The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03122

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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AN ttJDEPEKDENT CS DAILY NEWSPAPER
VI
CANADIAN WHISKY
'Let lite people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln
I4TH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, 1959
FIVE CENTS

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men titer the latter stepped

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Russian Invasion In Homeland Leaves CZ
Musing On Lunar Bullseye, War, Baseball
A cynical tone today underscored Canal Zone opinion on Russian Premier Nikita
Khrushchev's late morning arrival on American soil.
But events of the past three days, notab ly Russia's stunning success in landing a
space rocket on the moon, may have added to the cynicism.
It is thought the absenoe of Hungarians here accounts for the lack of violent pro.
posals regarding the Khrushchev's portly person, although one retired Zonjan and ex.
newsmari said he would be happy to have h is opinion quoted if he could be assured his
unprintable remarks would be printed.
His offer was declined, with profuse thanks.

Here's" a roundup of Zone opin-
lon, selected at random, on the
historic visit.
"They the elaborate security
guard) better take good care of
him," said a veteran engineer.
"No telling what might happen if
the old boy got knocked off in the
Slates."
A Balboa Heights regular, thought
"He will get a more enthusiastic
reception in the States than Ike
will get in Russia, and probably
a lot more courtesy."
"Talk, talk, talk, talk," sai
a usually rasarvact Canal vatar vatar-n.
n. vatar-n. 'Don't axpact nothing but
hot air, and most of that stale
PC Executive
Secretary Back v
Paul M. Runnestrand, execu executive
tive executive secretary of the Canal Zone
government, returned to the
Canal Zone last night" after
spending several weeks in
Washington, D.C.
Runnestrand was assigned to
temporary duty in the wash
ington office during the vaca
tion of W. M; Whitman, secre secretary
tary secretary of the Panama Canal Co.
During his absence,' "Forrest O
Dunsmoor, deputy execu 1 1 v e
secretary acted as executive
secretary.
Today's Transits
(scheduled)
Northbound 17
Southbound 13
TOTAL
30
(Clear Cut: t)

n
from his Diane today at Andre
Voicing a majority opinion, a li-
,terate secretary observed that
"Khrushchev comes to Washinton
with the tremendous advantage of
the successful moon rocket clutch clutched
ed clutched in his first."
Like many queried, she felt cer certain
tain certain the rocket shot was planned
in the hope it would coincide with
K's visit.
An. avid baseball fan, who didnt
care to indetify his job, grumbled
hV didn't give a hoot for the Rus Russian
sian Russian dignitary one way or the
other. Apparently nothing was
going to divert his attention from
the pennant race windup:
A veteran cop; "Just glad I'm
not part f th security, detail.
It was bad enough when Quatn
Elizabeth was lown here."
An ingenious proposal came from
an englishman connected, with
commercial shipping interests
the Zone, "Why, I say'
in
Ike

Zone's Latin American School Kids
Relax In Annual Mid-Term Vacation
The annual mid-term vacation started yesterday in the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone for approximately .3900 students in the Latin Amer American
ican American schools.
The vacation for the Latin American students and their
teachers will continue ail this week and will come to an end
next Monday when classes will be resumed in all schools. No
special activities have been planned.
The school year in the Latin American schools started in
May and is geared to that in Panama so that the mid-term
vacation is at approximately the same time;:, The school year
will end In February, I960. V :

Cake Kiss Controversy Arouses Spicy Gossip; Housewife Sues For Dough

WAPKONETA, Ohio (UPI) A
slim housewife whose fuss about a
buss became a favorite gossip top
ic the past, four years said yester
day she doesn't' know if she will
appeal a decision denying her
$7,500 for the stolen kiss.
"We haven't decided if we ought
to appeal," Mrs. Alvina Jirorein,
,29, of rural Buckland, said.
"But that jury was definitely
prejudiced," her husband, Ber Bernard,
nard, Bernard, said. "Just like the first
one."
The Jury said the $7,500 the Bro-
rein family collected from 73 year-

'A Soviet PremlEE.NUuU Khriwihoher tmiled momtrrt Iwr newt

ws Air Fore Base near Washiniitoiu :i v

should propose to Khrushchev that
the two countries launch a joint
assault on Mar. The project
might take, say, five or 10 years.
and during the interval the people
on earth could breathe easy.
But a' vataran army officer
perhaps '., sounded the deepest
notes, ;
'It's a damn strange world,"
ha said. "First we fight a war
alongside them for four years,
and are told to love them like
btothart.
Then for ten or 15 years we get
taught a new catechism the Rus.
sian Bear is history's most sinis sinister
ter sinister villain.
"Finally, for the past six weeks
we have had to listen to endless
public lectures against bad man manners
ners manners and crank behavior against
the Russian leader. Why don't they
make up their minds?"
And who could say him nay?
old Albert Kurtz for the stolen kiss
would have to be returned to him
plus three per cent interest.
The "Kiss-Cake Case" has been
the talk of Wapakoneta for four
years. Fajrmer Kurtz, then 69, was
working op Mrs. Brorein's front
porch and she waved him in to
give him a piece of cake to deliver
to his sick wife.
What happened then has been a
matter of dispute.
As the balding Kurt? tells it, the
young lady invited his attentions.
"I was working on the porch, re
pairing it, you know," he testified

NO ASCENT FOR JUPITER AS
KHRUSHCHEV DESCENDS ON U.S.
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla, Sept. 15 (TJPI) The Arm? failed
early today to fire its intermediate range Jupiter rockel, three
hours after a scheduled Vanguard rocket launching was post postponed.
poned. postponed. The double missile failure came only hours before Soviet
Premier Nikita Khrushchev arrived in the United States to per personally
sonally personally tell President Elsenhower of Russia's successful moon moon-shot,
shot, moon-shot, Lunik II.
A malfunction prevented the Jupiter from leaving its pad,
a spokesman for the Atlantic Missile Test Range said. The mal malfunction
function malfunction occurred shortly after ignition, causing the engine "to
cut off automatically while still on the launching pad."

Three hours earlier an at attempt
tempt attempt to place in earth satel satellite
lite satellite in orbit with a Vanguard
rocket also failed. The Van Vanguard,
guard, Vanguard, expected to hurl a 50 50-pound
pound 50-pound instrumented satellite
into orbit, was never ignited
and its firing was postponed
until an unannounced date.
In London, newspapers re reported
ported reported today that the Russian
aioon shot "shook" the United
States on the eve of the
Khrushchev, visit.
"The usual blase, poised cap capital
ital capital of the United States is
dithering, unsure of Itself, and
making zero-hour changes of
plans," the Daily Mail report reported
ed reported from Washington.
"Never have security chiefs
been so insecure talk about
the Iron Curtain."
"There Is no doubt that
Russia's tremendous triumph
in hitting the moon has great greatly
ly greatly shaken and disturbed an
America which was already
In a worried and uncertain
mood over Khrushchev's visit.
The Dally Express Washing Washington
ton Washington dispatch said.
But American scientists meet meeting
ing meeting at Nantucket, Mass., hailed
the Russian lunik rocket as a
diplomatic triumph and an im important
portant important scientific achievement.
It was "a wonderful diplo diplomatic
matic diplomatic shot," aid Dr. Harlow
Shapley, world-renowned astro astronomer
nomer astronomer on the sta'ff of Harvard
Observatory. "Scientifically, it
during his trial, which ended Fri Friday.
day. Friday. "I had a box to move or some
thing and she came along and
helped me carry it behind the
house, I sat down on the box as
she went by me, and I threw out
my arm and told her she was a
nice girl."
"Did you touch her'" his attor attorney
ney attorney asked.
"No," said Kurtz.
But Mrs. Brorein't story differ differed.
ed. differed. She said she did nothing to in invite
vite invite the farmer's sdvanres. "1 may
have said hello through the win

Atlantic Headwinds Delay Russians
On History-Making Cold War Mission
WASHINGTON, Sept. 15 (UPI) Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev arrived at 12:21 pm
today for a fateful 13-day American visit and talks with President Eisenhower that seemed cer certain
tain certain to affect the course of the Cold War for better or worse.
1 The Communist leader, his family and official party landed behind schedule at nearby An Andrews
drews Andrews Air Force Base after their Russian Tu-114 turboprop plane battled delaying 100 mph head headwinds
winds headwinds over the Atlantic on their non-stop journey from Moscow.

President Eisenhower was at the foot of the steel 27-step ramp when the roly roly-poly
poly roly-poly Khrushchev descended for the beginning of a visit that will take him coast to
coast and wind up with crucial man-to-man conversations with the President.
Then, for the first time in his career, Khrushchev was accorded the full honors
of a visiting chief of state a 21 -gun salute, review of a proud honor guard of the
four armed services, reception by top-ranking officials of the American government
and their wives, and the playing of the National Anthems of the two nations.
This was the first time Khrushchev had ever set foot on American soil.

Eisenhower welcomed Khrush
chev to the United States with the
assurance that the American peo people
ple people "have no ill will toward any
other people, that they covet no
territory, no additional pover.'
"Nor do they seek to interfere in
the internal affairs of any other
nations," the p r e i d ent told
Khrushchev.
"I most tinctrtly hop that as
you earn to sat and btliava
thasa truths' about out- ptoplt
thara will davalop an improvad
basis an whlelj w can -tagethar.
JUJUatmws,iii - u
. Soviat jaadar
shows they were
able to make
the complicated mathematical
computations necessary."
Dr. Fred L. Whipple, direc director
tor director of the Smithsonian Astro Astro-physical
physical Astro-physical Observatory, praised
the Soviets' guidance mecha mechanisms.
nisms. mechanisms. "This shot shows the
Russians have developed an
extremely good guidance sys system,"
tem," system," he said.
"By golly, they're good,'
cheered Dr. Kirtley F. Mather,
president of the American Aca
demy of Arts and Sciences, and
chairman of the three-day
gathering.
Gen. John B. Medaris, chief
of the Army's rocket and mis missile
sile missile development, commented in
Huntsville, Ala., that the US
cannot match the Soviet feat
of hitting the moon "in the im immediate
mediate immediate future." t
He blamed a lack of money
being spent for US rocket pro programs.
grams. programs. "I have said repeatedly that
we have the knowledge, under understanding,
standing, understanding, people and resources
here to match Russia and even
surpass Russia in its space and
missile program. The problem
is how much Americans want
to spend oh our resources for
our space projects," Medaris
said.
"I am fearful that we only
come to life when we are
shocked by some achievement
of the Russians."
dow, but I wasn't smiling," she
testified.
Kurtz and Mrs. Brorein agreed,
however, that while he was in the
house to get the cake he kissed
her.
After that kiss, Kurtz said, he
had nothing but trouble.
He testified Brorein, his wife,
and Brorein's father demanded
$5,000, his 86-acre farm and his
town property or they would take
him to court.
"They came to my home, said 1
had molested Mrs. Brorein. and
they'd have to have a settlement

Eisenhower said he was looking
forward to his talks with Khrush
chev and "although we shall not
be negotiating any issues affecting
the interests of other countries, I
trust that a full and frank ex exchange
change exchange of views on many subjects
may contribute to better under understanding,
standing, understanding, on both sides of unresolv unresolved
ed unresolved international problems."
The honor guard, with fixed bay bayonets
onets bayonets and in summer dress uni
form, snapped to attention as the
plane door opened and Khrushchev
first Russian leader. Czarist or
Communist, ever to visit America
Ldescended with his wife-
Eisenhower shook hands with the
Soviet premier and cordially wel
comed the rather shy ana piump-
ish Mrs. Khrushchev.
Then the American and Soviet
leaders walked together through a
cordon of troops to a receiving
line. Eisenhower presented Khrush
chev to Secretary of State Chris
tian' Herter and his wife.
MrS Herter handed a bouquet to
Mrs. Khrushchev.
The Khrushchev's were escorted
by protocol chief Wilpy Buchanan
along the line of dignitaries.
They were first welcomed by
UN ambassador Henry Cabot
Lodge who will be thoir guide on
trips to New York, Los AnRcles,
San Francisco, the Des Moines,
Iowa area and Pittsburgh.
Khrushchev walked along a 150 150-foot
foot 150-foot red carpet.
Ha hid somathuig rad with him,
too. It was a raplica of the pen pennant
nant pennant the Russians say they
plantad on tha moon with their
rocktt. Khrushchev brought it a a-long
long a-long a a souvenir for Eisenhow Eisenhower.
er. Eisenhower. The United States had attempted
two rocket shoots from Cape Ca
naveral, Fla.t early today hut both
failed.
An Army jupiter malfunctioned
and did not leave the launching
pad. Three hours earlier an at
tempt to put an earth satellite in
orbit with a Vanguard rocket wa.
called off.
Eisenhower left the premier
briefly to greet Khrushchev's two
daughters, Yulia, 42, and Rada,
29, his son, Sergei, 24, and his son-in-laW
Alexei Adzhubei.
Then the president and premier
mounted the reviewing stand and
faced the honor guard, command commanded
ed commanded bv a colonel whose unit usually
patrols the tomb of the Unknown
Soldiers.
Tha US Army band played four
ruffles and flourishes. Than tha
strains ef tha Soviet national an anthem
them anthem sounded across an air bate
that Is tha key to tha aerial de defenses
fenses defenses of Washington.
The first round of the 21-gun sa
lute was fired simultaneously with
the first note of music and subse subsequent
quent subsequent rounds boomed out at three
second intervals.
Then the band of 55 men played
the Star Spangled Banner.
Eisenhower and K h r nshchev
walked toegther from the platform
to the ramrod stiff honor guard
for it. They wanted all my prop property
erty property and $5,000, too.
"They came one day at 9 a.m.
and stayed until S p.m., trying to
talk us into giving them the mon money"
ey" money" But the Broreins claimed It was
Kurtz Who came to them, offering
a settlement.
"We made no demands," Brorein
said. "Kurtz made all ihe offers."
In an earlier trial, jury had
also ruled in favor of Kurtz. But
an Appeals Court ordered tha case
retried on a technical error.

Washington!

for inspection. It consiated of four
30-man platoons from the Army,
Marines, Navy and Air Force.
Only a singla 6-by-10-foot Ham Ham-mar
mar Ham-mar and Sicklt flaw at tha air airport.
port. airport. It and a smaller flag fly flying
ing flying from tha standard at Blair
House, where tha Khrushchev
family will stay, will be tha on only
ly only Russian flags officially dis displayed
played displayed in Washington except for
small banners flying from Soviet
automobiles.
Khrushchev's delayed arrival
upset the plans of all Washington,
including those of the president.
Eiaenhftwar-dtcye. i-he ,15 miles
from the White House to the air airport.
port. airport. Also set back were elaborate
welcoming arrangements. The ar arrival
rival arrival had been scheduled for 11:30
am to insure lunch hour crowds on
the capital streets when the Pres President
ident President drove into the capital with
Khrushchev and his wife.
The strictest security measures
in peacetime history were invoked
to protect Khrushchev.
President Eisenhower walked
400 feet out onto the airport apron
to greet his guest. He was alone
except for chief of protocol Wiley
T. Buchanan Jr.
A 49-star American flag rippled
in the sunshine at the airport.
For Khrushchev's first glimps?
of Washington, the day wis per perfect.
fect. perfect. They sky was almost cloud cloudless
less cloudless and the temperature was in
the low 70S.
But at tha high altitudts en
route tha Russian plana, with an
American navigational and radio
crew aboard to bring it in, had
been forced to buck the strong
headwinds that often delay east-to-west
flights.
While Khrushchev was coming
to town, Congress was leaving.
Congress worked through the en entire
tire entire nicht and early morning,
partly to avoid beine in session
when Khrushchev arrived.
The House finally adjourned at
6:21 am and the Senate three min minutes
utes minutes later.
The first Eisenhower-Khrushchev
"business" session was
scheduled for 3:30 pm EDT at
the White House. The two lead leaders
ers leaders were expected then to initiate
basic "exploratory" talks on vi vital
tal vital international issues, including
the problem of Berlin and Ger Germany
many Germany which Khrushchev has
said is paramount.
Because of the protocol applying
to such an occasion. Vice president
Richard M. Nixon was not at the
airport. Nixon had been up with
the rest of the Senate all night and
didn't get to bed until after 7 am.
The Vice president's first en encounter
counter encounter with Khrushchev since his
Moscow trip was to come at the
White House meeting.
Khrushchev planned to bring a a-lone
lone a-lone foreign minister Andrei Gro Gro-myko,
myko, Gro-myko, Russian ambassador to
Washington Mikhail Menshikov and
A. A. Soldatov, chief of the Amer American
ican American department in the Russian
foreign ministry.
Tonight President and Mrs. Els Elsenhower
enhower Elsenhower Were playing host at a
formal White House dinner to
the Khrushchev family with
tome 10 additional guests from
tha highest governmental and
diplomatic circles. Khrushchev
was to don white tie tr.d tails for
tha first time In his Dfe.
Three
such Soviet officials as Oro-
myko and his wife, followed
Khrushchev's.
But military men and high high-ranking
ranking high-ranking government officials
were conspicuously ahsent on
a trip that has fifed RiuHrtn
and the w.uld with
IviTtes of -n end to the Cold
IVnr
Khrushchev, exultant because
of the successful SovleJ moon 1

rocket, brought with him aj
gifts for President aiseniiover
a replica of the metal pennants
the iocket planted on the moon
early yesterday.
All the pomp and ceremony
accorded trm No. 1 Communist
us head of a foreign state stjil
left hanging the question of
how the man in the street
would greet Russia's leader on
his parade into Washington and
his trans-continental tour dur during
ing during the 13-day visit.
Khrushchev was eager to be begin
gin begin some personal "summiU "summiU-manship"
manship" "summiU-manship" quickly at this after afternoon's
noon's afternoon's White House "business"
session.
The Soviet leader apparent apparently
ly apparently wanted to try his hand af
some personal negotia i n g
with Eisenhower immediate
instead of settling for the an anticipated
ticipated anticipated polite greeting on.
the White Bouse front steps
and a tour of the famous old
mansion.
Press Secreatrv James Has-er-

ty said emphatically thavhe thavhe-White
White thavhe-White House call should not M
characterized as a courtesy, vis visit
it visit but as a business session.
Also present for the United
States will be secretary of state
Christian A. Herter and Henry
Cabot Lodge, US amabssador to
the United Nations and Khrush Khrushchev's
chev's Khrushchev's guide on his trans-continental
tour, and Foy Kohler,
State Department expert on Eu European
ropean European affairs.
The meeting will take place
in the President's office.
Both Eisenhower and Khrush Khrushchev,
chev, Khrushchev, while agreeing their talks
would be only exploratory, have
expressed hope they might start
a thaw in the Cold War and
lessen chances of a catastroph catastrophic
ic catastrophic missile war.
It appeared they would get
right down to initial basic talk
on Germany, disarmament and
other East-West disagreements.
The Capital was in a state
of excitement unparalleled by
any previous state visit and
not all of it by any means
happy.
Ttie tightest security meas measures
ures measures in peacetime history had
been taken to prevent 'the
nightmarish possioility of a
fanatic's attempt to assassinate
the world s No. 1 Communist
leader during his 13-day visit.
Khrushchev got the 'full 21 21-gun,
gun, 21-gun, red-carpet reception at Uit
airport befitting the nead of
state as he has chosen to
designate himself.
Actuaiiy, he carries the title,
of head of the Council of Min Ministers
isters Ministers and First Secretary of tht
Communist Party.
The honor guard included
men of the combined unit of
Army, Marines, Navy and Air
Force who also patrol the tomb
of the Unknown Soldiers, one of
the places Khrushchev will not
visit in sightseeing.
The US Army band played
the Star Spangled Banner and
the USSR national anthem.
The visiting Russians can
only hum the music of their
song. The lyrics were banned
several years ago because one
stanza was devoted to praise
of Josef Stalin.
Khrushchev is accompanied
by his wife, two daughters, son
and son-in-law.
Khrushchev said before leaving
Moscow that he will present Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower with a copy of the hammer
and sickle pennant planted on th
moon by Russia's Lunik rocket.
In a statement issued through
the Tass news agency ami
echoed by Russian scientists,
Khrushchev called the rocket i
moon shot a victory "el thg .V"
whole Soviet people and thf

whale camp of Socialism." x.w't
He said the pennant he would

give Eisenhower was "a, symbol
for the joint efforts of -r
scientist.
engineers, workeri ... m, the)
struggle for better relations be
tween our two countries, for
Mac
on earth among all nations.' t
The Soviet coat of arms consist!
of a hammer and sickle superim- I
posed on a globe of the world'
which is topped by a red star, f "f
The emblem is enclosed in a .'
wreath bearing the phrase. "Work
ers oi the World Unite." V-

-t

i



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER U, Wf

pxai two
TBS tASkJAA

- .J
I I 1 J III ft S

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
CKNCD US KLlKWHtD THI PANAMA AMlaiCAN PMUS. INC
rebNMD NiLton loUNfivtu in
NAIMODIO ABIAB. ioito
!- H Inill P O Bon 4 Hn B Of
TtLIPHONt -0140 IS Lixttl
CASH tDMIII PANAMCHICAN. Panama
C6L0N OfFICI II '7 CtMTL AvtNUt irTIIN 12th AND 1 STM TItT
ForiiSN DlMrHXTATivll JOSHUA B fOAIBI INC
S48 Mabison Avt Mm YOKK ''7 1 N. Y
lCAl ""I
Pt MOWK rtt ABVANCt, 70 t SO
Fea M0WTK1 IN APVANCI BO S OO
On Veaw in Abvanc- 'B 9 1 00
THIJ IS YOU FORUM THI IAOIM OWN COLUMN
Tfc MilBo (it iorum oi rttitn T Panama Amrita
Letter ar raciiv' fratttylly ar art hana'Ks' in a wholly cnfiaWiai
teener.
It t ernW a lrtr don't ht imparltni If It Be tin t atai tht
ant 41. Lttttn art Bubliihed in tht Brdtr rtctivti.
Plsate rr ts kttp tint Urttrt limrrad tt out tiM Unit".
Idtntit Ittttr writtrt ii held in itricttit confident.
Tnii BBwtpapcr uiumii in reponibilit for rtattitnti or opmioni
.prtJJtd in lttttn trem rtdtr.
THE MAIL BOX
ISTHMIANS REMEMBER RAILROAD WHEN HILLS SILDE
Sir
It mv interest newcomers to know that one of the factors that
moved the United States Congress to forestall the planned scrapping
of the Panama Railroad was the hazard of slides on the (Traip-lsth-mian
Highwsv. This Vasn't the determining factor. Thai was, prob probably
ably probably Isthmian defense. The firmly voiced wish ""J. talte
men in Panama to keep the railroad service counted heavily. Their
wish was put on the line despite the efforts of the truck and bus
lines to have the railroad torn up and done away with
Cfoce again we have an illustration of the long headedness of
th law makers whose foibles and fanfare irritate us sometimes
If former Canal executives had had their way, the railroad
would have been scrap iron in Japan by Sunday when the Trans Trans-Isthmian
Isthmian Trans-Isthmian was blocked for six hours or more.
Pretty inconvenient, heh, for Panama City, Colon and both sides
of the Canal Zone? ...
So the railroad coupled on a few more cars and handled tne
business. Not many people missed planes or ships because of the
lldHow about remembering this, fellow Isthmians, when the next
fanfare is aimed at the railroad. Trivolor

Labor News
And
Comments

QUESTIONABLE CANDIDACY
Sir:
I wonder how long will it be before someone challenges the con con-gtitutionalitv
gtitutionalitv con-gtitutionalitv of Dicky Arias' presidential candidacy?
Panama's constitution states clearly that a president cannot suc succeed
ceed succeed himelf and must wait at least two presidential terms of four
vears before he can run again. But here it is Dicky Arias, who was
elected vice president in 1952 and served as president lor over a
year and a half has been nominated by his party as a presidential
candidate.
In addition, the Coalition has even nominated Heraclio Barletta,
who is now second vice president, as its first vice presidential can candidate
didate candidate for 1960.
It could be that the opposition 'has taken it for granted that they
have a hetlerthan-good chance to defeat Dicky if the National Guard
allows the holding of free elections. The opposition is probably
counting on Arias' apparently unconstitutional candidacy as an ace-in-the-hole
to spring on the Coalition just in case Dicky manages to
win Hnywiiy.
Many people have their doubts that Panama will be able to have
free elections in 1960 and if the arrest of several citizens who booed
Dicky during Saturday night's parade is any indication, next year's
flections will only be a repetition of the 1956 farce.
Walt N. Sob

CLUBHOUSE CONFUSION
Sir:
School kids, especially the Teenagers, get more than their
ihare of criticism, I suppose, but whether or not they are to
Maine, the noontime mess at the Balboa Clubhouse ought to be
itraightened out. I don't know what time the herd is released
!rom the school corral, but by 12:15 on school days, the club club-nouse
nouse club-nouse Jrom front door to back Is a noisy, pushing confusion of
youngsters.
They take over every facility, from the rest rooms and tele telephones
phones telephones to the candy counter and cafeteria line. I don't deny
them the right to use the place, but It makes life Impossible for
anyone else. They have nearly every table in the cafeteria, many
of them apparently using the space to eat their home-packed
lunches.
Far be it from me to deny a school kid his right to lunch.
But there are days when I'd like to eat there too. Getting a cup
of coffee and a bowl of soup becomes a real problem at noon
Mondays through Fridays.
Isn't there some place at the school these kids could eat
their lunch. Why should they carry lunch palls all the way to
the clubhouse to unload?
Looks to me like the PanCanal Schools Division is doing as
lou.'y a job providing for the kids' lunching as they did with
the school supplies melee.
Hungry and Trampled.

RP POPULACE STILL IN DARK
Sir:
It appears to me that once again efforts of certain opposi opposition
tion opposition groups to make political fodder out of the assassination of
farm.r President Jose Antonio Remon have come to naught.
Tnat is what I gathered after reading a story In yesterday'
The Panama American baed on statements attributed to ex ex-president
president ex-president Jose Ramon Guizado who was Impeached by the Na National
tional National Assembly for alleged participation in the murder plot.
I am sure that In anti-government quarters there was hope
that Guizado would have made new and sensational revelations
which the wishful thinkers expected would have fallen like a
bombshell on certain government leaders with such force as to
wipe out their political chances in the coming elections.
From this neck of the woods it would seem that Guizado
said nothing about the Remon assassination that had not been
Mid before, and with this lack of cooperation on his part, the
"mystery" of the Remon case lingers on.
All this brings to mind the threat that first vice-president
Temi Diaz made some years ago to tell the public "all" regarding
the Remon killing at a meeting at Santa Ana Park.
Temi's decision to reveal the true facts came just when he
broke from President de la Guardia's CPN party and the country
waited with bated breath for the showdown talk.
When Temi finished speaking at Santa Ana, the gullible, sensation-seeking
populace was still in the dark as far as the clear clearing
ing clearing up of the "mystery'' was concerned.
And that's exactly where the people are today following Mr.
Oulzado's Interesting but unenlightenlnyg radio chat.
In The Dark.

Vf!00 I AH JcW? S I
I fJ I OOJrOCATtONB MTEKNaJ
I I c a mn.tcro

By VICTOR RIESEL
They picketed the moon the
other day. Or perhaps it was
Mars. Few know which. We know
only t; at the pickets belong to
the International Union of Opera: Opera:-mg
mg Opera:-mg Engineers. This outfit is guar guaranteed
anteed guaranteed not to be selected by the
sculptors of the world as the mod model
el model for a majestic "Purity in Repose."

There is one road only turning

from the Florida beach highway
towards the Atlanlic to Cape Ca Canaveral.
naveral. Canaveral. Some day some astro astronaut
naut astronaut will take that road to the
Air Force Base and wind up in
the heavens. That is, if some loc local
al local construction union hasn't de decided
cided decided to place a lone picket with
a small "Don't Cross" sign at

the roadside.
The placard at the junction of

the highway and the one road
which all must travel can close
the secret super missile launch launching
ing launching base. The picket nsed only
stand by.

He will be recognized. No one

will go past him to work. Not
even if they are members of 10
other unions from 10 other cons

truction fimrs not involved in any

dispute, but merely working on
common site with an employer
whose union is angered with him.

This, in essence, is what the

Senate-House joint conference on

labor law has fought over biHer biHer-ly
ly biHer-ly for almost two weeks. This
picketing of a "common site" and
row to resolve it has been called
the "biggest stumblinp block" in
writing a new labor law.
Operating Engineers pekets
struck the famed missile site on
the morning of Aug. 31. Immed Immediately
iately Immediately the Atlanta, Ga., office of
Joe Finnegan's harassed Federal
Mediation Service aleripri its spe specialists.
cialists. specialists. They found tin the Op"r Op"r-ating
ating Op"r-ating Engineers who run the
cranes at the missile cantries
were striking the B.B. McCormick
Construction Co., of Jacksonville
Beach, Fla.
The Federals were concerned
for many reasons. The base is al always
ways always behind in its work. It is al always
ways always under construction. Launch Launching
ing Launching pads, dormitories, new block
houses are always needed. And,
loo, the Operating Engineers run
the elevators which carry missile
doctors up and down the long
rockets.
Furthermore, the other cons construction
truction construction workers soon would
respect the picket line. Shortly,
some 800 skilled men did just
that. They refused to go in, though
they had no quarrel with their
own employers. Their firms had
nothing to do with the McCormick
people, Yet, because the Operat Operating
ing Operating Engineers were out, the rest
had to down tools, as they say in
the classics.
But perhaps there was a heav heaven
en heaven shaking issue needing the
solidarity of the working class

That issue, it turned out, was

whether the comoanv should nav

double time instead of time-and-

a-half.
The 70 Operating Eneinerrs.

members of Local 673. wanted

double time. Their leader said

that the rules for work in North Northern
ern Northern Florida called for double
time. Since they were working

or a Jacksonville Beach corpora corporation,
tion, corporation, headquartered in the north
of Florida, the strikers said they
deserved double time.

The company officials pointed

out that the men were working
in centra Florida and that the
Central Florida Council rules
called only for time-and-a-half.

such are the going rates for other
employes. The union said. "No."
And out they went to the road roadside.
side. roadside. True, they issued special Dass-

es to those workers who were on

emergency tasks which is real

nice.
But emereencv work is nnl (hp

moral issue here. The Engineers
could rave picketed the Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville Beach offices. The union
choose instead to picket a "com

mon site." It threw S00 mm nut

of work for a while. This cost
'hem much needed pay. It cost
the other employers monev while

their equipment stood Idle. The

strike added to the government'!
construction costs.
No one amies the union's rieh.t

to strike or picket. What is being

argued is whether is has the right
to involve hundreds of other men
and rithsr firms in their own
quarrel.
And all this at the very moment
when national labor leaders, their
own chiefs, were embattled in the
corridors of Congress, trying to
eas the new law being written.
If the rank-and-file members
care not for labor's public rela relations,
tions, relations, they will have no one to
blame hut themselves for the
anger of the public and the lawmakers.

FLY INC TV NETWORK First step in an eventual chain of
Jky platferma to unit America and Europe via television has
.been taken by the Air Force. Raytheon, Inc., of Waltham,
"(Mbss., has been awarded a $90,0(10 contract to study methods of
l converting microwave energy into heat. The company had
-Mrlier announced plans for the chain of platform. Four
illations, hovering about 700 miles apart over Newfoundland,
Greenland, Ireland and Scotland, would relay a TV beam
cross th Atlantic. They are shown in drawinf, above, from
Wrrraft and Missiles Manufacturing magazine.

He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not

NEW YORK CONFIDENTIAL
By LEE MORTIMER

THE OTHER GANGSTERSI
In order to give my readers and
me a rest from the hoodlums, 1
am devoiing today's essay to those
other gangsters, the Communists.
There are many points of con contact
tact contact between the underworld and
the Communist underground, sex sexually,
ually, sexually, socially and sadistically. In
many instances they use the same
criminal devices, take advantage
of the same egghead court deci decisions,
sions, decisions, employ the same mouth mouthpieces
pieces mouthpieces and use threats, beatings,
torture and murder as normal
operating procedure.
Most of the world's narcotics
originates behind the Iron Curtain
whence it is transshipped to the
organized underworld for distribu distribution
tion distribution to the public. The Reds' pro proceeds
ceeds proceeds in dollars do not go back
behind the Curtain, however, but
are retained in America for the
support of undercover activities
here which cannot be financed
through normal banking or diplo diplomatic
matic diplomatic exchanges. All of this has
been proven conclusively by U.S.
Narcotics Commissioner Harry J.
Ansliger, and that is why he is
continuously hampered in his
work.
Both the Communist undergroun
and the underworld underground
make liberal use of females in
their illegal activities. Indeed sex
is the Communists' secret wea weapon.
pon. weapon. But, as with everythihg else
Communist, the fulfillment does
not meet the promise. (Did you
ever see the average Communist
babe?).
Communism is made palatable
to little faceless men and women
by offering them escape from re repressions
pressions repressions and frustrations It ii a
standard method of recruitment in
all non Communist countries
where female card holders are re required
quired required to show their loyalty to
the cause wherever and however
it will do the most good.
Marxism came into Russia on a
wave of free love which has since
been tempered down to a dull and
drab puritanism. In countries not
yet engulfed including our own,

7NJ

5

DAILY
MEDITATION

(PrssBntad by tht Dpartmnt
of Christian Education of the E E-piscopftl
piscopftl E-piscopftl Church in the Mission Missionary
ary Missionary Diocota of tho Panama Can Canal
al Canal Zone.) f
STRUCTURES OR SOULS
"Hoavsn it my thron and the
earth it my footstool; what it
tho houie which you would build
for mo?.. But thit it tho man
to whom I will look, ho that
It humblo and contrito in tpi tpi-rit."
rit." tpi-rit." RSV.
There has been no period In
Christian history when more
church buildings have been erect erected
ed erected than here in America in the
past decade. They have been the
rsult of hard work and sacrifice
on the part of many earnest
Christians.
Accordinly today's passage
come as a shock. There arc more

important matters to God than

buildings. Rites and cei"inonies
can degenerate into empty torms.

It is possible to put marble altars
and gtained gM windows in the

place of God. Ve become more

concerned with structures than

with souls.

God calls but we are so involv involved
ed involved in whether the carpet should

be red or green that we do not

hear His voice.

The prophet speaks of choosing

our own ways rather than those

of God. As he points out, this is
the sin of idolatry, and how easily
we fall into the trap. We give

to God, thinking He needs our
offering but in reality we are the
needy ones. All we can ofter God
is our need, yet this It the one
Sift He desires.

dreary men and women are

brought into the told at Bonenuan

sociais and soirees with tne lure

ot purple and unconventional de

light.
Once hooked, Communist fami

lies are required to teacn their

children tnat sex is biological and

not romantic. There is no place

for love and emotion in tnel prole proletarian
tarian proletarian paradise.- Deviation lrom

that rule is punishable by expul expulsion
sion expulsion from the party.
Sex is used as an inducement
for the comrades to attend meet

ings, it is a weapon lor ro

mancing unioneers in sensitive in

dustries. It has been used as a

standard tactic in lobbying and its
use in espionage is as old as es espionage
pionage espionage itself.
Another weapon of the Commu Communist
nist Communist conspiracy is flattery. Those
soft-on-Communism are per se "in "intellectuals"
tellectuals" "intellectuals" or highbrows. But
those who fight it are anti-intellectual
or just plain common low lowbrow
brow lowbrow slobs like me.
Thus there is a vocal, voluble

segment of Americans, numbering

millions, which claims to be anti anti-Communist
Communist anti-Communist but always hysterical hysterically
ly hysterically attacks those who try to expose

Communism, while invariably

leaping to the defense of those

accused of being Reds. To do oth

erwise would mean they aren't
intellectual.

These people are classed under
many labels, but what holds them

together is their devotion to the

words: "Welfare state." They plug
security from "the cradle to the
grave." They contend that treason
is excusable if the traitor became

"enlightened" in or after the

1940's.
They accept socialism as the
specific for all evils and they

believe Marxism differs from

communism. They are not to be
mistaken with hard core Commu

nists. They aren't that smart.
Of course, there are cliques
and factions and wings and blocs
among the Communists themselves
not only in Russia but in the
Western countries, as there are
among Democrats, Republicans,
unions and Wall Street trusts.
Some are Stalinists, others are
Trotskyites. And the majority goes
with Khrushchev at the moment.
Some are nationalists. Like Tito,
they practice communism but do
not want it directed from an out outside
side outside source. These so-called "na "native"
tive" "native" Communists are the most
insidious. They preach against Rus
sia but work for a revolution in
America that they will run them themselves.
selves. themselves. All these forms are closer
to each other than they are to
honest Republicans and Democrats
who are for the American way
despite policy differences.
Holding up the rear, like a huge
infantry, are these millions of "in "intellectual"
tellectual" "intellectual" Socialists and welfare welfare-staters,
staters, welfare-staters, above referred to, the
stooges of the party, unwitting,
idealistic, double dome Nice Nel Nellies.
lies. Nellies. Among them also are shrewd
and ambitious politicians as well
as the stunted visionaries.

fhe1eai v'eWr eteWntrlii'r join

ea witn a bottomless flush tuna
pioviaed by heirs, movie itars1,
popular autnors and others itching
with guilt and inferiority com complexes.
plexes. complexes. While they provide the money
and public relations the shock

troops oi tne organized Reds go

to war. They have access to the,

nation s military and diplomatic
secrets through their control of
the left-wing unions in the com communications
munications communications business and many
other industries.
Control of a shipping union, for
instance, may enable the Redi
to know every ship movement.
Strikes and tieups can interfere
with the flow of material: mem

bers may sabotage shipments to
our troops. Supplies may be stolen

irom ships and docks and trans

planted to Communist countries.
It requires little effort to a

rouse sympathy for Reds in Wash

ington, New York or Los Angeles.

To a large number of people

Aiger Hiss is a martyr.

They still engage in propaganda
to prove that Hiss was framed

by the FBI and bkacken, instead,
J. Edgar Hoover.
They have never forgiven this

fearless patriot for exposing the

nature of the common enemy nor
their own damn foolishness even

when he had to fight presidents
to do it.
The double domes and eggheads
yet mean to destroy him and his
dedicated men for puncturing their
vanity. With the help of the Com Communist
munist Communist underground and the gang gangster
ster gangster underground they will use
every foul means available, for as
long as the F.B.I, is free and
unhampered they cannot take ov.er
the country.

V
t

Washington
Merry-Go -Round
tr DREW FKARSON

T

WASHINGTON Though this co column
lumn column Dears a Washington date dateline,
line, dateline, actually it ii, written from
a near-by vacation spot, isolated
from the telephone, tne irritation
of Congresimen and the usual
mass of mail, where I caa con
centrate on what I consider to be

the most important newi deve

lopment of the year Nikita Kflrus
chev'i visit to the USA
In my opinion, the exchange
trips of Khrushchev and Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower will mark a turning point

in history from .which veithea. we

go ahead to a new area, ot peace
or we deteriorate toward war. In
this and subsequent columns I
should like to set forth the rea reasons
sons reasons why.
According to latest reports, mail
is streaming into the Wlte House
critical of Eisenhower lor agree agreeing
ing agreeing to the exchange visits. On top
of this certain powerful Senators
and churchmen have taken pub public
lic public postions in 'opposition.
Without doubting the sincerity
of these objectors, it seems to
me that President Eisenhower
has just two alternatives. He can
either fight or he can talk.

That may sound like an over oversimplification
simplification oversimplification of the case, but it
isn't.
When any two nations have at at-teined'the
teined'the at-teined'the strength of the USA
and the USSR, and have pretty
much divided the world into Com Communist
munist Communist bloc and capitalistic bloc
nations, then either they learn to
get along with each other, or face
an eventual military showdown a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst each other.
OUR POOR POSITION

sJCLefs;mihe-theC latter Uer

the outcome would be in case of
a military showdown.
Ten years ago, in 1949, the U U-nited
nited U-nited States had such preponde preponderant
rant preponderant air power in Western Europe
that we managed to break a mi military
litary military blockade of Berlin deliber deliberately
ately deliberately aimed at forcing us out of
that key city. Our- military
strength in the air was so predo predominate
minate predominate that the Soviet threw in
the sponge.
A year later with the advent of
the Korean war, we began build building
ing building a circle of air bases from
the Arctic to Nerth Africa, from
the Near East to the Far East,
which, studded with bombers and

fighters, made us by 1952 easily

the world's greatest military pow power.
er. power. But In the six years that have

passed since 1952 we have lost

that predominance.
Taking only the public state statements
ments statements of our military leaders
not their more pessimistic pri private
vate private statements w have lost the
edge necessary for decisive victory.

According to Secretary of Def

ense Neil H. McElroy we have no

plans for catching up with Rus Russia
sia Russia in the race for the dread,
long-range intercontinental ballis

tic missiles.
According to Keith Gl e n n a n,
head of the space agency, Russia

is far ahead of us in the conquest

of outer spacp.
According to Adm. Arleigh Burke
Chief of Naval Operations, Rus Russia
sia Russia is far ahead of us in subma submarines
rines submarines able to launch underwater
missiles.
On top of this, if we face the

fact that Russia has an army of
175 divisions against our 14 divi

sions that Russia now has tht
second biggest navy on the world;
that Russia has an atomic stock stockpile,
pile, stockpile, perhaps not as big, but ful fully
ly fully able to knock out the chief
cities of the USA then you can
understand why President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower is talking to Khrusnchev,
not righting Khrushchev.
COMPETITION
It is not the purpose of toes
columns to criticize Eisenhower
for le .ting us slide into this poor
bargaining position, but rather
o examine the realities of the si situation
tuation situation and see exactly what wa
face.
And the major reality, unpleas unpleasant
ant unpleasant as it may be, is that we have
lost the sure ability to win an
atomic war. A war today might
be a stalemate, with each said
suffering atomic fallout for years.
Or if taken by surprise, we could
lose.
In any event, the sure ability
to win which we had during the
Berlin airlift 10 years ago, ii
gone.

lhat is why Khrushchev preci

pitated the new Berlin c r 1 s i

witn such confidence. And that
is why we have steered away from
another Berling arilift and are

talking to Khrushchev instead.

The fact that Kmrushchev is
talking, rather than pulling the
trigger, is in itself a healthy
thing. It bears out the diagnosis
of former ambassador Charles
Bohlen, of ambassador Llewellyn
Thompson, and more recently of
Vice-president Richard M. Nixon,
that the Kremlin wants no war,
buL ai preparing for a long pe period
riod period of competition with tne ca-pilaristic"w6rld-h
trade, propa propaganda
ganda propaganda and the winning of men's
minds in Asia, Africa, and Latin
America.
If we are afraid of that com competition,
petition, competition, then we are afraid to
practice the basic principle of ca capitalism
pitalism capitalism which, of course, is com competition.
petition. competition. It may well be that Eisenhow Eisenhower
er Eisenhower and Khrushchev, during their
talks, will set out some of the
ground rules for this competition.
Khrushchev will be a tough
trader,' He'll be no pushover. But
you can write it down as certain
that on the behavior of the A A-merican
merican A-merican people during Khrush Khrushchev's
chev's Khrushchev's visit will partly depend the
success of Ike's talks.
If we show Mr. K the best side
of the USA it will strengthen Ei Eisenhower's
senhower's Eisenhower's hand. If there art
dangerous demonstrations, the re results
sults results could be disastrous.
What some diplomats fear Is a
repetition of Sarajevo, the little
Balkan city which the Archduke
Franz Ferdinand, heir apparent
to the Austro-Hungarian throne,
visited in 1914. The bomb that
killed him at Sarajevo started
World War I.

FORTUNATB SAMMY
EXETER, England (UPI) -Sammy
the squirrel jumped out of
the frying pan into the fire here
yesterday. Sammy bolted from
traffic into a furriers' shop.
"He wasn't our type," said the
shop manager when Sammy was
finally caught and freed in a field.
"We don't use English quirrel
fur."

matter of
FACT

The lighthouse of Pharos,
begun about 283 B.C. on the
island of Pharos, off the coast
of Egypt, aerved for more than
1,500 years before it was final finally
ly finally destroyed by an earthouake.

(There are conflicting accounts

of the lighthouse's height, but
it Is generally believed to have
been 600 feet tall.
O Encyclopedia. Brltannlca,

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TUESDAY; SETTIMBEHc 1M89

TEX fAHJMA AMERICA -. All UfDETETODTr DAUT NTWSP.1PEB
PAAI THIII
Only Guest flies non-stop to
MEXICO CITY
T

he JanM: American
.... j
tbiiGnues to

st records' i

advertisinq

mi circulatio

.

IN AUGUST yh.
American published more advertising than in
any other August in its history.
IN AUGUST
nama American sold more copies than in any
Other August in its history.
'
) :
AM 0 wnat 's true Auust s tme
the seven months of the year so far. The trend
of advertisers and readers to which has been
running strong for several years, is running
stronger than ever.

WHY?

WE THINK
with what seems to us to be the obvious reason.
Advertisers and readers alike get from The Pa Pa-nama
nama Pa-nama American the results they want-more for
their advertising money, more for their reading
time.
42

fa

AN INDEPENDENT

NEWSPAPER

NEW STRIPES ON RETURN Alc George A. Varney, Jr., medical corpsman, was surprised to
find he had beep promoted to the grade of staff se rgeant effective Sept, 1, upon his return from
three weeks of temporary duty with the medical team on the East Coast run. His wife, Lorraine,

Maj. Paul Musgrave, director of Dispensary services, and many co-workers from tne $70Utn u&Ar

IP

.vvHIWto

..... -. -vr

"Ut tho poophknow tho truth ani th country is iat" Abraham Lincoln

jW Only
W 6 hours W
Jin non-stop Jsa
kComfort

THE ROUTE OF THE SUN
fir tickh mi rrvotlon your (rovl a wit.
Gunrt Aerovlu Mexico, Jutto AroMmcn Atiim and Jl Stract
Vallarino Building -- Tel. 3-0369

Read Our Classifieds

USAF Jet Plane

Accidentally Shot

Down; Pilot Unhurt

TAncsftTJ "Miflh. fUPn One

Air Force Jet plane accidentally

ahot down anotner in uw air over
tnHiT but the nilot of

the craahed plan balled out

lately.
First Lt. Albert L. Pruden, 23,
TJoloioh WC attached to Self-

ridg Air Force Bate, wai the
pilot f the plane that was shot
down. His parachute ballooned

open ana he maa a saie landing
several miles from where the

plane crashed east of here,
Lt.- Col. Montri L. Davis, 38,
.TarVsnn Mini.. WS1 oilotinE the

other plane. He returned to Self-

ndg and reported tnai one 01 ine
ir.tn-sir misailei with which his

plane was equipped accidentally
firH Th mimiU hit Pruden's

plane while they were flying in

formation at jb.ow ieei.
PruHen wit nicked un hv state

police near Cassidy Lake, south

east et jacxson ana lanen 10
Chelsea where he was treated for
an injured ankle by Dr. Michael
Papo.

'Something went wrong with

my plane, I don't know what,"

Pruden said. He cum t Know inai
he had been bit by the missile.

A guard at Southern Michigan
Prison in Jackson heard the ex explosion
plosion explosion when the missile hit the

Diane. The prison is six to eight

miles from the area wner tne

plane was shot down.

Pruden was picked up axbout

11:30 a.m. Inmates of a prison

farm and farmers ran to his aid.

He suffered lacerations on his

right foot and injuries to his right

g-
A helicopter came from Self-

ridge to pick up Pruden, who

lives with his wife and infant son

in Mount Clemens.

Wanna (Hie) Make
Some Home Brew!

CLEVELAND. (UP!) It's

unlikely that the fine art of
home-brewing will ever make a
comeback.

Aside from the fact that the

US Alcoholic Tax Unit frowns

on the practice, Its resumption
is doubtful for another reason.
Not only are supplies hard to
find, but the art of home-brew

ing itself la an almost iorgouen

one.

f
folr In t.h pnrlv '20V rer.iDCS

flourished aplenty. But Prohibi Prohibition
tion Prohibition wont. nut. In 1933 and many

of those who brewed their own

now have only a hazy recollec recollection
tion recollection of how they did it.
Th formula, is relatively sim

ple once the supplies are ready.

uiv nnii cm inn or nnn-iiavor-

ed malt syrup with five pounds
nf in par And a tfftsnonful of

salt with two gallons of water

in one crocK as tne iirsi step.

Next Ada tne nrit mixture iu

fhree gallons of water in an

other crock. Add one cake of

yeast and allow the concoction
to ferment, in a warn place,
bottling on the fifth day while

it's still rermenunit w assure

carbonization.

COMPLiTl HONIYMOON

MADRID (UPI-Prince Albert
and Princess paola of Belgium

flew home yesterday after a "two

week" Spanish honeymoon that
lasted more than two months. The
young couple arrived at Palma,
Mallorea, on July 2, flying there
from their storybook wedding in

SAVE WITH ASTRA!
SAVE FROM 20 to 50 & BE SURE of QUALITY
Look for the trade mark in theso
and many other products

CREME SHAMPOO
4 oe. jar ONLY 50
1 34 o. jar -464
Other brands 4 oz. jar -90$
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back.

LIQUID SHAMPOO

Imported brands

5 oz. bot. ONLY 500
7 oi. -$1.15

7l2oz.- 0.93
4oz.- 1.00
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back.

STIMULIS

ASTRINE fls

8 o. bot. ONLY 45
Imported brands 7 oz. hot. 90t
Astrlne is an excellent preventive ef "halitosis"
(bad breath)
Guaranteed satisfaction or Vour money back.

it ASTRELIF (Cold Relicr Ointment)

4 oz. jar ONLY 50
1 oz. jar ONLY 200
lYi oz.jar 60 1

3 oz. jar 75t
1 oz. jar 35$
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back.

Other brands

greaseless hair tonic
5 oz. bot. ONLY 450
Imported brands 4 oz. bot. -75$
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back.

BRILLANTINEhairtaN

4 oz. jar ONLY 450
2 oz. 80$

2oz.-47$
Guaranteed satlaf action or your money back.

Imported brands

Mentholated INHALERS

Imported brands

ONLY 300
50$
55$

Guaranteed satisfaction or your money oack.

And FOR THE HOME! -A
A CTDCV LIQUID BLEACH
tSc Ao I KtA disinfectant

Quality controlled products
at sensible prices I
IF YOUR FAVORITE SHOPPINO PLACE
DOES NOT HAVE ANY OF THESE
ASTRA PRODUCTS Call Panama 2-3033
We will deliver to your HOME
AT NO EXTRA CHARGE

Other brands

32, oz. bot. ONLY 250
16 oz. bot. ONLY 140
32 ox. bot. 28-30$

16oz.bot. 16-17$
ASTREX Is exactly the same strengh as other brand
imported into Panama.
Guaranteed satisfaction or your money back.

ROACH KILLER "die g

The ONLY insecticide designed
to eliminate the German roach.
It does the job.
27 oz. bot. ONLY.70
Qgartntfcd MtlafacMon Of your mwrr bc. 1

I

Brussels.



TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 15, 1951

PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT .DAILY NEWSPAPER
" mm r V f
n
Contest Season Opens tor frize uraDDers;
' .... i ii tit r r t
Social and Otli
Dox 134,
Panama
ienvi5e
Moms, Dads, Kids All bcriDDie ror uougn
Authentic Maine Clambakes

t

f a,-
if

MEWS OF ENGAGEMENTS. MARRIAGES, BIRTHS, PARTIES AND TRAVEL SHOULD B& MAILED
PROMPTLY TO BOX-NUMBER SHOWN. IT WiLL EE RECEIVED BY TELEPHONE OVER
PANAMA 2-0740 OR 2-0741 BETWEEN 8:00 AND 10 A.M. ONLY.

W 1X0. OF PANAMA TO ENTERTAIN TOMORROW
IN HONOR OF VISITING OFFICIAL, MRS. SIEFF
Members of the Panama froup of the Women's Interna International
tional International Zionist Organization will entertain tomoirow evening
at the Panama Hilton Hotel In honor of its distinguished vis visitor,
itor, visitor, Mrs. Rebecca D. Sleff, world president of the organiza organization.
tion. organization. The event is planned for 8:3(1 to 10:30 p.m.
Mrs. Sleff, member of a prominent British family, is
making a tour of W.l.Z.0. roups in. Latin America.

All members are urged to attend.

-Amtrican Businessman
"Weds Mist Maria Grusk
At McGrath Residanet
Ol unusual social ...ierest on
the Isthmus is the announcement
ol the marriage Saturday morn morning
ing morning ot Miss Maria Grusk, daugh daughter
ter daughter ol Mr. and Mrs. Vincent
tirjsk, and Mr. John L'ristopher
Jj u y i e, American businessman
with vast interests in the United
States and Canada and majority
stockholder in the Panama Hilton
Hotel owning company.
Municipal Judge Miguel Concep Conception
tion Conception penormed the civil ceremo ceremony
ny ceremony at tne residence ol Mr. and
Mrs. Robert K. McGrath in Coco
del Mar. A number of officials
and socially prominent guests ol
Panama and the States were pre present.
sent. present. Witnesses were His Excellency
Joseph Smallwood, premier ol
Kewioundland's Province, Terra Terra-nova,
nova, Terra-nova, Canada, and Mr McGrath,
president ol Panani Uokers.
. Others attending wedding
included Mr. A. tourist
commissioner of ..mdland,
Mr. William Smalh. Col. and
Mrs. Bolivar Vallarino. Air. Ralph
,R. Rcber, Mr. and Mrs. Juan del
.Castillo, Mr. Pettifer. Mr. J.
Brock, Mr. J. Alexander and Mr.
James Price.
Asilo de Bolivar Group
Of IAWC To Sponsor
Card Party Next Week
The Asilo de Bolivar Committee
ef the Inter-American Women's
Club will sponsor a card party
Wednesday, September 23, at the
Union Club.
During the break for tea at four,

Dynasty fashion lrom -Motia's
will be shown and the drawing
for the door prize neki Ine prize,
a pair of canuelabra wnun may
be disassembled in a variety ol
arrangements, nas Ix n uonatey
by Henry Sommerfreund of Mer Mer-curios.
curios. Mer-curios. Miss Euper Honored
At Coffee Today
Miss Jo Ann Euper, who haa
been assisting Mrs. .Natalie Gril
fin in classes lor e.cj..ona,
children at Balbo.i, was honored

this morning at a voiiee given oy :
parents of the children in the
classrooms at tne Girl scout:
Shack. ;
I
Miss Euper, daughter ol Mr.,
Mrs. Raymond Euper of BalooaJ
will leave tomorrow to return to I

Michigan State University. She
will enter her senior year to stu study
dy study for a major in music therapy,

Eastern Star Chapter
P am Cristobal Daru
A gala dance is planued by Roy Roy-al
al Roy-al Palm Chapter Two, Order of
tne Eastern oUr, ,-istobal, for
the evening of Saturday Septem September
ber September 26, in in.; Cristobal Sl.y Moon.
Music will be' f tn.islietl uy iions
Janowitz and nis orchestra lrom
9 p.m. to a nt. A Hawaiian
theme wul be ufcJ, and ;nter ;nter-tainment
tainment ;nter-tainment will be provided by Ruth
Walea ami her riuianani. Inform Informal
al Informal dress will be appropriate.
A 10-cuDic foot food ireezer wil:
be awarded as a grano toor
prize, and spot prizes also will be
awarded.
oaioenis holding SA tickets will
be admitted to the dance lor hau
price, out will not be eligible for
the door prize. Proceeds irom tne
event wiL be used for the Star
cnapter's charity projects.

Engineers Society
Plans Dinner, Piogram
The Panama and Canal Zone
Chapter of the American Society
of Heating, Refrigerating and Air
Conditioning Engineers will meet
this evening at 6 at the Tivoli
Guest House for dinner and a
program.
Featured at the meeting will be
an address on "The Psychrome Psychrome-tic
tic Psychrome-tic Chart" by James t. Cullen,
member of the society and mecha mechanical
nical mechanical engineer for the Panama
Canal Company.
Members of the lct-iimc;ii com
mittee are expected to report on
plans lo sponsor a mechanic
training program.

DOROTHY CHASE'S

Studio of Dance
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS HALL, BALBOA
BALLET TOE CHARACTER TAP ACRORVI IC
Special classes for kinderoar, n and pre school lot
Registration will be held at the K of C
Wednesday and Thursday, September 16 and 17
from 2:30 to 5 p.m.

Gulick Ladies Guild
Hears Miss Kuoal
The regular moihly meeting, ol
the Fort Gulick Protestant Ladies
Guild was held at the Chapel
center with Miss Jean KubaJ,
head librarian at Guiick, as guest
speaker.
Her review was on "T h e
Strength to Move a Mountain,"
tne siory of the construction of
the Kuidiuu Canal.
Hostesses for the meeting were
Mrs. Marvin Nofte and Mrs A
brahani Gu.nez. New of.icc.ts el elected
ected elected a,;nn Ine business session
were 'An James Sonne, presi president;
dent; president; Miss Kubai, vice pnsident;
Mrs. P iihp Judson, secietal'y;
Mrs. William Foliaici, ireasuivr.
Mrs. Dona'd Kiot and Mrs.
James fnoi'iton were tvo.tOTiJ
as tie iiei'i.Ha. Alts. Linswccd,
president of the Marganta Union
Church G.'.ild, was a gue;
Others attending weie Mrs.
James ikufccs. Ails. L.i;n Green,
Mrs. Cec. iimes, ir. arroll
Chaphe, Mrs. Avis Kclley, Mrs.
Elroy Lipsey, Mrs. James Eier
and Mrs. Gerald McCurtly.

Amei icn Legion
Auxiliary To Meet
'i.ic American Legion Auxilia Auxiliary's
ry's Auxiliary's department executive com committee
mittee committee will meet Saturday after afternoon
noon afternoon at 3 at Albert F. Waid Post
Two in Cristobal.

Curundu Women's Club
Card Party Tomorrow
The monlhly card party of the
Curundu Women's Club will be
held tomorrow morning at nine
at the home of the club president,
Mrs. Thelma Guibert, Qtrs. 2153A,
Curundu. Members are invited to
nttend with guests.

Always on hand

The smart housewife always has ice cold
Coca-Cola on hand to refresh friends who
come to call, to fire a lift to a light lunch,
to please the children at play. Everyone
likes Coke's cool crisp taste that so deeply
satisfies. No wonder Coke Is the real frrsh frrsh-ment.
ment. frrsh-ment. .anytime. .anywhere.

Symbol at jnoil (nrte
In over 100 rminlrirn.

HcKiilur

Blf

THE PANAMA QCU' BOTTLIKG COMPANY
Celebrating 50 yoarn of Coco-Coin in Panoma

uSi an e Noyable Everywhere

. -f. J M '

rrt'i tm

LOBSTERS AM CLAMS, favorite foods or Maine's visitors,
are checked for shipment by Edward Myers and younr friend.

Rrnnswiek Maine, is a beauti

ful town not many miles inland.

The site ot ivy-coverea tsowaoui
College with hits inspiring grove
of pines, it is also famous as the
place where "Uncle Tom's Cab

in" was written by Harriet Beech-

er Stowe.

A young Bowdoin graduate, 34-

year-old Donald Strong, has re

stored the colonial Stowe House
and added one of the finest res

taurants in Maine. Although Har

riet Beecher Stowe's original
Dutch oven is in the cocktail
lounge and the room with the

painted iron fireplace where she
wrote the book that helped cause
the Civil War is a step away,
Strong's menus feature huge char charcoal
coal charcoal broiled steaks with onion

rings, stuffed baked potatoes, hot

French bread and lusty salads all

geared to modern American, ap-

petittes. Of course there are live
lobsters, too. But in general, the

Stowe House menu is not typi typically
cally typically Maine even though the his

toric town has the quiet charm

and friendliness associated with

"down-East" living.

HAWAII'S SENIOR
SOLON Republican Sena Senator
tor Senator Hiram L. Fong and Mrs.
Fonff, above, are shown in
Washington, where Fong, first
member of Chinese ancestry
ever to sit in the Senate, be becomes
comes becomes senior senator of the 50th
state in wake of a Coin toss.
Drawing for terms gives him
six years in office.

But you can have an authen authentic
tic authentic 'down-East' living clambake ev even
en even though you live thousands of
miles from Maine. At Damaris Damaris-cotta,
cotta, Damaris-cotta, on Clarke's Cove, 6 miles
from the sea, we met another
young man, Princeton-bred Ed Edward
ward Edward Myers, who owns the Salt Saltwater
water Saltwater Farm, shippers of live lobs lobsters
ters lobsters and clams and all you need
for a clambake anywhere in the
United States.
We saw lobsters and clams,
checked for vigor and perfection,
being packed in metal containers
cushioned with chilled fresh sea seaweed.
weed. seaweed. The filled containers were
lowered into ice-packed wooden
barrels, then rushed to the rail railway
way railway station to be iced along the
route to a Maine clambake in

Denver, or Cleveland, Chicago, or
wherever you live. A traditional
clambake ends with hot Indian
meal pudding.
Myers, once only a summer vi visitor
sitor visitor to Maine, started Saltwater
Farm 10 years ago with $700 ca capital.
pital. capital. Today, he, his -ttv ve
wife and two sons can't under understand
stand understand why people choose to live,
anywhere else.
Grasping a struggling lobster,
he added. "Your feat might in include
clude include a green salad French bread
or rolls, with or without garlic but

ter, green olives or sweet pickles
and potato salad or potato chips."
Then all of us went swimming in
the cove near his home.

NEW YORK (UPl)Open sea season
son season is beginning for one of the

nation's favorite indoor sports

bagging contest prizes.
From Labor Day until spring,
millions of Americans write j-i.
files, siogans. and "25 words it

less" about everything from so
flakes to foundation garments.

Who enters? Men and women oi

all ages, in all walks of life.
More women both housewives
and career girls participate be

cause most contests are spon

sored by manufacturers of prod products
ucts products wh.ch women buy. Children

enter "as soon as they're old
enough to hold a crayon," arid

women in the 90's send their life

histor.es with their entry blanks.

mere is no oHKial count of

persons who enter- contests year yearly,
ly, yearly, but entries for a single con

test run irom 100,000 to iive-mil-Lon
or more, said D. M. Ostrom,
eastern sales manager for Robin
H. Donnelly, which judges 75 per
cent of the significant regional
and national contests.
Cash is the No. 1 prize because
it has "absolutely general ap appeal,"
peal," appeal," Ostrom said. Trips and
cars also are popular, but most
persons do not want furs, jew jewelry,
elry, jewelry, houses or appliances.
"It's a case ot what people
want but can't buy," Ostrom ex explained.
plained. explained. "The only appliances that
make good prizes are color TV
sets, blenders, dishwashers, and
air conditioners in some areas.
People are embarrassed to wear
furs and jewels if their neighbors
don't have them, and there are
high taxes on these items."
Most unusual prizes have includ included
ed included a producing oil well, a thor thoroughbred
oughbred thoroughbred horse complete with
trip to the Kentucky Derby, des desert
ert desert islands, and a vacation in a
castle on the Riviera. One con contestant
testant contestant won a Caribbean island,
and the runners-up got a trip to
the island to hunt for specially
buried treasure.

The Donnelly company initiated
the contest judging business about
25 years ago, Ostrom said, and
now has judging departments -in
New York, Chicago, and Los An Angeles.
geles. Angeles. A permanent judging staff

is maintained, supplemented by

part trnie college students.
"Judging requires a terrific
amount of concentration, so we
maintain a library atmosphere,"
Ostrom said. "It's not just tossing
a bunch of entries in the air and
choosing one. We must follow
strict requirements to be sure- a
contest is not based on chance,
violating the lottery laws. Each
entry receives equal considera considerate.
te. considerate. And please tell people thai
elaborate, decorated entries don't
help. We just tear the entry blani
off or retype it on plain paper."

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen

MEXANA for
EVERYONE Athlete's
Heat
I Baby
nSSSf.-. Foot
M !-'" 0 Primly
Rash

it
pOLVO
rtiM4ML

" iii,cWiA'ft i I

There In nolh nolh-t
t nolh-t n g finer than
MEXrVNA Med Medicated
icated Medicated Ponder to
alleviate nrickly
heat.
With MFIXANA
Medicated Pow Pow-ri
ri Pow-ri e r ,vour baby
will he fre
from diaper rash.
MEXANA Med Medicated
icated Medicated Powder In
unsurpassed for
Athlete'! foot.

By OSWALD JACOBY
V'ri'ten for NEA Service
NORTH IS
K4
VQ975
64
K1005 3
WEST EAST
4k J 10 98 6 52 43
V A J 6 2 V 1084.
4 None OAQ1082
J2 A874
SOUTH (D)
4k A Q 7
V K3
K J9753
Q6
North and South vulnerable
South West North East
1 3 4 Pass Pass
3 N.T. Pass Pass Double.
Pass Pass Redbl. Pass
Pass Pass
Opening lead 4 J

There was a happy kmd of r o
backstage at the Latin Quarter
when Ricky Ne son .trollea b.o

to case uie cum"'"- -,
went into a state of shock : and
..... ,.o Keen oieased to

KlCKy lliuai F :
not that hs was a prominent pin-
roccinff rOOm PIC"

" .The'reveUnonof.the Ma Ma-hara
hara Ma-hara ah of Cooch Behar a mar
riage to English model Gina Egn
was a blow to his mother and as
a result the Maharanee is HI at
her lavish home in Bombay. She
had hoped her son would marry
someone of suitable rank al although
though although how she could have che cherished
rished cherished that illusion is a mystery,
because for years he has dated
, ... -u:.T- H n'hpr OCC1-

SnOW D1Z UIIlCRB
dental glamor girls with no ti-

ttes in ineir oaciv&iuuiiua. ---tal
Hill rumors have it that tne
steel negotiations, so long on the
road to nowhere, will take a dra dramatic
matic dramatic turn and Jhe strike will be
settled with surprising quickness.
Errol Flynn has slipped off to
California, leaving behind a pro process
cess process server who was anxious to
notify him of a lawsuit pending a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst him and others connected
with his former TV series, "The
Errol Flynn Thea.re". .Sidney
Kingsley and Carol Grace were
engaged in a bit of serious con-

versauon ai oaiui a
day, which might mean that the

lormer Mrs. winiam aaiujon
up for a role in a forthcoming
Kingsley drama.

Blue book actress Dina Merril
is wanted for Jackie Gleason's

TV version of "The Baker's Wife".

. .Sherman Billingsley has a new

assistant at the Stork Club Dick

Nesoitt wno's weh known to the

cafe society crowd. He'll help

with the greeting of celebrated
guests and function as an execu executive
tive executive in the perfume department.
. .Jane McArthur, the award-win-

nin actrees who plays the bride

in "Our Town at Circle-in-tae-Square
becomes a real life bride
when she says "I do" to James
Tuttle, also in show business in a
simple service at the All Souls
Universal Church in Glatbush.
The groom's late father was vice
president of the Standard Oil Co.
of California.
Those planned undergound bases
of the Atlas ICBMs will cost
$80,000,000 apiece. .Murry Kor Kor-man
man Kor-man expects to be first of the
commercial photographers to sue
publishers Simon and Schuster ov over
er over their new book, "C a m e r a,"
which goes into some prettv sor sordid
did sordid details anent the relation relationships
ships relationships between cameramen and
pretty girls. It doesn't appear that
he has a prayer, legally, but he
and any others who care to pro protest
test protest via their attorneys; can
create a small nuisance while
boosting the sales of the book.

There are times when it's not
easy to understand how the la
works. Gerry Mulligan, an intel intelligent,
ligent, intelligent, articulate chap and one of
the finest of the progressive jazz
musicians regardless of any re regrettable
grettable regrettable personaL- habits in tiia
past which got him into trouble
with the police 8 is giveo a

shockingly stiff jail sentence re

trying to leave tne country with without
out without performing the necessary
technical amenities (he still didn't
knife anyone) while all kinds of
murderers, some of them with
felony records as long as your
arm, are happily out on bail.
Jack Carter's success in the
Summer theatre -version of "Hat "Hatful
ful "Hatful of Rain" in which he plays
a serious dramatic part didn't
come as too much of a surprise
to friends who remember that
long before he become a rapid rapid-fire
fire rapid-fire comedian and incomparable
mimic, he did straight acting
roies. In school he even braved
"Cyrano" and later emoted under
Christopher Morley's supervision
in "The Trojan Horse."

In the TV version of "Baby
and Soul," which will star Ben
Gazzara in the role John Garfield
created on film, the leading cha character
racter character will be changed from a
Jewish boy to a Puerto Rican
youth to make the script more
topical the thinking being that
Jewish boys in 1959 don't have to
fight their way out of poverty
and obscurity by way of the priza
ring but Puerto Ricans do.
Tin Pan Alley insiders are grin grin-ning
ning grin-ning over Jack Lewis' cjedica cjedica-tion
tion cjedica-tion to United Artists president
Max Youngstein in a current
"Porgy and Bess" album. Those
who know the real story agree
that Mr. Youngstein was indeed
the A and R man's personal ins inspiration
piration inspiration and champion" and "with "without
out "without him this album would not ex exist."
ist." exist." Lewis recorded the "Jazz
Soul of Porgy and Bess" after
many other variations of the
Gershwin score had been released
and Monte Kay, then V. P. ob objected
jected objected and said the disc shouldn't
be put out. When Mr. Youngstein
backed up Lewis, Monte Kay quit.

Susan Luckey, the ingenue in
the forthcoming musical "Take
Me Along" was Forrest Tucker'j
best girl when she appeared with
him in the Chicago idition of "The
Music Man." But since leading
that show and working with ac actor
tor actor Robert Morse, -he's displayed
a conspicuous change of heart.
Fragment of philosophy from
Bessie Love, the former silent
film star now making a movie in
Hollywood: "The best thing in
the world that can happen to
anyone is to lose everything. I
know, it's happened to me on sev several
eral several occasions."

New Pastor Of Balboa Union
Church Arrives With Family

I wish to thank the many friends and
organizations who extended their sym sympathy
pathy sympathy following the death of my wife
NYHA B. BROWN
David S. lirmvii

tVW Eyes...to remember

cr? f-r 'm
EYE-GENE

K

M

i CLEAIl

SPARKLING

t

BEAUTIFUL
. for your eye... take
car of them well! Us the
modern ere drop... that
vootlien, rlcmift, tftmhtn and

1

x K

m 'lenutlflen

I

Onlv "Oc.

HUT, KVK-GKNE DAILY TO LOOK VOUB BIWT

iUf J

South's three no-trump bid was
a terrific gamble but he was one
of those players who just hated to
be shut out.
South thought about running to
four diamonds after East doubled
and even more about it after North
redoubled but he finally decided he
might as well take his beating at
no-trump as anywhere else.
Instead it was East and West
who too kthe blow. South won the
opening spade lead in his own
hand and went after the club suit.
When the jack of clubs fell from

the West hand on Sotith'r second

lead he had four club tricks.
There were still plenty of prob

lems left in the play and you read

ers can have a lot of fun working

them out if you wish. Suffice to
say that if South played carelessly
he might well have gone down and
if East an dWest played badly
South might have gathered in an

overtrick. As it was, three no no-trump
trump no-trump redoubled and made was
reward enourh for his dangerous

risk.

If

Q The blddiflf has ben:
i North Eaa Sooth Wert
I 1 A Tmm 3 Fas
'a Pew T
! You, South, holtJ:
43 m AQTf KJII4
What do you doT
A Paaa, Three el aba night hm
winning bid bat ther to
much chant that it will 1m4 U
trouble.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Instead of bidding two spades
your partner has raised you to
three diamonds. What do you do
now?
JkMPwr Tanadar

Arriving on the Isthmus aboard
the SS Ancon today is the Rev. Or Or-ville
ville Or-ville Jay Hine, new pastor of the
Balboa Union Church.
The Rev. Hine, a native of Chi Chicago,
cago, Chicago, 111., comes to the Canal Zone
church from Warwick, N.Y., where
he has served as pastor of the
Warwick Reformed Church lor the
past eight years. He is accompa accompanied
nied accompanied by Mrs. Hine and their three
children, Janet Ann, 15; Orville
Jay, 13; and Cheryl Sue, 12.
A minister with wide experience,
he has a record as a religious
leader, including active youth and
radio work. As of Sept. 1 when he
resigned the pastorate at Warwick

to accept the call to Balboa Union i

Church he was president of the
board of Foreign Missions, Re Reformed
formed Reformed Church in America, and
chairman of the Pastor's Commit Committee,
tee, Committee, Warwick Valley Council of
Churches, a position he had held
since 1954.
The Union Church has issued an
invitation to the general public to
attend both the Morning Worship
Service next Sunday at 10:30 when
the Rev. Hine will fill the pulpit
for the first time and the special
service of installation to be con conducted
ducted conducted at 4:30 Sunday afternoon.
After cmopleting his grammar

and high school education in the
Chicago Public Schools, the Rev.
Hine attended Hope College at Hol Holland,
land, Holland, Michigan, majoring in phil philosophy
osophy philosophy and graduating in 1939 with
a Bachelor of Arts degree. In 1940
he received a. Master of Arts de decree
cree decree from the Graduate School,
Boston University, majoring in
philosophy and religion, and in 1943
he received a Bachelor of Divini Divinity
ty Divinity degree from the New Bruns Brunswick
wick Brunswick Theological Seminary. New
Brunswick, New Jersey. In June
of that, year he was ordained to
the ministry, Reformed Church in
America.
The Rev. Hine hat been active in
Community Chest and other civic
work and has been a leader in the

Eastern Seaboard Radio Workshop

or the Joint Religious Radio Com Committee.
mittee. Committee.
In 1954, he visited Panama while
on a world tour which look him to
some 18 countries. In the summer
of 1958 he traveled to Europe and
Scotland, and attended the Ecu Ecumenical
menical Ecumenical Institute of World Council
of Churches at Geneva. Switzer-

Mrs. Hine is also a graduate of
lope College at Holland, Michi Michigan,
gan, Michigan, and has taught in the War War-ick
ick War-ick school system for the past
three years.

Confederale Sons
Support Vet Jlalus
Of Walter Williams
JACKSON, Sept. 15 (UPI) -ine
Sons of Confederate Vet Veterans
erans Veterans said today Walter Wil Williams
liams Williams is "positively" a Conied Conied-erate
erate Conied-erate veteran.
Tom White Crigler, Jr., na national
tional national commander of the SVC,
oa,",the attemPt to discredit
a. helpless and dying old soldier
is reprehensible and beneath
the digmity of a respectable
newspaper man."
Crigler, of Macon, Miss., took
issue with a hews report of re records
cords records casting doubt that Wil Wil-iams,
iams, Wil-iams, known as the last surviv surviving
ing surviving Civil War veteran, was ever
actually in the war.
"These statements are based
on gossip and on sketchy and
incomplete records made almost
a century ago," said Crigler.
Surviving Confederate military
records indicate very clearly
that Walter Willim's 'was a
Confederate soldier7,
"The Sons of Confederate
Veterans states positively that
Walter Williams is a Confeder Confederate
ate Confederate veteran, is so honored as
one, and will be honored as the
'ast survlvlnjr confederate vet veteran."
eran." veteran." Williams is now in a coma in
Houston, Tex. Census records
from Itawamba County, Miss.,
and Brazos County, Tex., list a
Walter Williams, if this Is the
same man there is a discrepan discrepancy
cy discrepancy in age that would make him
about eight years old at tha
time he claims to hava been a
Confederate soldier.

MINERS THREATEN STRIKE
ROME (UPI)-Itallan Commu Communist
nist Communist and non-Communist unions
have called a 48-hour nationwide
miners strike Sept. 21 and 22 un unless
less unless neffotiatinna for nu con

and.

tract art returned.



FACE p'lYl

TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER IS, 1951
TBI PANAMA AMTBICAlf AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB

r .ThfA t it J 1.
o 1 I

7iTILLERY OFFICER PROMOTED Newly-appointed Capt. James W. Smith, battalion motor
officer, receives captain's bars from Lt. Col. Robert H. Johnston, commanding officer of the 4lh Gun
Battalion, 517th Artillery. The captain and his wife, Shirley, right live a Fort Clayton with their small
son. They first came to U.S. Army Caribbean in Oc tober of 1957, and the captain has been motor officer
for the gun battalion for four months (U.S. Army Photo)
Peaceful Boycott Expected To End
With Integration In All-White Bronx
NEW YORK, Sept. 15 (UPI) More than 900 white students were expected to show up for
"integrated" classes today, ending a peaceful boycott to protest the transfer of Negro and Peur Peur-to
to Peur-to Rican children to five predominantly white schools.
Yesterday's boycott in Queens was billed by the students' parents as a one-day protest a -irainst
transferring students across county lines. Schools officials said they did not believe the
arents would try to continue the demonstration this morning.
Two hundred Negro students also boycotted their neighborhood schools In Harlem yesterday.
Their parents plan to take them tomorrow to R iverdale, an all-white section of the Bronx, to
attempt to enroll them In schools there.

This move was another reaction
to the school board's policy ot
transferring students from crowed
schools to less crowded ones. The
board transferred several hundred
white students to the Riverdale
school, and the Negroes claim
they have as much rignt as any anyone
one anyone to be transferred from schools
they claim are "segrega'ed and
inferior."
y.o other incidents occurred to
mar the return of 1,500,000 stud students
ents students to the city's schools yester yesterday.
day. yesterday. There was picketing n it no vio violence
lence violence at five elementary schools
In the neat Ridgewood Glendale

Eisenhower Signs Tough
Labor Reform Bill Into Law

WASHINGTON (UPI) resi resident
dent resident Eisenhower armed the gov government
ernment government with powerful new weap weapons
ons weapons against union abuses and
racketeering today by signing into
'law the tough labor reform bill
recently approved by Congress.
; The new statute, which aroused
the bitter opposition of organized
labor, marked the" first major
change in the federal law govern governing
ing governing unions since the enactment of
the basic Taft Hartley Ac; in
1947.
The Labor Department an announced
nounced announced shortly after the signing
that it already had taken steps to
s?t up administrative machinery
for enforcing the new law. Among
other things, it set a special bu bureau
reau bureau to handle a flood of reports
required by, the law.
he department also announced
a massive program to educate un union
ion union officials and the public on
their obligations and rights under
ihe law, including the mailing of
2a0,000 reporting forms to union
kauers.
In contrast lo the heated public
debate surrounding the issue in
the past two years, the President
signed the .bill without comment
. or fanfare, although it came close
to meeting his own labor reform
proposals.
The drive for the new law was
set off by the Senate Racket Com Committee's
mittee's Committee's three-year exposure of
corruption, racketeering and dic dictatorial
tatorial dictatorial practices in some unions,
especially the giant Teamsters
Union, the nation's largest.
As signed into law, the legis legislation
lation legislation provides a "bill of rights"
to rank-and-file mbers, and
compels unions -fo follow demo democratic
cratic democratic procedures and to operate
in the full glare of publicity in
handling their finances.
TODAY.ENCANTO-25-15
WAHOO! S115-00
Jane Russell in
"Revolt of Mamie Stover"
Brian Keith In
"VILLA"
"
TQDAY
rtvoLi
35c; tOC.
Spanish Program!
ANDO VOLANDO
BAJO
- Also: -EL
COFRE DEL
PIRATA
with Tin Tan

section of Queens as 302 transfer
students, most of them negro, ar arrived
rived arrived in special buses. Teachers
said the new students, neatly
dressed and wellbehaved, got
along amicably with their white
classmates.
Only one of the schools in the
Ridgewood Glendale section of
Queens reported a normal attend attendance
ance attendance on tlie first day of school
The number of white aln-entces
was nearly 50 per rnit of he total
enrollment of all of the live
schoo's.
School officials and police, as assigned
signed assigned to maintain order,, said

It Imposes tough new curbs on
such union pressure tactics as the
secondary boycott and organize-
tinal picketing. It ended the so-
called no man s land in lanor
disputes by allowing state agen
cies to decide cases rejected by
federal agencies.
The new bill also ends the 12-year-old
requirement that union
officers must sien non-Commu
nist affidavits. The oath was
written into the Taft-Hartley Act
at a time when Communist con
trol of some unions was a cause
for federal concern.
Th new law simoly bars Com
munists and certain ex-convicts
from holding union of'ice or act acting
ing acting as an agent for employer
grmros dealing with unions.
AFL-CIO officials bitterly op-
oosd the new law. They contend contended
ed contended i' was so far-reaching that it
would hamper the legitimate ac activities
tivities activities of labor unions and tip the
balance of economic power in fa
vor of management.
They originally supported a Sen Senate
ate Senate bill sponsored by Sens. John
F. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Sam
J. Ervin (D-N.C). But they
withdrew their supoort when the
measure was toughened up on
the floor. Their own proposals for
ending labor corruption were re rejected
jected rejected in the House.
IDRIV 7 I N
I
I
I
I
a today :s
A GREAT ATTRACTION I
COLLEEN MILLER
Charles DRAKE In
"STEP DOWN TO
TERROR"
n
Tomorrow!
n
POPULAR NIGHT I
i
$1.10 per CAR!
JOHN PAYNE
i
L Rhonda FLEMING In
"CARIBBEAN GOLD"
Rhonda FLEMING In

'O'mggs TODAY

CAPITOLIO
25c, 15e.
BANK! $125.00
BADLAND COUNTRY
Geo. Montgomery
- Also:
curse or
FRANKENSTEIN

VICTOM4
15c.
ATTILA
with A. Quinn
- Also:
KINF Or THE WILD
FRONTIER

there iu 1 been no incidents. None
of the trwnsfer r:l,:rr,ii was lho-

lested while entering the schools.
Barents in ihe qaiet, residential
section of Jueras charged mat
the transfer amounted to "en
forced integration." They claimed
that there were empty schools in
Brooklyn that could be repaired
and used lo cae the overcrowa overcrowa-ing.
ing. overcrowa-ing. The school bcani stood firm de
spite protesv meetings in Queens
ana picsei nns in wnue uiumtis
who marched in front of city hall.
Dr. Alfred J. Marrow, chairman
of the New York City Commis
sion on Intergroup Relations, said
the "integrations" were responsi responsible
ble responsible for the -mass absence of white
students.
Marrow said, however, that the
transfer was progressing "smooth
ly and we find a distinct improve improvement
ment improvement in community attitude since
the time when hundreds of resi residents
dents residents of the area picketed city
hall."
Yesterday's boycott resulted in
only 217 children ojt ol a sched scheduled
uled scheduled 610 showing Op at Publi;
School 68; 150 out of m at P.S.
91; 500 out of 787 at P.S. 81; and
290 out of 494 at P.S. 77. P.S. 88
reported 95 per cent of regtstra
tion, considered normal on the
first day of a new semester
The figures represented the
number of local white children
who had been scheduled to re
port.
The picketing parents said their
children would return to school
today carrying their own lunch
es.
This was a reference to a board
of education ruling that the trans transfer
fer transfer children would be provided
with lunches because of the dis
tance they have to travel.
Local children normally jo
home for lunch, so their parents
have demanded equal trr-ient
on lunches.
TROPICAL
SfS T0DAY $
GREAT FORTUNE NIGHT!
$150.00
IN CASH
PRIZES!
Be One of The Lucky Winners
of These Cash Prizes!
1st Prize $100.00
2nd
3rd
4th
25.00
15.00
10.00
THE FORTUNE NIGHT
PLAYS AT 9:00 P. M.
On the Screen:
DOUBLE FEATURE I
Orson Welles Diane Varsi
- In
"COMPULSION"
Jennifer Jones In
"SONG Of BERNARDETTE"
RIO
35c.
20c.
GREAT SHOW!
- Also:
LOST TREASURE of I
THE AMAZONS
- and -THE
CADDY
with Jerry Lewis

Frondizi Weathered Latest Crisis
Thanks To US Ambassador Beaulac

o
By BMW PI ARSON
WASHINGTON. Sept 15 Ar.
Eentina's President Arturo Frondi
zi weathered his latest military
political crisis by far the most
serious of bis 18-month adminis administration
tration administration thanks in part to a warn
ing given rebellious army leaders
by U.S. Ambassador Willard
Beaulac.
When Gen. Carlos Toranzo, dis dismissed
missed dismissed Sept 2 as Army Chief of
Staff, holed up with a group of
supporters at a military school in
the heart of Buenos Aires and de
fied the government, open civil
war seemed unavoidable.
Frondizi ordered an armored co column
lumn column from Camp de Mayo, the
bif military installation 25 miles
south of the capital to move in
and capture the rebels. But from
other army headquarters all over
the country, word came that 90 per
cent of the officers corps would
back Toranzo.
The dismissed Chief of Staff had
publicly disclaimed any political
motives for his defiance, but as,
messages of support from milita military
ry military colleagues poured in, friends
urged him to demand Frondizi's
resignation and' proclaim himself
provisional president.
FrontMzi, tteklng to avert
bloodshed, beat him to the punch
by offering to quit and let To Toranzo
ranzo Toranzo take over. While the gen general
eral general was considering this propos proposal,
al, proposal, four pro-Toranzo officers
paid a private late-night call en
Ambassador Beaulac at his su suburban
burban suburban home.
Heading the visitors was retired
Gen. Rodolfo Larcher. who had
been trying to mediate between
Frondizi and Toranzo, both his
eood friends. Larcher told Beaulac
that the rebel movement was not
aimed directly at the President,
but against his Minister of War.
Gen. Elibio Anaya, who had fired
Toranzo.
Anaya, Larcher said, was too

Pennsy Station Crowd Panics As Cop
Fires At Fleeing Suspected Thief

NEW YORK (UPI)Nearly 200
persons panicked in crowded
Pennsylvania Station last night
when a policeman fired a
Lsenes of snots at a iNegro tneu
suspect fleeing tnrougn tne nuge
waiting room. Three bystanders
were injured and the suspect .was
shot in the leg. (
An 80-year-old man was tram trampled,
pled, trampled, a sailor was nicked by a
police bullet and a woman was
cut by flying glass. None was ser seriously
iously seriously hurt.
Patrolman James Mierisch
started the chase in a nearby bus
terminal, acting on a tip reported
by a private guard, la all, he
fired five shots.
Recognizing 19-year-old James
Tally from a radioed description,
Mierisch jumped from his patrol
car and ordered Tally to halt.
When the youth fled, Mierisch
fired.
Tally ran down a long flight of
steps leading to the waiting room
at Pennsylvania Station, and
Mierisch fired again. The sound
of the shot panicked the crowd
near the entrance to the waiting
room. Celon Alexander, 80, was
knocked down and trampled on
the stairs.
Mierisch said he got off two
more shots as Tally dashed
through the waiting room. One hit
a phone booth, spattering glass
over Hilda Rolston, 27, of Down
ey. Calif. The other struck the
sailor, Clarence E. Ickers, 32, of
Johnstown, Pa., in the right ear
and neck.
Mierisch chased Tally across
the waiting room and down an
other flight of stairs to the track
level, then stopped him with
shat in the leg. As Mierisch ran
up to him, Tally said, "I give
up."
He was suspected of stealing
BALBOA
i Associates fcww

Llovd Youns I

Li

A Universal International Relwst

ICOCO SOLO
Charlton HESTON
Anne BAXTER

"THE TEN COMMANDMENTS"
In VistaVision and Color!
Last Time TONIGHT!

DIABLO HTS
7:00
Jack
Lemmon
Kathryn Grant
"OPERATION MADBALL"
GATUN
7:00
John Mills
Richard Attengorough
"DC N KIRK"
PARAISO
7:00
Double Feature!
TOR MEN ONLY" and
"THE GLASS TOMB"

7:00 CAMP BIERD 7:00
Gene Raymond Jeanne Cooper
"PLUNDER ROAD"
S rv I c C n t r Thtatrs

friendly toward members of the

"Green Dragon Lodge" a se
cret organization of younger offic
ers who are hand-in-glove with fol
lowers of ousted dictator Juan D.
Peron.
Bu now that Frond:z; was stand
ing behind the War Minister, he
added, and had sent tanks to com combat
bat combat Toranzo's forces, it might be
"best for the country" to accept
the" President's resignation and let
Toranzo form a new military jun junta
ta junta to govern temporarily.
Whit would bt the reaction of
United States authorities to such
a move. Gtn. Larcher Inquired?
Beaulac replied firmly that
while he could not speak for the
State Department, It was his opln
ion Washington would refuse to
recognize any regime which
seized power from the constitu constitutional
tional constitutional government.
When this warning was relayed
to Toranzo, he quickly decided a-
ealnst any coup Back went Lar
cher to the presidential offices
(Frondizi had remained there
throughout the night) to report
that Toranzo had "no personal
ambitions but only wished to pre preserve
serve preserve public order."
Frondizi, realiziting then that
Anaya had to go as Minister of
War. asked Larcher:
"Will vou accept the post of
War Minister?"
The retired general agreed. The
tank column was then stopped at
the outskirts of the city and the
crisis was over. Toranzo, a 57-year
old naturalized Argentine born in
Turin, Italy, was sworn in again
as Chief of Staff and emerged as
the new "strongman" in that coun country's
try's country's turbulent politics.
Note: Next target of the vic victorious
torious victorious generals is likelv to b M
varo Alsogaray Frondizi's Min Minister
ister Minister of Economy and Labor. To Toranzo
ranzo Toranzo and other military leaders
of the revclt that toppled Peron
four years ago distrust Alsogaray
because he collaborated with Pe Peron.
ron. Peron. girl's wallet in the bus terminal
last week.
Police meanwhile revealed the
had arrested nearly 650 youths
since beginning their crackdown
on Juvenile crime at the start of
this month. But Mayor Robert F.
Wagner again ruled out the idea
of a police-enforced curfew for the
city's youth.
"l feel tnat any cunew snouw
be started by parents," Wagner
said. "They should know where
theiriSoungslvi-areoand who they
. ...i ...in, .i .11 ti...
die uuv nuu mi au wmco.
Steel Production
Amounts To 1.
NEW YORK (UPI) Steel pro
duction last week amounted to
327,000 tons or 1.5 per cent of
rated capacity as the nationwide
steel strike dragged on, the Amer
ican Iron & Steel Institute report
ed yesterday.
The steel dispute is still at log
gerheads with no end in sight.
The Institute estimated output
this week will rise to an esti estimated
mated estimated 345,000 tons or 12.2 per
cent of capacity. Last week'
turn out, which fell below expec expectations,
tations, expectations, had been estimated at
1.9 per cent or 32,ooo tons.
The tonnage figure for a month
ago at 321,000 tons or 11.3 per
cent was the second lowest since
the beginning of the strike on
July 15. At this time last year
output amounted to 65 6 per cent
of capacity or 1,71,000 tons.
ARTILLERY BREAKS CALM
TAIPEI (UPI) Communist Chi Chinese
nese Chinese artillery broke a five-day si silence
lence silence in the Formosa Straits yes yesterday
terday yesterday by firing a light barrage
against the Nationalist-held Que Que-moy
moy Que-moy Islands.
FULLY AIR CONDITIONED
6:15 7:55
Fully Air Conditioned 1:
00
Yul BRYNNER
Edward G. Robinson
GAMBOA
7:00
Burt Lancaster
Rita Hayworth
"SEPARATE TABLES"
MARGARITA
7:00
Richard Burton
Curt Jergens
"BITTER VICTORY"
SANTA CRUZ
7:00
Brian Keith
Mala Powers
"SIERRA BARON"

School Board Prexy,
Woman Neighbor
Missing In Penna.

BRISTOL, Pa. (UPI)-A 15
state alarm was sent ou' yester
day for the missing president of a
township school board in Bucks
County and a woman neighbor.
Police said Benjamin F. Stock
ett Jr., 37, president of the Bristol
Twp. School Board and father of
five children, was reported miss
ing by his wife, Mildred, 35, Sat
urday morning.
Mrs. Margaret Connell, 29,
mother of three children, was re-
oorted missing by her husband,
Edward, 3, yesterday morning.
Authorities said the two, botn
residents of nearby Levittown,
disappeared from their homes
last Friday and may be heading
south in Stockett s 1957 Ford sta
tion wagon.
They said Stockett, who is al9
president of the Delhaas Joint
School Board and Bucks County
superintendent of Midges, left
note for his wife and withdrew
$300 from their joint checking ac
count.
Mrs. Stockett reported that $150
in cash and all her husband's
clothes were missing from the
house, police said.
A friend of the Stockett family
reported Chat Mrs. Stockett said
her husband had been under tre
mendous strain and pressure from
his several jobs.
Seaweed Extract
Found In Thailand
May Help Ulcers
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (UPI) -The
use of a seaweed extract as
a weapon against peptic ulcers
and extraction of an antibiotic
from Thailand soil were discussed
yesterday as the American Chem Chemical
ical Chemical Society opened its 136th na national
tional national meeting.
Dr. John C. Houck, director of
the biochemical research labora laboratory
tory laboratory of the Children's Hospital Re Research
search Research Foundation in Washington,
reported on the possibility of the
seaweed extract as a weapon
against peptic ulcers.
He said the extract called car car-rageenin
rageenin car-rageenin was inexpensive, com composed
posed composed of 60 to 70 per cent dry
seaweed, and apparently inter interferes
feres interferes with the developmnt ol ul
cers by blocking the action of
pepsis, chief digestive agent in
the stomach.
,A new antibiotic which s :owed
promising possibilities in agricul agriculture
ture agriculture and medicne was reported
by Mchael E. Haney Jr., asso associate
ciate associate biochemist for the Eli Lilly
Co. of Indianapolis, Ind.
Haney said the antibiotic take"
from Thailand soil samples and
named tylosin, now was jiuli
clinical test.
He said preliminary animal
tests indicate that tylosin stimu stimulates
lates stimulates growth in both swine and
poultry, and retards the growth of
bacteria.
CENTRAL
TODAY-Shows 12:45,2:34,
" 4.44 A A.AJ
1.44, o.ai, s:u
AMEDEO I GINO I LEA
NAM
ScrwnpllT by
NORMA COftWIN dlOMIO MOSMRI
Story by OSCAR SAUl TALBOT JlNNIttOS
fntimt by DirM to
GOFFKEOO LOMBAROO-HENItY KOStER
A TITANUS PRODUCTION
nrthKMNNM- I nta) 4 TNMKM9I
im-NutTi-iurn ana
All ticket holders will have
the right to participate in
the drawing of 3 bottles of
the delicate Perfume "Ma
la" of Myrurgla. The raffle
will take place this evening
at 9:00 o'clock.

t i m
if 'hft v
rj fa
m M-Q-M presents 1
It AVA ANTHONY
I GARDNER FRANCIOSA J
The l'J

f

Reserved Tables
For Altamira

To Be In Thursday
Tabh reservations for the Club
Altamira's seventh anniversary
dance at Hotel El Panama Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, will be accepted until Thurs
day it was announced today.
Priced at 50 cents, each table
will have four chairs, guest being
v im 1 1
yilA

-SrifTR ATI-U

I JC -T7 I

s .v,s m D.,amAini

IgfiS M0RE7HAN -V J CD H VI

INHERES GREAT TA LEWIS

From Marseilles underground, comes the most
'hocking adventures!

!l

THUNDERS" K

1 m

i tar

r t

STEPHEN BOYD IAMES ROBERTSON JUSTICE
ks KATHLEEN HARRISON fONT WRIGHT ANNA SATIM
WED. THUR. Opens fRDAYo

For the lovers of good mu music,
sic, music, a new version of the
famous ROSSINI's Opera
FIGARO, IL
BARBIERE
Dl SIVIGLIA"
with TITO GOBBI
IRENE GENNA
ARMANDO FRANCIOLI
ALBA ARNOVA
VICTOR FERRARI
In Ferranla Color!
e In Italian with Spanish
titles!

Move Out Of Doors
the moment the weather permits
use this extra light
Portable Outdoor Equipment

FOLDING
Picnic tables
Picnic benches
REASONABLY
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r ALUMINUM
this week CHAIRS
ONLY! $6.50

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CAVE IN TRAPS WORKERS
MATSUYAMA, Japan (UPI)
Eight Japanese worken vtr
trapped late last night la a

cave in of a road tunnel being
enlarged near the Ehime and
Kochi prefectural border. 1 One
worker was rescued but fears
were held fcr the lives of the
seven others. s
are urged to make their reserva reservations
tions reservations before Thursday at No. 1 'O'
street (Vinsencini Bldg.) Apt
from 5.30 to 7.30 p.m.
PRICES: 60c. 30c.
TODAY
PRICES: 60c. 30c.
3:00 4:40 6:45 9:00 p.m.
A SENSUAL STORY OF
HUMAN
PASSIONS!
Belinda
LEE
Jacques
SERNAS
Massimo
GIROTTI
- in
APHRODITE"
(GOODESS OF LOVE)
In TOTALSCOPE & COLOR!
.J
CHOICE OF TERMS
& 3 (am burnishing Slot
Ave. & "H" St. Tel. J-0723



THE PANAMA AMERICAS AM DiDEPIKDEOT DAILY NEWSFAfDt
TUTSDAT, SEPTEMBER 15, 1S59
Braves Climb To Within lie Game Of NLV tead?

PAGf SIX

Buhl Hurls 3-Hit 4-1
Victory Over Dodgers

By MILTON RICHMAN
NEW YORK, Sept. 15 (UPI) Milwaukee is
making a stretch run and it's a sizzler so Bill
Rigney may be right when he says "It's liable to be
another one of those photo finishes."

tk. Braves aDDarently have no
The Braves apparru"
lire AJi v. w "ri
i.uUm f taVinfj down the flag
UllCUUUU vi
symbolic of the National League
KStoSp.thitta 'flo r
Z ,S um the past two
vuuuw
years.
Sfcey won their eighth game in
the test nine and climbed within a
came of Rigney's pace-setting Gi Giants
ants Giants by defeating the Los Ange es
Dodgers, 4-1, last night "fter Cin Cincinnati
cinnati Cincinnati beat San Francisco 4 1, in
the only other N.L. scheduled con con-test
test con-test Bob Buhl, a Dodger-killer from
way back, licked them for the
fifth time in six decisions this year
even though he needed Don McM. McM.-hon's
hon's McM.-hon's help in the ninth. Buhl hurl hurled
ed hurled a three-hitter for his 13th win
of the season and he now owns a
20-8 lifetime record over the Docig Docig-crs
crs Docig-crs Del Crandall gave the Braves an
early lead when he slammed his
19th homer with one on off loser
Don Drysdale in the second inning
and Milwaukee added two more in
the seventh on Bill Bruton's single
with the bases loaded. It was
Drysdale's 13th loss against 16 vic victories.
tories. victories.
Wally Moon's 17th homer in the
fourth was tht only hit off Buhl
until the ninth. Enos Slaughter
mad his 2nd appearance with
the Braves since coming from
the Yankees and collected one of
Milwaukee's seven hits.
Dutch Dotterer, Cincinnati's second-string
catcher, proved San
Francisco's undoing. Dotterer sin singled
gled singled runs across in the fourth and
sixth innings after taking over for
Ed Bailey in the second inning.
Bailey was ejected from the game
along with Red manager Freddy
Hutchinson when both got into a
liUlCninSOn Wllfll uuui &vn.
hassle with umpire Jocko Conlan
-.11. J 4U;.r4 of yr A
Hod third strike
Johnny Antonelli failed in his
second attempt to nail dnwn his
20th victory. He yielded Cincinna Cincinnati's
ti's Cincinnati's first three runs, including a
third-inning homer by Johnny
TemDle. and went down to his
ninth defeat.
Jim Brosnan hurled the first
seven innings for the Reds and
earned his ninth victory against
five defeats. Brosnan gave up five
of the Giants' eight hits, including
Willie Mays' 30th homer in the
sixth. Brooks Lawrence held the
Giants scoreless over the last two
innings.
In the American League race,
the White Sox' lead was cut to
4Va games when they dropped a
9-3 decision to the Red Sox while
the Indians beat the Yankees, 8 8-5.
5. 8-5. Baltimore topped Kansas Ci City,
ty, City, 9-4. and Washington beat De Detroit,
troit, Detroit, 50.
The Red Sox routed Dick Dono Donovan
van Donovan with a six-run rally in the
sixth inning that kept the White
Sox' pennant clinching "magic
number" at six. Boston overcame
a 2-0 deficit during the big sixth
with a rally comprised of five
As close as
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walks and four singles, including
nlh.kiP Tori Williams

nnp hv ninch hitter Ted Williams
Rookie Jim Manoney appnea me
clincher for the Red Sox with a
three-run homer in the seventh off
reliever Turk Lown. Bill Monbou-
quette went the distance for Bos Boston,
ton, Boston, allowing 10 hits for his seventh
victory.
Cleveland clinched second place
and kept its faint pennant hopes a a-live
live a-live with its victory over New
York. Cal McLish scored his 18th
triumph although the Yankees
routed him with a too-little, too too-late
late too-late five-run rally in the ninth.
McLish, who beat the Yanks for
the sixth time this season, drove in
three runs with a triple and .a sin single
gle single and rookie Ray Webster also
drove in three runs. Art Ditmar
suffered his ninth loss asainst 12
wins. Marv Throneberry homered
for the Yankees.
Bob Nieman batted in four runs
runs with his 21st homer and a
single as the Orioles climbed
within a game of fourth place by
defeating the Athletics. Hal
(Skinny) Brown held Kansas Ci City
ty City to five hits to register his 10th
victory.
The Orioles made it easy for
Prnwn iumnine nn rookie Al Grun-
wald for four runs in the first in-
ninp and Nieman hit his homer
with two on in the fourth. Rookie
Lou Klimchock homered for the
A's.
Tex Clevenger, a former reliev reliever
er reliever promoted to a starter, limited
the Tigers to four singles in gain gaining
ing gaining his eighth victory for the Sen Senators.
ators. Senators. Big Jim Lemon slugged his
.)liu liuinci uii ami ici ivj i.owo-
ki, who lost his sixth straight and
1 Otli nf ik rft n CAM urVlllo fftnlri 0
32nd homer off starter Ray Narles
12th of the season, while rookie
Dan Dobbek collected three of
Washington's nine hits.
International
Final Playoffs
Begin Tonight
HAVANA, Sept. 15 (UPI)-The
best-of-seven International League
final playoff ser.es gets underway
at Gran Stadium tonight with Ted
Wieand (16-11) of the Cuban Sug Sugar
ar Sugar Kings scheduled to face Jim
Bronstad (6-8) ol the Richmond
Virginians.
The Virginians and the Sugar
Kings, a couple of underdogs in
the semi finals, made short work
of the champion Buffalo Bisons
and Columbus Jets. The V e e s
beat the Bisons four games to one
while the Sugar Kings took four
straight from the Jets.
Wieand, the Sugar Kings' big
winner during the regular season,
won the first game of the playoff
series with Columbus, although he
needed relief help from Pedro
Carrillo and Luis Arroyo.
Bronstad, who spent part of the
past season with the parent New
York Yankees, also has a victo victory
ry victory in post-season play. He beat
the Bisons in the second game of
men- series with relief help from
Johnny James.
The Sugar Kings are expected
to follow wieand with Miguel
Cuellar (12-11), Walt Craddock
(12-8) and Raul Sanchez (11-4).
Richmond pitchers who will see
later duty include Bill Short (17 (17-6),
6), (17-6), Zack Monroe (10-11), who won
two playoff games, and Glenn
Cox (4-4).
The winner of this series will
go on to meet the winner of the
American Association final play playoff
off playoff series in the Little World Se Series.
ries. Series. LEADING
FITCHERS
National League
W L Pet.
Face, Pirates n l .944
Antonelli, Giants ... 19 9 .679
Law, Pirates 16 9 .640
Conley, Phils 12 7 .632
Jones, Giants 20 12 .625
American League
Shaw, White Sox .... 16 6 .727
McLish Indians .... 18 8 .692
Wynn, White Sox ... 20 9 ,.690
Maas, Yankees .... 13 7 .650
Lary, Tigers 17 10 .630
Rheumatism
.whsiiavar the pains of iOieuiuatlim,
Arthritis, Neuritis, liimbfo, Hoi-
Jtlon, stiff mosolss and swollsa
olnts make you mlssrabls, (at
LOMIND from year drugaist al
ne. ItOMIND quickly brlnas tan tan-tastia
tastia tan-tastia rsllaf so you saa ilun. work
nd lire la aomfort. Doa t si
'. CUt KOJaUXD ts4sjr.

LEADING
HITTERS

(Bated on 375 Official at Bats)
National League
c AB R
141 577 107
134 428 60
140 562 87
140 532 78
145 609 122
143 560 96
135 540 105
143 531 106
131 489 85
137 511 74
H Pet.
205 .355
149 .348
180 .320
168 .316
192 .315
176 .314
167 .309
164 .309
148 .303
154 .301
Aaron, Milwau.
Cun'ham, St. L.
Cepeda, S. F.
Boyer, St. L.
Pinson, Cinci.
Temple, Cinci.
Mathews, Mil.
Robinson, Cin.
Moon, L. A.
White, St. L.
American League
Kuenn, Detroit
129 520 93
126 477 78
138 525 87
134 419 62
147 594 78
126 463 74
114 419 54
141 540 86
123 427 45
139 566 98
182 .350
155 .325
164 .312
127 .303
180 .303
139 .300
123 .294
158 .293
125 .293
163 .288
Kaline, Detroit
Runnels, Boston
Woodling, Bal.
Fox, Chicago
Tuttle, K. C.
Cerv, K. C.
Minoso, Cleve.
Rich'son, N. Y.
Power, Cleve.
Runs Batted Tn
National League
Banks, Cubs 134
Robinson, Reds 125
Aaron, Braves 115
Bell, Reds 107
Cepeda, Giants 96
Mathews, Braves 96
American League
Colavito, Indians 106
Jensen, Red Sox 102
Killebrew, Senators 100
Lemon, Senators 96
Maxwell, Tigers 92
Home Runs ?
National League
Banks, Cubs 41
Aaron, Braves 38
Mathews, Braves 38
Robinson, Reds 36
Mays, Giants 30
American League
Colavito, Indians 41
Killebrew, Senators 40
Lemon, Senators 32
Maxwell, Tigers 30
Mantle, Yankees 29
Held, Indians 29
Allison, Senators 29
SCORES
PACIFIC WOMEN'S LEAGUE
COFFEE AND DONUT
By LOU
Teams W L
Strikettes 6 2
Splitarikei 5 3
Four Hits and Miss s 3
Kool Kats 5 3
Lucky Five 4 4
Five Gals 4 4
Lucky Strikes 2 6
Torpedoes 1 7
STRIKETTES 1 LUCKY FIVE 1
The Lucky Five did not have
enough stuff to overcome the 54
pins handicap tney were handing
out to the Strikettes, and as a re result
sult result the Strikettes retained their
hold on first place. The Strikettes
opened with a 30 pin win, drop dropped
ped dropped the second game by four,
and took the finale by another
thirty maples.
Three of the ladies for the
ladies for the Strikettes, present presented
ed presented good series. Lois Walls 520,
Jean Saylor 527 and Estelle Bolin
504, all handicap, for the losing
Lucky Five, Kathy Bathurtt
maintained her good bowling with
with 504, and Vicki Kasnicki
made her presence felt with 523,
both handicap.
PRIS READE 4
LUCKY STRIKE I
For the tongue twisting named
team. Solitarikes. it wag a red
letter day for their anchor bowler,.
when Priscilla Reade, had one ol
her best days in bowling, when
she hit a 502 scratch and 628
handicap gems.
Pris started out with a good
160 game, then came the big
moment, when Priscilla rolled a
213 gam, in which the had six
strikes in a row. Although sua
had a letdown in the last game,
her teammates made up the oil
ference and captured all four
points from the not-so-lucky Luc Lucky
ky Lucky Strikes.
The two Dolores of the Split Splitarikei
arikei Splitarikei also had commendable han handicap
dicap handicap sets. Dolores (Number 1)
Taylor collected 519, and Dolores
(Number 2) Castro 527. lor the
Strikes who are pushing the eel
lar swcllers, Luis Traynor scored
510 and Eva Lee 529, both nandi
cap.
FOUR HITS AND A MISS 4
TORPEDOES
The Four Hits and a Miss jam
rued the Torpedoes, and walked
away from the Bowling Center
with a clean slate of 4 to 0 count.
Handing out 74 maples per game,
did not hell) U'e Inipecioes, De
cause they dropped games by 63,
38 and 15 sucks.
For the winners, Diane Oliver
and Jean Earnest tallied 536 and
551 handicap series. For the un
fired Torpedoes, Jean Brady up

jaw ; ajaaaaayaaaaMMaai l-y. fr-w"- -'.. ;;- ..-' .'-' t -ij-jSBai)aw!saaa!M

KUNAS COP CAGE CROWN Melibers of the San Bias basketball

panied by their "godmottpr,"
were held at San Bias for the
dians win five and lose one. The

pearand and were invincible after that. They naiiect down tne

over Panama for their first title.

Hank Luisetti, George Mikan
In Basketball 'Hal I Of Fame

Bjj O SC ARFRALEX

TrnBir.dT HTT.I.S. N.Y. (UPD
United States tennis fortunes
slipped to the lowest ebb in rus rus-tnru
tnru rus-tnru tnHav as both the men's and
women's national tennis titles
joined tine Davis Cup in foreign
hands for tne nrsi umi 10 t"'
annels.
Tha catastrophe reached its cli climax
max climax at Fprest Hills Sunday a
site once ruled by the Tildjjns, the
Budges, the Kramers no the
Wills, Jacobs, Betz and Connollys.
Australia, recent winner of the
Davis Cup, sent its fourth conse consecutive
cutive consecutive son to victory in the men's
singles as left-handed Neale Fra Fra-ser
ser Fra-ser swept to a 6-3, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4
victory over Alex Olmedo, the
lend-lease star from Peru.
WINS WOMEN'S CROWN
And the women's vrown was
taken by Maria Bueno, a 19-year-old
school teacher from Sao Paulo
Brazil, whose 6-1, 6-4 win over
Christine Truman of Great Brit Britain
ain Britain made her the first foreign
winner of ie women's cham championship
pionship championship in 'li years.
But the real ignominy was that
for the first time in history both
finals were contested without one
of Uncle Sam's nephews or nieces
sprinting around the premises.
Fraser, seeded second in the
tournament, ruined Olmcdo's
dreams of gold and glory as he
whipped the brown panther from
Peru decisively. On the line for
the son of the Incas was, in ad addition
dition addition to a Wimbledon-U.S. slam,
a $100,000 pro offer.
When it was all over, and he
had been swept off the court by
Fraser's blinding service and his
own volley errors, Olmedo's pro
prospects weren't worth a plugged
peso.
PROSPECTS NOT ROSY
Nor were the prospects regard regarded
ed regarded as rosy for the nited States
in the immediate future. Because
neither the new Australian won wonder
der wonder boy nor the saucy Brazilian
miss could be regarded as "cheese
champions" and both apparently
will be around for some time.
The pros weren't, apparently,
intending to lure Fraser into their
ranks on the grounds that he is
held her end with a 506 handicap
figure.
KOOL KATS I FIVE GALS 1
With both teams evenly match matched,
ed, matched, this was a battle of splits,
when 24 splits made their ap
pearance in the last game of the
morning session. The Kool Kats
piled up enough pins in the first
two games, so that when the Five
Gals won their game, the Felines
still had enougj sticks in reserve
to be credited ub the TP mark
er.
Daphne Tolley and Mimi Mitz-
ger were the bulwarks of the Kool
Kats attack, clearing the lanes
for 521 and 5GJ handicap count.
Louise Broadhursl and Thei.na
Guibert topped the Five Gals
with 502 and 511 handicap gets.
GATUN SWIMMING CLUB
On Friday Sept. 18, coach Ken Ken-nen
nen Ken-nen will meet with any Gatun and
Margarita children who wish to
join the Gatun Swim Club. The
pool will be closed for cleaning
on that day so the meeting will
be held at the Gatun gym. To be
eligible you must have s green
swimming pool (D card. Come to
the gym at 4:00 on Friday hept.
18, and join we have great plans
for the year.

after clinchine the republic's hoop

first time In the iounament's 11
champs lost their only decision

(Photo Mendoza)

too fresh an arrival. Yet there
was no doubt but what he "found"
himself completely in the Davis
Cup challenge round, where he
downed both Olmedo and big liar
ry 'MacKay. For in the finals of
the Nationals he was a court killer
whose big serve, solid foundation
in all strokes and gameness came
through unquestionably.
So who is to beat him?
MacKay, according to those who
know, refuses to heed advrce that
he should take two or three
months and get himself a solid
first service, a confusing second
service and a new forehand. The
next 12 months, the experts con
tend, will tell the story for 19-
year-old Butch Buchholz of St.
Louis, so the main hope seems to
be 18-year-old Charles McKinley
of St. Ann, Mo., who is regarded
by pro interests as a "really
wonderful prospect."
Junior College
Football Clinic
Great Success
The football clinic put on by
the coaching staff and football
squad of the Canal Zone Junior
College in conjunction with the
Canal Zone Football Officials As Association
sociation Association Saturday morning at
Diablo was a smashing success.
The only unpleasant aspect of
the morning was a neck injury
incurred by Roland Hinds. The
promising J.C. fullback will prob probably
ably probably be sidelined for all of the
1959 campaign.
In attendance at the clinic were
ten oficdals which included atlan-
tic siders Luke Palumbo. Paul
Moser, Larry Ames and Jack Ru-
off and Pacific siders Lew Hil-
zinger, Dal Thornton, Dick Shaf
fer, Del Brauhn and Ron Card
and the dean of Canal Zone whis whis-tletoo
tletoo whis-tletoo ters, Larry Chance.
The coaching contingent present
was comprised of Dave Ingram
and Lou Dedeaux of Cristobal
High, Larry Horine and Ross An Anderson
derson Anderson of Balboa High and host
coach Stew Brown of the Canal
Zone Junior College. Unfortunate Unfortunately
ly Unfortunately not one member of the Athle Athletic
tic Athletic Club's mammoth coaching
staff could find his way to the
Diablo arena.
Dignitaries on hand for the ses session
sion session were Mr. G. C. Lockridge,
Director of Physical Education
and Athletics for the Canal Zone
Schools and Junior College's Dean
and staunchest supporter, Mr.
Roger C. Hackett.
The actual clinic, in a nut-shell,
consisted of Coach Brown's Erid-
ders demonstrating the "Do's and
Don'ts" of football and Larry
Chance and his staff of officials
explaining the disciplinary action
that will be taken against mis mischievous
chievous mischievous footballers. As the sage
of the Diablo Gym put it "to err
is human but it will cost you
nneen yards."
The J.C. coaching staff wishes
to convey their thanks and a p.
preeiation to the players, the of
ficials, the coaches and the ma
ny Interested spectators who con
tributed to the success of this,
the first Canal Zone football clin-

team parade proudly, accom

title last week in the renewal
yei.r history, saw the Kuna In
to Los Santos in their first ap
cnampionsnip with a 49-47 win
BOSTON Mass. (WVW Hank
Luisetti and George Mikan, two
players whose prowess made a
lasting imprint oh the game, were
amnns 12 men named veslprrfav In
the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Hall of Fame.
The 12 mpn alnno with fivo n.
vious selections, will be honored
at the hall which will be con constructed
structed constructed at Springfield College,
svene of the invention n( thp na mt
by Dr. James Naismith. Ground
lor the. nail was broken Sept. 11.
In addition tn Luisetti the Stan
ford star of the late '30s who
and Mikan, the De Paul and Min
neapolis Lakers ace who perfected
the big pivot man role, others
named Monday were:
Charles (Chuck) Hyatt, former
Pittsburgh star; the late Coach
Dr. Walter Meanwell of Missouri
and Wisconsin, former coach Dr
H. Clifford Carlson nf Pittshiireh
former Coach Dr. Forrest (Phog)
Allen of Kansas, fnrmw Univer
sity of Chicago Athletic Director
Amos Aionzo Stagg, Dr. Luther
Gulick, who assisted Dr. Nai Naismith
smith Naismith in drawing un the oama'c
0 -r .....
nrst ruie code; tne late Coach
Harold Olsen of Ohio State, who
neipeo start the NCAA tourna
ment: former Coach F.dwarH .T
Hickox- and the late Matthew
(rat) Kennedy, one of the most
coiortul officials in the game's
history.
Also singled out for honors as a
group was a team the original
Celtics, a New York nmre
squad widely hailed as the world
cnampions in the 1920's.. Members
ot tne team included Johnny Beck
mann, Joe Lapchick, Nat Holman
Horse Haeeertv PhH r
Dutch Dehnert, Pete Barry, Dave
ranKs, crie Keicn, Benny Borg
man, Elmer Ripley, George Whit
ty, and Eddie Burke.
Named to the hall earlier were
one time Chicago star John
Schommer, early rules maker
James Morgan of Pennsylvania,
former Coach Oswald Tower, Dr.
Naismith himself, and members
of Naismith's first team.
New American Grid
League Pronounces
Itself Organized
BEVERLY HILLS. Calif. (UPI)
The newly-organized American
Professional League Sunday pro
nounced itself a functioning real
ity with its basic organization es
tablished.
The announcement followed 1he
conclusion of a two-day organiza organizational
tional organizational melius 8t the Beverlv
Hilton Hotel. Cluh owners put off
until uieir meeung, Sept. 27 m
New York, three items naming a
commissioner, awarding thp iwn
remaining franchises, and setting
up arait pioceaures.
Harry Wismer, chairman of the
league's radio TV committee and
representing New York, told news
man the league's television policy
would uitter trom tnat of the Na
tional FootJall League. Cameras
will remain.oij fig'it?, "incidents'
and injure? Dlavers h said.
The eighfeiuDs league is to start
play in 1960.
Owners at Sunday's meeting ap approved
proved approved the league's constitution
ana Dy-iaws. rney declined to
disclose identities of three persens
under consideration for the com commissioner's
missioner's commissioner's fob and Lamar Hunt
of Dallas said others might be
added to the list.
Hunt said schedules were being
Worked OUt with fah team nlav.
ing 14 games, seven at home and
seven away, pius exhibition
games. He said scheduling would
avoia coninci wnenever possible
with other athletic events in a
franchised city.
One of the two remaining fran franchises
chises franchises has a good chance of go
ing to San Diego or San Fran
cisco, he said. Several other cit cities
ies cities are also in the running for the
irancnise, including Miami.
me six cities which are now
charter member the new

Editor: CONRADO SARCEANT

National League
TEAMS
San Franciica
W L
0 63
79 (4
71 45
73 71
Pet.
.55
.552
GB
r
Milwaukee .
Los Angeles .
Pittsburgh .
.545
.507
2
I
Cincinnati .
71 74
.490 10V4
.479 12
.457 le
.417 21V
Chicago it
74
5t. -Louis .... 45 7
Philadelphia . M 14
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Chicago
Cincinnati at San Francisco
Milwaukee at Los Angeles
Philadelphia at St. Louis (N)
Yesterday's Results
(Nioht Game)
Cincinnati 001 101 001 4 9 ft
San Francisco 000 001 0001 8 3
Brosnan (9-5), Lawrence and E.
Bailey, Dotterer.
Antonelli (19-9), Miller and Lan-
drith.
(Night Game)
Milwaukee 020 000 0204 T 0
Los Angeles 000 100 dOO-l 3 0
Buhl (13-9), MacMabon and
Crandall.
Drysdale (16-13) and Roseboro.
Only games scheduled.
EIGHT OPPOSE JAMIN
WESTBURY, N.Y. (UPI)-Eight
American trotters have been
picked to oppose Jamin, the Eu European
ropean European champion, in the $50,000
American Trotting Championship
at Roosevelt Raceway Friday
night. They are Trader Horn,
Steamin' Demon, Jean Laird,
Darn Safe, Mix Hanover. Senator
Frost, Camas B., and Sun Mac
Lad.

HOOFBEATS
By Conrado Sargeant

Promising apprentice rider Vic Victor
tor Victor Tejada and veteran Ruben
Vasquez were the only jockeys
suspended over the weekend at
the President Remon racetrack.
Each got eight meets for crowd crowding
ing crowding in the homestretch.
Tejada was set down for bump bumping
ing bumping into Dagon during the run running
ning running of Saturday's first race while
riding newcomer Tricon to her
first local victory.
Vasquez was guilty of keeping
Edimburgo in close quarters in
Sunday's eleventh race while win winning
ning winning with Tanarik.
Hnmprn HiHalpn Dot a S1fl fine
for not reporting that Behader's
Dandages came loose during me
sixth race on Saturday.
Bias Aguirre was also fined $10
for failing to report a slipped
saddle on Radical during Sunday's
fourth race.
Zia and Al Justo, bad trailers
in the eighth and tenth races
on Sunday, each got eight
moots for their poor perform perform-ancet.
ancet. perform-ancet. Ramo, a bad last in
Sunday's third race, also got
eight meets.
Mi Deseo. Rabiblancn and T)n-
ble Fija were set down for 15
aays eacn tor being lame.
black Bee, Victoria Regina and
Roina. were placed under nhspr.'
vation by the veterinarian.
0O0
Betting picked 110 over I ho won If.
end with a total of $126,049 push-
eu mrougn tne mutuels windows.
The bettors wagered $55,933 on
Saturday and Dluneeri to th tuns
of $70,116 on Sunday.
0O0
The Panama A
the tipsters contest fnr th
of September by one point in one
of the most hotly contested com-
peuuvms 01 tnis sort.
La Fiji is in second nlapo u,;th
165 points, Critica third with 164,
L ra rourtn witn 161 and El
Dig fifth with 159.
The third Quarter variv
test is also wide pen. Critica
and' La Estrella Ha Pimm.
deadlocked with 116 winners while
La Fija is close behind with 115
The Panama Tribune follows with
m ana me Panama American
remains in contention with 111.
0O0
Leadin? lockpv RraniiA d..
increased his margin in the rid riders'
ers' riders' contest for the sernnH aam.
ester with 69 winners to 64 over
arcn-rivai tieuodoro Gustines. Ru Ruben
ben Ruben Vasquei is a distant third
16 victories.
0O0
The two new steward whn i.rr.
appointed a littu nw, m,-
fortnight ago Carlos Bermudez
ana jorge Kamon Paredes work worked
ed worked for the first time over the
weekend.
Bermudex and Pari win .1
- -nil. mi
ternate with Luis Punting,' Jorae
" uu mm ra ue ia uuar uuar-dia.
dia. uuar-dia. They took the places of Bunt Bunting
ing Bunting and Dawson on both Saturday
ana Sunday.
league are Los Angeles, Dallas,
Houston, Denver, Minneapolls-St.
Paul, and New York City. Others
being considered for the two re remaining
maining remaining memberships are Buffa Buffalo,
lo, Buffalo, New Orleans, Kansas City, St.
Louis, Louisville and Mismi.

American Leg pie

TEAMS W
Chicago .... 89
Cleveland ... 84
New York ... 73
Detroit 71
Baltimore ... 70
Boston ..... 47
Kansas City . 42
Washington . 40
L Pet.
54 .414
M .583
GB
4'
15
17Vi
18Vi":
21VS
24
28Vi"'
71 .507
73 .493
74 .484
77
81
84
.445
.434
.417
Today's Games
Chicago at New York
Kansas City at Wash. (T-N)
Cleveland at Boston (N)
Detroit at Baltimore (N)
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 000 002 0013 10 I
Boston 000 006 30x--9 9 1
Dopovan (9-9), Staley, Peters,
McBride and Lollar.
Monbouquette (7-6) and Whui
Daley.
Cleveland
New York
002 300 0308 12 1
000 000 0055 12 1
McLish (18-8), Bell and Nixon.
Ditmar (12-9), Larsen, Blaylock
and Howard.
(Night Game)
Detroit 000 000 0000 4 0
Washington 002 021 OOx 5 9 0
Narleski (4-12), Proctor, Bruce
and Berberet.
Clevenger (8-4) and Courtney. -.
(Night Game)
Kansas City 000 000 0224 5 1
Baltimore 400 300 20x 9 11 0
Grunwald (0-1), Dickson, Killeerr
and House.
Brown (10-8) apd Triandos.
TAnA "D M. ..U J 4. it..
v va. v-o tt a 3 4 ustitu vu usb
San Fernando Clinic yesterday.
morning after being thrown by by-fractious
fractious by-fractious Chilean, colt Medio Pa-'
so during a workout. Reyes suf suf-fered
fered suf-fered only bruises in the fall.
0O0
Veteran trainer Augstin- Soane Soane-has
has Soane-has received many congratulations'
on the recent victories of the six--year-old
Chilean horse VergniauxS
in the track's top class. -"
Vergniaux, imported by the
Haras Carinfhia for a high price
two years ago, has boon plagued,
by poor health over since ar ar-riving
riving ar-riving on the Isthmus. Soane's
patience and expert handling
re finally paying off.
In contrast, however, another
Louis Martinz-owned racer which?
triumphed over the weekend did"
so under the handling of youthful-
Anihul A llua.eA itf.:i
... mnnuu, aiaiuya, ay
big three-year-old native daugh-i
ter of Barretin Argyle Street,"
proved a complete flop under under-Soane's
Soane's under-Soane's guidance.
As a last resort, it was decide
ed to turn her over to young Al Al-varado
varado Al-varado before sending her back
to the Martinz brood farm in Ce-
rro Punta for breeding purposes."
Marilyn has already chalked up'
two easy victories and several'
more appear in sight.
Fraser-DuPont Duo :
Win Mixed Doubles
Net Championship
FOREST HILLS, N.Y. (UPI)-'
Australia's Neale Fraser, amateur'
tennis' new golden boy, teamed
with Mrs. Margaret DuPont of,
Wilmington, Del., yesterday to de defeat
feat defeat Janet Hopps of Seattle, Wash,
and Bob Mark of Australia, 7-5f
13-15, 6-2, to win the mixed dou-'
bles title in the U.S. national ten tennis
nis tennis championships,'
The match was interrupted by
darkness Sunday, with the score
tied at 13-13 in the second set.
Yesterday's triumph gave south-'
paw Fraser a clean sweep of U.S,"
titles. He already had won t h e
doubles crown teamed with Roy.
Emerson, and Sunday he defeated
Alex Olmedo of Peru to win the
singles.
Braves Accepting
Applications For
Series Tickets
MILWAUKEE (UPI) -The Mih
waukee Braves are accepting mall
order applications from the publie
for World Series tickets, Vice
President George (Birdie) Teb Teb-betts
betts Teb-betts announced yesterday.
T e b b e t s said applications.
mailed after midnight, Friday;
Sept. 18, will not be accepted.
Series ticket applications fof
season ticket holders were mailed
last week.
All ticket sales, except those fot
standing room rickets, will be bt
mall, Tebbetts ssid. Dates for
over-the counter sales of stand
ing room tickets will be an
nounced later,

4
t,



PACI SEYtFf
Wrinis Never Saiv A Girl Like Karen Hantze

TBS. PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAIIY. NIWSFAJrTB

3

by I
-JOE WILLIAMS

'Too Beautiful
To Be Great'

The fellow .tared sullenly at
the flicker box. This wai the Ar Arthur
thur Arthur Murry Show, ajid presently
Whitey Ford, Andy Carey and
Norm Siebern came on, dancing
bouyantly with dream dolls.
"The YinkeM-ought to trade
thpse birdsfor three of Murray s
danceri,"he feUow growled. I
ruaranle you the ball club would
et all jfce best of it, too."
Hell las no fury like a tor tor-mentjid
mentjid tor-mentjid baseball fan, and clear
purl reason is a commodity he
wouldn't be cdught aeaa with, a

emote risk at best, xne xanees

d to be too good. JMOW iney

COUldn t De worse, Aiieie is
den idolatry tor the White Sox,
unniing their first pennant m 40
rears, ridicule tor the Yankees,
losing nly their third in 13 years.
This has been one of those
maddening seasons when practi practically
cally practically everything and everybody
went wrong. The front office was
guilty of a rare mistake standing
pal, overrating its personnel while
.. .,.in tn nnnosition'S.

For most of the last half of

'Si the Yankees naa piayeu
.:. is, inH inderisivelv. a clear

warning of diminshing tatents and

a booty-trappea uuc
came the dramatic uphill victory
- h. Rravet in the World Se-

ne (What's that, Pop?) and the

fatally optimistic mgm io euphoria.

And yet if the pitching had
stood up, the Yankees might still
have made it a close fit. Last
yetr Turley, Ford and Larsen
combined for 44 wins. 20 losses,
with only weeks to go their ag aggregate
gregate aggregate accomplishment is 28-za.
Turley has been the big bust.
Only pitcher in the league to
win 20 or more last yttr the
Yankees ace became the Yankee
deuce. What happened?
Too" much Akron squab at off offseason
season offseason banquets is one theory,
and it could have been a factor.
Slow illustrious players than Tur Turley
ley Turley have paid the penalty in ex excess
cess excess weight and tired blood for
touring the rubber-chicken circuit.
' Eyen Stan Musial, following his
second batting championship in
4$, when his BA skidded from
.MS to .312.
CUPID'S SET SACK
AM... P.nd1 perennial star was

doing it for free, too, whereas

the more moaem pmyeie

business agents, ajid when they
make like Demosthenes they must
be paid. Another explanation is
that Turley's heavy involvement
in player-owner relations was so
demanding his crafts raanshipsuf-fered.

Eddie Yost lends plausibility to
that conjecture. In 58, with Wash Washington
ington Washington Yost like Turlev was the

players' representative. Traded to

Detroit, ne aDanaonea me acti activity,
vity, activity, pleading a need to "concen "concentrate
trate "concentrate better." He's upped his aver average
age average some 50 points, his home run
output to a career high.
To what extent, if any, extra extracurricular
curricular extracurricular exertions affected Tur Turley's
ley's Turley's pitching, who can say? His
best previous year was 17-13; al also
so also hp was sone of (hp late-sea-

son wilting Yankees whose World

Series splendors contriDutea to me

general sense oi laise lormiaao:
lity.
A Ipmncrampntal sniinhnne lia

harassed Ford for several years

now. cut ne s a pncner oi aumen
tic big-league status and physi
last spring Cosey Stengel predict
rallv solvent still a master. Lar

sen is an enigma; his top Yankee
figure is 11-5 in '56. In Florida

last soring Casey Steneel nredict

ed marvelous things for him, "now
that hi's married." . .That little

guy you see hanging on the ropes

is uupia.
MANTLE'S EMPTY BAT

This should have heen one Of

Mickey Mantle's brightest seasons
Instead it's fine of his dullest

Free nf nhvsiral miseries, he has

v r -

worked hard kept in line conai

tion Ye aside irom ms neiaiiuf

running and throwing, hesel hesel-dom
dom hesel-dom -displayed the greatness you
In the past Maptie has led in
xittino home rims, sluezine and

runs batted in. This year he'll lead

in none. In fact, ne may noi ev

n hit son At 28. after nine

uiimm neak nerformances can

be most elusive, now ao you ex

plain him.'
Well he's a Dart-time busi

neosman. with investments in mo

tels and bowling alleys. When
slumps occur, the front-office
view is the victim is also a part-

time ball player. Uie case iranK
iv admits o bewilderment. .

"Mantle can do anything, but

when he don't hit, he's just an

other euv that's fast going to

firsti"

o

Tip to the New York Giants n
they're still trying to locate that
W end they've needed for
Tears: there's one right down the
rAad from their Bear Mountain
camp, helping Army get ready
for the season ... ex-AU-America
Don Holleder, a lieutenant on The
Plains... but available at the right
price since his three-year tour has
ended and he could resign tomor

row if he wanted to...
One reason pitchers don't fool
Bill White of the St. Louis Car Cardinalshe
dinalshe Cardinalshe was second in his high'
aehool graduating class of 127 127-and
and 127-and a fine student at Hiram College-
The Chicago White Sox tell you
il.i ii.. mnrp of Bob Shaw

as a brilliant starter traces to

the change in ms oenvery u.
Coach Ray Berres to aH overhand
motibn...but wasn't there also i
change from a talky, cocky kid
to one who now keeps his own
.......t? inH has the sage ad-

j .aamU TTjiriv Wvnn to

guide him...

The Tigers wouldn't have come
mt hirilv ivins up Shaw last

yar if only they'd hung on to

frtBA rlil inV Bill I 1 1 1 11,111 .v

LUC V

tu.'. ipnupl to the story

f the padlesss Giant linebacker

who showed up ai me uiiyvn
t swimming suit, paddUng across
the runway.-.after having all his
clothes stolen while he slept pool pool-mtA
mtA pool-mtA a (mitt nivi later Coach Jim

llUC.i-ii
i Unwell harl a sauad meeting

Ad"id he thought the boys de-

lervtd to hear Uie iuu siory...ai siory...ai-.r
.r siory...ai-.r ,hieh Howell solicited com

ments from the veterans ... wno
were mum for the most part un until
til until Frank Gifford broke the ten ten-t
t ten-t on: "I just want to know one
thing. Was he wearing a Jant Jant-ren?"...the
ren?"...the Jant-ren?"...the swim suit that Frank
plugs off-season.
Little Brown and Co., a staid
Boston publishing house, made
overtures to Giant rookie Lee
Grosscup to enroll him among
their authors.. .after reading of his

writing ambitions...
r Maybe you're tired of reading
bout that boxing mess.. .but it is
Interesting how Willie The Wai
Rosensohn kept Vincent The Veil
Velella. who owned him two two-third
third two-third body and soul, In the back background
ground background for iix months before the
Patterson-Johansson fight ... Said
The Wail: "You're politician.
V it comes out that you're behind
tlia nromotion. vou'll eet so ma

ny people king for free tickets,
you could cut out all our pfofits.
rh vail a sreerl it made sense.

Where do you think Willie was

over the Davil cup weex-enar...
In the stands at Forett Hills and
commenting right off the bat;

Bob Shaw

"What a wonderful place this
would be to stage a boxing match."

fonrcT HTT.T.S. N. Y. (NEAl

v.r umt7 ii the eirl they

say is too beautiful to become a

great tennis player.
The golden haired 16 -year- old
cn ftieen miss disooses of oppon

ents with the aplomb and precise
determination of a genteel English

lady snipping roses in a Hamp

shire garden, sne giwes auoui me
court with the fluid rhythm of an
skatpr returninf volley after

volley with deceptive ease ntu

she has jockeyed nerseii ana uer
opponent into position for the

kill.
Than with the cold cruelty of

VA1I ih she ruts murderouslv at

the ball imparting a malevolent
twist that makes it and often
the nnnonent do acrobatics.

When she turns on uie nuici u
is as though the little girl next

rlnnr cnririenlv had stariea 10

wield Liizie Borden's axe.
Tt takes real old-timer to re

call anyone with her ability at

her age.

"She's the greatest i ve seen

cino uv button Bundv came

ainno hark in 1900." savs Perry

t .innps 71-vear-old Mr. Ten

nic nf southern lalliornia nu

Davis Cub team captain the past
twn vears. "Her only weakness

is her beauty, rne Doys win

rush her to deatn, Mie nas me
Hisnitv and comoosure of a

Helen Wills Moodv. so ah e's

bound to get caught in the social
whirl. All that's tine, but makes
it hard to concentrate on cham championship
pionship championship tennis."

The girl wno won me unuea
States girls championship in

1957 at tne age oi 14 ana mis

ixf became the first person in
ie tournament's 42-year history

to regain it, has a solid all-

round game. She is excellent at

the net. Her baseline game,

while sound, could stand im

provement so she now is being
rnarhen bv Maureen Connolly

Brinker, the famous Little Mo.

Against Angela Mortimer in

this year's United States wo women's
men's women's sineles at Forest Hills,

Karen, following Little Mo's in

structions, seldom went to me

net and in ladvlike manner

slneced the h i e h 1 v regarded

British player, 63, o
Karen took to tennis at eight-and-a-half
when her mother and

father started takine her to La

Jolla, a suburb of ban uiego,

where they played week enos.

They would leave the sprout

that was to bud into an Amen Amen-ran
ran Amen-ran hpautv on a nlaveround.

wnen 1 goi urea oi swinging
on hars and swines. I started

swinging a racquet," Karen re

calls.
Kenneth Hantze. a school teach

er anH hia wife. Svbil. detected

signs of real playing anility in
their offspring, so they took her to
Fleannr Tennant who had a hand

in developing every male player

in soutnern uaiuornia irom Maur

ice McLoughhn to Pancho Gonza

les and everv eirl irom Mary K.

Browne on."T each" Tennant

taught her the basics, then Karen
was placed under t(le tutelage of
Les Stoefen at the La Jolla Beach

and Tennis Club. J'--'

Karen is a bit more than five

feet-six and toaj' grow some

more. The uaual statistics are

useless in describing her be

cause hers is the type of beauty
that cannot be tabulated on an
adding machine. It is the beauty
of a youthful natural blonde with

almost classic leatures who shines
wit'h a health v crlnw

The young lady is loaded with

quiet assurance and modesty
"You won of rnurte enm

one efkiri tn hpr elm nama tnlA

the lounge of the West Side Ten

nis ciud looking as fresh and cool

as a aeworop itier limshing a
1 on id

"I won," smiled Karen Hanbe

in me genuesi oi reouxes, "but
not of '. urse."

t A.

Jeanine Hebert 1st
Semilinalist In RP
Girls lie! Tourney
Jaanin Hebart bacam the
first amif inaliit of rha Girls
Junior Tannis Tournamant be being
ing being played at the Panama Olym Olympic
pic Olympic swimming paol courts whan
she defeatod Carolyn Davis 4-2,
4-0 on Sunday.
This was tha first quarter fin final
al final match of the tournament.
Tomorrow Mary Essllnger and
Mercedes Argote tangle in the
second quarter finals contest.
Two oher quarter finals
matches will be played. Mitzi

Sucre tackles Betsy Foster

one and Ruth Phillips is sched scheduled
uled scheduled to meet Hilma Cooke in

the other.
In other matches played aver
the weekend, Miss Sucre elim eliminated
inated eliminated Efigenia Voutselakos, 4-1,
4-0 and Miss Davis won ever
Anabel Varela.

" Karen Haatie

Davis Golf Club
Announces Monthly
Best Ball Tourney
The Fort Davis Golf Club todv
announced a monthly four-ball

tournament. All Isthmian golfers
and duffers are eliaible to par

ticipate in these monthly 72-hole

match play tournaments.
The first tourney is scheduled
(o get underway on Sept. 19. Win Winners
ners Winners in each foursome share
eoually in przes to be awarded.
The prizes to be awarded are on
disnlay at the cluh.
Tee off time has been arranr
ed to allow participants who have
to stand inspection to nhv. Knter
now by calling 07-319. Fort Davis.
The qualifying rounds to e
Held in October will be?in Sept.
29 and end Oct. 4 at 5 p.t. in
order that pairings for flights

may be set up.
This tournament is not restrict

ed to members of the club onlv.
Choose a partner witH a hani hani-can
can hani-can in your category for a team.
There are If pieces of silver to
be awarded. Entry fee is J2.

r

WINNING RUN The Giants' Orlando Ccpcda scored the lone San
Francisco tally in the second inning of the game against the Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia Phillies in San Francisco on Sunday. The run gave the
Giants a 1-0 victory and came when pinch hitter Dusty Rhodes loft lofted
ed lofted a fly ball to left field. Harry Anderson's throw to the plate wai
dropped by catcher Joe Lonnett (UPI radiophoto).

ATINA CARRIES YOU SMOOTHLY

HRU THE IRONING HOUR I

Sotina...
i BIO honing

W In tht fifti box.

mm

PACKAGE DEAL Choose Inggafe for your boat that earn
LAsde4EiS rtoWed easily. Storage Pce to alway. arcL,

Don't fret about the Reds' depos

ed skipper Mayo Smith ... who's

dickering to come back into the
Yankee organization ... and who.

you might say, is picking up pin

money wnn a nuge Downng al alley
ley alley venture in Winston Salem
partnered by Sam Snead, Perry
Como and Jay Hebert.. .Isn't New
York's Madison Square Garden
branching out to buy the Lake
Worth, Fla., alleys in which Ma Mayo
yo Mayo also holds an interest?...

With college football upon, us,
Bob Blackman of Dartmouth has
a quaint gripe he has a tough
time keeping some of his grid grid-Hor
Hor grid-Hor in ltniinrm... because Rucbv

has gotten so much publicity at

the Hanover institution, Us noios
greater glamour for freshmen,
who can become varsity ruggers.
Bill Murray at Duke calls capt-
in.siiard Mike MrGee the great

est lineman he's ever coached...
also one of the smartest ... Red

Blaik inVerited the lonely end
simmirk last vear. hut successor

Dale Hall feels he didn't exploit it

enough.. .and plans to tnrow more
tn the Innelv one this vear.. .The

citadel will he hannv to know that

AI Bansavage, lured away a year

ago oy soutnern cauiomia, is
down for 225 pounds of itartlng

guard...
Rut the enlleffe football mate

rial that has all the professionals
gaping ii at Auburn... with three
potential All-America linemen
center Jackie Burkett and guard

Swim Classes
To Begin At

Gatun Pool

After a surresKftil Dimmer at

the pool and evm we are now

ready for our new session of
rlasse for oil tvn nf wimmara

a new touch has been added to
the Personnel at the nnol with the

arrival ot uoacn syd Kennon who

win assume the duties as swim-

mincr lnatriirtnr onH urhn will

q ... .... i ...
handle the Phys. Ed. program for
Gatun. He will be aided by the
....LI. V ( t

tapauir ivirs. Jean vvainio.
We hope there will be a good
response so our nrncrram will he

a success. Everyone xl all ages

tiinc hiju enjoy uie pool wnne

learning io swim.

Schedule for Classes
lUonH.tv weYnecHnv ITrMav

9:00,-12-00 Onen Kwimmino- 9-30.

3:30 Beginners Classes; 3:'30-4:30

Beginners uasses

TnesHav and ThnrsHav Onn

10:00 Adult Swimming Classes
inon.insn KlnHertrarten Plassei

10:30-11:00 Nursery Age Swim

ming; i:oo z:oo Mndergarten
Classes; 310-4:00 "I" Classes.

Swimmers interested mav rail

at the pool to register all this

weeK. a scneouie tor Margarita
school children is being passed
out at the school.

Travel Light But With
Proper Boating Gear

.0-

By WM. TAYLOR AACKEOWN
"We've heen invited out on a

friend' boat for Uie week-end,"

men and women readers write.
"What do we need to take
alone? What are we expected to

bring?"
If you don't know, find out:
1. How big is the boat? 8. Will
you be sleeping aboard?
The size of the boat is impor important.
tant. important. Clothes that look sporty in
a fashion magazine can lose
their glamour when the first solid

green wave breaks on aecK.
In a runnabout or small sail sailboat,
boat, sailboat, you will need sturdy and
warm clothing. Boating has al al-uivi
uivi al-uivi heen the answer to any heat

wave. Speeding through blowing

spray can Keep you cooi on me
hottest days.
Skin fancy clothes if you are

small-boat sailing. Sweaters,
dungarees, bathing suit, raincoat
or foul weather gear are in order.
It's nnsnnrtv to horrow a warm

jacket off your host's back. A

larger boat may nave extras

aboard.

Read Our Classifieds

Destroys germs. ..fdst

the

(245) and even faster than

others...
Between you'n'me, isn't one of
the Service academies bending
its rules ever so slightly to see to
it that one of lis standout grM
ers stays in scho"!?... aware c
'Wo fart he has a herknnine e-

Zeke Smith, who've already made reer in pro sports if he shoul
it, and tackle Ken Rice, bijser flunk out...

Arrive with rubber-soled boat boating
ing boating shoes on, clothes and any ac accessories
cessories accessories in a soft duffle or sea
bag. Any craft smaller than a
palatial yacht ,has limited stor storage
age storage space. A stiff-framed suitcase
cannot be folded and stowed con conveniently.
veniently. conveniently. Because bags must fold, so must
clothes. If the week-end will in include
clude include parties ashore and you
bring dressy clothes, choose gar garments
ments garments that hold their cease and
do not winkle easily.
The air is moist around a boat
and promptly removes all shape
from suits and dresses that need
constant ironing. Hang up clothes
if the boat boasts a hanging
locker.
Find out about sleeping aboard or

ashore." Some families una muco
of the fun is to blow up air mat mattresses
tresses mattresses and curl up in sleeping
bags on the floorboards or the
beach. This can be fun if you
come mentally forewarned, but it
alan heen a severe shark to

landlubbers and boatmen used to

bunks.

Count on your hosts for food un unless
less unless you have offered to bring
something in advance and they
'lave agreed Rpfriseration

nually limited. There may be no

oom in the ice chest for your sur
prise contribution.

In vour kit include toilet arti

cles, insect repellent, sun tan lo lotion,
tion, lotion, a flashlight, binoculars, ca cameras
meras cameras and sun glasses. Put on

dark glasses immediately if it is
a bright day. A few hours of star

ing into glare on the water can
bring on a headache.
If you suspect seasickness, take
in advance one of the new anti anti-motion
motion anti-motion drugs. While you may ne never
ver never feel upset on your boat, the
seemingly unsettled motion of a
strange craft can cause uneasi uneasiness
ness uneasiness in many experienced sailors.
Be certain that the marine toilet
aboard operates in the manner to
which you are accustomed. These
devices can jam up easily. Ask

questions of your skipper on
such matters, follow instructions.

As added insurance on a trip
when the weather, appears
threatening, you might include
one of the very small portable ra radios,
dios, radios, a pocket-sized novel and a
deck of cards. Some week-ends it
has been known to rain.
But even a damp day can be
restful if you are dry and warm
afloat.

v mm

1 Ol4ft

To a race track hanger-on a
nickname is almost a necessity
and although some of the desig designations
nations designations seem to be bestowed with without
out without rhyme or reason, other titles
are readily understood.
For instance, there was a char character
acter character known far and wide around
the turf as Lyin' Fitz. He came

by his tag by describing the plight

of a cat which was stepped on by

a horse one day, resulting in the

loss of two or three inches of one
foreleg.
"I felt real sorry for that old
cat," Lyin' Fitz would say. "And

I finally whittled down an old

harness peg to make him an ar
tificial limb.

"After the cat got used to H

he was as good as ever at every

thine, maybe even better at

catching mice. It was down right
wonderful to watch him catching

nvce with one paw and clubbing
them to death with the other."

-

I vriarr I

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It's true . USTERINE is the best way to protect
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colds... It is also the fastest, most efficient way
to stop bad breath. But that's not iall.
LISTERINE has 1001 uses ... for cuts and scrapw,
for desinfecting thermometers and baby's bottles...
for local infections like athlete's foot.
Whenever there is danger of infection and where
hygiene is a must. LISTERINE is fast... kills
germs by the millions, instantly... No wonder
LISTERINE is the most efficient home antiseptic.

Dont be caught without
LISTERINE I
Buy enough bottles to today
day today at your favorita
drugstore

And for your teeth,
LISTERINE
tooth paile.
Helps prevent decay and
keepe your mouth
freeh and clean.



PAGI EIGHT
THE PA5AMA AMERICAN Alf INDEPENDENT DULY NCWSPAPCB
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BARDO LOM-BARDO -o 26 "B" Street MORRISON 4th of July Ave a J SI LEWIS SERVICE Ave. TivoU Ne. 4 FAKMACIA EST ADOS UNIDOS 141 Central Aa.
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Beside Bella Vista Theatre and Branch at Minima Super Market oa Via EspaSa COLON OFFICE: 15th ana Ana dor Gaernre Ne. 14m TeL 4M.
I contract.

- TCTSDAT, EIPTTHBER 15, M5f

V

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Wis

Resorts

PHILLIPS Oceans ids Cottages
Santa Cur. R. da P. Pfcene Pa Panama
nama Panama $-1877 Cristobal J-1673.
Baldwin'! furnished apartments
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
ith, Gamboa 302.
Foliar' cottages, near Santa
Clara. Reasonable rates. Phone
Balboa 1866.
Houses
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet,
2 medium sixe bedrooms, living-dining
room, porch, kitchen,
bathrooms. 48 street (ending),
to the left. Bella Vista. Phone 3 3-1863..
1863.. 3-1863.. FOR HINT: Chalet. Newly
constructed. Three bedrooms,
studio, garage, large fenced yard,
hot water. Calle G. Loma Alegre
phone Balboa 3228.
FOR RENT: Room, private
bath. Two meals, laundry, Tel.
3-1146, near Hotel Panama.
! Commercial Sites
NEED OFFICE SPACE?
Will rent desk space in well lo-
i eated air conditioned office.
i Receptionist and secretarial ser services
vices services i desired. Tel. 3-7001.
Lessons
ILEARN SPANISH! The easiest
and quickest way. Private les lessons
sons lessons by experienced Spanish
native teacher. Also commercial
correspondence. Guaranteed per personal
sonal personal method. Apply: senor
Latorre 13-93, Central Avenue,
Pension Vaiquex, Apt. No. 14.
rz

Rooms

Commercial Guide

ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
Ads only cost $0.85 per col. inch
Ads accepted for a minimum of one month.

FOR INFORMA I IUIM utu

Canal Zone Society For
The Prevention Of Cruelty
To Animals
Box 246, Balboa. C. 7,.
Phone: Curundn 5113
The followini animal at the
Corozal Veterinary Hospital
need good homes:
1 Black female tox, medium tirt,
native terrier
1 t;rey female rlns, lonj shasir.v
hair, very- friendly
Frellv raliro female al
1 (.rev and hite young male cat.
Call the above telephone number
for the following:
2 Female kiltens, hlark and white,
2 months old
1 Female rat, blark and while, 2
vearn old
SI PPORT VOI R SPf A.
OV NEED IT. IT NEEDS YOU.
GIBRALTAR LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Jim Ridge
Harry Cornell
Davis Stevenson
Box E Diablo, C.Z.
Telephone Pan. 2-0552

-i i ..i i.j
A.

,4 You moan 1 ran nave a
after all?" Guardia & Cia.,
, l'anama Citv.

Apartments

FOR RENT: Modern three bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, living room,
dining room, three bathrooms,
hot water, maid's room, garage,
etc. Manuel Maria Icaia street
"Formentor Building ". Phone 3 3-4994.
4994. 3-4994. FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, living-dining room,
kitchen, hot water, maid's room,
garage, etc. Via Argentina, Ma Ma-ruja
ruja Ma-ruja Building. $75.00. Tel. 3 3-4994.
4994. 3-4994. FOR RENT: Modern furnished
apartment, two bedrooms, liv-ing-diningroom,
hot water,
maid's room, garage, etc. 49th
Street. "Isabelita" Building Tel.
3 4994.
Billy Graham Ends
Two-Day Crusade
At Little Rock
MTT1.K ROCK. Ark. (UPI)
Kvanpplist Bill v Graham wound
nn a tivn-rlnv whirlwind crusade
telling a racially mixed crowd and
Cnv nrval Faubus that Little
Rock would have no trouble if its
people followed Christ.
The Little Rock crusade was
Graham's first in three and a
half months since he returned to
the United States from Australia.
11 wasn't the first time he had
spoken in an integration hotspot,
however, he said.
"1 snnkp in Clinton Tenn.. too,"
he said. "It is my policy never
to speak publioy where an audi audience
ence audience is to be segregated."
Graham ignored some 40,000
pamphlets circulated by segrega
tionists who objected to tne even even-gelist
gelist even-gelist demanding that there be no
segregated sections at War Memo Memorial
rial Memorial football stadium,
It was filled with 25,000 persons
Sundav. Some 20.000 persons heard
him Saturday night.
"Tf npnnlp lived like Christ and
hplipvnd in him there would be
no problem in Little Rock," Gra
ham said. It was tne only direct
eference he made to race or in in-egration
egration in-egration during the sermon.
But afterward, when several
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES TP TO 36 Mo
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile how
Phone 3-4981 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
We Certify
RADIO and TV
i SERVICE
ij Wi certify quolity ports and tervic
... foir chargvi.
I Orf TROPELCO
I lJ-rh''''i)ir,t;
Cjudranty Stal.
TROPELCO, S. A.
Tel. 3-7489
Mark IV for my own car
SA Tel. :,-7225 Ext. 8

f

I

1

Automobiles

FOR SALE: MG-TD 53. radio,
w.w new paint, new top, lunch lunch-time
time lunch-time 3-1390, Navarro.
FOR SALE: Two 1953 Chev Chevrolet
rolet Chevrolet 2 ton, 4 cubic yards dump
trucks in good running condi conditions
tions conditions One has an overhauled
1955 The other a brand new
1959 Chevrolet engine.
One 315 Chicago Pnewmatic air
compressor with D4600 Cater Caterpillar
pillar Caterpillar Diesel engine. Mounted on
4 pneumatic wheels and working
in perfect conditions. Call Pana Panama
ma Panama phone 3-7243.
FOR SALE: 1957 Chevrolet
4-door Sedan 6 cylinder with
shift, new tires, new battery un under
der under coated, oil filter bumperetes
low mileage, clean throughout,
good dependable transportation
5341 Davis St. Diablo 2-1733.
FOR SALE:-1958 model TV 21
inchs, needs repair. Phone 86 86-7182.
7182. 86-7182. FOR SALE: 1947 Ford, 2 door,
good tires, new battery. $75 00.
Balboa 2-3091.
FOR SALE:-51 Plymouth $175.
Apply 0268-C, Gamboa.
FOR SALE: 1957 Rambler 4 4-door,
door, 4-door, one owner, 22,000 miles,
excellent condition $1,450 00.
Call Hull, Cristobal 3-1772.
During office hours after hours
3-2568.
Car Rentals
Visiting firemen on your hands?
Put a new Hertxcar.at their dis disposal.
posal. disposal. Call Fiesta Car Rentals.
Tel. 3-4568 Lobby El Panami
Hilton.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE: Motorcyclist gen genuine
uine genuine horsehide coat and belt, top
condition, used twice only, value
$35.00. Will sell for $16.00.
Phone 6-484, Gamboa.
hundred persons both white and
colored came forward at his in invitation
vitation invitation to accept Christ, Graham
spread his arms wide and said:
"Newspapers have been full of
violence in Little Rock. I chal challenged
lenged challenged them to print this story
people of both races standing
here together."

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
(INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840)
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
S.S. "COTOPAXI" Sept.
M.V. "SARM1ENTO" Oct. 1
"TO I NITElTkLNGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUA1RA,
KINGSTON. HAVANA. NASSAU, BERMUDA. SPAIN
AND FRANCE
S.S. "REINA DEL MAR" (20,225 Tons)
(Air-conditioned) Nov. 29
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. "PJZARRO" Sept. 19
M.V. "SALAMANCA" Oct. 8
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD.HOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "DALERDYK" Sept. 25
S.S. "LOCH AVON" Oct. 4
TO IKCONTINENT
S.S. "AKKRUMDYK" Sept. 16
S.S. "DINTELDYK" Oct. 3
ISA1LINGS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
TELEPHONES:
Cristobal 3-1G545 a Panama 3-12578 a Balboa 2-1905

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
GREAT WHITE FLEET
New Orleans Service S a i U Arrivs
"" Cristobal
ULUA Sept. 11 Sept. 19
YAQUE Sept. 18 Sept. 26
MORAZAN Sept. 25 Oct. 3
"CIBAO Oct. 2 Oct. 10
YAQUE ... Oct. 8' Oct. 17
'Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo

New York Service S a i I Arrives
MUSA Sept. IS Sept. 22
JUNIOR Sept. 22 Sept. 27
SAN JOSE Sept. 29 Oct. 4
METAPAN Oct. 6 Oct. 11
HEREDIA Oct. 13 Oct. 18
MMON Oct. 20 Oct. 25
METAPAN Oct. 27 Nov. 1
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
CRISTOBALW.C.C.A. FEEDER SERVICE
TEXITA Every (15) Days
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles. San Francisco
and Seattle
SPECIAL EXCURSION FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return $275.00
To San Francisco andor Seattle and Return $400.00
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA,2-2904

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Frigidaire electrie
stove, China closet, 3 youths
desks etc. Vallarino, Calle 6.
Golf Heights.
FOR SALE: Westinghouae re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, new unit $50; G E.
electric fan $10; 6 bamboo
blinds (4 x6') $9; table model
radio $8. Phone Monday trough
Friday, Balboa 2553. Evenings
Saturday and Sunday, Balboa
1443.
FOR RENT: Furnished room to
a single man. Phone 3-2147, 97
East Street No. 18, San Francis-
FOR SALE-. Refrigerator S I.,
good condition $75.00. Maho Mahogany
gany Mahogany bedroom set, single bed,
chest of drawers dresser, night
stand 10 mos., old excellent
condition. 3-3125 Margarita.
FOR SALE Westinghouse refri refrigerator,
gerator, refrigerator, 12 cu. ft., all porcelain
box, first class condition. $50.
Balboa 1634, 627 Ancon Blvd.
FOR SALE: One solid maho mahogany
gany mahogany buffet, one gas water heat heater,
er, heater, one cot and mattress for
maid's room. Tel. J-6784.
Wanted Position
Young Spanish commercial cor correspondent,
respondent, correspondent, experienced, bilin bilingual,
gual, bilingual, also speakes French and
German would gladly consider
any proposition to act as execu executive
tive executive or secretary in a responsible
American concern or first class
commercial firm. Highest refer references
ences references available. Apply to senor
Latorre 13-93 Central Avenue,
Pension Vaiquex, Apt. No. 14.
Catholic Paper
Praises Soviet
Moon Shot
VATICAN CITY (UPI) The
semi-official Roman C a t h o i c
newspaper Osservatore Romano
yesterday praised the Russian
moon shot as "a conquest of man mankind."
kind." mankind." But the Vatican newspaper
warned that such achievements
should not lead man to think him himself
self himself the sole master of the uni universe.
verse. universe. "The faith in God Is not contra contradicted
dicted contradicted by science today nor will
it be tomorrow," it said.

Miscellaneous

FOR SALI: Atad natural ma ma-aura
aura ma-aura at oivt-away pricoi fcy Ha
rruckload. Call 2-2641.
FOR SALE: Mavtaa washing
machina, $75.00; 2 matal atrtt atrtt-tart,
tart, atrtt-tart, aach $7.50; 1 rwin bad.
$15. 00; 2 pain drapat, $20.00;
1 table taw; I daep freait (with
out compressor), $30.00; I
wrought iron couch, $60.00;
60 cycle, 1 Vi h p. motor,
$75.00. 2-4263, Los Rios 6444.
SALE: Head Stona new assort
ed in Georgia Granite!. Discount
10 for Corozal and Mount
Hope. Apply to MARMOLERIA
CA5IMIRO MORENO, Calle B
and 19 West. Phone 2-26S6.
FOR SALE: Leica M-3 with
exposure meter and F2-50
mm. Summicron coated lens and
leather case: Ektar telephoto
135 mm.; Elmar portrait 90
mm.; Elmar wide angle 35 mm.;
Universal view tinder; Leiti
leather case for above lenses,
plus filters and sun shades. A
magnificent collection for all
purpose photography $395.00.
Call evenings 3-0117, mornings
3-6153.
FOR SALE: Electrie plant, 5
kw. 110220 volts. 4 hp Jeep
engine partially disassembled,
as is, $50.00. Balboa 2-3630.
Must move at once several truck
loads of good lumbar. Will sell
reasonable or trade for anything
of value, ABERNATHY 3-6895.
FOR SALE: Kohler light plant
1 500 watts OS. Economical oper operation.
ation. operation. With 2 DC motor. All
very good condition. $165.00.
Write Box 1892, Balboa.
FOR SALE: Brand-aew Admiral
air conditioner. 1-ton 220 velt.
Still in crate. Will sell for U.S.
wholesale price. Phone 2-6384.
FOR SALE: Like new, ladiai
fall-winter coat navy blue. Girl'e
navy pea coat, eixe 9-10. Bal Balboa.
boa. Balboa. Call 2-1713, 1:00 p.m. to
3:00 p.m.
FOR SALE:
2964.
-Talking parrot. 2-
FOR SALE: Small maternity
shop in Avenida Justo Aroseme Aroseme-na,
na, Aroseme-na, across from Royal Crown at
very reasonable price. Inquire
"Stork", Tel. 3-6740.
Employment
Opportunities
WANTED: Bilingual first eiaet
telephone operator. Ability more
important and experience, eall
Personal Director, El Panama
Hilton. Tel. 3-1660.
WANTED: Secretary with
knowledge In bookaeper, with)
shorthand and able to speak v
English perfectly. Novedades
Lachman, Central No. 51.
Hat
These Car
Buys Are
BIG!
1957 Chevrolet
Bel Air two
door, 6 cyl,
Trans. Std.
$1,750.00
1955 Pontiac
4 door, 2
tone, radio
. 250.00
Panel
Chevrolet
900.00
1957 Ford
4 door,
6 cylinder
1,600.0Q
1956 Plymouth
4 door,
2 tone
1,300.00
1957 Panel
Taunus
500.00
C0LPAN
MOTORS
Tels. 2 0625 2-0628

MEaaWEE
?$mt how
1W V 0nto
I m Your

i 1955

Real Estate

!OR SALE: Use 500 end 1 .000
tnotera, ill the Nueve Hrpc-dreaM
Urbanliatioe- acree Hit Ramon
Racetrack. All lets wttk street
fronts, sewage, water aeaia and
electricity. Cef W. MeBaraeH.
Tel. 4-0976.
FOR SALE: 4Vi hectares m
Cerro Asul at lake 2 small Bid's,
deep well, large light plant.
Small stream runs thru property.
One of the most scenic and de desirable
sirable desirable location in Cerro Asul.
House 1579-A, Balboa, phone
Balboa 2 3133.
Services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
SERVICE. Our new sarvice plan
gives you faster, mora econo economical
mical economical and better service. Phone
2-1905 Crawford Agencies. Tlvo Tlvo-II
II Tlvo-II Avenue.
Protect your home and pre par party
ty party against insect damage.
Prompt tciaatifie treatment oe
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777.
FOR RADIO, TELEVISION and
Hi-Fi too, ne other service but
ours will do. U. S. TELEVISION
Phone 3-7607 Panama. From 9
a.m. to 10 p.ir Saturday to 6
p.m.
ALLIED UPHOLSTERY SHOP
(lloise. Manager)
.We specialise m Furniture,
Drapes, bfipcovert and ear
upholstery
Our vast experience make every
)eb guaranteed neatness and
punctuality
TNHMpertee Baxter, S.A. next he
El Ranch o
(Temporary Location)
Telephone 2-4586. Panami, R, p.
Animals
FOR SALE: Puppies I eks
old. Vi Poodle end V2 Ger man
Shepherd. For information call 2 2-2963
2963 2-2963 (Balboa).
Personals
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 1709.
Sen. Kennedy Seeks
Democrat Conless
In Slale Primaries
WASHINGTON, Sept. 15 (UPI)
Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-
Mass.) has challenged potential
nvais tor tne Democratic presi
dential nomination to run a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst him in state preferential
primaries.
Kennedy, a front-runner for
the Democratic nomina t i o n,
said yesterday that he was a
"great believer" in the primary
system because it gave "the Deo-
ple an opportunity to partici participate'
pate' participate' in tne selection of candi
dates.
"I think that anyone who is
a candidate T wnnlrl hnne
would submit themselves to
some judgment," he said. "Now
the primaries don't exist in ev every
ery every state Political leaders will
have some influence.
"But I would hate to have it
finally made a judgment on the
Dasis or a iew people in a meet meeting
ing meeting in some Los Aneplp hnt.pl
I have never thought that, was
the way candidates ought to be
picKea.
The Democratic convention
Will he heir) in T.nc Ancelec navt
summer. Kennedy made his
statement wnen asKed on a tele
vision Droeram whether ho ho
lieved candidates should enter
sucn primaries as those in Ore
gon, Wisconsin and New Hamp
shire.
Discussing his own candidacy,
xvcnueay saia again ne would
not mate up his mind finally
until abtJUt the unrl of r.ho
But an all-out Kennedy drive
iur tne nomination is consider considered
ed considered a foregone conclusion.
Although the polls currently
show Kennedy to be his party's
frontrunner. tha 42 veur nlri
senator is known to feel that
a series of smashing primary
victories would fee his best ave avenue
nue avenue to the presidential nomina nomination.
tion. nomination. BARGAIN
Thermosvtats for Commr.
clal Cat Ranges, Stainless
Steel Tanks, Rebuilt Com.
mercial Electrie Ranges.
44th Street & Justo
Arosetnena Ave.
Call 3 6121

II HlaBBIaiEaaaaaaaiaaaasaBaa

Ji : 1

Wall Street
CHATTER
NEW YORK Snt 1 fTTDi
"Whether the. bull market h. .1.
ready seen Am peak, or is yt to
experience a final blow-up is a
chancey speculation," ay the
Value Line investment survey.
But regardless of which may
prove to he tho rat rh Tuihli.
cation asserts, the stock market
can be expected to adjust to
wwer level Because:
Stock vielrls ara inn 1v, U -.!.
- v w m icia-
tuMl 10 DOnrl viplrlc mnA
prices are out of line with the
normal price-earnings valuations.
Such abnormalities have always
proved temonrarv anrl km.
followed by corrections in the
marm, value Line says.
Harris. Uoham erwl r.n miM.
sins its favorable attitude towards
iears, Roebuck common for long
term holders becauxa nf th
panv'a itrone retail nn.iti.nn
growth'of its subsidiaries, and for
in management.
Alfred L. Vanrien Ttmanlr mnA
Co. notes that the paper industry
ia experiencing a lull revival at
a somewhat later date than the
more cyclical industries a n h
calls attention to its recent re
commendations of international
raper, s.u. warren Co., and
Great Lakes Paper.
m
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WPD
Schools in southern and border
states increased expenditure for
education. 47.S per cent in the
period between 195if and 1957, a
sehool fact finding agency rej
ported today.
A new book published by the
Southern Education Reporting
Service notes that mrieh of the
money was used to improve
standards of Negro schools in tne
South.
The book, "Southern Schools
Prp,o1 and Problems, wh
published under a grant from the
Fund for the Advancement of
Education, a Ford Foundation
project.
According to the authors, the
South has taken a "great leap
forward in education" in the past
six years but still lags behind the
national average.
The southern states by 1957 had
increased per pupil expenditures
to $31.16 a 28.1 per cent increase
in five years while the national
average was $496.43, a 17.3 per
cent increase.
During the 1952-57 period, how
ever, the South had spent ap
proximately naif a billion dollars
a year for new and improved
scnooi facilities, and the 17 states
were carrying almost half the
total national bonded indebtedness
for education incurred during the
period. It amounted to approxi approximately
mately approximately one billion dollar a year.
The book noted that the South's
"drive to refurbish the whole edu education
cation education system" had begun prior to
the Supreme Court's decision but
that its progress had been "large "largely
ly "largely blotted from view by hte an anguished
guished anguished struggle over desegrega desegregation."
tion." desegregation."
Defense Scientist
Ambushed; Shot
6 Times At Woburn
W0BUHN, Mass. (UPD-A de de-fense
fense de-fense scientist was shot six times
vesterday in an early-morning am ambush
bush ambush by a mystery assailant and
later told his wife "there seems
to be no rhyme or reason" to the
attack.
Omar C. Wheeler, 37, father of
three small girls, was on the dan
ger list at Choate Memorial Hos Hospital
pital Hospital after undergoing emergency
surgery. Doctors removed slugs
from his right shouldr. left upper
arm, left forearm and left knee.
Although he bled fiecelv. he
never lost consciousness and was
able to supply police with an ac accurate
curate accurate description .of what oc occurred
curred occurred as he left his suburban
home to go to work.
Wheeler, an 1ectrnnlr onoinopi-
at Massachusetts Tnstirnla nf
Technology's Lincoln Laboratory,
an Air Defense research center,
walked out of the rear door of his
home. A bullet struck him.
The engineer, who often left for
work at five In the morning, ran
to nis car, tne gunman at his
heels. When Wheeler slumped to
the ground in his driveway the
attacker pumped five more slugs
into him at point-blank range.
witnesses saia wneeier s assail assailant
ant assailant wore no Jacket or hat. They
said they heard shots and saw a
man running into the wooded area
adjoining the Wheeler ranch
home, Police found no trace of
either the man or the fua.

Today's Opening
STOCK PRICES

NEW YOR1T Samt. W HTP1
Stocks opended lower today la
moderate trading.
Individual losses of a point or
more were fairlv niimarnna at t
start. The decline was as exten
sion of the late selloff which hit
the market before the close oi
trading yesterday.
ACF Ind
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium Ltd
Amer Cyanamid
Amer Motors
Amer Tel and Tel
Anaconda Copper
Arkansas Fuel
AVCO Mfg
Beth Steel
Betttoger Corp
Bicroft Uranium
Blauknox
British Pet
Burroughs
Celanese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler
Cities Service
Coastal Caribe
Colgate Palmolive
Colorado Fuel
Cons Electro Dynamics
Creole Pe,
Crown Cork end Seal .,
Cuban Venezuelan oil
Du Pont
fcl Fuo Natural Oas
Fargo Oil
rehnont Pet
General Dynamics
General Electrie
General Motors
General Plywood
Gulf Oil
Harsco Steel
Howe Sound
Imperial Oil
lata Pet
Lockheed
Magellan Pet
Montrose Ch em
New Eng. Tel aod Tel
Northrop Air
Olin Mathiesoa
Pancoaetal
?hillipg p
we Oil
Royal Dutch fhet
RCA
Reynolds HeiaJ
San Jacinto
Servo Corp
Signal Oil and 8t
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobile
Sperry Rand
Standard Oil Kf
Studebaker-Paekeftj
Superior OH
Texas Gulf Prod
Textron
Underwood
United Canto 09
US Rubber
US Steel
WestingJrotwe Utej
Wheeling Steel
51
285b
im
324 I
S5b
50V. :
7Vk
01V4
31V :
IBM)
iS
Mb
lb
SI
TV
H
37
4
48Vb
64
sa
3T
30
34Vi,
44 Ms
32b
S,16
51 Vi
SO
Vfr
evt
47 Vk
77
53
ISVab
10044
XD40
J0V4
S794
!4Vib
26Vfc
1
12Vb
188 14
17
47V
4lt
ssv
XD37
10J
4M4
7b
S2s
554
424.
324
Shoe' Hurt
In Bad Fall
At Aqueduct
NEW YflPlf torvf IK rTTBtv
JOCkev Willie ShnmaVf mMA
a fall In the fifth raee at New
York's new Aqueduct race track
and was taken from the track in
an amouiance.
Shoemaker hart nalokvef.J
- x lJ qlc:vi VI IV
opening of the new $3,000,000 track
by winning tho rlaitv hm. t .1..
- -o -ST xim lite
fifth race he was riding "Amber
Morn and tho Wca .t,Kij
Jt was moving up through the
fiolrl
Shoemalror Inst Vila
to regain it by grabbing at the
horse 1 mane anrl than lu
- -"- Jill urn
track. He lay there motionless as
me item munoered by.
He tfllrl rlrwfnra T T m
til 1? ; iie ivi
been tumbled around."
Amher Mnm urn 4L. 1
choice. The favorite Tharp, rid ridden
den ridden by Eddie Arcaro, won the
race Willie had opened the dav in
great -fashion, winning the first
two races on Four Lane ($4.10) and
Ira Eaker ($9.10) for a $22 daily
double.
Shoemaker was taken to Phy Physicians
sicians Physicians Hrtsnital flor n.,:il
-r- Bvl n ivicijiimjih-
ry examination showed a possible
COnCUSSlon milltinU
-- -uinuaiuns en
the chest and face and possibly
The riav'i fiufm-am ft. a m..j...a.
Handicap, was won by Hillsdale.
tY-Vi 1 "rrow re the favored
Hillsdale to a three-quarters of a
leneth victory nv n.u r---i.
ter overcoming an earlv pocket.
v ..V,,n tne 5B'2W' handicap
was Hillsdale's ninth .(.k.. I
1? starts this year. It was his sec second
ond second Vlrtorv in Mam V,.1. -!
riving from California. Hillsdale
turned the mile in 1:36 2-5 over
the grass course and paid $3.80,
Bald FflPlp PBturn.l 1 in ..j
$3.80. Tick Tock was third and Air
rum lorum. &ome of the East a
sprinters participated.
TORCH ro NIKITA
ROME (UPI)-The Rome news news-paper
paper news-paper II Tempo todajr published
a cartoon titled "Preparations for
Khrushchev. It shows two Amerl.

cans staring att he Statue of Lib.
erty. The caption: "Maybe we'd

oener cover k up. He might mink

m viurvwiuuiit. i u . '. .



' Y

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PA6I NIN1
(THE $TOY Of MARTHA VAYNI
Message Frem Martha
1Y WILSON SCRUGGS! TERRY AND THE PIRATES
Bf GEORGE WVXDLR
.
y AL V1RMIII

1 fj .a CT J

1 n,, lilcucigTryiLMmCTfyviLilUiPicg Tinr.T PrGa t ui t.iuuiC;-7r-Wl SJ M3UW0UrreB6T,MK.SVFR0NA A,AH PBWI APA T0 H CERTAINLY NOT THE WUALSENSf, MlC.-j
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MTIIWSX. Xirmr-t4- vSSSi fer TATTOO, AW7 Y A5500ATE, wf KX VWfL XAKZ J TO XTPi7 THE, AhAH, -COJrrES OF
I jl j

jPRISOLLA'S POP Makes Sens

I

ALLEY OOf

t

CAPTAIN EASY

MORTY MIIKLI

?

fRBCKLIS AND HI FRIINM

Pewer rf Suggestion T Y Mil RILL BLOSSER, gr p THIS TERM I WWTJ 1 I REMEMBER, THE M I W I
1 f YOU TO PICK A WILL COME YOU'D BETTER
I I KA .11 t fSSttA SUBJECT AND PEALlVln I XWUFN VT1 J I CONCENTRATE I

I J J .III I II '. ". Z I J5&W P2 CONCENTRATE' -1 WWj SHAVE TO FLY LON FLYING- J
rrumi T' i I Mope I make daisy, why dptodxpop dadp is usM6 psYCHaocycAL ,5"XJl 0 Ptt1 ff "a (out of the ; Sc w
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ii mm j j jrii 1 1 J akr&fe True Life Adventures! Hodgepodge

I iiildUUm. I

Glad nd Sad 1Y MAR MARTIN I 1IISK dSSSfZ' avbwss

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tOOtS AND HIR tUDMM

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,..AWP ONE 1 CAPABLE OF PEEP HYPNOSIS.
THE5E WE CAIL 50WNAWBULIT. THEY
OBEY AMY UJaETlON4 NOT IN COMPUCT
WITH THEIR STAUPARD5 OP ODMPUCT-CAM
PERFORM AWMIMQ PEAT OP MEMORY...
ALIO kOf. liArVUlUR 10 PAIU. 4IK1CE- THEIR

TONIOHX WEIL TRY NO EMBARRA55INO
TUMT&... BUT WILL PEIA0N5TRATE SOME
miTiii!. acii iti& i vn tu mis ur-

CON5CI005 VVHICH Wf LET SO TO WASTE!

now to pick a rew or kpu at rwjwm

lT

Broktn Rtcord

Y DICK CAVALLI

I "" x I what do j I iGueeerbBe
JONI'0 A GENIUS. 6HEI3 si HOW OLD WANT JO f ( EJJJfJfS?D J
ALREADV TALKING AND6HE'6A ( ARE NOU, ) x eEWHgNNOJ 1 O S f
ON A YEAR OLD! SAY SOMETHING ) V J0NI? 7 V QRCWU(? A WA6 ALBERT, i
FOR WINTHROR HEWW JONI? HCV A, VJ J
'
l !jr I TM. U t. KI.

'OUR BOARDING HOUSE

...... ....t..' A.mKT iffilAJT

TH' FIRST TIME 85SAUSK t'.W IN A HURRY-' 1

ONE AT ATI Mb i. mi ct wi-
. Ti out vrv IK VMALLEl.SflUR.

,T,rt aIiO i lAcc. COI DIMS AWMEV

S YflUR POCKST& ON K.uininiiw ovj

OF.TH CAR TJIU 1 w cwk. t M-n.

with MAJOR HOOPLB OUT OUR WAY

,-ths onb W(TH
TtT 'STRIPED

AnDTH

WALRUS FACE-

iCOESFIKSTi'i

livelv voeii

V i. R. WILLIAMS

WBLL.THE WEI&HBOR DON'T KWOW

THAT AMP WU'VE BEEKI OUT HERE
fOK TEW MIMUTE5 APMIKIWiS THIS
THIWtf THEVSAVA PERSON IS

JOC2P BV THE COHAPANV HE KEEPS,

SO GET ON TO SCHOOL WHILE

I PISAAANTL6 THIS

y3

vn

-i-r rri

3?

MOW DO NT BLAME V
J MEPERTHIS-VDU 1
KNOW I JUST CAMS
OUT HERE ON MV WAY I
TO SCHOOL ,50 I J

IV M.WT HAVE MAP M.
t AWVTHINA TO PO (T)

WHY MOTHEUft SET GRAY '"'-

ll UNfi EELS. SEEM LIMS EAvSV riWN66

ii POR A HUMSWV W6H...UO TEETH, NO SCVAOJiS,

I

AMI? THEV'KE HOT VERV ESK9-.BUT

At w

..EVEN BABY
ELECTRIC EELS,

A UOL-TTC? A MOUB6ESTEK.

iiliijjjiuiiiiiijiij mil I 'T MMMW"'""''''"W,l,IW'"IB'WWiWWW
, ,", 2 .1

1 Chalcedony
6 Carpenter"!
Implement
llRetitl
IS Guarantee
14 Leaser
15 Aft parti of
ahipa
18 Mariner'!
direction
IT Sun
IB Obtain
20 Consume
22Af
23 Measure
of cloth
24 Loiter
2FUh
28 Fondle
30 Father
31 Organ of
hearing1
32 Female
aakit (ab.)
33 Mistake
35 Bitter retch.
37 Elder (ab.)
38 Lubricant
40 Pronoun
42Tienra del
Fuego Indian
43 Genus of
meadow
grasses
44 Peer Gynt'l
mother
46 Second
selling
49 Nasal sounds
52 Greater in
depth
53 Soup vessel
M Command
85 Pithy

DOWN
1 Arrivals (ab.)
1 "Honkers''
3 Temper steel
4 Make lac
6 Dutch unci
6 Social Insect
7 Employ
8 Flow noisily
9 Sea eagles
10 Pause

12 Gaelie

mMM
Skis slgnjni
ISiliiE

89 Cavalryman
13 Expunged
14 River (Sd.)

13 Bodies of una 38 Partaker
18 Mouths 27 Derisive
21 Candle grimace
23 Senior 89 Endure
25 Machine part 41 Colorado
27 Fence opening resort park

42 Religious
book
45 Domestic Slav
47 Mimic
48Brythenie
sea god
SO Consort of
Gb (Egypt)
Bl Native metal

nrr1rrL p i i n
I "in liT
c
Lrpsr-r f
Tfmi -1
a ir
jr rpa r
!T 5
"I 1 1 I r 'Hill i

ciFDVIIMO HIS PARTY This Perry, Mo., mule campaigns for
?"Y!N. Jst?,.rt svmineton. The bii "Symington for Presi

dent" button on the. bridle is owner Gene Chipman' idea.
Chipman is a booster of the Democratic senator s nomination.

Read Our Classifieds

PANAMA-MIAMI 55 00
MIAMI-ATLANTA 25.45

PANAMA
ATLANTA

Today's jy Program

3:00 CFN NEWS
3:15 Dlnh Shore

You Aiked Tor It
Mr. Wlrarri
Amateur Hour

.1 :00 Whlrlvblrda
5:30 PANORAMA
7:00 Science Fiction Theatre

3:30

4:90
4:30

7 30 Jimmy Rndgers
8:00 Ozzie It. Harriet
S 30 Decoy
9:00 Armchair Theatre:
Mid Summer Nights Dream
1100 CFN NEWS
11:15 Ene: Jack Benny &
Voice of Firestone

Courtesy of Aerovias Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573.16983.1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Ml

830 Oiu. Panamd 1090 JCca. frit

4

...

i



1 ,V. Vi i

Braves
To C lose In
fleac story on page 6

Scalp

Dodgers

Qra

-" W : ."VI

If n trv rje

II II w If II II u..

Chicago Girl 'Didn't Care
That Youths Killed For Her
CHICAGO, Sept. 15 (UPI) Deadpan teenagers told today how
they ought to the death on a Chicago atreet over the affection
of a bJonde, 15-year-old girl.
The rirl herself, Roberta Skirmont, was the star witness at
the inquest into the knife killing of Robert Jedlowski, 17. -i
Her face expressionless, but with tears wellinr in hr hiu

Cll ,""0! iff r. 'H" -' V I
f -SiMff rmmimTHiiimiiifnii r J

I'.S. AKMY ENGINEER'S earth-moving equipment completes clearing of Sunday landslides which blocked the Trans-Isthmian
Highway about 13 miles from Colon. Limited traffic was restored five hours after the slides were reported, and Army authorities
reported road clearance was fully restored late yesterday afternoon. Hundreds of Sunday motorists were delayed homeward bv
the blockage.

Congress Quits At Dawn, But OKs
Civil Rights Body, Foreign Aid
WASHINGTON, Sept. 15 (I'PI) Congress adjourned at dawn today, ending its eight Month session with last-minute action
on hvo of Its most controversial Issues civil rig-hts and foreign aid.
The first session of the Democratic-controlled 86th Congress ended at ti:24 a.m. when the Senate adjourned sine die. The
House had quit at 6:21 a.m. The second session, barring an unexpected special call by President Eisenhower, will convene on
Jan. fi.
Adjournment came less than six hours before the scheduled Washington arrival of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev and
eliminated tha question of whether he should be invited to ad dress a joint session.
The legislators shoved some of their biggest problems under the rug until 196T. They postponed the main civil rights fight
until mid-February and also put off action on farm and schoo I aid legislation.

While the House marked time
m"sl of the final day of the long long-session
session long-session in eight years, the
S nate played to packed visitors
galleries in a windup debate on
civil rights.
TK product of its labor was
a two-year extension of the Fed
er.-l Civil Rights Commission,
wlvch the House accepted as
part of catch-all $3,626,00,000
appropriations bill.
Of the hill's total. 33 .22", ,81 3.00
was for 1 1 o foreign aid program.
A JCinO.onn ile.n covered next
year's expenses of the Civil
Ttidhls Commission, which had
hrn scheduled to (lie Nov. 8.
In the final flare on over the
Civil Tli'jhis Commission. South Southerners
erners Southerners said extension of the "roup
v'fiild Vr a "calculated insult" to
(hp South. Thev elided norlhern-
by chin" instances of racial
c'rifp and violence in northern cit cities.
ies. cities. Thp Norlh'Tner.s replied that the
e ensinn of the commiss;on was
th barest minimum they would
jc-rertt before acreeinc to adiourn.
Some bewailed th fart that the
S-nate preferred to quil for the
year before acting on broader
legation.
Tie eight month session was
marked by repeated (lashes be between
tween between the leadership of the heav heav-'i
'i heav-'i v Democratic Congress and I'res-i-'enl
Eisenhower and his legisla legislative
tive legislative lieutenants on a wide ran-e
r' domestic issues, particularly
tbe question of government spend-
ing.
At season's .end, each party
claimed credit for Coniress'
achievements and blamed the
other for its failures.
Before Congress adjourned until
pext Jan. 6. the President called
his legislative leaders 'n the Wl ile
Potiff to thank them for their co cooperation.
operation. cooperation. In all, the President sent Con Con-greas
greas Con-greas two dozen major legislative
recommendation Concress re replied
plied replied by approving about 1.1 of
them, many in extremely modified
form.
Among other Uiini's. Congress
voted to raise gasoline (axes by
one cent a gallon to rescue the
filtering highway program, to lift
th?Jjllerest ceiling on government
savings bonds and to authorize
( ItWising program acceptable to
the President after two earlier ve-
Rirl Congress failed to go
alCnfl with the President's pre pre-poult
poult pre-poult on school aid, an extensive-civil
rights bill, a $ cent
mp, a wheat program and a
beoet in interest rates on long long-term
term long-term bonds. It may take action
on some of these proposals
miff year.
Most of the friction between the
White House and Congress in in-tfrnational
tfrnational in-tfrnational scene. Democrat ie
Winakera generally supported
h Prejident'a cold war policies.

Session Served Public, Held
Down Rancor, Johnson Claims

EDITOR'S NOTE: The first
session of the 86th Democratic Democratic-controlled
controlled Democratic-controlled Congress has closj.H.
How did this Congress fa.e?
, United Press International asKHd
Senate Democratic Leader Lyn Lyndon
don Lyndon B. Johnson and House Re Republican
publican Republican Leader Charles A. Hal Hal-leck
leck Hal-leck to evaluate the record.
By LYNDON B. JOHNSON
Senate Democratic Leader
WASHINGTON (UPI) Tie first
session of the 86th Congress,
operating under great difficulties,
produced a record which was sub substantial,
stantial, substantial, prudent and designed to
serve public rather than political
(Is.
I. ike every Congress, this ses session
sion session will have its critics. But the
American p.'ople sustained their
faith in the Democratic majority
and the faith was justified by sol solid
id solid achievements.
To list a few:
Economy: Recognizing the need
for careful management of public
funds, die Congress carried out
its announced intent to cut spenoV
in. It reduced the President's
appropriation requests bv a mini
mum of $1,8000.000 and the Prpsi-
dent's requests for back-door fi-
nancing by about $700,000,000,
Racketeering: The Congress
! combined the most effective pro provisions
visions provisions of hills passed by both the
House and the Senate and pro produced
duced produced legislation to clamp down
on the thieves and hoodlums who
have been preying on honorable
labor and the public.
Hawaiian statehood: Congress
not only approved the admission
of Hawaii as a state but set in
motion a program to make Ha Ha-iwaii
iwaii Ha-iwaii a "real center for exchange
ol knowledge am
I" ast and West.
cull lire between
Cancer and heart disease: Cnn-gres-
provided the lunds for a
( rash program to battle heart dis disease,
ease, disease, cancer, and other killing
and crippling ailments the larg largest
est largest such program in history. This
represented the only appropriation

Beebe Book Depicts 'Mansions On Rails

BERKELEY. Calif. (I'PI) J.
P. Morgan, Jay Gould, Diamond
Jim Brady and numerous Van Van-derbilts,
derbilts, Van-derbilts, Whitney s and Rockefel Rockefellers
lers Rockefellers are all passengers aboard
Lucious Heche's lalest excursion
into the nation's colorful past.
Beehe has published a hand handsome
some handsome new look called "Mansions
on Kails'' which deals with pri private
vate private railway cars Ihe coaches
bought, owned and outfitted by
Ihe very few who could afford
them several generations ago Ihci
way today's Texas oil men are I

bill in which presidential requests
:were increased, but the increase
was more than offset by prudent
j reductions elsewhere.
These achievements should not
;bo allowed to overshadow (he sol sol-!
! sol-! id but possibly less dramatic
accomplishments in other fields.
Among the hundreds of bills
which were passed were included:
ivxlension of the Agricultural
Tiade Development Act; the Alas Alas-x;
x; Alas-x; Omnibus Act: expansion of the
World Bank and International
Monetary Fund; and Inter-America
bank to strengthen the West Western
ern Western Hemisphere; Railroad retire retirement
ment retirement improvements; a bill to
modernize the Navy; a veterans
housing act; an improved veter veterans
ans veterans pension bill; and many oth others..
ers.. others.. in some fields, Congress encoun-
tered the frustrations that can go
with divided government. When

the branches of Government arelAmenca

controlled by different political
parties, it is possible to paralyze
the nation.
Congress, at least, recognized
this fact and mov ed early to meet
the views of the Executive branch
halfway. This- was based on the
principle that it was better to do
something and produce needed

legislation for our people than tolinated by substantial Democrat
do nothing and produce issues for j majorities in both the House and

an election.
In the field of housing, the Con Congress
gress Congress sought twice with bills
which had bipartisan Senate spon sponsorshipto
sorshipto sponsorshipto m""t the views of the
Executive. Twice, such bills were
vetoed.
. A third attempt has been made.
land if 1 1 e -Executive attempts lo
go as far in meeting the views
of Congress as Congress has gone
to meet the Executive's views,
America will have a housing bill.
The measure will not go as far
as it should in Ihe judgment of
Congress. But it will meet imme immediate
diate immediate needs.
reputed to acquire swimming
pemls.
The former New York newspa newspaperman
perman newspaperman and present publisher of
tWe Territorial Enterprise in Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia Cily, Nev., was the logical
man to writ? about this phase of
transportation in America.
Beehe himself owns whal Is
probably Hie last bit of "private
Tarnish" which is what railroad railroaders
ers railroaders call privately owned v cars in
(lie country.
At least his car, "The Virginia
City," is probably the only such

Jalleck Fe.S
c i i j
People Are Boss
By CHARLES A. HALLECK
Senate Republican Leader
WASHINGTON (UPI)-Thls Is
the Congress that found out the
American people are still boss.
The people spoke out on two vi vital
tal vital issues. They demonstrated
that an informed, articulate, even
indignant, public could bend a re reluctant,
luctant, reluctant, Democrat-controlled Con Congress
gress Congress to its will.
They did this because they were
an informed people, and my hat
is off to the magnificent job per.
formed by the nation's news me media
dia media in dissecting the issues.
The people made it clear they
stood with President Eisenhower
on his program for guarding the
military and economic strength of
Republicans In the Congress
stood with President Eisenhower
on his program for guarding the
military and economic strength of
America.
Republicans in the Congress
stood with the President, too. As
a result, a large measure of his
program has been sustained in
spile of a Congress that is dom-
i Senate
The people made it clear with i
illln. r wtAi- iA 4Un; .... i
minions ot ie;ter to their sena
tors and representatives that
they wanted economy in govern government.
ment. government. President Eisenhower wanted
economy, too. So did Republicans.
With gratifying public support for
this position we have held the line
on spending.
Make no mistake about this:
We have curbed the announced in intention
tention intention of radicals in the Demo Democrat
crat Democrat ranks to bust the budget to
spend billions more of the dollars
earned by our citizens on schemes
'hat would sooner or later destroy
freedom as we have known it.
coach still used strictly for plea pleasure.
sure. pleasure. The other "varnish" today
is usually designated "Business
Car," "Officers' Car," or "Direc "Directors'
tors' "Directors' Car" and presumably goes
only on company business.
Bui Beebe has written mostly
about the heydev of the private
car. To him, 188S was "a vintage
year for princely private cars,'-'
when they could be seen lined up
platform to-platform in Ihe coun country's
try's country's most fashionable resorts.
Beebe n steeped ia th lore.

eyes, Roberta revealed she was

nives over ner. umy live weens
cut one of her admirers in the

When Coroner Walter McCarron asked how she felt when

sue learned mat more Doys were arming themselves for the Sat
urday night ."rumble,"' Roberta rfiutten'd, "Oh, I didn't care."

Roberta was the girl Iriend of
the two leaders of the Saturday
night "rumble," Daniel Prokaski,
20-year-old reformatory graduate,
and Joseph (Butch) Khaperek, 18.
According to police, Prokaski
hsa signed a statement admitting
he knifed Jediowski, one of Kna-
perek's allies.
Knaperek, Roberta, and Fred
Sopieski, 19, recounted the story
of Teenage jealousy and violence
to the packed hearing room.
Roberta displayed emotion on only
ly only when McCarron waved the
bloodstained death weapon be before
fore before her. Knaperek'i composure
didn't crack once.
Sopieski owas different. He sob sobbed
bed sobbed uncontrollably as he told how
he knelt on the street beside the
dying Jedlowski, crying "He's got gotta
ta gotta be breathing he's gotta be
breathing."
Meanwhile In Richmond, Va.,
two young brothers were sen sentenced
tenced sentenced to si months in jail to today
day today and ordered to face a grand
iury for allegedly attacking five
college students with their fists
and chunks of wood "ot for
laughs."
Police Court .fudge C. W. Lester
sentenced Robert C. Camden. 20,
and his brother, Buddy C. Cam Camden,
den, Camden, 19, for slugging one student
with their fists and ordered them
to face a grand jury on the more
serious charges of whacking four
other idents with the wood.
James L. Brunner, 16, also
charged in the attack, was order ordered
ed ordered to be tried in juvenile court be because
cause because of his age.
The three tough-talking youths
were seized by police in a down-
Lions Hope Aid
Plan Will End
Street Begging
Dfinit plans were made last
night by the social assistance
committee of the Panama Lions
Club to control begging and in indigency
digency indigency in Panama City.
The committee agreed on a fu future
ture future meeting with the Mayor and
the commander of the National
Guard to put its plans into effect
immediately.
Plans include issuing identifica identification
tion identification cards to all beggars follow following
ing following a medical examination which
will be conducted from Sept. 17
to 30 between 1 and 5 p.m. at an
offica to be installed by the Lions
Club in the National Palace.
Beginning Oct. 1, all beggars
without identification cards will
be arrested.
The Lions Club estimates that
there are some 300 beggars oper operating
ating operating in Panama City, with about
80 percent getting less than $1.50
oil the days they select for mak making
ing making their rounds. The Lions feel
that with their social assistance
program they will be able to give
each beggar approximately $3 in
addition to medicine and other as assistance.
sistance. assistance. Pupils, Principal
Die As Bomb Hils
School In Houston
HOUSTON, Texas, Sept. 15
(Xjpi) A tremendous explosion
shattered the Edgar A. Poe Ele
mentarv School shortly after 10
a.m. today, killing several stu students
dents students and a man who may have
tossed a bomb into the school.
A newsman who reached the
scene shortly after the explosion
said he counted "at least six
i Heart inrliirlino x withe man
bout 30 years old.
: . ..... ...
The school is auenaeci oy wnne
children only. None of the schools
in Houston are integrated.
The sheriff's office said that it
was told that "someone threw a
bomb on the school basketball
court."
Bodies of three small children
were lying in the yard of he
school when police first arrived
at the scene.
One of the dead was said to be
the woman principal of the school
who tried to wrest the suitcase
containing the explosives from
the man.
Of Plush Past
The current volume ia his third
on the subject of early railroads
all published by Howell-North
of Berkeley, Calif.
In all three books Beebe offers
a multitude of photographs (350
in this one). These include many
shots of "The Virginia Cily," one
a full color reproduction of the
interior of the author's "private
varnish."
This picture may inspire envy.
Or it may merely "make the read reader
er reader glad that such luxury is out of
reach of the Joneses nexA door.

used to having boys duel with

ago, she said, a neighbor boy
face.
town city park several hours after
the Saturday night attack which
sent one of the five Richmond Pro Professional
fessional Professional Institute students to a
hospital for treatment.
In Battle Creek, Mich., Judge
Alfonso A. Magnotta said today
his sentence of 45 days in soli solitary
tary solitary confinement for a 14-year-old
chronic criminal was "strict "strictly
ly "strictly an experiment."
The judge ordered Richard Ba Ba-bic
bic Ba-bic to serve 45 days in solitary
a tier the youth appeared before
him on the most recent of five
breaking and entering at night nighttime
time nighttime charges placed against him
in the last three years.
Babic also has been convicted
of three auto thefts during that
period.
While he Is in solitary, Babic
will be restricted to a diet of
bread, milk and water.
He will be allowed to read on only
ly only the Bible "and other religious
materials" and will be allowed
no visitors except clergymen and
physicians.
"Medical authorities are coming
up with new treatments fdr ill illnesses,"
nesses," illnesses," Megnotta said.
"I hope this will be a new treat treatment
ment treatment for chronic offenders. So far
it is strictly an experiment. I call
it shock treatment."
In addition to the term in solita solitary,
ry, solitary, Babic will be on probation for
five years, Magnotta said.
THE ALMANAC
Today is Tuesday, Sept. 15, the
258th day of the year, with 107
more days in 1959.
The moon is approaching its full
phase.
The morning stars are Mercury
and Venus.
The evening stars are Mars,
Jupiter and Saturn.
On this date in history:
In 1789, the United States, De Department
partment Department of Foreign Affairs
changed its name to the "Depart "Department
ment "Department of State."
In 1821, five Central American
republics won independence. They
were Costa Rica, El Salvador,
Guatemala, Honduras and Nica Nicaragua.
ragua. Nicaragua. In 1857. America's 26th presi president
dent president William Howard Taft was
born.
In 1938, British Prime Minister
Neville Chamberlain flew to Ger Germany
many Germany in an attempt to mediate
the German-Czech crisis.
In 1949, Dr. Konrad Adenauer
became the first chancellor of the
Germany Federated Republic.
A thought for today: Scottish
anthropologist Sir James George
Fraser said: "The world cannot
live at the level of its great
men."
Georgia Concerns
Seems Low For PC
A. C. Samford Overseas. Inc. of
Albany, Georgia, made apparent
low base bid on the Panama Ca Canal
nal Canal Company's extensive building
project on wh eh bids were opened
yesterday in Balboa.
Local firms placed second and
third.
The Samford Company made a
low base offer of $1,855,984. Next
came Isthmian Constructors of
balboa with a $1,974,127, followef
by Bishop International of Panama
with a $2,103,280 bid.
Bidders hoped for a decision on
the contract in a few days.
The total schedule includes
the construction of three new
schools in Diablo and Los Rios
and 45 replacement housing un
its In the new La Boca townsite.
Eleven other contracting firms
from both Panama and the li linked
nked linked States entered bids on the
project,
They were E.O. Hauke Con Construction
struction Construction Company, of Colon: Ro Ro-gciio
gciio Ro-gciio Diaz and Gilberlo Guardia,
S.A., of Panama; Southern Con Con-si
si Con-si ruction Company, of Augusta,
Georgia: 'Bildon. Inc., of Curun Curun-f't;
f't; Curun-f't; Lott of Panama Inc. and
Dr?ke Possessions, Inc of Hous Houston;
ton; Houston; Framorco, Inc. of Panama, of
Co'on; Corporation de Ingenieria
S.A.. of Panama; Dillon Construc
tion Company, of Balboa i and Flo
rida Builders In a joint venture
with Intercontinental Constructors,
of St. Petersburg, Florida.
The bids were opened by Lt.
Col R.D. Brown, Jr.,. Engineering
and Construction Director in the
Balboa Training Center in the
presence of a large group of con contractors'
tractors' contractors' representatives and re re-presentatives
presentatives re-presentatives of Ihe Canal organi
zation,
Total base bids were made by
nine of the 14 companies making
offers en the project. Thes rang ranged
ed ranged from the low of $1,S55,B4 to
a high of $2,448,682.
Isthmian Constructors bid $300,
000 og the construction ol the ele

1WX. Jut-' f
i,' ..iitWK..!,..i,'

DANCE EXHIBITIONS are part of the' program put on yearly
by the Balboa Armed Servicts YMCA. Here a pretty miss and
her partner give a tamborito exhibition.
(Official US Air Force Photo)

.
Of 20 United Fund Agencies
.i
YMCA Develops Man's Physical,
Spiritual Mental Well Being

Known the world over the
YMCA represents the ideals of all
Christians in ihe development of
man's spiritual, mental and phys physical
ical physical being.
An expected 400,000 people,
both servicemen, and civilians,
will pass through the Ba.boa
Armed Services YMCA's doers
this year to seek -spiritual guid guidance,
ance, guidance, entertainment and recrea recreation.
tion. recreation. The "Y" offers x varied year year-round
round year-round program. Going from lec lectures
tures lectures and language classes on the
educational side to tours and
dances in the entertainment field,
everyone will find something to
interest him or her there.
The YMCA is making an appeal
for funds through the United Fund
Drive, which is scheduled to begin
in the Canal Zone Sept. 28, with
an overall goal of $127,000.
The goal set for the Balboa
Y is 8UUU, less than one
seventh of the budget planned
for the year 1960.
how does tne ymca maxe up
this deficit? Most of the money
to fulfill irs need is given to them
by the National Council of YMn
CA's in New York. A small
amount is derived from the gilt
shop and concessions in the
YMCA building.
The first YMCA was establish established
ed established in Panama in 1906 and since
that time tne YMCA has been
serving the Canal Zone area.
Last year the YMCA held 104
$1855,984 Bid
Housing, Schools
mentary school at Los Rios; $221, $221,-970
970 $221,-970 on the elementary school at
Diablo Heights; and $90,857 on the
45 replacement housing units in
La Boca. These offers were low for
individual items.
Contractors were given the op option
tion option of entering offers on all work
under one lump sum or on the four
different items. The contract can
be awarded by the Panama Canal
Company by separate schedules or
in one lump sum.
The project, which is the la
building program to be offered for
contract, by the Canal in, several
years, includes a new elementary
school at Los Rios and another at
uianio Heights, located on the sits
of the former Special Engineering
division DMiaing.
Both will be masonry construc construction
tion construction similar in general appearance
to-the Paraiso Elementary School
were the plan of single classroom
depth was first-used in the Canal
Zone.
"The new fonlor high school
building at- Diablo will be two
two-story masonry structures lo located
cated located adjacent to the existing
elementary school. The work In Includes
cludes Includes the construction of a shop,
music building and remodeling
of the existing gymnasium.
The new housing at La Boca in included
cluded included in this contract consists of
2 hpuses with 45 apartments. Se Se-ven
ven Se-ven will he a new type of two two-family,
family, two-family, two bedroom maannrv
buildings with two stories. Each of
the new quarters will have a pa patio
tio patio area connected. to the living
room section by sliding glass
doors.
The housing units are the see-
ond group of A3 new U.S. family
apartments to b? built in the new
La Boca townsite.
Five are now nearing comple comple-Ion
Ion comple-Ion by Ihe Panama contracting
firm of Corporation de Ingenieria.

free darlees for the servicemen
in the area.'
Many classes were organized;
skindiving and an outdoor ad adventure
venture adventure group were just twe.
Each Wednesday ivinlng i
square dance is held, free, for
both service and civilian res residents
idents residents of the Zoite.
Two other facilities open to ht
public are the swimming pool and
the gymnasium, where sport
such as basketball, volleyball fnd.
weightliftlng can be followed.
The YMCA in Balboa also af affords
fords affords the servicemen and civilian
populace a place where they can
make those all-important phone
calls to the states. And on the.
weekends the dormitory is opened
to become a real home away
from home for servicemen and
civilians who wish to stay in town.
This year, many activities are
planned. Soon to come up on the
agenda is a flowpr

class for both the civilian and
military distaff elements of the
Isthmus. In the planning stages,
is a religious film series concern concerning
ing concerning man and the universe.
Once a month the "Y" holds its
young couples evening. A fAe
supper and free use of facilities
are given to the couples on this
night.
Among the main factors which
helps the YMCA keep its cost to
a minimum are the many hours
of time given by volunteers to
help keep the program going going-Indeed
Indeed going-Indeed it is a community cM cM-ter
ter cM-ter which serves a large portSn
ilif. PPuIa'ion in many wajfc.
Officials of the United rW
re urging that people aVoi4
designating specific amounts t
P,u eo,,r 9neies ef the FuniK
When each giver makes hti sm.
tire contribution, to the UniSd
und undesignated, it is then M M-sible
sible M-sible for funds to be distributed
to each agency, according to-
needs. If the overall total goatM
$127000 is reachd, every fgen?y
will get its full share. .'
Undesignated gifts mean ts
total funus required for the United
fund, because if some agencies
fu T1? desi2nted funds tfciii
their budget goals, it fakes Thflffe
collections to meet the goals 3wf
other agencies. g
Weather
Or No!
. Th,s weather report for theSl
hours ending g a.m. today;!
liTH by the Meteorolpgfifl
and Hydro raphlc Branch It Qb
Panama Canal Company "T
Balboa CrlstdBAl
TEMPERATURE:
Hik-n I7
tow ii
HUMIDITY:
High 5
tow se.
WTND:
(max. mph) SF-I
RAIN (Inches) .86
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 81
IT
IK
V '.
H
-
N-l
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake MJl ;
Madden Dam tlfj.9f;
BALBOATIDES
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. II
High
Hi

Time
3:06 a.m.
3:25 p.m.
Time
:17 a.m.
9:36 pm.

15,f ft.
18.9 ft.
Low

Hi,
J ft.
3 ft.

. ...A,u.ii-J.'.

.hjiM';'',:!.;-.