The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03135

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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CANADIAN WHISKY
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"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln
PAXAMA, R. F., MONDAY, SEPTEMBER t8, 1959
FIVE CENTS

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AN INDEPENDEWJIp;,, DAILY NEWSPAPER

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THE HANDS OF THE CLOCK stood at just a minute past 7 am today when delegation of 12 employes of th Sosa Hill Quarry
plant ef this Maintenance Division covereed on the offfce of Lt. Gov. John JX McElheny to present the first Company-Goyern-

-BwaitotjfJ United,

fmngfwsi. year, naa-Deenoiitrjociceyed inUiTr,-ry-x' ,i;ji'iot- Trmvf ur-Jt -yrO coujot i wrnr,,
or the Fund Kickoff the fiosk -Hill contnigen.s5&' fl" honors as first tifavdV UerHfi' 'jjpenfTheit.,coDtriotitttm'
represented 100 per cent participation of the 5T" Quarry employes The United Fund cBh'fcffbutien for the group was presented to
the Lieutenant Governor in the latter's capacity as chairman of the Governor's Committee for Voluntary Giving. Led by keymen
N. M. Elich, iii khaki, next to the lieutenant governor, and Goldbourn P. Maynard second from, the left, the delegation of 12 em employes
ployes employes made jtheir presentation in the presence of F. H. Lerchen, Maintenance Engineer, left.
United Fund Wheels Are Set In Motion
By Potter, Entertainers On Rail Stage
jf, Grey skies did not discourage or a drizzle halt the United Fund Kick.Off Train as it moved north today on its ap.
pointed run.
I, Music, songs, comedy and talk were delivered from a flat-car spotted between two Panama Railroad coaches.
A huge banner reading "Give the United Way" was hung along the floor of the flat car.
t At the first stop Paraiso a dripping figure in raincoat s tepped onto the mobile stage to start the entertainment.

He introduced himself as
Afterward the vocalists and
nitarists, the governor and other,
f Is put on a show for about 500
eople, some standing under urn urn-fellas,
fellas, urn-fellas, others wearing raincoats,
Cd still others standing further
ay under the eaves of Paraiso
uses. i
Skies had cleared by the time
It Fund train moved on to Gam Gam-ba
ba Gam-ba where some 500 schoolkiris
tdadults were out to meet it anf
eer the show.
Follwoing its Atlantic tide per performance,
formance, performance, the entertainers are
booked for return to the Pacific
tide where the day's fan will be
climaxed at 4:45 with a big show
at Balboa. Theater.
i Meanwhile the Division of Vet Vet-rinary
rinary Vet-rinary Medicine of the Panama
anal's Health Bureau got the
im on everyone else. In the
ritted Fund, that is.
.Distribution of material to key key-tan
tan key-tan soUcitors started last week
t enable units to be in readiness
it today.
The veterinarians were so 1m 1m-fctient
fctient 1m-fctient to "do. their fair share"
fiat they bat ; ,the gun. They
tanvassed the division, got 100
ferticipation, and had the dona dona-Ion
Ion dona-Ion slips and the contributions
lelivered to the mail opening
init at Balboa Heights by 1:30
t.m. Friday. In fact, this Health
lureau contribution arrived al almost
most almost before the United Fund mail
mit was set up.
Credits go to several people.
' Keymen for the division was
Clifford Francis, clrek at the
Ceroial Small Animal Quaran Quarantine.
tine. Quarantine. Chairman ef the drive was
Robert i). Schulte. Chief of the
Division ef Veterinary Medicine
is Dr. Robert O. Marhonoy.
Health Director It Col. Themes
0. Fallen. Gladly accepting the
contribution for United Fund
was Edqar R. McArthur, of the
mail unit.
This unprecedented action poses
i question. Do before-fhe-deadline
donors go in a special class by
Ihemselves
There has been an informal race!
tach year to see what unit could
irhieVe 100 participation in col collections
lections collections and deliver the result to

Fund campaign on Klckoff Day,

"Flash bulb Willie.
the Administration Building soon
est after seven o'clock on kickoff
day.
If siich a race appears today,
United Fund officials say. there
should be two sets of hoorays. One
for the veterinary group who
jumped the gun, and another for
the unit which, while observing
kickoff day, showed its enthusiasm
and support wiht a fine job first
done.
Desperation March
From Colon Branded
h CommwnisI led
The organizing committee of
the proposed Oct. 5 "hunger and
desperation march" from Colon
was branded over the weekend
by the Panama Secret Police as
"communist dominated."
A spokesman for the Secret
tii -oU v,n ,,.,.. o5 hawrl
Police said the charge v. as oaseci
nn th fart that knnu;n rnm-
munists Juan Anino Cedeno,
Marta Matamoros and Andres
Galvan are advisers on the
committee.
In addition the the spokes spokesman
man spokesman said the committee also
gets advice from Carlos J. Lo Lopez
pez Lopez and Felix Dixon, who were
described by the spokesman as
"recalcitrant native commu communists."
nists." communists." According to the spokesman,,
the majority of those mention mentioned
ed mentioned have received communist
indoctrination in countries be
hind the Iron Curtain at vari various
ous various times.
The Secret Police also said'
they have knowledge that com communists
munists communists are bent on creating
disturbances In Panama, add adding
ing adding that Panamanian commu communist
nist communist leaders Carlos F. Chang
Marin, J6se de la C. Tufton and
Rupert L Thomas left, here only
a few days ago on a trip be behind
hind behind the. Iron Curtain, via
Mexico.
The spokesman said the de department
partment department was sure that that the
purpose Cf the trip was to Ret
detailed instructions from the
Kremlin on the carrying out of
subverslye acts In Panama.

While the..osia Hill Quarry gangs,; wh led. the organization-lrr

Injuries In Atlantic Side Accident
Fatal To Army Employe Harry Levine

Harry George Leyine, an Army
civilian employe with a long re record
cord record of service on the Isthmus,
died at 7:15 this morning at Coco
auiu nospuai. r
.Levine, 59, was employed as a
lead foreman slid pest control
equipment operator with the post
engineer, Fort Davii.
He was injuredSvbn. he ap apparently
parently apparently lost control of the Ar Army
my Army Jeeps he was driving toward
Colon in a heavy rainstorm, one one-quarter
quarter one-quarter mile north of Coco Sol6
Hospital, about 11:20 Friday
morning.
Levine apparently slajn med and
on his brakes, swered to the right,
struck a bridge abutment, glanced
r j i i i. ; i
n"P ""'"alien inio a dus wnicn
h d h -.,: tnwarA
..
ma on the opposite side of. J the
highway. No one on the bus was
injured. The jeep was demolished
The bus driver, Cecil Oliver
Knight of Sabanita, flagged an
Today's Transits
(Scheduled)
Northbound 15
Southbound 13
TOTAL 28
(Clear Cut: 3)

other chiva and transferred his 14
passengers. Knight went to

help Levine but the injured man!
had been picked up by another1
vehicle and was on the way to Co-i
co Solo Hospital. Admitted about
11:35, he was placed on the ser-1
iously ill list, suffering from mul multiple
tiple multiple internal injuries.
Levine's federal service here in- i
eluded employment with the En-'
gineer Section prior to 1944, and
with the Navy at Coco Solo. In
1950 he was employed by the Air
Force as a civilian in Alaska. On
return to the Canal Zone in 1951
he was associated with the Trans Transportation
portation Transportation Section motor pool and
the Engineers on the Pacific side,
and since May 1955 he was with
the insect control branch on the
Atlantic aide.
Survivors include his wife, Ma Ma-nuela,
nuela, Ma-nuela, and six children, all of
Gulick Heights, and a brother,
Louis Levine, of Birmingham, Ala
Funeral arrangements have not
been completed.
Cuban Fishermen
Held Far Fishing
In US Waters
KEY WEST; Fla., Sept. 28 -(UPI)-t.
Five Cuban fishermen
wtre held today on charges of
fishing In American waters and
illegal entry into the United
States.
U.S. Park Service and Bordei
Patrol agents arrested the five
Sunday as they fished from a 45 45-foot
foot 45-foot boat within the boundaries of
Fort Jefferson national park at
Dry Tortugas, 60 miles west of
Key West.
Names of the Cubans were not
released. Authorities said they
probably will be arraigned today
before a U.S. commissioner here.

90 Years of Worldwide Adventure End
With Gorgas Death Cf Tivoli's Krus

Folke Maurice Von Krusenstier Krusenstier-na
na Krusenstier-na died at Gorgas hospital at 4
am yesterday. He had entered
the hospital Thursday night fol following
lowing following a stroke suffered in his
room at Tivoli Guest House.
Mr. Von Krusenstierna was a
naturalized American. He was
born in Orebro, -Sweden, and was
a memoes: oi one or mat coumry s
oldest titled families, its written
record beginning in 1545. Had he
lived until Oct. 1, he would have
been 90 ears old.
A veteran of. US Army serv service
ice service in the Spanish American War,
he wet retired from the Pane Pane-mo
mo Pane-mo Cenel organization in 1936.
He first came to the Canal Zone
in 101 and was at one time
Chief Customs Inspector for the
Port ef Balboa.
Though bent and requiring the
use of, a cane, Krus, as he was
generally known on the Isthmus.
had Jretained all of his faculties
and was a well man for his &ge
until his fatal illness.
Krus was the son of Baron Folke
S. Von Krusentierna, who war
general manager of a chain ol
Swedish railways. There wre five
admirals in the family and it was
for this career that the son was
destined when at the age of 12 he
was enrolled as a cadet in the
Swedish Royal Navy.
He disliked Navy life, had no
desire to become an officer and
shrunk from becoming enmeshed
In'Jbe formal, life of his rela rela-iei
iei rela-iei .A- -..
o!l his own bent, and
wtft mViather's permission
thtph:iot his approval, Krus
signed on before the mast in the
sailing ship Aurora to see tne
world.
He saw a lot of it from the
decks and fog'sle of sailing ves vessels,
sels, vessels, deserting often as was
customary when food or condi conditions
tions conditions displeased him.
Seamen's documents were of
small irnoort then. If an able
seaman didn't return after pay payday,
day, payday, nobody worried. The ship
signed on another. The seaman
checked in at a waterfront
boarding house end presently
took another berth.
But deserting once in Montevi Montevideo
deo Montevideo was not so easy. Young Kms
slipped over the side .'ind tared
swimming ashore. A tough captain
persuaded harbor police to pull
him from the water and bring him
back aboard.
Blackening his faco and arms
with coal dust from the hunkers,
(so he couldn't be seen while
swimming) he tried again after
dark That time he made it a a-shore
shore a-shore bift was jailed. Later. Jar Jarful
ful Jarful of his life, he was stood up in
8 courtyard before a detachment
of soldiers.
At this point a not-so-fnendlv
ram rushed into the area end
butted the prisoner 'rom behind.
Krus went sprawling. The Uru Uruguayans
guayans Uruguayans roared with laughter.
Everybodv was se amused that
he military Invited tiim to a good
Sarah
Fined In London
For Drunkenness
LONDON, Sept. 28 UP1)
Sarah Churchill, stress daughter
of Sir Winston, was fined $560 to today
day today for being drunk and disorder-
lyA policeman told the Bow Street
Magistrate that Miss Churchill,
45, was holding "a sort of politic political
al political meeting" in a London snack
bar last Saturday night when he
was called to eject her.
Police constable David Bearne
said "I got her outside and she
tried to get back so I arrested
her." When charged she said 1
am not guilty
She was charged with being
drunk and disorderly."
In January last year Miss Chur Churchill
chill Churchill was arrested and jailed for
drunkeness en Los Angeles. She
was fined and released.
After her release she returned
to Englnd to begin the slow pro process
cess process of provincial theater work to
re-estabnth her name on the Brit British
ish British stage.
After an appearance in Terence
Rattigan' "Variations on a
Theme? she got the star role in J.
M. Barrle'a "Peter Pan." During
its Liverpool run she had another
clash with the law.
Sarah then got into a mld-morn-Ing
argument with a taxi driver
after"' refusing to pay her fare.
She was carrid into court by
four policemen and fined $5.60
which a spectator paid.

Evasion

o
MR KRUC
meal and taught him enough Span Spanish
ish Spanish to clear himself and ship out
on another vessel in :i few days.
Along the New York waterfront
one day, he heard of a ship bound
for San Diego. Supposing it was a
Caribbean port, he signed on only
to find himself on a four month
voyage around the Horn to Cali California.
fornia. California. Chow and conditions were so
poor, Krus was cured of handling
lines on sailing ships, 4n-I(os An Angeles,
geles, Angeles, a recfuitirig poster caught
hi eye afid he enlisted in th US
Army for thre yeirs.
As a cavalrymen in frontier
posts, he helped in the finel tam taming
ing taming of the West, had a clear rec recollection
ollection recollection of the famous old fioht fioht-er
er fioht-er Indian. Geronimo.
In the Army, he w;;s promoted
to scr"eant and became an Amer American
ican American c;ti'en. Much of his service
was at Ft. Stanton, Texas, and
when it was finished he went
home on a visit jo Sweden Sou'h
Africa was unvisited. so he paid
his fare to Capetown where he
served in a nirrecnl-ir mili,'a
which w;'S brought into Qi'et n v'ic
toria's British Armv .it the ,;me
of the Matabele P"h"liion. Krus
rememberer! Cecil Rhodes, and
could recall many words of an
African dialect.
Returning to the United States
in IfW. he lived in an Antonio
for a time an rlbeeame a ndm"
instructor with the Na'ional Guard
in New York.
Another liieh in the Army took
him through he Smnish American
War. eiving him a toM service of
vears.
Once he returned to Swe',nn to
resume his place wi'li Vs familv.
But at the last minute he (banker!
his mind, retained his American
f.;t;.nnoh!n. and went' back to th
Stale-.
H first came to Panama in
1908 and ioined the Canal on
May 31, 1910, es a plainclothes
sergeant in the Police Division.
After resigning from the cus customs
toms customs servjee in ,1917, he lived in
New York and was in the sugar
business in Cuba for several years
before returning to the Zone in
1928.
He was retired at 62 in 1936 and
for the next six years spent most
of his time in Potrerillos, Chiri Chiri-qui.
qui. Chiri-qui. as the manager of a sugar
mill.
Meanwhile, on a Europe-bound
liner, he met Miss Beatrice Drew
of Evanston, III., to whom he was
later married. After her death,
his wife's sisters, Misses Annie
and Mildred Drew of Riverside,
Conn., gave a home to his two
daughters while they attended
high schools and Vassar College.
The daughters, Mrs. Robert P.
Stephens of Alexandria, Va., and
Mrs. Peter Bently, of Old Green Greenwich.
wich. Greenwich. Conn., have frequently vis visited
ited visited Krus on the Isthmus.' He al also
so also left three grandchildren.
Krus had appeared to be his
usual self on Thursday when two
of his close friends, .1. E. Jacob
and Crede Calhoun, had lunch
with him at the Tivoli.
His death has cast gloom over
the guest house.
For years, when he wes asked
how ho was, which was fre frequently,
quently, frequently, he replied with e cheer cheerful
ful cheerful smile, "Much worse." He
had e fine courage end strong
will and at the most difficult
times was uncomplaining.
Today K. E. Frauenhelm, Assis Assistant
tant Assistant Manager of the Tivoli aid an
old and close friend of Krus, said:
"We'll miss him a lot around
here."
Instructions are awaited from
his family as to the disposition of
his remain.

Charge

Civic Counci

Says Admin Tries

Whitewash Job J

A Pacific Civic Council spokesman today accused tha
Canal Administration of "double-dealing" in denying
Balboa postmaster Arthur T. Cotton a choice Diablo
home, while giving it to Supply General Manager John J.
Barton on an "officials for quarters" assignment.
Yesterday Balboa Heights offered its official ex explanation
planation explanation for the incident which has fired tempsrs
throughout the Zone, pointing out the Barton assignment
was reauested and approved through routine adminis administrative
trative administrative channels "early this month," and that consequent consequently
ly consequently the disputed quarters never were actually placed on
the "housing vacancy" list.
But the Council spokesman challenaed the Balboa

Heights reference to when the Barton assignment was
e'enred rs p-rj "an attempt to whitewash plain
favoritism."
According to the spokesman, Barton first became a a-ware
ware a-ware of the Diablo house and its extreme desirability on
Sept. 19, a Saturday, thus making Monday, Sept. 21 tht
earliest possible date on which action could have been

taken to s?t the house aside,
cutive.
'ft was the foll&wLng day, Sept.
22, .that the Council clashed with
Gov. William E. Potter in a
stormy meeting at which the Bar Barton
ton Barton assignment was revealed.
, .The Council strenuously sup supported
ported supported 33-year Canal veteran Cot Cotton's
ton's Cotton's unofficial request for the
house on the grounds that it ncv
er had been previously set aside
for executive use, and that it was
manifestly unfair to nass over the
Balboa postmaster ia favor of an
employe with only twq years Ca Ca-na1
na1 Ca-na1 service.
Rarlon has been on the Isthmus
onl" since 1 P-7 while CoMon, a
second generation Zomari. has
served coniimio'"-lv since 192':.
Zonians or-heri 1ofJV grudging- j
ly admitted Ball-oa Heights mav
have acted in the nvlter techni technically
cally technically within their administrative
ri"!it. hi)' unanimously criticized
officials from Poller on down for
noor timing, tactlessness, and just
nlain "lack of feeling."
The two questions reieatedlv
asked thro"rhrml the community,
thev say. have never been an answered
swered answered satisfactorily by the Ad Ad-min'slrpiton'
min'slrpiton' Ad-min'slrpiton' "'A'h" wasn' the house quar quarters
ters quarters MIS at D!ahlo set side
f-r "c"ic:ls for f"'rers" use
f-ree or 'our mon'h ago, and
he oublir d":d in a routine
announcement?"
"Despite the lack of official ap application,
plication, application, why did it take until
the Sept. 22 meeting to advise
Cotton he would not have the Dia Diablo
blo Diablo house?"
Observers noint out that offi officials
cials officials have lone known Balboa
High School assistant principal
Harold J. (Zin) Zierten who is
vacating the Diablo home was
to retire sometime this fall
Officials also knew for some
time that Barton's family was ex ex-petced
petced ex-petced to join him toward the end
of the year, and thus could have
set the quarters aside long ago,
forestalling the raging controver controversy
sy controversy which has resulted.
Cotton, whose chief reason for
wanting the house Is to make it
easier to care for his 79-year-old
semi-invalid oarents, admitted
today he had filed no formal
application for tht dwelling.
But because of his long service,
and because the house was not
designated for executive use, he
ftould see no reason why he would
nl be eligible for it and had al already
ready already completed negotiations w th
ZieVten to purchase many of the
improvements in the home
TVlVanwhi'e both sides in the
dispute, the Civic Council and
Ralbrta Ileichts officials, prepared
for a meeting tomorrow with Pot Potter
ter Potter In thp hone the matter can be
settled amicably and with fairness
all round.
In a last minute development of
the battle between the Civic Coun Council
cil Council and the Heights, a petition be began
gan began circulating todav in Pacific
side communities asking that
Council president Sam Roe Jr.,
reconsider his threat to resign
from office.
Earlier Roe had termed the
Barton assignment a betrayal of
the Council's relationship to the
Administration, and hinted he

for the Supply Division cxe-

1 i r
would tender tiis mignatfoa at
special public meeting tentatively,
slated for early next month.
Arias-Owned
TV Station
Starts Tests
HOA-TV today reported re receiving
ceiving receiving several reports from dif different
ferent different points of the Canal Zont
and Panama on telecasts mad
Saturday nigra ana yesteraay
afternoon over Channel Two.
The PaTiamerican Radio Net Network
work Network (Radiodifusion Panameri Panameri-cana,
cana, Panameri-cana, S.A.) started telecasting
Saturday night at 9:50 and
stayed on for almost two hours
broadcasting test patterns and
audio signals.
It beat the deadline specified
speeified in the contract be between
tween between the government and tht
network by more than 24 hours,
The station again went into
operation at 4 pm yesterday
and continued for several
hours, with calls coming in
from Fort Kobbe, Diablo and
several others points in Pan
ama and the Canal Zone.
Earlier on Saturday, Dr. Gil Gil-berto
berto Gil-berto Arias and Dr. Harmodio
Arias, Jr., as legal representa representatives
tives representatives of Radiodifusion Paname Paname-rlcana,
rlcana, Paname-rlcana, S.A. and also of Televi Television
sion Television Panama, S.A., formally re requested
quested requested the Ministry of Govern Government
ment Government and Justice to revoke an
order banning installation and
operation by the latter firm of
equipment which arrived her
last week and was held up in
customs for three days by red
tape.
The request pointed out that
the license to operate a televi television
sion television station had been issued to
Radiodifusion Panamericana and
consequently the order barring
installatio ndoes not affect thlj
firm.
The brief also observed that
nowhere in the license grant granted
ed granted to the Panamerican Net Network
work Network does it specify what
brand of equipment should be
used and only authorized the
firm to operate a commercial
television station of 500 watta
In video and 500 in audio.
The order issued by the Min Ministry
istry Ministry of Government and Jus Justice
tice Justice on Friday had stated that
the original contract had spe specified
cified specified that RCA equipment
would be used and that the
equipment imported by Televi Television
sion Television Panama was manufactur manufactured
ed manufactured by the Gates company
The request by the Arias bro brothers
thers brothers also pointed out that the
equipment in question had been
sold to Radiodifusion Paname Panamericana,
ricana, Panamericana, which has been duly li licensed
censed licensed to operate a television
of a certain wattage which can
be produced by the equipment
bought frv "PsifrviBion Pan Panama.
ama. Panama. .',

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TBI r AN AMI AMERICAN AN INOEFENDENT DAILY NIWSFAfEB
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, USt

i TV O

5:.' THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OffNtB AND FUBlMC BY TH PANAMA KIH
rtuHHo by NfkBttN MUNtlVIU ib
.' HmM AIA. tBITO
21 "t anrarr r o o "-
TtLPMHI 1-Z4I IMBI
J Cabli ABotsa, panambimcan. banana
CaLBN Orrtcr II 17 CrNTKAi Avcnui BrrwttH ith nb iSth Tirr
5 rmilN HlPIWMHTATIVM JOSHUA MWM tNC.
2 t Mabibsm Avt.. NIW B 7t M. V.
mi Month in abvanci .122

Co Sl MBWTHi IN ABVANCt.. I A 14 04

W VIA H AOVAKCt.

Walter Winchell
In New York

ftuS IS YOW POtUM TMI IADIRS OWH COtUMM

TIM Mrf 11 M BfB far rBtt t TV. Mra A

Lllllfl are fBCiT innriiir ...- .

-f It f BBBtriBBfB MrtNr 4bb t B HKB.HBB rf BBBt1
m By. Letter ar awaliihea' tke arrfer receirea'.
Pleate rr a keep tae latter limited te eae eat lent".
i Ueatiry a letter writer, h htla h itrwtett eBieeee.
T' Tfcit MwiMMi tiMBti f rtiptiitrY let atate-B.Bt. at epiniBBt
BStaaita' ia lettan fraiB retn.
THE MAIL BOX

THAT HOUSING ASSIGNMiNT

Sir:

! Let's wind up the quarters big wind with a few words to set the

course right. In all this hurricane sigm nai ueen "v
thm?n the first place, who assigned the quarters to Barton? What
is thi "management" horsefeathers? Could it have been Ferguson
who is Barton s boss and incidentally the boss of the Housing Divi Division
sion Division who made this fat headed assignment and put his own boss
Joe Potter, behind the big black dirty eight-ball? No matter who
it was so far as I am concerned Joe is an innocent victim of some
dull-witted individual or individual who failed to see the true ques-
tlBThethcas"iSsn,t at all one of Management Prerogatives vs Em Employes'
ployes' Employes' Privileges. Cotton should have been given the assignment
based on onlv one factor-one that can completely overlook his 34
years of dedicated service: that is, a question of need.
Cotton doesn't even want these quarters-he likes where he is
living now and would stay there until the day he retires. But he
needs to get different quarters. He has two completely or practi practically
cally practically completelv helpless parents, well advanced in age. whose wen wen-being
being wen-being (to say nothing of the Cottons' wellbeing) depend on a more
suitable place to live.
In the old days a question of need was always given special
onideration and employes whose quarters "rights or privileges
were over ridden because some other employes' needs were given
ronsiedraiton, were willing to accept this. Always, of course, with
the thought in mind that all folks have problems which they are
expected to solve bv their own efforts.
But to over-rule an employe's absolutely correct quarters priv privileges
ileges privileges and also over rule his extraordinary needs is something no
manacer in his right mind would ever have done and is certainly
ro kind of action Joe Potter would ever have taken. He's far too
imart and far too good a manager himself.
20-Yeer-Butten

THI ROADWAY LIGHTS
Celebs About Town: Mrs. T, D.
Roosevelt, who will appear on
"Thinking Thing! Thru,'' her first
teevet weekly pajiel program.
Guests will be foreign exchange
students, She will give her wages
to worthy causes. ."Suzie Wong''
siar e ranee Nuyen, Brando's Mar
loncholly Baby. .Nancy Kelly on
Central Park South. "I always see
you after the first rehearsal of
every new snow 1 do!". .Lois
'('Lipstick") Long of The New
Yorker and former star Nancy
Carroll In The Stork Club remind reminding
ing reminding some of us of their girlish
pranks in the Thrilling Thirties...
Marlene Dietrich's starlet figure
mesmerizing the male animals in
the Brasserie, the new all-night
rendezvous. . Curvy Barbara
Nichols, the Girl Appeal in "The
Untouchables," helping light up
the Broadway scene. .The 59th
Street breeze gently teasing
Lauren Bacall's skirt.

Sallies In Our Alley: Some
Broadway unknowns, just s.gned
for their 1st show, were ecstatic in
Lindy's. ."Broadway's a great
street," one said, "when you get
to know- it". ."You mean," re reminded
minded reminded another, "when it gets to
know you'. .At Sardi's a group
of show people were discussing
Great Americans. One mentioned
General Grant, ."Grant'?' quer queried
ied queried a listener, ''I her he was anti
Semitic!". ."Oh, that can't be,"
logie'd Carol Matthau, "he's bur buried
ied buried on the West Side!"

T.V. COMPITITION
Hooray for progressiva Panama! In spite of the bitter charges
going back and forth between the promoters, it looks like local tele television
vision television fans are going to have a chance to see something besides
CFN. It's been a long, long time since those dials have been twist twisted.
ed. twisted. Many may be permanently caught on i.
The new siations, if and when they actuallv go on the air, should
give poor old CFN a slight chance to relax. At least they can share
(he grioers with the Panama outlets. Those who are now so criti critical
cal critical of CFN can be told to turn their dial to another station or off.
I hear that the new stations are to be Spanish-speaking, which
might be some small incentive for the language-lazy Amreicans to
laern a little Spanish. The chance is slight, to be true, but even
Hogs learn to recognize the meaning of words after long and pa patient
tient patient repetition,
I say more power to the. Panama TV stations. Local viewers
.nave taken advantage of CFN, which in reality is only here for the
cthpfort .and enjoyment of the military families; for far too long.
JarTCanaWv and; JPnamln alike have, come to assume that
CFN;-both ,JV aatfradio. a theirs.
"t-fv doubt that the CFN folks will shed a tear at their proposed
''eooipetition." They should be glad to have someone to share the
ffTlating gripes. That's one thing Americans should be glad to
share 50-50.
Mana-Dtalar

BACK TO-SCHOOL VERSE

This little verse about "A Child" was written for me by a good

friend in Biloxi, Miss. Now that the children ar? going to and from
fchool again, maybe it will make people think about their safety a
little more.
A CHILD
A child is one thing we should love
From which God sends us from above.
; A child who is a lot of joy
As we watch him play with his toys.
And I know that I'll never see
Anyone as sweet as a child to me.
t So please be careful and don't, drive wild
For fear that you may kill somsone's child.
And please be careful wherever you may be,
Because if you kill a child, then you will remember...
Just like me.
C. Fellows.

Mio'town Vignette: Bobby, the
newsdealer on the 50th and Main
Stem corner, doesn't care what
the Los Angeles newspapers call
his favorite baseball teum. He ne never
ver never even called them the Dodgers
and he wineed when headline
writers called them "Dem Bums"
. ."Why are you so depressed?"
we asked him the other night. .
"Because my team lost again!"
he groaned. ."The Yanjs?". .
"No, them Brooklyns!"

Memos of a Midnighter: Jack
Dempsey's new Big Date is Dean Dean-na
na Dean-na Piatelli. She runs the gem con concessions
cessions concessions in some midtown hotels...
Beatrice Lillie and John Phillip
will never know if they don't know
now. .There will be at least six
new cigarette brands before 1960.
The commercials are being re recorded
corded recorded now. .Song star Georgia
Gibbs has fallen hard in Israel
for a real life "Exodus" character
. .Comic johnny Carson and his
mate Jody are "secretly" di divorced.
vorced. divorced. Most of their chums didn't
even suspect they were separated.
She picked up the final decree last
week. .Copa gal Debra Agin flat flattened
tened flattened another Copa siren in Reu Reuben's
ben's Reuben's because of ia Ud who be belongs
longs belongs to another. J .Zsa Zja's
new feud in Vegas is with comic
Dick Shawn. .Latest Insult:
"Where's ya Cape'?'

SAN ANTONIO BUGLE
SSr:
The world is training m fine. Never felt better, and if 1 could
et these old eves to work I would be fine. I've tried all kinds of
glasses and find the five-and-tn store variety is as good as any.
A factory near Boston sent a man down here a few years ago
and had to give it up.
I still have hope as mv grandmother, who was a Hightowei.
regained her sight at 95 and read to 103 without glasses. The spe specialists
cialists specialists gave up a long time aao.
The light rains that are falling are keeping things green.
My friends the Hinkles keep m? well-oosted with clippings and
I am sending some of them on to Mrs Whitsett. who has treated

me wrong bv not stopping to see me on her return irom veneiueia.
Frank has put in a shade that covers the driveway in front of
where I sit Keeps out the sun and shades the whole end of the house.
We have the largest run of figs I ever knew, but they are about
finished. ...
A lot of mv old friends from the Crossroads passed me up this
eison, but thev will return. I am sticking this in because I am
getting lonesome and want to write and can't see WrgW
REWARD FOR RESCUI
Sir:
Fourteen months ago your paner carried the headline "PC
Worker Rescued as Orsova Sails." The. storv went on to tt-ll now
George Labastidas of San Miguelito was dramatically saved by
teonard Roberts of Gamboa as hundreds of passengers watehed
tabastida was in daneer of being crushed between the snip and
the dock fender at Balboa.
A few months apo snother PC worker saved Ms companion in a
fill revive 300 reward for his art.
' Surely then Roberts deserved some such recognition for fluickly
siidinc down a dock piling, srasping his unconscious co-worker, and
holding him on the camel till the injured man was lifted to safety

DF ine poiirr Ann niurr m
Lahastidas can testify how fortunate it is that Roberts ws on

ot. ....

Jehn Jahnten

Broadway Sideshow: Band loot looter
er looter Mile Davis could have avoid avoided
ed avoided those stitches in his head, loss
of his cabaret permit and all that
trouble in front of Birdland when

a cop told him and others to

"move on . .But he elected to
make an issue of getting a breath
of fresh air between shows and
wouldn't budge. .The fight that
followed landed him in the hospital

and clink. .One block away the

same officer broke up a small
group loitering on a corner. .
They moved on. ..All concerned
have no stitches in the head. .
One of that group didn't have to

move on, but he did. .He didn't

even show his badge.

High Fidelity

Times Square Circle: The head headlines
lines headlines disclosing the Onassis-Maria
Callas trysts confirmed eolyum
buzz for over year. His former
favorite was (freta Garbo. They
say the Callas thing is humid,
though a long way from per permanence.
manence. permanence. .Alexander Guterma's
reported $750,000 from Trujillo ex exaggerated.
aggerated. exaggerated. He got a down pay payment
ment payment of 250Gs, the only loot. .
Magda Gabor's huge party at
Southampton (about 500 guests:
cost her groom $28,000. ... Red
Nichols, the Roundtahle heidliner,
will rate about $150,000 from the

THE ALMANAC

, - .
f Washington
f JIERRY-GO-ROUIJD
L-tavl PftEW PIARSON

. o

"Five Pennies" picture. ... We
assume Esther Williams and Jeff
Chandler,, reported merger-bound
for a long spell, have Had It. His
playmate appears to be Nora Ed Ed-dington
dington Ed-dington Haymes. .Duke Elling Ellington's
ton's Ellington's medic, Arthur Logan, and his
mate (songstress Marion Bruce
expect an image any moment. .
Buddy Rich threaten, tm thuck

his drums for. Cfoone jareej al alter,
ter, alter, the 19th.

Stage Door: Ann Sheridaif en envies
vies envies women who can diet and lose

weight. She's down to 115 and can't

gain an ounce. She stars in Udd
Man In," which soon tours for IS
weeks. Her pulse-hopper, Scott
McKay, is the lead. .The buzz
persist that producer lean Dal Dal-rymplc
rymplc Dal-rymplc and her Genera! have a
splituation. .The John Shuberts
reconciliation is a click. Critic
Ward Morehouse's piece in
Theater Arts nostalgic number- is
delighting the Broadway crowd....
Producers demand that sctreess sctreess-es
es sctreess-es provide their own mink coats
wiien needed in a play. One im important
portant important actress told T h e a t eNr
Guilders No!. .Boy wonder di director
rector director Elia Kazan is 50 this week.

The New York-HoUywood Jet;
Steve Allen and Milton Berle arc
at the Don't Invite stage. Insiders
blame it on Berle's constant need needling.
ling. needling. .Scott Brady's return 1o
Movietown put the spark-back in
Pat Monahan's orbs. She's an
Arthur Murrav dance tutor there
. .Yvette Vickers in "The Gang'?
All Here" (due on B'way shortly I
and her groom parted again. They
plan making it permanent. .
David Cameron, not yet free, is
expected to blend with Hildegardc
I1'. .Isabella Taves, wed to Dan
Mich' of Look, completed her firs'
rn. el, he Quick Rich Fox." It
will start a controversy amonj
:--p' Mn'ivwood na'ives.
. .Coast Judge Edward Brand's

, ... -uuy weds New

Yorker Clifford Wolff in hi A. next
December. .Ben Blue introduces
one of his comics with: "Star of
Stage, Screen and Tel a-Viv!". .
Long delays at the airports have
wags saying: "If you can spare
the time take the Jet."

The Cookie Jar: "Kitty, I Hard Hardly
ly Hardly Knew You" by Edward Mc,
Sorlev. a new movel ahnnf thn

firish and lov'e in America. Boupf

tor tne best-seller lists. ,Lia Del Del-la's
la's Del-la's ditties at the Chardas. ..The
new book, "By Rocking Chair
Across America," by A. Atkinson
and R. Searle. .Phil Bennett's al
bu m"Dance, Everybody, Dance"
. .Nat (King) Cole's album.
"Every Time I Feel the Spirit,"
a Spiritualulu.

Company" and Janice Meshkoff,
who joins the "Suzie Wong" cast,
were waitresses at The Right
Bank, an espresso sihop at Mad Madison
ison Madison and 68th- last week. .Joan
Staley, one of the more promising
youngsters on teevee, will get a
large buildup via the Wm. Morris
Agency. ,"The Naked Genius"

film begins with a brilliant quote

'Mitimima mdfe ft up. "to give

the picturte class". .Hal Boyle's

Cast of Characters: Liz Cole, who
will appear opposite Ben Piazz.a in
"Juniper and The Pagans"; Caro Carolyn
lyn Carolyn Groves, who inherited Dolores
Hart's role in "Pleasure of His

description of May Britt's blue

gray orbs: Civil War eyes '. .
Fred Astaire's book, "Steps In
Time," is all sweetness, etc. But
Look's Bill Davidson is preparing
a 2-partner on what Fred omitted
about a certain femme star with
whom he hoofed. .Sinclair Robin Robinson
son Robinson invited several of the "Gvd-

sy" beautniks to his country manse

tor the weekend. He was so im impressed
pressed impressed with showgal Barbara
London's eating capacity he
bought her a cow.

WASHINGTON Nikita Khrush Khrushchev's
chev's Khrushchev's see-the-USA tour was ar arranged
ranged arranged after various huddles with
the State Department, to take in
approximately six big cities, one
farm, one factory, various opper-i
crust dinners, plus the necessary
conferences witn President Eisen Eisenhower.
hower. Eisenhower. If I had been arranging this
tour and Nikita can be gratefiul
I wasn't 1 would have included
a session with Harry Truman, a
down-to-earth guy who's skeptical
about Russia but who actually is
the same kind of whistle-stopper
as comrade Khrushchev.
I would also have included the
most diverse establishments ami
elements in American life, some
of them a credit to the USA, some
of them a discredit, as follows.
REBUILDING A BLEMISH -The
school in Clinton, Tenn.,
which was dynamited, a blot on
American tolerance but at the
same time a great credit to the
little community that continued
schooling without losing a single
day; also a credit to thousands
of school children all over he
USA, and to organized labor and
many others who contributed their
time and money td rebuild it .:.
Also the Charles Pfizer experi experimental
mental experimental farm at Terre Haute, Ind
where heifers and hogs are made
to grow twice as fast by the use
of certain hwmones and vitamins.

This would be a great thing for

tne farmers of Russia. ..The Flori

da citrus mutual at Lakeland,

ila., one of the most successful
and amazing farm cooperatives in
the world, which has been able
to save Citrus growers millions
without sacrificing private enter enterprise
prise enterprise and initiative ... The B. B.

Walker Shoe Co., in Asheboro,

N.C., vhere 90 percent oL tne
workers own the stock of the com

pany... The Vernon Co., of New

ton, Iowa, which makes all sorts

of advertising gadgets that would

delight .Russian consumers from

rain gauges to litter bags to two two-way
way two-way salt and pepper shakers.

TRAVELING AMERICANS

And to let Mr. K see how busi business
ness business can be built up overnight,

I would show him the Rembrandt

Mobile Homes plant at Cham

bersburg, Pa., with its sister plant
at Bonham, Texas, where Speak

er Sam Rayburn comes round in

his shirtsleeves to chin with the
workers. Robert de Rose and his
brother built trailers for the US

Army in Italy during the war,
then established their own facto factories
ries factories after the war ... Or there's

Champion Home Builders at Dry

aen, Mich., which turn out thou

sands of portable homes at an

amazing low cost, complete with
almost VTStm(ifV sets,.;
They woule6sr Russians
goggle-eyed with envy ... Or Air Air-stream
stream Air-stream Trailers, in Jackson Cen.
ter, Ohio it not only builds trail trailers
ers trailers but Wally Byam, its chair chairman,
man, chairman, has organized people-to peo
pie trailer caravans to Europe,
Canada, and Latin America. He's
now taking a group of trailer trailer-minded
minded trailer-minded Americans from Cape Capetown,
town, Capetown, Africa, to Cairo. NO Rus Russians
sians Russians have ever done anything

like this ... Or there's Tappaa

itanges in Mansfield, Ohio, wa.cn
have been making cooking stoves
for over, 75 years and have now
developed an electronic stove
which can cook a six-pound roast
in 30 minutes and fry bacon in
90 seconds...

Down in Jacks. Tenn.. is th

independent Aluminum Foils, Inc.,
which is able to compete with the
giants of the aluminum industry
Alcoa, Reynolds, Kaiser, Ana.

conaa ana make a proirt ... in
Klllfftnn fthin UilliatM-D Ttil-t

and his company have, developed
electrical instruments so delicate
that they can measure the smoke
coming out of a chimney or tfi
amount N of static build up by- a
surgeon's shoes beeore he goes
into the operating room.
SHOES AND HI-FI Thnn rhera

is Leonard Rae, a native of Po-

ianu, wnose utruon u. has be
come the biggest manufacturerr
of plastic shoes in the world. He
has a factory in Puerto Rico with
a new one be.ng built in Hazel
ton, Pa., which will make plastie
shoes and sandals so cheap that
they will be within the price range
of the barefoot people of Afric
and Asia...la White Plains.N.Y.y
arthur BJumenfeld is the father
of Hi-Fi and manufacturer of
more loud-speakers than any oth other
er other company in the world.. .In Bar Bar-ringion,
ringion, Bar-ringion, N.J., Paul Weathers has

developed a hi-fi stylus so light
that it weighs only one gram.
With it, a record can be played
many thousands of time?. They
don't have much hi-fi in Moscow
yet, but among Russian young youngsters
sters youngsters it's coming ... And Nikita
would have also been interested
in the fact that 40,000,000 Ameri Ameri-cans
cans Ameri-cans move every year and how
they do it. An average of one"
family out of every four pack up
and change their homes every
year. The best expert I know on
this is' Bill Kutschbach, president
of United Van Lines in St. Louis
whose company makes a special
ly not only of packing every ar
tide in the house, loading it,, and
deliverine it. but also of advisin

the housewife how to get her chil.
dren registered in school in th
new town.
These are just a few of the in intriguing
triguing intriguing industries, big and little,
which make America industries'
w hi c h Khrushchev's inquiring
mind probably would have de delighted
lighted delighted in seeing.
KHRUSHCHEV GO-ROUND i;
It used to be that invitations to

the British Embassy were the

most prized cardboards in Wash Washington.
ington. Washington. This month it was tickets

the National Press Club. Mem
bers had to call personally to pics
them up. No secretary, assistant,
or messenger or even the mail
was entrusted with them. ..Carlos
Denegri, Mexico's top columnist
and commentator took a long
shot by writing Nikita Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev a letter asking him various
questions about Russian-Latin A A-merican
merican A-merican relations. BeHeve it or
not, he got an answer.

Seh

eel

LJour Sea Set 77ow
Direct C.Z. Deliveries
at largest discounts

the)

tor:

DIABLO COMMISSARY

m'I. -1 min-M i fk nialiln Cnmmiiiifv fnminff to be?

Ttnai mini ",T
None of the employes seem to know where to find anvthine. What
ver happened to that nice, courteous dark girl? Whv don't the
Supply Division chiefs leave someone on a job once they have learn learned
ed learned to do it well?
d Unhappy Cvttemer

FT. KOBE I N.C.O. CLUB

r:
&
t Though there Is plenty of criticism fit the Ft. Kobhe NCO's club,
feoncede the tervice is pretty good when you take into considera consideration
tion consideration bow few employes there arc to provide it. Sometimes it looks
t me as if the tame Individuals work without relief from opening
Ml closing rime. Miybe things would get better for the customers
it the management devoted more attention to improving the condi condi-tibr.t
tibr.t condi-tibr.t the employes are working under, and less to the automatic
Mia machines.
iy Observer

Today is Monday, Sept. 28, the
271st day of the year, with 95
more days in 1959.
The moon is approaching its
new phase.
The morning star is Venus.
The evening stars are Jupiter
and Saturn.
On this date in history:
In 1745. English theater-goers
sang "God Save the King" for the
first time in history.
In I7S1, General George Wash
ington's forces began the seige of
British and Hessian troops
Yorktown Heights, N. Y.
In 1850, the flogging of sailors
in the U. S. Navy was abolished.
In 1904, New York City police
arrested a woman on Fifth Ave Avenue
nue Avenue for smoking a cigarette.
In 1920, baseball's biggest scan scandal
dal scandal broke when a Chicago grand
jury indicted eight Chicago White
Sox players for "throwing" the
mo Vr-td Series to the Cincin

nati Redi. L "J

In 1939. Germany and the So

viet Union agreed on a plan to

partition FOinaa.

A thourht for today: George

Washington said: "There can be

no greater rr- 'i expect

r calculate upon real favors ii.
nation to nauon.

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P Atti THRU j

ing US Steel Prexy

Takes Turn For Worse

HYANN1S,- Mass. (UPI)-Walter
T. Munford, $250,000 a year presi president
dent president oT strikebound U. S. Steel
Corp., took -a sudden turn for
the worse yesterday at a hospital
where he had been recovering

from a cerebral hemorrhage and

accidental stab wound.

He was placed in an oxygen

lent

Dr. Robert J. O'Connor, medical
director of the U. S. Steel Corpo

ration, issued a statement at

Cape Cod Hospital saying "Mr,
Munford's condition has worsened.

He is now on the critical list. His

family has been notified and a

son who was in England has come

to Cape Cod, to be at this father's

bedside'

Munford's wife, Camille, and

another son also were at the bos
pital.
Or. O'Connor said that at 1

p.m. the 59 year -old Munford

was "still conscious."

He indicated that me 1 worsen

ing"- resulted from a cerebral

hemorrhage suffered Thursday

and not from an operation per performed
formed performed Wednesday because of an
accidental stab wound.

Munford had been vacationing
eti tiie cape when he accidentally
tumbled and fell while carrying

dished and kitchen utensils Wed Wednesday.
nesday. Wednesday. at knife penetrated his stomach
ami he was rushed to Cape Cod
Hospital for emergency surgery.
The mishap was cloaked in se secrecy
crecy secrecy formor thean 24 hours, with
Munford's doctor merely saying
he had been under treatment for
an undisclosed ailment and that
on Wednesday "surgery was in indicated."
dicated." indicated." Dist. Atty. Edmund Dinis in in-Testgated
Testgated in-Testgated the case and said after afterward
ward afterward that his detectives were sat satisfied
isfied satisfied sHie steel executive slipped
on the highly polished floor at
his home.
He said he found no evidence
to indicate that Munford wounded
himself intentionally and said the
ease should be regarded as
"closed."
Then on Friday an unexpected
hospital bulletin announced that
whila in the hospital recuperating
from surgery, Munford suffered a
cerebral hemorrhage.
His arm was partially paralyzed
New-Type 'Natural'
Apple Juice
Developed In NY
-'GENEVA, N Y. UPI) -,A hew
type "natural" apple juice has
been developed at the -New York
State Agricultural Experiment
Station.
' According to food scientists
there, the product "is a, cloudy
(Juice which retains the body of
I the freshly pressed fruit and, be because
cause because it is pasteurized soon after
pressing, it keeps well on the
shelf so that it can be had the
year around."
The new-type juice is made by
adding ascorbic acid or vitamin
C to the apples as they are ground
up and just before they are pres pressed.
sed. pressed. The ascorbic acid protects
the juice from discoloration and
change in flavor due to the action
of oxygen in the air.
' Apple juice produced by this
method also is said to be much
more nutritions than ordinary
favorably in vitamin C content
eitrus juices.

and has speech affected, doctors
said.
The seriousness of the ease was
emphasized when neurosurgeons
and a neurologist were summoned
from Boston:
Munford was elected president
of the huge- steel firm only last
May 8, just before the star, of the
labor negotiations which broke
down to start the long strike.
He was born in Worcester,
Mass., and was graduated from
Massachusetts Institute of Tech Technology,
nology, Technology, working part time while
at school in wire mills owned by
U. S. Steel.
He began full-time employment
after graduation, starting at the
bottom as an open-hearth helper.
His sons are Walter F. Jr., and
Robert W. Munford.
He spent most of this summer
at his plush summer home in
nearby Chatham, where U.S. Steel
oficials were visiting when he
accidental stabbing occurred.

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Midwest Cleans Up In Wake
Of Tornadoes; Death Toll 3

MIDWEST CLEANS INSIDE
CHICAGO, Sept. 2a (UPI)-The
Midwest cleaned up yesterday
in the wake of tornadoes and vio violent
lent violent wind and thunderstorms that
raked dozens of villages and
cities,, causing thousands of dol-;
lars of property damage.

At least three deaths were at

tributed to storms that swept

through even states Saturday

night. More than 50 persona were

injured by falling trees, flying

debris and collapsing walls.
In Texas. Valeria Goodacre, 32

was struck by lightning and killed

at Tyler during a thundershower.
Loren Duffie. 38, Dallas City,

111., was killed when a gust of

wind shot a tree branch through
the side of a garage at Monmouth,

111. The limb reportedly beheaded
Duffie, who was working on a
car.
Elmer Laacke, 59, Quincy, 111.,
was killed when a 70-mUe-an hour
wind knocked a tree on 'top of a
car in which ha was riding near
Quincy.

1 Morris Shapiro, 65, Detroit, was
struck by a car and killed in De

troit during a rainstorm yester yesterday
day yesterday morning, olice blamed toe ac accident
cident accident on aUppery streets.

Tornadoes struck time after
time in Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri,
Illinois and Wisconsin, leaving

piles of debris. Tornadic winds
wreaked havoc in he beautiful

little western Illinois college town

of Monmouth.
Lower Michigan end Indiana

also were pounded by squalls and
heavy winds.
But the storm activity subsided
lain taturdav nisht. The U. S.

weather Bureau at Chicago said

that only a few scattered snowers
lingered Sunday from the lower
Mississippi Valley to the Great

lies region.
High winds hampered an air air-sea
sea air-sea search for 1st Lt. Jay Graf Graf-miiiAr
miiiAr Graf-miiiAr f Illinois who was believed

to have crashed m his F-86 Sabre

jet in or along Lake Huron.

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QLARLES PERRET SWISS JEWELRY
CanaraJ Agent Colon, R. P.
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Autheriwd Ajpnt Panama City

STURM IN STIR
NIAGARA FALLS, Ont. (UPD (UPD-Picked
Picked (UPD-Picked up by police for driving
while his license was suspended,
Dennis Priddle, 34, pointed out
that he was only steering the
wheel of a car while another mo motorist
torist motorist pushed it.
But magistrate H. R. Howitt
found Priddle guilty anyway. He
was sent to jail for seven days
when he couldn't pay a $105 fine.

nd passes along the Montana Montana-Idaho
Idaho Montana-Idaho border also hampered a
search for a light plane piloted
by the Rev. Carl Foese, Mattoon.
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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER H, HI
PA6I FOUR

THS PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDETOTOIXT DAILY HIW8PAPEB

.Social and 0 titer

wide

Box 134,
jPanama

NEWS OF ENGAGEMENTS. MARRIAGES, BIRTHS. PARTIES AND TRAVEL SHOULD Bi MAILED
PROMPTLY TO BOX-NUMBER SHOWN. IT WiLL EE RECEIVED BY TELEPHONE OVER
PANAMA 2-0740 OR 2-0741 BETWEEN 8:00 AND 10 A.M. ONLY.

PRESIDENT AND MRS. DE LA CUARDIA TO ATTEND
INAUGURATION OF PANAMA BOSTON'S NEW PLANT
liwitationi havt btn circulated by tha Pimmi Boston Com Company
pany Company for a party Wtdnaiday to inauguratt its now plant in P iti-
Ha. Tht informal tvtnt is planned for fiva to tavan.
Panama's Praaidtnt and Mrs. Ernasto da la Guardia Jr. art ax-
ptctod to atttnd.

operations of the Internal Reve Revenue
nue Revenue Service, arrived in Panama
this morning and plans to remain
here until Friday. He is register registered
ed registered at the Tivoli Guest House.

HoJiflioui Film Thursday
At Bafcoa YMC A
A color film. Dusl or Destiny.'
will be shown Thursday eenin
at 7:30 at the B-dboa Y.Mt'A Arm Armed
ed Armed Forces Servi.-e Center
The film is boms sponsored by
the Religious Kmphasis Commit
tee of the V of which Chaplain
Silas E. Decker is chairman.

Curundu Woman's Club
Plans Wtdnesday Coffot
The Curundu Woman's Club will
have a coffee meeting Wednesday
morning at nine at the Comnm
nity Building.
Hostesses will be Mrs. Jo Thrr Thrr-rell
rell Thrr-rell .nd Mrs Eva Chancey. All
members are invited to attend.

AVOID
DIAPER RASH

Don't let your
baby suffer
from damp"
diapers. After
every diaper
change, use

M EX AN A

' Historical Socioty
To Meat Octobor 5
' The first meeting of Inc season
of the Isthmian Historical Socie Society
ty Society will be held Monday evening,
uct 5, at 7:30 in the ballroom of
the Tivoli Guest House.
' Speaker of the evening will be
i.Mrs Virginia Stich, medical li
I branan at Gorgas who will review
the Ancon Hospital from 1882 to
the opening of the Panama Canal
in 1914.
Slides of the old buildings oi
I Ancon Hospital w i 11 be shown by
Dr. E. W. Michelsen of the Gor
! gas staff.
Balboa Woman's Club

Board Mooting Wednesday
A board meeting of the Balboa
Woman's Club is scheduled for
Wednesday morning at nine at
the Balboa USO-JWB.

O'Leary To Speak
At Engineers' Dinner
Arthur J. O'Leary, deputy comp comp-tro.ler
tro.ler comp-tro.ler of the Panama Canal
Company, will be the principal
speaker Wednesday at a dinner
meeting of the Canal Zone Socie Society
ty Society of Professional Engineers.
The meeting will be held in the
Fern Room of the Tivoli. A steak
dinner at 7:30 will be preceded
by a social hour at 6:30.
James Brigman, Allen K. Mil Miller
ler Miller and Jack Paterson are in
charge of reservations.

Meeting

Central Camera Club

The Central Camera Club will
hoiu its semi-montnty meeting to-

mgnt at 7:30 in Room 31, Jbuild

ing 381, 89tn Street in Carrasqui Carrasqui-11a.
11a. Carrasqui-11a. An informal discussion on

"Know More About Your Came

r- anu camera demonstrations

are pianneu.
Ah interested amateur and pro
fessional photographers are iiivu
eu to attenu.

Zone S.F.C.A. Chapter
Ihe Canal Zone v.napter of the
Society lor the Prevention oi Cru Cruelty
elty Cruelty to Animals will meei this eve

ning at i:30 in tae auditorium of

tne Balboa USO JWiJ.
Guest speaker will be Sgt. Wil Wil-burn
burn Wil-burn Miinauser, an authority on
parakeets.
All interested persons are in invited
vited invited to attend.

Mrs. Allen To Be Feted
At Farewell Luncheon

i jaiewfu LuiiiLJujni -in n iHu.

Dorothy Allen will be a no-host
luncheon and silver shower Thurs Thursday
day Thursday at 12:30 at the Fort Amador
Officers Open Mess.
Reservations should be made
with Mrs. G. 0. Parker, Balboa
1412.

Charity Raff: Winners
Announced By CD. A.
W. W. Wood of Ralboa was kp

lucky winner of the tea and cof-
fee service, first prize in the an annual
nual annual charity raffle sponsored by
I the Catholic Daughters of Ameri America,
ca, America, Court Sancta Maria 447, Bal-
boa. The winners were announc announc-i
i announc-i ed yesterday in conjunction with
. the national lottery.

Ihe second prize, a Danish silv silver
er silver cnafing dish, went to Mrs.
Kathleen DuChene of Birmingham,
Mich., and third, a silver console
set, to Mrs. Audrey Bowman of
Balboa.

Internal Revenue Official
Arrives On Isthmus
Ross V. Thompson, chief of field

Curundu Woman's Club
Holds Mexican Fiesta
The Curundu Community Build Building
ing Building was gaily bedecked with
streamers and flags last Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday for the Mexican fiesta spons-

JWB Art Class
The USO-JWB art class, under
the direction ol Pic. IVLartin Faro Faro-man,
man, Faro-man, meets this evening at the
Armed Forces Service center in
Balboa.
Ail registered students are re reminded
minded reminded that tne class stans at 7
p.m.

Beginners Spanish
ihe regular weekly Spanish
class for Deginners, under tne di direction
rection direction of Miss Clauaette de Villa Villa-franea,
franea, Villa-franea, will meet at tne USO-JWB
in Balooa tonight at 7:30. All re registered
gistered registered students are urged to attend.

oied by the Curundu Woman's,
Club. Tne event was arranged by
Mrs. Calvin H. Johnston, program
chairman.
The dignitaries' table was cov covered
ered covered with a lace cloth and center centered
ed centered with a batea filled with gold

leaves. The buffet table featured

streamers using-the colors of the
Mexican flag. A Mexican vase
filled with shrimp plants was
flanked with miniature Mexican
dolls. A pirtata in the form of a
chicken, flags and travel folders

CLOVERBLOOM DEVILS FOOD CAKE

23 Cup Cloverbloom Butter
I'-j Cup suitar
3 Well beaten em
3 Squares melted chocolate
2 Cups -ifted cake flomi

1 Teaspoon soda
H Teaspoon salt
H Cup buttermilk
1 Teaspoon vanilla

tVIPl

Cream butter, add sugar gradually and blend. Add
eggs and chocolate. Add sifted dry ingredients and
milk alternately. Turn into two 8 inch greased cake
pans and bake in a 350 F. oven or 35 minutes or until
done. Frost with peppermint flavored Seven Minute
Frosting, tinted pale pink.

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Delicate workmanship
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Prices? The lowest in Panama
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Four Exchange Students Head
For Home After Panama Visit

1 If f :

KENT HORTH

blANE EMERSON

Literary Notes

Answer to Previous Puzzle

ACKOBS
X Juan
4 of books
5 Rogers
12 Uncle Tom
and Littl
IS Ti(ht
14 Region
li Mai d
1 Attacker
II Repeat
performances
20 Feel
21 Poaaanive
pronoun
22- Poreena
24Veutureaome
2( Antitoxins

27 Male
SO Place within
22 Representa Representative
tive Representative 34 More acid
35 Cheen
36 Abstract beinf
37 Cravats
39 Canvai shelter
40 Small
iwallows
41 Through
42 Cut
45 Take the chair
49 Talked
together

; 51 Measures of
land
. 52 Century plant
,53 de camp
,54 Vegas,
Nevada
55 Good Queen
it French
summers
57 Female saint
(ab.)

DOWN
1 Creek district,
I Stove part
9 Mythological
youth
4 Asterisks
5 Comfort
Struggle
7 Musical
direction
t Division of
Great Britain
t Persia
10 Camera part
II Tardy
17 Jewish
homeland
11 Different
33 French city

24 Ascend
2Soc
26 Ban
27 Ingredients
21 Solar disk
21 Bird's home
SI Withdraw
SS Entrance In
fences
SI de corps

44 Strong boses j
41 Feet (tuBx) 1
42 Wound
eoraring"
41 Pit
44 Sath's sea
44 Ccnmsel
47 Kxclamatifla
41 EsaentialbeiBg'

MOtrl's 1

ii r ijr
EL
mr
SttlEZLllIIX
v w in Iff TW
T yi
F""?r t

. PATRICIA GREENE
Four teenagers who spent their
summer as exchange students in
Panama left Saturday to return
to their, homes and schools in
western New York. Patricia
Greene, Diane Emerson, Brisn
Leach and Kent H o r t h were
among 48 yowig people from their
area to be chosen as exchange
student representatives.

BRIAN LEACH
Before leaving the Isthmus, a
spokesman for the group said,
"Each of us has truly enjoyed our
stay in your wonderful country,
and hope that others will be able
to benefit throught the Internatio Internatio-al
al Internatio-al Fellowship program of ex exchange
change exchange students." The experience
was educational as well as enjoy enjoyable,
able, enjoyable, they agreed. 1

also were featured in the decora decorations!
tions! decorations! Mrs. Abel Guibert, club presi president,
dent, president, welcomed members and
guests and introduced the guests
of honor, Mexican Ambassador to
Panama Dr. E. Rafael Urdaneta
and Mrs. Urdaneta; Mrs. John D.
Coney, wife of the post command commander
er commander of Fort Clayton; Mrs. James
Davis, wife of the adjutant at Ft.
Clayton; Mrs. Phil B C"o ":'-
of the commandant f the USAF
Latin American benuo.; i.n. u.
Jt,: Worley, second vice president
Mthe Balboa Woman's Club; and
Manuel S. Castillo, who gave an
Interesting talk on Mexico.
The ambassador made a brief
speech in which he stressed the
strong ties of friendship between
Mexico, the United States and La Latin
tin Latin American countries.
The entertainment included a
rendition of the Mexican Hal
Dance by Mrs. Edilia Torres and
Johnny Johnston, who also per performed
formed performed Las Chiapaneeas, another
traditional Mexican dance.
Several popular songs were pre presented
sented presented by singer Braulio Sanchez,
who accompanied himself on the
guitar. The ritual dance of Te Te-huantepec,
huantepec, Te-huantepec, La Sandunga, was
danced by Mrs. Chila Metcalf and
Sir. Johnston.
Hostesses for the function were
Mrs. Jessie Kaska, Mrs. Lilly
Blumberg, Mrs. Frances Smith,
Mrs. Single Murdaugh and Mrs.
Edilia Torres. The receptionist
was Mrs. Connie Reichar., and
Mrs. Jeannette Giacomini was in
charge of decorations.

HEBREW
NEW YEAR
CARDS
ON SALE
A very nice assortmenl.
COME TO
MORRISON'S
4th of July Ave. and
"J" Street

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service

NORTH 30
Q 10 9
x A K J 10 9 t
J9B"
WEST' () EAST
W85 AK62
VJ 8 65 32 VK4
52 Q74
A K 4 10 8 5 4 2
SOUTH
A743
A 10 9 7
63
Q73
North and South vulnerable
West North East South
IV 2 4 Pass 2 N.T.
Pass 3 N.T. Pass Pass
Pass
Opening lead S

West's opening heart bid Is not

recommended and it did not do

him any good. North and South
had no trouble getting to game

against it.

South took East's king id

hearts with the ace and prompt

ly lost the diamond finesse. The

four Of hearts return accounted

for South's nine and West's jack

to do West dhrew dummy in with

a diamond.

South ran the diamond suit
and discarded two spades and

two clubs from his hand while
West let two hearts ana two

spads go.

South had a pretly good cou'U

of West's hand bv this time

West wac marUarl with t w

hearts, two clubs and a spade,

South was nrnllv sum llm

West's spade was the kine so he

simply played his ace of spades

ana was aisappointea wnen tne
jack and not the king appeared
However, it made nn rpal riif

ference. Since West did hot hold

the spade king he had to hold th
ace and kins of rluhs Thp ompp

of clubs put West in the lead and

after cashing his two high clubs
he had to give South two heart

tricks tor his contract.
se

QThe bidding has been:
North East South West
ii 2 Double 2
2 Pass ?
You, South, hold:
' AKSt
What do you do?
A Bid three ndM v... i'

vh vnij
have two trumpa but your club
are two tricks for your vrlntr
i you only have a doubletoa

oBri.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Inctcad of hidHIn

'-II aHurB
our partner has bid two no-j
: ump over West's two-heart bid.
tVhat do you do now? I
Answer Monday

i

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen

i i svrwnso of im-

porting a highly-touted Engh h
child actress, 11-year-old Carta
Challoner, to pUy Flor. m Inpid,
Bergman's TV how The Tu n

of the Screw. bui v;
tie Carla was missing when the
cast assembled for rehearsals
She'd been given her noOe and

passage nome..."" -
f Boston during the run o Jake

se re htirbeen enlivened not
only by the show's warm recep reception
tion reception but by his dates witt i pret-

ty Susan i.aD0i. ous
the Hub as a member, of the
company of another Broadway Broadway-bound
bound Broadway-bound play, "The GoMen. Fleec Fleecing,"
ing," Fleecing," but she wai replaced by an an-other
other an-other actress 4u?in tttej tryout.

CfllL II tic a a
the other morning- sta-rUng witn

a scuttle in jtsiraianu auu yi..uu.b
AnayaaH in apnne.

Up, consiuei uiy cuioism
on the sidewalk outside. It last lasted
ed lasted for almost half an hour, with
some 40 participants getting into
the act, and one young woman
was badly injured kicked and
stepped on. ..Germany the free

part now nas me mum
A strong faction in France is de-
nAnny.nnlinfl snrl all in

favor of uniting with La Belle s

traditional Diuer enemy iuueus iuueus-then
then iuueus-then the French position in deal dealing
ing dealing with bigger powers.
George Shearing became enrag enraged
ed enraged during the Newport Jazz Fes Festival's
tival's Festival's last concert at Town Hall
when they rang down the curtain
on him while he was still playing
because, they feared a union prob problem
lem problem if the-, entertainment went

into overtime. So the pianist

threatened to pull out of the na national
tional national tour, and gave his oands oands-men
men oands-men notice. When he relented,
next day, it was too late to make
the company bus, so he charter chartered
ed chartered a plane for all the musicians,
at his own expense but still
couldn't make the Pittsburgh gig
in time. Thelonious Monk never
got there, either, giving Pitt Pitt-burgh
burgh Pitt-burgh music lovers considerable
rausp for disaDDointmCnt.

Rock Hudson must be having
busy or absentminded days on
his current ballyhoo trip to our
town. He was more than an hour
late for his scheduled radio inter inter-vipw
vipw inter-vipw with William B. Williams...

Bantam will print 1,500,000 pocket
editions of "Exodus," the biggest
nrintine of a best seller in the

publishing firm's history.

Linda Christian, who never
made much of an impact on
U.S. film producers, is expected
to be a top star in Germany with within
in within the next six months. She's
made two pictures with O.V.
Fischer, and the prognosticators

think that will do it.;.Th Holly Hollywood
wood Hollywood studio that owns one ot tne
top male box office attractions is

working arouna tne ciock io seep
a potentially headline-making dov-

orce action from reaching the a-

rea of public domain. Their hand handsome
some handsome hero has been nsjned as co corespondent
respondent corespondent by the angry wife.
Dorian Leigh, the international
hpautv who enioyed a brief inter

lude as the Great Love of the

Marquis "Fon" de Portago, ana
bore him a child, has divorced
her Italian husband and married
a Frenchman. She's colorful Suzy

Parker's older sister .., Georgt
DeWitt, wh6 was first to suggest
young Eddie Hodges for "Huckle
berry Finn" (the studio thought

he wasr.too smair ror xne row;,
mayywtnd up playing part in
the pteture, WmeHAtiflTr6b
lem of Eddie's size will be solv solved
ed solved by having him wear' shoes with
lifts that will make him two inches
taller and surrounding him with
short actors. , y,
Peggy King's chums believe ,hell
marry writer Bill KUpatrick and
move East. ..The new record hit,
"Oranges of Jaffa," was written
by a French jazz drummer, Jer Jerry
ry Jerry Mengo, well known in the Pe Peris
ris Peris caves. He was inspired dur-
; n u,. .f Torajkl n four vMri

nig IVUl W 1 1 1 v j
ago in a combo led by the fam famous
ous famous guitarist, Django Reinhart ...
T." J AA wniri. tuIAMI TfttMr

Warner are delighted because he
appears to be in better shape now
than he was before his frighten frightening
ing frightening auto accident in Europe. He
plays tennis almost every day.
Marty Allen, now at the Statler Statler-Hilton
Hilton Statler-Hilton in Dallas, has a new show
stopper, a pantomime tribute to
... .i" Savo. It draws both laugh laughter
ter laughter "iid tears from his audiences:
...Willie Shore, once co-owner ot'
the Composer, is out of the new
jazz room, the Arpeggio ... The
Russians' favorite cosmic project
is a space vehicle capable of car carrying
rying carrying two men on a round trip to
the moon. Captured German
scientists are responsible for most
of the daring scientific thinking,
and accomplishments, of the Sov Soviets.
iets. Soviets. Bobby Darin is a generous best
man. When he flew in for Don
Kirschner's wedding 1 to Sheila
Good in Englewood, N.J., he pre pre-sented
sented pre-sented the happy couple with an
automobile.. .The State Liquor Au
thority has been cracking down,
on popular spots around town.
That's what shuttered the Tendef
Trap alleged violation of its li liquor
quor liquor license. ...It's like a fashion
chnur at rphftttftflls far tha-MRPA

TV "Wonderful World Of Enter.'
tainment" spectacular, Polly Ber Bergen
gen Bergen and Rosalind Russell arrive
in such high-style costume. Min Minor
or Minor members of the cast are agog
with admiration.

T

R733MJJ

a

El?

t w 43'- -i."

vl.

feel clean, fresh ALL DAY"

(

t CON IUNI AM

for that
clean
fresh
feeling
AROUND
THE CLOCK

In three
beautiful

decorator eelort

. .with exclusive

SUPER AT-7
which eliminates the cause of body dor



fcOKDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1959

TBK MMAMA AMERICA!! AH IKDEFENDEKT DAILT WEWtrJkrmM

Pgnriiunjon, Once Heralded As Hope For Peace, Degenerates To Tourist Attraction

ti imrTlUTtil VAa TTDT

This tiny trace village, once the

source of a world-wide nope- for
permanent peace, hs degenerat

ed into little more tnao a tourist
attraction. 5 .' ;
Since July1 2T. 1953. hen the
Korean truce y was signed here,
Panmunjom has served as the site
of occasional 1 meetings between
the United Nations Command and
the Communists, but they have
produced almost nothing except
propaganda blasts.

' Seldftm does a aay pass, now now-ever,
ever, now-ever, wihtout a visit from some
batch of sightseers, either from
the Red side or from the free
world or from both.
Even the meetings of the Armi Armistice
stice Armistice Commission cannot be held
without tourists looking on.
' Equipped with passes and badg badges
es badges issued by the Military Armi Armistice
stice Armistice Commission, these rubber rubbernecks,
necks, rubbernecks, including brightly dressed
"American women, drive 35 miles
from Seoul to peep through the
windows of the plain corrugated

improves
commu-
nications
expedites
letter
answering

erifax

A Kodak
Verlfax
Copier will

make 5 copies
of letters,
memos and other documents
in 1 minute. Makes copies
on bondtype paper or card
stock, reproduces all colors.
Several models. Ask for
a free demonstration at
Kodak
Panama, Ltd.
Panama Col6n

steel hut in which the sessions are

held. ,;

Whpn unmplhinff imDortant is to

h rituMissed. the area is flooded

with reporters, photographers and

tourists who shuttle arouna ruo-

bing elbows with newsmen and

follow siehtseers from the other

side of the Bamboo Curtain.

To ease' the lam. the United na

tions Command installed loud loudspeakers,
speakers, loudspeakers, outside the conference

building.
According to Maj. Charles A.
Gibbens of Richmond, Va., who is
in charge of UNC facilities at
Panmunjom, an average of 125
visitors- a day take free guided
tours of this little "no-man's land"
village.
From the North Korean side, 10
to 15 persons visit here a week.
Gibbens, who is often referred
to as the "mayor of Panmimjom."
rnrt the tINC visitors, mostly

American GI's, on a regular

cook's tour of the area, which is
a circle of about 1,000 ysrds in
diameter located in the center of
the 2.5 mile-wide demilitarized
7nn

He points out spots of interest,
rolntintr historical noets and hu-

morous tidbits just like a profes

sional guide.

fiffioUNv railed the Joint Se

curity Area, Panmunjom is such
hie tourist attraction because

thp armistice was signed here

and because this is the only place
in Asia where Communists and
Westerners are exposed to each

nthpr around thp clock.

Artnaiiv thp exact spot where

the United Nations and Communist

delegates signed the 18 pieces of
paper that comprised the Korean

truce la now in Communist nanas.
No one from the U.N. side can get
to within 300 yards of it.

The. old peace pagoda which the

Communists hastily built for the
signing ceremony has been torn

dwon snd a permanent structure
erected for the benefit of visiting
Communist tourists.
After the military demarcation
line was established, the general
conference site was moved about
800 yards south because the old
one happened to be ia North Ko

rea. It is now half in South Ko Korea
rea Korea and half in North Korea.
Here on a hill overlooking the
peace pagoda, about 10 buildings
have been constructed by both
sides.
The Communists built permanent-type
stucco buildings with

tin roofs, including a central
steam beating system.
But the U.N. hoping there
would be a peace treaty in 60 to
90 days, as the armutice agree agreement
ment agreement called for, put up temporary
quonset huts of corrugated iron.
It is still content with them.

TOYS

and
GARDEN
FURNITURE
Durable
Attractive
Opening Soon
on Via Espana
Between
"Central de Lecherias"
and Clay Products.

(XqmsdaA Tft&AceA

f

Representing:

If "TAZEL ATLAS GLASS COMPANY
if Industrial Glass and Bottles
i CONTINENTAL CAN COMPANY
m Cans, canning equipment and Bottle Caps
S WHITE CAP COMPANY
M "Vapor vacuum" Seals and Sealing Equipment
II DIXIE CANNER COMPANY
II PHILADELPHIA TINPLATE CO.
M ROONEY MACHINE COMPANY

Other corresponding lines for canning, can m
1! making, bottling, sealing, labeling etc., Ifi
if1 il
JACK MERCER
Ave. Justo Arosemena y Calle 32
Edificio Vallarino
., Apartada 4411
Telephone 3-3555

SAVE WITH ASTRA
SAVE FROM 20 to 50 & BE SURE of QUALITY!

Look for the

trade mark in these

and many other products

ASTRA-RUB

Medicated Rubbing Alcohol
Full pint only 50$
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back

LtNOA de C0L0GNE

16 oz. ONLY 7Q

Other Brands 16 ox. $1.20

20 ox. 4.35
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back

ACETONEX

NAIL POLISH REMOVER
4 oz. bot. ONLY 40
Other Brands W2 ox. bot. 25 f
2.7 ox. bot. 40 f
llp ox. bot. 70 1
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back

SANOL personal antiseptic
SAFE SURE PLEASANT
4 oz. JAR ONLY 450

ALWAYS ASK FOR

Quality-controlled products
at sensible prices I
IF YOUR FAVORITE SHOPPING PLACE
DOES NOT HAVE ANY OF THESE
ASTRA PRODUCTS Call Panama 2.3033
We will deliver to your HOME
AT NO EXTRA CHARGE

BOCAS Mouthwash
8 oz. bot. ONLY
Other Brands 9 ox. bot. -90$
Guaranteed satisfaction er your money back

MENTICOL Lotion
Most famous Astra Product
16 oz. bottle ONLY 60
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back

AGUA GLACIAL
AFTER-SHAVE LOTION
6 oz. bot. ONLY 600
Other Brands 5 ox. 90 1
4 ox. 75$
4 ox. 69$
Guarantead satisfaction or your money back

DOG DIP

Flea and Tick Killer
8 oz. bot. ONLY (fit
Other Brands 4 ox. $1.00

BOOK LACQUER
ANTl-MILDtN
8 oz. bot. only 750
The only product sold in Panama
which protects the covers of your
boohs and albums from deteriorating.

ran

I

GRAND OPENING-

Wednesday, September 30

5? amarjRmm

dress up your table
for the traditional dinners
during the coming holidays

Tr' 1.4.1

-.warn .?Si,

A
P

As traditional as the
holidays choose from
romantic or modern
patterns in flatware
and matching service
places. .
INTERNATIONAL STERLING
...THE SOLID SILVER
WITH BEAUTY THAT
LIVES FOREVER.

Lady Luck could smile on you and
make you lucky winder this week!
THIS WEEK'S WINNERS

Lucila Altamlranda
Mina Dee
Tva de Maduro
Silvia de Quinte-o
Berta de Arosemena

Cecilia de Won
Vilma Comrie
Ines Ma. de Gonzales
Arthur French Jr.
Rosie Hatton

All Sales Slips Ending in 3 Won
DOUBLE CHECK YOURS

EASY TERMS

THE JEWELRY STORE
18.45 Central Avenue ,(137)
FREE "Chico" de ORO STAMPS

Read Our Classifieds

02AD(IH STORE Sou (SsaDidl oraaaa

Located in the brand new building on Central Ave. & M St.
(Next to West Indian Bodega)
New and Fantastic Assortment of Yardgoods at the same PUERTO LIBRE low, low prices!
PERFECT FOR ALL POCKETBOOKS
Ask for your RAFFLE TICKET for the Second Chalet Drawing on December 27.
SENSATIONAL GIFTS AND SURPRISES FOR EVERYONE!

I
&4

I

PCDGCTu" GJ03E2G and ONLylCllGQTir ILDI3C2L; SELLS AT SUCH LOW, LOW prices



' PA8I SIX

TBI PANAMA AMERICA
AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSFAPEB
MONDAY, SEPTEMBEK tl. MSI
Steel Scramble Spotlights Ominous
Hurdles Ahead In Top Industry Of US
LANCOME

"Natural

Beauty?
The French
Have a word for

i

it.

. LAN COME
With Lancome's exclusive creams at your finger,
tips you can help yourself to "natural beauty.'
This is complexion care the French way. Try
Lancome Achieve true complexion loveliness!

today, September 28, through Wednesday, September
30, at our Main Store.

HOl'RS: 8:30 a.m. to 12

Her free consults ns will he conducted in
English, Spanish and French.

r

the finest cosmetics
for a lovelier you
NAIL-POLISH LIPSTICK
CREAMS POWDER
PERFUMES MAKE-UP
REFRESHING LOTIONS

MAIN
22rM Central Art.
LANCOMF. Cosme,
PANAMA CITY
Felix B. Maduro,
Blanch Store
VnlaS
Tony's Kmtitv Salcii
Srutio's 'Vaiitv Salon
COLON
I. L. Mdurc

IT SWtfTttWf 1

FELIX cordially Invites you to consult
with Mademoiselle Emllie R. de Leon,
expert beautician from the world-famous
LANCOME Beauty Salon in Paris,

noon 3:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
STORE
el. Z-177S
. Also Available: J
( Ul' HE
Vmnren Kosita
lAVil
( iiui.i in Beaut v shor
(iH7.alrr. Krvilln
Tni c Store

CLEVELAND, Ohio (UP1)
The steel scram ole is on and is
expecteu to intensity in the com coming
ing coming weexs. Steel Magazine report-
eu yes.erua,).
The industry magazine said
steel consumers were scouring the
country lor badly needed sheets,
plates, bars and structural. And
they re laying premium prices,
absorbing extra freight, signing
costly conversion contracts to get
what they need. Unless they got
it, they'll have to cut production
or shut down.
As the steel strike dragged
through its 11th week, signs were
mounting that it will cost addi additional
tional additional Hundreds ot thousands ol
workers in supporting industries
their paychecks. Hundreds of steel
using plants will be closed ior
lack of material.
The metalwjrking industry mag magazine
azine magazine said direct steel losses alone
now amount to almost four billion
dollars through lost steelworker
wages, sales and other losses, in including
cluding including federal taxes.
Industry observers were expect expecting
ing expecting President Eisenhower to in invoke
voke invoke the Taft-Hartley Act some-:
time between Oct. 1 and 15 to get
the striking steelworkers back in
the mills, according to Steel Mag Magazine.
azine. Magazine. The strike has sent Canada to
new steel sources. The industry
magazine said Canada, which im

Mrs. K. Bids Mamie Goodbye
On Final Day's Visit In US

o
Nina Khrushchev exchanged
warm goodbyes with Mrs. Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower yesterday and then visited
the historic homes of two Ameri American
can American Revolutionary War heroes.
On the last day of her U.S.
visit, the Soviet lirst lady went
to the He House tor an un unscheduled
scheduled unscheduled 25-mlnute farewell visit
with the President's wife.
She men motored tnrough sun sun-splashed
splashed sun-splashed Virginia countryside to
see Mount Vernon, home of
George Washington, and nearby
Gunsion Hall, home of George
Mason, one oi the s.gners ol tne
Declaration of Independence.
Mrs Khrushchev and Mrs. Ei
senhower emerged together onto
the portico of the White House at
the end of their visit.
The Soviet Premier's wife told
Mrs. Eisenhower "we expect to
see you" when the President goes
to Moscow later this sear. Mrs.
Eisenhower, whose mother's ill illness
ness illness may prevent her making.the
trip, replied: "111 probably '' see
VAIt ? I i
vnu
The two women were smiling
and patting each other's hands as
they said go'Xibye.
"Good luck. 1 hope you have a
lovely day down in the country,"
Mrs. Eisenhower called out as her
guest dep irted.
During the visit, Mrs. Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev also was approached by
Anna Tchaprachikod, a reporter
for Pars-Match Magazine who
asked for Mrs. Khrushchev's help
in getting her mother and brother
out of Bulgaria.
The newswoman reported Mrs.
Khrushchev told her that Bulgaria
was a free country and that she
could not interfere. Mrs. Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev asked her why she did not
visit her family in Bulgaria.
The party then drove to Guns Guns-ton
ton Guns-ton Hall for lunch at the home of
Robert Thayer, an asistant to
secretary ot State Christian A.
Hertpr whn lives on the ernunds
of the historic Virginia landmark.
Before setting out on her final
round of public activity, Mrs.
Khrushchev had a brief talk at
Blair House with a Chicago priest
on the possibility his 72-year-old
jiiwuc
3'
i TIM III llll
FISH
I

a fl

-

i! fj run

I

BIRDS IYI quick-frozen foods we farm farm-fresh
fresh farm-fresh and flavorsome. Grown exclusively
for Birds Eye, these ready-to-serve quick quick-frozen
frozen quick-frozen Birds Eye Foods are carefully
selected, cleaned and packed to meet top top-'rade
'rade top-'rade U. S. Food Standards.

I
1
I

Stock the best-get some today I

pure about one million tons oi
wiusned steel annually, 60 per
cent rrom U. S. mills, was turn

ing to European ana Japanest
suppliers in the pinch.
ine shift was making U. S. pra pra-ducers
ducers pra-ducers wonder whether they will
regain their Canadian customers
after the strike is settled. A per per-manerrt.loss
manerrt.loss per-manerrt.loss of the Canadian ex export
port export market would mean a corres
ponding loss of U. S. steelworker
jobs.
Apprehension increased among
steelmen concerning the possibili possibility
ty possibility of an iron ore shortage. Only
37 ore carriers of a fleet of 243
vessels are moving Lake Super.or
ore and just a trickle of ore is
moving down the lakes.
Steelmakers say they barely
will scrape through spring produc production
tion production if the strike ends about Oct.
1, if vessels resume operations
quickly, December weather per permits
mits permits shipments, eastern steve stevedores
dores stevedores handling foreign ores don't
strike, and if rail labor doesn't
halt traffic with a strike.
Last week, steelmaking opera operations
tions operations held at 12.5 per cent of ca capacity
pacity capacity for a production of about
354,000 ingot tons.
The magazine's scrap price
composite on the prime grade of
heavy melting crap last week
held steady at $41 a gross ton
A heavy post-strike movement is
expected.
mother might be allowed to come
to this country irom Lnnuama.
Her visitor was the Rev. Dr.
Joseph Prunskis of St. George
Lithuanian church. He reported
that the Soviet Premier's wiie had
told him she would "personally
take care of the matter" and can
it to her husband's attention.
It was the third known case in
which the Khrushchevs had prom promised
ised promised to take such action. The Pre Premier
mier Premier told a Chicago couple and
an Ohio woman during his cross crosscountry
country crosscountry tour that relatives ol
theirs would be permitted to come
here from behind the Iron Cour Cour-tain.
tain. Cour-tain. Cops' Records Told
In Detail As IBM
Ticker Comes Clean
CLEVELAND, (UPI)-An IBM
machine at Central Police Station
here began talking about the pol
ice force recently and really came
clean.
The machine disclosed that
members of the force can speak
21 different languages, including
Chinese, Japanese, Turkish, Ara Arabic
bic Arabic and Portuguese. Nine can
read lips nd 16 can converse
with deaf mutes.
On the force are attorneys, for former
mer former bank clerks, teachers, chem chemists,
ists, chemists, engineers, barbers, bricklay
ers, butchers, plasterers, plumb
ers, cooks, airplane pilots and
even an ex-undertaker.
The oldest policeman is 81 while
the oldest in length of service has
55 years. The heaviest weighs m
at 280 pounds. And the tallest is
six feet seven and onehalf inches.
IT SAYS HERE
NEW YORK, (UPD-The Nutri Nutrition
tion Nutrition Foundetion reports that the
average person can lose one
pound a week by cutting out '500
calories a day.

6!ST- POULTRY

VEGETABLES FRUITS

i :

f4yy lA1 0 I?
til t r;y Ay it& s&k
, 1 ,.. "sf .'fSy 4 .r

PERUVIAN OFFICERS VISIT Officers of the Peruvian Army who visited In U.S. Army Caribbean this week watched firing of
the 120mm guns of D Battery, 4th Gun Battalion, 517th Artillery, at Fort Sherman. Looking over the big guns as the crew works
in the background are, left to right, Col. John O. Woods of the U.S. Army Mission to Peru, escort officer; Col. Jorge Rendon de
la Lema, director of the Peruvian Army's Cavalry School; Brig. Gen. Augusto Romero Lovo, chief of the Fifth Department (train (training
ing (training and schools); Maj. Miguel Pereyra Arroyo, assistant chief of schools of the Filth Department; Capt. Orlando Ortiz of the
U.S. Army Caribbean School, Fort Gulick, and Lt. Col. Robert H. Johnstoh, commanding officer of the 4th Gun Battalion, 517th
Artillerv- (U.S. Army Photo)!

DAILY
MEDITATION
Presented by the Department
of Christian Education of the
Episcopal Chu'ch in the Mis Missionary
sionary Missionary Diocese of the Panama
Canal Zone.
Your Evening Bible Reading:
St. Matt. 3:7-15
ALL THE PEOPLE
"Now when all the people
were baptized, it came to pass,
that Jetut alto beina baDtlxed.
and praying, the heaven was y
opened.
St. Luke 3:21
John, for all the terror of his
preaching, cut through the tangl tangled
ed tangled web of Pharisaic tradition,
pushed as.de the mountains of in interpretation
terpretation interpretation and went to the heart
of things. John's God may not
have been the loving God o.
Christianity, but He was a forgiv forgiving
ing forgiving God, Who responded d rectly
and immediately to the repentant
heart.
Thus when Jesus accepted
John's baptism He thereby align
ed Himself on the side of the com common
mon common people, the so-called of the
land." Always, and in the face o.
sternest censure, He maintained
that alliance.
Among the common people is
where Christianity was born, and
only in this native soil has Christ Christianity
ianity Christianity ever found its strenglh 'o
live. When the Church has forgot
the rock from whence it was
hewn, and has sought first its own
power and prestige, it has been
weak.
When, casting place and privil privilege
ege privilege to the winds, the Church has
gone out in compassion to the
people of the land, then the
Church has been and always will
be strong.
WHAT'S THE NAME?
LONDON (UPl)-G orge Swin Swindle
dle Swindle was sues .-;! rlav fo" il illegally
legally illegally possessing an automobile.
JUICES
I

Enjoy your favorite fruito, vegetables,
fruit juices, fish and poultry, all year
'round regardless of season.

I

Typhoon Vera Makes Vicious Sweep
Through Japan, High Casualty Toll

TOKYO (UPD More than 2,300l
persons were dead or missing
today in the flood-soaked wreck
age left by typhoon Vera in a
disastrous sweep through 38 of
this nation's 46 prefectures
(states). Some 4,000 others werp
injured and more than a half half-million
million half-million left homeless.
Authorities feared the toll in the
biggest storm in Japan's recent
history would climb as disrupted
communications were restored.
The government set up a dis disaster
aster disaster headquarters in Tokyo and
mobilized the nation's resources
to' rush aid to the "stricken areas.
The latest unofficial casualty
figures listed 900 dead, 1,422 miss missing
ing missing and 4,065 injured in the ty typhoon
phoon typhoon that first lashed Kii Penin Peninsula
sula Peninsula in cen rai Japan Saturday
evening and then moved north northeast
east northeast to envelop virtually the en entire
tire entire main island of Honshu.
Government officials estimated
the typhoon damage at about 20
billion yen (about $61,000,000). It
was announced a supplementary
budget would have to be prese prese-ed
ed prese-ed to Parliament to cover the
losses.
The U.S. Air Force announced
that its Tachikawa Air Force
Base near Tokyo suffered damage
in excess of $1,000,000.
More than 160,000 houses were
destroyed or damaged by winds,
rains, floods and landslides trig triggered
gered triggered by the storm.
An estimated 320,000 houses
were flooded in the disaster that
struck exactly a year after ly ly-phoon
phoon ly-phoon Ida hit Japan's Izu Penin Peninsula
sula Peninsula in a sweep that claimed
1,345 lives.
Most of the casualties of ty typhoon
phoon typhoon Vera were concentra.ed in
three prefectures Aichi, M;e and
Gifu in central Honsu. All 1'iree
lie along Ise Bay, where Vera
first struck with 135 miles-an-hour
winds at high tide about midnight
Saturday.

WINDOW ON tERROR Neighbor Gertrude Jump, who
heard screams for help from University Of Southern California
coed Linda Edna Martin, stares inside the doorway where the
girl's body was found. The door glass was broken by the des desperate
perate desperate 21-year-old girl's fl?ts as she fled her fiance's Los Angele.
apartment, pursued by an unknown assailant who stabbed her.

Id!

H f I I

The Japanese Kyodo News
Agency reported at least 377 dead
and 54 missing in Aichi; 26
dead and 755 missing in Mie and
68 dead and 68 missing in Gifu.
In the city of Handa, in Aichi
Prefecture, more than 300 persons
were either washed away by flood
waters or buried under collapsed
buildings.
The heaviest casualties occurred
in the flat delta area where the
Nagara, Kiso and Hibl Rivers
flow into Ise Bay.
Floodwaters: covered about one one-fifth
fifth one-fifth of the lowrlying city and two
apartment houses collapsed under
the force of the winds and rain.
Some 60 persons were buried un under
der under the debris.
New Religious,
Scientific Film
Series At YMCA
The Balboa Armed Services
YMCA USO will inaugurated a
new series of religious-scientific
films, starting Thursday.
The films, all in color, wil cover
subjects of interest to the lay layman,
man, layman, and are open to the public
without charge. The schedule is as
follows: Oct. 1. "Dust or Desti Destiny";
ny"; Destiny"; October 8, "God of the
Atom"; October 15"; God of Crea Creation.'"
tion.'" Creation.'" Chaplain Silas E. Decker, chair chairman
man chairman of the YMCA's religious em emphasis
phasis emphasis comittee which is spon
soring the series, said the short
film ser es will be followed by a
series of Thursday night lectures,
stsrting Oct. 22,
The lectures will be given by
members of the clergy living in
this area, and the entire series
will be open to the public free of
charge. All programs begin at
7:30 p.m.
oWW'lMjSl'iJClw.ii.i,

p v :t -V 4-
EXPERIMENTAL WHEAT
Short, stiff-strawed wheats thai
can be grown without lodging;
on fertile soil with heavy nitro nitrogen
gen nitrogen fertilization are being de developed
veloped developed by USDA. Wheat (left)
with short, stiff straw has lodg lodging
ing lodging resistance and other merit,1
while typical commercial wheat
(right) lodges badly. Lodging is
the breaking over or falling;
down of plants because of weak
stalks, or top heaviness due to
lush growth. J
Laotian Troops
Retake Garrison
From Red Rebels
VIANTIANE, Laos, (UPI)-Gov.
ernment troops attacking under
cover of a heavy mortar barrage
yesterday recaptured a key north northern
ern northern garrison lrom communist re rebels
bels rebels in a nightlong battle.
Tnere were immediate re reports
ports reports on the number of casualties,
out the details brought to tlte cap capital
ital capital of Vientiane by French pilou
returning u -m the front indicated
that the lighting was relatively see
vered in tnis nit-and-run guerilla
war.
The pilots reported that shortly
after dawn the government forces
seized the outpost of Muong Het
at the northwestern end of a 25 25-miie
miie 25-miie curving battle line along th
River Ma. The fort on the north northwestern
western northwestern tip of beleaguered Sam Sam-neua
neua Sam-neua Province had failed to tho
Pathet Laos Communist rebels
Aug. 30.
Muong Het was one of five out outposts
posts outposts which the Reds stormed to
give themselves a defense line
behind which thev could hid and
prepare for raids.
Two weeks ago, the government
in Vientiane began lending troopi
northward toward thp nntnnt
They encountered little rebel re
sistance, a w e k ago, tnveunj
through dense jungle, government
patrols slipped close to the Ma
Kiver leading to Muong Het.
Observers said it innearad thai
in the last few days, the govern government
ment government forces closed in for the con con-certcd
certcd con-certcd attack that wnn thpm hark
one of (he five captured forts.
n was believed tne loyal troopa
now would swing southeastward
to attack Xicng Klio, another ol
the five forts.
The Communists continued
try to win by propaganda whit
they have not taken by force ol

v. l"

j

arms.



I

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER M, 1959
AD PANAMA AMERICAS A5 IJfDETEfDENT DATIT XfWSTkT-
PA6I IIVIM
US Agrees To Pul
OH Nuclear Test
HJLTXd-.!
Ban Talks At Geneva

.x V

74

mn

5 f

1 1 mi Tim ii r ilhrW-'TriWSliirli)! n mm ill iiiirimrnf "Ti mi

LADIES AT THE GUNS Enlisted men's wives of the 4th Gun Battalion, 517 th Artillery, have a Held day as they get a first hand look-in at the 80mm
antiaircraft artmery and see their men in action servicing the pieces during a live-fire problem at Battery MacKenzie. More than 35 wives took to the field
to learn from blackboard problems how the guns are readied for firing, to see communications systems and radar in action, and to partake of an Army meal
tin the messhall of A Battery. Here some of the wives are given a close look at one of the 90's by Capt. Donald G. O'Brien, battery commander.
1 (US Army Photo)

pt. zs (ui) The

United States has i.;.eed, at Bri

tain's request, to puit off ihe sched scheduled
uled scheduled reopening in Geneva of ne

gotiation for a ban on nuclear

testing from Oct, 12 to Oct. 25, it

was announced today.

A fore.gn office spokesman sa'd

Britain proposed postponement ot
the talks to the United States and
Russia, the other nations concern concerned.
ed. concerned. No reply has been received

so far from Russia. I

Diploma! sources said Britain

wanted to elay the reopening ol
the talks because Oct. 12 is too
short a time after the parliament

ary eleciton scheduled Oct. 8.
If the laborites, who have been
out of office for seven years, win
the parliamentary election, it
would take some time to inform
a newfiegotiator of the matters
CeTed at previous sessions of the
talks.
Even a conservative victory,
continuing the present government
in power, would not allow Britain
much time to prepare.

finance Official Sees US Defense
Spending Staying Up At $40 Billion

o

WASHINGTON, t-.yt. 28 (UPI)
-Ths Pentagon's top finance of official
ficial official said today that is world con con-litions
litions con-litions remain unchanged. U. S.
lefense spending probably will
iontinue in the neighborhood of 40
lillion dollars annually for the
lext two to four years.

L

J. McNeil, assistant

pastor Ends Up
In Jail Every

f-To

NF.W CASTLE. Pa. (UPI)

fevery Sunday afternoon, John
Martin ends un in the Lf.wronce

County .nil. This has been going

bn for. 22 years.

Yet. during that time, no shr-

ff hps ever filed a charge against
Martin. For some of the prison prisoners,
ers, prisoners, his weekly treks to the pokey
have done more than all the bars,

fcourts and desk sergeants ever

fcould to help them find the
Btraight and narrow.

Martin, a Church of the Naza-

rene layman, conducts religious

services each hunday tor tne in

mates. He reoorts tnat several

Imembers of his past "congrega

tions" have accepted the church 'oustrics

tes a guiding force in their lives.
He still receives occasional let letters
ters letters from former prisoners who
credit his missionary endeavors
with helping them become useful
Citizens.

secretary of defense, said that the
defense Dudget conceivably could
go lugner. But he predicted man manpower
power manpower might be reduced slightly
to oifset increased procuremenc
costs.
McNeil, who is credited with
knowing more about defense fin finances
ances finances man any other Pentagon
official, made the statements n
an interview with U.N. News and
World Report. He is leaving his
post Nov. 1 after 12 years to be
president of Grace Line, Inc.
McNeil forecast there would be
a need for a "considerable num number"
ber" number" of military aircrait through throughout
out throughout the next 1U years. But ne ad added
ded added tnat ine new money going into
missiles already is almost as
mucn as thai speni on new planes.
Any manpower cutback, AlcNed
said, woulu be considered "dras "drastic"
tic" "drastic" wn.ch was within a 5 or 10
per ceni range in the next three
or four years.
McNeil sam he did not think un un-iLcaiion
iLcaiion un-iLcaiion of the armed services
would lead to any substantial
change in defense spenaing.
"The large seavings that we
nvusi eonstajiily strive for ..re o
be found through a real effort U
seleci. iiie ngiu type and cnar cnar-ter
ter cnar-ter ol weapons arid the proper
balance of forces, regardless of
how you are organizeu to support
or employ them," he declared.
McNeil said a general disarma disarmament
ment disarmament could have a painful impact
on certain communities and in-

On the other hand, jailers keep

an eye on prisoners who don t at at-Itend
Itend at-Itend Martin's services. A few
'yean ago, while his "congrega

tion" was singing loudly, some

convicts in another part of the
prison went to work on their cell

bars with hack saws while the
hymns drowned out their noise.

6:45
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One and one half hours of
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professional talent and the
79th Army band.

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Double Feature Program
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"Hong Kong Confidential"
and "SPY IN THE SKY"

PARAISO 7:00
Ray Mllland
Maureen O'Hara
"LISBON'

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Double Feature Program
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Govt. Officials
Ponder Breakdown
In Steel Talks

WASHINGTON (UPI) Top gov government
ernment government officials conferred again
yesteraay on the breakdown in
steel negotiations, weighing whe whether
ther whether to invoke ihe Taft-hartiey
Law to end the prolonged strike.
Secretary of Labor James P.
Mitchell and Federal Mediation
Director Joseph S. Finnegan dis discussed
cussed discussed the stalemate lor two
hours Sunday the 75th day of the
walkout by 500,000 steel workers.
Sources said a decision on
whether to invoke Taft Hartley
emergency procedures to halt the
strike for 80 days may be made
within the next several days.
Mitchell and Finnegan also are
considering shifting the site oi
bargaining from New York City
to Washington to make a new ef effort
fort effort to achieve agreement.
Both men, it was reported, may
confer on the steel crisis with
Pres.dent Eisenhower early this
week.
Meantime, two other isputes
between labor and management
threaten to cause strikes.
Federal mediators said they are
concerned about possible walkouts
by .East Coast longshoremen and
by can factory workers at Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday midnight.
The International Longshore Longshore-mans
mans Longshore-mans Assn. (ILA) is seeking a 50
cent an hour wage Increase for
its 50,000 members who work on
Atlantic nd Gulf Coast docks.
They usually follow a no contract contract-no
no contract-no work policy.
The contracts of major can
makers with the United Steel Steel-workers
workers Steel-workers Union also expire at
midnight Wednesday. A strike is
feared since hese negotiations
usually follow the pattern set in
basic steel contracts.
No negotiations on the major
steel atrika were scheduled Mon Monday.
day. Monday. The steel workers walked
out of New York City talks last
Friday and said they were a
fafee.
Representatives of 12 strike strikebound
bound strikebound steel Companies said they
would be willing to keep talking.
Finnegan has withheld comment
on hit plans for future mediation
efforts.

Ireland, Malaya To Ask UN
To Take Up Tibet's Invasion

I

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (UPI)

lielanj and Malaya plan to ash
tie United Nations oeneral as
sembly today io take up he

question of the Communist Chi

nese bloodoath in Tibet.
Tne plan was lo ig..ore the po political
litical political aspects of the Tibetan case
and concentrate on the suppres suppression
sion suppression of human rights by the Com Communists
munists Communists in the remote Himalayan
mountain country.
Irish Foreign Minister Frank
Aiken took tne ead in seeking

support for an assembly debate
on Tibet. Although there had been

marked reluctance among delega delegations
tions delegations to sponsor the move to put
it on the agenda, Irish sources ex

pressed confidence that the resolu resolution
tion resolution sponsored by Ireland and Ma Malaya
laya Malaya would be approved by a two two-thirds
thirds two-thirds vote.

The exiled Dalai Lama of Tibet

two weeks ago appealed lor im immediate
mediate immediate U. N. intervention ;o

"slop this ruthless and wanton
murder of my people" by the Chi- I
nese Communists.
The United States welcomed the
Dalai Lama's appeal arid' said it I
should be debated by the '!N,
but it took no action to place it

on the assembly's agenda. II
India openly opposed any move

for U.N. action. The western pow- I

ers generally felt that the initia- m
tive for U.N. debate should

I

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:'ome from an Asiatic power,
)referably a Buddhist country,
.lost chancelleries were inclined
.o "play it soft," lest any action
hat might be taken make India's
position more untenable in its
border troubles with Red China.
The ticklish problem of whether

Tibet is an independent country or Africa on the list

a part of China posed legal ques ques-,:"
,:" ques-,:" ''iat complicated the ssue
further.
. irish decided to sidestep
th s part of the problem.
The resolution under considera consideration
tion consideration by Ireland and Malaya would
recall the 1951 agreement under
which Communist China guaran
teed political, religious and other
liberties for the Tibetans.
The General Assembly's policy
debate was scheduled to resume
Monday at 10:30 a.m. e.d.t. with
speakers from Peru, Lebanon, Al

bania, Byeloniss:a and South

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J i

PAGE' EIGHT
TEX PAAMA AMERICAN A3 lKDETOTOtNT DAUT ITCWSPAP13I
' MONDAY IEPTEMBEB It, 1951 I,

Braves, Dodgers Begin WMrA

Teams Move To Los Angeles
Tomorrow To Continue Series

By FRED DOWN
NEW YORK, Sept. 28 (UPI) The Los Ange Angeles
les Angeles Dodgers defeated the Chicago Cubs, 7-1, and the
Milwaukee Braves beat the Philadelphia Phillies, 5-2,
yesterday to finish the regular season in a tie for
first place and create the third playoff for a pennant
in National League history.

The three-game playoff begins
in Milwaukee's County Stadium at
1:30 p.m. Panama time today
with the second and third games
scheduled for Los Angeles' mas
give Coliseum on Tuesday and
Wednesday. If the third game is
necessarv, the World Series will
open in Chicago's Comiskey Park,
home of the American League
champions, on Friday.
Roger Craig, a 28-year-old right righthander
hander righthander from Durham N.C who
joined the Dodgers from Seattle
In the Pacific Coast League in
June, pitched a six-hitter in the
season finale for the Dodgers
while Bob Buhl, bushy-browed
fast-baller from Saginaw, Mich.,
ained credit for the Braves' vic victory
tory victory with relief aid from Don Mc Mc-Mahon.
Mahon. Mc-Mahon. The San Francisco Giants,
' who remained "alive" in one of
1 the most fantastic pennant races
,.of all time when Sam Jones
'pitched seven-inning no-hi'ter
Saturday night were eliminated
' when they lost Sunday to the St.
: Louis Cardinals, 2-1.
Craig, who had made only two
hits in 51 previous trips to the
plate, sent the Dodgers off in
front with a two run single in the
iecond inning. Charley Neal's tri triple
ple triple and Norm Larker's single
added a third Los Angeles run in
the third and Neal drove Cub
starter Bob Anderson from the
mound with a two run homer in
the fourth to boost tne uoogers
lead to 5-0.
Catcher John Roseboro hit a
two-run homer off reliever Don
Elston In the eighth to give Los
Angeles two more insurance runs.
A crowd of 48,642, largest in
the history of Milwaukee's Coun County
ty County Stadium, saw the Braves
score their all-important victory
on five unearned runs.
A wild pitch by Jim Owens
gave the Braves their first run
in the fourth inning but the Phil Phillies
lies Phillies tied the score on Carl Sawat Sawat-ski's
ski's Sawat-ski's homer and it remained that
way ur.til the seventh.
Del Crandall started the sev seventh
enth seventh Vith k single to lefk-the on
ly baB. hit: out of the infield dur during
ing during the entire inning. Humberto
Robinson replaced Owens and
walked pinch-hitter Enos Slaugh Slaughter,
ter, Slaughter, then short-stop Joe Koppe
dropped a potential force out
throw at second base to fill the
bases.
Crandall scored on Eddie Math Mathews'
ews' Mathews' infield out and two more
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tallies crossed on a balk by
Robinson and Hank Aaron's in infield
field infield hit.
The Dodgers, then representing
Brooklyn, were involved in the
two previous National League
playoffs, losing in two games to
the St. Louis Cardinals in 1946
and in three games to the New
York Giants in 1951. The latter
ended with Bobby Thomson's fa famous
mous famous three-run homer in the last
half of the ninth inning of the
third game.
The Cleveland Indians defeated
the Boston Red Sox, 8-3, in 1948
in the American League's only
post-season playoff for a pennant.

Jeanine Hebert
Wins Girls Net
Championship
Fifteen-year old Balboa High
School student Jeannine Hebert
yesterday defeated Mercedes Ar Argote,
gote, Argote, 19-year-old Panama Univer University
sity University student, in three sets at the
Olympic swimming pool to win
tournament sponsored by a local
cigarette firm.
The game ended at lt.M p.m.
with both players almost com completely
pletely completely exhausted from the heat
of the noonday sun.
Miss Hebert won the first set
8-K, lost the second 4-6 but came
on the win the final set 6-2 when
her opponent faltered.
Jeannine has won two Canal
Zone school tournaments and last
year was selected as the best
junior tennis player on the Paci Pacific
fic Pacific side of the Canal Zone, She
has been receiving instruction
from Bill Hele for the last two
years. She is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Walter H, Hebert of Dia Diablo
blo Diablo Heights.
Miss Argote, a second-year stu student
dent student ofthe science faculty of the
Panama University, has been re
ceiving instructions for the past
year from Panamanian instructor
Alejandro Tarte. She is the daugh daughter
ter daughter of Mrs. Hercilia Ramos Ar Argote
gote Argote and the late Prof. Benigno
Argote.
mmmmim

GOLD SEAL'

v

Bourne Scores
TKO Victory
Oyer Murillo

Former bantamweight cham champion
pion champion Melvin Bourne, 123W, last
night scored a TKO over Roberto
Murillo, 126, in 2:05 of the fifth
heat of a scheduled ten-rounder.
The fight was stopped by refe referee
ree referee Vivian Stewart because of a
gash Murillo received on the side
of the left eye in the fourth
round.
The wound, from which blood
flowed freely, was estimated by
Boxing Commission medico Dr.
Olmedo Duque to be about one
and a half inches wide and a
half inch deep.
Murillo appeared to be ahead
on points up to the fourth stanza.
He led the attack from the outset
and outpunched his opponent
while keeping Bourne off balance
and making him miss repeatedly.
Stewart said the loser got cut
when the fighters' heads knocked
together accidentally while in
close.
In the semifinal which had been
set for six rounds substitute An Andres
dres Andres Allen, 135, knocked out Rav
Best 126Mi, in 2:58 of the fourth
heat.
Best walked into a left hook
to the jaw, fell forward and got
up a second aftre referee Servio
Tulio Lay counted him out. The
fight had been more or less even
up a second after referee Servio
in place of Stanley Wilson who
failed to show up at weighing-in
time.
Constantino Diaz. 126, kayoed
Arias Mendez, 119, in ten sec
onds of the third heat of a prelim
scheduled for four; and Elio Pon Pontiles,
tiles, Pontiles, 114V2, took a unanimous de decision
cision decision from Benny McCree. 120Vi,
in the four-round curtain raiser.
A disappointingly small crowd
took in the program.
LEADING
HITTERS
National League
G AB R H Pet.
Aaron, Mil, 152 623 115 221 .355
Cun'ham, S. L. 144 458 65 158 .345
Cepeda, S. F. 151 605 92 192 .317
Pinson, Cinci. 154 648 131 205 .316
Mays, S. tF. 151 S7S;125 180 .313
Temple, Cinci. 149 598 102 186 ,311
Robinson, Cin. 146 540 106 168 .311
Boyer, St. L. 149 563 86 174 .309
Mathews, Mil. 146 486 116 180 .307
Banks, Chica. 154 489 7 179 .304
American League
Kuenn, Detroit 139 561 99 198 .353
Kaline, Detroit 136 511 86 167 .327
Runnels, Bos. 147 560 95 176 .314
Fox, Chicago 156 624 84 191 .306
Mifioso, Cleve. 148 570 92 172 .302
Rich'son, N.Y. 134 469 53 141 .301
Tuttle, K. C. 126 463 74 139 .300
Woodling, Bal. 140 440 63 132 .300
Power, Cleve. 147 595 102 172 .289
Mantle, N. Y. 144 541 104 154 .285
Cerv, K. C. 125 463 60 132 .285
Runs Batted In
National League
Banks, Cubs 143
Robinson, Reds 125
Aaron, Braves 123
Bell( Reds 115
Mathews, Braves 113
American League
Jensen, Red Sox 112
Colavito, Indians Ill
Killebrew, Senators 105
Lemon. Senators 100
Maxwell, Tigers 95
Home Runs ?
National League
Banks, Cubs 45
Mathews, Brakes 45
Aaron, Braves J9
Robinson, Reds 36
Mays, Giants 34
American League
Colavito, Indians 42
Killebrew, Senator! 33
Mantle, Yankees 31
Maxwell, Tigers 31
vrnz:
(Besetf en 14 or Mere Bedstone)
National League
W L
. 18 1
. 18
Pet
Faec, Pirates
Law, Pirates .
Antonelli, Giants
Conley, Phils .
Buhl, Braves .
.947
.667
H 10 .655
12
15
.832
.625
American League

Shaw, White Sox .... 18 .750
McLish, Indians .... 19 S .704
Wynn, WhiU Sox ... 12 10 .688
Mossi, Tigers 17 I .S54
Maas, aYnkees .... 14 S .636

mmmssi

9 tilt0 tJl 2X. i

BARELY MADE IT The Stud Rancho Bravo's promising colt hangs on to score by a long
nose over fast-closing Miss Brunette in the $2000 added one mile Panama Jockey Club Classic
yesterday afternoon at the President Remon racetrack. Mutuels favorite Puerto Madero wound
up third, only three-quarters of a length back. Heliodoro Gustines, who rode Gong, put cn
another of his rough-riding exhibitions. Fernando Alvarez was up on Miss Brunette. Leading
jockey Braulio Baeza rode third place finisher Puerto Madero.
Gong Races To Tainted Victory
In Panama Jockey Club Classic

The Stud Rancho Bravo's re
portedly expensive Argentine colt
Gong yesterday raced to tainted
nose victory in the $2,000 added
Panama Jockey Club Classic for
three-year-old imported coUs and
fillies at the President Remon
raeetrack.
The chunkv black son of Mos-
Ifm-Panfila was in fine form and
would probably have scored a
more clean-cut victory but tor nis
rider's monkeyshines. When ma ma-note
note ma-note rhnirp Puerto Madero made
hi final hid in the homestretch.
jockey Heliodoro Gustines allowed
his mount to gradually Dear oown
against Puerto Madero until tne
lattpr was un aeainst the inner
rail where he finally spent him himself
self himself in the slowest footing on the
track. Gong himself weakened in
the maneuver and barely lasted to
gain a nose photo-decision over
Miss Brunette.
Puerto Madero finished third,
ttirao-nnarters of a lensth behind
Miss Brunette. Singaluz was
fourth and Serres Koaa, Monies Monies-co
co Monies-co and Tanarik trailed in that bor
der. .
Gong turned the mile in I last
1-42 15 over the somewhat slow
strio. He paid $5.40 to win and
m nt Miss Brunette return
ed $6.20 place. The Gon?-Miss
Brunette one-two oaia
Emilv Mary ($22.40) and El Fa Fa-v.v
v.v Fa-v.v (1 m naid the day's best
win odds. Gustines and leading
jockev Braulio. Baeza shared rid riding
ing riding honors with three victories
earh.
Besides the Classic, there were
two other instances in which win winners
ners winners would have been disqualified
at most racetracks.
In the second race, Edimhurgo
(Baeza up) was stooped cold in
the homestretch when apprentice
Juan Pablo Diaz, upon Azabache,
.tvu.V ITHimhiirsn with his Whip.
In the other, Jos Talavera
changed his course witn Fonemo
in th treteh and moved from
the Inside to crowd Bugaha nrac-
ticallv against the outer rail in
the third race.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 El Fakir. $21.40
1 Empire Cress, $3.M
SECOND RACE
1-Aiabaehe, $7.M. $3.40
1 E'dlmburge. $3.40
First Double: $284.10
THIRD RACE
l-Felletlte, U. $2.M
I Buiaba, $2.40
AliaTU AC
lKm $lte (excluded frem bet-
Inn)
jTlte $3.10, $!.W
J Linda Suiv J w
Quinleia: w.ra
FIFTH RACE
1 La Pellrrola $S.40, $3
J Santanare $3
SIXTH RACE
lCler6n $4.40. $3.10
INew Then $10
SEVENTH RACE
1 Daauvltle S5.M, $2.10
1BI TwneW $2.10
Second Double: fir
iautu RACE
1 Buerv Met II (oieeluded from
bertino) i.
lBatantlte $14.40. $4-40
3 Lobe $2.(0
Oulnlela: $1.t0
NINTH tACB
lOeni $S.40, $4.20
I Mitt Brunette $4-20
One-Two: $21 JO
TENTH RACE
1 Emily Mary $22.40, $5.20
I Mlchlrlpa $3
ELEVENTH RACE
1 Saprlttl $5, $3.20
2 Marlman $3.20
One Two: $13.40
tier

1!

KT A I

COSMOPOLITAN LEAGUE
Teams
Won Lest
8 4
7 5
6Mi 5V4
6 6
5 7
5 7
5 7
,A.P.A.
Johnson's Seahorse
Lan Chile
Tasco
Lee's Steakhouse
Aberhathy S.A.
Tahiti
Colonial Ins.
MEN
Earle Best ; 206
Mac Lane 197
Pepe Damian ; 194
WOMEN
M.imi Metiger 160
M. Mitchussen 149
Vi Rudy 149
High Team Single Game-Johnson's
Seahorse 1072. j
High Team series-Johnson' Sea Seahorse
horse Seahorse 3016.
High Single game-men Ed Kun Kun-kel
kel Kun-kel 244.
High Single game-women Mimi
Metzger 183.
After three weeks of bowling the
Pacific Cosmopolitan League is
off to it's best start in years
with only three points betwe the
first and last place team. Tasco
Batteries slowed the high flying
A.P.A. had established finally
caught up with them.
APA gave Tasco 75 pins in
handicap and edged TASCO by 7
pins in the first game. From tnen
on, TASCO, led by Pepe Damian
poured it o;. Damian posted
games of 202-214-225 for a 641
scratch series, the highest in the
league this year. Ed Lowande
scored 549 for TASCO. For APA
Earle Best posted his third 600
series with a 604 as his average
slipped to 206.
Johnson's Seahorse scored a 3
to 1 win over Tahiti Jewelers to
move into second place. Tahiti
was handicapped by the absence
of two of its bowlers, in the
opener Ed Kunkel's 244 paced
Tahiti to it's lone point. The Out Outboard
board Outboard 5, paced by Don Rudy's 570
and Mimi Metzger's 502, roared
back to take the final two games
and pinfall. Johnson's Seahorse
scored 1072 in the second game,
a new high for the season. Ed
Kunkel's 584 was high for Tahiti.
Colonial Insurance scored the
only shutout of the night as they
handed LAN CHILE a 4 to 0 loss.
Lan Chile slipped to third place a
game and a half off the pace.
Charley McGlade again was high
for Colonial Insurance with a 523.
George Folger's blind score of 495
topped anything the Lan Chile
could offer.
Lee's Steakhouse dropped game
to Abernathy S.A. but came back
to score a 3 to 1 victory. Mac
Lane's 612 was high for Lee's
Steakhouse and boosted his aver average
age average to 197. Bruce Hassler came
up with a fine 583 series including
a 231 game. ..This was the closest
match of the evening as only 1 pin
separated the teams in handicap
and in final pinfall Lee's had a 30
pin edge.
The free steak dinners offered by
glen Lee, Manager of Lee's Steak
house. this week were won bv Pe
pe Damian whose 641 plus handi
cap totaled 677. For the ladies
Mimi Metzger came back raving
about the fine food that Lee's offer
and her handicap series of 598
gives her 2 more steak dinners.
TASCO BATTERIES 3
E. Lowande 549
Lang 381
T. Lowande 359
Ehremfourg 451
Damia 441
LAN CHILE 0
Blind
M. Albritton
Borgis
T. Albritton
R. Thompson
495
376
364
438
445
AFA1
Soystor
P. Best
Mitchussen
Prusinowski
E. Beit
542
401
460
518
604

im

a. -a
.k VV 111
RES
Klumpp
Colenan
Voss
McGlade
B. Brown
448
408
423
523
385
TAHITI 1
Barbour
Cam by
Blind
Blind
E. Kunkel
394
434
43S
3&!)
584
ABERNATHY S.A. 1
Rogers
486
386
402
499;
5221
Gunn
R. Schmidt
B. Best
T. Schmidt
JOHNSON'S SEAHORSE 3
V. Rudy 439
Herrisgton 473
M. Melzger 502
G. Metzger 49f
D. Rudy 570
LEE'S STEAKHOUSE 3
Hassler
P. Lane
N. Mclanson
583
330
310
487
612
T. Melanson
M. .ane
MARGARITA LEAGUE
FIRST WEEK
The league rolled into the first
week with two teams taking four
points to secure the lead for the
present.
The RA Wonders, a new team
to the league, took four points
from Powells with Brady leading
the Wonders with a 557 series. Al Although
though Although Hogan's 559 paced both
teams to take Class A prize for
the week, the rest of the team
couldn't get started.
The Aces, paced by .ROdenhi .ROdenhi-zer
zer .ROdenhi-zer with a 519, took four froin, an another
other another newcomer Gold Label Rum.
Fortner led the Liquor rtjen with
a 542. V
Beck's Beer and Moog, Int. bat battled
tled battled it out with the Beermen tak taking
ing taking three and losing one. St.
John, anchor ma,n for the Beer Beer-men,
men, Beer-men, led his team with a 499
while Blank paced Moog with a
511.
With two new men added to the
Wright Bros team, who have yet
to establish an average, the out outcome
come outcome of their game with Gillette
will not be known at this time.
We would like to take this op opportunity
portunity opportunity to thank the sponsors
of the Beck's Beer team for the
refreshments at the alleys last
Tuesday night. It is hoped that
your team can uphold the honor
you have placed upon them.
STANDINGS
Teams
RA Wonders
Aces
Becks Beer
Moog, Int.
Powells
Gold Label Rum
Wright Bros.)
Gillette
W L
4 0
4 0
5 1
1 3
6 4
0 4
To Be
Determined
HIGH FOR THE WEEK:
Hog an
Tom
Dougan
ACES
Reich
Gullickson
Rodenhizer
Stilson
Spinney
Totals
Class A 559
Class B 506
Class C 488
182 162 146 490
147 182 155 484
168 159 192 519
166 169 141 479
165 171 169 505
124 443 (43 2474
v. GOLD LABEL RUM
Jones
Fortner
Tully
Guest
Martin
Totals
147 140 154 441
165 180 197 542
142 150 132 424
139 187 147 473
127 180 167 474
720 437 797 2344
R.A. WONDERS

Editor: CONRADO 6ARCEANT

National League
TEAMS '
W L
44 44
44 44
43 71
74 74
74 40
74 40
71 S3
44 90
Pet.
GB
Let Angeles .
Milwaukee .
San FrMlrlira
.581 -.584
-J39
3
J04 4
.441 12
.441 12
.441 IS
.414 2
Pittsburgh .
Chicago
Cincinnati .
St. Louit .
Philadelphia
Today's Games
National League Pennant Plaveff
At Milwaukee: Los Angeles v
Milwaukee 2:30 p.m. (EST)
Yesterday's Results
Los Aneeles 021 200 0207 9 o
Chicago 000 010 0001 6 1
Craig (11-5) and Roseboro.
Anderson (12-13). Henrv. Elston
and S. Taylor.
Philadelphia 000 010 0012 9 4
Milwaukee 000 100 31x 5 7 2
Owens (12-12), Robinson and Sa-
watski.
Buhl (15-9), McMahon and Cran
dall.
(First Game).
San Francisco 000 100 0001 9 1
St. Louis 000 000 02x 2 5 1
McCormick (12-16), Miller, and
Landrith.
Jaokson (15-12), McDaniel and
Smith.
(Second Game)
S. Francisco 202 030 001 8 12 0
St. Louis 105 035 0OX 14 13 5
Renfro. Worthmeton, Fischer
(2-6), G. Jones, Byerly and
Schmidt.
Miller, Gibson (3-5) and Oliver.
Pittsburgh 004 110' 100 7 12 2
Cincinnati 210 013 llx 9 15 1
A. Jackson. Hall. Green (l-z),
Dpniels and Krsvitz.
TToak Pefia. Brnsnan. NuxhaH
(9-9), Purkey and Dotterer.
Chilean Boxers
Go On Amateur
Card Tomorrow
A five-man Chilean amateur
boxing group headed by welter welterweight
weight welterweight Alfredo Cornejo, makes its
debut against local fightes at the
National Gym at 8:30 tomorrow
night.
The most outstanding of the
quintet, hat been South Ameri American
can American champion in 1954, 1957 and
1958, and came out on top in the
recent T h I r d Panameriean
Games in Chicago and in the
Golden Belt championship! in
Mexico.
The other four members of the
visiting group are Carlos Lucas,
who finished third in the Olympic
Games held in Melbourne in 1956,
fighting in the light-heavy weight
division and took the title jn the
middleweight class in the Goldm
Belt tourney.
Lightweight Luis S i 1 V a, was
third in Chicago and Mexico, and
Sergio Robles, finished third for
featherweight honors in Mexico.
The only fighter among the vi visitors
sitors visitors who failed to qualify in
Chicago or Mexico is flayweight
Reinaldo Seguel.
The complete program fol follows:
lows: follows: Carlot Lucat, Chile, vt. Hum Humberto
berto Humberto Salaiar, Panama, 14S
pounds.
Alfredo Cefnejo, Chile, vt. O O-nel
nel O-nel Eastman, Panama, 147
pounds.
Luit Silva, Chile, vt. Humber Humberto
to Humberto Herman, Panama, 135
pounds.
Sergio Roblet, Chicle, vt. Polo
Belgrado, Panama, 118 poundt.
Reinaldo Seguel, C c h 1 1 e vt.
Leopold Campbell, Panama,
112 poundt.
Admission rices are general
admission, 75 cents; ringside, $1;
and children, 50 cents.
The Chileans expect to m a k
two local appearances before re returning
turning returning home.
Kirch
Cosmano
Brady
Peters
Totals
138 162 169 489
175 165 155 495
180 199 178 557
154 151 181 486
410 749 454 2453
27 27 27 41
437 414 441 2534
vs. POWELLS
Badger
Stepp
Gibson
Brown
Hogan
158 154 122 434
144 168 134 446
187 134 113 434
122 140 165 427
188 196 175 559
Totals 799 792 709 2100
BECKS BEER
Graham v
Brooks
Carpenter
DeVoll

144 149 160 401
134 155 143 432
109 135 145 389
144 M 143 484
167 189 141 4M
WO 4U 739 2)41

St. John

American League
TEAMS W L Pet. GB
Chicago 94 40 .410 .'
Cleveland 19 45 .578 5
Now York . 79 75 .513 15
Detroit 74 74 .494 14
Boston ..... 75 79 .487 19
Baltimore ... 74 80 .481 20
Kansas Clt .'. 44 It .479 71

Washington . 43 91 .409 31
Today's Games
National League Pennant PlavofV
At Milwaukee: Los Angeles vi
Milwaukee 2:30 p.m. (EST)
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 500 000 0016 8 4
Detroit 002 002 0004 7 2
Shaw (18-6), Latman, McBride-.
and Romano, Carreon.
Bruce (0-1), Morgan, Foytack,
Burnside and Shoop.
Washington 000 110 0002 8 1
Boston 240 000 OOx 6 6 1
Katt (0-2), McAvoy, Krawick,"
Lumenti and Korcheck.
-Casale (13-6), Baumann and"
Gile.
Baltimore 000 000 0303 10 0
New York 000 000 1001 6 0
O'Dell (10-12) and Ginsberg.
Gabler ,(l-1), Coates, BlaylocV
and Howard.
Kansas City 000 140 100-6 10 8
Cleveland 100 020 2005 12 z
Garver (10-13), Tsitouris, Kuty-;
na and Smith.
Score (9-11), Locke, Cicotte. B..
Smith. ". Harshman and Brown,
Nixon.
Rainbow City
Sports
The Latin American IntershooV
Basketball championship will blovp,
the lidi Wednesday at Rainbow Ck
ty gymnasium, when Santa Cruz
(Gamboa) will journey to Rainbow
City to engage Rainbow City
quintets, in the boys and girls de.;
partments.
Rainbow City has been master od
crown.
Last Friday, Rainbow City Sen-,
ior High boys and girls crossed
rackets with Paraiso stalwarts at,
the Paraiso gymnasium and won
the 1959 table tennis torunament
4-2 to retain the championship.
E. -Blades, Paraiso; lost to G.
Piper, R. City; L, Blades, Paraiso; Paraiso;-lost
lost Paraiso;-lost to C. Dun Moodie; A. Worrell,
Paraiso; bowed in defeat against
Joseph Flemmings and C. Greaves
in the girls department of Rainbow
City took one cinch the champion championship,
ship, championship, chalking four to .Paraiso
two.
Next Friday, Rainbow City will
again travel to Paraiso for the
first two games of the 1959 Sen Senior
ior Senior High basketball championship.
Last year Rainbow City split with
Paraiso in this activity when the
boys took the championship, and.
the girls lost.
SENIOR BASKETBALL
LEAGUE
Hvltons Plavbovs won the first
half.
Second Half Standing
Teamt W L Pet.-
Bazan 3 0 1.000-
Alumni 2 0 1.000
Piper 1 0 1.000
Cragwell 0 1 .000.
Hyltons 0 2 .000-
Playboys 0 2 .000"
Next scheduled games:
Monday, September 28,
Piper vs. Cragwell 7:00 p.m.
Hyltons vs. Playboys.
Wednesday, Sept. 30.
Bazan vs. Alumni 7:00 p.m.
Cragwell vs. Playboys r
Friday, Oct. 2,
Hylton vs. Cragwell 7:00 p.m.
Playboys vs. Piper
Monday, October 5,
Piper vs. Bazan 7:00 p.m
Alumni vs. Cragwell
Wednesday, October 7,
Alumni vs. Piper 7:30 p.m.
MOOG, INT.
Berger
Merrill
Lindgren
Blank
Blank
St. Cyr

140 149 128 41T
148 153 122 423
139 140 144 423
139 140 144 423'
169 185 157 51V
129 135 166 430,
725 742 717 2204

WRIGHT BROS.
Shobe 112 171 114 397
j" 145 150 137 43X
Thompson 121 124 145 390
Compton 154 106 134 .394
Dougan 1330 159 199 488
Totalt
vs. GILLETTE
Corro
Tom,,
Y
ChuUak
542 710 729 2101

122 156 163 441
203 123 180 500
143 170 169, 'SOI
151 136 146-433
138 162 189 480
774 747 147 1371

Baiile
Totals

COLONIAL 4
Lewis
141 1U 1T1 424
' 'I
, ... m .... .1



MONDAY, gETTZMBKB Xt, WW

TBI PAX AMI AMHJCAM a- AN INQCPIHDIKT DAILY MIWIFAPEB
PAGI NINft
Win Weekend s big Football Gomes

Tennessee, Northwestern

Wll Think
Rosenbloom
X.

Y MURRAY OLDERMAN

BALTIMORE (NEA) The Bal Baltimore
timore Baltimore Colts, ftefendingchamptohi
Of the National Football League,
plan to tike a tip from Khru Khrushchev,
shchev, Khrushchev, and propagandize in othei

lands, too.
Carroll Rosenbloom. the ener

fetic owner, wants to take his

padded .giants. East or West, to

Europe or Asia, on a post-season
tour that would introduce profes professional
sional professional football to the rest of the

world, under State Department
uspiee.
Carroll never realized he'd get
so involved when he sat down
to breakfast at his summer home
on the ocean in Margate, N. J.,
half a dozen years ago. A11 ne
had to-concern himself with then
ni his board membership on
three major industrial corpora corporations,
tions, corporations, plus numerous subsidiary
interests in the financial world.
But his neighbor down the road
was Bert Bell, National Football
League commissar.
The phone rang. Carroll picked
"It's Bert. I'm coming over.'

Of Something, Coach;'
Is Behind Colts' Story

COLTS' KEEPER

Bell, telling it now, says, "I al
'ways eat v,th. him. He's got the
money."
Over ham and eggs, ne told
Rosenbloom, "Carroll, you're go going
ing going to buy a pro football franchise.
Baltimore is ready for it again."
Baltimore is Rosenbloom's aome
town, and Bell could talk like that
because he was Carroll's backfield
coach at Pennsylvania in 1927 and
'28.
Matter of fart, he caused Bel)
to "resign." Carroll had been a
good driving halfback for two
years. He almost quit Penn to
accompany Marty Brill to Notre
Dame. A schism developed on the
coaching staff, with one faction a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst inviting Rosenbloom back
to play his senior year. So Bell
quit. And Carroll spent the fall
scrimmaging on the scrubs.
"He was a terrifically aggrgsr
slvt player," recalls -Belt, "Villi
great desire and anibition. And
that's why the Colts are so suc successful.
cessful. successful. He brings herij, the same
qualities." X f.
When Bell first "told Rosen Rosenbloom
bloom Rosenbloom he was an NFL owner,
Carroll shrugged, "Okay, yoa get
me the coach nd the irfartsger.
And I'll go see them play when
I can."
He was kidding himself. Ros Ros-enbloom
enbloom Ros-enbloom took a perfunctory in interest
terest interest one season and the Colls
were a perfunctory team. The next
ear, he took : a personal hand in
hiring a new coach, Weeb Ewbank
and seeing to it that the team
began to stock new players. He
promised Baltimore a champion championship
ship championship in five ya.rs. In the fifth
year, 1958, they make it.
. "He knows," says Bell, "what's
foing on within his ball club,
hat's what sets him apart."
A myth has been built up that
after the 1955 season, Rosenbloom
was going to fire Ewbank.
"Not so," says the still trim
Colt boss. "Weeb had his weak weakness.
ness. weakness. Every coach, you know, gets
married to certain players. But
Weeb's over that."
Rosenbloom is blunt in his opi opinion
nion opinion of how a team should be run.
Ewbank, for instance, is a notor-C-usly
excitable sideline coach.
"No coacn in the NFL," says
Carroll, "should be allowed on
the field during the game. They
should all be confined to the lock locker
er locker room."

Late in the fourth quarter of
last year's championship game,
the Colts were on the march for
the field goal that would tie it
for them and result in the even eventual
tual eventual 23-17 overtime victory over
the Giants. Johnny Unitas had
just completed a pass to Ray Ber Berry'
ry' Berry' that put the ball in New
York territory. The Colts called
time.
Unitas went to the side line.
This was to be the key play the
coach would call. The two minutes
elapsed in conference. Unitas broke
away from the sideline to rejoin
the Colts. He turned his head and
called back over his shoulder to
Ewbank:
"Don't worry, Coach. We'll think
of someth ng."
That's the way it must have
happened because Carrol Ros Rosenbloom
enbloom Rosenbloom tells the story.

Sports Briefs

MARRIAGE CHANCES
LONDON (UPI) Fat girls have
a better chance of getting mar married
ried married than skinny girls, a British
physician reported Sunday. Dr.
R. W. Parnell, Oxford University
researcher, put the fat girl'a odds
at 3-2 over the lean, willowy
typt

i diwt ju?r v ??tf'i?yx M
nit cw s jH Al

if p i

in?

;

B L

. m t

A

-jf f ST

XsJ

SOuiPPmo FOO Turn f Ljay V.

TWB SOS'S, yAJ

by

JOE WILLIAMS

On the eve of the 1919 World
Series one which was destined to
live in infamy and interminable
rehash an approximation of this
headline startled sports page
readers from coast to coast:
"Turbyville picks Reds in Six."
Only weeks befqre Fred Tur Tur-beyville
beyville Tur-beyville had come to Cleveland to
edit sports for NEA, then (as now)
the nation's largest and most

esteemed mail newspaper service.
Newly arrived ourself, we had

suggested this audacious exercise
in. Cassandraism.

"All the bie-shot writers will oe

picking the invincible White Sox,"
we reasoned. "Why not go for the

Reds? Who knows, they may get

lucky and putt it off. If they
do, pal, you're made."

Fred piayed U stragnt. ine
Reds would win on pitching.
Ruether, Sallce and Ring were
superior to Chicago's Big Three
of Cicotte, Williams and Kerr. So
what happens? Ruether, Salle and
Ring win three of the first four.
Only Kerr fails our friend: he
wins two for the White Sox, soon
to be stigmatized forever as the
Black Sox.
For all we know, he may have
been genuinely sold on the Reds,
anyhow. After all, they did have
solid pitching, in any case, our
friend's exhilaration was short shortlived.
lived. shortlived. His pre-Serics analysis turn

ed out so remarkebly accurate,

that Ban Johnson, Amen Can
League prisident, wondered if he
might have had advance infor information
mation information on the players' swindle
as yet unproved and requested
an interview.
"What do we do now?" grimac grimaced
ed grimaced Fred, already up to here in
such jocularly press-box j'bes as
"What, was your cut? "Did
you put the $10,000 under Cicot Cicot-te's
te's Cicot-te's pillow?". . "Wouldn't Jack Jackson
son Jackson stand still for you?". .et

cetera, etcetera.

A brush-back pitch in the form

of a sharp note, deploring John

son's utter inability to recognize

extraordinary perspicacity, pre

sumably sent the executive back

to the. dugout in silence. That

was the, end of that.

had umpired it. But our boss, Ed
Bank, alertly competent, had in insisted
sisted insisted from the second game that
the players had sold out.
On the White Sox' first trip to
Cleveland, the following spring.
Bang phoned Eddie Cicotte and
Lefty Williams asking that they
meet with him in his office. We
were dispatched to bring in the
two pitchers. On the way Cicot-1
te said: "All this is nothing but
wild talk and it's libelous. 'Ill set
Bang straight. He's a nice fellow,
and I would-hate to have to sue
him.". . We remember think thinking
ing thinking it was awfully decent of the
shine-ball master.
Joe Jackson we had known from
our days in the Southern League,

so when the White Sox returned

later we had emboldened to ap

proach the tremendous hitter on

our own. Jackson had come up
from wretched poverty, couldn't
read or write, was sullenly uncom

fortable m the presence of strane

ers, but our relations had always

oeen on The -cordial side.

"You, of all people, should
know better," he frowned. "On

my mama's grave I swear I Dlav

ed my best. Look 1 led both
teams in hitting (.375); if I had
sold out, and then hit like that,
them gamblers would have had

me killed long before this." .
Certainly made sense to us. Be
sides, nobody could tell us Shoe
less Joe wasn't an honest man
In late September we were a

bfuptly bumped off Cloud Nine.
Jackson, Cicotte and Williams

signed confessions of gu'lt, na

ming five others. That nas been

called baseball's darkest hour. It

wasn't too bright for a starrv-eved

cub who had scarcely been able to

wait to get to the big leagues

eitner.

'ON MAMA'S GRAVE'
Unlike boxing, where the re

verse is true people are seldom

in a mood to listen to evil about

baseball. Turbyville refused to be
lieve the Series had been fixed,
So did, we. And we had encour

agement from Billy Evans who

TE'CT'IUIIW-

Ti

WIN DESPITE FIX

The '19 Wh!te Sox was the

greatest team baseball had yet

Known, and while few sensed it
at the time, it was to be the

last of the old championship mo

dels. The lively ball was iust a

round the corner, for in '20 the

Babe was to hit 54 homers to

launch the Dower era.

Jackson, Cigotte Williams and

the other Black Sox played

through 20 on v what they must

nave known was borrowed time

Most of them had been short'

Changed by the gamblers, to
they set out to clip the game for

an tney could before the ine
vitable.

"No telling how many games
they threw, or tried to throw,
that season," Eddie Collins, one

of the untainted Sox, told us
"They practically lived with gam

biers. But th team had so

much all-around ability that the
crooks, trying to lose, often founr"
themselves winning instead. They
must have had some very trvin-

moments with their sponsors."

Fired-Up Vols
End Auburn's
Win Streak

y EARL WRIGHT
NEW YORK, Sept. 2 -(UPI)-It
was a football weekend to re remember
member remember for Tennessee and North Northwestern,
western, Northwestern, and one that Auburn and
Oklahoma would rather forget.
Tennessee's fired -up volunteers
ended the nation's longest current
unbeaten streak by inflicting Au Auburn's
burn's Auburn's first defeat in 25 games.
3 0, and Northwestern handed
Oklahoma its most one sided
shellacking in 14 years, 45-13.
Those were two of Saurd'ay's
biggest surprises, but there were
a number of others also.
Like Texas A and M's 9-7 victory
over Michigan State, which was a
two-touchdown favorite; Missouri'
20- 7 win over Michigan: Georg'a
Tech's K-12 triuph over South,
ern Methodist, and Nebraska's 32
12 romp over Minnesota, which
entered the game a nine point
choice.
FIELD COAL WINS GAME
The Vols, who couldn't even
make a single first down against
Auburn last year, made 10 on
Saturday and won the game on
Cotton Letner's 20 yard field goal
during the second period. Block Blocking
ing Blocking back. Ken Sadler set up three three-pointer
pointer three-pointer when he recovered a fum fumble
ble fumble on Auburn's 45.
Northwestern recovered five of
11 Oklahoma fumbles in racking
up the second-rated Soontrs. The
game was nationally televised. 4
was the Sooners' worst defeat
since their 47-0 beating at the
hands of the Oklahoma Aggies in
1945.
A severe case of food poisoning
laid half the Oklahoma team low
last Thursday but Oklahoma
Coach Bud Wilkinson said after
the game that his Sooners were
beaten by "a far, far better
team" and not food poisoning.
Quarterback Charley Milsiead
put on a one-man show in guiding
Texas AaM to its victory over
Michigan State. Milstead gave
what his coach called "the reat.
est performance' t have ever
seen," surprising Michigan State'
with a quick kick from his own
22 in the first period and then
scoring his team's only touchdown.
Randy Sims actually supplied the
winning margin, however, with a
21- yird field goal in the second
quarter.
WIN RESEMBLES MOVIE PLOT
Missouri's victory over Michigan
was straight out of a Hollywood
script. Bob Haas, a second-string
quarterback, scored the winning

touchdown from the one-yard line
with two seconds left after the
Wolverines had taken a 15 14
lead less than three minutes be before.
fore. before. Tommy Wells, a place-kick spe specialist,
cialist, specialist, led Georgia Tech to vic victory
tory victory over Southern Methodist with
a second period conversion and a
29-yard field goal in the fourth
period.
Rutgers also scored something
of an upset with an 8-6 triumph
over Princeton as tailback Bill
Wolff passed for all the points.

All the favorites, of course, did
not fall by the wayside.
Top ranked Louisiana State
started slowly and was given a
rough battle by Texas Christian
but still won 10-0.
FIRES 4 TOUCHDOWN PASSES
Joe Caldwell fired four touchd touchd-down
down touchd-down passes to help make Coach
Dale Hall's debut a success in
Army's 441 romp over Boston
College, and Navy made it two in
a row with a 29-2 victory over
William and Mary.
Notre Dame rolled over North
Carolina, 28-8, as Coach Joe Ku Ku-harich
harich Ku-harich guided the Irish for the
first time, and ninth-ranked Clem Clem-son
son Clem-son mauled Virginia,, 47-0.
Iowa, ranked 10th, practicajly
repeated its Rose Bowl victory ov over
er over California, winning 42-12. The
Hawkeyes beat the Golden Bears,
38-12 last New Yeai'sDay.
' Sophomore Ronnie Bull made
his first collegiate gan.e a mem memorable
orable memorable one when he scored both
Baylor touchdowns in a 5-7 victory
over Colorado. Fred Brown, an another
other another soph, scored one touchdown
and set up another to lead Geor Georgia
gia Georgia to a 21-8 victory over Vander Vander-bilt.
bilt. Vander-bilt. Holy Cross licked Dartmouth's
defending Ivy League champions,
31-8; Ohio State barely got by
Duke, 14-13, and the Air Force
Academy hurdled Wyoming, 20-7.
SCARE DELAYS TAKEOFF
SYDNEY. Amtrili. (1IPII A

bomb scare Sunday delayed the
takeoff of an Ameririn tirllnai nn

a flight to San Francisco. Fifteen
minutes before the scheduled
takeoff of Pan American Airwiys
Flieht 898. an innnvmnni rrllr

tolri the Mascot Airport a bomb

nan oeen planted aboard the DC-7
lirliner. Police searched the plane

or three hours but found nothin?.
'he olane finally tnnk nff with mi

passengers and a crew of 8.

Football Scores

w 0

EAST

Army 44 Boston College 8
Syracuse 35 Kansas 21
Yale 20 Connecticut 0
Pennsylvania 28 Lafayette 0
Carnegie Tech 14 St., Vincent 13
Juniata 7 Westminster (Pa.) 8
New Haven St. 4T American In International
ternational International 12.
Kings Pejnt 28 Hamilton 8
Colby 30 Brandeis 26
Buffalo 28 Temple 14
St. Lawrence 21 Hobart 8
Trinity (Conn.) 42 Williams 12
Delaware 12 Lehieh 7

Nowich 32 Rensselaer Poly 0

nates tjn.on imx) 14
Cornell 20 Colgate 15
Holy Cross 31 Dartmouth I

Tufts 24 Bowdoin 6

Rhode Island 0 Main 0

Middlebury 12 Wesleyan 6
Lycoming 30 Bridgeport 6
Bucknell 21 Gettysburg 0

Mew Hampshire 33 Northeastern
14

Clarion Tchrs 24 Grove City 14
Muhlenberg 21 Scranton 12
Lock Haven St. 17 Brockpon St.
14

Penn Military 20 Wagner 12

Monteiair M. 10 National Aggies 7
Vermont S4 Coast Guard Acscie Acscie-mv
mv Acscie-mv 8

Harvard 38 Mai&irhiu.-Mt ??

Southern Illinois 20 West Virginia

ot.

Springfield 12 Amherst 8
Slippery Rock Tchrs 13 Edinboro

icnrs ii
Shippensburg St. 14 Shepherd St.
0
Penn St. 21 VMI 0

Central Connecticut St 18 Worces

ter 3
Lebanon Valley 13 Wilkes 0
MIDWEST
Missouri 20 Michigan 15
Oberlin 33 Hiram 8
Notre Dame 28 North Carolina S
Granville 21 Otterbein 13
Ohio State 14 Duke 13
Indiana 20 Illinois 0
Coe 8 Knox 0
Akron 8 Muskingum )
Austin Peay 12 Eastern Illinois 8
Detroit 14 Marquette 0
Bowling Green 51 Marshall 7
Evsnsville 8 Indana St. 6
Beloit 9 Monmouth 8
Cincinnati 21 Dayton T
Findlay 14 Alma 7
Northwestern 45 Oklahoma 13
Capital 46 Mt. Union 20
Valparaiso 24 Ball St. 6

Nebraska 32 Minnesota 12
Cornell (Iowa) 19 St. Olaf 0
Texas A and M 9 Michigan State 7
St. Joseph's 19 Depauw 0
Heidelberg 14 Wesleyan (Ohio) 7
Missouri Mines 27 Washington
(Mo.) 15
Ashland 27 Earlham 0
Elmhurst 6 Concordia (111.) 0
Butler 28 Wabash 8
Miami (Ohio) 21 Western Michi
gan 0
Tarkio 31 Central Missouri 0
Dillard 21 Philander Smith 18
Carleton 18 Ripon 6
SOUTHWEST
Ariozna U. 7 West Texas St. 6
Texas 2fi Maryland 0
Texas Tech 15 Oregon St. 14
SOUTH
Louisiana State 10 Texas Chris Christian
tian Christian 0
Clemson 47 Virginia 0
Alabama 3 Houston 0
Tennessee 3 Auburn 0
Maryland St. 39 Blueffeld St. 0
Navy 29 William and Mary 2
Georgia 21 Vanderbilt 6
Georgia Tech 16 Southern Metho Methodist
dist Methodist 12
Wake Forest 27 Virginia Tech 18
Florida 14 Mississipi State 13
Shaw 14 Virginia Union 14
East Carolina 27 Guilford 0
Ft. Valley 16 Miss. Vocational 0
Washington and Lee 45 Centre 8
Virginia St. 36 Howard (D.C.) .0
Presbyeterian 25 Davidson 21
Randolph-Macon 15 Newport News
0
Howard '(Ala.) 20 Sewanee 0
Allen 13 North Carolina College
13 (tie)
Miles 9 Albany (Ga.) St 7
Tuskegee Institute 7 Xavier (La)
6
Mississsippi 16 Kentucky 0
Wofford 14 Elon 0
J.C. Smith 14 Hampton Institute
8
Emory and Henry 19 Hampden-
Sydney 7
South Carolina 30 Furman 8
Florida St. 47 Citadel 6
Newberry 14 Catawba 8
FAR WEST
Iowa 42 California 12
Montana St., 35 California Poly 18
Washington St. 30 San Jose St. 6
East Los Angeles 14 Pasadena 12
Washington 23 Idaho 0
Air Force Academy 20 Wyoming
T
Baylor 15 Colorado 7
Hawaii 14 Daho St 8

33 imntxcsmai

rr

KODAK EKTACHROME FILM
Extra speed, range for color transparencies
Now you can make brilliant full-color ilides of action at faster
shutter spetdi, get sharper detail with jmaller lent stops, take
pictures in lets light with new, 3-times-faster Kodak Ikto Ikto-chrome
chrome Ikto-chrome Film. You eon proceis the film yourself with mn in inexpensive
expensive inexpensive kit, or we'll have it done for you. Available in both
Daylight Type and Type F for flash pictures.
See us for all your Kodak Film and finishing needs.
Now Your Kodachrome Film as well as
Ektachrome, processed in Panama.
Bring your films to our Kodak Department
FOTO EL HALCON
Photography Center
in front of El Panama Hilton Tel. 3.1179

Read Our Classifieds

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 2116, September 27, 1959.
The whole ticket haa St pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "H"

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

2253
2859
5147

$ 52,000.00
$ 15,600.00
$ 7,800.00

K. frliM No. p'i-Izm
SJ IM.M 1M im.m
1SJ IM.M H5.1 IM.M
2Sa 2.SM.M 1253 2,0.
35.1 IM.M 13S.1 ISC.an
45.1 1.1S.M 145.1 l.-S.M
SS.1 l.H.M 15S.1 ISS.M
S:l ISS.M 1S5.1 IM.M
753 ISS.M 1753 ISS.M)
S5.1 1M.IM 1S53 150(1
W5.1 156. IK) 1R3 IM.M

Ne.
M5.1
2153
2253
2353
245.1
2553
2S53
2753
M53
2953

f
Prlwn
ISS.M
15S.M
52.000.(1(1
I.M.0O
156.00
I5S.M
IM.M
156.00
156 00
156.00

N.
.105.1
.1153
.1253
3.153
345.1
.155.1
353
375.1
.1553
,1553

PrliM
I5S.00
15S.00
2.SOO.00
ISS.M
156.00
I5S 00
IM.M
15S.M
155.1)0
155 M

I I
N. PrliM No. Prlrr No. PrliM No. Prl No. PrliM No. Prlien
4053 ISAM J053 156.00 605.1 154.00 7053 15S.M S053 155.00 905.1 15S.W
4153 155.1)0 5153 156.00 615.1 156.00 7153 156.00 S15.1 156 00 9151 15S.0A
425.1 2.600 00 S25.1 2,500.00 525.1 2,600.00 725.1 2,600 00 S251 2,600.00 5253 2.S00.M
4353 155.00 S.15.1 156. M S353 156.00 7.15.1 I5.0 S35.1 156.00 D353 155.IMI
4453 155.00 5453 156.00 643.1 156.00 745.1 156.00 S45.1 15S.0O 9453 15S.0D
4553 156.00 55S.1 I.M.M 5553 156 00 7553 155.00 S553 155.M 9553 155.O0
4553 156.M 5S3 15S.M 565.1 156 00 7653 IS5.IMI S653 15S.00 53 1550
475.1 I5S.M 5753 156.00 753 156 M 7753 15f,00 8753 15S.1KI 9753 15S.00
4553 156.M 5553 155.00 5553 156.00 7553 155.00 8553 158.M 9S53 15S.0
4953 156.00 5953 156.00 S953 1510 7953 15S.M 895! 156.00 9953 155.00

Approximations Derived From First Prize

ISU Imm I ill? Ill m ,4Jm Hi? s 00 J2S' nu J"' I
mM "3e.ee 2251 S20.01 1254 520.90 22s sjo.m i?5 520.M 2200 520 00 2352 sm.m J
Approximations Derived From Second Prize
JM UM 8-W 3m M 485t 250,00 m 2.00 I MS. j'o.M j 78MI j'sO.M 1859 250.M 9859 20.00
nn 2mu mil 22 J2-J1 255 122 M ' M "' m iii;,
1 "' nu w-w ww nt.ea zsm is.m i 2sj mn 1 2s4 130.M 2ss i.io.m un imm
Approximations Derived From Third Mrize
!lf 'UM 1147 3147 IMM 4m M SI47 IM.M 7U7 ISS.M 8147 15 M 9147 IM.M
Wll 104 os 511? JltS slli2 JXIS Jill 12-2 !' lMM "" sm ioToo sTsT, ,7m
5139 104.0 S141 104.M 5143 104.90 5145 104.00 I 5148 104.M 515 104.00 I 5152 104.09 5154 104.0 515 lotoj

Prixe-wintiinf
The Nine

- - .,.. aiiu oiu. in o. ari 1
Hundred whole tickets endins; in 3 and not Included in the above list win Fifty Two Dollars (52.&0) each.
The whole ticket has fifty two pieces which comprises (he two series "A" fc "B"

Sijned by: The Governor of the Province of Panama ALBERTO ALEMAN
The Representative of the Province of Panama LUIS CHANDECK

WITNESSES: Roberto Gonzales G. Ced. 7-36-195
Silvia Berrio de Garibaldi Ced. E-8-9574

ALBERTO J. BARSALLO
Notary Public, Panama

PABLO A. PINEL M.
Secretarv

klftTC. Th winning ticket! with the last rlphor and with tht two Ian
1 ciphers pnly only to h rirst Prlt.
The First Prize rtd the 2nd nrl 3rd Prized re drawn leparately. Tht ap
pmxlmatiniw are calculated on the Timt, Second and Third prizes In case
a ticket should carry th number of each prize, the holder Is entitled io
claim Davment for each
DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, September 27, 1959
Drawinc Number 117
Fraction Ticket
First Prize. 53 $11.00 $220.00
Second Prize. .... 59 3.00 60.00

2.00 40.00

Jhlrd Prize 47

l'h prize. nTPb7TSdIn"a7mwnTewIJ
the office, of the National Benetlc'enl Lottery situated on Central Avenue
PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No 2117 WHICH WILL
TAKE PLACE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4. 1959
Divided In two .erlea of 28 fractions each denominated "A" and '"B"

first rmzr

1 First Prize. Series A and B. of
1 Second Prbc. Serie. A and fl. of
1 Third Prle Series A and B. of
18 Approximations, Series A and B, of
Prizes. Series A and B, of
SO Prizes. Series A and B, of
SO Prizes. Serie. A and B. of

125 000 00 each erle
7 800 00 each series
3.9O0 00 esch series
20n (Ml each serie.
l,3nn on each series
78 00 each series
25.00 each series

sftond pbizk
18 Approximations. Beriea A and B. nf $ 85.no each serie.
Frfzea. Serlea A and B. of 130 00 each series
third rmz

II Approximations. Series A and B. of
Prize Serie. A and B. of

52.00 each series
71 00 each series

J52.000 on
i:.OA.0
7.800.
5.350 nil
23.400.00
14.044)00
48.800 Aft
I 2.340 no
lJ40.n0
1 404 90

1174 Prliea

Total

ei7.see.ea

Price of a whole ticket $26.00
Price of a 52nd part 0.50

PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOI'T DISCOUNTS OR TAXFS

i a



THE PANAMA AMERICA
AJC INDEPEKDECT'DAILT HEWSta
Monday, t eptembzs tt, im
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
AGENTS:
bone Panama 2-0740 tor
information about Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Chane your ad if
you have a commercial
contract.
Clusifled Faga closes 11:31
ajn. Mon. te Friu 11 sjo.
"'Sat, I p.m, gat for Sun.
Office, open t-S weekdays.'
LEAVE YOCJR AD WITH ONE OP OLB AGENTS O OUR OFFICES AT IJ-JT "H" SMEET. PAMAMA LIBKEKIA MJECIAJH T Street a AGKNCIAf,
INTERNAL. DE PUBLICAClONKS No 3 Lottery Plaza CASA ZALDO Central Ave. 45 LOURDES PHARMACY 181 La CarnsquiUa FARMACIA LOM LOM-BARDO
BARDO LOM-BARDO .No. 26 "B" Street MORBISON-4th of July Ave & J St LEWIS SERVICE Ave. Tivoli Me. 4 a FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS 149 Central Ave.
FARMACIA LUX-1C4 Croaral Ave HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J Fee. do la Om Ave. No. 41 FOTO DOMY Juste Aroecaiena Ave. S3 U PAB,
MAC1A VAN ORB JIS 5a Street No S3 a FARMACIA EL 8ATURRO Paroue Lelevre 7 Street f ARMACJA "SAS" Via Pvm U NOVEDADES ATH1S
Beside Bella VfcU Theatre and Btanrli at Minima Saper Market n Via Espaia a COLON OPnCE: ISth and Amador Gaenere No. 14211 TeL 412.

PAGE TEN

Resorts
i

fosters cottaees, n r Santa
Clara Reasonable rates. Phono
Balboa 1866.
PILLIPj Oeaawida Cottaoee
Santa Ciara e B "-ama
ama "-ama 1-1877 Cristobal 3-1673.
Houses
FOR RENT : Beautiful resi residence,
dence, residence, or information phone 2-
3145, Panama
'FOR RENT: Chalet Newly
constructed. Three bedrroms,
studio, oarage, large fenced yard,
hot water. Calle G, Loma Alegre
phone Balboa 3228.
ROOM FOR RENT: Large bright
furnished Studio room. lemi lemi-nrivare
nrivare lemi-nrivare bath, independent en entrance
trance entrance near Bellavi.ta Theatre
$35.00. Call 2-2542 oHice
hours.
FOR RENT Private home in
Golf Heights offer airconditioned
bedroom, meals, laundry for cou couple
ple couple at attractive price. Phone
4-1389.
Rooms
FOR RENT: Furnished room for
family or bachelors, arage, 97
East Street No. 18, San Francis Francisco.
co. Francisco. Tel. 3-2147.
Miscellaneous
American hair stylist from Cali California
fornia California Erma Dykstra formerly of
Clayton has returned to Albrook
Beauty Salon, appointments call
86-7103.
Grimm Choice Made
To Follow Scheiling
f $(..$' Manager
CHICAGO, Sept 28 (UPD-Bob
Schoffing resigned loday as man manager
ager manager of the ChieaRo Cubs and
Charley Grimm was named to re-1
pi -0 him.
Grimm, who two years ago re-
jo nr l the Cubs as a Vice-pres-ident
after his ouster as mana.per
of the Milwaukee Braves, will be
PMnaging the Cubs for the fourth
time.
The Cubs elosed the season,
Scheffing's second as manager,
yesterday with a loss to Los Ange Angeles
les Angeles and wound up tied for fifth
place with Cincinnati, with 74
wins and 80 deteals. In Scheffing's
first season the club also tied for
fifth with fewer victories.
REDS MAKE CHARGE
TOKYO UPI) Communist
No.ui Viet Nam charged yesier-
day that Soath Viet Nam has in increased
creased increased the number of its mili
tary airfields eightfold since the
signing of the Indochina armis armistice,
tice, armistice, the Viet Nam News agency
reported. The Communist charge
was made in a letter from the
North Vietnamese army high com command
mand command to the international com mis
sion supervising ihe armistice.
RECEIVES KING SIMEON
VATICAN CITY (UPI ) Pope
John XXIII yesterday received in
private audience former King S; S;-meon
meon S;-meon II of Bulgaria. The Pontiff
had served in the Vatican diplo diplomatic
matic diplomatic service in Bulgaria a few
years before the king's birth in
1937. The young ruler xiden the
PLAIN GAL: PLAIN CAKES
CHICAGO. I UPI iYou can ac ac-uaily
uaily ac-uaily "read" the woman n the
cake she bakes, psy hoi" -!i re recently
cently recently rcporied to one i.v.kcv "f
specially cake mixes. Plain .lane
makes plain cakes. Chic Sharon
dresses m her cakck nd 'ca
Nellie shies from gooey frostings
and fillings.

Commercial Guide
ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
Ads only cost $0.85 per col. inch
Ads accepted for a minimum of one month."

I

FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740

I i J I 1 1 i v- i 1 1 1 i
Canal Zone Society I or
The Prevention Of Cruelty
To Animals
Box 24fi, Ballton. C 7
Phone: ( urundii M 13
The foliowinjr unimah M 1h?
Coroal Veterinary Hnspilnl
need gnorl homes:
1 Male brown and white dog. long
heir, medium ie
1 very pretty wantfe and while fe female
male female kitten, 3 month, old, house house-broken,
broken, house-broken, a special pel
i 3 Black kitten, 1 wreks old
L Cell the above telephone number
for the following:
r I Female kllten, Mark and white,
S mo, oio
1 Female) ret, Mark and while, ?
jeers old.
Sllf PORT VOUR SP( A.
YOU NEED IT. IT NFFDft YOU.

t ROWING UP
' t BETHESDA, Md. (UPI) The
modern Ampriran six-year old is
. Equivalent in heighl and weighl
to the child of eighl and -one-half
to nine years in 1883. report
"t rrOTtlrchM at ttv U.S. Naval Hos-
vv pital ui Bethcsda.

Apartments

FOR RENT: Furnished and un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished apartments. Alhambra
Apartments, 10th street 8061,
Tel 1386, Colon.
FOR RENT: Modern two bed bedrooms
rooms bedrooms apartment, furnished. Liv-ing-diningroom,
hot water,
maid's room, garage, etc. 49th
Street, Isabelita House $140 00.
Tel. 3-4994.
FOR RENT: Large three bed
rooms apartment Livingroom,
diningroom, three bathrooms, hot
water, maid's room, garage, etc.
Manuel Maria Icaia Street. For For-mentor
mentor For-mentor Building. Tel. 3-4994.
$185 00.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment, kitchen and bath bathroom.
room. bathroom. Information Metropole Bar.
Tel. 2-5590, mornings.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment. El Cangrejo, maid's
room with service, garage, hot
water. Alberto Navarro Street
No. 48. Tel. 3-4734 and 2 2-2883.
2883. 2-2883. FOR RENT: La Oesta, two
bedroom apartment, living, din dining
ing dining room, maid room, two bal balconies,
conies, balconies, 3-1586
FOR RENT: Three bedroom
apartment, two baths, dining
living room, kitchen, porch, hot
water installation, independent
maid's room, bath, laundry. DO DO-NICHITA
NICHITA DO-NICHITA building, two blocks
from Minimax and Santuario Na Na-cional
cional Na-cional $130.00. Ask gardener
for keys. Tel. 2-0481
FOR RENT: Army inspected
one bedroom furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, kitchenette, hot water.
No. 17-18, 4th of July Ave.
Across from Aneon bus stop.
Phone 2-5342, ask for Mrs. Eve Eve-lia.
lia. Eve-lia. FOR RENT: Large bedroom,
bath, kitchen, dinette, third floor
near C.Z. Tel. 2-0027. 3-7527.
FOR RENT: Ideal location
apartment, livingroom, bedroom,
kitchen, dinette, Calle Darien
No. 14-21, next street from 4th
of July. Apply Apt. 2.
Services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
SERVICE. Our new service plan
gives you faster, more econo economical
mical economical and better service Phone
2-1905 Crawford Agencias. Tivo Tivo-li
li Tivo-li Avenue.
TELEVISION troubles? Don't pull
your hair, give us a call and we
will be there. U S TELEVISION
Phone 3-7607 Panamb. From 9
a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday to 6
p.m.
Project your home and proper property
ty property against insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment on
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
Tanama 3-7977 ot Colon 1777.
omestic
WANTED : Maid to live in
0932 Amador Road.
WANTED: Cook housekeeper
sleep in, no laundry. Experienced
only. Apply 9:00 a.m. to 1 :00
p m House 8447 Margarita, C.
Z Phone 3-1519.
Wanted Position
Reliable housekeeper, cook and
caretaker of children. Call Co Colon
lon Colon 438 A.
Boats b Motors
FOR SALE: Cushman motor
scooter, $40.00, American Flyer
electiic train, working extras.
Phone Curundu 7227.
FOR SALE: 12 ft. boat, 5 Vi h.
p. motor, trailer and' equipment,
asking $300.00. Call 83-5173.
iwi vnui a- V
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
I'sed Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES TP TO 36 Mo
on new cars
AtiENCY DEHLINUER
No. 43 Automobile Kow
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
GIBRALTAR LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Jim Ridge
Harry Cornell
Davis Stevenson
Telephone Pan. 1-0552

Automobiles

FOR SALI: 1958 Ford "300"
tudor blue, auto shift, radio,
17,000 miles. Phone Kobbe
7169, Navy 3543.
FOR SALE: Plymouth 4 door,
station wagon, 6 cyl., 4 months
old' Excellent, $2400. Tel. 6-
165.
FOR SALE: 1957 Ford Ranch
wagon, 8 cylinder, automatic
transmission, w.s w., radio, will
trade. Amador 2253.
FOR SALE: Morris convertible
1955. good condition, can be
seen Curundu, 2126-C. 4-7.
FOR SALE: 10 h p., Mercury,
excellent, low time, short lower
unit. Balboa 2-1385.
FOR SALE: Lincoln converti convertible
ble convertible 11953), radio, good tires
and top, duty paid, call Balboa
2-2755.
FOR SALE 1950 Ford V-8
grey and black 2 door sedan,
radio with extra speaker in
back, lowered, skirts. Good
tires. Phone 6-256 189-A,
Gamboa.
WE PAY CASH FOR
GOOD LATE MODEL CARS.
Autos Eisenman, S A.
Next to Coca Cola Plant
phone all day Panama 2-2616,
2-4966.
Car Rentals
Need an extra car tonight? Rent
a new Hertscar from Fiesta Car
Rentals. Tel. 3-4568 Lobby El
Panama Hilton.

C Or H

Heirloom or modern silver ami family portraits are deenento to
denote dignity and graritmsness, and add mwch to family dfatog. j

Charcoaled Filet Steak 1.75
Chicken Sancocho 0.60
Barbecued Rabliit 1.50
Barbecued Venison 1.50
Hash with Yucca & Green
Plantain 1.25
Crisp Fried Chicken. . . 1.25
Spaghetti with Goat Meat. . 1.25
Saturday & Sunday
Delicious Chicken Tamales 1.00

Wide Choice
Wines

Home Articles

FOR SALE: One electrit Hot
Point stove in vary good condi condition
tion condition with four top burners and
oven. Also three drawers. Call
Balboa 1072 or 2617.
FOR SALE: 4 burner gas stove
used 6 months, $ 1 25. ,Fedders,
2 ton air conditioner, -used 3
months, 300. White, wooden
hi-boy dresser $5. Metal bed bedside
side bedside table $3 00. Call Panama 3 3-6260.
6260. 3-6260. FO R SALE: Magnavox Hi-Fi,
$75.00. Assembled HEATHKIT
amplifier, preamp. Am-Fm tun tuner,
er, tuner, etc. Curundu 5243.
FOR SALE: Upright piano,
medium sixe, $125.00, 6 patio
chairs, $10 00. House 6363-B,
Juan Diai PI.. Los Rios, Tel.
2-4347.
FOR SALE: Whirlpool DeLuxa
clothes dryer, $100.00. Albrook
4108.
FOR SALE: 9 ft. Frigidaira,
all porcelain; Zenith all wave
radio and Hi-Fi; Venetian
blinds; 1948 Packard. 5411
Diablo. Phone 2 2917.
FOR SALE Kenmore eemi-aute-matic
washer, excellent condi conditionNorth
tionNorth conditionNorth American $75-00.
Tel. 3-7387, 12 pound load.
FOR SALE Old but very ser serviceable
viceable serviceable Westinghouse refriger refriger-artor,
artor, refriger-artor, porcelain box, low price.
5824-D Diablo. Tel. 2-2837.
Animals
FOR SALE: Boxer puppies.
A K.C. registered. $65.00. Phone
Navy Pacific 2391.

u

Sombrero
(Drive Inn)
Via Espafia
just 300 ft. from tt,
San Francisco entrance.
Daily Specials

A

of Your Favorite
and Liquors

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE i Agad natural ma ma-aur
aur ma-aur at giva-away arieas by tha
tritckleatf. Call 2-2641.
FOR SALE: Thrta (J) "Vor "Vor-nade'
nade' "Vor-nade' air cenditionart, V h a. at
$125 00 ach. Tal. 3-3936.
FOR SALE: Piano good condi condition,
tion, condition, boy's 26" English bicycla.
Call Balboa 1214.
FOR SALE WEBCOR tapa Ra Ra-corder
corder Ra-corder and Blupont all wava bat battery
tery battery and direct current radio.
Good condition. Tivoli Ave. No.
18-64. Apt. 11 between 9:00 -12:00
and 2:00 to 4:10.
GIUNDIG
Germany't most complete) fully
STEREO line ot radio-consoles.
Short wave radio, tine changer,
AMFM, taperecorder, all wrap wrapped
ped wrapped up in beautiful cabinet,- Sea
GRUNDIG before you buy. We
have duty-free prices-
CASA SPARTON
Central 26-109 Calidonia
FOR SALE: Fabulous Foodarama
refrigerator of $979.00 for
$674.00; like new. Warranty
still outstanding 4 yean.
It is the Paramount household
refrigerator today. Has 2 doors;
one of which opens unto a large
vertical freeiing compartment.
Come and see this unusual value
at Case Admirable, next to the
Lottery Building.
FOR SALE: 1955 Buick sedan,
4 door, hardtop, office desk, pia piano
no piano blond color. Call Curundu
83-3)80.
SPECIAL PRICES FOR THIS
WEEK ONLY!
Brand new living room suites
98.00. Lovely dinette sets 65.00.
Dining Room Table and 4 chairs
(mahogany) 59.00. New double
mattresses 19.00, Hollywood
Beds 35.00. Large Desk 20.00.
End tables, 10.00. Swivel chair,
7.50. A-my Cots 5.25. Pillows
0 .95. HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE.
National Ave. 41 (Auto. Row
41). Tel. 3-4911 & 3-7348.
We buy Used Furniture We
recondition mattresses pick
up and delivery same day.
FOR SALE MISC MOF
Baby parrot for salt. Good condi condition:
tion: condition: easy to handle, $5.00. Call
2-6426.
FOR SALE: One bicycle, one
month use. Special price. Pana Panama
ma Panama 2-269 84-6117. C.Z,
FOR SALE: Chrome dinette set
$25.00, living room set, $25.00,
Wheeler, Amador 3297, before
6 p.m. Panama 3-7813 after 7
p.m.
FOR SALE: Closing "Stork",
maternity clothes at cost price,
all the furniture, clothes hang hang-era,
era, hang-era, paper bags, boxes, babies
garments and shoes. Justo Aro Aro-semena,
semena, Aro-semena, across from Royal
Crown.
NO LANGUAGE BARRIER

1 jtiaw Japanese movie, American raise mcnier apptors m a
fiSjnjmatic scene with Japanese star Shigeru Amachi (left),
gitthough she speaks only a little Japanese, Elise has earned the
RjbiTing role in the new film, Dawn. Over the Indian Ocean."
Jba is from Chicago. ... ..

3 yjt S'!" V jVV--
v .' Svi 4 .Ja-M;:-.v,;.

I II Y AND THP 17-Pnnwn

table beast get toRelher at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan. Lily Hodge,
16, shows comparative rize of a two-foot, 17-pound squash, l j
J grown from a lil.llii, tccd by a lacnUarmer" v

Real Estate

FOR SALE i Late 500 ami 1.000
asetero, ia the Niteva HipMraata
Urbanization across rhe'Rempa
Racetrack. All lets with street
fronts, sewage, water aula and
electricity. Cad W. McBaraatt.
Tel. 4-0976.
FOR SALE: Case Kerch, 210.
2nd St., Las Cumbres, concrete
and tile, $15,000, bargain.
Personals
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS"
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
Wanted to Buy
WANTED TO BUT: Swedish
living room set. It was brought at
Dagmar. Tivoli Ave. Call Tel.
3-6244.
Lessons
Learn To Drive Dual Control
Car $4.00 par hour. Tel. 3 3-0338,
0338, 3-0338, Panama.
DENIES ALL Marcos Perez
Jimenez, ex-dictator Qf Vene Venezuela,
zuela, Venezuela, has denied charges of
.murder and theft brought
. against hjra by )e present gov-
eminent; of :Vnezuela. The
attempt to extradite him is
Communist inspired, he says.
Jimenez was arrested and re released
leased released on $25,000 bond by au authorities
thorities authorities in Miami, fla., whwe
he has lived since fleeing his
country in March, 1958.
Portraying an Indian girl m a
emuuRliiii. .....

M
- I iff , is II
'I r 'l I 4
A i l" i " 1
l hCJit pi
V v

JnvestorY Guide-
-By

By SAM SHULSKY
King Features Syndicate,
23S B 45 St., New York
Q. I am 54. single, owning odd
lots of Colorado Fuel. General Te
lephone, American, Telephone
some bonds and a few hundred
in cash. I would like to sell A. T.
and T. I think I bought it at a
bad price. Also want to sell Colo
rado Fuel, cash in $1,000 in
bonds and buy more shares.
A. All in all, I d say you have
a perfectly fine balance of secur securities
ities securities and cash. And yet you teem
to be troubled by the fact you
bought 25 shares of A. T. and T.
five points above the present le
vel.
Now, let's tee what you have
to fret about. At 80, A. T. and
T. yields 4.1 per cent; at your
price of 84, it yields 3.9. That's
a difference of 2-10 of one per
cent on $2,125 or a grand dif difference
ference difference of $4.25 a year in income.
I don't think you ought to wash
out a $2,000 investment in a top
grade company for mat.,
The nrlme test of whether nr
not a security belongs in your
poruono is not wnetner it goes
up immediately after you buy it.
A iunkv $1 issue m avert tn si ?5
and sun be totally unsuited to your
Duroose. A daclina of five nnintt
in A. T. and T. me ants absolute absolutely
ly absolutely nothing; to vnur lonff-term nrn-
gram. So let's not get panicky
ana sian iraoing.
O. I am alone a nrl retired
I have been getting along on my
social security checks hut nniv
fear inflation. I have $30,000 in
savings, and a life insurance po policy
licy policy which pays $185 a year.
Should I draw on ranital? Hnw
long can a man live?
A. with $35,000 to draw against
you could, of course, double your
present income for many years to
come.
There are several course anon
to you.
You could pet ahnut t2fln a
year more bv switching tin non
irom savines into ru prior vei Hino
securities either 'fchain store or
n;iAKj : s j-
xkiixvau vuuMiiujisi prerroas or
-
You could get an Income of six
to seven Der cent on all vnur 5S
000, which would i-" increase
your present income three-fold, by
putting the funds into an annuity.
Since you have no dependents the
latter course would be permiss permiss-able.
able. permiss-able. It would seem to me that
if you did this you needn't fear
inflation too much since you would
have quite a cushion even though
your income would be fixed.
Perhaps an acceptable solution
would be to put some of your
funds in good grade stocks in the
rail and retail fields and the ba
lance into an annuity. Tor the
latter you should consult an agent
of one of the big life companies
wno can ten you to the penny
what you would receive.
I don't see much point to con
tinuing- your present policy since
you are insuring yourself with your
own money and the income is not
as much as you could get from
Treasury bonds.
Q. I will retire next year on
social security and a small pen
sion. Have $12,000 in savings and
would like to get a larger income
from it. What do you think of
Treasury notes, or other govern
ment agency bills. Are they tax
exempt.'
A. You should be able to realize
five to 5V4 per cent or so from
the savings put to work in good

Jews To Observe Two HigH
Holy Day Beginning Friday

Beginning at sundown Friday,
those of the Jewish faith will
observe the high holy day season
which includes the two major
holy days of the Jewish calendar
year, Rosh Hashnah, the New
Year, 5720, and 1fom Kippur, the
day of atonement.
Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new
year will be observed from sun sundown,
down, sundown, Friday at sundown.
The day of atonement, Yom Kip Kippur,
pur, Kippur, begins at sundown, Sunday,
October 11, and continues until
sundown, Monday, Oct. 12.
Rabbi Nathan Witkin, will con conduct
duct conduct the religious services for the
observance of the holidays in the
Chapel of the religious services
for the observance of the holidays
in the Chapel of the US0-JW3
Armed Forces Service Center in
Balboa. Seymour I. Barkowitz of
Balboa will assist with the serv services.
ices. services. The schedule of services for
Rosh Hashatiah is as follows:
Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at

'
SAM SHULSKY

common shares, or soma torpor-
"muu. xreasury noiei are
specialiied field. When you buy
short-term securities you must be
steadily concerned with reinvest reinvestment.
ment. reinvestment. The income from Treasury
bonds-all types-is taxable. Mu Mu-nicipal
nicipal Mu-nicipal bonds pay tax-exempt in income,
come, income, but I don't think, from what
VAll 'Tall m t ...... s.
you ougnt to be too
much concerned with tax exemp-
safe'ty fr g00d i04
Today's Opening
STOCK PRICES
NEW YORTT erJ rrn-iTx
Stocks were .mixed today in a
quiet opening.
The market marie i
m rouUflVU
recovery last week from a Ion
-..awiou uecune. Many stock
found a base where they were con considered
sidered considered oversold and buyer rush rushed
ed rushed in.
ACF Ind
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium Ltd
Amer Cyanamid
Amer Motors
Amer Tel and Tel
Anaconda Copper
Arkansas Fuel
AVCO Mfe
Beta Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bioroft Uranium
Blauknox
British Pet
Burroughs
Celanese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler
Cities Service.
Coastal Caribe
Colgate Palmoliya
Colorado Fuel
Cons Electro Dynamlcg
Creole Pet
Crown Cork and Seal
Cera Metals
Chalmers
Cuban Venezuelan tf
Dii Pont
El Paso Natural Ga
El Paso Natural Gas
Fargo Oil
Felmont Pet
General Dynamic
General Electric
General Motors
. General Plywood
Gulf Oil
Harsco Steel
Howe Sound
Imperial OA
Intl Pet
Lockheed
Magellan Pet
Montrose Chem
New Eng Tel and Tel
Northrop Air
Olin Mathieson
Pancoastal
Phillips Pet
Pure Oil
Royal Dutch She
RCA
Reynolds Metal
San Jacinto
Servo Corp
Signal Oil and 6m
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobile
Sperry Rand
Standard Oil NJ
Studebaker-Packafd
Superior Oil
Texas Gulf Prods
Textron
Underwood
United Canso OH
US Rubber
US Steel
Westinghouse Ele
Wheeling Steel
250b
114b
57
61
787a
30b
13
5
1Mb
63b
49b
T 1-18
lOVib
28'
35 Vi
42b
62
49
14
MH
31
32'
AVA
iVAb
Vsb
38
(-18
252
39Ta
2fl'4
4 9-18
b
4694
n
14
lVib
114
40Vb
20
88
S3b
27
1
12V4
185V4
30b
49
2
43
8614b
58
105
40
6Hb
ll4b
19
3
41
22
48
17
1565
29
18
21
ll4h
58j
103 V,
mi
61

9 a.m., Saturday, t 7:30 p.m.,
Sunday at 9 a.m.
Arrangements have heen mbrla

for military personnel of. the

jewisn faith and t(veir famuiea
stationed throughout the Caribbean
Command as well as for civilian
government employes, to attend
the religious services for tht
holidays.
The National Jewish Welfare
Board which is responsible for
meeting the religious, welfare and
morale needs of the Jewish mili military
tary military personnel in the U.S. Armed
Forces, has dispatched all over
the world, months before the high
holy Days, quantities of religious)
supplies, holidav literature, and
special kosher foods.
Here in the Canal Zone, two
luncheons for the Rosh Hashanah
holiday will be held for the men
and their families at the Tivoli
Guest House, through the auspices
of the National Jewish Welfara
Board.

'I 1.1



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2S, 1959
TtHI JTORY OF MARTHA WAYNI

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPES
PAGE ELEYEA
Interruption
Y WILSON SCRUOOSj TERRY AND THE PIRATES
tj GKURGI trUMLEJ
TOUTW0TAiOP. lull
HAVE TO OPERATE. THE K1X1
PROM HEW. CAST OFF WHEN
YOU HIT THE WATER ANP STAMP
W TO PICK ME UP WHEN I
FIVE.
RISOLLA'S POP
Rough Beginning
y AL VERMII

BETWEEN THE BLAKeI
olKf ANP E rwly i 4
-M SAVE THEM, THE WATCH
2,M& I I WILL NEVER HEAR US J
WlWL I J PUT THIS LAUNCH V

AUSUD? I

ILLIY oor

CAPTAIN 1ASY

MORTY MIIKL1

ftlCKtIS AND HIS f tllNM

Tee Late

Y MIR KILL BLOSSI R

veam rr RF-

Somebocy lose 1 A
THEIR LIBRARY PoU. NAMED
CAHP.NOTTy? lKrrTy tykRLIMO

3(6 OK DRIVE

PUBLIC

LIBRARY

THIS IS Mf KWP OF
GIRL SHE READS AM

AVERAGE OF TEN BOOKS

(yes, m wtty

I WAS CORN ABOUT FIFTY)

vcadc nm I ATP

J

Oop Meant Business

Y V. T. HAMLln

r

FT

JUST WHAT

. I SAID,

WHATCHA MEAN,WRE 1 YOU

NOT GOING r APC.

9-l

V

...YOU'RE NOT PUTTING ME

BACK IN THAT TEN-MILLION-

YEAR-OLD SWAMP... OR

ANYWHERE ELSE, I

THAT matter;

T TH' HECK I

WE'RE

1 .HOT!

roR rsrv-i

OKAY DOC. TURN ON OKAY... BUT BE

TH' HEAT AN' WE'LL CAREFUL OR

GET ON WITH TH' VOU'LL WIND UP

OPERATION!

BACK THERE

HIM.'

OH, hiOt A LENGTH OF
SASHCORP WILL TAKE I
CARE THA:r"'tfjffi

SlOOTI AND HIR tUDMM

Big New

lY IDOAR MARTIN

NEVERJ5?$
(been sick) kTxb
V A DAV Y fW$ J

YDU RE $K$
7 LUCKY, SUf
I URISCILLA'J

6,

EM J

I'VE HAD EVERYTHING.'

MtASLES,

MUMPS,

CHICK

UCS BUNNY

Safety First

r WHY,
I WAS t
EVEN CWVA

likf&toBjk True Life Adventures

VtCbOCOXO

W5vY

-1 jr3 "t''Ti

Memory Test

Y LRSLII TURNER

' E$, PEFINIT6LV..WITH A fiOOP 5UWCT

UK6 VoUl CWB.ICRN WUICKLY

5H0W WU HOW we vo Hi wun

I T 1

1 PR. 5HANPU

THIS PAGE IW THE- PHONE BOOK...
5 EE HOW MANY NAMES. WITH THEIR

vnu rjku lAEWORize in -. l

lTHKEt WINUTCSlWE"L"'j5ur

P0T EX.fEC1

MUCni

PENNY CAN

TWO LINES
CORRECTLY

YOUR &UBC0N5CI0U5 CAN
pprAl I AFTER WUDYIN6

AU.TH05S ANOTHER PAGE THUEe

WINUTES1WH1L6 UNIW

nil r.u-'i-'

f fiOT THEM

V

Wrong Guett

Y DICK CAVALLI

BUTCHERS BILL. I BOUGHf f FREEZER AfSf IN THE V AAY?-L
60METHINQ THAT WILL iVEALWAVS J aftRA(. .'.' rf VWA
rSCrWALLTHATTy (WANTED.O jwZT "A!

E4 '

eft THE PUP? AMP MAJESTY OP A TKOWSAL STORM

25 ARE MAY3HH? BV HIS MAJESTV THE UON,A6 HE

1" KQAR3 HIS PET)AnNE TO THE WC3KU7. BUT.

"A

...OM A QJJIET MOOUU6HT l
NIC&HT HE MOVES OUIETLV :

ANP 6TEAL.THILV.

DintHbuUd by Xlnf fuluru Srndktlt.

. I .M.lli I lil Ll-.il

mmmm

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calbraitt

A

rn

CMP

T.M. lag. u PM. an

"If pop gives me any more of these educational toys, I j
won't need to go to school!"

1 OARDIN0 HOUSI

With

MAJOR HOOPLR OUT OUR WAY

ktV J. R.WILLIAMS

WHATCHA

"OOIIM'

UA30R

TAKlN IM
LAUNDKV

JO PAY

OFP YON?

pAK
bill

HEH-HEH.' WHAT A DROLL

'amA 'iUfiSETION TO MAKE TO

A MEMBER OF THE STORIED HOOPLE

CLAN.' NO, FOSTER ,I'M CREATING A
RECORDi N6 ,tudio Tn nn mv

(flMPn;iTIOM "TUC fiOl nskl UCAPT

rVE SELECTED FOUR Of"oUR FINEST

VOICES FOR THE IMMORTAL TASK,

AND cKNebT WILL. (Yf

His bass viol

THESE FABRICS

WILL. MUPFLE ALL

EXTKAN&OUS

ermestI

16 THE
OMLV
AAN

MHO
&OES
OFF

KEY"

OM

'JOHNMV

OME

MOTE.

--XT:

, a 6PARRER' I'LL BET YUH )
I OT A LOT Of I V TWO BIT
) WERVE, BUT ?TH' ROBIW
- I HBCAIN'TLICK V RUNS FUST J
r Vfer'im

gwX. 7 17

T.M. hf. U.I. f. W.

1H9 by N lirvi.. In.

'Thanks awfully, Stewart! Would you mind sort of
driving by where some of my girl friends live?"

1

ART CULLERY Bird-watching is an artistic exercise In
Stockholm, Sweden, where these sculptured seagulls stand on V
the grass of the Charles XII Square. One-( is apparently look looking
ing looking for food, while the other swivels his head like a tank turret i

Ml

830 Kca. Panama 1090 Jk&. fati

AfPQVAS PANAMA Af WAYS

PANAMA $
CALI

Totl-y's jy P.-ogra

00

o

in

.100 CFN NM.S
3:1s tll'mli .'Vie
.1 .-:ii NaiiK- Tlixi Tun
4 00 Mi IVi-anl
4 .10 KIDS KLUB
S:0O Rihln Unort
5:30 PANORAMA

-'1 Tllgft
; -0 Vpii I l Yi-'lr T,lf
s nn t iv r ei-
on Mnvip I'm. Now Vo.ffer
11 00 CFN NEV'S
11 IT. Eric: Ed Sullivan.

Courtesy of Aerovia Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3.1 6S3 3.1 C?3
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

:.V



7 V. -

Heber
Terns
"Am
eanoine
.Read story on page 8
4

Wins

Girls

1 1 ivfc n n n rsi rvvi ex rAi ,-

Khrushchev Tells

'Eisenhower Wants To

Ike Declares Berlin Impasse Broken
At Camp David Weekend Conferences

MOSCOW, Sept. 28 (I IM) Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev
returned home toilav and said he had gained the impression that Presi Presi-dent
dent Presi-dent Eisenhower "sincerely wanted to liquidate the Cold War and create
normal conditions with the USSR.
Khrushchev gave the Russian people his views about his trip at a "Welcome Home
Rally" in the sports palace of Lenin Stadium two hours after his TU-114 turboprop
plane completed a non-stop flight from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland to Mos-
CW Khrushchev's farewell press conference in Washington last night is to be re re-broadacst
broadacst re-broadacst over CFN radio at 9:05 tonight).
Meanwhile in Washington, Eisenhower said today that the East-West impasse
over Berlin was broken during his weekend talks with Khrushchev.
Eisenhower said that aside from the language of the official communique issued
yesterday at Gettysburg, he and Khrushchev had agreed that new negotiations on the
fat. of West Berlin should not be prolonged indefinitely. But at the same time, h
aid they agreed there could be no fixed time limit on these reopened discussions.

Eisenhower said Khrushchev
would corroborate the lad ihn
no deadline hangs over Berlin.
He said that from their Camp
David meetings there was detinue
nrogress because the two big pow powers
ers powers were no longer at an impasse
on the is.sue.
lisenhower told a crowded
press conference that at far at
hi wa concerned no party to
the Berlin situation wa now un un-aler
aler un-aler any ort of threat or duress.
He said that Khrushchev made
an emphatic point that he had
never intended a threat against
the West German metropolis.
Eisenhower also told reporters
that as far as he was concerned
most of his previous objections vi
a Summit meeting had been re removed
moved removed by his Camp David talks
with the Russian leader.
He said. However, that the tim tim-Ine
Ine tim-Ine of a Summit was a matter to
be negotiated with the Western
Russia last November proposed
ending the four-power occupation
f Berlin in an effort to get Al Allied
lied Allied forces out of the German ci city
ty city Russia had set last May 17 as
a deadline for the West to Bt
out of Berlin. But this was ex extended
tended extended indefinitely as the Big
Four foreign ministers sought a
...... Berlin solution.
Eisenhower and Khrushchev said
in their joint communique yester yesterday
day yesterday that they had agreed that the
formal negotiation should be re reopened
opened reopened "with a view to achieving
a solution which would be in ac accordance
cordance accordance with the interests of all
concerned and in the interest ol
the maintenance of peace."
Today the President was asked
whether, in the new negotiations
on Berlin, any solution acceptable
to the United States must guaran guarantee
tee guarantee the Allied occupation rights
and the freedom of the West Eft
liners.
The President, suffering from a
Mid Which he said started short shortly
ly shortly after his recent trip to Europe
said he could not guarantee any anything
thing anything because he did not know
Weather Or Not
This weather report for the 24
hour ending 8 a.m. today ts
prepared bv the Meteorological
and Hydrographic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE :
High R 84
Low 1 78
HUMIDITY:
High 4 H
Low 71 6
i
WIND:
(max. mph NW-17 NW-15
RAIN (inches) T 122
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 82 81
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
f.alun Lake 84 08
Madden Dam 227.06
BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, SEPT. M
High
Time HI.
1J:5S a.m 13.1 ft.
m U.4 ft.
Time
7:10 a.m.
, H7 :S4 p.m.
III.
S l ft.
SO ft.

American School Kids Said Lagging

; American children, by thp lime
ihey finish elementary school, are
' a full two years behind their Ku
rbpeao counterparts in the study
-$t: arithmetic.
f.SThil shocking assertion is made
S-klid documented- in a reporl
;l't published by the Council (or
i lc Educ;.l(in
A PAlflU'l! t. ......t,i
".., liZRUon nrvoiec s rcntti hen
'.iitt the academic curriculum ot

Welcome Home Rally In M oscow .

what sort of solution from the
forthcoming negotiations might be
acceptable.
Eisenhower told reporters he
found Khrushchev a dynamic
and arresting personality, a
man who resorted to great
flights of manner and disposi disposition
tion disposition ranging from a negative,
difficult attitude to easy, genial
discussion.
He summed up his impression
of the Soviet premier with two
words: Extraordinary personali personality.
ty. personality. As to whether the Cold War ice
is melting, the President said the
answer would have to be relative.
Bui he thought it was melting,
if measured by Khrushchev's dis displeasure
pleasure displeasure at continued heavy mili military
tary military spending and the awareness
of the Russian, as well as the A A-merican
merican A-merican people, that East-West
differences must be solved rea reasonably
sonably reasonably and without war.
Eisenhower said the Camp Da David
vid David meeting in essence should be
regarded as a beginning.
He said the reason he post postponed
poned postponed his planned trip to Rus Russia
sia Russia from this fall until next
spring was largely due to the
crowded schedule he faces this
fall with a number of foreign
visitors.
In this connection, he pointed
oui, too, that Khrushchev also has
a busy schedule, involving a trip
to Red China this week.
Against this background. Khru Khrushchev
shchev Khrushchev entered into what the Pre President
sident President smilingly referred to as a
discussion with the Eisenhower
grandchildren at the President's
Gettysburg farm Saturday and tlie
decision was finally made to post postpone
pone postpone Eisenhower's visit to Rus
sia until spring.
Eisenhower said he and Khru
shchev discussed the Red Chi China
na China question but that their dif differences
ferences differences were so wide and sharp
they decided it would not be
profitable to continue this line
of discussion..
The President, husky of voice
because ot his cold, opened his
press conterence discussion ot the
Khrushchev visit with lavish
praise and thanks to the Ameri
can people for their restraint and
conduct and their demonstration
of their understanding of the in international
ternational international situation.
He said that because of the
conduct of the American people
he thought Khrushchev went
home last night with a better
understanding of American as aspirations,
pirations, aspirations, general attitude to toward
ward toward international questions and
a desire for peace.
In his Lenm Stadium speech,
Khrushchev reiterated today that
one meeting could not solve all
the political problems involved.
He also said he once threatened
to break off his American visit

ana come hack home it ne wasexjst

met with "more hostility.'
As his airplane left the United
Stales, Khrushchev sent a faro faro-well
well faro-well message to Eisenhower which
said relations between their two
countries were in the ascendancy.
The TU-114 turboprop plane car carrying
rying carrying Khrushchev and his party
made the flight non-stop from
Andrews Air Force Base in Ma Maryland
ryland Maryland to Moscow.
An estimated 500 persons were
at the airport to greet him. Four Fourteen
teen Fourteen Red Flags decorated the air
terminal. Groups of workers and
representatives of Soviet organi
zations were on hand.
In his message of thanks to
Eisenhower for the welcome he
had received in the United
States, Khrushchev said that
"our acquaintance with the life
I of the American people was
j highly interesting and useful.
V.ven before he arrived home
American schools, lis report, en entitled
titled entitled "Teaching the 3rd R." is
based on a comparative study of
arithmetic textbooks used in A A-mencan
mencan A-mencan and European elementa
ry schools
The report reveals that Euro
pean schools, beginning with the
Inst grade, spend significantly
more lime on arithmetic than do
American schools."
The study also shows that Euro

the Russian people held the be belief
lief belief that Khrushchev had scor.'d
a major international diplomatic-

triumph
The atmosphere surrounding his
landing this afternoon was unpre unprecedented.
cedented. unprecedented. For the first time in history
of airport arrivals, Radio Mos Moscow
cow Moscow gave a blow-by-blow ad ad-count
count ad-count of the progress of Khrush Khrushchev's
chev's Khrushchev's plane. From the time the
plane was first sighted over So Soviet
viet Soviet territory, there. were radio
announcements of its progress
every few minutes.
Moscow radio televised and
broadcast details of the arrival.
Among thi dinlomats gathered
l the airport was US charge d' d'affaires
affaires d'affaires Edward breers
US ambassador Llewellyn
Thompson accompanid Khrush-
cnev to the United States and re
mained in Washington.
It was at his farewell press
confer e n c e yesterday that
Khrushchev revealed "'grand "'grandfathers
fathers "'grandfathers and grandchildren'
were the ones who decided to
postpone Eisenhower's trip to
Moscow until next spring.
Asked why Eisenhower put
off his trip, Khrushchev replied
with a smile that he would Use
to tell a "secret'' and reveal just
how the decision was made.
He said thai on Saturday Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower "was kind enougii" to
take him to his Gettysburg, Pa.,
farm.
There, the Premier said, "I
establisheu direct contact with
those woncieriul grandchildren
of his" David, 11; Barbara
Anne, 10; Susan, 7, and Mary
jean, 3.
"We held a conference with
them," Khrushchev continued
"as to whether they s.iould ac
company their grandiather toi
the Soviet Union, and if so.
when.
"At that conference with tnc
President's grandchildren, Uityl
and 1 readied a unanimous de
ciMon that they certainly should
come with the President
"The question of time aro.it,
and I took it upon myself to
suggest that perhaps spring springtime
time springtime would be the be.si time
of the year ior a visit like
that because everything is in
flower then. The weather is
warm. Nothing is frozen up."
Khrushchev, who evidently was
enjoying his story immensely,
continued that he and the Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower grandchildren "then
had an exchange of views with
the President and came to the
same conclusion."
Warning against any attempt
to read deep international sig significance
nificance significance into the postponement
of the President's visit, Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev said :
"There is no noint. in lookinu
I for fleas wnere fieas do not
As Khrushchev was leaving
the National Press Club after
the press conference, club pres president
ident president William H. Lawrence com commented
mented commented to him that "that was
a wonderful story about the
grandchildren. . you might call
this rule by grandchildren."
"Yes," said Khrushchev, "this
was a new type of international
conference."
Soviet foreign minister An Andrei
drei Andrei A. Gromyko, who was
walking with them, cut in:
"You mij(hl call it a Sum Summit
mit Summit lower meeting."
Eisenhower and Khrushchev
tool; their public farewell of
each other yesterday In a pri private
vate private doorstep chat watched by
hundreds of interesed specta spectators,
tors, spectators, shouting protographers
and a swarm of reporters.
Both world leaders were
emlling broadly as they said
pean achools introduce basic
mathematical concepts and pro processes
cesses processes much sooner than do A A-merican
merican A-merican schools. For example,
the multiplication tables are us usually
ually usually taught in the 4th grade in
this country. Children in France,
Germany, Greece, Holland, Po Poland
land Poland and Sweden master them in
the second grade.
American children as a rule
don't take up fractions until the

Liquidate Cold War

S1DF BY SIDE Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev (fore (foreground)
ground) (foreground) and US Vice President Richard Nixon stand side by
side during the playing of th national anthems of both coun countries
tries countries at Andrews AFB, Md., shortly before Khrushchev took off
for Moscow yesterday, ending his 13-day US tour.

goobye on the front steps of
Blair House where Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev has stayed while in
Washington.
They shook hands for more
than a minute.
Onlookers were kept at a dis distance
tance distance and most of the conver conversation
sation conversation of the "Big Two" was
inaudible.
Khrushchev was heard to ask
the President to "convey my
best regards to Mrs. Eisenhow
er."
Eisenhower, shaking hand;
with the premier for spveral
moments at the request of
photographers, told Khrush Khrushchev;
chev; Khrushchev; "Have a pleasan tvoyage."
As he was leaving, Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower remarked "I think I'll
take the whole family," ap apparently
parently apparently a fererence to his
forthcoming trip to Russia.
"You'll have more Eisenhow Eisenhowers,"
ers," Eisenhowers," he said but the rest of his
remarks were not audible to re reporters
porters reporters at the foot of the steps
Meanwhile in Peiping, the
elobetrottine Khruchev s next
scheduled international stop
Mikhail Suslov, one of he
Kremlin's most powerful offi officials,
cials, officials, arrived as the advance
m-n fo' the Soviet Premier.
He declared that Russia's
fr. -IK'. 'iip for Communist Chi China
na China was "immortal and indes indestructible."
tructible." indestructible." Suslov, secretary of the cen central
tral central committee of the Commu Communist
nist Communist Party, headed a Soviet del
egation to the Oct. 1 celebra celebration
tion celebration of Red China's 10th anni-j
versary.
The New China News Agency
in a broadcast to Tokyo, said
crowds gathered at Peiping Air Air-Dort
Dort Air-Dort applauded and presented
bouquets to the Soviet delega delegation.
tion. delegation. Suslov said that he carried
"warm respects" from Khrush Khrushchev,
chev, Khrushchev, who Is scheduled to fly
to Peiping with Gromyko later
this week
Khrushchev was expented to
give Chinese Communist lead leaders
ers leaders briefing on his talks with
Elsenhower.
Until then, the 57-year-old
Suslov, who has been mention mentioned
ed mentioned as a possible successor to
Khrushchev, will act as the Pre Premier's
mier's Premier's representative.
He also has been named chief
speaker for the Soviet Union at
the big anniversary celebrations
"The Soviet people of all na nationalities,
tionalities, nationalities, who regard the Chi Chinese
nese Chinese people as their friends and
brothers, are celebrating togeth together
er together with the Chinese people the
10th anniversary of the found founding
ing founding of the Chinese People's Re Republic,"
public," Republic," Suslov said hi a brief
Peiping Airport speech.
"The fraternal friendship be

Behind Europeans In Math Mastery

fifth grade. Most European chil children
dren children learn fractions in the fourth
grade, and English schools intro introduce
duce introduce them in the third grade.
Decimals, a sixth grade subject
in America, are taken up in the
fourth and fifth Rrades in Europe.
European children, by the time
they finish the sixth grade, have
covered as much geometry as the
average American child gets in
the 8th or th grade.

1

tween us which is closely knit
by our common aim has been
tried through the years. This
friendship is immortal and in indestructible."
destructible." indestructible." Premier Chou F,n-lai head headed
ed headed a high powered delegation
that greeted the Soviet group
at the airport.
Chou declared Saturday night
that Russia's moon rocket suc success,
cess, success, Khrushchev's US visit and
the latest Soviet disarmament
proposal had boosted hopes for
world peace.
Khrushchev offered flatly yes yesterday
terday yesterday to accept stage-by-stage
inspection and control as part
of any East-West disarmament
agreement.
His willingness to accept the
principle of inspection was spelled
out at a farewell news conference
held by the Russian leader at the
National Press Club.
Khrushchev's remarks on this
topic tended to clarify his earlier
speech at the United Nations
in New York where he unveiled
a new disarmament proposal.
The UN speech had left some
question in the minds of Western
diplomats as to whether he was
at last ready to go along with A A-merican
merican A-merican demands that an inspec inspection
tion inspection and control system be includ included
ed included in any such pact.
Khrushchev was asked point point-blank
blank point-blank at the Press Club whether
Russia would allow foreign ob observers
servers observers on her soil to insure that
the terms of any agreement were
being followed.
He replied that "each stage of
development of disarmament
should be accompanied by the
development of inspection and
control."
When disarmament is complet
ed, he added, "observers should
remain to be sure that the agree
ment is fully observed.
Khrushchev met with reporters
alter completing his momentous
peace talks with President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower at Camp David.
He said Eisenhower wants to
improve U.S. -Soviet relations but
must overcome influential K US
forces who oppose a relaxation
of Cold War tensions.
"There is no doubt whatsoever
that the President is sincere in
his desire to improve relations be between
tween between our countries," he said.
"But I must say the President
faces more difficulties than I do
in this.
"Apparently there are influen influential
tial influential forces in this country who are
opposed to relaxation of tension."
The premier did not elaborate
or otherwise identify the "influen "influential
tial "influential forces" he had in mind.
However, he said he believed
Americans as a whole "have
one desire, to bring about peace
Behind these specific differ
enccs, the authors believe, is s
fundamental divergence of educa
tional philosophy. European!
schools value mathematics high
ly as a means of sharpening a
child's intellect and leaching him
to think logically, clearly and
quickly.
American educators tend io re
garri this "mental discipline" con
cept as old fashioned and osbolete.

the prevention of world

war.
Shrushchev opened the news
conference, his second in the
ress club, by reading the text of
e communique issued after the
p David talks and thanking
nefcsmen for their coverage ol
his US visit.
Somfe 500 correspondents gath
ered rn the club auditorium to
quiz the premier.
Khrushchev said "most of the
journalists 1 came in contact with
tried to be objective in covering
our trip." But he said some found
it difficult "to forget the Cold
War."
Khrushchev said he spoke as
"a man enriched by all that he
saw and heard in your country."
In his travels and talks, he said,
"I have learned something a a-bout
bout a-bout Americans."
He said he had "pleasant talks"
with Eisenhower and "there was
a great deal in common in our
understanding ... of the need to
improve relations between our
two countries."
But he cautioned that "it is not
so easy to do away with all the
burdens that have piled up in the
cold war years'
He said "one cannot hope for
a' sudden change in the atmos atmosphere."
phere." atmosphere." This, he said, takes pa patience
tience patience and hard work.
He pledged that "the Soviet
Union, our government and the
people I represent.. .will make
very effort to put an end to
the Cold War and improve rela relations
tions relations between our two coun countries."
tries." countries." Khrushchev also said his meet meetings
ings meetings with US business leaders in indicated
dicated indicated a "mutual interest in the
renewal of relations of ties of be benefit
nefit benefit to both countries."
He said "they offered to con consider
sider consider in a calm atmosphere ways
and means of converting from
some military to civilian produc production."
tion." production." He also spoke of his meetings
with students and intellectuals,
saving he found that he liked the
American people.
' He said he had been asked ma many
ny many times whether he liked the A A-merican
merican A-merican way of life.
Naturally, he said, he liked
the Soviet way better. But he
added that these differences
snouia nor intertere witn coo cooperation
peration cooperation in the international
spbfre.
Khrushchev promised that Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower would be received in the
Soviet Union with the "same cor
diality and hospitality that your
people have accorded me.
Asked if he expected his visit
to result in an increase in US-
Soviet trade, Khrushchev replied
that the Soviet Union "is not
colony but a great industrial pow power
er power with great industrial capacity
and with a high level of scientific
development."
"If there are any intentions to
sell sausages or shoes to us,
you will not find a market for
those things in our country ...
but... industrial products and
consumer goods," he said.
As for Soviet-American ties in
the cultural field, he said "we are
prepared to develop these ties
further so long as the United is
willing to cooperate."
A joint communique issued by
the American and Soviet govern governments
ments governments following three days of con conferences
ferences conferences between the President
and the Premier reported prog progress
ress progress toward solutions of such knot knotty
ty knotty Cold War problems as Berlin
and divided Germany.
In a companion development,.
Russia agreed to reopen long long-stalled
stalled long-stalled K negotiations which might
settle Its big world War II
lend lease debt to the United
States.
Talks will get underway at a
time and place to be determined
through diplomatic channels.
The United States has asked for
payment of 800 million dollars to
settle the account which shortly
after the war was put at $2,600, $2,600,-000,000.
000,000. $2,600,-000,000. Russia offered $300,300,000 be before
fore before the negotiations broke down.
Khrushchev and the President
ended their conferences at Camp
David, at 2:10 p.m.. yesterday
and drove back to Washington.
The joint communique expressed
the optimistic hope that the Eisenhower-Khrushchev
talks would
contribute to "a better under understanding"
standing" understanding" between their two coun countries
tries countries and thus "to the achieve achievement
ment achievement of a just and lasting peace."
Both leaders called the ques question
tion question of general disarmament
"the most important one facing
the world today."
They promised in their com communique
munique communique that "both governments
will make every effort to achieve
ia constructive solution ot tnis
problem."
The understanding between Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower and Khrushchev to re reopen
open reopen formal international negotia negotiations
tions negotiations over Berlin was subject to
approval by other nations direct directly
ly directly involved.
They emphasize the "usefulness"
of mathematics in dealing with
practical problems of business,
scitnee or engineering.
The report argues that Ameri American
can American children are not inherently
stupid, and that they could grasp
and delight in the exciting con concepts
cepts concepts of mathematics as early as
European youngsters if given the
chance.

Clock-Rouncl
I II

Lanal Lable lemporarily f
Round-the-clock operations by the southern branch of thi"
Canal's Electrical Division, reinforced by men from the northern northern-district,
district, northern-district, restored normal electric service to the Pedro Miguel,
locks about noon yesterday, it was announced today at Balboi"
Heights. -4, JI
Trouble in one of two 2,390-volt, 25-cycIe feeder lines; whie
had developed Saturday and limited locks operations t eight
car lockages, was corrected at 12:33 pm yesterday, approximate
28 hours after the trouble developed. ,;
The fault in the feeder line was located about two and tv
half miles from the locks on the Miraf lores suostation.end of that
feeder line. It was bypassed with a temporary connection. Pewna
nent repairs are to be made tonight after the Pacifit locks shuf.

UWWH 1U1 LUC UlgUt,
Yesterday afternoon there was
another brief power failure at
Pedro Miguel caused by the fail failure
ure failure of a resistor in switchgear
which closes one of the circuit
breakers. This was corrected
within a short time.
Despite weekend difficulties,
the Pedro Miguel locks were
able to clear all ships on
schedlue last night.
Miraflores locks forces were
required to work only about
one-and-a-half hours beyond
their normal operations period
Exiled Government
Of Algeria Said
Seeking Peace Talk
TUNIS, Tunisia Sept. 28 UPI()
The Algerian rebel government in
exile announced tonight it was
ready to negotiate "immediate
peace" with France.
It said it was ready to "enter
discussions with the French gov government
ernment government in order to discuss the
political and military conditions of
a cease fire and the conditions and
guarantees of the application of
self-determination" for Algeria.
SOME TOMATO-Only a face
that Mother Nature could fash fashion
ion fashion appears on this tomato
grown by Elmer Benson, ot
Amherst Junction, Wis.
KM

lliiMim rwiMnMlMi

Alan JjEK

Opens TOMORROW!

SHE WAS GOING
id TEACH
THE MAN WHO
UNDERSTOOD
WOMEN
otuLdidtl
2c
Be-ifrv-r
Ltii.lt
HENRY
HON
The
Dantfto
ITJPERSTCGD
vLunik vnuvin i
m M lit Mm h

(ill

I I eouan tyotiusc
Cinemascope
STUKOPHOWC SOUND

Work Fixes i
.. .1 'it

-
The power failure -occurretr"
at 8;19 am Saturday. At' 9:49
am, after checking k ti-onj.
r fb tuaiia
formers and cables, the smallei?
of the two 25-cycle feeder line
was reenergized. .y
This enabled transits to belt
resumed, but restricted lock-
ages to those using eight locH
motives until both 'Mrvieeff
were restored yesterday after -noon.
Saturday night, special rri
were called out to kAn
tinuous operation at both Pedrff
Miguel and Miraflores locltat
kuiuuguuui, me nignt.
LEFT BEHIND Mrs. Unii
Martin, mother of University ot
Southern Califfirtiia'coed Lindi
Edna Martin, sadly touches hej
daughter's bicycle. It was found
chained near the apartment Ol
Linda's fiance, where the 21-year-old
girl was lata try,
stabbed by an intruder.
PRICES: 75c. 40c.
LAST DAY!
3:00 4:35 6:45 9:00 p.m.
in the Ala
llei
DUD10B'
UUEKKI9
SttnrttmQ
mm mm
NUNNALLY JOHNSON
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