The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03074

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
A
Staff
s

Throughout jihc world
acre people Buy
than any other
imported whisky
DAILY NEWSPAPER
0 L ,:,r r-
"Let .the people knout the truth tmd the country ismfe" Abraham Lincoln
A.
- .6V-T!.
PANAMA, K. P, MONDAY, JULT?, J5
PIVI CINTt
I4Hi YIAt

mm

Banana $m

V

Striking Checkers Picket
Gill's Central Ave. Store
At toast a scora a striking ampleyaa ef the Canal Zona But Sar Sar-via
via Sar-via icketed bafora tha Case CHI ttora on Central AVenue today,
demanding Panama govarnmant Intarvantion in thair diiputa with tha
bus lina'a aparatar, Ouraam Sing GUI. u-u
Gill, whose living quarters aceupy tha uppar part af tha build build-ing,
ing, build-ing, was at hi Curundu office aarly this morning and was advised
af tha demenstration by hit maid.
No incidents were" raportad during tha pickatmg.
Maanwhila, thara wa no indication of vf moating gatwaan Gill
and 23 maintenance employes who struck last Monday for higher
wagas along with 30 bus route checkers.
Gill said today ha is still wHIing ta nagotiata a aettlement with
tha malntananea man, but that his firm's decision ta abolish ehaekars
jobs still stands.

Traffic Resumes
In Both Lanes
Of Gatun Locks
Both- lanes at uaura
were opened to traffic yester yesterday
day yesterday following the completion of
the work of concerting to 60 60-cycle
cycle 60-cycle current all frequency sen sensitive
sitive sensitive equipment on the Gatun
Locks west lane.
. vntv lanes are now
XUUIlirUKll WW-" ...
in operation, Gatun Locks will
continue io uyciauo t
hour basis so long as traffic ( de demands
mands demands make round-the-clock
work necessary, the Marine Bu Bureau
reau Bureau announced.
On Sunday, the first day
that the both lanes tad been
open simultaneously since
early in June, there were .16
hips making the Canal
transit northbound and u
ocean going vessels., south southbound.
bound. southbound. Itwat expected that
there vouid be-, -p
northbound ;and W uth uth-bound
bound uth-bound today, rf-r-:r
fclirafldres and Pedro Mfeuel
Locks, which' have higher lock lock-capacity
capacity lock-capacity than Gatun, will
continue to operate ort the pre pre-.ohArtnies
.ohArtnies pre-.ohArtnies with overtime
operation being used only when
necessary.
frk. nH-im of the conver-
X liC T , i.
-ion WOrk on the west lane at
?iDt,in hrriusrht to a conclusion
the huge locks conversion pro
vw the Consolidated Intel
.i-i iMowtrv nomDany on
...i, wViirK becan early this
year.
-)nnArcfnn of hoth Sets Of
pacific Locks was completed in
May of this, year and conver conversion
sion conversion at Gatun was started May
nr. t.he east lane. The work
t Gatun was completed Satur
day except for minor details.
Princess In Practice
V t ftMr.nN mpn Princess Anne
has ban sprinting down thehalls
of Buckingham Palace in order to
be able to uphold the royal family
Bonw tomorrow when she visits)
her brother, Princa Charles, at
Cheam School. Last year, at an an-sual
sual an-sual sports day at Cheam', Anne
eompetrd m a race of pupils' sis
ters and was baaiy Deaten,',

all utA w
; :
' .-:...A 4Lwtoiw'i i rirtpywin li'-8w

CHICKIRS PICKET Striking bus route 'check era of the Canal Zone Bus service, inc., aemons aemons-trated
trated aemons-trated with placards this morning in front of a Central Avenue store owned by bua line operator Gur Gursam
sam Gursam Singh Gill. Following the demonstration seeking Panama government intervention in toe labor
conflict, the striken attended a meeting at the Panama Foreign Ministry.

The move to abolish the 30
checking stations was announc announced
ed announced last Thursday after a meet

ing between management and
workers ended In a flat refusal
on the part of the strikers to
Singh's offer of a 10 percent
wage increase. The strikers are
demanding a minimum wage ot
75 cents per hour.
Company spokesmen have said
such an increase is out of the
question, and pointed to m
creasing costs and falling re'
venues of the bus firm as lead
ing leasons why such demands
cannot at met.
Prior to the strike, maintain'
ance workers earned $25 to $45
weeklv while route checkers
made $80 to $120 monthly.
A spokesman ior the strikers
said there had been a meeting
this morning at the Panama
Foreign Office between the
strike group ana representatives
of the bus tirm.
But Singh said that by noon
he had not yet heard irom any
of the 23 maintamance worKers
He added, however, that he was
still hoping to reach an agree
ment with the men.
Saturday, in a move viewed
in some quarters as harass
ment of the ilrm. the Immigra
tion Division of the Panama
Foreign Office ordered Singh';
manager,- Mahln, aej.. singn
Bhullar. nicked! ud on an in-
iracwon owmiaAgraiion ruien.
' Reoortedlv Sirtch-" BhttUaiL.
alien resident Had neglected fo
inform authorities alter cnang'
lnir his address recently. Gur
sam Sineh Is a nafsralized Pan
amanian citizen and all of his
-children were born in Panama
Both Singhs are of East Indian
birth.
Spokesmen for the strikers
said they Syere reluctant to
meet with Gursam Singh Cpll
at his CurunBu headquarters
after "display of military force
last Friday" at the Curundu
gate.
But they agreed to go to
Gill's Curundu headquarters to today
day today when a bus company
spokesman assured them that
the firm had no. part in the
military police detachment
which met the strikers' delega delegation
tion delegation at the Cunindu entrance.
Strikers said the eight-man
delegation was met at Curundu
by four military police patrol
cars and were thoroughly
searched before allowing to pror
reed tn the bus comoanv office.
Gill said today all but four
scheduled pusses are operating
as usual and that thus far
there has been no major break breakdown
down breakdown of equipment. Two or
three busses appeared to be ,a
waiting service in the compa compa-nv's
nv's compa-nv's sheds today. The sheds
have been ailent since last Tues.
day.

i&

I ii hi ii Wiiitiir-r-iiiiiiMQtlil.. .t

BARBERO I H TRANSIT'. Tha V. 8: 'Navy gulded-mlssfl submarl ne Barbero-passed through Pedro Miguel locks late-yesterday after afternoon,
noon, afternoon, Xhe sub, cdnverted to house the Regulus missile on her deck, ii enrouts from Norfolk to join the Pacific fleet,

Old War Horse
r ..
With New Face
Transits Canal
An nld war horse with a new
face steamed through the Pana
ma Canal yesterday ana nea up
Rodman Naval Station.
She is the Navy's guided mis mis-sile
sile mis-sile submarine Barbero, en route
from Norfolk, Va., to Pearl Har Harbor
bor Harbor to. join the Pacific flee1
submarine will" be docked at Rod Rod-man
man Rod-man until Wednesday, morning.
Its commanding officer Lt. Col.
C Dew Jr., paid an official call
todav on a fellow submarine of of-ice?
ice? of-ice? Rear Adm-Xewis S. Parks,
commandant of the Fifteenth Na
val District.
Tha Barber, a World War II
sobmarina, was rU4J
Mara Island Naval Shipyard In
California. Tha tank-like stroc stroc-hira
hira stroc-hira on tha dek housas a
oulus I missile.

"' T--T, t-riT'r-f nrirmiriinnrfffnnTrirrnwr--iiii miiium ,-iMiiiiriiinirnnrrriiimBini in urn n iiiiiiiiiririniiiinli

SUB-LAUNCHID MISSILI A Regulus guided misre similar to those capable of being launched from
the Barbero is pictured after firing from the deck o a submarine at sea. s

History Repeats Itself:

Suffers Second Mishap At

History has an unpleasant way
f repeating itself, for 17:year-ola.
Joann Hwwkins of Fort Kobbe.
She has made two trips, a year
apart,- to Santa Clara and both
1-
X
7. Germans Ponder
Signing Peace Pad
Willi Poles Czechs
BONN, July 27 (UPI)- West
Germany is considering the pos possibility
sibility possibility of signing a non-aggression
pact with Communist Poland and
Czechoslovakia, a g6v e r n m e n t
spokesman said today.
The spokesman said, however,
"Concrete steps in this connection
do not stand in the Immediate fu future."
ture." future."
A German newspaper today said
that Bonn is considering a non-ag-gregion
pact with Warsaw and
Prague. I
In confirming that such 7 a pos possibility
sibility possibility is under consideration,' the
spokesman laid f this theme is not
new,!' i
Beside the possible padt, Bonn
is also considering an agreement
wun tne two satellite nations on
mutual renunciation of force, and
a normalizing -d .relations, the
spokesman said. 1
According !6 'the newspaper,
Chancellor Konrad Adenfcuer has
already approved of suck a plan;
The spokesman refused .'comment
on this. i

times had to be evacuated after

accidents involving horses.
Jeann's latest encounder with the
unlucky combination of steeds and
Santa. Clara took place baturday
during an all-day outing to the
beach with other members of the
Fort Kobbe Teenage Club. While
she "was cantenng merrily along
near the Casino, a stirrup broke
and she fell to the ground.
About then, things began to
seem rather familiar to Joann,
who was thrown from a horse on
June 1958, when the teenagers
were picnicking at Santa Clara.
That' time she was returned to the
Zone by military bus and' hospit
alized at (.orgas.
After her fall on Saturday, chap chap-erones
erones chap-erones with the party immediately
contacted the medical aid station
at Rid Hato. where troops from a
Company. First Battle Group Ft.
Koobe,; are in training. Medical
personnel sent a litter jeep for the
girl, and arranged for her evacua evacuation
tion evacuation with the Aviation Section ;t
the 'battle group. W
CPt- John R. Beler took off In
ah Army L-20 with Capt. Donald
Cox, battle group surgeon, aboard
for!, the trip to Rio Hato. In less
than an hour and a half the plane
touched down at Albrook Air Force
Base, where a Gorgas Hospital
ambulance was awaiting the pa patient.
tient. patient. Joann was released from Gorgas
this morning after having under undergone
gone undergone observation for possible back
injuries.,
Joann's parents are M-Sgt. and
Mrs. Donald D. Brookover of Fort

Kobbe Gir

Santa Clara
Kobbe, her father is on duty with
the battle group. Mrs. Brookover
said her teenage daughter has
been riding for years and despite
the fact that she has suffered two
mishaps is a fairly accomplished
equestrienne. Joann hopes to keep
on riding, but definitely has ruled
out taking to the trails at Santa
Clara.
Labor, Management
Meet With Finnegan
On Sleel Dispute
NEW YORK, July 27 (UPI)-For
the first time since the nation wide
steel strike began July 15, repre.
sentatives of labor and manage,
ment met face to face today.
The loint meeting was called by
Joseph F. Finneean. Director of
the Federal Mediation ana vonci
liation Service.
Before the section began none of
the principals had anything to say.
Finnegan said the situation was
no different than when he told re
oorters last Wednesday that an
easy or early solution was not like
ly.
Finnegan laughed off the asser
tion of former Gov. W. Averell Har
riman of New York who said on a
TV. program yesterday that Pres
ident Eisenhower should have cal
led both sides to the White House
and "knocked their heads toge
thef."

n

"Z3

UN's Economists
Foresee 10-Year
Decline Unless...
UNITED NATIONS, July 27 (UPI) A report from
the UN Economic Commission for Latin America predicts
a decline in the Panamanian economy for the next ten
years unless measures are taken which would bring about
a two percent risf in general living standards and a five
percent increase in consumption.
The report said that to carry out these goals would
necessitate "effort which might appear excessive even

rrom a strictly economic viewpoint.

It was noted that Panama s economy is governed by
the impact of the Canal Zone, its limited market and the
monetary system.
Pr POcy of the Panamanian government in favor favoring
ing favoring domestic expansion of basic capital was described a
"resolute one" directed towards the country's internal
development. v

Chief obstacles were listed m
non-development of rural areas,
lack of incentive for private in investment,
vestment, investment, lack of highways and
communications and the riisnnr.
ity between the Balboa and the
Canal Zone dollar.
Panama, the reDort said ha
5,400,000 acres of arable land of
wmcn only 44 percent is utilized.
;-MinwhiM Jmj ih-4thmus Pa.
"Bia-Ainbjsaait: tha
US, Rlearda cMs Artat; Mst'iilght
said ha regarded low Panama
wagas as tha biggast aeorwmle
problom facing tha present ad administration.
ministration. administration. Speaking on the Spanish-language
"Meet the Press1' radio pro program,
gram, program, Arias said there are no re reliable
liable reliable figures on current unem unemployment,
ployment, unemployment, but the wage situation
was so bad thats more than one
member of each family has to be
working m order for the family
to meet its expenses.
inis, ne said, cut down the em employment
ployment employment possibilities for other
persons.
According to Arias, who it ttak
Ing th prasldantial candidacy of
Navy Search For
Proves Fruitless
o
A two-day search by US Navy
skin divers at the suspected
crash site has failed to yield
any trace of a private plane
which disappeared over Central
America jury ev
The single engine Beech
Bonanca was en route to To To-cumen
cumen To-cumen Airport from Mana Managua,
gua, Managua, Nicaragua; when it dis disappeared.
appeared. disappeared. There were severe
tropical storms along Its
route.
Aboard the plane was Juan
Jose Blaquier, wealthy Argen
tine landowner and sportsman,
and his veteran pilot Luis Men
diville.
The minesweeper USS Falcon
was dispatchetf Friday to search
a pinpointed area off Cebaco
Island In MontLJo Bay, about
200 miles southwest of Panama
City, on the Pacific coast.
Earlier, an Indian living on
the mainland opposite the is island
land island reported seeing a falling
plane about noon of the day
Blaquier and Mendiville disap disappeared.
peared. disappeared. The report,, was con confirmed
firmed confirmed by Juan Reynal Jr., Bla Bla-quier's
quier's Bla-quier's son-in-law, who flew to
the area in a chartered private
plane.
A detailed check of weather
reports for July 8 showed the
Montijo Bay area to have
been In the worst section of
a severe tropical storm that
day.
Reynal said the Indian fam family
ily family -also found what appears to
be the detachable headrest
which may have come from the
missing Bonanza.
The plane's manufacturer at
Wichita, Kansas has ben re requested
quested requested to aupply a positive
description of the headrest of
Blaquier's plane, but has not
yet replied.
Upon reaching the suspect suspected
ed suspected crash scene, the Falcon
obtained a clear fix upon an
underwater object, marking
the site with a buoy. But ob observers
servers observers on the scene said skin
divers could hardly see six
Inches In front of them when

tha National Patriotic Coalition,
th wag question is one of thf
main problems which must be)
solved by th next administra administration.
tion. administration.
On the sublect of ILS.-Punnm.
relations, Arias saids-he did aot
Deueve in an agresslve policy to to-Wards
Wards to-Wards the United States.
His stand contrasted sharply jwltji
the'vies of formed JForeiga Mi Minister
nister Minister Aquilino; Boyd, who recom recommended
mended recommended on the same progf am two
weeks ago that Panama adopt a
more aggressive policy towards the
U.S.
AHat, who Is en leave from
his pott m Washington, said he
believed that It It only a mat mat-tor
tor mat-tor of time before "the discrj.
mlnation existing in th Canal
Zone would be totally elimin eliminated."
ated." eliminated." The Ambassador said he did not
regard his mission in Washington
as being very successful, because
'in the past two years we have
made very little, almost no pro progress"
gress" progress" in the matter of wages for
Panamanian workers on the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone.
Argentine Plane
Over Weekend
under the murky water.
Complicating matters further
were a dark muddy bottom and
a strong current running In the
offshore area.
Several members of the Bla Blaquier
quier Blaquier family have been in Pan Panama
ama Panama since the first search made
by US Air Force C-54 more than
a week ago. But there was no
Indication today the search
would be continued unless thi
Navy agreed to send the Fal Falcon
con Falcon a second time to fix "the
probable crash position,
11 so, a spokesman for Jtht
family said, they wouid con
tinue to hunt for positive iden identification
tification identification of the lost plane with
a privately secured boat and
divers.
Oldster PanCanal
Out-performs
New St Lawrence
In spite of traffic jams, bus
checkers strikes, and the Potter-Pilot
feud the aging Pan Panama
ama Panama Canal handled almost
twice the June cargo tonnage
of the brand-new St. Lawr Lawrence
ence Lawrence Seaway.
The St. Lawrence Seaway
handled 2,787,000 tons of car cargo
go cargo during June which la a
whopping 69 increase over
the 1,644,474 tons which pass passed
ed passed through the former St.
Lawrence system a year ago.
However this total was only
half the 4,844,568 long tons
of cargo put through the Pan
ama Canal In June. And this
June figure was well below
the PanCanal totals of March
and May.
On top of this the total
Panama Canal transits 1 for ;
the fiscal year ending July
first hit an all time high of
11,191 which I the first tim
in the Canal's history trans.
Its have topped the 11,001
mrk. SV,':

tv.
M

V
i? IP
it.
X!
I

t.



PAG I TWO

TBI PANAMA AMZKICAN AN INDEPENDENT PAar NTWSPA.
MONDAY, JULY 2), 1951

-r THE PANAMA AMERICAN
jSv OWNta A0 euaiMHtB y TMt PANAMA AMKMICAN PR KM. IMC
... reuNNi v n bison OUNAKVCVX m
'"' MAMMOOI AftlABj, terro
"" IS-S7 M linn P O BO '34 PkHUM m. t P
Tilmmi 8-6740 8 LlNM
CABLI Aeoatae. PAN AMERICAN PANAMA
T-eat, Orieti 11 t7 Cintrai Avui atrwttN Htm nb ISth Tirr
remiaN crutNTTivca. johua owee. INC
i S4 Madison Avi.. Ntw Vo 117 N. V.
IHlt
Ptt MOMTW IN Afw.w. $ I 70 i 52
W i MCNTtti in Advance 'J
F OW VAI IN AOVANCt i l BP 1 OO
THIS tS YOUR FORUM THI READERS OWN COLUMN
' I I Ml I I
The MM h ea Urum far rn B The Panama Amarleeai.
Letters art receiveal tralafully an J art haiiaMea' in a wholly aeaHdeartal

II utt. J'

Mat day. Lartert art aubliihaa" la tka areV receive.
Plana try eta m letter limitee ta ana tat tanftR.
Identity a I attar writers it Ma" hi atrtrtttf eeftfMenca.
Ti MnNM' iwimii no reseenifbllltv fat statement ar eainleii
xprattta' la latter frem reader.
THE MAIL BOX

SIGNS WANTED
Sir:
As daily users of Frangipani Street and Ancon Boulevard
s-e are scared out of our wits every time we reach said corner
where' mad drivers of buses, military staff cars and other assort assort-sd
sd assort-sd civilian vehicle operators come crashing into the heavy
itream of traffic coming from FranglpanT to Ancon Boulevard
and the J Street lights with utter contempt of safety or com compliance
pliance compliance with the rules of traffic which Indicated that the An Ancon
con Ancon Hill traffic coming from Oorgas should yield the right of
WaJMay we suggest to the Canal Zone Police traffic engineer
that a yield si g similar to the one installed at the old abto
Crossing be placed at the corner of Ancon and angipanl In
order to avoid a future death or accident so close to Gorgas.
Bewildered Wrivers

BUS PROFIT AND LOSS
Sir:
Something's mighty strange about the Gill Bus company'
claim that It lost $9000 in the last six months I don t disbelieve
Gill's claim that he lost money, but there must be a reason other
than the fact that fares have fallen off.
The Idea advanced by a friend of mine that some canal
Zone Local Raters are now making more money as a result of the
implementation of the single wage and are consequently buy buying
ing buying more automobiles is equally goofy, because for every local
rater who got a raise there are probably five more whose Jobs
were "reclassified" and downgraded. So that would mean that
lor every one who bought a new "second-hand auto, five more
had to give up their cars. .
. In act, thinking into the matter a Uttmorevdeep y Gill
Is probably losing money only on paper. .MlOf ttat
the Canal Zone Bus Service Is showing a 3o: Gill's other enter enterprises,
prises, enterprises, like the buses he has competing with the Independent driv drivers
ers drivers who are barred by entering Canal Zone twona lor his beneiit,
are more than making up for it.
, The buses he also has operating in Panama In his own name
r the name of his ton or some countryman also probably help
to balance out the loss of the Canal Zone operation with a
big profit for the enterprising East Indian.
1 This might not have anything to do with the case In point,
but Gill's employes claim that he took several hundred thousand
dollars with him to India, from where he recently returned after
a six-month visit.
Q. Rtous.

SOUR MINDED
Sir:

' If sour-minded civilians have to complain, and these Zone
people apparently have to, the US Army Is a sitting duck for a

Subject. Mayo iney try too nara wj snow ra puuuc just now
hearted the Army really Is.
During the war, the screams were loud and long that no nobody
body nobody ever got mentioned but the generals. Where, but In the re re-portings
portings re-portings of the Ernie Plyes, was the gallant doughboy?
So now the Army hands out pictures right and left of pri privates
vates privates being honored for meritorious service paperlip, perform performance,
ance, performance, and even the civilian slaves get recognized suggpjtion. And
the complainers are still unhappy.
And poor old CFN. There's an outfit which hardly ever gets
A compliment, but the gripes flow fast and free. Maybe the Pan Pan-Canalers
Canalers Pan-Canalers and even TV viewers in Panama ought to be remind reminded
ed reminded once in a while that the Army's television station Is not here
for their consumption anyway. They should be darned glad for
anything. I haven't noticed the Canal Company piping in tele television
vision television or radio, and If Panama had a TV station anything like
the quality of their radio, the picture tubes Would burst in disgust:
.', I've noticed that the civilians here are the first with the

sarcastic comments about soldier servants, ftupld GI pictures In
the paper and the elocution of radio announcers. They are also
the first to ask their Army neighbor to buy them a couple of

pounds of GI coffee at the commissary. And how many of them
sneak into the military theaters, feeling Justified because- they
pay "civilian prices" (about a third of the' ticket price at Balboa)?
j It's the same old story. They want all, the advantages and

feel free to cruize on the grounds that they are U.S. taxpayers.

hooey!
i
i
NIXON IN
Sir:

Well, after Mr. Nixon's recent hog calling contest with. Mr.

K under the Kremlin walls It is easy to understand why the Pe Pe-ruanos,
ruanos, Pe-ruanos, and Venezolanos took so unkindly to him on his ill-fated
Wait to South, America. For it seems our Vice President i about
lbs gracious and diplomatic as a gin mill bouncer on New York's
Bowery.
On his trip here he was far from a pillar of grace, but when
he starts slinging epithets back and forth with his host on a so
called "goodwill" mission to a foreign rtate things are getting
pretty bad.
In solte of the provocation, and in spite of the fact that
fTrlcky Dicky' Is visiting with the big bad Russians there is no
excuse whatever for his shameful conduct.
Though the Republican Party is shot through with blabber blabbermouths
mouths blabbermouths and "red balterr." Mr. Nixon could take a lesson In dip diplomacy
lomacy diplomacy from his fellow Republican Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., U.S.
Representative to the United Nations, who maintains his com composure
posure composure as well as the dignity of the great nation he represents,
While at the same time weathering vituperation at the hands of
the Russians far in excess to anything Nixon has experienced.
Then again Lodge Is a diplomat; Nixon'a Just a Jerk.
!
!' Embarraaed American.

DAILY MEDITATION'

? ( Presented by the Department
?9l Christian Irfucatisn of the I -p$etp
ChwreK In the Mlaslen Mlaslen-rv
rv Mlaslen-rv Diecesa) f the Panama Ca Ca-'fitl
'fitl Ca-'fitl Zeiw.)
i SICOND WIND
f'
. y "They shall meunt u with
jVHr aa hs; ffy shall run,
naj Mt aw weary; an) they
tiail walk, and Mt faint."
1. One of the first lessons the
athlete learns is the Importance
) getting his second wind. It is
equally important in other areas
Of life. It is so easy to start wilh
a burst of enthusiasm and then
find that our interest and energy
have given out and we are at a
standstill. It may be such sim sim-pl
pl sim-pl thing as learning to play a

laMAtlanl II II 4aMa1 aaaear the

CIVILIANS
I. C. Red.
MOSCOW
new game, participate in some
sport. Even in such matters as
ehurehgoing or Bible reading we
may hit a dry spot and lose our
zest.
There were probably many
Jews in the prophet's day who
game up the praetiee of their re religion
ligion religion as the outside pressures
mounted snd Uieir ense of isola isolation
tion isolation increased. The prophet would
have then return to God for re renewed
newed renewed strength.
H
Note the o"der: flving, running,
walking. This is no anticlimax
but the soberest truth. When the
going gets rough and the pare
slows us down it is then that we
need His help. It demands more
of us to keep pluKfinc aloni.
working away on the routine task.

Walter Winchell
In New York
THI PEOPLE OP THI CITY
They r the eight million. An

impressive statistic. A montage
01 iaces, isces, laces. A sad ado
gladdening pageant. .You can
ueteci i irazic novel in some
races. And tne singing wonder 01
youthful oeauty in others.
They are tht people, young and
old. The splendid savages, it has
required billions of years to
csrvt the shape of their hands.
There Is classic poetry in the
soaring beauty of a skyscraper.
And a true artistic masterpiece
in the shimmering lignts ot
Broadway The material wonders,
however, merely serve as the
scenery for an epic drama. The
people are its stars. Individuals
form the basis of cities as well
as empires. Our town reflects
their dreams and accomplish
ments. Their daily 'routine! re
present its everlasting pulsebeat.
And their biographies are its his history.
tory. history. They are the Broadwayites
whose lives are sketched with
bright lights and the darkest sha shadows.
dows. shadows. And they are afflicted with
strange ironies: The famous are
frequently friendless, cynics com compose
pose compose sentimental ballads and
stars rarely achieve the securi security
ty security attained by the corner news
stand proprietor. Those who en entertain
tertain entertain millions are frequently
gripped by the melancholy which
stems from the constant struggle
to gain and retain success. i
Broadway is a wild fairyland
where the law of the jungle pre
vails. Success is King and fame
is Paradise. And those who wear
stars for crowns often discover
that the heights are extremely
lonely.
They are the nightclubbers who
have acquired a desperate gaye gaye-ty.
ty. gaye-ty. Frantically clutching for frag
ments of happiness. Searching
for amusement in a vanishing
dream. .Some visit ioynti sole
ly to display emblems of wealth.
There are insomniacs who find
a certain contentment in inno innocuous
cuous innocuous chatter...Headwaiters have
an enameled charm. They func
tion like actors in a well-rehearsed
play. .Lovers are marooned
on an island of enchantment.
Torch-carriers are lost in an al alcoholic
coholic alcoholic haze. Visiting movie
stars are basically lonely. They
squander hours searching for the
warmth of companionship and
discover the cold emptiness that
is called boredom.
They are the first-nighters. A
peculiar, untamed breed. .They
have acquired certain tribal cus
toms. They mistake bad man
ners for sophistication. Arriving
tardy is almost a rigid law. Bel Bellowing
lowing Bellowing greetings of recognition is
considered a form of socialitly.
During intermission they dash up
aisles with the menacing feroci ferocity
ty ferocity of a cattle stampede. Their
lobby-opinions of a play are in
variably wrong. .They trans
form premieres into unruly so
cial events and gaudy fashion
parades. They are more con concerned
cerned concerned with how they look than
the show thev see. Curiously;' the;
most i.ncorispienous: members of
the audience are the 'most 'im 'importantthe
portantthe 'importantthe critics. .A wild
poet once described 'irst-nl?Vers
as a necklace worn by the thea
tre. Actually, they seem more
like a noose.
They are the wealthy those
who can afford everything and
nothing. A luxurious fortress :s
their home. Lofty enough to col collide
lide collide with passing eagles. .They
are the dowagers and debutantes
spending time as recklessly as
money. You see them in expen expensive
sive expensive shops, exclusive restaurants
nd' swanky rafes. And yet-
there is a strange vacuum tn
their lives. Those who are never
matter of
FACT
The people of Phoenicia a
strip of coast line in Syria,
lying between Mount Lebanon
and the Mediterranean north
of Palestine were the most
daring of ancient sailors. They
ventured far beyond the Medi Mediterranean
terranean Mediterranean Sea in their galleys.
I By their travels they joined
'the old civilisations of Mes Mesopotamia,
opotamia, Mesopotamia, Egypt and India
with, the trowing power of
Greece and Rome. They left
few records of themselves, so
all that is known about them
was learned in histories writ writ-ten
ten writ-ten by others.
i aeyelapae'ta BrlUaajte

i I

y s ssss s s s ss.' ,j-

yi am n- m m m A tcr at s-m m m i Haaiaau. m a

compelled to strive for success
miss the great satisfaction or lui-
filling aspirations, Material pos
sessions cannot nourish lamisiiea
spirits. Diamonds are beautiful
but cold. .They seem to have
what dreams are made of. .So
many of them, however, are mak
ing psychiatrists richer by recall recall-ing
ing recall-ing their nightmares. Such is the
irony of their existence.
They are the failures. The root rootless,
less, rootless, witherine and waiting to
die. Humans stripped of dignity.
. .rney arouse puy as wen as
the profound sorrow that comes
from the desecration of life.
They gaze at the stars and see
only mud. Lonely and desperate,
the primitive instinct for surviv
al has replaced the basic decen decencies.
cies. decencies. .They are hoboes and
bums and mendicants. They scuf
fle along and plead abjectly. Sad
caricatures of humanity who
have surrendered the prime aua
lities which distinguish mankind
from beasU They are the Army
of th. Jsatith!)1vlnt' no nowhere.
where. nowhere. AiiCJhjfe vf-burning
insult to the world's richest city
They are the cabbies. The a-
mateur philosophers... They have
an inexhaustible fund of conver conversation
sation conversation and toss opinions around
with confetti-like abandon. They
drive crosstown and solve the
problems of the world, while
stressing their own personal mls-
Mtionat
My

t ill I START A REFRESHING COOL WAVt . TO LAST ALL
V 1llB Sv" rf YIAR IN YOUR HOME OR OFFICE . OR II 'jk
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Whole Room's Bugged" V I

I t
i000

fortunes, .Some are rude, most
are friendly as missionaries.
They maneuver their vehicles
with the boldness of conquerers.
Their daily battle with the traffic
tangle demands the rugged spir spirit
it spirit of an explorer. .They know
the city as intimately as birds
know forests. Or lions known jun jungles.
gles. jungles. They are the strollers on sun sunny
ny sunny Sabbath' mornings, when the
city is touched by a mystical se serenity.
renity. serenity. The tempest of the com commercial
mercial commercial world has been stilled.
Canyons are playgrounds for e e-choes.
choes. e-choes. Residential areas have an
almost zephyr-like tranquility. The
city is hushed and people seem
to walk on tiptoe... Families find
deep comfort in prayer. .Neigh .Neighbors
bors .Neighbors have the time to be neigh neighbors.
bors. neighbors. . The promenaders in
parks early absorb the antiseptic
air. The more rugged clip clop
along on horses. .Solitude can
be a warm friend when the
world seems becalmed. For a
few hours the city is caressed by
peace and the people hold it in
a lover s embrace.
They are the children. Bubb Bubbling
ling Bubbling out of schools, playing in the
streets or sneaking in the dark.
. .The heirs of the future. The
living symbols of a city's aspira aspirations.
tions. aspirations. .Some find their horizons
limited by walls of dismal tene tenements.
ments. tenements. Many are doomed to be

at aaaa m mm k m m m mm m am aim.. m. n aai a-

Ill 1 1 A II T O M n R I I f ROW IMS

am jf w iti v aaa aa a aj IM St
1 1 AMPLE PARKING SPACE AIR CONDITIONED

juna i initrrtfn '"J

GallThe

A crowded, turbulent existence
compels them to acquire a na native
tive native guile far beyond their years.
They age quickly and become
tired too soon. Poverty can be a
more formidable, prison than one
made of stone and steel. .Nev .Nevertheless,
ertheless, .Nevertheless, the Great Democracy
of Youth gifts them all with com common
mon common enthusiasm. Those who fro
lie in traffic-jammefl streets are
as joyful as others fortunate e e-nough
nough e-nough to have lavish playrooms
or spacious lawns. Children are
unconcerned about price tags
on toys. When life is in Its morn morningsunset
ingsunset morningsunset holds infinite prom promise.
ise. promise. They are the people of the ci city.
ty. city. A massive, dizzybg kaleido kaleidoscope.
scope. kaleidoscope. An awesome group thrust thrusting
ing thrusting forward their hopes and striv striving
ing striving to bury their fears. They gen generally
erally generally have a deep pride in their
city. .The loftiest edifices have
the deepest foundations. The pin pinnacle
nacle pinnacle that the Big Town has
ganined in the minds of people
around the world stems from' te
roots new x oncers nave tnrust
into it. Out of their ingenuity
and sweat have come admiration
and exaltation. The city is a mo monument
nument monument to its inhgbitatns. They
are the eight million of famous
and nameless. They sre the most
exciting, most fascinating, most
exasperating, most tragic, most
wonderful of living things. They
are people.

l liMllYMSHlNGTOTJ
- 1 iMerry-Go -Round
;. 1 v -3 ly HfW. MAt.OMV'V".
I aa 1. 1 ill

WASHINGTON --Attorney-general
Bill Rogers is bowing to J.
Edgar Hoover by oisDancung met
special squad he set up u UgM
organized crime., :
He will explain to Congress that
he is integrating tna anu-racKis
sauad into the United States at
torneys' offices around the coun country.
try. country. Each U.S. attorney? will be
asked to assign one man to con concentrate
centrate concentrate on organized criminals.
However; the-outboine head of
the anti-rackets squad, Mnton
Wessel, has protested privately
that a central bureau Is definitely
very much seeded to direct the
drive against the. crime syndi syndicate
cate syndicate even though 3. Edgar Ho Hoover
over Hoover is opposed. : : ;
Hoover has -made it clear that
he considers, such a bureau a re reflection
flection reflection on the FBI.. :
BOHLEN AND C.O.P.
Jerry Persons, the chief Pres Presidential
idential Presidential aide, has pleaded with
GOP Senate leader Dirksen una
GOP policy committee chairman
Bridges, to call off their attaekJ
on ambassador Charles Bohien as
prospective Russian adviser to
Secretary of States Christian; A.
Herter.
Persons assured the sena tors
that Herter will talk over his
plans regarding Bohien before
he makes up his mind, so they a-
greeed to ease up.
Meanwmie Bohien, now in the
Philippines, has decided to take
private business Job and write his
memoirs. He's tired of politics.
BELLIGERENT CONGRESSMAN
Congressman Ben! Franklin Jen
sen, known to colleaeueg as "Bia
Ben," is a hefty, likable, '66-year-old
Iowa Republican who is moro
conservative in his politics than
in nis Denavior on the floor of the
House. Twice recently he has hecn
on the verge of a fist fight.
Tne tirst oegan as a finger finger-pointing
pointing finger-pointing contest with Democrat
Clarence Cammon of Missouri o-
ver some criticism Cannon had
leaveled at Lewis Strauss. Pres
ident Eisenhower's rejected no nominee
minee nominee for secretary of commerce
ine exchange became so acri
monious that news reporters
thought it might erupt into fisti
cuffs, even though Cammon is 80
years old. However, cplle ijg tf e s
placated the two men and nothing
nappened.
A few days later Jensen aeain
was in a combative mood. Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Rep. Barratt O'Hara of Kl-
lionois objected to spendine $250.-
000 for a new dining room m the
states department, requested by
the Eisenhower administration.
I do not think that is any
worse than spending $900,000 for
cafeteria for House members and
employefcifexploded Jensea'I
have not heard h gentleman com
plain about that.' ,
"Let the gentlepan come out
and argue with our fists." suescst-
ed O'Hara who is 77. "1 am
willing to revert to fisticuffs, e-
ven at my age, on the issue that
no dining room in the State De
partment is worth '$250,000 pi the
taxpayers money in order to im impress
press impress foreign diplomats. We can

9 f clr5

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and 6Wr many other gifts for your
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build many homes in .Illinois for
mat."
ue ui not get into a fight,-
replied Jenseu,. "I have never
touched a man with my fist sines
I have been married."
m
David Greenelaxa fh. .t.i.
""t Maj SB WUHU
spy who testified for the govern govern-ment,
ment, govern-ment, has appealed for parole. Ho
has served nine years of a 13 13-years
years 13-years sentence, in Lewisburg" pe pe-mtenUsry,
mtenUsry, pe-mtenUsry, and is eligible. .fh
House Armed Services committa
House Armed Services committea
ia investigating whether military
women are? .necessary. A staff
study ..will recommend whetner to
abolish the Wact, Wafs.'and Waves
and confine the armed services to
men onlyvs-ViThs American em em-bassy
bassy em-bassy in Moscow has advised
Vice-president Richard Nixon to
abandon his nlans for informal,
handshaking talks with the Rus Russian
sian Russian people at street corners dur during
ing during his visit.' Everywhere Nixoa
has gone overseas, this folksy per-son-to-oerson
annriurh ha,
mstrademark. But the American
embassy doesn't like the idea !.
.Another prominent Louisiana Po Politician
litician Politician has been hospitalized Con
gressman Overton Brooks, chair chairman
man chairman of the House space committes)
hig. office says he's receiving a
routine medical check-up,but clost
friends say he is suffering from
mental exhaustion. .Both tht
Army and Navy have appealed to
the security council to cut down
on atomic weapons and spend tne
money instead oh artillery, ma ma-chineguns
chineguns ma-chineguns and the old-fashioned
weapons of World War II. They ar
gued that Russia will never start
a nuclear war, but only Korean Korean-style
style Korean-style limited wars.
TROUBLE OVER FORMOSA
Adm. Harry Felt, U.S. com com-mander
mander com-mander in the Pacific, has warn warned
ed warned that the Chinese Reds may bt
stirring up another cirsis around
Formosa.
The monsoons have died down,
creating perfect invasion weather.
Red pilots have been target-practicing
with air-to-ground, missiles
in the Formosa Strait.
The half-dozen airfields opposito
Quemoy and Matsu are crowded
with Russian-Built Mig-17 and Mid Mid-19
19 Mid-19 supersonic fighters. Powerful
new guns have also been
tailed withing easy range of the
Nationalist-held islands.
No confirmations has been pick picked
ed picked up, however, of Khrushchev's
boast that atomic missiles hava
been delivered to Red China.
On the- ground, Communist forc forces
es forces outnumber the Nationalist gar garrisons
risons garrisons 300,000 to 130,000 in the Que-moy-Matsu
area. Felt pointed out
that the Reds have stepped up
vtheir propaganda and artillery
bombardment, though the' recent
air clashv was provoked by eager eager-beaver
beaver eager-beaver Nationalist pilots who new
over ped territory. The gun films
show that the National!'" ''ot
down only four, not five Mid-17s.
One crashed into the Formosa
Strait and was picked up by A A-merican
merican A-merican destroyers. It will be
shipped to the United States and
patched up for flight tests.
9 &
yaw
3
I
a

CeefQtllCii
CINTRAL AMIRICA'S
LIADINO JIWILLIRS

The Chase Manhattan Bank



THB FAMAMA AMAaUCAJI AN iKDAUU'UiI UAii, M. bJrAlJ(
Judge Orders 12 Negroes Admitted
Hoffa Seeks Means To Defeat
MOSCOW (UPI) The United
States has withdrawn about, 100
"controversial" books en- politics
and religion from its exhibition
here by Soviet request, it was
announced today.' ;
to Arlington, Virginia Schools
Anti-Teamster Congressmen

. gPalss UIIVUMtlUM SB AAVt

'kV''"' i
.V2,V if H vjl
f: if jj
j ,t,.r.f maiimin- .imirWw t mmdL

bvs'yti ivmv APpniKTiwirKT isf. Ti: William -T. Newton, assistant S-3 of the 1st Battle

Group. 20th .Infantry, Is sworn in as an officer In the Regular Army. Maj Robert -D. Danforth, bat battle
tle battle group adjutant, administers, the oath as U. Col. James N. Lunsford, executive officer and
Mr. wourfnn nhserva thW ceremony. (U.S. Army Photol

4

3

' - 1

CAPITAL INVESTMENT This architect' sketch shows how a notorious slum area In the
nation's, capital, Dixon Court, is being transformed feto what is called one of the most
modern vrban areas in the country. Apartments, town house and parks are appearing, where
nee stood crowded tenements. The dome of the Capitol to risible in the background". J"he
reconstruction project is well underway and win be completed in 1960. i

; ALEXANDRIA, Va. (UP1) -Federal
Judge Albert V. Bryant
today ordered that 02 Negro
students admitted to three
schoola in Arlington, Va., when
they reopen this fall.
For two of the schools, it will
be the beginning of integration.
The judge held that the Arling Arlington
ton Arlington School Board applied entrance
reauirementa unequally in reject

ing tiie students. But he upheld
the board's refusal to admit 10

other Negroes.
At the same time, Bryan de

nied a motion toy attorneys for

the Neeroes that the board be re

quired to submit a comprenensive

n an for aeseereKauoo. ine

hoard's system of screening pu

nils orovides adequate relief, he

said, and is proper so long as u
it applied equally to whites and

Negroes.

One of the schools involved is

Statford Junior High which last
February became the first te-

srated school in Virginia since

the days of reconstruction.

Under the judge's order, seven

of the students will go to Strat

ford, four to Washington-lee
Tflffh and one to Patrick Henry

Elementary scnooi. ine si iwo

have been all-wmte.

The school board refused to ad

mit the four to Washington-Lea on

mounds the school was over

crowded. Judge Bryan ruled that

this was imoroDer tnat we we

groes "cannot be singled out for

nWtinn for overerowchng. alone,

The students seeking admission
tn Patrick Henrr and Stratford

were turned dowh because their

grades on academic tests fell be

low the median achievement level

of the erades they wanted en

ter. In overturning this, the judge

pointed out that some wnue pu pupils
pils pupils also fell below this median,
"Should any classes be estab

lished with reference to the na

tional median or some other stan

dard," the judge said, "admitting

only those above it, tnen any

white or Neero pupil not posess

ing these qualifications could be
excluded from those classes, pro-

vided U student were given an

equal opportunity to enter such
classes.

The judge upheld the beard In

turning down tne 10 otter appn

cations because the pupils lived

outside the district of the school

they sought to enter.

"Considering school bus routes

safety of access and other per pertinent
tinent pertinent factors, it cannot be found

that tne school board s assign

ments i are arbitrary or predicated

on race or color, n said, in

their own district, he added, the
pupils actually "are afford

ed schools of better pupil-teacher

ratio and of less congestion than

any in the county."

This rating in effect upheld the

board's right to set up school dls

tricts. -The court cannot draw
the boundaries for attendance

areas,"' Judge. Bryan eaid

Saturday's rulings were ttie

latest in a, legal battle that went

all the way te tne U.S. Supreme

Court. In January Chief Justice

Earl Warren rejected the school

board's request te postpone into

gration.

Judge Bryan ordered last year

that the board admit uie four Ne

groes to Stratford Junior High,

but granted a delay until Febru

ary. As the deadline approached

opponents of integration threat

ened to picket tne scnooi and i
tense situation developed.

On Feb. I, a Monday, police
equipped with riot guns and tear

gas stood at other officers escort

ed the Negroes, three boys and a
girl. Into the school. But there

was no trouble, and has been

none sines.

School integration m Virginia

came slowly. The Legislature
drew up. a pet of ."massive resis resistance"
tance" resistance" laws to combat it, but the
state's own Supreme Court threw

out the entire package on consti

tutional grounds

Negroes have gone to tne courts

WASHINGTON (UPI) Team,
sters' President James R. Hoffa
is planning to set np a political
department in his union to try
and defeat congressmen with, anti
Teamster voting records.
The pro gram would be financed
hv novel "Dolteal eheckoff"

. . J Ml

system under wmcn ransana-me
Teamsters could earmark SO eents

of their monthly dues for political

action. This would be en a volun voluntary
tary voluntary basis and thus in compliance

with the corrupt iractices aci.

Funds collected in this way t-

potentially several millon dollars
a year would be spit between

regional and national headquar headquarters
ters headquarters ef the 1,600,000 member

union.

They would be used against

congressmen whose voting rec

ord! were considered anti-labor.

Hoffa, who describes himself as
political independent, was pic

tured Saturday by his ades as

man who is going into politics

reluctantly after Buffering repeat-

ed setbscks in his efforts to tone

down labor reform legislation dur during
ing during this session of Congress.

Many of the union control bills

have been aimed openly at curb

ing the power of tne controver controversial
sial controversial Hoffa, target of corruption
charges by the AFL-CIO and Sen Senate
ate Senate Rackets Committee.

In a tip-off to his plans, Hoffa

discussed what he called the leg

islative threats to the labor move

ment in a recent article in the

Teamasters' mgazine.

"Tha day of reckoning will
come at the polls," lie observed.
The bantam siied Hoffa is re reluctant
luctant reluctant to discuss hs poltcal
plans now until he polishes them
for presentation to the next meet meeting
ing meeting of the Teamsters' executive
board, in September.
But, in broad outline, here is
what he has in mind:
Political departments would be

set up at national headquarters

Charlottesville, seeking admission

to white schools.

lip W v ..

Yot11 enjoy o NrwW of txpwimK? whm'yov th
IN THE WONDERFUL"
WORLD OF

est. The AFL-CIO COPE, which
appeals fof voluntary $1 contribu contributions,
tions, contributions, nsually gets about 1 million
dollars in a presidential election
year although there are 12,500,000

memoerj oi al-i;io affilates.

me new political emphasis

within the Teamsters seems' to
have been inspired by Harold Jm
Gibbons, Hoifa's right-hand man
and often called his "egghead.--:
Gibbons has nsed the "political
eheckoff" system in his home le
cal 688 in St. Louis snce I960
suits.

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A"

An airline must be judged by the experi experience
ence experience of its employees, the jobs they do,
how well they do them and the service
they offer.
For this reason 25 million passengers have
made Pan American the airline of their
choice... last year alone 3 million people 1
travelled via Pan American.
1500 Pan Am pilot have flown more than
one million miles each. 150 have flown over

thm million miles!

They have made mora than 75,000 flight

r.

across the Atlantic750,000 acroea tksHrt
cific and 6,000 around the world .? more
than m tkovsandmillum miles fo.fawstvj
oceanic flight.
rfcisiewhatyouSn EXPERIENCE! ItgW
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ern, eastern, southern and cen central
tral central conferences. Similar sections
would be established in nearly 10
Teamster Joint councils in every
major city.
The funds would come In the
form ef "contributions" from
Teamster members. They would
be asked to authorize the union
to use SO cents of each month's

dues for political purposes. Hof-

fa's aides say this procedure is

very legal.
The Teamsters. Ike the AFL-

CIO Committee en Political Edu Education,
cation, Education, would compile lists of con

gressmen's votes on key legisla legislation
tion legislation and label them "rightT" or
"wrong" to guide ths member membership
ship membership en which candidates to back
or oppose.
If the dues-contribution scheme
works perfectly, the Teamsters
could collect up te ft ,00,eoo a
year for theif political war chest.
Their hopes are much more mod-

TO Ul MASIC WAND
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (UPI) A A-thorities
thorities A-thorities hope, te open the gates
of the 15 New, York state fair
from, outer- space. A "magic
wand,", wielded by the yet-to-be
selected state fair queen, will re receive
ceive receive a signal from the vanguard
I satellite about T:M a.m. Sept.
4. The signal, H is hoped, will
then open, the north gate te the
fairgrounds electroniearlyi

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R. 8. Herr
Rufus M. Lovelady
Mary Msgulre

; i VTimiers

J. C. Clan
Peter Rogerberg
Anna de Jlminei
Virginia de Soto
Harmodlo Centella
Rloardo Nan'olaree
Trtta Bernal C.

Easy Terms

rv

3kt ffmnitm 9 SKt

lomt Curnuhtna otort

4th ef Jaly Ave. 'V It I Tel. t-7xS

FtY NOWPAYIl ATER

WORLD'S ? MOST EXPERI ENCED: Al RL1 N E
Porwmot 22-B Stree Mal24Q Tel? 9-nA-7ft ffwU. tvjt. iLUtu.

' ' mwmg m WltJUV HiyMWtW

I.na.fee.lfit.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS, ELECTRICIANS,

and CONTRACTORS

Mr. Rodolfo J. Alvarado, Field Engineer for the Square D Company'will be visiting
Panama for approximately one week. Mr. Alvarado will deliver lectures with
demonstrations en Distribution Equipment (Panel boards, Safety Switches, etc.)
and Motor Controls.
You "ire Invited te attend these lectures and demonstrations as well at to consult
Mr. Alvarado personally regarding this type of equipment.
Please contact Mr. Ramos at our store for further details, datss and ap

pointments

Exclusive Distributors for Sauare D

No. 1 Via Expafia Tel. Tel. 8-0383

P,. O. Box 617 Panama. R. de P.

f 4. 4-' i ?

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each designed with a one.plece steel body,
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direct transmission, e-speed
gear shift.
gravitational fuel flow of
gas and oil mixture, 2Vi gal.
tank capacity, Including re reserve.
serve. reserve. (
up to 62 mph.
60 td 65 rnpK.
229 lbs. :; r.

150 C. C

MOTOR 8 cylinder, 150 cc, 8Va hp
TRANSMISSION' 3-speed gear shift
FUEL gravitational fuel flo of
, gas and oil mixture, 2 gal.
tank capacity, Including re reserve.
serve. reserve.
MPH up to 58 mph. J
MPO 85 mpg.
WEIGHT 187 lbs.

UNICAR, S. A.
Tel 2-0311

Finance Plan Available

125 C. C

MOTOR
TRANSMISSION
FUEL

MPH
Mpg
WEIGHT.

2 cylinder. 125 cc. V hp.
3-speed gear shift,
gravitational fuel flow of
gas and oil mixture, 2 gal.
tank capacity, Including re reserve.
serve. reserve. no to 46nph.
103 mpg.
178 lbs.

I)

! (
f 4
.V! v
A
h ft

mm

. TV''1''



PAG I FOUR

TSK F45AMA AMERICA AM PTOPPfDEWT DAILY lOCW SPA?CS
, MONDAY, JULY tl, X95I

V

I
J'"

lociai ana sin

0, Staff,

herwi&e

Box 134,
Panama

M VTf WffUfM, Bids Pft 3r.l JumU L msiU fMmftl) It LnumL
Jt miff L rivJ If uLpLmm puumm 3-0740 m 3-0741 Uwm 8.00 uj 10 turn. mtf.

FORT CLAYTON NCO WIVES HOLD SOCIAL EVENT;
PINGO PRIZES AWARDED, GUESTS WELCOMED
' Members and ruests of the Fort Clayton NCO Wives Club
' held a bingo party as their July social meeting In the ball ball-'
' ball-' room of the Clayton NCO Club.
Priie winners were Mrs. W. B. Freeze, Mrs. J. J. Ryan,
Mrs. R. E. Long, Mrs. M. H. Bryant, Mrs. G. V. Hall, Mrs. R.
H. Kinsey, Mrs. T. L. Wilcox, Mrs. E. E. Shanonn, Mrs. H. F.

Braunsteiner ana Mrs. u. j. sweius.

Mrs. William E. Hull club pres president,
ident, president, presented a farewell gift
to Mrs. Francis M. Dorsett, and
Mrs. Richard Lytle, Mrs. J. J.
Glynn, Mrs. Charles Gombers and
Mrs. Charles J. Swetits were
Introduced as guests.
Hostesses for the evening were
Mrs. Paul Hollingsworth, Mrs.
Leo P. Cameron, Mrs. Johnnie
Bullock and Mrs. J. J. Ryan.

IAWC Colon Unit
Has Meeting Today
The board meeting of the Colon
Unit of the Inter-American Wo Women's
men's Women's club was held this after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. Business to be transacted
includes the appointment of work working
ing working committees.

to members of the British Aid
Society for a cocktail party Fri Friday
day Friday evening at 6:30 at the Golf
Heights residence of' First Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of the British Embassy and
Mrs. Robin Farquharson.
Members are invited to bring
guests. Reservations should be
made with Mrs. June Lee, Pana Panama
ma Panama 3-571.

Meetings
Atlantic Camtra Club
The color division of the Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic Camera Club will hold its re regular
gular regular slide clinic at 7:45 this eve evening
ning evening in the club rooms at Mount
Hope.
The program will feature Dr.
Stephen Plank, who will present
an illustrated lecture on his re recent
cent recent ship-auto trip to South America.

JWB Art Class
The art class taught by Marty
Farbman of Fort Amador will
meet this evening at 7 at the Bal Balboa
boa Balboa USO-JWB. All enrolled stud students
ents students are reminded to be on time.

Dirksen Says Congress Won't Go
Home Without Passing Top Bills

Cristobal Women's Club
Card Party Tomorrow
, The Cristobal Woman's Club
will sponsor a public card party
tomorrow afternoon at one at the
Red Cross Building. Refresh Refreshments
ments Refreshments will be served, and prizes
awarded.
Mrs. W. Patton and Mrs. M.
Dunn are in charge of ticket
sales.

British Aid Society
Pains Cocktail Party
Invitations have been forwarded
Beginner's Spanish
Class AtJWB-USO
Meeting Tonight
' Another meeting of the USO USO-JWB's
JWB's USO-JWB's Spanish Cnss for Begin Beginners
ners Beginners is on the agenda at the
Armed Forces Service Center this
vejrng, at 7:30 p.m.
It is urged that all registered
atudents attend this class, which
Is taught by Miss Claudette Villa-franco.

AVOID
DIAPER RASH

Don't let your
baby suffer
from damp
diapers. After
every diaper
change, use

MEXANA

3rk

WASHINGTON (UP1) Senate
GOP Leader Everett M. Dirksen
said this weekend Congress would
not go home this year without
passing civil rights, housing, and
probablv a new farm bill.
The Illinois Republican said in
an interview that there was a
"real hope" that a compromise
farm bill, acceptable to both Pres President
ident President Eisenhower and the Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic Congress, could still be
worked out.
He was more certain of enact enactment
ment enactment of a housing bill to supplant
the one betoed by Eisenhower,
and "a modest civil rights bill."
These three are the hard core
legislative measures standing in
the way of congressional adjourn adjournment,
ment, adjournment, now expected in late August
or early September.
In addition, Congress must clean
up its appropriation bills, with
the big defense and foreign aid
measure the most troublesome,
and try to get action on labor re reform,
form, reform, highway financing, and
monetary policy bills.
The President specifically
named the farm, labor and high highway
way highway bills as things Congress should
do before adjournment.
Dirksen said of the housing out outlook,
look, outlook, now before a Senate subrom-miitPP-
"Wp'U not leave here

'without a bill. There'll be a lot

of soiiawblin?. but there will be a

new housine bill, even if It is ratn
er foreshortened."
He pointed out that the Senate
Judiciary Committee meets again
tomorrow when it will be con confronted
fronted confronted bv a motion to make ci civil
vil civil rirhN the pending business
for act;on. How much time the
So"thern ('onvnMert Committee
will takp depends largely on how
man" r'Rid "mendments are pro propose'',
pose'', propose'', he said.
"At h, w're eoinc o get a
modest bill," Dirksen said.

T
U
E
S
D
A
Y
9:15
P.M.

A Double Treat

BY

Double

mi

LJU

Cola

ON

S
A

T
U
R
D
A
Y
12:15
NOON

0
F
C
0
U
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S
E

"You Asked For
PANAMA'S MOST POPULAR REQUEST SHOW
AND
"Record Session'9
THE HIT TUNES OF THE DAY

Both Democratic and Republican
leaders "want" a civil rights bill
passed this year rather than in the
1960 presidential election year ses session.
sion. session. This is viewed as meaning
there will be action in this session
whether it comes first from the
House or the Senate.
On the farm bill controversy,
Dirksen said various compro compromises
mises compromises are "under exploration"
both in Congress and the execu executive
tive executive branch.
He said those concerned with the
iroblem, which embraces wheat
and tobacco bills already vetoed
by Eisenhower, must decide
whether they can develop a "rea "reasonable,
sonable, "reasonable, sound program which
looks down the road," and whether
they can "command enough
support for it."
Asked what the outlook for doing
his now, he replied: "There is a
real hope that it might still be
worked out."

Jazz Praoram To Be
Presented Aua. 6
At Balboa USO-JWB

Jazz goes to the USO-JWB Aug.
6 at 7:30 p.m., through the court courtesy
esy courtesy of the National Electric
Center.
The music will be demonstrated
on both stereo and hi-fi equip equipment
ment equipment and Sp5 Phil Jacobs of CFN
will be the moderator.
The recorded selections to be
presented cover the entire Jazz
period from New Orleans blues to
progressive Jazz.
Admission will be free, but re
servations must be made with
the JWB in order to assure enough
seats for all who plan to attend.

BAN TWO FILMS

HONG KONG (UPI -The Brig Brig-itte
itte Brig-itte Bardot film "Love is Mv Pro

fession'' and a horror film. "Blood
of. the Vanpire," have been
banned bv censors in this British
crown colony. The first was called

immoral, the second too bloody.

Fish Yarn

Answer 1a Previous Puzzle

EI
mi

ACROSS
1 Horned dace
8 Snaky nth
I Rock
12 Polynesian
chutnut
13 African worm
14 Leave out
15 Asseverate
16 Finish
1? Brood of
pheasants
i 18 Become
) 10 On who
nullifies
1 22 Female saint
(ab.)
23 Louse egg
24 Capacity
28 Corn breads
12 There

vast numbers
of fish in the
world
83 Male cat
38 Poem
38 Encountered
37 base
38 Knock
39 Pillars
42 Shrill cries
45 Ventilate
47 Chinese
musical
instrument
48 Card game
SI Diners
95 Grate
8 Courtesy title
88 Notion
59 Martian
(comb, form)
60 Dutch city
61 Harvest
62 Bridie

83 At distance

(comb.- form)
, 84 Makes,
mistakes

DOWN
1 Crustacean
2 Possess
I Shoshoneao
Indians
4 Least
(Weather
conditions
6 Eternity
7 Burdened
8 Marine fish
9 Among
10 Lateral part
II One who

(suffix)
19 Summer (Fr.)
21 Mouth part
24 Sufar-mapls
grove
25 Mountain
(comb, form)

Former Braniif Manager
Here Get New Post

r

26 Commercial"
fisheries use
huge lor
their catch
27 Pedal digits

29 Girl's name
30 Kind of
cheese
31 Skink
34 Important
food fish
40 Suverflih

41 Perch
43 Narrow inlet
44 All
46 Set anew
48 Ages i
49 Soft-finned
fish
60 Bewildered
82 German river
83 Erect
84 Enervates
87Cyprinoid flsl

ri s rZZZ
B IC" Z
r" rf5&"
UL-L-a w
HTTK if V" fllF
3 rff r-rr-
1 1 1 T5 ff!
fE::-p::
3 EG r
,i I I y I I M 11 v

0?

trouble-free
If you cannot breast feed baby,
choose a food which resembles
breast milk in nourishment, in
digestibility and in health pro protection
tection protection Lactogen.
Lactogen is an all cow's milk
formula plus vitamins A and
D and iron, and it is so easy
to prepare.
thanks to
105111
Mssy

n

Prepared
by Nettle's
specially
for
Infant
feeding

Commenting on a recent col column,
umn, column, a reaucr who signs her herself
self herself "Old Maid" writes: "It's u-

sually the unmarried child who
ends up with the responsibility
for old parents. Married ones find

excuses &la people s homes are

crowded because there aren't e e-nough
nough e-nough single children around to
look after our aged population."

I felt that Old Maid" hassome-

thing. And after checking with a

friend whose work is placement
in homes for aged, I found she
thought so, too.
But unmarried children who

find themselves exploited by

married ones have only themselves
to blame. They're so ashamed of
their single state that they be become
come become easy victims to the marri

ed brothers and sisters who say,

"We are so important to our own

families that we just can't take

any more responsibility. You're

not Important to anyone. So you

are the person to take care of

our parents."

Actually behind this plea of too
much responsibility Is resentment
of it. The married children think
this way:
"Jane has nobodv to please but

herseli while I have to please my

wife or husband and youngsters.
"Jim has nobody to spend his
money on but himself while my
family's demands on me leave
me with little. ."
But though this Is what they
think, they do not say, "We are
really just jealous of your free freedom."
dom." freedom." Instead they use words like
"duty' and "unselfishness" tode tode-nrive
nrive tode-nrive the single child of his free freedom.
dom. freedom. The single child promntly
reacts to them like bid fire horses
to the souna of the alarm bell.

. He often accepts not just the
whole responsibility for physical
care but for financial support of
his parents.
Just as he once needed to show
his brothers and sisters that he
could spit as far as they could,
he now needs to show them that
he can be as self-sacrificing as
they are.
Because married brothers and
sisters are jealous of the single
child's freedom is no reason to
spare them their share of a com common
mon common responsibility.
The single child needs to stop
feeling apologetic for his single singleness.
ness. singleness. He needs to stand up in

family council and say: "We are

all important to ourselves. Only
with this truth established can we

plan justly and co-operatively to

work out this obligation tbgeth
er."

Robert Beeth

DALLAS. Texas, July 23 The

newly-created post of Manager,

International Sales, for Braniff In

ternational Airlines will be filled
by Robert Booth, according to an
announcement by J. W. Miller,

Executive Vice President of the
airline.

Booth, former manager of Bra

niff in Colombia, and in Panama,
will have his office in the airline's
administrative headquartres here.

His Immediate responsibility will

be to develop tourist and commer

cial sales from the U.S. to the nine

Latin American countries served

by Braniff.

A specialist in international trav

el Booth joined Braniff in 1951 as

head of the company's sales staff

in Uruguay. He then served in the

U.S. as sales manager in Lot An Angeles,
geles, Angeles, until his promotion in 1956

as manaeer of Braniff in tne Jte-

public of Panama. A year later he
become manager in Colombia
when the airline inaugurated ser service
vice service to Bogota.
In Colombia, Booth' nas been a
Director of the National Tourist
Board and a member of the Board
of Directors of the American-Colombo
Chamber of Commerce. He
is Vice President of the Skal In International
ternational International Club of Colombia.

The new manager in Colombia

will be Harry Marples, who has

been Braniff manager in Ecuador.

Mraples, a 17-year veteran of com

mercial transport in Latm Amer

ica, was General Manager in the

U.S. for Aerolineas Argentines be

fore loinine Braniff in January

1958. A native of Argentina, Mar

ples speaks five languages and is
also a member of Skal Interna

tional.

fFFfCWf HELP for
ASTHMA MUCUS
Anthma and Bronchitis attack! ruin
your alaep, undermine your trenfth
and weaken your heart. Mendico
tarti to work through your blood to
overcome asthma and bronchltia At Attack.
tack. Attack. It helpa diMolve itrant; iinf mu mucus
cus mucus and promotes tree, easy breath breath-Inr.
Inr. breath-Inr. Mtndato's action is effective even
In old and stubborn cases. Get Men.
daco, from any drugstore today and
see how much better you sleep and
breath tonight, and bow much better
you will feel tomorrow, Mendtc
fights discomforts of Asthma, Bros Bros-hitis
hitis Bros-hitis and Hay Fsver.

WorldFamtms

thrvugh
Quality

Fragrant and fash,

graceful and (harming
thanks to rare

4m"TO$CA" Eau de Cologne.

A dtlightful blending of refreshing,
"4711" Genuine Eau de Cologne
with the bewitching

fragrance of
4711 "TO SC A" Perfume.

mi

L M i 1

1 i

TOSCA

EAU DE COLOGNE

i8isAn!niiiiIIliinnKiiniiiii

-Vn-.COtOOHl H IMIHL.

ibli

!w,

f

Inn. WW. w4::.'Wniia&

mmm

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written er NEA Service

NORTH 28
A10 J 6
82
A1098
J87J
WEST EAST
K42 QTS3
VQJ1088 V743
64S KB
YK2 6 8
SOUTH (D)
A J8
V AK9
QJ7
AQ109
No one vulnerable
SMth Weal North East
2N.T. Pass 1N.T. Pass
Pass Pass
Opening lead V Q

The Professor's two no-trump

opening was just the least bit

shadea but North's raise to game

had a trifle in reserve and if

everthing happened to work he
might actually have made 12
tricks. s

As it was he made nine tricks

with everything wrong. He
ducked the first heart after East
played the three spot, won the
second and played ace and an another
other another club. West was in and led

third heart which South won.

Now the diamond finese lost but
since East did not have a heart
to lead back South made one

spade, two hearts and. three tricks

in each minor suit for a total of
nine.

"Why didn't you try the dia

mond finesse right away?" asked
the student.

"I wasn't after overtneks," re

plied his mentor. "By, abandon

ing the club finesse and playing

the way I did it did not matter

who held the king of clubs. As

one- as East did not hold five

hearts my contract was entirely

safe and I was sure that was the
case, Remember, East played the
three of hearts on the first lead

of the suit,"

28

ls3HimiMj77y77Tl

The bidding has been:
it as i't
You. South, hold:
What do you do?
A.W iW Hearts. Tear
Partner sbeedd i entitle to
know abrat the heart aoa alnee
P8reail it lnviUny aba
TOOATI QWESTTON
Your partner continues with a
bid of four spades. What do yOU
do now?
' Answer Monday

ENFOftCI CURMW
KAMrALA. Uganda (UPlWPo

lice today enforced a strict cur

few on the town o' Luwero, 31

mnes norm or Kampala, to pre
vent fu ther violence in the after

math of a riot last night in

wmcn seven natives were killed.

,THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorofhy Killgalkn

H our' State .Department beads
In Washington deny they're grav

ely worried over tne explosive -tuation
in Cuba and nearby Latin-American
countries, ; theyxe
either giving out false informa

playing t ostrich, which might
prove to be a dangerous game.
U. S. Intelligence in virUally
non-existent if the gov e r n m e n t

isn't aware tnat ttussia aireaay
has bases-In Cuba, and Russian

pilots in uniform are strutting

nnanlv in Havana. Clitro-agglSiea

schemes to overthrow; Trujiilo's

reign in the Dominican Jte-nionc
has attracted revolutionaries iror;
all MTBP lltn -manv nf them are

temporarily In Miami, making

that mnrt rinv reiemnui inn-

gier -full of international-Spies
and war talk. Meanwhile, ; -Fidel
Castro is the target for so many

assassins they're apt w isu over
each other in their efforts to get
him. The Mafia want to knock
him off. so do the Batista sympa sympathizers,
thizers, sympathizers, of course, and then there
are his own disillusioned rebels rebels-just
just rebels-just for starters. He has machine
guns and other ammunition
mnnntitrl nn everv kev rooitop

near hisvbase of operations, but
the smajvmoney doubts if any
amount of precaution can change
his status as a clay pigeon.

Marlon Brando keeps revisiting
the-African Room (recently with
Rita Moreno) because it's one
place where has isnt annoyed by

the other customers. The patrons

dig drums, and they're not the
autograph collecting type. .Tomy
Martin's gin rummy winnings are
the talk of show biz. Thous Thousands
ands Thousands and thousands in ;just four
weeks, if ydu can believe the
starry-eyed reports along Broad Broadway.
way. Broadway. Horace Stoneham wduld love to
persuade Toots Shor to forsake
Manhattan where he's been hav having
ing having trouble finding a new location
and reopen his famed eatery in
San Francisco, instead. Jery
Southern is such a talented and
engaging singer she doesn't nasd
'.he dumb kind of publicity she's
going' to get if she or her man managersdoesn't
agersdoesn't managersdoesn't speak sternly to
the flacks. Silly sample: a re release
lease release alleging tht she wouldn't o o-pen
pen o-pen as scheduled at the Den in
the Duane unless the bosses

found her a suitable apartment.

(Tell that to AGVA! Besides
which, it makes her sound so un unprofessional
professional unprofessional and inefficient.)
Jaye PiiMorgan Perry Como's
substitute starting August 1 tells
chums her romance with disc
spinner Willie B. Williams is "all
over." Silly girl. .The Johnuy
Johnstons have tossed in the towel

and win make it a -Florida di divorce..,
vorce.., divorce.., .When the Colony reo reopens,
pens, reopens, small TV sets will be a a-vailable
vailable a-vailable upon request for" diners
at tables in the bar area. .Those
who've heard Pamela Mason des describe
cribe describe passages from her soon-to-be-published
book say tha unless
she's kidding, she'll have to go
into hiding for at least a year af after
ter after it hits the stands but fans cu curious
rious curious about Hollywood "lowdown
are bound to make it a best-seller.
The fake fur manufac t u r e r s
claim their biggest item for the
coed or, adventurous females of
ill ages who don't own full-length
mirrors will be ersatz muskfat
slacks.' One of the slick fashion
magazines is giving the imitation
fur trousers a big spread (what
else?) in the fall
Experts who've seen "Hercules"
(foreign-made, with dubbed voices
on the English sound track)
predict it will be a giant money moneymaker
maker moneymaker all over the world, with

Steve Reeves becoming an im

portant international star as a re

sult. interesting lob-switcn: Ca

milla Williams, companion-secretary
to Debbie Reynolds, has re

signed to handle similar chores
lor Dan Dailey. .Gwen Verdon
will star in a Playhouse 90 dra dramaa
maa dramaa non-musical next season,
with Fred Coe producing. The
show will be .taped so there'll be
no interruption of her performan performance
ce performance in ."Redhead". .Book pu publishing
blishing publishing certainly isn't as staid as
it used to be. One firm has sign signed
ed signed a skywriter to emblazon' .the
name of a new novel across the

skies over Coney Island and Jones

Beach for the rest of the summer.

TaVa a hat that fivrf-Mv Plinnlla

and Lauren Bacall will become a
lively column item when they
team up for Broadway next sea sea-inn.
inn. sea-inn. Mutual frinnrla thinlr th&v

have scads of ingredients in com

mon, ana the forecast is that
all kinds of proper chemical reac reactions
tions reactions will hp nrrmrrirtcr w h a n

they're together day after day.
Translation. Exit Noelle Adam,
who has been Sydney's favorite
for quite a long time. .,As the re

sult oi a note in this spaca,
Rose Murnhv th "f!he.r h a

gitl has been found for Juiius
Monk. Clipping in hand, she walk walked
ed walked into his Downstairs Room

readv for action. Slam stpwnrt

will accompany her on bass. It'll
1 Lam XT .T 1

uo ncr in si new xorK singing en engagement
gagement engagement in many a year.
The Luchow's scene was enough
to make a fan of old movies pal-
Bit flte with pMtemnt tha Alru.

evening. Adorning1 various tab'es

arouna tne room were such daz daz-zlers
zlers daz-zlers as Paulette Goddard, Mae
Murray. Marlenp Dietrich mH

Constance Bennett.

Balboa JWB-USO Plans Display
Of Corozal Patients' Art Work

Finger paintings, crayon
sketches, bateas, maracas, and
watercolor pictures will be a a-mong
mong a-mong the works featured in an
unusual art exhibit beginning Ju July
ly July 25 at the USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center in Bal Balboa.
boa. Balboa. All the works to be shown were

done by patients at Corozal Men Mental
tal Mental Hospital as part of the arts

and crafts program which is un

der the direction of Mrs. Lea

Lane. Recreational Therapist. The

showing is being sponsored by

the Canal Zone Art League.
Absolutely no formal training

has been had by the majority of

the patients and the works are

for the most part very primitive
and simple. Several men and
women enjoy doing individual
work and have excelled at paint painting
ing painting designs on the bateas and do

ing freehand sketches or com

pleting number paintings.

By far the most popular group
activity is finger painting. Some

have achieved very interesting

color combinations and unusual

figure formations. Others, experi

encing inner turmoils, have greif

difficulty in giving expression to

their feelings with smudges of
apint.
Patients like to paint the "ma "maracas,
racas, "maracas, which are used in the
rhythm band during dances aor
song practices. These instruments
were constructed in the Corozal
Shop.
Recreational therapy is a basic
fundamental program which pre prepares
pares prepares a patient by removing feel feelings
ings feelings of fear and aloneness to go
on to a constructive sueful pat pattern
tern pattern of life, where he can feel
he is equipping himself to make
a worthwhile contribution to so society.
ciety. society. The program, which gives the
mentally ill person and opportu opportunity
nity opportunity to express through an art
form something that he is not a a-ble
ble a-ble to express in any other way,
is financially supported through
the Canal Zone United Fund
Drive allocation to the Corozal
Recreation Therapy program.
Servicemen, their families, and
interested persons of both the
Canal Zone and the Republic of
Panama are invited to see this
display: The USO-JWB building
is open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.
for the convenience of the public.

ViMUilillJUIN I P Mi

A)

'l ' 'r- ;f Vit!
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mmmmmmmmmJLfii. t.. 't aC ,

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YOU TWO RFI ATrn- tni. t .u.i

iji vnj,iiic( x runcn airline I
hostess, fled Into Paris with a plaster bust of ancient Egyptian
Queen Kafartt t. Cheek to cheek, only the cap sets thernTpirt
The original stone sculpture of the queen is in. Cairo Muwum.l



V:-. it

MvtAY, JULY IM .'".J.
TSl FASAMA USEUCAM AN IKDE?DOZXt DAILY KXWSPAFA
FAOf HV'

4

4.

3 .(

NEW AMERICAN SHRINE TO H ISTORY -The ; Cumberland Gap, where the southwest
tip of Virginia joins-Kentucky and Tennessee, will be dedicated July 4 as a new historical
ihrine at America,, Visitors are shown looking "out over this famous pass in the Cumberland
Mountain' from the Pinnacle Observation Terrace. From this terrace, five states can be seen.
Over ,20,000 acres of forest lapd in the area have been donated to the National Park Service.

Allack On US Plane
Labeled Murderous
In Prblesl To Reds
WASHINGTON (UPI) The"
United States has charged that a
Communist jet attack on a Navy
patrol plane last month amounted
to "attempted murder ovef the
high seas."
An official U.S. protest was
lodged with the North Korean and
Chinese Communist volunteer
trmy last week for the inci incident.
dent. incident. The protest was relayed to
the Communists by the United
Nations Command at a special
meeting of the armistice commis commission
sion commission in PanmuBiom, Korea.
The Nav said last week an in inquiry
quiry inquiry had determined that the
two Russian Duilt MIG planes
flew out of North Korea 10 at attack
tack attack the four-engine patrol plane
over international waters and tnen
returned behind the Bamboo Cur Cur-tain.
tain. Cur-tain. Maj. Gen. William Biddle, sen sen-ir
ir sen-ir momhsr of the U.N. team on

th. Military Armistice Commis-

gion, delivered tne protest, n
called the attack .'flUegal and un.
provoked" and said there was no
doubt the hostile action wai "pre "premeditated
meditated "premeditated and intentional."
Aviation Eelectronics Mate 3-C
Donald Eugene Corder of Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, 111., suffered 50 shrap shrapnel
nel shrapnel wounds when the Red MIGs
swooped down on the U.S plane
over the Sea of Japan.
The protest said the U.S. plane
at no time was. over Communist
territory. It described the -flight
as a routine" reconnaissance mis mission
sion mission such as Soviet and North
Korean aircraft carry out in the
same area.
The United States warned that
its planes will continue flights
over international waters. The
Communists. It said bluntly, will
"have to bear the full conse consequences"
quences" consequences" of any future attack.
SAUD VISITS GERMANY
VENICE, Italy (UPI) King
Saud of Saudi Arabia left here
yesterday on a special train for
a vacation in West Germany. The
king had arrived here by ship on
Wednesday with a' suite of some
70 persons, including many wom women.
en. women. Most of the women proce

ed to Milan Wednesday night and

flew directly to Germany.

Glittering Beauty Of 20 s Dies
Penniless Addict In London Room

PCC Orders Slash

In Bepeii-Siaies
Phone Call Charges

WASHINGTON (UPI) A fed

eral asency has issued an order

calculated to save Americans so

million dollars in long distance
telephone charges each year.

The Federal Communications
Commission (FCC) has orders!
the Bell Telephone System to re

duce its rates by this amount on

calls of more than 300 miles in

distance.

However, the order affects only
telephone calls between states.
The FCC said anecific rates

would be announced in the near

future and would be in effect
about mid-Seotember of this year.

No precise reason for the order
was mven by the FCC, but it was
reported based on improved earn earnings
ings earnings on the Bell System's inter

state long-distance business in re
cent years.

The last change in charges oc occurred
curred occurred on Oct. l, 1953, when the
FCC permitted an I per cent hike
designed to bring in 65 million
dollars more a year.
The FCC said its order was the
rWult of discussions it initiated

with the American Teleohone and

1aI.m..L iiwn,

ieiegipii 10. (Aii) in a con

tinuing review of interstate opera

tions of the Bell Systemi. ATT

owns the Bell System.

The commission also said it

plans to continue its studies of
interstate long-distance telephone

rates and trends and will observe
Hie effects of the new rates on
the Bell System's earnings.

- o

LONDON, July. 27 (UPI)
Brenda Dean Paul, the glitter glittering
ing glittering "bright young thing" of the
roarina: 20s whose beauty stun

ned all of Europe, died last

night penniless, starving, and
a narcotics addict.
The daughter of' wealthy Sir
Aubrey Dean Paul began whirl whirling
ing whirling t.hrnnoh international so

ciety and newspaper headlines

when she was only lo.
She become an actress and

her beauty had scores 'of men

at her feet.

That was how it was whfen
she was young. But last night
one of her few remaining
friends found Miss Paul dead
in the bed of her seamy third-

floor flat. She was 49.

Guilty Conscience
Not Enough To Gel

Chlcapoan Convicted

CHICAGO (UPI) For five

years, Edmund crimen was
haunted by the belief he killed, a
boy.

He knew he was driving near

the scene when James Adamczyk,

13, ws struck and, killed by an

auto July 5, 1954.
He knew h's car matched a de

scriotion of the death car and he

was unable o fi"r out how the

front bumper of his car became

demM.
But he had been drinking

O'Brien exolained n felony court
Friday, and couldn't .remember

bJWne the boy.
So for five years, the 39-year

old "nemnloye' mpn Vnt the
haunt'n fear locked within his

cof'ence.
The worry became o intense
thf h Wain irritable and his
wife, violet. Wt him two years
am. Vintr Hip'- tv children.

O'Brien f'npllv turned himself

int noli" ,T"i ""' Emitted

striking the AHumezvk bov.

But .Tnf Walter J. KowalsH

'reed .O'Brien today because of

lack of evidence.

"WerV man wM want 'o
conf"' '' esn't "'I hel
him." KowahVi "We can't
nono'em er ee.dw. iv1" "'
if you did it, but we don't know

if you did or not."

Only last month Miss Paul's

landlady complained in court

that Miss Paul was a "public

nuisance1' and the former beau

ty was ordered to vacate by

Oct. l.

Police said that although Miss

Paul died of a heart attack,

there was a supply of narcotics

In her room. The actress, dub

bed "the bright young thing"
by European newspapers In the
1920's, took to narcotics after

undergoing an operation in

1930.

Miss Paul took several futile
"cures" and was in and out of
jails for years. Her degradation

seemed to be complete when in
1953 she wrote a public letter

that said:

"To be forced for a whole

lifetime to appear in court jon
charges of unpaid debts, to go
to prison, at times to starve,

and at best to live on the
grudging charity of a few loyal
friends, is hell unimaginable.
"I don't want to die. But I
can't go on living in disgrace
and .being .misrepresented."

! t J L?" '
W : H
fit H
V V ; I
. x' jj A
V,

Embezzler To Gel Oul

On GoodXonducf

ATLANTA (UPI) Mrs.
Margaret Burton will be released
from the Reidsville state prison
Aug. 9, ending almost a year and
a half in jail jor embezzling $186, $186,-000
000 $186,-000 from a medical clinic.

Asst. Stat Corrections Director

J. B. Hatchett said today Mrs

Burton, alias Janet-Gray, has

served one yeifind five month

of her two to five-year sentence.

which under state law is sufficient

time to win a mandatory eondt

tional release. He laid she was

considered a model prisoner.
Hatchett said authorities in Nor

folk, Va.. and San Antonio. Tex..

have dropped detainers against her

for embezzlement and larceny.
But he said Los Angeles authori authorities
ties authorities want to bring Mrs. Burton to

trial on six counts of grand theft
Hatchett said his office has sub submitted
mitted submitted a waiver of extradition to
Mrs. Burton in the California eases
but that she has refused to sign it.
Mrs. Burton ,ws convicted In
DeKalb County, Ga., on charges
of mbezzllng iunds from the clinic
where she worked as a trusted
and highly-respected bookkeener.
She was tried aster a chase that
ended in Oklahoma.

Mi w ...
"Sl'- L. ... B,
, 1 l
Y
ill.1 N i
! .1 f m" I In

CHARLES HILL of the roads and grounds section US Army
Caribbean Engineers, is retired after 35 years Federal service.
Durin this time Hill has served with the US Army, the Pan

Canal Company and has had continuous employment with the j

USARCARIB Engineer section since 1B41. He retirea as a ieaaer
paver of the roads and grounds section. Congratulating Hill
on his retirement is Col. S. G. Spring, USARCARIB Engineer,
while Lt Col. Donald F. Rogers, left, looks on. Hill lives at 11,
4th of July Avenue, Panama City with his wife and three
young daughters (US Army Photo)

Mississippi Farmer Seeking
Housekeeper; May Get Wife

! GOING OUT "-c After almost!
jhalf a trillion printings this,
'face of former New York gov-'

ernor Dewitt Clinton soon will
go out of circulation. Reason:
Treasury Department has freed
tobacco companies from placing
on cigarette packages the blue
tax stamp bearing his picture.

o

OXFORD, Miss. -(UPI) A
70-year-old farmer said today he
only wanted a housekeeper and
aot a wife with five children.
The widower cotton planter,
L. G. Lynch Sr.. said he was the
victim of an international mis

understanding but the first memb
of the family, Edith Mans, 12,
already has left her home at
Reusrath, Germany, bound for
Mississippi. Her mother, Mrs.
Astrld Mans, and the rest of the
family plan to leave shortly.
Edith left under the impression
Lynch would marry her widowed
mother aner adopt the children.
Her-lathet' died' in 1957.

"Buf Lynch,' when he heard of

the family s plan this weekend
said "There's nothing to any of it
There's no marriage intended, I'm

Bickering Over Ticket Allotments
Jars Democrat Convention Planning

''r
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tr V1

CBS

00(33003

r j.i ? .a i

9

WSfM GOG30 or?
03 033

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Democratic National Committee
is at loggerheads with the Cali California
fornia California group which helped lure
the 1960 Democratic National Con Convention
vention Convention to Los Angeles. The dis dispute
pute dispute involves allotment of a big
bloc of convention seats.
Although party officials here
hope the disagreement, will be
settled soon, the dispute has de delayed
layed delayed the signing of a, contract
for the convention. The National
Committe voted last Febff to
hold the convention at Los An Angeles.
geles. Angeles. , i
Speaking for the two parties are
Paul M. Butler, chairman of the
National Committee, and Edwin
W. Pauley, treasurer of the-bipartisan
Los Angeles Host Com;
mittee, which bid for both the
Democratic and Republics Con Conventions.
ventions. Conventions. Pauley is a former
member and treasurer of the Na National
tional National Committee.
As the dispute is reported here,
Pauley has insisted with table-

pounding emphasis that he was
given a commitment that 5,000
tickets for convention seats would

be allotted to the host committee.

He also was said to have inflated
that he could not raise the $350
000 cash bid for the convention

unless he has the 5,000 tickets to
distribute to contributors.

Th host committee originally

asked for 6.000 seats s request

which was rejected. The Butler

side of the argument is tnat
Pauley was not promised any
specific number of tickets but
that the question was left for

settlement in future negotiations.

Butler has offered the host com

mittee 1,500 tickets.

He also has denied that tne

dispute could lead to the selection
of another city for the convention.
A National Committee spokesman
said party headquarters ''does not
even have a plan to explore the
possibility' of choosing another

convention site.
Butler was understood to be
convinced that Norris Poulson,
Republican Mayor of Lei Angeles
and chairman of the host com

mittee, was willing to settle on

terms satisfactory to tne national
Committee. i ;
A highly placed California
Democrat ssld that he expects the
dispute to be settled but that he
Is sure: other Califomlans will
raise the 1350.000 if the host com

mittee fails to do so. This ssme

Democrat, who is not directly in involved
volved involved in the r argument, said the

National Committee cannot possi

bly allot as many -as 5,000 tickets
to the host committee.
Although no final decisions have

been made on the seating layout
for the convention, party officials

believe the new Los Angles Con Convention
vention Convention Hall will provide a maxi

mum of 16,000 seats.
Of these, about 4,500 would be

reserved for delegates and alter alternates
nates alternates and an equal number for
party bigwigs, press, radio and
television and members of the

"750 Club." Two seats have been

promised to each Democrat who

loins the "750 Club" by contri contributing
buting contributing $1,000 to help pay off the
party's debts.
By this calculation, there would
be about 7,000 seats available for
spectators and Pauley wants 5,000.

just trying to get somebody to

Keep house tor me.
The apparent mixup began when
Edith wrote a letter to Santa
Claus last Christmas, asking him
to bring a new father for her and
the children. The letter was mailed
to Santa Claus, Inc.
Mrs. Mans said Lynch replied
to the letter and gave a tentative
proposal of marriage. "I must say
I was shocked when I got the
letter," she said.
After an exchange of letters,
the German woman said, Lynch
Surprised the family with a person
al visit last April. Mrs. Mans said
she accepted the proposal and
preparations were started to move
the family to the United States.
Lynch tells a different story.
He said he was looking for a
housekeeper for some time and
met Mrs. Mans on his visit to
Germany. He said she agreed to
be his housekeeper and he planned
to adopt two of her small sons.
He opposed taking in the other
children, including 12-year-old
Edith. Since the matter was
publicized, he said, he might refuse
to have any of them.
"Its a shame a 70-year-old
farmer can't, by golly, get some somebody
body somebody to keep his house for him
without a lot of people trying to
nose, into his business,' he said.
Lynch was asked what he
would do if the entire family were
to come to Oxford.
"If this thing keeps stirring up

I'll shlr them back to Germany.'
he said. "I don't appreciate this
great notoriety."

1 r lit J trv )
VS. .JT-r.

STRANGE With Its odd, off off-center
center off-center dial, this watch may be
perfect for people who .think
the morning drags while the
afternoon just flies by. It was
shown at a watchmaker's ex ex-albition
albition ex-albition to Paris.

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Oa PANAMA AMERICAN Alf JMUT MlDJUtT PittT. WWPiFP
MONDAY, JTXY 17, 1951
Braves Win 2 To Jump Sick 1
Fishf
LEADING
HITTERS

FAG I SIX

Fading Yankees Lose 1-0
To Drop 9 Game Off Pace
By FRED DOWN
NEW YORK, July 27 (UPI) The Bravei are
coming and the Yankees may be yone.

.v, Editor; CONRADO SARGCANT
(Bsod en 250 official at bats)
National League
r

I s
5..

1
4? I
'7. if.
i'T

That's the trend of tie pennant
races today as the straining de

fending champions struggle 10 or organize
ganize organize late-season drives. It looks
like the Braves are going to
make a fight of it. But there's
do sign that the Yankees can
snap out of the coma that now
has them drifting out of the race.
The Braves, bouncing back
from a seven-game losing streak,
ran their winning streak to four
games Sunday when they beat
the Pittsburgh Pirates, 4-0 and
2-1. They're now only two per percentage
centage percentage points behind second second-place
place second-place Los Angeles and two
games behind first place San
Francisco.
The Yankees, meanwhile, suf suffered
fered suffered a 1-0 loss to Frank Lary
and the Detroit Tigers and fell
one game below .500, nine games
behind the Cleveland Indians, who
took over first place with a 9-0
and 4-3 sweep of the Washington
Senators. The Yankees' problems
were further complicated by the
news that first baseman Bill
Skowron is lost for the season
with a broken wrist.
The Chicago Cubs scored a 7-3
rictory over the Giants, the Dodg Dodgers
ers Dodgers whipped the St. Louis Cardi Cardinals,
nals, Cardinals, 8-2, and the Philadelphia
Phillies beat the Cincinnati Reds,
6-3, after a 4-2 loss in other Na National
tional National League games.
The Baltimore Orioles knock knock-Ad
Ad knock-Ad the White Sox out of first
place, 4-0, after Chicago won
the first game, 4-1, and the
Kansas City Athletics ran their
winning streak to seven games
with a 5-4 decision over the
Boston Red Sox in tho other
American League games.
Warjen Spahn tossed the 47th
shutout of his career and won his
13th game of the season in the
first game and then Bob Buhl
gained his seventh win for Mil Milwaukee
waukee Milwaukee in the nightcap. Johnny
Logan'! two-run homer was the
clinching blow of the first game
while the Braves' winning run in
the nightcap came on a walk.
Hank Aaron's single, an error
and an infield out.
Lary, who has beaten the Yan Yankees
kees Yankees four times this year and is
20-5 over them lifetime, pitched
an eight-hitter and struck out sev seven.
en. seven. Art Ditmar matched seroes
wih the Alabama Bulldog for
nine innings but the Tigers won
inj the 10th when pinch-hitter Neil
Chrisley's two-out single drove in
Gail Harris. Yankee relief ace
Ryne Duren lost his third deci decision.
sion. decision. Ernie Banks hit a two-run hom homer
er homer and pitcher Bob Anderson sin singled
gled singled home, two runs for the Cubs
who dealt San Francisco's Mike
MjcCormick his eighth defeat.
Willie Mays' two-run homer was
th,e big blow for the Giants.
Don Drysdale pitched a seven seven-hfyter
hfyter seven-hfyter and hit a two-run homrr
as he won his 13th game for the
Dodgers. Charlie Neal had a
homer and two singles and Duke
Snider also had two hits in the
Dodgers' 15-hit attack on Dick
Ricketts and two successors.
George Crowe hit a two-run hom homer
er homer for St. Louis.
Jerry Lynch and Willie Jones
hit homers to spark an eight-hit
attack that brought Brooks Law
rence his sixth win but then
SERVICE CENTER

COCO SOLO Air-Conditioned 7.00
BRADFORD DILLMAN 4 DEAN STOCKWELL
"COMPULSION"

ADDED ATTRACT! ON

PATTERSON vs. JOHANSSON FIGHTI
Tuesday "No Place To Land"

BALBOA THEATRE 6:75 8.45
AIR-CONDITIONED!

LANA TURNER 1
SANDRA DEE
ROBERT ALDA
EARL GRANT
ting

Tuesday "Machete"

DIABLO HTS. 7:00
e Richard Eyer
"JOHNNY ROCCO"
Tiies. 'The Purple Plain"
PARAISO 7:00
Santa

"Ball Out At
43,000" and
'Flame Barrier1

I WANT
TO LIVE
TODAY
TIVOLI
35e.
20e.
Spanish Program!
8 tECCIONES IE
' AMOR
; Also;
FLOR DE MAYO
with Maria Felix

Gene Conley pitched a seven-hitter
for his ninth triumph to earn
the Phillies a split. Gene Freese
hit his 13th homer and Richie
Ashburm had four singles to lead
the Phillies' 14-hit attack.
Rookie iim Perry pitched a
two-hitter "and Wood it Held hit
two homers for the Indians in
the first game and the Tribe
won the 12-inning nightcap
when Minnie' Minoso doubled
and scored on Jim Baxes' tin-)-
Jim Grant picked up his sixth

win for Cleveland in the second
game while Pedro Ramos went
all the way for the Senators to
suffer his 12th loss. Rocky Cola-
vito hit his 30th homer for the
Indians in the second t game.
Early Wynn pitched a two hit hitter
ter hitter to run the White Sox winning
streak to five games but then
Milt Pappas turned in a five-hitter
than snapped the Orioles' los losing
ing losing streak at six games. Al
Smith's three-run homer was the
big blow for the White Sox in the
first game. Bob Nieman has four
hits and Gene Woodling a homer
for the Orioles.
Harry Chiti snapped a 4-4 tie
with a homer in the eighth inning
as Kansas City's Ray Herbert
won his 10th game. Earlier Ted
Williams had hit his eighth hom homer
er homer of the year and the 490th of
his career for Boston.
Yankess Lose
Bill Skowron
For Season
DETROIT, July 27 (UPI)-New-York
Yankee pennant hopes, al already
ready already badly bettered, suffered
another jolt today with the loss of
first baseman Bill Skowron for
the rest of the season.
Skowron, the team's leading
runs-batted-in slugger while in
action, suffered a broken left
wrist Saturday when he collided
with baserunner Coot Veal of De Detroit.
troit. Detroit. It was his first play In the
field since returning from an ab
sence caused by an injured back
The Yankees placed Skowron
on the disabled list Sunday, leav
ing them one man below the 25
man limit and thus giving them themselves
selves themselves room to add one player for
the now desperate struggle to
save the pennant.
The Yankees made one other
change Sunday they purchas purchased
ed purchased pitcher Gary Blaylock from
the St. Louis Cardinals for the
$20,000 waiver price and sent
pticher Jim Bronstand down to
Richmond of the International
League. Both are righthanders.
Skowron entered Saturday game
as a pinch-hitter and struck out.
He took over first base in the
next inning. On the first play
Veal grounded to third baseman
Hec Lopez, who threw wildly to
first for nis third error of the
game. Skowron stabbed for the
errant throw and Veal slammed
into his arm, causing the injury.
THEATERS TODAY
runic insert

Imitation

otiite
JUANITA MOORE MAHALIA JACKSOW

a Oniversaunternational picture

MARGARITA 7:00
Lloyd Bridges
"APACHE WOMAN"
fTues. 'The Girl Can't Help It'
Cms 7:001
ICamp Blerd 7:00
V E R T I G O"
eoteg

CARITOLIO
35c. . 20c.
PARTY GIRL
with Robert Taylor
- Also:
FRONTIER
RANGER
with Keith Larsen

VICTORIA
tie. 15e.
GUNFIGHT IN
TOMBSTONE
with Mark Stevens
- Also:
ROUGH RIDE TRAIL
with Jim Davis

C AB
94 383
92 339
89 283
96 356
82 277
97 393
97 390
90 324
98 399
97 372

R H Pet.
67 139 .363
53 115 .339
39 96 .339
73 119 .334'
36 90 .325
67 12T .323
65 125 .321
63 103 .318
73 122 .306

Aaron, Mil
White, St. L
Cham, St. L
Robinson, Cinci
Logan, Mil
Temple, Cinci
Cepeda, SF
Gilliam, LA
Neal, LA
Banks, Chi
61 114 .306
American League
C AB R
66 256 45
92 364 64
90 288 41
96 396 51
81 315 53
91 358 56
95 387 78
76 290 40
74 282 39
89 338 63
91 331 67
H Pet
Maris, KC
Kuenn, Det
Woodling, Bait
Fox, Chi
Kaline, Det.
Runnels, Boston
Power, Cleve
Kubek, NY
Skowron, NY
Mantle, NY
Jensen, Bos
88 .344
125 .343
98 .340
132 .333
105 .333
115 .321
118 .305
87 .300
84 .298
100 .296
98 .296
Runs Batted In
NATIONAL LEACUI
Banks, Cubs 92
Robinson, Reds 88
Aaron, Braves 79
Bell, Reds TO
Mathews, Braves 70
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Killebrew, Senators 80
Colavito, Indians 74
Jensen, Red Sox 72
Maxwell, Tigers 67
Lemon, Senators 63
Allison, Senators 63
Home Runs
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Mathews, Braves 29
Banks, Cubs 27
Aaron, Braves 24
Robinson, Reds 24
Hodges, Dodgers 19
Cepeda, Giants 19
AMERICAN LEAGUE ,v
KiUebrew, Senators 32
Colavito, Indians 30
Allison, Senators 26
Triandos, Orioles 22
Maxwell, Tigers 22
Lemon, Senators 22
LEADING
PITCHERS

t (Based en 12 er more decisions)
" W L Pet.
Face, Pirates 14 6 1.000
Antonelli, Giants 14 5 ;737
Mizell, Cards 11 5 .688
Drysdale, Dodgers 13 6 .684
Newcombe, Reds 10 t .667
AMERICAN LEAGUE
McLish, Indians 13 3 .813
Shaw, White Sox 8 3 .750
Pappas, Orioles 11 5 .688
Wynn, White Sox 13 6 .684
Mossi, Tigers 8 4 .667

Sports Briefs
REUBEN VARGAS MARRIES
PORTLAND, Ore. (UPI) -Reuben
Vargas, Mexican heavyweight
married Mary Tabarez of San
Francisco Friday. Vargas suffered
a sixth round technical knockout
at the hands of Eddie Machen
here Wednesday night.
49rs OPEN CAMP
MORAGA, Calif. (UPI) The
San Francisco Forty Niners open
training camp practice today with
16 veterans and 30 rookies on
hand. There will be 15 more vet
erans reporting Aug. 2 and five
additional rookies showing up aft
er the College All-Star game in
uucago.
I TODAY ENCANTO-35-20
Kenneth More in
"A Night To Remember"
Harry Kruger in
"The One That Got Away"
Po R I V E -1 n"1
60c.
TAfiAV 7:00
I
I
30c
run 9:00
A GREAT PICTURE!
GERALD MOHR
Mamie Van DOREN in
"GUNS, GIRLS AND
GANGSTERS"
I
I
4
Tomorrow
I
I
ACTION PICTURE!
ALAN LADD
Diane FOSTER In
J "THE DEEP SIX" J
'THE DEEP SIX'
- TODAY
RIO
.S5 0.20
7th VOYAGE OF
SINBAD
Kerwln Mathews
. AWo: -ME
AND THE
COLONEL
Danny Kaye

FAVORITE WINS The Haras Carlnthla'i classy colt Plccolino scoots across the finish line
a. little more than A length ahead of Puerto Madero in the $2500 added seven furlong Re Republic
public Republic of Peru Classic yesterday afternoon at the President Remon racetrack. Heliodoro Oua Oua-tlnes
tlnes Oua-tlnes rode Plccolino, an odds-on mutuels favorite, while Braulio Baeza had the leg up on run run-nerup
nerup run-nerup Puerto Madero. It was Piccolinio'i fifth win in eight starts, finishing second in the
other three.
Plccolino Races To Victory
In Republic Of Peru Classic

IF
iafeiiffr'''itMii

CLASSX XOLTnkTracIc manager Pablo A. Thayer poses In the
winner's circle with classy three-year-old' colt Plccolino after
the latt,ejs post-to-post victory in the $2500 added seven fur furlong
long furlong Republlo of Peru Classic. The Haras Carlnthla colt, which
got a good ride from Heliodoro Gusttnes, Is one of the many
successful importations made by Thayer from Argentina.

-:'------i1ii,ii,,mm,.ii,, lTr- -Tr---- mm I

YCAZA AT RACETRACK Manuel Ycaza, the present sensaf
tion of New York's tracks, chats With President Remon -racetrack
manager Pablo A, Thayer during a visit to the local oval
last Saturday. Ycaza promised local fans to do his best to
come to Panama to ride in the $10,000 Panama Independence
Day Classic on Nov. 3.

.mm

GOING DOWN Panama bantamweight champion Edwin Sykes
goes down for a mandatory elght-courtt in the fourth-round
of last night's scheduled ten-rounder which he took on a
seventh-round TKO from Cuban Manuel Armenteros. Sykes,
who was sent to the canvas for the second time In the sixth;
Inflicted a cut over the visitor's right eyebrow near the end' of
the sixth. Boxing Commission medico Dr. Manuel Ferrer stop stopped
ped stopped the bout before the seventh started because of the serious seriousness
ness seriousness of the wriund, Armenteros, Who protested bitterly that the
cut was the result of butt, was leading on all of the officials'
scorecards when the light was .halted (Photo McCleaa)

v V

The Haras Carinthia's classy
Piccolino was sent out an odds-

on mutuels choice to win the $2, $2,-500
500 $2,-500 added seven furlong Repub
lic of Peru Classic for imported
three-year-olds yesterday after
noon at th President Remon
racetrack and he did not let his
backers down. Piccolino scored a
one-length victory over second fa
vorite Puerto Madero.
Miss Brunette, unbeaten in sev
en previous stars, finished third.
four lengths behind Puerto Ma Madero.
dero. Madero. Rev Belot garnered the
short end of the purse while Dou Double
ble Double Dee finished fifth and Stavro
wound up last.
Piccolino easily outsprinted the
opposition and held a three
length lead all the way around
to the final furlong where Puer Puerto
to Puerto Madero moved up menacingly
and get to within three-yearters
of a length of the winner but He Heliodoro
liodoro Heliodoro Gustines, up on Piccolino,
went to the whip and his mount
responded to score by a clear
length.
" -. AUAlllJLKa
was a creditable 1:26 4-5 for the
seven nanels over a ilnw trv
Piccolino paid $3.40 to win and
rne quinieia wwn jruerto Madero
returned $4.20.
Gustiaes also scored with Gong
and Palave to share xaddu hnn.
ors with leading jockey Braulio
Baeza Who broucrht horn Ft.
ban, Montesco and Bob first. The
latter scored a post-to-post half-
lengm inumpn over Mi Deseo.
Zia naid the best the win divi
dend $37.80 in the fourth race.
xne oest payoc, however, was
the eleventh rar. nne-twn fNH.
rey-Dofia Flora) which nade
some rans 8s.eo ncner.
The dividends:
FIRST It ACS
Salale $8.20, $4.80
Meteor Lady $5.80
SICOND RACE
Gong $4., $2.60
Reina Negra $2.40
, First Double: $15.
THIRD RACI
Silvana $5.40, $3.20
Golden Tab $5.80
FOURTH RACI
Zia $37.80, $5.60
Pilluelo $2.80
Quinieia: $14.
1
2
FIFTH RACI
Rsteban (excluded from bet
Naranjazo $4.10, $2.80
Julie $4.40
1
ting)
2
8
SIXTH RACI
Montesco $3.20, $2.40
Last Moment $3.20
1 --
2
SIVINTH RACI
Palave $3.60, $2.80
Michaux $3.40
Second Deuble: $4.40
IIGHTH RACI
Piccolino $3.40, $2.60
Puerto Madero $3.
Quinieia: $4-20
. NINTH RACI
Coltro $5.20, $3.60
Lobo $4.80
One-Twei $25.40
,TI NTH RACI
Bob $2.40
place betting
1
2
1
2
I
t
No
ILiyiNTH RACI
Nedrey $8. $5.
Dona Flora $7.20
OneTwe: $81.40
1
2
7
YACHTS VII FOR CUP
SANDHAMN, Swedeon (UPtl -The
American yacht Sabre and
Sweden's Rush V meet today n
their decisive race for the Gold
Cup Sailing Regatta champion championship.
ship. championship. Each yacht has scored two
victories In the event that was
won by Sabre last yea.

Katlonal leagm i
TEAMS q'tf' L.Pct. Ci:.:
San Prsnclsco S5 43 M
Les Anfleles 55 4i J4S ltt
Milwaukee .51 43 .543 J
Chicago 4 4 JOS. 5Vi
Pittsburgh 49 49 .500
St. Leuis 47 50 .485 TVi
Cincinnati : 43 54 .443 lift
Philadelphia 40 M .417 14
Today! Gamei f
Pittsburgh at MilwaukeV ;
St. Louis at Cincinnati (N)'r"
Only games scheduled.
Yesterday'i Results
(First Gsme)
Pittsburgh 000 000 0000 I I
Milwaukee 110 002 OOx 4 0
Friend (4-18), Porterfield and
Burgess.
Spahn (13-10) and Lopata.
(Second Game)
Pittsburgh 000 100 0001 8 1
Milwaukee 010 100 OOx 2 5 3
Witts (0-7), Face and Kravltr.
Buhl (7-6), McMahon and Cran Cran-dall.
dall. Cran-dall. (First Gme)
Philadelphia 100 100 000 J T 0
Cincinnati 020 001 lOx 4 8 0
Roberts (9-0) and Sawatskl.
Newcombe, Lawrence (6-9) and
Bailey.
(Second Game)
Philadelphia 011 012 100-6 14 0
Cincinnati 000 003 000-3 T 0
Conley (9-6) and Lonnett.
O'Toole (2-4), Pena, Acker,
Brosnan and Ddtterer.
Chicago 022 030 0007 10 0
San Frahcisco 100 200 0003 S 1
Anderson (7-7) and Averill.
McCormick (9-8), Sanford, Fish Fisher
er Fisher and Landrith.
St. Louis 000 002 0002 7
ix)s Angeles 124 000 Olx 8 15 0
Ricketts (1-6), Urban, Stone
and Smith.
brysdale (13-6) and Pignatano.

MWIimillUliWMIIWIlWIII II M-P I' f II -U IWlll)toJIMyiuilMIMWIUMlM

EAST MEETS WEST Soviet athlete Taisia Chenchlk chats with

American trackman Fred Timcoe
In Philadelphia.
PANAMA

FILL YOVR ISEtiDS!

'C5

. American Leatme
TIAMS
Cleveland
W L Pet
54 58
54 40 .583
49 49 VJ00
48 49 .495
48 51 .485
44 49 .484
43 54 v!43
40 55 .421
GK-
Chicago
Baltimore
411
9
ia-:
10
m
New York
Detroit
Kansas City
Washington
Boston
Today's Games
Boston at Cleveland (N) 1
Baltimore at Detroit
Waahington at Kansas Cdty-(N)
Only games scheduled.
Yesterday's Results
(Wirt ftiaul
Baltimore 000 000 0011 I
Chicago 000 300 10x-r4 8 1
rorioearrero (1-6), Hoeft and
Triandos.
Wynn (18-6) and Lollar.
(Second Game)
Baltimore inn ona wi a m a
Chicago 000 000 0000 5 0
Pappas (11-5) and Triandos.
Latman (2-4), Moore, Ariaf
and Romano.
(First Game)
Washington 000 000 0000 2 0
Cleveland 210 000 15x- 9 0
.1
Griggs (2-7), and Naragon.
Perry (6-2) and Nixon. I
(Second Game)
Wash. 000 201 000 000-8 6 1
Clevp. 300 000 000 0014 9 1
Ramos (10-12) and Naragon.
Locke, Grant (6-4) and Nixon,
Fitzgerald.

(Ten Innings)
New York 000 000 000 0-0 8 0
Detroit 000 000 000 11 8 2 -Ditmar,
Duren (1-3) and Eer-
ra.
Lary (ll-T) and Berberet.
Boston 020 000 110-4 8' i ""
Kansas City 100 021 01x-5 8 1 ;
Brewer, Delock (6-6) and White,
Daley.
Herbert (10-7), Coleman and ":
Chiti.

at the U.S.-U.SB.R. track meet
AMERICAN

Mil

ii
f
4

1 1

.4



MONDAY, ICU n, 1951

TBI TAXWJk AMCXICAN AN IKDEfJKDEKI DAILY S1WSTITIM

r.

, r J
ft f K' f r II
I : V' '.V
J !! f f
I 1. 1

RECUPERATING RED Red Schoer.dlenst, recovering from tu tuberculosis,
berculosis, tuberculosis, took batting, practice and played catch wlh team teammates
mates teammates when the slumping Milwaukee club visited Busch Sta Stadium
dium Stadium in St. Louis. The veteran second baseman plans to rejoin
the Braves in September when he is fully recovered.

By OSCAR FRALEY

Two IL Players Hit
Bullets During Celebration

By MILTON HCHMAN
"
NEW YORK, July iff (UPI)
Pop bottles and beer cans, okay,
but slightly; nervous International
Leaguers said today-they'll take
a raincheck on" those flying bul

lets. Many International League

players voiced i marked reluc reluctance
tance reluctance today- about 'returning .; to
Havana wbert twe-of tbtm were

shot by celebrating rebel soldiers
Saturday night during a game
between the Cuban Sugar Kings
and Rochester Red Wings.
f Rochester infielder Frank Verdi
was struck by a stray bullet a a-bove
bove a-bove the right' temple and short shortstop
stop shortstop ; Leonardo Cardenas of the
Sugar Kings was winged oa the
right arm.

by
Dan Daniel

NEW YORK (UPI) Fearless
Fraley's facts and figures:
If you wondered what happened
to Hoyt Wilhelm, the Baltimore
pitcher who was sailing along
with nine straight victories and
then lost five of his next s i x
games, the answer is that oppos opposing
ing opposing hitters smartened up and be-
fan "slapping" at his knuckle
all instead of taking a free swin.
Nine out of every 10 pitches he
was throwing were knucklers and
the hitters began timing and cuff cuffing
ing cuffing his slow atuff. To. gci him
to throw moret fast balls...he 8
hoping that more of a mixture
will get Wilhelm in a winning
groove once again...
Sonny Liston, who battles Nino
Valdfts at Chicago on Aug 5 in a
televised beut, talks more Me
the number one challenger in instead
stead instead of a man who stands fourth
In a dot-too-impressive line, lis liston
ton liston saw la theater showing ot the
bout in which Ingemar- Johansson
kayoed Floyd Patterson for. trie
title : and has harsh words for
both of them.
SPOKEN LIKE A TIGER
"Now I, know for sure why that
manager of Patterson's is so

about opppnentsi ne assenea.
"Patterson didn't show nothin
and couldn't take a puch, either.
Johansson's got nothing m 'his
jab and ail he did was get In,
one Jucky punch. r
spoked tike a true tiger...
The slugging power of the Wasti
Ington Senators has drawn raves
this eason on the home run efforts-
of Killer Killebrew Bob Al Al-lisoivJim
lisoivJim Al-lisoivJim Lemon and Roy ; Sie Sie-versi
versi Sie-versi But Al Lopez, Chicago White
Sox Snanaget,- also praises their
pitching with the accent on -Cv
mno,Bascual. He claims Pascual
has the best curve ball in the
league and a good fast ball to go
with it.
Which proves that- the senor is
an appreciative man. The White
Sox won. on and lost' one against
Pascual: But in his winning effort
he lasted only six innings and
when Chicago beat him they rai raided
ded raided him for nine; hits...Lopez ob

viously would like to see more ot

Camilo s curves...
NASHUA WAS FAVORITE
Trainer Sunny Jim Fltzsim

mons, who celebrated his 85th

birthday this week, finally hint'

ed that in the long cavalcade of

thoroughbreds he handled his fa favorite
vorite favorite was Nashua. He admitted

that his greatest thrill was Na

shua's match race victory over

Swaps and pointed out that Na

shua first Sl&ite Shea instion-and-answeresH

of the majors intends to expand

Kenneland and

BECERRA'S VISION OKAY
MEXICO CITY (UPI) Doc Doctor's
tor's Doctor's at the military hospital hern
said Friday that bantamweight
champion Jose Becerra is in per perfect
fect perfect health and that his vision is
absolutely unimpaired. It was pre previously
viously previously believed Becerra had suf suffered
fered suffered triple vision due to a blow
during his title fight with Al Al-rhonse
rhonse Al-rhonse Halimi of France

money" to the

Saratoga sales... -. ;
What with such former fisti

cuffers as Rocky Gluziano. Abe

Simon. Lou Nova and Tony Ga?
lento hamming it up in the enters
tainment world, it figured that

former v middleweight champion

jaKe L,amoua woum make a de determined
termined determined bid.' He currently ap appearing,
pearing, appearing, as "Big Julie" in "Guys
and Dolls" at the Hudson Theater-in-the-Park
and it's a sad com

mentary: that Lloyd Bridges
knocks him out with one slut ..
Elsewhere in the entertainment

worja, rKmeman" Chuck Con Connors
nors Connors will appear at the- New York
Yankee Old Timers' Dav at the

Stadium Aug.. 8. This': is really
milking the. attendance dollar
what with Connors having played
for the Chicago Cubs in 1951, hit hitting
ting hitting .239 in 66 games.
The Yankees announce that he
.Played briefly as a Dodger in
19if very' briefly, might be
added. He appeared in one same
and hit .000...
The New York City Depaitment
of Public : Events will present n n-gemar
gemar n-gemar Johansson with a perpe perpe-tual
tual perpe-tual heavyweight champion trophy
Sept. 9 and will attempt to have
all former heavyweight kings on
hand for the ceremony. An un unusual
usual unusual bit is that 13 former
champs still are around, going all
the way back to Jess Willaid...
Patterson is the 13th...
Did you hear the baseball story
about the umpire who came homi-.
cuffed his son, -relented and asked
the lad to eit'on his lao anu was
amazed when' the kid refused
The moral of'the story is: The
son never sits on the brutish um um-pire..
pire.. um-pire.. '(

WINS VIRGINIA AMATEUR
RICHMOND, .Va. (UPI) -Marry
Patton Janssen of Charlottes Charlottesville
ville Charlottesville won her third straight Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia Women's Amateur qolf
championship Friday, Miss : Jans Janssen
sen Janssen beat Donna O'Brien of Rich Richmond,
mond, Richmond, 13 and 11 in the 36 hole
final.

New York's chances of again
getting a second representation in
the majors were revealed -to
me today as being far stronger
than is generally suspected. But
not through organization of a third
league.
On Aug. 18, most likely here,
the committee of even headed
by Commissioner Ford C. Fricjt,
with Warren Giles. Lou Perini and
Bob Carpenter of the National
League and Joe Cronin, Tom
Yawkey and Arnold Johnson of
the American will confer with
William A. Shea and his third third-league
league third-league backers.'
If Giles, Perini and Carpenter
are sufficiently impressed with

Shea's ability to get New York

Citv to build a Flushing Meadow

stadium, and if they are convinc convinced
ed convinced the big-money names reported

to be behind the projected New
York club are ready to go ahead,
they are almost certain ro re recommend
commend recommend NL expansion.

If the old circuit went to ,ip
clubfc the AL unddubtedly would
follow ult. Houstor or Minn-

polis-St. Paul perhaps, would join
tvii NT. irtn with New Y6rk.

And LAs Angles and possibly T6-

rAnto would have tne cage in we

AL,

, She says B6b Moses ha assur assured
ed assured him New York City is ready
to donate the land needed for a
Flushing Meadow arena and to
get behind a $13 million bond .is .issue
sue .issue for its constnirtion As for

financial hacking, J?hes has an announced
nounced announced Mrs. Charles S. Payson,
Mrs. Dorothv Killam. Dwi?ht F.
Davis Jr.. G. H. Waiker Jr. and
William Simpson, eyerv one of
whom commands millions, are
solidly behind the "second club
for New York" movement.
AIMING FOR EXPANSION?

I have spent several hours with

other fact Shea appears to disre disregard
gard disregard is major-league ownership of
the great majority of. minor
clubs, and prospective big-league
players. Are the club owners of
the NL and AL Being to make
gifts to Shea and the rest of
that talked-of league of their
most promising replacements?
Not t ghost of a chance, molt em emphatically.
phatically. emphatically. It has to be expansion.
New York will give the im impetus
petus impetus to that in the NL, and Los
Angeles will urge the AL to make
its too-long-delayed move into Ca California.
lifornia. California. No new arena would be needed
In New York. The Yankee Sta Stadium
dium Stadium is available, with fair and
logical stipulations by Pan Topp-;
ing and. Del Webb-: It is' known
that Walter Francis .Q'M a U.e y
would welcome the Los Angeles
AL club into Chavez Ravine.
What with one thing and another,
the Aug. 18 meeting, original originally
ly originally regarded as Just an. explorato

ry conference, now shipes, up as

a very important tnair.

and that he definitely will have a

third league ready for the I960
spring. After listening intently to
all of his arguments, and letting
his replies jell for some time, I
am convinced Shea is after ex ex-nanslon
nanslon ex-nanslon and that he does not ac actuary
tuary actuary believe he can solve the
hundred serious problems which
stand in the way of a third
lea sue.
Sit with Shea and he will con convince
vince convince you of anything he wants
to drive home. That persuasive 38-vear-old
lawyer could sell you
the Brooklyn Bridge. You leave

him with the feeling he has tnat

third lrgue all readr to go.
But once away from his pre-

sence, you realize ne wavea on
far too many tremendous prob-

'ems and minimized far too many
seriouR handicaps.

Finding 200 players of even

near-major caliber, rebuilding the
minor-league structure after a

third league's raids, keemng play-

rs interested even without a
World Series incentive, working a-

gainst the vast disadvantage of

offering no pension plan to the
players all were wiped off the

slate by Snea witn noining more

than a flick of the wrist.

After seeina so many of those

tremendous perplexities kicked a-

side a unworthy of aeep consi

deration, I got the notion Shea
wasn't joshing and that expansion

was his No. 1 goal.

Shea emphatically' is not "Casey

Stengel's Little Ned out of the

Fourth Reader.

Gatun Pool
S,:Pri''lii: I
Wednesday each of, we swim swimming
ming swimming classes had" some form' of
competition with the winner 'n
each event receiving a eandy bar,

In the beginners class at 9 o'-
clockthe following children Won!
SylvWjStiebritz, Chris M o o n y,
Jim Heaslet, Karen1 Schill, Con Connie
nie Connie Lasher, Victoria Kaufer, Deb Debbie
bie Debbie Schill, Hiram Robison and
Vickie Smith.
.,
In the nursery class at 9:30 the
following won: Kathy Danlelson,
Madeline Rudolf nd Myra Mai'
colm? ttichird WalnJ'drDihhy Aus

tin ana Joey ouerholtzer were
the winners in the 9:30 interme intermediate
diate intermediate class.
At 10 o'clock for the beginners
class the winners were: Mike Hall,
Jim Washabaugh, Roland De De-Fees.
Fees. De-Fees. Paul Richards Frank Tor Tor-torici,
torici, Tor-torici, Frank Rudolf and Charles
Crump. 1;.);
The following children won for
the 10 o'clock intermediate1 elass:

Kathy Gegg, Ronnie Crump and

Duffy Nichols. .' I
f.-.v.
Remember the AAU elimination
swim meet July 31 at Gatun Pool.

AUG. Is VERY IMPORTANT
On no Question involved in the

third-league discussion is Shea so
ntitimiftic as on the matter of

reoruitir.fi at least 200 olayers oi

better thap minor capacity .-

Nor is Shea sufficiently lamin

ar with baseball to appreciate

the trmendout problem of set

teing un third-league farm ssytems

on the ruins of the minor-league

structure the projected circuit
would leave strewn about. An-

4

It' .rv'l1

ALARM
CLOCK

830 Kcb.

S5ti.vs wstSi, j!L lillflWssMBBi.ijL ..

COLLEGE CASEY-Joe Bedenk wonders and criticizes, cautions and encourages his Penn State baseball players. Known as
the Casey Stengel of the college game, the veteran coacn led the Nittany Lions into the NaUonal Collegiate Athletic Association
- 7Vorld Series Jn Omaha for the third time in 10 years. He owns a 29-year record of 180 victories, 140 defeats and three ties

t

I m" : rU All

I t ti y

1 : f

' "If that MM has tn twe
Inchos H the kft," said Mm
still shaken Verdi, "all the
Ham would have had te chip
in five bucks apice fw flow flowers."
ers." flowers." As a result, tne Red Wings refused-
to take the field for a
scheduled doublefceader with the
Sugar Kings ain Havana yester yesterday
day yesterday and league president Frank
Shaughnessy said in Montreal
that the' Red Wings "acted with
my permission because I could
not order them to play if they
thought they were in physical
danger."
But the Red Wings weren't the
only dub ia the league that was
frightened.
"I doubt if we could get our
ball club down there Tight now,"
said manager Pepper Martin of
the Miami Marlins. "We have a
three-game series in Havana
starting Aug. 24. That's a long
way off, Things will have prob probably
ably probably quieted down there by then.
But it looks like dangerous
ground to tread on right now."
Manager Steve Souchock of
Richmond laid he heard some
of his players say "they're not
interested in going back."
"I don't blame them," he add added.
ed. added. "I would say that it Is a lit little
tle little bit dangerous there."
Souchock also said Toronto
players' had told him their en entire
tire entire team signed a petition say saying
ing saying they would not play in Hava Havana
na Havana any more this season. The
next team-scheduled to play in
Havana is Montreal on Aug. 11.
.The- Sugar Kings oouldn't we
the reason for any alarm.
They a caused the Red Wings
of using an "unimportant inci incident''
dent'' incident'' to get out of playing yti yti-ttrday's
ttrday's yti-ttrday's doubleheador "because
w are hot and they are eeld."
Thoy pointed out that Carde Cardenas,
nas, Cardenas, one of their own players,
also was hit by a bullet "and
didn't tomplam."
Shortly aftef the sheeting inci incident,
dent, incident, umpires jrank Ouzzetta
and Harry Sehwartz drdered the
game suspended the game sus suspended
pended suspended with the ecore tied 4-4 in
the 12th inning and telephoned a
full report of the incident to
Shaughnessy.
Verdi, who claimed he might
have been killed were it not for
a rubber and plastic liner he
wore in his cap, was treated at
Anglo-American HosnitaJ venter.

day and then accompanied the
Red Wings aboard a- nlan wtilh

took-them-first -to Miami and then
to Rochester.

- i

AJ

7

cuts

retyping
checking and
proof reading..,

(Biruffaass

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PANAMA COLON

i

i

5 copies in 7 minute

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 2107, July 26, 1959.
The whole ticket has 81 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "B"

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

2291
4267
6068

52,000.00

$ 15,600.00
$ 7,800.00

I
! Na. Prim Na. PrUei
S091 154.00 1091 1SS.00
SlSl 15S.M 1191 15S.00
291 2, 6O0.00 1291 2.608.00
391 156.00 1391 150.00
491 1S0.0O 1491 15S.00
S91 150.M 1591 156.00
891 156.00 1691 150.00
791 150.00 1791 150.00
S91 156.00 1891 150.00
991 150.00 1991 150.00

No PrliH
2091 156.00
2191 150.00
2291 52.000.00
2391 150.00
2491 156.00
2591 150.00
2091 156.00
2791 150.00
2891 156.00
2991 150.00

No.
3091
3191
3291
3391
3491
3591
3691
3791
.1891
3991

4Mm
150.00
150.00
2,600.00
158.00
158.00
158.00
158.00
150.00
156.00
156.00

I S f
Na. Prtzei No. Prizes Ma. Prliei No. Prize No. PrlzM
4091 156.00 5091 158.00 8051 158.00 7091 156.00 8091 158.00
4191 156.00 5191 158.00 (191 168.00 7191 150.00 S191 158.00
4291 2.600.00 5291 2,800.00 8291 2.600.00 7291 2.600.00 8281 2.600.00
4391 156.00 5.191 156.00 8391 156.00 7391 150.00 8391 158.00
4491 156.00 5491 150.00 8491 156.00 7491 150.00 8491 158.00
4591 156.00 5591 158.00 891 156.00 7591 158.00 8591 158.0
4691 156.00 5691 156.00 6691 156.00 7691 156.00 8691 158.00
4791 156.00 5791 158.00 8791 156.00 7791 156.00 8791 156.00
4891 150.00 5891 158.00 (891 156.00 7891 158.00 8891 158.00
4991 156.00 5991 156.00 8991 156.00 7991 156:00 8991 156.00

No.
091
191
9291
9391
491
9591
9691
9791
891
991

t
Prim
156.00
156.00
2,600.00
158.00
158.00
156.00
156.00
158.00
158.00
158.00

Approximations Derived From First Prizi

22S2
1283

S
520.00
520.00

2284
228S

S
520.00
520.00

2286
2287

S
520.00
520.00

2288
2289

S
520 00
520.00

2290
2292

8
520.00
520.00

2293 520.00
22r 52.0

'rjze

J295
2298

t
520.00
520.00

2297
2298

I
520 00
520.00

22M
2300

520.00
520.00

Approximations Derived From Second Prize

S S SS l ft I t
M" mM T 288.90 2267 260.00 328T 288.00 5287 260.00 8267 280.00 T287 260.00 8267 280.00 27 2M.M
illl !2 J? !J2H Ml "SI i2M mM tM mM I M 4271 130.00 42731 13(U)0 427S 13000
4288 1 39.0 4283 138.00 I 4268 130.00 4208 130.00 427y jt. 4272 130.00 4274 130.00 7f mM
Approximations Derived From Third Prize
S S' I I i I t t
ej8158.00 1088 156.00 2068 156.00 3088 156.00 4068 IStLOO 5068 1588 .7068 156.00 R068 156.00 9068 158.00
SOS 104.00 8081! 104.00 6063 104.00 8085 104.00 R067 104.00 0070, 104.80 8072 loTon Mu imm 07 uilnlk
0M 0082 104.W 6064 104.00 8066 164 00 1 6069 104.00 I 8071 104.00 6073 104 00 Zl m, mm
"""" 1 iw ,i

(52.00) each.

Priie-winnlnf Numbers of, ,Mterday' Lottery Drawlnr were sold at: The 1st Panama, 2nd Vera-rux nrl 3rd In Colon.

, Tne Nine Hundred wnole tickets rndinr In 1 and not Included In the above list win Fifty Two Dollars

, Tne Whole ticket has fifty two pieces which comprises the two series "A" Si "B"
Signed by: The Governor of the Province of Panama ALBERTO ALEMAN
The Representative of the Treasury, JAIME DE LA GUARDIA JR.

WITNESSES: Jors;e N. Rawlins Ced. 8-9-8562
n-vld Edward Hussey Ced. 8-8-7799

JULIO VALDES D.
Notary Public, Panama

PABLO A. PINEL
Secretary

M.

NpTE:

The winning ticket with tho lait cipher end with the two lit
clone apply only to the First PiMi.

The Flrtt Prlxe end the 2nd nd Srd Prttee are drawn aeparately The ap

proximation are calculated an the Firat, Second and Third prizes In case
ticket should carry the number of each prize, the holder 1 entitled to
elalm payment for each .

DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, July 26, 1959
Drawing Number 808

First Prize. 91
Second Prize". . . 67
Third Prize 68

Fraction
$11.00
3.00
2.00

Ticket
$220.00
60.00
40.00

The prlzee will be

the office of the

paid In accordance with the Official List of Panami In
National Beneflrlenl Lottery situated on Central Avenue.

PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No. 2108 WHICH WILL
TAKE PLACE SUNDAY, AUGUST 2, 1959
divided In two series of 28 fractions each denominated "A" and "B"

rmsT prizf

1 Pint Prize. Series A and B, of

1 Second Prize. Series A and B. of
1 Third Prize. Series A and B of
IS Approximation, Series A and 8, of
I Prize Series A and B. of
80 Prize. Series A and B. of
800 Prize. Series A and B of

S26.0O0.0O each series

7.800.00 each serle
3.000 On each serle
280 00 each serle
1 .300.00 each serle
78 00 each series
28 00 each series

SECOND PRIZE
IS Approximations, Series A and B. of $
Prize, Serle A and B. of
THIRD PRIZE
18 Approximation, Serle A and B. nf I
Prize. Serie A and B. of

88.00 each serin
130.00 each series

81 00 each Miia
78 00 each aerie

$52.000 00
15.600 00
7.800 00 :
9.360 fV,
23.400 00
14.040 00'
46.800 00
t 3.340.00
3J40.0O
I 1,871 M
1.404.OS

174 Prize

Total im.sss.se

Price of a whol ticket $26.00
Price of a 52nd part 0.50

PRIZES ARE PAID WlTHtJUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES



TKZ PANAMA AMERICA AM INDEFEHDENT DAXLT XIWIPAPES
MONDAY, JULY S1S
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ad;
AGENTS:
Phone Panama 1-0749 for
information about Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Charge your ad if
too hare a commercial
contract.
LEAVE TOO AO
INTERNAL. DE
BARDO No. M B"
FARMACIA LVX-
U A a-I A Dili ? 1
Beside Bella VtaU Theatre and Branch at Minima taper Market ea Via Eapana COLON OFFICE: 15th and Amador Guerrero No. ln TeL 43X..

PAG1 EIGHT

I Classified pace cki 11 :3
lom! I JB Moa frl, U tun.
Ueaju 1 Sat, I pjnv St for Sun.
TaZ I Office open -I weekday.

WITH ONI Or OUB AGENTS Oil OOTt OfflCB AT U-S1 "H SWEET. PANAMA LIBRFJUA FKECIABOI IM WOM

rUBUCACIONES No. I Lottery Plaza tasi ialuu--""" O) tuunuu rMwwn" iTquiii iuiuua -Y-

Street MORRISON ith ot July Ave. e J SL i lewis buivilb Ave. Tlvotl Mo. 4 fuiuiia estauus wiuhimo tromu arm.

-1U Conk-al Ave HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. reo. o la una ave. wo. 41 e FOTO DllMI-Jano Arooemena vo. ng rius rius-,
, rius-, wl ? d vi r 1 1 1 1 BATlTKRn Puont Lefevre 1 Street a. ARMACIA "SAS" V'.i Porn 111 NOVDADES ATHIS

Resorts

Foster's Cottages, pear Santa
Clara. Phone Bilboi 2830 be between
tween between 9 a.m. and noon, weekday.
PHILLIPS Oeaeiielde Cottage
Santa CUra R. P- """St"
nam S-1B77 Cristobal 3-1S73.
FOR RENT: Completely furnish furnish-ed
ed furnish-ed three bedrooms houie. dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, kitchen, bar, air-conditioned,
yard, in Cangrejo "F" St.
Ho 10. For information call Tel.
3-4619.
FOR RENT: Home. Three bed bedroomi.
roomi. bedroomi. with er without furniture.
311 3rd Street, Lat Cumbrei.
Tel. 2332.
FOR RENT: Newly constructed
4 bedroom chalet in Loma Me Metre,
tre, Metre, unfurnished -180.00. Phone
3-2247 or 4-0196.
Three Bedroom residence, furn furnished,
ished, furnished, $250 per month, including
servants, for August and Septem September
ber September only. Call 3-6648 office
hours. p.
Wanted Position
WANTED: Documentation clerk
to work for American firm. Write
to: P. O. Box 536, Colon.
Secretary-stenographer or clerk clerk-typist,
typist, clerk-typist, British, open for imme immediate
diate immediate engagement. Box S-134.
Experienced housekeeper avail available
able available for household duties wanted
to work. Cell Celia, Panama 3 3-1175.
1175. 3-1175. Lost Articles
LOST: Female Pekinese, brown
right eye, smaller answers to
name Bonnie, call T. Stewart,
210-A, Ancon. Tel. 2-1408,
reward from three heartbroken
little girls.
j'jiw
SMALL FIVE-C. F. Riswlck,
chief steward of the Holland-American,
liner Maasdam,
watches the open-mouthed an antics
tics antics of canary quintuplets born
aboard ship. The birds were
hatched on the Maasdam on
the crossing from Rotterdam to
New York. Proud parents are
Riswick's pets.
FOR RENT
Un to 2200 So.. Ft. of modern
office space on second floor
of new "ELGA" Building
Large private parking area
In rear Janitor and night
watchman services Air
Conditioning optional Via
Espana on 46th block
ELGA. S.A.

Houses

imur x 7 &

rCommercial Guide
ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION I
Ada nnlv rost $0 fli m, .i :l. I

j

I FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740

LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co.,
for rates and information
Tel. Panama 2-6552
Monday thru Friday
:06 a.m. to 12 (H)
2:00 p.m. to 5:00
Saturday: S:0 a.m. to 12:ft
Listen To
The OAS
' (Panameaca n
(kecori Si ow
)2:30 p.m.
HOC-YCN
Every Sunday

Apartments

FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, new apartment,
house located on the Transisth Transisth-mian
mian Transisth-mian highway, modern, well ven ventilated
tilated ventilated with private bathroom and
kitchen, completely furnished
with new furniture specially de designed
signed designed for thd apartments, rea reasonably
sonably reasonably priced. Call Panama 2 2-2766
2766 2-2766 from 8 to 12 and from 2
to 5:30.
FOR RENT: Furnished and un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished apartments. Alhambra
Apartments. 10th Street 8061.
Telephone 1186, Colon.
FOR RENT: Unfurnishad, cool,
modern, comfortable two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. 50 Street No.
115. Phone: 3-1210.
FOR RENT: Furnished 1 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, livingroom, bal balcony
cony balcony and garage, close to The
Panama Hilton Hotel, phone
3-4567.
FOR RENT: Best located small
furnished apartment or room,
clean and independent. 43rd
Street No. 13.
FOR RENT: Apartment 2nd.
Ave. San Francisco No. 64, casa
Maria, Tel. 3-7784.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment comfortably furnished, San
Francisco. Phone 3-5024.
FOU RENT: In the luxurious
and modern, recently constructed
"Alina" building, two-bedroom
apartments, living-dining room,
air-conditioned, hot water instal installation,
lation, installation, maid's room, independent
wash tuba, elevator, penthouse
for parties, etc. On the ground
floor: two air-conditioned com commercial
mercial commercial sites. Inquire Marichal
Boyd, Office: Peru Ave. No. 57.
Tels. 3-6710 and 3-7926.
FOR RENT: Brand new build building.
ing. building. El Cangrejo, one and two
bedroom apartments, hot water.
Cucalon and Cla. "Realtors".
Phone 3-3330.
Car Rentals
Weekending at Santa Clara? Rent
a Herticer from Fiesta. Tel. S S-4568,
4568, S-4568, lobby El Psnamo Hilton.
Barry McKay Vins
Penn Lawn Tennis
Crown In Repeal
HAVERFORD, Pa., July 27 -cttpti
Thp rpfum to too form
of Barry MacKay sent American
Davis Cup tennis hopes soaring
today despite the latest defeat
suffered by Alex Olmedo.
MacKay. on leave from the U.
S. Air Force and trying to regain
his best condition before the Da Davis
vis Davis Cup challenge round Aug. 28
30, showed that he's finding his
touch again by winning the Penn Pennsylvania
sylvania Pennsylvania Lawn Tennis champion championship
ship championship for the second straight year
yesterday. Ir the finals he beat
Ian Vermaak of South Africa, 9 9-7,
7, 9-7, 10-8, 6-0.
The game but outgunned Ver Vermaak
maak Vermaak thus failed in an effort to
give South Africa sweep of sin singles
gles singles titles here. Sandra Reynolds,
womens champion of South Afri Africa,
ca, Africa, beat her countrywoman Re Re-nee
nee Re-nee Shuurman in the women's fi final,
nal, final, 1-6, 6-1, 6-4.
But the big news was MacKay
as he once again used his "big"
serve to advantage. That served
to erase thp memory of Olmedo's
loss to Vermaak in the semi-finals.
U.S. Cup officials know that
Wimbledon champion Olmedo, at
his best, may hp the best ama amateur
teur amateur in the world.
Both MacKay and Vermaak em employed
ployed employed the samp pattern of serve,
charge, volley, and smash for
two close sets hpfore the South
African appparpd to tire in the
third set.
.ui IMUn
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
tTed Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo,
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Anto Insurance
We dve all kinds of clothes,
drapes. ruj-R, coats, dresses,
suits.
Two Hour Dry Cleaning
TROPICAL LAUNDRY
(10 minutes from town)
Via Fspana No. 830,
Parque Lefevre Tel. 4-1277

Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1955 Ford, tudor,
fordomatic radio, heater, call 2 2-3444.
3444. 2-3444. FOR SALE: 1956 Thunder Thunder-bird,
bird, Thunder-bird, with removeable hardtop,
continental spare tire, power
steering, Fordomatic, radio, wew
tires, new paint, tires and brakes.
Call Sgt. Waller, Albrook 2166
or 5296 after five o'clock.
FOR SALE: 1958 Cadillac
Coupe De Ville Pink and Black.
Fully Ex. Colon 1369.
FOR SALE: 1949 Buick good
running condition. Apply A. F.
Barr 0273-O, Gamboa.
FOR SALE: 1956 English Naih
Metropolitan convertible. White
with black top. New matching
upholstery, tires, etc. Must see
to appreciate, Balboa 2676.
FOR SALE: 1956 Lincoln hard hardtop,
top, hardtop, excellent buy. Call 3-3909.
FOR SALE: PLYMOUTH BEL BELVEDERE,
VEDERE, BELVEDERE, 1957, 4-door, air-conditioned;
power brakes and steer steering;
ing; steering; automatic seat; underrat underrated;
ed; underrated; radio 19,000 actual miles,
one owner 4 new W. W.
tires, two extras EXCELLENT
CONDITION, new muffler, brake
linings 8 cylinder automatic
transmission, etc. $1825 or best
cash offer. CALL Panama 3-6153
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Panama
3-0117 at other hours
FOR SALE: 1955 Ford Thun Thun-derbird.
derbird. Thun-derbird. A-l condition. Balboa
2-4280.
FOR SALE: Ford 53-V 8, 4 door
duty paid, good tires, motor ex excellent,
cellent, excellent, radio can see at 21-42
Ave "B" or phone 2-5474.
FOR SALE : 1957 Ford perfect
condition. Information 4-0964,
cash.
Boats b Motors
45 foot double planked ex-Navy
boat hull for sale. Asking price
$1000 or make an offer. Com Commander
mander Commander Taylor, Navy 2553.
FOR SALE: Gasoline driven
electric plant 9 kw, 110220
volts, 1 phase. $225.00. Tel.
Balboa 2-3630.
SERVICES
TELEVISION SERVICE
Experts in TV, radio, Hi-FI and
transistor.
We do more Work, becautt w
do ft the best.
Phone 2-1905.
Crawford Agencies.
Tivoli Avenue No. 18-20.
U.S. Television
Means reliability
better service,
and lasting repair.
Phone 3-7607 Panama.
9 A.M. to 10 P.M.
Prefect your home and proper property
ty property against insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment en
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777,
Wanted to Buy
WANT TO PURCHASE: 1959
Model, used, small car. Panama
3-6121 or 3-6943.
WANTED TO BUY; Used 20"
or 24" girl's bicycle, baby strol stroller,
ler, stroller, and playpen. All In good con condition.
dition. condition. Panama 4-1368.

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
GREAT WHITE FLEET
New Orleans Service Sails Arrives
" Cristobal
MORAZAN July 22 July 31
TJLUA Auk. 1 Auk. 8
YAQUE Aug:. 8 Auk. 15
'MORAZAN Auif. 15 Auit. 22
ULUA Aug. 29 Sept. 5
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Carro
New York Service Sails Arrives
Cristobal
JUNIOR' July 24. Aua;. 2
SAN JOSE Aug. 4 Auk. 9
PARISMINA Auk. 11 Auk. IB
METAPAN Auk. 18 Auk. 23
LIMON Auk. 25 Auk. 30
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
CRISTOBALW.C.C.A. FEEDER SERVICE
TEXITA ...lEvery (15) Days
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle
SPECIAL EXCURSION FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA :
To New York and Return 8275.00
To San Francisco andor Seattle and Return .$400.00
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA.2-2904

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Household goods,
leaving the Isthmus. House 6443
Las Riot, Balboa Tel. 2-2672.
FOR SALE: 4 burner gas stove
with oven and broiler, practically
new. Call "H'' No. 1 126, first
floor, Apt. 3.
FOR SALE: Laundromat wash washer
er washer Wettinghouse, 9 months old,
$185.00, available August 10,
9 cu. ft. refrigerators. Unit 9
months eld, $60.00. Call 2-3444.
FOR SALE: Frlgldalre automa automatic
tic automatic washer. Excellent working
condition. $100.00. Call Pana Panama,
ma, Panama, Tel. 3-7856.
PERSONALS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
Special Offers
HELP WANTED: Civil Engi Engineers
neers Engineers and draftsmen with high highway
way highway experience. Write Box 4356.
WANTED:
ply Peikard
Tel. 1920.
Correspondent, ap ap-Zona
Zona ap-Zona Libre, S.A.,
WANTED: Experienced office
clerk with knowledge of account accounting,
ing, accounting, apply Peikard, Zona Libre,
S.A., Tel. 1920.
HELP WANTED. Matured. U.S.
citixen female far position of
Secretary, Grade NM3 (Secur (Security),
ity), (Security), with opportunity for ad advancement
vancement advancement to position of Execu Executive
tive Executive Secretary. Permanent res resident
ident resident of Canal Zone desired.
Call Personnel Manager, Cen Central
tral Central Exchange Office, Fort Clay Clay-ton
ton Clay-ton 8111, for appointment,
Lessons
Learn Spanish with Mri. Rome Romero's.
ro's. Romero's. Practical conversation 4th
of July Avenue. Ti-352, apart apartment
ment apartment No. 10. Phone 2-3021.
Rooms
FOR RENT: Confortable room
for students. Uruguay Street and
48th. Tel. 8-6506.
it ii ,7 M-,
miii i maim iOTgwWMnipMSSfSSBfffJ
SOLID GOLD SARDINE
Famed French author artist
Joan, rnrtoau displays the solid
gold sardine presented him by
nw :M irillafrta-nViCkJEIlt'M
Mer. France. Cocteau wai
tViA memento for dec
i: AnV.Hwmnn .V. O .Art!
Jn .thejowrv....

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Aged statural ma
nure at give-away price by the
fruekload. Oil 2-2641.
FOR SALE: Dinette set. for formica,
mica, formica, wrought iron with 6 chain
$60.00; twe chain, overstuffed
foam cushions, $35.00 each. 2
piece sofa foam, $75.00; chest
of drawers $10.00; 2 desks,
$10.00 each; baby heigh chair
$5.00. Call 2-3444.
FOR SALE. Air conditioner
h.p. Emenon, 9 month eld,
$125. CO, HI-FI record player, 4
ipeed, en year old $50.00. Call
2-3444.
FOR SALE: 1 6oodtell-Wil-liamson
Amplifier. 1 Goodsell Goodsell-Williamson
Williamson Goodsell-Williamson P re-Amp (matched).
1 Fisher Tuner, Model FM 80.
1 Garrard Transcription. Motor
Turntable, Model 301. I Gray
Viscu Arm. 1 G.E. Diamond Va Variable
riable Variable Reluctance Style. 1 Wil Wil-sox
sox Wil-sox Gay "Imperial Reeordlo"
Tape Recorder. 1 Electro-Voice
Slimair Dynamic Microphone,
Model 636. 1 Motorolo Hi-Fi
Console Record Player. All brand
item. Navy 3723.
Automobile and household good
for sal. H-790-X Tavemilla St.
Balboa. Phone 2-1521.
FOR SALE: Electric Clothe
Dryer, Frigidaire all Porcelain
like new $100. Phone 1-4181
after P.M.
NURSERY SCHOOL
Transportation provided, con con-ttant
ttant con-ttant supervision, age 2Vi to 5.
Fenced in yard, call Balboa 1214.
FOR SALE: Lullaby 6 year eld
crib with mattress, $25.00 and
Lullabye chifferobe, $25.00.
Phone 3-2247 or 4-0196.
FOR SALE: 100 ft. white picket
fence, 36 ins, high, three gayes,
1 4 Venetian blind 1 1 need
painting and new tape. Very
cheap. Call Balboa 2194.
FOR SALE: (1) Air-conditioner
Fedder All Weather, 1
Ton, 220 Volt Automatic, $200.
2) Washing Machine MAY MAYTAG
TAG MAYTAG Fully automatic $250.
(3) TV, RCA 21 inch, all metal
table model with rotating atand
and antennae $200. (4)
Dishwasher HOT POINT
Portable and Front Opening -$250.
All are In excellent operat operating
ing operating conditiend and have iutt been
completely terviced. May be seen
by appointment only at Quarry
Height. Telephone 82-8217.
SmeII (tram ff .SO) fleet-!
to School'' and other permanent
Monday and Tuesday until
Sept. "YOU CAN BE SURE"
when your work is done In
Genell' long established Coeoll
Beauty Shop. Experienced State State-tide
tide State-tide operators. Navy 3812.
FOR SALE) Zenith Victrola
shortwave radio combination,
SVi' G.E. refrigerator, water
heater, call 8-4304.
FOR SALE: Maternity and baby
clothes store Stock, owner unable
to give it personal attention. For
information apply en premise.
Juste Arosemena Ave. in front of
Royal Crown Cola.
FOR SALE: Portable ROYAL
typewriter, $25. Hou 5426,
Diablo Height. Phone 2-2674.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS VARIOUS ITEMS
FOR SALE
Sealed bids, for opening; in pub public,
lic, public, will be received until 10:30
a.m., July 31, 1939. in the of office
fice office of Superintendent, Storehouse
Branch, for life boats, drill, en engine,
gine, engine, hoist, compressor, genera generator,
tor, generator, pump, saw, batching plenty
transmitting and receiving equip-)
ment, electric refrigerator, med medical
ical medical equipment, microscope,- ml ml-crophotographic
crophotographic ml-crophotographic projector, sedan,
cargo truck, road maintainor.
Inspection car, tracton, gate lift lifting
ing lifting pontoon, and machine: lash
aticker, rp (hear, washing,
pipetting, tending, stencil. Invi Invi-tarion
tarion Invi-tarion No. S-59-434 may b
obtained from office of Superin Superintendent,
tendent, Superintendent, Storehouse Branch, tele telephone
phone telephone 2-1086.
ADVERTISEMENT
EXPERT ACCOUNTING SERV SERVICES
ICES SERVICES OFFERED under direct u u-pervltion
pervltion u-pervltion of college graduate, C.
p. A., with long years of profes professional
sional professional experience, Special arrange arrangement
ment arrangement for commercial and indus industrial
trial industrial establishments and indivi individual
dual individual businessmen that, may net
require the permanent employ employment
ment employment of beokkeeppen at their
offices. Servklo d Contabllidad,
S.A. 6-25, East 34th Street P.O.
Box 4160. Telephone 3-6835.
FOR SALE: Talefunken tape
recorder, practically new. $225.
7th street, house 2523, Rie A A-baio.
baio. A-baio. STRAYED: Yea nt female
brown dog, part hound, very thin.
Balboa 6-342.
Investment Clinic
Continues Tonight
At Balboa JWB
"Growth Stocks" "will again b
the subject of the evening' in in-vefttment.
vefttment. in-vefttment. clinic at the USO-JWB.
in a continuation of last week's
discussion. c
Under the direction of C. T,
Richardson, Jr., the clinic meets
each Monday evening at 7:30 cm,
at the Armed Forces Service Cen Center
ter Center in Balboa.
Pi
ta at
tend this session.

Real Estate

FOR SAL! s Let 500 ead 1.000
met art. In the Nuave Hipedromc
UrbaatietW acre the Reese.
, Racetrack. AU let with street
fronts, sewage, water main and
electricity. CaH W. McBaraett.
Tel. 4-0976.
FOR SALE: Beautiful residence.
4 bedroom, livingroom, dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, library, recreation room, -large
kitchen, pantry, maid'
room with teryice, hot water, ter terrace,
race, terrace, garden, garage, land 1 ,800
m. 9th. Street Ne. 28, San
Francisco.
FOR SALE: Large 2 bedroom
house furnished in Santa Clara
ear beach with guest cabin, easy
payment. Called 1-4569 Pana Panama.
ma. Panama. FOR SALE House at Santa Cla Clara,
ra, Clara, quick tale, best offer ever
$3,000.00. Leaving the Isthmus.
Balboa, Tel. 2-2672.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Office tpiee,
Mereede building, above Aveni Aveni-da
da Aveni-da Balboa' Post Office, with
condition, good tircr, good paint
private bathroom, watchman,
very reasonable rent. Tel. 3-3054
FOR RENT: 316.80 square
meters', suitable for a warehouse
workshop, garage, S Street, be between
tween between Automobile Row and Fran Fran-gipani
gipani Fran-gipani Street, close to Auto Ser Ser-vicio,
vicio, Ser-vicio, $235.00. Phone 2-0481
office hour.
Negro Golf Tourney
Cancelled As Mayor
Enforces Park Rules
ATLANTA (UPI) Negroes
have called of a golf tournament
scheduled for a desegregated city
park because of a ruling that no
spectators could attend.
Mayor William B.' Hartsfield
told a group of protesting white
residents In the park area that the
Negroes eould not be legally pre
vented from using th course, so
long ai every person on hand was
a bona fide golfer.
But It was decided that the
Negroes would, have to abide by
t&eula that -anyone on the golf
course would have to have a bag,
a minimum of five clubs and a
ticket. This rule Is enforced on
all city courses except during
white tournaments.
The Negroes, members of the
New Era Golf Club, at first de decided
cided decided to go ahead with the tourna
ment with all the entrants playing
as individuals.
The elub. in announcing a later
decision to tancel the tournament,
declined to state the reason for
the change in plans.
The sponsoring ciud nad invited
about 100 players from such points
as Nashville. Tenn., and Jackson
ville and Miami, Fla., to take part
in the tournament at Adams Park
next Wednesday through Friday.
T. D. Hawkins, club president,
said in announcing the cancella cancellation
tion cancellation that the club "did not give
me authority"1 to state the reason.
A delegation of 60 residents pro
tested against the tournament.
The Negroes at first said they
would go to court U denied the
tournament.
Alfred Holmes, one of several
litigants in a suit that resulted
in a court order desegregating
municipal golf courses here, was
among those threatening legal ac
tion.
Holmes said the tournament had
been planned, among other rea
sons, to show golfers from other
parts of the- country "that the
South is not a bad place to live."
we're sorry that this sort of
had to coma up," he said.
THE NEW CINA "If movie
is bad it k bad. Taking oft
clothes does not help." So says
Gin Lollobriaida, who has
lust finished nlmrne "Never So
Few," oostorrinc frank Sinatra.

: V-
t (r V it

I vf,'1 Vt

ju if sn

Investor's Guide-
-By

By SAM SHULSKY
Q. in ISM I started a mutual
fund at $50 a month. What can 1
expect alter io years? If I were
10 increase tne payment to $100
a month what would it amount
to? A friend ii interested in the
same fund.. Can I collect a fee if
I get him to buy?
A. Every so often k becomes
obvious that the 10-year rise in
the stock market has led people
into careless thinking.
if you ask me how much $50 a
month deposited m a bank at 3-
2 per cent interest will amount
to in 10 years, I can find a for
mula to tell you the answer to a
penny.
But when yon buy stock, it's
something else aeain. And that
holds whether you are buying
the stock of a single corporation,
or the shares of a mutual fund
holding the shares of a hundred
or more different aorporations.
It is perfectly true that bv buv-
ing the shares of a mutual fundi
you vare spreading the risk over
me nunared different corporations.
And spreadine the risk is the ha.
sis of all good insurance. But
that still does not mean there is
no risk.
When you buy $50 a month
worth of a mutual fund you can
be sure of winding up the 10
years with the number of shares
that $50 (less commissions) will
buy you at the various monthly
prices prevailing during the 10
years. What the price of your
fund will be in 1964 I don't know
and neither does anybody else.
The mutual funds' record has
been a good one. You can as
sume tnat they will share ki a
growing economy. (Although your
nnin.,1.. I T .
ii".uiai 1UUQ oeing a Daianced
trust holding both stocks and
bonds is less likelv In mnwo
widely in value than an all-stock
iuna.)
Mutual funds are sold by brok brok-kers
kers brok-kers or agents. They alona get
the selling commissions.
Q. I feel my father, to., who
has about $15,000 in govrnmei
savings bonds and sash, should
buy some stock as a hedge a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst inflation. Do yon thlpk
By TOM
Well, k's back on the beat with
what has been happening around around-town.
town. around-town. The Bartenders and Walters As Association
sociation Association after electing a new
president recently also changed
the manager of the Club. While
Ritchie continued to promote
some real solid shows and keep
the folks happy with the versa versatile
tile versatile music of tiie Jets.
Tilings, In the meantime, be began
gan began to take on a real political as aspect
pect aspect ae preparations for nomina nominations
tions nominations at the different conventions
were being made. With the elec elections
tions elections set for May, the presiden presidential
tial presidential aspirants are sounding their
call for backers and making
promises as to tne good that will
come to toe populace as a result
of their nomination and subse subsequent
quent subsequent election.
Speaking of originality, the

cake goes to Brandon Eisenmann'and K. A. Jonea anrl v v St-?'

former radio commenter and far-
sighted business man. The acco-
lade is for the. recent recording
of a sneeze for his eompany's.
mentolated cigarettes.
Slated to arrive from Jamaica!

soon is Miss Cynthia Claire, who'lf jklL......-. l T
.Wi2isw5rww Cub M
of CaHe Estudiante and Mrs. A- Members and guests of the Pa
delina Baptiste Cordova, whose nama C. 2. VW Cluh 4sitJS
birthday was yesterday. Chepo yesterday- on ocassion of
the festivities of St. Christooher
The gay crooners are swinging patron saint of motorist and av'
their forces in line for a series elers.

of ehows in various service cen centers
ters centers on the Canal Zone. The show
will include such talent as Lady
Trixie, Lord Cobra, the Crooners,
the Teen-Queens, and the Dian
Sisters.
Over at the "White House,'!
"Hutchie," had some-renovations
made with an eye to make the
joint more comfy. 1
Plans, plans and more plans
were being made by members of
Club Altamira in connection with
their seventh anniversary celebra celebration
tion celebration which will be held on the Pa Pacific
cific Pacific side. Hie bid day is Sept. 19.
Coming upsoon mighty soon,
probably about mid-august is the
Castillos dance which i to h
held in the Vina del Mar dance
nau at san Francisco de la Cale-
Nearly every business in Pana Panama
ma Panama at this time is planning some
kind of promotional activity, but
tne one tnat attracted our atten attention
tion attention was the offerings of Vinico Vinico-lera
lera Vinico-lera of some $12,000, odd dollars
to be distributed in prizes over
the next several months.
The Colon Fire Department mov moved
ed moved a step closer and gave due

SAM SHULSKY

such Issues as Gulf, Standard Ofl
of N.J., Grand Union, Safeway,
or mutual funds' would offer such
a hedge? I think he ought to buy
stocks periodically, regardless f
price.
A All 41 :
a. All uie&B eomnaniBM a waii
as mutual funds offer hedges a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst inflation since in times of
higher prices their products and
services bring higher prices and
increased profits!
Some mutual j funds also are
set up as hedges against infla inflation,
tion, inflation, holding stocks of metal, oil
and other natural resource com companies
panies companies as well as companies
which TO nirn nrnitiiAia nj

vide services keyed to 1 i, v i n
costs. tL
A mutual fund would be an ex-1
cellent device for periodic pur- 1
chases which is the best way
he could invest.
Why don't you look over the
prospectuses of several mutual
funds obtainable at all brokerage
offices as well as directly from
selling organizations who adver advertise
tise advertise their funds and select one
urViinl. ...... .1 .1 f. a

v.11 nuuiu hi. ma neras Derjt.
Q. I am a single woman with
Insurance, a share in a retire-
ment fund and money in a credit
union. Should I invest in a mu mutual
tual mutual fund rather than continuing
to pat money in a credit anion?
A, The two are entirely differ differ-ent
ent differ-ent forms of investment. The
mutual fund would be an Invest,
ment in securities which you
hope would appreciate in value.
The eredit anion is a savings to
dollars, at interest.
A person should have both.
Since vou ah-eadv ha
y6ur funds in dollar Investments,
I would certainly think that yon
Should cnnciiinr mitfino
.uvMua) wyj in c
funds Into securities via a mu mutual
tual mutual fund, a you 'don't want to
select your own securities, or
feel you shouldn't
Since you are a young woman.
I would select a growth fun
rather than aim for safety oi
generous income. Ask any bra
f er, to suggest several funds,
look a over ewef., be sura
you are baying eaactby what
youwant and under tha term
wWcJ suit yon best.
recognition to baaoWsdwr ati
nald Prescoit nrwrnvHrm ki-
full "lovie. i
Discharged from tJi a a r .
Hospital, and convalescing at
home since last Friday has been
Joseph Rochester, popular man a a-bout
bout a-bout town.
On the Atlantic side, Clarence
Lewis, was admitted to the Ama.
dor Guerrero Hospital feet
Wednesday.
The new staff of officers of the
Loyal Victor Lodge is comprised
of C. G. Brown as noble grand; d
Davy, Immediate noble grandj
H. L. Levy, secretary; L. Dum Dum-e,Mtlve
e,Mtlve Dum-e,Mtlve secretary, J. D.
Phillips, warden; T. A. Dumbar.
treasurer; C. W. Wynter, and.
Hotaess, right and left supporters
to the noble grand; G. F. John John-son
son John-son and R. n vrnnu,j. -i-n
teft suimortr. t ttLL.TS'
s6n, toner and outer guardians
. 6aiu
i Thouoht w r.u. .
lives and does nothma- for hi. Ti
wastes nis time).
iu
Guest mcluded membesw of the
Isthmian Sports Oar C1M nd
Circulo Auto Deportivo ofj Pana-
ma.
With ttie assistance of the Ca Ca-nal
nal Ca-nal Zone police, the motorcade of
.uib vnan cars left the Diablo
viuonouse at 8:30 a.m.
The motorcade arrived at Chh
po at 11 a.m. and after a short
rest gathered in front of the Po Police
lice Police Station where a group of
more than 25 Choco Indians were
awaiting the travelers. Gifts do.
nafd by participating enthusiasts
were distributed aimpng the in.
rUans. Those carrying cameras
had a chance to take very dif different
ferent different types of TjIrtiirM
many drivers were surerised to
loam tail hi tt
highway has been paved, and the
unpaved four-mile portion is in
very good condition.
nau UUL I Ul II I TT1 1 1 aBl AI Trial
. Pictures of this trip wffl ba
shown at the next regular month month-ly
ly month-ly meetine to be held nnt Winn
day, at 7:30 p.m. in the Panama
baion of the EI Panama Hilton
Hotel.
An jnvitation Is entended to all
Volkswagen owners in P a n i m a -and
the Canal Zone to attend the
meetincr.
For further Information call
Balboa 2107 after 4 p.m



':.''
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bNDAY, JULY tT, 195

THE PANAMA AMFRirtV AN IVMFPPNnFNT DAILY NEWSPAPPR

H v ( w MARTHA WAYN I

PAS! NINE

Downgradinf Martha

A

BY WILSON SCRUGGS j TERRY AND THE PIRATES

l GEORGE WUKDZM.

UJIICKLI5 AND HIS EIINDS

-LIY OOP

fjOTS AND HIE BUD Dill

. ., ; n ? f Ml iiii 1 7 ; 7- I I ( KING ON FR)ENPLy .Q. AtlSHT HAVE SOMETHING WPS. IF THE LOCalX Kah, THfKC, MISTER MIHI5TB?. RXLY MRErfil
VV. P IF YOU MEAU MASTTUA, 1 6U66ESTED i SOU DOtlT f UMWWWrS em) f SHt'SAOCVES: m I TERMS WTTH THE PO I TOllCt CAN OTWOinr OF TOWN M A WAV A A LAW-AI fPIN mtOLX FEEL VCX1 A -tlTt
CM3t X SHE 60T0rSZ ROOM AMP REST, 3 eaU.YTTOKfwraWTTM'Cli? O f rAOTETWrtALL' ) 7 LICE 15 A HANPT, IF THAT TXCRE WONT PE A WHCOWNO DWUT7R J OULP KNOSC m-JI I' t
wciLSOMajtefi srrri AUW5iwniAWA$w Efi!J yr-rJr-sfC S 20 ( unu5uau,5wje for atthf mfxt i'ii wFAg that J fr Jipggjl
hwaawst'm ffilET-.. umvxvNxilTW WAYm trjsky ff Awa rf u? I klix the NtFAgiout. veil yet, tattoo. fVprrSfc "j-
' '..-- """" ?RISCILLA'$ POP ThatsOurBoy lp AL VIRMII1
1 1 1 m r-r t 1

-1 tM 1 YOU ROU6Mn yfeAM. RUT W I r ummi CAn1 I TMAM 60ODMESS 1 LcOr IvST fU V?y VpJ" tV
U0l IPTtXi wMul ecTJW'j TOO AAANV- NOT GONNA ; yoME HAOTW GOOD SCNS T-V 3fXxL& t K W
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yj rtl iiftlS "y Fyy iUCS BUNNY Bal1 Com" Flr,t

Good Guess Y V. T. HAMUIN T) tGLUP.'j) WHAT V THAT IT DON'T LOSE OUR OVtV

4aOMiTHINa MV J -vY that's ...KNOWINS I CANT IMAfilNE H FOR CATSAJtl, DOC, i---4l Nl !5rs tftf I NEARLYV
39 7" BE WRONX3 T.. IN THAT dOT TO (MEiPY OL' HIM LSTTINfl Ufi 3 WHAT'S HOUJlNfi TM DOINfl V Kv 'TFX "C )lfT SWALLOWED A V ilu
I WONDER WHY DR. WITH THE CMS, THEVp B IT OSCAR LIKE 6IT HERS ON A IL UP THE THE BCTT v. S Jff I f L$ THI5 BALL! KV 1 s. i tT
f WCNMUa LEAVIN TIME- NOT KNOW ALL i I DO J MILLIOM-DOLLAR RBfRS A I CAN S r)(j76rU JKWS C C Zj k a VS
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k lAACWMfetDll OQ... CWa? 1,1 Qf ijrl; LL ZJ raUN?jL PUSH T button uSpt V

PHInj It On ., BY LESLIE TURNER pfTW" l& 'W&rMWrW -' Cs----- K

lA- Ve5,T0NV. HE'S STILL SO WSANaY HMWlAMT MB.TOOt I'M WWIEP ASOUT O QUITE A JL. JSJ J Ww M0 I JLSTji Lr 3s 11
I TK" JEALOUS, I HARPLV PAR LOOK AT SftGIN TO THE WAV HB SLARBS AT Zt f VIEW, SUH! TS22dbiN X MWM0 J 1?7CyP!iM1 T .l. U...U...
wp vou sayVa HftNP0WB AAN.ifHSA,ROUNPi RgsKET i YOU! ue look5x-- If .but a risky VyvwwLXr Vv7i VCw"tl ffikx (Ct ''WlJ i "Pop is the local Blood Bank for all th mosquitoet
I captaim easvY mum ii 2smmu4 injitb hiw positivelv iiljustI 14 Pt to loiter. 1 M tfZ&SUr 1 1 around here!"
I pl pT" SIDE GLANCES ByCalbraith ,I1L j

One-Seater EY DICK CAVALLI j 1 LJ

- : : T x-j? j yr''VJ iLi MVhicvr. l

16 IT fe? I think it W.irS NfVwA CD
HEY, MORTY.' HOW V 5HOULD HAVE A GOVERNOR ciwli fa C Caxi I L -f I (X J 7 1
j DO MOU LIK"E MY NEW ON IT. -- fe THERESA i V.Krfiall vV ll Y JJL
; CAJ??IT1SG0TA y -y HARDLY 1 J V)rjlO I I n-?
I p v j j '
lai? xl I fBEr" ul
I l Bs Jw "I'm going stir crazy!" ,.
BOARDING HOUSE with MAJOR HOOPLh IT OUR WAY '. ) faY J. R. WILLIAMS I M hy ft -----------------------
TVi)GSSI6gRINeWHES L this is V who 'V mvaaan, thkre whosaip it 1 if 'a 71 'ymmmmT 'Tmmm9Tmmm 1
njTrrf 'NG WIW IN f FOSTER TERRIBLE 1 XOUX 1 1 SOME MISTAKE JM.S?THI& IS ) IX 7ll iWA if I fj 1 JTk I
1 li THE MATOR M.TAP5 THE A why, we'll y have iV here--thatis A FKRA&Awa Ll W A A.- J f n' m
PARTY? HE'S HAD 0 MUCH uT4E 1 lES IT W ALL be PIC W positively not J who's haviW fC L V-- 177 T f J T HI III
CULTURE SINCE HIS FALL, HB WANT6jRLH. VP,S WLl pis&raceP.'J SUCH X FORUS.' --( A poiws here ) n V l?Vw A "
u?alSi fmmiSW .S. PANAMA.M.AMI 55.00
Sliiil f XSfMP rZZ miami-new Orleans 3530
at&Era PKEVENtSm J) TWO- LJsL4-y l -9k "Sure Ife undignified, but If. the first thinj your mother had .......

.a k 1HR yiMECTNS; WARi tCHBRCr 1 m .... that didn't cost over a quarter PANAMA C AA

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rjggimamt mr.M" r.,ri n worn thirty years too soon

CAPTAIN IASY

WORTY MEEKLI

I 00 ,wrnr Wl)t

i 00 Movl Tim: Bby Tt

I 00 Mr. Dlttrlcl Attorney

i 30 Arthur Munriy

00 CFN NIWS

Kne: Kd Sullivan

CourtesT of Arrorlas Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573-16983-1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

I

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830 Xca. Panama 1090 Jfa. Qoldn

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Care fre e
ans

Cub

Shoot

Nixons Take Red

Carry US Message Of Peace For All World'
r LENINGRAD, July 27 (UPI ) Vice-president Richard M. Nixon flew here today and said he and premier Nikita Khruehehev agreed during
their talke that "diferrences between nations must be settled at the conference table and not on the battlefield."

"So my message to the people of Leningrad from the people ot the united states is peace tor all the worm,'' Nixon va a large welcoming
arowd at Leningrad airport.
Nixon flew here from Moscow with Mrs. Nixon, Soviet first deputy premier and Mrs. Frol R. Kozlov in a Russian Tu.104 jet airliner. They
made the flight in one hour and nine minutes.
V crowd of between 100 and 1500 prsons gave the Nixon's and the Kozlov a cordial weleome at the sun-drenched airport.

In response to an official wel welcome
come welcome from chairman I. V. Spin Spin-donev
donev Spin-donev of the Leningrad commit
tws of the Communist Party, .Nix .Nixon
on .Nixon discussed his five hours and
45 minutes of "frank and com complete
plete complete talks" with Khrushchev.
"I had yesterday a very con constructs
structs constructs and full discussion on
some of the problems we have
between our two countries, MX MX-on
on MX-on said.
"I can sav that we had some
differences with chairman Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev on pom'5 of isslle- l.woul(1
lay it was not a case of his con convincing
vincing convincing me or my convincing
him.
"But thart Is a point on
which we did agrea that dif dif-fararvcai
fararvcai dif-fararvcai between nations must
b ettled at the conference ti tibia
bia tibia and not on the battlefield."
Spiridonov told Nixon in his
welcoming speech that "our peo people
ple people want to live in peace and
friendship with all peoples, espe especially
cially especially Americans."
Over the weekend Nixon won
the acclaim of thousands of cher cher-ing
ing cher-ing Russians despite his first
taste of Soviet hecklers and a
new press attack on "American
Imperialists."
Nixon held his owrt with the i
hecklers one of them apparently
a "Plant ana gave as k"ou as
he got from them at the Soviet
Agricultural and Industrial Expo Exposition
sition Exposition where other Russians cheer cheered
ed cheered him and tried to shake his
hand.
Is
Nixon's meeting with Soviet
deputy Premier Anastas I. Mi Mi-kovan
kovan Mi-kovan started on a strained
i T1 t....wU( nUnr, Hi,.!
Boeschenstein, president of the
Owens-Corning Fiherglas Corp.. of
Toledo. Ohio, to "Mikoyan's office.
.'I thought you two business businessmen
men businessmen could get together," Nix-
Weather Or Not
This weather report for tne 24
hours ending; 8 a. m. today is
prepared by the Meteorological
and Hydrographic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE:
Sigh 86 4
Low 75 77
HUMIDITY:
High 92 95
Low 69 90
WIND:
(max. mph) N il NW 14
RAIN (inches) 0 .05
WATER TEMP:
. (Inner harbors) 82 82
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake 83.40
Madden Dam 213.10
BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, JI LY 28
High
Time
9-: 38 a.m.
10:10 p.m.
Time
3:31 a.m.
4:08 p.m.
lit.
13.4 ft.
12.2 ft.
Low
Ht.
3.5 ft.
3.8 ft.
PRICES: 75c. 40c.
LAST DAY
1:15 5:10 7:05 9:00 p.m.

BMCP0N SK ilfi
M mm sri wVJ If J
f. awAtTHui
V conm tm wSJwil

Jr. iiai-twutM f h ..
rfegT:,'::::;uiffi.tl i

on told Mikoyan who doublet
at Soviet Trad Minister.
"The Stat Department will
decide that," replied Mikoyan
who has criticized U.S. Trade
restrictions.
Nixon, a non-smoker, declined a
cigarette and the men sat down
to chat.
As Nixon rode to Mikoyan's of office,
fice, office, the Communist Party news newspaper
paper newspaper Pravda was on the streets
with an attack on the American
"Captive Nations "Week" as "a
coarse, dirty adventure of Amer American
ican American imperialists."
Radio Moscow took up the
them and charged the decla declaration
ration declaration of "Captiv Nations
Week" by Congress was "an
expression of Cold War reviv revival."
al." revival." After his meeting with Miko Mikoyan,
yan, Mikoyan, Nixon and Adm. Hyman
Rickover went to Kozlov's office
28 minutes late for their ap appointment.
pointment. appointment. Nixon introduced Rickover as
"an old friend," who had met
the Soviet official on his Ameri American
can American tour. Kozlov received pic pictures
tures pictures of himself and Rickover
taken at the Shippingport, Pa.,

nuclear power plant
Kozlov and Rickover told each
other they were very photogenic
and would make "good Hollywood
movie stars
From there, Nixon went off to
the Soviet Exposition where Rus Russians
sians Russians in groups of 500 applauded
him as he went from exhibit to
exhibit.
Three times, he was stopped
by hecklers who demanded to
know about American policy.
To each, Nixon replied:
Peace Is a matter for two

New Miss Universe Prefers
Home, Kids To Movie Career

LONG BEACH, Calif. (UPI)
The first oriental beauty to win
the Miss Universe crown Ja Japan's
pan's Japan's Akiko Kojima said yes yesterday
terday yesterday a movie career may be nice
for some people, "but all I want
is to find an honest man and make
him a love'v wife."
Nevertheless, said the 22-year-
old high fashion Tokyo model,
"two movie studios 20th Century-Fox
and Warner Bros.
have expressed interest in me, and
I will make a creen test next
week."
The black-haired, black eyed
riental, who was named Miss Uni Universe
verse Universe before a (herring throng
of 4,500 in Municipal Auditorium,
hastened to add, however:
"I would be interested in only
one or two movies not a ca career.
reer. career. I would like to stay here a
while and then return home. A
woman's mosi important duty )n
life is to make a good wife, a good
mother, and I will try my best."
Miss Kojima. who stands 5 feet
6 inches tall, weighs 120 pound?
and measures 37-23-38. lives in
Tokyo with her l9year-old broth brother,
er, brother, Takao.
Her earnings of $300 to $700 a
month as a top flight model help
support him as well as her widow?
ed mother, who lives in Kochl
on the island of Shikoku, and a
younger sister. She also has an
older married sister.
'1 would like to use the money

A GREAT SPECTACLE!
A Thrilling Story of Lust, Love and
Desperate Struggle For Power!

THE REVOLT
OF THE
GLADIATORS
Starring:
Gianna Ma. Canale
Ettore Manni
f George Marshal
And a cost of thousands!
IffSSeV

Jet Airliner To
t

nations. Th only wy te get
peace is a free exchange of I I-das."
das." I-das." In his comments he chided
Khrushchev for calling Americans
"imperialists."
A sharp exchange came when
a man leaned over his shoulder
and said "it is a great provoca provocation
tion provocation to say we are suppressed
peoples. We. . ,do not consider
ourselves oppressed."
Nixon, apparently slightly an annoyed,
noyed, annoyed, said: "I think it is fin
to have freedom of speech. I
am glad that this man is able
to speak up."
As the vice president atopped
at another pavilion acrowd came
up to shake his hand.
One man called out: "How can
we have peace in the light of
your recent proclamation of so so-called
called so-called enslaved peoples which is
crude interference in the intern internal
al internal affairs of other countries."
The man said he was I. Kuz Kuz-min,
min, Kuz-min, a worker at the exhibit. Nix Nixon
on Nixon did not take kindly to him.
"We must always remember
that peace does not mean a state
of no change," the vice president
replied. "To have progress we
must have an exchange of ideas.
We must have free criticism.
"For example, Khrushchev says
we are imperialists, colonialists,
that we are keeping down the
working class of the United
States and that our children will
live under communism."
"I think he has the right to My
if because he believes It. We
think ours is best, he thinks his
is best."
He concluded, "the main thing
Is the exchange of ideas.
I get for being Miss Universe to
send my brother through college,"
she said.
The victory the first for an
Asian entry in the pageant's eight eight-year
year eight-year history guarantees her
$11,000 in contracts for tours for
a makeup firm (Max Factor) and
bathing suit company (Catalina)
which sponsor the contest.
Miss Kojima, daughter of an
Army major who died in 1950,
edged out four younger lovelies for
the crown. The runners up, in
order, were: t
Miss Norway, Jorunn Kristian Kristian-sen,
sen, Kristian-sen, 18; Miss USA, Terry Lynn
Huntingdon, 19, who won her na nation's
tion's nation's crown three nights go;
Miss England, Pamela Anne
Searle, a 21-year-old titian-haired
beauty, and Miss Brazil, Vera
Ribeiro, 19.
"Winning meant something extra
good to me," the dignified oriental
said through an interpreter. "I
was forced to withdraw from last
year's Japanese contest for Miss
Universe because of an automo automobile
bile automobile accident.
"I was riding on a float in the
parade in Japan during the com competition
petition competition when il was hit by a car.
I suffered many bruises and had
to withdraw."
Miss Kojima, whose English is
limited to a few phrases like "Oh,
my gosh," cried as she walked
down the ramp of the auditorium
after being announced as I960'
Miss Universe.
OPENS
WEDNESDAY!

I

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Moscow Crowds Impressed,
Not Overawed By US Show

MOSCOW, July 27 (UPI)-Tens
of thousands of Muscovites pour poured
ed poured into U.S. Exhibition in
Sokolniky Park over the weekend
for their first glimpse of life in
the United States. Most seemed
impressed, but not overawed.
Many Russians, with tickets dis
tributed through various Soviet
Labor and Communist Party or
ganizations, were lined up long
before the gates opened to the gen
eral public for the first time.
When the gates swung wide
there was a near-stamped of Rus
sians in their Sunday best for the
golden-domed central pavilion and
the side exhibits.
Crowds thronged past the dis
plays of baby food, shoes, hi fi
phonographs, and the model kitch
en with push-button gadgets.
Som American products, such
th Pepsi Cola given away
free at stands seemd to lav
th Russians cold. They prefer
fruit juices and mineral waters
to soft drinks.
.A mob scene developed around
the display of American automo
biles.
Many Russians seemed astonish
ed to hear they were easily avail
able In the United States.
The American book display
minus such Hems as the 1939
World Almanac which Soviet offi
cials removed also drew favor favorable
able favorable comment. Russians are avid
readers.
The lack of more industrial and
machine exhibits seemed to dis
appoint many.
Ticket were at a premium
throughout th Capital for th
six-week fair which Vic Presi President
dent President Richard M. Nixon formal formal-ry
ry formal-ry opened with th snip rib ribbon
bon ribbon Friday night.
One of th most eontroverslal
displays was the American art
show soon to be bolstered by 25
traditional paints at President Eis
enhower's suggestion.
Russians, who like "socialist
realism" in art, were baffled at
some or the modern art forms.
Russians went to th polls to
vote as Americans do but for
such candidates as Emest Hem Hemingway
ingway Hemingway and Wall Street.
The "election" was being held
at the disnlav of voting machines
at th exhibition.
Printers' Strike
In Great Britain
May End Shortly
LONDON, July 27 (UPI)-Hopes
soared today that Britain's print printing
ing printing strike would be solved soon on
the basis of a "peace" plan that
would give printers a 42-hour week
and a four and half pet cent wage
hike.
The strike by 100,000 men has
closed more than 1,000 provincial
newspaper and magazines. It is in
its sixth week.
G. G. Eastwood, spokesman for
ten printing unions Involved in the
dispute, told newsmen: "We be begin
gin begin today with high hopes of
reaching a settlement and of get getting
ting getting the men back to work be before
fore before the end of the week."
The "peace plan" was drafted
by 75 year-old Lord" Birkett, the in independent
dependent independent chairman of an employe-employer
negotiating eomit eomit-te.
te. eomit-te. Th anions had original de demanded
manded demanded a 40-hour week and 10 per
crnl pay raise.

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.60 30 JiX 8:42 p.m.
BY REQUEST OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC!

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Russian visitors to the exposi
tion were able to enter four cur
tained booths and select the can
didates they wish to vote for in
seven races. Then they could
pull the lever which records the
secret vote and keeps tally.
One question on the voting ma
chine asks which American locale
they'd like to visit; the candidates
include New Orleans, San Fran
cisco, Grand Canyon, Philadel Philadelphia",
phia", Philadelphia", Chicago, New York, Kasas
wheatfiekts and Washington.
Another question asks which
work area they would lik to
visit- aotomovil factories in
Detroit, hog farms in Iowa, tim timber
ber timber stands in th Northwest or
th Wall Street stock exchange.
The Russians could vote for their
favorite American writers includ including
ing including James Fenimore Cooper,
Mark Twain, Jack London, Carl
Sandburg, William Faulkner, or
Ernest Hemingway.
They could select outstanding
Americans from among George
Washington, Benjamin Franklin
Thomas Jefferson and Abraham
Lincoln.
Eight American guides were as assigned
signed assigned to explain the American
voting machines to the Russians
whose own balloting is somewhat
different.
Th Russians rciv ballot
with their own nam on it and
drop it into a ballot box with without
out without marking It if they apprev
of th singl slat of eandi eandi-dites.
dites. eandi-dites. ,, f .'.
Arthur Darby of New York, who
heads the display, said it was
similar to the setup suggested by
President Eisenhower which turn
ed out to be one of the sensa sensations
tions sensations of the Brussels exhibition.
"The questions were selected on
the basis of the whether they would
be of interest to the Russians,
and on subjects of which they
had som knowledge," Darby
said.
Early Hearings Set
For Eastland's Plan
On Morals, Decency
WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen. Olin
D. Johnston (D-S.C.) has called
for early hearings on his proposed
constitutional amendment to let
each state decide its own stand standards
ards standards of "decency and morality"
in such things as book and movie
censorship.
Johnston wrote Chairman James
0. Eastland (D-Miss.) of the Sen Senate
ate Senate Judiciary Committee this week weekend
end weekend that the measure is needed be because
cause because of a recent U. S. district
court decision prohibiting the Post
Office from banning the novel
"Lady Chatterley's Lover" from
the mails.
Johnston earlier urged the Post
Office to appeal the ruling. He
said he hoped a higher court
would reinstate the ban on what
he called a 'disgracefully ob obscene
scene obscene book."
In his letter to Eastland, Johns Johnston
ton Johnston said "it would be of great
help in this situation if you could
call for hearings on this resolution
at an early date in order that this
problem may be fully aired."
Johnston, a member of the com committee,
mittee, committee, said his- proposal would
"guarantee the right of each state
on the basis of its own public pol policy
icy policy to decide questions of decen decency
cy decency and morality and to enact leg legislation
islation legislation with respect thereto."
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Castro's brother Raul, pony pony-tailed
tailed pony-tailed command r of Cuba's
armed forces, set the stage for
his appearance with a speech
sayuxg that "the only thing we
ask Is that ridel return."
Osvaldo Dortlcos Torrado
who was installed as president
in place of Urrutla. then sten-
ped forward to announce that
wsfuo naa aeuued to resume
his duties as premier "as a re result
sult result of your mandate."
Castro confirmed his deci decision
sion decision in a 2 H -hour speech, de declaring
claring declaring also that anyone who
opposed his land reform plans
would face a "united front"
of machete-wielding peasants
like those who heard him
speak.
Both Castros declared repeat repeatedly
edly repeatedly that the machetes in the
civic center were there to de defend
fend defend the Cuban revolution a-
gainst unidentified enemies
who, Raul said, had plotted to
assassinate Fidel and his prin principal
cipal principal aides.
Police took no chances that
anti-Castro forces might use
the occasion of the anniversary
leienuuues m cause trouble.
xire government ordered a
12-hour ban on sale of alcoholic
beverages. Some 235,000 mache mache-te?ear
te?ear mache-te?ear r y i n g peasants milled
wirougn tne streets.
Police said a tip led them to
searcn .rrincipe Prison in Ha Havana
vana Havana and find hidden weapons.
ucy sam political prisoners
joined by common criminals
piannea a major riot yesterday
to trv to spoil the celebrations.
une prisoner tried to fight
,ut una was tear-gassed
into submission. Twenty five
gasoline bombs and 60 daggers
were found, police said.
1 Ceremonies started at mid midnight
night midnight Saturday with the chime
or .a peu on the state radio net
Austerity Program
For Peru Launched
By New Premier
LIMA, July 27 (UPI)- Premier
Pedro Beltran launched his "aus "austerity"
terity" "austerity" ccampaisn todav bv elimi
nating price controls and subsidies
on meat, raising the price of oil-
aenved fuels and increasing tran transit
sit transit fares.
The new Premier who is also
finance minister, cushioned t h e
shock of the program bv erantins
a $1.80-a-month allowance to work
ers who earn less than $54 a month.
The oil-price and fare rises will
Lbe fixed, but meat -prices will be
auowea to und their own level.
The government's main purpose
in increasing the price of such
fuel as gasoline, kerosene and
Diesel oil is to stimulate Peru's
own oil industry..
Although prices in some cases
were virtually doubled, they were
still low-by the standards of most
foreign countries 19 cents a gal-
ion lor extra", gasoline, for ex example.
ample. example. Urban transportation fares
were increased about a cent.
An official announcement said
that, if the price rise did not in increase
crease increase Peru's oil production, the
government would ask Congress
for legislation designed to encour encourage
age encourage foreign development of the na nation's
tion's nation's oil fields.
Sk csa m a es
IBY NUMEROUS1
REQUESTS!
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Beginning.
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WEDNESDAY 29th
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HE'LL STICK AROUND Cuba's revolutionary her,. Fidel Gastrof
told screaming Cubans last night he would continue in the. posCpl
prime minister, thus withdrawing the resignation he had submittedf
last week in a maneuver designed to effect the ouster of Presiiienji 1
Manuel Urrutia. Castro, who had cut down the length of :onedfi
his usual marathon speeches last week to a bare 45 minuiei'Mi a
gained his old form speaking to tha masses for 212 hours, j.
. .r

work. This was the signal for a
minute of bell pealing in ail
Cuban churches.
The Moncada Army barracks
at Santiago, where 100 "Fidelis-

Federal Reserve Board Not6s
US' Recent Economic Growth

WASHINGTON, July 27 (UPI)
The nation's economic growth
has been "materially greater"
over the past 10 years than
previously believed, chairman
William Mc. Martin of the Fed Federal
eral Federal Reserve Board said today.
Martin said this was shown
in a revision of the board's in industrial
dustrial industrial production index.
He told the joint economic
committee that the new index
will show a level of about 165
at mid-1959 10 points high higher
er higher than reflected by the unre unre-vised
vised unre-vised index for June.
Martin made the statement
In explaining his opposition to
a house proposal which, in ef
feet, would instruct the federal
reserve system to buy long-term
government bonds as a means
of increasing the money supply.
"Under present conditions,"
he said, he believed such ac action
tion action would be inflationary and
might put the federal reserve
system In a frozen position
so far as holding are concern concerned.
ed. concerned. He denied that his stand rep
resents "arrogance or defiance
of congress. Rather, he said
it was a "question of principle
Ay JLZLR E L

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in management of- ear Money
supply."
The federal reserva index-(
industrial production is a tra traditional
ditional traditional yardstick of economie
growth. U'
Martin said the revised indes
results from "digesting" the last 5
full census and reappraising in- 3,
dustrial data in that light.
Some of the improved position, S
he said, results from including
more fuel and energy produc i
tion figures which wefe not
previously represented in th
index.
But he said more than half
the increase results fsom im improvements
provements improvements in measurementtof
presently included industries
"The main, effect ef the revi revision
sion revision in the total," he said5
to tilt upward this measure -of
industrial growth over the past j
decade." .
For example, he said, it plow
appears that industrial output
of consumer goods on a revised
list has risen at an average- an annual
nual annual rate of 3.8 percent as com
pared with 3.2 percent sown
oy the unrevised index for con-

he noted, has oeen at a rate? 01
1.7 percent a year.
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