The Panama American

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Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03039

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Hit FEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 195S
flVE CENTS

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!i!,-.!n3 Lines vs. Pentagon end Bdbca Ileijhts
Seybold Harrison Oppose
Commerce Dept. Getting PC
( WASHINGTON, March 20 (UP) The Defense Departament and ratienal ship,
ping interests took opposing views yesterday on whether the jurisdiction of the Pan Panama
ama Panama Canal should ,be transferred from the Army to the Commerce Department.
. Representatives of both sides in the controversy testified as the Panama Canal
subcommittee of the Senate Commerce committee began a series of hearing on the
proposal.
The Canal Zone governor, Gen. J. S. Seybold, opposed the bill, and said Canal
administrators believe the present arrangement 'is in the best interests of the Canal
enterprise and of the United States."

Vs ivy Y U

w

7

UJ U

-?
j

Whether the national defense! civilian aspects of the Canal en
aspects or the lnteroceanlc com- terprlse and with the inevitable
merce advantages of the Canal continued need for transfer of.
Is the more important Is an "un-1 control to the military In time of

necessary ana uuiura tjuco

ilon." h said

In any case, the Defense De De-jartment
jartment De-jartment would take over the
Sanal in wartime.
In a 19-page statement which
he read to the subcommittee, he
said:
"It is considered that the nec nec-sssary
sssary nec-sssary coordination between
peacetime anticipation of condi conditions
tions conditions to be met hi wartime and
military plans for defense can
best be accomplished under the
present arrangements whereby
executive supervision is vested in
a single official, the Secretary
of the Army, who has requeslte
top level authority over both the
military and civilian components
of the Canal enterprise."
The present arrangement, he
Added, "provides desirable con continuity
tinuity continuity of interest, authority and
responsibility throughout periods
6i war and peace."
It. Gen. William K. Harri Harrison,
son, Harrison, commander in chief of
the Caribbean Command, also
noosed the bill, both person

s!Iy and as ypokMtvn r the
Armv.
For imp thin?, he S3 id, the
Secretary of t!,e Armv ""t id pn
loHr be ftuth'iiizi.a 1 1 f-eU'e
disputes which arise over admin administration
istration administration of the Canal, and -l-oovf
-v.-" rfl t"r)r" 'i

I, as provided

war," he said.

"In contrast, the present ar

rangement provides desirable

continuity of interest, authority
and responsibility throughout
periods' of war and peace."
On the ether side, represen representatives
tatives representatives of steamship companies
strongly recommended approv approval
al approval of the bill and said that un under
der under the present arrangements
an undue portion of military
costs of the Canal are incor incorporated
porated incorporated in the tolls and there
fore paid by the ships transit
Inr the Canal.

Robert E. Mayer, president of
the Pacific American Steamship

Association, said the proposal
"does not ignore the military im

portance of the Canal, nor would
such a transfer be inconsistent
with that aspect of the Canal."

. "It suggests closest liaison

with military In peace time, and

complete military control. In
emergency or war period," ne

said.
He added that the Defense
Department "offers no eom-
pellinjt reason for maintain-

fax military control in peace peacetime''
time'' peacetime'' and said "the ration
of the Canal Cosrpsny apl
Zri" EPtriument Itave nn f.i-

. :"-t ".trine on t'. dii j in
..pevaime." ': v v-j
j v-j ''Lxctiv t for l'.i lonaI;v 0'itside

pute

Vvei of eovrrr

:n v'e propo,.n. bill. '" ;
"TTrncfieaiary confusion and
amhittuity in responsibilities
would undoubtedly arise if peace
time supervision of the Canal
operation were placed In the Tt Tt-partment
partment Tt-partment of Commerce with the
resulting sDllt of authority and
responsibility at the Washington
level as between the military and

Privaie Charged
Found llol Guillv
.. After three hours of dellbera dellbera-nn
nn dellbera-nn a rnnal Zone Jury last

night found Army Pvt. Edward
J. stroup not' guilty of involun-
an TnanslniKThtftr.

The verdict was reiumeu w,
Judge Guthrie F. Crowe In the
Cristobal division of the U. S.
District Court at 6:10 p.m.
. Stroup. stationed at Ft. Davis,
was charged following an auto automobile
mobile automobile accident In which an another
other another soldier Terry Walker, a
passenger in Stroup's car, was
killed. t .
The accident occurred last
September when the car ran off
the road on Bolivar Highwav
near Gulick Road. Walker died
after his bodv was flun into the
water when the car rolled down
into a ditch near the river.
Stroup was represented ( m
court by attorney S. T. Frankel.
Eleven government witness, in including
cluding including three doctors, and 11 de defense
fense defense witnesses were heard in
the case. The soldier is attain attained
ed attained to an antiaircraft outfit at
Davis.

To Serve Ona Year
On Burglary Count
A 13-year-old Panamanian hoy
with a larceny record today join joined
ed joined three other youths at the Gatun
Jail for Women and Juveniles af after
ter after he was sentenced yesterday in

District Court to serve a one year

term for burglary. .f
George L. Ashby was found

guilty yesterday on two counts of
burglary. He received the one-year
sentence on the first count which
involved entering the' Mt. Hope

Stadium and making off with some
tools.

On i second count of breaking

into unoccupied quarters at Rain

bow City and stealing plumbing

fixtures, the youth was given a
one-year suspended sentence and

placed on probation for five years

United States boundaries," he
said, "the Canal is no different

irom other major utilities.
'Its locality of course requires
added continuous defense ef

forts.

"But as to the actual oneratlnn

of the Canal, there is no appar

ent, necessary iunction or the

military there In neacetime. out

side of close liaison for security!
purposes."

Statements favorine adoDtioni

of the proposal also were submit submitted
ted submitted by James Sinclair, president
of the Luckenbach Steamship
Company, and C. M. Harmon Jr.,
secretary-treasurer of the Wey Wey-erhauser
erhauser Wey-erhauser Steamship Company.
The hearings will resume to

morrow, with more witness on

ootn sides of the question.
Probation Violator
To Serve 3 years
In Gamboa Prison
. r.
A total of three years in the
Gamboa penitentiary was the pen penalty
alty penalty imposed yesterday on 18-year-old
Edward Mahoney, who violat violated
ed violated his probation.
For entering the Mt. Hope pow power
er power conversion office and stealing a

ijiiewmcr, Moloney was given

mr ypar in me penitent, ry by U.
S. Disiritt Court J-.idge Gulhit'u F.
Crowe,

His farlier nrobatlon ua rpvnfr.

ed, and the youth was also requir required
ed required to serve an additional two years.

Manoney s previous conviction
Was On Scot. 1 of last veai- whn

he was found guilty of burglaryj
giveri a one-year susDended en.

tence and placed on three years

prooauon. m is a British Hondu

ras citizen.

l!ev Year's Slabber
Gels 5-Year Term
For ManslaiihJer

Says P

WOODMAN SPARE THESE TREES. .is the pi alnt of Canal Zone civic council members who
fear that cutting down the stately banyan tr ees of Roosevelt Avenue will destroy the beauty
of the oft-admired view. Two of the trees are coming down soon to make room for an en enlarged
larged enlarged parking lot to accommodate Balboa Commissary annex shoppers.

Civic Council Scores Felling
Of Roosevelt Avenue Banyans

A charge of murder was reduc

ed to voluntary manslaughter yes

terday against a Colon resident, I zen of Batista's leading opponents

Cuban Solons Urge
Dominican Republic
Diplomatic Break

HAVANA, March 21 (UPJ-ConH

gress urged the government to today
day today to break relations with te Do Dominican
minican Dominican Republic if other means
of settling their current Caribbean
dispute fail. i

The bill proposing the diplomat

ic DreaK was approved by unani unanimous
mous unanimous vote at the end of an all all-night
night all-night session of the House of Re Representatives.
presentatives. Representatives. Earlier, the legislature had vot voted
ed voted formal approval of President
Fulgencio Batista's request for a

weekend leave of abasence to take
part in ceremonies proclaiming

mm an "adopted son of uaytona
Beach, Fla.
Weeks of charges and counter

charges between Cuba and the Do Dominican
minican Dominican Republic were climaxed

here Monday when some two do

Ashton H. Franklin who was sen sentenced
tenced sentenced to spend five years in the

Gamboa penitentiary for a stab stabbing
bing stabbing which occurred on New Year's
Eve.

Former CZ Ccnvicl
Sent To Prison
For 3 Burglaries
A former convict who was dis

covered barefooted in the Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal Clubhouse around mid midnight
night midnight last month, was found
guilty yesterday on three counts
of burglary and sentenced to
three years In jail.
Stanley D. Slajke, a 23-year-old
Panamanian, admitted tc
police that he went into the
clubhouse with Intent to steal
He was picked up before he was
able to get away with anything
The Colon resident was given
a one-year penitentiary sentence
on two burglaries. Besides the
clubhouse entry, Clarke also
broke into the Cristobal Yacht
Club and made off with a quan

tity of food.

were jailed on charges of plotting
with Dominican agents against the

t uba government.
Leaders of the Dominican. Re

public charge the Cuba Army is
fostering a similar subversive plot

The unemployed defendant plea against tneir government,
ed euilty to the charge. The stab-

bing, which occurred on Bounda-!

ry Street in the Canal Zone at 4
p.m. on New Year's Eve,' was the
outgrowth of a quarrel between
Franklin and the victim, Clifford
Armstrong, over a dice game.
One of the witnesses in the case
earlier testified the argument -developed
over a dime.
Armstrong was stabbed in the
chet and neck and died a short
time afterwards.

Many Pacific Civic Council'
members today expressed con concern
cern concern over the proposed rutting
down of two banyan trees on
Roosevelt Avenue designed to
make room for a new parking
lot which will be built opposite
the Balboa Commissary Annex.'
They claimed that the remov removal
al removal of two, and possibly more of
the trees, would damage the

aesthetic beauty oi Koosevwi,
Avenue long prized as one of the
"most scenic views" on the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone.

At a recent council meeting,
discussion of the situation re resulted
sulted resulted in a protest being made
to Col. Hugh M. Arnold, Engi Engineering
neering Engineering and Construction Di Director
rector Director who said yesterday that
he made a personal survey of
the area, and concluded that
they could get by with cutt'ng
down two trees in a section
whera the trees are close to to-rether.
rether. to-rether.

It was originally decided to
cut down four trees. By only

cutting two, he stated yesterday,

the aesthetic quality or koosc koosc-yelt
yelt koosc-yelt Avenue will not be marred.
He added: "From a safety and

traffic standpoint four trees

reallv should come down, but

we're settling for two."
civln council members con

tend that "from a safety point

of view a parking area should

not be fed by an. artery, or war
tie."

Bids were being solicited last
week for the construction of a

new paved parking area design

ed to accommodate about m au

tomobiles, and to be located at
the corner of Clinton Street
which runs behind the Commis Commissary
sary Commissary Annex, and Roosevelt Ave Avenue,
nue, Avenue, adjacent to the Balboa
baseball park. The entrance will
be from the Clinton Street side
and the exit on Roosevelt Ave Avenue..
nue.. Avenue.. Although civic council mem

bers feel that the park'ng area
i3 not of vital necessity (they
say at the tad of the. year
many persons will no longer be
able to shop In the commis commissary),
sary), commissary), the Canal states there
will be a "critical need" for
the parking space which will
be felt acutely when they close
down the Ancon Commissary
annex early next month,

One

day:

council member said to

"I wish they would stop this

nlecemeal enlarcine of the com'

missary. Instead why couldn't

they lay out ana pian a snop snop-pine
pine snop-pine center which would include

its own parking lot?" She men

tioned La Boca as a possmie sue
for the center.

Several people still felt hope-

Ship Transits
Set New High

Daily Average

anamsnians

Working on Zone

Live in SIP

Should

WASHINGTON, March 21 (UP) Canal Zone Gov.

John S. Seybold urged Congress today to prescribe Pana

ma Canal Company wage scales as the minimum rates for
all privately-employed workers in the strip.

Seybold made his recommendation in testimony be before
fore before a House labor subcommittee, headed by Rep. Carl
Elliott of Alabama.
The retiring governor contended that it would be

"both unrealistic and unsound, in principle and in prac

tice to enforce in the Zone the $I-per-hour federal mini minimum
mum minimum wage required by law in the Continental U.S.

With 681 transits of. the Panama
Canal in February by ocean-going,
commercial ships, a new high dai daily
ly daily average record was establish established
ed established in Canal traffic, according to
statistics announced today at Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Heights.
The daily average for the month
was 23.45 in July 1955 when there
were 727 commercial transits by
ocean-going vessels.
' This high daily average record
was established during the Gatun

Locks overhaul when one set of

locks was closed to traffic.
Although the number of com

mercial transits was high in Feb

ruary, there were only J2 trans
its for the month.

Tolls collected in February a

Enforcement of the statutory

minimum in the Zone. Seybold
said, would disrupt the labor

situation in the adjacent Re Republic
public Republic of Panama and create
problems for the government-

operated Canal Company, which
employs more than 93 cent of
the 25,000 workers in the Zone.

The principle of equal pay
for equal work, required under
the latest treaty with Panama
he said, does not mean the
payment of .continental Amer American
ican American waces.

Seybold said the latest treaty

Is in line 'with a United States

policy of substiuting the Pana Panamanian
manian Panamanian pattern of living for the
semi-American pattern, under
which Zone workers from Pana Panama
ma Panama were accustomed to live un until
til until recent years.
Contending that such a policy
Is designed to help Panama as
well as the U.S., Seybold said:
"The Panamanian who cros crosses
ses crosses over and works in the Zone
should live and spend his
time in Panama... should go

to their school and churches'

. .and plow back into the
Republic the proceeds of his
labor..."
Seybold, who came to Wash Washington
ington Washington to testify before other
Congressional committees, said
he planned to leave by plane at

6:00 tonight for Panama.

Elliott praised the Canal Com

pany for its efficiency.

The subcommittee's flying vis-

It to the Zone last weekend con

vinced in that Seybold heads an
administration ''which is doing
a fine Job' Elliott said.

ful that all four trees could bej mounted to $3,07L897, of which $57,
saved. 953 was in tolls credits for Gov-

"Im sure If the engineer real-1 eminent shipping

ly put their minds to it they
could work out a plan which
would not require cutting down
four trees," one man remarked.
"After what they did to Los i
Rios, we should be on the a a-lert
lert a-lert to guard aga'nst a repeti repetition.
tion. repetition. That place has no shade
at all," a resident said, "and.
looks practically bare."
"They're trying to make this
place a desert," another council
member added, "There's some someone
one someone around here who hates
trees."

Kelauver Wins
Stunning Victory

In Minn. Primary

Former Bus Driver
Gets 6 Months For
Statutory Rape
A former bus driver was found
guilty yesterday of statutory rape
and sentenced to spend six months
in the Gambon penitentiary.

The charge was lodged against
John R. Boweii following a com complaint
plaint complaint received from the parents
of a 14-year-old Rainbow City girl.
The 28-year-old defendant pleaded
guilty to the charge.

According to testimony heard in

Co. Norman H Wiley Named
Superintendent Of Gorgas

"The appointment of Col. Norman'

H. Wiley, commander of the U.S.i
Army Hospital at Fort Benning.i
Ga. since December, 1953, as su superintendent
perintendent superintendent of Gorgas Hospital,
succeeding Col. Howard W. Doan.i
was announced today at Balboa

Heights.
Accompanied by his wife and
three children, Col. Wiley is ex expected
pected expected to arrive in the Canal Zone
April 16 to take over his new du duties.
ties. duties. ',
For the past three years, Col.
Wiley was not only commanding
officer of the U. S. Army Hospital

at Fort Benning, but was head of
the post's preventive medicine pro program
gram program and commander of the Pro

visional Medica Group, v

A native of Hollistervilre, Pa., he

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., March 21

(UH-i Sen. Estes Kefauver won

a stunning Minnesota Presidentia

nrimanr aartinn virtnrv ThaqHuv

and claimed today the tide had ablv be made now

The number of commercial trans

its in the first eight months of this

fiscal year exceeded the previous

year's figure by 175, but the Can Canal
al Canal traffic by Government vessels is
less this year than last.

I). S. Opposes Four
Anglo-French Steps

Toward Disarmament

LONDON, March 21 (UP) -The

United States has raised four ma major
jor major objections to the three-phased
Anglo-French disarmament plan

now before the five-power disar
mament conference here, author!

tative sources said today.
The U.S. opposes an advance
commitment on a long-range dis disarmament
armament disarmament scheme. It favors in instead
stead instead a limited arrangement on

such armscut-steps as can reason-

earth For Mutual
Girl Friend Brings

fharno 01 Vsnrancv

Three Panamanians In search of

their mutual girl friend were found
guilty of vagrancy during t his
morning's session in the Balboa
court.
The men, Manuel Santana, Isido Isido-ro
ro Isido-ro Quiel, and Cesar Jaramillo told
the Balboa Magistrate this morning
that they were walking by the Pa Pacific
cific Pacific Clubhouse in the Canal Zone
looking for a girl who they said

"is the sweetheart of all three of

us."

When they found she was not

there, they started back to Pa

nama, but were picked up in the

Zone by, policemen.

I've never been in trouble

For violating his probation the the Cristobal division of the U.S

ex-convict is now required to i District Court Bowen drove his
serve an additional two years. bus out of Rainbow City and on to
He was previously convicted of Randolph Road, where he parked
burglary with the girL

He served his internship at the
Walter Reed General Hospital in

Washington, D. C. and was com

missioned a first lieutenant in the

regular Army in 1929;

Previous to World War II, he

served four years in the Stcnbcrg

General Hospital in Manila and
later in several Army hospitals in
the United States.
During World War II, he was
with the Second Corps headquart headquarters
ers headquarters in Algeria and Tunisia, the
48th Surgical Hospital in Africa
and the 128th Evacuation Hospital
in Sicily, England and, in Europe.

For a time after the war he was
commander 4f the 48th Gral. Hos

pital irt Paris:

Before eoinff to Fort Bennine in

attended Stroudsburgh High School 1953(he was in command of Percy
and received his bachelor s;wgree Jones Army Hospital in Battle

from Lafayette College, EwonCreek, Mich. (
Pa., and his doctor of medicine dafAAmong his decorations are the
gree from Jefferson Medical Coiyj'Lcgion of Merit, and the French
lege in Philadelphia, V rJLtgion of Honor.

turned in the race for .the ; Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic nomination.
Kefauver upset Adlai Stevenson
in a state where analysts had said
the 1952 nominee needed a deci decisive
sive decisive victory to remain the front front-runner
runner front-runner for the nomination.
Stevenson congratulated Kefauv

er on the .victory early today but
said the setback would not stop
his campaign to head the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic ticket again this year. The
defeat for Stevenson was unexpect

ed, since he had the support of
the Democratic-farmer-labor "party
organization of Sen. Hubert Humph Humphrey
rey Humphrey and Gov.. Orville Freeman.

"I believe this primary mam

the turning point in the campaign
for the Democratic nomination,"
Kefauver told cheering supporters

at a victory celebration there ear early
ly early this morning.

He led in the statewide balloting

and in seven of the state s nine
congressional districts. The state statewide
wide statewide victory gave him 21 of, the
state's 30 Democratic national con

vention votes, while one vote rode
on the individual results in each
of the districts.
With 2,535 of the state's 3,806
precincts counted, Kefauver had
192,298 votes to Stevenson's 151
274,

American plan s" furthermore
clash with Anglo-French proposals
for limitation and the ultimate
banning of nuclear tests.

The U.S. moreover opposes the

setting of levels for armed forces I th acros9
l ILL nnH if- H rra not 11 ant

Baraza Expected
To Return To PR

For Array Service

" An agreement between lb
District Attorneys of Puerto E

co and the Canal Zone is expect
ed momentarily which will per.
mit Dr. Jaime L. Barraza, Copo
Solo Hospital eye -specialist
charged wi th draft-dodging, to
return to Puerto Rico to serve in
the U.S. Army.

It was anticipated that the
charge against the young doctor
who resided in Puerto Rico In
1952, would be dropped.
A preliminary hearing: for the
32-year-old ophthalmologist was
continued yesterday in Cristobal
Magistrate's Court to give the
defendant time to verify infor information
mation information received from Puerto Ri Rico
co Rico concerning conferences held
between his relatives and Puer Puerto
to Puerto Rico's district attorney.
On of the defendant's law-

yers, Dr. Harmodio Arias said
today he expected that the a
greement would be received
sometime today by the U.S.
District Attorney here In the
Zone. This would permit draft draft-dodg'ng
dodg'ng draft-dodg'ng charges against the
doctor to be dropped.
Both Dr. Arias and Dr. L. JR.

Carrington, the other defense

lawyer yesterday moved for a

continuance oi uie neanng un until
til until next Tuesday.

It was believed that, If Induct Inducted,
ed, Inducted, Barraza would be assigned to
duty In the Army's Medical
Corps, i
The case developed after Ba Barraza
rraza Barraza received a notice to report
for induction in Puerto Rico
while he was serving his intern internship
ship internship at Gorgas Hospital. He has
sine? been indicted by a Puerto
Rlcan grand jury with failing to
answer the summons.
Barraza alleges he wrote the

draft board but never received a

at this stage, and it does not want

an advance commitment on the
banning of nuclear weapons, the
sources said.

fendants who said he works for a P& ntil the summons came

shoe store in Panama City. "I
miiht lose my job for this." 1
The Judge told the defendants
he could not accept their explana explanation,
tion, explanation, and pointed out that the area
attracts people who are- trying to
evade police. If they are being
sought by the Panama police, they
run into the Canal Zone, the Judge

said. If the Zone police are looking

the

2 Get Suspended
Jail Sentences
For Burglary
Two former employes of con contractor
tractor contractor Louis Sommer, yester yesterday
day yesterday were each found guilty of

burglary and given one-year 1
suspended penitentiary sen

tences and placed on rive years
probation each.
The defendants, Cecil A. Fer Ferryman,
ryman, Ferryman, and Holp H. Crossdale
both Panamanians, pleaded
guilty to the charge of stealing
a quantity of wire from the con contractor's
tractor's contractor's office at Mt. Hope.

The burglary occurred during

the day. after the men were

preparing to leave the job.

ctrtiftt inln Panama

Balboa Magistrate John E.. De De-ming
ming De-ming then gave each of the three
vagrants a suspended sentence and
placed them each on one year probation.

RP Decorates
Eugene Lombard

For Second Time
Panama Canal Executive
Secretary Eugene Lombard,
who is retiring from Canal
service, today was decorated
by the Panama government
with the rank of Grand Offi Officer
cer Officer of the Order of Vasco Nu Nu-net
net Nu-net de Balboa,
'This is Lombard's second de decoration
coration decoration n the orden His first
was with the rank of Commander.

Local-Rate Workers

Quarterly Increases
A number of local-rate em employes
ployes employes will get quarterly auto automatic
matic automatic administrative increases
early next month, Panama Ca

nal authorities said today.

The officials said published

reports of a two-cent-an-hour
wage increase probably referred

to the automatic quarterly in

creases granted to local-raters
according to the system applied
to U.S.-rate workers of the Pan Panama
ama Panama Canal.

Each quarter a group of about

800-800 local-raters Is affected,
the Canal said. The effective

date for the. present quarter is

April 8.

The increases range from two
cents an hour for grades one
through seven, to six cents an
hour for grades 13 through 15.
These automatic Increases ap apply
ply apply to all local-rateus who wot it
for the Canal except teachers,
who get regular increases each
year. X'.-'- ,;.
. The raises -cost the Canal
$200,000 yearly, according ta
their estimate.



t
i
r.

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
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Tkif newspaper euamei M faipaatifcilift o 3t3NMat( aa aiftieM

Karaite ia Jertar tram reader.
THE MAIL BOX

LOCAL-RATERS' RICHTS

Labor News
And
Coninienl

The Right Place

gir: .

I have been reading a number of articles In the local press
. and the Mail Box about Rulus Lovelaay, who is the leader of
a labor organization m the Canal Zone, the American Federa Federation
tion Federation of Government Employes.
I would like to advise the members of his organization to
drop him, or to keep him quiet. His position and statements
are only creating ill will and labor unrest among Canal Zone
workers. This is a serious matter, detrimental to good relation relationships
ships relationships between Panama and the United States, and contrary to
the wishes of President Taft. who once stated that Americas
policy In Panama is the mirror oi her policy in Latin America,
This statement should not be forgotten.
The attitude of Rulus Loveiady is not going to solve the
problems ol the US-raters. He should realize that the local local-raters
raters local-raters do not want him to shed crocodile tears over their prob problems.
lems. problems. They are aware of his Intention towaras them, and
would like to remind him of some of the barriers he has placea
before them.
The American Federation of Government Employes is on
: record as tar back as 1947 as favoring legislation to give citi citizens
zens citizens of the United States job preference in Panama Canal
skilled, semi-skilled and otflce positions.
This same resolution was adopted by an AFL convention
during the war, and presented to Senator McCarran for in introduction
troduction introduction In Congress. The bill, now known as the McCarran
amendment, hangs over the head of local-raters
It is one of -the most selfish pieces of legislation to reach
"the halls of the United States congress. It could mean the end
of skilled Jobs for local-raters.
As for eligibility of Panamanians to take the U.S, Civil
Service examination, I refer to the hearing of the House Civil
Service committee in Washington, March 21, 1947.
AFL representatives Burns and Hushing In their testimony
etrongly opposed the liberal ruling of the U.S. Civil Service
Commission, in a most narrow-minded and chauvinistic manner.
I quote from the record.
Murray: "It seems to me there are a considerable number
of contradictions in the testimony presented here this morning
(Dy AFL spokesman). I think the security of the United States
is unaffected by letting Into Civil Service examination those
who are not citizens of the United -States. The whole question,
it seems to me, was answered by the people who spoke for
themselves. There are now twenty-odd thousand aliens employ employed
ed employed on the Canal Zone, and as it was pointed out by another
AFL spokesman, they are employed In all sorts of locations.
"It does not seem to me, from the standpoint of security,
that it makes any difference whether the worker Is a Janitor,
policeman or common laborer. I do not see where we are help helping
ing helping security by excluding those people from jobs paying more
money.
"Either we believe In our international commitments, and

the Good Neighbor Policy, or we do not. We said In 1936 that
Panamanians should be given equality of opportunity."
Murray then went on to read a newspaper article in which
Walter Jones and Ruf us Loveiady were criticized, and in which
statements were ascribed to them to the effect that that Pan Panamanians
amanians Panamanians are dishonest and disloyal, and that Panamanians of
West Indian origin were synthetic Panamanians.
The right for local-raters to earn eaual education in Canal
Zone schools was also hampered by Loveiady and Jones.
It was the AFL which, after Sen. Langer Of North Dakota
introduced an amendment April 26, 1949. to the retirement bill
covering US-raters, so as to extend the coverage to local-raters,
made counter-moves to block local-raters from this benefit.
rh hill had already been amwoved by the Civil Service

committee, and was awaiting consideration by the Senate. Con Congressman
gressman Congressman Murray of Tennessee then introduced a bill in the
House providing that the civil Service Retirement Act not be
permitted to apply to non-citizen employes outside the con continental
tinental continental United States. This move was obviously designed to
defeat the Langer bill.
It was the AFL which once remarked that the local-raters
are a menace to the Panama canal,-and which caused a Con
jrressional investigation by the Un-American Activities commit committee
tee committee headed by Congressman Parnell Thomas. Thomas was sur surprised
prised surprised to find no such Communism among the local-raters as
had been reported to him by the AFL. But he found shocking
working conditions for many local-raters.
Many Panamanians took and passed the Civil Service exam exam-'
' exam-' lnatlon but they never got the Jobs.
. The obligation to local-raters Is based on past misery,, and
hardship encountered during the construction -period, in which
local-raters died like flies. How many American lives ;were lost
Mhen? - ;
Many of our Panamanian boys have enlisted in the U.S.
- Army, and fought in the Korean war to defend the rights of all
human beings to a decent and secure existence. Under a dem democratic
ocratic democratic form of government, the democratic rights of all must
be maintained. We get out of democracy what we put into it.
Not prejudice and cheap chauvinism and injustice.
., Queensbury Joe

By VICTOR RIESEL

In some circles there aparently
is a difference between racketeers

and Sovieteers

The very same unions whsse

leaders scream in justifiable an

guish when pacts are made with
racket unions, make their owe

friendship deals with pro-Commu
nist unions.

Let's have a single standard. It is
an unethical practice to line up

with the moos. It is just as un

ethical to line up with a union
some of whose officers have been
convicted of lying about member

ship in the global conspiracy
known as the Communist Party.

And some of whose officers have
Slanned strategy to discredit our
ustice Dept. and the FBI.

And some of whose officers toos

union funds, according to Congres

sional testimony, and paid for

propaganda against these lections
of our government.

And some of wnose advisors

have refused to deny under Con Congressional
gressional Congressional oath that they knew
Soviet spies or that they knew of

Soviet espionage.

This union is the Mine, Mill and

Smelter Workers. It was ousted
from the CIO in 1950 on charges of

following the Communist line. Yet

we find that in the past month of

ficials of former CIO unions and

many AFL unions have sat in con

ference with representatives of

this Sovieteerlne labor organiza

tion.

Little more than a month ago,

in Chicago's Hotel Congress on

eb. 10 and 11, to be exact, there

was a conference or some 13
unions. They have in common

their wage negotiations with the

Anaconda copper Co. in that com

ence room, planning joint strategy

against the corporation, were rep

resentatives of the Mine, Mill and
Smelter Workers now charged

by the Justice Dept. with being a
Communist controlled outfit.

In that conference, too, were

representatives of a string of anti anti-Communist
Communist anti-Communist unions the Auto
Union of the old AFL, the Ma

chinists, the Electricians, the In In-ternational
ternational In-ternational Union of Electrical

Workers as well as the Soviet

eering United Electrical Workers,1

which walked out of liu in 1949

before it could be kicked out.

They called this the Montana

Anaconda Joint Unity Council. By
what sophistry such anti-Communist
unions as the Auto Workers
and the Machinists rationalize
their presence in a room with
these people, one still must dis discover.
cover. discover. The point is that the Mine, Mill
and Smelter Worker! has its
members in the very heart of our
atomic, hydrogen and war metals
atnnl inj1iiiti Vam mm m v-3i MAW

m4jAMji'j0m0.i''ll -) ii in iir iihl .iKmtmmm

5 I

Kuks Can Clobber

MENYAMYA, New Guinea

"You've got to call the Kukukuku
an Irishman,',' Ken Chester, assis assistant
tant assistant district officer for the wild
Kukukuku country, was saying
over a cup of tea, with an array

of recently-collected lethal weap weap-pons
pons weap-pons spread out before him.
"He'll fight anything, anybody,
any time. For a real reason or
just because he gets bored living
in these hills. He doesn't even
have to be angry. He'll bash out
your brains with one of those dir dirty
ty dirty great shillelaghs and never
even stop talking to somebody else.
We have a patrol out now collect collecting
ing collecting murderers."
In this Year of Our Lord, 1956,
the Kuks declared war on the Aus

tralian government again the other

Dave McDonald's Steel Workers day and let loose a few arrow sal-

Umon has been trying to dislodge vos at an Aussie patrol,

SIDE GLANCES

By Colbroith

I if j MM

it from this strategic straddling

of our defense machinery.

It has been slow and costly cam

paigning by the Steelworkers. Yet
we find colleagues of Dave Mc McDonald
Donald McDonald sitting down with those he
is fighting and giving the So Sovieteering
vieteering Sovieteering union a chance to show
what "friends'V it has in the unity
council.
These "friends" incidentally

heard at this conference a report

on Anaconda s profits. This was de

livered by one Bernard Stern, the
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers
research director, who has pre prepared
pared prepared material for the union's
former secretay-treasurer, Mau Mau-Ice
Ice Mau-Ice Travis, who has been con con-victed
victed con-victed of violating a law against
falsely swearing that one is not
a member of the Communist party.
This week the Mine, Mill and
Smelter Workers will be running
its 51st national convention at the
Hotel Newhouse in. Salt Lake City.
I recommend to those who have'

sat in the Chicago "Unity Com

mittee" to read all the resolutions
and convention speeches.

They might start with the Mine,

Mill convention announcement it

self. It says the delegates will be
occupied by discussion of "politi

cal action, legislation, labor unity

and organization.

On the lighter side, the Mine,
Mill leadershio has invited folk

singer Pete Seeger to come to
Salt Lake City and put on a show

to boost the delegates' morale.

Which keeps the entertainment In
th same vein as the politics.
Seeder has not onlv warbled for
organizations like the Committee
for a Democratic Far Eastern Pol Policy,
icy, Policy, which was whooping it up for
the North Kweani while they were

killinsz tur GIs. but has also pro

vided muclc for Communist party

club shindies to bolster the com.

rades militant mood. He has also
been an instructor at the Jefferson

School, the notorious Communist

training center, and something the
partv calls Schools for Political

Action Technique.

This should make ?t clear on

which side the Mine. Mill stands

Now let's all treat these Soviet Soviet-eers
eers Soviet-eers like the pariahs we justifiably

make out of the racketeers.

It seems there was a little intra

mural war and it happened like

this:

A Kukukuku husband, whom we
will call Joe, got a bit teed off at

his Mary for not digging enough

potatoes, and casually chopped off

the top oi ner neacj with a cane

knife.
She staggered home to die

By BOB RUARK

to her husband, whom we will call
Pete,. "If you were any kind of a
man, you'd get up off your dead
end and go down the ridge and
settle Joe, instead of just sitting
there, chewing betel nut."
"Nag, nag, nag," Pete said. "Go
tend the pigs and shut up."

But Mary didn't shut up. And

finally Pete muttered something
about no peace in a man's house,
picked up his club and rounded up
a few mates.

"I can't kill Joe," Pete said.

"He's got four kids and it'll mean
they'll move in on us. We better
do somebody else, How about his
brother, Hank?"
So they went down the ridge and
found Hank in his garden. ;

One of the boys slipped through

the Kunai grass and swiped Hank's

dow ana arrows., Ana men iney
surrounded him and bashed- his

brains out. The score was even
now and the gents went home. On

the way back -they saw a lone

warrior washing himself in the

river, so they just clobbered him

der get sway with this or a girl
won't be able to hold up her head

at the next sing-sing."

So Mika sighed and took up his

club and a few choice friends.

There were seven corpses strewn

around. At this writing, five of

the implicated gents have been

rounded up, and the search patrol
this minute is debating whether

to fire in the air or at the Kukuku Kukuku-kus
kus Kukuku-kus when the next shower of ar arrows
rows arrows comes from the Kunai grass.

"I suppose we ought to hang one
or two, "Horrie Niall, the district

commissioner who was with me,

said. ."Maybe it would teach them
that this eternal killing is bad

pidgin. ', - ,.
"But I haven't the heart for It,
Fighting is about the Only amuse

ment they got, poor devils, and
they don't see anything wrong in
it. It would be like hanging an

Englishman for the sin of playing

cricket.

Hq ; sighed a Mr"; then went, out io

pat a "tame ; Kuk on the souiders,

The kuk,,' who naa arrow scars

m

mi itfiltt a W'

WASHINGTON U.S. officials hut he "blew "off steam tfc.

aren't advertisinff it. but ard

have been given to two cruisers; Terry. The verbal explosion echoed

-.... t lt onm unuugn uie oeuaie cornaors. Alt Alt-fleet
fleet Alt-fleet in the Mediterranean to joinler taking a dose of hot words, Mrs
with units of the British Mediter-jTerry spat back: "Don't speak to
ranean fleet m standing off Is-tme like that, little man!" . .Sen-raeli-Arab
ports during the nextjate Democratic Leader Lyndon

Johnson's friends are excusing his
stand on the natural gas bill be because
cause because he's a Texan. His opponents
argue, however, that he should give
up the Senate leadership if he
must put Texas oil ahead of the
national Interests. They are tired
of Texans running both houses of
Congress to suit the Texas oil-gas
crowd. .Maryland's Sen. John
Marshall .Butler, who looks like a
startled robin, was gleeful over

the news that Ike would run again.
Butler's GOP seat is at stake. In

the past, Butler has been more loy

al to Senator McCarthy than Presi

dent Eisenhower, but has now dis discovered,
covered, discovered, belatedly, that Ike's po political
litical political pulling power is greater than

McCarthys.

CAPITAL COMMENTS
Sen. Joe McCarthy, who b a s

been cooking with gas lately, seems
to have cooked his own goose. The
Wisconsin whiz kid voted for. his

Texas millionaire friends instead

of the folks back home on the
natural gas bill. Reports from
Wisconsin indicate this was the
last straw; his constituents have
had enough. Citizens who wouldn't
dare speak against him two years

ago are now openly suggesting mat
he move to Texas. He is represent representing
ing representing the Texas oil millionaires, they
say, so he may as well live there
. .Example of how Wisconsin
opihlon has turned against McCar McCarthy:
thy: McCarthy: "Time and the public's good
sense have taken care of McCar McCarthy,"
thy," McCarthy," said editor, Roy Matson of
the Madison State Journal, one onetime
time onetime McCarthy supporter. "He's

a dead pigeon.': i .lxe s l-wiu-run
statement stimulated the stock
markfit. but had a reverse effect

on farm prices. The day after his

announcement nog prices moppcu
as much as 25 cents a pound in
some places. . .Politicians study studying
ing studying Ike's TV statement noticed
that he seemed to divorce himself

from his own administration. Not
once did he speak of "my admin administration."
istration." administration." Rather, he referred to

himself as "President of all Amen Amen-cans.",
cans.", Amen-cans.", and spoke of the adminis

tration artd himself as two separ

ate entities.
TWIN PROBLEM
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (UP) -"It
looks like we'll have our hands
full commented Joseph Peters
after his wife gave birth to her
second set of twin ? sons in U

months.

few weeks.

This coincides with U.S. intelli

gence reports that war may break
out in the Near East in April.

jnese reports are oased not on v

upon growing Arab fanaticism ht

on the fact that the Arab nations

now nave the small state of Israel
in a bind where, in case of war,
Israel could probably be wioed

out. The Arabs also have the

United States in a bind from which

it will be extremely difficult if not
impossible for us to get out.
Delay, procrastination, cenprnl

bungling have put us in a cross cross-saw
saw cross-saw by which we jeopardize one

or the other of the following ob objectives
jectives objectives in the Near East:

1. The future of the tiny state

of Israel which we have long cham

pioned as a national policy.

Z. Ihe tremendous oil reserves

of Saudi Arabia, considered the

greatest in the world.

3. Air bases in Saudi Arabia.

which are within striking distance
of Moscow.

4. Air bases in North Africa.

located among other Arab peo

ples, all seething with hatred of

Israel and resentment against the

West..--. .'

In case of war or even the use

of U.S. troops around Israel to

prevent war, the lives of American

women and children 'at these far far-flung
flung far-flung North African bases would
be in ieoDardv.

What s happened to change the

balance in the Near East are two

things: "'-"

A. i The exit of British Lieut,

Gen. John Glubb from Jordan,

thereby making it possible for the

Arabs to invade Israeli almost

from inside Israel. Jordan police

are right inside the old city of Jer

usalem, are entrusted with its pre pre-tection.
tection. pre-tection. As long as they were un

der British control they were a
stabilizing influence. Now they are

not.' :" V :

B. The arrival of Russian-Czech

tanks and let nlanes in Egypt.

These now make it possible for

Egypt to do to Israel what -Hitler

did to Czechoslovakia, Holland,
Belgium. France. Israeli airfields

can be wiped out in a few minutes

Se f-m-ooeled Russian tanks, in

the hands of Egyptians, can make

mince-meat of Israeli defenses

Israel is so minute that, faced

with this kind of strength, it prob

ably could be wiped out before

American-antisn troops couia in
tervene. ... ".

There was a time, last summer,
hefnrc thn arrival of Red rms.

when the opposite was true; "The
Israeli armv. well-trained and da-

termined. ;couldi probably have

captured Cairo. r( Its troops arc
far suDerior to Hhe Egyptian in

old-fashioned warfare, but now far

fBU JUO VIW""V1W lltll l I un (JB vm.m. 1 e
aughs although nobody hadibloody grin through his betel cud

been properly introduced. and shook wiau s nana warmly witn
Well. Hank s widow went to her his non bow-holdinff hand.

brother and said. "Look. Mike; "One has to like them" Niall

on his off-shield arm, grinned ajbehind in the new Hitler blitzkrieg

Her sister was incensed. She said you can't let those rascals up yon-said.

' "That new hat, my dear, positively makes you good
eking it's hard to realize little things can to change
. a person J" 'j--.

Ike Loves Farm Kids
By PETER EDSOM

WASHINGTON (NEA) -- The

big drive to lighten President Ei;

senhower s burdens is not going
to make him a hermit.

This was proved the other day

when he received a delegation of

six 4-H Club national award win winners.
ners. winners. They were three farm boys
and three gals scrubbed, corn corn-fed
fed corn-fed and eood looklnY

Angela Heine oi uiienaaie, ssjj.,

and Franklin McKay of Clayton,
N.M.. achievement winners. Ann

Guindon of FianKinton, s.u., ana

Eldon Rebhorn of Oswego. Ill-

leadership winners. Nellie McClure
of Cleveland. Tenn., and William

C. Thiesenhusen of Muskego, Wis

ritbenshln winners.

Thev presented the rresiaem

with a nicture book on the accom

plishments 01 Z.iou.uw -h teaa,

Heart. Hand et tieaitn; teen-ge

memhefs.

The President shook hands with

all six and ; asked what studies

thev were maiorinS in.

They were photographed with the

President the boys weu m me

background, the gals front and cen

ter. All over in w minutes. -

Nnw thl Is significant news.

Originally, when Department oi
Agriculture was arranging this
year's 4-H convention program in
Washington, this event was booked

6

for Gov. Sherman Adams, the As

sistant to the President.

When this got out, a number of

people said, "Oh, oh! There are
going to be some mighty disap disappointed
pointed disappointed 4-H clubbers."

In the past, presidents have al

ways received them

If you're a national champion champion-Railroad
Railroad champion-Railroad Man of the Year, Truck
Driver of the Year you'll prob probably
ably probably get your picture taken with

Vice President Richard M. Nixon.
If you're just a shade under,

you 11 get Gov. Adams, who s tak

ing on more and more of these

Though Agriculture Department ceremonial jobs.

people shook their heads sadly It's Adams, the dry New Eng-

over tnis come-aown,. tney aian cigiander. who going to spin
a J. 1 l i ia. i . i .i f .

try to do anything about it. But
when President Eisenhower went
over the list of White House visi visitors
tors visitors for the week, he spotted this
4-H delegation and said simply,
"I want to see them."

So Gov. Adams got cut out of

the job and the picture.
There are a few pet groups
which the President has a person personal
al personal interest in. He's crazy about
farm kids, in particular.
These he intends to keep on see seeing,
ing, seeing, in spite of doctors' orders that
he cut down on unnecessary
chores.
So if you want to know who's
important around here, in the fu future,
ture, future, all you have to do is watch

the list of people the President

gets photographed with

techniques thanks to Soviet tanks
and planes.
Chief cause of the present dynamite-laden
crisis is a split person personality
ality personality inside the State Department;
also to some extent inside the Brit British
ish British Foreign Office
The State' Department has been
torn between Arabian oil and Jew Jewish
ish Jewish Israel. Undersecretary of State
Herbert Hoover, Jr., a power in
Union Oil of Calif, and the man
who handled the Iranian oil dis dispute,
pute, dispute, has sided with the Arabs.
Some other State Department of officials
ficials officials have sided with the Jews.
Secretary Dulles has teetered in
between. This split personality has
caused fumbling and delay. :
SENATE :::SIOElHT$"y
New Jersey's conscientious Sen.
Clifford Case, a possible substitute
for Vice President Nixon on the

GOP ticket, has been dubbed ''the

, .....i'.ii. .1, mi i ;
-1
; ....
7-SS$( 1r" :
j

wheel of fortune to pick this year's: Xj,oi at'.M h pnhiUn

Washington Cherry Blossom Fres-party ,. ohio,s jolly s?n' George

tival Queen,

President Eisenhower has never
picked or received a beauty queen,
by the way, unless the task was
forced on him at some out-of-town
ceremony where he didn't control
the program. ; r "
When Gov. Adams is all tied up
and doesn't have time to be photo photographed
graphed photographed receiving a grand cham champion
pion champion turkey or a first prize cherry
pie sent to the White House, this
honor is passed on to one of the
assistants to The Assistant.
That would be Deputy Assistant
Wilton B. Persons, or Assistant to
the Deputy Asistant, Homer H.
Gruenther. Or somebody else.

4 Jt's all done in the interests
i1 tb. D.Bijt .....

If you don't rate, you'll get 'relieving, the President of unnec

farmed out on one of the White essary burdens. It's all. right, as
House assistants. Which one wil long as nobody goes away mad,
depend on who's free at the time.'and it doesn't lose any votes.

LIFT UP YOUR HEARTS

(A Lentan "feature of the Pna-
ma-American, prepared by th
Rev. M. A. Cookson, Episcopal
Churefces of Our Savlour St. Mar Margaret.)
garet.) Margaret.) THE CHRISTIAN WAY
Read St. John 14:1-14. "Jesus
salth unte him, I am the way, the
truth, and th,; life: ne man eem eem-ath
ath eem-ath unto the ?ethr, but by mt."

'THERE is a Christian way to
do everything." It is a simple

statement but It Is big With pos

sibility. Of course; we do not
mean there is a Christian way to
do wrong; we mean that there is
a Christian way to do the things
that have to be done every day,
tn meet the a c u a 1 situations

uihirh arkn in 'life.

FOR ME, it puts a sharp point

upon our Lord's 6wn word, "I
am the way." A way is a path
that threads itself through and
past obstacles. "There is a Chris

tian way to an everytmng. xes,

because Christ is the way. i
WHEN we decide to move and
accept His way, the new life off offered,
ered, offered, we respond to His v o i c e
spreaking to us. .
LOVEST thou mee Going my
way? It means a cross. It is a

hard road, and demanding; it will

mean putting me first in every

thing.1 But if you come with me,

because you love me following my

way, you will be unafraid, poised

and sure, at peace within, under

Bender seldom loses his temper,

PARTY STYLE Here's the
"GOP Hairdo," as modeled by
Georgiann Roubal at the Mid Midwest
west Midwest Annual Beauty Trade
Show in Chicago, 111. The coif coiffure
fure coiffure features swept-back lines
along the, ears and a center
curl resembling an elephant's
trunk. It's topped off with an i
, elephant pin near the curL

Happy Holiday!

Answer to Previous Puzzle

- cross
1,4,9 Tonight Is
12 Before
13 Clothe
14 Crimson
15 Bind
1 Viper
17 Born
18 Pieces out
20 Contender

22 Pigpen
24 Wager

25 Entangle

28 Compass point M rol)ower

34 Mereymiji Seated

7-Toirt '""'""25 your
35 African worm a 0ww-1

49 naiic
2JR1P

3 Tomorrow
starts a new
4 Leaven
5 This is the
of 1955
6 Augment
7 Regret
t Wait on table
9 Sea eagle
10 Swerve
11 City in The
Netherlands

19 Worm

Pit IE I if ia it ig. sh p
"tin -E.5N E
J0AT5, A Mfe UK E
c.e i en t p ar s
een"TFnp' snTus
Iizz z i w s isi5" ?tzz
oieib A" a rT H Q iE P
OVRB AfeEB hTT E
SOLt'lETO IF A
emit I si ji peKi pTgjg

choosing; you will be free and ad

vancing out of darkness in light:

you will never again be alone or

too weary or too weak or too dis

couraged to face up and walk a-

nead, journeying my way.

-WE CAN start now. one sten at

a time, now with ... this uncon

trolled temper; this unconfessed

guilt; this broken relationship;
this hurt feeling, because of self self-centerness;
centerness; self-centerness; this judgment .upon
another; this neglect; this selfishness-whatever
seems to be God's
will for us from now on.
THAT will we strive to do with
His help. "That ye might be filled

with all the fullness oi God." "This

my control in mum ana neart;is the way we may be sure we
you will be blessed with clear-iknow him, by obeying His corn corn-eyed
eyed corn-eyed vision of right, full hearing mands." This Christ's way upon
Of my word at times of cross-road ,earth for us.

38 Brazilian
macaw

137 New Zealand
parrot :
! 38 Land parcel
' 39 Clamp
40 Auricles
'42 Individual
43 Harem rooms
44 Stitch i v

46 Burmese wood

sprite
48 Salamander
SO Steals
83 Metal
84 Treasure
58 Fairy fort
SO Social insect
61 Musa of
poetry
62 Table scrap
63Drivihg :
: command
64 Most unusual
63 Tiny
DOWN
lSeini
1 j I Great LaVa ...

29 Presently 51 Horns and
31 Baton whistles will
32 Assam tonight
silkworm 92 Forefather
33 Knocks 53 Label
41 Mariner' 53 British monejfl
direction of account
43 Siouan Indian 56 River in
45 Anesthetic Switzerland
47 Zeal 67 Route (ab.
48 Number 59 Female samt I
49 Grafted (her.) (ab.)

I l Ii I H IS V p IS I k l
j- ; 3- J
iT""""" T""""
;.',:: ."
3 TO; a
T T r if

!



THE fAT!t A.'
PACE T
I'ousa Uiuirnisn behsves US Senate
Will Accept Compromise Farm Dill
STERLING ROSE

Vv'I ENTSDAV, MATtCH :i. if'S

t

i

4S

POST HASTENER Youll appreciate this mailbox innovation
if you've ever tried opening a mailbox when your arms were
loaded with packages. This mailbox at the Washington, D.C.
airport features a foot pedaL You Just step on the lever under underneath
neath underneath the box and the lid comes down. If the idea proves worth
while, more pedal-opener boxes will be considered.

Ikes Foreign Aid Program
Faces Two Economy Slashes

WASIIINGTOS. March '21 tUP)

President Eisenhower's $4.86

Million foreign aid program faces

two rounds of heavy congression congressional
al congressional economy cuts.
The first will come from the
TfnusK Foreien Affairs Com""'!Uee.

Chairman-Jarv ,P.-Ilfcbr (D
:S('!.l.' tweeted f. the COHluuU"l'S

probable attituue, when he s a i d
bluntly that Mr, Eisenhower asked

for "too much.- ...
" Tha tteond will coma from'
tha Houta Foreign Operations
Appropriations .Sub-Committaa.
Chairman Otto E. Passman ) )-La.)
La.) )-La.) said yesterday he was
"stonnad" by tha size of tha pro program
gram program ,th president racommand-
d. -t ,v:',:-;v
While the Foreign Affairs Com Committee
mittee Committee prepared to authorize, a
tnMrh. smaller nrogram than Mr.

Eisenhower wants, the appropria

tions subcommittee appeared rea ready
dy ready to cut that 'authorization still
deeper. '' ", y
The Administration's defense of
the foreign aid request was put.be put.be-fore
fore put.be-fore Congress today by John B.
llollister, director of the Interna International
tional International Cooperation Administration,
lie was to appear before the For Foreign
eign Foreign Affairs Committee as follow follow-up
up follow-up witness to Undersecretary of
State : Herbert Hoover, Jr., who
argued in the. program's behalf
yesterday. ' '
Tha administration told eon eon-grassman
grassman eon-grassman yastarday President
Eisenhower's beefed-up foreign
aid program is vital to thwart
a new Communist drive for
world domination.
But the President's plea for $4, $4,-860,000,000
860,000,000 $4,-860,000,000 in new aid funds, cou coupled
pled coupled with authority for long-term
aid commitments, drew cries of
"staggering" and "'fantastic"
from the head of a subcommittee
which must act on the request.
Hoover carried Mr. Eisenhowers
Kid battle to the House Foreign

Affairs Committee less man a
hours after the chief executive
nt Coneress his special ; a i d

Hoover, opening a fight against

trong 1 congressional resistance,
said Russia has launched a new
offensive to dominate the world
through political and "" economic
means and the United States must

act to block it.
Ha said tha Soviet drive gives
"no basis of any home that tha

long-range objectives of interna international
tional international Communism for world
domination have been abandon abandoned.
ed. abandoned. t.

: Hoover also held out hope- that

the. disputed long-range provisions

of the new program would encour

age mor U.S. allies, to extend aid
to underdeveloped nations and ul

timately lessen; the load on Wis

country,..;;:;. -:

Passman, however, calling the

$4,860,000,000 figure "staggering,"

said the administration still had 9

billion dollar in unspent aid mon

ey enough to run its program for

tnree years.
Passman also laballtd "fan "fantastic"
tastic" "fantastic" tha i' resident's request
for authority to make aid com commitments
mitments commitments for periods up to 10
years. Hoover insisted this was
necessary to provide needed
"flexibility" and "continuity" in
foreign aid.

The Foreign Affairs Committee
will act first on the chief execu

tive's aid program; hoover told

the group inai secretary of State

John rosier Duiies, due bacK to today
day today from a 10-nauon Asian tour.

wul report to the committee

promptly. He said Uulles "wul un-

uouDveaiy toucn on the importance
of this program in the areas he

nas visiied." ,:. ... ; ',,

John B. Hollister, chief of the

International Cooperation Admin Administration
istration Administration which : handles foreign
aid, said this country has "no in intention"
tention" intention" of competing with Rus Russia
sia Russia "offer by offer" on arms, ma machinery
chinery machinery and food to free nations.
But he added "we must take ac account?
count? account? of the new Soviet approach.

Acolytt

11 It IS'll I

re wno Miiea

Classmate Held

For Grand Jury
PrrfsBURGHt, March 21 (UP)
Eugene Psoty, 13, a slight, mild mild-mannered
mannered mild-mannered altar boy who killed a
classmate with a piece of iron
pipe because he "bullied me," to today
day today was ordered held for grand
jury action on v a manslaughter
charge. .,
Psota told a coroner's jury,
which returned the verdict on rec recommendation
ommendation recommendation of Coroner William
D. McClelland, that the taller and
heavier victim, John Willinski Jr.,
also 13, had bullied him constant constantly.
ly. constantly. v.-
Wilinski was killed Feb. 28 as
he and Psota walked up a hillside
path at nearby Homestead, Pa.
after ciasses at the parochial
school where they were eighth
crade pupils.

Jtf cClcllajut-saia, IsotOa A "no

justifiable reason" for slugging
the victim.

Red Cross

Without immediate attention,
Mike, an Ohio boy of 7, could
bleed to death from a slight cut
or bruise. Because of a hemo hemo-pholia
pholia hemo-pholia condition his blood does
not clot normally. So, for all
his short iifa, Mike hat b a n
kept a live with blood, and froz frozen
en frozen plasma made from' blood,
supplied by tha Red Cross. Mike
is one of thousands of parsons
who are living today because of
blood and plasma transfusions.
By joining the Red Cross, you
help maintain tha blood supply
and keep blood center techni technicians
cians technicians and donors on tha job!

Aldous Huxley Wed
To Concert Artist

YUMA. Ariz,. March 21 (UP)

Author Aldous Huxley and a 40-year-old
Italiar concert violinist

were married here, it was learn

ed today.

The 61-year-old Huxley and Lou-

ra Archera were married at the

drive-in wedding chapel about 4
p.m. yesterday with the Rev.
Charles Cady officiating.
The couple secured a marriage
license at the Yuma county court courthouse
house courthouse and drove to the chapel im immediately.
mediately. immediately. They returned to Los
Angeles after the ceremony.
The a u t h o r of "Brave New
World" and "Point Counterpoint"
and mat.y other works told report report-ers
ers report-ers his next book would be pub published
lished published next week. He' said It would
be entitled "Heaven and Hell."

WASHINGTON, March 21 U?)
Chairman Harold D. Cooley of
the House Agriculture Committee
predicted today that the Senate
would accept a compromise farm
bill calling for a one-year restora restoration
tion restoration of 90 per cent price supports.
The North Carolina Democrat
will head a group of house nego negotiators
tiators negotiators who will meet with a sim similar
ilar similar group from the Senate to
work out differences between the
two chambers over farm legislation.

Cooley said a one-year restora

tion of SO per cent supports might
be the answer to their major dif difference.
ference. difference. The Houe farm bill,
passed last year, called for un

limited restoration ot so per cent
supports. The Senate bill, approv approved
ed approved Monday night, retained flexible
supports in principle, but through

other provisions would boost sup

ports to 83 per cent ot parity tor
com and wheat and 90 per cent

for cotton, v

President Eisenhower, long op

posed to the House plan, was ex

pected to also express displeasure
at his news conference today with
the Senate's "back door" ap

proach to rigid high supports.

Besides this feature, the admin

istration opposed provisions of the
Senate bill which would continue

the dual partiy formula, set up a,

two-price plan for wheat and make
participation in the soil bank compulsory.

Senate Republican Leader Wil William
liam William F; Knowland has predicted

Mr. Eisenhower will veto the new
farm bill unless it is "modified."

He said the measure is "unwork
able."

Knowland made his prediction

to reporters following the Presi

dent's regular weekly meeting

With GOP legislative leaders. A A-griculture
griculture A-griculture Secretary Ezra T, Ben

son sat in on the session.

The California Senator said

"everyone, including the Presi

dent," expressed hope the bill witl
be modified by Senate-House negotiators.

"It is unworkable in its present

form," Knowland said. "I don't
see how, if left in its present

form, the President could sign it

Senate Democrats claimed that
the bill, passed 93 to 2 Monday

night after three weeks- of bruis

ing debate, was a "back door"

victory over the administration.-

The bill would raise sharply the
present government support- price

AUl DU1U, lUluu CUJU nuvnvi
make participation in the "soil
bank' compulsory, and authorize

a two-mice system for wheat.

While the administrations flexi

ble price support system would re

main on the law books, the bill

would give "backers of rigid high
supports many 'of the things they

fought for. 1

The House Agriculture Commit

tee oadered its staff to maKe a

detailed analysis of the Senate
measure, which differs in major

wavs from the bill passed by the

House last year. The House voted

flatly tor a return to au per cent

suoDorts on basic crops.

The first House showdown win

come when committee uiairman
Harold D. Cooley. (D-N.C. asks
for unanimous consent to send the

Senate bill to Senate-House con

ference committee. This may be

next week.

Renublicans plan to ask the

House instead to instruct its con

ferees to abandon the fight for ri-

md h sh suDDorts. GOr leaders

hope to come up with other con concessions
cessions concessions to help carry their point.

Post-Dispatch

To Publish Weekly
Television Guide

ST. LOUIS, March 21 (UP)

The Post-Dispatch announced to

day it will publish a weekly, pock

et-size television guide which will
be distributed free with all edi editions
tions editions of its Sunday morning newspaper.

The first edition, containing oz

pages ot TV programs, ieature

articles and pictures, wui oe dis distributed
tributed distributed April 1, according to man managing
aging managing editor Raymond L. Crowley.

Cover pages of the magazine

will be slick paper printed in co

lor. Inside there will be sections
devoted to TV movies, children's
programs, sports and other cate categories
gories categories of special programs, in ad

dition to the regular daily listings.

The magazine will carry adver advertising,
tising, advertising, i
US Steel Corpr
Sees Inflationary
Spiral Underway
NEW YORK, Marcy 21 (UP)
The U.S. Steel Corp. warned today
that industry-wide labor unions
vying to out-do each other and the
government's "full employment"
policy triggered "an alarming" in inflationary
flationary inflationary spiral.
The world's biggest steel com

pany said these "two basic roots
of the inflationary tendency" have
handicapped efforts to check infla inflation
tion inflation and maintain sound monetary

policies.
In a special review contained in
the annual report covering 1955 o o-perations,
perations, o-perations, the corporation s-a 1 d
this "institutionalized inflation"

has been reflected in greater tax taxes
es taxes and mountin prices of things it

must buy.

1

i tfiV;itaal

GUIDED MISSILE CETS WHEELS Navy's guided missile
"Regulus" has been outfitted with a wheeled cart so it can be
used on a ship's catapult.' The cart replaces the old combination
of portable launching platform and jet-assist take-off bottles.
How it works is shown in this sequence of pictures taken by the
Navy aboard the carrier Hancock somewhere off the California
coast. Regulus is placed on the cart, top poto. Center photo
shows it being launched by the ship's steam catapult. Regulus
leaves ship in bottom photo. Cart is jettisoned when tha
missile is aloft.

Case Warns Election Change

Would Nullify GOP Chances

WASHINGTON, March 21 (UP)
-Sen. Clifford P. Case (R-N.J.)
today warned that a proposed con constitutional
stitutional constitutional change in the presiden presidential
tial presidential election system would nullify
Republican chances of capturing
the White House.
The proposed amendment, co co-sponsored
sponsored co-sponsored by 54 senators, would
leave the Democrats as "the domi dominant
nant dominant party and establish the Re Republican
publican Republican Party as a permanent
minority," Case said in an inter interview.
view. interview. To buttress his argument, Case
today circulated among Republic Republican
an Republican Senators a 1950 letter by the,
late Sen. Robert A. Taft warning of
"the dangers" oi changing the
present electoral system. Taft
then warned Republican Congress Congressmen
men Congressmen that a similar constitutional
amendment would "be fatal to the
hope of electing a Republican pres president
ident president if the election is in any way
close."
Tha Sonata today want into Its
second day of debate en tha cur currant
rant currant proposed amendment. It
would revise tha present "win "win-nertakeaH"
nertakeaH" "win-nertakeaH" system by which all
of a State's electoral votes go
to tha presidential candidate win

ning a majority of the state's
popular vote.

Instead a state's electoral vote

would be, divided between candi

dates according to the popular vote

or according to the vote in the

individual congressional districts.
Simultaneously.-- Sen.. Paul. H.

Douglas (D-IU.) charged that "one-

party states want to "dominate
the choice of the president" by
changing the present "winner-take-

au electoral system. -Douglas,
said the proposed

change in the electoral system

would "deprive city voters of fair

representation" in the election of
a president and vice president.

He said the change would be
an attempt at "national gerry gerrymandering"
mandering" gerrymandering" which would create

"chaos and confusion" instead of
making any desirable rtform in
tha Electoral Collage system.
The president and vice president
are chosen formally by electors
named by the voters in the No November
vember November presidential elections.
The system has meant that the
candidate receiving a plurality of
the popular vote in any state re receives
ceives receives all of that state's electoral
votes.
One of the nronosed rhanppe

and the target of Douglas' ire-

was me proposed amendment
sponsored by 54 senators to divide

up each state s electoral votes

among the candidates in accord accordance
ance accordance with the percentage of the
Donular vote thev rprpiveH

Sen. Price Daniel (D-Tex.), chief

sponsor of thit proposal, said the
present system should be changed
before it "rip in hmint tie in

flouting the will of the people."

Daniel said tha system disen disenfranchises
franchises disenfranchises millions of voters. A
candidate who carried New York
state by one vote would receive
all of New York's 45 electoral
votes ha said.
But Douglas retorted that the

proposed amendment would mean

that the city dweller "would lose

what little influence he now has
in the elctora) system."
"Candidates and party platforms
would have to appeal to the one one-party
party one-party South and the one-party
Middle West where the margin of
electoral victory would be gained,"
he said.
But Sen. Albart Gore (D-Tenn.)
said the present system is' "un "undemocratic
democratic "undemocratic and filled with poten

tial danger for usurpation of the
will of the people."
Sen. Alben Barkley (D-Ky.), a
former vice president, said he saw
no reason to hesitate to let the
people "vote directly" for the
president, as has been proposed by

Sea. William Langer (R-ND),

By WATSON
j
A DIVISION OF-
R. WALLACE SL SONS

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ncE FOUR
WrrNF.SDAT. MARCH tl. 1?!J

TFT FAN4M. AMERICAN AN INDEFfNTfEST DAH.1 KF.WSFAFER

i

jacost cn Eaton,

By OSWALD JACOB Y
Writttn for NEA Service

Tax 7ri!:r$ Oppss
Dednciisns
On Campaign Gills

rzzzx ad mr Fir. itxs

tfA:rD&.t,-s True Life Adventures

l&mWlfD B LENNY.

4.

WEST
AQS
V74
K 10853
1063

NORTH tl

4J32
VK103
764
KQ93
EAST
A 10878

VQ9 8 6Z
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42

South
1
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SOl'TH (D)
AK94
AJ5
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North -South vul.
ViH North
Pass 2
Pats Pass

East
Pass
Pass

Opening lead 5

WASHINGTON'. Mar. 21 (UPW
Three House tax writers voic voiced
ed voiced opposition yesterday to aj

i deductions of up to $100 on po-ilitl'-al
campaien contributions.
I The proposal is one of several
p-ovisions in a "clean elections"

bill sponsored by 85 of the 96

; senators. It is aimed at encour encour-larring
larring encour-larring more people to help fi finance
nance finance political campaigns.
5 But three members of the
: House Wavs and Mean Com Committee
mittee Committee Indicated In separate in interviews
terviews interviews that the tax deduction
plan would have to be chanced
' considerably to win congression congressional
al congressional approval before the November
election campaign.
; Rep. Herman p. Eberharter
i (D-Pa. protested that most of

the tax benefits would be limit limited
ed limited to th well-to-do.
He said $ taxpayer taxed at
the top rate of 91 per cent could
make a campaign contribution
of $100 at a net cost of only S9,

pinna V. -MMti Mll Art Mel

1 How would you play today's! c "vu,u i
South hand at a contract of three!1 m"' j
mo-trumpc Weai opens the five of; c the oth hand( he 8ald.

ji.aiiuiu:,, 4uu uu.w.u 1W f taxpavers of moc!e.t
ZrTl t no n' oui Income who use the standard 10
jrocccd from that pom cent deduction Instead of

V vn- -"-v i1' i

iuu nave .i;iu uu ... wutpirl7im, their ta d(,ductions

earns, ana you can casuy oeveiopi t .. wnatcvei.
a ninth trick by successfully qucss- wo"'
Jiwrts. If ou make mistake by fc t r0mpomlse nroposai
taking the finesse in the wrong; ... hLpflt Bi. flm.
oireci..m. however, you will wi rSl& ir,

down.

i small.

! be dot

it for those who use the stand-

XUiM guesser necuh no auviL-e.;. rf nrnvlrfinir tav Priri-

mtsauess a r ii". r:;u .... W.

He suggested this could

-if vuu occasionally

uuecil, nowtver, JOU cmi xmu ,n ,. rf.rinrfinn .nH a

better way to play today's hand for others
than by trying to make your mirth! ? PnSlw. irn

..gUilNJI Kil'U IP loll L ITU11 VlIK'cU tllrtLi

LIPOW THE KOK3 ANI7 6KA.ZE OKI THE A.L6AE.

-r.-Jt.-L- Jill IIP- .-.
TRISKV &WASOUTS THEV LEA.P PRiDM ONE TIPE FIOOU ;
TO ANOTHER IN OF POOP AN 17 SOMETIMES
6eeminslv oust for the pun op it. l mriTI

K LA"ifJ,hA'vOC...EcHT

t rr
r,' ih-zzz ass

iti'ti K in hearts.
'take three rounds of clubs.

. . i . i.x v rr i if i 1 1 ii in ii 1 1. it i i i jiii i i.i li ii

ll;e ace of diamonds, and men let ; 5 1(lp -f al : .
West take his diamond tricks. You V,Sd JveA m! tax relief t
'can d.scard a spade on the fourth I erted for eclaf dufdoIL t
'round ot diamonds and a club oniS'?"1. 5hK -P I

delavs the dav when tax rates

can be reduced for everybody.

"the fifth round. Dummy has no
nwliicms, of course, since uc
kpuioK can be spared. You care care-f'J'y
f'J'y care-f'J'y refrain from cashing a fourth
flaij in order to have this safe
'dti ar.! available at this time.
1 ..:iing taken his diamonds,
IVoi ntu.st .now lead a spade 01

iie art. In cither case, huj lead;-, ., .
must ssuarantee your ninth trick. tlUA Mlfl.PAnUnlirC
Bridge i. an easy game when you I II v I'lIU KUflMMIIVJ
Can nia..e your opponents take'

Jour auesses for you. SAN SALVADOR. Mar. 21

Ouakc In Lebanon

; Salvador To Pre

For Fwterclion 01

Trkes Heavy Toll
; PiiiRUT, Lebanou. March 21
(VP) A government spokesman
snid today 115 persons were killed,
more than 500 injured and 25,000
uth-rs left" homeless by the earth earth-oi'i'cs
oi'i'cs earth-oi'i'cs that, rocked Lebanon Fri Friday.
day. Friday. Approximutoly 5,000 houses were
1-eported destroyed in the scries
o earth shocks.
A Foreign Ministry spokesman
disclosed that British Prime Min Minister
ister Minister Anthony Eden has sent a mes message
sage message to Lebanese' President Ca Ca-milie
milie Ca-milie Chamoun. offering the serv services
ices services of British fleet units in rescue
lie nairl also that the United

S! Hies has sen! some supplies of

tonts and blankets needed l or
thousands of persons without shelter.

REVERE BELLS led by Federal Council, such as in
BOSTON (UP) A total of Switzerland and Uruguay, in
398 bells were cast in the famous which the five Republics would
foundry of Paul Revere. Several of have equal representation, and
these bells still ring in New the president would be elected by
England the Council itself, in rotation.

;(UP) An official spokesman
, said today that El Salvador will

make concrete proposals soon for

the federation of the five middle

American Republics into the Unit United
ed United States of Central America.
The. propsals will be made at
the first meeting of the Central A A-merican
merican A-merican Jurist Commission sched scheduled
uled scheduled to open in San Jose, Costi
Rica, next Thursday.
Supreme Court Justice Mauricio
Guzman, who is the Salvadorean
member of the Commission, said

He would ask the Commission to

lay the basic principles for a dem democratic
ocratic democratic political constitution for
the United States of Central America.-
Such a constitution. Guzman
said, should follow the principles

embodied In the United Nations u-

niversal declaration of human
rights and in the American decla declaration
ration declaration of the rights and duties of
man.

The federation would be govern

"You hiard ma! I said tie up your horse and head for
the bunkhouse!" ;

Faltering Philip
Philip's life ts filled with braise.
Well-worn steps and rugs hi uses.
Repairs would leate bis home like new.
"V A Classifieds, hist the right clue'

itt jwsR OF MARTHA WX

"Condemned Man"

By WILSON SCRCGGS

CUNT7IPPOVOU ( J.Z )
Off ON A VACATIOW Vs
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THE WIDOW WAA.weU,CHECT IREVEBV "S3
k a i . m

vvi recta UKS ACONPEWMEU MAN WHEN

THE WEDPSJS DATE IS SET. I CEWEMBETJ

(

WHA1

ves, i TO3P0SE0. Birr rw talions about

TVO VOCTOBS TOLD Me. CLIT

uazshau. has a okje-wav

J?ESrZVATlON ON A WHEEL

CKAK TO THE SBA

'-7 1
hill IE 111 .-Jl.r.UJ.M.DH

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LACUT. MicHT F;NCA LINE CN r
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V

Wronf Answer

& UXKRTLL BLOSSrS

( NiOW wwat did ) lJe ffi.J, YlH

i PATE ME? WANT 3rttrr rW YOU OATt ITS BOY Rr'j rTfie '
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Different yu7fv5'vV- H boys once tm.s merj. ,rvV Si
y V from TUf --v imavwile, -sucwr c pates, ri I
fellas 't1 '"Sv "ST r- X BA2QO I wuy .-I "V w ?

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Bif Man Now

f T. T. BAMLDI

" 1,1 1 1 ""' my APOLOGIES THATS WHAT T I YEM, MAN. AND Y'KNOW. I81 WHY, OF 0X1636.: ;
r "MCTOWff'S I BEEN TRYING W GOT THI5 STUFF Vu.OOFiX ANY TIME I
Wtuimi OF IT AIM fiS-YEWA NO WONDER TO TELL. YOU SOMfcTHlMG COULD PUT US I GUES5 ITS CAN
ELEMENTS OF THE VERY J PERKED UR T'l f VfX- hf t
fv FINEST 20TH CENTURY 'iZ- 1X7- -All XT HtCE7XREAP

BOOTS AND BK BUDOBi

It's an Honor

CI RKLU UAfirjl

ThW vfcUTCWO0OREt "TO

VlftvJB OO T0 THE STKTDl

0? nHt -fiVTOfs&z; WPiW.

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By LESLIE TURNXK

. kTfcff MS COULDN'T PINO

ttil I CONVWCeO THSY
, ucn uJila TuKT 0AV

RE6ULAR RUN 0F,6YNTrtETlC

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fciV ill

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MOKTY MEEKLI

cup. The

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mntr k lifcffK Oil THE 1 mimabiu

..... unZ.T.Hi J ......

(WEN wCM"y A.REH7U5

7 WITH mc

other:

'"JsTbt Mi rtiee.i

... .c

'WE U1CM. CU3TWNS WILL

DIP WCLUPE WWE SIMTnein.

u&v PUT K6LL SP0OL9

$t)T HOW

WILL &

Drop Us a Card

By DICK CiVAlLl

rttist ii la's tor

Growinf Pains

By AL rtKMLttt

( BIRTHDAY, A PAL A
Uestercarlyle)
SO I'LL --v.!! ZZS
I PAY FOR )
YOU-

HE'S TREATING ME

BfcCAUSE TODAY I'M

IZ YEARS OLD

2

12 YEARS- vl

iMtiN ryu WONT
WANT A run tve

U TICKET;

1

f AS I
( YOU'I
GET

-DER )
: I'D
rERJ

led

COt'TBENEKVOUJIU...
VOU'eECONcrFINE.

5TEP0N THE KAKE NOW

H AKPEK ON THE KbSSJ'JL TfrS OWAMIEVeA
KAJILL. ) SftSffi I 1 dOINcr TO LEARM
0TEPONTHE i p;TC0 j itaa? tdpkiveifmou

)HK B4UDIKO IfOLSI

ILUOat Boon-i01,1 out WAS

(If . W11XUO

It's on His MJod

Like TbatT

cjg yr popky!
j, J6ET IN HEP?E...YES
"T-ffrrtMK LATE FCC WCWL
EftKEHYI il(C-C-C0MIN6!

ALL THEM CAKES
60TTABE X
DECORATED 17 OKAY
, ,.EX Ji PETUNIA
,BUSy!jf...IM-MEAN )
'V Xajesiy

WAODAVA KN0W.TH'
LOVESICK CLUCK IS
e&aur woi?kin0 J
... ajhwi j

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LAID A
fiLOVI" rtsl

) AVE 6ET

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hit BOUT

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THERE

A?t
6TAV

TILL

AY W0RO.FATMEC THAT t'i-l

TueSDAY

AND THE

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COLLECTS

WILL PICK

YOU LP

YOU ACe A

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'0 i 4)M
4 b

i WASU'T A

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MUCH

PLAYIN

ill

TM' COOK IW&IT6P

OM PRIVIkl, AMP IP
TM COPS 5E Odd.

U TRAIL, LEAVIM'TOWU

YOUH THEY'LL. TRACK US,

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WAY, SO I'M MAKIN'

IT LOOK LIKE y YVi.tivvU.

WE'RE DOPOIN-

'.' U : ;u U M N. kVIH y i'

iitLI



TTH! PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT TAUT NEWSPAPER

PA""

) octal ana Jthci

ivtde

Box 134, Par. a ma

Jtj Staffers

or

1 Box 5031, Jl;

xcon

mail Vrtmf ilmfJ L mitJ premplff 1 LrumL tLntm.
-
Ul ml! L fcmJl If hLpl" r Psm 2-0740 m 2-0741 LlvMm 9;00 mJ ft a-m, mff

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Ml

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ml I n mwmmmiemomrii V rWv i in in 1 1' t ...iuii.il in.... in im.mi

HAVING LUNCH AT THE UNION CLUB are, left to right, Mesdames Lily Fogarty, Esther G.
de Paredes, Dora de Jimenez, Damarls de St. Malo, Misses Julaine Fogarty, Dorita Jimenez
and Eva de Halphen. The luncheon was given by Mrs, Paredes yesterday, in honor ol Mrs.
Fogarty......'. ";- '

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM H. ALLEN TO HOLD
OPEN HOUSE FOB DR. JOHN BIESANZ
, On Friday evening, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Allen will
hold "open house" at their quarters at 208 Rodman In honor
of Dr. John Biesanz, who is visiting on the Isthmus. Dr.
Biesans together with Mrs. Biesans co-authored the widely
read book "People of Panama" during their several years of
residence here. ' :
All those interested in meeting the popular author or In
renewing old acquaintanceship will be welcome to attend.

Frtd Humberts Leaves
For Europi
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Humbert
have left for Europe on vacation.
They plan to take in all the prin principal
cipal principal cities on the Continent while
there,
Dr. j. J. VaiUrino Here
The Panamanian ; Ambassador
to Washington, J. J. Vallarino- is
visiting in Panama with his fam family.
ily. family. yy':i:''
Mrs. Henrietta Shaw will Speak
At Crtl Zone" Art League
The Canal Zofie Art League will
nippt tomorrov evening, at th e

hom of Mr. and" Mrs. A. Houston,

No. 515. Manzanillo St., A n c o n

(third house on right on Manzani
Uo St.). !X-:-fJiifist
sDeaker will be Mrs. Hen

rietta shaw who will give a talk
nn Mexico. Also feature will be

Mexican sonRS and guitar selec

tions rendered bv Mrs. Shaw.

-Mrs. Shaw has spent several

vears in Mexico and has a fasci

natins store on Mexican folklore.

All members are invited a ndl

guests will be welcome.'
Col. And Mrs. John L. Adams
Give Cocktail Party
Col. and Mrs. John L. Adams en
tertained last night at their quar quarters
ters quarters at an impromptu cocktail par

ty for Dr.. John Beisanz, the writ-

er who, togemer wun mrs. ne ne-sanz
sanz ne-sanz co-authored the popular book

"People of Panama.
Among those present at this af affair
fair affair were, Mr. and Mrs. William
H. Allen; Col. and Mrs. William

N. Hornish, Mr. Dwight McKab-

ney, Mr. and Mrs. Rowe and Mr
and, Mrs. William Stevens. ;
Mr. Burton Davis To Give Talk

Mr. Burton Davis, President of
the Gem and Mineral Society has
recently returned from an extend

ed vacation in tne umiea oiaies.
While there he visited the Gem
Centers of America.
Mr. Burton will .speak to the

Canal Zone Gem and Mineral So

ciety at its monthly meeting at
Diablo Heights Service Center on
Friday, at 7:30 p.m.
Visitors or guests who are mter mter-ested
ested mter-ested may attend.
Minister of Uruguay
Entertains
The Minister of Uruguay, and
Mr. Felix Polled Carrio and Mrs.
Maria Virginia de Polleri enter entertained
tained entertained at a luncheon for a group
of friends at their- country home
in El- Valle on Sunday.
Mr. And Mrs. George Arias
Entertain
Mr. and Mrs. George Anas en entertained
tertained entertained at a luncheon for Miss
Helen Lawrenson, well- known
writer for "Esquire Magazine" at
their country home in El Valle. A A-mong
mong A-mong those invited were Mr. and
Mrs.. Charles Kline and Mr. 'and
Ms. Irving Bennett.
Vacationing Hart

Mr. Steve Maduro has arrived
in Panama to spend the Easter
vacations with his father and
mother, Mr. and Mrs. Felix Ma Maduro.
duro. Maduro. After the holidays he will re return
turn return to Lawrenceville School in

Lawrenceville, New Jersey, to re
sume his studies. ;

and Mrs.
Heights.

Stanley Kidd of Brazos

Mr. J. S. Andrews
Will Visit Here

Mr. J. S. Andrews of the Ford
Motor Company will visit Panama

at the end of Aoril.

Mr.' Andrews will be taking the
place of MY. Thomas Eybye as
Regional Director of Latin Amer

ica, Ford International Division.

Mr. -Eybye retired from his post

witn r ord Motor Company at the

beginning of March.

VStrikt4t JiUh'A At Fort Amador

Officers' Wives' Club-

An evening ot entertainment will
be sponsored by the Fort Amador

Officers Wive3 Club on April 7
at 7 p.m. at the Army-Navy Club,

"Strike It Rich" will be a Cha

nty Benefit which will feature

Bingo with unusual prizes, also

numerous door prizes. A television.

set will he given away in a raffle,

You, do not have to be present to
win. Participants may wear sports

shirts if so desired.

Cocktail, Party Honors
Eugene C. Lombards :
' Mr. and Mrs. John T. Oglesby
gave a cocktail party last night in
honor of the Executive Secretary
of the Canal Zone and Mrs. Eu Eugene
gene Eugene Lombard who will be leaving
soon, v

U. S. Luxury Liners
Make Bid for Ric
Auslralasinn Trade

SYDNEY (UP) -. The Amer

icans make their bid for the rich
Australasian passenger trade this
June with Matson's super luxury

liners, Mariposa and Monterey.

The two new 20,000-ton ships will

challenge the British, who have

dominated post-war shipping in the
South Pacific. The Orient Lines'

four great vessels Oronsay. Or-

sova, Orcades and Orion now ply
unODDOsed with full bookings be-

between Australia and North Am

erica. The, British have reaped a

golden harvest in dollars with their

600-passenger ships, while the

Americans have had in service

only an occasional 12-passenger

freighter.

In an abrupt about-face, the new

American ships are designed to

attract the "carriage trade." Un Unlike
like Unlike most nost-wan ships, which

are being built as either tourist

class only, or with very limited

first' class accommodations, Mari Mariposa
posa Mariposa and Monterey will be all first
class. Fares will range from $1,180

for a lanal suite down to $547 for

pullman bed, inside cabins for the

315 passengers.
Orient Line fares for the San
Francisco-Sydney trip range from
$768 to $290, while the comparative
first class and tourist air bookings
cost $675 and $540 respectively. ;

Matson undoubtedly expects to

get most of its revenue irom
American travelers, as Australian
booking agents say the tariffs will
be too expensive for the average
Australian traveler.

Shipping interests here deny that
the Matson ships will start a price price-cutting
cutting price-cutting war if the British line finds
the American competition too
rough. An Orient spokesman said
his company "welcomed"' the Mat Mat-son
son Mat-son competition and saw no reason
why it would be necessary to re reduce
duce reduce fares on the Orient ships to
keep them filled.
For their comfort, travelers on
Mariposa and Monterey will have
fully air-conditioned accommoda accommodations,
tions, accommodations, swimming pool, dance and
sports decks, movies and room
service. However, the deck chairs,

usually tarried as standard equip-1
ment, will be rented to passengers i

mrn

' Each nollr for Incliulon In (hli
column should iubmilted in type typewritten
written typewritten form and mailed to one of
the box numbers luted daUy in "So "Social
cial "Social and Otherswisc," or delivered
by hand to the office. Notices of
meetings cannot ba accepted by tele telephone.
phone. telephone. Cristobal Emblem Club
To Meet
The Cristobal Emblem Club will
hold its regular social meeting on
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Elks
Home. ;
Atlantic Girl Scout Leaders' Club
To Meef
The Atlantic Side Girl Scout
Leader's Club will hold their
monthly meeting, Thursday, at
9 : 00 a.m. at the, Margarita Scout
House. )':' :

The Guest Speaker will U Mrs:

r . Mcuermitt of Gatun. She
will speak on "Birds Native of Pa Panama.''
nama.'' Panama.'' All those who attend are

asked to bring paper, pencils and

crayons. Anv reeistpreri Ariu r rciri

Scout, including leaders, commit

tee mem Ders ana. other interested
persons are urged to attend.
La Boca Civic Council

The La Boca Civic Council will

hold its monthly meeting Friday
night at the High School Study
Hall, commencing at 7:30 p.mi

Matters Of vital importance will

be discussed as follows: (1) third
local rate commissary forum (2)
Governor, local rate community
conference (3) group tour of the
Mount Hope plant. All adult resi residents
dents residents are invited to attend.

Polo Grounds Hold
IIY Farmers!, Sure

ITHACA, N. Y. (UP) The

number of commercial farmers in
New York state is declining each

year, but it's because of more ef efferent
ferent efferent farming methods.

Prof. S. W. Warren of Cornell

University believes that by 1966,

all the commercial farmers in the
state can be accommodated in the

55,000-seat Polo Grounds in New

York City instead of the 67,000-seati

Yankee stadium as at present.

The farmers will be fewer but

more efficient, getting more per

acre per man. Warren pointed out.

He also predicts 260 eggs sold per
hert in 1956- by the upper 10 per

cent of the farmers, compared

with 250 today.

This Shamrock Cake Is

St. Patrick's Day Delicacy

DAINTY MORSEL for St Patrick's Day Is this atuunrock cake.
haded a delicate treea with a vaniUm-Unie frostlnf
By GAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Markets Editor

Tinted a delicate green, flavored

with fresh lime, here's a greeting
to spring and St. Patrick for

March 17th.
Vanilla-Lime Shamrock Cake
(Yield: 12 servings)
Cream together 2-3 cup shorten shortening,
ing, shortening, 1 1-3 cups sugar. 1 teasDoon

pure vanilla extract and 1 tea

spoons grated fresh lime rind. Beat

in ,4 egg whites, one at a time.

Blend in Vi teaspoon green vege vegetable
table vegetable coloring.
Sift 2 cups sifted cake flour with

2 teaspoons double-acting baking

powder and V teaspoon salt. Add
alternately to the batter with 1 cup
milk. Beat Vi minute. Turn batter
into 2 well-greased, lightly floured,
8-inch cake pans.
Bake 25 minutes or until done in
a preheated moderate oven (375

degrees F.). Cool 10 minutes in

pans. Turn out on wire cake racks
to finish cooline.

Spread Creamy Vanilla-Lime

frosting between layers an don top
and sides of cake. Place an open open-top
top open-top shamrock cookie cutter in
center of cake Into which snrinkle

green granulated sugar. Remove

cooKie cutter.
Creamy Vanilla-Lime Frosting
(Yield: Sufficient for topi and
sides of 2 round 8-inch layers)

Combine M cup sugar and 2

tablespoons cornstarch in a sauce

pan. Add Vfc cup milk and cook
until very thick, about 5 minutes,
stirring constantly. Cool. Blend in
1-16 teaspoon salt and Vi cup

softened butter or margarine.

Gradually add 3V4 cups sifted con confectioners'
fectioners' confectioners' sugar, 1 tablespoon light

cream or undiluted evaporated

milk. Stir in 1 teaspoon grated
lime rind and 1 teaspoon pure

vanilla extract.

More Land, Less Farmers Seen
In Future; Outlook Good, Tho

High Altitude Can

Cause Vapor Lock

COLUMBUS. O. (UP)- Ohio

State University researchers have

found that the heart develops a
"vapor lock" when exposed to low

air pressure found at extremely

high altitudes.
Drs. Fred A. Hitchoek and John
P. Kemph simulated pressures at
an altitude of 72,000 feet in the

laboratory and photographed the

physiological effects it produced.
Th 3 X-ray photographs showed
that blood circulation continued no
nore than 16 seconds after the
pressure dropped to that found, at

72,000 feet.
The researchers found that gas
appeared in the heart shortly after

circulation stopped, "correspond

ing to what, ane ngineer would

call vapor lock.

Bufftt For Mr. Garrett
Mrs.: N. J. Garrett whn will ho

lpavintJ thn Tsthmiic eVmrtlv in m J .t a nnminnl rhnrrp

turn to her home in England was
given a buffet at the home of Mr.
and Mrs W. D. Midd!mas of Bra

zos Heights on nv'ny evenn.

The Matson ships will make the

6,500-mile trip from both San Fran

cisco and Los Aneies, caiiins ai

Mrs. Ganr-tt nas been the house-Honolulu. Samoa. Suva, New Zea-

ipucst of her tunt and undo, Mr.jland and Tahiti on the round trip.

ANITA RAVEL

our beautiful songstress
with the sultry voice
EVERY NIGHT
y Bella Vista Room
8:30 and 11:30 p.m.

CHICAGO (UP) The trend
toward larger farms and fewer
farmers in the United States will

continue in spite, o the fact that.

population increases will raise de

mand for farm products, accord

ing to the dean of agriculture at

Kansas State College.

Dean Arthur W. Weber gave In Increases
creases Increases in production, brought on

by improvements in seed, fertilizer

and machinery, as the basic rea

son behind what is happening in

agriculture today.

He said the farm population has
decreased nearly one-third since

1935 mainly because mechaniza

tion has decreased the need for

labor on farms.

Looking ahead to 10 years from

now, Weber made this forecast in

a speech:

"In 1965. we will have 15 per

cent or 25,000,000 more people in

the United States than we have

now. The average work-week may
be shortened by 10 hours te a 30-

hour week. Total U.S. production

is expected to increase by 40 per

cent, and output per man hour

may ne up 30 per cent.
"But, more important to farm

ers, output per man hour in agri

culture is expected to be up 36

per cent. In addition, total in incomes
comes incomes after taxes are expect expected
ed expected to Increase by 43 per cent."
He said the basis of present
farm problems is the fact that
farm production has risen faster
than population and markets, with
the result of accumulating surplus surpluses
es surpluses of many farm products.
"That is what has been happen happening
ing happening in agriculture," Weber said,
adding that the result is seen in
declining farm income, lower farm
prices, higher production costs and

increasing competition in the for foreign
eign foreign agricultural trade.
The dean explained that although
an increase in population has1
meant a bigger market for farm
products, and increasing incomes
have meant more mony with
which to buy the products, total

farm production went up 44 per

cent while total v. s. population
increased only 33 per cent
Competition from synthetics and
changes in tastes and eating habits
have added to the problems and
have strengthened the market for
other products. r
Weber said people now are eat eating
ing eating more meat, fresh vegetables
and margarine, and less potatoes,
wheat products and butter. The
result, he said, L that outlook for
some farm products has been im

proved while serious problems
have been orpatprf fnr

Other factors, aprnrriinff tn WeK

er, are that World. War JI stimu stimulated
lated stimulated farm Droduptinn tnH arm.

ernmental programs after the war

neipea maintain the farm income
but did. not provide the economic
incentives for adjusting production

iu uiarKeis.
With the rtiri nf fh urni Willi

tary demands were decreased and
agricultural recovery abroad dried

up a large part of our export mar
ket. It also is indicator! ha caA

that we can evnprt affricnltnval

production abroad to continue to

increase in the future.

let Cabbies Li

By Fori Knox Riders

FT. KNOX. Kv.-(UP)-Thpre'K

a place in the Army at F. Knox for

soldiers who don't talk much, have

no strong opinions on baseball or

women, little interest in politics
and can drive an automobile. They

are wanted as post taxi-cab dnv
ers.

Lt. Col., Henry M. Stiebel, post

transportation oiticer, said his
"quiet men," drivers concentrate
on driving, rather than oh political
theories and witty exchanges with

the passengers. The officers, who
do much of the cab riding on the

post, preier it that way.
Few of the drivers were civilian
hackies. One Louisville cab driver,
drafted into the Army, tried the
job, but soon asked for a transfer.
"This quiet is driving me nuts,"
he said. V

v

i f

(

-v ;

I 4

1 :

i v.-
w

4 .wyj.........!,

NAVAL OFFICERS' WIVES PLAN "EVENING OF GAMES" to raise funds for Welfare work!
Left to right Mrs. R. L. Mann, Mrs. H. H. Spick er, Mrs. R. L. S. Clark, Mrs. Geo.' King;
Mrs. H. Ransom. Mrs. W. B. Tucker and Mrs. e. M. Saunders. The affair will take place at
the Army Navy Club, Fort Amador on April 3, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are now on sale through
the Club members.

Gl Ilcbbyisls Using
Souvenirs In Arts

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (UP)

The "do-it-yourself," hobby craze
is just as big with servicemen as

civilians, but the GI's and their

families often nave an advantage
through the use of souvenirs they
have collected while on overseas

duty.

TVhhlps from Mediterranean

hparhps stonex from Airline trails.

baggage labels from Japanesei ho

tels, theater ticket stuos, a piece
of rubble from Hitler's Berlin
bunker all can be used as raw

materials for various arts and
crafts.

The r.TV Alwavg inveterate sou

venir hunters now are converting
their mementoes into cuff links,
onrrintfR helt hnekles. kev taES.

book marks and paperweights.

rne Army nas sei up pjjcukh
Service Craft Shops on many posts
to help GI hobbyists convert their

souvenirs into useful articles.

A Key Theft

HARTFORD. Conn. (UP)

Policeman Adolph Lopes had to

call headquarters ior neip auer

investigating a oisturoance at a
tavern. While Lones was inside

someone stole the keys to his
cruiser. He had an extra set at

headquarters.

FREE LUNCH
4.6 p.m. DAILY

EL RANCHO

MOTS

J

IFLL CO IPLACES-Thls

........V vw .au uc iransporiea oy nencopter to the front fo

use as an am siauon. Marines are shnvm ult na It

... ... - u k m L wuillUI

iva., during recent triphibious maneuver iTh. a.

used as a command post or as an enclosure in .. .j..

supplies and equipmentPhotc, recently released by tb Deoera-I
ment of Defense. -

mi

CLOVERBLOOM
Butter

Teenagers Advised
To Start Programs
CHICAGO (UP) J. Frank
McCabe, director of the Kiwanis
International Key Clubs for hiuh

school boys, says the teenagers

can launch their. own programs
to fight juvenile delinquency.
McCabe said the local Key Clubs,
with a total membership of 30.000

in 1,370 communities, can conduct

campaigns by posters, blackboard
and school assemblies on school

property values to combat vandal
ism. .

He also suggested that the hoys

work on safe driving campaigns
and cooperate in community,
church and civic efforts such as

the Community Chest drives.

lor,

Ne7 CUTICURA TALCUM
Acts like Magic

fjulicur,

It's the softest, finest, most delightfully
fragrant talcum you can buy. At the same
time it is lastingly deodorant and antisep antiseptic.
tic. antiseptic. Yes, magical C-8 (Hexachlorophene)
in new Cuticura Talcum keeps the skin
fresh and sweet, relieves sunburn, prevents
and relieves heat rashes and other skin
"rntallbhs. Wonderful for baby"ariJ"everyr
one. Buy Cuticura Talcum today.

J

J cooli, lefreshe Xs ittaltm : KjM
.J -and soothe akin. ' '- 11 "
. i.Hlhmidic.t.d J THE IIST AND NOTHING 'JijiM!f
rWd"V JI- iUT THK BIST 15 """l J

...

The bottle baby
needn't be a
"PROBLEM CHILD"
Robinson's 'Patent' Barley
added to your baby's formu formula
la formula makes cow's milk easier to
digest less likely to cause
indigestion and colicky cry crying.
ing. crying. Helps your baby get used
to starchy foods, too, makes
weaning so much easier!
Robinson's Bar

ley mixed with
water is a sooth soothing
ing soothing drink for.
4 people with
fever, stomach
"- or kidney complaints.

ItWWillUVII tl

'PATENT' CJiTlET
Also available ai
your local commissars.

Ka
!! I
l' j

Lanolin Plus "Powder Plus"
makes you look more beautiful whilo
it helps you become more beautiful! I

. fcr - I

This wonderful new pressed fac
powder banishes little lines and
blemishes instantly . helps your
skin grow softer, smoother, thanks
to wonder-working Lanolin Plus
Liquid!
owDEn-rms ;

PRESSED FACE POWDER IN LOVELY MIRROR CASK

AGCNXIAS LATINO AMERICANAS
(CANDANEDO'Y C'lA. LTDA.)
P. 0. l?ox 212 Tel. 3-4 SGI



FAGE SIX

r.. ,.,. ,,,....,.....,
r I n V
nil r'
r 1

Uune

MINIMUM
for
12 WORDS
COMMERCIAL &
Professional
CANAL ZONE POLYCLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
(R. C I. FABRIGA. D O S.
DR. R. A VILA JR.. M.D.
Tivdu (4th o( July) Ave.. No
optoKc Ancon School Playirouno)
Tel. 2-2011 Panama
RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
jm ridge
Phone ranama Z-0552
infill) llMJUMlUalJ
TRANSPORTIS BAXTER. S A.
Peckers Shippers Movers
Jhnn.. 2-2451 2-2562
team Riding t
.PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding t Jumplnej dosses i Joily
to 5 p.m. Phono J-0279
1 or by appoint mem.
'We shape Vour figure"
BODY-REDUCING
t famous MrLevy Machines
Swerftih Mwi Steam Bath
(or male and female
ORTEPEDIA NACIONAL
(Dr. Srholli)
SS Juito Arosemene Ph. 1-2217
HARNETT & DUNN
BALLROOM DANCE STUDIO
Balboa: 2-42M or Pan.! 3-1660)
,TEACHK8 UNTIL VOU LEARN'
Studio El PiT.cma Hotel
Divorce Lav Groups
Issues Repsri On
lesl lube Babies
..
LONDON, March 21 (UP) A
nrtal commission which made a
four-year study of Britain's di-
varce Jaws today recommended!
ttsAt test tube babies conceivea
without the husbands consent
should be ground lor? divorce.
The Commission on Marriage
arid Divorce published its massive
4iin-page, report today.
Acceptance by a wife of artlfl artlfl-ciiil
ciiil artlfl-ciiil insemination without the con con-yilnt
yilnt con-yilnt of the husband does him a
"grave injury," the commission
sul. It is as serious as auuiiery,
iti asserted.
... ... ,:....,
The commission said that incom incom-..
.. incom-.. ptience in itself should not be a
' iound for divorce if husband and
wife have consented to a test tube
baby. This would, apply .whether
t ie seed came from the husband
- o from a donor.
M u
.Among others, the commission
rrtoom mended' also:
J. That husbands be entitled to
eumony if unable to support them themselves.
selves. themselves.
2. That wives be able to claim
damages from an adulteress just
a$ the British husband now has
thjc right to make similar demands
nn an adulterer.
. The commission criticized what
if termed "an increasing disposi disposition
tion disposition to regard divorce not as the
lat resort but as the obvious way
out." .'
It said that if this tendency con continued
tinued continued unchecked it may be neces necessary
sary necessary to abolish divorce entirely
ancr accept "the inevitable andivi andivi-dii:l
dii:l andivi-dii:l hardships that this' would en en-tailr"
tailr" en-tailr"
The commission noted that
some 20,000 children under 16 arc

"fwtprl hv divorces in Britain,.

"" each year and recommended thatj
no' divorce ne gramea unm m -
future well-being of children was
assured.
PanCanal Solicits
Ceiling Tile Bids
Bids are now being solicited by
the Panama Canal Company for
the Installation of acoustical tile
inltho ceiling of Building 365 in
Ancon.
Kormerlv the Ancon Service Cen
ter, the building is now being us user!
er! user! by the Payroll Branch of the
Canal Fiscal Division.
Bids will be opened the morning
of .March 26 in the Administration
Building at Balboa Heights.
MEAD THIS!
Are you Interested for a ridi ridiculous
culous ridiculous low price. In a beauti beautiful
ful beautiful lot at Panama's closest
and finest beach resort? Yoa
ran pay as you see fit. We
Viant nice neighbors ana
joney.is no ohiect. CORO CORO-iUO
iUO CORO-iUO btACll 4Ii miles front
j erry, tall Ebienmann Pan Pan-ma'
ma' Pan-ma' 2-4503 or see Caslilla at
uronailo.

zneizow Wcm$ Ado

LEAVE YOUR

LIBRERIA PRECIADO
7 Street No. 1
Agendas Internal, de Publicaciones
N. 1 Lottery riau
CASA 2ALDO
C cabal Av. 45

1 1 1

for sale
Household
FOR SAL!: Hollywood double
bed with bo springs, $50. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Phone Kobbe
3175.
FOR SALE:- 3 -piece mahogany
livirtf room set, large mahogany
wardrobe cedar lined, other mil
cellineoui. 3-6042.
FOR SALI; Living room, din
ing room, bedroom sets; new
water heater; itove; refrigerator.
Can be seen at Apt. II, houce
44, 46th Street,
FOR SALE: Living room set.
$250, youth bed $35, dining
table $15. 217 l-B Curundu.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE: Cabin cruiser 17'
long, 5. wide, 3' depth; No. I
condition, newly painted $300,
Trailer special built to handle
boats $50. Can be seen at 2003 2003-C,
C, 2003-C, 1st Street, Curundu, Phono
83-6226 after 4:30 p.m. P. 0.
Broome.''
Alabama Makes
(mpresive A,MJ.
Cage Tcurney Debu!
Bv GENE MF.AKINS
DENVER. March 21-UP
Alabama University's senior
team, denied Its chance lo com compete
pete compete in the NCAA playoff, made
an impressive debut in the Na National
tional National AAU Basketball Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament last nleht. edelng the tal talented
ented talented U.S., Air Force All Stars,
90-83.
In yesterday's session, Loyo
la University freshmen of New
Orl ans defeated Salt l ake Ci City,
ty, City, Utah, 78-67. and the U.S.
Marines edged Brownstown,
Inrt., 71-61. Paiadcna, Calif..
defeated 1 he U.S. Army All
Star., 72-68, in last night's
onencr".
The Alabama seniors, play ins
asthe Ada Qilers from Mobile.
Ala., dlsplavfd an offense cen centered
tered centered about 6-10 Jerry Harper.
who controlled both backboards
However, little Wally Ziemba of
Wayne University, speaiheaded
an Air Force last break that al
most naid off,
Ada movpd to a 45-41 half time
lead, but found itself in diffi difficulty
culty difficulty early In the second half
when the Flyers came within
one point, 51-52. Harper hooked
two long shots to zoom Ada far farther
ther farther ahead. 56-51.
Then, with less than 10 min minutes
utes minutes remailn'nf the Air Force
tied the ame and meved a a-head.
head. a-head. 68-64, a minute later on
two fast break laynps by Ron
Bane, former. UCLA (treat.
Aria mnverl Vionlf Intri a 'JtJtl
tie and auard Dick Gunder hit
two field eoals for a 76-72 lead
and" the Alabama seniors re remained
mained remained In front, Alabama won
the Southeastern Conference
Liiiunpiuniiiip, Din uin iiui. uiay
in the NCAA because its starting
five were Ineligible for the tour tournament.
nament. tournament.
Rinii Nocero Cops
Crowd Pleasing' Nod
Over Said Khelfa
NEW YORK, March 20 UP" UP"-As
As UP"-As last-minute substitutes, mld mld-dleweights.
dleweights. mld-dleweights. R inzi Nocero of
Brooklyn and Said Khelfa of Al Algeria
geria Algeria staged a crowd pleasing
bout Monday night at St. Nicho
las Arena.
Nocero was awarded a unanl-
mous 10-round decision in their
widely -televised battle,' -which
was arranged at late nour wnen
Miguel Berrlos was unable to
meet Bobby Bell because of a
severe cold.
Nocero, who we 1 g he d 1C4
pounas io linena s imvt, gainea
the nod on Ills superior ; punch-
ing and ring general, shlp.Thera
were no knockdowns, although
Nocero rocked his opponent sev several
eral several times with strong r 1 g h t
hooks.
At the finish. Khelfa was bleed
ing from a cut over his right;
eye, which required several
stitches.
Referee Ray Felix awarded No
cero six rounds, gave three to
Khelfa and called one even.
Judge Bobby Dawson scored it
7-2-1 and judge Frank Fullman
voted 8-2 In favor of the Brook Brooklyn
lyn Brooklyn battler.
Meetings
AFGE Meets Tonight
The Pacific branch of Lodge
14. American Federation of Gov-
lernment Employes will meet to
night at 7:30 in tne Baiooa club clubhouse.
house. clubhouse.
I rm the acenda tonlcht will be
! a.jrepoxt.oa.ieceAt Jhearl.ngsJ?elcl
I in the Zone concerning, we-ap-'
ollcation of $l-an-hour mini-
jmum wage, and a report on leg-
islation now pending before the
! 84th congress.

THE

YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY

AD WITH ONE OF
LOURDES PHARMACY
182 Ll Crrsquill
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
No. 26 "B'r Slreet
MORRISON
4lh at July Av. A J St,
FOR SALE
Automobiles
"The) Servicie Cooperative Inter Inter-amerkeno
amerkeno Inter-amerkeno de S a I u d Publics''
sells to the belt offeror the fol following
lowing following automobiles: A '51 Che
relet carry-all, a '51 Willys 'Sta 'Station
tion 'Station Wagon, a '51 Chevrolet Se Sedan.
dan. Sedan. Information concerning this
sale could be obtained at the
"Miniiterio de Prevision Social."
3rd Floor, office No. 302.
FOR SALE: Late 1954 Ford 8 8-passenger
passenger 8-passenger station wagon, 17,500
miles, excellent condition $1625,
Can be financed. House 8574,
Margarita. Phone 3-2175 or 3 3-1311.
1311. 3-1311. FOR SALE: 1950 Pontiac Cat Cat-alina
alina Cat-alina hardtop Sport Coupe, ei ei-cellent
cellent ei-cellent condition.. Phone 3-1606.
House 561 5-C Hodges, Diablo.
BARGAIN: 1955 BUICK SPE SPECIAL
CIAL SPECIAL 4-dr. Riviera Sedan, wsw
tubeless tires, dynaflow, Sono Sono-matic
matic Sono-matic radio, windthield washers,
complete safety group, 8500
miles. Can be financed. $2495.
Fort Clayton 2171, after 4 p.m.
6143.
FOR SALE: 1953 Chevrolet 4 4-door
door 4-door sedan, TTP, radio, excel excellent
lent excellent condition, $1050. Phone
87-2288
FOR SALE: 1953 Chevrolet
Tudor R & H, 18,000 miles,
$1015. Call Balboa 4197.
FOR SALE: '53 Pontiac Chief Chief-tain
tain Chief-tain Deluxe. Duty paid, radio,
mrater, back-up lights, foam
rubier cushions, directional sig signals,
nals, signals, excellent condition, Origin Original
al Original owner. Phone Panama 3 3-0898.
0898. 3-0898. FOR SALE: 1951 Naih Station
Wagon with radio, in good con condition,
dition, condition, $475. Via Porras 166.
FOR SALE: 1951 Studebaker
V-8 Commander 2-door, radio.
Phone Balboa 1713 early eve evenings.
nings. evenings. FOR SALE: 1950 Chevrolet 4 4-doer
doer 4-doer sedan, good condition,
clean, excellent paint, $450.
5435-A, Diablo, after 5 p.m. ...
FOR SALE: 1954 Ford 2-door
sedan, cadet blue. Call 6-739,
Gamboa.

Albrook Appears To Have
Clear-Gut Edge In Four
Individual Track Events

By CRYSTALL BALL
- Albrook AFB has clear cut
edge in our predictions for the four
individual track events in the Bal-
hna Tlplavs
In the field events,owever, the
Flyers will the going rougher. Our
predictions concerning the top
three places in the 100, high hurd hurdles,
les, hurdles, low hurdles and mile, put 1 1-brook
brook 1-brook ahead with 16 points, follow followed
ed followed by A- C. with 9, BUS 6. JC 3
and one each for Navy and Ma Marines.
rines. Marines. Curtis Jeffries is just about as
sure a winner as there is in the
entire 18-event program,. He will
be doing his stmt lor Junior Col College
lege College in the pole vault. After Jet Jet-fencs
fencs Jet-fencs the going gets difficult a
gain, but Studebaker from. Fort
Kobbe tied for second last' year
and is given the silver trophy for
1958. 1
There are so many unknown en entries
tries entries in the vault that accurate
predicting is impossible, but rum rumor
or rumor has it that Tito Giraldcz of the
A.C. is capable of 12 feet. If he
can hit this Friday night he will
be far better than the third place
we are giving him now.
Other boys who must be men
tioned as possible point winners
arc Aubrey Hake of Ft. Kobbe.
Bill Halvosa of BHS, and Boyce
Jark of Albrook. Injuries may
keep Clark out of the event, how however.
ever. however. That remarkable performer. No
el Gibson, will be around to de-
fend ms high jump title. Ever since
the first Relavs were run in 1950
the first Relays were run in 1950
Noel has been making the boys
really jump to beat him. Sure, he
is a year older, but it still looks
like Gibson for first.
Manuel Quezada of J.C., Bob
Lowe CHS, and Bill Coffey of BHS
will be pushing Gibson, but that is
the best they can do. There are
a host of military jumpers en entered,
tered, entered, but there is no information
on them, except for Ed Davis of
the Navy. He holds his college rec
rvA In the hiafi iumn an1 if ha la
w. in i. ..'few ji"r,
in condition he should take the ev event
ent event hands down. Grizaldez is to
be considered here, also but we
still say Gibson, with Quezada,
Lowe, Davis, and Giraldez tied for
second,
Hake is the only one of the 1955
place winners back in the broad
jump. The fort Kobbe soldier will
be hard to keep out of the top spot
this year, hut Leonard Travis and
Chris Fluellen of Albrook, Bil f
tofley of BHS. uibson of the A
Ci, and Bob Lowe from Cristobal
High will give hirr. a run for the
(up honors. It Ts a dangerous thing
riot to count Gibson in the finals
for he has a habit of making fin
als, but right now it looks like

iHakc, Travis, and Cofiey. The
i ....

PANAMA AMERICAN AS

OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES

LEWIS SERVICE
Ave. Tivoli So. 1
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
149 Central Ave.
FARMACIA LUX
. .64. Central Avenue.

FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Camera Rollieflei
2.8C with accessories and flash,
like new. Phone 3-6369 Pans Pans-ma.
ma. Pans-ma. -v-
CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC, Dr.
Leon C. Brathwaite. Office 2nd
Street Amador Guerrero 2006.
Telephone 3 1 2-A, Colon.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS VARIOUS ITEMS
FOR SALE
Sealed bids, for opening in pub public,
lic, public, wil( be received in the office
of Superintendent of Storehous Storehouses,
es, Storehouses, Balboa, for the following
items:
INVITATION No. 234 Cocks,
b f a i s connections, couplings,
valve disk, faucets, tube fitting!,
gaskets, and pipe fittings.. TO BE
OPENED 10:30 A.M., March
23. 1956.
INVITATION No. 239 Light Lighting
ing Lighting fixtures, floodlights, lamp
guards, lamp fixture parts, elec electric
tric electric lamps, street light parts,
annunicarors, signal vibrating
bells, bushings, drill parts, fueoi,
fuse elements, insulating mate material,
rial, material, and insulators. TO BE
OPENED 2:30 P.M., March 23,
1956.
Invitations may be obtained
from office of Superintendent of
Storehouses, telephone 2-1815.
FOR SALE: Beautiful violet
ioscs for Easter gifts and many
others. Phone 1464 Balboa
FOR SALE: 1 por.'able type typewriter
writer typewriter Royal, almost new $80;
1 course Spoken French, 24 rec records,
ords, records, $25; 1 tennis racket w-frame-and
cover, $8. Call 3 3-1017
1017 3-1017 mornings.
FOR SALE: Hallicrafters SX-71
communications receiver with
"Q" multiplier. Phone 5-500.
FOR SALE: Winter piano, al almost
most almost new. Tuned. Phone 3 3-5366.
5366. 3-5366. Ave. 7, Casa Propla, Co Coco
co Coco del Mar
WANTED
Automobiles
WANTED: To buy a pick-up
truck, good condition. Call Mar Margarita
garita Margarita 3-3256.
broad jump along with the shot
put, should produce some of the
most spirited competition in the
entire, meet.
Speaking of the shot put, track
and field fans will really be in for
a top show In the iron pill tossing
event Friday night. Seldom, if ev
er, has such t brilliant field been
assembled for the Balboa Re
lays. There are five known out
standing performers. These are
Lawrence Reeves, Kobbe, Charlie
Morris BHS, Bob Harms USMC,!
Chris Fluellen and John Clark of
Albrook. ;
All of these have been over 49
feet 4 inches which was the win winning
ning winning d i s t a n c el a s t year.
Harms took second last year, but
he hasn't been seen in practice
this year, tso it is impossible to tell
what kind of condition he is. in,
Reeves, a 310 pound giant, goes
over 50 feet regularly, with Fluel-
len not far off the pace. In spite
of Harms defeat of fluellen last
year, we will pick Fluellen to fin finish
ish finish in second righUbehind Reeves.
Really going out on a limb now,
we string alont with Charlie Mor Morris,
ris, Morris, the top school boy shot put putter
ter putter since the days of Tommy Hugh Hughes,
es, Hughes, to beat Harms out of third.
This will make BHS and Charlie
Mnrris' tiffht hannv.
The last of the field events, the
discus, will feature many of the
men also seeing action in me snot.!
Fluellen got second last year,:
and with tire defending champ not
coming back, he is favored to get
first m 1956. He has many tnrows
well over 130 feet this season. Dor Dor-man
man Dor-man Fulton, who has shown tre
mendous improvement in recent
weeks looks like the closest threat
to Fluellen, so we say Fulton of
BHS second, and John Clark also
of Albrook third.
Three other men who are cap
able of getting points in the plat platter
ter platter spinning are Reeves, Jim Des Des-Londes
Londes Des-Londes of BHS, and Harms, but
to date they don't have the per performances
formances performances the others do.
In spite of the tough going the
r lyers nave now moveu ineir i.i.
vantage on paper up to 28 points
while the A.C. is next with 15, Ft
Kobbe 13, BHS 11, J.C 8, Navy
1 W, and CHS Is. Next will come
the all important relays. These
fnnr events will decide the even
tual winner, not only on paper but
actually.
The box office will open at 6 p.m.
Friday to tickets can be secure
without a long wait in line ior inos.e
whn want to cet there early. Open
ling ceremoney is at 7 p.m. First
events" at 7:30rwhile'mia!tfyinr m
the 100, both nurdles, high jump
pole Vault, board jump, snot pu
and discus win ce nem rnnay ai-

tcrnoon. t

INDLFENBEXT DAILY SL SPATES

U:5::cj
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE: At Santa Clara,
chalet "El Pino," 7200 square
meters, $5,500 cash. 4 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, 3 baths, living room,
dining room, kitchen. House
completely furnished. Tiled floors.
Call Panama mornings 2-0027,
afternoons 3-4603.
FOR SALE: House with 3 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, bath, parlor-dining room,
kitchen, garage. 6th Avenue No.
12, San Francisco de la Caleta.
information: Camilo A, Porras,
43rd Street No 44, Bella Vista.
Wanted to Buy
WANTED TO BUY: t- Smooth
tires, suitable for reconstruction.
Reconstructora Naciortal, Peru
Ave. 7. Phone 2-0406.
WISH TO BUY tropical fish,
good price. Phone 3-4976.
Sunshine Melts
Snow-Battered
Eastern Coast
NEW YORK, March 21 (UP)-
i Spring sunshine cleared acres, of:
isnow from the storm-battered e'astj
coast today and the activity of the i
J nation's bigges city returned to'
j 90 per cent o; normal.
Streets and highways werej
cleared, schools reopened, busi business
ness business perked up and public trans transportation
portation transportation facilities resumed regu regular
lar regular schedules.
Temperatures rose toward the
40's in New York City for the
first time in more than week
and weathermen predicted the
sun would clear most of the let
and snow from road surface
not already- tcreped clean by
thousands of workers.
New. York t' sanitation commis commissioner
sioner commissioner Andrew W. Mulrain report'
ed every street in the fiye bo bo-by
by bo-by 6 a.m. today. He predicted all
traces of the 14 inch weekend
snow would be gone by Saturday.
Public and parochial schools
throughout the metropolitan a-
rea were ordered reopened today
afterx being closed for two days
and nearly a million and a half
students trooped back to their
classrooms.
Business firms and merchants
reported that activitiy yesterday
rose to 66 per cent oi norma, al almost
most almost twice what it had been the
day before. They said business
volume should easily increase to to-dav
dav to-dav to 90 per cent of normal.
Subways, buses, and commuter
trains resumed normal schedules
today with few exceptions.
' Most transit authorities called
the restored service miracle of
recovery from one of the worst
transportation snarls in the his history
tory history of New York. v
Congressmen
To Cuba To Valch
Ilavy Mom Maneuver
'.WASHINGTON, March 21 (UP)
About 80 Congressmen packed
summer gear today for a flight to
Cuba where they will see what the
Navy is doing about guided mis-
siles and A-bombs.
The group will spend a day
each aboard the guided missile
ship Boston and the supercarrier
Forrestal, operating out of Guan-
tanamo Bay. Some members of
the party will return late Friday
and others Saturday.
From the deck of the Boston
the lawmakers will see the Navy
missile, Terrier, fire at d r 0 n e
' . ....
planes mues away ana wousanas
01 ieet in ine ir. it 111 goes wen
the obsolete planes will be blast blasted
ed blasted to bits.
On the Forrestal, the N v y's
newest, biggest carrier, the House
and Senate members will watch
flight demonstrations including a
mock, low-level attack with A A-bombs,
bombs, A-bombs, delivered by a new meth method.
od. method. -V.. ..
Departure from National A i r r-port
port r-port was tentatively set for 1 p.m.
The advance passenger list in included
cluded included several women members
of the House, who were advised
to bring cocktail dresses for a re
ception tomorrow night.
Visiting Chaplain
Speaks Friday At
USO-JWB Center
Chaplain Joshua L. Goldbere
Captain, CHC, USNR, District
uiapiaro, inira JNavai District
New York, will be the euest soeak-
er at evening services Friday at
7:T0 p.m. in the Chanel at the
i-"j-jwb Armed Forces Service
Center. Rabbi Nathan' Within will
officiate.
A-wdiaHwvitatintr is extended
to military personnel and their
families, and to the public of the
Canal Zone and the Republic1 of

ranama 10, auenu the services.
, 1 :':

Qc:w?$n?GC:ticS '.,.., I

AT 57 "H" STREET,

HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
J. t'co. it la Ossa Ave. No. 41
FOTO DO MY
Just Aroumena Ave. and 31 SC
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS
St Street S. S3

Apartments
ATTENTION G. I.I Just built
modern furnished aaertments, I,
2 bedrooms, hot, cold sv 1 0 t.
Phone Ponama 3-4941.
FOR RENT:- Modirn furnished
apartment. Will sell furniture
cheap. Justo Arosemene Avenue
97, Apartment 4.
FOR RENT: Furnished I -bedroom
apartment, complete with
linen, dinnerware and hot wa water.
ter. water. For further information call
Panama 2-2835 between 8:30
a.me and 5:30 p.m.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment
ment apartment $50. American neighbors.
Phone 3-0471.
FOR RENT; Best location, 2 2-bedreom
bedreom 2-bedreom apartment with I arge
balcony, but stop. Call 3-0934.
FOR RENT: One 2-bedroom
.apartment, hot water, furnished,
unfurnished, near Hotel El Pan Pan-ama.
ama. Pan-ama. Apply 2034 7th Ave. Es Es-pane
pane Es-pane (Sabanasl. Phone 3-5692
after 6 p.m.
FOR RENT: Unfurnished apart apart-s
s apart-s ment at exclusive "El Cangreje."
2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, din-ing-living
room, maid's room
with bath, garage. Phone, busi business
ness business hours, 2-0321; Sundays 2 2-'3525.
'3525. 2-'3525. FOR RENT: Vacation quarters,
April 30 June 30, completely
furnished new 2-bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Linen, dishes, etc., all fcr
price of normal rent; maid serv service
ice service available. Phone Panama 3 3-6572.
6572. 3-6572. FOR RENT: In chalet, private
apartment completely furnished.
Kitchen utensils and linen, one
bedroom, living room, pa rcli, 1
dining room, garage, garden, hot
' water, G.I. inspected. 9th Street
No. 47, San Francisco, near but
stop. ?
FOR RENT: Furnished apartr
ment $50 American neighbors.
Phone 3-0471.
FOR RENT: Ju'njshed orun-;1
Jurimhed oht-ifeedrciom modern V
apartment, garage. 168 Via Be Be-tisario
tisario Be-tisario Porras.''
FOR RENT: Two furnished a a-partments,
partments, a-partments, $55 and $65. Mili Military
tary Military inspected. Via Porras 99,
Phone 3-2068.
FOR RENT: 1 -bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, good location, 32nd Street
No. 4-08, corner Ave. Justo Ar Ar-osemena.
osemena. Ar-osemena. Phono 3-1179.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, living room bedroom. Fac Facing
ing Facing Hotel El Panama, Call 3 3-1179
1179 3-1179 between 9-12 mernings,
3-6 evenings.
Ilavy RevealsIIew
Plans For Man-Made
Earth Satellite
NEW YORK, March 21 (UP (UP-The
The (UP-The Navy has disclosed new de details
tails details on plans for the first man man-made
made man-made earth satellite a relative relatively
ly relatively tiny object about the size of a
bowling ball.
Details on the history making
scientific project were revealed
last night at a symposium be before
fore before the Institute of Radio Engi Engineers
neers Engineers in New York.
Dr. John P. Hagen, who Is di directing
recting directing the satellite project tot
the Naval Research Laboratory,
said the satellite will be shot In Into
to Into space by a three-stage rock rocket.
et. rocket. 72 feet long and 45 inches In
diameter at Its widest point.
Drawings of the flnless rocket
indicate it will resemble a giant
rifle cartridge.
U.S. plans to launch 13 earth
satellites during the 1957-58 In International
ternational International Geophysical year
and hopes to have the first one
clrcllne the globe by Sept. 30
1 nan rm 1 a. j .iu.j ....
ijjj. hip tockps acsinoca yn
terdav is designed to carry the
satellite to its orbit, which will
sweep as far from the earth a.
1500 miles and as close as 200
miles.. : ''. :
Along The Fairways
GOLFING COSSIP FBOM
THE
AMADOR LADIES
Irene Robinson won the Blind;
Bogey Tournament at Fort Ama
dor last Thursday with a net 73.
Harriet Serger won low gro with
an 80. Marian Tubus, Hannah
Clarke and Alyce French were in
a three way tie for second place.
tiobbi Uugnes won low putts.
In the Spring Handicap Tourni Tourni-ment,
ment, Tourni-ment, championship flight. Bobbi
Hughes will play Betty Hayter in
the finals. In the first flight, Wil Williams
liams Williams will play Serger. In tu con consolation
solation consolation flight the matches ire
Schull ts. Dilvcr and Morris vi,
Fish.
Captive Audience
MIAMI, March 21 (VP) -Druggist
R. W, James reported
that two hooded bandits held
htnTTapttrr End watrriP'f'telryH
slon until his wife came home
with his store's receipts.
Then the gunmen tied up the
couple and left with the money.

PANAMA

FARMACIA EL BATURRO
, Parqua Lelevr 7 Street
FARMACIA "SAS"
Via Ferras 111
NOVEDADES ATHIS
; Via Espana Ave.-
FOR RENT
Houses
, FOR RENT: Chalet unfurnish unfurnished:
ed: unfurnished: 2 bedrooms, office, servant's
room, and all modern facilities.
Near La Salle Cortege, El Can Can-grejo.
grejo. Can-grejo. Call 3-1312 between 5
p.m. and 7 p.m.
FOR RENT: Chalet: two bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, bath, porch, living room,
dining roe m, kitchen, maid's
room and bath. Aquiline de la
Guardia No. 24. Phono 2-1878.
FOR RENT: Chalet: 3 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, in Parque Lefevre. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone 2-0364, Gelabert Office.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet,
two bedrooms, refrigerator, ga garage,
rage, garage, garden. 18th Street No. 8,
San Francisco.
FOR RENT
Hooms
FOR RENTs Furnished room in
family home near Hotel El Pan Panama
ama Panama with independent entrance
and service, garage and tele telephone.
phone. telephone. To gentleman only. 52nd
Street No. 10, apartment 3.
Wanted Position
PRACTICAL NURSE, specialii specialii-ing
ing specialii-ing in care of aged and children,
seeks employment. Call (-512
after 7 p.m.
Plane-Train Trip
To Banana Farms
Slated Fcr April 8
A one day plane-train tfin has
been planned by the National
Tniiriur Uiifre'iti it VnnniMn AA
nnfafinn urith i v, rit l a

ivwmi train mc VUU 1UIU jVlQlJU' ..l ... .. .,
Co. to the banana plantations atiwnh. ,s,rf,tinn fro. service at the

Almirante for Sunday, April 8.
The Chartered DC
will leave Tocumen
a.m. for a 1350-mne trip
del Toro where a launch will be
boarded for Almirante, an hour's
boat trip. There will be a!1 brief
stopover at Almirante, the head headquarters
quarters headquarters for the Chiriqui Land Co.
and the scene of the beautiful Chi Chiriqui
riqui Chiriqui lagoon, before boarding the
tram for an all day trip through
the banana farms. It time per.
mits, the trip will procedd to Six Six-aola,
aola, Six-aola, the border town between Pa
nama and Costa Rica, where there
will be an opportunity to cross in
to the neighboring country to post
mail,
In order to have ample time for
sightseeing and photography on the
banana plantations, it is suggested
that those going bring picnic
lunches. Stopovers will be made
at the various banana loading
platforms. - .-
The cost of the one-day excur
sion. which covers all transport
tion, is $25. Military personnel

..irS wHSF1 Jan Duggan; Edward Duke Duke-call
call Duke-call the USO JWB Armed hart. Mr nd M R p rdt
Service Center, B a 1 b 0 a Mrs Ka B Fulle Wm c. Frank.

should
Forces
1072.
Angus Ward Quits
As US Ambassador
To Afghanistan
WASHINGTON. March 21 (UP)
Vetran Hinlnmat Anffue Ward.
one of the first Americans to ex-
perience the tyranny of Red Chi
na, is retiring. :
Ward resigned yesterday as U.
S. Ambassador to Afghanistan to
devote his "remaining years to
private pursuits'
'- -" .-. v'
The veteran of 31 years in the
foreign service was jailed for one
month bv the Red Chinese in 1949
while he was American Consul
General at Mukden. He described
his treatment as "Hellish."
President Eisenhower told the
63-ycar-old diplomat In 1 letter
that he accepted his resignation
"with reluctance" and "with
sense of real regret."
"You have served your country
with true distinction in arduous
and challenging assignments," the
President said, "and .have won for
yourself the admiration and confi confidence
dence confidence of the people in the coun-
tries to which you have been a s-
signed as well as of your fellow
citizens."
Mr, Eisenhower nominated Shcl Shcl-ton
ton Shcl-ton T. Mills, present U.S. Ambas Ambassador
sador Ambassador to Ecuador, to succeed
Ward at the Afghan Post.
Ward's arrest by the commu communists
nists communists shocked the nation and crys crys-talizml
talizml crys-talizml American public pinion a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the Red regime In China.
Rolling Phrases
': MILWAUKEE. Wll March 21
(UPl Urail Wllliarrvi, 42. was
accused yesterday of owning a
tambllntt device four pain of
dice Initialed "U.W," but pro-
tewtid hi ufld tht dice oniy in
I ilirtwt
"t imtiflr tiint'a the reason
for the initials," JiK'ue P'birt
VV, Hnen coiritiieiited,- "Tliey
mum LVd 11 Vsuk'zar).'

T I.DNF.SDA Y, MARC H 21. 15

'.' ti
cJ Al
MINIMUM
FOU
12 WORDS
RESORTS
Baldwin' furnished apartments
t Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Smith, Balboa 3681.
Gramlich'a Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modern conveniences,
moderate sates. Phone Gamboa
6-441. .. ...
Shrapnel's furfllsked houses en
beecb et Santa Clere. Telephone
Thompson, lalbeo 1772.
FOSTER S COTTAGES. One mil
past Casino. Lew rates. Phone
Bolbe !S6f.
PHILLIPS Qceenside Cottage.
Santa Clara, (m 435, Belbea.
Phone Paname 3-1877. Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-1673.
WANTED
. Houses
AMERICAN FAMILY needs 4 4-bedroom
bedroom 4-bedroom or combination 3 and
1 -bedroom house or apartment.
Bella Vista preferably. Phono 3-
6492.
LESSONS
EXPERIENCED, processor teaches
Spanish to foreigners. Apply:
"Gloriole" Building, apartment
II. telephone 3-6553.
Medern plan lessens taught.
Lessons in your home or studio.
2EZ BENNETT, Phon 2-1282.
Panama Line
Sailing
PANAMA LINE SAILING RUNO-
fcugene C. Lombard, Executive
i secretary ox the Panama Canal.
nv vi maiiii, wixi iur new
York Saturday aboard the Panama

3 Copa plana ijnc?f Hf-be accom accom-'
' accom-' Airport at 7P.fed. Mrk- 40mb4rd-
trip to Bocashr;u;''T,.lJi!::L;..':V:::;V

The Panama is scheduled to sail
with 9 passengers- for New York
and eight passengers for Port-au-Prince,
Haiti. :
Passengers booked for Port-au-Prince
include Mrs. Clay Bartlett;
Mr., and Mrs. Henry M. Berliner
and two children; Mrs. Frederick
Beers; Mrs. Robert Piel and Louis
Riordan. .,,
The complete advance passenger
list for New York follows:
Harold I. Anderson; Mr. and
Mrs. Theodore L. Bailey, and son;
Mrs. Russell Bailey; Mr. and Mrs.
Robert W. Bayle; Mr. and Mrs.
Paul D. Barnard; William Belling Bellinger;
er; Bellinger; Mr. and Mrs, Raymond Brown;
Miss Marion Brown; Mr. and Mrs.
Allan B. Cook;. Mr. and Mrs. A. I.
Cook; Mr. and Mrs. John Conzel Conzel-man;
man; Conzel-man; Mr." and Mrs. Robert E.
Dawn; Mr. and Mrs. John C.
Dean; Mrs. Constance D e g e n:
lin and. son; Mr. and Mrs. Paul
C. Glaros ana six' children; Mr.
and Mrs. T.- M. Gopsill; Mr. and
Mrs. T. M. Gopsill, Jr.; Frank A.
Hartman; Mr. and Mrs. Paul H
ner; Richard A. Jamison; Miss
Cynthia Jennison; and Dr. and
Mn. Robert K. Johnson.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kalb; Mr.
and Mrs. Jerome Katzman; Mr.
anu Mrs. fi. H. tuieoensiein; Mrs,

Gloria Kohnstamm; Mr. and Mrs.
John Kozar; Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
C. Lombard; Donald S. McKinlay;
Mr. and Mrs. George C. Manning;
Mr. and Mrs.- Matthew T. Mor Morgan;
gan; Morgan; Miss Christine M. Mosler;
Mr. and Mrs. William Oaks; Dr.
and Mrs. George Papen; Mr. and
Mrs. George H. Richards; Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrason Riggs; Dr. and
Mrs. Saul Ritchie; Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore J. De Sabla; Mr." and
Mrs; C. Victor Sammett. Sr.r Wii
iiam D. Schultz; Dr. and Mrs. Mar Mar-co
co Mar-co Shcppe; Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Wesley-Sparling
Sparling Wesley-Sparling and two children; Mr.
and Mrs. Sceva Speare; Earl V.
Stoody; Mr. and Mrs. Andrew M.
Underhill; Mf. and Mrs, John L.
Whigam, and Archibald L. Wright.

Brush Off
TOKYO. March 21 (UP) The
government-operated Japan Na National
tional National Railway yesterday order
ed car stewards t6 refrain from
brushing passengers' coats or
shining shoes unless asked.
Officials said tne directive was
designed to discourage tipping.
it
By th time you or obi not to
cor what people soy about you.
nobody says onything,
MA

UMhftfcftF. jlH

i



!-

W I DNESDAY, MARC H !1, 1?8

CAHTOL10
Spanish Double!
TFSORO DE LA
1SLA pE Pl.VOS
- Plus:
I.A MF.SERA DEL
CAFE DEL PIERTO

KEEPING BABY WARM A baby eh- elephant gets S
babushka wrapped around its head to protect large ears from the e"rude Lazarus, ana tymnia wu
cold weather in ChUago, 111. Tying the cloth is Arthur Boiler.. i. Th ,n,ijn fanR on Her Her-left.
left. Her-left. and Earl Anderson, as trainer Mac WacDonald stands by. ; "2 JK "Kyi the Jart of

JOLLY

MOVIES TV RADIO
' by Erskine Johnson

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Hol Hollywood
lywood Hollywood and Grapevine: Hollywood's
striking back at the nation's scan scandal
dal scandal magazines. A' '-new ; movie,
'Scandal, Indorporated," will turn
the celluloid heat on the expose ed editors
itors editors . Opening of the Cannes
International Film Festival; has
been postponed until April 23. The
April 10 opening it was -decided,
would be competing with the Grace
Kelly-Prince Rainier marriage.: V;
Thin'i in tyobrow-liftor eom eom-ina
ina eom-ina for movio fans who can romom-
bor Hollywood's first 1,000,000
movi back In tht '30'i. C. B. Do
Millo is preparing an announct-j
mont that his iO,000,oon "Tnt ion
Commandmonts" contains ONE
SEQUENCE that cost $1,000,000.
It's eight minutes of special ef effects
fects effects film showing the parting of
the Red Sea. The studio used 50
tons of a gelatin dessert on the
job. ''
. "THE SINNER," Italian film
starring Ruth (Roman, may not
be released in the U.S. There's too
much of Ruth showing on the
screen ; Nancy Valentine, back
i in the actress, arena after three
years as a religious disciple, is
insisting on nice-girl roles. She
makes her comback in a Jane
Wyman telefilm, "Echo of the
Past."

Arthur Treacher, the sereen'sjin the lead, it could have been a
onetime perfect butler, now plays, click. .
everything from heroes to villains
in tv nd snnDlements his incomei Rav Boleer. who gave up with

five months a year by playing
women's clubs in a one-man act
he calls "A Little of This, Some
thing of That." Answering qucs

tions about show business lor ine for sponsorship nexi season.
ladies always gives him a laugh, i
The two questions he s almost al-j, Marcia Duff
vavs -asked, 'he says, are:- Esta naci6 en Colon el 28 de
"Do I know Marilyn Monroo and Enero. Margo es una eficicnte ven ven-will
will ven-will radio comt backo" dora de la tiendita, gran deportis-
Ita. Adcmas de equivocarse siem-
DAWN ADDAMS, who 1 1 11 1 pre en todo. se la pasa cantando

noias ner cnusu Munwaup v
spite her marriage to Italian
Prince Vittorio Massimo, Is being
lashed by Lonaon scnoes iur hii-
pcaring in a movie titled, "London
Calling North Pole" in Rome. They

"WRAPPED" FOR FRESHNESS Double yolks are not too
unusual in chicken eggs, but double shells are. This egg, laid

by a h"n at Hastings, Ontario,
ruler shownt'"wasvt wo Inc
protective covering, 'the smaller

TIVOU
35c. 20c.
BANK NIGHT!
Dan Duryea, in'
CHICAGO
CALLING
- Plus:
THE FIGHTER

CEFJTOALThcntr0
75c. 40c.
ACTION PICTURE RELEASE!
STERLING HAYDEN
and VERA RALSTON
in
TIMBERJACK
Shows: 12:55, 2:38, 4:45, 8:52, 9:00

f
I
I
I
j
J
I
claim that the movie, which tells
how the German secret service
outguessed British intelligence men
during World War II, is anti-Brit
ish. iler co-star in the movie is
Curt Jureens, the German star
recently signcdby Hollywood.
.3A;.big;ltudid.,i)oss finally, is ad admitting
mitting admitting TY can ke competition for
movies.. .. u ...
"But .only for inferior movies,"
says Y. Frank Freeman, head of
Paramount. "There is no way that
TV can compett with graat mo-
tion picturos."
Lauren Bacall lost the second
reminme leaa in maruyn wonroe s
Bus 'Stop" because of hubby
Humphrey Bogart's next, "Melville
Goodwin, U.S.A." Both films are
starting at the same time
Julie London, ex-wife of Jack
Webb, has joined Judy Garland
in the race for the Helen Morgan
filmbiography ... Edgar Bergen
is adding two more dummies to
his "Do You Trust Your Wifee"
act on TV.
SPEAKING CF Marilyn, and
who doesn't, has it ever been
pointed out that she was risjht in
turning down both "Pink Tights"
and "How to Be Very Very Pop Pop-ular"6
ular"6 Pop-ular"6 The first script was shelved
and the latter didn't do too well
at the box office. But with Marilyn
i his telefilm series, wants back on
TV wiLh a live show titled "Wash
ington Square." He's put an,58f.-
jooo weekly price tag on the show
, jyu uiuuiu uu'w
Mtlba Goniilox
Chitreana limpia. Debi6 naccr el
14 de Mayo, pero se atrasd un dia.
JT"'
1
i
has such double protection, i ne
egg was grade A.

jflQJ

TOE

SI. Joseph Players
Star l.'orma Brown
In Passion Play
"Thy Will Be Done, the Pas-)
sion-time stage play to be present-!
ed by the St. Joseph Players, will:
star Miss Norma Brown as con-!
stancia. j
The play will run for three con-i t
secutive nights: March 26 at the!'
Paraiso Theatre and March 27
and 28 at St. Joseph's Church Hall;
in Colon. Tickets are now on sale i
i Qnrl tha rlAmQnH ie Cllfh Ihflt tno.!
cial arrangements are being madej
to accomodate an overflow crowd, j
With the leading role being play-1
ed by Miss Brown, the completei
cast of this play is adding finesse;
to the different parts. The players
were carefully screened and au-t
ditioned before their selection. This
presentation of the St. Joseph!
Players is under the direction of I
Father John King. j

umer lemaies piaying important
J roles are Dorothy Bennet, who
" plays the part of Sarah, and Mar Mar-.
. Mar-. -5 jorie Cummings, who plays Esther.
. Supporting these are Violet Ram-

(alius, Const at. -ia s husband, and
Verne Richard.., acting as Elias,
Sarah's lover. The male support
ing cast will include Carlos Lazu-
rus, little Raymond Cameron, Her
bert Holt, Ronnie Malcolm, Val
Sterling and Lloyd Bovell. j
Arrangements are completed for
the -Pacific presentation of thisj
play at the Paraiso theatre oni
Monday. Tickets for this staging
are on sale and may be purchas-i
ed from any member of the Parai-;
so parish.
AF Orders Cutback
In Production
Of Jhunf:rstre!(s
'
WAMUNi.ruN, warcn zi. my)
-The AirTorce today ordered
iu per ceni cuioacK in me prouue prouue-tion
tion prouue-tion of ;Thunderslreak jet fighters
at the strike-bound Republic A A-viation
viation A-viation Corn, plant at Farming-
da'c, N, Y. -. i-.-;-i
It was estimated that the cut
back would amount to from 250 to
300 airplanes, with a combined
value of 100 million dollars.
The Air Force said the reduced
rate of production would go into
effect in March 1957. It said the
cutback would mean an overall
reduction of "approximately 10
per cent" in the total number of
planes already produced and on
order from the plant. , ;
A spokesman said there was no
connection between the cutback
and the strike of the Internation International
al International Association of Machinists which
has been gohu on since last Feb.
19. ..!''' 1 -i. .i-.-
The Air Force said it has "re "re-anDraised"
anDraised" "re-anDraised" its need for the Thun-
dcrstreak in the light of later mod
el supersonic jets now on order.
Aussie Physicians
Announce Invention
01 'Oxygenator'
MELBOURNE, Australia
March 21 (UP-Three Australian
physicians announced today they
have invented an "oxygenator"!
machine they claim will enable
surgeons to stop the human heart
for 30 minutes during an opera operation.
tion. operation. The doctors sud the previous long
est period of heart stoppage ef effected
fected effected safely during operations was
10 minutes.
The nhvsicians are Dr. Trevor
Currier anaesthetist at tho Royal
Melbourne Hospital, ana urs. ii.
M. Cass and Margaret McClelland,
members of the staff of the Royal
Children's Hospital.
Thpv said thev collaborated In
constructing the "oxygenator"
which acts as i heart by pumping
blood from the patient, passing
oxygen through it and them pump pumping
ing pumping the blood back into the per person
son person
2 Jsl Fli:rs Die
Alter Percchiiiing
Into lev Vto
REYKJAVIK, Iceland, March 21
(UP) Two American air men
died of exposure yesterday after
tney paracnuiea into cnuppy -y
waters from their crippled Scor?
pion jet plane a mile offshore.
Both men were unconscious
when taken from the water an
hour later by Icelandic .fishing
boats. They die shortly afterwards
Their U.S. Air Force F-89 Scor Scor-pion
pion Scor-pion all-weathe fighter ran into
trouble at 16,00t feet. The-pilot and
observer parachuted.
from Greenlam sighted the two
airmen in the sea and notified Ice Ice-landic
landic Ice-landic fishing boats. y

PANAMA AMERICAN AN

LUX THEATRE
"5c. 40c.
PRE-RELEASE! You will see a
picture of very special greatness!
Jane WY.UAN and Van JOHNSON
in
MIRACLE IN THE RAIN
Shows: 3:15, 5:00, 7:05, 9:08 p.m.'

COL. ROBERT R. ROBERTSON (left), director of the Inter
American Geodetic Survey at Fort Clayton, is shown receiving
the Order of the Paclflcador from Gen. Angelo Mendes- de
Moraes of Brazil. : ; ',
The Order of the Paclflcador, the highest honor awarded
by the Brazilian government to representatives of other coun countries,
tries, countries, was presented by Mendes de Moraes to the colonel for
services rendered to the Brazilian Army. The medal was given
on behalf of the Minister of War of the Republic of the United
States of Brazil. ?
During a recent inspection tour of LAGS projects in South
America, Robertson was also presented with the highest wards
of Chile and Peru the "Military Medal of the Army" for dis distinguished
tinguished distinguished services rendered by LAGS to the Army of Chile in
connection with the Joint cartographic program, the "Military
Order of Ayacucho" in the grade of "Officer" for merits at attained
tained attained in connection with the LAGS program In Peru.
In addition, Robertson has previously been awarded honors
by the Republic of Colombia, the Republic of Ecuador and the
Republic of Bolivia, during his tour as director of IAGS.

860 Young, Old Show People
Attend Fred Alien s funeral

NEW YORK,,, March 21 (UP)
Comedian Fred Allen was buried
yesterday, mourned by show folk!

both old and young, and py meioooK, '-Treaamiu o .vonvion v;
fams he kent lauiihing through the! NBC casting director Martin Beg-

i years.
Allen, who dropped dead at 61
on a Manhattan street while out
walking alone Saturday night, re received
ceived received the final tribute of his
priest, his friends and his griev-j
ing widow at a nign requiem mass
sung in the church were he was
married and where he worsnippea
every Sunday. ',.
St. Malachy'j Roman Catholic
Church, known as the "actor s
church" because it is in the heart
of the Broadway theater district,
was filled to overflowing for the
45-minute service.
In addition to 800 persons crowd crowded
ed crowded in the church, there were 700
shivering ort the snow-banked side sidewalk
walk sidewalk outside, gathered to pay their
last respects to the man who was
known as the sharpest wit and
softest touch on Broadway.
Portland Hoffa, a former dancer
who married the baggy-eyed for
mer juggler In 1927, walked with
head erect ana eyes dry down the
church aisle behind her husband's
unadorned brown casket. She was
escorted by comedian Jack Hailey,
an old friend.
Mrs. Allen and her husband had
been almost inseparable during;
marriage. They appeared together
on the radio, witn ner snrin "Hel "Hello,
lo, "Hello, Mr. Allen,'" setting off his fa
mous hour-long NBC program
"Town Hall Tonight" for a decade,
And at the funeral were some
of the other oil occupants of "Al "Allen's
len's "Allen's Alley," There was Kenny Del-
mar, the "Senator uagnorn ol
Allen's skit's spoofing Congress,
and Jack Pearl, the "Baron Mun
chausen" of radio fame.
The honorarj pallbearers were
Alton Cooke of the New York
World-Telegram and Sun; Donald
Voorhees, who conducted the or-

SUOWISG AT YOVR SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TONWllTl

BALBOA 6:15 3:20
AIK-CONUITIIINED
1
" as the
avalanche
i of fury

they sailed...

Mint Icchnlcaler
Also Showinf TlllRSDAVt
FARAISO
l)rri DAV
1:15 8:48
EAVE ME"
IT
"LOVE ME OR LEAVE
SANTA CRUZ
"DAWN AT
6:15 7:40
ROCOHRO"
Ind Coioneli"
Klnd IkaiU A

INDErE.NDL.VT PAILI NEWSPAFES

DRiVE-IF! Tiiesire
60c. 30c.
' Popular Night! $1.10- PER CAR!
SPENCER TRACY and
ERNEST BURGNINE
:;'?.;-. in ;
BAD DAY AT BAD ROCK

chestra that played on AUen's ol.
show; cartoonist Al Hirschfeld
who drew tlie cover for Allen's
icy, ana uncie Jim narKins, an
old-time vaudeville performer.
There were no flowers in the
church and no eulogy was deliv delivered.
ered. delivered. The only time Allen was
mentioned came at the end of the
mass when Msgr. James O'Reil
ly, pastor of the church, prayed for
him, ending with the pnrase,
"May his soul rest in peace."
New Walkouts
Hit Denmark
COPENHAGEN, March 21 (UP)
An estimated 45,000 more work'
ers walked out today in a growing
stride that is crippling Denmark
The new "walkouts brought the
number of strikers in the three
day movement to at least 75,000.
The strikes, spearheaded by trans
port and construction workers,
created shortages of food and fuel.
ANNIVERSARY ST AM P P-Thls
Thls P-Thls is one of three new Lux Luxembourg
embourg Luxembourg stamps honoring the
European Coal and SteeJ Com Community.
munity. Community. The stamps will be
issued Aug, lo to mark four
years since the establishment
of the Community's authority
n Luxembourg.
DIABLO UTS. 6:13 7:40
Frank Lovejoy,
Cathy O'DONNEIX
"MAD AT THE WORLD"
Tliiir."HaitnChrlMlaii Andtwtn"
GAMBOA 7:00
"BOTf from OKLAHOMA"
FrI. "Bobbr Ware I MiMlnf"
-rmm un m i -nt t
MARGARITA :15 7:40
Nevllla BRAND
Arthur FRANZ
"Bobby Ware I? Missing"
t m
Thun. JMARRVME AGAIN"
CRISTOBAL 6:15 8:20
Alr-Cundllioaeri
' Joan CRAWFORD
Barry SULLIVAN
"QUEEN BEE"
Thurs. "THIS ISLAND EARTH"
II
I I
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LA HOCA
1M
HocK HUDSON
"BENGAL BRIGADE"
CAJ
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MASTKRSON OF KANSAS'
nd S ATVRD ATS HERO

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6c. 30c.
FOR ADULTS ONLY! The French
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WOMEN OF THE NIGHT
with FRANCOISE ARNOVL
Plus: Another Exciting Feature, .:!

Sponsorships Still
Being Received
For Girls SI ale
Sponsorships and contributions
are still being received for Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Girls State which will be held
from March 22 to 29.
As the final plans are prepared
for this program, donations or
sponsorships are still needed.
Organizations or individuals who
wish to participate may send their
checks to the treasurer, Bertha
B. Brown. Box 2846, Cristobal, C.
Z., payable to Caribbean Girls
State.
Additional sponsorships have
been received as follows: B.P.O.E.
Cristobal C.Z. Lodge No. 1542: A-
merican Legion Auxiliary. Aruba
Esso Unit No. 1; American Legion
Auxiliary,; Panama Canal Unit No.
1; Lnited States Citizen s Asso
ciation; Panama and Canal Zone
Automobile Club; Panama Chap Chapter
ter Chapter No. 35, National Sojourners;
Voiture Locale No. 89; Cristobal
Emblem Club No. 52; Young Men a
Christian Association: C.Z. Central
Labor Union and Metal Trades
Council; Daughters of the Ameri
can Revolution; Mrs. Mary E.
Becker; Mrs. Alice Pincus; Mrs.
Robert Leight; Mrs. Earl Orr;
Mrs. Gilbert Morland: Mr. and Mr
C. E. Staples; Mr. and Mrs. Al
bert F. Daniel,
US Asia Diplomats
End Annual Heeling
On Oplimislic Hole
TOKYO, March 21 (UP) A A-merican
merican A-merican diplomats in Asia ended
their annual conference today on
a note of optimism despite the. "still j
powerful threa of Communist ag- j
gression."
Chiefs of U.S. diplomatic mls-
sions in 15 far eastern nations and
colonies issued, a comwunioue'
which spoke of "a general feeliftg1
of confidence" in non-Communist!
Asia .;
They spent three davs reviewing
the "present situation in Asia, the
progress made over the past yean
and the prospects for the future," I
their brief communique said.
ine U.S. diplomats said they
were impressed by the "growing
strength and vigor" of defensive
pacts and by "increasing associ association
ation association and practical cooperation a-
mong free Asuti nations.
The meeting revealed," the com communique
munique communique said, "a general feeling
of confidence based on the politic
al, social and economic advances
made during the year in the free
countries of Asia, the growing
strength and vigor of collective
security efforts against the still
powerful threat of Communist ag
gression and the developing sense
of partnership in free Asia.
British Tug Races
To Rescue Damaged
Panamanian Vessel
LONDON, March 21 (UP)- The
British tug Turmoil today raced
to the aid of the Panamanian ship
Universo which suffered a damag-i
ed rudder in, trie North Atlantic, i
The Universe, en route from.
Hampton Roads, Virginia, to Eng-i
land, radioed a call for help early ;
today reporting "serious damage"!
to the rudder.

Al All im Zona, Army, ilavy, and

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DISTINGUISHED HOSTS AND GUESTS AT FRENCH EMBASSY RECEPTION 0 Zr7,

'General Beigade and Mme. Penette was attended by a large number of high ranking government and Canal
Zone officials as well as diplomats. Let to right are Mme. Marcel Penette, French Ambassador Lionel Vasse,
,Mrs. John S. Seybold, General Beigade, Mrs. Julian F. Harrington and Mme. Julienne Vasse.

1

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HDrmnC Cnb niCCT HE UAIinO r8'1 Clinton Baverstock Is pinning orchid corsage on the guest of
UKLnlU) fWK llUCH Ur nUilUK honor, Mrs. Sydney W. Peterson (second from left) as Mrs. Kenneth
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son Thompson at her home on Saturday.

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of the home of Capt. and Mrs. William f. Thwpion, Stmd'jf,'i Call Antigua, Coif Heights, In honor of Mrs.
Sydney W. Peterson.



EASTER'S
ON ITS WAY

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TYO-PIAIIO RECITAL BENEFITS PANAMA SALVATION ARMY "Zl EhEIE
son, wife of Her Majesty't Ambassador, and Mrs. Eleanor Walker. The recital was given by these two accom accomplished
plished accomplished pianists on Wednesday last, at the Teatro Naciona! de Panama for the benefit of the Panama Salvation
Army. ;

-
i

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THINKING OF TRYIKG 1

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Frank E. Hirt shows his
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icquatic sport in Madden
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not a sport for softies.

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I

PACE TEN
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NE.TSrAFEU
WEDNTSDAT, MAr.Cil 21, ID'S
liodes
THD-
o
HI J I
CSi i 'Til
Ch cf Cx Yi t; ct?
JT OF ;WS
Former Durocher Favorite
'Clouting Pill At .387 Clip

: By JOE SARGIS
.. NEW YORK, March 21 (UP) Giant manager
'.VUill Rignev hardly ever mentions Dusty Rhodes as
a left field candidate, but the hitting hero of the
..1954 World Series appears today to have a "lock" on

the job.

i

t Rhodes, one of former man man-ager
ager man-ager Leo Durocher's favorite;
characters and a legitimate
f, Jong-ball threat, Is banging a a-...way
...way a-...way at a .387 clip In exhibition
games thus far and what's more
.-.most of his hits are going for
, -extra bases.
Tuesday h o thraa Ms- i an,
two of tham homart, lo laid tha
Giants ta a 9-5 victory ovar tha
Battimora Orioltl. Tha homart wtra
M kit fourth- ana" fifth of tha spring
and ha'l baan up only 31 timei.
fa Significantly, ha battad only .095
. la it iprinf. V
r Durocher was reluctant to use
JJRhodes regularly because of his
poor fielding. Rigney knows this
r too, having played on the same
rtpam with Dustv In past years,

I but the new manager needs hit-
ting In the middle of his bat bat-?
? bat-? ting order and Rhodeswho bat-
ted .341 and .305, respectively
f the cast two seasons. Is the best

Wttpr amoniz the left field can

t, didates Whitey Lockman, Bob

. Innon.and Foster castieman,

Dusty knows his shortcomings

. .as a fielder, out says ne can w
prove if he plays regularly.
The homer-hitting Cubs made
:' It two straight over the Cleve Cleve-'
' Cleve-' land Indians, 14-7. with Ernie
: Banks, Hank Sauer. Walt Moryn
and rookie Ed Wlncennlak sup sup-plying
plying sup-plying the jackpot pokes. Early
wynn. Art Houtteman and Ray
Narleskl absorbed the punlsh-
ment.
Tha Naw York Yankaas, who

had wen f ivo in a row, suffered a
3-2 Ion at St. Louis pitchars Luis
. I 4 I

Arroyo, Larry jjcuion ana wroonu

Jonas tat nam down on usr tivo
hits. Mickay Manila polad a 450 450-foot
foot 450-foot homor off Jackson.
The Cincinnati Redlegs gain gained
ed gained their second win In as maty
days over the Pittsburgh Pi Pirates,
rates, Pirates, 10-3, with a crowd of on only
ly only 575 looking on In chilly Tam Tampa,
pa, Tampa, Fla. The Redlegs bunchec"
eight hits In the third inninr
for seven runs.
Max Lanier, attempting r
comeback In the major leaguer
at the age of 40, hurled three
fine innings as the Philadelphia
Phillies defeated the Washing Washington
ton Washington Senators, 7-1. Lanier allow

ed only one run after some un uncertain
certain uncertain fielding because of s
strong wind. Stan Lopata poled

a lone homer over the center

field fence for the winners.
Tha Kansas City Athletics snap snapped
ped snapped a three-game losing streak by
rallying for three runs in the ninth
inning for a 7-5 decision over the
Milwaukee Braves. Harry Simpson
supplied the long ball in the rally,
hitting homer with a mate aboard
for tha winning, runt.

Elsewhere . Pitcher Johnny

Schmitz of the Boston Red Sox

is undereoins: treatment for. a

foot infection by a skin special

ist... and slueeer Ted Kiuszew

ski Is scheduled to- get his sore
back examined by Dr. George
Bennett of the Johns Hopkins

Hospital In Miami today.

Homeroom 8B Wins Trophy
At Annual BHS Swim Meet

It e suits Of Jr. High Swim Meet
cntmmeffl nf the Balboa Jun

ior High School representing 19
v,nm. mniYis wer on hand iasi.

night at the Balboa pool for the
annual home room champion championship
ship championship swim meet.
!: Approximately six hundred
spectators watched the 149 con contestants
testants contestants go through their paces
In an effort to capture the cham championship
pionship championship tronhy. )k,
' The participants were the
successful swimmers from a se series
ries series of preliminary meets which
-were held to decide the partici participants';
pants'; participants'; for the championship
meet. k ' y

I Home room 8B with 191 point
won the team championship in

fithe hotly contested meei. (.

Homeroom Standings

- (1st Five) -
1st pla;e and chamnion
;"nm. room 8" 191 points..:
2nd F lfi2 nolnts
. 3rd, 7D 154 points.
f 4th, mW points.
Sth, 7G-87 points.
; Results of the Meet: (All dis distances
tances distances are meters).
40 FS Girls Harned,
? Holmes, Gunderson, Spector, n n-Spector.
Spector. n-Spector.

7D (Vaughn, Dykes, Luslg Luslg-nan.
nan. Luslg-nan. Gerhart).
160 Med. Relay Boys
8C (Amato, Hunter. Bag

gott. Gorham).

8B (Scott. Morris. Wilkinson,

Fearsoni.--""' ",..

8F-.-''''(Men!enhall. Bettsak.

aenar, Ruiz).

8G (Hatting.' Johnson. Bule.

Garcia),

7C (Gallagheri Hall. Corn

gan, Rathgaber),

160 F.S. Relay Girls

8C (Bartlett. Rose, Rogers.

uonerty).

8F (Thompson. Bryant. Ho-

enKe, Bowen).

7D (Hickman. Davis. Davs.

wmart).

8G Hearn. Walker. Kirch

maier, Spector).
8H -T- (Holmes, Wagner, -Yale,
Flowers).

160 FS Relay Boys
80 (Riggs, Barley, Harvey,
Bellamy).
8G (Reynolds. Dolon. Garcia

Hatting). ;-; ;

71 (Giazer, Krisko, Nahmad,
Crawford).
7D (Thrift, Wlnrl. Borowlec,
Wilkinson)..
7E (Keefe, Anderson, Clark,
Schwararock).
Diving Bradshaw, Cluver,
Bettsak, Moore and Brockman
(tie).

Imm.. 40' FS BOVS
Winn, Thrift, Btesh,
Zirkman.

1st Heat,

Crawford

4

QUEENLY INTEREST There appears to be something mlgh ty Interesting In Henry Barker's track shoe to Balboa Relays
Queen, Shirley Ransom. Could be the boys on the BHS track team are interested In Henry's shoe, but somehow we feel
they are more Interested in Queen Shirley. Miss Ransom Is ju st getting Into the spirit of the spiked shoe sport in prepara preparation
tion preparation for her duties in the colorful trackr and field meet slated for Balboa Stadium on March 23rd.

r

i

"isc-

Boxer Admits
Throwing Bout
In California

Mottas Top MRAToTie CPO
For Atlantic Teen loop Lead

LOS ANGELES, March 21 (UP)

Former lightweight boxer Tom

my Campbell s testimony that he

was -"told to lose" a 1950 fight to

Art Aragoa held the spotlight to today
day today as the governor's committee

met to investigate alleged prize

fight "fixes" in California.

Campbell told the committee

yesterday he was instructed to
throw the fight at a meeting in

the apartment of matchmaker
Babe McCoy. His manager,

George Moore, attended the
: i it : i

meeting, bampiii iu. tlanr1 Tulliirtk Trarli.

Wam f net Vtftt

js : vi juwufc v.

ALL i uru 1 a c!i.u K Powells v 1 0 1.000

Powells Defeat Army
In Opener Of Playoff
Championship Series

STANDINGS

until the fourth round and (ben get

hit that would be all," Camp Campbell
bell Campbell said. ;
He said he felt he could win the
fight but his manager told him
he had to lose "because he'd post posted
ed posted money guaranteeing the loss."
Campbell, who declared it was
the only fight he had not tried
to win, lost by a technical knock knockout
out knockout in the fourth round.
Aragon, who did not attend the
hearing, said he knew nothing of
any alleged "fix" in the match
and that at the time he felt Camp Campbell
bell Campbell was trying.

Army Atlantic

0 1 .000

2nd Heat Scott. Reynolds,

Pnl. Dolan.

Finals' Scott, wlnn, John

son, pevnolds, pnmn.

4ft j,rwsr uiris .T,-v.v.-,
T "ln, Harkleroad, Webb, Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett 40 Breast Boys wttsnk,
Unberser, Fabrega, Pearson.
M60rind. Med. Girls Tuck Tucker.
er. Tucker. Famed, Gunderson, Felps,
wpbb.
,. an mil Mud. POVS PeT-

. ,onr cluvcr.BtestuWilK-inson,

Execs, Payrolls
To Tangle Al incon
launrfrv Tofla

The Execs Softball team frnm

dmin Heights and the softball softball-ers
ers softball-ers from the Payroll Branch will
meet In a challenge match at
Ancon Laundrv field at 4:40 p.m.
today. The Execs survived an
intra -squad game plaved last

week and are confident that

rney will emerge victorious In

uieir urst serious" game.

40 Back Girls Harned,
Pmith, Heilman. Chalmers, Aba Aba-di.
di. Aba-di. Rant Rovs Reynolds,

-" '-"-"-; ., -o-n-if.pcuuuN report mat tney are out
Hunter, Bettsak, Harris. Brock-fo defeat'the chROTns Jr0meBftl.

in
SO FC Girls

tor. '
FS Boys Scott, Winn,
Faega. Wilson, Thrift.' :
10 Med. Relay Girls
pp (Tucker, Thompson,
Feins, Harkelroad).
PH (Hdmes, Dempsey, Wag Wagner.
ner. Wagner. Flowers).
8 A (Heilman, Vlck, Perra,
Gunderson). v
8 (Curtis, Lltvin, Davis,
Binkley).

The Payrollers under manager
Ben Williams, who will go to the
mound against the Execs, ere an
unknown quantity but the Execs

scouts report that they are out

Turgor Snec-!!10 Heiehts as strategv meetings

-tv nil tiic r-ajfiuii
branch durln? lunch hour 'and
coffee breaks the past, few days,
tt is reported that the Rollers
.lso can depend on a large root-

'nij section from amongst their
fairer sex employes.

S3a

At 9:00 p.m.
"DON BALBOA"
On the Screen:
AFFAIRE IN TRINIDAD'
"A BULLET IS WAITING"

Pero Infante, in
"LA VIDA NO VALE NADA"
Roiti 0"lntnnn, in
MUJERES"

The
ups:

probable starting line-

EXECS.

Fred Sapp fans 12
As Dark Millionaires
Cop Jdffea!" Opener
By HERBERT MOISE
Fred Sapp, a new acquisition
to the pitching staff of the Dark
Millionaires, electrified over 750
spectators when he pitched his
team to a 6-4 victory over Powell
Garage while fanning 12 hitters.
Fred was almost as wild as he
was effective. He walked 8 bat batters
ters batters and had one hit a sacrifice
fly off him. In his debut In the
Rainbow City Open Classifica Classification
tion Classification Softball League, Sapp pitch pitched
ed pitched a two-hitter as his team cap

italized on a shaky Powell first

Inning.

His pitching opponent, Osbert

Haynes, settled down after the
second Inning and matched him
Inninnr for inning holding the

Millionaires hitless and runless

thereafter. The Moneymen to

taled five hits in the first two
innings with home runs by Ce Ce-lestlno
lestlno Ce-lestlno Magdaleno and Humber Humberts
ts Humberts Arthur. Powell had singles In
the first and fifth innings.

- The game started wild and

woolly but settled down after DM
had scored four in the first and
two in the second with the Pow Powell
ell Powell Garage coming up with three
in their first and one more In
the third. :
The fielding play of the day
that drew the applauses of the
overflow crowd was made by
Redman (Powell) as he raced to
right center to grab a hard
grounder and hold Bovelle to a
double.

The activities of the league

will continue today with man manager
ager manager Henry Thoma? leading his

team against Alfredo Brath Brath-waite's
waite's Brath-waite's Dipal. All games will be

played at the Rainbow City play playground.
ground. playground. :; ;;

, MONDAY'S RESULTS
' Powells 6, Army 2
THURSDAY'S GAME
(2nd of series)
Powells vs Army
By TREVjOR SIMONS

ATLANTIC TEENAGE LEAGUE

STANDING

Teams
C.P.O.
Mottas

Bulck
M.R.A

Won Lost Pet

.... 5 2 .714
....5 2 .714

....J... 3 4 .w

1 8 .143

Tiger Thompson, c '
Gabby Poietti, p
Rosy Mead, lb-
Abo?ado Runnestranri, 2b
01 Pro de la Mater, ss
, Jota Ellen, 3b
Wee Willie Taylor. If
Strategy Wieg. Mrr. and cf
Planner Birrow, rf

Reserves: ; Norty Stephenson,

Planner Maguire, Carlos Garcia,
Payer Paige, Federico Wells.

Juan Conner,- Maury Norton and

earo Riiey,

PAYROLLERS

I Ed Appin, c
I Ben Williams, Mgr. and p

' Score By Innings

D. Millionaires 420 0006 5 2

Powell Garage 301 000 4 2 3

Batteries: Sapp and Kandrln;

Haynes and Barrow.

Howard "Chief" Turner, lb
Russ "Asst. Chief" George, 2b
Bob "Control" Brogie. ss
Juan Fallon, 3b
George '"Lover" Moore, If.
Andy "Processor" Nagy, cf V
Moony Huff, ringer and rf

Reserves: Mae Johnston and
''NCRa-Harrv- Mussermarr and
Elmer Downing.
Umpire; Danny "One-Eye" Pa-olucci.

Noel Gibson, the Powells work

horse who finished the regular

season with a 6-2 record, pitcnea
6-hit ball against Army Monday

night, while his team-mates fur

nished late-innings power that

overcame Army Atlantic by a 8-2
count and gave Powells the Jump

in the 2-out-of -three series In
quest of retaining their cham championship
pionship championship In the Atlantic Twi Twilight
light Twilight League,
Klissman went the distance
for the losers and was in trouble

right from the start with 5 of

his 6 walks being given up in the
first two Innings of play.
It was lack of control that put

Army behind when Klissman is issued
sued issued free passes to Swearingen
and Dedeaux with two out In the

first inning and Noel Gibson fol

lowed by driving a single- in the
hole between second and short
for the first Powells score. Three
more walks in the second inning,
added to Louis Dedeaux' infield
single put the garage-men a-

neaa z-o. :

Army tied it up In their half
of the third frame. Taylor start started
ed started by lifting a tall Infield fly
which Powells first-baseman,
Hall, let fall through for an er error.,
ror., error., After Klissman had been
tossed out at first, Rice and
Tucker followed with successive

singles, scoring Taylor. Musengo
and Pennella both got on errors
that pushed Tucker across with
the second and final Army tally
of the game.
Louis' Dedeaux got his second

hit of the game, v a single to
right, to open Powells half of

the fifth and Hair beat out an

infield blow. Swearingen advanc

ed both runners with a sacrifice

bunt. Dedeaux scoring moments

later after Ridge's fly ball to left
field had been gathered in. Noel
Gibson walked and Hall scored
when the Army catcher threw
wild to third. Hooper followed
with a double to right, but High High-ley
ley High-ley struck out to end the rally.
Powells added a Dair of insur

ance runs In the bottom half of
the sixth. McGaughey started
the new rally with a double to

left and after Rlnehart had

gone down swinging Louis -' De Dedeaux
deaux Dedeaux came up with hit No. 3 of i
the game, this time a booming
three base blast into right field
that scored McGaughey. De

deaux scored on Swearingens
single to center.
After the third inning, in
which Army got a pair of hits

and' their two runs. Noei uidsoh
had th situation under complete

control. He wound up his 6-hit

performance with no wanes ano.
it strike-outs. Louis Dedeaux with

three hits in four trips to the
nlate and two runs scbred. was

easily the leading hitter of the
noma rnf rmv' Rir( nnrf Plnel-

la each had two hits.

again against the defending
champions of 1955 tomorrow

(Thursday) night at 7 o'clock.

Taylor, who boasted a 2-0 record
on the season In which Army
only participated for the second

nau, wm proDapiy araw tne
starting assignment in an at attempt
tempt attempt to put the soldiers back
in the race for the crown crown-It
It crown-It is a near-certainty that Noel
Gibson will be starting again for

Powells. Noel will have the ben

efit of three days rest and even
if he loses there will be plenty

of time before the third game
which will be scheduled for

Monday night If necessary.

Vince Ridge (3-2) is also a prob

able Powells starter tomorrow
night, but his presence on the

mound leaves a gap in the third

Dase position that is hard to nu.

: ft
it

' ...... --

Both teams pack dynamite

laden batting power that only

came to life on the Powells side

in the late Innings last Monday,

Tucker, Army's power-hitter who
finished the regular season with
10 hits in 19 trips, was held to
one single in three tries; while

Noei GiDson, the nitting pitcher,

had one hit for Powells. He had
17 hits in 49 trips for a season
average of .347. Bucky wearlngen

oi poweiis ana Terry from tne
Army can be looked upon too to
contribute much to their team's
attack In tomorrow night's game
at Mt. Hope Stadium. s

The box score:

Army Atlantic

Rice, ss
Tucker, rf .......
Musengo, 3b .....
Pennella, lb .....
York, 2b
Terry, If
Rash, cf
Taylor, c
Mitchell-

Klissman, n .....

Schmidt .

YESTERDAY'S RESULT
at Coco solito)
Mottas 11, M.R.A. 10

The Motta team came from

behind to defeat the M.R-A. club;
11. in in rom nf fluctuating

t i. r-,-,11.. ..a . 1

iununes at coco ouinu ycavciuajr
afternoon.

This victory gave them a tie

with the C-P.O. team in the sec second
ond second half standing with each club
havlnir two games to play :. to

complete the schedule.

The Motta club enjoyed r 5-1
lead going Into the fourth in inning
ning inning but the MRA team dldn:t
behave like cellar dwellers and
scored five runs to go ahead 6-5.
Mottas came back with two in
the bottom of the fifth but MRA
was not to be denied and scored
four runs in the top of the sixth.
This three-run margin ap

peared ta be good enough until
Mottas surged back with four

runs to eke out a shaky victory.

The only extra base blows of
the game were two-baggers by

Blllv Gibson, th losing pitcher,

and Tompkins, the right fielder

of the victorious Mottas.

Blevlns, Mottas' starting pitch pitcher,
er, pitcher, got credit for the victpry al although
though although he had to. have relief
from Peterson.
Fans are urged to be on hand
tomorrow afternoon when the
C.P.O. team tackles Mottas in
a game that should decide the
winners of the second half.

HITTING THE LIGHT BAG Battlin' Byron Cumberbatch,
the Calidonia bantamweight who hopes to" beat Toto Ibarra for
the second straight time Sunday night at La Macarena Bull Bullring,
ring, Bullring, rattles the light bag at the Marafion Gym as he gets
ready for the ten-round feature bout. A seasoned -veteran of
many a ring war, Cumberbatch gave young Toto the only set setback
back setback of his professional career last Dec. 18 at the National
Gym in "the most talked about fight of 1955." The Calldonlan
came from behind to score a TKO win in the seventh heat of
a scheduled ten-rounder. An overflow crowd is expected to
take in the Macarena program.

Ab R H Po

0

1
0
11
0
1
O
5
0
0
0

Diamond

Didg

:VU"3
il' .m :
.V.'-

By TicYor Cray

,--4.-'

. 1 !'

(Sixth of a aeWea nf rlnseuna and

evaluations of Major League

Clubs In tbe 1956 season)

The box score:

M.R.A.
Irving, 2b

Marshall, c
Cabanillos, ss

Gibson, p

Carle, rf
Wood, cf
Phillips, lb

Duhon. 3b

Hall, If

Ab R II

0
3
4,

.. 4
. 3

'2

4
3
1

Philadelphia Phillies (NX.)

me pnns' cnances this year
hinge on the following possibili possibilities:
ties: possibilities: Robin Roberts winning 20

or more games lor tne seventri

consecutive year; Curt Simmons,
return to winning form (He won
onlv eipht last vear)- A sound

right field throughout the entire
season, and rookie Ted Kazanski
proving his ability to hold down
the shortstop position.
Led by the robust Roberts, the

Philadelphia pitching" corps is
well set for the season. Right-

nanaers Murray Dickson. Her

man Wehmier, Jim Owens and

Al Mrozlnski; along with south

paw Simmons ana tne nigniy

touted Seth Morehead, have
erased some of the wrinkles from

the brow of Manager Mayo

Smith. ; -,.

The Phillie manager proudly
asserts that h's team should
be better than it was last year,
and should be right In there
battling every inch of the way.
Stan Lopata, erstwhile slug

ging backstop will try out on

28 2 6 18 11

Powells

Dedeaux,"ss T.
Hall, lb ........
Swearingen, 2b
Ridge, 3b ... .. ...

GiDson, p
Hooper, cf
Highley. rf ....
McGaughey, c
Rinehart, If ....

Totals

24 10 3

Army And Powells Meet Again

TomHT

Mottas
.i. vv...;j.:

IPohnn ?h

2 3 3 2 Fields. If 7. ........

11 5 0 Hytlnen, ss
1 1 0 I HumDhrey, c
0 0 11 Sanchez, 2b
0 113 Bruce, cf ...
Oil 0, Tompkins, rf
1 0 1 llweigle, lb ..
1 1 9 1 "levins, p ..
0 0 0 0 Peterson, p

22 6 8 21 11' Totals

27 11 6

City Bowling Tourney Results

FINALS 5 MAN TEAM EVENT

Team League Scratch
Marcy Margarita-Mixed. 2587 -Sioux
Diablo-Com.. . ,. 2399
H. I. Homa Diablo-Maj. . 2698
- Sulkers Balboa-Mens. ... 2489
Mohicans Dlablo-Com. . 2505
Tasco Diablo-Mix. . . 2744

sc

Handicap
4?2
594
266
458
420
. winners.

FIRST NIGHT'S DOUBLES LEADERS

Army, with their backs now
pinned to the wall, take the field

1.
2.
3.
-4-

5.'
6.
7.

Bis Si Reynolds .......
Schimer & Burgis .....
McElRoy & Ellenberger

viHmptrSf- Heltorr

Almeda & McGarvey

rani ei Amato
Lyons & Walher ...

Scratch
. 1023
. 1121
, 1100
. 1129 :
. 94G
.1031

Handicap
238
134
130
-198

84

266
178

Total
3004
2993
2964
2947 1
2925

Total
. 1261
1255
1230
1212
1209

Hearne Cops Pacific Twiloop
Pitching And M.V.P, Awards
' Webb Hearne, veteran Twilight League hurler, won the lead leading
ing leading pitcher award and was, voted, the Most Valuable. Player In.
the 1956 Pacific Twilight League. Pitching for the runner-up
Lucky strike team Hearne posted a record of five wins and no
losses in five complete games, striking out 41 and giving up
only two bases on balls.
' Hearne allowed an average of one run a game and was
nicked for -22 basehits. One of his wins was a one-hit affair
with the blow coming in the seventh inning with one out to
"deprive the lefty of a no-hit no-run game. Balboa Heights
Wayne Wall and Ed Kirchmier hurled no-hit no-run games over
the Junior College team.
Lambert Mantovani of Junior College, worked in all 12 of
his team's games pitching 77 innings to post 4 wins and 7 losses,
Mantovani was the tough luck pitcher of the league losing 4
or. 5 close decisions, notably a 10 Inning 3 to 1 game to Balboa
HiRlHearne and Danny Wlnklosky, leading batter, will receive
trophies from the League in recognition of their outstanding
feats during the 1956 season. , :

first base, where, should h
make the grade, he will be abi
to see daily action. But, to win
the lob he must outhustle last
year's first sacker, Mary Blay Blay-lock,
lock, Blay-lock, who, although not the hit hitter
ter hitter that Lopata is, comes
through with some timely blows
and -sets up better defensively.
Gran Hammer, after a disnstmna

season, will try to redeem him himself
self himself at second base, while Willie
"Puddinhead" Jontfs will be on

tnira. ir Kazanski fails to make
good at short, Bob Morgan will

oe on nana to taice over.
Last year's batting champ
Richie Ashburn will again be in
center field, while Del Ennis,
runs-batted-in monarch and
slugging Jim Greengrass will
flank him in left and right, re-,
spectively.
Andy Seminick will handle the
bulk of the catching duties,
while Frankie Baumholtz, ob obtained
tained obtained from the Cubs last win winter?
ter? winter? will be around for pinch-hit-ting
and substitute out fieldinsr.
The breakdown on the Phils lis
as follows: -
CATCHING : Fair v ''
Pitching: Acceptable
INFIELD: Uncertain'. .
OUTFIELD: Fast and Powerful
. FINISH: Fourth. .-.

The pitching records;

Pitcher-Team

Hearne, LS. .
Kirkland, L., LS.
Almeda, AL.
Hinz, AL. .
Mantovani, JC.
-Kirchmier, HS.
Conrad, AL. .
Charles, LS.
Johnson, J., AL.
Wall, BHS. .
Jeffries, JC.
Hartley, HS.
Bass, AL. .
Campanelll, LS.
Halman, LS.

RUSSPllrALr:

Hamilton: HS.

Kirkland, G.( HS.
Flynn, JC. .

G

. 5
. 5
. 1
. 5
.12
.6
. 5
. 5
. 4
.

4-

IP

34
23
14
30
77
31
23
21
16
37
4
4
4
3
2 23

-2-

AB
128
72
14
108
263
105
87
84
77
128
15
19
15.
10,
14

a

3 10 13 41
2 113 10
1 2 6

R
5
7
2
15
37
9
10
25
19
15
12
6
5
6
4
8
0

II
'22,
16
3
18
63
19
24
20
22
19
5
6
3
5
5
12
3
0

SO
41
9
1
22
71
38'
8
32
15
51
2
2
6
2
3

13
1
3

BB
3
3
9
28
9
5
: 28
v 13 :
23
10
2
4 :
2
; o
5
4
v0

w
5
2
1
3
2
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0

L
a
0
0
1
7
2,
1
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
0
0



n

r .r 3
I
Pacific Softy
Mob Scene May Fore
n

Red-Hot Neal To Farm
Editor: CCNRADO SARCEANT

Leogus
By GILEERTO TKORNE
SECOND HALF STANDINGS

oiroF ooons waA

Bowman Ntxti Sill
- to make Kill
By WARREN PAGE
Shooting Editor ;.
THE evening 'paper carried I
short item about the Now Jer-

ey archers who had sallied forth

No admirer of the bow as a
weapon of power and precision, I
still must admit that the arrow arrow-flinger
flinger arrow-flinger has a tough row to hoe,
and rates kudoes whenever he
drops a buck, sot a dumb doe
or a yearling, but a mature, sav savvy
vy savvy buck. In the first plact he's a

small baa of fire a be can surely

to slay their venison as the Indianshit a deer anywhere at all. let a

lone in a quickly vital spot, from
much beyond 50 or 60 yards. And

in the second place only a whisper

of contact with branch or twig wui
flip his broadhead arrow off line.

Tast tries for deer running in

either hard or soft woods, and
much of New Jersey is jungle
thick, are a waste of arrows. The
archer must work in for a close
shot and a clear one if he's to be
certain. And a smart old whitetail,

one who knows the score, just
ain't for letting people get t h a t

close to him outside of dense cov
er, not very often.
Without venturintf into the has

sle about the relative killing
cower of the broadhead and the

bullet, the fact of the matter is
that if the deerslavers, or would-

problems the bow and arrow nim- be deersiayers, wno- we-, -raw
r . with tYiA iifla wrtiilH hit tit

did. with bow and arow. Quite

mob of .'em, too, some 15,000 licen-j
aces.. v -.".!
From, which, figuring that in
Maine, for example, the batting
average among "gun hunters"
; usually runs better than 50 per
cent, one might conclude that the
"deer population of New Jersey
: had taken terrible lacing, with
thousands of fat bucks wearing
drag-paths out to the roads. Not
to. The. total kill, with all precincts
reporting, tallied only 346 deer.
- As a gent who hints deer with
: rifle, I might be inclined to sneer
' at such a low success ratio -one
"deer for about every 50 hunters
is miehty slim pickings. Bit I

don't know that the batting aver
a? is no bad. considering t h e

rut has in fnnnilpr

Very possibly if the same
15,000 were even reasonable shots,
.had been armed with proper rifles

venison

with as much caution, develop as
much woods skill as the modern
Mohawks must have to bag their

or even shotguns,, and had hunt- meat, tne ireezer pianu in u u.c
j lur ..... r w m. ,,t hunt iiWr states would double their bu-

thev'd have killed truckjoads, of;siness-and the undertakers would

I1B1VO U1WI9.

March 20
Olud Agencies Stars
Signal ....
American Legion ....

6th Engineers ......

Cer. Pan Liquido ....

W
. 8
, 5
, 4
. 2
, 2

(IB
A 1 f

"2
5!-2

b

Signal

Amer. Legion

032 001 77 12
050 010 08 U

venison.

JOE WILLIAMS

Veen's American Legion una

Grb&'s Signal fought for second

place in tne racinc soiiDau

Leaeue with Signal forgin a-

head in the seventh inning for a

7-8 win which gives them com

mand of that cherished soot,

Heary and Veeh were all tied
up at 5 runs when Grba relieved

Heart in the 3rd. in tne sin in

ning, Tuller lined hotly to 3rd
fror the American Leeion. He

stole second and scored when
Bouk threw badly to first on

oorsWs rrounder.

Orba tied It up In the slxh

when he hit safely for one baje,

cantured second on Hin s sacn

flee and hoofed it to home on
Stewart's hit to center, scoring
only because Mohn couldn't hoid
onto the ball after making the
tag.
Newman reDlaced Veeh on the

pitcher's mound, walking Mohn,

who wetn around 10 inira on
Bouk's bunt-slngle and scored
when Tinkler hit. The score
would probably have ben much

bipger haa n not Deen ior uaa
ner floatlnir around in the out
ftriri taline- base hits and cut

tins down runners who would

stretch sinele Into doubles, sav

in Newman and Veeh many a

heartbreak. f eymour Agency 50

Grba retired the siae wiuiouv
incident and Signal assumed sec
ond place.

V

i

V

I.-

1.

a

WRONG GUY WORKING Yankee pitcher Tom Morgan works hard in St. Petersburg sun, but
the cameraman looks as if he needs the workout more.

CLASSIC LEAGUE
F'nal Team Standings

El Panama .
Austin Nash

1. Skychef

58V,
55

40V4
53
55 Vz
58

Ave

925
924

92'

High Game

Coffey-Welch
Balcer .......
Balcer ...

By HARRY GRASYSON
MIAMI, Fla. (NEA You

don't have to see any farther than

second base to get the best line on

tne national League race.

The Dodgers have five players

who would at once fasten a ham ham-merlock
merlock ham-merlock on the second basing job

with four other clubs in the circuit.
They are, not ncessarily in the

order of importance. Junior Gilli

am, Don dimmer, Charley Neal,

Jacie Hobmson and Chico Fer

nandez.

?
Schooled obsen-ers tell you tlit
Shortstop Fernandei, a 6-foot, Im Impound,
pound, Impound, 24-year-old Havana Special,
now gets his dukes on balls that
such a celebrated performer as
Pee Wee Reese would not reach.
And such an accepted authority o
ivory in its native state as Branch
Rickey always has contended that
a young man capable of playing
shortstop well Should be perfectly
at home on the other side of the
bag. ,
Young Fernandez lacks Neal'i
tremendous blast, but drove in 62
runs spraying hits all over the
place and batting .301 for Montre Montreal.'.".,'".

it

r

Little' League

PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Second Half Standings

278
277
267

Team v: 1
Gibraltar Life. .
Lincoln Life
Police ..........

Elks 1414 .:
Seymour Agency
Spur Cola

Won Lost Pet

'A;

ickle Roblnsott

Don Zimmer

ZIMMER HAD 15 HOME RUNS

playing only part time last year

and at last is listening to the coach

es and choking his bat real good
in search of directional hits that

would pout his speed on the bases
oftener. i

i,.

MIAMI BEACH. I happened to catch up with Sdrlt Snead
recently when ft wasn't on his way to the bank jnd henee was
in no mad fush. t wondered if the millionaire hillbilly besides
golf, he's in shirts, shoes, hats fishing tackle, real estate and
how-to literature) would mind standing still for a very personal
question, "Of course not," he said,
"Well, what in hell happens to you when you play In the
National Open?" 1W
Snead, now 43, a local winter resident, affable and witty In
the red clay manner, said:
"Why I thought you knew. Most sports writers do. They
say I can't putt, can't think, lose my temper, don't like It when
the going gets rough and that I got a phobia, or is it a fixation?
That gives you a wide choice to pick If om.'.' .
"Which one would you pick?"
I aide-stepped.
Uneua turned thoughtful Hi hadn't been bitter in list'
tng the flaws the critics -found in his play. Rather, this
appeared to.be his way of trying to be lighthearted about
, a subject that has undoubtedly given him mor concern than
he cares to admit. ,
"A jellow always rembembers the short putts he miss
i ed," he sflid finally, so maybe that's why t don't win. 1
hate to admit it, but the short ones do seem to give more
trouble than the long ones.
. "I've been runner-up in the Open four times, and had
winning chances in several others. In some of those I play play-.
. play-. ed good enough to win, but didn't; in others I didn't play
SO well. :: ": .'
"In order to win any kind of golf championship you got to
be good and lucky at th same time. I'm probably kidding
; mysalf, but I don't feel I've had that combination clicking for
me very often. I cto have one minor resentment. .It's the popu
lar impression that I always beat myself. The fact is, there
have been times when some powerfully fine golf beat me."

. Still Haunts Him

In 1937, Snead, 23, his effortless swing and booming power
tVian hoinn netaHcaliw arrlatmprt marl hts first ftrmear

ance In the Open: an early finisher, his formidable 283 looked

a certain winner. ,9
In Yact, 1 had finished an Interview and4was In the process
of batting out a personality piece on the former caddy when
Ralph Gudahl, a good hour and a half later, came lntwith 281.
It Just so happened this was the lowest score Never made in an
Open championship here or abroad, up to that time.
In going back over the scores, it was discovered that
Snead had three-putted three green in playing the final It
holes, tuid as he lost it by ohiy two sirokes, there was no
need to look further for an explanation. : ;
Sure, you don't win many Open championships by three three-putting.
putting. three-putting. At the same time, not many 23-year-olds make a
monotonous habit of beating 2tl the first time they thow
up for the most demanding test in golf.
Because of the circumstances under which he was beaten
the possibility that Snead Suffered an emotional experience
that tenas to reduce his effectiveness in the Open (and only
the Open) has often been suggested. v
'How about itV I asked him.
' "I hope I got sense enough not to worry about something
that happened so long ago," he said and clearly meant it.
And yet. on his own, he began to describe in detail the
thots that beat him. There was the 60-footer Guldahl holed at
the elgh:h hole on the final round, the 30-footer at the ninth,
the 12-footer at the 10th. The recovery shot he had made at
the 16th. How he reached the green from the "rough at the 18th.
1 I was astonished. He might have seen Guldahl hole out
at the 18th, but that's about all. Indeed, I had taken up a large
part of his time Interviewing him. Still nearly 20 yeara later,
he was able to recall the round, stroke by stroke. '
"I read about it," he explained.
And, subconsciously, It's still haunting him.

I Worsham Incident

; For the first time Snead discussed his defeat in two Other

Jl Opens each of which had controversial undertones.
H' One was in "47 when Lew Worsham beat him in a playoff.
.5 finead was in the act of striking the ball on the home green

i when Worsham suddenly asked for a measurement to see who

i was away. Upset, angered, too, Snead missed a 30-incher and

1 I the title that seems fated to elude him forever.
J Worsham's action, it. was remarked smacked of poor
i sportsmanship. ''
1 "I guessed he was just getting even with me," Snead
laughed easily. "On the 17th he stood too close to me on a
. 1 chip shot and 1 had to stop and ask him to give me playing
I room. He didn't like it." :

The box score:

Signal
Hill, ss
Stewart, If ......
Matsomoto, 2b ...

Voltatina. rf .....

Wlrth, cf

Mohn, c, ........
Bouk, 3b ........
Heary, p
Orba, p .,

Games Ave.

.. 78 208

... 81
...42
... 21
... 78
... 81
... 78

Coffey ...

927 Balcer ...
Melanson

Hotel El Panama successfully, Best .....
defended Ujelr title in the Clas- Colbert ..
sic Bowling League by bMn8;jSSr
V-.1. u .haiiinx nf Austin-J acoDer ..

Nash. The League Championship'McGarvey ............. 62

Ab R H Po K'was thus won on the last nigh0i?-wi.n

a of the league ana me "::,;"
I landings indicates the closeness "mann

Billy Coffey led Hotel El Pan Pan-u
u Pan-u ma in their league title defense
1 hile Bill Jacober and Chuck Al Al-l
l Al-l Tieda. scored well for Austin-

1

2 0
II
1 0
3 2
1 11
1- 0
1 0

vtash.

Totals

30 7 12 21 6

American, Legion

Banner, cf ...... 3

O'Conner, 3b ..... 2

Hartman, c s
Nelson, If 3
King, lb r,o 4

Dunn, rf ...,,..,. 3
Fuller, rf 2
Gorski. c ........ 4
Bradley, 2b 4
yeeh, p 3

HOTEL EL PANAMA

Wllber
Feeer

JjLowande
"owen
?i Coffey

ij
0

4
3
2
1
6
0

0 0

1 "llenbereer

. w

153
196
172
170
214

197
177
162
,180
242

104
no
158
187
189

544
543
492
537
645

81
39
63

Zeletes 78
Glelchman .....1 78
Larrabee 80
Bowen ................ 63
Welch 81
Wilber 75
Thomas 81
Stephens 51
Lowande 51

20S

199
197
191
190
189
188
185
184
184
182
182
181
180
'180
177
175
174
173
173

. 905

AUSTIN-NASH

958 898 2751

Totals

30 6 12 21

SUMMARY Btolen bases

Mohn, Fuller. Sacrifice hits:
Hill, O'Conner. Bases on balls
ntt. Hporv 9 nrhft. 1. Veeh

u Thomas

Almeda
Jacober'
Best .

169
167
170
201
166

181
182
193
214
170

161
173
225
183
164

Grapefruit
League

St. Louis (N) 100 011 0003

IN. Y. (A) 001 001 000-2

4

4
4
3
3
2

2

2
4
V
4
: 4 :

.667

.667
.500
.429
,429
.333

Police 4, Elks 1

Monday afterdnoon the1 Police

climbed within a eame of the

League leaders by defeating the

fiiKs oy tne score or lour to on

The Braves, off last season's run

generally considred the top con

tenaers, are without a second

baseman who hits much more than

his weight. Indeed, Jack Dittmai
weighs 55 more pounds than the
.125 he batted in .his Jew opportu opportunities
nities opportunities last trip. The Iowa alumnus
is deeply dissatisfied and frankly
looking to be traded. The best Dam
ny O'Connell could bat was .225.
Neal easily could be the strong strongest
est strongest of the Brooklyn candidates.
"Ail he has to do is leara to
lay off the high pitch," say scouts
and men who played with and a-

cainst the 24-year-old Longview,

873 940

Seymour Agency

Newman 1. Struckout by: Heary,after their poor showing of the

1. Grba 0, Veeh 2, Newman l. orevioUa week and kept Restau-

innings pitched by: Heary 2 2-3, rante Skychef from taking over

Grba 4 1-3, Veen 6, Newman J. gecond place, in tne nnai stana

Hits off: Heary 7. Grba 5, Veeh
10, Newman 2. Winning pitcher:
Grba 3-2. Losing pitcher: New Newman
man Newman 1-3. Umpire: Metheny.
Time: 1:30. Scorer: Thorne.

Fastlich
League

Won Lost

Palomas
Pumas
Conejos

Ocelots

Macaws 2

Jim Million's and Mickey Kler

nan's Conejos stopped the win win-Tln
Tln win-Tln streak of the Pumas Tues

day afterdnoon at Fastlich Park
when they took, over Balbernle'i

nine by the score oi
Parker gave up but three hits
Aithonirh he walked nine. Good

support by the Conejos kept him
out of trouble. Charlie Chase got
two hits for the Conejos, giving
him six straight hits in his last

three games.

lngs. Harry Colbert and Charlie
Kutsch led- Seymour Agency
while George Zeletes and Mac Mac-Lane
Lane Mac-Lane were high for the Skychef
team.

511
522
5flS

Arroyo, Jackson (5), Jones (9)

.3UU and Sarni; Kucks, coleman (7),

7Z 7land Berra, Biancnara (4). hk
906 2719Mantle (NY). WP Arroyo. LP-
" Kucks.

came bacKr

Phlla. (N) 002 100 1127 11 2

Wash. (A) 000 000 1001 6 2

Miller, Lanier (5), Llperti (8)
and Lonnett, Burk (8V. Curtis,
Ramos (6) and Courtney. WP
Miller. LP Curtis.

Doug Priester toeing t h e Te-. Negro is the International

mound ior the Police team had
a no-hitter going into the last of
the sixth inning, Jackie Devon
leading off hit a Texas Leaguer
to left field for the first hit off
Priester, Berganer hit a Texas

Leaguer to left field for the first?)

hit oif Priester, Berganer hit a
ground ball to shortstop Ashton

who forced DeVore at second,!

Micnaei wiinams strucK out,
then a throw to second hoping
to get Berganer went into cen

ter field and Berganer came all

the way around to score the Elks
only tally.

The big blow and the big In

ning ior tne ponce was tne

third. Warren Ashton bunted

safely, took second on a single

by Browder, Dehunger was sate
on a fielder's choice as he hit a
ground ball to second and the
throw came home to force out
Dempsey, With the bases loaded
Doug Priester lifted a Bleakley
fast ball over the right center

field fence for a grand slat.i

home run putting Police ahead
four to nothine.

Doug Priester won his second
game of the second half giving

up one run on two nits, walking
four and striking out five. Ed
Bleakley lost his second game ot
the second half allowing four
runs on eight hits, walked three

and struck out seven.

League, where he stretched 153
hits into 258 bases and manufactcr manufactcr-ed
ed manufactcr-ed 16 home runs while batting ,274.
" The Braves' eyes popped when
Neal swatted a Humberto Sobio-i
son fast ball far over the Miami
Stadium left field wall and into the
night and park i n g lot. You
wouldn't suspect that a 5-foot 10 10-inch,
inch, 10-inch, 165-poundi lad could beli a
ball for such tremendous distance.

NEAL AND FERNANDEZ mav

be sent out again, unjust as that
might be.
"We need tftem at Montreal,"
says Vice-President Buny Bavasi,

who makes the heavier decisions

having to do with player personnl

acreoss the bridges.

RESTAURANTS SKYCHEF

Lane .
Gleichman
Zeletes
Welch
Balcer

182'
197
181
136
180

211
168
224
208
213

201
169
195
15
178

499
571

The box score:
PolJze
Dempsey,-3b ........

Ashton, ss 3
Browder, lb ........... 2
Dehllnger, cf i 'l
Priester, n 3

Corrigan, T. 2b 3
Glazer, If-rf 3

Ab R H

4 0 1

1
1
1
1
0

0

876 1024 898 2798

K. City (A) 001 002 0137 12 0
Milwati. N 000 221 0005 11 1
Ditmar, cox (6), Burtschy (9)
and Ginsberg; Crone, Gorin (6)
Robinson (6). Jay (9) and Rice,

Roselll (6). HR-Simpson (KC S i

114 bVw-. V--- : -.Ajves, rr i u
"4 Robinson. Betu' 2 0

Balti. (A) 000 002 030-5 9 I
N. Y. (N) 031 014 00X 9 12 2

Duren, Brown (5), Shallock Elks

(8) and Trlandos, Gastall (5)

SEYMOUR AGENCY

Kutsch
McGarvey
Larrabee
Melanson
Colbert

18?
192
187
191
179

194
178
200
202
182

20
187
lflR
183
255

25 4 8

Stoudnor. 2b 2

WorthlnRton. McCall (6) andjDeVore, cf 2
Katt. HR Leppert Bit), Rhodes, Berganer, If ,,,.,.... 3

K rMYl. TtreMOiiH (NY). WP-

t Worthington. LP Duren,
Chicago (N) 202 005 02314 15 1
?7?!Cleve. (A) 110 050 000 7 9 1

010

931 956 1000 2887

The box score: ..

Conejos Ab

Cunningham, 3b 2
Marquard, If 1
Hall, c 1
Webb, c 1
Schwarzrock, ss .. 3

Reynolds, p 3
Hele, cf ......... 3

Roe, If .......... 0
Trower, 3b 1
Pearl, 2b ........ 0

Priest, rf 2
Scott. A. lb. ...... 1

II Po
0 0

0
1
3
1
0
1
0
0

0 0

5,0

Totals

18 4 J 12 7

Pumas

FrangloAe, 3b
Scott, R. cf

Parker, p

Chase, c .
Godsey, rf
Hadley, If
Seise, ss ..
Chassln, 2b

Hern, lb

make a shot out of Irtna'e rouoh near the 17th areen and lost Totals

a stroke that cost him a certain tip. and vossiblv a' win.

Pumas
"They called me a bonehead for that one," said Snead, "but Conejos
the club I used was the right one for me. Nine times out of 10 1
It would have worked. The club wasn't at fault that day.' The SUMMARY SUMMARY-player
player SUMMARY-player was. I just made a bad shot." - pearl, Priest,

I

The Classic League 'wishes to
take this opportunity to wisn
success to the members of the-

Armed Forces bowline team, Al

meda, Jacober, Kutsch, and Mc

Garvey, in their quest or tne a a-Army
Army a-Army Bowling Championships
soon to be held at Fort Sill, Ok Oklahoma.
lahoma. Oklahoma. Good bowling, Gang!

High Tea mSeries

Austin-Nash . . . ... . ... 3030

Seymour Agency .......... 301o

Hotel El Panama 2948

High Team Game

Fanning (7) ; Wynn,' Houttemaft

(4), Narleskl (71 and Naragon.
HR Banks (Chi), Wincenlak
(Chi), Sauer (Chi). Moryn (Chi),
Busby (Cleveh WP Rush. LP
Houtteman.

Williams, ss 2

Cross, c ............... 2
Burton, 3b ............. 3
Bleakley, p 2
Berger, lb 2
Hern, rf .............. 0

Lincoln, rf 1

Pitts. (N) 100 100 100 3 9 -A
Cin. (N) 017 002 OOx 10 13 (
Green. Murray (3), MeMahoi

(4), Ravdon (6), Brown (6) Do Do-noso
noso Do-noso (8), and Shepard, Kravitz

(7) ; Acker. Minarcln ; (7) ann

Birrgess. HR Ppwer?! (Pitts),
Bell (Cin). WP Acker; LP-

urecii.

HE KFEPS BUSY

Chapel Hill, N. C. (NEA)
North Carolina's basketball

coach Frank McGuire, doesn't

Restaurante Skychef 1098, believe in takinff it easv. Once the

Hotel El Panama 1070 basketball season ended, he lined

Hoter El Panama .......... 1051 up speaking engagements for ev

ery nignt tor two montns.

Individual High Series
Balcer 726
Coffey ..................... 722
Coffey ............ 710

batted in: He Priest, A. Scott,
Parker, Chase, Godsey, Hadley,

0i Seise. Two base hits: Hadley,

t XJb fifnleri hasfls- Him rhm.

0 sin, Seise, Godsey, Chase', Park-,in the contest

0 er, R. Scott, sacrifices: Seise.
0 Double plays: Parker, Hern. Left
0 on bases: Conejos 6, Pumas 9:
0i Bases on balls off: Parker 9,

0' Reynolds 5. Strike outs by Park

er 2, Reynolds 4, Hit by pitcher:

by: Roe by Parser, Chassln by
Reynolds. Balk: Parker. W'ld
pitches: Parker. Passed balls:
Hall. Winning pitcher: Parker.
Losini nitcher: Reynolds, um-

Errors: Reynolds.pires: Mohl-Diaz. Scorer: Mead.
Chasssin. Runs Time: 1:40. ..

PASSING FACTS

Baton Rouge, La. (NEA)
Louisiana State's 1956 football

squad should feature a strong
passing game, if the annual

spring sntrasquad game is an ex.
ample. The three top Tiger pas.

20 9 7 15 3

202 00-

351 Ox

sers completed 14 of 26 attempts

HIS FAVORITE

Tucson, Ariz. (NEA) Cleve Cleveland's
land's Cleveland's Mike Garcia has beaten

the Athletics 2 2times in his ca
reer, : :

Additional Sports
On Page 6

I i
i : I

C Charley Near

Junior Gilliam

The Cincinnati Dutchman, the
most valuable olaver in evenr min

or league in which he played, has

oeen impeaea Dy a frlehtenins

string of beanings, breaks and
operations.

The switch-hittine Gilliam it

equally at home in the outfield.

WITH RANDY JACKSON'S

home run bat at third, the versa versatile
tile versatile Robinson, streamlined at 37,
fighter than he has been in three
or springs, is freed for service
elsewhere. i

Robby isn't fiehting evervone

for a change, not even Walter

Alston.

"The only thing I'm figMing."

he says, "is Robinson's weight."

The surplus of superior infielders
and the consequent competition' is
the Brooks' greatest insurance a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst the complacency that ; so
frequently sets in with the winning
of a world championship.

A

w

A

v

VICTORY SMILE The new welterweight champion Johnny
Saxton displays victory smile as he points to a newspaper In
Chicago tellinp of his fight with Carmen Baslllo. Saxton won
the crown with a 15-round decision. gm

19 12

For

EXTRA

STRENGTH,
VITALITY,
and STRQHG

YlEnVES
take

IN THE NAVY Brooklyn
Dodgers' pitcher Johnny Po Po-dres
dres Po-dres is shows on his arrival
at Newark, N.J., from the
World Champs' Vero Beach,
Fla., training camp. The
southpaw passed his physical
examination yesterday at the
New York City Armed Services
Induction Center and was as assigned
signed assigned to the Navy by the
Selective Service Board.

PESO)

AW 1' "'

7T

New energy and strength for you! That
is the result of taking Phosferine every
day. You will have stronger nerves, a
better appetite, a keener brain. Signs of
weakness will vanish and you will enjoy
life. Get Phosferine now
A Splendid
Tonic



1 r
I j i
--", I :
jut Vj
- v. j
W j J M i.
.Read stcrv cn coc? 10
Liitle League
Girls 16, Boys 11
INDEPENDENT

Pi

' mm it X ni V

n

' Sixteen girls and 11 boys were

born in Gorgas Hospital aunng
the week ending at "midnight
Monday, March 19, according to
the regular hospital report. Dur During
ing During the same period 190 patients
"were admitted and 175 were dis discharged,
charged, discharged,
- Th i names and addresses of

. follow: Mr. and Mrs. Pedro L6 L6-z.
z. L6-z. of Panama City: Mr. and

Mrs. I. Toppin: of Panama City;
Lt. and Mrs. G. N. Cornelius, of
Fort Kobbe; Sgt. and Mrs. E. C.
Henderson, of Albrook; Sgt. and
Mrs. R. Collazo, of Gamboa; Sgt.
and Mrs. R. K. McKee, of Fort
Kobbe; Lt. Cdr. and Mrs. A. E.
Carter, of Farfan: Mr. and Mrs.

C M. de La Ossa, of Panama
Cltv; Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Stewart,
"of Diablo; Sgt. and Mrs. R. M.
Haines, of Fort Kobbe; Mr. and
Mrs. G. E. Daniel, of Paraiso.
Boys were born to the follow following:
ing: following: Lt. Col. and R. W. Garrett,
f Fort Kobbe: Mr. and Mrs. L.

-R. Worrell, of La Boca; Mr. and
'Mrs. R. K. Mathews, of Panama

City; Lt. and Mrs. C. E. Storrs,

ef Fort Kobbe: Mr. and Mrs. J,

A. Rlvas, -of La. Boca; Mr. and

Mrs. S. E. Beckford, of Gamboa;
Mr. and Mrs. A. Tulle, of Gam

boa; Mr. and Mrs. C P. Blake,

of Cocoli; Lt. ana Mrs. E. E. pe pe-hota.
hota. pe-hota. of Fort Kobbe: Mr. and

Mrs. M. F. Green, of Balboa:

MaJ. and Mrs. W. R. Kenney, of

Albrook; Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Mar Mar-kun,
kun, Mar-kun, of Balboa Heights: MaJ.
and Mrs. J. F. Reish, of Albrook:
MSst. and Mrs. D. J. O'Neill,
of Cocoli; Mr. and Mrs. W. C.
Lashley, of Parat.so: arid Mr. md

Mrs. P. C. Petit, of Panama City

IBM

'Let the people hnotc the truth and the country is safe1 Abraham Lincoln.

31st f EAR

PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 1956

FIVE CENTS

TowMcl

WASHINGTON, March 21 (UP),Rev

President Eisenhower said to

day he thinks it is incumbent on
the Southern states to make some
progress toward racial integration
in schools as decreed by the U.S.
Supreme Court.
Under news conference question questioning,
ing, questioning, Mr. Eisenhower said that he'

is well aware of the deep emotions
involved in the South, and that he

advoeates a pattern of modera

tion and progress.

M. L. King, 2T. one of 24 1 The state then resumed exhaus-

clergymen under indictment. tive questioning of Erna Dungee,

The state delved into the brief financial secretary of the MIA. a-

Annual Army Talenl

,w Gefs Ifnderway
lwM h Amador

The annual Army talent centest
here Is shaping, up.
News coming in from Service

Clubs of the U.S. Army Caribbean

area this week indicates that there

will be tremendous variety and
jfreat talent in the preliminaries of

the All-Army entertainment con contest
test contest which will he staged during

the next two weeks, starting to

The first show will be reeled off

at tie Fort Amador Service Club,
starting at 8 p.m.
" Among entries in twelve enter

tainment catagories are a roller

skater, combos guitar soloists,, a
classical pianist, I sax soloist, the
Lifeliner Regimental Chorus, the
60th Army Band Chorus, a hillbil hillbilly
ly hillbilly band, vocal soloists, and a co comedian.
median. comedian. Fort Kobbe' club will hold Its
preliminary contest tomorrow
(Thursday) night, also at 8. The
Fort Gulick preliminaries come
Friday, the Tot'. Clayton first round
Monday and the Fort Davis show
on Tuesday night. All times, and
all shows sites, are the same 8
p.m. at each post Service Club.
WinnerswiH appear in the Pana Panama
ma Panama Area contest on April 14 at the
Fort Clayton theater Nr. 2, and, if
judged winners, will compete a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst Puerto Rico's winners for
trips to New York City and the All All-Army
Army All-Army finals. The winners will ap appear
pear appear on the Ed Sullivan TV show
n June 17.

Thr Chitf Executive said ha
dot not btlltv in stiorution on
tht racial itiue in the South. But

ho added that he wanted to lake
the occasion of hit mooting
with reporters to plead again for

understanding and patience.

The President's discussion of

the segregation, issue was produc-

ea Dy a series oi news conference

questions.

He was asked first how he felt
about Negroes being brought to

trial in Montgomery, Ala., for "re-

lusai to nae the buses."

The president said first that he

understood there was an Alabama

state law against boycotts, but as

for the overall problem of segre

gation he said he wanted to refer

back to his news conference' state.

meht of, last week when he asked

for patience and understanding.

no President, paused for a
moment and then said he had an
' added idea he believes It it In Incumbent
cumbent Incumbent on the South to show
tome progrest toward school in integration
tegration integration in conformance with
the opinion of the Supreme
Court.
Meanwhile in Montgomery, the
state attempted to show that or organized
ganized organized Negroes spent $30,000 for

u auatwi imiim aim luincu
AL ., . . L

me segregaiea city dus system in

to a ghost line.
' If it could prove such a deliber

ate scheme, the state hoped to

convict the first of 90 Negro lead

era to go to trial on charges of

conspiracy to interfere with a bus

mess operation under an old Ala

bama law.
Since they began their boycott,
now in its 15th week, the state at attempted
tempted attempted to show, the Negroes
have held mass meeting twice a
week to assess the results.
The but line admits the boy boycott
cott boycott hat put it In teriout finan financial
cial financial straits because lt normally
carriet 40 to 70 per cent Negro
passengers.
The arrest of a Negro s e a m m-stress
stress m-stress for refusing to take a "Jim

Crow" rear seat touched off the

demonstration last December

history and financial records of

the Montgomery Improvement As Assn.,
sn., Assn., a Negro group, in an attempt
to show it was organized soly to

plan ana execute the boycott.
Negro witnesses said the MIA
k also, provided "spiritual" aid to
members.

The trials, which conceivably
could require months, were being
held in a dingy 100-year-old court

room before Circuit Judge Eugene

Carter. Almost all in the audience,

numbering jus', over 100, were Ne

groes and most of them were de

fendants.
A state witness on the second

day of King's trial yesterday, was
Stuart Patton, assitant cashier

of the Alabama National Bank of,

Montgomery, identified as a de

pository of the MIA.

Some $30,000 in expenses for the

group was identified by Patton

from photostats of deposits and

checks.

bout the group's income and ex

penditures.
When Assistant Solicitor Frank
Stewart asked her about three
small checks in one exhibit she

said they were used for "transportation."

"What kind of transportation"

Mewart asked. "What transporta
tion means," she replied.

Then she teio that various

155-Day Strike Al
Wesfinghouse Ends
With Hew Conlracl

Funeral Rites For

Chester Wilson
Held At Mt; Hope
Funeral services for Chester Wil

son, former Canal emnlove. who

died at Coco Solo Hospital, were
held yesterday afternoon and in

terment followed at Mount Hope
Cemetery. He was 65 years old.
A native of Rockville, Missouri,
Mr. Wilson was employed from
1918 to 1921 as a clerk and later
as an inspector with the Panama

Canal Accounting Department.
After leaving the Canal service.

he made his home on the Atlantic

WASHINGTON. March 21 fUP)

Some 44,000 workers started
back to their iobs at 30 Westinc-

house Electric Corp. plants today

aner tne longest major strike in

at least 20 years.
The bitter dispute was settled In

its 156th day last night when neg

otiators tor the company and the
AFL-CIO International. Electrical
workers Union signed a new five-

year contract retroactive to Oct
15.

The strike cost worker almnst

half a year of wages about $75
million and the company more
than $250 million in sales, accord according
ing according to company estimates. Other

unions loaned the IUE more than
$1.5 million in aid to strikers.
The union claimed the walkout
was one of three longest nation nationwide
wide nationwide strikes ir. American history.

It said the other two were coal

mine strikes in 1922 and 1902.

company officials said the bulk

checks were issued to Indivi Individuals
duals Individuals for "wear and teer" en
their cart.
Mrs. Dungee said that she at

tended a mass meeting at King's
church the night of Dec. 5 when
money was collected. She said she

was sure the money was depos
ited to the account of the MIA.

The state contends the MIA was

organized at the Dec. 5 meeting.

with King as president, solely to

put across tne Doycott.
Mrs. Dungee said that the MIA

had "some other functions" be beside
side beside the boycott, but she did not

know of any "direct function."

four Negroes testified that thev

owned or worked at gasoline sta stations
tions stations and had received money

from the MIA for fuel charged to

the organization's account by pri

vate onvers.

They said they identified the

drivers from a list of license num

bers given them by the MIA.

City Detective K. W. Jones tes

tified that he stopped two Negro

drivers on Jan. 11 and that they
told him they hauled passengers

witn gasoline paid tor by the MIA

7

"3
V

s

"COLORED EGGS and Easter go together like Santa an ,i. i.ivh
FhTA

Italy Rules Latin
Useless As Roman
Empire To" Pupils
ROME, March 21 (UP) The
Italian government decided today
that Latin is as dead as the Ra
man Empire.
Minister of Puhlie

. iiiuviULUVU
Paolo Rossi said students in jun junior
ior junior high schools no longer will be
taught the language of their an

cient loretathers because they
would have no use tar it in law

life.

;V;,V

Ft. Gulick Units

Will Entertain
Panama Orphans
Some 35 omhans frnm rnlnn

St. Vincent de Paul orphanage will

De guests oi the 7470th and 7406th
Army units Easter Sunday from
11 until mid-afternoon. An Easter
egg roll, dinner and a religious
movie will highlight the occasion.

fir,-.: 1 ..J I v.".

side and recently was living on a 'of the IUE strikers would
farm in the Ratun T.nfcA rfistrirt inn th.i 4h. ..,ii.i "1 sua can study it in all

""" us declensions and conjugations.

Army, Air Force In Guided Missile Feud

WASHINGTON, March 21 (UP)

The Army is reported to have
formally protested against Air

force plans to build Talos guided
missile bases in this country for

anti-aircraft defense.

The Army contended the Talos

anti-aircraft bases would be duo-

lication of the Army's Nike mis

sile system now spread across the

nation.

Gen. Maxwell Tavlor. A r m v

chief of staff, and Army Secretary

w iioer m. urucker carried

Hi

The first man on trial was theiprotest yesterday to Secretary of

Defense Charles E. Wilson, It was

reported.
Earlier, a Senate suborn mi ttee
proposed a duel between the
Taolot and Nike to show their
merits.-

The subcommittee proposed the
two services give a demonstration
of the missiles in action against

arones comparable to latest Rus
sian bombers.

Defense Department officials

doubted the demonstration would

be permitted because the weapon's

exact performance is a military

secret.

OPENING TOMORROW ft LUX ft

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Pancho Villa's fabulous saga!

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I Air Force undersecretary James
H. Douplas sunnnrtpH Ihp nrnnni.

I ai ior a auei.

crucRer said it was up to the
defense department.
The Nike hat a range of about
25 milet.
The Talos originally devel developed
oped developed by the Navy hat a rang
of about 50 milet.
The duel was proposed hy Sen.
Henry M. Jackson (D-Wash.).
"Before plumping down any
more money" for the missiles sys system,
tem, system, Jackson said, Congress
should find out exactly how effec effective
tive effective the weapons are.
Jackson told reporters that nei neither
ther neither the Nike nor the Talos has

I ever had a full-scale test against

pianes tnat iiy as high and fast
as modern Russian bombers.
The Army's new construction
program calls for additional funds
to expand the Nike defense ring
around the Nation's principal ci cities
ties cities and extending it to European
ba8eSi- -(,-'
The Air Force Is seeking funds
to install Talos launching sites at
some Strategic Air Command bas bases
es bases in this country.
The Air Force has tended to be

little the effectiveness of the Nike

against modern jet bombers.

Jackson suggested that both
defensive weapons be pitted a.
gainst new "pilotlest bombers,"
such at the Snark or Matador
missiles, which would simulate
let; bombers attacking e "tyoi "tyoi-cal
cal "tyoi-cal eityy
The Nike last year was matched
against the Matador imrW

tions which Army official describ-

ea. as realistic and Air Force of officials
ficials officials contended were controlled
The Nike succeeded in knocking
down some of the Matadors but
missed others.

Enlisted men from the Fort Gu Gulick
lick Gulick units voluntarily contribute to
the orphanage fund each month.
Started eight months aso the chil

dren have twice been the guests
of the two units. Thanksgiving din

ner prepared by Army cooks, and
a 'Christmas party complete with

Santa Claus and a gift for each

cniid have been past projects.

An Army bus will pick un the

children at approximately 10 a.m.

Accompanied by orphanage per

sonnel, tney will make a brief tour

ot points of interest on the post,

Future plans call for each child
on her birthday to be taken to Co Colon
lon Colon for dinner, a movie and to a
store to pick out a gift of her own

choosing. Escorts will be billnv

gual volunteers from the units.

When funds permit, permanent

playground equipment such as

swings, seesaws, slides, soccer

balls, volley balls and nets will be
donated. '.'. ;"'
There are approximately 60
orphans in the institution with ag ages
es ages ranging from a few months to
15 years.
Name Droppers
MILAN, Italy. March 21 (UP)

The parents of at least 187
Italian children w ere finding
their sons' names embarrassing
today.
The parents are Communists
and had christened their chil

dren "Stalin." i

(U.S. Army Photo)

Key Suspect
.VANCOUVER, B.C., March 21
(UP) Police questioned a 50-year-old
man Vestprriov nr h

they found he had been posing
as a janitor In the police sta station
tion station and found he had stolen
the master key to the headquar-

BALBOA TIDES

THURSDAY, MARCH 22

niton

IOW
5:47 a.m.
6:26 p.m.

Reds Hurl Charges
Of U.S. Violation
Action In Austria
JMOSCOW, Manch 1 (UP) -The
official Soviet Communist party
newspaper Pravda charged today
that the United States is violating
the neutrality of, Austria. .
The newsnaner sM in 17;..-.

dispatch that many. American sol soldiers,
diers, soldiers, both in uniform and civilian
clothes, are oassinp thrmmK a...

tria from West Germany to Italy.

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' SAMUafi. NGEL-HENRY K0STER ELMNORE GRIFFIN

THE STORY OF ECGBERT An Easter Adventure BY WALT SCOTT

I'M NOT AFRAID OCVnil A)llTre

SKITTEK! 1V9 ALWAYS BELIEVCD i
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JANE WYMAN
Ruth, who thought love hid passed hir by. 41 :
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