The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03072

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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DAILY NEWSPAPER
CANADIAN WHISKY
Let thp people know the truth end the country i$ tafe" Abraham Lincoln
34th YEAR
PANAMA, R. P.i SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1959
FIVR CENTS

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ASIAN liOVELY Akiko Kojima, newly-crowned .Miss Universe
1960, sits in her throne holding her sceptre shortly after the
judges announced, their decision in Long Beach last night. The
26-.year-olev Oriental beauty is the first Asian,-to, win the title
to tto annual ioeauty pageant.
Japanese Beauty (37-23-38) Wins
Miss Universe Title In Long Beach

LONG BEACH, Calif., July 25
(TJPI) Twenty-two-year-old
Tokyo fashion model Akiko Ko Ko-lima
lima Ko-lima whose measurements are
37-23-38 was selected last night
as Miss Universe of i960 the
first Asian ever chosen for the
honor.
Runners-up were Miss Nor Norway,
way, Norway, Miss USA, England and
Brazil, in that order.
The black-haired, black-eyed
Miss Japan Is. the first Oriental
ki the eight year history, of the
nageant to be acclaimed most
iwautiful girl of the Universe.
The radiant winner stands 5
feet, II inches tall, and weighs
120 pounds, She speaks no Eng English.
lish. English. Miss Norway, Jorunn Kris Kris-tiansen,
tiansen, Kris-tiansen, 18, was second, fol followed
lowed followed by Miss United States,
Terry Lynn Huntingdon, 19;
Miss England; Pamela Anne
gearle, 21 and Miss Brazil,
Vera Ibeiro, 19,
AM winner of the pageant,
Miss Kojima will first tour the
US and then other countries for
the pageant's sponsors and
ther countries for the winner's
wrize of 41 1,000. She also won
a fur eoat and diamond ring,
Through her interpretor, Miss
Japan said her ambition is "to
make it lovely wife." Her favor-
Explosion Causes
Power Failure
On Atlantic Side
A ten-minute electric power
failure on the Atlantic side was
caused shortly before 2 o'clock
yesterday afternoon by an ex explosion
plosion explosion in an oil filled instru instrument
ment instrument transformer located in the
Mount Hope dlesel substation.
Capt Ernest Cotton of Mar
garjta and a crew of three mer
arnvea at tne scene of the ac accident
cident accident shortly after the explo explosion
sion explosion occurred at 1:59 pm. The
fire was bronght under control
by the use of chemicals and an
asbestos blanket.
No injuries were reported.

l 4

ite sports are swimming and
golf.
The Oriental beauty won out
over 79 contestants from 33
foreign countries and the Unit United
ed United States. Seven previous win winners
ners winners were from Finland, France,
Sweden, Peru Colombia, and
two from the United States.

Judge Advocate General s Corps
Celebrates Anniversary Wednesday

One of the world's largest and
oldest law. firm's celebrates its an anniversary
niversary anniversary next Wednesday the
Judge Advocate General's Corps.
For en July 29, 75, the Seconc
Continental C6ngress selected Wil William
liam William Tudor of Boston to be the
Army's first judge advocate.
Althoughn this appointment, made
only 26 days after General George
Washington had assumed com command
mand command of the 16,000 New England
militiamen besieging Boston, signi signified,
fied, signified, the use of professional legal
talent in the trial of courts-martial
cases, there was no established
corps of judge advocates until
1862. And the Judge Advocate Ge General's
neral's General's Department was not creat created
ed created until 1884 At that time, the de department
partment department included only right of officers,
ficers, officers, but the past three-quarters
of a century :. have seen rapid
growth today there are approxi approximately
mately approximately 100 judge advocates.
Tne Judge Advocate Genera
legal adviser to the Secretary of
the Army and the military estab establishment,
lishment, establishment, is responsible for super supervision
vision supervision of-the-system of military
justice,, for administration of the
system of (Statutory appellate, re review
view review of ali'records of trial by gen general
eral general courts-martial, and for the as assignment
signment assignment of traiifed legal officers
(judge advocates) to all principal
commands.'
Every officer who swears the
quill, wreath and sword insignia
01 -the, Judge Advocate General's
Corps is a graduate of an approv approved
ed approved law school and is qualified to
practice law before f the highest
court of a slat of the United
States of. before a federal court.
International ; affairs, claims,
military affairs, legal assistance',
legation, military justice, patents,
procurement law and real estate
are among the fields in wich the

rv n o

GZ fius Services Continues;
Maintenance Sheds Deserted
-
Canal Zone bus service continued without Interruption today
although the Curundu maintenance shed of the firm proyiding
bus service have been silent and near-deserted sine last Tues Tuesday.
day. Tuesday.
Thus far the five-day old strike of 53 checkers and mainten maintenance
ance maintenance men has brought no clear result other than thf company's
move to abolish checkers' jobs. s
Gursam Singh Gill, head of the Canal Zone Bus Service Inc.,
said yesterday the move was dictated by economy, and that the
decision followed Thursday afternoon's stalemate meeting be between
tween between strikers and company representatives. t
Checkers have long been employed on the Canal Zone bus
routes to tally passenger totals as buses move between different
tarrlf tones.

The checkers, who company
spokesman said had been earning
SRO to 125 monthly walkedoffthe
ioh last Monday, demanding a 75-
cent-per hom minimum wage. An Another
other Another 23 maintainence workers
joined the 30 checkers in the dis-
nnf with the hue firm.
Singh has maintained the firm'r
diminishing revenues cannot sup
port such a sweeping increase,
At Thursday's meeting he offer
Cuban Embassy Says
It Has Received
Anonymous Threats
The Cuban Embassy here eon eon-firmed
firmed eon-firmed today that it has been
receiving anonymous threats but
that although daytime, police pre
toftinn hd been red mitld
hEugl the Panama foreign W
' Cuan Chat g d'Afhires Ricar Ricar-do
do Ricar-do Rlano Juama said Cuban ex exiles
iles exiles in Panama "meet and cons conspire
pire conspire opnly." He said they en engage
gage engage in1 gun-running and are
dealing with influential sugar in interests
terests interests who want to create dis disturbances
turbances disturbances on Cuban soil.
"I don't doubt that they (the
snoar (interests) have properties
here that have been effected by
the revolutionary laws," Juama
said. ;
Cuban exile Ramon CalviftVnas
reportedly cieculated flysheets a a-cainst
cainst a-cainst a rallv scheduled by 1-
-al vi&ulh erouti in Santa Ana
plaza 'for tonight in support of
the Cuban revolution.
However, by the Panama Fore Foreign
ign Foreign Office has declared that Cu Cuban
ban Cuban exiles in Panama are acting
normally, Jauma said.
The Cuban charge d'affai res
also said he had turned down a
luncheon organized by the Cuban
colony in his honor, suggesting
that the money would be better
spent on Cuba's agrarian reform
program. He said they could
make their contribution 'through
the magazine Bohemia,
Judge Advocate fieneraPs Corps
specializes.
One of the most noteworthy
judge advocates was John Marsh Marshall,
all, Marshall, who served during the Revolu Revolutionary
tionary Revolutionary War. A captain in the 15th
Virginia Regiment, Marshall later
became member of Congress, Se Secretary
cretary Secretary of State, and Chief Justice
of the United States.
Two World War I judge advo advocates
cates advocates were Major Henry L. Stim Stim-son,
son, Stim-son, afterwards Secretary of War,
Secretary of State and the Philip Philippines'
pines' Philippines' Governor-General, and Ma Major
jor Major Felix Frankfurter, now a Unit Unit-ed
ed Unit-ed States Supreme Court Justice.
Col. Thomas J. Henderson is
judge advocate for USARCARIB.
On his staff are Lt Col. Frank O.
Hamilton. Lt. Col, James C. Starr,
Capt. Robert M. Thorniley and
Fst, Lt. Leonard G. Crowley.
CFN will televise a special pro program
gram program in honor of the Judge Advo Advocate
cate Advocate General's Corps at 5:45 p.m.
Tuesday
Books On Religion,
Politics Removed
From Moscow Show
MOSCOW (UPI) '-, The' United
States has withdrawn about 250
books on religion and politics
from its exhibition here for fear
tney might be considered "con
troversial" by the Russians.
U.S. sources said the removal
of the books about 4 per cent of
the exhibition's 8,000-book library
was "entirely an American de decision,"
cision," decision," reached by exhibition di director
rector director Harold MacLellan.
Most of the books were "purged"
a week ago, but 50 were removed
today, a few hours before Vice
President Richard M, Nixon
opened the exhibition

ed the striking group a 18 per
cent wage increase which was
flatly rejected.
Singh said today he would re resume
sume resume settlement talks with 23
maintainancc employes on Mon
day, and would talk to, them as
a group or singly.
Before the strike maintainence
employes, including mechanics
and welders earned $25 to $145
weekly, according to company of officials.
ficials. officials. This compares favorably
with the 50 to 75 cents an hour
paid similar workers by Pana Panamanian
manian Panamanian bus firms. Based uponthe
48-hour work week prevalent here
Panama bus line maintainence
workers would be earning $24 to
$36 weekly. Presumably, both
sets of figures exclude overtime
pay. s
Dwrmf the wave ttUspuf
drivers, who negotiated a new
contract with, the bus Arm -recently,
he v continued te main
' fain regular schedule. Spoke
men. for tn CanaL Zone Bus
Srvlc W irlvoriWiLn. M
r cents hourly, average afceut
$150" monthly Including ovr
lm payments.
Singh has been accused by Pa Panama
nama Panama officials of. operating his
bus line illegally since the Canal
Zona bus concession grants fuel fueling
ing fueling and maintainence privileges
to the bus firm at their Curundu
operating base.
But a company official said to today
day today their sole advantage is fuel fueling
ing fueling privileges, since practically
all replacement parti are pur purchased
chased purchased from Panama firms.
No eauinment failure resiilHtiv
in interruped scheduled have been
reported since the strike began..
Plastic Bags Have
Killed 79 Infants
CHICAGO (UPI)-Plastie bags
have brought suffocations to at
least 79 infants so far this year,
a count showed today. In addi addition
tion addition 17 persons have used the
bags to commit suicide.
Many agencies and the federal
government have warned parents
to keep the thin plastic containers
out of the reach of children.
Last month the Society of the
Plastics Industry, Inc., launched
a national advertising campaign
n newspapers and over the radio
to uuorm the public about the
safe use of the bags, commonly
used to package laundry and dry
cleaning.
The industry warned that the
plastic should never b used as
makeshift covers in cribs or play
pens or lor mattresses or uphol upholstery
stery upholstery and should never be given
to children as playthings. The
bags should be torn or tied in
knots and discarded.
Meanwhile fifteen states and 10
cities have considered legislation
against the bags.
166 NEW P-l Sunday
166 New Cases
Of Polio Reported
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Pub Public
lic Public Health Service today-reported
there Were 166 new cases of para
lytic polio last week the most for
any week this year.
Surgeon General teroy Burney
said the newiv reoorted e a t
brought to 956 the total number of
paralytic cases this year. During
the same per'od in 1958; there
were 437 eases of crippling polio.
Dr. Burney said however that
in 1955-the first year' the Salk
vaccine became available more
than 1,500 paralytic polio victims
had been stricken by mid-Jury.
FDjfc Memorial
WASHINGTON UP1) The
House pissed by voica Cvote
yesterday a resolution setffng
aside a 27-acre site along the Po Potomac
tomac Potomac River here for a memorial
to late President Franklin D.
Roosevelt. c
The measure, which now goes
to the Senate, also would author'
ize the spending of $150,000 to fi finance
nance finance a competition for a design
for the memorial

li iiiiimiiiiiiwiiiiiiiinin

TERBAL i FRAY Vice-President Richard, -Nixon and Soviet, pre premier
mier premier Niklta Khrushchev are pictured at the U.S. exhibition in
Moscow, where a pointed exchange of political views set off a
blaat which has been heard around the world. (UPI Radiophoto)
Bridges Believes Nixon Would Come
Home If Ruskies Get Too Insulting

HASHINGTON (UPI- Chair Chairman
man Chairman Styles Bridges of the Senate
Republican Policy Committee
said ftUay Vice President Rich Richard
ard Richard M Nixon Would "come
home" immediately if the Soviets
try to use his Russian trip to in insult
sult insult the United States.
The New Hampshire Republi Republican,
can, Republican, one of Nixon's Intimates,
said the vice president would not
tolerate anything like the diplo diplomatic
matic diplomatic snub Soviet Premier Nikita
S. Khrushchev gave British Prime
Minister Harold Macmillan when
he was in Moscow.
Bridges' comments were made
as Nixon and Khrushchev, in one
of their first encounters, engaged
in heated debate during a tour of
the U.S. fair in Sokolniki Park.
White House Press Secretary
James Hagerty said President
Eisenhower saw news reports of
Gunman Terrorizes
Virginia Family,
Kills Man, Infant
BASSETT. Va. (UPI)
; A
stump-shaped gunman with a long
police record ambushed and killerl
one man today. Then he kicked in
the front door of a nearby home
and killed an infant girl who was
cradled in her grandmother's
arms.
The gunman, identified as Earl
A. Smith, 30, of Ferrum, Va., fled
into heavy woods carrying a 30-30
deer rifle. A posse of 60 officers
went after him.
Police' said the gunman am ambushed
bushed ambushed Marvin Whorley and his
wife, Louise, as they walked up a
dirt road near their home. He
stepped from behind a bush and
said, "I've waited a, long time for
this."
He fired one shot, killing Whor Whorley
ley Whorley instantly. Mrs. Whorley fled
back to the house. Smith fired
once at ner, mil misseu.
She locked the door
screamed for her mother,
and
Mrs.
Mroi T.pp Ymine. and her child

ren to flee son visit, one member of (he party
Mrs. Whorley managed to run' Ml overboard into the Sarapiqui.
out a back floor with three of herThe soldier could not swim and
children and reach the safety ot a 'he river was heavily strewn with
neighbor's house. I debris. There was a dangerous cur-
Smith kicked in the front doormen' and undertow,
and found Mrs. Young cowering1 The citation accompanying the
in a bedroom cradling 8-month-oldif oration points put that Ser Ser-Della
Della Ser-Della Whorley in her arms. ;pent Akers, without hesitation

He fired one shot, killing tbeian" w"n compiere oisregarn ior
nfcfM hnA umnnrfinr Mrs. Yonn in bis own safety, jumped into the

the chest. She was listed in "sat
lsfactory" condition at a Martins Martinsville
ville Martinsville hospital.
Smith had been released Sunday
from' the Lewisburg, Pa., federal
reformatory where he was sen sentenced
tenced sentenced to 30 months for whisky
conpiracy. Police described Smith,
$ feet, 5 inches tall and weighfng
190 pounds, as a 'habitual crim crim-insl"
insl" crim-insl" iwith a long record.
He Was due in court at Rocky
Mount,; Va.,1 this morning to
swer a charge of beating his wife
Tuesday Police put his wife under
guard at her home at- Ferrum be because
cause because of fears Smith might harm
be. ;v.

n

the change before leaving the
White House early this morning
for a week end at his Gettysburg,
Pa., farm-
But HaVerty said the President
had no comment and had re received
ceived received no reports either from
Nixon or the, American Embassy
in Moscow.
Bridges and other senators
agreed that Khrushchev was
"showing his sore spot" in de denouncing
nouncing denouncing this country's proclama proclamation
tion proclamation of "captive nations week" as
direct interference in Russia's in internal
ternal internal affairs.
But Sens. Paul Douglas (D-I1I.)
and Jacob K. Javits (R-N. Y.)
said Nixon would have to make
his own decision on how much
rough treatment to take from So Soviet
viet Soviet leaders.
Bridges indicated little doubt of
Nixon's determination to under underscore
score underscore U. S. firmness throughout
his 10-day visit to Russia.
"If the Soviet leaders Iry in insulting
sulting insulting the United States through
Nixon," Bridges said, "I think the
vice president would not accept
such insults and would immedi immediately
ately immediately break off his trip and come
home."
Soldier's Medal
For Valor Awarded
To Local Sergeant
The Soldier's Medal for valor
has been awarded a U. S. Army
Caribbean soldier on duty with the
U. S. Army Mission to Costa Rica,
Sfe. Harold W. Akers.
Col. Maurice C. Holden, mission
chief, presented Akers with the de decoration
coration decoration which was established hy
Congress in 1926. The soldier's
Medal is awarded to members of
the armed forces who, while serv serving
ing serving with the A r my, distinguish
themselves by heroism not involv involving
ing involving actual conflict with an enemy
and not in aerial flight.
Akers was honored for his hero-
( ic attempts to save a fellow soldier
i from drowning. On Oct 16 last
year, while returning by boat to
1 mission head-quarters from a liai-
water fully clothed. After reach reach-ing
ing reach-ing the victim, the sergeant strug struggled
gled struggled to keep his comrade's head
above 'the water, but due to the
overpowering current the man was
swept from his grasp and lort.
Aker s rescue attempts were so
exhausting that he was on the
verge of collapse and had to be
lifted from the water by other or or-cuoants
cuoants or-cuoants of the craft.
The 33 year-old soldier Is an In
fantry instructor with the mission
A uradimte of the Armv Lnneunge
School at Monterey, Cal'f., he has
been In the Armv s'nrr itni
was assigned to USARCARIB
eirly in Janary, 1959,

Moscow

Booming

Greet Him After
Khrushchev Clash

iuii i xi ii w k r dm
L J AT At 1 I . 1 m. ......
"iwww ? juir t.j ur

M. Nixon reigned as a Dooulnr hero in Communism', t

hometown today after enaaaina Premier Nikita S. Khru-

shchev in a arin-and-bear-it

Nixon, who won only listless applause from a meager
airport crowd when he arrived Thursday for his 11-day

oovier rour, arew booming cheers from both Russians and and-Westerners
Westerners and-Westerners lust night at the American exhibition wherft
the clash took place yesterday.
The Vice-President later attended a "capitalists"
banquet that became a virtual victory dinner in his honor."1
An American corporation president, present at the
dinner for the 212 "capitalists" who aided the exhibition,
said regarding the hassle with Khrushchev rhnt Nhrnn

"took a beating at first. He picked himself up off the
canvas and really staged a comeback." v-h
Khrushchev and Nixon tangled on such East vs. WestV
topics as women and rockets, war and peace and who wai l

threatening whom.
putiea of his verbal starring
vate
He paid afficfaffibemlin calls
on first deputy premiers Frol
Kozlov and Anastas I. Mikoyan.
Tonight Nixon and Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev will meet again. Nixon will
play host to the premier and
other Soviet leaders at a dinner
at the American embassy. j
Proof that Nixon's popular popularity
ity popularity was blossoming came at
the official opening of the
TJS "Slice of American Life"
exhibition last night. Only
Khrushchev, himself, mount mounted
ed mounted the platform to louder ap applause
plause applause from the audience es estimated
timated estimated at 3000.
The two duelists bore no
scars. Nixon smiled as Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev gallantly nelped Mrs. Pa Patricia
tricia Patricia Nixon, the vice president's
wife, to her platform seat.
Khrushchev told the opening
day audience that a visit to the
Soviet Union by President Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower would Te "very useful
in improving relations between
our two coun tries and in
strengthening world peace.
Nixon told the crowd: "The
government and the people of
the United States are as one
in their devotion to the cause
cf peace. But dedication to
peace, goodwill and human
brotherhood should never be
mistaken for weakness, soft softness
ness softness and fear."
After the formal specehes
there was another brisk ex exchange
change exchange between Nixon and
Khrushchev but noi as brisk
as the morning one in the ex exhibition.
hibition. exhibition. The two men stopped at a
glass-laden table and Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev proposed a toast to the
elimination of all f or e i i n
bases. Nixon sidestepped this
and in Russian proposed a
toast to peace Instead.
Let us drink to the liuiqda liuiqda-tion
tion liuiqda-tion of all foreign bases and
for peace," Khrushchev rw rw-swered.
swered. rw-swered. Jus before he lef, Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev raised his glass lagain and
said: "If you are willing to li
quidate your bases, I am willing
to stay here all week II neces necessary."
sary." necessary." "We will talk about that and
as long as we talk, we will not
fight," Nixon said.
"Why should we fight?"
Khrushchev asked.
Nixoh -r- "I agree with that,
as long as it "is 100 years ot
peace."
Khrushchev "That Is good.
and when I am 99, 1 hope we
can talk again."
Nixon "You mean that
in 99 years you will still be
In power and there will be no
elections?"
Khrushchev's reply was
inaudible.
The Nixon Khrushchev ex
change made the front, pages
of the Moscow newspapers to to-dav.
dav. to-dav. Pravda and Isvestla both
gave comprehensive accounts of
the freewheeling exchange wit
quotes.
The American exhibition
was opened to the general
public today and immediately
attracted thousand of Rus Russian
sian Russian citizens.
Thev had auened for mi
eral hours In advance at the

Cheers

......
lie w; -. n : n : i
uj v ice-rresmenr mennrn
verbal wresHina mntrh
the hope of being the first. to
far seem to have attracted met
attention were the automobile
show, the supermarket and the
Helena Rubinstein beauty salon.
Several Russian women vol volunteered
unteered volunteered for demonstrations of
facial massages and other beau beauty
ty beauty treatments.
As they argued heatedly in
public yesterday over respon responsibility
sibility responsibility for the Cold War,
Khrushchev accused Nixon of
trying to "frighten" Russia,
"We will answer your threat
with threats," he said.
The amazing face-to-face
debate in the American ex exhibition
hibition exhibition just before the for formal
mal formal opening of the display
occurred within earshot of
hundreds of persons. The two
spoke back and forth sharply
through interpreters.
Later in their formal speceh specehes,
es, specehes, neither referred to the flare flare-up.
up. flare-up. Nixon challenged the Soviet
Union to join tha United States
in a quest for peace, "not peac
by ultimatum but peace by ne negotiation."
gotiation." negotiation." A 450-foot formal message
from Eisenhower was read to
officials attending the opening.
The President expressed A A-merican
merican A-merican friendship for the
Russian people and invited
them to visit the United
States and see it for them themselves.
selves. themselves. It was a hectic day from tht
start.
While Mrs. Nixon went sight sightseeing
seeing sightseeing and passed out lolipopa
to Russian children, the vice
president visited a farmers'
market and went to the Krem Kremlin
lin Kremlin to pay a formal call on the
Soviet premier and President
Klimenti Voroshilov and present
a private message from Eisen Eisenhower.
hower. Eisenhower. At first all was cordial, de despite
spite despite Khrushchev's blast Thurs Thursday
day Thursday that the united States was
guilty of "direct interference"
in Soviet affairs by proclaim proclaiming
ing proclaiming a "captive nations week."
Khrushchev's first words to
lixon were: "I'm glad you
came and we are slai t0 have
vou here. We are hoping your
"visit will be helpfnl."
They went into tiie premier's
office where Khrushchev, in a
brown suit with four medals
on his lapels offered three bot bottles
tles bottles of mineral water.
Nixon declined and they began
to talk. Thirty minutes later
they emerged an.1 drove to together
gether together to the exhibition at So So-kolniky
kolniky So-kolniky Park. Here, the cold
war issues were Joined, over A
kitchen stove.
A crowd of officials, lnclud-
lng Kozlov and Mikoyan, US
Ambassador Llewellyn Thomp Thompson,
son, Thompson, wives, and even tourist,
milled around.
In the model home exhibit,,
frequently derided in th
Soviet, press the two men.
looked at the kitchen.
"You Americans expect that
the Soviet people will be amaz amazed."
ed." amazed." Khrushchev said. !'It la not
so, we have all these things lni
our new apartments."



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T1 Mail Boi ts as open lorum tar readers or The Panama Americas,
latter ara received gratefully and ara handled in a wholly confidential
MMiur. ...
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Mat day. Lett era ara published in tha order received.
Please try ta keep tits letter limited to ene paae length.
Identity of fatter writers ii held in strictest confidence.
This newspaper assumes no responsibility for statements er opinions
(pressed in letters from readers.
THE MAIL BOX

PEACEFUL
Bir:

t rnndripr the Nov. 3 Deaceful demonstration to the Canal

Zone, as proposed by politician Aquilino Boyd, amounts, to tress tresspass
pass tresspass and thus could be grounds for civil action against the
participants.
If he finds people foolish enough to take part in such a
demonstration, the damage to international goodwill and to
Panama's reputation will be great. I hope the wise counsel of
President Ernesto de la Guardia Jr. and National Guard com commander
mander commander Col. Bolivar Vallarlno will prevail to prevent the pro provocative
vocative provocative demonstration. tu,
. In any case we can assume that Boyd wont be there lead leading
ing leading the mob. The great patriot will probably be in the same
Jplace he was when the Cubans recently invaded his and my
omeland True Panamanian

G. I. SERVANTS

Sir:
Th. rprpnt refusal of the top

I figures on the number of G. I. servants at Quarry Heights is com-
pletely justified. ,
i What business is it of a sovereign foreign power to probe nto
t .. -rmod fnrres' Conceivably.

" me internal auairs ui anuuin .Uu, ------
guch. requests for information, if secretly obtained, could be termed
t !P Perhaps the people of Panama lock upon the U.S. Armed Forces
as their own. This is understandable in the light of history. The U.S.
f Arrrfed Forces are always ready to help and protect the people of
I Panama if the need should arise.
I 'Why doesn't Panama investigate the Guardia Nacional and their
1 problem of soldier servants? Why not investigate Aquilino Boyd s
desire to incite mob action? Why not find out who the Panama poli-
2 ticians are who shop at the Army, Navy, Air Force PX s, and at
1 the same time want none of their less-well-off countrymen to do so.
If Panama has a right to interfere, meddle and investigate the
I Internal affairs of our country's institutions, then we have a right
J to interfere in Panama's domestic problems. "We could find plenty
J that smells, too.
' The internal affairs of the Armed Forces are not your affair, in
fact none of your business. Concentrate on cleaning up your own
7 dirty linen, we can take care of cleaning up ours, efficiently, and
'1 without the help of such unqualified people to advise us.
Serviceman.
,
WILLIE'S PILOT PROBLEMS
Sir:
J All this fuss and to-do about the Canal' pilots wanting more pay
has certainly provided some interesting sidelights. And it has also
! served to open a lot of eyes abbut the real situation.
In my own low-class circle, the juicy annual salary these boys
n are already getting was quite a surprise. We had seen their families
1 living in the older, and cheaper houses In the Zone and driving the
' cars of the low-price bracket. The pilots' wives we have run into
Is are far from the best-dressed women on the Isthmus, and the only
j' show of dough we have noticed Is footing the bills for some fancy
U college their kids attend.

' Ever since 1 arrived nere, me onisnness oi me puois nas uwu
V apparent, except for maybe one or two. They are in a class of their
, own, as if they personally own the Canal and the entire operation de de-c"
c" de-c" pends entirely upon them. They have gotten so big for their bell bell-;,
;, bell-;, bottoms that maybe Potter really should train 18-year-olds and tell
the ancient pilots to go shove it.
i The part of the whole argument I find most ridiculous is the
11 laugh about their not being, able to sleep during the day because
u of inadequate quarters. Plenty of other people in lower income brack brack-,";
,"; brack-,"; ets have moved into the new ranch-style homes, stuck an air condi-
tioner in the bedroom window, and, if they didn't have to work
!, every day, could sleep in noiseless comfort anytime.
I know for a fact that the pilots could have moved into these
! nice homes, but they claim the rent is too high. Many of them
have squatted in their old-fashioned homes since the year one, and
'' they think it's theirs, just like the Canal.
The increased traffic certainly has causpd the pilots a lot of ex extra
tra extra hours on the road, and I agree that they should have some re relief.
lief. relief. But not in the form of money. Let the Canal Company bring
down more pilots to share the pot of gold.
The pilots seem to be saving all that money for something. They
' don't appear to spend it. But if they are working as hard as they
say, none of them will live to spend it in their old age either.
Itia Darntd Shams.

MACHINE OPERATORS' PAY

Sir:
Last Aoril I hardened to be a
from the IBM Accounting Unit.
but their salaries were mighty low.
I figured that the situation

lince those April classes, but I have jHsWearned that insult has
recently been added to injury. The Local paters in question were

huddled into a meeting ana tola mat to quaniy tor oeuer pay mey
Would have to learn to use machines other than the IBM machines.
tThis is unfair Insofar as they have already been using miscellaneous :

macnines wunin meir unit.

worse, thougn, is tne tact mat tne same worK usea to ne done
by well-paid US Raters. For the same job, couldn't the Local Raters

cet at least half what the US
GIRADEAUX
Sir:

A play review is no place for a critical essay on Giradaux's
work. From a total of some 70-odd lines in' his July 14 article, re-
viewer Jay Lerner devoted approximately 14 to the Theater Guild's
'( production of "Ondine". Even these few remarks, consisting mainly
v of who made up the cast, were vague and indefinite. His criticisms
J (if they can be classed as such) were neither constructive nor des-
tructive they were redundant.
' I suggest that on his next visit to the Theater Guild, Lerner pay
! more attention to what is taking place on stage and pay fewer visits
r to the man who "so admirably handles the amenities between acts."
Theatergoer.

DAILY MEDITATION

o
(Presented by tha Deaprtment
f Christian Education of the E E-pltcopal
pltcopal E-pltcopal Church In tha Mission Missionary
ary Missionary Diocese of the Panama Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone.)
ST. JAMES THI APOSTLE
"The Sn f man tame net to
b ministered unto, but to mi minister,
nister, minister, and to give his Ufa a
ransom for many."
Two points stand out In conae; conae;-tion
tion conae;-tion with St. James. With his
brother St. John he was given the
title Boanerges, "sons of thunder"
by Jesus in tacit rebuke oi his
violent temper.1 Today's gospil re
fers to the desire for th pl.ico
of pre-eminence, a petit V made
by their mother.
By the grace of God, si Ja;ns
was able to overcome hoih lh.";f
hortcomings. This fiery, "pushy"

- BO tfu

IS so
14 00
INVASION
brass to give your newspaper any
classmate of some Local Raters i
They seemed to know their job,
may .have changed for the better
Raters used to make'
-Fair Mlndad.
AND ONDINI
. ...... ,u.
apostle became the first of the
little band to give his life for the.
uuusuaii nun.
Yesterday we learned the ne-
cessity for strength and endurance
in communicating the gospel. The,
enperience of St. James adds the
supplementary lessons of quietness
and self-sacrifice in serving our!
Lord. If men are to be convinc convinced
ed convinced they must b persuaded, not
coerced or high-pressured, into be-.
lieving.
"Grant. 0 merciful God, that,
as thine holy Apostle Saint Janes,
leaving his father and all that he
had, without delay was obeiint
unto the calling of thy Son Jesi:
Christ, and followed him; so we,
forsaking all worldly ami en nui
affections, may be evermore read
y to follow thy holy cominanl cominanl-rnenls;
rnenls; cominanl-rnenls; through Ihe same Jesus
Christ our Lord. Amen".

Ruarkdus
Comments

By ROBERT C. RUARK
I am almost certain that life
is passing me by. 1 juit aia't
witu it, kids. 1 know a lot u
broads in a lot of cities, but 1
00 noi know the one on pme
121 of a recent fNew Yorker
Magazine, who is slopping a a-round
round a-round in a nightgown, poising a
cigaret holder in a dashing fash fash-io.i.
io.i. fash-io.i. She seems to have a Urge
diamond orooch in tne vicinity
of her belly button, ana is wear wearing
ing wearing high-heeled shoes that don t
seem to go witn a nighUuwn.
So maybe it ain't a nightgown'
This family has formed a ha habit,
bit, habit, like marijuana, of auto automatically
matically automatically buying the New Yoiiter
Magazine for better than twen twenty
ty twenty years, because soriie" people
like Sid Perelman and Charles
Addams did outrageous things in
it, and E. B. White was some something
thing something special in the front oi the
book.
The New Yorker, you must un understand,
derstand, understand, then was edited by
the late Harold Ross, a -hick. He
put ou. a flossy magazine for
other hicks. He was. aiming, he
said, at the old lady from 'Dubu 'Dubuque,
que, 'Dubuque, and well he aimed, mocd
he did.
He was helped by people like.
Jim Thurber, an Ohio boy, in
his deadly aim, as Mr. Thurber
will tell you in his book on
Ross.
I find the N. Y.'er a 1 e 1 1 1
rough going these days, because
all the stories seem to start out,
quote: "When I was a little
girl in Upper East Pakistan, my
amah always used to. ." and
so on for 90 years with the
wrong amah.
But man, 1 am here to tel!
you that this broad on page 127
has got me made. The head headline
line headline says: "Look at her and you
know (with no period)
"She uses a Hasselblsd 500 C,
and she is attracted to the man
who always looks for this shield
(inserted picture of shield).
"She is often seen at Van
Cleef and Arpels, and she is at attracted
tracted attracted to the kind of man
who always looks for this shield
(inserted picture of shield).
"She keeps time with a Lu Lu-cien
cien Lu-cien Piccard. .He does with a
Patek Philippe, and he is the
kind of man who always looks
for this shield (inserted" picture
of shield)."
This dame begins to bother
me, now. If she wants to use a
Hasselbland 500 C, that's her
own business, but it sounds sus suspicious
picious suspicious to me, and she might as
well get tattooed and switch to
that other hasselblad which does
not avoid the manufacture of
stereo and monaural records un under
der under the same roof, like it says,
just as plain.
Now any dame that is always
hanging around Va Cleef and
Arpels, a jewelry joint, is just
hunting trouble, i
She is either a kleptomaniac
or a babe looking! to shake her
fiance out of a lifetime wage for
one of those glittery things that
ladies prize only for sentimental
value and what it'll bring when
she needs hasty travailing mon
ey.
Believe me, if I were either
Mr. Van Cleef or Mr. Arpels,
1 would watch this one like a
hawk, and check the Dun and
Bradstreet soonest on any gen gentleman
tleman gentleman she brings in, especially
if he carries a cane and wears
a hard collar and a bowler hat.
You just can't tell who's what
these days, ever since the tea tea-tasters
tasters tea-tasters and beard-wearers invad
ed the New Yorker. Even an ehe
patch is suspect, becauij the
wearer mignt be hustling another
brand of shirt
We have an unimial !n
New Ynrlr uhiph nan 1..
in the snee7er for lnitrin.i nH
.every time I look it this' lass
' and 1 know that she uss a
Hasselblad and is ofter te i at
you know who's Five-and T n
(million, that is) and keeps time
wun Lucien riccara. Well
vvnen i was living on the
Left Bank, and practicing how
to grow a beard so I could be
either a writer or a jazz mu musician,
sician, musician, I knew- a fellow n a med
Lucien Piccard. And if this girl
is keeping time with that
Lucien Piccard, all I can say is
that Van Cleef and Arpels better
lay on some extra house dicks.
I knew a fellow in the Mo Moroccan
roccan Moroccan quarter named Philippe
Petek, too. Shifty, is all I can
say. Both these people claimed
relationship with famous watch watchmaking
making watchmaking firms, but they were ac actually
tually actually in the hot machinegun
trade.
I've been reading this anver.
I tisement over and over, and still
can't quite figure out what this
girl is hustling, Blue Cross or"
Warner Bros, stereo records.
But that shield is in there,
loud and strong, and if you see
. a gin keeping time with Lucien
plccard. you just call up Van
cleef and Arpels and ask them
straight out, has anybody seen
nasseiDiaa aoo u iateiy7 if they
hand up, call the cops,

I SOON BELLA VISTA I

the revolt
I OF THE V
LglaiatortJ

VHMfMfd

E5 -Jl 1.IIIHH m imi-.uu.!. ii fe7-vv .-- vv i.f. i.i ,i mmmmm-

?. Mmi

It,

Walter Winchell In

THI HELL OP FAME
Fame ii the agony of
Paaerson. uatterea by
Floyd
some
members of the press, ridiculed
by former supporters and pub publicly
licly publicly Diasied oy a member oi iiis
family he has become a recluse.
Bemnd tne snutterea winaows 01
his home he has tried to under understand
stand understand why his world has turned
topsy-turvy. And it is difficult to
explain wny he is the target of
such abuse. For years, he lought
like a champion. And even when
he lost he lought like a man.
Fame is the insult of Babe
Ruth, No single player ever did
more for baseball. His bat made
the N. Y. Yankees wirch aud
triumphant. Then time took its
toll 'iht Bambino had a bad sea season.
son. season. lTie following year the Yan Yankees
kees Yankees sent' him a contract calling
for one dollar.
Fame is the historic inaugural
flight of Wilbur and Orville Wright
which was practically ignored.
Most newspapers believed the sto story
ry story was too fantastic to mention.
Several devoted only a paragraph
to the event and dismissed the
plane as a rather ridiculous me mechanical
chanical mechanical freak.
Fame is the strangely ironic
story of John Paul Jones. He was
the first man to hoist the Stars
and Stripes on a. warship. His
exploits will forever symbolize the
grandeur of the Star Spangled Ban
ner. Congress voted Jones a gold
medal and France presented him
with a diamond studded sword.
Several years later, the hero who
was honored by two nations died
in obscurity in Paris.
Fame is the ironic story of
Tom Paine who was never en endowed
dowed endowed with the honors he deserv deserved
ed deserved during his lifetime. Then man
whose eloquent clarion calls in in-soired
soired in-soired the Minute Men was pub publicly
licly publicly vilified after the Revolution.
Paine fled t0 France and was im imprisoned.
prisoned. imprisoned. During his final days
he wa a wearv and bitter old
man. So profound wis hli bitter

THE SAVINGS BANK
Institution Guaranteed by the Slat
Pays 2 Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
We makt loans with guarantees -on first mortgages
or other securities
25c. -50c. $1.00 and $5.00
CHRISTMAS SAVING
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks
Individual safety deposit boxes, for jewelry and
documents, In 4 different sizes.

OFFICE IN PANAMA
109 Central Ave. at
corner of "IM Street
G. A. De ROUX,
Manager

HOURS:
From 8:00 a.m. te 12:30 p.m.
SATURDAYS i from 1:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon

Widening Kipples

ness that he authored a letter a
busing his former comrade and
good friend George Washington.
Fame is a cruel joke that was
General Custer's destiny. He hun hungered
gered hungered for military victory and
frequently contended that the suc success'
cess' success' of a man's life could oniy
be measured by the glory he gain gained.
ed. gained. Ironically, he won unaying
fame as a result of "Custer's
Last Stand." The worst defeat sus sustained
tained sustained by U. S. troops.
Fame is Marlon Brando's inse insecurity.
curity. insecurity. He has confessed: "In re reminiscing,
miniscing, reminiscing, success seems so
simple. But I remember being
plagued by doubts, fears, loneli loneliness
ness loneliness and all the other horrors
that haunt everyone who is try try-ing
ing try-ing to develop a- talent he is un unsure
sure unsure of. Even after a certain mea measure
sure measure of success, such as I have
had, it's still hard to be sure."
Fame is the misfortune that
haunted Gen. Grant after leaving
the White House. Failure in br -ness
burdened him with stagger staggering
ing staggering debts. Always an honorable
man, he pawned his war trophies
in an effort to compensate those
who had lost their savings sup supporting
porting supporting his commercial ventures,
He spent the last agonizing
months of his life penning his
memoirs represented the crown crowning
ing crowning irony of his life. Mrs. Grant
received over a half-milHon dol dollars
lars dollars in royalties. More than her
husband had earned during his
lifetime.
Fame is the harsh reality of
movie stardom as explained by
Dinah Shore: "I was so tired
when I got home at night that
I didn't want to talk. My husband
waited to eat with me, we'd sit
quietly for a while: then I'd go
to bed. because if I'd missed any
sleep it would show on my face
when it was enlarged or, the
screen. Besides, I wns so keyed
im from working all day that,
tired as I was, I had trouble
fallir"? asleep. That was my idy idyllic
llic idyllic life as a motion picture ac actress.
tress. actress. You can have it."
COLON BRANCH:
Front St. at corner
of 7th 8t.
CARLOS M0UYNES V,
Sub-Msnater

.

' 4
New York
. Fame is the fickle monster in
Aamiral Dewey's carrer. He was
- welcomed witn one of New
York s wildest ovations after his
triumph at Manila. He was
public idol, consequently, demands
that he enter tne Presidential
sweepsiakes were inevitable.
Dewey destroyed his political op
portunities with a single unfortun
ate remark: "It's easy to be Pre
sident, all that I have to do is
take orders from Congress, and
I have been obeying orders all
my life." The editorial barrage
that followed subsequently shat
tered Admiral Dewey's heart.
Fame is the ghost that has fol
lowed Garbo a constant, unwel
corned companion. When she was
a reigning rpovie queen, she dwell
ed in a lavish mansion but used
and decorated only one room
When friends called, they usually
found her huddled in a room with
the curtains rawn to keep the
light out while she moaned:
"Here one sits and sits and sits
and sits."
Fame is the strange saga of
George M. Cohan. He achieved a
greatness and nobility few twin twin-klers
klers twin-klers have eve. matched. He
triumphed as a playwright, song-
smith, actor, director and produc
er. Incredibly, Cohan was constant
ly nagged bx a sense of inferior
lty. He scorned himself as an
ignorant little guy" and was hurt
and bewildered by alleged soDhis
ticates who dismissed his works
as "corny." He never really
reconciled h'.mself to the impres
sive public image of George M
Cohan.
Fame is the compulsion that
makes people risk their health
and their lives to gam and re
tain it. Amelia Earhart (the most
famous woman of her time) wa?
showered with honors following
her trans-Atlantic solo. She was
feted by royalty and mobbed by
the public. Amelia, however,
found a bed of laurels an uneasy
resting place. She could never re resist
sist resist the challenge of conquering
space. Before her final flight she
gave reporters this prophetic state
ment: "Someday I'll get bumpe
off. I don t want to go, but wher
I go I'd like to go in my owe
plane. This is my final flight."
SiN JUAN
: SAMANQUILLA
5533333

v

.-...-

Merry
WXSHIGTON -r Colle a g u i
chuckled when Congressman Wil William
liam William Jennings 3ryan Dorn, the
alleeed Democrat of South Ca
rolina, scolded Democratic thair thair-man
man thair-man Paul Butler for criticizing
the Rayburn Johnson leadership.
Republican efforts to "divide" tne
Democratic -party.
Meeting Dora in the Democra Democratic
tic Democratic cloakroom shortly thereaiter,
Congressman Carl Vinson of Geor Georgia,
gia, Georgia, a legitimate Democrat, hail hailed
ed hailed his friend from Seuth Ciro Ciro-Una:
Una: Ciro-Una: ; :,. -v
"You did a great ob defending
the Speaker, Bill," said Vinson.
"A grtat job! I noticed that you
said Paul Butler was helping the
Republicans. You know,. BUM, It
hasn't been so long ago since you
voted Republican yourself."
Vinson referred to the fact that
Dorn has been a consistent sup supporter
porter supporter of Republican leader Char Charlie
lie Charlie Halleck in his efforts to de de-vide
vide de-vide the Democrats.
Dorn was even' one of only four
Democrats who deserted Speaker
Rayburn in the battle to override
Eisenhower's veto of the rural e e-lectrification
lectrification e-lectrification bill.
ILEANOR OF OLD
Mrs. Eteanof Roosevelt got to together
gether together with a closed-door meeting
of Democratic Congressmen the
other day and- "advised" them
somewhat in the manner of the
old days when she was a tixture
in Washington.
What she said wasn't published,
but her chief advice was that
America's tremendous surplus of
food was the most powerful wea weapon
pon weapon we have in the cold war.
The meeting was arranged by a
freshman Congressman; William
H. Meyer, the first Vermont De Democrat
mocrat Democrat elected to Congress in ICO
years.
"Military aid may be a prim primary
ary primary necessity to check Russia m
Western Europe, where most
countries enjoy a stable economy''
said the former First Lady.
"However, military aid is not
a very dependable defense against
communism in Asia, Africa and
th? Middle East, where the worst
Kina oi poverty ana aisease exist.
"We saw what happened in Iraq,
where we, helped build up n ar army
my army tha later overturned the pro-
West government and is flirting
with communism. We Americans
are inclined sometimes to think too
much of the military, factor in
meeting the Communist challenge
and not enough about economic
factors.
"We are crawling when we
should be running with our food re
sources Here we are with tne
greatest surplus of farm commo commodities
dities commodities in a hunerv world, but we
stilt don't seem to. realize that it
can ne our Dest asset in tne tjoia
War."
Mrs. Roosevelt said it was al also
so also "extremely important to do a
better job of educating our young
people, chiefly in languages, for
foreign service in countries threat threatened
ened threatened by Communism.
"Russia is not 'overlooking tlrs
in the Middle East, Africa and A A-'a,"
'a," A-'a," she said. "It is sending in
doctors, teachers, technicians snd
others well grounded in the cul cultures
tures cultures and languages of those a a-reas.
reas. a-reas. We have no comparable pro program
gram program on a large scale."
REVENGE FOR COURAGE
When Sen. Bill Langer of North
Dakota drafted a statement an announcing
nouncing announcing that he would,,, be the
lone' Republican at that time to
vote against the confirmation of
Adm. Lewis Strauss as Secretary
of Commerce, he philosophized to
a friend:
"That means that I get no pa patronage
tronage patronage when it comes to appoint appointing
ing appointing census jobs in North Daknti."
However, Langer went ahead
and issued his statement anyway.
The prophecy came all too
true. North Dakota Republicans
say that no less than Vice-president
Richard M. Nixon himself
telephoned form Washington to an
nounce that Langer's man would
not be appointed director of cen census
sus census in North Dakota. Langer had
recommended Clarence Haggart,
who had put up a vigorous bal bal-Me
Me bal-Me to keep the Non-P artisan
League inside the Republican party.

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But tinker was overruled. '.Fol '.Following
lowing '.Following Langer's vote agaiast
Strauss, Haggart was nixed n di director
rector director of census.
Note; Sen. Margaret Chase Smith
of Maine, who later joined Ling Linger
er Linger as the only two Republicans
voting against Strauss, has been
floored with mail from Maine
commending her courage: When
Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona
swore that Mrs. Smith would get
no funds from the Republican Sen Senate
ate Senate committee for her re-election,
Mrs. Smith began getting $1 bills
from thri folks in Maine. She has
indicated that she doesn't want
Goldwater's money anyway.
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Sen. Jack Kennedy's public re relations
lations relations men never miss a trick.
Getting ready to campaign for
Wisconsin's presidential delegates,
Kennedy sent letters to weekly
Wisconsin newspapers as follows:
"I am very much mindful of the
tremendous influence of Ameri America's
ca's America's weekly editors. I understand
that especially in your-section of
Wisconsin the interest in and de
pendence upon weekly newspap
ers is well above the national av average.
erage. average.
"On Sept. 24, 25 and 26 of this
year, I plan to visit your area
of Wisconsin, It may very we'l
be that my schedule will bring me
into your home community. In a a-ny
ny a-ny event, I hope to have the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to meet you personally
at some point during my Wiscon Wisconsin
sin Wisconsin trip.
"Sincerely,
"John F. Kennedy
"U. S. Senator, (Mats.)"
UNMYSTERIOUS TRIP
Texas politics were mystified the
other day when Sen. Ralph Yar Yar-borough
borough Yar-borough of Texas turned up in Ca California
lifornia California on a hectic speaking tour.
He spoke before 11 different De Democratic
mocratic Democratic clubs in 11 different ci cities.
ties. cities. Jealous Texas politicos didn't
know whether Yarborough was
trying to boost the political iature
of Gov. Pat Brown of California
or whether he might be collect collecting
ing collecting presidential delegates himself.
The mystery could have been
solved very easily had the Texas
politicos bothered to read the press
statement issued by Yarborough's
office in Washington that he had
been invited to California by De Democratic
mocratic Democratic leaders to report on
Washington to the state's five wire
Democratic clubs.
These clubs have been the re recent
cent recent backbone of the California De Democratic
mocratic Democratic party and the reason for
the overwhelming Democratic vic victory
tory victory in the state last year.
Brown conferred with r"arba r"arba-rough
rough r"arba-rough a i length, compared notes
regarding ,the ; presidential ratte.
Brown confided that secret polls
taken by Sen. Jack Kennedy of
Massachusetts show him with a
26-point rating hf the state, Adhi
Stevenson 22, and Brown himelf
21.
However, in any presidentinl
primary, Stevenson probably would
not campaign, and Brown would
pick up most of his delegates,
thereby beating Kennedy.-
TRES CHIC a black
French poodle, sports snappy
convertible wear alongside
Brenda Baumhart, left, and her
owner Charnell Thomas, both
of Eaton, Ohio.
- MADRID
R PARIS
wm
USBONI
' MADRID Nl
AZORES
PANAMA
FARES

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KOREA TO KOBBE Former members of the 14th Infantry now serving with the 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, meet with Col. John R. Wright Jr., former 14th
commander, who presently is commanding officer of the battle group. From left are 1st Lt. John W. King, Sgt. John M. Snipes, Pfc. George W. Lee, Pfe. Meneva $.
Fiani, Pfc. Rodgers L. Copeland of D Company, Sp4 Jo hn Batson Jr. Sp4 Christopher C. Ridgley, Sgt. William Boyd and Colonel John R. Wright, Jr.

Former Members of 14th Infantry
Renew Acquaintances From Korea

o

Col. John R. Wright Jr., com commanding
manding commanding officer of the 1st Battle
Group, 20th Infantry, this week
had an opportunity to talk over
old times with former members
of the outfit which he commanded
in Korea the 14th Infantry Regi Regiment
ment Regiment who now are serving on
the Isthmus with the battle group.
Praising men of the 14th and
their spirit. Wright said "They
were a fighting bunch. You
couldn't hold them back." The
unit had occasion to demonstrate
its fighting spirit on some of the
most famous Korean battlefields.
Wright took over the 14th while
lt was stationed in Inge, Korea,
on July 3, 1952, and served as re regimental
gimental regimental commander until Nov November
ember November of that year. When he as assumed
sumed assumed command the 14th had just
returned irom the line where it
had seen much action around the
"Punchbowl" area.
On Aug. 28 Wright led his regi regiment
ment regiment back into combat in the bat.
tie of Heartbreak Ridge. His 14th
Infantry "Golden Dragons" a
name which Col. Wright coined
and is still with them today re relieved
lieved relieved the 35th Infantry Regiment
under Col. John D. Cone. This
move was made with such speed
and secrecy that it was a week be be-fore
fore be-fore the 14th recorded a casualty-
This highly successful operation
was carried out on very short not notice.
ice. notice. Instead of the customary
week's notice, the relieving unit
had only two days in which to
prepare. The swift, safe transfer
earned a letter of commendation
from the division and corps com commanders.
manders. commanders. Action was near a standstill
during part of Col. Wright's com-

SAFKTY FIRST SIGNS
SOUTH BRUNSWICK TOWN TOWNSHIP,
SHIP, TOWNSHIP, N. J, (UPI) The New
Jersey Turnpike Authority an announced
nounced announced it is placing heavy guard
rails around its safety signs to
protect them from unsafe drivers.

bat tour with the regiment, since
truce talks were underway at Pan Pan-munjom,
munjom, Pan-munjom, but it did suffer one maj major
or major attack which carried the ene enemy
my enemy Over the position. The regi

ment regained the position in a

counterattack, however.
Two of the Infantrymen at the
gathering in Col. Wright's office
had been with him during his
tour. 1st. Lt. John W. King, now
executive officer with Headquart Headquarters
ers Headquarters and Headquarters Company,
Company, received a battlefield
commission while with the 14th in
Korea. King, a sergeant first class
and the platoon sergeant of a
counterfire platoon, stayed on as
platoon leader after receiving his
commission.
Wright also remembers Sgt. Wil Wil-Ham
Ham Wil-Ham BayMji squad leader in B
Company of the 14th. He served
from May 1952 until January 1953
and participated in action at the
"Punchbowl," Kumhwa Valley and
several other areas. The battle
group commander knew Sergeant
Boyd as a flamethrower instruc instructornow
tornow instructornow the sergeant is assigned
to D Company, 34th Armor as a
tank commander.
The other members of the group
did not see combat with the 14th,
but served with it during a later
period in Korefc and at Fort Ben Ben-ning.
ning. Ben-ning. Ga. They were Sgt. John
M. Snipes off Headquarters and
Headquarters Company; Pfc.
George W. Lee of A Company;
Pfc. Meneva S. Fiaui of B Com Company;
pany; Company; Pfc. Rodgers L. Copeland
of D Company and Sp.4 John Bat Bat-son
son Bat-son Jr., and Sp. 4 Christopher C.
Ridgley of C Company. All men
wear the Combat Infantryman's
Badge which they were awarded
during the Korean Conflict.

COMPOSER EXPECTED

MOSCOW fUPD Soviet Com

poser Dmitri Shostakovich is ex expected
pected expected to go to the United States
fn September for a visit of about
one month, it was qreported to today.
day. today. The trip would reciprocate
for a visit of U.S. composers to
Russia last autum.

r ; C''p-i fir V

MA J. GEN4 CHARLES L. DASHER, commanding general, U.S.
Army Caribbean pins the Commendation Ribbon with Metal Pen Pendant
dant Pendant on Col. Walter J. Preston, outging assistant chief of staff, G-l,
USARCAR1B, just before the colonel leaves the command to retire
from the Army. Preston, who is retiring after more than 32 years
service, has been G-l of USA RCAR1B since coming to the Panama
area in Augur. 1957. He left by MATS aircraft today for Fort Jack Jackson,
son, Jackson, South Carolina, and upon retirement will live with his family,
wife nd daughter, at Fernandina Beach, Florida. The citation am amplified
plified amplified the cojonel's success at personal efforts and aggressiveness,
and his k !tn analytical approach in solving the many problems
which confronted the USARCARIB headquarters in the G-l area of
responsibility.
(U.S. Army Photo)

Senate Pigeonholes
Bill To Modify

Loyally Pledge
WASHINGTON (UPI) The

Senate climaxed two days of

sharp debate today at voting

to send to a labor committee

pigeon-hole a bill to modify the
loyalty oath required of students
seeking federal education loans.

The vote to send the bill baclc

to committee was 49-42

Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.),

floor leader for the bill, said he

doubted that it would "ever see

the light of day again" in this

session of Congress.
Senate R-epublican Leader
Everett M. Dirksen (111.) dryly
commented that the pillars in the
Senate chamber would not tremble

if that were to happen.

The bill would have substituted
a simple oath of allegiance to the

United States for the present sec

tion oi me law requiring giuuenis
to take such an oath and also
disclaim membership in any sub subversive
versive subversive organizations.
The double requirement has ir irritated
ritated irritated educators who complained
it made second class citizens out
of the students.
The move to send the bill back
to the committee was sponsored by

Sen. Russell B. Long (D-La.). He

acted after the Senate had voted

46-45 to require the students to

take only the oath of allegiance.
Long argued there would be "no
possibility" of convicting any Com Communist
munist Communist accepting government loans

under the revised oath which wxs
proposed by Sen. Jacob K. Javits

(R-N. Y.)..,
On the showdown, 23 Democrats
joined 23 Republicans in voting
to send the bill back to committee.
ODDOsed-awere 34 Democrats and

8 Republicans.

Hope Says He'll
Keep Clubs Near

BRUSSELS Belgium (UPI)

pdlan Bob HoDe refused to

fall fo- a "gag' pulled by King
BanHniiin toriav.

The young king, who played

golf wiih Hope latei, sent two(
court limousines to Brussels air airfield
field airfield to meet the comedian one
for Hope, the other for his golf
clubs.
But Hope did not go along with
the gesture.
"My clubs come with me,'
Hope quipped. "I'll bet the king
has ordered that my clubs get

lost just to win our game today.'
So Hooe and the clubs went in

one car while the other trailed
behind. emDtv except for the

driver.

President Sends Report To Congress
On Foreign Aid Mismanagement

WASHINGTON (UPI) Presi

dent Eisenhower sent to Congress

without comment today a re

port conceding there is some

waste and mismanagement In the

foreign aid program.

But the report, prepared by a
presidential study committee of

former government officials, said

this can be corrected and is no
reason for "emasculating or aban abandoning"
doning" abandoning" the program.
The committee, headed by Wil William
liam William H. Draper Jr., submitted 14

recommendations for making the

aid program more efficient.
Among other things, it suggested:

Eastland Pressing
Senatorial War
On 'Chatterly' Movie

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.

James 0. Eastland (D-Misi.) has

called for a wave of public pro pro-tst
tst pro-tst against the Supreme Court's
decision in favor of a filmed ver

sion of "Lady Chatterley'i
Lover."

Eastland declared mat the June

29 decision, permitting distribu

tion of the film, is preventing the

states from protecting their citi citi-tens
tens citi-tens from obscene literature, in

cluding the novel on which the

fljm is based.

"I urge every relieioug orsanl-

zation, every civic and fraternal

organization, every group afld in individual
dividual individual who stands for morality

ana aecency to protest this deci decision,"
sion," decision," Eastland said today
in a Senate speech.

Eastland, who has freauentlv

attacked the court on the seere-

gation issue, has introduced a con

stitutional amendment that would

guarantee "ine right of each
state to decide on the basis of its
own public policy questions of de decency
cency decency and morality."

THREE-EYED Penny Griffin, )
of Chicago, dons a monocle'
designed for feminine wear, j
Popular with dashing men-about-town
in movies, the mon monocle
ocle monocle is claimed to correct, near-
sightedness in one eye. Mostly,
it serves as conversation piece.

Creation of a single agency to

take charge of all aid programs
now scattered throughout the gov government
ernment government under the general super supervision
vision supervision of the State Department. It
said the new agency preferably
should be an independent unit of

government but might be made s
semi-autonomous unit within the
State Department.
That the United States "in "insist"
sist" "insist" that nations receiving U.S.
aid pledge in return that they will
try to help themselves. Recipient
nations would be asked to work
toward an effective internal tax
system, domestic price stability

and increasingly honest ana effi efficient
cient efficient government.
Long-range, rather than year-to-year,
financing of the develop

ment loan fund, the heart of the
aid program. ,The President, al although
though although he has favored this in
principle In the past, opposed such

a move this year.
Congress only Wednesday ap

proved and sent to the President

a compromise bill authorizing S3,

556,200,000 in foreign aid spending
during the current fiscal year. This
was about 9 per cent less than

the President had sought.

But the big foreign aid battle,
in which charges of waste and

maladministration will play a

large part, is still to come when

Congress taker up a separate mea

sure to provide actual cash for the

program.
The Draper report reached Con

press amid new criticism of the

military aid program by Chair

man Otto E. Passman (D-La.) of

a House foreign aid appropria appropriations
tions appropriations subcommittee. Passman said

his group had uncovered "almost

unpardonable" practices.
He also said a major general
and a rear admiral had told him
privately that the Weapons Depart

ment is "forcing" certain coun

tries to accept more weapons thsn
they can use. He said the high-

ranking officers were afraid to
testify about this publicly for fear

of reprisals.
Yesterdays report was the

third in a series prepared by

the Draper group.

Washington Hostess

Loses Court Fight

For PR Payments

LONDON fUPD Martha Rru.

set, a Belgian divorcee described

as "Washington's No. 8 hostesa,"
failed today in her attempt to col

lect npwaraa of 372,000 from Lon London
don London insurance tycoon Edward
Lumley,
High Court Judge Donald Finne Finne-more
more Finne-more dismissed Mrs. Brussefs
suit for money she said Lumley
owed her as payment for her ser services
vices services as a "public relations eon eon-tact
tact eon-tact woman."
"These two people were attraet attraet-'d
'd attraet-'d each ether," Finnemore
said. 'For some years, there was
a close and intimate friendship
between them."
He added, however, that he
found nothing fn the correspon-

ucuce auDmmea as evidence in
the three-day hearing of the suit
to support Mrs Rriit' oioi

that there had been a rnmmprui

relationship.

The former Washington hostess
had claimed among other things
that she introduced T

"chief of protocol of the U.S. gov government"
ernment" government" and other top-ranking
diplomats.

Lumley's attorney assailed Mrs.
Brusset's suit as "blackmail." He
said she had shown herself to be

a completely untrustworthy wit-ness.

Crude Oil
WASHINGTON (UPI) Domes Domestic
tic Domestic and foreign crude oil stocks
totaled 270,367,000 barrels on July
18, an increase of 79,000 barrels
from the previous week, the Bu Bureau
reau Bureau of Mines reported yesterday.
Texas had 117,532,000 barrels
of domestic Stock, an increase of
347,000 barrels.
Other domestic stocks on hand:
Kansas, 10,381,000 barrels, up
119,000; Louisiana, 19,692,000 up
389,000; Oklahoma, 17,026,000 up
483,000; California, 82,128,000
down 180,000 barrels.

SOON BELLA VISTA

T A"THE REVOLTS
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LaADIATORSW
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1 1 mmm NON STOP New York Europe
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VdM'lfn IM 203 K,M t """ Caribbean, Cn-
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aOVAl DUTCH HXM, Tlvoll Avenue
Ww0K M

For
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MON. SAT. till I n.m.
All Work Guaranteed

We SPECIALIZE
WESTINGHOUSE
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TELERAD
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Across from Coea-Cola
at Frana-ipanl

SOMBRERO

EATING
LOUNGE

"The Most Hcjani RefUurant Oat Of Home"
Stop over this Week-End

Charcoal Barbtcu Filtt F
Roatt Country Sty It Chicken
Roast Pork 4";
Barbacu Rabbit' ",r'V
Special Southern Fry Chicken
US
Our Specialties
CHINESE. AMERICAN and
CREOLLE DISHES r
See you this Week-End

SOMBRERO

Coctail
Lounge

Alr-Conditloned
S00 meters after San Francisco Entrance Via Esnafia

Cold Beer 0.15
High Ball 0.25
Rum & Coka 0.15

SPECIAL PRICES
From 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

DANCING SATURDAY ;
k SUNDAY
Open Day & Night

ANNOUNCES ITS

FABULOUS

r

SUNDAY EVENING BUFFET
enjoy an evening of enchantment T ",'
this and eyery weekend m our f
BELLA VISTA ROOM f 1 7
from 7 p.m. .-. ...only $4.28 per pron
2.M children

the year' most

and
xeitint French Star

MARCEL LE BON
1:18 and IIiOO p.m.
Mualo and More Muslo by fiy
CLARENCE MARTIN'S Orchwtra f

V1 J

EVERY NIGHT (except Mondays)

'JUNGLE STEAK PIT"

4(

Informal Steak Dinner

Tou select your own steak. .watch It beinsr grilled
to perfection orer giasllnit ooala...njojr the full
flavor of fine food...
MODERATE PRICES
Music by CRISTOBAL MUftOZ

Read Our Classifieds

1
a f i

ULIn, J

r-taVa'aa'i'i'rTaA

717ms oCaura (Burgos,
special representative of

trill be with us from Monday,
July 27 through Saturday, August 1

Consult with her on
beauty and skin care.

piwiawB i
1 The Label Stqntftea Quati-tij- )



e ACI POUR

TCI FAKAMl AMERICA AN INDCTINSENT DAILY KIWCTAMC
lATtHDAY, JULT 195f
Box 134,
Panama
Utility Room Is Practical Place To Leave
Wet Swim Suits, Sand Before Entering House
kenvide
'octat ana sin
4 .&"

i

f

i Jt miff L m'J If uLfkmi

NAVAL OFFICERS WIVES CLUB ENTERTAINS
AT COMMUNITY HOUSE BEACHCOMBERS PARTY
The monthly luncheon meeting of the Naval Officers Wives Club
was a gay beachcombers party Tuesday at the Fifteenth Naval Dis Dis-.
. Dis-. trict Community House.
The program featured Betty Emmett in a hula routine, Priscilla
Reade, who sang and did a character skit, and Nora Davies, who
played accordion selections.
Door prizes were won by Mrs. Florence Campbell, Mrs. Lilly Do-
herty and Mrs. Ursula Leahy.

The guest list included Mrs.
Campbell, witn Mrs. iwis a.
Parks; Airs, traily Johnson, the
fesi of Mrs. J. A. Menniken;
rs. Addie Feckham with Mrs.
fclargaret Tricky; Mrs. Ji I g i e
Emerson and Mrs. Ubby Fry with
Jtlrs. Emmett; Mrs. ran McEl McEl-beny
beny McEl-beny and Mrs. Mildred Fox with
Jlrs. Marion Shimp.
New members who were wel welcomed
comed welcomed to the club were Mrs. Es Esther
ther Esther Ashley, Mrs. Dorothy Cunha,
Mr. June Glaes, Mn. Lilly Do Do-herto,
herto, Do-herto, Mrs. Macon Almonrode.
Farewell compliment! were ex extended
tended extended to Mrs. Marion Ely.
Mr. and Mrs. Wright
SJntertain For Guests
Mr. and Mrs. John Wright en entertained
tertained entertained at their Golf Heights
residence last evening at a dinner
party honoring Dr. and Mrs.
Thomas Johnston, who are visit visiting
ing visiting on the Isthmus.
PrWt-Elect Fated
fist Luncheon Party
.. Miss Marta Vasquez entertain entertain-.
. entertain-. ed at her residence in Panama
' City this week in honor of Miss
mma Macrini, who is to be mar mar-,rled
,rled mar-,rled to Mr. Ramiro Fonseca.
Sunday Coffee Event
'At Balboa JWB Center
The Sunday morning coffee get get-together
together get-together at' the Balboa USO-JWB
Will be held tomorrow from 9:30
a.m. to noon. All servicemen and

IB I 4Mfc MW r

f

Pears Prepared In Wine

Make Cool
HERE'S a cool idea for hot
they serve lusciou Bartlett
At we drove by miles of
Bartlett pear orchards in Califor California,
nia, California, we stopped at ranch houses
to ask for recipes for this
creamy-fleshed fruit. They are
In the national market from mid mid-July
July mid-July well into October. So have
fun.
Pears In Port
Peel ripe pears and put them
into cold water to which you
have added a little lemon juice.
The
Slork delivers
MEXANA
protects. ..
Powder your baby with
Mexana after every bath and
diaper change. Protect his
skin from the cause of irrita irritations
tions irritations and odor. M"ana, with
Hexaclorofin,
absorbs, re refreshes,
freshes, refreshes, deo-
dorizes and (
t e n d e r I v
clings to the
baby's skin.
POLVo
DOES NOT
CONTAIN
TALCUM

SPECIAL COURSE AT UNIVERSITY
A new Intensive Spanish Course for English,
speaking people at University of Panama has been
scheduled from July 23 to September 9. This gives
an opportunity to all students already calling for en.
rolment. Class on Monday, Wednesday and Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday. Beglnnsrs: 6:30; Intermediates 6:30; Advanc.
ed: 7:30 p.m. Credits will be given for this course.
Registration at Secretary's Offioe (top building of
University),

- Fm 2-0740 m 2 0 741

their families are invited to stop
by.
In Panama City
Of socisl interest in Panama Ci City
ty City is the announcement of the en engagement
gagement engagement of Miss Lilibeth Arose Arose-mena,
mena, Arose-mena, daughter of Mrs. Beatriz
S. Arosemena and the late Mr.
San Antonio Co-Op
To Hold Annual
Meeting Monday
The annual general assembly
meeting of the Cooperativa de
Credito, San Antonio de Padua
Credit Cooperative will be held
on Monday at 7:30 in the auti auti-torium
torium auti-torium of the French Society Hall
opposite the Tivoli Theater.
Reports of the general activities
of the various committees will be
rendered for the Information of
the general membership.
Nomination and election of cer certain
tain certain officers on the executive
board, the credit committee and
the vigilance committee will take
place during the course of the
meeting.
Refreshment will be served at
the conclusion of the meeting.
Summer Dessert
weather from California, where
pear lit delicately spired wine.
This keeps them from turning
brown. Do not core them or re
move the items. Poach them iji
a syrup made of 3 cups water,
2 cups sugar and 1 cinnamon
stick. Cook only until tender. Re Remove
move Remove from the poaching liquid,
place In a bowl and cool. Mash
2 boxes of thawed, frozen rasp raspberries
berries raspberries and strain. Add 1-2 cup
red port wine and poir over the
pears. Place the pears in the
refrigerator (add the cinnamon
stick from the sugar syrup) and
turn them occasionally so they
become rosy. This may be done
the day before. When ready to
serve, whip cream and add
enough nort wine to color deli
cately pink. Pass pink whipped
cream separately.
Baked Pear Ambrosia
(Makes 4 servings)
Four firm-ripe fresh Californi
Bartletts, 2 oranges sliced; 1-2
cup orange luice. 2 bananas,
mashed smoothly; 12 cup honey,
coconut.
Cut pears in half: remove core1
and stems. Arrange in shallow
bakim.' dish with orange slices
Mix oranne juice, bananas and
honev and nour over fn'it. Cover.
BnVe 400 decree Fahrenheit
more. Seve warm or chilled with
COCO'lllt.
Sllmn-.
Antipasto
Serve Biirth'lls on a .lad
nlale with a tnr1 "rapofni't dre!f dre!f-in
in dre!f-in (ve grapefnii; inic wiih
o and seasonings), a fp'- hits
of nip' and cheese, an o'ivp or
two. rll it a s'immer sntipssto.
a s'lad. a snrk. or a lunch-in-itself.

Uwm 8:00 J 10 ..m. lf

Carlos Arosemena, to Mr. Irving
H. Benneth Jr., son of Mr. and
Mrs. Irving H. Bennett.
Little League
Girls 4, Boys 3
Four baby girls and three
baby boys became Atlantic Side
residents during the week ending
on July 22, according to the re report
port report of births at Coco Solo Hos Hospital.
pital. Hospital. Parents of daughters are: Mr.
and Mrs. Conrad Burnett, of Co
lon; Sgt. and Mrs. Edwin Com
pany, of Fort Davis; Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Egger, of France Field;
and Mr. and Mrs. Eusebio Gomez
of Colon.
Boys were born to: Mr. and
Mrs. Anatolln Anderson, of Colon;
Mr. and Mrs. Fitz Kirkaldy, of
Rainbow City; and Mr, and Mrs,
Alfonso Charles, of Colon.
A total of 65 patients was ad admitted
mitted admitted to Coco Solo Hospital, anj
49 were discharged during this
same period.
Cab Driver Slayer
Finally Executed;
luck' Runs Out
OSSINING, N. Y. (UPI)
Leroy Keith, 52, of Akron, Ohio,
was executed at Sing Sing Prison
last night for the slaying of a
cab driver during a 1956 noldup.
Keilh's electrocution had been
HpIdvpH fiup times, twlrp tn al
low him to lodge an appeal with
the U. S. Supreme Court. On both
occasions, the hich court refused
to step into the case.
H said inst heforp hs death
that he was "disappointed In"
New York Gov. Nelson A. Rocke Rockefeller
feller Rockefeller for not staying his execu execution
tion execution aeain. His lawver had told
him he had no other legal moves
to take, but Keith had main maintained
tained maintained up to the last that "I may
be lucky again."
At the time of the December,
1956, shooting of cab driver Jo Joseph
seph Joseph Suro of Jersey City, Keith
was on parole from a life mur murder
der murder sentence in Ohio and was
wanted for questioning in connec
tion with another Ohio killing,
Keith was convicted of killing I
Suro after the cab driver refused
to follow directions given by
Keith and three companions who
had taken the cab to go to a
i" -rket they planned to
hold UP. 1 if EZ3
According to trial testimony,
Suro was shot when he refused
to turn into the wrong end of
a one-way street, then tried to
signal policemen parked nearby
in a patrol car.
Meals taste
better
with...
Use it on rice! See how
delicious it is with sea
food, spaghetti, meat
eggs, salads every everything.
thing. everything. Add Maggi Ketchup to
' all your meals and
everybody will be delighted.

yM 1

1 -"

MRS. MARGARET MURPHY, salary and wage enalyit In the Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Bureau, is congratulated by Edward A. Doolan, Personnel
Director In presenting letter from Gov, W. E. Potter informing
her that the was awarded an Outstanding Performance Rating for
the year ending March 31, 1959. The presentation was made by
Doolan when he awarded Mrs. Murphy end 28 other Personnel Bu Bureau
reau Bureau employees with ten-year service pins and certificates.

Famous Folks
ACROSS DOWN
1 Crosby 1 Hairless
4 Patriot, Henry 2 Musical
lnstrumsot
8 Prod
12 Lincoln
13 Engage
14 Roman,
the Censor
15 Actor,
Chaney
16 Starts
18 Makes less
; happy
1 20 Attire
' 21 Noah's
22 Building
additions
1A Main.
I Franklin and
Disflieil
4 Young fowl
5 Linen
ravellngt
6 Ascended
7 Still
8 Cicatrices
9 Top of the held
10 Shoshonean
Indiins
11 Flag-maker,
Betay
17 Loafers
19 Eat away
26 Arrow poison 'J..'
27 Hud. on snow 24 mt P"n
SO Ran together
32 Marked cost
34 Horsemanship
35 Get away
i 36 Conditions
37 Former
heavyweight
champion,
Max
39 "Green Hat"
heroine
40 Source of
water
41 Watch
42 Tender
45 Fines
49 Operated
81 Van
Winkle
B2 Alwayl
63 Personification
of truth
64 Mineral rock
95 Organ part
C6 British
statesman
7 Espouse
Office Copying
The compact 14-lb. low cost of office
fice office copier, the Verifax Pantam
Copier, launched in the Panama
market a few monthi ago by Ko Kodak
dak Kodak Panama, Ltd., has found
ready acceptance by local busi businessmen.
nessmen. businessmen. According to Carlos Bermudez of
Kodak's Panama city office, the
"Bantam" which retails in Pan Panama
ama Panama at $99.50 the same as In the
United States has proved its worth
in many local offices from small
one-man office, to larger compa companies
nies companies where copying costs are cut
by one-third. It functions almost
like an extra typist in the office,
many purchasers have told Ber Ber-mudez,
mudez, Ber-mudez, and large companies find
that it pays to buy several to place
throughout different departments.
The "Bantam" Copier accepts
original up to standard letter-size,

House Appropriations Group
Cuts Ike's Foreign Aid Bill

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
economy minded House Appro Appropriations
priations Appropriations Committee yesterday
chopped $390,195,000 more from
President Eisenhower's foreign
aid request, bringing total reduc reductions
tions reductions so far to $743,495,000.
The committee took the action
In approving a $3,188,500,000 mon money
ey money bill to finance the flow of aid
to other free nations In the cur current
rent current fiscal year which began July
1. Military aid stid the develop development
ment development loan fund bore the brunt of
the reductions.
Coneress already had trimmed
$390.l95,nno from the program in
passing an earlier authorization
bill setting an outside limit of
$3.57r.fi95.ooo for the progra m.
The Trcsidpnt signed the author authorization
ization authorization hill into law Just before
the committee acted.
Eisenhower was "disappointed"
by the new slashes which If they
are approved bv the full UaW
and Senate would mean an over overall
all overall cut nf 18 per cent In the $3, $3,-929,995
929,995 $3,-929,995 noo program the President
renuestpr) last January,
Press Secretary James C. Hag Hag-erlY
erlY Hag-erlY said in a statement that
"the accumulative cuts sre deep deeply
ly deeply below the 'Minimum lm H'1 H'1-enliower)
enliower) H'1-enliower) considers ne"esarv rnr
the security of our nation and the
free world."

J eW jf&
ISISN
tpif f:
'Si '.'

Amwir to Previous Puzila
2D Norwegian
king
38 Cheered
40 Eerie
41 Closed car
42 Hebrew
measure
43 Number
44 Run away
46 Simple
47 Ireland
48 Hastened
60 Hail!
28 Perfect
27 Character In
"Wizard ot
Oi"
28 French cap
28 Roman date
31 West Saxon
king
83 Colder

SIESES A MS ATE
MEEK; EE2ffi5 1

nnr rrrr nnrr
II u i
15 ft
11
OT par Vv
55 r pjz r
onr irr rpr
?J 5P
a jj
t: uzzz Ezi

Now Inexpensive
makes up to five copies in wie
minute of any typed, drawn, writ written
ten written or printed material at a cost
of a few cents a copy. It is con conveniently
veniently conveniently and economically located
in sales, advertising, engineering,
accounting, shipping departments
where copies of any originals may
be made by all personnel after a
few minutes instruction in the
simple operation of the copier.
The second "budget" copying
machine introuced by Kodak in re recent
cent recent months, the Bantam follows
the Verifax Sifinet which makes
copying of documents up to legal
size at less than the cost of a
standard typewriter. Now, $148.50
the Bantam Copier brings office
copying within the portable type typewriter
writer typewriter range. Also available are
two other models, the Regent, and
the Viscount Copiers. Advt.
"The President most earnestly
hopes that the ultimate action of
Congress will be to restore the
appropriations to the full amount
authorized," Hagerty said.
The President previously threat threatened
ened threatened to recall Congress in special
session this fall if it failed to pro
vide him with adequate foreign
aid funds. But few lawmakers
took the threat seriously.
The Apnroprialions Committee
traditionally is less friendly to the
aid program than the Foreign
Relations Committee which hin hin-dles
dles hin-dles the authorlistion bill, In sd sd-dition,
dition, sd-dition, there was strong pressure
for reductloni because of chsrseit
of waste and mlsmannfemsnt
hurled at the profram.
In sinin the authorization bill,
the President asked Congress in
a Jast-mlnute renuest to Include
In the mnney bill nn extra 800
million dollars as a first Install Installment
ment Installment on the funds for develop development
ment development loan fund. But the appro appropriations
priations appropriations ?roun promptlv and
lirmlmouslv rejected his rout
The development losn fund, the
agency wh'ch channels most TT.r,
economic aii overseas, v grant granted
ed granted M0 million dollars bv the
committee 1S0 million below (he
President's original request and
the subsequent suthorlitstlon.

The military aid program, a

Small, wet and slightly sandy
footprints tricking across the
floor lesd to s familiar summer summertime
time summertime treasure a soggy little
lump of bathing suit and an
equally soggy towel, waiting to
be discovered by mother and
bung up to dry.
No one really objects to the
exercise, but it would be nice if
the drying-off after swimming,
were tended to mors thoroughly.
Fortunate are the hornet wiJi
utility or mud room entrances
which can be converted to dry dry-off
off dry-off places in the summer. An
outside hose or shower for rins rinsing
ing rinsing off sandy feet, s supply of
old towels and a terry coversll
to substitute for the wet suit, to
be hung up ss soon at it it peeled
off, would corral the puddles.
More effective than nagging at
a reminder to take care of swim swim-suits
suits swim-suits is s special place for each
garment, perhaps gaily colored
or set off in a distinctive way.
One mother's solution it a
boldly striped zebrt equipped
with knobt for suits, cap and
towel. A zebra outlined on s
piece of thin plywood and cut cutout
out cutout It painted white. Stripet are
strips of red plastic tape.
Braided yarn it uted to make
the tail and the mane.
Most of ut encourage a lot of

water play during warm weath
er months to help youngsters
keep cool as well as have fun
Other cooling clothes besides
bathing tudtt should be in the
wardrobe, too,
According to one climate ex
pert, wearing comfortable cloth
ing on even the hottett days
means you will be cooler than
you would be without it. "The
principal advantage of wearing
clothing on hot dayt," notes this
expert, "is to reduce the amount
of heat coming from the sun and
to increase the area that can
evaporate perspiration."
In terms of comfort, light
colored fabrics which reflect the
sun's rays are likely to be more
comfortable than the dark colors
which absorb them. However,
clothes made from fibers that
absorb Derspiration are a factor
in comfort, too.
Cooling results when moisture
is evaporated, which is easier
done with some fibers and fab
rics than others. One of the best
!n this repect is mercerized cot
ton which is said to absorb ner
spiration and permit r a n i d
evaporation much faster than
orinarv cotton.
Happily for mothers, Thercer
ized cotton is widely used In all
types of children's clothes, from
porous knit shirts to shorts and
dresses.
I Coos-1 Bandit
Hurt In Piltshurqh
Shooting Match
PITTSBURGH (UPI)-Two po policemen
licemen policemen and one of a group of
bandits who stuck up a Pittsburgh
bank were hospitalized today after
a spectacular gun battle.
Two bandits were trapped short
ly after the $27,000 robbery at the
Hays branch of Peoples First Na National
tional National Bank and Trust Co. Thurs
day afternoon and decided to shoot
it out with a tightening coroon
of police, aided by bloodhounds
and a helicopter.
One officer was critically wound-
n4 n nnlioamon tllfH tha thllffl
in the brush of a nearly-mountainous
area between the city's "Gold "Golden
en "Golden Triangle" and populout tub tub-urban
urban tub-urban areas. Another officer was
seriously wounded.
One of the desperadoes was
wnnndtid in the let durinff the
rattlinff exchange of aunfire as
the police closed in. The loot was
recovered.
Police taid a third man probably
was involved in the well-planned
stickup which went awry because
of a quick alarm that enabled dis district
trict district police to tet up a ring of
road blocks.
The first bandit to turrender
was Joe Gaito, 39, who twice pre previously
viously previously hadbeen involved in ihoot ihoot-Ing
Ing ihoot-Ing affrays with police. Wounded
In the leg, he gave up when a
dog flushed him from his hiding
place. Ten minutes later Edward
J. Kern, 50, gave up.
subject of spirited congressional
debate this year, was allotted
$1,300,000,000. This was 100 million
dollars below the authorized cell celling
ing celling and 300 million lets than Els Elsenhower
enhower Elsenhower requested.
The committee recommended
an outlay of 700 million dollars hi
defense support fundi which are
uied to bolster the economies ol
friendly nations to they can take
on more of their own military
load. This wat a cut of 13S mil million
lion million dollars from the President's
request.
SOOV BELLA VISTA

4k

the revoltS
f OF THE 1
.. Lgladiators
SUPSCIMSCOPE

II;? itp

I- K' ":
. i

If-4 1': -r.

(
i ' '

Read Ut trap wet swimming
"" emj reacn iqr mo
Mrs. Alben Barkley, attrscUve
widow of Harry Truman t -veop,
it being piloted toward the altar
by Henry ueeping, a u. a.
torney in Washington. .Pablo Pi Picasso
casso Picasso raves to his friends about a
beautiful maiden from Milan
j i7. Vmi nnlv 19 The
liniiicu rem -'
aged artist met her at a party on
tne Kiviera, lmmeaiaieiy
"She li my very own aiscovery,
marvel who hat the most interest interesting
ing interesting face in the world," and pro pro-mi.
mi. pro-mi. rl uljv threatened to mikS
dozens and dozens of paintings of
ner. .
Cnma tnn leipntUt believe but
aren't permitted to announce-that
the level ot Mronuum w, vi
nll,.f 11 riaino tnwarH I nil-
imum permissible, and that
... ii i -1 a i
tnit level wm oe reacnea in buuui
further nuclear exploilons. Ono re
sult: certain ioous, sucn muiv,
may be taboo within a decade. .
Both the Copacabana and the
Latin Quarter want the Four
Crosby Boyt for a fall booking
Their act is a smash out of
town. .Tab Hunter and Debbie
Reynolds will team their vocal ta talents
lents talents for an album of dueU.
The big New York racing story
of the season may have leaked at
Jamaica this week when two
high-ranking track officials held a
conference that was overheard by
sharp-eared patront at a nearby
table in the track's restaurant.
The chaps were enthusiastic a a-bout
bout a-bout the proposed installation of
Exacto, a South American trom
of betting, in which the bettor
chooses two hortet and wing only
if the horses run first and second
in the order he predicts.
With this system, Exacto pay payoffs
offs payoffs run much higher than Qui Qui-nella
nella Qui-nella payoffs, In which the fan
wins if the two horses he ploM
run one-two. regardless of the or
der in which he named them. The
racing biggies figured they could
start Exacto betting with the
third race each day, using their
regular daily double machines for
the operation.
Dlno De Laurentis was to im impressed
pressed impressed with Harry Guardino't dy dynamic
namic dynamic quality during the first
important reading for hit new
film, "Jovanka." he's ordered the
witeri to revite the script, mak
ing me uusraino roie far me
ier ... Cozy' Cole will realize a
big success because of his "Ton-
sy" recording!, list provided him him-with
with him-with enough loot to open a small
jazz club of hli own a West
54th St. lite to be called "Cozy's
Talk in Caribbean political elr.
clet concerns the president of a
smau country, who it being tlowly
poisoned by murdrous meinbert
of the "nalace guard" he trusts
The owners of Leslle't. a snincv
new hot dog tpot on Lexington,
Aval hmra Atn I ir as) lU.(,i
iiei w ciuvru IIIMIIK'VUU
note from Queen Elizabeth s sec secretary.
retary. secretary. The estlng-place had tent
iix dozen frankfurter! to Hie
Queen't yacht, the Brltan.iia, be be-caute
caute be-caute itt head man wat the ven vendor
dor vendor who terved thoie famoui
welnen to her father and mother
t Hyde Park during the Rootc
velt sdminlstration. The letter of
thankt explained that Her Mijei
Meetings
Atlantis Camera Club
The color division of the Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic Camera Club will have its
regular tilde clinic Monday eve eve-nig
nig eve-nig it 7:45 in the club roomt at
Mount Hope.
Dr. Stephen Pltnk will pretent
an Illustrated lecture on his re recent
cent recent trip to South America by
ship and auto.
MOSCOW (UPI) Poet Carl
Sandburg was cheerfully admitted
to the Soviet Union for a two two-week
week two-week lecture tour today minus the
passport ha lost somewhere be between
tween between Moscow snd the United
Cfatet.

': ''' ? W, v ;'s MM m m Si?
gesr Is this little sebra, place?
3
jounjsicr.

.. .. j j ... s?.zt .

; t - 1 , 1

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen

ty wasn't on board when the
goodies srrive, but the crew were
mott appreciative of the treat.
Willy Brandt, major of West
Berlin, it toiling on hit autobiogra autobiography.
phy. autobiography. Doubleday will publish it...
Among the performert agitated
over the upcoming TV vertion of
the Run Colurabo ttory are John Johnny
ny Johnny Desmond, who yean ago
"bought" the rightt to the tale
from Columbo's sister, and
George DeWitt who not only in in-vetted
vetted in-vetted in the project but learned
to imitate Columbo's singing style
perfectly. They'll consult lawyers
about restraining the network from
going through with the snow,
but there's a discouraging prece prece-dent
dent prece-dent to their experience: a few
teasoni ago, Polly Bergen decided
to do the Helen Morgan ttory
and just did it.
Anita Ekberg and Walter Chiarl
aren t mch a constant twosome
since Franco Silva, a handsome
Italian actor, happened to enter
the scene. .Anyone who's seen
"Jem together will testify that
Jule Styne, compoter of the nifty
Gypsy" score, consider! Sandra
Church (who plays the title rolo)
the greatest thing since the inven inven-tion
tion inven-tion of the mazda lamp.
rWh,en th,e mm venion of
Look Back In Anger" it releas released,
ed, released, keep your eyepeeled lor a
newcomer named Gary Roymon.
He's 23. w th rfo-i, "i
faze, and apt to ttart a few fan
Errol Flynn't current fav irite re re-treat
treat re-treat at tea time is a booth in
W. where he and hi. lady
friend thare blintzet and bee-.
"C?,I'Len;Ane..0!? married
i7 T """'"Jan oi tooch-Behar.
is on the verge of oetrothal
to beaman Jacobs, who used to be
PP" Margie rfart's husband
Could this foreshadow a trend?
S, ivT film- "Strange""
(On, Slvei leroon ...j,.
the bank from which the n onev
wat borrnwuH n ti 'uuney
ture. "u-uce me pic-
Brazilians Holding
American Financier
Al FBI's Requesl
RIO T)V. tAMTTSA rrtBTv
, -....ijiiiv uri Bra Brazilian
zilian Brazilian author ( iu.
K?' f,1the, FBI- today hiM
American financier Lowell M. BJr BJr-rell
rell BJr-rell who li wanted in the United
dollar itock swindle.
Birreii, 52, was arrested in the
exclusive rniUKDhin. ..:
this city Thunday. climaxing a
search that lasted nearly two
years and covered a number of
countries.
Police, acting under a direct or.
der from Justice Minister Cirilo
Junior, held the American Incom Incommunicado,
municado, Incommunicado, and refused to give out
jny information about the caie.
In New York a grand jury has
indicted Blrrell on 69 countt of
grand larceny.
Blrrell dronoed out of tight la
November 195T after being wm wm-monad
monad wm-monad to appear in a federal
court on a ehsrre of violating reg regulations
ulations regulations nf the Securities and Ex Ex-ehsngs
ehsngs Ex-ehsngs rommUslon.
New York D-'st. Atty. Frank 5
Hogan revel.d that Blrrell hat
been found in Rio de Janeiro I'vlnsr
under the name "Twell McAfee."
He arrived In the BmHn cnltal
t'" this week, probtbly from
Pnrlt.
Prtzil has no extradition agree agreement
ment agreement T"'th the United states, and
the TT,s. Sfite Department was
Bked to help work out some r-
B'nrel' was accused of a series
of fraudulent stock manipulations
In h'a cs"ici'v s an ofrp' of
the S'an-Finch Oil Corp. and Doe Doeskin
skin Doeskin Products Inc.



SATURDAY, JULY U, W
PAOI PIVt -i
ES
ISTHMIAN

THE PANAMA AMZKICA1 AW INDEPENDENT DAILY KEW8PAPEB

CHURCH

MOTIC

rf niUROlES

Church of ChrUt
JisJ9 JB Afislfl Hf-!

.JTOLof toui m3bi
KWUf '"
UNITARIAN
The Unitarian Society
Sunday Services 10:30 a.m.
Bldg. 362
Aacob BIt. d Mamey Flce,
Ancon
Your Invitation to
Liberal Religion.
Baptist
COCOU BAPTIST CHUBCH
111 Bruj Road
Dnwic 368 Blb CJL
Phon S-1708
Edmund a, gullwort Paatof
Sunday School "'
mStSb Wornip
Union :"
7JQ pm
Priyu UhUpi Blbl
Study Each Wednesday...
Brotherbood-lrt Monday
Y.jVi Mruith
1:00 pm
IM pm.
WMU-4tb Monday
bah Month ....
riRST BAPTIST CHUBCB
Balboa Height. C. Z.
M7 Ancon Boulevard
Orawar "B" Balboa Height
Phone Balboa 1727
Willi am & Beeby. fastst
Sunday School
Morning Worship
9:30 a.m
10 : am
Baptist Training Union ....
BvaniaUttia Strvlca ........
Prayar Meeting, Wadnaaday.
W M S BlU Study Tburs-
Men'e Brotherhood '(La
8 JO p.m
7 30 p.m
7:00 pro
I NO i
Monday in month) 140 PJ
PIBST BAPTIST CmtBCB
MargtfiU Avenue at 5th Street
Margarita. Canal Zone
Rev. Wendell C Parker. Paitot
Sundav School
Morning Worship
Baptist mining Onion
Evening Worship
Brotherhood, Tuesdays
Prayer Services, Wednesdays
W M.U 1st it 3rd Fridays
O.A.. R.A A Sunbaama,
Friday
:4 a m
11:00 a.m
:30 p m
7:45 pm
7:00 oJn.
. 7:00 pm.
1:30 e.m
Salvation Army
i)lon.i)eumlmirlonal tvangellrtie
Meatingi)
PANAMA CITY
Major Mrs. W. Bishop
laireoruary bow. rnone:
28 80054
00 Holiness
Meeting
3:00 Sunday School
7:30 Salvation Meeting
PARAISO, C.Z.
Envoy & Mrs. C. L. Moselay
Guiana Street
11:00 Holiness Meeting
COLON CENTRAL
Sr. Captain it Mrs. H. Grant
14th Street, Phone 38 743
11:00 Holiness Meeting
3:00 Sunday School
7:30 Salvation Meeting
COLON THIRD STREET
Sr. Captain S. Taylor
11:00 Holiness Meeting
3:00 Sunday School
7:80 Salvation Meeting
RAINBOW CITY. C.Z.
Envoy 1. Gill
3:00 sunaay scnooi
7:30 Salvation Meeting
Union Churches
BALBOA
Balboa Road at San Pablo Street
Church Office 2-3236
t:30 a.m. Church School Free bus
service. Classes for all ages.
10:30 am. Worahlp Service Church
Tims Story Hour for Klndsrgartan
and Primary Children. Church-Tim
Cradle Roll and Nursery.'
6:00 p.m. Post High Fellowship.
6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Junior High
fellowship.
7:00 p.m. Senior High Fellowship.
MARGARITA
Margarita Ave. and Bolivar Hwy.
Rev. Theodore E. Franklin Pastor
Phones: Office. 3-8S48. Rea. 3-1498
Sunday Bervlcesi
8:41 am. Church School. Bus service
Class: Nurisry through adult
11:00 a m. Morning Worship.
M.nr foi Infanta and small chil children.
dren. children. 8:00 p.m. Junior Fellowship.
6:11 p m Youth Fellowship.
A complete chedul of auxiliary e
tlvltiee and official meeting a an announced
nounced announced from week to wee,.
OAMBOA
Bev. Walker M. Alderon, Pastor
OlM 6-470 Baa.: 6-130
9:30 a.m. Sunday School,
10:40 a.m. Morning Worship.
Official meetings and weex-day sett'
yltin s announoed.'
Christian Scientist
Christian Science Charehe
Mrs Church al Christ. Scientist An cos
110 Ancon Boulevard
Sunday Bervleee 11:00 am. Sunday
School 9:30 a.m. 1
Resiling Yearn lOa'Tlatho Rsag Open
ally except Sunday and peUdty (rem
JO ta 1140 am. and tiM ta liM a.m.
aturdiy: 3:30 ta U:lo am.
-Evening Hour 6:00 ta 1:00 p.m. except
Wednesday and Saturday.
FIRST CHURCH OP CHRIST
SCIENTIST, Cristobal
All church services will be held ta
the Ground Floor Room of the Masonic
Temple in Cristobal I next door to the
Margarita Florist). Entrance la on Sal
boa Avenue through the Arcade.
Sunday Service II :00 a m
Wednesday Evening Testimonial Meet.
lm 1:00 o'clock.
Bitnday School Is held t 9:30 am.
Reading Room Hours Monday 2:(HI
to 4 00 pm. Wednesday 6:00 to lilt
You are cordially tnvlled to etteno
the services and to use th Readini
loom.

CkwcM. tht bub laiPka to fh Canal Zeae, anal the terminal eWea
am aJaak wririan Wee"aev aoaa at ike tataat at any change
fat Mm Manias Jatard' chart, papa-
Miniatm, CBMrcb aacrataria ead chaplain ara asked la Cnrorm the
f PiMas ana) Ca4oa. Rapwbltc al 'aaama. arteae welcome at all
tiraaa ta MB an) weaaeai at tka armed tarvice. and" re crWIiaa aaigb aaigb-kan,
kan, aaigb-kan, Meads aa etraagare.
At a pybltf arvke. Tka 'arums American liiti kalow, ky denoml denoml-satiane,
satiane, denoml-satiane, a at lea at kauri a worship and other regular activities.
Uatinpa ara rafarad frae ri to time. Daaamraatioiw having only
M at twe eegreattea ara liarad under "Other Church b Servkt
A spatial UatrBf la iaalutfee' far lervisai at Army poart. Air fore bates
and Naval rtatian.

Catholic
- ST. MABY'I CHUKCH-Balbaa
Sunday Uaaaaai IM. 14)0. 100 and
U:00 a.M.
Uol Day Msssas: IM
Coniaaafona: Saturday IJ0 M J0
and 7:00 :O0 pm Thursday, bator
rinrt rrtdayi 7 :w to a:w p-m.
Miraeulouf Modal woven: isuv pan
afl Mondava.
Catacbista auas' anar ma aw snv
on Sunday.
Hizh school atuaj viup aw pm. or
Wadnaaday.
aararn reaBT
Sundae Ibsm l:aa. IM h 1:10 am
Holy bay aaasaati I and l:0
"'Contaaslonii Saturday tM to i;00 and
t 1:00 p.m. Tbuwday before First
Priday 7. -00 pm.
Sacred Heart Devotions; IsOB pja, on
Cs'ichlsm Claaai t:lt to 4:41 pja. on
Thursday.
OUB LADY Of PATIMA Conwda
Sunday Mass at 1:00 in.
Holy Day Maaa at l:M p.m.
Confessions: :00 to (:tt pa on Sat
urday.
Catechism Claaa: Saturday a JO to w
IA
ST. JOBEPB Paralea
Sunday Maaaaa at TW and 1:11 ajn.
Holy Day Mass at 1:00 p.m
Waekdav Maaaaa: .!O0 am.
Confasaionai Saturday l:M to M and
1:30 to 7:30.
Catechism Class: Sunday 1:00 la 4l00
p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novenai IM p.m
on Pridav.
Convert Instructional Thursday 7:00
p.m.
ST. VINCENTS rename City
Sunday Maaaaa: 1:00 and 1:30 a.m.
Holv Dav Masses: I JO and 1:00 o.ra.
(It It (alls on Saturday the Maaaaa ara
6:00 and sua a.m.)
Confessional Saturday 1:00 to 1:00 and
j :ov to i:vo p.m. inuraoaya oeiore ram
maay i :sv p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena and Sta
Hana of the Cross: Friday 7:10 P.m.
Catechism Clara; After I JO masa en
Sunday
Thursday
Convert a ass, i JO p.m. Tuesday and
ST. THEBESA'S CeeoU
undav Mass: 3:10 a.m.
Holy Day Mass: 6:00 am (It tt falls
an Saturday 3:30 a.m.)
Catechism Class: 320 to a:uu p.m. on
Monday.
Confessional 1:00 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
ST. JOHN BAPTIST DE LA BALLS
Parqoe Lefevre
aAinriay Masses: 6:30 and 8:80 a.m.
Weak Days Man: 6:30 Mon., Thurs.
Prl. and Sat First Priday masa: :00 a.m.
Holy Day Masses 6:00 am. to 6:00
p.m
Confeealotu : 8:30 to 4 30 and 7iU0 to
8:00 pm on Saturday
Miraculous Medal Novena i Friday 7:00
p.nv
Catechism Class: 3:80 p.m. on Sunday
tfl. rHKBEBE-B La Boca
Convert Class: Monday IM p.m.
ay Mass: i:w a.m.
Holy Day Mass: :S0 pm.
Confessions: Saturday 6 M to 730 p m
Thursday before First Friday 6:30 p.m..
Catechism Class: 3:11 pm on Sunday.
Sacred Heart Novena- 7:00 om on
'Convert Class i 1:80 pm on Thursday
ATLANTIC SIDE
ST. JOSEPH'S ColdB
Sunday Masses: 1:41, 1 :00 and :i am
Holy D
Day
Mass i 1:41 and 1:00 am
uid 1:43 p.m.
Confessions: seturoey :ou w e:w sn
:00 to 8:00 p.m. i
Miraculous Mdl woven i weonesaay
1:15 and 7:00 pm .
Sscred Heart novena: rnuay i-io pm
Sunday Evening Services 7 :00 p m
Convert Clssa: 7:11 pm on Mondays
knd Thursdays
Catechism Class i nunusy iu:ie a.m. ic
11:45 a.m. 8:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
First Friday -Exposition oi Most mess-
ed Sacrament all day Reposition at 1:30
am. Saturday morning.
First Saturday Devotions to our ueay
of Fetlma-The Holy Roaary-:O0 a.m.
Flrat communion instructions tor cnn-
dren Mondays nd Thursdays 6:00 to
f:00 pm.
MIRACULOUS MEDAL Cristobal
Sunday Masses: 7:00, 1:00 and 10:30am
Holy Day Masses: 6:00. a:00 am. and
! P'
tonxeaaiona; aiaiuroay ;uv w m.w inu
7:00 to 8:00 p.m. After Rosary each eve-
ninfl.
Miraeuloua Model Novenai 3:11 and
7:00 n.m. on Monday.
Catechism Class: Arter s:w aaaaa on
Sundav.
First Friday Exposition ail aay ounng
tne acnooi year.
First Saturday: Mass at 8:00 am
HOLT FAMILY CHURCH In Margarita
Sunday Mess: 7 JO, 9:30, ii:v a in
First Saturday Masa:
. 6:00 am.
Weekday Masses :
Saturday .. 7:00 p.m. to
Miraeuloua Medal Nnvene
Holy way Masses- 7:30 a.m.
Confession ., :4t pm. to
every Monday,
arlsh Family Rosary and
Benediction
every Wednesday.
Discussion Inquiry Oroup
every Friday.
1st Friday Devotions ...
1st Saturday Devotions ..
8:00 am.
9:00 p.m
7:00 pm
5:15 p.m
4:41 p.m
7:00 pm
7 JO p.m.
7:00 p.m
7:00 p.m.
ST. VINCENTS Rainbow
Sunday Masseui 6J0 am
a.m.
City
snd
!X
Holy Day MaMasi 6:00 am. end 6:0C
am.
Confessions: 4:00 to 3:00 and 1i to
8:00 D.m Saturday.
Catechism Class i 10i5 a m. on Sunda
. convort Class every Monday it 7
pm.
Miraculous Medal Novenai 7i00 o.ra
an Tueegay.
Sieret Heart Maranai 7 KM pm. or
Friday,
IMMACULATB CONCEPTlON-OardB
itundiy Mass: gi em
Holy Day Masa: 1.-00 pm.
Confeaalmwi i80 ta 7:00 p a, an Beti
urdy.
Catechism Class 4:00 a m nn Monday
OUB LADY OP GOOD COUNSEL
Dsaibea
Sunday Masses: 7:00 end 1:10 a.m.
Holy Day Messes I 6:00 am- and liM
Aonfmton Saturday at 70 pm. and
after all evening devotlun.
Baptisms by appointment
Miraeuloua Medal Novenai 7:09 pm
n T.asday
Saored lleert Novena: l:oo pm or
rrlday
Sunday Sohool: I lo p m. on Sunday.
Religious Innlruetlon Class for Chll
Iran, 4:00 p,m en Thursday.
Kellgiou Instruction (or adult (Con
dieted tti Spanish I- 7:00 o m en Mon
y
Convert Instructions by appointment

Episcopal

Tbe Bt Ba B Oaadaa. II D.
The Very Bev ...... art I. Pataraoa,
8.T.B. Dean
THE CATHEDRAL Of ST. LUKS
SUNDAYS
SUNDAYS
7:30 am Holy Communion.
1:11 am. Church School (Holy Com
munion 3rd Sunday).
law am. Santa Communion, ara Sun
day
Escueta Dominical ........ t:U a.m
110 am Morning Prayer and Ser
mon, Holy Communion 1st Sunday.
7:00 pm Evenlnr Service.
WEDNESDAYS
sJV i n,. Holy Communion.
I M o n Evening Prayer.
HOLY DAYS
4 00 am Holy Communion.
1:80 am Holy Communion.
DAILY
1 11 am. Mornlna Prayer.
17:00 Miff -day Missionary Prayers,
COCOU
Church of St. Andrew
The Bav. William W. Baldwin,
Priest in Charge
Mr. David W. Plumer, assistant
, SUNDAYS
Holy Communion 7:30 a.m
Family Morning Prayer, Church School
(Family Eucharist second
Sunday) 1:15 am
Morning Prayer and Sermon
Holy Communion First
Sunday) 11:00 a.m.
Evening Prayer by Layreaders 7:30 pm.
WEDNESDAYS
Holy Communion 1:30 a.m.
Evensong, cnoir practice ... i :w p.m.
Chapel of St. Clare
Santa Clara, R. de P.
Morning Prayer and Sermon
Third Sunday
(Holy Communion aa announced)
COBOZAL
Chapel oi The Good Shepherd
The Bev Clarence W. Hayes,
Priest Id Charge
FRIDAYS
8:00 e.m. Morning Prayer.
(H.C first Friday each Month),
OAMBOA
St Simon's Chotcb
The Rev. John Speer. Priest In Charge
Choral Eucharist and in-
SUNDAYS
man 7:00 a.m
Church School 3:00 p m
Episcopal Young Churchmen 1:00 p.m.
Evensong and Sermon 7:00 pm
MONDAYS. TUESDAYS,
and FRIDAYS
Morning Prayer and Holy
Communion
9:00 a.m
7:00 p-m
Evening Prayer
WomaiTs Auxiliary, 2nd and
WEDNESDAYS THURSDAYS
Holy Communion ......... 7:00 m
Morning Prayer
Evening Prayer ..
1:09 a.
7:00 P
SATURDAYS
Family Eucharist ......... 8:30 a.m
Office of Compline 9:00 pm
LA BOCA
St Peter's Church
Th Rev. John Spear. Priest to Chargt
Morning Prayer end Churcn
School 8:00 am
mon iu:w a.m
Confirmation Class 9:80 am
Choral Eucharist and Ser-
Holy Baptism 12:00 noon
Evensong and Address .... 7:30 P.m
3rd MONDAYS
Woman's Auxiliary 7 JO pm
THURSDAYS or FEAST DAYS
Holy Communion ,.. :w am
PALO 8ECO
Chapel of the Holy Comforter
Ven. L. B. Shirley. Priest In Charge
Lthursdays
8:30 am. Holy Communion.
MARGARITA
Church of St. Mrgret
Espav4 and Brazos Blvd.
The Rev. Edwin C. Webster
SUNDAYS
7:30 a.m. Holy Communion.
9:30 a.m. Church School Service.
11:00 am. Morning Prayer. (Holy
Communion first Sunday of
the month)
THURSDAYS and HOLY DAYS
9:00 a.m. Holy communion,
PARAISO
Th Rev. Allan R. Wentt,
Priest tn Charge
The Rev. David A Osborne,
Vicsr Emeritus
SUNDAY
4.00 t.tu. Choral Eucnansi o armor
9:30 a.m. infant Baptlam.
3.00 niu Church School
5:00 o.m Youth Fellowship
7 l i m. Evensong end Address.
2nd and 4th WEDNESDAYS
i JO p in woman s Auxiliary ana At Attar
tar Attar Guild Meeting.
PANAMA CITY
St Paul's Church
The ven. Lemuel B Shirley, Reetn
The Rev. Carlton O. Morales, Asst.
SCNt.'.
6:00 a.m. Holy communion
9 '00 a m flung Eucharist it Sermon
10:45 s oi Morning Praver and Church
School
12:00 nucr Holy Baptism
7 00 'i.m Solemn vesnera
(heio It Building 131)
rUESUAVfs
8:30 a m Holy Communion
7:30 p.m. Evening Prayer and Sermon
WEDNESDAYS
l 0:00 t m Holy Communion
7:00 u.n. Evening Prayer
rhURbtAYb AND FRIDAYS
8:80 ( m. Holv Communion
HOLY DAYS
. 00 e.m. Holy Communion.
CHRIST CHURCH BY-THE-SEA
Colon, R.P.
(Opposite Hotel Washington)
The Rev. J. Peter Farmer, Rector
The Rev. Henry A. Blake, Assistant
SUNDAY
6:00 a.m. Holy Communion
7:30 p.m. Solemn vensong Sermon
8:30 a.m. Morning Prayer
9:00 a.m. Choral Eueharixt and Sermon
10:30 a.m. Church School
MONDAY, TUESDAY tt THURSDAY
5:40 a.m. Morning Prayer
6f00 am. Holy Communion
5:00 p.m. Evening Prayer
WEDNESDAY
1:40 a.m. Morning Prayer
:00 a.m. Holy Communion
f :30 p.m. Evening Preyer a Addree
FRIDAY
am. Morning Pryer
p.m. Evening Pryyer
in. Children' Eucharist
SATURDAY
1:40 a.m. Morning Prayer
6:00 e.m. Holy Communion
1:00 pm. Evening Prayer
7:80 p.m. Office ot Complin.
RIO ABAJO
Bt Christopher's Church
10th Street Psrque Lefevre
The Rrv Clarence W Hayes,
Priest la Charge
The Rev. Clarence A. Cragwen.
Assistant
SUNDAYS
6:00 a m Holy Communion.
7:30 a.m Rung Eucharist and rmon
10:10 am Morning Praver and Church
School.
11:00 noon Holy Baptlam,
(JO pm Evensong and Benno,

MONDAYS

Tilt am wina ara. woman's Aim-
TUESDAYS
ado pm Junior Daughter af the
Klni
1 JO p ro. Youth Fellowship.
WEDNESDAYS
1:00 a m Holy Communion.
I 0 pm. Evening Prayer and Religious
Instructions.
THURSDAYS
:po pas uinr rriendi society.
1:00 DA. 1st and 3rd, Slndetana.
SATURDAYS
PJO s.m. junior Confirmation Claaa.
Other Churches
CHURCH OP THE MAZARENS
441 Franglpani St Ancon, C.Z.
Bav. Elmer O Nelson. Pastor
Box 897 Balboa. CJC Tel 1-3601
Sunday School 8:41 am.
Worship Service ...... .,, 10:46 am
Youth Service ,,,, 6:41 pm
Evengelistie Service ,. 7:80 pm
Prayer Service, Wad. ... 7 JO p.m
METHODIST
Sunday: I a.m. Panama Wesley.
io:io am Sunday acnooi.
" 7:13 pm. Evangelical Service
and Sermon.
Sunday 7 a m. Paralso
10 am. raraiao aunaay ocnooi
7:11 pm. Paralso Evangelical
Service.
METHODIST NOTICES
John Watson B.D. 7 pm. Mr. A. A.
Lovell.
Monday, Oct. 20th 6:30 p.m. Prepa
ration Class. Mr. Geo. Mitchell. 7:30
D.m. Prayer meetlna Mr. Pearl Ford.
Tussdey, Oct 21st 7 JO p.m. Girls
League. Mrs. K. King.
Friday 7:30 p.m. cnoir practice.
CHURCH OF THE NAZABENE
Mount Hope, Canal Zone
(across from Mt. Hops RR Station)
Bev. Ralph Hyaong, Pastor
Bos 1019 Margarita, C.Z.
Phone 3-2476
Sunday School 9:41 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m
EvancaUstie Service ...... 7:30 p.m.
Prayer Service, Wad. .... 7 JO pm.
NATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH
Panama BP .. 33rd Street East
Bev B. N. Brown. Minister
Divine Worship 9 JO a.m.
5T.Il n i i aerepi pims
ui d oo:g potPS ispung
Rio Abajo, RJ.
Sunday School .,
8:00 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S wrrNUSES
Meetings Thursday at 7:30 pm. and
Sundays at 4:00 pm. Win Manorial
906 Balbo Road. Balboa.
CHURCH OP JESUS CHRIST OP
LATTER DAY SAINTS (Mormon)
Chanel on Balboa Road
Priesthood Meeting: Sunday 8:30 em.
Sunday School: Sunday 10:00 a.m.
Sacrament Meeting: Sunday 6:00 p.m.
Relief Society, Tuesday :uo a.m.
MIA; Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
Primary; Thursday 4:00 pm.
Telephone Balboa 4227.
Atlantis Branch
Building 200, Bchoolhouse Road, Gatun
Sundav School: Sunday 9.30 a.m.
Sacrament Meeting; Sunday 11:00 am
CUBUNDU PROTESTANT CHURCH
"A Warm Hearted Church"
Milton R. Leldlg, Minister
Phone Res. 83-7118 OL 83-5105
Sunday School 9:30 am.
(A class for every age)
Morning Worship liM am.
Youth Fellowship 6:00 p.m.
Eevenlng Worship 7:00 p.m
Prsyer and Praise (Wed.) 7:00 pm
A church nursey In provided.
OLD CATHOLIC CHURCH
Bt Raphael The Archangel
13th St West No 1
Holy Eucharist-. Sunday at 700 a.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursday
i:30 am.
Sacrament ot Unction (Healing cter-
vlce) Fust Sunday el each montu a
7:30 om.
Mount Halihet Christian Ch ureal
Panama R. P
Bt Rev T. .lamea, D. D. Bishop
officiating.
Morning devotion 6:00 a.m
Fellowship Worship 11 :00 .m
Sundav School 3:00 p.m
CHRIST ADELPHIAN BIBLE MISSION
8104 8th and J. Arojemena, Col6n
SUNDAY
Memorial Service 10:00 .m.
Sunday School 3:00 p.m
Bible Lecture 7:30 p.m
MONDAY
Adult Bible Class 7:30 p.m
BAHAI'S CENTER
s First Street
Urbanlisclon El Carmen. Panama City
informal Talks and Discussions
Thursdays 6:00 pm
Colon, tb at Front Streets
fnastalrs American Sisaar)
Study Classes .Thursdays. 7 JO p.m
BETHEL MISSION CHURCH
Eapalab St., Psrstao. C.Z.
Rev Wsldaba H. Stewart, Pastor
Sunday: 11:00 am Worship Service.
8:00 p.m. Sunday School.
7:15 p.m. Gospel Service.
Monday: 7 JO Young People's Society
Wednesday: 7 JO Mid-week Christian
Fellowship.
Thursday: 8:00 ChoK Rehearsal.
Fridays 7:30 Women's Missionary So Society.
ciety. Society. CHURCH OP CHRIST
& Bolivar Ave., Cristobal, C.Z.
13th
Ray O. Wright Evangelist
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
SUNDAY
Bible Classes
Morning Worship and
Communion
Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
Herald ot Truth
HOK 8:45
Mld-Week Bible Study
10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m
7:30 p.m
'9:15 a.m.
7 .30 p.m
THUKSDAT
Questions and Answer 8:48
9:15
HOK, Col6n. R.P.
You will receive warm welcome at
each of our services.
CHURCH OF GOD
Foreign Mission Dept. Hdqtrs.:
Cleveland, Tennessee
CHURCH OF GOD Bslhoa, C.Z.
Win Memorla Bldg.
806 Balboa Rd.
Information: Phone Gamkoa 428
Sundsy Service 11:00 e.m.
Youth Service 6:30 p.m
Evangelistic 7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OP GOD Paralso.
C.Z.
No. 4 Paralso Rosd
Information: Phone Paralso 633
Sunday Service 11:00 a.m
Youth Service 6:30 p.m
Evangellstl 7:30 p.m
CHURCH OP GOD Rio Abajo, Pm.
15th street, Parqus Lefevre
Suiday Service 11:00 a m
Sunday School 3:00 p.m
Evingellstlo 7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD Chorrlllo. Pm.
No. 4-144, 27th Street
Sundsy School snd
Morning Service 10:30 a.m
Evangelistic 7:30 p.m
CHURCH OF GOD Gstuncllle, Pm.
Translsthmltn Highway, Gatunclllo
Sundsy School and
Morning Service 11:00 a.m
Evangelistic 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OP GOD Santa Rita, Pm.
Translsthmlsm Highway, Santa Rita
Sunday School and
Morning Service 12 noon
Evanssllstle 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH Or GOD Catlv, Psnam
Trsnslathmlan Highway, Catlv
Sundny School -and
Morning Service ..... .... 11:00 .m
Evnngellstie 7:00 p.m
CHOURCH OP GOD Colon, Psnam
8th street near Mellnde Ave.
Sunday School and
Morning Service ...i 10:00 a.m
Evsngellstla 7:00 p.m.

COMMUNTTT CHAPEL
Diablo Heights. C.Z.
Bev. Cert V. Thompson, Minister
Box 1008, Diablo Heights. C Z.
., phones: Home Balboa 3237
; ChurCH "Balboa 4271
Sunday School 10:00 am.
Worship Strvice 11 :00 a.m.
Youth Bepvie 6:00 p.m.
Friday :yBlble Study 7:00 p.m.

Lutheran
RED FEME LUTHERAN CHURCH
Balboa Road at Wight Street
Bav. Robert F. Guaslck, Pastor
P.O. Box 666, Bslboa.
Sunday School, Bible Class 9 a.m.
Divine Service 10:11 am
Holv Communion, first Sundav of th.
month.
Atlantis Side
Csco Solo Chspsl
Mr. Frederick B. Illicit Vicar
Divine Service 11 a.m.
Holy Communion, last Sundav of th.
month.
Jewish
J swim Welfare Board Bid lti-X L.
Boca Road Balboa. C.Z. Rabbi Nathan
Wltkin Director.
Servie Friday. 7 JO ajn. Batura
S JO pm
(Sea aise listlnaa at Jewish satvira.
under Posts, Basse and Stations).
Congreaanot) Koi Sheaiith laraaL An.
olda Cub and 86th Street Bell Vista
Panama City Service 8:00 pm
Posts and Bases
PACIFIC SIDE
Protestant
FORT AMADOR
Junior Church Sunday School 9:00
Morning Worahlp 10:00
cnurcn-tim Nursery School... 10:00
Fellowship Hour li on
rOfll KUBBE
Sunday School
9:00
10:30
Morning Worship
Kouto r-eiiowsh n
6:30
U.S. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Sunday School ,. 9:30
Morning Worship n:oo
(Holy communion
day ot Month)
First Sun-
FORT CLAYTON
Sunday School (Bldg. 126) ... 9:00
Morning Worship 10:18
Youth Fellowship Sunday .... 7:00
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Sundsy School 9:30
Morning Worship 9:30 4 10:45
Youth Fellowship 6:30
Adult Bible Claaa Monday ... 7:30
Young People' Instruction
Tuesday 8:30
15th ND HEADQUARTERS CHAPEL
Morning Worship ... 9:00
(Holy Communion First Sun Sunday
day Sunday of Month)
Cstholle
FORT AMADOR
Dally Mass 4:15
Sunday Masses 8:30 ii 11:30
Confessions Saturdsy 6:30
PORT KOBBE
Dally Mass 6:15
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:18 & 11:45
Confessions Saturday 6:00 & 7:30
Catechism Class Wednesday 4:00
U.S. NAVAL STATION, RODMAN
Sundny Mass
.9:30
FORT CLAYTON
Dally Mass
Saturday Masa
Sunday Mass
Confessions Saturday 7:00
6:00
7:00
8:30
8:00
COROZAL
Sunday Mass
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Daily Mass
Saturday Mass .
Sunday Masse 7:45
Sunday Mass (Spanish)
Novena Services Tuesday
Confession Saturday ...
10:30
6:00
7:00
12:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
Jewish
Fort Kobb Saturday
USO-JWB, Balboa Friday ....
Albrdok Air Force Saturday
USO-JWB, Balboa Saturday ..
ATLANTIC SIDE
Protestant
2:00
7:30
4:00
5:30
FORT GULICK
Sunday School
Morning Worship
Coffee Call
Church Nursery
9:30
10:45
10:30
10:30
Catholic
FORT GULICK
Daily Mass 4:30
Saturday Mass 11:30
Sundsy Masses 8:30 & 9:30
Confessions Ssturday 12:00 12:30
6:30 7:30
Jewish
FORT GULICK
Tuesday 7:15
Seventh Day
Adventist
Weekly Services in (U churches
as follow:
SATUKDAY:
Sabbath School 9:30 a.m.
Davlne Service 11:00 a.m.
Yeuth's Meeting 4:30 pm.
WEDNESDAY:
Bible Study and Prayar Service
7:30 p.m.
Pacific Side Fanaml
Pistor F.R. Archbold Tel. 28-3-3890
Cabo Verde, Ave. J.F. de la Oss No.
"chorrUlo 25th. No. 27.
Pueblo Nuevo 2.A St. between 3rd
and 4th Sta. ,
Rio Abajo 11th St. No, 37
Gamboa and Frtjoles
Pastor W. H. Waller Tel. 6-580
Pastor A. A. Grizzle Tel. 6-102
Snanish Churches Pacific Side Panama
Pastor Daniel Moncsda Tel. 28-3
Panama, Calls Darlen No. 3.
Pedregal A Nuevo Gi-srare.
Atlantic Side
Pastor G. A. Jeffries Tel. 1-2103
Cristobsl English 16th it Bolivsr
Ave.
Colon 3rd St.
Pastor Manuel Cslderon Tel. 3-2103
Cristobsl Spanish 16th It Bolivsr
Ave.
Cenirsi iiinre
0844 Gavllnn Road, Balboa Tel.
2-1859 St 2-3531.
THE CHURCHES OF GOD
General Offices Anderson, Indiana
Rev. Wm. Livingston Supervisor
The Churrh of God
16th St. (Monle Oscnro Rd.) Rio Abalo
Rev. W. J. Johnson Pastor
Sunday School 9:30 .m.
Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Night Service 7:30 p.m.
The Churn of God
7038 Eighth Street
Mrs. L. C. Dnnsldson, Pastor
Morning Worship .. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Night Service .. 7:11p.m.
The Church of God
New Providence
Mrs. M. Hines, Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 m.
Sunday Night Service .... T :30pm.
Momlng worship 11:00 a.m.
First Chureh of Go
Cor. Jamslcs A Trinidad Stg.
Rainbow City, C.Z.
Rev. Wm. Livingston, Pastor
Rev, G. W. Grsndlson, Asse. Pastor
Sundsy School 9:30 am.
Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.
SLTlSNight Service .... 7:30p.m.
LINrt LANDSFELy"
TUCSON, Ariz. (UPI) An
American Airlinea Boeing 707 jet jetliner
liner jetliner with 102 persons aboard
made gn emergency landing at
Municipal Airport here last night
after trouble developed in the
hydraulic system. One of the plane
tires blew out aH the 707 touched
down, but the landing wig other otherwise
wise otherwise uneventful.

UNION CHURCH
Cam baa
Gamboa Union Church will be

host to the quarterly meeting of
tne Eeneral council ot the union
Church of the Cana Zone tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. The session will be called
to order promptly at 2:30 p.m.
Among several important items
of business, the delegates will
hear a report of progress on a
study of budget resources and
ministerial support in the consti constituent
tuent constituent churches. The body will
also hear reports from standing
committees.
The chairman, Miss Lois Mc Mc-Clure
Clure Mc-Clure of Balboa, has invited sev
eral members and officers of
Young Peoples' Societies to at
tend, and will call upon some of
them to assist in making the
report.
Spike" Lawrence, president of
the Union Church Youth Fel Fellowship,
lowship, Fellowship, will represent his orga organization
nization organization in putting before the ge general
neral general council plans for the next
rally, to be held in September.
He and others will speak of the
general reorganization by which
it is hoped the youth groups
will be brought into closer work working
ing working relationship with parent
churches and with the General
Council-
President James Harned sold
members of the con s 1 1 1 u e n t
churrhes, whether delegates of
not, are free to attend the sesion.
only credentialed delegates may
vote in the proceedings.
The ladies of the Gambot U U-nion
nion U-nion Church will serve refresh refreshments
ments refreshments t the close of the ses session.
sion. session. In Morning Worship at Gam Gam-boa
boa Gam-boa Union Church, the minister
will use as his theme, "A Lit Little
tle Little Leaven." Mrs. Paul M'Bell
will conduct the Sunday School
Assembly at 9:30 a.m., to be fol followed
lowed followed by the class sessions. Kin Kindergarten
dergarten Kindergarten and primary groups
meet separately, the other gra grades
des grades remaining in the Chapel.
Morning service opens at 10:40.
Farmers Choose Crop
Control Over Lower
Prices For Wheal
WASHINGTON (UPD-The na
tions wheat farmers votea oy a
better than four to one margin to
continue rigid government control
over their 1960 crop, returns
snowed today.
In return they will receive high
price support assistance. The al alternative
ternative alternative rejected by the farmers
was unrestricted plantings and
chnrnlv reduced Drice props.
Returns from all of the 39
states participating in the wheat
rofowmrtum showed 0.7 per cent
nt ih formers in favor of the
r,ront urhpat proeram. The al
most complete vote was 160,718 to
38 522.
A two-thirds majority was need
ed to keep the controversial pro
gram in effect anomer year
Farmers gave a 84.1 per cent en
Hnrcpmnnt In the 1958 vote.
Aprici ilture Secretary Ezra Taft
Benson, who has bitterly criticized
the present program for prociuc
inp surpluses told a news confer
rnrp in advance of the returns
that he did not believe Congress
ih rpvisp the nroeram at its
nrospnt session.
Benson said it would be "un "unfair"
fair" "unfair" for Congress to pass new
wheat legislation now in view of
the referendum. He said it was
"very regrettable" that Congress
did not enact the administration's
wheat plan calling for lower price
supports.
Thp present rigid program calls
for planting allotments totaling 55
million acres, marketing quotas
based on the allotments, and
price supports at the present min minimum
imum minimum level of 75 per cent of par parity
ity parity or not less than $1.77 a bushel.
If the farmers had rejected the
controls, they would have re received
ceived received price support of only 50
per cent of parity, or about $1.18
a bushel, president Eisenhower
said yesterday It was a "sorry
choice" the farmers had to make.
Lion Tamer Almost
Loses Arm To Lion
.TANESVILLE. Wis. (UPI)-Lion
tamer Joe Hartman nearly lost
his left hand and forearm last
night when one of his big cats
jumped him for the second time
this month during a circus per performance,
formance, performance, i
A lioness named "Tina" leaped!
from her perch and grasped Hart Hart-man's
man's Hart-man's hand and forearm up to the j
elbow In her mouth. The lion j
tamer used a chair in his free
hand to force the animal back. I
Hartman, Peru, Ind., was taken
to Mercy Hospital here for treat treatment
ment treatment for puncture wounds from
thp animal's teeth and cuts and.
abrasions.
10 CHILDREN DROWN
TOKYO (UPI) Ten children
drowned in the Tokyo rei today
on the first day of Japan's ium ium-mer
mer ium-mer vacation period.
SOON BELLA VISTA

the REVOLTS
J OF THE V
JLJ5LADIAT0RS'' 'Ji.
I SUPBWCIIS"cp

al 4 6 & 0 j T
.. m .lessV

MSGT. (B-9) JEFFERSON R. SMITH, post sergeant major. Quarry I
Heights, receives from Col. James D. Heriot, post commandant, a (
Commendation Ribbon with Metal Pendant, for outstanding and I
faithful service while serving a prior assignment aa sergeant major
of the 1st Battle Group, 327th Infantry. Fort Campbell, Ky.. WorrJ '(-.
from Port Campbell announcing the award wa awaiting the ser- ?'
geant when he arrived last week at his new duty station here la
U.S. Army Caribbean. He was gergeant major of the Fort Campbell
unit from July 1856 until June 1959. the period the citation covers, (
Sergeant and Mrs Smith and three children live at Quarry Heights I
(U.S. Army Photo)

Haiti Fires Ambassador To Japan
On Charge Of Treason Against State

WASHINGTON, July 25 (UPI)
Haiti has charged Jean David,
ambassador-designate to Japan,
with high treason' and fired him
from his new job, the Haitian
Embassy here announced today.
David now is in New York.
en route to Tokyo, the Embassy
said.
In a telegram to David, Hai
tian Foreign Minister Louis
Mars accused him of "Unpatri
otic activities in the United
States." These activities were
not spelled out.
The telegram, in French, said:
"I inform you that the Haiti Haitian
an Haitian Government Is aware of your
unpatriotic activities in the U
mted States of America and that
you are removed from your func
tion of Ambassador of Haiti to
Japan. Please deliver to the

Mrs. Jim Tatum Goes To Hospital
With Illness Which Killed Husband

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. (UPI) -Mrs.
Jim Tatum was hospitalized
yesterday with apparently the
same mysterious virus infection
which killed her husband, football
chach at the University North
Carolina. fcfiP
Mrs. Tatum, whose Illness was
believed to be less serious than
that which claimed her husband's
life Thursday night, had been ill
at home with a nurse in atten
dance when her husband died. Doc
tors decided yesterday to trans transfer
fer transfer her to North Carolina Memo Memorial
rial Memorial Hospital.
There was no immediate state
ment from either the hospital or
Mrs. Tatum's physician regarding
her condition. A university spokes
man said, however, that he did not
think it was "anything serious."
The couple s three children. Re
becca, 14, James Jr., 13, and Edna
Reid, 7, remained quarantined at
the Tatum home here. Thf. had
not been stricken by the ailment,
which was described as an "over
whelming virus" infection.
Dnctos and members of the
familv said that the virus infec
tion that struck down Tatum had
induced a malfunctioning of the
kidneys which led to uremic poi
soning.
E. B. Crawford, associate di
rector of the hospital, said thtt
an autopsy performed on the 45
year-old Tatum indicated that
death was caused bv failure of
vital organs to function properly.
He said a clinical review of the
autopsy "supported the possibility"
of an unidentified virus but that

rryx Begin the Week
With God
You will find apir- I
itual strength in
"XtVU God'i Houie. A cor cor-V.4UU3
V.4UU3 cor-V.4UU3 cjia welcome iwaiti
you in thia church.
I MAKE JULY COUNT FOR GOD
RgJESSBSsT--

END YOUR SEARCH FOR A FRIENDLY CHURCH
:20 10:40 MORNING WORSHIP
"BELONGING TO THE LORD"
Many people tods sre frustrated because of uncertainty: bL
those who are in Christ thrill at the Lord' word. "And They
Shll Be Mine." YOU can have this assurance and confidence.
9:30 SUNDAY SCHOOL (Classes for all aces)
We live In an age when scores of people are grasping for great greater
er greater knowledge; yet the only knowledge that lasts forever is the
eternal truth of God. Have YOU searched for thatt It's found in
the scripture; we Invited you to study with us.
8:S6WBAPTIST TRAINING UNION
A union for every age Join
7:8ft CAMP ECHO'S PROGRAM
After three week of camping and over 100 people participating.
th closing program will be delight to you. Dent miss thja
service.
Mission Minded Gospel Preaching- 4 Parking
Areas Evangelical Nurseries Prorided
Everyone Welooma

I I

Haitian consular authorities It
New York your diplomatic pass passport,
port, passport, the passport of Mrs. Jeaa
David and passport of your
housekeeper, Marie Lucille Ker Ker-nizan."
nizan." Ker-nizan." Haitian ambassador to Wash Washington
ington Washington Ernest Bonhomme said he
had been instructed to grr
widest possible publicity to Day Day-ed's
ed's Day-ed's firing.
"Please issue press releag
Jean David is fired from bis as assignment
signment assignment for crime of high
treason against state," a tele telegram
gram telegram to Bonhomme said.
While the telegrams did not
spell out the charges Bonhomme)
said Haitian intelligence agents
had found he was guilty of coll collaborating
aborating collaborating with "enemies of the
country." He declined to identi identify
fy identify them.

it will take at least three or
four weeks before the outcome is
final."
Crawford told newsmen, "ths
doctors said this virus is common;
affecting many people in mild
form. It just hit Tatum like i
steamroller."
Funeral services for the 45-yeari
old Tatum were held at 11 a.m.
today at the University Met Methodist
hodist Methodist Church here with burial in
Chapel Hill Cemetery.
The 18 members of Tatum's Tar
Heel football team, headed by
first string auarterback Jack Cum Cum-mings,
mings, Cum-mings, will serve as active
pallbearers. Tatum's coaching as assistants
sistants assistants will serve as honorary
pallbearers.
It was speculated that one of
the assistants, possibly Emmett
Chpek or Jim Hickey, would bo
himed to rephce Tatum at least
on an interim basis for the coming
session which Tatum hid believ believed
ed believed would be his greatest since
returning as head cnarh of his
alma mater four year ago.
Tatum, who had laid the ground groundwork
work groundwork for Bud Wilkinson's Oklaho Oklaho-ma
ma Oklaho-ma football powerhouse and had
built his own potent end machine
at Maryland, was brought here in
1958 to restore the Tar Heels to
their former football glory.
I
SHOCK CAUSES DEATH
MACON, France (UPI) Mrs.
Nestorine Travaille, a 75-year-old
widow, died of shock today 10
minutes after a wasp stung her on
the back of the neck.
BAPTIST
CHURCH
pWT ACSOW OM BlOA iX CTATJOU
Elton P Vlcker. Ass 4 Psstoi
RADIO OUTLET HOXO, 789 Kq
W Preach ChrWt
Crucified Risen Coming Agab
Listen to "Manna In Th Morning"
Dally 8:00 .- HOXO

1 :

'17 ,1
I.



t
Cliisox Keep Lead By Winning Another 1-
untbrame-
? 4

m i a. a a a a M a w itifititninni n a n w umiviint

1

Lopez' Crew Nips Orioles
2-1 To Stay Ahead Of Tribe
1
! By MILTON RICHMAN
NEW YORK, July 25 (UPI) If the American
Learae race is going to wind up in one of those c ose

shares, look for tne wniie ox 10 win n uy ....-

That'i how they've been win winning
ning winning all along.
There's an old baseball adage
which aayi the team that wmi
the one-run games usuaUy cups
the pennant. And nf that is the
case, get ready to mail those
ticket orders in care of Comiskey
.Park.
Al Lopez' crew scored their 22nd
one-run victory of the season by
shading the Baltimore Orioles
2-1 last night to remian in l'.rst
place in the American League.
U marked the 27th time this
year the light-hitting White Sox
were involved in a one-run game
and of all those contests, they
have been on the short end in
rnlv fivp nf them.

Knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm held

the White Sox to tnree mis un until
til until th- eichth innine when they

tallied on a single by Jim Mc-

Ajiany and Nellie Fox s triple.
That tied the score at 1-1 and
the White Sox won it in the ninth
when Al Smith hit a home run
with one out.
the leu was Wilhelm't aixth

gainst '10 victories. Southpaw
Billy Pierce yielded seven his,
including Bob Nieman's 11th
homer in the third inning, as
ho evened his season record at
11-11.
Cleveland licked Washington,
5-2; Detroit beat New York, 4-2,
and Kansas City won its fifth
game by defeating Boston, 8-i.
In the National League, the

Giants increased their lead to
2Mi games by beating the Cubs,
6-5, in 10 innings; the Cardinals
ripped the Dodgers 2-1 and the
Braves blanked the Pirates, 8 0,
and the Phillies edged the Reds,
2-1.
Gary Bell hurled a six-hitter for
the Indians, who snapped Camilo
Pascual's seven-game winning
streak in beating the Senators.
Jim Baxes put the Tribe ahead
with his 10th homer in the sec second
ond second inning and George Strick Strickland's
land's Strickland's single with the bases load loaded
ed loaded in the third gave Bell a 3-0
lead. Roy Sievers hit his 15th and
16th homers for the Senators,
Southpaw Don Mossi of the Tig

ers beat the Yankees for the fifth
straight time while dropping the

worldchamps, below the .sou

mark again, eignt games on me
pace. Eddie Yost hit his 13th nom nom-er
er nom-er in the first inning and nis
teammates garnered three singles
in the same frame. The Timers
added two more runs off rookie
Eli Grba in the sixth on two :nts,
a walk a fielder's choice and an
error. Mossi held the Yanks score
less until the ninth when EUton
Howard hit a two-run homer.
Johnny Kucks scattered nine hits
in stopping the Red Sox and pitch pitching
ing pitching the A's to their ninth victo victory
ry victory in 11 games. Big Frank Sulli Sullivan
van Sullivan started for Boston and yiel yiel-ed
ed yiel-ed all of Kansas City's runs dur dur-k
k dur-k i.s innines he worked,

including a homer by Dick Wil

liams in the fifth. Kucks is now

4-6 and Sullivan 6-6.

ITODAY ENCANTO 35 201

Kenneth More In

"A Night To Remember"

Harry Kruger In

"Tli. rtno Thai, fint. .v"

Jim Davenport singlad home
Hobla Landrim In the 10th In Inning
ning Inning to giva tha Giants thalr
victory over the Cubs. Victim
Of Davenport's hit was Don El El-,ton,
,ton, El-,ton, who suffered his third loss.
Sam Jones, last of four Giant
pitchers, gained his 14th victo-
r . mi E a al A uar

ry Bobby mormon,
III and Jackie Brandt each hit
homers.
Johnny Podres 6f the Doogcrs
was coasting along with a l-o
ltad when the Ordinals chased
him and won the game with two
rune in the eighth. Singles by

Don Blasingame, Alex Grammas

Bill White and liino union com combined
bined combined U hand Podres his seventh
loss. Ernie Broglio gained bis
fifth victory although Lindy Mc Mc-Daniel
Daniel Mc-Daniel pitched the last two in innings
nings innings and held Los Angeles hit hit-less
less hit-less Southpaw Juan Pizarro struck
out 12 Pittsburgh batters and
pitched a four-hitter in leading
Milwaukee to victory. Joe Adcock
belted a two-run homer oif loser
Harvey Haddix in the first inning,
then drove another run in a four four-run
run four-run fifth inning rally. The victo victory
ry victory was Pizarro's third against one
loss. Haddix suffered his eighth
lncB against seven wins.

A two-run pinch homer oy Carl
Sawatskl in the ninth brought the
phiiHs thpir victory over the

Tj.rU Kawataki's smash, off

rookie Jay Hook, came after Ed
Aim Kaskn had nut Cincinnati a'

head with his first home' of the

apasnnin the bottom of the

-.fcrhth. Jim Owens, who was Hit.

ed for a pinch hitter in the ninth,

Was Crealiea wun ma biaui
tory.

Clayton Hands
Kobbe Third
Straight Loss

Th Fort Clavton Cavaliers av

enged an earlier lose at the nands
of the Fort Kobbe Regulars by
downing the Regulars 84 to 63 at

the Fort Clayton uym rnajy

night.

The once powerful Regulars

could not regain the form tint

brought them five straight victo

ries and an over 90 point average

as the smooth playing Cavaliers

got off to a 20 to 17 lead in the
first quarter which was never
threatened.

Bob Richardson's scoring and

rebounding led the Clayton five

during the first half as tne Dig
center hit for 15 and then came
back with five to finish with 20
for the night.
High scoring Skip Kroeger found
the range late in the second
quarter and continued in the sec second
ond second half to lead all scorers with
28 while steady Dick Kyllo pour poured
ed poured through 18.

The Kobbe quintet showed falsh falsh-e
e falsh-e nf their old form but could

never quite get their attack in full
eear while trying many different

combination of players. Dave How Howard
ard Howard found the lid was still on the
basket for him too as the lanky
forward's one hand set hit tor on only
ly only 14 points. Guard Charles Wil Williams
liams Williams was high man for the Reg Regulars
ulars Regulars with 15.

Marlbo

ro

Unbeaten

Colon Basketball

TODAY

60c. 30c.

TOMORROW

DRIVE-IN

A GREAT WEEKEND
ATTRACTION!

HOPE

RIDES THE

RANGE BAREBACK
FOR A
HILARIOUS WEEKEND !

-IN THE
BIGGEST
GUN.GAL
AND GAG
STAMPEDE
IN THE

WEST!

II M . AH lift

LEADING
HITTERS

(Based on 250 official at eats)
National League
G Ab R H Pet.
Aaron, Mil 91 373 66 134 .35,9
White, St.L. 90 330 51 113 .342
Cham, St.L. 87 276 38 94 .341
Robinson, C. ? ? ? T ?
Logan, Mil. 79 268 33 87 .325
Cepeda, S.F. 95 382 65 124 .325
Gilliam, L.A. 88 315 62 102 .324
Temple. Cin. 94 382 65 121 .317
Pinson, Cin. 93 394 76 121 .307
Cimoli, St.L. 95 381 64 117 .307
American League

ml v ,$m
iimiiiimn mi mm mni:"lrnmi

WHEEL OF FORTUNE? Kt Mattson Just wants to be
sure trTe Cart wheel is.in good condition. Sweden's top driver
will be behind that country champion trotter, Adept, in the,
fist International .Twt at Roosevelt Raceway, N.Y-. Aug. U,

Kuenn, Det.
Maris, K. C.
Kaline, Det.
Fox, Chi.
W'ling, Bal.
Runnels, B.
Power, Cle.
Jensen, Bos.
Kubek. N.Y.

Skow'n, N.Y. 73 281 39 84

90 355 62 123 .346
64 252 45 87 .345
79 306 53 104 .340
? ? ? ? 1
87 281 40 94 .335

89 349 55 113
92 373 75 113
89 325 67 98
76 290 40 87

Teams

McGloin

Boseman

Tompkins

Humphrey

,324
303
.302
300
299

tan

IIo?e FiEf.ii;:s

, "ALIAS
Jesse James

WENDELL COREY

Color by DE LUXE a U UMTCO WT8T8

ko-fkiHlHlIM IWtS xMHI I MMtlWf
l Wt NH Imm Mm HI Hfl
KmM kj HUM t SlUN -1 W MIIMUI. Wi mm

TODAY
AT
7 1 .00 P.M.

MIDNIGHT SHOW!
Robert LOGGIA Ellen PARKER in
"LOST MISSILE"

Runs Batted In
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Banks, Cubs
Robinson, Reds
Aaron, Braves
Mathews, Braves
Cepeda, Giats

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Killebrew, Senators
Jensen, Red Sox
Colavito, Indians
Maxwell, Tigers
Lemon, Senators
Allison, Senators

Home Runs I
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Mathews, Braves
Banks, Cubs
Aaron, Braves
Robinson, Reds
Hodges, Dodgers
Cepeda, Giants

89
88
79
70
69

80
72
70
62
62
62

29
26
24
24
19
19

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Killebrew, Senators
Colavito, Indians
Allison, Senators
Triandos, Orioles
Maxwell, Tigers

32
29
26
22
22

LEADING
PITCHERS

(Based en 12 or mora decisions)

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Face, Pirates
Antonelli, Giants
Mizell, Cards
Law, Pirates
Drysdale, Dodgers
Newcombe, Reds

14
11
11

12

10

Margarita Junior

Basketball League

Standings

W L
2 0

Tuesday, July 21

W L Pet

14 0 .1C00

5 .7:17

5
5

6

5

.6R8
.f,Hi
.67
.667

AMERICAN LEAGUE
McLish, Indians 12 t
Shaw, White Sox 9 3
Wynn, White Sox 12 C
Pappas, Orioles 10 5
Fischer, Senators 8 4
Mossi, Tigers 8 4

To start off the second hall Mc

Gloin was matched with Tompkins

in the opener. McGloin s team
jumped off to a fast start en two
oointers by J. Palumbo, B. Will

and Gibson. Tompkins men

couldn't break the cover on meir

basket.

Trailing 9 to 1 midway thru the

period they finally dropped one in.

Playing even the rest of the way
the period ended McGloin 15,

Tompkins 9.

Both teams played a slow sec

ond period, waiting for the good

shot. Not too many points were

scored, but there was a little
team work shown. At the half Mo Mo-Gloin
Gloin Mo-Gloin had increased his advant

age slightly 2617.

The third period Bill Gibson

took over, scoring 9 of the teams
15. Playing loose ball T9mpkins'

men were able to register only 5

markers. After third period Mc

Gloin was up 19 points 41 22.

The last period was a scoring

duel between Tompkins, and Gib Gibson.
son. Gibson. Tompkins dropping in 11
points, Gibson 7. Most of the last
half was spent at the foul line.

The two teams, working easy,
collaborated for 21 personals.

The second game saw the Bose

man, Humphrey men bouncing the

round ball around. Both teams

liking the fast game, there never

was a dull moment.

Boseman got off to a first pe period
riod period lead of 14 to 10. In the second
period Humphrey might h a v
been able to take over, if they had
given some help to Leignadier.
Paul accounted for 9 of the teams
11 point second period output.
Leaving at half time Boseman had
increased his lead to nine, 3021.
In the third quarter Boseman
was able to increase his lead by
one. Third period score 4030;
Most of the last quarter was spent

at the foul line. Not to be out none
by the opening game there were
a total of 21 personals counted in

the last half.
Baseman's out1 scoring Humph Humphrey's
rey's Humphrey's team 20 to 16 in the "w;;lk-a-thon"
went on to win 6046.
High scorers for the winners
were Bosemjan with 19 and Mar Marshall
shall Marshall with 15. For the loser Leig Leignadier
nadier Leignadier accounted for 16.

of either captain, the teams ap appeared
peared appeared to be even. The first quar quarter
ter quarter served to bear this cout. Play Playing
ing Playing good team ball, the teams
matched point for point, with the
first quarter score ending 1212.

Playing well thru the second

neriod the teams staved close

Shortly before the half Tompkins

was able to take a 3 point advant

age. Leaving at the half it was

2421.

.800
.750
.667
.667
.667
.657

SOON BELLA VISTA

Thursday, July 2S
The opener matched the Bose

man. Tompkins teams. Taking to

The third quarter was point for

point. Most of the periods scoring

Demg done by two men. tor

Boseman, L. Palumbo cat the

nets for 10 of his teams 14 points

For Tompkins, it was Haknnson

dropping in 8. The third period

ended Tompkins still hanging on

to nis sum lead, 3835,

Playing a running game in the

final, lompkins Quickly increased

his lead to 8 points. Continuing
his third period play, Hakanson
matched his 8 points in the final

quarter, ine final score Tompkins

60, Boseman 48. High scorers for

me winners was Hakanson wnh

18, followed by Wittaker with 17

tor the losers it was L. Palumbo

with 28....

The night can matched Mc

Gloin Humphrey. Starting quickly

a. umson and McGloin put ;he
"Falcons" out to a 13-5 first pe period
riod period lead. This 8 point lead, plus

me iact that Humphrey hud to

leave the game earlv in the first

quarter with three personals, gave

me impression it was going to be
a McGloin runaway.

Humphrey came back strong in
the second. Helping the cause with
10 Don was able to close the gap

io c points, leaving at half it was
McGloin 25, Humphrey 23.
Humphrey sitting out the Mrrd
quarter with four personals watch watched
ed watched his team keep in reach. With
Gibson doing most of the scorin"
McGloin was able to increase his
advantage by one at the end of

me sra quarter.
Working quickly McGloin and
Gibson combined to drop in four
quick baskets, while holding
Humphrey to a weak two poin's

j rmn ine ioim line.
Limiting the Humphrey men to
only two baskets in the final
quarter, the "Falcons" walked ,i ,i-way
way ,i-way with a 6547 victory.
The big gun for the winners
was Gibson with 33. For the low lowers
ers lowers it was Donohue with 13.
Games are played each Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and Thursday night. The o o-pener
pener o-pener starling at 7 n.m. The night
cap immediately after.
Tuesday, July 28, will see
Humphrey and Tompkins in the
7 p.m. game followed by the

Clinches
Journey
By HERBERT MOISE

Marlboro, (champions) 8 0 1.000

Cerveza Balboa 4 3 .a a

Pens! Cola 2 5 .!o

Pnwell finraae 1 7

WOMEN'S LEAGUE

Deportivo Iris 4 1 .800
Mentolados Cig. 4 2 .667

Kuna Indias 0 5 .000

Marlboro Cigarettes of tne co colon
lon colon District Basketball League is
handed their arch rivals, Cene Cene-za
za Cene-za Balboa, a 81-to-64 defeat in the
Colon Arena before a good-sized
howling crowd Thursday night.

The winners naa to come irom
behind to win the title with an
undefeated status.
In other .games Powell's Garge
won its first game in eight nut nut-ines.
ines. nut-ines. The Mechanics had to use

up five periods to win this excit exciting
ing exciting contest. The Powell 66 to-63

victory was a just reward for a
game well played. In the female
division. Mentolados kept taeir

pennant chances alive by beating

tne ivuna inaiag u u m.
Mentolados 40 Indias 23

Rainbow City's Mentolados kept
their pennant chances alive ana
moved to within half game of the
Ipiipue leaders bv beating the

haDless Kuna Indias 40 to 23. The

Rainbow City damsels opened the

first quarter by piling up a 14
to 2 lead then widen the gap

by scoring 12in the second
quarter to the Indias' 9. After the
halfwav mark. Mentolados taper

ed off to 6 points ia the third
quarter and 8 in the final period.
Meanwhile the Kunas were adding

12 markers to their score with
three in the third quarter and

nine in the last.

Officially. Mercedes Wedder-

burn. with 8 points, was the shoot

ing star for Mentolados. Felicia

Davis with 7 and a eiicia jviaunews

and Cecilia Bryan, both with 6,

led the Rainbow City scorers

A. Iglesias with 11 topped the Ku

na scorers.

Powell Garaoe 66 Pepsi Cola 63

Hustling all the way as it in

tussle for first place, rowen s

Garage 'battled the veterans Pep Pepsi
si Pepsi Cola team to an extra-time con.
test for their first win of the sea

son.

Led by F. Garibaldi's 16 points
and Delbert Lewis' all-important
12 markers, the Mechanics pulled

the contest out of the fire with

sure shots by these two high pow powered
ered powered scorers. Lewis arrived lale

in the first half and scored his
"dozen" in the second period
period when Powells neede them

most.
At the sound of the last whistle
of the regulation game, both
clubs had scored 53 points In Inside
side Inside the last 30 seconds, the pace
set by both clubs was amazing,
leading several veterans to ex express
press express the opinion that this has.
been the fastest game ever play played
ed played in Colon. In the extra five
minutes, Lewis and Garibaldi a a-gain
gain a-gain pulled the strings apart for
the 66-to-63 victory.

Editor; CONRADO SARCEANT

TEAMS

San Francisco

Los Angeles

Milwaukee

Pittsburgh

Chicago

St. Louis

Cincinnati

Philadelphia

National League

w L
55 41
54 45
48 43
49 46
47 48
46 49
42 52
38 55

GB

Pet.

.573 -.545
2Vi
.527 4Mi

.516 5tt
.495 JVi
.484 8V.
.447 12
.409 15V

American League

L Pet. c-

TEAMS
Chicago

Cleveland

Baltimore

New York

Detroit
Kansas City
Washington

Boston

Today's Games
Philadelphia at Cincinnati
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee
St. Louis a tLos Angeles (N)
Chicago at San Francisco
Yesterday's Results

(Night Game)

Pittsburgh 000 000 0000 4 0
Milwaukee 200 040 02x 8 11 0

Haddix (7-8). Blackburn. Daniels

ana jvraviu.

Pizarro (3-1) and Crandall.

Philadelnhia ooo non nnsj 7 n

Cincinnati 000 000 0101 8 0

Owens (6-8). PhilliDs. Spmnrnch

ana ixmneu.

Hook (1-1), Brosnan and Bailey
(Night Game)
St. Louis 2
Los Angeles 1
(Night Game, 10 innings)

Chicago 000 032 000 05 11 1

F. 001 120 010 16 13 1
Hillman, Elston (8) and Aver-

iii ; Antonelli, G. Jones (5). Fish

er (7), S. Jones (9) and Land-

nth. WP Jones (14-10). LP El

ston (5-3). HR Thomson (8th),

iiranat (tnj.

W

54 39 .511 ;.
53 39 .576 V)-
48 47 .505. T. J.
47 48 .495
47 50 .485ii.-.
44 49 .473 10--
43 51 .457 llttP
0 S3 .4304

Today's Games

..

New York at Detroit
Washington at Cleveland
Boston at Kansas City (Nk
Baltimore at Chicago
Yesterday's Results.

(Night Game) "V V.

Washington 000 100 0012 8 tl

Cleveland 012 200 OOx 5 0-

Pascual (11-8), KemmereiT!

Stobbs and Naragon.

neu (9-9) and Nixon.

(Night Game)
New York 000 000 0022 6 I
Detroit 200 002 OOx '4'1'S
Larsen (6-6), Grba, Coates and
Berra.
Mossi (8-4) and Berberet. "f

(Night Game)
Baltimore 001 000 0001 7 1
Chicago 000 000 011-r-? $X
Wilhelm (10-5) and Triandos.
Pierce (11-11) and Lollar. JI
(Night Game)
Boston 000 100 0001 9 J.
Kansas City 002 010 OOx 3 12 t
Sullivan (6-6), Fornieles, Bau Bau-mann
mann Bau-mann and White, P. Daley
Kucks (4-6) and Chiti. '"A

Local Fishing Impresses

California Sportsman

and Howard Teitenburn. Rav WUlst'7

lost a marlin judged to weigh?
bout 700 lbs. They ran into a

churning school of fish one dav.

put five lines out and were hauJL-

uig uie iisn in one arter tne other-
News for Outboard Moterbont,.
The Army has allowed its land--ing
craft to go out the final week-,'?
end of the tournament July 31 to
Aug. 2 earring the tournament'i"
gasoline, oil, water and ice.
To enable the smaller boats ?tf;;
go further into the fishing areay. areay.-the
the areay.-the landing craft will go Friday
morning to Perry's Bay, and jX
Soturday morning will be at Bo- .'
dega, returning home on Sunday 'I
morning. Scales will be carried a-
board also. .-.

MARLBORO NEW CHAMPS
OVER CERVEZA BALBOA

The team with one sponsor but
three directors concentrated ef efforts
forts efforts to win at least one title by
convincingly beating Cerveza Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 81 to 64. They have just one
game remaining in the schedule
against Pepsi Cola on Monday.
The champs had to come from
behind a 13-point deficit in the
first half finishing that period
three points in the arrears.
In the second half and the
combined efforts of Carlos Hya Hyacinth
cinth Hyacinth and Bobby Taylor, each hav having
ing having 20 points, proved too much
for the Beermen. Arturo Agard's
16 added to Taylor's and Hya Hyacinth
cinth Hyacinth accounted for more nan
half of the winner total output.
When the final whistle sounded,
the fans gave the new champs a
standing ovation as they par.ided
around the court with a large banner.

0

California fisherman George Lo Lo-baugh
baugh Lo-baugh who edits the official pub publication
lication publication of the Spin Fishing A-so-ciation
on his return from a three three-t'ay
t'ay three-t'ay fshing trip board the Yankee
with Charles Abernathy, said he
had never seen such fishing.
Fishing with spinning tackle from
8 to 12 lb. line, 60 fish were
caught. Abernathy lost a sailfish
after fighting him for an hour and
a half, using 12 lb. monofilament

(line. Lobaugh made about 20 casts

near the Three monks from a
small 12-ft. boat, and 15 times he

toever retrieved his plugs.
XNever in my life have I had

inis-vexpenence, ana never nave
I seenssuch wonderful fishing,"
he said. te plans to write an ar article
ticle article otirWf enama's fishing ex experience.
perience. experience.
Earlier this month when anoth another
er another group of out of-towners fished
from the Yankee in the VHI In

ternational Marlin and Sailfish

Tournament, in a four-day fishing
trip. They caught 12 sailfish and
a 334-lb black marlin. The marlin
was caught by Robert Tochstone

while Claude G. Adams, vice pre

sident of Braniff Airways, landed

three of the sailfish on 20-lb test
line.
Adams has participated in ma many
ny many of the annual marlin and sail sailfish
fish sailfish tournaments here, but re remarked
marked remarked that the fish are parti particularly
cularly particularly plentiful this year. With
Adams also were Joseph Ha?ein Ha?ein-botham.
botham. Ha?ein-botham. a businessman from Dal Dallas,
las, Dallas, and Lucian Touchston, a Dal Dallas
las Dallas lawyer.
Among the local participants in
the tournament are the group
which went out last weekend on
the Panama Canal Runner. In
four days they caught 208 fish.
Two men rJiuijht their first and
second sailfish Roy Walthers

Clayton Youngsters'
Preparing For Swim

Meet On July 29 1
. a -I.
Youngsters participating in the

fort Clayton summer recreatjOBt
program are preparing for-..
swimming meet, scheduled for
Wednesday, July 29. -.t
Winners of the last weekly meet
which featured the vacation pro program
gram program were: boys in the 7-8 age,
bracket, Fred Ramirez, SHifti;
Gregory and Lee Hornsley; girsf,,.
7-8, Trudy Johnson, Alice Elhjsjti
and Sandy Johnson; boys, 10-11...
John Scott, Lo Premer and. .Jjjj'!.
Huinker; boys, 12-13, Bruce Par Par-rish,
rish, Par-rish, Victor Perez, Benny a
sons and Dan Bryant; girls, 12-1S,
Becky Clark, Pat Carter and Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Weber.

the hard wood minus the services Boseman vs. McGloin game.

m r An.

V

SSSI II

K, LjP

X 1 I III

THE REVOLT X I I
f OF THE I II
. Igladiatorsw I
lUPEPCINESCOPt II

TODAY-MiiAfKEs-TODAY

Tt VOL

J5c. 20c.

Spanish Program!
3 LECCIONES DE
AMOR
- Also:
FLOR IE MAYO
with Maria Felix

CAPITOLIO
35c. 0c.
PARTY GIRL
with Robert Taylor
- Also:
FRONTIER
RANGER
with Keith Larsen

VICTORIA
15C. a S
TIGER WOMAN
Chapter! 4-6-6
FATAL WITNESS
THE WOMAN
ALMOST DIED

RIO

35c.

20c.

LOTTERY NIGHT!

HIGH FLIGHT
with Ray Miliaria
- Also: -THE
WHOLE TRUTH

Stewart Granger

SERVICE CENTER THEATERS TODAY

BALBOA THEATRE 1:00 3:30 6:00 8:30
AIR-CONDITIONED!

urn mat EE&ZS
mm dee dan wuh &ZtfC!Zm

SUSAN KOHNER ROBERT ALDA JUANITA MOORE-MAHALIA JACKl

j EARL GRANTJing A unnnternational picture,::

Also Showing SUNDAY and MONDAY

COCO SOLO 7:00
Air-Condltloned
Virginia Field
"ROCKABILLY BABY"
Sunday "Compulsion"

DIABLO HTS. 7:00
4 Montgomery Clift
"LONELYHEARTS"
Sunday "I Want To Live' -.

Margarita 7: Of

Danny Kaye

Me & the Colonel

Sunday!
"Lonelyhearts"

GAMBOA 7:00

"MAN OF THE
WEST"
Sun. "Nowhere
To Go"

GATUN 7:0(1

"WATUSI" 4

Sunday
"The Spanish
Gardener"

PARAISO 7:00

Th Cunt Aln!it
Brooklyn" nd
"Biiinboo Prison"

Santa Crui 2:30
THE WHOLE
TRUTH

Camp Bierd 2:31$

GUNFIGHT
AT INDIAN
GAP"

0



u

. i
IATCTOAT, mi JW, 1B3V
THB PAH AHA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAPEB
PAGE SEVIN
uran
em
36-Hole Matches

CafeD

GdiTWurneyS

ikrs Today;FinalsTomorrow

r

' -NSWsssv::.V..
MS:'
- ' I
1 tin i.t I j. (

7 V

vmnip wivivP.RS First Dlace winner of 25 yd. free style fqr

girls 7 and under was Kit Whitney. Second was Florence Thomnson.
Elks' youth director Stewart J. Brown presented awards at the Elks
Fourth of July Swim Meet at the Gamboa Pool.

This Afternoon
By TED WILBER
Tht 36-holt semifinal matches
in both men's flights of the 1959
Cafe Duran. golf tournament suit suited
ed suited this afternoon and the final
18 holes will be played sunday
afternoon t the Panama Goif
Club.

Two splendid match are
eheduletl In the ehampionihip
flight. The first, between .Paul
Moran and Temmy Jacks, will
be a tightly fought match,
wjth .facks giving Paul a stroke
a side for each II holes.
Paul, with his handicap of &,
has a slight advantage over Tom
my with a handicap of 3, but
Jacks is capable of overcoming
the slight difference H on hts
game. Moran has been played
well ot late and should give Tom
my all the competition necessary.
Moran defeated Billy Beeiou,
Shead and Mono Arosemena, (the
latter in 20 holes) in the tourna tournament
ment tournament thus far, whilt Jack! de defeated
feated defeated Dr. Earle Gerrans, Coionel
Hurr, the Ted Pierpoint.

Elks Basketball League

ElKS LEAGUE STANDINGS

Team
Wildcats
Wolverines
Badgers
Hawkeyfs

W t
10 5
8 1
8 7
4 11

In close, well played game,
thVWolverines subdued the Badg Badg-ers
ers Badg-ers 58-49 to come out of a pro prolonged
longed prolonged losing. streak. Captain Pa Pa-iak
iak Pa-iak leds his Wolves with 27
points, followed by Ashton and
iradlin with 12 and 11 respec respectively.
tively. respectively. The addition of Spradlin to the
Wolve Uneup wil make them
k.f hat. for the losing

Badgers', Stfotalwrf' "Netted- 26

Bornts louowea Dy xibvjuo
Dombrowsky with 9 and 8 respec respectively;
tively; respectively; The wind up game of the eve evening
ning evening saw the Wildcats dump the
trnifri in a ooorly played con

test, The Cats led at the first
qflarter mark 10 to 3, and at haU
time 13 to 10, a low scoring ef effort'
fort' effort' by virtue of shabby play.
Archie Carroll of the Hawks was

the only player to enrer me u
We column with 19 scoring pts.
'.The box score;

WOLVERINES 58

fg ft-pf tot

Pajak
Ashton
chase
Spradlin
price
Smith
Totali

13

1
6
'1
5
0
0

1 27

1

I 12

3 5
1 11

0 0

1 1

26 6 8 58

BADGERS 49

in the game with a fine 15 point

effort.

The box scores:

fg ft pf tot
Stromberg 4 4 2 12
Dombrowsky 3 0 16
Blevins 2 5 0 9
DeVore 1113
Rodriguez 3 0 2 t
Dahlhoff 0 10 1
Metheney 10 2 2
Totals 14 11 8 39
HAWKEYES 38
Roe 2 0 0 4
Carroll 10 3 2 6
Morris 3 0 2 6
Pearson 115 3
Bergener 0 0 3 0
Perantie 10 0 2
Totals 17 412 38
WILDCATS 50
Engelke 7 0 0 14
Scott, A. 5 2 1 12
Stewart 5 1 3 11
Hanson 13 15
Bowman 2 0 14
Moses 12 2 4
Le Brun 0 0 0 0
Totals 21 8 8 50
WOLVERINES 29

Hall 0 0 3 0
Roger 0 0 10
Ashton 2 10 5
Chase 7 1 .1 15
Spradlin 2 0 2 4
Price 2 13 5
Smith 0 0 0 0
Totals 13 3 10 29

Stromberg
Dombrowsky
Blevins
DftVore
Rodriguez
Lorpbana

12
4
4

0 0
3 0
0 0

126
0 8
2 9
4 0
3 6
0 0

T6tali

23 3 10 49

WILDCATS Jl

Engelke
Scott, A.
Stewart
Hafison
Copigan
Bowman
Moes
Le-Brun
totals

8 0
2 3
3 2

2 6
4 7
2 8

4 1 19
0 0 10
10 12
0 0 10

0 0 0 0

13 6 17 32

' r HAWKI.YES It

Cafrcii v
M4rrif
Scott, R.
Pearson
Bergeuer
Perantie
-
totals

S 5

4 19
0 0
3 1

3 0
0 0

0 1

10 0 26

Once again the Hawkeyes made
a valiant effort to breakinto the
win column only to fall before a
fourth quarter rally by the Wolv Wolverines.
erines. Wolverines. Hall with 18 and Spradlin
with 10 led a well rounded team
effort by the Wolves. Carroll

with 11 points led the desperate

Hawks.

Trailing for 3 quarters the

league leading Wildcats rallied
with a 20 point 4th quarter
splurge while holding their oppo opponents
nents opponents to 6 points. Engelke led his

Cats with a 19 point effort while
Stromberg and Blevins tossed in

14 and 13 for the losing Badgers.

WOLVERINES 43

Player
Hall
Roger

Ashton

Spradlin -Price
,
Totals

fg ft pt tot
6 0 4 12
2105
2 10 5
5 0 2 10
.3117

STERLING PLAYER

The other semifinal round
match should provide any lsinmi lsinmi-an
an lsinmi-an golfer with some splendid
play. 'Doc' Herb Mitten of Bal

boa, former Panama Open aul

Isthmian Amateur Champion, low

amateur in the 1959 Panama O-

pen, and winner over Jim Riley

in the 1959 Pan American World

Airways tournament, will take on

Webb Hearne, also of Balboa, in

the first 18 boles this afternoon.

Hearne, becoming more noticed

each day for his ability, is also
a long ball hitter, and is quite

at nome around tne greens, fifth

Miuen ana Hearne are very ac accural
cural accural wedge "operators", and
can 'stick' the ball dose to. the

pin consistency. In the putting de department,
partment, department, the talent is about ev evenly
enly evenly distributed, so the outcome

of the match will depend greatly

upon the play of either on both

Saturday and Sunday. Herb .per-

naps cas an advantage because

of his many years of tournament

experience, but Webb, iormer Isth
nuan tennis champion, is aho
accustomed to the rarefied air

breathed only by champs.

In the tournament thus far,
Mitten has defeated Bob Meding Meding-er,
er, Meding-er, Gordie Dalton and Bill Le Le-Brun,
Brun, Le-Brun, former Isthmian Amateur
Champion. Hearne, thus far, ha 3
won over Humbert, Frank Mor Mor-rice,
rice, Mor-rice, and Don Erasmo de la Guar Guar-dia.
dia. Guar-dia. The Mitten Hearne match is
scheduled for 1 p.m. today, Hearne
with a handicap of 6, will receive
two strokes a side for each 18
holes from Mitten, whose handi handicap
cap handicap is but 1.
The final 18 holes will be play played
ed played on a foursome with Moran and
Jackw, starting at 1 p.m. Sunday
afternoon.
FIRST FLIGHT PLAY
The semifinal round matches
in the first flight will also pro produce
duce produce some good play among
those with the higher handicaps
In the firtt of the 36-holt match match-,
, match-, Pablo Abad will meet Kikl
d la Ossa.

Abad has beaten Busky, Dr.

xapia ana wiuis, wnile Enrique
has won over E. Jaen Guard's.

apiain nooDerry ot AiDook, arm
Bod Chandler.

The remining semifinal match

oi m noies will find Campaguani
of Kodak (no plug intended:) a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst Jack Scribner. Nithrr f

these players have gotten so far
along before and the results over
the 36 holes should find some

gooa gou.

Campagnani has defeated Jack

Mercer, A. Aaraneo and Lain A

rango thus far, while Scribner has
won over Paul Duran (tourney

sponsor wrum ana Jorge Boyd
HARTACK RIDES TRIPLE

UCEAIMFORT, N. J. (UPI)

docitey wime riartack rode a tri triple
ple triple at Monmouth Park wrfn..

day, including Atoll in the $23,200
Lamplighter Handicap. Hartack's
other winners were Moon Glow

oey ana Bumpy Koad.

JWTC. PLAYERS The Jungle Warf tr Training Center team displays awards won in the recent
company level basketball championships.. Captain Gerald R. Marcus, left, detachment commander,
holds the championship trophy while at. the right Maj. William A. Dickson, JWTC executive officer,
shows the commander's trophy Players left to right in the top row are Sp4 Manfield Boyd, Pfc.
Marsden Owens, Pie. Richard Oseak, Pfc. Carl Feaster, Sp4 Lolly Sapp and Sp4 Allan Hansen. Bot Bottom
tom Bottom row, left to right are Sp4 James. Douglas, Sp4 Joseph Everly and Sgt. Louis McDermott,
coach. The men In playing togs are members of the Army Atlantic PAF basketball team-now com com-psting
psting com-psting in Caribbean Command championships, (U.S. Army Photo)

by
Dan Daniel

Captious critics of the horse-1 "Th;re are wise men in this a-

racing situation will tell you thatirea who will tell you to keep an

iuuiuu(iiLucu liuiiiycuuuu us eye on insn Liancer, Dy noyai
jor league Daseball, is suffering Charger. He has done little of ac-

from a lack of vouiik material

The boys with the fright wigs
and crying towels insist there
are few 2-year-olds ji class and
they envision a dreary prospect
for boih 3-year-o'ds and handi handicap
cap handicap horses in 1960.
They are yammering copiously
oVer the retire'ment of Bold Rul

er and Gallant Man, handicap

coun', as yet. In one race he fin finished
ished finished third, in another he never
figured. But he has won both of
his most recent races, neither a
stake.
"Irish Lancer, owned by the
Pebblebrock Farm, has been
Mxjught along slowly and cau cautiously,
tiously, cautiously, and for all we know his

being tipped as the dark horse of

m mra r L i Li i -. ... .

smii in woo, anu real nexi year me juveniles will nolo up.
will see harness racing making "Now about the 2-year-olds In
further and more serious Inroads California? We actually know
on the thoroughbreds; little about them, but should get
All this leaves Jimmy Kilroe, a line through C. V. Whitney's
local handicappi and racing sc- Tompion, which finished half a
retary, somewhat more than length behind Noble Noor, a
cold. He accuses the crying strong possibility on the Coast,
squad of rank failure to analyre'in the Hollywood Juvenile. Noble
the 2-year-old picture, in particu- Noor paid $60.
lar, with fu'l recognition of all "Tompion. Tom Fool colt, Is
the faclors involved. coming to Saratoga Perhaps he
"Not many juveniles have prov- will furnish the late fireworks."

n up, as yet, and we have to

HAWKEYES 33

Carroll
Morris
Scott, R.
Pearson
Bergeuer
Perantie
Totals

!nokin for a much needed vie

toty tht Hawkeyea led for three
fluarters onlv to face before a

ioijrth quarter rally by the Bads Bads-trt.
trt. Bads-trt. Leading 30 to 23 at the end
of "the 3rd period,, the Hawks
were .outscored 16 to 8 in the
fotfftjl stanza to lose a one poi" poi"-erl
erl poi"-erl Carroll led the Hawks with
28 counters while Stromberg fa'
114 12 for the winners.
I badly disorganized Wolverii'
ten'iorely missing Captain Pa Pats
ts Pats made a valiant effort to mn-

ta i' hot Wildcat club. Falline
Y&ni 29 to 11 by half t'm t'm-t4j)'
t4j)' t'm-t4j)' vere soundly trounce SO to

7"j T"'ite. scon an" tewn
.-j.-t. Shirpeyed Cat wttii
."": an 11 points 'eee'lir 'eee'lir-ly.
ly. 'eee'lir-ly. Chase tried to keep his club

WILDCATS 58

Engelke 8' 3 2 19
Scott, A. 4 0 18
Stewart 115 3
Hanson 3 2 0 8
Bawman 4 0 2 8
Moses 12 3 4
Le Brun 10 0 2
Totals 22 8 13 52
BADGERS 40
Stromberg 5 4 3 14
Dombrowsky 3 0 16
Blevins 6 1 2 13
DeVore 0 0 10
Rodriguez 2 0 2 4
Dahlhoff- 0 0 2 0
Metlreney 13 13
Totals 17 6 12 40

SOON j.. BELLA VISTfl

Playground
Sports

ANCON
This past week here at Ancon
has been one busy place. Mfincuy

tnrougn Wednesday we lust about

piayea every sport in tne oouk

and then some. But now mind

you Thursday saw us here at An

con Gym going through our an antics.
tics. antics. We had contests in shot-put,

basketball relays, races, basket

ball game and all received prues.

Wednesday mgnt saw our D.

team going over to Diablo to play
a game for the parents night act.

Boy a barrel ot tun was lor a.l

who participated and those watcii

mg saw a good showmanship ot

archery, basketball game, weignt

lilting or weight training a more

dignified name for it, and final

activity was the tumblers.

Now with Master Herr and his

two consorts, they realiy gave

oomph, to the. activities.. Coach

Brown, spuriocn ana mrs. liar

nes deserves a big hand for such

a good program.

1 nday saw the Ancon boys and
girls traveling to Gamboa. Ancon

"C" team won in basketball

game, then apick-up game with

"D"" and "E" playing, Anon al

so too that game, men folliw

ing that the kids all made oue

mad dash tor the pool to' demon

strate some' good old fasaioned

swimming.

Following are winners of some

of the swimming contest run for

tne boys:

Free style Altman, A. Saiteno,

J. Willis Beardau.

Back stroke Altman, sec. Snl-

teno, third, McConney, Ctus.

Butterfly Altman, Saiterio,

Blumberg. E.

Breast stroke McConney, Chas

sec, Altman, A Third. Saiterio,

Relays 1st team Capt. Altman,

Saiterio, Burda, Daubin were win

ners, all winners of above acti

vities received prizes and were

made happier.

Next week we look forward to
another big and eventful week,
want you join us here and see
for yourself what we do.

By OSCAR FRALEY,

NEW YORK (UPI) Don

Newcombe, the big guy wno

couldnt win the "big ones, is
making such a comeDack today
that he seems almost a cinch to
be picked for action in the second
All-Star game at Los Angeles on
Aug. 3.

There was a suspicion when he

was traded away by the Dodgers
last year that he was finished. He

had a pulled shoulder muscle and

his record when the Brooks cut

him loose was zero wms against
six losses.

But the six foot, four inch 245 245-pounder
pounder 245-pounder is a sassy 10-5 today
and more important has come on
to win nine of his last 10 games.
As late as this spring there
was basis for the contention th?
he might be washed up. Rival

teams insisted that his fast ball
was gone in exhibition contests

and nobody listened w hen New Newcombe
combe Newcombe insisted his stomach was
upset and he felt weak.
ACCUSED OF CRYING "WOLF"
That's because the hulking man
long has been accused of being
a hypochondriac and he had cried
"wolf" once too often. Yet. oner
the season started, he indicated
in his first start that he might
still have the stuff which carried

1iim to three 20-game seasons and

gave him 27 wins and most valu valuable
able valuable player honors in 1956.
For in his first start evpi
though he lost he tossed a fine
four-hitfer His next two starts
were disastrous and Los Angeles
must have figured it did right in
peddling him away. But since

May 5, big Newk has been dyna

mite.

BALBOA
Balboa Gymnasium yesterday
held the final elimination for the
all Zone tournament to be held
in Coco Solo on Aug. 12.
The competition in the 12 and
under age group for the girls was
especially fierce. Hilma Cooke fin finally
ally finally won out by a close margin
over Grace Whitney.
Hilma will represent Balboa in
the tournament for the 12 and un under
der under group while Grace will move
to the 14 and under bracket.
The end result for the Balboa

entrants is as follows

1

Camby. Alternate, Don Dard'

Boys 14 and under, John CooV;

Boys, 12 and under, Roark SumV
merford. Alternate, Walker Pruirf
Boys, 10 and under, Harry Whit Whitney.
ney. Whitney. Alternate, Kenneth Brogie.
Girls, 16 and under, Joan Uo Uo-herty.
herty. Uo-herty. Alternate, Susan Lessiack.
Girls, 14 and under, Grace Whit Whitney.
ney. Whitney. Alternate, Susan Lessiack.
Girls, 12 and under, H i i m n
Cooke. Alternate, Grace Whitney.

Girls, 10 and under, Ana Pro-

Boys, 18 and under, Georga back. Alternate, Kay Stevenson.

He won nine in a row and then
was hailed by Hie Cardinals only

Dy one run in an ll-inmng aflair

Now, in Ills latest start, he dusied

oii the defending champion

Braves lor his 10th win.
That 10-5 record is much more
impressive than it looks at first
glance. Seven of those victories
have come against the three
tough clubs the Dodgers, Giants
and Braves. He has gone the
distance in 13 of his 15 starts, h.
has yielded Only 17 bases on balls
while posting 58 strikeouts.
BATTING LOFTY .324
On top of which, Newcombe is
batting .324 and has knocked in
16 runs.
Big Newk always has been a
good hitter. Even back in the
days when he broke in with the

Doagers' Nashua, N. H., farm

club. Because earlier, when he

signed with the Newark club ot
the old Negro League, the mana manager
ger manager took one look at the tower towering
ing towering teen-ager and told him:
"Son, you're big enough all
right. Just learn how to swing
that bat, too, and it'll win some
games for you."
iSewcombe's pitching long has
been complicated by a reputa reputation,
tion, reputation, just or not that he couldn't
win the "big ones." This was
pinned on him in perpetuity wneu
the Yankees knocked his brains
out four times in World Series
play. It was compounded by an
inclination to brood over these
failures and a manner which
creates an impression of surli surliness.
ness. surliness. Then there was his con constant
stant constant catering to the slightest
twinge in his arm, understanda understandable
ble understandable possibly in view of the fact
that it is his living.
But a lot of them thought he
was through last year when the
Dodgers traded him away and
Los Angeles may be a bit un unhappy
happy unhappy about it now, particularly
if he walks out in their park next
month as one of the All-Stars.

bel'evr that bett?r. ones are to i

come," Kilroe pointed out today.
"As for there being trouble in
the 1 year old division, that
doesn't add up. There is a lot of
late with voung horses, and our

calculating trainers and owners

do not like to accustom liu r

charges to short distances, only
to run into difficulty ir strectch strectch-ing
ing strectch-ing them out late in the season.

"Just take a look at the nca
and formidable schedule which
lies before the 2-vear-olds. The
historic Futurity $75,000 added,
at the new Aaueduet track on
Sept. 19, the Champagne, likely
te go up o $150,000 on the same
course on Oct. 17, the Garden
State, with a possible $300,000
late in October and the $150,000
Gardenia for fill'es the previous
week, should explain amply why
the owners want to go slowly
with their juveniles,
"Add to these rich events in

this area. th- $100 000 2-year-old
fixture in Chicago the Arling Arlington
ton Arlington Futurity and the Washington
Park Futurity, to make mv ar argument
gument argument all the more convincing."

IRISH LANCER DARK HORSE
"Off what our 2-year-olds have
shown to date. Bally Ache, by
Bally Dam by Celestial, Blue,
owned by L. D. Fruchtman of
the Edgehill Farm, is tops," Kil Kilroe
roe Kilroe continued.

"Bally A"he- again asserted hi
speed last Saturday in the Great
American at Jamaica, when he

beat Vital Force. The Fruchtman

colt makes every outing a good

one.

"Vital Force has a nasty habit
of going out on turns and giving
away too much ground He Hid it
again in the. Great American,

and obviously will have to cor,

rect that if he is to figure in th?

big races to come.

JUVENILES OF 195s DODGE
EACH OTHER
While the juveniles of 1959 are
being prepared for the festive
days of September and October,
and, at long range, for the many
rich stakes for the 3-year-old divi division
sion division in 1960, what are the 2-year-old
stars of a vear ago doing for

trcmselves and the racing industry?

At the moment, the 3-vear-old

heroes p th? season are very
bu?v doe" n? each oh'er. Take a
look at their committments for

Saturday.

Sword Dancer is a definite

starter in th? $100,000 Monmouth

Handicap. Intentionally will go

in the no-l'ss ooulen Arlmgton

Classic in Chicago, and Bagdad

is to run in the $75,000 Dwyer at

lamaira.
In he Monmouth, Syr.tr Dinn

er wi'l carry V0 im"nd. Had

Mr'. Isahellp rori? Sloane and
Fllintt Rurch rhnsen the Dwyr.
their rolt would hav been asked

to pack 12fi and give away two
pounds to up-and-coming Bagdai.

Mr. Racing Fan naturally

would liko to see all of the 3-

vpar-old stRrs gn in one rae-.

But spreading them through

three events will add to the gen

eral interest, even if it fails t)
give us a re'iable index to com comparative
parative comparative ratings. - -4,

tne onening of mat tremennous
new plant at Aqueduct on Sept.
14.

LIGHTWEIGHT BOUT SET
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Match Matchmaker
maker Matchmaker promoter Jackie Leonard
said Wednesday that Johnny Gon Gon-salves
salves Gon-salves of Oakland, fourth rank ranking
ing ranking lightweight, (fill meet Roy
Kiojas of Fort Worth, Texas, in a
10-round bout at Legion Stadium
Aug. 8.

RECORD DAILY DOUBLE
CHICAGO (UP1K( S'ep-Stevie,
a 43-1 eboW. provided 'he w
share of WeHnesday's $1,875.60
daily double, largest o the CM-.
cao riHng season. Sten-SteVg
oaid $"7 "0 to go alone w'h Bib Bib-loom's
loom's Bib-loom's $11.80 in the second race.

I .' .r '":;y,:

2105 OF THE -.V i I ,J7 I YZ&Jii if?7-l
15 3 5 33 1 f J i t

i. f.'.. t

1 fc!!3Zs -,

FATICUE DETAIL Bob Soth of the Southernn California. Striderg first bent over from ex exhaustion
haustion exhaustion and then went down in a heap with three laps remaining in the 10,000-meter run
contested in 83'degree heat as the United States men again repulsed Russia in the dual track
and field meet at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. Soth was helped up by a coach In stripes.

T
U

E
S
D
A
Y
9:15
P.M.

A Double Treat

BY

Double Cola

im

LIU

s
A

T
U
R
D
A
Y
12:15
NOON

0
F
C
O
U
R
S
E

ON

"You Asked For It"
PANAMA'S MOST POPULAR REQUEST SHOW
AND
"Record Session9'
THE HIT TUNES OF THE DAY

.

r 'u ii i r



THE PANAMA AMERICA AN INDEPENDENT DAILY XZWfPAPB

SATURDAY, JULY 951 V

-at j s m at u

Classified Ads Classified Ads Classified Ads Classified Ad;
i agents? :-Mr icnM.n,. i ; nJilMJ LL 11 1 K
I n III 171111171 III Aufnmnhilec III Miscellaneous III Home Articles ll Real Estate 1 1 ' i

i resuri "hui in 7 in 11

Fosror's Cottars,
Clara. Phono B iasv
twssn 9 a.m. and noon, weekdays
i PHILLIPS OcmmIHi Cotfaaos
ftaota CUta R. 4e roie f f-mim
mim f-mim i-1177 Cristobal 1-1673.
Houses
FOR RENT: Completely furnish furnished
ed furnished three bedrooms house, dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, kitchen, bar, air-conditioned,
yard, in Cangrejo "F" SJ SJ-No
No SJ-No 10. For information call Tel.
J-46T9.
FOR RENT: House. Throe bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, with or without furniture.
J11 3rd Street, Lat Cumbres.
Tel. 2332.
FOR RENT: Newly constructed
4 bedfroom chalet in Loma Ale Alegre,
gre, Alegre, unfurnished -180 00. Phone
1-2247 or 4-0196.
Wanted Position
POSITION WANTED: Reliable
maid, good housekeeper, general
house work seeki position. Phone
426-B. Colon.
WANTED: Documentation clerk
te work for American firm. Write
to: P. O. Box 536, Colon.
Lost Articles
LOST: Famala Pekinese, brown
right eye, smaller answer to
name Bonnie, call T. Stewart.
210-A, Anton. Tel. 2-1408,
reward from three heartbroken
little girls.
Animals
FOR SALE: Purebred Doberman
pinscherjPjj5ilIj02J3875
Commercial Sites
FOR It I N T: Office apace.
Mercedes building, above Avenida
Balboa's Pest Office, with terrace
floors, acoustic ceiling, private
bathroom, watchmen, very rea reasonable
sonable reasonable rent. Tel. 1-3054.
Murrow Says He
Wants To Learn
About The Navy
PAWLING, N.Y. (UPI) News
commentator Edward R. Murrow,
who began a year's leave of ab absence
sence absence from the Columbia Broad Broadcasting
casting Broadcasting System July 1, said to today
day today he applied for a Navy com
mission because he "just thought
it was a good idea to learn some something
thing something about the Navy."
Murrow said he had gathered
considerable information about
the army and air force during the
course of his eareer but knew
"less about the Navy than about
the other services."
A spokesman for the third na naval
val naval district said the application
had been forwarded to the bureau
of personnel in Washington and
probably would take several
months to process.
TO LODGE PROTEST
TOKYO (UPD Japan will lodge
strong protest with the Repub Repub-Bc
Bc Repub-Bc of Korea against the seizure
f a Japanese fishing vessel in
v ---rs SaiH to bp on Japan's side
ti the controversial "Rh line",
foVeign office sources said.
FOR RENT
Up to 2200 Sq. Ft. of modern
office space on second floor
of new "ELGA" Building
Large private parking area
In rear Janitor and night
watchman services Air
Conditioning optional Via
Eapafta on 46th block -ELGA.
g.A.
IV

Commercial Gui del

I

ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION
Ads only est $0.85 per eol. inch

FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740

LIFE INSURANCE
cell
JIM RIDGE
General Aaent
Gibraltar Lift Ins. Co.,
for rates and Information
Tel. Panama 2-0S52
Monday thru Friday
t:M a.m. te 12:0
J.ae p.m. te S:N
Saturday: :0e i.m. to IS
Listen To
The OAS
XPanamerican
Record Show
1130 pm.
HOC-YCN
Every Sunday

fOH HINT: Ont bodroom
apartments, n w apartment,
houit located en tha Traniisth Traniisth-mian
mian Traniisth-mian highway, modern, well ven ventilated
tilated ventilated with private bathroom and
kitchen, completely furnished
with new furniture tpecially de designed
signed designed for tha apartmentt, rea reasonably
sonably reasonably priced. Call Panama 2 2-2766
2766 2-2766 from 8 to 12 and from 2
to 5:30.

FOR RENT: Modern two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. Hot water
Campo Alegre. Tels. 2-2341 and
3-3379.
FOR RENT: 6.1. approved, fur furnished
nished furnished apartment, modern, clean
building, convenient location.
Automobile Row No. 36, call 3 3-6855
6855 3-6855 after 7, 2-5046.
FOR RENT: Magnificent view
in La Cresta, two bedroom apar apar-ment,
ment, apar-ment, den, hot water, garage and
bio porch Call 3-3421.
FOR RENT: In the best resi residential
dential residential section of El Cangrejo,
two bedroom apartment with
porch, dining, livingroom, large
kitchen, laundry, maid's room,
garage, all screened, play-ground.
Call 3 7453.
FOR RENT: Apartments and
rooms. $40.00 and $25.00. Via
Eepana, in front La Gallera,
5010-A. Tel. 4-0553.
FOR RENT: Furnished and un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished apartments. Alhambra
Apartments. 10th Street 8061.
Telephone 1386, Colon.
FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, living, dining room
kitchen, balcony. 50th Street No.
15 (near El Baturre), $72.00.
Phana 3-4994.
FOR RENT: Modern two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, livingroom, din din-Ingroom,
Ingroom, din-Ingroom, hot water, ewn blinds,
maid's room, garage, etc. 49th.
Street. Tel. 3-4994.
FOR RENT: Unfurnished, cool,
modern, comfortable two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. 50 Street No.
115. Phone: 3-1210.
FOR RENT: Apartment 2nd.
Ave. San Francisco No. 64, case
Maria. Tel. 3-7784.
FOR RENT: Furnished 1 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, livingroom, bal balcony
cony balcony and garage, close to The
Panama Hilton Hotel, phone -4567.
FOR RENT: Best located email
furnished apartment or room,
clean and Independent, 43rd
Street No. 13.
FOR RENT: $65 00, furnished
apartment 51 St. Number 10, call
4-1449 or 3-6480.
FOR RENT: Apartment, living living-dining
dining living-dining idom, bedroom, kitchen
and service. Street No. 3, Vis Vista
ta Vista Hermosa.
FOR RENT: Apartment exclu exclusive
sive exclusive place, comfortable, beautiful,
all conveniences. Can be seen
evenings from 4 to 6. Vallerino
Place, 71 Carr Trensfrtmlca No.
9, phone 4-1016.
FOR RENT: Modern and attrac attractive
tive attractive two bedroom apartment with
all conveniences, near Hotel Pa Panama.
nama. Panama. Compose Alegre, telephone
3-0702.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment comfortably furnished, San
Francisco. Phone 3-5024.
SOON BELLA VISTA
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 86 Mo,
on new ears
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
TANKIRS COLLIDI
YOKKAICHI, Japan (UPI) -The
12,400-ton German tanker
Helma Entz collided with a Jap Japanese
anese Japanese freighter yesterday and
burst into flames. Crewmen of
the tanker finally put out the fire
after a desperate 13-hour battle.
The German vessel collided with
the 6,890-ton freighter Shofuku
Maru.

TH E R E V0LT
7 OF THE Y
LgladiajortJ
I SUP6P CINE SCOPE I

FOR SALE: Sport cars, 1955
Thunderbird, A-l condition, ra radio,
dio, radio, heater, overdrive, power
seats, etc. House 507 Parita
Place, Ancon.

FOR SALE: 1955 Ford, tudor,
fordomatic, radio, heater, call 2 2-3444.
3444. 2-3444. FOR SALE: 1949 Hudson four
doer sedan. Good tires, a good
car for transportation. Call 2 2-3320
3320 2-3320 or 0428 Frangipani St.
Apt. C, Ancon.
FOR SALE: 1957 Ford station
wagon, 6 cyl., standar, radio,
heater, undercoat, seat covert,
etc. 15.000 miles, leaving for
States, $1550. Excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, Balboa 1253.
FOR SALE: 1958 Vauxhall sta station
tion station wagon, excellent condition
$1750 2109-B, Curundu. Phone
83-2165. anytime.
FOR SALE: 1953 Mercury
Monterey, tudor, hardtop, excel excellent
lent excellent condition. Call Balboa 4337.
FOR SALE: 1958 Cadillac
Coupe De Ville Pink and Black.
Fully Ex. Colon 1369.
FOR SALE: 1958 Mercury
Montclair, 4-dbor white sidewall
tires, two-tone blue, approxima approximately
tely approximately 17,000 miles, radio, heater,
power steering, power brakes,
push button control $2700. Call
83-6105.
FOR SALE: 1956 Thunder Thunder-bird,
bird, Thunder-bird, with removeable hardtop,
continental spare tire, power
steering, Fordomatic, radio, wsrw
tires, new paint, tires and brakes.
Call Sot. Waller, Albrook 2166
or 5296 after five o'clock.
FOR SALE: 1956 English Nash
Metropolitan convertible. White
with blak top. New matching
upholstery, tires, etc. Must see
to appreciate, Balboa 2676.
FOR SALE: 1949 Buick good
running condition. Apply A. F.
Barr 0273-D. Gamboa.
FOR SALE: 1956 Lincoln hard hardtop,
top, hardtop, excellent buy. Call 3-3909.
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE: 14 ft. speed Hujl,
fiber glassed, 22 h.p. Mercury,
motor, liscensed for 4. New chant
trailer. Will sell separately or aa
unit. Curundu 5227, telephone
after 5 p.m.
45 foot double planked ex-Navy
boat hull for sale. Asking price
$1000 or make an offer. Com
mander Taylor, Navy 2551.
SERVICES
TELEVISION SERVICE
Experts in TV. radio. Hi-Fi and
transistors.
We do more Work, because we
do it the best.
Phone 2-1905.
Crawford Agencies.
Tivoll Avenue No. 18-20.
U.S. Television
Means reliability
better service,
and lasting repairs.
Phone 3-7607 Panama.
9 A.M. to 10 P.M.
POSTPONE TALKS
GENEVA (UPl) The nuclear
talks between the United States
hoviet Union, and Britain were
postponed yesterday for the third
straight day to give Russia time
to answer a sweeping Western
concession on the staffing of con control
trol control posts in any proposed ban on
nuclear tests. The meeting was
rescheduled for Monday.

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

GREAT WHITE FLEET

New Orleans Service 1 1 Arrive
- Griatobal
YAQUE July 17 July 5
MORAZAN July 81 July 29
TJLUA Aug. 1 Aug. 8
YAQUE Aur. 8 Aug. 15
MORAZAN Aug. 15 Aug. 22
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
New York Service Sails Arrivs
Cristobal
PARISMINA July 21 July 27
COMAYAGUA July 24 Aug. 2
JUNIOR Aur. 4 Aug. 9
SAN JOSE Aug. 11 Aug. 1
METAPAN Aug. 18 Aug. 23
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
' CRISTOBALW.C.CA. FEEDER 'SERVICE
rEXITA .Every (15) Dy
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattli
SPECIAL EXCURSION FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR JJALBOA:
To New York and Return V- S27.VM
To San Francisco andor Seattle and Return .$400.00

CRISTOBAL

1 1

FOR SALE: Aged natural ma manure
nure manure at give-away price by the
truckload. Call 2-2641.
FOR SALE: Leaving for States.
Norge Freeier, Wostinghouse
frigidaireV Dodge '56, duty paid,
25,500 miles. Telephone 3-
1813.
, FOR SALE: Dinette set. for.
mica, wrought iron with 6 chairs
1 $60.00; two chairs, overstuffed
foam cushions, $35.00 each. 2
piece aefa foam, $75.00; chest
of drawers $10.00; 2 desks,
310.00 each; baby heighs chairs
$5.00. Call 2-3444.
FOR SALE: Air conditioner
h.p. Emerson, 9 months old,
$125.00, Hi-Fi record player, 4
speed, one year old $50.00. Call
2-3444.
FOR SALE: 1 Soodtell-Wil-liamsen
Amplifier. 1 Goodsell Goodsell-Willlamson
Willlamson Goodsell-Willlamson Pre-Amp (matched).
1 Fisher Tuner, Model FM 80.
1 Garrard Transcription Motor
Turntable, Model 301. 1 Gray
Viscus Arm. 1 G.E. Diamond Va Variable
riable Variable Reluctance Style. 1 Wil Wil-aox
aox Wil-aox Gay "Imperial Recordio"
Tape Recorder. 1 Electro-Volee
Slimair Dynamic Microphone,
Model 636. 1 Motorolo HI-FI
Console Record Player. All brand
items. Navy 3723.
FOR SALE: Girls' 26" bicycle.
Tel. 2-4416, house 1534-A,
Calabash St. Balboa.
FOR SALE: 100 ft. white picket
fence, 36 ins, high, three gayes,
14 Venetian blinds 11 need
painting and new tapes. Very
cheap. Call Balboa 2194.
FOR SALE: Zenith Vietrola
shortwave radio combination,
S'i' G.E. refrigerator, water
heater, call 3-4304.
FOR SALE: Maternity and baby
clothes store Stock, owner unable
to give it personal attention. For
information apply en premises.
Justo Arosemena Ave. in front of
Royal Crown Cola.
FOR SALE: B tr W Amateur
Radio Transmitter 115 Watts
Input. Excellent eendition. $225.
KZ5FL, phone Balboe 1694.
FOR SALE: (1) Air-conditioner
Fodder All Weather, 1
Ton, 220 Volt Automatic, $200.
2) Washing Machine MAY MAY-TAG
TAG MAY-TAG Fully automatic $250.
(3) TV, RCA 21 inch, all metal
table model with rotating stand
and antennae $200. (4)
Dishwasher HOT POINT
Portable and Front Opening
$250. All are hi excellent operat operating
ing operating eendltiend and have lust bee
completely serviced. May be seen
by appointment only at Quarry.
Heights. Telephone 12-1217.
FOR SALE: Lullabye year eld
crib with mattress, $25. 00 and
Lullabye chifforobe, $21.00.
Phone 3-2247 er 4-0196.
Special (from $7.50) en "Back
to School'' and ether permanent
Mondays and Tuesdays sjntll
Sept. "YOU CAN BE SURE"
when your work It done in
Genell's long established Cocoli
Beauty Shop. Experienced State Stateside
side Stateside operators. Navy 3812.

NURSERY SCHOOL
Transportation provided, con constant
stant constant supervision, ago 2Vi te f.
Fenced in yard, eall Balboa 1214.
Rooms
FOR RENT: Confortable room
for students. Uruguay Street and
48th. Tel. 3-6506.

i

TELEPHONES:
2121 PANAMA.2-2904

FOR SALI: HMiehela" t.
leaving tha Itrhmu. Houee 6441
Ui Riei, l.lbea Tel. 2-2672.

FOR SALI i OrerttuffeJ (tying
reem let, new condition 4
ereh ear new Guatemalan fur furniture,
niture, furniture, cliaaa, Btlbea 4495,
mornings.
FOR SALE: Frifidaira refrigera refrigerator.
tor. refrigerator. Goad running condition, $50.
. May be soon at 0428 Frana Irani
St., Apart. C. Aneon.
FOR SAL!: 4 burner fat tteve
with even and broiler, practically
new. Call "H" No. 1126, first
floor, Apt. L,
FOR SALE: Large dlnlnfroem
table, 10 chain buffet' wonderful
condition, mutt pall, $125.00)
parakeet and cafe, $20.00; tofa
$35 00; 1 Rattan tablet atop atop-down
down atop-down typo, $25.00; small end
tables, $8.00. Phono lalboa 2 2-1762.
1762. 2-1762. tFOR SALE; Laundromat wash washer
er washer Wostinghouse, f months eld,
$1(5.00, available August 10,
9 cu. ft. refrigerators. Unit 9
months old, $60.00. Call 2-S444.
PERSONALS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.I.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
Special Offers
HELP WANTED: Civil Engi Engineers
neers Engineers and draftsman with high highway
way highway experience. Write Box 4356.
WANTED: Correspondent, ap apply
ply apply Poikard Zona Libre, S.A.,
Tel. 1920.
WANTED : Experienced office
clerk with knowledge of account accounting,
ing, accounting, apply Peikard, Zona Libre,
S.A., Tel. 1920.
Lessons
Loam Spanish with Mrs. Rome Romero's.
ro's. Romero's. Practical conversation 4th
of July Avenue. TI-352, apart apartment
ment apartment No. 10. Phono 2-3021.

Eight Unionists Sentenced
In NC Dynamiting Conspiracy

, HENDERSON, N. C. (UPI) -Attorneys
for eight union mem members
bers members convicted of conspiring to
cripple a strike-bound textile mill
here studied the trial record to today
day today in preparation for an appeal
to the State Supreme Court.
An all male jury yesterday
deliberated about hours before
finding the eight members of the
Textile Workers Union of America
guilty on three .eounts each of
conspiracy.
Judge Raymond Mallard, charg charging
ing charging that the unionists had' con
sidered themselves above tne
law," immediately handed down
stiff prison sentences. The de defendants
fendants defendants served notice of the ap appeal
peal appeal and were released under
bond.
The defendants were accused of
conspiring to dynamite a power
plant serving the Harriet-Hender
son cotton mills and a boiler at
one of the mills and to burn the
mills' main office.
Mallard sentenced Boyd Payton,
Carolines director for the TWUA;
Lawrence Gore, a TWUA organi organizer:
zer: organizer: and Charles Auslander. a
TWUA official from Rockingham
County, to six to 10 years on eaci
count. He ordered that the sen sentences
tences sentences be served concurrently.
Four members of the two union
loci as which have been on strike
at the mills since last Nov. 17
Calvin Ray Pegram, Robbert Ab
bott, Warren Walker and Johnny
Martin were sentenced to five to
seven years each.
A fifth man, Malcolm Jarrell,
described by Mallard as the "low
man on the totem pole" in the
conspiracy, was sentenced to two
Tire Pacific Steam
(INCORPORATED BY

FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
S.8. "FLAMENCO" July 26
8.8. "PIZARRO" Aug. S
8.8. "REINA DEL MAR" Aug. 14
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GCAIRA,
KINGSTON. HAVANA, NASSAU. BERMUDA. SPAIN
AND FRANCE
8.8. "REINA DEL MAR" (Z0.M5 Tons)
(Air-condltloned)
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
M.V. "SANTANDER" July $9
M.V. "SALINAS" .Aug. 1$
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD.HOLLAND
AMERICA LINK
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
M.V. TARIMA" ,, An. 10
8.8. "DINTELDYK" , t tv 1?
TO UKCONTINENT
8.8. "DALERDYK" July 10
M.V. "DONGEDYK" Aug;. 7
LL SAILINGS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
' TELEPHONES:
Cristobal 3-16545 o Panama J-1157i Balboa 1-1905

FOR SALE: Lots 500 and 1.000
meters, h the Nimvo Hipodromo
Urbantietioa across tha Romosi
Racetrack. All lots with street
fronts, sewago, water aula and
electricity. CsB W. McBamott.
Tel. 4-0976.

FOR SALE: Beautiful residence.
4 bedroom, livingroom, dining-,
room, library, recreation room,
large kitchen, pantry, maid's
room with serviced hot water, ter terrace,
race, terrace, garden, garage, land 1.800
m. 9th.' Street No. 28, San
Francisco.
FOR SALE: Large 2 bedroom
house furnished in Santa- Clara
near beach with guest cabin, easy
payments. Called 3-4569 Pana Panama.
ma. Panama. FOR SALE: House at Santa Cla Clara,
ra, Clara, quick sale, bast offer over
$3,000.00. Leaving the Isthmus.
Balboa, Tel. 2-2672.
FOR SALE: Property on 4th of
July, Ave, tower floor is now
occupied by Swift 6 Co., eleven
ether apartments are in the same
main building No. T1-132. Throe
are also 16 spaces and apartments
all rented in the roar of the main
building, also a large space of
land that can bo built on. The
rentals will pay for the entire
property in about 1 5 years at tho
present rentals. There is also a
largo space of land that can bo
built on. Owner is usually at his
office on some property daily or
phono Hopkins, Balboa 2966.
WANTED
WANTED: Radio trasmiter and
communication receiver, call 2 2-2460,
2460, 2-2460, Panama.
Secretary-stenographer er clerk clerk-typist,
typist, clerk-typist, British, open for imme immediate
diate immediate engagement. Box S-1 34.
WANTED: A good cook and
housekeeper. Good salary, San
Francisco, Calle Novena. Casa
No. 41 altos, Tel. 3-5111.
Car Rentals
Your ear being repaired? Rent a
dependable Horticar, eall Fiesta
Tel. 8-4568, lobby El Panama
Hilton.
to three years.
Mallard set bond for Payton,
Gore and Auslander at $25,000
each.for Abbott, Pegram, Walker
and Martin at $20,000 each and
for Jarrell at $10,000.
Before passing sentence. Mal
lard said, "These people were
led to believe they were above the
law and enjoyed perfect immunity
from the law. There has been
much criticism of the government
by these people and the people
of Vance County have been in injured.
jured. injured. "Fear has ridden rampant in
Vance County. Payton, twice
dally, made speeches on the
radio which were inflammatory.
After the sentencing, he raid,
"I could have given each of you
45 years. The sentence I gave you
is intended to be a deterrent to
others and to impress on others
who are like-minded that they
must uphold the law."
Gore, described in testimony as
the "payoff man" for the plot,
was singled out for special com comment
ment comment when it was his turn for
sentencing. Mallard told Gore,
"Some day you will come to
learn that the law is bigger then
you and bigger than the union."
In answer to defense pleas for
mercy, Mallard said, "The fami families
lies families of these men who have been
pointed out to me are indeed
lovely families. You (the defense
attorneys) want me to think of
their families. If these men had
been thinking of their families,
they would not be here asking for
the mercy of the court."
Navigation Company
ROYAL CHARTER 140)

Investor's Guide- v
-By SAM SHULSKY

Sy SAM SHULSKY
Q. I tin 61, considering retire retirement
ment retirement by 65. I have a $10,000 po policy
licy policy with a cash surrender value
of $5,000 or $6,000. If I take
that out in an annuity for my myself
self myself and wife, it will amount to a a-bout
bout a-bout $30 a month. Of course, this
will deplete the capital. Could I in
vest this money, get very nearly
as much and retain the capital?
And where?
A. I start with the assumption
that this policy is not your only
insurance protection.
On a strict money basis, I
would vote for the investment o o-ver
ver o-ver the annuity.
If you4&lce $30 a month annuity,
that would amount to $360 a year
and, of course, leave no estate.
a you put $5,000 into five pr
cent stocks, you could draw $250
a year without touching the nnn
cipal. And if it amounted to $R,'
000, it would be $300 a year. (If
you wanted to tie your income
down to a fixed dollar amount
by buying straight preferreds or
bonds you could come even
closer to the annuity income. The
annuity Income is fixed, too.)
While I realize that a stock
market investment is always vul vulnerable
nerable vulnerable from the point of view of
market value, I also realize that
a fixed income is always subject
to deterioration via inflation.
You will have social security
and a company pension to fall
back on for fixed income. I don't
see then, why you should also
fix the income from your invest investments
ments investments for the rest of your life

Negro Discrimination In South
Wavers; Treatment Inconsistent

ATLANTA (UPI)-Polite, well well-dressed
dressed well-dressed Negroes may be served
in the restaurant at Atlanta Mu Municipal
nicipal Municipal Airport without incident;
others may be turned away.
A prominent Negro reported he
was told flatly by the restaurant
management that no Negro could
be seated and served. Another was
told Negroes would be served be behind
hind behind screen.
In Columbus and Augusta, Ga.,
and Memphis, airport terminal
restaurants are segregated. In 17
other major southern cities the
air p o r t restaurant segregation
practices varv as in Atlanta's
cafe.
In the Atlanta case, observers
for the Southern Regional Council
believe the policy is so ill-defined
that treatment of Negroes depends
'almost entirely' upon which em employes
ployes employes are on duty. Others attri attribute
bute attribute the differential treatment to
the dress and bearing of the Ne Negroes
groes Negroes themselves.
The SRC issued a report Satur Saturday
day Saturday on the status of segregation
practices at bus and train sta stations
tions stations and airports in 21 southern
cities. It said segregation which
existed prior to 1955 is "slowly
cracking" and that the situation
is in a state of transition.
All 20 airline terminals sur surveyed
veyed surveyed have non-segregated wait waiting
ing waiting rooms, but there are no air airport
port airport eating facilities for Negro
passengers at Augusta. At Mem
phis Negroes may be served at
snack bar. At Columbus they
may eat at a lunch counter.
Airport toilets are seereeated in
Chattanooga, Memphis, Augusta
and Columbus, but the degree of
segregation varies. The other cit cities
ies cities have non segregated rest
rooms, the report said.
Seven cities have non-seereeated
railroad waiting rooms Memphis,
Portsmouth, Richmond, Lynch
burg and Norfolk, Va., Louisville's
Union Station, and St. Petersburg,
Fla.
In Nashville, Greensboro. Little
Rock, Louisville and Memphis,
Alonso Johnson
Wins Decision
Over Pastrano
LOUISVILLE. Kentucky. July
25 (UPD Alonw Johnson of
Braddock, Pa., won a unanimous
decision over Willie Pastrono last
night in a heavyweight fitfht in
Louisville.
It was Johnson's 13th straight
win and k earned him an Aug.
14 date In New York with Argen Argentine
tine Argentine heavyweight Alex Miteff
Johnson was filling in for Miteff
last night after the Argentinian
was sidelined by a Kidney lnfec
tion.
Johnson battered his heavier foe
in the middle rounds and opened
a cut over Pastrano's eye In the
sixth. But neither man was ever
in seriou trouble.
JUST IN CASE
NEW YORK rUPI) An ambu
lance stood by the stage entrance
throughout last mgnrs concert
at Lewishon Stadium. But tne
sinffinf star. Graciela Rivera, for
whom It was waiting, jusi in
case, made it through the concert
and home In her maternity dress
VOLCANO IRUPTS
KARTJIZAWA. Japan (UPD-
The Mount Asama volcano erupt
ed yesterday, sending columns of
smoke 14.000 feet into the air and
spravine ashes over this resort
town' 80 miles north of Tokyp. No
casualties wera reported. :

The $5,000 to $6,000 in VertffHiea
may go ud in value over thai nert

20 years, or it may go down. But
Dow vaiue ana income are likely
to keep step with the cost of liv living.
ing. living. And that's something.'
my sisier, a WIOOW, D01QS
Braniff, Allegheny, jnd Industrial
Enterprises. I urged her to sell
and buy a mutual fund. Do you a
gree?
A, I agree that these are not
widow's stocks. They are all
speculative and Allegheny doesn't
pay a dividend. I assume aha
needs income.
The answer rnnlH ho mnvn,i
fund,, in a lump sum purchase, or
a few high grade corporate issues.
Q. ,1 am 72, retired, with a small
pension. I bought the following
in 1955 and 1956 Dover, Bosch,
Bell Minerals and Chemicals,
Central, St. Regis, Southern Pa Pacific,
cific, Pacific, TWA, United Air Lins,
Whirlpool and Woodward Iron.

Have $13,000 margin. Since I
trade, I feel I am not getting
enough dividends to pay for the
margin. Should I sell the slow
movers?
t A. I see no point to the marg margin,
in, margin, either.
But since you are retired I
should think you would sell out
the more speculative issues and
hold the safe dividend payers ra-
ther than "fast movers." In f
ther words, you ought to direct.
your thinking to the best quality

maena payers ratner than as assume
sume assume the risk of trying for fast
capital gain.
Negroes are allowed to sit and
be served at the same railroad
station restaurant lunch counter
as whites. In Memphis, this applies
only to interstate passengers.
In Chattanooga's Terminal Sta Sta-tion
tion Sta-tion a Negro interstate passenger
must go to the kitchen to bo
served.
There are no' eating facilities
for Negroes at railroad stations
at Augusta, Tampa and Richmond
although these have facilities for
whites. There are separate eating
facilities in seven of the eities.
Bus carriers "have been th
most resistant to change,"' tha
SRC said. Rlcnmond and Ports-'
mouth alone have non-segregated
uug waning rooms, although Ne Negro
gro Negro interstate passengers infre infrequently
quently infrequently use general waiting rooms
in Atlanta, Lynchburg, Norfolk.
Jacksonville, Greensboro, Louis
vine, msnvuie and Little Rock.
Only in three cities are there even
limited eating facilities for Ne Negroes
groes Negroes at bus Stations Pnrtemmitl.
Louisville and Nashville.
All bus stations surveved hava
egreeated rest rnnme bv
those in Richmond and Greens-
FBI Enters Hunt
For Armed Convicts
With Aged Hostage
FAIRFAX. Va. (UPIV-Tb FBI
officially entered the hunt today
for two "extremely dangerous"
vuuvicis who juanappea an w-year-old
man as a hostage.
Both men. one of them a eon.
victed murderer, were believed
neaviiy armed. A 15 state alert
was broadcast for them and thr
hostage, Peter Nielsen.
The convicts were identified at
James Hall, 36, Rockymount, Va.,
and Connie Plott. 27. .Alleriianv
County, Va. Hall is a convicted
murderer and Plott was serving a
sentence tor forgery when they
slipped away from a prison road
gang in Fairfax County Tuesday.
They forced Ndelsen from bed
Thursday without giving bim tima
to change from his striped pajam
as, stoie nis car and shotgun and
a large supply xf canned cooda.
They also were believed to be car carrying
rying carrying a rifle.
Nielsen suffered a sMeht stroke
two years aeo and walks with a
limp.

tor, who lives one block away in""
the town of McLean, Va., said
she saw her father's car beint
driven by two strange men with
the elderly man in the back seat,
clad in his pajamas.

A service station operator re reported
ported reported Thursday night that tha
three stopped for gasoline. He said
Neilson was driving and the car
Was headed toward Leesburtf.
They stopped at a Leesburg serv
ice station later.
Police said Hall bad scars on
111 4anM mnA InMtmn mnA Vlitft
was tattooed on .both forearms.
Both were described as 5 feet, 11
inches tail, weighing about 150
pounds.
Navy Lt. Robert G. Clark and

a companion, uraee Mccurdy, a
secretary on the staff of Rep.
Dnte B. Fascell (D-Fla.). said v

they saw the two fUEitives before

the kidnaping. Clark tald he
slowed down to pick up a hitch hitchhiker
hiker hitchhiker and another man sprantf j

from some nusnes wieionni a n,
fie. Tha naval offlacr sped

0

t



V.

8ATnUIr, JUIT 25, 1959
"THI STORY OF MARTHA WAYNE
THE P4S4MA AMZRin All INDEHWDFNT DAflf KIWSPArTS;
PA? NINE
, Not So Cur
BY WILSON SCRUGGS
r GRUIKSR i;DB
rasttrwnTtoi
soao; pappy put ou know
OU HAVE TO PESO l
THE REP'S THOROUGHNESS. THE
ONLY PERSON IN THIS ROOM THPV
WOULPNT FXSURE AS A PAN6CR
TO THEMSELVES WOUU7 K TERRlf
'RISCILLA'S POP
The Clincher
By AL VERMEIt

IT'S LONESOME OUT HERE.f5-
SUPFOSf I MAKE THE UST )LL -JU Zg.

. . f HO, MARTHA, tl JUST WT-
v LAMAR AMD I HAVE HAD A J
ciM.yyte bebA misuhdekstawdiwu. v-
SOOifCT.ISAW- J i
THIUSWHOMS?' J7!

U but you doJ yes, at uast XTWUK sq fiirnuj there's the aiuic UP AHEAD, --v
- if ..yf jrr IT"kit" -''iy ayff? r -sr.lj-

.ALLEY OOP

fti'n Vi it.

ryi
-.1
CAPTAIN EASY

MORTY MEEKLB

, iri'iv-'

oft ftfff ImMK.

FRECKLES AND Hit FRIENDS

Letter From Home

BY MERRILL BLOSSI R

606M.MOA S.

ShoUCDnT WOfW

LIKE THIS.' JUST LISTER

ID HER. LETTER,

DON.Y ,fau- OFF a
Hrs--dotJT aerSuM
STROKE. OB. DWMIC any
Aad water. &e Mice

lTO THE IMDiAMS THEV

CAM Be QUfTK NASTY
AND 5WAJt.E OF STRAN

GERS WITH MUSTACHES

r-

- ALSO" 6yARD
A6AINST .TORNADOES,
DUST $TQRMSAND ,.
FLASH FLOODS NO
BE tspeciAixy CAU TIOUS
OP RATTLE

SNAKES, 6ILA mooters;

awKJ-lONS AND OWCR,
POISOMOUS CREATURES

LOVE.

WE WANT A RERWD

Safer this Way

A Y)N9IPCRABLE NO... JUST
- CHUNK OF IT I'LL SCRAPS LEAVE IT
TH' WAV NORE OlN' REMEMBER? "WAT MUCH Trf WAV
B"f ON ABOUT NATCHEZ, A 1 35,00O OFF FOR YOU IT 19...
5 BODV'P THINK THIS J WORTH, TO; ANY TIME S

...TOO BK3 TO RELIEVE
AND TOO HEAVY TO
STEAL ....NOW HEAD TM
EAT ANP LETS 0

Y V. T. HAMLIN

f- IS
t Wt fcy Iff Ww h. T.M. Ihc OM .it Cff.

f IVI A BUST.'X
A COMPLETE J

WASWiOUTv) TjfS
' I'M NO v7 Ar'v
GOOD AT) KVa
THING) l

CKDNTT SAYYBLESS YOU
THAT POP! I PRISCILLA.
IT ISN'TWU REALLY

YOU'RE PLENTY)
GOOD AT
TIGHTENING )
T ROLLER rJS
VJTESI

3UCS BUNNY

Hard to Please

- -SWELL.TvA 5H0ULPA PUT MORI 1

: N. V PETUNIA 1 I MU5TARP ON EM AN J
f HOW ARB THE V. -i MOW SUSA1? IN TK' A

THIS CHICKEN'S TOO WELL
-v PONE T' SUIT MB!

(iit how you) f
LIKE THE
SALAPfJ

)So!V f EPs

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

Boots Is Hungry

BY EDGAR MARTIN

I Am t

wtiO-

n

I I II

Sight-Seeing

BY LESLIE TURNER

0BVI0USLy( THAT

POOR 5A? WILL SOOM

tt PUTTV In HEK HAWD5,

UMLE55 I STICK CLOSE

AMP CRAMP HER STYLE!

1)1

PFBMkP VOU LIKS TO TOUR

THE CASTLEkSENORITA TRENT

JUST CALL

WE WMSJONY

YES.IPIOVC

IT!

BUT IP I KNOW EASY, T OH, BUT I AM
HE'D BE BOREPSTIP1 J lNTERE6TED?r

DO YOU HAVE ANY IF 1 WON'T B6

PICTURES HE CAN V IN THE WAV I

BE LOOKING AT

' EASX PlEAEl WLLVOU Y AND SPEAKINS OF

HEELS! LOOKS TIKEPl tOULP

.SOMEPLACEWTO

W4ST-aTJ.r

IIIIIT -PmiHK"""-,

IMUS

7-18

Something's Wrong

BY DICK CAVALLI

FIR6T HE PBOMOTPD

. TO VICE PRESIDENT.

THEN HE PBOMISHCJAaOFUS
A BIG RAISE ANOA HUGE

l-OF-LIVING BONUS.

AND THEN HE CLIMBED OPON

mm i-sr ami) ur cncn

in.rwvi nefciNi II

W A OUKt.BUT WE DIDNT

wtt II THAT WAY.

WHAT BOOM lMP.

BOOMER IN, PLEASE?

n

HOPfT
7-a

::6UI BOARDING HOUSE

MAJOR HOOPL E OUT OUR WAY

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

'mo PAYS TH gAR
LPASDER WAS A COMPLETE FLOP WHEM ?-u at ui Sm
IT CAMS TO BRIMSIN6 THE MA30f? OUT C4 cop nviMTf
OF HIS FOS THIS MORMING WAS THE- WS c
WLbES.TYET.'THSFlREH&N HAD TO 74LC9.
CUT HIM OUT OF THE FIREPLACE WMEM Cl,nr
HE 60T STUCK CLEANING THE CHIMNEY" H) J;2Lur
gw CAN, VOL) SET HlAVTO THE ZaToV 1
OWLS CLUg PEF0R5 y 2fV
THS WRECKS TH& iy -rn

fWHAT, TAKIN" A BATH WITHOUT V NO, THE EASY WAY I'M
ME TELLIN'XI TO f THAT'S TIREPOF YOUR INSPECTION A
,1111. 6REAT, BUTINLYASKEPWU TOURS UP MY-5LEEVES,
111 TO WASH LIP A WT-IWJ'T THIS I POWN MY NECK, AN1 INTO
' IV POIN' IT THE HARP y MY EARS, WHILE 661 TIN'
, I In! ftr. WAY ? I CHEWEPDUTALL JS
THE WORRTr.

ftkf Eftafe True Life Adventures

ix i a m ir w

LAXV SUSAN OF THE Blt? VORU?,
ePOTS AN UNOUAKI7H? SlE6T. SHE 6003-1
LAWS HER OWN ES3 AMP PEPARTS.

but thi time
mrs.cowwc
- has fjoosp ths
VVR040 NEST.

MffruBR VELJjOW-BREASTED CHAT

WETURNS, PETECrrs THE TRAUPANP
PESTKOVB THE EfifcS. SOMETIME6 SHH
PE6TROV HER OWN AS WSU-. s

vim

Hi" u

T.M. R. U.S. Pat. Off.
IMf bf NBA trk, h..

'Crime waves sweeping the city and this is the way
you spend your time!"

SIDE GLANCES

By Calbraith

V

-A-A V I I

V 1 I

Stl .11 -X- A V I I

mm

7-20

T.M. Nf U P.I Off.
4t 1Ht by NBA BtrvH, li.e.

"Mom didn' put in any pickles. She's 31 years old
and she's kind of forgetful!"

830 Jfa. Pattern 1090 Xa.

T.M. Reff U Pat. Off.
) 1Sf Nf A Berate, tM.

7-2

"Weather Bureau? Don't you know it's a sin
to tell fibs?"

AfOVtA$ PAAAMA AAtWA KS

PANAMA
CALI

4

Today's TV Progr am

S 00 Jukt iox Jury
4:00 Bowline Derby
I 00 Lucky tr Sportt TTmt
i jo pan6bama

7:00 I Ud 1 LIvh

7 M) Miuqurid Prty
1:00 Dlnnh flhnr

9:00 Th SUi and Tht Story
:!0 Hihwy Patrol
10:00 feplt Ar Funny
10:00 The Mllllondr
11:00 CFN NEWS
11 15 Pat Boon and
Star Performance

Courtesv of Aerorlas Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3-1698 3-1 C9t
OFFICE 'HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

, J"



V'
. V
n
Kan
traiaht
j-i. ::
?eaJ sfory on pay3

' 7 ( :
Meal

iCobfe

OS

no

:UdylOfl

Air Forces Thor IRBM Takes Movies
From Nose Cone 300 Miles Above Earth

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., July. 18-inch data capsule in the base
25 (UPI) The Air Force fired; of the special "nea". sink" nose
a Thor intermediate range mis-'euie, uis set to take pictures
sile with a 16-millimeter movie1 3l'C :.iles ..bove the earth,
camera in its nos cone 150U i Purpo.s.- of '.he picture-taking
mile ctownrange to mj. Ann-1 was to uuin information about
gua lsiand yesterdav and recov-1 performance of the nation's
eifc the cone, camera and lihnlmo.st reliable IRBM, partuuUu partuuUu-intact
intact partuuUu-intact j lv at the time of hose cone
The' camera, encased in an! separation. It was tin; second
. ; such film test and the data cap-

'For Men Only1 Tour
01 Europe Open
To Isthmians
A sixty-da v excursion to Europe
"For Men Only" js being organiz organized
ed organized by a Colombian travel agency
and will be available to residents
of Panama and the Canal Zone.
A spokesman for the Lanseair
Agency of Bogota states, this ex excursion
cursion excursion is unprecedent in the an an-lals
lals an-lals of pleasure trips."' It calls for
visits to 20 important cities of the
Old World.
The "For Men Only" excursion
will begin Aug. 3 and will end
Sept. 28.
Trie trip originates in Bogota and
larranquilla Via Avianca Airways.
The spots to be visited during
the trip have been carefully select select-ad.
ad. select-ad. In Madrid, aside from the usual
tourist attractions, the male tour tourists
ists tourists will visit the gay. cosmopolitan
Perico Chicote bar, located on the
busy Gran Via. They will have the
opportunity of being invited into
Chicote's private liquor museum,
the only one of its kind, with liq liq-our
our liq-our from all over the world.
In addition, there will be invita invitations
tions invitations to "field picnics", trips to
trie' "Caves of Luis Candelas", Me Meson
son Meson de San Javier" and "Meson
Segoviano".
Guides will be employed to take
the itinerant makes to all interest interesting
ing interesting spots, enabling them to save
both time and money.
Visits to the Moulin Rouge and
Follies Bergere in Paris are also
Included in the 1,368 hour excur excursion.
sion. excursion. Weather Or Not
This weather report for ths 2i
hours ending 8 a. m. today is
prepared by the Meteorological
and Hydrographic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE:
High 92 84
s Low 75 74
HUMIDITY!
High 95 96
Low 62 85
WIND:
(max. mph) NW 16 N 17
RAIN (inches) T 3.41
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 82 83
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake 83.25
Madden Dam 212.23
BALBOA TIDES
SUNDAY, JULY 26
High
Time
8:09 a.m.
8:26 p.m.
Time
1:52 a.m.
2:28 p.m.
lit.
15.1 ft.
13.9 ft.
Low
Ht.
1.5 ft.
2.3 ft.
TODAY! 75c. 4Cc
1:35, 3:25, 5:20, 7:10. 9:00 p.m.
m
tit
7
4
WW
n IMTUfjQ MTSIS
A Sight To
Shatter
The
Nerves!
FTE It Froti

' I HP i)T!S w,Ht

i t

1 "TtS

sue- containing I lie camera was
ai.-o recovered on the previous
i li il t
Presumably the camera yes yesterday
terday yesterday started clicking at the
time the missile booster section
separated Horn the nose cone
125 miles above the earth
moments after it blasted off in into
to into morning sunlight at 8:47 am.
The launching of the 65-foot
snub-nosed missile was smooth.
The daylight shot was plan planned
ned planned to afford proper exposure
for the film.
In order to work properly

, :
i y -; Wh-
-rf F j All-
" n v r
1 33

SYMBOL OF NUCLEAR ACE-Gleaming, knife-like prow
of America's first atomic surface ship, the cruiser Long Beach,
symbolizes nuclear fleets of the future as the ship awaits
launching at the Quincy (Mass.) Shipyards. Powered by twln.
nuclear reactors, the Long Beach is 721 feet long, 73 feet wide
and displaces about 14,000 tons. Armament aboard the cruiser
will include Terrier and Talos missiles.

2 Solons Offer Substitute To Put
Teeth Back In Labor Reform Bill

o
WASHINGTON (L'l'l) Two high high-ranking
ranking high-ranking House Labor CoinmiUee
members yesterday olfered a sul) sul)-stilute
stilute sul)-stilute to "restore the teeth" to
the labor reform bill narrowly ap
proved by '.We committee Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday. They expected President Ki-
', senliower's support.
! Other members ol the sharply
split committee began lining up
i support to soften the committee
bill. They claimed the provisions
j to which they objected would hurt
' clean unions instead ol racketeers.
! The flurry of activity apparently
! foreshadowed a tierce battle when
I Ihe House takes
I about two weeks
!oi'ps.'iv a
it'lee.
the
tD
;H
The tougher substitute for
by Reps. Phil M. Lanilrum
Ga.) and Roberi P. Griffm
Mirh.1.
Griffin said he expected F.isen
bower lo back t lie measure, lie
said its provisions had been dis discussed
cussed discussed with White House and La Labor
bor Labor Department experts. Lan-i
drum said the substitute had a
good chance.
However, the Landrum-Griffin
measure was not carbon copy of
the administration's recommenda recommendations,
tions, recommendations, and the Labor Department
said it was standing on its sup support
port support of the President's proposals.
Landrum is co-chairman and
Griffin is ranking GOP member of
a House labor subcommittee that
worked for months on a labor re reform
form reform bill. They said they voted for
the committee measure but only
to get the issue to the House
Floor.
The two congressmen said th"
I substitute "restores the teeth in
the Senate-passed bill which were

the nose cone had to be con controlled
trolled controlled in flight so that its
base was directed toward the
earth during most of the bal ballistic
listic ballistic arc.

Prior to re-entry into the high schools passed the 50 mar
atmosphere the camera was setin a surge of last-day activity
to shut itself off and the data j without any show of violence,
capsule was ejoeted. 1 By registering at Central, Hall

in the previous test, tne
mera caugnt pictures oi uie
earth from the highest altitude
ever achieved a panoramic
sweep of the Florida peninsula
and the South Atlantic coast as
far as the Carolinas and Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky as the nose cone sep separated
arated separated at the edge of the "dark "darkness
ness "darkness of space."
The previous, data capsule re recovery
covery recovery took only 39 minutes.
Yesterday the no!; cone and
camera were reported recover recovered
ed recovered pt 11:20 am after a-n Air
Force search plane sighted
them in th eimpact area.
extracted by t hellouse committee
and adds important and neces necessary
sary necessary provisions to deal directly
with abuses left untouched."
To Sack Chang
It would place tougher re restrictions
strictions restrictions on secondary boycotts
and organizational picketing and
restore the "bill of rights" for
rank-and-file unionists passed by
the enate. The committee toned
down penalties in the enate ver
sion.
Rep. August E. Johansen
(K-Mich.) said he would seek a
change in thef committee bill to

up i ne mil hi make it a criminal oilense to in in-One
One in-One lawmaker (Vrfere with the right of union

I members to petition Congress
1 Jnhansen said he had been told
Michigan Teamster Union officials
iare distributing cards to their me
bers for registering protests to
I the legislation. But themnion mem-
1 bers were not permitted to mail
the cards themselves, according to
Johansen's information.
He said this raised a possibility
of "improper coercion."
SOON BELLA VISTA

8K fisjw ?f j.
4 therevoltS
it OF THE V
JLgladiators'W
SUPEPCtNESCOPi

Negro Registrations 50
At 3 Little Rock Schools

0
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (UPI)
.Teeange Negroes registering yes
terday at the city's three white

ea-;and Tech, tne .-Negroes oDViousiy

were indicating their desire to at
tend those schools when classes
open next Sept. 8.
They had no assurance, how
ever, that they would be permitted
to integrate the previously aii-
white schools under the 1959 state
pupil placement law.
Thirteen white girls registered
at Horace Mann High School, this
integration-conscious city's only
all-Negro school. But it turned out
to be a hoax.
The girls, wearing shorts, drove
up to the school in a ear with
the words "Horace Mann or Bust"
written on the side.
As they came out, a newsman
asked them if they were serious
about signing up for classes at
the Negro school.
"Hell yes, we're serious," one of
them said.
They were asked if their parents
kenw about their trying to inte'gr
a Negro school.
"Yes, they are in favor of in integration,"
tegration," integration," one answered.
Their prank was discovered when
assistant school superintendent
Paul Fair checked their names
and addresses. The names fidi fidi-tiousy
tiousy fidi-tiousy and the addresses would
have placed their homes in such
nlaces as the Arkansas River
which runs through Uttle Rock,
Air-conditioned
Underwear To Cool
Astronauts In Space
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Mercury Astronauts will keep thir
dates with space dressed in $3,750
outfits consisting of a pressure
suit by Navy and airconditioned
underwear by Air Force.
This was disclosed today by
the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration in an an announcement
nouncement announcement that it is buying 20
of the outfits for a total ef about
$75,000.
The Astronauts, now training for
their roles as first Americans in
space, will wear the suits during
brief test flights in the nose of
a Redstone rocket and again when
they are boosted into orbits around
the earth by Atlas rockets. The
Redstone flights are expected some
time next year with the first
oribital attempt scheduled for
1961. (
The pressurized outer suit Is a
modified version of a suit made
for the Navy by the B. F. Good Goodrich
rich Goodrich Co. of Akron, Ohio. Beneath
the one-piece Navy suit the As Astronaut
tronaut Astronaut will wear a double-walled
ventilated rubber garment of a
kind used by Air Force pilots.
Next to his skin the Astronaut
will wear an old-fashioned suit of
long underwear.
Dr. Emil Grubbe
Undergoes 92nd
Cancer Operation
CHICAGO (UPI) Tor the
92nd time, surgeons operated on
Dr. Emil Grubbe yesterday for
cancer.
The doctors at Swedish Covenant
Hospital removed the first and
fourth fingers from Grubbe's right
hand and a lemon-sized cancerous
growth under his right arm.
The operation was just another
bitter chapter in the pain-wracked
life of the 84-year-old pioneer in
X ray therapy.
Since he became the first known
man to be burned by X-rays In
1895, Grubbe has lost parts of his
nose, his upper lip, his jaw, and
his left arm.
Thursday's operation took three
hours and 15 minutes. Afterward
the old scientist was report?'! to
be In satisfactory condition.
On the eve of his latest nners nners-tion,
tion, nners-tion, Grubbe clung to h's crusty
brand of atheism and his fa'th in
science.
"I want o advance humanity."
he said. "It has pothing to do
with reliflon."
TODAY

mil

.60
030

BY REQUEST OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC!

LANA TURNER
JOHN GAVIN
SANDRA DEE
DAN OHERLIHY
SUSAN KOHNER
ROBERT ALDA
uiiiiiTi iiAftnr i
MUM A mUUKt
... T
tn "ifM d nM"

it

2

tt

Ll

or in the middle of the Little Rock
municipal airport.
All four Little Rock schools were
kept closed last year by Gov.
Orval E. Faubus under a law
given him by a special session of
the Arkansas Legislature in August
1958. A three-judge federal court
later invalidated the law and a
companion measure which permit permitted
ted permitted withholding state funds from
the Little Rock school district.

Gov. Long Plans
Kansas City Trip
To Chat Vilh Harry
DENVER (UPI) Louisiana
Gov. Earl K. Long awoke from a
five-hour sleep early today and
began making plans to fly to
Kansas City where he hopes to
visit former President Harry t.
Truman.
Long, tired by a second after
noon at the races and extensive
telephone conversation, went to
bed before dar and awoke about
midnight.
Long told newsmen he wanted
to talk to Turman about the 1960
presidential election because he
hopes to be elected governor a a-gain
gain a-gain this yar and "to have som som-thing
thing som-thing to say about the Louisiana
delegation to the national conven convention."
tion." convention." The governor spent a losing day
at Centennial race track in subur suburban
ban suburban Littleton. He dropped $1700 on
one race because his chauffeur,
Louisiana State Police Lt. Bill
Wisner, placed Long's bet on the
wrong horse.
Wisner said he "made a
mistake" when he placed the bet
on Gola in the seventh race in instead
stead instead of Spicy, the governor's
choice and the winner in the race.
The governor was irritated and
growled, "Why didn't you put on
Spicy like I told you to?" But his
irritation did not compare with his
outbursts that marked his trip
through Texas and New Mexico
last week.
Frondizi Weathers
Government Crisis
As Navy Sec. Quits
BUEN03 AIRES, July 25
(UPI) Argentine President
Arturo Frondizi today accepted
the resignation of Navy Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Adolfo Estevez as his only
hope of ending a Naw revolt
that broke out last night.
Vice Adm. Estevez submitted
his resignation last night after
rebellious naval officers declar declared
ed declared they would no longer accept
his orders and instead vowed
allegiance to ousted chief of
naval operations Vice Adm. Al Alberto
berto Alberto Vago.
The crisis eased off early this
morning after Frondizi, in a
series of emergency meetings
with military leaders and gov
ernment officials, indicated he
would accept Estevez.s resigna
tion and appoint a successor
favorable to Vago.
Vago sent radio messages late
last night to all ships and na naval
val naval bases asking the command commanders
ers commanders to submit to the orders of
their new operations chief, Rear
Adm. Jorge Perren.
It was unders t o o d Perren
would step asjde shortly to al allow
low allow Vago to resume his old job
Red Frogmen Hit
Quemoys Again
TAIPEI (UPl)-The Natianalis
Chines.- Defense Minislrv d i s
closed Friday that six Commumsti
Chinese frogmen yesterday made
their second landing of the week
on one of the Quemoy islands
but we-e driven away.
The island on which they landed
is abou two miles west of little
Quemov which itself is three
miles off tne Communist China
roast. The" frogmen "took flight
after artillery fire was directed
againsf them." thp defense min
istry s'd
It was believed the frogmen
were trying to gather information
-Nuit Nationalist defenses in thel
TODAY
12:58 3:18 :00
8:42 p.m.
mm

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mm

:4 :lcAyts rfxiy-
I :wyyiy:y;AY y:?:,;(,. iyy.y&y.
0 -y:yySrryf rv -AVrS

TOMORROW'S OCEAN LINER? A giant haiicoptw, 300 feet Jong, powered by mutmr
energy, takes flight from the drawing board in artist's conception above. It's more than ft
flight of iancy, however. Preliminary studies for such a eraft have jwst been completed for th JJJ;
Air Force by Bell' Helicopter Corp, though there are no plans at present to build it. The pab -Wi
jected behemoth wotrid weigh half a million pounds 10 times more than any 'copter m exist exist-ence
ence exist-ence and be able to carry troops, passengers or cargo m its many decks at over 200 mQef pet
hour. Atom power could keep it aloft indefinitely, giving it virtually animated range. L'Z

Hoffa Announces
Intention To Sue
Senator Kennedy
WASHINGTON (UPI) Team
ster President James R. Hoffa is
preparing to sue Senate Rackets
Committee counsel Robert r.
Kennedy and the NBC television
network for libel, it was learned
yestcrdfly
Hoffa informed Robert Sarnoff,
president of the National Broad
casting Co.. of his intention to
sue for statements Kennedy made
this week on the Jack Paar show
on NBC-TV.
The Teamster chief, a prime
target of the rackets group, was
disclosed to have sent the follow
ing telegram to Sarnoff:
"I have today instructed my at
torneys to prepare libel action
against NBC-TV, Robert Kennedy
Jack Paar and all others who
sponsored' or were associated with
the shameful abuse of national
television time on Wednesday
night.
"Any repetition of such per
formance will be met with an ap
plication (to the Federal Comma
nications Commission) to revoke
your license for permitting the
telecast of criminal libels."
Kennedy appeared on the Paar
show and repeated many of the
charges he has leveled against
Hoff? and his associates during
hearings of the investigating com
mittee.
There is no orotecfion against
libel for allegations repeated else
where, however.
Peace Conference
HeM l?!f!ftr
With 2 Top Demos
WASHINGTON (UPI) Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic National Chairman Paul M.
Butler held an hour-long peace con
frence yesterday with his party's
two top leaders in Congress. They
agreed no one was trying to split
the party.
Butler, who has-been somewhat

critical of the congressional leade alter consultation with Williams,
ship, sought the meeting with! .... ,
Speaker Sam Rayburn and Senate; .Gldfl?- .hos nighJv Publi Publi-nprnorratie
nprnorratie Publi-nprnorratie Trfpr T.vnd n i cued gift-giving reached all' the

Democratic Leader Lyndon B
Johnson (Tex.), in Rayburn's Cap Capitol
itol Capitol office.
Rayburn said afterwards that
the conversation was "very
friendly."
"We agreed that no one of the
three of us is trying to be divisive
he added, "it matters not what
otner interpretation otners may
put on it
It was the first meeting between
Butler and the two Texans since
he recently complained on a tele television
vision television program that many Demo Democrats
crats Democrats are unhappy because the con congressional
gressional congressional leaders were steering
moderate a course in Congress.
The complaint provoked an up
roar in Democratic circles. Some
congressmen accused Butler of
seeking to divide the party and of
provding ammunition for the GOP.
There also were demands that he
resign.
Kayburn tola newsmen that But
ler assured the congressional lead leaders
ers leaders "he meant what he said" when
lie also said on the TV show that
the Democrats will write a strong,
progressive legislative record by
the time the 86th -Congress ends
next year.
Butler told newsmen after the
conference he "staled strongly my
conviction" that, the Democratic
record in this Congress "in the long
run will satisfy most Democrats"
and will be one of the strongest
ever presented to the electorate.
Asked if he bejieved the leader leadership
ship leadership hi Congress was representativ
of the party. Butler uglier! no
question shout it."
Asked if he were satisfied with
Butler as national chairman. Ray Rayburn
burn Rayburn commented thftt he h;u; said
nothing about removing Butler.
"Nor have If said Johnson
quickly
MOSKCUTO RKILLED
BONE, Algeria; (UPI) PudIIc
Prosecutor Alphonse Agelou was
assassinated last night ty ter-r-ist
gunmen who fired at lum
from- an automobile while he
walked with his wife. Agelou died
en route to a hospital.

Gift-Giver Goldfine

Suspended Jail Term, Fine

WASHINGTON (UPI)-Bernard
Goldfine, the gift-giving Boston
textile tycoon, yesterday was hand
ed a suspended sentence of one
year in jail and a $1,000 fine on
contempt charges stemmmc from
the 1958 influence investigation.
But he immediately faced an another,
other, another, appearance before the
House" Legislative Oversight Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, where he balked answer answering
ing answering 18 questions which led to the
charge.
Federal Judge James W. Mor Morris,
ris, Morris, in rendering his verdict di
rected Goldfine to answer the
question if given another chance
to do so.
Subcommittee Chairman Rep.
Oren Harris (D-Ark.) nromntfv
said he expected to invite Gold-
line back for further questioning.
Harris said he would call a sub
committee meeting "in the next
few days" to fix a definite date.
Goldfine said on leaving the
court mat ne teit he was "vindi
l.J II IT 11 .
caieu. ne aaaea mat he was
"very happy about the outcome"
He also said he would be "very
nlnQCAil" 4t iu i
h-itootu iv ajiswei me questions
put to him last year if the com
mittee recalled him.
Goldfine and his attorney, Ed
ward Bennett Williams, an
nounced last week they no longer
wuuia ngnt tne contempt charges
uoidfine threw himself on the
mercy of the court and withdrew
ms piea of "not guilty."
Moms indicated at the time
that he would impose a light sen
tence because of the widelv-mibli
ci?ed "bugging" of Goldfine's ho
tel suite during last year's inves
ligation. The judge also made
clear, however, that the subcom
mittee had every right to ask the
questions.
Morris said yesterday he impos
ed the suspended sentence attr
carefully studying a report by
the court Probation nffirer anA
7. .........
way to the White House in the
form of a vicuna coat to former
Presidential aide Sherman Adams,
wore a brown suit with a light light-colored
colored light-colored flowered tie. His secre secretary,
tary, secretary, Miss Mildred Paperman, sat
among the spectators.
In Boston, the U. S. Circuit
Court of Appeals upheld s "con-
j3 123 m 'E
CBY NUMEROUS1
REQUESTS
Beginning.
WEDNESDAY 79th
at the
"CENTRAL!
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tempt judgment against Gcjafinii
and his secretary for failurf t
turn over records to federal 4sl
agents. Goldfine and Miss Jjpefl
man are under 30-day and 10-dj
jail sentences, respectively." Boa
have been free on bail pendinj
the outcome the appeal.
Attorney Harold Rosenwald saU
h would appeal the Circuit Coiln
ruling to the U. S. Supreme Court
The decision came few houri
after Goldfine was sentenced it
Washington on contempt charge
Hurricane Baffers i
Cities Along Coast
Of Southern Texas
HOUSTON, Tex., July 28 (UPI)
Tropical hurricane Debra bafr
tered exposed cities along tht
Texas coast with winds tip t
105 miles-an-hour today and whl
tied deep inland to hit Houston,
the biggest city in the sduth.
A woman and her daugh'
ter were missing and a man wal
reported to have been drowned
at Freeport, on the coast soutj
of Houston;
Besides Houston and Freeport
one hurricane hit Galveston,
where, nearly 59 years ago, a
storm killed 5,000-8,000 persons. It
also hit many smaller poinU.D4m
age totaled hundreds of thousand
of dollars and was growing,
The coast guard reported that
the hurricane, springing intolifs
last night almost without warn
ing, caught 10 fishing boats oft
the Texas coast,
The coast Guard said that sU
were either being towed in of
were aground, except the trawler
Rosina.
Patrol vessels were seairch'ng
for the Rosina, from which, earli earlier
er earlier reports had said, three or four
men were rescued. The Coast
Guard saicj none was lost or 'se 'seriously
riously 'seriously injured in tts rescued oper operations,
ations, operations, "i
Except for scratches frofli fly.
ing glass; none was reported bv
jured in the area through which
the hurricane sept.
CENTRAL
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