The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03115

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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' f
Seaoram's
AN INDEPENDENT Htj?p DA,LY NEWSPAfER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country it tafe" Abraham Lincoln
vo. A
CAADIAN WHISKY
f&TH YIAR
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1959

'1 r

'0-

LAOS ROUNDUP Newsmap
spots (1) where Red-dominated
Pathet Laos troop are reported
massing for a major assault a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the Laotian government.
Ventiane (2) is receiving point
for airlift of several planes from
US to Laos. Airlifted planes were
assembled in Bangkok (3) and
readed for flight to Ventiane at
Saigon (4). Laos has great need
of aircraft because of rugged
border terrain.
Long Weekend
Boosts Trade
For CZ Court
While the Labor Day week weekend
end weekend was a remarkably safe
one In the Canal Zone com compared
pared compared to the slaughter on
Stateside highways, police
here wefe kept busy enough
with bumper crop of law lawbreakers
breakers lawbreakers ooth afoot and be behind
hind behind steering wheels.
No fatalities or serious acci accidents
dents accidents were reported over the
long holiday but 11 defendants
appeared before Judge John E.
Dem'vig at Balboa Magistrate's
Court on a variety of charges,
from loitering to aruwken driv driving
ing driving
Two Americans were cited on
NtJPCfe. afrld V, dunson, 88,
.d 1ft is' case was continue to
Thursday to await results of a
blood alcohol analysis.
Joseph S. Leiby, 54, of Diablo
Heights pleaded guilty to drunk
driving on Frangipani Street
early in Saturday morning.
Leiby, who was convicted on
the same charge in April 1958,
was fined $100 and given a
10-day suspended jail sen sentence
tence sentence with a year's probation.
He was warned that any in infraction
fraction infraction 6f Canal Zone law
would revoke the probation and
end him to jail for the 10 days.
His license was also revoked for
one year.
Jose Leonidas Perez, 62, Pan Panamanian,
amanian, Panamanian, whose license was re revoked
voked revoked for drunken driving last
May, was sentenced to serve
five days in jail for driving in
the Zone while under license
suspension. Perez was arrested
after he bumped a woman walk walking
ing walking in the street at the Shaler
Road-Chepo Street intersection
He gave oral notice he
would appeal the conviction
and was released on $100 bail.
Two Panamanians, Ruperto
Robles, 30, of the San Bias, and
Navarro Bartenio, 18, pleaded
guilty to being drunk in public
place and unable to care for
themselves. Robles was found
passed out along Gorgas Road,
and Bartenio behind the Bal Balboa
boa Balboa housing office. Robles was
released after having spent the
weekend in jail and Bartenio
was placed on six months pro probation.
bation. probation. A third Panamanian, Julio Pi Pi-mentel,
mentel, Pi-mentel, 35, was placed on one
year's probation for being found
drunk on Porto Bello Street
Ancon.
Roaielio Calderon. 26. ind Sin-
foroso Centeno, 30, both Pan
amanians, were fined $10 and
$5 respectively for driving with without.
out. without. 7,fne licenses. Calderon Ls
a bus driver and Centeno a cab
drlyer. Centeno said he had
recently arrived from the Inte Interior.
rior. Interior. Martin Nunez, S7, Panama Panamanian
nian Panamanian youth, Angel Ortega, was
given a 10-day jail sentence for
committing battery against E E-mllla.de
mllla.de E-mllla.de Garcia on the Chlva
Chiva Trail, within the Zone.

-33

Today's Transits
(ichtdultd)
Northbound 17
Southbound 13
TOTAL 30
(Cloor Cut. 2)

jfH'- h i4 V
Y
4
irii

DEBRIS rises several hundred feet In the air as Dredging Divi Division
sion Division forces start the work of blasting a drainage channel through
the mangrove swamp near Randolph road in connection with
the Colon Corridor being bulit in that vicinity bv Panama.

Canal Dredging Force Blasts Way
In Randolph Road Mangrove Swamp

Panama Canal Dredging Divi
sion forces, wnose principal job
is to keep the Canal channel n?.
vigable, is also engaged these
days in blasting a channel through
the dense mangrove swamp near
Randolph Road in Cristobal.
The work, started last week, is
connected with the construction of
a drainage channel adjacent tD
the new Colon Corridor being
built by Panama from Randolph
Road to Folks River.
The first blast, one -of the most
spectacular seen on the Atlantic
side in recent years, lifted debris
Santo Tomas1 New
Visiting Hours
From 2 To 3 pm
Ww daily visiting hours between
2 and 3 p.m. went into effect yes
terday at the Santo Tomas Hospi Hospital.
tal. Hospital. The new visiting hours were es established
tablished established following a meet'.ng of
doctors nurses and chiva drivers
with Public Health Director Dr. Al
berto Bissott Jr.
II was understood that all agree'l
Ihat the afternoon visiting hours
are more convenient for everybody
concerned.
Up to yesterday, the Sar.lo To Tomas
mas Tomas visiting hours was Irom 6 to
7 p.m.
Vocal Duel
ly FRANK ILEAZER
WASHINGTON (UPI) Our
highway program, the witness
said has run out of gas. And Rep.
Clarence J. Brown (R-Ohio) said
he for one was mighty disappoint disappointed
ed disappointed in the House Ways and Means
Committee, which was trying to
get it pumped up.
True, Hie eommitttee had come
up with a plan to keep 1 he con concrete
crete concrete pouring on those new coasl-lo-coast
freeways.
Brown conceded that's what a I
his correspondents seem to want
But he noted that the committee
was proposing to mane peop e

pay for the new roadg through an

Air

ifting

as high as 600 feet in the air.
It was set off by a discharge of
approximately 400 pounds of dy dynamite
namite dynamite and was the first in a
series of blasting operations ne necessary
cessary necessary to complete the project.
The channel will be 40 feet wide
and 1.000 feet long, reaching from
the East Diversion to the inter intersection
section intersection of the Colon Corridor and
Randolph Road. After the dyna dynamite
mite dynamite blasts have dislodged the
matted roots, the Dredging Divi Division's
sion's Division's mighty midget dredge Man Man-dinga
dinga Man-dinga will complete the clearing
of the drainage channel.
National Guard
Offers To Drive
Inebriates Home
The traffic department of the
National Guard yesterday mov moved
ed moved to cut down on drunk driv driving
ing driving by inviting persons who
feel they had been drinking too
much liquor to call in and ask
for a guardsman to drive them
home.
In a regular bulletin Issued to
the press, the department said
It would be only too glad to
suooly an inspector.
The bulletin also called on
the owners of bars to try to dis dissuade
suade dissuade customers from driving
if they seem to have Imbibed
too much liquor.

Over Fuel Rages In Congress As Gas

extra penny a gallon tax on gaso gasoline
line gasoline they burn riding around jn
,he old ones. That, said Brown, is
just what most of the folks he s
Lecn hearing from definitely don'
want al all.
Ways and Means Chairman Wil Wil-l
l Wil-l ur Mills (D-Ark.), appearing be
lo.e the rules committee to get
Hie highway bill cleared to the
i louse, said regretfully Ihat (he
nagic formula which so many of
Brown's friends are demanding is
just what his committee tried to
devise.
But they just couldn't do it, he
:,aid.
As a result, we'll all be paying
an extra 15 or 20 cents per tank-

UN Investigators To Visit Trouble Zone
As Russian Veto Effort Is Overridden
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y., Sept. 8 (UPD The Security Council, overriding Russia's veto, voted
early today to send a four-nation committee to investigate the situation in Communist-threatened
Laos.
The Tote in the 11-member council was 10 to 1 against the Russians.
The negative Soviet vote ordinarily would have killed the measure, but the coilicil had ruled
in a previous 10 to 1 vote that the creation of the investigating committee was a procedural
matter, not subject to the veto.
The four nations making up the conynlttee are Argentina, Italy, Japan and Tunisia, all
members of the council. They scheduled a meeting later today, and it appeared likely investiga investigators
tors investigators would be on the way to Laos by the end of the week.

Soviet ambassador Arkady A.
Sobolev protested the Council deci decision
sion decision bitterly, charging that the ma majority
jority majority was in effect rewriting the
UN Charter when it overrode his
veto.
"The delegation of the USSR re
gards this action as non-existent,
illegal and not binding on anyone
to whom it is addressed," Sobolev
said.
US ambassador Honry Cabot
Lodgo and othor spokoimon for
tho Wostorn Big Throo rojoetod
tho Soviet charge, pointing out
that tho Chartor pacifically ox ox-ompts
ompts ox-ompts procedural mattoro from
tho big-power vato.
The council debate focused on
the resolution creating the investi investigating
gating investigating committee.
Neither Laos request for UN
troops to expel communist invad invaders
ers invaders from its territory nor the US
charge that Russia is cooperating
with the attackers was mentioned.
In Washington tho Southeast A-
Treaty Organization (SEA-
TO) today was obitrving Its fifth
annivertary faced with the pos possibility
sibility possibility that It soon may under undergo
go undergo iff first mater test.
VtW15 Mnds.'Mbfd.
iy would nave to act to preserve
thw independence of Laos if the
United Nations failed to move into
the situation and Communist ag aggression
gression aggression continued.
As in the Korean war, American
troops will probably have to bear
the brunt of such a burden.
SEATO never has been called
upon to take military action in de defense
fense defense of the treaty area, which in includes
cludes includes Laos, since It came into be being
ing being at Manila on Sept. 8, 1954.
The Chinese Communists origi originally
nally originally called SEATO a "paper ti tiger."
ger." tiger." They have changed their
tune more recently to brand it
an instrument of "American im imperialism."
perialism." imperialism." The United States declared in
the Security Council discussion it
believes Communist aggression is
being committed against tiny Laos
and called upon the United Nations
to investigate it "without hair
splitting or haggling."
Lodge, on behalf of the United
States, Britain and France, put be before
fore before the Security Council the reso resolution
lution resolution naming Argentina, Italy, Ja Japan
pan Japan and Tunisia to look into the
fighting between forces of the dem democratic
ocratic democratic Laotian government and
Communist-supported rebel troops
of the Laos movement.
Sobolev opposed the resolution
and objected even to putting the
issue of Laos on the agenda. He
launched an invactiveaden at attack
tack attack on the government of Lao Laotian
tian Laotian Premier Phoui Sananikone,
accusing It of torturing, killinq
and jailing rebels to the extent
that full-scale civil war I threat threatened.
ened. threatened. Office To Study
Minimum RP Wage
Will Open Soon
The Panama government reveal revealed
ed revealed yesterday that the recently-decreed
Minimum Wage Office will
be operated at the Ministry of La Labor
bor Labor and Social Welfare, wilh its
own budget.
A spoeksman said theie were
high hopes that the results of the
investigations of the Minimum Sal Salary
ary Salary Commission and its recom recommendations
mendations recommendations will be of benefit to
the working classes.
ful of gas, atarting In another
week or so, depending on how
fast Mills' new tax plan can be
shaved through the House and
Senate.
The alternative, said Mills, is to
quit letting new highway con contracts
tracts contracts and to halt work on some
already let. The Highway Trust
Fund, Into which motorists have
been dropping 3 cents per Jatlon
of gas since 1956. is about to go
broke.
Some of the rules members
seemed to think this was sort of
peculiar.
Rep. Homer Thornberry (D (D-Tex.)
Tex.) (D-Tex.) said he heard a lot of mon money
ey money was wasted, on things like

n n

munition

Sobolev argued that UN secretary-general
Dag Hammarskjold
acted without support of UN rules
and and regulations in requesting
the council meeting.
The Russian was supported by a
note to the council by Pham Van
Dong, prime minister of North Viet
Nam, from whose territory the in invasion
vasion invasion of Laos was launched, ac according
cording according to Western reports.
Pham Van Dong said his gov government
ernment government was "highly indignant at
these fabricated complaints and
senseless requests put forward by
the Phoui Sananikone govern government."
ment." government." The North Viet Nam leader ac accused
cused accused the United States of send sending
ing sending "thousands of tons of arma armaments
ments armaments and hundreds of military
advisers" illegally into Laos to
establish new military bases.
The US decision of last Aug. 26
to grant emergency military aid to
Laos triggered the present situa situation,
tion, situation, Pham Van Dong indicated.
Pham Van Dong called for the
international control commission
set up under the 1954 Geneva a a-greement
greement a-greement to resume its functions
and said any move to supplant i!
by a UN committee would wreck
the ermnl
Lodge nfide i brief and simple
appeal for diplomatic help to the
Sananikone government.
"The appeal," he said, tells of
threats to its "Laos" independence
from torces outside its own bwder.
Clearly we cannot ignore this ap appeal.
peal. appeal. "The United States believes that
aggression has been committed.
School Supply Sales
Al 2 Retail Stores
Through This Week
School supplies for pupils in
the Canal Zone schools will
continue to be available in the
rpec'ai sections at the Btilbna
and Coco Solo Retail stores
throughout this week it was
announced today at Ba!?ra
Heights.
Through Saturday, the sup sup-nlies
nlies sup-nlies will be on sale at Build
ing 38 in Balboa, adjacent to
the Wholesale Shoe Section, and
at Building 22, immeaiaieiy De De-hinrt
hinrt De-hinrt the Coco Solo Retail Store
Thereafter the school supplies
will be on sale in the stationery
sections-at the Balboa ana co coco
co coco Solo Service Centers.
a few items which were out
of stock, such as notebook fillers
and work books for Gregg typ typing
ing typing should be available this
week.
RP Seamen Talk
Boycott For Fleet
Under Panama Flag
Panama seamen have threat
ened to seek an international
boycott aealnst Panamanian
shipping If the government does
not make some effort to Imple Implement
ment Implement the law specifying that
ten percent of each crew, must
be Panamanian citizens.
Both Panama and Colon sea seamen
men seamen have scheduled a meeting
for Thursday to agree on a plan
of action "in view of govern governmental
mental governmental indifference" toward
their claims.
roadside "rest areas," each cost costing
ing costing $51,000. Rep Ray J. Madden
(D-Ifld.) said he bet the program
wag infested with crooks.
Rep. Gordon H. Scherer (R (R-Ohio),
Ohio), (R-Ohio), speaking for 'he Public
Works Committee, said sure there
had been .some waste and some
fraud, this being history's biggest
public works program. But he
said Congress itself is to blame
for the fix the Husl fund is in.
He said (he lawmakers stalled
out originally to build 40,000 miles
of new super highways Willi the
federal government putting up 00
per cent of the cost, and (he
states 10, he said Uncle Sam's
share wag estimated at 24 billion

The newspapers are full of it. It

is common knowledge. There mav
be those who do not agree around
this table.
"But certainly there is no doubt
of one fact the government of
Laos believes it has been a vic victim.
tim. victim. And when a government ap appeals
peals appeals to tr Security Council, the
Security Council cannot turn a
deaf ear and pass by on the eth ether
er ether side."
Senate Democratic whip Mike
Mansfield warned meanwhile that
the United States could "stumble"
into direct military involvement in
Laos unless the administration
tightens up U.S. programs there.
While emphasizing his support
of administration policy in the La Laotian
otian Laotian crisis, the Montana Demo Democrat
crat Democrat said the Communist led fight fighting
ing fighting in the little southeast Asian
nation raises "grave questions" a a-bout
bout a-bout how this policy was being car carried
ried carried out.
"This administration," he told
the Senate, "had better see to it
that in the present delicate situa situation,
tion, situation, it is the President and the
secretary of state and the Depart Department,
ment, Department, of State they atone aVid no
one else in the executive branch
who calls the shots.

I

WEAPONS INSTRUCTION US. officers and enlisted men. work working
ing working under the U.S. Military Assistance Program in Laos, art'
shown in the village of Pakse training younn Laotians in the
use of weapons supplied by the United States. Thev are aided
by a French non-com. Here an unidentified instructor shows a
Laotian how to diassemble a U.S. -made carbine. (UPI Radiophoto)

Tax Bill Heads For House

dollars.
Later, he said, the lawmakers
added 1,000 miles tn the system.
He called these political miles."
Meantime, he said, construction
costs, like everything else, were
on the way up and the govern government's
ment's government's share now is estimated at
37 billion.
He said Congress really fouled
things up last year when it gol
Ihe jillers about the recession. He
recalled that it ordered spending
stepped up, and said we now have
run t!. rough the money.
Rep. Henry S. Reims TD-Wis.)
got the floor to say he had a help helpful
ful helpful amendment. It wouln raise the
road money we need by cutting

Reds Reported
To Be Readying
Further Assault
VIETIANE, Laos, Sept. 8 (UPI) The government
today reported widespread Communist troop movements
across northern Laos and speculated the rebels may be
readying for a concerted assault on Samneua, capital
of the province with the same name.
The United States, meanwhile, was airlifting muni munitions
tions munitions to the Royal Laotian army to help it in its defense
against the Communist attackers.
Two planeloads of grenades were flown in yesterday.
Several additional loads were due today. Observers
thought some of these latter might include small arms
ammunition, badly needed by the Royal army.
Acting foreign minister Sisouk Nachmakassak told
his daily news conference that Samneua village southeast
of Samneua City was surrounded by a three-pronged
enemy attack with forces converting on the village.
Samieua probably will be attacked in the near fu future,"
ture," future," he said.

Government troops, he said,
have already evacuated Samne Samneua
ua Samneua and are positioned in the jun jungle
gle jungle to conduct guerrilla warfare
should the enemy attack further.
Sisouk, said a buildup of rebel
forces near the villages of Moung Moung-het,
het, Moung-het, Samneua and Xiengko indi indicated
cated indicated they will be used as stag-
the depletion allowance enjoyed
by oil and gas producer; when
they pay their taxes.
Madden said since taxes rrs
being discussed, why didn't Mills
close up other loopholes in the
law? He said a lot of rich folks
aren't paying their fair share. He
mentioned 22 "fat cats" in steel,
lie said something about profita profitable
ble profitable "stock options." lie spoke un unkindly
kindly unkindly of fast tax writeoffs.
Possibly Madden had more on

his mind, but Brown managed to I i.ahoraiory on ,iust; Arosemena
get in a word. Brown said he lv- Avenue in Panama Cily (said the
lieved Madden was contused. The extra funds would permit the re re-congressional
congressional re-congressional elections, he said, search unit to expand its program,
are not this year; they come in Some additional employes are pro-,
I960. vided for in the new budget.

Las-

ing areas for the attack on tho
provincial capital.
Sisouk said fighting also was
reported from Phongsaly prov province.
ince. province. He said fighting ther has
""1 '3' fW'J ,ncf- Sept., 3.
Th acting frt!gn mfnTiWr"
said thrM batfaliem nt ftirtk
Vitnamas treepi attacked Pak
ban Sapt. 1, Nuonghkhowa Sapt.
2, and Gannflanasan Sapt. 4.
He said since then iwn nt th.
North Vietnamese battalions have
oeen withdrawn to ward the Vie -namese
border, leaving one bat battalion
talion battalion to continue the fiChtino
Snouk said rhi battalion laff
Mhind had soma Pathtt Lao
numbers plus Black Thais, but
claimed th battalion cam
oriBinally from North Vittnm.
Action also has been reported
daily from Luang Prabang prov province,
ince, province, Sisouk said, especially a a-round
round a-round Paphay where the rebels
are distributing pamphlets and
posters in an attempt to influence
villagers.
In Naha, Okinawa, US mill mill-tary
tary mill-tary authoritios denied today a a-ny
ny a-ny knowledge of the movement
of military ,uppli tni( troopg
trom the American Island bat bat-tion
tion bat-tion to support the Loatian gov government
ernment government in its battle ag.in.t
rebel forces.
USAF Lt. Col. Bernard Peters
Okinawa military information col
ordinator, said he knew nothing
of any emergency Marine Corps
task force being airlifted to the
Philippines on stand by orders.
ihe Third Marine Division, com commanded
manded commanded by Maj. Gen. Robert
Luckey i, stationed on Okinawa
and is the largest ground striking
force in the western Pacific
Untonfirmed reports from the
Philippine, ..id that Marines
from Okinawa landed at Clark
Field m the Philippine, ai part
of an emergency tttk force.
Several Marine camps on Okl Okl-na1wa..,wpre
na1wa..,wpre Okl-na1wa..,wpre deserted or nearly so.
Military regulations, however
prevent the disclosure of any
troop movement until the troop troop-arrive
arrive troop-arrive at their destination.
Gorgas Lab In RP
Voled $250,000
Yearly Budget Hike
WASHINGTON. Scd H- rtTPn
The House passed and sent to the
President today a bill increasing
the authorization for the Gorgas
Memorial Laboratory in Panama
to $250,000 annually.
The original authorisation fr the
laboratory, created for the study
of tropical and Preventive medi medicine,
cine, medicine, was $150,000.
The hill passed tndav also au authorizes
thorizes authorizes an appropriation of $250, $250,-ooo
ooo $250,-ooo for construction, aleration and
equipment of facilities at the labor labor-atory.
atory. labor-atory. The bill has already beeu ap approved
proved approved by the Senate, and will he he-come
come he-come law when signed 'by the
President.
Several weeks ago, when the leg legislation
islation legislation was moving through Con Congress,
gress, Congress, a local spokesman lor the



PAG! TWO

THI P4NAMA AMIR1CA AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NlWSPAPEa
TUESDAY, lEPTEMlM I, lttf

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
rou'eiVBT VlLNN toUNtiyiU in nit
HARMtlW AVI AS EDITOR
1S-ST M TttT r O Bo 4. fiK n. or
TILIFMONI -OJ0 LHI
CLI ADOUCMi PANAMKBICAN. PN
tat,a Orrteii 'l '7 ccnthh Avinui '2th nb istm Ttm
POnaiew Pirf tNTTivt JOiHUA B POWIM INC
14S Midiicn AVI., Nl Yell 1171 N. Y

Siva MOMIII IN
Itviwi
fll MONTH IN ABVNC
ff ONt Vi IN A OVA NCI

THIS IS YOU FORUM THI PEADERS OWN COLUMN
Tk Mail lax it a forum for ntitn of THa Paotrn AmaricaB
UMn ir rctiYd rarully nd ir hmdlto in t wholly eerideitial
If raa eaurrieirra a tartar don't ka Imparlanr If l aoam't aaaaar fKo
Mat ear. Lattara ara uafiKa in rha ardor racaivad.
Please try fa kae tna lattara limitad ta ana aS raitftk.
Idantrry of latter wntan it Said in atrietett aenfidanca.
Tliii newtpaaar anai na raponibility far rfatamanti ar ecmiani
xaratsad in lattan from roadart.

THE MAIL BOX

o
ALB ROOK N.C.O.
Sir-

Mv sympathies to "Iceberg Melter'' (Mail Box Sept. a) and
her woeful en about the unfriendly women of the Albrook NLO Club.
Her complaints lead me to suggest that, on the subject of snobs, it
takloZn,0aknrwo0rneen. wherever they are. Oet. two or more
gether in ar.v given location, and you've got gossip. f this bitter
letter writer 'has been a service wife for any time at all. she should
realize that Albrook cannot be too much deferent than any othe.
base Theie are always cliques, but they are short lived because the
faces have t- change periodically with transfers.
Soon Mrs Melter will find herself in the clique, and she un
doubtedlv will give the cold shoulder, perhaps unconsciously to some
other newcomer. If she didn't think she was better than the women
who already belong, she wouldn't be so touchy. Maybe she was sec second
ond second assistant sergeant at arms in the club on her last assignment,
and thinks the Albrook wives should fall on their knees at the honor
of having her here now.
What's all this importance at having to belong, anyway? If she
doesn't like the wav the Alhrook wives art, let her operate in some
other outfit If she's volunteer happy, there are plenty of places she
can spend her energies.
Mavbe she should see her hushand s chaplain. 1 have it on good
authority that a fresh supply nf crying towels, highly absorbent, are
available just for people like her. Ner,.$ymp,.thil.r

MOVING SCENE IN CLUBHOUSE
Sir;
Although the Canal Zone oldtimers seem to take everything in
stride that happened in this colonial paradise, I am still taken aback
by the never-ceasing, mvsterious activity at the Balboa Clubhouse.
It seems there is no end to the maintaining and remodeling re required
quired required at th? clubhouse, and for months crews have been busy re remaking,
making, remaking, moving, painting etc etc. ,,,
The latest oi these elicits holds a steady facination for oung
and old alike. For mam weeks the lord ward section of the building
(opposite the sales section! was prettied up and finally the sales sec section
tion section was moved lock stock and barrel.
Then the powers that be sent their crews to the vated secn
and started the process all over again. Nobody seems to be sure just
what it's all about but you can get even money that when it s all ov ei
the sales section will go back to wneie it was in the first P'"-
One 30-vrar veteran assured me the oth?r day there is nothing
i .1, iwi, ;., r-nn.-.m Hp assures me the same damn loolisn-

has been going on since the
ness
POLITICS FOR
Sir:

.. j: ili nni,;-.ii miirs in Panama

It IS CI1SEUM1II '.

tO convert Gov. Potter's honest ettorl to miuine vo... k
amanian emtjloves of the ( anal into something unpleasant.
"VTlfnTtec. States gov,rnment's position in this matter is c ear y
liheral and constructive. Panamanian employes may take part in
ffir"n."ul.l 5Hli. ;o,n a party of their cJooMng work f
it. even run for office, provided they do not their pouncing in
UntiPrl States jurisdiction.
What cculd he fairer' ,re not per-

United Maies ciui. .-.m-
mit'.rcl. either in the States or the

,ch they ar. suppoWto logroll for particular fac

tion.
y do so,
But Panamanians ma
ties in Panama.

CONTROLLING BEGGARS

Sir:
snd the Lions Club
Th Citv
akine clans
to
capital- B"' 10 Ho PrPprly wi"
net tra nerl to cliscriminaie
rrarkinc down on professional
at least one man and one woma
Vn 'area riailv to prey on tourists
Ttv on hnnie at night to families
truly
Atiat e These people are not

fCOmOnhth: SeVside of the picture, I know several ole men who are
too srk or feeble t find employment. They trv to make a little liv liv-K
K liv-K by perf rm ing his or that service, or selling discarded clo the.
2 son, such marginal effort. But they can't live on the result. If
ttew wor l" need food, and most of them do, there should be SOrne
Sa place i Panama where they can get a little a.d with dignity
But 'somebody above or out of politics will have to be named m

charge.
Otherwise the City will

vultures
- ti r.1 r,rifl nH trmnine. no

permitted to beg Kids who go around scronging nickels are apt to
go around grabbing purses a few years later. ,um
Tf a parent cannot stop an offspring from begging, thought
Ihould be given to putting the child in an orphanage for
Those kids who pester train passengers in Colon at .1 pm daily

eeuld
ho stnnned if the Citv of
nts, who now look on with

INSTHMIAN ENTERTAINMENT
Bir:
I am a single soldier, assigned to Fort. Kobbe through no
choice of my own. and am bored silly at what was once described
to me as a real gone" place to be alive This place has me almost
believing that there really Isn't any place like home, or at least
like the old home town.
What la a single serviceman supposed to do here for fun?
We seem to be persona non grata with mammas everywhere.
The bigoted old-time Zone families seem to have an un unwritten
written unwritten rule that their dead daughters should stay away from
US terrible soldiers. It's much better thai, they rtl.-k with the nice
Zone boys, whose family tree also was planted In Construction
Pats.
-- And the Panama mammas are even worse. Nice Panamanian
girls don't go out with American OIs. and I'm not Interested in
beinj Jen on the street with the other kind. The girls .ho are
recruited for the service club dances are nice enough, but plenty
of -them have an eye on a marriage license and passport to the
States.
and my buddies really have some choice for Rlrls We can
take out 15 year-olds, bubble gum and bobby socks not wit list and-

fnr. or we can stand on anv

n,areeable companion within mlnuten. Or we can occupy our
minds with bingo, bateas and movies, movies, movies

":,"",The old fashioned custom
here, but It sure Isn't available

B I 70 I 3

IS OO
1 SO
14 00
WIVBS CLUi
month he first got here.
Naive.
LOCAL RATERS
should have tried
. ,;U. t Pan-
. .-..ivivelv
are civil servants of the whole
provide they carry on their activi-
Non-Employe.
are taking a fine setp toward a bet-
control negging on mr sum ....
,ak
some social service person-
anhandlers is needed. 1 know
pa
an who comes to the Cincn de Ma-
and tenderhearted inhabitants.
nd homes, not palaces but ade-
needy, and they divert charity
una iisrn ..r-n ,., e
Panama child should be
Colon mane us wisnrs nrai mi men
clear approval.
Social Sarvica
street coiner In Panama and have
of dinner and dancing may exist
for the single soldier.

Labor News
And
Comments

By VICTOR RIESEL
! For months now the swirling
i Susquehanna River has drowneu
out the sobs of the widows of 12
men drowned by those gushing
waters in a creaky Pennsylvania
mine. For months the tears of the
widows, thougn in torrents, have
not etched themselves on the
const-. ence of a busy land.
Those 12 men died on the morn
ng ol Jan. 22. The river in rage
nad torn through the thin earth
crust of the Knox Coal Co. Riv River
er River Slope workings of its vein un
der Pittston, an area trod by ma
ny a Mafia man.
Four months later, on May 19,
a Federal jury convicted a Ma
lia power, .Nick Alaimo. on 3i
counts ot taking $30,753.21 trom
the president and acting general
manager o. that mining compa company.
ny. company. Ala mo had muscled his w
into becoming a committee-man
foj- the Mine Union's Local 8005
at the Knox p t.
But devotion to his duties di;
not absorb enough of his time to
keep him (rom being a delegate
to the Apalachin crime conven
tion. No one quite knows where
Alaimo was on the January morn morning
ing morning when the flooded Susquehan Susquehanna
na Susquehanna Rver ripped into the mine
Not only were 12 hewers of coal
drowned, but pits employing sev several
eral several thousand other miners were
wiped out, thus washing away an
annual payroll of $7,000,000.
For months the Pennsylvania
State legislature probed t h e
plunge of the Susquehanna through
the roof of that coal lined mau mausoleum.
soleum. mausoleum. Now a mining expert ha?
analyzed the probers' 107-page re
port "of that disaster.
Most significant passage is this:
"Of all the causes leading to
the disaster of the River Slope
Mine, the lack of any design or
checking by professional ining
engineers was a paramount con
tnbuton."
It is shows that someone gave
orders for the miners to dig "off "off-course
course "off-course chambers." The mineis
who went down the pits that
morning did not know they were
diggings. A stale mine inspector
testified that the map he was giv given
en given "can be called a fairy tale."
Another state inspector said that
if he is not furnished with an ac accurate
curate accurate map, he cannot prooerlv
inspect. This official, David W.
Cosslett, asserted that if he haa
known that two chambers were
driven 260 feet beyond the red
line under the river, which was
at the high level mark, he would
have stopped the operation as be being
ing being dangerous.
Some of the miners who escap
ed the waters which drowned
their brethren testified that they
had not heard of a safety com committee.
mittee. committee. A mine safety committee
would have noticed that there
were no signs marking the exits;
that the off course chambers
were under the river; that they
never received or were shown a
map; that pillars were hacked in
to; that there was too much wa
tef in the pit and that some had
to work in raincoats.
The report states on page 55 that
one witness, a coaldigger, testi testified
fied testified that "neither he nor the oth
er men complained about condi
lions in the mine, or their sala
ry, because of the threat of los losing
ing losing their job."
All
state:
this led the probers to
"It is the opinion of this com
mittee that a combination of con
tributing factors including, bu!
not limited to, indifference and
apathy on the part of the lessor
concerning the mode of extract
ing coal, incompetence on the part
ot supervisory employes of the
lessee, an incentive pay system
resulting in the miners. ..conduct
ing mining operations without
sufficient regard for their own
safety or position; owners of the
lessee uninformed and uinterested
in the means of extracting coal:
a lack of qualified professional
mining engineers and-or consult consultants."
ants." consultants." And 12 men, who once walked
abroad in the sunlight, now are
part of the coal rock from which
they hacked their daily bread.
No one seems to care except
those whose sobs are drowned
out by swirling waters.
r
matter off
FACT
In the United States most of
the flah sold at American sar sardine
dine sardine are really the young of
menhaden or herring, which
have been prepared in oil the
same as sardines would be. On

the Pacific Coast one true tar tar-dine,
dine, tar-dine, the foot-long California
sardine or pilchard, is found.
These fish are a o m e 1 1 m e s i
canned, but they are usually j
eaten fresh. Oil is obtained
from the California sardine.
O Encyclopedia Brltannloa. J

NEW YORK CONFIDENTIAL
By LEE MORTIMER

COULD ONLY
NAPLESI
HAPPEN
Everyone was amazed when I
was in Italy a few years ago,
that 1 did not care to visi
Charles "Lucky" i Luciano. It
seems it is almost de rigueur for
American newspapermen (who
are quaintly calicd "journalists"),
Hollywood stars, crooners, cafe
society personalities and other
such characters, to make a pil pilgrimage
grimage pilgrimage to Lucky in his Naples
St. Helena.
In fact I was looked at as if
I was slightly touched in the
head because everyone knows
the exiled Mafia chieftain main maintains
tains maintains a staff in New York, Chi Chicago
cago Chicago and California which ar ar-rages
rages ar-rages all expense tours, with oth other
er other emoluments, for writers yJio
will whitewash their infamous
client, and apparently there is no
shortage of them.
Ipttaad of paying a social
call on tha Idgandary pandar pandar-ar,
ar, pandar-ar, dopa king and instigator of
mats murdar, I am parfactly
contant to ba taparatad from
him by savaral hundrad milas.
In fact if I haar ha is In tha
ama town with ma, I will laava
it at quickly and quiatly at pot pot-tibia,
tibia, pot-tibia, and mayba avan toonar.
Tha raaton for thit it a long
story that goat back to Naw
Year's Eva, 1934, whan tha lata
Earl Caroll opanad hit fabulous
Plam Island C a lino in what it
now tha Latin Quartar on what
wat tha lata Al Capona't pri private
vate private Miami itland.
In that show was a buxom
blonde who sported tie name of
Gay Orlova. She was a White
Russian by birth who cam" to
Broadway via Turkey. Carroll, a
judge of f?male flesh without e e-qual,
qual, e-qual, staled unequivocally that
Gay was the most beautiful bim bimbo
bo bimbo who ever worked for him.
That covers a lot of years and
area.
A the time of which I write
Gay was maybe seventeen or
eighteen, hut the already had a
lot of mileage in back of her,
having come to the Earl of Car Carroll
roll Carroll when she was but thirteen,
not unusual in thos; days.
Gay used to arrive at the stage
door on Palm Island every nisht
in a chauffeur driven Rolls Rolls-Royce.
Royce. Rolls-Royce. She was dripping with furs
and it was no socre' that these
and other baubles rad brpn given
her by an elderly Wall Street
gent.
When the lavish Palm Island
Casino was first opened it was
owned by what is euphemistical euphemistically
ly euphemistically spoken of as "th-s boys." Since
thp Wall Streeter was not In Mia Miami
mi Miami at the time to look af.rr his
expensive portable property,
Lucky, who was there, moved in,
though I have no doubt he would
have moved in even if Sugar
Daddy had been in Miami.
al:t

NATIONAL" ELECTRIC CENTER

vay

WHERE OUR ENTIRE SALES FORCE HAS ONE AMBITION TO SERVE YOU WELL.

"Now Here's My Plan

I (

One evening after the close of
.he Miami season I bumped into
oay in the old Dave's Blue Room
on Seventh Ave. In New York.
In order to make small chitchat,
I asked why she jeopardized her
regular monthly check by rom romancing
ancing romancing a bum like Luciano. Gay
quain.ly replied "Oh, but Lucky
is sinister." 1 thought this so
funny 1 printsd it without realiz realizing
ing realizing the consequences.
At this time Lucky was in hid hiding
ing hiding from the law, who wanted to
turn him over to a young and am ambitious
bitious ambitious prosecutor with a must mustache,
ache, mustache, who later became Gover Governor.
nor. Governor. Apparently the first the cop coppers
pers coppers knsw about Luciano's affilia affiliation
tion affiliation with the blonde was when
they read it in the Mirror, after
which: bv means, known .to coo
pers they" tracked", the farriistert'
down through Gay and delivered?
him up to the majesty of the
law which sent him to the clink
for a little matter of 40 years.
Gay, who was not an American
citizen, was listed as an "unde "undesirable
sirable "undesirable alien" and there was
much mourning on Broadway.
Being much youngar then and
just at foolish at now, I ad ad-rctpontible
rctpontible ad-rctpontible for tha ganglaadar't
raspontible for tha gangladar't
apprahantion. I laarnad through
deviout channels that it wat
lucky for ma that Lucky and
I ware taparatad by ban.
With Lucky in the clink, Gay
went to Paris and became a
mannequin. During the war she
was variously accused o' being
the sweetheart of the German
commander by the French under underground,
ground, underground, and the sweetheart of the
French underground leader by the
Germans. Knowing her. both were
probably right.
There were frequent reports
that sh? did a Mata Hari before
a firing squad, though I under
stand she was still a mannequin
at the close of hostilities. All
trace of her has since been lost,
but there are rumors she is dead,
which is how I would have been
if I traveled from Rome to
Nap'es.
After servinp ten of his 40
years. Lucky was pardoned by
the Governor, vhn as prosecutor
originally sent him up. Uncle
Sam hough1 h's ticket back to
Italy, whrffn-1 he eablished a
stable of dames, among them
.Mussolini's daughter. Edda Cia Cia-no.
no. Cia-no. No longer a chick"n she was
a sl ot in the ego to the swarthy
gangster.
Lucky followed her with Isea
Ligoni who I believe has sine
passed out of the picture and
may he dead. She was an Aus Austrian
trian Austrian who once played a bit part
in an Italian picture, after which
she moved in with him. Lucky
continued to have a roving eye
and was taken to task by Isea
for same, after which he slapped

mmatcummsfm

30 :5

I l..llWll.i'i)W)"""111
31,

Smc, Inc.

her soundly in a public place on
a not-so-publie place.
Itaa draw from bar handbag
a little .22 ha had given her
and forgotten all about, and taid
"OK, my friend. If I evar tee
you flirt with another girl yeu
gat thit."
That was why Lucky was lead leading
ing leading such a 'quiet life," for a a-while
while a-while not because he was forced
to do so by the local law, which
however took credit for his "re "reformation."
formation." "reformation." For years Lucky has been en engaged
gaged engaged in a desperate attempt to
get himself extradited, of all
things, back to the US on "con "conspiracy"
spiracy" "conspiracy" charges.
ffe figures that under current
dizzy U.S.' Supreme Court deci-
DAILY
MEDITATION
(Pratentad by tha Department
of Christian I due a tion of tha
Episcopal Church in the Mit Mit-tionary
tionary Mit-tionary Diocete of the Panama
Canal Zona.)
KEPHZIBAH
"And give him no rait, till he
ettablish, and till ha make Ja Ja-ruialem
ruialem Ja-ruialem a praite in the earth."
Our chapter contains a number
of que?r names. That in our ti title
tle title meant "My delight-is-in-her"
and is part of the prophet's des
cription of the new condition of
the nation. It is very close to our
slang phrase "God's country." Ho
ever as we looked out on the A A-merican
merican A-merican scene on Labor Day yes yesterday
terday yesterday our land is far from be being
ing being God's country.
The reason is that man's res restlessness,
tlessness, restlessness, a?l'-intentioned and
eager as it may be, is worthless
unless it is rooted in God's own
restlessness. He is the master
workman and we work under His
direction. Only He ran establish
Jerusalem as His Hephzibah.
His Labor Day concerns us all,
lawyer, doctor, teacher, housewife,
as well as carpenter, mrcnanir,
'ruckdriver. T'
n the terms of building the high-
way f"r Co'i' n-o-.i I
make thp ,-r""-rr-
others fill in the dirt, some lcear
out the s one.', II ol ei,
the flag. Each one has his pari in
building the road, in making this
a better world.
tj ii Wjr. fin q el

THI OWNER AND SOUL Of
'NATIONAL' ILICTMC CINTI.
UNLIKI MOST EXECUTIVES. HE
DOESN'T SPEND HIS TIME IN A
RICHLY FURNISHED OFFICE.
INSTEAD. YOU'LL FIND HIM IN
THE "LATIN QUARTER" READY
TO DROP WHATEVER HE'S DO DOING
ING DOING TO MEET AND SERVE YOU.
NATURALLY. HIS PRIMARY IN INTEREST
TEREST INTEREST IS TO PROVIDE YOU
WITH THE VERY REST IN ELEC ELECTRONICS
TRONICS ELECTRONICS AND MUSIC. AND HIS
HOMY IS PROMOTION AND
PUILICITY.

AUTOMOBILE ROW

WASHINGTON. -Uncle Sam has
reponded to the crisis in Laos
characteristically by pouring still

more aid into ajungle kingdom
that has already received more
aid into a jungle kingdom that
has already received more than
it can absorrb.
Then new supplies will go to
build up the 25,000-man Laotian
army, a crack motorized force
which unhappily is roadbound jn
a country without roads. Its jeeps
and trucks are of little value in
the steamy jungles where the Red
guerrillas are attacking.
Providentially, the first supply
plane brought in a load of jun jungle
gle jungle boots which are not only
more useful but less costly than
all the Laotians' modern mecha mechanized
nized mechanized funds to increases the lit little
tle little army to 30,000 men, although
there is considerable doubt that
the present payroll goes to the
25,000 soldiers who are supposed
to collect it.
Of the $250 million Uncle Sam
has already sent to Laos, all but
a small, green trickle has gone
for military aid. Yet the Laotian
army couldn't rescue a surround surrounded
ed surrounded paratroop company because the
reinforcements had no parachutes.
DOLLAR DUMPING
For its small size, Laos has be become
come become the biggest dollar dumping
ground outside of Fort Knox.
The greenbacks have blown in
faster than King Sissavang Vong
and his courtiers could spend them
until now the government has
almost ai much green as the sur surrounding
rounding surrounding jungle.
The result has been a record of
such as has not been seen since
the decline of Chiang Kai-shek.
Although it is impossible to sell
more than $2 million worth of im imported
ported imported goods in Laos in a single
month, for instance, the Laotian
ministers breezily issue import
licenses for as much as 7 mil million
lion million a month.
Of the 2,000,000 Laotians, less
then 150,000 around 1he royal ca capital
pital capital at Vientiane have benefit benefitted
ted benefitted from American aid.
Next to nothing has gone into
the remote sections of the coun country
try country now being overrun by Com Communist
munist Communist rebels.
Several investigating teams have
been sent into Laos to find out
where ihe moeny is going. All
have coma back with dreary re reports
ports reports aoout waste and corruption.
Tha c.iief dispenser of aid to
Laos during the give-away days
was Carter de Paul who solid a
10-year-old Cadillac, worth $600
at best on the Laotian market, to
sions he can beat such an indict indictment
ment indictment hands down, after which,
according to hit hign priced
lawyers, he cannot, under inter international
national international law, again be deported
from America, having been
brought back here forcibly.
While we are given to under understand
stand understand that Lucky and the other
deportees are under rigid obser observation
vation observation by Italian police and con confined
fined confined to certain areas, they are
not. These gangsters are among
the richest men in Italy where
money talks as loudly as it does
here, and maybe even louder."
"Hampered" as they are sud-
posed to be in Italy, they still
throw their weight around. Some
times amusing incidents haDDen
such as the time when Luckv
found Truman CaTote usurping his
ravorne ecair in his ftavonte
sidewalk cafe. When the gangster
asKen mm to move, Truman
bravely flicked him on the wrist.
Lucky swished away in a tower towering
ing towering rage, but the onlv casualty
was his girl frin'ds pansies which
he stamped on in his anger.
Here, here, boys! Can't you
act like ladies?

CONSTRUCTION
Contractors Subcontractors Material Suppliers
Re: Proposed Construction of 3 Schools and
29 Dwellings in the Canal Zone
For the Panama Canal Co. Bid Due Sept. 14, 1959
The Five Boro Construction Co. of New York City
invites bids on all trades.
Please phone Mr. Solotar at El Panama Hilton
for an appointment.

PLATED

WALLACE

For
DIRECT CANAL

rte Washington
Merry-Go -Round
r DREW PIAVtSON

o
the Universal Construction Com.
pany tor 3038. Tnis happened
to be one of the contractors out
side the Universal office as a
rusting symbol of corruption un until,
til, until, at the request of the Amer.
ican mission, it was torn up and
dropped down an abandoned well.
OFFICIALS RIWARDIO
De Paul's reward was a promo promo-ton
ton promo-ton a i chief of the Investment
Division in Washington where he
also does liaison work with the
National Security Council, the gov gov-ernment's
ernment's gov-ernment's top policy-making body.
De Paul's work in Laos and the
sale of his Cadillac was approved
by Ambassador Graham Parsons
who was alos promoted a few
weeks ago. As Secretary of State
in charge of Far Eastern Affairs,
he is now in a position to spend
money and influence people
throughout the Far East.
Note The cloak-and-dagger boys
at Central Intelligence would like
to answer to Communists in Laos
,uy ,m"8lin8 food nd arms to
the Tibetan triKmr. ...
fighting the Communists in the
high Himalayas, As long as the
i?' "P "volution in Laos,
I CIA boys believe we should
eep the Tibetan not hoiiinc t,
can play at the game of stibver-
iu ana innnration.
HOPFA SEEKS LOOPHOLE
Labor Day Round-up: On the
second floor of the Teamsters po
litical headquarters. .limmv u-
fa's lawyers are already search.
ing the new labor bill for loop loopholes.
holes. loopholes. To get around the new res res-tnctions,
tnctions, res-tnctions, he has already served
an ultimatum upon Brinks that
all contracts with armored ear
drivers across the country must
be signed at the same time. .
Khrushchev has agreed to see la labor
bor labor leaders in San Fra
20. Only Walter Rith.r A..
Auto Workers, Jim Carey of the
Electr.cal Workers, and Joe Beir Beir-ne
ne Beir-ne of the Communications Work Work-ers
ers Work-ers are expected to keep the
date.
The Senate-Houae
fought bitterlv behind l n . a
doors over the labor bill. Th
room was a!rid with tubirrn
smoke and controversy. At one
viegons wistie-browed Sen.
Wayne Morse shouted, "This is
not the way to write legislation
for the American people!" and
stomped out of room. ..On another
accsion, Morse annnunrH n m.
chief antagonist. rnnen-m..
Graham Barden of North Caro.
Una: "I am going to get the Con.
gressman from North Carolina
to agree to one thing. For that
I ask for a one-minute recess.".
- Then Morse passed a borof
cigars, explaining: "My champioii
Devon cow gave birth to a bull
calf while at the Gaithersburg
Fair last night. I understand the
Congressman from North Carolina
is a great cattleman, and I am
going to sell him that bull calf."
. .Sen. Jennings Randolph, West
Virginia Democrat, also broke the
tension once by quoting a pass passage
age passage from Joaquin Miller's poem
"Columbus.". ."This mad sea
shows his teeth tonight, he curls
his lips, he lies in wait with lift lifted
ed lifted teeth as if to bite," repeat repeated
ed repeated Randolph. Just as Columbus
had sailed on to find land, the
Senator urged the conferees to
search on. "We may find common
ground on which to stand," he
said. '.
Later, Morse was explaining to
Randolph why he had voted a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst a proposal that would
help West Virginia coal operators.
Michigan's gravel-voiced Sen. Pat
McNamara broke in mischievous mischievously:
ly: mischievously: "The Senator from Oregon is
just explaining to the Senator
from West Virginia that he is a
fair weather friend."
WARE
BY
ZONE
DELIVERY

Bored Stiff.



.

TUESDAY, 8EFTEMBEK t. 1151
THX rAXAHA AMERICAN AN INDIKNPEN? DAHT .KKWI7APDI
FAOt THRU

!'l

MacmllarifiCa
f o iPave For General Election

LONDON Sept. 8. (UPI)Prime Minis ter Harold Macmillan called a cabinet meet
Ing today to pavethe way for a public anno uncement of Britain' general election date.
.A public announcement of $e date at ixpected sometime after the 8 p.m. cabi cabinet
net cabinet meeting ;
i ft It to taka the form of an official anno uncement from No, 10 Downing Street, Mac.
miilan doe not think it necessary he should make a radio broadcast, as was done in
1951 and 1955.
Macmillan flew to Balmoral yesterday to.informn Queen Elizabeth II of h decision
to haVparliament dissolved nd a general election called. He flew back to LWon thj.
morning. ;

' Macmillan does not have to call
an election until next May, since
British government may remain
in office for five years. But m the
light of the added popularity he
picked up from President Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's recent visit as well
the general calm of world condi conditions
tions conditions and continued prosperity at
home, he obviously feels ithat now
Is the time for his conservative
party to cash in oh a direct ap appeal
peal appeal to- the electorate.
Macmillan took the first step in
Uhe ancient game of British elec election
tion election procedure by flying to Bal Bal-moral
moral Bal-moral Castle, Scotland, for an
audience with the vacationing
Queen.
He was required by Britain's
unwritten constitution to ask the
Queen, to dissolve the present Par Parliament,
liament, Parliament, which now is in recess.
She was required to do so on re request
quest request of her chief minister.
But political observers alreadv
were taking a short cut through
the prescribed formula or steps
which are to be followed to pick
tht exact time when Britain will
choose a, new Parliament and a
new government.
."Yes, it's Oct. 8," said a ban ban-ner
ner ban-ner headline in yesterday's Lon Lon-don
don Lon-don Evening Standard. "The fore forecasts
casts forecasts are strong for polling on
Oct. 8 or 15, but today's move
swings opinion towards the earli earlier,
er, earlier, date," the London Evening
News said.

OCTOBER 8
LONDON, Sept. (UPI) -Prim
Minister Harold Macmil Macmillan
lan Macmillan with the odds favoring con conservative
servative conservative victory, today ordered
a general election held Oct. 8.
A statement from No. 10 Down Downing
ing Downing Street announced the disso dissolution
lution dissolution of parliament and the call calling
ing calling of the fifth parliamentary
eelction in Britain since the end
of the war.
Macmillan made known the
leng-a waited election date after
a dramatic 24 hours during
which he suddenly flew to Scot Scot-land
land Scot-land to inform Queen Elisabeth
of his decision, and then returned
to London to telj his cabinet this
afternoon.

The precise date was virtually
the only thing left to be an announced.
nounced. announced. Political battle lines were drawn
months ago. Campaign platforms
are all but c o m p 1 t e. Par Party
ty Party plans for waging the brief cam
paign are ready to be set in mo motion.
tion. motion. The issues on which the elec election
tion election will be fought are clearly de defined.
fined. defined.
But first there is the formal
procedure which Macmillan set in
motion Sunday.
Yesterday's "audience of the
queen" was a matter strictly be-

tween her and her chief minister.

No word of what transpired leaked
out. Macmillan planned to spend

the night at Balmoral Castle, add-

ing to the suspense,

Today he will ily back to Lon London
don London and probably consult with his
cabinet. Then, in his own good
time, he will name the date on
which he will put his office and
his government in the hands off
the British voter.
The last election in 1955 was
the first time in nearly century
that a political party in ; office
had increased its majority by so
large a margin. The Conservatives
wound up that one with a majori majority
ty majority of 60.

Vatican Newspaper Raps
Bathing Beauty Contests

VATICAN CITY (UPI) The Va Vatican
tican Vatican City newspaper Osservatore
Romano masted, bathing beauty
contests yesterday as '"We mar
ket-like displays" of girls looking
for careers-artistic or otherwise.
The denunciation was. made in
au editorial commenting on4
statement made by Fench ac actress
tress actress Martine Carol that she had
undressed too much" m past
turns and now wanted to devote
nerseft T ,to art alone i ?-
the editorial did. not mention
Miss Carol by name, but it iden identified
tified identified her beyond doubt. i
On the general subject o un undressing,
dressing, undressing, Osservatore condemned
boauty contests as such, including
Sunday's "Miss Europe" election
in Palermo, Sicily.
3 Die As Neighbor
Families Quarrel
Over Cow In Field
BARBOURVILLE, Ky. Sept. 8
(UPI) Three members of one fa family
mily family were slain in the eastern
Kentucky mountains near here
yesterday following a quarrel be between
tween between two families over a cow.
Dead was Nathan D. Honecutt,
60, his son, Thomas, 43; and his
nephew, Joe Honeycutt Jr., 29,
all of the Baughman community
of Knox County.
Charged with the slaying are
John Thomas King, 53, and his
son J. B. King, 17, alos of Bopgh-

The Kings gave themselves up
late yesterday afternoon to the city
police department here.
The triple slaying was less then
10 miles from where three mem members
bers members of the Jess Hatfield family
alin August 24 following a

quarrel with a neighboring family

over a property fence line.
Th olrir Kimr told nolice V?s

terday he and .his son shot the
Honeycutts after they bad thereat thereat-ned
ned thereat-ned to kill his son, J. B. H
said he and his son opened fire
nn them as thev closed in. The

shooting was done with two pis
tnU

The argument started after one
of the Honeycutt's cows got into
the King's cornfield. The son had
cone to chase the cow out when

hp was confronted by the three

Honevcutts. John King said,

J. B. King said, "They told me

if I touched that cow, they wouia

kill me. Then they started at me

Osservatore said it is not a co

incidence that the first step to towards
wards towards the "modern Olympus" is

beauty contest.
"And it is not a coincidence that

n tnose came mantei-mie ms-

plays, undressing is an indisputa indisputable
ble indisputable conditon," ,it said-

It referred to miss uaroi oniy

as van international star ana

commented favorably on her view

exrreslped in Rio. de Janeiro that

now sn was an esiaDiisnea per personality
sonality personality she wanted to concen

trate on art without benefit of nu

dity,

"The fact that this intention

emerges only 'now that my name

is know well enough' indicates
that sufficient knowledge is due
wholly, and not partly, to her un undressing
dressing undressing too much," Osservatore
said.

'We are mentioning no names

both as a tribute to so much good

will, on which one could say 'late
is better than never and because
it would be unfair to stress as
exceptional what instead is a com common
mon common way of 'stars.'

There was no mistaking .its

views about beauty contests and
nudity in general, however, and

Osservatore referred its readers
to a picture of contestants in the
'Miss Europe" contest published
in a Rome newspaper.

The picture, captioned "living

statues," showed Misses Holland,
Norway, Italy, Ireland and Ger

many in bathing suits with their

backs to the camera.

'All girls competing, like the

unnamed stars, owe their success
at that stage to undressing too

much," Osservatore said,
atement made by French ac actress
tress actress Martine Carol that she had

a i ii I l

mrs. Mirusncnev

Has International
' Outfit For Arrival

MOSCOW (UPI) Mrs. Niklta

Khrushchev may make her Amer

lean debut wearing an interna

tional outfit an English wool suit

and an American handbag.
The diplomatic kitchen crape

vine reported this week end that

an English couturier has arrived

from London to present a smart
English tweed to the 59-yar-old
wife of the Soviet Premier for her

first public trip abroad.
Nina Khrushchev also is expect
cd to meet the women of the U

nited States carrying the hand handbag
bag handbag Mrs. Nixon presented to ber
during the vie nresidential tour

of the Soviet Union.

"Naturally she wants to look
her best for her first visit to the
l'":'d States and she's very ex excited
cited excited and pleased about going,"

one diplomats wife who Knows

Airs. Knrusnchev. said.

British Labor
Leaders Begin
Annual Congress
BLACKPOOL, England (UPI) (UPI)-Britain's
Britain's (UPI)-Britain's union leaders open their
annual congress today with a wide
policy split showing in their ranks
and national elections expected
next month.
The eight million union mem members
bers members represented at the trades

union congress here form much of j

the voting strength of the Labor
Party, which will contest the elec elections
tions elections against Prime Minister Ha Harold
rold Harold Macmillan's Conservatives.

Political observers expect Mac

millan to announce an October
date for the elections sometime
this week, with the 8th or the 15th

the most frequently mentioned.
More than a million of the trade
unionists are opposed to official
labor Party policy on nuclear
weapons. This does not mean
their votes will turn toward the
Conservatives. But it does show
the uncommitted electorate that
Labor lacks unity in the face of
the smooth and confident cam campaign
paign campaign already begun by the Con Conservatives.
servatives. Conservatives. Labor Party leader Hugh Galt Galt-skell
skell Galt-skell and his lieutenant, Aneurin
Bevan, want to establish a non non-nuclear
nuclear non-nuclear club of nations other than

rue united States and Russia. Un Under
der Under the plan, Britain would ore.
njunce : her nuclear weapons if
ether countries with such poten potentiality
tiality potentiality do the same.

.-:u.sust v'
?
V A.
-kx ; -v
:r; -

BARE WITH US Yon can't lead a boy to water, but you
can't keep- him out of it, either, on a scorching, )ate-flummer
day. Mike.McCann, 21 month old, takea the' shortest, un unclothed
clothed unclothed way to beat the swampish heat of the nation's cctpitaJ.
I He's the aon of Mr. and Mrs. Perry McCanzt, Washineton. D.C

Typed A Santa Claus
Ed Gwenn Played
In Shaw's Comedies

HOLLYWOOD, Sept. 8 (UPI)-

The cheerful twinkling little man

who meant Santa Claus to many
children will hold no youngsters

on his lap this coming Christmas.
Edmund Gwenn, whose role as
St. Nick in "The Miracle on 34th
St." brought him an Academy A A-ward
ward A-ward a dozen years ago, died Sun Sunday
day Sunday night at the Motion Picture
Hospital. He would have been 82
on Sept. 26.
As the movie department store
Santa, Gwenn insisted to his em employers
ployers employers he was the joy-giving
saint of children and his faith
in the role brought' the spirit uf
Christmas to an entire city.
Although type-cast in the minds
of movie-goers as the white wlvsk
ered; red-clothed Santa Claus,
Gwenn actually got his start while
still in his teens and earned the
stinging praise of playwright
George Bernard Shaw.
t Gwenn, one of the last to per perform
form perform for Shaw, impressed the
caustic Irish author by his per performance
formance performance in an obscure one-act
play in London.
The two were brought together
and Shaw give the voun r
a prominent role in his nsw play,
"Man and Superman" So ntran" ntran"-ed
ed ntran"-ed wag Slaw with the actor's work
in. the 1895 performance that he
starred Gween in five other works

including "Heartbrsak Houf

Dead Brazilian
Alblefe In U,S.
Considered Suicide

NAPERVILLE, 111., Sept. 8 -(UPI)
Police said today a Bra Brazilian
zilian Brazilian athlete competing in the
Pan American Games, who, was
found shot and killed under mys mysterious
terious mysterious circumstances, might have
taken his own life.
"It seems he was despondent,

but over what we don't know,"
said police chief Irving Lichter.

The body of Ronaldo Duncan

Araentes. 26, of Pernambuco, Bra-

si!, was found yesterday by north
Central College football players re

porting for early practice.

A .38 caliber pistol was found

near his right hand. He had been

shot with the weapon and his

shirt was scorched with gunpow

der burns.

Arantes was a member of an
eight-oar crew in the games. His

brother, Romulo, trainer of the
ciew, said he was positive Ronal Ronaldo
do Ronaldo had been murdered.

Lichter said police were conti

nuing to investigate the possibility
of murder despite the indications
of suicide.

Lichter said members of the
team told him Ronaldo had been
moody recently but they knew of
no reason for the despondency.

SEYMOUR AGENCY
General Agents for the
MARYLAND CASUALTY COMPANY
NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER
2-6375
CLAIMS DEPARTMENT
2-1463

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it costt only... $47.50
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With qood reason the
Kodak Retinette it the

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"PANAMA COLON

Allempls To Kill
Her Six Children

HOUSTON, Tex. (UPI) Mrs.
Phyllis Clark, 32, went berserk
yesterday and ordered her six
sons to kneel around a chair and
pray while she attacked them with
a butcher knife.

Play like y
lied," she told

ou are betni enici-

d them.

She plunged the eight-inch knife
into the chest of Paul, 8, pulled
it out and wiped the Woody blade
on her flimsy nightgown and tried
to stab a second son, Timothy, 4.
Paul was critically wounded.
Her oldest son, Michael Clark,

a, struggled with her while his
five brothers ran from the house
to a neighbor, Mrs. Pauline Wells,
31, screaming "our mother is try trying
ing trying to kill us."
Mrs. Clark chased her sons to
the neighbors home, and treid to
batter down the front door while

Mrs. Wells called police.
'Open this door, I havt to do a-
way with my children," Mrs.
Clark shouted and hammered on
the glass in the door so hard it
shattered and slashed a three-inch
gash in her wrist.
Sho dropped the butcher knife
and staggered back to her front
yard and fell unconscious. Po Police
lice Police found her in the yard and
had her rushed to a hospital.
Relatives and friends described
Mrs. Clark as a "devoted mother
who loved her children very
much." Her husband was away
on a fishing trip at the time of
the attack. He said she was nor normal"
mal" normal" when he left Friday.

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use rug pad

Inclement weather and kiddies muddy
$hoeg need not concern you. . when
you have transparent plastic runners.

If you can use
Throw cushions
or

RATTAN COUCH BOLSTERS

Don't miss our
features of the week!

It says: I quit! Try
getting help through the
classified columns of
The Panama American!

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SOUNDSCRIBER REMINGTON RAND
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ANNIVERSARY
190 Vf'.V 1S

Tels. 2-2010, 2-0925 Ave. Jose Fco. de laOssa

i-4 Hf.v

"1:



ttiSiJAti lOTtHBU 1, 1951

FACE FOUR

Social and Ott

Bo 134,

xerwite Y)

anama

NEWS OF ENGAGEMENTS, MARRIAGES, BIRTHS, PARTIES AND TRA .,-iUULD Bs MAILED
PROMPTLY TO BOX-NUMBER SHOWN. IT WlLL BE RECEIVED BY TELEPHONE OVER
PANAMA 2-0740 OR 2-0741 BETWEEN 8:00 AND 10 A.M. ONLY.

, BALBOA WOMAN'S CLUB WELCOME HOME TEA
PLANNED FOR TOMORROW AT BALBOA USOJWB
The annual Welcome Home tea, inaugurating the 1959 1960
.club year of the Balboa Woman's Club, will be held tomorrow
afternoon from 3:30 to 5 at the Balboa USO JWB. All members
are urged to attend, as well as guests and Pacific Side newcomers
who mlfht be Interested in joining the group.
The club is a member of the General Federation of Women's
Clubs, the largest group of affiliated women in the world. Us

actirities are devoted to civic welfare, chanty and cultural acti

Club officers have planned a program for the coming year

of interest and outings to the Interior. I

All Society member j, their fam families
ilies families and interested guests are in in-vit
vit in-vit ?d to make reservations before
tomorrow evening by telephoning
Balboa 3326 or 4203, or contact contacting
ing contacting William C. Merwin at the Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Post Office.

Birth Artrvoimcemtnt
Mr. and Mrs Jack Simon of
Anton announce the birth of their
first child, a son. born Sunday at
Gorgas Hospital. He has been
named Jack Junior.
Mrs. Simon is the former Miss
Lirola E. Tarn, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Jose Tarn of Penonome.
Mr. Simon is the son of Mrs. Ma Marian
rian Marian Simon of Santa Barbara,
Calif., and the late Mr. John Simon.

USARCARIB Toittmift.rt
To Hear Jim Pittison
Jim Pattison, radio and televi television
sion television program director at CFN,
will Rive a special lecture tn
members of the USARCARIB
Toastmasters CUih during their

Guard Against

Heat
with

Ll

MEXAIIA WA

The whole family will enjoy
the feeling of freshness which
MEXANA powder elves. For
prickly heat, ra'- enema,

diaper rash
and skin ir irritations
ritations irritations .
nothing can
surpass .
Mexana.

Contains
Starch

POLVo

regular meeting tomorrow eve evening
ning evening at six in the Club Room of
the Tivoli Guest House. He will
discuss the do's and don't i of
radio and television professional
techniques.
Neville Harte will present the
invocation and benediction, and
Guy Thomas will act as Table
Topicmaster. Formal speeches
will be given by Orrin Appin, Wil William
liam William Trost and Stanley Bolek.
Their critics will be Cecil Vock
rodt. William Kongable and Mar Martin
tin Martin Lopez.
Toastmaster of the evening will
be Thomas Vale, and Arthur Mo
Krav will be the general evalua
tor."
New club officers will be elect
ed during the meeting. Candidate:
are William Trost for president;
Arthur MoKray, Neville Harte.
ice presidents; Stanley Boiek,
treasurer; William Sullivan, se: se:-rctary;
rctary; se:-rctary; Cecil Vockrodt, sergeant
at arms.
Clv.b members are urged to A A-tuid,
tuid, A-tuid, and to bring guests.
Kathln, Brian Cox

To Saii For School
Kathleen and Brian Cox, daugh

ter and son of Mr. and Mrs.

Richard E. Cox of Diablo Heights,
plan to sail for the States tomor
rcw aboard the SS Cristobal, both
are students at Villanova Univer University,
sity, University, Kathleen in the School of
Nursing and Brian in the Division
of Education.
Prior to entering school, they
will be the house guests of Mr
n.id Mrs. Thomas J Burbine aL
Camp Kilmer, N.J. The Burbines
are well-remembered on the At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic Side, where they were sta sta-I'oned
I'oned sta-I'oned at Fort Gulick.

Squirt Dance Party
At Balbea YMCA
The weekly square dance party

will be he'd at the Balboa Armed
Services YMCA starting at 8 to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow evening.
Ross Cunningham will call po popular
pular popular square and folk dances. Re Refreshments
freshments Refreshments will be served.

Mrs. Emogtnt Cook ton
To To Honor
The- Mount Hope home of Rev.
and Mrs. Edwin C. Webster will
be the scene tomorrow afternoon
Of an open house tea honoring
Mrs. Emogene Cookson.
All Atlantic Side friendi of Mrs.
Cookson are invited to call be between
tween between four and six.

.Curundu Womon'i Club
j Moots Tomorrow
j The regular monthly business
I meeting of the Curundu Women's
I Club will be held tomorrow morn morning
ing morning at 9 at the Community Build Building.
ing. Building. All members are urged to

ttend.

Gem, Mineral Sociity
Plans Birthday Dinner
The annual birthday dinner of
th? Canal Zone Gem and Mineral
Society will be held Friday eve evening
ning evening at 7r30 at the Tivoli Guest
House. Officers for the new club
year will be presented during the
evening.

Free Evening Course
In Piloting, Small
Boating To Begin
Registration for a free evening
course in piloting and small boat
handling will be held tonight in
the Panama Canal Company train training
ing training center, Balboa, starting at
7:30.

The. course is sponsored by the
local unit of the United States
Power Squadrons. It will extend

over about 11 sessions, to be held
I each Tuesday evening. Sublets
will include equipment and lights,
rules of the nautical road, sea seamanship,
manship, seamanship, the mariner's compass,
(safety afloat, manners and cus customs
toms customs afloat, and others.
' The course is open to all adults
and to young people aged sixteen
jand over. Boat ownership is not
j necessary.
The Training Center is located

in the upper floor of Building 0602
Corozo Street, across the Panama
Railroad tracks from the Balboa
station.

SATINA CARRIES YOU SMOOTHLY

THRU THE IRONING HOUR!

ssst

Safina...

Hi i6 ironing

tld in fhf liftU box.

JaW

Why pay more for NAIL POLISH
REMOVER?

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Lrrw tip
Tmr
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Quick acting with Carbitol
to keep the skin soft.
Ask for -CktC

Birdland

Anawr to Prtvtout Punlo

DOWN

ACmOM
1 Graceful bird
Groat
riifhtleai
bint

llShl.MX..r1n S MimlC

II Priority f
(prefix) Ship bottomj

14 "Emerald Me" asnarpatt

15 Drink made

1 Weep
ISonr bird
Nautical term
4 S nymph

with malt

1 Mariner's
direction
17 Eternities
18 Scoff
20 Small finch
22 Electrified
particle
24 Female saint
(ab.)
25 Luminaries
20 Compound
ether
SS Individual
34 Isaac's elder
son (Bib.)
S Ripped
37 Siouan Indian
it Fork proof
41 Cushion
42 Rigid
44 Deviate
48 Tree fluid
48 Oriental
porT
40 Herons
52Pigeonr
98 Presently
57 Noah's boat
60 Biblical weed
61 Surfeit
62 Falaehood
63 Domestic
slave
64 Female
sheep (pi.)
65 Extinct bird
66 Act

Press

10 Fermented
grape Juke
11 Present
month (ab.)
It Stage part
21 Follower
23 Bird's
25 Surf duck
26 Poker stake
27 Gaseous
element

2a Uttered
30 Drink to
ex rets
31 Ales
32 Communists
35 Distinct part
38 Ascetics
40 Minced oath
43 Consume
45 Engif ed In
tumult

47 Sacred song
49 Comfort
BO Chew
CI Surf noise
53 Holder for
flowers
54 Sea eagle
55 Bird
58 River (Sp.)
58 New Zealand
bird

i p fi ryri p Pr i
l B U
j r I?
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487

Senate Approval
Fvlension Of Crop
D!$no5dl Plan

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Senate approvpd yesterday a 3 3-year
year 3-year $5,415,000,000 extension of
the government's overseas surplus
cron riisnosal olan after adding a

"pi'ot" food stamp plan to help
I feed this country's needy.
The House, which previously ap

proved a more modest program,
itiromptly refused to accept the

Senate version, sending th? issue

to a joint conference committee to
work o';' a compromise.
The House voted only a one-year
extension involving about $1,800, $1,800,-000,000.
000,000. $1,800,-000,000. Th; 68-14 Senate yote came aft after
er after three days of off-and-on debate
marked by a host of efforts to
amend the bill. The present sur surplus
plus surplus disposal law expires Dec. 31.
The Senate bill would extend for
three years at a maximum of
$1,500,000,000 a year the present
so-called public law 480 program
through which farm surpluses are
sold or bartered abroad for for foreign
eign foreign currencies.
It also would extend for three

years, at not more than 300 mil million
lion million dollars a year, the present
program of donating government government-owned
owned government-owned surplus foods for use in
famine relief and other emergen emergencies
cies emergencies abroad.
During an unusual Labor Day
session, the Senate reversed itself
and voted 44 .18 to approve the
food stamp plan, sponsored by
Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey (D-

Minn.). It would be limited to not
more than six communities in the
nation.
But it rejected 6418 a proposal
to allot unlimited quantities of
government-owned surplus crops
for use in direct relief in this
country
The plan, sponsored by Sens.
John F. Kennedy (D Mass.).
rhi'ip A Hart (D-Mich.) and oth oth-?rs.
?rs. oth-?rs. also called for spending 150
million dollars a year for "sup "supplementary
plementary "supplementary foods" to round out
the food relief program.

"Ty. k-Hrs
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m it f hhihi itHM

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SOUTH
A JlttS
VKII
kjios
KJ2
No one vulnerablt
North fast goaU West
1 Pass 1 pass
1 Past 2N.T. Pass
S N.f pass Pass pass
Opening lead 4 4

West had to find some opening

lead against the three no-trump

contract and finally selected the
four of spades.
East won with the king and could

have beaten the hand immediately
by simply playing the jck of
hearts but East could not tee ill
the cards and just returned the
suit his partner had led.
This gave Harry Fishbein of New
York a chance to wrap up the con contract
tract contract and when Harry gets a
chance he takes it.
It wasn't hard for him. His ten
of spades was covered by West's
queen and won in dummy with the
ace. Now he cashed four diamond
tricks discarding a club from dum dummy.
my. dummy. His next plays were the jack of
spades and a low club to dum dummy's
my's dummy's ace for his seventh trick. Now
he led the last spade from dum dummy
my dummy and discarded the deuce of
hearts from his hand.
West was in an end play. A heart
lead would establish Harry't king
while a club lead would give Har Harry
ry Harry two more tricks in that suit.

11

Q The bidding has been:
West North East Smith
1 Pass 2 4 Pass
Pass Double Past 3
Pass 4 Pass 7
You, South, hold:
4 VAQ78 KJ7I 854
What do you do7
A Paac Year partner eovld
not doable at Ms first turn. You
have mad a rry atroar bid
and he eonld hre Jumna1 to
five diamonds if h had th sards
for it.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Your" partner hat opened the
bidding with one spade. You
hold:
A VK54 AQ687 J54
What do you do?
Answer Tomorrow

'".: t

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Kjllgallen

Pantry shelf homemado ice
cream saves labor and money.
Made with evaporated milk, can canned
ned canned fruits (or fresh) and other
pantry shelf items, this ice cream
costs only about 25 cents a quart.
Although not as rich or as smooth
as the more expensive homemade
recipes, it will please the young youngsters
sters youngsters thoroughly. We like it best
with fresh fruit, but that cost a
little more.

Poach Ice Cream (Yield:
I quarts, at about 25 cents
a quart)
One tall can (1 2-3 cups) eva evaporated
porated evaporated milk, 3 tablespoons lemon

juice, 1 cup sugar, 1-8 teaspoon

salt. 1 can (1 pound) cling peach

es. diced: 1-2 teasponns almond

flavoring.
Chill evaporated mild in freez

er tray of refrigerator until ice
crystals form around edges. Turn

into large chilled bowl and whip
with cold rotary beater or on high

speed of electric mixer until mild

is stiff. Add lemon juice; Deat un

til blended. Combine sugar, salt

diced peaches, peach syrup and

almond flavoring; fold into whip

ped mixture. Turn into 2 freezer

trvs: freeze until firm.

Note: One can (1 pound ol

whole cranberry sauce may be

substituted for peaches and a
mond flavoring.

Maplo Walnut let Cream
One tall can (1 2-3 cups) eva evaporated
porated evaporated milk, 1 tablespoon lemon
juice, 1 cup sugar, 1-8 teaspoon
salt, 1-2 cup water, 1 tablespoon
maple flavoring, 1-2 cup chopped
walnuts.
Chill evaporated milk in freez freezer
er freezer tray of refrigerator until ice
cystals form around edges. Turn
into large chilled bowl and whip
with cold rotary beater or on high
speed of electric mixer until milk
is stiff. Add lemon juice; beat un until
til until blended. Combine remaining
ingredients; fold into whipped mix mixture.
ture. mixture. Turn into freezer trays:
freeze until firm.

O WU Sar...

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MUEBLERIA
CASA SPARTON
CENTRAL te-lM CALIDONIA

By MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE
"Wt adopted our 7-year-old girl
when she was a baby," writes
Mrs. S. "For gome time I've not noticed
iced noticed her interest in the sex of pup puppies
pies puppies and kittens. Yesterday, neigh
bors brought over a young moth moth-her
her moth-her and baby. While the mother
was changing his diaper, Elly
stared so that the other women
noticed it and told me I should

take her to a psychiatrist. Does
she sound mentally unbalanced to

you?"

No. But you can t rely on my

ooinion. as yesterday, for in

stance. I found myself staring at a

woman teetering along the street

on backless pumps with four-Inch

heels.

When 1 was Elly's age, 1 stared

at lightning bugs, my friends in
new dresses, naked boy babies
and elephants in the zoo. So, ts t
starer myself, my own sanity
comes into question here and
makes my opinion of Elly's unde unde-pendable.
pendable. unde-pendable. Under these circumstances
maybe Mrs. S. Better consult a
psychiatrist.
Indeed, 1 urge her to. For I ex expect
pect expect that her adopted child was
orn out of wedlock, and that
Mrs. S. is struggling wilh fear
hat Klly is the inheritor of her
latural parents' sinfulness. ThiF
eir, I think is what makes Elly's
uteres! in naked boy babies so
orrisomr; ami as it is not a ra ra-onal
onal ra-onal fear, a psychiatrist mighi
elp her get over it before ii doe.:
erious harm to her and Elly.

In the meantime I offer her
some words by Dr. Irene M. Jos Jos-selyn,
selyn, Jos-selyn, a noted psychoanalyst of
children who writes: "The child's

first awareness of bodily differ

ences comes most easily in obsc;'
vation of a small baby. Parents'
naturalness in accepting infant
nudity gives a casualness to the
experience that helps the child ab absorb
sorb absorb what he sees."
But if, like Mrs. S., we resist
his curiosity in the sex of babies,

kittens and puppies, we make it

impossible for him to absorb what
he sees. Sensing our disapproval,

he's too distracted by it to absorb

what he sees. So his sex curiosity

remains unsatisfied.

As a result, he'll work out one

of two solutions for himself. Ei
ther he'll satisfy it in guilty secre

cy or start pretending he doesn't

feel it. Both solutions have made

much trouble In this world.

High school marriages are on

the increase all over the country.
In some cities the school boards
are trying to figure out ways of
discouraging teen-age marriages.
Actually the only people who

can put the brake on high
school marriages are parents. But
if they are to do it they will

have to start on their campaign
before their children even hit

senior high.
The first thing parents cn do
is stop encouraging their chil children
dren children to start dating when they
are still just kids. Make no nis nis-take
take nis-take about it. it's the parents
not the kids who start planning
dances for youngsters in the sixth
grade.
It's Mama who can't wait for
her little girl to have her first
evening dress, and who thinks
it's just too cute that another
mother is chauffering her son
and the little girl on an afternoon
movie date.
Then parents will have to quit
saying they "don't really approve
of steady dating for 14, 15 and

16-year-olds, but what can we
do about it? They simply must
say, "I don't care what the cus custom
tom custom is you aren't going steady."
Parents can also keep their

kids on foot longer. The sooner a
boy or girl has a car, the sooner

he is out from under parental su

pervision.

Still another reason why so

many hlgn scnool kiqs marry

without any thought to the fu

ture is because their parents have

been so indulgent all along that

they figure their parents wouldn t
dream of not pitching in and

helping to suooort the teen-age
marriage. A little less indulgence

would keep the klds from being
quite so heedless.

And mere is sun one wner
thing If parents reserve the right
to ell their kids whom they can
and whom they can't date a lot
of unsuitable romances never
would be started in the first
place.
Parent shouldn't look te the
school to discourage their chil children
dren children from high jrhool marrltges.
They ought to look te them themselves
selves themselves for that.

Arlene de Marco of the tinging
sisters separated from her hus husband,
band, husband, actor Keefe Brassellt, and
It's been agreed that the will go
to Mexico tor the divorce. They
were married on Christmas" Eve in
1956. .The best of, all New York
summer shows (especially for
those who think burlesque is ban banned
ned banned in Manhattan) it not TV co comedienne
medienne comedienne Genevieve playing "Can
Can" in the Park but Genevieve
watering the flowers on her East
52d St. terrace. She perform this
daily chore wearing what appears
to be a tiny handkerchief that's
all and don't think her male
neighbors tren't grateful for the
divertisement. To quote one: "The
first time I taw her I thought I
was dreaming but now I'm used
to it".
Althoueh he's nearina 80, the

fabulous Nick the Greek Dandolai
it on one of the biggest winding

streaks of the decade in Las Ve

gas. Nobody is even estimating
how far ahead he is, but they're

impressed. .Steven Rockefeller i

and his pretty bride succeeaea in

dropping out of the headlines, but

tney sun star in me mgni ciuo co comedians'
medians' comedians' routines, where they're'
the top gag targets.

Actrees Martha Scott flew to

Kansas City to be at the bedside
of her mother, who is seriously ill

Eve Arden, whose West coast

appearance in "Auntie Mame
shattered box office records in
both Los Angeles and San Francis Francisco,
co, Francisco, is headwg for New York in
hopes of finding a Broadway script
which might be equally suitable
for her talents. .If you're inter interested
ested interested in minor wars, note that

Francoise Sagan is battling with
her publishers because they want
to put a question mark after the

title of her new book. "Aimez-vous

Brahms" and she doesn't dig that

punctuation. .Parole, 1959: Gang

ster Roger Touhy is being flown
straight to New York for a TV in interview
terview interview the moment he's released
from prison in Illinois. The deal
was signed in (as well as by) the

pen. ..Lance Keventlow is said to

have extracted a promise from

Jill St. John that she wouldn't tell
any newspaper reporters about

gifts he might give her in the
future. He thinks it's bad taste.

The publishers who were hottest
after champ Ingemar Johnasson's
autobiography grew cool after

some expensive transatlantic ne

gotiations and decided to wait

and see what happened in the next
fight. .The television technicians
who caused many a network head headache
ache headache when they went on strike
some months ago have applied for
membership in the Teamsters'

Union.
Singer Cu Beth was painfully In

jured (dislocated jaw, lacerations

w me cnest and knees) in a car
accident caused when a deer
crossed in front of her on a New

Hampshire road, but she insisted

on doing her act at the Balsams

Hotel. At the end of her perform

ance her petticoats, brassiere and
white gloves were soaked with
blood,, and she fainted in the arms
of the bandleader's wife as soon

as she got off stage. An ambulance

took her to Cable Memonal Hos
pital in Ipswich, Mass.

Reports out of Hollywood indi indicate
cate indicate that comedienne Patsy Kelly
will make a happy and splashy
comeback in the Doris Dav-Davld

Niven flicker, "Please Don't Eat

the Daisies." She s still a Scene

stealer, they say.

The Madison Ave. book world

has a new character to celebrate

He's a hearded chap, about 40

who haunts the publishers' offices
propelling a hamper on wheels. He

says it contains at least 100 bril

liant manuscripts, but he won

let anybody read them until the
whole bitch is purchased, and his

asking price is $1,000,000. Oh, his

name? Gene Yus. .Two mttri

Jazx world: Writer Nat Hentoff
flew to Mexico, shed hit artist

wife, Trudy Far ilant, ana
promptly wed Margot Wolinski, hit

assistant on the Jazx Review. On
the Coast scene, arranger Johnny
("I Want to Live") Mandel took
pretty v Lois Williams Sims for hit
bride, and the't a belle who knows
her way around a bandstand: the

was formerly married to pianist

John Williams and sax atar Zoot

Sims. .Lionel Hap ton hit a host
of favorites contributing to hit

"ad libs." Joe E. Lewis. Red

Skelton and Milton Berle have
been giving him funny lines to
spring m the audieaces between
his musical numbers.

Maurice Chevalier might well

sing "I'm Glad I'm Not Young
Any Mote." Although he'a 70, Pa Pa-ramount
ramount Pa-ramount is realiably reported to
have offered him a long term,

multiple-picture deal timilar to the

one that's making William Holden
immensely rich.

Sir Carol Reed has been auoted

as saying the romance between hit

daughter, Tracy Pelissier, and the
Aga Khan "is greatly exaggerat exaggerated";
ed"; exaggerated"; nevertheless he shipped her
off for a holiday in Austria with

Lady Reed. .One of the Miss Ame America
rica America contestants, Mies Illinois, hat

a job offer already. Fred Waring
wants her to join his Pesnsylvan Pesnsylvan-ians
ians Pesnsylvan-ians as a vocalist.

Obituaries on MiatnL'a Palm Ta-

land Club, which burned to the
ground the other day, failed to

mention that It was the forerunner

of all the plush Florida gambling

omts. "The boys" built it m th

early '80s and it figured in a
couple of murders during the gang

wars oi inai era. Aiterwaras u be

came a respectable night spot.

Congress Seeks

Agreement On New

Housing Bill 1

WASHINGTON (UPI) Demo

cratic congressional leaders said
yesterday they might know to today
day today whether Congress coujd agree
on a trimmed down "third' try"
housing bill that would be accept

able to president Eisenhower.

Speaker Sam Ray burn indicated

he had strong hopes such an

agreement might be reached.
Chairman John J. Soarkman D-

Ala.) of the Senate Housing Sub

committee did not touhd so opti optimistic
mistic optimistic but said something definite
should be known Tuesday.

The President has vetoed two

housing bills as unsound and infla

tionary. The Senate Banking Com Committee
mittee Committee was unable at a Saturday

meeting to act on proposals for a
compromise which would meet
most of his objections.

The atmosphere was just not

right for doing anything," Spark-

man Said. "There were several

Senators there who did not want

anything done."
Banking Committee Chairman
A. Willis Robertson (D-Vi.) has

decided against calling another

committee meeting until a major majority
ity majority of members agree on some something
thing something informally. Sparkman said
such an agreement would require
time to let things settle a little
more."
Sparkman first declared there
would be no new housing bill
when Eisenhower vetoed the sec second
ond second measure Friday. He late rre rre-lented
lented rre-lented and offered to try to draft
a bill which the President might
accept "if we take a little time
for consideration."
The Senate failed by nine votes

and five votes, respectively, to ov-

monial announcements from the erride the two vetoes.

Adm. Hirschfield Of Coast Guard u

Rebuked For Junket Of 6 Relatives f

THRU ELECTROCUTED

CORDOBA, Mexico (UPI) A
calf killed by a storm-ripped pow power
er power l!ne live-wire set off a series
of three human deaths in the
village of Cuitlahuac near here.
Jose Izaxaga, 18, the calf's owner,
tried to lift he animal, and
dropped dead from the electric
shock. Hearing his cry, Mrs. Ma Maria
ria Maria Izataga, the youth's mother,

rushed from their house and, as

?he tugged al his body, was dec

trocuted. A neighbor, Zenon Lo Lo-oea,
oea, Lo-oea, came lo her rescue, tnd died

when he touched her.

APPROVE! NOMINATIONS
WASHINGTON (UPD-The Sen

ate Judiciary Comm. yesterday
approved the nomination of Henry

,J. Friendly or New York to oe
iudae of the Second U.S. Circui

Court of Appeals. Also approve''

was the nomination of Harold r
Wood of Philadelphia to be U.P
District Judge for the Easter
Pennsylvania District. The nom
nation of Friendly had turned f
by mistake on the Senale calcnd
last week hut was not formally
rmrted to the Senile until yester
day.

WASHINGTON (UPI) Rear

Adm. James A. Hirshfield, assist

ant commandant of the toast

Guard, has been officially reouked
for taking six relatives along on a
28-day flying inspection trip to

Europe.

Alto censured for approving the

presence of a total ot nine civil civilians
ians civilians on the trip was Vice Adm.

Alfred C. Richmond, the Coast
Guard commandant. The rebukes
were approved by Treasury Sec Secretary
retary Secretary Robert B. Anderson, who
has jurisdiction over the Coast

Guard in peacetime.

The service's two top officers

were reprimanded orally by As

aietant Treasury Secretary A. Gil-

more Flues, who investigated tne

trip on Anderson's orders after

was publicized oy a ntwsptper
enlumnlat.

Th tretsury told United Press

Irternationtl that HirshMd't

June It-July 16 trip was for legt
timate purposes. But it said ttk

ing the nine civilians along on the
four-engint DC-4 plane was "an

tbuse ol discretion' Dy coin

Hirshfield tnd Richmond.

Hirshfield wis accompanied by

his wife, his daughter, a son,

'rlend of the son, a brother, the

hrother't wife and a niece.

Four Coast Guard officers alsc

nade the trip, including Rear

Vdm. Edward H. Thtele.Coas

lusrd englneer-ln'-chief, who toor

'ong nit wiie ana aaugnier.

Hirshfield would not comment
i the official treasury criticism

) if his passenger, roster, He laid

the nine civilians were lodged and
fed at their own expense and that
the Coast Guard was reimbursed
for box lunches eaten in flight.

Hirshfield or Thiele inspected 18

Coast Guard units in England,

Belgium, Denmark, Norway, West

Germany, France, Italy, Greece
and Mediterranean areas. Their
familiA violta! tviAaf kill nnt nil

of these countries, Hirshfield said.

The Treasury said the trip "wat

for proper and normal inspection

and conference purposes and at

such was rightfully authorized."

But it said in a statement re

quested by UPI that "there wai

an Improper and unwarranted in in-elusion
elusion in-elusion of civilian passengers on
th flight."

Tne Treasury said it would Con

tinue to approve use of coast

Guard transportation on a space
available basis for dependents of

Coast Guardsmen who are being

reassigned or wno are on leave.

"Any otner passengers should

bt taken only when the propriety

is beyond question," it taid.
If ''there Is any extraordinary

question regarding propriety" of

accommodating civilians, tht
Coast Guard commandant "shall
seek advice from the assistant
secretary of the Treasury respon response
se response for Coast Guard matters,"
the department said.
Asked about his approval of
Hlrshf'eld's plans, Richmond told
UPI "the cerrylng of dependents
on lnspect'on trips his been car carried
ried carried on for quite a while on a
space available basis. There it
nothing unusual about it."



ttcsdAy, imzMsz i, list

TBI FAKAMA AMEBIC! AM UtlUfEKDEMT DAILY HXWSPAPTB
paoi rvi

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IT'ft If I IU Tile riDneim, da

"""f f'M'iBwneijs isecona irora ngntj mouier went out
lL- to Cincinnati, Ohio. Susie Mrttfny, Z
Si J, "Jr?' 6iatirft)- nda suaestionf. rortuaatly, no one sowed. The house has
Deen razed to ke tray for people.

Business Drops In Steel Cities As Strike
Stretches To Longest In Postwar US History

NEW YORK, Sept. 8 (UPD The
Btion's steel strike is S6 days
old today and has thus become
the longest in the vital industry's
post-World War II history.
On Labor Day yesterday, the
current strike became as long as
the 1952 walkout which began on
June 2 and ended July 24. That
strike the longest since World
War II until now lost the indus industry
try industry an estimated 17,553,000 tons
ol steel, 2.500,000 tons of steel,
2,500,000 man days, and 1450,000, 1450,000,-000
000 1450,000,-000 in wages.
Tha? steel, strike of 1958. was
likely? to be even more costly.
One industry source estimated
the loss to the steel industry at
$15,000,000 a day, or $725,000,000
through Labor Day. a few, but
not many, basic industries, were
beginning to feel the- pinch of a
ateel shortage. Foreign steel pro producers
ducers producers were making inroads in
the U.S. market which may prove
hard to wipe out.
Thr was no immediate end
In Sight to the walkeutl For the

Both Houses Labor Through Holiday;
Bring Forth Only Legislative Mice

WASHINGTON (UPI)-'Congresii
labored mightily through an ex extraordinary
traordinary extraordinary Labor Day session
yesterday in hopes of speeding
adjournament by next week eid.
It came up with relatively little
to show for its effort.
Plans to put some steam behind
action in the Senate and House
were thwarted at least tempora temporarily
rily temporarily by 'Sen. Wayne Morse CD CD-Ore.)
Ore.) CD-Ore.) and Rep. H. R. Gross (R (R-Iowa),
Iowa), (R-Iowa), respectively.
At one point, Senate Democrat Democratic
ic Democratic Leader Lyndon B. Johnsoj
(Tex.) threatened to hold the Sen Senate
ate Senate in session until midnight if
necessary to get a vote on legis legislation
lation legislation extending the farm surplus
disposal program.
Morse, irked by what he calls
Johnson's dictatorial tactics, con continued
tinued continued the delaying maneuvers
he launched Saturday, He de
manded lime-consuming quo.uii
calls and opposed Johnson's re request
quest request for unanimous consent to
step up the order of business.
The House did tentatively ap approve,
prove, approve, 163-5, a pre-adjournament
resolution that would permit bills
to be brought up under a speed-up
procedure on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday.
But a final vote was put off un until
til until today when Gross objected
that a quorum or majority was
not present. He objected that
speed-up arrangements would per permit
mit permit House leaders to ram through
legislation wit no chance for a a-mendments.
mendments. a-mendments. Many members of Congress,
away for the holidays, failed to
attend the Labor Day session, the
first in 17 years. On one House
quorum call, 260 members and and-wered
wered and-wered to their names. This was
the smallest number to answer
this session, but 41 mora than the
required minimum.

TODAY-gatoes-TODAY
TIVOLI CAPITOLIO VICTORIA RIO
J5c. . tOc. tSe. .. n-. I,,- 15c. 15c. 35c. SHOW!
BANK! $125.00 EL POLLO del AffO
AL CAPONE FUGA A BIRMAMA M
with Rod Stelter STAGE TO TUCSON with Robert Ryan Also:
mm Roa Bieiger RqA 0tmerm ANNE OF THE
- Also: A1M. A1S0- INDIES
Also: j. dnd'
WOLF LARSEN WALK EAST ON AMERICANO The Day The Earth
With Barry Sullivan BEACON .with Glenn Ford Stood Still

moment, negotiators placed their
hopes in a now bargaining for formula
mula formula scheduled to go into effect
Thursday.
The steel companies and the V
nited Steelworkers planned to
name 12 separate subcommittees
for each big steel firm affected
While the subcommittees work on
local problems, top-level, industry industrywide
wide industrywide talks will also continue.
The impact of the strike hit
hardest at the nation's two great
steel-producing centers Pitts Pittsburgh
burgh Pittsburgh and Chicago.
Bureau of labor statistics rec records
ords records showed the Pittsburgh are
suffered the most. Out of 106,000
steelworkers in the region, 18,600
were idle. Of the 71.000 workers
furloughed across the nation b b-cause
cause b-cause of the strike, half were in
Pennsylvania.
As bank accounts shrank, so did
Pittsburgh area retail sales, bank
clearing, ele'ctric power consump consumption,
tion, consumption, and transit receipts. Retail Retailers
ers Retailers in the milltowns of the Beav
er and Monongahela valleys re-

Between quorum calls the House
managed to pass some minor bills.
One sent to the White House
would change the name of the
Roosevelt Dam in Arizona to the
Theodore Roosevelt Dam. The
change was designed to make
sure there Would be no confusion
about which President Roosevelt
Theodore or Franklin D. the
dam was named for.
As the Senate convened at 9:3;
a.m., Johnson introduced a re resolution
solution resolution expressing Congress
"deep realization and appreciation
of the basic role that labor plays"
in the economy and well-being of
the nation. A similar prop o a a J
was approved by the House.
.Johnson sought unanimous con consent
sent consent to limit debate on the resolu resolution
tion resolution to three minutes for each
Senator. Morse promptly resumed
his parliamentary war with thr
Democratic leader. He objected
to the move and refused to con
sent even after Johsson increased
the debate limit to 15 minutes.
Some members of Congress
were convinced that Morse's tac tactics
tics tactics would force abandonment of
the House-Senate goal to adjourn
next Saturday, or before the ar arrival
rival arrival here Sept. 15 of Soviet Pre
mier Nlkita S. Khrushchev.
HOUSK PASS IS BILL
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
House passed yesterday and sent
to the Senate a bill directing the
Treasury Department to pay the
state of Oklahoma $652,091. 71 for
building roads and a bridge in the
Grand River Dam area. The bill,
approved without objection, re requires
quires requires the money to be used for
highvay projects.

.......

ported business wat off as much
as 20 per cent.
In a grim corollary to the
strike, relief rolls bulged. As of
last wook nearly 5,000 workers
had applied for relief in Allegh Allegh-ny
ny Allegh-ny Pittsburgh county alone.
The story of idle men and idle
businesses was the same in the
Chicago Gary Hammond area,
were 13,600 of 71,000 steelwork steelworkers
ers steelworkers were without work.
Merchants pleaded with custo customers
mers customers to buy on credit. A Gary
jewelry store put a sign in its
window reading "On sffike? Your
credit if1, good. When, a customer
wandered into a uary store, he
was likely to find two to three
clerks converging on him.
Only one business was booming
in the steel cities. Paint and hard hardware
ware hardware stores reported they were
selling do-it-yourself kits hand
over first to steelworkers anxious
to spend their idle hours fixing
up their homes.
The closoly.relattd railroad in industry
dustry industry was suffering bocauso of
the stool striko. But the automo automobile
bile automobile industry, which must have
stool to survive, was still doing
nicely.
The Association of American
Railroads estimated that railroads
have lost one million carloads of
freight since the start of the
strike. In the week ending Aug. 29
alone, the industry estimated it
lost 165,000 cars of freight.
In Detroit, by contrast, all ma major
jor major auto companies figured they
could get well into 1960 model
production on a near-record ba basis
sis basis without feeling a steel shor
age. No car companies, however
were willing to estimate how Ion
they could continue manufactur manufacturing
ing manufacturing if the steel strike continued
"We may have a tough time re
gaining some of those markets
we're losing."
TROPICAL
8 g T0DAY &
GREAT FORTUNE NIGHT!
$150.00 12CE1!H
Be One of The Lucky Winners
of These Cash Prizes!
1st Prize $100.00
2nd
3rd
4th
25.00
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THE FORTUNE NIGHT
PLAYS AT 9:00 P.M.
On the Screen:
DOUBLE FEATURE!
Kerwln Mathews
Kathryn Grant In
"The 7th Voyage of Sinbad"
In Technicolor I
Lee J. Cobb In
"THE GARMENT JUNGLE"

Quote Unquote

MALDEN, Mass.-Mrs. Michael
Ferrangamo, otherwise known as
Dancing Dotty, on her Bikini-clad,
backyard dancing:
"T a t general public wants
rhythm, spice and aliveness. And
men like clothes as tight as pos possible."
sible." possible." WASHINGTON- AFL-CIO Vice
President James B. Carey, charg charging
ing charging that President Eisenhower
misrepresented the labor picture
in calling for a labor reform bill:
"I certainly thought there were
enough big businessmen in the
present administration that Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower wouldn't have to get the
Chamber of Commerce to write
his . anti-union speech."
WASHINGTON Chairman J.
William Fulbright of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee urg urging
ing urging that the State Department re refuse
fuse refuse to cooperate in filming the
movie "The Ugly American"
which is critical of U.S. foreign
aid in Southeast Asia:
"It is apparently enough for the
producers that they can make
money out of it even at the cost
of their country."
AYR, Scotland The Rev.
Grorgc Irving of the Fundamen Fundamental
tal Fundamental Presbyterian Church in wel welcoming
coming welcoming President Eisenhower to
the church:
"We pray your stay will help
you better to bear the burdens of
your high office."
New York, Miami
On Films Tonight
At Balboa JWB
Two travel films are included
tonight in the USO-JWB's "Arm "Armchair
chair "Armchair Tour." Through the courte courtesy
sy courtesy of Pan American Airways, to tonight's
night's tonight's adventure will take you on
"Wings Over New York" and down
to "Miami Crossroads."
All servicemen and their fami families
lies families as well as the general pub public
lic public of the Canal Zone and Pan a
ma are invited to attend. Cur Curtain
tain Curtain time ii 7:30 p.m.

Police Bring In 17 -Year-Old
In NTs Latest Teen Murder

NEW YORK, Sept. I. (UPI) -Police
questioned a 17-year-old
suspect today in this city's latest
case of Teenage murder.
The victim was tentatively 1 1-dentified
dentified 1-dentified as Thomas Jordan, 28,
was chased about four blocks,
then stabbed to death by a Teen Teenager
ager Teenager oa the Lower East Side, ac ac-cordinm
cordinm ac-cordinm W a -traVdrifrt? who wit witness
ness witness tiM slaying. The suspect, Ro Ro-miro
miro Ro-miro Roman was picked up after
the cabbie pointed him out to po police
lice police on a Lower East Side street street-corner
corner street-corner near the scene of the stab stabbing.
bing. stabbing. Roman denied the slaying. He
told police he came here from Pu
erto Rico three months ago and
has been employed as a delivery
boy, police said the crime appa apparently
rently apparently had no Teen gang connec connection.
tion. connection. Roman was arrested on the eve
of a top-level conference on the
growing juvenile crisis. Scheduled
to meet today were Gov. Nelson
A. Rockefeller, Mayor Robert F.
Wagner and 24 officials and ci civic
vic civic and religious leaders.
Police meanwhile pressed a step-
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Susan Hayward "SORORITY GIRL"
"I WANT TO LIVE" '1 Shot Wiry The Kid"

Constitutional Amendment To Insure
Voting Rights Proposed By Commission

WASHINGTON (UPl)-The Civil
Rights Commission recommended
today that the federal government
be allowed to take over voter reg registration
istration registration at the local level when
necessary to halt discrimination.
Three of the six members also
proposed a constitutional amend
ment designed .to guarantee vot
ing rights, along with suggested
steps to combat discrimination in
education and housing.
The commission included 13 spe specific
cific specific recommendations in a com comprehensive
prehensive comprehensive report to Congress and
President Eisenhower on work
done since its creation in 1957. The
group will cease to exist 60 days
from today unless Congress votes
to extend its life.
Member John S. Battle, former
governor of Virginia, dissented to
several of the proposals, and in
a brief accompanying statement
expressed disagreement with "the
nature and tenor" of the entire
report.
The proposed constitutional
amendment would limit the re requirements
quirements requirements states can make for
voter registration. Two members
dissented in a special statement,
and Battle endorsed their objec objections.
tions. objections. Battle was the only dissenter on
the federal registrtion proposal.
The report voiced particular
concern over discrimination
against non white voters. "Our
investigations have revealed. ..that
many Negro american citizens find
it difficult, and often impoosible,
to vote," it said.
In the field of education, the
commission urged that it be al
lowed to function as a clearing
house and advisory agency on
school Integration provided Con Congress
gress Congress keeps it in existence. It also
called for improved methods of
gathering statistics on the number
and race of students.
Taking note of the major role
the federal government plays in
public housing, the report asks
that the President order all de
partment; dealing in this field to
ped-up campaign of arrests that
has netted at least 304 youths
since last Tuesday. They also
moved to expand their informa information
tion information of the city's street gangs
which have been involved in the
siayings of four Teenagers with within
in within the last week.
Police commissioner Stephen P.
Kenedy:4rdered every5 man in
the department to dig up infor information
mation information about the gangs, their
members, the gang hangouts, and
which gangs were most liable to
clash.
Kennedy's department directive
pointed out that "proper intelli intelligence"
gence" intelligence" on the gangs was essen essential
tial essential to taking "appropriate law en enforcement
forcement enforcement counter measures."
K 1 v
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Clark Gable
Burt Lancaster in
"RUN SILENT, RUN DEEP"
Cornel Wilde In
"STORM FEAR"
THEATERS TODAY
DIABLO HTS. 7:00
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Wed. "7th Voyage of Sinbad"
GAMBOA 7:00
"Bell, Book and Candle"
Wed. "Female Jungle"
GATUN 7:00
"THE LASTHURRAH"
Thursday "Cop Hater"
AIR-CONDITIONED
' 7:00 p.m. Only!
WEDNESDAY U-

reshape their policy to guard
against discrimination.
Vice Chairman Robert G.

Storey, dean of Southern Metho Methodist
dist Methodist University law school, dis dissented
sented dissented to this and other state
ments in the report with regard to
housing. Battle and former Flor-
ida Gov. Doyle E. Carlton shared
his views.
The commissioners reported ex extensively
tensively extensively on their study of voter
registration procedures, particu particularly
larly particularly in Alabama and Louisiana.
Those two states "led in the num number
ber number of voting complaints received,"
they said, and gave the least co cooperation.
operation. cooperation. "It has become apparent," the
inadequate to assure that all our
qualified citizens Shall enjoy the
right to vote."
Under the key voter proposal,
machinery for federaj interven intervention
tion intervention could be set in motion by
nine or more persons complain complaining
ing complaining of having been denied the
r'ght to vote on a discriminatory
If ris.
The complainants would submit
affidavits to the President, who in
turn would refer them to the
Civil Rights Commission. If the
commission found the complaints
to be valid, the President then
would appoint any local federal
official in the affected county or
district to step in as resistrar.
The federal official would han handle
dle handle these duties until the Presi President
dent President saw fit to return registration
to local control.
Other proposals on voting:
Compilation by the Census Bu Bureau
reau Bureau of nationwide figures on
registration and voting, including
race, color and national origin of
all individuals.
A law requiring states to pre preserve
serve preserve registration records for five
years, during which time they
would be subject to public inspec inspection.
tion. inspection. An amendment to the section of
the Civil Rights Act which for forbids
bids forbids action designed to deprive
anyone of voting rights. It would
extend the provision to cover dis discrimination
crimination discrimination through failure to
carry out a public duty.
Authorization for the commis commission
sion commission tQ apply directly to a federal
court for aid in enforcing a sub sub-pena,
pena, sub-pena, rather than making such
application of those qualifications.
A literacy test, one of a num number
ber number of requirements imposed by
the various states, apparently
now provides the chief means of
barring voters "where there is a
will to discriminate," the report
said.
IDRIVE-IN 1
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Will ROGER, Jr. in
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In their statement ot dissent to
the amendment proposal. Storey
land Carlton expressed belief that

the other recommendations would
be sufficient to enforce equal
treatment, and that such an
amendment would create prob-
lems in federal-state relations.
The members were evenly split
on a proposal that the federal
that the federal government re require
quire require guarantees of equal oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity before granting money to
institutions of higher learning.
This was suggested by Chair Chairman
man Chairman John A. Hannah, president
of Michigan State University; the
"IGUANA GO HOME" Let Letting
ting Letting out a yell, 6-year-oljJ
Michael Hughes of Brooklyn,
N.Y., has a monster on hU
mind. Actually, he is just kid kidding
ding kidding around and usin an igu iguana
ana iguana lizard for a hat
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INDEPENDENT NEWS REEL IN COLORS
WITH VIEWS OF THE CARNAVALITO

LAST DAY!
2:05 4:05 (1:30
.75 .40
9:00 p.m.
BINO CROSBY
DEBBIE REYNOLDS
ROBERT WAGNER in
CAV Alir mn
Jm I Ullb run
h fmisi Shaggy

r

t

Opens TOMORROW!

all about Wilby Daniels,
a teen-age boy
who turned into
a Bratislavian Sheepdog
to the Hilarious

M tatheHilarious Ttif I

Horror of hi
friends and
family!

libit Dloneyb

FredMacMURRAY-Jeai

TOMMY KIRK ANNETTE FUNICOLO
TIM C0NSI0INE-KEVIN r CORCORAN

1)

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r : ...j. an

Rev. Thesdore M. Hesburgh, pet pet-id
id pet-id ent of Notre Dama University,
and George M. JohnsOn, Uw pro professor
fessor professor at Howard Univeriity.
Storey, Battle and Carlton objected
on grounds that education might
suffer, and that guarattg Zm

cufij mrvuuu U11UCI law OTUU19
remain solely a judicial function.
Recommendations on housing
primarily concerned a change of
federal policy designed to mar-
antee equal opportunity for all
races, and suggestions that local
.. .u .. Li 1 ,

ouinui uirg sfi up Di-racial puwis
to work out housing problems.
Storey, Battle and Carlton
pressed the view that the recom recommendations
mendations recommendations were keyed to inte integration,
gration, integration, rather than housing, and
if carried out might result In
"dissension, strife, and even violence."

Inspector Reports
Jayne Mansfield
Kept Son Up Late
BLACKPOOL, England (UPI)
Inspector Frank Sevier of the Na National
tional National Society for the Prevention
of Cruelty to Children says he'll
report Jayne Mansfield to his su superiors
periors superiors for keeping her baby up
too late.
Miss Mansfield opened Black Blackpool's
pool's Blackpool's Illuminations Saturday
night. Eight-month old Miklos waa
there, along with strongman hus husband
band husband Mickey Hargitay. Miklos
stayed up until 10 p.m.
"No child of that age should
take part in publicity stunts, es especially
pecially especially at that time of night,"
Sevier said. He said he was for.
warding a report to his London
headquarters.
"I'm sure they loved seeing
him," Jayne said. Her husband
said Miklos had slept all day be
fore his late night.
Mr In ClnemaScop
lilt Color by DeLUXE
dog smy ever told.
ntuiy

HA6EN Li

-mTmxv m am mm mm

ft -Irigk



TEX PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER fc'IMf
LEADING
HITTERS
(Bated on 350 official at bats)
National League
earns Gallop Past Labor Day
Milestone With Good Leads
V- Edrtor:;C0NRAOO 5 ARC E AN"-

PAS I SIX

History,

Oddsmakem Favow

...

, r f I w jf.T .?

By TIM MORIARTY
NEW YORK, Sept. 8 (UPI) The Chicago
White Sox and San Francisco Giants, frisky front front-runners
runners front-runners in the major league pennant races, galloped
past the Labor Day marker with history and the
oddsmakeri on their side.

During the lit 10 years only
on American League team
(Cleveland in 1955) faltered in
the! itretch after leading the field
on. Labor Day. In the National
League, the Labor Day pace-setter
hai appeared ii the World Se Se-rie
rie Se-rie aeven times in the last dec decade
ade decade The "quitters" were the
Braves in 1956, the Dodgers in
1951, and the Cardinals in 1949.
Broadway oddsmakers also feel
certain now that it will be a
White Sox-Giants World Series.
In their revised quotations, they
listed the Chisox as whopping 10 10-1
1 10-1 favorites for the American
League flag and pegged the Giant
at 3-1 in the N.L. The odds a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the Dodgers and Braves
catching Bill Rigney's sluggers
ire 5-1.
The Whit Sox maintained the
4 1-2 game lead over Cleveland
yesterday by downing the Kansas
City Athletes twice, 2-1 and 13-7,
while the Indians swept their ho holiday
liday holiday twinbill with the Detroit
Tigers, 15-14 and 6-5. The Wash
ington Senators clubbed the Balti Baltimore
more Baltimore Orioles, 8-1, in 10 innings
after dropping the opener, 7-0,
and the Boston Red Sox whipped
the New York Yankees in a sin single
gle single game, 12-4.
In the N.L. race, Sam Jems
pitched mo Giants to a 4-1 vic victory
tory victory ovor tho Cardinals. The
Braves tied the Dodgers for
Mcond place, thro games back
of San Francisco, by taking i
riir from tho Pirates, 5-1 and
1, while Los Angeles ripped
the Cubs, 7-1 and the Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia Phillies downed the Cin Cincinnati
cinnati Cincinnati Reds, 4-4, in single
game.
Ted Kluszewski had a big hand
In both White Sox triumphs. The
husky National League castoff
jingled home a key run in the
opener and then drove in five
i ns with two homers and a sac sacrifice
rifice sacrifice fly in the nightcap.
Billy Pierce, making his first
itart tine suffering a bruised
hip three weeks ago, limited K.C.
to five hijs before giving way to
Turk Lown In the seventh inning
of the opener. Al Smith and Jim
Rivera also homered for the
White Sox in the second game.
The Indians won both their
games with three-run, ninth-inning
rallies, in the opener, Jim
Piersall singled home the tying
and winning runs on Jim uun
ning after the Indians had trail-1
SMU's Superb
To Passing Of
Editor Not: Thit It the
first of oight ditpatchot tiling
wa tho college football protpectt
if various aoctiont of tho na nation
tion nation for tho 1959 toaten.
(Tho Southwest)
By ID PITI
DALLAS, Tex. (UPI)-outhern
Methodist' superb balance
geaUed to the passing of Don
Meredith and the speed and shift shiftiness
iness shiftiness of a fleet of fine backs
projects coach Bill Meek's Mus Mustangs
tangs Mustangs to the extremely delicate
position a.s Southwest Conference
football favorite.
But, if it wasn't for Meredith's
maneuverings, SMU would be
rated "Just another good football
team," probably no better than
fn even choice with talent-loaded
exas Christian, the defending
champion, and only a step ahead
Of an experienced University of
Texaa.
These three clubs aland out
bead and shoulders above the
rest of the field on paper. But,
pat history of the turbulent
Southwest indicates that fourth
and fifth-ranked Rice and Arkan Arkansas
sas Arkansas might easily slip into the
throne room, or that lowly-regarded
Texas A and M or Baylor
could turn the trick without in inflicting
flicting inflicting too great a shock.
If Meredith remains shockproof
-and he is husky enough at 195
pounds, SMU conceivably could
mow down everything in sight, in including
cluding including Georgia Tech, Navy and
Missouri outside the loop, and bid
for the mythical national cham championship.
pionship. championship. Meek has such proven runners
aa Glynn Gregory, Tirey Wile Wile-mon,
mon, Wile-mon, Billy Polk, Frank Jackson
and Jimmy Welch, all of whom
double as excellent receivers with
ends Henry Christopher, Pat Neill
and Bud Jones.
U HAS MANY LITTERMEN
r And, from tackle to tackle,
Meek has two and three letter letter-men
men letter-men for every position, headed
by center Max Christian, guard
Bobby Loveless and tackle Gary
'Ferguson all well above 2(H)
'pounds and extremely mobile.
n If Larry Dawson had Hie prov proven
en proven ability of Meredith as a pass
r, coach Abe Martin's TCI)
champions probably would rate
vn higher than SMU. Dawson
.it a, tin runner and defensive
ait, but weak aerially.

rt hv as much as 12-4. Cleveland

used eight pitchers in the wild
contest which featured a total of
29 hits, including seven homers.
Ted Lepcio'a three-run homer
gave Detroit a 5-2 bulge in the
seventh inning of the nightcap
but the Indians again bounced
back in the ninth, scoring their
winning run on Vic Power's sac sacrifice
rifice sacrifice ily.
Rillv O'Dell -Ditched his second
straight shutout in the opener at
Baltimore, allowing only four hits.
The Senators won the nightcap
with a seven-run burst in the 10th
inning that featured home runs
by Roy Sievers and Kon aamiora.
Consecutive homers by Don
Buddin, pitcher Jerry Casale and
Pumpsie Green during a six-run
sppnnri inninff helDed the Red Sox
down the Yankees and thereby
clinch their first season series a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the Bombers since 1948.
Miekev Mantle and Andy Carey
homered for the Yanks.
Jonos struck out nino and
icattorod seven hits in handcuf handcuffing
fing handcuffing tho Cardinals for hit 19th
victory. Orlando Cepeda, who
collected throe hits to pace tha
Giant attack, singled homo tho
decisive run in tho sixth in inning.
ning. inning. Kon Rover of the Cards extend
ed his hittine streak through 25
games while the Giants' Willie
McCovey hit saiely in nis jum
straight.
Lew Burdette also registered
his 19th victory for the Braves,
halting the Pirates on six nits in
the opener, while Bob Buhl com competed
peted competed the sweeD with a neat sev
en-hitter. Hank Aaron, rookie Lee
Maye and Del Crandall nomerea
for Milwaukee in the first game.
Tho Rraves wraDDed ud the night
cap early with a three-run spurt
. i : i : r-. ;.,i
in me opening on dcuiuo uauicis.
Johnny Podres struck out 14
cub batters a career high for
the Dodger southpaw and al allowed
lowed allowed only six hits in posting his
13th victory of the campaign. Los
Angeles broke the game wide o o-pen
pen o-pen with four runs in the seventh
inning off Bob Anderson, who had
beaten the Dodgers four times
this season.
Dave Philley'i two-run homer
in the ninth inning sunk the Reds
at Philadelphia. Cincinnati had
tied the score at 4-4 in the sixth
on a home run by Willie Jones.
Wally Post also homered for the
Phils
Balance Geared
Don Meredith
Martin has lettermrn for his
first two units, several others to
spare and lost only three starters
from the outfit that won the title
and played the Air Force Acade Academy
my Academy to a 0-0 tie in the Cotton
Bowl. He has, by his own admis admission,
sion, admission, "real tough runners" in full fullbacks
backs fullbacks Jack Spikes and Merlin
Priddy, halfbacks Marvin lasa.ter
and Marshall Harris and Dawson.
The line, anchored on tackle
Don Floyd, is as big and tough
as they come, both defensively
and offensively.
Darrell Royal at Texas, who in included
cluded included a victory over alma mater
Oklahoma in a 7 3 season in 1958,
has 22 lettermen back from that
squad, plus some of the most tal talented
ented talented sophomore backs to hit the
campus in several lean years.
His backfield returns intact, but
quarterback Bobby Lackey might
lose his job to one of two sophs sophs-Mike
Mike sophs-Mike Cotten or James Saxton.
Halfback Rene Ramirez looms as
the offensive mainspring.
ENDS ARE GONE
From tackle to tavkle, Rice
might hold its own with the three
top outfits, but the ends are gone
and the backs appear just aver average.
age. average. The linemen are small, but
agile, al Arkansas, where Frank
Broyles has four of his nine top
backs who have broken 10 sec seconds
onds seconds flat on the 100-yard dash.
The Razorbacks will rely heavily
on untried manpower, but their
speed could prove disastrous on a
given good Saturday against even
the best of the opposition.
Coach Jim Myers al Texas
A a M still has pass happy Char Charlie
lie Charlie Milstead. And, that's warning
enougn tnat the Aggies can't be
taken lightly. But, the size and
depth just isn't there.
The Baylor football brochure
neatly wraps up the situation
there when it says, new
coach, a new offense and virtual virtually
ly virtually a brand new. football squad."
John Bridgers, the new mentor,
knew all that when ihe took the
job, however. And he isn't t o o
pessimistic.
Texas Tech doesn't start bid bidding
ding bidding for the championship uniii
I960. And, from the looks of
coach Dewitl Weaver's rosier o!
only 16 lettermen, it's a good
thing.

G Ab R H Pet.
Aaron, Mil. 135 552 103 198 .359
Cun, St. L. 129 413 57 143 .346
Pinson, Cin. 137 574 116 186 .324
Cepeda, S. F. 134 540 84 .175 324
Temple, Cin. 132 528 92 167 .316
Mathews, Mil. 129 521 99 164 315
Boyer, St. L. 135 511 75 161 .315
Robinson, Cin. 135 502 99 .158 .315
White, St. L. 133 501 72 152 .303
Hoak, Pit. 140 511 55 153 .299
Moon, L. A. 126 469 78 140 .299

American League
Kuenn, Det.
Kaline, Det.
Runnels, B.
Wood'g, Bal.
Fox, Chi.
123 495
120 456
132 503
127 398
139 562
120 441
132 534
133 508
106 389
115 442
91 175 .354
77 150 .329
83 160 .318
58 124
78 174
71 134
95 159
84 151
52 115
60 129
.312
310
304
298
297
296
292
Tuttle, K. C.
Power, Cle.
Minoso, Cle.
Cerv, K. C.
Kubek, N. Y.
Runs Batted In
National League
Banks, Cubs
Robinson, Reds
Aaron, Braves
Bell, Reds
Mathews, Braves
128
118
110
102
93
American League
Colavito, Indians
Jensen, Red Sox
Killebrew, Senators
Lemon, Senators
Maxwell, Tigers
102
100
98
88
87
Home Runs ;
National League
Banks, Cubs
Aaron, Braves
Mathews, Braves
Robinson, Reds
Boyer, Cards
40
38
36
34
27
American League
Colavito, Indians
Killebrew, Senators
Allison, Senators
Maxwell, Tigers
Lemon, Tigers
Held, Indians
40
39
29
28
28
28
LEADING
PITCHERS
(Bated on 14 or more decitions)
National League
W L Pet.
17 0 1.000
Face, Pirates
Antonelli, Giants
Newcombe, Reds
Conley, Phils
Law, Pirates
19
13
12
7 .731
7 .650
T .632
15 9 .625
American League
McLish, Indians
Shaw, White Sox
Pappas, Orioles
Wynn, White Sox
Lary, Tigers
17 7 .708
14 6 .700
14 7 .667
18 9 .667
17 9 .654
Military Personnel
Skindiving Course
Starts This Week
The Balboa Armed Services
YMCA will offer a new skindiving
course to military personnel, start start-ing
ing start-ing this month. The course will
involve ten sessions of instruction
and will be under the supervision
of Sgt. Willard Reese.
Registration for the classes will
be from September 16th through
22nd, at the "Y's" main desk, and
the physical requirements test will
be given on Wednesday, Sept. 23.
All students must present a com
pleted physical exam blank by the
23rd, which may be obtained when
registering for the course.
The skindiving course itself will
begin on September 28th and will
run through October 25th. There
will be two salt water sessions in
addition to regular sessions at the
"Y" pool, and the course will be
topped off by a field trip to the
ocean for those completing it.
Instructors will include outstand
ine persons in the fields of medi
cine, diving, engineering, and from
other walks of life. A limited num
her of civilians (over 18 yrs) may
be accommodated for the course,
provided there is room.
Registrations will be taken at
the Balboa YMCA starting Sep
tember 16th.
GAIN FINAL ROUND
HOT SPRINGS, Va. (UPI) -Don
O'Brien and Alfred Williams
of Richmond, Va., gained the fi
nal round of the Hot Springs In
vitationa.l golf tournament Sunday
by eliminating Roger Martino
and Jim Draper of Silver Springs,
Md., 1-up. Dr. Charles Nelson and
his son, Garnett, of Richmond de
feated George Morgan and Wil
liam Steele, 3 and 2, in the other
semifinal.
Rheumatism
wliaiiaver the palna of Khemnutlam,
Artfcrltli, Neiiritli, Lumbago, Hc.
atlca, stiff muaelea and iwollaa
inlntt miki you mtarabl, gat
:OMIND from your druggiat al
lira. ROMIND quickly hrlnga fan fan-tattle
tattle fan-tattle fallaf io yon can alaap, wortj
and lira In comfort. Don't matey
Oat KOMIND tooar.

RARE THRILLER Mar Bravo gets up In the closing, strides to nip Chacotero by -a head In
Sunday's first race while Festival (5) noses out Teloreo covered by Festival) in one of the
best finishes at the President Remon racetrack In a long while. Alejandro Ycaza rode the
winner, Victor Tejada had the leg up on Chactoero, Heliodoro Gustines on Festival and Ro Rolando
lando Rolando Cruz aboard Teloreo.
Vergniaux Upsets Entry mate

Palave In
r- r

1 1

m w? - ; w-

NAVY'S AIR ARMS Wayne Hardin, the new head coach,
"atchef Joe VtMhtoT tatt,- 3im Maxfleld throw passes
in pre-season practice at the United States Naval Academy.

U; vv M ... :A

SHARP STYLE Hanging on for all she's worth, Judy
Hoyer cuts a corner during a run over the water skiing slalom
course at Cypress Gardens, Fla. Miss Hoyer of Fresno, Calif., i
churns up spray as a stronu contender in, major tournaments, j

1 Jf
H ft -

DILLER HANOVER WINS HAMBLETONIAN-Diller Hanover crosses the finish line to win the 341!
anneal running, of ,tie Hambletonian at DuQuoin, 111. Driver is Frank Ervin. The 2-1 favorite won in
two straight heats. (NEA Telcphoto)

Labor Day

- A
t
-.irj? '.::;:.:-?'

4 V 1 .i .c.JP--.-- J

Handicap

The Haras Carinthia's entry of
Palave and Vergniaux finished
first and second in the featured
$750 six furlong Labor Day Hand Handicap
icap Handicap yesterday afternoon at the
President Remon racetrack. But
the winner, Vergniaux, surprised.
The entry went off the odds-on
mutuels favorite but mostly be because
cause because of the brilliant Palave,
which was fresh from five straight
victories. Stable-mate Vergniaux,
with apprentice Victor Tejada giv giving
ing giving him a creditable ride, took
command two furlongs out and
held on gamely in the stretch
when Palave challenged.
Coltro was third, Tatin fourth,
Gavilan fifth and Sputnik finish finish-ed
ed finish-ed last. Vergniaux' time for the
three-quarters of a mile was a
good 1:13 3-5 over a strip that
was slowed up somewhat by a
heavy shower that fell before the
running of the seventh race,
Formful racing prevailed but
an Haras Carinthia race, Carca Carca-man,
man, Carca-man, sprung the day's major sur surprise
prise surprise by winning at $32 straight
odds in the seventh race. Victoria
Regina combined with Carcamar
for a $521.20 double payoff.
Amado Credidio was the day's top
rider with three victories. He
scored with Michaux, Victoria Re Regina
gina Regina and Vespucio. Leading jockey
oiauiio jjaeza won two wnile run run-nerup
nerup run-nerup Heliodoro Gustines saved
himself from a white washing in
the last race aboard Highland
Prince.
Tbe dividends:
FIRST RACE
1. Last Dust $4.40, $2.80
2 Cordial $2.40
SECOND RACE
1. Reina Negra $7.00, $3.80
2. Arancel $5.60
FIRST DOUBLE: $18.40
THIRD RACE
1. Smart Catch $4.40
2, Calancha $12.40
FOURTH RACE
1. Chalia $3.40, $3.00
2. Folletito $4.20
QUINIELA: $13.00
FIFTH RACE
1. Michaux $9.00, $3.80
2. Account Rendered $3.20
SIXTH RACE
1. Victoria Regina $8.20, $3.60
2. Julio Verne $3,60
SEVENTH RACE
1. Carcaman $32.00, $12.40
2. Serres Road $9.80
SECOND DOUBLE: $521.20
EIGHTH RACE
1. Vespucio $5.00, $3.60
2. Mauricio $4.80
QUINIELA: $46
NINTH RACE
1. Guadalcanal, $9.20,
2. Lobn $5.60
ONE TWO: $49.20
$7.20
TENTH RACE
1. Vergniaux $3.00, $3.00
2. Palave $3.00
ELEVENTH RACE
1. Highland Prince $7.20, $4.60
z. Damamana $13.00
ONE TWO: $25.60

National LeagW
TEAMS f
San Francisco
Los Angola
W L
77 60
74 a
74 A3
71 68
65 70
66 71
64 75
59 10
Per.
.562
.540
.540
Jll
.483
.482
.460
.424
GB
J
3
7
11
11
14
19
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Cincinnati
St. Louis J
Philadelphia
Today's Games
Open date.
Yesterday's Result
St. Louis 100 100 0002 T 1
San Francisco rO0Q102 lOx 4 10 2
GiDSOn.r fl-5). Mtf Daniel anH
Smith.
S. Jones fl9-121 and Landrith
Hegan.
(First Game)
Pittsburgh 100 000 000 1 6 1
Milwaukee 211 100 OOx 5 15 0
Friend (8-17), PorterfMd, Kline,
Gross and Burgess.
Burdette (19-14) and Crandall.
(Second Game)
Pittsburgh 100 000 000-1 7 D
Milwaukee 300 001 OOx 4' 6 1
Daniels (7-9). Green. Face and
Foiles.
Buhl (12-9) and Crandall.
Philadelphia 200 002 002 C 14 0
Cincinnati 000 031 0004 11 2
Robinson, Gomez (3-8) and Sa-
watski, Lonnett.
Newcombe, Pefia (4-8) and Bai
ley.
(Night Game)
Chicago
Los Angeles
Hot Bisons, Jets
Favored In
Opening Playoffs
NEW YORK, Sept. 8r(UPI) r
The Buffalo Bisons and the Co Columbus
lumbus Columbus Jets, the International
League's two hottest clubs, are
favored to win the opening-round
series in the triple A circuit's, play
offs which get underway this week;
The Bisons, who clinched their
first pennant in 10 years last week
made it 10 victories in their final
12 games yesterday : by beating
the last-place Toronto Maple Leafs
2-0, The Jets, who won II of their
last 12 games, posted a 5-4 win
over the Richmond Virgianians,
their opening round opponents in
the playoffs.
Havana, the .fourth club In the
playoffs, defeated Miami, 4-2, and
Rochester downed Montreal, 7-4,
in other final regular aeason
games.
Buffalo, paired against third third-place
place third-place Havana in the playoffs,
won on the four hit pitching of
Warren Hacker, who wound up
with a 9-8 won-lost record. Bobby

Unforgettable Moments In Sports

thmmtos Hemorables

If o &

Just as in war, science, arts
has captured the highlights of
An Interesting rnllMlmi. nf

. -' m Kuv iiiumciiis lit. ajiurto W
of the last few decades has been prepared especially by Life--'
Magazine for the Gillette Safety Raxor Company, lonr Identic
fled with sports throughout the world.
These great moments have been captured by thl tmti$'
lens of leading sports photographers. The never-to-be forgotten
great moments in baseball, boxini;, golf, bnll-fighting and other' M
sports have been dramatically recorded. Among them are the-'
photos of, such memorable events as the famous, "long-count"
In the Tunney-Dempsey light 1 Babe Ruth's farewell aopear aopear-ance
ance aopear-ance at Yankee Stadium, and others.
This book, is yours free with the purchase of a Gillette TvU
one piece Raior now i available everywhere in the Republle
of Panama for limited time only.

American League 5

TEAMS
Chicago .
Clovoland
Detroit
Now York
Baltimore
Boston
Kansas City
Washington
W L Pef.
IS ML .620
:. M 56
69-69
68 69
6 69
64 74
59 76
56 12
.588
4r
iii
17
id
500
.489
.489
.464
.437
2T
.406 29!
Today's Games
Kansas City at Chicago (N)
Only game scheduled. ,-4
Yesterdays Results
Kahsaa Cltyr;'; 0fw;oiov()Ottit;vT ri
uucago -i.. 002 000 OOx-2 8
Garver (M2f and House.
Pierce (13-13), Lown and Lollar,
(Second Game) J
Kansas Citv 22n ann mn 7
Chicago 016 203 01-1J 13 1
Tsitouris, Tomanek (0-1), Grim,
Dickson. Kileon and H. Smith.
Latman. Mnnre KtnW .,
' J w uy u
nomano, jLouar.
(First Gama
Detroit 141 600 20014 13 0
Cleveland 220 053 00315 is n

Foytack. Morean Siw Bun. 4

ning (15-11) and Wilson.

.9
Garcia, McLish, Perry, Cicotte,
Score, Ferrarese, Bell,. Locke (3-2)
and Fitigerald.
(Second fiinul k

Detroit 100 010 300-5 8 l'
Cleveland 020 000 103 0.1..'

Narleski. Biirnsid n.!n sid
and Wilson.
Smith r..( T ..1
uiiiiiu. uiauL. kh'kp i.arpii i j-
5) and Rrnwn
" Flrat (lnmm

Washington. 000 000 0000 4 2
Baltimore 111 000 40x 7 11 0

Kemmerer IH.IRIT Stnhhc ririn.i

v.iggo
and Korcheck.
u dcu (9-10) and Ginsberg.
(Saeonrf GamaV" if.
Washington 000 001 oWf-i 10
Baltimore 000 000 001 01 10 2
Fischer. Hyde. Woodeshiek (1-4V.

Griggs and Courtney, Korcheck,?.;

Fischer. Loes. Wilhelm 1 13-11).
Hoeft, Jolihson and Triando's,
Ginsberg. ...y
New York

013 000 000 -4 I t

Boston nn nnn 2v-
x 12 14 0

Maas (12-7). Turlevf Grba..BlavJJ.

lock and Berra.'Blanchard.
Casale (10-8). Fornieles ahd

White. .1,

Del Greco's 21st home run with n
ho one aboard in the seventh iw-
";ns was all the help the veteran
Hacker needed; '
Paul Giel, the former Giants be

nus pitcher, settled down after
a shaky start to post his fourth
victory against five defeats for tmj
Jets. Bob Thorpe's bases-full hom
run in the third, his seventh, wW
the game's biggest hit. 1
and personal JiVs. Bhotoaraphy
exciting sports.
t. ....! u

'-I

'?'



TTX8DAT. lEPTCMBCX I, UK

m PANAMA AMERICAN AN WBIFEJfDEJJT DAILY VYWIPAFD
PAG I SIVEN
US Overwhelms Pan-American Games Opposition; Not Much Competition

V"' ski
J' l
... '?wJi

DOWN, DOWN, DOWN Eddie Machen, ranking chal-

lenger, looms over Liarvin lawyer as tne iNew i otk neavy neavy-weight
weight neavy-weight plunges to the canvas in the eighth round of a fight
Is Fresno, Calif. Sawyer was up and down like a yo-yo,

being floored four times in

by
JOE WILLIAMS

In his uncustomary, ra.ther awk awk-ard
ard awk-ard role as a World Series neutral,
Mr. C. Dillon Stengel continued to
talk of his currently favorite bah
club, the White Sox, and his favor
We manager, Al Lopez.
"I already told you about their
ttam speed and how they make il
work for them. Now let's talk
about fome of their men that
make it work best. Naturally, you
ttart with their second baseman.
Lius Aparieio (or Appeyrichie, in
Stengelese.)
"II he gets his lead, and it don t
kave to be more'n average, there
tint nobody can stop him. Our
r v; nr-ra i a nrsttv fair
catcher, with a pretty fair arm,
yet I've seen him call for pitchouts
and itill miss him a foot or
mort."
What makes the White Sox short-atop-such
an exceptional base
atealer?
"Because he starts fast. Swoosh!
And he's off. Most runners have to
run-20, 30 feet before they reach
top. (Deed. This little squirt (5.8,
155) takes one step, and, swoosh!"
Aparicio, a native Venezuelan, is
IB, a White Sox farm product, with
ftv years pro experience, six
counting this one, his fourth in the
majors. His "swoosh" first at attracted
tracted attracted attention with Memphis
When he led the Southern Assn.
with 48. He led the American
League in '56, '57, '58, and is again
far out in front.
"They tell me Lopez lets him
run on his own," said Mr. Stengel,
"which, when you have a runner
that studies the pitchers and 'catch 'catchers
ers 'catchers and is not a showboat that runs
Just to show he can run, is the
intelligent thing for a manager to
do, which i what Lopez is, and
which ii not surprising, if you re remember
member remember h caught for me when I
wis managing Brooklyn.
LIKI JOE DIMAGGIO
It W not unusual for a team to
have two or three fast men. What
makes th White Sox unusual is
that every regular, except Nellie
Fox, their second baseman, is a
Grade-.A iwiftle, and most ot uiem
like Cliff (Earl) Torgeson, their
first baseman, are faster than their
league nvls correspondingly em employed.
ployed. employed. Mr. Stengel resumed.
"Now the have anotlher fella
ut in center field, which I hear
k called The Judge, because his
name is Landis, Jim Landis, and
if he is not as fast as the squirt
going to second, he is faster going
from first to third in tact, mere
ar very few in baseball that are
as fast.
"I would say this fella Is the
most improved, and also the most
underrated, player they got. There
Is nothing he can t do. Besides,
being fast, he has a fine arm, gets
the timely hit and is amazing
with the glove. He makes hard
catches look easy, like Joe Di Di-Maggio
Maggio Di-Maggio did, and when you say
that, you have nothing else to
aay."
Perhaps you or I wouldn't have,
but Ole Case would and did. .
"This is not a great team, not
even a sound one, because they
have a third-base problem. But it
team that plays together well,
with what football people call 'de 'de-tire,'
tire,' 'de-tire,' and their manager manipul manipulates
ates manipulates them so he gets 100 percent
result. If you want the real tipoff
an how well this team has been
managed I will give it to you."
We waited with bated breath, al always
ways always an agonizing position sicken sickening
ing sickening to contemplate, too, yet one
which long experience has proved
most rewarding in moments of
profounds expentancy.
"You never see 'em miss a sig signal,"
nal," signal," confided Mr. C. Dillon Stenel
winking conspiratorially.
LIKI A STRING-SAVER
The wav the National Leamie

losing a 10-round decision.

1 the Dodgers sihould win, and Mr.
Stengel was on record as rating
(lie White Sox over either of them
in the World Series. ."Which, be because
cause because of certain unfortunate cir circumstances,
cumstances, circumstances, I will have to pay to
see, but which I feel will be worth
the money."
One of the attractions Ole Case
looks forward to is Lopez' handling
of the team. ."Lopez is a de defensive
fensive defensive manager. 1 believe he
would rather have this kind of
team than a lot of muscle guys.
He's a stringsaver at heart and U
a player has a small talent he will
find a way to make it work for
him.
- ."A defensive manager nlavs tn
keep you from scoring. He gives
you noimng ana takes everything
he can; he waits for you to make
a mistake and turns it to his ad advantage.
vantage. advantage. Of course, a defensive
manager has to have strong pitch pitching.
ing. pitching. Lopez has the pitching and
maneuvers it with skill. He's even
got that Dick Donovan winning for
him."
Mr. Stengel's expressive shrug
implied that in itself was nnitp
enough to put the leading citizen
oi lampa in tne Hat of Fame.
Labor Day Weekend
Provides Olmedo
Plenty Of Work
FOREST HILLS, N.Y. (UPI)
This was really labor week for
Alex Olmedo, the usually inscru inscrutable
table inscrutable Inca, as he labored with his
tennis and his temper in an effort
to capture the U.S. amateur ten tennis
nis tennis crown
"The chief," whose game re recently
cently recently went bad and thereby
helped lose the Davis Cup to Aus Australia,
tralia, Australia, was struggling to recap recapture
ture recapture his touch as he led the way
into the third round of the na nationals.
tionals. nationals. But he was having just
as much trouble with his emo emotions.
tions. emotions. "Be quiet, will you, please"
the Wjmbledon champion shouted
furiously' at the gallery Sunday
during his arduous 7-5, 6-4, 6 8,
6-2 win over veteran Herbie
Flam.
Glowering and scowling, he
went on to victory over the one onetime
time onetime "boy wonder" from Pasa Pasadena,
dena, Pasadena, Calif.
Big Barry MacKay of Dayton,
Ohio, blasted his way forward
with a 6-3, 6-2, 6 4 triumph over
46-year-old Gardnar Mulloy.
But it was becoming more and
more evident that there was a
distinct possibility of the first all all-foreign
foreign all-foreign finals in both men's and
women's singles in 26 years.
For advancing with Peru's Ol Olmedo
medo Olmedo and MacKay were such in invaders
vaders invaders as Australia's Neale Fras Fras-er,
er, Fras-er, Roy Emerson and Rod Laver;
India's threatening Ramanatban
Krishnan and Chile's Luis Ayala.
Meanwhile, in women's singles
three foreign seeds led the way
inlo the third round in search of
the crown abdicated by Althea
Gibson.
This trio Included
Sandra Reynolds of SouUi Africa,
third-ranked Christine Truman,
the Six-foot tepn.airpr frnm f.ra.l
Britain, and England's Ann Hay Hay-don
don Hay-don while going along with
them went Panama's Dorothy
ncHa ivnoae.
BOUCHEI SIDELINED
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) -First
baseman Ed Bouchee of the Phil
adelphia Phillies is exnwleH tn
be sidelined two or three Hnvn
with an ailment the team physi
cian magnosea as aiapragmatic
pleurisy." Bouchee left with hi
teammates on a western trip
starting today.

No Test For
US Chances
In Olympics

CHICAGO, Sept. 8 (UPI The
third Pan American Games turned
out to be an overwhelming triumph
for the United States, but didn't
turn out to be much of a testing
ground for its 1960 Olympic chanc chances.
es. chances. Pilina up 121 gold medals f
th 144 up for decision, th U.S.
crushed tho opposition from 23
othtr nations from tho wostorn
homisphoro in tho Gims which
closed yesterday but it wasn't
as glittering a triumph as the fi
nal count indicated. I
Charles McCaffree coach of the
U.S. men's swimming team, sum
mer it up when he said:
"There was so little real com competition
petition competition that I had a terrific time
keeping our boys in top shape.
sure, we set a lot of records, but
we're still behind the Japanese and
Australians."
Other U.S. Pan American coach coaches,
es, coaches, while lauding the performanc
es of their teams, also discounted
the star spangled victories. In
track and field, the U.S. won 26 of
32 events, but Russia wasn't com competing
peting competing an dthe Soviet has been a
big thorn of the U.S. in that snort,
just as Australia and Japan have
been in swimming.
The Games wound up yesterday
when the U.S. won the Equestrian
Prix de Nations, its third gold
medal in the sport. Brazil was sec second
ond second and Cuba third.
It was tho only gold medal de decided
cided decided on tho final day and by
winning it the U.S. finished as it
started a victor. That was back
on Friday, Aug. II when Albert
Hall of South ington, Conn., won
the hammer throw, hours after
it was over because of one of the
many disputes which marked
the Games.
The U.S. final victory came easi easily.
ly. easily. It had wrapped up thi Grand
Prix before its final rider got on
his horse.
That's how it was all along.
When it was all oer in Soldier
Field, before a crowd of 5(1.000 on
a sweltering day, Mayor Richard
J. Daley officially proclaimed the
Games ended.
The Sports Patrol
ly STEVE SNIDER
NEW YORK (UPI) Every sec
lion of the nation has one or more
candidates for the 1959 college
football championship.
No two forecasters can agree.
but the "best bets" by sections
are running like this:
EAST Army or Navy.
MIDWEST Louisiana Stale or
Auburn.
SOUTH Texas Christian or
Southern Methodist.
SOUTHWEST Texas Christian
or Southern Methodist.
FAR WEST Southern Califor
nia or California.
Only 11 days hence the scram
ble opens in the sunnier sections
of the nation and it's no less than
proper that LSU, last vera's un
beaten champ, is on the firing line
the first week.
Louisiana State plays Rice at
Baton Rouge, La., the night of
Seot. 18.
LSU literally came out of no
where to win the national title last
year. The Bayou Bengals were
classed in advance, by the close
followers in their own section, as
rating somewhere about the mid
dle of the 12-team Southeastern
Conference.
But they soon broke out of the
middle" with a three-team sys
tern installed by coach Paul Diet
zel and picked up all the marbles
with a 10-0 record. Dietzel has all
but four of those squadmen back,
including the entire lineup of the
noted "Chinese bandits" whose
defensive heroics made them le legendary
gendary legendary stars instead of third third-stringers.
stringers. third-stringers. In some quarters, however, LSU
isn't even the favorite in its own
league this year. Many like Au
burn, unbeaten but tied last year
and noted for its free wheeling fe ferocity.
rocity. ferocity. In the East, Army and Navy
lost their head coaches Red Blaik
and Eddie Erdelatz but not their
role of favorites. Syrscuse lack!
the good "press" enjoyed by the
service academies but lust mleht
have a better football team.
Oklahoma rates its usual nlace
in the sun and won't have tn wait
Ion gbefore discovering its trup
strength. The Sooners ooen a!
Northwestern, a risine newer in
the Big 10.
Iowa's romp In the Rose Bowl
against California dazzled a flock
of forecasters who still like the
Hawkeyes despite dents by grad graduation
uation graduation and calssroom failures.
They'll get a tussle in the Big 10
from a gruop including Wisconsin,
Purdue, Ohio State, Northwestern.
Down in the Southwest, Texas
Christian is favored to repeat as
conference champ with a team
hailed as even better than '58.
However, repeaters are rare down
that way and since Southern Meth Methodist
odist Methodist has one of the nation's most
talented passers In quarterback

J' N)L s
hi

i .jiv.Viho otNm.h- ciii-los Yvilsuu i right) of Paraiso, pounds
Alfredo Estrada of Pariarna through the ropes during their
three-round amateur lightweight bout at the National Gym
Sunday night. Wilson, who took a unanimous decision win for
bis first Panama victory, sent his rival to the canva3 for man mandatory
datory mandatory eight-counts in the first and second rounds. In another
CZ-vs.-RP bout on the card, Paraiso's Clyde Thomas gained a
split verdict over Miguel Murillo. (Photo McCleait)

By OSCAR
FOREST HILLS, N. Y. (UPI)
The racket-swinging scandal at
the U.S. amateur tennis cham championships
pionships championships today is the Cavalier
manner in whicn Uncle Sain keeps
selecting his Davis Cup' captains.
Tiie post has become a politic!
plum within the framework ot
the U.S. Lawn Tennis Associa Association.
tion. Association. It's not what a maa knows
but who he knew.
The selections almost might be
made at King Arthur's Round Round-table,
table, Round-table, because it has become
strictly a matter of knighthood.
Knighthood, that is, for Austral Australian
ian Australian Davis Cup captain Harry
Hopman.
We have picked such a series
of "towel boys" non-tactical gen geniuses
iuses geniuses whose chief duty seems to
be handing our lads a towel to
wipe their frustrated brows that
we have made a net genius out
of Hopman. He works hard tac tactically
tically tactically at his job, jockeying his
players from the sidelines with
such effectiveness tiiat he ac actually
tually actually is being mentioned for nom nomination
ination nomination as "Sir Harry" on the
Queen's list.
JONES HAS STEPPED DOWN
Perry T. (for Towel) Jones
now has stepped down as the
non-playing U.S. captain having
blown the cup to Australia after
predicting a 5-0 U.S. victory. His
successor is expected to be Wil Wil-lia.m
lia.m Wil-lia.m Clothier III of Philadelphia.
This despite the fact that a bril brilliant
liant brilliant tennis man named Gardnar
Mulloy has been 'campaigning ac actively,
tively, actively, and hopelessly, for the
job.
Clothier is described as a cap captain
tain captain in "our tennis tradition."
His father was the national cham champion
pion champion in 1906. Bill also is charac-
Calienle Stewards
Bar Jockey From
Racing Permanently
AGUA CALIENTE, Mexico
Stewards of Caliente Racetrack
Sunday suspended jockey Arthur
Stone and recommended he be
barred from racing permanently.
The suspension, second in three
days, came after the 39-year-old
jockey failed to appear at a hear hearing
ing hearing called by the stewards after
a race-fixing and horse-doping
probe by the Los Angeles County
grand jury.
Jockey Arthur Anderson, 27,
Long Beach, was suspended Fri Friday.
day. Friday. Both Anderson and Stone
testified in the grand Jury investi investigation
gation investigation which brought indictments
against eight persons.
In suspending Stone, Caliente
stewards recommended the case
be referred to the National Rac Racing
ing Racing Commission of Mexico with
the stipulation that his license be
revoked and any further applica applications
tions applications for a license be permanent permanently
ly permanently denied.
Rulings by the National Racing
Commission are recognized by
major tracks in the United
States.
b wB2 Sportt Briefs AX B-7
1 1 AL I AN WINS TOURNEY
LACCO AMENO luchia Ttolv
(UPI) Nicola Pietmnpeli lt.
ly'a Davis Cup star, defeated
Britain's Michael Davie a.fi
6-4, Sunday to win the aecond
Laceo Ameno international tennis
tournament.
Don Meredith the Mudano r.
bracketed with TCU in the "most
likely'' class.
If LSU went to the tOD unherald
ed, one of the western powers
might do It, too. Southern Califor California
nia California l laid to be loaded in the line
and California wasn't exactly deci decimated
mated decimated hv eraduatinn thnuoli Ihp
loss of nlftv auarterhark
did hurt.

FRALEY

terized as a "nice guy" and "a
pretty good player.
It isn't enough.
We need a scheming, analyti analyti-c?.l
c?.l analyti-c?.l man with solid tennis know knowledge
ledge knowledge to counteract the sidecouil
piquing of a Hopman. The tact
that Clothier's father was a cham champion
pion champion more than a half venlury ;i;;o
won't mean, a Ihinj; when Kill
tells our young alhleles what and
why they are doing wrong,
FAVORS MULLOY
Mulloy is in the doghouse be because,
cause, because, two years ago, lie voted
against Jones as Davis Cup cap captain.
tain. captain. That was when they kicked
out Billy Talbert, a smart tennis
man who had succeeded Alriek
(Towelrack) Mann as captain.
The West Coast faction still is in
power, however, and will actually
decide that a man "in the tennis
tradition" gets the post.
Mulloy would be the smart
choice, or even Talbert, who
would welcome it back. Gar has
made tennis a career, winning
five U.S. doubles championships,
the seniors last year, appearing
in four Davis Cups and winning
the father-son title three years
which is a testimonial to his abil ability
ity ability to teach youngsters. At 46 he
has the settled sagacity and know knowledge
ledge knowledge to make the team tick.
And remember, it was losing
the doubles at which Mulloy is
an expert which cost us the cup
in our recent 3 2 defeat. Yet the
best Jones could do, according to
the frustrated Alex Olmedo, was
"offer me encouragement." But
nothing tactical as Hopman
moved !his players like a master
chess player.
With more of the same in slore,
it looks like Hopman is a cinch
to become "Sir Harry."
Why Wonder?
BE SURE!
with a
finstom
DRI CHARGED
BATTERY
oni
1 MINUTE OLD
WHEN YOU BUY IT!
Guaranteed!
At Your
SERVICE STATION
?ire$tone
Tel. 3-1501
Tr.tntNthmian Hiirhwav

Dewveall Looks Like
Offensive Weapon
Bears Need For Title

Willard Dewveall, a former all all-Southwest
Southwest all-Southwest Conference end from
Southern Methodist, .roks like the
offensive weaoon the Chicago
Bears need to dethrone the world
champion Baltimore Colts.
Dewveall snared iwo touchdown
tosses Saturday night to help the
Bears to a 52-14 exhibition victory
over the Washington Redskins. It
marked the second straight game
in which the ex Mustange soeed
ster had grabbed a pair of TD i
passes.
i
The victory was the foiirl.i in
a row for Chicago and kept the :
Bears on unbeaten terms with the
Colts in pre-season play.
All-pro fullback Jimmy Brown
finally got Cleveland on the right
track by leading the Browns to a
27-24 victory over the Los Angeles
Rams; the Chicago Cardinals beat
the San Francisco Foriy Niners, ;
27-24; and the New York Giants!
won their second s' raig.it with a
14-0 whitewash of the Green Bay
Packers in other Saturday action.'
Brown scored twice to pace
Cleveland to its first exhibition
victory. Lou Groza's two field
ijoals from the 17 and 24, helped
keep the Browns in iron;.
The Cardinals made it lour out
of five pre season wins as Bobbv
Joe Conrad accounted for 15 ot 1
Chicago's points on a touchdown,
two field goals and three perfect
placements.
The Giants stopped a Packer
team that had scored 45 points
the previous week. Halfback Alex
Webster scored both New York
touchdowns on plunges from the
one and two-yard lines.
Baltimore had kicked off the
week-end schedule by beating the
Pitlsburgh SJeelers, 30-21, on Fri Friday
day Friday night. Quarterback Johnny
L'mtas connected with three
touchdown passes to Lenny Moore
jiii give t.ie Colts their fourth
i straight exhibition win.
Sports Briefs
SOVIETS TOP ENGLAND
MOSCOW (UPI) Russia de defeated
feated defeated Britain, 205-136, during a
32-event weekend track and field
meet wilh Soviet women finishing
first in nine of 11 events and So Soviet
viet Soviet men winning 15 of 21 events.
YANKS RECALL PLAYERS
NEW YORK (UI
York Yankees have recalled pitch pitcher
er pitcher John Gau.cr
Gordon Windhorn from Denver of
the American Association and
have purchased the contract of
outfielder Ken Hunt, who hit .340
with Shrcveport of the Southern
Association this season.

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INTERNAL DE PUB1.1CACIONES No 3 Lottery Plaxa CASA ZALDO Central Ave. 43 LOUROES PHARMACY 1U U CamMDiuT HMAOl LBM.
BARDO -So. 26 "B" Street MORRISON 4th ot July Ave J St LEWIS SERVICE-Ave. TivoU No. 4 FARMAC1A ESTADmfil AVLl il
Ave. and n It. rL
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"SAS" Via Parraa 111 a NflVminre 1th ts
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IMh mni Amader Guerrero Ne. 14221 Tel. 431.

fACI UGHT

I i v v I II II 1 1 Ji rv i

I

Resorts

Foitcr'i cort,?i, near Santa
Clara Reasonable ratei. Phone
Balboa 1866
Baldwin'! furnished apartments
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Smith. Gamboa 302.
PHILLIP Oceantide Cortagea
Santa Ciara R 4 P. Pfcone Pa Panama
nama Panama -877 Critrobal 1-1673.
Houses
FOR RENT: Furnished four
bedroom residence, two master
bathrooms with hot water, two
miii) i room with service inside,
terrace with bar. garage, air con conditioning.
ditioning. conditioning. No. 12, 49th Street,
Bella Vista. Apply from 10 a m.
to 1 p.m. and from 4 p m to
7 p m
FOR RENT: Chalet Newly
constructed. Three bedrooms,
studio, garage, large fenced yard,
hot water. Calle G. Loma Alegre
phone Balboa 3228.
Personals
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211 CRISTOBAL. CI.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
TELEVISION AND RADIO
SERVICE Our new service plan
gives you faster, more econo economical
mical economical and better service Phone
2-1905 Crawford Agencies. Tivo Tivo-li
li Tivo-li Avenue.
U. S. TELEVISION
Means reliability, and lasting re repairs.
pairs. repairs. For better home service
call 3-7607 Panama from 9 a.m.
to 10 p.m. Saturday to 6 p.m.
Prc-;ct your home and proper property
ty property against Irticcf damage.
Prompt scientific treatment cn
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
-1

Services

Commercial Guide

ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
Ads only cost $0.85 per col. inch

I Ads accepted for a minimum of one month.

FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740

Canal Zone Society For
The Prevention Of Cruelty
To Animals
Box 246, Balboa. '. 7.
Phone: turundu .it 13
Call Iht arivirf number for
i Kittens. 1 malr. 2 females, Mark
and while, 2 mos. old
1 Female eal, hlark and white, 2
yrs. old.
SITPORT YOL'R SPC.V
YOl NF.F.D IT. IT NKF.DS YOU.
GIBRALTAR LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Jim Ridge
Harry Cornell
Davis Stevenson
Box E Diablo, C.Z.
Telephone Pan. 2-0552
KU KLUX SIGN
BIRMINGHAM. Ala. (UPI ) A
Kit Klux sign today greeted nic
torists at the Tarrant City li :!,
roar here. 11 was the fourth sncli
nijri put up in the state I'ccvrr'v
All the signs depict a wh:te ni ,!
man mounted on a horse and
waving a Confederate fUg. Tnr
others include two at hesspier
and one in Tusraloosa.
"Says he can' take our

ms Mark IV installation department
is booked solid all the rest of this week."
Cuardia A Cla S. A. Tel. 3.7225 Ext. 8 Panama City

Automobiles

FOR SALE: '51 M G -T D e
cedent condition, $800. Navy
3968 7 to 3:30. Navy 3077
FOR SALE: 1929 Ford, like
new, $125, truck body. Oken,
Balboa 1625
FOR SALE : 1 947 Buick sedan,
very good condition, $100 00.
Phone 2406, Balboa.
FOR SALE: 1952 Buick Super.
4 door, good condition. New
tires Duty paid. Call Welborn,
Gamboa, 6-152.
FOR SALE: Dodge Coronet
1957, low mileage, w s.w radio,
auto trans. Low mileage. Price
$1,800.00. Call 3 2733
FOR SALE: 1958 Chevrolet. 4
door, hard top, radio, w.s.w.,
Bel-Air, $1,900.00. 2-2893.
Wanted
WANTED: Vacation quarters,
Balboa area, responsible party.
Call Balboa 1473.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE: Lambretta"
scooter, perfect conditions
$225.00 cash. Contact Mr. Na Navarro.
varro. Navarro. Tel 3-0784 from 8:00 a.
m. to 5 :00 p.m.
Church Row Ends
As Father Shoots
His Mother-in-Law
MILWAUKEE (UPI) Police
today were holding a man who
admitted shooting his other-in-admitted
shooting his mother-intake
his children to church.
Thomas Rose, 48, gave that as
(lis reason yesterday for shooting
Mrs. Una Robinson, 64, in her
home. Hose's lour boys were liv living
ing living with ilieir grandmother be because
cause because Rose and his wife were
:
(740
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile How
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
We Certify
RADIO and TV
SRVIC
W rfTfy quolity port, onej irvx
. . fotr chargtM.
TROPELCO
Guaranty beal.
TROPELCO, S. A,
Tel. 3-7489

'J

car 'til next Monday!

Apartments

FOR RENT: Very cool and
comfortable one bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, San Francisco. Phone 3 -5024.
FOR RENT: Furnished and
unfurnished apartments. Alham Alham-bra
bra Alham-bra Apartments, 1 0th Street
8061 Tel. 1386, Colon.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, light, gas, telephone.
Phone 2-4462.
FOR RENT: Newly built apart apartment
ment apartment "Nuevo Campo Alegre" 3
extra large bedrooms, porch,
terrace, maid" s room, garage.
Ready mid September. Phone
2-3405.
FOR RENT: Comfortable apart apartment,
ment, apartment, residential area, private
entrance, porch, bathroom, refri refrigerator,
gerator, refrigerator, telephone, air condition conditioning,
ing, conditioning, only single person. Calle 16
and Ave. Tercera, Pa it i Ma 3 3-3516
3516 3-3516 FOR RENT: Modern three bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. Maid's room.
Hot water. Garage. Paitilla, 117,
14th Street.
FOR RENT: Modern three bed bedrooms
rooms bedrooms apartment, livingroom,
diningroom, balcony, maid's
room, hot water, garage, etc.
Building", Campo Alegre. $185.
Tel. 3-4994.
FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, living room, dining
room, kitchen, hot water, maid's
room, garage, etc. Via Argentina,
"Maruja House". $75. 00. Tel.
3 4994.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, suitable for two couples,
$80.00 per month. Also spaca
suitable for bachelor, apartment
or office. $50.00. Apply janitor
at Tl-132, 4th July Ave., or
phone Hopkins, Balboa 2966.
FOR RENT: Small clean airy
furnished apartment in El Can Can-grejo,
grejo, Can-grejo, reasonably priced. Tel. 3 3-5692.
5692. 3-5692. apply 2034 Sabanas.

Body Of Premier Duplessis

Flown To Quebec With Family

QUEBEC CITY (UPI) The
body of Maurice L. Duplessis, 69,
premier of Quebec since 1936, was
down here yesterday from the
mining community of Schefferville
where he died from a series of
cerebral hemorrhages.
Duplessis, regarded as one of
the most powerful politicians in
the history of Canada, died early
yesterday, shortly after midnight.
He had gone to Schefferville, 600
miles from here, to make a tour
of mining developments.
He had been in a coma most of
the time since he suffered the first
of five attacks on Thursday.
The body was accompanied here
in a mining company plane by
Legislative Councillor Gerald Mar Mar-lincau,
lincau, Mar-lincau, a long-time aide of the
premier, Duplessis' sister, Mrs.
Edouard Bureau, her son, Jacques
and a group of doctors and
nurses.
Paul Sauve, social welfare min minister
ister minister in Duplessis' National Union
Administration, said th premier's
oony would tie n state in the
legislature buildisg 'unitl this
afternoon, when it will be moved
NEWS
Scouts Send Thanks
To Balboa Lions
For Aluminum Cano
The Canal Zone Boy Scout Coun Council
cil Council has sent a special word of
thanks to the Balboa Lions Club
for an alumnum canoe the Lions
jgave to Camp Chagres.
In a letter written by Brig. Gen
George r Schlatter, president of
the Scout Council, the Lions insti institutional
tutional institutional representative, Joe Wertz
also was complimented.
After wxpressing thanks to the
club for the expensive canoe,
Schlatter wrote:
". .The work of the club has
been especially noteworthy in
.Scouting, s a sponsoring institu institution
tion institution for Pack 7. Troop 7 am
Post 7, the club has accepted and
carried out its responsibilities 'n
a wonderfully effective manner.
"Your institutional representat
ive. Joe Wertz, who is serving
as a member of the council exe executive
cutive executive board this year, has not
only represented your institution
well, but has kept us carefully
informed of your plans and needs
for better Scouting in your units.
Clambakes Feature
Labor Day Along
New England Coast
OLD SAYBROOK, Conn. (UPI)
There were clambakes galore
along the New Kngland shoreline
on Labor Day yesterday.
But the one in the seaside
town of Old Saybrnok was no
picnic.
New Haven Railroad traffic
was halted temporarily while vol
unteer firemen fought a blaze
thai baked thousands of clams in
a refrigerated car. I

Home Articles

FOR SALE : Refrigerator West West-inghouse,
inghouse, West-inghouse, 7 cu. ft. porcelain
throughout. 1 dining table, 8
chairs. Can be seen in House
8032-D. 2d. St. Margarita. Op Opposite
posite Opposite Post Office. Owner leaving
Zone. Tel. Cristobal 3-2143.
FOR SALE: Kenmore electric
dryer, good condition, RCA T.V.
need picture tube. A lb rook 86 86-6102.
6102. 86-6102. FOR SALE: Wall gun cabinet
$10; Singer sewing machine,
$25; platform rocker $30; small
mahogany book case, $26; two
end tables dark, $8; sofa with
pillows, $25; two budgybirds
with cage $12; corner bar $50.
Phone Balboa 2-3782.
FOR SALE: Kenmore Hi-Spaed
dryer. New condition $135.00.
Albrook 86-4109.
FOR SALE: Rattan furniture,
(I sofa, 2 chairs, three tables),
one China closet. Tel. 3-5395.
FOR SALE: Hollywood twin
beds for tale (21. Price $100.
Telephone 3-5089.
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, Hoov Hoover
er Hoover washing machine, four burner
gas stove, table with four chairs,
and metal ironing board. Call 3 3-5301.
5301. 3-5301. Boats & Motors
FOR SALE: IS1' ft. out outboard
board outboard cabin cruiser, 22 horse horsepower
power horsepower motor. A wonderful fish fishing
ing fishing and family boat, completely
equipped, licensed for 6. This
boat can be seen at Diablo Spin Spinning
ning Spinning Club. Must tell, if interest interested,
ed, interested, phone Balboa 2-3782.
FOR SALE; 16 ft. fiberglassed
boat. Champ tilt trailer, 50 h.p.
Evinrude, equipment, new condi condition,
tion, condition, sacrifice this week $1050
or best offer. Phone 2-2902,
5965-D, Diablo.
Archbishop maurice Roy, pri primate
mate primate of th Roman Catholic
Church irj Canada, will conduct a
brief ceremony. The premier's
body will then be taken in a mo motorcade
torcade motorcade to Three Rivers, his
hometown, where services are
scheduled for li a.m. Thursday.
Burial will be in the family plot.
Duplessis died in an Iron Ore
Company of Canada guest house
at Schefferville in the heart of the
ore-rich district he named "Unga "Unga-va"
va" "Unga-va" and sometimes called "New
Quebec."
Sauve, No. 2 man in the legis legislature
lature legislature and regarded by some as
Duplessis' probable political heir,
led a delegation of about 20 mem members
bers members of the provincial cabinet who
met the plane.
The bachelor Dremier. whn hart
rutea Canada's largest province
with a five-year break in opposi-
nuii umuijj worm war ii, was
Dorn April 20, 1890, in Three
Rivers.
During his political career, he
was described both as a saint and
a despot. He held nearly absolute
rule over his province by virtue
of heavy majorities. He had only
token opposition in the legislature
The premier had waged a run running
ning running battle with the federal gov government
ernment government over provincial rights
demanding decentralization of gov government
ernment government and a larger share of
taxes for Quebec.
Jap Government
Supreme Court
Clash Head On
TOKYO (UPI)-The government
clashed head-on in the Supreme
Court today with "no-war" advo advo-eales
eales advo-eales who claim U.S. security
forces are in Jipan illegally.
The Procurator-General's Office
asked the supreme tribunal to set
aside a lower court iudement that
declared the U.S. -Japan security
pact and U.S. security forces here
violated Japan's postwar
war" constitution.
no-
If the Supreme Court upholds
(he ruling of Tokyo District Court
Judge Akio Date, it could compel
the United States to withdraw all
its forces from Japan.
Last March 30 Date acquitted
seven left wing demonstrators
who broke past police cordons in into
to into the U.S. Tachikawa Air Force
Base two years ago in a protest
against requisitioning of land for
longor runways. His grounds were
that the security forces were
present in violation of the consti consti-tuion,
tuion, consti-tuion, so they could not be con convicted
victed convicted of trespassing.
A battery of three high officials,
led by Procurator-General Kuni Kuni-kazu
kazu Kuni-kazu Kihohara himself, charged
the Date ruling made "grave er errors"
rors" errors" in its interpretation of the
constitution.
The American troops did not
violate the constitution, they said,
because they are here to defend
Japan against attack, and posses
sion of defense potential is not
denied by the constitution.
Even if they did violate the
constitution, the prosecution said,
the courts of Japan had no au authority
thority authority In rule on their constitu constitutionality,
tionality, constitutionality, i

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Aged natural ma manure
nure manure at give-away prices by Hie
trudcload. Call 2-2641.
FOR SALE: "B" Met Silver Silver-tone
tone Silver-tone clarinet ebonite finish ex excellent
cellent excellent conditions. Balboa 3759.
FOR SALE: General Electrie
Thinline air conditioner, one ton.
Used only 3 weeks, $160.00. G.
F. Ward. Telephone Navy 3104.
FOR SALE: Golf clubs, 2 wood,
S iron bag, etc. $50.00. Pan. 3 3-4265.
4265. 3-4265. Big Three, Russia

Commission to Work on Cold War End

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
United States. Britain anrl Franco
joined Russia yesterday m setting
up a special lu nation commission
charged with imakinc a npu of.
fort lo end the costly cold war
arms race.
The makeup of th new com
mission, which will nnerata nut
side the United Nations but make
reports to that body, represented
an apparent U.S. concession to
Russia sinrp it will inelnrlp five
Communist and five free nations.
American officials said hnu.
ever, that this should not be con considered
sidered considered a precedent which would
lead to giving the communist
world equal representation on fu future
ture future international negotiating
groups.
Although the United States al always
ways always has opposed such represen representation,
tation, representation, officials said the new dis disarmament
armament disarmament commission was set
up under "s p e c i 1 circum circumstances."
stances." circumstances." They important, hing,
they said, was to resume arms
talks ith Russia after a two two-year
year two-year deadlock.
Free world representatives on
the new Hroim will be thp TTnitH
States, Britain, France. Canada
and Italy. Speaking for the Com Communists
munists Communists in addition 1n Russia mill
be Poland, Romania, Czechoslo Czechoslovakia
vakia Czechoslovakia and Bulgaria.
The group will begin its work
in Geneva early next year.
American officials saw special
significance in Russia's willing willingness
ness willingness to take part in the new arms
discussions because it came al almost
most almost on the eve of Soviet Pre Premier
mier Premier Nikita $. Khrushchev's visit
to the United States for face-to-face
talks with President Eisen Eisenhower.
hower. Eisenhower. The Pmident has made clear
to visitors that he considers some

Ex-Convict Leads Police
To Troopers Shallow Grave

ARGENTINE, Mich. (UPI)-Ex-convict
Alvin W. Knight, 48 yes yesterday
terday yesterday led state police to a shal
low grave in the underbrush off a
country road near here and point pointed
ed pointed to the body of Trooper Albert
W. Souden, 29, slain last Thurs Thursday
day Thursday after questioning Knight about
a $75 burglary.
The trooper had been shot atid
his body stripped of the state po police
lice police uniform. The body was clad
only in shorts and police said it
was "badly decomposed."
State Police Commissioner Jo Joseph
seph Joseph A. Childs and Deputy Com Commissioner
missioner Commissioner Howard L. Seiler said
Knight had made neither an oral
or written confession about the
slaying but the fact that he led
them to the body was considered
as good as a confession.
"I assume a first degree mur murder
der murder warrant will be issue d."
Childs said, then withheld further
discussion pending a conference
with Livingston County Prosecutor
Wilfred H. Erwin.
Knight admitted one shot had
been fired, presumably from Sou-
den's service pistol which Knight
nao wnen he was arrested last
Friday. Three empty cartridge
casings from Souden's gun had
been found in a creek near where
the body was found.
Knight has a long prison record
and was a patient in a mental
hospital. He had been questioned
since Saturday but denied knowl knowledge
edge knowledge of Souden's whereabouts un-
Monday morning, nine hours
after Mrs. Clara Souden, 23, met
him face-lo-face and asked him to
tell her where to find her hus husband.
band. husband. "I'll tell you where the body is
. I'm doing this because of her
appeal," Knight told police Mon Monday
day Monday morning.
State police blocked off a mile mile-square
square mile-square area southwest of here, to
keep out the hundreds of curious
who flocked to this rural commu community,
nity, community, and rushed Knight here from
headquarters in Lansing.
Knight led police into an under underbrush
brush underbrush covered section between
Argentine and Cnhoctah 60 miles
northwest of Detroit. I
Officers on the scene said
Knight showed no emotion when
he pointed to the shallow grave
containing the trooper's body. But
Sunday night, he cried after tell telling
ing telling Mrs. Souden that he couldn't
tell her anything.
Knight had insisted that he be
taken immediately back to Lan
sing state police hcadauarters
after locating the body because
he didn't Want to face people of
this community. He has been liv living
ing living in this hamlet of 300 with his
mother and stepfather.
Souden'a body was taken to a fu

Real Estate

FOR SALIt Uti 500 and 1.000
Meters, in tbe Nuevo HipMrome
Urbanization across the Ramon
Racetrack. All lots with Mreet
fronts, sewaaj. water main ana
electricity. Call W. McBaraett.
Tel. 4-0976.
Domestic
English family requires reliable
maid with good references for
cleaning and washing. Call 3 3-1950.
1950. 3-1950. Between 6 and 7 p.m.
Set Up Special
relation of the dangerous and ex
pensive rms race one of the
most important problems facing
him during his final 18 months
in the White House.
The allies have been unab'e to
get together with Russia on a re
sumption of disarmament talks
since September, 957. when a
United Nations subcommittee
DroKe up in disagreement in Lon
don.
Facing the new commissio.i are
sucn toucny issues as ending out
put of fissionable weaoons ma
terials. trim mine mirrnt slnmii
, o . v a L.riiiiv.
military forces and setting up a
system to prevent surprise at
tack.
Desnite the hrraWrimim nt fh.
London talks, the UnitpH State.
Britain and russia have made
some nrocrress aineai trmrarl 9
system for policing nuclear
test ban. But they have failed in
enoris to oevise metnods of less
ening the danger of xnrnrise at
tack.
A four mnwpr mmmtinlnu.
I . bviuuiuuiijuc
made Dublic in Washintrtnn Inn.
don'. Paris and Moscow su'irl tho
new arrangement was the result
oi iscussions held by the big
powers at the Geneva Foreign
Ministers conference this sum
mer.
American officials, -whn haA .n
ticiDated small natinn nrifi.icrm
of the new move, said formation
oi tne commission outside the
United Nations did not mean the
nig powers were bypassing the
world organization.
They said U.N. Secretary-General
Dac HammarskiolH haH
v o e d "general satisfaction"
witn lie arrangement tf it nf.
ierea gome real nope f agree
ment.
neral home where an autopsy was
to be performed.
Thus ended what started as a
routine checkout of a $75 burglary
of a tool manufacturing plant at
Milford.
Souden Thursday morning went
to Argentine from his Brighton
state police post to find a car
seen near the burglarized plant.
He questioned Knight at his home
here, and the two Wprp ppn lpav.
ing in Souden's squad car.
When Souden didn't return
home Thursday night, his wife,
mother of a seven-months-old son,
called the Brighton post.
An alarm was ent out for
Knight and a search starter! fnr
Souden's squad car and Knight's
oiue uaauiac.
Knight was trarked In hi ratlin
on Cedar Lake, 175 miles north.
State police broke into the cabin
Friday and found Knight lying in
bed. Souden's .38 ralihre servif
pistol and a .22 calibre snub-nosed
pisioi and a rifle were in the
room.
Knight was taken to East Lans
ing state police headquarter, and
questioned for 14 hours without a
break. But he stuck to his story
that he left Souden alive after
convincing the trooper he had
nothing to do with the burglary.
Knicht told a far-fetched tale nf
picking up a hitchhiker later and
buying Souden's service pistol
from the hitchhiker for $10.
Red China Troops
Cross Burma Border
To Hunt Refugees
RANGOON. Burma fUPn
Communist Chinese troops led by
a second lieutenant crossed the
border into Burma searchine for
Chinese refugees, the English lan language
guage language newspaper "The Nation"
reported today.
The newspaper did not sav
when the crossing took place. It
said the Chinese since have with withdrawn.
drawn. withdrawn. According to the dispatch, the
Chinese Communists penetrated
from Yunnan eight miles into
Burma's Kachin State.
Some 10,000 Chinese have been
reported to have fled across the
border and found haven in Kachin
State.
They have reused to return in
spite of a flood of propaganda
posters and pamphlets promising
they would not be punished.

INVESTOR'S
GUIDE
By SAM SHULSKY
King Features Syndicate,
235 E 45 St., New York
Q. I am a woman of SO, with
about $20,000 savings and $2,000 in
E bonds. I am continually hounded
by relatives to take the money out
of the bank and put it into sure'
things. When I did so two years
ago I never made any money. On
ly recently this same brokej;, m
a reputable firm, made me buy 100
International Petroleum for $4,500.
He said I will make money, but
friends say no, what with tb Ve
nezuelan taxes.
When I ask firms for advice, I
get a long list of stocks. What am
I supposed to do, buy 10 shares
of each?
A. This is a very real problem
presented intelligently by one per
son who must be speaking for
hundreds of thousands.
The problem, obviously, tems
from the fact there is' no royal
road to investment riches, nor
even to comtortaoie investing.
When this investment in Interna
tional Petroleum was made, for in
stance, it seemed fair enough. The
company boasts an A- rating in
fact is 97 per cent owned by Stand
ard Oil of N.J., which should be
recommendation enough.
Unfortunately, the oil industry Is
a highly competitive business and
a lot of things mostly bad
have happened to it since this
purchase was made. It does not
mean that the broker was ms
honest or even, for that matter,
used bad judgement.
But. to set back to the main
problems set forth in mis letter:
What is a lady to do wno nas work
ed hard and saved $22,000 and
must think of her retirement?
Nothing I can put down here can
remove the risk that must accom
pany the ownership of securities.
However, we can discuss some
ways of keeping that risk down to
minimumeven if by so doing
we have to give up some of the
glamorous benefits Which, in
bull market, everybody eem to
be reaping.
In the first place we must discu
selection of securities. Interna
tional Pete is fine but Standard of
Jersey itself is far safer. One
hundred .shares is a fair amount
of stock, and it does cost a trifle
less in commissions than an odd
lot," but $4,500 or about 20 per
cent of your money in on stock,
and that a foreign oil, seems going
i bit overboard.
But neither of these points proves
anything much. Nor answer any
basic problem.
You must still but some of your
funds to work in equities because
you will have to look to these
funds for income for a long time
and you can't combat inflation by
seeking 100 per cent safety for
your 1959 dollars.
I don t know at what rate you
can generate investment funds.
funds. But I do think you must
continue to buy stocks, not neces
sarily $4,500 worth at a time.
Discuss your situation with
some reputable brokers and then
use your judgement in selecting
one that suits you best. I think
half your savings can be put into
stocks over the next six months
and thereafter buy another issue
every quarter or every six months
(or whenever you can manage to
build $400, $500 or so).
What stocks? Aye, there s me
rub. I am sending you a list of
top grade companies, both for in income
come income and for growth. Don't try tc
buy 10 shares of each, of course.
But there's no reason why you
shouldn't buy into some business
you know something about tex
tiles, foods, department stores.
I don't think this if a 100 per
cent answer by any means I
don't think there is any. But I
have seen some wonderful port
folios built up by persons who
knew nothing more about the
market than that quality pays off
in the long run.
Friends Dropping In
On Grandma Moses
For 99lh Birthday
EAGLE BRIDGE, N.Y. (UPI
-A few close friends and rela-
tivpj nlannprl tn drnn in todav and
wish "happy birthday" to Mrs.
Anna Mary Robertson Moses, bet better
ter better known to primitive art enthu enthusiasts
siasts enthusiasts as "Grandma Moses."
She is 99.
Mrs. Moses, who gained fame
in the "golden years" of life with
her prim tive, colorful paintings
of rural country scenes, had a
larger pre-birthday gathering at
the home of a friend in Schuyler Schuyler-ville
ville Schuyler-ville Sunday.
The small, frail-looking woman
said she is healthier and happier
when she is kept busy. That s
why, upon the death of her hus husband
band husband in 1927, she turned to paint painting.
ing. painting. Although she had little or no
previous painting experience, her
work was so expertly done and
eye-catching that she soon gained
nationwide fame.
Her art work became a collec collector's
tor's collector's item and canvasses have
brought her as much as $1,500
each.

Today's Opening
STOCK PRICES

NEW YORK, Sept. I (UPTV (UPTV-Stocks
Stocks (UPTV-Stocks opened the week mixed and
quiet today.
Uncertainties ever tight money,
tne steel strike and international
political situations combined to

keep the market off balance.
Atjr ma
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium Ltd
Amer Cy ana mid
Amer Motors
Amer tel and tol
Anaconda Copper
AVCO Mfa
Beth Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bicroft Uranium
Blauknox
British Pet
Burroughs
Canadian Eagle
Celanese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great Wett
Chrysler
Cities Service
Coastal Caribe
Colgate Palmolive
Colorado Fuel
Cons Electro Dynamics
Creole Pet
Crown Cork and Seal
Cuban Venezuelan Ofl
Du Pont
El Paso Natural Gas
Fatrchild Engine
Fargo Oil
Felmont Pet
General Dynamics
General Electric
General Motors
General Plywood
Gulf Oil
Harsco Steel
Howe Sound
Imperial Oil
Intl Pet
Lockheed
Magellan Pet
Montrose Chem
New Eng. Tel and Tel
Northrop Air
Olin Mathiesoa
Pancoastal
Phillips Pet
Pure oil
Royal Dutch SheS
RCA
Reynolds Meta!
San Jacinto
Servo Corp
Siffnal nil ojI H -.

170b
11
S344
8914
S3
T8 I
4H
m ;
ST
in
79b
13 (
T 9-13 1
J0H j
flVab I
I9Vt I
T9V4
ttttb
66-4
63
1H
S8 -H I
S0 I
1
46 I
34
S-lfib
261 1
M
44b
Vib
49
7
S3
19
MCHb
42 I
lOMib
.8 i
14b
27
lb
13b
193 I
M i'
SO j
m 1

4S
0
59
!03
44
8b
Kb
32
S6
42
22
SO
12
1S12
S3
Mb
S4Mb
lb
0
103
90
3b
f -Sinclair Oil
aocony Mobile
Sperry Rand
Standard Oil NJ
Studebaker-PaekaM
Superior Oil
Tecas Gulf Prodi
Textron
Underwood
United Canso OH
US Rubber
US Steel
Westinghouse Blee
Wheeling Steel
NEHRU TO IRAN
TEHRAN, Iran (UPI)-Offickli
said today that Indian Prime
Minister Jawaharlal Nehru is
scheduled to arrive Sept. 18 for
JI ff.11P.r4 r:.;4 tT. '11
A. AL I "m wm cower
with the Shah the following day.
1951 PANEL
Truck $150.00
1957 FORD
CUSTOM
$1,495.00
1954 FORD
$ 500.00
1956 DODGE
$1,295.00
1955 ClflEVROLET
Delivery sedan
$ 800.00
1956 MERCURY
Ford sedan
$1,395.00
1955 PONTIAC
$1,000.00
1955 STATION
WAGON
$ 750.00
C0LPAN
MOTORS
Tel. 2-0623

V

In.

n



THE PA.VAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
PAG I NINft
HI STCRY OP MARTHA WAYN1
In Dai
BY WILSON SCRUMS! TERRY AND THE PIRATES
By GEOKGB WVNVCl
LOOKA'WNiWHAKEimj YlX'SAFUN...jHOm,ft3TTA LEAVE..
FUHMY-10OWMS pCwBW:
LATH NfO- HCUYWOP Sf T5H r
ARKAN6EP AT 'NOURMOUSH I
PUT CL' MCHCYBA55 5HAV5 a' TUB
9HAIL.5 TM6MT, WOULN'T WANSA
AWH 'AT, M'RKSMT, 6AN6T
H SHAMBEK COMMER5H,
r
(iilil'WL (iilil'WL-l
l (iilil'WL-l I It
RIS:iLLA'$ POP
The Amwtr Man
By Ai. VIRMIII

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER I, 1959

AT FREIE'5 SUCH A SHRIEKING JoH,HS'5 A hl
IPIOT, PUT HE'S PERFECTLY J ONE,J 'If II

I WHAT HATOJED,HERWKEWT5 HAVE k 1 OUTSIDE THE JAZZ CLUB, THE TEARFUL, UN-D
VIC? DID yXISf BEEW CWIU6 HERA 1 I HSDWd OOAJASTSFSIUTOTHE PATH OP I g
CHICK CUT ODT?,HaRD TIME BECAUSE A HER FATHEt'S UMOUSIUE. f j
. OF ME. BUT IP she'd N i 1 1

. 'UCWf Jtl

.V

- BOOTS AND
tAHTAIN BASY

...

MORTY M1IKLR

OUR BOARDING HOUSI

f HCKLIS AND Hli PtIINM

Budget Wet

BY MERRILL BLOSSKR

I f ONC AMD THREE
I FOURTHS GALLONS
nj OT THE REGULAR --S
S --S "IHAJlL COME OUT
-UVtD RFTY CENTS

CAM I HAVE IT FOR A VI

QUARTER. IF I DOW XAKfe

OMON, REUSH AND FRENCH

Fries wnw rr?

AMD FAST 60TTA 6ET "Rb

THE SHOW BC FORE THE

MM

ll.i. Mnr T"

MAGAZINES HERE, WZ 6000 REASOM N- 1
THEM, ONLY BUVS A jfeaififfl WHY NEED tfh

r

WE'LL- ASK MY POP!

S HE KNOWS ALL

STMAT STUFF

-a

J POP, IF w
f THE PEOPLE IN
AUSTRAL!A ARE J
UPSIDE DOWN. S
(MOW COME THEIP )
WATS DON'T r
VFALL OFF? j a

6ET06

tAJp

THAT'S FUNNY.

WE ALWAYS

SAYS

ir i r

WAVE A s
I QUESTION.
(ASK him

iTXal

iUCS BUNNY

Rair Guard

On tha Jab

BY V. T. HAMLIaa

LT OH, YES,. I KNOW...
I V E WAR'S MOT
L ( AWRIGHT, SO OVER YET.'
L' OKY SOT TH' BEST fc- r S
OF ME WITH HIS ftl -l1 1
1. X.. 1

OU'RE GOL PA.MG ALL RIGHT,

TOOTIN' ITS NOT! ( NOW, CALM

AS FA.R AS I'M DOWN....

CONCERN EP, IT

HASN'T EVEN GOT

STARTED YET

...IT NEVER'D UTTLE FELLA,
GOT STARTEP 1 MY EYE! X
IF YOU HADNT HE'S C

JUMPEP ALL I A...,

OVER THE LfTTLE

FELLA --A

'"' Im. T M. Wl

HRR BUDDIBI

It Figuras

BY BDGAR MARTIN

Y If tMf Wm lwSl

EH HOW A?E A vOrl
YA FIXEP FEU 7 fft Wli

((krorsite True Life Adventures

feet

WorUlUMaM

51

--

Y-2

Sarieut Buiinaia

BY LESLII TURNER

PBgya1 MP'A WKV CLfVeg, PBtONV..,ANP QUITE A I
5H0WWAU1 HIS LOVE FOR THE UWEUfi-HT
yJBPP, TELL WB HA KEPT HIW ON THE STAGE W5TEAP

HVPNOTI&W SHOULDN'T K A PARLOR
GAME'. ITS IW4U5E ON THE STAQBi
AND 8Y AWATEUR5. HAS DOME MUCH
TO DISCREDIT IT1 SLIT SHANPl) CAN'T

RESIST THE APPLAUSE NHV (AONETl

n PK.INO HIM

POSSIILV. WT ONCf THE MOST SWLLFUl

CAN TRICK A SUBJECT miv n rti

-mil OUT iHXRUW"" Irlurw7l v.nrr."

?L-...i r "77 THAT GfUf

II IU (.UIWWMI

A CRIME?

A

Clovers
1VITH ONK POOT TO UURB EARTHWORMS
BKL-OW TO THE 6URPA-CE.

Making An Imprattien

iY DICK CAVAULI

f KNOW WHAT IVE iV
I GOT IN THIS J NO lli
V," BOX, CINDY? J I WHAT? 1

V TOADS, I V
Fuzzy i CyJr'
PIPERS J ) Ml

IY I NEVER IcNEWAN ITT
EMPTY BOX COULD BC 1 clJLU
L 60 MUCH j,
f'2 M k NtA lvlM. W TJl U.. tal Off.

MAJOR HOOPLB OUT OUR WAY

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

NOU 5HOOTHAI w'JeuE5sl0vJAGERC0L

SSTOUTOFTHISF-Kioiu uaV6

TO WAIT

X T5R0PPED A HINT 1 THAT'6

TUAT IT HUACT AKTO IMC

k AA-fWfe A TEETH

fti cccl TiOvJAGER COLDICHATTER-

'H6

WONT

I SHOO,

LAIC6 AMD IMTO SOAAEl

, TJBY CLOTMe

T30M3U1

GUYS HEAR
SOMETHING

1IKBCA5TAN6(J

1

IT.MA3CK -x

KJ6V6Rt6PTOJACORM- 1 M wmmmb
I HUSK MATTRESS BEPOREf I
I WSLL.THeYARKKISJPOP J
HOTNIGKTS-MAHAP
I TH1 HUSKS OUT AIRIW'EM 1
f TOPAY AKI' SOMETIMES I
I STUFF 6ITS IM 'EM OUT J
I INTH'YARP--30IFVDU V
EL AWVTHIM6MOVIW. VfoiL m-
WAKE ME UP--A SNAKfi pgf;,;!' I
I 60TIM WITH TH' HUSKS PT f&J? i
I 1 OMCE--JlsrALITTLi 1 X -tfj
1 K V fELLBR-..WELU, w ffS5 I
f PORM TH-RTV -AR TOO 0OM s'ST.

. - -. --v m

ITWIB li 'Hi

I IM iB.lft

-"-ir n .imTiC.

MCRRINCi C1UL.L.S
PRUM OKI THE ANO

i T,r.' camp tnma: w n"

WITH BOTH FEET.

SIDE GLANCES

By Calbraith

7) I

.T.M. Bsf M. Off.
1? Kv AftA Barvica. If.

8-27

"If you lee a rather stout woman waiting her pretty (
oon, will you tell her Cora has gone to ''
the Koffee Kup?"

5A

1

f-

t M. Raf U t Pat, Wf.
T 1959 hy Hi A 9ar,a. ka,

"What are we going to tay when they ask us why we
let tha national debt cat so big?"

T M. Raff J.. P Off Off-tf,
tf, Off-tf, 1t9 tijf NCA tvrvie. rn.

"Too bad you can't have the car tonight, Bud. Still,
I courted your grandmother in a porch swing and th
results were highly satisfactory!"

830 Xca. Panama 1090 Jfa.

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Today's J'' FrcTam

S:00 CFN NEWS
3:15 Air f .-c tiwt Revifw
3 :.K) You A;lcd Tor It
4:00 Mr. Vizrd
A:n Amalrur Hour
1:0(1 Whlrlyblrds
5:30 PANORAMA
7:00 Sclnc Fiction Thlr

7 30 Jlnunv Rod(rt
S (7jie A Harriet

Decoy
Armchair Thlrt;
Tlie Unsunected
CTS NEV.fa
Eric : Jack Benny &
Voice of Firestone

ft no
9 no

11 no
n .15

Courteir of Aerovlas Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573.1698 3.1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

30

Hi i nvai'ai'-tia--'ijrii),il. aj "Hia-i iWMi'riaiTifniRainEriiif.i-i



Dodgers

Win

7-1 To Stay In ML Figbi
KOnn CTftfU fKk rnrr Jh.

With Khrushchev Arriving A Week From Today .
Eisenhower Will Give US Radio-TV Report
Cn His Everyth ng Splendid' Trip To Europe
WASHINGTON, Sept 8 (UPI) President Eisenhower will make a television report to the American people Thursday night on his swc.
cessful mission to Europe, the White House announced today.
White House press secretary James C. Hagerty said the President will give his television and radio talk from 7:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.
Hagerty said Eisenhower will discuss "some of the international d evelopments the President and some of the foreign leaders discussed
during that trip."
Eisenhower went to Europe to talk with free world leaders in Wes t Germany, Britain and France in advance f Soviet Premier Nikita
Khrushchev's visit here next Tuesday.
Eisenhower returned yesterday from his historic trip to Europe with a glowing report on allied unity. He said "everything is going splend.
idly everywhere" in western Europe.
The President told high administration and congressional leaders, p lus several hundred spectators gathred at the airport to greet him that
he was "happy to tell you that every one of our troublesome problems has been talked out."

Aiii.uuncemciH ol the Presi President's
dent's President's talk taiv.e jIUt ',tlU
an nour ana a lii cnnir, ence
witn GOP Kjiisn--.--on.il leac'.er. leac'.er.-on
on leac'.er.-on t;-,t legislative siluaUon and
prospects "tor adjournment.
Hoose and Scmte chid tain
ka:d he was pleased with tne
labor ictuun b;!l pas.-e.! during
his European trip and by tne
Kipport of his etoes on tv.o
key issues.
Senate OOP !cade:' Everett M
D' Kvsn i III told reporters he
is'stin hooelul that Congress
;,n ao'oui'i. ih.s weekend and
that the President and hi.-, le,; le,;-rlativp
rlativp le,;-rlativp lieutenants "piesumec
this would be tne las. get-to-grinei-
ol the year.
"I presume or hope mat tne
rui'ain will come down at the
end of the week." Dirksen said.
House Republican 1 e a d e l
Charles A Halleck of Indiana
reported that Eisenhower was
'pleased at the outcome ol the
laboi relorm bill because it is
substantially what he asked
for."
The measure is still awaiting
the President's signature.
He said the President was
"particularly happy" that the
House upheld by one vote his
velo of a public works money
bill and "was graulied that the
Senate sustained his second veto
ol controversial housing legis legislation.
lation. legislation.
On his arrival yesterday
Eisenhower, who conferred
with allied leaders in Bonn,
London and Paris, said the
people of the western world
have a "deep and abiding
trust" in each other and "in
that there is great moral
strength."
"I am glad to bring you that
kind of news," he said, and
again I am glad to be back.
Vice President Richard M M-Nixon
Nixon M-Nixon and Mis. Eisenhower led
the delegation which greeted
the President as his silver and
ciane jet transport swept down
through slightly overcast skies
and landed gracelully at Wash Washington's
ington's Washington's National Airport.
The President, who flew
here from Prestwick, Scotland,
where he had been vacation vacationing
ing vacationing for three days, made the
transatlantic flight in seven
hours and 30 minutes, not
counting a 4ii-minute stop at
Gander, Newfoundland.
Mrs. Eisenhower was the first
to greet the president upon his
return from his 11-day trip.
She was waiting with a kiss
a,s he walked down the ramp
from the big Air Force 707
transport.
Eiesnhower then was greeted
by Nixon and the other digni dignitaries.
taries. dignitaries. Eisenhower and Queen Eli Eli-eabeth
eabeth Eli-eabeth U exchanged best
wishes as Eisenhower ended
his Scottish holiday to fly
home.
Buckingham Palace released
the President's message, which
said :
"Dear Queen Elizabeth.
"As I depart for the US I as assure
sure assure you again that my party
Weather Or Not
This weather report for the 21
hours ending 8 a.m. today Is
prepared by the Meteorological
and Hydrographic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal'
TEMPERATl'KK:
High 0 84
Low Ti
HI .MIDITYi
High 5 t
Low 88 89
HIND:
(max. mph) NW-I8 W 17
BAIN (Inchen) .01 .82
WATER TEMP:
(Inner harbors) 83 8S
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake
Madden Dam
.t.69
213.17
BALBOA TIDES
WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 1
HlKh

Time lit
t:M svni l.. n.
S:3t p.m I4.H it.
Low
Time Ht.
1:S4 1.1 ft.
t.17 y.ai 1.3 ft.

and I have enjoyed a most
I happy visit in your country andj
with your people. The highlight
ol wy stay here was, ol course,
our day with you and Prince
Philip, your children, sister and
'mother. To all of them and to

ou, my re.-ipeeiiui ana aiiec aiiec-uonaie
uonaie aiiec-uonaie feyarcin.
'Sincereiy, JJwight D. Eisen Eisenhower."
hower." Eisenhower." The .Queen's reply said:

"Thank you SO much for your1'" s .'uu u"e wmcn

kind message. I am delignted

.r.f.i you enjoyed your vis.i a..u For lhosf ci(izens who want
hope that we shall see you some guiclant.e in the maUel. nere
again before long. Philip andare few words 0, advice from
my mother and the otner mem-!stlt( Departmen' officials:

Ders oi my lainny jum m senu-,
m to you and to Mrs. Eisen
i hower our warmest good wishes
i "Elizabeth R."
j
' After his brief remarks to
the airport crowd, the Presi President
dent President drove to the White
House to prepare for next
i week's meetings with Soviet
j Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev
I and to deal first hand with
the fuming Democratic Con Congress.
gress. Congress. It apparently will be up to
Eisenhower to decide whether
the world's No. 1 Communist
should be invited to address a
joint session of Congress
Democratic congr e s s 1 o n a
leaders have indicated tney will
not take the initiative in ex-
tending an invitation.
of town when the Soviet
pre-
mier arrived.
But its plan for a Saturday
adjournment has been jeopar-
i clized by, among other things
Eisenhower's veto of such ma-
jor pieces of legislation as hous housing
ing housing and public work spending
I bills.
j Eisenhower has vetoed as in
; flationary two housing nieas-
ures supported chiefly by Demo Democrats.
crats. Democrats. Democratic leaders still are
smarting from the fact that
I despite their big majorities in
both the House and Senate,
1 I hey were defeated in efforts
to override the vetoes. They
I now are working on a hous hous-j
j hous-j ing bill that meets at least
i some of the President s objec objections.
tions. objections. The Democrats were even an
grier over the President's veto'
of the public works bill
They are firing back at him
virtually the same measure he
disapproved, although it has
been trimmed slightly.
Also confronting the chief ex executive
ecutive executive is the explosive situa situation
tion situation in Laos.
While he was In Europe di.s-!
cussnio chiefly the situation
j there, Communist led rebels at-

ih l Keel in me nonnern seciorimav think o a oerson or what he

'of the little
country.
Southeast Asian
The State Department has ac-

( used Russia and Red China of conduct which embarrasses Khru Khru-cooperating
cooperating Khru-cooperating with Communist shchev will also embarrass our
North Viet Nam to stir up trou-1 government."
ble in Laos. Meanwhile, a number of pro
minent clergymen have urged Am Am-Bad
Bad Am-Bad weather over Iceland ericans to greet the visit of Soviet
(orced Eisenhower to cancel at Premier Khrushchev with an atti atti-Ihe
Ihe atti-Ihe last minute plans to stop turie of prayerfulness.
at Keflavlk 011 the way home Francis Cardinal SMllm.n

for a talk with Iceland Presi
dent Asgeir Asgeirsson.
Instead the plane made a
stop at Gander, Newfoundland,
then flew on to Washington.

Nearly 400 Guards To Surround Khrushchev, Pave Way

WASHINGTON 1 1 I'll -. Soviet
Premier NikiU Khrushchev will
have nearly 40,1100 guards during
his lour of Apnea.
That is a t1. S official's esti estimate
mate estimate of Ihe total number of uni uniformed
formed uniformed police, plainclothes detec detectives,
tives, detectives, troops and federal agents
who will watch ovpr the Russian
leader at various stages of his
cross country route.
Never have more elaborate
plans been laid to insure the
safely of a foreign visitor. Aware
that Khrushchev is anything but
j popular figure in this country,
officials are doing everything pos
s 1 1 If lo eliminate anv chance ol
an "incident iluriny his I I day
visit which begins Srpl IV
"If am tinny should happen to
llii ill h ii while lie is on Aiueiicaii
soil, the ronsemiences lould be,
very serious," explained one of
ficial.
Security preparation! began is

BOO? GHEER? POLITE APPLAUSE?

WASHINGTON, Sept. 8 (UPI) You're a loyal American, and you don't like commies. You're
standing there on the street corner watching Nikita Khrushchev ride past.
What should you do? Boo him? Cheer him? Applaud politely? Or maintain a stony silence?
Several million Americans are going to face this problem when the Soviet premier makes

his tour of the country beginning
This being a free country, the

v """u "w io
Rfmemhpr ,hat Khnnhi-hev will
be here as an invited guest of
the President and the United
Stales. As one of his hosts, von
are under an obligation to be cour-
icons aim nospiiame even n you
don't like him.
Remember also that President i
Eisenhower will be returning
Khrushchev's visit later this year.
The Russians are great on re reciprocity.
ciprocity. reciprocity. If anything happens
to embarrast Khrushchev while
ho is in America, it is extreme extremely
ly extremely probable that the same sort
of thing will happen to our Pres President
ident President when he gets to Russia.
RpmpmhT finjllv Ihnl Tt'hrn.
shchev is notoriously touchy about
j personal snubs and' insults. Some
(diplomatic observer, believe that
his craving for recognition as a
big wheel on tne inlerna(innal
scene is a primary motive behind
Since President Eisenhower's
motive in inviting him is to
thaw some of the ice from US
Russian relations, any personal
discourtesies directed at him
would amount to sabotaging the
President's hopes.
This advice would seem defi definitely
nitely definitely to rule out any boos, jeers,
catcalls, derisive remarks.
It militates strongly against a
stony silence.
American sentiments will prob prob-ablv
ablv prob-ablv rule out the cheers.
That leaves polite applause.
If the thought of applauding
Klirushchev still slicks in your
craw, it may help to hear in mind
that handclapping does noj neces necessarily
sarily necessarily imply approval. II is sim
ply a conventional wav for a

large crowd to say hello' '.o a vis- rnn President Eisenhower to fur fur-itor.
itor. fur-itor. ther the possibility of world
John W. Hanes Jr., head of Peace."

the Stale Department's Bureau
of Security and Consular Affairs
said the government is relying
heavily on innate American
courtesy to prevent any unpleas unpleasant
ant unpleasant incidents during Khru
shchev s visit.
"We are confident tM.i visit will
go off without a hitch." said
Manes, who has cliarge of the far-
flung security arrangements.
"I do not anticipate anv serious
trouble because Americans are a
hospitable people Whatever we
represents, we will be courteous
to him as long as he is our guest.
"I believe that all Americans
will realize H at anv enisnri or
Roman Catholic archbishop of
New York, made a rare pulpit
appearance Sunday to call fir a
holy hour Of prayer Sept. 14
the day before Khrushchev ar arrives
rives arrives in the United States.
i
soon as Khrushchev's u.mI wa,
announced last month. They are
under the overall direction of the
Stale Department's Office of Se Security,
curity, Security, a small but highly efficient
organization that extends to dis distinguished
tinguished distinguished foreign visitors t h e
same kind of vigilant protection
that the Secret Service gives lo
the President of the United Stales.
The exact number of specially
trained agent,s on the Security
Office staff is secret, but it can
be said that they constitute only
a tiny fraction of the total man
lower required for guarding a
visitor like Khrushchev.
"Our role is Ihree fold," a
spokesman said. "Cirsl, we par
licipate in planum the itinerary,
and I rv to eliminate any potential
Iv dangerous situations. Second,
we coordinate the efforts of local
police deparlmpnls, who provide
mont of he manpower and do
most of the hard work of checking

Sept. 15.
government cannot presume

luruias sucn gestures as iiiiuwmg otichs, jtm re enuuea 10

receive unmsnm".

Spellman did not mention Kru-1 same courtesy that Vice President
shchev by name by warned thatiRichard M. Nixon was received

the United States once again was
threatened by "masters of propa propaganda."
ganda." propaganda." In Washington, the Rev. Dr.
Charles D. Kean, rector of the
Episcopal Church of the Kp'ph Kp'ph-any,
any, Kp'ph-any, 'said it would be un-Christian
: lor Americans to strike a "nose
i0f moral superiority" when Khru-
shchev arrive here.
ile said Americans should rra
while Khrushchev is in the United
States that his talks with Presi President
dent President Eisenhower "may contribute
peace."
But Kean deplored efforts to
organize public "days of prayer"
as protest against the Khru Khru-schev
schev Khru-schev visit.
"The exploitation of our Chris Christian
tian Christian heritage for this purpose is
a serious perversion of the faith,"
he said.
The Rev. Dr. Dan M. Potter,
executive director ef the Protes Protestant
tant Protestant Council of the City of New
York, said In a sermon Sunday
that the Khrushchev visit offer offered
ed offered a rare opportunity for Ameri America
ca America to demonstrate its spiritual
greatness.
"At this important moment In
history it is not only possible but
nie Doiinuen duty of our people,
wnnout compromising their avow-
ed disapproval of the atheistic and
materialistic way of life of the
Communist to demonstrate the
fruits of their faith," he said.
"If Khrushchev leaves this
country without discovering our
spiritual vitality, he will have
missed the most powerful ingre ingredient
dient ingredient of the American way of
life."
Potter said that Americans
should pray "that God may us
'nt "change visits of Khrushchev
Richard Cardinal Cusing, arch
inisnop of Boston and
spiritual
leader of the nation's second larg
est Koman Catholic diocese, au authorized
thorized authorized special services in all
churches, shrines and chapels un under
der under his jurisdiction during the
Khrushchev visit,
"e urged the more than 1,500.-
000 persons in the diocese lo par-
licipate in his "crusade of pray-1
! er." the Cardinal has written a
"necial booklet of prayers to b
I recited during the Soviet premi
ers tour.
In Geneva Point, N.H., how
ever, Methodist Bishop John Wes
ley Lord and 115 other saanisters,
meeting for a New England area
pastors' assembly, warned that
the best way to make Khru Khrushchev
shchev Khrushchev "a hero in Russia" would
be a "discourteous greeting
when he arrives" in the United
States.

Dr. Julius Mark, senior rabbi of at the oase have often joked to
Temple Kmanuel and a leading the Air Force:
spokesman for Judaism In New "Next time I'll buy a train lie lie-York,
York, lie-York, said that Americans shouM kei. The passengers on it can
treat Khrushchev as a guest of : see more than we can form the
their government. ; pi ess site. Tliey get the Cook's

! "We should comport ourselves
i wit 1 dignity and receive him in
I Hie tame manner and with the
out places the Premier will visit
etc.
Finally, if something goes wrong
in spite of all our precautions,
we provide the body.'
What did he mean by that last
macabre phrase provide th
body?
"I mean thai there will always
be one of oui men on hand to usr
his own body as a screen .1
necessary lo defied any hostile
gesture toward the visitor."
During initial discussions ol
Khrushchev's itinerary, U.S. offi
rials were alarmed by an appar
enl (le si re of Soviet representa representatives
tives representatives lo leave a good bit of "open
lime" on Ihe .schedule.
It began lo look as though U S
Coiiniiiiiiisls had tneir tinkers in
the pie, and were coaching the
Soviet embassy lo set up a situa situation
tion situation in which Khrushchev could
visit places where sympathet sympathetic
ic sympathetic crowd had been planted.

STONY SILENCE?

to tell Americans how to act. As
with in Russia," he said. "We
shouldn't get all excited about his
coming. We can only hope."
In other reaction to the Khru Khrushchev
shchev Khrushchev visit, Dr. Bela Fabian,
chairman of the Federation of
Hungarian Former Political Pris
oners, said that Khrushchev
would be picketed "wherever he
goes" during his New York stay.
Fabian attacked the plans of
ine Economic Club of New York
to "honor" Khrushchev at a din dinner
ner dinner the night of Sept. 17.
"Are they honoring him for his
past deeds?" he asked. 'He kill killed
ed killed 5 million Ukrainians. He kill
ed 30,000 Hungarians during the
uprising and deported 75,000.
There are now in Hungarian con concentration
centration concentration camps more than twice
as many."
In California people are wonder wondering
ing wondering what Khrushchev will remem
ber most from his train trip from
Los Angeles to San Francisco?
A coastline termed the most
beautiful in the nation? Fertile
fields and herds of fattened cat cattle?
tle? cattle? The historic city of Santa
Barbara now the playground of
the rich? The multi-colored pat
terns of flower fields
Probably not
A .lrge blue and white bill bill-hoard
hoard bill-hoard the Russian leader could
hardly miss it stands besid? the
Southern Pacific tracks on a
windsweot sand dune.
It reads:
'Welcome to Vandenherg Air
Force Base. Home of the 1st Bal
lisfic Missile Divison of the Stra
tegic Air Command."
A Strategic Air Command shield
a mailed fist holding an arrow
and a bolt of lightining is ins inscribed,
cribed, inscribed, "Peace is our profession."
The sign is framed by three
12-story high Atlas missile gan gan-trys
trys gan-trys the platforms workmen use
to service the missile.
War ready Atlas weapons cap capable
able capable of hurling hydrygen des destruction
truction destruction more than fi.000 miles
stand in the ganlrys.
Those grantrys and missiles
are poisled to strike out at any
aggressor.
!
The Air Force says their tar targets
gets targets are pro selected and pre presumably
sumably presumably are inside the Premi Premier's
er's Premier's country.
i The missiles are almost within
stone throwing distance of the
I railroad tracks. On Ihe other side
of the tracks are five launch pads
I used for the Discoverer research
project.
Newsmen covering lannehinss
!oi r of tne base.
The tracks run
right through
the middle of the base

Security officials fell that any
such freewheeling would definite definitely
ly definitely increase the risk of an inci incident.
dent. incident. They convinced Soviet rep
resentatives that it would be
much safer lo have every public
appearance carefully planned.
Maj. Gen. Nikolai S. Zacharov,
who heads the section of the Sov Soviet
iet Soviet secret police charged with
protecting Khrushchev and other
Russian leaders, and his top aide,
Vladimir P. Burdin, have visited
eath of the cities Khrushchev's
itinerary.
Willi Stale Department security
agents and local police, they have
aone over every roule Ilia
Khrushchev will lake, every hotel
in which he will stay.
They found that I lie Americans
were taking precautions which
are, even by Russian secret po police
lice police standards, very extensive.
Before Khrushchev arrives, the

Florida's Token School Integration
Gets Under Way Peacefully In Miami
ATLANTA, Sept. t (UPD Token integration came peacefully to Florida today and wtt
tended quietly in Virginia.
Two segregationists, including a friend of race agitator John Kasper, turned up at theJftr
chard Villa school in Miami but were paid no attention by the few white children and the IS
Negroes who arrived for the first day of school.
Only four Negroes those assigned to the school by the Dade County school board -trite
admitted at Orchard Villa. Twenty other Negroes were due at a white school at the Homestead
Air Force Base elementary school near Miami.
Sixty Negroes were assigned to classes at formerly white schools in Alexandria Front lUtrnt
Norfolk and Charlottesville in Virginia. ,nMH ,M33?

Seven Negroea entered two Alex Alexandria
andria Alexandria elementary schools without
disturbance.
It was the start of the second
year of token integration in Virgi Virginia
nia Virginia which gave in to court orders
after a year of massive resistance
to integration of any kind at the
public school level.
The Orchard Villa school in Mi Miami
ami Miami is in a changing neighborhood
where the makeup of the commu community
nity community has turned from mostly white
to mostly Negro in the past year.
Only a few white pupils were
left in the district to attend the
school. But it signaled Florida's
first acceptance of integration in
public schools.
Fred Hockett, a Miami carpen carpenter
ter carpenter who is a friend of Kasper and
a co-organizer of the local White
Citizens Councils, and J. B. Stoner
of Atlanta, claiming to be the Im Imperial
perial Imperial Wizard of the Christian
Knights of the Ku Klux, were at
Orchard Villa.
"You don't have to go to school
here," the two men called to the
white pupils. The six white pupils
paid them no mind.
Stoner had a small camera and
took pictures as the child-en en entered
tered entered the school.
The Dade County sheriff cheeked
by the school at opening time. A A-bout
bout A-bout the only other persons pres present
ent present were a corps of news report
ers and photographers.
For Front Royal and Charlottes Charlottesville,
ville, Charlottesville, it was integration for the first
time.
Norfolk and Alexandria, cos cosmopolitan
mopolitan cosmopolitan centers with Federal
government employes making up
a large part of their population,
began token race-mixing last
February.
All four bowed to integration on only
ly only after losing battles in Federal
court.
Twenty-one Negroes filed Into
seven previously-whitp Norfolk
schools, including six which were
closed last fall under the state's
old "massive resistance" laws.
They reopened last February with
17 Negroes admitted.
In Charlottesville, where Virsi
nia's only voluntary desegregaiton
plan was adopted in exenange foi
SI. Malo, Janowilz
Concert Tonight
Promises Success
A well balanced musical com
oination will be heard tonight at
the National Theater, with Alfre
do St. Malo and Hans Janowitz
ieatureing a violin and piano con concert
cert concert of the highest quality. Both
of them are favorites in Panama
and Canal Zone, ahd their perfor performances
mances performances always attract capacity
audiences.
Saint Malo is still in first place
among Latin America virtuosos.
He spent the last year working
hard and has achieved success in
United States. He has had one of
the most outstanding eareers oi
any Panamanian musicians When
ever he plays, one can be sure ol
hearing a wonderful performance
Well chosen rograms with
faultless coordination, and high
respect for his audience are Saint
Malo's characteristics.
Hans Janowitz ahs done a mag magnificent
nificent magnificent jod in Panama. He is a
skilled professional a serious pia pianist
nist pianist an efficent teacher. Jano Janowitz
witz Janowitz has given many recitals and
has performed! as soloists with
Ihe Panama Symphony. As ac
eompanist he is rated the best on
Ihe Isthmus and is highly ;
preciated by visiting musicians.
Tonight's concert program will
begin at 8:30 p.m. and patrons
have been asked to be punctual,
to avoid last minute interrup interruptions.
tions. interruptions. The National Theater ticket of office
fice office will be open at 6:00 p.m.,
and a few reservations at one
dollar, are still available at the
Department of Fine Arts, tele telephone
phone telephone 2 0258.

For Safety During US Trip

police and security agents in each
city will have:
Tested every elevator on which
Khrushchev may ride.
Investigated all of the cooks,
waiters and maids who may have
occasion to serve Khrushchev or
prepare his food.
Carefully inspected every plane
and automobile in which Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev will ride, and then put them
under round-the-clock guard.
located and kept a watch or
individuals known to have poten potentially
tially potentially dangerous personal griev grievances
ances grievances (for example, some Hun Hungarian
garian Hungarian refugees whose relatives
wre slaughtered in the revolt put
down by Khrushchev's tanks.)
Kximined Ihe streets along
which Khrushchev will ride, and
marked for special police surveil surveillance
lance surveillance any rooftop or alleyway
that might be a good vantage
point for a would-be assassin.
Eliminated from the itinerary

another semester of segregation,
i nine Negroes were admitted tc

Lane High and three to Venable
elementary. Both schools were
closed last fall.
And at Front Royal, seat of
troubled Warren County, the big
Hilltop High School with a capaci capacity
ty capacity of 1000 took in 18 Negroes and
some 400 whites while a private
foundation opened registration for
about 600 white students who plan
to boycott the integrated facility.
Meanwhile In Little Rock, Ark.,
explosions last night wrecked an
unoccupied office in the Little
Rock school board building,
damaged a building housing the
private offices of the mayor, and
demolished the fire chief's city city-owned
owned city-owned station wagon.
No one was hurt.
Assistant police chief R. E.
Glasscock did not know if the ex explosives,
plosives, explosives, possibly dynamite, were
set or thrown.
The blasts, on the eve of the
opening of the city's grade and
junior high schools, came minutes
apart.
Radio Announcers
In RP Musi Pass
Examining Board
An Executive Decree regulat regulating
ing regulating examinations for radio an announcers
nouncers announcers and commentators in
Panama was issued yesterday.
The decree specified that all
applicants for licenses as an announcers
nouncers announcers or commentators will
be examined for:
1. Knowledge of the laws and
regulations government broad broadcasting.
casting. broadcasting. 2. Basic knowledge of Spanish
grammar, diction and reading
of scrlpcs, speaking ability, tone
and vocabulary. iTiifi decree
ooes not specify how this would
apply in the case of English an announcers.
nouncers. announcers. The examination, which will
be conducted by a three-man
board, will also include narra narrations,
tions, narrations, dialogues, elocution, and
the reading of poetry, news and
radio commercials.
The board will establish the
cticlicn, interpretative ability
end tonal qualities of applicants
and wil lalso call on them to
act-l'b on given topics to test
their vocabulary.
Batista Family Due
In Madeira Today
For Political Exile
LISBON (UPI) Ex-President
Fulgencio Batista of Cuba left
here today by ship for the peace peaceful
ful peaceful honeymoon isle of Madeira to
settle down in political exile.
The 58 year old Batista left
aboard the Portuguese passenger
liner "Patria" with a party of 19
including his wife, young family
and personal staff. He will arrive
at Madeira this evening.
Batista arrived here Aug. 20
from the Dominican Republic,
and has lived for the past 18 days
in the new luxurious Ritz Hotel in
Lisbon. His wife flew in from the
United Slates a week later, Aug.
28, to join him. They had been
separated for the seven previous
months following the upheaval in
Cuba.
The reunited family will move
into one of Madeira's most fam famous
ous famous homes, the Quinta da Favila.
Under the terms of Batista's
political exile in Portugal he can cannot
not cannot engage in political activity,
and must refrain from any politi political
cal political utterances.
He was expected to spend part
of his time in Madeira writing
his memoirs.
any tight spot where a traffic jam
or a crowd out of control might
put the Russian leader in the po position
sition position of a sitting duck.
The problem has been some somewhat
what somewhat eased by the fact that
Khrushchev's itinerary will take
him mainly to big cities New
York, Washington, Los Angeles,
San Francisco and Pittsburgh
whose police departments are
very highly regarded by State
Department security officers.
Greater difficulties are posed
by Khrushchev's scheduled visit
lo tiie rural farming region of
Iowa. To meet Ihe security prob problem
lem problem here, the governor probably
will concentrate a large propor proportion
tion proportion of the state police force. If
Khrushchev questions some of the
"farmers" along his route too
closely, he may find they are fed federal
eral federal agents who know very little
about trarlors, but a great deal
about security.

The first yas to fire chief Qn
Nalley's car, parked in frontal
hig-residence at 10:20 pm.
The second was at the modern

istic building where Mayor Wetner
Knoop has his private construijtipji
firm offices at 10;53.
The third was at the school boald
office, just off the downtown jee jee-tion,
tion, jee-tion, at 10:58.
Police chief Gene Smith, teh
turned back a demonstration
marching on Central High School
when it opened integrated Aug;
12, immediately called all mo t
duty.
He ordered lights lurried eir in
all the city's school buildings rior
the remainder of the night.
Princess Royal
To Visit W. Indies; :
Early Next Year ?j
LONDON, Sept. 8. (UPI)-rjjS
Princess Royal is to visit the Wesl
Indies and British Honduras eflrjy
next year, it was announced to today.
day. today. The Princess, Queen Elizabeth'i
aunt, will sail from Portsmouth
in the royal yacht Britannir''' Britannir'''-bout
bout Britannir'''-bout the middle of JanuaryXand
return in the yacht at the figf
her tour.
She also hopes to pay a "Visit
to British Guiana.
During the tour, the Princess
hopes to be able to inspect Red
Cross and Girl Guide units; hosp'i hosp'i-tals,
tals, hosp'i-tals, social welfare and education educational
al educational projects; the West Indian. ee ee-giment
giment ee-giment and the University Col College
lege College of the West Indies.
California Croup
Of Businessmen
Back From Russia
BRUSSELS (UPI)-A group of
Californian business and profes professional
sional professional leaders arrived back here
yerterday from a two-week tour
of Russia.
The group was headed bv Cyril
Magnin, president of the San
Francisco Authority and presi presi-dent
dent presi-dent of the Joseph Magnin fash fashion
ion fashion chain.
They made an extensive tour of
Moscow, Kiev and Leningrad and
visited factories, farms, burning
sites, and various other facets of
Soviet industrial effort.
But none of the group said he
saw anything in Russia either in industrially
dustrially industrially or otherwise that fhey
thought could be used in the
United States.
All were impressed bv Russian
efforts at industrialization and! the
friendliness of the Russian peo people.
ple. people. VENUS OBSERVED lW
Sands poses after winning 3hil
title of Bronze Venus of ib
fir
Riviera In Nice. France. That.'i
father of the 2J-yer-okk-4j
from England and bar ao&aW f
ta from inaiav

tif tip
I 'r.i:Jifr!