The Panama American

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Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03108

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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CANADIAN WHISKY
XH IKDEPEKOfMT IJgS?, DAILY NEWSPAPER
iMiaia American
"Let the people know the truth and the country it safe Abraham Lincoln
PANAMA, K. P TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1959
PIVI C1NTS
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rX)R WHOM THE BELL TOLLS-r-Hundreds of happy, smiling youngsters tripped thrdugh the
dobr of Zone' schools this morning heralding the opening of the fall term. Their enthusiasm
was n.bt necessarily reflected in ix-year-old Chris Walter, candidate-for the first grade at Dia
blowho suspects that those tight new shoes are also going to squeeze out the backyard base-,
ball1 games and fishing expeditions for the next nine months. Oh well, there's always recess.
Chris is the son of Navy Chief Loren Walter of Fifteenth Naval District Headquarters.

US Pensibtis
In RP May
Go Tax Free

I' k 1 Panamanian and other

non-US-citizens drawing pen pensions,
sions, pensions, after retirement under
the V9 Civil Service system
may soon te relieved of the
present deductions made for
United States income tax.
A law to eliminate income
tax. oa annuities paid hon-US-citjens'
who ; do not reside in
the'.UnitedStates was passed
on Aug. 25 by" the House of
Representatives,
Officially titled House Resolu
tion'' 125, the bill now goes to
the Senate for action.
j.-'As now "written, the measure
would apply as of Jan. ,i, i9bo.
The, legislation hat ,? been
trashed by the National Asso
elation of Retired Clvif Em Employes,
ployes, Employes, both on the Canal
Zone -and through the parent
organization in Washington.
Other Federal employe groups
have also supported it.
( "Under present law, a noh
US-citizen working for an
American Embassy ., ow other
. Government agency "'iwad is
not .suDjccr, to US tax on nis
" salary, since this is considered
to be 'income :rom sources wnn
1 out the United States.
"In the case of US civil
service retirement pensions,
however,, while' oh tax is due
on the amount which had
been set aside by the Govern Government
ment Government for Jtuoh future retire retirement,
ment, retirement, Sueh an annuity is tax-
klt to the extent that it rep represents
resents represents earnings, on this a
monnt. because this is -con
sidered as investment income
from sources within the onty
ed States.'

"The committee on Ways and
Jf Means; has been advised by the
Department of State that the
Imposition of this tax has

caused .severe narasmps ana
engendered resentment against
the United States, in that non nonresident
resident nonresident alien employes consider
these? pensions to be deferred
comnensation and tnat tney ex
pect them to be tax free,, since
ineir.raniea yiL-ujue is ix nee

I? Kf i "The committee was further

'? t advlsefl tnat many toreign toy

i rtrnmehts have objected to rtljelihe rafters of. th Ann. Arbo First
. imposition, of tliil .tajt.'' (? ; Jjiethodiiit Church, Th father nev

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)

Motorists Warned
Against Passing
CZ School Buses
With the opening of the Ca
nal Zone US citizen schools and
the increase of school busses on
the Canal Zone highways, p
erators of motor vehicles in the
Canal Zone are reminded of the
traffic ruling requiring that all
vehicles must come to a full
stop for school busses.
The stop must be made when
meeting or overtaking from
either direction any school bus
which has stop on the highway
to receive or discharge passen
gers.
The ruling, an amendment to
the Canal Zone- Traffic Regula
tions signed in March by Gov
W. E. Potter, requires a vehicle
to stop' at least 10 feet from a
stopped school bus, either in
front or at the tear, as the case.
may be.
The vehicle shall not proceed
until the school bus jnoves on
or until the driver receives a
signal from a policeman or from
the school bus driver.

Chinese Church Hermit Gets New Chance For Schoo

ANN ARBOR, Mich. ,(UPI) A
young Chinese student wno numc numc-ed
ed numc-ed an engineering course his fath father
er father demanded and, hid in a church
attic lor four years in "shame
today was offered a chance to
redeem himself in a career of his
own choosing.
Cleared of all charges by police,
Chene Guan'Lim. Singapore,
was turned over1 to University of
Michigan authorities by federal
Immigration Department agents,
pending his own decision on what
he will de. i-.
, Tim's father, who had insisted
on an engineering career for his
soni. died last March while Lim
was iivino in absolute solitude in
ihe rafters otihk Ann. Arbo irst

It

New Teachers Get
Briefed On How CZ
Educates Smallfry
The annual orientation pro
gram for the new elementary
classroom teachers of the US
schols in the Canal Zone was
held Saturday' at the Ancon
School. Those present included
the Superintendent of Schools,
S. E. Esser, 13 new elementary
teachers, seven principals, two
supervisors, and four demon
stration teachers.
The general opening session
was conducted by the Super
visor of Instruction and the
principals and included discus
sion of the canal zone scnooi
system's values, procedures, and
policies. .
Teachers then demonstrated
the classroom teaching Job
which included the organiza
tion, planning, and methods ex expected
pected expected to be followed in each
subject area. The demonstra demonstration
tion demonstration teachers were Mrs. Armella
Hutchings, grade 1: Mrs.. Dolo
res Jarvls, grade 2; Mrs. Sarah
Flowers, grade 3; Mrs i Annie L.
uaivosa, graae o.
At the close of the program
a luncheon was served at the
Officers Open Mess,, Fort Ama
dor.
er knew what had happened to Mis
son.
Federal immigration authorities,
police, and university and church
authorities joined in paving the
way for Lim to return to Univer University
sity University of Michigan and study politi political
cal political science or take pre-law, train training.
ing. training. But Lim, who anglicized h f s
name to place bis last name last
instead of first as in China, was
undecided whether to return to
the university or return to the
Qrient. to see his mother.
The young student was visibly
shaken when Reverend Eu Eugene
gene Eugene A"- Ransom pastor of t h e
church where Lim had hidden out
for four years, .broke the news
that his. schoolteacher lather had
died, .Wj?;.' v: f

o f
11 S

Navy Civilian McNamee
To Give Up Jungle Hikes
Warren R. McNamee, 52-year-old American civilian employed
by the Nary at Fort Amador, who was lost for more than 30
hours In dense bush country near the Las Cruces Trail, said to today
day today he has decided to give up jungle hiking;.
McNamee, a 15-year hiking- veteran on the Isthmus, Insisted
his unscheduled night out Sunday had nothing to do with aban abandoning
doning abandoning his long-standing hobby. Mrs. McNamee doesn't much care
why he gives up the bush treks, so long as he does.
McNamee finally emerged unaided from the bush early yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon just as an entire jungle-trained platoon of the
1st Battle Group was preparing to re-enter the trail area for an
intensive search.

The troops, commanded by It.
Fred W. Lawley, were greatly re relieved
lieved relieved to see the missing man
yesterday. They told him they
were anxious to get on about
their usual payday activities. Yes
terday was payday.
Amiable iungle veteran Me-
NiniH said the worst of the
perlanc was learning he was
being searched for,' and the un unfortunate
fortunate unfortunate anxiety .the long wall
caused his wife.
Settine out Sunday morning with
only a pint of water nd his shot shotgun,
gun, shotgun, the hiker entered the bush
where the Las Cruces Trail cross crosses
es crosses Madden Road.
All he had in mind, he said,
was a leisurely wauc amia me
solitude, and return to his park
ed car early enough to get home
for sn early dinner.
But alas, it didn't work out that
way and by nightfall Sunday Mc McNamee
Namee McNamee knew he had lost his trail.
Not long afterf he gave up any
attemnt at backtrackin1a 4 the
a creek bank tor tne jong wsu
till dayBght.
Having already crossed a deep
stream, he had ne light and
waj (wetty sure the shotgun
was lammed from the soaked
shell m the firing chamber.
As it turned out the first soalc soalc-in
in soalc-in diditff'make too much differ difference,
ence, difference, lince it poured with rain
later,'.' v
iVMctfattee said he wasn't par particularly
ticularly particularly panicky, having lost, his
way for brief period, before and
he settled down to sleep out the
wet night.
He only regretted that by now
his wife wouli be worrying that
he might have been delayed
through some unexpected injury.
Canal Zone police had been
notified' early Sunday night and
stationed e team in the area
till daybreak, when they began
searching the trail approaches
on either side of the read. But
it was soon apparent. that help
was needed to make e thorough
search, and military aid was
requested.
Soldier Implicated
In Hotel Incident
Sought By DA
District Attorney Francisco Al
varado yesterday formally re
quested National Guard Command Commander
er Commander Col. Bolivar Vallarino to use his
good offices to have Canal Zone
police aid in serving a warrant on
a U.S. military policeman wanted
for assault.
The military policeman, Marvin
Swennes, who, is said to have been
transferred out of the Canal, Zone
shortly after the incident, is ac accused
cused accused of having thrown Hilda Po Po-lanco,
lanco, Po-lanco, a Dominican, to the street
from a balcony pf the Roosevelt
Hotel last June 7.
Alvarado's warrant orders Swen Swennes
nes Swennes to appear for questioning in
connection with the charge,
After regaining 'his composure,
he said "is view of my father's
death, I'm undecided. I need a
few more hours of meditation."
Roadblocks in, the way of young
Urn's return te college began fall falling
ing falling away one after another.
But one niter another, they were
dissipated. '. '-
Walter Rea, dean of men at
University of Michigan, and Rob Robert
ert Robert Klinger, foreign student advis adviser,
er, adviser, both reported the university
would. like to have Lim back as a
student. KUhger said authorities
of the Liberal Arts college would
register him for the fall term. ,.
. Rev. Ransom' announced that
tne Wesley an Foundation. of
which he is a director; had div
Jcussed eponsorijia -Lintv as its in

op
u

McNamee said that at one point
during the search yesterday morn morning
ing morning he could see the helicopter but
A-ic Bruce A. Larson, acting as
observer, could not spot him at the
low point of a small valley.
From time to time McNamee
could hear auto traffic along Mad
den Road.
The first squad of soldiers led
by Sgt. Edward Wears, Jr., enter entered
ed entered the bush about 10:30 yesterday
morning, but withdrew about two
hours later to acquire additional
equipment, rations, and reinforce
ments.
The helicopter, piloted by Lt.
James A. Darden, Jr. unable to
see into the dense vegetation, had
already withdrawn in favor of the
ground search.
Then about 2:30 in the after-neen-McNamee,
having struck
out on still another faint trail,
walked out en Madden Road only
a couple of miles beyond the
point, he parked his car.
i'.VU said he feK fine, but was ter
HWv enfUTis$ed.t alLthentk-U
jy ms one apsence nad stirred up
MUK ne said, it was nice to know
help was there had he needed it.
At Balboa police station, where
Mrs. McNamee was waiting, he
confessed to a great craving for a
cup of coffee but was not aware
of any great hunger.
Today at his Amador quarters
he was busy Catherine together
his jungle hiking and camping gear
ana saia ne ,wouia present tne
gear to some worthy young hiker
Mrs. McNamee was very ap approving.
proving. approving. Argentine Novy's
Bafifa Thetis Here
To Take On Water
The Argentine naval trainins
ship Bahia Thetis stopped at Rod
man for a long gulp of water to
day, then steamed on for Guaya
quil. The former U.S. Navy trans
port sailed here from San Juan,
and after transiting the Canal to today,
day, today, tied up briefly at Rodman to
take on water.
The Bahia Thetis is commanded
by Cdr. Carlos H. Schliemann. It
is carrying 22 officers, 229 enlisted
men and 193 cadets.
Today's Transits
(scheduled)
Northbound
Southbound
14
13
27
TOTAL
(Clear Cut: J)
ternitional student for the year
1959-60, which would solve his tui
tion and board problem,
lamest McFadflsn, deputy die
trict director of immigration in
Detroit, said "if his story is true
we are disposed to permit him to
return to school, if the University
Of Michigan Will allow him to en
ter."
Lim no.v must make his own
decision. If he want to return to
college, he has only to register
and continue h's studies tlarlinK
with the fall term
if be wants to return to see his
mother, he catt accept voluntary
deportation -at soverntnenl ex
pense, and apply later lor anomer
student visa to return to this coun-
1 try. ;

Fighters Qmit

Soldiers Held
In Beating,
Taxi Robbery
Two soldiers from Ft. Kobbe
and one from Ft. Clayton were be
ing held in a Panama jail today
on charges of beating a taxi driv
er and stealing his vehicle.
The soldiers are George Hill
and Joseph Valko, both 21, of
Fort Kobbe and Howard Tucker,
1?, of Fort Clayton.
charges were filed last night by ;
xi driver Ehzondo A. (Cholo)
taxi
Tejada, 34, who said he was also
robbed of $14 by the trw.
Tejada said he picked up the
three soldiers dressed in civilian
clothes at a bar on the Boyd-Roosevelt
Highway. He said they attack
ed him after he had driven a short
distance and drove off with the
vehicle after leaving him semi
conscious at the side of the road.
The three soldiers were picked
up by the National Guard at the
Tocumen police booth an hour
after Tejada reported the theft.
One of the trio was barefooted
end the clothing of the ether two
was extremely dirty end crush crushed.
ed. crushed. The case has been turned over
to the District Attorney by Traffic
Judge Sebastian Rios who heard
the charges this morning.
Maranon Hoods r
Exchange Shots
With RP Secreta
Three hoodlums from the "Sie
rra Maestra" area of Panama Ci City's
ty's City's Maranon borough exchanged
shots early today with members of
the Secret Police in the vicinity
of K Street,
Two of the hoodlums were forc forced
ed forced to surrender while attempting
to flee, but the third escaped. De Detectives
tectives Detectives found some ten bullets on
Elicre Murillo and Robert Beltran,
but found no weapon.
The gang started shooting at de detectives
tectives detectives when they were spotted
acting suspiciously between J and
K Streets.
The exchange of shots was de described
scribed described by detectives as brief.
German Tourist
Robbed At Noon
On RP Waterfront
A German visitor left Pan
ama today somewhat shaken
over having been robbed at
gunpoint about 11:30 Sunday
morning on Balboa Avenue,
overlooking the waterfront.
Kurt Burcnarci said he was
robbed of his watch and cam
era, a wallet containing $100 in
cash and everything 'he had in
his pockets.
Burchard said he was taking
pictures of the waterfront op op-posit?
posit? op-posit? the new Chinese Center
when a tall, well-built man
walked up to him, pulled a gun
and went through his pockets
as Burchard stood with his
hands up.
After robbing Burchard, the
man turned and ran, still car carrying
rying carrying the revolver in hand.
RP Customs Will
Confiscate Cars
If Duly Is Evaded
General Customs Adminis Administrator
trator Administrator Ignacio Aleman disclosed
today that steps are being
taken to confiscate automobiles
which have entered the Repub Republic
lic Republic without paying duties.
Aleman said that with the
cooperation of Canal Zone au authorities,
thorities, authorities, an investigation is
being conducted to establish if
duty free automobiles have been
bought by Panama residents
without going through the for formality
mality formality of passing through cus customs.
toms. customs. Aleman said buyers evade the
dutv by either umkinu transfers
In the Canal Zone or by pro procuring
curing procuring license plates from mu municipal
nicipal municipal 'treasurers in the Inte
r'.or who do not bother to rc
I quest a ccustoms clearance.
rior who do not bother. to re

Feud With
M

erupts As Reds
Mass On Frontier

NEW DELHI, Sept. 1 (UPI)

I-!. I 14 .1.11
rxriinna rvtenon ana rne neads
air force resigned todav.
Ti . ... 7
The internal dissension

erupted as fresh reports came in that Communist Chinese
troops were" massing along India's northern frontiers.
The resignations caused grave concern throughout
the country, and threw the government and parliament
into turmoil.

The service chiefs quit because they said Krishna
Menon was playing politics with the armed forces. Krish Krishna
na Krishna Menon offered in turn to quit himself.
Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru has not yet ae?
cepted the resignations. He is due to make a statement
in parliament tomorrow, when he is expected to announce
his decision.

It was reported, that a fresh
wave of Red Chinese troops back
ed up by mile-packed heavy weap
ons was advancing toward North Northeastern
eastern Northeastern India.
Press reports from Jornat, iff
Ihe bordeEflrpyjnce of Asf anisald
tlui.&edal r joovie- feiie-lthe
borfleh between India' .-iuj Wrn'miK
nist-conquered Tibet "where an
incursion has already taken
place."
This was an apparent reference
to the Longju area, where the Reds
seized an Indian border post a
week. ago.
An Indian government spokes spokesman,
man, spokesman, however, denied that the
Red Chinese were beginning a
mass Invasion. He said the re reports
ports reports were "baseless."
But the Reds were reported
readv for action. With Indian and
Chinese forces only a stone's throw
apart in some places. Thus tar
there haVe been no major lnci-
dnets only minor skirmishes.
In' Calcutta, Premier Jigml
niarii. mf Bhutan, ene of Vie tiny
border states between India and
Tibet, said there had been ne in
vasion of hii country, ne saia it
there had been, he would have
been the first person te know of
An Indian foreign office spokes
man also denied the invasion re
ports and described them as "false
and incorrect.
There was no denying tne ser -ousness
of the internal military
rift. The nation's three chiefs of
staff Lt.. Gen. K. S. Thimayya,
Vice Adm. R. D. Katari and Air
Marshal S. Mukherjee-handed in
their resignations in protest a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst Khrishna Menon's handling
of military affairs.
They said promotions were given
without consulting them, a mow
which demoralized many officers
and men.
Thpv also said they were nm
satisfied with the treatment giver
them by Khrishna Menon.
The resignations coniromw
Nehru with one of the biggest
problems he has faced since In India's
dia's India's Independence.
The main factor is whether hs
should accept the resignations f
all four, retain Khrishna Menon
ana lei ne service
oermit Khrishna Menon to quit ana
kepp the chiefs of staff.
The defense minister, one-time
Indian delegate to the Uniiert Na Nations
tions Nations in New York, has been un
der itioreasinp criticism iron
press and parliament here fur
ulaying politics with the armed
forres. One groupveven has arr is-
ed him of being '"pro-Corirmur.ist
Now that the service fchtef
have publicly accused Khrishna
Menen of political activities in
tho military services. It will be
difficult for Nehru to retain him
In the face ef growing opposition
from the ceuntry.
Pending Sction by Nehru, Khrish
na Mennn carried on with his nor:
mal activities. He worked in his
office, appeared in parliament-
nut said nothing and attended
two social engagements.
Unofficial reports of the alleged
new raids gave no details cf Red
activity in the almost inaecessihie
bonier area.
The reports were published at
about the time Prime Minister
Jawaharlal told Parliament that
India must solve Its ierdar dis dispute
pute dispute with Chine by words rather
then war.
The reports said "a few" In
dian frontier post near the Mcj

Minister
. .

Defense Minister V. K.
r ..
or India $
ormy, navy and
in the nation's armed forces
Mahon line had been lost to Chi Chinese
nese Chinese troops that swarmed across
the border'from Tibet.
The McMahon line Is the varue-
ly-defined northern border of In-
oia, adopted by treaty with China
and.Tibetln 185.44
mm or tne same. territory Jalon
the border that India ihsists,-is'
hers.
Anti-Communist tension in India
led to Nehru's decision to address
Parliament,
H rejectee e member of Par-,
'lament's suggestion that indie
bomb away tho portion of a Rtd
Chinese road -the Communists -built
across Indian territory In
17.
Nehru said his government's pol policy
icy policy would be two-fold in the pres present
ent present crisis with China: "To
strengthen our defenses nd not
go to war to settle disputes but 'set 'settle
tle 'settle them through conferences and
negotiations."
Nehru revealed that after the
government first received word
in 1957 the Chinese had built the
Sinkiang-Tibet road across India!
territory at Ladakh, Kashmire he he-sent
sent he-sent two survey teamss,:into the
area. '.
One of the teams was arrested
by the Chinese, Nehru said, but
the other was able to report thajf
the road appeared to have been
built across some Indian territory.
He said the last of four Tecent
Chinese incursions across the In
dian border occurred last Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, when Red troops fired on a
border outpost at Longju,
Other "incidents" occurred Aug.
2S at Subansifi, Aug. 14 af'Khine af'Khine-nane,
nane, af'Khine-nane, and Aug. 7, also at" Khin.e
nane, Nehru said. ',,
He added that the Chinese vie-
lation of the northeast frontier f
borders was e dear case of eg
gression, but the Chinese may
have e right te claim certain ter- -ritery
neer" Ladakh, which has
been in dispute for yeers.
5 Panamanians Met
With RofeertoArial
In Colombia Sunday.
Informed sources here today
said live Panamanians, including;,

two newsmen, mot wltl) Pans- t
nianian poli ical exile Or. Rober,-

to Arias in BarranquiUaf last Sun-
day- 'i
The newsmen were Tito del r
Moral, editor of Critica who wen

to Barranquills to interview A :. .

rias, and Guitlermo Vega, "ty-
editor of La Nacion whoV repre

ented the National LibersuoBt

Psrty along with Dr. Sergio Gon
a!ei and Carlos Calzadilla.. J
The fifth member of the'psfty.
a Carlos A. de la Ossa. generv
al manager of the Arias' tabloid,
T.a Hnra. who went to set. Arias

on business concerning the 'pspen v
Political discussions .with- Atlas : -V

were confined to the,.; grpup re. F 1
nraranttntf th nnlv Panama toiKi.'; 'S

htical
tical party which took; pai;t, in
talks. .iA.j
n a i.therellon Partviled'' W
the

dissident First Vice .President .Te .Te-niistoih's
niistoih's .Te-niistoih's Diaa, ij.bebwVs mover'
to have Alias fun as- a presidih '
Hal candidate hv the; v19bf; le
tions, , i .:, "-V
It was not believed tjhlt AtlaV,
arrived at any definite ,, 'decision .s
. l n ....:n ''..II.. -. i

aurin tnv aiiniivi' ibuii-

it

1
'A
'4.J
1



PA61 TWO

TH1 t AN AMI AMXHIC AJI, r- AH,KBfPKNPDT P1 WEWSPAHaV
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, J95S

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNIB anb uliltHID t THR PANAMA AM1MICAN U. INC.
rSUNRIB IV NCLSON lOUNtVtLL IK (
mahmodio ia. toireii
IS-ST M ITIIHT e O oi '34 M R OF P
" TlLinONl Z OZAO '9 t'"l
1 Ctl Donn P4NAMCKICAN. Panama
jp(-ttM Orrict '2 '79 Centrm AvtNur afTwtr '2th nd t 3th tiit
,- Popiion PrPKEICMTkTivts IOHUA 8 POWSH8 INC
v 349 Madkon Avi NIW YORK 7' N. V
" ieiM wn
PML MONTH IN A OVA NCI S 70 SO
WW tU MONTH I IN AOVANCr SO S oo
Pea'ONl VlfAK in Aovanci IB SO t OO

THIS YOUR FORUM THI HEADERS OWN COLUMN
Tk Mil Be it an open forum lor readers ot Tha Panama Amarican
Uttor aro roctived irarafully and art handled in a wholly confidential
Man.
If contribute a letter don't be impatient if it doein't appear the
Mai day. Latter are published in the order received.
Pleas try t keep tne letters limited to one pae lenfth.
Idantirv ef letter writers is held in strictest confidence.

This newspaper assumes 110 responsibility for statements or opinion!

expressed in letters from readers,
THE MAIL BOX

FRUITS OF
Sir:

ment, and only won the battle be be-As
As be-As a Panamanian 1 am wondering seriously what will be- tause George m was as crazy
come of inv country and its citizens if we permit ourselves to be led as a coo, and his gencrals and
by kucIi characters as Aquilmo Boyd, Ernesto tastillero and other lroops were g hun.;h 0( powder powder-fuppoiters
fuppoiters powder-fuppoiters of the project to stage a peaceful "invasion' on the Ca- lwigg.d nums wilh small jmer.

..i 7. n N.'nv ? Panama's Indenendence Day.

First my dictionary tells me invasion is "the act of entering a
foreign land with hostile intention; infringement." Though the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone is not a foreign land, it is territory over which a foreign gov government
ernment government lawfully exercises jurisdiction and control. 1 can see nothing
peaceful in any project to conduct any sort of an invasion under
these circumstances.
How would Atiuilino Bnvd feel if a column of campesinos was to
conduct a "peaceful invasion'' of a piece of property he had rented?
He would blow his top, and set the authorities on them for trespass trespassing
ing trespassing on private piopcrty. 1 imagine the Canal Zone authorities hold
precisely Aquilmo's view of the principle involved.
If this is the kind of leadership agitator Aquilmo is offering Pan Panama,
ama, Panama, coolcr.headcd citizens whose votes he needs would do well to
think back to previous outcomes of agitation here:
1 Spurred on bv agitators, the National Assembly refused to
grant the US the right to use the Rio Hato base-. Hundreds of Pan Panamanian
amanian Panamanian thrown out of work there, and several Panamanian busi businesses
nesses businesses which depended on the Rio Hato trade shut down.
2 The Rcmon-Eisenhowcr treaty, which was negotiated in an
atmosphere of constant agitation. Result.- Hundreds of amn amn-ians
ians amn-ians working on the Zone for wages well above the Panama average
lose their jobs completely, while thousands of others lose the com -missarv
privileges which were so essential to their mainta.n.ng a
deCwlthlfme,anS.v history in mind, what can the working man
in Panama hope for from this latest agitation? As it ever has been
in Panama, it will be the poor who suffer most.
Whv don't Bovd and Castillero use their influence to help the
working man of Panama by fighting for a minimum wage
is such a bill before the Assembly. What has Assemblyman Boyd
done to enact it into law? , ,.
If he is so interested in marches, what is he doing to support : the
proposed march of Colon's hungry unemployed fro mC olon to P an an-a
a an-a ma Sept 6" That's something to draw attention to the interests of
Panama's working class, and the organizers of the march deserve
eVP7 aEVv fellow Panamanian to think for themselves and
above all not to bite the hand that feeds them. It is part of the his his-torv
torv his-torv of ".. -country that when things are hot and the chips are down
the agitators have not been around to help the working man out of

trouble.

HERITAGE

Si'-

I've lived on the Canal Zone for all my 49 years. My father came
n hVrP shortlv after Teddy Roosevelt gave he Colombian the

dow

boot He helped the Colonel dig the "Big Ditch. 1 was m
Zi in school here, and was married here. Panama and specifically

the Canal Zone are as much if not more my country as m
Aquilino Boyd's. My family has been here as long as his has With Without
out Without expounding on this topic to great lengths let me tell Boyd that
if he and his crew attempt to "invade" my home Nov. 3 1 will take
, verv dim view of the situation. There are many like me on the
Zone who feel the same way. ojd Timer

BLOOD
Robert Messier (Mail Box, Aug.
urn
MIS. VCC10 I Mai. du.v .-IUK.

procedure she went througn at aamo : "
He gave her little credit for advancing constructive criticism, aimed

at making the service more efiieienl
So what if he got iastcr service than she did? So what, if he
went there for five minutes to four and left at five minutes past
tour This does not prove that on other days it took Mrs. Vecc.o or
anyone else two hours or more to get their h'00:, . her
As 1 understand Mrs. Veccio's letter, the time ey kept her
waiting about would have driven any five less patient peop e away
disgusted, never to return. In fact, maybe it was the effect of her
letter which got Messier so much better service.
If there is a shortage of doctors at Santo Tomas the blood bank
cannot be blamed, but if the delay was due to inefficient use i n : the
facilities, than as a Panamanian I thank Mrs. Vecc.o for building a
fire under the appropriate authorities.

I can't
r: 1 ....... u ... .v n iirhipn
, n.;i pv a,,o 9fii nnH his
nno anyiiiiiiK lul """"

shopgi l h in on ; good thing because they get Social Security
benefits upon becoming a mother. Maybe he is trying to prove that
"the Social Security Board is responsible for the current wave of

Mr n ni i n r I I r 1 rT in C ni'N
.al' i ,.,';ih w

unfoine dwells Mariflon "to Vhe VS Government. They should
have gone out into the countryside, huilt themselves shacks and
made themselves farms instead of cluttenng up their smelly war warren,
ren, warren, in the heart of the city. Sharpshooter.

ALBROOK N.S.O.
. ir:

When mv husband received orders for Albrook we were happy
it the prospect. Never having been oversea., before myself 1 as
regaled with tales of the friendliness of our fellow NCOs and
especially their wives and their club, that shining jewel the
SC! nVPt.hCerUpb'all bv mvself. and It seems that my friends In

tt States have never been to the

I met. two women One tniormrd me n i "rtVJ T

. . t u turn, ohH thn
tiithi i i r.uuiu ,ut iimi- nn v...

could) Then she told me about how things were run In the
Wives Club at another Air Force Base. ...
The second ladv asked me my religion, and we were interview interviewed
ed interviewed by a verv friendlv colored woman. This upset the second lady,
who after the Interview informed me that although sepregation
was the accepted thing In the services, she came from a fine
Southern family and slmnlv could not accept It, adding that
she wa sure I felt the sump wav. being from the Deep South
too I didn't bother to exn'aln that I didn't feel the same way -how
can vou replv topically to hl"otrv?
I realize that these two women are not tynieal examples of
NCO Wives Club members, but where can I meet others
We were told not to brine nnr winter clothes down here, so
we gave awav scads of th"vi Now we diseovpr th-t we need them
to ward off the chilly attitudes of our fellow NCOs and airmen.

RTO HATO
Sir:

It V wan big mt'tpWe n Hr 'in and Hrlve nut the o'dW"
fron- Klc Ha.tr irn It? Well, ivh&t Hn "on Vnow When I Vird
tjiat n T "lmvt fell off the tieht backed rhalr I wa sitting
im, 'n thn ppl "best room
Nr thr rtrji neonle In 1547. and It Is ro rlmiM afe
it umtm the e a.11! rich since thev are vr" arefnl "ith hetr
inone? arh .h1 midden change of p-iin") if, tru thev b-ve
'm tnartmenl wini' town stpnin1' "t ",t v-'."'r'r't
taVv 'Kha hn e1r nf? 1hr-1r fratl" riMr'ritism Mavbe H't v.
Cfle il'rtVt v' th t eon'llllt0 'Ob thev r-orp snn-llno for
' "Tii- rwi' Ir T''ti eonlH hpve 'ilH t'in It was
' jtliftl'f tS Tii f1V F'n1 thl- mnne" 'in nut
V th! to a-1 "'"l "'V-ni'-al TronlcM f.-nrrlr) ir TOIlM
Rrl N11e TT 'n V "nr r' "hrln" about" v.'r1
fierve' n'1" nf 1 '""l'l'r -.nvtM. h'r1 rinn vrh
fttrt, VATthln. itc h. ar,r" be morose, when you ran blame
,Kmb4j t and W htppr about It.
Good Neighbor.

AGITATION

Thinker.
BANK
26). in replying to the letter by
, cnticism of the
a k.r hlnnrl
n I n a II K wilt if 1 aiv-i,
mranderinus about $24-a-montn
"
irvintf In hift rPSDOnsibilitV
for the
WIVES CLUB
Albrook NCO Wives CluD. Hrrrr
nil the nociors ana uu.L. hi,,
."V.Vvoi Tt

nnri couldn't believe it was

....
-Ieeberj Melter.
STORY

Ruarkous
Comments
By ROBERT C. RUARK

When 1 am feeling low you
know, bank balance overdrawn,
lousy weather, dogs chewed the
divans again it comlons me lo
think of ihe two noblest organi organizations
zations organizations in our land, namely, the
Daughters of the American Rev Revolution
olution Revolution and the Women's Chris Christian
tian Christian Temperance Union.
It comforts me because no tem
ale member of my family belongs
to either aroun. which is the fol-
I lvnnna annrnarh l.iko nnf havinp
leprosy.
Now and again I recall that the
DAR, possibly the nosiest, med-
Idlcsome group of females ever as-
1 sembled, are descended lrom a
j rabble in arms, which overthrew
i the nice folks, fought treacher treacher-;
; treacher-; ously against established govern
est in their work.
Our Revolution, unless I am as
wrong as history, was quite like
the Castro revolt in Cuba, except
that the Father of Our Country
was a rather more talented mer mercenary
cenary mercenary 'than most, having had
some practical experience in bush
fighting in the French and Indian
War on the side of the British,
the people he later knocked off.
Old George knew a cinch when
he saw one. For a squirrel rifle
or a well-aimed arrow, them Red Redcoats
coats Redcoats with the white cross straps
were a dead-solid bull's-eye.
The seeds of sedition must have
been firmly planted in young
Washington's mind then, when he
saw what a mess the French and
Indians made of old Braddock.
He knew about the French hat hatred
red hatred of anything German, and he
figured that the House of Hesse
had to get mixed up in the future
argument. So he coppered the
Hessians with the French and,
meantime, continued to burn the
hams and pop away at the strag
glers.
I keep what I call a happy file
on the DAR, ever since they
wouldn't let Marian Anderson sing
in Constitution Hall, which they
happen to own, in the city nam named
ed named after that line, old gentleman
who wound up fat and happy
with a mess of slaves at Mount
Vernon.
I'll bet old G. Washington would
have let her sing. I'll bet old G.
Washington might have had her
singing privately, as a matter of
fact.
But I'll bet that the nation'si
Pappy wouldn't have called for
America's withdrawal from the
United Nations, since he knew
about letting your allies absorb
some of the lumps, andj he reck reckoned
oned reckoned that if yoti could set two
strange dogs to fighting, there
was ample time to steal the neg neglected
lected neglected bone.
And I'll bet old George would
have clacked his false teeth in
anger at the D.AR's resolution a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst slum clearance, because
when George cleared a slum,
man, that cat cleared all, them
free acres at the. place for; which
the very decent rye whisky is
Me VCI
named.
Since just about everybody a
round this country, except a hand handful
ful handful of Indians, is an immigrant
I expect that we couldn't have had
a Revolution wi'nout immigrants,
but George's daughters want to
keep a closed door cm immigra
tion, and I presume that one day
there will be a motion adopted to
chuck out the Indians as undesir
able aliens.
Do you suppose they'd let Ma
ria Tallehief do a ballet in Consli
tution Hall? Probablv no. if
somebody checked her bloodlines,
She's an Injun. A foreigner.
Old George, when he was off
learning now not to fight a war
with the British against the French
and Indians, learned much of oth
er people's culture. But the DAR
according to my file, don't want
any dirty old Russians to come
over here and have a look at the
kind of a democracy a dirty rab-
Die can produce if given time.
"We do not invite murderers in-
ito our homes to talk to our chil
dren," one lady said, in referring
to a cultural exchange with Rus Russia.
sia. Russia. I suppose this puts the Bolshoi
Ballet, and the written works of
Turgenev, Tolstoi, Gogol and
Chekhov off limits.
"f.iis is going to confuse 'hp rjil-
leco authorities which forced me
" read all of this gunk, includ
. ,, ...
uusiucvan, anu 1 suppose
matter of
FACT
The rank of lieutenant gen gen-:
: gen-: eral of the army was created
I by Congress In 1855 as spe spe-j
j spe-j cial honor for Wlnfield Scott,
commander of the army dur dur-!
! dur-! ing the Mexican War and
I Whig candidate for president
in 1852. When the War of 1812
broke out, Scott, then a lieu lieu-i
i lieu-i tenant colonel, went to the
Canadian frontier where he
was captured by the British.
A few months later he was
returned to the U.S. in an ex exchange
change exchange of prisoners.
C Encyclopedia Brltannloa.

NEW YORK CONFIDENTIAL
By LEE MORTIMER

IT'S THE TRUTH (So
me): Sir Laurence Olivier
help
and
Vivien Leigh don't act like
the
reconciliation is for real. .Mary
Morrison, widow of Mocambo own
er, celebrating witlli Orrin Lehman
at Le Vouvray. .Press agent
Gene Schoor preparing the papers
against Virginia McManus, the sin
school teacher. Claims he set tip
the publishing with Putnam's. .
If anyone's looking for a technical
expert for the proposed picture
about gangster Larry Fay, howz howz-about
about howz-about Joe Russell. He knew 'em
all when. .Jill St. John says she
never even heard of Jack Fergu Ferguson
son Ferguson until the item was printed tnat
she as dating him. Embarrassing
loo, coming the same day as her
engagement to Lance. Sorry. .
Did I read it here that Tab Hunter
finally vcaught upj. to, flirfsday
Weld?, t .The Joati Colnhs Do Dolores
lores Dolores Michaels feud that started
when both were iti "Wayward
Bus" is on again with both after
the same role of "Clara" in 20th 20th-Fox's
Fox's 20th-Fox's "Sons and Lovers.' Joan is
reported to have said she'll belt
Dolores if she keeps making re
mark about her. (That I ant to
see).. .John Smith of TVs "La "Laramie"
ramie" "Laramie" and Luana Patten have
reached the serious stage. . I
like gals who say a paragraph in
one word: "Yes."
I'M A BIT FATIGUED (How
about you?): How time flies. Now
linger Kogers and Ray Anthony
are back together again. . .Big
piooiem witn Millie Perkins and
Dean Stockwell i3 religion. She
won i ao a Liz Taylor or M. Mon
roe. .Forgot to mention that the
chimps in 20th-Fox's "A Private's
Affair" are the same fun-makers
currently appearing in the great
L,aun quarter snow. .Which re
minis me to add the name of the
l. y. s general manager, Ed Ris
man, to the list of great gents
Ed is one of the few saloon keen
ers wit.i a college deeree. Hp anH
owner F. m. Loew prove their
class with some of the classiesi
shows in the country. .Don't tell
me that lovely Venetia Stevenson
hat "Dr. Zhivago" Is apt to get
banned in Alexandria, Va. Given
my choice I'd ban the lot on dull dullness
ness dullness alone.
rannot quarrel overmuch with
the DAR's quarrel with the Su-
nrmo Cami u.. t
........ v. wmii, uul L can pQfjp on(1
question wnicn the Supreme Court
might answer for me somedav
Just what business have these
v.u KOi meddling in other
p.e s Dusmess, on a national or
international scale?
I'll bet old G. Washington, the
......vcnaiy, revolutionist, and conn
.1. T a wmsky drinking
o.ovc-iiuiuiiiK-oia-inan. .n
"d the room would be blue

jh

"NATIONAL" ELECTRIC CENTER
ri 31, AUTOMOBILE ROW
WHERE OUR ENTIRE SALES FORCE HAS ONE AMIITION TO SERVE YOU WELL.

Help!

is receiving fan letters from Corp.
h-ivis Presley.'. .Love the way way-Doris
Doris way-Doris Day and Rock Hudson kit.
H 'n' R in "Pillow Talk". .
Khrushchev's all right in his place.
(Bui they haven't dug it yet.)
IT'S A LONG HOT SUMMER
(And I don'f make .It .shorter):
What a laugh on the charges and
countercharges between the pub publishers
lishers publishers of "Lady Chatterley's
Lover." The book is in the public
domain because it was first print
ed in the English language in Ita Italy
ly Italy and thus did not secure British
copyright protection. Thus every
publisher is "pirating" it. Grove,
which brought the court action, al already
ready already cleaned up $250,000 from the
hard cover sale before the others
jumped into the act with papers
covers.) Incidentally, I always con considered
sidered considered the book deadly dull. Even
the Lawrence cultists don't rank it
as a major effort. If it hadn't
been banned in the beginning, it
would have sold a few thousand
copies and then died away. For
my money, you can take "Chat-
terley" and James Joyce's "Ulys "Ulysses"
ses" "Ulysses" and throw 'em both in the
waste basket. Their dnief crime
isn't dirt. It's dullness. And that's
the greatest crime of all.
I'M A BEATNIK ON A SPUT
IK (And going places): To hear
the Kennedy Rover Boys would
think the Teamsters was (he on
ly union with crooks. They have
plenty, but how about the De
mocrat campaign fund-contribut
ing unions that are never in investigated
vestigated investigated or even mentioned .
Things will be difficult for poor
Ben Gazara. His West Coast ro romance,
mance, romance, Lillian Portnoy, daughter
of Che film financier, is now the
New York roommate of his East
Coast romance, Lord Scott. .
Sexy Clara Ahn, former Honolulu
high school teacher who began her
career hoofing at the old China
Doll on Broadway, quit her job at
the UN for one at the Crusade for
Freedom, which sine quit lo be
come office manager for the head headquarters
quarters headquarters of the Hawaiian Visitors
Bureau soon to be opened in New
York. She can do more for Hawai Hawaiian
ian Hawaiian good will than anyone I know..
In the list of fighters for Hawaiian
statehood, leave us not forget my
old friend, the late Joe Farrington,
Delegate to Conercss and publish
er of Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Too
bad he didn't live to see it.
IT AIN'T THE HUMIDITY fit's
me): In a letter to a reader of this
column, Mike Wallace admits his
man-on-tne-street interview crew
couldn't find anyone against Nixon
"After getting a number of "eo
pie wfho spoke in praise of Mr
Nixon, our reporter attempted to
get the opposite viewpoint. ..As a
matter of fact we didn't have much
luck in this. Of the five interviews
we finally used all were favorable

NEA Serrice, Inc

to Mr. Nixon.". ..Wallace denied
trying to slant the show, but my
correspondent notes: "I happened
to be a witness. It was just like
you reported. There was an at attempt
tempt attempt to slant the interviews lo
wards an anti-Nixon conclusion."
So there!
TOMORROW'S HEADLIN E S
(Before the paper's even printed):
Bill O'Dwyer, hiding away to com complete
plete complete the manuscrii of his thrill
ing autobiog for Julian Messner
publication, told me at the Harwyn
that it will follow closely the lines
of the appraisal J-"k Lait and
I made of the frame against
him. His book is neit' r a defense
nor an alibi, but will tell the fas
cinating story of nis exciting me
in ctroiohr onverinnl tvl
... .,..... r i -
with emphasis (I hope) on the
strange incident he told Jack and
me at Gracie Mansi6n, shortly be before
fore before he resigned to become Am Ambassador
bassador Ambassador to Mexico. Gene Fowler
and daughter and Johnny O'Con O'Connor
nor O'Connor were there, can vouch for it.
THE TRUTH: It was December
7. O'Dwyer was District Attorney
of Kings County, where he busted
"Murder, Inc." Tha next day, he
said, he was ready to bring before
the Grand Jury, first degree mur murder
der murder charges against a "beloved"
New York political figure and a
"beloved" union leaders as an
aftermath of a union mob killing
in the 1920s. O'Dwyer said he had
evidence that the labor leader had
ordered several :"ings of recal
citrants and the politician, as the
union's lawyer, had suborned per perjury
jury perjury and squared the killings after
the fact. .That day night of
December 7, while he was working
in his Brooklyn study, he got a
personal call from the White
House. This is free version of
what the President of the United
States said to him: "Bill, as you
know, we are at war today. I heard
you are trying to indict these two.
I consider these men necessary for
the war effort. So as your com
mander-in-chief, I call on you to do
nothing now that will conflict with
those objectives." The indictments
were forgotten. Bill rose to be
come a brigadier general. After
the war O'Dwyer became mayor.
Bill O'Dwyer was no tin angel. But
during his five years New "ork
was cleaner than it had been in
years.
THE DRAYMA: Cindy Adams
writes about her opening in "The
Gazebo" at the Capri Tneatre, At
lantic Beach. She says joey is also
in it. ."Advance reports" she
notes, "are quite exciting. The
theatre is so keyed up about joey
they consulted Lloyds of London
about tar and feathers insurance..
As you know we open tonight.
My advice to you is don't wait un until
til until tomorrow. Are you sure Lunt
and Fontanne started this way?"
. .It's signed "Cindy Cornell."
of Ins is So
nja.

ALWAYS SMILING AND AL ALWAYS
WAYS ALWAYS ANXIOUS TO HILP YOU
SILECT THE RECORDS YOU
DESIRE!
SHES OUR ASSISTANT MAN MANAGER
AGER MANAGER AND JUST GREAT WHEN
IT COMES TO PLANNING AN
ENVIABLf RECORD COLLECTION
R AN OUTSTANDING MUSICAL
SOUND SYSTEM.
COME IN AND MEET HER AT
OUR "LATIN QUARTER"!

L

o
WASHINGTON A new chapter
has just been revealed in the o o-peraiion
peraiion o-peraiion of, the giant US Steel
Corporation, whicn wljile netting a
record quarter of a billion Dol Dollars
lars Dollars profit in the first six months
of the year, has refused to pay
proportionate school taxes in Mor Mor-risvilie,
risvilie, Mor-risvilie, Pa., and tried to oppose
more taxes for school purposes in
Alabama.
The new chapter pertains to the
manner in wnich US Steel got
Uncle Sam to dredge the Deia
ware River to a 40-foot depth up
to the Fairless plant at Morris
ville.
Army engineers testified that
one company only would benefit
by the deepened channel U.S.
Steel.
Various congressmen opposed
this gift of $91,738,000 to US Steel.
Among the most vigorous of all
its opponents was Congressman
Mike Kirwan, Democrat of Ohio.
He made speech after speech op opposing
posing opposing the giveaway.
Then suddenly Ben Fairless,
head of US Steel and the man for
whom the Fairless plant is nam named,
ed, named, came to see Mike Kirwan.
Suddenly also Michael J. Kirwan,
Jr., was given a job with US Steel.
After that Congressman Kirwan's
opposition melted. He gave his
blessing to the $91,738,000 for US
Steel.
Significantly, when US Steel
wanted to dredge the Orinoco Riv River
er River in Venezuela in order to take
ore boats upstream, it paid for
the dredging itself.
But when it came to dredging
an American river, the Delaware,
US Steel got the Eisenhower ad administration
ministration administration with strong though
related support from one key
Democratic congressman to pay
for it.
Note: Young Mike Kirwan is
still working lor US Steel and has
had some nice raises. He says he
plans to stay there allhis life. v
CONGRESSMAN ORATES
Study of the Congressional com
mittee neanngs regarding US
Meet shows that no congressman
in years has reversed himself so
quickly as Mike Kirwan, Sr., on
any project.
Kirwan is chairman of the House
Appropriations subcommittee deal dealing
ing dealing with public works. His support
was all-important.
Here is how he battled against
the US Steel project on the House
floor when the 1956 public works
appropriation bill was under con consideration.
sideration. consideration. "It is a long time since the De-
iaware River esneciallv th.
. esDeclaily the Up
ivuri om neiwppn 'I'ronin. j
Philadelphia, has been before this
house," said Kirwan.
"I think the first mention of it
was some 180 years ago when
George Washington asked for
some money to keep the Continen
tal nimy going.
xvow let us march on from
there. This protect that u.o ,r
talking about never had a hearing
"v.uic me tommiuee. n
id.Kca on as a rider last year
We gave that steel Dlant win
000,000 in tax amortization in ord
er to DUiid the plant.
v.ic vi mcir suDsiniaries is
...... s a,cel u(mls m japan
with cheap labor. Each one of
WALLACE

DIRECT CANAL ZONE DELIVERY
O ROSE POINT $25.50
O ANTIQUE 24.90
O SIR CHRISTOPHER 27.10
O IRVING 16.75
O MEADOW ROSE 23.80

nfte Washington
Merry-Go -Round
r DVtaTW PEARSON

those boats will carry two train.
loads of ore, eliminating a great
many laDonng men. It will be fly
ing under a foreign f.ag with
cheap labor.
"Now that is what we have got
h e r e," continued Congressman
Kirwan.
"Those very boats built over-
seas will be going down the Dela Delaware
ware Delaware River. For 20 or 30 vean
the Delaware River had a denth
of 25 feet and nobody used it. f ha
river filled up to where they had
uiuy eigm ieei.
KIRWAN REVERSES
"The Army Engineers titiij
that the only one company wno
will get 100 percent benefit out of
this is the United States Steal
Lorp.
"Up on the St. Lawrence River
me are only paying $100,000,000 to
complete a seaway 105 miles long.
They have 65 seaports on tha
Great Lakes and they havt 5,000, 5,000,-000
000 5,000,-000 tons awaiting shipments
'But on this waterway, they
will only shin 30.0oo nno t,. ..j
f ; uaa B1JU
it is costing as much money to
construct that 30 to 40 miles of
channel as it is costing to build
the St. Lawrence Seaway
"The only one that has made
any commitment that they will
VnUJ1? 4(f00t channel 1 fa
United States Steel Corp.
true to our laboring men and to
he men that crossed that river
180 years ago when they would
Kirwan" quarter'" concluded
,.'Jhy Proved to the country
hat they are not going to g i v
thing that is not worth it
I am thankful that you havt
gven me this time. I nope that
this amendment is voted down
The House of Representative.
wan s appeal and voted down thm
giveaway to US Steel
However, on June 1, 1957, voung
Steel. K'rWan Went t0 work'fbr US
Before the end of June, US Steel
had received House approval I for
'ts 40-foot channel, costog
taxpayers $91,738,000.
DAILY
MEDITATION
(Praaantad by the Dapartm.nt
of Christian Education ef tha
Episcopal Church in tho Mis Missionary
sionary Missionary DMcasa of tha Panama
Canal Zono.)
Isaiah 58:J RSV.
BUSINESS AS USUAL
"Behold, in the day of your fast
you pursue your own business."
Back to the Monday world and
business as usual. This was the
attitude of the Jews. True they
observed all the rules and regu regulations.
lations. regulations. When it came to a fart
they kept it most scrupulously
with due attention to sackcloth
and ashes. Indeed, they were
most enthusiastic as the prophet
says, "they seek me diilv and
delight to know my ways."
Yet something was lacking.
Their religion had no effect on
their daily business. Fasting did
not change their disposition unless
to make them more irritable. If
anything, they became more hard hardhearted
hearted hardhearted toward the hungry and
homeless.
What about us? Has our wor worship
ship worship of God yesterday made any
difference in what we do today,
or are we going on with business
as usual? The ancient Jews com complained
plained complained that God did not answ,er
their prayer, tl -'ns ---swers
man, but sometimes man
is so concerned with see ng ms
own pleasures, pursuing his own
business, he does not hear God's
voire.
"Business before pleasure"
and both before God?
STERLING

i n i A'



'n fAKAMA AMDUCAK AH INDXPCMOSMX BAJJLX KKWifAJFiJI

rAC.Vtr.Rfcl--
Regional UN
Parley Opens
In Buenos Aires
BUENOS AIRES (UPI)-Mal-colm
Wikcy, a United States De Department
partment Department of Justice official, ar arrived
rived arrived yeaterday to attend a re regional
gional regional conference on international
legal problems, sponsored-by the
United Nations.
Hie conference, which ooens
today: will consider the legal
remedies that are available to
combat the illegal use of the ad administrative
ministrative administrative power by eovern-
ments.
Wilkey, an1 assistant attorney
general in the criminal division of
the Department of justice will
attend the conference as an ob
server.

A rti'

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ADVANCI PARTY Maj. William A. Dickson, second from left, commanding officer of the Junglt Warfare Training Center, USAR USAR-CARIB,
CARIB, USAR-CARIB, greets nine men, officer and enlisted personnel of the 77th Special Forces, upon their arrival at Albrook Air Force Base. Shak Shaking
ing Shaking hands with Dickson, is Lt. Col. Magus L. Smith, officer in charge of the advance party to a larger group expected ie arriv ia
the Canal Zone next week. At the extreme Jfet is Capt. David Chung, of the JWTC.

72
To

Officers,
Train At

Enlisted Men From Ft. Bragg

Jungle Warfare Training Center

Future Spacemen

To Live By Drink

WASHINGTON (UPD-Soace-

men of the future will be able to

live by drink alone.

Aero medical scientists at

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base,

Ohio, said in a just-published re

port that they have established
this with liquid menu tests on 15
military and civilian' volunteers.

It has long been theorized that

under conditions of weightlessness
in space the best wav to eai

would be to squirt liquids forti fortified
fied fortified With vitamins and Droteins

down the gullet with squeeze bot-

ues.

In the tests t Wrinht-Patteroon

the volunteers, ranging in age
from 21 to 39, drank their meals

three times a day for five days
while going about their usual
work In the aero medical labora

tory. Each pledged in advance to

ao no "outside eating."
In addition to iwgiriar meals

they were allowed imid-mornlng,
mid-afternoon and mid ,- evening
liquid snacks as desired.

Six of the an en gained and nine

lost weight during the Moeri

ment The greatest gain was 5.5

OIL BLAS TEJEIRA, the vice-minister of the Presidencia of Panama, congratulates Mai. Fred

Vigil of the U.S. Army Caribbean School at Fort Guhck, after presenting him, on behalf of Presidents
Ernesto de la Guardia Jr., the Vasco Nunez de Balboa Medal, in the grade of Commander. Vigil was

awarded tnis decoration lor nis outstanding devotion in instructing students from Panama and other
Latin American students as well as his contributions to the furthering of frientV relations between Pan

ama and the United States. From left to right: Ricardo Cucalon. Panama's sub-director of orotocol:

Vigil; Camilo Levy Salcedo, Panama's chief of protocol, and Tejeira. Earlier in the day Vigil received
a U.S. Army Caribbean Certificate of Achievement from Col. Cecil Himes. commandant of the school.

for the exemplary manner in which he discharged his duties during his tour of duty. (U.S. Army

rnoio; j

Seventy -two officers and enlist enlisted
ed enlisted men from the 77th Special
Forces Group, Airborne, Fort
Bragg, N. C, will begin a four four-week
week four-week session at the Jungle Warfare
Training Center next week.
An advance party from the h-

English Cops Hunt
15 Teenagers Who

Fled Reform

CARLTON, England (UPI) -Scores
of police with tracker dogs

yesterday sought 15 teen agers

from among 81 prisoners who
rioted and broke out of the reform

school here Sunday night.
The other 66 escapees were
rounded un Quickly.

Four of the prisoners who were
captured after the mass breakout
scaped again and were among
the 15 at large yesterday. The re reform
form reform school is 40 miles from

London.

The breakout was attributed to
the inmates' anger over delays in

the eovernment investigation of

their complaints of being beaten,

underfed and generally mistreat

ed.
The trouble began Saturday
when some of the boys marched
through the gates of the prison
and descended on the nearby

hnme, of writer Talcott Williams,

of Rockford, 111. WilHama and his

wife calmed the boys by feeding

them and tyoine their complaints

Last night tha prison director
told the inmates their complaints
would "take weeks" to study and
left them for 10 minutes to dis

cuss the problem "like gentle

men." Then the riot broke out

and tha boys escaped.
Sen. Javils Urges
'Health For Peace'
Legislation Now

NEW YORK (UPI)-Sen. Jacob
v .lavitu ureed yesterday that

Congress rush enactment of the
"health for peace" program so
that President Eisenhower can
ure Russia's participation during

his forthcoming talks with Soviet

Premier Nikita S. unrusncnev.
The New York Republican said
that although the Senate author-i-7orf
th 50-million-dollar program

. Mav 20. the lettislation is "still

languishing" in the House Educa
tinn and Labor Committee.

Javits, in a speech to the Amer American
ican American Podiatry Association, said
"it is imperative" that Congress
omplete action on the bill before
adjournment so -that It can be
"high on .the agenda" of the Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower Khrushchev discus discus-iions
iions discus-iions in mid-September.
The measure would establish an
Institute of International Medical
Research within the National In Institutes
stitutes Institutes of Health. The institute
would administer grants for re research
search research on "killer" and crippling
diseases and, among other things.

personnel with all participating
nations, including Russia and Its

satellites.

nit arrived in tha Canal Zone

Thursday afternoon to make ar

rangements for the special cycle
with representatives of the JWTC

and the U.S. Army Caribbean u-3

Section. The remainder will make

the trip from Fort Bragg by

planes, due to land her Tuesday
or Wednesday.

During the urst two weeKs. mey

will undergo a training cycle spe specially
cially specially tailored to meet their unit's

needs, while the final two week?

will be devoted to a field exercise
emphasizing guerrilla operations.

Members of the advance party.

who arrived at Albrook Air Force

Base by MATS plane, were greet greeted
ed greeted by Maj. William A. Dickson,
JWTC commanding officer, and
Capt.David Chung, training direc director
tor director at the center.

The group includes Lt. Col. Ma

gus L. Smith, officer in charge;
Capt. Robert B. McKnight, 1st
Lt. Billy J. Chance, M-Sgt. John
H. Burdge, M-Sgt. Eugene B. Zor Zor-nes,
nes, Zor-nes, Sfc. Chalmers Archer Jr.,

Sfc. Joseph E. Turner, Sfc; Wil

liam H.r Peacock, and Sgt. Jesse

m. stmmons.

Airman Caught Trying To Smuggle
Fiance, Baby Into United States

GREENVILLE, S. C. (UPI)
he 20-year-old airman caught
trying to smuggle his German
fiance and 10-months-old son in into
to into the country said at the week weekend
end weekend he had started filing papers
necessary for the marriage.
A 2C William R. Arnett of Ro Ro-yalton,
yalton, Ro-yalton, Ky., said he planned to
secure the aid of his Dase chap chaplain
lain chaplain in order to marry the gfrl
as soon as ha could.
Arnett also denied reports he
had- married Gerda Bleish, 22,
prior to his attempt to smuggle
her and his son into the United
States aboard an Air Force C129.
Arnett said "I tried that but it
didn't work," in response to a re report
port report he had married despite fail-

Sight, Life Of Girl, 19, Hinges

On Parents' Consent To Surgery

KANSAS CITY. Mo. (UPI)-The

failing eyesight, and possibly the

me, of a 19-year-old girl apparent apparently
ly apparently hinged last night on per persuading
suading persuading her parents to consent to
surgery which thus far theyhave

forbidden.

"I am determined to live, and I

will live," Miss Charleye Butts'
attorney1 quoted her as saying,
"but I love my father and mother

and I want to do it with their con consent,
sent, consent, if possible."
Miss Butts! exact whereabouts

were a secret except to her law lawyer,
yer, lawyer, Emil C. Anderson, who said

she feared her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Butts of Oswego,
Kan., might "come to take hei
home."
Anderson filed -a petition in
Wyandotte County District Court
her to grant Miss Butts rights of
majority, enabling her to sign the
surgery permission, denied by her
parents.
However, Kansas law requires a
30-day waiting period in such ac actions.
tions. actions. Specialists at the University of
Kansas Medical Center here were
agreed that the only hope of sav saving
ing saving Miss Butts from total blind blindness,
ness, blindness, and from ultimate death
from a tumor of the pituitary
gland, lay in quick surgery. Her

vision -already is 40 per cent de

stroyed, they said.
The girl, a clerical worker who
earns $37.50 weekly, said money
was not a factor in her problem.
She said her parents love her
and would gladly pay for what whatever
ever whatever they believe she needs, "but
they believe a man in Oklahoma
who has treated me with what he
calls an 'ultrasonic machine' can
cure me," she said.
She identified the practitioner
as H. C. Hunt, Hugo, Okla., who
said' he attended a Swedish mas mas-suer
suer mas-suer training school and that he
is not, a medical doctor.
Miss Butts said her parents paid
him $81 for treatments for, her.
"He has convinced them there

is nothing much wrong with me,H

sne said.

The parents' phone went unan

swered at Oswego yesterday and

Anderson said they "may be en
the way here."

He expressed hone they would

file a habeas corpus action which

would force him to reveal their
daughter's whereabouts.

"If that happens." he said, "the

whole matter can be broueht no

for court hearing without a 30-day
watt."

Anderson said an Osweeo physi

cian was attempting to persuade
the parents surgery is necessary.
"We still hope, and Miss Butts
believes, that they will consent to

the operation," he said.

He predicted that "she'll be In

the hospital for the operation be before
fore before the week is out."

Army Firings Set
At Pina, Empire
Artillery; Ranges
Headquarters, U.S. Army Carib Caribbean,
bean, Caribbean, has announced supplemental
weapons activity scheduled to take
place this week,
Tomorrow the Pina Light Arti Artillery
llery Artillery Range will be in use from
12:01 a.m. until, midnight, with
mortars, rifles, machine guns and
rocket launchers' fired 'Grenades

asd a simulated bomb .will. be de detonated,
tonated, detonated, "as weU.'V'.'"'1'

i he maximum altitude will m
16,500 feet and th.homontal range
is 5000 yards..
On Friday; September 4. Empire

Artillery Range will be the sit of
mortar firing between1 ths hours of
7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
Maximum altitude is 6500 feet
and the horizontal range is 6000

yards. j ,; :

pounds, tha greatest loss 1.7
pounds.

Some of the men thought they
got a little touchy and weary as
a reeult of the liquid diet, but
generally "the morale of the
group was good."
The scientific conclusion was
that "a high protein liquid diet
will- be acceptable for crews fly flying
ing flying high altitude, high-performance
vehicles for extended peri periods
ods periods of time."

ure to. obtain permission from

superior officers.

He said, "I'm not 21 yet and

in Germany you can't get mar

ried without permission until
you're 21."
Arnett tried to alio Miss Bleish
and his infant son, Billy Ray, in

to tha country aboard an Air
Force transport plana Inbound

from Weisbaden, Germany. How

ever the baby's cries gave tha

stowaways away and they were

returned to Germany from the

Atores.
The airman said he wanted to
marry Gerda and bring her and
the baby back witii him when he
was transferred to Donaldson Air

Base near here from temporary

duty in Germany. But he added
he had been repeatedly thwarted
by her brother and guardian, in
addition to military red tape.
Arnett said ha had already be began
gan began filing the required papers
with Air Force officials here to
clear the way for tha maarraige.
He said he planned to contact the
Donaldson base chaplain today in
order to secure permission as
fast as possible.
Friday San. Strom Thurmond
(D-S.C.) aaid the Air Force had
assurred him that Arneet would
be permitted to ask his present
commander for permission to mar marry
ry marry Gerda.

Chuck Deny Won'!
Return To Attempt
To Refute Charges
RICHMOND, Va. (UPI) Negro

rock 'n' roll singer Charles

(Chuck) Berry indicated today
he will Dvt return to Mississippi

to try to refute charges that he

asked a white girl for a date.
.Berry, 28, under a $750 bond he
posted before being escorted from
Meridian, Miss., for his own safe safety,
ty, safety, said it was all a "misunder "misunderstanding,"
standing," "misunderstanding," but indicated he will
forfeit the bond rather than re return
turn return for trial on disorderly con conduct
duct conduct charges.
In fact, Berry told reporters in
his first statement describing his
version of the incident, that he
had considered "trying to run all
the way" to tha Alabama border
20 miles away.
"Those cats were real warm,"
Berry said of the crowd of teen teenagers
agers teenagers who became angered over
reports that he had offered to
prolong a fraternity dance per performance
formance performance one hour Thursd y
night In exchange for a date with
a, white girl.
County attorney Paul Busby
said in Meridian that a white boy,
Fred Ross Jr., 16, son of a prom prominent
inent prominent attorney, introduced Berry
and the 20-year-old white girl so
she could get his autograph.
Busby said also that "Ross had
promised to get Berry a date in
order fn' Berry to perform an ex extra
tra extra hour."

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Vanishing Socialite Secretly Weds

Heir To Fortune At New Jersey Home

- 0

SHORT HILLS, N.J. (UPI)
Socialite Jacqueline Gay Hart,

object of a nationwide search

when she disappeared last month

with a case of pre-wedding lit

ters, was married in such secre secrecy
cy secrecy Friday night that even the
neighbors did not know of the
ceremony, it was revealed today.
The 21 year old debutante
daughter of a wealthy executive
married Stanley Noyes Gaines, 25,

of Fayetterville, W. Va., heir to
a coal mining fortune, on the eve

of the date originally set for
their wedding.
But instead of a vlavish formal

church ceremony witnessed by 500

guests, the couple was married
quietly at the home of Gay's par parents,
ents, parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A.

Hart, in this exclusive New Jer Jersey
sey Jersey community.
Hart is executive vke president
of, the Colgate Palmolive Com Company.
pany. Company. Tha telephone at the Hart
home was disconnected. Autho Authorities
rities Authorities kept secret the Issuance
of a marrlaga I i cent to the
couple early this week. But the
Rev. David St. George, assist assistant
ant assistant rector at Christ Episcopal
church, confirmed that the
wedding had taken place.
St. George said the Rev. Herb

ert H. Cooper performed the cere-

mony at 5:30 p.m. Friday. Only-i
about 35 persons attended. Neigh
bors said they noted no sign of :
any festivities.
Gay and remained In seclusion
since she returned home July 25
after a two day disappearance.
The Sweet Briar College graduata-.
took Gaines to the Newark air
port July 22, kissed him goodby -and
disappeared. While police
worked on the theory that she -had
been kidnaped and possibly
murdered, she took a bus ride to
Chicago and went into hiding in ;
a hotel room.
After two days of his, shi
went to a Chicago park and vas

found disheveled and nearby hys-

lericai oy ponce, u iir: le
said sine had been kidnaped and
mistreated. Then she admitted
that she had run away, in a,
case of nerves over her wedding.
Gaines and Gay's father went
to Chicago and brought her
home. The family then announc announced
ed announced that the wedding had been
postponed indifinitely. Gay went
into seclusion. Later she was re reported
ported reported to be in Canada on- a
vacation. That was where she
was believed to have been whenV
the wedding ceremony took place.

PEEKABOOM What looks like a group of' visiting Martian
conventionera is really a bunch of ordinary earth-type native.
They're Ryan Aeronautical Co. employes peeking at the photog photographer
rapher photographer in San Diego, Calif., through the camera holes in wing wing-tip
tip wing-tip pods used on Firebee jet targets. Cameras in the pods snap
pictures of missiles as they home to on the drones in flight.

ft V.', vl s I; vt 4
Nte -v.
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SATIN A jCARRIISifOU, SMOOTHLY
mm a aakaTav t a all 4 fl IAI IM I

THRU THE- iKwfimv nwum

Sofina.J

MinlhflMibaL

.jL. J

Only Guest flies non-stop to
MEXICO CflTY

OUT TO LAUNCrf-Tw youhgatera make ready to "blast
off" in a rpeket ship at Racine, Wis. The flower bedecked spaoo
craft waa a featured float during big parade in the city.

Only

6 hours

in non-stop

Comfort

FLY

THE ROUTE OF THE SUA
fat Ikinh ond iwtwvatiem

Wl.. Mxleo, Coll. I H Congn T.l.ph,, ,.)tf3r.

1

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KARMANN CHIA
SEDAN DE LUXE
MICRO BUSES

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WA

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WSTRIBl'TORS
UNICAU, SeA.
PHONE 2 031 1 Pinarni

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FA9I POUt

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erwide

134,

anama

NEWS OP ENGAGEMENTS. MARRIAGES. BIRTHS. PARTIES AND TRAVEL SHOULD BE MAILED
PROMPTLY TO BOX-NUMBER SHOWN. IT WILL BE RECEIVED BY TELEPHONE OVER

PANAMA t-0740 OR 1-0741 BETWEEN SOO AND 10 A.M. ONLY.

It

y
trOlTHCOMING MARRIAGE Of MISS HILDA FERNANDEZ
TO MR. DON R- FLETCHER IS ANNOUNCED TODAY
1 Mr. and Mrs. Aristldes Fernandes announce the forth-
Jf owning marriage ef their daughter, Miss Hilda Fernandet,
V t Mr. Den Randolph Fletcher, son ef Mr. and Mra. Harold
i R. Fletcher of Cumberland, Md.
The religions ceremony It planned (or ten o'clock Satur-
t day morning September 12, at Crieto Key Church.
1 The bride-elect la a graduate of St. Mary's Academy and

, K ttendd Barry CoUege in Miami.

Mr. Fietener wai greouaieo irom ucihiij min nii
Cumberland, Md., and attended Weet Virginia University,
where he was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. He
Is presently employed by the Engineering Department of the

City of Fort Lauaeroaie, n-.

1

liirrh Announcement
American Vice Consul ind Mn.
'John R. Horan of Colon announce
.ttt birth of a daughter, Kathleen
t Patricia, at Coco Solo Hospital
i The baby's grandparents are
Mrs T. J. Horan of Cambridge,
'Saw., and Mr. Charles Ervin Mc Mc-t
t Mc-t Keen of South Hadley Falls.
Mast.
Luncheon To Honor

Miss Iola Arnold, Girl Scout
Jxecutive for the Canal Zone,
will be honored at a no-host fare fare-Iwell
Iwell fare-Iwell luncheon Friday at noon at
' the Tivoli Guest House. Misl at at-'
' at-' sold is soon to return to the
States to further her schooling.
, All adult Girl Scouts and friends
Of Miss Arnold are invited to at attend.
tend. attend. Reservations should oe
nade before 4 p.m. Thursday
' with Mrs. H. t Spinney, Balboa
2490.
ft ,.
"Cristobal Woman's Clob
'Fetes Mrs. McClelland
Mrs. E. F. McClelland, who is
leaving the Isthmus with her
Isthmus with her family to Ran Ran-toul,
toul, Ran-toul, 111., was honored at a fare farewell
well farewell coffee given by the Cristobal
Woman's Club last week at the
Sew club building.
Mrs. McClelland has been an
Active member of the club (Jur (Jurist
ist (Jurist the past few years, holding
warious offices and participating
la the programs. Mrs. William F.
' Grady, club president, presented
to Mrs. McClelland a tft spoon
nd a bracelet made of local
stones.
' Mrs. Gilbert Morland acted as
chairman for the coffee, and
Mrs. Eustace Lee presided at the
of fee service.

Others attending the event were

I Mrs. R. L. Hearn, Mrs. m. r.
OreeM. Mrs. Ray Smith, Mrs.
Robert Neely, Mrs. Earl Orr,
Mrs.'M. F. Dunn, Mrs. Andrew
Metigar, Mrs. George J, Roth,
Mrs., W. W. Patton, Mrs. B. T.

Emmet Argo, Mrs. T. J. Fels,
Mrs. A. L. Logan, Mrs. R. L.
Pennington, Mrs. Stanley Kidd,
Mrs. Perry Francey, Mrs. J. W.
Hall. Mrs. George Werti. Mrs.
Stanley Hamilton, Mrs. C. J. Gen Gen-nil
nil Gen-nil and Mrs. J. Wolburn.

Duplicate Br Ida
At JWB This Evening
The regular tournament dupli duplicate
cate duplicate bridge games will be play

ed this evening at the USO-JWB

Armed Forces Service Center.
In order to assure rapid move movement
ment movement of the play, players are
asked to be at the USO-JWB no
later than 7:15 p.m. All bridge
players are invited to participate.
Servicemen and their families
are particularly welcome.

Executive Board,
Cristobal Woman's Club
The meeting date of the execu
tive board of the Cristobal Worn

an's Club hat been changed to

a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 9. All
members are uged to be present.

Miss Orr Honored
At Farewell Events

Miss Jeannette Orr was guest
of honor at a farewell dinner par party
ty party Sunday evening at the Tivoli
Guest House. Mr. and Mrs. Rich Richard
ard Richard E. Vogel of Paitilla hosted

the event.

Miss Orr, a member of the
staff of English teachers at the
Panamanian American Associa

tion, also was honored by her
former students with a buffet-

supper last week.

A 1959 graduate of the Canal

Zone Junior College, she will
leave later this week to enter
Missouri State College at Cape

(tirardeau. Mo. She is the daueh

ter of Mr. anrt Mrs. Robert Orr

of Panama City.

Girl Staters, counselors and city
mothers are invited to attend.
Reservations should be made
no later than Thursday evening
with Grace Vale, Curundu 2213:

Pudgy Watson, Balboa 1714, on
the Pacific Side, or Bonnie Ran Rankin,
kin, Rankin, 1-1752, on the Atlantic 'de.

Birth Announcement
Mr. and Mrs. Bart J. Elich of

Ancon announce the birth of a

son Monday morning at San Fer

nando Clinic. He is their second
child.

Mr. Elich is Merchandise and
Promotion manager in the Retail
Store branch of the Panama Can Canal
al Canal Company's Supply and Com Community
munity Community Service Bureau.

Mitt Bittel Returns
From Summer Camp
Miss E. Pattie Bittel, daughter
of Mrs. E. H. Bittel of Gamboa,
has returned after spending the
ui;..n- at Camp Ton-AWandah
near Hendersonville, N.C. At the
camp she won first prize in the
annual horse show and honors n
swimming and canoeing competi competition.
tion. competition. Before returning to the Zone,
she spent a week visiting in Miami.

Popular Pairs

ACROSS
IFrom
to bottom
4 Kind
I Hearth
and.
It Maria
IS Australian
ectrich
14 Fruit drinks
II and
women
II Absolut
rulers
lg.and
eonfldential
20 Laconic
il Sun
22 nd
dashes
34 Cain and
26 ., Nevada
27 Unclose
(poet.)
30 Revoke
32 Motorist
34 Strategy
ii Buries
St Female
taint (ab.)
37 Sudden wind
31
Pennsylvania
40 Monster
41 Metric
measures
41 Court bearing
45 Agree
it Rebuke
II Head part
52 Comfort
51 Unemployed
14 Grande
River
55 Snow vehicle
U Oriental
officials
87 Furtive

Answer prsvtait Punl

IFfeesdews
S-aa4
above
SXemorM
eCfoeedear
I Leave oat
Zbb
7 txeltSMtiOB

Of reproof 24 and 41 South
IDetetts crafts Americas
Scent SI Whip mountains
IIFreneh seat 1 Happen a gala 42 biea
11 Ktsentisl befe 37 Supervisors 41 Actual
iTCeatinu M Persian fairy 44 taete
tenancy SIGeelie 44 Merely
1 Men servant It Titter 47 Teeth and
J3 It to said SI Roma a reads
(French, SI Withdrew 41 Helen of
Swords) 40 Having oars 10 Secreted

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Meetings
Isthmian Nurses Assn.
The Isthmian Nurses Associa Association
tion Association will meet tomorrow evening
at 7 in the new conference room
of Gorges Hospital.
Dr. Fiks Mai will be guest
speaker.
All nurses of the .Canal Zone
and Panama are invited ti at attend.
tend. attend. Margarita Civil
Defense Corps
A meeting of the Margarita
Civil Defense Volunteer Corps
will be held tomorrow morning
at I at the Service Center. A
practice first aid session on trans transportation
portation transportation and the blanket lift will
be held. Mrs. Charlotte Kennedy,
first aid instructor, will be pre present.
sent. present. All members of the corps and
other interested persons are urg urged
ed urged to attend.

Fashion Model Now Handles
Television, Not Auto Plugs

Girl Staters Plan
Luncheon Saturday
Girl Staters will have a lunch
eon Saturdav at 12:15 at the Fort

powier, Mrs. James Pfau, Mrs. Amador Officers Open Mess. All

DOROTHY CHASE'S
STUDIO OF DANCE
Reiteration open.
Now located In the Knights of Columbus Hall, Balboa.
All Classes will be resumed October 1.

Special Education Assn.
The first meeting of the school
year of the Special Education As Association
sociation Association will be held Wendnesday
evening at 7:30 at the Balboa
USO-JWB.
All parents of handicapped chil

dren and other interested per

sons are urged to attend.
Orchid Society

The first meeting of the new

season of the Canal Zone Orchid
Society will be held this evening
at 7:30 p.m. at the USO-JWB
Armed Forces Service Center in
Balboa.
All members and prospective

NEW YORK (UPI) Blonde
Rita Mueller, a TV and photo photographic
graphic photographic model, once was told she
was best suited to become an air airplane
plane airplane mechanic.

The vocational counselor wasn i

far wrong. She became an auto

mechanic.
"I thought I'd start with cars,"

said Miss Mueller, 24, who meas

ures 36-23-36 and is S-feet, l-inches

tall.

She bought a 1926 VWIysKnight
and enrolled in a vocational
school n ber native Milwaukee
to leain mechanics. She studied
iur a year after leaving college,
then became a pit mechanic at
sports car races. She also re repaired
paired repaired her own snd her friends'
iars.
Has she ever used a bobby pin

members are urged to attend.
Justice Lodge ef like

The Social and Welfare and

Ways and Means committees of
Justice Lodge of Elks will meet
in a special session tomorrow
evening at 7:30 at 27 -2t Q Street
in Panama City. All members

and officers of the lodge art urg urged
ed urged to attend.
Knights of St. Paul
The Knights of St. Paul win hold
a special meeting tomorrow night
at 7:30 is St. Paul's Church.

i

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for repairs?

'Bobby pins, hair pins, and oc

casionally nuts and bolts. I once

mended a carburetor with a

bandage, and I fixed a boat with
a can opener. Women's intuition
and a slight mechanical knowl knowledge
edge knowledge will do wonders," she said
in an interview.

Once Miss Mueller was stopped

for speeding in her Antique car.

The traffic policeman was vis visibly
ibly visibly shaken to find a girl at the
wheel especially a girl like Miss
Mueller. . wearing shorts. But
he went ahead and filled out a
tirket.
Then Miss Mueller explained
tht the car would not go pore

than 24 miles an hour, and to

prove it, asked the policeman to
look under the hood.
"When he saw that bandage on
the carburetor, he tori up the
ticket and let me go," she
laughed.
Miss Mueller had to give up
mechanics full time when she be became
came became an airlines stewardess to
South America. She also was a
script summerizer for a movie
producer in Paris and a secre secretary.
tary. secretary. Then she turned to model modeling.
ing. modeling. Today, she Rets $35 an hour for
everything from posing for hos hosiery
iery hosiery ads in catalogs to live fash fash-Ion
Ion fash-Ion modeling, television and pho photography
tography photography work. She studies acting
and hopes to become both a dra dramatic
matic dramatic actress and comedienne.
She also has appeared as an ex extra
tra extra In movies and TV.
An active sportswoman, she
speaks Spanish and French and
designs and sews her own clothes.
"I made this out of a sheet."
she laid, indicating her full, white
skirt.
"If I didn't have to make a liv living,"
ing," living," she said, "I'd devoie more
time to cars again. I've always
dreamed of hiving a large, well well-equipped
equipped well-equipped garage.
"But right now I can't do my
favorite job packing wheel bear bearings
ings bearings in grease. I had to ejuit be because
cause because it's too hard on my hands
and Jack Pair wouldn't let me
continue the hand commercials on
his show."
But she still tinkers enough
with cars 10 that "dates can't pull
that run-out-of-gas routine."

y OSWALD JACOIY
Written for NIA Service

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Me

If you don't think that expert!

have their troubles at the bridge

table study this hand from the fi finals
nals finals of the mixed pairs at the

Spring National.

A look at the North-South hands

only will indicate the desirability

of getting to six spades. As long as
West does not hold all three
trumps the slam Is a lay down.

Stranselv enough not one pair

found their way to the spade slam

and it was well that they didn't.
West holds all three trumps and
the slam must go down.

In fact, five ipadel can be beet-

en. West opens the king Of hearts
and if he shifts to a elub South
must lose three tricks but at the
hand where South played spades

not one West found that defense.
A fw South nlavers chose to

doubl East and Wist It five
hearts. Neediest to say those South
players wound up with very bad

scores. All East needed to ao was
to play clrefully and make his
doubled contract.

--T Adding has been:
West North EaJ 8Mth
1 J" Ps INT.
Double Peat past ?
You, South, hold:
What do you de?
A Pisa. Tom tot mte
Vet and should Aght It eat,
TODAY'S QUESTION
Again west's spade bid has
been passed around to you. This
time you hold:
A'Sfi OA 1 14 4
What do you do?

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
f
by Dorothy Killgalkn

You might not think to at first
glance, but New York really hat
iuita a lot more to offer the visitor
than heat wavet and yc"Pe":
It hat th bett theatres and the
finest thopt in me world, and
some pretty fine museumt, cathe cathe-dralt,
dralt, cathe-dralt, rettauranti nd night club
entertainment. Everything but the
taxi, butet and tubwayt u air
conditioned, ao never mind the
thermometer -you'll be comfort comfortable
able comfortable wherever you go. Ther e a
plenty of exhilarating jaw to lis listen
ten listen to in the late spots, and tome
excellent tingert exercising their
vocal chordt for your pleasure.
Most out-of-townert visiting Man Manhattan
hattan Manhattan want molt of all to catch
what mott townt out of town don t
have: firat run Broadway shows.
For my money, the best musical
currently available to ticket-buy-ert
it "Gypsy," which hat a marv marv-elously
elously marv-elously cheerful score, a knockout
performance by Ethel Merman, a
terrific bratt section in the pit,
and never a dull moment. "Red "Redhead"
head" "Redhead" it gay and good, too. and
"Flower Drum Sone" can be re-

rnm mended enthusiastically for

itt music, vitual beauty ana per performances,
formances, performances, although it does have
a rather who-cares? libretto.

The not-to-be-missed dramas are
"A Raisin In The Sun" (hurry to
ntrh that before Sidney Poitier

leaves the cast, because his il a

remarkably appealing jpenorm jpenorm-nri
nri jpenorm-nri "Sweat Bird Of Youth

the best movie at the moment ut

"Anatomy Of A Murder," "norm
Bv Northwest" and "Room At

The T6p."

If you like to celebrate your
trip to our town by trying ntw
restaurants, the place to catch
these days it the Four Seasons, a
staggeringly expensive eating a a-creage
creage a-creage imbedded in the Seagram
Building on Park Ave. It special specializes
izes specializes in tasteful appointments, exo exotic
tic exotic dittoes and excellent wines and
if you dine there you're sure to
finH inmtthintf nn the menu that

you've never had before pear

vicnysoisse is suggested aiso we
lobster stuffed with musel.

mr? "m --1
I i& ?' Jiff. V i 7
lis
r,ii. 'I -"

M J V

Harnett And Dunn
Leave For Stales

Harnttt md Dunn will leave
for thi Statii fteptertber tri on
a two-month trlj?. Tn diheirtg
couple will visit New York.
Aitlr icAuiriAS A miteflAl.
they will fy td Caltf6rnla tb
visit billroom and ittend con-

ventiohs in Los AAgtlet And
San rranclico. Ori their wiy

back they will stop m Mtx Mtx-leo
leo Mtx-leo City and Acapulco.
Tntrnatlfinl t.vl of fftx-txnt

and wilts il becoming lhcreai-

lngly populir and Harnett na
Dunn plin to future It in their
televition show when they re return
turn return to the Isthmus.

For Chinese dishei of superb
quality served in a cool smartly
decorated atmosphere, Sun Luck

East is wttnout peer, xou can

have fun selecting your own
courses, naturally, but you might

wind up witn an even more aa aa-vantiirnus
vantiirnus aa-vantiirnus meal if vou iust told

the rintain to brine vou a few of

his own recommendations.

. i a.

If you're looking for inexpentive

but. delicious Italian cuisine, try

the Capri on W 52nd St. It's an

unpretentious little place with old

fashioned and rather plain decor,
but the cheerful chef it a marvel,
the waiters are friendly, and you'd

do well td sample any of the pas

ta specialities as well as their

veal-and-muthroom concoction,

Night clubt? There's a fine bill
at the Blue Angel, which hat just
reopened, everybody'i raving par particularly
ticularly particularly about the two young men
who play guitars and ting Latin
tongs, with genuinely witty com comments
ments comments sandwiched between the
ballads. The Living Room hat toft
lights and Sylvia Syms, plus the
talented Jacques Kayal who al-

way .aaket any room teemmort

romantic the minute he sits at the
piano and begins his repertoire of
toreign tongs and show tune.
Another pianist who'll meet any
challenge in the way of remem remembering
bering remembering your favorite Cole PorteV
or George Gershwin dit it the
amiable and stylish "Rack," who
can be found at the appropriately
little piano in the far corner of the
Little Club, which, incidentally is
open on Sunday nights even dur

ing the summer wnen to many

oiner lamout Doites are closed, to
you stand a good chance of glimp glimpsing
sing glimpsing a celebrity or two at Billy
Reed's small ttriped parlor on

Sabbath evenings. It's safe to get

nungry mere, too; the, teak tid-
u: !i.t i

una wiui special sauce are lavor lavor-ites,
ites, lavor-ites, and the curries are good.
Don't just get lost in midtown,
though; our island spreads out

auit t bit North and South,
and there's entertainment ev.

erywhere. Uptown, you can get

scnmaitzy in tne mittie-Europa at atmosphere
mosphere atmosphere of the Grinzing or the
Viennese Lantern: down in Green

wich Village you musttrya steak
It O. Henry's -the former "at

market where the waiters wear
butcher's straw hats and aprons
and c" andeliers are Tiffany glass glass-and
and glass-and listen to Blossom Dearie's
cool jazz soprano at the attractive
and imaginatively decorated Versailles.

There's bound to be an outdoor
concert jazz or long-hair while
you're here, or a play or ballet or
other divertissement in Central
Park, so consult your newspaper's
entertainment pages to find out
how the big city dweller digs cul culture
ture culture wlhen he can tear himself a a-way
way a-way from the air-conditioner and
the TV set in favor of fresh air
and performers-in-the-flesh.
,And if you don't want to spend
even a penny, take a walk along
Fifth or Madison or Park in the
fifties and look at the shopwind shopwind-ows
ows shopwind-ows and the gleaming new sky skyscrapers
scrapers skyscrapers and the trees and the
flowers and bannert that spell
"Welcome!" to you, New York il
so glad you could come.

BARK WORSI THAN BITS
CARLISLE, England (UPI)
Maj. John Dicksee put all he had
into it when he shouted the com command
mand command "Attention!" when the gen general
eral general arrived to greet his troops
at Camp Durranhill yesterday. He
shouted. the command so vigor vigorously
ously vigorously that his false teeth popped
out.

Wedgwood
tint Botte Chins.
Shawns
Partsmi, ft. P.

TTAllilKHyiS (Fwd of Germany)
COSMOS, S. A. Tel. 24680

DOLORES KOSAN
announces the opening of her
SCHOOL OF SPANISH DANCING
October S, 1859
THE TEEN CLUB, BALBOA, C.Z.

DOCfiONENOVELTY-'ftA-ney"
the Peking iitl you
peek at on K her rrlnfa.
Ptrimyt owntd by Mm. Con Con-MptlM
MptlM Con-MptlM Alt, bulls, Tx.
Th lejft tan up plrl

AVOID
DIAPER RASH

Don't tot your
baby uffr
from damp
diaperi. After
vary dliplr
changl, lit

M EX AN A
-r :

li

Local Writer Produces
. New Book

Albert wsrl, whi di as I

tat h" M
A Mirror' hi sill diUhU
! raading fttlUl with an;
tir took ntltl4 "Homm."
tits took MttUiAl tfcre
different typii tt literatur
that fully dpieti th differ
ent itaget ef human thot'i
ana behaviour.
It'l retealiiiK! New! Written
without fear I Dialing with
th age old phllosoflcal prob
lemi, that hate Interested,
fascinated, and puttied man mankind
kind mankind vr line ancient
Greee.
rr A truly Interesting read reading
ing reading w recommend "Rninan."
4W'::lvV'i;i.t,.'.:V-'.:v.v-.

THE BELLA VISTA ROOM
Tonight
Proudly Presents
The Debut Of

BIT

i t K-'i'mii
MM

Caxmen and Maria
SORIANO KINS
Direct from Miam1
Th Msfnlflesnt Sptnlih snd Flamenco Dancer
Two Shows Nightly 9:15 and 11:15 p.m.
with Clarence Martin's Orchestra
No Cover or Minimum Charg

fP J4.i4.-.

h



ttesdat, f orrzMBim t, m

m rixAHi aissica an induenumt daily kewspapv

Jl'.lllll)'.ll.y,

- .A-
y, f t v
V ,' '

" t

eOU. WALT I R A. DOWN INS JR., future chief of itaff of U.S. Army Caribbean, watches opera operations
tions operations in the translation section during a visit to the U.S. Army Caribbean School. Since all instruction
at the school is carried on is Spanish, the translation section is an extremely active unit. Mrs. L L.
Ender of Colon, shows a sample of the section's work to Downing, left, as Capt. Jose A. Esttras, ed editing
iting editing officer and Col. Cecil Himes, school commandant, look on. (U.S. Army Photo)

Main Street

sr
To Lure Customers Back

CHICAGO, September 1 (UPD
The grass growing in the main
atreets of Kalamazoo, Mich., and
Toledo, Ohio, was the hottest
thing in the world of city plan planning
ning planning today.
Cities throughout the nation
were watching the Kalamazoo
And Toledo formulas for keeping
automobiles out of their down downtown
town downtown shopping areas so that the
hopper can get in.
Other cities, from New York to
Waco, Tex., and Allegan, Mich.,
were studyihj plans to turn their
main streets into malls pleasant pleasantly
ly pleasantly landscaped thoroughfares or
Mdestrians only.
Behiad almost all the drawing
board projects was the hope o
luring customers back downtown
from fast-growing suburban shop
ping centers.
For years, main street mer
have watched their old
customers taking their trade to
new, easily accessible shopping
en.terft on the edge of town.
uai!b4vv8 fouAd it was far easi
tr and more pleasant to $ark the
family car in the shopping center
lot than to fight downtown traf traffic
fic traffic and parking problems.
Two years ago, a noted city
nTanner and writer. Lewis Mum
ford, revived the old institution of
the mall as a solution to the
mounting oroblem of main street
; "Either the motor Car will drive
us all out ol our ciues or we ci
ties will have to drive out the mo
tr car." Mumford wrote.
: Other city planners took up the
Idea and some tinkered with it on
an experimental basis. This sum summer.
mer. summer. Kalamazoo and Toledo put
It into effect.
At a cost of $60,000, Kalamazoo
opened the first permanent down
town shooning mall in the nation
It was an almost Instant success.
Toledo had already blocked off
four of its downtown area blocks
on a 45-day "experimental" bas basis.
is. basis. The period ends In September,
but the mall has caught on so
well that Toledo will probably
make it a permanent fixture.
Other eitifts speeded up plans to
follow the Kaiamazoo-TOieao ex
Detroit Mayor Louis C. Irlanl
gave his blessing to an experi experimental
mental experimental mall, including fountains,
statues and sidewalk restaurants,
In the motor city's Grand Circus
Park Area.
Allegan, Mich., experimented
with a downtown mall. St. Louis
staled a fashion show on a down
town street. Plans moved ahead
fir permanent mall in Waco.
Tex,, following three experiments,
nd n experimental mail at Fort
Worth was termed "highly suc successful."
cessful." successful." ,0ld plans for pedestrian only
shopping centers were dusted or
and; re-examined in Dallas, New
COLLAR! Hit MAN
LONDON (UPD-The man re responsible
sponsible responsible for British Prime Min Minister
ister Minister Harold Macmillsn't safety
got-rid of a pain in the neck
Sunday for the man responsible
for President Eisenhower's afe afe-ty.
ty. afe-ty. When White House Scrt
Service Chief U. F.. Boughmsn
complained about the tore neck
tht ha plagued him for months,
Scotland Yard tnsptetor Dennis
Jacobs, e trained osteopath, vol volunteered
unteered volunteered his ierviei and mil mil-eiged
eiged mil-eiged the in out f lough lough-man's
man's lough-man's neck.
TODAY

r r vol
tse. .I. toe.
Sptnish program I
EL PORTERO
' with Cantlnflas
Also:
QUE SEAS FELIX
with M.. A. Mejla

ri;:,. :MS'r. ,...s7 J

imA v 't!!lllMl'lllll 111111 J

Merchants
York, San Francisco, and Hamil
ton, Troy, Fostona, and Alliance,
Ohio. Chicago planners ffieially
declared themselves lukewarm to
the idea, but nevertheless sent a
delegation to study the Kalama
zoo mall.
In both Kalamazoo and Toledo,
the advantages of the mall were
immediately apparent. Its possi possible
ble possible drawbacks the threat of

British Atom Spy Klaus Fuchs
Given High Post In E. Germany

BERLIN (UPI) Dr. Klaus
Fuchs, British atom spy who
spent nine years in prison for
. ri : U -a 4 tk.
giving jvussia uis ccuici. tu uic
atomic bomb, his been appointed
deputy director of the East Ger
man Central institute tor nuciesr
Physics, it ws announced yester yesterday.
day. yesterday. The Communist East German
eovernmen'. said Fuchs. who end
ed his jail sentence in England
last June zo, win neaa a sciemmc
department in the institute.
The exact field of his work was
not disclosed.
Thi East Gefhian sovernment
granted Fuchs asylum after his
release from prison and en Just
26, at his request, 'he was grant granted
ed granted citizenship in the "G-ermsn
Democratic Republic.
The Esst Germsn Central insti institute
tute institute for Nuclear Physics is it the
Technical University of Dresden,
in Sixony. It is operated under
the supervision of the government
office for nuclear research and
physics.
Fuchs' father, Prof. Emil
Fuchs, an 15-year-old theologian,
lives in Liepzig, about 70 miles
from Dresden.
Fuchs, 48, was released from
prison 5 years ahead of schedule
because Tie was a model prisoner
and wen time off for good be behavior.
havior. behavior. He had been sentenced un under
der under Britain' official secrets let
for passing atomic information to
RuSsi between 1643 and 1947.
It was Only because Russia was
not legally an enemy power that
Fuchs wet spared the death sen sentence.
tence. sentence. Fuchi was born In Germany but

BALBOA THEATER Sept. 4

ON STAGi!
8:00 only!
- i st t s m

gatogg TQDAY

CAPITOLIO
Ut,. -' 15B.
dANKt 1125.00
CARIBBEAN GOLD
with John Payne
Also;
ARROWHEAD
. with Cn. Heiton

VICTOMA
lie. ,;
'
DESERT
SAND
. Also:
TOP GUN

Study Ways
Downtown
snarled traffic and Inadequate
parking facilities in larger cities cities-did
did cities-did not emerge immediately.
Youngstown, Ohio, meanwhile,
took a completely different tack.
Practically all parking restric restrictions
tions restrictions were lifted in the downtown
area for a week. Police feared
the worst, but reported,aftei!wards
that traffic had never moved,' so
smoothly.
was forced to flee in 1932 because
of Communist n4 anti-Hitler ac activities.
tivities. activities. He became a British sub
ject in 1942, at which time he
signed a loyalty pledge.
At his trial' he admitted he con contacted
tacted contacted Russian agents through the
Soviet Embassy in London as soon
as he got a government research
job at Britain's Harwell Research
Center of Los Alamos, N.M. The
long-time Communist continued to
relay information to the Soviets
until 1947. When authorities traced
leaks to him, he confessed his
treaenery.
House OKs Bill
For Coal Research
And Development
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
House gave final approval yester
ciay to a mil setting up a new
Federal Coal Research and Dev
elopment Commission.
The bill, approved by the Sen Senate
ate Senate last Tuesday, was a compro compromise
mise compromise between varying versions
which previously had been passed
by the two chambers.
The compromise retained House
language making the new com ml s s-eiOn
eiOn s-eiOn an independent agency, it
would be under' the Interior De Department
partment Department but for housekeeping
purposes only.
The purpose, of the commission
would-be to encourage and stimu stimulate
late stimulate production and conservation
of coal.
I SCREEN ATTRACTION
I 6:75 9:20
John CRAWFORD
Mimi GIBSON
In
J' The Courage Of
I Black Beauty"
I
BiMJ Una jf.
..... , 1 ,.; i r.j.
NEWS EVENTS!
RIO
ise.
SHOW!
"El Polio del Aflo"
Also:
BEAU JAMES
with Bob Hope
"tnd
JAMAICA RUN
with. Ray Mllland

Thrill Slayer Sent

To Menial Hospital;
Will Plead insanity
Brwnutfin v v 'frpt
Confessed thrill-slayer rraneis
Henry Bloeui ws ... j
the state mental hospital yesterday
for psychiatric examination at uis
arraignment on three first degree
murder indictments.
Suffolk County Judge Lloyd P.
Dodge ordered the commitment
upon the request of Bloeth's at attorney,
torney, attorney, Sidney Siben, who told
the court that Bloeth's defense
would be insanity.
Bloeth, 27, was arrested by Suf Suffolk.
folk. Suffolk. County police, Aug. 10, after
a week-long reign of terror dur during
ing during which three persons were
slain in holdups of small e-tin
establishments which yielded
Bloeth less than $400. tiloetn tola
notice that the money he stole
wis secondary to his urge to
klU.
After Bloeth's confession, au
thorities said he was the most
coldblooded killer they had ever
seen and that he told them the
only reason he halted his murder
spree was that "I ran out of bul bullets."
lets." bullets."
In court yesterday Bloeth, who is
married and the father of a young
daughter disrupted proceedings by
shouting: "I'm guilty; I want to
plead guilty."
But Judge Dodge said, "Young
man, you cannot plead guilty to
murder."
Dodge ordered Bloeth trans trans-furred
furred trans-furred from the Suffolk Country
Jail in Riverhead to Pilgrom
State Mental Hospital at West
Rrntwood.
Bloeth was specifically charged
with the murder of Hans Hach-
mann in an Isllp Delicatessen
July 31, Lawrence Kircher in a
Smlthtown Restaurant Aug. 8, ana
the robbery of an East isiip Tav
em July 22.
Grand Jury Probing
$1. Louis Cops'
Racial Intimacies
ST. LOUIS (UPI) The case of
two white St. Louis poncemen
rhnrirpH with havina intimate re
lation with two Neero girls will
be put before the grand jury w
Patrolman wmiam i. uisieu,
. ... I .11
24, was charged witn statutory
mm. patro man nooen, j. Wal
lace, 30, was- accused of having
relations with the older girl but no
warrant was issued against mm
Rnth officers wh owere auspena-
ed from the force, denied the
charges.
The two girls, 15 and II, said
the officers had relations with
them in a police car parked on
the grounds of Dunbar school
about 1 a.m. Saturday.
Police Chief Jeremiah O'Con O'Con-nell
nell O'Con-nell said Wallace and Osten had
picked up the Xwo girls and a Ne Negro
gro Negro man shortly before 1 a.m. Sat Saturday
urday Saturday when the trio was found
drinking beer on the street.
The three were taken in, but not
booked, failure to book them was
the basis for a neglect of duty
charge against the two -officers.
The man was released first and
the two officers left later with the
girls. The girls appeared later at
a hospital and said they had been
raped by two white, uniformed of officers.
ficers. officers. Police said both girls are un unmarried,
married, unmarried, but each has two ille illegitimate
gitimate illegitimate children. Both officers are
married. Olsten has one child, and
Wallace has two.
ITODAY-ENCANTO -25-15
TVAHOO! $115.00
Ingrid Bergman in
"THE INN OF THE SIXTH
HAPPINESS"
Ronald Colman in
"CLIVE OF INDIA"
rDRmT-IN T
I
S!;: TODAY IS
JEAN SIMMONS
I
David FARRAR in
"CAGE OF GOLD"
i
i
Tomorrow!
POPULAR NIOHTI
$1.10 per CAR!
Fernandd Lamas In
SANGAREE
I In TECHNICOLOR 1 I
TROPICAL
$;f0TODAY $j?
GREAT FORTUNE NIGHT!
Be One of The Lucky Winner
of Theie Cash rriiei!
1st Prize $100.00
2nd
ird
4th
18.00
15.00
10.00
THE FORTUNE NIGHT
PLAYS AT 1:00 P.M.
On the Screen:
Jeff Chandler
June Allyson In
"STRANGER IN MY ARMS"
George Nader Julie Adami
. in
"AWAY ALL BOATS"
In Technicolor

J

17

' v f -.
- ; '' -

NOT THE WAY IT LOOKS Karl Kenney looks like he's
getting a shave. He isn't Just the opposite. A make-up expert
Is fitting Kenney with a beard. He'll play an ancient prophet
in the annual Mormon church pageant near Palmyra, N.Y., in
August It's held on Hill Cumorah where Joseph Smith had
the religious vision which led him to found the Church of
the Letter-Day Saints.

Franco Appeals To Ike
For Greater U.S. Aid

LONDON (UPI) Gen. Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco Franco appealed to Presi President
dent President Eisenhower in a personal
letter delivered here yesterday for
greater American military and
economic aid to Spain.
The letter was presented to Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower by Spanish Foreign Min Minister
ister Minister Fernando Maria Castiella in
a 25-minute meeting at Winfield
HouSe, official residence of U.S.
Ambassador John Hay Whitney.
Presidential Press Secretary
James C Hagerty announced aft afterward
erward afterward that the letter from Fran Franco
co Franco expressed the Spanish chief's
"complete confidence" in Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's handling of his current
European peace mission.
Diplomatic sources said that
Franco also extended the Presi President
dent President an open invitation to visit
Spain. This, however, was not
confirmed officially.
Hagerty, in announcing the
Franco request for further aid.
said Eisenhower had expressed to
f oreign Minister Castiella U. S.
thanks for Spain's cooperation in
the construction program of U.S.
airbases on Spanish soil.
He said the text of the Franco
message and Elsenhower's reply
probably would be published in
. SffiVCF CENTER
BALBOA 6:15 7:50
AIR-CONDITIONED
It
litTS TK GSUT UNKNOWN I
r
Wednesday "Al Capone"
Margarita 7:0(1
K1ATUN
"MAN WITH
A MILLION"

( ti

1!M

"ScUn'i SatellitM"
A "Daniel Bonne,

Wed. "The Lady

TrllhlT.er(i" Thurs.

killers"
"The
IPARAISO 7:00
Santa
"Sorority Girl"
it "I Shot Billy
The Kid"

"THE
ABDUCTORS"

TOMORROW
IP

EXCEPTIONAL WEEKEND RELEASE!

It talks straight talk
I

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II TYCr-

gssf -a
I .Ungimgt
I I moro than sr I
a story ( V&l
I fl of love fcw JmM
.1 a story jtrttSftM

I i SOPHIA 'aNTHONyXb
III" If I Anpu II

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Washington and Madrid Wednes Wednesday.
day. Wednesday. Secretary of State Christian A.
Herter was present at the meet meeting
ing meeting between Eisenhower and the
Spanish foreign minister. Later
Castiella had a brief talk alone
with Herter.
Hagerty said the question of
Spain's admission to NATO was
not discussed in the talk. But he
said the matter of U.S. aid to
Spain was discussed at length.
(In Madrid, informed sources
estimated that since the begin beginning
ning beginning of the U.S.-Spanish join de defense
fense defense program in 1953, Spain has
received more han one billion
dollars in U.S. aid. This does not
include aid from private sources
for which Spain became eligible
last month).
In reply to newsmen's questions,
Hagerty declined to say whether
the Spanish bases would be
equipped with nuclear weapons.
But he said the discussion cov covered
ered covered both military and economic
aid.
Hagerty sidestepped questions
as to whether Spain's need for aid
was urgent in view of Castiella's
special flight to London to see the
U.S. President.
THEATERS TODAY
COCO SOLO 7:00
Alr-Conditloned
k Kathleen Crowley
Lawrence Tierney
"FEMALE JUNGLE"
Wed. "7th Voyage of Sinbad"
DIABLO HTS. 7:00
-k Dinah Shore
Alan Young
"MARSHALLOW MOON"
Wed. "Live Fast, Die Young"
7:0fi
GAMBOA 7:00
"LIVE FAST,
DIE YOUNG"
Wednesday!
'Cop Hater"
LadykUlen"
Crux 7:00
Camp B'erd 7:00
"THE DEFIANT
ONES"

CENTRAL

and feels real feelings!

Valuable Prizes To Be Given Away At.
The CENTRAL THEATRE DURIIiG
THE SHOVIIIG OF THE

"BLACK

ww';m;)"M;"mvwwmwmtmmmmmfmBmmmKc mm J. iii)in ..
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Interesting and luxurious presents will be raffled to
the persons who attend the release, tomorrow of the pieV
ture "THE BLACK ORCHID" at the CENTRAL Theatre.
These presents have been donated by some of the most,
well-known stores in Panama:
MOTTA'S: A flask of the exquisite CHRISTIAN DIOR,
perfume.
LA PARISIEN: A beautiful black nylon slip with lace.
P. JHANGIMAL on 4th of July: A black silk Kimono
with golden embroideries.

DARNA: A complete set

JEANNE GOTINEAU also the services of a beauty expert
I. L. MADURO: An elegant cultivated pearls neklaee.
BAZAR INDUSTAN (Sally and Charlie) t Four beauti beautiful
ful beautiful wall pieces of the four season of the year.
EMPORIO ITALIANO: A beautiful and delicate aet
Italian ceramics, plus a sample flask of Italian perfume.
CHAMBONNET y QUINTA AVENIDA: An elegant night
purse.
"THE BLACK ORCHID" Is a picture that offers an Ibk
teresting and romantic story in which Sophia Loren sur surpasses
passes surpasses herself. Her interpretation won her the title of the
Actress of the Year in the Venice Cinema Festival. Adrt.

CENTRAL
LOVE-AFFAIR WITH
OPENS
TOMORROW!
ONE OF THE BIGGEST
HITS OF THE YEAR!
: 2a

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9 mmNiyp : jjm
BINO 4

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: HI II IIMIU .AlL

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DEBBE W OflV
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ROBERT IJ(
mm

ORCHID"

of cosmetics from the f anions
"""i$STDJTt
SHOWS: 1:15 1:55 4:51
6:57 9:00 P.M.
PRICES: 75c. Me.
A FRENCH FLAIR!
MG-MVenu)

Deborah Rossano

Kerr Brazzi
Maurice
Chevalier in

tgn mm mmmmm mm mm

in CmemaScope and METROCOLOR

wi

Last Day! .75 .40
2:50, 4:40, 6:45, S:0O p.m.
James CAGNEY
Don MURRAY
Dana WYNTER In
"SHAKE HANDS
WITH THE DEVIL"

.B-.vk:.'..1.!.
. -;



V
THX PAH AMA AJtTMCA AH
ETT DAILY NIWHF ATO
TUESDAY, CEFTEMBXS 1,
Trim
Giants9 NL EeM To SIiJliiiffiSh 1
gers
LEADING
HITTERS
Koufax Ties Feller's
CL8 Strikeout Record
('-; Editor; CONRADO SARCEANT

I fAGl SIX

Bod
.-.

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I fi.iinMniMa: mi vsmummi war

f V

By FRED DOWN
I NEW YORK, Sept. 1 (UPI) It took Sandy
Koufax a long time to deyelop but now that he has it
may be just in time to put the Los Angeles Dodgers

px the World Series.
i r a 2t.vcar-old left-hander rrom
Brooklyn who got a J25,uw Donus
1b 1955 and once sprained an an
kle when he "tripped over a ioui
line," Koufax last night pitched
his way into the record book and
the Dodgers to within one game
of first place in the National
League with a spectacular 5-2 vic victory
tory victory over the San Francisco Gi Giants.
ants. Giants. A crowd of 82,794 at Los Ange Angeles,
les, Angeles, including 60,194 paid, saw the
210-pound southpaw strike out 18
tatters to equal the major league
mark set by Bob Feller Oct. 2,
1938, and break the National
League record of 17 held by Dizzy
Dean since 1933.
Since he struck out 13 batters In
Ms previous start a week ago,
Koufax also set a major league
fyecord of 31 strikeouts in two con consecutive
secutive consecutive games.
l Koufax' great effort appeared
doomed to end in defeat even as
feller's 18-strikeouts effort did in
J938 unti the last of the ninth
rhen Wally Moon's three-rur.
fiomer off Al Worthington gave the
Dodgers their 11th win in 19 meet meetings
ings meetings with the Giants this season.
Jhe Dodgers tied the score In the
jelghth with the help of two wild
pitches by Jack Sanford.
4 The suprtme Irony of Koufax'
victory from the Giants' point of
view was that ho actually ltd
Jeff tho gamo-wlnnlns rally with
J'a single. From tho moment ho
joined tho Dodgtrs In '55, Kou Kou-Max
Max Kou-Max has boon recognized as ono
ef tha weakest hitters In tho his his-,
, his-, tory of the major laagues.
Jim Gilliam followed Koufax'
Inning-opening single with another
Igingle and San Francisco manager
Bill Rigney immediately replaced
fanford with Worthington. Moon,
the first batter Worthington faced,
then connected for the game-win-liing
blast.
LATIN AMERICA SCHOOL
LEAGUE
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Team Standings
Won Lost
13V2 2Vi
Cerveza Balboa
Marlboro
Gulfpride
Volkswagen
La Mascota
Cla. Americana S.A.
Mercurio Jewlers
Cyrea S.A. Free Zono
8Vi
8
m
8
S
8
10
11
CERVEZA BALBOA 4,
LA MASCOTA 0.
The beermen continue to ride
herd on the rest of the league by
onceremoniously taking every --me
that comes up against them
to the cleaners. Last week it was
...La Mascota who succumbed under
the steady pounding of the Cerve Cerve-ceros
ceros Cerve-ceros the Custom Tailors couldn't
get started till the third game, and
by that time, all was lost. Better
Juck next time.
f. The top producers for the Beer Beer-rnen
rnen Beer-rnen were Serna, (who incidental incidentally
ly incidentally won't be around next week, he
Was selected as the "Oustanding
Airman and is going to Florida)
49 and Garcia with a 457 series.
For the Custom Tailors, Davila
lead with a 430 series and Huertas
came thru with an even 400.
MARLBORO 3
VOLKSWAGEN
' Marlboro made quite a leap
from seventh to second place in
three games that were reluctantly
donated by the Carmen, in the 1st
'and second games, the Smokers
dominated the field of action all
the way but in the third the Car Car-rien
rien Car-rien retaliated and managed to
igave one. For the Smokers Hervey
almost broke the ilusive 500, was
'.abort 6 pins and second high score
was donated by Gonzales 389. For
the Carmen, anchor boy Hensel
Was in first place all the way with
a 435 and Larrazabal helped with
a 394.
rj
V GULFPRIDE 3,
,' CIA. AMERICA 1
'It wag here where real excite excitement
ment excitement took place. After the Wild Wildcatters'
catters' Wildcatters' throughly trounced the
. Hardwaremen in the first game,
Cia. America came back to give
the Oilmen the roughest battle yet.
. It was decided in the last frame
' ilth the wildcatters claiming it
With 8 pins. This turns of events
so infuriated the hardware men
that they redoubled their efforts
and the last game was quite a
PIERSALL "MUCH BETTER"
I CLEVELAND (FPn-Outfielder
I Jim Piersall of the Cleveland
Indians reported today he felt
'(I'much, better" after suffering a
severe pain in his head that ne necessitated
cessitated necessitated his removal on a
stretcher from the field during
Funday'i double-header with the
'Chicago White Sox,

IP

The Giants scored their first run
off Koufax in the first inning on
doubles by Willie Mays and Or Orlando
lando Orlando Cepeda and their second in
the fifth on Willie McCovey's 8th
homer of the season.
Koufax, who has struck out 150
batters in 127 innings while fash fashioning
ioning fashioning an 8-4 record, struck, out the
side in order in the sixth and
ninth innings and also sandwiched
three strikeouts around McCoveys
homer in the fifth. He yielded
seven hits and walked two betters.
Always possessed with a blazing
fast ball, Koufax struck out 14 bat

ters in a sensational early appear
ance as a Dodger starter in 1955
but has been basically a .500 pitch
er during his career. He was ti
ll last season and his entire major
league record including this sea
son is 28-25.
"I had two good pitches work working
ing working for mo last night," Koufax
said. "A fast ball and a curve.
It was my bost game and my
luckiest."
The victory was the fourth in
their last five games for the Dodg
ers while the loss was the Giants
fifth in six games. The Giants won
the first game of the key three three-game
game three-game set with Los Angeles but the
Dodgers bounced back to beat San
Francisco in the last two games.
The Dodgers can inch to within
a half game of the league leaders
tonight when they play the St.
Louis Cardinals.
Pete Runnels' lOth-inning homer
cave the Boston Red Sox a 4-3 vic
tory over the Washington Senators
in the only other major league
game played yesterday.
Mike Fornieles picked up his
fourth win for Boston in relief of
Bill Monbouquette. Jackie Jensen
homered for the Red Sox in the
fourth inning to lift his runs batted
in total for the year to 95.
RES
race. It turned out to be a photo photofinish
finish photofinish with the hardware men
taking the game by 1 pin. Natural Naturally
ly Naturally this kind of bowling produced
some fine series. For Gulfpride
there was Borrego with a 486 and
Miranda with a 479. For Cia. Ame America
rica America Vargas rolled a 455 series and
Gomez a 437.
CYRCA I,
MERCURIO JEWELERS 2
This was the gentlemen's con contest,
test, contest, 2 points each team. Best bowl bowlers
ers bowlers for Cyrca, Spiros 426, and Tay Taylor
lor Taylor 406. For Mercurio, Bloomer a
489 and Di Paulo a 458.
5700 MATERIEL MIQED
LEAGUE OF ALBROOK
The league members took Friday Friday-evening
evening Friday-evening off from their usual week weekly
ly weekly bowling sessions, to celebrate
the completion of a very success successful
ful successful season. The festivitis took
places at the private ball room of
the American Legion Club at Ama Amador.
dor. Amador. The gala affair was highlighted
by the music of a four piece com combo
bo combo of the Airforce Band. Members
of the combo were airmen, Gilleon
La Beau, Bafoke and Ridenour.
Bert Moss was the Emcee and
with the help of the honored guest,
the 5700 Materiel Commanding
Officer, Lt. Col. Sponenberg, dis distributed
tributed distributed the bowling loot. The win winning
ning winning team, Tigers, that ran away
with the title, received individual
awards which went to three guys
and two dolls Bert Moss, Al Ke Ke-tree,
tree, Ke-tree, Al Walker, Billie Ketree and
Grace Moss.
The Hits and Mrs. who managed
to rally the last night of bowling
by sweeping all four points to
finish up in the runnerup spot, also
received individual awards.
Signal honors were paid Jim
and Helen Mingin, from Riverside
New Jersey, for capturing the
high average honors of the league
for the men and women.
Bill Fish and Doris Freda car carried
ried carried off the trophies for high series
scratch. For high game scratch,
Jerry Reid and Grace Moss walked
off with the prizes. In the handicap
division, high series honors wen!
to Harry Rouse and Chris Woods
and high game to John Woods and
Mary Gomez.
It was a husband and wife duo
that came out on top lor being Hie
most improved bowlers of the loop
Bill and Betty Fish.
For being "first in reverse" in
average, there was lie between
Harold Thigpen and Lu Diosdado
Both received remembcrances of
their accomplishments, as did
Carolee Rouse, teenager who
competed with the adults.
All members of the league re
ceived momentoes. in the form of
embossed pocket mole books, with
gold stamping to commerate the
league season. All the l rophn s
were made of local Panama lum
her and were custom made for the
5700 Materiel Group.
Also, all guests received a small
bowling pin made by one the mem
beri of the league.

JgjGL

(Bttde on 350 Official at Bats)
National League
o AB R H Pet.
Aaron, Milwau. 128 523 100 189 .361
Cun'ham, St. L. 123 396 55 139 .351
Pinson, Cinci. 131 549 113 181 .330
Temple, Cinci. 126 505 90 161 .319
Boyer St. L. 129 489 71 155 .317

Cepeda, S. F. 129 519 80 164 .316
Robinson, Cin. 129 481 95 152 .316
White, St. L. 127 479 70 148 .309
Mathews, Mil. 122 494 94 152 .308
Mays, S. F. 128 492 103 150 .305
American League
Kuenn, .Detroit 115 461 82 162 .351
Kaline, Detroit 112 429 75 143 .333
Runnels, Boston 125 477 81 153 .321
Woodling, Bal. 119 377 56 119 .316
Fox, Chicago 131 530 72 165 .311
Tuttle, K. C. 119 441 71 134 .304
Power, Cleve. 126 512 92 154 .301
Minoso, Cleve. 127 483 79 144 .298
Cerv, K. C. 100 364 49 106 .291
Lopez, N. Y. 124 459 68 132 .288
Runs Batted Tn
National League
Banks, Cubs 122
Robinson, Reds 115
Aaron, Braves 102
Bell, Reds 101
Mathews, Bravei 89
Cepead, Giants 89
American League
Colavito, Indians 98
Killebrew, Senators 97
Jensen, Red Sox 95
Lopez, Yankees 82
Malzone. Red Sox 82
Home Runs
National League
Banks, Cubs 38
Aaron, Braves 36
Mathews, Braves 35
Robinson, Reds 32
Cepeda, Giants 25
Boyer, Cards 25
American League
Colavito, Indiana 39
Killebrew, Senator i 38
Allison, Senators 29
Maxwell, Tigers 27
Jensen, Red Sox 26
Held, Indians 26
Lemon, Senators 26
Mantle, Yankees 26
LEADING
PITCHERS
(Batod on H or more decisions)
National League
W L Pet.
Face, Pirates .... 17 3 1000
Antonelli, Giants ... 18 7 .720
Law, Pirates 15 7 .682
Newcombe, Reds ... 12 7 .632
Conley, Phils 12 7 .632
Podres, Dodgers ... 12 7 .632
Shaw, White Sox 14 1 .778
McLish, Indians .... 16 7 .696
Lary, Tigers 17 8 .680
Maas, Yankees .... 12 6 .667
Wynn, White Sox ... 17 9 .654
Navigation Classes,
kail Boa) Handling
Begin Next Tuesday
Free classes in navigation, small
boat handling, and safety at sea
will be offered to Pacific Siders
beginning Tuesday, Sept. 8, under
sponsorship of the United States
Power Squadrons.
Registration will be held at 7:30
p.m. sept, tf in tne ranama uan
al Company Trairiing Center
Building 0602 Corozo Street, a-
cross the Panama Railroad tracks
from the Balboa gasoline station.
The course is designed for peopie
interested in pleasure boating.
Ownership of a boat is not neces necessary.
sary. necessary. Classes will be held every
Tuesday evening and will last two
hours each. Such topics as Equip
ment and Government Regula
lions. Rules of the Nautical Road,
Seamanship, Safety Afloat, the
Mariner s Compass, Aids to Na
vigation, Charts and Piloting, and
Manners and Customs on Ship
board will be covered in about
eleven sessions.
The Canal Zone unit of the U.S. U.S.-P.S.
P.S. U.S.-P.S. has been offering free boating
courses to the public since the loc local
al local squadron was formed eleven
years ago. There is no obligation
involved in taking the course, al although
though although many U.S. citizens who
complete it become members of
the U.S.P.S. and take advanced
courses that are available to
members only.
The United States Power Squad
rons is a nationwide association of
pleasure boatmen dedicated to the
promotion of safely, good citizen citizenship,
ship, citizenship, and good fellowship afloat.
In addition to other activities it
conducts a program of instruction
in boating subjects for its mem members
bers members and others who are interest
ed in the water. The organization
was established in 1914 and today
hag more than 40,000 memberi in
274 local tquadroni.

if t J K- vtW f
i -v. M,-
T IJKm f 'iV V'-f

HE'S SAFE! The Chicago White Sox' Luis Aparicio slides safe ly back to first during an attempted
pickoff by the Cleveland Indians' Cal McLish in the sixth inning of Sunday's doubleheader in Cleveland.
Tito Francona covers first. The umpire is Nestor Chylak. The White Sox won the garrie, the first of a
twinbill, 6-3, and also took the second game, 9-4. The first place White Sox built their lead to S-l2
games over the second place Indiana.

States Continues To Pile Up
Gold Medals At Record Pace

Diller Hanover
Hambletonian
2-1 Favorite
By 1AM HANCOCK
DU QUOIN, HI. (UPI) Diner
Hanover, a nine time winner and
never worse than second in 12
starts this year, became the 2 to
1 favorite for tomorrow's rich
Hambletonian when 15 three year
old trotters were entered Monday
for the record $125,284 stake.
The major surprise yesterday,
though, came when Billy Haugh Haugh-ton
ton Haugh-ton announced that JHckory Pride
would not start due to ieg trouble.
Hickory Pride, winner f Bin
straight starts earl this year,
and the winter book favorite for
the stake, has been off form in
his last three starts.
The race will pay a record
purse with the gross exceeding
the richest harness race ever,
123,712 for the Yonkers Trots last
month, as well as the previous
best Hambletonian purse, $117,117
divided in 1951 when Helicopter
won.
Horsemen gave Diller Hanover
a good chance to win in straight
heatg and perhaps grab the full
potential purse of $73,654 for vic victory,
tory, victory, since he drew post position
two for the first heat.
The possible second prize will
be $30,689 with $12,275 available
for third and $6,137 for fourth, but
the payoff will depend on the
number of heats run and the posi position
tion position of the horse in each heat.
The winner is the first horse to
win two heats and as many as
four heats can be run.
The Diller was expected to get
his best challenge from a pair of
4 to 1 bets. Circo, which Haughton
will drive, and Tie Silk, with
Ralph Baldwin driving.
The only filly in the field, Lady
Belvedere, owned by Armstrong
Brothers, Brampton, Ont. and
driven by Del Miller, was a 10 to
1 darkhorse.
Raoul N. Theriaulf
Freshman Track
Coach At Colorado
Raoul N. Theriault, 52, son of
Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Theriault of
Balboa, has been appointed fresh freshman
man freshman track coach and assistant
varsity coach at the University of
Colorado for the coming year.
Prior to this assignment.
Thereiault enjoyed four years of
outstanding success in Colorado
prep circles.
He attended Cristobaf Higji, the
Canal Zone Junior College and was
graduated from Bradley Universi University
ty University in 1953.

people ane

ujarif-ail
But you don t need
know tha Classified
American are tope

Chipped Finger Bone
Sidelines Bob Turley
NIW YORK, Sept. I-(UPI)-Bob
Turley, the New York Yan Yankees'
kees' Yankees' World Series hero and the
maor leagues' loading pitcher a
year ago, is out of action with a
chipped bone that may sideline
him for the remainder of the
season.
X-rays disclosed last night that
Turley had suffered a chipped
little finger on his right hand and
It was announced that he was
out of action "indefinitely." Tur Turley
ley Turley suffered the Injury Saturday
whll catching a toss from catch catcher
er catcher Yogi Berra.
A 21 -game winner during the
1958 American League season,
Turley won two World Series
games and saved a third but has
Ibeen ineffective this year. He
-has won only eight games and
lost 11 with a 4.47 earned run
average.
GUN CLUB
NOTES
CRISTOBAL
Trap shooters yielded to their
more numerous and more brethen
with preference for skeet at the
Aug. 26 exercises of the Cristobal
Gun Club, and fore went practice
for: the 16-yard National Brewery
Trap Shoot scheduled to be held on
Sunday morning, Sept. 6.
Art Sutton prolonged his grip on
top-spot among the skeeters, .410 .410-ing
ing .410-ing 24 clays in his preliminary
round in spite of structural failures
depriving him of use of his own
weapons, which cracked up under
one, flinging as many parts as pel pellets
lets pellets at the house target.
Joe Kueter, George Lopp, "Doc"
Norris and F. Chollar all broke 22
targets out of their best rounds.
"Nobody" Keller, J. D. Shields
and "Doc" Snyder assisted with
cheerful competition.
Flood-lit skeeting at 7:30 p.m.

'ems the club's agenda for Sept.
2.
Dixie Walker
Resigns As Pilot
Of Toronto Leafs
TORONTO (UPI)-Dixie Walker
resigned as manager of the last last-place
place last-place Toronto Maple Leafs of the
International League Sunday
night, claiming 'it's the worst
year I've had as a manager,
coach or player."
General Manager Rudie Schaf Schaf-fer
fer Schaf-fer said Coach Lou Kahn would
take over the field manager's job
for the balance of the season.
Walker, appointed Maple Leaf
manager in December of 1956,
said he quit because "of a series
of things which finally get you
down to the point where you have
to make a move."
miii
a college degree
to
Ads of Tht Panama
In aelling power.

e9

y LIO H. PETERSIN
CHICAGO, Sept. 1-(UPI)-The
United States was piling up gold
medals at a record pace in the
Pan American Games today.
With 30 championships decided,
U. S. athletes had won 26 of them
and were favored to win most of
the nine on the program for the
fifth day of competition in this
athletic carnival among the na nations
tions nations of the western hemisphere.
Yesterday, led by two Califor Califor-nlans,
nlans, Califor-nlans, Ray Norton of Oakland
and Mrs. Earlono Brown of Los
Angeles, each with a second tri triumph,
umph, triumph, the U.S. won eight of nine
titles decided.
Norton, in world record tying
time for the run around a turn,
won the 200-meter dash to add to
the 100 meter crown he had taken
the previous day. The husky Mrs.
Brown added the shot put cham championship
pionship championship to the discus title she had
won previously. I
This brought the, total U.S. vic victories
tories victories to 16 in the 18 traek and
field events which have been de decided,
cided, decided, and in 12 of them, the U.S.
set new records for the Pan Amer American
ican American Games.
It wasn't only in track and field
that the U.S. was doing well.
It won two more weightlifting
titles Tommy Kono of Honolulu in
the middle weight class and James
George of Akron, Ohio, in the
heavy-middleweight class and two
in the English rifle shooting com competition.
petition. competition. Arthur Cook of Adclphi,
Mo., won the individual title in
that event and the U.S. took the
team championship.
In team competition the U.S..
was doin gokay, too. Its basket basketball
ball basketball teams won their third con consecutive
secutive consecutive games, the men booting
Cuba 114-46 and tho women de defeating
feating defeating Braxll 55-38.
In soccer the U.S. upset Brazil
5-3; in water polo it was the U.S.
8, Brasil 2; in women's volleyball
Puerto Rico was the victim 3-0;
the same score by which the men
beat Puerto Rico.
In boxing, tennis, yachting, mod modern
ern modern pentathlon, and all the other
sports on the agenda, the U.S. was
dominating the picture.
The only gold medal the U.S.
failed to win yesterday was in
women's foil fencing, where 19-year-old
Pilar Roldan of Mexico
defeated 42-year-old Maxine Mitch Mitchell
ell Mitchell of Los Angeles.

Weekend Sports
Summary
Saturday
WASHINGTON, D.C. Barbara
Mclntire of Lake Park, Fla., won
the U. S. Women's Amateur golf
championship 4 and 3 over Jo Joanne
anne Joanne Goodwin of Haverhill, Mass.
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. N.Y.-Tompion,
Tompion, N.Y.-Tompion, a C.V. Whitney colt rid ridden
den ridden by Wilbe Shoemaker, won the
$114,175 Hopeful Stakes at Sara Saratoga.
toga. Saratoga. Vital Force was second and
Bourbon Prince third.
Sunday
MILWAUKEE. Wis. Gene
Littler of Singing Hills, Calif.,
won the $35,000 Miller Open golf
tournament with a 72-hole total of
265.
MANCHESTER, Mass. Ange Angela
la Angela Mortimer of England won the
singles title in the Essex County
Women's Invitation Tennis Tour Tournament
nament Tournament by beating Barbara Green
Weigandt, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3.
MILWAUKEE, Wis. Roger
Ward won the 200-mile auto race
at the Wisconsin State Fair that
claimed the life of Ed Elisian of
Fresno, Calif.
WATERLOO,
Rawls opened a
In the Waterloo
golf tournament.
Iowa Betsy
four-stroke lead
Women's Open

National League
TEAMS
W
73
72
70
70
63
62
61
54
L
58
5
60
62
61
67
72
7
Pet.
.557
.54?
.538
.530
B
San Francisco
Les Angeles
Milwaukee
1
Vi
31
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
.481 10
.481 10
.45 1J
.406 20
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati (N)
Philadelphia at MilursnV. m
St. Louis at Los Angeles (N)
Only games scheduled
Yesterday's Result.
(Night Game)
San Francisco 1
Los Angeleg 5
Only games scheduled
WINS LADIES SINGLES
WENGEN; Switzerland (UPI) (UPI)-Joan
Joan (UPI)-Joan Johnson of Los Angeles
won the ladies singles title in the
Wengen International tenia tour tour-ament
ament tour-ament Sunday by defeating An An-dree
dree An-dree Ore'mfflet of Trance, 6-1, 0-2.

Fraser Hero; Aussies

:ure
FOREST HILLS, N.Y., Sept. 1 1-(UPI)
(UPI) 1-(UPI) Neale Fraser of Australia,
who won the Davis Cup for his
country with an easy conquest of
big Barry MacKay, emerged today
as the favorite for the national sin singles
gles singles tennis championships which
start Friday.
Fraser needed only two sets yes yesterday
terday yesterday to take the cup back to Aus Australia
tralia Australia .adding them to the set he
had won Sunday evening for an 8 8-6,
6, 8-6, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4,'Victory over Mac Mac-Kay.
Kay. Mac-Kay. It gave the Aussies -the de deciding
ciding deciding point in a 3-2 triumph over
the United States.
"This will be known as 'Pra 'Pra-sor's
sor's 'Pra-sor's Davis Cup.'" said tho non non-playing
playing non-playing Aussie captain, Harry
Hopman. "He won both his sin singles
gles singles and shares in tho doubles.
You can't do any better."
Fraser, at 25 a veteran of seven
years of international tennis, slow slowed
ed slowed his service somewhat from his
Sunday pace; and gained in accur accuracy.
acy. accuracy. MacKay, a six-foot, three three-inch,
inch, three-inch, 185-pounder, relied as usual
on his power game and his big
serve failed him;
The Dayton, Ohio, slugger was
broken twice in yesterday's first
set, as he contributed three dou dou-blefaults
blefaults dou-blefaults in the first break and two
in the other. He was broken again
in the 10th game of the last set
and again hurt himself with a dou dou-blefault.
blefault. dou-blefault. By STEVE SNIDER
FOREST HHXS, N.Y. (UPI) -Left-handed
Neale Fraser, 25-year-old
strong man of an underrated
team from Down Under, regained
the Davis Cup for Australia yes yesterday
terday yesterday by slashing his way to an
8-6. 3-6, 6-2, 6-4 victory, over Air
man B. MacKay of Dayton, Ohio,
in a playoff of the final match in
the bitterly contested challenge
round halted by darkness Sunday.
All square with MacKay at one
set each when fading light inter interrupted
rupted interrupted their vital fifth match on
Sunday, Fraser clinched the Cup
for the underdog Aussies, 3-2, by
attacking continually with his
twisting, wild hopping service
and winning crucial games on
MacKay's double faults. Fraser
thus figured in all three points
won by the Australians two in
singles and one in doubles.
The victory was the 15th for
Australia in Davis Cup play and
the 13th in 25 challenge round
tests agairtst the United States.
PLAY DELAYED BY RAIN
Play was delayed 45 minirs hy
rain at the- start Monday but
neither player appeared nervous
under the mounting pressure.
They battled confidently on the
slippery turf after donning smkea
shoes in the eighth game of the
day's first set.
It was a tremendous personal
triumph for Fraser, whose par
ents traveled the 10,000 mues
from Australia to sit in at the fin finish
ish finish with a sparce gallery of 4.000.
On Friday, Fraser humbled
Alex Olmedo of Peru in four sets
and Saturday he teamed wifh Roy
Emerson to sweep the doubles in
straight sets from Olmedo and 18-vear-old
Earl (Butch) Buchholz of
St. Louis.
MacKay and Olmedo scored the
two U.S. points by whipping 21-year-old
Rod Laver in singles.
Aftef Olmedo, surprise star of the
1958 Cup victory in Australia last
December, had kept American
hopes alive Sunday with a mara marathon,
thon, marathon, four-set victory over Laver
for a 2-2 deadlock, the defense of
the huge international tennis tro tro-tihy
tihy tro-tihy then was olaced squarely in
MacKay's hands.
FOUGHT TO STANDSTILL
MacKay, humiliated twice by

Recapl

American League

' tcttx4erfl
jf wciieiuacjysBftsj

TEAMS
Chicago
Cleveland
Detroit
New Yet
Baltimore
Boston
Kansas City
Washington
W L Pet. Ol
M 4 .62S-"

75 55 .577 JVfc" "V

65
64
61
62
59
52
65

.500 in"""

66

.492 16Vi "'

66
69
70
.480 18

.473 1a,.J.y-.
.457 21
.400 28Vh i

71
Today's Games
Washington at Boston
Kansas City at Cleveland (N)
Detroit at Chicago (N)
Only games scheduled.
Yesterday's Results
(Night Game)
New York at Baltimore
(Postponed, rain)
(Night Oame)
Washington 100 010 010 e It
Boston 000 800 000 14 10 1
Fischer, Griggs, Woodeschiek, Woodeschiek,-Hyde,
Hyde, Woodeschiek,-Hyde, Stobbs (1-8) and Courtney,
Korcheck.
Monbouquette, Fornieles (4-tT"
and White.
Only games scheduled.
Davis Cup
rn
4.:
Aussie cuppers Mai Anderson t&i -Ashley
Cooper in last yearY chal challenge
lenge challenge round, fought Fraser to a
standstill Sunday, losing one set
andwinning one before darkness
cut them short.
But yesterday, Us 24th birthday birthday-Barry's
Barry's birthday-Barry's big service let him dowffi
Ha committed three double-faultg
L VXh 8Im of the W V"
the first Monday, and was broken
uuuugu. ne aouwe-faulted rwir-o
"a uiunen a
Fraser at 6-2
give it
i!hln' ln. Wcal fourth set, -MacKsy.
had trouble getting Mi
fi.rVerSlce ,nt0 Ply while trail- ...
mgirS. Fraser. moving in sharply
on the gecond service, forced Bar-
ry into netted errors for the final
wo points and the Cup went over
to Australia after only a year's;
stay in the. United State..
Playground

Sports i S
TUMBLING
Since time does note permit atiV -further
tmbling classed Aug 26
H" tlJ"v CMltet on all''" 1
Thr,tfgLhis """""i--
14) anrt o! th af.8P XO-
Mn(t!:9) have tearDed
Jhesf re the girls in Uie.aMV"--'
first, Susan Lessiack second Clau Claudia
dia Claudia Doyle third. In the (6-9) group
Smith second and Pam Groz thirl W U
for the best attendance: Pat I'
n,?,am nrst,' Jackie Lovelady ancH
Claudia Doyle tied for second'-'
Hamet Smith first, Jeanette Mo Morales
rales Morales and Vicky Vivkers tied for
second.

.Tf e g,ls wreL graded bv t point
system in which the stunts are
graded as excellent (4pt..) good 4
(3Pt fair (2pt.)( poor (lpt ) 2d-'--ternble
(0). No one got beiow'i
3?.' "52,lhe highest "ore--':
was 39 and the lowest score was
All in all it can be said that Ms -years
tumbling class has beeira
success. The girls are eagerly vl. ,-.

.u.K i0r next year's tumbling
class.
Buffalo Reduces
Magic Number'
In I.L To Two

NEW YORK, Sept. l (UPI)-""""
The Buffalo Bisons' "magic num-' ;; :
ber" for clinching the Interna-"'
tional League pennant was reduc-"'"
ed to two today. "VT
Any combination of Buffalo vie-'"'"
tories or Columbus losses adding"
to two will give the Bisons thel?""""
first league pennant since 1949.
The Bisons moved closer to the""",
clincher by handing the Montreal'
Royals a 4-1 beating last night 68" nt L
hind the five-hit pitching of Art
Mahaffey. t ''IT
The second-place Jets, who trail
Buffalo by seven and onehtdL"
games, beat the third-Dlace Hava-,
na Sugar Kings, 4-2, to delay the.,
clincher a little longer. Buffalo hftj'i',,
eight games left to play while the -Jets
have nine.

The Toronto Maple ?,eafs beatYi.
the Rochester Red Wings, 15, ahVf V

me Miami juanins downed tpe
Richmond Virginians, It, in ether,.
games.
O ' '.' ;

'!"

.r.tl
...at..

hi f

4(



TUCS9AT, gcrmnnt 1, 1959

THf PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEk
PAGE SSVIN
ose Matches Feature Dunlop tournament's Opening Round
lilipip
Field Cut To
32 At Panama
HOOFBEATS
By Conrado Soigeant
Four Roses

a

FEATtHE RACE WINNERS Joejcey Virgilio Ca stillo begins to ease up on the reins as El Tunchi
approaches the finish line with a one" and one-half- length lead over Double Four in Sunday's featured
1,000 iven furloni sprint for first and second se ries racers at the President Remon racetrack. He He-loderft
loderft He-loderft Gustines rede Double Four.

by
JOE WILLIAMS

' One of the points raised at the
Cotenorg Cauliflower Congress
had to do with customer reac reaction:
tion: reaction: If the lngemar Johansson Johansson-Floyd
Floyd Johansson-Floyd Patterson rematch were
deferred until next summer,
wouldn't there be a sharp lei lei-down
down lei-down ip public interest?
Jack Dempsey, who had been
brought, Along to lend a pro touch
to the amateur American delega delegation,
tion, delegation, and possibly be-dazzle the
Swedish titleholder, argued to
the Contrary. A year had elapsed
between his two battles with
Gene Tunney, yet the rematch
did $701,000 more businesi l-n
the orialnal.
True. But in the meantime
Dempsey had stopped Jack Shark
ey, and though palpably low
blow! and a remarkably tolerant
referee compromised the victory,
nevertheless it fanned a new en
thusiasm tor the bobbing, weav weaving
ing weaving man who was known as Tne
Killer.
Whether- the rematch would
have still packed Chicago's mas mas-ive
ive mas-ive Soldier Field, even if Demp Demp-aey
aey Demp-aey hadn't managed a degree of
rehabilitation and thus sparked
new confidence among his loyal loyalists,
ists, loyalists, who can say? In any case,
the rematch drew $2,658,000, still
a record after 32 years.
Actually, a later date for the
Johansson-Patterson re-match fi figures
gures figures to increase rather than

I -decrease fan interest since it

Vily the baiiynoo department
$re time to refashion the peek peek-jTNrfSjtoo
jTNrfSjtoo peek-jTNrfSjtoo power into a murderous

tnreai, a cnauenge yeime wium
mere finite ingenuity and imagi imagination
nation imagination must surely cringe, yet
one which is not likely to fail
thanks to the ring saps limitless
capacity for punishment and gullibility.-.
Certainly there .is no logical
Justification for a rematch Pat Patterson
terson Patterson came completely and ins instantly
tantly instantly undone the first time the
Swede landed a reasonably stout
blow and was exposed for all to
aee as a china chin specimen
who couldn't take a punch. That
vulnerability was ether suspect suspected.
ed. suspected. Even so, it was startling to
fi- it went so deep and was so
total.
DUCKED THE TOUCHIES
If prize fighting were conduct conducted
ed conducted on sporting principles even
normal reasoning SVatterson
would be forced to earn hisnght,
to another shot at the champion champion-thin.
thin. champion-thin. In an interim match with a
ranking heavyweight. Winning,
then be deemed to have qualifi

ed; losing, he would have clearly
revealed his unfitnes.
And before you ask. "What
ranking heavyweight?" let it be
pointed out there are several urn urn-ly
ly urn-ly boys around whom Cus DA
mato, Patterson' manager, has
studiously avoiaed on one pre
text or anotner.
Our estimate of Patterson all
alon has been that he is no more
than the best of a very ordina ordinary
ry ordinary American group. Watching him
against the Swede, we wondered
if we hadn't been much too cha charitable.
ritable. charitable. He may not even be the
best of the worst.
How do we know whether they
can take Eddie Machen, Zora
Folley or Sonny Liston particu particularly
larly particularly Liston? D'Amato must have
had good reason for putting him
in with the likes of Radamacher,
Cut 'N Shoot and London. .
And it could be precisely the
same reason that prompted him
to keep Patterson away from the
o. hers namely, he didn't want to
get him whipped."
Well, if that's so, how come he
worth, we have Bill Roaenshon's
word that D'Amato was contempt contemptuous
uous contemptuous of Johansson. ."When
I told him I was flying to Sweden
o sign lngemar if he beat Machen,
D'Amato laughed advised me to
save my money and predicted
Machen would win in a breeze."
REWARD FOR FAILURE
As has been noted, even Demp Dempsey,
sey, Dempsey, an all-time great' by any
yardstick, had to qualify for a
Tunney rematch. All Patterson
has to do, however, is show up,
and if the fight is anything like
the first one, it'll last just long
enough for him to count the
house and fetch a truck to bank
the loot.
The ballyhoo theme will no
doubt stress the fact that Peek
a-Boo survived six knockdowns
before referee Ruby Goldstein
stopped it. That would serve to
point up his, courage which
can easily be mistaken for reflex
action) and at the same time
inferenlially disparage the Swede's
hitting power.
The battlers won't be in train training
ing training a week before D'Amato will be
insisting (1) that it was a lucky lucky-punch,
punch, lucky-punch, (2) that the oftener Peek-a-Boo
went down the stronger he
got and, finally, (3) that Gold Goldstein
stein Goldstein was on Jim Norris' payroll
and that's why he slopped the
fight. . And by fight time the
ring worms will have forgotten
how utterly hopeftss ant help helpless
less helpless Patterson was on the rain rain-splashed
splashed rain-splashed June night in Yankee
Stadium.

Swim Meet Held Amid
Chattering Jack-Hammers

This week the Swimmers at the
Balboa swimming pool ran com competition
petition competition with Jack-hammers, big
aammtH, U.tle hammers and ce cement
ment cement mixers. Tie swimmers all
proved they had good ears as
well as rjni and legs, fo hear the
ata-tin" pistol over Jihe contrac contractor's
tor's contractor's Staccato in D Minor. Reno Reno-vation
vation Reno-vation and swimming were played
in the same key all loud.
The Valiant and brave swim swimmers
mers swimmers who placed first, second and
third this week were:
Year Old Girls Sheila Chi Chi-iolm
iolm Chi-iolm 5 points.
7 and 8 Year Old Boys Sieve
Townstnd 20 points
7 and 8 Year Old Girls Gwen
Doyle V 20 points
and 20 Year Old Boys Dun Dun-ran
ran Dun-ran Summerford 18 points, Jody
Summerford 16 points, Jerry
Chisolm, 8 pints
8 and 10 Year Old Girls Jane
Wilson IV 20 points. Katy Gibbins
10 points, Mary Thompson 10
points, Pat Hannigan a points
11 and 12 Year Old Boys-Roark
Summerford 15 points, Duke
Wilson 14 points, Stewart Brown
12 points.
ii .nri 12 Year Old Girls Vi

vian Kosan 16 points, Pat Bash-

am HJrolnU, Claudia Doyle iu
points.
13 and 14 Year Old Boys Garth
Feeney 20 points, Paul Chisolm
point; Paul Starr 9 point.
13 and 14 Year Old Girli Mag Mag-lie
lie Mag-lie Mdhoney 20 points', Jane
Unlsartnn 14 nnints.

The winner 01 ine riDDons irom

ombined points ol tne two

are:
nit' under fiirls Sheila Chi

ld m H pointl.
T and"! Year Old Boyi Bruce

McElhenny 20 points, Steven
Townsend 20 points, Ricky Line Line-back
back Line-back 3 points
7 and 8 Year Old Girls Gwen
Doyle ,40 points, Markza 12
points
9 and 10 Year Old Boys Dun Duncan
can Duncan oummeriord 38 points, jooy
jummei'ioru u0 points jerry
iiisoiin 10 points
and 10 rar old Girls jane
Wilson 40 points, Mary inompson
.4 points, ivaty Giboons lb points
It anu icar Otc coys, Koaik
Summerford 35 poinrc, Duke Wil Wilson
son Wilson 'It points, Stewari Brown 19

joints

The wu

WJee.s'.r
0 amt'i

5irhi -'

ll and 12 Year Old Girli Vivian

Kosan 34 points, Pat Basham .A
points, Claudia Doyle 17 points.
13 and 14 Year Old Boys. Garth
Feeney 35 poin.s, Paul Chisolm
15 points, Paul Starr 9 points
13 and 14 Year Old Girls Mag Maggie
gie Maggie Mahoncy 40 points, Jane Hol Hol-gerson
gerson Hol-gerson 26 points
15 and 16 Year Old Girl Dan Dan-idle
idle Dan-idle Harned IS" points
Come join us at tte pool. We're
having a lot of fun. What other
pool offers you hot only competi competition
tion competition with other swimmers but
competition with cement mixers
and jack-hammers too.

AMERICANS WHIP AUSSIES
THE HAGUE, Holland (UPD (UPD-Tony
Tony (UPD-Tony Trabrt of Cincinnati and
Pancho Segura of Los Angeles
scored victories Sunday over Aus Aus-.ralian
.ralian Aus-.ralian opponents in Jack Kra Kramer's
mer's Kramer's professional tennis tourna tournament
ment tournament here. Trabert beat Lew
Hoad, 6-2, 0-4, and Segura downed
Ashley Cooper, 6 3, 6-1.

JOE NOTTER'S famous ride on
unbeaten Colin in the Lclmont
S.kes years ago is still a con conversation
versation conversation piece among real old old-timers
timers old-timers at race tracks.
Colin seemed to be winning
handily from his arch rival Fair
Play when suddenly the distance
between them began to shorten
and Notter's mount kept his un undefeated
defeated undefeated record by a short neck.
Some argued that the race
showed Colin lacked stamina
and others claimed Nolter had
taken up at the wron finishing
post, Belmont having two on the
same course in those days. Not Notter's
ter's Notter's version was that he did
not mistake the post.
"I was taking Colin up delib deliberately,"
erately," deliberately," he explained. "I
thought I had the race won." he
said.
A rehash of the affair remind reminded
ed reminded trainer Monig Dixon of the
time he chided one of iiis riders
for drawing a finish too fine with
a horse (mat could have won by
lenaths.
"Gee, Mr. Dixon," said the
jockey remorsefully. "I though!
you got the same purse whether
you won by nose or six
lengths."
"You do," replied Dixon, "but
when the margin's wider, the
trainer lives longer."

Field & Stream

POOR DUCK SEASON
AHEAD
By WARREN PAGE
WHEN the ace ornithologist of
the Canadian Wildlife Service fi figures
gures figures that drought-striken Sas Saskatchewan
katchewan Saskatchewan will produce only 20
per, cent as many young ducks as
it did last year, the water-fowler's
life is going to be no bowl of
cherries this fall.
This despite the fact that Al Alberta
berta Alberta is running better because
its network of Ducks Unlimited
marshes has helped the puddlers
tremendously.
United States prairie sections
have been dry a' the wrong time,
too. The Sand Lake are of
South Dakota had from two to
four times as many gadwall and
mallards on its 2,500 acres ol
natural marsh and 200 man man-made
made man-made potholes, but these came
to the refuge from dried out
breeding grounds, and most of
the Sand Lake pptholes were
sun-baked mud before broods
could be started.
Marshland breeding areas in
the extreme north have stayed
wet during the breeding season,
but many of the birds who mov moved
ed moved up out of the drought areas
arrived too late, found condi conditions
tions conditions too crowded or strange to
reproduce normally.
5f., United States Fish nd
Wildlife Service attitude before
any season is likely to be gloom gloomier
ier gloomier than that of Dukes Unlim Unlimited
ited Unlimited executives. So when the DU
boys talks of the possibility of
seasons cut to 50 instead of 60
days and the chance' of further
restrictions as to limits on can can-vasbacks
vasbacks can-vasbacks and redheads, the
handwriting is on the wall.
It profits us little to set aside
vast acreages of marshland witn witn-nj
nj witn-nj (he U. S. to erve as feeding feeding-maces
maces feeding-maces and itnn-nffa Inr Ik ;

grating birds, if birds aren't

proviqeci to populate ttiose acre acreages.
ages. acreages. They can be provided most
efficiently only by insuring
breeding waters in the Canadian
prairie provinces, building more
prairie provinces, building more
dams and creating more marshes
and potholes where young start.
We annually spend up there,
through Ducks Unlimited, a con considerable
siderable considerable wad of dollars. We
need to spend more if we're go going
ing going to keep duck-shooting worth worthwhile
while worthwhile under present gunning
pressures.

smY
w
Ttm

By TID WIUBIR
Close scores featured the play
in the opining round of the 1959
Dunlop Golf Championship which
started this past weekend at the
Panama Golf Club.
With the 113 entries in the quali qualifying
fying qualifying screened down to the 32 in
each of two men's flights and one
women's flight, 40 players came
ou: victorious despite the sloppy

course.

In the championship flight Tom Tommy
my Tommy Jacks barely got by 'Abuelo"

Chandeck by the score of 2 and
1. Pat Moran, recent winner of the
new Cafe Duran tourney, won over

Lul Arango by the same score.

frank mum ice, in a maun unan
it looked, knocked out Roy Glick-

enhaus, medalist ki the champion-

srip flight, by the score of 2 and

1.

Jim Hinkle caught a tiger by
ihe tail in Roberto Torres and
managed to squeak in with a 1 up

victory. In another close match,
punctuated by superb putting, Dr.
Earl Gerrans ran over Don Eras Eras-mo
mo Eras-mo de la Guardia 3 and 2.

Sheriff" Kincaid was extended

to 27 holes by Colonel Shead in an
extremely close match which
found them even after the regula-

lion 18. Kincaid lound the range
first, and won by 1 up afier 27.

Shead, a newcomer, is expected

to tour the Panama course in fu future
ture future matches with much greater

ease. Dick Dehlinger, playing

well, defeated Dr. J. J. Massot 2

and 1.

Several matches were recorded

by default in the championship

flight. This found "Skip" Bab

winner over Jim Riley; Art Hurr
over Jaime de la Guardia; Ted

WUber over Rey Valdes; Brack

Hauler over Jorge Paz Rodri Rodriguez;
guez; Rodriguez; Louis Marttnz over Pico
Diaz, and Morric Muller over J.
J. Vallarino, Jr.

Most of these matches were de

faulted due to early departures
fur business trips out f Panama,
and business reasons.

DR. TAPIA WINS IN 34
In the first flight. Dr. Tapia and'

Colonel Bob Drum of Albrook
wound up in a fantastic hassle

which found them even after 18,

and it took an additional 18 for
Tapia to come out on top 1 up

af.er 36.
In another close match which
was even after the regulation 18
holes, Davis defeated Chick Kline

4 and 3 after 27.

Lalo Arango won over Carlos
OriMac 4 and 2 in another match,
which also found Jack Mercer
winner over Rupp 1 up; Guiller Guiller-mo.
mo. Guiller-mo. Cruz over Baldwin 2 up; J.
Garces over Octavio Arias 7 and

6.

Young Ernesto Jaen Guardia

defeated Hank Kascher 4 and 2;

Bob Jarrell won over Roberto Ale Ale-man
man Ale-man 2 up, and Jack Anderson de defeated
feated defeated Tim Woodruff 2 and 1.
Mullin defeated Harry Willis 3
and 2 in a close match and Pablo

Abad found the wet course to his

likfng over Col. Mark Mooty by

the score of 1 up after 18.

In other matches in the men s

first flight, Charlie Vandergrift
won by default over Carrizzo:

Busky defeated Geoff Lee 5 and

4: Mike Maduro won over Bob

Chandler 2 and 1; Randall defeat

ed Stan Fidanque- 5 and 3, and
Jorge Boyd squeaked by Kiki de
la Ossa.

ALYCE FRENCH WINS
In the ladies's competition, me

dalist Alyce French defeated Fran
Twomey 2 up after 18. Mrs. Hurr

took a marathon 36 holes to come
out ahead of Mrs. Dease by the
same score, while Kay Purdy had
an easy time with Alice Mooty 7
and 5. Mrs. Mooty, enjoying her
first Isthmian tournament, will
give some of the ladies some
trouble after becoming accustom accustomed
ed accustomed to the Panama layout.
Connie Bishop flipped into the
second round by default over Va Va-llarino,
llarino, Va-llarino, and Kelsey Garces won
over Helen Baird 6 and 5. Jane
Sullivan won 2 up over Stempel,
and Helen Sliker defeated Virgi Virginia
nia Virginia Lamning 1 up.
In the final match in the ladies'
flight. Pat Waring defeated Phil Phil-lis
lis Phil-lis Mansfield 1 up in a close
match.

A brazen exhibition of loul rid rid-.g
.g rid-.g in Sunday's sixth race by Vi Vicente
cente Vicente Ortega, earned him an in indefinite
definite indefinite suspension from the Pres President
ident President Remon Racetrack.
The stewards, who meted ou' the
suspension, also recom-nended to
the Panama Gambling Control
Board that Ortega be barred for
life.
Vespucio, ridden by Ortega,
changed his course repeatedly
from start to finish. He fouMd mu
tuels favorite Abolengo at least
twice, Tarasca twice and High
Day once.
. Jockeys Braulio Baeza, Heliodo Heliodo-ro
ro Heliodo-ro Gustines and Hernani Mora,
who rode Abolengo, Tarasca and
High Day, respectively, all actus
ed Ortega. The patrol judges and
a stewards' assistant also verified
the foul claims.
At a result, Vespucio was dis disqualified
qualified disqualified and placed fourth be behind
hind behind Abolengo, Tarasca and High
Day. The track's veterinarian
also Informed that High Day
finished lame, probably because
of his being bumped by Vespucio.
oOo
Parasol, Cindertrack, snd Sec

ona uup eaen got is-tiay suspen suspensions?
sions? suspensions? Second Cup bled Irom boih
nostrils after winning Saturday's
sixth race while Parasol and Cln
dertrack finished lame in th?
ninth race on Sunday. ;j.irasol
won the race. Pancho Lonpz also
got 15 days when he was i'ound to
be lame ater the fifth race on
Saturday.
Big Sun and Madame Cueu were
scratched by the track's veterina veterinarian.
rian. veterinarian. Big Sun had a swelling nn
the left side of his neck while Ma Madame
dame Madame Cucu had an inflamed right

Lforeleg ankle.

Stavro, which refused to start in
Sunday's second race, was set
down indefinitely and placed un under
der under orders of the Panama Gaui-

Ibling Control Board.

Newcomer Maracalbo, making
his second start, was unusually
fractious at the starting line before
the race and was almost unman unmanageable
ageable unmanageable after getting away to a
good start. Jockey Ruben Vasquez
finally had to pull up the native
colt in Sunday's fourth race.
The stewards ruled that Mara Mara-caibo
caibo Mara-caibo Is still too green and sus

pended him indefinitely until the
track manager reports In a; the
colt is completely broken and lit
tor racing.
Jorge Phillips, who traveled to
Mexico City Friday, got four four-meet
meet four-meet suspension for not showing
up to ride Met Fierro in Sun Sunday's
day's Sunday's fifth race.
oOo
Betting continued to drop at the
President Remon racetrack. Last
weekend only $115,614 wen v .i
cered $54,691 on Saturday and
$60,923 on Sunday.
oOo
The Panama American's selec

tor won the monthly tipsters' con contest
test contest for the month of August with
a total of 3G7 points as compared
to 352 for La Estrclla's Donald
Vincent. Roberto Maduro of L; i
Fi ja finished deadlocked ir third
olace with Joseph R. Wehb of j
Mundd Grafico with 337 each.
oOo
Six three and four-year-old fil
lies were nominated for the Sent
?0 2.500 added one mile Republic
20 $2,500 added one mile Remibii' Remibii'-lliia
lliia Remibii'-lliia entered Palave and Hermcli
na, the Stud Limarx will be rep represented
resented represented by the duo of Miss Bru
nette and Atrayente, the Stud "in"

by Ncbrisca and Second Cun will
sport Stanley Lawrence's colors
Second Cud will carry the top top-weight
weight top-weight of 122 pounds. Palave,
Hermelina and Nebrisca have
each been assigned 120 whil
Miss Brunette and Atrayente will
tote 106 each. Miss Brunette nnd
Atrayente are three-vear-olds,
the others four-year-olds.
oOo
Braulio Baeza's seven victories
over the weekend moved him into J
slim lead over arch-rival Gustines
in the second semester iocky cm
test. Baeza now has 55 victories
while Gustines, who scored five
wins, also has a total of 55 but one
of (hem is a deadheat. His dead
heat triumph is rated only a half
victory, hence a total of hiu2.

Kentucky Straight Bourbon

That
old-time
flavor
is back

FOUR ROSES DISTILLERS COMPANY, N.Y.C. KENTUCKY
STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY 86 PROOF AGED 6 YEARS

EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS:
CYRCA, S. A.

PANAMA

COLON

Read Our Classifieds

t

THE AIR-CONDITIONED

COOLING REFRtsHING MASCULINE

be comfortable anytime
in the humid tropk heat

Use AGUA GLACIAL regularly

Its agreeable scent will
please YOU and your friends.
Large Bottle ()

Coco Solo Pool
For Cleaning
To Be Closed
The Coco Solo swimming pool

will be closed all day tomorrow

and Thursday, Sept. 3, for clean cleaning
ing cleaning and trim painting. The pool
will reopen at 9 a.m. Friday.
Meanwhile, preparations are un
rter iv fnr thp sernnd annual At

lantic Side Invitational Swimming
Meet to be held at the Coco Solo
pool on Labor Day, next Monday.
Swimmers and spectators from

il over tre istnmus win anenn

le meet.
The pool'' regular hours are
m In I n m risilv. exrent for

Vnndavs and Wednesday's when 11

remains open until 9 p.m.

5 -T.-rs h.tunC

Arthrltu, smnui, """'" """'"-iilf,
iilf, """'"-iilf, etlff mueelte nd iwoll
Jolnti make yeu mUjrable,
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once KOMIND quickly brlnM fn fn-Utlc
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Drive now... Pay later 1



TUESDAY, MPTEMBEfci,

PAG I EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NIWSPAPEB
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
AGENTS:
Phone Panama 2-0740 for
information about Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Charge your ad if
von hae a commercial
contract
Classified Pace close 11:30
a.m. Mon. to Fri., 11 a.m.
Sat., t pjn. gat for Bun.
Office open C-l weekday-
LEAVE YOCTB AD WITH ONE OP OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 1J-I7 "H" RTrtr ET, PANAMA LIBREMA PRECIADO I Street Me. AGENCIAB
INTERNAL. DB PLBL1CACIONES No. 3 Lottery Plan CASA ZALDO Central Ave. 45 LOTJKOE8 PHARMACY 12 La CarrasqnUla FARMACIA LOM LOM-BARDO
BARDO LOM-BARDO No. 26 "B" Street MORRISON 4th of Jul; Ave A J St LEWIS SERVICE Ave. Tivoli No. 4 FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS 149 Ceatral Ave.
a FARMACIA LUX 164 Central Ave HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J Fee. de la Osaa Ave. No. 4 FOTO DOMY-Jtuto Anwemena Ave and S3 St. a FAR FARMACIA
MACIA FARMACIA VAN DER JIS SU Street No 53 FARMACIA EL BATURRO Parque Lefevre 1 Street FARMACIA "SAS" Via Pwrraj 1U NOVkllADES ATH1S
Beside Bella Vista Theatre and Branch at Minimal Super Market on Via Espafta a COLON OFFICE: 15th and Amador Guerrero No. 142Z1 Tel. 43Z.

Resorts

PHILLIPS Oeeenside Cortapes
Santa Clare R. 4a P. Phono Pa Panama
nama Panama -877 Cristobal -1 673
otter's cottages, n a a r Santa
Clara. Reasonable ratal. Phone
Balboa 1866.
Houses
FOR RENT: Beautiful resi residence,
dence, residence, in Coco del Mar, two bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, two bathrooms, living living-room,
room, living-room, diningroom, large kitchen,
laundry, maid'i room and bath bathroom,
room, bathroom, porch, terrace, garage and
good siie yard. Phone 3-6307.
Panama.
FOR RENT: Two chalets, fur furnished,
nished, furnished, ending of 48 Street, on
the left. No 25 Bella Vista.
Phone 3-1 863 Two bedrooms,
living-dining room, kitchen,
bathroom, porch.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Office space,
Mercedes building, above Aveni Aveni-da
da Aveni-da Balboa's Post Office, with
condition, good tirer. good paint
private bathroom, waKhm"'
very raonable rent. Tel. 3-3054
Rooms
Furnished room. Private entrance
bathroom at Bellavirta 48th St.,
No. 49-141, Call 2-3778 -S3.
00.
TOR RENT: Rooms $20 00;
$25 00 per month. Apartment!
$30.00. Phone 3-0850, 2-1508.
Employment
Opportunities
NEEDED: Expert operator for
pantt and shirts, air presses, Pa Panama
nama Panama Steam Laundry, Ave. National,

Commercial Guide

ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
I j. iu Mit fl.85 ner col. inch

Mai umij w
FOR INFORMATION
Canal Zone Society For
The Prevention Of Cruelty
To Animals
Box 246, Balhoa, C. Z.
Phone: Curundu 5113
The following annlmals at the ( o -rozal
Veterinary Hospital need rood
homes:
1 Male yellow oat, larre. excep exceptionally
tionally exceptionally handsome and gentle
1 Male black kitten
1 Male hlack and white kitten
1 Male black dog, ahort haired,
terrier type
FOR THE FOLLOWING ( ALL THE
ABOVE PHONE NUMBER:
1 Femalr Dalmatian, spayed, thor thoroughbred,
oughbred, thoroughbred, deaf, 3 jn. old
1 Male shaggy dog, medium sire,
f yrs. old
I Kittens, 1 malr. J female, black
Jnd white, 2 mos. old
emale cat, black and white, 1
yrs, old.
Sl'PPORT YOUR SPCA.
YOU NEED IT. IT NEEDS YOl'.
GIBRALTAR LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Jim Ridge
Harry Cornell
Davis Stevenson
Box E Diablo, ( Z.
Telephone Pan. 2-0552

f i.Wfvmlmm!t W i i. ii... lie

"But I just talked to the Mitchell Company.
They say if we want our car air conditioned,
we have to go through our Mark IV dealer."
GUAKIHA & CI A. S. A.
Tel. 3 7225 P.xt. 8 Panama City

Apartments

FOR RENT: Three bedroom
apartment. Maid's room. Hot
water Garage. Paitilla. Phone 3 3-2279.
2279. 3-2279. $50 00 furnished apartment.
Norrhamerican neighbors Fre Fre-quentl
quentl Fre-quentl transportation. Yard. Tel.
3-0471.
FOR RENT: Modern one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, dining and liv living
ing living room, kitchen, balcony, gar garage,
age, garage, room for maid, etc $75.
Via Argentina Tel. 3-4994.
FOR RENT: Very cool and
comfortable one bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, San Francisco. Phone 3-
5024.
WANTED: Furnished house in
Golf Heights, at least three bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, from September 28. Be Between
tween Between $250 and $300. Amer American
ican American family. Prefer 4 month lease.
Call 3-4719 during office hours
FOR RENT: Beautiful large
apartment occupying entire floor,
Best residential area, three bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, master bedroom air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, with private porch, two
bath, maid's room and bath, large
porch, large livingroom, dining
room, pantry, kitchen, dinette,
laundry facilities, closed garage.
Phone 2-1 538, during office
hours.
FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, garage. Bella Vista.
$75.00. Phone 3-1917.
FOR RENT: Apartment at Via
Porras No. 64, on the riqht fac facing
ing facing Eden Theatre. Living-dining
room, bedroom, porch. Phone 3 3-1
1 3-1 863.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE: 1952 ARIEL twni
500 e.c, $225. Phone Brooks
Claxton, Panamb 3-3493.
Animals
FOR SALE One female Boston
Terrier Toy bull puppy, four
months old. Call Navy 3986.
I --
CALL 20740
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
We Certify
RADIO and TV
SE RVICE
W certify quolily parti cmd ervke
. fair chargtM.
Orff
TROPELCO
ll.'M.I ( MS
TKOPKIXO, S. A.
Tel. 3-7489

Automobiles

FOR SALE: 57 For V-8. 500,
two door, hard top, radio, tutone,
$1,300.00. Phone 3-2953.
FOR SALE: Mercury Hardtop
coupe 1955, loaded, duty paid,
eye it and try it at 5281 -A,
Morrison St. Diablo. 2-3654.
FOR SALE: Cadillac sedan '51,
$500. Hillman Minx convertible,
$250. Both good condition. Tel.
Gamboa 605.
CUSTOMERS WANTED NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
Nrw mattresses 6 50 Springs
12.50. Metal Double Beds with
Spring 19 00. China Closets
15 00 New Cacas Cost 5 50.
Hollywood Beds w 'o mattress
15 00 Chrome Dinette Set 'Only
Onel 45 00 Brand New 5 pc.
Dinette Sets 89.00. Mahogany 5
pc Dining Room Suites from
59 00 A Thousand Other Bar Bargains
gains Bargains in New & Used Articles
Cash or Credit We Deliver.
HX Household Exchange HX 41
Auto Row. Call 3-4911 or 3 3-7348
7348 3-7348 We Buy Your Old Fur Furniture
niture Furniture FOR SALE: Ford, 9 passenger,
Country Sedan, 1954, V-8,
standard shift, perfect condition,
recently overhauled, good tires.
House 2426, telephone Balboa
2914.
FOR SALE: Good transporta transportation.
tion. transportation. 1948 Super Buick, 4-door
sedan Single owner. Excellent
condition. Telephone 3-6794.
Wanted
WANTED: Two bedroom house
with yard, centrally located be between
tween between San Francisco and Canal
Zone School. Near bus line.
Reasonable rent. By Northamer Northamerican
ican Northamerican couple with two daughers.
Call 2-4437.
WANTED: Used small Euro European
pean European car, in excellent condition.
Will pay cash. Call Panama 3 3-4528.
4528. 3-4528. WANTED TO BUY: Used elec electric
tric electric calculator. Box 2005, Bal Balboa,
boa, Balboa, phone C. Z. 2-3288.

Solon Proposes Govt. Grants
For Fallout Shelter Program

WASHINGTON (UPH Sen. Hu Hubert
bert Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Minn.) pro proposed
posed proposed today that the government
start making grants to states
and communities to finance a
"realistic" program of fallout
shelters against nuclear attack.
His statement prepared for Sen Senate
ate Senate delivery followed release of a
congressional subcommittee's re report
port report describing the American peo people
ple people a being in a state of "total
unreadiness" to survive an atomic
war.
The special atomic energy sub subcommittee
committee subcommittee said the lack of pre preparedness
paredness preparedness threatens to undermine
the nation's ability to resist "pos "possible
sible "possible Soviet 'nuclear blackmail'
Humphrey said America nev never
er never will have adequate protection
against atomic attack if the gov government
ernment government "is content with a volun voluntary,
tary, voluntary, do-it yourself shelter-building
program."
He said individuals could not be
expected to take the program ser seriously
iously seriously when the federal govern government
ment government does not require shelters in
ils own buildings.
"Even a limited to intermedi intermediate
ate intermediate range nuclear attack on the
United States would now result in
deaths of at least 50 million Amer Americansmost
icansmost Americansmost of them radiation cas casualties,"
ualties," casualties," Humphrey declared. The
potential death toll would be cut
by missions with adequate shel shelters,
ters, shelters, he said.
The subcommittee published ex expert
pert expert testimony that a shelter sys system
tem system costing 20 billion dollars could
save some 46 million American
lives if nuclear war should come
The subcommittee did not pass
judgment on responsibility for
planning, and financing "an effec
tive national defense program." M
said the decision as to whether

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
(INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840)
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
S.S. "KENl'TA" Sept. 2
S.S. "CUZCO" Sept. 11
TO t NITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA,
KINGSTON. HAVANA, NASSAU. BERMUDA. SPAIN
AND FRANCE
S.S. "REINA DEL MAR" (20,225 Tons)
(Air-conditioned) Sept. 6
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. "FLAMENCO" .....Sept. 8
S.S. "PIZARRO" Sept. 21
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD.HOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "LOCH LOYAL" .....Sept. 12
M.V. "ALBANY" Sept. 15
TO UKCONTINENT
S.S. "LO( -' GOWAN" : Sept. 6
S.S "DIEMERDYK" Sept. 10
'I I. SAILINGS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOT1CI
TELEPHONES:
Cristobal 3-16545 Panama 3-12578 Balhoa 2-1905

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Kenmore automatic
washing machine in A-1 condi condition.
tion. condition. Call 3-3595, can be seen
at house No. 28 7th Avenue,
San Francisco.
FOR SALE: Ona 9 foot West West-inghousc
inghousc West-inghousc refrigerator, new unit.
One 10 cu. foot, deep frexe.
Telephone, Balboa 2479.
CUSTOMERS WANTED NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
New mattresses 6.50. Springs
12.50. Metal Double Beds with
Spring 19.00. China Closet!
15.00. New Cavas Cost 5 50.
Hollywood Beds wo mattress
15 00. Chrome Dinette Set (Only
One)' 45.00. Brand New 5 pc.
Dinette Sets 89.00. Mahogany 5
pc. Dining Room Suites from
59 00 A Thousand Other Bar Bargains
gains Bargains in New & Used Articles
Cash or Credit We Deliver.
HX Household Exchange HX 41
Auto Row. Call 3-4911 er 3 3-7348.
7348. 3-7348. We Buy Your Old Fur Furniture.
niture. Furniture. FOR SALE: Rattan table with
four chairs, double couch, ward wardrobe,
robe, wardrobe, lamps, curtains, etc. Rea Reasonable.
sonable. Reasonable. No. 3, 52nd Street.
Tels. 4-1444, 3-0638.
FOR SALE: Norge automatic
washing machine $130.00. Tel.
5-362, house 249-A, Gatun.
FOR SALE: Baldwin Acrosonio
piano, States made cordovan ma mahogany
hogany mahogany bedroom set, Bendix
washer and dryer, tewing ma machine,
chine, machine, 34 ton Feddert air condi conditioner,
tioner, conditioner, Sintmont Hide-a-bed, me metal
tal metal office desk, dinette set, Floor
lamps and miscellaneous house household
hold household items. See at No. 40, Fif Fiftieth
tieth Fiftieth Street, Panama, Apartment
5. Telephone 3-6794.
Lessons
SPANISH CLASSES
Every day except Saturday and
Sunday; morning, afternnon and
evening classes. Enrollment:
August 17 to Sept. 7. Classaa
Begin: Sept. End Nov.
27 PANAMANIAN NORTH
AMERICAN ASOCIATION, Peru
Avenue No. 66 (near Bella V la lata
ta lata Theatre). Tel. 1-7963. I I-3018.
3018. I-3018. the federal government, the state.
or the individual pay the bill "re
mains and demands solution.
For the purposes of the hear
ings on the effect of nuclear war,
conducted June 22-26, the subcom
mittee assumed that 224 U. S. tar
gets were hit with 263 nuclear
weapons having the destructive
power of 1,446,000,000 tons of TNT
It also assumed that an additional
2,500,000,000 tons was dropped on
targets in the attacking country
and Western Europe.
In stressins that man and na
ture would ultimately recover, the
witnesses did not minimize the
horrors of such a war. Assuming
no ffective civil defense, they
said it would cost lives of about
50 million Americans, with 20 mil
lion others suffering serious in
jury.
Millionaires Club
Reelects Bailey
As President
Ivan A. Bailey was re-elected
president df the Millionaires Social
and Sporting Club for another six six-month
month six-month period at a meeting held re recently.
cently. recently. Other members elected were El Elbert
bert Elbert King, vice president; Vic Victor
tor Victor Osborne, secretary; Miss
Joyce Torres, treasurer; Huey
Howard, business manager, and
Rolando Williams, fiscal.
The club is scheduled to meet
again Friday at the usual place of
business, starting at 8 o'clock.

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Aged natural Ma Manure
nure Manure at give-away prices by the
truekload. Call 2-2641.
FOR SALE: New Guatemalan
furniture tor your porch. Stuffed
living room set in new condition.
Hand made Italian wine red rug.
Large size 1 954 Pontiac hardtop,
excellent condition. .All below
normal prices. Must tell, leaving
Isthmus. Telephone Balboa 4495
after 4 p.m.
FOR SALE: A "Lester" piano,
in good condition, Moderate
price. Phone Panama 3-3436.
FOR SALE: 1951 Buick two
door. Good ski boat, 25 h p.,
motor, trailer, 22 rifle. Balboa
4263, house 6444, Los Riot.
FOR SALE: Venetian blindt,
very good condition!. Several
sixes Phone 3-3152.
FOR SALE: BABY PIANO in
perfect conditions, for additional
information and price, please call
2-1790, Panama.
FOR SALE: Three riding horses,
saddles, bridles. Call 83-6173.
FOR SALE: Cabinet with
shelves, workbench. Vice, Heat Heaters;
ers; Heaters; bar; furniture; Miscellan Miscellaneous.
eous. Miscellaneous. 2308-B Lascruces, Bal Balboa,
boa, Balboa, CUSTOMERS WANTED NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
New mattretset 6.50. Springs
12.50. Metal Double Badt with
Spring 19.00. China Clotett
15 00. New Cacat Cott 5 50.
Hollywood Beds we. mattress
15.00. Chroma Dinette Set (Only
One) 45.00. Brand New 5 pc.
Dinette Sets 89.00. Mahogany 5
pc. Dining Room Suites from
59.00. A Thousand Other Bar Bargains
gains Bargains In New Used Articuet
Cash or Credit We Deliver.
HX Household Exchange HX 41
Auto Row. Call. 3-4911 or 3 3-7348.
7348. 3-7348. We Buy Your Old Fur Furniture.
niture. Furniture. FOR SALE: Piano, desk, chain,
tablet, band taw with 1 h p.
motor, table taw 8" 6" pointer
1 h.p. motor and ether house household
hold household items. Call after 4:30 p.m.
motor and other household Hems.
Call after 4:30 p.m. Phone 2 2-2906.
2906. 2-2906. Boats & Motors
FOR SALEi Outboard motor,
Johnson, I h.p. excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, long and ehert lower units,
alia tet uaed golf elubt. 6427,
Lot Riot, phone 2-4436.
Quote Unquote
LOS ANGELES Vice Presi
dent Richard M. Nixon, discuss
ing the effects of President Ei Eisenhower's
senhower's Eisenhower's tremndous welcome
on his European tour:
"When Ike sits down at the
conference table with (Soviet Pre Premier
mier Premier Nikita S.) Khrushchev, the
premier will know that he is
dealing with a man who repre represents
sents represents the attitudes of the free
world."
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Chinese
student Cheng Guan Lim, 28, de describing
scribing describing his feelings during the
three years and 10 months he
spent hiding in a Methodist
church steeple to avoid the shame
of failing at the University of
Michigan:
"I was afraid spiritually. I was
panicky for almost four years .
I lived in panic. I call myself a
Methodist but I'm a traitor to
my church and my religion."
RICHMOND, Va. Negro rock

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
GREAT WHITE FLEET
New Orleans Service $ a 1 1 Arrive-
Cristobal
CD3AO Auif. 18 Sept. a
MORAZAN Sept. 4 Sept. 12
ULUA Sept. 11 Sept. 19
YAQUE Sept. 18 Sept. 28
MORAZAN Sept. Oct. S
CIBAO Oct. t Oct. 10
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
New York Service Sails Arrives
"""""" Cristobal
COMAYAGUA Sept. 1 Sept.
"HEREDIA" Sept. 8 Sept. 1.
ESPARTA Sept. 15 Sept. 20
JUNIOR Sept. 22 Sept. 27
SAN JOSE Sept. 29 Oct. 4
METAPAN Oct. 6 Oct. 11
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
TL
CRISTOBALW.C.CA. FEEDER SERVICE
TEXITA Every (15) Days
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle

SPECIAL EXCURSION FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return $275.04
To San Francisco andor Seattle and Retfirn $400.00

TELEPHONES:

CRISTOBAL 2121

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Ure 500 and 1.000
meters, ia the Niter Hipodrem
Urbenlxetiot across the Remoe)
Racetrack. All lots with errae
fronts, sewage, water Main anal
electricity. CaH W. McBarnett.
Tel. 4-097C.
CUSTOMERS WANTED NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
New mattresses 6.50. Springs
12.50. Metal Double Bedt with
Spring 19.00. China Cloteti
15 00. New Cacat Cott 5.50.
Hollywood Bedt wo mattress
15.00. Chrome Dinette Set (Only
One) 45.00. Brand New 5 pc.
Dinette Sett 89.00. Mahogany 5
pc. Dining Room Suitet from
59.00. A Thousand Other Bar Bargains
gains Bargains in New cV Used Article!
Cash er Credit W Deliver.
HX Household Exchange HX 41
Auto, Row. Call 3-4911 or 3 3-7348.
7348. 3-7348. We Buy Your Old Fur Furniture.
niture. Furniture. FOR SALE: 5000 M2 with deep
well and other improvements,
16 miles from Panama on Trans Trans-Isthmian
Isthmian Trans-Isthmian Highway, 80c. per M2.
Telephone Balboa 3753.
Services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
SERVICE. Our new service plan
gives you faster, mora econo economical
mical economical and better service, Phona
2-1905 Crawford Agenciat. Tivo Tivoli
li Tivoli Avenue.
U. S. TELEVISION
Meant reliability, and letting re repairs.
pairs. repairs. For better home service
call 3-7607 Panama from 9 a.m.
to 10 p.m. Saturday to 6 p.m.
Pr erect your home and proper property
ty property against Intact damage.
Prompt tciantifie treatment tvn
emergency or monthly budge
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777.
Personals
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.X.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
LOST: August 4th Budgy
bird (parakeet). Blue and gray
with ehite tap. In Margarita.
Name ft "Mitii". Talkt wall.
Generout reward. Mary Mehl.
8057-C. Third, Margarita. Tel.
3-3240.
'n' roll singer Charles "Chuck"
Berry, revealing that he consid considered
ered considered fleeing last week after he
had hidden from an angry crowd
in Meridian, Miss., that accused
him of trying to date a white
girl:
"THp border from Mississippi
to Alabama was about 20 miles
away and I was thinking about
trying to run all the way. inose
cats were real warm."
CHAMPAIGN, m.-Robert Ken
nedy, chief counsel for the Sen Senate
ate Senate Rackets Committee, attacking
the Hous passed Landrum-
Griffin labor reform bill as
"weak In regard to racketeering
and gangsterism :"
'The problem Is not that (for (former
mer (former Teamster President Dave)
Beck and (current Teamster
President James R.) Hoffa were
allowed to continue in positions of
authority but that no legislation
preventing such things in the fu future
ture future has been enacted."
PANAMA.2-2904

Jill

INVESTOR'S
GUIDE
By SAM SHULSKY
King Features Syndicate,
235 E 45 St., New York
Q. I am a widow of 53. A friend
took me to her broker and since
this was my first purchase, I left
matters to the broker. He sold me-
10 shares A.T. and T. at its high
est price, $265; 100 Toledo Edison
and 25 General Motors. I feel now
that he should have sold me some
other utility. I can invest $15,000
more. What would you advise? I
am interested in bonds, also.
A. I don't see why you should
fret over this situation. I think the
broker gave you some conservat
ive advice. The fact that A.I. and
T. dipped after your purchase is no
more significant than the fact that
General Motors rose. Both belong
in your portfolio, and so does To Toledo
ledo Toledo Edison, a high quality utility
yielding better than 4.1 per cent.
1 notice that phrase he sold me
10 shares. .at its highest price.
He didn't sell you anything. He
bought for you and the fact that
the old A.T. and T. was then sel selling
ling selling at $265 put no more money in
his profit than if he had been able
to buy it for you at $250 or SIS'),
I don't think it's fair to blame
a broker because you decided to
invest on the day A.T. and T was
near its high. His judgment as
good I'd say excellent. The rest
represents the risks you run when
you buy securities.
y. About vc months ago. a
former insurance man sold me on
a mutual fund plan for 10 years at
$15 a month. More than half of
each month's payment is taken
out for brokers' fees. In other
words, I pay $195 the first year
in order to invest some $30 odd.
After the first year the commis commission
sion commission drops. I was given the im impression
pression impression that I will more than
double my money. What I want to
know, is this worth while? I am
a laborer, 61.
A. You are now prepaying sales
commissions for 10 years. If you
figure on continuing your monthly
payments until you an 71, you're
got a fair investment.
But, if, for example, you figure
on retiring at age 65 in four years
and, I assume, will then be un unable
able unable to spare the $15 a month for
investment, you've made a mis mistake.
take. mistake. You seem to have understood
the terms and length of the eon eon-tract,
tract, eon-tract, so I can't understand why
you are puzzled.
As for whether your money will
be doubled, trebled, or halved
I don't know. I have no erystal
ball on the stock market.
Q. I am a school teacher who
expects to retire next year at 69.
In the last two years I have pur purchased
chased purchased small lots of Ravtheon.
Spiegel, Merrit-Chapman Scott,
American Motors, Continental Mo Motors.
tors. Motors. I have $3,000 more to invest,
A. I suppose you have some pro profits
fits profits in these at least I hope so.
But even so, with the exception of
opiegei, tnejr naraiy make up a
retirement list,
I am sending you a Est of high
grade compames. By retirement
time, I would suggest a switch
out of these into utilities" and other
more conservative issues.
Wall Street
CHATTER
J
NEW YORK, (UPI) -When the
stock market falls out of bed it
make a noise heard all through the
economy, warns the Value Line' In Investment
vestment Investment Survey.
"The stock market W grossly
overvalued," it cautions. "Sooner
or later it may be expected to
have a fall the size of which
could shock the entire economy."
Value Line says stock prices are
living on borrowed time and notes
that the break if and when it
comes could be "shocking and
may actually cause a business re
cession.''
It adds that the final reckoning
may be delayed in point of time
but not in terms of value.

Investors should always keep In
mind the fact the market will al always
ways always have setbacks as well as ad advances,
vances, advances, says investors' reader.
The magazine, published by Mer Merrill
rill Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and
Smith, says "even more important
for naive or forgetful investors, the
'market' consists of thousands of
individual issues, moving on their
own and quite a number of well well-known
known well-known stocks have not made the
long trip back to the 1929 high just
as others have soared to previously
unattained peaks."
Allis-Chalmers Is attractive for
accounts looking for capital ap appreciation
preciation appreciation and eventual increase
in the dividend, says Reynolds
and Co.

STICKY PROBLIM
THOMASTON, Ga. (UPI)-The
Upson County grand jury has
cracked down on penny gum ma machines
chines machines because they give odds.
"It has come to our attention
that even gum dispensing ma machines
chines machines are now offering odds so
as to make it a game of chance,"
the grand jury said in a present presentment.
ment. presentment. "A gum machine offers
tlie possible reward of a nickel
bar of aanriv."

Todays Opening
STOCK PRICES

NEW YORK, Sept. 1 (UPI)
Stocks rjoened vnaA mu) iiii l.
day.
The list was a ar mKU s
minor gains and Josses as invest
irs iouowco a cautious policy. A
number of pivotak opened atv
cnaugea.
ACF Ind
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium Ltd
Amer Cyanamid
Amer Motors
Amer Tel and Tel
Anaconda Copper
Arkansas Fuel
AVCO Mfg
Beth Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bicroft Uranium
Blauknox
British Pet
Burroughs
Canadian Eagle
Celanese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler
Cities Service
Coastal Caribe
Colgate Palmolive
Colorado Fuel
Cons Electro Dynamics
Creole Pet
Crown Cork and Seal
Cuban Venezuelan Oil
Du Pont
El Paso Natural Gas
Fairchild Engine
Fargo Oil
Felmont Pet
5M4
380b
12Vt
34
59Ti
471
8fM
7V4
3
UK
58
72b
WMib
m
53b
40V
45Hb
683a
S3ra
1
40
S2'fc
30
47Vi
36Hb
5-18
261
S2H
a
4b
--ieM
Sm
57Vi
SOMib
110 b
43
22H
m
195
80
General Dynamic
General Electric
General Motors
General Plywood
Gulf Oil
Harsco Steel
Howe Sound
Imperial Oil
Ml Pet
Lockheed
Magellan P4
Montrose Cbem
New Eng. Tel and Tel
Northrop Air
Ohn Mathieson
Paocbaetal
Phillips Pet
Pure Oil
Roy Dutch flue
RCA
Reynolds MeM
San Jacinto
Servo Corp
Signal Oil aod tec
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobile
Sperry Rand
Standard Oil NJ
Studebaker-Pack-ard
Superior Oil
Texas Gulf Prod
Textron
Underwood
United Canto Oil
US Rubber
US Steel
Westraghouee He
Wheeling Steel
eMt
tos
4444
9b
Sf4b
M
-
44
33 V
51
12H
I860
34H
JS'i
VJ-19
624
10544
98HI
85H
(3fl
to
at sacrifice prices
1956 Opel
$795.00
1957 rord
$1,650.00.
1955
Chevrolet
$895.00
1955
Plymouth
$750.00
1952
Buick
$395.00
1955
Pontiac
J i
$950.00
C0LPAN
i
MOTORS--
Tel. 2 0621

S

K
m



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN IJiTJEFENDFNT DAILY NITPSPAPEB
PAGI Nl
v. f HI- STORY OP MARTHA WAYNR
iesler Slid Than Dent
BY WILSON SCRUGGS TERST AND THE FICATLS
Ir GEORGE WVNOU
7J!
RISIILLA'S POP
Good Inttntiont
y Ai. VIRMII

TTESDAf SITTESIBER S, 1959

,UH.MUH...TMBBTKVO-ANP U A TOTAL Ji
1 1

n iJU

Jy b liLJ II si?, may i help m me. fd?te?.i
AT MW?THA I IV. V3U?,T IWDKSTW40 W
WWHE'S I Ny-iw IJUWAWAVDAlkSHTSe)

:. ( 'OJ COINS? IVc SEEM THESE tfrf&Z&Z.
jfji PEW3N5TKATION5 FEfDRE. f;i,2sSl5? X

PftlCKLII AND HIS MIIMOR

SOOTS AND HIR RUDDill

APTAIN IASY
- MORTY MIIKLI

"Uk" BOARDING HOUSI

I ALWAYS SAY THERE'

OTHlNS LIKE A LITTL6

IN SHAPE DONT YtO THINK

THE MA30K LOOKS LISHTER

ALREADY? I'M PSTTINS

THAT FOOTRACE HE RAN

NTH 1HE BtAK tLICEDj

OFP r-l6 rf UNP5 OP

Y MSRRILL BLOSSIR

PsT 1 DOIT LIKE THE
I YT WAY VALERIE MAKES

WHATS THE
DIFF, AS
L0N6ASHE
DOESN'T
MAKE EYES'

BACK AT

-APPARENTLY SHE'S OUTC ,7 fZM I

After Oop

Y V. T. HAMLIN

eo

73 W,
X A SOTO

7 ...CADGUM
I STUPID, TIN

BUT T E RF LX XA'
IT'S NOT SAFE TOj I
L'SIT ON THE). t.

COME ON, NOW S.
( FLY AWAY BEFORE)

WMV DON'T I MIND
MY OWN BUSINESS

1 T

JUGS BUNNY

Didn't Work

Return Trip

Y IDGAR MARTIN

S X ,L

V&Y.V.CA

The

SOU VJOERE.

STWU NO uoos

P L

7"

(ekfDMer True Life Adventures

HOCUS
FOCUS

&HAW,C)KaJNa HISH IN THE 6KV,
HAS REMARKABLE FARSIGHTEDNESS

EES A TINS' MOUSE ON THE
lEIOW. SUI7PENL.S HE PfVES.

Incomplete Cell

Y LISLII TURNER

ffljHEM E5y
' TRIE TO
CALL PEKWy
BURKE IN

J WUK PMCTy 15 OUT, (K! WE

ARB TOLP VOU CAN R6ACH

HER AT 6 KM.!

THANK5,

OPERATOR,

I'LL CALL

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LerrS7 THANk5,i
r7nn opskatobi

NOW WHO HWto. VOU WERE 5AyiNO

COULP BE HER C0U5IM GEOPPREY 15

tALUINS l POWN FROM OXFORD TO

PENNY PKWkHeLP A MENTAL CA5E-,

DrtnO 11B I

iA"XA it miufTf lirtf? 1Pl V I

YE. HER PSYCHIATRIST 5AY& 60METHIN6
HAPPENED IN CHILPHOOP THAT GAVE HER.

A GUILT COMPLEX ..PLAYING HOB WITH HER
5U6-CON5CI0U5'. BUT HE CfcN'T LEARM WHAT

IT WA4, 60 HE CAN TREAT IT! HEA5KE9

6 H6LP ANP PfcNNy 6 WITH HIM!

AV

vJIPTL.S'. HIS E-ES NRI

FOCUS ANP RE-FOCUS
ON THE TARGET.

VHEM HE POUNCES ON HIS TK&-,

HIS EVES HAVE APJUSTEC TO N E ARSUSHTEPNESS.
5-23 DUlrltHited bj King Mturee Syndic I e.

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calhraith

Tight Squeeze

BY DICK CAVALLI

NOTHIN' WRONG WITH YET?

FURNACE. MAYBE SOME

obstruction in ver

'CHIMNEY... T

) m

f MY ASSISTANT'S I
I CHECKING IT NOW..?? 1 I

CAUAIXI

II

EITHER YOU (SO
ON A DIET, SIDNEY,
OR I'M GOING
TO GET ANOTHER

ASSISTANT;

I

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to

with

MAJOR HOOPLR OUT OUR WAY

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

XERCI5S"EJ KEEPA MAM vmpics '1 bear

H& SAID,

INAIN& B THE

THOUGHT

OF A

HAVE VOUI?

'FLHYOJ
OAFS ?UT

I WARN

.YOU NOT TO

HE S ET f APPEALED! 60 TOO FAR

OR YOU'LL

FEEL THE l

Wpatu nc l

HOP-SKlP-fl HE tA HOOPLE

?AVELEP;
.IKEA f
3TROD
Ml

35V" -FTER ALL,
IT cSjLO HANS'

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If V WAY UP
.II JTDTMC JrK

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8-24

1 v m

T.M Ul. frt. C.

"I "know you like me now, Len but what about next
winter when my tuntan haf faded?"

Lit a8

;n. "SH

"HOW?" Defense Secretary Neil McElroy knows what
makes Russia's atom-powered icebreaker Lenin go. What he's
trying to determine Irom the scale model on display at the
Soviet Exhibit in New York City is how the nuclear power
plant and its power drive are arranged.

V

rri

Q-ZS

T R.g U P.l, Of

"We're playing house. Will you be our little boy?"

7T1

JT7

830 3A. Panama 1090 J(c&.

MIAMI-NEW YORK 35.10
PANAMA-MIAMI 5b. 00

PANAMA
NEW YORK

10

Today's JV program

3 00 CFN NEWS
3:15 Dinah Short
3 .11 You Aiked Tor It
4 (XI Mr. Wizard
4:30 Amateur Hour
5 00 Whlrlybird
S 30 PANORAMA
7 00 Scltnct Fiction Thiatit

7 30 Jimmy Rodgtr
R:0O O.zie & Harriet
8:30 Drcny
9 00 Armchair Thtatit:
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II () CFN NEWS
II. IS Fur Jark Btnny and
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BOOM THtrrV WA TOO 9O0N Ifi.



Koufax Fans 18

Dodgers

As

' 3fit.

Ike Takes Time Out From Peace Crusade
To Handle Desk Work, Signs 27 Bills
r IONDON Uo 1 (UPI) President Eisenhower turned to domestic business today in a brief time out from his international peac. crusade.
Baskinr 'in th. warm glow of congratulatory messages approving the views expressed in last night's radio.television chat with Prime Min.
liter Harold Macmillan, the President concentrated on White House affairs and made plans for the remainder of his European stay.
He worked quietly all morning with his counsel David Kendall and assistant counsel Roemer McPhee, who flew here yesterday from Wash,
kiffton with a large assortment of White House business.
Presidential pres. secretary James C. Hagerty said the President signed 27 congress,cnal b.lls.

d the President probably will spend a few Cays at luiz ean casue in . wo tt.

Hagerty sai

The predt probably will fly .Premier Nikita S Khrushchev
a:.". C r,n. Prestwirk 1 was hiher than Macmillan s.

nilf IT ILlFlil n, .r

Scotland, on Sept. 4, and then
rfriv In the castle, where he

own an apartment given him by
the Scottish people for his serv
lcs in World War 11.
List night'i radio-television ap appearance
pearance appearance by the President and
Prime Minister showed there is
Still some disagreement between
Eisenhower and Macmillan on
Summit policy.
'iitnhowtr aid ht would 90
t a Summit "ly rf thrt ar
trpcrs of iuccni, Macmil Macmil-Ian
Ian Macmil-Ian wn frank to ay that he
till itrongly wanti a Summit
meeting, regardless.
Although nothing they said in indicated
dicated indicated anv serious friction, it
was clear that Eisenhower's price
for Summit talks with Soviet

Eisenhower scheduled no more

major political Ulks unftj he gbes
to Paris tomorrow to meet with
French President Charles de
Gaulle and Italian leaders.
Th US President told a tele television
vision television audience that "peeee ...
it imperative in our time." i
"If we are to have a sum
mil," Eisenhower told Macniillan.
Khrushchev must understand
that as you and 1 do." If Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev realizes this; he said, "Then
the summit meeting would be
profitable."
Eisenhower also declared that
both East and West must try to
solve "on a coopers. ive basis"
the problem of the people of un underdeveloped
derdeveloped underdeveloped nations who lack
sufficient food, shelter, clothing
and health facilities.

Units such an effort is made
Eisenhower warned, "there is
just going to be an explosion."
Eisenhower spoke just a day
after Khrushchev declared he was
visiting the United States next
month "resolved to take mea measures
sures measures whi. h will hi 'o melt the
ice of the cold war.
Khrushchev, in a speech Sun Sunday
day Sunday in the Russian village of
Veshenskaya, said he hoped this
would enable nations "to breathe
easily" and added: "I would
hope Mie U.S. government is
guided by the same considera considerations.".
tions.". considerations.". The President was seated on a
couch in the state drawing rooms
of 10, Downing Street, official
residence of Britain's prime min ministers,
isters, ministers, as he appeared before tele televiewers
viewers televiewers in Britain and most West Western
ern Western European countries.

Harriman Believes Khrushchev Would Make
Deal On Arms Control During US Visit
NEW YORK, Sept. 1 (UPI) Former New York Got. Averell Harriman said today that he be believed
lieved believed Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev would come to this country next month prepared to make
a "deal" on arms control.
"Khrushchev may pull out of his sleeve some fairly sensational proposals on arms limits-.
Hons, contrived to put the United States on the spot before world opinion in order to force s
te"fo further than some of our experts think Is safe at this stage," he said.
In an article in Look Magazine, Harriman said that he had found Khrushchev "deeply Inter Interested"
ested" Interested" in arms limitation during his recent talks with the Soviet Premier in Russia.
VI think that one reason for Khrushchev's keen interest in arms control is ins desire to ful fulfill
fill fulfill his promise for a better riving standard in order to strengthen his personal prestige" said
Harriman.

"The competing demands of
the arms industries for scien scientific
tific scientific brains, skilled labor and
Investment capital are jeopar jeopardising
dising jeopardising that promise."
Therefore, said Harri m a n.
what Khrushchev will want to
find out in Washington is
whether the US is prepared to
make a deal on arms.
"He not only desires to re relieve
lieve relieve his domestic pressures
to raise the living standard,
but, being a rigid Marxist, he
thinks that a reduction in
arms expenditures in the
United States will cause a
major permanent disruption
of our economy."
In this connection, the for former
mer former Democratic governor, and
former ambassador to Russia,
said that Khrushchev did not

understand the great potential

Meanwhile Senate Democratic
and Republican leaders threw
cold water on a proposal by
Sen. George A. Smathers,,' D D-Fla.)
Fla.) D-Fla.) that Congress take a re recess
cess recess while Khrushchev is in
this country.
Senate Democra 1 1 c leader
Lyndon B. Johnson (Tex.) said
he would .onsider Smathers'
suggestion. But he made it
plain he had little enthusiasm
for the idea.
"We must all- realize that we
were elected to come up here
and do a job and my view Is
that we ought to stay here and
do that job," Johnson said. He
added that 'my present feel feeling
ing feeling Is that we ought to stay
here" until needed legislation
is out of the way.
Senate Repub'li can leader
Fifarott A nirlrcen I Til t aorpefi

lties lor expansion of the US ..... ' ,u,n w

J..iii.- l,lu hat!"1" w....B ...

Annual. rwM.wmjr, ... t0 stay hm until we get the

urrw ucinjrcu wjr (job done.

expenanures.
Har rim an said that if
Khrushchev did make an agree

ment limiting arms it also
would be a "tacit admisison"i
that the threat of American I
aggression has diminished. I
"With it, the justification for,
heavy, industry's favored posi position
tion position and the necessity for un unquestioning
questioning unquestioning obedience by thei
people will likewise diminish 1

and perhaps the militant atti attitude
tude attitude of the regime may softer,
a trifle."
Harriman said, however,
that Americans should not
expert that the Eisenhower Eisenhower-Khrushchev
Khrushchev Eisenhower-Khrushchev exchange of vis visits
its visits alone would settle all the
issues between the two countries.

Smathers proposed Satur Saturday
day Saturday that Congress recess from
next Friday until Oct. 15. He
said this would permit the
lawmakers to dodge the tick ticklish
lish ticklish question of whether to
invite Khrushchev to address
Congress during his forth forthcoming
coming forthcoming visit.

Macmillan sat en a chair be- and that he still believed one

side Eisenhower. Both leaders

wore dinner jackets.
The President and the Prime
Minister went on the air after

two intensive dajs of private "lit

tle summit lams on Key coia
war issues.
Eisenhower had returned to
London yesterday from Che Chequers,
quers, Chequers, the Prime Minister's
country home a"d drove to St.
Paul's Cathedral where he paus paused
ed paused for a few minutes to visit
the memorial chapel for Ameri Americans
cans Americans who died in World War II.
Thousands of Londoners gave
Eisenhower another warm ovation
as he drove to and from the cha chapel
pel chapel with Macmillan.
During the broadcast Eisenhow

er chatted rreeiy ana iraniuy

without sqript or preparation;
. Immediately afterward, the two

leaders went into the state din

ing room for an official dinner in
Eisenhower's honor.
Among the guests were three
former British prime ministers ministers-Sir
Sir ministers-Sir Winston Churchill, Sir Antho

ny Eden and Lord Attlee.

Macmillan told Eisenhower

frankly before the TV cameras

that he always had advocated a
summit meeting with Khrushchev

The State Department said
yesterday that Mrs. Khrushchev

had accepted President Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's invitation to accompa accompany
ny accompany her husband to the United
States Sept. 15.
The department added that
the party also will include two
Khrushchev daughters Yulia
and Rada; a son, Sergei, and a
son-in-law, Alexei Ivanovich
Adzhubel.
Adzhubei is editor of the So Soviet
viet Soviet rewspaper Izvestia and will
oe credited as a jonvspondent
to cover his father-in-law's
tour for Russian readers.
Mrs. Khrushchev is a plump
and motherly-looking woman
who is believed by some ex experts
perts experts to exert considerable in influence
fluence influence on her husband.

Some diplomats also credit

her with having a somewhat

open-minded view towards the

United States. Thus, they view
her as a welcome companion

for the Premier on his tour.
Mrs. Khrushchev, the pre

mler's second wife, has studied
a good deal of American his history,
tory, history, apparently much more
than her husband, and taught
herself English during the war
when she and her family were

evacuated from the Ukraine.

Her given name is Nina Pe-

trovra.

Meany Calls Issues
in Steel Strike
'Fight For Justice'
WASHINGTON, Sept. 1 (UPI) -AFL-CIO
president George Meany

said today the issues wnicn lea to
the steel strike constitute "a fight

of the entire trade union movement

for economic justice."
Meanv urged the officers of all

affiliated unions to make Labor
Day next Monday a "support the
steel workers day."
In a letter to the officers, Meany
said the 500,000 striking steel
workers may still be on the picket

lines this Labor Day "because of

the arrogant refusal of the giant

steel corporations to engage in

good faith collective bargaining."

As the strike .rounded its seventh
week, the Commerce Department
reported that factory sales drop dropped
ped dropped two per cent last month, ap-

up.

The Department also said last

night that ew orders for durable

goods fell kree per cent during the
month and feet factory inventor inventories
ies inventories rose about 100 million dollars.
In New York, negotiations be between
tween between the industry and the United
Steelworkers of America in re recess
cess recess until tomorrow. Both sides
agreed to the five-day recess last
week.
Meany said the AFL-CIO execut executive
ive executive council has "unanimously re recognized
cognized recognized that the struggle of these
steelworkers is the struggle of the
whole American labor movement."

should be held.

Addressing Macmillan as "Har "Harold,"
old," "Harold," the President said that
war today had become so
threatening that peace was
"imperative."
"I am sure that Mr. Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev understands the solution as
well as I do," Eisenhower said.
The President said that U. S. S.British
British S.British relations never had been
better than they are today.
Tomorrow's visit to Paris will
be Eisenhower's fifth.
It was in 1928 that Eisenhower
came to Paris for the first time
as a young major attached to a
U.S. Army commission which in inspected
spected inspected American war memorials
in France.

That was in the gay postwar

Paris when Americans like Er Ernest
nest Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitz Fitzgerald
gerald Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein were

living the life of Bohemians on

the Left Bank.

At that time the Eisenhower
apartment at 68, Quai d'Auteu d'Auteu-il,
il, d'Auteu-il, became part of the Ameri-cn-in-Parii
scene. It was dub dubbed
bed dubbed the "Eisenhower Club."
The bridge leading over the

Seine near to the apartment was

known as "Mamie Bridge," for

Ike s wife and tne nearby square

was labelled 'Eisenhower Square.'

Eisenhower's other sojourns in

the French capital were:

In 1944 when he entered the ci

ty at the head of the World War

II armies.

In 1951, when he returned to

Paris as supreme commander of

Allied forces in Europe

In December 1957, when he
came as President to attend the
NATO summit conference held

Dec. 16-19

Read story on page $r,
NY Teenager Pours Cleaning Fluitl"
Over 7-year-olds, Sets Them Alight
NEW YORK, Sept. 1 (UPI) A teenared boy poured eleanlnr fluid on two T vear-old H.

yesterday and turned them Into human torches. Both boys suffered serious burns ai they play.,
ed in an abandoned tenement on Manhattan's slumridden upper West Side. '; 1
A 17-year-old boy was seized for questioning in the attack, which came shortly after an aa
gry crowd milled outside a police station in Hell's Kitchen, a block from, the Broadway shea,
ter district, shoutin; insults at four street touphs charred with murdering two 16-year-old boyrba

yiaj ga. viiuu.

Police said all the boys involved In yesterday's violence were Puerto RlcantV

Michael Fernandez and Alvin

Fernandez wree playing with oth other
er other youngsters on the third floor of
an empty five-story building when
they were set afire.

Police said the children were

gathering candles to use in a club-

room they had taken over in the

building.

Alvin, the less seriously burned
boy, told detectives that a Teen Teenager
ager Teenager entered the room and pour poured
ed poured the contents of a cleaning
fluid can on him and Michael.
Then intruder then sprinkled

some of the fluid around the room

and set fire to a pile of rubbish.

A passerby, heard the boys

screams and. rusned into tne ouita-

ing. He managed to get the two
boys to a street corner where two

policemen found them in the midst

of a crowd.

The policemen rushed the boys

to a hospital, where Michael was

in critical condition with ourns on

his head, neck and arms. Alvin

was less seriously burned.

Jose Cruz, 17, who was found

loitering in the area, was taken to
a police station for questioning.

Earlier patrolmen were forced
to form a guard around a station
wagon carrying two of the four
boys charged with homicide in
Hell's Kitchen n e i g hborhood
when the crowd convreged on
the car.
Police said the crowd, apparent apparently
ly apparently friends and relatives of the dead
boys, Anthony Krezesinski and

) (4y tfj i

Funeral Services
For Wm Wilkins
Set For Tomorrow

Funeral services will be held

tomorrow afternoon a 4 o'clock

for the late William Wilkins,
who died on Sunday morning
at the Santo Tomas Hospital,
where he had been confined for
a week.
A native of the island of
Montserrat, Mr. Wilkins was 78
years old and a former employe
of the Dredging Division of the
Panama Canal Co. He was a re retired
tired retired employe and was residing
at Parque Lefevre.
The body will be at the Sal Salvation
vation Salvation Army Church from 2 un until
til until 4 o'clock, when the service
will be conducted, and then
taken to the Pueblo Nuevo cem cemetery
etery cemetery for burial.
Survivors are his wife. Hilda:
son, Herbert, and step-children
Chanita Flemmings, George and
Leroy Fraser and several erand
children.

Tropical Paint Co.
Awarded Contract
At Quarry He ghts
Exterior painting of 515 struc structures
tures structures on the Post of Quarry

Heights has been started by the
Tropical Paint Company of Pan Panama
ama Panama under a contract awarded
by the US Army Caribbean.
The contract was awarded the

Panamanian firm on a bid of
$15,070.
The project, which includes
family and bachelor officers
quarters, library, post theater
.and electrical trans former

houses, was negotiated by the
Army in line with its support

function for the joint Head Headquarters
quarters Headquarters Caribbean Command.

Caribbean Command is the

using agency of all the struc
tures coming under the paint
Ing contract.

YOUTHFUL KILLERS These two Puerto Rican youths, Jos
(Frenchy) Cordero, 18, and Francisco (Baby Charlie) Cruz, 11,
are accused of participating in the knife slaying of two New
York youths Sunday. Police have not revealed which one wield wielded
ed wielded the knife.

Robert Young, tried to storm the

vehicle after shouting threats and

epithets at the prisoners.

Those booked on homicide charg

es were identified as Jose French

Cordero, 18; Francisco Baboo

Charlie Cruz, 17; Rogelio Lowie
Soto, 17, and Nestor Hernandez,
16.

All denied any connection with

the stabbings.

In addition, four other Teenagers
were held as material witnesses.

They were Ruben Ruby Rivera

18; Francisco Frankie Calderone,
18, Jose Pepe Rivera 18, and John
Maldanedo, 17. A 14-year-old boy
whose name was withheld also was
charged with unlawful assembly.
All those charged were Puerto Ri Ri-cans.
cans. Ri-cans. The arrests followed a round roundup
up roundup of 15 boys Sunday night and
early yesterday for questioning
in the latest outbreak of juvenile
violence which cost the lives of
two other Teenagers last week.
Three of the latest victims died
of stab wounds. The fourth was
shot to death.
The most recent killings brought
the number of teenage slaying?
during the hot summer months to
at least 20, with 38 wounded.
The killings led to protests from
some city officials for the alleg alleged
ed alleged kid-glove treatment of young
hoodlums by police authorities.
Mayor -Robert F. Wagner called
a special city hall meeting Thurs

day to discuss the current terror terrorism.
ism. terrorism. He will confer with Police Com Commissioner
missioner Commissioner Stephen P. Kennedy,
Youth Services Commissioner
Ralph Whelan and Dr. Alfred Mur Mur-row,
row, Mur-row, head of the Commission oa
Intergroup Relations.

Jet Engines On Airliners Proving
More Reliable, FAA Officials Say

WASHINGTON (UPI) Jet
engines on airliners are proving
to be 20 times more reliable than
conventional engines. Federal Avi Aviation
ation Aviation Agency officials revealed today.

Gift Box Explodes,
Intended For King,
Queen Oi Cambodia

TOKYO, Sept. 1 (UPI. Tlv
kinj and queen of Cambodia
escaped Injury but a prince and
a palace servant were killol ami
two others wounded In an as

sassination attempt, a Chinese

Communist news agency if
ported today.
The New China News Agemy
quoting an official coiinmimqur
Issued by the royal cabinet in
Penom Penh today, said:
"The king and queen of Cam Cambodia
bodia Cambodia yesterday escaped an at-

temrt uDon their lives when a

bomb exploded in the royal
palace, killing Prince Norodom
Varrlvan and a servant and
wounding two other persons
The prince was protocol chief
of the palace.
According to the communique
the prince received an "Asiatic
foreigner' with large parcel con containing
taining containing a so-called "gift .from
friend .at Hong Kong" ad ad-H(Sressed
H(Sressed ad-H(Sressed to the queen,
, When the package wa open open-d.
d. open-d. King Norodom Siuaniarlt
trid the queen left the room to
receive foreign minister Sou
Sann and the Cambodia dele&a dele&a-tfon
tfon dele&a-tfon to the United Nations, the
communique said.
, While the royal couple was
fut of the room the parcel ex exploded,
ploded, exploded, killing the prince, it
fid.
.
)U.AiJU,-,

O PLASTIC HELMET WITH TUKSCTOl KADIO
O INFRA-RED BINOCULARS ATTACKED TO ROOT
O MCt MASK TO PROTECT AGAINST MEAT Of KUOlAltUST
O MOLDtD PLASTIC OOVC5
O NUOH IODY .ARMOR OVT CT1ST IO
O INFRA-RED RAT CWNTERDETICTOt
O ADVANCED FORM OF RIFLE
NEXT DECADE FOR THE DOGFACE The tT.S. Army recently unveiled
what tt celled the "uttinwte wapou" lr the 1965 era a Ml-r. Uut it Is
snMfer linJike any Hint was ever seen before In our history. The Army says It
ham the hmhm en Mnriitm ttria mkiier of tomorrow. All il needs is lbs "green

O LIGHTWEIGHT WELDED OOtS TO PROTECT AGAINST SEEPAGE OF
RADIOACTIVE DUST OR WATER
O EXPLOSIVE FOXHOLE DIGGERS
g) ROCKET 'JUMP IELT
(D SUPPLY-CARRYING TOMER MISSILE FIRED TO ISOLATED TROOPS
AIR CARS WITH INFRA-RED HEADLIGHTS
(J) FLYING PLATFORM
HEAT-SEEKING, PORTABLE 'RED-EYE ANTIAIRCRAFT MISSILE
light and the green eaab." Sketch above depict posnlble scene in the field,
showing various Items that one tiny may be standard personal equipment for
infantrymen, together with other pieces ot advanced ordnance. Matty ?i these)
new devious are already well along to tbe develoomool stit

That somewhat startling safety
statistic came out of an FAA

study of jet operations by two of

the four U. S. airlines currently

flying Boeing 707s.
The two airlines studied were
Pan American (for overseas oper

ations) and Trans World (for

domestic).
The survey showed that in five
months, TWA's jets compiled 48, 48,-380
380 48,-380 jet engine hours with only
two precautionary shutdowns in
flight. That adds up to more than
24,000 hours per shutdown. (A
"shutdown" is not necessarily an
engine failure, but is usually a
precautionary measure in the in interest
terest interest of preventing an actual
failure and or damage to the
engine).
Pan-Am's jets totaled 64,000 en engine
gine engine hours in a 10-month period

with five shutdowns. That repre represents
sents represents 13,000 hours between shut shutdowns.
downs. shutdowns. Two of the seven shutdowns re required
quired required only minor adjustments,
with no engine removal necessary.
"That kind of reliability record
is about 20 times better than
most piston engines," an FAA
spokesman said.
The study of the. two airlines
revealed these other facts about
jet operations:
As of July 31, -TWA had can cancelled
celled cancelled only two ut of 886 jet
flights, thus completing 99.8 per
cent of scheduled miles.
The two carriers are operating
their 707s about nine hours a day.
seven days a week. That Is not
only greater utRlizatinn than for
piston engie planes but also in involves
volves involves twice as much daily mile mileage
age mileage flown.

Railway Unions May

Strike For Higher i

Wages In November
WASHINGTON, Sept. 1 (TJPiy
Sleven railway unions hacs
threatened to strike in Novem November
ber November unless the railroad agree t

end a three-year moratorium on

ine Kauwajr Labor Executives
Association, composed of the 1

non-operating rail unions, said
the strike would involve 80.000
workers whose average waM

rate now is about $2.30 an hour.
Association chaiman Georg
E. Leighty told a news confer conference
ence conference yesterday that a strike is
"entirely possible" Nov. 2 un unless
less unless railroad management aerlej
to end the moratorium by Nov.
Lelghfcy also served notice that
the 11 unions will seek a. 26 26-cent
cent 26-cent hourly wage increase. Hs
said the unions would notify th
rail lines today of the waee de demand
mand demand as well as proposed in increases
creases increases in health and welfara
benefits.
Leighty said the rail unions
demands also call for cancella cancellation
tion cancellation of an existing- contract pro provision
vision provision which provides for wae-n

-adjustments with changes in

tne government s cost-of-living
index.

Town Meeting
At Diablo Set
For Tomorrow
The regular monthly session
of the Diablo Town Meeting
will be held tomorrow evening
at 7:30 at the Diablo Clubhouse.
Lt. Col. Robert D. Brown, Jr.,
Engineering and Construction
chief for the Panama Canal Co.
will be guest speaker. Brown
will discuss design, construction
and cost problems of CftJftal
Zone housing.
All Pacific side resids-ntiGtt

invited to attend.

8ZT

1

The only one who- enjoys o
drum solo apparently Is the drum-

Weather Or Notl

This weather report for th-4
hours ending- S a.m. todaV
prepared by the IVleteoroIortml
and Hydrographic Branch ttlfii
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE:
High 90 8i
Low 75
HUMIDITY: SS
High 96 tC
Low 66
WIND: -i'
(max. mph) NW 15 SW-W
RAIN (inches) .30 .28
WATER TEMP: M
(Inner harbors) 81 81

LAKE ELEVATIONS: 1
Gatun Lake 817J
Madden Dam ....... S14.g;;
BALBOA TIDES
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. f
High

Tin.
2:58 a.m.
3:14 p.m.
Time
0:19 a.m.

8:39 p.m.

Low

.

14.9

15.3

Ht.
18 tt,
....