The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03130

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"1
only $20 now
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gDAILY NEWSPAPER
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PANAMA l-097 COLON 77
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe
Abraham Lincoln
I4TH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1959
FIVI CENTS

A
TO.
IIIIHI

A A O

I t I I

!1

RP Envoy Admits He Can Do
Little More About Treaty
WASHINGTON, Sept. Zl (UPlK Panamanian Ambassador Ri Ri-eardo
eardo Ri-eardo M. Arias will begin to make farewell calls to U.S. officials
eext week before he returns home to campaign as the govern government
ment government CoaHtion Party's presidential candidate in next year'n
election.
Arias also will be the guest at several receptions planned for
aim by State Department officials and his friends in the foreign
liplomatic corps. 1
The envoy said there Is little more he can do to break the
Jeadiock over the dispute of what constitutes fair wages for Pan Panamanian
amanian Panamanian workers in the Canal Zone.

Zonians Spot
Skulking
Guerrillas'
' By noon today more than SO
reports had been received that
Individual "guerrillas" or small
bands had been sighted on the
Canal Zone.
The men spotted by the popul populace
ace populace in response to an Army call
for reports jn any 'hostile' troops
were members of the 77th Special
Forces Group and the 1st Battle
Group, 20th Infantry.
;As part of Exercise Black Palm,
these attackers were supposed to
be. attempting to escape to the
Pacific and Caribbean Coasts,
While remaiping within the Can Can-ttizone.Hhe
ttizone.Hhe Can-ttizone.Hhe US Army Caribbean
laid, .A-.;,y- v Js
i ReWfs ha guerrilla
'.ler been 'sighted flowed In all
morning throgqh Canal Zone
pallet and military channels.
Seme of the reports were du duplicates.
plicates. duplicates. 1 ; The guerrillas-in-training were
pied makingtheir way through
the jungle or drying to move un unseen
seen unseen from one wooded area to an another.
other. another. Up to midday there had
been no reports of simulated at attackers
tackers attackers in Canal Zone communi communities.
ties. communities. Residents inJhe Canal Zone
were reauested to report any
guerrilla .troops seen to the near nearest.
est. nearest. Canal Zone Police station or
headouarters of a military post.
The reports were needed in ord order
er order to keep track of the routes fol followed
lowed followed by Ae attackers, as part
of the exercise.
The attacking trooips can be
Identified by their fatique uni uniforms
forms uniforms with red bands about the
sleeves and red caps.
Small teams of men from the
77th Soecial Forces Group have
been organizing guerrilla units in
jungle areas of the Canal Zone
since last Thursday.
The participating recruits have
been soldier "from the battle
group's A Comnany and Assault
Gun Platoon. The groups have
"b?en training to conduct simulat simulated
ed simulated attacks on objectives within
the Zone.
When.tre training exercise ends,
the guerrilla units will be disband disbanded
ed disbanded snd the 77th Soecial Forres
men will return to thpir home sta station
tion station at Fort Bragg. N.C.
Two Venezuelan,
f reefc Vessels
Due' A Rmon
Rodman Naval Station will be
the host port for two Venezuelan
frigates and a Greek Navy des destroyer
troyer destroyer due to arrive at the Isth Isthmus
mus Isthmus tomorrow.
The Venezuelan ships are the
Juan Flores, commanded by Capt.
Enrique Domingues Garcia, and
the Jose Moran. com sanded by
Capt. Pedro Medina Silva.
The destroyer Velos, with Cdr.
George Moralis as captain, was
turned over to Greece this year
by the United States under the
Military Assistance Program. With
a complement of 18 officers and
284 enlisted men, tftie Velos is en
route from San Diego to Greece.
It will make the north transit Fri Friday.
day. Friday. Yardmaster To Act
As Manager Of RR
Donald R. Brayton. general
yardmaster for the Panama Rail Railroad
road Railroad in Cristobal, will act as man manager
ager manager of the Railroad Division dur during
ing during the absence of Richard E.
Pinkham, it was announced yes yesterday
terday yesterday by the Transportation and
Terminals director.
Pinkham left the Isthmus Mon Monday
day Monday and will be absent on leavt
(or approximately 10 days.

n

This point, as well as Panama's
desire that it get preference to
supply foodstuffs to the Zone over
other foreign sources was raised
in a recent exchange between
President Ernesto de la Guardia
and President Eisenhower. The
U.S. position was that the same
conditions had to prevail in the
Canal Zone as in other overseas
bases namely, 'hat supplies had
to be purchased from the lowest
bidder.
"$e are completely at odds on
this problem." rias said, "we
totally disagree that the Canal
Zone fits into the same category
as other U.S overseas territories
or bases because the U.S. has
been, there for 50 years and God
knows how much longer it will
remain."
Panama has no objections to
continued U.S. control of the
canal, but rt must insist that
its workers there receive the
same wages U.S. workers get
for the same work. Arias said.
He suggested that one way of
improving Panamanian wages
would be to increase the tolls,
which he jsaid are much tpo low
in' relation to the fcqrease'.ofj liv living
ing living costs throughflfut the' world.
. Arias recalled that these, points
had been" raised duringprivate
discussions, between Secretary of
State Christian Heffer and Pana Panamanian
manian Panamanian Foreign Minister Miguel
Moreno at the Santiago foreign
ministers conference in August
and more recently when the two
men attended U N. general as assembly
sembly assembly meeting at New York.
Oil Executive
Tom E. Sunderland
Heads United Fruit
The United Fruit Co. yesterday
announced the election of Thomas
E. Sunderland by the board of
directors as director president
and chief executive effective
Nov. l.
The company also announced the
promotion of Louis S. Sisto from
vice-president in charge of finance
to executive vice-president.
Sunderland will replace K. M.
Redmond, 65, who is retiring from
the- company after 42 years of
service. Sunderland is presently
vice-president and executive com committee
mittee committee member of Standard Oil
Co. of Indiana.
At yesterday's meeting, the com company's
pany's company's board of directors also ac accepted
cepted accepted the resignation of Almry
L. Bump as a director and vc? vc?-president
president vc?-president in charge of tropicM
perations. Bump had been m
ager of the company's operation
in Guatemala for many years be before
fore before taking over the position from
which he resigned.

I

VICTORY SHOWER White Sox outfielder' Jim Rivera gets an impromptu shower, fully-clothed,
by teammates, from left. Earl Battey, John CallLson and Luis Aparlcio in a locker room cele celebration
bration celebration after the Chicago team enncned the American League pennant by defeating Cleve Cleveland,
land, Cleveland, 4-2 last night at Cleveland. Rivera and AJ flmlt.h hnth connr.td or sixth-inning homers,
the game-clinchingblows. (UPI Radtofoto)

Reception
1

CANAL ZONE CIVIC COUNCIL
whirh r.nv w. K. Potter nnened

ribbon are Mrs, Margaret Rennie, (right) of the Pacific Civic Council, who contributed her services in. handling the interior de

coration of cne
tages will ciotttinui
to 4 pm.

Gay Khrushchev Heads Off To Coon Rapids Corn
COON RAPIDS, Iowa, Sept. 23 ( UPI ) Premier Nikita Khrushchev headed gaily toward Coon Rapids today
where he will visit Roswell Caret's profitable com and cattle farm.
In the cool of the morning, beneath overcast skies, the Carst family and a corps of helpers put the finishing
touches on plans to show the: world's top Communist how agriculture thrives in a capitalistic system.
Khrushchev left his hotel at Des Moines a few minutes a head of schedule after a long night of rest. Weary after
his transcontinental flight yesterday and a busy afternoon and evening in Des Moines, Khrushchev bounced tout of
the hotel this morning smiling and waving at a crowd of curious bystanders.

Windy City's Wailing Sirens Bring
Raid Scare To Gay White Sox Affair
CHICAGO, Sept. 23 (UPI) Someone celebrating the
White Soxi American League pennant victory turned on the
Jity's air raid sirens last night and threw thousands into
anic.
Many feared there was an air raid. Families raced to
their basements. Men and women rushed into the street to
scan the sky for enemy planes.
The telephone company, newspaper arid wire service of offices,
fices, offices, and police and fire stations were flooded with anxi anxious
ous anxious and angry calls.
Frieht turned to indignation when It was learned Fire
Commissioner Robert J. Quinn had ordered the sirens to
sound for five minutes at 10:30 p.m. when the pennant was
assured.
Mayor Richard J. Daley said the city council "passed a re resolution
solution resolution decreeing that there should be hilarity in the streets
and shouting and celebration."
But the council resolution said nothing about air raid
sirens.
Robert M. Woodward, Illinois Civil Defense director, said
he would protest the siren blowing to. the office of Civil De Defense
fense Defense Mobilization.

REPRESENTATIVES and Canal Zone officials were at the ribbon-cutting ceremony during
two of the La Boca houses for public inspection yesterday afternoon. Holding the ends of the

, Margaret Rennie, (right) of the Pacific Civic Council, who contributed her services in. handling tne interior ne ne-of
of ne-of the cottages and MJas Louise Tate, deft), who) aupervised. the 'interior decoraticw te-h9ther. Te two eot-t
nu ljyM pm and iaturir'jBulaJ;'lroiitert i'

I'" '

' J

He shook hands vigorously with
Garst on the sidewalk in front of
the hotel, climbed into the front
seat of a limousine with his Coon
Rapids host and started on the 50 50-mile
mile 50-mile trip to Garst's lush farm farmlands.
lands. farmlands. Khrushchev meets and talks to today
day today with Adlai Stevenson, 1952
and 1956 Democratic Presidential
nominee, during the Coon Rapids
tours.
Sttvtnson txprtsscd optimism
last night ovr tht rtsultt of tht
prtmitr'j United Stat visit.
"It looks lik ptact is break breaking
ing breaking out' ht said.
At the Garst place there was a
curious mingling of security mea measures
sures measures and country festival atmo atmosphere.
sphere. atmosphere. Four hundred soldiers were sta stationed
tioned stationed at the farm, assigned to
keep spectators from trampling
Garst's crops.
Army helicopters landed end
took off while Garst's cows and
pigs geied inquisitively at the
interruption in their morning
feeding.
Between farm tours Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev was to be honor guest at a
feast under a broad tent on the
Garst lawn next to the family
swimming pool.
About 160 oersons were expect
ed to eat fried chicken b?ked ham
barbecusd ribs ?nd side riish;s
amid a rustic setting of fa'l flow flowers,
ers, flowers, pumpkins, sheaves of wheat
and barley.
Khrushchev's farm t 0 -which
the premier tioecifically
requested a a major part of
his United States visit was mad
to try to learn how 12 percent
of this nation's population pro produces1
duces1 produces1 enough hearty food for
all.
Khrushchev a professed farm
boy feeling at home in the heart
of America's corn belt, said re
would like n get together with
President. Eisenhower once or
twice a vear.
The beaming Sovie! premier
ycslerday got the seconrt warmest
welcome of his US tour xt Des
Moines, the capital city of soma
of the world's richest and best best-cultivated
cultivated best-cultivated farmland.
The cordiality didn't come up
to Khrushchev's San Francisco
greeting, but the. people showed
more hospitality than those of
New York, Washington and Lot
Angeles.
Khrushchev even got a taste of
his first American hot dog ap ap-oropriately
oropriately ap-oropriately enough at a hot dog
factory. He pronounced it "won "wonderful"
derful" "wonderful" and demanded another.
Khrushchev responded to the
Midwest cordiality with a side-

Boca

walk interview amidst thousands
of persons in which he said he
wanted to see more of President
Eisenhower.
Khrushchev, who will meet a a-gain
gain a-gain with the President following
his Iowa tour and a visit to Pitts Pittsburgh,
burgh, Pittsburgh, said:
"It's always better to meet and
talk than to send messages,
which are not always friendly.
Therefore, a meeting or a couple
of meetings a year would be
beneficial.'
Khrushchev also served warn warning
ing warning that the Russians are compet competing
ing competing to grow corn taller and bet better
ter better than Iowa's.
"Our people know much of your
state," he told a crowd of 2,000
at Des Moines Municipal Airport.
"We know you are first in torn
production, but ve are competing
with you and this competition will
be useful."
He repeated his oft-expressed
wish that his visit to America
would help bring peace and friend friendship
ship friendship to the world.
Iowa's Gov. Herschel C. Love
less told the former shepherd
boy from the Ukraine "we hope
you like our homes and schools
You are among friends."
Khurshchev was mellow, talka talkative
tive talkative and a trifle philosophical at
end of an open tar tour through
tlie streets ol Des loines to his
hotel, where 15,000 persons were
massed.
"As we were driving through the
cily I saw a placard which said:
"Mr. Khrushchev, we don't agree
'with you but we welcome you',"
Khnislvchev said through an in-
( Continued on Page 12)
Drum, Bugle Corps
Of RP Institute
Diverted From CZ
The drum and bugle corps nf
the National Institute was stop stopped
ped stopped from marching ilong Fourth
of July Avenue yesterday by Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone police because Zone au authorities
thorities authorities had not been notified be beforehand.
forehand. beforehand. The student corps and their
teacher 'ere headed toward the
Justo Atosemen,! Instilut" when
(hey were stopped.
It is understood that Canal Zone
police have requested the oean of
the National Institute to notify
them whenever students ire go going
ing going to march along Fourth of Ju July
ly July Avenue so that the necessary
arraneeme"', for handling traffic
can be mad.

Ul

in

Small Bedrooms,
Large Rents Draw
Heavy Criticism
While scores of Canal workers today hoped for as assignment
signment assignment to the first fivt La Boca homes, more scores
continued grumbling about the tiny bedrooms and high
rents of the most modern homes ever built in the Canal
Zone,
Two completely-decorated La Boca model homes
were opened to public inspection yesterday in formal cert cert-monies
monies cert-monies as Gov. William E. Potter cut the ribbon across
the threshold of the first cottage and presented the keys
to Pacific Civic Council president Sam Roe, Jr.
During the afternoon and evening inspection period,
more than 1500 eager householders and their families'
streamed through the two controversial homes.
They came to see for themselves what $20,000
cost of the La Boca units can buy in the way of hous housing
ing housing in the Canal Zone.

Reaction appeared mixed, but
a substantial majority criticized
what they termed the "ridiculous "ridiculously
ly "ridiculously small" bedrooms in the homes.
Nearly all questioned the ap approximately
proximately approximately $110 .monthly rent
nec hern as "Will last.
Tifc rent figure does not includW
telephone or electric nrvici,
which can rua as high as 30-$40
for families using air condition-,
ers and completely electrified
laundry equipment.
As a comparison, Roe pointed
out that his own five-year-old Bal Balboa
boa Balboa home, admittedly the proto prototype
type prototype for the La Boca units, rents
for about $30 less a month.
Leading the list of innovations
at La Boca is a 12-foot living
room wall made up of sliding
glass panels. When open it leads
directly onto a spacious paved
terrace.
Although it was widely ap approved,
proved, approved, some visitors question questioned
ed questioned whether the sliding wall was
worth the nearly $1000 it added
to the homes' cost.
Less well received was a com combined
bined combined bedroom-play area which
can be divided by a built-in fold folding
ing folding wall. Designed for growing
children, the area counts as two
bedrooms in the new homes.
But most of those who have
seen the model unit complain that
when the wall is closed, .the two
bedrooms are no more than tiny
cubicles.
One Zonian, living in old-style
family quarters at Diablo, said
he "would be very happy to
leave the La Boca houses to
whoever wants them."
Potter was not heard to take
any side in the controversy over
the long awaited La Boca units,
of which 88 are yet to be built.
Both models opened for public
inspection have been decorated by
courtesy of the Commissary Divi Division,
sion, Division, the "three bedroom unit by
Margaret Rennie for the Pacific
Council, and the two-bedroom bv
Louise Tate for the Commissary
home furnishing store.
Bids For Widening
Rainbow Cily Street
Asked By Canal Co.
Bids are being solicited by the
Panama Canal Company for the
widening of Trinidad Street in
Rainbow City and the replace replacement
ment replacement of certain sections of Roose Roosevelt
velt Roosevelt Avenue and ( anal Street in
Cristobal. The bids are to be
opened Sept. 28 at Balboa Heights.
The work to br done will also
include the construction of addi additional
tional additional sewer and storm drainage
(icil'ties and the relocation of the
existing bus stop shelter on Tri Tri-i.itlad
i.itlad Tri-i.itlad Street.
A suggestion that Trinidad
Strret be widen?d was made at
a recent Latin tier can commu commu-ni'v
ni'v commu-ni'v conference at Rainbow City
with Gov. W. E. Potter.
. The street runs between Ran Randolph
dolph Randolph Road and Jamaica Street,
passing the Rainbow' City School.
Traffic congestion in that area
has been a problem recently.
The work on Roosevelt Avenue
and Canal Stree is n continua continuation
tion continuation of a general .('placement pro program
gram program for streets on the Atlantic
sid".
The contractor will be given ap ap-proximtel'
proximtel' ap-proximtel' f ,p months to com complete
plete complete the work.

uses

Teenager In Trouble
Sent To US School
Us-
Anew We fcegaft thfa week ht
a youngjter from Panama, upon
his arrival on the west coast ol
the United States to enter the Van Van-couver
couver Van-couver Boys Academy at Van Vancouver,
couver, Vancouver, Washington.
Fifteen-year-old Jimmy Lestei
waved goodbye recently to friends
and relatives as he took off on a
launch at Pier 16, Balboa, to
board the Japanese ship Shiga Ma Ma-ru,
ru, Ma-ru, steaming south through the
Canal and bound up the west
coast for San Francisco.
Jimmy had attended Canal Zone
schools until a couple of years
ago, when unfortunate circum circumstances
stances circumstances turned his world upside
down. He found himself and his
family in dire circumstances in
Panama. He was headed down the
road to trouble.
The situation came to the at attention
tention attention of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars, Panama Canal Zone Depart Department.
ment. Department. It was decided that the ;boy
needed to get away from his en environment
vironment environment and that, if a school
could be found and if funds could
be raised, he could to to the U U-nited
nited U-nited States and there receive
an education. ;
Department Chaplain John Fin
lason took the matter up with the
veterans at post-level several
months ago and a fund was es established
tablished established to which everv Veter Veterans
ans Veterans of Foreign Wars post on the
Canal Zone contributes monthly.
Meanwhile throueh the efforts
of the Rev. William W, Baldwin
of St. Andrews Episcopal Church
of Cocoli. a vocational school was
located where ttp tuition was with
in the canabinties of the VFW".
Eventnallv all the red tape was
unwound and Jimmv's TlmW
sites cilizenshin was established
ui- whs men oiuriltea witti a new
wardrobe and luggage. A bit ao ao-nrehonsive
nrehonsive ao-nrehonsive he board?d the bunch
on ti e f'rs' ten tn new life,
Jimmy will learn 3 tradtr-at
the school. Whn he reaches the
proper ne-v he nlans to enlist 4n
he militarv cPrvice where he wilt
he in a position to help tin
fnvlv. Perhap, one dva. the
VFW feels. thP Isthmus will see a
new Jimmy in the service of his
coimlrv. a hov who needed and
f'e opportunity to be a good
citizen.
Today's Transits
(scheduled)
Northbound IS
Southbound IS
TOTAL
(Clear Cut: 4)



FAG I TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1159

t

m
it
lie

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNIC Hf) puiiiihid BY THE PANAMA AMKlCAN rUI. INC
fOUKBfo ar NKlaON ftOUNaKVCi.1. ip. itll
HAKMODIO ARIAS, to. "Ox
13-17 M Iimii o Bon i'4 Panama n or P.
a Tit iphoni 2 -1.40 'S Li"f
CAIlf ADDKtSS S" N A M IHIC AN. PANAMA
.COCON CVnc.r. 12 179 CrNTRAi AvfNus bftwefn 12th and 13TH STRcrTI
rOPIIGN PIlPHtSINTATIVf JOSHUA B POWKPS. INC
141 M.nifON AVI NtW YORK (171 N. Y

MONTH IN AOVANCU
Six month i in advance.
re Oni Via. in advance

i 'THIS YOUR FORUM THI HEADERS OWN COLUMN
The M.il Boi it an open lorum tor readers at The Panama American,
tetters art receive gratefully and ara handlid in a wholly confidential
mini.
If ran contribute a letter don't be impatient if it doesn't espetr the
oit day. Latttrt ara published in tha order received'.
Plana try to keep the letters, limited to one eat length.
Identity of letter writer! ii held in strictest confidence.
Thil newipaper aitumcs no responsibility tor etatententt er opinion)
xprested in letters from reader.

THE MAIL BOX
LOCAL-RATE EX-G.I.s
1 Let's give credit to the yoking Local Rate men who volun volunteered
teered volunteered on a waiver oasts to cuter me US Army years a&o. These
' niie yumi .cuiit.o in ui uiic' ar. io .serve me United
States, and the cause of other freedom-loving nations. Memo Memorials
rials Memorials to three of them who died lie on the Paraiso hilltop, fac facing
ing facing the Gaillard Highway.
But there are some of their comrades today alive and un unemployed.
employed. unemployed. They learned the democratic manner of life, and at
the same time accumulated various trade skills under Uncle
Sam's supervision.
Today their skills and experience are going to waste, for
these forgotten men have no one to represent them.
Tlc thought they may have rated a five or 10 point pre preference
ference preference system while seeking a job, but they have been disap disappointed.
pointed. disappointed. The. way in which we are neglecting them is a crying
shame. t
The unions, the civic councils and the Army Mothers Club
have done nothing for them. And what became of the so-called
representative who was supposed to be representing them in

I hope the community can open its eyes and its hearts to
help these ex-GIs.
Fed-up Father
CAPITALISTS AND SUFFERING
There are almost 90 children in the Children's ward of the
Obaldia Hospital in David, and none of them are Americans.
Many are very sick, while others are getting well rapidly.
There are many capitalists in the Republic of Panama, and
-tvgreat number of them are getting richer rapidly.
Instead of sitting parasitically on the sidelines and leaving
I the generosity ir me .uiunrani. warn help such as called for
' erA.": t.j,.,.m im-.ii Rnv sent. 19) is needed,

" DV Briumane jhiisuii rruiii ........ r -- .
"whv do not these individuals stand up among men of pride and
: honor -and 1 use some of their capital to help ease universal suf-
! iennB? Dan Frey

VNHAPPY WITH TABOGA
r-:
I have been down here several weeks, during which I heard
mucn of Taboga Island, the Isle of Mowers and so forth, so 1
take the trip there. The 8 o'clock ride over was pleasant. Once
there thought I found the facilities meagre. We wa ked around
and saw dilap dated houses and smelly areas, I certainly never
saw the "beautiful species of every South American flower.
Where are they? ,, ,.,
But here's my real beef. They would not sell us a return trip,
saving we could return by the 3:30 pump boat.
y I gadmit there is a small sign at the Restinga, tolling one to
make reservations there for the trip back. recalling
crowded condition of the boat going over, we dldn t rufh 1 or our
return tickets. We tried for them an hour and a half before tne
return boar-was due; to Jeaye. l. .. a
How Were Wttd know, s innocent tourists, that there wtWffl
be a call to the hills, and all the natives would come a-rushm
for the 3 30 boat, We felt that we would not be accommodated
till the 6 30 boat. In view of al the swarms which appeared at
the 3:30 boat, but we were the on)" ones left out
We felt this was definite discrimination, with the effect of
keening us at the Restin.ga, to foend more money
This has put us in an unpleasant frame-of mind toward the
officials concerned. esrjeciaUy considering that the 6:30 return
boat carried no more than a dozen passengers
Was our T?boea trin worth $2? I say definitely no, and wish
I could warn future sucker?'.
They have signs there marked "No Picnicking, vet Panama Panamanians
nians Panamanians brought baes and ba?s of lunch and cat under the thatched
roofs while we ooor tourists who obeyed the signs spent heavily
eatine in the Restlnga. How come?
For me it's a case of Jnce bitten, twice shy, and rver p,aln.
Tourist.

NO THANKS

Sir
What heals me down is the anlomb of some of those "rielitos"
who. having been spared the firing squad onlv because of the mer merciful
ciful merciful laws of Panama, anrl the mercv of those who administer
them have not started expounding to their constituents how good
they are going to be next time. I think the words Thank You (if
thev know how to use them) would be in order.
But 1 cuess they've got to lapup that publicity whilrJthe lap lapping
ping lapping is good.
Trigger-nappy

PENFRIEND FROM 50TH STATE
Sir:
I would like to correspond with an English-speaking person In
your country. 1 am interested in collecting and exchanging stamps
a a hobby. T also will exchange post cards.
John Drusynski
517 Punaa Si
Kailua, Oahu,
Hawaii.

ARMY COMMISSARIES
girr
I read "Shopper's" (Mail Box, Sept. 20) complaints about the
Army commissaries clos;ng for inventory, etc., with mixed feelings
of sympathy and disgust. I wonder how long "Shopper'' has lived
with th military, because find that the Zone rommissaries close
less often for inventory than anywhere I have been.
Most of them close at least one day a month, not only the gro grocery
cery grocery sections but also the exchanges.
The happiest situation I have seen was in Uermany. where Ihe
large commissary kept regular hours (and closed days), but a small
dfliratessen type place was available all day and in the early eve evening
ning evening for folks to get cold cuts, cheeses and the like, .is well as an
emergency quart of milk or pound of coffee. Wouldn't it he won wonderful
derful wonderful to have something like that at the new Clayton exchange''
Po'sibly service people need an installment plan lor buving
groceries, so they wouldn't find the cuoboards bare and the kids
starving on the day before payday. Maybe something like buying
a numbered card that could be punched when you buy
'I's not easy to hang onto 1 h at sawhuck for end of the month
food, so maybe some kmd of grocery insurance needs to be intro introduced.
duced. introduced. Food For Thought

SAN ANTONIO BUGLE

Sir:

WeMliPr still suits me. A little hot during the first of tht- night,
but cool enough to reach for the cover before morning
Frank drove me around to see the new street work, hut I told
him it was no use. for my seeing is about finished.
The market is holding up fine. Full of finest pears I ever saw
and thev fiw from Oregon and Washington State. The price is a
little high. 15 rents each, but it's quality, regardless of price, that
keeps business up.
From the way traffic is moving throuch the Canal we ire go going
ing going to need a sea level canal before we get it i listen in on this
Monitor talk and hear many more think as T do.
They are talking of rutting down on the road work and that will
hurt, for "more upending more business."
Good time for a short trip Haven't heard of one, but some
friends are to rome here. They live in Tercel, Tex., (lie home Of
the lir.-t Booby Hatch in the State, officially.
Met a lady in David one day and she slopped me and sid:
"I come fcom Texas, Terrel. Tex.." and I asked how she es escaped
caped escaped the plare, and she stumbled

1 ;ce enough to know that I
tne in. slakes. Will try it again

t 2 SO
IS oo
24 Oft
am mixing tins up, for I c;,n
feel
next week.
Pop Wright

LOCAl
. I 7o
t SO
1 BO

Labor News
And
(Comments

ty VICTOR RIESEL
Vice i rcsiuent s.xon .s tne
lutiieat uriei'ican itauer ever io
.nd lnn.e direct contact wmi oo oo-wei
wei oo-wei laooi i seu nun .or n.a.
impressions anu i t actions io his
1 t tAill viiaOl cti V I Jiu uilQ Ldli.a.
litis is Vice r lMutin .mxoii s iUu
repiy to Uns coiuinnisis queiy:
Tn anuuiei itvui y.di& we
will Liu Oil uit: aime levti an Am Am-erica,
erica, Am-erica, ahu' liun we wm to lui uier
iu umi oa uj nitn ii jou Wis.!
we win Siop and wave dim say
lOuOrf us.
' n vvus boviet Premier Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev w.io inaoe mis Doasl u.mmg
our ijieai ueuale at ine Ameri-
i.i aiii j.i.oii in .tioseuw uus
buiillnCl. ikllu ille.e aic ivvu Si
nVai uiula l u Of siU in i.
'mt iiuv. is uus: iia one who
iias acii uuui AmeiKan and so so-viei
viei so-viei mines ..iiu uuui u..i
lies 1.1 UjAl'auOU, 1 uU nui .ur a
ffloineiu uiiiu uicy will siicceeu
111 aid,.. life uliS uudSl oUOU. iSO-
Uiiii i saw oui.ng my tiaveis uus
iiln..i.i mailt iii. ue.ii.Ve me oo oo-viei
viei oo-viei ijiiiou wui cai.cu up with Am American
erican American leuluOiOfc anu jiiouuLiiVi jiiouuLiiVi-iy
iy jiiouuLiiVi-iy in seven yeois or in seven seven-ly.
ly. seven-ly. "But maKe no mistake about ii
Uiej are hi earuesi; iney mean
business aooui atiiievinj; weil'
goais; Unu uviei muusn.l pro pro-oiess
oiess pro-oiess s.nee voriu v, ar 11 nas in
iati uotii at a tuuu rale, oe
are aneau now anu we can siay
aneau uin omy il ve Keep on
moving antjU. ye musi. in saori
main.ain t.i reoiu o. ctononi.c
growtn anu progress tnat nas
ijrOUgilt Ua 10 uui piaCIK nVti.
' ...U o it is necessary tnat we
ask ourse.ves wji una tJv.
uynamic source oi Uns malaiiess
recoru oi aiuidiueu progress, i
Unnx the answer is near: m one
worKQ, t..e uyuaniic ayurte au
oeen ireeaom.
"ihe a.. oi our economk iy iy-tem
tem iy-tem wiiic.i is ready lnsepifraoie
iroin our po.iticai aim so.ui sys system
tem system as wen is the mutual, co cooperative
operative cooperative enterprise o. nee just justness
ness justness aim nee laoor, in a manei manei-plaee
plaee manei-plaee wneic lunuom t. iniuvuiual
rtineiicns register Uieir iree con
sunier i.,o..i..
"To won. well, tins system de de-nianus
nianus de-nianus ti.oi.piu.t -1K. Ui
responsioiiny but v,e navt a.-
was oL.ituued on seu-Uiafjipline,
noi on eon.ro.s imposed oy gov government
ernment government or any specially privi privileged
leged privileged groups. ,rtnd it demands, too,
M-i lndiviuuai enterprise be sti sti-mulafeo.
mulafeo. sti-mulafeo. oy incenuvs .nn ie ie-warassbasLu
warassbasLu ie-warassbasLu on rcai procuuiiVi procuuiiVi-iy;
iy; procuuiiVi-iy; tnji mosi eiiicieni us o. ev every
ery every unit oi capital a..u iabo. oi
material resources and inventive
genius,, thai we n.v.ot
nomX,.,,. ....
"One of the first things you no notice
tice notice in a Soviet factory is i.ie
charts of production ligures
tne ajore-carus ol ear.i inmv.rHm.
woiKer, ana ol the so called 'bri 'brigades'
gades' 'brigades' or work-teams, in acmcving
or exceeding production quotas.
Soviet workers watch tneir com competitive
petitive competitive standings' just abut as we
watch the Daseuall standings.
"And tine importan. point is
this: Everything depends on these
standings wages, bonuses, va vacations,
cations, vacations, special pnvi.eges of all
sorts.) Competition seems to oe
Ihe rule across-the-board: between
individuals, between work teams,
between whole factories producing
the same commodity.
"In a nutshell, the Soviet indus industrial
trial industrial economy is based to a tre tremendous
mendous tremendous degree on a system ol
incentives and competition copied
straight out of free-enterprise ca capitalism!
pitalism! capitalism! "T.ie Soviet Union is, of course,
called a 'workers state." But the
reality is a world apart from this
official Marxist theory. There is
some thing called a 'union' in ev every
ery every Soviet factory, and there is
something called 'management'
but both are in fact arms of the
state. Both are completely state
controlled. And all the key deci decisions
sions decisions are state decisions.
"There is no real bargaining'
Ihere are no strikes; wages and'
hours are set by toe state: and
the councils that hear workers'
grievances are, again, nothing bu1
official admini.'irative licxiies.
Both are comp e'ely stateontrol
led. And all the key decisions are
state decisions.
"There is no real bargaining;
there are no strikes; wages and
hours are set by the state; ,-id
the councils that hear workers'
grievances are, again, nothing
but official administrative bodies
wnerever he turns, the Soviet
worker is directly subject to state
control.
"There is nothing in the Soviet
Lnion comparable to our free
....ur mm, us. a aoviei union is
in iaci a sort of a social club
and a center for indoctrinatioa
ami political 'education. At its
best it is roughly the equivalent
i our so-called 'company unions'
a way-sianon that American u-
iiions nave long since passed by
men marrn io a position in
American society of effective free freedom
dom freedom and power
"Another striking feature of the
iaius oi une hoviet worker and
I'm still describing reality, not
official theory is the enormous
gulf between labor and manage management:
ment: management: in terms of pay, soda! p6 p6-Mtion,
Mtion, p6-Mtion, all sorts of special privi privileges
leges privileges from the use of company
cars to holiday resorts to advanc advanced
ed advanced educational opportunities. And
as Milovan Djilas has so effective effectively
ly effectively pointed out, this social and eco economic
nomic economic hierarchy tends to bt selX selX-perpetuating:
perpetuating: selX-perpetuating: there is less mobi mobility
lity mobility in Soviet society than in just
about any industrial nation in the
world today. This, again, ii the
reality of the 'workers state'!
"I was amazed, in the Soviet
factories I visited, by the lack oi
direct contact between the indivi individual
dual individual workers and the 'bosses.' So Soviet
viet Soviet workers seem Io be treated
always in mass terms the in
evitable result, of course, of Marx

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ii" ii I I in iv v i i fYYY i vjrsi I

It's a good thing I was sitting
down the other day when I read
that Andrei A. (Iromyko is in the
process of wrilinjj a 'three-volume
guide to diplomacy." As it
was, 1 almost fell off the chair.
How can there possibly be that
many ways of saying nyei ;
Russian Foreign Minister es
tablished' himself as the original
nyet man in the early days of the
United Nations when he served
as the U.S.S.R. delegate to the Se Security
curity Security Council. That was in the
spring of 1946. Hope has never
sprung quite so eternal since.
Gromyko was the first Russian
working diplomat that the unbe unbelieving
lieving unbelieving eyeshot Uncle Sam had
jen in 'ctt&j&Lf
The country .Aa glimpsed V.M.
Molotov sparring in San Francisco
10 months earner in the formative
sessions of the U.N. But it remain remained
ed remained for Gromyko to establish in all
his monolithic granite the Soviet
Nyet Man.
The world quickly discovered
that Gromyko any Russian repre repre-seniative
seniative repre-seniative was not so much a di diplomat
plomat diplomat as a messenger boy or hi-fi-woofer-and-tweeter
for whom
ever currently occupies the Krem Kremlin.
lin. Kremlin. In the beginning, Gromyko
spoke for Stalin and now. as
foreign minister, for Khrushchev.
Indeed, in this interesting Soviet
contribution to the diplomatic us usage,
age, usage, Khrushchev hat scooped his
buddint author.
The Red dictator wrapped It up
in one blunt sentence, in Gro Gro-myko's
myko's Gro-myko's presence when he explain explained
ed explained recently to. former Gov. Averell
Harriman that Gromyko was Vis
errand boy and that any time An Andrei
drei Andrei failed to carry out his
(Khrushchev's in s t r u c t i o n, h
Khrush, would get another errand
boy.
U seems difficult to believe that
Gromyko can sum up Russian
diplomacy more succinctly. Why
three volumes?
In the unlikely possibility that
G"omyko can't read his own
notes or his memory is faulty,
there are a number of American
reporters who can supply him with
fulsome accounts of his early days
at the UN.
ism's emphasis on abstractions
like 'the bourgeoisie' and 'the pro proletariat'
letariat' proletariat' and 'the class conflict.'
Even my official 'hecklers' among
the workers seemed to be taken
aback when I treated :hem as in in-divudals
divudals in-divudals and when I suggested
they make up their own minds,
as "individuals, about the problems
we face.
"If more ani more Soviet citi citizens
zens citizens could sec for themselves the
real sHatus of the free American
worker or, at least, hear and
read about it if only we can

find ways greatly to expend the"as u.r. 1 e"L sl.mul

froe exchange of ideas and inform ;
ation and direct person-to-person
contact, 1 think the effedt would be
devastating: Communist :heory
and Communist propaganda simp simply
ly simply do not square with tile facts
of life. And I am convinced that
these facts cannot be surpressed
forever: No Iron Curtain is proof,
over the long run, against ihe
explosive force of the very concept
of freedom, or against the econo economic
mic economic sun?es-story of freedom-in-ac-tion.
-"That is why I stress that to
slay ahead 01 the Soviet Union,
we must keep moving ahead; and
that to move adead, we must ne never
ver never forget that the dynamic source
of American progress is the res responsible
ponsible responsible exercise of freedom by
labor, by management, by every
indivudal consumer. The burden
of self-discipline which boils
down to claiming rewards only for
real contributions to productivity
is on eeh one of us.
"Our resoonse to this challenge,
over the past, has been the secret
of our matchless record. I feel
sure we wi'l in the si me way ful fulfill
fill fulfill the promise of the years a
head,"

ii n n i k sfJtxrs i I

Nyet Man
By INEZ R0BB
My notes, for example, contain
a blow-by-blow or step-by-step
account of Gromyko's historic
walk out of the Security Council
on March 27, 1346.
That is a diplomatic device that
Groinyko should certainly des describe
cribe describe in detail iit iis guide to di diplomacy.
plomacy. diplomacy. This walk' echoed around
the world.
( It occurred to me at the time,
as both the Security Council and
the audience sat stunned by his
performance that Gromyko would
make a superb Hamlet.
No graduate of the famed Mos
cow art Theatre could have bet bettered
tered bettered his act or made a more dra dramatic
matic dramatic exit. His timing was superb,
and modesty should not interfere
with' his description ot tnis pas passer.
ser. passer. I hope he remembers that re reporters
porters reporters used to refer to him eKher.
as The Dead End Kid, because he
never gave up, or The Great Stone
Face.
Although it may seem a far cry
from diplomacy, 1 also hope Gro Gromyko
myko Gromyko finds room in his three vol volumes
umes volumes for at least a few para paragraphs
graphs paragraphs on the Joe Louis-Billy Conn
DAILY
MEDITATION
(P resented by the Department
of Christian Education of the
Episcopal Church in the Mis Missionary
sionary Missionary Diocese of tho Panama
Canal Zone.)
Your Evening Bible Reading:
St. Luke 3:1?
IN THE WILDERNESS,
"And he cam into all the
country about Jordan, preaching
the baptism of repentance for the
remission of sins."
Jesus was friendly and socially
I nclincu, so much so that His op opponents
ponents opponents complained about His as
sociations and called Hi ma glut glutton!
ton! glutton! John the Baptist never drew
those complaints. He lived spare sparely.
ly. sparely. He dwelt out in the desert. He
clothe.i himself in skins. He
preached frightening, fire-and-brimstone
..ospel that set one's
hair on end.
At abo i,,e point where the
Jordan River emp.'ies into the!
Dead Sea, John took his stand. I
There the crowds, doubtless small
at first, grew rapidly as the peo-j
pie came to hear his strange mes-;
sage. He told them that danger!
. '- win come snoruy io
requite every man accordinc to:
his works. i
The people should take smal!
comfort in the belief that they :
were the chosen ones, for Qbd
could raise up a chosen people :
wherever He wished, yes, He could :
make them out of .these very i
stones. i
The axe was at the root the;
tree, th gra:n was about to be
throughly threatened. The people'?
would-be leaders were an off-
spr.ng of vipers. "Repent, for
TO START COMEBACK
NICE. France (UPD Spanish
bullfighter Luis Miguel Domingu'n
announced yesterday that he will
start his comeback to the blood-and-sand
arena at Cali, Colombia
on Dec. 26. The handsome Torero,
wice grave y injured by fierce
bulls w th n a space of two weeks
last month, announced his deci decision
sion decision to a group of friends. The
announcement ended rumors that
Dominguin was planning to aban abandon
don abandon the bullring in response to the
Eleas of his wile Italian move star
ucia Bosa.

the Kingdom of God is at hand!"
heavyweight bout in June, 1946.
All members of the Security Coun Council
cil Council attended the fight as guesis of
Bernard M. Baruch.
In the eighth round, after the
great Joe had flattened Billy like
I m.'ckerel I asked Gromyko his

reaction to the prize fight. The an answer
swer answer left both Baruch and me
slightly hysterical.
"Always," said Gromyko in his
sepulchral chest tones, looking at
the ring where Joe danced to the
crowd's plaudits and Billy lay
prone, "my sympathies are with
Mr. Louis."
U.S. IRON CURTAIN
SAN JOSE, Calif. (UPI)-Some
100 policemen and security offi officers
cers officers surrounded the depot here
Sunday when Russian premier Ni Ni-kita
kita Ni-kita Khrushchev's special train
stopped briefly. "Is th:s the U.S.
iron curtain?" someone in the
crowd shouted to Henry Cabt
Lodge, President Eisenhower's
personal representative wth the
Khrushchev party. "It is just
common sense for U.S. foreign re relations,"
lations," relations," lodge replied w:th a
smile.

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' 4

(Si

te
WASHINGTON, R dwell
Garst, the openfieed corn farmer
who's playing host to Nikita
Khrushchev today, has been on
the teleDhone to the Sta'e Depart Department
ment Department urging (hat his guest arrive
at 7:30 a.m. instead o' 10:30. Rea Reason:
son: Reason: there's too. much to see at
Coon Rapids.
Simultaneously all sorts of lo
wing have been on the phone to
Garst giving suggestion, for en entertaining
tertaining entertaining tre No. 1 Russian.
Thev suggest redoes for Rus
sian dishes; advise that yKhru,sb yKhru,sb-chev
chev yKhru,sb-chev be served tomato "Jtrice ;. In Instead
stead Instead of alcohol: hope that eraee
will be riven before the Jiinch;
and warn that" war conies from
refrgierators because cold food uo-
sets the d'gestive tract and causes
hot tempers.
Garst, who hasn't experienced so
much excitement since he worked
for tfenry Wallace in the days of
the New Deal, rs accephne some
of the suggestions.
But he is serving a cocktail or
scotch before the lunch for Khrush
chev m the big tent ererted on
his lawn.
What Khrushchev will see on this
1000-acre farm which has made
Coon Ranids famous behind the
Iron Curtain is first of all. huge
vats on a railrtiad siding. They
contain the molasses and urea
which Garst mixes and pours on
ground-up corncobs to feed his
beef cattle,
A few years ago most farmers
threw away their corncobs. But
Garst says he soent 100 Rn an
Encyclonedian Britannica. found
that cellulose dissolved with the
application of certain ineredients,
consulted Iowa University scient scientists,
ists, scientists, and began the application of
urea and molasses to corncobs at
cattle feed.
RUSSIA IS TOO DRY
Only 250 white-faced Hereford
r feeding on the Garst farm.
But the cattle-feeding season
hasn't started vet and in a month
or so Garst will be feeding up to
2000.
Khrushcrev will also see some
new hybrid sorghum which Garst
is recommending for Russian
fa'ins bepau it reonires less
rainfall, therefore is better adapt adapted
ed adapted to the arid areas of southern
Russia. Khrushchev, a great corn
man, is skeptical about sorghum.
The Garst seed corn operation
is in full swing as Khrushchev ar arrives.
rives. arrives. In the past farmers didn't be begin
gin begin picking their corn until mid mid-October.
October. mid-October. It was too moist.
But Garst and other modern
farmers now solve this by dump dumping
ing dumping their corn into big heating
drums, 500 bushels at a time, un until
til until it reaches the right moisture.
This is whv corn-picking ma
chines .are out in the Garst fields
right now. one month eariy, send sending
ing sending a steady stream of golden ears
into trucks, which haul the corn
to the dehydrating drums.
"BENSON BUILDINGS"
Mr. K. wi'l also see three new
buildings which on some Iowa
farms are called "Benson Build
ings."
They are erected to take care
of this year's nuge surplus of

Washington

AIerry-Go -Round

o
corn 1,800,000,000 bushels rolled
up when Benson tbok the' acreage
controls off corn. Tfcis will doubt'
less give Khrushchev something
to chuckle about and perhaps b
envious Over, -
Khrushchev, the iociajist, hai
been doing his best to: ijicreast
corn Production in Russia: Mn.
while, the United States; long .fol .followed
lowed .followed the socialist pattern of con controlled
trolled controlled corn production, ..
Last year Benson persuaded
corn- farmers to vote to take it
off. Whereupon' the Midwest, un un-der
der un-der the uncontrolled, capitalistic
system Khrushchev is following,
will harvest the biggest crop in
history.
It will be so bie that smart
farmers like Roswell Garst hav
built Benson Buildings;" where,
after their corn is sold to Benson,
it will be stored at Benson's ex ex-pense.
pense. ex-pense.
Benson will be paying lS-4-10th
cents per bushel per year of th
taxpayers' money to -Garit and
other farmers ail over the Mid Midwest
west Midwest to store the surplus eor
crop.
The Garst family and their old
friend Henry Wallace who left
Iowa to become Roosevelt's secre secretary
tary secretary of agriculture, probably hav
done more to increase corn acre acreage
age acreage than anyone else in America.
Both are pioneers in the deve development
lopment development of hybrid seed. And whilaj
Wallace left the Agriculture De De-partmen
partmen De-partmen to run for vice president
and president Gnrcf hm k
concentrating on raising 120
bushels of corn per acre.
Since our average corn produc production
tion production in 1939 wa. 29 bushels per
acre, 120 bushels is quite an In Increase.
crease. Increase. Garst doesn't always go that
high. Last year, without much
rain, his average was 109 bushels;
but even that was twice as much
as the 51-bushel national average.
WILL THEY BURY USt
The secret of this amazing corn
production will be something
Khrushchev wants to know about,,
and Garst will tell him.
"I'm not going to show Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev anything that I haven't
shown other agriculturalists for
the past 10 years says the hustl.
mg corn grower of Coon Rapida.
Hunger ought not to be a pro problem
blem problem in a,ny part of the world.
What he will show him is ouit
simple: Very heavy application ol
fertilizer, especially nitrogen.
Garst applies fertilizer to hia
field, over and over aeain. H
doesn't rotate crops. "Crop rota rotation,"
tion," rotation," he says, "is as out-of-daU
as the outhouse."
Khrushchev will be especially
interested in one section of corn'
640 acres which hasn't been ota.
ed in clover since 1945. It's litill
growing corn, with yearly applies.
tions of nitrogen.
it costs 50 cents to one dollar
to produce nitrogen bv rotation:"
explains Garst. 'It eosts 10 to IS
cents to buy nitrugen.
Crop rotation in clover will
disappear as rapidly in the next
two years as horses did during tha
iasi iu years, when farmers can
buy one pound of nitrogen for one one-fifth
fifth one-fifth the cost of raising it. They
won't buy the same amount,
they'll buy five time- as much.
Yields will go upward, giving us
an opportunity to do away with
hunger in the world"
Mr. K. is already following
Garst's advice, and Russian Com Communist
munist Communist corn may catch up with
American capitalist corn.
Russia's crop was 525,00,00
busrels last year against 3,800,00, 3,800,00,-00
00 3,800,00,-00 for the USA.
With his head start, it should
take the Communist world som
time to bury us in corn even
with Roswell Garst's advice. But
by the spring of I960 Russis will
have enough corn to supply iti
own needs.
GIVES EXCHANGE REPORT
BERLIN (UPI)-The exchangt
of goods between East Germany
and Communist China has
reached an annual value of more
than one billion rubles (about 25
million dollars at off'cial rates).
i the East German News Service
reported Sunday.

to GUQOPG

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MADRID 31

1



TH rAKAMl AMOUCAIC AH IKDEFETOENT DAILY HIWSPAPZS

PAS! THRU

1

In

I - s
I v H
1 I

MRS. REBECCA D. SIEFF, world president of the Women's Inter International
national International Zionist Organization (WIZO), right, pays a courtesy call
on Gov. W. E. Potter. Left to right: Robert A. Farquharson, charge
d'affaires of the British Embassy, with Mrs. Farquharson. Mrs.
Sieff, and Potter.

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Reform Group

Out Of Power
In Phoenix City

PMENIX CITY. AU. (UPI)

The reform group which domin dominated
ated dominated the Phenix City commission
since the assassination of Ala

bama Gov. John Patterson's tam tamer
er tamer and a vice cleanup here was
out of power today.
A reform candidate lost Monday

in an eektion to fill the vacancy
on the three-man City Commis

sion created by the resignation of
Mavor Arnold Thompson, a de

clared reformist.

That gave a 3-1 edge-to a group
not identified with the reformists.
The victor was Dr. W. B. Mims
Sr.. who defeated reform can

didate Leonard Coulter. Mims
was supported by former City
Clerk Jimmy Putnam, who is now
a member of the commission,
John Barbee is i bow the "only

known re o r milt"? Jeff? tfEtte
board. : --
Patterson voted !n he elections
Monday. He flew here with his
wife to vote and cautioned resi residents
dents residents that the crowd that ran the
citv wide ooen years go were

determined to make a comeback

Patterson's father, Democratic

nominee for state attorney gener
al, was assassinated during J
drive to clean up the city in 1954

The night spots here catered to the

personnel of nearby rt. uennmg,
across the state line in Georgia.

Young Patterson ran in place of
his deceased father and was elec

ted state attorney general. He

was later elected governor.

SENDS KHRUSHCHEV CARD

SAN FRANCISCO (UPD-Soviet

Premier Nikita khrushchev re

ceived a two-by-four foot postcard

through the mail yesterday irom

Mrs. William Crawford III, of

Dallas, Tex. the message said in

Dart: I oppose President Eisen

hower in his action (inviting

Khrushchev) and yet the U.S

mail carries my message. Would

this happen in Russia? . .Neither
Marx nor missiles can destroy
the American heritage."

Rep. Flood Makes

Inspection Tour

In Far East

TOKYO (UPI) Rep. Daniel

Flood (D-Pa.) will arrive in Tokyo

today in the course of an in-

spection tour of U.S. military in installations
stallations installations in Asia.

Flood, member of the House

Appropriations Committee, will be
accompanied by his wife and Maj.
William D. Lynch. They will stay
in Japan until Sept. 26.

Whil In Janan th congressman

win cnnfor with ii s military au

thorities including Lt.. Gen. Rob Robert
ert Robert W.J Burns, commander of U.S.
Forces there, and Maj. Gen. Da

vid H. Tulley, commanaer ot u.s.
Army, Japan and American Em Embassy
bassy Embassy officials.

Flood also will make an inspec inspection
tion inspection and tudy tour of military in installation,
stallation, installation, in orea, Taiwan the
Philippines-and Southeast Asia.
TO USE PERSONAL CONTACT
LONDON (UPI) Labor lead

er Hush Gaitskell announced

vesterdav that his party's cam

paign for election next month will
be waeed primarily "on the door

step" of British homes. Gaitskell

said television, radio and press

reports were important campaign

tools but that tne ultimate nope
of his party lay in "the personal

persuasion of douotfui voters

Truman Says Wilson

Might Have Sold US
On Joining league

NEW YDRKV Sept. 23 (UPD-

Former President Harry S. Tru

man uid yesterday that Woodrow

Wilson might have been4 able to
get the United States into the
League of Nations if he had pos possessed
sessed possessed more political' skill.
"I think that he felt a contempt
for a great many of the people

he had to deal with politically

because he was one of the smart

est men in the world," said Tru

man.

"He always wanted people to be

on the level with him. and I think
he gave the impression that h
was better than any of them. Of

course, that offends anybody."
Truman appeared on a taped

ABC-TV program entitled "Harry

S. Truman The Prophecies of

Woodrow Wilson." produced in

cooperation with the Woodrow Wil Wilson
son Wilson Foundation.
It commemorated the 40th an anniversary
niversary anniversary of Wilson's nationwide
tour to "sell" the League of Na Nations
tions Nations to the American people.
Wilson collapsed on Sept. 26,
5919, while speaking in Pueblo,
Colo., after covering 28 cities.

REED & BARTON

ITTLU

tntae

Movbe al

vo think, far

etM on TV

fneraefce don't

BEGINS CAMPAIGN
LONDON (UPI) Visitsig Pak Pakistani
istani Pakistani Finance Minister Mohamed
Shoaib began acampaign yester yesterday
day yesterday to form alittle common commonwealth
wealth commonwealth of nations" designed to se secure
cure secure higher prices for primary
products. Shoaib, who arrived here
Sunday, said "all raw material
countries" outside the European
common market were "worried"
about the effects of free trade
competition on world prices.

Whether ytm see startnt or adding to her Reed k Barton
service, your gift of starling on that special occasion
ays yon think the world of bar. Prices are per

6-pe. settings.

I Her Birthday ? J
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5 oz. bot. ONLY 45tf
Imported brands 4 o. bot. 75$
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it BRILL ANTINE
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16 on. bot. 16-17$

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7



PAG I FOUR

THX PANAMA AMERICAN AX DrDKFUVDCT DAILI MWIFAPU
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1981

Social and Otli

tenvide

134,

anahiu

NEWS OF ENGAGEMENTS, MARRIAGES, BIRTHS, PARTIES AND TRAVEL SHOULD B MAILED
PROMPTLY TO BOX-NUMBER SHOWN. IT WiLL EE R ECEIVED BY TELEPHONE OVER
PANAMA 2-0740 OR 2-0741 BETWEEN 8:00 AND 10 A M. ONLT.

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen

OftPS

mm

By, OSWALD JACOBY
Written far NIA Service

VISITING CONGRESSMEN, WIVES ENTERTAINED
AT LUNCHEON BY U.S. AMBASSADOR HARRINGTON
Tht United Statts Ambnttdor ind Mri. Julian Fitkt Hirring Hirring-ton
ton Hirring-ton entertained today at thtir residence in La Cresta at a luntheon
party honoring fwo visiting congressman and their wivas.
Tha honored guests were Rep. and Mrs. George H. Fallen of
Maryland and Rap. and Mrs. Gordon H. Scharar of Ohio.
6

Meeting

Mr. and Mrs. Gomei
Leave For Vacation
Mr. and Mrs Louis A (iomez
left yesterda ior a vacation of
about two months in the I nited
States. Mr. (Iomez is vice presi president
dent president in charge of Isthmian branch
es of the Chase Manhattan Bank.
Teenage Dinner Danca
Saturday At St. Luke's
The Young People's Fellowship
of the Cathedral of St. Luke's wi.l
have a dinner dance Saturday
evening at six in Bishop Morns
feall.
The event will honor Col and
Mrs. R. D. Brown Jr advisors
(or the proup during the past
year, and CWO and Mrs. Theodore
V. Hobbie. the new advisors.
All members, guests and Iriends
are invited to attend. Sports shirts
and party dresses will be appro appropriate
priate appropriate dress for the teenagers.

nod out. with entertainment prov provided
ided provided bv the Hulananis directed by
i Mrs. Ruth Walea.
i A deep freeze will be awarded
as a door prize during the eve eve-'ning.
'ning. eve-'ning. as well as spot prizes.
Proceeds from the affair will be
used for the chapter's chanty
, projects Reservations may be
'made telephoning Cri nObal 1916.

Progressiva Square Dancers
The Progressive Square Dance
Ciub will have a practice session
Saturday at i p.m. in the Paraiso
gym. Jack and his Harmony Mak Makers
ers Makers will play for the meeting.
Members of all sister clubs are
invi;ed to attend.

Millionaires Club
The Millionaires Social and
Sporting Club will meet this eve evening
ning evening at 7:30 at tne home ol the
secretary Victor Osborne. Vice
president Elbert King will preside
at the meeting.

Newcomers Cub
To Meet Tomorrow
The Newcomers Club of the At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic Side will have its regular
meeting tomorrow afternoon at
1 30 at the Breakers Club in Co-,-o
Solo. All members and guec's
are invited to attend.

O.E.S. Chapter Plans
Saturday Night Danca
An informal dance is being
planned for Saturday evening by
Roval Palm Chapter Two ol the
Ofcler of the Eastern Star at the
Cristobal Sky Room. Hans Jano Jano-witz
witz Jano-witz and his orchestra will play
for dancing from 9 p.m. to 2
.m.
A Hawaiian tlveme will be car-1

Installation Of Officers
For Rainbow Girls
Cristobal Assembly Two, Order!
of Rainbow for Girls, will have j
public installation of officers to-1
morrow evening at 7:30 at die,
Cristobal Masonie Temple. i
i
Marion Leach will be the inslai-1

ling officer and Irene Meehan is
the incoming worthy advisor.
Refreshments will be served af
ter the installation ceremony. The
public is invited to attend..

DOROTHY CHASE'S
STUDIO OF DANCE
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS HALL, BALBOA
BALLET TOE CHARACTER TAP ACROBATIC
Special classes for kindergarten and pre-school tots.

Seeing is
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ill,1

US Embassy Vehicle
Seized By Brazilian

Authorities In Rio
RIO DE JANEIRO, Sept. 23 -i
I'PJ ) Brazilian authorities have
seized S V embassy station
wagon in an effort to force the
rehiring of a Brazilian ex-emplo.ve
of the American technical aid
program.
Sylvain Loupe, administrative
adviser at the embassy, said he

will file a formal protest against
the act. on today. Another embas embassy
sy embassy spokesman said the seizure of
the station wagon "violated diplo diplomatic
matic diplomatic immunity."
Brazilian police jacked up the

station wagon and towed it awavl

from a parking station near the
embassy grounds, despite the pro protests
tests protests of embassy representative
Manuel F, Croy.
Mario Fula, for 13 years an
employe of the U.S. aid program,
filed suit "recently in an effort to
collect severance pay. A Brazil Brazilian
ian Brazilian court ordered the embassy to
rehire Kula and pay him a year's
back wages.
The embassy has refused to far
to do so, saying that it pays near nearly
ly nearly double tht Brazilian scale for
locally-hired employes, and that
the law will permit it to pay the
severance sum provided for by
the Brazilian constitution.

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Although rehearsals for the ply
1 "The Tenth Man" have been under
I way for only a few days, 17 year year-!
! year-! old Risa Schwartz is being hailed
by members of Wie company as
the next Elizabeth Taylor." She's
strikingly beautiful, and evident evident-lv
lv evident-lv absorbed a great deal of know know-j
j know-j ledge about the stage in the year
she spent traveling all over the
world with her actor father
Maurice Schwartz. Jan Sterling,
! the widowed Mrs. Paul Douglas,
decided to return to the West

Coast cast of "The Gazebo al although
though although her doctor isn't happy a
bout the decision
Marlene Dietrich, strolling along

W. 46th St. with Billy Rose the

other evening, attracted more than
I the predictable amount of at
tention. She was wearing an ele elegant
gant elegant white casnmere cos costume,
tume, costume, and the most awed double double-takes
takes double-takes were performed by other pe pedestrians
destrians pedestrians who turned around to get
the back view; Marlene's skirt had
a center split what showed her fa famous
mous famous legs as few cheesecake pic pictures
tures pictures ever did. and she wasn't
wearing any slip to obscure the
scenery.

Well, RCA Victor did it; the
brass saw fit lo record a tune cal called
led called "The Bear Flew Over the
Ocean." officially described as "a
flavorsome, no-nonsense welcome
to iviiruslK'iiiev written and per performed
formed performed by Jimmy Driftwood."
Since the recent juvenile crime
wave, some of the Times Square
novelty shops have removed the
switchblades from their window
displays. But they haven't stopped
selling them. .Heavyweight cham champion
pion champion lngemar Jo.iansson with his
good looks and engaging persona personality,
lity, personality, has proven popular with the
crowds wherever he's traveled
especially in Paris. Some admirers
have expressed concern because
the only roadwork he's done late lately
ly lately has been on the dance floors of
the Left Bank cafes, but plenty of
social life seems to be his style,
and it certainly didn't impair his
ability to floor Floyd Patterson.
Mike Todd's former aide, Lenny
Gaines, is in Gotham setting up
tne machinery to launch a new
singer, a promising lad named
Billy Sherman. .Love, Hollywood
style: Jim Mitchell took an ad in
a trade publication to tell actress
Sarah Shane that he adored her.

later this month: "Forecast of the
Night by Jack Denton Scott.

Beautiful Anita Coiby has cor corralled
ralled corralled famous names from all
over the globe (o contribute paint paintings
ings paintings to toe Country .Art Gallery
chjarity exhibition',-; starting; in
WSstbury, L. I.J?Sjfrti 20. I
Many of the celebrity canvases
will be for sale, for the benefit of
the Nassau Cerebral Palsy Associa
tion and art lovers who attend
will see works by President Ei Eisenhower,
senhower, Eisenhower, Sir Winston Churchill,
Madame Chiang Kai-shek, Mary
Martin, David Niven, Ciaudette
Colbert, Sen. Jack Kennedy, Tony
Curtis and a host of favonties,
.Nancy Walker, who has a re record
cord record ot being funny, must be top

ping her previous triumphs in the
lortneoming revue "The Boys A-

gainst the Girls." One man who

came to the theatre to deliver
sandwiches and coffee during re

hearsals laughed so hard he got

a stiUn in his side and had to be

helped back to his delicatessen. .
Armchair adventurers who like

stories of tiger and leopard hunt hunting
ing hunting will be thrilled by a book

Rinehart and Co. it publishing

Broadwayites wno remember the
era of Jack "Legs" Diamond think
actor Robert Evans is a perfect
choice for the lead in the celluloid
version of the gangster's life. They
point out that "Legs" was far re removed
moved removed from the plump and ugly
Al Capone type of killer; he was
slim and handsome, and despite
his sinister reputation had beauti beautiful
ful beautiful girls fighting over him right up
to the bullet-ridden end. .Count
Basie's wife stole the show at Mor Morris
ris Morris Levy's party in honor of Dinah

Washington and her sixth bride bridegroom.
groom. bridegroom. Mrs. Basie hat become
stunning blonde.

The management of a resort ho hotel
tel hotel is still fuming at comedian
Buddy Hackett. Whatever he said
about their plaice, they didn't think
it was funny. .Tin Pan Alley ru rumors
mors rumors have the Warner Brothers
recording company and some of

its most important employes on

the verge of divorce. .Dr. Carlton

Fredericks, radio's nutrition ex expert,
pert, expert, will journey to England next
winter to participate in experi experiments
ments experiments aimed at determining the
effectiveness of a controversial
drug as a cancer cure.

NOKTH XI
AM
V AJI2
Jt
KQJ10
WEST (D) EAST
SKJ74 A1052
10 VKM
KJ Q 10 985
AI 5 3 2 484
SOUTH
VQ7 6 5 3
A742
4(7 v
Both vulnerable
Waat North East Sauth
1 Double Pass 2 V
Pass 4 V Paaa Pass
Pass
Opening lead A

Globe Trotting

The off-Broadway theatre will
boast a new Ivy League producer
this season. He's wealtiny Jim Mc Mc-Ewen,
Ewen, Mc-Ewen, a Princeton graduate from
North Carolina who will present
"Somewhat a Lute" at the Jan
Hus. .Before Cary Grant made
his recent brief trip to New York,
he held a preview of his film,
"Operation Petticoat" for just one
person-his estranged wife, Betsy
Drake. It was quite obvious to
those who saw him usher her into
the projection room that they've
remained good friends even though
the marriage is over.
The night club comedians are
having enormous fun with the
Onassis-Cailas headlines. They're
trotting out "yacht" jokes tney
haven't used since Rafael Trujillo
Jr. courted Kim Novak.

Quote Unquote
NEW YORK Adlai Stevenson,
commenting on the possible re results
sults results of Premier Khrushchev's
visit to the United States: i lie
cold war isn't going to end over overnight.
night. overnight. It's not going to end for
a long time."

ANCHORAGE, Alaska P P-fense
fense P-fense Secretary Neil McElroy on
Khrushchev's disarmament plan:
"I assure you there is going to
be no false disamrament such as
America was pulled into following
the last war."

Take a look at the North hand
only. Everyone is vulnerable and
West opens the bidding with one
club. Do you pass, bid one no no-trump
trump no-trump or double?
, In a recent team of four match
one North player decided on a
trap pass in the hope of eventual eventually
ly eventually picking up a nice penalty. Un Unfortunately
fortunately Unfortunately for his side East and
West stayed out of' trouble. East
bid one diamond and West one
spade. North passed again and so
did everyone else. West made his
contract and one overtrick. y
At the other table North chose

to duoble as against the trap pass
but the trapper still contends that
his bidding was correct and the
other North was just lucky. He
also contends that when the bid bidding
ding bidding died at one spade his part partner
ner partner should have reopened with a
bid of two hearts, etc.
There is some' merit lo this

North's contentions but I still will
have to go along with the winner
and recommend the double.

I Q The bidding has been:
, North East South West
I 14 24v ?
! You, South, hold:
3I V7 5 QUI 7 6 2 J 5 J
. What do you do?
j A Paaa. Yo would' like to
; double with glue bat there is no
, such bid and aomeone is sure to
j take your double out whereupon
your partner is likely to play yom
. for atrenrth, not a bust hand.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Again East has overcalled your
partner's spade bid with two
diamonds. This tim you hold:
V7 5 Qiei7 AKIJJ
. What do you" do now?
newer Tomorrow

ACROSS
1 Vegas,
Nevada
4 Grand
I Product of
Pennsylvania
12 Old French
coin
13 the way
14 Italian river
15 Tavern
18 Residents of
Western
Hemisphere'
18 More stern
20 Auctions
21 Donkey
22 Song for one
24 Night birds
28 Antitoxins
27 Males
30 Most wan
32 Whole
34 Thoroughfare
33 Handsome
man
38 Romanian
coin (var.)
37 Fragrant
plant
39 Pastries
40 of Capri
41 Footlike part
42 Blarney
45 Browned
bread
48 Baffle
61 High note in
Guido's scale
52 Toward the
sheltered aide
53 Heraldic band
54 Edge
55 Nick
58 Oriental
rulers
57 Plant juice

DOWN
1 Hawaiian
1 wreaths
2 Skin disorder
3 Idaho resort
(2 words)
4 Boxes
5 Crippled
8 Opposed
7 Mai de
S Tropical tre
Kind of
examination
10 British
' princess
11 Deprivation
17 Cuba, for
instance
II City in
Germany

Answer to Previous Puzxle

A L. El Ick2il

Iffl

JikE. X1 e mTTt?

23 Mountain
nymph
74 Gem
23 Vacillate
28 Rob
27 Clergymen
28 Great Lake
28 Cape
31 Twilight
33 Drinks heavily
38 Go to bed

40 Place within J
41 Leaves, as
,of a book
42oodsh
43 Story
44 Portent
48 Single
47 Pseudonym of
CharletXamb'
48 Moist I
50 -i and reel

LLH. I1 P M7 I I9 I1 I10 I"
iT" I li
iT T Wk
a WTti -L"LJ
w W" wXtw
j
j r
i i
in w iff' or
r f r
l

Appeal Planned For Three Negroes

Barred From White Pine Bluff Schooi1

ST. LOUIS, Mo. (UPI) An

appeal was being planned today

for three Negro student, barred

from an all-white school near
Pine Bluff, Ark.
Robert L. Carter, one of the at attorneys
torneys attorneys for the Negro students,
said the Supreme Court would be
asked to review a decision Mon Monday
day Monday by the U.S. Eighth Circuit
Court of Appeals.
The three-judge appeals court
reversed a lower court ruling
which ordered the three Negroes
enrolled in the Dollarway (Ark.)
School District.
The decision was hailed by Ar Arkansas
kansas Arkansas Attorney General Bruce
Bennett as a 'major victory" en ensuring
suring ensuring that "there will be -no
Little Rock incident in the Dollar Dollar-way
way Dollar-way School District this year."
Bennett, who appeared as a
friend of the court in the Dollar Dollar-way
way Dollar-way appeal, said "The battle was
won in the courts, the only place
a lasting, successful victory can
be.
"We have taken another step
toward the return to peace and

progress, in our state."
An Aug. 4 ruling by District
Judge Axel,J. Beck ordering th
Dollarway district integrated wai
overturned by the Appellate' Court.
The Appeals Court upheld the
Arkansas placement law designed
tc put Negro students in som
(hools and whit children in oth

ers The court said the three Ne Negro
gro Negro children must follow-procedures
laid down by the state -act.
Beck had upheld the constitu constitu-t'onality
t'onality constitu-t'onality of the Arkansas place placement
ment placement law but had ordered arirnis arirnis-slon
slon arirnis-slon of the Ni'-'ro"- T""
Dove. 16, James E. WarfLeld, 13,
ird Corliss Smith 12.
Carter said the students at attempted
tempted attempted to enroll at Dollarway
but were sent instead to a Negro
school.
However, school board attorneys
el arged -the Negroes 'flaunted
and ignored" the Arkansar Pupf!
Placement Act. ' tl ..
The school board said the Ne Negro
gro Negro children had not availed them themselves
selves themselves of the remedies under th
assignment laws.

SAN FRANCISCO Premier Kh Khrushchev
rushchev Khrushchev to Thomas Watson while
visiting the 1MB plant in San
Jose: "You started our acquaint acquaintance
ance acquaintance by taking me to this dining
room. You fed me very well. And
even an animal becomes kinder
when well fed."

DEFICIT SPENDING
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
(UPI) The Brazilian govern government
ment government has announced that hence henceforth
forth henceforth it will substitute coins for
all one and two cruzeiro notes. It
said it colt 1.2 cruzeiros to print
a one cruzeiros note.

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1 'Teaspoon vanilla

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WEDNESDAY, bLr iiiiBxil U, lio

Ike Hopes Savings Bonds
Interest Hike Spurs Sale

WASHINGTl,.,.J -. Presi President
dent President Eisennower yesterday raised
the interest rate on series, E and
H savings bonds from 3 3-4 to
3 3-4 per cent and appealed to all
Americans to buy and hold the
better -paying "shares In
America.",
The new' rate, retroactive to
June 1,;, applies to the 42 billion
dollars worth of bonds now held
by 40 million persons as well as
to all bonds bought in the future.
The President acted immediate immediately
ly immediately after signing a bill, passed in
the closing days of Congress,
which permitted him to raise the
rate as high as 4 1-4 pr cent. .The
administration does not plan to in-'
crease the rate beyond 3 3-4 per
cent.
"To my mind there is no better
way of saving, no more effective
way of strengthening our power
for peace, than to own U.S. sav savings
ings savings bonds," he said. "To buy
these bonds is to express faith in
America."
While the President hailed the
bill, it failed to give him the wide
powers ne sougnt to meet govern
mnt financial nrnhlerrn stem
ming from the mounting-cost of
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GAMBOA 7:00:
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"HONG KONG AFFAIR &
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MARGARITA 7:00
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Marshall Thompson
Maria Landi
PARAISO 7:00
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"ARMORED ATTACK" and
"A STOLEN FACE"
SANTA CRUZ 1 7:00
Jack Palance
Barbara Lane
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borrowing money in the open
market.
Congress refused him authority
to raise, interest rates on long long-term
term long-term government bonds. The
President argued that it was in inflationary
flationary inflationary to force the government
to sely on short term financing to

jstay in business
I But he accepted the half-loaf
j . : i t. i
t auu promptly vuiugq nope mat
making savings bonds more at attractive
tractive attractive would "serv as a re renewed
newed renewed invitation to every citizen
to buy and hold these 'shares in
America."
The Treasury Department hopes
the increased rates will make E
and. H .bonds attractive enough to
reverse the trend of the past few
months in whleii bond redemp redemptions
tions redemptions have topped new sales.
Sales totaled 309 million dollars
last month compared with cash cash-ins
ins cash-ins of 454 million dollars, leaving
a deficit of 145 million dollars.
Treasury officials noted that the
half point increase in interest
rates was the biggest in the 24 24-year
year 24-year history of the savings bond
program. It also was the first
time the rate had been increased
on outstanding bonds.
. The Treasury said afl bonds
bought before June 1 will earn at
least one-half of one per cent
more from now to until their nejlt
maturity aate. aonag mac nave
been earning 2.9 per cent will be
Search Continues
For Man Who Killed
Widow At Graveside
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI)-Po-lice
pressed a hunt today for the
slayer of a 75-year-old widow who
was raped and murdered in a
cemetery here Sunday.
The victim, Mrs. Foy B. Coop Cooper,
er, Cooper, was buried today beside her
mother, about 100 yards from tne
mausoleum where her body was
hidden after the attack. It was
while visiting her mother's grave
Sunday that Mrs. Cooper was
raped, beaten and strangled.
Police believe the assailant
dragged the elderly woman across
a fence separating the white and
Negro sections of the city-operat-
ed cemetery, raped and killed!
her and then carried her body 100
yards down a gentle slope to the
mausoleum where he hid the
body.
The body was discovered late
Siinday'by" 14 year Bid boy
whose companions Had dared him
.to crawl through a hole in the
door of the tomb.
Officers searching the cemetery
found the woman's pocketbook
wrapped in news papers and
stuffed behind a hedge several
hundred feet from the mausole mausoleum.
um. mausoleum. It contained one dollar.
TODAY ENCANTO-35-20
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"THE HOUND OF THE
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Victor Mature in
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SHOWS:
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RELEASE!
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KUIVlAN I II. ...
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Police Question
Professor's Wife

In Heiress
NEW 'YORK (UPI) Police
questioned the wife of a St. Louis
professor today about the myste mysterious
rious mysterious death of a 23-year-old Chi Chicago
cago Chicago heiress whose half-nude body
was found in Boston Harbor fol following
lowing following her disappearance from a
Dutch freighter.
New York and Boston police and
federal agents have turned up no
clues so faras to whether the
death of pretty Mrs. Lynn Kauff Kauff-man
man Kauff-man Friday night was murder or
an accident Her body was found
by the Coast Guard on Spectacle
Island in Boston Harbor early
Saturday after the freighter
Utrecht had left for New York.
Michael A. Luongo. Boston med medical
ical medical examiner, attributed death to
drowning, but severe head and
body injuries led authorities to
attribute death to violence. Her
body was clad only in shorts and
terry-cloth slippers when it was
found.
Mrs. Kauffman's traveling com companion,
panion, companion, MTsrJuanitaSpectorv.is
ited the shin at its Brooklyn pier
with her husband, Dr. Stanley
Spector professor of Oriental
studies at Washington University
in St. Louis.
Spector; 35, had employed Mrs.
Kauffman as a "eseareh assistant
for the past two years.
Boston Police Capt. Joseph B.
Fallon, cracl? homicide detective,
said Spector was unable to shed
any light on Mrs. Kauffman's
death. Fallon said he would con concentrate
centrate concentrate questioning today on Mrs.
Spector, who was believed to have
been the last person to see Mrs.
Kauffman alive.
"I have not ruled out the pos
sibility of accident or suicide,"
Fallon said. "From what I've seen
on the ship, it is very possible
she might have fallen. If it is
murder, it will take a day or
two to discover the motive."
Stripper Back
In New Orleans;
To Visit Long
NEW ORLEANS (UPI) Red Red-tressed
tressed Red-tressed stripper Blaze Starr, who
recently made a whirlwind trip
from Miami, Fla., to New Orleans
to see Gov. Earl K. Long, was
back in town today.
She flew in from Baltimore
after visting her home in West
Virginia and said she has no
plans to see the 64-year-old Long.
She said. she will be?in her act
in a French Quarter bistro tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. Miss Starr mt Long for the
first time at a Quarter night
spot more, than six. months ago.
She closed her act in Miami
last week.
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TODAY
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"ViIgwa Ktt s MS r nTi i
. must : WnKhHl Al

Macmillan Does Not Believe
Russian Leaders Want War

' LONDON (UPI) -Prime Minis Minister
ter Minister Harold Macmillan said last
night he did dot believe Rus Russia's
sia's Russia's leaders wanted war but that
there must be a quick summit
meeting to help keep the world
from 'Thundering" into one.
Macmillan launched a whistle whistle-stop
stop whistle-stop campaign tour for re-election
of a Conservative government in
general elections Oct. 8 with a
speech at Manchester based pri primarily
marily primarily on international affairs.
His opposite number, Labor
Party Leader Hugh Gaitskell be began
gan began bis barnstorming tour at the
seaport city of BrjsttL
Gaitskell started jus campaign
by denouncing the ruling party's
"disastrous" invasion of Suez in
1956 and accusing the Macmillan
government of giving only a "tep "tepid
id "tepid reception to Soviet Premier Ni Ni-kita
kita Ni-kita S. Khrushchev's total disarm disarmament
ament disarmament proposal.
The Labor Party leader said
Khrushchev in-his address before
the United nations last Friday
"put forward a sweeping plan for
scrapping all arms." Britain, said
Gaitskell, should have given the

Little Rock Girl Claims Negro Boy
Hit Her, Broke Glasses In Bus Fray

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (UPI)
A 16-year-old white senior girl at
Central High School said today
she suffered a cracked nose and
facial injuries yesterday in a scuf
fle with a Negro boy on a city
bus.
Annette Harper said the boy,
identified by police as Cecil
White, a student at a Negro juni junior
or junior high school, justled her several
times. She asked him to stop it,
and he hit her in the face with
his fist. She said he hit her three
or four more times, knocking her
glasses out the bus window and
bruising her lower lip.
Police Chief Gene Smith said
officers investigated and turned
their information over to school
and juvenile authorities. He said
no arrest was made, but the girl
or her family could file charges
through the prosecuting attorney.
The girl said she and three
companions boarded the bus at
Central High, and' sat quietly at
the rear.
A few blocks later, eight or nine
Negro students boarded the bus,
and. crowded around the white
girls, she said.'
The Harper girl said the Ne
groes jeered at them, and one
stuck out her tongue and made
faces at the white girls. The same
girl, she said, kicked her foot sev-

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SAETA DEL
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with Joselito
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EL ZARCO
Pedro Armendariz

VICTORIA
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plan 'a warm welcome."
The prime minister said he. fa favored
vored favored disarmament, provided it
"equal and parallel" by both East
and West and involved both nu nuclear
clear nuclear and conventional weapons.
"Do not let us slip into the loose
way of talking about war with so so-called
called so-called conventional capons as
something almost tolerable," he
said..
"I do not believe that the Rus Russian
sian Russian leaders want war. By a
strange paradox one of the few
advantages of the nuclear weapon
is that no nation can expect any anything
thing anything from war except annihilation."

Nevertheless, Macmillan warned
that major issues remained be
twecn East and West which could
trigger a conflict.
"There are outstanding prob
lems between the two sides which
are, of course, dangerous," he
said. "One of them is the ques
tion of Berlin, the future of Ger
many and all that goes with this.
It is on ,)ust such an issue that
the two sides might, if I may use
the expression, blunder into war.'
eral times, making K appear ac
cidental.
The white girl said she and her
companions said nothing and paid
no attention to the Negroes.
She said the Negroes pushed
tne boy several times in such a
way that he fell across them.
She said she asked the boy,
"Will you please stop it."
With that, she said he hit her
in the face with his fist. She said
the blow broke her glasses. He
hit her again, she said, and her
glasses fell out the bus window.
The girl said she grabbed at
the Negro's shirt, and he hit her
three more times.
By that tikme, she said the bus
had reached the downtown section.
When it stooped, she erabhH the
boy again and he kicked her in
the stomach, sending her sprawl
ing across tne bus.
She said he and the other Ne Negroes
groes Negroes jumped off the bus, ran
across a street intersection and
boarded another.
BURGLAA TOOLS LOST
GATESHEAD-ON-TYNE,
land (UPI) Police lost
Eng-
and
found custodians reported yester-
aay mat someone had turned in
a lost bag containing a complete
set of burglars tools.
R I O
25c.
BANK I $311.00
MY MAN
. GODFREY
vlth David Nlven
- Also: -THE
INVISIBLE
SHRINKING MAN

BELLA VISTA

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Hi'lU'llf um'fiii
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4,
J
AMARTINE

IMOL

Retired Chicago
Broker Killed
By Bandit Gang

CHICAGO (UPI) A retired
real estate broker was killed and
bis caretaker seriously injured to today
day today when bandits broke into an
old North Side mansion contain containing
ing containing antiques and a fortune in rare
coins.
Detectives found the. beaten,
body of Joseph CucUic, 75, on a
bed in a made-over apartment on
the first floor "of the mansion. He
was naked and his hands were
bound with wire.1
Cucilk's caretaker. Walter Mc-
Cauley, 50, was found nearby,
also tied up. He was beaten and
taken to a nearby hospital for
treatment.
Homicide Det. Sgt. Edward
Gagney said McCauley, before he
lapsed into unconsciousness, told
him that two men forced their
way into the apartment.
The men apparently surprised
Cuculic and killed him in the bed bedroom.
room. bedroom. McCauley was attacked
when he awoke in another bed bedroom
room bedroom and heard Cuculic being
beaten, police said.
Officers said the bandits ap appeared
peared appeared to be after a rare coin
collection worth $60,000, belonging
to a man identified as Al Sax.
Police said Sax rented a room
from Cuculic, who owned the old
house.
Gagney said the combination
had been knocked off a safe in
Sax's room but he did not believe
the bandits had taken anything.
However, officers learned that
Sax reported someone took $13,000
in rare coins just two weeks ago.
Sax's room, police said, looked
like a museum, containing medie medieval
val medieval lances, helmets, crossbows in
addition to sets of dueling pistols
and other antique objects.
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FAS I SIX

TVI PANAMA AMZXICAS AW INDEPENDENT DAILY NCWSPAPI
WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 23, 195
its

DINNER PARTY
Mr. and Mrs. Charles F.

GM is First Auto Maker To Run Out
Of Steel; US Economy Not Hit Yet
DETROIT, Sept. 23 (I'PI) The auto industry today began to feel the first effects of steel
shortages which would force complete shutdowns of production of some lines in a little more
than a week.
The first critical shortages appeared to be showing up in General Motors Corp. plants.
In Washington, however, It was disclosed that the strike has as yet failed to lower high con consumption
sumption consumption levels in the domestic eonamy.

General Motors announced it
would beein layoffs at its Tern-
iteclt Division plant at Columbus,
Ohio, and would lay off al least
2,800 employes at Hie plant by
the end of lb- shutting
Of all production there.
That wouu. ... plants
it Detroit and Flint, Alien., and
Trenton, N. J. producing such
things as door handles for Gen General
eral General Motors cars.
Chevrolet Division General
Manager Edward Cole said Ms
division would be forced to close
off its production by Oct. 1, just
a little more than a week away,
unless the steel strike was ended
bv that time.
"Chevrolet has been producing
its small Corvair at a rapid rate
for some time now and Cole said
he expected all Chevrolet dealers
to have stocks of 1960 models in
their showrooms before produc production
tion production ended.
General Motors' AC spark plug
plant at Flint laid off 400 em employes
ployes employes last week because of the
steel strike. The employes wers-
making air cleaners lor um cars
and the company decided it had
enough air cleaners for the lim limited
ited limited production of cars possible
wita current steel supplies. There Therefore,
fore, Therefore, production was stopped so
the steel being used for air
cleaners could be used for other
purposes.
GM'j Harrison Radiator plant
at iocKpor., a. i., win ko on a
four-day week next week in irder
to conserve its steel supplies The
plant currently has enough steel
but it is ahead of demand lor
radiators.
General Motors also announced
it was negotiating with Phoenix
Steel Corp. for "emergency" steel
supplies.
Chrysler Corp., probably hard hardest
est hardest pressed next to GM, already
has reached an agreement witn
the operating Lone Star Steel
Co., Dallas, Tex. for "emergency
supplies" of steel.
Chrysler spokesmen said ie
company still feels it can con continue
tinue continue to produce car m.o Nov
ember with current steel sup
plies.
Ford Motor Co. said it ha.s
enough steel to supply all ol it,
dealers with enough cars to al'jw
them to do "considerable" selling.
Ford produces about 40 per
cent of its own steel but does
not produce all of the types need needed
ed needed in to manufacture of its cars.
American Motors Corp. Pres President
ident President George Romney said his
company should be able to con continue
tinue continue operations longer than njiy
other auto company with the
possible exception of Ford.
Studebaker Packard said it ex-
WITH

mmmmmmmmm' 1 111 -1 -mmmmmmmmmi 1 mini 1 1 hmmmimmmmmi i 1 "aMHI'aal"MaaMMMMWMsnKMM
TOTAL PLIGHT TIME
PANAMA (Tocumon)TO PAN AMERICAN COMPETITION
PARIS 13.15 hs. 19.30hs.
ROMA 14.45 hs. 18.10 hs.
LONDON 12.00 hs. 19.30H6.

at m. PAk, in.

peeled to be able to continue pro

during cars from stockpiled steel
until Dec. 1 but admitted an un unforeseen
foreseen unforeseen shortage by any sup supplier
plier supplier could bring about a crisis
sooner.
In Washington, meanwhile, the
steel strike tailed to cut into
high demand and consumption
levels in the domestic economy
through early September, the
Commerce Department reported.
The department's Office of Bus Business
iness Business Economics said in its month monthly
ly monthly survey of current business
that capital investment continu continued
ed continued to expand and most major
types of construction continued
well ahead of a year ago.
The influence of the steel strike
has been reflected chiefly in em employment,
ployment, employment, personal income, man manufacturing
ufacturing manufacturing and mining production
and freight transportation, it said.
nowever, spoKesmen said, in
general l,ie pattern and the mag
nitude of change in the various
segments oi tne ai'onomy during
the first six weeks of the cur
rent strike were "similar'
,n
British Hero-Spy
Lord Ironsides
Dies In Hospital
LONDON, Sept. 23 (UPl)-Ficld
Marshal Lord Ironside, who serv served
ed served as a German Army private and
as wartime chief of the British

Imperial General Staff, died last
night of a heart attack at Mill- ; NEW YORK, Sotp. 23 (UPI)
bank Military Hospital. He was Tammany chief Carmine G. De De-79.
79. De-79. sapio was re-elected chairman, of
the New York Cotintv Democra-
The six loot-four soldier had j ic Committee last night, defeat defeat-been
been defeat-been recovering from a broken ling nominees of two rival fac fac-hin
hin fac-hin s'llifMTd several veek? ago. Itions.
Tall, lean, gruff Ironside (his : The victory made his relection
friends called him "Timm ." but j tomorrow as chairman of the
his subordinates often called him county organization's executive
"Old Ironsides") served Britain committee a ce'ainty this post
in every major military operation is the Tammany chieftainship.

from the Boer War through
World War II.
Before World War I Ironsides,
who could speak 14 languages,
posed as a refugee Boer and join join-ec'
ec' join-ec' the Kaiser's Imperial German
Army i East Africa. As an ox oxer
er oxer rt driver, he won the respect
of British military intelligence
for sending home r its en Ger German
man German troop movements.
His unknowing German supe superiors
riors superiors were so impressed with the
anti-British Boer" that they a a-warded
warded a-warded spy Ironside with a me me-oal
oal me-oal before he fled back to Bri British
tish British lines.

THE WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE!!

those which prevailed In both
mz and 1956.
Seasonally-adjusted non -farm
employment in August the survey
noted, was over a half million
less than in July. Personal in income
come income in August stood at an ad adjusted
justed adjusted annual rate of $381,500,-0O0-down
$2,500,000,000 from tne
highs readned in June and July.
The income decline stemmed
from reductions in wages and sal salarieschief
arieschief salarieschief in payrolls affected
by the steel tie-up and a con continued
tinued continued drop in farm income.

In a separate analysis on con consumer
sumer consumer goods, the survey noted
that an expansion of consumer
tTuying and a sharp rise in con consumer
sumer consumer goods output has been a
feature of the general business
recovery.
It said that by the early fall
of 1958, total production ot con consumer
sumer consumer goods had recovered fully
lrom the spring slump and had
advanced to a new high. The ex expansion,
pansion, expansion, it said, was widespread
among durable and non-rlurahle
goods.
The report said that while the
general price level has shown re relatively
latively relatively little change the chief
movement has been upward dur during
ing during the past four months.
Desapio Reelected
Chairman Of NY
County Committee
Desapio was reeelected county
criMirman Dy an overwn e I m l n g
voice vote at a noisy meeting of
the county's 3.328 denrnc r a t i c
committeemen. Desapio had clain clain-ed
ed clain-ed the sunnort of at least 1.900
committeemen.
The Tammany chief easily de defeated
feated defeated JTqrlem district leader J.
Ravmond Jones, nominee of Rep.
dam Clavton Powel and Lloyd
K. Garrison, a law partner of
Adlai S'ovpnson Garrison was
'he candidate of a reform groim
header' bv former Sen. Herbert
H china" Thomas K. Finlotter
and Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt.
l ; i i
Panama 22-B Street No.

Kline of Panama City are pic.

tured with their guests at a
dinner party given at their
residence. The social event
honored Mrs. Manuelita de
la Cuardia, wife of Panama's
ambassador to Uruguay, who
is visiting here.
Club Altamira's
Anniversary Dance
Seen As Success
The seventh anniversary dance
of Club Altamira, which was held
at Hotel El Panama Hilton Hotel
last Saturday evening, proved to
be a social success.
Hundreds of guests from Pana
ma City, Colon and the Canal
Zone, converged on the south pa-
io of the hotel for one ot tne
best dances sponsored by any
troup.
Featured as the anti-climax to
the anniversary celebration, the
dnce got underway at 9 p.m.
with ttaa musical chores being
taken care of by Willie Moro and
his "super" orcnestra. Al 1 a.m.
prizes given by a numoer of busi business
ness business firms including Almacen El El-ga,
ga, El-ga, Felix B. Maduro, Madurito,
Cigarrillos Panama, Zapateria E-
luuante, Angelini. the Cia. Pana Pana-mena
mena Pana-mena de Alimentos Lactea and
Muebleria Guillen was raffled.
Winners include Miss Eugenia
Henry, Norma Braithwaite, Jean
Cooper, Beverly Brown and Leti-
cia Williams, Wilfred Rawlins and
Donald Dillon.
Following the distribution of the
prizes, dancing continued until 5
a.m. to music by the Jets combo
All guests attending the anni
versary function received a card
to attend the "Pre Halloween Gra Gratification
tification Gratification Dance" on Oct. 3 at the
Casino Vina del Mar in San Fran Francisco.
cisco. Francisco. A slight charge will be made
for those who did not attend the
dance, a spokesman for the group
said, in order to allow the many
friends of the organization an op op-pnrtunity
pnrtunity op-pnrtunity to participate in the
pre-halloween festivity.
Spokesmen for the Club Alta Altamira
mira Altamira lauded the arrangements and
facilities which the hotel manage management
ment management made available to guests of
the Club during the dance.
'Pleasant Sunday
Afternoon' Planned
At Christ Church
A "Pleasant Sunday Afternoon"
has been scheduled for Sunday,
at 3:30 by the junior branch of
the Girl Friendly Society of
Christ Church by the Sea. Colon.
This organization, the smallest
in the Parish, Is supporting Mar Mar-cela
cela Mar-cela Doyen, the smallest candidate,
for queenly honors, in a rally of
the West Indies Federation.
Music, both vocal and instru instrumental,
mental, instrumental, will be featured. Artists
fiom the Christ Church Choir
Guild, the Junior Choir, and other
local talent, will be among those
participating.

12-83 Tel. 2-06-70 (Facing Palaclo tegislativb) Col6n. No.

L

RFfFIVIMr MNP and IV,rs John R- Wr'Bht Jr- at right, welcome guests at a tea dance in their-honof
KCV.EIVINV1 LINE at the p0rt Kobbe Officers Club. The event was the first social affair of the season spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the Kobbe Officers Wives Club. Receiving with the Wrights are Capt. and Mrs. James Dickson, here Intro,
ducing Lt. and Mrs. Edwin Dodd and Lt. and Mrs. Leo McCoff.

w
I r ...1 i n -fei m.m a a I

ENJOYING THE REFRESHMENTS

Chester Tuckerman and Mrs.

o

HMsNMWMSl MHSJSMSMSIISMSMMSJSMSiSSite NNSBMMtMSMP MSMWSMSISJibA iimii ii hi i i ii SMSMlMSMSISk.

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Among the
were, from

Thomas M. B. Hick III. (Army Photos).

EUROP

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officers and their ladies attending the Kobbe tea danc
left, Lt. Col. and Mrs. Thomas MacDonald, Mai. and Mrs.

" JjKt

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ttum m



WIDXtSDAT, 1ETTEMBEK tt, 1SSI

tn PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDmNDENT DAILT XXWttATDI
SIYIN
LAN COM E

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AAAAHHD MIB DDHrDAM Silver was the theme of the season's first meeting for the Fort Amador Of.
AfVlAUUK ILUD rKUviKAVl f jCers Wives Club. Before luncheon, members and guests had an opportunity
o view a collection of attractive silver pieces which represented designs created in many different countries. From
eft are Mrs. Chester Tuckerman, Mrs. Thomas J. McDonald Jr., Mrs. Robert W. Nelson and Mrs. Howard A. Smith.
(Army Photd).

BiMiiiiiiiiiifraiwiiHuuijwiMiiLiMiMiiiwMiw in iiiiiii iiwii'iiii iiniiiiinriijiiMnn iiiiiin iiiiiiiii ii inn i iniiiiimwiiiiii 'nun

PANAMA BEAUTY
Lovely Caroline Aurora Te.
ran, lovely Panamanian lass
now living in California, is
crowned queen of the Pacific
festival in San Diego. The
regal honor is bestowed by
last year's queen, Miss Elvia
Aguilar, as festival president
John Quimby looks on.
(Photo by San Diego Union)

liillililif w tlflf-A Vs jltf&ji if ?tHfl

"-iTff.m

AT TUC DIIMrU DAAI CaP' James H- Dick9on Jr- presides at the punch bowl while his wife, president
Al lilt rUriV.n DUWL 0f the Fort Kobbe Officers Wives Club, chats with Col. John R. Wright Jr.,
obbe post 60.. imander, and Mrs. Wright.

Naturally...
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No. 82-06
Central Art.

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Tivoli Ave.

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Faltering Philip!

Philip's lift l filled with bruises.

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830 Xa. fianamd 1090 Jfa. frldn



PAGE EIGHT

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AX IXPtPEHDEMT DAILY XZWfTAFEB
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER SS, M5t
White Sox Are 4In Braver Seem

On Me vlCai
. , , ...... ,' ...v

Chicago Clinches First
AL Pennant In 40 Years;
Milwaukee Takes NL Lead

By MILTON RICHMAN
NEW YORK, Sept. 23 (UPI) The Chicago
White Sox are in" and the neighboring Milwaukee
Braves may be joining them soon to set up modern modern-day
day modern-day baseball's closest approach to the old-time niekei
World Series.

It costs only $2 31 (tax includ included)
ed) included) to travel by bus from Chica Chicago
go Chicago to Milwaukee, about 85 miles
away, and that path looks more
arid more like the one fins will
be shuttling on during World Se Series
ries Series time.
The While Sox did their part by
tUinching their first American
League pennant in 40 years with
a 1-2 victory over the Indians last
night, and the Braves took a big
step in the same general World
Series direction when they def rat rated,
ed, rated, the Pirates, 5-3. to move a full
gahie ahead in the N a t mnal
League.
There were several standouts in
the White Sox clincher.
Af -Smith and Jim Rivera sup supplied
plied supplied the muscla with sixth in inning
ning inning homers. Early Wynn, who
won his 21st game, and Bob
Shaw held the battling Indians
In tow over the first 8 1-3 in innings.
nings. innings. Then when Cleveland loaded the
bases in the ninth, sinkerballer
Gerry Staley sauntered in from
the bullpen, delived one pitch
and got Vic Power to hit into a
game-ending double play.
It Was a sweet triumph for Al
Lopez, who had finished second
the past four years, twice as man manager
ager manager of the Indians and last
two years with the White Sox. But
It was a bitter defeat for Joe Gor Gordon
don Gordon of the Indians, who officially
left the club as manager the in instant
stant instant the final out was made.
Pitching coach Mel Harder will
lead the Tribe In their remaining
four games.
The Braves victory over the
j -te; rro'"d them a game a a-head
head a-head of the Dodgers and two, in
front of the fading Giants, The
Cardinals knocked the Dodgers
out of a first-place tie by beatinj
them, 11-10, and the Cubs downed
the Giants, 5-4. The Phillies swept
a twi-nighter from the Reds, 3-1
and 3-2.
Southpaw Juan Pizarro, credit credited
ed credited with his sixth victory, helped
the Braves as much with his bat
as! he did with his pitching arm.
Ordinarily a weak hitter, Pizarro
blooped a two-run double just in inside
side inside the left field foul line to high highlight
light highlight a three-run seventh inning
rally against loser Harvey Had Had-dix.
dix. Had-dix. Pizarro yielded only six hits
during the eight innings he
worked and Don McMahon yield yielded
ed yielded two more in the ninth. Del
Crandall hit his 21st homer for
Milwaukee, which now can
clinch at least a tie for the pen pennant
nant pennant bv winning three of its
four remaining games.
The Dodgers went down fight fighting.
ing. fighting. Rookie Frank Howard's pinch
thfee-run homer in the ninth drew
them to within one run of the Car Cardials
dials Cardials but reliever Lindy McDan McDan-ielgot
ielgot McDan-ielgot Junior Gilliam on an infield
out to wind up the struggle. Walt
Ateton tried everything, including
nijie pinch hitters, which set a
major league record.
Hal Smith hit a grand slam
homer in the first innin
and Curt
Flood hit a two-run
five-run third inning
homer in a,
rally by St.
Lfjuis. Gil Hodges homered
one on for the Dodgers.
witli
Austin looks years
New swift line, new

11X4 JJ iA m& idJ

f t
Itf r Tfanrrni i1iAV- ' -

' Th4 ntw Austm Ahh Cnmhndge Mk. U is now ti our
1 ibowroom.
Here art njeu jtwH and flqitrtg nnut it :
Vw tipek tin dmgneH lv Pinin Kunna. Hoom for fivo in
oomfori. Giant hoot. Uk nil th family iukjzbh. All
found unwwfcrioievi vipw for th driver. 4-pped Kftirhnx
with ithw l4wririff column or central floor pflr rlitin-.

1 litre 4-ryltniW enfrnw 1 1
Com and fe the car, exfilorr
fxdi in for a Jrer triU run.
speed
ird'f

C. Z. $2,075
CYKNOS,

(IA.

EDIFICIO CYRNOS
FRANGIPANI RT

Rookie George Altaian's two two-run
run two-run homer with two out in the
ninth sunk the Giants. Altman's
game-winning homer came cf
thp Giants' 20-game winner, Sam
Jones, who was working in relief.
Jim Marshall also hit a two-run
homer for the Cubs. Reliever Don
Elston scored his ninih victory.
Jim Owens won his 12th game
for the Phillies when he stop stopped
ped stopped the Reds on five hits in the
opener and winner Humberto
Robinson and Jack Meyer com combined
bined combined to hold Cincinnati to three
hits in the nightcap. Robinson
aided his own cause by hitting a
double and scoring one run.
In the American League, the

Yankees beat the Senators, 8 4;
the Red Sox nipped die Orioles,
4 3, and the Tigers topped the
Athletics 6-4.
Art Ditmar checked the .Sena .Senators
tors .Senators on six hits in gaining his 13th
win tor the yanks. rive Wash Washington
ington Washington errors helped Ntw York to
four unearned runs.
Pete Runnels' triple and Dick
Gernert's single in the seventh in
ning broke a 3-3 tie between Bos
ton and Baltimore. Frank Sulli Sullivan
van Sullivan was the winner and Skinny
Brown the loser.
Harvey Kuenn's three-run homer
powered Detroit to its victory
over Kansas City. Jim Bunning
hurled 5 1-3 innings, enough to
earn him his 17th victory. Rookie
Ken Johnson was the loser.
Champagne Flows
In Windy City
After Clincher
CHICAGO, Sept. 23-(UPI)-The
victory jag went on all night and
into the dawn in the horn-blowing,
siren-sounding windy city today.
From the "world's busiest cor corner"
ner" corner" at State and Madison, where
some young celebranls were ush ushered
ered ushered into a paddy wagon, to the
far suburbs and beyond, this was
the day to remember.
This was the proud day aftei
the glorious night when the White
Sox brought the American League
pennant, the first in 40 years, to
the folks back home. A few of the
oldsters remembered that che last
one was won by a team which
later became the "Black Sox,"
but who cares about 'hat gang 40
years ago?
The cork popped, emotionally
jand physically, at 9:43 p m. last
night, when the Sox clinched the
pennant at Cleveland.
Out came Chicagoans. from the
bars and homes and clubs whore
they had clustered by radios and
watched TV screens. The glare of
headlights brightened the streets.
Champagne bubbled in the far
north suburbs. Beer cans and bot bottles
tles bottles were waved aloft on the South
Side, where some old folks could
recall how that some members of
that former wnnant-winnins team
threw a World Series
'ti back in 1919.
!o Cincinna
ahead with the
uncrowded comfor
(ivi-r 75 iliN.
it 'J'fJrphottr,
S.
A.

A UfVS. IMS

LEADING
HITTERS

National League
G AB R H Pet.
Aaron, Mil.
Cun'ham, S. L.
Cepeda, S. F.
Pinson, Cinci.
Boyer, St. L.
Temple, Cinci.
Robinson, Cin.
Mathews, Mil.
Mays. S. F.
Banks, Chica.
White. St. L.
148 607 114 217 .357
140 448 65 157 .350
147 592 90 187 .316
152 639 127 201 .315
146 553 86 174 .315
147 589 100 183 .311
146 540 106 168
142 570 112 176
147 561 117 171
151 573 93 173
139 517 77 156
311
309
305
302
302
American League
Kuenn. Detroit 132 544 98 194 .357
Kaline, Detroit 132 497 82 162 .326
Runnels. Bos. 144 548 93 172 .314
Fox, Chicago 153 619 83 189 .305
Minoso, Cleve. 147 566 92 172 .304
Tuttle K. C. 126 463 74 139 .300
Woodling, Bal. 139 436 63 131 .300
Rich'son. N.Y. 130 453 51 134 .296
Cerv K. C. 120 443 58 130 .293
Power Cleve. 146 592 102 172 .291
Runs Batted Tn
National League
Banks, Cubs "9
Robinson, Reds 125
Aaron Braves 121
Bell. Reds "2
Mathews, Braves 109
American League
Colavito, Indians 109
Jensen, Red Sox ... 106
Killebrew, Senators 101
Lemon, Senators 99
Maxwell, Tigers 93
Home Runs f
National League.
Banks, Cubs 43
Mathews, Braves 43
Aaron, Braves 39
Robinson, Reds 3.6
Mays, Giants 31
American League
Colavito, Indians 41
Killebrew, Senators 40
Lemon, Senators 33
Mantle. Yankees 31
Maxwell, Tigers 30
LEADING
PITCHERS
(Based on 18 or more decisions)
National League
w L
Face, Pirates 18 1
Law, Pirates . .... 18 9
Antonelli. Giants 19 10
Podres, Dodgers ... 14 8
Conley, Phillies .... 12 7
Pet.
.947
.667
.655
.636
.632
American League
Shaw, White Sox
McLish, Indians
Wynn, White Sox
Mossi, Tigers
Maas, Yankees
17 6
19 8
21 10
16 9
14 8
.739
.704
.677
.640
.636
Dykes Predicts
Tigers Will Be
Contenders In 60
By DON FERMOYLE
DETROIT (UPI) Jimmie
Dvkes rehired as manager of the
Detroit Tigers for 1960, promptly
lit up one of his trademark cigars
and from behind the cloud of
smoke predicted his club will be
a pennant contender next year.
Dykes, his 62 years 42 of them
in baseball considerably lightened
by the contract signing Monday,
saw things in line smoke clouds
that weren't so discernable to his
watching audience.
"I think we have the stuff to
go all the way," said the newly
signed little manager. "We'll have
to pick no a shortstop and a lirst
baseman' Pressed a bit, Dykes
added that he wants to strength strengthen
en strengthen the benciii and he'll need more
consistent relief pitching.
It was Dykes' turn to be con confident
fident confident although Detroit in the
past two years heard almost the
same words irom departed man managers
agers managers Jack Tighe and Bill Nor Norman.
man. Norman. The signing of Dykes Monday
ended several weeks of specula speculation
tion speculation about whether the veteran of
the Connie Mack era would be
rehired or if the Tigers would bid
for anodher "name" manager.
This speculation grew last week
after Joe Gordon announced he
was quilling the Cleveland In Indians.
dians. Indians. But General manager Kick Fer Fer-rell
rell Fer-rell said Monday that no one ex except
cept except Dykes had been considered
for the 1960 field job.
COACH TO BE HONORED
FAYKTTE, Iowa (UPI)-ur.
John Dorman, llhe 81-year-old
head football coach at Upper Iowa
University for 56 years, will be
honored at the halflime intermis intermission
sion intermission of the Oct .1 game with
Wailburg. A special program, in including
cluding including a performance by march marching
ing marching tands, will highlight the festivities.

Bourne Bombs The
Falls Short Against

BOWLING TROPHY Curly Bates, Secretary of the Balboa
Men's Bowling League, presenting Summer League sponsors
trophy tp Mrs. Carlos de Janon, wife of the manager of Tivoli
Travel Agency, sponsor of the winning team.

Oddsmakers Tab LSU, SMU,
Sooners, Notre Dame, Auburn,
Ohio State Saturday Favorites

NEW YORK TJPI)( 81ouisiana
State, Oklahoma, Notre Dame,
Southern Methodist, Ohio State
and Auburn yesterday were tab tabbed
bed tabbed as the favorites for six of Sat Saturday's
urday's Saturday's key college football games,
The oddsmakers made Lou Louisiana
isiana Louisiana State, the defending nation national
al national champion, an 8-point choice to
defeat Texas Christian, the de defending
fending defending Southwest Conference
champion. This is a night game
at Baton Route, La.
Oklahoma, prennial Big Eight
champion was made a 5V4 point
choice for its interseictional na nationally
tionally nationally televised (NBCt 315 p.m.
e.d.t.) feature against Northwest Northwestern
ern Northwestern at Evanston, 111. In another
big midwestern intersectional
clash, coach Joe Kuharich's Notre
Dame team is a 3-point favorite
to whip North Carolina in its sea season
son season opener at South Bend, Ind.
DUKE IS UNDERDO
Duke also carries southern foot-
Absent Butch Garrett
Wins Summit Hills
Ringer Tournament
Although unable to play the last
two weeks of the tournament
Butch Garret's gross score of 65
was good enough to take home
first place in the Summit Hills
Golf and Country Cluh Ringer
Tournament completed this past
week end.
Butch returned to her studies in
first place prize of a set of silver
the states, but still copped the
candlesticks.
Low net honors went to Velta
Sharp with a net 51, with Fave
Day trailing by one stroke. Polly
Zone was in third place at net 58,
while Wilma Riley was fourth
wi)h a net 60.
Summit will be hosts to all Isth Isthmian
mian Isthmian golfers this Saturday when
they stage their regular monthly
mixed scotch foursome. Tee off
times has been set for 1:00 p.m.
The new No. 1 and No. 2 ladies'
tees will be used.
There will be a barbecued steak
dinner-party at 6.30 p.m. at $1.50
per person. All golfers and non non-golferc
golferc non-golferc are invitPd. Orchestra mu music
sic music will be presented at 8 p.m.
The tournament committee has
announced that a rincer tourna tournament
ment tournament for the men will get under underway
way underway this week-end at Summit. En En-trv
trv En-trv fep will be $1, which will en entitle
title entitle the golfer to plav as many
times as he cares to in trying to
lower his ringer score. All Sum Summit
mit Summit golfers, men that is are urged
to enter this tournament. Nine
hole scores will be accepted.
REVITALIZE
your GLANDS
If you feel old before your time or
suffer from nerve, brain or physical
weakness, you will find happiness and
health in a new American Laboratory
method which retoie youthful vigour
and vitality, it 1 a simple home treat treatment
ment treatment In tablet form prepared by an
American Laboratory and la very easy
to take. It acta directly on your
glands, nerves and vital organs, and
works so well' you can see and few
new bodily power and vigour In a
ahort time. Becaune of Its natural ac action
tion action on (lands and nerves your brain
power and memory often Improve
notably.
This new gland and vigour restorer
called Vl.Tabs haS' Jieen ted and
proved In the United States and la
nw availnble at all Urflifatbpes here.
0t VI. Tabs table-u from yonr drm-
f l.it toilav, put them to test and set
he blB Improvement. Take the full
bottle, which lasts eight days. It will
make vou full of vhrmir, energy and
vitality, and you will feel yar
rounder. The large sUe whiota lasts Is
ays la very oonomioal

- riltM- J

ball prestige into the Midwest and
is a 10-point underdog against
Ohio. Southern Methodist plays
Georgia Tech and is a 6-pbint
choice for the game at Atlanta.
Auburn, unbeated in its last 24
starts, is a 6V4 point favorite to
open its campaign with a victory
over Tennessee at Knoxville,
Tenn.
In Friday night's two top
games, Southern California is fa favored
vored favored over Pittsburgh by IVi
points and Miami is favored over
Tulane by 4.-
All Uiree service academies, are
favored Saturday games. Army
is favored over Boston College by
20 points and Navy is a SVi point
choice to down William and Mary.
The Air Force Academy is fa favored
vored favored over Wyoming by 4 points.
In other eastern games, Dart Dartmouth
mouth Dartmouth is favored over Holy Cross
by 5 points, Syracuse over Kansas
by 12Vi Brown over Columbia by
6V4, Princeton over Rutgers by 4
and Cornell over Colgate by 7V4.
CLEMSON GETS NOD
Clemson is favored over Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia by 20, Mississippi over
Kentucky hv 7 rnroi. r.t,a- rn
" ., vjvv.g.a VYti V a"-
derbilt by 6V4, Wake Forest over
Virginia lecn Dy 7, and Florida
over Mississippi State by 12 in
sonthern games.
In other miHwActpm nf,,...
Michigan State is favored over
Texas A and M ,by 14, Michigan
over Missouri by 7 Wisconsin
over Stanford by 19, Minnesota
over Nebraska by 10 and Indiana
is rated even with Illinois.
In the Soutihwest, Texas, u fa favored
vored favored over Maryland by 'Ar 'Arkansas
kansas 'Arkansas over Oklahoma State by
13Mi. Texas Tech nvor rw
State by-4, and Alabama pyefi
iunaiwu uy a. an tne f ar .West,
Iowa is favored over California
by 10 ,and Colorado over Bavlor
by 7.
JC To 2-Platoon
Opponents Friday
In Grid Jamboree
For the first time in the history
of the Canal Zone Junior College
a two olatoon system will be
used. The r?vils will field an of offensive
fensive offensive unit and n defensive unit.
THs will nermit nn frrouo of
Dlavers to rest while their cohorts
are giving their all on the gridiron
turf.
Offensively the Green and White
wiil have Gene Burch and Russ
Favorite at the tackle posts, Har Harry
ry Harry Keepers and Gary Alexander
at the terminals. Georpe Trimble
and Jarir Willonghbv at the
"uards. Charlie Laat7 at renter
and Joe Reynolds Billy Gibson,
Frank I.eves and Pete Corrigan
is backs.
Defnsivelv the Devils use John
En"elk and Dan Jsnkins at the
ends. Tom Ashton and Jack Wil Wil-louphhy
louphhy Wil-louphhy at the tackles' Bill Kirk Kirk-land
land Kirk-land and Ben Thomas at the
suardg with Gary Alexander, Haf Haf-ry
ry Haf-ry Keepers George Trimble. Gene
Burdh and Rus Favorite operat operating
ing operating in the secondary.
Although this may not be a true
two platoon system It does permit
adeouate rpst for the J C: back back-field
field back-field ace and does not require
inv member of the squad to go
bo'ti wv! a the same position.
Snot substitutions will also me
mad frnm Ihp nennhvlfta nn the

JC squari that include Lou
jSnrauv. Fred MoKrn7'i. Andy
IFranginni. John mw Lane
Thompson, and Bill Millett

Bantams,
Feathers

Mauling Melvin Bourne, the
former bantamweight chimp who
murders the top 118-pounderi but
has had little success against the
ranking featherweights, takes on
featherweight Roberto MuriUo in
126-pound ten-rounder at the
Olympic Stadium Sunday night. ,.
in recent years Bourne has run
roughshod over the best local ban
tams. His victims have included
Claudio Martinez. Toto Ibarra,
Hector Hicks and 118-pound king
dwin Sykes.
But whenever Melvin has faced
outstanding feather like Redol Redol-fo
fo Redol-fo Francis, former 126-peund
monarch Itidre Martinet and
the- present champ Jesus Santa Santa-maria,
maria, Santa-maria, the story has been differ different.
ent. different. In Murillo Bourne admittedly
may not be meeting the most de
vastating of the featherweight con
tenders. But he definitely will be
up against a fast-moving, ring ring-wise
wise ring-wise and colorful fighter who
boxes and hits with equal facility
and who is the possessor of a
great fighting heart.
mm
MELVIN BOURNS
Murillo, always known for his
boxing prowess, showed clearly
that he also packs a wicked punch
when he dropped 135-pound cham champion
pion champion Jorge Quintero in the eighth
round of a bout in which Murillo
lost a disputed decision at the Na National
tional National Gym -last June.
In the supporting bouts en the
program drawn up by promoter
Egbert (Champion) Raid, un unbeaten
beaten unbeaten Carles Wilson, a winner
of eight straight battles, engag engages
es engages Ray Best in a six-round semi semifinal
final semifinal at a weight limit of 121
. pounds.
Constantino Diaz swaps punches
with .tough, deatmute San Bias
Indian Arias Mendez and in the
four -round curtain raiser Eligio
Pontiles clashes with Ben McCree
at a weight limit of 122 pounds.
Swim Club Dubbed
Coco Solo Sharks
the formation of a new swim swimming
ming swimming club for Coco Sob took place
on Tuesday at Coco Solo Pool. The
membering 'body unanimously e e-lected
lected e-lected Miss Judy Redmond, Canal
feZone swimming ace as their first
president. Miss Louise R u s s o n
was voted to act as vice-president.
The name "Coco Solo Sharks"
fwas officially adopted. The club
is being sponsored by the Division
of Schools, and is under the direc direction
tion direction of the Department of Physi Physical
cal Physical Education and Athletics.
It was annonm erl at the meet.
ing that a "Canal Zone Mile As
sociation" had been formed for
natrnns nf the Cnon Snln Pnnl Inn
nersfln reirarrllrct nt a 0a Hii-in
s
10 oo so couia Deiong to tne aso aso-ciation
ciation aso-ciation by accomplishing a mile mile-lone
lone mile-lone swim f.lfi lans of the Xfl-vard
pool ).
Members' names would be af affixed
fixed affixed on the honorary list of mil mil-ers
ers mil-ers and each would be awarded
a certificate of merit for the ac accomplishment.
complishment. accomplishment. Members of the
"Shark Club" will in addition re receive
ceive receive a certificate of merit for
one-quarter and one half mi'e
swims in accordance with their
own particular age groups.
"The Sharks" agreed to procure
club emblems to he worn on their
bathing suits or sweat shirts. Ar Arrangements
rangements Arrangements will be made to this
effect.
The cluh will meet again on
Tuesday, September 22 at 4:00
o.m. at the pool to formulate plans
for the comine school year. New
members interested in the sport
of swimming are invited to at attend.
tend. attend. No dues are to be charged
and there will be no requirements
in regards to swimming ability
other than- the possession rt a
green swimming pool identifica identification
tion identification earrL
JOCKEY SCORES TRIPLE
MAYS LANDING. N.J. (UPD (UPD-Smmy
Smmy (UPD-Smmy Boulmetis had threr
winners ? Atlanta Cl'v Mondnv
in.-luding Weather Proohet in the
featured fix furlon sorint. He
also scored o Pe'ix Arabia
r7.20) and Golden Wedding
($21.20). Weather Prophet re returned
turned returned $5.88.

I

8 ln..- 'I : -o-x.

Editor: CONRADO SARCEAffT,

National, Leagiin ;
TIAMl : ." ui""",':
Milwaukee . 14
Lea Alleles U 7 J53 1
San Francisco : II M J47 J.
Pirtiburah n h n wu.
Chlcaje 72 71 Mi ft
Cincinnati v. 71 So .474 13
St. Louis ... f tV .440 II
Philadelphia 43 It .417 21
maw.
Today'a Gaines
San Francisco at';Chicago
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh (N)
Los Angele at St. LouirlN)
Only games echeduled.
Yesterday's Result.
Milwaukee inn nm aa i
Pittsburgh 000 010 020 S S 1
Pizarro (-2), McMahon and
Crandall.
Haddix (12-12), Face and Bur
gess. 1
San Francisco Oil 000 0204 o l
Chicago 200 010 002 S 13 1
Sanford. McCormick. S Jnnex
(20-15) and Landrith, Hegan.
Hillman, Elston (9-8) and S.
Taylor.
(Night Game)
Los Angelea 312 001 00310 14 2
St. Louis 405 020 OOx 11 14 1
Koufax, Churn (3-21. Labine.
Williams, Kipp, McDevitt and
Roseboro, Pignatano, N. Sherry.
Jackson. Bndses (6-3). McDan-
iel and Smith.
(Twilioht Gamal
Cincinnati 000 000 0011 5 0
Philadelphia 000 010 20x 3 8 0
Pefia (5-9), O'Toole and Bailey.
Owens (12-12) and Sawatski.
(Nioht Game)
Cincinnati 000 200 000 I S 0
Philadelphal 000 010 20x S S
Purkev (12-18). Brosnan and
Dotterer, Bailey.
Robinson (2-4). Mever and Lon-
nett, Thomas.

A Look At The 1959
Jamboree Teams

JUNIOR COLLEGI
GREEN DEVILS
Coach-Stu Brown
Offense-Gap-L
Lettermen-7
Season's Prospetts
For the first time in over seven
yesrs the Big Green will be able
to function with two balanced
teams. Coach Brown will have a
veteran line to work with; in
Keepersand Alexander at Ends,
Favorite and Burch at Tackles,
Trimble and Willougby at Guards,
and Gibson, Reynolds, Corrigan,
and Leves in the Backfield.
Forecast
Look for a good running game,
mixed With long passing from Gib Gibson.
son. Gibson. Barring injuries, this team
could win the Jamboree and in:
terscholastic season.
CRISTOBAL TIGERS
Coaches-Dave Ingram and Louis
Deddaux
Offense-Single wing (Balanced
line)
Lettermenl-1
Season's Prespcts
Cristobal, looks set in the lihe-
with an All-Lettermen group from
tackle to tackle, Tompkins who
was injured last year before the
season started, will help at one
end. The weak spots will be in
the backfield in filling the positions
mat Rung and Humphrey made
famous last season. Right now,
it looks like McGloin, Jim Will,
Whittaker, and Cotton, forming the
backfield, with Vsldet, pushing
Will for the Tailback spot. Bruce,
Woodruff Lutz, Peterson, and
Palumbo, make-up a strong Nu Nucleus
cleus Nucleus in the Line.
Forecast
Defensive unit will be tough a a-gain,
gain, a-gain, but offense will have to a'how
some improvement in order to be
a constant threat. Passing and
backfield speed is questionable.
With breaks, could repat this
year.
BALIOA BULLDOGS
Coaches-Larry Herine and fcosi
Anderson
Offense-Single wing (unbalanc (unbalanced
ed (unbalanced line) V
Lettermn-10 v- ...
$oair's Prospects
The Red and White, seems to
be in a rebuilding year with a
squad of. seniors and sophomores.
Only four starters return to Coach
Horine, in his first year as head
coach jt Balboa. Scott, Cage, Ble Ble-vins,
vins, Ble-vins, French, and Tathegabef, a
good set of Backs will .give-opposing
Linemen truble au season.

America) Lesgrne

TIAMf
Chieaie
Cleveland
New York
Detroit
Ealtlmere
W
n
7
77
75
72
71.
i3.
L
n
u
71
7S
u
If
Pef. ei
.tn
.5.9 414
.513 14V,
.500 HVi
.480 lVi
.473 20Va
.423 28-'
.420 28Vk
Boston . rf
Kansas Cltjr
Washington .,
Today's Games
Kansas City at Detyoltv '-Y
New York at WashiBgtoa-(N)
Baltimore at Boston '
Only garnet scheduled.
Yesterday's liii.
Kansas (Sty 101 000 02QV4 T I
Detroit 003.1U OOx-i I
Joinaon (01), Herbert, Kutyna
and House, Smith.
Bunning (17-13), Burnsidel' Mo
gan and Berberet.
(Night Came)
Chicago 200 002 000-4 8 l
Cleveland 000 011 000 2' 11 a
Wynn (21-10), Shaw, Staley and
Romano, Battey, Lollar.
Perry (12-10), Grant, Bell,!;
Harshman and Nixon.
(Night Game)
New York 001 ost jnia ii a!
Washington 010 003 0004 SI
- Ditmar (13-9) and Berra,
Ramos (13-19), Hyde, Woodeg Woodeg-chick
chick Woodeg-chick and Korcheck.
(Night Game)
Baltimore 000 100 200 S 9 0
Boston 011 100 10x 4 10 0.
Wilhelm, Brown (10 9) and Tri-
andos, Ginsberg.
Sullivan (9-ljl), Chittum, Fori,
nleles and White.
Rent?, Price, Marshall, and Pajak
are experienced Linemen. ;
Forecast
Balboa, will have nlentv of aneed
fin the backfield, but interior Line
men will have to be found in order,
to give this team balance. Too"
much depends on inexperienced'
reserves.
ATHLETIC CLUB RAMS
Coaches-Bill Deiamlater, Bif"
Nickisher
Offense-Single wing
Season's Prospects
As usual, conditioning and prac practice,
tice, practice, will be the big question
marks of A.C future. From the
last reports, the 'Rams are lack-,'
ing in both above- phases, which
make suooessful teams. The Rami"
have several veterans returning
in Rankin Cicero, Fearon, and.
Fullerton. Also, on their roster will
be Ben Favorite, ex-army play play-er,
er, play-er, B. Meade and E. Sander. Both
are former prep players.
Forecast
i
' I
Line has experience, but offense
will need a boost. Passer and
Fullback will .be needed this year
Former American
League Homer King -Tilly
Walker Dies
tJNICOI, Tenn. (UPl)U"Funeral
arrangements were being made
today for Clarence William (Tilly)
Walker, 72, former American
League horn .run king, whose
body was found Monday at the
home of his brother.
Walker apparently died from
natural causes Sunday, according
to physicians. The body was found
by his brother W. F. Walker.
Walker was major leaguer for
13 years. He. broke into the mi-,
jors in 1911, and during his ca career
reer career played with. Washington, the,
old Philadelphia Athletics,' the old old-St.:
St.: old-St.: Louis Browns, and the Boston,,
Red .Sox. .. t ..
BROWNS R.ELEASE PLAYERS
CLEVELAND (dPUr-Offensiv"'
end Farrell Funston and defensivt,
halfback Dick Lebeau were re re-leased
leased re-leased by the Cleveland Browns,
Monday, getting the dub-down to
the 36 man player limit. Funston
is from the College of Pactfii
while Lebeau played hit collegiat
baU at Ohio Stata



(

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1959
THE FANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
PA6I MINI
.56" Tops First Weekly UPI Football Ratings

4 ,r

i

3 v?" HiiW-S i

THI5 WAY Toe Kuharich, Notre Dame's new head football
coach eives Capt. Ken Adamson pointers on a tackling dum dummy
my dummy Adamson will be right in the thick of ttnnw "rd.

I iy
JOE WILLIAMS

Looking babk, it seems incred incredible
ible incredible the Yankee command could
have debated even for a moment
whether to play Lawrence Peter
Berra back ol the plate or in the
outtield. Such a thought misht oc oc-tur
tur oc-tur to a sports writer, leaning se securely
curely securely on hindsight'. .but not to
a Joe DiMaggio.
"Keep in mind, Yogf was only
jO or so when he joined us,"
counseled the famed Clipper "A
natural ballpiyer, still in his form formative
ative formative stage, and pretty fast, he
could have made it at most any
position. And if he-looked bad in
the outfield it wasmosU pa ac account
count account of me.
Would the gentleman mind play playing
ing playing that one once more, with feel feeling.
ing. feeling. .and amplication?
"I think 1 overawed him. You
know I was supposed to be a hot hotshot
shot hotshot out there, so any time a ball
. was hit to. Aright center even when
it" was more, to right than center-.
Yogi would hesitate, waiting to
gee whether I wqnled to try for it.
"Rookies playing alongside old old-jtr
jtr old-jtr players are generally like that,
otjly Yogi was more so than most.
That's what I mean when I say I
handicapped him. He was afraid
he might be intruding, mess up a
play, in some way, embarrass me.
But don't never get the idea he
didn't, have what it takes."
The records are proof enough
Ihe Yankees' eventual decision to
play Berra back of trie plate was
no mistake, and it's in recognition
of his remarkable contributions as
a catcher, plus his .warni i perso personality
nality personality and immense popularity,
that he was honored by the fans
Saturday at the Stadium,
Still, it's interesting to speculate
ofi what might have happened jf
they had kept him in the outfield
altid made Sherm Lollar their
catcher. For one thing, they'd still
hava Lollar currently the big bat
and catching mainstay of the pen-nanl-bound
White Sox.
In those days the Yankee
catching situation was chaotic. In
the '47 World Series Bucky Harris
used three catchers, Berra, Lollar
and Aaron Robinson. -In one game
he pinch-hit Berra for Lollar, and
Yogi hit a home run, In two other
games he played Berra in right
field. In another game he ignored
him entirely.
IIGHT PASSED BALLS.
The unsettled condition persisted
through the following season. Gus
Niarhog was called up from the
Kansas City farm an official clas

Santa Cruz Sports

By CLAUDETTE B. JONES
(This column hop to inform
sports fans at loot one a wtk
of th sport happenings in th
Santa Croi community, o if
roadors hav an activity in
mind for your club, ploai cell
"Shaggy,'.' your roportor,)
BASKETBALL
Miss Matilda Yearwood, physic physical
al physical education teacher of Rainbow
City High School, was the honor
ed guest at Santa Cruz gymna gymnasium
sium gymnasium for the opening of the Mos Mosquito
quito Mosquito League on Monday of the
vacation week.
In the opening tilt Jose French's
Dust Bowl downed Robert Smith's
Candy Boys 15 to 8. In the sec second
ond second game of the evening Los La Latinos
tinos Latinos defeated Canada Dry 9 to
3'The Dragons also set back Par Par-ratlet
ratlet Par-ratlet 9 to 3 in the third and final
game of the day. These games
wtre played every afternoon at
1 p.m.
VOLLEYBALL
' y it a Cruz Civic Council,
, le s;-rport of the Division
c tcliools' physical education

sification at the time and if there
was a No. 1 catcher, the Greek
was it. Berra, witn eight passed
balls, was beginning to look more
and more like an outfielder to Har Harris;
ris; Harris; in fact, Harris piayed him in
right field a third of Me season.
Casey Stengel, the timeless
manager arrived the next season,
arid So did Berra, the full time
catcher.
From the beginning, Berra be-
From the tieginning, Berra be became
came became one of Siengel's most im im-"You
"You im-"You can become one of the
game's, greatest. What's more,
you. ca;n, make more iponey than
any" catcher ever:ncf Before. Now
you listen to me, boy, and we'll
both get rich together."
The boy must have listened. All
the Yankees got rich, or at least
much richer than they were. They
won nine of tlhe next 10 cfiampion-c
ships, with Berra catching 116 to
151 games a season, including
double-headers, hitting 20 to 30
homers batting in 100 or more
runs five times, four in a row,
and more often than not play playing
ing playing a major role in the Series.
The stubby, pleasant little guy,
with scarred face and curiously
soft, tender dark eyes, is a can't can't-miss
miss can't-miss to join another illustrious
Yankee catcher in the Hall of
Fme. Bill (Bird Dog) Dickey.
Maybe you remember him?

HIS LAST BIG FLING.
Yogi is closing out his 14th big big-league
league big-league season and obviously hasn t
many niore left. His last big one,
regular and Series, was in '50
when, in 140 games, he hit 30
homers drove in 105 runs, batted
.298 and then left Don Newcombe
and-the Dodgers for dead.
In the Series he had driven in
10 runs to set a record, hit three
homers, two off Newcombe in suc successive
cessive successive innings after he had two
strikes. The first off Newcombe
was on an ear-high pitch, the sec second
ond second on below-the-knee pitch. .
"I guess the umpire would have
called 'em balls," Berra laughed,
"but you know me any ball I
can see is a strike."
Yet Ole Case was more impres impressed
sed impressed witin Berra's catching. ."Se ."Seven
ven ."Seven games he catches and never
makes a mistake, never calls for
a wrong pitch, never gels shook
off even once by a pitcher. Call
it the greatest catching perform performance
ance performance lever saw.". .And, he might
have added, by one of the greatest
little guys our town ever saw.
branch inaugurated a colorful
women's Volleyball League on
Sept. 14 with four teams parti participating.
cipating. participating. Each- of the teams participating
are supported by community per per-sonel,
sonel, per-sonel, Front Square (Tappy Bug):
Church Square (Gay Crooners);
Dust Bowl (Butcher's salon tie
belleza); and Parrallel.
Results of games played during
the first week are as follows: Dust
Bowl 3 and 0; Church Square 1-2;
Parrallel 1-2; and Front Square
1-2. The league will continue to
offer exciting games on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays. All are
invited to come out and build the
spirit of the district which he or
she represents.
. SOFTBALL
John Small, chairman of the
Santa Cruz Working Mens' League
will be gled to meet with the re representatives
presentatives representatives On Saturday to lor lor-mulate
mulate lor-mulate plans for tlhe 1959-60 sea season.
son. season. .BASEBALL
Parents of boys' expecting
to

Oklahoma,
Wisconsin
Runnersup
By IARL WRIOHT
NEW YORK (UPI) The Louis
iana State Tigers, defending na national
tional national colleee football champions,

topped the first weekly coLege
football ratings of the United
Press International Board of
Coaches today by a big margin.
The Tigers, who opened their
1959 campaign Saturday with a
26-3 victory over the Rice Owla,
wert selected first by 28 of the 35
eoacnes who will rate ine majoi
schools each week for UPI.
Three teams which do not be begin
gin begin their seasons until next Satur
day and Southern California, a
27-6 victor over Oregon State last
Saturday night received the oth other
er other first-place votes. Oklahoma re received
ceived received three and Iowa two whiie
Wisconsin and Southern California
each drew one.
SOONER WERE SECOND
Coaoh Bud Wilkinson's Okla-
home. Sooners were placed sec second
ond second to the Tigers. Wisconsin and
Ohio State, both Big Ten teams,
were placed 3 4. Mississippi,
Army, Auburn, Texas, Clemson
and Iowa rounded out the top 10
group in that order. Of the se select
lect select 10. only LSU, Mississippi,
Texas and Clemson have opened
their 1959 campaigns.
With points distributed on
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-21 basis for votes
from first through 10th places,
coach Paul Dietzers LSU team re re-i
i re-i ceived a total of 327 points. Thus
tie Tigers were only 23 points off
the maximum possible total of
350.
Oklahoma received 211 Wiscon
sin 131, Ohio State 114; Mississip Mississippi
pi Mississippi 106, Army 97; Auburn 93, Texas
90, Clemson 87 and lowa 74.
SMU HEADED SECOND TIN
Of the first week's top 10, Lou
isiana State, Oklahoma, Iowa,
Army, Auburn Wisconsin and
Ohio State finished in the nnai
top 10 of the 1958 season.
Southern Methodist headed the
second 10 group with 71 points.
It was followed in order by South Southern
ern Southern California, Navy, Northwest Northwestern,
ern, Northwestern, Texas Christian, Purdue,
Penn Stafe, Georgia, Maryland
and Georgia Tech.
A total of 31 teams received
votes in the first week's ballot
ing. The others receiving points
were California, Pittsburgh, South
Carolina Notre Dame, UCL.A,
Florida, Oregon, Syracuse, Michi
gan State, Air Force Academy and
North Carolina State.
300 Bowler
llllflf
-4
TONY LUTTINBERGER
Last Thursday night during a
practice session in the Balboa
Men's Winter Bowling League's
first bowling meet at the Balboa
Bowling Center, Tony LuUenberg
er racked up the 4th. 300 perfect
game rolled in the Canal Zone.
Some years ago Lou Zebrock
bowled a 300 in a practice ses session,
sion, session, also at Balboa. Although To Tony's
ny's Tony's 300 was not bowied in reg
ular ABC League play, he will
receive full recognition in
local howling annuals along with
Zebrock.
In ABC history, there have on only
ly only been three perfect 300 games
rolled outside the U.S.A. The first
perfect 300 was bowled in 1943 by
Bud Balcer at the Diablo Bowling
tenter on lanes 3 and 4. The sec second
ond second came in 1944 and was turn turned
ed turned in by a U.S. Navy member,
Joe Millay, at Port au Spain, Tri Trinidad.
nidad. Trinidad. The third was hit on Feb. 21st.,
1958, by Jose Damian, at the Dia Diablo
blo Diablo Bowling Center, on the same
lanes 3 and 4 that Balcer hit his
300.
All of the Canal Zone bowlers
and Tony's many friends join in
congratulating him in this out outstanding
standing outstanding bowling feat and in plac placing
ing placing his name in the Canal Zone's
Bowling Hall of Fame.
take part in Little Leagua and
Farm League baseball in 1960
season are reminded that it is
time for placing order with th
commissary for gloves and shoes.
Look for this column next week.
Bye now.
TO RGB SON NAMED COACH
WASHINGTON (UPI) Lavern
Torgeson an eight-year veteran
of the National Football League,
has been named an assistant
coach by the Washington Red Redskins.
skins. Redskins. Torgeson, a linebacker, an announced
nounced announced his retirement Monday,
cutting the Redskins rosier to 37,'
one over the limit.

F 3 Apr
i

or

LATIN AMERICA
SCHOOL HAGUE
ALB ROOK AIR
FORCE BASE.
Team Standings
Cerveia Balboa
La Mascota
Gulf price
Marlboro
Ci. America S.A.
Volkswagen
Cyrca Free Zone
Mercuri
Won Lost
19Vi 8Vi
17 n
16 12
13Mi 14Vi
13 15
13 15
10 18
9 19
By HENRY L. HIRVBY
CERVEZA BALBOA
CYRCA FREE IONB 1
After a rugged night of bowling
the Beermen managed to stay in
first place. The first game was
won by the Free Zoners in the
proverbial last frame Chavez
came through 20 pins over his
average and helped win the game
by 3 pins.
In th second, the Beermen let
loose with everything they had ind
literally manhandled the Free
Zoners into submission. They won
it bv 90 oins.
In the last game, Cyrca again
took charge of the situation and
came very near to getting even
with Cerveceeros, as it was they
took the same by 73 pins unfortu
nately not enough to claim total
Dins. Hi2h series lor terveza ai
boa were rolled by Serna 457, and
Garcia 384. For Cyrca Taylor had
a 409 and Michael a 402 series.
LA MASCOTA I, MBRCURIO 1
Checking the records I found
that w have a bit of creeping
something or other in the league.
For the past 4 weeks. L.a Masco
t h been comine up the lad
der one step per week, this week
they are in second place and they
did it by taking I points from
Mercurio.
The first game was won by the
haberdashers by 37 pins. In the
second the Jewelers woke up and
scared the heck out of the Cus
tom Tailors. However La Mascota
still claimed it by 7 pins.
In the third game Mercurio ac
cented no arguments from La Mis
cota who by this time were like
mad to save the fourth point,
Well they saved it. The best for
the Tailors were Davila with a 414
series and Shaffer with a 396. For
the "Jewelerr, urkinf hid a 401
serits and Di Paulo rolled a 374.
CULFSPRIDE 1
VOLKSWAGEN 1
Like I said a eoupl a week ago,
competition in this league is
rough, we haven't had a clean
sweep for a month and in order
to win 2 point you hav to do some
fancy bowling. Such was the case
with these 2 teams. Considering
their averages, they had good ser
ies and yet all they could was take
two points each.
Leading the Wildcatters were
Martinez with a 460 series and Mi
randa with a 441. For the Carmen
Larrazabal rolled a 406 and Tib
lier a 381.
MARLBORO I,
CIA AMERICA S. A. 1
After losing th first game to
the hardwaremen by 61 pins, the
Castro Cheers
Arroyo To Win
Over Richmond
HAVANA, Sept. 23 (UPI)-Luls
Arroyo, a maior league failure,
wound up as the biggest hero, in
the Cuban Sugar Kings' surpising
victory over the Richmond Vir
ginians in the final round of the
International Lea gu playoffs.
The stubby relief pitcher turned
in another remarkable perform performance
ance performance last night at tlhe Sugar Kings
edged Richmond, 1-0, to clinch the
bestof-seven series, four games
to two.
With Prlm-ar Minister FWol
Castre a former cello pitcher pitcher-cheering
cheering pitcher-cheering htm on, Arroyo blank
ed the Virginians on on hit af after
ter after relieving startoe! Raul San San-chei
chei San-chei in the sixth inning.
It was his third "save" of the
series. He won the first game in
relief and raved a victory for Ted
Wieand in the fourth game.
The Sugar Kings bunched three
of .their four hits in the second
inning when they scored the
games only run. With one out,
Ray Seharer beat out an infield
grounder and scored on successive
singles by Leo Cardenas and En Enrique
rique Enrique Izquierda.
Havana next will meet th
winner of the Amerleen Assocle Assocle-tien
tien Assocle-tien playoffs In the Little WerM
Series. MinneepeMs an) Fort
Worth er 'eia'leekod at 1-1 In
th A.A. final.
FORTY-NINERS PARI DOWN
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) Th
San Francisco. Forty Nlners oared
down to within one of the Na
tional Football League player lim limit
it limit of 36 today when the cut Paul
Lowe, a rookie halfback from
Oregon State. Injured hilfback
Jim Pace planned to work out to today.
day. today. Club officials said It he can't
play this season they will place

i t.1

JZHJL

Smokers returned from lunch and
were able to onset tne 61 pin ad
vantage and take the other :
points. For Marlboro Trevino had
a pretty good series he rolled a
436. Sierra was the real saver for
the night with a 378. For C.a
America, anchor man Gomez lead
his team with a 430 and was help helped
ed helped by Vargas with a 419 series.
5700 MATERIEL
MIXED OF ALBROOK
By LOU

Teams W L
Rolling Five 93
Honey Bears 8 4
Sloth 7 5
Tigers 7 5
Alley Cats 5 7
Panthers 7 5 7
Sharpshooters 4 8
Eagles 3 9
ROLLING FIVE 4 BAOLtS t

By winning all of their four
games, the Rolling Five rolled
themselves into first place of the
5700 Matron Loop. Three of four
were easy, but the Eagles did
threaten in the second stanza, but
lost out by 19. The three male
keglers of th winners did all the
kegling with their lady friends
taking it easy.
Sam Millwee celebrated a 513
Chuck Ingram 526 and Jack But
ler 510. For the Eagles no one
scored to any great heights, Mar Mar-cella
cella Mar-cella Uffelman being tops wilh
49, 711 handicap. The four point
loss, dumped the Eagles into the
cellar.
HONEY BEARS 1
SHARPSHOOTERS 3
The Sharpshooters set their
sight on the Honey Bears and
knocked the sweet bruins right
out of first place by taking three
of four points. Three more maple
pins in the opening round and
the Sharpshooters would have
taken all four. The Honey Bears
were not eaiv to knnrk nff ho.
cause 31 pins and 24 pins were
uie amerences in tine 0 5h e r
rounds.
The master Sharpshooter was
Julio Gomez with 506, and the
beaten Bears presented M a r v
Freda and Jim Mingin with 530
and 500, all handicap.
SLOTHS f PANTHERS 1
The Panthers punced on the
Sloths and took the opener. But
the Sloths wore down the Panth Panthers
ers Panthers and took the next three a,nd
put themselves very much in the
picture for first place.
The three points pickup for the
Sloths was done the hard way, be because
cause because only Marge Worthen rolled
a 500 series, a 506 handicap. For
tlhe skinned Panthers, Harry
Rouse propelled his pill down the
straightaway for a 527 handicap
set.
ALLEY CATS 3 TIGERS 1
The domesticated Alley Cats
triumphed over the jungle variety
felines 3 to 1. The Alley pussies,
really poured it on the Tigers in
the curtain raiser, spanking the
striped beasts by 105 maples
The next round was closer but the
Alley Cats came out on top by
17. With a white wash job star staring
ing staring them, the Tigers cam back
to salvage a lone point.
For the Alley Cats, Bill Fish
was just too rough with a 515
scratch series. For the tamed
Tigers, Bert Moss broke out of
his slump with a 556 handicap
trio, and Jim Howard had a 512
handicap.
Getting Up Nights
' !' tytttr from Getting Up
,'i.?c1 Ifom Getting Up
V fhL, Bickuch., Lt P.lm, I.o.t of
vigour, NcrvouincM or wuknciii, you
hould htlp your Proitnte Glami lm lm-mflltly
mflltly lm-mflltly with Regtnt. TM. mtrilrin.
"Li JOM '' y"""! ". tronrr, an
bit to eletp without interruption.
wt nigtna from your chtmUt today.
XI

Your Community Network

liLtUD

- Or OLD

SCOTCH WHISKY C

FELIPE MOTTA e
TEL. 3.7008 BALBOA BOULEVARD,

AND... more

FIRESTONE FACTORY METHOD

Hi'"'
i;iti-

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(M OF' 3 0 FlrrtVoV0COTCrWHI5KIE5

S3

C ? j OL..tMll

DISTRIBUTORS:

Read Our Classifieds

than 5 new Tire Cost

WITH

USE FIRESTONE PAY-DAY TERMS
BETTER RUBBER FROM START TO FINISH
TRANSISTHMIAN HIGHWAY TEL. .1 1501

ALTMAiYS
lei War
SfijodAwnaA
100 Guaranteed
Invite you to Listen to
WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE

anu
"you asked
1:30 P.M. O
Del Mar really adds to

1ST IS
HIJO
PANAMA
RETREADING
SAME
TREAD
WIDTK
V SAME
TREAD
DESir-'
v SAME
TREA:
DEPTK
for it"
9:00 P.M.
your iersonality.

him on the injured reserve list.
V

V



' WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER ft, llfl
rAGI TIN
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
ENTS:
Classified Pag closes 11
a.m. Hon. to FrL, 11 ajn.
Sat, t pjn. Sat. (or Son.
Offico open' fi-l weekdays.
Phone Panama 1-0740 tor
information about Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Charge vour ad if
you have a commercial
contract
in vf voir ai wrrn on or our agents ok oub ornces at i-rr -h- stfet, Panama ubrekia prrciado i stress R. it agenciai
INTERNAL DE PLLlCACIONE8-N. 3 Letter "lasa CASA ZALDO Caalral Av. 45 LOl'RDES PHARMACY 181 La CarrasquiUa FAKMACIA LOM LOM-sAftDON.
sAftDON. LOM-sAftDON. U "B- te MoTrISON-4U. i Jul, Ave. 1 St. LEWM StRVlCE-Ave TlvoU N;. 4. ARMACIA EJTADOS LNId3-U. Ctr A.
aFAKMlCIA I.l'X Hi Central Avt HOUSEHULU lALniiurj rsc. w rvivr wusw emT. V
ATIAVAN DFR JIS-M TsttI K. S3 1 TfARMAClA EL BATURRO-Paxaue Lefevr 7 StiMt FARM ACTA "SAS'-Vi. Pottm 111 MOVfcDADKS f
PAB-
TH1S
Besida Bella Vista Tbcatra an Branca at Mlnlmax Super Market aa Via Espaaa (.ouiiM or r ice: ist aa unader oatmra No. Vtzn in 4

THE PANAMA AMERICA AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAPEB

Resorts

Fostar'i cormai, a a r Santa
Clara Raasonabla ratal Phona
talboa 1866
Baldwin's apartments at Santa
Clara Beach. Telephone Balboa
1622 or Ccxo Solo 36-728.
VILLlPi Ocanm Cottaaaa
Santa Car. ?"J 'V
ama 1-1877 CrWcbal a-!67i.
Houses
FOR RENT: Beautiful resi residence,
dence, residence, tor information phone 2 2-2145,
2145, 2-2145, Panama
FOR RENT: Chalet, Newly
constructed. Three bedrooms,
studio, oarage. Irf fenced vrd.
hot water. Calle 6, Loma Alejre
hone Balboa 1228.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: 0 M i e e space,
Mercedet building, above Aveni-a-j
Balboa's Post Office, with
private bathroom, watchman,
very reasonable rent. Telephone
3-3054.
Boats & Motors
FOR SALI: 17 ft. outboard
cruiser Flanked Hull Fiberglasa
bottom 20 h p. Mercury motor
trailer. Must sell. Phone Gatun
534.
American hair stylist frOm Cali California
fornia California Ermi Dykstra formerly of
Clayton has returned to Albrook
Beauty Salon, appointments call
86-7103.
BUYING A CAR? Auto financing
through us on new or used cars
often cost less than from other
sources and you can swing a bet better
ter better deal with cash in hand. See
sis today at Panama Credit Cor Corporation,
poration, Corporation, 30-40 Automobile Row
In Panama. Telephone 3-7833.
Wanted to Buy
WANTED: Te buy a large
quantity ef folding chairs. Phone
1-5568.

Miscellaneous

Commercial Guide i
ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION I
Ads only cost $0.85 per col. inch
Ads accepted for a minimum of one month.

run irvrumviM i iuin zutu

Canal Zone Society For
The Prevention Of Cruelty
To Animals
Box 14(1, Balboa, C. Z.
Phone: Curundu 5113
Thr follow inj animals at the
Coroial Veterinary Hospital
need good homes:
i hlark kittens, S weeks old
1 Male native terrier, not a year
old. very friendly, light tan,
Mike"
L tall the above lelephone number
it ( Inr th fnllnu'lnv:
1
1 Female kittens, hlark and white,
3 mov old
S'Femnle rat, black and while, Z
years old.
Sl'PPORT VOUR SPCA.
YOU NEED IT. IT NEEDS YOU.
SS FRANCISCO (UP1) As
$ov,iet Premier Nikita Khrushchev
entered the Mark Hopkins Hotel
yesterday he shook hands with
clolhing designer F.ddy Allen, one
of the 300 persons in the loby. "I
dqrVt know why he shook my
Uaoii." Allen remarked, "but the
viyneriean way is to shake hands."

' r- W ?
; a I)
J' Jyf)
I si Yt MsflsW-r'
j I tit0(iflrl m"':' '"''

"But you have to install it today !'Mv wife savs

:she won't drive another dav without a Mark IV"
:Guardia y Cia., S.A. Tel. 3-7225 Ext. 8, Panama
City.

Apdrtrnenrs-

FOR RENT'. Three bsdrm
apartment, two baths, dining
living room, kitchen, porch, hot
water installation, independent
maid's room, bath, laundry. DO DO-NICHITA
NICHITA DO-NICHITA building, two blocks
from Minima and Santuario Na Na-cienal
cienal Na-cienal $130.00. Ask gardener
for keys. Tel. 2 0481
FOR RENT: Apartment two
bedrooms, living-dining room,
bath, etc., screened $65.00. Be Be-lisario
lisario Be-lisario Porras No 56 Key No. 1.
Information 2-2316 and 3-0234.
FOR RENT: Spacious 3 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, living room,
dining room, 3 bathrooms, hot
water, maid's room, garage, etc.
Manuel Maria lean street "For "For-mentor
mentor "For-mentor Building" $185. Phone
3-4994.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment, two bathrooms, fur furnished.
nished. furnished. $100.00. 48th Street Be Bella
lla Bella Vista, house 27 apartment
No. 3. Tel. 3-2504.
FOR RENT: One large bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, kitchen, kitchenette, bath,
all screened, 3rd floor, near Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone. Call 2-0027 or 3 3-7527.
7527. 3-7527. FOR RENT: Modern apartment,
furnished, two bedrooms, living living-dining
dining living-dining room, hot water, maid's
room, garage, etc. 49th Street,
"lubelita Building", $140.00.
Phone 3-4994.
FOR RENT: Campo Alegre. I
have a newly furnished one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment for rent. Please
call 3-1789.
TELEVISION AND RADIO
SERVICE. Our new service plan
gives you faster, mart econo economical
mical economical and better service. Phone
2-1905 Crawford Agencies. Tivo Tivo-li
li Tivo-li Avenue.
Prefect your home and proper property
ty property against Insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment ca
emergency er monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
Panama 3-7977 er Colon 1777.
If your TV, Isn't en the ball,
U.S. TELEVISION is the one to
call. 3-7607 Panama. From 9
a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday te
6 p.m.
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Tour New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo,
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
GIBRALTAR LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Jim Ridge
Harry Cornell
Davis Stevenson
Telephone Pan. 2-055J

Services

Automobiles

' FOR $At,E1S7 MS roadster,
white walls, radio, wire wheels,
excellent mechanical conditions.
See Mr. Zappi Lot No. 2, Smoot
y Paredet.
FOR SALE: 1 958 Ford "300"
tudor blue, auto shift, radio,
17.000 miles. Phone Kobbe
7169, Navy 3543.
FOR SALE: 1 950 4 door auto automatic
matic automatic Pontiac 8, radio, good con condition.
dition. condition. $275.00 or best offer, 5
to 7 p m. Apt 19, 0853. Balboa
Road
Car Rentals
Househunting? Follow up all
your leads with a new rental car
from Fiesta I Herts Licensee)
Tel 3-4568, Lobby El Panama
Hilton
Lost Pomeranihn-dog, brown
wish white chest. Name "Chico",
if found please call Navy 2474
anytime, license number 2386.
Reward.
REWARD: Lost at Balboa Rail Railroad
road Railroad Station Wednesday child's
dental brace. Looks like upper
plate without teeth. Phone Pan Panama
ama Panama 3-6779. Reward.
Local Rosicrucians
To Commemorate
Building Of Pyramid
Rosicrucians throughout the
world are commemorating the
building of the Creat Pyramid
today.
Joseph N. Fiwlds, master of the
local AMORC Rosicrucian Pro
naos. said Rosicrucians through throughout
out throughout the jurisdiction of the philo philosophic
sophic philosophic order will gather or a
ceremony on Sunday to symbo symbolically
lically symbolically re enact the building of
the Great Pyramid of Cheops.
Since the Rosicrucians, trace
their traditional, origin back to
the year 1350 B. C, when Amen Amen-hotep
hotep Amen-hotep IV was Pharaoh of Egypt
and historically known as the
first great personality in histo history,
ry, history, they commemorate their an an-cient
cient an-cient origin by the ritualistic
construction of a miniature py
ramid.
The laying of each stone re represents
presents represents to them the cultural
accomplishments of he Orrie-
during each year of its existence.
the apex will be placed upon a
miniature pyramid at a fut-ire
time when the ideals of the Ro Rosicrucian
sicrucian Rosicrucian movement have been
realized.
The outdoor fete and ceremony
will be enacted locally at the
Dos Hermanas near Ruena Vista
it 2 p.m. Sunday. The nublic is
invited to witness the ritual and
participate in the fete.
28-Cnr- Freioht
Run Ovr Woman,
Breaks Her Arm
ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. (Wl)
Janic Snoden 62. was telling
mends inriay now she felt while
a locomotive and 2R cars of a
freiRth train passed over her yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday. The woman suffered a brnVen
arm and minor cuts and bruises

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
GREAT WHITE FLEET

New Orleans Servict
CIBAO
YAQUK

Also Handlin( Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
New York Service 8 a i I Arrivet
MUSA Sept. U Sept. 2
JUNIOR Sept. XI Sept. 27
SAN JOSE Sept. 19 Oct. 4
MKTAPAN Oct. Oct. 11
HEREDIA Oct. 13 Oct. IS
LIMON Oct. 20 Oct. 25
METAPAN Oct. 27 Not. 1
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Carte
CRISTOBALW.C.C.A. FEEDER SERVICE
TEXITA Eyerr (15) Days
Weekly sailings of twelve passenjer ships lo New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle
SPECIAL EXCURSION FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return 8275.00
To San Francisco andor Seattle and Return ..8400.00
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA.2-2904

Home Articles

FOR SALE : Columbia stereo
Hi-Fi console, blond wood, ex excellent
cellent excellent toned controls. 1959
model. Give away price $100.
leaving country, Balboa 3-708.
FOR SALE: Norge upright
freezer, Norge ice-bol Admiral
T V small brown sofa, Chinese
chest, Hob-nail crystal dessert
set, miscellaneous glassware and
kitchen utensils, lightelier lams.
Panama 3-0377.
FOR SALE ; -One electric Hot
Point stove in very good condi condition
tion condition with four top burners and
oven. Also three drawers. Call
Balboa 1072 or 2617.
FOR SALE: 21" RCA, TV.
$65. GRUNDIG Hi-Fi console
$150; youth bed and dresser,
$60; Kenmore semi-iuto washer,
$60; crib, $65; chrome dinnetta
set, $25; bedroom set, $25; liv living
ing living room set, $25; 12" oscil oscillating
lating oscillating fan, $10. Phone Panama
3-7813.
FOR SALI: Used "Marion"
kerosene Range, 3-burner, oven
compartment, suitable for cOun cOun-.
. cOun-. try home, reduced price, can be
seen at 12 St. Parque Lefevre,
house 20, not far from Crag Crag-well's
well's Crag-well's FOR SALE: Dining room, living
room, two bedrooms, Frigidaire,
air-conditioner Vornado, 2 bars,
tables, chairs, lamps, many other
householdf items. Owner leaving
Isthmus. Apply M. Toussich,
44th Street No. 37, Apt. C. Tel.
3-0980.
FOR SALE: Bamboo tit, I sofa,
2 chairs, 1 foot steel, 2 end
tables, 1 coffee table, ill with
inner spring cushions $100.00.
Diningroom set: 2 tables, 6
chairs, I corner coffee table For Formica
mica Formica $100.00. I single bed, in in-nerspring
nerspring in-nerspring foam rubber mattress,
$75.00. 1 refrigerator $100.00.
1 gas stove, $100.00. T.V. set
21'' Philco. floor model, $100.
Phone Balboa 2-3703, house
1536-B, Mango St. Balboa.
FOR SALE: 4 burner gas stove
used 6 months, $125. Fedders,
2 ton air conditioner, used 3
months, $300. Write, wooden
hi-boy dresser $5. Metal bed bed-tide
tide bed-tide table 63. Call Panama 3 3-6260.
6260. 3-6260. Weekly College
Football Ratings
NEW Y6RK (UPI) The first
weekly United Press International
major college football ratings of
1959 (first-place votes in paren parentheses):
theses): parentheses): Team Points
1. Louisiana State (28) 327
2. Oklahoma (3) 218
3. Wisconsin (1) 131
4. Ohio State 114
5. Mississippi 106
6. Army "97
7. Auburn 93
8. Texas 90
9. Clemson . 87
10. Iowa (2) 74
11, Southern Methodist, 71; 12,
Southern California (1), 67; 13,
Navy, 51; 14, Northwestern, 48;
15, (tie), Texas Christian and
Purdue, 46 each; 17, Penn State,
41; 18, Georgia, 35; 19, Maryland,
33; 20, Georgia Tech, SO.
Others California, 12; Pitts Pittsburgh,
burgh, Pittsburgh, 16; South Carolina and
Notre Dame, 15 each; UCLA and
Florida, 14 each; Oregon, 1;
Syracuse, 5; Michigan State, 4;
Air Force Academy, 8; North
Carolina State, 1.
fell and waj lyint? on tie eross eross-ties
ties eross-ties between the tracks when the
freight train approached. She es escaped
caped escaped serious injury by remain remaining
ing remaining motionless,

Stilt Arrive
Cristobal
Kept 18 Sept. 26
Sept. 25 Oct. S
Oct. Oct. 10
Oct. Oct. 17

Miscellaneous

FOR SALI i Aged natural ma manure
nure manure at give-away prices by the
truckloast. Call 2-2641.
GRUNDIG
Germany's most' complete fully
STEREO line at radio-consoles.
Short wave radio, fine changer,
AMFM, taperecorder, all wrap wrapped
ped wrapped up in beautiful cabinet, See
GRUNDIG before you buy. We
have duty-free prices-
CASA SPARTON
Central 26-1 09 Calidenia
- AUCTION SALI
Prfvatly owner automobile. '100
area behind Balboa skating rfnk
Saturday Sept. 26 10 a.m. Cars
on display Friday Sept. 25, 9 a.
m. to 12 neen. Public invited. For
information call lalboa 2-3227.
1951 Pontiac tedin. 1954 Ford
Ranch wagon, radie. 1958 Chev Chevrolet
rolet Chevrolet Bel-Air, sedan, ridie. All
cirs good condition.
FOR SALE: 6 weeks eld. wash washing
ing washing machine, wringer 2-2964.
Domestic
WANTED: A maid to cook and
iron. 9080, 8th and Roosevelt,
Colon.

Mother, Uncle, 10 Children Drowned
When Boat Swamps In Michigan Lake

MUNISING, Mich. (UPI) A
mother, her 10 children and their
uncle drowned yesterday when
their overloaded 12-foot boot
boat swamped on Lake McKeever,
15 miles south of here.
The only survivor was the father
of the children, Leonard Larson,
42, Skandia.
The dead, all .f Skandia, were:
Mrs. Dora Larson, 41; Harry
Larson, 64, and Mrs. Larson's
children, Arthur 15, Shirley 13,
Harry 10, Marlene 9, Freddie 8,
Carol 7, Robert 6, Mary Ann 5,
Melody 3, and Terry Lee, five
months. All the bodies were recov recovered.
ered. recovered. The Larsons bad 11 children.
The oldest, Doris May, 16, a high
school student, did not go with the
family to Lake .MeJCeever. She
stayed in Skandia.
State police at the Munising
Defroil Man Held
In Knifing Death
Of Wife's Lover
DETROIT (UPI) A 50-year-old
Internal Revenue Service employe
was held today for the eternal
triangle" slaying of a married
man who allegedly had carried
on an intermittent affair with the
slayer's wife for nearly 20 years.
Leon Anthony Briskey admitted
holding the butcher knife that
killed Paul Wesner, 51, but said
it was an accident that occurred
when Wesner took a swing at him
with his fist.
Police said Briskex's wife, EJ1
nor, 46, had met Wesner nearly.
20 years ago when she became- a
waitress in his bar.
Mrs. Willie Wesner, 51, wife of
the victim, told authorities she
forced her husband to fire Mrs.
Briskey after 6he learned they
had "become involved."
However, police said the affair
continued intermittently until
about 18 minths ago when Mrs.
Briskey decided to "give him
up." Police quoted Mrs. Briskey
as saying her husband promised
he would stop drinking and "we
would lead a good Christian life."
But according to authorities,
Wesner continued to try to see
Mrs. Briskey and made many
telephone calls to her.
Briskey said Wesner came to
his house last night and kicked
in a window. Briskey said he got
a 10-inch butcher knife to protect
himself, and then went outside and
tried to talk to Wesner.
He said Wesner had his back to
him at first, and then spun around
and took a swine with his fist.
Briskey said he ducked, but that
Wesner's body lunged forward in into
to into the knife.
BUBBLE TROUBLE
LONDON (UPI) Motorist Eric
B. Pye told police yesterday he
failed to chase a burglar and his
tiny "bubble" get-away car be because
cause because be didn't know what direc direction
tion direction the car was going.
"I saw him climb into the bub bubble
ble bubble car and went to overtake
him," Pye said. "But he was
going backwards. I couldn't tell
the front from the back. As soon
as I came alongside he started
going forward and shot off in the
opposite direction."

GSRG,0,AK0G

WITH EXPERIENCE NEEDED
Typing and shorthand in English and Spanish ssssn.
tial. W look for executive calibar personnel.'
APPLY:
MARTIN, S. A.
50th. Street, corner to Venesuela St. Bella Vista
Tel. 3-7116

Rear Estate

f-OR SALI; Let 500 end 1.000
aneters, te the Neeve) Hipodreme
Urbsaliariae acrsws tfce Ramon
Racetrack. All left with street
fronts, sewn, water ssuia end
electricity. CaM W. McliraeH.
Tel. 4-097.
FOR SALE: 4j hectares In
Carre Axul it like 2 small Bid's,
deep well. Urge light plant.
Small stream runs thru property.
One ef the most scenic and de desirable
sirable desirable location in Carre Axul.
House 1J79-A, Balboa, phone
Balbet 2 3133.
Animals
FOR SALE: Doberman Pinscher,
I year eld female, feed watch watchdog,
dog, watchdog, excellent for breeding, de descendant
scendant descendant of AKC champions.
Write Bex 212, Rodman er see
it S25-A Firfen.
Personals
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.I.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
post said the family got into the
boat to travel across the lake to
pick cranberries in a bog along
the opposite shore.
When the father tried to start
the five horsepower out Board mo motor,
tor, motor, the boat swamped, and all 13
plunged into the water.
State police at Munismg said the
father reported that when he re
turned to the surface he could
find none of his tamily in the wa water.
ter. water. He grabbed the side of the
swamped boat and held on, grad gradually
ually gradually maneuvering it to shallow
water. The water was about 15
feet deep at the spot where the
boat swamped, although it was
only a short distance from the
shore.
First word of the tragedy was
telephoned to state police at Mun
ising by Mrs. William Ryan, of
forest Glen, a resort about 10
miles south of Munising. Authori Authorities
ties Authorities theorized that Leonard Lar Larson
son Larson walked to the resort to report
the tragedy, and then returned to
the lake to help search for the
bodies.
A spokesman at the Munising
state police post said he did not
know the regulations governing
Doais on tne lake, but said "I'm
sure it was overloaded."
"When you put 13 persons into a
12-foot boat even though most of
tnem were children, you're put putting
ting putting in a lot of weight," said the
oiricer.
He said there! probably would
be an investigation by state police
ana a coroner s jury into tne trag
edy. He said there was a poSsj
bility that a charge of negligence
"oh .somebody' part" would be
m.aof
Spokesmen
Demand Wage Cut
For Non-Operators
CHICAGO (UPI) The nation's
railroads have demanded a 15-
cent-an-hour wage cut for non
operating employes.
In addition, the railroads insis insisted
ted insisted that non-operating rail unions
hold the line on fringe benefits.
The demands were included in a
statement yesterday by the Car Carriers
riers Carriers Conference Committee, com comprised
prised comprised o f railroads around the
nation.
The committee said the wage
cuts were necessary to bring rail
employes' salaries into line with
those of production workers in
other industries.
Ted Short, chairman of the
Western Carriers Conference com committee,
mittee, committee, added that "tremendous
and steadily rising competitive
pressures" also dictated the pay
cuts.
The non-operating rail unions
represent 550,000 workers includ including
ing including clerks, telegraphers and sta station
tion station agents not directly involved
in moving trains.
Short said that non operating
employes were earning an aver average
age average of $2.37 an hour as of last
July. This compared with an av average
erage average of $2.16 for industrial work workers.
ers. workers. Short said.
Since 1953, he said, hourly pay
raises for rail workers have
totaled 59 cents, as opposed to an
average of 43 cents for workers
in general manufacturing.

INVESTOR'S
GUIDE

By SAM SHULSKY
King Features Syndicate,
235 E 45 St., New York
0. In a recent column vAn A.
vised a retired Sentleman nnt In
put a mortgage on his home and
a.U i
fui me proceeds into stock. Have
you forgotten that mortgage in interest
terest interest is deductible on his income
tax and that any good stock could
increase in value and pay higher
dividends?
A. I realize that TY1 fri 0 Q 0a. In.
terest is a tax deduction. But I
also know- that a mortgage costs
about seven ner rant a war in
service.
NOW. What would Via th nnint
of this elderly retired gentleman
placing a $5,000 mortgage on his
nnmA tirhitk ntm.U u;
iw.iiK., ntuvii vruuiu uua L uim seven
per cent or 350 a year to servic
for the rest of his lifetime inrl than
putting the $5,000 into iVi per cent
stock and receivine S225 a. vear in
interest?
And whv malrfi snvh fnce
about a tax deduction when, at
nis age ne aoesn t even pay taxes?
O. In 1949 I nurchasorl 1 non li
nked COrD. Warrants Mv Krnlrore
tells me they are worth about
two cents today, (I paid 50) al although
though although the com nan v tpllo mA thv
have been ruled wortlhelss by the
courts, wny tne two cent bid?
A. This is an interesting sit
uation.
These warrants, which were la labeled
beled labeled "perpetual," were issued by
United Com. when it W9C a uti
lity holding company. When the
company pecame an investment
trust under the Sepiiritic nJ tt
change Commission the SEC in
sisted the warrants be cancelled
ana m was upheld in the courts.
I can't explain the two cents bid
except that (a)- it represents
some misunderstanding (I notice,
for example, tha an authoritative
oyer 4he counter listing still car
ries me warrants as 'perpetual;
obsolote security; or (c)- someone
actually thinks he can get the de
cision reversed whih dnem't
seem very likely since the Su
preme court nas already ruled on
the matter.
i nuiu tne ionowing SIOCKS,
but wonder whether some could
not oe sold because I need more
income: A.T. and T., N.Y. State
JMecioc ann lias southern ri
fornia Edison, L. I. Lighting Slan-
ia re, orooiriyn union Gas, stand standard
ard standard Oil Of N.I Maniifatmi-
Trust, National City Bank, One
William Street. Also $5,000 Jn E
uunus, ,?o,uw in governments, due
in 1962 and $9,800 in cash.
A VA Via kaImiaIh.I 4 -11
of these issues they teen so well
CM if A4 in vnttv Mien.
I suppose you could get about one
n OT Pont mnA Kit : 4 u :
iu i vy owuciung some
v. i- v kjci iu suine mer-
tv.n,i, cwiu ouiiie ttUUl-
tional rails. But in general, vou
iTuuiu imve 10 step ciown in qua
lltv
If vou neerl mmr m.A. l'
annul the n r
. a year, or so, you
could get by switching the E bonds
lntO ,riiritlA rtavinn ...1-
- Kj"i current-
crime vThon u-a
cash seem .5.1arge itent, unleaV
.t ,c Bwcciai reason
keeoinr that mu.v.
for
o vii lianu.,
gether they make almost $15
To-
,000
v iuj jnuney.
The governments r nam. ...
"i ".auiiic flLC
HOW orettv flar Hnmn
what you paid. In any event their
'""a is good and the
three-year maturity is worth wait-
Wall Street
CHATTER
NEW YORK Snet ) imv
Apart from distortions in the busi-
' Picture created by the steel
Strike, the ecnnnmv ic ..u.
ing an interesting and dynamic
r".' ,aJ i. eecicer and Co.
m its business and financial re.
view.
"We are in the process of shift shift-ins
ins shift-ins from the rernven, :
the business cycle to an expan-
siuu era, uecxer points ot.
It SaVS this is the fnnrth
since World War II that this pro
cess nas occurred.
Green, Ellis and Anderson says
when you buy a stock like Inter International
national International Minerals and PhemipniB
there's no need to be preocupied
with how the averages will fare.
This quality yield issue, it says
will orobably continue in the fore foreseeable
seeable foreseeable future and same confined
price pattern displayed for almost
four years.
American Metal Market Maga Magazine
zine Magazine reports the steel union is nowj
resided to the use of the Taft Taft-Hartly
Hartly Taft-Hartly Actla no progress in ne ne-pntiations
pntiations ne-pntiations is reported by either
side.
Unexoected Recess
For Hung Jurists
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UPI) A
lury here got hung, literally, even
before all the evidence was in.
The jurors were hung between
floors of the courthouse yesterday
when an elevator stalled. It was
90 minutes before they got un-bunf

s Opening

STOCK PRICES
NEW YORK SerJ rrrDT.
1 "-r" vuii,
a locks met simnnrt at the nmn.
ing today in quiet trading.
Small
,11 r-MvauuaiW,u ill Ull
list following yesterday's moder-
te decline. .Brokers said thera
are enough oversold stocks in tha
market to. form a ha fie far rettv-
ery. they feel some good newa
could spark an upturn and that
settlement ot the steel strika
might fill the bill.
ACF Ind
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium Ltd
Amer Cyanamid
Amer Motors
Amer Tel and Tel
Anaconda Copper
Arkansas Fuel
AVCO Mfg
Beth Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bicoft Uranium
Blauknox
British Pet
Burroughs
Celanese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler
Cities Service
Coastal Caritoe
Colgate Palmolive
49
260b
11
31
53's
55
75
59V
30'ib
11
55 V4
14Vib
, 60b
45
T 3-18
29 Vi
25
34V
41b
61
48
lVs
35
Colorado Fuel
29
Cons Electro Dynamics 32
Creole Pet
41
Crown Cork and Seal
Cera Metals
Chalmers
Du Pont
El Paso Natural Ga
Fargo Oil
Felmont Pet
General Dynamics
General Electee
General Motors
General Plywood
Gulf Oil
Harsco Steel
Howe Sound
Imperial OH
lntl Pet
Lockheed
Magellan Pet
Montrose Chem
New Eng Tel and Ti
Northrop Air
Olin Mathieson
Pancoastal
Phillips Pe
Pure Oil
Royal Dutch SheB
RCA
Reynolds "Mtial
San Jacinto
Servo Corp
Signal Oil and Oat
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobil
Sperry Rand
Standard Oil-NJ"
Studebaker-Packard
Superior Oil
Texas Gulf Prods
Textron
Underwood
United Cans Ofl
US Bubber
US Steel
We sting house Elee
Wheeling Steel
S3b
SVb
34
244
28
4
6Hb
45
75
52,
17 b
110b
40b
18
36
32
25
lb
12
178
27
45
2
42
37
S6
89
41
6b
obi
19 1
80'
53
21 I
49 I
13 1
1715
27
22
21
1 1-16
56
100
87
. S9V4b
CFN To Broadcast
IIL Pennant Race
Deciding Games
The announced week's schedule
for major league baseball ever
the Caribbean Forces Radio Net Net-work
work Net-work will be slightly revised du
to the tight pennant rac in the
National League.
Instead of carrying th regular
schedule, CFN will pick up 11
games uroaacasi irom Armed
Forces Radio Service in New Yok
AFRTS is sending all games "that
are of prime importance in th
pennant race and both day and
night contests will be broadcast
over CFN.
Starting at 2 p.m. today.
(Wednesday) it will be San Fran Fran-cisco
cisco Fran-cisco vs Chicaeo. At k-ak
the Los Angeles Dodgers vs St!
uuius game or tne Milwaukee Milwaukee-Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh Milwaukee-Pittsburgh contest will be aired,
depending on which wnulrl rhm.
the standing of the top teams in

me league.
If there is a playoff at the end
of the week in the National
League, CFN Radio will carry all
games. Playoff dates and parks
are decided by the commissioner
of baseball. They will be on a
two-out-of-three basis, and tha,
World Series will be postponed
until the playoff is finished.
ThevArmy said every effort will
be made to keep the public ad advised
vised advised in advance of games broad

cast by regular press notices and1
frequent CFN announcements.
You will be able to admire
the Pacific international
Trade Fair at Lima from
5000 feet of carpet brought
from India for this oc occasion.
casion. occasion. Departure from
Panama October 5th return
October 20th by Avianca,
First Airline in the Ameri Americas.
cas. Americas. Colombia and Esua Esua-dor
dor Esua-dor will also be visited visited-Available
Available visited-Available seats running
out. Reserve yours now at
Blok Agencies telephone
Panama 3-3397.

4



WTOSISDAT, SIFTIMBEH il, 18S
Trtl JTORY OF MARTHA WAYNI,

TOT PANAMA AMERICAN AN IXDrFENDENT DAI1T NIWSPAPOI
PA6B ILIVIN
Defends Vic
BY WILSON SCRUGGS,' f-f-y ANn The PIRATES
It GCURGK WMBKB
St.

S I fU"HJ,TEI.'UI WE 1TE f IF mcKC 9 A Kzy U-'AT NEAKpY TKET LOCK SO NEAAT-ANP "ivSjP1"! J
III I IB 1 1 y-VI II I I HI I 7 1 i i -O SOT TDAfSUMETT I Wt MI6HTMAVE ONLYAFEW MOUIW. J THEY MISHT Af WELL PC &3wvf3V(f"i ? 'V
"" R;LLA'S POP Hit end Milt ty At VIRMIII
i
. i ir t I

suit 00

CAPTAIN IASY

MORTY MIIKLI

PllCKI.il AND HIS f RIINM

' r : sr n r 1 : r V teacwer j V my math JsVjQi Jo U jo tme yfJ
U f ( Z Jt .ne k PttKiDEMT or 1 1 PLUS SHCfe TAr- OPSTHeJkwMATS THIS IS We CV I HAVF ). lrV J I'VE GOT PAPER .'y CMA ?MV J &k)
tT I t6 au,ecn&R.- tM6 A college i nLJ appcvmtmdjt vyitu -s& ? r "I L fv? X lZcf -V (' i
10 Ul Of TUe SCHOOLS, MAJOR. COURSE. .77 Ct2f? I td'J fiBlMW ft-TJ fc 1 l
It caitaim or the sirxs' wtth am etra C; 'Yt t"'ar"f VtMl feQ rTyrp-ul3 fsHf JKr v,- f) ) :
jMV ItbI SSw'' C fr'9 P (
i I I i LT SOME IMAYIE I CAN I f oUtlMcrl I Ll6UtSS VA FOOLEP YB?) I
Riaht t tht Point Y V. T. HAMLIn . WATCHDOO! THAT PEST AWAY WITH) (jf(lCUr,W U 071 TO0 7 r-
Ktgnt t in. ro.ro J V C HPS MOT EVEN THIS COTTUME I WAS J kJrT rt-fTr?rrx1 l1 JjSA'-r
WMCh'' I BARKINS AT J 7 TWYIN6 ON FO? THE XnI WjJT A JT Cfl
rSW OH, THAT WAS ...TEN VhARD TO BELIEVE I I .JN FACT, I'M WE'LL BE HAPPjJ ( ..VUTH A ONE- HSSU lf J VfJi NEPEIALL! jW'EM I "N
APg'H NOTHING FOR MILLlOKl I ISN'T IT.A ViORLD NOT SURE I 00 TO PROVE IT' YEAH.M VyW'Y TKXET VSl pYWIlY I OS A&1 STlij
' iff SfOr ncchancalS a culture years Like that, now i believe it.' to you, my I I'll say ) rM K T a 1 ?S WrlT TO J X fPVniVL'

rW .feeyy to9rsfeyk True Life Adventures"

IY I0AR MARTIN I

00TS AND Hlft lUDOfil

Wis Guy

DANGER in NUMBERS
SOMKTIME6 THE IN6T1NCT 'FOW
BAMPlNd TOCSftTHER HA UP
ANIMAL.6 TO THBR PESTKUCDOM.

t IBM
Wilt DiinY Prmluetluiil
Wufl4Hi''URtMn4

1 1 1 1 1 n ;' . 1

Of jPWV JZ&V) tjiljg Sr06HS A WKSCEN WVET,TH WCr MASS
JV cQS. CI p J Ns. NJ; '.lT Of A BUPFAL.O HBKP WWAK3 THOUSH THB E,
fP.'. Vw, t nca m.r.i. t.m. B.t. w..J I f nUNSIM& WUNT7RBPS INTO THt KV WATBRS.
: ' ' -.- isiSB

HSR!' A PKTURft 0H.YE5! T'5 MOW I SrtiffLBI IT WITH THE5B I llT IS TH6 OWE W ARBW'T 5URE! BUT UWOeK 1 -V. A 5EiliWil58S O"
i i OP 10UR. WOTHeg, J1)T HOW BLANK CARP1. CANYOUFIKJP ,AN0 ASWLUTCLY 1 HYPM0M5. TW 6tN5C5 ARE FAR. 1 -.-Nk ;VRf? Wj5TTgttoi4
BltO TWINTV WIS SURKEl fi05P 5HE LOOKBD -t?lllfR PICTURE AaAIWf BLARK! HOW PIP WORB ACUTBi BNOUOH, PERHAPA J VVl-.W' S'Avj-'
BLANK CAKPI VjgMe. IWT IT f WHIN I LAST MjwsK'T W RECOlJHIZB ITfTO 5ef A TIMV FLUW ) THt- t Ofl ( wf '' &T IS WEPWTBO TWArr SWUL
HAWUTAKB jSLp-A RL A jflfJr.JwTi fj PAPER THAT NORMAL EYeyPtgHftPS ,VIVtU' ( hbrps iiraSi jTrf
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flT l Tlfl HB TURM5 THRUTH6 5TACK, J C I jt7l
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XTSilfc VI PICK5 THBgAUM- CARPI 'WA ' ""'l
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Henortd Gut.t ... it diw wyalii iZ ((YJr-

f II J i MJJ

I ENTERTAIN AREN'T YOU f HE'6 V CHEUA7) CHEWNS I auSn'
LJt MRfltOCVUN f ENTERTAINING )V LOOKING j xJlflT I JMCARD6? J v.
T jd i

" :r" . : 1 : r Yii ii II Mr X

itt MAJOR HOOPt. OUT OUK.Wy ii .R.niuu rf 13? If

GARNERED A FORTUME- A l7fp ic,TT,u&vaj p r-? ---- fromth'mor&u6- V VO
WITK A FEW HOURS' TOIL.THElK J ANS ONE OP YOUR ijrTVlr SOmbbopv w.ll be I V
Aa-Zf Si ff7 .zz?zr li
sTA -Charlie', got thi, thing all backward. H. mtkw a
ffASiW SURPASS wsss rrr-TTVuO 1 WlPVi 8 hohbv of ivine up Rolf!"
TEl

Mother Watches
As Auto Crashes
With Six Children

MEMPHIS (Ul'l) A Memphis

mother stood helplrss and horri horrified
fied horrified as her ear full of six girls
caromed off two other ears, a bi.

?vcle and hnildinc here yesterday

hut the children escaped the War War-in?
in? War-in? runaway venicle.

Mrs. Elfo Gnsanti said she left
the six children in her car while
on an errand. The ignition was
off, but a key was in the car,
she said.
Police said the car backed
across the street when Sharon
Grisanti. 12, apparently turned on

the ignition with the gear shift
in reverse.
After the car hit another car,
Sharon shjfted to a forward eear
and officers said it shot back
across the street.
It hit a bicycle and another
car, bursting in'n flames and
ramming a building before corn corn-in"
in" corn-in" to a halt.
Mrs. Grisanti said she heard the
first crash and then watched the
rest of the accident helplessly.
All six children escaoed the
badly damaged car before fire fireman
man fireman arrived to nut out the fire.
Diana Grisanti. 1. suffered
back injuries, but was renorted
in pood condition at a local hos hos-nital.
nital. hos-nital. Mary Rr'ad'ey In good con condition
dition condition at a local hospital. Mary
Bradleh. 14. was admitted for ob observation,
servation, observation, hut all the other chil children
dren children suffered only minor injuries
and were not hospitalized.

Lunik's Second
Stage Hit Moon
With Payload

MOSCOW (UPI)-Radio Moscow
reported yesterday night that th
last stage of its second "lunik"
rocket as well as its payload of
instruments hit the moon last
week.
The official report said analysis
of tracking data indicates that
the rocket stage landed erst of
the Sea of Serenity, near th
craters of Aristylus, Archimedes
and Autolycus about 10 miles
east of the center of the moon.
Instruments in the payload ra

dioed back reports indicating that
the moon has no magnetic field,
nor is it surrounded like the earth
by a belt of radiation, the Rus Russian
sian Russian radio said.
"The rocket strictly followed the
calculated trajectory," the broad broadcast
cast broadcast said. "All circuits, units and
elements of the rocket functioned
normally in flight.
"Radio equipment on board, the
rocket insured reliable tracking...
beginning with the launching and
ending with the arrivir of the
capsule with the instrumentation
on the moon's surface."

Elephant Swallows

Visitor's Camera

COPENHAGKN. Denmark
fUPD A shaken visitor walked
into th? Copenhagen Zoo office
yesterday and reported an ele elephant
phant elephant had just swallowed his camera.

He was about to take close-tin
shot of the elenhant when it
snatched the ramera from his
hands.
Zoo officials rrassurei the man,
whos? name was not riisc'osed,
tht there was no harm r'one.
They said the earners would
"surely dissolve comple'ely."

Iraqi Mob, Police
Shoot In Out
i
In Bagdad Streets j
CAIRO. Sent. 2? (UPD Egvpt'lJ
semi-official Middle East newij
agency reported tody that aa,
armed Iraqi mob shot it out '.With
no'ice last night outside Bagh-J
dad's central cable office.
Three policemen and a rioter
were wounded, the agency said.
Earli-r, the radios of the UnMd
Araba RcDublic had reported that
ant'-governm?nt rlemonstr a t o T t
in Iraq had scied two oolice, sta stations
tions stations in Ramadi, G5 miles we'?t of
Baghdad.
The U.A.R. reports said police
gunfire failed to halt the mobs
in Ramadi one ot four provirV"1
centers wh-re viohnt opposition
'n the Government of Premier Ah Ah-del
del Ah-del Kassem was reported.
There was no report of casual-iti?s.

BUR BOARDING HOUSI

AfOWi PANAMA AAWAYS

MIA,.-!:.;M JUAN, P. h 45.70
PANAMA-MIAMI $55.00

SAN JUAN, P R. 5
PANAMA

100

70

Today's Program

1:00
a is
4: JO
rM
T:30

CfN NEWS S 00
Poika Partri
Mr, Wlnrd 9 Sn
Capt. Kaniaroo 10""
PANORAMA U 00
Roytl Pliyhout 11:15
Jimmy Htywood Show

Mld-Wk Movlt
Th Mn Whs Pltyd Go4
Truffle Court
Vd. Niaht rifht
CFN NTWS
Fiic: Pt Gunn and
Highway Patrol.

Courtesy of Aeroiias Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3-1698 3.1 699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

830 Xa. fianama 1090 Xca. fold



'if i

-I
Hurls -Phils

Homberto

Doubles,

o

Wots
.Read sfory on page 8

'J

t
f:
if
!
I
17-

Iowa Nearly
To Junketing

(Continued from Page
1)
terpreter
into a sidewalk
phone.
"I think this it a vary wia ap approach
proach approach today and this is txactly
ur attitudo towards you, too. Wo
welcome you but wt don't al
ways agree with you. Wa must
loarn to liva in peace and
friendship."
Of everything he had seen in
the United States. Khrushchev
said, he wa$ most impressed by
the fact that -'your people want
peace just as much as our people
So"
Asked if his far-ranging tour of
Hie U.S. had wearied him the lead leader
er leader of one of the world's two great
powers said "I have no right to
be tired."
"Ufa is short," Khrushchav
said. "If a parson livas 40 yaars,
no slcaps for 20 of 1ham. You
hava to make the bast use or
tha othor two-thirds of your
lifa.
You hava to saa as mucn
as you can
and ba usaful to so-
'Khrushchev, who got his start
tip the ladder to power as one of
Russia's top agricultural experts,
looked forward Ic 30 hours and
Mrd" miles' travelling throush roll roll-ffrg
ffrg roll-ffrg farm acres which outproduce
tWe of his own nation five to
trhrushehev's Midwest visit cot
off t-o a good start almost as soon
as hit iet nUne hrffiight his partv
from San Francisco.
Hf ioined Loveless and Henry
P ho Lodge TT S ambassador to
the United Nations, in a conver
tibie he first open can he had
wiiered since he rode at Kisen Kisen-hnwer't
hnwer't Kisen-hnwer't side through the streets
vf vVashinton.
In San Francisco. Los Angeles
and New York. Khrushchev had
Wn nackeri into closed car, and
he had comn'ained about it.
lowans crowded tha streets
eiaht to 10 deeo for a look at
,the stocky, smiling Russian, and
Jha scano bora earmarks of a
Midwest county fair.
But ther were some ugly sur surprises
prises surprises for Khrushchev in the signs
sprouting from the throng.
One sign said: "The only good
Communist is a flead Communist."
"We butcher hogs, not people,"
eaid another.
Khrushchev's wife, who could
easily past for an Iowa farm
wife, drew more applause than
far husband at Mrs. Loveless
escorted her through the packed
hotel lobby to the couple's $50-a-day
suite.
-This was Khrushchev's first look
at:.what the I'niled Slates is like
outs:dn the big cities and diploma
tic offices.
The Hawkeye State wanted Khru
ihehev to feel at home, but as a
Gorgas
Lab Growth
Authorized; Money
Hot Aporonrialed
WASHINGTON, Sept. 23- (UPI)
President Eisenhower yester
dav signed a bill increasing
from $150,000 the annual U. S.
contribution for maintenance and
operation of the Gorgas Memorial
Laboratory in Panama.
The measure also authorizes ap appropriation
propriation appropriation from time to time ol
aiEbunts of money Congress may
decide are needed for construction,
alteration and equipment of faci facilities
lities facilities for the laboratory. This s
Tint to exceed $250,000.
The laboratory was built in Pa
nama City more than 30 years
tia' to conduct research on Iro
purSJ diseases.
"Im Panama today, Dr. Carl
Jphnson. director of the Labora Laboratory,
tory, Laboratory, said it will act at once mak"
up.Ta budget for the expansion ol
its. annual maintenance and oper
ation costs, and also for its needs
for new construction and equip equipment.
ment. equipment. This budget will be presented
to the Congress when it recon
Vnes in January.
Johnson stressed thai the mea
lure signed l.y the President yes
texday is an authorization' only.
An opportunity must follow before!
any funds become avaialble 1
. The d'reclor said the physical
plant of the Laboratory is burst-;
ing at the seams. Several research'
programs cannot be started until
wore space and equipment are a-

Viable.
RP Firemen Battle
Warehouse Blaze Blaze-Many
Many Blaze-Many Toys Burned
Panama City firemen haltled
(or two hours yesterday to put out
a fire f unknown origin which
atarted in warehouse and de
atroyed more than half of the $50. $50.-000
000 $50.-000 worth ol plastic toys and olh olh-f
f olh-f merchandise it contained,
-j The owner, Francisco Sanson.
Slid the merchandise was insured
for. $48,000. v
-' i Nip one wn in the building at
'.tfif iim of the fire, and liremen
were forced to break in and to
jijak several openings through
Vvhich to play hoses on the blaze.
. Jt" apparently hecan m a wooden
mmanine at the rear of tha ton
, tfcte- structure.
t.
t'.
.ft '.'?'' 4
'(,, ,4rt ..,
! x ...

As Friendly As Tr'lSCO

'" ,v. .lUjIgg,!! II

vNIBBLING NIKITA "Excellent," observed Soviet Premier Ni Ni-kita
kita Ni-kita Khrushchev as he got his first, taste of the American hot
dog during a visit yesterday to a meat packing plant at Des
Moines. Iowa. Yesterday's schedule also included a tour through

a iarm macninery manuiacuuring plant, in which he seemed

especially interested.
precaution Loveless called 700 to
800 National Guards troopers to
protect Khrushchev.
Within the hour, Khrushchev
bounced out of the hotel and took
off for a look at how the Ameri American
can American hot dog is created and eatenv
He put on a butcher's white coat
and toured the Des Moines Pack Packing
ing Packing Co. plant, a small firm em employing
ploying employing only 150 men.
Khrushchev also had original originally
ly originally baan scheduled to visit a
larger Swift and Co., subsidiary
a block away, but Swift's work workers
ers workers are on strike and security
officers feared Khrushchev
might run into trouble on the
picket line.
A girl presented Khrushchev
with the hot dog. complete with
bun and muslard. Betweeir bites.
Khrushchev said 'this eatinc hot
dogs is what you call friendly
competition."
The first hot dog gone. Khru Khrushchev
shchev Khrushchev said: "It's not enough."
second helping, bill he did not eat
it.
Khrushchev indicated he was
fast catching on to another Ame American
rican American tradition the free load.
"We don't have to pay for
this" he grinned to Lodge.
Khrushchev's next stop vas the
John Deere agricultural imple implement
ment implement factory 10 miles outside Des
Moines. The plant, covering sev sev-square
square sev-square miles and employing
I:. 300 men. specializes in produc produc-lin"
lin" produc-lin" the heavy farm machinery
which has made Iowa famers pros pros-per.
per. pros-per. Meanwhile in Washington it
was revealed that President Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower and Khrushchev will
stay at the same rustic looking
cottage during their crucial
cold war talk Cam? David,
Md., this weekend.
The White House announced the

"
, '-,mStimmmmmmmmmmmmimmmiUmti mammmmmmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmm -' iWwitinminiir im ininririiiiiiiliiniiimniniiiiJ

AT the I'.S. Civic COUNCIL Officer's regular September executive session with the Governor at Balboa Heights yesterday
afternoon, the Coco Solo Civic Council presented to Gov. W. E. Potter a certificate of appreciation "for all aid and assistance re received
ceived received from the Canal Zone Government-Panama Canal Company In the forming and establishing of the Community In which
we live pictured above at the time of the presentation are, standing from left to right, James J. O'Donnell, vice-president of
tha Coco Solo Council; Potter; and council president Peter W. Foster.

Ex-Farmboy Khrushchev

(UPI Radiotoloi
arrangements after the President
had conferred with seven top ad advisers
visers advisers in preparation for his con conference
ference conference with Khrushchev. The
two will meet Friday evening, all
day Saturday and Sunday morn
ing.
i he White House said Soviet
foreign minister Andrei A. Grom Grom-yko
yko Grom-yko and Secretary of State Chris Christian
tian Christian A. Herter will occupy Aspen
Cottage at Camp David with the
President and Khrushchev. This
will give them an opportunity for
uninterrupted conferences.
While Aspen Cottage has a
rustic appearance, it is luxuri luxuriously
ously luxuriously furnished and normally is
occupied by the President when
he goes to the retreat in Mary Maryland's
land's Maryland's Catoctin Mountains. Camp
David is about 40 miles north
of Washington.
Several other members of the
Russian delegation, including So
viet ambassador Mikhail Menshi
kov, will slay at Camp David.
Americans staying in other cot
lages will include Llewellyn
Thompson, ambassador to Mos
cow and possibly Henry Cabol
Lodge Jr., U.S. ambassador to the
United Nations who has eseorteci
Khrushchev en his cross-country
tour.
Khrushchev returns to Washing
ton tomorrow afternoon. He wiU
go to Camp David Friday after afternoon
noon afternoon and return Sunday afternoon
for a news conference and an
hour long nationwide television
speech.
He will return to Moscow Sun Sunday
day Sunday evening.
No agenda has been announc announced
ed announced for the Camp David talks
but the President and Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev are expected to discuss
such cold war deadlocks as the
Germany-Berlin dispute and disarmament.

I io inresn out me u.s. posuion

on tnese issues me president met
at the White House with Under Undersecretary
secretary Undersecretary of State C. Douglas Dil Dillon;
lon; Dillon; Deputy Defense Secretary
Thomas Cages; John MeCone,
chairman of the Atomic Energy
Commission; Allen W, Dulles, di director
rector director of the Central Intelligence
Agency; Adm. Arleigh F. Burke,
chief of naval operations; Dr.
George B. Kistiakowsky, the Pre President's
sident's President's science adviser, and

uoraon i,ray, special presiaenuai peres aiij s;x fellow members
assistant for security affairs. j of Morris High 'School in the
The White House announced Bronk Monday, were booked for
that the President would not hold;homicid and held without bail for
a news conference this week be-L hearing Sept. 29
cause of the press of other busi- Another 14-vearold eane mem-

ness, including the Khrushchev
preparations.
Vice-president Richard Nixon
today advised Thiol College stu students
dents students to accept Khrushchev's
challenge for peaceful competi competition,
tion, competition, but he left no doubt that
democracy would win.
During a five-hour visit to the
western Pennsylvania college
town, Nixon helped dedicate a
new science hall and received an
honorary doctor of humane let letters
ters letters degree.
The vice president allayed con
cern over Russia's scientific
achievements, including the re
cent moonshot.
He said such achievements
were made with tha emphasis
on scientific materialism, "dis "discounting
counting "discounting completely the import importance
ance importance of spiritual guidance."
Nixon cautioned his audience
not to jump at unwarranted con concessions
cessions concessions and "use the Commu Communist
nist Communist yardstick to determine the
lack or excellence of our educa educational
tional educational system."
"We do not want to adopt the
basic theories of the Commu Communists,
nists, Communists, who are trying to pro produce
duce produce students who believe only
In scientific achievements and
materialism and have atheism
as a sureme being," Nixon
tald.
Nixon told his audience of stu students
dents students and educators he was con convinced"
vinced" convinced" that "no Americans will
be persuaded by Khrushchev's
skill as a debater to abandon the
democratic system of government
for Communism."
Khrushchev's trip to the Unit United
ed United States Is winning general ap approval
proval approval in uncommitted and offi officially
cially officially neutral nations but his dis disarmament
armament disarmament proposals are getting
a skeptical reception, a survey
showed today.
The tour has received heavy
coverage in the press everywhere,
but editorial comment varies from
nation to nation both in con content
tent content and in extent.
Newspapers in such pro-Wesl-ern
but officially-neutral nations
as Switzerland and Austria saw
Khrushchev's tour much as did
many US newspapers.
Retired PC Foreman
Walter Harris, 68,
Dies At Gorgas
Walter A. Harris, a former em employe
ploye employe of the Canal's Mau.tenance
Division, died at Gorcns Hospital
yesterday after a long illness. He
was 68 years old.
Mr. Harris was born in San
Antonio, Texas, and was employ employed
ed employed by the Canal organization from
1940 to 1942 as a foreman in the
Maintenance Division
For the past few years. Mr.
Harris has been living in El Espi Espi-no
no Espi-no near Chorrera.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced later.

Youthful Killer Who Heeded. 'Burn

Now Sorry
NEW YORK. Sent. 23

a u- J V' I j.
ed at him "to burn him" moments hafnro k. .k.t j l,:ii

a high school.
Cr D. U ..

, ... .... .. a, .a;o u, pu ng me xngger on the
an admission of cowardice in juvenile gangdom terminology
Witnesses told police that Peres had taken deliberate
"It was all a mistake," he said. "I didn't want to shnn

w horH ,iih i,,niu a
linquency with a stipulation of
homicide.
A ninth member of the Knights,
Angelo Diaz, 20, be lieved to have
possession of the murder weapon,
was being sought.
All, including Guzman, are Puer Puerto
to Puerto Ricans.
Witnesses to Guzman's slaying
said eight of 10 boys dressed in
blue, tan or white trenchcoats
converged on the ?outh as he
chatted with several conTpanions
in front of Trinity Episcopal
Church in The Bronx. There was
an argument and Guzman started
to run toward nearby Morris High
School where he was a sophomore.
A single shot through the low lower
er lower left chest from a .11 rifle cut
Guxman down on the top step of
the school and he collapsed
Inches from the door.
He died two hour later in Lin
coln Hospital, gasping:
' Royal Knights got me."
Police said the shooting stem
med from a dispute between the
two gangs over an infringement
by a Knight on the "turf" of
the Crowns.
This occurred when the Knl?ht
en'ered territory ruled by the
Crowns to visit a girl friend.
The pace of juvenile crime
has stepped up during the past
few days.
Six vouths armed with a knife
tanged up on a sailor near the
B-ooklyn Navy Yard Monday
irpht and robbed him of $10. Two
teenagers allegedly kidnaoed and
raped a 13-year-old during th?
weekend, and a similar assault
on a 17-year-old girl was reported.
Meanwhile In Pikeville, Tenn.
a 12-year-old Negro bov began
serving a 35-year-term at the state
training school for Negro boys for
the rape of a 7-year-old white
girl.
Authorities said James West Westmoreland.
moreland. Westmoreland. Nashville would re
main here until he is 18 and then
be transfrred to the state prison
in Nashville. Westmoreland ad admitted
mitted admitted the charges in criminal
court.
The ury turned down a plea
by Asst. Atty. Gen. Howard But Butler
ler Butler that Westmoreland be oiven
a 25-year-sentenc. The jury de deliberated
liberated deliberated about five minues be before
fore before increasing the penalty an another
other another 10 years.
The Senate Juvenile Dclinauen-
cy Subcommittee begins hearings
laster today on New York's summer-long
wave of Teen terrorism.
Five vouths have been killed
In tha last month in the siege
of murder, stabbings and rape.
Mayor Robert F. Wagner will
be the first of about 50 witnesses
to testify before the committee.
CIGAR CAUSES ODOR
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) Jit Jittery
tery Jittery security officers spent a hec hectic
tic hectic evening last night tracing
the source of a strange odor in
the Mark hopkins Hotel shortly
after the arrival of Soviet Premier
Nikita Khrushchev. They checked
(he wiring, neon signs and the en entire
tire entire lobby and then found a cig cig-aret
aret cig-aret smoldering in a large potted
plant.

For Gunning Rival On

(UPW FAujarA Tl. D,,,.

-
X ii.. . ....

vwiwib us aiiui. hi iii n
-
AMBUSHED Just before he

f .III Ajm y$i wMS;t :
"' C 1
A J, J.'.sj&ri ffej&g!

pressed close to the dying youth's mouth, the name of the gang
fhe0rkmUf & Bmnx hlgh schooL Hours later

TeSn terrorism strides along on
ly a' few sidewalks in New York.
Most of the city is peaceful.
Most subways, school corridors
and playgrounds are safe despita
the fact that terrorism has erupt
ed on a subway, mrked in a
school corridor and spit death in
a playground.
While the terrorists may spill
blood, most of the Teenagers in
New York still stick to harmless
pranks.
The lethal mischisf has been
traced to street gangs. There
may be as many as ISO of such
gangs with a total membership
of more than 7,000.
This is small percentage of
the metropolis' eight million po population.
pulation. population. For every street gang, there are
hundreds of Boy and Girl Scout
troops. Most of their 155,439 mem members
bers members spend their time in construc constructive
tive constructive activity.
These troops iunction in the
same rundown neighborhoods
where gang cloashes or "Rumbles"
even slayines occur
They are in the majority in
their neighborhoods.
Their members go to plays and
concerts, sponsored by the youth
organizations to which they be belong.
long. belong. Some of them work, without
fanfare, as volunieers in hospitals
and homes for oriopled children.
A majority of them, working
together, side by side, are Ne Negroes
groes Negroes and Puerto Ricans.
Weather Or Not
This weather report for the 24
hours ending; 8 a.m. today Is
prepared by the Meteoroloeical
and Hydrogranhic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company :
Balboa Cristobal
TFMPF.RATURE-
High 80 78
Low 71 74
HMDITY:
High 95 97
Low 84 M
WIND:
(max, mph) NW-11 SW-17
RAIN (Inches) .03 .25
W'W-H TEMP:
(inner harbors) 81 81
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake 84.19
Madden Dam 224.59
BALBOA TIDES
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 23
High
Time
7:25 a.m.
7:51 p.m.
Time
1:2$ a.m.
1:49 p.m.
Ht.
14.4 ft.
14.5 ft.
Low
lit.
2.7 ft.
2.7 ft.

n a e ...

r., IO, Tom today how members of hii eane had tcrtarrw
- .j r... a" "u atireiarn

iii ru m r i w a i iranrv ma l. i
- "lomuer wno
cut-down 22 .caliber rifle he
.
aim at his cornered victim,
t t -i
. VII1J vy an icq to
dies, John Guzman,
Those are the same groups,
who, according to authorities,
'mix it up" in gang fights in
the same areas.
Police figures show that there
are about 1,600,000 in the metro metropolitan
politan metropolitan area between the ages of
14 to 19. Of that number, they
estimate that annul 7,500 are mem members
bers members of gangs. Some of that 7,500
Retired Zonian
Amos Fox, 73,
Dies Suddenly
Amos Fox, former employe of
the Personnel Buieau, and long
lime resident of the Canal Zone,
died ai Gorgas Hospital al 4:20
a.m. today after suffering what
appeared to be a heart attack al
7:55 p.m. yester.iay. He was .73
years old.
Mr. Fox collapsed Tuesday night
in (he Balboa Clubhouse and was
rushed to Gorgas Hospital after
receiving first aid from Dr. C. E.
Hawkins. His death occurred some
hours later.
Born in Eldrcd, Pennsylvania,
Mr. Fox came to the Isthmus in
1912 and worked as a clerk with
the Isthmian Canal Commission
until 1914. He was reemployed as
a clerk in the Personnel Bureau
in 1917 and, with only a two-year
break in his service remained in
the same unit until his retirement
in June 1946. At thai time he held
the position of Administrative As Assistant,
sistant, Assistant, i
Since his retirement. Mr. Fox
has been living at the Tivoli
Guest House. He had no Imme Immediate
diate Immediate relatives on the It: mus.
Funeral services will be an
nounced later.

AMOS FOX

I
I..

Hii

im 'tgging
School Steps
"0 tuw,r,n8 on w steps of
'
was cowering
earned or "chickenine out
-nignning eui,
John Guzman also 18 But
,
irignien mm. rm very sorry

17. tplle a Kenr Vni-V nll..-.. .

which rtwrt T him 'ZSSi
rnot all of them- are taught m
!n 'he violence that has spread
headlines across the country
The ybuth division of thr- pe.,
lice department and. thiry'i
youth board spearhead efforts
to quell Teen troubles. They; aim
to curb the epidemic before it
becomes more widespread.
Ralph W. Whelan, commission commissioner
er commissioner of youth services, coordinatei
me .ami-gang Dattie.
He also ig executive vice' chair chairman
man chairman of the New York City youth
Board.
Youth board, workers, he said,
gain the confidence of gangs,- en encourage
courage encourage them to avoid fighting,
htip them get jobs, help them with
family problems.
Whelen said workers attend
hard-core gang meetings and try
to put the gang leadership on
democratic footing.
The workers report impending
rumbles to police. They report,
too, weapons carriers and narco
tics oeddlers.,
When a rumble is in the wind,
youth board workers get leaden
of oppsing gangs together -round
a peace table to talk out
the difficulties. Frequently
truce is called.
, During July and August, he
sa;d, 192 incidents, including rum rumbles,
bles, rumbles, have been averted.
A year ago, 126 were averted;
The races are mixed in most
gangs, but one ethnic element do
rr.inates as a rule..
Negro and Puerto Rican gang!
have warred on Italian and Irish
gangs.
But sometimes, Negro cantrf
war on Puerto Rican gangs and
Negro gangs war on Negro gangjj.
THE ALMANAC
Today is Wednesday, Sept. 23,
the 26th day of the year, with t
more days in 1959.
The moon is approaching ft
last quarter.
The morning star is Venus.
The evening star's are Jupiter,
and Saturn.
On this date in history:
In 63 B.C., Augustus Caesar, the
first. Roman emneror, was born.
In 179, the American naval
hero, Commodore John Paul
Jones, commanding the Bonhom Bonhom-m
m Bonhom-m Richard, won the naval battle
with the British at which he ut uttered
tered uttered "I have not yet begun t
fight."
In 1806, the Lewis and Clark ex expedition
pedition expedition arrived at St. Louis, hav having
ing having succeeded in its mission. Thf
expedition which took over Fw8
years, covered over 8,000 miles
of wilderness. "cVf
In 1938, t time capsule was bur buried
ied buried on the grounds of the world'
fair in FlusHng Meadows, New
York City. The capsule is to be
unesrthed in the year 6939 to how
the people of that dav the eu.Uur
of America in the 1930's..
A thought for today: English
novelist John Gaisworthv laid:
'If you do not think about the
future, you cannot have ene."

7li

1 ( f V- i (' , 'i V T