The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03054

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
D(3 IT A Coomtio
, --" or a different 'vacationl
ONLY $7.20 Down Payment
. 30-day tourist round trip.
V-S LBlfADDI?I?
PANAMA OFFICE, 2-097& COLON 779

Seagram's

AN INDEPENDENT iHE DAILY NEWSPAPER
"Let the people know the truth aid the country it safe Abraham Lincoln
CANADIAN WHISKY
34th YIAR
PANAMA, K. P,. TUESDAY, JULY 7, 19
FIVR CINTS

lb

if
ft

CZ Youth Gets
Year In Pen
For Burglary
A U-ytr-old Panamanian youth
was among fivo persons in U.S.
District Court today sentenced to
terms in, Oamboa penitentiary
ranging from ona year to
months.
The youngsters, one of 11 chil chil-ren
ren chil-ren of a Canal Zone family, was
I co-defendant with his 19-year
eld brother on a charge of bur burglarizing'
glarizing' burglarizing' a Paraiso building used
fs a sales center for area land land-lease
lease land-lease residents.
Both boys, Harold, 16 and Rup Rupert
ert Rupert Selman, 19 pleaded guilty to
fcie charge. In addition to a quan quantity
tity quantity of farm produce, a number
f personal articles, including a
fcatch, were taken in the theft.
Rupert had never before been
'In trouble with police and Judge
Guthrie F. Crowe sentenced him
to one year, but suspended the
sentence and placed him on pro probation
bation probation far two years.
However, despite Harold's youth,
!e has been in constant trouble
ince before his 14th birthday and
las been arrested on at least a
lozen occasions fcir petty larceny
r burglary. In view of the past
tecord, Crowe sentenced t h e
ioungster to .-serve one year at
lard labor in the Gamboa peni-
In other matters before the
!ourt, Manuel Chu Delgado, 28,
t Wmanian, pleaded guilty to
Irobation violation and returning
o the Canal Zone after deporta-
ion.
On the first charge, Delgado was
trdered to serve his prior suspend suspended
ed suspended sentence of 18 months and on
ihe second charge received a 12 12-fnonth
fnonth 12-fnonth suspended sentence, with
jive yea", jobation to begin after
release from prison.
Balbino Thompson, 28 year-old-Panamanian
who was shot down
krhile attempting to evade police
tapture last month, was found
fcuilty on two counts of petty lar lar-Feny
Feny lar-Feny after prior convictions. He
has sentenced to serve 18 months
kn one count, with 18 months, sus suspended,
pended, suspended, on the second count, plus
five years probations beginning
fcith release,
Also appearing before the
eourt today was Julio Santama Santama-ria,
ria, Santama-ria, Panamanian who has been
under observation at Coroial
mental hospital since Sept 2,
1958, and who escaped from that
Institution earlier this year.
Santamaria was charged, in July
(958, with three counts of return return-fcg
fcg return-fcg to the Canal Zone after depor deportation,
tation, deportation, as well as burglary and
(heft after a prior conviction, the
iwo thefts committed while he was
in escapee from the mental hos hospital.
pital. hospital. On the five counts he was sen-
Senced to serve a total 42 months
t Gamboa penitentiary.
I .1 1
ADULT WESTERNER -Jo
Marsh, 18, is dressed as cowgirl
I for her part in the Fourth of
1 Jul fun at Watsonville, Calif.

wyw mum mwwinmmym
csTH s WIT

Sing

AFTER NEARLY FOUR YEARS OF LIMITED OPERATIONS the Curundu Poet Office, a' branch
of the Canal Zone Postal Service, has been restored to full service. The office which lias been
closed since July 1955, with the exception of handling incoming and outgoing mail will now now-serve
serve now-serve the community with stamps, money orders and the handling of parcels. Officially receive
ing'the first piece of hand-delivered mail, above, is George Hansen, right, presldenjf of the Cu Curundu
rundu Curundu CMC Council. Looking on at the left is Earl F. Unruh, director of the Canal Zone Postal
Service, and center Col. John D. Coney, commanding officer of adjacent Fort Clayton of which
the Curundu Civic Center is a geographical part. Distributing the mail, background, Is William
M. Jensen, who will be superintendent of the Post office. iV.S Army Photo)

To
Receive
Lady Olave Baedn-Powell, wid
ow ot Lord Robert Baden-Powell
the founder of Scouting, will re receive
ceive receive the key to Panama City at
an open meeting of the Panama
City Municipal Council at 8:30 ihis
evening.
Lady Baden-Puwell, who arrived
in Panama yesterday, is in the
midst of an insepction tour of
Scuut'ng establishments through throughout
out throughout the Americas. She has visited
with Boy Scouts and Girl Guides
in Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Ve Venezuela
nezuela Venezuela and Colombia. She plans
visits to seven other countries, in
cluding Canada and the U.S., be before
fore before her return to England.
Her South American junket was
hichlichted by decorations for her
work in Scouting from Chile and
Peru. Added to the Order of St.
Bernard given her- by Chile and
Peru's Order of the Sun will he
Panama's Order of Vasco Nunez
de Balboa which she will receive-
at a mass Scout rally in the Na National
tional National Stadium at 7:30 Thursday
evening.
The award will be presented
by Panama's First Lady, Mrs.
Mercedes de la Guardia, who is
the honorary president of the
Scouting movement in the Re Republic.
public. Republic. Lady Baden-Powell, who speaks
affectionately of Scouts the world
over as "belonging to her," ex expressed
pressed expressed regret that she does not
speak Spanish. But this has posed
no problems for her so far, she
stated.
"Everyone has opened their
hearts to me," she said, in an
interview this morning, "because
they know that I have come to
see them with a message of good goodwill
will goodwill and encouragement as their
leader."
Besides seeing young people, the
grand old lady of Scouting has vis visited
ited visited with every president and ev every
ery every archbishop of the countries she
has thus far visited. She found this
Congressmen
By FRANK ELEAZER
WASHINGTON (UPI)- The not notice
ice notice said this was a hearing on
whether congressmen should nave
to make public what they spend
on overseas travel. But this must
have been wrong.
It turned out to be an inquiry
on why we newspapermen are al
ways picking on Congress, asking
questions about matter like (hat.
I hadn't realized how obnoxious
reporters can be, always nosing
around, demanding to know which
of his relatives a congressman
has on his payroll, whether he
rents nis iront porch to the tax
payers, and lately how much
counterpart money (that's U.S.-
owned foreign currency) he spends
when he travels abroad.

Panama Key,. Decoration

particularly inspiring, she stated,
because "it was apparent that
these leaders were all fully in favor
of the Scout and Guide movements
and the ideals which they repre represent."
sent." represent." The white-haired Scout lead
has made four trips around the
world to aid the Scout and Guide
movements as well as ten tours of
the U.S. and five tours of Canada.
Before starting on her present
journey in mid-May she visited
with Scouts in Australia, Fiji, the
9

LADY OLAVE BADEN-POWELL, widow of the founder of Scout Scouting,
ing, Scouting, chats with Mrs. Christina Morales de Higuero, director of
the Panama Girl Guides, before a press conference held at the
International Hotel today. Lady Baden-Powell is on the Isthmus
for a one week visit with local Scout and Guide leaders as part
of a goodwill tour she is making through the Americas.

See Green,
Rep. Samuel N. Friedel (D-Md.)
the chairman, opened up by say saying
ing saying the press hasn't been fair. He
contended we've led folks to be believe
lieve believe that Congress has been se secretive
cretive secretive about some of these mat matters.
ters. matters. Rep. Wayn L. Hayt (D-Ohlo)
said it (mid funny to him w
reporters don't tpand mor f
our tim looking for thivry in
th xocutiv branch of rh gov gov-rnmnt.
rnmnt. gov-rnmnt. Rep. George M. Rhodes (D'Pa.)
complained that news sometimes
is distorted and slanted.
And Rep. Prank Smith 'D 'D-Miss.)
Miss.) 'D-Miss.) intimated that when it
comes to padding expenses, news newspapermen
papermen newspapermen do pretty well for them themselves.
selves. themselves. They pretty near had me shed shedding
ding shedding a tear for the Congress

Wage

J 1
Phillipine Islands, Malaya, Sara Sarawak
wak Sarawak Borneo, Ceylon, Belgium,
Switzerland and East and Central
Africa.
Her week-long trip to Panama
and the Canal Zone will be climax climaxed
ed climaxed by the mass Scout rally in the
National Stadium Thursday eve evening.
ning. evening. She will meet the President
of the Republic, Ernesto de la
Guardia Jr., at 11 a.m. tomorrow.
Saturday she will travel to Co-
ion wnere several programs are
planned for her.
9
1Mb
- w
1W

Point Accusing Fingers

Fortunately, though, Rep. H.R.
Gross (R-Iowa) kent rpminrtino ni
why we were here. Namely, to
consider uross bill, by number
H.R. 3401, to stop free wheeling
counterpart SDendinn. ifanv hv
junketing congressmen. ;
rrienei said he hadn't heard of
any abuses. Gross said he had,
but if the Himnrn wra ttrrnna
then surely nobody could object
to passing his bill, which wOu'd
relieve us reporters from having
io wonaer.
Grots' bill wit introduced latt
March and I almost said It
had bn "gathering dut" vr
sine. But I g u s a Friodal
wouldn't Ilk that kind of r.port r.port-ing.
ing. r.port-ing. H said tombody alraady
had wrltt.n that Oron' bill was
"plgonhold," and h couldn't

I alb

Panama Canal Seeking Bids
On Light System For Locks

0
Bids for the permanent in
stallation of a system of light
ing in the Panama Canal locks
and along th banks of Gaillard
Cut between Gamboa and Pe Pedro
dro Pedro Miguel are now being solic solicited
ited solicited both locally and in the
United States by the Panama
Canal Co.
The bids are scheduled to be
opened Aug, 21 in the adminis administration
tration administration bull ding at Balboa
Heights.
Part of the over-all plan to
Increase the capacity of the ca canal,
nal, canal, the lighting of Gaillard
Cut and the locks is the out outgrowth
growth outgrowth of an experl mental
lighting system which has been
Trujillo Tightens
Security
Suggest
As Rumors
lle7 Trouble
CIUDAD TRUJILLO, Dominican
Republic, July, 7 (UPI) The Do Dominican
minican Dominican government tightened sec security
urity security measures today against the
possibility of a terrorist campaign
or an armed invasion aimed at
overthrowing the Trujillo regime.
This capital was filled with rum rumors
ors rumors of an' invasion launched from
Cuba through Haiti, of abandoned
invasion pats being sighted on
beaches, and oj arrests of under underground
ground underground ,gents. ?'
. Non could be confirmed but
Roverimient-'Miokesmail" said the
armed forces had tightened sec security
urity security measures and were maneuv maneuvering
ering maneuvering around Santiago, a ec o n d
largest Dominican city.
Political observers familiar with
the situation said there was an ex extremely
tremely extremely high possibility that a
campaign of terrorism would be
the next step in the Caribbean war
of nerves, particularly in view of
the success of Fidel Castro's sim similar
ilar similar operations during his revolu revolution
tion revolution in Cuba.
Dominican authorities said they
felt well; able to cope with any
terrorist campaign because the
government has the support
the people.
of
Long Slops Pigs,
Relaxes Al Farm
After Speechmaking
WINNFIELD, La. (UPI) Ail Ailing
ing Ailing Louisiana Gov. Earl K. Long
fed the nties and attended to chores
around his farm today, resting
from a .cruelline tour of speech
making undertaken July 4 against
the advice of his doctors.
Long, who has a heart ailment,
felt iU toward the end of the long
day Saturday and returned to his
tin-roofed farm home here. He
took things easy Sunday and got
a "refreshing" six or seven hours
sleep Sunday night. He had his
ravchlatrist sleep in the same
room with him.
The 63-year-old governor, center
of a Louisiana political maelstrom
in recent weeks, indicated he
would return to the state capita
when he felt like it, and he was
in no hurry today.
He sat in an Oldsmobile and
watched while an aide called up
the pigs. Then he spent an hour
riding sround his "little pea
patch" farm and 30 minutes rid riding
ing riding lit jwinnfielri He returned to
his farm home with two waterme watermelons
lons watermelons in the trunk of his car.
understand whr thy got that
impression.
As a matter of fact he is for
it, Friedel said, hut he isnt sure
it will work. Hays seemed to
think mjivhe the idea was a pnnH
one, top. and Rhodes came r'ght
oui ana sain ne wnuin vote aye
despite the fact the press hadn't
been fair.
Hayt said he has quit worrying
what the newspapers say aooi',
him.
"One paper in my last cam
paign," he recalled, ran 16 or
17 editorials calling mr the Mar
co Polo of the 85th Congress.
They said I have s pe n t
15,000 on travel. I told em it Was
nearer $10,000.
"When the election returns
cam in they called up to ask to

on a trial bais for the past
two years in Pedro Miguel Locks
and a section of Gaillard Cut.
A committee of pilots worked
fcr several weeks with illumina illumination
tion illumination engineers and the pilots'
recommendations have been fol
lowed throughout.
The system to be installed
unoer the contract now being
advertised, is expected to result
in mild illumination and good
visibility of both bank lines of
tne waterway without glare to
the pilots. It will provide safer
navigational facilities at ni9,ht
and make possible the transit
at night of the large super-carrier
type ships which are now
limited to daylight transits.
Lighting in tne 43,000-foot
stretch of the cut between
Gamboa and the north end of
Pedro Miguel Locks will be pro provided
vided provided by approximately 1100
shielded light fixtures which
will illuminate the banks of the
canal without glare. There will
be no change In the present
channel marker lighting used
throughout this srea to deli delineate
neate delineate the prism.
In the locks, the work will
consist mainly of the installa installation
tion installation cf fluorescent Jii'hting of
approach walls, the control
houses, and locks wall -surfaces,
; and the replacement of the
steel light standards at Pedro
Miguel, used in the experi experimental
mental experimental llghtine project, with
new aluminum ones.
The project is expected to be;
CQmnletedJurithim nn'uiar atJ
tei &&jcMwajd?d and
ine nouce 10 proceed is issued.
The work will be performed in
such a manner that there will
be no interference with the reg regular
ular regular operation of the locki or
with ship traffic.
Panama Youth Hurl
In Auto Accident
Dies At Gorgas
A 16-year-old Panamanian youth,
critically injured over the holiday
weekend when he fell from the
rear of a moving station wagon
on Madden Road, died yesterday
at Gorgas Hospital.
William Griffith Archer suffered
a fractured skull Saturday night
when he fell from the car. The boy
apparently had climbed on the
rear of the vehicle while it moved.
Police are still investigating the
circumstances of the accident.
In Panama, National Guard au authorities
thorities authorities identified two young men.
Herbert Hall Jr., and Jose Pablo
Sanchez, both 18. who were killed
when a truck overturned on the
Trans-Isthmian Highway at Las
Cumbres Saturday. Two other Pa Panamanians.
namanians. Panamanians. Carlos H. Serrano, 23,
and Valentin Espinosa, 52, were
injured in the collision.
Hondurans Capture
Nicaragua-Bound
Invasion Force
TEGUCIGALPA, Hon d u r a s,
July 7 (UPI) Honduran troops
captured a 20 man invasion
force trying to cross the border
into Nicaragua, the government
announced last night.
The announcement identiyd
the leader of the group as 7 n n-rique
rique n-rique Lacayo Farfan, self-styled
head of a movement aimed at
overthrowing President Luis A.
SGmoza of Nicaragua.
The report said the rebels
gave up without a .-.truggle.
At Newsmen
what I attributed my great vic victory.
tory. victory. I said, 'I can't make up my
mind whether it's your lousy
newspaper, or that people like
Marco Polo'."
Gross said he already had in inquired
quired inquired about the flight, w h i r h
cost over $5,000. So what ahout
the other expenses?
Hays, who got up the trip, said
things like hotel bills for the five five-day
day five-day session were to be paid for
by a private committee. Gioss
said this sounded odd.
"Well,' said Hays, "since the
gentleman is worried about it 1 1'
just call London today, and have
it paid out of counterpart funds.'
So there went another $2,000
Whether anything else comes of
the hearing remains to be seen.

Resume

Washington Sends

Detailed Memo
On 1955 Treaty
WASHINGTON, July 7 (UPI) The United States
has sent the aovernment of Pnnnmn n AptnWeA memnrn-

dum in a new attempt to settle the disagreement over
wages paid Panamanian workers in the Canal Zone, it

wus learnea roaay.

Ihe memorandum resulted from an exchange of let letters
ters letters between Panamanian President Ernesto de la Guardia
Jr. and President Eisenhower last March,
The Panamanian President appealed to Eisenhower
to accede to his country's demands that Panamanian
workers in the Canal Zone be paid according to US waae
standards. s
The United States had insisted that under the 1955
US-Panama treaty, Panamanian rather than US waae
standards would be used.

The Panamanian government
suggested that the matter may
be turned over fpr arbitration
to the International Court of
Justice at the Hague.
But first, de la Guardia made
what Panamanian diplomats
have described as a "last ditch"
appeal to Eisenhower to see if
bi-latera.1 talks cmilri ht
'4m uedV'--v--.
Eisenhower then ordered a
further study of the matter.
A US official said today he
had no doubt that talks over
wares and other proyisions of
the 1955 agreement would be
resumed.
US officials are expected to
deliver the memorandum to the
Panamanian foreign office mo momentarily.
mentarily. momentarily. Macmillan Sees
Summit Parley
On Disarmament
LONDON, July 7 (UPI)-Prime
Minister Harold Macmillan said
today an east-west summit con conference
ference conference might begin preliminary
disarmament discussions after
settling the Berlin issue.
Macmillan told the House of
Commons that the point has not
yet been reached of deciding the
topics for discussion at a summit
gathering.
"But 1 am bearing in mind the
possibility of discussing general
disarmament at such a meeting."
Macmillan told laborite Arthur
'Henderson he would "bear in
mind" a suggestion that he should
try to break the present disarma disarmament
ment disarmament deadlock by proposing to
Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev
that disarmament talks should he
revised on the basis of western
and Soviet proposals of 1955.
"What I am hopeful of, if and
when we get to a summit meet meeting,"
ing," meeting," Macmillan added, "is that
we should, after disposing of the
urgent questions such as the fu future
ture future of Berlin and so forth, pro proceed
ceed proceed at least to some preliminary
discussions of the best way now
to tackle the dsarmament
problem."
Missile StocMles
Growino In EnnknH
LONDON. July 7 (UPI) The
free world's first force of strate strategic
gic strategic ballistic missiles rapidly is
taking shape at widely dispersed
sites in easlern England.
Progress is such that Britain
now could launch a "reasonable
number of th( U.S. -built Thor mis missiles
siles missiles with nuclear warheads if a
war emergency required it. Brit British
ish British and American officials said
today.
The full planned force of 1.500 1.500-mile
mile 1.500-mile range weapons, with U S
trained Royal Air Force crews
and highly automated ground e e-quipment,
quipment, e-quipment, will take another six
months to year to complete, ac according
cording according to best available esti estimates.
mates. estimates. "Onerationl Readiness" of
Thor missiles in England has been
a rrtat'"r rf controversy sine US
Sen. Stuart Symington (D Mo )
cintenHerl several weeks ago th it
'h weapons were not ready to
fire and were not dispersed or
protected.

. The officials gave no indica-

1Lefea lts Past position.;
, nll awareness fierev
however, that the question In Involving
volving Involving wages of 12,000 work workers
ers workers is a major issue ;n the
small Isthmian Republic and
could result in expression f
nt fo tha torthcoinki ran-
astsssr not
K thi the election cam campaign,
paign, campaign, the wage question mar
become confused with the over-
c rn?ng thff fse"nt "con "concerning
cerning "concerning the status of the Canal
" n&t the United State
anxious to have the matter J
Panamanian demands? th
Dirfy Linen Drama
A! Ancon laundry
uncovers loif Ring
Finding a needle in a havdi,
HospiSl.the kUndry from Gorgas
The search started after the
laundry received an SOS from
sheets had been changed and that
the one with her ring in it had
been thrown into the laundry.
Apparently this bundle of laun.
inyU1S and al1- had been lent
or rh A nrn laundry shrtly t
fore the linen room was alerted
There was nothing to do but look
through the mountains of sheets
and olher bed linen at Ancon
mfi .h 'a,indLry Personnel ad ad-mi
mi ad-mi there, have been times when
os property failed to turn up,
th s .me the search was success success-lul.
lul. success-lul. In a few hours the wedding
ring was aisrnuro ha
bed sheet and subsequently return returned
ed returned to its owner, who is now recu recuperating,
perating, recuperating, at Gorgas-her weddinj
nng salely back on her finger
Summer Program
Enrollment Begins
Thursday At BHS
Youngsters between the ages nf
.-..a aim jo wno are students of the
Ancon, Balboa and St. Mary'i
I schools are reminded of a regis regis-I
I regis-I tration session for- the summer
I program Thursday morning at
in oaiooa Mign School.
The vacation program includes
bowling, directed by Lou dud,
arts and crafts led by Mrs. Pit
Ridge, woodwork by Pete Monaco
and swimming under the guidance
of Frances Summerfori.

i.



- AC I. TWO

HI PANAMA AMERICAS AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPE

feTHE PANAMA AMERICAN
"IrWHtO AND ruaueHtO T TM PANAMA AMtftlCAN nUI, INC.
rouNoto ay NlLteN kounsivbxl in )eia
MAHMODrO AIAS, CDITOR
. j U-S7 M Tuirr P O Box 134. pnma. n.'1fr P.
F ... TLpONt S-O740 IS LiNtet VS b '. ?
3 CMH- AOOMMi PANAmtPICAN. PU0lA. V; ..
COLXm OFrici. 1S-I70 Ciwti Avirwjt betwicn '2b 13l:T-tFl
W FOAIIOM fKMEMNTATIVI. JOSHUA 8 PO&EW. IN? ;V i
349 MADieoN AV.. Mw York 17 N. Y.
PO. .: MONTH. mADVANCt K '27
Fo. YIAH IN AflANCt ,BSt 'r" 1WJ

me Building Site
"X-.' ?t
Labor News
And
Comments
IIIiJGTOIJ
IV

IviERIlY

U0UND

THISIS-YOUR FORUM THI PIADIRS OWN cdtfcMN

W jr i "w y . v
'Tfc Mil Bo it an opn forum for reader W The Panama America.
Lett aro received gratefully and are handle jn V wholly confidential
Mi .-'
II you contribute a letter don't be impatient if tt doom t appear th
ait day. Letters are published in the order received. ;
:f1ono try to keep tne letters limited to one pjqe Iteirtky
'loWrtr of fetter writers Is held in strictest confidence.
Jhri newspaper assumes rio responsibility for cfatewients jor opinions
expressed in letters from readers.
THE MAIL BOX

AR JOJJA-MAIL BOX

8
SAN ANTONIO BUGLE

Sir:
i.'nnnh of .inlv in thp LIS and

My friends are si ill fi-eding me on ripe tigs and it's making me too
fat dnd lazy. In is not so well and l am trying to keep him home.
Not many building on like me at 96 plus. I may not be able to get
it in papir but Jim will be able to hear from me for some time and
that I am passing time.
No let up to our rains and most of the country flooded east up
throuph the Rockits. We are invaded by Russian visitors and one is
spending three davs in the beautiful Sacramento Valley. Wonder
what he will think of a nice "free" city like that? Heard one say in
a speech that if Russia ever had a war it would not be with the
United States. u i
More rest may help my eyes and I am going to try it for a while.
Nobody shouli miss me from my weekly Mail Box.
Pop Wright.

CONTRABANDING

Sir:

t nirrpp with "Panamaricanism" (Man box, June jui aou.iu

stopping the contrabanding from the Canal Zone. From time to
time I read complaints in the newspapers about the merchants
of Panama and the high prices they charge.
How about the unlicensed merchants? Here are some prices
at which contrabandists in Colon and Panama City are freellng
selling articles from the Canal Zone retail stores:

'"
Tomato paste (per can)
iCigarettes (per pack)
;Klim (per 5 lb. can)
ipanish powdered Milk
(per o lb. cant
'Candy bars

1; It will be noticed that in many cases their profit is 100 per percent
cent percent or higher. This is certainly more than the average profits
of the legal merchants In Panama.
At the same time, the contrabandists pay taxes neither to
the government of Panama nor to trte US. The legal merchants
pay import taxes? and income taxes to the. government of Pan Pan-arna
arna Pan-arna i '!,
; Thus the current heavy contrabanding from the Canal Zone
lAto Panama is hurting not only the merchants, but also the
government of Panama and thus the welfare of every citizen of
ite nmint.rv

Someone has written that

meet their operating expenses were it. not, ior me extensive
sales which find their way into the hanclsof the contrabandists.
lTdoii't know anything about that. But I do doubt whether some
cif trie clubs on the Canal Zone could support themselves on Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone memberships alone. I have seen bingo games with more
players from Panama than from the Canal Zone. These people
do not just play bingo. They buy Deer and other refreshments,
cigarettes and other articles. All free of Panama tax.
As I understand It, the clubs are established for Canal Zone
rferstmnek who feel that Panama prices, are exorbitant. As the

rnletaaS, they have the right
jApivT'tn secure their recreation

reasonable. But persons without Canal Zone privileges have no
such right.
I further believe that the term "contrabandist applies to
many more persons than those who sell smuggled goods from
thp retail stores Also as contrabandists I class:

li. : Persons vho buy postage

privilege card. Persons not entitled to a Canal Zone postal box
are not entitled to any other services of the CZ postal service
either;
2. People who eat in the clubhouses when they have no CZ
privileges. The local-rate service centers especially serve food
and beverages to any patrons who come through the door, to
the economic detriment, of Panamanian restaurants which pay
taxes to our government;
; 3. The working wife who buys in the Canal Zone and takes
her purchases home to Panama. CZ privileges should be given
only to heads of families. The working wife cannot take her
husband to Canal Zone hospitals. Why should she be able to
feed him Canal Zone food? (But if working .wives are going 1l
Have commissary privileges,, it is invidious to make the present
distinction between wives whose husbands are US citizens and
those who are not.)
" There has been another loophole for the contrabandists, too,
since the service center counters began .selling articles previously
obtainable only at the retail stores. The volume of sales over
these service center counters has increased away out of all pro proportion
portion proportion to Increases in the purchasing power of the communities
in which the service centers are located.
The news items published occasionally telling of some., em employe
ploye employe having lost his commissary privileges for abusing same
are just a thin smokescreen. If the Canal Zone authorities were
really serious about curbing contraband, there would be seivera
such news items daily. ,-,
Canal Zone movies should be limited more effectively' than
at present to holders of CZ privilege cards.
Just as regular imports into Panama are subject to Import!
duties, so should household articles sold privately by Zonlans to I
residents of Panama.
The Canal Zone authorities can do more than at present to
ensure that the revenue of the government of Panama is not
reduced by all these various evasions I have listed. By so doing,
the CZ authorities will not be truckling to the demands of the
merchants, but will be showing a friendly regard, fo'r the well well-being
being well-being of the common man of Panama.
Campesino

fen

! if

ITS THE BERRIES Mary
iflayles Wells prepares to down
ft giant blackberry with the
(lclicacy of a true connoisseur.
' The berries are grown on her
''rtaJ.her's farm in Llndale, Tex.

I came ns'ar missing the Mail Box.

.. nn -1 1
Retail Store,
Price
11 cents
13 cents
$3.25
Contrabandists'
Price
25 cents
20 cents
$4.50
5 cenfca
$4.00
10 cents
4
the CZ retail stores could not
to feemhat-ay and to
at prrces trrey insider
stamps, money orders and so
SPACE STEWARDESS-
Pamela Jay.sc.ii, a registered
nur.'e with a master's decree in
psychology, ;is the, first candi candidate
date candidate to he space stewardess. stewardess.-She
She stewardess.-She was (elected after inter interviews
views interviews and tests In Los Anreles.

I h $ i
Ming & v f , i
m ; '; ..

By VICTOR RIESl

When the Teamster tdt rup an
epic statue to James Rjddle Jol
fa, they'll have, to use suopeua
instead of a fig leaf lor with without
out without an investigation about him,
their leader would feel unclad.
So uniii a monument is built to
the stormy one, the Fe d e r a 1
courts will see to it that Holla's
day is filled with probers long
after the Senate' racket busting
committee turns in its witness
chair.
This was decided at two p.m.,
Monday, June 29, in the Wash Washington
ington Washington law offices of Martin 0 0-Donoghue.
Donoghue. 0-Donoghue. chairman of the court court-aDnointed
aDnointed court-aDnointed Board of Monitors. In
just one hour, it was agreed to
hire whatever investigating siau
is needed.
This force, some of whom may
come from the McClelland Com Committee
mittee Committee itself, will operate inde independently.
pendently. independently. It will have the ap approval
proval approval and power of the Federal
court. Tne work will be slow, lor
it is exoected that whenever the
investigators seek Teamster s re: re:-ords,
ords, re:-ords, they will be defied.
But the court always can jail
and fine the defiant ones includ including
ing including Jim Hoffa, the entire Team Teamsters
sters Teamsters executive board or any lo local
cal local officer. The Monitors decided
to build their own investigating
agengy after reviewing the num number
ber number of cases in which they had
asked Hoffa to take action or
look into violations and all they
got was promised. With each bro broken
ken broken promise, Hoffa's power gre;.
Typical is the Alaskan affair
which was gone over last Men Men-day
day Men-day because all it did was give
Brother Jim Hoffa considerable
nfluejice over that outpost state.
It all really started at the
Teamsters convention in Miami
Beach in October '57.
Delegates from two Alaskan lo locals
cals locals Fairbanks and Anchor Anchorage
age Anchorage which operate under Jie
midnight sun, withstood Hoffa's
midnight pressure. They voted a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst him for president. Not ioo
long after the convention adjourn adjourned,
ed, adjourned, Hoffa moved on those two u u-nions.
nions. u-nions. There were conversations with
the Alaskan brethren. They were
"convinced." The two locals (v
ering some 1,800 members, ere
merged. Anchorage was the nead
quarters. Except for a tiny local
on Kodiak stand, this Anchorage
unit became the only Teamsters
outfit in the entire state.
This is a state of construction
Land heavy hauling of civniar
maetrial, of ornament, of food.
The drivers roll 'for hundreds o!
miles, ubviously they coulJn't
come to meetings in the port ci city.
ty. city. Among the forces ranged a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst them are trip scheduled
anH thp upatho1. A few memhers

takpi0"tested We jpgwlwyMfe

ousted.
Ouster meant they lost their
jobs. The Minitors demanded
their reinstatement. Finally uey
were. The Monitors then told Hof
la to unmerge the locals. He sa'd
lie'd look into it. That was in
September '58, almost a year a-
go. The locals still are merged
into one. Hoffa's supporters run
it.
There is not much union orga organization
nization organization in the new state now As
it opens up, however, much of
the freight will be moved in by
air. Hoffa says that's his jurisdic jurisdiction
tion jurisdiction too. And what comes in by by-sea,
sea, by-sea, must be hauled from the
oocks. That's Hoffa's jurisdiction.
All this gives him the transporta transportation
tion transportation unity he said he'll get and
which lots of cynics said was
just Hoffa fast talk. What Hoffa
doesn't construe, his friend Har Harry
ry Harry Bridges, does among the long
shoremen, the fishermen and the
warehousemen.
Three's nothing corrupt here.
Just power power over a new
economy, all tillering tnrougn one
Hoffa headquarters. A pattern is
being drawn. And this pattern of
power is what disturbed the ma
jority of the Board of Monitors.
This led its chairman, Martin u u-Donoghue
Donoghue u-Donoghue to say very quietly ;ind
very firmly that he would nng
charges against Hoffa as soon as
ailing Judge Dickinson Letts is
well. O'Donoghue Will ask that
Hoffa be suspended as president
now, before the hearings and be
fore his power is frozen in on the
nation's arteries from Alaska to
Cape Canaveral along which
flows this country's life blood.
Certainly the suhpenas have
not gone out of Hoffa's days
15. the charm

ing Austrian princess, Marie
Antoinette, was married to
Louis, heir to the throne of
France. Four years later, ha
assumed the throne as Louis
XVI and Marie Antoinette wa
crowned with him. During the
French Revolution, ihe became
to the people a symbol of the
hardships which thoughtless
rulers had imposed upon them.
In 1793, at the age of 38, Marie
was tried, condemned and died
on the guillotine.
Encyclopedia Brltannka

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Calle Rochet

WASHINGTON, -r- "flere'i iomkfaimy Byrd" bt VirglnU

thine awfully tusplcious about
the manner in which, members- of

Uie House Elections subrnmitteeltional: Review is that its halaice
K a ir a Kaaii luiaiksnn t the m rnA. T ahAot a T Hit m

hav htfwifi )uiehin0 nn thA itna.
graphic transcript of the hearings
regarding the; -flection a efjoa
Pressman Tar-Afnni,-4rn.w'itA.
in candidate from. Little Rocky
The ncyfc-$m&jt&
al committee wjjet ioVin'ubliS
is supposed ojjb;xbI'Uh'-
utes. The stpicriphw;lw
Rut ant in ihm2 MZ'&$i&
in.f-wvnW -nWT: nJS.'jS-' n...l
iu""u "i :iwn-iwnii(riiii
lUlSeat one or ihw. tnrt iMTVijr
members of i Congreason k i
Repeated Inqiiiries for?'aooUS" 10
davs for nprmilftn:"jk:'r lw-u .. At
" uu.uu vw vr. -r D
the transcript;: theiaivestfei-
around s. '" .. . -Congressman
Robert Ah mnrp
of South Carolina, -who ilidn't
want to investigate Alford's elec election
tion election in the first place, referred
the. Question tn hi olsrlr Tli.i
Langstrom. Langstrom passed it
back to other memhert whn ti.
said, had all the copies. Next
day, Langstrom said: "No copies
have been returned and there's
no way I can get 6ne from a
member unless Ashinore okays
Ashmore, queried again, said:
"The hearings have to be cor corrected.
rected. corrected. Thev Upro niihK hor-
inCS and nothing is hoina hiHlon
k I a -w 1UUU.U,
Bfut they have to be corrected.'
irrye aays, later, Ashmore,
ffMled again, said: "We're not
stalling." (He emphasised the
word "not.") "We want the trin
script completely correct and it
takes time to corrprt Ahcninioi,,
no editing.1 We are not delay-
ing."
CENSORSHIP
Finally, Congressman John Le Le-sinski
sinski Le-sinski of Michigan was queried.
He let the cat out of the bag.
"Aitoras attorneys severely
cross examined Congressman
Hays, which was not according 10
the rules of the House," he said.
"The committee was proceeaing
in an improper manner. Only
House members are allowed to
cross-examine, and Alford's at
torney was permitted to do so.
Furthermore, he attempted to in
ject a personal fight into the is
sue.
"I am sorry but I can't get in
bad with Ashmore .by giving you
the hearing,? Spttl)ia4iJ M lXy
One day later, Lesinski was
asked again lor the hearings He
replied: 'Dear friend, he (Ash
more) is chairman of the com committee.
mittee. committee. This is an important mat matter.
ter. matter. There was a mixuo at the
"beginning "and we'' are' trying" to
straighten it out.
"What was the mixup?' Le
sinski was asked.
The Congressman from Miehi
gan woula not expain further. He
seemed a bit irritated that any anyone
one anyone should persist in Wanting to
read tne record ot a public hear
ing, paid for by the taxpayers
money, which pertained to one
of the most important elections
held recently in the South.
ISote Lven thougn the hearings
are suppressed, it can be report
ed thai the stickers hearing the
printed name of Dale Addrd as
ihe write-in candidate arrivea at
ihe polling places inside the bal ballot
lot ballot boxes. Faubus not only had
picked Allora as his candidate
but had sent the printed stickers
inside the ballot boxes when the
boxes were delivered. Some of the
election judges even helped voters
to put the write in stickers oh the
ballots.
VOTING IN MOSCOW
Interesting indication that dem democracy
ocracy democracy may be getting a toehoM
in Russia ij the fact that voting
machines will be exhibited in
Moscow this summer.
They will be sent to the Amer
ican exhibit by the Shoup Voting
Company, and Russians will be
able to step inside the voting
bootns to vote on various ques
tions now being compiled at the
State Department.
Significantly, this is coming a a-bout
bout a-bout through the invitation of the
Soviet Government itself.
Anastas M i k o y a n saw the
Shoup voting machines on display
at the Brussels f air last year.
He inspected them, asked: "How
do we know it can t be fixed?
Shoup demonstrators snowed
that the machine had 33,000 mov moving
ing moving parts and was completely
foolproof. This led to correspond
ence with Moscow, and it was
suggested that the Shoup Compa Company
ny Company send four machines to the A
nierican National Exhibition open opening
ing opening July 25 in Moscow.
It's planned to permit Russians
to try out the machines, but the
State Department is stumped as
to what they should vote on.
Obviously they cart't yete-.ort
such que$onf.4Fht'-S'6H
cnev a soprmieii!?oa',Wei-e
you for Jmwtv?
So the r, Staie jPepartmeh is
scratching it'fdiplomati.'lea.l
and hopes to have something vot vot-able
able vot-able before July 25
UNKNOWN ANCSt.
Whittaker Chambers, the ex-
I'nmmnnU crpnt. whn steered
Richard Nixon- to those pumpkin
papers, onereuy jituirauig ubimiui
headlines ,-fer Nixori'1 mWtiDus
future, is no longer In tte head headlines.
lines. headlines. iinwpvfr. one of his organiza
tions is still attempting to in influence
fluence influence public opinion. It's the
Nutinnal Review, ultra reactionary
maoaiinii owned hv the National
WmItIv Inr rhamhera la one of

as

one of lta m-Af anthnrc
interesting lact; aDouti thr Na
sheet of June Sui'iaA:' annawa .i.
seU touung. KiwtttvdebU
iwnuuiiung vo ;aUmoaTK-flp0,aj0.
Losses Wfm TBfarAeA -itr lou
Of 1252,764; m mi3tftWi,1iZ3:
.! m B16 qtiescwaatoam'' Who
Was Tnittinp un th JYtinBtt
the bill for Wh Hakn ttidmi..
I aim uieuasr
ADENAUERS INFLfXIBfLITY
Durins German f3ianPiirt iri..
Jeauer's last Vjh,ia.iyashington,
he held a secret. meetings with
auunesota s assu aauDert Humph
rey on how td JJandl;.Rolsia.
The wrikled "'Id German lead leader
er leader Visorou&lV rionniin.w fk.
of .djsengagmeat.r It would "lead
only; to deceit and trouble,' hi
said;- --
He al.SO Warnot mrsin.l II..
flexibility which Humphrey had
uvui:iea in ioreign policy.
"This word 'flexibility,' he
snorted, "is lust mnih.- a
for retreat.'
"Mr. Chancellor' unmn).a.i.
protested poUtelv, "when we
talk about flexibility, we aren't
talking about retreat. When we
talk about disengagement, we
mean disengaging from J a posi posi-Uon
Uon posi-Uon that is unprofitable, and en en-gaging
gaging en-gaging ngain. where we can
make some gains.
'We believe in Unn i...:li.
enough to meet the Soviet head-
cv ueZ-lKtt of f8rein" Poli Policy.
cy. Policy. Flexibility mean.
rhilitaK.power- But k also mn
tne ability to meet th d,. : ..
economic propaganda, and cultur-ahinfvnives-
n"lty means the
that kind of definition
E2? Aden"ur,
DAILY
MEDITATION
' (?.,n,t,d h Department
of Christian Education ef the
Episeopel choreh in the Mis Mis-sion.ry
sion.ry Mis-sion.ry Diocese ef tho Pans Pans-ma
ma Pans-ma Canal Zone.)
St. Matthew :3J
THI PRICI OP PIACi
"But seek ye first the kina.
dom ef Cod, nd his rl8ht.oui.
ness; and all these things shall
be added unto you.''
Our author is speaking to our
modern spirit 'when he t41kg it
terms of perfect peace and a sta sta-ble
ble sta-ble mind. Peace of mind is the
engrossing concern of our age.
One reason is our confusion of
worries and anxieties. We art
beset by pressures and tensions.
Wo UralrlKmA a
stituatibri.
Yet so much of our peace of
mind literature is an attempt to
escape from reality. It is a kind
of spiritual narcotic that dulls
our sensitivity to human suffer suffering.
ing. suffering. The value of the Bible is
that it makes us face up to our ourselves
selves ourselves and to life. In the process
we may be far from peace or
comfort.
Our passage promises peace,
but there is a price. We must
learn righteousness. This means
that we must have God's con con-cern
cern con-cern for misery and wretched wretchedness
ness wretchedness wherever it exists. Peace
comes as a by-product of our
struggle on God's behalf. Peace
is the fruit of righteousness. It
does not come of itselfC
Thou wilt keep him in perfect
peace, whose mind it stayed on
thee. .
OMINOUS -Lei, Jtu.it rerJ
Chinese attorney, above, will
iiuiu miw iww .fuvmunent u
rSintapore Newsmap) for1.
, the leftist People's Action Party
which von 43 of 51 seats in the'
former British colony's first
general election. The election
results are considered an omi ominous
nous ominous sign for Southeastern Asia
Lby Western observers.

Iff .V

ii i-

if :x;smm
k

1 ) t,VA Hainan
; fa-. J INDO INDO-VrUTr
VrUTr INDO-VrUTr chin
I AY Of rf Si'--T
UHGAl t:rn p
K;.X JOUW
CHINA SIA
BORNE

the editors. It also boasts Sen.



TUESDAY JULY 1, 1951

THS FANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAlLfc NCHWArUe
Blazing Belgian HipBeachecf
r1
38 Persons
V
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I I r- 1 1- I I i il l i'ii I'll il'iliii imir ii iii ii iii imiiii.j.

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r.- X :

xr-' 'si t at f y

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TRANSPORTATION AWARD A Certificate of Merit lot Safety ,was presented to the UJS. Ar Army
my Army Caribbean Transportation Section eupply division for having accumulated 330,000 man man-hours
hours man-hours worked without disabling injury. This record was achieved between January 1955 and
January 1,959 Maj. Henry Konvicka, acting transportation officer, makes the-award to
Capt. R. N. Cressy, section chief, as supervisors Ray Dorsett, Ferdinand Garcia, Gerardo Feliu
and Thomas E. Reyes look on. Maj. -Gen. Charles L. Dasher, U.8. Army Caribbean command commanding
ing commanding general, commended the unjt for its performance. (U.S. Army Photo)

Farmhand Decides To Keep
Triplets Despite Low Wages

WILMINGTON, N. C. (UPlj-A
plantation hired-hand took hi wife
and 8-day-old triplet girls home
yesterday determined to keep his
family together, with the help of
strangers all over the country to
supplement his $25 a week wages.
Nathan B. Miller, 55-year old
worker on Clarendon Plantation
near here beamed proudly
announced "we'Ye decided we'll
keep them "and do our best for
them." ...
He had considered giving the
three girls JUT for yp-4s4
week because hfelt he ufdli6t
support them on his small salary
and a $15 a month Army disabil disability
ity disability pension. But word of has plight
spread quiickynd Prst,of help:
poured in.""' ' -,
"I don't think I could ever for forgive,
give, forgive, myself if we did part with
them," said his wife, Plinkie, 35.
whose family doubled with the
birth last Saturday of Glenda,
Linda and Brenda.

- "My wife" and f h'aVe decided

not to let the triplets De aaupieu
Miliar r he loaded them and

rvjoiic nf ofift Tackaees into his

old modef car.ibr the trip tQt their.

tenant larmnouse.
Just.5-bej5MR.4he ..famMy,, lfiXt
Southportfs sJMemesial;-08

pital, MUler was toia me dih,
a,mounting to about $250, had been
"tak-f -eare of. I was sure
please'd to hear that," he said. "I

omy maw
Miller was eiven the day off

and spent., most of, tthe morning

shopping for tmik tor tne mpreis.
The older children in the f amily
worked at cleaning up their five-

room frame house -and arranging

two baby cribs, part of the large

accnrtmfvnt of eifts donated to

help the family through its,. finan financial
cial financial crisis.' -:' y-u m
Jimmy Miller, 13, the only boy
in the family, took the news that
the triplets would stay with them
enthusiastically. He jumped in .a
wheel chaiir at th hospital and
rolled himself around the corri

dors excitedly.
Friends and neighbors clustered
around the house when word

soread that Mrs. Millet : and the

girls had come-hom6 i

Miller decided against the adop adoption
tion adoption idea after he received two of offers
fers offers of better jobs.
One of the offers came from
Paul Jones, a Charlotte, N.C. egg
producer, who said he would hire
Miller at a salary of $50 a wees
and furnish a home and" other
benefits. Jones was to come here
today to discuss the offer with
Miller.-
; Another offer came from J.W.

Crew Jr. of Weldon, N.C. who of

fered Miller a six-room house on
is3,500-acre farm and chickens
find livestock-to get him started
on a farming operation of his
own. "I can give him all the land
he wants to farm," said Crew.

Search Launched
For Sailor Who
Vanished1 Sunday
DETROIT (UPI,) TV A search
was launched yesterday for a

crew member of the destroyer
L.ia Boberts who ranishedjiflrday
after saying iie was goinf to
sleep on deck because of the in in-tolerable
tolerable in-tolerable heat below.
Police "begantSfeBg: fce De Detroit
troit Detroit River this'jnprmpgfor. Theo Theodore
dore Theodore Wheeler;-' of 8 o s t o n,
Mags. yy,-; -TT.:'

Promoters Hope
New Rocket Will
Forecast Weather
DENVER (UPI) A skinny
five-foot rocket named "Snoopy"
could become as familiar to the
weatherman, as. overshoes in '.he
corner of his office. At least, two

.DepveEfesintssmen hpe so.

incorporation papers nave- ueeu
filed for a $1.5 million iirm to
manufacture a small rocket the
two businessmen claim can help
predict the weather.
The firm Micro Dynamics
Corp. is the brainchild of G

vK&rbfrS a formW sdsterday of killing her US Army

tist with the Martin Co.,. and Bill

Meller. head of Sonic Research

Corp., which makes noise sup

pressors for airplanes.
Stine and Meller plan to begin
production this summer, of a five-

foot-long, 15 pound, two-inch in

diameter rocket to collect meteor meteorological
ological meteorological data. They claim the lit little
tle little rocket can carry a half-pojnd
of instruments to, 10Q.000 feet in
one minute, i ,'t ,.
The Air Force is investigating
the' rocket, which is powered by a
solid propellant and launched

from a simple portable rail-type

launcher., ime man can assemme
and launche" the rocket in 30 min

utes.

Stine and. Meller hope the

rocket will replace the weather

balloon, which U.S. weather bu

reaus across -the country send

aloft by the hundreds each day.

They claim "Snoopy" can pro

vide instantaneous readings more

accurate than balloons in the

midst of severe storms, if necessary.

RUG FIRM SOLD

Police Probe Theft
Of $260,000 Worth
Of Bonds In Miami
MIAMI BEACH (UPI) Police
yesterday sought a thief who stole
nearly $260,000 in securities and
cash from two safe deposit boxes
in the fashionable Bel Aire Hotel.
Max Levine, 67, an owner of
Empire Jewelers Corp. in New
York City, reported that $250,000
in non-negotiable stocks, $2,000 in
bonds and $5,000 in cash had been
taken from a safe deposit, box
sometime between Friday and
Sunday afternoon. He said it rep represented
resented represented his "life savings."
Hotel owner Albert Silveqnan
said between $1,200 and 4l,400j in
cash also had been stolen from
another lockbox at the desk
clerk's counter.
"I wanted to be a smart guy
putting-my life savings in a safe

ty deposit boxand I'm paying

for it now, Levine said.
He said his stocks, which in included
cluded included such "blue chip" securi securities
ties securities as AT and T and Consolidated
Ediison, could not be cashed.
Officers said neither of the box

es had been forced, indicating

the thief duplicated the four keys
needed to open the two boxes.

.CAMERON, La. (UPI) A 9JM0 9JM0-ton
ton 9JM0-ton Belgian ship, its holds and

cargo afire, was beached and

abandoned yesterday and 81 per

sons aboard escaped with' their

lives.
. Capt. Henri Sanglier, his wife

and 36 crewmen scrambled
ashore. Some were barefoot, their
clothing in tatters but ther were

only minor injuries to two sea

men. The fire had raged tirough

the tanker-freighter Anvertf from
stem to stern, and attempts 'to nut

it out were given up... Officials

saia uie vessel may ours tor a
week.-1.! : .' '"
The Vessel belched black imoke.

Brilliant white light exploded in

her Holds as bars of mage$vum'
metal ignited. Bales of 'cotton

smouldered and flamed and the

vessel s hull glowed red.

The French-speaking fishing vil
lage of Cameron took in Capt.
Sanglier, his wife and members of

the crew. 1
Six men two crewmen two
U.S. Navy seamen and tw coast
guardsmen were injurd. All
were released from hospitals aft after
er after treatment for bums, uts or
smoke inhalation.
Two U.S. destroyers, Coast
Guard ships, tugs and fireboats
gave up an 18-hour fight to save

the burning ship early Monday

and towed her aground to burn

out.

Later tugs moved her te a new
position, west of Cameron, for

fear that she. might get oose and

drift into offshore oi wes. In

the new position, she was ground
ed more firmly.

The sea. roughened and small

Coast 'Guard boats had to com

inland. A Coast Guard party was
on the beach, watching her burn.
- The American agents of the An-

vera, out of Antwerp, said they
had no tear of the ship, a combi

nation tanker freighter, being
boarded and seized as salvage un under
der under Maritime law because she is

too hot.;.
The Anvers was en route from
Freeport, Tex., to Lake Charles,
La., with a thousand bales of cot cotton,
ton, cotton, magnesium, resin, lumber,
iron ore. rice, fish -odl. carbon

black, tallow, rubber and 800 tons

of fuel oil when a fire starte l in
her engine room, probably from
faulty electrical equipment.
The magnesium exploded in
white blasts every 10 minutes ear early
ly early Monday until the last bar 'vas
gone.
Mrs. Sanglier and 25 seamen
were brought ashore at Cameron
Sunday. Capt. Sanglier, who had
remaned aboard with a fire-fighting
party of 11 other crewmen,
came off Monday before she was
abandoned.
The survivors escaped with only
the clothes they were wearing.
Many had no shoes or shirts and
some wore dungarees cut up
above their knees.

Trucking Operator Admits
Buying Teamster Labor Peace

US Woman Convicted

By V. German Curt

For Manslaughter

DAKMSTADT, Germany (UPT)

A Georgia woman was convict

ed by a West German court on

GREENSBORO, N. C. (UPD (UPD-Burlington
Burlington (UPD-Burlington Industries, Inc. has
acquired charm, tred mills, a Chi Chicago
cago Chicago maker of tufted rues, for

'in excess of $4,000,000," it was would return to the United States

announcea inursaay. tomorrow

sergeant husband. She was given

a 15-month suspended sentence

and freed.

Mm Emma Lee Cheaves, 30, a
Negro of Bainbridge, Ga., was the

first American dependent ever

tried by a West German court

The three-judge court agreed to

suspend the sentence on condition
Mrs. Cheaves' attorneys agree
not to appeal the conviction and

not to challenge German lurismc

tion over the case at a higher

level. The defense agreed.
"God answered mv prayers,

Mrs. Cheaves sobbed. She had
been charged with manslaughter

m the stabbing of heri husband,
Sn-4 Oliver Cheaves, 42 of Feflin,
Ala., in tVeir Army apartment
las Aue. 15.
Mrs. Cheaves had been In Jail
ten months and would have faced
five more months imprisonment
had not the court suspended sen sentence.
tence. sentence. The T)rosecution had de demanded
manded demanded a 30-month sentence.
Dirine hpr trial three nqychia nqychia-trists
trists nqychia-trists testified that Mrs. Cheaves
was io emot'onallv unset pfter an
hour-long fight with her drunken

husband, in which he hit her over

the head with a bottle and beat

er. that her judgment was Impaired.

Mrs. Cheaves attorney said she

Iff

1

i

AA JET FOR T0CUMtr-i The: first of Braniff i Airways' fleet of Boeing 707 jetUHers, which
should be Opera ting- throiifeh Tocumerr within ft iyear, lakes to the air on its initial flight at
the Rentpn, Washington Boeing plins.. After, undergoing certification' tests by the Federal
Aviation Agency, the 600 rflph, long-range Jets will be delivered to the airline's Dallas, Texas
headquarters' this October-, and placed In on the Latin American run shortly after the first of
In early 1860.;Tie jets carry, 112 passengeri and have a top cruising speed of 605 mph.-

WASHINGTON (UPI)-A truck

ing operator testified yesterday

that he tried to buy labor peacs
from the Teamsters Union by pay
ing $14,000 to lawyer Michael
Communale, now an assistant pro prosecutor
secutor prosecutor in Hudson County, N. J,

Walter A. Dorn, president of

Dora's Transportation Co. told the

Senate Rackets Committee he

paid a $200-a -month retainer to

Communale from 1953 to last
June 1 at the suggestion of Tony
Provenzano, president of Teams

ter Locaf 560 in Hobokea, N. J.

He said he never taw nor

talked to Communale but, advised
him in a letter that he was being
put on the payroll. Darn said he
got nothing for his $14,000.
Provenrano, called to the wit

ness stand, refused on grounds of

possible self-incrimination to an answer
swer answer any questions about Dora's

testimony or his own union bene

fits.

The benefits included a $19,500

salary, a union-provided Cadillac

and coverage in; a unon pension
fund, the eommittee fid. Pro Pro-veniaBO
veniaBO Pro-veniaBO also is head of Teamster

Joint Council 78 in Newark, N.J
Dorn said he retained Commu

nale to "avoid more trouble"
with Provenzano. He testified he

started having trouble with the
Teamsters shortly after opening a
terminal at Seacaucus, N.J., hub
of a trucking operation that
reaches from the Canadian bor border
der border to Baltimore.
Two other businessmen Arthur
Pitman, president of the Pitman
Trucking Co., Hoboken, N.J., and
Carl A. Helm, Pittsburgh, presi president
dent president of the now-defunct L and H
Transportation Co. also told of
Teamster demands for tribute.
They testified as the rackets
committee looked Into what chief
counsel Robert F. Kennedy de described
scribed described as "a couple of extortion
cases." Kennedy said Pitman and
Dorn made their payments be because
cause because Provenzano could use his
teamster position to put them out
of business.
Kennedv described Provenzano

as a close associate of Teamster
President James R. Hoffa, who is

due to return to the committee

witness stand later this week.
Kennedy said Provenzano had
contacts and connections with the
most notorious racketeers rackets

and gangsters in New York and

New Jersey.
As for Communale, the commit committee
tee committee counsel ,ald he now "does

labor racketeering work' In the

Hudson county prosecutor's office.

PINBALL BAN BI6INS
ROME (UPI) A nationwide

ban on pinball-machines went in

eaect Wednesday. The ban origi originally
nally originally was aet for Jan. 1 but was
postponed six months to give bar

owners time to dispose of the

macnines.

DROUGHT HITS AFRICA
PIETERMARITZBURG, South

Africa (UPI) Farmers in South Southwest
west Southwest Africa are fighting the worst

drought to hit the area in many
yeirs. Hugh Connan, president of
the cape wool growers associa

tion, said livestock losses alone

were estimated at $700,000.

SBB
m flip

UP AND READY Gleaming
Atlas ICBM stands upright in a
new simple launcher, ready to
be fired. The 100-ton missile is
lifted by a 75-horsepower elec electric
tric electric motor.

mil mn'nn

Mr l

.
.

111

Id.-

7

Hi: i it ii

Vl I. III...

i 3? I 1 I I f I

.)-. I

" i" km i m m r.ii; j,'aMAiia ,- 1 1 i-ymi a
INFLATIriM'S nriM V Trtl I lT lain v 1 J. .

f SiUaJSt dQUb -et-o. and information from "Bette?

Ben-Gurioris Party Urges
Him To Stay On As Premier

JERUSALEM, Israel Sector
(UPI) Resigned Prim Minister
David Ben-Gurion'i majority Ma-

pai party yesterday urged that he
be kept in office. It appeared he

would continue to lead the coun country
try country he helped to found.
A group of Mapai labor party
leaders called on President Itzhak
Ben-Zvi and urged that a new
government be formed under Ben
Gurion with as wide a coalition
representation as possible.
Ben-Zvi, who must name a
prime minister designate, be began
gan began consulting wth leaders of 12
parties after Ben-Gurion resigned
and brought down his old regime
Sunday in a feud with four rebel rebellious
lious rebellious cabinet ministers who op

posed his sale of arms to West

Germany. Ben-Gurion quit when
the leftist ministers refused to
resign.
Sources said the likeliest solu solution
tion solution to the cabinet crisis would
be another Ben-Gurion govern government.
ment. government. The opposing ministers ministers-members
members ministers-members of the leftist Ahdut
Avoda and Mapan parties would
be given posts without portfolio.
Their jobs as ministers of inter interior,
ior, interior, health, transport and develop

ment would go to loyal Ben
Gurion backers.

Until a solution is found, the

74-year-old architect of Israeli in

dependence and all the members

of the cabinetincluding the re'
bellious ministers, remain in of'
fice as caretaker officials.

General elections are scheduled
for next november. Mapal party
leaders said Ben-Gurion's forces
would campaign to have them

moved back to September for a

showdown fight between the Ma

pai and the leftwtng partiei.

Ben-Gurion had threatened last

week to ouit for good and retire

to his Negev desert home unless

he Won approval of his sale of

250,000 grenade launchers to West

Germany. The issue raised mem

ories of the Nazi extermination of

six million Jews1, but Ben-Gurion
said practical matters outweighed

all else.

Informed sources said it was

unlikely that' Ben-Gurion really

would retire permanently because
of the serious- International prob

lems facing the country, particu

larly the United Arab Republic's
refusal to permit Israeli shipping

to transit the Suez Canal.
Momentous decisions might be

necessary for Israel, the sources'-'

and, and only Ben -Gurion could
make them. :; ;,,
The prime minister, who 'todaV
office first when Israel became
state In 1948, has dissolved ev
eral governments before. Once,r
m 1953, he retired for "reasons o$ o$-health,"
health," o$-health," but earn back to pflw-'
er in 1955.
His Mapai party was reported
ready to operate cabinet with
as wide a coalition of parties ii ii-possible.
possible. ii-possible. Failing that, It wanted
the liberal progressive party "W'-7-eluded
with Mapai in aminorltr
government. 1; "-
In such an arrangement, Ben.
Gurion would have to rely onJb-V

stention of other parties in an an-confidence
confidence an-confidence votes, observers said.

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PAGI POUR

TOT PANAMA AMEftlCAN AN INDCTIKDENT DAILY NsTWSPAPEB
TUESDAY,, JUL! 7, 193 s

( and Otfi

xerwi&Q

Be

.134,

anama

fmm J&rfmmtt, WviUf, Bids Pvlim J 3" & LummL .JL

Jt M'f i imfrJ if ulfLmm Mt Fimm 3-0740 m 2-0 741 Llwm 8.00 mJ 10 .. mlf.

AFTERNOON TEA TOMORROW TO HONOR
14ES. TRUMAN LANDON AT ALBROOK CLUB
The Officers' Wives Club of Albrook Air Force Base will
Honor Mrs. Truman H. Landon at a tea tomorrow afternoon
at two in the Albrook Officers Club.
.: MaJ. Gen. Landon, commander of the Caribbean Air
Command, recently was named to the rank of lieutenant
general. He and Mrs. Landon will leave the Isthmus next
week for Washington, D.C., where the general will assume
the post of Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel at U.S. M"
Force headquarters.

GaHhers' Daughter
Arrives Per Visit
Mrs. William Van Dyke Ochs
Jr.,' daughter of Lt. Gen. Ridgely
Gaither, Commander in Chief,
Caribbean Command, and Mrs.
Gaither, is visiting at the gener general's
al's general's residence at Quarry Heights.

Meeting

Birth Announcement
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Pape
of 1060 Fair Oak Ave., Arroyo
Grande, Calif., announce the birth
of their second child, a son, on
June 28. He has been named John
Clayton.
Mrs. Pape is the former Miss
Dorothy Dedeaux of Balboa. The
maternal grandparents are Mr.
and Mrs. Leon E. Dedeaux of Gulf Gulf-port,
port, Gulf-port, Miss., former residents of
Pedro Miguel and Balboa.

Nancy Hughes Jons
Chamber Of Commerce Stiff
Of local interest in an announce announcement
ment announcement received from Rangeley,
Maine, that Miss Nancy Hughes,
daughter of Mrs. H. F. Hughes,
has joined the staff of the Cham Chamber
ber Chamber ot Commerce of that city.
"Miss Hughes is well-known on
the Isthmus, and lives on the
Zone during the winter months.

servations should be made by to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow with one of the hostesses,
Mrs. Kay Daniels. Panama 3-4711;
Mrs. Emily Bolton. Panama 3-77-78;
Mrs. Elsa Tamm, Panama 3 3-534J;
534J; 3-534J; or Mrs. Phyllis Euper, Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 4442.

IAWC Cooking Class
Luncheon Tomorrow
The Cooking Class of the Inter Inter-American
American Inter-American Women's Club will have
its first luncheon of the fiscal
year tomorrow at noon at the Fort
Amador Officers Open Mess.
Mrs. Nancy Sidebotham, IAWC
president, will be the guest of hon honor
or honor and Mrs. Elfie Hotzel, new
class chairman, will introduce new
msmbsrs and guests.

Royal
Moots

Palm. Chapter
In Cristobal

Fill the Blanks

Dancers to Appear

On CFN-TV Thursday
Students of the Madge Locwe
Theatre of Dance will be present presented
ed presented Thursday at 6:30 p.m. on CFN
television. The participants will
be Maryanne Field, Dorothy Har

per, Sharon Highly, Gloria lveiai lveiai-dier,
dier, lveiai-dier, Chickie Archibald and Leta
Tigert.
Culick Chapel Guild
Meats With Mrs. Hodges
At the monthly board meeting
of the Fort Gulick Protestant Cha Chapel
pel Chapel Guild, held in the home of the
vice president, Mrs. James Hedges
plans for a church-wide potltick
(upper July 19 were discussed. A
irthday theme has been suggest suggested
ed suggested for the event
The July meeting of the Guild
Will feature Rev A. Linkemenn of
the American Bible Society, who
will show slides and speak on i i-lle
lle i-lle Societies inJCentral and South

America.
Attending the board meeting
were Mrs. Marvin No'te, Mrs. Lo Lowell
well Lowell Erickson, Mrs. Elroy Lipsey,
Mrs. Leon Green. Mrs. Abraham
Gomez and Mrs. James Roane.

Royal Palm Chapter Two, Ord Order
er Order of the Eastern Star, held a reg regular
ular regular monthly meeting Monday eve evening
ning evening at the Cristobal Masonic
Temple. The business included bal balloting,
loting, balloting, initiation, installation and
memorial services.
Refreshments were served at
the close of the meeting.

Coco Solo Civic Council
All residents of France Field
and Coco Solo are reminded of a
meeting of the Coco Solo Civic

Council Wednesday evening at sev

en at the Breakers (Jiub.

Announcements will be made

concerning the rental structure uf
Coco Solo quarters, and certific certificates
ates certificates will be presented to three

members of the community in re

cognition of their public services.
Other items on the agenda will in include
clude include a report on Fourth of July

activities and a discussion of ot
taining service on commissary

purchased appliances.
Residents are advised to be on
hand for the meeting earlier than
the announced starting time.
Conversation Club
The Canal Zone Spanish Conver Conversation
sation Conversation Club will hold its regular bi biweekly
weekly biweekly meeting tomorrow evening
at 7 '30 at the Quarry Heights Of Officers
ficers Officers Club. All persons eligible
for membership in an officers'
club are invited to join the group.
Informal dress is the appropriate
attire.
Boy Scout Board
The executive board of the Can Canal
al Canal Zone Boy Scout Council is sched scheduled
uled scheduled to meet this evening in the
Quarry Heights Tunnel.

A sDecial discussion or opera

tions at Camp Chagres will high highlight
light highlight the program.
Unity Tempi. Elks
Unity Temple 759, Order of Elks
will have a regular meeting this
evening at 7:30 at the Paraiso

T-ndpo Hall. All members of ne

unit are urged to attend.

Steel Negotiators In Final
Round Of Bargaining Talks

ACROSS
I A In
a poke
4 Nomad
I and
hostess
12 Poem
13 Learning
14 Wing-shr
15 Number
lt Copying
It Oriental
rulers
20 Stephen
Vincent
21 Angeles,
California
22 Seth's son
(Bib.)
24 Malt
beverages
2t City in
Oklahoma
27 Health resort
30 Most crippled
32 totter
34Parsee sacred
writings
35 Landed
property
36 Oriental coin
I7Mlmicker
39 Shoshonei'
Indians
40 Hurries
41 Lemon
42 Flavor
45 Picture shows
48 Interpret
51 Self-esteem
52 French river
53 and
shut case
54 Man's
nickname
55 Caresses
St Nuisance
57 Afternoon

DOWN
1 a'nd pant
2 Notion
3 Ladies and
4 Other name
t Frolic
Ascended
7 Wager

t Detests
Boy's name
10 Rescue
U Allowance
for waste
17 Homes
lt Flowers
23 Saltpeter
24 and
alack
25 Wash

. 3. ; r-
I Antwerp Previous Puxile

28 Ston house
27 Decli ration
25 Petei s
nickr ime
29 War od
ot Gi eece
31 Flight of
steps
3lMuil al
exerc Jt
31 Get I ee

40 Sharpens,
as a razor
41 Concerning
42 look
and listen
43 Operatic solo
44 Great
48 Followers
47 Awry
4t Ice cream
50 Cut oil

i MM I? F N P I FTTTT
I iT n
u rr""r
is It tip t
r t
51 W IT
r 11
w
e t n
s r" n j

State Dept. Right To Select Newsmen
To Tour Red China Upheld By Court

hir!ty Card Group,
alboa Woman's Club
The Charity Card Groun of the
Balboa Woman's Club will meet
Thursday at noon at the Fort A A-Wador
Wador A-Wador Officers Open Mess. Re-

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NEW YORK (UPI)-Steel ne negotiators
gotiators negotiators went into their final
round of bargaining sessions
yesterday to try to hammer out a
new contract in time to prevent
an indus'ry-wide, 500,000 man
strike called, for midnight July 14.
Members of both the induslry
and union four-man negotiating
teams greeted one another cor
dially as they went into a etspped etspped-up
up etspped-up schedule of two sessions a da
following a July 4 week end "coo1 "coo1-ing
ing "coo1-ing of,r4er,ip.d7
A rash of wildcat strikes ham hampered
pered hampered negotiations las week, bu'
the stoppages ended over the
week end.
Neither side would discuss the
present status of negotiations, but
there was no indication that a
contract formula was near.

R Conrad Cooper, executive
vice president of the U.S. Steel
Corp. and industry's chief nego negotiator,
tiator, negotiator, was asked if he thought la labor
bor labor Secretary James P. Mitchell
was right when he said in a na nationwide
tionwide nationwide radio interview Sunday
that there was a "good possibil possibility"
ity" possibility" that an agreement would be
reached before the strike dead deadline.
line. deadline.
"I don't know." Cooper said. "I
hono he's right." ,:
Tie American Iron a Steel-Institute
reported that summer va vacations
cations vacations and the wildcat strikes
cut the nation's s'eel production
last week to th" lowest level in
five months.
The institute said a substantial
pickun was expected this week.
Oulnut last work came to 2, 2,-215,000
215,000 2,-215,000 tons, well below the ex

pected 2,405,000 tons. It was the

least since the week nep;nning
last Jan. 26, when 2,178,000 tons

were produced.

Many big steel users have been
stock piling steel to be ready for
an emergency, however.
Newsmen called Cooper's atten attention
tion attention to a story published in the

Wall Street Journal Monday indi indicating
cating indicating a battle was developing
over the working rules that gov govern
ern govern steel-making in the mills.

The story said management in

sists there is an urgent .Ineed tor
changes in the contract with the

United Steelworkers Union to

eliminate featherbedding and re

strictive union practices which

add to cost."

"We have not been emphasizing

featherbedding," Cooper said.

"We have been emphasizing the
need to work together to make

progress so as to generate in

creased economic wealth.

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
U.S. Court of appeals today today-unanimously
unanimously today-unanimously upheld the right uf
the State Department to choose
the netvs correspondents it would
allow to travel to Communist
China.
It ruled that the department
acted within its authority in deny denying
ing denying permission to author Waldo
Frank, who sought to go to China
as a correspondent for Latin
American newspapers. He
claimed the department discrimi discriminated
nated discriminated against him in violation of
the "due process" amendment of
the constitution.

But Judge Warren E. Burger

said that the secretary of state

has a "wide latitude" in carrying

out foreign policy. He said the
secretary should be allowed to es establish
tablish establish strict criteria for those it
permits to travel to Red China.

SATINA CARRIES YOU SMOOTHLY

THRU THE IRONING HOUR I

Satina...

the BIG ironing
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Duplicate Bridge,
Recordina Session
At JWB Tonight
Duplicate Bridge is being play
eel this evening, at the USO

JWB Armed Forces Service Cen

ter in Balboa.
As actual play must com

mence promptly no later than
7:30 p.m., lt Is urged that all

interested players nresetn them

selves at least fifteen minutes
prior to satrting time in order
to assure themselves of the op

portunity to participate.

The weekly supervised Voice
Recordings on discs is also on
the agenda this evening.
All servicemen and their fa famine
mine famine sare welcome to make use
of these facilities to send mes messages
sages messages back home.

",The department had said that

enly news organizations with at
least one full-time correspondent

overseas could send a man.

Burger said in the appeals
. f . in.

cuurc opinion uiai u is axiomat axiomatic
ic axiomatic that the conduct of foreign af

fairs necessarily involves flexible

measures and policies which can
be adjusted to meet changing

conditions."

"Just as Communist China al altered
tered altered its former rigid policy of
admitting no American newsmen,
this country must be free to alter
its policies."
Burger said the State Depart Department,
ment, Department, but certainly not court, is

qualified to say whose presence in
China implements its policy.
The judge also Said the depart

ment should be allowed to make
t distinction between individual
reporters and news agencies with

7 PITIR O. SMITH
Peter G. Smith, agle Scout and

senior patro leader, i Boy Scout
Tvoop 5, Ancon, leavei today to

attend the 'Junior leader training
course at Schiff Scout Reservation

Mendham, N.J. 1 M :: ';

Schiff Scout Reservation is own

ed and operated by the Boy Scouts

of America. Tot purpose or the
training course It to provide
twd-weekfv period 1 ot intensified
training in scoutcraft and leader leadership
ship leadership for icouti of outstanding abil ability
ity ability and leadership from the differ different
ent different local councils. During this per
iod the scouts are under the gui guidance
dance guidance and training of the best pro professional
fessional professional adult icouters.

When the scouts return to their

units, they are better able to car

ry out their duties and responsmu-

ities as iunior leaders and also to

train other Junior leaders in weir

respective units and in tne council.

Smith 1 honored to be recom recommended
mended recommended by Troop 5's sponsoring

institution, the Cathedral of 5t.
Luke and approved by the council.

He was awarded the Episcopal
God and Country medal recently

after a vear and a half of lnten

sified study and work. Thia is the
highest award that the Episcopal

Church can award a scout.
The Cathedral sponsors three u

nits of scouting, Cubs, Scouts and
Explorers. These units have al always
ways always maintained an "open troop"
policy. Parents and boys who are

interested in becoming part of the

Bov Scout movement and enter tn

to a program of character build

ing, physical fitness and citizen

shin training the better to prepare

themselves as citizens and leaders

of their country are Invited to be

come a member of one of these

units.

THE yplCE OF
BROADWAY
tiy Dorothy; Killgalkn

(Derethy.Kllgallen Is on v.
tion, Htr f uest column st to today
day today ? Ronnie Prinkhouse
youthful proprietor nt of
Naw York's; mesl fascinating
aHnefptaces, Manny Wolf's.) ..
Rverv hookworm i eventually

cornea to' believe that truth, can

be lota more colorful man: ncuon,

if not stranger, When I acquired
Manny Wolf lait Winter, my .li .library
brary .library of novel took a tempora temporary
ry temporary back seat to. aome new books

scraobooks.' started by the ong-

kial nroorletor VWhetf. hit Place

pened in I8i. Mguring i migm
at well leant something about
Manny's besidea the : butcher's

nam and where they keen the

catsup, I pored through the in innumerable
numerable innumerable newspaper : clippings.

It was all new to me, those good
old days at the turn ol the cen century,
tury, century, and I think anyone would
find the scrapbooks amusing or
wonderfully nostalgic.
Now in its 30th year on the cor

ner of Third Ave. and 49th St.,

Mannv's was first launched on

Forathe St. in lower Manhattan,

Among its earliest feasters were

Sarah Bernhardt. Diamond um

Brady, Fanny Brice, Will Rog
ers. the unforgettable Mayor Jlnv

mv Walker. O. Henry. Caruso,

Ethel Barrymore, Flo Ziegfeld,
Mrs. John Jacob Astor and Lil Lillian
lian Lillian Russell. Funny thing, a hot
topic of conversation at the time
win the Cuban rebels then try-

in e to throw off Spain's yoke in

stead of Batista's.

a demonstrated interest in foreign
news coverage.
"The ''probability that the Com

munists will try to secure some

advantage out Of admitting Amer American
ican American news reporters to the 'main 'mainland
land 'mainland emphasizes the strictly polit political
ical political nature of the entire prob

lem," he said.
The court also cited its ruling
in the case of newsman William
Worthy in which it upheld the
right of the State Department to
restrict travel to the China main mainland.
land. mainland.
The State Department granted
permission to 30 correspondents
to enter Red China. But the Com

munist regime later refused to

issue visas for all except John

Strohm of Newspaper Enterprise

Association.

Outdoor Dining Affords Pleasant Change

SALVAGE FIRM SUES
OSAKA, Japan (UPI) The Fu Fu-kada
kada Fu-kada Salvage Co. said today it
would sue the government of
Okinawa because someone stole
five ships from the bottom of the
Pacific a half mile off the Okin Okinawa
awa Okinawa port of Naha. The ships, sunk
by U.S. planes in World War II,

were purchased by Fukada for

scrap.

If yoii have Ian outdoor ...dining

ares, don't limit"itt mse-"tp the

nights you entertain. Families, es especially
pecially especially the children, enjoy the
novelty of eating outdoors, and

the cool evening breezes will

make food taste better.

Informal service is certainly

th order of the day,1 but that
needn't mean a succession of pa

per plates and cups. Some thrifty

homemakers will save their odds
and ends of old china, to use in
such a way.

This form of thriftiness will

not appeal to all, especially to

those who delight in a pretty,

co-ordinated setting, whether for

company or for the family.

In these days, when really
good-looking dinnerware can be
bought for so little, and when
there are so many double-purpose
containers which go from
kitchen to table, it's not an ex extravagance
travagance extravagance to have dishes enough
for any occasion.

Looking very much at home

on either outdoor or indoor in
formal tables are the new serv

ing pieces and canisters which
team warm woods, such as wal

nut, with earthenware or china

One new and very moderately
priced group features tapered
china canisters with walnut lids.
Those could line up on a kitchen
counter or a table to hold condi condiments
ments condiments and sugar and, in the
larger sizes some staple items.
A wood tray is likely to be
teamed with cheese, or snack
servers. Walnut and brass are us

ed to make warming stands for

coffee jugs or casseroles.
Oiled teakwood holders with
glass liners could be used for a
variety of foods.
Natural teammates for such
serving pieces are china and

earthenware in modern shapes
and those with provincial or

Scandinavian motifs,

hi
i y tr- c

in mm m iw Mmmm

ii& dt.-?.1 ,l.iVi

For informal dlnlnr, blue cloth Is set with new, Inexpensive,
dinnerware In mustard sunburst rim pattern. Canister and
ervlnr dish have walnut lids: casserole, a walnut stand. Pltchrr
and matrhlnr mugs carry well on a wicker tray.

A good example is found in a
low priced dinnerware with a
brilliant mustard sunburst that
rims plates and the bases of
wood-topped jars and cruets.
What joins in smoothly with
such tableware the wicker bas baskets
kets baskets for bread or rolls, wooden
candle holders, boldly colored

tablecloths and sturdy garden

flowers.

A welcome change, too, for the
youngster charged with setting

the table us to show her this va
riation:

Let her tie each person's flat

ware in h big, lap-size napkin.
Wrap protects silver and sim
plifies buffet service.

One winter evening in l600,
Diamond Jim Brady strutted in into
to into Manny's with another strap

ping gent name of John

Kvan. They'd reserved

hie pnnuph for 10 but

for the two of them and they kept

eight waiters scampering luce ran ran-bits,
bits, ran-bits, for Diamond Jim and chal

lenged the' celebrated cnamp ,m

an eating contest that lured a
horde of newspaper photographers
and fans..
The, great John L. was kayoed
by Diamond Jim's abiUty ft0, put
away four dozen oysters, t two
thick sirloins and six lamb chops,
a mountainous salad and a run running
ning running wash-down with four quarts
of iced orange juice.
Over the years. Diamond Jim

was a frequent Manny Wolf's

guest, almost always with his
beloved Lillian Russell. One time
they arrived on twin gold-plated

bicycles, diamond encrusted to

boot.

Brady later tossed the doorman

a diamond sticKpin wortn aDout
$12,000 for watching those far-

out bikes,i1fle:toyrarr.'rtb-'

ly gone forever.)

And so are those delicious days,

I note trom siuaying a menu of

the time, when a six course din dinner
ner dinner was yi.iia, vintage cum cum-pagne
pagne cum-pagne was RaO, ana u you paid

more than a nicxei tor any vege vege-uoie
uoie vege-uoie you were trtuy extrava

gant.

ai smith ana Jimmy walker

onen luiicned ac manny s ana 1
see wnere a politico named "non-

est jonn Aeiiy was quoteu in
pruu as cracking tnere one
night, "Me ouy a 100 motet to
a uemocmuc dinner? I'll never
eat that tnucnl"
A silent man who usually ate
alone was William Sidney sorter,
Deuer Known as u. Henry. Answ Answer
er Answer of the literary set at Manny's
was Samuel Clemens yes Mark
Twain. He wore a white suit e e-ven
ven e-ven in the Winter,, and. it was
while being interviewed over din dinner
ner dinner that ne made international
news by uttering five simple
words. The reporter said his
newspaper had just received
wora that Twain had died. The
great author commented, "The

story is grossly exaggerated," and i

calmly resumed eating his duck duckling.
ling. duckling. F. Scott Fitzgerald and Irvin
S. Cobb used to get together It
Manny Wolf's, and while dining
there one night Cobb learned
that officers in Texas were hold holding
ing holding a warrant for his arrest.
They alleged he'd violated state
game laws on a Texas fishing
trip by taking out a two dollar
resident's license in the vialse
name of J. H. Davis instead of
paying $15 for a non-resident's li license
cense license in his own moniker.
Flo Ziegfeld threw a farewell
Daily costing over $8,000 before
aking off for Palm Beach after
the premiere of "Kid Boots," and

nieht Leslie Howard and Al

fred Lunt hosted an affair toast

ing the iriumpn m -uuiwaro
Bound." v t

Georee M. Cohan staged the

liveliest blowout of another sea

son to- entertain -Cecil o. ueMiue
and Will Rogers. Then .there was

ine nignt. w. u f ields prancea in
puffing a cigar a foot long, ex explaining
plaining explaining thai his doctor had cut
him down to one stogie-a day so
he'd ordered the jum oo size spe specially
cially specially made.- Fields boasted he
was adhering strictly to the phy physician's
sician's physician's orders but each ele

phantine cigar -lasted all day
long.'' 1

flow in 1959, my associates and
I are pleased that celebrities still
fltnlr tn Mlrmv U7rlf x Pittlatta

Goddard vand Erich Maria Re-,
marque, for example, come in
regularly to fill up on sauerbra sauerbra-ten
ten sauerbra-ten and boiled potatoes, Oscar
Homolka and his beautiful wife,.
Joan Tetzel, like to dip into our
big tank and chose their own
live lobsters.
- Milton Berle invariably break!
up the crowd with his shenanl-
fans over dinner, and so dot)
nil Silvers. Sen, Estes Kefauvef
gets as many requests for auto autographs
graphs autographs as any movie star. A A-mong
mong A-mong the quiet, though famous,
gourmets who drop in from time
to time are Montgomery Clift,
Shirley Booth and Benny Good Goodman,
man, Goodman, So we're confident that half-a-century
from now, the scrap
books we're pasting up today will
be as fascinating to lovers of
New York lore as the' old ones
I've had such fun reviewing.

If you want to keep a man en entranced
tranced entranced for the rest of .your
lives: . .. rJ ,v
Don't turn yourself fnto a door doormat.
mat. doormat. He'll find you far more fas
cinatkig if you have just a touch
of the prima donna in your make make-up.
up. make-up. :.,
Don't believe he wants you to
be as sensible as he says he does.
Men pride themselves on being
sensihie. hut. vnii rflralv Via...

, - Aic& m
man brag about how sensible his
wife is. A man finds a little fem feminine
inine feminine inconsistency amusing as
well as -exasperating
Don't let Mm ever feel that he
knows exactly how you'll react
to any given situation. Surprise
him now and then.
Have some real, abosorbing h
terests Of your own so that vmi

fiance, happy., alone,,, jThaj;:, makes

anyone more tascinaung.
Hang on to your femininity
The more a woman of any age
emphasized her feminine traits

the more attractive she is to a

man.
Be enthusiastic instead of dead
pan. A woman who lives life with
enthusiasm makes it more excit exciting
ing exciting for those around her.
Back your husbands ideas in instead
stead instead of always throwing a wte wte-blanket
blanket wte-blanket on his plans. A wife who
is too fearful of taking a chance
can hold a man back and if she
does her husband is sure to ro ro-sent
sent ro-sent her lack of faith in him.
Stay as young as you can
through the years not just in
appearance, but in your ability
to have fun, your anticipation of
the future, your happiness in the
moment at hand,

HAT PRICES RISE
NEW YORK (UPI) Hat Corp.
of America announced it will in
crease the retail price of its Knox
and Dobbs fall felt hat line to
$11.95 from $11.50 effective imme immediately.
diately. immediately. All hats at $13.50 and up
will remain at the same price.
The company noted the price for
Australian rabbit skins, major
raw material In felt hats, has al almost
most almost doubled in the past vear.

MATISM
tain MRtuumfttlara,

'henver th natal

lllllll is, .l.UHUDi MIllllUMlVi
.ttlca, tiff itiuaalci ajid iwolUa
lolntt mk you mlirable, gt
ROMIND from your druggist at
one. ROMIND quickly bring! fan fan-taitlu
taitlu fan-taitlu rllef to you can lloop, work
and llv, in comfort. Don't auttcf

WVIWi U MOW.

orrivo rolroshod in

i 1 -iSlo

SUPER CONVAIR 340

optimistic ... and happy

(6)

Leave: PANAMA 7:30 a.m.
Arrive: SAN JOSE 815 a.m.
Arrive: SAN SALVADOR 10:35 a.m.
Arrive: MEXICO 2:40 p.m.

LUXURY SERVICE AT TOURIST FARES
Pressure controlled, air conditioned
Cabins
Only 2 seats abreast for your
comfort
Panoramio windows
Delicious breakfast and exquisite hot
meals served in flight
Bi.lingual stewardesses give you
personalized service

Consult your Travel. Agent
s or call our offices 3.7011

LINEAS AEREAS COSTARRICENSES, S.A. AVE. J. AROSEMENA No. 31-40 (Across from Olympic Swimming Pool)



TUESDAY, JULY I'lMk'..".

TBS fiX AMI AMERICA AIT INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPBT
MO I PIVI
AECs Plan To: Dump Nuclear Wastes
.V.--V J.-. sj -.
In Gulf Of 'Mexico Seen As Ill-Timed

. ;.T 9

- : V-:
J? f

CIVILIAN EMPLOYES HONORED Peter M. Demangue, center and James C. Lastlnger, right,
civilian employes ol the U.S. Army Caribbean Quartermaster Section, receive cash awards and
Department of the'Army certillcates for -adopted ideas from "Robert H. carpenter, chief of the
quartemaster maintenance division. Demangue, a furniture repairman with the maintenance
section,; devised an Improvement for a lathe used In the allied trade shop. A resident of 398Q

nuevo iumperaaor, ne nas 10 years 01 reaerai service ana nas Deen wun uio vuurwimaatci ocu ocu-tion
tion ocu-tion for 10 years; Lastlnger, a. lead foreman in the- maintenance section, submitted a work
simplification study concerning equipment-lri the noh-perishable warehouse which simplified
operations and brought savings of more than $200 annually. (U.S. Army Photo)

By DREW PEARSO
WASHINGTON, July 1 (UPD
The Atomic Energy Commis Commission's
sion's Commission's announcement of its In Intention
tention Intention to dump nuclear wastes
in the Gulf of Mexico eouldn't
have been more ill-timed If the
Kremlin had planned it.
Mexican government officials,
press, and public reactej with
net resentment. Foreign Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Manuel Tello, a good friend
of the US, promptly cabled
Ambassador Antonio Carrlllc
Flores In Washington to lodge
an energetic protest with the
State Department. Bristling ed editorials
itorials editorials In Mexico City papers
denounced the threat to marine

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEa Service

r: i:rr T'43j

1 w

NORTH 10
87 f
9 7 2
KQ
A0754
WEST EAST
AQ109S AJ4
VQJ85 V10
J10 A8J2
4Q83 J102
SOUTH (D)
A AK6B2
AK4S
7P
East and West vulnerable
South West North East
1 Pass 1 N.T. Pass
2V Pass 3t Past
4 Pass Past Pais
Opening lead 4 J

41 'ir

'"fl ''s V

A LETTER OF APPRECIATION, signed by Ma. Qen. Charles L. Dasher, commanding general U.S.
Army Caribbean, was presented by Col. Jobie J, Dixon, quartermaster. USARCARIB, to Janathan
ThomFsonj'te emnlDyet,,flf ;the dauarteEmaster iMatoAenanee Division, CMOzalr-bemps-retirel
recently kfter 27 years service with the Federal Government. He first entered government ser ser-Mce
Mce ser-Mce in 1942, durlnpr which time he was employjd as a sewing machine operator and textile
fabricator in the maintenance division. He la AS venrs.nlrt n tibHva nt St. Thnm Jimiin onH

lives with his wife at Number 281, San FernahdD, Juan Diaz. Members of the groun, from left to
right, in the photo are, R. H. Carpenter, chief, nnihtenance division, Thompson, and Dixon.
(US Army Photo)

1 1 1 : 7 : -. 1 "
i H V

.t u A'

When the late Major Patton in invented
vented invented the takeout double some
45 years back he started a rev revolution
olution revolution in auction bridge. Prior to

that time no one had ever dream

of bidding a four-card suit but
the iakeout double made you bid

and sometimes your longest suit
would be only a four-carder.

it didn't take experts lone to

discover that four opposite four

made a pretty good trump noiding
and four-card suits were here t

stay.

Today's hand is a good Illustra

tion of the power of four oppo opposite
site opposite four. South wins the second
diamond lead in dummy snd
promptly plays out the ace and

king of trumps. The bad trump
break is annoying but not fatal.

South takes his ace and king

of spades and ruffs a third spade
in dummy. He comes back to his
hand with the king of clubs and

juffinofter soade. The ace .of

ciuos ana a ciun run give mm
his contracts and West makes the

last two tricks with hii high
trumps.

Q The bidding has been:
North East South Weal
2 Pass 3 4 Paf
.4 4k Pass t
You, South, hold:
AJI.54 VA QJU4 Q6
What do you do? 4
A Bid four heart. This it
dearly aft showlnc W and
jowr hand warrants M
TODAY'S QUESTION
' Your partner continues with a
bid of four spades. What do you
do now?
Answer Tomorrow

1 3

11.1 11 1 Af I a I tt a st S wa a mm a mm .....

lr"'?irwu lP,tu?lr11 T IN HIS FACE-Hlgh-altitude-painting specialist
Ray Howell does aerial ballet as he sprays water tower braces lOO feet in the air. He was
v working on a new half-m llion-gallon tower In Salina, Kan. Grease on his face and a sweater
protect him from the wind-blown spray. Howell'i been at the sticky business for nine years.
. Ht earns $5.50 an hour, ..

AWAITS APPROVAL

MILWAUKEE. Wis. (UPI

Richard A. Wagner, 33, hoped

Thursday for, approval of his

bankruptcy .petition, which listed

his assets at $2,856.26 and his lia

bilities at $9,929.99. Wagner is in

no hurry for final judgment. He

is serving 50 years on seven
counts of armed robbery.

life in the gulf, cn which a
.arge portion of Mexico's popu
iace lives.
What made this angry out outburst
burst outburst particularly unfortunate
Aras that It came right on the
.-.eels of a week which saw an
extraordinary upsurge of Mexi Mexican
can Mexican friendship for the United
States,
US Ambassador Bob Hill,
addressing the gradua ting
class of the American Insti Institute
tute Institute for v Foreign Trade at
Phoenix, Axis., had praised
the Mexican revolution of
1910 as wholly democratic
something no other American
diplomat had ever done.

Sen. Wayne Morse of Oregon

later torn an audience at the

commence m e n t exercises of
Mexico City College that he was

in iavor or more economic as assistance
sistance assistance and less military aid
to Latin America. He also in indorsed
dorsed indorsed the Latin-American com common
mon common Market plan, which Mexi Mexico
co Mexico is working to bring about.
Between them, these two U.S.
spokesmen did an important job
of convincing the average Mexi

can tnat we regard his country

as worthy of respect and con confidence.
fidence. confidence. Then came the AEC

announcement, suggesting that

Mexico's prime nsning grounds

iook like a good public dump to
the US.

- 1 fit
- 'r,, h-t;

1 V

AMERICAN EXHIBITION IH MOSCOW Model shows the buildings and landscaping for
the American National Exhibition In Moscow. The exhibit, opening in July and running for
six weeks, Is in the city's Sokolniki Park. In foreground is the science building, housed under
a huge aluminum dome.. Cultural and technological exhibits will occupy fanlike structure
behind dome. By reciprocal agreement, the U.S.S.R. will exhibit this summer in New York.

Democrat Dorn Demands Resignation

Of Butler In Raging Family Fight

WASHINGTON, July 7 (UPD

Rep. William J. Dorn demand demanded
ed demanded yesterday that Democratic

national chairman R. M. Butler
resign hia post because of But Butler's
ler's Butler's attack on Democratic con congressional
gressional congressional leaders. He forecast
a move to oust Butler if tne
chairman doesn't resign.

Dorn complained in a house

speech yesterday that Butler
was "serving the cause of the
Republicans by creating a

Democratlo spilt. As an em employe
ploye employe of the party, he said,

Butler should be trying to piu piu-mote
mote piu-mote Democratic harmony in
stead of discord.

Butler had charged that some

Democrats around the country
were dismayed by what he
termed the refusal of Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic congressional leaders to
support "progressive" legislation.

Dorn told newsmen that But

ler's comments lent credence to
"grapevine" rumors that Butler

PPLEASECi

VATCII ROAD

Not Road

Constructipri

n

II

EYES STRAIGHT! You
cant be a sidewalk superin-
tendent while driving a car.
That's the idea behind this sign
on Route 66, about 20 miles
wuth of St. Louis, Mo.

m v 1

ARM? HEIR CORPS-Pour ber'et-clsd British soldiers hoist their children aloft at Southampton, England. It wal the first
time tfcey.Jbjd. gejin Uieir offspring. ,They hd ust debarked from -a troopship .bringing ftem back from duty in Cyprus.

IO x

i v

1

4' rf...

FOR THE SWEET Andrea
Maxime Hambaldl, 24, holds
some -of the pralines (almonds
roasted in sugar) she won for
being named best fashion model
of the year in Paris. Shs won
her weight in the confections
and that's 107.8 pounds. 1

is heading a drive to ditch
speaker Sam Rayburn as 1960
conven t i o n chairman, oust
House Democratic leader John
W. McCormack (Mass.) as pro program
gram program chairman and revamp the
credentials committee to con control
trol control the seating of southern
delegates.
Senate Democratic whip Mike
Mansfield (Mont.) leaped into
the family fight early yesterday
with a charge that Butler was
the one who was damaging the
party. He said it would be far
better If Butler supported the
party's congressional leaders in instead
stead instead of "participating in these
atacks.t"
Rayburn joined in Mansfield's
appry;sal ol Buler's charge Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. Rayburn said he might is issue
sue issue a formal statement later
this week in reply to Butler.
For the moment, he said, "just
let him stew with Mr, Mans Mansfield's
field's Mansfield's statement."

Senate Demo c r a 1 1 c leader
Lyndon B. Johnson (Tex.) re

plied with a one -sentence state

rfient Mdicra'tthg "fta 'would pay

as much attention to Butler's

criticism as to recent attacks

by Republican National Chair
man Thruston B. 'Morton.

"Mr. Butler and Mr. Morton

both are entitled to their opin opinions,"
ions," opinions," he riaid.
Johnson received a boost
from an unexpected quarter
when Sen. William Proxmire
!D-Wis.), one nf hio som2time
critics, defended the party lead leader
er leader against Morton's attacks.

Morton has branded the Demo

cratic Senate and House as a
"won't do" Congress.
Proxmire mad eno mention
of the Butler criticisms. But he
dismissed as nonsense GOP
cnarges that Democratic leaders
had to crack down on the big
spending programs of certain
members of their party.
Proxmire 8aid' the OOP was
trying to build the impression
that "liberal spenders" are "be "being
ing "being held in tight checK by more
responsiblel elements in Con Con-eiess.
eiess. Con-eiess. He accused the GOP of

trying to build up inflation as

a straw for the I960 presidential
election.

Mansfield, replying to Butler,
said the Democrats would have

a "toueh time in 1960 under any

circumstances, but the chair

man of the Democratic Nation National
al National 'Committee finding fault with
the leadership is not going to
helD one bit."

He said the record of the past

two Democratic congresses Us

resDonslble for the congression

al victories in the 1956 and 1958

elections. He predicted the re

ccrd made by the current Con

gress would neip elect uemo
ciats next year.

But he said "It's going to be
much tougher In 1960 if our own
people keep on shooting at us."
Senate Republican leader Ev Everett
erett Everett M. Dlrksen (111 ) said he
would stay out of the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic "family brawl." He said

"it's part of unwisdom to be become
come become engaged in such a con

troversy."

POUR FIRMS MERGE ?
SOUTH NORWALK, Conn
(UPI) Aerotec Industries an announced
nounced announced the merger of the Prat
Daniel Corp., South Norwalk,
Conn., the Aerotec Corp., and the
Thermix Corp. of Greenwich,
Conn., and the Aerotherm Corp. Corp.-of
of Corp.-of Bantam, Conn, went into ef

feet.

SERVICE CENTER THEATERS TODAY

BALBOA THEATER Presents

ON SCREEN
6:15 9:15

.Mil

mam BRIAN D0NIEVY

tOm. tat. NwsMi mt Tftl tt

ON STAGE
8:00 p.m. Onlyl
FOOTLIGHT PARADE
THE NATIONAL
Ray STYLES
Jack PYLE
Peggy ADAMS
- and
Bob STEVENS Quintet

COCO SOLO 7:00
AIR-CONDITIONED
Michael CRAIG
Julia ARNALL
"THE HOUSE OF SECRETS"
Wed. "Me and The Colonel"

DIABLO HTS. 7:00
Anna MAGNANI
Burt LANCASTER
"THE ROSE TATTOO"

Wed. "Juvenile Jungle" and
"Younr and Wild"

vlARGARITA if Rita Hayworth Robert Mitchum
7:00 "FIRE DOWN BELOW"
Wednesday "The Man Inside"

G A M B O A Double Feature Program
7:00 "JUVENILE JUNGLE" and
Wed. "Bonjour Tristesse" "YOUNG AND WILD"

G A T U N Jack Palance Anita Ekberg
7:00 "THE MAN INSIDE"
Thursday "Across The Bridge"

PARAISO 7:00

"The Wayward
Girl" and
"Bal Tabarin"

Santa Crus 7:00

"PARIS
HOLIDAY"

Camp Bierd 7:00

THE CROOKED

CIRCLE" and

"RIO GRANDE"

BALBOA 2:00

"Fight Nurse"
and Serial

COCO SOLO 2:3(4

"On The Thres
hold of Space"

Margarita 2:30

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THE NATIONAL FOOTLIGHT PARADE
FEATURING
RAY STYLES "THE DIPLOMAT OF HUMOR"
JACK PYLE COMEDY AND MAGIC
PEGGY ADAMS DANCE STYLIST
fend i
THE 60B STEVENS QUINTET.

On the Screen 6

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Jane Hearn, Charlene Graves,
Judy Redmond, Dick Van Loon
Establish Latest New Marks

The Gamboa Swimming Pool was the scene of
the Elks annual Fourth of July Swimming Meet last
Saturday. Four new Canal Zone records were estab

lished by local aquatic stars
The record smashers and their
record times are as follows:
Jane- Hearn-fifty yard breast
stroke, girls aged 13-14 yrs.-45-O.
- Dick Van Loon twenty live
yard back, boys, 1 and 12-16.5
Judy Redmond twenty five
back! stroke, girls, 11 and 12-17.0
Chkrlene Graves fisty yard but
terfW, girls, 13 and 14-37.6
Meet director Charles Connor
,nno inced that these records would
b fcrwarded through proper chan
nels jso that they will be recog recognized
nized recognized as official.
Four Swimmers Win Three
First Place Prizes in Elk s
' Swim Meet
At least four participants in
this year's annual Elk's Fourth
of July swimming meet nave as
their? motto "life, liberty and the
pursuit of swimming trophies.
Thfe following four aquatic stars
were! the life of the meet as they
took! the liberty of pursuing and
capturing threefirst p lace cup.
Judy Redmond won the twenty
five 'yard breast, back and free
style; events in the U-U year old
Charlene Graves finished first
In the fifty yard butterfly, free
style- for girls in the age group
made up of 13 and 14 year olds.
M?ss' Graves rested for the dura duration
tion duration of one event and returned
to competition to win honors tne
free stvle for women.
Jane Wilson made a clean sweep
of all events she entered in taking
first place laurels in the twenty
five vard back stroke, butterfly
and free style for girls in the ten
yeari.old category.
Duhcan Somerford was the only
boy to crack the exclusive circle
of three winners. Duncan lead the
nack in the twenty five yard back
butter-fly and free style events for
boys of ten years of age.
FAMILY SWIMMERS TAKE
OVER IN ELK'S ANNUAL
5 SWIM MEET
Several families blessed with
children of outstanding aquatic
skill turned the annual Elk's swim
meet into a family' picinic as they
combined to take twenty one
placis, fpur second places and
three1 third places. On the basis
of 'hree point for first places, two
points for second place and one
pn-nt for third place the swim swimming
ming swimming tribes finished in this order:
1st, nlace The Somerfords (Dun (Dun-c?".Roard,
c?".Roard, (Dun-c?".Roard, Jody) nineteen points.
?nd place Tie between the Van
Lrons and the Wilsons with thir thirteen
teen thirteen points. Van Loons (Harry
and birk) The Wilsons (Jane and
Duke).
3rd place The Graves (Char
Ipne and Conchita) eleven points.
Harry Van Loon and Charlene al also
so also sfet new Canal Zone Records
to fujrther contribution to the fam
ily affair at the gamboa Pool
last Saturday.
complete results of
BLK'S 1939 4th OF JULY
; SWI MMEET
f 25 yd. Breast for boys
i 10 and under
lstj place -Tody Somerford
Time1 2'.8
2nd place John Festler
3rd place Bryant Placens
1 IS yd. Breast for girls
' 10 and under
lsti place Laura Russon Time
25.0
2nd place Yvonne Lavender
3rd place Wanda Bell
T 25 yd. Breast for boys
. 1 and 12
1st, place Roark Somerfoiu
17.9 i
2nd place Dirk VaLoon
3rd place Duke Wilson
25 yd. Breast for girls
I 1 and 12
1st place Judy Redmond Redmond-Time
Time Redmond-Time 20.9
2nd place Vivian Kosan
3rd place Ginger Thomas
j 50 yd. Breast for boys
; 13 and 14
1st, place Jim Dykes
Time
39.8
2n
id place Sam Witkin
3r
'd place Jir
im Wilson
; 50 yd. Breast for girls
j 13 and 14
Time 45.0
2n
id place place's
's place's place place-j
j place-j 50 yd
ace Nancy Morency
3r
-Conchita Graves
Breast for men
1st place Gerard Detore Time
35.2
2nd place Mike Budge
3rd place Bryan Cox
50 yd. Breast for women
. 1st place Joyce Herring Time
41.8 ;
2nd -place Marian Howe
TODAY
TIVOLI
.35 0.20
Spanish Pictures!
iUBE Y BAJA
frith Cantlnflas
' PECADORA
'twjth Emilia Gulu

25 yd. back for boys 10 and under

1st place JJuncan stomeuuru
19.8
2nd place Billy Ray
irH nlareGerald Starr
25 yd back for girls 10 and under
1st place Jane wuson u.k
2nd place Wanda Bell
3rd place Kit Whitney
25 yd back for boys 11 and 12
xlst place Dirk Van Lonn
Time 16.5
2nd place Roark Somerford
irH niarfcMathew Mannine
25 yd btk for girls 11 and 12
xlst place Juay Keamona
Time 17.0
2nd place Helen Manning
3rd place Nancy Chadwick
50 yd back for boys 13 and 14
1st place Garth Eeeney Time
37.3
2nd place Jim Wilson
50 yd back for girls 13 and 14
1st place Grace Figueroa 37.4
2nd place Nancy Morency
3rd place Carolyn Canby
50 yd back for men
1st place Harry VanLoon 32.9
50 yd baek for women
1st place Jean Seaman Time
36.5
2nd place Joyce Herring
25 yd butterfly for oys
10 and under
1st place Duncan Somerford
Time 18.2
2nd place Dan Holcomb
3rd place Brian Placens
25 yd butterfly for girls
10 and under
1st place Jane Wilson Time
21.8
2nd place Laura Wilson
3rd place Eva Sellens
25 yd butterfly for boys
ii4fc.ll anc) U
1st p!ace--T)u1c"ej, Wilson Time
i7.i (
2nd place Dick Eldon
3rd place Gary Vauchee
25 yd butterfly for girls
,11 and 12
1st plaee-T-Linda Benton Time
17.9 .-ji .,.
2nd place-SMirifji
3rd place GitfkeyTKoteilCf
50 yd butterfly for beys
13 and 14
1st Dlace Jim Dvkes Time
34.9
2nd place Garth Feeney
50jfdbutterfly girl
xlst place Charlene Graves Graves-Time
Time Graves-Time 37.6
2nd place Helen George
3rd place Grace Figueroa
50yd butterfly for men
1st place Don Ryter Time 30.1
2nd place-Mike vftudge. t.
3rd place bryan Cox
50 yd butterfly for women
1st place Marian Howe Time
37.1
2nd plaoe-Ruth Smelzer
3rd place Jean Seaman
25 yd free style boys
7 and, under
1st place Lance Brockmever
Time 20.3
2nd place Jim Lavender
3rd place Charles Rattie
25 yd free style for girls
7 and under
1st place Kit Whitnev Time
24.0
2nd place Florence Thompson
5 yd free style boys 8 years
25
1st place Dare Bullock Time
15.8
2nd place Mike Benton
3rd place Steve Adell
25 yd free style girls 8 years
1st place Elva Salens Time
17.2
2nd place--Pat Brockmever
3rd place Virgina Rattie
25 yd free style boys 9 years
1st place Jodv Somerford
Time lfi.7
25 yd free style girls 9 years
1st place Jane Wilson Time
17.9
2nd place Shirley Brandt
3rd place Pat Hanagan
25 yd free style boys 10 years
1st place Duncan SnmcrfnrH
Time 16.0
2nd place Billy Ray
3rd place Dan Holcomb
25 yd. free style flirls 10 yesr
1st place LaiiM Rnsson- Time
18.4
2nd place Wanda BpII
3rd place Mary Clement
25 yd free style boys 1 lyears
Isi place- Duke. Wilson Time
14.7
2nd place Matt Manning
3rd place Gary Vaueher
25 -yd free style qirls U vears
1st place Judy RedmOn- Time
14.6
2nd place Susan Shirk
3rd place -Linda Benton
50 yd free style boys 12 years
1st place Dirk VanLonn Time
29.5
2nd place Rrmrk Somerford
3rd place Dirk ICMnn
50 yd free style girls 12 years
TTMEATOIES

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THE LION

Betsy Rawls
Cops Women's
PGA Golf Title
FRENCH LICK, Ind. (UPI) -Betsy
Rawls won her first Wom Women's
en's Women's Professional golf champion championship
ship championship yesterday, defeating Patty

Berg by one stroke.
Mrs. Rawls won the match on
the 17th hole when Miss Berg's
putt stopped two inches short of
the cup. Both girls then birdied
the 18th.
The Spartansburg, S. C, star
the year's leading money winner
among the ladies shot a one-over
par 75 for the final round of the
72 hole tourney. She had started
the day with a four stroke ad advantage.
vantage. advantage. Miss Rawls' total for the tour tourney
ney tourney was 76-68-69-75288. Par for
the distance is 296. Her money
winnings were more than $1,200 to
bring her take for the season to
almost $13,000.
Miss Berg of West Chicago, 111.,
pressed Miss Rawls by carding a
four under-par 70. She came
within two inches of sending the
match into overtime, but missed
a heartbreaking putt on the. 17th
which would have given her a tie.
In third place was Louise Suggs
of Cincinnati. She shot a three-under-par
71 yesterday to finish
with a 290 total.
Joyce Ziske of Milwaukee took
fourth. She shot a two-over-par
76 for a 293 total. Miss Ziske had
trouble on the greens and didnt
get her first birdie until the 16th
hole.
All-Star Game s
Probable Lineup
PITTSBURGH, July 7 (UPI)
The batting order for today's 1959
maior league all-star game at
Forbes Field (with batting and
pitching records in parentheses):
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Minoso Clevel'"' .7)f If
Fox, Chicago (.330), 2b
Kaline, Detroit, (.344) cf
Skowron New York (.293), lb
Colavito, Cleveland (.280), c
Triandos, Baltimore (.267), e
Killebrew, Washington (.271), 3b
Aparicio, Chicago (.291), ss
Wynn, Chicago (11-5), p
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Temple, Cincinnati ( .326), 2b
Mathews, Milwaukee (.306), 3b
. Aaron,1 Milwaukee (.370), rf
Mays, San Francisco (311), cf
Banks, Chicago (.302.), ss
Cepeda, San Francisco (.31) lb
Moon, Los Angeles (.29), If
Crandall, Milwaukee (.277), c
Drysdale, los Angeles, (9-6), p
Umpires: Plate BarlicX (N.LOi
lb; PapaTella (Ax.); 2tftonatelS
(N.L.); 3b, Runge (A.L.)rFouI
Lines, Crawford (N.L.) and Rice
(A.L.).
After 4V4 innings, Barlick and
Paparella switch positions, as will
Donatelli and Runge.)
Never-Quit Bisons
Ridinn Hiah In IL
NEW YORK. July 7 (UPI)
The Buffalo Bisons are riding
hiph in the International League
today because they never quit
even when they are trailing 8-1
in the last inning.
That was the score. when the
Bisons came to bat tin the ninth
inning last night against the Red
Wines at Rochester. They scored
seven runs to tie the score and
then pushed across four more in
the 14'h inning for a 12-8 verdict.
A three-run homer by Panclv
Herrera featured Buffalo's ninth
inning rally. Ken Lehman came
on in the bottom of the ninth and
held the Red Wines scoreless un until
til until th Bisons settled matters in
the 14th.
Zark Monroe allowed only four
hits in oi'ehinr Richmond to a
3-1 triumph over JTavana. Borre Borre-go
go Borre-go Alvarez ruined Monroe's hout hout-oUt
oUt hout-oUt bid with a bases-emntv homer
in the sixth inning. .Tack Reed
homered for Richmond.
Columbus corerl a comeback
I '"-5 triumph ove- Maimi while the
Toronto at Montreal same was
postponed because wet grounds.
1st nlace Nancy Chadwick
Time 39.5
?nd ilace-VBonnle Crowell
Kfl vd ree tvl boys
ii
1st place Jim T)vfc- Time 28.5
2nd nlace Sam Witkin
3rd "ic" tim Won
M) yd ree tvle qirls
11 anH 14
1 ; niiee rhifipno Craves
Timp 5
?nd nlace Grace Fiueroa
3rd "'ir Conchita Graves
50 yd free style mn
'is' ra. f p,.'".. TNme 24.7
?nd place Harry VanLoon
nrr1 '"Ure Mike Rudee
fl vd fr svle women
1st place Charlene Graves
TiTi- 30'
2nd nlace Jean Seaman
3rd place Marian Howe
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jlLV;

HOME TRAINED Gene

oiane at tneir uu wuom, iu., siw air, isep z. Koaney vick, nearest camera, Gene Hayes
up, was the iirst Hambletonian candidate to, win this year, coming down in front at Rose Rose-croft
croft Rose-croft Raceway, Oxon. HilL Md. Othei- colt, driyen by Don Hayes, is Mr. Dudley, juvenile Dacer.

Mentolados, Marlboro Win
Easily In Colon Cage League

National League Favorite
For Today's All-Star Game

By LEO H. PETERSEN
PITTSBURGH, July 7 (UPI)
The iavored National League was
to have sent 22-year-old Don Drys Drysdale
dale Drysdale against the American
League's 39-year-old starter, Early
Wynn, today in what may be the
last All-Star Game as the current
baseball generation remembers it.
Some of the glamour already
has been rubbed off today's clas classic
sic classic by the fact the two leagues
will, for the first time in history,
play a second All-Star Game dur during
ing during the same season on Aug. 3 at
Los Angeles.
Nevertheless, a capacity crowd
of 34,000 was expected to jam
Forbes Field today to witness the
latest renewal of an annual mid midsummer
summer midsummer event begun way back in
1933.
DrysdaJe, the hard-throwing right
handed ace of the Los Angeles
Dodgers who has won nine games
and lost six so far this season,
was manager Fred Haney's choice
to face a preponderantly right right-handed
handed right-handed hitting American League
line-up for the first three innings.
"After that," said Haney, man managing
aging managing in his second all-star game
"I lean toward Lew BurdeMe."
And after Burdette, of Haney's
own Milwaukee club, It's almost
a cinch that little Elroy Face of
the Pirates was to finish ,up. Face
is the National League's no. i re
lief pitcher with a glittering 12-0
record and Haney unaouDieaiy
wishes to give local fans a chance
to see their home-town pride in
all-star competition.
In choosing the crafty Wynn
of the White Sox to start, Casey
Stengel appeared to ver away
from his original Intention of o o-penimj
penimj o-penimj up with Baltimore knuck knuckle
le knuckle bailer Hoyt Wilhelm, who won
his first nine games this season,
then lost his next four.
WWhelm suffered Ms latest loss
Sunday and Stengel wasn't sure
the veteran right hander would be
rested sufficiently to start. Stengel
with a record of three victories
and five defeats In eight previous
all-star games, did not say who
would follow Wynn but did make
clear that Rvne Duren of his own
Yankee staff "will be in there."
most likely for the last three in innings.
nings. innings. Left-handers Whitey Ford of the
Yankees or Bi'Iv Pierce of the
White Sox appear the best bets to
pitch the middle Innings for the
American Leaguers, who are 13 to
10 underdogs in the game al
though they b-ave won 15 of the 2"!
alWar contest?.
The American League has ,wfln
the last two games by one run.
Thev won the 1957 ?am at St.
Louis. 6-5. and last year's contest
at Raltimore. 4-3.
Most baseball men feel the V
mTican League's best chance to today
day today lies in home run threats Har Harmon
mon Harmon Killebrew of Washington and
Rocky Colavito of Cleveland, both
TROPICAL
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On the Screen:
Double In Technicolor!
Ingrld tiergman
Curt Jergens In
"THE INN OF THE SIXTH
HAPPINESS"
Brian Keith In
"SIERRA BARON"

and Doi Hayes train their entry

i

of whom are in the starting line lineup.
up. lineup. Killebrew. a first-time start-
er in all-star competition, leads
the majors in home runs with 28,
while Colavito, another first-time
participant, has bit 24 homers so
far.
Big drawback for the Amer Amer-can
can Amer-can Leaguers, however, is that
thy havt only one left-handed
hitter in their starting line-up.
That's second baseman Nelli
Fox of the White, Sox, whose
specialty is singles.
The other American League
starters are left-fielder Minnie Mi Minoso
noso Minoso of Cleveland, center fielder
Al Kaline of Detroit, first base baseman
man baseman Bill Skowron of the Yankees,
catcher Gus Triandos of Balti Baltimore,
more, Baltimore, and shortstop Luis Aparicio
of Chicago.
The National League has two
left-handed hitters in its starting
lineup third baseman Eddie Math
ews, who has hit 25home runs so
far for Milwaukee, and left-fielder
Wally Moon, batting .299 with
Los Angeles.
Johnny Temple of Cincinnati will
start at second base, OrlandQ Ce Cepeda
peda Cepeda of San Francisco at1 "first
base, Ernie Banks of Chicago at
shortstop, Willie Mays of San
Francisco in center field, Hank
Aaron of Milwaukee 'in right field
and Del Crandall of Milwaukee
behind the plate.
Haney adhered to the balloting
of the players in the first and second-place
voting.
"I could have picked eight
pitchers, but,' selected only seven
instead and chose Stan Musial
as the 25th mn on th, squad,"
h explained. Musial is hitting
only .270.
In a similar move, Stengel chose
Ted Williams to the squad even
though he is at only .217 "and
don't think I won't call on him if
I need him in a pinch."
For, those whj go by past per performances,
formances, performances, the National League
scored a 7-1 victory the last time
the all-star game was played at
Forbes Field in 1942. That was the
only night game ever played in
all-star history.
The plan afoot now is to play
the two, all-star games next year
on consecutive days, one in the
east and the other in the west the
following day.
That'll give everyone a chance
to see the all-stars in action and
it'll also give each league a
chance to earn an even split, if
anyone will bother to count any
more.
BLUTH IEADS BOWLING
BROOKLYN, N.Y. UPI) Ray
Bluth of St. Louis, Mo., held the
lead in tne weekly "major leasue
bowling" television show today
with only two programs remain
ing. Bluth defeated Lou Detums
of Richmond Hill, N.Y., 722 6?8.
Saturday night to better a 708 se
ries rolled by Tom Hennessey of
St. Louis four weeks ago.
TODAY ENCANTO 25 -151
WAIIOO! $115.00
Robert Ldggia in
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Robert Stack in
"BWANA DEVIL"
Pdrive-inI
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WITH FULL PRIZES!
KARL MALDEN
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Tomorrow
' POPULAR NIGHTI
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Charlton HESTON li.
"BDIV1TC UiB r F
I

MAJOR BEON" j

rrvivMic yti ur

for the $133,000 Hambletonian

r
By HERBERT MOISE
Two Carlos Eleta sponsored
teams had easy pickings in the
third night of play in the Colon
Basketball Female and Senior
Men Leagues.
In the distaff division, Mentola Mentolados
dos Mentolados easily handed the Cuna Indi Indians
ans Indians a 39 to 19 setback who thus
made their debut a losing effort.
In the nightcap, Marlboro was an
easy 73 to 62 winner over Powell
Garage. Despite the scores of
both contests; there were many
exciting and well-executed plays
on all sides.
Mentolados 38 Cuna Indians 19
Clinton-Parris and his Mentola
dos team bounced back from an
opening day defeat to iumn into
the win column at the expense of
the Cuna Indians who played
themselves into the hearts of the
good sized crowd. The Indians
received a big ovation as they
came onto the court with their
beautiful red and blue uniforms.
From the beginning of the game,
it was evident that the natural
characteristic of these native was
a handicap as their taller oppon opponents
ents opponents from Rainbow City pulled a a-way
way a-way fast to open a wide lead then
toyed and coasted to the 38 to 19
victory.
One aspect of the loser's plav
delighted the fans and that was
heiri;a'BffllV -1o '-hnyje the' ball in
making all sorts5 of passes. They
were exciting in making the over over-bounce
bounce over-bounce passes to their team teammates.
mates. teammates. For Mentolados Shirley Griffith
was top scorer while S. Alba top topped
ped topped the Cunas.
Marlboro 73 Powell Garage 2
It was just a matter of time
after the ten-minute mark when
Marlboro, in much better condi condition,
tion, condition, pulled away and won 73 to
62 over the PG Yellows, this
Malrboro victory gives them a
good jump over the rest of the
pack as they now boast a '2 and
0" record.
Coming up with an unsual de defense
fense defense of a tight man-to-man play,
the winner managed to keep the
yourthful Powell team prom doing
too much harm on the boards.
Marlboro abandoned its Zone de defense
fense defense to meet the threat of this
fast moving team coached by the
astute Raymond Kam.
Jose Julio Noel, Marlboro cen center,
ter, center, reached the arena late be
cause he read in a morning dialy
that his club would have a night
off but when he tuned on his ra radio
dio radio to 1500 Kcs on the CRC Net Network
work Network he heard Pappy Ceballos
with the first broadcast of this
station and hurried to the Arena
to help his club with twelve
points.
Top scorers were Taylor. Noel
for Marlboro and for Powells Wil Williamson
liamson Williamson and Harrison.
TODAY REX THEATRE
IN COLON
EXCLUSIVE RELEASE!
Shows at 2:30 8:00
SECOND BIG WEEK!
cecilRDeMille-s
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CltAltLTON'
VOL
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H5T0N BRYNNER -BAXTtR
EDWARD 6 WONNt.
R0BIN50M CARLO
PAGE! john DRK

my y il I e:.,-:.:

f Editor: CONRADQ

National Leagu
L Pe. SB
Milwaukee f
San Francisco
Los Angeles
44
46
47
43
39
37
35
29
33 : .571 U U
35
.5M
37
39
41
42.
45'
48
.50.f
:560 Vs
.483 M
.41 ;
.433 10V4
.377 IS-
PiHsbur9hJifr
Chicago t
St. Louis
Cincinnati ,' -Philadelphia
'.'
Today'i Games
Major League All-Star Game' at
Pittsburgh. t
Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.

HOOFBEATS
. By Conrado Sargeant

A special two eram will be run
at the President Remon racetrack
next Tuesday, on which three im
portant events will be comme
morated with the running of three
handicaps.
ine "Third Anniversary of tlj
President Remon racetrack Handi Handicap"
cap" Handicap" will probably be the main
event. Also ,scheduled to be run
will be the "50th Anniversary Mof
ine ranama National Institute
Handicap" and the "Republic ; of
France Handicap."
,1, iQQqi .in
Betting soared to $1 47,943 ov over
er over the weekend. Of this total,
$79,775 wre wagered en Satur
day (Fourth of July) and f6i
168 on Sunday.
oOo
Eight of the President Remon
racetrack's best three year-olds
were nominated yesterday for the
$2,500 added seven furlong Repub Republic
lic Republic of Peru Classic which is sched scheduled
uled scheduled to be run on July 26.
Unbeaten Miss Brunette will get
her sternest test in this race when
she goes against Piccolino, Puerto
Maaero, btavro, Falange, Rey Be Be-lot,
lot, Be-lot, Azabache and Double Dee.
oOo
The stewards had to work over overtime
time overtime when the track's "bad bovs"
almost got out of hand over the
weekend., j- --sr;--. ,'..;:
Chilean jockey Fernando Aiva Aiva-rei
rei Aiva-rei topped the list of suspen suspensions
sions suspensions with a 12-meet enforced
vacation for carrying Buen Mo Mo-20
20 Mo-20 II wide with El Tunchi and
crowding him in the homestretch
during the runing of the ffourth
of July Classic.
Heliodoro Gustines, who had
the leg up on Buen Mozo II. gtt
a $10 fine for whipping Alvarez, in
the stretch and in the next race
earned himself a four-meet layoff
when he crowded Arancel (Alva
rez up) with Azabache immediate
ly after the start. Azabache held
on to score over Arancel by a
head.
Jose Talavera got eight meets
LATIN AMERICA
SCHOOL LEAC.UE
ALBROOKE AIR FORCE BASE
Team Standings
Won Lost
American Supply 41V4 30Vi
Gulf pride 40V4 31ft
Cerveza Balboa 39 33
Mercurio Jewelers 38 34
La Mascota 35Va 38V
Marlboro 33 3'
Volkswagen 30V4 4VA
Crawford Agencies 30 42
American Supply 2Vi
Marlboro IViJ
The American Supply team got
another chance to see what first
place looks like. This time it was
through the courtesy of Marlboro
although the Smojfers were any anything
thing anything but gentle with .the Suppli Suppli-ers.
ers. Suppli-ers. In the first ; gaine tjhey, had
a tie. Naturally, this spured the
teams to do better with the
Smokers coming thru, in the
stretch, they won' it by 37 pins
By this time the Suppliers had
had enough and in the htird they
managed to offset Marlboro's ad ad-vantege
vantege ad-vantege and take the last 2 points
For the Suppliers, Morado roll rolled
ed rolled a 443 with Michaels and, Mon Mon-toya
toya Mon-toya doubling Up with a 404. tot
Marlboro, Vargas led again with
a 466 and Durkin helped .with 397.
Gulfptid 3 Volkswagen .1
AlUjoHfih Volkswagen ( Strength Strengthened
ened Strengthened the team with the addition
of Da vila, they still couldn't con contain
tain contain Gulfpride. As the oilmen are
saying,;; why take-' seconds w
when you can have first? And
to prove it, they took, the nrsr
game from the car .men by 40
Dins. Then! to add iniult to in
jury, they took the second by 185
pins taking, credit for,,, the laird
highest game roueo so tar.
The Wildcatters figured they had
Volkswagen all demoralized' and
defected,? so they ; let, up in the
tnird- a mue. xney nowiea an du
came-4retty EOod. but' not tood
enough. For .Volkswagen .Instead
of defected was hopping mad and
put together a 809 game to. sal salvage
vage salvage point

-Jfi-.r '-if f

SARCEANT
American League
1 W U Pet.
44 32 .579
GB
Cleveland
Chic age
Baltimore
New York
Detroit
Washington
Kansas City
Boston
43 15 551
41 31 J19
40 38 .513
40 40.. 500
37,41 .474
s
3 43
.434 11
33 44
.429 ilk i
Today's Games
Major League All-Star Game
Pittsburgh. r
Yesterday's Results
- i
No games scheduled.
al ,1
for changing his course and crowd-1
ing Linda Susy (Gais tines ) wlch -
Tanganica in the homestmcn aur
ing Saturday's third race. i
Franco Justinian! and Arquime-i
des Alfaro got six and eight meets.'
respectively, for crowding and
crossing several horses during tne
running of Saturday'! fourth race
while riding second Branch ana
Cleron. The latter, ridden by Al
faro, held on to finish in a dead,
heat with Metafierro, I
Fortunate Hidalgo Jr. get four
meets for not showing up y on
time, to ride Ruttlant in itw Satvl 't
ruday'S Arts race. Ha was r
placed by Apollnar Reyes Rios.
Homero Hidalgo netted a, sz una

for being disobedient at &ft start starting
ing starting line while riding Dofia Linda ,,
n i t j

in aunaay s iirsi ratcet -' y i
Reyes Rios got four meets io?
crossing Porro (Guillermo Milordj
with Resolana soon after the s.art
of Sunday's first race,
Manuel Valenzuela was set down
for six meets1 for reneatedl jjf

changing his course while ridina

larasca in Sunday's second raca,i:2s,

He was specifically accused o
crowding La Desiree (Gustines) -and
Le Matelot (Bias Aguirre).
The patrol judges reported that
Valenzuela weaved his mount in i
a "zigzagging" course throughout
the. wee. i jih f, .-.(; inff
Milord was given a four-meet 1 4: 4:-nforced
nforced 4:-nforced vacation for crossing L-fV
Palave (Gustines) and Bongaros
(Alfaro) with Milcel in th fire

ouarhr af Simdiv't ivnh rin. 4

Bugaba, Contralor, and Zumar,
aQnh ant 1 A slave' iwnc1Hi frnnvm-w

thA rranVm VAtnHnarian VnllatifA 'r'.r

and El Pequefio were ste down
for eight meets each for their
poor performance in Saturday'
third race. ........
Bucalemito got two meets for
refusing to start in Saturday', n.o
eighth rac. Renata, Martlet andi;
Nebrisca were ordered to be Dlac- '

ed under treatment by the track's
vet.

High men for Gulfpride were;
Segura with a 548 series and a
212 game. Tyalor had a 434. For
the Carmen Davila had a 47$ se series
ries series and Doter helped with a 438. :
Cerveza Balboa 0 La Mascota 4
Cerveza Balboa has not been
able to get over "the slump that 4
they are in and have been in
for almost a month. Consequently ;
they have won only 2 points m ,.
that time. Well it just so happened
that it was La Mascota's turn to :-.,
go up this week, so they took all
four points from the v beweild-,
ered Cerveceros.
Here Is hoping their luck
changes by next week. Anyway fc,
the first 'game ended up amid all
kinds of excitment with the, CustT
torn Tailors taking it with 10 pins.
The other two games were tough
but not nearly as thriling as the,;
first. ,': .'
' For La Masc6ta, Hervery rolled
a 487 and Borrego a 421. For the'-:.
' Beermen, Hernandez finished v
with a 438 and Spiros with a 374..,,,

Mercurio Jewelers 4 n( $"
Crawford Agencies I
The Jewelers were pretty 3
lucky to take 4 points from Craw
ford Agencies, in tne first game
the zenith men had only 2 play
ers available,, so. they rolled for
average against Mercurio and bet

them. Of course they had to lor-

ten, me game nue 10 iuck ot may-,
ers. In the meantime 'some of the
other players came in so they fwV.

gured they could at least salvage c

3 poins; but ; Mercurio had. 'none ; i

wash (Crawford Agencies five, 4 ; 1

High series ; for the Jewelert'j a

were turned in by' Teal with 47

and ; a 207; gam ,and Martwo -iS
with a 413, for Crawford Agencies v
Sinclair had a ,47V and Opio. a 375.
SECOND IN JUMP EVENT i M 4
1 AACHEN, Germany (UPlJ
George Morris of t New Canaan,
Conn.,- finished second behind Eu-

Italy Sunday in the; Grand Prix, 1 4

of Aacnen jumping event wnica
uiniinit im iha lnral nnria ehnw. i i

nvuuw f "V" 'J'.J 41

. j

r i

I



55?.
TUESDAT, JTOTJr 95
TH1 PANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
0peflourney 0$ To Fast Start At Panama Golf Club

PAGI IIVIN 4

? I I 1 1

SHAVING FACE El Roy Face of -the, Pittsburgh Pirates
whittles his whiskers in the clubhouse after putting out an another
other another fire. .This Face is all too familiar to National League
batters. The little right-hander leads the majors in number
of pitching victories, all of his triumphs coming in relief.

by
JOE WILLIAMS

By TED WILBER
The new Cafe Duran Golf
Championship got oft to a rousing

start this past weekend at the Pa

nama Golt Club,, Eighty men and

women golfers went .out and forty
came back as winners, of which
there were 16 in each of the men's

flights, and 8 in the women's

flight.

ihe low-handicap first flighteri

had some close matches, with the
better players winning. Weoi

Hearne won over Fred Humbert,
the long ball hitter, in a close 1

up tussle; Erasmo de la Guardia
won by the same score over Jim Jimmy
my Jimmy DesLondes (Sr.).

Gordie Dalton, despite the terri terrific
fic terrific sun of Sunday managed to de defeat
feat defeat Mike Moreno 1 up, as did
Dr. Massot over A. Paz Rodriguez.

In the second men's flight Kiki

de la Ossa eked out a 1 up vic victory
tory victory over young Jaen Guardia, as
did Campagnani Jr. over Jack
Mercer. Mike Maduro, who flash flashed
ed flashed a net 68 to lead the second
flight, dropped a 2 and 1 deci deci-sion
sion deci-sion to Dr. Tapia, while Chick
Kline bowed to Sosa 2 and 1.
In the ladies' flight, both Luise

Jones and her daughter Lynn won

over tneir opponents and will
meet in the next round. This
should be one of the best matches

in the ladies' group, and well

worth watching.
The complete scores follow:

A. Arango beat Garcez 1 up.
Lalo Arango beat Kent 3 and 2
Sosa beat Kline 2 and 1.

Josge Boyd defeated Bob DUfer

i and 4.
Orillac beat Julito Valdei
and 4.
Drum beat G a Undo 3 and 2.
Scribner beat Duran 7 and 8

LADIES' PLIGHT

I ml umpire

I n '

I' Thi
he liabl
- liTS big
he dnn't,

A mania for biographical fidel

ity and a property informed pns
terity impels us, at risk, pf fur.
ther ennui, to toucb upon a couj
pie of items hitherto neglected,
relating to the battle of the snafus.

, First, the stalwart role Jack J

Cudoy piayeo as reveaitu u
Bill Kosenhosn, haggard hero of
hkp hfvfipvilpd Dromotiu..

"This is in Los Angeles last

August, the day before the Patter Patter-nn.rut
nn.rut Patter-nn.rut 'N Shoot thing, and I

inw, it' ant tn lav the biggest

' egg this side Of tne pieroaagi.

tlSQitor note: mr. ivueiia""
an authority of extinct repl-les,
.g., genus D'Amato.)
"I still got Patterson for anoth anoth-.
. anoth-. matph hut who can I nut him

In with that can bail me out?

I'm doing a deep brood at DreaK-

fast when Cuddy gives me tne
best tiD I've ever got. It's about

Johansson who's going to fight

Eddie Machen in a couple or

' weeks.

'This euv's a puncher and

liable to stoD Machen. If he

b e. you re m misuiess u

so what? You re ayins?,

if is. Franklv. if it hadn't

rVenf for .lack the i idea would

have nccurred to me."

Ir. Cuddy is one of the top

Prls of our business, and as a
lote.tfmB member ofvflhe UP var-

'ly has seen more blood shed in
tyoxing abbattoirs the nation ovpr
,.han the Butcn-.- oi Buchenwald,
w i" '-iteiof which, he remains his

fid lovable, unaffected,

. irascible self,

t aon.to his journaiislle
Mr. Cuddy, once a chain
v. moker,ti8 esteemed .for
th Ingeniousiv" effective manner

in whieff he resjufj'j himself ota

"Itook iusto-Seattle.'
You wail for more but there is
none. His puzzled attitude is:
"Doesn't everyone?'
The role Henry Cooper played
was pivotal and may even have
led directly to the new order
. which was to see Ingemar Jo
hansson crowned heavyweight
champion, and Octopus II perish
' In its plastic panties.
THANK YOU, MR. COOPER
"I am in London,' relates the
gurvivor of the snafus, "with in instructions
structions instructions from Patterson's manag manager
er manager to sijm the .winner of the Coo-i
. per fight for $75,000.
"Cooper makes a joke of Lon London
don London which, regardless of what

they say of the British sense of
humor, is, in tins cast, insia.itiy
comprehended and relished no
ena. But Cooper scorns tne offer.
Now he's the empire eftampiOn,
ana so ne must have $40,000. doy,
am 1 happy.'
Happy'.' . ."Yes, indeed, you
sue, uy now I'm convinced Pat Patterson
terson Patterson s manager (ins loaiiuiig
ior uUs I) Amato is so intense he
never mentions him By luuiiej

Knows ne s made a dangerous

ni a ten, and is looking for ui out

Cooper, with 4is new title and ail,

can give it to mm.
"But it still has to be at his
price. Would London go for
uOOV London would, and does.

.rattersin's manager can't sell

London as any kind of contender
over here, but ne s running scar scared,
ed, scared, and at least' he's got to have
a warm-up lor his tiger.

"'"Patterson's manager doesn't

now it, nut lm Keeping jomis-

son constantly informed on What s

going on, and wnen Cooper

snouts the $75,000, 1 know were

home free, so I phone ingemar

in GoteDorg and tell lum to start

sharping up ine ngiu nadu. onie

Junt, we re going w need it.

Still without the C anu C com

bo obviousiy, neitner tne Swede

nor the coy promoter coulo nave

made it.

URGED A FAST FINISH
Hosensohn made the trip to

Sweaen by boat, docking only

hours oeiore the johanssou-xVlacn-en
light, it was his nrsi loK ot

the land of tne Vikings, ne iviiew
nooouy. .in Goiborg.rltjut thanks
to Cuddy'g; cames,- ne was wen
known.
"There werK newspaper liead-lmefji-"Anjerican
promoter, neie
to;ga, Johansson, anu a sense

oi awe anyone" would travel so

tar to see tne local nero. 1 looked
up Eddie Ahlquist," said Kosen Kosen-sohii.
sohii. Kosen-sohii. "flease send the boy out for a

quick Knockout,' I pieaded. "If

ne can. vin sensationally. I can

get. him a shot at the champion

ship, inis was contrary to ine

Swede's customary conduct, but
Ahlquist agreed to reiay the suggestion."

Johansson left the California

Negro for dead in less than a

round. ."I must assume the bov

liked the idea,' said Bill," "but

I an t prove it by anything he

said, I didn't get to meet him un

til just Hefore the bell sounded,
and I was seeing, him for the first

time.'

MEN'S FIRST FLIGHT

Shead defeated Luis Chandeck

by default.

Paul Moran won over Beeson 1
up.
Morrie Muller won over Jim
Ridge by default.
Mono Arosemena defeated Car Carlos
los Carlos Arosemena 2 and 1.
Bobby Sander won over Al Saa Saa-riden
riden Saa-riden 2 and 1.
Ted Pierpoint defeated Jimmy
DesLondes (Jr.) 5 up
Tommy Jacks won over Earl
Gerrans 4 and 3.
Col. Hurr beat Rey Valdes S
and 4.
Herb Mitten defeated Bob Me Me-dinger
dinger Me-dinger 6 and 5.
Dalton beat Moreno 1 up.
LeBrun beat Nene Arias 1 uo.
Massot defeated A. Paz Rodri Rodriguez
guez Rodriguez 1 up.

Hearne beat Humbert 1 up.
Morrice won over Negro Arias

1 up.
Capt. Kade won over C. P. Ro Rodriguez
driguez Rodriguez by default.
E. de la Guardia defeated Jim Jimmy
my Jimmy DesLondes (Sr.) 1 up
MEN'S SECOND FLIGHT
Dr. Tapia won over Maduro 2
and 1.
P. Abad beat BmUky by default.
Willis won over Anderson 1 up.
Baldwin beat Correa 2 and 1.
E. de la Ossa defeated E. Jaen
Guardia 1 up.
Hooberry beat Rupp 6 and 4.
Mansfield won over Holmes by
default.
Chander beat Mullin 8 and 8.
Campagnani beat Mercer 1 up.

Lynn Jones defeated Ceci Hur Hur-tematte
tematte Hur-tematte by default.
Louis Jones beat Maggie Dalton
by default.
Pat Waring defeated Rosemary
de la Guardia by default.
Alice French beat Bev Dilfer by

default.

Jinny Senn beat C. P. de Pe Pern
rn Pern on 7 and 6."
Nellie Humphreys beat A. Hr-

rington by default.

Sra. Nmomiya defeated Phyllis

Mansfield 3 and 2.

Hilda Mercer beat Helen Owens

by default.
WEEKEND MATCHES
The matches scheduled for this
week, which must be completed
by 8 p.m., Sunday evening, are
listed below. All players are re reminded
minded reminded that no matches may be
postponed except by authority of
the Tournament Committee.

If your opponent is unknown to
you, the club professional will aid
you in furnishing telephone num numbers.
bers. numbers. MEN'S FIRST FLIGHT

Art Wall Whips Finsterwald
In Buick Golf Open Playoff

Shead vs P. Moran
Muller vs Mono Arosemena
Sander vs Ted Pierpoint
Tommy Jacks vs Col. Hurr
Herb Mitten vs Gordie Dalton
LeBrun vs Dr. Massot
Hearne vs Morrice
Capt. Kade vs Erasmo de Is
Guardia
Of the above, several should
provide splendid golf worth follow
ing. The Mitten Dalton match
should be interesting to follow, if
only to watch these two players
hit 250 yards off the tee. Both
are very adept with all iron shots,
and the match should be close.
Capt. Kade will have his hands
full with Erasmo de la Guardia.
as will Bill LeBrun with Dr. Mas Massot.
sot. Massot. Webb Hearne and Frank Mor

rice should provide a lot of plea

sure to those who like accurate
iron shots and fine putting exhi exhibitions.
bitions. exhibitions. MEN'S SECOND FLIGHT
Dr. Tapia vs P. Abad
Willis vs Baldwin
E. de la Ossa vs Hooberry
Mansfield vs Chandler
Campagnani vi A. Arango
Lale. .Arango vs C. A. Sosa
Jorge Boyd vs Orillac
Drum vs Scribner
LADIES' FLIGHT
tynn Jones vs Louis Jones
Par Waring vs Alice French

Jinny Senn vs Nellie Humphreys

Sra. Ninomya vs Hilda Mercer

By LLOYD NORTHARD
GRAND BLANC. Mich. (UPD-

Art Wall, Jr., of Pocono Manor,
Pa., fired a one under par 71
yesterday to defeat Dow Finster Finsterwald,
wald, Finsterwald, of Tequesta, Fla., by two
strokes in their 18-hole playoff for

the Buick Open golf championship.

wan, 35, gou s top money win

ner of 1959, earned J9.000 for his
victory to swell his earnings for
the year to almost $55,000.

Klnsterwald picked ud 14.600 for

nis second place finish.
The champion, who won h i s
fourth title of the year, went two
shots up on the first two holes on
the 7.280 yard Warwick Hills Golf
and Country Club course, and was
four strokes ahead with only three
holes remaining.
SAW LEAD SHRINK
But he took a bogie 6 at the
18th and a double-boeie 5 at the

17th to see his lead shrink to only
two strokes. However, he finished
with a par 4 at the 453-yard 18th
and Finsterwald was able only to

maicn tnat effort.
It was the sixth time Wall has

played off for a title during his

pro career ana the fifth time he
emerged a winner T.itt cm mm or

Wall and Finsterwald met in a

sudden death playoff for the Rub Rubber
ber Rubber City Open title at Akron, Ohio,
and Wall won on th second extra

hole.

Finsterwald, 29, who has won
money in all but four of the tour

naments in which he has compet competed
ed competed since September, 1955, was in
a playoff for the fourth time and
a loser for the third time.
DROPPED THE PUTT
Wall wedged to within six feet
of the pin on the 587 yard par 5
first hole and dropped the putt for
a birdie 5 to go one up He in

creased ms lead hy another s'roke
at the 451-yard second when Fin Finsterwald
sterwald Finsterwald mixed a four-footpr for
a bogie 5. The pair matched
strokes for the next eight holes
before Wall ran in 30 feet putt

at the 194-yard 1th for a birdie
deuce. Both golfers birdied t h e

Flynn s Vagabonds Grab Lead
In CZ Government Hoop Loop

Teams
Flynn
Riley
Gayer
Delamater

'f K v i 1 1 I V v 1 i
' W V
- ( p-'Y i ":-x i Ir ;'v'' I
, .... ?:...!
2

TENNIS FASHIONS Christine Truman, Beverly Baker
Fleit and PaUy Stewart, left to right, model the latest crea creation!
tion! creation! of Teddy Tinling at the Wlmbeldon Championships.

With the completion' of the fourth
week of play and the season's
midway point almost reached, Ab Ab-diel
diel Ab-diel Flynn's scrappy Vagabonds

copped two victories this past
week to displace Riley's Gents in
the first position in the team's
standings for the first time this
season.
Riley's quintent unobtrusively hit
"the skids," losing four games in
a row to slide into a second place
tie with Dick Gayer's Execs. Bill
Delamater's surprising Veterans
suffered two losses this past week

to fall into the cellar oosition as
the Canal Zone Government

League fast approached the mid

point in the season's 18-game
schedule.
The Vagabonds began the week's
olav by a kting a hard fought
thriller from Delamater's Veter Veteran's,
an's, Veteran's, 57-5'". as the sHro-shoottng
quintet r loosed o "Moss" Nes Nes-bi't.
bi't. Nes-bi't. ill Joyce, Grivo Reyes, Os Oscar
car Oscar Kouraney and Edgar Koura Koura-nev
nev Koura-nev oroved too much for the game

Ve'erans. 1
Leading the victors in the scor scoring
ing scoring column was the one-hand set set-shot
shot set-shot artist, Oscar Kouraney. with
17 nnints, and Rav NesWU and Ed Ed-ear
ear Ed-ear Kouraney with 10 points each
rpa mater's hoonsters were led

bv "T ffy" Georee Tocherman
with 1 ooints followed by Walter
Trout with 12 points and Chafljey
Norris with 10 markers. . v

in a surnrlsingly Jow-soring

affair for first place honors,
Flynn's oulntet dumoed Gary Ri

ley's Gents out of first place fof
the first time this season with a

handy 55-35 victory. The usually

high-scoring Riley hoops'ers could

no' find t! 'oi hoop In this all im important
portant important affair as ihe determined
Vagabonds proved too much for
them to handle in the second half
of play as the Flynn hpopsteri
went on the take over first place
honors for the first time this sea

son.
Leading the league-leaders in
the scoring column in this highly
important contest was Bill Joyce
with 15 big points, followed by Os Oscar
car Oscar Kouraney and Ray Nesbitt
with 12 points a piece. The losing
Gent's were led by "Jumping"
Danny Winkloskv wi'h 12 Doints

and Smiling Jack Peranti with 7

points in their low-scoring cause.

o
W L Pet. Gary Riley's hoopsters lost their
5 3 .625 fourth game in a row when they
4 4 .500 bowed to Dick Gayer's fast-im-
4 4 .500 proving quintet. 71-66. The highly
3 5 .378 improved play of the Execs

brought them a slightly unexpect unexpected
ed unexpected victory over the former league
leaders.
The Execs' dead-eye forward,
Roy Culpreth, was the games
high scorer with 25 points Tn the
victorious tause. He was followed
by teammates Dick Gyer and
Fred Raybourne with 13 points
each. The Riley rjound-ball artists
were led in the scaring column
by Smiling Jack Perantie with 24
big points and center Danny Wink Wink-lowsky
lowsky Wink-lowsky with 20 points.
Needless to say, with the mate material
rial material available on the Riley quintet,
such as Bob Best, Best, Charley
MacArthur, Johnny Morris. Bill

Gilbert, Gary Dunsmoor, Rolando
Linares and their "Big Three" of

Perantie, Alexander and Wmklos-

ky, the Gents will not be lone in

their losing streak or sitting very
low in the league standings.

Dick Gayer's Execs copped their

second victory of the week by

trouncing Delamater s Veterans in

a Iosely played affair, 71-54 to end

the week s play. The highly im

proved hoopsters on the Excecs

lighting five will prove tough com
petition during the. season's sec
ond half of play and are definite

ly giving notice that they have
eyes on the season's champion

ship.
Leading the victorious Execs in

to their second place tie with the
slipping Gents was Roy Culbreth

with 19 points, who was closely
supported by center Doup Pajak

with' 16 pom's and Fred Ray Ray-bourne
bourne Ray-bourne with 14 markers. The los losing
ing losing Veteran's cause ws ably as assisted
sisted assisted by the league' fifth place
scorer, George Tocherman, with in

points; closely assisted bv Bert

Joyce with 14 points and Charley
Norris with 12 points.

in reference to the en ton scor

ers, it is interesting to note here
that at this ssme oint In last sea sea-son's
son's sea-son's play in the Government
Woon L?arue only two nlavers had

woken into the 100-pmnts or be be-ter
ter be-ter cateeory. This season, with
the lea file's, play one me shy of
the mid way poin. six hoonsters
have entred the "10O Doints or
better" rateeorv in the season's
hv"vidul scoring race.
The Exec's Poy Culbreth is
shooing a' a sizzling pare with a
ifl.5 average in tVe six games he
has participated in, to move him'

Playground
Sports
ARCHERY TOURNAMENT
On Juno 6, the Balboa Gymna Gymnasium
sium Gymnasium held a local archery tourna tournament.
ment. tournament. The older archers (10 to 13)

shot 48 arros for score at distances
of 25 and 30 yards while the yourg-

er Robin Hoods skillfully dis dispatched
patched dispatched their 36 shafts from a dis distance
tance distance of 15 yards.

Prizes were awarded to the first

and second place winners in each

age group. Another tournament is

scheduled for Thursday of this

week at the Balboa Gym.

The scores for the boys, by age

groups, were as follows;

Age 8; (1) Mike Bradshaw 116);

(2) Joe Dolan (97)

Age 8; (1) Douglas McConney

(137); (2) Billy Foster (113)

Age 10; (1) Harry Whitney U49)

(2) Konald Keeney (132)

Age 11; (1) Walker Pruite (20):

(2) James Micek (96)
Age 12; (1) Bob Micek
Age 13; (1) Walter Monroe

Now we come to the girls side

of the s'ory with several extreme
ly good scores and a possible reo
ord breaker in Grace Whitney.

Age 8; (1) Anna I'roback (01);

(2) Jean Jensen (71)
Age 9; (1) Sherry Bissell (9);
Pat Hannigan (67)

Age 10; (1) Kay Stevenson (89)

Age 11; (1) Grace Whitney (?70)
(2) Kathy Dolan (88)

Age 12; (1)1 Susan Lessiark

(127); (2) Michelle Canavagjio
(107).

into the number three position in
The Top Ten Scorers. The Vaga Vaga-bond's
bond's Vaga-bond's "Moss Nesbitt continues to
hold down the league's number
one individual scoring position, but
Riley's Perantie is in very close
pursuit in the number two posi position,
tion, position, just 8 points behind Nesbitt.
Play thu far by all four teams
gives ample indication that the
competition and calibre of play in
the second half of the season's
olav will be one for all Canal Zone

basketball fans to see and thrill
to as the fight for the league's
season championship develops.

This week's schedule: Monday,

Riley v. Delamater; Tuesday,

Flynn v. Gaver; Wednesday,

"Ivnn v. Delamster; Thursday,
Riley v. Gayer.

TEN TOP SCORERS

Player

Nesbitt, Ray (F
Perantie, Jack (R)

Culbreth, Roy (G)
Winklowsky, Dan (R)

Tocherman. C. (D)

Joyce, Rert (D)

Pajak. Doug (G)
frout.Wallv (H)

Gayer, Dick (G )

Alexander, Don (R)

G Ptt

8 131 I

117
112
111
104
w
97
83
81

507 yard par-five 13th and Wall
picked up another stroke at the
35-yard par-four 14th when he
stopped his second shot two feet
from the pin for a birdie 3.
Wall hit his tee shot into the
trees at the 222-yard 17th, trapped
his second and hit two put's for a
double bogie 5. But Finsterwald
picked up only one stroke on the

hole when he trapped his first
shot and two-putted after explod exploding
ing exploding to within nine feet of the pin.
Wall's purse was his second second-largest
largest second-largest this year, He earned $12, $12,-000
000 $12,-000 for winning the Masters in the
spring and his other tournament
victories this year came in the
Azalea open and Bing Crosby
Invitational.

Ji H Weatherproof
yMj, s SERVICE AREA
O'16 Room w'th 700 square meters for
j Nsf ) 4 TIRE REPAIRING
r' l BATTERY SERVICE
tIL I TIRE RETREADING
V" WHEEL BALANCING

de Panama. S. A.
Calle Jer6nimo de la Ossa No. 13-33

Tel. 2-0754

y I

for a
perfect shave
every day

Change to Yardley Brushless Shaving
Cream. It softens the toughest beard,
permitting your razor to give you a
perfect have, and leaving the skin
smooth, cool and cleanly fragrant.
Afterwards, splash on Yardley After
Shaving Lotion. It is antiseptic,
prevents dryness and gives you a
well groomed feeling.

f having Seapt and Creams, Shainng Utions,
Hair Prepares, Talcs and Cologne f,r men

II ma n I VaKa

YARDLEY for men

v3

3 off?



-7"

THB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NUTSPAPn
TUESDAY, JTLT 7, 1959
in iH
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
AGENTS
Classified Pais close 11:10
a.m. Mob. te Frl, 11 a.m.
Sat., I jpa,. Sat. for Sun.
Office opes t-S weekdays.
Phone Panama J-0740 for
information about Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Charge your ad If
you hare a commercial
lAJKX-r-T Street If. 13 AGENC1AS
Carrasqntlla e FARMACIA IX) M M-STADOS
STADOS M-STADOS UNIDOS 14 Centre Ae.
iNMBtu Ave. and 33 St. A fjlfc
S .Vi .T nt JiCtt Ko S3 m FARMACIA EL BATURRO Parque Letevre 7 Street f AK MA 1,1 A "SAS" Vta
Md.Vltawf ThtS mjJto!!vZ M.rk.t VI. COLON OFFICE: IMh ... Aed G.
111 NOVfcllADeS ATMUm,
contract.
Ne. 14121 Tel. 43Xt ,-ri

I ' '

1

hi
ft

Resorts

Foitir corteeei. betwet Santa
Clan and Rio Hato. New low
retet. Phone Balboa 1866.
PHILLIPS Oeeeneide CoMaee
(ante Clara R. e P. p"
ame 1-1877 Crtitobel 3-1673.
Balrfwin'i furnished apartmenri
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Smith. Gaeboa 102.
FOR RENT: Completely fur furnished
nished furnished three bedroom residence,
prevoiusly occupied by Bolivian
Minister in Ecuador Avenue No.
28. Livingroom, dfiningroom,
kitchen, office, two bathroom,
maid's room with service, wash
tubs, garage, inside patio, hot
water in all services, direct tele telephone
phone telephone line. For inspection, see
at Ecuador Avenue No. 30 or Fe Fe-breea
breea Fe-breea at 29 Eaat Street, rear Mer Mer-cado
cado Mer-cado Vaico.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet in
48th end. Bella Vista, left hand
No. 25. Two bedrooms, living living-reom.
reom. living-reom. dining room, kitchen,
ervice, $100.00. Gardlen. Tels.
3-1683 and 3 6887.
FOR RENT: Completely furnish furnished
ed furnished three bedrooms house, dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, kitchen, bar, air-conditioned,
yard, in Cangreio "F" St.
No 10. For information call Tel.
. 3-4619.
Commercial Sites
FOR KIN T: Office tpace,
Mercedes building, above Avenida
Balboa's Post Office, with terrace
' floors, acoustic ceiling, private
: bathroom, watchman, very rea reasonable
sonable reasonable rent. Tel. 3-3054.
SERVICES
TELEVISION SERVICE
Experts in TV, radio, Hi-Fi and
transistors.
We de more Work, because we
do ft the best.
Phone 2-1905.
Crawford Agencies.
TlveJI Avenue No. 1S-20.
Prefect your heme and proper property
ty property against insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment en
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service.
Panama 3-7977 or Colon 1777,
U.S. Television
Means reliability
better service,
and lasting repairs.
Phone 3-7607 Panama.
9 A.M. to 10 P.M.

Houses

The Pacific Sleam Navigation Company
(INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840)
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES

TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SALAVERRY" Julv 14
S.S. ."FLAMENCO" '. Julv 24
S.S. r'REINA DEL MAR'' Au 14
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA,
KINGSTON. HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. SPAIN
AND FRANCE
S.S. "REINA DEL MAR" (20.225 Tons)
(Aid-conditioned)

TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
NUT A" M

S.S. "KE

ROYAL MAIL LINES LTDHOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "AKKRUMDYK" Iuv y
S.S. "LOCH COWAN"' julv 1?
TO I KCONTINENT
S.S. "DUI VENDYK" Juv io

LL SAILINGS SUBJECT TO

TELEPHONES:
, Panama 3-12578

Cristobal S-16545
r

Commercial Guide

ADVERTISE IN

as oniv cost lu.ah nor

FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740 j

LIFE INSURANCE
rail
JIM RIDGE
Oenernl Asent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co..
for ratea end Information
Tel. Panama 2-orM
Monday thru Friday
10 a.m. to 12:00
2:0t p.m. to 5:00
Saturday: 1:00 a.m. to 12:00
Listen To
The OAS
UJananiencan
Record cSiow
12:30 p.m.
HOG-YCN
Every Sunday

Apartments

FOR RENT: BeautiKil Pent Penthouse
house Penthouse in 1 Cangreio "Madurito
Building Throe Bedroom, Two
Baths. Maid's Room and Bath to
be available from August 7th.
For information call Telephone
2-2844 from f to 12 and 2 to
6 p m.
FOR RtNT: In Cangreio, fur furnished
nished furnished or unfurnished apartment,'
two bedrooms, all around balcony,
maid's room with service, gar garage,
age, garage, with water. Alberto Navauo
Street, La Castellana building.
Tel. 2-2883 or 3-1318.
FOR RENT: Cangrejo. Fully
furnished modern, cool one
room apartment, hot water, bal balcony,
cony, balcony, etc. Call 3-1789.
FOR RENT: Beautiful two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, very spacious;
best section of Campo Alegre.
Living room, dining room, ter terrace,
race, terrace, maid's room, hot water, in individual
dividual individual wash tubs, garage. Di Direct
rect Direct line telephone installation, to
dificult to get now. Very cool.
Enquire beside Guatemalan Em Em-basiy
basiy Em-basiy on 51 Street.
FOR SALE: Apartment 3 bed bed-roomt,
roomt, bed-roomt, modern building, top
floor, El Cangrejo, hot water.
Phone 3-6589.
FOR RENT: In the luxurious,
modern "Alina" building recent recently
ly recently constructed on Manuel Espi Espi-nosa
nosa Espi-nosa B Avenue, beside the new
"Cemento Panama'' building
which houses the Chase Manhat Manhattan
tan Manhattan Bank branch: two-bedroom
apartments, living-dining room,
porch and installation and acces accessories
sories accessories for air-conditioning in the
bedrooms and hot water, etc.
Each apartment has maid's room
and independent wash rooms,
elevator service, janitor and gar garage;
age; garage; also a penthouse with bar
and hall for parties for the ex exclusive
clusive exclusive use of tenants. On the
ground floor are two commercial
eitei of 112 sq. mts. each, with
their respective storehouses. Ap Applications
plications Applications will be accepted start starting
ing starting from today ana" apartments
will be turned over to tenants
July 15. Inquire: Marichal Boyd.
Office Peru Avenue No. 57. Tels.
3-6710 and 3-7926.
Do yeu need an apartment, all
conveniences, two bedrooms,
porch, livinsj-diningreom, large
kitchen, American style, laun laundress
dress laundress room, maid's room, lux luxurious
urious luxurious bathroom with vanity and
closet, very modern. Call Tel. 3 3-1107
1107 3-1107 from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
FOR RENT: Screened apart apartment,
ment, apartment, comfortable furnished, two
bedrooms, hot water, refrigerator
etc. 43rd Street No. 27.
PERSONALS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
Julv
CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
. Balboa 2-1905
THIS SECTION
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo.
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINOER
No. 4.1 Automobile Row
Phone .1-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
MOISIYIV TO APPEAR
MOSCOW (UPI) igor Mois Mois-eyev,
eyev, Mois-eyev, noted Russian Choreograph Choreographer
er Choreographer who toured the United Stales
last yegr, will return there ,iext
week for a new series of appear appearances
ances appearances in connection with llip So Soviet
viet Soviet exhibition in New York lois lois-eyev
eyev lois-eyev will prevent three nu m hers
from his newesi dance program
introduced here recently.

Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1948 Ford sedan,
good tires, runs fine, inspected
$175. 00. Panama 3-7810.
FOR SALE: 1958 ford Country
sedan (Station Wagon) Fordor,
6 passenger, V-8, 265 h p. Ford Ford-omatic,
omatic, Ford-omatic, back-up lights, heater,
$2175.00 1950 Willys jeep with
wmch $750.00. Call Vic Melant
at 6-347.
FOR SALE: 1958 Mercury
Montclair, two-tone, blue, white
side wall tire, practically new,
approximately 17,000 mil es,
push button control, power steer steering,
ing, steering, power brakes, radio, heater,
one owner. Call 83-6105.
FOR SALE: Chevrolet 1955,
white side walls, radio, excel excellent
lent excellent condition, new tires.
$900 00. Call Balboa 3284.
FOR SALE: 1955 Ford, excel excellent
lent excellent condition, 4 new tires, $725.
Call Navy 3554 or can be seen
at quarters 805-B, Far Fan.
FOR SALE: 1955 Mercury
' Montclair. hardtop, Merc-O-Ma-tic,
white, green top, white-walls,
duty paid, $975 00. Tel. 2 3654,
5281 Morrison, Diablo, after
4:30.
FOR SALE: 1952 Hillman
Minx, 4 door sedan, 1957 Ply Plymouth,
mouth, Plymouth, 4 door sedan, push but button
ton button drive. Best reasonable offer.
Balboa 1342.
Animals
AKC Boxef 5 mos. hschrkn ears
clipped' had shots. Call Bal.
1503.
FOR SALE: AKC Registered
Toy Bull Boston Terrier Puppies.
Call Navy 3986.
mama Lino
Sailings
VaCpning Panama Canal em
iilnvps- afccomDa'nied by their fam
lies, nMW'st fl. passen passenger
ger passenger list of the Panama liner Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal sailing tomorrow from Cris Cristobal.
tobal. Cristobal. There are 155 passengers on the
advance list of the Cristobal for
New York. In addition, three pas passengers
sengers passengers arc scheduled to sail from
Cristobal to Haiti.
The complete advance passenger
list of the Cristobal for New York
follows:
Mrs. Berta Albritlon and daughter-
Mrs. Francis M. Baltozer and
daughter; Mr. and Mrs. Milton
n,n- Mr and Mrs. Carlton S
Bell and two children; Mr. and
Mrs. Albert B. Berger; Mr. and
Mrs Donald J. Bowen and son;
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar B. Bristol and
three children; Mrs. Rosa Cole and
two children; Mrs. Prances uoeu,
Miss Dorothy polowith; Miss Etta
Dolowith; Miss Cgina Dunay;
Miss Rose Dunay; and Mr. and
Mrs. Kerner E. trauenneim arm
four children.
Mr. and Mrs. Joel B. uooaman,
Mrs Ada Green; Mr. anu mn.
wiliiam s Ball: rM. and Mrs. Hale
L. Haws and three children; Miss
Mary Hamilton-Spencer; Mr. anu
Mrs. Joseph B. Hill; Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas V. HVinckle and two cnu cnu-dren;
dren; cnu-dren; Mr. and Mrs. Roger M.
lowe and daughter; Mr. ano mn.
Emery Jacoby; Mrs. Jea n.
Karch; Mr. and Mrs. Jonn m.
Klasovsky and four children; Mr
and Mrs. Harry Knahel; Mrs. uoi-
othv E. Knox and lour cnimieu,
Mr. Mildred C. Komp; and Mr
and Mrs. Kenneth ti. Korver anu
child.
Mr and Mrs. Harold W. l.enin,
Mr. and Mrs. Sydney T. Lindh and
two daughters; Mr. and Mrs
Charles X. Lopeman; Miss Ethe
i, T.uras: Mrs. Frances McDer
mott; Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Mc-
Ilvaine and two children; Mrs.
Joseph Mark and three children;
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Marsh; Mrs.
Mae Marsh; Miss Florence Mit Mitchell;
chell; Mitchell; Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Mc Mc-Askill
Askill Mc-Askill and son; and Mr. and Mrs.
R. H. Nesbitt.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. Paine;
Miss Anna W. Pontius; Mrs. Leota
Price; Mr. and Mrs. William B.
Redmond and three children; Miss
Marion Reed. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
O. Roche; Mr. and Mrs. Edward
('. Ryan: Mr. and Mrs. Jack Saltz.
man and tw" children; Mr and
Mrs. Fred F. Schwartz: Mr. and
Mrs Roy A. Sharp and two children-
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Sheridan;
Miss' Ann M. Smith; Peter G
Smith; Mr. and Mrs Bernard
Sperling; and Mrs. Maria A. Meers
and three children.
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Taber and
two children: Mrs. Margaret Til-
ton Mr. and Mrs. jonn w. mrj
and four children; Morris wax wax-man:
man: wax-man: Rev. and Mrs. Allan R
Wentt and two children: Mrs. Ei Eileen
leen Eileen D. Wilkinson; Miss Connie
Williams: and Mr. and Mrs. Har Harry
ry Harry M. Williams.
Cristobal to Port au Prince:
George W Hinds; and Dr and
Mrs. (1 S. Serino.
FRENCHMAN DIES
EVREUX, France (UPI)
Frenchman was accidentally kil killed
led killed in a freak fencing accident
yesterday during an official meet
of the French Fencing federa federation
tion federation Police reported yesterday.
Bernard Maillard. 28. was stab stabbed
bed stabbed in the armpit by his oppo opponent,
nent, opponent, identified as a Swedish phy physician
sician physician who had come to F.vreux
for the meel Rotli men were
wearing standard protective ,e-quipmenl.

t-sU

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Plants. House No.
9081, 8th Street, New Cristobal.
Phone 50, Colon.
FOR SALE: Brambach Baby
Grand Piano, excellent condition
$350, or best offer; Argus C44
Camera, Telephoto lens, view view-finder
finder view-finder $90; Double bed $20;
Wicker table, $5; Mirror $3.
Phone Balboa 2-1665.
Call Panama 3-7935 for filling
and repairing carbon dioxide fire
extinguishers. Rapid service. Dry
Ice-Incorporated.
Bring this notice to
EDITORIAL CARIBE
21-42 "B" AVE.
and receive your
FREE GIFT
Especial gift for HEBREOS
FOR SALE: Winter Spinet pia piano.
no. piano. Excellent condition. Phone
Balboa 3173.
FOR SALE: Mink stole. Ranch
mink, half-ski, letout. Sacrifice.
Phone Curundu, 83-3231.
AIR CONDITIONERS
DUTY FREE FROM OUR STOCK
IN THE COLON FREE ZONE
DELIVERED TO YOUR HOUSE.
FROM $179.50 UP.
ERA, S. A. Tel.
P. O. Box 910
3-7895
Panama
FOR SALE
1 Roustabout Crane, Model
MCR2, 5 Ton., 21". In very good
condition.
Call Tel. 2-2847.
See it at BALINERAS Y REPUES-
TOS, S. A.
Ave. Nacional 25.
FOR SALE: Deep freeie, chest
type, very good condition. $100.
Balboa 1342.
FOR SALE: Freeier like new,
14' '2 cubic feet capacity. See it
Limbergh Brece Fabric Hielo,
Calidonia. Good for restaurant or
large family.
Mexicans Stream
Into LA For Title
Battle Tomorrow
LOS ANGELES, (UPI)-MexIc-
an followers of Jose Becerra, ar arriving
riving arriving yesterday for their idol'j
title bout tomorrow with Bantam Bantamweight
weight Bantamweight Champion Alphonse Hali Hali-mi
mi Hali-mi of France, forced the odds
down to 10-6 in their confidence
that an upset was In the making.
Becerra, aside from the natur
al desire to become champion and
bring the title to his country, has
been dedicated to the cause of
avenging (hp defeat of his own
hero. Raul Macias, who went down
before Halimi's fists on Nov. 6,
1957.
That date also marked a mile
stone for Becerra who fought on
the same card and was so stunned
by Macias' defeat that he was
knocked out by Dwight Hawkins.
INVITATIONS SENT
MOSCOW (UPI) Film produc
ers and technicians from 42 coun
tries have asked to participate in
the International Film Festival
scheduled to open here Aug. 3, the
official news agency Tass said
today.
ESCAPE FIRE
CANNOCK CHASE, England
(UPI) -Seventeen territorial sol soldiers
diers soldiers on week-end maneuvers
charged to safety through the
thin wooden walls of their hut
yesterday after it eaught fire.

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
GREAT WHITE FLEET

New Orleans Service falls. Arrives
" "" Cristobal
MORAZAN" June 3(1 July 1
ULUA Julv 7 July 15
YAQUE Julv 14 July it
MORAZAN Julv 21 July 29
ULUA July 28 Aurust 8

Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo

New York Service Sails Arrives
" Cristobal
Y,OMAYAGUA July 3 Julv
FRA BERLANGA July 11 July 16
ESPARTA Julv 18 July 23
JUNIOR July 24 July 29
"SAN JOSE Julv 31 August 5

Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
CRISTOBALW.C.C.A. FEEDER SERVICE
TEXITA Every (15) Days
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle

SPECIAL EXCURSION FARE FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return $275.60
To San Francisco andor Seattle and Return ..$406.06

CRISTOBAL

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Frigidaire 9 e r.
Porcelain, Solid Mahogany Desk.
Call Balboa 1503.
FDR SALE: General Ilectrie
Clothes Dryer, good condition.
Qtrs. Ill, Albroek, Phene
86-4144.
FDR SALE: Leaving country
Mahogany dining table seats
eight Phene 3-3485, Pan Panama.
ama. Panama. Boats & Motors
For a quick sale yacht messenger,
Diesel powered $450, register registered
ed registered length, 45 ft. Balboa Yacht
Club, owner Kealy Ashby.
FOR SALE: 14' fiberglsssed
renabout, 1958, 35 h p. out outboard,
board, outboard, trailer accessaries, $650.
0433, Ancen, Tel. Balboa 6316.
FOR SALE: Two cylinder Pente
gasoline marine engine, ten h p.
1000 r.p.m. Navy 3397.
WANTED
WANTED: To rent long erm
4-btdroom house, unfurnished,
modern, residential district. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone 1-7397, 7 a.m. te 1 :30
p.m.

Kobbe Edges Albrook
In Basketball Thriller

Rv sot Dirt Shaffer
The Ft Kobbe "Regulars," be-J
hind brilliant shooting by Forward i
Dave nowara ana uuaru uuc
w;ii;0 ,mcot tho hitfhlv touted

Albrook '"Flyers" in the opening I with 20 markers, while 6 feet and
r-aoo contest for both teams by a',3 inches "Mo" Moseley banged

72-71 score. Jhe contest was play played
ed played Monday evening at the Albrook
Gym before a "standing room
only" crowd.
Albrook's Base Executive Of Officer,
ficer, Officer, Lt. Col. Clarence A. Dooley,
tossed the center jump to start th
game. Kobbe Guard Dan Davis
scored the first fielder of the game,
while Albrook's Jerry Patri dunk dunked
ed dunked the "Flyer's first two-pointer.
The Albrookites, behind tne snoot snooting
ing snooting of their "Hoosier hot-shot,"
Guard Bill Agan, pulled out to
what seemed a comfortable 40-25
halftime lead. But the "Regulars',,
were not to be denied this night.
They came back like a proverbial
express train in the wild third
stanza, being led by Howard and
Williams, who poured home 12 and
11 points, respectively.
Aided by frequent "Flyer" defen defensive
sive defensive lapses, the Kobbeites banged
home 29 points in the period, while
Albrook could muster but 11, giv giving
ing giving Ft. Kobbe a slight 54-51 edge.
With less than 4 minutes left in
the game, the "Flyer" trailed 62 62-58.
58. 62-58. Albrook Forward Jim Kern
made his first appearance of the
game, and almost single-handedly
boosted the Albrookites to a 67-62
lead by sinking 7 consecutive "gra "gratis"
tis" "gratis" shots.
Howard, the outstanding perform performer
er performer of the game, sank two "gratis"
tosses, pulling Kobbe to a 67-64
deficit. John Phillis then hit a field fielder,
er, fielder, making it Albrook 69-66. Mow Mow-ard
ard Mow-ard again scored for Kobbe, then
added insult to injury by stealing
the "Fiver" throw-in and scoring
it to put Kobbe ahead 70-69. Wil Williams
liams Williams wto "gratis" markers made
it 72-69 with' second remaining.
Tom Donaway scored for Albrook
to end the night's scoring.
The Flyer "Teener" cage squad

TELEPHONES:
2121 PANAMA.2-2904

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Lets 500 and 1.000
meters, hi the Nurve Hipodreme
Urbanliatiee acreee the Remea
Racetrack. AH lets with street
fronts, eswsfe, water eaain and
electricity. Cell W. McBaroett.
Tel. 4-0976.
.
FOR SALE: Beautiful residence.
4 bedroom, Hvingroom, dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, library, reereatien room,
large kitchen, pantry, maid's
reem with service, hot water, ter terrace,
race, terrace, garden, garage, land 1 .800
m. 9th. Street Ne. 21, Sen
Francisce.
Rooms
FOR RENT : -Comfortable reomt
for responsible couple end stu students.
dents. students. Uruguay Street and 48th.
Tel. 1-6506.
FOR RENT: Furnished reem,
liying-diningroem, to good per person.
son. person. Bella Vista, 45th Street Ne.
14.
FOR RENT: Furnished room,
independent entrance with meals
te gentleman bachelor. 43rd St.
Ne. 27.
1 eained some solace for their "Big
brothers" heart-breaking defeat as
they easily handled the Ft. Kobbe
,
Forward Bill Gibbs led the winners
home 12 counters for Albrook.
The box score;
Ft. Kobbe "Regulars"
Po. Name Pts
Howard 33
Ryan 4
Dftvis 9
Arnold . .. 2
Phillis 6
Williama M
T2
Albrook "Flyers
West .. I
Agan 16
Patrie 10
Stephenson 10
Hopwood 13
Self 4
Donaway 6
Kern 7
71
Half time score: Albrook 40. Ft.
Kobbe 25.
Officials: Hilzinger and Mc Mc-Arthur.
Arthur. Mc-Arthur. GUN. CLUB
NOTES
CRISTOBAL
Walter Johnston repeated his last
yar's win of the Leonard M. Camp Campbell
bell Campbell Skeet Trophy at the July 5
Cristobal Gun Club competitions,
scoring a neat but not gaudy 46.
Joe Kueter and Frank Chollar
shared second slot, much to the
surprise of each as well as others,
with 44 apiece. Art Sutton destroy destroyed
ed destroyed 43, and J. D. Shields 41. H. H.
Shacklett and "Mudbug" Loga,
who came for Trap and stayed for
Skeet .turned in 39 and 32, respec respectively.
tively. respectively. George Lopp, not competin, shot
the day's best single string, 24 ex
25, to provide a proper example
for visiting neophytes, Srs. M.
Monslo, L. Monslo, and el Don Ta Ta-cho,
cho, Ta-cho, all of whom performed cred creditably
itably creditably under Loop's instruction.
The highest Trap scores were
shot by:
Lee Carr 23
Lopp . .. , 23
Shacklett 22
Johnston 21
With two more trophies to be
won this year, selection of a date
to gratify the Trap specialists will
soon be made. Meanwhile, gunning
proceeds on the regular practice
scrfWule: eac Wednesday after
noon at 4:30, except for the first
Wednesday of each month, when
Skeet is shot by floodlights, at 7:30
p.m. Trap and Skeet are shot on
the first Sunday morning of each
month.
USO Armchair Tour
Postponed Until
Next Saturday pm
The USO-JWB Armchair Tour
scheduled for this evening has
been postponed until Saturday,
July 11, at the usual hour of 7:30
n.m.
This presentation will concen
trate on sports, ana win mciune
several short films on basketball,
tennis (with Donald Budge), swim
ming and diving. The films are
being presented at the Armed
Services Center through the cour courtesy
tesy courtesy of the United Slates Inform Information
ation Information Service.
All servicemen and their edp-
endents, particularly, the children
and the general puouc of pana
ma and the Canal Zone are cor
dial welcome.

r

Investor's Guide-
-By
A Chicago reader returns a list
of long time dividend paying
stocks with this comment: 'I
don't mean to appear 'facetious,
but my je?en-yf)airold grandson
could get up a representative list
of stockg, such as this."
I don't ichow what, lis intent
may be -r rather think he is
bawling me out as being a sim simpleton.)
pleton.) simpleton.) But just the" same, his
note unwittingly makes an im
portant point.
The long-time dividend paying
companies of this country are,
without doubt, known to many
seven-year-olds.
My own son, -when he was
seven, chose five shares of Ra
dio Corp. of America (then sell
ing at 16) for his birthday pres
ent because he associated the
stock with the satisfactory per performance
formance performance t)f an old radio set we
had around the house.
Now I don't know -what Mr.
Chicago expected me to dig up
for him when he asked me for a
list of well-established corpora corporations
tions corporations which have been earning
money and paying out dividends
for a long time. Did he think I
could have omitted American
Can, or General Electric, or Ra Radio
dio Radio Corp., or Standard Oil of N.
J., or F. W. woolworth of Conso
lidated -Edison B, Which have
been m'he tfverrnrfnt "putilic
domain' for1- vpars? 1
Did he think it possible that I
would come up with a list of top
erade coroorations that only a
select few-haAJiiard ottJltheV
were known only to a few, how
would they ever have become
successful enough to pay divi
dends without interruption for 20,
30 or 100 years?
I'm not criticizing Mr. Chica Chicago,
go, Chicago, nor am I apologizing for the
"naivete" of my list. I'm just
trying to make the point that if
you want the most, reliable, y
buy the most reliable.
Q. I am retired on Social .Se .Security
curity .Security and on 'income from Niagara-Mohawk
preferred, federal
Land Bank, Ward Baking prefer prefer-ed,
ed, prefer-ed, U.S. Treasuries, American
Sugar-preferred, U.S. Steel pre-
ferred; A.T. and T. I understand
me r-ower AUtnnritV nonns
. ..jib. .... .
yiciacex ii ee interest.
A. You're right on the Power
Authority bonds. And, of course,
they are a safe investment.
But I think you should be warn warned
ed warned that you are very heavily in invested
vested invested on the side of fixed in income
come income return. You don't give
your age, but in the next 20-years
you could run into considerable
inflation and-or higher money
rates which would impair the
purchasing power of your in income
come income and the market, value of
your investments. ,. L
I would: faypjL putting atraition-
In
Vt
A

JULIO jullo 7 'Inside y d todo tamaflo
MAJ. GEN. CHARLES L. DASHER (left) commanding general
USARCARIB, presents the 20th Infantry Colors to Col. John R.
Wright 3r. during change of command ceremonies at the Fort
Kobbe parade ground. Wright replaces Col. Ralph A. Jones Jr.
as commanding officer of the 1st Battle Group and also as com
mander of the post of Fort Kobbe. Jones has commanded the
20th and Fort Kobbe for the past year. (U.S. Army Photo

SAM SHULSKY

al sums into common shares s
lebentures .or preferreds conver conver-pay
pay conver-pay in a period of government
UDie into, .CjOmmon. It doesrji4
uencu spending, to get yoursr
too neaviiy into' cued incomt
curities.

Q. I am 40, with wife and tl I
children. Have been invest!)! l
since last July and, have made X

small profit on some buying and
selling, (Very small). Now hold
small amounts of Standard Oil
of N.J., Pan American, Schenley,
,N.Y. Central. McGraw Hill anil
Upjohn. Are these-all right? Am
i too diversified?
A. The-- stocks are well-studied
to your purpose. Central is per perhaps
haps perhaps a little more speculative
than you should hold, but the a a-mount
mount a-mount involved is not large.
What is far more dangerous. Is
,your hope of making trading prof profits
its profits in? fivl' and 20-share blocks of
stock. You're likely to find that
trading commissions, stamp, tax
es and income taxes will eat up
all your profits.
Secondly;' .the lure of tradin
has led you into the bad habit of
taking profits whenever possible,
Dut locKing yourself in with loss
es. It so happens that you have
been left with fair to good secur
ities. But if .you are tempted into
increasingly speculative shares
for tiding purposes you may
well Iind yourself hung up with
an unsavory list of "eats and
dogs.'
NEW YORK, July T (UPI
Stocks opened somewhat mued
today as profit-taking came into
the market after yesterday's yesterday's-sharp
sharp yesterday's-sharp spurt to new all time
highs.
Sports Briefs
CRACKERS' PILOT RESIGNS
T TITH fwirTf III 11. TTtt V
ii .BiKMUwrtAM, Aia. turij
IBiiddv Bates resigned Sundav
Imsnimr nf the Atlanta Oirltan
ear. pr- ti rw
fwho ha vie been kicking around is
the Southern Assn. basement most,
of the season. He was replaced
by Bab Montegue, a former At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta outfielder.
WISE BACK IN LOUISVTU
MIfcW3afE (UPI)-The
waukee Braves, who recentl J
called Casey Wise from Loui 1
have returned the second u
man to the same American Ai
nltih An nntinn Wiga n11a-1
only 13 hits in75 at bats for ,1
anemic 173 aferage during ,1
latest stay wmh me xtraves.

j
If 1 Wt

dMhfariBi



' ; : -' i
TUESDAY, JULY T, 195fc THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDFNT DAILY NEWSPAPER. PAGE NINB
" THE STORY OP MARTHA WAYNf Touchy BY WILSON SCRU&GS 1 PRISCILLA'S POP The Long, Lonf Trail By AL VERMCIR
tr yrty. rjc- IUallW : I CY1 POOR 1 S I
F" RFlik T5Y UMAOtfU. jrHOPETHAT (HOW LOOK, MARTHA AUDI HAVE MEVC' VOuVS KEN AS JUMPY A5 aTtM SORRY, UUAE TWEWAO T ll ( M5 fiSM (2) :
.V.- At-L-T'V WfTHA STATED "nWEM-MORi THAU- KAM6AKOO EVER MCC WE 1 6UBS YOU'RC JVSaV--. FROM V H iiScrU ffWrt -Al !V
- :RWEVJBWpU6 jDOKu'T p6OO0TOEMPS7l!0i5rV-e: SVT THE WEDOM6 DATE TStJHT. LETTER FOR 1 E a ALASKA) IT V-o OiDVV ''
lx-i K INCLUDE c cog UFAmJ; jkSfSlajnl'iL- - y riSv' I YOUR FOLKS, i"e i !! -w TwfUR XZJZZ y fx2t
j: v i ."
- BUNNY Bite Before Brk
M.CKLES AND H.S .iNDI Sober.n, Influence BY MERRILL BLOSSl'R 77! IO Eg tJ K (2S SSS
f s I BARK FEB THIS -ySPEAX ,.6e fll HE BAKXS.1
. r - '- ' , a piP V3U TEACH ASJB0NE1 TRY IT' V YBi sPEAK II i V

'! f

r he d.

as i',

reer i

eve
v-
loi,
it
t

m

ALLEY OOP

Horse Power

BY V. T. HAMLIN

I rZJS?tr S kSoISlO I IT OUT A THOUSAND OuGHTV H' 'V

BOOT! AND HER IUDDIB1

Curiour

BY EDGAR MARTIN

he's APTAIN 6A$v
wins

sj ivi i v r n

C3CKT CiAtt'S
a?tCc. -xvyLse

wwST Vm,f

gl IWbyTilf

Language Harriet

BY LESLIE TURNER

I i 1 mmmmmm 1 1

fc" "V THAT D0U8LB-' "S-sT 1 f RtCB Y POR FAVOR, i WHERE r I'WAKIT TO REPORT V J NO
I : i i i "Sf CH0&SIU6 BABB l AMERICAwWe CHECU?J THE A STOLEN CAR'. 010 1 ICOWPREMDa
I n AFTER THAT PAINTlWfi, 1J TRAVEL OW Kr---fy POLICE YOU SEE A RLONPB L VSEN0R.1

' ll' III II

H0RTY MEEKLE

Spoil Sport

BY DICK CAVALLI

JUNIOR I f rWONOER I EE HER...HEV N I tt'V I 11 qf IT'S NO FUN 1
LADIES CLUB WHICH BOOTH ) I H RUNNING TH6 ) J gj' (n)., II (3SS(2 W GOING TOA I
(SKIMBW 1 THEY GAVE JILL I V 0OLLAR-A-KI66 J ( "j 1 BAZAAR WITH Jk
' (J

MAIOR HOPPLE blT OUR WAY BY J. R. WILLIAMS

. 1 r 1 g 1 l '1 M r-r

.111

BOARDING HOUSE.

VOUK (REMARK 10 lEAMDEJ?
A80UT DEVOTIOM ID WoEK

0OCMEO AW HEART, AMCHEL-

ANCELO I HEREBY

COMMISSION YO) TO TM

M 0HT EST DP MS kALS

TH&H0US6IT5 REI?friAJ

T.HB gONES ON SUNDAY S
CHICKEN N0WGET6CMN6

r

UktEtoBk True Life Adventures

BATTLE of
the BIRDS

M94
Walt PiTtv IrnliiettM

Warld Hit hta MiwvtA

All

BACTTLH IS REPUTED TO
TAKE PLAOE IN SOUTHERN MOROCCO
- STORKS AfiAvlNST RAVENS.
Winners varv.

L-OSEkS LEAVE.'

DUtrlbutti by Kint FittufM yiit. 4"1

SIDE GLANCES

By Calbraith

lip
I f- e by NtA Urrit. hM.

"Homer's spending his vacation just sitting. Says he's
escaping from the things people do to escape!"

L)KCLT VflU ARE 3EST NGf

FORCING ME T3 PAIMT TH&

HE-iFETi to fiddle for a

gARN DANCEVOU CANT

grE-YOL) WOULWT

rAFf

r .it 1

y a-

M3W PIP I XlOU SHOULD HAVE

KNOW THOSE VOL! TOLD ME YOU

XWS WERE USEPTO SWATCH THE

HIPWJ6 UP SfOOKS IWTHAT

VFRV COVERED BRlPSEi

YOU SHOLILP HAVE
KNOWW' BETTER.' WOW

THE WHOLE TOWW WILL
KMOW--11L WEVE? BE

ABLE TO HOLD Mv

uciniic id.iLif

I HAAHr- HA-HA.' 1 7
I 5E&HIM I AAUSHV I

1 1 KISS" SEE 1 ,1 tyUSH! J I

I HIM Hue

II HER.' HAH I IW THE
V HAH V ( 006i, RAFTER
1 : V 6006LY.' V T 7

1 imwftm mMmxh

rk;ft : MtfMPr w like to; Live over ,,y-y.t.'-!.S? j''"'

ACME
WRECKING
YARP

T.BL EMf. U,t. Pt- Off.
INI by ME A Brle,

7-

"Need any help? My fathar aaya I'm real good
at wrecklnr thinara!"

New Airport TV Scanning Device
Spots Dangers On Foggy Runway

NEW YORK CUPI)-Th OC-7
carrying about 60 passengers ap approached
proached approached New York on a ci?af
nifiht. It had been an easy eight-

hour flight form the Wt Coast

with no incidents. f
The pilot asked thfj .air, traffic
controller at Idlewiid for ap approach
proach approach instructions.., The con controller
troller controller delayed a fe.w. seconds
whele giving landing, instructions
to a commercial plane, on a train
ing flight.
Once the training flight touch
ed the runway,, the, traific con controller
troller controller ga,ve instructions, .to. thn
DC-7. The big plane.anked (or
long white strip of concrete.
Suddenly the traffic .controller
looked up. , t,,,

"Where's1 that training flight
that just landed?" He asked.
"Where's its ground report? Can
anybody see it out there?"
He squinted but couldn't see
the runway clearly. 1
The DC-7 was straightening
out of its turn, sighting the same

runway on which the training
flight had landed..
"No reports on the training
flight," the controller heard. Puz

zled, he spun around and looked

into a TV set.

"There it is! There it is!" he

snapped. ti 144tt,

He turned back to the DC 7.
There is a plane apparently

out of commission on your run runway,"
way," runway," he said in the familiar

monotone of his trade. Taxi

close to the left and there will be be-no
no be-no danger. Taxi close ,tnthe. Jeft.

You will be on observation at all

time. The disabled" planVhas no

lights and no communications.

Careful, easy, keep to the left.

That's it. You're past it now. Use

-Hirnoff three. Proceed to the

loading apron."

The TV set that saved, a possi

bly seious accident ''one 'night re recently
cently recently is an enlargement" of a
peculiar new radar device that

will soon be installed in 15 U.n.
airports.
It is radar solely for ground

operations at an airport,' to per

mit the control tower to keen an

eye on trucks, people and planes

in fog. Snow, rain, dust storms

and night darkness.
The incident involving the

DC-7 was revealed by Mike Mit-

sakos, deputy controller at Idle-

wild. Where the ground radar,

called Airport Surface Detection
Equipment (ASDE), has operated
experimentally for a year. Tdla Tdla-wild
wild Tdla-wild lands about 700 planes a day.
"The landing gear had col collapsed
lapsed collapsed on that training flight on
the runway and all its lights' mid
communications went out," Mit Mit-sakos
sakos Mit-sakos recalled. "At night w de depend
pend depend on pilot radio report? to
make sure the runways are clear
for the next flight. This time the
controller's instinct and tbt
ASDE saved the day."
The ASDE has been ordered for
installation at Newark, K.3.,
Washington (D.C.) National.
Washington (D.C.) Chanti 11 y,
Los Angeles International, San

trancisco International, Seattle.
Tacoma Cleveland, Chicago
O'Hare and Boston Logan air airports.
ports. airports. In addition, the Air Force
has ordered six of the devices for
its installations.
"This device is very accurate
and the controller can tell at a
glance if everything is clea1-."
Mitsakos said. "It's so accurate accurate-it
it accurate-it can even show when a fire
truck passes under the wing of a
plane.

St) S5'- v-.H

ALL OUTDOORS-Leader of
Hollywood's new muscle and
outdoer set is actor Gardner'
McKay, above. He will be seen:
this fall in a TV he-man series,'
"Adventures in Paradise."

AfPOVAS PANAMA AfiWArS

PANAMA $
CALI

Today' JV Program

45."'
i

l
!

S:00 CFN NIWS 7 30
3 1! Induatry on Paridt 8:00
3:30 Workshop for Pmtt S 30
:00 Mr. Wizard 11:00
4:S0 Movie: ArJni Dayt
SMt PANOBAMA 1 1 00
7:00 Buccaneers, Rpt. 11 IS

Dangerous Assignment
Oizie & Harriet
Phil Silver". Hpt.
Armchair Theatre:
Camecip Hall :
CFN NEWS
Enc: Ed Sullivan.

Courtesy of Aerovlas Panama Alrwai j
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573-16983-1699 -J
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ')

Ml

830 3k. fiwtamd 1090 Kul faM"

t
' 1 1 1 f ."l" "'
,i .i i-
...... . ... t T
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. ( i.
... 1 '' 1(1 l1!



i
Wins
I-

i.
r."

Rowls

Golf

etsy
4

ToBMB

6

Radiant
i
Cheered
if

' CHICAGO, July 7 (UPI) A radiant but urea wueen
whirlwind love affair with Chicago today and headed back

She cruised away with
thetosands of friendly, cheering
the
'fireworks-lighted shore of
i For the Queen, it was a

anil America s secona largest n-j
3ft For Chicago, it was a proud, tumultuous day that symbolized the city s emergence

4 world port and gave midwesterners their Tirst cnance to

at

Jmarch. They liked what they saw.

$ayor Richard J. Daley, host
at U wind-up state dinner in he
rad Hilton hoici, "-
sen:
fkour Majesty, come back a-:
lh and bring the children
tie 1,400 hand-picKed gur. f-i
plaiided ana cneer-u. ...j
Uk lauehter when the queen
: i i rhAii nrnKP
"TT
rettiea mai sue ;
ft
tF longer ana gei u m
eafgo unaer mme m"
tlo&s
IfThe monarch's visit was mar mar-tkU
tkU mar-tkU five hours after her arriv arriv-i
i arriv-i by an anonymous telephonce
re
t
.Veather Or Not
tthls weather report for ths 24
hours ending 8 a. m. today is
prepared by the Meteoroiopica!
aBd Hydrographic Branch of thf
Panama Canal Company:
f f Balboa Cristobal
MPERATURE:
K?.:::::::: 8 S
HUMIDITY:
hBgh 94 93
P ...49 81
WIND:
(max. mph) N-16 NE 19
RAIN (inches) 9 .02
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 82 85
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake 82.95
Madden Dam 215.15
BALBOA TIDES
WEDNESDAY, JULY 8
High
Time
5:17 a.m.
5:25 p.m.
Time
11:24 a.m.
11:42 p.m.
Ht.
15.2 ft.
15.3 ft.
Low
Ht.
1.6 ft.
0.6 ft.
PRICES: 75c. 40c.
. ui-uMf iUTUAUV
&JSl WIDMARK FOND QUIMN
fcifcX 0M0TW DOlOKtS
" UM ONE MICHtLi 3
bWARLOC
-
CAM k HUBS ITtMOMMC I
TOMORROW

NOTHING COULD COME BETWEEN
HER AND HER SON . NOT EVEN
THIS MAN, THIS LOVE, THIS
HUNGER!

, fa Winner! Vj

SUSAN HAYWARD

Lit

yn the wonder of High
.fidelity Stereophonic Sound

Buf Trec
Wcy n

. i
Prince Philip aboard the royai

Chicagoans bade them a noisy, spectacular farewell orr

Lake Michigan.
triumphal, 14-hour visit to the
call to police headquartar that
a bomb had ben placed in tht
Museum of Seianca and Indut Indut-try
try Indut-try timed to go off when the
Queen arrived.
Police discounted the call as
probably that of a crackpot. They
rushed a bomb squad to the mu museum
seum museum and apparently satisfied
themselves that there was no dan-
ftor tip wnepn anivcu
utes aiier cne i.eieiJ"1""'
entered the museum vvunoui hjli-
dent.
Th Queen and her husband,
r-;o Phiiin rlimaxed their tri
umphant. 15,990-mile tour of
ct T.auirenrp Seaway with
the
13
crowded hours in the nation's sec second
ond second largest city and newest ma major
jor major world port.
Chicago, once known as the
strenghold of Midwest isolation isolationism
ism isolationism and of gangsters, put on Its
finest clothes and most ; sninmg
face for the slim, 33-year-old roy royal
al royal visitor.
Even Chicago's smll was
changed for the 'Queen. The air
was spreyod with pine scent ev every
ery every place she stopped during the
first hours of her visit.
Firecrackers popped, sirens
screamed, cannons boonled, and
honHc hiarpri "Rule Britannia" as
the royal barge brought the Queen
and Prince from their yacht to n
landing at'Bnckingatun Fountaon
on the shores of Lake Michigan
and right in front of the Chicago
skvline.
The Queen, dressed in a white
lace dress with brown embroid embroidery,
ery, embroidery, was smiling and gracious as
she received the welcome of May Mayor
or Mayor Richard J1. Daley -and Illinois
Gov. William G. Stratton. Within
a few hours, however, she ap appeared
peared appeared weary at a governors
luncheon and Prince Philip kept
up her spirits with a running com
mentary of quips.
Half a million Chicagoans.
wearing their holiday best and
many waving British flags or
wearing pins with the Queen's pic picture,
ture, picture, welcomed Elizabeth. A total
of two million persons were ex expected
pected expected to see her before the day
was over.
The reception at Buckingham
Fountain, under a bright blue
sky and in perfect 70-degree
weather, was properly decorous
LAST DAY!
ALSO:
JOHANSSON
vs
PATTERSON
FIGHT!
o
WEEK END
RELEASE I
AS THE
WOMAN
OBSESSED
rr

- STEPHEN BOYD
BARBARA NICHOLS
Frodoctot y utw i. SYDNEY B0EHM

Diriid po, HENRY HATHAwat
CincmaScop
COLO oor Dl LUXt

Queen
Chicago

tnoem enaea a une-uay,
to Canada.
i- i : I xi i l
yacnx oriiannia arxer muw
caprtal city of the corn belt
ennm a reigning Bnun
Temporary Filling
Queen s Souvenir
Of Chicago Visit
CHICAGO, July 7 (UPI) -Queen
Elizabeth II left Chicago
last night with a temporary
souvenir that should last her at
least until she returns to Lon London.
don. London. That's the judgment of the
dentist who put it i n t o her
mouth in his Chicago hotel of office
fice office between cocktail time and
dinner last night.
The Queen, it was disclosed,
had smiled through a long day
of official greeting although a
jagged hole in one tooth from
which she had lost a filling be before
fore before her arrival here was rasp rasping
ing rasping her tongue.
She and Prince Philip left a
cocktail reception early to visit
the dentist, Dr. Norman B. Ol Olson.
son. Olson. "She didn't have much time,"
Olson said. Rather than a tooth toothache,
ache, toothache, I would say it was more
of an aggravation to the tongue
from the sharp edge of the tooth.
"The temporary filling wiH
work out well for her until she
gets back to England."
and restrained. Protocol was
strictly observed.
But Chicago began to yell Its
welcome as the Queen's motor motorcade
cade motorcade proceeded sliwly along
Michigan Boulevard,' into the Lo
business district, and down the
city's famous State Street.
Cheers came in a full throated
roar from crowds packed as much
as 15 deep. Office workers and
store attendant stopped whatever
they were doing arid hurried to
the street. In the Queen's wake,
sightseers moved in to strip off
bunting and royal emblems from
the decorations.
Another visitor to Chicago, Mrs.
Laverne Priebe of Waterloo, Iowa
expressed the way the Queen ap appeared
peared appeared to Chicago.
'She is beautful," Mrs. Priebe
said. "She is prettier than hr
pictures, which don't show up
her beautiful complexion."
A few others were less entranc entranced.
ed. entranced. A waitress at a hamburger
stand said dourly, "seems like an
awful lot of fuss I bet they
wouldn't do it if the Lord himself
came back."
Whatever the quibbles, Chica Chicago's
go's Chicago's welcome for the Queen was
the greatest mass spectacle the
city had put on since Gen. Doug Douglas
las Douglas MacArthur returned from Ko Ko-rea
rea Ko-rea in 1951.
Nazarene Church
Continues Revival
The Ancon Church of the Na Nazarene,
zarene, Nazarene, enters the second week of
revival services with Rev. and
Mrs. William Fisher, the services
will close July 12.
The Rev. Fisher is the author
of four books titled, "The Time
is Now." "Second-Hand Religion,"
"Wake Up and Lift," and "why
I Am A Nazarene. The public
is invited to attend all services
begining at 7:30 each evening.
STOCKHOLDERS VOTE
VANCOUVER, B. C. (UPI) -Western
Plywood Co., Ltd. an
nounced Thursday its sharehold shareholders
ers shareholders will vote July 13 on a pro proposed
posed proposed option of 150,000 class "B
shares to Georgia-Pacific Corp.
which would give Georgia-Pacific
about a 25 per cent interest in
the class "B" voting shares of
Western Plywood.
"Jodaij
SHOWS:
1:15 3:45 6:17
8:49
UMvfDSAl MTfcNATiOMl pnmh
IANA TURNER
JOK
SANDRA DEE
SUSAN KOHNER
ROBERT ALDA
E
ft" t,rtd III lilt World"

CENTRAL

1 1M: It

VS1A

YW

Reds' Quemoy Maneuvers
Alert Nationalist Navy

o
TAIPEI, July 7 (UPI)-The Chi Chinese
nese Chinese Communists have been hold holding
ing holding amphibious exercises opposite
the offshore Quemoy Islands, it
was reported today, and National Nationalist
ist Nationalist China has ordered its naval
patrols stepped up in the Formo Formosa
sa Formosa Straits.
The independent newspaper Li Linked
nked Linked Daily News said the Commu Communists
nists Communists held two exercises last week
near Amoy and that nearly 100
warships participanted.
Adm. Ni Yue-si, commander of
the Chinese Nationalist Navy
told newsmen he had instructed
his warships to increase patrol
activities against the possibility
of a sneak attack.
Ni called the alert after Sunday's
air clash when four Nationalist
Sabres were reported lo have shot
down five of 12 attacking Mig-19
Communist jets.
Ni, speaking at a port in
southern Formosa, said the
strength of the Nationalist Na Navy
vy Navy has been increased by ships
received recently from the Unit United
ed United States under the military aid
prgoram. One wa sa Benson
class destroyer, largest in the
Nationalist navy.
The Nationalists claimed yester yesterday
day yesterday that the Chinese Communists
have 2,300 aircraft concentrated
at 47 coastal bases along the Chi Chinese
nese Chinese coast, all only little more
than an hour's flying time from
Formosa.
The announcement backed up
earlier intelligence claims that
the Communsits were planning to
launch a new offensive soon in
the Formosa strait. Nationalist
officials believed the offensive
would get underway at about the
time the Big Four foreign min

. ... 'j 1 , ....

T LAUNCH ATLAS A new simplified launching system for tho Alia, tprw
has been developed to eliminate the huge gantry crane usually emnloved Th c M
horizontally, above, clamped by the nose on the 70-foot erected IZ !n ?ess han'two mif
KSSSr to be fueled fired-This E:

PREPARING FOR ROYAL VISIT U.S. Army Engineer Corps dredge Kewaunee deepens the
inner basin of Chicago's harbor. Operation is part of the preparations for the visit of Queen
Elizabeth and Prince Philip aboard the Royal Yacht Britannia. Their ship will be escorted by
ships of the Eoyal Canadian Navy and U.S. Navy.

Guards Que
Hostages In
MONROE, Wash., July 7 (UPI
A small army of officers, in
one bold move with tear gas
cartridges, today captured four
convicts who had threatened
death for 38 hostages If their
escape demands were not met.
No one
move.
was Injured in the
JhwteJi
PRICES:
$1.00 and $0.50

GAVIN l-W W "WA

; ted. 'A$

7 7$Mr fMGRANT)

ister reconvene in Geneva, July
13.
The aerial dogfight at supersonic
speeds above the straight Sunday
may have been the prjelude to a
renewal of warfare mi the area,
all but called off since last Octo October
ber October when the Reds lost 31 Mig Mig-type
type Mig-type jets.
The military information serv service
ice service said yesterday that 70 per cent
of the planes concentrated along
the mainland coast were jets. It
said none of the base was more
than 850 miles from Formosa, or
at most an hour and a half flyin?
time from the island fortress.

The Nationalist report said the
2,300 planes represented about
two thirds of the Communists'
entire striking power.
Military observers pointed to
several reasons why Sunday's
air duel might usher in a new
series of clashes with the Com Communists:
munists: Communists: Nationalist intelligence, which
hag been right m the past, report
ed a high level Communist mil
itary meeting had been held June
28 to plot new trouble for the For Formosa
mosa Formosa Strait.
Red fighter planes and pilots,
pulled out last October for inten intensive
sive intensive combat training, have been
returned to coastal bases.
jr-Aerial battles like Sunday's
started the Quemoy crisis last
summer.
It was believed the Communists
Migs flew over the Strait Sunday
as part of a step-up in pre-battle
aerial reconnaisance of the Matsu
Islands.
A Defense ministry spokesman
said the li Mig pilots fired first
at the four Nationalist sabrejets
in an "entirely unprovoked" at attack.
tack. attack. Convicts, bave
Prison Uprising
Dr. Garret Heyns, state insti institutions
tutions institutions director, helping direct
strategy from his' office, said
the officers "conned" the four
convicts into defeat.
"The guards armed them-
selves with tear gas after wait waiting
ing waiting until the hostages had bed bedded
ded bedded down," Heyns said. "Then
with just the four men up and
around, prison officials called
the four to the window and
told them l hat I was coming
to talk to them.
"As soon as they came to the
window, the guard let them
have it with tear gas There
was no one hurt. The four pris prisoners
oners prisoners were rhook up by the tear
?as, but will recover shortly."
The move against the con convicts,
victs, convicts, holding their hostages in
the reformatory's visitors room,
came moments before 4 a.m.
Within five minutes, it was all
over.
Twenty-six of the hostages
were outsiders seized while they
were visiting inmate relativRs
yesterday afternoon.
The four would-be fugitives,
brandishing butcher knives and
large meat forks, threatened
mutilation or mur.ier for their
.autives if their demand for a
'dean gel away" ci, were not
met. At tin:o the; even threat threatened
ened threatened to kill themselves.
The convicts,, two cf them
former mental pitier.'s put
their escape plot Into action at
2:35 p.m. yesterday.

Russia Claims

Into Outer Space, Return ing?ThenrSafelw
i I'1 'C f ..." ,.
MOSCOW, July 7 (UPI) Russia has hurled two does and a Whbife' b a 'trreat heiirht" 1 I
two-ton "space rocket" and brought them safely Aack to earth, it W annSraoedveSrdav I
The dogs, named "Daring" and "Snowflake.'' andtne unnamed rabbit were i ffiSw'hi'
Thursday, six weeks after the United States blawdvai space trail with two vnkv An liiS.
mile flight down the Cape Canaveral, FJa.. spaot' HUiire. v"" li T "??
The announcement referred to the "upner atmosphere" and said the MOO-mnT J
diate range rocket" reached a "great height." But it ave no specific figures ontitnrf. r ?i2

tance.
The rocket was launched at 6:30
a.m. Moscow time, July 2.
The "zoo rocket" was one of a
series of experiments involving
animals looking toward- putting
man himself into space.
The official announcement said
the dog Daring (Otvashnaya in
Russian) was making its third as
cent. Russia announced 11 months
ago that it had sent animals aloft
and successfully retrieved tnem
indicatane Soviet scientists had
licked the "re-entry" problem.
The announcement did not further
mention the dog Snowflake (Snez
inka in Russian).
The animal-carrying rocket al also
so also brought back "valuable in information"
formation" information" about the "composi-
GOVERNORS VISIT TIFLIS
LONDON (UPI) Seven Ameri
can governors on a tour of Soviet
Russia have visited litnc, capital
of the Soviet Republic of Georgia,
Radio Moscow reported today.
The governors are LeRoy Collins
(D-Fla.), George D. Clyde (R-
Utah). Robert B Meyner (D-N.J.)
John E. Davis (R-N.D.), Luther
H. Hodges (D-N.C), Stephen L.
R. McNichols (D-Colo.), and Roo Roo-ert
ert Roo-ert E. Smylie (R-Idaho). Cecil
H. Underwood (R-W. Va.) re returned
turned returned to the United States yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday. wrergFTt
Every business concern needs
some promising young men to
attract good secretaries.
Limn
RELEASE!
0.60 0.30
Shows: 3:15, 5:15,
7:15, 9:08 p.m.
'A.
TMI tWIlTINt MOTMIM NOWJCTMN
RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH
DENNIS PRICE
TERRY -THOMAS
IAN CAR MICHAEL"

Privates

Read

Sending ffv6
tion of th light gatat in th at at-mosphar'
mosphar' at-mosphar' tha announeamant
The Radio Moscow announcement
called the vehicle a "space rock rocket"
et" rocket" and said it was a "single-stage
geophysical ballistic rocket of me medium
dium medium range."
The U.S. rocket which threw
monkeys Able and Baker 300
miles up into space at 10,000 iniles
per hour last May 28 was an intermediate-range
U.S. Army Jupi Jupiter
ter Jupiter rocket. Monkey Able, a seven seven-pound
pound seven-pound Rhesus, died June 1 under
anesthesia while ail electrode was
being removed from its flesh. The
one-pound spider monkey Baker is
alive and reported well.
Radio Moscow gave no techni technical
cal technical details of the condition of the
three Soviet rocket animals, but
said: "The condition of the ani animals
mals animals after landing is good."
The radio said the rocket was
launched "in accordance with the
plan for scientific work on re
search into the upper layers of
the atmosphere."
Russia launched the first animal
ever into space on Nov. 3, 1957
At that time, Sputnik II, with tht
37-pound dog Laika aboard, went
into an ormt with a maximum
House Groups Opens
Inquiry Into Pull
By Retired Brass
WASHINGTON, July 7 (UPI) -A
house armed -serf ices subcom subcommittee
mittee subcommittee opened a'public inquiry to today
day today into whether retired military
brass have influenced the award
of defense contracts to industries
that hired them.
Deputy Defense Secretary Thom Thomas
as Thomas S. Gates Jr. was called as the
leadoff witness.
The investigators want to find
out whether favoritism h plac placing
ing placing defense contracts has' been
shown to companies that hired
high-ranking retired officers a ex executives.
ecutives. executives. They also seek to determine if
there is any conflict of interest in
the ex-officers' employment by
firms they may have dealt with
while on active duty.
The hearings stem from concern
in congress about the number of
senior military officers who have
retired to take high-paying jobs
with defense contractors.
Cuban Consular
Chief In Miami
Leaves For Home
MIAMI, July 7 (UPD Cubas,
Consul-General Alonso Hidalgo
was whisked out of Miami by
plane last night with other Cu Cuban
ban Cuban officials. They headed lor
Cuba.
Hidalgo had far.ed trial Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday on charges of inciting
Saturday night's riot between
rival Cul-an factions.
Miami Police Chief Walter E.
Headley submitted a 15-page
report that showed, in effect,
that Hidalgo's actions turned a
minor street disturbance into
a free-for-all.
The report, signed by more
than a dozen oolice officers, in indicated
dicated indicated that Hidalgo personal personally
ly personally led a group against anti anti-Castro
Castro anti-Castro followers. They clashed
'n front of the home of ex-Ba-tJstf.
senator Rolando Masferrer,
Castro's top enemy.
CENTRAL
Q TOMORROW
Tie Jttarte delimit
H greatness of thiN.Y.ghow
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WHAT JA
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story on page 8

Qpbabpit.'
height if yWoBBf Laika died
a week later 'still in main mj1
the rocket Amntetmii i i.Jr I
1958. '. "it j
rflekMnehed ;t Thora Thora-day
day Thora-day atttmptad an;rbit around
tha aarth. v I
s The animals underwent a period!
of weightlessness", duaifcg the flight
and gave "new data, on the be-J
Mvior of ammsjls"-under weight-1
less conditions. Radio Mn:
j formation about fte compos! compos!-SM'
SM' compos!-SM' eases in the atoms atoms-phere
phere atoms-phere has. been, obtained for tht
ftrst time The;, repeated ascents
iHte oy xne same animals havi
..wae4.possanito'btain data 'y
bout the adaptafeiiity of animals
to flights in rockets."
The native home of the i
lemon tree is thought to hav
been in north-western India.!
But it has been 'grown through
out southern Asia and in Asia
Minor for centuries. During
the 12th century it was intro introduced
duced introduced into Europe by th
Arabs. Now it is grown in all
warm countries from Rhodesia
in South Africa to- Calif ornia.J
Nikita, Governors
Chat Oh Nicies
MOSCOW, July 7 (UPD-j;
ler Nikita S. Khrushchevtoday
discussed Soviet American rela rela-tions
tions rela-tions with seven American govern,
ors on tour of the Soviet Union.
The meeting took place in tht
Kremlin.
mi
FACT
ine tirst screw-driven
(steam) naval ship in the
world was built for the United
States Navy in 1844. The ship,
the USS Princeton, was
equipped with sails, because
the steam plant was not meant,
for full-time use. About the
same time the Navy got its
first iron vessel, the USS Mich Michigan,
igan, Michigan, which remained in serv service
ice service for almost 100 years until
1942 when it was scrapped.
Incyctopedl Britannic :
THURSDAY
VICTOR ANNE
MATURE AUBREY
ANTHONY NEWIEY.
"THE
BANDIT Oil
ZUOBE"

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