The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03052

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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THE CITY OF THE
: VICEROYS .. s r
CANADIAN WHISKY:
' iMTIftM T ION i WXV :
Let the people know the truth and the country is safe90 Abraham Lincoln

h. y ....... jmi j.

-axa YO. fc

: I

- -

9

34th TEAK-J i
$ sifts Survivors .Her

Afew Schools, Housing, Bridge

Hobs In Coming PC Contracts
work on the Balboa highJevet bridge to such comparatively minor item as
inland fencing jobs, many or. millions are to be spent this fiscal year on tonstrucfon
MdTiS:t' that major among these be
contraH superstructure of the brid ge, for cohstruct.on of ne housmg and for
three new Pacific side-schools. f pr0jects,
Aside from actual instruction work, planning oi", have re.
some for this fiscal year, other, for the following year, Three 'TShidh I. a
cerTtV been negotiated for projects scheduled for the near future, each of wh.ch
bit out of the usuar run.of.the.mill work.

The three design contracts cover
preparing a report and recom recommendations
mendations recommendations for the control of cor corrosion
rosion corrosion on gome of the Canal's larg largest
est largest metal structures' air condi conditioning
tioning conditioning of several large office
buildings, and an electronic sys system
tem system to relay rain and flood-stage
data from, field stations to a cen central;
tral; central; location.
A company which its president
William H. D. Hinchman, calls
"electrochemical detectives," has
been retained to study what
means of corrosion control may
be effective in the Canal Zone.
The company is the Hinchman
Corporation of Detroit, leaders, m
the field of corrosion .c 0 ntr ol
Hinchman, the corporations presi president,
dent, president, 'and J. D, Chesquierey vice
president in charge of -engineering,
spent several days here 4?t
month 'at the-twrKrthe- study con-
iraci was awarueu.,": -.
iThfr. .study will' 'be concentrated
on the largest .mtal tructures in
ttie Canal Zone the locks and the
tank farms and what can be done
to protect them from the corrod corroding
ing corroding effects of salt water and mois moisture.
ture. moisture. The. engineer will also look
into the problem' ptarrosion on
underground and ; inderwater fa facilities,
cilities, facilities, such :as .table comuniea comuniea-tions.
tions. comuniea-tions. :
A preliminary report of the study
on the locks is due days after
the work begins; the study on the
tank farms will not be completed
for six months. . ',7. """"'f
A likely solution f to the Canal
Zone's corrosion- problem is ca ca-thodic
thodic ca-thodic protection. ;, This ;. involves
the sacrifice rf pnca metal 'to.prci-'
tect another from corrosion ; due
to stray electric currents. Ity3s
likenpH rppentlv -bv Coronet Mag
azine to the practice of villafiers
in
a tiger'infesteti country staKing
out a goat to satisfy the tiger's
appetite and divert his attention
from thft village j children
and
Jn addition to me design
consultant servTceS offered by the

0
! J5 )4 1;
:v: x-:':: : v:i: '.:-N':::y:sv::Ko4-w 3
iip::m:::''' r'i
f I I ;1

S 1
;. J 4
' -i ...
..

; A LETTER of commendatioB frem Gov. W. E. Potter h presented
I to James Green, nwsseneei? in the Balboa Retail Ktore. by L. A.

h Ferguson, Supply and Community

follow workers. The letter commended Green on his action May 26

. when he carried Mrs.' Gertrude Connard, left,: Commissary super super-visor,
visor, super-visor, out of the building to the First Aid station after she had beett
overcome with ammonia fumes, which had ea sucked, in. through
thaii!.eondUonjnael;.r.-'S7"'

Hinchman Corporation

install corrosion conttoistne
company also operates a
in Detroit where it offers four four-week
week four-week courses in catholic protec
tion. The Panama Canal compa company's
ny's company's Engineering and Construction
Bureau plans to send two engi engineers
neers engineers to take this course later
ditioning systems for. several of
the large office ouuaings m i
Canal Zone was discussed with the
. : ti rf u T. Duffer ana
Associates, the firni which design
ed the air conditioning system i
the Administration BuiWing ai
Balboa Heights,; s
thf design
r Anto air rnnniLiuiuiiK w
for four buildings in Ancon and m m-J...U...1
J...U...1 m-J...U...1 ...twio 'Cm fnrpA fltiier
riiviminl vsterti8 for three
large- bufldings..:. I
To be air conditioned from tut
central .unit are tne two
BuQdings formerly -eceindM wr
the Anton -commissary.iHe ouw
- kmiBtntf thB t Treasury
Branch and the Ancon Dental
Clinic,- and the building w n l e n
was formerly tne ancon emu
house and 1 snow occupied by the
Payroll Branch. :....
The system wouia De liwiaueu
over a, two-year penoa. ine ray ray-.nii
.nii ray-.nii 'Rpartrh in scheduled for air
conditioning this year; the others
would not be air conditioned until
fiscal year 1961.
VW Athor nffio hiiildines to be
1 u- --
air-conditioned are the office of the
finnniv nivisinn in the Balboa In
dustrial Area, the Coco Solo re retail
tail retail store, and the Cristobal Ter
minal building.
In addition to the air condition-
ing, the PayroU and Treasury
Branch Buildings ana me vrim-
mai Terminal rmuumg i v
dropped ceilings ano nuores.,
lights.
Another design contract, al
Ohough not a new one, is that for
'the telemetering of rainfall
auu
Services director in a ceremony

.J.

i Hata frrnn stations in the
ji nivtn tfha Central Hv-
11C1U uucvu; w
drocraohic Office, is being design
ed by Gibbs and Hill, tne new
York firm which' recently co,m co,m-nifai
nifai co,m-nifai tho Hpsipn of a micro-
ViCiwi m.w
.nmmnnicatjons svstem to
supplement telephone cable .com .communication
munication .communication across the Isthmus.
n.. Ait, nhtnineit thondh the te-
lemetering will be coordinated m
a central office to insure more ei ei-ficient
ficient ei-ficient control over flood-control
facilities such as those at Madden
and Gatun Dams. The reservoirs
can be controlled to provide tne
maximum abount of water for
shipping and for hydroelectric. p.o-
wer
Thieved Tokr, Best
.. . .n, ........ ... at.i...
'"tONDOrf (Un)-WcTteritratifft
. 1 .... LL.J K,ti fUnn nr I..
45,dbb worth for furs
ft t
inieves rouueu mayiw w
45,000 worth for furs yesterday
Policy said they spent three hours
in the shop,, separating the-...mink
frnm thi sauirrel and leavinK the
less valuable furs oenina.

SISTER DIES The sister of these three children died from burns resulting from the fire which
brofre out aboard the Rio Atrato after the explosion. Being held by members of the crew on Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal docks are America, 4,' Soledad, 6; and Eulogio, 7. They are the children of Mrs. Sara Herrera
Mafia, one of the.survivors who arrived at Cristobal early Saturday morning.

Zonians Reminded
Of July Schedule
For Dog Licensing
ranal Tons residents were again
reminded this weekend that the
time for the annual anu-rame in inoculations
oculations inoculations and licensing of their
ht arrivPfT All dflCs OVer
1 MW&W
orro a rvitT mnntriR must DC
wjw, 6 wx
vaccinated and licensed, a ree
$2 is charged.
&hnu1H hrine their
pets,, on a eash, to the following
locauons:
Monday, North Margarita School
Thursday. Shower Room. Mount
Hope Stadium.
'Friday Coco Solo Elementwy
School. :
Monday, July l&r-Gatun File
Station. 1 v i.y-.
Thursday. July 1-Gamboa Aids
to Navigation Building. 1 ;
Friday, July 17 Paraiso Seoul
Shack. ' '(
: Monday, July 20. and Thursday,
July 23 Balboa High School porte
cochere. t
On the Atlantic side, the hours
will be 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2:30
to 4:30 p.m. V:';.
At tne Pacific side stations, tne
hours will be 10 i.m, to 1 p.m.
and I U I ,., ;

PANAMA, R. P., SUNDAY JULY 5, 1959

s t

GRIMACES WITH PAIN Oreste Howard, 'master of the ill-fated
Colombian, freighter Rio Atrato grimace from the pain of bis wounds
as he waslieing helped down the gangplank of the German vessel
Essen, which picked vup the survivors Howard suffered from in internal
ternal internal injuries nd burns on his lower abdomen, (Foto Mendoza)

800 View Balboa Parade,
tops Report Quiet Fourth

o
FORT MCHENRY, Md., July 4
f TTPfi America's new 49 star
flag "was unfurled before dawn's
early light today in impressive
ceremonies at the mrtn-piace 01
the "Ster Spangled Banner."
At precisely the same moment,
12:01 a.m., a 49-star banner was
hoisted to the top of a flagpole on
the west front of the U.S. capitol
overlooking the lights of Washing
ton.
Interior Secretary Fred, seaton
raised at Fort McHenry the new
Old Glory, with an added star tor
Alaska, while the Marine band
played the national anthem. Fire Fireworks
works Fireworks served as the modern equi equivalent
valent equivalent 'of the "rockets jed glare"
and Army-Navy units re-enacted
the British; bombardment of the
War of 1812.
Onlv a handful of newsmen, pho
tographers, capitol policemen and
laborers and about 150 tourists
watdhed the flag raising at the
capitol. ;;'".. ..' -" j ;
On the Isthmus the new 49-star
banner was formally introduced
yesterday morning by Lt. Gen.
Ridgely Galther, commander in
chief. Caribbean Command, during
impressive ceremonies at Quarry
l-Heichts. ..
a large erewa wee ea naoo wr

the program, which featured a 21-

ciin snlutp hpirvrf tne new nan
was raised to full mast, uaiiner
aHdrPsaed the trrouD before a
grouDins of flaes-from each of.
the 49 states, arranged accord according
ing according to their entry date in the U-
nion.
At noon yesterday, for the first
time, a 49-gun salute was fired at
Fort Amador oy a oattery oi mo
4th Gun Battalion.
Patriotic programs started
Fourth of July celebrations on
both sides of the Isthmus. Canal
Zone Gov. W. E. Potter was guest
speaker at an early program at
the Coco Solo elementary school.
then moved to the South Margari
ta School for another. Parades
preceded both, appearances.
Crowds stimattd at hiort than
800 thronged into tho area of
tho Balboo Sorvico Contor to
vlw parade of military, ve veterans
terans veterans organisations and Scouts.
At noon, patriotic program,
followed by lunch and base base-ball
ball base-ball game, was hold at tho A A-morican
morican A-morican Log Ion Club at Fort A A-mador..Tho
mador..Tho A-mador..Tho 79m Army band
provided musle, and Judge Outh Outh-rle
rle Outh-rle F. Crew was the featured

39 In Coco Solo

Corozal Immigration Station

Thirty-nine survivors of the greatest of sailors terrors-fire at ea
are in Coco Solo Hospital or the Corozal immigration station today
Seven, and perhapsv.more of their fellow voyagers are feared to hav
died in the Caribbean. n
Several of the castaways have relatives from the islands of San An Andres
dres Andres and Old Providence living and working on the Canal Zone and in
Panama.
The trim German freighter Essen, commanded by rescue hero Capt. Theodor
Busch, brought the 39 survivers of the Colombian vessel Rj0 Atrato to Cristobal
early yesterday morning after having plucked them from in the storm-torn Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean about 200 miles northeast of Cristobal in one of the luckiest rescues in mod.
em maritime history. 1
The 500-ton Rio Atrato, en route from Cartagena to San Andres and Old Provi Providence
dence Providence with at least 46 passengers and trew qboard, caught fire following an explo explosion
sion explosion in a bulk-gasoline hold Thursday afternoon, and finally blew up and sank be before
fore before dawn Friday.
The first blast destroyed her radio installation, leaving no means to call for help.
Had it not been for sharp-eyed Busch on the bridge of the Essen, all 46 would
have vanished without trace.
Nineteen survivors were taken direct to Coco Solo hospital when the Essen dock docked
ed docked m Cristobal. None of them was in serious condition: Minor burns and exposure
were the mam trouble. One of those hospitalized was discharged yesterday

u b- a. s l r 'V.exPcrea
KB the Kin Afrnt-n curviunrc Unr-V rl .k: MLr

believed toiiave becom a Victim bf sharks; The Infant's
sister Were saved.

Weather conditions in
least six men unaccounted
and headed for Cristobal.
The frigate relieved the
urday morning. The Cibbins
The Essen transited the
les and San Francisco.
Waiting at Cristobal Pier 8 when
the trim Essen arrived at 12:40
a.m. were all available Coco Solo
ambulances three and two cars.
Official confirmation of passeng passenger
er passenger and crew manifests is still lack
ing but 18 crew members and 21
passengers were confirmed as be being
ing being among the survivors.
Capt. Orestes Howard, suffering
abdominal burns and severe shock
was not clear as to whether 46 or
49 persons were aboard his ship
wnen the converted U.S. Navy
LCI put to sea '2 a.m. Wednesday.
Thus at least five and possibly
eight persons are feared to have
been lost in stormy, shark-ridacn
seas or aboard the flaming 150-
foot steel vessel.
Although the rescue effort was
a coordinated effort between tne
fast turbine-driven Essen and Can-!
al Zone Naval and Air Force au
thorities. Caot. Theodore Busch
the 6100-ton Hamburg America
Line cargo ship was the hero of
the day.
Busch's radio message alerted
the Navy's transport Henry Gib-
bins, Puerto Rico bound some 12
hours steaming norm of tne dis
aster scene.
This was late Thursday niht.
The Gibbins Immediately radioed
15th Naval District tieaaquaners
here setting In motion emergency
search action.
Within an hour and a Halt of
notification at Albrook AFB,
Capt. Edward Pierson and a
soarch mission crow roared off
tho runway In a C-54. Equipped
with flarot and directed by the
still distant Gibbins tho four-en-
glnod piano was over 'tho soarch
area by 3:40 a.m. Friday.
But the. miraculous had happen happened
ed happened more than seven hours before.
Busch, a hearty veteran ot 44
years at sea. was on the bridge
of the Esseii Thursday night.
His shin, doins 17 knots, was ex
actly on schedule and exactly on
course squarely in the major
shipping lane between Puerto Ri
co and tne Manama uanai wnen
at 8:30 he spotted a yellow gtsre
reflected above the horizon off
the starboard bow. The reflected
light was about 10 miles off.
"I have nover known open tiro
t sea without a yellowtih cast
to tho rof loctod light," Busch
said, "and I altered course im immediately."
mediately." immediately." "We reached the area in about
35 minutes. The ship (Rio Atra Atrato)
to) Atrato) was an inferno, the starboard
bow almost awash in heavy seas.
She was listing badly."
The Essen's log showed its one
powered lifeboat was in the water
within 40 minutes of arrival an

the Rio Atrato. Another half hourHoward tried to reconstruct (he

later the first IS survivors taken
Lfrom t lubbet lifexait fere be-

the area are so bad that hope
for. The Admlrante Padilla

MSTS vessel Henry Cibbins at the site of the disaster Sat
resumed its voyage to San Juan, Puerto Rico
Canal yesterday, 0n its voyage from Antwerp to Los Anee
"

ing helped aboard the German
freighter.
A second lifeboat mission found
eight more survivors crammed in
the stricken- Rio Atrato's ship's on
ly small, powerless boat.
Lifeboat Mission III drew a
blank and returned to the Esien
for a fresh crew. Meanwhile a sur
vivor aboard the rescue ship said
there might be someone still a-
board the flaming Rio Atrato
Thoro was.; The fourth lifeboat
mission found a woman, three
small children and a man clutch
ing tho high rails. Tho hysteric hysterical
al hysterical woman, Sara Herrera de Ma Mafia,
fia, Mafia, whoso 18-month-old daugh daughter
ter daughter Angela died in tho initial ex explosion,
plosion, explosion, had to bo forcibly re removed
moved removed from tho burning vossel.
By 1 a.m. Friday 28 had been
accounted for.
While Pierson was trying to es establish
tablish establish the disaster position via
the Gibbins' radio the Essen and
Pierson s c-54 carried no raaio
frequencies in common the Rio
Atrato went to the bottom at 8-30
a.m. Friday,
Although a night search patten)
was impossible with the radio fa
cilities availables the C-54 circled
the assigned area dropping scat-
icreq wares.
At daybreak, despite high run running
ning running seas, poor visibility and
strong surface winds, Pierson be began
gan began a systematic pattern search
of a 30 by 30 mile area at altitude
ranging between 300 and 100 fest.
Dye-markers pinpointed sighted
debris, or anything that might
bo a survivor.
During tho first five hours of
' daylight tho Essen, guided to tho
markers by tho noaring Gibbins'
radio, picked 11 mere survivors,
mosr,"y Rio Atrato craw mam mam-bar,
bar, mam-bar, from the open tea.
These were the last to be found.
despite the Gibbins' arrival at 10
a.m. and continued air and sea
search until dark Friday night.
After eight hours aloft un.lor
rugged conditions, the C-54 head
ed bacK, landing at AiDrooK ai
11:16 yesterday.
By noon a fresh crew, com
manded by Capt George Mielke,
was on its way back in the same
plane to carry on the fruitless
search, in conjunction with the
Gibbins, until dark.
Meanwhile the Colombian Na Navy
vy Navy frigate Almirante Padilla,
dispatched from Cartagena,
reached the search area late
Friday. It stood by last night and
took evr tho search yesterday
morning as the Gibbins resum.
od course for Puerto Rico.
Helped ashore among the sur
vivors, dazed 37-year-oid capt,
first terrifying minute of hiiord
deal, u

TEN CENTS

HospifaL

ro reach tnstpba today to
- wl ... 7
r -"wnc.ui.
mother, twa brothers and "on
has been abandoned for at
V "r
There was no warning when at
approximately 4:3f) n m Thnrcl,.
the Rio Atrato's amidships hold.
uum-iuaueo. witn zz,300 gallons of
gasoline, exploded, opening the
steel hull.
The blast and immediate fire
were iust below the radio room,
so any chance for an SOS was
lost before the first alar mwas
sounded. ,:
The four-hnur niohtmaro ,Mt
followed could not be accurately
lecunsiruciea. in equipped witn
survival equipment not a single)
life jacket was found on the res rescued
cued rescued persons already listing and
aflame, the dnnmcH Rfn Ataf.
Was wracked hv at lo
more explosions during those
nours.
Dry cargo, 350 tons of It, be began
gan began taking fire, many were al already
ready already Injured, and tho Atrato
was being battered by heavy
seas. No one could recall fust
when the first group was put ov
er the side. Presumably it was
15 persons, mostly passengers,
in a large rubber life raft.
Five rrpw inuA
.. ........ clo pii.acu uo
Friday morning had no other sup.
'port but the packing case to whica
they clung for many hours. Oth.'
i crew members were found one
by one that morning in the open
sea. . :
The smoothness with which -everything
took place upon the 'Ee 'Ee-sen's
sen's 'Ee-sen's arrival was due in large part
tothe efforts of the German ship's
Cristobal agent, Hans J. lilies' of
Continental ShlnniW onj n.-.t
Zone authorities. ... i
, lilies, lacking official diplomitle:
instructions via Bogota, assumed
full reSDonsihilitv f,r th
survivors, while Canal Zone im.
migration provided immediate;
clearance for the Colombians.
uavia t. Mcllhenny, Ad mini,
trator of Coco Solo Hospital
provided waiting ambulances,
cars. Dr. Joseph A. Johongen
and medical attendants. -Jose
Antnnin Onaria nuii ha
stened Cnlnmhian
was at dockside with lilies,;, but
reponea yesterday he had not yet
received instructions from kit,
government. ;
Boozv Theft :
,LjyfcPOOl. England. July
(UPI;-The whiff of tho whiskey
was irresistible and tt was sht
cases strong. 4
So 34-year-old workman Fran
Mis Mahonoy decided to replace
tho whiskey bottles with ahr.
Today ho was remanded est
bail until July 10 for stealing
$327.40 worth of booze.
Police said he made stato
ment admitting the theft ens
ethers Walla tJtiuif

'1

1 t J

'1 f



. SUNDAY JULY S.; 1359

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN

"THE PANAMA AMERICAN

HARMODIO AHIAS, EDITOR
i 13-37 H Street P. O Box 134. Panama. B. of r.
TCLlRHON 2-0740 S LINE.! ;
llUFIICkN. PANAMA

CABLE 11TH STRCETB

AVENUE BtlWtEl ...r.

H POWERS. I-

' ... fo I7fi CENTRAL

34S WADISOW AVE.. NEW YORK M7) N. Y.
- LOrAl
iiPtu Month in Advance Vi.

. ... . inutMfF

mix rwutino in

( Fc Osr Year in Advance-

is 90

V MAIL
f 2 SO
13 OO
(4 00

' TttjYOUR POBUM THI REAPERS OWN COLUMN

en forum for reader or IN """"

Uttfrt -r

Ml 4n. Ulrm at published in the order racalyai
i SPIoaw trt to keep foe lerrert limited to one ease length.

i SWentit of letter writers It held In strictest eonriaenc.. -:-PZZJ3
assumes ..0 responsibility for statement, or opinions

recetrea grareruiiy ...

letter don't be impatient if it doesn't appear the

ppFretstd in letters from reader.
T H E MAIL BOX

DECKHANDS WORKING CONDITIONS

Ruarkous
Comments

Blackout

.. .. tt- i ; u p in q m i r.nnal

In connection with the recent trainc jam m

, Kt tl- tlra n it Tjiaceu UUWI wie

papers naa a m t.h.tlovat arouc of lo-

,0t IOrce. LOnSpitUOUSiy leas wa "'u ---

eal-nten called deckhands. ...

The deckhands, too, were woriung iuuuu v-.. --- --

i fcrts to keep Canal traffic flowing they, were geuing
hmirs sWn a Ilieht.

w ,. -r last month nut aiSO 111

! ixnr on v at such rusn umes uaui. .- --- :,,
: Xm Smcs deckhands work all holidays, and sometimes remain
: S&ci&u'sss. sm srWw2

home unci return iaicr, ur iu -
schedule The deckhands get no such consideration
Ga gs which check in ,s late as 10 a.m S
i ,inn ,.t nut mi shirjs which are alreadv in oattm wiKe,

ntch the earlv tram bacK nomc.

and complete their transi in f"r, 1s tn make the

The best the earlier-cnecKen gaim Lrt.. ,v. needed

&e;"sthmus

Int elcht hours, finally reaching can..,, ... "'f-

hpin at 2 a.m. with the duty of reporting to wor o.ou u. .....

morning

but are sent to work when

c, nri mnVP this 6:30 a.m. check-in lust tor love oi

.ii i U tf nn ri m P

monev. utners fan i maw u.. .....v.

orlurMe Ter" in men 'akinP advanta.e of this a a-tSffSL
tSffSL a-tSffSL their turn delihteW on Sund. f .r-
.S-ffo mane t "tn sS and tj tj-,14
,14 tj-,14 Ch as from the Lake to Balho. or they come out at night to
shuttle-two shins in thp scribed

rnus me men wn l.,,,..- . ....nturi.

hems?lves P,P ,vr ..

of fr'pnris alle-'irip mai "-

ntW pnnfrivn tn conn ti--m--

manner, find

T have heard snme

i 1 .,

two checker wno snm ';'',,, nwiPe as

lHM..

prp aro snnr 1T1

on ship making r fast trnt. I nave no rersoni
" V, T .u... j. i.tv, in th c lint i do Vnnw th

nH thp rhpckin- ,u of

ll 4PMnll

By ROBERT C. RUARK
I ufitice we have been overrun
by ants again, and the birds got
ail the cherries, and, innocent
that I am, 1 had a large chunk

bitten out ol my tinumb oy a e-

ry large Iiiarc wham tne aogs
had cornered and whom I was
endeavoring to helo get over a

wall. The one of the uogs bit me
for helping the lizard. A low-flying
songbird also decorated the

brow of my iatner-in-taif, as saiu
parent amiably sipped his matu matutinal
tinal matutinal mint julep in the garden.
This is not opinion. This is sta statistic.
tistic. statistic. The animals are going to
take over gain, as sure as you're
born. If Uteres anything left aft after
er after the big blast, it won't be wear wearing
ing wearing a slim-line suit and carrying
a brief case It'll' be wriggling,
hopping, crawling, flying, leaping

or slinking, ana it wiu never nave
heard of either Khrushchev or
Jack Paar.
Consider recent incidents of ani

mal, activity. Just the other day

a bear was shot wandering narm
1p'v nunr dear, around Balti

more, an aimless activity, at
best. All the forces of humanity
harnessed1 themselves against tht
bruin, which had obviously excap excap-ed
ed excap-ed from & Senate hearing in
Washington. They used police
dogs (the K-9 Corps) and expend expended
ed expended 100 rounds of ammunition o
exterminate an animal which
most nearly resembles man with
his fur off. Some police force.
Consider the poor alligator
which was found swimming in
Nes'iamtny Creek, outside of
Langhorne, Pa. It's a free coun country
try country and nobody thinks anything
about a 'gator in Florida, but this
on? came north in search of inte integration,
gration, integration, and so Police Sergeant
Gilbert Custer mowed it down
with a rifle. Democracy? Pfui!
An invas'ion of large snapping
turtles recently invaded Norwalk,
Conn., and. anxious suburbanite
mnthpr affain called the police

fearing that their monstrous chil chil-rirpn
rirpn chil-rirpn m isht be consumed by the

monstrous turtles.

As a naturalist, let me hasten

to assure the anxious moms that
no self-resDectins turtl? would eat

a commuter's child. It is rather
the other way round. What actual

ly has haDDened is that there is a

decline in the shkunk pooulation

of Connecticut, and skunks eat
turtle eggs. Hence, less skunks,

more turtles. Selah.

V POLITICAL COVERAGE
iWy lip

.I. iitiiMiiiimmp j'TTH r "in ii i 11 ryiirw'r-r'irr-f-'-m irrinvr- rn" m
WSSSB

Half a Column More or Les s Now and Then

by CREDE CALHOUN

A GREAT IRISH WRITER

are.

Sir

X.fJOO.OOO To 1 Srft)T

...... -d 901 hits th nail on the nad

' Feconsinewiion man du. uu..c j.finn
when heCsayr I have been exposed to somed of edueatin

tranKiy ia "i.ui ue ,;Mt tv,p rB1TtiHon pofc'iit'

remark he rrarl. anom n. .

;S r rboth inside and outsider anll Tave
1, to the r average reader to make up his own f

into tm-' piciupe anywneir.
iT mv opinion that everj' person should place his co co-vou're
vou're co-vou're a young Gringo, the draft board m 1 do this f.
Next important is the sanctitv of human life.
Anv v ''Reconsideration" and 1 have this much m
odds are abou the same against our government im

cOmmon-

imnlpmentinB

dream, dream, ine suujeci is

Ginger Know All.

DAILY MEDITATION

(Presented by the Department
of Christian Education of the
Episcopal Church in the
sionary Diocese of the Pana Panama
ma Panama Canal Zone.)
SUCH GOOD THINGS
"And in his mountain shall
the Lord of hosts make unto
.11 I- f.nst

II tu.
Tho Hnlv Communion is the

fitiUment of these an-

i, and has a plan

V. u-,r)t nt i the past. It

ll rent"" m
j ,y,f man today, ine

God will destroy the veil that
is spread over the nations. The
Holy Communion strips away our
pretenses. At the same time it
monifpsts us the love of God

in Christ.
God will wipe away all tears.
He is the source of joy and glad gladness
ness gladness Another name for this serv:
ice if 'he Eucharist, Thanksgiv Thanksgiving.
ing. Thanksgiving. It tells how Christ transform transformed
ed transformed shame and defeat into victory,
may do the same.
"0 God, who hast prepared for
thnse who love thee such good

Includes cverVnmWmorate things as pass man's understand understand-Holy
Holy understand-Holy Communion commemorate, iz

tne shvuik ----- ..
God is a stronghnld to the

..dv. In this service w ""

i". j..i.,nor(DH pnpour-

re ted. tne v ol,
i?ed This is His Invitation to all
X travail and are heavy laden.

kvc tnwirH thee that we, loving

thee above all things, may obtain
thv promises, which exceed all
that we can desire; through Je Jesus
sus Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen."

DesDite the fact that I have

heen hitten bv everything from

mosquitoes to a chipmunK l once

tried to release from a steel

trap, I am with the animals all
the way. Dammit, they were here
first, but now the .suburbs keep
creeping aTOierf ffnt farther tn tn-to
to tn-to the ptfy4a, encrojchi
on the animaV lerritory.
Deer have surpassed rabbits In
breeding in Westchester, where
once you saw only the mink on

jthe back, of Die banker's bride.

It s getuna 05 wnere it isn i sate

to go to a P I A meeting any
more, for fear of running head-

on into a rutting buck. Turn your
back for a second and deer have

consumed the zinnias. The citi

zens are clamoring to take un
arms against the deer, but when
everv Westchesterite is armed.

the slaughter among the slaughter

amnne tho citazenrv will be tern

ble, and I bet you. the deer will

inherit.
I also read recently where an
eagle stole a baby, and where a
family on Long Island is being
driven daft by seagulls that fly
over their house and drop clams
on the roof. Presumably it is to

break the clamshells, but you

can't kid me. Those gulls just
don't like those people, because
there are plenty of other hard
surfaces around.
In the long run I don't give peo people
ple people even a little chance. I know
a guy who got concussion of the
brain from a caterpillar. It drop dropped
ped dropped into his shirt and he fell and

prapltpH his heat1 in his panic to

remove the furrv presenct. An

other pioneer fell into a camp camp-fire
fire camp-fire and sustained second-degree
burns when i gnat few into his
ear. Ducks have downed B-47s,
and seagulls have ever been the
bane of off-taking fighter planes.

Right now I want to be record recorded
ed recorded as siding with the animals
ana birds and bugs. In all these
. i i U 1

years, tney aiont nave ueen auic
to teach humans humility, and
if you don't believe it, Cobber,
just sav one word in the vicinity
of Svdney, Australia. The word

Ireland has produced a number
of great writers, especially of the
drama, including Bernard Shaw,
Oscar Wilde, J M. Singe, Wil William
liam William Butler Yeats and last but
not least Sean O'Casey. Brooks
Atkinson, erudite head of the
drama department of the New
York Times, says that no living

persons today writes English well
as O'Casey.

He is known best as a drama

tist. One of his best plays June

and the Paycock has been turned
into a musical comedy and is run running
ning running in New York. His plays have

not always been financially suc suc-ppasfnl
ppasfnl suc-ppasfnl in New York, but that

ttoesndt mWstoeheir quality.

leajtiO'CehM written hi?
DioBraDfiy. in the third person,

and with a good mixture of poetry

and drama, and beauty that is a
comnliment to the English lan

guage, NOW it has run into nve
volumeiCThey are "I Knock at
the Door," 'Pictures in the
Hallway," "Drums Under the Wil Willows,"
lows," Willows," "The Rose and Crown,"
and "Innisfallen Fare Thee
Well.'
O'Casey made his first trip to
the United States for the produc production
tion production iof nisi. lay "Within the
Gates." The Abbey Theatre had
refused to produce "The Silver
Tasse." after getting his pro

mise before the may was written
to let the Abbev have it. At what
time William Buttler Yates' letter
giving the reasons for rejecting
the nlav. was published in an

Irish periodical
Yeats threatened a suit against

the editor for publishing the. let

ter without his permission "Whit "Whit-in
in "Whit-in the Gates" had a good run and
reception in New York but it was
banned by, the censors in blue blue-nosed
nosed blue-nosed Boston. One of the objection
was to the character of a street
walker. The censors- preferred to
pretend that such women did r.ot
exist, to finding out why they
are that way and trying to do

something about it.
Now I am going to republish
some O'Casey letters from

TIMES TALK, house organ of the

New York Times, without permis permission
sion permission .and hope that no suit will
follow. Clara Rotter is secretary
of the drama department of the
Times, and when a pice of O' O'-Casey's
Casey's O'-Casey's was printed in The
Times, she mailed it to him, say saying
ing saying how much she enjoyed it and
that she expected no answer.
A letter came from O'Casey to
"Dear Claire" instead of Clara.

"Thank you very much for the
copies of the article. I'm very
glad you thought well of it, for I
was in dread of reading it over

when it came, so much so that I
left it lying lonely for a day be

fore I ventured to give it tne
caress of a reading. One so often
finds foolishness staring out of
what one has written a little while
before.
"I'd like two more copies for
friends who have asked me to let
them read the article God for-

ve my vanity for complying!

if the sending be not too much
trouble.

"Thanks for the second time,
and love for the first for you.
"Yours very sincerely.

"SEAN O'CASEY.'

In September, 1957, she mailed
him two nieces by Brooks Atkin Atkinson
son Atkinson in which the playwright had
been mentioned. She told him in
a note to take good care of him himself.
self. himself. It brought this reply:
"My dear Clara:
"Thanks, dear, for your kind-

ness in sending me Mr. aikui-

son's articles.
"Brooks is a very dear friend
of mine but far more important,
he is a damned fine Drama Critic.
Mav he he long spared to The
New York Times, to the Theatre
and to all of pS Temple of pray prayer
er prayer and loud laughter.
"I urn. in a wy, taking care of
mySe1fby a lot n? work to keen
myself from thirik'iff too much
about my own afflictions; merg merging
ing merging them away into the concerns
nf o'hers

"Keep well yourself, and as far

away as you can trom a irouoieu.

heart: for a troubled heart doesn't

go a long way, ana a iignt Heart

is best for the long day's journey

into night or, as 1 should phrase
it the long day's journey into an

other day.

"All good wishes and thanks

again.

Your very sincerely,
"SEAN O'CASEY."

When New York theatre folk

assembled to pay tribute to Mr.
Atkinson in Sardi's last March,
Clara thoughtfully mailed Mr. O' O'Casey
Casey O'Casey a copy of the mock Drama
Section front page that the de

partment put. together for the oc occasion.
casion. occasion. It brought! tWs reply;
"My deaf lass, M
'T11ffc for the
NewYf1eirS,Biaoh on my
dear friend, Brooks Atkinson I

had not known before that the

lactao naa gone tnro's so many
jungles and deserts, and climbed

so mpy iuustn.$uiet man is
not qui'te'sd ijuiet as I thought
him. Be he is shy. I knew, of

course, he had been in Moscow
and China; but didn't realize
how long and torturous some of

the journeys were. God be thank

ed, he's safe home from them all.

for his tunic is not the tunic of

the traveller, but the alb of the

Theatre.

"Please remember me to Mur

ray Schumach and tell him I stii:

enjoy a smoke from the pipe he

gave me.

"My thanks, Clara, and my af

fectionate regards.

"As ever,
SEAN."

AGGRAVATED

ASSAULT

13

FORCIBLE
RAPE
11

CRIME IN AMERICA

PER CENT CHANGE IN CITIES
OVER 25,000 JAN., FEB., MAR.,
1959, COMPARED TO SAME
PERIOD LAST YEAR.

LARCENY
OVER
BURGLARY $50
1 1

1958 LEVEL

-3
MURDER

AUTO
THEFT

TOTAL

CRIME

TOTAL DOWN LESS THAN 1

-8
ROBBERY

Shark.

THE SAVINGS BANK
Institution Guaranteed by tie Stalf
Pays 2 Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
We make loans with guarantees on first mortgages
or other securities

railTIOUS OPTIMISM Crime statistics Just rrlrasert ny ine
S6TO?"?i,?.in drop" in tmivikr and robberies

Tri th firat three months ot 1859. Bui assault and rape
were oXS .e nd tho nation's overall "U showed
miIv alight dacrease-less than one per cnt-S competed
Sh !h. tft JS ol 195B. Chart above list, the record ot

iwKaajor crimes w wur ;.,.

In ancient times the moon
was worshiped as a goddess
who ruled the night. The old
moon was (believed to have a
bad Influence, while the new
moon was conildercd favor favorable
able favorable for atl kinds of under undertakings.
takings. undertakings. Crocs were planted at

new moon so that they might
draw strengthfrom the grow growing
ing growing moon. Mothers often cut
their little girls' hair at new
moon in art effort to make it
grow long and thick.
6 Eaej$l4lft rttannlo J

25c. 50c. $1.00 and $5.(

CHRISTMAS SAVING
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks
Individual safety deposit boxw, for jewelry and
documents, In 4 different sizes.

The most recent exchange oc occurred
curred occurred last month when Clara
clipped from the drama section a
niece about Paul Shyre's new
Brordway production of a O'Ca
sey's "The Shadow of a Gun Gunman,"
man," Gunman," and a one-column cut of
the playwright wearing a beret.
On Oct. 14, Mr. O'Casey took
up his pen again:

"Dear Clara,
"Thank you very much for
sending me the Press-Clipoings,
with the photo in the N. Y. T.
showing me in the Britans Beret
Paul Shyre gave me. I've only to
nut a tassel pompom on thevtop

to make it a Connemara Cap.

As for preserving my energy,
the one way do this, it seems to
me, is to use it till it's all gone,
and T ankgone, too.
"All thanksantUcordial good
wishes.
MiEAN."
Clara stores the O'Casey let letters
ters letters in their pale blue envelopes
in a hidden corner of her desk:
shows them only rarely, and nev never
er never outside The Times family
She handles them with awe and
with reverence.
Any reader who enjoys good
writing and drama can find 0'-

Casey's plays and his biograohv

it the Canal Zone library. I don't
know which should be read first,
if vou read the plays first you
will enjoy the biography more,
but that advice also works in re
verse.

OFFICE IN PANAMA
109 Central Ave. at
eortier of "I" Street
fl. A. De ROUX,
Manager

COLON BRANCH:
Front St. at corner

of 7th, St.

CARLOS MOUYNES V,
8ub-Mnater

HOURS :
From 8:00 a.m. to It: SO p.m.
SATURDAYS; from : 00 am. to 12:00 neon

i y -A

am i

STAYT-HQMES, RUSTICS, ANCHORITES, the thm

.wmuj 13 wuiw aim murium, u win ag nine gooa my bsk.
ing most of you "what you are doing to see more of Panal
this long Fourt)f4iii'W0to
most of you-ls tKat trelt-from fie "TV iet-tfPike T Teehox
during the commercials, v s .,.' .j
The recently.reaptriatedf Cuban Invaders who tpwi
two months and one week In Panama two monthsjpilWl

time in jail wsaw more of the Isthmus than somelZonranf

who have spiht years here.

Jumping off point for this reverse is a statement a

couple of days ago by Panama's sharp Minister of Cover,n.

ment and Justice Jose D. Bazan. In a survey before fthx
Panama University Circle of Economic Studies Bazart neteti

that among Panama's various and persistent econemio woes

was a drop in the tourist trade.
Bazan and the professors he talked to might welt give
thought to the question Of why a tourist shou'J comeV,to
Panama at all, unless his plane Is held up with engine
trouble at Tocumen
What is Panama doing to make it worth a tourist's
while coming here? What is there to see? Who is thereto
explain it? Where's the fun?
For sheer lavish gaeity, wit and talent, Panama's niHftr
life has everything in common with the Tibetan capital. Of
Lhasa before the Red Chinese marched in. Comedians jid
even betterTn "Lhasa than Jn Panama, more yaks.
Panama City may fancy itself as a wide epe'n town,
but more conspicuously wide open are the yawning moujths

ot tne Dored tourists, as they wonder what to do next.

The government of President Ernesto de la Cuardla

Jr. has spent a goodly sum on publicity of one kind arid

another to encourage tourists to come here. But what has
been done about providing anyone to show them rouri once

they arrive?

In many other tourist cities around tha wnrlrf Ko

thorities have given special ratings to cab drivers wh6.K&y

examination, nave proved thev know enouph of the histtrV

ana legend ot those cities to give tourists a full and interest interesting
ing interesting rundown. The best rundown a cab driver gives ybu.
here is In Central Avenue, with a fender.

There are cahdnvers in Panama Citv who do not know

todav whether Old Panama was rad bv Henrv Moreran .of

Cardiff dr Cesar Veca of Havana. Pitv th tourist who has
to rely on these individuals to tell them of Panama's place
cn the Spanish Main. X (
Have any efforts been made to give tourists cause to
travel beyond Panama City (and spread their money further
through the country in the process)?
Day trips are available to the San Bias Island, and
Saguila Jim Price swings in his meetine house hammock

there at El Panama Hilton drumming up fair business in,
this regard.
But what about Columbus' harbor of Portobello?
Does any other touristseekine country. In Latin America

imrc ouv.ii a msiuiiu spui, ana just let it rot.'
Has anyone ever thought of running short safaris over f

hi mncT unmn nnrr t wainna-e ri tr rrr-n ri n t am .hii

I f -" w. avw

uwv.uci liic ravtiiib J ...... -(

The US Army has cleaned up'Ftv San Lorenzo; Hit Is

there anyone on hand there to retrace for tourists who

attacked who there, and how and when and why?
Likewise at Old Panama there is a total of detail avalL
able from qualified guides as to Where Morgan attacked
from, and how the battle went. On the subiect of battles;
I doubt you can find an individual within half a mile of 'Irie'
cathedral tower at Old Panama who does not know more
about Ingvnar Johansson's right hand than he does about
whatever right jabs and left hooks Mprpran and the Spanlsh
commander&trijar. fctjvej .traded at Old Panama the day the
treasure city fell.
Is there a shop in Panama Citv devoted to selline

souvenirs of Panama, made here by Panamanians and fnir.
rorin the nation's culture and history? That Is, apart from
the emporiums devoted to the retailing of Balboa Beer.
You can buy scarves stamped "Panama" but probably
made in Hong Kong, Ashtrays and other trinkets bear.ing
a map of flag of Panama are probably made in Y6ko!;nma.
Bateas, polleras and montuno hats can be found in some
shops, scattered around undistinguished among the mer mer-chandise.
chandise. mer-chandise. But where is' there a tourist shop where everything is
reasonably typical of Panama, and made here by Panama Panamanians,
nians, Panamanians, so 100 cents of every tourist dollar spent there
spreads through the Panamanian economy and down as far
as the campesinos who cut the straw to make the tnon.

tuno hats.

Instead, a typical souvenir of Panama is a Swiss watch

or a bottle of Continental perfume, or an intricately.carned
elephant's tusk -.

A solid effort is in progress to build a decent- tour st

hotel at Taboga. This is all to the good. Whoever Is going

to run the hotel might find it worthwhile to seek enlighten

ment ,on the pirate-rich history of that sweet Island-ir-wo
tourfst should be allowed to leave without knowing his pre.
decessors include Pizarro and-Ferdinand de Lesseps.

The Canal provides good guides at Miraflores Locks,

but how would tourists react to organized launch trios
through the Cut for instance, with equally knowlegabl.

guides?
Before MerrittXhapman opened their sculpture studio
there, how many cab drivers used to take their tourists up
on to Contractor's Hill, t? look down the funnels of ships
oasslng through the Cut? This Is just as typical and Impres.
sive a view of Canal operations as the locks.
The shiploads of tourists off cruise liners who drop In
on Cristobal from time, to time during the dry seasor are
well enough looked after for the one day they stay here.
But individually Individual .they leave a whole lot lesi
money here than atourist who stops by for a few days on
his own, or with f small group.
This. Is the tourist who brings and leaves the money.
He does not owe TPanama a living. If Panama wants his
business, Panama has to offer hirri better value for what

he spends than he can find m, lot example. Mexico, Cuba,
Jamaica or Puertrt Rico. This Is not presently the case.
Panama Is doing him no favor by letting him come
here He Is doing Panama the favor by spending his money

here Best tor tm national ouaget wen that someone makes'
sur ehe receives the courtesy and attention and value due

a guest of honor. v ;;,v
. -: L0 Mai .'
mmm tttmt fe nrrfrnLif It. i i ..

rtKWT rr.tm.tso rwn i tin i xnis ween is tne record

9925 .. ''

ocean-going vessels which transited the Canal In the

Fiscal Year which ended midnight Tuesday. I'll wager thai

aboard thew were some thousands of passengers who weur

have been content to sbend a few bucks .on properly.

guided lock around Panama; but no one ever asked them.

So they took their, ducks oacx aboara witn tnem, to pena

elsewhere. :-J 1 1 -rnB 1 V-" "'"



SUNDAY, JULY 5. 1959

THJ5 SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAOI THRU

Albrook Officer Transfers Family To Panama
In Private Flying Trip Over Central America

Last week CWO Charles E. Hull who is departing for the Miami,

crriiwrf Aihrnnk AFR with his'Fla.. Intern tional Airport, nis

wifeMariorie. and son Rano in

hisprivately-owned Stinson station-wagon
aircraft. He has been
assigned as Aircraft Maintenance
Officer, S700th Materiel JSquadron
replacing CWO Troxle Hi Moore

new duty assiSRMnent,

This is the first time that anyone
has flown to Albrook in a private
aircraft accompanied with family
om permanent change of station.
Hull left California June 10 and

f (-in i im urn' iniiirii iiinuM
WABiTOBKITAIMW

i 1 ly u CUJ DL

LONDON, July 4 When things
go badly, daydreaming can be ex extremely
tremely extremely dangerous. Bui at times
like the present, when Britain's
prosperity mounts like a space
rocket, it does us all good to pause
a moment and stick our heads in
the clouds, or even above them.
No one in the' United Kingdom,
I am sure, will have grudged the
House of Lords that Ijilarious
quarter-of-an-hour the other day,
probing into outer space on the
question whether the country's sa satellite
tellite satellite programme threatened the
peace of Mars.
Triggering off the enquiry was
Lord Fraser, whom it was my pri privilege
vilege privilege to meet many times when,
as Ian Fraser, a Member of Par Parliament,
liament, Parliament, he was an ardent radio
experimenter concerned with the
behavior of short waves in the
outer atmosphere.
"What he gravely asked, "are
the Government's views on sover sovereignty
eignty sovereignty over outer space?"

SOLEMN REPLY
Amid laughter came the solemn
reply from Viscount Hailsham,
Lord President of the Council:
"The Government consider that
sovereignty over space above na national
tional national territory cannot extend in indefinitely
definitely indefinitely upwards."
Lord Fraser then wanted to
know whether circumstances in
outer space ought to be further in investigated
vestigated investigated "before we "lend our ourselves,
selves, ourselves, however indirectly, to a
process which, .may appear to be
unprovoked aggression, and may
even be the beginning of the war
of the worlds."
Before the laughter subsided,
Lord Hailsham was on his feet a a-gain,
gain, a-gain, denying almost indignantly
that our space programme involv involved
ed involved aggression against any third
world or second world.
"We are limiting our activities,"
he said, "to satellites, those re revolving
volving revolving round our own planet.
' The Government would resent any
suggestion that the Martians have
anvthing to fear."
The notion of Parliament with
its bead in the clouds is beautiful beautiful-lv
lv beautiful-lv cantured by a New Zealand ar artist,
tist, artist, Felix Kelly. He shows Rig
Ben and the Palace of Westmins Westminster
ter Westminster floating above an airy mount mountain
ain mountain top in one of his 'London Ca Caprices,"
prices," Caprices," a collection of paintings
causing quite a stir just now at
the Arthur Jeffress Gallery jn
London.
With the detachment of a Com Commonwealth
monwealth Commonwealth visitor, he depicts ma many
ny many of our famous landmarks, in
such seettings as Venetian canals
or the Rockv Mountains, and I
must say this treatment gives
them unsuspected charms.

SURGE TOWARDS PROSPERITY
No such fantasies are needed to
set off the snlendid picture the
Board of Trade has just given us
of Britain's forward surge to pros pros-perity.
perity. pros-perity. Exports from the United King Kingdom
dom Kingdom in 'he mnntn of May touch touched
ed touched the all-time peak of $640,000,000.
And the trade gap the surplus of
imports over exports fell to the
''tiny figure of $4,200,000.
This is the lowest ever record recorded
ed recorded since the Board of Trade be began
gan began comoiling monthly figures in
the middle of the last century.
Economic observers wr!o, in
their pessimistic moods, are rea ready
dy ready to scrape even the silver lin linings
ings linings off the clouds, are now un ungrudgingly
grudgingly ungrudgingly optimistic, while ad admitting
mitting admitting their astonishment.
The figures, it is pointed out,
confirm the increasing competitive
power of Britain's industries, due

flew the Central America route to
Panama in 13 hops.
Total time for the flight va 40

hours and five countries crossed.

Dai'.y flying time ranged from two
and a half to four and a half hours
each day.
Their son, Rano, has over 150
hours flight time as a passenger.
He began his flying career in Ko Korea
rea Korea where he was adpoed by the
Hulls three years ago Mrs.
Hull recommends this type
of travel to all service wives be because
cause because she points out "It is clean,

tp -the stability of prices, cost of
living and wages established over
the past twelve months.
SEARDH FOR MARKETS
Sir David Eccles, president of
the 'Board of Trade, has been
throwing metaphorical bouquets at
our businessmen for so vigorously
searching, out markets overseas.
Certainly the country's economic
recovery owes a lot to contracts
won by United Kingdom firms for
major engineering and construction
schemes overseas.
That the trade gap will conti continue
nue continue to stay so small is unlikely.
As ir David has already stress

ed, witn expanding trade we shall
be importing more.
Among Britain's biggest dollar
earners is the booming automo automobile
bile automobile industry, With main roads at
home thronged with cars the prob

lem ot noisy is becoming seconda secondary
ry secondary only to that of traffic jams. In
Parliament it has even been sug suggested
gested suggested that vehicles should be tax taxed
ed taxed on the basis of the clatter they
make.
LEGAL PUZZLE
Though such an idea would seem

to bristle witn legal difficulties,
they would be nothing compared

with the puzzles, lawyers have

been set by Britain's new Hover

craft.
.What is it, this revolutionary
"flying saucer" that skims across
sea and land on a self-made "air
cushion"? Boat, vehicle or air aircraft?
craft? aircraft? It has neither wheels or
wings.
As the first public demonstra demonstration
tion demonstration has just shown, this extraor

dinary craft the prototype, no

doubt, of huge, ocean ferries in
years to come can go forwards,
backwards or sideways, support supported
ed supported only a foot or two up by down downward
ward downward iets of air.
Not being airborne in the same
sense as an aircraft, it is presum presumably
ably presumably not covered by the Air Navi Navigation
gation Navigation Act.
Without wheels, it is not "me "mechanically
chanically "mechanically propelled."
Moving above the water, It Is
riot a ship.
People are asking whether the
pilot could be fined for dangerous
driving, low flying or faulty sea seamanship
manship seamanship and the lawyers can
find nothing but "No" for an answer.

rmint snrl lrorv 1Ylfrtrf nHIp

Hull hat nvpr in vprc ixKi '.TrUTiewspapers devoted

live service ana nas served over overseas
seas overseas in Europe, Japan, Korea,
and now Panama. His previous
duty was at Edwards AFB, Calif.,
assigned to the Inspector Gene General's
ral's General's Office.
HulOsaid the trio debunked ma many
ny many stories told about flying o o-ver
ver o-ver Central America. The route
they flew was well-populated and
airfields were about 30 miles a a-part,
part, a-part, he noted. The service at the
airports was adequate and the
cost averaged with flying in the U U-nited
nited U-nited States. The entire trip was
ma-ie by visual flight rules. The
Hull's longest delays were caus caused
ed caused by bad weather in Mexico and
David.

Alabama Papers
Raise Objections
To Advertising Tax
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (UPI)
Alabama newspaper officials
yesterday opposed as "punitive
and discriminatory" a proposal to
put a 3 per cent gross receipts
tax on advertising in the state.
Newspaper representatives told
a legislative committee that the
tax would be a "direct, unfair
imposition" upon all news media.
"Advertising is our life blood,"
said Bonny Hand, legislative
chairman for the Alabama Press
Assn. "This tax would place a

tremendous restriction on weekly

to serving

the public." He said weeklies al already
ready already are showing only "meager
profits" because of intense com competition
petition competition for the advertising dollar.
Chauncey Wood, manager of the
Downtown Business Assn. of
Montgomery, said it "is nothing
but a direct tax on the cost of
doing business."

Jour $eL

iremen

t

NORGE PLANT EXPANDS
CHICAGO (UPI) The Norge
division of the Borg-Warner Corp.
yesterday announced a $950,000
expansion at the Effingham, Illi Illinois,
nois, Illinois, Range and Home Laundry
plant. The 33 per cent expansion
is scheduled for completion in
December of this year.

AAaj. xDoc Blanchard Cited
For Landing Burning Plane

WETHERSFIELD, England
(UPI) Maj. Felix (Doc) Blanch Blanchard,
ard, Blanchard, American football hero, has
been cited for bravery for riding
his burning plane down rather
than risk a crash in an English
village, U.S. Air Force oficials
disclosed yesterday.
The incident occurred last
month. Air force officials said
Blanchard had only moments to
decide whether to bail out or risk
his life by riding the burning
super-Sabre jet down.
Blanchard shrugged off the ex exploit
ploit exploit yesterday.
'It happened a while agi
it was just one of those things,"
he said.
Blanchard, three times all all-America
America all-America touchdown ace for West
Point, was approaching the land landing
ing landing strip at the Wethersfield Air
Base when the jet fighter broke
into flames.
"The village of Fineingfield
was straight ahead. The plane

would have hit either the village
or one of fhe other populous
places in the vicinity," he said.
An Air Force spokesman said
that 'nobodoy would Have blamed
Blanchard if he had ejected him himself."
self." himself." "We had a similar case here

two years ago the pilot stayed
in his plane to avoid hitting the
village and the plane crashed. He
wasn't around to pick up his
medal," the spokesman said.
Blanchard brought his burning
fighter in safely.
Blanchard. 34, won fame as
'Mr. Inside" partner in West
Point's famed "touchdown twins'"
with Glenn Davis, who was "Mr.
Outside," in 1944, 1945 and 1946.
Blanchard of McColl, N.C., is
operations officer with the 77th
tactical fighter squadron at this
American occupied Royal Air
Force Base. He has been sta stationed
tioned stationed here two years.

By MARIE DA ERR
The wife of a newly retired
man, a former vice president of
a big corporation, called' on a
friend in an employment agency.
"You've simply got to find
something for Jim to do," she
pleaded. "I just can't stand hav having
ing having him around the house all
day long being restless and un unhappy.
happy. unhappy. "All of a sudden, I find myself
cooking three full meals a day.
If this keeps up, I'll have to give
up my church clubs and board
memberships."
This woman is only one of
thousands of wives who have
found that they, too, have a big
adjustment to make when the
man of the house abruptly leaves
the office that had been his
second home for so long.
"A wife should be prepared to
help her husband through a pe period
riod period of depression that will last

for the first six months of his
retirement," a psychiatrist said at

a retirement conference.
"That's part of her job," he
continued. "She should be ready ready-to
to ready-to dish out big helpings of un understanding."
derstanding." understanding." In Jim's case, help in finding a
part-time job did much to solve
the problem. It wasn't a sensa sensational
tional sensational job, compared with what
Jim had been doing. Jim works
part time as a clerk in a hard hardware
ware hardware store.
"You'd be surprised what that
means to my husband," the wife
said a few months later. "He has
regular hours now. He's back on
a schedule."
For other wives, a husband's re retirement
tirement retirement has meant a move to a
new home in a faraway state
where the couple believes life will
be easier. Often, in those far-from-home
spots, adjustment is
harder for the wife than for the
husband.
"I don't like fishing and I
don't play golf," one wife said.
"Bill is off with his pals all
day long.
"Our house is so little, I'm

though with my chores in no
time. Then the probelm ts what
to do in a town where I don't
know amybody."

These transplanted woman must

make a real effort to find new

firends and new activities to take

the place of those back home.

They must get acquinted with

new neighbors. They must be

come interested in a church, join

a club, find a volunteer job, .of .offer
fer .offer to baby-sit for a busy young
mother.

the rules covering the extent of
of disability one must have to be
eligible for disability insurance be benefits?
nefits? benefits? L.T.
A Thert has btn no change
in th rules rtg'rding txttnt of
disability. You do havo to b
disabled to such a dogreo that
you cannot do substantial gain gainful
ful gainful work.

Q I'm still working at age 65.
Like other unattached womea, I'd
like to join a golden-age group.
But all in my area meet during
the afternoon. Why aren't there
any groups with evening meet meetings?
ings? meetings? Miss F.R.
A I'm told it U because, In
many areai, older people don't
like to go out alone at night.
Why don't you take the initia initiative
tive initiative and start a group In your
neighborhood?

Q Have any changes been made

.in the Social Security law on

Colorado Ski Resort
To Make Own Snow
COLORADO SPRING, Colo.
(UPI) A new ski area is being
built near this resort city which
will be equipped to make its own
snow.
Most Colorado ski areas are lo located
cated located high in the Rockies, where
snow is nearly always plentiful.
But this area is at a lower alti altitude
tude altitude and skiing conditions are
not usu;illv good.

Charles L. Tutt, president of

the Broadmoor Hotel, Inc., said
the machine, nicknamed the
"Phenomenal Snowman," will be
capabl- of laying down an inch
of snow an hour over a wide area.
Water is forced through a car carburetor
buretor carburetor under high pressure with
compressed air to manufacture a
fine blanket of snow.
Broadmoor officials expect to
maintain a three-foot, snow base

on the 3,000-foot-iong ski run

from November through April.

Asfor it by nameO

SEE
.1 9

the season s
biggest values in
SEARS Catalog Dept.

New Causeway

Provides Shortcut

Across Salt Lake

LITTLE VALLEY, Utah (UPI)

A train ride between San Fran

cisco and Oeden, Utah, usually

more than 700 miles, is about to

become 43 miles shorter,

The short cut, a 12.6-miles

earth and rock causeway across

the Great Salt Lake, will begin

carrying Southern Pacific vail

traffic in July. The new causeway

divides the lake from Promontory

Point on the east shore to Lake Lakeside
side Lakeside on the west and replaces a
56-year-old wooden trestle that
helped link Ogden with Lucin,

Utah, a 102-mile distance of

which 31.5 miles went across the
lake.
The new trestle, built on a bed
of solid rock, cost $49 million
and required four years of con construction
struction construction work. The top of the
trestle is about 18 feet above the
lake and 38 feet wide.
To conquer the quicksand-lake
bottom of the Great Salt Lake
and reach a solid base, more than

16 million cubic yards of material
was dredged. This created a
trench 175 to 480 feet wide and
20 to 35 feet deep.
Thirteen barges, some as long as
a football field, were used to fill

the trench with rock and gravel.
The earth fill is covered by rock
loosened in a series of dynamite
explosions, including a 1,069-ton
blast in August, 1957, that is con considered
sidered considered the nation's largest non non-atomic
atomic non-atomic explosion.

CXTRA VALUES
THANKS TO INVENTORY

To
Reg. Clear
RATTAN BOOKCASE $95.00 $75.00
BIRD BATH 9.75 5.25
MAHOGANY DINING OR DESK CHAIR .. 18.50 9.95
THROW CUSHIONS ,, 3.95 195
ELECTRIC TOASTER 24.95 14 25
TABLE LAMPS 1.95 L25

WHILE THEY LAST!
CUSHION COVERS

Seat 26 x 22
Back 23 x 22

Reg. 12.50 pr.

435

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Take Advantage of These
Inventory Clearance Items
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SEARS

Los Angeles Transisthmian
Highway Tel. 2-0931
Colon, Bolivar Ave. Tel. 1132

Open from 9:00 a.m to 12.00 noon and
from 2:00 to 6:45 p.m.

If 1 v ii HgiSaSlfP, If

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COLON
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.2-0931

11SS



SUNDAY. JULY t, 1951
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
AOI FOUR

1 1

1

vciat an

d Otherwise

By Staffers

134,

anama

ma 8.00 tuJ 10 .. tfny.

Meeting

&-itff an in, 1 i
ItSiWttXlAM MC GUTH TO ENTERTAIN
ftBTMONOR OF VISITING PARENTS, SISTER

Mr. and Mr. A. Edward Fewia and their eleven-) ear-old duh- Writ.r.' L..9o
... t.i ,., ...i.iiin inr month s visit with Thp Panama Canal Zon Chap

th.W daughler

Albrook Air Fore Bse. Alter leaving meir oomr uea w.n x.
Wilted In Miami befo-e toutiiiuing to Panama. nins ai 7:30 m the library ol tne
Mr. McGuth will entertain during this week with coHee honor-, Balboa USO JWB
i. L ...... .....in. rniHaii nartv is also beinf planned rasue odcials have announced

rir. And Mrt. Riehardt
"faVad At Cocktail Bran

dent of the cluD, will U: Uie kuest ,h ,WBi A book ,is, for wril.

faad At Cocktail franf ot i nor. anu ... .w- prs hgs bppjl prepare1 by We
Th charee d'ffanrs ad inter- new chairman of tne -POIt,n' Fort Clayton librarian.

tm d tbc Unitad Stater, Embas-I Class, wih miroaure new men ClvilianS) as wen a8 service
litf' :John C iltillock and Mt. bprs aj.d Kuests personnel, are invited to attend
sBltoCk. eatortained at th Tivo- Hesrrvalions be th(1 meetings.
House UM wvek "itt a by Tuesday oy t?lephon.ni? tht
"'cocktail partv honorim? Mr. una lAWl off.ee. Balboa o46.-.. i Bueeanetr Flyart
Mrs John Richards. I A meeting of the Buccaneer
' Mr Richards is preside!.! of Photo8r"phlc "our Flying Club will be held Monday
the ii s Commiaai'in fir I'NES-'Todaw At USO-JWB evenins at 6'30 in Hangar Four
CO 7110 first of ser'es t see' at Fort KoVibe.
' aml.ehoof camera ..ijPoee.ngi u m,-k, .r uroefl tn t-

"v-'T.- ' . . : (ho .O.inHl (Or MV-1 . .:.! :- .1.-

iuiu l uii mi. i0 participate in uie genef

sun lii-ii lrtiMiiir..

fAWC Cookiro CUu

INI' K iiilUCnLi lA.almn I inP'.-li-r.

riins LLUnvntun I-, -' .,,, fu D91K,

Th Cooking Class ol the nier- ati?muon ai
American Women's Club will I'SC- J'.VB.
have it flist luncheon PiPetmg!
of 5 W"' year Wednesday at: Each week's tour is Urn ilea
oi uie jt ,'.,. nffir.,.. onH intPiested persons -ire advm-

noon ai '.hp ru, .iimuw. tol-nhnn-

the JWB. Balboa 11).

si election of officers.

ODn Mess

Mrs. Nancy Sidebotham, presi-ung

Accounting Firm Promotes
Two; Gives Bonuses, Raises

During a luncheon held at the
Union Club last Saturday, the Pa Panama
nama Panama office of the world's larg larg-st
st larg-st accounting firm, Price We We-terhouse
terhouse We-terhouse and Co., announced two
major promotions amone the Pa Panamanian
namanian Panamanian members of its staff.
Manuel Chong Gomez, a young
Panamanian who has been with
the firm for 11 years was promot promoted
ed promoted to the position of supervisor.
f!honf. a graduate of the Pana

ma University, thus became the
first Panamanian accountant to
be offered a supervisory contract
with Price Waterhouse.
a
The other promotion went to
Policarpo Salazar, 39. who was

advanced to the top position of
senior accountant in the firm's

accounting and auditing staff.

Salazar, who also is a graduate
of the Panama University, has

been with Price Watershouse for

only two and one half years. Pri

or to joining the firm, he was on
the staff of Esso Standard Oil

for 12 years.

US Makes Series
Of Technical Aid
Pads With UAR

CAIRO. July (UPI) The U U-nlted
nlted U-nlted States concluded a series
of technical assistance agreements
with the United Arab Republic
this week in another sign of im improving
proving improving relations.
Within the next four or five
months, according to the agree agreements,
ments, agreements, the U.S. will provide a a-bout
bout a-bout ten experts to help in vari various
ous various fields. They will:
Help train Egyptian civil a a-viation
viation a-viation personnel, including air airport
port airport technicians, to handle jet
age traffic.
Help with Egypt's road Dui;d
ing program. This is a revival of
a program cut short by the Suez
crisis of 1956.

Help train census person m.
The last time Egypt held a cen

sus, it took five years to tabulate

ji". For the census scheduled next
guest at the luncheon, year, they aim at tabulating in

one year.

These three programs are

worth about 400,000 dollars. They

bring the total aid to the U.A.R.
in the first six months of this
year to $60,000,000.

This aid had helped improve
relations. But a case like that of
the freighter Inge Toft, stopped
by Egypt when it tried to carry
foods from enemy Israel through
the Skez Canal, illustrates hew
fragile relations still are.

In addition to announcing these
promotions at Saturday's lunch luncheon,
eon, luncheon, Carder. S. Shekell, princi principal
pal principal of the Panama Office of the
world wide accounting firm, pre presented
sented presented the annual bonuses and
notifications of salary increases

which customarily take place on

the 30th of June each year. A'
members of the loca' staff, 5 A

mericans and 15 Panamanian, re

ceived an increase of at least 10
percent, and those with one year

or more service received bonus bonuses
es bonuses of not, less than one month's

salary.

Specia

was Prof. Braulio Vasquez, Pro Professor
fessor Professor of Accounting at the Uni University
versity University of Panama. Professor
Vasquez spoke briefly congratu congratulating
lating congratulating Messrs. Gomez and Sala Salazar,
zar, Salazar, both of whom were students
of his at the University, on their
progress in the profession and
expressed his pleasure at seeing
so many of his former and ori orient
ent orient students on the staff of Price
Waterhouse and Co.

Retired Navy Chirf Reveals Secret

After 33 Years: 1 Never Complain

PRIVATE PLANE ARRIVAL At Albrook AFB last week, CW0 Charles E. Hull and family were
greeted by CWO Theodore V. Hobbie and family as they concluded an air journey from Edwards
AFB, Calif, to Albrook In their private aircraft. From left are Hull his son Rano and wile Marjorie.
Mrs. Hobbia, daughter Julia and Hobbie. (USAF Photo)

Herbert Hoover Says Russia
Trying To Forget US Succor

lit

I HE Master Teacher em emphasized
phasized emphasized that man cannot live by
bread alon ... If you have left
Christ out of your life there's
something missing something
He alone can supply.

9:30 SUNDAY SCHOOL BRING YOUR

FAMLY CLASSES ALL AGES
Though you have provided all material needs for vour
family, Do they have a saving knowledge of Christ?
"Whosoever shall call upon the name pf the. Lord, SHALL
BE SAVED" Romans 10:13. ARE YOU SAVED? Our Saved
Teachers can show you the way. Jesus said "I am the wav.
the truth and the life." Jno. 14-6.
11:00 SERMON: "THE WORD, WORK
AND WORSHIP"
HOLY COMMUNION: Christ said "This is my blood
which is shed for many for the remission of sins."
6:00 JET CADETS AND HIGH SCHOOL
(Grades 4 and up)
7:00 EVENING GOSPEL SERMON:
"HOW DEEP IS HELL?"
Rev. Tom Hash, director of the Christian Servicemen's
Home will be delivering a message that may be a practical
" spiritual blessing to you. Bring a friend.
NURSERY AMPLE PARKING EVANGELICAL
MISSIONARY
PREACHING CHRIST JESUS AS LORD, CRUCIFIED,
.RISEN AND COMING AGAIN.

''tern

r.

I

It
V
ii i
t1
I'

Long Vows To Hit

Campaign Trail

For Fourth Term

VILLE PLATTE, La., July 4

(UPI) Gov. Earl K. Long was ex

pected to begin his stump cam

paign for an unprecedented fourth

term as Governor of Louisiana

here today.

Long, 63, announced last niht

in the capital at Baton Rouge he
planned to make four speeches to

day in soutihwest Louisiana and
then fly to northeast Louisiana to

attend the Miss Louisiana contest

Judged on past mornings, the

governor will be raring to go. But

if the governor under his no al

200-pound weight by more than
40 pounds, takes to the Bayou
stump, it will be strictly "his own'
decision.
His battery of six doctors, in including
cluding including a heart specialist and psy psychiatrists,
chiatrists, psychiatrists, have strongly urged the
Governor to cancel the campaign

until his weakened heart and ner-
vious condition are improved.

Dr. Paul Piatt, a psychiatrist
who has accompanied Long night
and day since the Governor re released
leased released himself from a mental hos hospital
pital hospital at Mandeville, La. June 26,
said "it is our duty only to advise
him. Any decisions are his own"
Long arrived in Baton Rouge
last night after an overnight stay
in a downtown New Orleans hotel.

NEW YORK (UPI) Forme
president Herbert Hoover s a i
today that U. S. gifts of food

Ltlo'liing ,ind medicine saved mon

than 20 million Russian lives dur
ing tho Sovie' famine of 1921-23-and
"they have been trying to for
get our help ever since."
The aid was not a loan, but a
gift with no strings attached, saic
Hoover.

Hoover s statement set Soviet

First DeDUtv Premier Fol R

Koziov straight on his facts. Koz-

lov comulamed to President Li

senhower In Washington wednes
dav thit the U.S. had forced Rus

sia iO make pavments in gold for
the supplies received during the

famine.

At a recention in Washington on

Wednesday night, Vice President

Ricnard M. Nixon and secretary

of State Christian A. Herter chai
lensed Kv.Tlov on his "loan" ver

sion. They fina'iy got the visiting

Russian to admit that he was in

error,
Hoover, who was director of the

American relief administration at

th lime of the Russian famine

said in a statement released at

his residence that the Com

munists aDDarentlv had tried

to bury the mtmory of once being
forced to rely on handouts from a
Capitalist country.
He said the Soviet government
TPnuested aid from the U.S. to

ive the people from starvation

nd ragir.p epidemics. Tnis coun coun-ry
ry coun-ry responded he said, by rush rush-ne
ne rush-ne more than 71)0,000 tons of food,

lothing and medical supplies to

tussia it a cost of about 62 mil mil-Ion
Ion mil-Ion dollars.
"It Kit not a loan and not a

dime was ever asked for or

Daid." Hoover said.

"The Soviet government also

requested ur to purchase 10 mil million
lion million dollars worth of seed on their
behalf which they paid for in
gold, but we provided the trans transport
port transport free
Hoovpr said that the Russian
commirsars showed their appre appreciation
ciation appreciation in July 1923 by giving a
dinner in honor oithe staff of
the American Relief Agency.

"Four of tie commissars 'in
their speeches used this phrase:
'the Uniop of Socialist Sovist Re Republics
publics Republics rfver will forget the aid
rendered to them by the Ameri American
can American peop;e'." .'aid Hoover.

5 Navy Warrant
Officers Promoted

JUROR WON'T SIRVf
CHIPPEWA F.alls Wis. (UPI) A
jury notice sent to John Risler
was returned to the commission commissioners
ers commissioners with a note from his mother.
John, she said, Is only six weeks
old.

The

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protects...
Powder your baby with
Mexana after every bath and
diaper change. Protect his
skin from the cause of irrita irritations
tions irritations and odor. Mexana, with
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dorizes deodorizes and
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TALCUM

The Navy announced promo promotion
tion promotion this wtok for flvt local Na Navy
vy Navy warrant officers, two of thorn
recently tranifarrod.
Selected for W-3 rank were CWO
George Schuller, new Commu Communication
nication Communication Station officer, and CVO
Raymond G. Lund and Warren
J. Drell, both of whom left for ne
duty assignments last month.
Warrant Officers Aubrey R.

Lanius and Richard V. Richard

were selected tor promotions iu
W-2.
NEWLY ARRIVID Schuller
came noro from San Francisco.
Ho succeeded Lund as electro electronics
nics electronics materiel officer at the U. S.

Naval Communication Station at
Ft. Amador. Lund loft Juno 24
for duty at San Francisco.
Relieved aa Galeta Point offi

cer ln-chargt last month, Drell

went to Ft. Meade, Ms., for duty

Richards, his successor, came

aboard from Norfolk. He is a vete veteran
ran veteran of 17 years' servke.
Lanius is Radio Farfan officer-ln-charge,
a post he took over a.
bout three months ago after ieav
ing an excess billet at the liar
bor Defense Unit at Balboa.

Teen Marriages
Worrying Texas
School Officials

DALLAS. Tex. (UPI) -A pert,

pretty dark-haired girl, well-de-

veloped tor ner in yems,
ting ready for her high school
dance.
this will be my last

rtnnpp for a while," she told her

mother. "I'm going to have a ba ba-hv
hv ba-hv hut it's all right I've been

secretly married for 10 months.

This girl and nunareas ue uu
are giving Texas school officials
one of their biggest headaches.
Many other school districts
across the nation are faced with

the 'roblem of skyrocketing
numbers of student marriages.
But the spotlight hit Dallas re

cently when ur. w. r. wm.c
superintendent of schools, report

ed a 41 per cent increase in mt
number of married students in
Dallas schools during the past two
years.

Ther were 480 of them as of

April 1, Dr. White reported, com

pared witn itoD at me nea oi vjoi.
White reported further that
144 eirls had dropped out of school

because of pregnancy, while mar

ried students still attending clas classes
ses classes had a total of 72 children.

After a colorful. 33-VMr Nivif

career as a barber, ship's taunt"

dry man and admiral's steward,.

CPO Salvador Caslra was o.u'ot.

ly onloyina ratirmtnr rnls waok.
The mild-ternMrad old "lilt"

drooped anchor on mora than

three decades of spotless service
with two words of advice to to today's
day's today's new crop of sailors: "Don't

complain.
That was Casira's philosophy

when he left home In 1926 at the-

age ol 18 to join the Navy." It

still was this week at age 52.
Asked how a sailor avoids get getting
ting getting into trouble all those years

he replied: "I never complain.

You never complain ypu ;stay
out of trouble.' '.. "i.

CASIRA learned his simple
wisdom in on of the Navy's.
tougheat lobs cooking for ad admirals.
mirals. admirals. Ho spent 20 of his
years in uniform satisfying the
ppetities of admirals, Including
four of the 15th Naval District
commandants who served hero.

The portly, asy-going ex Na

vy steward calls Rear Aam. ivui ivui-ton
ton ivui-ton E. Miles, commandant from

1954-58, "the greatest man i ever

work for.

"If he ask me to make a sand

wich, he make me make two two-one
one two-one for him and one for me."

Casira did not always wear a

chef's can. In the; thirties he was

a laundryman aboard the survey
ship USS Hannibal. He later was

barber aboard tne gunooai

USS Erie.

CLIMBING A HILL while car carrying
rying carrying 85 pounds of stool on hi
back produced the molt memor memorable
able memorable day In Caalra's career. Tho
hill wa Flamenco Island hill on
the Ft. Amador cauteway.

Casira had to walk tfhe load up

the Island to help build a Navy
radio tower in 1928.

'There were no roads then,"

he skid with a trace of regreat in
hi voice.

The Canal Zone has brought

'r s

Vati

CFO SALVADOR CASIRA

nothing but good luck into Cast-

ra'i life since that incident, ii
was here that he met and mar married
ried married his wife Carmen, today the

mother of six Casira children

aged 10 to 21.

IN iru Rodman doc a me tne
first shore duty for Casira after
IT straight years at sea. It also
was his last and best assignment,
ho says.
-The agile, round-faced veter veteran,
an, veteran, who wears a thin trace of a
mustache under black-rimmed
trlasses. first visited the Canal

Zone in 1926 before many Navy-

men stationed here now wers

born.
He has since transited the ca canal
nal canal more times than he can re remember.
member. remember. NOW HAPPILY retired. Casira
has chosen Panama as his heme
port. Ho plant fa stay here tho
rest of his life.

General Motors Set To Use
Aluminum Meter In Corvair

1958 SALES INCREASE

NEW YORK (UPI) Brancn

units were the main source of
volume gains for the nation's de department
partment department stores, in 1958 as total
sales rose lXper cent over 1957
levels, according to the national

retail merchants association.

Dallas parents promptly de

manded that the school board
take immediate action to curb

the trend. The board launched a 1

studv. promising to have a lan

of action ready by the time school
starts again in September.

The fitrures Dr. White released

represent two per cent of total
enrollment. They do not reflect
the number of teen-agers who
have married and dropped out of
school, those who attend private
or parochial schools, or those who

are secretly married ana sun in

classes.

Cop Becomes
First Victim
Of New Edict
ROCHESTER. N.Y. (UPI) A
patrolman was the first victim of
a drive by Rochester city police
to make sure that churches and

schools keep their doors and win windows
dows windows locked after hours.
The patrolman Jack DiPoalo
had gone down to the basement
locker room of West High School
to close an open window when
the door slammed shut and lock locked
ed locked behind him. DiPoalo finally
"sprung" himself after two hours
by picking the lock with a coat
hanger.

DETROIT (UPI) The last
doubts that General Motors will
use a flat, aluminum engine rn
the rear of its new small car, the
Corvair, were eliminated today.

Although introduction of the
Corvair, is still three months
away. GM's Chevrolet division
called an extraordinary press
conference yesterday to answer

mounting criticism of rear-engine
cars launched by its competitors.
"I think this car will be an
outstanding success," said
Maurice OUey, who was called
from retirement to explain the
benefits of an engine in the rear
and to answer charges that it is
difficult to steer, unsafe and lack lack-ing
ing lack-ing in space for parcels.

Olley, who has been acting as
a consultant to GM since he re retired
tired retired as director of research and

engineering nearly four years ags

not onlv defended the rear en

sine but launched an attack on

those who plan to build a small

car with an engine in the front,

16 pounds and the rear tires tl
26 pounds. He said the proper
tires are available.

"You can't just take a conven

tional car and shrink it down to

two-thirds of its normal site when
you want to build a small car,"
he said. "You can't expect any

thing but a poor ride and unsafe

braking conditions if you do that."

OUey admitted a car with the
engine in the rear might present

some difficulties if proper steps

were not taken to avoid them. But

he claimed GM has licked these

probl?ms.

For example, he said It was not
feasible to put the engine in the
rear unless it was made of alum

inum, because it would cause the
car to be too heavy in the rear.
And he said, steerinf problems

can be avoided by using tires
with good cornering properties

and inflating the front tires to 15

Help Your Piles

Don't suffer (ram painful, itahlnf

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Chlnareltf. Upon application Chinaroh

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EMa mJo and Itohln. 1 HalM akriiil

or, (WolKa Umum. t. Help Oaturt

Ileal UT1UUO mmDrai and allay Flit

..MTouinMa, am your vruiw ea

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If you cannot breast feed baby,
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breast milk in nourishment, in
digestibility and in health pro
tection Lactogen.
Lactogen is an all cow's milk
formula plus vitamins A and
D and iron, and it is so easy
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thanks to

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I

SUNDAY, JULY I. 1959
TBE SUNDAY AMERICAN
FAiJkVJVi

r

Sun, "Sand "Styles
F6r Small Fry
Mww hum IIIIIIH f',ll'"lMuaiW')MyMW
'V : If
' x 1
4A ihi-'-U
h;. A U fc't

Here's an upside down view of future Miss America at the
beach.. She' wearing a blue maillot In helanca nylon with
ter n nl J1! Panel. Her friend wears minute
stripe trunks, By GAILE DUGAS, NEA Women's Editor

FRIENDS
If you are going to tent a gift
for a special occasion, make sure
it arrives In time.
Going on a trip? Don't be
trapped into buying something
to wear Just as a souvenir. It will
probably look, out of pi a op back
home and throw your clothes
budget out of line for six months.
Save .your travel enthusiasm for
small souvenirs unless money is
no, object. i
When you buy clothes for at at-home
home at-home wear, keep in mind the
color scheme of your living room.
A green dress and a red couch,
for instance, will -clash, Your
clothes for entertaining in your
home should blend with the
background.
Charm bracelets become a nui nuisance
sance nuisance to others when you jangle
an armload. .Two or three bracelets-
are fine:; rSmw; thin that
amounts to clutter.
Get weary of washing out
white cotton and pylon gloves by
hand? Toss them into the ma ma-chine
chine ma-chine but onto when you're doing
other white things.
Nothing makes woman look
o careless as run-down, sculfy
or unpolished shoes. When yours

. Jmm fef ; it
4 r-'X r-'" v -i -' I I

I SK2..F0R,IHE SHOW-Leisha Gulllson, left, and her twin.
w';.Corn, h,8twy when toey both S

L. Ettmr""1 came about when

83Q JCa. fianimaJ090 JCu. Colon

'JAM! ..Vf.-rt.'

"How old do you "think you
are?" asks a magazine article.
Well, Sir if you're talktfig. to us
women the answer will vary
from day to day.
We feel 10 years younger when
someone we haven't seen in
years says wliF artful flattery
"I can't get over it. You ha"ven't
changed a bit."
We feel 10 years older when we
try on a dress and after one
glance n the mirror feel comoell comoell-ed
ed comoell-ed to say: "This is pretty but it's
a little too girlish looking, don't

you think?",
tio iot w years yuuuger wuen
we've just had a new and be becoming
coming becoming hairdo, bought a dress
that "does something for us," or
finally managed to shed a few ex excess
cess excess pounds.
We feel 10 years older when a
son or daughter innocently refers
to someone,-we know is younger
than we are as "pretty old."
We feel 10 years younger when
we're dressed for a Dartv and In
the mood for a gay evening.
We feel older, much older
when we come across some old
snapshots of ourselves and realize
what changes the years h a v e
made.
,..Wfi. feel., younger than we are
when-w-arM in a eav. hnnm
mood no matter what has given
us a lift.
We feel older than we are when
we get discouraeed or over-
worked or weighted down with
too many conflicting responsibi responsibi-litiea.
litiea. responsibi-litiea. So what does the gentleman
mean, how old do we feel?
Is he talking about today, to-
frnm nnf tirknn tt-i l
iiiuiiuw, nexi weeK or o vr'
happen to feel much vnunoor than
" "iicu we iiiikiu usi
we do today?
show signs of wear, take them
to the shoe repairman fast.
The life of the average cash
mere sweater is two years. Dry
cleaning and washing shouldn't
oe usea alternately. Fix on one
method or the other and stay
with it.

mm

em'
By MARGIE
Jessie Mary Luques it

mellowed with age, yet retailing a charming blend of spirit

and pungent wit.

Her vintage li 1864, oftimes noted as the year the

Civil War ended.

Mathematically, that makes her 94 years young, but

she cannot be described statistically; Instead, she is a
walking, talking history book.

Vnr th nast 15 vears. Mrs. Lu
ques has made her home witn Mr
and Mrs. Russell Wise in Balboa
Polly Wise is both her grand
daughter (MM. Wile's motner
who was Mrs. uiques aaugnwi
died when Polly was a baby, and
she was adopted and rearea Dy
Mrs. Luques.)
None of her four cnuoren are
still living. She has three other
grandchildren, five great grand grandchildren
children grandchildren and five great grandchil
dren.
There are, undoubtedly, those
who would disapprove of same
of her small pleaturts, which
normally are attributed to the
young and foolish. Far Mrs. Lu Luques
ques Luques is not th. Whittlr'i Moth
r-type. She does not tit demure demurely
ly demurely in her rocking chair and
watch the world pass by.
She was only 70 when she light lighted
ed lighted her first cigaret, and is now
nearing the chain-smoker stage.
At the tender age of 88, she was
seen "cutting a mean rug" to the
music of Panama's Lucho.
Admitting that she likes a mar-
Hill UC1U1 C lll-.. win... ..
that "sometimes I think I'll tell
Rusetll 'I don't need that' and
then I think 'Oh, why not?' ".
Her aDDetlte for reading mate
rial is never satisfied, and she
"consumes' about seven books a
week. History books are her deep
est interest, although there is no
greater mystery story fan on the
ADtlllllUO,
"When I read a hvysteryT'I lor
get everything else, she says,
adding that this theory is possi
bly the reason so many great m
of our time enjoy mysteries.
The Wise book supply was vlong
ago read and re-read, and she U
working her way through the Hi Hi-rary
rary Hi-rary shelves. "She reads every
thing from Plato to Earl Stanley
Gardner," her granddaugnter re-
,
VealeQ.
Among Mrs. Luqua't priitd
personal posteltioni Is a copy
of the Charter for Massachusetts
Colony, printed In 1725, and still
In remarkably good condition.
She still refers to it for interest'
ing historical facts of that pe period.
riod. period. History is her specialty. And
what she doesn't read, she has
lived. Brave is the soul half her
age who would challenge her to
a memory contest.
She recalled a day in her early
childhood in Pasaic, N.J., when
she visited at the home of a neigh
bor a Mrs. Gillin, where her mo
ther had specifically forbade her to
go. During the visit little Jessie
Mary Burns fell through the Gil Gil-lin's
lin's Gil-lin's cellar door, brusing her lip
and cutting her head.
This is her version of the inci incident:
dent: incident: "Mrs. Gillin was scared to
death, oor thing. She fixed me up
as best she could and sent me
home. Ail the way I was not so
worried about the hurt as about
what my mother would say.
"So when I walked in the door,
my mother said, 'What happened
to you?' And 1 told her, 'A bumb bumblebee
lebee bumblebee bit me.'
"She sent me to bed to rest,
and through the window I saw
Mrs. Gillin coming to se ill was
aingnt. so l quickly cried out the
truth to my mother, who had
Known it ail the time.
"That was the biggest lie 1 ev ever
er ever told in my life."
Mrs. Luques vividly recalls at attending
tending attending the centennial in Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia in 1865, when she was 10
years old. Her sister had been
honored by having a sample of
her delicate handwriting displayed
in s second-floor : display at the
centennial. Jessie was more in interested
terested interested In the lst-floor activities,
and "camped"- there while t h e
rest of the family admired the
handwriting.
If was there that she saw
glass-making for the first time
and she still has twe tiny vsiet
s souvenirs. Also capturing her
attention were miniature fount fountains
ains fountains which spurted selegne.
' Since she and her family visit,
d the centennial f ere week,
she had ample eppertunlty
douse all her handkerchiefs un until
til until one day a woman, attendant
cemmonted, "Little girl, don't
you thing you've had enough?"
She remembers spending won wonderful
derful wonderful hours admiring a special
necklace of turquoise and opal,
and her love for jewelry has re remained
mained remained through her life.
After Comoletini elementary and
high school In Pasaic, she attend attended
ed attended a private school in Rutherford
for a year, then entered a school
or oratory in Philadelphia. The
study was dear to her heart, since
she dreamed of becoming an elo elocutionist.
cutionist. elocutionist. Her parents lster called
a halt to her. plans., Mice girls

IB

m

Inded peddle jCi

ROTHROCK
v.
Hike a rare liqueur, tastefully
were not allowed to work for a
living in those days.
After only a year at the Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia school, Jessie's oratorical
star glowed brightly when she w
a coveted gold medal in competi-
tion with She male two-year stu
dents
She recounts the night as if it
were last week. She recited "Bri "Briar
ar "Briar Rose,' a poem about a young
girl who single-handedly broke up
a river log jam. v
"I was Briar Rose. I lost my myself
self myself In the poem, and actually was
that girl on the logs," she smiles
today.
"I thought the fellow silting next
to me had won the prize, and
someone had to poke me before
I stood up to take it." Besides the
medal, she took home a pillow of
flowers, with "Jessie" workr .in .into
to .into the arrangement, the gift of
her father.
Jessie's older fitter knew a
fellow who had a classmate
friend from Dartmouth. And
that's how Jessie met Bert
Luques. All musically Inclined,
the four of them organized a
vocal quartet and tang at the
local Baptist church, which was
on a fund-raising program for
a new organ.
They sang all types of songs, in including
cluding including the soft and low Negro
spirituals, Mrs. Luques re-alls
' At first the deacon raised his
eyebrows, but when we continued
to keep the church filled "and the
contributions "coming in, he : stop stopped
ped stopped complaining."
Her sister also married the
singing Dartmouth man.
The newlywed Luques built their
home in Pasaic, and Mrs. Luques
lived there until taking residence
with the Wises. She managed.
however, to spend many, of the
cold winters in the South, and,
conversely, the torrid summer
months in the then-wild Maine
country.
She may have inherited a love
to travel from her uncle, who
crossed the Atlantic 18 times in
fthe days when service was not so
speedy. She avowed that when
her four children were grown she
would see the world, and she ve very
ry very nearly has.
A trip to Eurone set the wander-
lust pace, then when the war years
came, she concentrated on South
America. It was during a trln
from San Francisco to New Yor
via the Panama Canal, that she
became deeply interested in the
tropics. She transferred her en enthusiasm
thusiasm enthusiasm to Russell Wise so ef
fectively that he and Mrs.. Wise
moved nere, and stayed.
Nonagenarian Jessie Luouet
brought a little bit of home with
her from Pasaic, including an
antique ruby-glass bowl for call calling
ing calling cards, a cologne bottle and
a unique celery dish which soma
what resembles a parfait glas.
The celery tits upright.
Since she and the Wises moved
to a second-story home, Mrs. Lu Luques
ques Luques has become more of a stay-at-home.
She gets great iov from
her feathered friends, who are
regular free-loaders from her be
room window shelf. She known her
birds so well she can describe
their personalities Sevrr"'
names Lincoln. Truman and Mus-
sonm

Which brought up the que&iion'the ironing board.

uaued
e.
MRS. JESSIE
"Who do you consider tihe greatest
president of your life?"
After a little thought, Mrs. Lu Luques
ques Luques singled out Woodrow Wilson,
whom she described as a dyna
mic speaker who died of a broken
heart. Her choice is a tribute to
Wilson's personal attributes, since
JJom em aliin
9
Washable paint can brighten
your fading outdoor furniture.
Scrub urmture and let dry tnor
oughly. Sand any rough spots be before
fore before painting. A variety of bril brilliant
liant brilliant colors will make your porch
or patio a happy area to relax in.
Dressing a picture window is a
big task and laundering the cur curtains
tains curtains that cover a wide expanse
is even more work. However, try
using several separate panels in instead
stead instead of one large piece of ma
terial. The panels are easier to
handle than a large expanse of
curtain.
More drip-dry clothing on the
market has inspired a new room
in the home. This is a drying clo closet
set closet designed especially for wash-and-wear
materials. The secret
of the area is to treat the walls
with a water-resistant chemical
and have a copper floor with cen
ter drain. Proper ventilation also
ia needed.
A rotating brush with a 15-foot
extension gives dad little excuse
for not washing windows. The
brush first soaps the area, then
rinses it. Men will like this to
keep the family car sparkling.
Now is the time time to simpli simplify
fy simplify your routine. With children
home all day from school this
sounds rather difficult to do. How
ever, cut down on dishes to wash
by using paper plates and cups.
And dress th famiiv in ,.,,.u
land-wear clothes to save hours at
'th irnnlntj htaivl

i? t 3 n- Wi, nn n Nn J
- n? A'VxV If&ac r 'wi
4 ? 'Inn n "Ji'r 'fttNifN n.

Jhst womanly way
d$ Jjcahlon

In fashion. .the pretty look. .the feminine
look... here now at Motta's chosen per.
sonally by Abigail Brid.
... New accessories for every
smart occasion.

Buy through our CLUB SYSTEM PLAN,
$1.00 a week for 25 week.

t

MARY LUQUES
Mrs. Luques is a staunch Repub
lican.
She remembers listening to Wil Wilson
son Wilson and "some Republican" dur during
ing during the presidential campaign a.
recalls that his oratory was so
compelling that everyone hung on
his last word for fear they would
miss. the pext. She believes that if
the world had followed his dream
of the League of Nations, World
War Two never would have bacn.
, Mrt., l,uqys' amazing memjD memjD-ry
ry memjD-ry operatt In her fingers at
well at her mind. She noyt
playing hymns and favorite
tunat on the piano in the
living room, and recently hat
been tempted to the newly ins installed
talled installed Hammond organ.
Her radio is a constant compa companion,
nion, companion, and she speaks of Don Mc
Neill of the Breakfast Club and
Groucho Marx of quiz show re renown
nown renown as sine might of a good nel
bor. When living in the Stales,
she was a great fan of the thea theater,
ter, theater, but she dislikes television.
She prefers a good book.
It is difficult to set down 94
years of an Interesting life in one
story. This can be but an intro introductory
ductory introductory chapter.
So, lovely lady, if we may
pause here with a personal note
from the theater you love so wp'I.
We're pleased to have made
your acquaintance.
LITTLE
Today's job holders would
probably be more olert if they
realized they could be replaced
by a push-button.

' Wf.
u. I hick, Juicy
A .yj l Are Men's

fW n if ;,
SK J

UMMMM! What man wouldn't delight in having steaks-like
these for dinner today? Perhaps with sesame seed potatoes
on the side?

Tall or short, fat or thin, al almost
most almost any man would select a
thick juicy steak for his Sunday
feast. Many would go even fur further
ther further and vote for individual sir sirloins,
loins, sirloins, cooked to each man's taste.
Select either a big thick sir sirloin
loin sirloin steak for slicing for gene generous
rous generous family service, or indivi individual
dual individual steaks. The sirloin with the
long wedge-bone contains t h e
greatest amount of tender meat
and least bone. Be certain it is
cut at least 1 1-2 inches to 2
inches thick for finest eating.
If porterhouse is the choice, se select
lect select elegant twin steaks, cut 1 1-2
to 2 inches thick. To serve, carve
around the bone and remove it
Then sliee across the steak, thus
giving each person a serving of
the tenderloin.
Here are two delicious vegeta vegetable
ble vegetable dishes to serve father with his
special stead: v
Chense-Caped Mushrooms
(Yield: 10 filled miihroomt
One and one-quarter ounces
blue cheese, 2 tablespoons line
dry bread crumbs. 1-4 cup Ita Italian
lian Italian salad dressing, 10 medium
sized mushrooms.
Mash cheese with a fork; Hdd
crumbs and 2 tablespoons of the
salad dressing. Mix well and form
into 10 small balls. Wash mush
rooms and remove stems. Dry
mushroom caps and brush well
with remaining salad dressing.
Place round side up on a heated
broiler about 8 inches froni
source of heat. Broil 3 minutes.
Turn mushrodms over and drop
a cheese ball into each. Broil 3
minutes more.
Sesame Seed Potatott
.One-quarteein) sesame seed,
butter, 8'fablespoons onion
flakes, crushed ; 1 envelope quick
mashed potatoes, milk, 1-2 tea teaspoon
spoon teaspoon salt.
Lightly brown sesame seeds in
1 tablespoon butler. Add onion
flakes to the water and prepare
mashed potatoes as directed on
the package. To the potatoes, ad..l
1-2 teaspoon more salad and 1
tablespoon of the browner) ses inip
seeds. From into balls. Roll

Today, a student ot the drawing
board . tomorrow,
a world-renowned architect

A4$0mU4Ji 1 Li J ;
. i
' -j t'ir 1 i iff
, rt, .n.. i ,4fv wr i yrsTTT3
H ft Jr -i I'.'i' "-tyf- --n
wTaml H ; mr rrr s

His atudies have already taught him the Importajice
Of combining inspiration with scientific accuracy Jin
designing. He knows that plans must be practieal as well
as beautiful. That is why he will appreciate a Tissot it
la a handsome watch and yet machined to mlcromeirlc
exactness for precision's sake. j
These are the reasons a Tlssot Is the best watch jfor
the young architectural student or any youne man Vou
want to see get ahead. f

TISSOT V1S0DATE T 12
Extra-sturdy, automatic,
super- waterproof, renlsts
underwater pressures up to
.12 atmos (400 feet).
TISSOT SEASTAK T 1 2
Same modt without date.
Swim
Uth and Front

w 1 m

,
Meaks
First Choice
in remaining buttered-Ojetame-seeds.
Heat in a hot oven, 400
degrees F.) for 10 minutes
Beauty Tips : I
Teen-agers troubled witW acne
know that soap and water used
frequently during the das iieip
ease the problem. Also kirep in
mind that this cleanlthesjmust
extend to the washcloths and
towels used.
Housewives who want to be
thought of as charming should do
their primping before pop comes
home. Set aside a particiijaj;' Ume,
in morning or afternoon", Tor a
weekly shampoo and setting. This
way you don't soenri the' evening
with your hair in curlers.
Now that warm weather is""hera
you will be wearing wh''p'o
er shades in gloves. Resist the
temptation to wear thcatwo n
three times before launderingeDir
ty gloves detract from a near an
pearance. Wash them after each
wearing. ;-4
Choosing the right colors for
you is important to your overall
appearance. Often youoggirlawlio
are just forming "clothes eon,se',
hide bubbly personalities in drab
colors because they hesitate .to sei
lect bright shades.
A revelation of the pfljae hand handbag
bag handbag era, which is still with Us is
what these heavy bags can do to
our posture. Most women tend to
carry a bag in the same hand day
after day. But with the latger.
heavier bags, it is wisA to khift
sides often.' This avoid pifllinsj
down one shoulder and a resulting
lop-sided appearance.
We all have our figure problems.
One seems to settle around the
waistline. This is true iffyou have
a short wais'. If this -is the fage,
he faithfii' to stretchinp and bend bending
ing bending exercises to ward off that
dumpy look. i
Unbreakable Tlssot J
Life-Spring f
Mlcronlsed Movement;
Permanent antl- 1
magnetism
Shock-protection
World-wide sales and!
serried.
VISOOATE
srity
Street, COLON

' r



f

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN,
SUNDAY, JULY 5, 195)
Nats Outslus Yankees 10-6 In First Of TwiabiUr

f

r,
!
I
1
if
41.
it'
3
t
ii
li

jkillebrew s 27th Homer In 1st
Sends Washington On ToAVin
1 0
1,1 NEW vORK Juiy 4 (UPl) -I sun in short right field The ball
: Hainan KreW tfth horn.! dropped lor double m the fourth
f 1 run ofjthe cson a three-run sa-; inning.
hiti tnnrhed uK tit lire or ks to -i ......

- wbMrthe Washington Senat- KANSAS U tf. i?th
?i "JTklT.. .u f j.iiv;,i:pli-vSherm Lollar bit his 12th

I'RSS 3 "it" defe'.t

; MfST 6
Killefcrew's Wast into te.e jeft
fieffl seatr off ioer Art Diimar
' ckith twc men on ir. the
firil mmng n K,

: r'lns' thrfP homers and four doubles a-
:: iTlMoaE Julv 4 (UP!) -mong 17 l.it off four Kansas U U-h
h U-h TW fiiumore Orioles, led by bigjty pitchers.
fe;,VS;ndfteS PITTSBURGH, July 4 (VP!;. -'
their .etentl. dral.t-Di-k Groat, the alternate Nai.on-
Sl'lff E 'a! League shortstop in Tuesdays
Jo, JI S. tooaj. i All-S' game hert. hit two tn-
.': i. .-i jw fe n.a- K- nip and a single to drive in a

ntiM:m

3hfcfo'ir pitcher, and a I i K e, ci; toiy p t
fttib! of pinch hitters into th;tha uaye th- I .souin ra.e
V 4fc ,ame F.d Wills. aouM-parf a 4-3 v. dory over the Onr.nnaii
trter", took the loss, his fifth a-'Beos.
VF IS' CHICAGO. Ju.v 4 ,rPI,r- Bob
" !rivtn S ail four of the Orio- Anderson gave up only six hits
,''f 1 toriiv to .".nisli f-rs- rame since
S : homers. ; ;iav a,- hrlr the Chicago

. .1- T.fi.i
MiT Vi!,niti..H the Detroit Ti-!
s on rive hits today to ttve tie
J cilveland Indians a 6 1 vietorv in
" the firs game of a double bender
.:..., ,l r.( r.A-l fnnc

Trdidn'tgiveuoVh m-:rr. beat the Dodgers, on opening
, tifffrst hasennr, Vie Power lostidav but failed to finish h,s nex,
Hirvey Kuenn's pop fly in the! u s'.-r:.-
Mazeroski Tech nique
Appreciated By Players

5 By CHESTER L. SMITH
PITTSBURGH. (NEATThe
most confusing probleflf for the
parties picking the National
League All-Star team was the
ihoiee of the second baseman.
' Because of the power he is
carrying to the plate this year
(his average is in the .320 s),
Johnny Temple of the Cincinnati
Beds appeared to have the bulge.
Of course, a bat isn't all Hut
wouldn't settle for him.
But the Pirates' Bill Maero-
fki. who crashed the team last
UHUuei;-Xiriains the ballplay ballplayers'
ers' ballplayers' ballplayer. It is In the dug dugouts
outs dugouts around the league that you
find the greatest appreciation of
his technique. There they drool
blmt his ability to get the .jump
oat Ithe ball, his marvelousiy-
--
Racetrack Tips
By CONRADO
1 festival
Ij-Plitano
J Jslaranjsio
4 ("uanx de Arco
5-r-bon Brigido
4-Purto Madaro
7-Bongaroi
iaHame Cucu
9v-Ooubl Four
Lo Moscoso
Tarasea
Pilluelo (c)
Rtina Negra
San Vicente
Atrayente
Palave
Maese
Dependable
Dauville
Sputnik (e)
Don Lucho
iltbriica (t)
.
I SERVICE CENTER
JAtBOA 'JjS : M
AIS-CONDITIONED

PtSIRE
i Wholesome Uffji
B 8howlrty Monday I

I WARARITA
HI -Mon

G A M B O A fc Yui Biynner 4 Joanne Woodward

7:00 THE SOUND AND THE FURY"
Tues. "Juvenile Jungle" "Young and Wild"

2-30 7:00 "TARAWA BI.ACHF.AD'
Tues "THE MAN INSIDE"

PARAISO 7 :0t!
"THE DEFIANT I
ONES" J

Janta Cni7 7. Of
REVENGE OF
FRANKENSTEIN

tODAY

TIVOLI
0.35 0,t0
tyo Spanish PlctuB
if SURE Y BAJA
con Cantinflas
-.W.CADORA

1 SSC3I

.nSmer th a man on m the sev-

'City AUile.ic
ah Lhe White Sox
showed a -new wok in power-m.-tiriK
in the first game of a double double-header.
header. double-header. ,
The Sox, often described as
siinr! of the ion, bail, walloped
P.;; of ,nu, an, .'ore once h.m-
rih tit a ?.i virfn over the Los
A.ueies Dodgers r, the first game:
of a riouhle hc-oer.
Anderson, a 2?. year-old right
bander who was approaching 'last
i i-fntm; w :i msnilar sr;rt-
quick hands. They envy him the
six-gun he carries as an arm.
When the talk turns to the
Pittsburgh coverall boy, you
come awav with the impression
that it is 'his potential that has
made the deepest impression
Such as the day Lou Boudreau
was asked to compare Maz with
his old partner, Joe Cordon.
"Joe could do everything,"
Boudreau replied. "But when
vou see Mazeroski and remem
ber how young he is, you begin
to wondqr if he couldn't be the
best of them all."
Mazeroski jrurrently is under
what is considered his natural
batting average but he still re remains
mains remains the second baseman, who
probably has the most glittering
future of them all.
No one can remember when
second base was quite as well
manned in the National League
as it is this season.
When the San Francisco Gi-inls
say they'll stick with Daryl
Spencer you can't blame them.
The Los Angeles Dodgers ..ire
sold on Charley Ncal, the St.
Louis Cardinals rightfully satis satisfied
fied satisfied with Don Blasingame.
The only club that is genuine genuinely
ly genuinely hurting at the position is the
Milwaukee Braves. Despite all
their wishful thinking they have
not replaced Red Schoendiest and
it could cost1 therm the pennan;.
The Redhead, was just th.it
good. Z'i'y
THEATERS TODAY
COCO SOLO 2:30-7:00
AIR-CONDITIONED
4 Victor Mature
Yvonne De Carlo
"TIMBUKTU"
Added
CARTOON AND NEWS
EVENTS
Also Showing Monday
DIABLO HTS. 2:30-7:00
4 Anthony Perkins
Sllvana Mangano
"THIS ANGRY AGE"
Added
"DESTINATION McGOO"
Mon. 'Bonjour Tfistesse"

Elvis PRESLEY 4 Carolyn JONES
"KINO CREOLE"
"ACROSS THE BRIDGE"

'amp Mierrt 7 (1(1
ME AND THE
COLONEL

THEAVBi

CAPITOLIO
n.-T's n.2n
STRANGER IN MY
A It MS
with Jet.' ('handler
Also: -THE
SILENT
INF.MY
with L. Harvey

VICTORIA
0.25 0.15
LEGION OF THE
DOOMED
with Bill Wlllnams
BULLWHIP
with Guy. Madison

Today's Sport
Parade

NEW YORK (UPlt-The back backstage
stage backstage maneuvering for the pro proposed
posed proposed third major league proves
today that baseball still is a bull
market and you can take that
any way it reads.
Baseoall has done many things
down through the years to show
that the men at the steering wheel
are myopic in almost everything
except money. The Supreme Couiu,
ruied that this was a sport and
it's one subject out of which the
nation' comedians never got the
proper mileage.
Because baseball is a nickt'l nickt'l-nursiiig.
nursiiig. nickt'l-nursiiig. doliar-grabbing business
whic'' 'unhesitatingly sells down
the rivers such items as milked
cities, knifed minor leagues, worn
out players and children's ideals.
The suspicion here is that you
can add the proposed third major
league to the list.
There coula be no other expla explanation
nation explanation for the fact that the pow powers
ers powers behind the proposed third
Iepgu" whipped out a velvet coh cohered
ered cohered blackjack Wednesday which,
sirippeu of its verbose covering,
was an out and ort ultimatum to
organized baseball that it had bet better
ter better be ready quite soon to talk
turkey, and no-. er .nind the oart
associated with fences.
SHEA INSERTS ISSUE
W'l.iam A. Shea, head of the
New York group which with four
other unnamed cities comprises
the backbone of the new venture,
was exeedingly polite. He dis disclosed
closed disclosed that at his intercession the
congressional anti-monopoly com
mittee had delayed hearings on a
pending bill which would severely
limit 'he number of players each
team could hold in peonage.
He managed it, he let it be
known, despite the feeling of U.S.
Sen. Estcs Kefauver, the commit committee
tee committee chairman, that under current
conditions the third league had no
more chance than an Indian in a
horse opera.
; Reading between the lines,
somebody in baseball has told the
third league to go take a leap into
the lake. Shea's move was an ob
vious reminder that, if provocated
properly, distressed gentlemen
with the proper Capitol connec connections
tions connections could make things extremely
uncomfortable for baseball.
Baseball moguls would almost
rather see the Senators and the
Phillies in the World Series than
be called up before the other un un-athletic
athletic un-athletic senators for a congres congressional
sional congressional investigation. The answ:r is
that they have made too many
enemies for what is laughingly
called "the national pastime''
through a greed unparalleled since
King Midas started mauling the
family.
MONEY MOST IMPORTANT
Squeezing the buffalo has be
come more important in basebail
than "the game." Once, when it
was a sport, ball clubs were rich
men's toys operated in conjunctive
delight with the populace. It could
be said that in those times it was
an insoiration to the youth of thr.
nalion.
Today it sells beer and cigars
as its main function. The televi
siOn dollar is more important
than keeping the game alive in
towns and hamlets which once
cheered their sons on to the ma major
jor major leagues. So teach the kids the
delights of drinking and smoking
Old and trusted hands once were
pensioned off with a job in the
organization but, as in the case of
Country Slaughter, they are ex expended
pended expended shortly after being advised
that they "will be here as long
as I am."
Now, too, there will be two All
Star games. This makes as much
sense as a 15-game World Series,
and I'm sorry I mentioned it be because
cause because if they ever get such a
thought it's sure as shootin' to be
adopted. More money. The second
All-Star game was devised sup supposedly
posedly supposedly to help the player pen pension
sion pension plan. But it cost the strug struggling
gling struggling minor leagues another one of
their few paydays, because no nobody
body nobody will watch the Paducah Pi
rates on such a natipnal teevee
day.
BUCS GET HURLER
PITTSBURGH (UPI) Arthur
Wells Lamb, 18 year-old right right-bander
bander right-bander from Sharon, Conn has
.signed a contract for a "substan "substantial"
tial" "substantial" bonus, the Pittsburgh Pi Pi-!
! Pi-! rates announced today. Lamb, who
Islands (t eel I and weights 180
pounds was assigned to the Co
nimbus Jets of tne t ri pie-A Inter International
national International League The Jets imme immediately
diately immediately optioned him to Salem,
Vn of the Appalachian Rookie
! League.
! SENIOR AMATERUR
j NEW YOR K(NEA) -The lOfiO
ll'iiiled States Senior Amateur
Championship will be held at
I the Ovster Harbors Club, Oster
'ville, Mass., in September.

is-TODAY

RIO
0.35 0.20
SEPARATE TABLES
with R. Haywnrt.li
THE GUNRUNNERS
with Audle Murphy
and Patricia Owens
and David Nlven

Deauville Seeks 5 th Straight
Victory In 7-Furlong Sprint

The Stud Los Siete's classy
sprinter Deauville. finally perform performing
ing performing like the first rate sprinter he
was reputed to be when imported
from England, goes out in quest
of his fifth consecutive victory this
afternoon in the featured $750 sev seven
en seven furlong sprini for second series
imported racers at the President
Remon racetrack.
Four other good racers Gavilan,
Aipina. Don Lucho and Critico
will attempt to cut Deauville's
winning streak. All four were droo drooped
ped drooped down from the first series this
week because of a reclassification
in the class groups.
Heliodoro (Papito) Gustines, who
has been getting the best out of
Race Track
P.P. Hone
Jockey St.
1st Race 9th Series Imp. i Fas.
1st RACE OF
t-Lo Moscoso H. Gustines 126
2- Porro G. Milord 110
3- Festival B. Baeza 124
4- Resolana A. Reves R. 112
5-Smart Catch H. Mora 108
6-(MuIchen J. Cadogan 105
7-(Dofia Linda H. Hidalgo 107x
2nd. RaCe 7th. Series Imp. 7 Fgs.
2nd. RACE OF
1- Chacotero
2- Martlet
3- Behader
4- Platano
5- Emily Mary
6- Contralor
7- La Desiree
8- Tarasca
9- Le Matelot
J. Ulloa 115
H. Mora 110
G. Milord 110
B. Baeza 113
J. Villanueva 112x
A. Alfaro 105
H. Gustines 106
M. Valenzuela 108
B. Aguirre 108
3rd. Race "F" Natives 6 Furlongs
1-Zia
2- Noticion
3- Victoria
4- Guacamaya
5- Naranjazo
6- Filon
7- Don Manuel
8- (Okiland
9- ( Pilluelo
V. Tejada lllx
J. Shaik 119x
H. Hidalgo 110
R. Cruz lOlx
C. Quiros 121x
F. Sanchez lOOx
F. Justiniani llOx
M. Chalmers lOlx
G. Ramos 116x

4th. Race "Specil" Imp. t Fgs. Purse $650.00
QUINIELA

1- Reina Negra B. Aguirre 113
2- Mane Chantal F. Justiniani lOOx-
3- Juana de Arco
4- Barracuda
5- Meteor Lady
6- Old Smuggler
7- Belduque
J. Ulloa 110
H. Mora 108
H. Pitty 109x
G. Vasquez 108
G. Milord 106
5th Rc "C D" NATIVES & Fgs.
ohBlack Bee H. Gustines 116
2- Domitila B. Baeza 108
3- San Vicente J. Samaniego 116
4-Julie
'5-Solito
A. Gonzales 104
M. Valenzuela 120
S. Carvajal 116
A. LourJess lOOx
G. Milord 108
6 Don Grau
7- Bugaba
8- Don Vito
9- Don Brigido
J. Ulloa 110
6th Race "Special" Imp. 7 Fgs.
1st. RACE OF
1-Luzbel H. Hidalgo 96x
2 Singaluz G. Milord 105
3- Last Moment B. Aguirre 108
4- Salale F. Justiniani lOOx
5- Atrayente J. Ulloa 115
6 Brandal H. Mora 105
7- Condotiero F. Sanchez lOOx-
8- Nairobi H. Gustines 110
9- Puerto Madero B. Baeza 118
7th Race 6th Serle Imp. 6 Fgs.
2nd. RACE OF
1-Mikel G. Milord 108
2 Palave H. Gustines 108
3 Bongaros F. Alvarez 108
4 High Day G. Montero 110
5-Higland Prince H. Hidalgo 102x
6 Princesa Gitana J. Phillips 104
7 Maniart H. Mora 110
8th Race 7th Series Imp.
1- Miss P. J. Talavera 103:
2- Julio Verne Jose Rodriguez 110
3- Mi Cautiva G. Vasquez 106
4 Luciente A. Gonzales 110
5 Kensington B. Baeza 110 -6-Maese
H. Hidalgo 113x 113x-7
7 113x-7 Madame Cucu J. Phillipsl06
9 Bathina
10-Lady Edna
lWRenata
12-tJoyero
V. Tejada 102x 102x-II.
II. 102x-II. Gustines 112
F. Sanchez 105 -R.
Cruz 102x

9th Rec. 3rd. Series Imp. 6 Fgs. REPUBLIC OF VENEZUELA
Purse $650.00 Pool Closes 5:15 HANDICAP
ONE TWO
1-Bacancito F. Justiniani I02x Doesn't seem likely 15-1
2- Dependable B. Baeza 108 Could improve here 2-1
3- Xislullari H. Hidalgo 97x Last doesn't count 5-1
4- Double Four H. Mora 120 Form indicates 3-2
5- Tatir. H. Gustines 104 Better this week 5-2
6- (Al Justo R. Cruz 117x Sharpened for this 5-2
7- (Diocese F. Alvarez 105 Was never better 5-2
10th RACE 2nd. Series mp. 7 Fgs. Purse $750.00 Pool Closes 5:40
"CYCLE LEAGUE HANDCAP"

1 Gavilan
2 Deauville
3- Alpina
4- Don Lucho
VCriticn
V. Castillo 113
H. Gustines 115
H. Mora 115
H. Baeza 113
J. Ulloall5
11th Race 4th Series mp. 6 Fgs.
ONE

1 Horacio
2 Rrote
3 Bright Spur
4- Abolengo
5- Albigense
6- Granadero
7- Neeful
8(Nebnsca
9-(Sputnik

M
Valenzuela 118
R. Cruz llOx
U Hidalgo I02x
B. Baeza 110
J. Ulloa 115
G. Milord 115
H. Gustinesll2
H. Mora 115
B. Aguirre 108

Deauville in his recent starts, will
be aboard the grey speedster as
usual.
Don Lucho, which was a bad
trailer last week, will probably be
the second choice because he will
be ridden by leading jockey Brau Brau-lio
lio Brau-lio Baeza. Last week's" poor effort
was the only bad performance by
Don Lucho in a long time.
Stout-hearted Aipina also rates
a good chance. She holds several
decisions over Don Lucho and
could make it here. Veteran Her Her-nafli
nafli Her-nafli Mora, who is making a suc successful
cessful successful comeback, will do the
booting.
Consistent Gavilan, which is a a-gain
gain a-gain enjoying top form after al-

Graded Entries
Cominant
Odiii
Pool Closes 1:00
Purse $400.00
THE DOUBLE
Form indicates EVEN
Would surprise 10-1
No. 1 contender 3-2
Rates good chance 3-1
Reportedly improved 5-1
Depends on start 5-1
Could go all the way 5-1
Purse $450.00
THE DOUBLE
Pool Closes 1:30
Could go all the way
pood chance here
Nothing recently
Could -score again
Rider handicaps
Lacks early speed
Dangerous contender
Hard to beat here
Could take it all
10-1
3- 1
25-1
2-1
30-1
8-1
4- 1
5- 2
4-1
Purse $375.00 Pool Closes 2:00
Rates good chance 8-1
Could make it here 10-1
Danger card 3-1
Jockey may help 5-1
Should score easily EVEN
Could suprise 10-1
Rales good chance 4-1
Brief early speed 4-1
Could hang on here 4-1
Pool Closes 2:30
-Ran well in last
M
15-1
EVEN
4-1
3 1
15-1
-Good early speed
Returns from layoff
Ran well in debut
Reportedly ready
Would pay off
Better this week
10-1
Purse $425.00 Pool Closes 3:00
Dangerous contender
Rates good chance
More competition here
3-1
5-2
4-1
25-1
Could surprise
Nothing to indicate
Woutc; pay nice odds
Rates fair chance
Not good enough
5-1
8-1
20-1
50-1
2-1
Will fight it out
Purse $650.00
THE DOUBLE
Pool Closes 3:30
-Not good enough 25-1
-Can run; dangerous 5-1
-Rider only handicap 3-1
-Early speed only 15-1
-Hard to beat here 2-1
-Would surprise 8-1
-Not good enough 30-1
-Poor race in classic 8-1
-Mutuels favorite 8-5
Purse $450.00
THE DOUBLE
Pool Closes 4:05
Impressive win last 10-1
Hard to beat here 2-1
Enjoying good form 5-2
Ear y speed only 15-1
Fasi est at getaway 5-1
Ratts good chance 3-1
In fight to finish 5-2

7 Fgs. Purs, $450.00
QUINIELA

Pool Closes 4:40
-Doesn't seem likely
-Not with this rider
-Could surprise
-Returns from layoff
-Nothing in months
-Form indicates
-Could make it now
-No. 1 contender
-Not good enough
-Returns from layoff
-Surprised in last
-Rates fair chance
30-1
50-1
10-1
81
10-1
3-2
3 1
2-1
25-1
6-1
10-1
10 1
Always dangerous 3-1
Beller eacn time out 3-2
Last doesn't count 5-2
Better this week 2-1
Improved; can win 4-1
Purse $600.00
TWO
Po( Closes
Poor recent races
Must go lower
Begging for rest
Enjoying rare from
Form indicates
Usually close-up
Distance only nandicap
Fractious; always, ready
Good recent races
10-1
15-1
4- 1
6-1
3-2
5- 2
31
3-1
3-1

most a year in the doldrums, rates
a good chance too. He could score
another of his patented upsets.
Virgilio Castillo, one of his favor favorite
ite favorite riders, will be in the saddle.
Critico, another longshot special specialist,
ist, specialist, will have strong-armed Jose
Ulloa aboard. Critico rates as a
good a chance as any of the oth other
er other starters in this apparently wide wide-open
open wide-open race.
Former sprint champ Double
Four will attempt to get back in
the win column when he tackles
Dependable, Bacancito, T a t i n,
Xistullari, Al Justo and Diocese
in a six furlong dash.
Yesterday afternoon, the Stud
Santa Lucia's classy four-year-old
Argentine-bred colt Bob raced to a
three-length victory in the $3,000
added one mile and one-quartet U.
S. Independence Day Classic.
Mi Deseo was second, a half half-length
length half-length ahead of Buen Mozo II while
the latter finished a neck to the
good of El Tunchi. Constantino and
Vernieux trailed far behind.
Bob, second choice in the betting,

paid $5.60 to win and $3.40 place.
Mi Deseo, the third favorite in the
betting, paid $3.20 to place. The
Bob-Mi Deseo one-two returned a
juicy $16.40.
Classic specialist Jose Ulloa gave
Bob another of tils, perfect classic
rides. Bob turne drhe ten furlongs
in the creditable time of 2:06 3-5
over a track officially listed as
"good" but which was probably
worthy of a "slow" rating.
Braulio Baeza led the riders with
four wins, Heliodoro Gustines had
three and Ulloa two.
The dividens:
FIRST RACE
1 Damajuana $12.20, $4.40
2 Tuti Fruti $3
SECOND RACE
1 Hermelina $7.80, $3.20
2 Otorongo $2.40
First Double $57.20
THIRD THIRD
1 Tanara $2.80, $2.20
2 Tanganica $2.40
FOURTH RACE
Cleron $4, $5.40
Metafierro $3.40, $4.80
Dead-heat
Quiniela $24
FIFTH RACE
1 Ciria $6.20, $2.20
2 Apache $2.20
SIXTH RACE
lVespucio $4.20, $2.80
2 La B-isa $3.40
SEVENTH RACE
1 Blancor $3.60, $2.80
2 Coltro $6.40
, Second Double $6.80
EIGHTH RACE
1 El Agheila $17.20, $8.20
2 Black Jet $9.40
Quiniela $113.80
NINTH RACE
1 Bob $5.60, $3.40
2 Mi Deseo $3.20
One-Two $16.40
TENTH RACE
1 Azabache $4.60, $2.40
2 Arancel $2.80
ELEVENTH RACE
1 FaralTon $3.40, $2.20
2 Carcaman $2.80
One-Two $8.60
Today-Fnconfo-.35 y .20
Double In Cinemascope!
e Yul Brynner
Joane Woodward, in
"THE SOUND AND
THE FURY"
Don Murray, in
"THESE THOUSAND
HILLS"
ALSO
In every show the complete
Motion Picture of the World
Heavyweight Championship!
INGEMAR
JOHANSSON
VS
FLOYD
PATTERSON
TODAY REX THEATRE
IN COLON
EXCLUSIVE RELEASE!
Shows at 2:30 8:00
SECOND BIG WEEK!
r'v
4
Cecil BDeMilles
TheTen
Commandments
CHAfflTON
YUL
ANNt
HE5I0N-BRYNNER BAXTER
EDWARD G YVONNE
. R0BIN50N 'DE CARLO
debra PAGET john DEREK

Baseball

NACIONAL LEAGUE
Cincinnati 002 001 000-3 10 1
Pittsburgh 110 020 OOx 4 8 1
Nuxhall, Acker (5) and Bailey
Dotterer (8); Friend (4-10) and
Burgess. WP-NuxhaU (3-8).
(First Game)
Los Angeles 000 000 0011 6 1
Chicago 000 200 OOx 2 4 0
Sherry, Klippstein (8) and Rose Rose-boro;
boro; Rose-boro; Anderson (5-7) and S. Tay Taylor.
lor. Taylor. WP-Sherry (0-1). HR-Snlder
(11)
(Second Game)
Los Angeles 010 202 0005 9 0
Chicago 000 020 0002 5 1
Drysdale (9-6). and Pignatano;
Drabowsky, Morehead (4), Single Singleton
ton Singleton (6), Hobbie (8) aijd S. Taylor.
LP Drabowsky (4-6). HRS-Snider
(12) and Long (12).
S. Francisco 101 150 11010 16 0
St. Louis 002 000 100 3 10 2
McCormick, Miller (8) and Lan Lan-drith;
drith; Lan-drith; L. Jackson, Jeffcoat (5),
Cheney (8), Ricketts (9) and H.
Smith. WP-McCormick (8-7). LP LP-Jackson
Jackson LP-Jackson (7-7). HRS-Spencer 2 (6
& 7).
TURNS SELF IN
NASHVILLE. Tenn. (UPI)
James Corley, 54, broke out of
state prison, stole a car and
turned on the radio. He heard a
report of his escape, stopped the
car and telephoned deputy ward warden
en warden W. S. Neil to come get him.
Neil dW.

ONCE OVER LIGHTLY J'i'l Fella ha.- his tnotsis tr-dtecS
by blacksmith Rhody Cart.pbe'., at Mof.rr.ci.'c Park on the.
New Jersey shore Howard Ij'rant. 'ho nd;s hel.ls horse.

BALBOA

. AIR-CONDITIONED!
Presents
on Tuesday, July 7

THE NATIONAL
FOOTLIGHT PARADE
Featuring
4 Ray Styles
4 Jack Pyle
4 Peggy Adams
and
The Bob Stevens Qulntel

ALSO

on the screen
6:15 9:15 p.m.
Admission
830 J(ca. fianamd

Results

0
AMRICAN LEAGUE f ''
Boston 001 103 0005' .1
Baltimore 021 151 01x11 t
Wills, Fornleles (5), Kiely (Ok
Wall (8) and White; Pappas (8-4)
and Triandoa. WP-Wills (2-5).
HRS-Dropo 2 (3 & 4), Furigan (1).
(First Game)
Washington 404 02 00010 13 1
New York 000 100 500 6 10 0
Ramos, Stobbs (8) and Naragon;
Dltmar, Bronstad (3), Coates (4).
Shantz (9) and Howard, BlaWhard
(7) WP-Ramos (9-7).LP-Ditmar
(7-6). HRS-Killebrew (27), Sievera
(8) Slaughter i3rd.)
(Second Game) ;
Washington 000 000 0000 1 1
New York 020 012 02x 7 13 0
Griggs Woodeschick (4), Fischer
(6) and Courtney; Turley (7-8) and
Berra. LP-Griggs (2-63.
(First Game)
Cleveland 100 220 0018 8 1
Detroit 000 001 0001 5 2
McLish (10-3) and Brown; Lary,
Schulz (9) and Wilson, WP-Lrr
(9-5). HR-Minoso (13).
t
(First Game)
Chicago 001 102 3007 17 0
Kansas City 011 200 0004 : 1
Donovan, Shaw (4) and"Roma and"Roma-nov,
nov, and"Roma-nov, Daley, GMm (6), Kucks (7),
Reed (8) and House, Chnei. WP WP-Shaw
Shaw WP-Shaw (7-3). LP-Grim (5-5). HRS HRS-H.
H. HRS-H. Smith (3), Romano (3), Phil Phil-lios
lios Phil-lios (3), Loll a r (12).
THEATER
on stage
p.m. ONLY!
8:
0.50W100
1090 Jfa. faton

ill
&WtimK mam WWOOItlW
. .hi. ft-'""'
HI

'



PAGI

Nhwcombe is Back But Thomas Deal Kills Refljfi

wmmi$m" "ftp" J

wsSSSasS' t i hi mii-mirm iiiitjlsiii&s.

BOWLKU uvn
ficer of tne wn

232 10 necimu iujui "-
bowleg season from January to June.

Stables Not
For Horses
tttytngtoN. Ky (NEA)
tu. ct.hisl Motel on the
north-
em edge -of Lexington is a- beU
thn lair place to.stefld the n ght.
it fia wimmin&ooi, ele ele-vioa
vioa ele-vioa in. the rooms; Bd
not. But. "the establishment on
the Paris Pike threw- and out-of-town
fyftilid for a losfP man
Md been' busy for hour' on end
vHting" farms, looking at horses
and listening to endless conver conver-s?'on
s?'on conver-s?'on on runners and breeding.
Toward evening, returning to,
town -h oassed the. .Stables
Mo' el, which in keeping with
i's name is designed to look, like
a fancy stable. As usual, there
were numerous horse vans and
trailers parked in front.
The visitor took one look and
exclajmei,. j'tfow I've seen y.
erythiiigv'- Imagine a motet for
horsesl". .. ., ; fZ:
cards sign outfielder
LouirtlMnalii ;f8lay anrroitriced
the signing of Jackie Kepic, a
Fordham University junior, to a
substantial bonus. The 19-year old
lefthanded- hitting, outfielder has
been .assigned tt) 'Wythesville, Va.
of the Appalachian Rookie league,

TODAY LAST DAY!

WEEKEND ATTRACTION!

X iMiTmiiaTOiiEimowiM-

imuLnmni imu jot manjell m -mmw

G. Barger, commanding of-

rvice) Fort Clayton
... Mp
avpraep
(US Army Photo)
Sports Briefs
BOOTS FIVE WINNERS
NEW YORK (UPI) Jockey
Manuel,: Ycaw.', booted home five
winners Wednesday at Belmoht
Park, Ycaza's -winning, mounts
were 'Doe, "How Are Things.
(S7.J0), Matisse ($8.00), Tufanhai
( $3,10 and -Past Due ( $4 .60 ) .
RETURNS TO 'NL
CLEVELAND (UPI) Third
baseman, Willie Jones returned to
the National League Wednesday
when he was sold by tne Cleve
land Indians to the Cincinnati
Reds. Jones was purchased from
the Philadelphia Phillies June 5
to strengthen Cleveland's third
base post.
TRY FQ SW-2EP
HENLEY-ON-THAMES, ".England
(UPiyHarvard's undefeated var varsity
sity varsity heavyweight crew .ppens its
WdW-tr-CSim'son sweep
of the" two" fop events in the Roy Royal
al Royal Henley Regatta. Harvard's un undefeated
defeated undefeated lightweight sprinters
opened, defense of their Thames
(Challenge Cup. Wednesday with a
two3erigtat$umph over1 Br'tains
Crowland Rowing Club.
That
lovable
laugh-maker
of NoTime
for Sergeants
nas -the
Coast
Guard
ma
wm

DK1
:1

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEW YORK (NEA) Quick
analysis of the Reds of whom so
much was expected in the
spring:
Don Newcombe is back, fire fireball
ball fireball and all, but the deal for
Frank Thomas killed them.
Yoei Berra of the Yankees hit

two home runs off Newcombe in
the final game of the 1958 World
Series at Ebbeta Field and some
thing snapped.
Here wag a strong right-hand
pitchei (6-4 and 240 pounds) who
won from 17 to 27 games in five
of six pitching years in the Na National
tional National League. There were two
years out for military service aft after
er after which he" Understandably bog bogged
ged bogged down in 1954. But he had
won 27 while losing only 7 when
Berra put the slug on him. This
led to his being elected the most
valuable player in the league
and won hjra the Cy Youn
Memorial Award as the outstand outstanding
ing outstanding pitcher of the year.
Berra so upset Newcombe
blasting the ball across historic
Bedford Avenue that Newk slug slugged
ged slugged a parking lot attendant leav leaving
ing leaving the Brooklyn battleground.
There followed headline-attract'.ng
brawls in his New Jersey pub.
Obviously he was touchy about
throwing (he gopher.
NEWCOMBE COULDnV GET
ANYBODY OUT IN Flatbush In
1957 and went completely to pot
with the aging outfit which mov moved
ed moved to Los Angeles last year. Fi
nally in mid-June the Dodgers for
whom he did so much gave up
on him. They sent him to Cinci
nnati for Johnny Khppstein and
Steve Bilko, who as an Angel, in
the Pacific Coast League hit
home runs like breaking stick3.
Newcombe arrived in the Rhine-
land in time to save Birdie Teb
betts, but didn't, and wasn't
much as Jimmie Dykes hoisted
the Reds from last to fourth.
But the deal now has turned
out to be one of Gabe Paul's good
ones, tor Newcombe went on
orotracted winning streak as the
Reds' lone stopper. O p p o s i n g
players tell you he is almost as
fast as he was in World Series
and that he mixes up his pitches
as never Deiore.
IT TOOK A PSYCHIATRIST to
convince Newcombe that he was
penectiy sate ana much more
comfortable in an airplane. Now
iNewk credits Trainer Wayne An
derson with putting him in the
frame of mind to pitch. Doc An
derson did it simply by rubbing
the supposed sore spot: and then
lighting the firecracker which is
the current Newk with a tug pf
tne arm
Paul, one of the more respect
ed general managers built' u.the
Reds througft iikilrftif" wppin2.
A pippin was the one which
brought Gus Bell, a long-ball hit
ting outfielder not yet 24, from
Pittsburgh in exchange for Out
fielders Cal Abrams and Gail
Henley and Catcher Joev Rossi

Oct. 15, 1952. Paul didn't "svewfeut decision.

have to throw in a couple of bro
ken bats.
He obtained Brooks Lawrence
from the Cardinals for little Jack
ie Collum. He landed Don Hoak
Pete Whisenant and Warren Hack
er of the Cubs for Ray Jablonski
ana a noDoay,
BUT PAUL RAN OUT OF LUCK
IN THE SWAPPING. A deal with
Pittsburgh made in Janaury kill
ed the Reds for this year. It gave
tnem frank Thomas, Jim Pendle
ton, Johnny Powers and Whanr
my Douglas for Harvey Haddix
Hoak and Smoky Burgess. This
transaction presented the Pirates
with everything they needed
left-hand pitcher, a third base
man and a left-hand hitting catch
er with power.
Thomas, the key man. showed
up with a bandaged right thumb
which keeps swelling and reduc
ed his home run output to some
thing aoproaching that of singles
niuer jonnny Temple.
With Thomas at third base
Roy McMillan Jiad to play two
positions and when he went out
with a broken, bone in the back
of his throwing hand the infield
looked like one representing the
Perth Amboy firemen at a fat
man s picnic.
Dependable pitchers went hay
wire, but not Don Newcombe
tie played m Brooklyn, you
see, ana naa to be different
Youth Calls
Shots Here
TAMPA. Fla (NEA') The Tern
pie Terrace Golf and Country
Club of .Tarn pa unquestionably
has the youngest set of club cham
pions. :
Lee Gav. Iff. hnldi fh men'
crown. Roberta Alber. 12. is th
women's titliat Gay and BUI
Dudley, 12, :re the Iclub'g four
ball champions. ?
other Temple Terrace young
sters who have distinguished
themselves include C h a r I e
Knowles, 18, who teamed with
Gay to win the Tampa city four
1 11 1 n I n I Ua.
uhii crown, ana &nan, annul jo
who won medal honors in thi
year's Florida state high school
tournament with 68. ."
Koberta Aioers, who ha 'Won
the National Pee Wee Cham
oionship in Orclando, holds the
lempie terrace women i course
record, 75.
1IVER TOfJIC

OF

IT TOOK. A
TO C&sVHCM

ISfSlS? J I I P$$0 JZ-Ht ABM BY
IK i1 yfZ
JrS f if j I Vi flTwfr
-

Armenteros Tq Meet Murillo
At Panama Gym N ext Sunday

Ranking Cuban bantamweight
Manuel Armenteros will seek nis
first victory on the Isthmus next
Sunday when he meets Panama
featherweight Roberto Murillo in
122-pound ten-rounaer at me
National Gym.
Armenteroi lost a thriuirjg spin
decision to leading 118- pouna
contender Toto Ibarra in the vis visitor's
itor's visitor's debut at the Olympic Sta
dium last Sunday.
Murillo droDDed a disputed ver
dict to lightweight contender Jor
0 Ouintero at the JNauonai uym
several weeki ago. A near-riot
MiKtied when it was announed
that two judges saw Quintero
winning, because the majority
felt Murillo had earned a clear-
According to the July world
ratings published during the last
few days, Armtnteros, a resident
of Mexico, is ranked fifth by the
National Boxing Association of A-
MARINE MONSTER Car Carson
son Carson F Chandler of Steelton,
Pa., landed this white marlin
off Bermuda after a 30-minut
fight. The fish is seven feet
long, weighs 72 lbs., 12 ounces.
BEARS INK LINEBACKERS
CHICAGO (UPI) The Chicagu
Bears today announced the sign signing
ing signing of two more linebackers for
1959, Joe Fortunato and Chuct
Howley. Fortunato, who went to
Mississippi State, has been with
the Bears for four years fncl how how-ley,
ley, how-ley, a former star at West Vir Virginia,
ginia, Virginia, was the Bears' top draft
choice last year.
PUBLIC LINKS
NEW YORK (NEA) Np few fewer
er fewer than 2,448 entered the United
States Public Links Championship.
The event will be held over Den Denver's
ver's Denver's Wellshire course, July 13 18.
PROPER GUIDANCE
FAST LANSING. Mich (NEA).
Michigan State's first football
coach was the Rev. Charlea O.
Bemies, who guided the 1889
and 1900 teams.

1?. I r"; XL-m- wr
I- y" : I

MIND AND MATTER

merica and seventh by Ring Mag Magazine.
azine. Magazine. The six-round semifinal brings
together unbeaten Eloy Henry
and free-swinging Antonio (Cora (Cora-zon
zon (Cora-zon de Toro) Gonzales at a weight
limit of 123 pounds.
Henry, one of the most prom promising
ising promising local prospects to come a a-long
long a-long in years, has racked up five
consecutive wins as a pro since
he became Central American and
Caribbean bantamweight cham champion
pion champion in Olympic Games held in
Venezuela early this year.

V M0DELO SO 1 72 WE U S
-M rV Special Datv Free Prices tt f S '(' 7
!" n,,r''y
y wmowfl" Pf. I
Xy r CASA SPARTW f Mj r
eentral 26-109 calldonla V
! 5
.. 1 : '-7

Gonzales, a scrappy youngster
fresh out of the amateur ranks,
is not afraid to slug it out with
an opponent. He has a good

punch and amazing stamina.
In two four-round prelims Car Carlos
los Carlos Cruz and Ernesto Campbell
meet at 119 pounds and Roily Mc McKay
Kay McKay and Alejandro P a c h e c o
swap punches at a weight limit
of 126 pounds.
General atfmiaslon
$1.2, general ringside
reserved ringside, $3.

ACADEMY AWARD BEST ACTkESSa :-f!
jusan hayward now m
"WOMAN OBSESSED"

"Tf" 7Ew I

Oscar winner Susan Hayward, voted Hollywood's best
actress by the Motion Picture Acaceiny o Arts.mnd
Sciences, returns to the screen as the "WOMAN OBSnS
SED", in 20th Century Fox's heart-shattering story .of a
young widowed mother, her son and their involvement
with a lonely backwoodsman, set against the rugged back background
ground background of the Canadian Rockies, Based in John Mantley's

best seller and produced in Cinemascope and DeIixev
color, this production starts on Wednesday at the Bella
Vista theatre.
In "WOMAN. OBSESSED", Miss Haywaii! puts ,fo,rfrj .alk
her talents and brings to reality Mantlets fortefur cfir
acter "Mary Sharron", a woman who facrs the job of
runnine farm alone and bringing up a., young son as a

result of her husband's untimely death. The conseoue

and the personal fight she

by an actress of Miss Hayward's stature.
Stephen Boyd, lop British star of stage and screen, who
caught the attention of the. American moviegoing pub-,
lie when he played the Irish agent in "The Man Whd'
Never Was". Barbara Nichols, Arthur iFranz and Kea,,
Scott also co-star in this tale of adventure and love.
Don't miss It.

Read Our

price s ,, l. -, I
$2.50 and 1 1 1 I

bears could only be depict

,'firwl'll.

Classifieds

i:;uai

a

3
A



SUNDAY, JULY I, S
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
Classified Ads
wassmea Has
AGENTS:
Classified Pare closes 11: SO
a.m. Mon. to Frl., 11 ajn.
Sat., t p.m. Sat for Sun.
Offlqe open 8-5 weekdays.
Ffaone Panama 2-740 for
formation about Clas Classifieds.
sifieds. Classifieds. Charge your ad if
yoa have a commercial
contract.
r., vn-m an uinl ovp OP OUR AGFNTS OR Ol'R OFFICES AT 13-37 "H" SWHIT. PANAMA MBRFR1A PRECIADO I Street M. II AGKNCIAS
"V?. ?.0J..A!?. v i ..fi-rv pi.,. I ASA ZALDO Central Ave. 45 LOURDF.S PHARMACY-182 Ijl Carrasaeilla FARMACIA LOM-
I.M LICHAI.. nr. ri.DMi.iiiu. -. ; ..V. '. t, i tit I FWIS SK.RVICF. Ale Tivoll No. A m F4RMATIA ESTAnOS IINIfWIft US
i nii stRvii'F ii Tivnii Nn Am rAPuirii caTinna imiiMMuin Ontnl Ave.
2b n Mreei mijnniaun iui '.' .... 7 a. I. o. Avi. Mo ai trvrn nniurv ),. Am.ia.n. i nH tt at. A FAR
F4RMUIA l.l'X 1C4 CenB-al Ave
Hini.HiiLu r ..iin.... ."-. -" ..."- ---r". ... "vrxT.iiv. ;-uia
Beside BeUii Vista Theatre on" f ftiac. f at Minimal ? Supi Market on Via Espaft. 0 COLON OFFICE: 15th .nd Amad., Guerwr. No. U2Z1 Til. 431.
-raruuc Lcinir i .urn a r.inirii.iA arta rvnu in . ......

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN

nt

Resorts

fetter cortagei. between Santa
Clara and Rio Hito. New low
rata.. Phone Balboa 1J6S.
PHILLIPS Oceania. Cottages
Santa Clan oe P f-
at Clan
"7 :)'
1077 Cristobal S-171.
Houses
(
FOR RENT: Completely fur furnished
nished furnished three bedtoom residence,
prevoiusly occupied by Bolivian
Minister in Ecuador Avenue No.
28. Livingroom, etininqroom,
kitchen, office, two bathroom,
maid's room with service, wash
tubs, garage, insids patio, hot
water in all service!, direct tele tele-phono
phono tele-phono line for inspection, see
at Ecuador Avenue No. 30 or Fd Fd-breoa
breoa Fd-breoa at 29 East Street, rear Mer Mer-cado
cado Mer-cado Vasco.
-r-sr
FOR HINT: Completely fur furnished
nished furnished chalet, 2 bedroom, living living-r
r living-r o m, diningroom, kitchen,
maid's room, garage, etc $175
- 95th. Street No. 43. Tel. 3 3-4994
4994 3-4994 -FQR RENT: Residence in "La
Oesta". Three bedrooms and
two baths Maid's room with bath,
living-diningroom. Garage. Lo Located
cated Located near the French Embassy
?Fr information call 2-0893 or
- 2-0894
FOR RENT: Chalet upstairs. 2
bedroom, recently painted. End
:. Via Espaiia. beside Radio Mira Mira-mar,
mar, Mira-mar, white house, Tel. 3-6351.
Commercial Sites
FOR REN T: Office space.
Mercedes building, above Avenida
Balboa's Post Office, with terrace
. floors, acoustic ceiling, private
bathroom, watchman, very rea reasonable
sonable reasonable rent. Tel. 3-3054,

Air Pioneer Not Sure Man
Will Soon Reach The Moon

ARCADIA, Calif. (UPD- Roy
IV .. Kn rich MP W lin was auile a pi-
nopr in the field of aviation
himself, is far from convinced
that the time is near for aman aman-hW'sflace
hW'sflace aman-hW'sflace flight to the moon.
In fact, the 82-year-old Kna Kna-benshue
benshue Kna-benshue is pretty skeptical about
outer-space travel in general.
Knabenshue. who made t n e
fjst motor -controlled flight in a
"dirigible balloon," claims to be
the oldest living "early bird in
America.
The gray haired one-time pro-
SLSw- ioi-
'V Vork lo lis n?clcs during
"h 1900's lives here in a trail-1
"home greeting visitors qutelly
with his recollections of the in
fani -ir'age and comments on the
'"'re'
Trie OX5 Club of earlv (lav
fiwrs re'centlv honored Knaben-
shn"
it.. n Mnst MVin" iiiiu
" rviaL-int him
the patriarch
of a' clan th' now cp's t onether
vearlv to remember naiioons,
.i-.'inc -.s iV'' "'ere t'len
'and flying hv the seat
of the pants.
Kfiabenshue, for instance, '."
fp"s the time he flew the fi''st
yrUrtgible balloon" at the St.
Loji Fair on Oct ?5 1001. sind sind-hie
hie sind-hie it carefully over the city.
. ""eonle 'hotilh' Ta7v. and
aid it could, never be done said
th -pld"rlv balloonist "But
:Bl(tV,ed it could Miybe ill this
itaJk-.. abotii hittins
Is' real doubtful.
"nor,

. Hi expressed pleasure at 'h' j I'ana manian Ruben Miro Guard! i
';fcpe.ed of present-day jets, re- Tho n0V(,rnmpn1 man th(,
nVaTlberine when the maxinvm sjon t exnel Miro because ol a
I pee'd in the air was 12 12 miles statement he made to the effect
rt, hour, and then the "aero thai Cuba had sponsored the ex ex-,
, ex-, plane?" couldn't get off thejperiitinn to Panama. The govern

ground on 'ncr own nower. inment considered the statement
'-maintain takeoff speed, he said,as harmful to the sovereignly of
thf plane had to be in position 'Cuba

Commercial Guide!

r wiiiiii i via i vju uc

I ADVERTISE IN
l

Ads only cost $0.85 Der col. inch

j" FOR INFORMATION CALL 20740 J

LIFE INSURANCE
rail
JIM RIDGE
General Airnt
Gibraltar Lite Ins. Co,
for rule and Information
Tel. Panama 2-Or,S2
Monday thnr rrlrtnv
S OU a.m. to 12:00
2:M p.m. In 5:00
Saturday: :l em. to 12:00
Listen To
The OAS
Panamen an
(Recant cSn
12:30 p.m.
HOC-YCN
Every Sunday

Apartments

FOR RENT. Completely fur fur-furnished
furnished fur-furnished apartment, 1 bedroom,
livingroom, diningroom, large
porch. Venetian blmdv garage,
linen, China glassware Exclusive
residential section Bella Vista.
Telephone Balboa 1448.
FOR RENT: Very modern two
bedroom apartment, best loca location
tion location Col! 2-2466 during office
- hours
FOR RENT: Completely fur furnished
nished furnished apartment, two bedrooms,
two baths, livingroorr, dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, kitchen, front and back
porches, maid s bath, garage and
hot water. Edificio La Aurcra,
55th Street corner of Via Argen
tina. Apartment No 3, El Can Can-greio
greio Can-greio Available for two months.
Call 3-6870 or 3-4899
FOR RENT: G.I. approved,
furnished apartment, modern
building, screened, convenient
location. Automobile Row, No.
36, Tel. 3-6855. after 7, 2 2-5046.
5046. 2-5046. FOR RENT: Furnished apart-m-nt
parlor, diningroom, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, kitchtn, porch, garage, til tiled,
ed, tiled, screened $55 00. Apply No.
112 Via Belisario Porras, near
Roosevelt Theatre.
FOR RENT: Beautiful Pent Penthouse
house Penthouse in El Cangrejo 'Madurito
Building Three Bedroom, Two
Baths, Maid's Room and Bath to
be available from August 7th.
For information call Telephone
2-2844 from 9 to 1 2 and 2 to
6 p m.
STERNO TAKEN OVER
NEW YORK (UPIi Colgate Colgate-Palmnlivp
Palmnlivp Colgate-Palmnlivp Co. has aqreed to ac acquire
quire acquire Sterno Corp. .if New York,
maker of "canned heat," in an
undisclosed stock exchange deal.
on a steep hillside and then push pushed
ed pushed down so it could get off the
ground
Knabenshue said he became in interested
terested interested in airships "because I
wanted to see how it felt to be in
the air."
But lie said he preferred flying
j balloons to planes, recalling what
happened when the Wright
brothers made one of their flights
at Dayton, Ohio, and Knaben Knabenshue
shue Knabenshue was asked to fly as their
professional manager.
"AH .he excuses 1 could thin,,
of came up al the time, but 1
lost and had to m the ma
chine." he said "I was really
j scared, not having a big gas filled
hallnon overhead."
Now. looking back over 50 years
. or what he calls "nhenomenal"
acnl nrogress Knahenshu con-
.k' m i"1"
J ned lunar flights may he unwar
ranted.
'Talk of hitting the moon may
i he just as possible as some of my
imnossihle lll"hts.
"But I still think
wav off
he said.
it's a long
Cuhon Government
Orders Pvrlsion
ijO D"l Miro
HAVANA, .lulv 4 il'PI) The
Ministrv of Government toda or
dererl the rxnulsinn from ("nli.i of
THIS SECTION
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Governmriit F.mnloves
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Tlseil Car
00VERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATKS I P TO 3fi Mo.
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINUER
No. 43 Automobile I'.ow
Phone 3-4984 .t-4!IR!i
All Types of Auto Insurance
BEMONSTRATOR HURT
PETERBOROUGH. K n E 1 a n d
(UPI) An engineer offered lo
show journalists how to tap a in in-eplionf
eplionf in-eplionf wirr with only a pair ol
nail scissors' during an inspection
of a new telephone exchange line
yesterday He was hospital. 7cd with
shock and a banied hand when
lie demonstrated on the wruiii
M'lrc.

Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1956 Chevrolet,
Bel-Air, 4 door, sport sedan,
powcrglide, radio, w.w. tires,
$1 350 House 1 5 1 2 A. Balboa.
Tel 1389.
FOR SALE: 1948 Ford sedan,
good tires, runs fine, inspected
$175 00. Panama 3-7810.
FOR SALE: f959 Pontiac, leav leaving
ing leaving Isthmus Quintero. Tels. 3 3-6029
6029 3-6029 and 4 0489.
FOR SALE: 1958 Ford Country
sedan (Station Wagon! Fordor,
6 passenger, V-8, 265 h p. Ford Ford-omatic;
omatic; Ford-omatic; back-up lights, heater,
S2 175.60. 1950 Willys jeep with
winch $750.00. Call Vic Melant
at 6-347.
FOR SALE: 1957 Ford station
wagon, 6 cylinder, standard, radio,
he.-ter, etc 16.000 miles, excel excellent
lent excellent condition. Balboa 1253.
FOR SALE : 1 949 Pontiac, 4 4-door.
door. 4-door. 5 cylinder, very good con condition
dition condition Phone 3 4855.
FOR SALE: 1958 Mercury
Montclair, two-tone, blue, white
side wall tire, practically new,
approximately 17,000 miles,
push button control, power steer steer-inp,
inp, steer-inp, power brakes, radio, heater,
one owner. Call 83-6105.
FOR SALE: Chevrolet 1955,
white side walls, radio, excel excellent
lent excellent condition, new tires.
$900 00. Call Balboa 3248.
WANTED
WANTED: Maid for house housekeeping
keeping housekeeping and cooking, must be
neat and experienced. House
6260, Los Rios.
PERSONALS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A" DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709.
Special Offers
Old established Hong Konk
firm wishes to contact reliable
importers, wholesalers and stores
interested in importing Hong
Kong manufactured men's, wo women's
men's women's and children's wear. En Enquire
quire Enquire please, in English, to
SWEDISH TRADING CO. LTD.,
PO BOX 108, HONG KONG.
AKC Boxer 5 mos. hschrkn ears
clipped had shots. Call Bal.
1503.
Scholar Has Problem
Using Scholarships
ST TAIL. Minn. (UPD Bill
Dclehantv, fresh out of St.
Thomas College. has a unique
problem: Rv next fall he must
decide how to use $8,200 in grad graduate
uate graduate scholarships.
Bill earned the scholarships
while compiling a record of al almost
most almost all "A's" in a lihcrul arts
course that emphasized hislory,
foreign languages and debate.
lie can read, write anil speak
French and Latin, lie had two
years ol Creek and German, lie
won 70 per cent of his debates
over a three vear period and re received
ceived received the St. Thomas "Mr. Tom
my" award as the senior who best
rcpiescnted the school s ideals
Tentatively, Bill plans to aolve
his scholarship dilemma this
way : He will enter Yale as an
OvcrbuoK Fellow to study his
lory next fall using funds Hum
the YVoodruw Wilson Fellowship.
I
I 1,1 tnt' fa" ol he t0"
ilmue at Yale for his masters
degree using a Danlorth scholar
ship. Later, he will work lor a
Wloctnratc. by which he hopes to
! lie teaching al some small col
ieg
Warm Weather
Is Time For
Icebox Caution
NKW YORK (liPH April
tlirmiuh s p ii I e m b e r arc the
months when most death.; Horn
Miilocation in abandoned refrig refrigerators
erators refrigerators ocriir.
In Ihe past 12 years, 150 chit
Idrcn, most oi Ihein three to six
! years old, have died this way.
! If vou're storing or discarding
:i refrigerator, padlock or remove
Ihe door, remove the iatcl. slop,
or ventilate the box by drilling
holes in it.
If possible, destroy the refrrg
erator, said Dr. I.eroy E. Curne,
surgeon general of the Public
Health Service.
Kefi iterators in use also are
dangerous, especially if sheies
have been removed. So parent
should snrpervise children earn earn-lullv
lullv earn-lullv when (hev are playing near
any refrlgeraor, Biirney added.

Animals

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Maternity and baby
clothes, store "Stork" owner un unable
able unable to attend it personally. Jus Jus-to
to Jus-to Arosemena Avenue in front of
Royal Crown. For information
apply on premises.
FOR SALE: Office safe 500
Lbs. Inside dimensions 20x16x12
inches. Masonic Temple Bldg.,
Cristobal, C.Z. room II, or Tel.
36-633.
NOTICE TO FISHERMEN
33 3 discount on all fishing
tackles. This is not a sale, but
permanent reduction of price.
ABERNATHV, J A,
Across side street from El Pana Panama
ma Panama Hotel.
FOR SALE Winchester, model
12-16 Gauge, 16 Ft. Fiber glass
bottom boat with outboard motor
and trailer. Fishing rods and
reels. Polaroid Land Camera,
Model 95A with case and flash
attachment. Qtrs. 2111-A, 5th
St Curundu, Tel. Curundu 5264.
FOR SALE; Plants. House No.
9081, 8th Street, New Cristobal.
Phone 50, Colon.
FOR SALE: Brambach Baby
Grand Piano, excellent condition
$350, or best offer; Argus C44
Camera, Telephoto lens, view
finder $90; Double bed $20;
Wicker table, $5; Mirror $3.
Phone Balboa 2-1665.
SERVICES
TELEVISION SERVICE
Experts in TV. radio. Hi-Fi and
transistors. t
We do more Work, because we
do it the best.
Phone 2-1905.
Crawford Agencies.
Tivoti Avenue No. 18-20.

Chunky Little Ship Aids
Navy In Missile Testing

CHINA LAKE, Calif. (UPI)
Perhaps the unlikeliest candidate
for seagoing honorsain the Navy
is the USS Butternut, a hard hardworking
working hardworking chunky little ship whose
current mission is to service "pop "popup"
up" "popup" tests of the Polaris missile.
From the Long Beach Naval
Shipyard, the nutternut hauls a
dummy of the Polaris out to sea
n the San Clement Island sea
ranges, recovers it alter the mis missile
sile missile is launched and then returns
it to shore for a checkup.
The Polaris, of course, is the
Navy's 1,500-mile guided missile
designed for firing from sub
merged submarines. In the cur
rent tests being serviced by the
Butternut, a 41-foot mulion-uol-
ar underwater launching tube is
used to "pop up" the Polaris
dummy.
The Butternut boasts a proud
crew of 55 officers and men, in including
cluding including 12 divers, one of whom is
her skipper, Lt. Mike Trens of
Williamsburg, Va.
The ship operates on a sched
ule geared to accommodate the
missile scientists, rather than the
Navy, One result is that liberty
for ihe crew is not routine.
Nevertheless, more than one
man has "signed over" for But-
lernut duty rather thafl take a
well-paying job in civilian life.
The explanation for this is sim
ple: morale could hardly be higher.

UNITED. FRUIT COMPANY
GREAT WHITE FLEET

New Orleans Service

Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Carjo

New York Service S a U s Arrives
- Cristobal
t ( I1MAY AGl'A Julv 4 July 9
FRA BKRLANGA Julv H July lfi
KSPARTA July 18 July 23
SAN JOSE July 25 July 30

Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
CRISTOBAI.VV.C.C.A. FEEDER SERVICE
TEX1TA Every (15) Days
Weekly sailings oi twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle

SPECIAL EXCURSION FARE FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return 1278.00
To San Francisco andor Seattle and Return ..$400.00

CRISTOBAL
tm

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Diningroom set,
table with six chairs buffet. Solid
mahogany. 243-C, Coco Solo 36-
760.
FOR SALE: Electric range, SO
inch, Kenmore, overhauled, full full-width
width full-width oven, $100. Navy 3260.
FOR SALE: Electric roaster,
electric sewing machine, Servel
refrigerator, coffee master, pres pressure
sure pressure cooker cabinet, motor 60
cycle, 1 hp, 1 ph., 220-240,
house 551, A neon Boulevard.
FOR SALE: Upright vacuum
cleaner, large wall mirror, dining
room set, sectional sofa, end
tables, washing machine.
FOR SALE: Heywood Wake Wakefield
field Wakefield Living Room Set OAK
Dining Room Set Bedroom
Dressing Tables Radio Phono Phonograph
graph Phonograph Tools Toys TV
Tel. Navy 3123.
FOR SALE: AKC Registered
Toy Bull Boston Terrier Puppies.
Call Navy 3986,
FOR SALE: Frigidairo 9 e.f.
Porcelain, Solid Mahogany Desk.
Call Balboa 1503.
FOR SALE: General Electric
Clothes Dryer, good condition.
Qtrs. Ill, Albrook, Phone
86-4144.
FOR SALE: Leaving country
Mahogany dining table seats
eight Phone J-3485, Pan Panama.
ama. Panama. Boats & Motors
FOR SALE: 8" Bench Saw and
4" Joiner on table with 2 shaft
V h p., 60 cy. motor. One Vi
h.p. motor G.E. New, 22 cel.
Supermatic pistol. Pistol case
with spotting scope. Misc. 1 2
gauge ammo. Calle Balboa 3444.
Trens, who earn up throuah
the ranks from apprentice sea seaman,
man, seaman, has contributed more to the
project than just running his
ship. He's an idea man, too.
It wag Treng who suggested
protecting the launching tube
from the possibility that the
dummy missile would fall back on
it after the "pop up" by using a
net that could be pulled back
from the mouth of the launcher
until firing and then immediately
close over it.
The Butternut, incidentally, is
the first ship to be hit by the
Polaris. Once while the dummy
missile was being placed aboard.
the crane rigging slipped and the
Polaris crashed to the deck.
How well is the Butternut doing
her job?
D. J. Wilcox, head of the Un
derwater Ordmance Department
which is supervising th Polaris
tests, says flatly: "We couldn't
get along without her."
NEW SHIP SAILS
PORTSMOUTH, England (UPI)
Britain's newest aircraft car carrier,
rier, carrier, H.M.S. Victorious, sailed for
THE United States yesterday to
take part in air defense demon demonstrations.
strations. demonstrations. The ship will first go
to Norfolk, Va., for the exercises
and then visit New York harbor.

Sails Arrives
Cristobal
June 30 July 8
July 7 July .15
Julv 14 Jul 22
Julv 21 July 29

TELEPHONES:
2121 PANAMA.2-2904

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Lett 500 ad i.OO
maters, ia the Nuava HipOdrome
Urbanlzatio across the Rama
Racetrack. All lots with street
fronts, sewage, water main and
electricity. Cell W. McBarnett.
Tel. 4-0976.
FOR SALE: Beautiful residence.
4 bedroom, livingroom, dining dining-room,
room, dining-room, library, recreation room,
large kitchen, pantry, maid's
room with service, hot water, ter terrace,
race, terrace, garden, garage, land 1,800
m. 9th. Street No. 28, San
Francisco.
FOR SALE: On double lot in
Santa Clara, best location, next
to church: 2 bedroom chalet,,
livingroom, bath, kitchen, large
porch, garage, fully furnished
with 6 beds, G.E. refrigerator,
Reckgas, electric light and water,
for only $2,450.00 cash. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone 2-5079.
Rooms
FOR RENT: Comfortable rooms
for responsible couple and stu students.
dents. students. Uruguay Street and 48th.
Tel. 3-6506.
Israeli Arms Sales
To West Germany
Condemned By Reds
MOSCOW, July 4 (UPI)-A So Soviet
viet Soviet newspaper today attached
Premier David Ben-Gurion and
other Israeli leaders for selling
amrs to West Germany.
The newspaper Krasnaya Zezda
said the "deal concerning the
supply to the Bundeswehr of gre grenade
nade grenade throwers is yet another
proof of the despicable pact be between
tween between the Israeli men at the top
and the West German revenge
seekers, Tass reported.
"Today it Is obvious to all that
the talk of compensation for
World War Two damages) was
merely a maneuver of the west,
the newspaper said.
"For Israel did not undergo
Hitlerite occupation, and the- ma majority
jority majority of Jews who suffered at
the hands of the Fascists live in
the countries of eartern Europe,
to whorp., the West German au-
uigtMtf,.iOWK not pay out. any rep reparations.
arations. reparations. "Reparations to Israel ar for
the American and Bonn imperial
ists only a convenient form of
rendering miutary aid, to the Is Israeli
raeli Israeli militariststheir agents in
the Near East," th newspaper
said.
Ike Places Third
(apilol Cornerstone
With GW's Trowel
WASHIONGTON, July 4 (UP1) (UP1)-President
President (UP1)-President Eisenhower lays the
third corner stone for the United
States Capitol today with the
same trowel and eavel Georee
Washington usd to put the first
corner stone in place in 1793.
He was to return by helicopter
from Camp David in Maryland,
interrupting his holiday weekend
to address members of Congress
and other guests briefly at the
ceremony on Capitol Hill.
Washington's trowel and gavel
were provided for the President
to spread mortar and tap the cor
nerstone, but a giant crane will
move the $1,600 pound granite
cube into place.
For the President and Speaker
Sam Rayburn, chairman of the
Capitol building commission, a
small, roofed wooden stand was
erected next to the cornerstone
location and in the area where
Presidential inaugural ceremonies
are held.
The cornerstone fits into the
foundation, below ground, of the
new east central front of the Ca Capitol.
pitol. Capitol. Congress has voted 17 mil
lion dollars for the project, which
involves erecting a marble front
32vfe feet outside the standstone
walls of the original eapitol struc
ture.

WEEKLY
CARGO SERVICE FROM NEW YORK AND U.S.
ATLANTIC PORTS AND U.S. PACIFIC PORTS TO
THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA AND CANAL ZONE.
PASSENGER SERVICE TO NEW YORK AND WEST
COAST SOUTH AMERICA PORTS.
PANAMA AGENCIES, CO.
CRISTOBAL 2131 ?135 PANAMA 3-0784 J-7999

In Your Pocketbook

By FAYE HENLK
Not so long ago I asked what
would you do with a $2,000 wind windfall.
fall. windfall. What prompted my query was
a survey made by a bnk asking
a survey made by a bank asking
residents in its area what they
would do with such good fortune.
I wondered what variation there
might be among folk in dif different
ferent different parts of the country, I
foend many similarities and many
differences.
Whon th. bank made their
survey I reported that 24 -per
cent of their respondents would
save all, that 16 per cent said
they would spend all, that 23 per
cent said they would use the
money to repay debts; In my
survey, repaying indebtendness
ran over 90 per cent.
But the type of indebtedness.
in a great many instances that
you wrote me about, was a dif
ferent sort than repaying the
butcher, the baker, the candle candlestick
stick candlestick maker or lending institu institutions.
tions. institutions. Many of you who wrote sipoke
of repaying your debt to God via
larger contributions to your
church. Many of you spoke of
sending your windfall money to
such institutions as the Heart
Fund, The American Cancer So
ciety and other such organiza
tions to repay for them for the
good they had done your loved
ones. Finally, you said, you'd like
to buy gifts for dwserving rela
tives. i
Though those replying fo the
', bank's survey mentioned chari charitable
table charitable contributions, you seemed
far more anxious to share Your
good fortune with the poor, the

Investor's Guide Guide-By
By Guide-By SAM SHULSKY

By SAM SHULSKY 1
O. We are in a heated debate
at the office about stocks such as
IBM. Minnesota Mining, Eastman
Kodak, duPont and others wjilch
nsv small dividends. 1 nave ex
plained that the money saved by
paying smaller dividends goes
back into researcn ana giwui
But the explanation isn't enough
nvpr the last 12 vears. our $60,
000 investment in growth stocks
has risen to about $175,000.
A. Your explanation is about
as good as one can get. But may
be this will help:
If vou had put $60,000 into con
servative, fair dividend paying
defensive preferreds and common
stocks 12 years ago you would
have received about $3,000 a year
in dividends, total $36,000 bring bringing
ing bringing your holdings to, say, $100,-000--compounding
the dividends.
Your $60,000 in growth stocks
yielded dividends, pershaps, of
only $1,200 to $1,500 a year (call
it a total of $15,000) but, in addi addition,
tion, addition, has increased in value to
$175,000, or a total value, includ including
ing including dividends, of $190,000.
I realize this is an oversimpli oversimplification.
fication. oversimplification. The conservative stock
would also have shown some ad advance
vance advance in the last 12 years.
But the fact remains that to
have boosted your $60,000 invest investment
ment investment on dividends alone you
would have required a total of
$115,000 in dividends over the 12
years, or an annual yield rough
ly of 15 per cent.
Furthermore, your annual divi dividend
dend dividend would be subject to your
highest income tax rate while
the gain on the rise in value,
whenever vou decide to take it,
will be taxable at only one-half
your regular rate and never more
than 25 per cent on the tun gain.
This is not a question which
can be answered categorically.
The answer, as in all investing
must be dependent upon the
needs of the investor. A youn?
man who has held IBM for the
last doen vears has a tremen
dous eain. An elderly retired
couple who need a generous re-
turn would be far happier with
ft
BALBOA 2150 2159

sick and the needy than I'd e.
er Imagined. You've taught
me a great deal.
From your replies I lather mat

for too many of you the mort
gage on your home is a burden
that weighs heavily. Some of
ycur recognize this mortgageas a
form of savings, others would re
duce it to release current income
for ether purposes. Among these
most often mentioned were in investments
vestments investments with the vote split e e-qually
qually e-qually between buying mutual
funds aid a couple of shares of
good old A. T. and T.
Third in popularity is your do
sire to add "possessions."' It ap appears
pears appears that what the ladies are vot voting
ing voting for is home furnishings and
that it's the gentlemen that
want fine feathers.
Travel agents woulf prof prof-it
it prof-it from the money that a minori.
ty of you would receive.
Sadly, not on of you wrote)
to say that this bonanza would
See you on the. road toward
more learning.
Though my eustion related
only to the $2,00 windfall, many
of you took this opportunity to
tell me that you are thinking a a-bout
bout a-bout the economy of the country.
While there is no underlying
flavor of gratitude for those
who have helped you, there ii
also evident an undertone both of
fear and of anger. For the most
part, this is directed against
higher prices.
Perhaps the words of an ano anonymous
nymous anonymous reader, who signs him himself
self himself G.I., sum it up or hs all.
Writes he:
"Give us the story. How ean we
lick inflation, keep prices down
and make labor see the light of
holding the line, .?
solid, slow moving utilitf, Mil of
department store stock.
Q. W will retire next April on
social security. We will also have
about $200,000, mostly ia cash
from sale of business and in
some matured E bonds. Would
like to protect ourselves against
inflation.
A. K you want a retirement in income
come income from these funds you will
have to start putting some of th
money into securities now da da-spite
spite da-spite the high level oi ths mar market.
ket. market. I am sending, along s fist ol
good quality investment stocks
which would yield the four to 4 4-per
per 4-per cent you want. You might
start buying the utilities and oils
which have been depressed of:
late. Try to space your buying
so that you will have about a
third of your money in securities
by retirement. And then continue
at a reduced rate.
I'd hold the E bonds until after
vou retire so that your income
taxv on the gain is kept to a min
imum. And you neednt redeem
them all, even then. You can con
tinue to hold as much as yon
think you need as a cash reserve.
Fire Chief Claims I
Call Wds Delayed 1
To Pentagon Blaze
WASHINGTON, July 4 (UPI)
The blaze in the "fire proof"
Pentagon 7s out officially, but the
entire embarrassing affair was
rekindled today with" charges
that defense officials dilly-dallied
before calling in fire-fighting re reinforcements.
inforcements. reinforcements. Arlington, Va., fire chief Jose-ph
H. Clements complained bitterly
of a delay of up to 34 minutes
between the time the fire was
discovered and the call that
brought his forces into action
Thursday.
Clements' version was disputed
by at least one government of li
a cial.

:Z.':IT



SUNDAY, JTLT 8. 1951
-
THE SUITOAT AMERICAN V
PA4B HIM

THI STORY OF MARTHA WAYNE

California Bound

BY WILSON SCRUGGS,' PRISCILLA'S POP

to.adopp rr.

AUNT MAmhAJ

BESIDESJIUEEO

irHCMOucyio

bum strmtcc

ErsinrJ

. .V IJUljIFYOUtafKOUS)

-v 1 J A3CUT WVn5 fARE OP

".i, TUS SHOP SQ THAT X 7

j fCffi,IWlvHI T,W,BUV,IFYOU'D. NAW,I6UESSOmA THKEf fwErHMCABCwJ
COULD eo-mj UKE TO SKIP THE :f WOUtD BE WOKS V W.WS CK.KXSBK'S JILlT 1
V p YMT NEOSOF -r,. Fyd w .ggg. wasowsi C-t

FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS

Not by Choke

BY MERRILL BL0SSKR

1 Jmwr

A AfRAID IVE RUM OUT fAW.THIS 6 K. ( LOOK WHERJE VMT ARE ) 1

ALL. r OOP

Strange Request

BY V. T. HAMLIN
i

Feeling Is Mutual BY IDC AR MARTIN

j J ;-js Jl -.

Calling Eb Shots

in.ti
i turn1

BUG! BUNNY

Throwing the Book-'

...THEN HOWX TOR THE LAST TIAASj
ABOUT SOME GO I'M VERV
DtSH TOWELS, i BUSy...OM.PEAR j
- 08... V SOMETHINO'S "A
lNINaVl

HEH'HEH! LOOlfS LIKE
YA COULD USE ONE 0'

THESE COOKBOOKS,

PETUNIA!

I AIN'T SUAPANTEEIKI' HOW

LONG THAT BOOK' LI LAST

W THROWS IT AKXJNO UKE

9

inf )i3KiE True Life Adventures

PROOF I

ftM r raw

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

CAPTAIN EASY

High and Dry

Y LESLIE TURNER

Til HfcVB TOA BUT IT WKDS I mun m iti tik PKMV I VrV USmi. 50MB0NE? OUNMIWa A
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'

MORTY MEEKLB

Safety First

BY DICK CAVALLI

C7 ; vlAl,tH'. aI AND THAT'S WHY ) 1 i "v
JFrrk, ( WITH M3U.vJlU. Wt' INTO THE MU-' f Cwlcu ) I

OUR BOARDINO HOUSE

with

MAJOR HOOPLB OUT OUR WAY

BY i. R. WILLIAMS

IfJ&AD, MARTHA, IT Oca TO MB THAT

I K ACT n MOKS 6EST6EL

UNLESS YOU WSD4S

-.it

si,

C SS AiL'lMiTLlr- nnnr ,i7W MS CI PAW IIP

CVETHfi COCR MESTIOUiN.HI L0KD6HIR,

I AM ADtKECT DHSCEMtiANT :

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life

PtLY visitors will

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Z0H- MENAJOW

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1

US Advertising Man Writes

Moving Book On Finding

By LOUIS CASSELS
Does God really exist?
That question arises sooner or
later in every human mind. It
haunts the believer in his hours
o doubt, the non-believer no less
in his. (
Several years ago; a serious ill illness
ness illness raised the question in acute
form for Thumas E. Powers, a
New York advertising man.
Powers had been, in his own
phrase, a 'liberal scientific-humanist
- atheist agnostic." He
was fairly sur$ there was nothing
to religion, but in desperation he
decided to test for himself its as assertion
sertion assertion that God is, and that his
reality can be experienced by
anyone who honestly seeks him.
"It worked."

In those two words, from the
preface, is the essential message
of an extraordinary new book by
Powers, published by Harper &

Brothers.
Somebody has aiven it the un

fortunate title, "First Questions

on the, We thm, Spirit." Seldom
hasai label been more inappropri inappropriate
ate inappropriate to the contents.
For this is not a stuffy aca academic
demic academic discourse on spiritual life.

It is a powerfullv-written hand

book on how to -find God, by a

man who did so, toi his own vast

surprise.
Although the intellectual level
of this book is always adult, and
at times even "Scholarly. Powers
writes in the breezy, uninhibited
language of the advertising man.

He gets down to brass tacon
the' first paga. ,.'',3 .,y
'If you are in trouble PJia
some sort of crisis if you sert-.
ously and quickly need tiOatrf
yourself that God exists it b
be done without a lot of'Wkuil-j
cracking or waste of breath. J
'Here is how: .
'First avoid like the fjajgue
all unnecessary argument a1?)? tie tie-bate.
bate. tie-bate. Accept God as a' Mrlnng
hypothesis. You can do thls'wijth thls'wijth-out
out thls'wijth-out straining your intellectual! in integrity,
tegrity, integrity, whatever your outlbok'-oa
life may be. Sincerely ask him,
if he exists, to help you! and
you. 1
'Second find and associate -with
a group of people who: real really
ly really do believe in God and wBotre
working their belief in daily ttfe.
Try to find a group who are fe- '-ly
ly '-ly doing this and not jyst talk talking
ing talking about it.
'Third be open and trijtfjfjil
with these people about your situ situation,
ation, situation, whatever it is, and follow
the reasonably suggestion y)?X
make to yo. Begin to tram your yourself
self yourself as they are trainine and to
do the things they are doing.
'Fourth -keep an open mild
and watch. The evidence God'
presence and influence,,, juy
pear in your own life,o!jsj!cj3f
sooner than you exrect."
This is what Powers calls, the
'emerfencv" approach to God.
And of it, he confidently says: ,t
'I do not merely hope and be believe
lieve believe It works. I know it works."

Crowds Jam To See U.S. Fleet"

Sail Into New Port-Chicago

o

CHICAGO (UPI) The fleet
sailed in to the new inland world
port of Chicago yesterday in the
Navy's first show of might on the
Great lakes since the War of
1812.
Fourteen warships from Task
Force 27, their battle flags flying
and their decks lined with white,
dapped sailors, cruised proudly
past 90 miles of shoreline stretch stretching
ing stretching from Waukegan, 111., to Mich Michigan
igan Michigan City, Ind.
An estimated million persons,
most of them clustered along Chi Chicago's
cago's Chicago's Lake Michigan beaches,
strained to catch glimpse of the
fleet as it passed in review two
milea from shore. Bright sunshine
and alight mist over the fresh
water prevented a clear view
from the beach.
The Flotilla billed as "Onerj "Onerj-tion
tion "Onerj-tion Inland Seas," celebrated the
opening of the St. Lawrence Sea

way and Chicago's emergency as

a ma.ior world port, even tnoucn
the windy city is more than 700

miles away from salt water.
The fleet will also do honor to
Queen KUsabeth II, whose royal
yacht -will dock at Chicago Mon Monday
day Monday In the only United States stop

on her current tour of the uw
inland waterway.
Not since 1813, when Ohir
Hazard Perry led a ramsHsrtkl
U.S. fleet to battle and vtetdry
over the royal Navy on nLk
Erie, had a war fleet cruised "the
Great Lakes. '''t"M.
The Navy had to get a,fstii.l
suspension of an 1817 agreement
between the United States nd
Canada to send its task 'tore
through the lakesv .''''
Chicagoans greeted the fleet'to
a summer holiday mood. Mothers
and children settled down oWth
beaches with box lunches M iff
view the flotilla. Loop office work
ers knocked off work and writ.to
the top of skyscrapers to cafch a
glimDse of the passing vessejljja
Chicago fireboats, JetUrijf!' col column
umn column of water in salute escorted
the fleet in its procession pst;tn
city. More than 60 Navy jjJlpAf
roared overhead.
The Flotilla was led by
force's destroyer flag ship, UW
W. A. Lee. with fleet commander
Rear Adm. E. B. Taylor alterl
It was followed by the 0utrld
missile heavy cruiser Miconttta

larges' warship ever to enter thef

AffiOV'AS PANAMA AffiWAYf

PANAMA-MIAMI ....55.00

MIAMI-HAVANA ....22.50

PANAMA $
HAVANA
(via Miami)

Today's JY Program

50!

1:00
1:06
5:30
6:00
:1ft
:S0
7:00

Sunritr Matln: 7:30
Blf HatrUd Herbert 8:00
BuebtU 9:00
Chapci of the Air 10:00
Sucred Heart. Apt. 10:30
cm NtWS
Skin Diver, Rpt 11:00
Men pf. Annapollf 11 05
Rpt 1-10-58

Schlltr llayhou
Steve Allen
Ed Sullivan
Telephone Time

crN News

Erie: Perry Corn a.

Coortesy of Aerovlas Panama Alrwayi

PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573-1698-3-1699
OFFICE HOURSi from .mr '''io'6 p.m.

ft
I
V

.ii''i' vV',., t (,ii !! i t. s i j.'i
!,.tois'f1':i'i .411 '. if.'V,?V.Si''j''i,',',1a ''Vi'i'' :Vi".:','t



; fllefereit 2 7th Homer Hsjps KfiYanlpPII

Read story on page 6
OTpef
II II II "5JV,,ff
Choi At Kohbe Club
u.v.c j&
Jazz
LfK-SSa -A
By Vimmio Wiei
As Audience Digs Second
roy?ig.n.,r

Festival

1 I vat a moment before she
fcoild speak. "No, Buck," she fi finally
nally finally said. "No. Not-right away.

tiki
that."
her cneeK wnu
' .i A (ir: "T-OOk. Kauiie:

" EXrf it sensibW Your uncle
down'twn this farm. You won
be-ablto stay on here-even .1
xm wanted to :ay on all by
. nri,D -ttrf 1 vou go?

care of; you, cawc. u
Lnestf went out of hiS voice. It
AndM as he .-Sung at her,
: areW Over J Hammer?
"He':been good R) me. .
' yeah,'! Buck said sarcastical sarcastically
ly sarcastically "HCfed an clothed you.
, V"yes? Kathie said, with sud-
Aunt
it me to a borne after Auni e
. 6S died It's what., most men .his
f age would have done with a nine-year-old
girt -or,fh"E- m
grateful, to him for what he did
do these 10 years.. And I dw it
like talking th W." add"
ed coldly, "whei.rs
BuckTcaught her shoulders in
a almost rough ap "J
turnedber around, forcing her
to meet his eyes. ...
"You love me,.n;t you Kath Kathie?
ie? Kathie? You do love me"
Her eyes widened "Buck Lan Landers!
ders! Landers! What's got into you this

- morning?

"Answer me!
" he demanciea.
"Haven't I said
y"Yes, Kathie," he said, but he
did not release her.
"Well, what more do you
WRoughly. he piflled her close
to hTm. After a started moment
Kathie jerked herself free her
how can you at a time like
th"l drew his heavy brows to to-r
r to-r w and his face took on a
sUn look she had never jeen
t...0 h,rre. He was like a
. -ifT monfcg.
Huck." she said sudoenly, fher
v,-"p ';n with alrm. "there s a
ctr goinp uo to the house!
Moe",'"-ilv Hiverted, he looked
toward the valley, shading his
p.-.. ..,iTit the rays of the sun,
s'ntinf briilisnHv ovpr the hon-
"Ych he said
It's the doc,
I think." 1U
Kathie started down the slope
without lookinp back to see n
Bi'ck was following her.
Behind her. one of the dops
let out a low mournful sound.
Se ouickenert her stens, a shiver
striking along her spine. The dog
lifted his nose to the red sky and
SDilled out the savage places of
his soul in a Ion? chilling wail.
Suddenly Kathie began to run.
The "services for Uncle Job
were held at 10 o'clock Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday morning at a funeral parlor
down in tv? valley town. Most of
the behchland families attended,
for whjle t1" mnv nf tvpm could
trulv sav Job Hammer had been
9 friend, still hp had been a
TQtiA! 75c. 40c.
1:80 3:50 6:25 9:00 p.m.
FLASH! I
Also in Every Show the
complete motion picture
of the World Heavy Heavyweight
weight Heavyweight Championship!
INGEMAR
JOHANSSON
vs
FLO
PATTEftSON
In ?tow Motion
S E E The Knockout

raft
rJ picture i!
VfJ exoltemaat
It S oonf age In
f UV,n no1-"
warn miiytkyk -miPtlJsk
' mean mm wmtw lI

I

.-. f Blow

neighbor for over SO yearg. Aad
they were all fond of Kathie.
Kathie, in a Hew. black suit,
with a hat that at strangely on
her coiled braids and gloves that
made her hands feel warn and
awkward, rode down to the vai
ley with Mrs. Jensen and her
husband, Buck sitting in the back
seat beside her.
After the aimple services, peo people
ple people gathered.' awkwardly around
Kathie and Buck. They express expressed
ed expressed their symphathy, said a few
kind words for Job, and then, re relieved
lieved relieved that that was over, they
finally scattered.
After a briet stop at a town
restaurant fo lunch, the Jensens,
Buck, and Kathie drove back to
the benchland. By the time they
reached the farm it was early
afternoon, and Kathie asked ev everyone
eryone everyone to come in. She had olef olef-red
red olef-red opening the strongbox Un'
Job had left her until after the
funeral, for reasons she felt
strongly but could not quite ex explain.
plain. explain. In 'spite of themselves, they
made a little ceremony of it.
Kathie went upstairs and got the
box from the closet in the room
that had been Uncle Job's until
his illness. She placed on the
kitchen table, itad the others
stood around, solemn and un unfamiliar
familiar unfamiliar in their town clothes,
while she inserted the key Uncle
Job had given her, and opened
the box.
There was not much in it Just
a small packet of bills, and a
yellowed paper, worn at the folds.
Kathie picked up the money
wonderingly. Mr. Jensen made a
muffled sound, and she saw they
were $100 bills.

"Job oughta had more sense!'
Mrs. Jensen declared. "All that
monev lying around the house!"
" 13, 14, 15!" she finished, ex excitement
citement excitement in her voice.
"Fifteen hundred dollars!? Buck
echoed.
"Is it all mine?" Kathie knew
Uncle Job had left a note at the
bank.
"That's what Job said on his
deafhbed, right in his house in
the back parlor," Mrs, Jensen
said positively.
Her husband spoke with mea
sured deliberation, and Kathie
listened to him, for he had taken
care of Uncle Jobs arrange
ments for her.
"The bank Is attaching his
bank account and the livestock
and machinery to cover their
note. Job's funeral expenses were
paid by his lodge insurance. He
didn't run up any bills except
when he had to borrow from the
bank. I guess this is rightly all
yours, Kathie." He chuckled and
London Newspaper
To Pool Supplies
To Avoid Shutdown
LONDON, July 4 (UPI) Print Printing
ing Printing Union leaders today remov
ed the threat of a complete news
paper blackout in Britain next
week bv agreeing to allow Lon
don's newspapers to pool their
dwindling ink supplies. y
This means the national news newspaper
paper newspaper presses will keep rollng
until Wednesday. Publisher hope,
the printers' strike which has
closed down periodicals and pro provincial
vincial provincial newspapers will be over
by then.
Leaders of the National Socie Society
ty Society of Operative Printers andi As Assistants
sistants Assistants took the derision' at a
special meeting this morning.
ILCDII
RELEASE!
0.75
0.40
Shows: 1.17, 2.25,
4.54, 6.56, 8.58
She s the sweetheart of
the beach generation..
JtM0lfamwi64vmiM to l MET)
MMtnllai

yidqsd

added, "I'll bet the bank would
be surprised to know he had it,
though."
"Well, it'll make a right nice
dowr.y," Mrs. Jensen said, pleas pleased.
ed. pleased. "I always liked to see a bride
start out with some linens and
things of her own."
Kathie smiled vaguely at them
both and picked up the yellowed
sheet of paper and unfolded it
gingerly.
It was handwritten, in the flow flowing
ing flowing script of two generations a a-go.
go. a-go. Kathie read with difficulty:
"Whereas I, Phineas Redd, be being
ing being of sound mind and body and
in full control of my faculties,
wish to acknowledge and pay a
debt incurred by me to Job Ham Hammer,
mer, Hammer, I hereby deed him in Pay Payment
ment Payment of said Obligation that strip
of land along the Beach which
extends from the street known
as Lono

Kathie stumbled over the next
word and spelled: "eew-a to
another word I can't make out,
and She stumbled again.
m-a-u-k-a to the boundary of
the property of Joseph H. Ar Ar-rendal
rendal Ar-rendal along the street known
as" She broke off again to ex exclaim,
claim, exclaim, "Oh, such names! Signed
by my hand this thirteenth day
of August, 1908."
Her voice was rising. "Witness "Witnessed
ed "Witnessed by scrawl, scrawl and
scrawl, scrawl. Executed in the
City of Honolulu, Territory of
Hawaii!"
She looked up, shaking now
with excitement. "Honolulu!" she
said.
The others looked at her for
a few seconds of blank silence.
Mrs. Jensen said then, "So that's
where he came from. I always
wondered."
"What does it mean?" Kathie
begged Mr. Jensen.
"Sounds as if your uncle own
ed some land over there at one
time," he replied cautiously.
'Did he ever say anything about
it?"
Never."
'Do you supoose it's any
good?" Buck asked.
Mr. Jensen scratched his head.
"I dunno. I don't know much a-
bout these things, but that don't
look like a proper legal deed to
me. 'Course it was executed a
long time ago. Maybe that's the
way they did things there at that
time. But as far as that goes,
he added, "he could have sold It
a dozen tames over since then.
"Honolulu." Kathie said solftly,
"I wonder what it's like, real
ly?M

TLeorerr H t
long for good home cooking-: 1 Wf Mf, :f .jS fl $
bochebrsond worried men. ; J :p jj fS f iM
BALBOA TIDES l&fii&iti r "5 fyf
MONDAY, JULY 8 SWINGIN' AND SINGIN' Displaying their talents atV the Jr 1""!
Hijrh Fort Kobbe Jazz Festival were The Sky Tones. Vocalists are f s Wf -,4 A Jjf 8 J
Time at. Edgar and John King, Rupert Yard and Stanley Bryan.. , iw v "f
3:58 a.m 14.5 ft. (Army Photo), Jfll
4:03 p.m 15.1 ft. v ' 4 I 4 I 1
Low ts'
Time Ht. ic 1r 1 1 I
10:09 am .2 ft. 1 1 1 1
10:30 p.m. ,.nn..i: 0-9 t- 1 111
mimmmfm i if

J-. fc fV 1 A. i I
I 4 .J -I V i v wir"r nnmniinnnnmnnii urn iiwifiimni rii-nmiri-irfr- -"r i ..M..n.HB)wwlnBimimni,mw

INTERSERVICE COMBO Musician- from the Army and Air
Maw,kA b A ton Pnnl' At.vnn nlnnn-

Frank Murat, bass trumpet;

Professionals and talented ama

teurs, military men. on duty in Pa
nama and civilians, residents of
Panama and the Canal Zone got
together for two nights. last week
at fort Kobbe with but one
thought in mind music, with
the accent on Dixieland.
They pooled their skills to per
form at the second international
jazz festival staged by the Fort
Kobbe Service Club, witn some
1500 enthusiastic listeners on hand
to applaud their efforts. The audi audience
ence audience was treated to four-hour ses sessions
sions sessions of music with a solid beat
that had them whistling and call
ing formore.
Vocalists, combos and larger
bands alternated throughout the
program, which was emceed fcy
Johnny B of radio station uui.
Mrs. Morris Caldwell, service club
director, was responsible for bring bringing
ing bringing the interpreters of modern and
Dixieland music to the club for the
second successive year.
Jolting the crowd with their
progressive jazz interpretation
was the five-man "Los Univer Univer-sarios"
sarios" Univer-sarios" combo from the States.
Theirs was the final and clima-

tic performance Sunday evenmg,4day night. Also programmed for

ComDosed entirely of university
students Ronald Dunton, Michael
Payson, Donri Chickering, Toshio
Nagatani and Robert Shechtman
they are now concluding a barn
storming tour that nas deiigntea
Latin .American audiences in 26
cities.
Capping Monday night's pro
gram was waiter Woods orches orchestra
tra orchestra and its Dixieland offerings
Appearing both nights was the
Interservice Combo composed of
Sfw WUlla Sparkv druma nd Pfc,

four enlisted men from the 79th
Army Band and two from the 77th
Air Force Band. Representing the

Army in this crew were Pfc. Na-
wamei aeon, uass; ay riant
Mutat.'basS trumpet; Sfc. .Willie
Sparks, snares and Pfc. Robert
Ralson, tenor sax. A2c Paul Aty,
piano, and A2c Henry Fishzohn,
clarinet made up the balance of
the combo.
A special highlight of their pre presentations
sentations presentations were the original ar arrangements
rangements arrangements of Murat.
They backed up The Naturals
who also appeared both nignts.
i Comprising this Fort Clayton tri
are Pfcs. Greg and Paul Marv Marv-enko
enko Marv-enko and Sp4 Bill Aldrich.
Billed witk Arthur Branch's or orchestra
chestra orchestra was Pfc. Clare Ugiestad
of the Signal Communications Se
ice, Quarry Heights, who sang
several rumbers "Sunday night.
Geo Harrington on the clarinet
added a touch of Benny Goodman
with hir. renditions of "Perfidia"
and "I Got Rhythm."
One of the favorite groups was
Al Martin and his orchestra who
made their only appearance Sun
Sunday were the Sky Tones, a vo
cal group from Panama City.
Monday night's celebrities in included
cluded included Archibald Lecky" and his
eight-piece jazz band; Wally Chil Chil-cott's
cott's Chil-cott's combo; Albert Lamar'ine,
vocalist; The Jets, an instrument instrumental
al instrumental trio; The Zone Tones, a vocal
group of Balboa Junior College
girls Josephine Frazier, accompa accompanied
nied accompanied by The Jets and The Cool Co Comets,
mets, Comets, progressivists from the 77th
Air Force Band.
Force blended their talents for
.Pfn. Nathaniel Bcott. bass: SD-
Robert Ralston, tenor wcASO

'

BRANCH'S BAND Military and civilian communities are represented In this musical aggre aggregation,
gation, aggregation, Arthur Branch and his orchestra. From left are Pfc. Clare UgelStad, vocalist, who is
with the Signal Communications Section, Quarry Heights; Egbert Cherry, bass; Branch and
George Harrington, clarinet (Army Photo)

SOLDIER TRiO .Adding to the harmony at the festival were The
From left theyM ffc Gregory Miirvenko, fip.4 JBillAldrlch and

I fa ft

Naturals, from Fort v Clayton.
Greg'i twin. Pfc. Paul Marven.

X



r

m e m
yi
! f
y
& mm

MM

ee

Road
To
Camp

CAN you follow
the trail that
leads to the ium ium-mer
mer ium-mer cottage in
the diagram at
right? To eolve
this poser, paste
the diagram to a
piece of card cardboard.
board. cardboard. Using a
elisors or a
harp blade, cut
It up along the
straight black
l t n e Into 24
rectangles. Pro Proceed
ceed Proceed as in a Jig Jigsaw
saw Jigsaw puzzle.
When correct correctly
ly correctly arranged, the
pieces at hand will form a map
showing a continuous route lead leading
ing leading from the- point marked
"Sta-t" to the campsite. The
completed (nap must be square.
No diagram of the solution is
provided, for you should be able
to figure it out. Save the pieces
so you can challenge others later.
Up the Ladder?
AN Y O N E
venturing
up a ladder
must watch
h 1 s step, of
course. Here
Is a ladder
with rungs, or
treads, num numbered
bered numbered from 1
to 9, on which
one must both
watch and
count his'
steps.
First, 1 e t's
suppose that
you are stand standing
ing standing on the
ground. The
Idea is to
count each
step so that
you will arrive at the top rung
in exactly 19 steps. During the ex exercise
ercise exercise you may step up or down.
'U39)eiIU JO
rW nyptm mi '6 "6 "i '? 'I
9 V '8 '8 'I S 'Z 'I :Inm d98
Xq ds)i enujiuoa -cd9)i OA) B9(iu
jsqx -punoaj ir oj Jpq 08 nam
'I Jmu o) quii3 JSJM :iMay

Do You Recognize This Old-Time

m
B.
D,
F

History to This Answer
rlERE is history In the answer to the enigma
phrased below, for it is something that first
made Virginia a thriving colony.
A cross, a circle complete,
An upright where two semi-circles do meet,
A triangle standing on two feet,
Two semi-circles, a circle complete.
There's a single word for it. What?
ooovaoi umiuv

Nursery Rhyme
PUR famous characters of a
beloved nursery rhyme are
portrayed In this coloring test.
To make them stand out, sim simply
ply simply add colors In accordance with
the following indicator keys: Y
stands for Yellow, Br Indicates
Brown, Bk Indicates Black, R
Is meant for Red and O Is for
Orange. B Is for Blue and 0 Is
for green while V stands for Vio Violet
let Violet Shade In Red lightly where
you see letter P for Pink.
e-iqX etn pa txsoupioo mv

Blanks Lead-to

Tl Kj iNfl

That la to say, In top diagram place a T In the
single space beneath It; K In the four spaces be beneath
neath beneath it, etc. Repeat In the lower diagram.

eluding the top or key word row

It isn't necessary to fill In all blanks of the dia diagrams
grams diagrams to arrive at Identity of key words, but it Is
interesting to note how many shorter words each
of the key words contain.
-n.Kouf flusjSnip ti jo Siti8iujn6
J )99U1 qom pjO J 9A10JJ, pus SUVJ, HJ9MHIV

B
C
D
E

GGAABDBGD1GGA
ABGD1GGAABD B G
E A C B G
G G El El F A F Dl DE
G G El El F DI CI Bl CI
Dl El F G E A C B G
,,i9-B qj S90S jdOrf 'no X9-U0U1
U) X qj t.jqj, :sp-u i joi
Xuasd y p9.iq) jo jood jo; Aaasd
Y :i9i-9 qj to doj :uni ai us
iqnoqj X9i(uoui eqj :i9t-9
-qoo eqj 'punoj- V tpjolji
MX IB9M qj too do j 1J9MIDV

Recognition Test
in One Word
COMBINE the four words FAR,
ART, THE and HER and
you get one word FARTHER.
Here Is a group of six small
words
HEN ART
ARE EAR
WAR THE
Which one word of 11 letters
will contain them all In the same
way?
-uqJa i pjoa HX

Aft

Baseball

. A

I

watching a ball
sail through the
air, for example,
the Professor
was suddenly be be-mused
mused be-mused by this
question: How
many baseballs
of exactly the
same size could

Words
complete
the key words
which appear in
s k e 1 e t o nized
form across the
tops- of the dia diagrams
grams diagrams at left
and below, pro proceed
ceed proceed as follows:
Copy all of the
letters now
showing in the
empty spaces be beneath
neath beneath each letter,
r e s p e c 1 1 vely.
ajqi pat nid
HATS
Now insert
trial letters in
the lower dia diagrams
grams diagrams In an ef effort
fort effort to form
short words.
When inserting
trial letters,
place them In all
blanks of respec respective
tive respective v e r 1 1 c a 1
rows. Correct
letters will func function
tion function in all hori
What's
zontal words, ln-
6t. squares.
Tune?
THIS is a mys mystery
tery mystery tune but
1 1 s identity Is
easy to establish.
Fold page so you
can place this
key board above
the correspond corresponding
ing corresponding keys on the
piano or accor accordion.
dion. accordion. Then play
these notes:
BCD
fHAT is this
draw lines
By Eugene Sheffer
HORIZONTAL
1 Every head of those dwelling
in Moab shall be this (Jer. 48:
37) :
5 Jokes.
10 Club-shsped staff of office.
14 Plant of lily family.
15 Son of Tshath (1 Chr. 6:24
19 Slightly elliptical. v
17 The bones of the Israelites
were to flourish as this (Isa.
68:14)
18 Solomon was wiser than he (1
Ki. 4:31)
19 Skin; comb. form.
20 Spanish ladies.
22 Amuses.
24 Thing, in law.
25 Sand hills.
26 Paul gave this to those in the
ship with him (Acts 27:35)
29 Married.
30 Fixed gaze.
34 Mother of Reuben (Gen. 29:32)
35 Tally, (colloq.)
36 Fashions.
37 Unit of work.
38 Exclamation of praise to God.
40 There was no room here for
Joseph and Mary (Luke 2:7)
41 Some of the Philistines
brought gifts of this to Je Je-hosha
hosha Je-hosha (2 Chr. 17:11)
43 Plaything.
44 Apportion.
45 Pointed weapon.
46 Ouided.
47 Narrow streaks.
48 Sweethearts.
50 Atmosphere,
51 Complains.
54 Prepared for action.
58 Inner coat of the Iris.
59 She hesrkened si Peter knock knock-eu
eu knock-eu at the door of the gate
(Acts 12:13)

n A B C D E F GH I J

on the Brain

PR O
SOR
K E S
DUZn
is an avid base baseball
ball baseball tan, but foi
a different rea reason
son reason than most
Fans. Being of a
scientific turn of
mind, the Pro Professor
fessor Professor finds de delight
light delight in comput computing
ing computing batting and
pitching percent percent-a
a percent-a g e s, plotting

the arc ot sweeping curve balls, estimating the dis distances
tances distances of home run balls, and so on. One day, while

be placed around tt so that each ot them touched It ?
Various answers ran through his mind, but final finally,
ly, finally, he determined, the answer.
Study the ball above for a moment and see If you
can do likewise.

0q ptr AOq
Sabi no xjg 'inq
OFF DIPLOMACY

WHEN the hats of three diplomats were placed
on a table with the center hat upside dowriy. as
shown above, they provided the basis for an Inter Interesting
esting Interesting test.
The question posed In the test Is this: How Is It
possible to turn two of the hats over each time for
three consecutive turns and finish turning with all
three hats upside down?
Remember, two hats are Inverted each time. The
hats are turned. three consecutive times.
8 pu z nq treiri :g pn t tq natfl -t poe r q
jao tun 'baoiu )sj; irj uo -jqJ o jjaj oioj; t pu 'g
'I oiq jquina uoj0;ju9p jo igiodjnd joj liCMisy

He Shooting? Draw Lines to See

tflUQiuu.oi -"a-iszOD.qQr:cnr-DSxNj

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IL I
,! -7
vg y -16
" I i i''
qsj.( -2
.
. i i i i i i i j i i i i i i i i I I i I 1 1 I l

KLM N OP
little Indian shooting? To find out,
as follows: Begin at H-8, draw to

1-15, to U-6, to T-5, to 1-7. Then draw G-16 to M-ll,
0- 12, 1-16, 0-16, G-15, H-l. 1-1. Add 1-14 to
1- 15. Begin again Y-H, W-14, V-15, X-18, Y-14,
Z-15, X-18. Draw 0-13, P-13, S-ll, R-10, S-9,
U-9, W-8, W-4T-2, R-2, 0-4, 0-6, P-7, 0-8, M-8,
J-10, J-ll, 0-13. Add lines S-ll to S-9, T-4 to T-2,
R-4 to R-2, M-8 to M-6. Draw J-10, J-8, M-6, 0-6,
R-4, T-4, W-6. Later, you may wish to add colors.

61 Heraldic bearing.
62 Shortly.
63 Abimelech was king of this
place (Gen. 20:2)
64 Ascent
63 Canvas shelter.
66 Variety of corundum.
67 Went swiftly.
VERTICAL.
1 Exclamations of disdain.
2 Opposite of aweather.
3 Forlorn.
4 She was Rebekah's nurse
(Gen. 35:8)
5 First name of the traitor Is Is-cariot
cariot Is-cariot (Mat 10:4)
6 Geological ages.
7 Title of address.
8 Spread for tlrying
9 Killed.
10 Absence of arrogance.
11 Avow.
12 The ark of God was carried
on a new one (2 Sam. 6:3)
13 Shade trees.
21 Color.
23 Wooden match.
25 Arguments.
29 Do this to those who perse persecute
cute persecute you (Rom. 12:14)
27 Tear again.
28 Bird of prey.
29 Existed.
31 Stranger.
32 French security.
33 Serfs.
35 High hill.
36 Ship's timber piece.
'38 A meet forbidden to the Is Israelites
raelites Israelites (Lev. 11:19)
39 Cain's land (Gen. 4:16)
RIDDLE ME THISi What re relation
lation relation la a child to Its father
when It la not its own father's
son?
ISSJnos jo J)qna 1
Olatrlbuud av Kins rtaturu Dyadic

AND now for the famous ribbon trick
. . the magician appears before his
audience &iplaying length of ribbon.
Holding the ribbon before Attn, At
strokes downward, and presto! the rib ribbon
bon ribbon changes color I There it nothing
truly magic about the magician's per performance.
formance. performance. It is one you can do yourself
with preparation and practice.
For this stunt, the performer uses a

I

dbbon that is especially prepared
He takes a piece of red, white
or blue ribbon, one inch wide and
two feet long, and two pieces of
ribbon of some other color, each
one and one-fourth inches wide
and 25 inches long. The two rib ribbons
bons ribbons of the same color are sewn
together at their extren e edges
to form a flat tube which Is left
open at each end. The single
piece of ribbon Is placed In the
tube and one end Is kept even
with the end of the ribbon form forming
ing forming the tube. Then the magician
sews across that end and fastens
the Inserted ribbon at that point.
When the conjurer starts to per perform
form perform the trick he takes hold of
the loose end of the Inserted rib ribbon
bon ribbon and pulls It out, crumpling
up the tube of ribbon as he does
so. Of course, he takes care to do
this in such a way that It escapes
notice 'of those In the audience.

Jingling the Wits
ARHYMSTER-PUZZLIST pro provides
vides provides an answer to prove
that this Jingle problem is not
impossible:
If from six yon take nine
And from nine yon take ten.
From forty subtract fifty, and
then
Odd enough, just half a dozen
'"will remain.
Too wizards now the problem
explain.
dl
Juuiuij qi inqx "X
j nuiu qx :I X ntm XI
:g tAM xi nnpui XI 6 :tJtO0j
pa)oj)qnt pa iueiuno aiuioy n
u))iJ J Jniu eiu, ieo)not
QRSTU VWXV 2
Solution to Cube Poser
' Stand cube on
edge as shown.
A square can be
cut straight
through cube at
angle shown, lar larger
ger larger than sides.
42 Strong and intrepid.
44 Looking-glasses.
49 The children of Dan fought
for and took this place (Josh.
19:47)
47 Prevarication.
49 Brink.
50 Wing-shaped.
51 Coating formed on iron.

' P 1 I4 Yfit F 1 I 1" I
: "iZZZZjlZZZ
13 P 777 re nr
WT? 77 WVV
55 rnfr vfa
J7 7? aT2 Jt
r 7z 7Z&
ppp7- pZZppp
3i 77, W V1 S
sr t gar
xr b- n-

The magician holds the ribbons in his tight hand
and his fingers conceal the tube from which the
single ribbon protrudes. The back of the conjurer's
hand Is turned toward the audience and only the
single ribbon of one color Is seen. Now, lowering
his hand to one aide, the magician strokes the rib ribbon
bon ribbon from top to bottom several times with bis free
hand, and suddenly the color changes again. He
accomplishes this by taking the crumpled tube be between
tween between the thumb and forefinger and pulling It down
over the single ribbon.
Try It yourself for some fun; then show friends.

STRIP A

an Yu Through the Cubes?

CROWDING a
1 o t Into a
little s o m e -what
akin to the
circus act in
which a large
number of pas passengers
sengers passengers spring
forth from a
mall car is the
objective here.
Let us suppose
that the figures at right repre represent
sent represent perfect cubes of plastic. One
cube is obviously larger than the
other, yet it la possible to cut a
hole through this smaller cube
and slip the other one through it
with ease!
How can this be done? A solu solution
tion solution appears elsewhere In the
page, but don't peek until you've
tried puzzling It out.
GET TOGETHER
T8 claimed two heads are bet better
ter better than one, but let's see if
one head is better when two's the
subject This quiz tests your
knowledge of various "partners"
linked In history, legend, story,
song, and so on.
Rock and
Thunder and
Adam and
Punch and
Day and
Fine and
Trlfl and
Cash, and
Soap and
Dollar and
Dps and
Castor and
rVTfison and
Needle and
Salt and
Pro and
Scylla and
Cup and
Gilbert and
Chang and
20.
'rain JO tuns
jo iuonJA puno; noX idqjd 'Inn
M nAng i jsns l 1pqXJ
-qO it "00 SI Meddej ji pwqx
t uoxia SI n0J Tl sniiioa II
)ao '01 "1M 'ajj0 'nJX I
xpaa 9 wSn t xpnr Aa
52 Cry of the Bacchanals.
53 Mexicsn laborer.
54 Month marking the instituting
of the Jast of Purim (Esth.
9:19) x
55 Short journey.
56 Otherwise.
57 Act.
60 Native metal.

A LETTER BOX

00
Qlo
o ag
Q 0
o go
oo n
too

PR each kind of differently
marked circle in the spaces
above, substitute one of the let letters
ters letters R, D, E and A, so that the
squares In the vertical and hori horizontal
zontal horizontal rows will spell a single
wOrd in each row with no surplus
letters. Remember, the letters
that you must use are R, D, A.
and E. You can use one of the
words twice In the arrangement,
but the other 14 words necessary
to complete It must be different
This may appear to be easy,
but you'll find It isn't as simple
as It looks.
MBPP MBp '9.1 '! 'pp M9J 'J1
'Jin :oj J1J9 U tpJOM '9J
'JJ9JJ 'pJ pp '9J 'J9p,p9fJ
: 10.1 )nocjoq ti ipjov :aopnOB
Lcgwork in Poetry
My second has two legs
My whole no more.
And yet my first alone
Always has four.
'aiuJoq pjo tqx U9irf
Its Your Move
m -m m m
1 10 ii n
0 B
mm "-
it &
A);
ffe, a m f p Q
m Jjf m
By Millard Hopper
WHITE'S Immediate objective
in this checker test Is to
furtl.tr disperse Black's men so
thst they are easy prey. The
challenge Is lor White's forces
to move and win In three moves.
DI-SK-OR-IU-H
-I )I'1M fi st (-'IH '9-1 )IMM 'W
-8I-M 8 k?:-6l H'tM :uiijuos

liilpii
III
CBOS8WOBD FUZZLK SOLUTION

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n
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WHAT ARE THEY SEEING?
m ft S
if V

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6

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IN LAND OF LINCOLN This summer the travel iocus in several states will be on
America's pioneer era. In Illinois, the Abraham Lincoln sesquicentennial -is being
celebrated at such sites as this one at New Salem state park, his one-time home.

FROM THE BOTTOM UP -Painters aboard a floating
scaffold wield brushes as they spruce up the black
hull of the liner United States berthed in New York.

. IK x vS&vmis. xxx ,K k x' ., xw r tS

5C-;-vl isSSrw V J

I I fix : ,T 1

fmm-mM, .MuMyn iin.num

r4 k'. 'lvliiF

inn .,,i. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir.niii m mi mi i ifii t nmiim niiinniniiniiiniri

4-

7K

) -if

THOSE FASCINATED SPECTATORS in the top photo are looking at movie
stars Ava Gardner and Gregory Peck as they film a scene for On the Beach,
the first major Hollywood movie to be filmed in Australia. Ava and Greg can be
seen in the lower photo, seated together in the foreground. The beach where the
picture is being made is at Canadian bay. Many of the Australian movie fans
turned up with cameras of their own to snap Hollywood stars on location here.

BUCKSKINS IN BRITAIN Texas cowgirls in buck buckskin
skin buckskin bring a touch of the old west to London as
students from Howard Payne college in Brown Brown-wood
wood Brown-wood arrive for tour with their version of A Mid Midsummer
summer Midsummer Night's Dream. It'll be a nine-week trip.

ART BEHIND BARS One of the most unusual art museums in the United States
is this one in Pensacola, Fla. It was once the city jail. Heavy barred doors have
been left up to create an atmosphere of intrigue in the museum and art center.

"1

mw 7 v !.m A tr-

WWElHIWlMi ill1il1WlilllliMIWlWWnitiirirtili11ivWlrtVti1Wir"i1fi f'ftfllt Ml 1.immlnmnlwMi iil I mbwWWMWM1IIIMMI ItWWWIMWIWiWWIWIiW 'HIHII aw

SUNNY'S SIDE IS UP Stunt driver Jean Sunriy, careens down the ChampSf?.
v Elysees in Paris on two wheels to show how not to drive in educational movie, i" ',
v ' si.. s "' '

; : 4

4

" tr' i,x- -vi V

m

i '' j

1

HUCK FJNN WOULD LIKE THIS Doing his fishing in the best Huckleberry Finn tradition, Ed O'Dowd angles
for a big one in New York's Central park lake. He was taking part in Children's Aid group's fishing contest.

DINNER FOR TWO, OR FOR ONE?-lt looks as if that alligator may be planning to dine on that .cat and fheri
finish what's left, Actually, the unlikely dinner companions are pets of Mrs. Isobel Cole in Winton, England.

Distributed by King Features Syndicate.



- ..I..... -" ( v,, A v t ( 4
ft vS V -
r Jr" "V i ; ;
j2L$fS;,liri ,n :

PLANES AND MEN of the Inter American Geodetic Survey
which, with headquarters at Ft. Clayton, is working on Latin
America's best-ever mapping job.
(See $tory and picture, Paget 2 & 3)

Supplement

PANAMA, K. K, SUNDAY. JULY 195



MBMr""lM' 1 11 1 1 1 J 1 --a ...j?.J,.......iMj3tA-llll mt M y

WHEN ENGINEERS of the Inter American Geodetiy"Surveyre "tenting tonight," usually in the wildest and remotest sections of Central and South America, they
caa expect pilots of the 937th Engineer Company (Aviation) todrop down close by their camp to keep IAGS'i collaborative mapping program going.

PART OF THE PACK TRAIN that helped carry out equipmsnt ot a level-line party not too long
go. In such areas as these, the horse or mule is the only transportation on which members of the
55lst Engineer Company can depend. One membar of the unit lost his life carrying out the Inter
American Geodetic Survey mission of mapping Panama.

LIVING IN THE JUNGLES of Panama some nine months out of each year, members of the 551st
F-"'nfrr Ornnanv, a coup1 t of the 93sth En r Cm- -t" (Aviation), catch a shower tha

ay ihty Can usually in a homemade riB. 'Thsse men seldom see the liehts of Panama Cilv.

Kobbe-based
Helps Map

By MSgt. ROBERT L, GROOVER
and
FIRST LT. DANIEL KNOTTS
One hundred and fifty-nine officers and men of the 937th En Engineer
gineer Engineer Company (Aviation), working in conjunction with the colla collaborative
borative collaborative mapping program of the Inter American Geodetic Survey,
recently chalked up 72,000 hours in operations extending front Mex Mexico
ico Mexico to the tip of South America -r- a distance of 3200 miles.
A part of United states Army Caribbean and ;with headquarters
at Fort Kcbbe, the unit presently is operating ux,JMexico, Guatema Guatemala,
la, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica. Panama, Colombia, Ecuador,
Peru, Dominican Republic and Haiti. Forty-two aircraft are assigned
to the unit to accomplish this task 26 convention aircraft and 18
helicopters.
Organized in 1953 with the job of providing fUpport to the Inter
American Geodetic Surveyt engaged in a world-wide Army mapping
program, the organization has given what the Survey recently call called,
ed, called, "invaluable assistance in the completion of the many phases of
basic .work required in the construction of a map.'

ing pf trails and routes, aerial re re-supply;
supply; re-supply; transporting survey person personnel
nel personnel and equipment into small, re relatively
latively relatively unprepared airstrips, limit limited
ed limited aerial photography and logistic logistical
al logistical support of the overalL program.
The H-13-H and H-19 helicopters
provide invaluable aid in transport transporting
ing transporting personnel and equipment to
points that for all practical pur purposes
poses purposes are inaccessible.
They are also used in classifi classification,
cation, classification, and; photography control.
In areas where use of ttese craft
is not possible due to altitude or
rangg Jimitattons the field engi engi-neer
neer engi-neer apend,;days geting to and
from' desired point.
Qtt oSuch occasions, the mode of
travel Is more" of ten than not by
foot, supplemented occasionally by
a horse or burrp.
. to some areat the natives have

never seen an iiutomobile hot are
on the best of terms with Army

Aviation planes and helicopters.
The sight of a new au'omobil
would cause more excitement, ac according
cording according to pilots who have flown

in the areas, tran the arrival or

'he familiar red and white planes
bearing the "Servicio Inter, Ame Americano
ricano Americano Geodes'co" insignia.
Two of the 937th Engineer Com-

iflny's (Aviation) most experienc experienced;
ed; experienced; ied-winlots -rnopitfb du-

The pilots, a majority of whom
are members of the Corps of En Engineers,
gineers, Engineers, are able to help in many
of the technical fields associated
with map reading, whiie flying the
aircraft which make the mapping
possible to begin with.
Commanded by Lt. Col. Jack
W. Ruby, the unit maintains a
staff whose mission is to provide
control, supervision and support,
to crews and aircraft operating
with field Droiects.

The many matters related W

supply and maintenance, person personnel
nel personnel and administration and effi efficient
cient efficient and safe operations (always
a trying task) are made extreme extremely
ly extremely difficult by a widespread dis dispersion
persion dispersion "of the unit's members.
A full-time radio net, designed
primarily for aircraft control ar.d
position reports,' is effectively .us

ed for transmitting and receiving
information that by mail, or oth
er methods, wouid take days or
even weeks.

Almost every type of aircraf.

presently available to operational

Army Aviation units is used bv

the 937th Engineer Company A
viation). The four cla3ses of con

ventional planes the L-19 Cessna

Bird Dog. the L-20 De Havilland

Beaver, the U-1A De Havilland Ot

ter and Ihn t.win-ntine r.-2t iwm

mana piane assigned ro-ine rT-.cwiicici(A-wcjc ictoiuj

Sunday Anerkan Supplement

nization are eiven soecific missions

depending on their versatility and

characteristics.
They are used most commonly

in low-level reconnaissawrevinarlc-

-iened to a field project in Boeo-

la.

Af'er operating In the country
or many long months, each has

frad1 more eTptrierce than tb av-

SllNDAY, JULY 5, 1C59



PILOTS of the 937lh Engineer Company (Aviation), working aerial support for the IAGS collaborative program In Central and South America, sometimes find them themselves
selves themselves using landing strips for their light aircraft not recommended in the rule book. In 11 Latin American nations, members of the unit daily fly in aod out of almost
impossible areas for aircraft. They land on beaches, in sparsely wooded areas in fact, in any area that will allow them a short landing and an equally short take-off.

Americas
Aviation Unit

rage pilot could amass in a lifs lifs-ilme.
ilme. lifs-ilme. Both were aware of the dif difficulties
ficulties difficulties in operations of this sort
when they were given their mis mis-lions.
lions. mis-lions. Such things as suitable housing,
food and water and proper maint maintenance
enance maintenance for the aircraft things
taken for granted by most Army
aviators posed real problems for
the two officers.
M The fact that they flew over 2500
fcours while in Colombia proves
Jhat they overcome the problems,
jhlr solutions should be interest interesting
ing interesting not only to Army aviators, but
to anyone who loves adventure.
From May to September 1958,
1st. Lt. Joseph P. Morris flew his
L-19 from Colombia's west coast
to an area 120 miles north of Bue Buenaventura.
naventura. Buenaventura. The region was .wild
nd rugged but it was necessary
fly over the area, because it
was theNednntry's only sectorthat
remained uncharted.
There were no airfields and the
weather (to put it mildly) wag terrible.

The L-19, with a maximum fuel
range of about 4 hours and 30 min minutes,
utes, minutes, could not operate from a
distant strip and insure any mar margin
gin margin of safety if the work was to
be completed.
Difficulties were encountered In
setting up a base of operations
from the west beach.
A portion of the beach was found
to be usable for landings and take-

offs, but before work could be

started supplies and equipment had
to be moved in.
A complete lack of roads prevent

ed the equipment and supplies

from being transported by land,
thus the job was done by boat.

There was no suitable place to

beach the boat, so 40 drums of ga

soline had tj be dropped overboard
while the boat was still a half
mile out. Using local labor, It took
the better part of three days to

round up the drums scattered ov
er a two-mile area.

The other, smaller supplies were

(Continues on Page S)

iCsSS '-, -.3

' -Lj

A TRIANGULATION party of the 551st Engineer Platoon land their boat after days of trcking
through the brush accomplishing the mission of mapping Panama for Inter American Geodetic Sur Survey.
vey. Survey. This is a collaborative mapping program of the Republic of Panama and IAGS. J

m

&&gk23s&lf ftM;--nVy--
', iiiiiiiiniiwj&iaiiMWi ,v- i. rf, .tfWcWKtow

IW MAKING THEIR WAY through some of the wildest regions of the Republic' of Panama,, members of the 551st Engineer Platoon sometimes encounter mountain
loreams thaf must be forded before they can continue the K mission. This unit, originally company-sized, wag redesignated, a platoon when they virtually completed
mapping of the Republic of Panama a short time ago.

UNDAYYSr195& ..

Sunday Amerkan Supplemart

PAGfi. THEEib



THE PANAMA AMERICAN
" ?. '-" '.' 'W
OWNED ANOu.lHtV'TH WkNAM AHMICAN HBI, IHC.:if
FOUNDED ST UOM OUNSBVtU, IN ISl-:. "I!
HAItMOOtO ARIAS. lorros
13-37 H MUI P O BO 14. PANAMA R. P.
TtLIPHONl 2-0740 IB LINES)
CABLE ADDfttas- PANAKKRICAN, PANAMA
COLON OFItlCE. 12 179 CEfl'IH. AVll.lJ BETWEEN 1 2TH M tSTM STREET

Washington News Notebook
V
Shio Christeners Take Hie Breaks Of Hie Gaiie-
Foreign Representative
0l iUA B POWtHb, irtl.
. f-m w I I a V I IS
949 MADISON Ave.
new York "7 H.
. .LOCAL
S I 70
80
18 BO
: ; Laconic rrenenman is a iwist in vasmngton
ST NAIL
f 2 BO
IS OO
24 OO
Per Month in Advance.
Fop Six MONTHS IN ADVANCE.
Foi One Year in Advance
Lartn By DOUGLAS LAHSEN and JEKBX BENNETT
Bennett

POE TS' CORNER
Richard Eberhart

Richard Eberhart, born in Austin, Minn., in 1004, was edu educated
cated educated at Dartmouth, Cambridge University and Harvard. He bts
won the Shelley Memorial Prize, the Harriet Monroe Poetry
Award from the University of Chicago, and a National Institute
award. Given an honorary Doctor of Literature degree by Dart Dartmouth
mouth Dartmouth in 1954, he now is poet in residence and professor of English
at Dartmouth.

A STONE
A stone the size of man was my stone.
I did not throw it to the skies.
1 did not kick it with my toe.
1 held it in my hand, all alone.
Ant! dreaming on the centuries,
Thin stone became a gentle dove
And dove-like flew upon the skies
In turns and ardors of fresh love.
It flew around a world of trust
In fine similitude. Its care
Astonished me, and loosed and lit
The eyes of lovers everywhere.

IN THE GARDEN
Memory is a watery flower, when watered
Will transplant a scent from A to Z;
It is September. There are zephyrs truly.
A gold-banded bee in russet loam
Throws off the earUi, his heavy cargo
At last aloft, you sire the medium.
In you the sufbtle messages suspend.
The alphabets particles of gauze
i Realization claiming permanence.
" For these zephrys, these sights and soiuvis,
Thst heavy bee, those intedterminate sceits
Are not the world, but thsy are you.
You know them sitting in the shade
In old September, by the rich red banks.
The zephyrs are your mind, a probable
Stored world of nielos appetit?.

THE LOST CHILDREN

And so the river moves.
Impersonal and slow
Today. Let us go,
Afraid to own our loves,
To the place of ice and sm r.
The brink where yesterday
Two children, held aglow,
Walked time sway.
In a moment they were lost.
Ignorance and innocence
Pulled them under and tos td
Their souls up from sense.
Now, 0 stars, yrw hold
Their small souls, two
Children cold and old
Inj lissome Spring the true.
And so the river moves
Impersonal, and slow.

Wc watch. Let us go.

And hold cJosSiour loves.

HQ

830 JCca. Panama 1090 Ku. Con

WASHINGTON (NEA) Prom Prom-noni
noni Prom-noni Wichintrtnn wives agrei

thai nrinratinn's most DreSiJny

need is a sped"1 course to teart)

them how to Mean cnmva&m

bottles at christening ceremonies
The idea started following Mrs.
Richard Nixon's seven-swing at at-sh
sh at-sh s bottle of bub

bly against a new commercial
jet airliner.
It picked up emphasis a few
days later when Mrs. Robert An An-j.rcnn
j.rcnn An-j.rcnn wif (f the Treasury

Ut,J.t7VU( T W
secretary, clobbered the missile

submarine George wasningion so
hard that she splattered everybo everybo-the
the everybo-the launching platform.

She and Frank Pace, boss of

General Dynamics Corp. wnicn
manufactured the sub, were
drenched.
To make matiers worse, her
mriot watch came off and fell the

nf three stories onto

ths concrete below. General Dy

namics plans to buy her a new

one.

pthi ENNE HIRSCH. French

president of the European Atom Atomic
ic Atomic Energy Commission, won the
applause of Washington news

men when he snowed tnai ne naa
no use for ghost writers. Appear Appearing
ing Appearing hpfnre the National Press

Club, president Hirsch said in

perfect Engnsn mat ne pew a
ctatAmunt attributed to him had

Koon n-icepn1 around. "I have

read it," he said simply. "It's

quite good. But wtiy snouia i re recite
cite recite it now?"
So he made a few off-the-cuff

remarks and sat down.

party where Panggang Perchik
was being prepared, Pentagon
Navy Captain Sidney Freedman
commented:
"This neighborhood smells lust
like the streets of Singapore.
PRETTIEST, MOST enthusia
tic huckster to visit Washington
this year is Irene Wasserkort of
Frankfurt, Germany, who -is
Miss Hot Doe of 1959. For three

days she toured the capital pro

moting not dogs at press confer conferences,
ences, conferences, embassy receptions and
hotel dining rooms. She also
found -a wav to hawk the dish in

almost every statement she

maae.
For instance, when a reporter
asked why she had never learn learned
ed learned to ski in Germanv. Irene mint

ed a line from "The Hot Dog
Polka." "It may be true as the
song says that 'There ain't o
bones in a htjfc dpg,' she ex explained.
plained. explained. "But here are bones "in

me and every ttime I tried to ski,
I broke one of them.'

This sort of dedication vanish-

ed, however, at the end of the

campaign. When asked what she
wanted for lunch on ber last day
in town, she answered, "Make it

a hamburger.

WASHINGTON socialite Mrs.
Robert Low Bacon may start another-
trend in women's summer
fashion accessories. She showed

up at a British Embassy recep

tion the otner afternoon carrying
a small portable electric fan.
"It's wonderful for this," sh
said, holding the fan behind her
neck.

TURKISH PRESS Attache Al Al-terhur
terhur Al-terhur Kilic has devised a new
cocktail which he says surpasses
a Bloody Mary as a daytime
drink. A Bloody Mary is a com combination
bination combination of vodka and tomato
juice. Kilic's concoction is a mix mixture
ture mixture of vodka and milk. He calls
it a Pale Jane.

WASHINGTON'S staunchest ad

vocates of paper plates are

members of the Sheraton rant

Hotel's kitchen crew who washed

and dried the dishes at a $100-a-plate
Republican dinner. The
wingding, which 3,200 people at attended,
tended, attended, turned out to be the big biggest
gest biggest dinner in the hotel's history.

Guests dirtied 28,800 pieces ot

china, 6,400 glasses and 19,600
kn:ves, forks and spoons.

The party probably set a re&

ord as a monev-making enter enter-nrize.
nrize. enter-nrize. A'thoueh the GOP Nation-

pi Committep charged each guet

$100 to attend, the dinner cost

onlv $6 90 per nlate. Thus the
GOP raked in almost $300,000 in

campaign funds.
FAVORITE DISH of Chevy
Chase back yard cooking enthu enthusiasts
siasts enthusiasts is a Malayan receipe call call-il
il call-il PinsJuano Pprrhik. It's char

coal broiled steak marinated with

a concoction of coconut milk o o-nions,
nions, o-nions, ginger root, green chili
ppnners and brown sugar.
Upon arriving at an outdoor

What Do You Read?

nmnM tt c hv Martin Cai-

din (Dutton): Less than 10 years

ago it was a snaKe-imcsicu

DanK. iuuoji r
to the world Cape Canaveral,

where we are trying out. me m-

ture to see if we UKe n.
This" is the story of the Cape
tprt installations.

strung out for 5,000 miles south

eastward across une m aui.uc,
which make up the Air Force Mis Missile
sile Missile Test Center and the AtlanUc

Missile Range. am.n
m.. lnnoi-e nf thi AFTMC

foresaw that it would expand and

estimated Uiat evemuauy
..u mninu f wnrVine force of

WUUlU K iLiyij o
4,250 persons. Events have some

what outrun ineir expccio expccio-By
By expccio-By the middle of 1958, the working
populatior of the test center total totalled
led totalled 18,000 and it was still grow-
TKn Knilrtiin i pvtiaMm) to CO

on for at least another 18 months

before the 1 workload levels on:
Caidin, a former consultant to
the commander of AFMTC, is ex
cellently qualified to tell its story.

He does so wiui uie aia oi -cerpts
from official documents,
ninnrti nf interviews with the ex

perts and his own recollections of

memorable launcnmes at me

Cape.

The Sleepwalkers, by Arthur

Koestler (Macmiuan): Man nas

alwavs theorized about his be

einnines and the nature of the

universe And as knowledge start

ed pushing aside the curtain of

darkness, old uneones were arop-

When Thomas Jefferson com completed
pleted completed his second term as
president in 1809, he began
one of the imost ambitious ef efforts
forts efforts of his life: the establish establishment
ment establishment of a university which
would live up to his ideals.
The University of Virginia re resulted
sulted resulted from his efforts, but he
was so short of money that he
had to sell his fine library to
Congress. Later a public sub subscription
scription subscription was taken for his
benefit. He died July 4, 1126,
almost penniless,
Encyclopedia Brltsnnles,

ped for newer and larger con concepts
cepts concepts about the summer, position
and movement of the stars,
planets and other bodies in space,
koestler has written a chronolog chronological
ical chronological story of these developments

as they were unfolded by tne

sleepwalkers. those giants of

philosophy whose visions drove
them groping and stumbling to
ward the light. Plato, Aristotle,

Pythagoras. Copernicus, uauieo.

Brahe and Kepler are the heroes
of Koestler's story. A book ol

this kind could not be made easy

reading, treating as it does of th
scientific charting of the heavens,
but Koestler has brought his

heroes to life, telling of tceir
struggles and failures and tri triumphs
umphs triumphs in a way that shows that
they were human beings beset
with superhuman problems.

The R-;n From The Mountain.

by William Groninger Rt i n e-

har): An impressive tirst novel,
largely autobiographical, describ describing
ing describing peacetime Army life as it was
in Japan during the U.S. occupa-
. . f. It' 1 J TIT j TT A

lion lusi mier vvunu rrar u- n.
good deal of the story is devoted
to the painful process by which,
Groninger's hero, S-Sgt. Herman
Wakely, achieves maturity. The

civilian reader may be shocked by
mnrh nf tha honk, but its descrip

tion of the Army holds few sur

prises for anybody who nas spent
time tn it Croninger has enriched
bis material through skill organi organization
zation organization and a thoroughly read readable
able readable style.

Herewith find solution to Sunday Crossword puz puzzle
zle puzzle No. 793, published today.

I R E N Ell." 3M A L J CITHOM E S

rEmmETRFl DnS P R A TDH E R M!E s

REGELATES TSJAMOA IDfEPOT
N E OCTjCE TkJSLJP E T E 5r1 ENQ
ETNAS aS Ep A LXjR E G U LATOR
SEOULSCPngPEILnS NE&UP.E
iBYNAMPCJrr4ngErUS"gr
I ffiAi: SERT SyMCr
j6iATr n riir NiA tnie weir e piol

iSlAlTlEnRlPIElOISnSICIAlUlPDNIOIVlAI

lot rte all p p to0PeJSamzP 1
TlplFyTk-- HsIelwlEbk-- HsIfIkiIoIrI

.' Answer tfi So?, AjprB 8CryptoquIp: CRASS
PRIDE AND PREJUDICE JUST IGNORE
OTHERS' RIGHTS.

B

PAGBU0
.Jffi...fBLJi



POPULAR
CONCERT

By WILLIAM D. LAffLER
NEW YORK(UPI) Dorothy
Donesan has so much energy
that she iust has to stand up

when she's playing the piano, but

this does not in any way-aeuaci
frnm hw digital aeilitv.

'Doroth Doneean live! Ca

pitol T-1155), her latest LP takes
this talented pianist through key keyboard
board keyboard calisthenics that would fa fa-time
time fa-time the ordinary artist. Only a

few of the dozen numbers allow
her to relax. .
"After You've Gone" and "Bo

dy and Soul" demonstrate the ef

fectiveness of Dorothys fiery

techniaue. But "Put Your Arms

Around Me, Honey' shows that
che can play-on the sweet side,
too. Collectors who specialize in

piano recordings should pick up

this one
Some of the sold piano records

the have been. released in stereo

have fallen flat because the put
no is primarily a monophonic in

ettrucment. But "Two Pianos in
Stereo" by Jon Keyes and Paul

Cleff (Col-Pix SCP-403) is ideal
y suited for the new sound me
ilium.

These duo pianists would

sound great on a conventional LP
but in' stereo they lend unbeaev-

able realism to their selection of

dozen keyboard workhorses.
They are especially good on
'Dardanella" and "Malaguena."

Hal Schaefer gives the 88 keys
an indigo tint on "Ten Shades of

Blue" (United Artists UAL-3021).
On some occasions Schaefer lets
composers such as W. C. Handy
and Harold Arlen speak for

themselves by following their

scores faithfully. Schaefer tan

sies 10 blues numbers without

Imparting a sameness to any of

them.

For Hi-Fi Fans: "Orienta" by

the Marco Polo Adventurers
(RCA Victor LPM-1919) is a top

platter for sound bugs. Exoti:
string instruments are used lib

erally. Sound engineering is perfect.

Selected tingles; "Wonderful

You" by Jimmie Rodgers (Rou (Roulette
lette (Roulette R-4158), Mar chin' the
Blues" by Quincy Jones (Mercu
ry 71460), "Taboo' by Arthur Ly
man (HiFiRecord R-550), "Yes,
You May" by the Teen Tones
(Decca 9-30895).

Stereoscope: "Man Bites Har

monica" by Jean Thielmans (Riv (Riverside
erside (Riverside 1125) proves the harmoni harmonica
ca harmonica is a formidable instrument. .
Stereo's realism is never more e e-vident
vident e-vident than on "Razz-Ma-Tazz"

(Urania USD 2003). Phil Moody's

piano and Nick Fattors drums
put new zip into a number of rag ragtime
time ragtime tunes such as "Hello My
Baby" and "Smiles.

The female lobster lays from
6,000 to 100,000 eggs. She car carries
ries carries them about for some 10
months, glued to the swim swim-mere
mere swim-mere ts under her tail. As soon
as they hatch, the mother fans
the babies away and they start
out on their own. All through
its life the lobster continues to
Crow and molt its armored
akin whenever it outgrows it.
During the first year, it molts
from 14 to 17 times. When it
grows older it molts not more
than once a year.
Rncrelope4la Britannic

By DELOS SMITH
NEW YORK (UPI) Pianists

of the German school play Cho-

mn so beautifully youre surpris

ed they don t piay him more oit oit-en.
en. oit-en. This thought is occasioned by

three records ot w 1 1 n e i jn
Kempff, each one entitled "Pia "Piano
no "Piano Music of Chopin" (London
CS6O40-41-42).
Kempff is of the same disci discipline
pline discipline as the late Walter Giee-

king" and Wilhelm Backbaus,
whose records have included few

of Chopin. He permits himself no
technical liberties and no emo emotional
tional emotional extravagances. Dynamics

are rigorously controlled and ton
al qualities are subdued.

Of the three records, the re reviewer
viewer reviewer liked volume two best. It
has four impromptus, one noc

turne, once scherzo, and the Ber Berceuse
ceuse Berceuse and Barcarolle. Volume one

contains the A-flat ballade, the
"Grande Polonaise Brillante," the

t minor Fantaisie and the Folo

naise-r antaisie. Volume three is

given over to the B-flat minor

and B minor sonatas which are
lesser Chopin.
The lively and sunny Partita
for Orchestra which Wiliiam
Walton composed for the 40 .i
anniversary of the Cleveland Or Orchestra
chestra Orchestra in 1957 has finally been

recorded. It is played by the

ueveianaers with George S'.ell
conducting.
It makes no pretensions to pro

fundity nor even minor message message-giving.
giving. message-giving. This partita is well "on

ceived and well put together

music tor the pleasure of players

ana listeners.

As such, it 1 s in interesinc

contrast to the fragments of the

lOUi symphony which Gustav
Mahler ahd in manuscript when
he died and which fills out this

record. These fragments do have

pretensions to profundity and
ir.ii i i

m diner naa a message, as was

his way (Columbia-LC3568).

i Premier Sunday Cross- Word Puzzle I :
i' fw r r i" ii" in :i
51 V '"
. 7Z
i ijsi w 26 w
30 31 31 33 j?
WL3LW W WzCTt: j
vZWW7- 777 Srzzm 47 WV?7
II5' "1" S45!; :
57 si ST 7frZo tr :
73 1 IS 77?lb 77 78 79 80
81 82. 83 84 8? J i
66 67 TTJea V) 777 77 i
r--Wx
pi!:ii" m
VZ 9 V 7Z 98 99 777 too ioi 77 101 103 104 7Z ;
irl 1 1 I wMA 1 1 I VMM n 1 1;

I HORIZONTAL

t
1

Best Seller

Fiction

DOCTOR ZHIVAGO-Boris Past-

ernax
EXODUS Leon M. Uris
THE UGLY AMERICAN Wil William
liam William J. Lederer'-aod Eugene L.
Burdick
DEAR AND GLORIOUS PHYS1C PHYS1C-CIAN
CIAN PHYS1C-CIAN Tavlor Caldwpll

LOLITA Vladimir Nabokov

MRS. 'ARRIS GOES TO PARIS
Paul Gallico
FROM THE TERRACE John 0' 0'-.
. 0'-. Hara
THE WATCH THAT ENDS THD
NIGHT Hugh MacLennan
Non-Fiction

MINE ENEMY GROWS OLDER

Alexander King

ONLY IN AMERICA- Harrfi

WHA 'WE MUST KNOW
ABOUT COMMUNISM H.11W

and Bonaro Overstreet

ELIZABETH THE GREAT ?

Elizabeth Jenkins.

TWIXT TWELVE AND TWEN.Y

COLLISION COURSE Alvia Mas
cow
HOW I URNED ONE THOUS-

AND DOLLARS INTO A MIL MILLION
LION MILLION IN REAL ESTATE Wil.

Ham Nickerson
BROTHERHOOD OF EVIIFr.

derick Sondern, Jr.
MY BROTHER WAS AN ONLY

CHILD Jack Douglas.

TO DISCUSS; ALGERIA

LONDON ITTPn Tho Afrin

republics will send delegates to a
conference in Monrovia. Tihfria

July 4-18 to discuss Algeria,' Ra-

aio Moscow said Monday. The
broadcast said the delegates pre presumably
sumably presumably would tak III) tha ntiM.

tion of aiding the Algerian rebels.

1 Goddess
of peace
6 Substance
found in
apples
11 Abodes
16 City in
Ohio
18 Tropical
plants
20 Tomor Tomorrow
row Tomorrow (Sp.)
21 Kettle Kettledrum
drum Kettledrum 22 Baffling
23 Calls to
readiness
24 Latvian
coin
25 Commem Commemorative
orative Commemorative disk
27 Workers
29 Hawaiian
garland

30 Russian
1 city
32 Military
assistants
34 Of war
vessels
I 35 High
i pommel
of saddle
36 River in
France
38 Small plots
of ground
40 Thing,
in law
41 Studies
42 A fuel
44 Short
jackets -Ift-iTufklsh
v
. river (var.)
48 List of
1 candidates
51--Mooh's
..'age at be beginning
ginning beginning of
calendar
year

53 Recook in
liquid
56 Click
beetle
58 Small,
European
herring
60 Messenger
of the gods
62 Freezes
together
again
64 Pacific
island
group
66 Store Storehouse
house Storehouse 67 New:
comb,
form
68 Equatorial
70 Chief of
the
Apostles
72 Of wine:
comb,
form
73 Small
heating
vessels
76 Leaf of

the calyx
(Bot.)
78 Clock
used for
timing
clocks
81 Korean
capital
(poss.)
83 Repulse
85 Office of
value with
little responsibility
86 Power:
comb,
form
88 A style of
type

90 Having
notched,
rounded
apex
(Bot.)
91 Pope's
triple
crown
93 Wanderer
85 Total

96 Acquire
98 Miss
Claire
100 Later
102 Fruit of
the gourd
family
105 Satiate
106 Bamboo Bamboolike
like Bamboolike grasses
108 Kind of
northern
duck
110 Suddenly Suddenly-blazing
blazing Suddenly-blazing star
112 Fate
113 Goes at
fast,
springing
gait
115 Musical
drama
117 Biblical
118 Ignores
120 Abstract
122 The
sheep
124 Read
carefully
125 -Dissem
inated.
126 Pompous
show
127 River
England
128 Conduit
129 Spanish
title-of
address

1 Italian:
comb,
form
2 Having
parts
that
turn
8 Puffs
up
4 Bird's
beak
6 A Dutch
cheese
6 Hammer
7 Babylon Babylonian
ian Babylonian sky
god
8 Endure
9 Protuber Protuberance
ance Protuberance of the
. skull
10 Salted
sturgeon
roe
11 Dutch
painter
12 Single
unit
13 Actor
Brando
14 Pene Penetrates
trates Penetrates 15 The
black
buck
17 Olive
genus
18 A mace mace-bearer
bearer mace-bearer 19 Identities
ab abstractly
stractly abstractly 20 Earth
(poetic)
26 Slope
28 Allayer
31 Envoy
33 Ceases
35 de
Balzac

VERTICAL
37 Badger Badgerlike
like Badgerlike animal
39 Breaks
suddenly
41 Raised to
third
power
43 Pinnacle
of glacier
ice
45 Worth Worthless
less Worthless bit
47 An excla exclamation
mation exclamation 48 Showered
icy rain
49 Philip Philippine
pine Philippine gulf
50 Locations
52 More
docile
54 Incentive
55 Girl's
name
56 Sea
eagles
57 Discour Discourage
age Discourage through
fear
59 Carries
(colloq.)
61 Lay
av.ay
63 Above:
.prefix
65 Teutonic
sea god
69 Flavor
71 Old Fin Finnish
nish Finnish poetry
74
Mame
75 Killed
77 Citrus
fruit
79 Abate Abate-;
; Abate-; jnent
tcolloq.)
80 Discernment

82-Small
(Scot,
var.)
84 Washes
87 Bay
window
89 One
lately
come
92 Anoints
(archaic)
9 Har Harvested
vested Harvested 9fc Jailer
97 Dress
99 Takes
as
one's
own
101 Regret
extremely
103 City in
Poland
104 Spanish
province
105 Slum Slumbered
bered Slumbered :106 Demolish
(rare)
107 The
sharp
tip
109--A
support
111 Genus
of
the
goose
113 Deport Deportment
ment Deportment (archaic)
114 Simmer
slowly
116 Topaz t
119 Press
for
121 Be in
debt
123 Anger

Average' time at Mlatloa: (1 mtmrtrn.

CKYFTOQUIP
SIFHH YIOTM FBT YIMUCTOSM
V IH' I O L X K K.

UCHK OLBVIM

It's The Sunday American
For The Best In Fotos & Features

1 f ,,.4,,

pplement x PAGE FIVE

Hi
)

.JMLJf



J
i iMfr I '
1

CAPT. JOHN G. DUKE takes time out to read a magazine under the protective cover of his H-13-H helicopter, which he pilots in ae aerial
rial aerial support of the Inter American Geadetic Survey, while Lynn Torbert. chief engineer of the Colombia IACS project peers through the
N-3 levfl. This scene, taken at San Benito, Colombia, is typical of many which take place in all parts of Central and fcoutn America
seven days a week. The light helicopters can land In planes inaccessible to other types of aircraft.

OLDTIIVIERS in the 937th Engineer Company (Aviation) (IAGS)
include Sp.6 Wallace Conerly, who recently reenlisted for six years
which will take him to the 20-ycar mark. Lt. Col. Jack W. Ruby,
commander of the unit did the honors. Conerly, unit airplane and
hc-licoptei technical inspector, is responsible for insuring that tip tiptop
top tiptop maintenance is performed on all of the unit's aircraft.

TYPICAL OF THE ENLISTED MEN Who help make the 837th En En-gineer
gineer En-gineer Company (Aviation) tick is Sp.5 Edward A. Powell, who re recently
cently recently was presented with his present grade by Ltf Col. Jack W.
Ruby, commander of the organization. Powell, a native of Wiscon Wisconsin,
sin, Wisconsin, serves as a specialist in the- supply section of the organization
at Fort Kobbe, where he has the responsibility of maintaining and
issuing parachutes and other emergency equipment to the crews
of the aircraft used by the unit. His job is increased by the wide
dispersion of the unit which currently has members and aircraft
in eleven Central and South American countries. He andhis wife,
Pauline, live at Fort Kobbe.

(Continued from Pago 3)
shuttled a shor by native dugout

canoes.. ,.t

The crew of three pilot, crew

chief and survey engineer lived
in a native hut that had been

"modernized. i
Screening kept out tt million

of mosquitoes that appeared at

sunset and disappeared at sunrise.
Electricity for lighting, and o o-peration
peration o-peration of the field radio, was
provided by a gasoline-driven gen generator,
erator, generator, i
The local diet of rice, yucca, po potatoes
tatoes potatoes and an occasional bit of
beef was considered an inade inadequate
quate inadequate bill of fare, so a refrigerator
and food-stuffs were brought in by
Otter aircraft. :
Thereafter, supplies of meat,
bread and other staple items wero
brought in every two weeks.
Cooking duties and the -daily
purification of drinking water wer
rotated among the crew.
Time required for the initial

cleaning of the beach to permit

safe landings and takeoffs was in insignificant
significant insignificant compared to the many
hours spent in the daily removal
of debris that washed ashore.

Maintenance of the aircraft waa

greatly increased by constant ; o o-peration
peration o-peration in this -area.
Sand, of course, presented a
major problem. It was necessary
to remove fuel and oil screens and

all gasoliife was filtered through a
chamois cloth.

Th Diane was flown inland pv-

ery six days for a through scrub scrubbing
bing scrubbing to prevent corrosion. Usin
water from a nearby river that
emptied into the ocean, the crew

washed the plane daily usinj
the 'hand and bucket" system.
Maintenance was often delayed

by the regular appearance of tro

pical down-pours, urn wis snu
tion was remedied when the QeW
constructed an overhead partition.
Morris soon found that flight
conditions were also complicated
in this area. A book containing tha
times of the low and high tide
was a vital part of the plane's e e-quipment.
quipment. e-quipment. Unable because of ita
low bearing capacity to land oa
the portion of the beach not af affected
fected affected by tide he had to insur
that upon his return the tide would
be out.
Low tide, a drop of from 12 to

15 feet, provided an area on the

sheen of tno Deacn aooui a iwi
wide that was firm enough to sup support
port support the weight of the plane.
Seldom did the L-19 get higher
than a few hundred feet from the
ground while conducting low lev
el reconnaissance in this area.
Often, when flying in the low
lands in a few miles to the east,
the pilot was able to look up and
see mountain tops rising m o r
than 10,000 feet on three sides.
It was at times like this that the
lieutenant thought of three other
pilots who went down in the samo
type of terrain two of whom
walked out in three days, while
(Continued on Pago 7) ''

mmw v i j ft x job hiih
Mi8l'i81 '''MIIMIIIII)MM11M1WIIWIIMII(UMWIIIM I III

BERS of the 937th Engineer Company (Aviation) and the 551st Engineer Platoon (Survey) teamed up to take the 1958 holiday touch .fa tonrent at FmI
e. ( ol. R. A.Monrs. Jr commander of the 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, presented-the winners trophy to Lt. Col. Jack W, Ruby (far left), commander ol we

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Kohh

Unit. Shown clutching the trophy is the team captain, Sp.4 Paul Arellanes

fIEX Sunday AmemaitteW81!

' SUNDAYi JULY 5, 1959



COUNTRY

area and after completing his as assignment
signment assignment with the Inter American
Geodetic Survey was assigned to
an area where, we are happy to
say,, the working conditions are
considerably better than in Co Colombia.
lombia. Colombia. 1st. .Lt. Thomas I. McMurray,
also an L-19 pilot, spent 42 months

(Continued from Pgt )
the other has not been heard of
since.
The hazards of flying a single single-tngine
tngine single-tngine plane low over the mount mountainous
ainous mountainous terrain covered with a
dense jungle growth were increas increased
ed increased by the rapid formation of thun thunderstorms
derstorms thunderstorms and accompanying bad

leather.
Flying a non instrument rated
plane, Morris had to keep a close
eye on the weather and race for
home once he recognized ths be beginning
ginning beginning of a buildup or lowering
ceiling. Navigating under these
marginal conditions was touch and
go.
The L-19 was equipped with a
tingle, manual loop compass, but
most of the stations transmitted
cn frequencies higher than those
Installed in the receiver. i
Morris spent four months in the"

THIS IS LT. COL. JACK W.
RUBY, commanding officer of
the 937th Engineer Company
(Aviation) at Fort Kobbe. This
unit has been called "one of the
Army's most unique organiz organizations."
ations." organizations." It is presently provid provid-;
; provid-; Jng aerial, support to the Inter
American Geodetic Survey, en engaged
gaged engaged In the Army's world worldwide
wide worldwide mapping program. The
unit's members and aircraft are
scattered throughout Mexico,
Central and South America. Hai Haiti
ti Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

in Colombia, working under much

uie same conditions as Morris lie
left United States Army Caribbean
recently with a world of knowl knowledge
edge knowledge gained while 'bush flying"

over the wild and unpredictable

Colombian jungles.

From sea level to altitudes 01

17.500 to 18.800 feet to "set on to

or to circumnavigate bad weath

er. McMurray has, probably seen

more of Colombia than any na

tive of the country.

His iota was to conduct recon

naissance in areas originally pass

ed over because of bad weather

or other difficulties not a job to

be approached with any degree of

assurance.

His "Bird Dog" never left the

ground without a good supply, of

portable oxygen bottles. If a mean

altitude for his operations could

be figured out, it would undoubt

edly be in excess of 10,000 feet,

Conducting low-level reconuais

sance in a two-place plane loaded
with surveyor and his instruments

and emergency equipment can

have its moments the higher
the plane goes the lower the safe

ty margin.

Through necessity, McMurray be

came quite proficient at finding
areas of least turbulence in the
menacing mountains. He also dev

eloped a second sense for analyz analyzing
ing analyzing weather that often amazed

those with whom he worked.

The early stages of engine com

ponents and increased aircraft

maintenance was nothing new to

McMurray, because he had work

ed out of airstrips approaching

10,000 leet for long periods of time.

This, of course, requires maxi maximum
mum maximum power for climbs to 13,000

ieet ana snortens the life span of
many of the engine's parts.
It was necessary for the lieute lieutenant
nant lieutenant to gauge accurately the ma many
ny many parts necessary for a month's

field operation, because he was

not able to locate at ny one
place that would allow an elabor elaborate
ate elaborate maintenance system.
Normally, the airplane returned
to Bogota for a scheduled inspec inspection
tion inspection after 100 hours of operation.
For major repairs it was return returned
ed returned to the maintenance division,

Transportation Section, United

States Army Caribbean, in the Pa Panama
nama Panama Canal Zone.

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FOUR MEMBERS of the 937th Engineer Company (Aviation) recently received certificates for com completion
pletion completion of the General Educational Development Tests high school level. Lt. Col. Jack W. Ruby,
commander of the unit, made the presentations. More than 97 percent of the organization have
now successfully completed a minimum of the high school equivalency tests. Left to right, Pfc.
Bartley L. Bullington, Pfc. James E. Height, Sp.4 Robert P. Silva, Sp.5 Fernand R. Guay and Ruby.

McMurray's L-19, like Morris'

plane, carried an emergency seat
kit which, in part, consisted of a
machete, over and under shot-gun
rifle, fishing gear, distress flares
and mirror, drinking water, con

centrated food bars and matches.
Parachutes were, of course, re required,
quired, required, but if the pilot had to bail

out the parachute would have of

fered scant protection in the tmn

air density over mountains from

12,500 to 15,000 feet high.
A broken leg would have been a

major disaster if the pilot had
landed in the almost impenetrable
jungles; there would have been no
help from local natives, because
the mountainous areas over which
McMurray flew are virtually unin uninhabited.
habited. uninhabited. Although Morris and McMurray
have now gone on to other assign assignments,
ments, assignments, other Army aviators are
still working with the Inter Ameri
can Geodetic Survey in its colla
borative mapping mission.
Tbey fly the kind of aircraft

that requires real flying ability
from its pilot. There is no push pushbutton
button pushbutton magic to this type' of fly flying.
ing. flying. ,,
An aviation maintenance man is
the pilot's best friend and the
937th Engineer Company (Avia (Aviation)
tion) (Aviation) has some of the best avia aviation
tion aviation maintenance men in the world
on its rolls.
It has to have, because the t.-o-lical
conditions under which the
inits aircraft fly are among the
roughest on earth.

0 0 o n
'' V

MILITARY AND CIVILIAN personnel of the. Inter American Geodetic Survey at Bogota. The pilots are assigned To the ,937th Engineer Company (Aviation) while the

crew TnembeJ'S are assigned to. IAGS FJ;qntJ9,-,ft' to ngl Charles Whaien, ;eophi!
,iect ensineervLt. Col. Robert MatlhewsJJfiHif fleet in.charee ot ist6eAi ist JA:'Riehi

Ksrlf Wiiff n'rfo'hf MH '.Tifrrw V .' .fnfip 'Viinicf ratti; ncoctant' Arthur Vorripi"

MSgt. Gale s. Moore, liscal administrative assistant; Sp.5 Terrance Uevereaux, crew member; sp.4 Harom vanaenoerg, crew memoer, anu om. nimaiu i. xauia xauia-naha,
naha, xauia-naha, crew member. Absent at time picture was taken were Vernon G. Perdue, assistant project engineer for vertical control; Charles Booher, area mechanic, and
Capt. Stanley Ballantyne, chief of the aviation section. ,

fflafAmemanglirn



1
, jJiMiii "' ":

MAP MAKERS IN COLOMBIA Lt. Col. Robert C. Matthews, Jr., officer in charge of the
Colombian IACS project (with pointer in hand), works closely in his operations with the staff and
members of the Instituto Ceografico, Colombia's own mapping agency. On right is Dr. Jorge
Noel Rodriguez, chief engineer of the cartigrapphic department of the instituto. On left is
Lynn Torbert, chief engineer for the Colombia project, IACS. Map depicts widespread opera operations
tions operations in Colombia, with headquarters at Bogota.
. ... ,,r (See Story & Pictures, pages 2 and 3)
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