The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03073

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Related Items:
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Full Text
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CANADIAN WIIIS ICY
-J.iefJ
'IS I
"Let the people know the trutfi and the ebuntry is safe9' Abraham tAncoln
44th YEAR
PANAMA, R. P, SUNDAY, JULY M, 195
TO CENTS

Isftirtsfl
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Castro Exchanges PM's Post
For Duty On Pitching Mound

HAVANA, July 25 8(UP1)
Fidel Castro traded his political
troubles-, for a baseball cap last,
J'- night and,, with the heltf of an
admiring umpire, pitched., his
"Bearded Rebels" to a 0-0 mo moral
ral moral v victory over a military
' .-, police, team.
( Castro said he will announce
1 tomorrow whether he will-je-
main as premier.
" The revolutionary hero, appear appear-'
' appear-' tog in exceptionally good humor,
. if not form,' participated in a
two and one-half inning exhibi exhibi-i
i exhibi-i bition game in Havana's Grand
. Stadium.
i He struck out the first' man
he faced after the umpire" con-
' verted a head-high pitch into a
third strike. Castro acknowledged
that the pitch was a wee bit
high, but aelcared. He -also call-
t ed one of my, strikes a ball."
" Then he proceeded to walk up
to the batter's box and shake
the umpire's hand, much to
' the delight of the more than

tp--38,00d fans who had jammed

, the stadium to see the tun.
The next batter grounded out
and the third went down swing swinging
ing swinging to give Castro a perfect in inning.
ning. inning. He himself grounded out when
he get to bat but said "At
least I didn't strike out."
The game was but one of a
, number of festivities which were
being staged in Havana in pre preparation
paration preparation for the huge "26th of
July" revolutionary movement an anniversary
niversary anniversary today.
. More than 500,000 persons were
expected to attend a farmers
rally in Hvana today at which
; time Castro said he would an announce
nounce announce his decision on whether
to withdraw the resignation as
premier he submitted a week
go Firday.
There; was little chance that
he would refuse the mounting
entreatis-d the Cuban people to
return as titular head of their
,. governmnt. - i
Castro" went to the resident
tlal Palace yesterday for the
"first time Since his break with
ex-president Manuel Urrutia Lto
. to confer with Osvaldo Dorticos
' Torrado, the new president.
After the meeting, Dorticos an an-'
' an-' Bounced that 1 .hp. and his ca cabinet
binet cabinet would go '-to Santiago to today,
day, today, to mark the holiday at
'the scene of Castro's 1953 attack
" against "Hfoncado Barracks, the
start of the armed revolt a a-gainst,Ftilgencio
gainst,Ftilgencio a-gainst,Ftilgencio Batista.
Dorticos assured the Cuban
people last night that Castro
could 'not for long resist the
.mounting pressure they have put
on him to return to the post
of premier.
"His return to the leadership vof
the government is necessary ,for
the definitive triumph of our .re .revolution."
volution." .revolution." Dorticos declared in a
nationwide television appearance.
FRIED EGG1" CHAIR It's
egg" chair. Beth Seidman Is
chair's frame i$ cast In plastic

.,,.;'- .... V .,

in i 1 1 i i ii in mi immmnmiimiiiiiiimi iw rmniiwn iiihiiiii iiiiii n

$7500 Mohkey-Bites-Ankle

A personal damage suit 'filed
. tgakist a Panama travel agency
.ivy a New York woman has been
postponed for trial at u.&. uis-.
;rict Court, Cristobal, until Aug,
The suit resulted from an uri
expected tangle between the va vacationing
cationing vacationing lady and an unfriendly
monkey who resided at the Fort
Sherman loologlcat bouse;
. It all gogs back to July ,1967
jwhen Adelaide Seivert, ac accounting
counting accounting clerk of Jamaica. New
York, decided to make a round
trip vacation cruise to the Pana Panama
ma Panama Canal Zone and Panama,

HAIRY irURLER-Guba's bearded : Prime .Minister Fidel Castro
warms' upla; Havana's Grand Stadiumwhere'. he pitched one
inning -against a Military Police team Friday as part of the
week's festivities in celebration of-the sixth anniversary of the
"26th of July-Revolution." r;

He said he felt the will of -the
people is above Castro's "firm
personal decision" to hold to
the resignation he so surprising surprisingly
ly surprisingly submitted a week ago.
Castro and a number of Ca Cabinet
binet Cabinet ministers were in the
studio audience,- The revolution revolutionary
ary revolutionary hero i expected to an an-;
; an-; nounce at' the mass peasants'
; rally in Havana today his deci decision
sion decision to pick up the reins of of office
fice office again.

a pteoa ol furniture with plenty of leg room, this unusual "frfed
demonstrating it at the Home Furnishings Show in Chicago. The
and baa foam rubber ftoed on.

' She booked passage on the An
con for the round trip cruise, in
cluding : paid-in-advance tour of
the' area to be arranged By Boyd
Bros. Inc.,, Panaa travel agent.
;t',!i'V'!u'.;-
Boyd Bros, thoughtfully provid
ed a private car and guide f or
th liehtseeinsr trip here and a
mong the places Miss Seivert and
several travel companions were
taken to was the Ft, Sherman
Zoological Gardens.' on the. Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic side of the Canal .Zone;
There, according to-the lady's
allegations..-the guide, took two
of tha visitors Into the zoo house

6

An estimated 90,000 peasants
streamed, into the city Thursday,
niaking a total of Tiearly 200,000
who already have arrived for, the
rally. Most earned machetes.
Ther voices were expected to be
raised in the "unanimous cry
"Fidel, come back."
The Cuban Confederation of La Labor
bor Labor was equally eager to have
Castro restored to the premiership.,

Suit Rescheduled In Crist obal

proper, where an uncaged mon monkey
key monkey set upon Miss Seivert, sink sinking
ing sinking his, teeth into her left ankle,
as a result of which she "suffered
pain and anguish, disability and
disfigurement to her damage in
amount of ,$7500.:f
Mis Seivert also alleges sign
posted 'at the zoo house entrance
admonished against entering but
that she and her companion
trusted to the guide's judgment
in this matter, and that her lnju
ry resulted from the guide's neg negligence;
ligence; negligence; The injured toavelar was givi

fata F

Soviet, British

Criticize Public Argument
Of Nixon, Nikita At Show

MOSCOW. July 25 (UPI)
newspaper Pravda unleashed
foreign policy today just when

appeared to be emereinc aa sometninr or a popular hero in

Moscow.
Pravda. in the fourth Russian attack on President Eiscn

hower's proclamation of "Captive Nation's Week," called the
move a "coarse, dirty venture of the American Imperialists
which has drawn the anger and condemnation of all the So So-cialist
cialist So-cialist countries."

It called it "unconcealed inter intervention
vention intervention in the internal affairs
of other states" and a "most im impudent
pudent impudent incursion of American ag aggressors
gressors aggressors against the sovereign
and independent countries" of Al Albania,
bania, Albania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Viet
Nam, East Germany, China,
North Korea, Mongolia, Poland,
Romania, the Soviet Union and
Czechoslovakia.
Nixon's current visit to Mos Moscow
cow Moscow also made headlines in Brit British
ish British newspapers today. Nixon and
Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev were rapped for their pub public
lic public argument at Moscow.
"A disgraceful performance,"
said Lord Beaverbrook's Daily
Express.
"Two public men engage in
bickering in public. They make
oflensive remarks to one another.
They disclosed a lack of re restraint
straint restraint which Is completely de
plorable.
"Back to the days of secret di
plomacy is the gest prospect for
world peace," the Daily Express
said.
The. Daily Telegtaph said world
opinion will decide vthat j '"both
men are equally Ho blame for
"bickering when serious problems
are facing the "world; and; we
sober attention with which-" the
Geneva talks have been follow
ed is likejy to be distracted."
All of London's morning news
papers, except the tamoids, gave
the Moscow incident top billing.
Headlines included the Express'
The Moscow Follies" and the
Herald's "The Moscow Circus.w
The Nixon-Khrushchev verbal
soarrine match had a sequel last
evening when Vice Adm.Hyman
Kickover, the father ot jtne at
omic submarine was introduced
to the Soviet premier at the U.S.
exmniuon.
Khrushchev said. ;'X
"We have 178,000,000 champions
of peace," Rickover replied,' and
the Soviet premier promptly
countered with, "we have 208,-
000.000 champions of peace.!
"Good!" Rickover said. "Let's
In ykif saw, it was announced
tod.ay that Nixon will visit Polan"
''fofa few days" on his way
back home from Moscow.
He Will arrive here Aug. 2. It
was not known exactly how long
he would remain in Poland, 'but
Polish sources expected It would
be four days.
During Friday's extraordinary
public squabble, Nixon said "both
sides can learn much" from each
other. "What is needed more than
anything else in the world is
free exchange of ideas."
Aquilino Boyd
SerMs Greetings
To UAR Minister
Former Foreign Minister Aqui
lino Boyd today sent greetings
to United Arab Republic Minis
ter Dr. Mohamed E. Tabei on
the occasion of the third anni
versary of the nationalisation of
the Suez Canal by UAR Pres
ldent Gamal Abdel Nasser.
In 'the note to El Tabei, Boyd
also expressed fervent hopes
mat tne day will come soon
with the republic of Panama will
be able to commemorate as
one of its glorious dates, the
one on whicE jurisdiction over
the Cabal Zone is recuperated."
en first aid at the Ft. Sherman
dispensary, and later was treat treated
ed treated by her own doctor at Jamai Jamaica,
ca, Jamaica, N.Y. Her doctor's bill of $35,
is also being asked, in addition
to the $7500 damages.
Court officials said -the long
delay in bringing the case to
hearing, .resulted front the time
consuming task of procuring nec necessary
essary necessary depositions front' witnesses,
who could not;, return here for
fee WaU..'-xi;.'i''::.iHt
Miss Seivert is represented
here by Woodrow de Castro and
L, s. tarrington is aefeoso eoun eoun-set
set eoun-set fox Boyd Bros lL

Newspapers

The official Communist party
another violent attack on U.S.
Vice President Richard M. Nixon
Khrushchev tried to change
the subject to washing ma ma-chines.'But
chines.'But ma-chines.'But thev could not seem
to get off Wre basic subjects.
Nixon pointed jo the wash washing
ing washing machine and said "is it
not far better to be talking
of washing machines than
machines of warlike rockets?
This is the kind ot competi competition
tion competition you want. I know, you
said so."
Khrushchev, raising his voice,
said: "Your generals say they
are so powerful they can de destroy
stroy destroy us. We can also show you
something so that you will
know the Russian spirit."'
At which point Nixon broke
in: "If you were in the Unit United
ed United States Senate you would be
accused of filibustering.
"If your reporters check on
the time," Khrushchev retort
ed, "they will see who has talk talked
ed talked more."
Nixon went on: "You are
strong and we are strong. In
some ways you are stronger but
in other ways we might be
stronger. We ar both so strong,
not only hi modem weapons but
also to will and spirit,"
Apparently referring to
Berlin, he said neither na nation
tion nation should put the other in
a position of "facing an ulti ultimatum."
matum." ultimatum." "With modern, weapons it
does not make any difference.
If war comes we bothhave
had it."
' Khrushchev acknowl edged
that the American people want
peace. .?
Nixon warned that if any
"powerful" nation gives ulti ultimatums"
matums" ultimatums" you are playing with
the most destructive, forces in
the world.
"Who is giving an ultima
turn?" asked Khrushchev. "You
are putting great emphasis on
ultimatums. If you want to
frighten us, it will not work
We will answer your threats
with threats."
At times, their voices rose
They often appeared to be on
the verge of anger, bub did not
reach, that point.
. Nixon said he did not quite
understand now tney got start
ed on such hard terms.
"You started it," Khrushchev
replied. "You wanted indirectly
to threaten me. But we have
means at our disposal which
can have very bad conse consequences."
quences." consequences." i-
"We have too" replied Nix Nixon,
on, Nixon, his voice sharp.
Khrushchev raised a finger.
"Ours are better If you
want to compete."
But he added, "we want
peace and friendship with A A-merica
merica A-merica and all other nations."
"We also want peace," said
Nixori. "But I don't think the
cause of peace can be served
by reiterating the point you
have brought up."
"But you challenged me," said
Khrushchev. "Let us argue fair fairly."
ly." fairly." ;
vi
Hugh M.Thomas Jr.
Dies In California1:
Hugh M. Thomas Sr:, long
time superintendent of the Qa Qa-tun
tun Qa-tun locks, died Friday in Arca Arcadia,
dia, Arcadia, calif., after an illness of
several weeks, according to In Information
formation Information received on the Isth Isthmus
mus Isthmus last night. H
Mr. Hughes was a Panama
Canal employe from 1909 to
1947.
He was appointed assistant
superintendent of the, Oatun
locks In 1921, and moved up to
the superintendent's position fn
1925, I" '.';.
He is survived by his wife and
three daughters Mrs. Virginia
Harvey of Balboa, Mrs. Grace
Maria Garcia of Fresno, Calif.,
and Mrs. Thelma Wyman of
Salinas, Calif. and two sons,
both of whom are Panama
Canal employes. They are Ro
bert Thomas of Ctatun ana
Hugh Thomas' Jr. of Margarita.
There are nine grandchildren.
Masonic services for Mr. Tho
ma wlU be bold la California.

V
Britain Decides
To Push For Fast
Berlin Agreement
GENEVA, July 25 (UPI) -Britain
has decided to push for a
quick Berlin truce agreement and
an East-West Summit meeting in
September despite American and
French coolness to the latest So Soviet
viet Soviet maneuvers, authoritative
sources said today.
Foreign sacratarv Selwvn
Lloyd, in London this weekend
for talk with Prime Ministtr
Harold Macmillan, hat launched
a campaign with this cUarcut
objective, the sources said.
Britian5 was said to fael that
even the most limited Berlin
true would justify a' Summit
meeting.
At the same time Russia has
discreetly informed the West it
still wants a Summit conference
and prefers holding one at an
early date. The information dis dispelled'
pelled' dispelled' earlier Communist reports
the Kremlin had cooled toward
such a meeting.
During the past week Commu Communist
nist Communist sources put out the word
Moscow was losing, interest in
the top level meeting.
Than Premier Nikita Khrush
chev raised the subject again
as ha was leaving Wars'w
Wednesday night and the word
spread in private diplomatic
talks that the Russians were
anxious.
The new Russian Summit move
was made with studied "casual-
ness," apparently in order to a-
void toe impression amone the
Western' allies that ", Khrushchev
was.ovujxrousj;"
-Western, diplomats said Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev apparently "was yearning-for
some international success: to
boost his prestige since hid ef
forts -in the Old War fields have
produced few major results.
Diplomats said Moscow's seem seemingly
ingly seemingly lessening interest in a Sum Summit
mit Summit conference last week mere mere-ly
ly mere-ly Was part of a deliberate cam campaign
paign campaign to whittledown- the Western
price.
BALBOA TIDES
MONDAY, JULY 17
High
Time
8:51 a.m.
9:13 p.m. ;
Time
2:40 a.m.
Ht.
Low
14.8 ft.
12.9 ft.
Ht.
2.6 ft.
3:14 p.m. .......... 3.2 ft.
MISS UNIVERSES. Japanese

fit

universe imv, raies a rega kiss irom ixuomoiaa i.ua Maria Maria-guluaga,
guluaga, Maria-guluaga, Miss Universe 1951

1
Promises West
Will Never Accept
Soviet Deadline

BERLIN, July 25 (UPI)US secretary of state, Chris Christian
tian Christian A. Herter promised West Berliners today the West
will never accept a Soviet deadline for withdrawing its
troops from the divided city.
Herter flew to the isolated city from Geneva for o six six-hour
hour six-hour visit to demonstrate Western determination to hold
Berlin in the face of Soviet threats. TT
In a speech at City Hall he clearly and emphatically
dissipated fears the West might allow its position hert
to Be undermined in an effort to reach agreement with
Russia at the Geneva foreign ministers conference.
"Much has been said at Geneva about the question of
Western rights in Berlin," Herter said.
"These rights are clear and cannot be terminated by
the unilateral action of any other power. We hvae not ac accepted
cepted accepted and will not accept any deadline on them."

He said the United States has
said repeteadly it will defend West
Berlin and this is a binding com commitment
mitment commitment and the U.S. will abide
by it."
"I km that the teople of
West Berlin regard our troops
and those of France and the U U-nited
nited U-nited Kingdom at defenders of
their freedom," Herter said.
. if. n V ?i
:. Vt;'.fcriow too "that" the presence
of-these iroopScWhich will be ore-
served, is indispensable to the
continuance of that freedom in
the three Western sectors of the
city-
He said he wanted to "assure
the Berliners that the United
States will not forget its respon responsibilities
sibilities responsibilities toward Berlin."
In what appeared to be a break
in the deadlocked foreign minis-
Not Satisfied
OLDHAM, England (UPI) -Thieves
stole a. television set,
hair drier, pressiife cooker, elec electric
tric electric toaster,, vacuum cleaner and
some luggage from Mrs. Joyce
Willerton last month.
But apparently the thieves
weren't satisfied with them.
Thursday, the ; appliances mys mysteriously
teriously mysteriously reappeared in her back
yard, neatly stacked against a
wall.
lovely Aklko Kojima, alias Miss

Of, . V:.:

ters conference at Geneva Rns-
sia ana the west eat Hnwn tn
brass tacks for the first time yes yesterday
terday yesterday on detftils of a 'possiblo
Berlin truce agreement. J -Soviet
foreign minister Andrei
Gromyko, reversing his previous
stand; suggested the discussion'
to his U.S., British and French

counterparts. i ,J
Gromyko tave no Indlcal V ? f

newever, mat he-wa reaV. to- i

rower ms price tag on an actual -'
settlement that would end the
explosive Berlin crisis. His price
which the West has rejected, has
been an all-German committee
on which East and West Ger Germans
mans Germans would sit as equajk
Until yesterday, Groihyko has
refused even to talk about a Ber.
lin truce pact unless the West a
greed in advance to an all Gen
man committee.
The West insists such a Commit Committee
tee Committee would perpetuate the division
ot Germany.
Western delegates differed ftj
their assessment of Grorayko's
move.
U.S. sources felt that the pro progress
gress progress was strictly procedral ani
therefore not too significant.
The British were optimisMe,
pointing out that the talks still 1
are very much alive.
The French were gloomy, eon-
tending that Gromyko simply
was playing for time.
Soviet spokesman Mikhail Khar Khar-lamov
lamov Khar-lamov shared the hopeful outlook
of the British. He said "today's
meeting was of certain interest
because it dealt with concrete
questions on Berlin. A certa:n
coming together made itself vi vi-dent."
dent." vi-dent." The foreign ministers agreed to
continue the eight-weekrold talks
privately at a "working tea" Mon Monday
day Monday afternoon at the villa ol
British foreign secretary Selwyn
Lloyd. Presumably they will tai
up the truce pact again.
Yesterday's discussions between
Gromyko, Lloyd, Herter aid.
French Foreign Minister MaurifO
Couve de Murville, were held in
private at Herter's residence.
They lasted three hours.
The session began with discus discussion
sion discussion of Russia's proposal for an
all-German committee.'
Conference sources said t hm
Western ministers told Gromyjt
again the West would not pay thi
price for a settlement, and press
ed him hard to say wheth-r he
would not waive this condition.
The Soviet delegate was do.
scribed as "evasive," but he al also
so also gave no indication that he
would back down eventually.
Then, suddenly, Gromyko sur surprisingly
prisingly surprisingly suggested that a Berlin
truce agreement be discussed.
The ministers promptly plunged,
for the first time since the confer
ence began into a discussion of
detailed points of a, possible tiuca
in the beleaguered city.
Plastic Clue
For Broken Bones
WASHINGTON (UPI) Tht
Army says it has an experiment
tal plastic glue designed to repair ''
broken bones and gets a patient
on bis feet in two days.
The substance could prove yU- :;
tally important to ground forces
because 60 per cent of combat t
casualties are bone fractures, tho4
Army said. V. ,.-?
The plastic, a polyurethan t,
polymer, is a foam which' can,
bind broken bones together until ;
bone cells grow through the sub
stance. Natural bone eventual!
would replace tko pUatiav s

I;

2

I



AOI TWO

THE SUM) At AMERICAN
SUNDAY, JULY 28, 1959

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNED AND PUUHHIt Y TNtNMA AMKKICAN HIIHt INC
FOUNDS. Y NKLSON MOUNatVBU. Ill KM
HAftMODIO ABIAa, EDITOR
13-37 H TKIIT O. BOX 134. PANAMA. H. OT P.
TELEPHONE X-0740 IS LNE
CABLE ADDRESS" PANAMKHICAN, PANAMA
Colon ernes. 12 17 Centhal Avenue eetween 1ST" an 13th CTMrra
v fomisn Representative' JOSHU a. POWER. INC.
348 MADISON AVE.. NEW YORK. 1T) N. Y.
LOCAL MAIL
PER MONTH IN Ji2

Fo Six month in advance
Wnm niii tub in

THIS IS YOUR FORUM THt READERS OWM COLUMN
I
. The Mail Box is an open tor urn lor rsadert of Tn Panama American.
Z Letters art receive' gratefully and art handled hi wholly tonfldenHel
aunner. :
f It yen contribute a letter don't be impatient if It doesn't appear the
next day. Letters are published in the order received.
. Please try te keep fhe letters limited to one page lensjth. '',
j Identity of letter writers is held in strictest confidence.
This newspaper assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions
? expressed in letters from readers.

THE MAIL BOX

TREATY HISTORY REVIEWEp
ft-
Sir:
In 1953, practically on the threshold of its golden anniversary of
freedom, the republic of Panama faced what its leading citizens have
described as the turning point in its life as an independent nation.
One iiiindred thousand Panamanians gathered at Fifth of May
;. Plaza on Aug. 27, 1953, in a public farewell to the delegatei who
r were going tu Washington to negotiate a revision of contractual
agreements between Panama and the United States.
k Later, Presidents Eisenhower and Remon in their historic meet-
ing said "we have agreed"... that the principle of equality of oppor oppor-V
V oppor-V tunity and treatments must have full effect in regard to the citizens
S of Panama and the U.S. employed in the Canal Zone. ." It is recall-
"ed that this conversation went on "the best of cordiality, at the top
level, but with manifest hostility from those who held bureaucratic
g posts in the Depart of State."
After the joint statement was agreed to by the two chiefs of
state, a member of the State Department "attempted to substitute
the original draft with one entirely different. When this new develop-
ment turned up, the late President Remon said to President Eisen-

V rirwfr "T can't have this OTinK

5 spoke sufficiently clear, it seems that your subordinates did not un un-4
4 un-4 derstand what you said and they want to take out this and that from
our joint statement."
sL Eisenhower then turned to Secretary of State John Foster Dulles
m and said, "Mr Dulles, I don't think there is a thing to object to
T here, this is the same thing. Don't take away a period or a comma.
Today we are fighting throughout the world for justice be done to
" our citizens and that being so, we must do justice to our friends, the
2 Panamanians, who have shown that they are our friends."
5- Dulles had this to say. We have to admit as honest peopH that
2 we "'are that wo haven't dealt with Panama as they deserve, but we
$"ant our Panamanian friends to know that this has not been through
neglect, but through carelessness." -',

- For these two great men President Eisenhower and Secretary

Dulles I ask an ovation and the eternal admiration oi an ranaman ranaman-Han
Han ranaman-Han Wp as Panamanians trustine. believine and admiring our be

cloved. President did just what he

,i.Mwivas" were heard in Santa Ana Plaza for tnis trio ana our esieem
First Lady Cecilia Pinel de Remon.
' The seeds nf hate were shown by the bureaucrats in the State
; Department. This group, determined not to comply with the man man-!
! man-! dates of their President, continues to deny our proposals.

in uecKmuer ui lao. me eve
. l 1

' ident Remon said: "In due time I

pie as I did on the night of Oct. 7,
.....

anes and the future generations
'. tiations."

The first of a series of briefings the chief executive planned to
hold with representative groups of citizens before the new treaty was
ent to the National Assembly for ratification became a reality when

President Remon, his cabinet,
Deputies and newspaper editors
ion of the draft of the new Treaty

operation. This phase of enlightment was abruptly curtailed when

"a political rival assassinated
ejected his commitments.

On Jan. 25, 1955, the stamping of signatures on the part of the
two nations binding them to the contract was unevenful.

The ratification on the part
one member against and 52 in
Arias said there and in firm words
"I am certain. . that you will

amanian demands are attained, substantial gains have been achieved
with respect to questions which have been the concern of our most
zealous countrymen, positive advantages of an economic nature have
been attained which tend to a more fair distribution of the benefits
derived from the Canal enterprise, and that, especially the position
of the vast group of Panamanian workers in the Canal Zone has been
improved."

The ratification on the part of the United States revealed 73 in
favor and 14 against. These congressmen using their constitutional
rights said: "the treaty und a memorandum of understandings is a
package in which the U.S. both gave and received certain rights;
we have been fair to Panama economically, morally and in every
area which must be weighed in past dealings with Panama: the
treaty is designed to placate the government and people of Panama
1 . i in i. i j. A.

him iu secure certain cuiicessions inai wiu De oi Denem airecuy uj uv.. irit,----ij -----
the U.S. military establishment in the Canal Zone rather than to the'STL f;,P 20 w" m?ch
canal; the treaty represents merely a yielding on part of this country tuTn? fv'r, WV

under pressure from the Panamanian government; in the event of ,,"nP nf ThZ. 'wmL
war, we will again be bled white .andjorced to rent some land in f, :??LJm 5.'
order to defend this vital area CZ.; we believe the Republic ol,wS.,ffM iif,c0i10" l,11;
Panama will never take less than control of the Zone and the first ,nv Zvlf ..! ik!, w.
thing we know they'll be leasing things we now own; the treaty i'I" ,?unid nnlV 2rt n
takes a big chunk; the treaty is a give-away treaty"... jfj.K Shrn'oS 'be-
At the conclusion of the signing of the treaty Joe Zonian said in Jf yoij!taf?. "f ,? .th!
part: "the average Zonian expected a lot worse, for instance, the re- ft' ml "..i?Iot nd
moval of luxuries from the commissary. We were half prepared for t .5 mi?" r-n
this and when it didn't come, it was an anti-climax. . t.,P", m A. "JM. R,U. 1 ?
One group of non-citizens had this to say: "..if wage increases :f"yL: L wn. Jl
which will no doubt be granted are not commensurate to the loss in if tk- .y. I LJL .P- di
take-home-pay, they are working out a program to replace loss of L1, ,n1 1
then the pre- A"0.; M,nif tn

cm cummirsary privileges, we snau noi cry over split mm,..
This group later, said: The negotiators took away from the work-
ers and gave to the industrialists and engineered the most disgrace-1

ful take-away and give-away affair

Another group of non-citizen workers had this to say: "they had
assured President Arias and his administration that It was 100 pet
ent behind the treaty provided: that definite assurance be given by
the national government that job opportunities would be provided
for persons' becoming unemployed... and also for the already large
army of unemployed in both terminal cities; that the loss of talv
home pay be compensated by a commensurate increase In salary
or by the lowering f prices in the Republic; that the interest Of the;
masses are safe?tfarded and tangible efforts are made to improve
their standard of living. -. ;
John S. Scybolu", president of the Panama Canal Co. saidt4...
the pact pledges the United States to get a single wage for all US and
Panamanian employees and extd Civil Service protection to Pan
amanians."
Among factors which would contribute to losses, Seybold cited
the single waje scale, the civil service provision... The 1956 estim estimated
ated estimated expenses, without considering the effects of the new treaty, and
the estimated income would result in a loss of $2,900,000. 'In view
of the present prospective deficit, we might have to ask Congrese
for an appropriation increase in 1957... The company would proceed
cautiously in any procram of reDlaelnc American neronnl with

Panamanian and that under the treaty the company could not switch
back to Americans if Panamanians should prove less efficient..."
While it is a fact that the United States officials have always
resorted to a legislative approach to every problem in the Canal

one anectmg non-citizens, it would appear that we are guests in
our own homes because of the manner in which they are handling
the mandates of a noble accomplishment.
Arguments have been that the native workers, non-citizeni, of
the Canal Zone under the palpable custom of unequal pay for equal
work, of segregation, of discrimination and of prescription of oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities for advancement should remain content because "they are
better off than they would be under the systems and wage scales
prevailing hi the terminals cities" bartering the Canal Zone.
In the Canal Zone today the truth is, truth like heat will melt
butter, that regarding the contractual obligation between the two
Countries no regulation, executive ruling, law or mutual cooperation
Is adherent to the principle on which it was formed, especially per pertinent
tinent pertinent in view of today's scandalous contrast between the well-being
of some and the insufficiency of others.
Non-Chameleon.

w w y ---.-.

WlM you, Decause i.uuugii juu
asked of us. Prolonged shouts of
.1 t 1.1 4. 4...
ui mc o it i unit vuj Mtaj
will speak to the Panamanian peo
1953, in order that our contempoiy
J 1 A 1L t Al
snau Know me wuwi oi uiese nc&v
the negotiators; National Assembly;
met for an article-by-article discus-f
of Mutai understanding ana re
the man who Kept his wora ana re
of the Panamanian legislature had
favor. The then President Ricardo
the following:
find that while not all of the Pan
during the years

Ruarkous
Comments

By ROBERT C. RUARK
BARCELONA I would like to
day to do a piece about writers,
for I have read about whimpering
homily to F. Scott Fitzgerald, anu
I weary of the legend. Since i
was also able to weary of Eu
gene 0 Neili ana Thomas Wolie,
not to mention Boris Pasternak,
you cannot accuse me oi playing
favorites. i
There is something wrong with
the writing trade if you got to
die, generally drunk, dope-addict
ed or just plain nuts, to be a le legend.
gend. legend. It does not seem quite fair to
such terribly well-adjusted people
as John MeumecK, tor example.
who can drink a good glass like
the rest of us, but who continues
to love Miss Elaine and to pay
his bills while writing prose.
Perhaps I am not worthy of
carrying F. Scott Fitzgerald's bad
checks, and I certainly will never
make as much literary mileage
out of my family as O'Neill or
Wolfe, but I can tell you one
thing.
I just finished a book which in
volved four years of writing and
which will be published on Oct.
26, and that book took a minimum
of five million words out of my
nervous system in order to get a
ciean 4uu,wo-or about five 10ne
novels. Under one cover.
This does not preclude the col
umns which are necessary to
my financial health, or the maga magazine
zine magazine pieces or the correspondence
or the daily paper-reading, or
trips to various foreign places
such at Australia. London, and
Upper Kaabong, In Uganda.
inis does not prelude the busi
ness of tax returns, long written
fights with publishers, or getting
loaaea wnen tne time seems like likely.
ly. likely. But my point, is that my three
dogs are in excellent health, my
wife is not nuts, I do not hate
my mother, my mother-in-law is
one of my best friends, I am not
-ji:a.ia i i j
aaaiciea to aope, l ao not ac accept
cept accept the bounty of women, and I
have seldom been known to get
sick in public or go around iden identifying
tifying identifying myself to strangers as a
famous author, a charming little
habit Mr. Fitzgerald developed. ;
When he was not climbing" up
wans, or oeing force-fed, or prac practicing
ticing practicing to be the subject for auto
biographies by women who kept
him in his failing years, which
started pretty early for grown
man. : )
The good Lord knows writing'
is noi easy, Decause it is the
most lonesome job in the world,
and does not considerably enhance
a good disposition.
Even the does know when the
Boss is ijaavinf dead.line trouble
or musttperfdrce do, a missive
rewrite joad thtay clear.
This also applies to- the- poor lady
who has lived in a welter of car car-bon
bon car-bon paper and newspaper clippings
wuu me ior zi years.
But a great many of the pros
manage fairly orderly life,; e e-ven
ven e-ven if it entails divorces, and the
point is that they don't wnimp wnimp-er
er wnimp-er -enough about crazy wives and
ineir own boozlness or had eiri
in their sons or domlnering mo mothers
thers mothers to make themselves proper
suujeci ior Diograpny.
I think that possibly Paul Ga-
mco is me Dest ail-around pro
in all the writing fields I ever
met, and Paul looks beter at
63 tuan I do at 44. And before
somebody hollers, "that ain't
nara, in say it myself.
..j. 1
iusi Decause a guy writes or
paints for a living gives him no
license to be a bum, a drunk,
a whiner, or a public charge." Ana
I have always thoueht. franklv.
.i "i r..7r
ftthr
& Vh.iJ
longer than a stick; of type will
be written.
That is the penalty a writer
pays for neatness, hard work, no
libel suits, and hitting a deadline
smack on the nose. Selah.
Immediately after the) Revo Revolutionary
lutionary Revolutionary Wan the United
States Wavy went completely
out of existence. Guns, powder
and cannon balls were put

fniaftoirof I
I FACT II

ashore and most of the naval I
ships were changed into tner
chant vessels. Then in 1704,'
Congress ordered the building
of six new frigates. These
chips were triumphs of ship shipbuilding?
building? shipbuilding? and were, as a class,
the world's best men-of-war,
O fticjrctopedl BrlUnnlc

Ho otToumn

. ; by
MoR b Notes on
A RANCH HOLIDAY
The weather at the Hacienda
Las La&unai dei Volcan is not
all like the Little Summer oi
Saint John. There are days when
it never stops raining. And the
rain at this high altitude is cold.
The sun is unseen and the ranch
house seems to be set m the cen center
ter center of a gray bell jar.
Onthft thv neaiest hills can be
seen and the volcano Baru nas
retired behind a thick white cur
tain of rain.
The cow hands in their black
ponchos end rubber hats looking
like galloping members of the
Klu Kiux Klan in black sheets.
The cattle and horses graze un
concernedly as though oblivious
to the cold rain.
The ranch house is surrounded
by. low hills covered with green
of varying shades, but- an are
restful and easy on the eyes.
They are at their best when
the sun comes out right after a
rain. Each kind of grass has its
own shade of green. The kuku-
yu is the darkest, followed by
pangola. The guinea grass al
ways holds some of the goia
from the sun.
It may be cold and dreary out
side, but in the living room of
the ranch house before a fire
place with a lively fire it is real really
ly really cosy and comfortable. Then
it seems to suit the mood of the
weather to play excerpts from
Verdi's Requiem with lion
Steingruber, soprano; Rosette An-
day, contralto, Ratko Delorco,
tenor: and Oskar Cerwenka,
bass, and Gustav Koslik, direct
ing the Austrian symphony ur ur-chestra
chestra ur-chestra and chorus.
If that seems too sad there is
the tape recording complete of
Puccini's La Boheme. It is best
not to' play the las part and a a-void
void a-void the death of Mimi and the
mourning of Rodolfo.
P.-TITA.I-. 11 A J 1
it is in exceueni reeoramg una
' reminds me of the' first timet
I heard the opera, with a sweet-
Voiced young Italian girl, Tin
Paggi, as Musetta. There is
symphony music also at hand.
We also have live music' with
Peggy Janson playing the accor accordion,
dion, accordion, and Carlyn Calhoun, and
Callecito Janson helping her with
guitars. It isn't exactly, a balanc
ed trio, but it is music and it is
alive.
Now while it is raining, a ques question
tion question about ducks. Have you ever
seen a duck, taking siesta in

DAILY MEDITATION

(Presented by the Department
of Christian Education of the E E-plseopal
plseopal E-plseopal Church In th Mission-,
ary Diocese of the Panama Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone.)
Colosslans 3:1
GIANTS OR GRASSHOPPERS
"If ye than be risen with Crist
seek those things which are a a-bove".
bove". a-bove". "When the spies returned from
exploring the land according to
Numbers 13 they complainea that
the inhabitants of the walled cities
were as giants. The prophet tells
us that God from His heavenly
dwelling sees all men as grass grasshoppers.
hoppers. grasshoppers. Giants or grasshoppers, it all
depends upon your vantage point,
whether you see life through the
eyes of God or from the earth-
at 8
'4

...

Read

Af ore or Less

CREDE CALHOUN

the rain? I taw one one day sit siting
ing siting on a limb of a tree that had
fallen across the lagoon near the
nouse. The, duck, black and
white, was standing on one leg
with its head' tucked under a
wing. Don't ask me how it did
it. Its body swayed in a rythym
like that of the pendulum of a
clock.
Now about tht temperature. 1
started to keen a record Satur
day June 27, wnen it was .60 de
crees farnenheit at six o hock in
the morning; it had risen to 70;
at noon; ee at p.m. and e-t at
ni.e o'clock when I went to bed.
The temperature has been 6(1 at
6 a.m. for four, days in succes
sion, with the noon time temper
ature at a -high of 74 and one
day at 72. Of course, this fs the
Veranulo de Sar Juan when it is
warmer'Xthan usual, but you 'can
see that it is not too warm at
that. The mornine after I wrote
jthe foregoing it was 54 at 6:30
a.m.
El Hato del Volcan is a town of
doll houses. The average size is
about 12 by 20 feet, and some
are smaller than that. Hie
"style" of architecture is not 11-
niform. It seems to depend on
the amount and kind of rough
lumber available.
Tar paper and corrugated met-l
al roofs are in the majority.N
There are no tile and only a few
shingled roofs on decaying old
houses. The average house has
three rooms, and a Chic Sale in
the back yard; some of these
are roofless.
There is no sign of plumbine.
but many houses have electric
lights and radio aerials strung
gable to gable. The houses are
almost uniformly ugly and few
are painted.
The headquarters of the Guar Guar-dia
dia Guar-dia Nacional is the best building
in town. It is new and is painted
a bright yellow with red trim trimming.
ming. trimming. The fire department has a
house about 15 by 30 feet, that is
locked and inside a barbed wire
fence. The shops are like the
crossroad stores in rural commu communities
nities communities in the United States. A lit little
tle little bit of everything from cod codfish
fish codfish to corn flakes. The Mercudo
Pedro is no supermarket no? is
the Casa Prado of Juan Prado,
but it's fun to shop in either
place.
El Hato bread and pastry Is
of the best. That is because the
bakery is run by an Austrian,
Herr Sternberger, whose wife is
the only registered nurse in the
community Hers is reallyacom
munity service. There is no doc doctor
tor doctor nearer than Concepcion or
David.
bound human viewpoint. This is
the lesson which the ,defeattst
Jews needed to learn; to raise
their sights, to live on the higher
plane with God. So Second Isaiah
does not weary in stressing the
power and the wisdom of Al Almighty
mighty Almighty God, the creator and sus sustained
tained sustained Today is the Lord's Day wien
we were meant to come into God's
presence, to lift our hearts to Him
in' praise and prayer. As we do
so, many of the problems which
worried us shrink to their proper
proportions. They are seen as
the grasshoppers they really ars.
"Grant to us. Lord, we bessejh
thee, the spirit to think and do
always such things as are right J
that we who cannot do any that
is good without thee, may be thee
be enabled to live according to
thy will; through Jesus Christ bur
Lord. Amen".

YOU ARE INVITID TO OUR
JAZZ FESTIVAL

0
30lk
Wusic
at
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our

AZZ MUSIC OP VARIOUS PERIODS
ILL BE PLAYED IN HI-PI AND STEREO
MODERATOR:
SPj5 PM JaU
(ARMED f ORCES RADIO AND TELEVISION SXEYICK)
ATTENOANCE BY RESERVATION ONLY

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COME TO OUR MUSICAL COFFKB HOVH FROM 4 f.M. TO
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Our Classifieds

Now andThen

M U.
i
The Zatwtefia Univa is. of
course, the only j shoe shop.
There is no mck oi cantinas ana
one is quite properly named El
laUCAP, VI
- There are flowers, but most of
them seem to be neglected. I
saw one rose garden with svea
or ignt varieties that must rave
been beautiful when in its pr.me.
Now it looks like a faded grand
dame who still holds some trac traces
es traces of her youth and beauty.
El Hato does blossom with um umbrellas
brellas umbrellas hanging upside down dry
ing on clothes lines Red is (he
predominant color, but there are
pinks, yellows, blues and greens,
all bright. From a distance they
look like huge flowers
The women of this' region use
umbrellas as protection against
both sun and ram. It is not unu unu-sua!
sua! unu-sua! to see one astride a horse
holding an umbrella over her
head.
Horses are still the main form
of transportation for the campe campe-sinos,
sinos, campe-sinos, although, of course, a ma
jority of them walk, especially
the women.
If there is a horse in the lami lami-ly
ly lami-ly papa rides it. He may condes condescend
cend condescend to takt a child on the sad saddle
dle saddle before him, but mama walks
behind her caballero.
Women walk miles to the vil village
lage village with babies on their hips
and then walk home again with
tne anaea load of their shopping.
I met a sm.ling brown woman on
a trail one day, but .instead of
cradling a baby in the crook of
her arm, she had a shotgun
"Good day, Senore, are you
going to shoot some one?
"No, Senor," she smiled, "the
gun is for deer, turkey or pig
eons."
Now thaf the country has been
cleared for pastures one has to
go a considerable distance to
meet up with, game.
Only 4 few 'years 'ago that was
not true A a,var killed a year yearling
ling yearling cut that belonged to my
grandson. Tommy Janson.
The carcass was left where the
tiger had made his kill. The va
queros built a blind nearby and
next day 'Waited for, the tiger to
return. He did. Now his head and
skin lie on the floor of the Jan Janson
son Janson living room in Panama.
The lakes on the ranch are a
boon to the natives since they
were stocked with black bass
and blueill.-J Apparently there
are enough fish so that restric
tions on fishing the lake are not
necessary.
One wonders how restrictions
would be auplied if theywerenec-
essary The natives fish with
poles cut beside the lake and
fish hooks baited with worms
found under and in rotten logs.
When they get a strike they
heave the pole. They lose the big
ones th.it way
Nevertheless, they catch enough
to sen to the shoos in the village
One day in Juan Prado's store 1
heard a woman ask for a pesca
do and expected him to get her
dried codfish.
He brought a frozen fish out
of the refrigerator and weigher
it and wrapped it up. I askud
the woman if I could see the fish,
expecting to find a large mouth mouthed
ed mouthed black bass from the lake.
It was net. It was a nine inch
trout from the Chiriqui Viejo. I
looked at it carefully and it
showed no sign of having been
taken with a hook. This is per
haps the only place in the world
wnere tney nsn for trout with dy
namite.
lire
CENTER

1
ssflssMsssBJESAsssl

ii i

s ; us.:

IS

- UNLETTERED VICTIMS
ine department let me assure

try to explain what the perpetratort of the commissary
lOutcry, or whatever may be the title of the weekly leaflet,'
meant a week or so ago when thy trumpet the availability
of verv.alertness" ftansiiifla mi,? : r.;-- l i..-

the English grammar, faculty at
Stav awakn" h niif

fatigue, it continued. "Seventy cents a vial," the message

Shortly after which thu

f .comT?ry manager character oh cnargesof fortrery.
I just don' bow whether the cops op thf harrd 4
rSLth88 V,SV But afty' emissary flack who
TrlRft Tft ntlCh Auav Ht ill... .... a. .

VtSrrX u9 ehowlrfbe hauled
up for forgery himself. If the Canal Zone constabulary tan.
not cast themselves as expert witnesses,' let's try a couple
of English teachers from the' Schools Divisions

Wells, so much for th
ceptintr that Armv dai v naui
much scurry ng round the
wnKUBgsi. i ij Dei me snirt
Have you noticed hriw

to port or' starboard .this week without enoounterltMt th
wheezy suddI cat one. of inrflMn- M.i-tu....

X$iy2W?l
"m'",,, ronJ nas
same position. If vou don't

lems, Just holler "Ahoy thr, Willie!" next tlm hMses
by. Hell understand, anrf vnn'ii wa ,.,u i r t

T j
Now It just so happens
way because the mechanise
x r.. .
j o u DITrer uatun "-"Ke
for myself a small
A man on a camel told

wai me ana ivf-ierina: of teeth oroinv on in riR
circles because, on a certain watrwav which hli -!r,
nameless, citiien

j mom uoi icon unnpnen gown
from $17,500 vearly to 8.O0- .
(All patriofsm, of course. You don' have to no too
tar to understand patriotic wasre rut-, ''fino tn

a comparison between, the wn h9 US overnmof nld' i
its Panama City water' and Sanitation employes when it was 1
In charge of there vital function, and how much paid
now by the grateful motherland. 1

I don't want to seem snide about this thin.' Af-'all,
Panama usually contrives to see tMt its oolitlc-ian oh
Un Ulth nra .imii.IL. .. xi j. ... ... a.

h oiviiwiii". inunev xnan ao Tne leo'l''f Tnr
side. It's 'uet a mtt.r 0f h-uw or Pm.,i,s, 8UD
'ectlve value, on which I would hot orMum o rule,
. Jx is a Sin of the rreflt rorw-hln r e de -Tpnd

( vvnat Jo you mean, unnamed!" f
(3!,,u'lf b,ab 8hrtrt,y- sur as shootln'." r
("What Suez shootin'!)
As I was saying, it Is a ulem of o-reat comradeshfo on a

cenam sanay and unnamable waterwav -that up from
among the camels and the pyramids comes a Pierelnc keer.
mj; familiar to any Zonian. In the memorable language of
the Koran, it says
"More. 3
Also, I hear, from ports such as Tamoa, and certain
Inland waterways which I do not nhoW to mention out
oud here in case Vice-president R. Milhaus Nixon ffete
m a cheap bawlin?.out brawl with Khrushchev as to wheth.
er these poets are bigsrer than the Vol?a navltion svstem,
tnat Pilots stateslo

a 4'ii l. ii j
io ami noiiering Tor more.

$40,000 a year or the $80 monthly Canal Zone bus cheeff.
it would be said should the time come when pilots at
ers to demand a beter salary if their work deserved It
I might even wonder why Radio. Mia developed such
an Impulse to orff9niT a mmffh M u. o i ...i

k u i vii un ui vanai i.on, wnerp
bus mechanics get paid around $45 weekly, when It would

fc-vun vior in wrms ot
miKch,?151? of par""a
get paid $35 weekly

t cannot thinlr nfmnn tuan u.. .i

, -" mi uuuasiun since) oam
oompers got into the union business on which enlightened
management has handed out worthwhile pay raises to em ft
Ployes Who Were not unliirhtanaH a.,-u r...u i

the volunteering spurt were
be no draft boards.
Only thine I suppeat the

an eye on, except th'e channel m TT WZ&li
th. emotlona eetup in a community a. small ff &.

m. inj run me riSK OT
miiiionrlre for more,
WnI a worker le flchtln

. -. . ; s n uui ior a ra se, it is
not Clever to lose tha avmnathu Ii. 'I..

worker, round the place r
Mind VOU. I don't want

that, Frankly. I've never had a rla.se, so I wouldn't know.
Th.r. I. not too much pac remaining to exchange a
thought or to with certain v.t.,n. A -u. ii".?. j

er of Macedonia who ..em. to have stayed alone with the
Kewalskl (D-Connv ) to find out how many senior officers
are beinar fed fanned and friarf hv r.i. .uk. ... ..u ..

. ., j.,
fighting soldier..

I aUOte from recent eorraunnnrfonr.. "U I. l. a

business, and Itt'a leave th.
nouse in truer.

J pffer.the contrary thought that any jerkwater general
or colon lor oarooral fa auhlant tn tha i ...i.. .....ai.. :

1 .r.-- T j
of the ttxpaoeriiwho -stake, h

iiv afnT. rinn nr- nTTair., are in tne public domain
Likewise any Jerkwater employe of any Federal .erv.

ice whairYti. such :a the Panama Canal, Is sublect to
inspection v any reh.raoolon.l. obrnoral hr otkar r.iuhn

pays his Jaxes .fe
"' lvtry$!lstltie(S io ,&k all steps he can to set
that h. gsts fulrvalu. foi his tax money. ,..,,

PERCY S PEERLESS PORTENT continues fascinated
by the fact that although mechanic.' wagss In Panama aver. J

age less than $35 weekly, a great clamor arose to protest
a $45 weekly .alary paid by private company In the Ca.
nal Zon. 60 if you want a real craiy number
iSL sssm. to be what you are looking for. '

nf .i.Ur.... u u.
von raniriiw that i hii I
Balboa Junior High School
. :.j in 1
CimaV 7v. HI
im, ;AtiL i...
h..n: v.Lm j
other day. Now there : was a 4
on It. ;;"
h;1miU : u.. u.i;r;i-.i.
bi? time,bt Cah-Ine
T0"id nlmself In exactly that
thinlr van k.x,. u- .L

" gi i iiionn.
the other da. 'mxv h9
war. AM 4..:l.. i.

w a nus
rht thre hetwen Ks-farlt
shufti at this pilotage business
me there wa. a woni nd
"K l Tv,uiyy yearly ana
principle and boot leather to
bus depots where mechanics
that widespread, there would
Pan.
SOUnd hff Ilk. tW aiM..
"
u. l... ..'
' '7 m9 r
,um ... j
J nv ais uaiu o
Army alone to set Its pwn
- - -iivryvi.vTiev urunriT
m. Anv military u



PAOI THRU )

THI IENDAI AMUUCAN
Quote Unquote
CHICAGO Society girl Jac Jacqueline
queline Jacqueline -Gay Hart, missing from
her home in Newark, N.J. for two
ANNOUNCES ITS
days ; before being t found here,
talking to her fiance by telephone:

WABlTOfBRITAIJ

i i n ii mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
-- - f- ':.,;:,':. -.::---- - - "
MMMwMMMMwMMMwMtjw- miwuiiw m li ii mmmvmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmM"'"
, s
1 : ; Ik itiih v iv
I ( !-K ,v
! I u-i
mpS - 1 J

LONbuN, July 25 -My lympt-j

tides are with a correspondeat

pleading in a London newspaper

tnat railway lutiion namDOBros
should be ejected obliquely. Ex Express
press Express trains on British Railways
whisk us through the stations so
fast, he argues, that it is impos-

8M1 to laemiry wnere we are
with the boards set up longitu

dinally.

If this u true of railway Jour Journeys,
neys, Journeys, how much truer it is of our

journey through life. We race past
the soectacle of human existence,

missinc nine -tenths of the facts

becaus of the speed of travel.
CONFERENCE AT OXFORD

For instance, as I range the U

to say -about the younger member

countries of the Commonwealth,

west Atrica ana Malaya especial

ly, and .the colleges now training

laeir luture prime ministers, doc

tors, civil .servants, headmasters,

scientists, diplomas and judges

To this work the United Kingdom

has m the past dozen years con

tributed $98,000,000 for education

alone. ,
But I have space only for per perhaps
haps perhaps the most human chapter
th story of how Commonwealth
students are made to feet at home
in the United Kingdom.
GREAT CAVALCADE
Their principal host is the Brit

ish Council, whose representatives

"They've taken, my ring, come
get me, come get me."
NORFOLK, Va. Postmaster
General Arthur E. Summerfield,
serving notice that, he intends to
continue his fight to ban from the
mails the uncensored version of
the D. H. Lawrence novel "Lady
Chatterley's Lover":
"If that book is not filth, pray

tell me what Is filth."

nited Kingdom I am constantly personally met "and welcomed

meeting students from the various nearly 7,000 students from over over-countrits
countrits over-countrits of the Commonwealth, seas in 1958. All over the coun coun-The
The coun-The other evening in the Inns of try there are some 20 Overseas

Court London's iegal centre, Iwas Students centres, in addition to

caught up in a solid phalanx of hostels.
Commonwealth students all wait- Many students from the non

Ing fo- law examination results.! self-governing territories are glad
And Commonwelath students were to attend a course in Britain's

noticeable in laige numbers this ways of life.

month at the famous Henley Re-, Accommodation is found, there

eatta on the River Thames

But I had no idea nor, I sus suspect,
pect, suspect, had many of my fellow citi citizensthat
zensthat citizensthat at this moment Com Commonwealth
monwealth Commonwealth students in the United
Kingdom number more than 26,-000.

The fact was only revealed to

are conducted tours to places of
interest, and trained advisers

help oa health and other personal

matters,

And, an enormous amount of

friendliness is dispensedby volun
tary organisations, helping stu

dents to- meet and mix with the

WILLIAM TROST, second from right, of the U.S. Army Caribbean Engineer Section, receives re retirement
tirement retirement papers from Col. S. G. Spring, USARCASIB engineer, after nearly 28 years of federal ser service.
vice. service. At the time of his retirement Trost was fore man of the equipment repair unit of the roads and
grounds section of the post engineer. Trost started his apprentice training as a machinist and in internal
ternal internal combusion engine repair technician in Germany, and received further training in the US.
With the Engineer Section, he aided in the training of officer and enlisted personnel of the U.S. Army
and personnel from various Latin American countries. In this connection, his proficiency in the
Spanish language was a means of furthering good relations with people from Latin countries. Mr.
and Mrs. Trost have a daughter who is attending the St. Teresa College in Winona, Minnesota. Pic Pictured
tured Pictured at the left are Martin J. Hayes, assistant post engineer, and Lt. Col. Donald F. Rogers, post
engineer. (U.S. Army Photo)

Diplomatic Talks On Formosa Problem Set
Record For Length At Polish Lodge Retreat

WARSA W(UPI) -The world's
longest series of East-West diplo diplomatic
matic diplomatic talks end their fourth year
on July 28 ,in an 18th Century
Police hunting lodge. They are the
American Communist Chinese
. negotiations 'On- the Formosa prob problem
lem problem and they're expected to drag
on into a fifth year.
The meeting next week will be
conducted according to a ritual
which has become familiar since
last September when the talks
shifted to Warsaw from;, Geneva,
About two minutes before the
hour set for the meeting, a long,
black Cadillac flying the Stars and
Stripes on the front fender will
glide quickly througn scrolled iron ironwork
work ironwork gates and up a gravel path
to the semicircular Mysliewicki
Palace, a hunting-lodge on Italian
design built for dashing Prince Jo Jo-nef
nef Jo-nef Poniatowski about 1760.
U.S. Ambassador Jacob Beam,
his tall, spare figure slightly
stooped to get through doors built
for shorter men, will alight and
stride briskly into the palace, fol followed
lowed followed by his interpreter and two
State Department officials.
As his car backs into its parking
place, a high, old-fashioned Rus Russian
sian Russian Zis will swoop up to the door
and bland, balding Chinese Am Ambassador
bassador Ambassador Wang Ping-Nan, trailed
by his interpreter and aides, will
follow Beam into the palace.
They will move upstairs into a
medium-sized, tastefully furnished
conference room, take their seats
on opposite sides of a polished
walnut table, and begin their in interminable
terminable interminable discussion behind
closed doors.
After an hour and a half or two
hours, the doors will open, the
American group will descend the
stairs. Beam will announce the

date of the next meeting, and he
will fold himself into the black
Cadillac for the ride back to his
embassy.
As Beam's car vanishes, Wang
will lead the Chinese down' the
itairs, his interpreter will an announce
nounce announce the date of the next meet meeting
ing meeting in English, and the Far East
group, too, will depart.
What has been discussed over
the polishd table?
Beam and his advisers, Wang
and his aides, and their superiors
In Washington and Peiping know.
Nobody else does.
Besides one of the longest, this
Is undoubtedly one of the most
closed-mouthed top-level diplomat diplomatic
ic diplomatic conferences of modern times.
It is known that when the meet meeting
ing meeting starts, Wang or Beam reads a
statement in his own tongue, each
sentence being translated while
the aides take notes. The other
side then consults briefly, the oth other
er other ambassador replies. Questions
are referred to the home govern governments.
ments. governments. Eventually they agree on
the date of the next talks, finding
a day on which neither has con conflicting
flicting conflicting commitments.
But of the substance of the dis

cussion, nothing has beeu-re

vealed. Neither Beam, a New Eng

lander, nor Wang, are given to ut uttering
tering uttering a syllable more than they
want to say. Some of the best
newspaper correspondents from
the Wes'. and the "uncommitted"
countries have tackled them with
out success.
When the talks began in Geneva
in August, 1B55 with Wang repre repre-senting
senting repre-senting Red China and Alexis

Johnson, then ambassador to

Prague, representing the United

S!at?s each side issued an oc-

crs'onal communique.
r,' "y n acl ed a?re?ment on re re-le
le re-le -e of each o'.hsr's nationals.

Sra: VA Americans were sent,
h :"" n" I SI "liinese were re re-,..
,.. re-,.. ... ., rY-ns ill an

h 'i C :';r'j rrisens.

your $eti

iremen

t

"My daughter never lets me do
anything," complained Mrs. F.
L., who has made her home wuh
her son-in-law and daughter for
the past five years. 4
"She never lets me forget that
she.i$ th,e, housekeeper," Mrs. F.
L! continued. "When I try to wash
the dishes, she says, 'Oh, Mom,
let me take care of that!'
"I'm afraid to pick up a dust
rag or a broom. Of course, I know
my eyesight isn't as good as it
used to be. And.I admit I'm a bit
stiff fr6m arthritis.
"But is there any reason v'hy I
should be assigned to an easy
chair, just because of that? I'd
be glad to replace any dish I
broke, ; though I don't think that
would be necessary often."
Mrs. J. W.'s complaint isn't uni unique.
que. unique. It s one thtt is heard from
many an older person whose chil children,
dren, children, well-meaning andj loving
though they may be, are making
the mistake of being overly- pro protective.
tective. protective. They forget that Grand Grandma's
ma's Grandma's or Grandpa's morale is in infinitely
finitely infinitely more important than a
gold star for a perfectly kept
house!
Does it matter if occasionally a
cup slips from Grandma's fin fingers?
gers? fingers? What if the end table do?s

show a few flecks of dust after

Grandma has wielded the dust
cloth? Neither of these "trage "tragedies"
dies" "tragedies" looms very big beside the

useless teeling that comes wnen

an older person isn't allowed to

be a real part of the household

wnat aoout the Derson who is

handicapped by a stroke or other

disability?, Here, too. overorotec

tion by the family can work real

harm.

Doing nungs for himself, no

matter how limited, gives t h e

handicapped person needed seJ

respect and a feeling of achicv?
ment," said Miss Lyla Spelbring,
supervisor of occupational thcra
py at University of Michigan Hos

puai, at Ann Arhor. "You cm

heb that person most by helping

just as little as necessary."

Simple gadgets otten do mucn

to help the handicapped re-enter

the independent class. A joric wun
a sharpened edge can -beivboth

knife and fork and giyes the per

son who has the use of only one
arm complete independence in
feeding himself.
A housewife who was paralyzed

on one side from a stroke need

ed her good arm for the cane. that
helps her walk: Therapists at Uni University
versity University of Michigan Medical Cen Center
ter Center have taught her how to set the

dinner table in one quick trip.

An ordinary wheeled cart does
the trick. She loads the dishes or
the cart, hangs her cane on the
handle and Uses the cart for need needed
ed needed support as she goes from kitch kitchen
en kitchen to dining room.
At the center men and women
with limited use of their hands
can even relearn how to play
cards. Women learn how to Cook
meals.
"Urging the patient to-help him himself
self himself doesn't mean pushing Mm
into things he cannot do," Miss
Spelbring Warned. "Doctors and
therapists should be called on for
professional opinions.
"Luck: y, most handicapped per persons
sons persons can be taught to-ao 'much.
It requires time, effort and con concentration.
centration. concentration. But it is w?rth it."

m in a new official booklet issued people of the United Kingdom

in AnnnAtriAn iirfffo "f Ha Prtm in An. "In f-Vi (tra a t Btr&IoHn rf fz-v rv

41k v. v nii rvii vuiu uiuu aii uui i lov vaTatkouc will-
wealth Education Conference being monwealth education," the book

held throughout the latter half of concludes, "it is the personal con
this month in the University Ci- tact. .which has created its en
ty of Oxford. during triumph."
"Student" in x broad term. The I n,

28.000 include 7,000 at Britain's 221
universities, about 6,000 at the tec!
nirnl rnHfae and 73ft nnnlifiort

people (many graduates firom
their own universities) training to
be teachers.
It includes, toe, Canadian en engineers
gineers engineers on post-gradutc 'ourses
of study; technicians from Aus Australasia,
tralasia, Australasia, Canada, the Union of
South Africa and other countries,
learning the peaceful uses of nu nuclear
clear nuclear energy; post-graduate en engineers
gineers engineers from Commonwealth coun countries
tries countries studying with Industrial
firms, and Commonwealth farm farmers
ers farmers getting practical knowledge

of mechanisation.
Th Conference at Oxford, the

biggest-ever get together of its

kind, stems directly from the de decision
cision decision at the Montral Conference
last October that the Comon-m
last October that the Common Commonwealth
wealth Commonwealth countries should unite In
creating 1,000 new places for Com Commonwealth
monwealth Commonwealth students at universi

ties and technical colleges and

schools.

The United Kingdom it

vide at least half the number,
Canada 250, and the balance to be

decided.
If it be thought the United King Kingdom
dom Kingdom is bitting off as much as she
can chew, at least there are wor worthy
thy worthy precedents. Even so, her lead

in the Commonwealth, so far as
education is concerned, Is not so

spectacular as the uninitiated
might think.

Engaeinelv frank, this book

(Commonwealth Education) has

taught me much about Britain's

educational history that might in

terest readers overseas,

It was in 1833 that the State

began to interest itself inschool

ing. In that year the British Gov

ernment voted a grant of $56,000

aid of voluntary educational

MARION, Ohio Patrolman

Lloyd Potter, after being told
that George Patrick Geiger, 27,

whom Ohio police had arrested

for speeding, was wanted for the

murder of his ex-wife s father in
Jeannette, Pa.
"I nearly fell out of my chair
when they told me we had a sus suspected
pected suspected murderer. The lieutenant
who brought in Geiger nearly
dropped over himself."

MICHIGAN CITY, Ind. Lake Lakeland
land Lakeland Town Marshall Ed Warner,
discussing difficulties involved in
a hunt for possibly dangerous
mountain lion believed prowling
the heavily-populated Lake Michi Michigan
gan Michigan resort area:
"There also are the cranks.
Last night, while fast asleep, I
was awakened by a prowler who
growled."

Q I have' quite' a 'Icollectlbn of
old-fashioned souvenir spoons, and
I'd like to enlarge this. My chil children
dren children laugh at me and say there
are many better hobbies. What do
you think? Mrs. R.R.
A Many people enjoy collecting
as a hobby; and, since you have

a good start or. your collection

why not stick with it? After all,
it's your hobby.

ii j n iy
V 1
U' i I If j

FIRE KILLS SIX
BLOIS, France (UPI) Six
women were killed and four other
patients seriously injured in a fire

that destroyed a mental hospital
near here yesterday. Seventy in inmates
mates inmates were in the hospital when

them made their escape by lump

ing from windows to mattresses

placed on 'the ground.

LIVER TONIC
Jf lur l'T" cauus yu to iuffr
from lallf atian, gal, heartburn, con
ftlpattM, haoAaehta, bad braath, dti dti-fm,
fm, dti-fm, MnevmvM and akin blemlihw,
M Hlajafen from your ehamlat today.
HI!on la a raal tonle to tha llvar and
tatMtlnaa. Oat Hloal'n at drufitora.

ABU LOUS

SUNDAY EVENING BUFFET
' enjoy an evening of enchantment
this and every weekend in our
BELLA VISTA ROOM 4
from 7 p.m. .-.only $4,25 per perton
$2.60 children S

and
the year's most exciting French itar
MARCEL LE BON
9:15 and lliOO p.m.
Music and More Music py
CLARENCE MARTIN'S Orchestra

EVERY NIGHT (except Mondays);
"JUNGLE STEAK PIT
informal Steak Dinner
You select your own steak. .watch lt belntr grilled
to perfection over sizzling coals... enjoy the full
flavor of fine food...

MODERATE PRICES
Music by CRISTOBAL MUflOZ

Read Our Classifieds

Q-At whr'
without dep
collecting .io
J.C.
A At age 62.

' can a widow
children bigin
Security? Mrs.

1 li

societies, and $84,000 to the West

Indies.
GIVE-AND-TAKI POLICY
Yes. official courses for educa

tion began simultaneously in the

United Kingdom and the non-sen
eovernine territories.

In 1870 the British Parliament

Dassed the Education Act for com

pulsory education based on the
simnle nhilosoohy that every child

should be taught according to its

age and aptitude, with equal
chances for all..
We had of course, our ancient
universities at Oxford and Cam Cambridge,
bridge, Cambridge, and a number of others,
but in 1890 a famous British po politician,
litician, politician, Sir Charles Dilke, was
writing of Canada, Australia and
New Zealand, that "they altogeth-

'er suroass the mother country in

the sacrifices they have made for

education."
In University education these
the Union of South Africa, too
were also well equipped, although
Dilke noted that Australian 'uni 'universities
versities 'universities relied mainly on "pro "professors
fessors "professors tempted out from England
by good salaries."
Nowadays there is a generous
give-and-take policy in all educa

tion matters within the Common Commonwealth
wealth Commonwealth Teacher are exchanged

between schools and technical

colleges
The 129 universities and univer univer-colleges
colleges univer-colleges In the Commonwealth Commonwealth-including
including Commonwealth-including those In newlv indep independent
endent independent countries like Indh, Pa Pakistan.
kistan. Pakistan. Ghana and the Federa

tion of Malaya are welded in an
Association of Universities of the
British Commonwealth, originally
framed in London in .1912.
It Is the AUBC that organizes
conferences such as that at Mon Montreal,
treal, Montreal, the eighth and latest in
the fn'nquennial series. It acts,
too, as a vast clearing house for
teachers and professors seeking

posts in various Commonwealth
countries. "v

This fascinating book ha much

UNAWARES Brigitte Bardot
swing! along, basket in hand,
unaware that a long-lens cam cameraman
eraman cameraman is taking her picture in
Saint Tropez, France. The "sex
kitten" was taking some fruit
to her husband, Jacques Char Char-rier,
rier, Char-rier, who was rasovering from

an appendectomy.

FREIGHTER SINKS

NEW LIEUTENANT Sp.5 William G. Dewhurst la congratulated
by Col. C, A. Beall Jr., U.S. Army Caribbean adjutant general, and
Maj. Robert O. Rettie, chief of the military personnel division, after
heing sworp Into the U.S. Army Reserve as a second lieutenant. Ad Adjutant
jutant Adjutant General's Corps. Dewhurst, who is with the Adjutant General
Sec! ion returnee unit, will continue on active duty in his specialist
rnnk. .
(U.S. Army Photo)

U.A.R. COMPLAINS
CAIRO (UPI)-,- Egyptian sourc sources
es sources charged here that 12 Israeli
planes flew over the Gaza Strip
today, in the areas to Kbun
Youni -and Abasan. Tha sources
said that the United Arab Repub Republic
lic Republic government had complained
formally against the reported
flights to the U.A.R, -Israeli mixed
armistice commission.

TAIPEI, Formosa (UPI) A
Nationalist Chinese freighter
bound for Singapore with a cargo
of 186 tons of brown sugar struck
a Shoal and sank last night off
eastern Formosa. All 12 crewmen
of the vessel, the Yung Shin, were
rescued.

I M Mil 7M

J I vf J I

b&sJUic r;

Tlliss JCaura (Burgos,
special representative of

5

will be with, us from tomorrow
through Saturday, August 1

Consult with her on
beauty and skin care.

It

l'Tite Label Signifies Qyqtrty.

D ME GAGmaJ

I
. ... I

Your guarantee on high
all climates

precision undef

Engineers In the sizzling heat of the Sahara;
scientists in the ice-bound solitude of the
arctic': sportsmen in the dim depths that are
the skin-diver's realm. Here Is the kind of
company you keep when you wear the Seaniast Seaniast-er,
er, Seaniast-er, the self-winding Omega hljh-precision
watch that defies the elements.
The self-winding Seamaster movement Is triple
sealed. The elements can't reach it. Tropical
heat leaves it cold. Arctic cold leaves It snugly
indifferent. Accurately and reliably, the
Seamaster ticks off the most exciting seconds
of your life.
Wear the Seamaster, and you participate in
one of the great watch-making success stories
of our time. The story goes back to World War
II when Omega was commissioned to design a
watch the soldiers, sailors and pilots of Britain
could confidently take with them into combat.
Restyled and reinforced for sports wear, this
watch became the post-war Seamaster, since
further strengthened and perfected and surely
the world's most popular sportswatch. Also
battle-tested, in submarine hulls and let air aircraft
craft aircraft fuel tanks, is the sealing device which
protects the Seamaster movement against
water and condensation to a depth of two
hundred feet.

CHARLES PERRET SWISS JEWELRY
Ceneral Agent Colon, R. P.
CASA FASTLICII
Authorized Agent Panama City

f

i
1

5 A'Jl.llJji.'l,3aW-'.fc Ja.J-

1.
if:,



SUNDAY, JULY ?,.195f
TACA Names

is

octal ana suterwMe

Bi Staffers

Box 134,
JPanama

J Jt I Jl uifUu r Fsmm,.M74Q 2-0741 U 8,00 J 10 tf

r

1 1

.AtSrv W sal-P. HSS

I J?', J

are soon to leave the Isthmus for
his new assignment.

Orchestra Danct Tonight

To Include Special

Program, Refreshments
Th mnnthlv nrrhfistra dance

scheduled for this evening at 8 at

the Balboa USO-JWB win teaiure
a variety of volunteer talent.
Al Hazan will serve as master
of ceremonies and will sing calypr

so and rock n roll numoers. aiso
on fVio nmorim will be Jerry

Walmsley, the Naturals, Bill Aid-

rich and tr.e MarvenKO iwins anu
Tom Vett.

Pete's combo will play for danc

ing- .. . .,

Servicemen, tneir lamny ana
anpetc as wpil ax voune people

from Panama and the Canal Zone

are invited to participate.
Visitor To Isthmus

Feted At Party
rr ttf-rirk R Youns. president

of Western College for Women,

Oxford, Ohio, who is visiting in
Panama, was guest of honor at
a nartv eiven Saturdav evening

bv Dr. and Mrs. Rolando Chanis

and his sister, Miss Marta Stella
Chanis.

THE VOICE OF

,v 1. :

BROADWAY
by Doroihy Killgalkn

r"T 'FAREWELL GIFT is presented to Mrs. Berta Zeleya Morales
(ight) as she presided over her last meeting with the Canal
Zone Spanish Conversation Club as co-president. Making the
J presentation is Mrs. Louis de Armas, club adviser. Stated in
- front of Mrs. de Armas is Mrs. Gabriel Briceno, wife of the
Venezuela's ambassador to Panama and Mrs, Morales successor
as club president.

Mr. and Mrs. Eisenmann
Celebrate Anniversary
In celebration-, of their twenty twenty-fifth
fifth twenty-fifth wedding anniversary, Mr.
and Mrs. Roberto Eisenmann en entertained
tertained entertained at their residence Sat Saturdav
urdav Saturdav pvpnins. Invitations were is-

sued to a large number of friends

of the honored eouple.

"QNTIN'UED ON PAGE FIVI)

J ChampaAada Honors
Mr. and Mrs. Morales
The Nicaraguan ambassador in
4 Panama and Mrs. Mariano Por-
toearrero entertained at the Em

bassy list evening at a farewell
champanada honoring El Salva Salvador's
dor's Salvador's ambassador' and Mrs. Alber Alberto
to Alberto Morales. "
Ambassador and Mrs. Morales

HALIFAX BREAKS HIP
LONDON (UPD Lord Halifax,

Rritain's former ambassador to

Washington, was reported "com "com-fnrtahlo"
fnrtahlo" "com-fnrtahlo" in a London hosDl'al

yesterday after breaking his hip

in a fall in his Yorksnire garden.
Halifax, 78, was flown to London

for treatment after the fall.

Jhi S "'.Hi

suddenly
...you look

younger

.4 3

i f
V J

Christine Jorgensen'i romance
with Howard Knox has reached
a dead enes. .Elvis Presley,
due to be discharged from the Ar Army
my Army in March, 1960, may get a
"good behavior" release around
Christmas time. .The Harness
Racing Commission scandals
aren't over yet despite a change
in the lineup of commissioners.

yiSUlCl rtlWIllCJ HUB1"' "-
is scanning the testimony with a

view tc a Grand Jury present presentment
ment presentment in the not too distant fu future.
ture. future. .Ginger Edwards of the
Latin Quarter floor show is be
ine wooed by Julio Di Benedet

to, who directs the Garry Moore

video program.
The high brass at Imperial
Records expect a new singer
named Billy Mitchell to make
disc history.- .Bella Darvi, once
linked with flicker boss Dairyl
Zanuck, has a new admirer admirer-Paul
Paul admirer-Paul Weiller, an industrialist. .
Insiders hear one of the local TV
channels is up for sale for a a-bout
bout a-bout $5,000,000. .Several pub publishers
lishers publishers think Martha Raye's au autobiography
tobiography autobiography would make colorful
reading, ni the comedienne ob obviously
viously obviously doesn't agree. Her reac reaction
tion reaction to publishers' offiers: "They
must be kidding. I haven't ftven
started to live yet." (No clue to
what the lively Martha considers
"living.")

priatt monicker, too. She now
peels at Dee Vorcey. ". .The Ty
Harding (he'g the TV cojvbey,
she's starlet Andra Martin; ex expect
pect expect twins in November. .Lisa
Kirk is up for the lead in the
Broadway musical "An Amazing
Woman," based on the life of
Victoria Woodhull,' the courieian
who tried to become President of
the United Statei.

New Yorkers who object to
paying the 10-cents-a-ride t a x i
would faint if they knew now
much bigger a bite comes out of
their incomes because of lo'.al
strikes. Example: the Stork Club
has been picketed for 32 months
by Local 1 (Dining Room Em Employes
ployes Employes Union) and Local ?3
(Chefs, Cooks, Pastry Cooks and
Assistants' Union) and the cost
to the taxpayers has been ap approximately
proximately approximately $75,000.
Polly Bergen isn't afraid of a
pun. Her next album, sung in

French, will be titled, "Polly

Vous Francais?". .Mad Maga

zine, the kookie Komic publica

tion, is about to put out an edi

tion in Spanish, as an illustration

of how far out things are going,

internationally.

Have radiant now
haircolon . wffi

C6rorJng-mixture applied right from boffe!
Simplest, speediest way to have beautiful
hoircohr that won't wash out I In lust minutes,
Roux cotors every visible gray hair, adds
gleaming highlights to dull hair, changes
your unexciting mousey looking hair
fO:ew younger-looking color radiance I

COLOR
SHAMPOO
ChooM tram IS natural-looklng colon.
Use according to direction.
To can (or your hatrcolon Rv Crome
Shampoo, Crams Rlnn, Crtmt Hair Hair-Veiling,
Veiling, Hair-Veiling, tpoclolly mad tor tinted and
Hghtonod hair I

'ASK FOR IT AT YOUR BEAUTY SALON
DISTRIBUTORS N PANAMA
JULIO VOS, S. A.
Second Diagonal (Old "A" Street No. 7.27 Box No. 1194 Tel. 2.2971

Jack Lemmon and Felicia Favr
have decided to put their idyll
on ice, although it seemed to be
headed for the altar. .A secret
showing of the movie "Pillow
Talk" (with Doris Dah, Tony
Randall and Thelma R i 1 1 e r)
drew raves from hard-bitten ex exhibitors,
hibitors, exhibitors, who were especially
lavish in their praise of the star,
Rock Hudson, playing his first
comedy role. They found the film
so funny the laughs covered some
of the dialogue.
Marguerite Piazza has told her
agents she doesn't want to work
quite so hard; she'd like h-r
bookings cut in half so she can

spend more time witn ner iami iami-ly.
ly. iami-ly. .The Saturday Evening Post'
will profile cinema actor Robe-t

Evans in its Aug. 15 issue.

Tourists returning to the U.S

from Havana report the situation

at some of the so-called luxury
hotels is "impossible." One

Broadwayite reports he stayed in

his room during his entire "vaca

tion," because shoeless characters

in overalls were roaming the Job-

by, wandering through the kitch-

ens-' 'getting -first call at meal

times and using the swimming

dooI as a community bathtub. .

George DeWitt plans to recondi

tion a B-25 and use if for com

muting between New York and

Florida.

A 52nd St. stripper, just back

from Las Vegas where she un

loaded her husband, returned

Greer Garson's chums Sav the

funniest thing hag happened as

a result of her quite serious
throat ailment. When she re regained
gained regained her voice after suffering

from a ruptured blood vessel,

she lost a lot of her Bntisi ac accent
cent accent and began to sound as A-

merican as the proverbial apple

pie. .Bill Egan, the floor man
ager at Roseland, could be a
subject for the local feature writ writers.
ers. writers. He's been captured in stone

three times by top sculptors im

mortalizing World War II heroes.

appearing in Wheeler Williams'

statue in England. Donald Du-

lue's in Anzio, and Paul Man Man-ship's
ship's Man-ship's in France.

Patricia Murphy's unique res

taurant in Westchester celebrates

its fifth anniversary in Septem September.
ber. September. When the petite boniface
built it, it was the largest eating

place in the East and cost S.OOO,-

000. Just the other day she turn

ed down $4,000,000 for it.

New Officials

Mr. .Enrique SoL leading
businessman of El Salvador, has
been named Executive Vice
President of TACA International
Airlines, and Mr. R. E. Cllpson,
former -Vice President-Operations
of the airline, also was
aDDointed .Vice President and

rGeneral Manager of TACAi.

These anointments were an announced
nounced announced by Ricardo H. Kriete,
President of TACA, after a meet meeting
ing meeting of stockholders of TACA
held in San Salvador recently.
For many years Mr. Sol was
connected with W. R. Grace St
who began his aviation career
Co. as General Manager of the
Grace Line for Mexico and Cen Central
tral Central America. -His headquarters
will be In the Executive Office
of the company in San Salvador.
In addition to acting as assist assistant
ant assistant and consultant to the Pres President,
ident, President, he will coordinate the
various activities of the com company
pany company relating the general policy,
operations and traffic.
Clipscn, an airline veteran
In 1938. joined TACA In 1947.
He was appointed Vice President-Operations
In 1953 and
has served in that post, until
his appointment asr General
Manager of the airline.
In addition to Sol and Clip Clip-son,
son, Clip-son, other new officers of TACA
were named at the TACA Di Directors
rectors Directors meeting In San Salva Salvador
dor Salvador George J. McHygh,. General
Traffic and Rales Manager: arid
Mr.' Claude Taylor, Manager of
Operations.
TACA's present routes em embrace
brace embrace the entire Isthmus of Cen Central
tral Central America, includine services
to Mexico. Panama, and New
Orleans. Vickers jet-prop Vis Viscount
count Viscount equipment la us"' nn all
routes. Advt.

29 BABIES DIE
PALERMO, Sicilv (UPD -Twenty
nine babies have died
here during the oast eight days
from intestinal infections, author authorities
ities authorities reported today. Hospi Hospital
tal Hospital sources said there was no
enidemic. Thev blamed manv f

the deaths on lack of sanitary and 1

preventive measures by paients.

Relations between the New

York police and the FBI here

have never been smoother. Lo

cal cops give most of the creait
to the pleasant personality and

efficiency of Harvey G. Foster,
in charge of the G-Men in this
area. .Before Rocky Marciano
left for Canada, he conferred
with his press agent, if that's a a-ny
ny a-ny clue to his Mure plans.
Alicia (Mrs. Edmund) Purdom
told chums she was going to Ita Italy
ly Italy "to paint," but they think
there's a chance she and the ac

tor might meet and reconcile

PIANO WIRE USED
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (UP!) -The
New Haven Rai'road is usinr;
piano wire to keen its roadbed in
tune. The line announced todav
that 80,000 new ties will be
laid this summer. APer th- tie;;
are in nosition 75 feet of tight.lv. tight.lv.-strune
strune tight.lv.-strune niano wire is used to aid
in leveling and straightening ihe
tracks.

while she's there, despite her le-

with a new and highly appro-1 gal actioh against him.

' iwf mi
hi
if &r
1
-
ik. I '.''

NEW ORDER PASSETH Blouse, stacks and loafers make
up the typically American garb of this Turkish miss in IstanbuL
She strolls by women who arc wearing traditional Mack en ensembles.
sembles. ensembles. More and more Turkish women ara adopting VS.
styles.

if ymsmtm
v$&wjw' X- y r -v

twuwk x-m jr m ,r. r.

:r;ra. 4i Jr u t

'
Attractive Miss Becky Arias, smiles at the photographer as
he took her picture while Fortuna Harrouche starts to touchnn
her hair style with Adorn, the invisible hair' spray. Miss Arias
was one of many ladies at the recent festival of the Damas Gua Gua-dalupanas
dalupanas Gua-dalupanas at the Union Club who enjoyed bavins; their hair
sprayed with Adorn. Adorn kept their hair styles perfectly la
place throughout the full evening's festivities.
During the evening Miss Annette Van Hoorde was elected
the "debutante of the year.''

For That Special Turkey

Wk vl

;5iS j Feast, Try Gobble Stew

i i mm eSMSS isrnr r

'prJMWTi.KIMSRW'lll I IS P I HUM

JUST one appetizing: way io take advantage at a market lull of
turkeys: Brunswick gobble stew, served with hot f arlio ftrcad.

ON SALE AT ALL..
DRUGSTORES
Exclusive. Distributor
FARMACIA RUIZ
P.O. Box 196 Panama, R.P.

According to the U. S. Depart

ment of Agriculture, turkeys in

the sizes best suited for n o m e

consumption will be in plentiful

supply for many montns. me

small, tender-meated, fryer-roast

er type turkeys, ideal for barbecu barbecuing,
ing, barbecuing, ranging in size from 4 to 9
pounds, will be the most plentiful
of all.

The larger, new crop birds

ranging from 10 to 14 pounds also
will be in plentiful supply. Al Although
though Although the supply of large turkeys
is not large right now, it will oe
later in the summer.

Quarter turkey roasts are How
available and will be even more

plentiful as larger turkeys mature

The housewife may select either a
leg or breast quarter, r a h g i n g
from 4 to 6 pounds. These provide

a one-meal portion of turkey meat,
at an economy price, that can be
roasted or used in other ways.
Also packaged turkey parts, such
as legs, wings, etc., are becoming
popular as consumers learn how
convenient, practical and econo economical
mical economical they are.
Brunswick Gabbls Stsw (Makes
4 quarts or U 8-ourtcs cups)
One fryer-roaster turkey, abou'
6 pounds, ready-to-cook weight,
whole or cut up; 4 cups (1 quart)
water, 4 teaspoons salt, 1 can (1

pound) cream style corn, 2 me

dium onions, cut in quarters; 1
package 10 ounces) frozen okra,
or 2 Vt cups fresh; 1 package (10
ounces) frozen lima beans, or 1
cups fresh; 1 can (No. 2 V4) toma tomatoes
toes tomatoes (about 3 Mi cups), V4 pound
bacon, ham or salt pork, coarsely
cut; teaspoon hot pepper sauce,
1-4 teaspoon ground pepper, J-4
teaspoon ground thyme, 1 can (S
ounces) mushrooms with juice or
Vi pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
and sauteed.
Place turkey, breast down, In
large kettle. Add water and salt.
Bring to a boil. Skim any broth
from surface. Reduce heat, cover
and simmer until meat is ready to
come off the bones, about 2 hours.

Discard bones and skin. Add re remaining
maining remaining ingredients except mush mushrooms
rooms mushrooms and simmer about 30. min minutes,
utes, minutes, stirring occasionally. Add
mushrooms (and juice if canned
are used) about 5 minutes before
serving allow just enough time to
heat throughly. If necessary, add
additional seasoning. -Serve in hot
bowls or soup plates.
Note: A larger turkey may .be
cut up and cooked as directed.
When white meat (breast section)
is just fork-tender, removeand
set aside for other menu Items
(cold meat platter, salad, sand sandwiches,
wiches, sandwiches, a la king, :tc)v Proceed to
complete the gobble stew with the
remaining turkey meat as direct directed
ed directed above.

Read Our Classifieds

" 3 "

' i Jr
mm.
till'

Optimistic... and happy

i.

Lem PAUAMA 730 a. m.
Arrive: SAII JOSE 8:15 a. ri.
Arrive: SAN SALVADOR 10,35 a, nv
Arrive: MEXICO 2:40 p-m.

LUXURY SERVICE AT TOURIST FARES
e Pressure controlled, air
conditioned cabins
Only 2 seats abreast for your comfort
e Panoramic windows
e Delicious hot meals served In-flight

e Bilingual stewardesses give you
personalized service

LINE AS AEREAS COSTARRICENSES. S.A. AVE J. AROSEMENA No. 31-40

SUPER CONVAIR A0

Consult your, Travel
' Agent or call our
i offlcisi7di1

w7 fTvrrtvrn

(Across from Olympic Swimming Pool)

1



-I

SUNDAY, ICITK, 1WI
THE SUNDAY AMERICAS
fasi nvi

iSoclat and Otft

.1 s.;

Crlttebal Wtmn'i Club ;
Plant Car Party
The Cristobal Woman's Club
will spooior a card party Tuesday
afternoon at one in the Red Cross
Building at Cristobal.
Refreshments will be served,
and prizes awarded. Proceed!
from the veat will be used -iot
' the club's, building fund.
Mrs,:, W. Patton and Mm, M.
Dunn, are in charge of tickets.
' Mcllheny Family
On Haiti Vacallon
Lt. Gov. John D. McElheny,
Mrs. McElheny and their children
are spending a short vacation in

xerwi&Q

ConlinutJ

Haiti. Tbey' left the Isthmus a

board theiPanama liner SS Cris

tobal, ;.', ..-v..

Gerga Pafwnta Given
Bing Farty In Lounge
-Tha Red Cross lounge at Gor

ges Hospital was the scene of the

montiuy Dingo party sponsored ior
the natients by the Fleet Re

serve Auxiliary.

Fleet Reserve Auxiliary.
Punch and cupcakes were serv served
ed served by Mrs. Peggy Beard, Mrs. Ire Irene
ne Irene Fowler and Mrs. Jean Barker,
hosteses.

Houses Standing On High Ground
More Likely To Be Hit By Lightning

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sup Supposes
poses Supposes bolt of lightning tings -out
of. a thundercloud and hits your
- house. .j?'4X':''
If you've anticipated' this com common
mon common summertime 1 threat and
equipped your home with lightning
rods you probably don't have to
worry. But if your house is not
.equipped and its chances of being
hit by lightning are not negligible,
perhaps you'd better do something.
If the house is on high ground
or stands in a thinly settled area
it's more likely to be hit.
Of course, your lightning danger
also depends on what part of the
country you live in. Electrical
storms are more common in sum summer
mer summer than in winter in all parts.
But there Is a great variance in
the frequency of these storms in
different regions.
According to the U. S. Weather
Bureau, electrical storms occur
omy once about a year in the San
Francisco area. But residents of
Tampa, Fla., can expect them on
an average of 90 days a year.
Frequencies in other areas fall in
between these extremes, ,.
When a s lightning 'bolt leaves
from a thundercloud it jumps the
smallest distance it can, according
to John A. Dickinson, -chief of
safety codes and standards of the
jrovernmenf s 'National Bureau of
Standards".
"A house on a hill or an un unusually
usually unusually high building is a tempt

ing target," Dickinson said. "The
higher the object the shorter the

trm ior the lightning."

That's why lightning rods work.

They stick up above tne nouse

eatching the lightning, before it
hits the building itself. If proper'y

installed, the rods carry the elec

trical charge off to the ground

where it is deposited without dam
age. ;

A code for protection against
lightning drawn up by the bureau
and industry advises that lightning
rods should be placed not more

than 25 feet apart. They should be

at least 10 inches high. Depending
on local weather conditions and
winds, they may have to be braced

or otnerwise supported it tney are
taller than 24 inches.
The code says the rods should
be made of galvanized iron, cop copper
per copper ors aluminum.

Dickinson, who helped draw op

the code, said each rod should
have a separate conductor leading
to. the ground or there could be

at least two separate conductors

to the grouna for an average size

bu'ldin?." The ground 'onductor

broDablv should be thicker than

the tonside rods to compensate for

corrosion. :

In moist earth it should be sunk
at least e i g h t inches. In dry
around it 's advtoW to bottom
the ground rod with a copper

nlate or else sink it deeper.

USj Postmaster General
Summerfield Talks Back

i

h
y .,.. v &
4 -StV

-

f

j4

Vis t vjw- s-s

JUMBO ROLLS ALONO

LA CHAMBRE, France (UPD
Cambridge University Prof. J. M.
Hoyte, 28, rode his elephant, Jum Jumbo,
bo, Jumbo, toward St. Michael at
Maurienne today on the lour'h
lap of his 12-day irip on wiat
he believes is the trail blazed
across the Alps by Hannibal 2,-

200 years ago.
DOCTORS ARRIVI
" BAGHDAD VUPI) Twenty-six

Soviet jmyiiuans have arrivtd in
Baghdad to help train Iraqi doc doctors.
tors. doctors. he heaHh ministry an announced
nounced announced today. Sixteen more are
expected in a few days.

HOTEL PANAMONT

Bo q ue tc
Announce! it will close, starting August 1
for the rainy season. The reopening date
will be announced later.
THE MANAGEMENT.-

if & y

as

MOSQUITO CONTKOL-Luis G. Plnzon and Luis Sanchei work at V preventive medicine cen cen-ter,
ter, cen-ter, Corozal. The center .maintains control over mosquito- breeding pn military post.

Beauty Tips

Summer breezes are refresh refreshing.
ing. refreshing. But all girls know what a
mess a windy ride can make of
their hairdos. On a date, espe especially
cially especially in a convertible, look pert
and protected wth a nylon lave
scarf. Tnes are shaped especial especially
ly especially for the job. N

Women who put off exercises

until tomorrow have had it. Now
it is too late to firm stomach and
hop muscles for a better look' in
shorts and bathing suit. However,
if you start with proper exercises
immediately you will be in bet better
ter better shape for the closing summer
weeks.
As the birthday candies grow
in numbers, a woman realizes
that her skin is changing in tex texture.
ture. texture. But. with all the modern

U.S. Army Medical Service
Observes 184th Anniversary

The United States Army Me Medical
dical Medical Service will observe its 184th
anniversary tomorrow, The Me Medical
dical Medical Service induces the Army
Medical Corps, the Army Nurse
Corps, the' Dental Corps, the Ve Veterinary
terinary Veterinary Corps, the Women's Me Medical
dical Medical Specialist Corps and the
Medical Servicer Corps.
One of the medical service's
greatest, achievements' oc occurred
curred occurred during the construction
of the Panama Ganal. After Maj.
Walter Reed demonstrated that

yellow fever was carried by

cosmetics, there is no reason why ( mosquitoes, Col. William Gorgis
her skin can't be more attractive used this iinding to fight the di di-and
and di-and silkv smooth than when she sease in the Canal Zone. Before
was in her teens. that, an earlier surgeon gener-
al, George M. Sternberg, had done
LAUNCH TANKER .1 considerable research on yellow
MARSEILLES, (UPI) -The 51,- 5 5ctiXw" hl whK se:
500-ton ankci "Centaure," largest lece to head the board

ever bi.lt' in France for. tie,""""' "luu' luo uiacaoc.

French merchant marine, was
launched today, four days be behind
hind behind sJiieduie because of a strike.

fU&iTOft';C"j!lOTE: Griping
agalnsf- theRfttt-. service la
eemething of a national past past-time.
time. past-time. In this dispatch, the pest pest-matter
matter pest-matter general talks back).
By ARTHUR I. SUMMERFIELD
WASHINGTON (UPI) When
the new postage rate increases
were being considered by Con Congress,
gress, Congress, last year, I stated publiclv
at that time that we would accel accelerate
erate accelerate improvements In postal serv service
ice service in every possible wav follow following
ing following the enactment of the increases
Into law to give the American peo people
ple people even more for their postage
dollar.
The postage rate increases have
not adversely affected revenues,
which were up more than 450 mil million
lion million dollars for the 1959 fiscal
year, nor mail volume, which will
be up about 2 per cent. At the
same time that the rate increases
were enacted into law, Congress
passed the postal policy act "of 1958
establishing as an important ba ba-ic
ic ba-ic principle of far-reaching im importance
portance importance for the future soundnees
of the postal service that the serv

ice should be substantially self
supporting except with respect to

specifically identified items of a
public service nature.
Equally important are manv sig

nificant and far-reaching service
Improvements which we have

ttidi: since President: Eisenhower

tlgned-th: postag?rate legislation'

into law on May 27, 1958.
For example, we announced
concurrently with the beginning of
postage rate increases last Aug.
1 that all postmasters should study
their needs at local levels for ad additional
ditional additional window service, improve

ments in collections of ma'I from

s'reet letter boxes, and related
yprvire irtinrovenients. with a view
to niittin? these 'mwovemen's into
effect wherever necessary.
As a result of this step and
through the solendid work of our
15 regional offices over the na nation,
tion, nation, well over 2,500 post offices
in every state have instituted
loneer hours of window service.
Also, we estimate that 4.000 post
offices all over the country pro provided
vided provided additional pickups of mail
from street letter boxes.
At the same time numerous im improvement
provement improvement in rurl deliverv serv.
ice were made. On August 1. 1958,
I ordered extension of rural de deliveries
liveries deliveries on the basis of two fami families
lies families oer mile of rural routes, rath

er than the previous standard of

three fancies Der mile.
And at the end of the 1959 fis fiscal
cal fiscal year lust closed .Tune 30. an

estimated 427.000 rural families

had benefitted from this extension
in sen'i',.
In addition to these immediate,
direct service improvements fol-

NEW1

LOTlOfil
DEODORANT

."ROLLS
AWAY ;
perspiration
vtorrifts"

. ph ftur
Modem, Mi; to hm.

Built-in routing marble tlldee :
a lotion exactly aa naoded.
No me, no dripping,
Effectively check aersplsatlea
and odor all day kme. m 1
a Big IVi as. tnbreekable container

more ror your money.

ROLIT felL t

mm

lowing the enactment of the post

age rate fincreaes the postal

service has forged ahead in many
other areas which have more or
less direct-and important service
benefits for every American.

Since the postage rate increases.

we have made major strides to

wards automating and mechaniz mechanizing
ing mechanizing the postal service. Oh March

3, 1959, we dedicated at Washing

ton, D. C. the renovated Wash

ington post office as the most

mechanized post office m the
world. On April 2, 1959, we start started
ed started construction of an even more
advanced post office the Turnkey
Post Office at Providence, Rhode

Above for Sunday. AMs July 26

SUM FAT AWAY
If tat ruin your flgur or make
yo-j inert of brMth and endanger
your health, you will nnd lt caay to
low welsht with th new Hollywood
method Formodt. No drartlo dieting
or axereU. Aek your drugstore (oi
Formoe. and itart ellmmlnt at one.

Preventive medicine continues
to be one of the major functions
of the Army Medical ervice. A
branch of the preventive medicine
division of the UARCARIB .Me .Medical
dical .Medical Section at Corozal, has the

primary mission of maintaining

malaria control at military instal installations
lations installations throughout the Canal Zone.

Rputine checks locate breeding
grounds of mosquitoes, so that

field crews may take immediate
action.

Another important mission of

the medical service in the Canal

AFTER EVERY
DIAPER CHANGE

Use Mexana and
see how happily
your baby plays
...free from
prickly heat
and irritable
diaper rash.

MEXANA

Medicated Powder

Zone is the operation of the dis
pensatries.

, Officers and enlisted men cf
the service are trained' at various

Army and civilian schools. By

means of internships and residen residencies,
cies, residencies, medical officers may be

come qualified experts in special

ized areas. Unlisted men are en

couraged to acquire professional

skills in technical fields such as

X-ray work, pharmacy, medicine,

surgery, dental and medical la

boratory work, physical therapy.

optical repair and food inspection

For USARCARIB Col. Homan
E. Leech is chief surgeon, head

ing a staff which includes Lt. Col.
Lee A. Ahr, Lt. Col. George D.

Batcheldor. Maj Ralph C. Sing

er, Capt. Harold R. Chappell
Capt. Vernon J. Tipton. Cant!

John J. Bohdan, John F. Burke
and Lester L. Boyer.
Lt. Col. Albert J. DiMafteo is
actine dental surgeon for USAR USAR-CARBI.
CARBI. USAR-CARBI. A radio and television. urogram
in observance of the anniversary
will be presented by' CFN at '5:15
p.m. Monday.

Course in
BEGINNER'S
RUSSIAN
Starting August 4th
Tuesdays and Fridays
7:00 P?M.
Preliminary
Information Meeting;
Friday. Jly 31st
' at 7:00 P.m.
- Balboa Armed Services
Y.M.CA
. .Inauire at office or
' call 2-2839 or 2-2759
Register Now Class Limited

SOLD AT ALL DRrG STORES
Distributor in Panama
JULIO VOS, S. A.
8etnd Diagonal (Old A Street) No. 7-7
Box No. 1194 O Tel. 2-2971

COMPARE Price and Quality

AND YOU
WILL BUY

8oz.

In each can

SAUCES

Spaghetti Sauce with meat la alscPgood on
fried eggs, meat and rice and MUSHROOM
SAUCE on spaghetti, ; topped with cheese,; Is
a welcome dish at any dinner table!

SOLD In jour
COMMISSARIES
SALES STORE,
and SUPER MARKETS

ituKi u..ii3iat ')vvx n uv.ia

DITDtOIGGu1 tO!
ELECTRICAL EKGIMEERS, ELECTRICIANS,
ARCHITECTS and CONTRACTORS

Mr. Rodolfo J. Alvarado, Field Engineer for the Square D Company will be visiting
Panama for approximately one week. Mr. Alvarado will deliver lectures with ?
demonstrations on Distribution" Equipment (Panel boards, Safety Switches, ete?JH
and Motor Controls. J''S
You are invited to attend these, lectures and demonstrations as well as to consult
Mr. Alvarado personally regarding this type of equipment. ViSS
Please contact Mr. Ramos at our store for further details, dates and ApC

pointments.

Exelnslve Distributors for Sanare D

No. l Via Espafta Tel. Tel. 3-03M
P. O. Box f 17 Panama. R. de P.

Fly to California to attend

7MisiBeia.. iP3lil'f'"'c'''

THE PACDIFflC
IFiSlAIL M

i i

w

' t C it

The Golden Triangle excursions

put all of the colorful West
within, your reach

The State of California is a second home for Latin
Americans I The architecture, the traditions, the
culture tell of its Spanish heritage.

Th Pacific Festival at San Francisco, September 18-27, will be an
event of international importance, with more than 30 countries par.
ticipating. Its program will show the Century's progress in the fields
of Art and Culture, Industry and Comnrerce, Tourism and Commu Communications.
nications. Communications. A truly fascinating program of spectacles specially con conceived
ceived conceived for Spanish Americans!
During 14 excitement-filled days you'll know why Tho GoMan Trl Trl-angle)
angle) Trl-angle) is the magic phrase that opens many doors for you in Los Ange Angeles,
les, Angeles, San Francisco and Las Vegas, Nevada. San Francisco -magnif-,
icent commercial' empire; Los Angeles -the movie Metropolis; and
Las( Vegas famous for its casinos. From any of these cities you can
make short side trips to other interesting places in the legendary West
to Yosemite Park, to the undescribably beautiful Grand Canyon of
Colorado, or follow the route of the Spanish missionaries on the
"Camino Real".

These excursions have
been planned so that the
visitor may take away
an unforgettable im impression
pression impression of the country
called "The Earthly Par Paradise"
adise" Paradise" in the chronicles
of the XVI century.

"Si

JFor tor information and reaervaHans.
$6e your travd aeid or tall directly ta ....!

WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE

?2

Panama: 22-B Street No. 12-83 Tel. 2-06-70 (Facing Palacio Ltgislativo) 4

Colon, No. 27 Front Street Tel. 10-97

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I :
A SUNDAY, JULY U, M&r
erra's Homer Gives;-aiik 9-8

? u sr r frr irvniT IMIUCIH

if AS MUX

TVWT TK no

w in uver

i.

Tack's Best 3 Year

m Republic Of Peru Classic

k choice field of the President
Klmon racetrack's best imported
1hree-year-old colts and fillies will
jrfatch strides this afternoon in the
leatured $2,500 added seven lur lur-k&g
k&g lur-k&g Republic of Peru Classic.
"Peruvian Ambassador to Pana Pana-ufi
ufi Pana-ufi Jose F. Mariategui, himself a
hSrse owner of throughbreds at
the local track, will persclly
psesent a sterling silver trophy
lnt here by the Jockey Club of
Pirn to the owner of the winning
facer.
Unbeaten Chilean filly Miss Bra Bra-feette
feette Bra-feette will most likely go off the
it
i
it.

Race Track Graded Entries

Hen
Joekty
lit Race "Spteiai" Imp. i Fgs.
1st. RACE OF
i-Salale F. Justiniam 103x
fc-Marsella J. Wainl IGOx
l-Rosenda B. Baeza 110
l-Condotiero J. P. Diaz lOOx
5- Meteor Lady H. Hidalgo 99x
6- Aerial Trumpet S. Hernan. 110
3-Luzbel G. Vasquez. 105
l-Guillotina H. Mora 105
Special" Imp. 7 Fgs.
2nd RACE OF
2nd Race
i,
j-El Venenoso
5-Don Chilito
S-Ranchipur
tSan Judas
Aludido
-Gong
-Reina Negra
R. Vasqucz no
J. Ulloa 115
G. Vasquez 106
A. Credidio 112
B. Aguirre V.
H. Gustines 115
B. Baeza 112
-
titd. Race Non-Winners Nat. 4 F.
i-Silvana
G. Vasquez 105
V. Tejada lOlx
H. Hidalgo I02x
V. Ortega 112
J. P. Diaz lOlx
J. Reyes 110
-Golden Tab
-Cristobalina
Tita
Flasfi
i-Donf Smith

&h Race "F" Natives 5 Furlongs Purse $375.00
QUINIELA

! -Silver Sun
-Mimi
-Guacamaya
-Don Luis
JDinamita
-Pilluelo
H Zia
G. Vasquez 113
H. Gustines 115
R. Cruz I00t
B. Baeza 120
D. Barret 10?x
A. Credidio 114
V. Tejada 107x
4
Natlvts 6 Furlongs
1- Noticion
2- Don Vito
S-Julie
4-Naranjazo
JJBsteban
J. Sahik lOdx
F. Hidalgo 110
. G. Vasquez 115
H. Gustines 110
B. Baeza 120
Mh Rac "Special" Imp. 4 Fgs.
. r, -m
1ST. hme ur
t-Barracuda
-Santanero
l-Azabache
1-Last Moment
5- Montesco
6- Sin Botas
H. Gustines 110
J. Ulloa 115
H. Mora 116
B. Aguirre 115
B. Baeza llfi
R. Cruz 102x

..--'u.

7th Race th Series Imp. 7 Fgs.
; 2nd RACE OF
f
-Recife H. Hidalgo P9x
2-Princesa Git. .1. Phill.ps l2
Bongaros S. Hernandez 113
-Palave H. Gustines 112
'6t-(La Desiree G. Vasquez !C5
8-(Michaux R. Vasquez
Sth Race "?iiYRS.nOLD Imp." 7
Murse $2500.00 Pool Closet 4:40
:-d-Miss Brunette J. Rodriguez 10.)
J -Puerto Madero B. Baeza 112
-Rey Belot J. Ulloa 112
;-Piccolino H. Gustines li:
s-Double Dee S. Hernandez 118
B-Stavro F. Hidalgo 118
Race 5th Srl
Imp. ? Fgt.
ONE
1-Coltro
l-Lobo
l-Skoll
1-Hermelina
i-(Melendei
(-(Tricon
f-(Pastel Poose
lOrh Rac 4th Srit Imp. 8 Fgs.
ll-Neeful
ft-Horacio
S-Bob
-Mi Deseo
-1-Nebrisca
; fc-Brote
H. Gustines 1)5
S. Carvajdl 18
B. Baeza 120
J. Ulloa lis
B. Aguirre 108
D. Madrid ionx
F. Justiniani l07x
-Play Boy
Artie Princess G. Vasquez 105
i
11th Rac 7th Srlt Imp. e Fg.
ONE
-Pangal S. Hernandez 110
1-Julio Verne L. Tunon lO'x
B-Nedrey R. Cruz 109x
,-Dona Flora A. Credidio Km
i-Alhaiar G. Vasquez !05
-Bathina V. Tejada 9 )x
Blue Paint B. Baeza 108
l-Kensington II. Gustines 1 1 4
!-Rhea Calls H. Mora 106
!ODAY
TtVOLI
55e. 20c.
iSpaaUh Program!
3 LKCCIONES DE
''-''V- Also:
FI.OR DE MAYO
With,. Mai m Felix

mutuels favorite but this time she
will get plenty of competition
from the vastly improved Picco Piccolino
lino Piccolino and Puerto M,adero.
Chilean jockey JUlio Rodriuf1!;
will have the leg up on -Miss Bru Brunette
nette Brunette while Heliodoro Gustines will
be aboard Piccolino and leading
jockey Braulio Baeza will handle
the reins on Puerto Madero.
Double Dee, Stavro and Rcy
Belot are the other scheduled
starters.

Rey Belot displayed vast im
provement by coming up to scoi
impressively over one-time tr
ore
op
Com.
Oddt
Pool Closes 1:00
Purw W50-'
THE DOUBLE
Has beaten better
-Returns from layoff
- Ran well in last
- Hasn t shown much
- Wul fight it out"
-Ran well in last
-Could get up here
Form indicates
3 1
25-1
3 1
5?-l
5-2
5-1
10-1
5-2
Purse $450.00 Pool Closes 1:30
THE DOUBLE
Improving steadily
Reportedly classy
Last was revealing
Ballyhoo; nothing. yet
Good early speed
Reportedly ready
Mutuels favorite
10-1
15 1
5-2
15 1
25-1
2- 1
3- 2
Purse $300.00
Pool Closes 2:00
Could score here
Waste of time
Improved in last
Much the best
Good early speed
Reportedly improved
2-1
15-1
3 1
2-5
201
5-1
Pool Closes 2:30
Poor recent races
Reportedly ready
Would surprise
Mutuels favorite
Nothing recently
Ran well in last
Depends on start
30 1
2 1
10 1
3 2
15-1
2 1
51
Porso $375.00 Pool Closes 3:00
Not against these!
Poor recent races
Form indicates
Mutuels favorite
Excluded from betting
' "50 1
25 1
4 5
35
xxxx
Purse $650.00
-rue nAimi e
Pool Closes 3:40
inc iww.
Good early speed
Sharpened for this
Could go all the way
Rider handicaps
Should get up here
Doesn't seem likely
5 1
3 1
3-1
5-2
2-1
10-1
Purse $400.00
Pool Clones 4:05
THE DOUBLE
Dangerous at times
Form indicates
Quit badly in last
Can make it here
Not good enough
Depends on start
2.V1
8 5
5-2
2- 1
3- 1
3 1
REPUBLIC OF PERU CLASSIC"
QUINIELA
Mutuels favorite
Could score here
Vastly improved
In fight to finish
Could surprise
Fractious; can run
EVEN
5-2
4 1
3 2
10-1
15-1
Purs $500.00
TWO
Pool Closes 5:15

R. Vasquez 113 Distance to liking 3-2
A. Credidio 106 Can make it here 5-2
B. Baeza 108 Rates good chance 3 1
J. Ulloa nr. Seeks third straight 5 2
H. Gustines 110 Depends on start 4 1
J. P. Diaz Ki'ix Unknown quantity 4-1
J. Waint 109x Unknown quantity 4-1

Purs $600.00 Pool Closes 5:40
-Outclassed here
-Nothing in months
-Mutuels favorite
-Could turn tables
.15-1
25-1
1-2
. 6 5
20-1
100-1
50-1
100-1
-Not good enough
Must go much lower
Distance to liking
Not againsl these
Purs $450.00 Pool Closs
TWO
Distance handicaps
Nothing to indicate
Nothing in ages
Could get up here
Not against these
Must go murh lower
In fight to finish
Form indicates
Could make it here

4-1

50-1
r,n i I

4-1 I

50-1
M0 1 I

7-2 Ufc

LiAmGS.TODAY

CAPITOLIO
3$e. 20c,
PARTY GIRL
wltji Robert Taylor
Also:
FRONTIER
RANGER
with Keith Larsen

VICTORIA
2Sr. 15c.
GUNFIGHT IN
TOMBSTONE
with Mark Stevens
- Also:
ROUGH RIDE TRAIL
with Jim Davis

0lds Go

class performer Surumeno after
getting off a poor last, jo
Ulloa will attempt to add another
classic to his impressive list.
Double Dee, a sprinter which
lost to Lo Moscoso his previous
time out. appears to be outcla'-s-
ed but will tote top weight along
with Stavro because of the conm
tions of the race. They will car
rv 118 pounds while all the others
will shoulder 112 pounds except
Miss Brunette which has been as
signed 109 because of her sex
Several other prospective Ihnil
ers are included on an attractive
program.
Heliodoro Gustines rode two
odds-on mutuels favorites to
victory in the main event and
secondary attraction at the
track yesterday.
Speedy Double Four scored
from post to post in the $750
severi furlong main event while
El Tunchi copped' the sub-fea
ture. Double Four paid $3.40 to
win while El Tunchi returned
only $2.80.
Mutuels choices dominated
the card but the moonshooters
had their innings too. Rutuan Rutuan-te
te Rutuan-te led the upsetters by return
ing $42.50 to win in the eigntn
race. Other juicy payoffs were
Creon's $19.60 and Behader's
$12.20 in the sixth race.. The
C r e o n-Porro one-two In the
nightcap was tops for the day
at $130.20 per ducat.
Gustines and leading jockey
Biraulio Baeza shared saddle
honors with three victories each.
Besides the feature races, Gus
tines also won with Tarasca.
Baeza scored with Account
Rendered, Kazan and Atrayen Atrayen-te.
te. Atrayen-te. Double Four raced Gavilan
and Alcaraz Into submission and
had plentv left when challeng
eb by Don Lucho and Diocese in
the home-stretch. Diocese wound
up second while Don Lucho
faded attain near the finish.
El Tunchi had a tougher time
wearine down speedv Depend
ab'e to score by onlv one length.
Bright Spur and Vergnieux
were third and fourth in one of
the day's best windups.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 A. Rendered $3.80, $2.40
2 Surumeno $2.40
SECOND RACE
1 Ringside $5.60. $3.60
2- Cervecero $3.80
First Double: $12.40
THIRD RACE
1 Sandokan $2.40
2 No place betting
FOURTH RACE
1 Kazan
(Excluded from betting)
2 Linda Susv $2.60, $2.60
3 Tingat $4.60
Quiniela: $11.60
FIFTH RACE
-Atrayente $3.00, $2.2,0
-Otorongo $2.6 0
SIXTH RACE
1 Behader $12.20, $6.60
2 Cindertrack $3.60
SEVENTH RACE
1 Taracas $4.20
2Gouvernant $2.40
Behader-Tarasca $48.40
Behader-Golazo $13.00
EIGHTH RACE
1 Rutllante $42.60. $4.80
2- L-Gran Capttan $2.40
Quiniela $10.00
NINTH RACE
lDouble Fou- $3.b0, $3.00
2 Diocese $6.20
One-Two $16.80
TENTH RACE
1 El Tunchi $2.80, $2.20
2 Dependable $3.00
ELEVENTH RACE
lCreon $1960, $9 40
2 Porrn $3.40
One-Two $130 20
Racetrack Tips
By CONRADO
1
Guillotina Meteor Lady
2 Ranchipur
3 Tita
4 Mimi
5 Jull
6 Montesco
7 Palav
Reina Negra
Cristobalina
Pilluelo
Naranjaio
Last Moment
Princes Gitana
8 Puerto Madero
Coltro
Piccolino
Skoll
10 Bob
11 Blue paint
Mi Dto
Kensington
rODAY ENCANTO -35-20
Kenneth More In
"A Night To Remember"
Harry Kruger in
"The One That Got Away"
RIO
0.J5 0.20
7th VOYAGE OF
SINBAD
Kerwln Mathewa
- Also: -ME
AND THE
COLONEL
Danny Kay

Nixon, Who. He?

Strictly
National League
W L Pet. GB
55 42 .567
54 45 .545 2
49 43 .533 3! 3
49 47 .510 62
47 49 .499 IVi
46 49 .484 82
42 53 .442 12
San Francisco
x-Los Angeles
Milwaukee'
Pittsburgh -Chicago
x-St. Louis ;
Cincinnati
Philadelphia
39 55 .415 14
x-Night game not Included.
Today's Games
St. Louis at Los Angeles Ric Ric-ketts
ketts Ric-ketts (1-5) vs Drysdaie (12-6).
Chicago at San Jf'rancisco An Anderson
derson Anderson (6-7) vs McCornuck (9-7)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (2)
Roberts (-8) and Conley (8-6) vs
Newtombe (l0-5 and O ioole (2-3)
1'ittsburgn. at Milwaukee (2)
Friend (4-2) and Witt (0-6).
vs Spahn (12-10) and Buhl (6-6)
and Willey 14-4).
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 006 020 3005 12 (
Si Francisco 001 000 0203 7 2
Ceccarelli (4-0) and S. Tayior;
Miller, Wortnington (9) and
Schmidt. LPMUler (4-5). HR HR-Bressoud
Bressoud HR-Bressoud (4).
Pittsburgh 000 000 0000 4 2
Milwaukee 000 110 lOx 3 8 0
Law, Porterfield (8) and Kra Kra-vitz;
vitz; Kra-vitz; Burdette (1310) and Cran Cran-dall.
dall. Cran-dall. LP-Law (11-6). HR-Logan
(11).
Philadelphia 202 001 0100 12 1
Cincinnati 000 001 0203 7 1
Cardwell, Semproch (8), Gomez
(9) and Lonnett; Nuxhall, Acker
(7), Schmidt and Dotterer. WP WP-Cardwell
Cardwell WP-Cardwell (4-6). LP-NuxhaU (3-9).
HR-Powers.
St. Louis at Los Angeles (Night
Game).
Sword Dancer Goes
Againsl Older Nags
Al Monmouth Park
OCEANPORT, N. J. (UPI)
Brookmeade Stable's Sword Dan
cer, the current leader ot me
three-year-old division, will match
his speed against older horses
again Saturday in the $100,000
added Monmouti Handicap.
The smallish but swift colt Is
an 8-5 favorite to lead home nine
rivals in the mile and one-quarter
event at Monmouth Park.
Sword Dancer will carry 120
pounds, four less than Talent Snow,
the highweight m the field. How
ever, the Dancer actually will be
giving Talent Show six pounds on
the scale inasmuch as 116 is the
scale weight for three-years-old at
this time of the year. The scale
weight for four-year-olds sucn as
Talent Show is 126.
Air Pilot, coupled with Talent
Show in the betting, drew a 119-
pound impost.
The other entries and their
weights are One-Eyed King (117),
Portersville (116), Amerigo (16),
Plion (115), Oh Johnny (114),
Nickel Boy C13 and Babu 12).
Sword Dancer met and defeated
older horses earlier this year in
the Metropolitan Mile at New York.
Running against members of his
own division, he finished second
in tne Kentucky Derby and Preak Preak-rtess
rtess Preak-rtess Stakes and won the Belmont
Stakes. v
Talent Show is one of the most
Jersey-Maryland circuit. He, won
the Laurel Maturity and the Valley
Forge Handicap and has been in
the money in seven other stakes
this season.
Willie Shoemaker will fly from
California to ride Sword Dancer.
Talent Show will be ridden by
young Jackie Leonard.
FACULTY MODERATOR
New York (NEA) Rev. Hen Henry
ry Henry C. Ilonsberger, CM., was
named Faculty Moderator of
Athletics at St. John's University.
BEATS HIS AGE
Fleetwood, Pa. (NEA) John
Knauer, Sr., celebrated his 0th
birthday by shooting an 88 at the
Rich Maiden Golf Club,

Editor: CONRADO SARGEANT
, li o

Baseball

American League
W L Pet. GB
55 39 .585
Chicago 1
Cleveland
54 39 .581 112
Baltimore
48 48 .600 8
48 48 .500 8
47 51 .480 10
New York
Detroit
x.Kansas City
44 49 .473 IO14
43 52 .453 12 Vi
40 53 .430 14i
Washington'
x-Bostori
x-Night game not included.
Today's Games
New York at Detroit Ditmar
(7-6) vs Lary (11-7)
Boston at Kansas City Brewer
(7-7) vs Herbert 9-7
Washington at Cleveland' (2)
Griggs (2-6) and Ramos (10-11) vs
Lodge (1-1) and Perry (5-2).
Baltimore at Chicago (2) Pap
nu rurwearrero
V'jW"?,.(?",,,t?d LatMan (3'3)
and Donovan (7-5).
Yesterday's Results
(17 innings)
Baltimore
100 000 010 000 000 00-2 12
Chicago
oio ooo ooi ooo ooo 001-3 12 i
O'Dell, Walker (10), Loe.s W)'
J'lTtKlM i
HR-Lollar (13).
New York 100 122 0129 13 5
Detroit 040 010 2108 11 1
Ford, Shantz (2), Duren (7).
Maas (8), Bronstad (9) and Berra;
Foytack, Morgan (5), Burnside (7)
Narleski (8) Smith (9) and Wilson.
WP-Maas (9-5). LP-Smith (0-2).
HRS-Richardson (1), Brickell (1)
and Berra (12).
Washington 000 000 1001 7 0
Cleveland 021 230 OOx 8 13 0
Fischer, Woodeshick (5), Cleven Cleven-Rer
Rer Cleven-Rer (7) and Naragon; McLish
(13-3) and Nixon. LP-Fischer (8-5).
HRS-Piersall (3), Lemon (22).
Boston at Kansas City (Night
Game).
Hit Parade
CINCINNATI (NEA) The
Croslcv Fieid organist. Ronnie
Dale, plays an anpronriate tune
whenever a Cincinnati pi a y e r
connects for a home run.
Some of the numbers he plays
are Frankie and Johnrty for
Frank Robinson and Frank
Thomas, MacNamara's Band for
Roy McMillan and Oh! Johnnv!
for Johnny Temple. When Ed
Bailey belts one the organist
nlavs Woft't You Comp Home
Bill Bailey? For Pete Whisenant
he riDnle of Peter Cottontail.
In an Old Dutch Garden creels
Dutch Dotterer as he rounds the
bases.
VIRTUE'S REWARD
Bay Head, N.J.-(NEA)-Safe
boating practices by youngsters
under 18 are beine awarded spe
cial prizes, by a Bay Head boat
yard.
The

A thrilling and brilliant film, with the proportions
of the big Hollywood spectacles Is, without a doubt, THE
REVOLT OF THE GLADIATORS, one of the Italian produc productions
tions productions made with, an eye to capture the fancy of the Amer American
ican American public.
Filmed entirely In Italy, with a famous cast of Conti Continental
nental Continental stars headed by handsome Ettore Manni, rugged
George Marshall and beautiful Glanna Maria Canale, THE
REVOLT OF THE GLADIATORS enthralls with the sensual

Aaron Is

Minded
By AL CARTWRICHT
PHILADELPHIA (NEA) -Eddie
Sawyer.Bot.only showed

up as the main epeaTterrnrthtY6ilrnkee$ a 9-8 win oyer

manager of the .definitely eight
place Phillies conducted a ques question
tion question and answer session at his
own suggestion.
WilliamIeU never had a bet
ter target.
"The way we're going, you fel
lows should do the, talking and
I should be listining," cracked
the leader of the Koal-Bin Kids,
You wouldn't have given Saw
yer's spot to your cleaner, Yet he
was thoroughly relaxed, very
frank and, as always, pretty hu
morous.
Sawyer blamed a lot of his
woes on the absence of hitting.
Harry Anderson, after enjoying
"the best spring training of any
player J ever saw," is having a
terrible year. Wally Post, after
a fine start, tailed off.
"This is typical of Phillies'
teams," explained Sawyer. "Or it
has been since Baker Bowl days.
Those clubs hit .400 in that little
park and also fielded .400.
That's why they finished last. We
field .400 and hit .200. That's why
we're last, too."
What to do about it? Well,
Sawyer is convinced that good
hitting is a state of mind.
He offered a tongue-in-c h e ek
example of the Milwa ukee
Braves' amazing Hank Aaron,
wh"m Pitchers haven't been able
to get out since the season start
; ed. Aaron was sitting with the
All-Stars at the banquet before
;the first All-Star Game of 1959
; in Pittsburgh when Vice Presi Presi-'dent
'dent Presi-'dent Nixon went down the line
, paying his respects. He spoke to
t:,l:t. ; hi , "Zh
h lZ P
-to Del Crandall at his
Aaron of his admiration for his
side.
"The vice president," answered
Crandall.
"Vice president of what?"
asked Hank.
"That's the kind of hitters I'd
like to have," said Sawyer. "I'll
always be able to tell 'em who is
vice president of the United
States."
Sawyer got into the iniury epi epidemic
demic epidemic as doing the Phillies ab absolutely
solutely absolutely no good, but stressed
that this wasn't the reason the
Red Hats weren't battling for the
pennant.
"If we had everybody healthy
from the start, I figure we're a
.500 club," he said.
Gene Conley is at least one
bright subicd available, and
Sawyer didn't miss it. He men mentioned
tioned mentioned that Conley came risht
from the Boston Celtics, witn
virtually no spring practice, to
win.
"That ?ivp Bob firnnnter ""1
me an idea," he said. "We might
save a in' nf -.vpy next spring
and have the Phils train in th"
Wilmington. Del Afrnnry. We 11
have 'em do nothin but shoot
basketballs."
The onlv rmerv Sawver .dodged
was why he waived Grqn Mini-
ner o"t of the leaaue instead of
h' aliened nf nve. Shortstop
Chiro Fernandez. He went into a
lone bit on ow 14 o'h- Hub.
"it the Phillie1!, waive Hainer
clear over and un to Cleveland
Somebody asked why -managers
argue with umn'res. dnce
decisions are rarely chaneed.
"Kverv time an umnire makes
a close decision, there's doubt In
his mind as to whether he's
rieht." Eddie Sawyer answered
"So we try to remove that doubt.

INCREDIBLE IN ITS MAGNIFICENCE
Revolt of the Gladiators
A HIT AT THE BELLA VISTA

Victory Conies Despite 3 Boots
: ., -v '..:
By Third Baseman Hec Lopez
DETROIT, July 25 (UPI) Yogi Berra's : ninth-inhing

homer with Mickey Mantle
The Yankees committed
to five Tiger runs. Three of
thirdbasemon Hector Lopez,
Detroit exploited With with four
runs in the second inning on sin singles
gles singles by Gus Zernial, Tea Lepcio,
Coot Veal and Charley Maxwell,
and an error by Hank Bauer on
Harvey Kuenn's line drive to right
field. i
The Yanks tied it up with a run
in the fourth with doubles' by
Berra and Lopez and three tallies
in the fifth on a base on balls,
Bobby Richardson's single and
Norm Siebern's double.
,, , j
The Tigershad an 8-7 lead en-
tering the top of the ninth but,
Berra's blast changed the situa
tion and gave the Yanks their
win.
CHICAGO, July 25 (UPI) The
Chicago White Sox today retained
their half-game America League

.. M.l..rf Trfi.n. hl"i7 inwjr UVC1 U1C XII.VSUU1U

nipping the Baltimore Orioles 3-2: It the gecond gtraight Ma.
in 17 innings. tory or the defending champions
rp. ,, ,.., o.ni ,f and second shutout in a row o o-The
The o-The Oyioles Billy, O Dell went th Pirfltp,
into the ninth inning with a 2-1 er lne riraie
lead but'the Pale Hose tied it up CINCINNATI Tulv 25 fIJPn
tVinTttaJrt WaT Th Philadelphia pffilf., Eg
test into extra innings. Gerry Wal- cj u Ditpnins fnr 12 rCit
ker replaced O'Dell in the tenth fw winnii .t.u L
but was himself removed in the '"twn "j
15th when Billy Loes took over. S3" a Wtoy todw.
v th victim of th. winnuiff .Two of the Reds runs.. caiae

r,m i Tk. 17H,
Bob Shaw toiled the first 12 in-
.ii .ii.
nings for the winners before giv-
ing way to Turk Lown. The victory
was credited to Lown who now
has seven wins and only two loss
es. The deefat evened Loes' record
at 3-3.
Sherman Lollar clouted a bases
empty homer for the White Sox.
SERVICE CENTER

Also Showing Monday!
COCO SOLO Air Conditioned 2:30-7:00
BRADFORD DILLMAN EAN STOCKWELL
"COMPULSIO N"
added Attraction
patterson vs. johansson fighti
air-conditioned i

BALBOA THEATRE
SANDRA DEE DAN O'HERLIHY
SUSAN KOHNER ROBERT ALDA
NEAR
EARL GRANT iino

I 5"

i mi iiiniuii m

lhmM lunntK f
AIM,., -i1 I J

junn bavin

Also Showing SUNDAY and MONDAY

.nn
7 0U
. DIABLO HTS.
Mon. JOHHNY ROCCO
Margarita 7: Of

GAMBOA 7:00

Sunday!
"Lonelyhearts"
Mon. Apache
Women

NO WHERE TO
GO

Tues. I
PARAISO 7:00

Santa Cruz 2:30
THE WHOLE
TRUTH

I WANT
TO LIVE

touch of the story, with exotic details of Its acenary, with
the dramatic punch of the action and the taste of bloody
legend of all sequences. THE REVOLT OF THE GLADIA GLADIATORS
TORS GLADIATORS will transport you to a time lost In the pages of
history, where iniquity, love and lust fight in a desperate
struggle for power.
Made In scope and colors, this English version of th
acclaimed Italian film, will enrapture you all. Don't fail t
see It. Starts on Wednesday at the BELLA VISTA Theatre.

on base today gave the New

the Detroit tigers.
five errors which contributed
the miscues were made by
" CLEVELAND, July 25 (UPI)
Cal McLish reeled off his eighth
straight victory and 13th of the
season today when he checked
the Washington Senators on sev seven
en seven hits and pitched the Cleve Cleveland
land Cleveland Indians to ad 8-1 triumph.
McLish, whose 13 victories
make him the biggest winner in
the American League, gave i!p
Washington's only-run in the sev seventh
enth seventh when Jrm, Lemon slammed
his 22nd homer over the left ue'd
'fence. It was the -121st"homer in
tu -.u- 4,,..
Zl ""t foX
ed last year.
MILWAUKEE, Wis.", July 25
(UPI) Righthander Lew Bur Burdette
dette Burdette won his 13th game of the
year today when he pitched the
Milwaukee Braves to a four hit,
'atter winner Don Cardwell was
r j iH. i .l i
witcu iium me game in me top
e??hth when tew. stale;
Acker's ouchm
, ACKer s Pucners-
PONY EXPRESS
Baltimore (NEA) The daily
race train from Baltimore t
the Charles Town, W.Va., Rac
Track is called The Pony E
press.
THEATERS TODAY
1:00 3:30 6:00 8:30
FANNIE HURST'S
imitation
ofjifi
with
JUANITA MOORE MAHALIA JACKSOR i

11 .--,LJ1'- J- WMll

A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE,

Susan Hay ward
I WANT TO LIVE
KATUN 7:0(1
"The Spanish
Gardener"
Tues. Life At
Stake
Want To
Live
Camp Bierd 2:30
GUNFIGHT
AT INDIAN
GAP"

'

)

V

i i,
v..-;;., :t;i ,v.;
-s V
r" .,'



SCKPAf?; JtJLT tt, 1959

THE SUNDAY AMERICA
PASIjSfVE.
V
Could Put Eager Giants Acros

Willie mays

- :

' J I i- 1 i I 1

WUUe
by

Dan Daniel

Trotters,' drivers and owners for
the fjrst 'International Cfcampion Cfcampion-abip"
abip" Cfcampion-abip" race, at a mile and' a naif,
to be contested at Roosevelt Race Raceway
way Raceway on Aug..l have gathered here,
and now the cognoscenti are busy
with a hundred and one questions,
ranging from the efforts of humi humidity
dity humidity on the seven foreign entries
to the possibility of rain and mid.
It is quite certain that Arthur
Nardin's 7-year-old Trader Horn,
the American representative, will
beta strong favorite even though-,
aoaae of the experts believe that
the distance will be a bit totHar
for- him.
The top contender appears to be
Jamjn, a 6-yearroM from France;
with! Jens Protector, age 10, from
Norway, with a mark of 2.02 and
a yctory over Jamin, the third"
thijiee.
In any event, it should be quite
a rice, this first effort to estab
lish an International all-age trotJ
ting champion, with,, a purse of
inn nnn 1
Trotting ';now?- flourishes ?
fewer "thafflft nations and the-time
Is ripe fsr;determining the world
title. iieft ""i t
Trader Horn, who has wonclose
to $300,000, will compete in the Na National
tional National Championship Tot at iXonkir
ers Raceway on Thursday 1 night,,
with the seven foreign drivers
watching Billy Ha'ughton pilot him
to what the experts predict will
be his njnth victory of the year.
Nardiii', and his wife,.. Jane, who
is listed as part owner 'of (he
Trader, have studied the1 Interna International
tional International Championshio field and are
confident that he will take the title
even from so competent a group.
Cloe students of tretttog say
that the Trader has a habit of.
looking back which,' one 6f these
n'ght, might beat h(m.' But the
Nardins and Haughton laugh that
off.
Gat May Halp Trader
Among the factors which are
expected to help Trader Horn s
the starting gate. He has trotted
out pf this contraption all through
his career. The foreign horses have
had comparatively little experi experience
ence experience with this- gimmick.
"About this husiness of a mile
and a half being a little toes,far
for the Trader' Haughton observ
, '-. CT

f -- r-if !m''
I'll K ii f 't""
17 ,. ,i' lltt..mijl

BEST EVER Sylvia Ruuska turned in the greatest performance
ever In the 440-yard medley In the National Amateur Athletic
Union Women's Swimming Championships a Redding, Calif.
The 17-year-old Berkely High School. senipr went the-distance
In a brilliant 6 minutes 40.2 seconds.

iliiiiilill

Mays
ed, "I can't see this as a factor
against us. A great trotter like
ours will go rignt on fighting just
so long as .there is a race to be
won."
Kurt Mattson, driver of Adept,
the Swedish entry, said that ne
was worried about the hutiidity
in this area. He was reminded
that Ingemar Jolinasson had made
similar comment on arrival here,
but had not deterred by humidity
or any other factor from taking
pare., Qf ., Floyd., Patterson.
None of the toreign drivers ex-pressetr-anrfears-as
to the ability,
of their trotters to become acclit
matized by Aug. 1. Nor did they
see any feed and water factory
operating against them.
Broka Onjy pne
Jean Riaud. Jamin's driver talk
ed up the French trotter as a truT
- ly
great horse.
, jamin nas raced not only in
FranUtlljBipelgium, Holland,
Sveden,leftria!rk;' Italy and Ger,
irtllny, 'and 'never has failed to put
up a fine contest," he said.
it t !. 1
"Where among the trotters of
tne world can you find a ereat
performer with the distinction 0f
paving oroKenonjy once? It h"
'pened "In "Italy, and was forced
on Jam in by art accident."
' Asked if it were possible that Ja Jamin,
min, Jamin, having rsred under liehts oh
ly once, would be bothered by the
unacrustompd environment,
Riaud laushfed, "I am not t
all worried about that."
George Morton Levy, of the Race
way, said that the non-American
entries would be worked under the
lights'; but; of the starting gate, to
familiarize them with actual race
conditions.'
Italy has sent two horses, both
7 years did, Tornese and Icare.
There was so little to choose be between
tween between them that it was dedideH to
ask Roosevelt Raceway to allov
both to enter.
Germany has shipped Ivacourti
and Canada ha sent down Phi,
lip Frost, a 5-year-old wh'ch has
competed in this country.
Icare last year was bought by
the Sandra' Stable of Padua, for
$100,000. a record on the other
side. Trader Horn was acquired
as a yearling for $1000.
1 & X

SV a Dm. 4a wAT I

By HARRY GRAYSON
j "4 "t t i,
' PHILADEL1H1A (NEA) A A-gain
gain A-gain the Giants are the most ex exciting
citing exciting club ui the majors, and one
good 4!rst from Willie Mayscould
five Sad Francisco its first World
cries"'' Mf' -'v"tT:-- s
Mays is batting around -300,
fair enough for most, but not for
a guy thoroughly capable of car carrying
rying carrying a club. His long ball has
been sadly missing when ne;dtd
most.
Bill Rigney is hoping for one of
the protracted .400-to-.500 hat hatting
ting hatting streaks Mays used to throw
while the Giants were tenants at
the Polo Grounds.. This might en en-afrle
afrle en-afrle the Giants to pull away from
the four-way scramble wh i 0 h
threatens to last down to the wire.
Manager Rigney'i natural Duoy Duoy-ancy
ancy Duoy-ancy is contagious, which is a
fine thing for toe outfit from, tb
Golden Gate, but the young
Giants have now been around bn2
enough to realize that it isn't
going to be easy. They couldn t
beat the Braves a year ago and
are not having any better luck a
gainst Milwaukee this trip. They
fattened up on the Dodgers in
1958, but have had nothing more
than an even break with Los An Angeles
geles Angeles this season,
THE GIANTS ARE VASTLY
better off at this stage than they
were a year ago, after wbiob
their thin pitching collapsed in
August from overwork. The start starting
ing starting pitchers are sounder. The pho pho-nemenal
nemenal pho-nemenal recruits of last term
have a vear of National Tenons

experience under their belts.
uaryi spencer has turned out to
be a more effcient second base baseman
man baseman than a shortstop, where 3d 3d-die
die 3d-die Bressound moved in to give
the club a slick double play com combination.
bination. combination. In the pitching department,
Sam .Tones nnri ToL- cnrii
are a tremendous improvement
over temperamental Ruben Go Gomez
mez Gomez and Ramon Monzant, but the
Giants still' lack-a pom nut on t r.
lief worker. After Johnny Anto-
neui, sam Jones, sanford, Mike
McCormick and Sfv Miller, Rig Rigney
ney Rigney doesn't know nnit whor
tO reach. Al Wnrthinirtnn ClnrAntt
. p. I WUtU'JU
jones ana uniy Muffett have
oeen c utne assistance.The hope
ic thuf PrlrliA ITifViA M-,A
up from Phoenix with limit 3
protes'-iina, exrenence, mign
help yith a knuckle ball.
Meanwhile, starters are rohev.
ing and that could be bad in the
1
long nam.
IT TOOK RIGNEY until Ju Ju-lv
lv Ju-lv 3 to ponvinrp Dwener Hnrap
Sloneham that Andre Rodgers,
the six-foot-three former cricket
player, would never be a ort ort-stOD".
stOD". ort-stOD". or' anvthine :ls in: tnaiar
league, for that matter. The
uiams maoe 17 errors in tneir
first half rinzen pampc anrl (lie.
miscast Rodgers' lack of rang",
bad hands and throwing. were sull
hobbling the club when the ac-
compnsneo bressoud took ov?r
for the fourth and perhaps the last
time.
Rigney further cemented the
Giants' defense bv installinc Jap.
kie Brandt in left field against
both kinds of pitching, eliminate
ing the risk of Leon Wagner emV
jaung ameaa joiiey.
A lot of learned hasehnll mpn
consider the Giants the most for
midable club m the Na t i 0 n a 1
League. They have the starting
Pitchers. SDeed anrl defence ml
the hardest working manager.
mere isn l0o mucn to beat, so
all Willie Mays has to do is catch
fire.
intentionally Picked
To Win $140,425
ington Classic
CHICAGO (UPI) Brookfield
Field's Intentionally was named
yesterday to face six challengers
in his bid for a fourth consecutive
stake triumph Saturday in the
$140,425 Arlington Classic for
three-year-olds at one mile.
Intentionally, to h Hdnn Vv
Willie Hartack, will carry 123
pounds, 6 more tnan any of his
rivals. Despite the difference in
weight, he was the even money
choice in, the early- line.
On the, record. Intentionally fig figured
ured figured to win. Only one other horse
in ths field has earned more than
$100,000: Mackle Brother's Onen
View, who has earned 115 $208,
compared to $410,522 for Intention Intentionally.
ally. Intentionally. Claiborne Farm's tluncB and
Calumet Farm's On-And-On were
figured to be Intentionally chief
competition.
Also In the field were Travis
Kerr's Top Cnarger, W. G. Gd Gd-more's
more's Gd-more's Fightin Indian and Jacnot
Stable's Diehard.
One Will Do
, CHICAGO-(NEA)- Red Ruf-
fine nnH ri7v Trnnt urn hnutlns
the bushes in behalf of the White
aox tor what they hope will be
baseball future greats.
The twn famous nIH Amnripun
League pitchers 1 are conduotlna
iryouis in Z3 states in, what Buf Buffing
fing Buffing believes t6 he: the most wide widespread
spread widespread nlaver hunt In histnrV: 1
"Someone will walk into ; trje
pars one or tnese .aays uus sum summer,"
mer," summer," says Buffing, "pick up a
baseball and -throw It over the
outfield wsll. We'll out nitn in
the car and throw a blanket over
him to hide him.
"If we get one really good
player, it's worth while."
BARGAIN RATI
Charles Town, W. Va.-(NKA)
General admsston to the
Charles Town Race Track is only
50 cents.

Your Own Family Crui se

From This
LONG, LONE VOYACEAnn
on on ner 5,000-mUe outboard
A.
Rv ncrxp
j -www rm. a
NEW YORK (UPI) Jeani
Riaud is a tall, strong Frenchman
who laughs easily and looks for forward
ward forward unafraid to driving the
French wonder horse, Jamin
against seven rivals from six na nations
tions nations in the International Trot at
Roosevelt Raceway on Aug. 1.
But it wasn't always thus.
For Jean Riaud remembers a
day of terror when the German
invaders came to his father's stud
farm in Normandy. A day, with
the two fearful nights on each
side of it, when 13-year-old Jean
hid in the woods with two of the
finest stallions in France and
saved for. the Fleur deJUs t"e
blood which now flows ins.haU of
the finest trotters in Europe.
The conauerors wanted to ship
the. two famous horses back to
Germany for their own breeding
purposes. The chief prize was
the stallion Hernani HI in Eu
rope the trotting equivalent to
Man O'War.
Raspensibility Wat His
"My father awakened me at 3
o'clock in the morning." Jean re recalls.
calls. recalls. "There was no other one he
could trust. All of the youn? men
were eone". prisoners or with the
Free French, and the old men
might go to sleep and let the
horses wander off. So it was tin
to me to take care of the horses."
Silently, the "oh so scared" lit
tle boy led the horses to a dis
tant wood.
"I grew up with them, so I was
not afraid of the horses." he
murmurs. "But I was afraid of
the park and I thought if the Opr.
mans found me they would kill
me."

uEJooo

,,v svJT REGULAR
Jffl I
kys

, "Ixtra Haavy" Rill "Ixtra Coal" Rlti lafular till
' FM mn who lilea tha fel For aitn who lilt tha FormMwheUkathaflttl
of haavy lubricating wakt-up foslini of (kin of whltkar-wiltlof. bar
"bruthlaM lathar." bracing mrathel lathar. banbap lathar.
': si". '. '-,'..
,
Whatever your type of beard, there's a Rill that's just
right for you., a Rill Instant lather that can give you 1
the smoothest, cleanest shavn you've ever had in half GET
th time And a Rs shavt la a U-hout share with
built-in after-shave comfort to keep your face feeling E T
smooth, soft and comfortable all day loag-j

CH005E THE RISE THAT'S

Gal's Long

Davison rets resit
cruise around eastern A7ri.V
CDAIPY
- a a u u a
LI
That day the Germans came to
take the horses away. Jean's fath father
er father shrugged his shoulders and
told then "some other Germans"
had come for the horses. So those
who had come took two mares
and left. Meanwhile, little Jean
huddled in the woods with the
great Hernani III and the stallion
Kaboul.
"Late that night, almost mid midnight,
night, midnight, I heard someone coming,"
Jean says, his brown eyes som somber.
ber. somber. "I was terribly afraid that it
was the Germans. So I tied the
horses and went to meet them,
thinking maybe they would not
find the horses if they took me."
Saw Father And Crltd
BW'lt was 3artVfather,"cIome
to take him home.
"I cried when I saw him," he
remembers. "It was the first
time I cried, but I was so re relieved."
lieved." relieved." Hernani III, led safely back to
his stall, went 6nfto sire Jamin.
the current European wonder
horse which Jean will drive in
this first big international classic,
and also sired Icare, one of the
two Italian entries.
Jamin has won 34 of 54 start"
but only has lost two equal
starts. The rest of his defef
came In handicap races. In which
he has given ayav as much as 75
meters almost the leng'h of a
footba)1 f'eld. Owned by MsHamc
Leon Olry Roederer, a cham.
pagne manufacturer, the S-yeir-old
trotter is the most ind'tlEed
horse s'nee the Emperor Climl
made his stallion Incitatus a con consul
sul consul of the Roman Empire.
He travel prvately and his diet
Includes artichokes.
RIGHT FOR YOU AND ENJOY

Can Benefit

Solo Voyage

By WILLIAM TAYLOR McKEOW
FAMOUS English writer-sai'or-artist
Ann Davison quietly power powered
ed powered out of Miami's Biscayne Bay
this summer on a 5,000-mile inp
to "discover America" for her herself.
self. herself. In 1953 she became the first
woman to sail the A'imtic aione,
and tola her memorable story of
that passage under sail with a 27 27-foot
foot 27-foot sloop in her book, "My Ship
Is So Small." Once again she
traveling alone, but this time in a
17-foot fiberglass outboard cruis cruiser
er cruiser powered by twin 35-horsep wer
motors the same type of cratt
that many pleasure boating fa families
milies families are using.
Every boatman has known fhe
temptation to csst off and head
out on an extended voyage, but
too often an inexperienced one
will rush out on a trip In whi:h
his "adventures" are more cor correctly
rectly correctly recognized as foolhardy
and dangerous stunts by me
Coast Guard and others vho
may have to rescue him.
Miss Davison combines long
years of seamanship expeiice
with careful planning for months
before a cruise. We have astied
her to record her first impies impies-sions
sions impies-sions of boating here as seen
through the eyes of an Engi-.sh
woman, and her experiences in
a boat which is new to her but
typical of the kind that is doing
so much for boating.
At a. warm-up cruita Miss
Davison traveled alone from Mi Miami
ami Miami to Key West and back by
outboard runabout, a trip of 350
miles in which she was delighted
to find today's powerboatman
can cover long distances on
schedule without waiting for thj
sailboatman's favoring wind.'
She cruised the unknown ian-
gk- wat?rwys pf Florida's west
coast Everglades, and leaniej
the pleasures of boating in a
small cratt that can explore very
shallow v',er.
This new trek is taking her
north by inland waterway 'along
the Atlantic coast to New Yori;,
then up the Hudson River and
through the Erie Canal and
Great Lakes to Chicago. From
there she will head down the
Illionois and Mississippi Rivers to
New Orleans, followed by a run
along the Gulf of Mexico and
Florida's west coast to Key Wei',
and the final Stretch back to her
starting point in Miami.
Her only special item of ad additional
ditional additional equipment insulle 1
aboard is a chart table for writ writing
ing writing and sketching.
Mit Daviton It cruiiing far farther
ther farther than the average family can
ever find time to go. She hrs
wisely plannefl hr timetable,
as every boatman iBhould, so 'hat
she need -not venture out when
bad weKther is threatening.
She hopes to compile a book
in addition to her magazine arti articles.
cles. articles. In it she may be able to
explain how any family with
enough time, experience, proper
planning and a suitable boat c:;n
travel almost as far.
The excitement and pleasures
of her trip, she explains, will
be the new places she will visit
and people she will meet rath rather
er rather than continual narrow escapes
and close calls.

mwm

12M

WISE
RISE
A REAL 24-HOUR SHAVE

TODAY

60c.
DRltE-IN
ri

RANGE BAREBACK
FOR A
HILARIOUS WEEKEND I

if., esSZ'J v.

1 BA;"..:

..tot BieSDJ
Uopz FLEnir:G
'Alias
Jesse James

WENDELL COREY
Color by D LUXE umn
Read Our

Rob" Yl
m Y

...the 36th Consecutive Victory in the
INDIANAPOLIS
500-MILE RACE

KM

Y as

Use the FIRESTONE Budget VUn7

BETTER RUBBER FROM START TO FIN6jH,(jl4

TRANSISTHMIAN HIGHWAY TEL. 3.1501 ''

Last Day! V

30c.
r
1
' "''it.
rides theVI
IN THr-
BI6GE8TH
GUNM
AND m
STAMPED?""
IN THE
WEST I
(.!
vil I
i H VKIIMI lEH MSI S
Mart t 10 HK Iinin fnlm IN MH
hxM k mm 1 um 1 mi uiumu. k nam
m DQ united artists
Classifieds
... n
' '.
,1 -n'?1
WIN
(;ai 1
The supreme test
of men and cars
in the world's most
famous race. Over
rough DricK and asphalt m
surface of the 21 mils
ival track, cars roar
down the straightaway
Pt speeds up to 160 miles
per hour and slide througfi
the 4 low.banked turns.
, It Is the extreme torture
test for tires and the "''j
winner does 200 time.,; :a
That's why race drivef s
insist on and buy the bestiX
tires for the big race race-Firestone
Firestone race-Firestone Tires.
mm
you mot :, j I I

w wrr' i fir 1

V



&
AGI II6HT
THE STODAT AMEBIC:
fUXDAT, TI?-2elS
Classified Ads
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AGENTS:
-,''v;..;:; ;. -Sir?'.'. T l-
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"SatCi, Bat. io JnV;.
Offlca Apen SJ weekdars,'
Phone Panama 1-0740 for
information about Clas
LMVE TOSS AD WITH ONE OP OUR AGENTS OR OUB OFFICES AT t&T "H SMEET, PANAMA UBHEKIA PHEC1ADO Street lta.Ua AGENClAt
INTERNAL. Dt PLBL1CACIONES No. 1 Lottery Pliu CAS A IALOO Central. Ase. ,45 LOUmOESPHAJlMACY 1M La CarrasqoiUe FARM A CIA LOM LOM-BARDO
BARDO LOM-BARDO Jio. M "B" Street a MORRISON 4th of Jul; Ave. A J St LEWIS 8KRVICE Ave. Tivell No. 4 FARMACIA ESTADOS VMDOS 14 CMrtra) Ave,
FARMACIA LUX 14 Cm) Ave HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE Fee: do la Oeea. Ave. No. 41 FOTO DOMY Jmte Areeeasem Ave. and St FABA
MAC1A VAN DEK JIS SS Street No. S3 FARMACIA EL BATURBO Faroue Laferr t Street FARMACIA "SAS" Via Parraa 11X NOVtDADES ATH1A
Beiidi Bella VkU Tbeatra end Branch at efbibnai Super Market a Via Eapaaa COLON OTF1CE: t5t an 4 A ma aer Guerrere Na. liza Tel. 43. t
sifieds. Chart your ad If
- ti; hin a commercial.
contract.

V'

ir
If
-
'f
7A
V
i i
V.

Resorts

Ferrer's Cottages, near 'Santa
Clara. Phone Balbsa 2830 bt bt-tween
tween bt-tween 9 a m. and neon, weekdays.
' PHILLIPS Oeeentide Ceftaoea
Santa Clara R. 4a P Pfcone Pa-
HM J-1 877 Cristobal 3-1673.
r H
-.
ouses
FOR RENT: Completely furnish furnished
ed furnished three bedrooms houta, dinlng dinlng-reom,
reom, dinlng-reom, kitchen, bar, air-eondi--tioned.
yard, in Cangreio "'" St.
Ho 10. For information call Tel.
J-4619-
"f fi(i HINT: House. Three bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, with or without furniture,
1 3rd Street, Let Cumbres.
Tel. 2332.
;fOR RENT: Newly constructed
I ifcarfroom chalet In Lome Ale Ale-""tWf
""tWf Ale-""tWf unfurnished -180.00. Phone
iZ247 er 4-0196.
-w i i
IWdnted Position f
; fOSITION WANTED: Reliable
-elil. food housekeeper, general
llOUM work seeks position. Phone
-X426-B. Colon.
iiWANTlD- Documentation elerk
WW for American firm. Write
liWt f. O. Box 536, Colon.
Lost Articles
frtCrSTVi Female Pekinese, brown
W5$&fa1 smaller answers to
Mum "Bonnie, call T. Stewart,
tp -Aneon. Tel. 2-1408,
2rrWrom three heartbroken
tMtH ffrit.
jjy1 ."
Animals
FCR.
:- Purebred Doberman
puppies. Phone 3-2875.
Commercial Sites
.'S'RENT: Ofiffce space,
itereedes building, above Aveni Aveni-MltVa1boa'a
MltVa1boa'a Aveni-MltVa1boa'a Post Office, with
jiondition, good tirer, good paint
private bathroom, watchman,
very reasonable rent. Tel. 3-3054
.OSTUPEFYINC'-Julie New New-,,
,, New-,, feiar scores a big hit on Broad Broad-m'
m' Broad-m' way as Stupefjin' Jones in
Hollywood, the six-loot star is
now playing in "The Marriage ;
Go Round."
FOR RENT
Vv to 2200 Sq. Ft. of r-.oHern
office space on second floor
Wf new "ELGA" BuildinR
Large private parking area
in rear Janitor and night
'watchman services Air
Conditioning optional Via
Espafia on 46th block
EL&A, S.A.
' 1 1

-JO

Commercial Guide
J ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
' . A I i -

as oniy cost $0.85 per col. inch
FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740

I! ' J -I 1
. ..
call
JIM RIOCE
General Agent
, Gibraltar Life Inn. Co.,
n tot rat and Information
. Tel, Panama 2-0552
Monday thni Friday
00 a.m. to 12:00
Z:M p.m. to 5:0
Saturday: :80 a.m. to 12:00
Listen To
The OAS
IPanamencan
(Record Show
12:30 p.m.
HOC-YCN
Every Sunday
. v

Apartments

FOR RENT: On bedroom
apartments, new apartment,
house located o the Transisth Transisth-mian
mian Transisth-mian highway, modern, well ven ventilated
tilated ventilated with private bathroom and
kitchen, completely furnished
with new furniture specially de designed
signed designed for the apartments, rea reasonably
sonably reasonably priced. Call Panama 2 2-2766
2766 2-2766 from 8 to 12 and from 2
to 5:30.
FOR RENT: Modern two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. Hot water
Campo Alegre. Tels. 2-2341 and
3-3379.
FOR RENT: G.I. approved, fur furnished,
nished, furnished, apartment, modern, clean
building, convenient location.
Automobile Row No. 36, call 3 3-6855
6855 3-6855 after 7. 2-5046.
FOR RENT: Magnificent view
in La Crests, two bedroom apar apar-ment.
ment. apar-ment. den, hot water, garage and
big porch. Call 3-3421.
FOR RENT: In the best resi residential
dential residential section of EJ Cancrejo,
two bedroom apartment with
porch, dining, livlngroom, large
kitchen, laundry, maid's room,
garage, all screened, play-ground.
Call 3 7453
FOR RENT: Apartments and
rooms. $40.00 and $25.00. Via
Espana, in front' La Callers,
501 0-A. Tel. 4-0553.
FOR RENT: Furnished' and un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished apartments. Alhambra
Apartments. 10th Street 8061.
Telephone 1386, Colon.
FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, living, dining room
kitchen, balcony. 50th Street No.
15 (near El Baturro), $72.00.
Phone 3-4994.
FOR RENT: Modern two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, livingroom,;din livingroom,;din-ingroom,
ingroom, livingroom,;din-ingroom, hot water, own blinds,
maid's room, garage, etc. 49th.
Street. Tel. 3-4994.
FOR RENT: Unfurnished, tool,
modern, comfortable two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. 50 Street No.
115. Phone: 3-1210.
FOR RENT: Furnished 1 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, livingroom, bal balcony
cony balcony and garage, close to The
Panama Hilton Hotel, phone
3-4567.
FOR RENT: Best located small
furnished apartment or room,
clean and independent. 43rd
Street No. 13.
Car Rentals
Your ear being repaired? Rent a
dependable Hertxer, call Fiesta
Tel. 3-4568, Lobby El Panama
Hilton. i
LEARN TO DRIVE DUAL CON CONTROL
TROL CONTROL CAR $3.00 per hour. Tel.
3 0338, Panama.
BRAZIL BEAUTY Teresa
Perseira, 18, is the daughter of
a Brazilian diplomat stationed
in Paris, France. She's playing j
the lead in a new rnovie,
"Gpsy, My Love."
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 8-4985
All Typea of Auto Insurance
We ye all kinds of clothes,
drapes, rurs, coats, dresees.
suits.
Two Hour Dry Cleaning
TROPICAL LAUNDRY
(10 minutes from town)
Via Espana No. 830,
Parque Lefevre Tel. 4-1277

Automobiles

FOR SALE: Sport cars, 1955
Thunderbird, A-1 condition, ra radio,
dio, radio, heater, overdrive, power
seats, etc. House 507 Parita
Place. Ancon.
FOR SALE: 1955 Ford, tudor.
fordomatic, radio, heater, call 2 2-3444.
3444. 2-3444. FOR SALE : 1949 Hudson four
door sedan. Good tiros, a good
car for transportation. Call 2 2-3320
3320 2-3320 or 0428 Frangipani Sr.
Apt. C, Ancon.
FOR SALE: 1957 Ford station
wagon. 6 cyl., atandar, radio,
heater, undercoat, seat covert,
etc. 15.000 miles, leaving for
States, $1550. Excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, Balboa 1253.
FOR SALE: 1958 Vauxhall sta station
tion station wagon, excellent condition
$1750. 2109-B, Curundu. Phono
83-2165, anytime.
FOK SALE: 1953 Mercury
Monterey, tudor, hardtop, excel excellent
lent excellent condition. Call Balboa 4337.
FOR SALE: 1958 Mercury
Montclair, 4-rfoor white sidewall
tires, two-tone blue, approxima approximately
tely approximately 17,000 miles, radio, heater,
power steering, power brakes,
push button control $2700. Call
83-6105.
FOR SALE: 1956 Thunder Thunder-bird,
bird, Thunder-bird, with removeable hardtop, hardtop,-continental
continental hardtop,-continental spare tire, power
steering, Fordomatic, radio, wiw
tires, new paint, tires and brakes.
Call Sot. Waller. Albrook 2166
or 5296 after five o'clock.
FOR SALE: 1958 Cadillac
Coupe De Ville Pink and Black.
Fully Ex Colon 1369.
FOR SALE: 1956 Ford. Good
condition, good tires, good paint
job; radio. Call 6-318.
Boats b Motors
FOR SALE: 14 ft. speed Hull,
fiber glassed, 22 h.p. Mercury,
motor, liscensed for 4. New chant
trailer. Will sell separately or as
unit. Curundu 5227, telephone
after 5 p.m.
45 foot double planked ex-Navy
. boat hull for sale. Asking price
,,$1000 or make n, offer Comr
mander Taylor, Navy 2553.
FOR SALE: Gasoline driven
electric plant 9 kw, 11 0220
volts, 1 phase. $225.00. Tel.
Balboa 2-3630.
SERVICES
TELEVISION SERVICE
Experts in TV, radio, Hi-FI and
transistors.
We do more Work, because wo
do it the best.
Phone 2-1905.
Crawford Agencies.
TivoH Avenue No. 18-20.
U.S. Television
Means reliability
better service,
and lasting repairs.
Phone 3-7607 Panama.
9 A.M. to 10 P.M.
DINNERS A CHORE
GENEVA (UPI) West Ger German
man German Press Chief Felix von Eck-
hgrt said a banquet given by So
viet foreign Minister Andre Gro-
myko Hast week was no comivon
man's fare.
"There was Russian caviar with
vodka, then trout and red wine
then some meat which I skipped
and finally ice cream," Eckhart
said of the dinner for West Ger-.
man delegates. 'Those official
dinners are a chore."

II --5 ith t-

CAREER SAILOR Reenllsting for six more yeras in the Navy
boatswain's mate 3rd class Billie o. Lambeth (left) Is admin administered
istered administered the oath by his officer-in-charge, Lt. Frank O. Oood-i-rmi.
at the Balba Harbor Defense Unit. A native of St.
uis, mo., Lambeth haa been in the Navy nine year

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Aged natural m m-nure
nure m-nure at give-away prices by the
truckloedf. Call 2-2641.
FOR SALE) Leaving for States.
Norge Freezer, Westinghouse
frigidaire, Dodgt '56, duty paid,
25,500 miles. Telephono 3 3-1813.
1813. 3-1813. FOR SALE: Dinette set, for formica,
mica, formica, wrought iron with 6 chairs
$60.00; two chairs, overstuffed
foam cushions, $35.00 each. 2
piecr sofa foam, $75.00; chest
of drawers $10.00; 2 desks,
$10.00 etch; baby neighs chairs
$5.00. Call 2-3444.
FOR SALE: Air conditioner v
h.p. Emerson, 9 months old,
$125,00, Hi-Fi record player, 4
speed, one year old $50.00. Call
2-3444.
FOR SALE: 1 Goodsell-Wil-liamson
Amplifier. 1 Goodsell Goodsell-Williamson
Williamson Goodsell-Williamson Pre-Amp (matched).
I Fisher Tuner, Model FM 80.
1 Garrard Transcription Motor
Turntable, Model 301. 1 Gray
Viscus Arm. 1 G.E. Diamond Va Variable
riable Variable Reluctance Style. 1 Wil Wil-sox
sox Wil-sox Gay "Imperial Reeordio"
Tape Recorder. 1 Electro-Vole
Slimair. Dynamic Microphone,
Model 636. 1 Motorolo Hi-Fi
Console Record Player. All brand
items. Navy 3723.
FOR SALE: Girls' 26'' bicycle.
Tel. 2-4416, house 1534-A,
Calabash St. Balboa.
Automobile and household goods
for sale. H-790-X Taverntlla St.
Balboa. Phone 2-1521.
FOR SALE: Electric Clothes
Dryer, Frigidaire all Porcelain
like new $100. Phone 3-4181
after P.M.
Roomj
FOR RENT. Confortable room
for students. Uruguay Street and
48th. Tel. 3-6506.
i NATU RALLY Ot course, this
' fellow in Waunakee, Wis., Is a
' happy man. He's finally gotten
where most of us want to b.

Si i

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Household goods,
leaving the Isthmus. House (443
Los Rios, lalboa Tel. 2-2672.
FOR SALI: Overstuffed living
room tt. new- condition and
porch set new Guatemalan fur furniture,
niture, furniture, cheap Balboa 4495.
mornings.
FOR SALE: Frigidaire refrigera.
tor. Good running condition, $50.
May be seen at 0428 Frangipani
St., Apart. C, Ancon.
FOR SALE: -4 burner gae tfevo
with oven and brellerttprctically
new. Call "H" K.AllK, first
floor, Apt, I. r
FOR SALE: Large dlnlngroem
table, 10 chairs buffet wonderful
condition, mutt sell, $125.00;
parakeet and cage, $20.00; sofa
$35.00; 3 Rattan tablet' stop stop-down
down stop-down type, $25.00; small end
tables, $8.00. Phono Balboa 2 2-3782.
3782. 2-3782. PERSONALS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 1709.
Special Offers
HELP WANTED: Civil Engi Engineers
neers Engineers end draftsmen with high highway
way highway experience. Write Box 4356.
WANTED: Correspondent, ap apply
ply apply Peikard Zona Libre, S.A.,
Tel. 1920.
WANTED: Experienced office
clerk with knowledge of account accounting,
ing, accounting, apply Peikard, Zona Libre,
S.A., Tel. 1920.
HELP WANTED. Matured, U.S.
citixen female for position of
Secretary, Grade NM3 (Secur (Security),
ity), (Security), with opportunity for ad advancement
vancement advancement to position of Execu Executive
tive Executive Secretary. Permanent res resident
ident resident of Canal Zone desired.
Call Personnel Manager, Cen Central
tral Central Exchange Office, Fort Clay Clayton
ton Clayton 8111, for appointment.
KOBE I MIXED LIA6UI
Kobe Keying Kernor
Teams Won Last
Quints 16 4
Sevens 14 6
Jesters 12V4 7V4
Doggoneri 10 10
Tankers 10 10
Ichiban 9 11
Holy Rollers 8 12
Shud Havs IVi 12V4
Fours 7 13
Weve Had lt S 14
Leading Averages (Ladies)
Crawford 142, Thomas 138, Miller
138, Hassler 137 M a t h i a s 164,
Olinger, Burton Thomas 161.
To tighten the race, the Shud
Havs should have won the first
game but the Quints won it by 15
pins. The Shud Havs should have
won the second game, and they
did by 45 pins, and the Shud Havs
should have won the last came
but they did not falling short by
77 sticks. As a result the Quints
still enjoy a two point lead.
Thomas Thomas took scoring
honors for the Quints with a 516
scratch and 558 handicap "L".
Cromit kicked in with 542 handi handicap,
cap, handicap, and Ed Sexton anchored the
team with 517 handicap. For the
snua riavs all of them should
have had 500, but they did not,
except M. Garcia with a 571 han-
dicap.
ovens 4 Doggoneri 0
The Sevens picked ud a noint
on the league leaders, and closed
the gap to two points, when they
rouea to a 4 to 0 victory over rh
Doggoners. Johnny Ely and BUI
Burke were the standard bi-ar.r
for the winners with 528 and 518
nanaicap sets.
ihe only member of the Do-
goners that was on the bail was
Lou Parker who hit 515 handicap.
This whitewash job hurt the Dog-
goners Decause up to this match
they were in the thick of the race,
but are now six games off the
pace.
m Jesters 2 Holy R oiler t J
The Holy Rollers, spirited in
two wins when they won two close
games, one by 25 maples and an another
other another by ffiur. Although the Jes Jesters
ters Jesters had an 81 pin advahtags in
total pins the best they could get
was an even split.
Jim Olinger, Improved his av average
erage average with a 501 scratch and 540
handicap for the Jesters. Ry
Burton backed up Jim with a 514
handicap.. For the Holy Rollers,
the bowlers' guardian angel was
Johnson was concerned, and she
enjoyed a 531 handicap blessing.
lohibant ) Pours 1
The Ichibans were red hot .nd
had four bowlers in the "500"
charm circle, all handicap. P.
GIVES EXPLANATION
HONOLULU (UPI) Deibart
K. Gregory, 22, who escaped from
Oahu Prison Monday, had an in innocent
nocent innocent explanation when police
picked him up Thursday splashing
in a swimming pool at Wiikiki
Beach.
'I just wanted to see the sirls
and have a swim. Hawaii bova

are cmy for the water' he said.

i Real Estate

in

ftR SALIiUti 500 sad 1.000
tnetera, tar the Naavg. Hipodromo
UrbatOxattoav aaroea the Raima
; Racetrack.. AH lata wKli arrsst
fronts, aawag e, water main and
leetrieity. Call W. McBaraett.
- Taf. 4-0975..
FOR SALIt Beautiful residence.
4 bedroom., livingroom, dining dining-'
' dining-' teem,, library, recreation room,
large- kitchaa), pantry, maid's
mom with aarviee. hot water, ter terrace,
race, terrace, garden, (arige, land 1,800
m. 9th. Street No. 21. San
Francisco.
FOR SALE: Large 2 bedroom
house furnished in Santa Clara
near beach with guett cabin, easy
payments. Called 3-4569 Pans
ma.
FOR SALE: House at Santa Cla Clara,
ra, Clara, quick sale, best offer over
$3,000.00. Leaving the Isthmus.
Balboa, Tal. 2-2672.
FOR SALE: Property en 4th of
July, Avo, tower floor it now
occupied by Swift tV Co., eleven
other apartments are in the sama
main building No. TI-132. Three
are alto 16 spaces and apartments
all rented in the rear of the main
building, alto a large space of
land that can be built on. The
rentals will pay for the entire
property in about 1 5 years at the
present rentals. There is also a
largo space of land that can bo
built on. Owner is usually at his
office on soma property daily or
phono Hopkint, Balboa 2966.
WANTED
WANTED: Radio tratmlter and
communication receiver, call 2 2-2460,
2460, 2-2460, Panama.
Secretary-stenographer or clerk clerk-typist,
typist, clerk-typist, British, open for imme immediate
diate immediate engagement. Box S-1 34.
WANTED: A good cook and
housekeeper. Good salary, San
Francisco, Calls Novena. Cata
NoJ 41 altos. Tel. 3-5111.
Carter 531, X. Tomlinson 539,
Jinny Hassler 515 and Bruce
Hassler 523. In three close and
interesting games, the Ichibans
took the first two by 56 and 33,
but the Fours won the last by 38
sticks.
The league leading bowler, Herb
Zost, and the big man for the
Fourg foiled up to his capabilities
with a 525 scratch series and 555
handicap, close by was Bill Bond
with 517 scratch and 565 handicap.
Tankers I Wove Had It 1
Tne Weve-Had-It really had It,
but It as all bad. Four of their
keglerg hit over 500 handicap se series
ries series But they till lost three points.
In comparison the Sevens rolled
2464 teepee, and won four and
the Weve-Had-It rolled 2513 or 49
better and yet lost three. The win winning
ning winning Tankers unleashed a barrage
of marks, and steam rolled over
the last place Weve-Hadlts. The
Tankers 1578 total pins, was high
for the league this week.
Willard Conklin had a 542, his
"111" woman Emily 513, Jerry
Diesing 539 and Cliff Parker 503.
The only 200 game of the eveningin
the league was on exhibition in
this match, when Bob Mathias hit
202, and ironically his team lost
that game, hut won when Bob hit
his lowest game.
RESIDENTS WIN
NEW YORK (UPn The
city agreed today, to let the
Canarsie section of Brooklvn en.
joy the pleasures of the past for
ar least a wniie longer.
Residents of the section had
objected to plans for putting an
automatic gate in Place of a
manually operated one at a erade
crossing where BMT tracks cross
a street. The- board of estimate
tabled the proposal.,

CARGO SERVICE FROM NEW YORK AND U.S.
ATLANTIC PORTS AND U.S. PACIFIC! PORTS TO
THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA AND CANAL ZONE.
PASSENGER SERVICE TO NEW YORK AND, WEST
COAST SOUTH AMERICA PORTS.

PANAMA AGENCIES, CO.

CRISTOBAL 1131

ll " -T

Investor's Guide-
-By
By $AM SHULSKY
A frequent query' -on mutaul
"How do the various funds' rec records
ords records compare with that of the
general market?"
Evaluation .of any particular
fund is a difficult matter.
It is not sufficient to say that
$10,000 invested. in 1948 would be
worth $30,000 today, or any such
figure.
There are about ISO open end
(mutual funds) today: and al although
though although many of them fall into
the categories of "growth," "in "income"
come" "income" or -"balanced" fund, there
are still so many variations with within
in within these categories and so ma many
ny many different manaeement nhilosn-
phies that It Would seem unfa.r
to say Fund A is a "much bet better"
ter" better" fund than Vunii H
.first going into all the, details.
A simple answer to the, ques-
HUll wuuxu PC.
Most large, long-established Vir Virtual
tual Virtual fund stock prices have kept
pretty much in step with the gen general
eral general market..
Leafing through Arthur Wiesen Wiesen-berger's
berger's Wiesen-berger's excellent "Investment
Companies" a leading source
of information on the industry industry-one
one industry-one finds interesting comparisons.
The Wiesenberger book provide?
a transparent chart which traces
the course of the Dow Jones in industrial"
dustrial" industrial" averages over the last
10 calendar years. And the de descriptions
scriptions descriptions of most of the leading
funds include a chart showing
the Dec. 31, 1958 value of a $10, $10,-000
000 $10,-000 investment made in that fund
at the close of 1948.
By placing the transparent
Dow Jones chart over that of the
individual fund one can see at i
glance which funds have done

Hits 1 T
p

END OF AH EYESOREf Shmw to the very shadow ei
Carjitol Rnilrlin fcrc w i 7t. Bnaolw

canitoi Buiidhio- haw w

lamous Washington eyesore, ii Ccbb'tedT 4

above, werTal

"
JktOVtAS PAMAMA
PANAMA
GUAYAQUIL
Today'a
IM
3:30
5:30
:00
:1S
6:30
7:30
Bun. Matinee:
Another Dawn
Baseball
Chapel of the Air
Sacred Heart
CFN NEWS
Operation Heart Saver
This la Your Life

Courtesy of Aerovlas Panama Airwaya
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3-1698 3-1 99
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

EEKLY
2135 PANAMA
BALBOA 2150 2159

SAM SHULSKY

better than, as well ag or -less
than the Dow Jones averages.
Surprisingly, many of the com common
mon common stock funds' charts show a
rather closa correlation with the
Dow Jones figure. A $10,boo -Jn-vestment
in 1948 in one" repre representative
sentative representative fund would have' been
worth about $30,000 at the closa
of last year, or three times as
much. v
The Dow Jones industrial aW
erage at the close of 1948 stood
around the 180 mark. It .closed
1958at 583. or 3.2 times higher.
While many a careless mutual
fund salesman may talk evea
more glowingly of what your in investment
vestment investment In a mutual fund today
will be worth in 1968, I think the
truth itself Is good enough.
I'm quite sure that many a
small investor, left to his own
resources, has not managed to
keep up with the. stock -market
m this the longest, bulj market
on record, 1 v
"V
But let's make OneXthlnff
clear:
If you make your derision on
a mutual fund by merely putting
the fund's record alongside the
Dow Jones averages during their
long-time rise you may be' doing
yourself a disservice.
A mutual fund's" record Is of
course important. But so are its
management, its goals, its abili ability
ty ability to stand up in all kinds of fi financial
nancial financial weather. (And we're
bound to have all kinds.)
Don't buy any one without
looking at all its qualifications qualifications-safety,
safety, qualifications-safety, ability to resist market
drops, income, growth, etc.
A mutual fund investment,
carefully made, an "be a solid,
lifetime program. X v
Give its selection the time 'and
consideration it deserves.
- r; rz'r
- i- '. m.nv ;i- T!i. fr7.Tr ilrww
AftWAYl
00
8:00 Steve Allen
:00 Ed Sullivan
10:00 Star Performance
1:30 Voice of Firestone
11:00 CFN NEWS
11:05 Col. March of Scotland Yard
. at Willy
3-0784
3-7999

Mel

TV Program

-A

sk-i-r
.4



i ;
THI SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAOt MINI
SUMUYjnT 88, 1959
Necklaces Are
Shorter- For
Fall Fashions

Htfoh '. .'v
r-t n SyolT

i
If'

FIVE -i (Juests at the" Port Gulick Service Club tried their skill as the limbo, a dahce fronvTrln fronvTrln-idadwhlch
idadwhlch fronvTrln-idadwhlch involves" dancing under a crossbar without disturbirfg it or losing the rhythm. Newly Newly-arrived
arrived Newly-arrived students from Latin America at the U.S.; Army Cariblxan School took to. the projeetvith
enthusiasm and had no trouble getting under 4he pole set at five feet, ,, (Army Phot!)

- fir' J x if s tv 4
It & A' f ' ? 1
' 'V
ljBBwrniiiiMuuWOinnillWWHM -- rriiWiiiiaflittimi I III II f 1 1

, FOUR But when the croachei?
-T9tfl5;tof the contestants fell by. the
THREE With the pole at three
ed as the dancers concentrated
MM
J ovp. Am 4 rtM.v Mr.

I T"'l- ..i.-, rWSiSi '

"f. ftwards prises to Miss Dllma Cervera and Sgt. Antonio FUomls Hernandei of CoiU Rica, A uest
3-tructop at the USARCARIB School, Their record? Under the sola t 1 aOefcefc.hrwV f-

!if r r fZF; Z i

MS lowered' to four feet,, a little
w,ayside.-
feet some of the smiles which had
on Inching under without touching
Rhlrlov' Hn1mtwrff. one of the Fort

iHt ... ;

W V 4.

'
s- vv W V 6$ej
; r? 1

more agility was required and
been in evidence earlier vanish-
that bat,. Jr! r
Gulick Service 'tlub directorsi!

mTTORK -tNEAWiThe new

leneth for necklaces, be they dla
monds or-inexpensive Deaas, u
short Bibs have been shortened
and even chokers have been.
shortened to rest gently-' at"the
throat base. '-
The idea, of course, behind the
new length u tnat it. proviajs
the perfect nil in for wideaway
collars and open necklines. la
midsummer, the prettiest neck necklaces
laces necklaces with black and pastels are
the frosty white. But sparkling
crystals in the short length can
lend drama to a simple linen
sheath '; ''
Many wdmen with too slender
necks will find the shorter neck necklace
lace necklace leneth a real bleuin. For
the short version tend .to fill
out an loverly slender neck, And
paradoxically, it conceals the
short,' full neck and gives'" It an
illusion of grace.
earrings, too, Have changed
their shape tp keep comoany with
tne snotened necklaces 'The short shorter
er shorter the necklace, th smallr the
earrmg.
For evening, earrines take on
slender length' and glitter. Wit.i
a snort summer hairdo, this is
the prettiest possible earring.
Generally, midsummer lewelrv
borrows its shape artti coloring
from flowers, birds, butterflies,
and bees. All of these motifs are
done lit both real and costume
jewelry. They have been worked
in ivory, gold, enamel, tinv beads
and crystal and appear in pins,
necklaces ana earrings.
The appearance of autumn co colors
lors colors in midsummer tobacco
browns, yellows, deep oranzes.
vivid blues -and areens hint at
fall. But, meantime, they're be
ing worn with black, brown and
au oi tne transition cottons.
&
vaul
Following a reducing diet is
much easier during hot. days
Most of us have less appetite and
are refreshed ..only Dy heating
slimming fruit and vegetable sal salads.
ads. salads. However, beware of wash washing
ing washing away necessary vitamins
during summer months with too
many iced drinks and too little
food.
Health experts come up with a
simple reducing .aid,. They say to
take two baths a day. instead of
one. Reasoning behind this advice
is that as body fat .disintegates,
more- waste material leaves
throueh : the- skin. You help by
:j'PoBtifix::tvay. 4
What has job hunting have to
do with beauty? Personnel exec
utives give a tip to recent college
graduates who apply for jobs. Be
neat, clean and well dressed for
a good first impression on an
interview.

wmmmmmmmmi Entirely new., .OX).. .from JRevlon mmrnmsmmmmm

Rnally!
'Hi and Dri
created for
'thing Kevlon

ialboa 6

4-
. By MARGIE
Littl Dorothy Hallberg

plrouatU long before she learned how to spell it. The tiny

ballerino slippers she donned
to become an integral part of
While other little girls in
tend games as movie actresses
her dreams at the celebrated

Eventually she abbreviated the name to Hall for the

professional stage, and in 1941
J. Chase, that is.
Hundreds of youngsters on the
Zone have benefited from he
long years of devoted stuay.
Poise, proper posture ano mus muscular
cular muscular coordination are the re rewards
wards rewards of their Efforts at the
Dorothy Chase School of Dance.
Mrs. Hallberg hoped to offer
young Dorothy all the exposure
to fine arts she did not have
herself. Besides the dance les lessons,
sons, lessons, she studied elocution, dra drama,
ma, drama, violin and piano. And the
lessons were well learned.
Dorothy started teaching dance
when she was 13, and three
years later was accepted by
Dance Masters of America. Fol Following
lowing Following her ambition to become
a classical ballerina, she joined
tne trouo of Russian ballet mis
ter Michel Fokine, whom 'he
describes as the 'lather of mo
dern ballet."
Amotut her personal treasures
are photographs showing hec in
solo roles of in "Sylphide," her
favorite ballet, and "Spectre La
Rose" In appearances at Kooin
Hood Dell in Philadelphia and the
ladelpt
in Ni
Capital Theater
ew
IforK
Cit:
or five months, she worked
with the Ballet Russe in Engiaul
then returned to New Yorx tor
further studies and appearances.
She diverted from the pure clas classical
sical classical roles to '-Derforrf with bal
let. erouPs 4n 4wc Rodgers and
Harfr BroadwfcyDrodudons, "Oh
Vm Tnu" anil 'T.yill al a n Pur.
chase."
But the part which seemed at
the time te be only a stop gap
ob has since come to be a hign
point in PeroThy Chase's back
ground. She Joined the elite line
f synchronized lasses who per

A gentle-strength deodorant created for
a woman's special needs

freedom from 'perspiration

instantly stops odor I Ends worry

stains! Insures 24 hoar protection! Ift the

woman's special needs:! the
knows iboutj women and 4c)ence
V.Tt
; The) rbllon deodoraht

ROTH ROCK
learned the meaning of a

at age three and a half were
her future.
Brooklyn were, playing pre.
and nurses, Dorothy aimed
Pavlova.
added Chase Mrs. Henry
form nightly at Radio City Musis
Hal) the world famous Rocket Rocket-tes.
tes. Rocket-tes. When Dorothy auditioned for
the Rockettes the first time, she
found that her years and years of
tutorship had trained her too well.
The Rockettes demand precision precision-perfect
perfect precision-perfect maneuvers. None can de deviate
viate deviate half an inch from the pros proscribed
cribed proscribed angle, and Dorothy kicked
too high, they said, After adjust adjusting
ing adjusting her limb lifting 'and brushing
up on the tap she had studied but
briefly, she became a Rocketle.
About this time Jack Chase, the
friend of a friend, arrived from
the Canal Zone to spend his vaca vacation
tion vacation in the big City. The intro introduction
duction introduction was followed by three
weeks of dates, which were fol
lowed by more than a year's cor correspondence.
respondence. correspondence. And then the m.ir
riage proposal.
Dorothy expected to call a halt
to her dancing career when tie
wedding bells pealed, but the de
cision had to be made unexpected unexpectedly
ly unexpectedly when she stepped on a broken
sewing machine needle while mak
ing her wedding gown. Her foot
became badly swollen and infect
ed, and it was nearly two ysirs
before she could use it normally.
Sht traveled to the Isthmus on
th Panama Line's last trip hare
bafora its ships war turned o
var for military use. Dorothy
and Jack Chase ware marriad
lit St.',Malt'i "Church;"' They
have lived on lbs truces Ave Avenue
nue Avenue in Balboa nearly all their
marriad life. The family now In In-c'udes
c'udes In-c'udes Alfred, soon tobe 14,
..J BL.L.III. 14
ana rnyiiiv, i.
An invitation from Llona Sears
to teach at her nursery school
prompted Dorothy to dust off her
V.'-.-.U;-
of perspiration
roll on deodorant
result of every.
You'U love it!
.. .. -W-k
9
l andUn
made Jut for women f

' "vv

'.V.;'
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K-.yMAXr.-.?
...
MRS. DOROTHY CHASE 'Z.

dancing slippers. She soon open
- J u J I i I : 1
eu uie uuors oi nr scnooi, nrsi iiu
xi -ij. ..k-. I r i -i :ui. 1
uie ota' nineriuBir ijegion ouiiuni,
then at the Balboa YMCA.
She has just recently moved
her studio to the Knights of Co Columbus
lumbus Columbus building, where 45 to 5U
little girls attend classes d iring
the summer session. Septemver is
Mrs. Chase's months ot rest. She
hopes to return to the States for
4
break-through

J Pi

vtMnasMv- is

umncu

1 the Dance. Masters annual hcuSn-
1 l-A-.A ' ..' --.jf
un BOsamBSij; .a,.
mu . .
Then,' eonti' October, her.sdiool
season wilj be resumed in earnest.
Much as she .'enjoys .the instruc instructions,
tions, instructions, Dorothy Chase; has not al allowed,
lowed, allowed, them to overshajlpw 'her
primary duties in her Dome ''and
children She refers tortftr senool
as a "profitable hobb&Vs'SJ
Classes end at 5 p.m.,r and she
leaves the school problems.' be behind
hind behind as she heads home to pre prepare
pare prepare dinner.
This summer's, volunteer ser services
vices services In helping handicapped
Children todince and .apprteU
ate ravslc.has been a nest re rewarding,
warding, rewarding, experience for her. She
expresses the satisfaction and
Inward oy ojseeing a .handi .handicapped,
capped, .handicapped, chjld, especially dlscev
r how tp control an arm Wcle
or to feel; a rhythm. "I
Mrs. Chase, points put that Pal Pallet
let Pallet exercises are now retognlzed
in the medical fiel as recom recommended
mended recommended therapeutic treatment for
muscular ailments. And even
hefty athletes at some Stateside
universities are required to mas master
ter master the graceful bends' for the
sake of coordination.
These advanced theories are
gradually dissolving the "sissy"
reference to masculine dancers,
she comments. But just so Sttle
boys on the Zone don't get ,-Uie
wrong idea, she refers to her
classes for them as "tumbling"
bhe believes firmly thtt esrr.
training in nance is a score fos
future. Many mothers tml
send only their talented offsjrlhg
for dance lessons, she savi.; Itut

emphasizes hat U is the Shfid
who is awkward, shy and disiOer disiOer-dinated
dinated disiOer-dinated who needs the trauima
most.
Dorothy Chase does no? 'Vtraui
her youngsters for the s ; pr pr-pose
pose pr-pose of performinf for the -pu-blic,
although many of hemrtlld hemrtlld-ents
ents hemrtlld-ents have appeared In loci pro programs.
grams. programs. The nearest thing tea re recital
cital recital in her end-of-the-seasofij par party,
ty, party, when the. young dance students
demonstrate their accompli, -ments
for parents and friends.
Her own children attend Hit
school, but Mrs. Chase does net -intend
to force dancing on thenf
except for exercise, poise Jid
pleasure advantages. Phyllis has
already demonstrated that"he
forte lies in another field of aril
painting. v lit
Tropical weather has at least
one fan in Dorothy Chase. The
warmth eliminates a large part .of
the cold-weather warmups which
were required in New York, the
notes. j
Although she forsook the sti Jo
life for which she trained -1nng
Mrs. Chase has no regretskJCl regretskJCl-home
home regretskJCl-home is her real center of devo devotion,
tion, devotion, a fact recognizable in Uks
Chase living room, which ls'.k
tasteful blend of modern and JO JO-riental,
riental, JO-riental, with a cherished memd memd-to
to memd-to here and there. It is the hofttf
of an established family who halve
a feelint' for the beautiful fcJ
Mrs. Chase is a Combination
wife, mother, homemakqr, sea'pi- 1
tress, organist, cook ahd daw J
teacher. ',.
She is still waiting for the 1KL '(
prediction to come true. J

you'll siow flown. The tropitai
weather will set vou
But sue s too
much thought
bmi to nvt

, .'

.-, ; .' '"! w :;.'..



-r "" -?;--! : -
lwrT" ... Read story on page 6X
- pOUrnEV TO LflVEfCi rTYTr w St'eam-ToDarlcn To PickJUp US Scientists . : :;Xsivrt:r ; -"

I i.

m .. tin:-. w V4

f THE STORY: Against everyone's advice; Kathie Ebberts

Iwt bought clothes and a ticket to Hawaii cut of a $1,500

legacy from her Uncle Job
- -y
.'BimV'i farp was
urorklne as he
handed the ticket DacK w ner.
iJHow can you possibly think
ytn deed is worth anyUiing?
he -asked her angrily. "Who do
ou suppose has paid taxes on
ttat land all Uiese years:
Job Hammer, I'll bet!
'l4jion't know,' Kathie said, I
stubborn note in her voice.
tAttraptb he seized her arms.
You're not going, Kathie! he
Aid '"Its crazy! Its even criz criz-ler
ler criz-ler ior you to go over there alone
than-what you said last night
k "I've bought my ticket, Katn Katn-Vk
Vk Katn-Vk said. .L
"Yu can turn it in.
"And I suppose I can take tne
clothes back, too?"
?Shi? put her hand out to him.
But uck had turned angrily a a-Zbv
Zbv a-Zbv "You needn't bother about
Se Sores." he muttered. "I can
finisB? without you."
lUp In her room, Kathie began
Mfig boxes and- putting her
rcteses on hangers. The new
S-esses looked out of place m
fer: Shallow little closet, along along-lidehe
lidehe along-lidehe cotton housedressed anfl
flielitcvitable shirts and jeans
IThlblue linen, with its tucked
fronr and tiny cap sleeves and
faring wide skirt, was irrenst irrenst-ftle.
ftle. irrenst-ftle. She stepped hurriedly out
at' the black suit nd sh pped the
fires over her shoulders. The
f tie Hue of the dress heighten heighten-fl
fl heighten-fl the blue of her eyes and seem-
a Iq cast, a Diue "e "
. i r Vi n ir with
KiaY.V can of hair, with
flje Dutch cut banes that
still
looked strange 10
-Knthie stared at the transfor transformation
mation transformation in wonderment, "But you
S-t belong here, either!" she
ib'Spered to her reflection
iJVnrV suddenly her tremendous
excitement of the morning came
tirag back. "I'm going!" She
Mt a little frightened, realizing
rf't shp really meant it. We
didn't know about the money
Wh-n we decided to tret married,
and if I sppnd it an find he
deed is worthless, we'll have just
as much."
But she still had to crowd
down a felling of guilt. Tf she
really loves Buck, wouldn t she
wfiat to stay here and get mar mar-....
.... mar-.... i. mj
-"But T An lnvp him." She told
oreMf Vet even as she voiced
her thought, she recalled Bucks
urgency up in the eucalyptus
grove the morning Uncle Job had
died, and the frightened clamor
it had set up in her heart.
"Why not admit you're a a-fraid?"
fraid?" a-fraid?" she asked her reflection.
"Downstairs in the kitchen.
Mrs. Jensen looked up, startled
by a quiet scratching on the
screen door. Buck Landers stood
there in the twilight, his solid
figure completely darkening the
door.
"Where's Kathie?"
"Upstairs, I think," Mrs. Jen Jensen
sen Jensen said, curiosity in her eyes.
"Come in. Buck."
He shook his head. "I don't
want her to hear us." He beck beckoned;
oned; beckoned; the older woman closer
"Do you know what she did in
town today? She bought a tick ticket
et ticket to Honolulu."
Mrs. Jensen's jaw droppVl.
. "She did! I declare!"
"It's that old deed. It's eon
to her head. Mrs. Jensen. I think
it's only right I should trv to
find out if that deed's any good
before she leaves. Tf it's worth worthless,
less, worthless, maybe I can keep her from
iquandering all her uncle's mon-

1 UMMii I CENTRAL

I i ""g-- U I RELEASE! 13 EH C3

(TODAY! 75c. 40c. A 1 0 75 040
1:35, 3:25, 5:20, 7:10, 9:00 p.m. KB Shows: 1:15, 3:03,
, ( VT 5:01' 6:S9- 8:57 vm

w inESSSKfiSi U,m nM-isn

I i II 1 1 -j with ;- vi .mm I I I

I. m v sHiiEir jokes i 5(f -mm i

V s I luJrri-i I I UM -tin mi rvt II

Hammer. y
i .. .

V ey. iou Know wnere Auue Keepsi ; , J :. ; .'?'. -j ? ' a ; .-".n -.M -i -i" i ; I

You know wnere sjuue keeps
it?
'bui i aoni Know as i
should we woman began a-
larmed.
"She's mad at me, so it's no
use asking h4r if I $an see it a a-gain.
gain. a-gain. i wantVto get the survey
off it and send" -a cablegram over
there and find out if tnat deed's
been recorded. There's no harm
in doing that, is there?"
Mrs. Jensen was trying to ima imagine
gine imagine what Mr. Jensen would say.
The ded was. Kathie's property.
But on the other hand, Buck was
Kathie s future husband, acting
for her own good.
"I'll try to get it for you,
Buck,'' she whispered, feeling
like a conspirator.
"I'l come back tonight," he
said. "After Kathie's in bed."
"She'll likely go to bed early,"
Mrs. Jensen whispered.
"Okay," Buck said, and van vanished
ished vanished trom the door.
The dresses hanging in Kathie's
closet, none of. which she had
yet worn, were'-a symbol of the
dream she still could not always
believe in. V
But today jhe. dream" semed
faded and dim, land she thought
of Uncle Job's old deed and went
to the strongbox to get it out a a-gain,
gain, a-gain, to pore once more over the
cryptic words fai the fine olf-fash-ioned
script.
She went to her closet shelf
and felt under, me red valentine
candy box .for the key. It was
not there! i
She had a moment of panic.
Her steamship ticket was in the
strongobx, too. She ran to the
box. It was where she had left it
only casuaUyShidden. behind the
Doxes tnat new ner new shoes.
And it was still locked.
She returned to the shelf and
anxiously felt along it: Almost
immediately her fingers touched
the cold metal of the key farther
down the shelf Hurriedly she o-
pened the metal box. The ticket
was safe, and so was the deed
But Kathie stood looking down at
it, her idea of reading it over a a-gain
gain a-gain all gone. She was trying to
remember exactly what she had
done the last time she opened
the box.
I know I put the key under
the red heart box," she told her herself.
self. herself. "I chose the ox because
I'd remember' it."
VI
It seemed incredible that some someone
one someone else could have used the key
without her knowledge. Mrs. Jen Jensen
sen Jensen was the only person who had
access to her room, the only one
who had seen her put the key
away. The older woman had been
in her bedroom, where she had
come to see Kathei's new clothes,
when Kathie put her travelers'
checks in the box.
Kathie went quickly in search of
Mrs. Jensen. She found her down
in the yard, and, surprisingly,
Buck was with her.
Kathie was too angry to be po polite.
lite. polite. "Mrs. Jensen, what did you
want from my strongbox?"
The older woman colored and
glanced at Buck. That look gave
Kathie Ebberts a hint of the truth
and she was not surprised when
Buck spoke.
Buck answered for Mrs. Jensen.
"It wasn't her, Kathie. She did
it for me. I wanted another look
at your Uncle Job's deed." ;
Kathie faced him, her eyes blaz blazing.
ing. blazing. "And couldn't you have asked
me?"
"I could have," Buck said un-

RELAXING ON THE RIVER Dr. John D Dwyer,' director of the
University; of .'St. Louis biolog department, watches uie Tuira Ri River
ver River as theLLOM ,heads towards a rendezvous with the minesweeper
USNS Falcon

smilingly. "But I didn't think you'd
like what I intended to do. I wired
the surveyor's description to Hono Honolulu
lulu Honolulu to find oat if your deed's re recorded."
corded." recorded." "Oh, you did!" Kathie saidsca.th
ingly. "And what did you find out,
Mr. Fix-it?"
"Nothing yet," Buck said stolid stolidly.
ly. stolidly. "There hasn't been time."
'.'You might have saved your
money," she said furiously, "be "because
cause "because I'm going anyway."
He looked at her. "You mean
that the trip means more to you
than our marriage does, Kathie."
"Or that the money means more
to you than anything else does!"
Kathie retorted sharply... "You
can't bear to see me spend it, can
you?"
The deep, dark color came creep
ing up from his blue collar. "We
may as well call things off, Kataie.
I .guess your ideas are too big for
a farmer's wife."
Kathie tossed her head and turn turned
ed turned swiftly away from him swiftly
enough so that he could not see
the tears starting to her eyes. For
she knew now that there was no
patching up the quarrel mat had
been growing between them ever
since her uncle's death. She had
taken a step that would change
her whole life.
Mrs. Jensen followed her to her
room. "I'm just as sorry as I can
be, dear," she said unhappily. "I
never would have done it if I'd
known it would cause trouble be between
tween between you and Buck."
fit's all right, Mrs. Jensen. We
were having trouble, anyway."
"Why can't you forget that old
deed, dear," and settle down' here
with Buck? Fifteen hundred dol dollars
lars dollars looks big to you, Kathie but
believe me, it isn't much money."
"Mrs. Jensen," Kathie asked,
looking past her out of the win window,
dow, window, "do you think your, husband
would hleo me arrange an auc
tion? I want to sell everything of
Uncle Job's everything the banJt
isn't takine."
The older woman pressed her
icafc-j,
C3Y NUMEROUS
I REQUESTS!7
Beginning.
WEDNESDAY 79th
at the
I TENTH .ATI
irit. "r.
i i spi
, chwuom"' wii V mm. ej
R0BIN50NDE CARLO
I In TECHNICOLOR!
v3 ca ca en cza ejJ

lips tightly together, realizing that
her advice wa$ not wanted. "Why
yes," she answered stiffly. "I'm
sure he will help you."
Buclfc took the auction as a per
sonal affront; Kathie knew, sick
at heart, that he had been count
ing on Uncle Job's things as his
own. Ha continued to help with
tne chores, 101 the bank had not
yet taken the livestock awav. but
he stalked about the farm looking
line a thundercloud.
The f armhouse and the barnyard
were cleared by the auction. And
Kathie added a few travelers
checks to her little packet, and
some handsome pieces of luggage
to her purchases.
(TO BE CONTINUED
NEXT WEEK)

V'
I 111 A' hM JWiniir 111 JSlfeilst:4

EL MONO Crewmen from- the landing craft met this perky fet
low at stop near La Palma. Although described as "friendly," Mr
Monk was a bit reluctant te be photographed. 1 1

TODAY
0.80 0.30 U

BY REQUEST OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC!

Vk UMlBB-p.yj
V' VJ0HNGAVIN.4

SANDRA DEE f
CAN OHERLIHY ;
Afinrnr una
RUULM ftLUMv ft
wlAHALIA mWS v
Mfil"lHlMWlHr

L

The landing craft pilot

intehtly as the craft is maneuvered upJyiog and sandbar

biiuiveu i ivor Bt eMail o pais.
ir.rwt r foulnH or imbedded
river bottom
:.. -r-i. .. i

iness are xne neauaunes wnicn xace ogi. ueorge 5.
Jackson and Sq. 4 George Maxwell, pilots with the Trans.,
portation Corps, U.S. Army Caribbean. SeveraFfimes a
month they fight ocean tides or river currents on missions

in support of U.S. M my Caribbean

The. harbor craft operations u
nit maintains facilities on both
eides of the Isthmus, shuttling its
six landing craft through the Ca Canal,
nal, Canal, fieces from the 4th Gun Bat Battalion
talion Battalion 517th Artillery; are hauled
twice a year to Atlantic side fir firing
ing firing ranges and heavy equipment
of the Infantry moved to R'o
Hato during maneuvers. Other
recent assignments included fery
ing a group from the 518th En Engineer
gineer Engineer Company. (Combat) to Rey
Island lor a "good neighbor" m
sion of making airstrip repairs.
Last ; week an LCM undertook
a 240-mile expedition to the River
Tuira in Darien Province where
the craft was directed to pick up
three U.S. scientists who repre represented
sented represented the largest botanical expe expedition
dition expedition .ever to penetrate the reg region.
ion. region. Teamin un with the USNS Fal
con, a minesweeper from Rodman
Naval Station, the craft left Pier
20, Balboa, early in the morning.
The Falcon anchored the after afternoon
noon afternoon at San Miguel Gulf while the
LCM proceeded up the Tuira Riv
er to La Palma.
The five-man crew, composed of
2nd Lt. Stewart H. Babrega, Sgt.
Jackson and Sp. 4 James E. Todd,
James R. Butler and George Max Maxwell,
well, Maxwell, then climbed under mosquito
bars to spend the night on deck.
The scientists were contacted
at El Real the next morning af after
ter after the hazardous river tourney
and the remainder of the' day
was spent sightseeing In native
piraguas long canoes with out outboard
board outboard motors.
Representing the University of
TODAY
12:58 3:18 6:00
8:42 p.m.
&

.Ay"

mm) WiiPr'

observes hit-guide' directions

wne niioucuuuiaiiun ana vne
in the cummv rtu f h&
. s'
.....:-t. i
St. Louis in the expedition was
Dr. John D. Dwyer, director of
the biology department. Two o o-ther
ther o-ther members instruct at Yale
University: Dr: Kehton Chambers,
assistant proiessor 01 botany and
John Ebinger, graduate student.
The leader of the nartv? Dr. Wil-
liam Steam, was stricken with
fever and evacuated by nlan
shortly hef ore the arrivaL of th
landing craft.
The project was financed by the
National Science Foundation in col.
laboration with the Department
of the Navy to exploit the rela
tively untapped area for plant
samples. As the area is rich in bo-
tanical specimens, the botanists
were pleased with the results and
hope to return soon. 1 1
Chambers' main Interest is In
the field ef plant, propagation.
Collecting specimens ef pollen
and stamen from ground (lowers
was comparatively! easy, but
tree flower collection pre ved
more difficult.
Since many tropical trees have
no low limbs which permit climb climbing,
ing, climbing, the doctor, shot the branches
down with a 12 gauge shotgun.
Although it was impossible to
capture the pollinating in s e c t,
many beautiful stages of seed and
fruit production were, saved,
Speedy iftecovery of the blos blossoms
soms blossoms was necessary as moisture
and heat combined to wilt or rot
the samples. Preservation was at at-teined
teined at-teined by inserting them in preser preser-ing
ing preser-ing fluid and then encasing the
containers in insulated boxes.
Steam is curator ef a botani botanical
cal botanical collection at the Yale School
'of Forestry nd studies weed
structure. He obtained, cross sec section
tion section of over 500 species ef tropi tropical
cal tropical woods.
A larse Quantity of leeumeq was
gathered by Dwyer. Some of the
seeds were the size of grapefruit.
Dinger is a specialist in the
field of taxoomy (plant identifica identification
tion identification and classification), and pack
aged several samples of an anaes anaesthetic
thetic anaesthetic plant used by the Indians
in the interior.
The enlarged nartv de n a r t e a
from the village the next morning
ana ai a rendezvous Wlin tne
Falcon the scientists left the land landing
ing landing craft. ; :

v t ,1 .'fill Isi
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STREET SCENE Klda ire kids the world over, and the presence-
fepreaentative U the amali any eet iQ-tbe vUlM U El ReaV

E'.fll.i
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EXPEDITION MEMBER One of the scientists returned from Da Darien
rien Darien Province through Army-Navy cooperation 'was John Ebinger
of Yale University. He rests aboard the USARCARIB Transportation
Corps landing craft as it prepares to leave the anchorage at El Real.

f Vlattora with eameraa draw

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vicryre amagicjar!

PLACE a small orange (or rub rub-ber
ber rub-ber ball) before you on the
table and- cover it with a glass
fruit Jar, such as la used for
home canning. Then invite one
of your friends to remove the
sphere from this location to an another
other another table across the room
without ouching it, of course!
Perhaps your friend will try to
scoop up the ball with the jar.
This is not permitted. The mouth

Track Digits Through Crossties?

i
4
10
IS
4
5
lb
2
n
TO SOLVE this wits tester, pro proceed
ceed proceed as in a crossword puz puz-tie,
tie, puz-tie, using numbers instead of
letters for the answers. Insert a
single digit in -each square. The
trick is to get answers that will
function across and down,
ACROSS
1. When written, the first part
of this hyphenated number con con-stains
stains con-stains seven letters and the second
Dart four letters.
3. How can you lose pounds
fef Ugly fat? Smart Aleck 'an 'answer;
swer; 'answer; Cut off your head.
5. The next two terms in this
series:, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12.
7. Twice this number Is equal
to the number added to two.
"SPOTTING COLOBS" SOLUTION
Dotograph for
3 .2H
25
2
5
7
.18
10
8
13
II
3lL
12
AN important part of thta pic pic-jS
jS pic-jS ture aeems to have disap disappeared.
peared. disappeared. It can be restored by
drawing a Una from dot 1 to dot
2, dot 3, etc., until all jot the
numbers up to 25 have been used,
Whera mora than ont number
appears close to a dot, use the
dot for each number. Afterwards,
add colors to the scene;
RIDDLE ME THIS I Why can't
, hens be expected to lay eggs at
night r ' ,.
uioseq Xaio iq'i'a T iwiv

l:

of the jar must be held down at
all times.
After a few minutes, he will
- ask you to do the trick, which is
accomplished very simply:
Grasping the jar -firmly, move
it around in a circle, thus caus causing
ing causing the orange to spin Inside. As
the orange whirls witHln it,
carry the jar. to the other table.
The orange will remain in the
jar as long as the whirling mo motion
tion motion continues in effect i s

8. XXXVI more than MC minus
CM. -,
10. Will Rogers said that if he
had only 2 days more to live he
' would spend each of the hours,.
at a time.
13. The month of love and
moon.
14. One meter suggests which:
3.142, 5280, 39.37, 1728?
. 17.1Making your 2's look like
7's, your 3'S like 8's and your 8's
like 0 would increase the sum''
of 23 and 26 how much?
18. That's for ACROSS.
DOWN
' 1. Delicatessen owner's lament:
days make weak.
2. Two sets of twin cous
their parents.
3. A man gave 10 cents to one
boy, 5 to another and 0 to a
. -third boy, what time was it? An Answer:'
swer:' Answer:' j to o'clock.
4. A vacuum.
6. Monolog; dialog.
7. Today's chuckle: When a.
woman's tired words, she's
asleep.
9. Sing a song of pence, but
sing it with a sigh
For what the heck will a
pence buyt
11. The number of each zodiac
whose sign is: scorpion, twins,
archers.
12. The Pony Express carried
on business for how many
months ?
15. A 66 "proof" liquor Is what
per cent alcohol?
16. At this age, the justices of
the Supreme Court are eligible
, for retirement
17. You are now on Cloud
-6-ii "01-91.
"ES-SI "6t-II '6S8-TT "99 8 'fZ'L US
'Q-t S9I-8 'll-I amoa "0S-8T
'66-it 'isee-H '9-i 'm-6 'asz-n
'SIH-S '01-8 'U-t-HMW?V itaOaog
Junior Readers
a3
16
15
14
In Time for Dinner
PVO men who had to drive
, separately from one town to
another planned to have dinner
together at a roadside tavern.
One left town at 7 a. m. and
travelled at an average rate of
85 m.p-h. The other man;; left at
10:30 a. m. How fast, would he
have to travel la order to over overtake
take overtake his friend at 8 p. m.?
jnoq ne tnn pjin-eae pvm eae
-XUU q PinoA pdt sih,, ioieS

rO X.

fiS 2.0 )

Letter Is a Challenge
To Youthful Minds
YJHEN a delivery truck carry carry-W
W carry-W jag huge, hand-made sign
hit a bump in the road, off
dropped a large wooden block
letter. Shortly afterward, four
boya happened along on their
way to 'school.
"took," one laid, -there' the
initial letter of my first name."
" "Mine, too!" each of the other
three said, although the names
of the four boyi all began with
different letters.
What waa the letter that each
one of them claimed?
As a hint, we'll reveal that the
Ill-fated letter waa a "small" one.
..'q,, q ov'jwdde or vno xt tuoji
-od jujmp uiojj jr Xuioo
P.. o00 I
Graile A Vision

IS THIS milk container standing
oh end, or is it resting on its
side? Gaie. at this figure fixedly
for several seconds, and you'll see
it appear to change perspective
before your very eyes. It's a
clever optical lljuaion, of course.
Did you ever try drawing one?

SPOTTING COLORS TESTS

PERHAPS the design above would pass as a work
of modern art In any case, It po'ses a problem
that challenges the wits and patience.
The, problem is this: To take crayons of three
different colors say red. yellow and blue; fill in
every area of the design with one of these colors,
and to keep areas of the same color from touching
at any point.
If cray&ns are not handy, pencil shadings or writ written
ten written symbols may be substituted.
A solution Is shown elsewhere on the page.

;mMMgTOgrowOhil OIDIE SXEIiCISE

By Eugens Sheffer
HORIZONTAL
1 fee married Ruth (Ruth 4:13)
8 Pharaoh's daughter named him
(Ex. 2:10)
10 Term forbidden to be used
against a brother (Mat 5:22)
14 Fairy tale monster.
15 Straighten.
16 Hebrew measure.
17 Embellished with details.
19 Additional amount
20 Be indignant at
21 Obliterates.
23 Clesnaei, as furniture.
26 Sped.
27 Allays.
30 Condition of the furnace into
which Daniel's three friends
were cast (Dan. 3:22)
32 Father of Jacob (Mst 1:2)
36 Biblical pronoun.
37 Expended freely.
30 Arabian garment
40 Possessed.
41 Herd of whales.
42 Those in office.
43 Outfit
44 Topax hummingbird.
45 Animals of the Andes.
' 47 Civil or criminal.
48 Tropical fruit
50 The sun.
51 Sand hills.
52 Anger.
54 One of the tribes of Israel
, (Num. 1:41)
56 Wanders from right path.
59 Nova1 Scotia.
63 Feeble groan.
64 Vacillation.
68 Send forth.
69 Shun.
,70 Grafted (her.)
71 Skin protuberances.
72 Many of his children returned
to Jerusalem from Babylon
(Ezra 2:44)

Its Spooky Arithmetic RINGING TRIBUTE

X X 5
XX
X X X X X
XX X X
8 6 4 5 7

A COUPLE of vacationing ghosts were rattled a
bit at first by discovery of the mysterious
markings above on the wall of an unfamiliar old
castle. But once they found out that this was
simply a multiplication problem, they settled down
to try and solve it.
Surprisingly, each of the ghosts came up with
a different answer. Can you puzzle out the answers
they found?
tt KuiD 6Slt P 69 seuirj ESEI
CHECK NOAH'S ANIMALS

PELING frisky
when asked
to make a list of
some of the anl anl-mals
mals anl-mals which
might have been
.found on Noah's
ark, a puzzllst
devised the dia diagram
gram diagram at right,

scrambling the
names of at least 30 animals among the letters.
To Identify the animals, begin at any square and
move to an adjacent square in any direction. A
square may be used mora than once in spelling a
word, providing you enter some other square before
using it again. How many names can you find?
Twenty is a good average.
Time limit for this poser Is 15 minutes.
tom(3 'viund
oipuu 'joS "jsnSsf Mriqaz mjoi 'aazS 'uon
uosiq 'Sop 'S4.i ')ot 'mioiii 'i(umt 'm )i '!'
6i 'noti.ij 'puta 'oq.i( 'Joq '4IUHJ Ja suaMauy

Figure This Out?
POM the figures 1, 2, S, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, form three num numbers,
bers, numbers, the first of which Is 67 less
than the second, the second be being
ing being 115 less than the third. The
three numbers total 2,511. What
are they?
Xt Xjitm UU put uo XjuaMj
"Jnoj in uAg iiv

73-Blast
VERTICAL
1 South-African of Dutch de descent
scent descent 2 Coquettish look.
3 Macaws.
4 Father of James and John
(Mat 4:21)
5 Stores.
6 Palm leaf (var.)
7 Hold session.
8 Compass point (abbr.)
9 Passover least.
10 The sixth book of the New
Testament
11 The 30th book of the Old
Testament
12 Wax.
13 Land-measures.
18 Burden.
24Thedoubting disciple (John
20:27)
25 French coin.
27 The Israelites encamped here
after leaving Succoth (Ex. 13:
20)
28 Ezra proclaimed a fast at the
river of this place (Ezra 8:21)
29 Type of auto.
31 Tests.
33 He laid a portion of manna
before the Lord (Ex. 16:33)
84 Dwell
85 Places of confinement
87 Close comrade (colloq.)
This Is Some Word
v OAN you name an 8-letter word
that has KST In the middle,
In the beginning, and at the end ?
Answer In 30 seconds.
jMOd
qi pMJ-tJ punni iar
Distributed by King Features Syadlcate

SUCCESS F U L
completion of
this test Is a
ringing tribute to
' one's sense of
balance.
As you can see,
some squares on
one side of the
liagram at right
contain dots.
Squares on the
opposite side are
empty.
All dotted
squares are to be
filled in with a
pencil or with a
crayon any
color you choose
Then, the prob problem
lem problem is to com complete
plete complete a bl-sym-metrical
design
by filling in the
c o r r e s ponding
squares on the
other side of the
diagram.
The best way
to work this is to

3

fill in one row at a time, starting
from the outside and moving in
progressively. Be sure that in
the beginning you fill in only the
squares containing dots. Then
duplicate the design in reverse
on the other side.
If you do this correctly, the
two sides will balance perfectly
and you'll ring the bell with a
design a needleworker might wish
to duplicate In embroidery, quilt quilting
ing quilting or lace.
Average Intelligence
LET'S say your car will aver average
age average 15 miles to the gallon

WITS
THS
of
' H E pussycat
an old fa
in 11 iar nursery
rhyme is shown
setting out on a
famous a d v e n n-ture
ture n-ture at right.
How long will
the Journey
take ? To find out,
trace through
this maze with a
pencil beginning
at bottom left.
First take the
path to the
bridge, point 1;
proceed to the
queen, point 2 ;
then to the
f r 1 g h t e ned
mouse, point 3;
through the
woods, point 4;
and return to the
starting point via
Indicated path.
Your way is
restricted to
paths shown, of
course, without
retracing steps.
The nursery

rhyme on 'which this maze is
based begins: "Pussycat, Pussy Pussycat,
cat, Pussycat, where have you beeu?"
Can you complete it?

.tiip in japan
-liiiuj i iajein
-ltd 'js.iidmnj
uopuo. Ol uaaq
38 Abstract being.
41 The wise shall inherit this
Pr. 3:35)
46 Extinct bird.
47 Rector's assistants.
49 Persons of excessive size.
51 Ten: comb. form.
53 Father of Ulam (1 Chr. 8:39)
55 Loathes.
14-
15
17
le
30
30
17
41
4T
is-
sa
53
5
91
sa
ST
7T
TX

"""
IIIIIIIIUIIII
-mmh.----z
IM

Poser Is

A
p-Q-O 0-Q--0
A A qE !ok)

on a trip. On your trip next week the addition of three more circles at intersecting
you will travel 750 miles. The points, nine lines of six circles each will be obtained ?
grade of gasoline you burn costs Letters indicated In diagram are for purposes of
28c a gallon. What amount will Identifying lines in solution stated below. No fair
you spend for gasoline on your peeking before attempting the problem, of course.
trip ? siio.i8S.ia)tn
ipat)Jdjns Jlop JuO aajqi m l ap.ip Snipps 'a oj o pu 'a m h 'J
aapno) ino ti.io U :0nu8 o) y uio.ij gx M.ip o) jj,iib aqKud mq :jmiuv
TRACE THE PUSSYCATS ROUTE

Think Twice Before Anmering
W1AT number is as much greater than 36 as it
Is less than 94? Don't jump to the conclusion
that you can find out by dividing the difference
between 36 and 94.
ju8iuejnbaj ir) tjsaui a-Aixi Jsquinu HX :jaiuy

asnoiu emu
paua
no pip
:iiant) ai() no o)
a.I .. :jaiuy
56 Small merganser.
57 Large volume.
58 Shower.
60 Eat dinner.
61 Small part.
62 Biblical place (1 Chr. 6:70)
65 Twilight (poet.)
66 Patriotic society (abbr.)
67 Artificial language.
13
I
"TV,
3
31
38
19
4T
1
51
1
1
7
Jo
7-a

IN BALANCE

a Side-Splitter
T3IS double
equilateral tri tri-angle
angle tri-angle (left),
shows an ar arrangement
rangement arrangement of six
parallel lines
each containing
six circles. How
quickly can you
add three more
lines to form one
more equilateral
triangle In such a
way that with
Its Your Move
4
4 4,$"
11 ,','t
By Millard Hopper
Long-time Open Checker King
EVERYTHING'S in White's fa favor
vor favor here. He has one more
king, an extra man and it's his
turn. Victory is just four moves
away. Can you determine the
winning plays?
zt-a-n-L ii'iAi 'ot-i iia
"901 1IMM 81-6 1-'IH '1-91 1I1M
'11-81 1'IU "Sl ttt lt(M :oon08

av3ssoaIr s Wm
S3 no alQii c9InTvw
2YlSilQMls3S
2lowa i v a ofv la
vblvldKaslalslolHlazWole

CROSSWORD PUZZLE SOLUTION

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9

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4 a
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fi &7f.XV -t : -; College Highsteppers. The coeds

VV .7r Ctme in from Raond, Miss, v

S"S!fbw tiT V' THE CAPITOL GAINS-An added
"sl5iL 1 tA X. A attraction to the usual Washing-

"vs m. ,m 'ti s1- -v sf

. ... -at u.5.".xJiir-j

1 C3

eat wt

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if.;:

t, i

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LEAFING THROUGH In an
old fashioned sunbonnet,
Mrs. Edward Stratemeyer
of Platte City, Mo., pulls
tobacco plants on farm.

J

jaiiiilWMIIWIIW

SMOOTH WATER SAILING Past a weathered mill, a sailboat 'navigates the f
waters at Thurne, Norfolk. More than 200 miles of smooth sailing awaits boat boating
ing boating enthusiasts' in the Norfolk Broads, one of the favorite English resort areas.

t-.x -'-.-VifA)
r Will'"-' i- i Ss. iiMkxMiillMSifiMMM, tr mmmammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmimmimmmmt

1

SET FOR SIP SESSION-r-This solitary drinker hopes: ;
no one interrupts him as he sits down and gets y al ready
with wine and bread in Genzano, Italy.

RAN OUT OF PASS The driver of this truck is still thankful that the low retaining wall was there when his ve vehicle
hicle vehicle nearly plunged off the cliff in Villefranche, France The truck had collided with an automobile onthe road.

' EASY AS PIE Penny Savage show? the latest in the
supermarket selling devices an oven i that hakes
frozen pies while customer's dotheir shopping. The
oven is on display at a convention in Chicago.

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS recently started excavating for a subway in.
Rome and dug up part of a palace. Labeled a major discovery by, archeolo archeolo-gists,
gists, archeolo-gists, these ancient ruins are believed to be part of Rome's second largest stadium,
the Variano circus, smaller only than the Colosseum. A floor mosaic uncovered
not far from the ruins is claimed to be part of the Emperor Constantine's palace.

1

a.

1 (-. l(4

SI

if.

A Savoia-Marchetti bomber watch work don at
ruini. Bomber is in a muum, which was rmovtd.

In foreground It a section of a cracked floor mot ale.
This part of the major find dates back 1,600 years.

Part of th ruins get a dousing from one of workers.
This was supposed to be the site of a new subway.

ill Y? jrit

4

I 4
T Aii iitfhi'i'.n a M

UT

FUNERAL FOR THE FIRST-T3)0.usands W residents )
follow-the horse-drawn hehrsci diuing funeral serVf
ices for the first victim' of a train-bus collision in
Schwaigern, Gcriaany.. Thirty-seven others died.

Distributed by King Features Syndicate, J

V.,.
r-;" tor! -ltrivlt-wbH

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1 .JlBM II

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'.4,1 ?V; -'' r.r, &- ... V A-t

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NUf Ms n 's

illSilillllllillilli

CHURNING UP A WIDE WAKE, the atom-powered Navy
tubmarine Swordfish points her bow for the open sea as
f he heads down the Panama Canal's Pacific channel en entrance
trance entrance carrying on her bridge the Zone's top-ranking Ar Army
my Army officer, Lt. Gen. Ridgely Gaither (right), and senior
Navy officer, Rear Adm. Lewis S. Parks, among some 20 20-odd
odd 20-odd observers who took an undersea ride on the craft.

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Supplement

PANAMA, nJlH ItmAt, JULY M,

i - h



sNuaeaK'Sttb Dives

i ; .. v
A RKU BEARD is sported by Lt. David G. Smita of Wabash, Ind., as the submarine's com-tn-nications
officer stands at his sea detail po:t while the Swordfish prepares to leave Rod-

By RICHARD ROTHROCK;

In ehoppy sea- of Paninia's
Pearl Islands, the biggest swqrd swqrd-fish
fish swqrd-fish ever seen, in the PacinV
showed its teeth to a .group .of

curious omooKerg last we";
The long, -grey denizen was j267
feet Ion r and wpiphpH Mnn hn

The teeth it bared were atomic
cower.' a tinse full-r.f 1nmaAJ.De

and 'a chrome-plated extra called

It wa. a swnrrffish nil rNht-

the USS Swordfish' newest mem.

ber of' the 4J.S. J 'Navy's njiclear!

powerea unaersea;i neet.' '. v :

The. Dowerfu! Kiihman'no' had

just surfaced after- a ? fast tin
from Biiboa with about 20 of the
Canal Znnp'n Tiiuhpct militoi-u rt.

ficials aboard. It had flexed its

muscles for the observers before
heading for Pearl Harbor to join
the Pacific Fleet.

The visiting VIPs a select

group" of Array, i Navy aa l Air
Force officers-- from, the Z jue's
major commands--has been Xaken
aboard at the' Rodman Naval
Station. imn .
; They included lL Gen. Ridgo Ridgo-ly
ly Ridgo-ly Gaithes, the. Canal Zone top top-ranking
ranking top-ranking efficfj rand. Reai Aim.
Lewis S. ParkSif.the Navy' iscn iscn-ior
ior iscn-ior officer. ,;
Hninp bnarrl tha KiannlficH

they were greeted by a 'young
sailor who pipped' 'on their fcirts
a linmp tap urith a cnllivs nf

whit fiber material attached.
The fiber tali looked likei the

suae-' a aentist puts in J-our
mouth to x-ray ypur teeth-.'"' y

much -radiation .'I'm exposed tc?"

asxea one oDserver.
"No." ouioned th aiinr "in

tell how much you die from
"The sailor was only joking.
The radiation picked up from the
submarine's nuclear reactor is al-

x 111 I

HIS EYES fiLITEn trt fh rnnfrnl iraitnoe tliA CnA.jfi.vC....

ecutive officer, Lcdr. Jeffrey C.jMetzel, Jr.,of Gales Ferry,
Conn., keeps watch In the submarine's control room whilt a
crewman t below) takes a respite irom his duties as bow pliahes pliahes-man.

IN THE CONTROL ROOM, a British Navy officer (left) under undergoing
going undergoing training aboard the modern new Swordfish conducted a
group of observers through the submarine. One of the visitors
Included Army Maj, Joseph Brigand! Jright) o U.S, Army Qarib-

T THE PERISCOPE. Lt Gen. Rldelv. Gait.her crnf a Innt ef. IMnm "fincMn" ,V,1 t-.tA-

.powered Swordfish cruised under the sea. The Canal Zone's ton officer kent t,h mihrfaftrlnA'a

crewmen busy throughout' the tour answering questions. v y j

Sunday AmenifaV Suinf Y t1



Afedr

Pear

Islands

-
i l- 1

i

nnat neelibie. shin's officer' tx-

laiaed : later. But they -: wanted
hair visitors-, to know UuL the
iavy ; too ever;, precaution.
i Anyone going to .sea; aooara a
i iubmarine must" pass an'unuias an'unuias-r
r an'unuias-r Id measuring test-Jitting through
riU narrow hatches. ? Fortunately
Everyone made it' and the Sword Sword-v
v Sword-v Bsh slipped away from her Rud-
Juan pier,, V JLr---
' ': Steaminz down the channel,

' fiie undersea craft : headed for
the opea. sea.On her deck -what
-T Sere is ot it observers and

crewmen watched as the suoiaa suoiaa-''
'' suoiaa-'' fine cut a wide ake reugh

. me waier. :. :.'-:.-- v;i -i i"
' On the bridge, General Qaither
and Admiral Parks kept ft w.atch w.atch-ul
ul w.atch-ul eye along with the : Sword Sword-'
' Sword-' ish's captain, Cdr, Shannoa D.
Jramer, Jr.. and a Canal ne
; Miot.

Keeping the submarine oa a
Straight course down the narrow
Channel reminded General ,( iif h h-tr
tr h-tr of an anecdote about, a ship's
Pilot in Alaska.
The general told this story:
The pilot, an "old salt" with
weather-beaten face, was? jguici-
- log a ship into an Alaskan liar liar-:'
:' liar-:' cor. Trying to strike up a convpr-
fatten, one of the ship's "officers
laid to the ; pilot: "You must
, biow' these waters pretty, good,
, "Yeah, I guess I know every
ttrowled the old eeezer:
iT SnHHonlv Oi shin lnrrhwi Tin
from the sea came the grueling
. opise of her bottom hitting some
focks. i
: "There's one now," quipped
the pilot.
The commander-in-chief of all
; jj.8. forces in the Caribbean area
NEW irswiTURE of the modem
between the ship's office and
luif, Nebr, demonstrates with
X?nmiiriinat.1riTis offlr-er. how the

rtjr;;f

4 'i

hundreds of steps that he used to have to run on old-type

lUDmarines. f r

' :-: .r,-.-.y. ;vssii:.:-a
tmm

I yvro INTENT 1ISTENERS among the 20-odd military observers
-rf J Navy Cdr.: Charles Fw-Concannon (left), commanding of of-IJ;
IJ; of-IJ; J of the p.S. Naval Communications Station at Balboa, and

WAV cant. James A: Fienniken.

ffWi Lt. James-R. Lewis of Albuquerque, N.M., is-the owner of

xpres8ivfluJiaid at. left.

was obviously enjoying himself.
Ha kept' Swordfish crewmen -bu

sy answering- a Darrage ot ques questions
tions questions : throughout the cruise.:
The -general and .-other observ observers
ers observers were taken on -a bow-to-stern
tour of the modern new Sword-
fish. In the' torpedo room; 4hey
were shown how today a suDmv
nnes. can load a torpedo in less
than one-third the time it oo't in
World War IL X'
Admiral Parks, a wartime cap-
tarn of a submarine as well as a
division.- wolf pack and .task
force commander -of the s under
sea boats, was on hand to con
firm it -,
With the! cost of torpedies
what" they are these' days, the
Swordfish could not fire one of
her "fish." But she did the aext
best thing.
Filling one of., her torpedo
tubes with salt water, the subma
rine fired a .water Vug, A big
whoosh followed by a crackling
boom echoed throughout the ship.
In the control room, observers
got to look through the Sword-
fish's two periscopes. They also
took turns sitting at the bow and
stern plane controls which oper operate
ate operate the rise and dive of the sub submarine.
marine. submarine. The idea was to keep a tube of
red liquid on a center line while
the submarine sped under the
sea something like the way a
flier keeps a pair of wings on a
center line while flying a plane.
; The Swordfish rose and 'dived
reacting to- thr unfamiliar
hands at the controls. After Afterwards
wards Afterwards the ,Army officers aboarj
said that some Air Foret offi-
( Continued on Fag 8)
Swordfish -Is this sliding panel
the. executive officer's, stateroom.
uawa u.ismitn, xne snips
new Danel works savins: him
Baiooa Dort caDtam 'rne swora-

i

V t, A

., w ,r . :'

-5 w-

. .... s .. i I l ??!, 1

4 f J j : f

ANOTHER SWORDFISH BEARD, property of EMI George F. Herda of New Prague, Minn.,
gets a combing as the sailor pauses on the pier for a moment above his proud submarine. Fouc Fouc-of
of Fouc-of the Swordfish's crewmen are cultivating the chin growth to see who can raise the longest

one before reaching pearl Harbor.

"-jit h f&fp 11
iWf -tyt?f ft ;

NOTHING BUT SMILES are worn by the Swordfish's two highest-ranking observers, Lt. Gen.
lidgely Gjtther at left' and Rear Adm. LewUS. Parks at right, as they are greeted by th-J
.ubmarlne's paptain Cdr". Shannon D. Cramer, Jr, upon coming aboard.

. 'i

n
s4
.'St;

i K

s
It v
fin



THE PANAMA AMERICAN

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Pe One Vean in Advance ta bo u m

POETS CORNER

James Hay ford

Born In Montpclier, Vfc, in 1913, James Hayford has iecn

a Kooen inn renew of Amherst Collefe and has published
In Harper's Magaiine, The New Yorker and The Saturday
Evening- Post. He is school music supervisor of the district a a-roond
roond a-roond Orleans, Vt
OVERSEER OF THE POOR
The poor men's God that gives them sleep
Is not to be reproached because
By some the gift Is reckoned eheap.
Let them deep soundly on their, straws
While rich men count expensive sheep.
God of the rich there never was.

IN A CLOSED UNIVERSE
Children and. pets, please note:
. When one Is pleased to dote,
Tour part Is to be grateful;
When you presume to expect
Indulgence, you seem hateful
And may be sharply checked.
That any live possession
Will thus commit aggression
Does seem unfortunate,
But in a closed universe
Love is the source of hate,
And favor is a curse.
See that you stand in awe
From childhood of this law
To ward off desperation
And heal the cruel cut
Whenever god or nation
Moodily says Tut tut.

- .. '"MNNNNMMMBMMy

I t;Vc:hingt

on iNcvo Notebook

HORN

O come sweet-death, sang Bach,
Not instancing his own,
The man from Eisenach
Who kept the night alone,
Busy as it grew late
To wake the patient morn
With his own intricate
Simplicities of horn.

THE RESIDENT WORM
The pitcher plant makes a living by
Enticing living things to die
In quest of ruinous delight.
It keeps an apprentice that matures
On the rich harvest of its lures
A resident worm or parasite.
On the other hand, the goldenrod
Burvives invasion by a worm
That dines upon its endoderm
- And winters in a private pod
An ugly but benignant cyst
That isolates the colonist.
80 life is given and taken in ways
That are too hard for us to praise praise-Inhuman
Inhuman praise-Inhuman are the ways of God.

LuwlEI

-

830 JCu Panama 1090 Xcl tfoi&i

Fashion Show Tops Men s Luncheon Club
-17 US Debs To Make Debut In London
By DOUGLAS LARSEN and JE&RX BENNETT

V
-

Basnet

WASHINGTON (NEA The Dis

trict of Columbia Democratic Club

lis now mixing fashion shows with

jits pontic

This club operates at a private Instead of popcorn, guest month

membershiD lunch s and dinner

meeting place for Democrats in 1

I Slier ton Lane ton-Hotern torm-

er night spot.-

But on Friday noons, prVty

I young models parade around -mong
the lunchers, displaying the
latest female fashions of an Arl-

jington, Vs., dress hop.

People like former assistant to

boot Malayan weddines and tin

production followed by flicks about

new Zealand stung and eraaun-

uun Climbing.

ea on xerupoks. These are snow

wmte crackers made out of tapio

ca uour ana snnmp paste.

The squabble over the suitabi

lity of paintings that the U.S is

sending to the Moscow exhibition

is not the first time art has been

involved m a ticklish matter of

HinlAm t a if

a vvirsc AAJBtSv ivi XJjt as bsmss v vuvtuiii (a .r
the president. John Steelman: Pre- Hep. Sidney Yates. CD-ID. la

sident Truman's legislative eoun- reminded of the artistic dilemma
sel, Charlie Murphy; his person-! which once faced former Ambas-

nel assistant Don Dawson and oth- sador to Italy Richard Washburne
ers of their era and ilk ogle these Child on a visit to the White

fashions but do not buy. House Calvin Cdolidge was presi-

Sometimes, though, they have dent at the time.

a fat-cat politico guest from out After dinner. Coolidce showed

of town who takes a faney to a new orotrait of himself to the

some number for his wife or daueh ambassador.

ter back home.

"I looked at the painting,"
The model goes and takes it off. Child said later, "and thought it

brings it back in a paper sack was so very bad that I could think think-having
having think-having changed to another costume of nothing to say. For a long ms ms-of
of ms-of course and delivers for cash, ment I stood in silent, deepening

f.w ur- emoarrassment and stared at the

picture. Finally the President said,

Newest thing in global tosether-

Iness is the international home-mo

vie party.

Most recent one here was tossed

by Malayan and New Zealand Bio-

lomats.

The show consisted of films a-

1 agree wttn you and led me a-

way."

Before beginning his talk at the
National Press Club, actor Ralph
Bellamy who portrays FDR in
the play, "Sunrise at Campobelle,"

explained that he felt out of plact
addressing reporters.
i He said' the situation reminded
him of a boat trip he once tool

en the English Channel. ,

One tf the English passenger

struck up a conversation with him
and asked, "Mr. Bellamy, would

yon mind if I write to you when

yotf return to the States?"

Bellamy answered that he didn't
mind one bit
Then the Britisher asked. "Mr.

Bellamy, will you answer my let let-tors?
tors? let-tors? Bellamy said that he would.

.After a Ions silence, the Brit.

isaer took a deep breath, sighed
and. said, "Mr. Bellamy, what
should I write to you about?"

Mary Stuart Price, charmina

Sheraton Carteton Hotel public

relations director and Washington
social arbiter, has pulled off the
year's greatest coup for U.S. de-

Mtantes.
. She has arranged a London com
ingout party for American debs
and believes that it will become an
annual affair.
This month. 17 debs from vari

ous U.S. cities will fly to the Brit

s capital where they will be win.

td, dined and hav their hands

Ikissed by scores of eligible dukes.

aru, Juughts and various royal
lesser lights.

Mary is already receiving let
ters from gals who hone to bn

picked for the event next year.

The Washington Merry-Go-Round

Br DREW PEARSON

WASHINGTON Jimmy Stew

art, wnj has wen many a worn

an's hert with his actios in "Mr

Smith Goes to Washington,'.' "Th
Glenn aiiller Story "The Soiri

of St. Louis and manv other

movies has been forced to

chance to campaign, and his

vote wjs ldifcely one of protest

i against Mcuonaia.

curing the c-urenl steel nego

uation",, most union members

surmany lvd oeen out of work dur

render to tfte lone lady of- the ing the 57-j8 recession.

oenaie V Now that th ctribn haa Kn

Ha unaii y put in all his re 1 called, however, it should niw

serve living time tj qualify for ify McDonald' union behind

promoi'on as a reserve Air him Hi diun t want the strike
Force general. hut wi'l benefit from it

T r .. .. .1 r. "

xic suntuuciea aner f-- (.ross-currant Na. T .mr.no

""'s"'-1 vfidsc aiimn oi m. a me siei executives, in th wast

.1 1 V. 1 rwi -1 ; . I . y I. I .....

itumiuM auaiiidiu mai u inev nave maver nan mith m.

iiui ia'r io arop some eu.ooo less-

glamor' 7ed Air Force officers be because
cause because tney failed to fill reserve

requirements, then' turn around!

and leo a siar stuf ed actor get
promote without flying time.

So lust bjfore the mA of the

fiscal y:ar June 30, Stewart man

aged to saueeze in th ronuirprf Ste(l

njring ume, ana Mrs. smitn vot

ed for bis confirmation

Donald and he: with them. It

has b9:n a cooperative union-in-

uustry reiauonsnip. When wage

increases were granted, the in

crease was passed on to the pub-j

uc pius.

Receuly however a new set
of executives ha? taken over Big

sieei. ine aays ot Ben Fairless,
who worked his wav un from

She all coal miner '.o be chairman of the

mj save uic green ugni to Gen.i giant iim saei corporation, are

jorn a. wontcomerv an Ai. over. Younerer. tnppthpr .flA-rm

Force ofiicet wLc left the Air iBlough is now -runninff US steii

Foree fir a lu&a salarv with A I Eueent Giace 2-veartil

mntinn A Al t r i I 4 v t . . I

..... ..u nuuuea, inen iransterra ume car -ot feinienem .steel,

ucur:j ciecinc now wants ana icra uuuier iron-tistert baa

wage increase of eight cents an
hour without passing tha in.
crease on, iu higher prices, HO
got a flat turndown
Neither Nixon nor MitcheU
could push then ideas, however,
in the face of oke's oDDosition

I and Ike has oeei, sold on an ada

mant policy oi seeping Bands off.
The men who sold him are tha
three who ate perhaps closer to
him thin any others in the world
and all of tliem steel executives
ex-Secretary ot the Treasury
Humphrey, now head of Nation National
al National Steel Jan Black, vice presi president
dent president of Republic; ond George 'Al 'Al-len
len 'Al-len director of Republic.
This was why a federal media mediator
tor mediator didn't eel into the irieturo

Tntil the last da of the talks,

wni?n is unheard of when the na
tion faces a major economic shut shutdown.
down. shutdown. Contusion: Tht strike will ho

-a long one, Unless Ike and friends

tteciae to c-mc'ade a settlement,
H so. they can end it almost o o-vernight
vernight o-vernight

to

'is

to be an Air Force Reserve gen

. Earlier Senator Smith

because MonUomerv hadn't full

filled his flying time. So the Gen General
eral General Electric tycoon has not on'
lv been up in the ozone in his
flying machine, but is even tak

ing correspondence courses to

pass A.r Force Reserve require

ments au in acierence to a la lady
dy lady wh.j believes in equal reserve
standards regardless of glamor.
STEEL STRIKE
To duge what's going to hap happen
pen happen in the steel strike you have
to understand some of the diffi difficult
cult difficult cross-currents inside the u u-nion
nion u-nion inside the steel Industry,
ond inside the Eisenhower admin admin-stration
stration admin-stration Here are some of them:
Cross nun-ant No. 1 Is Inside

tne united Steeiworkers w h ere
David J. McDonald has not been
too pomilar with his men. In A A-pril.
pril. A-pril. 19V. Uonalo C. Rarick. a

relative unknown, ran against

Mcuon id nr president and roll rolled
ed rolled up rise amazivg total of of-Sit
Sit of-Sit vor,. McDonald not 404,172.
Rarick haa .no build np to

ot nepi-uc stee- resisted union
organha'ion like tyrants. But

once the union was recognized,
they cooperated.

New executives have replaced

them. Chartes White, new head

of Republic Stee and more oro-

fane thin any steel puddler ever
though jt being is far more dif-

ncuit to get aloDg with than Tom
Girdler

tfiomii ago, tne steel execu

tives decidevi there was going to

oe a snjwaown witn the Union.

we aecision went higher up'

man even tz steel industry.
The bankers, the auto manu

facturer' as the chief users of

cteel. and uose who sit around
the Duqoesue Club in Pittsburgh,
all. decided that now as the time

and McDonaid' union the place
to take a stand against the conti-

nuea r-md of wage hikes. 1 1
Cross-currant No. 3 is inside'
the administration, between th SELASSIE VISITS PARIS

rresider t on on hand and Vice-

Presidett Richao M Nixon with

secretary of Labor James Mit Mitchell
chell Mitchell oi the other.
Nixon ana Mitchell have hoped
for a comrromi&e. Nixon even
suggest d t-. some of his steel
friends that they could afford a

BAiTKSTAGE AT GENEVA
" 1; .-'
Secretary-of State Christian A,
Herter It aiguing as much with
French foreign minister Couve do
Murville as he is with Russian
foreign minister, Andrei Gromyko.
De Murville cme hapk frnm

Paris with the toughest kind of

instrut-r.ms from General do
Gaulle .agains4 accepting' any
compromise of the alhed stand
in Berlin As a result, Herter
has been meeting as much with
the French as he has with t tho
Russiar.s. .Morale in West Ber Berlin
lin Berlin is getting lower and lower.
The West Berluiers believe they
wifl be sold down the river by
Herter and Britain's Selwyn
Lloyd. The American Embassy
has appealed to Nixon to stop off
in Berlin on his way back froti
Russia to bolster Berlin morale.
But Nixon Las turned down tho
!dea.

PARIS (UPI) Touring Emper Emperor
or Emperor Hailt Selassie of Ethiopia ar arrived
rived arrived here, today from Moscow,
for a two-day state visit.- He was
met at the airport by President
Charles de Gaulle and Premier
Michel Debrv." '.-

Wit h Suaiiy AmtrM SsmM' fill ',rj,l$l?" IBUNijAYrJlTLV 2fll$59



795
POPULAR
CONCERT

i

By WILLIAM D. LAFFLER
' NEW YORK (UPI- "Moore't
Tour," subtitled "An American it
England," (MGM-3572) is an un
usually good bit of descriptive
music.
Phil Moore, the composer,
worked ud the 13 pieces that

. comprise the suite while touring
the British countryside and lis listening
tening listening to the sounds of London
If you have never been in Eng England,
land, England, you might miss some of the
nostalgic feeling that Moore has
injected into these tone poems
trot the notes on the jacket will
help you visualize the various
scenes.
In some sections the musk u
Jazzy, because Britain is a jazzy jazzy-loving
loving jazzy-loving country and the orchestra
led by Johnny Dankworth, which
takes you on "Moore's Tour," is
one of England's top combos.
Moore is equally adept with
ether composers' work. He serve j
as both arranger and condutor
f "The Mad Twenties" by Bob Bob-fey
fey Bob-fey Short (Atlantic 1302), a good
reprise of the sounds of a mad
decade, including "Nagasaki,
"Don't Bring Lulu," "Tiger Rag"
and "That Society Bear," one of
Irving Berlin's gems that is
fceard too seldom.

For Basebal) Buffs: "That Hol

ler Guy!' (United Artists UAL-

1032) is a playback of some ex

temporaneous speeches by one of

the funnies comedians anywhere

Joe Garagiola. Joe was the wit

f the National League while
catching for the St. Louis Cardi

nals, Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago

ittbs and New York Giants.

Selected Singles: "Please Be

Kind" by Teddl King (Coral
-62128), "The Late Late Late
Movies' by Spike Jones (Liberty

J-55191), "Barbara" by The Blue

Jays (Roulette R-4169), "Lulu

Had a Baby" by Chico Hokiday

R C A-Vietor 47-7549), "Wild

Willie" by Annette (Vista F-339)

(Best Seller

Fiction

""u" ticuu i. una l7Mim
THE UGLY AMERICAN "WU-,

Uam J Lede.er and Eugene L.
surdick ...
DOCTOR ZHIVAGO-Boris Paster Pasternak
nak Pasternak DEAR AND UJ-ORlOUS PHYSI

CIAN Ta' lor Caldwell

By DILOS SMITH
NEW YORK (UPI) Those
ho consider the 4th the finest
Beethoven's piano concertos
ill play the new Wilhelm Back Back-laua
laua Back-laua recording of it many times
n proof of their contention.

As pre-eminent a Beethoven

lianist as Backhaus is, be must

share the glory of the achieve

ment with Hans Schmidt-Isser-stedt
who conducted the Vienna

Philharmonic. Piano lines and

orchestral textures absorb one

another: the composer's unity, of

conception is made profound

(London CS6054).

Another new Beethoven piano

record is of Artur Rubinstein

playing the playful sonata in E E-flat.
flat. E-flat. the third in his opus 31," and

the one which immediately fol followed
lowed followed it, the "big" and dra

matic "Waldstein" (RCA Victor-

LM2311). r-

An unusual piono record has

Julius Katchen playing Mill Ba-

laurev's brilliant fantasy 1s-

lemey," which once enjoyed much

fame but has fallen into obscur obscurity.
ity. obscurity. In addition to being a pian pian-istic
istic pian-istic rocket, "Islamey" has mu musical
sical musical merit and individuality,
which Katchen sensitively makes

sometning ot. ine record also nas

him playing Rachmaninoff's 2nd
concerto, with the London Sym

phony under Solu, and again it

is a glowingly appreciative ren

dition (London-CS6064).
Sir Thomas Beecham's lasts

contribution to the phonograph

is what can be called a revival
of Beethoven's incidental music
to the now-nonsensical festive-

play "The Ruins of -Athens." Its

march and overture survive in a

ninor way, but Sjr Thomas has

added the three big choruses
which have not, and these are
sung by the Beencham Choral So Society.
ciety. Society. The orchestra is his own
Royal Philharmonic. The record
also has a playing of Beethoven's

2nd symphony (Angel-S35509).

An admirable choral record has
the Don Cossack Choir singing
"Choral Masterpieces of the Rus Russian
sian Russian Orthodox Church." On the
whole these are hymn-like adora adorations,
tions, adorations, with real reverence in ihe
music and its ( singing (Decca-

Audio-Fidelity was wise to. con concentrate
centrate concentrate its unlimited range ste stereo
reo stereo recording techniques on
Tchaikovsky ,in two new disks.
The pieces recorded are, the 'old

i.atyv ramrm.ipv'c jiwtvm renaoies, ana conaucior Aivrea

- - w uu U7rllf;

-D. H Lawrence

LOLITA Vladimir Nabokov
CEiJA GARTH Gwen Bristow
MRS. ARRIS GOES TO PARIS
Paul Gallico '. ":.'
NINE COACHES WAlTING-Mary
Stewir x

Non-Fiction

THE STATUS

Packard

SEEKERS-Vance

new thoughts

on them. But Tchaikovsky is al always
ways always celebrated for his maslerv

of orchestral ranee, texture and

jcolor, and these, recbrds tell you f

uyte wnq. .Bas ? ,ine nutcracKef

(huite" jmd the Romeo and Juliet
OVerture (FCS-50006); the o;ber;
two1, ballet rsuites ".Swan Lake;"
and. "The Sleeping Beauty'
(FCS-50010). 4 J

MINE ENEM'if GROWS OLDER nd "Without You" "by Jim Lowe

" J Wy'
W v yy
&
y&
ppp--p:i-pf:iPi
!1 tZZ.ZZW W
z--3Ir W
77? 77$ JZs
MH 1.1 1 mA 1 1 1 m m.

Alexander Kins

ONLY .N AMERICA

Golden

Harry

(Dot 45-15954)

Best Revival: "After You've
Gone"; by Remo, ... Caora" (PEnnv

HOW I TURNED ONE THOU- P-10I). Good handling of a mod-

SAND DOLLARS INTO A MIL- efn swing classic by an artist
LION IN PEAL ESTATE worth, watching. e
William NickerSon Stereoscope: "Gait e Parlsl Parlsl-THE
THE Parlsl-THE YEARS WTH ROSS James enne (Urania USD-1002). Offen Offen-Thurber
Thurber Offen-Thurber bach's ballet always has been
MY BROTHER WAS AN ONLY, lively on records bu this tfereo

CHILD Jack' Douglas
ELIZABETH THE GREAT Eliza
beth Jenkins.
FOLK MEDICIVE D. C. Jarvis

THE dOUSE OF INTELLECT J

Jacques uarrun j
COUPLES MARRY
SURABAYA, Indonesia (UPIV (UPIV-Ten
Ten (UPIV-Ten couples were married in a
mass ceremony at the Bangun Bangun-red
red Bangun-red jo Village recently, r it was
learned today. The brides were
ex prostitutes and the grooms
were formerly beggars. They met
In a rehabilitation center in the
village.

version by Rene, Leibowitz and
the London Philharmonic is re reproduced
produced reproduced so faithfully yon r
almost see the can-can dancers
. ."Everybody Digs Bill Evans
by Bill Evans, Sam Jones (bass)
and Phlly Joe Jones f drums v

Good modern jazz interpretation

oy an api trio, with Evans stand standing
ing standing out on piano (Riverside RLP RLP-1129).
1129). RLP-1129). .. "Ellinston J.--

m Stereo" bv Duk F.llnatnn

Dixy Gillespe, Johnny ...
Jimmy Rushing and Jimmy Joiks
(Columbia CS-8127). A formida formidable
ble formidable (roup tackling formidable
music in three-dime nsioaal

sound.

1 Carp
6 Think
11 Published
item that
ridicules
another
18 Royal
residence
17 Heavy,
, gaaeoua
element
18 Term in"
' jneteor
oiogy
20 Imitation
satin
21 On the
., left side
(naut.)
22 A popular
.-''.aong;;
24 Jog
25 Steps
over
fence
27 Allow Allowances
ances Allowances for
waste
29 Observe
30 Division
of geo-
logical
- time
31 Pitcher
32 Angle of
fault vein
(mininrt

3Marsny ''v-:',
5'iTs'ineadd'v?' ... :
34-3hatles
. Lamb "-
88 Sister of
Ares
87 A register
10 Formal
discourses
12 Make
into law
13 Catkina
15 A genua
of swans

BOBDBOMTAL
46 Cubic
metric
measure
47 Equal
48 Divisions
of a play
51 Narrow
Inlet of sea
(Norway)
62 Constitu Constituent
ent Constituent parts
6 City to
- i France
57 Mexican
laborera
58 Act of
surround-
59 American
poet
60 Equatorial
61 Ancient
Hebrew
liquid
measures
62 Vein of
a leaf
63 Due
April 18
66 Pomme
de
67 Book of

the Old

84 Babylon Babylonian
ian Babylonian deity
(poss.)
86 Mend ho
87 Function
in trigo trigonometry
nometry trigonometry 88 Larva of
ye-
thread threadworm
worm threadworm 88 Eli (Bib.
, var.)
90 South
American
country
91 Woman
under
. religious
' vows
92 Girl'a
name
"94 Snarl

(var.)
85 An Old
peo people
ple people (poss.)
97 Wax
88 Site of
King
Arthur's,
court
100 A kind

of acid

t aa,. avi
Testament 102 Towpr

69- Of debris on a
(Geoi) mos4ue
70 T revive l04- Ptacid

71 Most; -colorless
.
72 Russian
' inland sea
73 Animal :

skins

74 Window
part
75 Make
plump
78 Yawna
7ft Banner
83 Fairy-tale
monster

105 French

Revolu Revolutionist
tionist Revolutionist 106 Girl's
name
(poss.)
107 Felt
ardent
affection
108 Anoint
- (archaic)
109 Pin used
in carpentry

1 Catonlan
2 Die Die-mounted
mounted Die-mounted 8 Carting
vehicle
4 Frosts
5 Sign Sign-painter
painter Sign-painter 6 Papal
veils
7 Document
8 Artificial
language
9 In a
northerly
direction
10 Admit Admittance
tance Admittance 11 Give
heed
12 Egyptian
goddess
13 Cut, as
hair
14 Black
15 Wool
fat
16 Word of
promise
19 Try
again
20 Commer Commercial
cial Commercial form
of iron
23 Irish j-
poet
26 Cer- ...
tainly
. (archaic)
28 Redact
35 Expiate
36 God of
love
37 Unique
things
(slang)
38 Mallets
of ;
presiding
officers
39 Smooth
breath

ings

Averar Um l iolntUa: St ariaafel.

VERTICAL
41 Rubber
trees
42 Collars
and
jackets
44 Informal -v
record
(colloq.)
46 Dakota
Indian
47 Spanish,
city
48 Having
flavor
49 Withered
old
-r woman
50 Choose
51 Of an
unborn
62 Vesti.
bule
53 Doctor's
assistant
54 Attempts
55 Jewish
month
(var.)
57 Leaf of
flower
58 Noble Noblemen
men Noblemen 60 Color Colorless
less Colorless oil in
. ,;.jetro ,;.jetro-'
' ,;.jetro-' leum
61 Garment
. acces accessories
sories accessories 64 Harangue
65 Thick
mud
66 Nara Nara-tives
tives Nara-tives 67 Healthy
68 Wide-mouthed

jars

70 Man
who
mends
things
71 Reed of
weaver's

shuttle
73 Complete
view
of a
region
74 Thrum Thrummed
med Thrummed 75
acid
76 Greek
77 A form
of net
78 Festive
79 Hindu
garment
80 Inor.
ganic
81 Habitu Habituates
ates Habituates (var.)
82 Snare
again
85 Covered
with
tents
86 Reduce
in
rank
90 Of punish
ment
93 Air:
comb,
form
94 Departed
96 Stor Storage
age Storage place
for
fodder
97 Walking
stlck
99 Bulgar Bulgarian
ian Bulgarian coin
101 Anger
103 Unused

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For The Best In Fotcs & Features
. It's The Sunday American

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THREE PANAMA CABINET MEMBERS were visitors to the Swordfish during three-day stay Jilongslda th Rodman Naval
Station pier. The cabinet officers, flanked at left by Rear Adm.' Parks, the Canal Zone's -senior Navy officer, and at right by
Cdr. Cramer, the submarine's commanding officer, included (from- left) Panama's Foreign Minister Miguel J. Moreno, Jr., Min Minister
ister Minister of Public Works Roberto Lopez Fabrega, and Minister of Finance Fernando Eleta.

frlKST-DAY VISITORS .aborad the submarine included professo s and students front the University of Panama, showrl here
islcmng to a lecture in the crew's lounge on the operation of the Swordfish's nuclear oower nlant. which after more than

25 000 miles still has not been refueled. The first atom-powered sub,marineNautilus was. refueled for the first time after 62,000

nines. '.' : h". i

, (CeaHmMdi frm 'efle SI T,'
i ,K w:iiHfi.:'s'l""T;. "'
cers must haye been tt.tfae oa
troll when the ship started ft
topsy-turvy : ride, v -' j
VERNITA July 24 : -The
Air Force officers were1
iaBdiig;v-.rit.'?:r ..
. The observers also, wert ehowa
through the compartment th l
stores the heart of the Sword
fish's powers plant her aucle&f
reactor. It was contained in f
circular tank-tike structure cover
ed by stainless steel.
'As on observer remarked, tt
would have mads a perfect ears
table seating at least 20 players
- However, Swordfish crewmen
are hot allowed in the reaetot)
room-' more than three hours 4
day and the reactor's-cover 4iaJ
never lost its shine.
Lt. James- R. Lewis,' the Sword Sword-fish's
fish's Sword-fish's "M" division officer, .-i v
plained the submarine's power
plant. '' :
The nuclear reactor produce
heat to generate Steam, he said.
The steam is used to drive lw
main turbines' geared to a pre
pellor and shaft on each side of
the ship.
Additional steam drives two
auxiliary turbines to generate e
lectricity for shipboard use. Aa
emergency diesel generator and
battery back up tha primary
plant. 'v
The lieutenant's description way
described by observers as the
clearest thing they had ever
heard on the operation of a no no-clear
clear no-clear power plant.
The Swordfish showed off some
of its other features too. Font
crewmen displayed handsome)
growths they were riasing oa
their chins in a contest to sc
who grows the longest beard b
the time the submarine reaches
Pearl Harbor.
In the galley, a crewman dera
onstrated the ship's unique garM

age disposal system. Garbage if

piacea in wirea screen pas

stapled shut and dropped drov

a hole that toes to the bottom

the submarine. The hole is flo

ed and that's the last anyo

sees oi tne garbage.
It was a Friday when the ob observers
servers observers were aboard and the)
Swordfish appropriately served
fish shrimp and perch. Navv
stew was served for non fish oaV
ers.
A special feature of the Sword Sword-fish
fish Sword-fish described to its visitors war

(Centlnued en Page 7)

'
Mir ST-J?k I'll '"' 11111 1111(1111 mmmman j- -Jjj ""

CjiiXTING HIS BIG FRAME through one of the narrow hatches of the sub- FRAMED BY A HATCH of the atom-powered Swordfish Is General Oaither
marine Swordfish was no problem for the Navy's admiral, 8-foot, 3-inch Real the commander-in-chief of all U.S. forces in the Caribbean area, and behind
Adm. Lewis S. Parks, who as a wartime ubmarlne skipper himself learned how him Commander Concannon, the Navy's communications boss In the Canal
maneuver through the tight spaces ol the undersea craft. , ,, Zone, They are shown leaving the submarine's engine room.
"-ji mrmmmmmmmmmmmm hhiiki. eai mm i u iteimteuv

Sunday AmericaiiSupplfment.



V

Vi,
Swordfish
.f

if. (Continual frem Page 4)
something called, "missile E'dd

tnce" capability. This means

that the Swordfish caa guide mis.

iileg launched from anothei snip.

submarine or aircraft to reach

an enemy target many, miles.
irys-;"' -. --?
Air conditioning, television,. Hid

a ship's loudspeaker system tiiat

sends music throughout the isuo-

marine were some of the other

features seen by the observrs,
But one feature they could net
ther see nor sense was the Sword'

fisWr great speed so smooth

was, her travel undersea.
"II r

At present, the Swordfish 's top

speed is secret. In excess or la
: knots is the most ship's bfiicer
will admit to. But the crilt's
time to the Pearl Islands gave
a rough idea of how fast today's
new atom submarines can travel.
The Swordfish had cleared the
breakwater at Balboa at aoout
8:30 a.m. Making two dvies for
the benefit of observers, she
cruised at a leisurely rate and
at times in an up-and-down fash fashionwhile
ionwhile fashionwhile mostly submerged.
However, the up and lwn
, course steered by herVjrisitors
' did. little to slow her down. Less
than five hours later the Swo: ri rifts
fts rifts surfaced off the Pearl Is
lands, rendezvousing with the
Minesweeper USS Falcon to
transfer the observers for their
trip back to Rodman.
In contrast, the Falcon had ar arrived
rived arrived at about the same time
and left more than three and a
half hours earlier.
From aboard the minesweepar,
. the Swordfish's 20 odd visi nrs
watched as the dark, grey-hulied
submarine with the bulging sid?s
disappeared underwater not to
surface again until Pearl Harbor,-
her next destination.

L
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LISTENING ATTENTIVELY, the cabinet ministers are briefed on the workings, of the torpedo room by Commander Cramer dur during
ing during their below decks tour of the U.S. Navy's fourth nuclear submarine. From left are Ministers Fabrega, Eleta and Moreno.

' tMu

IN THE TORPEDO ROOM, Admiral Parks (left) and General Galther (center) listen to

fish." A water slug

fom getS swordfish officer explain how today's modem submarines fire the big

" lmulating the firing of a torpedo was fired for the touring VEPs.

Sunday American Supplements''

SUNDAYULY 26,4959

page mmn



PEERING INTO A PERISCOPE, Lt. Gen. Ridaely Galther, the commander-in-chief of all US forces
in the Caribbean area, takes his turn at the big "optic eye" of the Swordfish, one of two aboard
the Navy's fourth nuclear submarine.

($ Story A Pietur4f pagv$ 2 and 3)



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, k I I POSSIBLY. MEN W6ULP MAKE
STAIRS I THINK. NO TOOL J
J MARKS OM THE WjatLLS AS
- SH INY AN P SMOOTH AS S S5??
... 1, ,, J 6LASS HOW FAR M Pr.
I A CAVE INTHE pEAK-r -. a&Z. TJK
r TlTLOOKSvS : THEN A LONG TUNNEL 1t V
t .J A-ENPLESS! LEAPING TO A VAGTRAAP- l I
! ' HAVE M APE IT? MEN -'mX3-G-
f TOPANANCIENTFORSOTTEN OTPPJRi
r V CIVILIZATION THAT MAY .HETlX
buriepherbt; - jKr
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: I I THINK WE CAN J MAYBE WE SMOULPN'T I"""
OPEN THIS. HEAR I 1 OPEN '.IT I MAYBE IT'S f
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fTHATt A POOR-N TTLEVEB-y XcgfIPB jl
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FOG. WINTER JUST
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IT YOU'LL BE GOTONE OFTHSE
PROUD OF HIM 7 GIMMICK IM YOUR

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BUGG ALL WARMED UP- W WATCH- PRESS THE
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V., nUNKTHE FOS WILL V WEATHER RETORTS LOOK ; 1 1 JT"rr l r
T: LIFT IN TIME FOR ,,K (.CHEERY, CAPTAIN GRAVES.' 1 If ,, ,M.r VJ f Uff
' 'tf THEREHEtg VALERIE w THE s T fV. SRAOOUS, SYPNEY,i J ZfOS7S MY jf ALL -THE
r41L '-aC-sZSlSW-THOTtANE 1 1 Tf ITVOES LOOK J J PEAR SISTER, THAT'S F MORE
AVfhm CAME OFF THE ASSEMBLY tT"'Ti 'lO" IMPOSING f- HARPLY THE WORP wf REASON
WAf? LINE, SECURITY HAS BEE iMlfe O-fcj 11 FOR A MACH S i FORME
r f L POUBLEP AROUNP THE PLANT I lR V'v L?V rV?CX AIRCRAFT.' JUST TO WORRY,,,
Sfc J-sJ'4' 3fe THINK, VALERIE,., V
wgS?Tr THREE TtMES THE f lfS
lyffif, T TO,5jrao!
ARENT YOU WrrTNG', A -NONSENSE SOMEONE MAS T WELL, YOU KNOW 1" f CHEERIO, WmJ-T'LL
ABTrtOOOLPTO IrSASSAFE TO TEST 'EM f BEST. -STPNEY.' BUT CHUM KATWA NAXOS, ARRIVES I I SET A LIFT HOME
RISK YOUR HECK TEST-1 AS AN EASY ANP I SEEM TO 1 'NOW I WUST'RUN,., FROM ATHENS TO STAY WITH l WITH ONE OF
PILOT) MS- PLANES AT 1 CHAIR BESIPE HAVE THE MOST I JUST LOAPS OF US PLUS THAT, MY THEATRE THE LAPS
SUCH FRIGHTENING J THE HEARTH EXPERIENCE L THINGS TO w PATE WITH RANPY EARLY ff'
nw SPEEPSf BSIPESi f" F THE JO 5 ,2f PREPARE f f THIS EVENING V A VI I I
I wf
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' I ITISHT-O, LOT OF AIRCRAFT Cl -JUST KEEP THE RAS r
f 4 T'MMY x THtSw. SIS AS A 1 "7, ON LON& ENOUSH TO CT Cf I
! 'RXrrSRFA-SIKiaHL MOITTOSET H005E!UTANPLES CLOSE THE, CANOPY, f:l: V
IN 'ER NOW, CAPT'N 1 THE FEEL OF LIKE A PRAM.' OW USZ?lJ liH GRAVES YOU'RE JjmT V-'
SRTVES, SIR.' SHOUU? 1 THIS BABY-' FOR A BRAKES-ON Yift tH TAKtNG OFF f-ri.'F Ll:
BE ENOUGH FORSROUNP 1 BEFORE I TAME WINPUP,., SEE IF I 1 liU J Ar J, jt 4
CHECK o, I'LL PULL CHOCKS HER UPSTAIRS CAN SHAKE HER v.'" f flf f)' rfX&f&J K Xfti
WHEN REAPYy SIR 7-THIS AFTERNOOl4 APAKT IirOS. jM"9f W V

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A 6 low your .1
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A WlLLYOu"N
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rri 1 HEY-NOT SO
I f-fXlll

I .U ri f PONT WORRY-- M FTTH LM I HAVE TO GO lUS
I 4?Srb2JpX? r. V? -rX CQME BACK IN A V AROUND RINGING yX
I J"t PT BROKE IT rsjr ef-- AN HOUR AND J N V. DOORBELLS JUST 1
I' J lS?XL teS, -sL,LL WAVE IT f jRg LIKE A COMMON 7
un,,y rr : 3i X"- i
nnf ii Tin ni Mi.ni.li.! ..in J I 1 IMJa..aiMas &f3&,
( TAKE THAT--) .sr- Fv-J r oh, tm so sorry mr beasley. J Mllw'
V VOU T f Hot : BUT YOU RANG OUR DOORBELL J V If j
7 VA n T i JUST LIKE MY GOOD-FOR- 1 V
( LOAFER IljFmX X 1 NOTHING BROTHER- n -"vX J I
.Tfc'' mtZ ZLM:: "Tjf RP AT Y'Z-l II f fT"I I'M SORRY, MR. BEASLEY---
I 7A H i ) V L -rVs1 THOUGHT YOU VERE
' -1 , x IT j;: -T-rK "my first husband
if ' ''Z(h-rr A r-tZ HE RANG THE
p'"r"" tc" : g?r!'S&i'i:



THERE'S NOBOPY IN
THE HOUSE NOT
EVEN IM THE

X w

e .yi I I. J'

I It'ltS' II fj ft 1 III

1 1 (

if it

T MUSTA FELL ASLFFP OM If 1

THIS SEP LAST NIGHT ZERO- M

P'lU'lN I VICHP W I

I WAS AWFUL

TIREP

IT

rr : rr

IT'S 4 6RAYM0RNINS AM' STILL RAlNlMS f

THAT RIVER OUT THERE S COLD AN W1LP-

LOOKING ITS ALL FULL OF TRASH. AM'

.STUFF BOILNG ALOMG

Tttt

9 rii

B 71 11 III II II HI I) I i Z 1 71

' "Vl i i. m i I

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GOLD GEE, ZERO! WHOEVER 'OWNS TUB MOOSE

LEFT AN AWFUL LOTTA STUFF IN THE ICEBOX'

WELL, WE'RE ALREAPY CRIMINALS 'CAUSE

CAME IM OUTA THE RAIN AN

SLEPT HERE LAST NIGHT

Ti (Tfi j i m i in 1

I

nil I

SO I GUESS IT WONT GO AW HARPER CM

US IF WE FIX SOMETHln TO EAT WELL

WASH UP EVERYTHING CAREFUL-LIKE,

AM' LEAVE BEFORE WHOEVER OWNS

THIS PLACE COMES HOME

v

t

rt i&m&E: due

6EE WHIZ WE CANT (SO OUT

THE BACK WAY LIKE WE CAME
IM THAT WILR MEAN-LOOKlN'

RIVER IS RIGHT UP TC

WE eOTTA GET OUTA HERE FAST

THE 5ROUNP IS HIGHER ON THE I

sjpe of the house am' we cam

MAKE JT OUT OKAY

" 11 1

MORE BAP MEWS,31! WAS AFR4IP IT WOULP At"J

f MAJDR-THEETLANPf LEAST IM HAPPY WE EVACU4TEP

PAW UPRI VER HAS EVERt?ME FROH1 THE RIVES-BOTTOM

i Auna vgcrcpnAV it

MOULD BE TOO LATE 1

NOW

.-..