The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03037

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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(NEA Radio-Telephoto)
MALENKOV IN LONDON Former Soviet Premier Georgl
Malenkov (arrow) la surrounded by airport officials, a welcom welcoming
ing welcoming committee and police on his arrival in London. Malenkov
is In England lor a three-week tour of British electrical
Installations In his new role as Soviet Minister of Electrical
Power stations.
-
Malenkov to See Eden
Apparently Keeping Worried Eye
On Khrushchev's Debunking of Stalin

LONDON, March 19 (UP). Georgi Malenkov rearranged his
' schedule today to pay a call on Prime Minister Anthony Eden.
Informed sources said the Russians regarded the visit by the
former Soviet Premier as "something more than a customary
courtesy call' and that Malenkov apparently was keeping a wor worried
ried worried eye on the Kremlin.

If the visit had anything to
do with,. NIMta Khrushchev's
bitter attack onsjosel Stalin, no
one was saying, ; t -But
Malenkov obviously .jhas
been worried and he has been In
constant touch with the Krem Kremlin
lin Kremlin since the Khrushchev speech
became public. ;
To visit Eden today Malen Malenkov
kov Malenkov had to rearrange his whole
schedule fox the day he origi originally
nally originally had planned to spend
most of it at the top-secret
British atomic research sta station
tion station at Harwell.
- Malenkov is now minister in
charge of electric power stations
in Russia. ..

The other 13 members of the
. Soviet delegation were spending
most of the day at Harwell and

were going to Oxford tonight
while Malenkov dines with the
Labor Party executive commlt-
tCThe pudgy official who suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded to the premiership on
Stalin's death only to lose it and
be demoted to minister of elec electric
tric electric power squeezed In a visit
yesterday to Windsor Castle, a
residence of the Royal family,
nd a chat with a labor leader
who was deported from the
United States for communist ac-
, tiVBuyt the rest of his schedule
was Interrupted. Malenkov van vanished
ished vanished Into-the brick building in
Kensington which houses the
Soviet embassy. He said he had
to "do some work." ; :
' Malenkov first cancelled, then
re-schedulecl his visit to Windsor
Castle. : "
The Eoval family was : not
present. Queen Elizabeth and
the Duke of Edinburgh return returned
ed returned to London today from a
week's cruise in the Mediter-
Malenkov, soviet Ambassador

Jacob Malik and Mrs. MaUK ap appeared
peared appeared at the 900-year-old castle
" and viewed its state apartments,
tv rinll house which belonged to

Oueen Victoria and the view
from the north terrace over
FRANCE
- GETS
TOUGH
ALGIERS, Algeria, March 19
(UP) France threw its full
military might today against
the 16-months-old .rebellion in
Alger'a.
France clamped dow n on
the restive populace with vir virtual
tual virtual martial law, ordered mas massive
sive massive troops reinforcements for
the sprawling North African
possession and sent the fleet
streaming across the Mediter Mediter-rean
rean Mediter-rean t oblockade the coast.
French resident minister,
Robert Lacoste warned that all
rebels will be judged and
swiftly by military trbunals
and that desert'on of Moslem
soldiers with their arms will
be punished by death.
ff Pran"- v -"I T.i-r ti
pressure from no o"P m tirnl-
ine with ?M ret-r! i ,oi eis al al-rni!y
rni!y al-rni!y undrr a d "''!"(,

u j
THE MARVELOUS
CARIOCA CAriTAL!

looking the playing fields of
WUH., :--.., ,;f ,i;,..k,
Malenkov. -during the, day
spoke with a delegation of work workers
ers workers from the Battersea 1 power
station.
Among them : was Charles
Doyle. scottlsh-born trades un unionist
ionist unionist who formerly lived at Buf Buffalo,
falo, Buffalo, N.Y. Doyle was deported
several years ago for Communist
activity. ,, ,..
:' At the castle, Malenkov ra radiated
diated radiated charm for other tour tourists.
ists. tourists. He posed with a group of
sari-clad Indian women,
"It Is wonderful to think that
this lovely building is open to
the British people," he told the
castle superintendent.
Baiila Of Ideas
Appeals To Reds,
Coqimenfafor Says
LONDON. Marrh 19 fl'X . 1
i dio Moscow commentator said
ioaay Kussians would rather cross
ideas than swords with A m e r i i-cans.
cans. i-cans. ':. ';. ,;.
Th commentator said competi competition
tion competition and mutual sharing of a-
cmevemems WOUIO. DO Dest for
Dominations,
He said that when Thomas Edi
son- invented the incandescent
lamp, "No one considered it a
threat to any nation's welfare.
"When fruit growers of America
copied Ivan Michurin's methods
and their Russian colleagues stu studied
died studied the work of Luther Burbank,
no one ten it was dangerous.
cooperation is as a a v a n t a-
ffeous to the U.S.A. as it is fn th
Soviet Union," he said,
"We'd rather argue with you in
univesity hals than night you on
me Datueiiem. ,, : .
SOUVENIRS FOR CLARA JO
tthrouslfUls 'fiPslt drawer In the

four-year-old Clara Jo Proud foot, National Easter Seal Child.
Clara J.o.of Miami sold the president the first sheet of Easter

tfais to help crippled children.

(uf;iii!rr!l!ji!d

"Lei fA people know the truth end the

(C 6 n

Red Freighter
Searched
At Honolulu
HONOLULU, March 19 (UP)
A Russian freighter whose last
port of call was believed to be
the Panama Canal was subject subjected
ed subjected to an inside-out, top-to-bottom
search by Coast Guardsmen
on arrival here at the week end.
(No official statement could
be obtained here today as to
whether the freighter Jana got
any such thorough going-over
during the several days it lay
at Cristobal before its Canal
transit last month.
(The crew was not allowed a a-shore
shore a-shore during that time, but offi
cials here refused to say whether
the shore leave ban was on or
ders of the Russian ship's cap
tain, or the U.S. authorluesv
(It is thought the long Cristo
bal delay may have been due to
the agent having to wait for
Russian authorities to forward
cash to pay for the transit of
the Jana, and the trawler and
small floating dock which, ac accompanied
companied accompanied her.)
A Coast Guard spokesman
in Washington said the Hono Honolulu
lulu Honolulu investigation was in ac accordance
cordance accordance with U.S. regulations
authoring port officials to
search alien vessels for fission fissionable
able fissionable materials, bombs or other
Illegal cargo.
The Jana arrived here towing
a floating drydock and trawler
from Kaliningrad, on the Baltic
sea, to Vladivostok.
All three vessels were thor
oughly searched, with Coast
Guard skin divers examining the
outs'.de.of the hull below th wa wa-teivline.
teivline. wa-teivline.
The trawler and drydock were
then allowed to tie up at a pier
but the Jana was kept all nlghi
in the "exDlosives anchorage."
Lt. Cmdr, Kenneth Wilson,
Coast Guard port captain, said
only the officers of the three
vessels would be allowed ashore,
and then only under strict su supervision
pervision supervision of the ships' agents,
Oahu Land and Railway Co.
Newsmen went aboard the
drydock and trawler and in interviewed
terviewed interviewed the captain, Nikolai
Petrovsky, 51, Leningrad, who
express d surprise at the
Coast Guard precautions.
He said the three vessels left
Kaliningrad Nov. 15, 1955, sailed
through the North Sea, to the
Atlantic and stopped off at Trin Trinidad
idad Trinidad before passing through the
Panama Canal, Feb. 22, 1956,
without incident.
Retired CZ Worker
Loses Left Arm
In Auto Accident
Severlano Pringas, a retired
Puerto Rlcam employe of the
Canal Zone, lost his left arm to today
day today in an automobile accident
near Quebrada del Pueblo, Ca Ca-plra.
plra. Ca-plra. i
The accident occurred when
the Interior-bound automobile
driven by Pringas sideswlped a
freight truck headed m the op opposite
posite opposite direction.
Pringa's arm, which was rest resting
ing resting on the window of the auto automobile
mobile automobile was crushed between the
guard rails of the truck driven
by Enrique Ducreut.
Pringas has been brought to
Santo TOmas Hospital .while
Ducreut has been placed under
arrest at Capira. t
"." (NEA Telephoto)
Pre.?ident Eisenhower looks
Ite"IIoUi for souvenirs for'

PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, MARCH 19, 195

WATCHING FOR TERRORISTS Para troopers man their guns opposite the Archbishopric
as they keep a watchful eye for terrorists at N icosla, Cyprus. Ancient Greek churches on the
island are being searched by British paratroop ers for the terrorist who machinegunned a
British sergeant to death.
;V"'.
Terrorist Tovn Fined 1 $19,600

As 19th Tommy Dies

NICOSlAt;yprurrMarcrf.19 (UP)-

of Laipthos $19,600 today
by Cypriot extremists.

The collective fine, heaviest yet imposed on a Cyprus town, came as a British
soldier died today from injuries suffered in another bombing Saturday irt Nicosia.

The soldier was injured when
extremists threw a bomb into an
army truck.
His dtath brought to 19 tho
numbtr of British soldier killed
sine thr currant unrt ttarttd.
Harding said yesterday there
would be no difficulty in finding
leaders to negotiate on Cyprus'
future once the political power
of the church in Cyprus is broken.
A group' of matktel txtrmitt
Invaded a crowdtd ehurchnr
here yesterday end shot a Creek
Cypriot worshipper to death be before
fore before a horrified congregation.
A second Cypriot was killed by
British security forces when he
failed to ston at a road block. One
other person was wounded in the
action. .
Four masked men walked into
St. George's Church at Kythrea,
neap .Nicosia, while the congre-
Ex-Convict Friend
Jailed For Robbery
01 JWB-USO Cenler
iAn ex-convict, Alfred It. Macha Macha-do,
do, Macha-do, and his companion, Juan San Sanchez,
chez, Sanchez, both 19, were in jail today,
charged with burglarizing the JWB
USO Club at Balboa.
The case against the two Pana Panamanians
manians Panamanians was continued until this
afternoon when it is anticipated
several other charges against them
may be. filed. Canal Zone detec-
tives are still investigating other
burglaries which may be tied in
with these two. ;
The defendants are charged with
entering the JWB building between
12:30 a.m. and 3:30 a.m. last Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, morning, with intent to com commit
mit commit larceny.
They reportedly stole a $350 ac ac-cordian,
cordian, ac-cordian, a $90 camera, a quantity
of cigarettes and
candy, and
register at
$80
in cash from the
the
soda fountain. ;'-"''.'
Detectives say the camera and
accordion were recovered in Pa
nama City, but the money has not;
been returned.

Treasury Secretary, Congressmen Agree: No Tax Cut This Year

WASHINGTON, March 19
(UP) Treasury Secretary
George M. Humphrey agreed yes.
terday with three members of
the tax-writing House, Ways
and Means Committee that
there will be no tax cut this year.
Humphrey said there is noth
ing in the administration's "fig
ures" to jusuiy a tax cut, "much
as I regret to say so."
The congressmen predicted

that the Democratic controEed4make any

nuuie anu jscimie win iorego ani
election-year reduction
Humphrey, interviewed by
Rep. Kenneth B. Keating (R-

DAILY
O

A 1

A1

country it we' Abraham Lincoln.

-4
,vwviiivr m
rw.....:t:.
in reprisal for an ahtf-British
gation was singing at the morning
service.
The priest begged the Invad Invaders
ers Invaders not te start shooting and flV flV-seerete
seerete flV-seerete the church, but the men
ordered the congregation to face
the walls.'
'One of the terrorists then order ordered
ed ordered ClerideS Maoli, 45, to stand in
front of the altar.
All four then shot Maoli in the
stomach before running out of the
church.
Authorities said the murderers
have not yet -been traced.
The murder came on a day of
mounting tension on this British
island colony while British troops
strengthened their security grip
against any new outbreaks by
Greek nationalists protesting the
exiling of Archbishop Makarios.
Harding clamped, a curfew on
26-Passcnger Bus
Leaps Embankment
Hear Mileposl Two
Twenty-six passengers on a bus
travelling westward on Thatcher
Highway which went over a two two-foot
foot two-foot embankment last Friday and
turned over, came out slightly
bruised and shaken from the ac
cident, but none required hospital
ization.
According to a police report, the
anver, Antonio spina, a 34-year
old Italian resident of Chorrera
t was driving the bus near milepost
2 when he lost control. The bus
swerved first to the left side of the
road, then Back to the right side.
went down a two-foot embankment,
sideswiped a tree and overturned
on its right side in thick jungle un
dergrowth. ; :
borne of the passengers were
bruised when they were tumbled
from their seats from the impact
Several were taken to
Santo Tc-t!
mas Hospital where they, were
treated for minor injuries, but none
was hospitalized.
Police are still continuing inves
ligation of the accident.
N.Y.) over New York TV stations,
said the administration's estl
mate of a 200 million dollar
budget surplus In the present
fiscal year still stands.
But he said this falls far short
of Justifying a tax cut.
Humphrey, who said the gov government
ernment government spends about 200 mil million
lion million dollars In a single day, add
ed that lt would take a surplus
of "several billion dollars to
wortnwnne.
Rep. Hale Boegs (D-La.). a
member of th Way and Means
Committee and vice chairman

KEYSPAFER

:
on Cyprus
vunri rwumg nnea me.- xowp
U...J- .. i' .i 'ii. a
bombing
attack Saturday I
the village of Yialloussa where
British truck was blown uo last
night. A British soldier was killed
and three others injured in the
bomb attack.
Troops cordoned off the whole
Yialloussa area and started an in intensive
tensive intensive hunt for the attackers.
A considerable quantity of am ammunition
munition ammunition was found yesterday at
Tokhni, near Larnica, when po police
lice police and troops made a surprise
raid. Two men were held for i
questioning.
Extremist raiders shot a British
foreman at the Linis copper mines
last night in a five-minute attack.
Police said the Briton was serious seriously
ly seriously wounded.
High School Youth
Gels $15 Fine For
Age Falsification
A 17-year-old high school youth,
who last year gave his age as 18
on a Canal Zone driver's license,
was fined $15 this morning in the
Balboa Magistrate's Cout on a
charge of "false affidavit."
When asked by Balboa Magis Magistrate
trate Magistrate why he had falsified the rec
ord, he said that he did it so he
could "drive in the Zone."
The student was found guilty of
' giving raise birthdate m applying
for an operator's license on July
o, 1M.
Before nassmg sentence, the
judge called the defendant's fath
er to the stand. The father testi
fied that he was told by his son
that all high school students who
complete a driving course were
entitled to a learner's license, and
thought the son was able to drive.
He stated, however, that he did
not lend his car to his son very
ouen.
Judge Deming said he felt the
father should nav the fine be
cause he permitted the son to use
the car. He also stressed the se
riousness of the o f f e n s e, and
pointed out that this might reflect
on the youth s record should
he
try to get employement.
of the Democratic National
Committee, told a reporter that
he was "sticking by my original
prediction I don't see any tax
cut this year." ;
Two other committee mem members,
bers, members, Reps. Robert W. Kean (R (R-N.J.)
N.J.) (R-N.J.) and An ton! B. Sadlak (R (R-Conn.),
Conn.), (R-Conn.), agreed with Boggs n
separate interviews.
Rep. Clifton Young (R-Nev.)
said in a statement that 68.8 per
a questionnaire he circulated In
Nevada favored the admlnlstra
tion's doIIcv of reduclne the 80
billion dollar national debt be

.

I

ie; Hundreds

Of Autos

Or Icy Highways

NEW YORK, March 19 (UP) The heaviest snow snow-storrtLof
storrtLof snow-storrtLof the winter paralyzed transportation in the New
York area today stranding thousands of motorists on
snow-blocked highways.
The surprise storm grew steadily worse and authori authorities
ties authorities went into emergency action in the hardest hit areas.
The eight-inch snow was the second storm to hit the
area since Friday. Together the two storms left a death
toll of more than 85.
Automobiles became stranded by the hundreds last
night on the slippery surfaces of superhighways in New

York and its sprawling suburbs.

The snow began yesterday as a
light flurry and slowly increased
In intensity. Winds up to 30 mpn
whipped the snow into traffic-,
stopping drifts.
Automobiles skidded and stall stalled
ed stalled on numerous thoroughfares.
Police closed the most seri-
'itoS Icr,8? '-'tcs,
t r' I e :
liiCiwIlj LAtli-sMl
Gunfire Af Border
JERUSALEM (Israeli Sector).
March 19 (UP) Troops of Jor
dan's Arab Legion and Jordan Jordanian
ian Jordanian frontier guards attacked an
Israel patrol yesterday, the Is Israeli
raeli Israeli government announced to today.
day. today. ..'. V
A communique said the attack
came on the Beer Sheba-Hebron
road paralleling the border and
that there were no casualties. It
said the Israelis returned the
fire.
It wa. the first attack In that
area since 1954 and marked the
first time Arab Legionnaires
have been involved in sklrmisn-
ing since Jordan fired .Lt. Gen.
Sir John Glubb pasna as neaq oi
the Legion.
It coincided with reports
young King Hussein was plan
ning a visit to tne leaders oi
other Arab states to show he
is for Arab unity.
A dispatch from Amman quot quoted
ed quoted the young monarch's chief
minister as saying Hussein was
planning to visit the Arab cap1
itals in answer to new Arab
pressure for Jordan to throw off
all western ties.
El Rancho Garden
Opens Display
Of Raft Cantute
The raft Cantuta which is now
located in the parking lot of EI
Rancho garden,- goes on display to
the public today.
All proceeds for the price of ad
mission, 15 cents to adults, and i
cents for children, will be given to
the five survivors of the raft who
were picked ud at sea and brought
here last week by the Greenville
Victory.
The four men and one woman
have since returned to Peru, but
left behind the memento of their
ill-fated trip.
The management of El Rancho
announces that on Sundays t he
raft will be open to the public free
of charge from u a.m. to 4 p.m.
fore cutting taxes.
Young said nearly 80 per cent
were opposed to any tax reduc reduction
tion reduction that would throw the budg budget
et budget out of balance.
Humphrey told Keating he was
"very happy" that the House last
week overwhelmingly approved
President Eisenhower's request
for a one-year postponement of
reductions in corporation and
certain excise taxes.
complete action on the measure
before the April 1 deadline when
the rates would drop under
present law.

flVE CENTS

J J o Li o

Strande
ously affected parkways of
Long Island, and set up rescue
apparatus for an estimated
2000 persons stranded in their
autos, miles from home.
They rushed buses with chains
into service and took the strand stranded
ed stranded motorists to transit facilities,
police stations and city halls.
, The Red Cross supp' ?d "civ "civets
ets "civets and hot coffee a: rn-.T-.'-'V'T
-ihfi i""" ',-';", V -W'v mi
Individual taken in ,-;,
left their automobiles t.ran.'ie.-l
in Jack Straw fashion along the
usually clear speedways.
snow quiciciy covered the aban.
doned automobiles and the high
ways were thickly dotted with
white lumps that indicated stall.
ed cars.
The weather bureau saM the
storm' dumped snow ever parts
of nine states from .Virginia to
Rhode Island. s
The storm began movin out in
sea today but temperatures wer
not expected to rise much above)
the lower 30's.
30 Candidates 5
Election To Board
Of American 5oci:ly
The nominating cnmmiftpo nl
the American Society of Panama
yesterday announced the pames
of 30 candidates who wilt take
part in the election of five officers
at the society's annual meetinu tn.
night at the Panama Golf Club.
In addition to the elections. ev
eral important matters will., be
discussed at the meeting, which
starts at 7:30 p.m.
The names submitted by the)
nominating committee are: Rob Robert
ert Robert J. Boyd, B. H. Carpenter,, L.
R. Cramer, D. W. Dickerson, R,
L.t Dehlinger, H. L. ; Deerwoster,
M. W. Fisher, G. K. Fox, F. J.
Gerhardt, R. LV Gleichman, Roy
Clickenhaus, John W. Graham, L,
B. Haberstick, C. R. Howell Saul
Jacobs, G. D. Makibbin, A. O. Ma Ma-theney,
theney, Ma-theney, J. T. Mc Grath, Jack Mer Mercer,
cer, Mercer, S. S. Moore T.. E. Oglesbv,
D. A. Pagenta, Donald Porter, F.
F. Purdy, C. T. Richarson, Jr., A.
G. Robins, R. M. Rummcl, J. G,
Ridge, W, C. Schmitt, C. S. Shek Shek-ell.
ell. Shek-ell. .". ;'
The meeting will be followed by
a buffet supper and beer.
Additional nominees may .be
added tonight with the the presen presentation
tation presentation of written endorsement by
ten members, the committee said.
Army Truck 7crIIi
$19,C0 DoslroycJ
When Oil L".i!:$
Ah oil-spreading truck worth
$19,000, according to Army en engineers,
gineers, engineers, was completely destroy destroyed
ed destroyed by fire last Friday mornin?
when the driver, Louis F. Marti Martinez,
nez, Martinez, started, the oil heating. It
ignited, in, some unknown man manner,
ner, manner, according to a police report.
The Army said today they
were still investigating the in incident
cident incident which, occurred on fara faraway
way faraway Road near the Gatun Tar Tarpon
pon Tarpon Club.
Two fire rigs responded imrr?--diately
and brought the fire i:--der
control, but the truiu -equipment,
valued at i
was damaged beyond m
cording to the Army.
The driver is a 3"M
Colombian employed t
i my Engineers at I t i



)

fGT. TWO
THE PANAMA AMERH AN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NE1YSFAFES
MONDAY, MARCH 13, 135

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THE MAI L BOX

Peter Edson
In

The Deeper Cleft

Washington

NOTHING IN A NAME

fiir:

When I wrote my first two letters I was a good bit in the
dark because I had read no more about Argentina than about
any other country. When Mr, Calhoun mentioned Argentina's
attitude during the war and blamed Peron, I didn't even know
that Peron was then only a colonel and that he did not assume
the presidency until after the war was over in 1948.
. J have since learned that Argentina and Brazil did enter
the, war against Germany and her allies early in 1945. In order
to show Peron's personal attitude toward the Nazis, I am going
to iuote an old press dispatch. The AP said on December 23,
"Argentine Foreign Minister Bramudlia announced that 13
Nazi agents had been deported to Germany, He cited this as
evidence that Argentina' had been fulfilling and would continue
to fulfill her International obligations."
I (.
In my other letters, written after my talk with Peron, 1
endeavored to prove by old press dispatches and by a few new
ones that most of the things he tola me are true. Some of his
statements I have not been able to prove because I have not
been able to find new books on Argentina.
How-ver, I will say this: I have found nothing to disprove
them, either. ''Honest Appraisal" says that anyone who cares
to read the facts knows that Peron is an evil man. Well, I wish
he would tell" us the names of some books to read on the sub subject,
ject, subject, or at least give us some quotations.

. Personally I believe that he Is doing like all the others
merely repeating conclusions that others keep reiterating with without
out without citing one instance where Peron robbed the government or
caused the torture or death of a single person. A great many
people, because they are evil themselves, will quickly accept as
the truth any disparaging statement about another person.
If anybody from his heart attempts to do somebody a good
turn, the evil type of person always tries to figure out an evil
motive for the good deed. Honest Appraisal really gave me a
'back-handed compliment when he told you not to be fooled by
the letters oi well-paid press agents.
I wish I were but really the only reason that I answered
Mr. Calhoun's letter was because I, as a true American, like
lair play and believe that a man Is Innocent unless he is proven
guilty.-If I believed that the majority of Americans were narrow-minded
bigots like some of the authors of Mall Box letters,
I. would be ashamed to call myself an American.

I am no Pollyanna, for I know too many Instances where
evil has triumphed. However, I am enough like a Pollyanna to
believe that the majority of our country's people are good Amer

icans, in ranama, as in every otner country.there are also .ou)d bc choscn to prevent either
,.. undeserving people, but we as American citizens should be broad-Jr.."!,,, minr nartv candidates

of the faults of a frw. j J : u 1 I

' Honest Appraisal, in condemning Peronlsmo, as heealls It,
does not seem to be well enough informed to realize that it
really embodies our own democratic principles of social aid and
social Justice,

In Peron's own words: "For us, the Justiclalistas, the world
is divided in two parts -Capitalist and Communists in conflict,
We claim Ideologically td be outside this conflict of world In Interests.
terests. Interests. That does not imply that we are in the international
camp, but Independent of the problem.
"We- believe that Capitalism as well as Communism both
are outmoded. We believe that Capitalism is the exploitation
of the man by capital and that Communism is the exploita exploitation
tion exploitation of man by the state. Both make Insects of men by differ different
ent different systems. We believe that the abuses of Capitalism are the
cause and that Communism is' the effect. Without the abuses
of Capitalism, Communism has no reason to exist. We believe
equally that, when the cause disappears, the effect will com commence
mence commence to disappear. .....,,....,.-....,
"We have proved this during the eight years of our gov government
ernment government when the Communist party In our country reached
its least expression. To do this, all we we had to do was sup suppress
press suppress the evils of Capitalism."
On the religious controversy all I am going to do is quote
Felix J. Well, a native of Argentina, who published a book in
1944 called "Argentine Riddle.'' He says in this book that under
the Argentine Constitution, nobody except a Catholic may be become
come become either president or vice president, and that In 1943 the
teaching -of the Catholic religion was made compulsory in all
the schools of Argentina.
At a believer in our own Constitution, I believe in religious
freedom and the separation of the church and the state. As an
American citizen, I hate Communism or any other type of gov government
ernment government that imposes itself by force against the will of the gov governed..
erned.. governed..
There's nothing in a name. Our country gets along whether
the Democrats or the Republicans are In power. It doesn't mat matter
ter matter If it is called Justiciallsmo if it is a government of the peo people,
ple, people, by the people and for the people.
' An American Citizen

SIDE GLANCES

By Colbraith

i f & t V
H pfcfi. I

1IMH HA twM,

"litre cornea our comedian friend to spring his joke
r --in how he never gets past this shop with his take take-home
home take-home pay!"

WASHINGTON (NEA) -Clarence
E. Manion, 'former dean
of Notre Dame Law School and

now co-chairman of the "Fnr

America' right wing political

movement, is navmg ms mtle re

venge.
Dismissed from a high Eovern-

ment commission post by President

cisennower in 1954, Dean Manion
is now promoting an involved plan
to elect an "All-American" instead
of an "internationalist-minded"
president in November.
In the latest of a series of Him.

day night broadcasts in which he
has been outlining his plan, Dean
Manion declared that. "The Re

publican party is dead. It has
ceased to exist as an opponent of

uie Democrat welfare state!

This will probably come as a

great surprise to GOP National

Chairman Leonard Hall, who has

been counting on electing Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower in a landslide. Manion hones

to stop it.

Dean Manion told this reporter

that the real reason both Repub Republicans
licans Republicans and Democrats set their

nominating conventions in late

August was to prevent any other
political movements from having
time to organize opposition third
parties.

But the Manion plan is intended

to overcome this, too,

In essence, Manion calls on vot

ers to cast their ballots for slates

of unpledged presidential electors

in the November elections. He says

movements are already under way

in several states to get them on
the ballots.

As anyone who has ever cast a

ballot in a presidential election
knows, he doesn't vote directly for
the presidential candidate. He
votes for electors. There are 531 i

of them one for every U S. sena
tor and representative".

The electoral college then meets

in December and elects the presi

dent inaugurated the following
January.

It must be remembered, says

Dean Manion, that:

Any presidential elector elected

in November has the legal right to
vote for whomever he pleases, re

gardless of the party or person to
whom he was pledged. This is the

master kev to any plan to elect

pro-American electors in 1956."

It taKes 266 or more electoral

votes to elect a president. Dean

Manion is not proposing that 266

unpledged electors can be elected

m wovemDer. out ne aoes oeiieve
that enough independent electors

. X ftm

mmsi liirf
t nifa'1W, w' t

III
;-,:.::'-;i : Vi!

Walter Winchell In MevvYoru

sav Kisennower or Mevenson

from aettmg the necessary too

electoral college majority.
In this situation, the Constitution

says that the president shall be
elected by the House of Rep Representatives,
resentatives, Representatives, with each state dele dele-eation
eation dele-eation having one vote. It would

take 25 or more state votes to

name the president.
Dean Manion believes that say
13 southern states and a dozen or
mom mid-western farm states,

with a total House membership of

around 100, could elect a president.
They would have more power in
this special election than the other
23 more, populous northern and
eastern states, with a total House

membership of over 300.
The "Fnr America" movement

announced earlier in the year that
it favored Sen: William F. Know-

land (R-Calif) for the presidency.

Dean Manion says now tnat, lms
is not the time to pick our All All-America
America All-America candidate for, a
president."
He says there are many gover governors
nors governors and congressmen, "American
to the core." who would do. The
trouble is they are now frozen in
the existing party organizations.
They would be driven from public
life by the "old pros" if they were
to endorse independent, pro pro-American
American pro-American electors. ,
Dean Manion thinks things will
be different after the Nov. 6 elec elections.
tions. elections. Then the third group of

independent electors can spean um.

LOBSTER LOVELY Here's
-a-Ma-Iaed -delicacy .to tempt
any gourmet. Aotress Barbara
Hall is dressed as a rock lob lobster
ster lobster tail to entice visitors to the
National Frozen Food Conven Convention
tion Convention in New York.

BROADWAY
Celebs About Town: Talented
actor David Wayne, whose Broad Broadway
way Broadway success is deserved. Four con consecutive
secutive consecutive smash click shows: "Fln "Fln-ian's
ian's "Fln-ian's Rainbow," "Mr. Roberts,"
"Teahouse" and now "The Ponder

Heart" . .The Nixons visiting
the stars backstage at "Fanny"
. .Eartha Kitt and her British
Lord digging Mabel Mercer's tor tor-chants
chants tor-chants at The Byline Room. .

Myrna Loy. now a resident of E.

51st St., alter a long stay in Wash Washington
ington Washington where her groom was with
The Dept. of State. .Novelist

Fanny Hurst, who inherited al almost
most almost $500,000 from her husband's

estate. .Edw. G. Robinson, who
is making more money on Broad

way man ne got in Hollywood. His
new hit, "Middle of the Night,"
grosses over $35,000 a, week. He
has 15 percent' of it' besides a

plump wage. .Mrs. Milton Berlc,

who wants her man to quit
"While he's still ahead" .Sam .Sammy
my .Sammy Kaye breathlessly renortine

that he just came- from a cocktail
party at which Jayne Mansfield
didn't show up!

Sallies in Our Alley : At Blair

House a patron was complaining
that his dog is more of a human

being than his wife. . ."Then."

teased owner Nicky Blair, "why
don you marry 'the dog?". I
can't," was the shrug; "get a di

vorcer . .Grace Kelley's reallv

different. Getting married and giv giving
ing giving up her career. Most Hollywood

to interview Mrs. Hemingway for
Harper's. .Art Stander, newly newly-wedded
wedded newly-wedded to Janis Page, gave her a
solid-gold miniature cage with a
porcelain convict inside. The word word-age
age word-age reads: "Darling. I'm Just A

Prisoner of Love." (Goo-goo-goo

ey!) .. .Linda Harper, one of the Broadway Bus: Sophie Tucker

top fashion modeis imade as much! ($10,000) Frankie Laine ($7,500),
as $40,000 per year), gave it upl Buddy Hackett ($3,500) and the

hypnotic hoop-dee-doo, he is in the
present time-jind while In a sort
of levitation-state he is able to
look down on his body in its prison
cell. .Similar to the general idea

of Bridey.

to enter the chorus of "Strip for
Action." Wants to start at the
bottom on the way to stardom. .
Then there's the Suthin' actor who
calls himself Wyatt Trash.
Rainy Day in New York: Her
name' is Hope Lange. .Out of
Nowhere onto the Big-Time.
Started two years ago on a rainy
day in New York. .Henry C.
Brown, who specializes in beauti beautiful
ful beautiful women for tv commershills,
was looking over the field along
5th Ave. '. .He noticed Hope.. .
Went over, tipped his hat, intro introduced
duced introduced himself and That Diddit. .
She soon became a regular on
"The Sky's the Limit," a daily
video thing. From that to Broadway
in the show, "The Hot Corner,",
which flopped in a week. .She
wangled a lead (amazing for an
unknown) in a Kraft drama, "Snap
Finger Creek" .Her playing

drew exciting comment. .Holly-

wooa wants ner, too. .xne sun is
shining brightly for Hope Lange,
Miss Nobody of 1955. .All be because
cause because of a rainy day in N.Y.
, Times Square : Circle: Elaine

Stritch of "Bus Stop" is quoted

actresses who marry don't even around Sardi's on Grace Kelly's

give up men.

Memos of a Midnlgliler: Martha

Raye's groom is suing for divorce
and $100,000. ,Ex-Pres. Truman
will speak at the Overseas Press

Club event here April 3 . .Vic
Mature's divorce made him half-

a million poorer. .Frank Sin Sinatra,
atra, Sinatra, who is determined to remain

a bachelor, has a favorite Tender
Trap named Peggy Connelly. ..
The Julius La Rosas' honeymoon
villa will be an E. 55th St. apt. .
Nanette Frabray (one of the col col-yums
yums col-yums revealed) "surprised" friends
at, dinner (in her home) by an announcing
nouncing announcing she will soon wed Marty

Mills, ihat was the lead item here

two weeks ago. .They say Kuth

Roman, the star, and her di

vorced husband may try it again.
Very cozy. .Pat Crowley's beau

is James Lebenthal of Life. .The

actor Tod Andrews ended it via

the courts. .Jacqueline Carey,
one of the beauts in John Wayne's
starrer, "The Conquerors," weds

mag illustrator h. Deems on the

23rd. .Marilyn's latest date .in

Hollywood, they say, is the bull

fighter. Carlos Arruza,

Cast of Characters: Ellen Com-

ola, the 400 hatchick. is also a

free lance scrivener. Flew to Cuba of past incarnations.

white' clove trade-mark. Elaine

caustically calls them: "Minnie
Mouse gloves" . .Lew Ayres took
the part of Conway in "Shangri "Shangri-La"
La" "Shangri-La" mainly because it is blended
with philosophic and spiritual over

tones. Just ms meat. .in me imai
version of "Time Limitl" almost
a complete act was rewritten by

one of the bit-players. .Prettiest

drama critic in town. Nancy Smith
of Limelight Magazine. ,. .T h e
Bankhead-Tenn. Wms. clash, is
what Broadway needed to stop
yawning. Few folks know that Mr.
Wms. wrote his first play for Talu.
"Battle of the Angels" . .Talk
about overacting. Gloria Jones,
who plays the' preggy gal in "The
Diary of Anne Frank," had to
leave the cast Monday because
she is.'!,:'';V-. ; v:.;-':v:
Literary Sk ew p: There's an
amazing parallel between the cur current
rent current best-seller, "The Search For
Bridey Murphy," and Jack Lon London's
don's London's novel, "The Star Rover,"
written in 1915. ..London's tome
deals with a San Quentin lifer, who
spends considerable time in soli solitary..
tary.. solitary.. .. .During these fenced-in
stretches, he whiles away the hours

hypnotizing himself. . In these
trances, he lives through episodes

During one

Blackburn' Twins were suddenly in
formed that the Beachcomber (Mi

ami Beach) wasn't taking in that

kind of coin to run a 3rd week.
Ray Shaw's novel night spot is
The Living Room. Fireplace,' etc.
. v .Emmett Kelly (America's No.
1 Clown) presented the "What's

My Line?" panel with replicas, of
if IT!. t -1 1 r

imnseii. ms own ciown uou an
eye-catcher at the Toy Fair. .

Muriel Bentley, ex-member of the

N.Y. Ballet Co., has shelved show

biz for a new career. The wall wallpaper
paper wallpaper industry. .Sheila Bond is
in a swivet because the Polize

Gazette said she started as a strip stripper.
per. stripper. Threatens a suit. etc. .Beau

teous Lynn Storm, stripper, is

wearing the darkest glasses to cov
er the blackest orbs.
Stage Entrance: You prob'ly nev nev-er
er nev-er heard of Kathy Vail. An un

known drama student in Paris 6

months ago. Now the top Ameri American
can American attraction there. Preston Stur-

ges discovered her for his "Major
Thompson", movie. .Germany's
outstanding jazz pianist (Jutta
Hipp) is starring at the Hickory
House. Leonard Feather, the jazz
authority, found her. .Blonde

Anne Bollinger, once the leading
femme thrush at the Met, will
wed a Scandinavian beer baron
in the Spring. .Not all celebs
change their names. Teresa Brew Brewer
er Brewer just altered the spelling from
Breur. .Some of the critics who

were barred from Shubert Thea

tres were discussing the order of

the Gov t to the Shuberts to sell
their chain. Imagine! The Shu

berts being barred from their own
houses!. .Mel Torme's new act
at the Cameo has been held over
a fortnight.

Sounds in the Night: At the Char Charcoal
coal Charcoal Room: "Who's thenew Square
in her Triangle-". .At the Stork

Club: "I don't mind a clever story

as long as it s dirty" . .At Casa

Marina: "The trouble with tv is

they put the wrong people in the

sound-proof booths . .At Cafe
St. Denis: "If Ike isn't elected,
the most surprised person will be

btevenson .'.At McCarthy s: "I
had a terrible nieht. Slept all
through it" . .At Si Bon: "Bore?
I thawt he'd never stop listening!"

BUSINESS FAILURE
SALT LAKE CITY -(UP)- Ed
Mackelprang's home-grown ven venture
ture venture into free enterprise suffered a
setback. He reported the theft of
his entire stock of angleworms.

WhMjtiiitt lit ilbttu 7f;a tliUjV

LIFT UP YOUR HEARTS

(A Lenten feature of the Pana Panama
ma Panama American, prepared by the
Rev. M. A. Conkson, ..Episcopal
Churches of Our Saviour-St, Mar Margaret.):
garet.): Margaret.): CLEAN AND WORTHY
Rcaa Psalm: 49. "Let the rods
of my mouth, and the mediation
of my heart, be always accepta acceptable
ble acceptable in thy sight, 0 Lord, my
strength and my redeemer."
BEFORE our prayers and the
thoughts of our hearts can be wor worthily
thily worthily acceptable to Almighty God,
we must submit to a self-examination
in His sight. The first step
is to be honest before God and
k HiiiV- the Psalmiatl "O
cleanse thou me from my secret
faults." I suggest that you com commit
mit commit the following prayers to mem memory:
ory: memory: '
"ALMIGHTY GOD, unto

whom all hearts are open, all i
desires known, and from whom
no secrets are hid; Cleanse the
thoughts of our hearts by the in inspiration
spiration inspiration of thy Holy Spirit,
that we may perfectly leve
thee, and worthily magnify thy
holy Name; through Jesus
Christ our Lord. Amen.". ;
AFTER careful self-examination
and being willing to admit our
"secret faults," we-Tisk God's for forgiveness
giveness forgiveness through C h ir i s and
"draw near with faith" we are
ready to offer this prayer fof the
lifting up of tfur hearts:

GOD, who hast delivered us
from the power of darkness and
trennlated tnfeMhe khrRdntn of
thy dear Son; Pour thy spirit in into
to into our hearts, that He may show
us things to come; so that every
face, however furrowed by sor

row, or distorted bv pa.ion, orj Invert us I
stupefied by telMnt!:t!;"v' iV Arn.

be a witness to us of eternity; that
we may remember that thy Soii
Jesus Christ died tr redeem that
man and us; that we may look,
not for a new heaven only, but a
new earth wherein dwelleth right righteousness,
eousness, righteousness, LIFT UP, we beseech thee, our
hearts and our spirits above the

false shows of things, above fear
and melancholy, above laziaess
and despair above custom and
fashion up to the everlasting the
faith and trost that thou hast giv given
en given us thy Son to be our King and
our Saviour eur Example and our
Judge.

Jvica .IVasi:i::3To;i
n.EnRY-Go-Rou;;D
V.DngW FEAftSPfi

p

WASHINGTON, Sen. Wayne
Morse of Oregon shipped a
trailer load of his prize Eng English
lish English Red Devon iattl a A US n

tt the Louisiana St a to ritti

l a -..v. vuiuc iUlUW
at Baton Rouge the other day and
prepared tn fniinw hm v, i

trip. Louisiana Ktato iTni...i,..

professors invited him to make an

too Bt pan. oi me student lec lecture
ture lecture series. Morse accepted, agreed

, speak on aiarcn 4, De enter,
tamed at Pleasant Hall on the LSU
campus.
But On March 2 Spnatnr Xtn

made a sDeerh in w,h;noiA

posmg Senator Eastland of Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi as head of the Senate Judi Judi-ciary
ciary Judi-ciary Committee on the ground
that he had attacked the Supreme
Court as treasonous after the court
abolished segregation. l

Some hours latpr fnm

ceived phone call from Professor
J. W. Kisllpr in ikrn nr u

- 6 m. wlc
LSU student lecture series, cancel

ing uie Morse speaking engage engagement
ment engagement for March 4 on "orders of
the dean of Liberal Arts."

We have also ranrolmt vm,r

- v. JVUl
reservatmn at Plnacant Uoii ..r. ti..

campus," Professor Kistler said,

ana mane a rpcarvstinn at ih

Hotel Heidelberg instead."

morse new to Baton Rouee anv.

way, mingled with his cattle in the

cattle Pavilion on the T.vn

did not mingle with LSU students

w yroiessors oi iiDerai a"S.

LOBBY MANEUVERLNG
Sen. Lvndon Jnhnnn' Anti inan

euvermg for a bipartisan commit committee
tee committee has certainly managed to ham hamstring
string hamstring the investigation of big-time
lobbying and big-time campaign
contributions.

He.'e is what hannonpr) at tha

cret session of the Senate Select
Committee in Vfce President Nix Nixon
on Nixon s office when it deadlocked over

investigating the Pas-nil lnhhu anH

campaign contributions.
Sen. Stvles BriHcp nf Maw Hamp

shire, who has been carrying the
ball vigorously for the Republican?,
did most of the talking. He was

me oacKstage operator who moved,
along with Johnson, to require
50-50 GOP membership on the com committee.
mittee. committee. At the secret organization
meeting Bridges laid down a flat
decree that the Republicans wanted
Control Of the Staff and onnncol in

return for giving the Democrats
the chairmanship. But he also stip stipulated
ulated stipulated that the chairman would

not nave the usual power to issue
subpoenas and call meetings.
Bridges issnrrl thin ultimatum In

such dictatorial, take-it-or-leave-it
language that the Democrats said
they were ready to walk out.

wnereupon Bridges relaxed a bit
He showed his hand somewhat, in indicated
dicated indicated he WaS AfrAM nf Tannnc.

see's Sen. Albert Gore as chair

man, uore was head of the Elec Elections
tions Elections Committee which started to
investigate but was circumvented
by Johnson, Bridges and Knowland.

ao images proposed that Sen.
Jchn McClellan of Arkansas bc the
Committee rhairman M.run..

, ...un. .i.vciiaii,
an alleged Democrat, has voted

more wun KepuMtcans on crucial
issues than with Democrats, so
Bridges knew that io lirm.. k.

would lean away from any pene-

irauni? proDe or me oil-gas lobby.
McClellan nninlrlv miumlui ik.i

he didn't "seek" the chairman-

snip. jwever, ne didn't say he

wouiv reject it ana obviously left
GRILLING SENATOR CASE
Bridges was then cVH

would be picked as counsel, If the
Republicans Wer aiven. tK rinUt

to select him.

"Charles Steadman R r l A sec

, y a, v v
rephed.

This is the. nersnnal frioV1 nt

Bridges whom he appointed as

counsel of the committee to inves investigate
tigate investigate the $2,500 gift to Senator
Case AS if Can a woo fftiilfu t

- -wsawv. ii HU SjUUlJ Ul
fraud. He showed no intention of

getting down to the real ramifica ramifications
tions ramifications Of the eras Inhhv anrl hat nlv

done so after evidence leaked out

accidentally that Superior Oil mon money
ey money had gone into Nebraska, Iowa
and other states.
Bridges' suggestion, therefore,
brought no enthusiasm from the
leading Democrats.
McClellan next proposed that the
T? nnnKI i.an. k. r 1 . ...

.v-Huuiit.ii3 uc tivcn me vice

chairmanship and one-half the
staff. This was rejected by the
Republicans.
At this point the deadlock was
such that Vice President Nixon
stepped in as peacemaker to sug suggest
gest suggest that the two sides cool off and
ihat Bridges and Gore get togeth together
er together meanwhile to work on the rules.
The meeting then broke up.
Note The Democratic and
Republican Senate leaders, John John-son
son John-son and Knowland, both oriinally
announced that .the Senate Election
Committee then headed by Hen-

nmgs oi Missouri flad complete
power to probe the entire question
of lobbying. But when Hen

started to investigate, Johnson da-

manaea mat ne resign because he
was up for election himself. Later,
when Gore succeeded him and in indicated
dicated indicated he was just as anxious as
Hennings to investigate, both John Johnson
son Johnson and Knowland. eceer! nn mi.

vately by Bridges, moves to re replace
place replace Gore with a diluted biparti bipartisan
san bipartisan committee. In order to take
no chances of a penetrating probe,
Bridges had himself appointed to
this committee.

ald-llsadsd Club

Docks Cold Season

MINNEAPOLIS (UP) The
nation's baldhcaded men can't
rhflntro thas ureathar Kit (ken man

arrange to hold their annual con convention
vention convention at a comfortable time of
the year.
Tradition holds that the National
Baidheaded Club meets each year
in Minnesota, where it was found founded
ed founded in 1938. Usually the conventions
have been held in October, but the
1955 meeting was postponed three
months until January. As anyone
knows, a Minnesota January is
not ideal for a bald pate. So the
1956 convention again will be held
in October.
Head man of the Baldheads is
Swen G. Swenson of Minneapolis.
His title is Front Row Sitter, the
club's equivalent to national presi president.
dent. president. Club members won't com comment
ment comment on whether the title derives
from the traditional "baldhcaded
row" of the burlesque theater.
Swenson and the more than 350
other members of the organization,
which extends as far as Japan, are
no prospects for the hair restorer
nnnnlt Thnir incict i k.u bm msiul

of the lack of hair on their heads.
They're good natured about it. too
call their fellow members
"curlies."
The club members contend that
their "special dispensation" has
marked "the majority of the great
men of the world from the time of
the Saints and Julius Caesar to the
present.".;: .-:;:'
They have a few present-day ex examples
amples examples among their membership.
Cards have been issued to such
luminaries under "capitol domes"
as President Eisenhower, Sen.
Sam Rayburn, former Postmaster
General James Farley, and Rep.
Joseph P. O'Hara (R-Minn.).

A oerson is onlv vouna once, but

. it's omozlng how long some con

i stoy immature.

MA

Weather Wise

.nswer to Previous PuzzU

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23 ScoUUh alder
tree
24mbenis-h
27 Blackbird ?f

O CHRIST, give us patience,
and faith, end hpe as we kneel at
the foot of thy Cross this Passion
week, and hold us fast to it. Teach
us by thy Cross that, however ill
the world may go, V.e l a" rr so

I tn fc ."fi r-' t 'i ',

decree
Slice
7 Portal
(Harbor
9 Seed covering
10 Arrow poison
11 Master
19Seaegle
21 Assam

cuckoo family 24S ed
28 Body of water

3lChattra
icoli.)
32 iMeaure of
type
S3 Cii!d't game
34 Hustle
35 Ripped
30 Solicitude
37.Fi-h ejffcS
38 BJikr vetch
39 Analyze a
siat::ce
49 Xt-ight of
l.idia
4lRo.ving
irr.p!n-ient
42 ZoJlsc sign
45 Feels one's
way
49 Tumult
50 Fij.on pea
5Z Ew

25 Pedestal part
26 Musical -instrument
27 Ventilates
28 Asterisk
29 Organs of
hearing
30 Awry (dial.)
32 Foodstuff
35 Year between
12 and 20
36 Drink success
39 Golfer's term

40 Locations
41 One who leers
42 Expanded
4? "Emerald
Isle" '
44 Greatest
quantity
46 Implore
47 Domestic slave
48 Capuchin'
monkeys
51 Air
fcomb. form.)

53 Gaelic
54 Driving
command
55 Healthy
(comb, form)

1 x i h I ii It 17 a Id 19 )0 III
I f T
. j- -j-
m- '?,
w T '- -"
ri-i tmmlmmimm
iSi-. ..-i
a j-i n j l'Ms sl H
. -j j -3
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4



rc:
MONDAY, M'HCH 1". V'S
r
Rota Of Virus In Genss Study
Backs Up Theory Of Evolution

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COL. J. H. WIECHMANN, Comptroller, U.S. Army Caribbean (left), congratulates lour em employes
ployes employes of his section during a recent awards ceremony at Fort Amador. Receiving recogni recognition
tion recognition for adopted suggestions are (foreground) Mrs. Lillianr E. Panzer, Ernest A. Wolitarsky
and Buford J. Carter. Pfc. Albert Chaippinelli (right foreground) got a commendation let letter
ter letter for services a an assistant Instructor of a special weapons course conducted for key se senior
nior senior officers of USARCARIB early this year Members of the Comptroller Section observing
the presentations are (background left to right) Capfcf Harry Wilder, Major G. E. Rogers
and Lt. Col. R. G. Davey. t (U.S. Army Photo)

Navigation, Communication Battle
Fought By Polar Weather Missions

ABOARD B29 AT 81 DEGREES
NRTH LATITUDE, March 19
(UP) Flying regularly to the top
of the world to find out what A A-reica's
reica's A-reica's weather is going to be
i :s is a battle of navigation and
communication.
Starting nine years ago, men and
ai: ilanes of the Air Force have
performed their vital polar weath weather
er weather mission -dubbed the "Ptarm -gan,"
after an Arctic bird m all
irmHi nf flvins conditions.

Th. rfatji nicked ud by the air

craft's many instruments is the
No. 1 ingredient in forecasting up up-rominn
rominn up-rominn conditions in the United

States.
The Ptarmigan misilon, along
with sisttr "Loon" flight that
carries B29'i out over the Aleu Aleutians,
tians, Aleutians, it performed by the 58th
Weather Reconnaissance Squad Squadron,
ron, Squadron, based et Eielson Air Force
Base about 26 miles south of fair fair-banks.
banks. fair-banks. Alaska. 1 ;.'

Flying" on1 Ptarmigan NO.M787,
the coal was to fly a north-north

westerly bourse from Eielson to an
invisible point on the polar ice cap
that bears the map marking of 85

degrees north latitude and leu de degrees
grees degrees west longitude.
However, atmospheric c o n d i

tions including unusually heavy

.Mnt tiiMi, that Ara pur.

Bull BUU( avufcj" jmim miv v

rently raising havoc with interna interna-tional
tional interna-tional radio conditions forced Capt.

Robert K. Davis, San Antonio,

Tex., aircraft commmander to turn

around at 81 degrees norm.
By that point, the B29 had

SI. Pelcr's Mutual
Benefit Society

Plans May 30 Oulini
Tentative 'plans for an outing to
the interior town of Penonome on
May 30 under sponsorship of the
St. Peter's Mutual Benefit Socie Society,
ty, Society, were discussed recently at a
meeting of the special effrot com committee
mittee committee ot the society.
Details on the time of departure,
pricse, and other pertinent mat matters
ters matters will be announced on a fu

ture date. Members of the socie-J

tv 'will attend a general meeting
slated for Tuesday, March 27,
when complete plans will be an-tinnnced.

Members of the special effort
committee are H. Bayne, chair chairman;
man; chairman; E. Hinds, secretary; K. Har Harris,
ris, Harris, A. Hall, W. Myrie, I. Hay

wood, C. Haywood, h. Best and
M. Pond.

been out of radio contact for two
hours and if the turn had not
been made, rescue craft soon
under regular proceedures
would have gone into gear to
start over the trackless ice cap
looking for the plane.
S-Set. Johnny Harrison, Florida,

Ala., and A-1C Edgar (Top Hat)

Moore. Santa Rosa. cam., pounc

ed their code keys and turned

their voice radio transmitters to

full strength, but had to admit

thev'd "been beat" by the mysteri

ous forces that blotted out their
waves,
During most Of the 11 and one-

half hour, 2400 mile flight, actual

direction of the B29 was assigned
to Capt. Robert M. McFarland,
Fairbury, 111., navigator, and his
pair of busy assistants, 1st Lt,
Thomas Burford, Webester, Wise,
and 2nd. Lt. Ellis Thiel, Barker,

bomb bays laden with 5uty.iv.aJ ge gear
ar gear for possible emergency use,
had passed Point Barrow on the
north coast of Alaska, there were

no navigational aids to iiy oy.
Thiel "shot" the sun repeated

lv. Burford gauged wind drift on

a radar. McFarland calculated
from this data the plane's position
and set the automati;Jot. head

ing or passed flight directions to

Mai. Lutner j. jviiuer, fliinneapuui,

unnaHron maintenance ofneer tiy

ing No. 1787 at pilot, and M-Sgt
Edgar L. Gee, Marysville, Calif.,

flight engineer.
Their Droblems are the tough

est facing navigators any place
in the world and they keep so
busy they can't take time out to
at. :

In the nose of the long B29 sat
husky Capt. Otis Knudtsen, Denv Denver,
er, Denver, weather officer, working at a
crowded plastic table and making

observations at least every 30 min

utes.

To the reports from Knudtsen's
gauges and charts were added the

atmospheric pressure, humidity
and temperature readings radioed
back to the B29 by "dropsonde"

instruments that were released

frequently.

The dropsondes were sent
through a compression chamber

for their chilly, parachuted-slowed

drop through space by Sgt, Wend Wendell
ell Wendell Parker, Macomb, 111. Their
progress was checked by scanners

Al Jose T. Robero, Jr., Los An
geles, Calif., and A2 Brooksie Mor

ns. Fort Hueneme. Calif.

The mission went "strictly rou

tine." up to the point where the

turnaround was made, with visibi

lity good over the shelf ice poling

out from Point Barrow and the cap

ice from there north.
The Soviet government is known
to maintain ice island weather ob observatories
servatories observatories on the "other side" of
the. top ofthe, world, but Ptarmi Ptarmigan
gan Ptarmigan crews have seen lights of
their camp but rarely.
The 58th formerly flew over the
pole itself, but the track was
changed to provide better weather
observations. N
"After all, the whole crew's work working
ing working for me," smiled weatherman
Knudtson smugly.

WASHINGTON -(UP)- The in-1
finitesimal atom is helping science
to understand the submicroscopic
virus.
The virus in turn is contributing
to knowledge of the genes, the
agents by which all living things
pass on heredity from generation
to generation.
-
The radioactively tagged virus
also is supplying test-tube corrob corroboration
oration corroboration of the theory of evolution.
The role of the virus in genetic
research is discussed by Dr.
George W. Beadle, head of the
biology division of the California

Institute of Technology, in a paper
just published by the Office of
Naval Research.

Viruses, tiniest and simplest of

living things, have genes the same
as plants and animals and human
beings. By ingenious use of radio radioactive
active radioactive atoms, scientists discovered

that the genes of viruses are car carried
ried carried in their cores by a substance

called desoxyribonucleic acid

DNA for short.

This suggests the conclusion

"that the primary genetic infor information
mation information in all organisms is carried
in the form of DNA." Whether that

is true or not, Beadle believes that
as a "working hypothesis" it will
lead to investigations which will
supply "correct answers."

The 'genetic information" he

referred to is what tells newborn

cells whether to develop into the

organs and tissues that make a hu

man being or into other structures

that constitute a virus or, say, a

giant sequoia.

Genes tend to live torever

through exact reduplication from
generation to generation. The
same genetic information that de

termined the color of Socrates
eyes presumably is performing an
identical function in the Athens of
today.

But genes are not immune to ac

cident. Occasionally a gene will
change undergoing what the ge geneticists
neticists geneticists call mutation. Most muta mutations
tions mutations produce bad effects. In the

course of time, however, a species

tends to eliminate bad genes

through natural selection. By the

same process, neneiiciai mutations
are perpetuated.
Biologists believe such genetic
changes, occurring entirely at ran

dom, are responsible for all evolu

tion since the dawn of me Dimons

of vears ago.

The mutation rate is slow so

slow that it cannot easily be stud

ied in a long-living creature such

as the human being. The virus,

however, produces a new genera generation
tion generation in a matter of minutes. One
kind of virus, which reproduces it

self in the cells of a special Kind

of bacteria, is particularly speedy.

In 20 to 30 minutes alter infec infection,
tion, infection, the host cell "is disrupted

with the' release of 100 to 300

daughter viruses."

"This," said Beadle, "is the
most rapid biological reproduction

known.
"If one virus particle were start started
ed started on its cycle now. and if all the

progency could be saved, they

would be saved, they would be suf sufficient
ficient sufficient in number within 24 hours,"

Beadle said, "to pack the universe

solid with virus particles.

Luckily for man and the rest of

the universe, "it turns out mat oc

casionally a bacterial cell resists
infection." This is the result of

mutations that "occur with a fre

quency of perhaps once in 1,000,000

cell generations.

Such gene-mutated cells survive

and flourish because they can re

sist virus infection, whereas their
unchanged neighbors can't and, so,

die out.

But test tube research showed
that viruses, too, are subject to

mutation. Genetic changes oc occurred
curred occurred which enabled a new gener

ation of viruses to overcome the

new bacteria.
"This." said Beadle, "is a spec

tacular example of evolution in a

test tube, for obviously if tne virus

could not undergo tnis type ot mu mutational
tational mutational change, it could not survive."

TALKING IT OVER The producers and two male members
of the cast of "Thy WU1 Be Done," discuss plans for the
presentation of the play next Monday nigh tin the Paraiso
Theatre. The play will be presented again on the following
Tuesday and Wednesday nights in St. Joseph's Church hall,
Colon, by the St. Joseph players. Identified in the picture
above are Ronald Malcolm, Verne Richards, Paul Martin and
Carlos Lazarus, president of the dramatic group.

Author Of The People Ot
Panama At Autograph
Party

Dr. John Biesanz, co-autor with
Mrs. Biesanz, of what Newsweek
terms, "The best book in Eng English
lish English on an Important hemi hemisphere
sphere hemisphere neighbor." will autograph
copies at' Morrison's (across from
Ancon postoffice) on Tuesday
afternoon from 3 to 5.
Dr. Biesanz will be happy to
autograph copies for those who
already have the book as well
as to talk with those who neither
have it nor Intend to buy the
book, which February Ladies
Home Journal says reads "al "almost
most "almost like fiction."
(Mercurio)

Jamaican Pastor
To Give Lecture
At French Hall
Pastor R. L. Gough, who arriv arrived
ed arrived here last Thursday from Ja Jamaica,
maica, Jamaica, will speak on "The Two
Salvations" at the French Socie Society
ty Society Hall, on "O" Street she re
Wednesday at 7. p.m. He is well
known in Jamaica as a lecturer
and newspaperman.
This is another lecture sponsor sponsored
ed sponsored by the Laymen's Home Mis Missionary
sionary Missionary movement of Philadelphia
Pa. You are cordially invited. All
seats wiil be free and there will
be no collections.

(NEA Telephoto).
LOOKING FOR WIN NUMBER TWO Sen. Estes Kefauver
m Term ). rnir.nai'TTiInf fnr the March 20 residential primary

in Minnesota, is greeted bv farmer Kenneth IrnS'""Ucrt7"&t"
CSranite Falls. Kefauver won an overwhelming victory in the
New Hampshire primary when he received more than 20,000
votes to Adlai Stevenson's less than 4,000.

Psychologist Sums
Up Significant
Marriage Changes
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (UP) A
psychologist who has studied the

marriages of some 300 couples for
the past 20 years claims the most
significant change has been the

attitude toward religion.
Prof, Lowell E. Kelly, psycholo psychologist
gist psychologist at the University of Michigan,

said both men and women place
more emphasis On religious values

today than they did when first

married.
Kelly, who started the still In Incomplete
complete Incomplete study in 1935 with then then-engaged
engaged then-engaged friends and classmates,

said other findings revealed that
there also is a definite tendency
among couoles to be less neat, less

energetic have fewer interests and
shorter tempers.
Instruments used In obtaining
information for the study included
psychological tests, personal inter

views and questionnaires.

Kelly, past president or tne

American Psychological Asso Association
ciation Association said the attitude of man
'and wife toward housework also
undergoes a change as the years

go by. The change, ne explains,
is from one of indifference in the

early years to a definite oisiute.
US' Citizens Make.
Huge Investments
To Benefit Others

PADUCAH, Ky. (UP) Once
at death's door, a famous patient

here is in good health and vigor
today after 20 years of nursing and
care. V: v.--
The now robust resident Is the
Saghalie Elm, largest known tree
of its kind in Kentucky.
In 1936, (Davey) tree -experts
were called in even though the
giant seemed a step away from the
axe. They installed cables, a light lightning
ning lightning rod system, and pruned and
fed the patient.
The Saghalie Elm, on the estate
of James Rose Smith near here,
now has a six-foot, two-inch trunk
diameter, is 100 feet high, and has
a branch spread of 175 feet. As
further proof of its vigor, the tree

has weathered serious drought
over the past three years without

perceptible damage.

FREE LUNCH
4-6 p.m. DAILY

EL RAtiCIIO

The Pacific Sfcam navigation Company
'1 (INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840)
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
S.S. "KENTJTA" ...March 31
S.S. "CUZCO" APfU
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, KINGSTON,
HAVANA, NASSAU, BERMUDA, SPAIN AND FRANCE
M.V. "REINA DE LPACIFICO" (18,000 Tons) May 14
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA,
TRINIDAD, SPAIN AND FRANCE
S.S. "REINA DEL MAR, (20,000 Tons.) ,
(Air-Conditioned) f
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. TIZARRO" H
M.V. "SALAMANCA" .................. .March 29
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD.nOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "LOCH RYAN" 1. March 19
S.S. "DURANGO" .j. 'Jjjjls Mch 28
TO UKCONTINENT
S.S. "LOCH AVON" .March 28
All Sailing! Subject to Change Without Notice
PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION Co- Cristobal Tel.: 16545
-Apnrn rvr fPANAMA Ave. Peru No. 55 Tel. 3 12578
FORD CO. INC.BALB0ATerm Bld(rt jel. 21905

mm mm j

28 modern "banta" ships uniting the
Americas with fast and frequent
service.

WEEKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
S.S. "SANTA BARBARA" ..Due Cristobal, C. Z. March 21
S.S. "SANTA ISABEL" ....Due Cristobal, C. Z., March 28
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK

S.S. "SANTA LUISA" .
S.S. "SANTA CECILIA"

.Sails Cristobal, C. Z.. March 20
.Sails Cristobal, C. Z., March 27

FROM U..S PACIFIC & WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA
Til BALBOA AND CRISTOBAL C. Z.
S.S. "SANTA FE" .. .......Due Balboa, C. Z., March 25
S.S. "SANTA ANITA" Due Balboa, C. Z., April 10
FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z, TO THE
WFST fr4ST CENTRAL AMERICA & U. S PACIFIC
S.S. "SANTA FE" ... Sails Cristobal, C. Z April 4

Balboa only

I

f

PANAMA AGENCIES CO.
CEmoBAL: 2131 135"rANAMAri;;C8:57
BALBOA: 1501 2159

t
V
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Sv' f

If ;:r.
I ii i H
ria-'(Ni'

if

it

STRANCE TRIO Here's graphic proof of the unusual friend friendship
ship friendship that has grown among "Flocki," the dog, "Murr," the cat
iand "Moritz." the turtle. The three pets are shown eating from

the same plate at their owners' home in West Berlin, Germany.

(Rlcardo'

YOU'LL DANCE WITH GLEE
AS DID McGEE

k JO h nf r- 1 r

I I: ....

WHEN YOU WIN IN OR ABSOLUTELY FREE
WEEKLY RAFFLE I
HERE ARE OUR LUCKY WINNERS

yt Dorothy Hayward
Capt. Clyde A. Cortez
C WO Gale F. Pollard
Robt. K. Jones

FOR THIS WEEK
' G. E. Lowecy
Olga de Calzudes
Clarita de Valverde
Clara Kelly

Paul Domincue
Jose Luis Rubio
Sara de de Sedda

BE SURE AND BUY IN THE TWO FOR ONE' STORE
WHERE YOU BUY ONE AND WIN TO YOUR
HEART'S CONTENT
k DOROTHY you're sure a lucky winner
(Rattan 3ieadqaarters

Home of Vertikal Blinds and Plasti-

oam

S! war-

pilrfpL

'mm m-m t I r' 1

'JUL' tZJM

CQatJEQllnd DAME N STREET' TEL. 2-21
"OVRfVRMTURE CRA( E.N HIE LOVELIEST UUMES"

JU I

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PLACE-YOUR -EASTER -ORDERS NOW-

NO DOWN PAYMENT REQUIRED

10119



MONDAY, MARCH 13, VZt
PU.E FCIH

rat fanama A'-rrr.iCAN an indifendint dailt nebspafeu

'Force And Friendship' Plan
Of Filipinos Defeated Huks

MELBOURNE (UP) The!
Filipinos offer their formula of;
force and friendship" as a means,
of defeating Communist terrorism.
Lt. General Jesus Vargas, the
Philippines' military adviser to
the South East Asia Treaty Or-!
ganization, told the recent SEATQj
meeting in Melbourne how his,
country defeated the Huk menace
with this simple policy. j
The handsome, cigar-smoking,
general explained that the once-t
powerful Huks had been eliminated
as a national threat and theirj
12,000 numbers reduced to less,
than 800.
"Terrorism," Vargas empna-
ized, "can never be stopped un-
less you hava the full cooperation
of the people. If the populace of a
country is either neutral or with.

the terrorists, no amuum vi .uni .unitary
tary .unitary force can control them.

fons&qs True Life Adventures

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service

WEST
AI3
VQ87
KQ873
54

NOBTH U
4752
Jfl
AKQ106
EAST
AJ10M
VJ105

4 A 10 S 2
487

South
14
2V

44

' SOUTH (D)
AKQ8
AK62
4
4J!2
Korth-South vul,
Wert North East

Pass 2 4
Pass 3 4
Pass Past

Pass
Pass
Fas

Opening lead K

Today's hand illustrates a point
that we have often discussed in
this column. When you can afford
it, be pessimistic about the way
your suits are going to break.
When today's hand was played,
West opened the king of diamonds
and continued with a diamond to
Ease's ace. East returned the jack
of nearts, and declarer won with

An optimistic declarer would
row lay down the ., three top
trumps, after "which the hand
ih oh tin in' mnk. South" would

have to try 'to fun, his clubs, but

East-would ruff the tmra ciuo ana
go back to diamonds. South would
ruff with his last trump and would
succeed in making only eight
tricks. ;
maiiM hin contract bv as

suming that the trumps will break

4-2 rather than 3-3. in wis case, a
trump trick must be lost. The im im-tnn
tnn im-tnn fhinu i that South must

lose this trump trick while he still

has control oi the diamonds.
Upon winning the ace of
hearts, South should Immediately
lead bis low trump. Dummy's re remaining
maining remaining trumps still control the
diamonds, and South can regain
' the lead to draw the rest oMhe
trumps. Then he can run the dubs

safely, fulitUing Bis conuacv.

He then explained how the Fili Filipino
pino Filipino government set aside tracts
of land, put houses on them and
offered the Huk sympathizers a
new start in life with cattle and
implements to work the land.

first oi au, he said, "you:
have to have a better plan than'

ine Keels, you nave to oner the
people something more tangible
than Communist theories. We did
that by giving them an opportunity
to make a decent living for them themselves.
selves. themselves. These projects were a suc success
cess success from the start.
"Next, we moved well-disciplined
and trained army units into the
Huk area. They met there as
friends of the people, and were
instructed to do everything possi possible
ble possible to win the confidence of the
inhabitants."
Vargas explained that the troops
accomplished two things they
brought people back to their farms
in the intimidated sections and
halted Huk raids in the area.
"These rehabilitated farmers are

now killing Huks," the general
said, "and they are supplying us
with intelligence that enables us
to ferret out the die-hards who still
make an occasional raid."
Along with the offer of a helping
hand to the neutrals and the re repentant
pentant repentant Huks, Filipino soldiers be began
gan began the job of smashing the
terrorists at every opportunity.
"It cost us many lives," Vargas
admitted with a sad shake of bis

head. "I know; I was in the fight

myself. But we persevered and

rooted them out wherever we

found them. This gave the people

confidence in us, and gave the lie
to the Huk propaganda that their

forces were invincible.'
As an added incentive, the gov

ernment offered rewards for

information leading to the capture
of Huks. and Vargas said this

aided the campaign greatly.
"However," warned Vargas,
"vnu ran nevov lnu'cr vnur diarrl.

We have liquidated most of the
Huks,. but they are now attempting
. . A- 1..! T IU...

to lniruue imo pontics, u
can't win by terrorism they will
try by undermining the govern government.
ment. government. Their policy is the same in
siioru rnnntrv and we found

numerous documents in the battle

field to prove it. wnen you diock
them on one front, you must ex expect
pect expect them to hit you on another.
I repeat, you can never lower
your guard."
Congressman Views
No. 13 Favorably
DAYTON. Ohio" ; A jjJP j- U.S.

Rep. Paul Schenck paid his .$50

jumfriee ie pin ioi re-eieciipn ,wn
a check, numbered 1,192 and said

that meant good luck. '.

? The local Republican congress

man said the numbers in the check

added to 13, and "thirteen is an
extremely lucky number with our

family."

The congressman's mother and
father were born oh the 13th of
the month and they were married
nn th 13th. Schenck bought his

home on the 13th and moved into

it on the same date a year later.
At the time, the house was on
Rural Route 13 and the digits in

his postal box numner totanea n
uio (rc ntfirm numher nHrlfri tn 13

His local congressional office num

ber in a Dayton building also adds
to 13.

MALES FEKf-c-KM
, EV-TcCHIMa
''AT,... ANTICS.

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TOPROVE TWA.T H6
IS HEW? OVER HEELS

in UOV&.

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MOXBAY. HRfH 15,

THE PANAMA ASITRICAN AN INBt PENDTNT HAIL I .NEWSFATIR
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Try Combination Patties
On Pineapple Rings

SEEN RECENTLY ENJOYING AN EVENING at the Hotel El Panama are, left to right, Dona
Dora A de Arias, M Nicholas Schipof f Mme. M. Olivier,- Chief of Protocol Camllo Levy Sal Sal-cedo,
cedo, Sal-cedo, the French Ambassador Lionel Vasse, M. Louis Savel, representative of Remy Martin
Cognac and Mme. Julienne Vasse. -" :

FRENCH EMBASSY HOLDS LARGE RECEPTION
The French Embassy on La Cresta was the scene of a
large reception in honor of General Beigade and Mme. Mar Mar-eel
eel Mar-eel Pehette, given by the French Ambassador and Mme.
Lionel Vasse, Saturday from 6 to 8 p.m. ''.,'
Many high rankin g overnment figures, Canal one of officials,
ficials, officials, and diplomats were present to honor General Beigade
and Mme. Penette. ,
Among those present was Mrs. John S. Seybold who re received
ceived received congratulations on all sides on the event of it being
her birthday.

Panama Canal Pilots' Wives
Lunch At Home Of

Mrs. Thompson

No Hosk Party Given
! For Lombarus
I A group ol friends, who knew

was of white" agaphanthis, and
green and silver bows, three can candelabra
delabra candelabra in silver completed the
arrangement. On an adjoining ta tabic
bic tabic were silver vases with coffee
roses tinted green, and a silver
spray bound with green ribbon.
Silvered palm branches tied with
huge green satin bows were about
the room. Each table was center centered
ed centered with tinted coffee roses and
shamrock, carrying out the St.
Patrick's day theme as well as the
silver.
Winners of the door prizes were
Mrs. Samuel Craig, a corsage of
woodroses, gift of Margarita Flor

ist; Mrs. Milton Cookson, a silver

r-., nonui Piinu' wives of Mr. ana Mrs. Eugene Lomoara

. ... .... u i un.. 1 uiiwn thoir oarlil rinvs in lilp

the Pacitic r'S S;r nil wil .liraeriet'ta the Colon Jewelers;

Saturday at me nome o i ... ---. on Satlu.(lav evonin2!Mrs. Stanley Kidd a vase from

nam a. inompson on v.-- M, 'U1 fll,,jShaw's another vase from Clam

rti m n in r ho oniG - t

gun vuii x a -1 1, j v.

Utztrmmtimt j--.. -n-r t n n i fnwrt

THERE ARE TROPICAL verton In thU fancr 41h-.
poUt and meat pattlei, served jnillee U pineapple.
By GAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Marktti Editor

Here's a main dish that's very
different a combination of mashed
potatoes, leftover meat, green on onions
ions onions and coconut. Serve as patties
on broiled pineapple rings.
. Coconut-Potato Pattits on
Pineapplt Rings
(Mtket 8 parties, or 4 strvings)
Two-thirds cup thin flakes of

coconut, 2 cups mashed potatoes,

M cup tinely chopped green onions,
1 teaspoon salt, dash pepper, 1 egg,

well beaten, Vi to H cup ground
cooked pork or other meat, bread
crumbs (about hi cup), 8 canned
pineapple slices, cup brown
sugar (about).

Mix coconut, potatoes, onions,

salt, pepper, egg and meat. Shape
into patties and dip in bread
crumbs. Brown in hot greased skil skillet
let skillet for 3 to 5 minutes on each side.
While patties are cooking, drain
pineapple juice and spread over

J. baitley Smith in Diablo. The! our ws won by Mrs. Floyed Rob- the pineapple slices.

Chickon Livtrs in Onion Sauco
(Maktt 4 strvings)
One pound chicken livers, 1-3 cup
flour, 2 tablespoons butter or mar margarine,
garine, margarine, 1 can (ltt cups) Condensed
onion soup.
Dust chicken livers with flour;
brown well in butter in skillet.
Stir in the onion soup; simmer
about 5 minutes or until livers are
cooked done, and sauce is slightly

tnickenea.

Jote: Attractive way to serve

the livers is in a ring of fluffy

buttered rice (cook a 5-ounce pack

age of precooked rice for 4 servings

wun the livers).

Two-Time Grandma

IU Vhlt.it

'MUSTN'T TOUCH' LANOSCAP LANOSCAP-INC
INC LANOSCAP-INC NOURISHES DELINQUENCY
CROP
J I new thought I'd find an article

nue Don t Decorate Your Kidi
Into Delinquency" in one of ihs
home decorating journals. But
that's right where I found it in
the November issue of "The
American Home."
In the past I have written
articles on the short-sightedness of
parents who think that keeping a
perfect lawn is more important
than letting children convert the
front or back yard into a ball
diamond or a football field.
And I hav now and again
pointed out that perfect housekeep housekeepers
ers housekeepers often maintain their reputations
by sending their own children off

to play in someone else s house.
So I was pleased, indeed, to find
that a magazine devoted to beauti beautiful
ful beautiful homes and yards is aware that
a growing number of people today
are decorating their kids right, out
of their homes and yards.
As Lee Priestley, who wrote the
article, points out: "Time was
when the kids at least had the
outdoors to .themselves . where
they could dig a cave, start a fire
to roast potatoes, or.build some-1
thing soul-satisfying and hideous
outo f odd bits of board and in old
piano box."
But," says Mr. Priestley,
"there's no space for all that in n
adult 'outdoor living room.' ;
Playroom Versus Perfection t
There's often not even space for;
rough play, either, when there arel
verbal "keep off the grass" signs
enforced by parents who are morel
interested in having a beautiful I
yard .than playing space for their j
own and the neighbors' youngsters.
And a woman's dream of what a:
house should look like may not;

take into consideration whether or

noi it can wunsiana me Kina oi
hard usage any house gets that a
family really "lives" in.
So it is good to see that at least
one decorating journal is aware
that the desire to have a beautiful
house and a charming outdoor
living room can, if we aren't
sensible, crowd our children right
out of the picture.

Our decorating magazines nave
done a great deal to make our
homes and yards more beautiful

but it is just as well for them to
be aware that beauty can be

oversold.

After all, we, buy a house and
yard to live in not just to let

others look at.

STURGIS, Mich (UP) Mr. and

i mmiuar w nn-scniwi wu.i! mson. Mrs. toia Mnions received

Cocktails anu luncn were caici- ------ .-.. a set of iewelrv from Slims.

u., P.n,m r.Mf nh nr) a camera, as a lareweii pitsem

snusic was furnished by the Casca-! vttation uu was fe,a t.cm

beles Trio. The St. Patrick's Day l" ",c ,"' u 6

motif was carried out in the at

tractive table decorations.
The Thompsons' private pool
was available for those desiring to
swim. Approximately 30 ladies at attended
tended attended the affair,

Mrs Journeay To Entertain
D.A,Ri Chapter At Tea V
Mrs. Donald W. Journeay will
he hostess next Saturday after afternoon
noon afternoon at a tea honoring members
of the Panama j Canal Chapter,
Daughters of the American Rev Revolution.
olution. Revolution. Mrs. Journeay lives at
Quarters No. 0597-B, B a y a n o
Street, Ancon.

regular.

D.A.K.!

Prior to the tea, the
anrine meetine of the

Chapter will be held at 3 p.m. All
members planning to attend the
affair have been asked to phone
Mrs. Journeay after 4 p.m. at Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 1691. Members and eligible
guests have been cordially invit invited
ed invited to be present.

Dear Alice and Gene:

It s plain to be seen
You've upset us no end
your leaving.
since we've learned that it's so
You're determined to go
We ve spent many hours
In grieving.
We write, mis to state
That we all want a date
i'o'floumt'up-"
Of old friends together.
To wish you the best,
God-Speed, -lots .-of rest
And a voyage of ideal weather.
On the 17th of March
At Mercedes' and Baits'
We shall dine
And perhaps reminisce.
And urge you today
At a near future day
You'll return j
Since you'll always be missed,

Leave For David
Dr. Dorothy L. Wilson has left
for David by plane to take up her

new post at the Jose de Obaldia Lero Gilbert

Hospital of that city.

Newcomer's Club To Sponsor
Atlantic Side Artists Exhibit

An Atlantic Side Art Exhibit will
open March 31-April 8 from 2 to

4 p.m. and from 7 to 8 p.m.

Hostesses for the Exhibit will be
Mesdames Howell Wynne, James
Juhnfon, Henry Tryner, Orville
Jones. Richard Hogan, L 0 r e n z
Guspach, John Snodgrass, A. L.
Wilder, C. Larson, James Walsh,

John sugar, waiter Goggans, Ed.
Donahoe, Robert Weise Jr., C. W,
Lnngdorf, Kenneth Rimer. S.
Blair. B. LeDoux. These will be
assisted by members of the exh
biting artists.
A reception will be held Satur

day, openiny day, for the artists

ana members of the Newcomer s
Club. Hostesses for this affair will
be Mesdames Harry McGinness
Jr., Richard McLarnan, John
Campbell, Ralph Dials, Norman
Hutchinson, D. E. Crier, Moses
Hartman, William Stanford and

Dot with butter or marcarine.i Mrs. D. E. Hoyt became grand

Place in broiler and broil until tops parents twice on the same day

are bubbly. When patties arel Their son, Carl, became the father
cooked, place on top of broiled! of a son in Oxford, England, and

pineapple slices. tneir daugnter, Mrs. wiiuam .Mac-
Here's an easy and tempting Pherson, of Killeen, Tex gave
recipe for chicken livers I birth to a daughter.

Returns From Caracas

Mi. Alesia de Chalbaud Cardo-! Luncheon And Cards At
B a, wife of the Ambassador of i Salvadorean Embassy
Venezuela has returned to Pana- Mrs. Marth de Osegueda, wife
ma after l short trip to Caracas. of the Ambassador of Salvador,
jgave a luncheon and card party
Morning Coffee At The Home Of at her home recently for a group
Mrs, Ann Lattin of her friends.
. Mrs. Ann Lattin and Mrs. Feme
Burton were co hostesses at a; American Legion
morning coffee at Mrs. Lattin'Sj -r0 Give Reception
home in Balboa to introduce Mrs.! The American Leeion. Depart-

F.dith Starnes. Mrs. Burton's sis-Uient oi Panama Canal Zone and

ter to their friends. About 50 la-1 Panama Canal Post One. is giving

dies were present. In reception in honor of Mr. J.
Coffee and refreshments were Addington Wagner, National Com Com-eerved
eerved Com-eerved in the attractive gardeni mander of the American Legion,
room of Mrs. Lattin's home in i The event will also celebrate the
Balboa on Friday from 9:30 to 11 Thirty Seventh Anniversary of the
a.m. I American Legion.
Mrs. Starnes will be visiting i Time and place of the affair
with Mr. and Mrs. Michael Bur-j wm be Friday, at 8:30 p.m. at the
Ion for a vew weeks before re-1 American Legion Club, for Ama Ama-turning
turning Ama-turning to her home in Texas. I dor, Canal Zone.

Canal Trip For Visitor Cocktails for the Lombards
Mrs. Edith Starnes, who is vis-j Mr. and Mrs. Paul Friedman
jting with her sister and brother- gave a cocktail party at their resin-law
Mr. end Mrs. M. Burton, idence on Saturday in honor of the
was taken through the Canal this Executive Secretary of the Canal

morning. Tomorrow, it is plannedizone and Mrs. Eugene Lom-i

to have her visit Santa Clara. ; bard.

Dinner At Union Club

Mr. Stanley Fidanque entertain-;
ed for a (roup of friends at the i
Union Chib recently. I

1

Fort Gulick NCO Wives

Enjoy Pizza, Spaghetti Dinner

The committee for the Art Show
are Mrs. Nathan Fuller, Mrs.
Howell Wynne, Mrs. John L. Su Sugar,
gar, Sugar, general Arrangements, Mrs.
John F. Greening, Artist Chair Chairman;
man; Chairman; Mrs. Lorenz Gerspach, dec

orations: Mark Sugar, Sound; Mr.
Hugh, Linn, porps and light; and

Mrs. Virginia ton, fosters; Mrs
John Snodgrass, reception,

Author Of "People of Panama"
To Be Honored By
Historical Society
Dr. John Biesanz, author of the
popular recently published book,
"People of Panama" will be the
guest of honor at a reception to be
given by the Isthmian Historical
Society on Wednesday evening at
7:30 at the Hotel Tivoli. Dr, Bie Biesanz
sanz Biesanz will be glad to answer any
questions pertaining to the book or
autograph any copies of his book.
No invitations have been issued,
and the meeting, like all Historic Historical
al Historical Society meetings, will be open
to the public,
Fort Clayton NCO Wives
To Hold Social
The Fort Clayton NCO Wives
Club will hold a husband-wife So-

The Right Way To Wash Your Face

i

(M

mmmim
' -i Hi 4'

The Fort Gulick NCO Wive si on .Tuesday. Free drinks, will

m
y

EASTER
o CARDS
o buniiies
o EGGS
o DYES
and the famous
"FIIY"
EASTER CANDY

Club had a get-together Thursday
night at Tony's Restaurant in Co Colon.
lon. Colon. Pizza, spaghetti and meat
balls, and other delicious dishes
were enjoyed by all.
Members and theirs husbands
who attended were: M-Sgt, and
Mrs. Mario Marrero, Sgt. and
Mrs. Dick Hosking, M Sgt. and
Mrs. Carl Hess, f -St. and Mrs.

Spender Luker, Mrs. Alice Stacho-

wiak, Mrs. Maruyn Wuliams Mrs.

Carol Mune, Mrs. Louise Sander

son, Mrs. Janis Finnegan, Mrs.

Clara Hollenbaugh and Mrs. Mae

Pelkey.

be served starting at 6:30 p.m

and dinner will be served at 7:00
p.m. An orchestra will play for

dancing during the hours 7:00 and

10:30 p.m.

Reservation? must be placed
with Mrs. Stella Wagner on or be

fore Friday 23 March 1956,

Cristobal Woman's Club
Hold Siver Tea

The Cristobal Women's Club

held a most sucessful Silver Tea
for the benefit of the Philanthropy

department ot tne ciuo.

Chairman of the tea was Mrs

Marcel Dunn, who was assisted by

the Mesdames, A. MctLean, A. Lo Logan,
gan, Logan, J. Sugar, R. Hearn. Presid Presiding
ing Presiding at the tea table were the

! members of the executive board,

Mesdames Koy Hearn, William
I Clute, J. F. Meehan, A. L. Wil Wil-i
i Wil-i der, John Sugar, Arthur Logan.

jiR. Rubbeli, Robert Miller and

tnve Lewis. Mrs. wutiam Brooks
was in charge of registration and

(Opposite the Ancon P.O.) xKa "table was beautiful in
. Sijver anf grcen. The center piece

I I Jut"

1

J

If

MEXSAN

fur prickly heat or skin
Irritailon Mexana Is

m c dicalrd powder
that relieves, re

freshen and prolert.

9

Another prouui'l: Mexxana

Skin Balm. Helps and pru-erfWywar-aiiw
" i i

HEXSASJ

WdaM

You can't take anything: for

granted anymore. Science has

made great progress, even in the

simple matter of face washing.
That's why this Is such cheerful
news. If you are at all dissatisfi dissatisfied
ed dissatisfied with your skin if it is dull,
dry, shiny, bumpy or blemished,

not the solt, smootn, luscious

complexion you'd love to own
it may fiimply be that you have
been washing your face all
wrong.

First, you may not have been

using the right soap. Perhaps

you have always thought that
"soap is soap'.' and the family
bath soap Is all right for your
complexion. Not so.
Scientific research now reveals
that' normal skin is on the acid
side. And it has to stay that way
to be healthy. When it loses Us

normal acidity It becomes coarse,

blemished and easily Irritated.
One way it can lose this acid

balance is by long use of a soap

that dries your skin, soap is a

combination of fat, which Is
acid, and alkali. Since alkali
tends, to cut the normal oil of
the skin, the less free alkali in
soap the better. Fortunately,

good soaps today contain very
little free alkali; but since no

two soaps are exactly alike some
contain a fraction more free al alkali
kali alkali than others and consequent consequently
ly consequently vary in the way they act on
your skin. If your skin has plen plenty
ty plenty of natural oil you may not
notice damage for a long time.
But t your skin is disturbed or
feels drawn or. pickly or cracks

mediately to a super fatted
(emollient) soap. This, type of
soap, skin .experts agree, is the

mildest, gentlest, least .drying,
and least Irritating of .'facial
" .-. .'-X rr '''.'
The superfatted soap ao often
recommended by doctors is Cu Cu-tlcura
tlcura Cu-tlcura Soap. In addition to be being,
ing, being, superfatted, it is delightful delightfully
ly delightfully fragrant, hard milled, and
mildly, scientifically medicated.
As thev soften and hein heal

m.inor irritations, the special in-j

greaients in Cuticura Boat) form
and invisible- film which 'pre 'pre-vents
vents 'pre-vents too rapid evapof atlon of
natural moisture, acts a; mild
stimulant, and protects- against
wintry blasts and Irritants fly flying
ing flying about the air. ;
' But using the right soap Is

only part of proper sbap-and-i

water cleansing, to get your lace

really clean you should lather-

massage your face and throat j

at least xwice a day, using warm
water, then rinse and rinse with
cool water. To obtain the full
benefit from Cuticura Soap it
is important" to let the rich
emollient lather remain a full
minute in contact with your
skin. This Is the routine for nor normal
mal normal dry skirt. : .:-
If the skin is irritated, blem blemished
ished blemished or excessively oily, you
should cleanse gently but thor-j
oughly three, four, or more times 1
a day, using hot water, then
rinse and rinse with cool water.

17 Frecfures Bed
Kansas Lad Again
TOPEKA, Kan. (UP) Seven

teen fractures In 17 years have put
Pat Williams back in bed again.
The dark-haired, chunky youth's
latest broken bom. was in his left

leg. He stepped on some hard hard-pressed
pressed hard-pressed snow and turned his leg,

resulting tn a aoume iraciure.

Apparently Pat is the victim; pfi

calcium deficiency, am tne aociors
have given him no definite verdict.
The breaks began when he was
two years old. The latest hospital hospitalized
ized hospitalized him three and a half weeks,
and he must return next month to
have stitches removed and a new
cast fitted. j
Missed classes have made his
education difficult. However, the)

high school has arranged for him
to take correspondence courses
from the University of Kansas, hv

bed, he has taken up a study of
?olice laboratory work as a hobby,
t may become a vocation.

Lost Will Be First
At Least In Line

GRAND RAPIDS. Mich. (UP)

Students with names starting

with W. X. Y. and Z were given a!

break during registration for sec-
ond semester at Grand Rapids

Junior College. i

Students with names' starting'

with letters at th ; end of the al-i

! phabet were registered- first while

; those with names starting with

11 A, B, and C were processed last.

FREE LUNCH
4.6 p.m. OAILY
EL RANCH0

I 1 C f f t
ilk!

Mill, ili i-Jl it

m M

if

i

limn ArrOlhor Cinnd

Trusted by more molhei's because of its
accuracy. Nonced to break tablets. Each
contains 1 grain of pure aspirin
tht preferred standard of accurate dosage
measure. You give "juat as the doctor
orders." Children like its orange flavor.

WLB LAMIIT tlUIN ASPiatM 0 CHILOMN k

SIMM

i

We tn site you to meet
' in person
. author of the booK t
'The People of Panama"
Dr. Biesanz will autograph the eopv you
already have or will want to purchase at
our store tomorrow Tuesday from J to 5 p.m.
COKES ARE ON THE HOUSE J
MORRISON'S
(Opposite the Ancon P.O ) i

.-...

March hat two birthston, th tloodmtpne fcr

courage, the aquamarine for tranquility. Tor him,"
. a bloodstone rinf handtomely mounted in 10
karat fold. For her, a beautiful aquamarine, the
exquisite color f ea water.' ' '
This Week's Lucky Winners
L. Zelenka Capita Ri.os

Azariat Carrijo
Dr. David 'de Jonjh
E. R. Freeland
Peggy Albertaon
Dora M.- de Piti

Daisy de. Noriega
e Humberto Ramirez, Jr.
e Juanita Whitehead
Coronef Harry Albaugh
Sr. E. Daggitt

All Slips Ending in 8 Win
Check YOURS!

TAHITI
18-47 (137) Central Ave.

0

0

easily, or if your arms and legs
appear to have a flaky, powdery

surface, these are usually siens

using are drying your skin. j

If such is the case, change im- J (Mercurio)

To help clear up simple pim pimples
ples pimples and blackhead s after

cleansing wlth Cuticura" Soap!

use cuticura Medicated Liquid
during the day, and Cuticura

RADIOS
.' &
RECORD PLAYERS
. i '"':''.". i
" t- ;..'"'
fyAJtM
Tivoli' Avt. No. 16

....
;T l.

Take advantage
of our Club Plan



PAGE SIX

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NETVSPAFEIt
MONDAY, MAECII 15,
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
i
is
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H'V STREET, PANAMA

J
' :i ill
1

LIBRERIA PRECIADO LOURDES PHARMACY LEWIS SERVICE HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE FARMACIA EL BATURRO
MINIMUM I Street No. 11 182 U Carrasqnilla Av. livoU No. 4 J. Feo. de U Osm Avi. No, 41 : Farquc Lcfevr I Street
Agendas Internal, de Publicaclones FARMACIA LOMBARDO FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS FOTO DOMY FARMACIA SAS"
FOR Mo. 1 Lottery Flu No. 28 "B"' Street 141 Central Ave. Juste AroKmena Ave. an 33 St. Via Poms 111
c CASAZALDO MORRISON FARMACIA LUX FARMACIA VAN-DER-DUS NOVEDADES ATHIS
12 nUKDS Central Ave. 4th o( July Ave. A J St 1 Central Avenue M Street No. S3 Via Espaoa Ave.

MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS

COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL

CANAL ZONB POLICLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
DR. C. I. FABRIGA, D.D.S.
DR. R. AVILA JR., M.D.
Tlvoll 4th ot July) Ave, No. HAM
(oppoiite Ancon School PlayiN""""
TeL 3-2011 Pnama

RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
, JIM RIDGE
Phone Panama 2-0552

FOR SALE
Household

FOR SALE: Mahogany dining
room table with 6 chain, "up "upholstered,"
holstered," "upholstered," $50. Call Curundu
6236.

FOR SALE: Modern mahogany
bedroom set: twin bedi. First
Street, Perejil 17. Phone 3 3-3004.
3004. 3-3004. 5 to 7 p.m.

DUE TO TRIP: Selling house,
hold article! & decorative plants.
East 29th Street No. 434, "Lu "Lu-pita"
pita" "Lu-pita" chalet

FOR SALE
Automobiles

"The Servicio Cooperativo Inter Inter-americano
americano Inter-americano de Salud Publico''
sells to the best offeror the fol following
lowing following automobiles:' A '51 Chev Chevrolet
rolet Chevrolet tsrry-all. a '51 Willys Sta Station
tion Station Wagon, '51 Chevrolet Se Sedan.
dan. Sedan. Information concerning this
sale could be obtained at the
"Ministerio de Prevision Social."
3rd Floor, office No. 302.

FOR SALE: 1953 Chevrolet 4.
door sedan, 210 series, 2 -tone,
radio, excellent condition $1 500.
Phone 87-6264 or 87-2288.

TRANSPORTS BAXTER. S A,
Pockers Shippow Movers
Phones 2-2451 2-2562.
' Learn Ridingj ot
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding t Jumpint elosses doily
i to 5 P.m. Phone 3-0279

or by appointment.

"We shape Vour Flure"
BODV-REDUC1NG
7 famous McLevy Machines
Swedish MesMfa Steam B,tB
tor male and female
ORTEPEDIA NACI0NAL
int. Rrhnlll)

S3 Justo Arosemena Ph. 3-2211

HARNETT & DUNN

BALLROOM DANCE STUDIO
Balboa: 3-4239 ot Pan.) 3-1BC9
"TEACHES UNTIL SOU LEARN"
Studio El Panama Hotel

fated Af Miami

f tj Hk

Adlai In Last Bid For Votes
In Crucial Minnesota Primary

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., March 19

UfJ Aolai h. Mevenson makes
a last bid for votes today on the
heels of Sen. Estes Kefauver's
stumping tour in their first head head-on
on head-on test of strength in tomorrow's
Minnesota presidential primary.
Kefauver left the state on the
eve of the election to vote on the
Senate farm bill in Washington.
Ho said he was convinced that he
has cut deeply into Stevenson's
edge.
Stevenson. Kefauver's rival in

the Democratic primary, returns
to Minnesota tonight in a last bid

for votes. His supporters concede

that the Tennessean has gained

ground, but predicted Stevenson

would still walk away with all of
Minnesota's 30 delegate votes.

Tomorrow s primary is the first

head-on clash between the two

candidates for the Democratic

presidential nomination. Kefauv Kefauver
er Kefauver won handily over a slate of
delegates favorable to Stevenson in
last week's New Hampshire pri

mary, but Stevenson did not cam campaign
paign campaign in that state.

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031, ANCON, CZ.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. CX

FOR SALE
Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: 75 shares El Pan Panama
ama Panama Hotel, Must sell immedi immediately
ately immediately Best offer. Writ Box 134
B2.

FOR SALE: Female German
Police puppy, 6 months old.
East 29th Street No. 434, "Lu "Lu-pita"
pita" "Lu-pita" chalet.

FOR SALE
Boats & Motors

FOR SALE: 1 8 -ft. cruiser, two
25-hp. Evinrudes and trailer, on
aqua lung and skin diving gear.
Phone Cristobal 3-3151 after 4
p.m.

RESORTS

PHILLIPS Oceonside Cottage,
Santa Clara. Box 435, Balboa.
Phone Panama 3-1877, Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-1673.

Gramlich's Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modern convenience,
moderate rates. Phon Gamboa
6-441.

Shrapnel's furnished house
beach t Santa Clara. Tclephen
Thompson, Balboa 1772.

FOSTER'S COTTAGES. On mil
past Casino. Low rotes. Phon
Balboa 1866,

FOR SALE
Real Estate

FOR SALE:-Lata 1954 Ford 8 8-passtnger
passtnger 8-passtnger station wagon, 17,500
miles, excellent condition $1625.
Can be financed. House 8574,
Margarita. Phone 3-2175 or 3-1311.

Kefauver has much to win In
the Minnesita race and Stevenson
has much to lose. The Tennessean,
a self-proclaimed underdog, could
claim a major victory if he cuts
deeply into Stevenson's margin.
Stevenson, heavily favored at the
start of the Minnesota campaign,
must probably win big over Ke Kefauver
fauver Kefauver to keep his banu-wagon rol-
linrf in nirth nan

""Jr. b" !" nn n -i 1 -u rti

The Democratic primary battle c Y7- Y l-

overshadows the Republican race,

wnere voters have a choice be between
tween between President Eisenhower and
Sen. William Knowland of Califor California.
nia. California. Knowland's name was en entered
tered entered before the president expres expressed
sed expressed willingness to run for re-election
and the Senator has since
thrown his support behind Mr. Ei Eisenhower.
senhower. Eisenhower.
Republican leaders are not en encouraging
couraging encouraging any write-in vote for
Vice-President Richard M. Nixon,
such as furnished the surprise of
the New Hampshire race. A Nixon
write-in vote would invalidate the
ballot and cur down the Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower total, the GOP officials
pointed out.

Unitefl States customs p r o c e e-dures
dures e-dures is receiving a jet age begin
streamlining for 30-day trial pe period
riod period at the Miami aerial gateway,
which started March 5.
Oral baggage declarations are
being permitted for eligible pas pas-seneers
seneers pas-seneers arriving on all inbound In

ternational flights during the test

period. This mades the customs
procedure as easy for passengers
arriving from Latin American and
Caribbean countries by air as it Is

at Mexican and Canadian border

cities, where oral declarations
have been permitted for years.

The new all-airlines experiment

followed a month of tests which

beean Jan. 30 for passengers on

certain Pan American World Air-i
ways flights., ..,.. ..: :f ... ,;. j
For a returning TJ. S. resident
to qualify for oral declarations, his
total purchases abroad must not
exceed $100, must be for person personal
al personal or household use, and must
travel with him. He is allowed a
gallon of alcoholic beverages and
100 cigars, must have been out of
the country 48 hours or more, end
not have claimed a customs duty
exemption in the past 30 days.

Non-residents of the U n 1 1 e d
States are permitted to make an
oral declaration if they have only

personal effects in his luggage, in including
cluding including one quart of liquor, 50 cig cigars
ars cigars or 300 cigarettes, 4

The Miami tests,' looking to the
rlav whpn creat net airliners will

ininad im tn ISO oasseneers at

iim at. aimorts. seeks to deter-

ino u;hther the oral delcaration

t faster than the written declara declara-Lm
Lm declara-Lm bow prepared during flight
and presented to customs agents

upon arrival.

Discrepancies In US Highway
Costs Call For Investigation

READ THIS!

Are yon Interested for ridi ridiculous
culous ridiculous low price, In a beauti beautiful
ful beautiful lot at Panama's closest
and finest beach resort? You
can pay as you see fit. we
want nice neighbors anfl
money Is no object. CORO CORO-NADO
NADO CORO-NADO BEACH 49 miles from
Ferry. Call Eisenmann Pan Panama
ama Panama 2-4505 or see Castilla at
Coronado.

WASHINGTON. March 19 (UP)

A House subcommittee has ord

ered the Bureau of Public Roads
to recheck the cost of the propos.
ed 23 billion dollar interstate
highway system in the hope of
saving billions of dollars, it was

learned today.
The Subcommittee ordered the

new investigation after Rep. Jim
Wright (D-Tex.) pointed out -wide

discrepancies in estimated costs ot
the highway program.
The subcommittee, which ha S

been studying President Eisenhow

er s proposed highway construc construction
tion construction nroeram. gave the Bureau of

Public Roads until Jan. 1, 1958,
to complete a thorough review of
highway needs and costs.

The study, however, will not
delay the start of the vast high highway
way highway program. The subcommittee
plans to recommend to the par parent
ent parent Public Works Committee that
work of the Interstate system
boa in at once.

The subcommittee already ten

tatively has approved a 13-year,
50 billion dollar federal-state con

struction program. The federal
government would put up $36,600,-

000,000 Wltn ?24,oUU,UW,WU

for the interstate system.

Under the subcommittee pian,

$1,200,000,00 would be allocated
for interstate highway construction

in the 12 month9xbeginning next
Jiilv t. When the Bureau of Public

Roads completes its resurvey of

costs, the outlays for future con

struction can be altered if neces neces-sary...
sary... neces-sary... ,. .

Wright saia tne review oi cosis
should be "very through and com comprehensive."
prehensive." comprehensive." He said there were
indications that an earlier study,

on which the subcommittee oasea
it hill, was taken "too -hurriedly

to be exact." He said estimated

costs in some states were com-
piled in only six weeks.
"This new survey will be un
hurried," he said, "end will toll
us if this program Is really go going
ing going to cost as much money as we
K.v koon told."

Wright sparked the move for the
new survey at a secret session the
subcommittee held Feb. 7 when
Commerce Secretary Sinclair
Weeks testified on the bill. The
transcript of this session has not

yet been made puDiic.
The Texas congressman pointed
out several "discrepancies" in es-

New Free Health Insurance
Plan Going To Congress Soon

Word has been received by the.health insurance in such as the

Blue Cross Blue Shield and Union

FOR RENT
Apartments

ATTENTION G. 1.1 Just built
modern furnished apartments, 1,
2 bedrooms, hot, cold rts.
Phone Panama 3-4941.

FOR. RENT: Modern apartment
at "El Cangrejo": 2 bedrooms,
etc., garage. For more details;
Phon. 3-4966 or 3-6737.

FOR RENT: For three month
starting April 1 5, completely
furnished I Vj-room apartment,
hot water, linen, etc. Phone 2 2-0143
0143 2-0143 or 3-0679.

FOR RENT: Modern furnished
apartment. Will sell furniture
cheap. Justo Arosemena Avenue
97, Apartment 4.

FOR RENT: Unfurnished apart apartment
ment apartment at exclusive "El Cangrejo."
2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, din-ing-living
room, maid's room
With bath, garage. Phon, busi business
ness business hours, 2-0321; Sundays ,2 ,2-3525.
3525. ,2-3525. J:

FOR RENT: Furnished 1 -bedroom
apartment, complete with
linen, dinnerware and hot wa water.
ter. water. For further information call
Panama 2-2835 between 8:30
a. me and 5:30 p.m.

FOR RENT
Houses

FOR RENT. In Golf Heights,
large unfurnished house with 4
bedrooms, office, living room,
dining room, kitchen, 3 bath bathrooms,
rooms, bathrooms, glass enclosed patio, bar,
maid's quarters, double garage,
orchid gardens. Call Mendex fir
lubiefa, Phone 3-3337.

FOR RENT: Chalet unfurnish unfurnished:
ed: unfurnished: 2 bedroom, office, servant's
room, and all modern facilities.
Near La Salle College, El Can-'
grejo. Call 3-1382 between 5
p.m. and 7 p.m.

FOR RENT: Chalet: twe bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, bath, porch, living room,
dining room, kitchen, maid's
room and bath. Aquilino de la
Guardia No. 24. Phon 2-1878.

WANTED
Houses

WANTED: Vacation quarters,
6-8 Weeks, April I on. Army
couple. Call Balboa 1405.

Students Find Way
To Hear Team Play
DAVENPORT, Iowa, March 19
(UP) Students at Davenport
High School found a way to hear
a broadcast of their team's play
in the state basketball tourna tournament.
ment. tournament. They chipped in to make a $100
kitty and sponsored the broad broadcast.

and

Ike's Controversial Foreign
Aid Program Goes To Congress

timated costs of highway construe
tion.

He said the Bureau of Public

Roads reported that rural high.

ways cost an average of $125,000

mile on the interstate system' in

fiscal 1955. But it estimated these

roads would average $450,000 a
mile under the new construction

program.

He said the bureau similarly

reported that urban highways in
the interstate system cost an av

erage of $834,000 a mile in fiscal
1955, hut estimated them to cost
an average of $1,600,000 under the
new program.

from its legislative representative
Howard E. Munro that 2,000,000
federal employes would benefit by
a new free health insurance plan
to be submitted to Congress in the
next few days by the Civil Service
Commission.
The new plan is expected to deal
with "major" illnesses rather the
comprehensive type of health in

surance first proposed by the ad

ministration last year,
Each employe or dependent could

be reimbursed for medical, surgi surgical
cal surgical and hospital costs up to $10, $10,-000,
000, $10,-000, or a top of $5,000 in any one
year. After he retires, the maxim maximums
ums maximums would be $5,000 and $2,500 re

spectively.
The employe could collect only
75 per cent off his annual surgical

costs for himself or his family but
only after paying the first $250

himself. He would also have to
pay the first $500, of annual hospi hospital
tal hospital care costs before he could be

paid 75 per cent of the additional

costs

Calls of doctors or other medical
care benefits depend on the amount

of life insurance carried. II n l s

life insurance is t5,000 or less, the

employe would have pay the first
$100 medical expenses for himself
and family in any One year before

he would receive the 75 percent of

anv additional costs.

For $6,000 up to sio.ooo me in

surance policy, the employe would
have to nay the first $150 of medic

al costs. H over sn.ooo ne musi
first pay the $200 costs. In each
case he -would be paid only' for
that amount in excess of the what
many employes receive from their

leon Kellman's
Father Succumbs,
Funeral Tomorrow

Edrlck Kellman, father of

player-manager Leon Kellman
of the Spur Cola baseball team,

died yesterday in tne Samaritan

Hospital, Colon, after a short

Illness.-. :;-::-; ; '-.-v-,'

A Barbadian. Mr. Kellman was

65 years and a retired employe

Of tne Panama canal.

Funeral arrangements call for

a viewing of the body at the

Flower of the Isthmus Lodge

Hall, Colon, between noon and 2

p.m. tomorrow loiiowea at 3 p.m.

by funeral services in Christ
Church by-the-Sea and burial In

Mount Hope Cemetery.

In addition to his baseball

playing son, Mr. Kellman is sur

vived by anotner son, waiter:

four dauftnters, Elsie, Norma,

Alima and Cama, and 25 grand,-!

children.

Red Cross

Mrs. W 89, and her mother,
90 lost everything when floods
struck their New Jersey town
last August. Through a Red
Cross gift totaling $6,814, their
house was rebuilt and refurnish refurnished,
ed, refurnished, and they were supplied with
food and clothing. Join the Red
Cros and keep its disaster re relief
lief relief workers on the Job!
'

Scout News

IBS Executive Boards

Name Committee

Considerable business was done

at the executive board meeting of
the International Boy Scouts of

the Canal Zone held at the Parai Parai-so
so Parai-so School yesterday, with Ellis L.
Fawcett as chairman.

Policies

The Administration will sueeest

to Congress that it broaden the life
insurance law to provide insurance
against heavy medical and hospi hospital
tal hospital costs.

The cost of each $1000 of life in-

surange covereage.is 25 cents per
pay period to the employe plus
12' cents from the eovernment.

The Administration will propose

that the government's cost be rais raised
ed raised to 25 to put it on a 50-50 basis
with the employe. The additional

cost to the government would

total $32.5 millions annually and it
would be sufficient to pay the en entire
tire entire cost of a major medical plan.

A survey revealed that three out

of every four federal employes is
now covered by Blue Cross or a
similar "basic" health plan. The
proposed major medical proposal
is not intended to "disturb" this
coverage but to "supplement it."

In other words, the Administra Administration
tion Administration plan would protect employes
and (heir dependents from the
heavy costs of lingering illnesses.

and it would pick up after the be

nefits expire from the basic health
plans. The administration assumes
that most employes are insured a a-eainst
eainst a-eainst hospital costs of less than

$500 and surgical costs up to $250
a year.
The Administration will .not
proposed that the government de deduct
duct deduct from employe paychecks the
cost of basis health plans. Earlier,
it indorsed such a proposal but it

will withdraw that support,.
The Administration's major me
dical plan was worked out by War
ren Irons of the Civil Service Conv
mission who held extensive confer

ences with employes' leaders and
officials of the American Medical

Association and the American Hos
pital Association.
60 New Citizens
To Allend 1955
Girls Slate Here

Among the important matters

dealt with at the meeting was the

appointment of G. L.- A. Davis,
second vice president of the local

Council, as chairman of the com committee
mittee committee for the preparation of Boy
Scout Week program in April,

William Arthus, first vice pres president
ident president of the local council, was al also
so also appointed to head a committee
to develoD a program and make

the necessary preparation for the
dedication of the new scout shack,
Building 6071, at Rainbow City,
during Boy Scout Week.
Other appointments made by

the nresident were: Scout com

missioner James A. Hassocks and
Pacific district commissioner
Pearl E. Ford, chairmen of the
stamp collection scheme commit committee,
tee, committee, international bureau, for the

Atlantic and Pacific districts, re

spectively; Davis and Arthur,
chairman of leadership training

for the advancement committee:

Cyril D. Atherley, chairman of the

Pacific district membersmp com
mitten.

Keen interest is being focuse on
th Rnv Scout Week Droeram in

Am-il. for which final poans will

be discussed at the next meeting
of the board slated to be held at
the new scout shack, Building
6071. Rainbow City, next Sunday

ing beginning at 9:30.

Hughes, Judith Tipton.
(Observers Sandra Turner

M. Leignadier.) I

Sponsorships are still needed to
make this program a success. A

nyone wishing to contribute to this
worthy cause may send a check
to Mrs. Bertha Brown, treasurer,

Box 284G, Cristobal, CZ. Sponsor Sponsorship
ship Sponsorship for one girl costs $20, but con-

ynuan wanuanu dtn lanltdamtltd

ceptable.

Speeder Comes Up

With Dandy Alibi

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.. March

19 (UP) Police admitted today ical year beginniug July 1 by $2.2

WASHINGTON, March 19 -(UP)
President Eisenhower sent
to Congress todav a proposed $4.9
billion foreign aid program that
will set off a htated, election-year
controversy.
The program will be detailed in
a special message which Mr. Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower put finishing touches on
while visiting, hit Gettysburg, Pa.,
farm over the weekend.
The main features of the foreign
aid request aneady are known and
already have provoked strong con congressional
gressional congressional opposition in both par parties.

The program would increase for

eign am appropriations mr uio ns

that Earl Johnson had a good ali alibi
bi alibi for failing to show up to face
a speeding charge.
Johnson said the ticket said to
appear in court on Feb. 31, "but
Feb. 31 just never came around,"

billion and nearly double this year's
outlay. Most if the increase would

be for a triple jump in military
aid $3 billion by contrast with
this year's $1 billion. Economic

aid would be raised only about

$200 million from $1.7 to 1.9 bil billion:
lion: billion:
But although appropriations
would be nearly doubled, actual
spending on foreign aid would re remain
main remain at nearly the same level as
this year 4.4 billion as compar compared
ed compared with $4.2 billion. The reason
for jumping the amount appropriat appropriated,
ed, appropriated, the Administration has said,
is that "carry-over funds" from
other years have dwindled and a
new b a c k I c g of appropriations
should be built up, largely so con contracts
tracts contracts for complicated modern wea weapons
pons weapons can be let for delivery in fu future
ture future years.
The other main feature of the
aid program and its most con controversial
troversial controversial is an expected re request
quest request that Congress approve long
range foreign aid commitments. It
has been indicated that the Admi Administration
nistration Administration wants authority to sup support
port support specific projects in friendly
nations for a period of 10 years at
$100 million v year,;tf ... t w

The American Legion Auxiliary,
Department of Panama, will have

60 new citizens attending the 1956

Girls state whicn opens Thursday

at t ort Clayton.

A List of the new citizens fol

lows:

Pacific side Rebecca Abel J,

Carolyn Corn, Joan Deeenaar, Ma

rie Eberenz, Barbara Klich, Bar

bara rarbman, Pe?gy Foiles, Ma Ma-Girard,
Girard, Ma-Girard, Lendy Harris, Diane

Hearne. Marcerv Icke. Diane Ja

cobs, Donna Jenkins, Lynne Jones,
Marilyn Kelly, Eileen Kirchner,

Marcia Lewis,- Julia May, Geral

nine McGriff, Carrie Miller, Gla

dys Miner, uau MuiiarKey. Mar

cia Musser. Helen Jane N i t a,

Catherine Ott, Penny Pennington!

caroi reranue, iNancy ruray, Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia Reynolds, Carol Roberts Ju Judith
dith Judith Sigl, Martha Stevenson, Pa Patricia
tricia Patricia Tubbs, Carol Voortmeyer,
Forest Wise and Sandra Turner.
Atlantic side Phyllis Wood,
Terry Louise, Janet Swicegood,
Helen. Trottur, Dianne G e d d e s,
Pat Peck, Marcella Leignadier,

Sandra Motta, Cathy Cheek, Mil Mildred
dred Mildred Gibbs, Lynda Geyer, Mary
Dailey, Kathleene Brede, Mary
Morland, Jo Ann Harte, Margery
Connard, Jeannette Swicegood,
Pat Maedl, Barbara Gecg, Ruby

Dodson, Jean Chambers. Sandra

Kirk Douglas Produces, Stars in "THE IIIDIAI1 FIGHTER"
Aclion Piclure Filmed in Color end CinemaScopc
Opening Thursday al the CENTRAL

-St- V
f-of 'Urn
wiitv- V V-:'
I ' vt- 4
I vt I

Klrk Douglas has his first venture as an Independent producer, as well as star of the ex exciting
citing exciting western, "The Indian Fighter," which will open Thursday 22 at the Central Thea
tre through United Artists release. The picture was filmed In color and Cinemascope.

"The Indian Fighter," starring Klrk Doug Douglas
las Douglas in the title role, also marks Kirk's bow as
an independent producer. Bryna Produc Productions,
tions, Productions, sponsor of the film, Is Kirk's own com com-pany.
pany. com-pany. '--.....;... -v
A stirring yarn of covored wagons In the
bloody Indian wars of the 1870's, "The In Indian
dian Indian Fighter" was filmed In ChlnemaScope
and color on location in the wilds of Oregon.
Co-starred with Kirk are Walter Matthau,
Walter Abel and Elsa Martinelllt beautiful
20-year-old Italian discovery who makes her
film debut as, Of all unlikely things, an In Indian
dian Indian princess. The large featured cast of

f'The Indian Fighter." which opens on Thurs

day at the CENTRAL Theatre through Unit United
ed United Artists release, includes such players aa
Lon Chaney, Eduard Franz, Alan Hale, Elisha
Cook and Ray Teal.
William Schorr was the producer of "The
Indian Fighter" and Andre de Toth direct directed.
ed. directed. The original story was By Ben Kadish,
and the screenplay was written by Frank
Davis and Ben Hecht. Wilfrid M. Cllne was
director of photography; Franz Waxman
conducted the musical score; and special
songs were composed for the picture by Irv Irving
ing Irving Gordon. Advt.



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDrTENTENT VAllT NEWSfAPrR

FACE T.l

1

CAfl TOL0

Double In Spanish
and tor the lirst time
In Superscope!
EL TESORO DE LA
ISLA DE FINOS
- Plus:
LA MESERA DEL
CAFE del PUERTO

n vol'
J5c. :oc.
A Great Double!
MONSTER from THE
OCEAN FLOOR
- Plus: -G
R 0 V E

CEflTOAL Theatre
:5c. 40c.
In Cinemascope and Technicolor!
Audie MtRPHY, In
TO HELL AND BACK
The exciting true-life story of
: America's most decorated hero!
Shows: 12:55, 2:38, 4:45, 8:52, 9:09

LUX -THEATRE

1 5c.

40c.

In Technicolor and Cinemascope!

WEEKEND RELEASE!
That Joyous New Musical Hit!...
Janet LFIGII Jack LEMMON
and Betty GARRETT, in
MY SISTER EILEEN
Shows: 3:00, 4:02, :I5, 8:50 p.m.

DOSVE-Iil Theatre
60c. ; 30c.
ELSY ALIBI N, in
"RAPTURE"

CECILIA THEATRE
60c. 4 30c.
John WAYNE Lana TURNER, in
THE SEA CHASE
In Cinemascope and Technicolor!
Edward G. ROBINSON, in
, ILLEGAL'

R I O

33c.

20c.

Double In
CINEMASCOPE!
Anne Baxter. In
BEDEVILLED
Also:
Leslie Caron. In
GLASS SLIPER

VICTORIA
Ttt'ft

GOOD
PICTURES!

j

CID-DAP!Ready 10 SO places on their giant snow rabbit are
two-year-old Paul Crosby, seated up front, and his sister, Cheryl,
4. Their father made the icy animal in the yard of their Minne Minneapolis,
apolis, Minneapolis, Minn home. t It took him about three hours.

'HOLLYTJ

rnvu

MQVB TV RADIO
by Ersktne Johnson

M I

HOLLYWOOD (NEAj Be-

Then hi added: "I don't think

people keep tuning in to see if
someone's going to win $135" on my
show."

hind the Screen: England is wail

ing about old American movies on
British TV.
It'i the laugh of the year for
U.S. television fans who can re remember
member remember when old English movies
dominated the late, late shows.
Snmo fif thnm are still with us and

another Boston Tea (V) Party to observed, is stillthe same.

dump all old British movies into
the sea is an excellent idea.
But old U.S. movies on British i Gen. C h a r 1 e s A. Lindbergh

TV is no laughing matter for the stopped in at Warner Bros, and
owners of British movie theaters.! watched Jimmy Stewart playing

This is Hollywood, Mrs. Jones:
Marilyn Monroe returned to town
with a "new approach" to acting.
But the wiggle, Hollywoodites soon

Commercial TV in England has
sent the box office into a hose
dive. Drops of 47 million in at attendance
tendance attendance and $9 million in gross
business arc reported from Lon
don.
Theater business on Fridays and
Saturdays ."has been slowed
down," It Is said, to 50 per cent

thai nraviou traffic,

. Having seen a couple of old Eng-j

Itsn A uor amui i iiiuvitTB uii j. i

Charles A. Lindbergh in "The Spir

it of St. Louis."
THE WITNf T: Reported con conversation
versation conversation between two Texans at
a Beveraly Hills hotel. Said one:
"I'm planning to build an 18-hole
golf course on my place," "Ohe"
asked the other, "Outdoors or in-

. idoorse"

Company Pkn Aiding
Alcoholic Employed
Has till Birthday
MILWAUKEE (UP) The al

coholism counselor at AUis-Chal-l
mers Co., in suburban West Allis.i
is celebrating his 10th year of
service.
A former memher of Alcoholics'
Anonymous, the counselor admin-i
isteis one of the most comprehend
give industrial alcoholism pro programs
grams programs in the nation. A.C pioneered
in the field and from its program
have come the nuclei of countless
other such industrial, civic and or organizational
ganizational organizational programs. j
The Wisconsin Association on Al Al-cohism
cohism Al-cohism and the Wisconsin Welfare
Association recently honored A-Cj
for its pioneer contribution to the

study and practical treatment ol
the problem alcoholic.
The company figures it ; saves
money by rehabilitation of em employes.
ployes. employes. Many problem drinkers
possess special skills; replacement
would be costly.
But more than that, there are
what A-C officials call "intangi "intangibles.'!
bles.'! "intangibles.'! These boil down to a "fam "family
ily "family spirit" in one of the world's

industrial giants.

Foremen and personnel workers
are alert for signs of alcoholism.

The 1,700 workers and their fami

lies know of the services available.
The assistance is free, the recipi recipient
ent recipient remains anonymous.

Top personnel have learned the

reasons why most people arm
They may begin as social drinkers

To others a drink is an escape
from bad living conditions or the
humdrum. Release from frustra frustration
tion frustration or worries of all sorts may be
the coal which tips a normal

drinker into alcoholism.

Evervone involved knows, too,

the improper approaches such as
holier-than-thou reproaches, well

meant nagging or gossip.
The alcoholic counselor is on call
24 hours each day, in the plant or
out.
Specific problems uncovered In
interviews may be referred to any
of 12 counseling services such as
the credit union, housing, legal,
medical, veterans, psychological,
recreation and others. Local pri private
vate private ot municipal services may be
brought into a given case.
Batteries of tests are available,
and an employe is fired only after
every recourse has failed. Then,
he may be rehired if he proves by
subsequent behavior that the shock
of dismissal was enough to start
him back on the road to self-control.
It costs severa thousand dollars
annually to maintain all these
services. The company says that
it feels economically it's money
ahead because of them.
; But the great pride of the or organization
ganization organization is in its-"intangibles."
There's a large file of thank you's
and a greater fund of family spirit
that the economists at A C don't

A

'V.

;'

tfh

FORTUNE HUNTER. Rory Calhoun hits new heights in

his looming career as the cynical American who handles
machine guns and women equally well in "The Treasure
of Pancho Villa," an Edmund Grainger production for RKO,
filmed in Mexico in Superscope and in Technicolor. Gilbert
Roland and Shelley Winters also star in this picture that
opens next Thursday at the Lux, Advt.

t
- k

I) ,.S ".

FEAR THREE DEAD IN CATHEDRAL FIRE A two-million dollar fire In TiSnS dei
stroys St. Marys Cathedral and rectory. A Roman Catholic priest and a housekeeper died la
the fire and another housekeeper is missing be lieved dead.

8iiy fast

..and I only have this to say. I am a

ORSON WELLES in on the verge

of a Hollywood movie comeoacK.
He hasn't made a film here since

1949. . A new movie tan maga magazine
zine magazine will have a "talking" record
in each copy recorded voices
of stars talking to their fans
Vivian Blaine of "Guys and Dolls
fame divorced M'nny Frank in
Las Vegas. He took back her mink.
f.roucho' Marx got off the best
quips in the barrage of blasts
aimed at the system of voting for
nominees for the Academy of Tele Television
vision Television Arts and Sciences Emmy
Awards. Not included as "Best
Comedian," Groucho's name was
listed in the "Best Audience Par Par-:
: Par-: ticipation" category.
. Flipped Groucho: "The Emmys
' are empty honors The only honor
is when your sponsor picks up
your option for another 13 weeks.

Not in the Script: Dan Daily,
about modern rhythms end beats:
"They were all stolen from the
tap dancers. We've been doing this
stuff for years." j
NBC radio will do a three-week
series on "Romance of Monaco"
as a build-up to network coverage
of the Grace Kelly-Prince 'Ranier
nuptials ... Movie magnate Spy.
ros Skouras goes to Russia in Sep September
tember September to discus) production of an
American film in the Soviet Union,

Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. would
like to play his dad. he's telling
pals, if Hollywood decides to film
the FDR life story.

Showing At Your Service Center Theaters Tonight!

BALBOA 6:15 8:40

.JOHN

IB-tONITINI"

0WIDFARRAR tYLE BtTTCER TABHUWfH

I

Tue. "HOBSON'S CHOICE" I

S3 1

DIABLO HTS. 6:15 : 7:50
e Farley GRANGEH
, Anne BANCROFT
"THE NAKED STREET"
Tuei. "DIAMOND QUEEN"
MARGARITA 6:15-7:55
Will ROGERS. JR.
Nancy OLSON
"BOI from OKLAnOMA"
Tuesday "Madame Butterfly"
CRISTOBAL 6:15 8:15
Air-Lundtlionee

Jack WEBB
"PETE KELLY'S BLUES"
Clnemabcope Color
Tuesday "GENEVIEVE"

fABAISO f:15 7:55.
nVICHITA" i
' Cinenmouope Coiorl I
i

SANTA CRL'Z 6:15 i 7:49

"YELIOW MOUNTAIN"
"RELUCTANT WIDOW

CAMP ttjf.RO 8:1S S:1S Eartlia Ivllt.r "JfttrTACES"

SELECTED SHORTS:

I'm convincee ine ouiiHii nun even try to gauge,
ka.t.r nunpr has. onlv one chance "I'll Crv'Tnmnnnw" and "Thnl

of luring back his lost patrons, Man Who Knew Too Much" will
. That's to force British television represent the U.S. movie industry
to show only old British movies. at the Cannes International Film
That ought to get 'em out of the Festival April 10-24 Rita Mor Mor-house
house Mor-house again. leno and Ricardo Montalban will
. .' co-star in the ,20th Centurv-Fox

Hour TV version of the movie
click, "Broken Arrow" .... Fib

ber McGree and Molly are losing
their radio sponsor late this month.

Amazing Blind Boys
Playing Baskclball
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (UP) -Basketball
players who have
trouble sinking free throws would
be embarrassed if they could
watch a group of youngsters at
tha-Kentucky School for the Blind.
These blind or partially sightless
boys not only shoot free throws
with amazing accuracy, but even
play improvised basketball games
with more success than can be
imagined. it
"We've been playing basketball
here for some time, and some of
our boys are uncanny," said Supt.
Paul J Langan. B. T. Kimbrough
shoots free throws better than I do
although he's totally blind. He can
tell from the sound whether his
shot is good or not." t ; ',
Uusually one boy stands tinder
each basket clapping his hand as
a guide for the shooters. Some Sometimes
times Sometimes a bell is used, but Langan
says it's surprising how well some
boys can do without any sound at
all. locating the basket just by In

stinct.
I In the impromptu games, each
team usually includes two or three
iboys with partial sight. The defen defensive
sive defensive team can set up some sort of
j defense by listening to the bounce
of the lall and the sound of feet.
! A few concessions are made in
the rules, in regard to dribbling,
i walking with the ball and other
points, but it'- still basketball.
Turnpike "Holrcdfea
Has Trep Underway

PITTSBURGH (UP) Peid-

insylvania'a Turnpike commission
is working out a new scheme to

nap speeueta wu uc oupci-iugu- y
Chairman G.Vranklin MgSoriey

told a western Pennsylvania safety
council meeting here that new
clocks will be installed at all toll
booths and synchronized With the
national time clock.

McSorleT-a4-a bill the" will

introduced "to permit the use of

this time as a means of enforcing
speed limits."

l

smoker from here on. I lilr
their rich flavor
and agreeable aroma."

Here's a man who knows what he's talking
about. The fine imported tobaccos and the
blending process of VICEROY produce the
best cigarette available.

06 yiCEROY:

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TOBACCOS

i

The indisputable quality of the imported to to-befecos
befecos to-befecos used to make VICEROYS end their
special blending will always give you the
best cigarette.

"Dynamic" end "proarHtnr" odjtttirti which qualify Mr
Jo Axguiielt $., froprinary Manager of "Almotir) Tilo" in
ih city el David

w.:-;-Svw.:.:.;.

FILTER

FRESHNESS

, -.' -V-er tjarJ.lt f. xivtii ..

The exclusive VICEROY filter is made from
pure cellulose -- soft;' snbw-whiternatural 1 7

Cellulose is a substance present in most of
the foods we eat.

v.;xK:r'wx
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ECONOMY

s

C

VICEROYS "ore" ALWAYS fresh."' They ore
manufactured right here in Panama, No
boats. No planes. Just a few steps from 'the -factory
to the deafer to you.

cigarettes cost only

a pack.

VIC Jlo 55

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h il ii itlE l.Xi
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F
! ;)Tfd0 (Tr;ci
) -1-.,- r n ior:
V V
- ii y Ji, jjl ji-4.
w.' im Mil

Snider And Campanella
Run Producing Factory
Is Bade In Business

0

" NEW YORK, March 19 (UP) All is mht once
again with the world champion Brooklyn Dodgers,
because the run production factory operated by
Messrs. Snider and Campanella is back in business.

"The Dodgers haven't looked
much like "champeens" this
sprint and have been getting
their lumps pretty regularly in
Grapefruit League games. But a
4-1 victorv over the Chicago
White Sox on Sunday could sig signal
nal signal the end of such nonsense be because:
cause: because:
J 1. Duke Snider drove fci his
first run of the spring a de department
partment department in which he led the
Jnajor leagues last year with
136.
12. Roy Campanella clouted
is first homer of the season season-tuning
tuning season-tuning up for a shot at anoth another
er another 32-homer season.
Both of these events occurred
4 Vm nnsnlno llinino' of the
i. UIC V l 0
gfeme and virtually ended the
contest. But there was still an another
other another Joyful omen for manager
"Walt Alston in we snape ui
knr nltfhlnor Inh hv rOOKle
seutftpaw'Ken Lehman. This
young man naa oeen wuueu no
t&e-most likely-lefty to replace
Army-bound Johnny Pod res on
the Dodger staff, but he'd flop flopped
ped flopped hi two previous showings
and tad walked, seven hatters in
four" frames.
Yesterday, however, he held
the Sox runless for five innings,
the longest workout by a BrooH BrooH-ljfn
ljfn BrooH-ljfn hurler this spring, allowed
only three hits, and walked only
one batter.
'The New York Yankees also
pleased with the continued good
work of a rookie six-foot, five five-Inch
Inch five-Inch Mark Freeman.
.This towering young right
m
ON THF RPOT .Yankee

Wally Moon at St. Petersburg. Both McDermott, traded from j

senators, ana Moon, snntea
J of their teams' hopes.
ffiS
JlwSyrt-

Hi

hander, Just out of the Army and
r.ffiniaiiv nn thp Yank ros

ter, held the Cincinnati Redlegs
to no runs ana two nus in
four-inning stint in yesterdays,
am vwnrv with a similar iob
against the Red Sox on his last
trip to tne hill. JJ iceman u!
has flipped elgnt scoreless in
nings.
Elsewhere around the camps:
Rookie Rocky Colavito making
strong bid for regular Job in
Cleveland outfield with two
ihomers Sunday on top of a
grand-slammer on Saturday...
Frank Sullivan, and Bob Porter Porter-field
field Porter-field continue to Impress for Red
Sox; each worked three scoreless
innings against Phils yesterday
for a total of seven whitewash
frames each this spring. .Roy
Sievers, Senators' top R.B.I, man
last year, showed good eye in
first exhibition game yesterday
with a two-run homer.
Ed Mathews of Miwaukee
whacking homers at steady
rate; Yesterday's was his
fourth this spring, but his er error
ror error also helped cause a 6-3 loss
to Detroit. Detroit right
hander Frank Lary, struck in
face by thrown ball in inffeld
workout yesterday, was unhurt,
X-rays showed...
vnnirpes' Filston Howard not
o. Hariiv hnrf. s first feared:
hand Injury will keep him out
only two or three weeKs. .buu
Friend of Pirates, National
League's best earned-run aver average
age average pitcher last year, looked
good in nve-inning arm, agamo
Cardinals.
-
Mickey McDermott fires to Cards'
irom ouineia o nrsi, tarry a ioi
Open Nightly f
8:00 p.m.
ROULETTE
(BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER ;
r
SLOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
41r-Condltlnnd si

Oon't sit and wail
for "Lady l uck" . 1
Go and meet her .
PANAMA AMERICAN

CUSSIFIED ADS

It's a "must" for
effective tr'IJnj; 1

O

SPARRING PARTNERS Battlin Byron Cumberbatch (left) squares off with 'Vicente Wor Worrell
rell Worrell as the pair get ready for their bouts at La Macarena bullring Sunday. Cumberbatch
meets Toto Ibarra in a ten-round, 120-pound feature-match and Worrell takes on Manuel
Prescott in a 128-pound six-rounder. In the semifinal, set for eight heats, Claudio Martinez
erigages Victor Asprilla. The "boys fought' to a thrilling draw in their first meeting.

Persiflage Feature Winner;
Ocean Star In Native Record

PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Second Half Stand!ngs
Team
Won Lost Pet.
Gibraltar Life 4
Lincoln Life 4
Elks 1414 3
Seymour Agency .. 3
Police 3
Spur Cola 2
.667
.667
.500
.429
.429
.333
Gibraltar Life 1, Seymour
Agency 6
In an important game last
FHdnv af terdnoon Seymour A-
gency pushed Gibraltar Liie.out,
or nrsi piace ana iniu a ue wuu
Lincoln Life defeating the Gi
braltar team by the score of six
to one: i- i i
Seymour scored four- runs in
the ton of the second inning.
Boatwright led off with a dou double
ble double to left field taking third on
a Dassed ball. Huddleston drew a
walk and stole second, Dubbs
walked loading the bases. K. An
derson lined a single to center
scoring Boatwright and Huddle Huddleston,
ston, Huddleston, Dubbs coming in to. score
as Anderson was thrown out at
second. The last run scored on
a bases on balls- to Carlson, a
stolen base and two nassed balls
In the third Barty Mallory led
off with a double which bounced
over the fence In centerfleld,
Boatwrieht followed with a sin
gle to right, Mallory taking third
on the play. Dickie Snyder was
called upon to relieve Gene
Fraunheim and got the next two
batters to ground out pitcher to
ilrst. K. Anderson then strotea
his second single to center and
two more runs crossed .the plate.
Freddy Huddleston pitched
beautiful ball for Seymour al allowing
lowing allowing but three hits. Gibraltar's
lone run came in the third in inning.
ning. inning. Gene Hermanny walked,
went to third on a double to
right center by Snyder, arid
scored on a passed ball and a
very close play at home.
For the winners 1 Huddleston
pitched the entire game giving
up one run on three hits, two
walks and ten strikeouts. Gene
Fraunheim was the loser being
PAN-CANAL UOWUNG
ASSOCIATION
15th Annual Tournament
March 17-23
Doubles Events Schedule
Tuesdav. March 20, 7:30 p.m.
Alley
TJttenberger, Pllachowski .... 3
Lyons, Walker ............. 5

Albrltton, Grlgsoy : 11
Garrldo, Voss .............. f
Cox, Stirling ......... .11
Hammer, Zeletes 8
Gleichman, Bowen, R. 9
Banks, Turner, A.G. ....... 6
Schirmer, Burgis 8
Almeda, McGarvey 2
Eest, Balcer 10
Gructte, Keeflin 4
Eck, Imamura 1
Melanson, Lowande ...10
Bus, Reynolds 5
Locander, Black k 9
Klumpp, Helton ........... 6
Pehl, Amato ............... 7
Wickham, Sohecker 3
TJranicki, Kotte 12
Boyer. Rogers 7
"Cutsch, Jacober 4
McElroy. Ellenberger .' 12
ronson Jodice 1
Wednesday, Mar. 21 7:30 pjn.
Giacobbe, Welch ............ 7
Turner, O.J., Van Pelt . . .. 8
tudy, Ilalliday 2
Hogan, Iloppe .... 40
J.

y

responsible for six runs on four
hits, four walks and three striKe-
outs. Dickie Snyder pitched four
innings allowing no runs on
three hits, three walks and one
strikeout.
For all snorts fans and espe
clally parents and friends of the
players of the Pacific Little
League a big eame is shaping up
for this Tuesday aiternoon at
4:30 when the two teams now
tied for first place, namely Gi
braltar Life and Lincoln Life,
will tangle for the last time this
season in what may well decide
the winning team for the second
half, r
Probable starting pitcher for
Gibraltar will be Bobby Brandon,
with a six and one record for
the year having pitched a per perfect
fect perfect game against Lincoln Life,
lor the Presidents starting pitch
er could be W. French of Gene
Beck, anyway fans It promises to
be a thriller so come out and see
some good baseball.
The box score:
Seymour Agency
Pearl, 3b
Corrigan, C. rf ....

AbR n
2 0 0
3 0 0
3 11
4 2 2
2 11
1 1 0
3 0 2
0 1 0
3 0 0!
1 0 0
0 0 0
0 0;U
1 0 1
22 6 7

Mallory, lb 3
Boatwright, ss .....
Huddleston, p .......... 2
Dubbs, c
Anderson, K. 2b ...
Carlson, If
Brockman, cf .'..,.
Calleja, 3b .........
Farrell, rf
Anderson, G. lb
x. Moses : 1
, ; Gibraltar Life
Hermanny, rf ; 1
Snyder. D. lb-p 3
Fraunheim, p-Jb ....... 3
Brandon, ss ........... 3
Orr. If 3
! Hutchinson, c '. ...... . 2
Wilson, cf 2
Hanna, 3b ............. 2
Hunt, 2b .............. 2
21 1 3
Anderson, Kunkel-,,,..,,,.10
irwiQ, Folger .....r... 3
Cataldo, Knowlton . M .v 1
Jacobs, De Vol) 6
Mueller, van Ernst 1
Stilson, Spinney 2
Thomas, Larrabee ... 3
Feger, Granata 7
Minor, Hicks .,..,,,,.,,.,.11
Mason, White 4
Peca, Abbott 9
Kenway, Bartram 5
McKeown, Stone ........ ... 6
Soyster, Toland ............ 5
Woodcock, Motykiewicz ..." 9
Coffey,- Colbert 4
Note: No drawing for alley as
signments for doubles or singles.
Jm nlrk will 00 OUt With O
t- a,: if k nrvls monev like

water.

tNCA

Mrs. Viola Redhead's classy

A r g e n tine-bred five-year-old
black son of Tonto-Cimera yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon made his first
start against Juan Franco's top-
notchers a victorious one Dy
scoring impressively In. the fea featured
tured featured $1,000 seven furlong sprint
for Classes "A" and "B" import imported
ed imported thoroughbreds.
lhe lightweigated rerstiiare
outdueled Kadir during the
first half of the race then
opened a good lead to enter
the homestretch two lengths
ahead of Kadir then held on
to cross the finish one-and-one-half
lengths in front of
the latter.
Empire Horiev closed fast aft
er a sluggish beginning to wind
up third only a necK behind Ka
dir. Biakemere, a forward lactor
and third to the final sixteenth,
faltered in the stretch to lose
third money. He was three-quar
ters or a length back of Empire
Honey with disappointing mu
tuels favorite Mossadeq one-half
length behind Biakemere. Pap' Pap'-pa
pa Pap'-pa Flynn, a bad trailer during
the early stages, wound up 'only
two lengths back or Mossadea
persiflage, second choice in
the betting, returned $7.60, $6
and $3.20 across the board. Hec
tor Ruiz gave the winner a cred
itable ride.
' However, the high point of
yesterday's card was probably
the thrilling dead heat finish
between native thoroughbred
Ocean Star and the Chilean
bred Lanero in the sixth race.
The two racers sped around
the oval in one minute 43 4-5
seconds. The time makes
Ocean Star the new holder of
the record for natives. The
prerous mark was 1:44 2-5 set
bv Golden Teacher on May, 20,
1945.
Jorge Phillips rode Ocean Star
while the veteran Bias Agulrre
nad tne leg ud on Lanero. Phil
lips also won with cartillero
whilp Aguirre brought Ornamen Ornamental
tal Ornamental Star-home first. No .other
rider won more than one.,
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Cartillero $4.20, 4.40, 2.40,
2 Le Sabre $6.80, 2.60.
3 Rada $2.20.
SECOND RACE
1 Maruja $3.60, 2.80, 2.20,
2 Quilacoya $3.40, 3.
3 Gaucha $2.20.
First Double: $7.60.
THIRD RACE
1 Little Blue $8.60, 3.20. v
2 Malaguefta $4.20.
One-Two: $20.60.
FOURTH RACE
1 Paparrorra $19.20, 7.60, 3 60.
2 Choly $3.80, 2.80
3 Golden Pick $9.80.
. Qu niela: $35.20.
FIFTH RACE .,
1 San Cristobal $3.
SITU RACE
1 Lanero $3.60, 3, 2.60.
1 Ocean Star $12.40, 7.80. 5.80.
3 Coral $2.80.
Dead neat
SEVENTH RACE
1 Ornamental Star $5.80, 3.60.

2.60.
2 Jaquimazo $4.60, 5.
3Escorial $3.60.
Second Double: (Lanero-Or-namental
Star) $7.60. (Ocean
, Star-Ornamental Star) $100.20.
EIGIITII RACE
1 Bagdad $4.60, 2.60, 2.80.
2 Chepapita $2.40, 2.40.v
3 Avispa $3.60. ;
Quiniela: $6.40.'
NINTH RACE
1 Persiflage $7.60, 6, 3.20,
2 Kadir $6.40, 6.20,
3 Empire Honey $3.80.
One-Two: $40.80.
TENTn R.CE '
1 'Andes $5.80, 2.60, 2.2C.
2 Kin$2.60r. 220.., .-.
3 Iguazu $2.20.
' ELEVENTH RACE
1 Lyrical $2.80, 2.20.
2 Panicus $2.20, .

261 Athletes

In 7th Annual
Dalboa Relays
A rernrA rntrv list of 261 men
and boys have entered the Sev
antK Annuo) reanna Heiiivs
which will be conducted this Fri Friday
day Friday niuht at Balboa Stadium.
I The first events will start at
7:30, but the opening ceremonies
featuring the honorary referee
Charlie Magee and Queen Shir Shirley
ley Shirley Ransom will be held at 7 p.m,
Th hmr nffirc will onen at 6 D
m. anil fans are ureed to get
their tickets early to avoid a long
wait in line. Price of admission
is 50 cents, with student associa association
tion association members being admitted
fro nt iharor
This tremendous entry list has
necessitated quamying rounas m
all Held events ana ine open tuu,
hinVi niirHiA- onH lnw hurdles.
lljl, ..W.
These preliminaries will be held
Friday aiternoon, siaimiR v r
p.m. this will assure all the fans
of a rapid fire conducting of
events during the night. Four
boy will qualify in the soht, dis discus,
cus, discus, pole vault, high jump, broad
jump, and both hurdles, jvhlle
six will be selected for the fi
nals In the 100. : ;
All t.h relav races will have to
be run in sections, with final
uHnnpr ript.prmlneri nn time. In
the elementary 440 yard relay,
the Ancon school will have to de
fend its title against 10 other
teams, while in the open nan
mile relay, the CHS Tigers will
be defending against 9 other
quartets. All the field events
have over 20 entrants, with the
board jump having the top num number
ber number in 27.
From these figures It can he
seen that the eventual winners
come Friday night will really
have to be the best in their
class. Competition promises to
be keener than It has ever been
at all levels. For the first time
in several years there are at
least three teams with definite
championship threat.
These are Albrook, Athletic
Club and Balboa High. But you
can rest assured that military
teams like Ft. Kobbe. Ft. Clay
ton and the U.S. Marines from
Rodman, all with full entries.
aren't going to sit back and let
the big trophy slip away from i
them without one whale of a
fight.
This is all good news tor tracK
and field fans who are expected
to jam old Balboa stadium to
overflowing on Friday night.
Dons 0dds-0n
NCAA Tourney
Choices to Cop
NEW YORK, March 19 (UP) (UP)-San
San (UP)-San Francisco's brilliance even
without Ail-American K. C. Jones
established the defending champion
Dons today as overwhelming fav
orites over the three other surviv
ors in the N.C. A. A. basketball tour
nament S.M.U.; Iowa, and Tern
pie.
It will be San Francisco v.
S.M.U. and Iowa vi. Tampla in
tho ttmi-finals at Evanston, III.,
on Thuriday night, with the two
"hot" streakers, San Francisco
and Iowa, favored to reach the
finalt.
And the defending champion Dons
must be rated heavier favorites
than ever to walk away with the
top prize, in view of the way they
swept through their first two
games in the tourney 72-61 over
U.C.L.A. and 92-77 over utan.
The other tourney teams had
hoped that the lou of J o n t
through ineligibility as a fourth fourth-year
year fourth-year man would make the Dons
a much weaker outfit. But oph
Gene Brown has stepped capab capably
ly capably into Jones' shoes with 41
points in the two garnet to com completely
pletely completely wipe out that hope. And
All-American Bill Russell, the
Dons' six-foot, 10-inch center,
showed that post-season play hat
dulled none of hit sparkle, either.
- S.M.U., on the other hand, had
to fisht to a one-point win over
Texas Tech before drubbing Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma City winner of the regional
tourney, to qualify for Thursday's
games.

Editor: CONRADO
J

DON HAPKA, world professional high diving champion, making:
a high dive from the roof of the Hotel El Panama during last
year's championship. This year, Hapka will defend his crown
- againnst top divers from the U.S. and Mexico.
. if
International High Diving
Championship Again Slaied
For El Panama Swim Pool

It was announced vesterday i
that the Hotel El Panama Caba Cabana
na Cabana and Tennis Club is again
bringing the high diving cham
pions to Panama next month
for Its. third annual high diving
championship. This spectacular
event will take place April 6, 7
and 8. i
Five of the too stars Jhave aw
ready signed for the event and
entries are expected very soon
from more of these devil-may-
care enthusiasts of this danger
ous sport. Among the first to en
ter Is the champ himself, Don
Hapka. It will be remembered
how he walked off with the top
honors in Panama last year.
Since Don left Panama he has
not been resting on his laurels,
having won the U.S. Open and
many other important tourna
ments.
Don Hapka was being press pressed
ed pressed in the open by another en entry
try entry in tb's year's event, Otto
Schmidt. Schmidt has let it be
known that he will be out to
five the champ a real battle
when they arrive in Panama.
Another entry that wHl be re remembered
membered remembered by all is Barney Ci Cipriani.
priani. Cipriani. Last year Barney
matched the champ every foot
of the way, but he didn't have
quite the form and came In a
close second. With, another
year of experience Barney will
be touch to heat.
Rusty Koheler. an 18-year-old
that will be making his first ap appearance
pearance appearance in Panama is reported
to be cominer last. Rusty placed
fourth in the recent champion championships
ships championships in California, and all the
reports are that his form is
beautiful to watch.
Terry Merrill, a newcomer in
the art of hieh diving, will be
here. Terry has shown fine form
on many occasions wen aDove
the 100 foot mark, and a surprise
might he in order from Terry.
Johnny Edmiston will be here
also, as' this goes to press we
ill

twc DFr TH!WflVineear Bend Muell shows Cardinal team team-mytlilWuKUg
mytlilWuKUg team-mytlilWuKUg left arm with which he-hopes to
win 20. Cards are counting on him for that many.

SARCEANT

have no history on his past per performances.
formances. performances. This spectacular show is being
moved back to the Cabana Club
Pool this year for two reasons.
The boys are going to high for
the tank that was used last year,
and the Mexican cliff divers are
expected to be back. It will be
remembered by those who at-
tenaed the show two year. ago
these Mexican cliff divers were a
hit.
They are accustomed to the
long swan dive and insist, even
irom the high pole to perform in
their accustomed manner. The
depth of the Cabana Club pool is
barely sufficient for safety for
these thrillers.
Another water ballet, similar
to the one two years ago, is be-,
ing planned for the enter
tainment of the crowds The
famous Broadway dancer and
trainer in water ballet, Nat
Dano, will be here as will be
Reba Kennedy for the water
ballet training. .
Clint Osborne, well known to
most of the local people as the
Hotel tennis pro, who left to ac
cept a pro job In New York, is
returning to help out with the
arrangements. Clint, and the
two who will do the training for
the ballet, are expected to arrive
within the next ten days.
Reservations have been made
with Aerovias Panama (APA) to
br;ng an estimated 10,000 pounds -of
equipment. This includes the
high tower that will be mounted
at the poolslde. This tower has
recently been rebuilt and length lengthened
ened lengthened as the divers keep pushing
higher. It is a question just how
high they can build these towers
when the champs keep going to
the top with each extension,
- This championship is another
in the series planned and pro
moted oy tne cabana- Tennis
Club to bring the champs to
Panama and take Panama back
to the rest of the world.
mi



TS PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT KPAER

MONDAY, MAF.Cn 13, !?!
9.1
n
Pacific Softball League
By HARRY GRAYSON I
TUCSON. Aril. (NEA) The!
Indians are i first class baseball
club only because of their pitch
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
Glud Ajencies

Bob Lemon' JikGrfjV I,r,y w.TBn L. P?" -Hoss!e

Bill LeBrun-Jim Hinkle
Cop National Distillers
Best Ball Golf Tourney

ing. .

vi'ifh T.arrv nnhv traded to the

White Sox this is truer than it has

been for the eight-year stretch in
uhirh Cleveland has been a con

sent contender in the American

League race.

Tki var the Tribe once more

could have enough handcuff kings
. il 1 1L!.. IS L

to be in me mien 01 Mings an uie
wv alnne the route, but some of

the older heads, outspoken Bob

Feller among them, express

doubt.

Like most other baseball men.

Feller didn't like the deal that
sent slugger Doby to Comiskey
Park for Chico CarrasqueJ and
Jim Busby.

"And our better pitchers are a

vear older stresses teller. We

.need help."

. . ; H

r

r r ? r
ma:

March 17

Glud Agencies ....... 8
Signal

American Legion
26th Engineers .-. 2

Cervecerla F- Liquiau t

9

7

r

Playing out of the Panama
Golf Club Bill LeBrun and Jim
Hinkle walked off with a 2 and
1 victory over Marv Chad wick
and Tom Connors r to nwln trie
championship in the 1956 Na National
tional National Distillers Best Ball Tour Tournament
nament Tournament at Summit Hills Golf
and oCuntry Club yesterday, r
It was LeBrun who carried tne
, r,t v. tiaiir in vesterday s

finals shooting even par nines

for a 70. The L,eBrun-nuiK";
ball score was a two-under par
Pearl Trim and Peggy Morn
i IU t,ot .Inh M RlltTl-

mit had themselves a day ol
glory yesterday when they edged;
Panama's Peg Porter and Penny
Daniell winnings and 1 on the
26th hole. Mrs. Trim sank a ten
th ith axeen, while

Mrs. Daniell was two putting to
send the match into an extra
nine holes of golf. .

Amador's Macuowan -very
neat three-under par 61 to
lead his partner Bill Gross to
the medalist trophy .wer fellow
Amadorltes Bob Fulton and Bob
Pearson. McGowan-Gross had a
f :!l 1X.n -.,r,H nf an the best Of

.nip tournament to Deal

out Fulton-Pearson by four

Tmmirfisitelv after the final

i nnmnieteH the Na

tional Distillers sponsored a La
Veinta cocktail party at which

time Mr, George Diifer present

The summary of the various
matches: )
Championship Flight

t stiriin xerveri nO-

tlce on the very first hole that
i, 'r.oiWnir around the

Summit layout Just for the exer

else as they one uie

a par. cnaawicKs dcu
- w A th miitrrh. but Le-

Brun's par on No. 4 put his team

1 un. LeBrun iaia ma ico-onuv
No. 6 wtihin inches of the pin
to win this hole with a bird, put-!
tine his combine 2 up. Chadwick
evened the match with a par on
No. 7 and a birdie on No. 9 to
complete the out nine all even.
After halving Nos. 10 and 11
Chadwick put his team ahead
for the only time in the match
with a birdie on no.. 1J. Hinkle
t .13... n knfVi hart narS On

B.UU XjCj-u www. f--' .
' no. 13 to even the match, oui

eagles on No. 5 over piraies even--jh.v,
motch for Chadwlck and

Connors. Hinkle and LeBrun
then stuck to par goH : on Nos.
U i and 17 while Chadwick

Trim's par on No. 10 gave tr-4

BUiumifc lauics a mu
pars by Mrs. Daniell and Mrr.
porter on Nos. 12 and 13 evened
the match. Mrs. Porter and Mrs.
Daniell took the lead for the

first time on No. 17 wnen Mrs.
nanlell sank ft very long putt for

a par. Trailing fcy one going up
to the No. 18 tee, Mrs. Trim
drove her tee shot hole high of
the pin but to the left of the
green after Mrs. Daniell had
rVinrf nt th ateetl. MfS.

guile B" v r
porter and Mrs. Montanye putt

ed out wltn lives on ine wuw
to leave it up to Mrs. Trim and
v-. rionlell Mn Danipll'S ftO-

proach was up to witnm nve ieeu
tu. tn iiihiu Mr. -Trim's ao-

proach rolled past the pin about

ten ieet. Mrs. irim saw ci ice icefoot
foot icefoot putt while Mrs. Daniell
missed her Dutt to even the

matrh

. . .

Both teams piayea eveniy u.i
t.h. third nine until Mrs. Trim

RUT WHEREVER YOU CO in

Tucson Hi Corbett Field, on the

xdira it inwn nrf fh rleserr. nr in

fh lnhhv nf th Santa Rita Hotel

vou are more convinced thai! ev-

. . . !...: .1

er that pitcners gravnaie io me
Indians like money to mil 1 i o n n-aires.
aires. n-aires. -1 :

Cleveland has Boasted the
nfft it aff in th maior fnr-

several years, and among the 20

roenrt this gnrinB. oossibly 15

would get attention from major

league clubs elsewhere.

Al Lopez can auora io De some somewhat
what somewhat Mimnlarent about the Ditch'

ing. He starts with four 1 a r g e

ones Bob JLemon, tany wynn,

HArh Score and Mike Garcia

Thar is B trninff aeainst the

a.... w n -o

first two, and the years may gran
ik. this time arnnnri. but as Se-

nor Lopez notes, solid precautions

have been usen io guaru atuiai

It. :

GB

3'a

8

K. McArthur. If.. 2

Giavclll. ss ...... 4

L. Jones, cf ...... 3

Next Fixe Games

H Foster, rf -3b

R. Dunn, c ..
V. Melant. lb ...

De La Mater. 2b
B. Lawyer, 2b ....
W. Black, 3b ....
C. McArthur. rf

F. Cheney, p .......

Glud

Mar. 19. Pan Llquldo vs.

Agencies;..

Mar. 20, Amer. region vs. oiS'
nal

Mar. 21, 26th Engineers vs. Pan

Llquldo. ;
Mar. 22, Glud Agencies vs

Msr. 23, Signal vs. 25th Engi

neers.

0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0

24 9 i 21 3

L

f

Signal 200 000 05
Glud Agencies 060 103 X 9

SUMMARY Two base hits:
Stewart, Val. Melant. Sacrifice
hits: Melant. Double olays: Grba.
Tlnlcr. Bases on balls off: Grbl
Cheney 4. Struck out by: Grba,

i rhenev 2. WP: Cheney (4-0

LP:

ly

Grba (2-2). Umpire: Methe-

Time: 1:33. Scorer: Thome.

Huo RUNNING ROOIvVDaryl Spencer, left, la in a fcattle with three ethers far the GlantV secen
D.O ri'SrJirri BillT Gardner and Fester Castleman.

BSSC JOB

Confusion Is Over For Spencer
He Could Clear Giants At 2nd

By HARRY GRAYSON .hitter. He wanted me to learn

to hit to risht field. If he thoueht

BtrnrvtY Arii rNF.AV The I Wasn t a nower hitter wny did

wie
put her team ahead on the 22nd

hole. The teams traaea noies ou
n it .mi Nn 9d with the Sum

mit team leading one up with

tnree noies w piy. ua.
put them ahead to stay on No.
nc a inn ir mitt for a birdie.

w.wii -
When Mrs. Daniell missed her

nor nn Kn to naive ine noie

it ended the match with Mrf.

Montanye and Mrs. Trim going
into the clubhouse with a 2 and

1 triumph.
First Flight

onv. f-nffa aWrt Rill Wheeler

,h.t a ht. hall nf is to win the

first flight title over Jack Per-

an tie and BOD urennan. vunj
.n whttHr hnilt un a two UD

lead over the first nine and then
closed out the match on the fif

teenth hole on wneeiers par
three to win out four and three.
Second Flight Goes 36 Holes
No score card was turned in
eannnrl fllffht matCfl be-

1U4 faUC OtWMU
tween Mathews-Castenada and

Favreau-Edstrom, mil we maii-u

.nj.ri oil nun nn tne irtin nuic.

playing nine more holes the

match was suu even, out u i
second extra nine holes Mathews
mil ractenada caught fire to

win 3 ana 2.

Third Fl'ght Won By Summit
. Duo ;:

The Summit Club had a lock.

on the title in this ; mem as
both finalists were playing out
of the home club. Bob Coffey andl
Malcolm Wheeler shot a best;
u-n w,ot-v nn nn tn win nut over.

Fred Hayes and Terry Honn. The

IMMEDIATELY BEHIND tb.
n; Fmir r nv Narleski ana

Don Mossi, remarkable fire fightj

ers, and four or five youngsters

who have been minor league
standopts. The hope, of course, is

that one or mayoe iwo wm mne
if Thau ara rioht-handPTS Dolan

lh - -O
Nichols, Cal McLish and Don Mm-

nich and lett-nanaers cuauy u

ley and Harry Aguirre. .

Nichols, 25, won 17 ior iuia,
!ch hnur sn erstwhile boy

nrlit?v of the Rickey war time

r-" pi." . e

.fa n Krnnirivn nappen 11 iu

t Anpples and San Diego wun

an earned-run average of 3.09
Minnirb. 25. CODOed 20 While

ins nnlv l with an ERA of 2.79

nl i ofi atrike-outs and 56 walks

f. taiin nf the Eastern

League. You don t give up on that

b nd not. at Jeasi. unui uw uj

after tomorrow. ; :
Pacific coast scouts say Daley

only 22, will do, some good in re relief
lief relief roles, which if true, would re release
lease release Narleski or Mossi for start

ing service, uaiey won io
turned In as many complete
games for a poor Sacramento out
7:t frnm TnHiananolis

ill. nsuun, p ,'

won two tor we injuna io

M..H iom a. the vear of

-
the great collapse, but to Daryl

Spencer it was the year ot comu

sion. .
Leo Durocher had ': more
nl h Pnln r.rnunders

it'. Rill Risnev's iob to

straighten them out here in the
Valley of the Sun.
ciii. wnnrtpd at the Pnoe-

ouuiw.
nix ball park three years ago the

most highly regaraea w "'
lo.mis nlavprs a 8iX-fOOt. tWO-

innh mo-nound shortstop w no

swatted the long Dan.
'Now, after two years in the

Army, the handsome Kansan is

strong canamaie io s
York badly needed right-hand bat batting
ting batting punch at either third or sec second
ond second base.

he have me hitting

uie lirsi piace?

clean-up in

me, but one that missed me did

nlnd Asencles won their 8th

straight game arM .lust about
clinch the second half with their

9-5 defeat of Signal. SHrnai ana

American Le?lon, wno iouow wic

Stars, nave iour games cam icm

ito play. j

rrh must, win them all while'

orayihg that Glud loses the fourj

they have leu. wiurumu vhi-"-in?
this week's activities against
Cervecerla, It does not seem
possible for them to lose.

rr-iA..m .nrvi. ivatfA Frlt.T Phe

ki fnnrth win firha evened

luw his nttchlna: record. Mohn hit

2-3 and Tingier naa wuet i

confusmg four trips,

nvnlatna

ilie OOa Stuic.

' w

That seems like a

iitftmnt' hiit'Sopnrer

'We were at DDeU' riem in late
.Inlv nr ar1v Aitaiict U'hin Rillv

a it v Ciwatal

, ... . a JMUtO ftUUtRCU INC UUTTIIt A "Bi

pencer never did get going in reauy shaken; The boys in theiu. ss ......
thjn1 '53. yet he whacked 20 home runs dueout said I turned oale. When Matsomato, 2b

mivedliu a generally unsatisfying cam- i BOt uo. I beean thinking of the! Stewart, If

..v. 4 oaien. and more than half of his in .!. nitrh th.t hit mt I aid

R hits urro for pvtr hasps 1 ivxa k...

hspn iriiipn i nun 17 nnmera ne-

fore Loes dusted me off. I hit Bank, 3b

only three more the rust of the Ellis, cf

Ab R II Po

season.

and Connors were bogeylng the!Fred Hayes and Terry Honn. Tne
noleSCtoneVut thl match onjmatch was all even a the end

the 18th hole.

Tr'm-Montanye Cop Ladies
Honors

Pearl Trim and Peggy Mon

. ntn. vnlp Haves and

Honn moved ahead 2 up with
wins on Nos. 10 and 11. However,
Coffey-Wheeler came back with
pars on Nos. 13 and 14 to even
the match once more. Wheeler s

voart Trim aim rcititj avauu- u ...wvVi.
tawml ttrttAoMT-m No. 16 put his team a a-ffiVbt
ffiVbt a-ffiVbt lost the ninth hole to Read and Coffey's par on 17
leave the out nine one up. Mrs. closed out the match 2 and 1.

OUT OF DOORS with

Shad For Spring Anglers
; By AL McCLANE
Fishing Editor

muv aVtsit .will he enminff un

river soon, and if you've never
:uj (n this hicrh ninmninc! aero-

bat, you mignt inciuao mm wj

your spring camyais"-
Enough the shad is native to
the Atlantic coast from the Gulf
- of St. Lawrence to Forida it was
successfully introduced in Cali California
fornia California in 1871 and is now an im im-nnrt.rt
nnrt.rt im-nnrt.rt onmmprpial fish there'.

Alona the Atlantic seaboard

the shad is fully recognized as a
nisrich in a few areas onlv.

These include the Connecticut
River, the Susquehanna River,
th. Pntnmnp River, and the St

John's River in Florida the

southernmost limit Of us range.
Many shad rivers, such as the
ii,un onH thpDelaware: are not

suited to sport fishing because of

rive trattic ana omer conauions.
! But in each ease inshore salt wat wat-ersp
ersp wat-ersp rovide excellent sport near
the mouths of the rivers, such as
the Potomac in Chesapeake Bay.
Very little is known of shad
habits while in the ocean, as rela relatively
tively relatively few have been captured at
sea.
Hnwever it is well known in the

AtUntip nstal rivers and its

runs, which begin in the southeast

- in February ana Marcn, are ioi ioi-lnurod
lnurod ioi-lnurod with nrpat inter st bv both

.sport, and, commercial fishermen J

As tiie season piogiesscs, buda
run up into more norther
ly streams and the extreme of the
ran?e is in the St. Lawrence River
anii La.ee Ontario.
Hie m..ks, C-.e so-called "buck

shad," srj in the majority early
.. t .1.4... .1. 1

in tne season, nui later uie icmaies

or "rose shad ar most numer

Spawning occurs soon after the
shad reach fresh water. They, ap-

near to orefer shallow spots in

the mouths of ereeks.

During spawning the fish pair off

and swim aiae oy siae.
After hatching in about six
days, the young forage ut the riv riv-r
r riv-r tnr thp.ir first summer and then

make their way downstream and

go to sea.

ALSO IN THE BACKGROUND

are the grand om campi8c",

Feller and Sal Aiagne. anu j
Houtteman, who has been around

quite a while for a chap ot oniy

28
The Old Barber, Maglie, who
admits to 39, couldn't help th e
Indians after he joined them from
.i. -.:..f. loot cpanns. DUt ne 5

wcirw th soring, and eager to

" in. i. a

give u uc --

He U nave iu B"w" ,i,.nt
.m if he doesn't, they wonl

let him stand in the way of young younger
er younger prospects. Especially not at his

t The Indians, as usual, have the
. ... i..A,u tha hall. But with

DiOKeg mivn w. .ul I.
I Larry Doby gone, the problem is
'to find enough guys to hit it.

GUN CLUB
NOTES :
The Gamboa Gun Club wll
hold Its annual Easter "Ham
Shoot starting t 9:30 a.m. on
Sunday, March 25.
Guns will be avalable for
persons not having same. Win Winner
ner Winner of each event will receive
a 12 lb. canned ham. Runner
up will also receive a consola consolation
tion consolation prize.

"I didn't know whether I was
coming or going in 1953, the
personable Spencer, an airplane

ariLisiu" ij : j 1 ....
"Leo (Durochej) told me I was

the regular snonsiuv, -....j
.,if niavinc third ana

1UUJ1U lllja.. r s ....

.epnnrt base. 1 leil lernuic,

I had never played anything jnit
.l ..... ...it anu hupnaii man

knows shorstops are hard to find.
t.. ...arf lv n (Dark) all

,. infiaH at first. I felt

funny seeing an established tar

1:1 tiahI eururnino ilia uuimivii

for a green kid hke me. I knew,
i f.- uA ...fiHanra n me. but I

JUCU . . .

. i irriira tiiiti iiijl.

never cuu.u ii6.. ...
"He'd tell the writers one th ng
. Z.1- .-a oii me aomethingi

SDOUl me kUmB!l

..tivaiv different, l "".""-j

Uo for my Play in 53 ha
I do say is that he seemed to want

to keep pressure on u.

In addition to being slightly
befuddled in '53, young Spencer
had to overcome another obsta obstacle,
cle, obstacle, He was struck on the cheek
six days before the season opened
by a fast ball thrown by Mike
Garcia of the Indians at Nash

ville. Teeth were loosened.

Did Uie beaning have anything

to do with his .208 batting aver
age? The answer is negative.

"I was back at third base in

the Sunday exhibition game at

the Polo Grounds before the sea

Vol. rf

Tingier, lb

Mohn, c

way. I Uidn't clg in tne rest ot
the year."

Spencer insists that he isn't'
plate shy now. "It was just
something that I had on my mind,
in 1953," ne says.

Grba, p 3

31 5 9 18 8

BREAKING LAW AND JAW

Now York (NEA Prlre fight

I irrnrrlinff to the En

Bespeciaciea, m nisieriai-appr.r- "Jr n, The term

ng Rigney, wno nas a way wun cyini).ui ........-..-. .
taVW: has taken lot off

snpneers mino. ine dov seems me -- --

son opened," he recollects. "Thelmore relaxed here this year iday Pro'MS,0ll"t' .'

pitch mat hit me'. didn't bother And tie isni tne oniy one. i(

LAST DAY!

3:15 4:45 6:35

.75 .40
- 3:00 p.m.

uitaftatOOfttaMIt 1
I -hmfwca'S wcrowTOTrri

1

TnAn Fnrnnta .35 .20

Double in ClnemaScopel
Richard Wldmark, In
COBWEB"
Gene Kelly C. Charlsse, in
"HIT THE PECK"

Today tDBAL :20
Jeff Chandler, In
. F OX F IKK"
Jon-Hall, in
"ARABIAN NIGHTS

.10

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE

, PANAMA. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1932, Sunday, March 18, 1956
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided In two series "A" & "B" of 22 pieces each

j.. m fAiirth one day.

I went O-for-4 and the next after-;

noon I batted seventn. ieo
Tl! and said I wasn't a power

LU

Gamboa Invilationsl

Sollball Tciirasmcnt

Slsled For April 7

tm.. ..anth annual Gamboa

.11 fp,i.natviflrit. Knonsorea

by the Gamboa Civic Council In

cooperation wim e.f
Schools, will take Place on sat-

j inn i a i. i tn in uua.

Urne followin-g eight teams
have accepted invitatons t0 play
In the single elimination tour-

"TTrnerican Legion team, co-

rhipf veeh ana a.

Murray.

r.inri Affencv Stars, captain: 1

Bill De La Maier T

. a. di"b. t;K". r. j. i
4. cervecerla Pan Llquldo, i

caotaln: Butch Baker..
5. Powells, captain: pick

a TTnlsnon. cauuuu.

v. jr I
Mosher.
i vt. niillck captain: Jacki

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

9528 $ 44,000.00
3095 5- 13,20.0.00
8884 $ 6,6oooo

PRIZES ARE PAID WITrfOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

N Prun. No

W28
12S

22
328
42
.)28

28

728
828
928

1.12.MI
m.i
1.12.(1
132.M
m m
2.2M.M
1.12.M

1.12.M

U2.M

!28
1128
1228
1328
1428
1528
1828
1728

1828

1SZ8

Prlt No
I.12.M 2028

1.12.M
132 M
KIM
I32.M
:,2fH).M

132.M
I32.M
132.(1(1

132.N

rrlzu.io frliei. PrUti i N. ftlaa i St.

2128
2228
2328
2428
2528
2828

272

2828

2928

I

132.M
132 nn
132 M
132.M
I32.M
132.M
132.M

132 .(Ml

132.M

rtliM I N. tnxm

3828
SI28
3228
3328
3428
3328

3828
3728
3828

3921

132 M
112 (Ml
t32.M
132.M
132.M
:,2(MI.M
x 132.M

132.M
I32.IM

132 M

4028
4128
4228
4328
4428
4S28

4828
4728
4828

492S

132 M
132.M
132.8ft
132.81)
' I32.W
2,2MI.M
132.M

132

132 M

132.00

K28
5128
S228
5328
5428
5528J

5828
5728
5828

5928

132.M, M28
132.86 8128

132.88
132.M
132.88
2,2(1 M
I32.M
I32M

132 M

132.N

8228

8328
428'
(328

M2S
728
(828

(92S

132.00' 7028
132.00 7128
132.00 7228
132.017328
132.00 1 7428
2,28.M 7528
132 M 7828
132 M I 7728

13? M I 7828

132.00 7928

132.0
132.00
132.0
132.00
2,200 (Ml
1320
' 132.0

132.00

132.M

Na fri"

8028
8128
8228
8328
8428
8528
8828
8728
8828

S928

132.M
132.H
132 0
132.80

132.M j
2,20. i
132.0

132.WI
132.0

132

Na
028
128
228
321
428
528
28
728

828
I92S

Maai
132.8
132.0
132 0
132 88
132.8
44,(X10.O0
132.0

132.08
132.0
132.0

1828 132.88 2828 132.0 3828 132. 4828 132.M 5828 HZ nv m .,. m.M I92S 13Z.00 I

192J 132.M 2928 132.M 3921 132 H 4928 132.0 5928 132.M W l wmmmmmmmmmmmi

' r Approximations Derived From First Prize
: : : TT

Approximations Derived from Second Prize

093

308
3087

'
228.(10
1108
HO 80

IMS'
308S
308S

f
220 00
11
U.M

2015
3091

f :
229.M
118.00
no.ee

40

392
393

220.00
110.0
1K.M

509S
3094
3091

220.M

1 (09S 22.M I 7

118.00
1K.M

3087
398

118
11 H

3ft
31M

220.89
n.
1U.M

8093
311
312

v
220.0
1100
110.00

t9l
313
314

220.0
110.0
110.00

'Thoa niiPKt and most DODuIar

way of catching shad is to use a
fly rod, or spinning rod, and fish
a small sparsely tied wet fly a a-long
long a-long the bottom.
Special patterns such as the
Silver Yank, : Joobie, and the
Standard White can be obtained
from most tackle shops' in shad
country.

annMlCIvn CITTIIltF.

m. i ti;ii VP NTTAl North

Carolina's freshman basketbaU
squad won 19 and lost two this
season.' The 1954-55 team won 20
and lost the same amount.

.... ... & llfmiaita a

MuwauKee nt-i
new head football coach, Johnny Carlson.

Druze. would like one part oi ni .... ,,. st nrant

cocge career rr nam io --r"- 8;n?ie

Approximationf Derived From Third Prize

Kil 132.M 1IM 132 H 2884 132.M 3884 132.M 4884 132.W

875

1878

88.00
88.00

1877
8871

88 00
SS.M

887
888

88.0
SS.N

'. 8t
882

'88.8
88.00

- 8S -8885
"

'' 88.8
88.80

5884' 132. 88
- M M 8888 ..
8887 88.00 8889

132.00 I 7884 KtM 9884 132M

. I'.:
. Rt.OO J' 881 88.
" 88.00 8891 S8.C

88Kt
8893

88.01
88.

M aa

Cl::!::n Setter 11

Fljjs HP's Cji:;sy

Al Ttr.:;:.l

A Chilean soccer team, on its
way home from Mexico where
It took part in the second Pan
American Soccer games which
nriM vesterdav with Brazil

'.ccpr'.Rg the cfetwjrtotishtr, WH

play Panama s i-izKayna eievea
at the Olympic Stadium to to-nfht
nfht to-nfht at 7:30.
trices are jeneral Smhs',on
cents, .d thlMrm 23 tec's.

Prlze-winninK Numbers of, vesterday's Lottery Drawing were so!d at: 1st in Col6n; 2nd In Chlriqui; 3rd In Panama

The Nine Hundred whole tickets endinc In 8 and not Included In the above list win torty-rour iiouar, .'

The whole ticket has 4 pieces which comprises the two series A and a
Signed by: ALBERTO ALEMAN. Governor of the Province of Panama.- Ced. 47-12155

The Representative of he Treasury RICARDO A. MELENDEZ

PAtlMAA AMERICAN

aD5

WITNESSES: Eduardo M. Perez, CM. No. 47-41585

Nelson Arcia u., ea. no., i-ouaiu

ALBERTO J. BARSALLO

Notary Public. Panama

PABLO A. P1NEL M.,
Secretary

CAN FILL WLR NEEDS!

KlftTF Th wlnnn w,,h th ,,, ciPher "nd wlth ,wo M

Th riwt Prizt and th 2r.d ni 3rd Prir ar drawn MprMly. Th p p-proximtiin
proximtiin p-proximtiin are calculated on th Firt. Second and Third 'f'"-'

a tirket nouia crry ine numpwr m nm -
claim payment for each.

dhavi;;g OF TIIE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, March 18, 1956
Drawing Number (33
Fraction Ticket

First Prize...:.... 28 $n.00 $220.00

-SeudTrkf 3.00 60.00

Third Prize 81 2.00 40.00

Tha Brlntwlll be paid In arcarrtanc with lh Official Lis! of Panama tn
the afficei of th National Beneficent Lattery altuated on Central Avenue.
' llan of Ordinary Drawing No. 1833 which will take
place March 25, 1936
Divided In Iwo wie ul 22 fractions h riwmmlnated "A" and ""
Finst PRIZE

1 First Prize. Series A and B. ol
1 Second Prize, Series A and B. ot
t Third Prize. Serin A and B. of
IS Approximations, Series A and B, of
t Prizes, beries A and B. of i
a iiM fi.ria. A and B. of

KM) Prize. Seriax A end B, of

22 UOII.WH) each series
S 600.00 each series
J. -,00.00 each series
220 00 each series
1.1OO 00 each series
6S.00 each series
J2 0 each eric

each series
each 'cries

II ADproxImalions. Series A and B of S 65.00
a DriT fi.r, A and B. of 110 00

THIKf) PRIZk
ISApproximatlona. Series A and B of S .Wl each series
t Pri. Series A and B. of 6 00 each ws

$44 "0 Oti
13 20W
S.eoo.oo
i.s?ooo
19.8O0 0O
ll.asOOO
S9.SO0 0O
$'l..0
l.OdOSil

t 1,584 211
l.lflSW

J074j-Hze; ........

rnce or a wnoie ucti

Price of a forty-fourth part

TOTAL $149,732 00
til r,i

.50



t ;

. r- r
U U U
-N I I.-
r 7
ail i IwIIS
( til
I i t
u

4 4 w O

' (i j)

i '- V

, Mi
'
N y mJ

Bus Boycott Trial
Scheduled Today

MONTGOMERY. Ala.. March;cuit Judge Eugene Carter in a
19 (UP) Ninety-three Alabama! century-old courthouse schedul schedul-Negroes
Negroes schedul-Negroes go on trial later today ed to be torn down next month.

on charces or violating city boy

cott laws for refusing to ride
buses on which Whites and Ne Negroes
groes Negroes are segregated.

me Negroes were ciiea as

Reporters were on hand

from London, Paris and big
U.S. cities.
The trial was likely to be de

layed because Judge Carter first

leaders of the highly successful was to act as pall bearer at a

15-week movement or "passive iiunerai

resistance" to Jim Crow prac

t tlces on the city bus lines.
The protested crowded seat seating
ing seating "behind the rail" while
seats In the section reserved
for Whites rema'n empty.
The leaders were indicted un under
der under a llttle-used "labor" law
making conspiracy to boycott a
. misdemeanor.
A battery of five Negro lawyers
defended the leaders before Cir-

Young Fred Gray, leading the

defense and solicitor William F.
Thetford, held separate strategy
meetings on the eve of the tri trials.
als. trials. The defense could ask for a
separate trial of each Negro. Ju Jury
ry Jury trial was waived. j

"The Negroes were inaictea

Feb. 21 under t 1921 law provid

ing six-month Jail -terms, 41,000
fines or both for conspiring to

organize an economic boycott.

US Armed Forces Spent $

Figure Does Hot
Include Spending
By Individual GIs

I

Democrat Wants Justice Department
To Set Up Civil Rights Division

WASHINGTON, March 19 (UP)
Rep. John D. Dingell D-
Mich.) said today he will intro introduce
duce introduce a bill to create a civil rights
; division within the Justice De-
. partment.
Dinaell. "upset by rising race
' tensions In the South, said in
speech prepared for House dell-j
verv that establishment of such

a division ''would be a step to toward
ward toward making the promise of A-

morlcan life a reality lor ai;

Americans."

Under his bill, the proposed
civil rights division would be
headed by an assistant attorney

general.
It would enforce all civil rights
laws except for cases handled
'personally by the attorney gen general
eral general or turned over to the FBI.
PRESENT PROCEDURE

Under the present law. civil
rights matters are handled by a
section within the Justice De Department's
partment's Department's criminal section.
The head of the section is re responsible
sponsible responsible directly to Assistant
Attorney General Warren Olney
III, head of the criminal division.''-
' -.. -..
Dingell did 'hot refer specifi specifically
cally specifically to Southern protests and
demonstrations against the Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court's decision outlaw outlawing
ing outlawing racial segregation in public
,'schools.
. But he said some Americans
"are being deprived of the full
exercise of their rights."
Labelling this ''morally and
loyally wrong," he said: "Our
national conscience cannot rest
easy if we do not make a sincere
and continuing effort to expand
the rights of all citizens."
The school decision recentlv
prompted 101 Southern members
of the House and Senate to sign
a "declaration of constitutional
principles" denouncing the rul ruling
ing ruling and- endorsing all lawful
methods of circumventing it.
PROUD OF MANIFESTO

The "Southern manifesto"
has provoked Northern congress congressmen
men congressmen to charge that the South Southerners
erners Southerners were attempting to un undermine
dermine undermine the courts.
But Rep. A. S. Herlong. Jr.. who
(aid he is proud to say he was
one of the drafters of the mani manifesto,
festo, manifesto, said in a statement that
the document is "on sound legal
ground."
The Florida Democrat said the
declaration actually called for
"a closer adherence to consti constitutional
tutional constitutional princinles."
He said the Supreme Court's
decision illegally usurped legis legislative
lative legislative powers and prompted ra racial
cial racial strife in the South.

Anyone who will bother to

"will realize that the situation
between the races certainly has
deteriorated since the Supreme
Court handed down its decision
requiring the- forced Integration
of our schools."
I

Attractive Young

Negro Girls Picket

Texas Southern U.

think for a minute," he said, not Shivers."

HOUSTON, Tex.. March 19 -(UP)
About 30 Negro pickets

most of them young, attractive

girls, paraded In front of the

Texas Southern University cam campus
pus campus today In protest against a
aneech bv Gov. Allan Shivers.

Shivers was scheduled to

speak at the main auditorium
at ceremonies inaugurating Dr.
S. M. Nabrit, a Georgia-born
biologist, as president of TSU.
The university is one of the
largest Negro institutions in
the nation.- ;;:
The Houston branch of the
National Association for the Ad Advancement
vancement Advancement of Colored People
headed by Negro attorney Fran Francis
cis Francis L. Williams, voted last Thurs Thursday
day Thursday to boycott the ceremonies.

The protest is against Shivers'

opposition to integration and his
advocacy of the doctrine of in interposition.
terposition. interposition. The pickets walked slowly up
and down before the main en entrance
trance entrance to the university.
University students stood a a-round
round a-round the' buildings watching
the pickets but there was no
trouble.. v
The pickets were under the di direction
rection direction of Mrs. Lulu White, state
director of the NCAAP.
She instructed pickets hot tc
talk to anyone nor to each oth

er and to stav 15 feet apart.
. Then carried signs, proclaim'
ing Shivers as a "race baiter."
Another sian said: "TSU, now
showing, Hypocrisy in a High
Place, starring Allan Shivers,"
Another sign said: "Hypocrisy
the principal speaker.!!
One sign carried figures, "1828.
J o h n Calhoun, interposition
1958, Allan Shivers, born too
late."
One young 'man picketed the
easy way. Chauffeured in a long
two-tone cream and orchid
hardtop convertible, he poked
his sign out the window as the
car drove up and down the
street.

It Mid: "We want integration

More thn $8,000,000 was spent

in Manama during 1J55 by the U.S.

Armed Forces for products, serv

ices and contractual activities, ac

cording to a report released here
today by Headquarters, Caribbean

Command.

The total, from the first com comprehensive
prehensive comprehensive annual report of. this

type to be assembled by the Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Command, reflects military

purchases, including post exchang exchanges
es exchanges and clubs, made to support U.S.
Armed-Forces operations in the
Panama area.
The report does Dot Include

those purchases accomplished on
an individual basis by military
personnel and their dependents
from their personal funds and
does not include purchases made
in Panama by other U.S. Govern Government
ment Government agencies.

The exact total for Army, Navy

and Air force expenditures in Pa

nama for the twelve-month period

IS $8,208,763.03.

While military payroll figures
for civilian employes living in the

Republic of Panama are not includ

ed in the "expenditures" report, it

is of interest to note that available
Caribbean Command figures show

that at least an additional $8,000, $8,000,-000
000 $8,000,-000 was paid out for such employ employment
ment employment in i955. ,'
This makes a grand total of
over $16,000,000 expended in Pa Panama
nama Panama during 1955 by the U. S.
Armed Forces which directly be benefits
nefits benefits Panama's economy.
In April of last year, the Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Command released a report
on purchases in Panama as being
$2,616,554 for the six-months period
from July to December 1954.
This figure did not include the

large item of "contracts.

The 1955 figures show an increase

in over-all expenditures in Pana
ma over 1954 figures.

fVf -V: ill
' J
i

. it

f 1 i A

2 h'
n ,n..,..J I :

Pfc. LESTER BROWN, 97th Veterinary. Food Inspection Detachment, Fort Clayton, checks the
temperature of sausage meat being manufactured at the Abattoir Nacional, S.A., in Panama
City. At left is T H. Isbell, plant manager. The U.S. Army Caribbean Quartermaster buys
an average of 10,000 pounds" of hamburger and frankfurters monthly from the firm.
- :. (U.S. Army photo)

11-Monlh-Old Baby
Dies; Malnutrition
Reported As Cause

The 11-month-old daughter of a
Panamanian employed by the Ar

my as a chaufhir, was declared
dead on arrival at Gorgas Hospi

tal late last week, with the cause
of death given as "evidence of
malnutrition."
The Armv said today that the

infant, Celina U. Harris, had been
ill since birth.
Her father, John R. Harris, a
resident of 32nd Street m Panama
City, reported he heard the baby
gasping for breath inH took her by
bus to Gorgas Hospital,

Harris works at Corozal for the

U S Army Transportation Division.
Laborer Injured

While Felling Tree

A laborer from the village of
Escobal was seriously injured
last Friday when a tree he was
cutting accidentally fell on him.
The Gamboa police launch,
which happened to be patrolling
near Escobal learned of the ac accident
cident accident to Rosario Hernandez,

and rushed to his aid.

The 30-year-old Panamanian
was brought to Oatun and later
to the Amador Guerrero Hospi Hospital.
tal. Hospital. Since this 'hospital had no
ambulance' available at the mo moment,
ment, moment, Coco Solo Hospital sent a

doctor and an ambulance to
transport the injured man.
He is considered to be in ser serious
ious serious condition.

OPENS

TOMORROW! :? BELLA VISTA

"WMt,Wi t-nria n uilulji.

M
N
I

-Ihfnush-beDove
ihaf makes
you -feel

so good!
20th Ctntvrf-foxj

),.a picture of

tVtKYBOOT i

Y
;
f
J

EVERYBODY!

i

.it

7

HO on

Uorr6

BOOK-OF-M MOhTH TEACHER w ;

ROBERT STACK

.SHEsnw-

CINemaScoP

COLOR by DELUXI

CO Itirrini

nnwait W- wftTOmwwMw. 'mr 'Humming nnMnrn -w).w .wgw.'a'Muum. "jii'inwin m, w iwim '
I t: (' 1 f
III 'k Y
I lf 'v
L-rf'.-'w L-k ',,..L -l. J ..J

fon1' iSS? EthJ SlIJX 7th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment, Fort .Clay .Clay-ton,
ton, .Clay-ton, puts the stamp of approval on milk pur chastfd by the U. S. Army Caribbean Quarter Quartermaster
master Quartermaster from the da. Ganadera Industrial Dairy In Panama City! Th Armv buv an aveJl
age of 1200 quarts of milk daily, six days per week. fronTthe dairy for trS Si.
(U.S. Army photo)

wp,,, ft.

I'' J

j

1

THE EXTENSION to the Albrook Air Force Base Aeromedical CenW h shown imHor mn
strudtion. The contract for this project was let to C. A High of Panama Nov i i5
$16,319 by Headquarters Caribbean Air Cpmmand. Panama Nov. 18, 1955 for
, ' " '' ' ' '' (U.S. Air Force photo)

1 PsMiia

Read story on pags

ti 95!

SHOPPING LIST
.mlS3l?,nfat! U-S- Amed Forces Pnditure in P
Soods1 aUhlered mMtS fWl' cnlcken $ 435.31
Dairy Product, (Milk, butter,' ke cream; eottaie' '
Frtsc "!e! 563,51
Oth iid ProdU (Maynab

Beverages (Soft cfrinks, aerated waterv bVeV," rum,
wines, whiskey)
ABtomot

....huii supplies) 415 II
Building Materials (Paints, hardware, asphalt tHe)'.'. gi
Toilet Articles, watchVsi'ieweiryv:::::::;;:::::::"
Miscellaneous Xonsumers Goods (Blinds, Venetian,
lamp shades, plastic fabrics, sewin machines.
. mattress covers, leather goods) 1138 22
Service Telephone repairinsurances premium,' films
rental, flowers, sheet metal services, mattress renovation,-
elevator repairs, hauling, packing mu-
sic, cleaning, pressing, photos) 16214
Contracts, Construction & Maintenance ....... . 2 316 14

518,29

19,71

TOTAL..

...$8,208,76

Brazil Officials
Probing Mystery
Of Russian Autos
RIO DE JANEIRO, March 19
(UP) The government here is
acting to solve the mystery of how
a number of Russian automobiles
entered Brazil despite import re restrictions.
strictions. restrictions.
Finance Minister Jose Maria
Alkimin launched an investigation
in an attempt to clear the myste mystery.
ry. mystery. Several "Warzava Pobieda" cars
appeared in Rio in the past few
days, and some were offered for
sale.
Rio's new collector of customs
said he was unable to offer any
explanation how the cars cleared
the customs. He has been in office
only two weeks.

Crippling Finnish
Industrial Slrike
Ends Unofficially
HELSINKI, Finland, March -(UP)
A general strike that has
paralyzed this tiny nation aince
March 1 ended unofficially early
today. It was the worst strike here
since 1017.
A government announcement

alter 12 nours Oi nppntiatinnc h.

tween the Cahinet

of the Employers Association and

uie.Aj-aue union reaeration said
the Strike Would end officially at

a a.m. luesaay.

The 19-daV-old strike rrinnlort

all Finnish transportation except

uiai oi sucn essential it tiwi

fuel and mpdirinp

It brought essential industry to

a standstill and halted work at

harbors and aimnrts Mail HHva.

ry was halted but water, telephone

ana teiegrapn service was not Im Impaired.
paired. Impaired. ExDerts oredicted it wnnlrf faV

three to four days to get street

car ana train services into full o o-peration
peration o-peration again. The rails are cov covered
ered covered with thick mat of ice and

packed snoW.
- Roads and streets were in ter terrible
rible terrible condition and 25 Per cent of

Helsinki's 1,000 taxicabs w e r e

wrecked by crashes on ice-covered
roads. : -

Economic experts said the gen general
eral general strike cost the country a loss
in national income amounting to
$110,000,000.
Thty ... estimated workers 1 oat
$57,OOf,OO0 in wages and said the
production loss was about S207.-

000,000.

Weslinghouse Gro
Calls Hew Meelinr
To Discuss Slrike
WASHINGTON M.r.h is i

Hopes rose today for settler

n me ioa-aay westingtu
strike, the nation's longest m
walkout.
They were based on the f ;
that the AFL-CIO Electrical w
ers Union summoned a mee
tonight Of its ton V'ocHnirhniie

licy-making body a confen

Doara composed of represe
tives from each of the unit
Westinghouse locals. v
Bob Nellis, chairman of the i
ference board, would not say
cificallv whether a npur ilrilra

tlement move would be sabmi
to the board by union negotiat
But a union spokesman said
board "must act" before the st
can be settled and "you don't
them together unless you 1
something."
It was understood changes i
suggested to both union and c
pany in the package settlen
proposal made earlier by fed
mediators. There were indicat
the changes centered a r o i
methods of dealing with 36 si
ers fired by the company.
Once Beefy Femali
Who Lost Four Ton:

Plan Victory Meal
Chicago, March 19 tup)
More than 1,000 once beefy w
en reported the loss of air
four tons of excess poundage
the YMCA'a slimdown swe
stakes entered its homestri
here. '.
Harold L,"Gibbsr who toted
the happy results, said 18 sy
like representatives of the woi
will assemble tomorrow night
a "victory dinner" to celebi
with a "restrained menu" tc
ing only 560 calories.
The 18, who lost a total of m
than 300 pounds, will step on
same scale on which they weig
in on Jan. 16.
The dieting program was
pled with curriculum that inc
ed courses in physical educat
charm and hair styling, Gib
said. ' -
One beaming contestant, A
Barney fiarrad, lost 23 pound:
tip the scales under 200 pou
for the first time, in years. B
the said she's only reached
half-way point.
"I intend to continue the cal
count until I've lost another
pounds," she said.

Exlincl Siberian

Volcano Erupting

Since last, October

London, March 19 tup) a

long extinct Siberian volcano e e-rupted
rupted e-rupted suddenly last October in a
roaring explosion that has lasted

ever since, Moscow radio report reported.
ed. reported.

The broadcast said scientists at

the volcanic study station in the
desolate Siberian Kamchatka pen

insula reported last Oct. 22 that
clouds of smoke had been arriv arriving
ing arriving from the "extinct" Kamchat

ka volcano.

"Scientists investigating saw
flame and ashes rising to a height

of seven kilometers (4.2 miles) a-

bove the crater, the broadcast
said. "The ground shook with ex explosions
plosions explosions and clouds of ash dark

ened the sky." ?,
Moscow radio said that in Nov November
ember November the eruptions became hea

vier and the pillar of flames and
ashes towering over the volcano
reached a height of nearly seven
miles. The fires began to abate in
January although lava surged o-

ver the crest of the mountain last'

month. i

BAUJOA TIDES
--TmSDAYrMARCM'2tr
HIGH' LOW
9:27 a.m. 3:26 a.m.

PRE RELEASES FOR THIS WEEK

TOMORROW AT THE
CENTRAL THEATRE
"IIIE BEKIIY GOODMAN STORY"

V

V 4

Itk mm.

iatltit.

J

Th DirtUrfk tc ihm Rnnv rnA- n

pears in llniversallnternational's Technicolor musical bio-'
5n?hy nhC BennyJ 90,dm Story," co-starring Steve
n r t w?, the ??tua members of the Quartet -(L.
to R.) Teddy Wilson, Lionel Hampton and Gene Krupa.

WEDNESDAY AT THE
LUX THEATRE

,.

1 1 i ". e l :

A

C4

pick-up
date
with
a soldier

; picture
of very

very

special
frrcatnczs!
r.

9:57 p.m. 3:57 i.m.