The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03114

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Related Items:
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Full Text
Throughout the world H
more people buy f
Seagram's VO. ftn
than any other
imported whisky.

AN INDEPENDENT ylJt?N DAILY
NEWSPAPER
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe
Abraham Lincoln
4TH YEAR
PANAMA, R. r, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1959
rivi CENTS

J

Canal Zone Spends Placid
Labor Day Long Weekend
Whilb polic details were doubled and trebled throughout the United States to cope
with the usual Labor Day holiday weekend slaughter, Canal Zone police worked only a
skeleton staff as usual on a holiday here, and the Zone reportedly was as quiet and
safe as anybody's backyard.
Well, almost anybody's backyard. But not that one in Ancort that prompted an ano.
nymous neighbor to phone Balboa station yesterday that a five or six foot bpa constric.
tor was an uninvited guest in the area.
Policeman William T. Nail, a veteran of countless bush assignments across the Isth Isthmus,
mus, Isthmus, brought the boa in with bare hands and today it sulked hungrily in a small cage
behind the station parking lot. And an ugly wretch it is.

So far in the Canal Zone's
long weekend the boa is about
the extent of excitement.
All construction projects were
at a standstill today, including
ti-oik axng 4th of July Avenue
'and at the Cut-widening si'e
or. te Wett Bank.
But if there were no acci accidents
dents accidents or fatalities here, there
were plenty across the States,
where the highway death rate
wag running 25 percent ahead
of last year.
A United Press International
count at 11 am showed 316 per persons
sons persons killed in traffic accidents
in the Labor-Day holiday.
Four died in plane crashes, 45
drowned and 42 were killed in
miscellaneous accidents for an
overall total of 4p7.
California, which had hoped

Nixon Group On Price Levels Says
Govt. Can Keep Inflation In Check

WASHINGTON (UPI) Presi President
dent President Eisenhower's cabinet com committee
mittee committee on price stability declared
yesterday that ther are "great'
la flationary pressures at work
within the economy: But it saia
tiiey'an be kept in "check with
iilankfand vigorous" govern-
- me eomnuuee, iieaiieu uy vice
President Richard M. Nixon,
thus made clear that it does not
think the country has won the
battle against inflation. Such a
conclusion had been drawn by
some on the basis of a report is issued
sued issued by the committee last month.
In the new report, the commit committee
tee committee said that "in periods of rapid
economic expansion like the pres present,
ent, present, upward pressure op the price
level is always great."
The report was part of a series
the committee is preparing on
the "basic facts" related to price
stability. Later it will recommend
policies for "promoting economic
growth and maintaining reasona reasonable
ble reasonable price stability."
Besides Nixon, members of the
special committee are the secre secretaries
taries secretaries of the Treasury, Commerce,
Labor and Agriculture depart departments;
ments; departments; the postmaster genera!;
Raymond J. Saulnier, the presi president's
dent's president's chief economic adviser, and
W. Allen Wallis, a special presi presides
des presides al assistant.
Tne committee's report was de de-Toted
Toted de-Toted to an analysis, of price
trends dating back as far as 240
years.

Mitchell May Ask Taft-Hartley
Invokement To Snap Steel Impasse

WASHINGTON, Sept. 7 (UPI)
Labor Secretary James P. Mitch Mitchell
ell Mitchell says he would recommend that
President Eisenhower invoke the
Taft-Hartley Act to force an 80 80-day
day 80-day "cooling off" period in the
steel strike if it continued into
October and created a national
emergency.
He made the statement as
Democratic Gov. Mike V. DiSalle
of Ohio, one of the nation's steel steel-producing
producing steel-producing states, called on the
government to use "all its faci facilities"
lities" facilities" to bring about an early
end to the 54-day old strike.
DiSalle, former federal price
stabilizer, criticized Mitchell in a
TV interview yesterday for fail failing
ing failing to intervene in the strike. The
governor said a continuing strike
could harm the economy. But he
conceded it had done no .erious
damage so far.
Mitchell noted on another pro-
40-Hour, 5-Day
Week Discussed
By RP Leaders
Govern mint, commercial
end Industrial circles are said
to be holding talks aimed at
establishing a five-day 40 40-Jhoor
Jhoor 40-Jhoor work week throughout
the Republic.
It is understood that spe special
cial special attention will be paid to
salaries to be earned by work workers
ers workers under the 40-hour plan.
Some sources consider that
the plan will provide addi additional
tional additional employment in those
service which are forced to
perate on a 41 or 56-hour
work schedule.

for a repeat of its relatively
safe July 4 holiday, when only
10 died, led the nation with 30
highway deaths, followed by
Ohio with 24, Texas with 20.
and New York and Pennsylvania
with 16 each. Virginia and Mi Michigan
chigan Michigan each recorded 13.
Six stales Alaska, Con Connecticut,
necticut, Connecticut, Nevada, New Hamp Hampshire,
shire, Hampshire, Utah and Hawaii
showed perfect records of no
highway deaths.
Fair weather across most of
the nation lured as many as 71
mill .on motorist.; to the open
highways, threatening to pro promote
mote promote a highway carnage that
may reach an all-time high.
The National Safety Council
estimated that traffic deaths
were running at a 25 percent

The committee said this coun country's
try's country's economic history shows pe periods
riods periods of both falling and rising
price levels. Overall, the latter
have dominated and prices have
risen at an average rate of one one-half
half one-half of 1 per cent a year.
The broad declines of earlier
periods have- disappeared in- tfre
last 25 years, the report said,
with the result that "rises in the
price lev-el are permanent and
cumulative in a way that they
were not in the proceeding two
centuries."
It said this was a matter "of
serious concern" and that "t h e
government must nip in the bud
any price rises that may be fos fostered
tered fostered by the current rapid co co-nomic
nomic co-nomic expansion.
"It is clear that public policies
for combatting inflation must be
more energetic in the future than
they have been in the past quar quarter
ter quarter of a century," the committee
said.
The report did not try to ex explain
plain explain why price declines no long longer
er longer are characteristic of the ecou
omy.
The committee's optimism that
tough government policies could
produce "reasonable" price stabil stability,
ity, stability, plus its finding that economic
surges have outweighed declines,
indicated it was not optimistic
that absolute stability could be
achieved.
gram that there were about 650,-
000 persons idled by the United
Steelworkers Union walkout that
has shut down plants producing
90 percent of the nation's steel.
Hie secretary said he would
recommend that Eisenhower ob obtain
tain obtain a Taft-Hartley injunction if
the strike continued into early
October and serious steel short shortages
ages shortages and urther unemployment
in allies industries developed.
The injunction would halt the
strike for an 80-da.v "cooline off"
period during which Steelworkers
would have to go back to their
jods. iney would be free to con continue
tinue continue the strike if no agreement
was reached by the time 'h in injunction
junction injunction expired.
Union officials oppose use of
Tiie injunction.
Eisenhower has refused to in intervene
tervene intervene in the strike He has urg urged
ed urged both sides to work for an ea' ea'-ly
ly ea'-ly settlement that would not he
inflationary.

lady Chatterleys Lover Incites Impassioned Feud Among Publishers

By CLAIRE COX
NEW YORK (UPI) Lady
Chatterley has turned into a trou troublemaker,
blemaker, troublemaker, perhaps the biggest
ever to hit the literary scene.
She has set publishers to feud feuding
ing feuding as they never have feuded be before.
fore. before. They are calling each other
names. Thy are duelling in court.
And they are fighting furiously for
Ihe reading public's quarters and
dollars.
The more they squabble, the
richer they get." in their ll-out
effor; to prove that all the world
loves a lover, even Lady Chatter Chatter-ley's.
ley's. Chatter-ley's. D. H. Lawrence's frank 192R
novel, "Lady Chatterley'i Lover,"

rate over last vear's and warn

ed that its prediction of 450
aeatns for the 78-hour neriod
ending midnight tonight might
De surpassed.
' A heavy toll Saturday night
pushed the death rate to seven
an hour across the nation yes yesterday,
terday, yesterday, compared to about five
an hour Saturday nicht.
"It gets tiresome issuing the
same warning," the Safety
uouncn saia, "out its strictly
up to the driver to hold down
the toll. There can't be enough
policemen to ride with every
driver.
The council said most states
had cancelled leaves and days
off for local and state police policemen
men policemen in an effort to hold down
the slaughter.
200 Teenagers
Arrested As N.Y.
Cops Crack Down
NEW YORK, Sept. T Police
reported today they have brought
in at least 200 teenagers during
a two-roundup to clear New,rYork-
Btrpflt nf "mint"
was oroerefl air loujr teenagers
were killed over t ipsa of A week
in the worst outbreak of a summer-long
wave of teen gang ter terrorism.
rorism. terrorism. Patrolmen and detectives were
arriving at various police stations
by the hour with groups of youths.
In nearly every arrest, the charge
was "disorderly conduct."
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller, mean meanwhile,
while, meanwhile, said that he did not believe
that the juvenile crime plaguing
New York was unique to the big
city.
"I don't think New York City
has got a really more serious
problem than our upstate cities
have. I think really we ought to,
all of us, understand that this
isn't a New York City, or New
York state problem slone, nor is
it a national problem alone.
"This juvenile delinquency is
a world-wide phenomenon."
Meany Will Speak
To Union Rally
In Sail Lake City
WASHINGTON, Sept. 7 (UP1)-AFL-CIO
President George Meanv
reserved hjs Labor Day statement
until tonight when he will address
a big union rally in Salt Lake Ci City.
ty. City. But AFL-CIO vice president
James B. Carey spoke out today
in behalf of organized labor.
Carey, who also heads the In International
ternational International Union of Electoral
Workers, took to television to ham
mer away at the President's role
In drumming up support for pass
age of Ihe labor reform measure.
He also pledged labor to seek ev eventual
entual eventual repeal of the legislation.
Through a slip of the tongue,
however, Carey paid th Presid President
ent President an obviously unitended com compliment.
pliment. compliment. He meant at one point
to say that few public figures are
more ignorant than Eisenhower
about labor matters. Instead, t
cam out "less ignorant."
Democratic Chairman Paul M.
Butler also took a slap at the bill
although he did not mention it by
name. Butler said proposals which
ostensibly are aimed at corrup corruption,
tion, corruption, but which actually are de designed
signed designed to "weaken or destroy hon honest,
est, honest, decent unions should be re resisted."
sisted." resisted." about adultery in the English
midlands, has not set any literary
records yet, hut it lg on its way.
It still has to go some to catch
up wiih "Peyton Place," which
sold eight million paperback cop copies.
ies. copies. But it has forged way ahead
of the 2,700,000 copies of "Anato "Anatomy
my "Anatomy of a Murder."
Total of about five million un un-expurgated
expurgated un-expurgated Copies of Lady Chat Chatterley
terley Chatterley are circulation all printed
and distributed this year. There
are another 1.500,000 expurgated
eoi?s -will, all the naughtiest
passages penciled out.
The prices range from 25 cents
for a tabloid newspaper edition of
the book to a $6 hard cover edi edition
tion edition sold by Grove Press. Despite

Laos

y m AkiH" A.'. : lit i tttfiMBi win nn m mini 0 V'HM u ii iminiimiiniiiiimny iiwintinimrf

MAT END SOON Begging In Panama, City, except in extreme
cases, will be regulated soon if plana jointly prepared by the
Panami Lions Club and the City, Council are put into effect.
It was pointed aitt that soma beg out. ,oL necessity, while, for.

City, Lions Club
Plan Would Help
Street Beggars
The Panama City government
and the Panama Lions Club are
currently making plans aimed
at ridding the city of streetside
beggars.
City Treasurer Modesto Avila
said a report on Lions Club study
of the problem is to be turned
over to Mayor Heliodoro Patino
with a proposal for the establish establishment
ment establishment of four stations where indi indigent
gent indigent persons can pick up weekly
handouts of food and money.
The proposal also calls for the
naming of a committee which
would collect contributions for
distribution to the poor and for
the issuing of identification cards
to beggars.
Vision Magazine
Sees 2 TV Studios
In RP By Dec. 31
Panama will have two television
stations "before the end of the
year," according to a recent issue
of the magazine Vision.
Recently, one Panama City
broadcaster signed contract here
for a supply of television equip equipment
ment equipment and reportedly intends to
start telecasting some time in No November.
vember. November. To Erect Statue
BEIRUT (UPI) A bronze sta statue
tue statue of Iraqi Premier Abdul Karim
Kassem standing 26 feet tall will
be erected at giant southgaie
square in downtown Baghdad. Re Reports
ports Reports here said the statue would
be designed by Iraqi irtist Khalid
AIRahal and cast in Italy.
will be the first statue of Kassem
erected in Baghdad.
the fact that the cheaper versions
are available, the Grove edition
is still on begt-sel'er lists.
Lady Chatterley demurely en entered
tered entered the American literary
world in 1946 in the expurgated
version. Grove introduced her in
her original form early this year,
setting off a chain of events to
which no end is in sight.
First Grove Press fought the
government. That battle still is
going on, although the publisher
won the initial skirmish with a
federal court injunction barring
Ihe Post Office Department from
keeping Lady Chatterley out of
U. S. mails.
The government has appealed
the decision. But meanwhile, the

nXv Mum

Panamanians Must
Apply For Cedulas
Or Face Govt. Fine
A communique issued over the
weekend by the Electoral Tribu Tribunal
nal Tribunal announced that $10 fines will
be imposed on all legal residents
of Panama who have failed to ap apply
ply apply or have not been photograph photographed
ed photographed for a new cedula by midnight,
Sept. '15.
The communique also announc announced
ed announced that 186,939 have been prepar prepared,
ed, prepared, of which 13,000 are waiting to
be picked up by their owners.
The total number of applica applications
tions applications which have been processed
by the Electoral Tribunal up to
Saturday was 320,000, with some
69,000' still to be processed.
Of Sthe total number of cedulas
issued, the tribunal said 101,417,
are in the Province of Panama,
15,553, in Colon and 2,566 in Bo Bo-cas
cas Bo-cas del Toro.
The tribunal said the $10 fine
would apply in all cases where
residents over the age of 21 are
not in) possession of a new cedu cedula
la cedula or an application stub indicat indicating
ing indicating tjiat the holder has been
photographed for a new cedula.
v o
I
X
Today's Transits
(scheduled)
Norhtbound If
Southbound 17
TOTAL J
' (Clear Cut: 4)
various publishers are fighting
one another in a literary sweep sweepstakes
stakes sweepstakes in which all are winning
prize money.
Because the novel is in the pub public
lic public domain, anyone is free to
publish it without paying royalties.
Some publishers are paying the
Lawrence estate anyway.
As soon as the court decision
was announced ruling the book
was not too obscene to send
through the mail, the publishing
race started.
Pocket Books scored first, by
sending out its first shipment of
unexpurgated paperback Lady
Chatterley's to sell for 35 cents
each.
Nearly two million copies have

Reaches

China Rejects
Centuries-Old
Indian Border
NEW DELHI, Indie. Sept. 7 7-(UPI)
(UPI) 7-(UPI) Prime Minister Jawaoar Jawaoar-lal
lal Jawaoar-lal Nehru disclosed today that
Communist China had rejected
traditional Indochinese frontiers
outlined in documents dating
beck more than a century.
Nehru placed before parliament
a 122-page White Paper containing
memoranda, complaints and let letters
ters letters about the frontier exchanged
between New Delhi and Peipmg for
the past five years.
The correspondence riisrlosrri
that Communist Chinese Premier
Chou En-lai said in a letter last
Jan. 23 that the border never had
been delineated and that historical
ly there never had been a treaty or
agreement between India and Chi China
na China on the matter.
Chou said the MacMahon line,
worked out before World War I
to define the southern border of
Tibet, was a product of British
"eggression" against the "Tibe "Tibetan
tan "Tibetan region ef China" and was il illegal.
legal. illegal. Chou suggested in the letter that
pending formal negotiations to de
fine the border, India and China
should continue to hold the territo territory
ry territory they then occupied and not try
to jgaiahy more.
India has charged that Chinese
treeps have encroached en In Indian
dian Indian sell this summer end clash clashed
ed clashed with Indian border troeos.
Peiping counter-charged that
was the Indians who trespassed.
Nehru replied to Chou las
March saying he was suroriserl
that Chou said the traditional
frontiers had not been accepted al
any time by China.
Bus Company Denies
Arbitrary Firings
Charged By Union
A spokesman for the Cana'
Zone Bus Service today denied
that three men recently let eo
had been arbitrarily fired by the
transportation company, as charg charged
ed charged by the Mixed Company Em Employe's
ploye's Employe's Union.
According to the spokesman, all
of the men were re'eased after
being absent from work for pe periods
riods periods rancing from two weeks to
two months. One of the workers
will be re-employed beginning to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. The other two workers will not
be taken back, a company offi official
cial official said. Both were away from
work for a month or more with without
out without proper justification, acording
to the company, and both later
reported, not to resume work, but
to collect what they termed "sick
leave pay."
fff;"-'' .:- 'V- 'i'' "it
pay sick leave to any employes,
and absence oiif In iMik-m or in injury
jury injury is acceptable only when pro properly
perly properly authorized by a doctor.
Neither of the two men pro produced
duced produced severance pay, which was
denied by the company on the
grounds the men had left their
jobs without authorization. How However,
ever, However, tioth were paid for accrued
vacation time, and are reported reportedly
ly reportedly working at other jobs in Pa Panama.
nama. Panama. been turned out In six printings,
all stemming from volume No.
402 of the 1,000-copy private print printing
ing printing financed by Lawrence in Italy
in 1828. Pocket Books paid $100
for its signed copy of this first
edition of Lawrence's third re rewrite
write rewrite of his favorite book.
After Pocket Books came out
with its version, Grove began cir circulating
culating circulating a 50-cent version through
Dell press. The New American
Library, which already is selling
the censored version, put the un unexpurgated
expurgated unexpurgated Lady Chalterley on
ihe market, also for 50 cents.
Pyramid tumped on the band-
': r c vfsion, and
other publisher! joined in the
race.

Security Council
May Send Mission
Of Fact-Finders

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y., Sept. 7 (UPI) The United
Mates lined up support today for a move to send United
Nations fact finders to investigate Communist attacks on
Laos.
US ambassador He

make the proposal to the

iiiii uuernaon.
Lodge spent yesterday sounding out possible co-sponsors
for a necessary resolution.
The Security Council will begin consideration of the
Laos situation by hearing a report from secretary-general
Dag Hammarskjold on the appeal for help he received
from the government of the tiny Southeast Asian nation.

Laotian foreign minister Kha Kha-mandan
mandan Kha-mandan Panya was on his way
to New York by air to plead his
nation's case personally if he is
invited to appear before the coun council.
cil. council. The council is composed of Ar Argentina,
gentina, Argentina, Britain, Canada, Nation Nationalist
alist Nationalist China, France, Italy, Japan,
Pakistan, Russia, Tunisia and the
United,,. States.
The Communist blec has op opposed
posed opposed UN interference and Rus Russia
sia Russia could veto any move the
ether members of the Security
Council might went te make.
Then Hie case likely would be
taken ua by the 82-ration Gen General
eral General Assembly.
Laos, in ts appeal to Ham Hammarskjold,
marskjold, Hammarskjold, asked for a UN emer
gency force to halt "aggres "aggression"
sion" "aggression" but the United States and
its allies decided to press for on only
ly only a fact-finding commission at
this point.
Announcement ef the UN fact-
PAA Introduces New
Jet Airline Service
Between US, Asia
TOKYO (UPI) Pan-American
airways yesterday introduced com
mercial jet airliner service oe oe-Iween
Iween oe-Iween Asia and the United
States, cutting travel time be between
tween between San Francisco and Tokyo
almost in half.
The inaugural westbound flight
was made in 13 hours, 20 minutes
Flvina limp hv a Rnpino Intrpnn.
t nental 707-321 jetliner named the
cupper uoerty Hen.
The plane, a ""larger model of
the 707-121 which has been in serv
ice for some time in the United
States and over the Atlantici, was
the same one used to carry the
press corps from the U.S. to Mos
cow ai me lime oi vice resident
Richard M. Nixon's visit.
Thp ipl airliner rarrvino 117
passengers, a crew of 10 and five
ran-ftm omciais, ieu oan rran-
cisco international airport at 2:45
D.m. e.d.t. Saturday. It tniirheri
down at Haneda airport here at
11:00 n.m. Minnav.
Mavor George ChristoDher of
ban rrancisco, officiating at in inaugural
augural inaugural ceremonies, snipped a
white ribbon at the loading ramp
after the Reverend Takashi Tsu
ji, director of the Department of
Education of the Buddhi t
Churches of America, had read
an invocation blessing the craft.
The airline has scheduled fnur
round tries weeklv from 1h Unit
ed States to Tokyo with the big
plane, which has a wing span of
142 feet, five inches, is 39 feet
loneer than the entirp lenpth nf
the first flight by the Wright
Brothers plane.
National Guard's
Radio Hookup
To Be Independent
The National Guard Is expanding
its radio communications system
in order to be completely indepen independent
dent independent of the telegraph system, Na National
tional National Guard commander Col. Boli Bolivar
var Bolivar Vallarino declared over the
weekend.
Vallarino said the aim Is to a a-void
void a-void the necessity of messaf.es be between
tween between National Guard headquar headquarters
ters headquarters and its detachments in outly outlying
ing outlying Interior districts p a s s ing
through the regular telegraph
channels.

l M

11-nation Security Council later

finding project came as Presi President
dent President Eisenhower foreshortened
his holiday in Scotland and
prepared to fly back te Wash Wash-incjton,
incjton, Wash-incjton, apparently deeply con concerned
cerned concerned by the threatening situa situation
tion situation in Lees.
Frank Carpenter, spokesman for
the US delegation tft the UN, told
a news conference that the. UniU
ed,. SUtes, hoped for "trarck tc-
uon on the resolution.
He said the plan was bemf
worked out with UN allies of the
United States, but he declined to
say which ones will jointly spons sponsor
or sponsor the resolution.
Authoritative diplomatic seurc seurc-es
es seurc-es reported earlier that the U U-nited
nited U-nited States was working n a
plen in cooperation with ether
members of the Southeast Asia
Treaty Organization (SEATO)
which includes Briteln, Frence,
Australia, New Zeelend, the
Philippine,, Pakistan end Thai Thailand.
land. Thailand. The proposed resolution appear appear-ed
ed appear-ed to rule out an American at at-tempt
tempt at-tempt to get the Security Coun Council
cil Council to approve the sending of an
emergency force of troops to Laos
as a Laotian anneal Mm....i,
jold had requested.
sued action appeared certain to
be vetoed by Russia.
There tpartd te be seme
hope in diplomatic quarters
here that Russie might sup support
port support the resolution, perhaps in
a modified form, as the best
way of stopping the fighting and
not inviting the ill will ef ether
nations.
If action on Laos was met by
a Soviet veto, the only recourse
would be for the problem to be
brought before the General As As-semly
semly As-semly a time consuming pro process.
cess. process. Carpenter said it was hoped the
council wojUI set up a subcom subcommittee
mittee subcommittee that could be sent to Laoa
"with some certain speeo" before
events there cancelled such a
group's usefulness.
"The United States hopes that
a group of countries of which it
would be one will join in propos proposing
ing proposing to the. ..council the formation
of a subcommittee to look into
the facts on the spot in Laos."
Carpenter said.
Geneva Disarmament
Discussions To Be
Resumed In I960
LONDON, Sept. T (UPI)- The
Western Big Three and Russia
liave agreed to resume disarma disarmament
ment disarmament discussions at Geneva at the
beginning of 1960, it was announc announced
ed announced today.
In addition to thp Bic Four." the
new disarmament committee will
include Bulgaria, Canada, Czechoi
Invakia, Italy, Poland and Roma Romania.
nia. Romania. The new lo-member body ffvei
the Soviet Union, in effect, nu numerical
merical numerical parity between eastern
and western sides.
The new group will be closely
associated with the United Na Nations.
tions. Nations. The agrement to call the new
hnriv into existence itemi from
an accord reached by the Bis
Three western powers and Russia
in Geneva in July, at the end of
Ihe four power foreign ministry
conference.
The official announcement that
the new group will meet said the
work of the new committee will
not in any way supersede- the re recognition
cognition recognition that disarmament is
United Nations matter.



, PAS I TWO

THE SUNDAI AMERICAN
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER T, 1951

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNIO AND njlLllHIt Y TMt PANAMA AMtltlCAN Pt8. INC
POUNOtO IV MLMN BOUNSfVtU. IH
HAKMODIO ARIAS. rOrTO
1-7 M Itiiii p o boi iS4 n pr P
TVLKPHONB l-Oi0 8 LlWIt I
CALI ADDKtt PAN AM KRIC AN. PANAMA
COLON Officii 11 170 Ccntrai Avinui iitwiin Utm and iSth TitT
PUIIta lIFtfNTATIVt JOIHUA B POWER! INC
14S MADKON AVI.. N'W YORK '7 N. V
tcM mt hah
PtN month in Aovanci 70 2 90
F IX MONTH! IN ADVANCt 00 I S 00
P ONt VIAK IN AoyANCt 90 4 00

THIS IS TOUR FORUM THI HADIRS OWN COLUMN
Til Mail toa it in pin forum tor moors The Panama Amoricin.
Lotto ri aro rocaivoo1 gratefully and aro Haaaloo1 in wtlly con iatntial
taonor.
If foo coatribvta a lottor don't fto imparlant it It ooein't aooeif thi
Mat day. Lottort iro piioliihto1 in tko ordtr received.
Pleata try to keep t'no lottort limited to ono aoe lenttk.
Identity of lottor writort it hold m ttrictttt confido net.
TbJt mniitti mvmot mo reteentibility for etatementt or opinions
aproned in lottort from reader.
THE MAIL BOX

DUBIOUS OPPOSITION

Sir:

We are a little confused by the rumors which have been 11ip
around regarding some of the political parties which are being form formed
ed formed supposedly to oppose the National Patriotic Coalition
Most of us Panamanians of West Indian origin or Afro Panama Panamanians
nians Panamanians feel that the Coalition has been giving us a dirty deal ever
ainec President Remon was assassinated, and we are seriously con con-iidering
iidering con-iidering joining up with the opposition to see if they will do any
better.
We have not yet made up our minds which one of the many new
parties we are going to support, because we don"t want to be fooled
or to be used only as pawns in a game of checkers. Some of these
new opposition parties have shown that they are willing to give some
of our best spokesmen like Basilio Cragwell and Dave Constable an
active part in policy-making positions, but we are still keeping a
watchful eye to see if they really mean to give them a free hand to
act as our representatives.
But we are beginning to wonder just how sincere some of the
others are. The other day the belief that the Republican Party
.might not really be an opposition party gained greater strength
with a statement by Deputy Marcel Penso that the Republican
group is made up of "friends of Ernestito."
As far as we have been able to see, this statement by one of the
men who broke away from the Coalition with Deputy Bazan has not
been denied, and if that is the case you can bet a lot of us Afro-Pan

amanians are not going to go along with them, because we want no
part of the Coalition.
The Republican Party is not the only one under suspicion, Baby
Aleman's Dipal group also has a mighty suspicious look and some of
us are willing to bet that some time before the elections one or may maybe
be maybe all two of these groups may form some sort of alliance with the
Coalition.
If this should happen, from past experience we know what to
expect so we are keeping our eyes open with a firm resolution to
act independently. In fact we have heard that an independent move movement
ment movement is being formed among Panamanians of West Indian origin
and we are only waiting to hear more about to see if it would be
worth the while to give it our wholehearted support.
Independionte

A BOOST AND A KNOCK
Sir:
I was agreeably impressed by what seemed to me a democratic
gesture on the part of your Mail Box editor after I read the last par paragraph
agraph paragraph of a letter which appeared in Saturday's Mail Box column,
signed by Andrei K. Lawson.
The paragraph in question stated, "I am with El Partido Repu Repu-blicano
blicano Repu-blicano because the party's program like a few others, but very few,
includes provision for equal opportunities for all Panamanians re regardless
gardless regardless of race, color or parental origin."
Now, any resident of the Isthmus who is fairly well informed on
the present political situation knows that the sympathies of the fam family
ily family which owns the Panama American lie with the Third Nationalist
Party.
1 thought it worthy of admiration therefore, when the Mail Box
editor failed to delete the obvious boosting of a rival political gtoup
and I commend him highly for this.
1 hope the editor keeps up the good work and does not ever re repeat
peat repeat the boner he pulled in the Mail Box (Aug. 21) when he showed
poor taste in placing derogatory comments above a boringly long
contribution by "Gringo."
Gringo, in his letter, hit Panama's demands for aid from the
US real hard, and although the writer pulled no punches in giving
his point of view, hewas invited to do so by a line appearing
above the column which says, "This is your forum The readers'
own column."
Let the Mail Box editor bear those words in mind whenever he
j : : .1 : : t: j i ; : t i :

aiKrrFK wiin, ami is inriineu 10 cuutizc in yum, me 'ipiniunt as
expressed by his contributors.
Another Gringo

PARTY CHATTIR

Sir:

Gov. Potter was plainly expressing his liberal attitude when he
said in an off-the-cuff response to a question from the floor.
that it was all right with him for Panamanian employes of the Canal
organi7ation to register with the Communist Party if they wisheij.
Potter cave that as his Dersonal opinion.

But I believe the law may say differently. And I suggest that

witnout trying to emnarrass me governor a morougn cneck ne mane
with the District Attorney as to the law in force in the United States
and on the Canal Zone, and whether membership in a Communist
organization disqualifies an individual for employment in a Federal
agency.
My puess is that members of Communist organizations, includ including
ing including the Communist Party, are barred from Federal jobs.
It will be recalled that several years ago some employes of the
Canal were dismissed under this law. They had signed petition in indicating
dicating indicating their membership in the Partido del Pueblo, a party open openly
ly openly claimed by the Communist Internacionale as one of its overseas
affiliates.
At the same time it was said, perhaps rightlywthat some, not all,

01 mose wno jigneo inougm mey were jusi peimoning lor neuer

housing, or something of the sort. Others were quite well aware of
what they were doing.
It was too bad that those who were merely gullible should have
suffered. But after all, none were illiterate.
Government service is a responsible job, carrying serious du duties,
ties, duties, a fact which many Panamanians in US service seem to realize.
But not all do.

Anrwav left hair what the DA In Anrnn ha In uv

For The Rtcord

.Sir:

ZONI ROBBIRIIS

I wish something could be done by Canal Zone Police author

ities, or by the governor, or by somebody about the recent rash of
thievery which is sweeping across the Canal Zone. Last week I had

several sheets and pillowcases stolen off my line and I know many
"persons who have had similar experiences lately.
; I am also given to understand that the recent crime wave is to
. a great extent a result of the impoverished condition of so manv
'Panamanians, many of whom have been hit by provisions of the
Eisenhower Remon Treaty. Oh, well Panamanian politicians will be

T 1 1 1 1 i rv V. i 4 1 ,.,;U U -nkkino aa..1J U - I

CZ Houtowlfo

CSamso .7e
by Juit Anderson

friorcuno
Jewellers

He Should See Us Now

frtnirt ac r -v 1 ot i s

NEW YORK CONFIDENTIAL
By LEE MORTIMER

ONLY TWELVE DAYS TO
WINCHELL (You lucky readerst:
Francoise S a g a n, the young
French authorine, and her publisher-husband
quietly reported
severed. ..Bob Neal who romanced
Debbie Reynolds is keeping his
dates with Mona Freeman very
sotto voce. .Scott Brady "dis "discovered"
covered" "discovered" Cincy Robbins at Joe
Marsh's Spindletop. .Come to
think of it. Who discovered Gene Genevieve?
vieve? Genevieve? I did. With a full column
in 1956 when she appeared at the
St. Regis where she already had
been discovered by Barron Polan,
as if it matters. .While Mort Sahl
is at the Copacabaga Gene Nor Norman
man Norman is minding Sahl's store in
Hollywood which goes under the
name of Phylli Kirk (and it serves
any comedian "like Satir Tight for
mixing "liberal" politics with "'hu "'humor").
mor"). "'humor"). .That was Winston Chur Churchill
chill Churchill (a grandson of Britain's
grandold man?) and brunette mo model
del model Gillis McGill at the Polonaise.

IT AINT THE WEATHER (It's
the humanity): If Tuesday Weld
is 15 John Ireland must be 15, and
a half. It's puppy love. .Another
juve, Metro's 19-year-old George
Hamilton, bought the Rolls origi originally
nally originally built for England's Queen
Mother and is wiring it for stereo stereophonic.
phonic. stereophonic. (The kid must play with
Wendy Vanderbilt?). .When Ca Carol
rol Carol Channing (who's heading back
to Broadway) closed at the Vegas
Tropicana, Lou Walters excitedly
told her she had broken Jayne
Mansfield's record. "I didn't know
I had the equipment for it," Carol
quipped. .Cincinnati's fighting
Congressman, Gordon Scherer,
shot back a counterthreat to union
prexy Jim Carey's threat to defeat
Congressmen who voted for the
tough labor bill. Scherer wrote:
"The forthcoming merger be between
tween between Hoffa and Harry Bridges'
Communist dominated Longshore Longshoremen's
men's Longshoremen's Union can result in com completely
pletely completely strangling the U. S. in
time of peace of war. Only anti antitrust
trust antitrust legislation will prevent such
an uhholy and deadly alliance."....
"Best of Everything's" Diane
Baker and Denny Powers (the boy
who went to Tahiti with Sterling
Hayden) are dating others. ..Base ..Baseball's
ball's ..Baseball's beloved humorist, Al
Schacht, celebrating 50 years in
baseball and 20 in the restaurant
business. .According to Joe E.
Lewis, a friend in need is a pest.

I'M A DIZZY WITH A TIZZY:
Gia Scala's engagement to Don
Burnett left Timmy Everett torch
ing like the Statue of Liberty. (Well
he's free ain't he?). .. .Bell Fugaiy
(listed here as last week's genious
of the week) in secret hudles wit n
Baron Hilton that may result in
a marriage between the big travel
agency and the hotel chain's cre credit
dit credit system. .Ork leader Nat
Brooks ought to book his society
band into a swank East Side
spot this year. It's a Summer
fixture at the Brown Derby in the
Catskills, but only does, private
dates in the Winter. (His lovely
wife Kono Fujii, started the Japan Japanese
ese Japanese glamor fad and still none have
topped her!). .When they say a
show girl has rocks in her head,
doesn't it mean she's alway think thinking
ing thinking of diamonds?

SOUTH HAS OR 1UST: Rober
ta Linn, Welk's former Chimpag Chimpag-tie
tie Chimpag-tie Gal, in a torrid romance with
Lloyd Samaha, eo owner of Canlis
restaurant in Honolulu. They're vi visiting
siting visiting all the island caves. . Ann

McCormack, once married to
Jackie Coogan, singing weekends
in the Honolulu Embers. Her hus husband,
band, husband, Paul Livermore, downs it...
Advertiser city editor Buck Buck Buck-wach
wach Buck-wach called the surprising election
shots a week in advance. Bob
Fukuda, who went to the U. of
Hawaii with Ann, and is president
of the Ann Koga Mortimer Memo Memorial,
rial, Memorial, was one of the few Republi Republicans
cans Republicans elected to the new slate's

lower house. .Ethel Azama, dis discovered
covered discovered in the Islands, opens at
Vegas Sahara with Torme and will
be as big as Pat Suzuki. .Henry
Kaiser's personal fleet getting so
big, there's a gag going around
Peart Harbor that he offered Ad

miral Felt (D-in-C of the Pacific)
a million bucks for his four stars.

POOR MORTIMER'S ALMAN ALMAN-ACH
ACH ALMAN-ACH Guy with dough
Soldom hoar No.

DAILY
MEDITATION

(Presented by the D opart moot
of Christian Education of the E E-pitcopal
pitcopal E-pitcopal Church in the Mission Missionary
ary Missionary Diocese of the Panama Can Canal
al Canal Zona.)
PRISONERS TO PRIESTS
"Preach good tidings unto the
meek. .' bind up the broken brokenhearted.
hearted. brokenhearted. proclaim liberty to
the captives."
This is the Sabbath lesson
which Jesus read in the syna synagogue
gogue synagogue as He began His ministry.
It is the Sunday lesson which
ansrs our dilema We all
come under the categories des described
cribed described in our text. There is much
in life today to af lie; and harass
us. We are captives of the spirit.
We can change from prisoners
to priests. God has anointed us
to do His saving work. As we
help others who are afflicted and
discouraged we find new strength
and joy in our own lives.
Today is the beginning of a

new year of activity as we go

back to -work or school alter tne
summer vacation. It may be a
return to a formal dull routine
or we can make it the year of
the Lord's favor as the, prophet
predicts. It all depends upon the
way we meet the challenge of our

title and text a do we work as
prisoners or priests?

"Keen, we beseech thee, 0

Lord, thv Church with thy peroe

tual mercv; and, because the

frailty of man without thee can can-no'
no' can-no' but fall, keep us ever by thy

help from all things hurtful, and

lead us to all things profitable
to our salvation: through Jesus

Christ our Lord." Amen.

at

Olie Washington
Merry-Go -Round
er DREW PBAItSON

o

SINNER REFORMS.

ILFORD, England (UPD Dam

on Runyon would have open

oleased when Tom Kcer married
Brenda Neve yesterday. Brenda,

!ik the heroine of Runyon's

Guys and Dolls." was a member

of the Salvation Army And Tom
was a sinner she met while do;ng

a little missionary work in a pub.

Tom, 23. became a color sergeant

in the Salvation Army. And after
he married 18-year-old Brenda
Saturday he said, "now w? can
work together to convert others."

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WASHINGTON Speaker Sam

Rayjurn of Texas, wao naa been

iieanng a lot of talk recently a a-bout
bout a-bout "secondary boycotts" in lab labor
or labor legislation, almost staged a
primary boycott of his own a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the White House.
Rayburn was furious when he
learned that his lriend, John A.
Burns, the retiring Democratic
delegate to Congress from Haw Hawaii,
aii, Hawaii, had not been invited to the
White .House for the signing o4
Hawaii's statehood proclamation.
"In that case, I won't go my myself,"
self," myself," exploded the Texan. "No
one has Gone more to achieve
statehood for Hawaii than Jack
Burns and no one has a better
right to be present at the procla proclamation
mation proclamation sign.ng. Yet he wasn't in invited
vited invited to the White House because
he is a Democrat. Well, if they're
counting Jack Burns out, they can
couni me out also."
When Burns heard about this
he hastened to the Speaker's of office,
fice, office, finally prevailed on him to
change his mind and attend the
ceremonv. but onlv after a lnno

ana impassioned appeal.
"I appreciate your friendly sup
port, Mr. Speaker," he argued
"but forget about me. I can with

siana me snuo. mis Ming is big

ger man anv one nersnna itv

"In the interest of Hawaii and

its people and for my sake I

am asKing you to go to the White

nouse on tnis occasion."
Rayburn went. However, hii
Texas temnpr hadn't cnhciHoH

en when President Eisenhower,
with a beaming smile, offered
pens used in the proclamation
signing to Rayburn and other
leaders. Looking Ike straight in
the eye, Mr. Sam refused the pen

cue nesiaeni protiered.
"I don't believe I want that,'
he said crisply.
As he Walked awav vnnno Ron

Daniel Inojye, the new Democra-

i c congressman-elect from Haw Haw-ai,
ai, Haw-ai, whispered:
"Mr. Speaker, maybe Jack
Burns would like that pen."
"Maybe ,he would at that," a a-greed
greed a-greed the Speaker. "He's certain certainly
ly certainly entitled to it

Whereupon Sam walked back
li-ll T-

aim ioia iMsennower: "ill take
that pen, after all. I'd like to give
it to Jack Burns."
Note Later Rayburn gave In Interior
terior Interior Secretary Fred Seaton, who
also attended the

gorous bawling out for the 'Burns

siiud. i aon t know who was
responsible and I'm not hlaminj

you personally, but this was inex-

cusaoie ana pretty small, if vou
isk me," he told Seaton. "the
White House deliberately i

the man who had the most right

io oe nere toaay.

IKE AND STEEL FRIENDS
Hard-workine Secretary r( r.jh.

or Jim Mitchell omitted some
rather important facts from his
fact-finding report on steel li; li;-understandable
understandable li;-understandable political reasons.

iney pertained to the heavy
personal influence steel executives
have with the President and why.
It has long been known that
Mitchell and Vice-pres'dent Rich Richard
ard Richard M. Nixon felt the government
should take a more active nart in

settling the steel strike. This w.is
why Dave McDonald of the Unit United
ed United Steel Workers flew to see Nix Nixon,
on, Nixon, not the President ftn tho i vt

of the strike.
Never before in a quarter of a
century has the Federal govern government
ment government kept so aloof from a steel
strike. The Federal Mediation
Service did not even have a man
;t down with the negotiators un un-il
il un-il one day before the strike start started.
ed. started. This is unprecedented.
Reason for this aloofness is ve very
ry very simple, also most important:
The close personal relationship
Jetween steel executives and Ei Eisenhower,
senhower, Eisenhower, plus the potent position
f steel with the Republican par
'y.
Here is the slorv. Snellen nv

n trmS of nolitiral rnnfrihntinn.

and personal friendships:

NATIONAL STEEL Its preav
dent, George ai. auipu .uwu
er 5ecreury 01 tne treasury, ro ro-mam
mam ro-mam one of lke'i closest lr.enus.
i'he President vis.ts Humphrey
Georgia plantation, every winter
tor quail snooting, went duck
snooting with Humpnrey near To Toledo
ledo Toledo a year ago, ana entertain
numpnrey at Gettysburg. Humph Humphrey
rey Humphrey is the only tabine. member
sjice Harding's day who was per permitted
mitted permitted to criticize the President'!
ouaget publicly and get away
with it. National Steel executive
contributed $37,200 to re-elect
Ike in '56.
REPUBLIC STEEL Jamej
Black, a vice president, is an Ika

golhng paruiCi- wt... t w ..j

tne wnue House day or -n gut.
George Allen, a Republic direc director,
tor, director, is Ike's farm partner and
br dge play.ng partner, Alien
.ells lrienas he isn't available for
dinner with anyone in Washing Washington
ton Washington on weekends. Weekends art
reserved for Ike at Gettysburg.
ReDUblic Steel executives rnn.

uiouteu it,juu to re-elect Ike.
U. S. Stool Its executives con contributed
tributed contributed $26,800 to Ike's re-election
in 1956. In 1952, it was large largely
ly largely the influence of US Steel exe executives
cutives executives which switched Gov. John
Fine of Pennssylvania and the en entire
tire entire Pennsylvania delegation irom
Taft to Eisenhower at the GOP
convention, despite the fact that
Pennsylvan;a had been ledged
by primary for Taft.
ARMCO Steal Corporation
Contributed $96,450 to re-elect Ike
in 1956. Biggest contributions
came from Charles S. Payson,
$6800; his wife, $65,050; Kenneth
A. Spencer, $10,600.
BETHLEHEM STEEL Contri Contributed
buted Contributed through its executives $8?r0
to Ike in 1956. it also helpd
switch Governor Fine and the
Pennsylvania delegation from
Taft to Eisenhower in 1952.
INLAND STEEL Edward L.
Ryerson, its former cha'rman,
was appointed by Eisenhower as
head of the Committee on Reci Reciprocal
procal Reciprocal Trade and has regular en entree
tree entree at the White House. He and
his wife contributed $3150 to Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower in 1956.
JONES AND LAUGHLIN Con Contributed
tributed Contributed through its executives
$25,800 to elect Ike in '56.
Note 1 The argument which
steel friends have made to Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower is that if the government
will stay out of the steel negotia negotiations,
tions, negotiations, the steel companies can

give the union a defeat it will not
soon forget. They claim enough
steel is on hand so the economy

will not suffer until Octdber.'
Mitchell is not so sure. He found
the President so sold on nonin nonintervention
tervention nonintervention that he was at frst
reluctant to publish the fact-finding
report on steel profits and
wage increases.
Note 2 Contributors of the a a-bove
bove a-bove compares to Eisenhower in
1956 tot'led $214,250. Contributions

to the Democrats in the same

vpar totaled $1000.

IS?

Al k. ESU

40$

CONSTRUCTION
Contractors Subcontractors Material Suppliers
R: Proposed Construction of 3 Schools and
29 Dwellings in the Canal Zone
For the Panama Canal Co. Bid Due Sept. 14, 1959
The Five Boro Construction Co. of New York City
invites bids on all trades.
Please phone Mr. Solotar at El Panama Hilton
for an appointment-

- i

llpp

r

g
o
S

2
a.
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a.

. -t
RICARDO RICARD0 RICARDO RICARDO



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1$5S

riA aouutM an tnDcnroEirr daily mwsrArn
fUOl THR II

1- v;r.,-

sennower

lb

Jets

Homeward

For

K's

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Junket

are

' ; FKESTWICK, Scotland, Sept.- T (CPI) President Eisenhower ended an historic trip to
Europe today and headed home to prepare for his meetings with Soriet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev.
The i-resident's silver and eranje jet transport pulled sharply up into low clouds- at 19:40
am carrying the President home from Cold War consultation in Bonn, London and;Paris and a
holiday in Scotland. ; : i f ;
Sad weather ever 'Iceland forced the President to eancel at the last minute plans to stop
at Ketlavik on the way home for a talk with Iceland President Asgenir Asjeimon.-
Instead the 'plane was scheduled to stop at Gander, Newfoundland, And then fly on to
Washington later thi afternoon. : -'

Tae President stopped oil tbii

morning at the birthplace of Scot'

lanu's national poet, Robert euro,
on his way to the airport from
Culkn Casue.
Scotslined 4he streets of Ayr and
ftiayooK, ihroo&j wx.. -
ide-. Vrove, and iiheers.. ij. .se
passed ay. It was a ivpe
miniature of the warm recep receptions
tions receptions Eisennower ha receiveu
through Europe and the British
Isles. :. '. v
Eisenhower, apparently wor.
ried over the crisis in Lees and
growing backlog of work at
Home, j decided yesterday to
change' plans and fly back te
Washington today.
He had thought of remaining
until tomorrow ai Culzean Castle
on the western Scottish coast
where he was relaxing alter his
10-day European, peace mission.
White House Press secretary
James C Hagerty,. asked if there
were any special reason for the
President's sudden. change m plans
said- "No, he just decided."
But it was though'; that the
threatening situation in Laos, on
which tli? United Nations Security
Council begins debate today, as
we!! as a work load piling .up in
Washington, mny have been the
reason ior the President's chang changing
ing changing his schedule.
Hagerty said yesterday that the
President "had been in constant
touch with Washington" on the
Communist threat in Laos.
Eisenhower was winding up a
dramatic European trip that be began
gan began Aug. 26, when he flew across
the Atlantic for a series of cold
war strategy talks with Chancel Chancellor
lor Chancellor Konrad Adenauer of West Ger Germany,
many, Germany, British Prime Minister Ha

IIAACP Official
Raps Mississippi's
New State Governor
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (UPI)-A
Mississippi NAACP Official said
yesterday his state's next gov
ernor "has already shown his
true colors by proposing to
speak to a fascist-like group of
white Citizens' Council members."
The charge ws made by Med Med-gar.
gar. Med-gar. .fivers,, Mississippi ,,'geld, rep representative
resentative representative for the NAACP in an
address to an NAACP meeting
here. He said Governor nominee
Ross Barnett will address a Citi Citizens
zens Citizens Council fund raising dinner
in Jackson, Miss., Tuesday night.
Evers, noting that Barnett "is
supposed to represent all the
people of this great state," said
the dinner would raise funds "ob "obviously,
viously, "obviously, to spread race hatred
and dessemination of vile propa propaganda,
ganda, propaganda, and to arouse the emo emotions
tions emotions of the illiterate and bor borderline
derline borderline whites who thrive on bi bigotry
gotry bigotry and race prejudice."
Evers also expressed concern
"that the 1 y n c h e r .s -of Mack
Charles Parker are known to the
FBI and state officials" but "not
a : single person has been ar arrested,
rested, arrested, which raises the question:
Is it excusable to lynch a perspn
...and inexcusable to murder
onee"
He vowed that Mississippi
schools will be integrated, "we
are making steady progr ss
across the South with integration
of public schools," Evers said.
"We shall continue that progress
until every public school is
ODened to every child, regardless
of race, creed or color, and this
includes Mississippi."

:old Macmillan and French Pres President
ident President Charles de Gaulle.
i His Scottish weekend that be began
gan began Friday had erased eeme of
'the fatigue produced by one ef
the most rigorous journeys he
has undertaken since entering
the White House.
More important, in the White
House viewpoint, Eisenhower is
flying back- to America convinced
that his tour produced a highly
desirable result in the diplomatic
field a closer unity of the big
western powers preparatory to his
talks with Nikita Khrushchev.
The US President played his
third round of golf in as many
day yesterday afternoon on the
tough Turnberry Course overlook overlooking
ing overlooking the1 Firth of Clyde.
First, however, the President
drove two miles from his Culze Culzean
an Culzean Castle apartments to Kirbo Kirbo-swald,
swald, Kirbo-swald, a tiny church of Scotland
place-of worship perched high
on a windswept hill in a grove
of yew and sycamore tress.
There, with his son Maj. John
S. Eisenhower and US Ambassador
John Hay Whitney, the chief exe executivewho
cutivewho executivewho embraced the Pres Presbyterian
byterian Presbyterian faith shortly before he
took office in 1353 sat in a hard,
straight-backed pew and joined in
a fundamental Presbyterian ser service.
vice. service. The pastor, the Rev. George
Irving, welcomed Eisenhower at
the tiny red door of the tradi traditionally
tionally traditionally plain church, then climbed
to his high pulpit where he told
members of his parish about the
Chief Executives's visit..
"We pray your stay will help
you better to bear the burdens of

your high office," the Rev. Mr.
Irving said, reminding ihe Presi President
dent President that since the Scots present presented
ed presented him with an apartment in Cul Culzean
zean Culzean shortly after World War II,
he was to regard Korkoswald as
his "home church."

matter of
FACT

The Sahara Desert of north northern
ern northern Africa is not entirely arid;
There are a few. Streams and
some springs with oases of con considerable
siderable considerable size. The fact that
vegetation with date palmv is
abundant wherever water
forces its way to the surface
proves the desert soil to be
fertile and in need only of
water to make it blossom. The
French particularly have Un Undertaken
dertaken Undertaken extensive reclamation
through irrigation.
Encyclopedia BrJtanntea

Constitutional Right Of US Troops
I it Japan Questioned In Tokyo Court

TOKYO (UPI)-The Supreme
rourt of Japan will open hearings
later today on' a historic-consti-tutional
case which may deter determine
mine determine whether the United States
can continue stationing troops
here.
Fifteen judges of the supreme
tribunal, headed by Chief Justice
Kotaro Tanaka, will review a sen sensational
sational sensational lower court verdict that
the presence of American troops
in Japan violates thevation's no
war constitution.
Hearings are scheduled to begin
when Procurator-General Kuniichi
Kiyohara' makes a precedent precedent-breaking
breaking precedent-breaking opening statement. This
will be the first time a procurator-general
makes a personal ap appearance
pearance appearance before the supreme
court to state the government's
case.
Kiyohara and two other procu procurators,
rators, procurators, who also are scheduled to
soeak will argue that the pres

ence of U.S. forces in Japan is

constitutional and that the lower
court ruling should be upset.
Later in the day the first of 26
defense lawyers will begin argu arguing
ing arguing in favor of the controversial
verdict The defense has mobi mobilized
lized mobilized a staff of prominent attor attorneys
neys attorneys and has produced a 500,000 500,000-word
word 500,000-word statement to defend the rul ruling.
ing. ruling. Oral hearings are expected to
run for six days. A verdict may
be handed down sometime in No November.
vember. November. The controversial ruling, known
as the "Date Judgment" for its
author, senior Judge Akio Date of
Tokyo district court, was issued
last spring. v
It created an immediate sensa-

Dancing Dotty Ends Backyard
Pyrotechnics; Fait Accompli

Hon by declaring that the pres presence
ence presence of U.S. military forces was
a violation of Article Nine, the
"no war" clause of Japan's post postwar
war postwar constitution.
"Therefore," the ruling said,
"the U.S. -Japan Security Traty
and administrativp aereernent

which safeguard their stay here,
are also unconstitutional.'?

The Jwo itreatiejT: mentioned by
thfr Tilling taHA thp rtWnn'nf

U.S.JapaHi reiatjons. Uf the su

preme couri were to iipnoid the
lower court's rulinir. Janan's nre.

ent defense structure would have

to be torn apart completely.

Few observers expect this to
happen, although a few .supreme
court judges are expected to
agree with the verdict of the low lower
er lower court and to write what may
prove an important minoritv opin

ion on it,

for shinier
easy-to-manage
HAIR -try
the new

lAOtam

MALDEN, Mass. (UPI)-Danc-lng
Dotty, the red hot mama of
Maiden, yes erday enerl Her ba bayard
yard bayard pyrotechnics and pronounced
a happy "mission accomplished"
on her efforts to find a career in
shnw rcsinefs.
The blonde. .13 year old mother
of three thrilled a crowd of 1,200
Saturday niht in a repeat per performance
formance performance of her now famed
"backyard bikini bounce" before
six local ooliceman, narransed by
th five-block-long traffic jam,
roke up the show.
Dotty, known around home as
Mrs. Michael Ferragamo,- and her
mother, Mrs Mary L. de Marco,
55, of nearby Revere, pranced
around the backyard for three
hours to the gaudy rhythms of
rock 'b Toll records on mom's hi hi-fi.
fi. hi-fi. The younger dancer wag taste taste-fully
fully taste-fully attired in a halo of flowers
and two bracelets, one around her

wwsi ana une criming an : anaie,
plus her pinkish-lavender. Turkish
toweling bikini. The bra celts
glamed In the spotlights as she
shook, shimmied, twirled and
leaped. Mom, on the, other hand,
was dressed in a- net blouse and
toreador pants among other cos

tumes, Though seeking to focus

attention on her talented daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, she changed costumes and
records frequently at the evening
progressed.

But yesterday; Potty, whose pre

viotis effort in the backyard had
drawn the ire of some of her
neiihhnri,; said her free perform perform--
- perform-- -s were over for the time be being.
ing. being. ahe'i tired," her husband said.

"And besides, sle's got several
good offers; one from a large out outdoor
door outdoor restaurant and a couple from
New York.
"She's pretty big down in New
York," he added happily. He
would not elaborate on the offers
Dotty's received except to say
they were just about what she
wanted.
"I'm a decent woman," Dotty
Said Saturday night; a little
breathlessly after her three-hour
sfint under the lights. "And 1 love
to dance."
The! 1,200 persons who jamm"l
the backyard, clung precariously
to, utility, poles overlooking, the
Ferragamd homestead, and bar bar-tied
tied bar-tied for premium viewing space
on the roof a of adjoining houses
could attest to the truth of her
love for the dance.
"The general public wants

rhythm, spice and aliveness," the

shapely mother said with a wink.

'And men like' clothes as tight
as possible.

.... U .',
The Maiden Police department,
whose unpleasant duty it was to
break up the backyard frolic in
the -Interests of traffic safety,
took an enlightened view of the
proceedings and .furnished extra
policemen to handle the crowds.
, One 'policeman,' whose superiors
had already pronounced a favor favorable1
able1 favorable1 review of earlier dances,
said, "we'va- looked the situation

over. It's a bikini all right.
"But it's not much more than
is seen .at the beach at that.

'And. after all." he aald

thoughtfully, it's her own back

yard." ..

Mil MHNt I II
M """"""("fl

After your first shampoo with Now
Lutfra-Creme you'll find your hair
i shinitr, oatiar-to-mitail And
it's se easy! lust shampoo
set with plain water end have
lovelyi natural-looking curlt! Se
et your supply of NEW Luttre Luttre-Cramo
Cramo Luttre-Cramo now and discover for your
If the new reason why
4 OUT 0 5 TOP MOVH STARS
USE LUSTRE-CREME SHAMPOO
Lanolinblestod Luttre-Crome
Shampoo alsel comes
' ' in eromo,

in tukti
or an.

Kay Kendall Dies
Of Leukemia; Rex
Knew Bui Din5f Say
- LONDON, Sept. 7. UPI) Rex
Harrison knew bis actress wife
Kay. Kendall had an incurable
illness before he married her. her
doctor said, but he kent the

knowledge' from her. ;

, Miss Kendall, 32, died here yes yesterday
terday yesterday of leukemia, cancer of the
blood for which no eure has been

found. Harrison played his most

aitueiut role in keeping her from
knowing she had it v during the
two years of their marriage, ac according
cording according to Dr. Carl Goldman.
"Kay never knew what her ill illness
ness illness was," Goldman told news newsmen
men newsmen after her death in the Lon London
don London clinic.
"Mr. Harrison knew before he
married her. It has been a long
and difficult strain for him Now
it is over and he is completely
broken up." ; ;
Goldman said the disease was
diagnosed in 1955 and Harrison
was told of it before their mar marriage
riage marriage in June, 1957. But he. said
Miss Kendall thought her trou
ble was a less cprimic VilnnH Aa

sease with similar symptoms. ...

narnson was starring in f'My
Fair Lady" on Broadway and
planning to marry Miss Kendall
when he learned of the disease,
Goldman siad. He was .instructed
by Goldman on the care she
would need and what drugs and
medicines to give her.
"He showed her great love, af affection,
fection, affection, and devotion," he said,
"no one could have been more won wonderful
derful wonderful than Rex was to Kay."

.huiui e. i i hi n -fwei !' 1 alPn fff
f -s St f JL.
- V ft ;c
I I r I
' I III Up Vt
WW 1
f It m
trrJ'X II (

NOTHING TO FOOL WITH-One- lad takes a close look at
the bayonet ef a Coldstream Guard on duty outside Bucking Buckingham,
ham, Buckingham, Palace in London while his friend keeps a respectful
distance. Perhaps he remembered that one overinquisitive
Visitor got banged in the head recently when a guard shouldered
arms, or that another received a boot in the rear from a fed-up
sentinel. It's always open season on the queen's guards, wh"
must take tourists' banter as part of their job.

riff

KODACHROME FILM
For brilliant color-slides at their sparkling best
There nothing quite like the thrill of taking and ihowing your
own color slides in the gorgeou, full-color that Kodachrome
Film gives you. You can enjoy your slides projected big-os-lif
or through a handy "go-everywhere" viewer. And Koda Koda-elvome
elvome Koda-elvome slides lead also to beautiful prints ond enlargements.
We have Kodachrome Film in both Daylight Type ond new
Type F for flash pictures. Stop in soon.
Now! .. Your Kodachrome Film as
well as Ektachrome, Processed in Panama!
Bring your Films to our Kodak Department
SEARS-ROEBUCK
Now in their new, modern building
Transisthmian Highway Tel. 2.0931

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Panama
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Colon

8th St. and Bolivar Ave.

Ministry f Education Ikpartment f Fine Arts and Publications
IS PLEASED TO PRESENT
LUGARA Y CIA. ENTERPRISES
THE PARIS DES ETOILES BALLET-19.10

Season and Single Tickets for all
performances on September
10, 11, 12 and 13
ire now on sale at the Theatre
Ticket window.
Four Performances with different
programs and decorations and
costumes from the world center
of fashions and art
PARIS.
Greatest Spectacle of 1959

1 The Paris "Des Etoiles" Ballet of 1959
,.
t featuring!
MILLORAI) MIskoVICH and IRENE SKORICK
has been widely acclaimed in Europe and the Americas hy the outstandlnj; art
critics of countries where it has appeared and has. keen applauded by millions.
This organization is making Its tour aboard planes of AVIANCA, the first airline
of the Americas.

A

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VU. U -.Xl-.T.- ahJ W ..:.;;.

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You are cordially invited to the grand Q
inauguration of our third store located on Q
Central Ave., near the Central Theatre. It O
fully equipped with the most modern
facilities, and serving you are tivo experts q
factory-trained by Q

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IMMO KAMRATH JOE BETISAK
former Rollei
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House warming from Monday, September 7,
through Saturday, September 12
ONE WEEK ONLY
ROLLEI 15 OFF
POLAROID 20 OFF
EUMIQ 20 OFF
DEVELOPING 20 OFF
EXPOSUREMETER 15 OFF
Qniititnational
fiJwio nxi.
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NEAR CENTRAL THREATRE
THREE STORES
Panama's Leading Camera Store

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THE P 15 AM A AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DATtT NIWSPAPE
MONDAY. 8EPXTMBEE T, J9

PAGE POUR

.Social and Otlier

wide

Box 134,
Panama

NEWS OF ENGAGEMENTS, MARRIAGES, BIRTHS, .PARTIES AND TRAVEL SHOULD BZ MAILED
PROMPTLY TO BOX-NUMBER SHOWN. IT WILL BE RECEIVED BY TELEPHONE OVER
PANAMA 1-0740 OR 2-0741 BETWEEN 800 AND 10 A.M. ONLY.

MRS. EMOGENE C00KS0N TO BE HONORED
AT OPEN HOI SE TEA WEDNESDAi AFTtKNOON
An open house tea honoring Mrs. Emogene Cookson is
planned for Wednesday afternoon from four to six at the
home of Rev. and Mrs. Edwin C. Webster, across from the
railroad station in Mount Hope.
All Atlantic side friends of Mrs. Cookson are invited to

attend.

Spaghetti Niht
At Amidtr Club
Tonight will be Spagetti Night
from 5:30 to p.m. at the Fort
Amador Officers Open .Mess.
perts shirts will be the appro appropriate
priate appropriate attire for gentlemen,
t
Quarry Heights Wemtn
Luncheon Is Wednesday
', The Quarry Heights Women's

Curundu Women's Club
To Meet Wednesday
The Curundu Women's Club will
have its monthly business meet meeting
ing meeting Wednesday morning at 9 in
the Community Building. All mem members
bers members are urged to attend.

I 3 i

GRADUATE Miss Natalia
Fossatti was honored Satur Saturday
day Saturday night at a party given by
her oarcnts to celebrate her
return from the United States
where she was graduated re recently
cently recently from the Comer and
corah Beauty School in Holly Holly-Wood,
Wood, Holly-Wood, Calif.

Club will hold it September lun- i

cheon Wednesday at 12:30 p.m.
in the lounje of the Q u a r r
Heights Officers Club.
Speaker for the occasion will be
Mrs. Helen Bornstein in Galeria
Panama, who will discuss dress
es, linens and other materials.
Hostesses will be Mrs. E. R
Poole, Mrs. A. S. Moura and Mrs.
L. J. Meyer. Cancellations must
be made before noon tomorrow.

IAWC Meeting
At Tiveli Wednesday
Board members and committee
chairmen of the Inter-American
Women's Club are reminded of a
meeting scheduled for Wednesday
morning at 9:30 at the Tivoli
Guest House.
Kitchen Party Planned
At Cristobal YMCA
The weekly Kitchen Party al
the Cristobal YMCA, conducted by
"Mom" Austin, will feiture grilled
cheese sandwiches this week.
Dancing, with members of the
Girls Service Organization as
partners, will round out the even evening's
ing's evening's entertainment.

Public Relations Assn.
To Lunch Tomorrow
The American Public Relations
Association will hold its month monthly
ly monthly meeting at the Chinese Club on
Avenida Balboa tomorrow at
noon.
Chairman of the meeting will
be Rogelio Alfaro, vice president
of APRA.

Alfredo do Saint Malo
To Present Recital
Alfredo de Saint-Malo. renow renow-ed
ed renow-ed Latin American violin si. will
be presented in a recital tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow evening at the National Thea Theatre
tre Theatre in Panama City. Hans Jano Jano-witz
witz Jano-witz will be the pianist.
Ticket sales are being handled
by the Department of Fine Arts,
telephone Panama 2-0258.

Mrs. Blanche Bishop and Children
Wish to extern! their sincere appreciation for
the many kindnesses, expressions of sym sympathy
pathy sympathy ranis and floral offerings after the
death of
HORACE D. BISHOP

Heat Exhaustion
Results In Death
For Football Star
BALTIMORE (UPD Charles
"Sonny" Lohr, 19-year-old Univer Univer-sit
sit Univer-sit v of Maryland football player
who collapsed on the practice
Held irom heat exhaustion last
Wednesday, died yesterday at U-

niversity Hospital.
Lohr, a sophomore and a cen center
ter center on the football team had been
in critical condition ever since his
collapse.
Lohr had been taken from the
football field to Prince Georges
County Hospital, not far from the
university. Recently he was re removed
moved removed to the university hospital
at Baltimore where an artificial
kidney was used to treat a kidney
infection.
Lohr of Blandensburg, Md, was
the first string center on last
year's freshman team at Maryland.

DOLORES KOSAN
School of
Sixtnish Dancing
The Teen Cluh,
Balboa, C.Z.
Registration begins, Oct.
2 4 3, all day.

The Good Things of Life

A perfect day to be out-of-doors . under
the warm rays of the ann. And how deliri delirious
ous delirious cold Coea-Cola Is tit that heat I Its
cheerful rift that's bright and lively really
refreshes. Enjoy the cold crisp taste of
Coca-Cola. . the pleasure of drinking
Coca-Cola Is Ks own reward.

Symbol of good U'te
In over I Oft rmintrltft.

Regular

Big

THE PANAMA QcU'j BOTTLING COMPANY

Ceiehrating 50 yours of Coco-Cola in Panama

Star Gazing

Amwtr to Previous Funis

ACXOSS
t Cottttenation
4 Foundation
I Heavenly
body
12 Conducted
It Landed
14 Wish
15 Cushion
II Fast steed
II Soviet
satellite
20 Possessed
21 Lettuce
22 Selves
24 Second
brightest star
21 Ill-bred child
27 In favor of
30 Wheat beard
J2 Natural
apace missile
14 Ran wild
2 Muse of
astronomy
3 Lair
J7Bird'a home
39 Gong
40 Moon goddess
41 Narrow bed
42 Different
43 Scorched
41 Liked better
31 Fruit drink
82 Legal wrong
33 Sun (prefix)
34 Beverage
S3 Remain
36 Advantages
37 Finish
DOWN
1 Swiss
mountain'
2 Harvest
I Citation

4 Stables
5 Soviet
mountains
I In worse
health
T French
summer
( Evinces
Ripped
10 Church recess
11 Bambcoliks
grass
17 Owl
13 Breakfast
bread
23 Musical scale
24 Poet
23 Iroquoian
Indian

samp Esta

ZU German
health resort
27 Enter
2 Disturb
29 Spoken
31 Holding
33 Drum
33 Holy
40 South-paw

41 Moslem
Judges
42 Chooses
43 Jog
44 Greek goddess
46 Retained
47 Paradise
48 Deceased
80 Greek letter

f f f ? 7 HEME
I 3 fl
U 5
L-L-ZI WTTt" L-LJ
or wt wwm
i rT2 if
a sr
" wv
l-J-L-f LJ
rrp "TTif "tw
B .r
e a
Hill Mill FTT7

tiro
in Ma

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written fer NIA Service

If

Menu For Labor Day Picnic

'Euro, f
jr. tjsJs Includes Canberry Punch
I prir jrr
.
I .. TTs

Take a look at all four hands and

see if you can ngure now souin
managed to go down at his three
no-trump contract.

I will give you one hint; South

was a very good player and really

did not play the hand badly.

West opened the nine of dia

monds. South went up with the

king in dummy, led a club to his

ace and a second club to dummy s

king. West discarded the deuce of
diamonds. A third club lost to

East's queen and this time west

dropped the deuce of hearts.

Now East led the queen ot

spades and South had to make a

decision. You see all the cards and

would play the king but South
could not tell what that queen of

spades indicated.

He finally decided that B,ast naa

led the queen from queen-jack-

nine-small and that if he put up
the king West would take the ace

and lead a spade back for four

spade tricks. So South played low

on the queen.

Now a second spade was led and

South had to lose four spade tricks

and his contract.

EXCITING foods for your Labor Day picnic Include cranberry
Juice and tea punch, meat loaf, wilted cucumbers and salad.

Let's go to a Labor Day picnic
in the back yard, at a nearby
park, or out in the country. We've
gathered recipes for food and
drink, including a bright-colored
zippy cranberry juice and tea pic picnic
nic picnic punch.
Spiced Picnic Punch
(Makes S cups)

One cup strong, hot tea, 2

sticks cinnamon, 6 whole cloves,
1 lemon, thinly sliced, 1-4 cup
sugar, 1 quart cranberry juice
cocktail, well chilled.
Add tea, spices, lemon and sug sugar
ar sugar to hot tea; stir until sugar ii
dessoved; cool. Discard spices.
Combine tea and cramberry juice.
Picnic Meat Loaf
(Makes I servings)
One egg, slightly .beaten, 1 1-2

teaspoons poultry seasoning, 1 1-2

teaspoons salt, 1-2 teaspoon pep pepper,
per, pepper, 1-2 teaspoon dry mustard, 1

1-2 pounds ground beef, 1-2
pound ground veal, 1-2 cup bread

crumbs. 3 bay leaves, 2 strips ba

con, pickle relish or chilili sauce.

Combine egg, seasonings, meat

and crumbs. Pack into 9x5x3-uich
loaf pan. Arrange bay leaves and

bacon on top. Bake in moderate
oven (350 degrees F.) 1 hour and

15 minutes, or until done. Pour

off fat, cool and diill loaf. Serve

with pickle relish or chili sauce.

NORTH I
A 14 7 2
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WEST EAST
AAJ2I AQ5
V J I 7 2 V Q 10 S 4
1172 lOSt
2 QJ1
SOUTH D)
4K4I
V All
AJ6
A74I
No one vulnerable
SNth West Nertk Bast
1N.T. Pass IN.T. Pass
Pass Pass
Opening lead 4

J w 1.

A ""Is? immMi f t sj? A;'f

J 4 ft

r.

? 1 Vi:itA.i'!-

Look Now For Exotic
Scent To Accent Furs

rami

QThe bidding has been:

Vl NorUi Kan

1 4 Pass 2 A Pass
pss Double Pass 7
You, South, hold:
44 VAQ76 KJ7 l 4
What do you do?
A Bid three svadea. Ter
partner to mtrnkittg a delayed
take-eat doMe aad wan't We
to imk kt yr haad la M
TMd that yew ean affer i ret
him right s, th few lereL Toa
hope he wlU Md few hearts.
i TODAY'S QUESTION
West passes and your partner
bids four diamonds. What do you
do now?
Aarwer Monday

You'll sea more fur fashions
this fall and winter than you've
seen in many years. And not only
fur fashions; fur trim of every
kind.
Knowing this, one perfume
house has brought out a cologne
mist keyed to furs. This doesn't
mean that you should ever spray
furs yith perfume of any king.
But it does mean that the girl
who's draped in furs shouldn't go
around wearing a light, flowery
scent.
Furs get along best with an ex exotic
otic exotic scent, one which hs a base
of Oriental spices and amber.

This gives it both depth and rich richness
ness richness with one lilting top note add added.
ed. added. This new cologne mist is design designed
ed designed to last for hours. But tha
lightweight plastic container in
which it comes can tuck neatly
into your handbag so that yon
can renew the scent yhenever it
fades.
If you haven't used up your
summer perfumes by the end of
the season, seal them securely
with wax dripped from a candle
and store them in a dark place.
They should stay fresh until you
need them again.

Tff VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen

Sour Cream Tomato Relish
(Makes about 1 pint)
One cup sour cream, 1 teas
poon sugar. 1 teaspoon salt,

teaspoon oregano, 1-4 teaspoon

pepper, 2 tomatoes, cut in chunks.
Mix sour cream and seasonings.
Fold in tomatoes until well coat coated
ed coated with sour cream mixture. Chill

well.

Party Potato Salad
(Makes 1 pint salad)
One cup mayonnaise, 2 table

spoons prepared mustard, 1 table

spoon vinegar, 1-2 teaspoon salt,
1-2 teaspcon horse-radish, 1-4

teaspoon tarragon, 2 cups sliced

boiled potatoes.

Blend mayonnaise, mustard and
vinegar; add salt, horse-radish.

and tarragon. Stir in potatoes

until thoroughly coated, C h i 1

well.

ij.(aiiiijKffliiniD

I found him In tha
Miscellaneous Column
of Tha Panama American

Former Singer Says
Diamond Necklace
Lost In Richmond

RICHMOND, Va. (UPI)-A for former
mer former vocalist with Tommy Dor Dor-sey's
sey's Dor-sey's orchestra eompla'ned to po police
lice police today that her Tiffany 43 43-diamond
diamond 43-diamond necklace, valued t,
$14,900, was missing.
Mrs. Janice Edwards, who sang
under the name of Janice Max Max-weir,
weir, Max-weir, said she first noticed the
loss after leaving Tantilla Gar Gardens
dens Gardens ballroom shortly before mid midnight
night midnight Friday.
v Club Manager William F. Via
said a search failed to turn up
any trace of the necklace.
Two detectives were assigned to
the case. Mrs. Edwards, of At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, Ga., said the necklace was
purchased at Tiffany's in New
York last year and contained 43
white diamonds including two of
4 1-2 carats each.
It was not insured, she said.

&lk WMl SaVi...

Before she decides that she can't
live without a young man, a girl
ought to figure out if it is going
to be easy to live with him. He
won't be easy to live with if
He 'is so jealous that he resents
the time she spends with other
girls, checks on her constantly,
and goes into a sulk if she seems
even faintly interested in anyone
else.
He is inconsiderate, often being
late for dates or calling oh off at
the last minute, or refusing to

take her to a dance because he
doesn't like to dance.
He rates her parents low, telling
her they are too strict and that
she is silly to let them tell her
where she can go, what time she
shouls be in, and so on.
He lacks ambition and is eon eon-tent
tent eon-tent to drift along, honing for a

"lucky break" some day.
He doesn't get along with his
own parents and shows little res respect
pect respect for their wishes or their i i-deas.
deas. i-deas.
He isn't honest in small matters
and is obviously proud of being a a-ble
ble a-ble to lie his way out of an um um-plasant
plasant um-plasant situation.
He can't take criticism from
anybody but is very good at
d'shine it out.
He Isn't as much in love with
hr as she is with him.

He doesn t like her friends or
em to care about having good
friends, of his owm
He deliberately tries to make

her jealous.
H" shows little respect for elder
pemi'e.
H is a practical joker who
laughs like crary when- he puts
someone else in an awkward or
embarrassing situation.
A youne man with only a few of
these strikes against him should
prove easier to live without than
to live in holy matrimony.

Dr. Paul Schneider, who leapt
from the conservative obscurity
nf the medic.i journal class to

the g'ossy fame of the gossip co columns
lumns columns by dating Ginger Rogers,
actually seems to prefer a model
named Pat Lynch. Friends think
they may marry. .Karen Chand Chandler,
ler, Chandler, a singer, is planning to bring
serious charges against actor Dan
Reed bef e Equity, the theatrical
union. She'll allege that Reed belt belted
ed belted her during an argument over
their roles in th touring show,
"Yes Man" and she was hospita hospitalized
lized hospitalized as a result.
Paramount is lining up gaint
film 'projects for Elvis Prs'ev he he-eaue
eaue he-eaue of his new multiple-flicker
deal with Hal Wallis which will
begin as soon as he shsds hii,Ar hii,Ar-mv
mv hii,Ar-mv un'Wm, The first scenario,
"G.I. P'ls" wiH lean quite heavi heavily
ly heavily on the singer's real-life expe expe-r:""oes
r:""oes expe-r:""oes as a member of the arm armed
ed armed forces. .Boyd Rennet, the hand handsome
some handsome 27-yenrs-o'd actor who
went along with Gypsy Rose Lee
and her teenaee son on their ho

liday in Europe, appears to have
disappeared although he was

sunposed to hive toiled as young
Fire's tutor. Gypsy's cr.ums say
-'1- bvn't clue to the reason

for his defection.

CANCER STUDY GRANT
STOCKHOLM (UPI)-Dr. Berttl
Bjorklund, assistant professor .at
the' state bacteriological labora laboratory
tory laboratory in Stockholm, was granted
$253,249 by the American Advisory
Cancer Research Council ve'er ve'er-day.
day. ve'er-day. Bjorklund has shown that
there are certain essential immu immunological
nological immunological differences between nor normal
mal normal and cancer cells. He has also
succeeded in isolating a natural
blood factor which attacks cancer
cells under laboratory conditions.
The U.S. grant will enable him to
continue and expand his experiments.

SEARCH CONTINUES
AALESUND, West Norws

(UPD The search for wreck wreckage
age wreckage from the Norwegian fishine

vessel Myrnes continued to

day but police here said there
was virtually no hope of finding
any of the nine men alive. TV

ship disappeared off the coast 0

jceiana Friday. Two men were

found ded in the sea.

AVOID
DIAPER RASH

Don't let your
baby suffar
from damp
diapers. After
vary diaper
change, use

M EX AN A

filiations. .An oil company in
Texas is trying to locate Tommy

Dorsey s heirs, which shouldn t be
difficult. It appears the firm is
about to issue some profits on an
oil venture in which Tommy in invested
vested invested shortly before his tragic
death.

Wealthy Dick Brown flew ta
Cincinnati to join Eva Garbor
a net prove that their ronince was
still swinging. .A lot of Bri Britishers
tishers Britishers are inexplicably resent'
ful about acreess Glynis Johns,
who is moving to Switierland to
avoid the hoavy English ineoma
taxes. Their unrealistic theory:
If they hadn't appreciated her
as a performer, she wouldn't bo
so brutally taxed. (Other side of
the story: If British Income tax tax-as
as tax-as weren't so cruel, she'd be de delighted
lighted delighted to stay In London). .Ian
Woodner, the Washington build builder
er builder whose divorce made front
page news a year ago, Is In tha
throes of a new romance. Tha
lucky girl is Pat Olson, a Hart Hartford
ford Hartford model.

Oosnite all the recent Rocke Rockefeller's
feller's Rockefeller's headlines, Winthron Rock Rockefeller
efeller Rockefeller is behavinq with the mo-d-sty
of a Joe Doake. He lona lona-di'tencerf
di'tencerf lona-di'tencerf his old frined Sher Sherman
man Sherman Billlngsley from Arkansas
te mkae a Stork Club reserve reserve-tion
tion reserve-tion for a quartet of collet plans
who were flylna to N Yerk

for dinner at the Stork Club and

a o at the theater.
Friends say Connie Francis has
snapped out of the dmress'on at

tributed to overwork and will be

quite fit to journey to London
rT a recording session and some
sightseeing. .Monique Van Voo Voo-ren
ren Voo-ren has been offerpd a starring
role in the Samuel Spewack nlay,
'On.ce There Was a Russian."
scheduled to onen in England in
Tecember prior to a Broadway
prmlere.-
Jameg Micrener got what he
wanted for the -inm ri?hts.to

his novel, "Hawaii" Universal Universal-International
International Universal-International is oaving an unpre unprecedented
cedented unprecedented 8000,000 olus 10 per cent
fvf the gross, which should gua guarantee
rantee guarantee th kuthor 1 profit of a
million dollars. Fred Wnneman U
likely to direct the picture, with
Pan Taradash writing the scena scenario.
rio. scenario. Judy Garland ic in for more le legal
gal legal action. Soe'ally prom 1 n e n t
Cvrles Wacker, who wa finan financially
cially financially involved In one of Judy's
engagements, is asking the star
and her husband, Sid Luft, for- a

detailed account of what happen

ed to the money on that parti particular
cular particular gig. .Actor Ron Randell
and bride Laya Rakl (who were
married In a civil ceremony in
Britain) are consulting church au authorities
thorities authorities about th possibility o(
a rollfious ceremony.
Many who attended the Inter Inter-American
American Inter-American foreign ministers con conference
ference conference in Chile believe it won't
he very long before Fidel Castro
quite frankly admits his Red sf-

Thcre might be some sentiment

involved in the fact that the Ma

harajah of Baroda will be one of

the backers of the new Gilmore's,
soon to open on Lexington Ave.

rhe old Gilmore's was one of his

favorite dining places when he

was courting an American girl ho
adored, Martha Cuneo Reed. (
Marlene Dietrich needed no help
to make her impart as the gla-mo-
girl of the .oricinal 'Blue
Angel" movie but 20th Century Century-Fox
Fox Century-Fox is taking no chances on May
Britt, who recreates the same
1 le in the new version of the
film. The stuido is on record as
intending o snend $800,000 to
advertise Miss Britt's charms.
Compromise department: tha
city of Blackpool, England, seek seeking
ing seeking a celebrity to turn on Its
new Illumination system In an
officii ceremony, tried first for
U.S. Ambassador John Hay Whit Whitney,
ney, Whitney, then Russia's Jacob Malik.
Both said no. So who'll press tha
button? Jayne Mansfield.

Quebec's Premier
Maurice Deplessis
Dies Of Hemorrhage
SHEFERVrLLE, ue.. Sept. T.
(UPI) Maurice L. Duplessis, Pre Premier
mier Premier of Quebec since 1930 and

one of the most powerful pou pou-ticlans
ticlans pou-ticlans In. Canadian history, died
early today from the effects of

five cerebral hermorranages.
The 69-year-old premier of Ca Canada's
nada's Canada's biggsst province succumbed
shortly after midnight in tha
remote mining community. Ha
suffered his first attack Thursday,
a day after flying here for a tour
of the mining developnents ha
helped make possible, and had
been In a coma almost eontlnous
ly ever since.



Monday, September 1,1m

THE FAN AM A AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT PA TIT KEWSPAPEZ
PAH FlYly

Bathing Suits As Beauty Test Is Poser

For Contestants In Miss America Pageant

-1 ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. (UPI)
The 32nd MUs America Pagein
epeni tonight with entrants at
oddi over the role of bath ng uus
in the beauty contest.
Some of the 54 ihapely girls
aaid they thought it was a good
idea to parade their pulchritude
before the public and the judges.
Some did not like the Idea at
all. Others were neutral.
A few admitted their feelings
reflected how they looked in bal baling
ing baling suits. But they all greed
that bathing beauty would be the
least important phase ot. the coo coolest
lest coolest to select a Miss America of
1960. who will stump the ntion
making speeches, modeling
clothes and appearing at conven conventions
tions conventions for a total of close to $100,-

000.

The question of swim suits
came up as a result ot a recent
decision to suspend the annual
Miss Universe Bathing Beamy
Contest at Long Beach, Calii.
Mrs. America traded her swim
suit for a house dress several
yean ago-
Leading the discussion were
pert brunette Mary Ann Mobley,
of Brandon, Miss., Miss America
of 1959 and statuesque Marilyn
Vanderbur, of Denver, Colo., Miss
America of 1958.
' "The public has been educated
in the Miss America contest to
distinguish it from a beauty con contest,"
test," contest," said Miss Vanderbur, who
will serve as a television com commentator
mentator commentator at the Saturday night f -nils.

Solon Would Discourage Aid
To Filming Of Ugly American'

WASHINGTON (UPI) Chair

man J. William Fulbright CD-

Ark), of the Senate Foreign Re

lations Committee urged the State
Department yesterday to refuse

lywood movie makers who want
help in'filming "The Ugly A-
mpriran '

He denounced the novel of the

a mo name as "false and in

many ways shameful." but he
said he was even more concerned

about the movie to be maae irom
it Wanse of the attitude he un

derstood had been taken by the

producers.

Fulbright denounced the movie
and the book, which is highly
critical of the U. S. foreign aid

program in Southeast Asia, in a
speech prepared for delivery in
the Senate Monday.
"I have been told upon excel excellent
lent excellent authority that one of the
producers of the movie -said: 'This
is our story line. Here is this
lush shacked up with a Eurasian
dame to whom he spills Ameri American
can American secrets'." the senator said.

"Translating this from Holly Hollywood
wood Hollywood language, this means that
' the U. S. ambassador to a South South-;
; South-; east Asian country is a drunkard
I who has a Eurasian mistress to
, whom he betrays secrets of our

foreign policy. Thus our amoas amoas-iador
iador amoas-iador is pictured as a drunkard,
, a lecher and a traitor."
"Thus I do not see how anyone
could more effectively discredit
this country especially in the
I eyes of Asians than through the
production of such a film."
... Nevertheless, he said, the film

makers "have the arrogance to

insist" that the State Department
"cooperate with them on location
to that they may produce their
wretched film with the greatest
epeed, economy, and authenticity
of diplomatic usage if nothing
else."
"It is apparently enough for the
producers that they can make
money out of it even at the cost
of their country," Fulbright add added.
ed. added. He urged the department to
deny cooperation "to men who
deserve well neither of it nor of
the United States.
Fulbright also denounced the
book's authors, William J. Leder Leder-er
er Leder-er and Eugene Burdick. He said
they were "so reckless, so intel intellectually
lectually intellectually lazy, that they have not
taken the pains to ascertain what

TO VISIT IRAN
TEHRAN (UPI) Indian Pre Premier
mier Premier Jawaharlal Nehru will ar arrive
rive arrive here Sept. 18 for four-day
visit to the Iranian capital as
guest of the government, it was
announced today. According to
the itinerary released today he
wi'I meet with the shah Sept. 19.
Talks will also be' held with Pre Premier
mier Premier Manutscher Eghba! and For Foreign
eign Foreign Affairs Minister All Asghar
IJflkmat.

I
I
I

I
I
I
I

I

rD7vT-7NM

I
I
I

TODAY ENCANTO -35-20

Double In Cinemascope t
Susan Hayward in
"WOMAN OBSESSED"

Clifton Webb in "Remarkable

Mr. Fennypaker"

I

I

I
I

30c. TODAY 9:00
LAST DAY!

GARY COOPER
Maria ICHELL in

i'THE HANGING TREE'

In TECHNICOLOR 1

we actually are doing in Southeast
Asia."
The "Ugly American," Ful Fulbright.
bright. Fulbright. said, "does nothing to help
Americans overcome their per perplexities
plexities perplexities with regard to the great
and difficult questions of foreign
aid.
"On the contrary, it merely
contributes to its own confusions
in an already confused area of activity."

"All of us feel that a bathing
suit belongs on the beach."
Miss Mobley said that the
pageant was not p t im a r i 1 y
a beauty contest, adding:
"Beauty of face and form are
not the most important things.
Miss America never poses in a
swim suit during her reign, but
gives up to .10 speeches a day.
The important background is
character"
State finalists gathering here for
the week-long contest, which start started
ed started as a strictly bathing beauty
parade in 1921, had various opin opinions
ions opinions about the role of the swim
suit in the pageant as it now is
constituted.
In the judging, talent rates 50
per cent of the points, with the
swim suit and evening gown divi divisions
sions divisions each getting 25 per cent.
Virginia Nobel Pailes, a buxom
(36-24-38) beauty representing the
District of Columbia, has no ob objection,
jection, objection, to walking down the long
ramp in Convention Hall in a
form-fitting bathing suit.
"I suppose," she said, "that
you could tell what kind of figure
a girl has in some other apparel
besides a bathing suit, but the
bathing suit is part of the contest
and part of beauty. It doesn't

toother me."

Miss Hawaii, a beautiful bru brunette
nette brunette from Honolulu named Gor Gor-dean
dean Gor-dean Leilehua Lee, was the only
contestant to come out four-square
for bathing suits in the pageant.
"A pretty girl in a bathing suit
is as American as baseball, she
said. "To me, beauty is not vul vulgar.
gar. vulgar. It all depends upon the view viewpoint
point viewpoint of those watching."

Federal Govt.. Texas Both Agree
Williams Is Last Civil War Vet

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Fed Federal
eral Federal Government and the State
ot Texas were in (uticial agree agreement
ment agreement at the weekend that 'Oio
Rebel" Waller Williams was the
last surviving Civil War veteran,
as he has claimed.
A spokesman lor Sen. James O.
Eastlana (D-Miss. said Texas of of-iicials
iicials of-iicials were welcome to continue
investigation ol inconsistencies in
Williams' records ll they see fit.
But Texas Gov. Price Darnel said
at Austin that the state was sa
tisfied.
"All the evidence available in
state ofiices ana Confederate ree
ords indicates that Walter Wil Williams
liams Williams is the last surviving Con Confederate
federate Confederate veteran," Daniel. sail

There was every indication thai'

Federal oliicials consider the mat matter
ter matter closed. President, Eisenhower
has signed a resolution, spgru'vreu
by Eastland,' calUnlbr' a period
of national mourning when Wil Williams
liams Williams dies.
The old Rebel has been unaware
of the controversy over his past.

He is seriously ill at the home of.

his daughter, -Mrs. Willie Mae
Bowles, in Houston.
Mrs. Bowles expressed her ap appreciation
preciation appreciation to the Governor for
coming to her father's support.
"My daddy is the type of person
that never lied about anything in
his life," she said.
Williams has claimed that ne
was in the Confederate Army din din-ing
ing din-ing the war and that his 117th
birthday is coming up Nov. 14.
Official records have cast some
doubt on his statements.
Eastland siad Friday that his

resolution gave "full faith an;,
a'euu io j.exis rcuius oe-Uiiit
oui uili. hhs ciuiin. me l'djOiu
L.on was picpareu uy uie Amer American
ican American L.egioii auu cleared Dy the
wnne .house.
Although Williams said lie
iougiu wan hoou s origdde, rej rej-orua
orua rej-orua at the National Archives ao
not list his name.
There are census records of a
Waller G. Williams at iLawam;jd
County, AUss., and Brazos Cojii Cojii-ty,
ty, Cojii-ty, lex. -Butt if Wis is Uie "Old "Old-ivebei"
ivebei" "Old-ivebei" he would have been omy
eigtu years old when the war end ended.
ed. ended. Williams applied for a state per.
sion in Texas in 1D23, listing his
age as 86. If that sworn state

ment was time,. hj-would be only,

113 una year,. ..
Officially, though, Williams is a
Civil War f veteran. The Veterans
Administration pays him a pen pension
sion pension as such, and the nation will
mourn him as such when he dies.

TRAIN CATCHES FIRE
TOKYO (UPl)-Three persons
were injured when an electric
train caught fire in Tokyo yester yesterday
day yesterday and braked to a sudden stop.
About 4 passengers had to be
evacuated. The injured suffered
cuts and bruises when the train
came to a sudden halt after
flames begain shooting through
the floorboards of the rear coach.

754 40 f

TODAY

E

CENTRAL

SHOWS: 1:15 3:10
a 9:00 P.M.

I

7:00

E3 O

I

A GREAT ROMANTIC SUPER-RELEASE!

I

Tomorrow!

J

r

MAUREEN O'SCLLIVAN

Will ROGER, Jr. In

"WILD HERITAGE"

I

I

i

ll

II

II

K I'' f groping I
ifcV grasping I
psSSpb I I
longing! I I
I more than J
a story f Wf
of lovo.WJj I
a story BnW m 1
M?m i
S SOPHIA AHTHOHY J I
' LOREfl QUINN

Medics Handicapped

As Fat Boy Dies

CAMDEN Ark. Sept. 1 (UPI)
-Danny Hope, 21, who weighed
70i pounds and claimed he was
the "Fattest Boy in the World,"
died yesterday upon two mattress
es laid sode by side on the floor
of a hospital room.
He was far too big for any bed
the hospital could find. Hope was
five feet, five inches tall and
was 9J Inches around his waist.
His hear' failed while physicians
were '."eating him for pneumonia.
Hi fat handicapped his doctors.
For instance, they could not
take his pulse or hear his heart
through th layers of fat. They
co-itf not find an instrument big
anought to take his blood presure.
Hone came to Camden from Lul Lul-inc.
inc. Lul-inc. Tex., where he lived with his

vwidowed mother, to promote an

automobile thrill show sponsored
by the Camden Boys Club
He complained in Litil Rock,

Ark., two weeks ago that he was j
homesick.

"I want to go home to mother
because she's got a -bad heart and
she's all I've got." fee said.
"I try to be a good. Christian
boy, but it's awfully hard. I ha haven't
ven't haven't been to church for several
months."
His mother, Mrs. Evelyn Hope,
arrived in Camden af:er his death.
Carpenters were making a spe special
cial special coffin for him. No ready ready-made
made ready-made coffin is big enouth.
They expect to finish it today
and as soon as they do, the body
will be put into It and taken to
San Marcos, Tex., for burial.

Edmund Gwenn
Ends Old-Man Role
In Britain At 81
HOLLYWOOD, Sept. 7 -(UPI)

Edmund Gwenn academy award-1

winning actor best known for his
motion picture characterization of
kindly, humorous old men, died
last nigh, at the age. of 81.

The bntish-born performer, who
given his first big break by play play-died
died play-died bf complications of pneu pneumonia
monia pneumonia at the Motion Picture
Country Hospital where he had
been confined to a bed or wheel wheelchair
chair wheelchair for almost two years.
He would have been 82 on the

26 of thes month. He spent sev several
eral several days on the Isthmus few
years ago.

Andrew May Dies
In Kentucky

TRESTONSBURG, Ky. (UPU
.Andrew- Jaclrtot; May,; one f-

Kentucky's most controversial po political
litical political figures died at a hospital
hpre yesterav at the age of 84.
May. a Kentucky congressman

during and before the years of
World War II, was caught in
the tangled web of a wartime
Washington. Convicted of accent accenting
ing accenting bribes to use his powerful in influence
fluence influence as chairman of the war wartime
time wartime House Committee on Military
Affairs, May went to prison at
the age of 74.

May always contended that he

was innocent, even during and

after his two-year term in prison.
Finally, he received a pardon and

the Kentucky Court of Appeals re

instated him as an attorney here.

INDEPENDENT NEWS REEL IN COLORS
WITH VIEWS OF THE CARNAVALITOS

TODAY-aGAiTRGs-TODAY

TIVOLI
5e Me.
AL CAPONE
with Rod Btelger
Alao:'
WOLF LARSEN
with Barry Sullivan

CAP IT OLIO
J5e. toe.
THE LAST
BLITZKRIEG
with Van Johnson
Also: i
BELL, BOOK AND
CANDLE v
with James Stewart,

VICTORIA
015 0.1S
WHITE SAVAGE
with Maria Monta
Alio:
THE MONSTER OF
'THE BLACK
H LAGOON

RIO
0.S5 o.0
A NIGHT TO
REMEMBER
- Also:
WIND CANNOT
READ
.with Dirk Bogarda

COMING SOON

CENTRAL

- tv;?
it

;

n w
I0 M-G-M presents
W AVA ANTHONY
1 GARDNER FRANCIOSA
Maja
'On
AMEDEO I GINO I LEA

HAZZARf KRV1 J PA00VA
Strtmpliy W
NMMANCOMMN GIORGIO MOSMM
Story OSCAU SAUl TALIOT JENNINGS
Fredueri by OirtcM by
COFFREDQ LOMBARM HENRY KOSTER
A TITANUS PRODUCTION
A ra-MMW-NMR niAR

li Ail
: Xi MV

FROM LITTLE GRAINS. A MICHTY HALL Kathy Hosch,
16, sifts grains of wheat through her hand in Welborn, Kan.
Small quantities of the grain are playing a part in the de development
velopment development of the Agricultural He.11 of Fame, a five-million-dollaf
world farm center. Construction will begin tn .1960.
Those who donate grain will be dsienated founding farmers.
Site of the hall is 12 miles west of Kansas City.

PRICES: 75c. 40c.
TODAY
2:05 4:05 6:30 9:00 p.m.

The entertainment that puts a glow in your heart!
A,

BINS DEBBIE ROBERT

CROSBY-RElfNOLDS WAGNER

SnYnMc for mc

HtGH FIDELIfY. STEREOPHONIC SOUND

WEDNESDAY o w

EEK END
RELEASE I

The WlfiMf DOG-GONE ADWIURE

THAT EVER
HAPPENED

TO

n iKAMr I 4T i4 "n

Fred MacMURRAY-Jean HAGEN

7r febMki whu vttt tnm DiiTvrM ro tm bumtt reontncw
- IT'S A BLAST!!

SERVICE CENTER THEATERS TODAY

r

COCO SOLO 7:00

Air Conditioned
"ROCK-AvBY BABY"
Tues. "First Man Into Space'

DIABLO HT5. 2:30 7:00

"FEMALE JUNGLE"
Tuesday "Bitter Victory"

MARGARITA Shirley Ballard

7:00 "COP HATER
Tuesday "Marshmellow Moon"

AIR-CONDITIONED

fi A I fA A

OnlO vrv 3.oo & 7.00 p. m.
Admission: .50 $1.00
NOTE: "TEN COMMANDMENTS' WILL BE SHOWN AT
BALBOA AND COCO SOLO THEATRES ONLY!

The Greatest Event In
Motion Picture Historyi

'hi ft 9

5 ir

j

' 41

,5 i

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"THf GREATEST BCjUtfi NCTUH I HAVE EVEI UlHr-Wolhr Whdwtf
"A rilM Of IEVEIINT AND AUSSIVt ASNIflCWar-Uf. Moffat
CEdlL E DeMille's
CHAUTOH VUt ANNC (0WAKD8
HE5T0N BRYNNER-BAXTER-R0B1N50M
WONNK OUIA JOHN
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i. SlCCDIC NINA MAITHA JCXXTM MMCttT
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i, hu icw jt j i umt. a -jkh om moc n rum
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ALSO SHOWING TUESDAY & WKDNTODAY!

PARAISO 7:00

"LONG HOT SUMMER"

SANTA CRUZ 7:00
"ALONG CAME JONES"

CAMP BIERD 7:00
' "ANNA LUCASTA"

TAKE YOUR PICK
OF THE FAMOUS BRAND YOU LIKE BEST!
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Winners in this week's Free Weekly Raffle

Lt. P. L. Knotts
Robert L- Richardson
Mrs. W. J. Wilkinson
Oswald Larklan Williamt
Rosa L. de VVone

Demetria Diai
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TBI FAN AM A AMEKICAN AN IKDEPEKDINT DAILY KIWSFAf EB
MOXUATj SEPTEMBER T; 1953.
Indians Make Most Of Life Saver' Series
Big
' .'.-1
Hector Lopez Muffs Fly Ball
To Pave Way For Oriole Win
LEADING
HITTERS
( Based on 350 official at bats)
National League
Editor; CONRADO SARCEANT'

PAS I SIX

But

Dodgers

Mil

Chanel

By FRED DOWN
NEW YORK, Sept. 7 (UPI) The Cleveland
Indians made the most of their "live-saver series
but the Los Angeles Dodgers blew a big opportunity

to close in on the faltering
Thafs the pennant story today
wilh the races t the Labor Day
m&stone and every game vir virtually
tually virtually "must" for the pursuers.
the Indians, down but not out.
wdn the game they had to win to
gth in the American League
rate Sunday when Vic Power s
twfc-run ninth-inning double pro prodded
dded prodded 21 victory over the pace pace-Sting
Sting pace-Sting Chicago White Sox The
reduced the Whit Sox lead
over ft Indians to 4 12 games
inftead of the almost insurmount
able S 1-2 it would have been had
Chicago won.
the National League leading
Glints gave the Dodgers a sim similar
ilar similar opportunity when they clrop clrop-oed
oed clrop-oed a 1-0 decision to Larry Jack
ion and the St. Louis Cardinals
but the Dodgers couldn't take ad advantage
vantage advantage of it. They blew a dou dou-bliheader
bliheader dou-bliheader to the Chicabo Cubs,
j-f in 10 innings and 5-3, to drop
ttijee full games behind the front-
rujuung tjianis.
,
The Detroit Tigers beat the
Kinsas City Athletics. 7-6. the
Baltimore Orioles shaded the
Ntw York Yankees, 5-4, and th"
Boston Red Sox downed the Wash Washington
ington Washington Senators, 2-1, in other A A-mferican
mferican A-mferican League games whi'e the
Milwaukee Braves defeated the
Cincinnati Reds, 6-2, and the Phi Philadelphia
ladelphia Philadelphia Phillies edged the Pitts
biirgh Pirates, 2-1, in other a
tional League activity.
A Orowd of 34,2 at Chicago
WW Dick Donovan carry a 1-0
load into tho ninth inning only
to have the Indians rally for
their biggest win of the year.
Tito Francona and Woodie
H4ld singled to set it up for Pow Pow-r,
r, Pow-r, who crashed a 415-foot dou double
ble double off the center field wall. The
White Sox had scored in the fifth
inning on singles by Luis Apari Apari-ck,
ck, Apari-ck, Nelson Fox and Jim Landis.
Jim Qrant went the distance for
fail ninth victory for Cleveland.
Jackson, who ahut out the Dodg Dodgers
ers Dodgers in his previous start, tossed
;five-hitten to win his 13th game
for the Cardinals ana nana nara-
JUCK AUK MCVOrmiCK nis urn ae-
at.
1a tingle, a throwing error by
Wft-fielder Orlando Cepeda and
AJex Grammas' sacrifice bunt
pushed over the Cardinals' run in
the eighth. Ken Boyer of the
Cardinals atretched his hitting

Chris Von Saltza, 15
1 World s Best Woman
4
j Freestyle Swimmer

' eVy ID SAIN4BURY
CHICAGO (UPI) Chris Von
galUa, at 15 perhaps the best
oman freeatyle swimmer in the
world, racked up her fourth gold
hedaT of the Pan American
parries yesterday with record
breaking speed in the 400 meter
Jensen's freestyle ehase.
Earlier Mias Von Seltza. a tall
Sonde from Saratoga, Calif., won
ith Ae 100 and 200 meter wom wom-ejh'a
ejh'a wom-ejh'a freestyle and added another
ptin In the women's 400 meter
SeeVfyle relay.
i .
jHffl fold medal achievements,
pouch, were somewhat surpassed
By the performance of a rifle
Jiarksman, Daniel F. Puekel,
Fort Benning, Ga. Puckel, who
Sarlier had won two gold medals
t)s the individual champion in
mall bore rifle shooting and as a
scomber of the winning U.S. team
Ipi the aame event, added five
Snore in free rifle shooting yester yesterday
day yesterday with a chance for four more.
He was the individual medal
winner In kneeling, etanding and
prone shooting as wen as the ov

raB He received another goIdV 7:3,4- Jhf Plr rned

medal eanse th U. S. team
lso won. And bee awe the fhoot

lug eommltteo rulei on gold mWCML,nd ti" ,rillmPhd bV ven

alt changed twice to add tnem int"""'"

tmall bore rule, it wat likely ne
would get more for free rifle.
k refreshing
AFTER-SHAVE LOTION
Urge Bottle 60c

Mm Mi) J A

an r rantistu u.a...

.)MQir in 9d oames and Willie
McCovey of the Giants ran his
'Erme Banks hit a three-run 10th 10th-mn.ng
mn.ng 10th-mn.ng homer to give Art Cecca Cecca-relli
relli Cecca-relli his fifth victory in the first
game and Walt Moryn hit three three-run
run three-run ninth-inning homer to give
Don Elston his seventh win in the
second game. Banks' homer came
off Don Drysdale, ace of the
to run his tnree-game total to a
record 41, While Moryn's came
off Don drysdale, ace of the
Dodger staff who suffered his
sixth straight loss and 12th of the
year.
The Tigers went into third place
in the A.L. when Charley Max Maxwell's
well's Maxwell's ninth inning single tallied
Harvey Kuenn wiih the decisive
run. Lefty fete Burnside shut out
the Athletics lor the last five in innings
nings innings to win his first American
League game. Al Kaline homer homered
ed homered lor tne Tigers and Bob Cerv
connected for the Athletics.
A stvanth-innina muff of a
fly ball by Hector Lopaz pav paved
ed paved tha way tor tht Orioles' de decisive
cisive decisive run as New York ace
Whitey Ford suffered his eigntn
loss. Gene Woodling drove in
three baltimore runs with a
homer and a single while Yogi
be' ra Knocked in rnree Nt
York runs with a sacrifice fly,
a homer "and a forceout. Norm
Siebern also homered for the
Yankees.
Tom Brewer struck out 10 bat batters
ters batters anu hit his nisi homer of tuc
year for the Red Sox, who beat
their nemesis, Pedro Ramos, wilh
the help of some brilliant defense
play. Brewer has' Won nine games
and lost 10 while Ramos suffer suffered
ed suffered his 17th loss compared to 12
wins.
Juan Pizarro hit a two-rundou-Juan
Pizarro hit a two run dou double
ble double and pitched a seven-hitler to
lead the Braves to their victory
at Cincinnati Ed Bailey doubled
home a run for the Reds in the
eighth inning and Frank Robin Robinson
son Robinson homered in the ninth after
Pizarro had a two-hitter going
for seven innings.
Robin Roberts pitched a four four-hitter
hitter four-hitter to win his 13th game for
the Phillies, who tallied both
their runs "in the eighth inning on
singles by Carl Sawatski and' Rob Roberts
erts Roberts an error hv ontfiplder Ro
berto Clemente and Joe Koppe's
single
BREAKS OWN RECORD
Miss Von Saltza's awards,
though, were untarnished by re revision
vision revision of the rules, yesteday she
was timed in 4:55 9, breaking her
own record of 4:58 1. In the 100
and 200 meters, she also set Pan
American records, and she an anchored
chored anchored the relay team to another
record, four tenths of a second off
the world mark.
Again the race was a U. S.
sweep, the 12th in 14 swimming
events. Sylvia Ruuska, Berkeley,
Calif., was second and Donna
Graham, Indianapolis, Ind., was
third.
The U. S. rowing team also
was contributing to the wave of
gold medals to Uncle Sam. Five
Seattle, Wash., high school boys,
Michael A. Yonker. Rov J. Rubin,
Ray D. Walker. Charles A. Holtz
and Leroy P. Jones, won the four
oared with coxswain chase in
7:09.4, coming from behind to de defeat
feat defeat Argentina by 2'4 lengths.
Robert P. Rogers and Ted S.
Frost, also of Seattle ran away
from the field to win the two
oared without coxswain rhamoion-
up with a 31 stroke per minute
beat, but later slowed to a 24
WINS BY FIVE LENCHS
The third Straight U.S. rowing
kmedal went to Harry L. Parker
of Philadelphia with a lime of
7:46.9. He won by five lengths
over Anthony Birrnacki of Cana Canada
da Canada with Paulo Carvalho of Uru Uruguay
guay Uruguay third. Alvaro da Silva of
Brazil wag fourth. Carvalho had
the best trial time, but he was
never a contender in the finals.
Only in cycling wag the U.S.
shutout in the early fvenls yester yesterday.
day. yesterday. Rlcardo Serin of Argentina
won the 175 kilometer (114 mile)
road race in 4:32.52 with Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco 1orano of Meitico second
and Ramon do Cfja of Uruguay
third, Argentina won the team
gold medal. Mexico was second
and Uruguay $ilrd.

G Al R
133 544 101
128 410 57
136 569 116
133 535 83
134 498 99
134 501 86
131 523 91
127 513 97
132 497 72
138 503 55

H Pet.
195 .358
142 .346
188 .327
172 .321
158 .317
160 .316
165 .315
161 .314
152 .306
151 .300

Aaron, Milwau.
Cun'ham, St. L.
Pinson, Cinci.
Cepeda, S. F.
Robinson, Cinci
Boyer, St. L.
Temple, Cinci.
Mathews, Mil.
White, St. L.
Hoak, Pitts.
American League
Kuenn, Detroit
Kaline, Detroit
Runnels, Boston
Woodling, Balti.
Fox, Chicago
Tuttle, K. C.
Power, Cleve.
Minoso, Cleve.
121 487 90
118 449 77
131 499 82
125 394 58
137 555 75
119 441 71
130 527 92
131 499 81
104 381 51
114 437 60
173 .355
149 .3o2
158 .317
123 .313
171 .308
134 .30-1
156 .296
147 .295
112 .294
128 .293
Cerv, K. C.
Kubek, N. Y.
Runs Batted Tn
National League
Banks, Cubs 128
Robinson. Reds 118
Aaron. Braves 108
Bell, Reds 102
Mathews, Braves 93
American League
Colavito, Indians 98
Killebrew, Senators 98
Jensen, Red Sox 98
Maxwell. Tigers 86
Lemon, Senators 85
Home Runs'
National League
Banks, Cubs 40
Aaron, Braves 37
Mathews, Rraves 3f
Robinson. Reds 34
Boyer, Cards 27
American League
Colavito, Indians 39
Killebrew, Senators 39
Allison. Senators 20
Maxwell. Tigers 28
I,cm"- Tigers 28
LEADING
PITCHERS
(Based en 16 or Mere Decisions)
National League
W L Pet.
Face, Pirates 17 0 1.000
Antonelli, Giants ... 19 7 .731
Newcomhe. Reds ... 13 7 .650
Conley, Phils .... 12 7 .632
Law, Pirates .... 15 9 .625
American League
McLish, Indians
Shaw. White Sox
Pappas, Orioles
Maas, Yankees
Wynn, White Sox
. 17 7
. 14 6
. 14 7
. 12 6
. 18 9
.708
.700
.667
.667
.667
BICYCLERS RESTS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (UPI) A
19-year-old bicycler rested to today
day today from his 18-day pedaling trip
from Portland, Ore., to Kansas
City. Kurth Layman, a sophomore
at Texas Christian University in
Fort Worth, pedaled into Kansas
City Saturday night after averag
ing nearly 100 miles a day on his
bicycle. He had spent the sum summer
mer summer in Kodiak, Alaska, at an
ecumenical work camp. On the
way back he decided to make his
bicycle trip, camping out at
night.
LICHT LOAD Explorer
Scout Willie Moore carried the
flashing electric torch headed
for Chicafio -to open the Pan Pan-American
American Pan-American Games through
downtown St. Lou. The ahow
ends a 12-day run Sept 47.

y&W J ; i

t. V f 1 fit

ALL ALONE The Cococha Stable's champion sprinter approaches the finish line all by him himself
self himself despite toting 124 pounds and getting off poorly in the featured $1000 six Jurlong dash
at the President Remon racetrack yesterday. HMiodoro Gustines booted home President Ernes Ernesto
to Ernesto de la Guardia's ace, one of three horses he rode to victory during the afternoon. However,
archrival Braulio Baeza increased his lead by p"Ning home four winners.
Double Four Easily Captures
Remon Racetrack Main Event

The Cococha Stable's consistent
sprinter Double Four yesterday
added another victory to his long
string when he overcame a poor
start to score by two and one one-half
half one-half lengths over Dependable in
the featured $1,000 six furlongs
dash for improted first, series rac racers
ers racers at the President Remon race racetrack.
track. racetrack. Dependable was second after
racing Deauville into submission.
Alpina, unusually sluggish, came
up to finish a listless third two
and one-half lengths behind Dep Dependable,
endable, Dependable, Deauville, which set the
pace for the first half mile, wound
up last.
Double Four, one of three win

Baseball's Wildest Winter

For Player Trades Coming?

o
By STEVE SNIDER
NEW YORK (UPI) Base Baseball's
ball's Baseball's swapping season is just
around the corner and it may
turn out to be the wildest winter
yet for player trades.
A new rule permitting inter-'
league dealing without resorting to.
waivers will be in effect from
Nos, 21 to Dec. 15 and nobody
knows what .to expect.
The rumors however, already
have started and the first one
was a dilly: Stan Musial of the
Cardinals to the Yankees for Yo Yogi
gi Yogi Berra.
That was laughed down prompt promptly
ly promptly but it'll give you a rough idea.
Frank Lane of the Cleveland
Indians, busiest trader in the
game, insists there will be few
significant swaps between the two
leagues but, like other, he's only
guessing.
One angle that may prompt
major dealing is the reluctance of
most clubs to make trades in their
own league that could turn out
better for a rival club.
MAY WANT MeDOUGALD
But if the Yankees, say, make
a swap with the San Francisco
Giants and get the worst of it
they aren't going to fret much
unless perchance they met in a
World Series.
A Yarkee-Gient wap was, in
fact, been mentioned. The Gianls
are said to look with favor on
Yankee infielder Gil McDougald,
who hails from that area.
No matter who wins the 1959
pennants there is likely to be
little stand-patting for '60.

ners ridden by Heliodoro Gustines,
turned the six furlongs in 1:13 over
a track listed as '"good." He re returned
turned returned only $3.40 to win.
Leading jockey Braulio Baeza,
however, increased his margin
over runnerup Gustines by win winning
ning winning 4 races. Baeza scored with
Don Cirilo, Esteban, Singaluz and
Robbie;
Mutuels favorites made another
virtual' sweep of the card. The
lone exception was registered in
the fifth race when weak-hearted
quitter San Vicente outsprinted a
bunch of slow starters and quick quickly
ly quickly opened a ten-length lead then
held on to score by three over a
mile.

The Yankees and Braves, win
ners last ysar, stood pat to their
ultimate regret. Off their current
standing, both need help.
The White Sox always are in
the market for a power hitter and
with Bill Veeck calling' signals
the prospect for changes is great greater
er greater than a year ago. Lane, at
Cleveland, would keep swapping
even it ne won the pennant by 15
games. It's second nature with
him.
SCOUTING OLD STUFF
Scouting players on rival clubs
with a possible trade in view is
old stuff in the majors. The Gi Giants
ants Giants last year, for instance, put
a man on the Phillies to learn
what could about pitcher Jack
Sanford and liked what they saw
so much they grabbed him in a
deal.
Now the Irade-hungry clubs are
scouting players in the other
league as we'l, hoping to pick up
a bargain in the "fr?e trade" pe period
riod period starting Nov. 21.
While Lane, among others feels
it won't amount to much, Baseball
Commissioner Ford Frick viewed
the idea with considerable alarm
when it first was proposed.
He admittPd frankly he was
against it but when the club own owners
ers owners pass a rule there isn't much
he can do except see that it's en enforced.
forced. enforced. Anyway, It'll be a good warm warm-up
up warm-up for the time when the new Con Continental
tinental Continental League jumps into the
market with ready cash to buy
talent. The wealihy clubs aren't
too interested in cash but they
don't have all the talent, either.

ceo oanHraDSt?
rciTflB HE Oi?

San Vicente, ridden by Ruben
Vasquez, paid $19.20.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Mar Bravo $9.40, $4.20
2 Chacotero $4
-6-SECOND
RACE
1 Aerial Trumpet $6, $4
2 Marsella $6.60
First Doub'e: $50.80

THIRD RACE
1 Sandokan $2.60
No place betting.
FOURTH RACE
1 Mr. Roberts (excluded from
betting).
2 T.inganica $6.20, $4
3 Pilluelo $11.20
Quiniela: $68.40
FIFTH
6 San Vicente $19.20, $4.60
2 Chilo $3.40
SIXTH RACE
1 Gong $4.80. $2.80
2 La rclirroja $2.60
SEVENTH RACE
1 Don Cirilo $4.20, $2.60
2 Cleron $2.80
Second Double: $8.60
EIGHTH RACE
1 Esteban $2.80, $2.20
2 Frijolito $2.20
Quiniela: $5.60
NINTH RACE
1 Singaluz $4.20, S3.20
2 Meta Feirro $6.20
One-Two: $44.20
TENTH RACE
1 Double Four $3.40, $2.40
2 Dependable $2.6
ELEVENTH RACE
1 Robbie $2.80, $2.20
2 Santanero $2.40
One-Two: $16.40
EFFECTIVE HELP for
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Asthma and Bronchitis lit tacks ruin
your Bkep, undermine your strength
and weaken your heart. Mendaco
starts to work through your blood to
overcome asthma and bronchitis at attacks.
tacks. attacks. It helps dissolve strangling mu mucus
cus mucus and promotes free, easy breath breathing.
ing. breathing. Mendaco's action is effective even
in old arid stubborn cases. Get Men Men-daco,
daco, Men-daco, from any drugstore today and
see how much bstter you- steep and
breatne tonigni, ana now muu ucuc.
you will feel tomorrow, wenosco
fights dlscomtons 01
"hltlr and Hay Fever.

National League
TEAMS W L rif.
San Francisco 76 40 .559
Los Angeles ... 73 63 .537
Milwaukee ... 72 63 .533
Pittsburgh . 71 66 .S1
GB
3
3V
SV
Cincinnati ... 66 70 4R5 in
Chicago ..... 65 69 .485 10
5t. Louis .... 64 74 .464 13
Philadelphia . 58 80 .420 19
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Cincinnati
Pittsburgh atw Milwaukee (2)
Chicago at Los Angeles (N)
St. Louis at San Francisco
Yesterday's Results
Pittsburgh 000 000 0101 4 3
Philadelphia 000 000 02x 2 5 0
Law (15-9) and Burgess, Foiles.
Hoberts (13-15) and Sawatski,
Lonnett.
Milwaukee 020 003 0016 10 0
Cincinnati 000 000 0112 7 1
Pizarro (5-2) and Crandall.
O'Toole (5-8), Brosnan, Schmidt
and Bailey.
St. Louis 000 000 0101 4 1
San Francisco 000 000 0000 5 1
Jackson (13-12) and Smith.
McCormick (11-13), Miller and
Landrith.
( First Game)
Chicago 000 000 000 33 5 2
Los Angeles 000 000 000 00 6 2
Ceccarelli (5-3) and Neeman.
Koufax (8-5) and Pignatano.
(Second Game)
Chicago 010 000 0135 11 0
Los Angeles 110 000 1003 5 0
Drabowski, Johnson, Henry, El Elston
ston Elston (7-7) and Taylor.
Sherry. Drysdale (15-12) and
Roseboro.
These days Jack Dempsey con confines
fines confines his exercise to walking, so
if Ihe should up and walk out on
the hoodlum-scented Johansson Johansson-Patterson
Patterson Johansson-Patterson rematch, he'll at least
be doing what comes naturally.
When the old Manassa Mauler
agreed to accompany a promotion promotional
al promotional group headed by Vincent J.
Velella, East Harlem barrister, to
Sweden to help charm the new
heavyweight cha'mpion into a more
cooperative mood, Ihe was unaware
of Fat Tony Salerno's background
role.
It wasn't until Dempsey return returned
ed returned he got the disturbing news. DA
Frank Hogan, in the interim, had
pictured Velella as a front for the
ex-con, (a Velella client, incident incidentally),
ally), incidentally), currently a hideout from
Hogan subpoena servers.
"These disclosures have embar embar-rased
rased embar-rased IJempsey no little," a busi business
ness business associate told the column
yesterday. "And unless Velella
can disprove them utterly and tot totally,
ally, totally, Jack is certain to take a
walk."
Indicating Dempsey may have
had intiuitive misgivings fro. the
start is the fact his contract spe spe-ciifcally
ciifcally spe-ciifcally provides an, escape hatch
which, according to the business
associate reads in effect: "The
first time I see, or even think I
see anything that ddesn't look 100
nercent kosher, I leave you guys
flat."
Apparently Dempsey is already
resigned to the conviction that the
promotion in its present form
won't ever by able to purge itself
of the Salermo infection in a way
that will be thoroughly reassuring
to the public.
If Salerno wasn't a power' be behind
hind behind the scene in the first fight,
why would he .have advanced Bill
Rosensohn, the nominal promoter,
$10,000 in cash to pay off- a per persistent
sistent persistent creditor? Winy wouldn't
this hustler have gone to Velella,
who swears he was the bankroll
back of the Yankee Stadium
show?
OWED IT TO BOXING
This is just one of several pe
culiar angles Dernpsey must be
trying to think through as he
marks time before deciding whe-
mer to stay or to go. ."Tne
easy thing for him to do" said
the associate, "is to say the hell
wioh em, and walk out now. But
being a fair minded, thoughtful
fellow, he doesn't want to be res
ponsible for improper inferences."
From all accounts, Dempsey ac actually
tually actually went into this deal as an
unselfish, zealous do-gooder. Sens Sensing
ing Sensing the precarious condition of
boxing and owing so much to it
himself, he sincerely hoped he
might exert a salubriously stimul stimulating
ating stimulating influence.
"Dempsey wasn't going to take
any money at all," revealed the
associate, still visibly shocked at
the thought of such an indecency.
"I insisted on the $500 weekly ex
penses. When I said, 'Make that
minimum,' the other guys pulled
back. One of them protested. Mi Minimum?
nimum? Minimum? Why. that might mean
81500 a week.' I reolied: 'Gentle-
mert, it might even meaa $5000.

ia MeaMlaiBMHMHaHaaMMBMIW'
by
JOE WILLIAMS

American League

TEAMS
Chicago . .
Cleveland .
Detrtit
New York
Baltimore '.
Boston- ....
Kansas City
Washington
W L
..S3 52
. 78 56
.6? 67
. 08 68
. 65 48
. 63 74
. 59 74
. 55 81
Pet.
.615
.582
.507
.500
.489
.460
.444
.404
CB
A r
14':
15V.
T7"
21"
2J
28'
.
Today's Games
Kansas City at Chicago (2)
Detroit at Cleveland (2)
Washington at Baltimore (2)
New York at Boston
Yesterday's Results !t,
Kansas City 200 040 000 8 11 0
Dertroit 020 040 0017 IS- 'B
Herbert, Dickson. Sturdivant ri-
7) and House.
Lary, Burnside (1-2) and Wilson.",
Cleveland 000 000 0022 9
Chicago 000 010 0001 8 V
Grant (9-6) and Brown, Fitzger'
(9-7) and Lollar.
Boston 001 010 0002 5 lv
Washington 000 000 0101 5 t"
-
Brewer (9-10) and White.
Ramos (12-17), Woodeschick and'
Courtney. "'
Baltimore 130 000 1005 8' (f
New York 000 101 0114 10 1"
Walker (10-8), Brown and Trian-;
dos.
Ford (14-8), Larsen and Berra.-
This is Jack Dempsey, the only
one of his kind.'
The business assnHat was nerl.
dling his own peanuts. The -ex
pense money was to be his to do
with as whim and fhirtt rtintatiH
If a pal can make a buck, Demp
sey never stands in his way, u
the B.A. was a pal.
CAST AS A COMB-OM
DemDseD's altruistir- flight int
the spiritual realms of cauliflow
erdom had other nnh 9nnv rociillfl
- r rj n
Among them, a mixed press re
action, ne was being transparent transparently
ly transparently used to lend an illusion of res respectability
pectability respectability to an enterprise of
questionable character. In what
way could, that help boxing?
Also, since when had Dempsey
found the linrnillhc amnna iho
uiei nooa so revolting? sports writ writers
ers writers with long memories recalled
that Bill. Duffy, long identified wRIl
New York ra.pfi hori ,nnj
his corner m the memorable
long count" battle with Gene Tud Tud-ney
ney Tud-ney And hadn't the odious Frank
Carbo reeularlv imhoiiichd nin
sey's Broadway restaurant? ete
If the wnv nt II,. n.-I 1
hard- the old champion wjrs
soon to learn the way of Che soui soui-saver
saver soui-saver is harder still. And w
suspect that, when he does take
that walk it won't be in the di.
rection of the nearest monastery.
' r r, vr a
: HONEST William G. Car
rincton. Jr.. tfauvhf' hi 411
pounder on a 39-pound test
me on oan juan. ine JNew
Yorker was a member of a
Puerto Rican team takine- nart
in a tournament gainst
norm varouna siat w aeter
Jht worWJlBtj;Ute5;

K 5t ri-4w



TBI PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART VEW8PJLPEB
PA61 SIVIN
Seniors Golf Tourney To Be Played Next Weekend At Amador

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, MM

mm

fay

Soon as Ibe uuohub about the
boxing investigation in New York
die down,' loolt for Rosensohn
Associates, ans Rosensohn, to
drop the name, but quickly, .and
renew tne okl 20th Century Sport Sporting
ing Sporting Club. .by buying the name
for a nominal ium from Mrs.
Mike Jacobs. .
Mike's nephew, Irwin Rosee, is
also in line to handle publicty
fox the new setup. and the In In-,
, In-, femsr Johansson Floyd Patter Patter-)
) Patter-) ion rematch.
Wasn't it Rosee's fine touch
t,that got Jack Dempsey back into
boxing action?. and salvaged
Vh operation. .The Manassa
JtCauler didn't come in as pro-
'motional director because he was
Interested in the dough he
doesn't really need it. .but more
to do a turn for an old friend,
Ned Brown, who has covered box boxing
ing boxing almost back to bare-knuckle
days. .
The Dodgers' Wally Moon ex explaining
plaining explaining why he runs so hard
after slapping one to the infield:
"When you see a legger, man,
you got to go.".
The late Jim Tatum never over overlooked
looked overlooked a football prospect, .and
that's how come South Carolina
Coach Warren Giese is in foot football.
ball. football. .Giese, in the Naval Air
Force during World War II, was
notputting on the drill grounds
for recreation one day. .when
Tatum flew in from a nearby
bas and happened to walk by
"and spot the husky guy. Jem
ram nvr inri asked how he'd

like to go to Jacksonville to play
football. .and flyine over for
practice every day. .Giese wound
im nlavinv nH for Tatum and
- V K --
started an association that led
him to Maryland and South Ca-
tvtlina
Southern Carolina's Don Clark
ean tell you why he didn't adopt
baseball as a career. .although
he once roved the outfield as a
achoolboy in Iowa. He got dis discouraged
couraged discouraged playing against a -team
from Van Meter and striking out
four times in one game. .The
pitcher?. ...Bob Feller. .
You'd think everything would
fee "chummy in Cleveland. with
th Indians pulling in twice as
many people as last year, and
Making a run for the pennant.
but General Manager Frank
Line is burning at Skipper Joe
Gordon for his -handling 1 of the
ieeond base situation. spouting
that he i hurting the club by play playing
ing playing Jim Baxes in the late innings
.instead of using fielding re relief.
lief. relief. Tell you how serious the New
York contingent is about the
Continental League venture. .
they've already begun exploratory
talks with Army's Joe Whill a a-botit
botit a-botit becoming their publicity
chief.
The Bobby Layne episode in
Austin has a faint parallel with

The Sports Patrol

By STIVE SNIDER
NEW YORK (UPI) Sports of
all sorts:
Chances of playing a World Se Series
ries Series game at night in the near iu iu-tufa
tufa iu-tufa are extremely remote, player
representatives have been inform informed;
ed; informed; .Television sponsors can't af afford
ford afford to pick up the tab for those
high-priced prime TV hours on the
evening schedule. .There had
been suggestions one or more
night games might become desir
ablt to beat the heat if the Los
Angeles Dodgers became involved.
Heat figures in plans for foot football
ball football practice at many southern
aehool. .Alabama, for instance
1i starting a two a-day schedule
-with the first one at 6:30 a.m. and
the other at 4:15 p.m. . .Florida
State has 'em at 6:15 a.m. and 4
p.m.
DROPS PROM TOURNEY
J 'Harlv football forecasts indicate
4 aw almost universal adoption of
!tha two-team system on the col
lege scene this year with even the
amaller schools hoping to run in
fresh units 11 men at a time
New Navy coach Wayne Hardin is
aid to be trying to achieve two
units of identical strength, switch
ins nersonnel to achieve balance.
JacK uougias, tormer oiamuiu
football and tennis ace, had to
scratch from the U.S. tennis
championships underway at For Forest
est Forest Hills. .He's due to enter serv service
ice service and got a delay only Ion"
enough to compete for the U.S.
in the Pan-American Games.
1 Airman Barry MacKay of Day
ton, Ohio, gets his discharge from
the Air" Force just in time to con concentrate
centrate concentrate on national tennis. And
a few days too late for the- Davis
Cup. .Top pros Pancho Gonza Gonzales,
les, Gonzales, Jack Kramer and Don Budge
have been trying for some time to
tltl MacKay to put more spin on
ia second service, and thereby
'tlln more control ,to lick those
doublefaults, but Barry prefers his
way.
WILT BUYS HORSE
Here's a news photo you're
bound to see one of these days-pn
basketball's WiL The Stilt Cham Chamberlain
berlain Chamberlain towering over his favorite
Jockey. '. .The Stilt, former Kansas
and Harlem Globetrotter star how

mm .i

i .ml

WW W MM- A

i

Jack Dempsey
his Detroit caper of a couple of
years ago. .with his lawyer now
insiting hoareness was mistaken
for drunkennes. .and in Detroit
the point being made that the
cops couidn't understand him, not
because of his condition, but be because
cause because he has a Texas drawl. .
so after the trial acquittal, there
was a party and the Leon equip
ment manager trotted around
with a sign: "Ah-all ain't drunk
. .ah'm from Texas." Nobody
laughed louder than Bob. .
Hasn't one young National
League outfielder got his team
worried because he might be an another
other another I'iersall case?. .
Giant end coach Ken Kava
ugh cMs obscure Jo Biscaha
of Richmond, "best rookie end
since I've been with the club.
. .yet Biscaha almost didn't get
to college because he missed
his senior year in high school
with a broken leg. .and was
almost passed up by the profes professionals
sionals professionals No. 28 draft ch(oice) be because
cause because Richmond played a sys system
tem system in which it didn't pass to the
ends and Biscaha caught only .ive
all last year. .but a couple of
them happened -to t)e. in a game
scouted by Al Sherman. .
Think the colleges aren't being
influenced by the pros .
starting this year, field goals In
college ball will be measured
from the point of the kick to the
goal posts. .
Between you'n'me the boys a a-round
round a-round boxing tell you that one
of the key figures in the investi investigation
gation investigation of the Johansson-Patterson
promotion has been under sur surveillance.
veillance. surveillance. .not only since the
trouble brewed. .but for the
past five years. .
preparing for his first league sea season
son season with the Philadelohia War
riors, recently purchased a race
norse, bpooky Cadet. .Chamber .Chamber-Uin
Uin .Chamber-Uin registered his silks-orange and
black and expects to race at At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic City.
Ordell Braase, a defensive en
for the BaMimore Colts, now
weighs 240 pounds and wants hi.
National Football League rivals to
know it. .His weieht has hoc
carried as 215 in the program. .
"When those offensive guards pul
out of the line they don't think
twice aoout mowing down a 215
pounder," he moaned. "Since I've
finally reached 240 1 want every
body to know it. At least those
blockers will respect 240 pounds"
. .Wanna bet?
This is Yale's 87th year of fool fool-ball
ball fool-ball and exactly 87 candidates
turned out for practice. .Coach
Jordan Olivar would settle for 22
good ones.
Herb Moford Hurls
One-Hit 1-0 Win
Over Havana Kings
NEW YORK, Sept. 7 (UPD (UPD-Herb
Herb (UPD-Herb Moford, who specializes in
pncning low-nit games, gave up
only one single as he pitched the
Miami Marlins to a 1-0 victory
over the Havana Sugar Kings yes yesterday
terday yesterday in the first game of an Int International
ernational International League doubleheader
at Maimi.
The veteran righthander, who
has a pair of two-hitters and a
four-hitter to his credit this sea season,
son, season, faced only 29 men in chalk chalking
ing chalking up his seventh win of the
year. The lone hit was a clean
fifth innings sirgle by Havana
shortstop Leon Cardenas. Foster
Castleman s bases empty home
run in the same inning won the
game for the Marlins. The Cubans
bounced back to win the seven seven-inning
inning seven-inning nightcap. 5-2.
Southpaw Bill Short of Richmond
checked the Columbus Jets' win winning
ning winning streak at 10 games when h
pitched the Vees to a three hi'
3-2 triumph in the nightcap, aft":
the Jels had taken the open open-by
by open-by tine same score. It was Shorl
17th win of the year against si:.

Champ Must
Be At Least
55 Years Old

The Panama Golf Association
sponsored 1959 Seniors Golf Tour Tournament
nament Tournament will be played at Fort A
mador Golf Course next weekend
Sept. 12 and 13.
Seniors golfers 50 years old and
over will be allowed to play with
no entry fee, and no PGA card
required. The Tourney will get a
36 hole medal play affair with 18
holes being played botn Saturday
and Sunday afternoons.
Prizes will be awarded to the
3 low gross scores, and also to
the 3 low net scores, the most
important prize of course will go
to the Isthmian senior champion
who will receive a beautiful silver
cup (or his efforts and according
to USGA rules the actual senior
champion must be at least 55
years old, any player may win
the other 6 prizes but the cham champion
pion champion must be 55 years old.
The field will be sprinkled with
many playerd who have been in
the golfing news and probably did
not know had reached the age of
50.
Governor Potter will ge playing
along with President of the Re Republic,
public, Republic, Frnestito de la Guardia,
and Gen. Dasher. In actually
the tournament should bring to together
gether together the men of the Isthmus
who have been playing golf here
for many many years and their
should be many a bull-session in
the.corner between men who have
not played with each oHier for
years.
After Sunday's play their will
be a buffet and Scotch bar in
operation at the club house. Come
out and meet your old friends
and make new ones.
Brown, Kerwm
Non-Title Bout
Wednesday pm
NEW YORK (UPI) Light Lightweight
weight Lightweight champion Joe Brown
meets Canadian Gale Kerwin at
Columbus,, Ohio., Wednesday night
in a non-trtle 10-rounder that fea features
tures features this week's boxing sched schedule.
ule. schedule.
Friday night's TV radio 10 10-rounder
rounder 10-rounder brings together welter welterweights
weights welterweights Caspar Ortega of Mexico
and Florentine Fernandez of Cuba
at Miami Beach.
Brown's title will not be at
stake Wednesday night at the Co Columbus
lumbus Columbus Coliseum because both he
and Kerwin of Ottawa, Ont., will
scale above the 135-pound limit.
Kerwin fights either as a light lightweight
weight lightweight or welterweight. He's the
Canadian welter champ.
Brown, now fighting out of
Houston, Tex., is favored at 4-1
because of his combined boxing
and punching prowess. Kerwin
has beaten Jimmy Archer, Dave
Dupas and Stefan Redl.
Wednesday's bout will be tele televised
vised televised nationally by ABC.
For Friday's Miami Beach
fight, Fernandez Cuban knock knockout
out knockout specialist is favored at 9-5
over Mexicano Ortega, rated ninth
among contenders. Fernandez is
not ranked among the top 10. But
the unbeaten Cuban registered 18
knockouts while winning all 20 of
his professional starts.
Ortega is aggressive and dur durable.
able. durable. Their bout will be televised
and broadcast nationally by NBC.
The week's boxing schedule in
cludes:
Monday
Oakland. Calif.
Smith vs. Jerry Hun-
Long Beach. Calif.
Tombstone
nicutt.
Tuesday
Kid Rayo
vs. Rocky Kalingo.
W.ednesda
y L-olumous, umo
vs. Gale Kerwin (non-
Joe Brown
title) .TV).
Thursday Thursday-ley
ley Thursday-ley Lee vs.
Friday
nar O'"'"'.
title) (TV).
Saturdav
Joe Miceli
-Los Angeles Cur-
Howard King.
Miami Beach Gas Gas-vs.
vs. Gas-vs. Florentine Fer-
Hollywood. Calif.
vs. Pat Lowry. West
N Y. Bartolo Soni
Wallitsch.
Hempstead
vs. Henry
setbacks.
The Rochester Red Wings and
the Montreal Royals divided a
twin bill at Montreal in which all
four starting pitchers went the dis distance.
tance. distance. Bill S.ith of foe Wings
topped Billy Harris of the Royals,
2-1, in the second game, after vet veteran
eran veteran Tom Lasorda had turned
back the visitors, 4-3, on tnree.hits
in the opener.
At Toronto, the pennant-winning
Buffalo Bisons warmed up for the
post season playoffs by whipping
the cfllar-dwelling M,ple Leais
twice, 3-1 and 4-0 Henry Moason
scattered six hits in registering
his 12th victory of the season in
the second game.
EXPLAINS TEACHERS' JOB
CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy
("UPI) Pope John XXIII
last ight old an audience of
Italian teachers that "teachers
ire more excellent than artists
ho mold figures, because they
old the souls.'' "Their missions
so worthy that it place them
c to priests, making them
- the nr ests echoes of the
word's word," the Pope said.

I 3
1 Ail $4e v Vnl

the Jour-Kilo snov v
many in an international meet

By OSCARjFRALEY;

NEW YORK (UPI) Ted Wil Williams
liams Williams will play again in 1960 and
Stan Musial will call it a career,
intimates of the two famous slug sluggers
gers sluggers are betting today.
Neither man has made a final
decision, according to those close
to them. But the theory is that
William's unfulfilled batting am ambitions
bitions ambitions will drive Mm into one
more campaign while Musial's
aims have been accomplished and
he won't stick around to be a
mediocre has-been.
"I'd bet almost anything," said
one who knows Williams well,
"that Ted will play at least one
more season."
One more would give him In all
probability the two marks he
now desires above all others. The
111 ol lo moving, uivw m
ahead of the late Mel Ott on
the roster of all-time home run
hitters, xne secona is laning soie
possession of fifth place in the
all-time averages.
INJURIES SHACKLE
WILLIAMS
Williams has been shackled this
cainn hv a lone series of frus
trating injuries. As of the moment,
it has dropped his all-time aver average
age average from .349 to 3.345 because of
a season in which he currently is
hitting a painful .239. Ted feels
that he still is a far better hitter
than that and must believe that
one final good year at bat would
move him up again just as rapid rapidly
ly rapidly as he fell.
That's reason number one to
give one more try. The second is
even more compelling.
Williams at the moment has a
lifetime total of 492 home runs
even though he has struck only
10 this season. One more will tie
him with Lou Gehrig for fourth
place on the all-time list and
leave him only seven short of the
"500 club." There are only three
members in this exclusive organi
zation-rRuth with his fantastic
714 round trippers, Jimmy Foxx
with 534 and Ott with 511.
IMPRESIVE TOTALS
Musial on the other hand has
just about "had it."
"Stan the Man" has run up im
pressive totals in every depart department
ment department and his record is enough to
satisfy any man. While h is only
39, the one-time king of the Na
tional League hitlers has no new
records within close proximity and
baseball has become a chore.
"It is easy to hit .300," he said
once while sitting in the sunshine
during spring training.
But this season he is batting
only .259 and it has dropped his
lifetime average from .340 to .337.
Another year could only make ii
worse and, meanwhile, Stan no
longer is the wheelhor.ie of the
Cardinals.
There was a time when he could
hope lor one more .vauoii.n
League batting title to tie Honus
Wagner's league leading eight
TO RECEIVE PLANES
METZ, France (UPI)-A ferrv
flight of 22 Royal Canadian Air
Force 1-33 Silver Star jet trainers
is scheduled to leave Germany
today to be turned over lo the
Turkish Air Force, Canadian Air
Division. Headquarters here said.
The planes were being turned ov over
er over lo Turkey as a Canadian coii coii-1
1 coii-1 rihut ion under the mutual aid
program, a spokesman said.

" "-T t.in in London.

win.
championships,
inspiration is ;
the betting is
follow.
But now even the
one tor S.ai. and
that he soon will
OFFICIAL LIST
Complete Prize
The

is it i i i i i i
No. PriM No. Prii No Prlii No. Prlrn No. PrljM No. PrljK No. Priio. No. PrliM No. rrlwt No. PtIim
0057 156.011 1057 156.00 2057 158 00 1057 1 5(1. 00 4057 1 5I.M SM7 1SS.M 1057 1SS.N 7057 IM.Ofl K057 151.00 057 150.00
0157 150 00 1157 150.00 2157 156.00 .1157 156 00 157 I56.M 5157 156.00 11.17 1M.M 7157 154.00 S157 156.00 S1S7 150
0257 156 00 1257 156.00 2257 156.09 .1287 156.00 4257 156.00 5257 IS. S2S7 ISS.oi 7257 1.16.00 S257 15. 257 15.e
0357 156.00 1157 156.00 2357 156.00 .1357 156.00 4357 156.00 1 5.157 15S.M S357 156 J 7357 156.00 6357 156.00 3S7 156.00
0457 156.00 1457 156.00 2457 156.00 3457 156.00 4457 156.00 J4.17 156.00 6457 156.00 7457 156.00 6457 156.00 6457 156.00
0557 I56 0O 1557 156.00 2557 156.00 3557 156.00 4557 156.00 M7 156.00 6557 156.00 7557 156.00 1557 156.00 557 156.00
0657 156.00 1657 156.00 2657 156.00 3B57 156.OO 4657 156.00 657 166.00 6657 156.00 7657 156.00 6657 I5610 0657 156.00
0757 156 00 1757 156.00 2757 156.00 3757 156.00 4737 156.00 S7S7 156.00 6757 156. 00 7757 136.00 6757 156.00 1757 156.00
OR57 156 00,1657 156.00 156.00 3657 156.00 4657 156 0 S657 136.00 6657 156.00 7657 156 00 6657 156.00 0657 156 00
0957 2.600.00 : 1957 2,600.00 1 2957 2,600.00 357 2.600.00 457 62.006.00 S7 1,600.00 6937 1,600.00 7957 2,600.06 6957 2,600.00 9S7 2,600.00

it 1 1 i i
4046 520.00 4950 520 06 4952 526.60 4056 120.00 4056 520.00 4950 520.00 4961 J20.00 4963 320 00 4905 520.00
4949 520 00 4961 520.60 4953 520.06 455 520.00 4951 520.00 460 526.06 462 520.00 466 520.00 46 526.06..

I III I III I I I
0667 260 00 1667 260.00 I 2667 260.00 J667 260.00 4667 260.00 5667 20.00 6667 266.00 7667 260.00 9667 260.00
6658 110 00 660 130.00 6662 130.06 6664 130.00 1466 130.00 I 666 130.00 6671 130.00 73 116.00 6673 130.00
8659 HO 00 I 8661 130.00 I 866.1 130.00 6665 130.00 8668 130.6 1 8670 130.00 6672 130.66 8674 136.00 8676 130.0
-

,!
0SR3 156 00 1863 156 00 2863 136.00 4663 156.00 3863 156.00 6863 156.00 763 I56 0O 8861 136.00 9863 156. 64)
3854 104 00 1856 104.00 1858 104.60 3860 104.00 1862 104.00 3865 164.00 I 3867 104.00 3B69 104.00 3871 104 00
.1855 104 00 1857 104.00 1839 104.00 3861 104.00 3864 104.00 1 366 104.00 : 3668 104.00 3670 104.00 3872 104.0

Priie-winning Numbers of yesterday', Lottery Drawlni were sold at: The 1st. Panama, 2nd. Panama and 3rd. In Panama.
The Ninr Hundred whole ticket ertdlftf In and not included In the above list win Fifty Two Dollars (52.00) each.
The whole ticket haa fifty two pieces which comprise the two series "A" it "B"

WrVSSF.S: Dudlev Farrell Ced. 8-4-3A62
Winston Spencer Johnson G. Ced. g-15-300

KJrtTr. Tho wlnnlnj tlrkru with tho lost rlphor and with tho two toil
lwl L. cjphfr apply only In tho FirM Prl.
The Tlrrt Pi i7 and the 2nd and 3rd Prize are drawn teparitely Tho ap
prnxlmatinn are calculated on. the First. Second and Third prlrea In case
a tlckcl hnuld carry th numhora of each prlie, the holder la entitled to
claim navmrnl for each

DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, September 6, 1959
Drawlnr. Number 114
Fraction Ticket

First Prize
Second Prize ....
Third Prize

World's Greatest Show Gets
Underway In Rome Next Year

By DANIEL P. GILMORE
ROME (L'PD The world'i great
est show in one of the world's
most magnificent cities will be
underway here a year from Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. Queen Elizabeth of Britain is ex expected
pected expected to lead a Lost of crowned
heads, and extraordinary visitors
to the Eternal City of Rome for
the staging of the XXVI (17th)
Olympiad.
For the first time in the mod modern
ern modern edition of the games, a Ro Roman
man Roman Catholic pope will also ob observe
serve observe some of the events.
A torch lit at Olympus in
Greece, where the historic games
originated more than 700 years
before the birth of Christ, will be
Olympic Stadium in Rome by the
last of a relay of runners on
Aug. 25.
Then will begin 15 days of
pulse quickening copetition a a-mong
mong a-mong the finest athletes of the
world.
East and West, all races and
religions, will compete on equal
urms in some of the modern
Madia, pools and arenas over de devised
vised devised by man.
Several events will even take
place in ancient sporting grounds
where Roman athletes vied for
honors almost 2,000 years ago.
Old and new will blend as in
no other edition of the games,
with the exception of the first
staging of the modern Olympics
in Athens in 1896.
Rome, a fabulous city in itself,
has been emerging like a phoenix
from the ashes with breathtaking breathtaking-ly
ly breathtaking-ly beautiful sports palaces and
stadia that display the genius of
modern Italian architecture.
One new sports palace amerg amerg-ing
ing amerg-ing south of Rome has a cupola
larger than St. Peters' Basilica,
largest church in the world.
Most of the events will be staged
in Rome whose citizens even to
day cannot but help to stop and
watch with awe as immense new
buildings and entire villages
spring up around them.
Like the Colosseum, which was
built for the ages, everything for
this Olympics is here to stay.
The Olympic village, mushroom mushrooming
ing mushrooming up beside a northern bend of
the Tiber River, will house some
8,000 athletes and officials. Af

OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 2113, September 6, 1959.
whole ticket has 92 pieces which comprises the two seriea "A" and "B"

First Prize 4957 $52,000.00
Second Prize 8667 $ 15,600.00
Third Prize 3863 $ 7,800.00

Approximations Derived From First Prize

Approximations Derived From Second Prize

Approximations Derived From Third Prize

Signed by: The Governor of the Province f Panama ALBERTO ALEMAN
The Representative of the Treasury, LUIS CHANDECK

57
67
63
$11.00 $220.00
3.00 60.00
2.00 40.00

PRIZES ARK PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

ter the Olympics it will become a
model housing development for
civil servants.
The giant swimming pools, with
temperature-controlled water and
underwater observation posis, will
be turned over to the public.
Football and cycling stadia will
serve as permanent fixtures for
the sports-loving Italian people.

JOHNNIE
WALKER

Silvestre
Cuba Ave.

"SPORTS PARADE"
Daily at 7:00 p.m.
Dfl S
Your Community Network

830 Kcs.
PANAMA
ALBERTO J. BARSALLO
Notary Public, Panama

rhTprReflRT!iTrnrc7urmT!7r"wTnr e
tho efflrea of the Sallonal Beneficent Lottery situated on Central Avenue'.

PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No. '114 WHICH WIT.
TAKE PLACE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13. 195
Divided In two aerleo of 26 fraction, each denominated "A" and "B"

FIRST
1 First Prire. Seriea A and B
1 Second Prite, Serioa A and B
1 Third Prlre Series A and B o'
1 Approximations. Seriea A and B.
Prlies Seriea A and of
0 Prlr.es. Series A and B. of
000 Prlrea. Seriea A and B. of
sr.f ONn
11 Approximations. Series A and B.
I Frlrea. Seriea A and B. of
II Approximations. Series A and B.
( Prlrea. Seriea A and B. of
174 Prltea

Price of a whole ticket $26 00
Price of a 52nd part 0.50

Some of the sites forevents aiw
oustanding attractions by them themselves,
selves, themselves, without the necessity of an
Olympics.
Conoeing and rowing will taka
place on the calm blue waters of
Lake Albano, nestled in the cra crater
ter crater of an extinct volcano in the
Alban Hills 26 kilometers IS 1-4
miles south of Rome.

& Brostella
27 02, Panama
1090 Kcs.
COLON
PABLO A. PINEL M.
Secretarv
I."
FBI7.F
of
of
of
$26.000 00 each series r2 non
7,(00 00 each series 15. 600.
S.90flon each seriea 7 600
260.00 each seriea .36fl
l.SOO.00 each series 2S.4nO
78 00 each aeries 14 040
26.00 each series 46 800
Ml
rair.ic w
of I 6300 each series $ 2.340.6
130 00 earh series 2 J4B
of I
no each series I 1812.0.
78 00 each aeries 1.404 0
Total
$17,5.

1

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4



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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER T. iaaf
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Beside Bella Vista Theatre and Branca at Minimal Super Market on Via Eapafta COLON OPFlCI: 15th and Amador Gntmra Ne. 1421 Tel. 432.
Resorts
Automobiles
Apartments
Home Articles
Miscellaneous
Real Estate

PAGt EIGHT

-

PHILLIP Oceania Cottatee
Santa Ciara H. 4 P. Pne
MM 1-1177 Crtttokal 1-1673.

Foster's cottages, e a r Santa
Clara Reasonable rates Phone
Balboa 1866
Houses
FOR RENT: Chalet Newly
constructed Three bedrooms,
studio, garage, large fenced yard,
hot water Calle G. Loma Alejre
phone Balboa 3228.
FOR RENT: Furnished four
bedroom residence, two master
bathrooms with hot water, two
maid's room with service inside,
terrace with bar. garage, air con conditioning.
ditioning. conditioning. No. 12, 49th Street,
Bella Vista. Apply from 10 a m
to 1 p.m. and from 4 p m to
7 p.m.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Office space,
Mercedes building, above Aveni Aveni-da
da Aveni-da Balboa's Post Office, with
condition, good tirer, good paint
private bathroom, watchman,
very reasonable rent. Tel. 3-3054
Personals
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE: 18'2 ft. out outboard
board outboard cabin cruiser, 22 horse horsepower
power horsepower motor. A wonderful fish
ing and family boat, completely
equipped, licensed for 6. This
boat can be Men at Diablo Spin Spinning
ning Spinning Club. Must sell, if interest interested,
ed, interested, phone Balboa 2-3782.

I Commercial Guide
1 ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
I Ads only cost $0.85 per col. inch
I Ads accepted for a minimum of one month.

j FOR INrOKMA l iuim v,li ui-u j

Canal Zone Society For
The Prevention Of Cruelty
To Animals
Bnx 24, Balhon. C l
Phone: Curundu 5113
jtall the advice- number for
"1 Kittens I male, 2 females, black
and while, 2 mo, old
1 Female cat, black and white, 2
jrrs. old.
SUPPORT YOUR SPCA.
YOU NEED IT. IT NEEDS YOU.
GIBRALTAR LIFE
., INSURANCE COMPANY
Jim Ridge
Harry Cornell
Davis Stevenson
3ox E Diablo. C.Z.
Telephone Pan. 2-0S52
TO CONVERT BUILDING
BEIRUT (UPI) Baghdad city
officials have asked lr;:cl Foreign
Ministry officers lo clean out the
old Baghdad Pact building :n
Baghdad. They plan to convert it
inlo an orphanage. The building
has been unused since Hie July 14,
9.')8, Iraqi revolution when it was
announced Iraq would withdraw
from the pact.

"No wonder you're Bold on Mark IV. We
haven't even driven a block yet !"

L Cuardia A Cia., 8. A. Tel. 3

FOR SALE: Tudor Austin A A-35
35 A-35 WS Excellent condition.
Phone Criitobal 3291 or Balboa
3346.

FOR SALE : 1958 Buick, two two-tone
tone two-tone hardtop, 4-door white tide tide-walls,
walls, tide-walls, extras, standard tranamtt tranamtt-sion,
sion, tranamtt-sion, new tires, less than 23.000
miles, excellent condition. Duty
not paid Reasonable offer con considered.
sidered. considered. Tel. 3-6695
FOR SALE: 1959 Ford Custom
300 sedan Low mileage, new car
condition. Call Balboa 3028.
FOR SALE: 1957 Lincoln Pre Premier
mier Premier Landau, 4 door, hardtop.
Fully loaded, factory air, real
cherry. Pink and white. $3,000.
Will consider 1959 Qpel en
trade. Phone 86-3122, after 4
p m.
FOR SALE: '51 M.fi.-T.D, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition. $800. Navy
3968 7 to 3:30. Navy 3677.
FOR SALE: English Ford, good
tires. $50 00. 1953 Vauxhall.
new paint, duty paid $450.00.
Call Curundu 2274.
FOR SALE: 1929 Ford, like
new, $125, truck body, Oken.
Balboa 1625.
Animals
FOR SALE: Doberman Pinscher
one year old female, good watch watchdog,
dog, watchdog, excellent for breeding, des descended
cended descended for AKC champions.
Write box 212, Rodman er see
at 823-A, Fifan
Wanted
WANTED: Cash for 1940 Ford,
good body, rest reparable. 2 2-3188,
3188, 2-3188, Box 400, Diablo.
WANTED: English speaking
Panamanian maid to live in. 3 3-5089.
5089. 3-5089. WANTED: Vacation quarters,
Balboa area, responsible party.
Call Balboa 1473.
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Hour,,
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
f We Certify
I RADIO and TV
I SERVICE
W certify qootity part, o
. fair charge.
TROPELCO
W r uf rvH
nuommrnd CBS
t uhrs. .1 lv lubes
v, tl li l Itr Cood
Hourkrrpmf
Cuararuy Seal.
TROIMXCO, S. A.
Tel. 3-7489
7225 Ext. 8 Panama City

FOR RENT: Vary cool and
comfortable one bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. San Francisco. Phone 3
5024.

FOR RENT: Furnished two
bedroom apartment. Inspected,
hot water, suitable two couples.
No. 82 Via Porras. Tel. 3-7258.
FOR RENT: Furnished and
unfurnished apartments Alham Alham-bra
bra Alham-bra Apartments, 10th Street
8061 Tel 1386. Colon.
FOR RENT: Apartment in con concrete
crete concrete house, living-dining room,
badroom, kitchen, yard $50 00
monthly. La Pradera Urbanisa Urbanisation,
tion, Urbanisation, across furniture factory La
Garantia, Sabanas. Tel. 4-0630.
FOR RENT: Modern two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, living, dining
room, kitchen, hot water, bal balcony,
cony, balcony, terrace, garage, laundress,
maid's room independents. Near
El Panama. Eusebio A. Morales,
Olga Houst. Information Apart Apartment
ment Apartment No. 2.
FOR RENT: Apartment, Valla Valla-rinoj
rinoj Valla-rinoj Place, Transistmica No. 9.
All conveniences, lovely place.
Phone 4-1016, from 4 to 6.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, light, gas, telephone.
Phone 2-4462.
FOR RENT: Newly built apart apartment
ment apartment "Nuevo Campo Alegre" 3
extra large bedrooms, porch,
terrace, maid's room, garage.
Ready mid September. Phone
2-3405.
FOR SALE: Comfortable apart apartment,
ment, apartment, residential area, private
entrance, porch, bathroom, refri refrigerator,
gerator, refrigerator, telephone, air condition conditioning,
ing, conditioning, only single person. Calle 16
and Ave. Tercera, Paitilla, 3 3-3516.
3516. 3-3516. FOR RENT: Modern three bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. Maid's room.
Hot water. Garage. Paitilla, 117.
14th Street.
FOR RENT: Cool clean apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Convenient access to Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone. Next street from 4th
July, Calle Darien No. 14-21.
Apply Apt. No. 2.
FOR RENT: Modern three bed bedrooms
rooms bedrooms apartment, livingroom,
dlningroom, balcony, maid't
room, hot water, garage, etc.
Building", Campo Alegre, $185.
Tel. 3-4994.
FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, living room, dining
room, kitchen, hot water, maid's
room, garage, etc. Via Argentina,
"Maruja House". $75 00. Tel.
3-4994.
Services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
SERVICE. Our new service plan
gives you faster, mora econo economical
mical economical and better service. Phone
2-1905 Crawford Agencies. Tivo Tivo-li
li Tivo-li Avenue.
U. S. TELEVISION
Means reliability, and lasting re repairs.
pairs. repairs. For better home service
call 3-7607 Panama from 9 a.m.
to 10 p.m. Saturday to 6 p.m.
Protect your home and proper property
ty property against Insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment v
emergency or monthly budget
basii. Telephone Pronto Service,
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE: "Lambretta"
scooter, perfect conditions
$225.00 cash. Contact Mr. Na Navarro.
varro. Navarro. Tel. 3-0784 from 8:00 a.
m. to 5 :00 p.m.

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
GREAT WHITE FLEET
New Orleans Service Sails Arrive
' Cristobal
MORAZAN Sept. 4 Sept. 12
ULUA Sept. 11 Sept. 19
YAQl'E Sept. 18 Sept. 26
MORAZAN Sept. 25 Oct. S
CIBAO Oct. t Oct. 10
'Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
New York Service Sails Arrives
- Cristobal
Ol'lSQlEYA Sept. 10 Sept. 15
MUSA Sept. 16 Sept. 22
JUNIOR Sept. 22 Sept. 27
SAN JOSE Sept. 29 Oct. 4
METAPAN Oct. 6 Oct. 11
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
CRISTOBAL W. CCA. FEEDER SERVICE
TEXITA Every (15) Days
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle

SPECIAL EXCURSION FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return $275.M
To San Francisco andor Seattle and Return ,.$409.00
TELEPHONES;
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA.2-2904

FOR SALE: RCA Victor console
radio-phono, three speed, maho mahogany
gany mahogany cabinet, very cheap. Phone
2-2490, Balboa 6351-B. Los
Rios.
FOR SALE: Automatic washing
machine, new unit, good condi condition
tion condition $75.00. Tel. 2-3118.

FOR SALE: Refrigerator West West-inghouse,
inghouse, West-inghouse, 7 eu. ft. porcelain
throughout. 1 dining table, 8
chairs. Can be seen in House
8032-D. 2f. St Margarita Op Opposite
posite Opposite Post Office. Owner leaving
Zone. Tel. Cristobal 3-2143.
FOR SALE: Kenmore electric
dryer, good condition, RCA T V.
need picture tube. Albrook 86 86-6102.
6102. 86-6102. FOR SALE: G. I. wringer type
washer. Excellent condition. Tel.
Gatun 5-564
FOR SALE: Wall gun cabinet
$10; Singer sewing machine,
$25; platform rocker $30; email
mahogany book case, $26; two
end tables dark, $8; sofa with
pillows, $25; two budgybirds
with cage $12; corner bar $50.
Phone Balboa 2-3782.
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, West West-inghouse,
inghouse, West-inghouse, new unit, all porcelain.
Telephone, Balboa 4337.
FOR SALE: Kenmore Hi-Speed
dryer. New condition $135.00.
Albrook 86-4109.

New British Fluid Drive System
Eliminates Clutch, Transmission

LONDON, Sept. T (BIS) A
fluid drive system for off-llie-road
working vehicles, eliminating en entirely
tirely entirely the conventional clutch and
transmission and replacing their
two controls with single lever
combining clutch, gear and acce acceleration
leration acceleration control, has been devel developed
oped developed by Dowty Hydraulic Units
Ltd., Ashchurch, Gloucestershire,
England.
Its more obvious application In-
Agency Announces
New Steamship
Service To Miami
A new direct service between
Cristobal and Miami is now be being
ing being operated on a monthly basis
by O.S.K. Line ships which ar ar-riveat
riveat ar-riveat Canal Zone ports en route
from the Far East to New York
Boyd Brothers agencies announc
ed todav.
Accordine to the agency, he
ships will accept cargo at th
Canal for delevery at Miami
There vessels are equipped to car
ry both dry and refrigerated car
eoes.
The Miami stoD was made last
month bythe "Chicago Maiu,"
latest addition to the O.S.K
fleet, on her maiden voyage from
the Far East. The run between
Cristobal and Miami was made in
lest than three days. The next
vessel to make the call will be the
"Philippine Maru," due here Sept.
11.
Boyd Brothers also announced
that O.S.K. had Inaugurated a
service. The first ship to make
the call at Cuban ports was the
'Kikuko Maru" which also stop
ped at Curacao and La Guaira
after leaving cnstoDai.

FOR SALI Afi natural ma manure
nure manure at give-away prices by the
truckload. Call 2-2641.

FOR SALE: Piano, Upright,
uitable for beginners. $135.00.
Call Balboa 2708.
FOR SALE: Modern living room
set, deep freezer, 14 cu.
ft. upright, refrigerator, 8 mm.
movie camera and projector,
Lionel Electric train set, complete
bedroom set, guitar, misc., items.
Call Curundu, 83-3180.
FOR SALE: 1957 four door
Ford. One double bed. One black
sofa Phone 3-2589.
FOR SALE: Dryer, 1957 Sears
Lady Kenmore, all porcelain, like
new $175. 20" two speed win window
dow window fan and extensions $25.
Sears portable electric roaster
with attachmenfi, $30. Qrts. 43
Albrook 86-4212.
FOR SALE: Complete set 1959
professional golf irons with
stainless steel, heads, $85.00.
Panama 3-4848.
SALE: Head Stone new assort assorted
ed assorted in Georgia Granite, Discount
10 for Coroxal Mount Hope.
Apply to MARMOLELIA CASI CASI-MIRO
MIRO CASI-MIRO MORENO, Calle B & 19
West Phone 2-2656.
FOR SALE: "B" flat Silver Silver-tone
tone Silver-tone clarinet ebonite finish ex excellent
cellent excellent conditions. Balboa 3759.
FOR SALE: General Electrie
Thinlina air conditioner, one ton.
Used only 3 weeks, $160.00. G.
f Ward. Telephone Navy 3104.
elude crawler tractors and heavy
earth-moving machinery, locomo locomotives,
tives, locomotives, road-making machinery, a a-gricultural
gricultural a-gricultural and civil engineering
tractors, cranes, hoists, fork-lilt
trucks and other handling equip equipment,
ment, equipment, mining machinery, marine
and aircraft-towing tugs, tracked
vehicles of all kinds, winches, der derricks,
ricks, derricks, and ship's steering gear and
stabilizers.
The system operates on the hy hydrostatic
drostatic hydrostatic principle and consists of
a variable output oil pump through
which, the engine provides a flow
of oil at a high and positive pres pressure
sure pressure but comparatively low velo velocity
city velocity to an hydraulic motor linked
to the driving wheels. The prin principle!
ciple! principle! of this system have long
been known, but only recently
have units been developed com combining
bining combining sufficient power with ac acceptable
ceptable acceptable weight and size for use
in vehicles.
The manufacturers have recent recently
ly recently demonstrated the drive in oper operation
ation operation in a conventional tractor, a
diesel quarry locomotive and a
diesel road roller. The simplicity
of control is such that once the
engine is started, the driver need
ojily to move the control lever for forward
ward forward or backward is order to ob obtain
tain obtain the full range of movement
m full ahead to full astern.
At the neutral, half-way positior
the engine ticks over freely while
the wheels remain locked. Brack Bracking
ing Bracking is not necessary.
Apart from simplicity of opera operation,
tion, operation, leading to increased safety
and a reduction in driver fatigue,
other advantages claimed for the
new system include the consider considerable
able considerable saving of time which stems
from the total absence of the dif difficulties
ficulties difficulties of changing gear under
load.
Vehicles can be inched forward
and speed increased until the op optimum
timum optimum engine output is achieved.
Maneuverability in difficult condi conditions,
tions, conditions, such as on steep inclines
and poor-holding ground, is claim claimed
ed claimed to be incomparably more effi efficient
cient efficient than with conventional drive.
The elimination of many parts,
including the mechanical drive
line, allows great flexibility in
vehicle design, and there is no
need for any brakes except one
for parking.
Endurance tests, say the manu manufacturers,
facturers, manufacturers, have demonstrated that
negligible maintenance is required,
that the system is long-lived and
likely to outlast the engine itself,
and that the life of the associated
drive-line components is extended
by the shock free drive.
MAKES RECOMMENDATION
GENEVA (UPI) The World
Federation of United Nations As Association
sociation Association (WFUNA) has rec recommended
ommended recommended staged abolition of nu nuclear
clear nuclear arms and other weapons of
mass destruction. WFUNA, a non nongovernment
government nongovernment organization with
consultative status with the U.N.,
wound up its week long 14th ses session
sion session yesterday.
HOIST TYPHOON SIGNAL
MANILA (UPI) The Weather
Bureau reported today that in
located a new tropical storm with
4! m.p.h. center winds about 28
miles northeast of Marinduque Isle
in the central Philippines. It said
the storm, named "Nora," was
moving 1 m.p.h. in the sen?ral
direction of the northern Philip
pines. Typhoon signal number one
was hoisted over that area.
VISITS WEST BERLIN
BERLIN (UPI) Former U.S.
Secretary of State James Byrnes
arrived yesterday for a private
visit in West Berlin. Byrnes was
met at the airport by a represen
lative of the West Berlin City
(iovernment. He is scheduled to
visit Mayor Willy Brandt today.

FOR SALE: lore $00 and 1.000
net en, in the Nyarvo Hipodrome
Urbanlzatioe ecroea Hie Demon
Aacetrack. All lefa with (treat
front, towage, water main and
electricity. Call W. McBaruett.
Tel. 4-0976.

FOR SALE: 5000 M2 with deep
well and other improvements,
16 miles from Panama on Trans Trans-Isthmian
Isthmian Trans-Isthmian Highway, 80c. per M2.
Telephone Balboa 3753.
Less
ons
SPANISH CLASSES
Every day except Saturday and
Sunday; morning, afternnon and
evening classes. Enrollment:
August 17 to Sept. 7. Classes
Begin: Sept. End Nov.
27 PANAMANIAN NORTH
AMERICAN ASOCIATION. Peru
Avenue No. 66 (near Bella Vis Vista
ta Vista Theatre). Tel. 3-7963, 3 3-3018.
3018. 3-3018. Learning Spanish is not easy, but
Mrs. Romero's Conversational
Method makes Spanish simple
and interesting. Twenty years'
experience with over 6,000 pu pupils.
pils. pupils. Individual attention to each
pupil. Lessons mornings, after afternoons
noons afternoons and evening. 4th of July
Ave. Tl 352 No. 10. In front of
Quarry Heights.
Learn to drive, dual control car,
$3.00 per hour. Tel 3-0338, Pa Panama.
nama. Panama. Employment
Opportunities
WANTED: Bilingual secretar secretaries,
ies, secretaries, must know shorthand. "Ser "Ser-vicio
vicio "Ser-vicio y Colocaciones". Camara de
Comercio building No. 9.
GETS US TEACHING JOB Miss
Rosilda Archbold (above), a re resident
sident resident of Rainbow City, departed
for St. Louis, Mo., to take up a
position as a Spanish teacher.
Muriel De Young's
Oils On Display
Al JWB-USO Gallery
In cooperation with the Canal
Zone Art League, a collection of
oil paintings by a well-known lo local
cal local artist, Mrs. Muriel H. De
Young, will be on exhibit at the
USO-JWB Armed Forces Service
Center from today through Sept.
25.
Muriel H. De Young, wife of
Charles De Young of D i a b 1 j
Heights credits her talent to hef
architect-father, Louis GTiarles
Maurer, a retired employe of the
office of engineers of the Pana Pana-man
man Pana-man Canal organization.
The artist has studied fine arts
with Mrs. Betty B. Bentz of tne
Canal Zone; Juan Cedeno of Pa Panama;
nama; Panama; Ringling School of Art
and Jerry and Helen Farnsworth's
School of Art both located in
Sarasota, Florida; and with Ro
berto Dutary of Panama.
Mrs. De Young's collection of
paintings is composed of por
traits, still-hfes, landscaps and
marine scenes done on the Isth Isthmus.
mus. Isthmus. Servicemen and their families
and the general public of the
Canal Zone and the Republic of
Panama are invited by the JWB
to view these works by a gifted
artist. The Art Gallery is open
daily from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.
It says: I quit! Try
getting help through the
classified columns of
The Panama American!

"cT

Investor's Guide-

By
By SAM SHULSKY
King Features Syndicate,
23S E 4S St., New York
Q. I'm 41 with eight dependents
I work very hard to support them
have never been able to invest
Recently I inherited $25,000 and
have been thinking of investment,
but am frightened by present in
flated prices of stocks. Have a
feeling they are badly overpriced
and that this can t go on. Yet,
I fear inflation. What about insti
tutions paying 4 1-2 per cent,
Federally insured?
A. You thought you had troubles
when all you had to do was sup
port eight dependents. Now you've
got to continue this chore and
shepherd $25,000 as well. It
ain't easy. As Shakespeare once
might have said: "Uneasy lies
the head that owns a buck."
You're not alone Wtfien you say
you're frightened by current stock
prices. But you're also paying
high prices for bread and shoes
and canned peas, as well. This
high stock market does not
exist in a vacumm. It is kept
up there by a world-wide fear of
inflation, a fear which drives
people to get out of money and
into things stocks, Flortda land,
or what have you.
You ask about Federal insured
savings and by all means you
should have some. But that's not
the complete answer. That money,
to be fully and gainfully employ employed,
ed, employed, should bring in more than
$1,125 a year in interest. Some of
it should be invested with an eye
to capital growth and to dividends
which, you can hope, will keep
step with inflation.
In other words, you've got to
lake a risk with it. llhe part
,1
"'' V
-
-vAv iw
DEER. OH. DEER Far from
part of a group of 35 flown over

KTill.11,.UJITymW,,T,Tpmr ,Ln HMy,

to the Aleutian island of Adak. U.S. Marines are charged with
raising the reindeer until they are old enough to be released
,riwhich were bought over last year. V& Fish,
and Wildlife Service is attempting to establish a herd on the1
island, the first such transplanting ever tried. These caribou
are expected to increase th hori ;

- -
The caribou could provide food

''BlrK ft

COME, DANCE WITH ME-JTrench actress Brittle Bardot
does a fast-stepping cha-cha hi Nice, Franco, rn xehearsinff R
her new movie, "Win You Dance With Me?" etoo sterrine;
Darius Moreno.

SAM SHULSKY

you put in insured savings is, of
course, subject to inflation. The
part you put into securities is sub subject
ject subject to a market decline. If you
have some in both camps you can
at least nope to keep even.
Fortunately, the two generally
uon i go logetner. so wnat yoi
lose on tne apples you can hop
io maxe up on the pears.
Q. I am very worried. I bout,
5,000 shares of TiD Ton Uraniil
at nna ranl tOA TH-U TT.Q
nium at 15 cents; 100 Consolidated
Fiberglass at $1.50; 2,000 Black Black-stone
stone Black-stone Uranium at two cents, 2,000
Crusader Oil and Uranium at
three cents. Last Spring they
changed the name to Crusader
Oil and Gas and gave me two
shares. Can they do that?
A. To a person who is as care careless
less careless as you are, yes. They..' tan
do much worse. And they will un unless
less unless you stop this nonsense. What
do you think you're doing, any anyway?
way? anyway? Trying to set a record for
being a patsy?
For the Top Top there is no
market; for Penn-Utaih there was
a bid of two cents a share two
years ago but the broker was put
out of business by the authorities;
for the Blackstone, no market
that I can find; for the Consolid Consolidated
ated Consolidated Fiberglass, no market.
On the Crusader: last February
0.005 shares of Crusader Oil and
Gas was exchanged for each share
of Crusader Oil and Uranium. This
should have given you 10 shares
of the Oil and Gas, not two. But
I wouidn t bother -much, the stock
is now selling for about 25 cents
a share, so it's a question of hav having
ing having an "investment" of $2e in instead
stead instead of 50 cents. Shame on you.

mmmmmmammm

Z&C A
'ifAi fit
, BfltvA f A v 5fffl
from the Aiair0 moini-Jii
- otu uifuuKttuiisc level, li
in case of militarj emergency!'
'HeajBiir

iNJAiJIN GROUPS 1NSIDH



, lONDAT, SEPTEMBER 7, 195
THI STORY OP MARTHA WAYNI

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
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with HiM.rr
IPT-UTSaUIWEaUIO
COMMIES PROSAW.Y
9i ARE THEY LOOKING ) WE MIS5EP THE SCAT
L0W0BEIORE-
Y0U--AiXRi6HT.'lU60
ruow.'
I J FOR US, PATT Y" NOW THEY'VE SOT TIME
f UX M. QW I
RIS:iLLA'S POP
That's Gratitude
By AL VERMEII

j H (tush what AM I )
I- 1 1 u SUPWSEDTO DO
DdtJUA, IT WOULD SIMPLY WRECK) WMEU OTHER COMES
YOUR MOTHER AMD FATHER IF WW HERE AkIO DEMWJDf
RAM OFF AMD wC I RETUBH HOME WITH
60T MAERIE0jte! pJW?

5

TOO KUPPY MELO MELA-j I
MELOPRAMASHIC, R1SHT, Q' 'il.

CNOWl

4

HOMERkShi

ALLEY OOP

BOOTS AND HIR BUDMIt

CAPTAIN iasy

MORTY MIIKLI

toy BOAR PI NO HOUSE

4ni''.

PRICKLES AND HIS FRIINM

Sweet Sorrow

.ill' VALERIE JUST SAID V
lCyDXSJEAC WITH

YOU'D BETTER. REVIEW
THE SITUATION, NUTTY

L7 V

WELL, OF

Ua THE Two-

"PMIN6
TRJCKS

AY MERRILL BLOSSl'R

.,.-N

RELAX, SYLVESTER.: iM JUal PREAKINb Ht
MEWS THAT I'M NOT GOIM5 "STEADl"WITH THEM

ANYMORE

1

Job for Little Willi

Y V. T. HAMLIM

C. MY ROBOT I'M AFRAID NOT, AW, ITS WELL,-IF YOU I
DIDN'T MAKE ANY OXY BUT ITS NOTHIMG I PONT WANT N

. f2 HITWTTH OOOlA. A FINE PIECE REALLY. "rtXlRTCV ID f-fT

v lAf1 pip rrr of machinery! just a J all busted up

ANYHOW TOY.' J WD BETTER KEEP

A?'

SI

AN EYE ON

OOP!

'THAT

I ADVICE,

KNOWING

I'D SAY THAT VS OH, IlL DO
GOOD ADVICE, I BETTER
OXY, KNOWING V THAN THAT..
OOP AT DO.'

1- Wfel'

WILLIE

I'LL JUST HAVE LITTLE J

KEEP AN EYE'

y'

Her Nam

BY ID6AR MARTIN

TYKE WOTO

URStf?

S S

NCA t.rrlo. toe. T.M.

g 1HI by

t. U.t. Pel Off.

Explanation

BY LESLIE TURNER

EVERYTHIMa EXPERIENCE? OR REAP IS

STORED IN TH6 SUBCONSCIOUS! AWPA,

r.iefl! HOW rAN-HYCWOTIIED rPKSDN I? IN AN AsNOKttnU

HYfU0l3 TAKE 6 OF C0WCENTRATI0N...CAPA8LE Or

k PERSON BACK L RECALL mo THEM. IF PKOimi PWECTEP1

I EVENTS LOI

7

WHAT ABOUT THOSE y THEY'RE DUE TO THE

PUBLICIZED CASES Or'SUBJECT" C0NFUSIN6

RECALLIW EVENTS IN THINSS HEARP OR
A FORMER UFE.5UCH I RE AP AT AN t ARlV

AS BRIPEV MURPHVf A(3Ei WITH Hl$ OWM

EXPER

A PARTV IW 10 ATTENP Y4HANDU? HE'S ONS

TONISHT HAS A HVPNO- 0f THE 8E5T1 SEIPOW

TIST TO ENTERTAIM US, PERFORWS AT PRIVATft

THE '6REAT SHANPU PARTIES, IT WAS SEElNo

HIM IN PARI5, VEARS

AGO, THAT STARTED

WE M THIS f IELPL A

LAST SPRING I

l DID EVERYTHING)

FOR MY

Wfl LAWN

r z

I pampered)
AND BABIED I n
0 'Vr-r ped it.'

UCS BUNNY

Food and Rtst

' N PLEASE?
SREETIN'S, BUM! V NO INSULTS
f 1 SEE YA GOT GOV 'NOR i
I POUGH FER A v v rr

I NOTICE YOU'VE
INSTALLECVtfWf INI
WIElMET

CAN EVEN yOO.

MVKWFI SYLVESTER

EAT SINCE YEf?

THERE? J ABLET' PAY!

T 4 VERY WELL B(?ING ME "N
lvCi I THE MERCHANT'S LUNCH

True Life Adventures

FRIEND
and FOE

WU Ihnn'T Pri)nrttnnt
Woikl Bifhtf Ktrvt

PUKIMO THE SBAsSOM
EUePHANTS OKl6EI?VE THE WATER &JWJJ
riS&IKI& PEEP HOLES INTO THE SOIL OF
THE RIVER BOTTOM. OTHER AHIMAvLS BENEFIT TOO.

Wall Rattod

Y DICK CAVALLI

IV" MEEKLE, YOU'RE
I I AN INCOMPETENT
LWp. BUCKET HEAD
WfKH0

cmm.ms

S (T9 Tl Me TO WIND UP
f MY VACATION'-I'M BACK: V
V IN GOOD 6HAPE AGAIN
It M by NI fcrflw. In4. A U 8ff.

MAJOR HOOPLB OUT OUR WAY

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

WM MMUttmMrX he's safs now. V
IrVrMV UNLESS HE FORGETS)
ftTHERE SOBS7 WHAT HoW TO $W,M -.J
Jiff jk r'NRTAgoI gSy, yjhat
411 OPEN THE TUB- A AT)Nf J

ir i i

A(?SUlMS

VllTH TflE BEAR" -i

TOP WE OT TO
I GO BACK TO TH y
I POC CUItLY'5 f
PACK IS OUT J
1 A6AIW.'y

Ar)rJ -vr-v

err

ESS

THE COLINTHY BLIMP kiK)

JIT -A-,
'f v. 'l t.

XK6E MUPHOLES MAV BECOME

TRAPS FOR THE USWAW. ClErHAMTS

THEM6ELVE6 CMi FALL VICTIM TO THE Lff-6IV1N3 -Lft
5"30 DlrtrllmtW br Klni PMturM Brmtiute,

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calhraith

)

'w

tl

85

3

r

t.M. nf. u.. o".
If m by NIA S r. In'

"It's an old family recipe. Vera't great-uncle Louie
oicked it up in a hobo camp!"

T M. lf U.l. 0".
1M9 by NU S.I.IM, bm

"Let's see what you have in football uniforms'.

.

fir i 4 iyi ox'', 3 tAJr tyvf

L'i m XU Vf.jKwSJ

STfLL KEEPING WATCH -Tho space age may seem to be
In the doldrums for most people, with no new satellites having
been launched in recent months. But every night at the Cin ;'
cinnati (Ohio) Astronomical Observatory, volunteers man th
telescopes in Operation Moonwatch to track the five, still I
orbiting satellites as they pass over the city. Two space en
thusiasts, Thomas van Flandern, left, and Dennis Smith, are);
shown keeping tabs on the man-made moonlets. One object'
they a're particularly trying to locate is the missing tiny
American "planet" that bypassed the moon to begin a journe
around the sun.

Ml

830 Xa. Panama 1090 Jk&. Colon

JkfOVAS PAAAMA AWAYS

PANAMA
GUAYAQUIL

00

o

Today's jy Program

J on cfn news
Dinah Short
3:30 Parolf
4:X1 Mi Wbaitl
4.10 KIDS KLL'B
8:00 Fohin Hoori
1:30 PANORAMA

7 I'O TartPt
7 .111 oldMirhil Muilc Thitr
8 nil l,'in;i'P V, k
II 00 Mm ir Tlll't.
i" Air Not Aion
II 00 ("FN NCWS
11. IS Enc Ed Sullivan

Courtesy of Aerovias Panama Airways
PHOfJES: PANAMA: 3-10573.16983.1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

f'

i4



1 '" 1

n
r

4th Pan-Am Win For
wimmer Von

Saltza,

5

As Millions Celebrate .

Union-Controls
Law Shadows
US Labor Day
WASHINGTON, Sept. 7 (UPI) The union controls law
patted by Congress last week cast a long shadow today
ever the annual Labor Day observance in the United States.
The workingman still was king for a day on this tradi.
tional last holiday of the summer. But organized labor
definitely was not in a holiday mood.
For the second time since World War II, Congress has
moved to strip labor of some of its power, to curtail some
of the privileges and immunities it " v Heal"
yar$ of the 1 930's

As they thronged to the beaches,
to parades and picnics. America's
wage-earning millions probably
gave little thought to the reform
legislation now awaiting Presid President
ent President Eisenhower's signature
But for the labor movement as
a whole, it gave Labor Day, 1959.
a new significance.
In many ways, the Labor Man
agement Reporting and Disclosure
Art of 1959 the reform bill's
technical title is an extension
of the Taft-Hartley Act. passed 12
years ago over the bitter opposi
tinn of labor leaders.
Taft-Hartley served as a re reminder
minder reminder to labor that what Con
gress gives Congress can take
Away. Twelve years before its
enactment, the labor movement,
then floundering under the weight
Of the depression, had been re
vitali7ed by the Wagner Act.
UNION FUNDS MISUSED
"A few labor leaders, in proof
ft the adage that power tends to
corrupt. misused union funds, con-
eriricri shadv deals with employers
snuffed out union democracy with
brute force and made extortion
a part of the bargaining progress.
Much of this sordid side of the
labor picture was exposed to a
Shocked public by the investiga investigations
tions investigations of tht Senate Rackets Com Committee.
mittee. Committee. This was the genesis of
the i-einrm drive which brought
enactment of the new controls
!aw
I'nk-n officials raised on 'slave
labor" cry when the Senate first
heean work on the legislation last

Tear. Officials of the AFL CIO sure, called the "bill of rights."
welcomed rome of its provisions J that was specifically designed to
si toois to help them clean house, protect their rights and give them
LANDRUM GRIFFIN a voice in union affairs.
It was only when the House re-j ANTI RACKETEERING
eently began considering the stiff j Threaded thrqughom the bill
Landrum-Griffin bill as a substi-;are provisions aimed at the mob mob-tute
tute mob-tute for the milder Senate bill that I sters and racketeers who have

labor became alarmed. They view
ed some of the Landrum-Griffin
features as threats to legitimate
activities

But it was too late A massive five years after they leave pn pn-pposition
pposition pn-pposition campaign, headed by son. Ex-Communists are subject
a multitude of lobbyists, was has- to the same restriction.

Morris Of Local 907 Seeks
Solution Of Labor Problems

The following Labor Day mes message
sage message was received from Alfredo
Morris, president f Local 907
AFSCME (AFL-CIO ) :
"Greetings to all Canal Zone
workers on this Labor Day wnu
is also the tilth anniversary ol
Local 907 I am indeed proud toi
be the leader of this union and
o be able lo look hack to the
many achieve -m pi i shed
in this rather short period. j
"Our Lo; cd to a i
potent and militant forte dedical j
ed to the adv ancement of all work j
eri, not only with rhe armed
forces in the Canal Zone, but al-1
so the workers in Panama through!

our affiliation with the American! "To hope for or to expect the
Federation of State, County and j Pana manian government to fight
Municipal Employes. our battles alone is pure wishful
"We are convinced that through thinking that will gain us nothing,
our labor we ran obtain the good We must use our full working
things of life but thai a strong force to demand our rights through
Md diligent union, is the best our union. We must continue to
cans of obalaining our goals. strive fnr equality of pay and
"During this five years period opportunity based on proper liv liv-w
w liv-w have obtained many benefits; ing standards and merit winch are
for-the C. Z. workers including t the basic rihls of II employes.

winter represeni ai ion on ine an
al Zone Board of Appeals.
Macmillan May Set
British Elections
For Early October
: LONDON, Sept. 7 (UPI) -Pre-
fnit If in! at At 14 a rnlH Mri millin'l
Office announced he would flv lo
Balmoral, Scotland, today for an
lurience with Queen Elizabeth.
Informed sources said he would
tell her what date he has selected
for national elections.
' There has been strong specula speculation
tion speculation Macmillan would set Oct.
I or 15
Law requires that he make a

ahibjic announcement of the dale;
17 days, excluding Sundav. in ad- Mav u" t,'u P1'1'" demo
Vance of the actual balloting to!rri"' s slaicl by Hie govern government!
ment! government! it lime for campaigning menis f boil, Hi, U.S. pt.
The Queen must formally dis- : '"V"" "' ",p'1 1,4 h"h "'i'n to
Aivt Parliament before he nm ,v 'h'" l'ftrene to the sa sate
te sate state. tisf action of all eoncerned
t-

lily and not too smoothly o"gan o"gan-ierl
ierl o"gan-ierl Business groups jumped in
!with a strong counter-lobby. Pub
lie opinion was aroused on be-
: half of Landrum-Griffin
Some of the main provisions of
the extremely complicated Lan Lan-drum
drum Lan-drum Griffin bill ano the pos possible
sible possible effect they will have on un unions
ions unions are:
FINANCIAL

Upwards of 55.000 labor organ-
izations and 500.000 union officers,
!ionr"n5mplors00'whi K
tile retailed reports witr the La-
'"3r I-,''Parlnient'
Unons must set forth their as-
reits!,bsSrie,,hd ".Mow
paid to officers and era
ployes who receive more than
SlO.vK'd loans to union members
above $250, any loans to business
enterprises, and all disbursements.
The. reports must be made a-
.vailable to each union member
in a iorm prescriDea Dy me ta tabor
bor tabor secretary and members will
have the right iO inspect the un union's
ion's union's books and recordi.
UNION DEMOCRACY j
Somewhat overshadowed by the
broader implications is the effect
the bill will have on individual
union members the rank and-
filers who have frequently been
kicked around by iron-fisted or
unscrupulous union officers.
There is a section in the mea-
gained a foothold in the labor
movement.
Ex-convicts generally are bar barred
red barred from holding union office for
"Sad to uy this union was not
approached by eur government
before me lt treaty negotia negotiations
tions negotiations and therefore could not as assist
sist assist them in formulating a la labor
bor labor policy that would have giv given
en given Panamanians employed in the
C.Z., fair wages and a aVcent
standard f living.
But Vn spile of our progress the
major change on equal pay for
equal work based on a decent liv living
ing living standard is still denied in
and can only be gained if we u u-nile
nile u-nile as one. organizing the unor unorganized
ganized unorganized until our maximum po potential
tential potential is reached".
"We art grateful kj the offici officials
als officials o 1 tit- aimed lories who have
cuoueraleil with us, lu t tie Span Spanish
ish Spanish and English press for allow allowing
ing allowing us llie chance lo air our views
to the public, and to officials of
our government who have aided
us in acquiring some of the bene benefits
fits benefits we now enjoy.
"We musl give spec.al men mention
tion mention to Aquilino E. Boyd for his
sincere efloris and assistance dur
ing his lour of duly as Foreien
Minisiet of the Republic
In Nun
D rx- '. ..
... mi,, k j'rpuiy of ine
National Assembly, tried to raise
the salaries of Panama workers
an a Hop gap measure until a
minimum wage law could be set
up; anil l() Mario J. de Obaldia
who tried to improve the vaca vacation
tion vacation Iwnefils of Panamas labor
lore.

.u
THE KIND OF LABOR DAY CELEBRATION that grandpa used to know would hardly be recognized today. Seventy.
S6Ven yearS' and much history- have Passed sinc the holi daY was firt observed. The young labor movement was
making a slow comeback from the industrial crisis of 1873.77 when Peter J. McCuire, president of the United Brother.
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, decided labor should demonstrate its strength. He started a campaign for
a daY honoring the worker. A continent away, Oregon was the first state to enact a law makinc the first Monday in
iSePtember a holiday- That was in 1887- Other states followed and by 1894 30 of them had taken similar action.

!11 w" inai vear xnaT congress legalized the holiday in t

icans think of it as a holiday
for honest toil and, above all,

CZ
For

Labor
Strike

By WILLIAM H. SINCLAIR
International Representative,
AFSCME, AFL-CIO
At recent meeting held at
Unity House in Pennsylvania,
the M-man Executive Council
of the AFL-CIO went on record
urging that Labor Day 1959 be
dedicated as "Support the
Steelworkers DAY."
Today when organized labor is
being attacked everywhere, on the
picket lines, in the Halls of Con Congress,
gress, Congress, at the collective bargain bargaining
ing bargaining table and in negotiations with
government agencies, we cannot
but solidify our support to the
courageous workers of the steel
mills in the United States who
are now engaged in a life and
death struggle with the powerful powerfully
ly powerfully financl I and well organized
steel industry.
If the steelworkers lose this
battle, organized labor all over
the world will have received an
almost mortal blow. On the oth other
er other hand, if the steelworkers win
this gallant fight it will represent
one more blow to organized man management
agement management which we hope will teach
the industrialists that labor can
survive without capita., but capi capital
tal capital without labor is only so much
waste riches stored up in banks
and mattresses that will one day
return to nature in the disinte disintegrated
grated disintegrated form from whence it came
in the first place.
Not very long ago, trade union unionists
ists unionists were considered as harnless
fanatics. After the trade unions
were able to give the workinjnan
status and a voice in the affairs
of industry and government, these
forces realized that labor meant
business and was determined to
get a fair share of its product.
As a resu"t, the common cry
today is that "organiied labor
is too big and too powerful."
They say the unions must be
controlled. They say labor lead leaders
ers leaders are crooked because a small
few have betrayed the trust of
the rank-and-file.
We offer no excuses for those
who have betrayed the working
mail, as we would not oiler ex
cises for any offenses agaiust the
laws of our complex society.
But we do ask "Who is fooling
whom?" We do ask why the con-
giessional committees investigat investigating
ing investigating malpractices in labor do not
do the same in industry where
businessmen are robbing the pub public,
lic, public, the government and the share shareholders
holders shareholders of industry of more than
two million dollars a day in the
united States alone.
as a trade unionist I would sav:
investigate labor from the small smallest
est smallest local union chapter up to the
largest worldwide federation. But
I would also demand that indus industry
try industry be iovesligated in the. same
manner go that perfection in our
way of life would not be limited
t. a one-aided affair.
As the AKL CIO Executive
Council urges, we must support
the steelworkers and in celebrat celebrating
ing celebrating Labor Day 19S9. whether we
do so al home or in public places
We should dedicate a minute of
prayer for those union brothers
manning the picket lines across

for everyone a day for remembering and reaffirming the

a day set aside in which to
Lead
Of
the United States today, while the
steel industry is amassing astro-
nomical profits
Those of us in the Canal Zone
labor situation are also observ observing
ing observing a new trend in the attitude
of government labor relations.
Officials at various levels are
becoming more aggressive in
trying to discredit organized
labor or worse still, they seem
to want to ignore the unions.
On this, our own Labor Day,
we or organized labor are sound
ing the bugle to tell them that
the trade union movement will
not be deterred. We know where
we are going. We are sure of our
ground We are huildinp fnr the
'future and consequently cannot
accept the status quo.
The history of our movement
if a story cf organized force,
marching forward. On this Lab Labor
or Labor Day we are writing history
;.r:d snail march together with
workers all over the world who
are determined lo stand up ami
imand their share of nature's
wealth.
L'ke the Steelworkers' Union,
labor is under attack every everywhere.
where. everywhere. In Latin America the
ciy is not that labor is too big
or too powerful; but the gov governments,
ernments, governments, both democratic and
dictatorial, feel that workers
are necessary only to keep the
machinery of the rich in opera operation
tion operation to make them richer.
No wonder we keep seeing pov poverty
erty poverty and more poverty in the

mmmmmmmmmmmsammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm i m mmmmmmmmimm
y 7rrmT7' UAljll

SEEKS VENGEANCE Mrs. Pjtniia Eave Smith, 30, of
Canoga Park, Calif., displays the drawing she made for police police-of
of police-of a man whose face she scarred With a hot iron during an at attempted
tempted attempted aswiult in her home in lrfi. .She narruwly escaped the
niiin two mure tunes utter Hint, Mrs Smith relates, lurciug lier
.imilv to mine twice. Now she repo-ls h fourth H'l.ick. Shu wan
uiihoniitil except for seven cuts wi n a ptiiknilc us lie vowed
revenge for his ncarring.

he District of Columbia and the

enjoy the fruits of that toil.

er Asks Support
US Steelworkers

, midst of advancing wealth. We
hear the argument that our em-
ployers are doing us a great fav
or to keep us in jobs. They say
without their capital we
would
starve, this is not true.
Our argument is .hat capital
does not supply the materials
which labor works up into wealth;
the materials of wealth are sup supplied
plied supplied by nature. Capital does not
supply or advance wages as tl.ey
would want us to believe, but
rather, our wages are that part
of the product of our own labor.
During two steel strikes I was
called upon to contribute to the
Strike Defense Fund and will
gladly do so again, because I sin sincerely
cerely sincerely believe that the steel in industry
dustry industry is making too much profit
at the expense of the steelwork steelworkers.
ers. steelworkers. So lei's all of us dedicate
this day as "Support the Steel Steelworkers
workers Steelworkers Day."
A long-range policy of the A A-merican
merican A-merican Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employ Employes,
es, Employes, AFLCIO, is to establish
"collective bargaining" rights
for employes in the public serv services.
ices. services. As unionists in the Canal Zone,
we want recognition of our unions
for purposes of true collective
bargaining; we want the check checkoff
off checkoff of union dues; we want re restraint
straint restraint against individual bargain bargaining
ing bargaining which only curbs the employ employe's
e's employe's rights and advances the in interest
terest interest of management or a se sell
ll sell cted favorite few; we want re

territories Today all Amer.

traditional American respect

straint against management at ev every
ery every level undermining and inti intimidating
midating intimidating our unions ad their
or maintenance ol membership
jso that we may maintain a "con
tinuous association of wage earn earners
ers earners for the purpose of maintain maintaining
ing maintaining or improving conditions of em employment."
ployment." employment." These we should have and these
we must get, because without a a-sreement
sreement a-sreement guaranteeing to the em em-rli.yes
rli.yes em-rli.yes the continuing right to
maintain a union, and the under understanding
standing understanding by the members of the
ccessity of maintaining it, bene benefit
fit benefit wo can easily be lost by the
members.
We look at management in in industry
dustry industry and governments today
using the power of organization
among themselves to protect their
rights, but in the same token, they
want to deny the workers these
rights. Undoubtedly both industry
and government have learned of
the power of organized force so
they want to monopolize it for
memseives to use it at will a
gainst the workers.
We recognize that collective
bargaining rights for public em employes
ployes employes would impose new and
greater responsibilities on both
the workers and government of officials,
ficials, officials, but thty would also dev develop
elop develop now and greater dignity
and mutual respect in labor labor-management
management labor-management relations.
Reliaions Leaders
See Labor-Rusiness
Issues As Moral
NEW YORK (UPI) Religious
leaders are appealing to unions
and employers alike on this Labor
Day to dedicate themselves to
greater morality and responsibil responsibility
ity responsibility in their activities.
The Roman Catholic Church
asks for less cynicism in labor
relations. The Protestants appeal
for greater understanding o' the
need for collective bargaining,
The Social Action department
of ihe National Catholic Welfare
Conference said in a statement
thai the biggest labor-management
problems today are basic basically
ally basically moral problems.
Msgr. George C. Higgins, direc director
tor director of the department, warned of
the danger of over-cyntcism or
pessimism in labor management
relations.
Rabbi Max D. Davidson, presi president
dent president of the Synagogue Council of
America, the national coordinat coordinating
ing coordinating agency for orthodox, conserv conservative
ative conservative and reform Judaism, said
that in the highly organized Amer American
ican American society, the methods of or organization
ganization organization and the needs of em employers
ployers employers and employes are con constantly
stantly constantly changing.
"Only by long range vision by
management and labor alike i
both the piniual and physical
needs of the nation, the commu community
nity community and Ihe individual; only by
the highest standards of ethics,
justice and cooperation, can the
welfare of all of us be made se secure."
cure." secure." Davidson Mid.

.Read

Less School Desegregation
Than Any Year Since 1954
NASHVILLE, Tenn, Sept. (UPD-Southern School News,
monthly publication, reported t the weekend that this school
term brought the smallest amount of planned desegregation ill
the South and border states sine 1954.
i ll Baid.iht 15 of tne 2132 errated schools in five states
in the South would be Integrated this term, either voluntarily or
by court order. J vf
Five other states, Southern School News said, were planning
m'u'H u".lsu1 desegregation programs. Southern New. &
published by the Southern Education Reporting Seryice.
In 1956. the nubliratinn oii icn ji.t.i.i. -i ..j rw,.j

were 270 more i 19577 68 more in 1958"
n!r,y deSeIre?itd diftrict were reported in Arkansas, Flok
da, Delaware, North Carolina and Virginia.
XJ?,,nd.'d desefreaon Plans were made in Kentucky, Mar,
land, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. ...

Meanwhile in Richmond, Va.,
Federal District Judge John Paul
brushed aside the authority of the
Virginia Pupil Placement Board
and told the city of Charlottesville
to admit 12 Negroes to two of its
white schools.
Paul, after an informal confer conference
ence conference at Harrisonburg with attor attorneys
neys attorneys for the city and the NAACP
told the city it would disregard
"any action" by the itatc level
board which assigned the Negroes
to all-Negro schools.
The ruling cleared the way for
Charlottesville to join three other
Virginia cities tomorrow in admit admitting
ting admitting Negroes to previously white
classrooms.
It also struck a new blow at the
last fragment of the state's old
"massive, resistance" dectrine,
the three-member placement
board which has never assigned
a Negro to a white school and,
thus far, has escaped a direct
challenge of its power in the
Federal courts.
But Paul and Federal district
judges Walter E. Hoffman of Nor Norfolk
folk Norfolk and Albert V. Bryan of Alex Alexandria
andria Alexandria have ignored the board
which conceded in a hearing be before
fore before Hoffman it never assigned
Neeroes to white schools.
Charlottesville, Norfolk, Alexan Alexandria
dria Alexandria and Front Royal are sched scheduled
uled scheduled to admit Negroes to formerly
white schools tomorrow Char Charlottesville
lottesville Charlottesville and Front Royal for the
first time.
At Norfolk, School Supt. J. J.
Brewbaker indicated the city will
go ahead and admit 21 Negroes to
predominantly white schools de despite
spite despite a placement board ruling
that that two had been assigned to
an all-Negro school. The others
were rejected earlier by the
board. I
Norfolk and Alexandria began
token race mixing last February.
At the sume time, down in
Jackson, Miss., the Mississippi
branch of the National Associa Association
tion Association for the Advancement of Col Colored
ored Colored People charged Negroes
were "pressured" into signing a
petition to keep a white family
from moving into a Negro neigh neighborhood
borhood neighborhood there.
The petition was presented to
the county board of supervisors
asking that white storekeeper W.
J. Garrett. 6?. be refused a build building
ing building permit for a three bedroom
home in the Negro community.
The NAACP said Garrett had a a-bandoned
bandoned a-bandoned his building plans before
the petition was signed.
Medger Evers. field secretary
for the NAACP in Mississippi, said
many of the 82 Negroes who sign signed
ed signed the petition "did not know what
thev were signing."
He charged manv were "high
oressured into signing before they
had a chance to read and under understand
stand understand all the contents."
The petition said the signers felt
the races should he segregated
as fnr as possible."
Evers said he felt the signers
put their names on the document
because they felt that if they
could not build in a white neigh neighborhood
borhood neighborhood a white man should not
be allowed to build in a Negro
neighborhood.
Evers also criticized Negro pub publisher
lisher publisher Percv Greene who wrote in
an editorial published Saturday in
the Jackson Advocate, a Negro
newspaper, that Negroes "empha "emphatically"
tically" "emphatically" do not want racial inte integration
gration integration in the schools.
As long as he is paid hv the
segregationists you can expect him
to say that," Evers said.
A Duke University sociologist
meanwhile said that social stat status
us status and net racial feelings lead
men to join the Ku Klux Klan.
James W. Vander Zander. 29-year-old
assistant professor at
the Durham, N.C.. University, de described
scribed described the Klansmen as persons
seeking to gain the status denied
them by upper-class whites
Seldom does pure hatred of Ne Negroes
groes Negroes lead Klansmen lo race ter terror,
ror, terror, he told a meeting of the Amer American
ican American .Sociological Society in Chi
cago.
Reporting en a study of the
hooded order, he said twe thirds
of the Klansmen wore en "the
lower runas of the middle class
gas station owners, small gro grocery
cery grocery owners, small contractors.
oDorarers or net dog stands or
they were en the upper runes of
the worklna class auto mechan mechanics,
ics, mechanics, carpenters, stene masons
and the like."
Despite the "nebulous, status
ranking" of the Klansmen, Vander
Zander said "thev are still while
. and American in a re?ion when
sueh things are very imnorlant.
"So whit hanuens? Thev over over-conform.
conform. over-conform. Thev heenme inn nereen'
Amo-ieant and white extremists
"The Klan lve them a ?oal
a meaning In life. Wi'bin the Klan
thev 1re able to identify with
something bigger than t h e m-

aelvea."

story on page 6

Negro Gl Claims
Army Denied Him
Use Of Laundry
VERDUN, France, Sept 7 i.
(UPI)-A Negro GI who claims h
is the victim of racial discrimina discrimination
tion discrimination has won the right o use Army
post exchange and laundry facili facilities
ties facilities again.
But the commanding officers of
the Army's European Communicav
tions zone said there had been
"certain mitigating circumstanc circumstances"
es" circumstances" for the ban which has kept hrrn
from them for more than a morrthr.
Sgt. Willie R. Brown of Detroit
Mich., claimed last week thet-h
and his Korean-born wife were
being denied their right to use
facilities at his base at Einsied Einsied-lon
lon Einsied-lon in Germany.
Brown said he was a victim of
racial discrimination hd -tht
there was ho reason for th? b?n."t
He and his wife, he said, -wcrV
forced to travel four miles to use
facilities at another base. .-
He threatened to take the affair
to his Congressman unless the Ar Army
my Army invesitgated the ban. imposed
by Einsiedlohn base commander
Col. R. W. Dempsey. 7S"
A statement issued by eoirfnt eoirfnt-nications
nications eoirfnt-nications zone headnuarters 'in
Verdun said an investigation' ihto
Brown's charges was underway
and would be wound! Up in about
three weeks.
A spokesman said Dempsey
had ordered the Browns kept Off
the post after "misconduct" by
Sgt. Brown, but refused' to say
what the misconduct was. -k- w
"There was basis for the action
by the depot commander," th
spokesman said.
"However the denying of baso
facilities to the Browns was ex extreme
treme extreme and these facilities have
been temporarily restored pending
the outcome of the investigation."
American In Fidel's
Army Claims Woits
Bouohl By Truiillor
HAVANA (UPI) William
Morgan, an American who holds
the rank of major in Premier
Fidel Castro's rebel army, last
night acc us e d "United Statei
congressmen bought by Trujillo'i
gold" for a State Department an announcement
nouncement announcement that his U. S. citizen citizenship
ship citizenship would he revoked. j ;"
Morgan, who fought a jrtir lit
the Escambrav Mountains with
the rebels before the ouster of
dictator Fulgencio Baisat last
Jan. 1, made headlines last month
when he was the principal flfiifr
in frustrating an alleged invasion
of Cuba from Generalissmo
Rafael L. Trujillo's Dominicp
Republic. w
"I don't think the American
people like Truiillo but he -is
State Department pet and.;hS
lots of friends in Congress, sucn
as Eastland, Smathers and Wal Walter,"
ter," Walter," Morgan said.
He referred to Sen. James O.
Eastland (D-Miss.). Sen. Genrgg
A. Smatters (D-Fla.) and .Jtesi.
Francis E. Walter (D-Pa ). v
Morgan said many Americana
fought in World War II in foreign
armies before the United Stales
entered the war, and some. Are
in the Israeli army now, but "th
United States left them alone.",,
"But I made Trujillo look liV
a fool so he is out to get mt
Morgan said. "One reason, he he-wants
wants he-wants my citizenship revoked -it
because then he is free to as assassinate
sassinate assassinate me without having any
Droblems with the United Statei.
I'm told l e offered gangsters1 in
Miami a half million bucks. if. J
can be kidnaped and delivered to
Miami."
Morgan said he had not violated
any laws of the United State: by
serving with Castro. He said J)
was never enrolled in the Cuban
army nor received government
pay and his rank of comandant
(major) was derived strictly froiS'
service with the rebels fightlnf
Batista.
REACHES MANILLA
HONG KONG (UPI)-San ffrin ffrin-cisco
cisco ffrin-cisco watchmaker Petr (ilurJr.
man arrived here from ManU
vesteraay, on his way to Tokyo.
Honolulu and San Francisco On
flight he hones will ol na
world record for a globe-girdjlni
trip in a single-engine plane. "T
have had a perfect and uneventful
trip," said Gluckman, who head headed
ed headed east from San Francisco Mi.
22 on the round-the-world flight
Gluckman has covered nearly;,?!)."
ooo miles iine k luft It Trim-

!..
It .,,