The Panama American

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Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03081

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
1
It Ki ...
.llli:
Throughout the vorld"
more people bay,
than any other
imported whisky.
DAILY NEWSPAPER
Let the people know the truth mid the country is afeM Abraham Lincoln
Mth-'YIAR
PANAMA, It, P., MONDAY, AUGUST t 15
fIVI CENTf

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PIE CHAMPS Sp.4 Donald Fortin, left, B. Battery 4th Gun Battalion, 617th Artillery, Fort
Davis and Pfc. James Gratia of Headquarters and' Headquarters Company, Fort Gulick clean cleaned
ed cleaned their plates in short order to become winner and runner up in a pie eating contest which
featured a Fort GulicK carnival. The event was onOf many arranged by the Fort Gulick En Enlisted
listed Enlisted Men's Advisory Council for servicemen at the ?post Service Club. Fortin took Just 50 sec seconds
onds seconds to down half an apple pie and Gratin was nt far behind in polishing; off a berry -filled
pastry. Use of hands while eating was barred u nder, competition rules. (U.S. Army Photo)

Eisenhower S ays He,
To Exchange Visits

WASHINGTON, Aug. 9

irkjh,hw miHI hner fv!ita th! fall J 4

, Ti f

'tfim&i&'&i&jil PreiWent intend to meet fate

frano Weet Germany.
Weeping Poles

At Tomb Of Unknown Soldier

WARSAW, Aug. 3 (UPI) Four thousand cheering, weeping
Poles all bat mobbed Vice-President Richard M. Nixon at the tomb
( Poland's Unknown Soldier today.
The crowd burst into a spontaneous demonstration of friend-
ship when Nixon was leaving the tomb after laying a wreath on
H. He was on his way to keep an appointment with Poland's Com Communist
munist Communist leaders.
At the council of ministers building Communist secretary
Wladislaw Gomulka greeted the Vice-President along with Foreign
Minltr Adam Raoacki.

Yesterday on his arrival, Nixon had received a roaring wet

eome from a quarter minion.
' He was swamped with houquets
yesterday in a spontaneous hero's
welcome that dwarfed the listless
pep-squad reception for Nikita S.
Khrushchev earlier this month.
The Nixons were Overwhelmed.
"Nothing, nothing hat vr tx tx-MiUd
MiUd tx-MiUd rhis," shouttd tha burn burning
ing burning Nlxen at he folded bunches
ef flowr toMod at him and his
wife.
Three and four deep, Poles lined
the 15-mile route to the city from
Babice military airport where Nix Nixon's
on's Nixon's Boeing TOT Jetliner landed
from Moscow. v
They had turned out only on the
strength of last-minute notices that
Nixon was conyfig for a two-day
visit; en route home. Their welcome
was obviously sincere.
"Bravo . bravo Americans"
rhoy shouted at Nixon wavod
from an opmi sr.Ylva Nixon,
Vlvs- Klsmhwrf.f..We love
Amtrlcant." -The
Poles found the route the
Nixon party took even though it
fcad not been announced or printed.
Observers compared the! rrecep rrecep-tton
tton rrecep-tton to the riotous celebrations
that markde the end of the Stalin
era when lndepnedent-mlned Go Gomulka
mulka Gomulka took over power as Commu Communist
nist Communist Party chief on Oct. 19, 1956.
Corratpondontl wiht Nixon said
h roeeivod mora chttrt. in his
first threo hours m Warsaw than
ho did throughout Russia.
Windows and balconies overflow overflowed
ed overflowed with Poles. The applause seem seemed
ed seemed endless. r
"Bravo Americans, bravo Amer Americans"
icans" Americans" could be heard "over and
over in a screaming chorus.
Only a few diplomats and offi
cials had been on hand to greet
Nixon and his party, including, Polish-born
Vice-Admiral Hyman G,
Kickover, father of the atomic sub
marine. ;
At US flagt with, the corrtct
4 start and rad and white Po Polish
lish Polish flagt flaw tide by tide, Nix Nix-on,
on, Nix-on, wit formally welcemad by
hit f ollth.counter.part, tango, a
farmer American cltlxan who It
vice chairman of the Council of
ttata. -;v

(UPl) President Eisenhower

Cheer Nixon
Nixon replied t V'The people of
Poland occupy a very special place
m the hearts of Americans."
He referred to Kosciusko and
Pulatki, the Polish-born Haroet
of tha American Revolution "fa "familiar
miliar "familiar to all American school
children."
As Nixon and Lange talked, peo
pie at the gates of the airport
waved and shouted, although kept
out of the ceremonies.
Nixon greeted the captain OfaJf
honor guard, valiantly trying to
say a few words in Polish.
Tha vice president mentioned
Rickovar was born in Poland and
there ware smiles for the salty
admiral.
Where Khrushchev's tour of Po
land early in July had bees mark
ed by mild applause and general
apathy, the reception given Nixon
was heartwarming and thrilling.
The
Judge's Bench
A 19-year-old American soldier,
Pvt. Rudolf Van De Walle, was
fined $10 in Balboa Magistrate's
Court todav on a charge of be
ing too drunk to care for himself
In a public place.
-While off duty late Friday night
the soldier was found near the
Diablo Service Club entrance in
nearly insensible condition. He
was turned over to military au
thorities over the weekend.,
Also fined on the same offense
was Gerald Bent, 42, Jamaican,
who walked into the Balboa po
lice station somewhat intoxicated
and finally became unruly. He
was fined $5 after having spent i
day In jail.
Pedro Carlos Reyan, 42 -year
old Panama radio announcer, of
Cuban nationality, was fined $10
for operating a motor vehicle
without a Canal Zone ODerator's
license.

artnoimcft today that He

tt,.to the, eyniwiMfv.Mh w totomffl

pif month with, the heada f
(V In a quickly called news con-
erence, the Fresia e n t an-
iunced that Khrushchev has
'accepted with pleasure" his in
vitation -to visit the United
States for nearly two weeks in
(September.
ft Eisenhower said that "later
this fall" he will pay an of official
ficial official visit to the Soviet Un-
ion but probably will not stay
as long as Khrushchev will
In this country.
. The exchange of visits has
been agreed to, the President
said, by the otner Western
heads of government. He said
thy have informed him that
ltr should produce results on the
plus rather than the minus
side.
He emphasized that while
he and Khrushchev will dis discuss
cuss discuss East-West Cold War ten tensions,
sions, tensions, he by no means con considers
siders considers himself as the single
spokesman for the West.
He said the visits will have
no direct connection with a
Summit meetiniz.
He added that he hoped that
today's announcement of the
visits will spur the foreign min ministers
isters ministers in Geneva to make some
progress before they recess on
The President opened the
press conference by saying he
had called it to announce an
impending exchange of visits
between himself and Khrush
chev.
He called his announcement
one of the worst kept secrets In
a long time.
In a formal state m n t
which he read, Eisenhower
said Khrushchev will visit
Washington for two or three
days and will spend ten days
or so traveling in the United
; States. The President indicat indicated
ed indicated that he may accompany
Khrushchev during a part of
the visit.
His own visit to Moscow, he
said, will come later In the fall
and will Kive him the oppor
tunity to see first hand the
country, its people and how
thev live.
The President said In his
statement; "Both governments
expressed the hope tnat tne
forthcoming visits will help
create better understanding be
tween the United States ana
the Union of Soviet Socialist
Republic and will promote the
cause of peace."
Almost identical language was
used in a simultaneous state
ment Issued in Moscow.
Eisenhower said the ex
change was his idea. He told
newsmen that written cor correspondence
respondence correspondence between himself
and Khrushchev was started
a month ago.
He said he suggested to the
State Department some time
ago that an exchange of visits
would be useful in order to melt
a. little bit of the lea that seems

" "U -.-;f

Travel-yeary Isthmians
Home From urofe Jaunt
Twelve of 4 J Isthmians turned tourlsts returned to Tocumen
early yesterday morning: after almost two months of harrassing
waiters, bus drivers, tour guides and bell boys from Lisbon to
London while having a whopping good time,

The member of the first annual
Isthmian European tour, organ organized
ized organized by CZ General Auditor
Floyd Baldwin, arrived here less
than 24 hours after having break
fasted in London. .-Their Boeingj
707 jet whisked them from Lon
don-to New York in a mere 7V4
hours, half the time it took them
on the flight'over in a prop prop-driven
driven prop-driven airliner.
First stop for the local tourists
on the continent was Lisbon,
Portugal, where they flew from
New York. The shrine of Fatima,
a visit to the famous fishing vii
lage of Nazare, and the 12th
century village of Alenquer were
highlights of their visit to Portu Portugal;
gal; Portugal; 1
Flying from Lisbon to Madrid,
the tourists had an opportunity
to see renowned bullfighters An Antonio
tonio Antonio Ordonez and Luis Domin-
and Soviet premier
Nikita
fovirnmentl Oreat ftrlfAth,
to have frozen US relations with
the Soviet Union.
Details of the vi<s are still
being workedout; by the two
governments, tie said ne am
not know when in September
Khrushchev will actually eome
to the US.
He said he consulted with
members of Congress early
today about the visit and that
those whom he had heard
from were favorably disposed.
In answer to a question, Ei
Benhower conceded that there
was a problem involved m the
possibility of Incidents being
created by some U3 citizens
when Khrushchev visits this
country.
He said however, that this
possibility has been pointed out
to soviet representatives.
When Soviet deputy premier
Frol Kozlov visited this country
last month, unpleasant nets
arose when the mayor of De Detroit
troit Detroit refused to receive the Rus
sian visitor.
Eisenhower emphasized that
while he Intends to discuss
problems of "mutual Interest"
when he talks with Khrush Khrushchev,
chev, Khrushchev, his visit to the Soviet
Union will be a pctcnal one
witli the hope that it will do
something to promote ander ander-standing.
standing. ander-standing. He said he told Vlce-Presi'
dent Richard M. Nixon about
the negotiations for the visits
the day that Nixon left -on his
trip to the Soviet Union. He
said he did this because, he did
not want the Vice President to
be surprised if the Soviet Un
lon officials mentioned.. It to
him in their talks. :
Nixon broadly hinted
throughout his 10-day tay in
Russia that ne felt a visit to
the United States by Khrush
chev should take place.
Just before his departure
from Moscow yesterday,, Nixon
said he felt the Soviet leader
should "at some time visit the
United States."
Eisenhower told his regular
news conference, last week that
whilfl Nixon had no- official au authority
thority authority to extend such an in
vitation, he had the right to
discuss the pros and cons of the
Idea on a persona' bas.
The President said bis trip
to Europe late m August will
be for the. purpose of going
over a number of problems
that ought to be talked eat
among Western leaders.
Ho said, these will Include
subjects other than the ex exchange
change exchange of visits between h
self and Khrushchev. v
He said he doubted he wo i
get to Bonn, the capital W Wo
Oermany, but said he would
West German Chancellor Kon
rad Adenauer wmewhere atom
tne line of his trip in Europe
He lert tne impression he orob
ably would go both to lendon
and Paria.

Krushy
In Fall

guin perform in La Plaza de los

Toros. Included on their Spanish
junket was a visit to the monas
tery of Monserrat Barcelona and
trip to the shrine built for
those who died in the Spanish Ci Civil
vil Civil War in El Valle de los Caidos.
The rrencn Rivitra ano
Nice, next on tha itinerary, ware
in tha words af ono of tha
younger tourists, "a ball." Bi Bikini
kini Bikini ware tha order of tha day
in Nice and thote who didn't
coma prepared for tuch ex
poture ranted tha abbreviatad
attire at local betiquei.
Visits 'to Genoa, Pisa, Rome,
Assissi. Florence and Venice, in
that" order, were included on the
Italian leg of the Odyssey.
The isthmian itinerants were
surprised to learn that many of
the males of Genoa, like the an
cient Egyptians, spend a great
portion of their life scrimping
ana saving to duuq memseives
magnificent tbmbstones or mo
numents si that they may repose
in regal splendor.
In Roma vitltt to tha Pantheon
tha ruins of Naro't palace, tha
Colaateum, .tha Catacombs, tha
Fountain of Tevl, Vatican City,
St. Pater's Batilica, and tha an ancient
cient ancient Applart. Way kept tha
wandering Isthmians buiy and
footsore.
In Asissi the tourists visited
the monastery, founded by the pa pa-tient
tient pa-tient aod;:beloyedFtac1s. .
-Wyewitffe'itatii entourage
took a gondalat-aerenade flown the
canals and a few of the younger
p h a s a d eolgttm gondol
ier shirts. V"
From Venice the gypsies travel
ed to Vienna where the younger
set rode the famous Risenrad, a
tremendous ferrls wheel built in
1897, while the cultured visited
Beethoven's house, the Hapsburg
Castle and the beautiful Vienna
Woods.
A short visit to Zurich Inter-
lochen, and Berne in Switzerland
preceded the swing into Germany
where most of the traveling was
done over the spanking new Au
tobahn.
Baden-Baden, Heidelberg with
its famous university founded in
the 13th century, Frankfurt, most
of which bears the scars of the
war, Koblenz and its mouse tow tower,
er, tower, the castles on the Rhine and
Cologne made up the German por
tion ot tne journey.
Paris wat favorite of all
and a law of tha daring fa ma la
wanderers took a trip to An An-toine't
toine't An-toine't to gat of hit modarn
coiffuret. Tha ratultt are ap apparently
parently apparently clastifiad.
London, the last stop on the trip
was the favorite of many. Besides
the usual visits to the Houses of
Parliament, the Tower of London,
Buckingham Palace, Windsor Cas Castle
tle Castle and Big Ben, a few of the
wanderers visited Slough and the
Stohe-Poges church which inspir inspired
ed inspired Thomas Grey to write his fam famous
ous famous "Elegy Written in a Country
Churchyard."
The band of Isthmians began to
split up in England with some go
ing on to Ireland, others back lo
Spi. and the bulk returning to
the States where most ar finish.
fng their vacations.
NATO Formally Ends
Occupation Sfalus
In West Germany
BONN, Aug. 3-(UPI) West
Germany's NATO allies formally
shandoned their status as an army
of occupation today.
Ambassadors of six western na nations
tions nations signed agreements here for formally
mally formally regulating the status of
'heir troops in western Germany.
The agreements meant that the
troops of the six nations Britain,
the United States. France, Cans Cans-da,
da, Cans-da, Belgium and Holland no
longer have the status of occupiers
if a conquered country.
Henceforth their standing will be
"xactly the same as (hat of Amer Amer-;ran
;ran Amer-;ran forces in Britain, France and
lier NATO nations.
The new agreement means that
'Vest German courts now have the
'Ight to Ir yallied troops and dis
oose of Mm unitary crimes eom eom-mitted
mitted eom-mitted off base.

Curbs

Remodeling
Of G org as
To Be Studied
Preliminary designs and cost es
timates o na modernization of Gor Gor-gas
gas Gor-gas Hospital as an alternative
plan to building a new general
hospital on the Pacific side are to
be prepared during September for
submission to the Bureau of the
Budget.
Representatives of two consult
ing firms employed for this sutdy
phase of the hospital project are
arriving today for on-the-site
preparation of plans and estimates
of costs. They are A. R. Roessling,
of the architectural and engineer
ing firm of Smith, Hinchman and
Grylls Associates, Inc., of Detroit,
and Dr. W. J. Dawson, Jr., of
James A. Hamilton Associates,
hospital consultants of Minneapo Minneapolis.
lis. Minneapolis. The aim of the studies is to de determine
termine determine the extent and cost of al alterations
terations alterations which would be required
to transform the existing facilities
at Gorgas Hospital into a modern
establishment which would fully
meet the anticipated needs of the
future.
Dawson will act as consultant on
technical problems in the provi provision
sion provision of a modern general hospital.
He is already well acquainted with
existing hospital facilities in the
Canal Zone, having participated in
an overall study by his firm on fu future
ture future hospital -requirements.
, --"':,n v
Secrela'slaldes
Denies His Outfit
Roughs Up Minors
A controversy loomed today
between Secret Police Chief Hec Hector
tor Hector Valdes and the Judge of the
Children's Court Dra. Clara Gon
zalez Behrineer as a result of
charges made by the latter last
night during a radio interview.
On the Spanish language
'Meet the Press" program. Un.
Behringer said delinquent arrest arrested
ed arrested by the Secret Police often
complain of being maltreated and
sometimes there is evidence that
they had been beaten.
Interviewed today, Valdes said
the charges were unfounded and
called attention to a case now be before
fore before the Attorney General in
which Maxwell Dodd, a minor
accused of stealing, testified that
he had been coached by the
Children's Court to say that he
had been tortured by the Secret
Police,
Valdes said "tortures are un unknown
known unknown in my organization" and
added that, confessions obtained
under torture have no legai
value.
Last night Mrs. Behringer said
there was no doubt that some sometimes
times sometimes minors are roughed up by
detectives. However, the delin delinquent
quent delinquent youths usually hesitate to
make concrete charges because
they fear that the detectives whl
take reprisals.
Cuba-Bound Planes
Damaged By; Bombs
Af Miami Airport
MIAMI, Aug. 3 (DPI )- Two
airplanes which officers said be belonged
longed belonged to the Cuban government
were damaged by homemade bomb
explosions here yesterday.
A spokesman for the metropoli metropolitan
tan metropolitan department of public safety
said the two planes were part of a
group of 10 T-28 prop-driven train trainers
ers trainers parked in a private hangar at
Miami International Airport.
The officer said the planes were
being repaired in preparation for
shipment to Cuba.
According to the spokesman, the
homemade bombs--nitro glycerine
and sand in paper cups were plac placed
ed placed in the cowlings of four of the
tircraft.
Two exploded. Fuses on the oth-
r two burned out before reaching
the cups.
Damage was confined to the en
gines of the planes.

CZ Says
9
Boarding

Treated
Canal Zone authorities
.
rarions have been nut unnn
,. r
boarding inspectors beyond
man L.. iL. n

" 1 ranama ono uj governments Aug. 5,
The Panama foreign office announced at the week week-end
end week-end that Panama has rerminnt-eH th;

which Panamanian inspectors

tc.s pamg rnrougn me canal to ensure that Pana Panamanian
manian Panamanian safety and labor regulations were being complied
with. o r
The Canal Zone authorities said today that only two
requests for permits for nautical inspector's permits hay
been received since the agreement was signed. One of
the permits granted was not even renewed when It ex expired
pired expired a year ago.
A Panama foreign office official, in announcing the
termination of the agreement, said limitations imposed by
the Canal Zone authorities rendered the inspectors' work
fruitless.

under the 1957 agreement,
the Panamanian inspector, were
to travel out -to Panamflsa
coocia m ie,c,oena oi tne ca ca-rtaT
rtaT ca-rtaT jMthnne agents for th
various vessels.
One;' Balboa shipping agent
wno nanaies panama-tlas shins
said today that "a vear or so
ago" a dock foreman introduc
ed a man to him as one of Pan
ama's nautical inspectors.
The agent told the inspector
to feel free to come along to
board a ship any time he
wished to inspect it. He never
saw the inspector again.
a Bpu&esman ior anoiner a-
gency which has handled about
&i, r-.v.Mmn 1 i ..
A spokesman ior another
ui, i aimiiia-iiiiK iiansi.is since
the agreement was signed has
seen a nautical imp;. tor cr.:y
enr-e.
He saidthat raihfr than hp-
ing a regular inspector the man
atlve, who made a courtesy call
on a Panama-flag ship docked
at Balboa. Since the captain
and entire crew of the ship
spoke little but German, the
verbal courtesies were limited.
The Panama Canal also of offered
fered offered to provide' the Panama Panamanian
nian Panamanian inspectors with launch
service to visit transiting Panama-flag
ships, bellevedly at
the same nominal rental
charged shipping agents.
Unofficial sources put the
total revenue from such
rental over the past two
years at something arouifl
$5.
In its statement announcing
the termination of the agree
ment the foreign office said the
main purpose of the modus
operandi was "to allow Pan
amanian officials, particularly
inspectors from the Department
of Labor, a larger control over
Panamanian-flag ships transit transiting
ing transiting the Canal, in order to ob obtain
tain obtain etrWo..' nnmnKonn. nrntsr.
WtWll DUl JlliJllOlll.. r 1 W I.
tion for Panamanian seamen
aboard these ships."
The Foreign Office, said the
modus operandi also was aimed
at securing compliance on mar maritime
itime maritime conventions, such as the
International Conven tion on
Safety of Human Life at Sea
and the International Conven
tion cn Load Lines.
"However," the off i c i a 1
statement added, "the experi experience
ence experience over the past two years
has shown its inefficacy,
which opinion is shared by
the National Seamen'i Union.
"The limitations Imposed on
the Panamanian nautical in
spectors and the manner in
which those limitations have
been interpreted and applied by
-r- -- --
the Canal Zone authorities have
rendered fruitless the work of
those inspectors."
The Fore gn Office said that
...
tion of the agreement to the
American Embassy. Pan a m
"expressed a reservation of all
its rights.
"The Foreign Ministry," the
official statement concluded,
"will undertake efforts to towards
wards towards obtaining that the Ke Ke-nunlic
nunlic Ke-nunlic of Panama mav exer
cise those rights practically
and effectively."
In a Utter to shipping agents at
the time the US-RP agreement
I concerning tha work o$ the inspec-

Panama's
Officers
denied rndnu tUf
- nwi uiij lillll-
the um-l c d :
- "wiix vi i uiiuinuman
those contained in the aaree-
. if 3
were to board Panama-flao
'bl
tors was sitfiW tha P.n.. r.. 1
qu" ed tbHSlfi onaS
!rmojF 5
'If la ,uiMWafcuuisM.ia
. in nine1
tiont ef tueh Panamanian nauti nautical
cal nautical Inspector! within the Canal
Zona shall be limited to tha fol following:
lowing: following: "1. To nhsorva fVi ..(.I. j
health conditions of such vessels;
"2. To observe tha n.l
-- evutiai il V ill K
conditions of crews;
"3. To examine the vessels' reg registers
isters registers fPatentes de Navegaci6n);
. io ascertain possession of
receipt for payment of vessels' an-
, r kv ""
nual registration fee;
"5. To asrprta
ship Inspection Certificates issued
in accordance with the Interna
tinnal Convention fnr tha c -j
Life at Sea and the International
Load Line Convention, to wit: (a)
Gauging Certificate; (b) Safety
certificate; (c) International Load
Line Certificate: (d) Safety RadiO RadiO-telecraDhv
telecraDhv RadiO-telecraDhv Certified.- f r...
, -1 xsciat-
ting' Certificate:
"6. To ascertain
smei-annnal Cinitam t.
Certificates;
7. To axr-rtnin nn....l.. .J
Panamanian radio license;
"8. To ascprfnin nnM.lmi -J
certificates of fitness for officers,
ana oi seaman s papers;
t. ie ascertain percentage of
Panamanian nationals Included
In complainants of vessels;
'10'. To obsprvp tafotv .n k..liL
. m nvi ncrtlLll
of crew members;
'11. To a.crprfain Bvi.fAnA.
obligatory insurance for seamen;
12. To examine shipping arti articles;
cles; articles; and
"13. To obiarva compliance hi
paymant of wagat and of eve
time to teaman.
"It is also understood that Inas Inasmuch
much Inasmuch as the funrt
- dui.1i i an-
amanian nautical inntnr
be those of inspection, thev shall
not include enforcement of laws,
regulations or requirements with within
in within the Canal Zone, or the levving.
collect-on or receipt with the Canal
Zone, of feps. fines, taxes or charg charges
es charges or collections of any character. 1
'Further, tuch Panamanian
nautical Inipactort shall not re re-nova
nova re-nova thipt papari from tuch
Vtsitlt or rtqu.it Canal Zona
aulhoritiat to withhold clearance
of any vassal or dalay ar Inter,
fata with tha expaditiout trantlt
of any tuch vattal through the
Canal. :lf.
"Tt im ,,tk. 1 1 1
" miUlCl UIIUEI 3UJOQ 1011
visits to such vessels shall be at
such times and places, and in such
manner, as shall be arranred with
teb Canal Zone port autborities,
u s"u in coursa db in comoxnu
ty with applicable rules and re.
ulations.
"It is further understood that tha
right is reserved to the Governor of -i
the Canal Zone to deny boarding
privileges to Panamanian autical
inspectors wnose acuvmes are not
in conformity with the conditions
of this modus operandi or whose,
presence is deemed to be inimic-
nhla in tha prnritv nt tha faMl M9 :
'..".V .V ...V- .u J V.
to the expeditious and free transit
of vessels through the Canal"

Correctly

t
I
I

.11



FAS! TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
1 MM AN mBLiHie BY THi PANAMA AMBtCAN IHC
V- wuhhi it numn wouneevau. m iaa
2 KAeWOBt AfttAS. aeire
I -t7 BratiT P Bei IS4 na.
TtLVHCMI 1-0740 LINM
CLI ABBKIW. PANAMIRICAN.
CM. ertKli It 7S CtNTWkl AvtMUt BITWttN ttTM N tlTM TIT

Labor News

.. Mmiin rtNTTivi. J0HUA 0WIl. NC

S4I Madison Ave,. Nrw Ye. JIT W

Ml MWTM m ABVAMCt-

P Oni Via im Abvnci

I1
so

T -MAIL
190
IS 00
t4 eo

TNI IS YOUB FORUM THI MADIM OWN COtUMH
,", TVa Matt h tarvm Hi r,in f The hum Amerkaii
LMm r received flretafalH' ana ara kanaled re eeefieeiitial
If'm eenfrifc.jte t letter dear W Imaarteiif W eaeaar He
Mat Letter ara tukdihee' in Hia arrftr recetrea1.
. Please frr fa kwa tae letters limtfaa te aae taee leair.
MaaNtr a tetter writer. Is Mala hi ttHefeet eeafleeeae.
Tfch nawtBaaat euamet na tetpamlpiltty fat statement ar ealniam
esBratita in laftan ftani reader.
THE MAIL BOX

CURUNDU BUS CHECK

sir

pnHnnc" i Mail Rnv Julv Hi claims a bus checker at

Curundu checked only seven out of 14 passengers in a bus In
which he was riding. ..., ., u i.
Allow me to say, despite "Curious," that the Curundu check check-era,
era, check-era, as well as all others on the Zone, are efficient and honest.
That is why the management of the Canal Zone Bus Service
has decided to make the positions permanent.
One of the Curundu checkers Is an elderly Indian who has
three yea I; of service with the company. The other is a Pan Panamanian
amanian Panamanian whose reputation with the company is above reproach.
I suspect that "Curious" is one" of those who opposed the
checkers' union in its recent successful strike against the bus
company, and who is basically opposed to fair wages and work work-ins:
ins: work-ins: conditions for these men. In other words, a union-buster
' To back up his unsubstantiated charge, he would have to
dve the bus number, the time of the Incident, and a convincing
assurance that none of those passengers he claims went un uncounted
counted uncounted are bus company employes (who are entitled to ride free
tj and from work). UnlonUt

And

Comments

Sir:

PENF.TENDS WANTED
I am anxious to have an exchange of letters with someone

I have heard from the Youth Council for International Con Contact,
tact, Contact, the organization which I belong to, that I might make
some contacts by writing to the newspaper.
The aim of such letter exchanges is to understand other
countries and deepen the friendships and learn the languages
et other peoples. I think it is a wonderful Idea.
Now, I want to introduce myself. I am a "-year-old Japa Japanese
nese Japanese boy and attend Yasuda Senior High School. Mv hobble,
are collecting- picture postcards, drawing pictures and building
radios I like sports, especially track and swimming.
I would like very much to correspond with someone from
Haama- Julchiro Ito.
2-39 dagawa
Edaga"wa-ku, Tokyo, Japan

Spooky Starters

Sir:

BALLAD OF THE BRIDGE

This is in answer to the versification of A.R.M. (Mall Box.

28): ....
Do stop my friend, doil't take on so.
Your woes could be much worse vou know.
Just think, when all that work is done,
The bridge complete, and we ean run
And skip across and dril e our cars
Without the fear of locks and bars
Of ?. bridge that makes one's life a panic
Closing and opening a second a minute.
I am always close to despair,
Most times I want to tear my hair.
That bridge Is timed to check my rate,
My car Is always a second late. .....
All hall to the racket and the din n the street
My dreams fulfilling man. ain't a noise mo sweet
Than that grinding shrieking earsplitting drill
That relentless mowing down of Ancon Hill
Oops 'scuse me: what's its name anyhow?
Never mind the name, man. they're clearing space
And the noise is music to my musical taste
They're clearing space for the road in the air
Where I won't have to speed on the wings of prayer
It means a bridge where I can walk, where I can talk.
Where I can park.
(Course 1 might get a ticket but who cares?
I won't have to hurry, near fracture mv ribs.
For I won't have to cross Miraflores Bridge.

AN OPIN LITTIR TO ONDINI

My dear Ondine,
I have followed with much interest the comments regsrding your
recent visit into modern time. ...,..
1 I was not too surprised to learn that many people did not receive

I know, perhsps better thtn most, the generous nature of your
heart. Even so I felt I must tell you not to be saddened by what you
may have heard yourself.
It is a peculiar trait of the people of that time to cast stones much

They never mention the quality ofa meal unless it is to say that

the meat is tougn.
Tki.v mh miV nf tha weather when It is grey and sad.

- They overlook the rich smoothness of the dessert and do not see
ttnrJrainbow in every rainy dsy.
They have no way of knowing of the many hours thit you and
your friends gave out of your young lives trying to harmonize with
nhat in th tollina nf I (torv.

They seem to forget that you are sot story taller. by trade but
rather for the simple reason that you enjoy auch activity for what it
. Is, lots of fun.
They even condemn you for trying to tell your story at all. It
mi that nthen mav have told it better.

Itrange they do not congratulate you for having the courage to

try They critieiie the young people t ineir jimi wnen mey oenave
Wlv. And when a erouo of those same young people join together

1b clean healthy activity, they criticize the product of their efforts

e-nee more.
Wa are not of their time dear Ondine.

When I saw vou there on their stage I was moved by the fact that

you seem to grow more beautiful with the passing of eieh year. Your

every movement ana gesture was a ming oi nuw grace.
I saw a white flowing beard that was very impressive.

1 saw the king's wart, which even though a trifle large, was quite

regal.
Thank you Ondine for making this vtsit. Also convey my grati

tud to, your friends who helped give me sucn a piesiant evening.
m Him

By VICTOR RIISIL
Dar Es Salaam, Tanganyika
If you didn't raise your ooy 10 be
a soldier, then fight for more
Bantus to be turned into "been "been-to's,"
to's," "been-to's," a sage Africa hand today
advised the American people
through this correspondent. Here's
what ue meant:
The Bantu people are millions
on millions oi uative Airicans.
The "Been-to" Bantu is the edu educated
cated educated cnap who long ago left his
tribal village, was probably edu educated
cated educated by one of 'he great Protes Protestant
tant Protestant or Catholic missions, and
was invited to the U.S. And all o o-ver
ver o-ver Africa he is known on his re return
turn return as a "been-to," for he has
the worshipped distinction of hav having
ing having "been-to" the United States.
That "been-to" phrase is rever revered
ed revered amongst the 200,000,000 peo people
ple people who will turn this continent

for or against us. They listen to

tne 'been-to s. Tney follow
them.
Yet of all the thousands of
young Africans eager to befriend

us, our government brings over
only eight from East Africa, the

norn oi tne continent an area
which not only outflanks the A-

rabian oil routes to the Suez, but

can slash the canal's communi
cations if controlled by an un

inenaiy torce.
Yet both our Central Intern-

gence Agency and Britain's MI-

5 know that Soviet agents are
seeping into the "Horn" and

down into Tanganyika and across

to Zanzibar 25 air minutes iway.
These Russian agents find a
hungry people. Starvation pains
in the gut can slash loyal ties,
even to us. How hungry are these
folks, how sharp is their pain?
The Russian agents see what I

see:
Workers in rags, men with
jobs, sleeping off their lunch hour
in the shadow of the white muni munificence
ficence munificence of the Aga Khan's Shir

tmami Ismalia Supreme Council.
Here the handsome new Aga
Khan was weighed in diamonds,
rubies and gold. But sleeping
workers lie in the street because
they have no money for bus
fare home. And if they got home
they would have no food. They
eat but one meal a day, in fact,
and at lunch time they have gone

wimoui a Due since a meager

meai me previous nignt. i h e.y

cannui anora Dreaxtasi of any

sun. ii mey eat earner, they
must go without dinner.
So when they break (or lunch,

tney Duy a Douie ot Togwa, a
grim pint of lemon juice for 20
Tanganyikan pennies about a

cent and a half American. Thev

drink this and Ahey sleep. Then
they go back id their WWdfags. f

unce a weeic tney eat some

sort of meat. Once a week they

at nci. The other evenines

A. I

mey consume some sort of por

ridge and an almost wooden root

ailed cassava. I couldn't cut it

with a sharp knife. They boil it
down and when it's cold they use

it for fire wood.

xneir average w is S2.10 a

week. High wages are five dot

lars. In the sisal (hemp and kha-

Ki raw material thev earn as lit

tie as 15 cents a day. This I

checked and rechecked.

Ann maybe back home vou

tninx I taut of jungle people.

They certainly are not. I lived
with them for two days. I saw

them put on amateur theatricals

I heard their new African jazz

unlike anything out of New Or

leans. I heard their children sing

in trained chorus:

"Mee-le-le Afrika. Mee le-le A

fnka (Forever Africa.)"

And in English( When the Sun

goes marching down 1 don't

know why I shouldn't be free.'

And in Swahili they sang: When

me ngnt came out of the dark

ness one man was for me (Ju

mis) JNyerere.

I

U NEA Sairiea, Int J

NEA Sanies, Inc.

NEW YORK

By LEE

I
i
f
i

crtaDAUY WAS II ItiGTO : J
MerryiGoRouijd

ly tllW riAttON

PILOT SITUATION

ir:

"1859 or 1959", in the Mail Box some time ago, set out the Pana

ma Canal pilot situation factually to the letter.

It if also factual that Gov. William E. Potter, his executive plan

ning staff and the Marine Director are human beings. Being human

ther too make mistakes.

d ttrMi1l't ff Um K an4 prails mnri unHritftnriin0 aHi

tude, and willingness to shoulder this burden by the men affected, If

th Administration would mibiiciv aomu mey erred mree years ago

la their estimate of the work load and the number of men required to

AXCOTXipilBIl UU IBAB, IQU B U1V fUUlS k4uiKCM.v uuili we, iu
tion ean be remedied by hiring more men?

So far they have only ignored the facts, and to appease the pilots
made emoty womises and suggested schemes that could never work.

Potter's- Executive Planning Staff has put him on the spot

and has created an extreme hardship on a large group of Canal em em-.hImvi
.hImvi em-.hImvi T inrwil to tha Rnvernnr in be bif enouah to nuhliclv admit

'that he recognizes this mistake, ask the employes' indulgence, and

,thui wins their respect, confidence and help over this rough spot.
Chlaf Watchum

Read Our Classifieds

Mindinf the store for Walter:

Aren't some American Reds and

fellow-travelers working for ur

exposition in Moscow. .TAna

won't they do everything to be

little America?. .And aren

they acting as couriers to trans

mit orders back to the, U.S. 7. .
By the way, how did impresario

Sol Hurok crasn tne UNixon par-

? It'a no secret that Hurok's

Russian dance importations have
been loaded with Soviet secret a a-gents.
gents. a-gents. It was testified before Con

gress that a top Russian spy was

a member of one ; company, a
Hurok executive look the 5th,

as did an in-law employed by

him. (But it's ART.)

I get around: (so do they.)

John Barrymore- Jr.. and

Duggan are a jkertsonfc Harry
Cohn's widow,; JoBUVpermUy

arranged Ingemar Johanssons

Columbia ic screen ttst. Dept.

of how-time-flies: Jack Lit's
youngest granddaughter, 17-year-

old Barbara, mmei-onaia liw

on Lehman In Caul on tne vm..

Carol Lvnley and Brandon de

Wilde carrying on their "Blue D;

nim" fum formance pa. icree.i.
fWith less casualties.). .White

Way Wisdom: Cute or beaut: to

make 'em toot u taaes loot.

The man they sang of ia the

man who will lead Tanganyika

when it becomes an independent

nation next year. He is one of the

staunchest friends the U.S. ha

in Africa. Next year he will try

to Duno a democracy here.

ivyerere is a Deen to. a sage

mend of the West. But if he
beaten down by the hunger

his people, and hunger turns men

sngry, the next been-to" will

have been-to Moscow.

matter of
FACT

wit .aVwapni.iLs;.

CONFIDENTIAL

MORTIMER

0

ing all the dividends. .Joey A A-dams,
dams, A-dams, the author-comic-comic who

seems to be i shoo-in for prexy

of the American Guild of Variety
Artists (of which I'm a captive

member) assures me that varie variety's
ty's variety's story about it ankling the 4

A's to join Jimmy Hoffa's gang

ster infiltrated Teamsters and
Harry Bridges Red controlled
ILWU is erroneous. Joey says:
"It can only happen over wy
dead body. ."(How's your insur insurance?).
ance?). insurance?). .Some gals call their
bikinis: Baiting suits.

tairt) it flipping over cheesecake
queen Geene Courtney. .Business
and pleasure at Romeo Salts'! :
Myrna Loy and Ben Gazzara. .
When a guy says he's brood brood-minded,
minded, brood-minded, that's what he is.

ADVICt TO YOUNG GALS
If aou return a wink with a
wink
You my get a mink in a wink,
I tink.

No Pain: (No fun either.) Laur

en Bacall's steady date, abroad

is Bruce Cabot. (Steady for a

day?). .This department always

maintained there was no r'-

er love than the love of p'tftlic-

ity between Anna Maria whatsher

name ana Buooy uregman. now
he's like the same headlines with

Corinne Calvet. .Siella Stevens,

the ange in 20th-Fox'l "Blue

Angel" is flapping ner wings ai

that handsome new movie 1001.
Michael Dante. (There should be

a Bae here, but what is it?). ..

Lionel Hampton sageiy remams

that it's okay for nusoanas to iook
at oretty gals. "Even when

you're or a diet you can sun

look at the menu."

To nrint or not to nriht:There's

a moral to this story but I don't

know what it is. Last year tne

Yankees trained at Ed Wynne's

Harwvn (Ed is a former urn

nire) and led the league. This

year they're confined to quarters

and vou set where they are. But

Billy Martin and four of nis not

Clevelsnd team mates weren't

bashful about swapping auto

graphs (and phone numbers) with
aiv ftiHH "Hfta TTnitraraA" fin.

alists who also graced tne emn.

In addition to being a hit at the
Copa, Andy Williams also made

a hit with Cooaeabana cutie He

lene Parker. .T-Men quietly
probing Broadway shows to find

out if their "angels" are aeciar

THE WAtCH

Tomorrow's Headlines Yester Yesterday:
day: Yesterday: Famed Waldorf Men's Bir
will be removed to the 49th and
Lexington corner to make way
for a smart French restaurant to

e "poncessioned" out. .Zecken-

orti hotel operation so massive,
immtious and successful ihat

Webb and Knapp dreaming of
floating a separate stock issue.
Which reminds me. Waldor's form
er Calude Phillip is not an of official
ficial official of the high-flying Zecken-

dorf chain as reported, merely an
executive consultant whatever
that means. .Nation's largest
guided missile plant secretly on
the blueprints for the Newburgh,
N. Y. area. (Twelve miles a a-way.)
way.) a-way.) No one, knows about t ex

cept the land speculators-. .Vir

ginia McManus, the Brooklyn

school teacher who did a stretch

for call-galling, is penning a book
to be called "Teachers Pet." Ac Ac-cerding
cerding Ac-cerding to Chicago interviewers,

sne says the fix is higher in N.

Y. than in Chi. (The cost of liv

ing i less there. . .All you got

ta do to write a book nowadays

De a junKie, prosue or an
alcoholic. .Milton Berle wires
from Las Vegas: "I wonder who's
going to shoot the firing squad
in Cuba."

DAILY
MEDITATION

DAILY MIDITATION
(Presented by the Depart Depart-mant
mant Depart-mant ot Christian tducatian f
the Ipiseapal Church in tha
Missionary Dioceaa af tha Pa Panama
nama Panama Canal Zena.)
Phillpplana 3.13, 14
A GOOD POROITTIR

Dames make news: Cesare Ro

mero dating concert celloist Evi Evi-ta
ta Evi-ta Arnold. .Rock Hudson real
cool with Sonja Henie skater Ina
Carter. .Daily Double at Yonk-

ers took second money when the

daily double of Anne Bancroft and

Susan Cabot were spotted in the
Terrace Restaurant. .Singer To Tony
ny Tony Bari torching for Lauy Ir s

Mountbatten. Keeps her picture
On a table always reserved for

her at the Gondolier where he

warbles. .Today's Scott's Scut

Brady item: Joy Karrington. Yes Yesterday's:
terday's: Yesterday's: Julie Newmar. Day-be
fore-yesterday: Anne Bancroft. ..
Etehl Six, Ethel Merman's d- ii
ter, and Paul Wallce, a menXer
of the senior Ethel's "Gppsy"
cast at Perona's El Morocco. .
Singers Dolores Gray and Dick

Smart singing to each other at

Joe Marsh's Spindletop. .Don't

tell me that the Earl of Car

narvon (once wed to Adele As

"Forgetting thasa things
which ara behind, and reaching
forth unto those "things which
are before, I press toward the
marIL"
Wanted, a good forgetter! If we
could really run that advertise
ment all of us and all our church churches
es churches would be much better off.
Sometimes it seems that our mot

to is the second part of the Gloria

Patri, "As it was in the beginning

is now, and ever shall be..."
We accept the .tried and tradi

tional but somehow we are afraid
of the new. Yet God is the great

innovator. Have you ever thought

what a daring novelty the Crea Creation
tion Creation was? But God is always

doing the unexpected. He brought
the Hebrews out of Egypt when
they had no claim upon Him. Our
prophet saw Him doing something
equally new and startling in his

day, bringing back the Jews from

the dispersion.

God stands ready to do some

thing new today. God can remake
our lives if we only surrender
them to Him. We need not plod
along in the old rut of former

failures. Past success, however

is often the greater hindrance

The price of future progress may

be a good forgetter.

WASHINGTON There was 1-

rnnv in the fact that NikRa Khrush

chev's unprecedented and on-the
whole healthy public debate at the
American Exposition in Moscow

was staged with the man wno oar
consistently urged more American
concentration on missiles.

When Khrushchev threw in Vice
nresident Richard M. Nixon's face

the warning "we hav means at
our disposal which can have very
bad consequences" and again
when he said, obviously referring
to missiles, "but ours are beter
if you want to compete" Nixon
knew Khrushchev was telling the

truth.
It was Nixon who urged a frank

er policy in telling the Amercan

people now far oenind kussi wr.
were when the first Russian Sput Sput-n'k
n'k Sput-n'k was launcher1 on Oct. 4. 195?

He wi overruled by the White

House.'
In the aonroximatelv two years

nre then, we have lagged eve)
farther behind. And the real rea reason
son reason Soviet foreign minia'er Andrei
Gromyko has been so tough at Ge

neva i because Rsi is now r

head of the United States in every
military department except sea
power. ;
Here is the box score on Sovle'

vs. American military strength,

wh'ch both Nixon and KhniHrhe KhniHrhe-had
had KhniHrhe-had in mind when they debated
in Moscow:

INTIRCONTINENTAL MIS MIS-IILIS:.
IILIS:. MIS-IILIS:. Russia suddenly resumed
testing intercontinental missiles
in March after a long lapse. From
this. Secretary of Defense Neil H.
McElroy hopefully concluded that
the laose meant the Russians, like

us, were having trouble with' their

long distance missile. Other

experts believe Russia stopped

firing the big missiles simply be because
cause because she was busy producing
them.
In any event, there can be
no mistakink the fact Russia .has

been blasting' off about four mis-

sues a month aince March from

her great test center northeast of

the Caspian Sea.
Our powerful radar eyes in Tur Turkey
key Turkey have spotted the missiles take
off; another radar station in the
Aleutians has followed the war warheads
heads warheads ss they plunged back to
earth.
Only two of the big missiles have
been hurled a full 5,000 miles. The
remaining 18 which we were able
to track went 3,500 to 4,500 miles.

Whether these were test models
or production models, however,
mains a question mark.
Our own ICBM firings have been
plagued by minor malfunctions. It

is no military secret that we have
tested z Atlas ICBM'S, of which

11 have been successful, six par partially
tially partially successful, and nine comnlet

failures.

In contrast, our monitor shown

that 75 percent of the Russian

ICBM tests have been succe

They have operated with alarm

ing reliability.

The first of our 5 500-mile At.

las missiles were supposed to be
combat-ready in July. But five

misfires in a row have dehyed
the operational date until Septem September
ber September or October.

It is doubtful that we will have

th 10 operational Atlases that Me-

Elroy nromised by the end of the

vear. Russia ought to have tan

times that number.

: We also hope to locate .four
aquadroms i Italy; pernaps V
more in Turkey, But we haven't
even selected the lauching sities.
Our present schedule un rali

for halting production" altogether

nave iuui auuui isuu inter intermediate
mediate intermediate missiles.-'.-., .... -
UNDERWATER MISSILISi We
have taken actual photographs of
Soviet Submarines equiped with
vertical launching tubes. These'
are capable of firing stub-noseu
Comet missiles from., underwater
hiding places at targets 700 miles
inland.
Russia has also stepped up Its
submarine activity in Americas
waters during the past three
years Apparently the Reds iiava
even plan'el secret' transmitters
long the-ocean bottom near, our
shores. -These serve as homing
devices to guide other sub submarines.
marines. submarines. f

ARREST FOR PUBLCITY

PARIS (UPD Seven teen-sgers

arrested in a street fight said they
just -wanted to get their pictures

in tne newspapers, pouce report

ed today.

INTERMEDIATE MISSILE

Russia is known to have 750 me

dium range missiles rendv to

launch against oir overseas bases.
They Include both T -'. which mn
shoot 1.000 mile!, and T-2V which

can hit targets up to 1,800 miles

away.

Our first squadron of 1.200-mile

T-hor middles was delivered to

England last and was sun edo
England last winter snd ws sun sun-nosed
nosed sun-nosed to be readv for combat by
January. Tt didn't become opera

tionsl until June.

This now gives us 15 "interme "intermediate
diate "intermediate m'ssiles agains Russia's 7.V
We should whip another 15-mls.''
souadrom into shape before thr
summer is over.
Altogether, we will set up foui
squadrons in England.

In contrast, ; we won't be able
to launch underwater missiles un until
til until late 1960. TJiese will be 4,200 4,200-mile
mile 4,200-mile Polaris missiles, which hay
fizzled in preliminary testa at
Cape Canaveral, Fla.
The test program will be ate
ped up for the next 12 months.
Then the Navy may attempt a ship
board launching from a aurfai

ship. If this succeeds, the Navy
will try firing Polaria misailes
from submerged submarines.

Of Russia's 600 submarines, an
estimatecLlOO are equipped to firt
missiles.
The United States has only fiv
missiles submarines, all carrying
winged Regulus missiles, which
must be fired from the surface.,
Our total submarine fleet, count count-ing
ing count-ing 80 used for training or stored
in mothballs, is less than 200.

RUSSIAN ATOMIC SUBSt
Thanks to Adm. Hyman Rickover,
however, we are well ahead of
Russia in designing and eonstruct eonstruct-lg
lg eonstruct-lg atomic submarines. But the
latest intelligence reports claim
Russia will soon launch its first
two atomic subs.

In atomic weapons, Russia has
caught up with us in quality and
is not far behind in quantity. Wt
have picked up enough Informa Information
tion Information from Russia nuclear test to
convince our scientists that Russia
has developed compact hvdrogen

warheads better in some respects
than our own.;
In conventional weapons, Russia
still maintains on overwhelming
superiority. Her land army is
still 175 divisions; ours has dwind dwindled
led dwindled to 14 effective divisions.

The Red Army also has better

modern rifles, self-propelled as assault
sault assault artilleryarmored personnel

shopping helicopters.

L7 a a, n ti 1 I... a. tA AM

bat jet planes to our 18.000. While

her fighter planes are probably su superior
perior superior to ours, our Strategic Air

Command is still considered a

more effective bomber force.
Russia has been testing a new.

supersonic, bomber which might
be the forerunner of the world's
first atomic-powered bomber. Her

atomic aircraft program is believ believed
ed believed to be ahead of ours.
On the high seas, we still sur surpass
pass surpass Russia in fleet strength. But
the Red surface fleet is now sec second
ond second only to our own, while her
submarine fleet is superior.
Russia hasn't bothered to build
any airplane carriers, perhaps be because
cause because carriers may be as outmod outmoded
ed outmoded as battleships in this atomic
age.

GRIVAS BALKS AT PACT
ATHENS (UPI)-Gen. George
Grivas, a leader of Cyprus' fignt
for independence, announced
today he would actively op oppose
pose oppose the present international
agreements by which Cyprus is to
attain nationhood. In so doing, the
EOKA guerilla chief opeuly broke
with Archbishop Makarios who
has given public support to the
Agreements reached earlier this
year by Britain, Turkey and

Greece.

Fruit Orchard

Anawer to Previout Puztlej

When Columbus sailed en
his second voyage is 149S,
Juan Pone de Leon wai with
him to begin his career as ex explorer
plorer explorer and eonqueror for Spain.
As governor of Puerto Rica, he
became impressed with native
tales of a nearby country,
Bimint, said to contain a spring
capable of making youth eon eon-tinua
tinua eon-tinua indefinitely. Setting sail
to nnd Bimlnl and the aprlng,
ha reached land in 1513. He
named the country- Florida,
after tha Spanish name for

Kaster Sunday, the day on

which he first sighted land.

O XacyoJopadla Britaaaiea

j

r

YOU CAN not

AFFORD ANYWHERE BUT

IN PANAMA

RICARDO RICARDO

cc

s
QC
tx
s
QC
cc

RICARDO RICARDO RICARDO cc

20 Edible turtle 37 Ohio and Utah, aa v..t iv.

23 Speaker for instance 60 Dutch uncle

ACROSS 85 Consume
Fleshy pome laaential betag
fruit DOWN
I Smyrna lHaaard
IUtt)e Jack 3 Expunges
Homer! fruit -g Declare
U Gaelic 4 Corded fabric
11 Follower 5 Clenched hand
14 Htnflu queen Willow genua

15 Grate 7 Garments 25 Melancholy
Id Body of water 8 (b.) 27 Father (Fr.)
17 Mix 8 Newest 28 Scottish caps
18 Suffix 10 Joins 33 Remove
18 Begin 11 Bogs down 34 Dried grapt

21 Summer (Fr.) aaianes so Emaciates

22 Dormouse
24 Worms
2 Divest
'28 Hones gaits
28 Mimic
I 30 Upper limb
I 31 Threefold
(comb, form)

32 Shakespearean

talry queen
23 Male bee
SSZjeets
violently
83 Affront
38 Angry -.
41 Biblical
prophet
43 killed
48 East Indian
timber tree
47- majesty
4IHeitlty
SO Feminine
appaliaUoa
31 Xlavator
inventor
82 Months (ah.)
61 Eneouiitar

pilliilS
tipmi Jib

38 Beneath
40 Puff up
43 Citrus fruit
44 Wild ox
43 Present month

(ab.)

' I? p ft M I 8 j JO ll
ZZ rZZ
i-iiirPE
?! m"
jrpr yr rm
Kir n
s : "r- j?



I-

MONDAY, AUGUST 8. 195
THE FANAMA AMERICAN AM IKDZFCXDCN1 DAItt NEWSFAPKB
FAG I rnkil

If j a,." i J-r ii "-if-" ..-.UA.rt., .iMMiaiim

IN THE FIELD Colonel John
order to staff officers during the
Tactical Units
In Command
. q
All tactical units of the 1st Bat Battle
tle Battle Group, 2)th Infantry," joined
by personnel from group head'
quarters, and Headquarters and
Headquarters Company, particip participated
ated participated in a command post; exer exercise
cise exercise last week. Purpose was to
develop proficiency in movement
to command post areas, to in instruct
struct instruct personnel m rapid installa installation
tion installation of communications and- to
practice application-of doctrine in
a tactical situation.
"The operation. served to point
outareas on ,which to place m-
nhanis in future training,- com-
mntAH r.nl John R. Wriaht Jr
commanding- officer of the battle
group. "The most noteworthy part
of the exercise was the enthusiasm
and diligence with whlcn all per
nnnel involved carried out their
j assigned duties," he sad.
The mission of the battle group

Sen: Kennedy Deplores Labor Reform
Bill; Hot Debate Expected In House

: WASHINGTON .(UPI) Sen.
I John F. Kennedy warned yester
i day that approval of a 'punitive
tabor reform bill in ; the House
! would endanger passage of any
anti-racketeeering legislation this
1 yThe Massachusetts Democrat,
I chairman of the Senate labor sub sub-'
' sub-' committee, issued a statement
! strongly endorsing a moderate
.measure approved by me House
i Labor Committee.
' He said it was "compatible with
:the strong, workable bill" which
he originally sponsdred in the Sen Sen-ate
ate Sen-ate The Senate toughened the
Kennedy bill before passing it in
the spring.
At this same time, K e n n e d y
.lmrniv. criticized a admituslra
tion backed House substitute
which would provide tougher
curbs on labor unions.
Tho Hnuxe was expected to be
!n dphnt on the bill late this
woeir or earlv next week. A bruis
Ing floor fight was considered cer
tain. ...
Tfpnuprlv said the substitute,- of
fered by a group of House Repub Repub-Uran
Uran Repub-Uran MA southern Democrats
and endorsed by President Eisen Eisenhower,
hower, Eisenhower, would "weaken labor's le legitimate
gitimate legitimate rights at the bargain
ing table." :;;4.
Kennedy's statement obviously
was aimed at strengthening the
hand of the committee bill's back
ers in the forthcoming fight on
the House floor. They had been
eager for Kennedy, also a mem
ber of the Senate Rackets Com
mittee. to help them counter
charges that their bill was too
weak. ...
But two members of the sharp-lv-split
House Labor Committee
weed with Kennedy. .,
Rep! John-H. Dent 'D Pa.)
contended that both the- moderate
committee bill and the tougher
nhctitntn measure en too far in
subjecting unions' Internal affairs
to government regulation. s f 1 -Dent
said this could set a prec
edent for future legislation regu regulating
lating regulating medical, legal and other
professional societies. ,'
One of the substitute r bill's auth
ors, Rep, Robert P. Griffin, (R
Mich.), denied the measure goes
too far. Ho saidvreform legislation
could' not be effective- without
some government regulation of
union affairs
Griffin saidthe government has
an obligation to protect, b a s i c
rights of union members because
4 "the law. now permits compulsory
unionism.", 4 V,

. I The two congressmen; debated

' f
" .( ; ..- -
,y L.
At ii 4f4r
, r v, "y L

R. Wright Jr., left, commanding officer of the 1st Battle Group, SOth
command post exercise. ;

Participate
Post Exercise
was to defend Miraflores Locks
against an airborne threat from
th northeast. The situation as
sumed that Aeeressor bases' ahd
been established throughout the
Antilles chain after an unsucces
ful attempt to invade Florida. Ag
gressor troops intended to seize
the Canal to divide the U.S. At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic and Pacific fleets. 1
Added forces were assumed to
have landed in the Canal Zone by
air. According to the situation,
friendly forces had air superiority
but the Aggressors had -captured
airfields at Mndoza and -were
capable of gaining greater
strength. The battle group was
ordered to proceed in a tactical
move to block air-landed Aggres Aggressor
sor Aggressor troops moving towards Mira Mira-'flores
'flores Mira-'flores from Mendoza, with the mis
sion of destroying the locks.
Buffalo and Rochester, N.Y., tele television
vision television stations.
It was also learned tnat sup
porters of the substitute on tne
House committee have urged Ei
senhower to make a televised ap
oeal for the substitute proposal.
They felt the President should try
to counter TV apeals by Rackets
Committee Counsel Robert F
Kennedy, the senator's brother,
on behalf of the committee bill.

In addition, Sen. Karl E. Mundtjby Florida with ,2.5- per cent:

(R-S.D,). vice chairman of the
Senate Rackets Committee, urged
the public "to keep up the pres-
sure on thos.e House members
who may vet yield to the dictates
of labor boss control arid compel
Congress to pass a milk toast
laW reform hill which would be
worse than no action at all."
Thus both sides were busily try-
ing to line up as much outside
summit aa Bossible net or tne
showdown. i
H
i. .- 1 1
1 1

BIRDS EYE quick-frozen foods are farm farm-fresh
fresh farm-fresh and flavorsome. Crown exclusively
for Birds Eye, these ready-to-serve quick-,
frozen Birds Eye Foods are carefully
selected, cleaned and packed to meet top top-fradeU.S.
fradeU.S. top-fradeU.S. Food Standards.

Stock fh bestget sortie today I

la I .

uy Penitentiaries nowing

Record N umber
WASHINGTON (UPI) -The
nation's penitentiaries held a re record
cord record population of 205,643 pris prisoners
oners prisoners at the end of 1958, the fed fed-era
era fed-era Prison Bureau reported yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday. Bureau Director James V. Ben
nett said there were 0,229 more
inmates behind bars in state and
federal prisons last year ,than in
1957 an increase of- 5.Z per cent.
There were 21,549 prisoners held
in federal prisons at the close of
1958 or 5.5 per cent more than
the previous year.: State peniten penitentiaries
tiaries penitentiaries had 184,094 prisoners or J.2
per cent more than in 1957.
Female prisoners totaled T,485
at the end of 1958. This repre repre-sented
sented repre-sented a 1.8 per cent Increase
over the 7,301 a year earlier.
The federal government had 775
female prisoners. Six states ac accounted
counted accounted for 3,6.2 or about half
of the total. They were New York
with 771; California, 730;. Ohio,
366; Michigan 330; North Ca Carolina,
rolina, Carolina, 323; and Texas, S17.
Western prisons had the highest
percentage of new prisonrs an
11.2 per cent increase.
All western states except Col Colorado
orado Colorado showed an increase. The
three states which accounted for
the largest gains in new prisoners
confined were New Mexico with
19.4 per cent; California, 13.5 per
cent and Arizona. 12.4 per cent.
The South had an increase of
6.3 ner cent in the number of
persons behind bars. Kentucky led
other Southern states with a 13
per cent increase. It was followed
'South Carolina, 12.1 per cent; ana
Virginia, 1.4 per cent,
Among northeastern states, ine
increase was 2.1 per cent. Vermont
and Connecticut had the largest
increases 19 per cent and 17.8
per cent.
For the country as a whole
there were 120 state and federal
prisoners confined on Dec. 31, .958,
for each 100,000 of the civlian
population, dui iney raneea irom
25 prisoners per 100,000 In New

rmHrWfrrT--. POULTRY

VEGETABLES FRUITS

Infantry, tomtit the operations
; (US Army fhoto)

Of Prisoners
Hampshire to 247 In the District
of Columbia.
Six other states also registered
higher than average prison rates
Georgia witn 182, Alabama
and Maryland, 174 each, Virginia,
151, and Nenada and Florida, 147
each.
EARTHQUAKE REPORTED
ST. HELIER. Isle of Jersey
(UPI) A ten-minute earthquake
rocked tms Brmsn mana m tne.
English; -Channel today; No dam damage
age damage was reported. t,
METHOD ACTOR "Mr.
Stubbs" is a "method" actor.
His method: stealing every everything
thing everything in sight, aceoes Included.
He's the animal star of the
forthcoming circus adventure
story, "Toby Tyler." Nine-year-oM
Kewia Owccaan twill
star a'Toby.t
JUICES
I
I
I
I

Enjoy your favorite fruits, vegetables,
fruit juices, fish and poultry, all year
round regardless of season.

j
: i a ostid "N o o o s : J

Cop' Disappears If!

ArSlreeHaves In'
; "iMjbt&BiAi UPI-i-Police
lie continued a search here Sun
day for the body of patrolman -Jo
seph Reiss,. 3$,: who disappeared
and was oeuevea Kiiiea in a:
street cave-in in the northeast
sectiori of th city Saturday.
Reiss had been sent to the In Intersection
tersection Intersection of 5th and Clearfield
Sts. to investigate a water leak in
the-street, poUce said. The street!
eonapsed beneatn nim as his part
ner, Josepn snepiicfc, looked on
from a short distance away.
A can about 20 feet deen and
38 feet -in diameter marked the
spot"where :the officer plunged.
About 60 families living in row
houses: in the section were evac
uated after, a broken water main
under the eive-ln flooded a wide
area .and gas from a broken gas
line' spread, through the neighbor neighborhood
hood neighborhood threatening an explosion.
News cameramen were forbidden
to use xflasB attachments, and
smoking was prohibited forelocks
i uiura. i' r
Scores of f police and firemen
were dispatched to the scene and
a watch was kept at the Delaware
River and Somimerset St., where
the broken r water main empties
Search operations moved slowly
ior iear- oi a jurcner couapse.

TOMORROW TUESDAY

MatW Annual

MIL

T-
from
r
Glasses
Open

Shirls

1.50

i ij
mmm &

m Lb

SUN

I Biases
tWSm from
95c.
J

9 a.m. thru 6:3u

CASH SALES ONLY

, Sorry I No alterations r No reurns
Branch Store No. 18-60 Tivoli Avenue Tel. 2-2126
Sale Only At Tivoli Ave,, Branch Store

Mam

is

Now Maintenance

STOCKHOLM, Aug. S (UPI)
The main concern of the Wqrld
Jewish Congress no longer is to
defend the rights of the Jews but
to work for the maintenance of
Jewish life, the president of the
congress ur. iNwnum uoiamann
said here today.
Goldmarin, speaking at a news
conference in the Grand Hotel be before
fore before the opening of the fourth ple plenary
nary plenary assembly in the House of
Parliament stated-that the probl problems,
ems, problems, to be fought ar$e not only le legal
gal legal ones, but also the cultural
problems!.
Stockholm had been chosen as
the site for the fourth plenary ses session
sion session of th congress because of
the' attitude of the Jewish and the
Scandinavian peoples towards
the Jews during nnd after the
second world war, Dr. Goldmann
said, pointing! out that thousands
Of Jewish refugees were allowed
to enter Sweden.
'The congress wants to show
the Jewish appreciation for what
Sweden and the other Scandina Scandinavian
vian Scandinavian 4iouritries did during and af after
ter after jth war," he said.
Pedal
Pushers
1 95

DRESSES!
Afternoon Wear
Formerly from 19.95 to 49.95
NOW from 5.95 to 20.00
Figure Flattering JStyles...
to make you feel, like a
Fashion model

SHORTS
x from
1.50

inqstiik
Rayon Panties ... ..3x1.00
Half Slips from 1.95
Gowns from 2.25
siips r 2.25
Pajamas .....A..... 1,95

p.m.-and during noon hours

Concern Of Jewish Congress

Goldmann also revla4 that
Hm congress has "tried very
hard to gt speaker from be behind
hind behind tb Iron Curtain" to take
part in tho plenary session, "but "but-wo
wo "but-wo did not succeed."
In a report from the political
directors A. L. Easternun of Lon London
don London and Dr. M. L. Perlzweig,
New York, it was stated that the
congress lias attempted to get in
contact win tht Jews in the So Soviet
viet Soviet Union.
The world congress was assur assured
ed assured repeatedly and emphatical emphatically"
ly" emphatically" by Soviet representatives that
the congregations and individuals
who were invited were free to go
to the Stockholm meeting if they
wished. "The government as a
matter of policy did not intervene
in such matters" it was stated.
There was no formal reply from
the Soviet government itself but
on the eve of the conference re-
Moroccan King Ends
Visit To Paris
To Hurry Back Home
PARIS (UPI)-King Mohammed
V of Morocco abruptly cut short
a Paris visit yesterday and left for
home amid reports of growing dis discord
cord discord in the Moroccan cabinet over
policy toward France.
The monarch's sudden decision,
apparently taken just before
dawn, dimmed chances for an
early meeting between King Mo Mohammed
hammed Mohammed and President Charles
de Gaulle that might help bring
auoui an ena 10 me Algerian war.
It came only a few hours after
Moroccan left wingers staged
huge anti-French rallies in Rabat
and Casablanca, demanding
a complete break with France,
withdrawal of all French troops
from Morocco, and "total mobili mobilization.
zation. mobilization. . to defend Morocco's
frontiers."
The Moroccan king arrived here
Wednesday with the announced in intention
tention intention of having a tonsillectomy
performed. But he had not had
the operation -when he left cy
train for the Riviera port of
Cannes where, it was reported, he
planned to board the U. S. liner
Independence for Tangier.
A Moroccan Embassy announce announcement
ment announcement said the king decided to re return
turn return to Rabat because of a mark marked
ed marked Improvement in his health.
Sun
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This Week's Winners

Charles Piokham
Vernon Gene Hasty
John E. Stringer
Josefina
de
Sibuste
Lilia F.
Del Rio
c7A cfurniture

4th of July Ave. "B! St

Of Cii

tur

plies from Soviet Jewish eongre-
gations were received declining i
the invitation because "as purely
religious bodies it would not, 'bo-'';
appropriate for them to be -represented
at an assembly with "p9'
litical aims." V '
Goldmann said the, only 'means
to the disposal of the congress in
this and many other cases is tba
weapon of public opinion.' m -.
According to estimates 'there
are some two to two and a half
million Jews living in Russia and
the non existence of Jewish com-

munities in the S o v i e t Union
which will be discussed and de
bated during thi plenary session,
Dr. Goldman said. v
In the rest of eastern Europt
there are 350,000 Jews living, bui
anti-Semistims has now become
minor problem. The great pro-
blem instead is to preserve tht
Jewish identity
On a question about anti-Semi-
tic problems in Germany, Gokfc t
mann said "this is not a seriou-
problem, even if I would not say
that it is not a problem at lL-,
The German leaders could d j,
more about," he said.

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f AGI FOUR

M0M3AT, AUGUST 1S

ociai ana

&f Staff,

a

CHINISI AMBASSADOR TO PANAMA TO II FETIP
AT FAREWItL EVENT TOMORROW EVENING
; TH Chinas Ambn.r U Pname, Dr. Mae Lsn-tuan, will be
hftrd tomorrew evening buffet party In th Salon Panarrlea
f Mm Union Club in Panama City.
Representatives of the Diplomatic Corps accredited to Panama
are heating Mm event a a farewell compliment to Dr. Mao, who hat
boon transferred by hit ovtrnmont to the Philippine Islands.

Invitation Issued
Mr. am) Mrs. Salvador Ripoll
Of Panama City have issued invi invitations
tations invitations for the marriage of their
daughter. Miss Rina- Elisa Ripoll,
to Richard R. Scott, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Curtis W. Scott.
The vowi will be exchanged
Saturday morning at 8 in Criito
Rey Church.
After the ceremony. Mr. and
Mrs. Ripoll will entertain, at a re reception
ception reception at their residence In Coco
del Mar.
Newcomers Club Members
Tour Mount Hope Facilities
' Members of tne Newcomers
CUib and their guests were con conducted
ducted conducted on a tour of the facilities
AFTER EVERY
DIAPER CHANGE
Use Mexana and
see how happily
your baby plays
...free from
prickly heat
and Irritable
diaper rash.
MEXANA

mfortaUe
'- r figuring, smooth lines
V riStf with the gentle
control of
Wy "Skippies"
j5rmfi t

All ease, no squeeze! Skippies give you naturally
smooth figure with the feather-light, coaxing
control of gentlest elastic. Skippies Pantie No. 815
it made of long wearing nylon elastic net.
The satin elastic front panel gives an extra measure
of slimming. The 24 inch waistband nips your waist.
White, S.M.L. (Also available as Girdle No. 915.)
yyiaduAcb

Cordially Invites you to
consult with
FORMFIT fashion and
figure advisor, in our
Panama store, tomor.
row, Tuesday,
August 4th.

I. L. MADURO Jr.
PANAMA STORE ONLY

ksui

'lermSe
.1 n ..

m i-OUO m J-0 74I Ltwm SiOO uj 10 mtf-

at Mount jlope last week. L. S.
Willvmnfiager of the ice cream
section, directed the group
through the milk plant, coffee
roasting plant and ice cream
plant.
Members who made the trip
were Mrs. Ben Duree, Mrs. Don
Kloe, Mrs. J. W. Hedges, Mrs. R.
h. Garvin, Mrs. E. K. Van Bus Bus-kirk,
kirk, Bus-kirk, Mrs James Thornton, Mrs.
P. M. Judson, Mrs. William Gil Gillespie,
lespie, Gillespie, Mrs. James Roane, Mrs.
Simon Woegens, Mrs. Ronald
Moore, Mrs. Oren Irion, Mrs. Ro Robert
bert Robert Wilcox, Mrs. Thomas W.
Gove and Mrs. Dennis Boniface,
Guests were Mrs. Robert A.
Cluse, Mrs. Richard P. Weir,
Mrs. Clarence A. Morris Jr. Mrs.
Avis Kelley, Brandt and Eric
Irion, Miss Kate Wilcox, William
Gillespie, Gregory and Michael
Gove.
Panama Teacher Attend!
Washington Conference
Miss Guillermina Fernandez, a
Panama delegate of the Socie'y
of Teachers for National Educi Educi-tion,
tion, Educi-tion, is attending the eighth an annual
nual annual meeting of the World Con Conference
ference Conference of Organizations of the
Teaching Profession in Washing Washington.
ton. Washington. D. C.
The conference, which will be
in session through August 12, is
hln attended by more than TOO
Mies MARIE PANAYOTTI

V

Be

134,
Pc
anama
leaders of teacher
from 70 countries.
organizations
Unity Temple
Unity Temple 759, Order of
Elks, will meet tomorrow even
ing at 7.30 at the Paraiso Lodge
Hall. All members are urged
attend.
Spanish Class
The Spanish class for beginners
will meet promptly at 7.30 this
evening at the USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center la Balboa
JWB Art Class
The art class will meet this
evening at 7 at the Balboa USO-
JWB.
Rockefeller
As leading
- o
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (UPI)
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of
N. Y. said yesterday he would
not rule out the possibility of be becoming
coming becoming a candidate for the 1960
Republican presidential nomina nomination.
tion. nomination. But he said that right now
Richard M. Nixou was "tne lead leading
ing leading candidate."
Rockefellei said be was not now
a candidate and had no plane to
become one but added that he
would not deny the possibility that
circumstances would alter his po position.
sition. position. He spoke to newsmen as the 51st
annual U. S. governor's confer conference
ence conference opened, but hig political com comments
ments comments were Interrupted briefly by
the news that his son, Steven, bad
become engagd formally to mar
ry Anne-Mane Rasmussen In Soe-
gn, Norway.
Shown a UPI message about the
announcement made from the
Rockefeller office in New York-
he laughed and said:
'Mrs. Rockefeller and I are
delighted. We couldn't be hapier."
He described Anne-Mane, who
met Steven while working as a
kitchen maid in the Rockefeller
home in 1950, as "a wonderful
girl."
Jovially, the governor fended off
questions about his position as the
only potential rival to Nixon for
the GOP nomination.
Asked if he would enter the
New Hampshire presidential pri
mary next March, he said he
would "face that situation when it
arose."
Asked whether former Governor
and unsuccessful presidential nom
inee Thomas E. Deweyhad asked
him to "speed up" politically,
Rockefeller replaied, "That's news
to me."
On two occasions, he said flatly
he would not accept a vice presi
dential nomination something
m
mencan
enu
Martha's Vineyard, serene U-
land, off Cape Cod, is as New
England as baked beans, gar
nished with the stately white
bouses of old sea captains. Sail
boats and power cruisers sweep
the blue Atlantic but soompr or
later they all steer hsrborward
in time for dinner.
We sat on the wide veranda of
The Harbor View Inn in Edgar
town, discussing menus with our
old friends, John S. Packard,' lite
Innkeeper, and his wife, Ruth,
famous for her flower gardens.
When white sails came nearer,
gliding in past the lighthouse,
John suggested dinner.
The recipes are in The Tread
way Inns Cook Bood. Packard, t
Yankee gourmet himself and a
guiding force in the Treadway
Inns, contributed to the collec
tion.
Crab Meat Caket
(Makes about 12 cakes
or 4 servings)
Two slices white bread, 1-4 cup
olive oil, 1-8 teaspoon dry mus mustard,
tard, mustard, V teaspoon slat, Vi tea teaspoon
spoon teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, dash
paprika, i eggs, separated; 1
tablespoon chopped parsley, 1
pound crab meat, about 1 table tablespoons
spoons tablespoons butter.
Take the crusti off the bread,
put It In a mixing bowl, pour 1-4
cup of olive oil over it, and let
stand for 1 hour. Then pull it a a-part
part a-part Tightly with two forks. Add
mustard, salt, Worcester shire
sauce, a dash of parlka and the
yolks, and blend lightly with a
fork. Pick over the crab meat
carefully to remove all bits of
shell, and quickly mix Into1 the
bread mixture. Fold in the whites,
stiffly beaten. Form Inte cakes.
Brown on both sides in a heavy
skillet In a small amount of hot
butter. The eks may be served
with tartar sauce with a little
grated horseradish in it.
"""""Roquefort Dressing
One-half cup cider vinegar,
ounces cream cheese, salt, dash
Tabasco, 2 cups mayonnaise, e
ounces Koqueton cneese, lemon
juice (optional), light cream (op
tional,),
Biend together vinegar, cream
cheese, salt, and Tabasco. Add
2 cups of mayonnaise and ront
mue beating until smooth. Stir
in Roquefort eheese broken into
i small pieces. The dressing should
not be beaten af'er (he onee is
added. A Jittle lemon Juice may
be edded if you wish, ind the
dressing may be thinned with a
little light cream.

86th Bruising
With Brusirig

WASHINGTON- (UPlpThe first
sestion of the Democratic r con controlled.
trolled. controlled. 8Mb Congress heeded; Into
the homestretch today with 1U
most bruising battle till to
come.
Major floor fights were consid
ered a foregone conclusion on the
issues of labor union reform and
civil rights legislation.
Congressional leaden also
agreed that the lawmakers muit
do something to prevent a abut
down of vital housing programi
and the federal highway construc construction
tion construction before they can adjourn for
tne year.
They also must complete action
one more than a half-dozen mon money
ey money bills to finance the govern government
ment government in the current fiscal year.
These 1 n c 1 u d e the compromise
$39,200,000,000 defense approprla approprla-ations
ations approprla-ations measure and the foreign
aid bUl.
The administration was expect expected
ed expected to make a .determined effort
in the Senate to restore at least
Sees NiXon
Candidate'
many Nixon supporters have sug
gested.
Rockefeller said Nixon "seems
to be the leading candidate,"
and he credited Nixon with "great
skui under difficult circumstances"!
in hie tour of the Soviet Union.
The fovernor said he thought
the GOP had a good chance to
win in I960, "anumlng the wis
dom of me delegates" in choos choosing
ing choosing a nominee at the presidential
convention.
The conference, which ends
Wednesday, eot underway as nic
kel from the Independenc Party,
which want Puerto Rico freed
from V. S. control, began picket-
m me noiei neaaquarters.
Connecticut Gov. Abraham1 RIM.
coff, leading backer of Sen.
John F Kennedy (D-Mas.) for
the Democratic presidential nom nomination,
ination, nomination, admitted at a hews con-
terence that he Is courting sup support
port support for Kennedy among Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic g o v e r a o r i, ? But Ribl Ribl-coff
coff Ribl-coff laid he sought bo' commit commitments.
ments. commitments. The Connecticut eovemnr da.
nied that Kennedy wai "to far
ahead" and laid that no candi candidate
date candidate can be too far in front when
he is going good.
Ribicoff expressed the belief
that Democratic governors will
have the controlling voice at the
convention but that the nominee
will come from the Senate.
He refused to rate the rivals of
Kennedy and said that Sens. Stu Stuart
art Stuart Symington (D-Mo.). Lvndon
B. Johnson (D-Tex.) and Hubert
H. Humphrey (D Minn.) have
varying support in different perts
of the country.
Adlai Stevenson, he said, has
much sentimental suPDort. but
few persons who will have an
important voice at the convention
believe he will be nominated.
Gov. Robert B. Mevner. of New
Jersey, viewed as a dark horse
candidate for the Democratic
nomination, was asked if he
would throw his hat Into the
ring. V
"l don't have ', hat to
throw," Meyner said. "I have
tenure, . I've got .lob until
1962. i:
Meyner urged th Euenhower
administration to use more "in "influence"
fluence" "influence" to end the Iteel strike.
He laid the President should "en "entrust
trust "entrust the secretary of Jabor with
the responsibility of bringing the
two parties together."
MARUN STABS FISHIRMAN
TSU, Japan (UPI) A Marlin
fatally stabbed fisherman Sueaki
Hamada, 39, in the throat, It was
reported today. The fighting
spearfish jumped Into Hamada s
boat when he tried to net it.

.TIRES
GIVE YOU DRIVING
PEACE OF MIND!
Translethmlan Highway Tel. 1-1501

VINICOLERA

RAFFLE

Drawing on
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Save? your lickets! They're good for all
drawings, held in accordance with the
National Lottery, until March 13, 19601
. U C

Battles Ahead
Battles Ahead

part of the 1743,500,000 cut "the
House, made in President Eisen
bower' i aid request. The House-
approved bill totaled fJ,lM,W0,'
000. :':-C V--V. ;..,.. r v
Congressional leaden originally
nopoo ra-aajoura tneir first tea
lion by tht end of this month
But with "muit" legislation atill
on the docket, it wai highly un
likely that they can quit before
htrxa Day.
The leadership wanti to clear
tne ciienaar of all time-consuming
legislation this .rear ta assure
a shorter aession next year when
the national convention! will re
quire an eeny adjournment.
The House will beein debate
late thli week or early next week
on lanor reform legislation. It
was expected to set off the most
noetic noor fight of the icssion.
The administration hai thrown
its support behind a touch, hi
partisan substitute for the moder moderate
ate moderate bill approved by the House
Labor Committee, The commit commit-tee'i
tee'i commit-tee'i bill ii weaker than the mea
sure aproved last April by the
Senate.
The differencei between the
senate bill and the measure even
tually anroved br the Home
prwaDiy ww e ironed out by a
joint Senate House Conference
Committee. A deadlock in the enn.
ference would jeopardise the
chancel for any measure what whatever
ever whatever this year.
Civil rights a legislation Is. itl 11
pending in the House and Senate
judiciary committees. It wai con considered
sidered considered likely that a moderate
measure would come ud in each
house, with southern senators
waging tneir traditional long fight
against even a token bill.
I he highway financing issue is
high on the list of muit lensla.
tion. President Eisenhower has
warned Congress that highway
construction may grind to a halt
unless Congress takes action to
rplenish the trait fund financing
the program.
The President has proposed that
the federal gasoline tax. which is
channeled into the fund, be raised
from S to 4Vi centi a gallon, This
has been rejected by the House
Ways i Means Committee, who
are wary of raising taxes at this
time.
The committee has come up
with a double-barrel plan calling
a itretcn-out in construction and
the issuance of government bonds
to beef up the highway fund. This
nroosal has been ooosed bv the
administration,
The Pregident'i veto of the
housing bill alio has forced the
lawmakers to take some form of
action to keep the federal housing
authority and other vital housing
program! in operation.
It appeared unlikely that dem
ocratic leaden would be able to
muster the neceiiary. two-thirds
mijority to override the veto.
Eventual passage of a stripped stripped-down
down stripped-down bill acceptable to the Presi
dent may orovide the eventual
answer to Congress' dilemma.

Decorator Finds American Wives
Harder To Please Than Royalty

NEW YORK (UPI) When It
comes to decorating a home, the
sverage American woman is
fussier than kings and diplomats.
Just ask Fred Gerstel, an Inter Interior
ior Interior decorator who once counted
among his clients eight royal fam families
ilies families of Europe and the Middle
East, twp Chechoslovakian presi presidents,
dents, presidents, and 56 foreign embassies in
Prsgue. Gerstel owned the larg largest
est largest furniture factory in Europe
and designed for th cream of in in-ternational
ternational in-ternational scoeity until he was
forced to flee Czechoslovakia in
1939.
How did Gerstel find his blue blue-blooded
blooded blue-blooded clients to deal withe
"Easier, much easier," he said
in an Interview in his New York
August 2, 1959
250261 $100.00
611473 $100.00
731025 $100.00

Little League

Boys 5; Girls 2
Seven blrtha were reported it
Coco Solo Hospital for the week
ending July 29. rive of the bablei
were boyev v
Parent of the boys are; Mr. and
Mr. Harold Knowlei, of Colon;
Mr. and Mrs. Sinico HaU. of Rain
bow City: Capt. end Mr, Joie Lo
pes, of Fort Gulick; Mr. and Mrs.
Hugh ArChibold. of Colon: and Sfe
and Mn. Weneeilao Torres, of
Prance Field.
Girls were born to Mr. and Hri
Luther B arrow i of Colon; and to
Mn and Mrr. Perry Manden, of
Colon. '
During the weeaf covered by the
report, 98 patient were admitted
to the hotaI, and M were dis discharged.
charged. discharged. 'legalized' Crime
Spreads In Florida.
Says Ex-FBI Agent
MIAMI (UPI) Miami Crime
Commissioner Dan 8 v I1Iti
warned a new breed of crime is
flourishing in South Flor aas
"Gold Coast" under the, gulie of
legitimacy.
Gone, he laid In a special re-
port on crime, are the wtae-opv
gambling caiinoi in pluih hotels,
vndS" Initead Veood ums
nave lwiureieo "'"
A-J tilUiawetA
neuei" sucn as
such ; as laoor umon.,
hntiili and nliht clubs.
He lingled out tne Teamsiwa
Union as a prime example.
"They (the Teamsters) contain
some of tne worst nooaiumi y
can iind," said Sullivan,
"They abuse tneir power anu
they are so flexible they can
transfer people here and pull
them out at a moment's notice.
As a result, vioiauons can do
committed and you can't find out
who is responsible."
He warned that public lndifr
ference is an open invitation to
the return of organized crime,
The former FBI agent said
hoodlum elements are being at attracted
tracted attracted to the are by Its wealth
and fast growth.
"Along with thii growth have
come additional racketeers and
their infiltration into legitimate
businesses. We find this to exist
in the ownership of night clubs,
bars, restaufafO. hotels, labor
union and other legitimate enter enterprises."
prises." enterprises." Sullivan praised Improvements
in law enforcement here in the
last decade but he said the Public
apparently 1 growing indifferent
to the new inroads of crime.
"Improvements made in police
administration should, be solidi solidified;
fied; solidified; police efficiency should be
increased and there should be bet better
ter better police protection for each tax
dollar," he said.
office. He generally was given a
free hand when decorating embas embassies
sies embassies and palaces.
For example, he was commis commissioned
sioned commissioned to re-model the Japanese
Embassy. His price was high, but
the Japanese ambassador sent a
check without looking at one
sketch or color scheme or con consulting
sulting consulting his wife.
LIARNI ABOUR
BUDGITI
"Then nobddy asked a price or
had a budget. But I have learned
since to work on budgets very
carefully," Gerstel laughed.
In dealing with royalty, the dec decorator
orator decorator was not faced with a lot of
do's and don'ts- There Was only
one rule: Everything he pur purchased
chased purchased or designed had to be
beautiful for 200 years.
A castle or palace meant as
much to kings and queens as a
home to commoners, and they
Wanted personal touches, he said.
But no queen considered re-deco
rating a trumatic experience. The
accepted dcor was usually 18th
Century French. If new carpets
or arapenes were neeaea, uerstei
was asked to get the same pat
tern because the clients were
"happy" with them. But Amerl
can women want a complete
Change every time they re-deco
rate.
Tastes varied from simple to
luxurious.. Gerstel recalled doing
a red damask reception froom
fpr King Alexander of Yugoslavia
and Oriental bedrooms and mod
ern baths for the king of Albania
The Albanian queen had been to
tne united states, ana wanted an
indoor swimming pool and a room
furnished as an American bar.
ABANDON PAL A CI
Unfortunately, the royal Albani Albanians
ans Albanians were forced to abandon their
palace to the Italiam, so the job
never was completed and Gerstel
never received payment.
A hearty man who has been In
business since 1919. Gerstel Is di divorced
vorced divorced and has three sons and
one grandchild. After fleeing his
country, he came to the United
Slates with "no money, but my
business in my head." In 1944 he
opened his own office. Today he
does Interiors for commercial
firms and institutions and is chief
consultant 6n interiors for a firm
doing missile research.
In .Czechoslovakia Gerstel lived
in e castle with 19 servants.
"If someone could give me the
chance of going back, 1 wouldn't.
Now t am an American and I
like It here."

t i.i A.t.Ve r irr'ed'a orettT IT'

vearld daughter, is beginning
(o rate almost as much publicity
is Dad the International reporters-taking
as much interest la
hi" romances as they do 1 in
Fred' talent. There was divwea
opinion on her frame of mind
when sne pianou ow m uuuv,
leaving behind John
it the Oxford law student with
whom she'd been linked quite se seriously.
riously. seriously. Some of those present at
the airport quowa oer ey
ing fliPPnty,,;u wetwejen.
faeea i wouiun i db ruanui vh,
And you'U note he isn't even
eoodbvo-he decided
to go to a party in tfte country."
But others tooughtxshe was -close
to tears as she moaeo, ana
said Parker-sees, wnen aro
bout the sltustton, snappeo, i
don't want to discuss it. i' y i.
One af the best of the Grade
B but "still quite famous coma,
dians is .on the dope. kick.
Elaine Malbin's cnums say
Texas oil millionaire name
Henry "Smitty' Gordon is on
the lonf distance telephone to ber
every dayn declaring nis aao aao-ration.
ration. aao-ration. i"
Faulette Goddard has a scoop
on the other glamor firis-she
ZZ.nl n.,A., MV. v h. fcanrl
, v-
Life's cover recently, Paulette s
report on the new Adonis is
very flattering; she thought him
a competent actor and very a a-greeable
greeable a-greeable personally. Ohvlously
he's clicked with the fans; boss bosses
es bosses of the telefilm titled .."Adven .."Adventures
tures .."Adventures in Paradise," had to or order
der order the sets closed because of the
number of screaming admirers
who descended on him.
Greta Garho appeared com completely
pletely completely oblivious to the stares,
nudgings and "look-a-there" while
she shopped on Bloomingdale's
street floor the other afternoon
Gee.Gee mad on quick pur purchase
chase purchase tan gloves-then vanish vanished
ed vanished with never a perceptible
glance at the oglers, .For some
inexplicable reason, the artist
who concocted or touched up
the trede ads for Alfred Hitch Hitchcock's
cock's Hitchcock's new film, "North By North,
west," has made Cary Grant
look like Rock Hudson, And that's
not had but what's bad about
looking like Cary Grant?. .
Jerry Grahame, the mountainous
wrestler, dawled the crowd at
Lindy's by entering In a 1400
white silk suit and a $50 black
lace "sport shirt." All this in
addition, to his platinum blond
duck-tail hair-do,
Shelly Winters, who got off
lightly when she was caught
speeding the other day, must
hope she'll exercise the same
kind of charm when she faces
Uncle Sam's tax boys. She's got
some headachemaking problems
with them- -Yonkers Raceway
attendance for the meet will be
sround 2,825.000 an all-time race
track rpord. Experts attribute
much of the sport's success to
its popularity with the ladies.
New York society win oe sur
prised to learn that Mary Ann
Traveri, a pooular member of
the Stork Club set, eiopeo from
Spring Lake, N. J,, to a Mary
land wedding, She made up her
mind so suddenly hor wealthy
and prominent fumiiv never e e-ven
ven e-ven got to meet the lucky bride
groom.
The proudest movie man in
Gotham these days 's 20h century-Fox
vice president Chsrles
Einfeldi Hi son, Pick, has amv amv-ed
ed amv-ed with prints of hi firs major
oroduction, "Orewn Trail." starr starring
ing starring Fred MacMurray. nd- ad advance
vance advance reports on the flicker are
so excellent young Elnfeld has
been flsred important produc producing
ing producing lobs at two other major
studios.
Pearl Bailev is another per performer
former performer being talked of for a show
at the Palace Theatre this fall..
Nancy Valentine and writer Sea Seaman
man Seaman Jacobs, who were speaking
about mirriege (rather ouietly,
it's true) now aren't speaking at
SHUNS SANITARY II WAGE
TAMPA, ria. (UPI) Louis
N. Drahgon ouit after working
one week for the Bureau of Sam
tsrr Sewers. Hi boss wrote on
his brief employment record:
"Tried, i but Just couldn't work
with sewage." X,

On Sale at the tnoit Known Storei
in Panama Qty,
David. Chltre, Colon and many other amaller towns
. In tha Republic,
HE WHO OWNS A MIDO NEVER MISSES A JOB

OR APPOINTMENT

Buy youra now-J
. Exolualva agent,
CASULKJ y CIA. LTDA.
Front Street 45 COLON, R. P.

C.

THE VOICE OF ;
BR&ADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallcn

all. But no torches are evident..
Lenny- Day, who was fired
West Side Story" after two weeks
of toil, is now doing the choree-
grapny tor a pair oi -jjem Are
Ringing psckages one of them
the version starring Martha'
Raye... -,-'
Roger Vadlm.1 Brlgltte Bardot'j
ex-husband, will cast his beau
ful new wife Annette Stroyberg,
in the movie role of a vicious,
vampire. ".Comedienne Jean
Carroll is on the mend after a
serious bout with pneumonia-and
other complications. ,Thelonious
Monk, the jazzman noted .'for
his colorful attire ai well as hit
genius, stays in the shade these
not summer afternoons by wear
a Chinese coolie that, in case the
male fashion i writers are get
ing desperate for items. -.Puzzl
ing statement attributed tovJoha
Huston; "I don't have to devote
a single minute to developing my
character, Everyone else does ft
for me. Nothing ; succeeds like
reputation.'.' ;
By OSWALD JACOIY
Written for NIA Service
NORTH 11
4.K972
V9
AK9
1087JS
WEST (D) EAST
A AM ANone
VKJSJ8 VAQI8
Tog, J10B
A KJ854
SOUTH
- AQJ108BI
WM
4Q4I
Q
East and North vulnerable
Wee Vert Ssi tenth
IV Double 4V 44
Pass pass g,V Pass
Pass B 4 Double Pass
Pass Pass,
Opening leadA 4
In a recent otal -point team of
four match, South became declar
er at five soades doubled at each
table.
One South was lucky enough to
play against a low heart opening
and was able to bold his loss to
one trick. At the other table West
decided that a trump opening was
in order and opened the four .of
spades. -x
South won in his own hand and.
played the queen of clubs where whereupon
upon whereupon West grabbed his ace and
Stayed the ace and five of spades.
Tow South had to go down two
tricks so that the trump lead worth
200 extra points to the defense.
I do not think much of either
five-spade bid. The .two Norths
could not .expect their partners to
make five spades and l see little
or no point in taking a sure loss
merely because you ere afraid
that your opponents can make
game.
North was looking at the Ocea-
king and nine of diamonds. Sure
ly there were two tricks for him
in that suit. Was It too much to
hope to find another trick some
where? Actually it was right
there in the diamond suit.
11
Ner Cms gonth West
Pass Pm, 4
Peas Pass ?
You, South, hold:
48 VAQS7 fAJII 4K9S4
Whatdoydudo?
Aftus. In ill mat Hihk
ww f year nnufi thrt.
pade M4 to start wtta and rm
I ffi",I are not rUr to hmi
1 enoaeats a faster
TO0AYJS QUtSTION
I The bidding Is the same es in
jut answered ex.
5 gone to four
hearts after his partner's four four-club
club four-club bid. What do you do now?
Monday
Tea never have
to wind your

fT-j



MONDAY, AUGUST I, 1951

THE PANAMA AMERICA -. AH OfDEPENDENT DAILY KEWSfATO
PAS I FIV3

A .. '.1.'.' -y '., 1'. ..'

- ubxak rcncx KuuKiuuci irom reru, guest instructor tome signal aecuon, tecnnlcal department of the U.S. Army Caribbean School.
Tort Gulick, explains principles of building transiting coda keyboards, receiver! and transceivers to atudent members of the com command
mand command and regimental and battalion ataff couru, From left to right are MaJ Alfredo Oandan, Maj. Hector Hugo Ordonez and Maj Er Er-"
" Er-" aeato Leopoldo Freire VaUejo, aU from Ecuador: Maj. Juan Angel Lopes Pineda, Nicaragua r MaJ. Alberto Donoso, Ecuador: lit Lt.
' Kenneth E. Bukowski, U.S. Army instructor lit Lt. Jose Vicente Aran and Lt. Felix Tomas Hcrnandei, Venezuela; Rodriguez, Lt
Col. Richard 1. Paul, director, technical department, and Capt. Enrique Alegria from Nicaragua.

'

Steel Wag

acoramas

' NEW YORK, Ang. S (UM) Steel lnduitry and onion representatives were to meet here to today
day today tor the second time sinet the beginning ef a nation-vide strike to days ago.
Hanging over their conference table are a sharp rebuke for both sides from Secretary of La Labor
bor Labor James P. Mitchell and a slap at the steel industry from Sen. Estes Kefanver (D-Tenn.).
At San Juan, Puerte Rico, Massachusetts' Gov. Foster Furcolo proposed that the governors'
conference take up the strike which he said calls for 'positive action on the part of the gov governors
ernors governors of the states, all of which we very much affected by this strike."

New Jersey's Gov. Robert B.
Meyner called for the Eisenhower
administration to use more 'in
fluence," through Mitchell, to
bring the lnduitry and union to together.
gether. together.
But federal mediation director
Joseph F. Finnegan, who sched sched-uled
uled sched-uled today' meeting, held out lit little
tle little hope the session would result
in substantial, or any, progress
toward agreement.
It was set for later this after afternoon
noon afternoon after a lunch scheduled by
the industry to release to tho
press "thousands of letters" sup
porting Its .position --that a wage
Incfeair4s not possible without a
price increase and that both must
be resisted as inflationary.
"The United Stetl worker e
America (USW) which called
half a wlllien members of strike
at .midnight July 4 whn a eon eon-tract
tract eon-tract extension profits are high
enough t provide a 15-eent-an-hour
wage package-without an
: Increase In riee.-''
Kefauver Said yesterday he be believes
lieves believes steel' profits are high
enough for the industry to b"th
pay a small wage increase, pre preferably
ferably preferably in pension contributions,
and reduce its prices

Jehovah's Witnesses Told
Paradise Can Be Found Here

Jehovah's Witnesses and their
guests last night that a Paradise
right here on earth ii a certainty.
The speaker for the occasion, F.
E. Harvey of New York and Pa Panama,
nama, Panama, told his audience,, of more
than 400 persons "when we say a
Capeharf Promotes
flew York Governor
For GOP nomination
WASHINGTON (UPI) y- Sen.
Homer E. Capehart fR-Ind.) came
1 J J VHVAKlf
our yesierasy im nrw iwui
Nelson A. Rockefeller as his'
choice for the Republican presi presidential
dential presidential nomination next year.
Capehart, a, 1952 supporter of the
let Sen. Robert A. Taft fR fR-Ohio
Ohio fR-Ohio said he has no doubt that
the Republican! can win next year
H Rockefeller headed the ticket.
He said he honed that Vice
President Richard M, Nixon, gen generally
erally generally regarded as the front run runner
ner runner for fhp nomination, would
aecept second plce on the tic ticket.
ket. ticket. He Slid Nixon Is youn
nough to serve eight more years
as vice president before seeking
the top pot.
fl am fond of trem both."
Canehart said on a TV program
fCBSVFace the Nation"). "But
Tm also realistic."
, Caoehart, who is generally re
garded as a member of the
party's conservative wing, atrreed
with Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R-N.Y.)
who said earlier that Rockefeller
emild poll more votes than Nixon
as the GOP nominee..
In another development. House
fcepubUcsn Trader- Charles A
Halleek (Ind.) said he would ac accept
cept accept the Republican Vice presi presidential
dential presidential nomination if it were of offered
fered offered to him. ; ;
: But Halleek refused to commit
himself as between Nixea and
Rockefeller, ether than to say that
if the GOP convention were held
today, he believed Nixon 'would
win the presHntial nomination.
Meantime, GOP National Cont Cont-mlttee
mlttee Cont-mlttee Chairman Thruston Morton
aid that Nixon's trip, to Russia
undoubtedly wll have "political
alue'V for him, despite the feet
that the trip was not, ''politically
motivated."
Javits, speaking on semi semimonthly
monthly semimonthly television and radio show
for New York stations, said that
it would not be "hopest'V if he
didn't say he believed Rockefeller
would draw more yotes than Nixon,
v -Javits already has announced
that if Rockefeller chooses to make
thrrace he would support him.

.. -1, 'its,'. 'I., .... ....

' t'
e

By Government Officials

Kefauver, a long-time critic of
the pricing policies of steel and
other big industries, said profits
after taxes for 14 steel companies
are 145 per cent over those of last
year.
"I believe there is ample room,
Without undue reduction in pro profits,
fits, profits, for a price reeductioh, toget together
her together with a small increase in
wages," Kefauver said in a tele television
vision television broadcast for Tennessee
stations,
Kefauver said the strike is the
nations most serious economic
problem; Hj said public public
policy which expect industry to
reduce prices as it reduces costs
cannot oe applied to the steel
Industry because "there Is no
price competition."
Mitchell, who is conducting a
fact-finding survey of this and
orevious steel strikes which he
has hinted may lead to federal le legislation,
gislation, legislation, in a tsh8rp t statement
Saturday said:
: "BofH parties have done very
little to measure up te their Own
responsibility te the American
pecfDle and te the thousands of
workers who are affected by the
strike." ;
In addition to the 5000,000 steel steel-workers,
workers, steel-workers, who have shut down 15
Paradise, earth through God's
kingdom we mean that the whole
earth will become like the garden
of Eden, but on a far grander
scale. Instead of two perfect peo people
ple people there will be an earthful of
happy humans living in peace
and happiness forever."
He invited his hearers to make
a careful comparison of world
conditions with the prophecies of
Jesus such as found in Matthew,
Chapter 24, and Luke,- Chapter
21.
"Take hope in these divine pro promises
mises promises that soon the present evil
system .will go down and a pa paradise
radise paradise earth under God's kingdom
will rise tip," said the speaker,
then quoting Matthew 24:
"This generation shsll not pass
away until all be fulfilled," he
applied it to the present genera generation
tion generation since 1914 and the start of
the present woes.
Concluding his discourse, Har Harvey
vey Harvey said, !'Sihce the Bible clear clearly
ly clearly teaches a Paradise eah let's
try to imagine ourselves being
there, Think of chancing upon
John the Baptist and hearing him
describe the loveliness of JsuS
when he was on earth. Or Moses I
and Joshua tell of the parting of I
the Red Sea while you in turn t
cite the awesome display of
Jehovah's power you witnessed in
Armageddon.
"You will see the restoring
work Jesus promised: Blind eyes
Opened, deaf ears unstopped,
mute tongues singing praises to
the Omnipotent God, lame oneii
leaping for joy, And best -of all
to hear the excited cries of the
happy inhabitants as they re-
e(v hrlr frim tho prav their
long dead loved ones. Wy mothers
is Here', or my father is back'
of 'Thank God my little baby It
restored'! This Indeed Is Pera
dise.",.
This assembly of -J e h o v a h s
Witnesses -was the second of a
series of five that are being held
throughout Panama in English
and ; Spanish new ministers
were bsptlied In a Saturdayef Saturdayef-ternoon
ternoon Saturdayef-ternoon immersion- service. This
new teachers will carry on min ministerial
isterial ministerial work In different parts of
the country,
IN LI IU OP FRIINDI
' LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (UPI) -Traffic
Judge Robert W. Laster
wore two .45 calibre six-shooters
on his hl" In court yesterday.
Laster, who war ousted recently
as a member of the school board
and beat'n In a bid for reelec
tnn-r ; traffic' hidg. ex explained:
plained: explained: ?'If a man doesn't have
any more friends: than I do he Is
entitled to wear two guns,

i ,.

(US Army Photo)

Talks Resume

per cent of the nation's produc production,
tion, production, an estimated 85,000 workers
In supposting mining and tran transport
sport transport industries have been laid
off because of the strike.
Mitchell said neither side has
made a "serious, conscientious,
continous effort to reach an agree agreement."
ment." agreement." "Thev have resisted efforts of
the federsl mediation and concil conciliation
iation conciliation service to hold more face
to face meetings," Mitchell said.
"This is no way to bargain. Trey
cannot reach agreement unless
they talk to each other."
The first Joint meeting since
the strike broke up shortly after
it began last Monday with no
progress reported. In setting
either side had made any retreat
from the stands with which they
entered bargaining talks talks last
May.
O
AC- OCuo

if b'j i
... '"

No movie will be shown

The Mighty King
SPARROW SHOW
will be at the COLOII AREIIA
THURSDAY, August 6th

SPARROW'S Panama Toun Sponsored by Balboa Beer
Managed by Carlos Smith and George (Baron) Bryan.

J

V
.1.
Mrs. Edith Smith
Dies; Funeral
Set For.Tomorrow
Mrs. Edith Smith, a Panama
City resident,, died at her home
yesterday after lenghty illness.
Funeral services hsve been
scheduled for tomorrow at 4 p.m.
in the Loyal David Lodge Hall.
Mrs. Smith Is survived by her
sons, Joseph, a Colon resident,
and Efrain, an employe of the
Dredging Division on the Pacific
side.
OFFICIAL CON 6AMI
NEW YORK (UPI)-Police ad admitted
mitted admitted sheepishly today that
"tow away zone" signs on mid-
town no-parking streets sre only
good to "intimidate the timid.'
The city closed down its impound
ing yards, and stopped towing
ears away from no-parking tones
a year ago to save money.

Amid

CERVECERIA NACIONAL,
(National Brewery, Inc.)

'7
ivm
O
o) o

Q

New York Farm Area Transformed Into Gigantic Theater
For Annual Pageant Depicting Highlights Of Mormohism

NEW YORK (UPI) -Thunder
will split the air over a little hill
in western New York Thursday
sight woe -her the sky is cloudy or
wear. ;-.
'The earth will rumble with the
sound of aa earthquake and mus music
ic music of choruses, orchestra and or organ
gan organ will ring through the mid midsummer
summer midsummer night.
For three nights, the farm com'
munity of Palmyra, 25 miles east
of Rochester, N.Y., will be bathed
in the glow of hundreds of bright
jignis ana ecno to voices teiung a
story thousands of years old,
The Occasion Will be the 18th
Hill Cumorah Pageant of the
Church, of Jesus Christ of Latter Latter-Day
Day Latter-Day Saints, known popularly as
the Mormon Church. The pageant
is held each year on Hill Cumor Cumorah,
ah, Cumorah, the birthplace of Mormonism,
That is where young Joseph Smith
told of receiving the golden tab-
WAtK ON WATER It's no
joke to aay that Jor Conover
has sRoes like boats. The Se Seattle,
attle, Seattle, Wash., airline pilot is
trying out his invention, "gun "gun-boat"
boat" "gun-boat" pontoons, on the waters
of Puget Sound.
(pAJlWltA

) 'I
'h
I 5 -. ...-

parrow

in pshion mohld famoui

pwm Jhimdad

UCaocatfri'G

lets he translated into the book of

Mormon to organise the ehurch in
1830.
Headquarters of Mormonlsm
now are in Salt Lake City, Utah.
The church has 1,500,000 mem members,
bers, members, 2,000 chapels and 12 tem temples
ples temples in the United States and
overseas. The Book of Mormon
his been translated into 27 for foreign
eign foreign languages, including Polyne Polynesian.'
sian.' Polynesian.' Each vnr. Mormons and mem-
bers of other religious denomins
tions make pilgrimages to Hill
Cumorah, outside Palmyra, N.Y.,
lo see the reenactraent of scenes
from the Old and New Testa Testaments
ments Testaments and the Book of Mormon.
The Mormons historically have
believed in entertainment as an
important part of both church and
personal life. In 1862, only few
years after they settled In Utah,
they built the finest theater be between
tween between Chicago and San Francisco
and brought the best road compa companies
nies companies to entertain them.
In furtherance of their tradition
of making religion a happy ex experience,
perience, experience, .the Mormons hsve put a
greet effortlnto making their pag pageant
eant pageant a combination of a religious
experience and entertainment.
They are using enough modern
equipment this year to put a Hol Hollywood
lywood Hollywood film set in the shade.
The pageant, to be staged
Thursday through Saturday with
no admittance fee, no collection
and no applause, will be present presented
ed presented on a slope larger than a foot football
ball football field.
There are 5 major stages and
20 secondary stsges to sccommo sccommo-date
date sccommo-date the army of 800 actors, who
will appear in costumes of kings,
prophets, warriors, slaves and
other Biblical figures.
During the 14 scenes, armies
will march on armies, kings will
rule over great courts, kingdoms
will fall, prophets will die at the
stake, the entire city of Zarahem Zarahem-la
la Zarahem-la will be destroyed and the birth
life and crucifixion of Christ will
be portrayel
Three water curtains will oe
used to give a diaphanous effect
to vision scenes. About 75,000 gal
Ions of water from a drilled well
will be pumped from a hill top
tank that looks like a large swim swimming
ming swimming pool.
Colored spotlights will play
from stage to stage. More than a
ton of wiring was needed to i Hook
up the network of arc lights
floodlights and dimmers. Some of
the brightest lights will beam
down from four 20-foot high tow towers.
ers. towers. A new power line was run in
recently to give the greatest pos possible
sible possible brilliance to the lights.
A hi-fi sound system so sensi-
S. A.
99

tive that a whisper can be heard
in the last row of seata accommo accommodating
dating accommodating 80,000 penona will carry
he voices of Mormon actors and
the combined choruses o f Brig Brig-bam
bam Brig-bam Young University, as well is
the music of the 1,000-pipe Salt
Lake City Tabernacle organ and
the Utah symphony orchestra.
All were recorded in Salt Lake
City. The actors on the Hill Cu Cumorah
morah Cumorah stages will do their parts
in pantomine.
An official of the psgeant said
the sound system for this year's
presentation is unique. It consists
of a new type of high fidelity, full
dimensional stereophonic s 0 u n d
reproduction usinc three huge
horns, three multicellular horns
and six small horns.
One of the final scenes of the
psgeant demands all the energy

3 Negroes Brandish Knife,
Pistol To Rape White GVs

LA GRANGE. Ga. fUPI)
Three y 0 u n g Negroes charged
with brandishing a knife and a
pistol to overpower two white
girls and rape them were held at
a secret jail for safekeeoini Sun-
a secret jail for safekeeping yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday. Sheriff L. W. Bailev dirlneH
the suspects. George Alford Jr..
18 of Dayton, Ohio, and Clifford
Johnson, 22. and Bnnnon Edds.
25 were spirited from the Troun
County Jail for their safetv late
iturday night.
T,, sheriff emphasized there
was no evidence of high feeling in
os wes Georgia mill city of 27..
000 population, but sa'6 he feared
some radical group from anoth
er area could have come in."
Some law enforcement officials
in the South have used this pre precaution
caution precaution in rape cases since a mob
of masked white men at Poplar Poplar-vllle,
vllle, Poplar-vllle, MJss., last April 25 lynched
Charles Parker, a Negro accused
or raping a white woman.
The suspects were irrmM nf
grabbing the girls, one 20 and
married, and the other 18 and

TIRES
GIVE YOU PROTECTION
AGAINST PUNCTURES!

Tranalathmlan Hirhway

don't decide on a
sterling pattern
until vouVe seen

III Ml

tho aolid silver with beauty that lives forever

THESE

LUCKY PEOPLE

in our
FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE
M. G. JEANMARIE
JOHN MORRIS
L. DE GUARDIA
REINA DOMINGUEZ
ROY ROGER
MARIA DE ZARZA VILLA
ANGELA J. MARTINEZ
PATRICK P. QUINty
GLADYS MORENO
JIMMY DIAZ
DOUBLE CHECK YOUR SALES
SUP. . IF IT ENDS IN 2
YOU WON TOO I

ffADIlDTrO
THE JEWELRY STORE
185 Central Ave. (137)
FREE VCmCO" de ORO STAMPS

sad skill the lighting crew can
command. This Is the destruction
of Zarahemla, on the day;, el ,
Christ's crucifixion. v., '.
Thunder will come from a re
cording of the rolling of croquet -'
balls and steel marbles in an oe oe-tagonal
tagonal oe-tagonal box. Army type amok
bombs will be set off to suggest a

cuy iq names. .. ,i
Then will come a moment of
silence. The stage area will go -dark.
A spot of light then will'
riw ilnwlv atrm Hill fhimm-sh..' ,'

beaming down on the figure of
Jesus, apparently moving down downward
ward downward through space.
"This singular effect is achle
ed," t pageant spokesman said,'
"by the ingenious use of lights ;
and having the a c t o r par-
traying Christ walk on a strip of f.
dark cloth."

Q
unmarried, early Saturday as
they were being escorted horae
by two white youths and despite,
efforts of two other Negro -men to
prevent the attack.
Sheriff Bailey said there hid;
been no threat of violence or
demonstration against the Ne
groes since the occurence. How- J
ever, an extra deputy was placed
on guard at the jail; then the sus-
pects were moved.
"I thought it would be safer but
It was only a preventive move,"
Bailey said, "since I do not
think anybody in the county would
resort to mob violence. I feel
that every citizen in Troup Colin
ty Is a responsible person."
The suspects were questioned ',
yesterday for a second time.
Fleming said Alford admmltted
having relations once with each
girl, out the others denied any
knowledge of the crime.
" The girls were returning home
from the dance with Aaron
Brooks, 18, and Bsrney Grizzard,
19, .friends of the married glrl'l
husband when the assault oe-
curred. ;
Tel. 1-1501
WON

"sss

i



TO PANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPENDENT DAILY NKWSP APEX
' MONDAY, AUGUST I, 1951.'
Thirty Shapes Up As.Maffl

PAG I SIX

Streaking Chicago Team
Ups AL Lead To 3 Games

for FRED DOWN

NEW YORK, Aug. 3 (UPI) Thirty shapes up
' today as the "magic number" which could give the
Chicago White Sox their first pennant in 40 years.

''. That National League race is
k still as tight as a can or saram
: but 11 victories in their last 12
9 me have the White Sox going
ffnine...and perhaps very
soon
"onn In the American
League
race
. The red-hot White Sox stretch-
ed their latest winning streak to
, six games and opened up a three-
came lead yesterday when they
swept a double-header from the
Washington Senators, 3-2 and 8-3.
The losses stretched the Senators
losing streak to 16 games two
short rif their club record and four
J Bhy of, a league mark shared by
three teams.
With $2 games left, the White
Sex can reach the 92-victor-mark
bv winning 30 gamei and
losing 22 for a .577 pace. The
second-place Cleveland l'n
then would have to go at a .649
pace to tie. The New York Yan Yankees?
kees? Yankees? A mere 42 out of 32 or
.808 would be enough to tie.
There's no sign of a major
break in the National League
Where the San Francisco Giants
retained their half-game lead wUh
a 5-3. win yesterday. The Los An An-.
. An-. geles Dodgers moved back into
fecond with a 4-3 decision over
the Philadelphia Phillies and tne
' Milwaukee Braves are only a
game behind San Francisco des despite
pite despite their split with the St. Louis
Cardinals. The Cardinals won the
first game, 4-3, but the Braves
bounced back for an .1-5 nightcap
v triumph.
The Indians bounced back
from a 5-4 10-inning loss to beat
the Baltimore Orioles, 6-3, the
Yankees downed the Kansas City
Athletics, 7-5, and the Boston Kea
Sox scored 5-4 win over the
Detroit Tigers in other A.L. games.
The Cincinnati Reds beat the Chi Chicago
cago Chicago Cubs, 2-0, in the other N.L.
fame.
The White Sox scored their 26th
one-run victory of the season when
. ... i 1 1L. .intU
iney tailiea two runs in me mum
Inning of their opener and then
Brifon Wins German
Grand Prix; Two US
Aces Second, Third
BERLIN (UPI)Britain's Tony
Brooks, a 27-year-old Manchester
dentist, won the automobile grand
prix of Germany Sunday while
United States aces Dan Gurney
and Phil Hill finished second and
third.
Brooks, second to Australian
Jack Brabham in world cham championship
pionship championship standings, drove his Ital Ital-1
1 Ital-1 fan-built Ferrari to victory in
each of the two 30-lap heats into
prix of Germany yesterday while
which the race had been split to
reduce danger.
The measure forced all compe
titors to change tires at the half halfway
way halfway mark Saturday. French driv driver
er driver Jean Behra was killed in a
sportscar preliminary.
Those who withdrew from the
15-man field because of assorted
mishaps included Britain's Stirl Stirling
ing Stirling Moss and Brabham. The Aus Australian,
tralian, Australian, however, retained his lead
In intermediate world champion champion-Ihip
Ihip champion-Ihip standings with 27 points to
Brooks' 23 and Hill's IS.
The only casualty was Ger Ger-.
. Ger-. imany's Hans Herrmann who suf suffered
fered suffered slight burns when his BRM
crashed through a barrier and
went up in flames.
Brooks covered a total of 60
laps, or 309.2 miles, on the Avus
circuit in two hours nine minutes
31.6 seconds, averaging 140.967
miles an hour in the first heat
and 134.881 in the second. He also
clocked the fastest lap 149.040.
Gurney, of Riverside, Calif.,
placed second with a two heat
aggregate time of 2:10:33. 5 and
Hill of Santa Monica, Calif., was
. third with 2:10:36.4.
T IVOLI
J5c. 20c.
2 Spanish Pictures!
YO QITIERO 8ER
ARTISTA
with Resortes
EL CASTILLO I)E
. LOS MUKRTOS
"With Clavillazo
With

breezed to an easy win in the
nightcap with the help of key
doubles by John Romano and Bub Bub-ba
ba Bub-ba Phillips. Luis Aparicio, Nelson
Fox and Billy Goodman struck
the key blows in the decisive first first-game
game first-game rally which was aided by a
wild pickoff attempt.
Rookie sensation Willie Me Me-Covey
Covey Me-Covey did it again with a two two-run
run two-run homer and Willie Mays did
it for a change with a clutch
double as the Giants handed the
Pirates their 12th setback in 14
games. Johnny Antonelli pitched
a six-hitter to win his 15th game
for San Francisco.
Homers by Duke Snider and

Charlie Neal were the big blows
for the Dodgers who rallied for
three runs in the fifth to give Lar Larry
ry Larry Sherry his second win. Sherry,
pitching in relief of Roger Craig,
shut out the Phillies with one hit
over the last five innings.
Ken Boyer singled for his fourth
hit and then went the rest of the
way around the bases on errors
by Hank Aaron and pitcher Don
McMahon as the Cardinals pulled
out a ninth-inning win over Mil Milwaukee.
waukee. Milwaukee. The Braves came back in the
nightcap with a 12-hit attack that
included two three-run triples by
Bill Bruton and a three-run hom homer
er homer by Felix Mantilla to earn Lew
Burdette his 15th victory.
Tito Francona, who went 7-for-8
and raised his average to
.416 during the doubleheader, hit
a three-run ninth-inning homer to
give Cleveland's Gary Bell his l.th
win iin the nightcap.
The Orioles won the first game
in 10 innings when rookie Barry
Shetrone tallied frorn third on a
"Baltimore chop" single by Wil
lie Miranda.
Elston Howard drove In four
runs with a double and two sin singles
gles singles and Yogi Berra had three
singles to lead the Yankees' 11-
hit attack.
Duke Maas received credit for
his 10th win but Ryne Duren
struck out six In 3 2-3 innings of
shutout relief. Ex-Yankee Bob
Grim suffered his seventh defeat
compared to six victories.
Jackie Jensen's three-ruri eighth eighth-inning
inning eighth-inning homer brought the Red
Sox from behind and gave Ike
Delock his seventh win after Piul
Foytack carried a five-hitter in into
to into the ninth. Frank Malzone also
homered for Boston and Charley
Maxwell hit No. 23 for Detroit
Rookie Jay Hook and veteran
Brooks Lawrence combined in
five-hitter as the Reds won their
sixth game in seven starts. The
Reds scored their runs in the
third inning on singles by Eddie
Kasko, Vada Pinson and Gus Bell
plus a double steal.
Tonight's All-Star
Starting Lineups
LOS ANGELES, Aug. 3 (UPI)
Here is the batting order and prob probable
able probable starting lineups for today's
All-Star Game, with latest official
batting averages:
AMERICAN LEAGUE
IB-Pete Runnels, (.321)
2B-Nellle Fox, Chicago (.334)
LF Ted Williams, Boston (.240)
C-Yogi Berra, New York (.287)
CF-Mickey Mantle, New York
(.290)
RF-Roger Maris, Kansas City
(-335)
3B-Frank Malione, Boston (.274)
SS-Luls Aparicio, Chicago (.277)
PRyne Duren, New York (W-l,
L-3)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
2B-Johnny Temple, Cincinnati
(.328)
3B-Kn Boyer, St. Louis (.297)
RF -Henry Aaron, Milwaukee
(.32)
CF-Willie Mays, San Fran (.295)
SS-Ernie Banks, Chicago (.310)
IB-Stan Musial, St. Louis (.265)
LF-Wally Moon, Los Angeles
(.297)
C-Del Crandall, Milwaukee (.258)
P-Don Drysdale, ties Angeles
(W 14, L-4)

CAPITOLIO
35c. 20e.
WIND ACROSS THE
EVERGLADES
with v Burl Ives
- Also:
THE INDISCREET

VICTORIA
s5 0.15
Dottle en Espanol!
LOS TRES RIVALES
con Angel infante
MARATON DE BAILE
con Luis Agullar

Cary Grant

LEADING
HITTERS
(BaMd an 275 official at bats)
National League

NATIONAL LEAGUE
0 AB R H
Pet.
.366
.343
.330
Aaron, Mil. 102
Cun., St. L. 97
White, St. L. 100
Temple. Cin. 104
Cepeda, S.F. 102
Gil., L.A. 96
Rob., Cin. 102
Pinson, Cin. 104
413
315
370
418
407
348
379
437
394
421
78 151
40 108
56 122
72 137
71 132
66 111
75 120
85 137
65 122
79 128
.328
.324
.319
.317
.314
.310
.304
Banks, Chi.
Neal, L.A.
103
104
American League
Kuenn, Det.
Wod., Bal. -Fox,
Chi.
Maris, K.C.
Kaline, Det.
Run., Bos.
Power, Cle.
Kubek, N.Y.
Skow., N.Y.
Minoso, CJe.
93
98
103
73
88
99
104
80
74
101
367
314
422
279
337
384
423
304
282
387
64 126
47 107
55 140
49 51
58 109
61 121
82 129
41 91
39 84
63 114
.343
.341
.332
.326
.323
.315
.305
.299
.298
.295
Runs Batted Tn
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Killebrew, Senators
Colavito, Indians
Jensen, Red Sox
Maxwell, Tigers
Minoso, Indians
81
79
76
70
67
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Banks, Cubs
Robinson, Reds
Aaron, Braves
Bell, Reds
Cepeda, Giants
Mathews, Braves
Home Runs ?
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Killebrew, .Senators
Colavito, Indians
Allison, Senators
Lemon, Senators
Triandos Orioles
Maxwell, Tigers
99
89
87
73
73
73
33
31
27
24
23
23
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Mathews, Braves
Banks, Cubs
Aaron, Braves
Robinson, Reds
Cepeda, Giants
30
29
29
24
21
LEADING
PITCHERS
(Based on 12 or more decisions)
American League W L Pet.
Shaw, White Sox 10 3 .769
McLish, Indians 13 4 .765
Mossi, Tigers 10 4 .714
Wynn, White Sox 14 6 .700
Pappas, Orioles 11 5 .688
National League
Face, Pirates 14 0 1.000
Antonelli, Giants 15 6 .714
Drysdale, Dodgers 14 6 .700
Newcombe, Reds 10 5 .667
Mizell, Cards 11 7 .611
Law, Pirates 11 7 .611
All-Star Game
Facts, Figures
LOS ANGELES, Aug. 3 (UPD-
Facts and figures on today s All
Star Game:
Site Coliseum, Los Angeles.
Teams American League All-
Stars vs National League All All-Stars.
Stars. All-Stars. Players Starting players on
each team selected by vote of
league players; reserves and
pitchers picked by All-Star man managers.
agers. managers. Rival managers American
League: Casey Stengel, New York
Yankees; National League: Fred
Haney, Milwaukee Braves.
Series standings American
League leads, 15 game to 11.
Starting pitchers American
League: Jerry Walker, Baltimore
Orioles. National League: Don
Drysdale, Los Angeles Dodgers.
Rules Starting players must
play at least three innings; pitch pitchers
ers pitchers may not pitch more tha
three innings except in case of
extra-innings game.
Starting time 6 p.m. (Panama
time).
nritivT-TNi
St TODAY
LAST DAY!
Rosalind RUSSELL
7:00
9:00
in
"AUNTIE MAME
In TECHNICOLOR I
J Tomorrow! j
A GREAT RELEASE!
ONE DAY ONLY I
Steve McQUEEN In
"The Great St. Louis
Bank Robbery"
Bank Robbery J
R 10
35c.
20c.
SOME LIKE IT HOT
-Marilyn Monroe and
Tony Crtls
Also: :
THE LAST MILE
Mickey Rooney and
Alan Bunce

OUCH! Panama City's Salvador Melendez (left) lands a
right hook to the chin of Paralso's grimacing Ferdie Crossdale
during their three-rounder on the amateur boxing program
at the National Gym last night: The match was stopped by
the commission doctor in 2:10 of the last round after Cross Cross-dale
dale Cross-dale received a cut over the right eyebrow. According to ama amateur
teur amateur boxing Yules, Melendez who was ahead on all the Judges'

scorecards, gained a unanimous decision. (Photo McClean)
RP Pan-American Boxers
Both Lose In Big Upsets

By J.J. HARRISON Jr.
The RP delegation which will
travel to Chicago later this month
to take part in the Third Panamer Panamer-ican
ican Panamer-ican Games added the major por portion
tion portion of $320.90 to their expense
fund today, but doubt existed if
the two boxers chosen to repre represent
sent represent Panama at the Games could
give a good showing against in international
ternational international competition.
Both fighterswelterweight Fe Fe-derico
derico Fe-derico (Chichombolo) Marshall
and featherweight Benito (Coco)
L a sso suffered uspet losses last
night at the National Gym be before
fore before paid attendance of 1302
persons who dished out $323.20
to watch the six-bout benefit
program. The fights were all set
for three rounds.
After the expenses of putting ov over
er over the card are deducted, the re it
of the gate receipts will be turn turned
ed turned over to the delegation. The pro program
gram program was arranged by the Pana Panama
ma Panama Amateur Boxing Commission
Marshall, who obviously wasn't
in condition at a fat 152 3-4 pounds,
was never able to get going a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst his victor, Onel Eastman,
who also tipped the scales at 152-3-4.
Eastman won by a split ver verdict.
dict. verdict. Lasso, 128, dropped a unanim unanimous
ous unanimous decision to Juan Nieto, 130 1-4.
The loser repeatedly complained
to referee Jim Boyle that a "for "foreign
eign "foreign substance" on Nieto's gloves
or person hampered Lasso's vi
Kahn Trying
Golden Age
By JACK CUDDY
NEW YQRK (UPI) 'Irving B.
Kahn, nephew and namesake of
composer Irving Berlin, is a
dreamer and do'er who's trying to
provide a new "golden age" for
boxing through electronics.
Although only 41, the new dy dynamo
namo dynamo of Rosensohn Enterprises,
Inc., is planning and actually ne negotiating
gotiating negotiating to improve the brand of
fights "with money" through a
continuity of national, sectional
and local theater-TV matches.
"And of course we also want a
network for home-TV fights," ex explains
plains explains the chunky, black haired
president of Teleprompter Corp.
which manufactures the tele tele-prompters,
prompters, tele-prompters, used to jog the memo memories
ries memories of public speakers TV an
nouncers and actors of variom
types.
"We expect to make available
more than 750,000 seats in thea
tres and other locations throug'i
out the United States and Canada
for next month's Ingamar Johars.
son Floyd Patterson fight," sav?
the man whose closed-circuit TV
systems are also used by the gov government
ernment government at missile bsses, etc.
KEY MAN
Because he was brought r t o
Rosensohn Enterprises as Key1
man last Friday, this graduate sf
the University of Alabama w 11 1
have a stellar role in promofSnc
the return Johansson Patterson
heavyweight title fight at Yankee
Stadium, Sept. 22, He hopes for a
crowd of at least 60.000.
And as president of Tele prompt
er he will be th! main guy in pro promoting
moting promoting the sales of theater TV
tickets in the many cities to which
the fight will, be sent on closed
circuit.
Busy Irving, who has leased St.
Nicholas Arena in New York and
is negotiating for the Hollywood
Legion Stadium in California for
staging his continuity fight-shows,
hopes to, begin that venture in
September.
PLANS THEATER TV
For outstanding fights "with
better purses ihan thpy're paying
now for home-TV bouts" Kahn
plans national theater TV. For
good bouts, having largely sec sectional
tional sectional Interest, the closed circuit

J 4

sion. But 'Boyle, a US Army capt
ain from Fort Kobbe, said he
examined the gloves and body of
both fighters and found nothing
irregular.
Cagey trainer Aubrey (Cojo)
Woodruff was the chief second
in Nieto's corner. If Woodruff
did use Illegal tricks to help
Nieto to victory, then the train trainer
er trainer evidently failed to use his ef effective
fective effective "stuff" en Marshall,
whom he seconded also.
In the other fights Salvador Me Melendez,
lendez, Melendez, 127, took a unanimous ver verdict
dict verdict from Paraiso's Ferdie Cross Cross-dale,
dale, Cross-dale, 127 1-4. The bout was stop stopped
ped stopped in 2:10 of the last round by
Boxing Commission medico Igna Igna-cio
cio Igna-cio Fabrega when Crossdale suf suffered
fered suffered a deep out over the right
eyebrow.
(According to amateur boxing
rules the boxer who is leadiniz
when a bout is stopped because of
an injury is declared the winner.
Kid Morocho, 106, took a divid divided
ed divided decision from Pedro CaEvajal,
943-4, in another exciting encount encounter
er encounter of the pair. The victory was
Morocho's second against his riv rival
al rival in three meetings.
Manuel Moreno, 105 1-2, gained
a unanimous verdict from Pedro
Caseres, 106 1-2; and Pablo Vas Vas-quez,
quez, Vas-quez, 126, kayoed Harmodio Mi Mi-culta,
culta, Mi-culta, 126 3-4, in 50 seconds of the
second round.
Boyle, who was sweat-sdaked at
the end of the card, served as ar arbiter
biter arbiter in all the bouts.
To Provide
For Boxing
will go only into one section, like
the Southwest, Midwest or East Eastern
ern Eastern Seaboard.
"And in a locality like New
York City, Chicago or Los Ange
les where some young fighter is
red hot, the. light will be sent to
theatres only in that area," he
explained.
"Imagine how many theatres In
New York could be filled if Jose
Torres, the unbeaten young Puer Puerto
to Puerto Rican middleweight, was
matched with a name fighter."
Once a "fair continuity" of
fights is established for theater theater-TV,
TV, theater-TV, and attractive boxers are de developed,
veloped, developed, Kahn is confident von
sors will become interested in us using
ing using that talent for a new weel-lv
or bi-weekly network show fc'r
home TV.
Jonnv Liston Seeks
!8th5fraiohtWin
WednesHv Niohf
NEW YORK (UPI) Heavy Heavyweight
weight Heavyweight contender Sonny Liston of
Philadelphia seeks his 18th
straight victory Wednesday night
against big Nino Valdes of Cuba
at the Chicago Stadium in a 10 10-round
round 10-round TV fight that features tis
wrek's boxing.
Because of his combined boxer boxer-ouncher
ouncher boxer-ouncher prowess, 27-ycar-old Lis Liston
ton Liston is favored at 3-1 over 35-year-old
'Valdes, who lost two of his
three bouts this year and slipped
out of the top 0. v
Their fight will be televised na
tionally by ABC.
Friday night's. TV bout brings
together welterweight contender
Gaspar Ortega of Mexico and un unbeaten
beaten unbeaten Florentino Fernandez of
Cuba at Madison Square Garden
for a 10-rounder that will be tele televised
vised televised and broadcast nationally by
NBC. Fernandez registered 20
straight victories as a professio i
al, including 18 knockouts.
.Ortega is rated ninth among
147-pound contenders. Fernandez
is not ranked yet, but he is f

vored at l-S to beat Gaspar.

Kazan ) Romps To Five-Length

Victory lii

-TheEleta brother's classy and
unbeaten two-year-old native colt
Kazan romped to five-length
victory' as. expected in the $2,000
added six furlong National; Cals-
sic (Clasico Premio' r Nacional)
yesterday afternoon at 'the Tresi
dent Remon racetrack.:
Because only three two-year-old
natives were finally entered for
this classic two of them goingl
in an entry and Kazan was ap
parently by far the best, the track
management- maae tne race
betless exhibition. ,
Tremal Naik, which raced in an
entry with Kazan, and Mechi
were the only other starters.. Tre
mal Naik jumped to the front at
the start witn Mechi second. K.a
zan got off a bit sluggishly .but at
the end of the first furlong he was
already going even with Mechi
and quickly moved up alongside
his entrymate. ?-.
Two furlongs out, Kazan' as
med command but did not begin
to pull away until given his head
in the final furlong where he
steadily increased his lead to
score by fully five lengths. His
time was an excellent 1.14 3-5 for
the three-quarters of a mile. Im Imported
ported Imported Argentine- filly Fille won
the second race in 1:16 1-5 while
Kazan's stablemate Nirvana turn
ed the same distance in 1.15 while
whipping a field of eighth series
imported racers.
Braulie Baeie had a gift in
this classic. He also scored with
Domitila, Nirvana, and Distante
to be the day's winningest rider.
Jose Ulloa and Heliodoro Cus Cus-tines
tines Cus-tines won two each.
Tatin, ridden by Homero Hidal
go, won the secondary attraction
bv a nose over Alcaraz. Ulloa ud
in the day's most exciting finish.
Ulloa was reportedly suspended
for crossing El Tunchi at the top
of the homestretch with Alcaraz.
Tatin paid $22.80 to be the only
non-favorite to win all afternoon
as the form players had a field
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Cleron $3.40, $280
2 Pepin $6.00
SECOND RACE
1 Fille $3,40, $3.00
2 Tanarik 4.60
First Double: 5.20
THIRD RACE
1 Domitila $2,20, 12,20
2 Tingat $2.20
FOURTH RACE
1 Sandokan $2.20, $2.20
2 Don Vito $2.20
Ctulniela: $17.40
FIFTH RACE
1 Mi Deseo (Excluded from
Betting)
2 His Majesty $2.80, $2.40
3 Maniart $2.80
SIXTH RACE
1 Last Moment $7.80, $4.00
2 Tierral $3.80
SEVENTH RACE
1 Palave $5,60, $3.00
2 Traipo $3.00
Second Double: $27.80
EIGHTH RACE
1 Nirvana $2.60, $2.60
2 Mi Cautiva $4.60
Quiniela: $11.60
NINTH RACE
1- jDistante $3.80, $2.60
2 Sicabu $2.80
One-Two: $9.40
TENTH RACE
1 Tatin $22.80, $8.20
2 Alcaraz $5.40
ELEVENTH RACE
1 Rey Belot 3.80, $2.40
2 Otorongo $2.40
One Two: $7.80
Don Drysdale,
Jerry Walker
Start Tonight
J
LOS ANGELES, Aug. 3 (UP
The National League wS:.
favored at 6-5 to score a "rer
peat" victory over the American
League today in the second major
league All-Star ( Baseball Game
Of 1959.
Don Drysdale, 23 year -old
speedball pitcher of the Los An Angeles
geles Angeles Dodgers, will start for the
National League against the
American League's 20 year
old right-hander Jerry Walker
of the Baltimore Orioles.
Manager Casey Stengel tabbed
the young Oriole pitcher for the
starting assignment because Ryne
Duren of the New York Yankees
pitched three and two-thirds in innings
nings innings yesterday against Kansas
City.
But other starters were less
certain:
Eddie Mathews of the Mil Milwaukee
waukee Milwaukee Braves will sit this one
out and Ken Boyer of the St. Louis
Cards will play third base for the
Nationals. Mathews has a hip in injury.
jury. injury. Orlando Cepeda, first base basemen
men basemen In the first All-Star clash
won by the Nationals at Pitts Pittsburgh,
burgh, Pittsburgh, 5-4, on July 7, withdrew
because of a wrist lnury.
Gus Triandos, Baltimore
catcher, withdrew because of an
inured hand.
Yesterday the American League
squad lost Harvey Kuenn of De Detroit
troit Detroit and Gil McDougald of New
York, scratched because of ail ailments,
ments, ailments, and they were replaced bv
Tony Kubek and Bobby Richard
son, both of the Yankees. Earlier
the Yankees' Bill SkoiAon injured
his hand and was replaced by Els Elston
ton Elston Howard.

National (Classic :

- w y! :
,''-.. a ' i
- -i v- mi
" v 'x
$VA$. xTU':l it
t:
JlWllWm mnnniiiniMraiMiinJ n
;, ap t s fV,
fhSV ?ara" 8a? MKuels brilliant native tolt Kazan
lLoin,?lDg, nome a-flve- ength winner in the $2,000 add,

, : wcw ouper siH. Mecni ouuiasrea Tremal Naik bv
llC& 5S3 ,rii!?erace that Waa betless exhibition ;

Editor! CONRADO SARGEANT

National League
TEAMS
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Milwaukee .
Chicago .....
Pittsburgh .
Cincinnati .
St. Louis .
Philadelphia
W
59
40
. 57
50
50
49
49
42
L
45
47
45
53
55
55
56
40
Pet.
.567
.561
.559
.485
.476
.471
GB
1
m
10
.467 1flVi
.412 1$
Today's Games
National League All-Stars
American League All-Stars
at
Los Angeles
Yesterday's Results
(First Game)
St. Louis 100 000 2014 li
Milwaukee 100 001 001 $ S
Jackson (9-9), MeDaniel and Por
ter.
Jay (4-8), McMahon and Cran
dall.
(Second Game)
St. Louis 000 210 020 5 9
Milwaukee 400 034 OOx 11 12
Mizell (11-7). Stone. Miller and
Smith.
Burdette (15-10) and Rice
Cran-
dall.
Chicago 000 000 000 0 5
Cincinnati 002 000 OOx 2 8 0
Hillman (5-9), Henry, Ceccarelli
and S. Taylor.
Hook (2-1), Lawrence and Bai
ley.
Pittsburgh
000 300 000-3 6
000 201 llx-5 11
San Francisco
Kline, Porterfield (0-1), Green,
Face and Burgess.
Antonelli (15-6) and Landrith.
Philadelphia
100 200 0003
000 130 00x-4
Los Angeles
Cardwell (5-7), Phillips, Farrell
and Lonnett.
Craig, Sherry (2-2) and Rosebo-
ro.
W ENCANTO-35-7
Orson Welles
Diana Varsl in
"COMPULSION"
Jayne Mansfield in
"Sheriff of Fractured Jaw"
SERVICE CENTER

B A LB OA 6;75 8:55
AIR-CONDITIONED
if ALDO RAY 'cUtT ROBERTSON
"THE NAKED AND THE DEAD"
Tuesday "MURDER BY CONTRACT"

COCO SOLO
7:00
Air-Condltioned
Lana Turner
"IMITATION; Or LIFE"
Tuesday 'SWachete"

MARGARITA Richard Eyer Stephen McNally
T:00 "JOHNNY ROCCO" v
Tuesday "The Purple Plain",. ;

kARAISO 7:001

ISanta Cms 7:001

MAN OF THE
WEST" :

"Snow-fire" and
The, t Maverick"

MATINEES
BALBOA
2:00

COCO SOLO 2:301

"DESERT

"SPOILERS OF
THE PLAINS",
. and Serial.

LEGION"

American League
TEAMS
Chicago .
Cleveland
Kansas City
Baltimore
New York .
Detroit .
Boston
Washington
W
. 42
. 60
. 51
. 53
. 50
. 51
. 45
. 43
L
40
44
Pet. GB
.608
.577 3 .,
.500 11
.500 11
.490 12
.481 U
.437 17Vi
.410 20ft
Today's Games
. ti
National League All-Stars vt' vt'-American
American vt'-American League All-Stars iat
' Les Angeles' ?' ,'
Yesterday's Results
(First GameV
Washington 001 100 000-S 1
Chicago 1 100 000 002 3 SF
Kemmerer (5-11) and Kortheck.
Pierce, Lown (8-2) and toUar. . ;
(Second Game) '"'
Washington 001 ion mns
Chicago 003 033 OOx 9 10 At
Katt (0-1). Gricos. Stohh. vs
eschick, Kemmerer and Naragott-
Shaw (10-3). StaleV and
Battey..
(First .Game)
Baltimore 000 101 020 15 15 fl'"
Cleveland 000 210 01004 m ri
Wilhelm (11-T). O'Dell .tM riini
berg.
McLish. Cicotte (2-1 ) nif frif. .!
gerald.
(Second Game)
Baltimore 000 002 0013 12 .'
Cleveland 001 100 0136 11
Pappas. O'Dell (6-9 and fiin...
berg.
Bell (11-9) and Nixon.
Boston
000 200 0305
012 001 0004
Detroit
Monbouquette.
Delock (7-6) aoj.':
White.
Foytack (9-10), Bunnlng and Wil
son.
Tew York
Kansas City
210 003 010-7 11- tl
002 021 0005 13 t
Terry, Maas (10-5), Slaylock, Du Du-ren,
ren, Du-ren, Shantz and Berra.
Daley, Grim (6-7), Coleman,
Sturdivant, Tsitouris and Smith.
THEATERS TODAY
DIABLO HTS. 7:00
' Kent Smith
"THE MtGAER MtGAER-Tues.
Tues. MtGAER-Tues. "Run For;ofer'
Camp Bierd 7:00
I WANT TO i
r,'LIWLr:
TOMORROW
Margarita 8:30
"PRINCE OF
PLAYERS"

v
.A.
J-
.::;.t''
' ...

I



MOHDAY, AUGUST f, 196

TBB PANAMA AMZXICAII AN IXDEPEXDtXT OAJLT NIWSPAPEB
PA81 lVl
- 1
MittenSan
Beeson-Jim Hinkle In Golf Finals
.
Fragetta Runs Ring's
'Lonely Hearts Club'
National Distillers'
Best Ball Tourney
OUT OF DOORS tilth "VOi
1FIKH

dyMmkkys.
'1

A

j

J

" A fi

BALANCED BEAUTY Riding prettily on one leg, shapely Suzie Bowden skimt along in
a water skiing exhibition at Cypress Gardens, Fla. Suzie is Florida Sports Car Queen, too.

Ted Williams, Musial To Play
Filial All-Sfar Game Tonight

Bob Rosburg
With Final

By OSCAR FRALKY
MINNEAPOLIS (UPI) Bob
Rosburg of Palo Alto, Calif., a
disappointed second to .the U. S
Open, reached the end? of golf's'
heartbreak highway yesterday 1
when he fired a blazing four under
par 30-3&-66 on the final round
for a 27 total which captured the
coveted PGA championship.
Six shots back of tiny Jerry
Barber and virtually counted out
of it as they started the final
. round at Minneapolis Golf Club
the man with the baseball grip
wielded a hot, putter and a will willing
ing willing wedge as he slashed five
strokes off par on the front nine
mil then roared on to victory.

it wax a crushing defeat for
fci little rival, because Barber
held a one-shot lead over Doug
tinrfM-K of the short backswing
and was two shots ahead of burly
Mike Souehak witn Kosmirg inose
staggering six shots back as they
went out this gray, chill diy with
its 20 mll per hour winas.
ROSBURG CHARGED AHEAD
But they couldn't withstand the
charge of the 32-year-old Rosburg,
victory starved for three years, a
burly, sanoy-nairea man wuu
low th recent Ooen with a
fci V WW W m
double bogey on the 13th hole of
the final round to finish one shot
back of Billy Casper, am nosourg
dida't "blow" sunaay
It was combination comeback
..ri Kniiamc in which Rosburg
earned his triumph and in which
the- five foot, live men, w-year-u
Airher laeeed under the
am nf the nressure and the
hneev the two final holes
;l Mr it awav with a 36-3773
ana a windup 271 which left him
in second place tie with Doug
Sanders of Miami Beaen.
.rv,r hid it in his socket with
) inly three holes to go when he
v atroked home a 12 foot birdie putt
to take a one shot lead over tne
M.i.h.rf Rnxhurs. Jerry save it a
game and gallant try. For, while
he trapped histee shot on the
short 16th and came out poorly,
he canned a 15-foot putt for a par
which saved his lead. But then
his irons came apart and he
boseyed both of the last two holes
by hitting his approaches into the
heaen ana iauins u saw ma
pars.
" ONI STROKE AWAY
Sanders, just one shot back of
Barber when tney sianea me uuj
round, shot himself a 38-36-72
which picked up one stroke on the
.Mtnmint Rarher and eave them
. wTcond nlaee tie at 278 that
one. slender but ever heart-break
ing-stroke away rrom me iop.
Sniifhik. the former Duke full
back who stood two strokes back
shot himself out of it early as he
took three back-breaking --bogeys
am. the first five holes before
flery of 12,000.
Thus In the end, Dow Finster Finster-wald,
wald, Finster-wald, the defending champion,
eame on to take fourth place with
a 5-35 70 or even par 280. And
ASTHMA and
RQ LIC VCD
Aathma. aa4 Bronchitis attaolu rull
Mur ilin, uadamln your trtntU
ini wkn your howt. Mnet
etMts to work throuth your blood tt
voreom Mthma and brenehltla at
Wka. It Mlpa dliiolT truigllnc mu
tut Md promotoo fro, way brth
tn, Mndao' aeuoa u oiimuv ra
In J14
Md atubborn
dot Min.
tiii, from anr druswtoro todar and
Eti hew much botttr rou and
roatho tonlfht, and how much bettor
rou will tool tomorrow. Mondaeo
flahta dUeomforta of Aathma, Brae
Mtu and Mar row

v-.y

"tf-4s1iJ
Wins P
Round 66
Souchak, chopping out a 38-3674,
finished up in a tie with stretch
running Bob Goalby and Ken
Ventun at 281. Goalby closed witn
a 34-3468 and Venturi with a
34-3569.
TRIED FOR FOURTH WIN
Another shot away at 282 were
Slammin' Sammy Snead, frustrat frustrated
ed frustrated in his bid for a fourth title
as he closed with a 37-3370 for
292 which banked him with for former
mer former U. S. Open champion Cary
Middlecoff, who wound up with a
37-3572.
From there they, stretched on
back with, Gene Littler carding a
73 for 284; Billy Maxwell, Doug
Ford and Porky Oliver among
those at 285; Paul Harney and
Tommy Jacobs at 286 and a
crowd at 287 which included Ern
ie Vossler, Pete Cooper, Tommy
Bolt, U. S. Open chai.pion Billy
Casper and former champions
Jackie Burke and Wallf Burkemo
Ted Kroll, leading money win
ner Art Wall and Jay Hebert
were at 288;. former champion
Chick Harbert at 289, and 1957
champion Lionel Hebert at 290.
Two former winners, Jim Ferrier
and Jim Turnesa were at 292 and
55-year old Denny Shute, who
won this 'way back in 1936 clos
ing with a 75 which tied him at
293 with Julius Boros.
Rosburg accomplished his tri triumph
umph triumph with one of the finest nine
hole efforts in PGA history as he
birdied five holes on the front
side. He started by knocking
home a 25 footer on the second
hole. On the 565-yard par five
third hole he trapped his ap
proach but wedged out 12 feet
short and ran it in for a birdie.
On the fifth hole he canned a 10
footer for his third bird and then
flipped in a six footer to birdie
the eighth and wedged to within
three feet to birdie the ninth,
TIED AT 13th
The one-time automobile sales salesman
man salesman trembled briefly on the 12th
hole when his drive caught the
rough and his second was 40
yards short of the green. He
whipped it on, but not close
enough, and had to settle for a
bogey. But he oarred the rest of
the way and as Barber, playing
methodically and slowly, reachea
the 15th hole they were tied.
Little Jerry had been having
his troubles, too. For his putter,
the big club in his bag, let him
down on the eighth when he
missed from 2V feet for a boiev
and he had bogeyed the 12th by
ariving tne rough to drop back
into the tie.
But on thVlSth. Barber an
peared to have forged his winning
edge when he calmly stroked
home a 12-foot birdie putt to
again move one shot in front of
the finished Rosburg.
But it wasn't to be, even though
Barber saved himself momentar momentarily
ily momentarily on the short 16th by coming
out of a trap poorly but holing a
15-footer for his par. But then the
sand caught him on those two fi final
nal final holes and, Jerry failed to es escape.
cape. escape. On the 17th he dunked his ap approach
proach approach into a trap and took the
bogey that left him tied with
Rosburg. Then it was onevhole to
So and again he hit a trap with
la approach, came out 15 feet
past the pinand missed coming
back.
Sanders, the man with t h e
shortest backswing in golf, never
had the lead although the 26-year-old
Georgia-born pro in this
one on a pass finished In a tie
with Barber for second place.

6A

By HAL WOOD
LOS ANGELES (UPI) Two o!
baseball's grand old men, Ted
Williams and Stan Musial, play
their swan-song to All-Star compe competition
tition competition today when the National
and American Leagues tangle for
the second time this year.
Don Drysdale, young fire ball balling
ing balling Los Angeles Dodgers right righthander,
hander, righthander, is expected to open on the
mound for Manager Fred Haney's
National League team.

But the choice of the American
League starter Is as mixed up as
some of Manger Casey Stengel s
conversation. The latest informa
tion is that Stengel will go with
his own relief ace, Ryne Duren
Stengel had indicated he would
start Camilio Pascual of the
Washington Senators, but Pascual
left a game in the eighth Inning
Friday night with a sore arm
and it's still sore. So he's out.
RAMOS REPLACES PASCUAL
Gus Triandos. Baltimore's slug
gins catcher, was another late
scratch. He hurt his hand in
game Saturday. Substituting for
him is pitcher Jerry Walker of
Baltimore, who at 20 may be the
vouneest All-Star in history. Walk
er has won eight, lost five, and
has a fine 2.65 earned-run aver
age.
Pedro Ramos, another pitcher,
will come from Washington to re
nlaee Pascual.
But while younger stars like
Willie Mays, Hank Aaron and
Mickey Mantle will be in key
roles, v it is probable that the big biggest
gest biggest ovations will be for Williams
and Musial.
This will be MuSlal's 17th All All-Star
Star All-Star appearance. During that
time he has a .309 batting aver
age. It will be Williams' 16th
showing, and he has an All-Star
average of .317
NATIONALS WON FIRST GAME
A crowd of about 50,000 is ex expected
pected expected to file into the steaming
Coliseum to witness the battle battle-first
first battle-first All-Star classic ever held on
the West Coast. The temperature
on the Coliseum floor at game
time is xpected to be around the
100 mark.
In the first All-Star game this
year at Pittsburgh, the Nationals
won on Willie Mays' triple in the
eighth inning. The. final score was
5-4.
Pitching highlight of that game
was a perfect three innings by
Drysdale. Haney is hoping the
Dodger star can do it again.
The schedule, which called for
all teams to play yesterday and
then send their stars ss much as
3.000 miles to Los Angeles for
(he game Monday, kept both man managers
agers managers out of the city until just be before
fore before game time. And all partici participants
pants participants will be back playing regu-lary-scheduled
games on Tuesday.
TEMPLE RAP GAME
For this reason, there has been
some complaints that this is a
"second rate" All Star game game-that
that game-that the atari of baseball didn't
want it; that it was forced on the
stars and the owners by the play players,
ers, players, themselves to enrich the
pension fund.
"It's just another exhibition, in
my book," said Johnny Temple,
out spoken second baseman for
the Cincinnati Reds, who will
start for the Nationals. "The
players voted against this game
not for it. We were told after
all the votes were in that we
would have to go through with
the second game as the radio and
television rights already had been
sold."
But the show will go on and
the cream of the current crop will
be on the diamond.
MAYOR'S BIO WHEELS
CHELMSFORD. England (UPI)
The local council spent $5,864
today for a new black limousine
for Mayor Tom Howes. Howes
had previously attended to most
of his civic duties under his own
power on a bicycle.

Doe Htrb Mitten and Sandy
Hinkle led the way irto the fin finals
als finals of the 1959 National Distillers'
Isthmian Best Ball Championships
as they toured a rain soaked Sum Summit
mit Summit Hills Golf and Country Club
course in sub par figures Satur Saturday
day Saturday afternoon to eliminate Earl

Schlegil and Don encbton 6 and
5.
Facing this awftseme twosome!
will be old grey beard Jim Hink- i
le and Bill.peeson. Beeson and;
Sandy Hinkle will he renewiap an
old golfing aequalnship as they
both played on the Duke Universi University
ty University golf team for three years.
WOMEN MEDALIST
REACHES FINALS
Women's Medalists Lynn Jones
and Madelon "Butch" Garrett put
up a great fight yesterday in de defeating
feating defeating Louise Jones and Pat War Waring
ing Waring 2 and 1. With a strictly parti partisan
san partisan crowd looking on, the young youngsters
sters youngsters lumped into the lead on the
first hole and never were behind
the rest of the way.
Louise Jones evened the match
on No. 2, but Butch put her team
ahead on No. 4, with Louise eve
ning things on No. 5 It settled
down to be a battle between Louise
and Butch, with the break coming
on No. 13. On the 13th tee Jones-
Waring were one down,' and Jones
attempted to even things with a
deadly approach shot that came
very close to dropping. That gave
her team their par on the hole
with Bunch's ball some four feet
away. She dropped her putt for a
halve and protection on their lead
of one hole.
Ob No. 14, uynn eame to life
and won it with a par. and halv
ed No. 15 with., a par. No. 16
saw both Lynn and Louise hit the
green In regulation, with Louise
two putting for a ar, and Lynn
missing a short putt to lose that
one. It all ended on No. 17 when
Butch sank an eight footer for a
par and the match.
In the other women's saml-finai
match Bev Dilfer and Katherine
Purdv tallied a 6 and 5 triumph
over Ruth Powell and Wilma Ri Riley.
ley. Riley. Dilfer-Purday made t,be turn
with a three up lead and the two
teams battled on evh turns over
the back nine with the match end
ing on No. 14.
HINKLB-BEESON
CLOSE ONE
WIN
Jim Hinkle and Bill Beeson
tangled with the tournament's sur surprise
prise surprise team of Bill Grow and Len
Collett. and although both teams
were almost flooded off the coue
Into the canal, the former combi
nation were able to win out on the
18th green.
Hinkle-Beeson moved Into the
lead on No. 1. but Collett-Grow
came back with three pars f r
wins to put them two up at the
end of No. 5, which they halved
Hinkle-Beeson rallied over the
next five holes to put them ahead
3 up.
Collett-Grow moved into tne
11th three down and proceeded to
hand Hinkle Beeson the same
treatment on the back nine as
they dished out on the first nine,
winning the 11th, 12th, and 13th.
The 14th was halved. Beeson put
his team ahead with a par on 15,
but Grow dropped a birdie put on
16 to make it all even. No. 17 was
halved.
Beeson was first to tee off on
18 and put his tee shot on the
green snort of the pin and to the
right. Hinkle was short of the
green withhis shot. Grow pulled
his tee shot to the left, but hole
high. Collett skied one and was
way short. His chip failed to reach
the green as did Grow's. With on only
ly only bogies facing him. Beeson sank
his long putt for a bird and the
match.
SEMI-FINAL RESULTS
CHAMPIONSHIP FLIGHT
Bill Beeson and Jim Hinkle de defeated
feated defeated Len Collett and Walter
Grow, up Sandy Hinkle and Doc
Mitten defeated D. Crichton and
E. Schlegal, S and B.
FIRST FLIGHT
Jack Perantie-Tom Perantie de defeated
feated defeated Melvin Smith and Bill Duf Duf-fus,
fus, Duf-fus, 3 and 2. Charles French and
W. Engleke defeated Hugh Thom Thomas
as Thomas and Billy Sullivan, 6 and 5.
SECOND FLIGHT
Jim Riley-John Zelnich defeated
Bipp Nelson-Bill Rogers, 2 and 1.
M. B. Huff and H. C. Durrett de de-feated
feated de-feated M. J. Deweese-E. M. Bar Bar-ashes,
ashes, Bar-ashes, 5 and 4.
THIRD FLIGHT
D. Rudy-A. H, Byrd defeated
Dick Danilson-M. C. Mosley. 3 and
2. M. E. Wheeler-M. A. Wheeler
defeated C F. Curz-Jack Ander Anderson,
son, Anderson, 3 and 1.
WOMEN'S FLIGHT
"Butch" Garrett-Lynn Jones de defeated
feated defeated Louise Jones-Pat Waring.
2 and 1. Bev Dilfer-Kathrins Pur Pur-dy
dy Pur-dy defeated Ruth Powell-Wllma
Riley, 6 and S.
PAIRINGS AND STARTING
TIME FOR FINALS
CHAMPIONSHIP FLIGHT
Jim -Hinkle-BUl Beeson vs. Doe
Mitten-Sandy Hinkle (8:35 a.m.)
FIRST FLIGHT
Jack Perantie-Tom Perantie vs.

HOW NEW BREEDS
OF DOG DEVELOP
By JOE STETSON
Dog Editor
"Every now 1 and then another
breed it recognized by the Ameri American
can American Aeanei club.

The latest 11 the Australian ter terrier
rier terrier and, not too long ago, the
German wirehaired pointer.
In some cases, as with the little
dogs from Down Under, the breed
resulted from a cross. The Aus Australian
tralian Australian silky happened to breed
fairly true to form and strike the
fancy of enough people to perpe
tuate it at a breed and sponsor
its recognition.
in other cases, tne Dreed may
have been centuries old before en
joying the attention of someone
willing to import it.
The Great Pyrenees from Spain.
the saluki of the Middle East, the
komondor, kuvasz, viszla and pu pu-li
li pu-li out of Hungary and so on, are
breeds of relatively recent recog recognition
nition recognition on this side of the Atlantic
though they have been typed lor
many, many generations.
Naturalists are well nri nf
the existence of hundrri nf umll
defined breeds throughout the
world. These have been typed by
either nature or man to fulfill a
certain funrfinn nr thriva chpc.
fully in a certain, or thrive sue-
cessruiiy in a certain environ environment.
ment. environment. They are just as definitely
pure creeds as anv w vnnw
Travel abroad made Americans
aware of the continent! iWtino
dogs. Even now, while we have
Armies of oecunancv tntor.tt
grows in support of certain breeds.
- 1 . . 1.
ui mi years me oermtn long-
C. French-W. Engleke (8:24 a.m.)
SECOND FLIGHT
Jim Rilev-Jack Zelnlrk v M
F. Htiff-H. C. Durrett s m
THIRD FLIGHT
D. Rudy-A. II Byrd vs. M. E.
Wheeler-M. A. Wheeler (9:05 a.m 0
WOMEN'S CHAMPIONSHIP
. Bev. Dilfer-TCathrinn PnrHv vs
"Butch" Garrett-Lynn Jones (8:45
a.m.)
OFFICIAL LIST
r .
Complete Prize
The

I S S S S f 1
Prizes No. PriiM No Prlrti No. PrlMi No. Prlies No. PrlMi No. Priiei No. PrliM No. PriiM
1SS.00 1002 1M.08 2002 156.00 3002 158.00 4002 166.00 5002 16S.0O 6002 156.00 7002 156.00 S002 156.00
156.00 1102 186.00 2102 156.00 3102 156.08 4102 156.00 S102 156.00 S102 156.00 7102 156.00 S102 15S.00
156.00 1202 156,00 2202 156.00 3202 156.00 4202 156.00 6202 156.00 S202 154.00 7202 156.00 S202 156.00
156.00 1302 156.00 2302 156.00 3302 156.00 4302 156.00 5302 156.00 6J02 156.00 7302 166.00 8302 156.00
156.00 1402 156.00 2402 156.00 3402 156.00 4402 156.00 5402 156.00 S402 156.00 7402 156.00 8402 156.00
2,600.00 1502 2,600.00 250? 52,000.00 3502 2,600.00 4502 2.600.00 5502 2,600.00 S502 2,600.00 750? 2.800.00 8502 2,600.00
156.00 1602 156.00 2602 156.00 3802 156.00 4002 156.00 5602 156.00 6602 154.00 7602 156.00 8802 136.00
156.00 1702 156.40 2782 156.00 3702 158.00 4702 156.00 5702 156.00 4702 154.00 7702 156.6H S70I' 156.00
156.00 1802 156.00 2802 156.00 I 3802 156.00 4S02 156.00 5802 156.00 4802 154.00 T802 156.00 8802 166.00
166.00 1902 154.00 2902 156.00 I 3902 156.00 4902 156.00 5902 156.00 4902 154.00 7902 156.00 8902 156.00

No.
000!
0102
0202
0302
402
0S02
0602
0T02
OS02
0902

249J S20 00 249S 829.00 249T 820.94 249S S24.04 2501 520.00 2804 S24.M 2S04 120.44 2508 524.04 2819 S24-W
2494 820.00 1494 S24.04 2498 520.00 2500 524.44 2503 520.00 2505 415.44 1501 520.00 250 520.00 1511 SM.44
Approximations Derived From Second Prize
t S S 8 S f
4114 140.04 1114 140.44 2114 260.00 3114 240.44 4114 260.00 8114 260.44 T114 260.00 8114 240.00 4114 144.44
S14S 130.04 410T 1M104 4109 130.00 4111 130.00 4113 130.00 4118 130.44 4118 130.04 6124 134.00 4122 130 00
4144 130.00 410S 130.44 4110 130.00 4111 130.44 6115 130.00 I 611T 134.44 4119 130.00 6121 130.00 8123 130.04
Approximations Derived From Third Prize
4 S S S S S I
0314 156.00 1310 156.04 1310 154,04 3314 154.04 4310 154.00 8314 154.44 4314 156.00 8316 156.00 9310 154.04
7301 104.00 7303 104.00 7305 104.00 730T 104.04 7309 104.00 T312 104.44 7314 104.00 7314 104.00 731S 104.44
T302 104.00 7304 104.40 7306 104.00 7308 104.00 7311 104.00 7313 104.00 T315 104.00 7317 104.00 7319 104.04

Prise-winning Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing were sold at: The 1st. Panama, 2nd. Panama, and 3rd. In Panama.
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in 2 and not Included in the above list win Fifty Two Dollars (52.00) each.
The whole ticket has fifty two pieces which comprises the two series "A" ft "B"

WITNESSES: Roberto Gonsalez G. Ced. 1-86-195
Rlcardo Sosa Ced. 47-9207

KJrtTC. Th wlnnlnf Uckoti with th lut clphor and with tho two tart
I'v I E, cipher apply only to tho Flrit Prl.
Tht Pint Prlio and the 2nd and 3rd Prize are drown teparotilj'. Tho ap approximation
proximation approximation ar calculated on the Flrat, Second and Third prlzet In cut
a ticket ahould carry the number of eaeh prize, the holder 1 entitled to
claim payment for each.
DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, August 2, 1959
Drawina; Number SOS
Fraction Ticket
First Prise 02 $11.00 $220.00
Second Prize. .... 14 3.00 60.00
Third Prize 10 2.00 40.00

haired pointer has been imported

and bred. The Brac-ue d Auvergne
is gaining sponsorship. The Wacd-
teihund has supporters.
How does a breed gain support
that reaches recognition There
must bs something individually
good or attractively different.
This must be followed by the im
portation of enough dogs and
sufficient backing to insure a
reasonable amount of breeding.
The dogs must breed true.
FULL CYCLE-Pumpsie Green is
the Boston Red Sox' first Negro
player and gives his race repre
sentation now on all the major
league clubs.

j,
lly

OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
' PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
winning Numbers In the Ordinary Drawing No. 2108, August 2, 1959
whole ticket has 52 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "B

First Prize 2502
Second Prize 6114
Third Prize 7 310

Approximations Derived From First Prize

Signed by: The Governor of the Province of Panama ALBERTO ALEMAN
The Representative of the Treasury, JAIME DE LA GCARDIA JR.

PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEW YORK (NEA) Dewey
Fragetta was finishing a letter
to the promoter in Bangkok, Thai
land, where, a bloke named Dow Dow-thong
thong Dow-thong Singbapalop had just won
the middleweight championshio of
the Orient, suggesting several op opponents
ponents opponents for the home-grown tiger.
"Pardon me," he said, "I thin
the phone is ringing in Spanish."
Fragetta, one-tim Utica, N.Y.,
boxing writer occupies a unique
position in sports. He is a sort of
international marriage broker for
boxing. So much of his business
is carried on by transocean tele telephone
phone telephone he swears he can tell what
country is calling by the way t p
bell rings. Ba that as -it may, af after
ter after s short spam of spavined
Spanish he hung up.
"That wS Mexico." he explain

ed. "Just made Ike Chestnut with
Claudio Adame, local feather,
for the Juarez Bull Ring, Aug. 1
Fragetta, who has been in the
beak Dusting business for 30 of
his 51 years, is one of the mighty
few who has represented every
body in the sour science fighters,
managers and promoters. If a pro promoter
moter promoter in Aukland. F.riinburgh, Jo
hannesburg or Kansas City wants
to put on a show, Dewey acts as
a kind of clearing house. He ar arranges
ranges arranges the card, lakes a per percentage
centage percentage of the profit, if any.
If a manager has a fighter out
of work, Fragetta will move him
throughout the globe, most like likely.
ly. likely. He sent Jimmy Martinez, the
Phoenix middleweight, all over
the world unescorted.
From time to timi. Fragetta will
dash off like a secretary of state
to some strategic soot reouirine
first-hand attention, but most of
the time he is represented by
traveling experts, such as Eddie
Borden, 111st returned from Aru
ba, a tiny island off Venezuela
in the Netherlands Wast Indies
and now packing for a flight to
the Philippines. A year asfo
Dewey opened a club in Alaska
Fanning up business in the A-
meneas,. Kurope, Asia and Am
ca, Fragetta, to acertain ex
tent, has to be multilingual. He
knows 25 per cent of the key
words in practically every Ian
guage.

$ 52,000.00
$ 15,600.00
$ 7,800.00

JOSE DOMINGO SOTO
Notary Public, Panama

The prliea will be said U aceoraance with the Official Llat of Panama la
the office of the KaUowal Beneflclent Lottery eltuated on Central Avenue.
PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No. 2109 WHICH WILI
TAKE PLACE SUNDAY. AUGUST 9, 1959
Divided In two eerie of 24 fraction each denominated "A" and "B"

FIRST
1 Flrat Prize. Sorle A and B,
1 Second Prize, Serlea A and B.
1 Third Prize. Serin A and B. of
18 Approximation!, Serle A and B.
9 Prize. Serle A and B. of
90 prize. Serle A and B. of
900 Prize. Serle A and B. of
SECOND
IS Approximation, gerie A tnd B.
S Prize. .Bexlet A, and B. el
THIRD
IS ApprexlmaUona. Serle A and B.
. 4 Prize. Serle A and B. of
10T4 Prize

Price of a whole ticket
Price of a 52nd part .

Sometimes Fragetta makes up i

a dream match, then shops to
a promoter. This brought about
tnt Joe Louis Jimmy Bivin
fight which drew 1102,000 for th
Baltimore Variety Club in 1951,
the first bout ever televised into
New York theaters from out of
the big town.
Fragetta operates from a little
Broadway suite surrounded by
the offices of song publisher!
whose pianos beat out a steady
obiigatto to the ringing of tele telephones
phones telephones in the fight headquarters.
His telephone bill averages $7,000
a year, cable tolls 11,500. He
spends $600 annually on out-of-town-and
- country newspapers,'
making him one of the best-informed
men in sports. Brochures
which glowingly describe t h
gladiators he represents bring an,
annual printing bill of $2,000.
Fragetta, who has much hustla
as a subway rush hour, does
practically all of the office work
himself. He types 1,000 letters a
month, sends out a monthly mi mimeographed
meographed mimeographed news release to prac practically
tically practically every newspaper sports
desk and promoter.
"Mexico is particularly active,'"
Fragetta says. "Boxing is rapid rapidly
ly rapidly displacing bull fighting as a
national sport because the cost
of fighting bulls and matadors
has gone way up."
Listening to Fragetta, profes professional
sional professional boxing isn't in any way as
sick as it has been pictured.
One reason for this is that re regardless
gardless regardless of to what ou-of-the-way
places boxing makes its
"'iy. Dwev Frage'ta will be
there with his "Lonelv Hearts
Club" that unites prize fighters,
managers and promoters.
DOES THOROUGH JOB
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) An At Attractive
tractive Attractive 28-year-old unemployed
actress killed herself night by
drinking ant poison, slash slashing
ing slashing her wrists, and then driv driving
ing driving her car off a 500-foot rK'f
overlooking the film capital. Po Police
lice Police officers pulled Delores Rose
out of the car alive as she plead pleaded
ed pleaded "just let me die, just let ma
die." Several hours, laer, In Gen General
eral General Hospital, she died.
t
Prim
156.00
154.04
mio
156.00
154.00
1,604.04
154.44
154.00
154.00
156.04
No.
9002
9102
4202
9302
9402
9502
9602
9701
9802
9002
PABLO A. PINEL M.
Secretary
PRIZE
of
of
of
426.000.00 each erle
151,000 00
16.400.00
T.snouo
9.360O0
23.400 00
14.041)00
44.800 00
7,800.00 each terle
3.900.00 each erle
260.00 each erie
1,300.00 each ierle
78.00 each aerie
24.00 eaeh eerie
PBUZF,
of $
PRIZE
of $
45.00 each earlee
130.00 eaeh eerie
S 2.340.00
2J40.00
12 OO each earle t 1.ST1.04
TLOO each eerie 1,404.04
Total
I1T4.SM.44
...$26.00
... 0.50

" i



I

AGI EIGHT
rax PANAMA AKKSICAK AJt INDEPENDENT BAJXY NEWSTAPEB
MONDAY, AUGUST S, 1U
Classified Ads
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AGENTS:
Phone Panama I-M4I (or
information about Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Chairs your ad If
you hTS a commercial
contract.
Classified race closes 11:
bjm. Mob. to Fri, 11 ajn.
Sat, S pjn. Sat. for San.
Office open t-S weekdays.
LtAVt TOO AM WTTH OKI Of OU Ar.TlfTS 0 ntm MTlCa At U-S7 TP BlngrET. PANAMA LBBEKIA P SCI ADO T X. 11 AGBfClAl I
INTUNAL. pK PUBLICACIONES N. 1 U.tar7 p CASA IA1JKV" r s LOURDES PHABMAty in U tnTMllUl O r ARMALIA LOM-BAftDO-Mo.
M Itmt MORJUSON-aYh iut Ave. AJ t ) l BEBVICE Ave. TWu No. 4 t FARMACIA EST ADOS UMDOS 1 Crural Av.
. inuini i.itxiu rHl l.. nTcfLrflOLtk wra uf-.K-J. fee. 4 la 0a At. N. li rOTO DOMY Jurta Aiwcawfla Arc. and n It CAK-
uirlt VAN rr J1X U street Ma U t dMACIA (i niVi.KKO Prm Lefem 7 Street a FARMACIA "SAS" Via P
111 MOTEUADE8 XtHIS
Bedde Bella TWta Theatre and Branch M MI.IaU Bqw M.rk.t an Via EP COLON OFFICE: 15th and Amador Gaorrare No. 14211 Tel. 4SZ.

1 i
Resorts
i

Apartments

Foster's Corfu.
Clan. Phone lalbea 2830 be between
tween between 9 a.m. ana noon, witdayt.
' PHILLIPS OeMMtoe Cottage
Santa Clara R. do P. Pfcoe rV
mm S-I8T7 Crterofca) I-1 671.

Houses

OR RENT: Completely furnish furnished
ed furnished three bedrooms house, dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, kitchen, bar, air-ondi-tioned,
yard, in Cangroio "F" St.
No 10. For information eall Tel.
3-4619.

FOR RENT: Is the modern
"ALINA" skyscraper of Panama,
two bedroom apartments, living living-diningroom,
diningroom, living-diningroom, air conditioner, hot
water inttalletiom, maid's roomi,
independent with tube, elevator,
garage, pent-home for partict,
etc. Price. $135. 00 to $160 00.
(round floor: Two commercial
ittel with air conditioner. $195
and $225 reipectively. APPLY:
"Marichal Boyd" office: Peru
Ave No 57. Phone.: 3-6710
and 3-7926.

FOR RENT: Two bedroom cha chalet,
let, chalet, spacious porch, Mila 9. Lai
Cumbret, reasonable rant. Call
3-1133

FOR RENT: Modern two bad bad-room
room bad-room apartment living room, din dining
ing dining room, kitchen, 2 bathroome,
maid'i room, balcony, ground
floor. 14 itreet and 3rd Avenue
Paitilla "Elitabatta Building".
$95 00. Phone 4-1268.

FOR RENT: 2 bedroom chalet
m Go'lf Height (exclusive res res-Idential
Idential res-Idential taction). For further par particular
ticular particular telephone Panama 3-6077.

I

Rooms

Jamin Wins

International

FOR RENT: Furnihed room, j
kitchen, maid'a service and pri private
vate private bathroom. 48th Street, 49-
141. Tel. 2-3778. $50.00.

FOR RENT: Furnished room in
family house with cloiet, inde independent
pendent independent eervice, hot water and
bed lining. Wanted responsible
person. Joeo Gabriel Duque, Ave.
No. 32, La Craita.

PERSONALS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONI BALBOA 3709.
Matadors Gored;
Rivalry Hailed
While They Recover
MADRID (UPI) The greatest
bullring rivalry of the decade
came to a temporary standstill
yesterday while the two principals
recovered from wounds received
from their common enemy the

bulls.
Matador Antonio Ordonez en entered
tered entered a Madrid hospital to recov recover
er recover from j goring he received in
the ring Saturday at Parma, Ma
Jorea. Already in the hospital was
his impressively talented r f v a 1
and brother-In law, Luis Miguel
Dominguin.
Doctors described Ordonez
thigh wound as "less than grave."
After he was gored Saturday the
bullfighter stayed in the ring,
fought and killed well, and was
awarded a trophy of one of the
bull's ears by the crowd.
His goring eame only 48 hours
after a similar but more serious
wound was inflicted on Dominguin
In the ring at Valencia Thursday,
as the two matadors appeared in
their first dramatic hand-to-hand
fight.

WESTBURY, N.Y., Aug. I

(UPI ) France's artichoke-loving
Jamin Saturday night staged a
sensational stretch-spurt to outlast
Italy's Tornese by half a length
in the $50,000 International Trot at
Roosevelt Raceway.
Turning into the homestretch,
U.S. champion Trader Horn led
with Tornese second, early pace pacesetter
setter pacesetter Philin Frost a farlins thirri

and Jamin fourth. With French
driver Jean Riaurl whinnine- fn.

riously, Jamin fairly flew down

tne stretcn to rush by the leaders

in a finish tnat had the 48,651 fans
on hand screaming.

Jamm's time for one mile and
one-half was 3:08 3-K He nairl 411

50 11 .10 and S3. TrarW Worn i,rt

off tne odds-on favorite. Trader

was z 1-4 lengths behind Tornese
at the wire.

The winner is owned hv Mm

Leon Olrv-Roederer of the Paric

cnampagne family.

A total of eight standard-breds,
seven of them foreign, started in

me international. Jamin's victory
StamDS him AS tha wnrld'a Vmm

pion trotter.

Automobiles

lil i s

FOR "-! ly55 roro ruuor
fofdo"4". radio, w.v., 2-tone
mech"'Willy excellent, $795-00
jash11 j-3444.
FOR $ALt 1954 Ford conver convertible,
tible, convertible, ", Fordomatk, radio,
etc wreciate, $50.00
caih. "J0-A. Diablo. Tel.

336-

FOR SALt: 1958 Mercury
Montl'r. 4 door, two-tone blue,
whit 'ewall tlrei, Pprol Pprol-mateW
mateW Pprol-mateW '7.000 milei, tirea prae prae-ticallV
ticallV prae-ticallV new. radio, heater, power
eteeri"8' power braktt, one own owner.
er. owner. C' "n excellent condition.
Own' ,e,v'ng, mutt aale $2600
or he" off,,. Tel. 87-8111 or
8M105
FOR SAL 1955 Mercury
Montdir, 2-dbor, hardtop, ra radio,
dio, radio, Merc-O-Matle, power brake,
vjw, whir and green, duty paid,
Tel 2-3654, No. 5281-A Mor Mor-riaoii
riaoii Mor-riaoii St Piable.
FOR SALE:'5j jru(ebaker aa-
dan. v,rv dependable, BJ
new battery, eu,n. Leaving, mutf
tell $250.00. Phone Balboa 2 2-2744
2744 2-2744 or tee at 0599-A, Bayano
t Ancon.
FOR SLf:--1957 Cadillac con convertible
vertible convertible fully equjped, good con con-ditio"'
ditio"' con-ditio"' c Crijtobal 3-1248.
FOR SA1-E: Chevrolet 1957,
4-dor' & cylinder, 16,500 mil"
one owner, $1,450 eah. Call

2340 or s-2430 Criitobal.

FOR SALE: 1958 Chevrolet
fordo' ix t a n d a r d thift,
$1700 00. Telephone Gamboa
-170- houte 124-B.
OR SALE; 1953 Ford atation
w,on, standard shift, 9

aenaer- Rodman 3961

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Household goods,
leaving the Isthmus. House 6443
Lot Rios, Balboa Tel. 2-2672.

FOR SALE: Set of Rattan porch
chairs with cushions, ($25.00);
used living room set including
bed couch, ($65.00); 10 gallon
water heater, ($60.00). Call
Panama 3-4977.

FOR SALE:,Twin iie Simmons
coil springs, wlegs Samsonita
wardrobe and make up case, all
like new. Call Balboa 2-1775
after 5 P-m.

FOR SALE: Hi-Fi, tablet
chairs, buffet, China closet,
server. .5251 -A, Walker, Diablo

FOR SALE: Ascot waterheater
Econagas, year old, $40. Laav-

ing Monday, t Cangreio, s-jui.

FOR SALE: Bamboo living
. .. i

room turnirure, rose ousnes ana
other plants, 1958 Volkswagen.
Quarters H-790-X Balboa. Phono
2-1521.

FOR SALE: 3 beds, 2 with ln ln-nersprings,
nersprings, ln-nersprings, big fan, framed Eu European
ropean European paintings, after 6:30 p.m.
and Sunday. Calle 33-A No. 3 3-59.
59. 3-59. 2o. floor.

FOR SALE: Living room, bed bedroom
room bedroom suites, allwave Philco radio,
new, 16" fan, small items, very
reasonable. McCarthy Roui Roui-seau
seau Roui-seau 84-8103.

FOR SALE: Electric dishwashing
machine, Hi-Fi set, electric fan.
House 0930 Amador Road. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone 2194.

$1,500.00 Down
37.40 MontWy
are the terms on a mod modern
ern modern 2 bedr,oom chalet on
a 460 M2 lot. Address:
9th Street, Rio. Abajo.
Price: $7,500.00
For further details and
appointment, please call:
Wolff & Company Ltd.
Realtors
"Our Integrity Is Tour
Guaranty"
Tel. S-6969
81st. Street, off Justo
Arosemena Avenue

British Auto Racer
Dies Of Injuries
CLERMONT-FERAND, FraJiee
(TJPI)--British suto racing star
Ivor Bueb died late Saturday
night at the Clermont Ferrand
HoSDital of ininrlei rerplveH Wi

Grand Prix race accident here
one week sgo.
Hospital officials said hs died
at 10:30 p.m. and that hs had
been partially conscious up to
about 30 minutes before the end.
They said his father and Mrs.
Stirling Moss, the wife of Britain's
renowned driving ace, were near
him at the last.
Bueb, 85, was flung out of his
car and his chest was crushed
when his Cooper- Borgward
plunged off Clermont Ferrand's
hilly track last Sunday at the
start of the Grand Prix D'Au D'Au-vergns
vergns D'Au-vergns formula-two race.
He nsd been a elose friend of
such outstanding British cham champions
pions champions as Moss and the late Mike
Hawthorne who was killed in an
ordinary road accident earlier
this year.

Ml SALS. in Ctnil.kakar.

very Spendable, new battery,
clutch, etc. Must tell, phone Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2"2744, see at 0599-A, Ba Bayano
yano Bayano Ancon.
FOR SALE: 1956 Plymouth V-8
Belvedere, 2 door sedan hardtop,
push button drive, wst tires,
(triple servic( tires) radio, heat heat-ar
ar heat-ar and backup lights, clean in
and u,t- Will accept trade In
financing t, Bi Jrringed. Fort
Kobbe 7103.

Car Rentals

ShoPP'rig Coon u,. new
Herts' from finft c R.ntsls
Lobbv El FInsm, Hilton. Tel. 3-456-

Wanted to Buy

WANTED T0 buy, Used 20"
or 24" girl-, bicycle, baby play playpen,
pen, playpen, nd stroller. AH in good
condition. pan,mi 4-1368.

Lessons

SERVICES

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Aged htral ma.
urt at give-away prices by the
truckload. Call 2-2641.

FOR SALE. Tape recorder, R.
C. A., 2 speed, speakers, or orthophony
thophony orthophony Hi-Fi, one year old,
$90.00, record player, portable,
Hi-Fi, ona year old, 4 speed, auto
changer, $40.00, double dresser
mahogany $40.00. .Chest of
drawers and matching ladies va vanity
nity vanity $35.00 each, ona single
bed, $25.00. Call 2-3444.

FOR SALE-1 Goodsel-WiHiam-son
amplifier and. matched pre pre-amp.
amp. pre-amp. 1 Garrard turntable model
301. 1 Gray Viscous Arm and G.
E. Diamond. I Electro-Voice
microphone model 636 all brand
sow, never sad. 1 Wileox-Gay
taps recorder. 804-A, Far Fan Fan-Navy
Navy Fan-Navy 3723.

FOR SALE: Model 70 Conquer Conqueror
or Conqueror spirit duplicator, hover, man man-sal,
sal, man-sal, complete In excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, see at Panama Canal Yacht
Club, Cristobal, C. Z. Telephone
3-2142.

FOR SALE: Panama Steel Co.,
150 prof., 500 common stocks.
Tel 3-1214.

FOR SALE: Brand new tire and
tube 5 255 50x17 Schuinn bi bicycle,
cycle, bicycle, 26". 5507-A, Diablo 2-1547.

FOR SALE : Underwater moral
treasure locator, 26' beat Diesel
motor, 26' hull, house boat. Taj.
3-1214.

TELEVISION SERVICE
Exports in TV, radio. Hi-Fi and
transistors.
We do more Work, because we
do it the best.
Phone 2-1905.
Crawford Agencies.
Tivoli Avenue No. 18-20.

Protect your homo and proper property
ty property against Insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVI A
FULLER BRUSH SALESMAN
VISIT YOUR HOME? JUST CALL
2-1905, Agendas Crawford.

LOST Gold bracelet with Phreo
charms (Canal service pin; map
with emerald; clover with atonal'
Reward offered. Call Mm. Hitch Hitching,,
ing,, Hitching,, Balboa 2537.

Loar Spanish with Mrs. Rome Romero''
ro'' Romero'' Practical Conversational
Spanish 1 Lessons. 4th of July Ave.

' apartment

A LIVE DEALER
WANTED
In Panama for Refrigera.
tion products. Good as.
sistance promised from
factory to selected compa.
ny. Write to:
LEC Refrigeration, Ltd.
Bognor Regis, England

7

Commercial Gui del

J ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
Ads only cost $0.85 per ool. inch
FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740 J

LIFE INSURANCE
rail
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Lift Ins. Co.,
rer rates and Information
Tel. Panama I-OSSJ
Monday thru Friday
l:M a.m. to 12:M
1M p.m. to 1:0
Saturday: f:M a.m. to It

Listen To
Tht OAS
Panomertcan
Record Show
12:30 p.m.
HOC-YCN
Ivory Sunday

AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo
on new ears
AGENCY DEHLINQER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Anto Insurance

CRASH PROGRAM
LOS ANGELES (UPI) Ralph
Hamilton, 40, rushed into a tele telephone
phone telephone booth to call his wife with
ikt good npwn the property
they had wanted to buy wag now
available. Still excited as he hung
up the phone, Hamilton walked
out right through the booth's glass

door. He received only minor
euts.

Ingo Won't Fight
Until Accounts
Are Cleared Up
GOTHENBURG, Sweden (UPI)
World howu;eieht boxing

chamPion Ingemar Johansson said

yesteruay ne does noi want oe
k:..H 111 : .rral Wt uoon

promoter gin Rosenshon and
lrviD Kahn of Teleprompter

Corpwauon.
'i havo rcr,nnl contract

with Rosnshon for a return fight

against Moyd Patterson, nosen nosen-tnhn
tnhn nosen-tnhn has honn honpst to me

earlir- Why should he not be so

to m even now? jonanssvu saia
yesterday.

"Reports are conflicting m this'
mattei"' Kahn says one thing and
Rosen'ohn another. One does not
know wnat to believe. Personally,
however, i d0 not want to be
mixed up in their mutual af affairs.
fairs. affairs. "It i my adviser Edwam Ahl Ahl-quist
quist Ahl-quist and I who have the ball
in the plan for a return match,'
he continued. The men in New
York wl,l have to talk to us about
a return fight. We have no reason
to call on them," he said.
Johansson also confirmed that
h. and Ahlquist had had a feel-
.L.I. 1 1 U n

ing inal something ium -"ppe..

in Mew ork, when rtsenwmi it it-turned
turned it-turned there of I or his visit last

wpek in Gotenburg.

iin. t i ih nt rn n urcnnni

for the June fight was not fully
in order," he said. "That was why

we asKeq for a statement oi ac account.
count. account. We wanted everybody who
harl ..t.lw In rin with thn

June right to show their papers

and explain the facts, we want
know hnxv tand. We will

not negotiate for a return bout

until we have an orderly account.
Investment Clinic
Toniqht At JWB
The USO-TWR Investment clinic

will continue its regular weekly

session tonight with furtmr nis
cssion of "Mutual Funds."

The group will convene al the
Armed Forces Service Center in
Balboa at the usual time ti 7.30

p.m.

matter of

Boats & Motors

45 feet deubls planked ax-Navy
beat hull for ala. Aaking pries
$1000 er maka an offer. Com Commander
mander Commander Taylor, Navy 2553.

FOR SALE: 18 foot cabin
cruiser, 35 hone power outboard
motor. $100.00 worth equip equipment.
ment. equipment. Call Army 14-5261.

FOR SALIi 12ft. boat 54"
beam covered with fiber glass all
equipment, license for eanal wa waters,,
ters,, waters,, with 5 h.p. Johnson out outboard
board outboard motor. Complete with
trailer good tirea. Can be aeen at
the Fort Amador Officer Open
Meet. Phono 12-5211.

Real Estate

FOR SALIr Lets 500 sad 1.000
aaarsra, la the Nsujvo Hisedienss :
Urbanlsatie screes fas Rmom
Racetrack. All Ms w)b atree
fronts, tewafe, water saaln sad
electricity. CaR W. Mclarnert.
TsL 4-0978.

I 'j v i t

l loday

INVESTOR'S
GUIDE

FOR SALE: Heats at Santa
Clara, quick sale, beat off er over
$3,000.00. 4,500 square meters,
4 lots. Leaving the Isthmus, lal lalbea.
bea. lalbea. Tel. 2-2672.

FOR SALE: Largs 2 bedroom
house furnished in Santa Clara
near beach with guest cabin, aasy
payments. Called 1-4569 Panama.

FOR SALE: Completely furnish furnished
ed furnished 2 bedroom e art agt at Cere Cere-aade
aade Cere-aade Beach. Beautiful view, fruit
and shade tress, well water and
2 power plants. Writs R. W. Hill
Box 1 449 Balboa, C. Z. for ap appointment
pointment appointment call eattag Saturday
and Sundays.

Commercial Sites

FOR RENT: 316.80 square
meters, suitable for a warehouse
workshop, garage, S Street, be between
tween between Automobile Row and Fran Fran-gipani
gipani Fran-gipani Street, close to Auto Ser Ser-vicio,
vicio, Ser-vicio, $235.00. Phone 2-0481
office hours.

s upemng

STOCKl PRICES

Motorcycles

FOR SALE : Motorcycle B.S.A.
58-650. C.C. Super Rocket
Spares. Phone 3-3202 er House
8405 Margarita.

Wanted Position

WANTED: Will live in. Excel
lent housekeeper and general
housework. Call Colon 1844.

WANTED

WANTED: Bilingual cashier
with typing experience. Call Cu Cu-rundu
rundu Cu-rundu 2118.

P0R IALIi Thundorblrd"
' fiberglass boat, 14', 15 h.p.
Motor and trailer. 254-1, Serun.
Tel. f-504.

WANTED: Office lota of Cen Central
tral Central South American and West
Indies stamp. On paper prefer preferred,
red, preferred, will pay caih, contact S.
Hamilton Box 112 Balboa.

WANTED) Vacation quarter,
approximately Sept. 1 0th. Service
couple, as children, Balboa 1-3740.

New Outbreaks Of Violence
Feared In Baja California

Jean Baptists Mm Bemo Bemo-dotte.
dotte. Bemo-dotte. bom m 1363, the son cat
a htsmbte SVeoeh lawyer bo bo-came
came bo-came king cat tsso exwntrk.
In 1MO, the people Sweden,
who had been seeking a evown
prince to succeed their aged
childless king, elected Berna Berna-dotte.
dotte. Berna-dotte. m 1814, Denmark was
forced to cede Korway to
I Sweden. Four Tears later the
old king died and Betnadotta,
las Charles XIV John, became
j ruler el Sweden and Norway.
! gneyolwprato mstsmtstea

OUT OP TUNI
COPENHAGEN (UPI)-Two 17

year-old boys were srrested

yesterday for stealing two organ

pipes from St. Aueustin's Church

to use for exhaust pipes on their

motorcycles.

matter of
FACT

TIJUANA, Mexico, Aug. S
(UPI) New outbreaks of viol violence
ence violence in the wake of the wounding
of a S-year-old girl and charges
of ballot cheating and political ar arrests
rests arrests were feared today when the
government announces the re results
sults results in Baja California's second

major election.
Candidates for the Party of Re Revolutionary
volutionary Revolutionary Institutions (PRI),
the party which has been in power
in Mexico for 49 years were un unofficially
officially unofficially reported running ahead
in the first count over opposition
National Action Party (PAN)
candidates.
Salvadore Magallon was the
PAN choice for governor of the
state established in 1953. He op-

nospd Elieio Esouivel, 51. of the

PRI., Esquivel had the backing

of incumbent Governor Brauho

Maldonado who is not eligible to

succeed himself.

The 3-year-old girl, Rosa Salci Salci-do,
do, Salci-do, was shot in the back of the

neck last night in the only re re-nriiH
nriiH re-nriiH ma lor eruntion of violence

in the three main population areas wounds.

of Tijuana, Ensenada and the

state capital, Mexican, aespue

heavv voter turnout ot up to w

per cent.
Shooting started in a north dis district
trict district polling area here when an
angry crowd of about 1,000 PAN
partisans fathered to protest al alleged
leged alleged confiscation of 8 to 15 bal ballot
lot ballot boxes in the district by the
government. Th district it
PAN stronghold.
Police and federal soldiers

brought into the .state to maintain
peace clashed with the crowd
with clubs and rifle butts when it
was too slow in dispersing. Wit Witnesses
nesses Witnesses said police fired several
shots into the sir and then both

police and soldiers opened fire in
to the crowd.

Rosa and two other persons

were felled bv bullets as they fled

The little rirl was taken to Ale-

man Hospital where doctors said

her condition was extremely

critical!" The two other victims

both unidentified, were believed

to have suffered only minor

By SAM SHULSKY
King Feature Syndicate,
235 E 45 St., New York
Q. We are in our 50s, with about
$13,000 in banks and a few thou thousand
sand thousand in E bonds "which we by
monthly. We also add $50 to sav savings.
ings. savings. Have 54 General Motors.
Know nothing about the market.

(The GM grew from nine shares

bought in 1930) How can we in
vest for retirement

A, You have about $15,000 in

casn and governments. If vou are

planning on retirement, some of

Wis snouid go into equity securit securities
ies securities which would give you a better
chance of keeping up with any

runner umation.

Certainly with this amount al-

i ready in "dollar" savings, it

would seem reasonable to shift

both the $50 a month now going

into & oonas and uie 550 goin
into additional savings to common
stocks, either at the rate of $100

a month or $300 a quarter.

I don't understand why you say

you know nothing of the market.
You have had an excellent ex-

I ampie over tne years of now a
long term position in a solid com com-nunv
nunv com-nunv Viae iniroDcot in valna anH

, at the same time yielded a ge

nerous dividend.
Go out and do more of the
same. I am sending you a list of
top grade companies.
Q. My husband died suddenly
last month, leaving me with
funds of about $8,000. I have a
child and my mother to support,
there is a four per cent mortgage
on my house for about $5,500.
Should I pay if off?
A. If you intend to remain in
the house I would vote for paying
off the mortgage. While the inter interest
est interest cost is low four per cent--you
will, in addition have to
make payments. The total may
run around six or seven per cent'
which would by considerably
more income than you could re receive
ceive receive from a safe investment.
You talk of getting employment.
I would hold off doing anything
with this $8,000 until you have de decided
cided decided your future course. It won't
pay to rush in either to pay off
the mortgage or invest the money
until you are quite sure about
what you want to do.
Q. We have 40 A.T. and T. and

$29,000 cash. My husband is ill,

and wants casn avaname tor a a-mergencies.
mergencies. a-mergencies. I'd like to invest
about $10,000 in some other secur securities;
ities; securities; my husband thinks more
Tel. and Tel. would be good.
A. There isn't much to debate
about the "goodness" of A.T. anij
Ti It is a top grade security.
Whether you should put two two-thwds
thwds two-thwds of all your funds in K is
something else.
On a general basis, I don't
think you can put $10,000 into the
market right here, anyway; cer certainly
tainly certainly not on one day. If you
want to put some of the $20,000

savings into securities, wny not
proceed at the rate of $1,000 or

$2,000 every few months into

some good grade utilities and

some convertible debentures

which will yield four to five per

cent u am sending you a list of

top flight companies. There's no

rusni

Norwegian Fishing Town Celebrates
Rockefeller-Rasmussen Announcement

o

Before European settlers

came to America, the Potomac
River was a much-used water waterway
way waterway of the' Indlahs and its
broad, wooded valley was an
Indian hunting ground. In

1808, capt. John Smith entered
Chesapeake Bay and sailed up
the river which he called
"Patowmack" after an Indian
tribe living nearby. The Poto

mac Valley was one of tha
chief Civil War battlegrounds.

Encyclopedia, Britannic

SOEGNE, Norway (UPI) The
engagement of Steven Rockefeller
and his family's former maid was
announced from New York
City skyscraper office yesterday,

setting off a flag-waving ceieora-

tion in this little fishing village.

The Cinderella story-come-true

of pretty blonde Norwegian Anne-

Marie Kasmussen was an mai

residents of Soegne, 150 miles

southwest of Oslo, could talK
about after word came that the
Rockefeller family had given its
official seal of spproval to the
romance.

Only Saturday, Gov. Nelson A.
Rockefeller had said he was very

fond of Anne-Marie, daughter of

a retired-storekeeper, who worked
for several months as a kitchen
maid in his New York City home.
He flew off to the governors'

conference at Puerto Rico saying
he knew nothing of any actual
wedding plans. But mimeographed

statements announcing the en
saaement were issued from the

offices he shares with his broth brothers
ers brothers on the 56th floor of the RCA

Building in Rockefeller Center,

built with some of the millions

left by John D. Rockefeller Sr.

The formal announcement is issued
sued issued by the Rockefeller family
was followed by a less formal
confirmstion by Steven, 23, and

Miss Rasmussen, 2L, who helei

news conference ai tne arnst

Hotel in Kristiansand, the largest

town near Soegne.

The couple said the wedding

would take place at the end of

this month. They will go on a
short wedding trio before settling

down in New York, where Steven
will go into one of the family's

many businesses in September.

"This marriage na bean

planned for a long time, but there

was no sense in Dragging aoout

it," Steven said.

Anne-Marie wore an engage

ment, ring with a diamond so

small that Steven smilingly said

he guessed it could have been
little larger.

The couple said they would be

married in the rural wood an

aaaqA eutsos jo qojnqa nejaqw

Anne-Mane was baptized and con
drawing up a guest list, but Stev

firmed. They had not started
en said he hoped his family would

be there.

A-BOMB KILLS 40,17$

HIROSHIMA, Japan (UPI) -Officials
said today that 119

persons had died in the past 12

months of effects of the atom

bombing of Hiroshima in 1945

This brought to 60,175 the total

number of deaths attributed to
the bombing, the officials said.

ACT Ind
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium lid
Amer Cy ana mid
Amer Motors
Amer Tel and Tel
Anaconda Copper
Arkansas Fuel
AVCO Mfg
Beth Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bicroft Uranium
Blauknox
British Pat
Burroughs
Canadian Eagle
Celanese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler
Cities Service
Coastal Cariba
Colgate Palmolive
Colorado Fuel
Cons Electro Dynamics
Creole Pet
Crown Cork and Seal
Cuban Venezuelan Oil
Du Pont
El Paso Natural Gas
Fairchild Engine
Fargo Oil
Felmont Pet
General Dynamics
General Electric
General Motors
General Plywood
Gulf Oil
Harico Steel
Howe Sound
Imperial Oil
Intl Pet
Lockheed
Magellan Pet
Montrose Cfcem
New Eng. Tel and Ttl
Northrop Air
Olin Mathieson
Pancoastal
Phillips Pet
Pure Oil
Royal Dutch Shell
RCA
Reynolds Metal
San Jacinto
Servo Corp
Shell Transp
Signal Oil and tas
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobfig
Sperry Rand
Standard Oil NJ
Studebaker-Paekard
Superior Oil
Texas Gulf Pilaris
Textron
Underwood
United Caoso Of
US Rubber
US Steel
Westinghouse Xle
Wheeling Steel

S3tt
. -.
12
87tt
64
46
80
64
14
17
13
H
T
24
83
88
45b
67
57
1
41
29
42
$1
89b
- 276
34
S
IVi
6
S4
81

ill
281: 1
38
31
1
14
194
83
55
3
49
43Va
6'
H
80b
0
61
45

1018
S6b
89
S5
1
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104
5H

i fljHr.r;-;

AND CROWINO-It may not

be as high as an eiepnanvs eye,
but Mary HIghtower has to
mount astepladder to reach the
tips of this corn in Marshall,
Mo. It's a demonstration field
ot tha Missouri Farmers Asn,t

ranamo VLino;
Onlllnsa"
The Cristobal of the Panama
Line has an advance Hat of 131 pas passengers
sengers passengers scheduled to sail Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday from Cristobal for New York.
Only one familv. Lt. nrl un

J. Helmerichs and two children,
will be making the voyag from

insiuDai to rort-au-ranee, Ham.
The comnleta advanc niunw

list for New York is as follows:
Miss Alharta Ahrama-

nice Abrams; Mrs. Isabe'lle Agnew:

miss sany Ballmgham; Mr. and

Mrs. Edward N. Belland; Miss
Katherine F. Bohen; Col. Monro)
Reyner Brown; Mrs. Leon D.
Brown; Miss Margery Brown; Mist
Thelma L. Brummett: Miss Patri-

cia Burke.

Miss Florence M. CamnbeH: MB I f -f

Lillian Capre; Mr. and Mrs. J. t

cope; Mrs. Phyllis H. Crook and )i
son and daughter; Mr. and Mrs. I
Edward J. Cullen; Miss Marie Da
Vito; Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Dilli
and Mr. and Mrs. Francis C. Dor Dor-sett
sett Dor-sett and son.
Mr. snd Mrs. Kenneth M. M-
wards; Maj. and Mrs. Idwin W.
Emerson and four children; Ronald v
A. Failnre- Mr anrl Mm ITnraoai

J. Fisher; Mr. and Mrs. Edgar H.

rTeeman; Mr. and Mrs. Sheltoa

E. Garner; Lt. C61. and Mrs. Les Leslie
lie Leslie M. Gross and son; Lt. and Mrs.
John M. Harms r Mr anrl Mr VII.

Hani D. Hardie; Mr. and' Mrs. (
Wayman A. Holland; Reed E. Hop Hopkins,
kins, Hopkins, Jr.; Mr. and Mrs. Frederick

Hyman; Mr. and Mrs. Louis A.
Jackson; Stewart H. Jadis; Mist
Elizabeth Kemble; Miss Helen
KesslerMrs. Anona H. KirMand;
and Mrs. Mildred Kopf.

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Leiber, Miss
Elizabeth Ludden: Mr. and Mrs.

Porter E. P. Marshall: Mr. snd i

Mrs. Jose L. Medina -No err An ni

four children: Miaa Clair T. Vl.

zer; Mr. and Mrs. Earl C. Mengel

an ddaughter; Miss Patricia Mil.
ler; and Mr. and Mrs. Bernard M.

Fsrmentier.

Mr. snd Mrs. Charles W. Raokj
Francis J. Reilly; Mr. and Mn.
Robert L. Ridge and five children?
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred n Unharca

snd two children; Dr. and Mrs.
Milton Saslaw; Mr. and Mrs. Wil William
liam William E. Snyder and aon: Mr. and

Mrs.' Alexander -T tnimv w

and Mrs. WiUiam D. Swank and

three children.
Misi Dnrnth TllKnH Uarlnn s

Trice; Mr. and Mrs. Francis P.

wasnabaugh ,nd flve children!

DanaWells; Miss Verna WeUs;
Mr. and Mrs. M. Weisman; George
RobertX Wills: and.Lt. and Mrs.

Rosi W.XWilme and son; Mr. and
Mrs. Luis Berguido; Mr. and Mr.
Charles H. Cooper; Mrs. Madeline
D. Kirnss and three ehlldrea; and

sua. awe ugresrif



HffivTiAY. irr.rtT

-THI fTORY QP MARTHA WAYNf
Whost Cart
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Mv 6I0RGI ITUNDU
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Nice Gesture

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OF ENCOURAGING LEADERSHIP IN

OUR EMPLOYEES, MEEkTLE .

YOU HAVE BEEN CH06EW
to BE "BOC COP A DAY!1

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MAJOR HOOPLB OUT OUR VAY

BY J. K. WILLIAMS

AFTSR l?L)MNINiS THIS
ALU THESE VAR5.I

THOUSHT NOTHING COULD

5U(?PI?ISS ME BUT
Voue DECISION TO

SECOMB A FARMER

WAS THE BISSEST SHCK

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TO PURCHASE OUR.

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he gets his allowance just about the time
mine runs out!"

'Do you have any classical records with a beat?"

AfOVAS PANAMA A fiWAYS
PANAMA-MIAMI 55.00
MIAMI-DALLAS 59.95

c 1

f AINAMA J
DALLAS

Today's TV Program

3:00 CFN NEWS
VIS Dinah Short
3 30 Pnrolf
(to Mr. Wizard
4:W KIDS KLUB
3:00 Clilnii Smith
5 10 PANORAMA

7 W) Target
f 7 30 4 Slar Anllioloiry
ft oo Lnwrmce Wlk
(Ml Movie Tlmn
Deipernte Journy
1100 CFN w'VS
11 IS Enc: Ed Sullivan.

CourtesT of ArroTixs Panama Atrwaja
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573-16983-1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

MARTHA
FAINTED
A6AirA

BUFFALO GRA
t. Ihf. U.. Pel, M, w
fi iwe iy n i.,,i, 7-al
830 Xa. fianamd 1090 Xa. fiMt



Fa vonie

All

Stan

i

ftffcjg?'' .. !y V) & jrfj

TROPICAL COCKTAIL, KING-SIZE Isthmian waters had a chill-provoking visitor today, a
round-bellied cocktail shaker which, in the proper elements, crushes ice as its contents rock
and roll But only warm Pacific waters slapped against the extra-thick steel hull of, the US
Navy icebreaker Burton Island, tied up at the Rodman pier after transiting the Canal yester yesterday
day yesterday The icebreaker, commanded by Cdr. Robert A. Weatherup, has just thawed from a jaunt
to thp Arctic, carrying; teams for demolition work along the Greenland and Labrador coasts.
The Burton Island will leave tomorrow for San Diego to prepare for a frigid jaunt in the other
direction Scientist and equipment will be embarked in January for a mission to the South
Pole The unusual !hape of the high-riding hull not only cuts a path through the ice, but also
crushes it. providing a water freeway for following cargo ships.

First Woman Demo
Solon At Age 84
GREENWICH, Conn., Aug. 3 -(UPD
Mrs. Mary Teresa Hopkins
Norton, 84, the first woman Dem Democrat
ocrat Democrat elected to Congress and a
U.S. Representative from New Jer Jersey
sey Jersey for 25 year, died at Green Greenwich
wich Greenwich Hospital yesterday following
a heart attack.
TODAY!
1:15 5:10
- 75c. 406.
7:05 9:00 p.m.
A GREAT SPECTACLE IN
SUPERCINESCOPE AND
EASTMAN COLOR
Giana Maria Canale
George Marshal
And a cast of thousands!
THE REVOLT
OF THE
GLADIATORS"
WEDNESDAY !0
SPECIAL
ENGAGEMENT
WALT
DISNEY'S
1TCMC0WB
T0K0WSKI
SUWSCOPE!

M

m ri

4

FT
When a fellow sweeps a flirl
off her feet, he usually winds up
with her on his bonds. ? NEA
Britain Warns Reds
No) To Interfere
In Troubled Laos
GENEVA. Autr. 3 fUPn Bri
mm iiais vvaiiirvi llllMM agaijlal
"outside interference" in land landlocked
locked landlocked Laos, whose government
is battling Communists said to
have been armed and supplied
by Red China and North Viet
Nam.
Authoritative sources said Fo Foreign
reign Foreign Secretary Seluvn T.lniM Aa
i livered the wrn!nu i,, t'nninn iu;
nister Andrei Gromyko at an
hour-long meeting here yeslerda.y.
Gromyko was said to have ex expressed
pressed expressed a "different view" of the
situation from (he one taken by
Lloyd, but no details were avail available
able available immediately.
Radio Moscow charged today
however, that Ihe United States
is the foreign nation which is in intervening
tervening intervening in Laos, if ny nation
is.
"The U.S.A. has long been try trying
ing trying to push Laos off the path of
neutrality," (he Red Broadcast
said. "If there is anv foreign in-
the uTa a" i0 U iS by
The Soviet radio repeated Red
charges that anti-Communist Pre Premier
mier Premier Phoui Sananikone has been
sabotaging" tht l!).r4 Geneva a a-greement
greement a-greement on Indochina and re renewed
newed renewed Red demands for revival
of the truce commission broken
h iasi year ai Laos' request.
Russian Classes
At Balboa YMCA
Mondays, Fridays
Jl8 .T" f Prospective stu-
m,c nussian language j
it was agreed to change the ses sessions
sions sessions for Beginners from Tuesday i
and Fridays 'o Monday and Thurs-I
day evenings at the Balboa Armed'
Services YMCA.
The starling class session fori
Beginners will open tonight at 7i
BatoS WceA.Palm R,h.
Intermediate' Russian classes'
will open shortly after Aug I
15, the exact dates to be an-1
nounced later.
Registrations for both Begin Beginners
ners Beginners and Intermediate are still
open.
Queen Mary's
Master Dies
SOUTIIAMTON, Aug. I -(UPI)
Capt. Andrew MacKellar, 62, the
Scottish-born master of the 81,000
ton liner Queen Marv, died early
today in the Southampton General
nospuai.
He had been hospitalized since
June 25 when he became III on a
crossing from New York.
He had spent a lifetime at sea.
MacKellar joined the Cunard
Line in 1924. His liners in the past
30 years have included the Mnr-
tania, Caronia, and Carinthia.

Gravel Grales Gov.
In Verbal Exchange
On Campaign Tour

ALEXANDRIA, La. (UPI)
Gov. Earl K. Long rested quietly
in a hotel room yesterday after
winding up a stump tour by
threatening to have National
Democratic committeeman, arrest arrested
ed arrested as a "common heckler."
Long was expected to leave
Alexandria, scene of hi triiimnVt
over National Committeeman Ca-
mine Gravel before 5,000 persons
Saturday -night, and go to hit
farm home at Winnfield later
today.
He hit three towns Saturday In
his 250-mile, revival-like campaign
tour for re-election before coming
up against Gravel in a rally in
Alexandria.
Most of Gravel's remark, mm
inaudible, but Long apparently
could hear them.
"If you don't keep your clap claptrap
trap claptrap shut," Long bellowed, 'I'm
going to have you removed as a
common heckler." The crowd
hooted and laughed.
Gravel was heard to accuse Long
of "double crossing" the people
"as .you usually do."
One of Long's aides, James
Harkins, jumped off the speaker's
stand saying "I'll get that ."
He took up a position near Gra Gravel
vel Gravel and things calmed down.
Then Long turned to the crowd
and shouted:
"Now, you keep your hand down,
Camille. Now, let's see who's gon gonna
na gonna vote for Ole Earl. Slick your
hands up. Get m up'"
Hands went up over much of the
crowd.
Long assured his audience that
he would not get committed to
another mental hospital ""because
I got me some bodyguards. If I'd
had one man wilh ome courage
and a six-shooter they never
would'a got me."
"If I can do all. I have done
and be crazy, what a man' whai
a man" he sighed dramatically.
"Amen, amen," responded the
crowd.
New Camera Club
Sel Up In Paraiso
A brand new camera club got
under way at Paraiso Fridav
with an organisational meeting at
the community high school presid presided
ed presided over by Eric S. Oaklev, vice
president of the Paraiso' Civic
Council.
Oakley, who is also recreation
committee chairman for the
Council, led a lively discussion of
tne objectives of the new hobbv
group and their was unanimous
approval for the club's formation.
Sylvester D. Callender assisted
Oakley, and E. S. Waldron acted
as lecretary tor the initial meet meeting.
ing. meeting. Callender was elected president
of the jfroup. Otherofficw re
Cleveland E. Stevens, secretary,
and Carlyle Atherlev. treasurer.
The public is cordially invited
to attend future meetings.
SI1K DRIVER
NURENBERG, Germany (UPI)
Police in nearby Hoechslndl
and American military police
were looking today for. the driv driver
er driver of an 85 ton U.S. Army Horn
ic cannon involved in two acci
dpnts in 24 hours. Friday the ran
non ran over an 87-year-old eve eve-list,
list, eve-list, crushing him to death. Sat
urday Ihe cannon was in collision
with a bus outside HoechstaadU

Flood Declares

Should

EDITOR'S NOTE: Rep. Daniel J. Flood (D-Pa.) has taken note in the US Congress of the Boyd-Castillero
proposal for a "peaceful invasion" of the Canal Zone on Panama's Independence Day, Nov. 3. Here is the full July 28
Congressional Record version of Flood's observations on this and other Isthmian topics t

REP. DANIEL J. FLOOD (D (D-Pa.)
Pa.) (D-Pa.) Mr. Speaker, during the
past two years the peoples of the
Americas have witnessed the gra gradual
dual gradual unfolding of explosive ten tensions
sions tensions in the Caribbean.
Featured by the overthrow of
established governments and their
replacement by pro-communistic
dictatorships, mass liquidations of
political adversaries, and expro expropriations
priations expropriations of valuable properties,
this turmoil has set in motion a
chain reaction affecting many
countries.
On f its prim objectives,
largely tf Communist origin and
direction, his boon wresting con-
trot of tho Panama Canal from j
th United States. i
Have conditions on the Isthmus)
stabilized? Far from it. A series j
of ominous reports points toward j
a new Canal Zone crisis on Nov. 3,
1959.
To understand what now teems
to be in (tore, a review of recent
PANAMA Canal Zone histry i a
necessity.
On May t, 1958, in a carefully
and secretly planned raid into
the Canal Zone, called "Operation
Sovereignty,!' Panamanian Univer University
sity University students planted 72 Panama Panamanian
nian Panamanian flags at prominent locations
in the Canal Zone, including one
flag in front f the Canal adminis administration
tration administration building at Balboa Heights.
The possibility of such an at attempt
tempt attempt I had foreseen and had
sought to prevent by giving time timely
ly timely warning to proper authority.
Whit can explain such indif indifference?
ference? indifference? Was it bee lute of ti timidity
midity timidity on tho part of local of officials
ficials officials or were those officials
conforming to superior orders
counsel or orders induced by a
failure to eemprehend what it
actually involved? I d not
know.
Certainly auch gross trespass,
which was part tf an overall pur purpose
pose purpose to drive the United States
from the Canal Zone, was not a
jest and should not have been
treated as such.
In any event, It served is
probing. f the psychological
strength of our Government and
its policymakers.
Morever, it did aet a danger danger-out
out danger-out precedent for allowing a for
eign nation to use territory under
control of the United. States as a
stage for hostile propaganda dem demonstrations.
onstrations. demonstrations. Morever, our failure to act
with forthrlghtnos on this inci incident
dent incident constituted- an open 'nviti 'nviti-tion
tion 'nviti-tion for griver trespasses a
are now threatened and may
end in tragedy;
The clamor about "Operation
Sovereignty" had hardly died
when the Republic of Panama, by
enaciment on Dee. 18,v 1958, by its
National Assembly, declared the
extension of Panamanian territo territorial
rial territorial waters from tl three-mile
limit to a 12-mile limit.
Blast Wrecks Home
Of Negro Family
In Wilmington, Del.
WILMINGTON. Del. (UPI) -An
explosion early yesterday
wrecked the $.2,000 home of the
first Negro family to move into
suburban Collins Park.
The blast was the second to rip
the house since George Rayfield,
his wife, Lucille, and their teen
age daughter moved into it last
Feb. 2.1. The Rayfields were vis visiting
iting visiting friends in Virginia when the
latest explosion occurred.
Investigations by state police
and the FBI determined that gas
probably caused the previous blast
April 7 which was centered in
the kitchen stove.
Authorities began an inquiry to
determine the source of yester
day's explosion, which damaged
the house so severely it was con
demned. A section of the living
room wall' was blown out and de debris
bris debris was scattered over the lawn
and at points 90 feet from the
house. ,r
Larry Boureer, next door neigh
bor of Rayfield, said the "tre
mendous blast" occurred shortly
after he heard an automobile pull
away from the scene He said he
had been sent downstairs by bis
wife to Investigate noises she had
heard, He said, however, he had
not seen anything suspicious.
The explosion shattered nearly
all the windows in the two-story
brick dwelling. Two other walls
along the living room were
buckled and a corner of the sec second
ond second floor was left dangling with
out support.
The attached garage and a car
in it were not damaged. Rayfield
had used a second automobile for
the trip to Virginia. He was noti notified
fied notified and started back home.
The Rev. J. Leonard Morgan,
president of the Wilmington
branch ofJthe NAACP, said his
group would give Rayfield finan financial
cial financial aid If it is requested.
"We'll meet violence with non nonviolence,"
violence," nonviolence," he said.
The Rayfield s move Into Collins
Park five months ago touched off
a series of demonstrations, includ including
ing including stone throwing and the burn
ing of a cross oa their laws.

Be Told

This attempted extension in included
cluded included a nine-mile strip at each
end of the Canal Zone, com completely
pletely completely encircling the Zone, in
effect, making it another Berlin.
The Government of the United
States, in a note delivered to the
Panamanian Government Jan. 9,
1959) refused to recognize claims
on the part of Panama to greater
width of the territorial sea and re requested
quested requested that country to reconsid reconsider
er reconsider its action.
Instead of complying, the Pa Panama
nama Panama National Assembly unanim unanimously
ously unanimously rejected th.s request, and
called upon all friencjly nations to
support the Panamanian margin
al sea action.
Meanwhile, the United States
reserved all of its rights in the
affected area, pending recom recommendation
mendation recommendation of a I960 internation international
al international conference that will consider
the question of the breadt of ter territorial
ritorial territorial seas.
The situation at Panama did not
remain quiet for long.
Victorious revolutionists in Cu Cuba,
ba, Cuba, trained in jungle warfare in
Oriente Province of that impor important
tant important island country and seeking
new worlds to conquer, focused on
the Isthmus.
April 26, 1959, some 89 Cuban
mercenaries, operating in collabor collaboration
ation collaboration with radical elements in Pa Panama,
nama, Panama, landed at historic Nombre
de Dios on the Caribbean coast
of that country, a short distance
east of the Atlantic entrance of
the Panama Canal in what was
an organized invasion of the Re Republic
public Republic of Panama.
One of their objectives was a
token occupation of the Canal
Zone. What a diplomatic crisis
that might have created!
Despite the strength of the
3 000 -man National Guard of Pa Panama,
nama, Panama, the people there became
excited, with some hysteria a a-mong
mong a-mong certain political leiders.
Panamanian people would have
been far more apprehensive had
they known that some of their
high officials hid sent their fami families
lies families into the Canal Zone as a hav haven
en haven of refuge.
"Fortunately, the invasion col collapsed
lapsed collapsed and the Cubans surrender surrendered
ed surrendered to Panama forces.
After brief detention and vir virtually
tually virtually no punishments, the invad invaders
ers invaders were sent home where they
were disavowed by those who had
sent them, thus closing the im immediate
mediate immediate crisis. But tne end is not
yet.
Who was responsible for this in invasion?
vasion? invasion? Th best answer to that ques question
tion question that I have read is by Presi President
dent President Ernesto de la Guardia, Jr.,
a strong supporter of constitution constitutional
al constitutional government, who staled:
"This is not a group of ad adventurers
venturers adventurers from our own country
or even from Cuba. These peo people
ple people were mostly Cubans, but di directed
rected directed by and led by militant
Communists. Their ambition is
the long stated one of taking ov over
er over the Pinami Cinil."
This statement of President de
la Guardia, Mr. Speaker, conforms
to the pattern repealed by my own
studies.
Moreover, radical Isthmian po politicians,
liticians, politicians, fully conscious of their
demagogic capacities, have not
forgotten their dream of recover recovering
ing recovering Panamanian sovereignty over
the Canal Zon granted to the U U-nited
nited U-nited States on Feb. 28, 1904, on
proclamation of the Hay-Bunau-Varilla
Treaty.
The latest developments on tho
Isthmian scene are plins for a
"peaceful occupation" of the
Canal Zone Nov.' 3, 19S9 the
54th inniversiry of the birth of
the Republic of Pinimi.
Led by Aquilino Boyd, a former
minister of foreign affairs, and
now a candidate for President,
and Ernesto J. Castiliero, Jr.,
CENTRAL
NEXT RELEASE!
AN OUTSPOKEN PICTURE
AN OUTSTANDING
PICTURE!
fata mount
presents

Peaceful

They. Won't Be

this demonstration Is to be tare tare-fully
fully tare-fully organized in advance
These activities will include a
mass invasion of the Canal Zone
with demonstrators taking seats
on the doorsteps of the Panama
Canal administration building, at
tne portals ot police stations, at
the churches, clubs, and other
places of prominence.
Moreover, world publicity is to
be built up as part of the prepara preparations.
tions. preparations. All of this, Mr. Speaker, con conforms
forms conforms to the pattern of the old geo geopolitical
political geopolitical game of protracted con conflict.
flict. conflict. In this case, it includes agi
tations in Panama to force the
Canal Zone sovereignty question
into an international court for ar
bitration or to the United Nations
The most vocal agitator in this
movement is Aquilino Boyd, who
is obviously using the sovereign sovereignty
ty sovereignty issue to further his political
political fortunes in reckless dis disregard
regard disregard of the consequences to
his country.
Moreover, it forms a part of
the Caribbean pattern of turmoil,
which now appears as a threat to
tne peace and safety of the West Western
ern Western Hemisphere.
The Communist penetration of
Cuba and other Caribbean coun
tries is a challenge to the Monroe
uoctnne.
The threat on the Isthmus to
the Panama Canal is a chal challenge
lenge challenge to the United States in its
highest sovereign capacity.
From the facts involved it must
be clear that back of all these ra radical
dical radical efforts in the Caribbean and
Isthmian areas is the hidden hand
of cunning and malignant Soviet-
ism manipulating their local pup puppet
pet puppet figures to destroy the just
rights ot the United States and to
jeopardize the peace of the world.
Such an invasion of Canil
Zone territory as is now being
threatened if permitted to oc occur,
cur, occur, would be in indignity a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst any portion of the conti continental
nental continental United States; and should
be so regarded and treated.
What should the United States
do to protect itself in the Canal
Aone? There is plenty that it can
ao; firmly, justly, and legally.
First, our people and the Con
gress should understand throughly
that the Canal Zone is constitution
ally acquired territory of the Unit United
ed United States granted in perpetuity for
Canal purposes with exclusive sov sovereign
ereign sovereign powers, that the United
Soldiers, Marines
To Get New Redeye
Guided Missile
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
continued a search here today
Army and Marines disclosed yes yesterday
terday yesterday they will equip infantry infantrymen
men infantrymen with a new guided missile
designed to knock down low-flying
combat planes.
Sketchy details of the new weap weapon,
on, weapon, called the "Redeye," were
disclosed and test models were
shown as part of the annual
three-day meeting of the Assn. of
the U. S. Army.
The Redeye looks like a World
War II anti-tank bazooka, but
there the similarity tops. The
weapon, fired from the shoulder,
has an infra-red "heat seeker" in
its nose which will carry it to a
strafing or bombing airplane that
gets within it- reach.
The Redeye and its launcher
weih 20 pounds. The weapon is
weigh 20 pounds. The weapon is
four feet long.
The announcement said tests
last year showed that the weapon
is feasible.
The Army has awarded a six
million dollar contract to develon
the weapon to Convair Division of
General Dynamics Corp., which
will do the work at its Pomona
Calif., plant.
The .Redeye missile contains a
propellent, high explosive war
neau ana lectronie guided sys
tem, it would De snipped to the
irom wiw us launcner serving as
a container.
The Army said both missile and
launcher "can easily be carried
by one man through underbrush
and rugged terrain where no otv. otv.-er
er otv.-er type of anti-aircraft weitfon
could be transported."
The range of the weapon was
not given. The Army said it "is
effective at altitudes and 'anees
commensurate with defensa of
field Army positions and Marine
Corps amphibious operations."
Presumably that means It could
hit strafing aircraft.
The Redeye is one of number
of new weapons intended to in increase
crease increase Individual soldiers capa capability
bility capability for defense and attack.
PHOTOGRAPHER SUES
FREIBURG, Germany (UPI)
A German news photographer
brought assault and battery
charges against two saber-carrying
bodyguards of King Sau ot
Saudi Arabia, it was announced
today. The photographer, Al Alfred
fred Alfred Strobel, said the bodyguards
struck him and took his camera
away while he was photographing
the king's arrival hera for medi
cal treatment,

Read

Invaders
States undertook the Panama Can Canal
al Canal project as a mandate for civ civilization
ilization civilization in accordance with trea treaty,
ty, treaty, and that its continued control
of that waterway .pursuant to
treaty and treaty obligation, is
best for all the Americas, best for
the world, and best for interocean interocean-ic
ic interocean-ic commerce.
Second, the Government of the
United States-must meet thfi issue
squarely, for the time foPprocras foPprocras-tination
tination foPprocras-tination or other form of evasion
is over.
To this end, I propose the fol following:
lowing: following: a) (That the Government of the
United States protest to Panama
against permitting the use of its
territory for staging any form of
hostile or provocative demonstra
tions against the United States in
tne Canal Zone;
b) That the Government of
the United States announce that
no hostile or provocative dem demonstrations
onstrations demonstrations of any character will
be tolerated in the Cirfal Zone;
and
c)( That it instruct Canal Zone
authorities accordingly.
Mr. Speaker, these are hard but
realistic words. They are not
meant to apply to our friends in
Manama, many of whom I know
personally and treasure.
Instead, they are aimed at ra radical
dical radical elements in and out of Pa Panama
nama Panama who have long been en engaged
gaged engaged in the process of conquest
through penetration and subver subversion,
sion, subversion, and are now undertaking
to deal with those grave ques questions
tions questions in mob spirit, especially
ambitious and reckless politi-
One of the earliest industries
to be started in colonial Amer America
ica America was. lumbering. According
to old Norse accounts. Leif
Ericson brought back a eargo
of timber from North America
about 100O A.D. Timbers from I
the Virginia -forests were among
the first products shipped to
England from the Jamestown i
colony, established in 1607. A
saw operated by water power
was set up in Maine in 1631.1
Encyclopedia Britannic I
TV VIEWING DIFFICULT
MIYAKO, Japan (UPI) The
only time the few television set
owners here get receptiii is when
Japan Air Lines planes pass over-
fi T"1Jnicians said the plane
-iv waves Drieiiy. Offic Officials
ials Officials of station SIPD said they
planned to float a huge silver
i. n i "u"u" over the area to
delicti uie waves so that
,;joi. .... r .
cau watcn television.
LSI ESS E3 EV
I CENTRAL!
1:00 0.50
I
TODAY!
3 SHOWS
12:00 4:00 8:00
I
I
I
"The greatest film pro production
duction production I have ever
seen... A sacred story,
treated masterfully and
reverently."
David O. McKay,
President, Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter Latter-Day
Day Latter-Day Saints.
I
CHARITON ' Yl V ANNt
HE5T0N BRYNNER BAXTER
NOTE: All Courtesy Passes
guspendedl
I

The I isWjs Drama
I Supreme MfH Of AH I
Human l ' 1 Time!
I Ma
I e i-.tcMjiV- 1 1

story pna page 6"

0f CZ
clans aspiring for high office end
devoid of any sense of respen-
sibilityf
If the people of Panama hiv
grievances against the Unite
States, it is their right to demonsv
trate as much as they wish but it
must be on their own territnri
and not in the Canal Zone
tBut it would be far better Tlorl
them to take up their 'probhrmi
.muugn -own officials Mth-.
er than to endanger further thei
own preferred status with respect
to the Panama Canal enterprfie. ;
And it must not be forgotteit
that n additional purpose inipir
mg these radical agitators is-tht'
nersistent aim in rl.vi... w -i:

Tolerated

j. ----- w v.oyiatc CI lies 10,
de la Guardia Jr. as President
to take over, by revolutionary W
cesses, the Panamanian Govern Government.
ment. Government. V
Mr .Speaker, as I have often','
said before, the paramount eiu eiu-ty
ty eiu-ty of the Congress is to declare .; -i
itself upon the question of Unit.
ed States sovereiantu ....

hv"r d$y wen is construeT i
by the Communists and other'Ta- t
dicals as weakness.
Our positive action would erf fajfV'
to strengthen our position as to all
.n" 3uestins PsitioS
founded and maintained upon Just
considerations. 1 3
i
CAR CALLED LITTER
SLOUGH, England (UPlfc J
Charles Simpson left his a t
long that grass began groMn?
through the wheic -if'

today he was"-fin7d fiXSPS?
depositing litter on th. highway
This weather ..i
hours endinr a ti.. T l!
235? by Meteorological
ff'j ?y?'f"phlc Branch af-tha
ranama canal Company:
v dwoosj. Cristobal
TEMPERATURE t
align
Low
IT
HUMIDITY j
,Hlgh
Low .....j,..
9S
n
W
89
WIND:
(max. mnhV lfw.i
K-17
IS
19
RAIN (inches) M
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 81
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake ai
Madden Dam
balboatides
TUESDAY, AUG. 4
High
Time
::s;-" a
t.ftA
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Low
Time
9:45 a.n,
0.75 O.40
Shows: 1:01, g;i,
7:03, 9:04 p.m
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