! naliun.s and Coiiuim
nit imnrmenls also addressi'il
" i . J . l,-. Hunt
.1,0 Ktpm i v. ni uuiiiK ih.t"-."'
Na 111
Hi)
CAu nunh 01 -Nunn
and Premier
Kim II -Sujife
01
Norlh Korea.
"The victory of the peoples
revolution in Chin has been
the moit outstanding event in
the history of mankind since
the great (Russian) October so socialist
cialist socialist revolution," Khrushchev
said in his message read by
Suslov. ,111
11 st nu-k a lreh. powerlul blow
al the tamp ol imperialism
and
reaction an I has exerted
Anmit influence on the
t re m
enl lie
course ol world history...
-The Soviet and Chinese peo peoples
ples peoples are linked li.v unbreakable
bonds ol eternal friendship ce
mented in Ihe joint struggle lor the
noble aims thev hold m common.
Back in the United Nations,
Nationalist China will condemn
the Communist Peiping regime
k.h,r. the General Assemmy to-
dav for the atrocities
in I ite
and the slave-labor
intern on the China
com mune
ma nland,
informed sources
reported.
The sources
nassarior Tinglu
said (.'binese am
F. Tsiang will in
orm the assembly that i.eneians
simo Chiang Kai -slick will not op oppose
pose oppose full I N debate on the Tibe
tan issue.
Both Nationalist and Communist
China agree on one thing: 'I hat
Tihet is essentially Chinese terri
tory even though it en.iove
T,.mvself-nilc from the
I aulo-estab-
lishmeivt of the Chinese republic
in 1911.
Tsiang is expected o put in
the UN record Chiang's promise
that Tibetans will be granted
the right of self-determination
if and when the Nationalists re recapture
capture recapture the China rrlainland.
The informants said Tsiang al alto
to alto planned a condemnation of the
commune system imposed on the
Chijiese farmers and peasants by
the Peiping regime.
A demand for the full debate
on Communist China's violation
of civil liberties in Tibet was put
before the assembly last night.
Ireland and Malaya submitted
to secretary-general Dag 11am-n.-iinlfl
a i-eouesl for inelusiin
of the question ol libel as an
ditional item on thh Assembly a
"""'"J"'" '..
genda.
Irish foreign Minister Frank
Aiken canvassed members of the
r.eneral Assemhlv s po w ? r t 11
steerine committee to support
his
proposal for a lull debate on Red
China's bloody suppression of civ civil
il civil liberties in Tibet.
Ireland and Malaya decided to
raise the Tibet issue despite op opposition
position opposition from India and other
Afro Asian countries which were
determined to keep it out of the
UN.
However, the Irish Malayan
proposal will avoid the thorny
political aspects involved in Red
China's crackdown on Tibetan
civil and religious freedom.
Aiken did ntit anticipate that the
Jl-natinn steering committee
would oppose including the pro proposal
posal proposal in the Assembly's agenda.
But he sought the highest possible
favorable vole for it.
Assured ol support from the
United Slates, which has de denounced
nounced denounced China as an 'internation 'international
al 'international outlaw" al this session of Ihe
UN. Irish sources predicted no
more than 14 nations would op oppose
pose oppose the resoluiion on the floor
of the 82 nal loit body.
Public opinion at home, which
has become steadily anti-Peioing
was counted on t0 force India
Weather Or Not
This weather report for the 24
hours etiriing ft a.m. today Is
prepared by the Meteorological
and Hydrngraphic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Ralhoa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE:
High
Low
HUMIDITY :
High
J.mv
89
81
76
95
78
98
95
WIND:
(max. mph i NVV-14
RAIN (inches) .02
WATER TEMP:
(Inner harbors) 81
NW-13
1.24
12
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
datun Eake 84.12
Madden Dam 227.81
BALBOA TIDES
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. !M)
High
Time HI.
1:42 am 14.3 ft.
2:02 p.m 115 ft.
Low
Time HI.
:03 a m 1.7 ft.
8:24 p.m 1.9 ft.

reported that the celebrations, honoring the Oct. 1, 1949,

and the other reluctant Afro-A-.
sian states to vote for the mea measure.
sure. measure. According to reports lrom Pan
n. on the Irontier between India
and Tibet, ( ninese Com m unist
troops from Tibet are taking over
land previous!) considered India's
and have reinforced their nam

Mins aloni; the border j.;v YORK, Sept. 29 U'PI) Adlai E. Stevenson revealed
Ihe reports said Chinese forces todav that Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev apparently has
just opposite the frontier of I'nme J abandoned his opposition to step-by-step control and inspection
Minister Jawaharlal Nehru's home0f disarmament bv an international control body,
slate of I'llar Pradesh flanking! n a copyrighted article in the New York Times, the former
lied held Tibet have started har Democratic Presidential candidate described Khrushchev's "fan "fan-assing
assing "fan-assing Indian businessmen and i tastit--' visit to the United States as a "hopeful omen" for world

confiscating their goods and mon money
ey money on the slightest pretext.
Traders and villagers said the
Chinese have moved in more
troops opposite Uttar Pradesh
and have built new roads and
six air-strips to supply them.
Chinese planes frequently vio violate
late violate Indian air space, they said.
The reports came from persons
in and arnind the village of Bara Bara-ho!i.
ho!i. Bara-ho!i. once considered India. The
Chinese have troops in the area,
claim Barahoti as their own and
have re-named it W'eeje.
According to the reports, they
took Barahoti by terrorizing vil villagers,
lagers, villagers, hampering the move movement
ment movement of traders who used the
town as a base and then seal sealing
ing sealing control by sending in 24
armed soldiers.
Only five years ago, residents
said, not a Chinese could be seen
along the border, although even
then Tibet was under Peiping's
rule. Then, they accepted Bara Barahoti
hoti Barahoti as Indian territory.
Just beyond Barahoti, a vast
tract of land which once was held
to be a no mail's land has been
taken over by the Chinese. Some
Chinese forces have made incur incursions
sions incursions across the Indian border it it-self.
self. it-self. reports said.
Traders, travelling between In India
dia India and Tibet said the Reds jeer jeered
ed jeered them.
They said they were taufited
with boasts that the Chinese
Communists would rule India I
soon.
Meanwhile Ihe Chinese Commu-'
nists called a five-day hall to Red!
shelling of Ihe Nationalist Quemoyl
offshore islands to mark the 10th

)(i-,"i i luuiming i me
'Communist regime.

,. r 4U r
i ue aiinouneemeni sain hat
Communist artillery would slop
all shelling on Sepl. 29 and Oct. 1
as an anniversary "expression of
solicitude."
This meant
(ive-dav halt to
the gunfire inasmuch as the Com Communists
munists Communists have been shelling the
Quemoys only on odd numbered
days since the massive artillery
attacks of late last Year.
IT E) A V
PRICES: 75.40
SHE WAS
GOING TO
TEACH
THE MAN
WHO
UNDERSTOOD
WOMEN
CL-ttA,.

rVi Rt,r)0

i7',;?a-. Itih
Nobody ever
fouled up a
honeymoon like

t 1

the man who
understood women 1

Carom 1

Wko PHD

CESARE DAN0VA-

COLON by

read by Mikhail Suslov, secretary of the powerful central

official Russian delegation.
0

Adlai Reveals K Junks Objection
To Disarmament Control Inspection

peace. He said conversation with

spent together in Iowa indicated a sharp reversal in some of the
Soviet Premier's attitudes.
"I asked if he thought he could satisfy our Insistence on ade adequate
quate adequate and simultaneous inspection and control if we agreed to
his proposal for complete step-by-step disarmament," Stevenson
said. ''His replv was that he thought international control and
inspection adequate for afRh of the phases envisaged by his Unit United
ed United Nation's speech routef be achieved..."

"The replies left me with (he
clear understanding that in their
view an international control body
should have the power and facili facilities
ties facilities to control and inspect each
step of the disarmament process

to the extent necessary In insure were to fill in the foreign diplo diplo-compliance
compliance diplo-compliance with that step, such mats on the discussions at Camp

powers and facilities to
cording to the needs
van ac-
of each
phase
The former Illinois governor
said this view threw new light on
Khrushchev's disarmament pro proposals.
posals. proposals. Khrushchev's UN speech, he
said, was generally interpreted
as offering full inspection only
after complete and total disarm disarmament
ament disarmament had been made over a pe period
riod period of years by both sides act
ing "in good faith.'
Stevenson said Khrushchev told
him the interna) ional control hodv
should have "free" access to in inspect
spect inspect all countries for compliance
once the process of total disarm disarmament
ament disarmament is completed.
He said Khrushchev agreed to
a suggestion that an internation international
al international police force might also be
necessary in an unarmed world
to protect little countries from
the sheer population weight of
adjacent big countries. 1
"He quickly replied that some something
thing something of that kind might he needed
and that he was ready 'to discuss'
an international force," Steven Stevenson
son Stevenson reported.
"While I wish T could be more
sanguine that something positive
might come of Mr. K's sweeping
disarmament proposals, he cer certainly
tainly certainly gave me new hope that they
meant business this time."
In Washington, representatives
of the 15 NATO allies were invited
to the State Department today for
IB EH LA
SHOWS: 1:00 2:45 .4:40

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P'uJ.t. d and Drf. tj Ifom
roZl NUNNALLY
Of LUXE CINIMASCOPE
STFRCOPHONiC

Pre.
establishment of
the Red
scheduled to arrive in Pei
Khrushchev during the day they
a briefing on President Eisenhow-,
er's talks with Khrushchev.
Livingston T. Merchant, assis assistant
tant assistant secretary of state for Euro European
pean European affairs, and Fny IX Kohler,
the deputy assistant secretary,
David, Md.
The consultation was In line
with Eisenhower's promise to
keep America's allies fully in informed
formed informed of conversations with the
Russians on Berlin, disarma disarmament
ment disarmament and other international is issues.
sues. issues. Secretary of State Christian
Ilerter gave similar information
yesterday to representatives of
the SEATO pact nations. However,
it was reported that Eisenhower
and Khrushchev touched only
'briefly on Far Eastern matters
The briefings of Allied diplomats
were viewed as a necessary pre prelude
lude prelude to substantive negotiations on
the Berlin problem and a proba probable
ble probable Bi gFour Summit meeting this
winter before Eisenhower visits
Russia in the spring.
Informed sources said that
Eisenhower and Khrushchev
reached no agreement during
their weekend talks en where
the Berlin negotiations should
start, or when or at what diplo diplomatic
matic diplomatic level.
The President fold his news
conference yesterday that his dis discussions
cussions discussions with the Soviet leader
removed the threat of force over
Berlin and cleared away most of
Eisenhower's objections to a Sum Summit
mit Summit conference.
He also said that he and
Khrushchev agreed no deadline
should be set for reaching agree agreement
ment agreement on Berlin.
VOSTTA
6:45 9:00 p.m.
0Orv,tta
a. t
2a
br, Htttgtjr by
JOHNSON
The j'o- M th Otf
by Ho"in Gary
3OUN0

today with Russian
nations.

International Girl Scouts Look To

For Entire Budget; $3000 Needed For This Year
1

The International Girl Scouts
provide a scouting program for
girls seven through 18 years of
age in the Latin American com communities
munities communities of the Canal Zone.
These Scouts receive their sole
financial support from the Canal
Zone United Fund, being one of
19 participating agencies. This
year the amount of $3,00 is budg budgeted
eted budgeted for the International Girl
Scouts out of an overall United
Fund goal of $122,00.
Costs are low because of the
fine support given by volunteer
adult workers. The International
Girl Scouts now include some 27
troops reaching some 550 girls.
About 70 adult volunteers help,
and more are being trained.
Open to girls of all faiths and
races, the program is built on
educational lines in civics, home home-making,
making, home-making, .service, projects, arts,
crafts, and nature study, motivat motivating
ing motivating them toward the high ideals
of womanhood. Certainly this is
a worthwhile target!
In addition, the girls are taught
poise, leadership, a high sense of
personal duiy and are oriented to
ward assuming adult responsibili
ty in the home, the community
and the world.
Since their foundingin 1950, the
International Girl Scouts have
made a major contributions to toward
ward toward good citizenship in the Canal
Zone.
Organized programs are being
carried on continuously on a troop
participation basis. The girls are
taught scoutcraft both indoors and
out of doors.
Out-of-door activities include
hikes, cook-outs, camping, camp camp-fires,
fires, camp-fires, health and safety instruc instruction,
tion, instruction, and courts of award at
which there is presentation of
badges earned for proficiency in
scoutcraft.
Indoors, the International Girl
Scouts are taughi home-making,
arts and crafts of various types,
interior decoration to enable them
to beautify and enhance not only
their own homes but those of
others, scout skills, and general in instructions
structions instructions for the development of
their character and native talent.
Gaillard Lighting
Contract Goes
Tot. R. Sommer
A contract for the installa installation
tion installation of a lighting; system in
Gaillard Cut, part of the over overall
all overall plan to increase the capacity
of the' Panama Canal, has been
awarded by the Panama Canal
Co. to L. R. Sommer, well-konwn
Panama contractor who made a
low bid of $467,201.69 on this
part of the lighting project.
The contract for the other
half of the project, which takes
in the lighting system for the
Panama Canal locks, was award awarded
ed awarded last week to E. M Freund
of Balboa, whose offer of $396, $396,-159.70
159.70 $396,-159.70 was low.
Bids on the Canal lighting
were opened vr-t-Ei'dav at Bal
boa. Th bidding was highly
competitive with offers being
received from a largo number
of Panama ar.d United States
companies.
The lighting p.ojecl, sched scheduled
uled scheduled to be completer, within ap
proximately one year, ha? been
designed to permit uninterrupt uninterrupted
ed uninterrupted 24-hour operation of the Ca Canal
nal Canal Locks and to provide safe
and useful lighting throughout
Gaillard Cut so that large supper-carrier
type ships can be
handled after dark.
Under the contract awarded
to Sommer, lighting in the 43,-000-foot
stretch of the Cut be between
tween between Gamboa and the north
end of Pedro Miguel Locks will
be provided by approximately
1100 shielded light fix t u r e s
which will provide mild illumi
nation and good visibility of
both bank lines of the water
way without glare to the pilots
Hurricane Lashes
Charleston; Worst
Blow Expected Today
CHARLESTON. S. C. Sept. 29-
(UPI ) 1 lurricane Grarie whined
in from the Atlantic with winds of
125 miles an hour today and killed
at least one person in lis first
smash at the mainland.
The wind gauge at Ihe Charles Charles-Ion
Ion Charles-Ion weather bureau was knocked
out shortly after 11 a.m. and at
that time the weather experts es estimated
timated estimated the velocity was about
100 miles an hour.
The storm's fyjl power was ex expected
pected expected to strike near noon today.
' Power was off thro ughout
Charleston. Hospitals wr-nt on
emergency circuits.
An unidentified man was killed
in Beaufort countv south of
Charleston when a tree toppled on
his ear.
An elaborate amateur radio net
work was put into operation to aid
state polire and Civil Defense au
Ihorities in rescue operations. Peo
pie were urged to stay off Ihe

streets because of the danger from
falling trees and flying glass.
Red Cross rescue teams shelter sheltered
ed sheltered hundreds through the night, in including
cluding including many who were attending
a two slate Methodist conference
and were living in tents.

1 ' ; ,it

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL GIRL
raftc toiifrht In tha InllrilllHnnnl
k mi"uiuuoi
The girls take home nursing
courses under trained leadership.
There are troops in all the La Latin
tin Latin American communities on the
Canal Zone.
Troops exchange visits with one
another to display friendship,
learn to meet and enjoy other
pople, and to learn the art of
sharing. These are the attributes
on which Ihe organization is found founded.
ed. founded. The International Girl Scouts
take active part in all national
and patriotic exercises, such a na national
tional national holidays, Girl Scouts Birth Birthday
day Birthday and Juliette Low Birthday.
In a broad sense, theorgani theorgani-zation
zation theorgani-zation dedicates itself to the
building and development of the
girls intelectually, morally, vo vocationally
cationally vocationally and culturally for bet better
ter better citizenship in their respective
communities.
Despite the fact that the Inter
national Girl Scouts depend etv
trelv on United Fund suppot, thev
do not ask that you designate
your contribution for their sole
use. If you give vour fair share
to the Canal Zone United Fund the
Girl Scouts will receive their
budgeted amount. Everyone be
nefits when everyone gives the,
fair share way.
Graveside Service
Al Corozal Tomorrow
For Ed Rounsaville
Graveside services for Erl Roun Rounsaville,
saville, Rounsaville, Curundu resident who died
yesterday at Gorgas Hospital, will
be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at
Corozal Cemetery. The Rpv. Wil William
liam William Baldwin of St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church, Cocoli, will of officiate.
ficiate. officiate. Mr. Rounsaville, who wfs 82.
marie his home at House 672 Cu Curundu
rundu Curundu with his son-in-law and
daughter, Mr: and Mrs. Robert D.
Mecaskey.
Born in Arkansas on Dec. 24.
1877, he was in the contracting
and copstruction business in the
U.S. before coming to the Canal
Zone.
In addition to his son in law and
daughter, Mr. Rounsaville is sur survived
vived survived by two sons, John Robert
and Calvin J. Rounsaville, and a
riauchter. Mrs. Gay. Cain, all of
Dallas, Texas; three sisters. Mrs.
May Garner of Bertram, Texas;
Mrs. Zula Smithson of Wichita
Falls, Texas, and Mrs. Meda Mc Mc-Rride
Rride Mc-Rride of California, and a brother,
Ila Rounsaville of Cal'fornia.
Grand Jury Indicts
Briber; Requests
Robbie's Autograph
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 28
(UP1) A grand jurv took one
minute today to inri'rt a 42 year year-old
old year-old restaurant owner on charges
of trying to bribe Philadelphia
Phillies pitcher Humberto Robin Robinson.
son. Robinson. The jury, which returned the hill
charging Harold Friedman with
bribery of an athletic contest,
heard in minutes of testimony
from Robinson. Then they asked
him for his autograph.
Robinson testified that Fried
man, who also faces vice charges,
offered him $1,500 to lose the sec
ond game of last Tuesday's dou
bleheader against Cincinnati.
Robinson rejected the alleged
offer and went on to pitch and win
his best game of the season.
Assistant District Attorney Ber
nard J. Coodheart, who told of Ihe
jurors asking for Robinson's anlu
graph, said the speed with which
the charge against Friedman has
been processed has aaved the
commonwealth close to $1,001

SCOUTS practice camera technlcues. This is r.n nf t.hm ..J

liW Cm,t, n f tu.
uui wwul3, o u osciiuj ui nic

Cristobal YMCA Has United Fund Goal

Of $5900 For Men
The Cristobal YMCA, one of the
19 agencies participating in this
year's Canal Zone United Fund
Campaign, is an organization de devoted
voted devoted to fostering physical, mental
and spiritual welfare oof young
people.
The goal set for the Cristobal
YMCA is $5900.
Each year the YMCA deficit is
filled by the National Council of
Anti-Malaria Team
Charged As Boy Dies
Of Poisoned Rice
Criminal charges were filed yes
terday against a group of em
ployes of the Antimalaria Section
of the Health Ministry who al allegedly
legedly allegedly caused the accidental poi
son death of a six year-old boy last
Saturday.
The charges were filed in the
Third Circuit Court by Hortensio
Florez on behalf of his mother-in-law
Mrs. Juan Davis, whose son,
Mario, died en route to San
to Tomas Hospital Saturday after
allegedly eating food which had
been sprayed With dieldrin, an in insect
sect insect exterminating liquid used to
control Mosquitoes.
Another son of Mrs. Davis, Mo
desto, 7, was hospitalized in a ser serious
ious serious condition from the effects of
the same liquid.
Mrs. Davis said an anti-malaria
crew went into her house in mo
Abajo last Friday while she was
away at work and although only
the two small boys were there
proceeded to spray the house with
the insect exterminator.
She said the spray impregnated
some rice and water she had left
on the stove and which the chil children
dren children later ate and drank.
Mrs. Davis was not aware that
..nything was amiss until later
tnat night when the children
awoke complainii.g of severe pains
in the abdomen, although they
seemed unusually thirsty during
the afternoon when she came
home from work.
She decided to rush them to the
hospital shortly after midnight
Friday, Mario died before they
teached the hospital.
Graveside Services
For Amos W. Fox
Al Corozal Thurs.
Graveside funeral services will
be held at 10 am Thursday at
Coiji.al Cemeieiy for Amos W
Fox. retired employe of the Per
sonnel Bureau who died last
Wednesday at Gorgas Hospital.
The services will be conduct conducted
ed conducted by Rev. Orville Jay Hlne of
the Balboa Union Church.
Mr. Fox, who was 73 years
old, collapsed Tuesday night in
the Balboa Service Center. He
was taken to Gorgas Hospital
where he died the following
morning.
Mr. Fox was born in Eldred,
Penna. In 1912 he came to the
Canal Zone as a clerk with the
Isthmian Canal Commission, a
post he held for two years. In
1917 he was reemployed aS a
clerk in personnel work. He was
Administrative Assistant in the
Personnel Bureau when he re retired
tired retired in 1946. After his retire retirement,
ment, retirement, he lived at the Tlvoli.
He Is survived by a brother
C. W. Fox, of Tampa, Fla., and
a sister, Mrs. Carrie McLaugh McLaughlin,
lin, McLaughlin, of Newcastle. Penn.

United Fun!

i i- .. .. .
anai .'me united f unfl
of Armed Services
iivias in iNew i one. A sma
amount also is derived from th
gift shop and concession in th
i MCA building.
The Cristobal YMCA fills Jk v4
ry aerinue gap existing on th
Atlantic Side. It is the only sed
ice center catering exclusively t
members of the Army, Navy an
Marine Corps in the downtow
shopping district of the city
Colon. w
It hat many thingar offer thef
serviceman and it equipped lid
fill his off duty time. Clean and
comfortable living quarters are!
available.
Ping-pong and billiard ire fea
tires of the 'Y" game room.
reaamg room and TV room an
nearby for those seeking these rl
lazations.
There is dancing in the bal
room every Saturday night, a
members of the Girls Service
ganization usually are well
presented as dancing partner
jwice each month a dance bar!
is featured and the iuke box
used the remaining two Saturd
nights.
Activities are not Confined to tl
weekends, and certain nights eat
week are set aside for speci
events.
Each Wednesday from 7:30
10 p.m., a kitchen party is held
conjunction with the Girls ServiJ
Organization. Servicemen help
preparation of the meals whid
may include such items as
dogs, spaghetti or chow mein.
Among the features whi
help the YMCA keep its cost
to a minimum are the marr
hour, of time given by Vofunt
teers.
Officials of the United. Fund
urging that donors avoid design!
lion of specific amounts to' pd
ucuiar agencies of the fund.
When each makes his entire col
tribution to the United Fund' d
designated, iU is then posairl
(or funds to be distributed to ea
agency according to its neea
Bids For Repairing
Streets, Painting
Sheds Are Opened
Wrleht Brothers of Colon l
TroDical Paint Co. made "1
offers on two Panama ban
maintenance projects, bids
which were opened at Bala
Heights yesterday afternoon
A low bid of $83,641 was
tered by Wright Brothers
the work of replacing;
widening streets in Cristof
and Rainbow City. v
The Tropical Paint Co. m
a low base bid totality; 142,
on an four scneautea maiuu
. .... .. j
in the maintenance paini wq
for the second quarter pf
fiscal yean it
The street rerjalrs on the
lantic side included the irldq
inn of Trinidad Street in Ri
bow City and the replacemi
of certain sections of Rooseu
Avenue and Canal Street
Cristobal. The work also will
elude the constructior; of fcd
tional sewer and rtorm tira
aire facilities and the relocat
of the existing bus stop shell
on Trinidad Street rKr
The second quarter malnt
ance taint work includes
erterlor painting of the big tj
sonry warehouse sneas loca
on pier 18 in Balboa and' pi
6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 in Crlstoba
Also in the contract are sen
buildings, offices, light po
cyclone fences and a numbed
Panama Canal structure!
I both sides af th Isthmua.

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