The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03035

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Related Items:
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tAe people know the truth and the country is ia" Abraham Lincoln.
Hit TEAR
PANAMA, R. p., SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 1358
riTI CENTS

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" LJ L4 U i s

MIDDLE EAST
DECISION TIME
NEXT WEEK
WASHINGTON, MARCH 17
(UP) OFFICIALS SAID TO TODAY
DAY TODAY THE CRITICAL TIME-OF.
DECISION FOR THE UNITED
STATES ON THE MIDDLE
EAST SITUATION MAY COME
NEXT WEEK.
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles returns Wednesday to Wash Washington
ington Washington from a -round-the-world
trip.
He and President Eisenhower
are expected to meet shortly af afterward
terward afterward to plan U. S. strategy
regarding riot-torn Cyprus and
other Middle Eastern hot spots.
Assistant Secretary of State
George V. Allen, the State Depart
ment's top Middle fcastern expert,
arrived home yesterday to help
with studies on the explosive Arab Arab-Israeli
Israeli Arab-Israeli situation.
Allen, who accompanied Dulles
to i Asia, sounded a net of ur urgency
gency urgency when he said the Middle
Eastern picture it "extremely
serious."
The United States hopes to find
a way to work through the United
Nations to avert serious fighting
in the Middle East. Officials were
reported favoring:
1. A warning to both Israel and
the' Arab states against new ag aggression.
gression. aggression. 2. A promise of U. N. action to
punish an aggressor. This could
be diplomatic, military or econo economic.
mic. economic. '
3. .tr?7iTfc,hing of- the machin machinery
ery machinery used by Gen. E, L. M. Burns,
the U. N. truce supervlser in
Palestine,, if he feels this is need needed.
ed. needed.
There are reports "Burns wants
greater nobility for his organiza organization
tion organization to check on reported armis armistice
tice armistice violations.
The United States also facet
renewed pressure from Israel
or American arms to offset
Communist weapons received by
Egypt. .'
i Israeli circles disclosed that
Israeli ambassador Abba Eban
will make a "supreme effort to get
an answer to his nation's arms re request
quest request shortly after Dulles returns
from abroad.
Eban demanded a "yes-or-no
answer to the request before
Dulles left Washington, but the
Secretary of State refused to give
one.
US Gives Up Bid
To Have Soviets
Play For 2 Plsnes
w a CHTNflTfYW "Marrh 17 fUPl
The United States today gave
up for the time being its efforts to
get Russia and .Czechoslovakia to
pay damages for two American
planes shot down by the Reds in
1952 and 1953.
. The State Department said if
the day comes when the Reds are
willing to settle their major differ differences
ences differences with this country, another
effort to collect will be in order.
The International Court of Jus Justice
tice Justice announced yesterday it- had
taken the cases off its docket be because
cause because Russia and Czechoslovakia
refused to let it take jurisdiction.
"The court can rule on cases only
With the parties' consent.
The State Department called the
Soviet-Czech stand an "unfortuna "unfortunate
te "unfortunate frustration" of efforts by peace peace-loving
loving peace-loving nations to settle disputes
''by the processes of law and ord order"
er" order" It said the United States has
now "exhausted all diplomatic
channels" in trying to settle the
disputes.
The government sought to col collect
lect collect 1,00,000 million dollars fro
Russia for a B29 shot down off
Kokkaido; Japan, in Ocober, 1952,
and $271,000 from Czechoslovakia
lor an E84 jet fighter shot down
Over Germany in March, 1953,
Department Press Officer Lin Lincoln
coln Lincoln White said abandonment of
the current bid to collect does not
mean this country has "wiped off
the boooks for all time" the bill
against the Red partners.
He said another effort to collect,
will be made if a time of general
agreement with the Reds ever
comes. w
White also reported that Russia
lias not yet paid $724,000 which
this country billed Moscow for
damages for a Navy Neptune
plane shot down by Soviet planes
off Alaska last summer.
t'i? ("'mpges. The United States
Russia volunteered to pay half
smt the Kremlin the bill Jan. 6
but has not yet received payment.

r i

LIOrvEnHC? W CAP,Rli? Aw8lain BUVice wrgeant (backgrounduSa1 aioS'wSd aioS'wSd-wl,Clp?lconablf
wl,Clp?lconablf aioS'wSd-wl,Clp?lconablf lle ,n the round after Cypriot Nationalists shot them durirte a new
anti-British outburst at Nicosia, Cyprus. Authorities In Cvprus said the new outbreak of riot rioting;
ing; rioting; was an obvious retaliation for Britain's deportation of Archbishon Makarlos.
ft it it it
Extremists Ambush Party
Leaving 7 Dead; E vidion On

NICOSIA, Cyprus, March
iu tiAuniusn diuuusiiru-
British patrol southwest of Nico
ala with a barrage cf automatic
weapons fire and bombs early
today. Tirst report aald five
British soldiers were wounded
and an extremist shot dead.
The ambush was staged near
Khandria, 35 miles southwest of
Nicosia.
An extremist band, number
lng gome 12 gunmen, attacked
two British patrol cars with au automatic
tomatic automatic weapons and bombs.
British reinforcements were
rushed in and a sharp gun bat battle
tle battle developed.
The extremists were put to
flight.
First report said they left one
dead and may have suffered sev several
eral several wounded.
Five British soldiers were
wounded, according to first un unofficial
official unofficial reports.
Four unexploded bombs and
an automatic weapon were found
near the body of the extremists.
British authorities ordered
residents of 10 homes evicted
and closed 20 shops indefinite indefinitely
ly indefinitely In the 'terror town" sec section
tion section of Nicosia.
The move was in retaliation
for the refusal of residents of
the area to divulge information
concerning the anti-British un underground.
derground. underground. Twenty-one murders or- at attempted
tempted attempted murders have been
committed in recent months in
the secelon of Nicosia that has
Crippling Strike
Faces Denmark
COPENHAGEN. March 17 fUP)
Denmark today faced a cripp crippling
ling crippling strike that may paralyze trans transport,
port, transport, building industries, oii .n
panies, and shipbuilding in its lirst
stages.
Later it may spread into ar all all-out
out all-out workers-employers fight sim similar
ilar similar to Finland's general strike,
now rolling into its third week
: Saturday afternoon, 30,000 work workers
ers workers launch the strike at "hostase-
industries" picked by the Associa Association
tion Association of Workers Union. Another
20,000 walk out Tuesday morning.
The employers association has
countered with a second lockout
warning. Within a few days, the
country s entire industry and trans
port may be paralyzed.
ine siriKe inreat Decame a rea
lity late last night, when Erik
Dreyer, chief of the Board of Ar Arbitration,
bitration, Arbitration, abandoned hopes to per persuade
suade persuade the employers and workers
representatives enter a comprom compromise.
ise. compromise. ';- -r
In spite of ten hours of negotia negotiations
tions negotiations yesterday, Dreyer ,had to re
port to Social Democratic Premier
and Foreign Minister H. C. Han
sen that be could not a v e r t a
strike.
The workers "general demands"
comprised wage increase, reduc
t ion of weekly working houri from
48 to 44 and sickness pay. At no
pomU,djdUie -employers .associa
Uon give in in accordance with
their warning issued several days
ago.

J.

l?-'bem dubbed "terror. town'H

uie cnusn,
The eviction orders were Issued
soon after severe curfew rules
were imposed on Nicosia and
two other island cities, Llmassol
and Kato Zodha.
The 24-hour c u r f e w in the
three cties placed the residents
under virtual house arrest. Only
one woman from each family
was permitted to leave each
home at midday to shop for gro groceries,
ceries, groceries, Residents of the 10 Nicosia
houses ordered evacuated were
believed to have been silent
witnesses to the unusually
large amount of violence in
their neighborhood, British of
ficials declared.
Their eviction for a period of
three months was designed to
iorce open sealed lips, but the
unprecedented order had no im immediate
mediate immediate effect in that direction.
District Commissioner Martin
Clemsen said the families would
be moved ont of their homes by
police tomorrow morning
The order was read to a group
of 70 Cypriots brought before a
public court of inquiry in Nico
sia's once-gay Luna Park.
A murmur of protest ran
Dulles Told America
Should Give Koreans
Arms, Atomic Guns
SEAUL. March 17 flTPV cn.,ti.
Korean leaders told Secretary of
oiave joim rosier uuues todav the
umicu oiaies snouia provide atom atomic
ic atomic weapons for South Korea's 600 -000-man
army.
. Defense Minister Sohn Won II
said Dulles' reaction to the re request
quest request was "encouraging," but ob observers
servers observers here believed, the United
States would stand by its earlier
refusal to give atomic arms to
the Koreans.
Dulles flew In from Formosa to today
day today to confer with President Syng Syng-man
man Syng-man Rhee and other Korean lead leaders.
ers. leaders. He leaves early tomorrow for
Tokyo, where he will meet the
ambassadors who represent Amer America
ica America in the Far East.
In a brief airport speech; he
offered greetings to the American,
South Korean and Allied tronDs
who "stand here as guardians of
iiDeny.
. "I am delighted at the prospect
of another talk with President
Rhee," Dulles added. "He is one
of the outstanding figures of the
free world. I look forward to ex exchanging
changing exchanging views with him about
the present tactics of the Com Communist
munist Communist rulers."
More than 150,000 Koreans lined
the streets to cheer the Secretary
as he rode from the airport into
the city.
Korean officials said Rhee plans
to ask Dulles for aid of .three
kinds increased military funds
and.equipmenU, .increased econom economic
ic economic appropriations, and assistance
in improving relations with Jap
an.

U
f
through the crowd. One gray
haired woman cried at the
thought of being forced out of
her home. Two teenage girls
boldly laughed aloud, while
many young men on the side sidelines
lines sidelines merely glowered at the
red-bereted British troops that
tood guard with rifles and
step guns.
All of Nicosia has been under
24 hour curfew since Rrit.ish nn.
lice Sgt. Gerald Kooney was cut I
down by gunfire thre dav. uon
All 10 houses and nine of the
shops affected by the eviction
order are in the vicinity where
Rooney lost his life. Residents of
the area claim that they know
nothing of the incident.
As the inquiry was in prog progress
ress progress in Luna Park, paratroop paratroopers
ers paratroopers less than 100 yards away
were breaking into shops
'whose owners failed to an answer
swer answer an order that the shops
oe openea in a door-to-door
search for arms and ammuni ammunition.
tion. ammunition. The search rjroduced six h
made bombs: several rnunri nf
shotgun ammunition and a
D?ucn or newly-printed propa
?iHlu,rglng, FvPrriotS!ls
m, o ill u' 1 B 11 10 oust
the British,
The stringent curfew rules and I
the evictions were the first col
lective punishment measures im imposed
posed imposed since Britain declared a
state of emergency on Cyprus
last year.

St. Patrick's Day

L.

AND 'TIS THE IRISH that bring,-? the glow to the eyes of
Irishman-for-a-day Eisenhowever, to be shure, Irish Prime
Minister John A. Costello (left), straight from Dungarvin,.
County. Waterfordwarmly greetslihe-Presideiitand presents,
him a bunch of shamrocks, the traditiptiai good luck plant of
the Ould Sod. .The Prime Minister is in Washington for a
: three-day official visit.

ffiKTOfl

U U

.
DO YOU WANT FEDERAL
MINIMUM WAGE LAW HERE?

Non-Citizen
Unions:
YES
rocals 900 and 907 came out
flatly in favor of the application
of the Federal Minimum-Wage
Law to the Canal Zone when
non-citizen union testimony was
delivered yesterday.
. Spokesman for the GCEOC GCEOC-affiliated
affiliated GCEOC-affiliated unions was Harold W
Rerrie.
He said:
'There are numerous agencies
on the canal Zone, other than
the U.S. Government, who by
the nature of their business in interests,
terests, interests, find it necessary to em employ
ploy employ people from the local area.
They include contracting firms,
shipping companies, banking
and numerous other private in interests.
terests. interests. "It is the firm position of
organized labor on the Canal
Zone that is affiliated with
the AFL and CIO that all em em-plovers
plovers em-plovers under the jurisdict'on
of the U.S. Federal laws should
conform to the standard of
the Federal Minimum Wage
"While some of the business
interests operating on the Canal
Zone do ooserve acceptable
standards of compensation, it Is
not so In many cases.
"Refuse of this non-confor
mity to a fixed standard In wag
es and other eniigntenea em employment
ployment employment practices, it is under understandable
standable understandable that they can accom accomplish
plish accomplish a given project at lower
cost than the government agen agency
cy agency could,
"This is sifrnally true in the
case of construction and main maintenance
tenance maintenance work of the Panama
Canal Company Government
wniew hoo heen nrenonderantly
awnrrieri to rnntraotinir firms in
recent years, and from present
Indications, there is an increas
in? trend toward this practice,
with the objective of effecting
economy.
"We hold that If in fact
economy does result from this
practice, it is realized almost
entirely at the expense of the
worker," Rerrie declared.
'The Panama Canal Company
has been and is equipped to per-,
form its construction and main maintenance
tenance maintenance work, as well as, if not
better than constructing: firms,
which are able to accomplish
this work at a cheaper cost, by
adhering; to practices that do
not compare favorably .with
Government standards.
"In awarding its work to con
tractors, the economy objective
accomplished in reducing the
working force of the Panama
iranai rnmnanv Government.
only to have In many cases, the
same persons employed by the
contractor, at rates equal io or
lower than they were paid with
an almost complete absence of
(Continued on Page 6, Col. 6)

US Citizens
Association:
YES
Dr. N. M. Newport, second vice vice-president
president vice-president of the United States Cit Citizens
izens Citizens Association, presented the
USCA's views to the subcommit subcommittee
tee subcommittee yesterday.
He said: "It is not possible, of
course, to estimate the effects ol
the proposed legislation.
"Howtvtr, in conformity with
tht'domocratic principle of our
nation, the mtmbort of thit As
sociation favor the tttabhth tttabhth-mtnt
mtnt tttabhth-mtnt of a ttatutory minimum
wage in litu of the ono provided
by administrative policies in
thit area.
"We feel that this method of ap
plication will eliminate the possi possibilities
bilities possibilities of payment of sub mini minimum
mum minimum wages and is in keeping with
the democratic principles of non non-exploitation
exploitation non-exploitation of labor while contri contributing
buting contributing to the stability and securi security
ty security of all employes in this area.
"About two years ago the Com Company
pany Company Government adopted the po policy
licy policy of hiring contractors to do
maintenance and construction
work, previously performed by
Company workers.
"ThU hat rosultod in outside
contractors bringing ..into ..t h e
Zone now 'employ ot,. at ratot
wall bolow those of tho Compa Company
ny Company Government workort.
"In addition, this is a system
which allows the awarding of con
tracts by Government agencies to
contractors, with no provisions to
protect the workers; it allow a
lowering of! their standard of liv living
ing living and results in false economy
that affects the United. States cit citizen
izen citizen employe by allowing con1
tracting firms to underbid Gov
ernment agencies, who, as a re
suit, are forced to give reduction-in-force
to Zone employes,
'If, as wo understand it, thould
thit policy of a minimum waqa
apply to omployot of contract contractor,
or, contractor, only, we baliovo thoro will
bo a tondancy to improvo liv living
ing living standard for thorn, and it
will lessen the opportunity to
substitute cheap contract labor
for Panama Canal Zompany em em-loyet.
loyet. em-loyet. "It is our opinion that lack of
fair labor standards contributes to
the opportunities which allow a a-pusive,
pusive, a-pusive, unscrupulous practices
and undemocratic exploitation of
labor that results in freezing U U-nited
nited U-nited States citizens out of jobs in
this area; permits the continuing
displacement of American em employes
ployes employes by cheap contract labor,
and permits contractors to rely
exclusively, on low wage alien la labor.
bor. labor. "We therefore contend that the
applicability of a minimum wage,
set by statute, will tend to elimi
nate exploitation of labor (if con contractors
tractors contractors are forced, to adhere to
it); will accomplish a more effi
cient working force (better quali qualified
fied qualified personnel for more pay):
and will reduce the lowering of
standards for the sake of econo economy
my economy as consideration is given to
the better qualified pertonne
when selecting for employment at
higher rates of pay.

$i-an-hour Minimum Wage

Harmful To Economy of Panama?
Phooey! Say US-rate Union Men
;: Two members of organized labor on the Canal Zone who. were heard today at
the conclusion of the House subcommittee hearings on the application of the $1 -art-hour
Federal minimum wage law here, took strong exception to the contractors' argu arguments
ments arguments that the economy of the Republic of Panama would be upset if the minimum
were enforced. 1

' They came out against what
they tetfmed "sub-standard con
ditlons"' existing now for con contractors'
tractors' contractors' workers, which are
('obnoxlous" to all organized la labor.
bor. labor. ;'
Fust speaker this morning was
R. L. 'Blaney. chairman of the
legislative committee and alter
nate legislative representative of
the Canal Zone Labor Union Union-Metal
Metal Union-Metal Trades Council AFL-CIO
who said their primary aim was
to-oppose- the- exclusionof- the
Canal Zone from the Fair Labor
Standards Act of 1938 and to
recommend that it not only coa

Also Maybe CZ
Wage Committee;
Puerto Rico-style

Net effect of whatever is decided by Congress con concerning
cerning concerning the $1-an-hour Federal minimum wage as it ap applies
plies applies to the Canal Zone will be to give laborers who work
for contractors on the Zone "some increase" in their bass
pay.
This was one of the impressions expressed today by
Rep. Carl Elliott (D-Ala.), chairman of the House Educa Education
tion Education and Labor subcommittee which concluded its two-day
hearings shortly before noon.
Two alternatives facing the subcommittee, accord according
ing according to Elliott are:
1) To leave the Canal Zone as it is now with full cov coverage
erage coverage of the Federal Minimum Wage Law, or:
2) To set up an industry wage committee similar to
that functioning in Puerto Rico which would work in con conjunction
junction conjunction with the Secretary of Labor.
The latter possibility seemed most likely, Elliott said.

It is anticipated that, it will take
the subcommittee between 30 to
45 days to complete and submit
their report on the Zone hearings.

X.UIOU, aner me enn oi m near-i appreciative of the corwarm
ings, also remarked that he gothey have recrivslirjc fuim pf pf-the
the pf-the impression s-iim gop! on firers of the Panama CanaJ Corn Corn-contracting
contracting Corn-contracting of labor and other jobs; pany, officials of the Caribbean
in the Canal Zone "may increase"JCommand, contractors' organiza organiza-over
over organiza-over what is being done nowandtions, citizens groups, AFL-CIO
as this contracting-out increases, spokesmen and those who spoke
it will become more and moreifor the citizens of the Renuhlii?

necessary to give "added atten attention"
tion" attention" to the application of the
Fair Labor Standard Act, and
perhaps other laws.
Ho laid the subcommittee will
hoar one othor witnott Gov Gov-ornor
ornor Gov-ornor Soybold, who will appear
bofore tholr committee in With With-ington.
ington. With-ington. Hit testimony will con conclude
clude conclude tho evidence they are jarh jarh-ring
ring jarh-ring en the enforcement' and
application of the act in the
Canal Zone.
. Elliott remarked that their com
mittee had two bills before it re referring
ferring referring specifically to several of
the territories and possessions of
the" U. S.
The bills, he said, were spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the Department of De Defense,
fense, Defense, and ask for special treat treatment
ment treatment of American Samoa, Guam,
Wake IslandPanama Canal Zone
by inference, and several other
possessions and bases throughout
the world.
"There it feeling on the part
of many people, and the govern government
ment government that we are building up
considerable amount of liability
under the operation of the pres present
ent present law." Elliott stated.
This subcommittee he explained
is charged with the responsibility
of determinine what the facts are
with respect to the application (of
the wage hour law and with res respect
pect respect to needed amendments.
He said that the hearings on the
Zone were the first in their plan
to visit the various areas. Trips
to some of the other places will
probably be made by April 1.
"I am rather pleased with the
information this committee has
tlnue In effect, "but be enforced
to the fullest extent."
Blaney was assisted by three
other members of his organiza organization,
tion, organization, E. W. Hatchett, president
L. S. Damlani, first vice-president,
and Curtis Coate, labor
representative on the Wage and
Grievance Board of the Pana Panama
ma Panama Canal.
Last speaker today was Rufus
Lovelady, national vice-presl
dent of the American Federa
Won ofGovernmenfc EmployeL
who said he believed that a min
imum wage standard should ap apply
ply apply here.

been able to gather here," Elliott
said today.
He added that he. as well a a

members of the committee, was
of Panama.
"They have given us a fairly
clear picture of the situation as
it exists here," he stated.
Elliott concluded the hearing
by thanking everyone concerned
for their courtesy during the hear hearings.
ings. hearings. Other members of the five five-man
man five-man committee added their brief
words of thanks.
"The type of citizenship exhib exhibited
ited exhibited here hat' been unutually
fine," Elliott pointed out, He
taid he did not know of any
area in the State! where citiient
take a keener interett than what
had been exhibited here.
The subcommittee expects to
leave the Isthmus early tomorrow
morning, and would meet again
Wednesday at 10 a.m. in Wash Washington.
ington. Washington. Mauldin Running
For NY Congress:
GOSHEN, N.Y., March 17 (UP)
Cartoonist Bill Mauldin, 34,
was endorsed today as the Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic candidate for the, 28th
Congressional District by theOr theOr-ance
ance theOr-ance County Democratic "Com "Committee.
mittee. "Committee. Mauldin has the support of the
executive committee of Rock,
land, N.Y., and has the support
of Michael Prendergast, Rock Rockland
land Rockland County Democratic chair chair-man.
man. chair-man. He is unopposed as the
Democratic candidate for the
28th district.
On CZ
"My, federation would rather
see it apply by statute, but would
not object," he said, "to a wase
board process, provided regula regulations
tions regulations were set up to enforce
them."
Lovelady said he was fearful
that management mlRht refuse
to negotiate on points that tripy
would not want -to consider. He
said that although this was not
often the case, it did someti;r.-
occur.
- If you gentlemen, of Cer.M
could come up wun a svs; r
where the employe could
(Continued on Face i:



SATURDAY, MARCH 17, V.S
PAlili TWO

THE FAN AM A AMERICAN AS IXDtFEXDE NT DAILY KEWSPAFES

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
CVWt NO euaiUHtO TMl MNAMA WCKICAN MUI, INC
rOUNPIO Y NIUON KOUN5IVCLL IK li
' HARMODIO AKIAI, IDITO
7. N Strict P. O. Bo 134. Panama. ft. e P.
': TiiiFHONt 2-0740 IS Uni
CAILI ADOTIIS. PANAMfRICAN, PANAH
Colon Office. 1Z 178 Central Avinii itwiem 12th ano Stn Ititn
foatiaN RlRRs(NTATIVM. JOSHUA B. POWERS. INC.
' 943 MADISON Avf. NIW VORK. 17 N. Y.
tor At. xaiv
P Month m
e eo 2222
on tian. IN """" 18. SO 24 oo

THIS IS TOUt FORUM THE HEADERS OWN COIUMH

i f
i aa man doi n aa vpaa renim
Utrt ara iiv4 ratcfuUv tad
. aiaanar. ;
If oa contribute a letfet don't
Mat tot Lei tart art pwbiui.e.1 in
lei ta try ta keep tha letter,

miiy. v, wnvr wriivrv
Thia aawipopor enamel at retpoMibilitT tor statement ai oafnien.

npratwd la letter tram reader.
THE MAIL BOX
' SAN ANTONIO BUGLE
Sir'
I That big livestock show is on and we paid our visit Sun Sun-da
da Sun-da but didn't even stop. They have doubled the parking space
ani when we arrived at 1:30 p.m. there was no parking space
feff and ca for a mile on each side were waiting, so we called
It si visit and came home, as did many thers- . th
Attendance makes It a success and a few cents added to the
admittance counts up fast. .nMnr. Hnino
Half the town has got the sniffles and the doctors are doing
a land office business; there's a waiting line wherever you go.
Had to 5o to get my ears overhauled Saturday and things don t
look too bright It's doubtful if my hearing will last a month
Just ffve to grin and bear it. At least I still can keep up with
the TggwuS&fu roads of late con con-Btructed
Btructed con-Btructed in South America, and ou line to Panama not finished--yet.
Looks like Uncle Sam will have to build the Costa Rica
""wVwlfblgTn Sding and Improving our roads as soon as
the VainTlet up and here they don't have to wait, for it
doesn't rain Some contracts are already let..
Looks like Mexico is going to make hophfVaredo
snite of all we can do. We had It well under control at Laredo
!Kpa and now they've switched to Eagle Pass. Its
' claimed they picked up one of the biggest hauls ever made
vAtTrdav and are keeping quiet for another possible haul
None of this affects me. Never hit the pipe or smoked a
v cWetln my whole life. pop Wright

DANSE
$ir:
!
Th atnrv eoine around is
KmWti. wrong, no
and the audit section.
complete only this course-.
AUTHERINE
nnlversltv of
Sir
7?.,r.irwtTnTve

rravTsusplclonas to the tirVlSto
rttlfflndln,
Alabama thinks there ar fnefthny)o;Srthe United
ttw?v -Sir' Play" how about publishing the list of irrespon.
conference with Senator Giuette. Dlxie Joe

TEXAS
Sir:

Here are some military figures on the Intelligence of Amer-

..B7(r.lr,to oincer"lobs.
sutlsuS gaUhrTnaVa
:th' Sarizin

Scl&ri brains at all.
Otner WOros, over Bu i.etrnr hacks anrt weak

Now I know where tnai ma oj
minds" originated.

- JOBS FOR PANAMANIANS
After reading the letter by North American physician, I am
Intrigued by his reason for obstructing Wfetfnem Wfetfnem-ployment,
ployment, Wfetfnem-ployment, by his presence here. Perhaps he will enlighten us.

-

BIG THING IN LITTLE PACKAGE This little (11.5 feet long
nnri fmir ftwt wirlf) Ttnlinn par Is hlf?ffpr than it looks. It pan

1 carry six passengers comfortably. Or its four back seats can be
folded to provide room for as many as a dozen pieces of luggage,
( according to its manufacturer. A 22-horsepower motor is housed
in the rear of the Fiat "Multiple 600," a more spacious version of
the popular Italian utility car..

I

TONIGHT

1
n

A DRAMA OF CHANGED LIVES
8.30-P.M.

-
HOXO

V J A TL. D a a a m A nt A r 1 r A H

--
ara Uadled ia a wholly confidential
b Impatient II D doain I appear IV

ma eroer recema.
limited ta ana poga length.

MACABRE
iA..k."Ai.. Amnr civilian Persnn-
mai ine
" "XiJWK order you kno.
, whlrh unanimous approval
Gossip
LUCY CASE
Alabama Expels Autherine Lucy.
of al because oku
SECOND
Mid other )ote where hmliu I are
upld people in
- s.
-Midwest
ie.: :.
760 Kcs.

ACKLED

Labor News
And
Comment

By VICTOR RIESEL
In the bars and grills,: hotel
rooms and camouflaged business
suites where the mob meets, a
corps of killers is being bawled
out as though they were children
playing with toys instead of hired
killers with trigger fingers for
sale.-
For a week now the under
world's executioners have turned
Newark, N.J., into a shooting gal
lery, ihey ve hit two labor men
with lead in the face, head, back
and arms. But, unforgivable by
the mob's code, killed neither of
tnem. J
One was a Teamster Union of
ficial involved in a juke box feud
The other was real big game. He
is Louis baperstcin, an insurance
man and mulcter-extraordmary of
union welfare funds. He dipped in
tor almost a million dollars.
And he kicked back to a string
of union men and their underworld
protectors from coast-to-coast!
He did business under the pro
tection of one of the directors of
the board of the Crime Syndicate
Abner Longie Zwillman. Zwill
man got hot recently, when the
internal Revenue Service cracked
down. Like Frankie Costello, when
a high mogul of the mobs gets
hot, he lost prestige among the
hoods.
With Zwillman for the moment
otherwise occupied, the mob start started
ed started after some of his friends in
the labor section of the under underworld.
world. underworld. The mob had real reason
to try and wipe out Louis Saper-
stein. He had testified before a
sub-committee of the Senate Labor
Committee which was investigat
ing welfare funds.
Saperstein had also talked be before
fore before a Grand Jury for the crusading
Manhattan District Attorney Frank
Hogan!
Saperstein was talking at a mo
ment particularly dangerous for
the mob inside labor, lie was in
forming just after the Supreme
Court had upheld the bribery con
viction of old Joe Ryan, one-time
lifetime giant of the now indepen
dent International Longshoremen's
Assn.
Joe Ryan was convicted last
year In the lower courts of ac accepting
cepting accepting bribes from a waterfront
company. His attorney, Louis Wald-
man. had rather brilliantly ar
gued that Ryan had not accepted
the money as a bribe to a union
official, but as a personal gift.
The lower courts backed Waldman.
But the Supreme Court ruled
eight ta nothing not so long ago
that Ryan .had acted as head of
the union when accepting the
money and was therefore guilty.
This set a legal precedent and
created an atmosphere for the in indictment
dictment indictment of. others possibly
some who had been mentioned by
Saperstein in his long hours of
testimony before local ana teaerai
investigators.
This means that those wno were
named as partners in crime by
Saperstein cannot argue that al although
though although they were labor leaders
the business they did with him
was purely personal.
Thus they are open to possmie
prosecution by District Attorney
Hogan in Manhattan ana Dy
the federals as well.
Hoean can move under a state
law (Section 380) prohibiting union
officials from taking such money.
And the federals can move under
the Taft-Hartley Act.
Todav the local and federal au
thorities are on the move. Careful
cases have been built up. The Man
hattan D.Ar has begun indicting
officials with interlocking direc directorates
torates directorates of unions.
The word is that the U.S. Justice
DeDt. is DreDaring to indict as
many as 50 labor men and their
mobster protectors each montll.
The time-table calls for such pros
ecutions from now until July first
or about 150 indictments in all-
right across the U.S.
Not all of these win oe inaici
menu for welfare and nension
fund looting. Some will be for
shakedowns. And other crimes.
So Sanersteiii. who himself faces
a 1ail sentence if he recovers irom
the four bulletSxin his face, sang
at a vptv critical moment.
Furthermore, tne ad l-uiu ami-
cal Practices Committee itself is
standing by. evaluating these scan
dals. Like the FBI, the committee
can't move on its own until it is
sn ordered. Only the Ar L-UiU ex
ecutive council can instruct the
Ethical Practices Committee. This
will be discussed at the council's
next session. The top body of the
AFL-CIO is empowered to lift
.hartoM nf crooked unions which
could cost many a s fellow a fine
living. v ,.
en manv nhservers believe what
District Attorney Hogan feels
that the mob ordered Saperstein
rubbed out as a warning 10 au
others involved to develop a case
of expedient laryngitis.
SLIPPER-Y HAT-This straw
slipper" the model is wearing
Is really a hat. It's designed by
"Canessa of Rome for sprmgtime sprmgtime-wear.
wear. sprmgtime-wear. And if milady doesn't
like her toe-to-head fashion
plain, she can tuck a rosebud or
other ornament In it.

pi. j, ...j.j i i
: 1 --

MENYAMAYA. New Guinea-
We slipped in cross-wind over the
sharp creases of folded, grassy
hills and rolled up to the bleakest
administrative district in this rug
ged vast island. Here is the home
of the Kukukuku, the toughest
piece of furniture of New Guinea,
There are many Kuks wno have
never seen a white man, who still
work with stone implements and
beat each other cheerfully to death
with vicious stone-headed clubs.
The outstanding aspect of the
Kuk is the way he kills. He seldom
kills from violent emotion. He kills
casually, almost absentmindedly,
and for no particular reason save
momentary irritation or boredom.
The KukukUku is' a ltttro man;
averaging five feet in height. He
is a miserably impoverignea na
tive, living hieh on the bleak ridges
of high, windy mountains, moving
from place to place aimlessly, liv living
ing living off kau kau (sweet potatoes)
as a staple, and occasionally kill killing
ing killing a pig for ceremonial diet.
He makes little effort at adorn adornment,
ment, adornment, unlike his neighbors in the
Wahgi valley, the Chimbus, who
festoon themselves with birds-of-
f I I, Him i

LIFT UP YOUR HEARTS

(A Lenten failure of the Pana.
ma-American, prepared by tht
Rav, M. A. Cookson, Episcopal
Church of Our Saviour-St. Mar Margaret.)
garet.) Margaret.) HE MISSED HIS CUE
Road St. Mark 10:17-31. "God
Master, what shall I do that
may inherit eternal life? Come
take up tha cross, and follow
mi," :..
THE STORY of Jesus and the
rich young ruler is an account of
a real tragedy. A young man who
missed his cue in the drama of
life..
THE ACCOUNT opens With this
wpflHthv vouth flinsine himself im-
netuouslv before Jesus, and ask
ing: "What shall I do that I may
inherit eternal life?" Nothine is
saiH fihmit what brought him to
Jesus in this way. The inference

P. A. CLASSIFIEDS

Babel 1956

Casual Killers
By BOB RU ARK

paradise plumes and pearl-shell
ornaments, and who go in full
dress every day.
The Chimbus wear golden wigs
and landscape their communities
with flamboyant blossoms.
The Kuk cuts his hair short,
wears a grass breechcloth, like a
Scot's sporran, and nothing else.
His singing is primitive, his dances
skimpy, his ancestor-worship paid
clean to the bone. He is only a
ceremonial cannibal, not a dietary
one which is to say he might
chop a ham off a fallen foe, but
he wouldn't kill him just to eat
him.
The Kuk has no chiefs, as such,
but only war leaders. The princi principal
pal principal weapon is a short, black palm
bow. The arrow is unfletched
unnotched and unbracketed, and
made of a bamboo shaft with
fire-hardened hardwood head.
But the Kuk can fire salvos
of three arrows into the air sim simultaneously
ultaneously simultaneously and when he fights in
force, he has artillery spotters on
his flanks. He fights from behind
a square wooden shield with a
peepgroove in the top, and the
shield will turn a bullet that hits
it obliquely. He wears a tapa-bark
.kuiui. i I
is that he saw something in our!
Lord Which greatly attracted him.!
In any event, what ne saw ne
wanted for himself.
JESUS BEGINS with the "Com-j
mandments, as if to says, "Re-
nemhpr that eternal life has a
moral back-bone. Do you keep the
rAmman4mAnfc V Anrl with the
VUllIiJICliVIIUVtlfcO . ......
naive conceit of the immature, the
young man replied, "All these
have I observed from my youth,"
JESUS DID NOT reprimand
him, "Jesus beholding' him loved
him." Then He put His finger on
the weak spot in this boy, his mon money:
ey: money: "One thing thou lackest: go
thy way, sell whatsoever thou hast,
and give to" the poor, and thou
shall have treasure in heaven: and
come, take up the cross, and fol follow
low follow me."
I DO NOT believe that this was
a universal command, but rather

WNDPROOF

ZIPPO MANUFACTURING COMPANY, BRADFORD, P.A.

cloak and hides his killing club

under it.
Since the highlands were dis
covered by the Leahy brothers in
the middle '30s, the Kukukuku has
caused more trouble than any of
the other tribes, has killed more
white men, more neighboring
tribes, more of his own people.
All you have to say is Kukukuku
to another tribesman and you can
see him wilt.
The Kuk is absolutely fearless on
occasion, and absolutely unpredict unpredictable.
able. unpredictable. He may faint from emotion;
he ma v attack you in the morn
ing and come down to barter for
food in the evening. One patrol
officer says half-admiringly, 'if
you cut one in half, both halves
would -get up and have -t go: at
Their sense of family Is small,
and then again, large. I met a
little boy whose mother threw him
away in the river, yet most wars
are started because of affronts to
a clan. I'll tell you about such
a war in the next piece because
l am lascinaiea wiui vne visa
man of New Guinea, the Ku Ku-kukuku.
kukuku. Ku-kukuku. at least for this particular young
man the greatest rival on God
as his ultimate security was touch
ed on, namely his financial securi
ty.
AND THE BOY "was sad at
that saving and .went away griev
ed: for he had great possessions,"
He missed his great chance to
know the joy of conscious fellow fellowship
ship fellowship with God-life's greatest pos possession.
session. possession. The young man was not
willing to accept the price that
must ba paid when a person lets
their life go into the bands of God.
WHAT DO YOU think was in
the heart of Jesus, when the rich
young ruler took the other way-
condemnation for what be had re-
ment at what he had missed. Turn
ed from a life of eternal qualities
in Christ Jesus to a mediocre, un
inspired, tepid existence continu
ing an indulgent wasteful exist
ence.
LGHTER
fl J)

i i"2 IVasioto;
j UERRY-GO -ROUND
1 ly DncW PEAHSOgJ

WASHINGTON The Demo Democrats
crats Democrats aren'i advertisi
re nursing a health problem just
" u" u ul worse, man that of
President Eisenhower namely
that of their Senate leader, Lyn Lyndon
don Lyndon Johnson of Texas.
Since Congress reconvened, John Johnson
son Johnson s absentee record h :ku.
worse than Ike's. Both men
of course, suffered coronaries, but
Johnson is about 20 years younger
uiou cjjscuuu wer. ...
Senator Johnson relumed fnr th
opening of Congress hnnt Jan
uary 1, then left a few days after
ward ior r londa and Cuba for
about 10 davs. during whiph ih.
preliminary natural gvs debate
droned on. I
Then he flew hart in whini.
ton for the climax of the natural
gas debate but left immediately

uui ten iHiiiieaiaieiyi j o- mw, nasi-
thereafter for Texas; flying, in-'y. written election bill exempts

cidentally, in a Brown and Root
private airplane. George Brown,
of this firm, was one of the most
effective lobbyists for th nat
gas bill and has also been a heavy
coniriDuior w jonnson s campaign
fund.
Johnson rested aoDroximatelv
week in Texas. Then when he
found that Senators Hennings T.D.,
Mo.) and Gore (D Tmn were
likely to put across a penetrating
probe of the gas lobby he flew
oacs w wasmngton.
After about 10 dvS in Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, during which e broadened
and diluted the ihree-man Gore
investigating committee, Lyndon
flew back to Texas for another
week's rest.
Thus, since Congress recon
vened, the Democratic Senate
leader nas taken three separate
vacations away from Washington.
Eisenhower in annrnximntplv the
same oeriod. took 10 riav off in
inomasviiie, ua., ana a similar
amount of time in Key West. Ei Eisenhower,
senhower, Eisenhower, incidental! has been
given orders bv his doctors tn take
10 days off approximately every
monin,
Note In th oast three vpars
Senator Johnson has not called ope
caucus of Senate Democrats,
inuugn ne s neaa oi me party)
Which advocates demnrrarv. ha an
pears to be afraid to put his lead leadership
ership leadership to the test of democracy.
IKE'S MINK CLOVES
The mischievous mink, which
figured in Democratic gift "scan
dals" a few years ago, along with
the dccD freeze and Christmas
hams, has made another appear
ance in tne White House, this time
with a GOP label.
In fact, it miL'ht he said lilnrallv
that President Eisenhower has
both hands in the deal.
iiaiiua m me ucni. t j
RCDublican Ren. Pat Kearnevl
of New York recently sent Ike a
pair of flikik-lined, pigskin glovcs.l
made hv Jnhnvtnwn M V firm
In a note accompanying the gift,
....... .......
1 a.4 .' .i r.
Kearney puckisiuy observed:
xou can wear these wnue wont wont-ine
ine wont-ine the tractor on vour farm
Ike wrote back: "Thanks for
the gloves. I'm afraid thev are ton
elegant for ordinary farm work.
But thev will come in handv on
oiq r. f..r, wmie t affi waiKing
around the farm."
LYNDON'S "CLEAN"
SUBSTITUTE
By long-distance telephone and
by using the office of the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic policy committee in the Sen
ate, Sen. Lyndon Johnson has been
bringing ail kinds of pressure to
sidetrack the "clean elections" bill
introduced by Senator Hennings of
Missouri and substitute for it his
own hastily conceived elections
bill, put together by him and Sena Senator
tor Senator Knowland (R., Calif.) after
public opinion got hot under the
collar agamst the ou-eas lobby
Johnson's persuasive sweet talk
nas been so effective that more
than 40 senators have lined up be behind
hind behind his bill. Several, however,
have refused, among them, Sens.
Margaret Chase Smith (R., Maine),
t aui uougias (u., ill.), McNamara
(D., Mich,), and Neuberger (D.,
Ore.).
Money In the Bank
i ACROSS 3 Simple
1 Silver coin J atu"lfat
9 Mexican coin ua"ty
9 Oriental coin Rn together
12 They used J
niamn... Estonian
money
MMHtlVi
nCenturyplant,;.
IS Roman Pennsylvania
general
17 Insect tei
11 Profits
16 Husband of
I J Woody plants .
i a f I.. 20 French river 3
Ids -.
21 Ascend 22 More eertaln
23 Hawaiian 24 Russian lake
wreath
25 Son of Jacob
S4 Winglike part Blt ?
27 Corrosion "upemngs
34Llght
36 Opposed
37 Military
commission
38 Italian coins
39 Rake
41 Compass point
T
Scottish cap
44 English baby
' buggy
46 Chopped pork
49 Sanctified
person
53 Go astray'
54 Better .,
56 Cravat
57Mouthward
is
58 Unbleached
59 Owns
60 Cape
ttl Foot covering
DOWN
,!Wipeoflil
to"
fjwmanroad

"Your bill is truly the whole
-'oaf," Mrs. Smith told Seiui---Hennings,
"because it require
contributions to primary election
to 1 adequately reported."
In Maine, liKe many Southern
states, the important election is
tie primary, not the final election.
Senator Smith feels that the public
is entitled to know how much mon money
ey money is spent on crucial primary
vocs, not merely the final elec elections,
tions, elections, in many states the cam campaign
paign campaign contributions are negligible.
What Senator Johnson obviously
is trying to avoid is the necessity
of chalking up for public, inspec
tion contributions to primar cam campaigns.
paigns. campaigns. In Texas, for instance,, he
spent well over a hundred tnou tnou-sand
sand tnou-sand dollars in one of his primar
ies. In the final election he spent

pr-cucauy notnmg. his new, hast-
primary contributions, applies on only
ly only to final elections.
PRIMARY SCANDALS
Howevi-i, some of the worst scan scandals
dals scandals in Senate history occurred dur
ing primaries. In Pennsylvania,
when Congressman Bill Vare, (Phil (Philadelphia
adelphia (Philadelphia Republican boss, spent
over $700,000 in his primary cam campaign
paign campaign against George Wharton Pep Pepper,
per, Pepper, the S?nate rose up in right
eoui wrath and refused to seat
him. This was a Republican pri primary
mary primary battle.
In Illinois, when Sen. Frank
Smith spent $125,000 contributed
by public utilities magnate Sam
Insull, the Senate likewise refused
to seat him. This was a Republi Republican
can Republican primary battle.
In Michigan, Truman Newberry
was elected after a hitter battle
against Henry Ford, but spent so
L. .L .1
inucii money in ine primary mat
the Senate was about to unseat
him when he resigned, ...
LYNDON'S CONCERN
These illustrate how money is
thrown around in primaries and
why Johnson has been pulling all
sons oi wires w oiock wi Men
nings Bill to be filed for the public
tn incnapt .Tnhnenn. nulled hie hill
out of the hat with such speed
that no hearings were held on it.
Hennings was given 30 minutes to
take it or leave it. He decided to
leave it.
The Hennings election bill, on
the other hand, was drafted after
extensive hearings, beginning June
22, '955. All senators were invited
to testify. The bill was approved
by the Senate Rules Committee
and now ranks No. 5 on the Senate
calendar. In other words, it rates
jar BllCftU Ml UUliilSUIl a new LMIJ,
and in fa of it rated ahead nf the
far ahead of Johnson s new dui,
gas' bill.
However. Johnson yanked the gas
kill- t Innnrlgnt'fn hi' Tutsi
uui ,u Ullku,tnilh VV J wuw
. -. .
1 place on the calendar last Jan January,
uary, January, and he will orobably yank
ored position in order to ram it
i K- MnAaa mm atAOCiVtlA
UuuUgll as own ua yuooiuiw.
Answer to Pwious) Punlt

n

ARsiQr7 lildklelEfTT
ilEOL E A A D 6
BIAIT ;.IEL5'?MA"T
g. E?ENT T
.2-1 A L. X." A ROM
gloT? etj. 'li Ff oss
I 9 B A. 3. I D'-l
i!iiNOD H fi klXl
Il.IiA.I.""'S't a'It la g I
g" a g k Is t I
b MfrlMTf t 'ai?tUI

28 Italian town 45 Heavy clubs
30 French 46 Son of Adam
summers
",
1 Allot
47 Operatic solo
48 Blood
50 Urge
K1 Pnman rnlr
33 Regions
35 Oil
40 Music dramas 52 Valid
43C,ty in 55 Highways
Georgia (aD.)
5T
JO
w.
ho
IS
u

!



SATURDAY. MARCH 17, 193S

XZZ PANAMA AMERICAS AN CVCEPEXDFVr DAILY NEWSPAFETt
Pics ir;-1.

1131

u u w w a
Church cf Christ
r. R. Milton IvanKiMt
Tel-phon l-3oi
BALBOA: 08j1. Balboa Hoad.
Services Sunday W W em. 11:00 am.
f :oo p.m.
CRISTOBAL American Urfon Hall
Servtc ij'inaay 10:04 am.
RIG ABA House 03 lath et.
Surd .-n 1Mb
c nitarian
CHft
UM1AJUAM
IMU01
. Bld. 862
Ancon Blvd.
Mamey Plac
Ancon
tout inviiatloo
to Uboral
religion.
oaptist
C010U BArtlST tHUBCB
311 Bruje Koa
Drawer
945 am
suiiuy c.h00i,.;' ii!uo am.
Horning Vnorship .m p.m.
fevenmg Viorsiiip
j-raye.- Meeting m
kicb Weonoday I""
Mo may each montn
Spanish liibt School t
act Saturday lu ,uv
I UtSl BAPT1S1 CHURCH
Balboa Heighta. C. Z.
627 Ancon Boulevard
Ortwct "B' balrx Heights
ni U.lhna 1721
fVllLam H. Beeby, Pastor
ailO .IS
Morning Worabip . .......
Baptist Training Union
Evangelistic Saxvtca
p ray at Maatlna Wtdnaa Wtdnaa-days
days Wtdnaa-days V M S Bit)! Study thur.
iSen Broi'erhooo'
Monday In month!
10.45 a m
6:30 cm
130 Dim
I JO (MB
1:00 am
1J0 PJ
FIRST BAPTIST CHllBCH
MargariU Avenue at 5th SUeel
MargariU. Canal Zone
Sav. i. M- Haulbrook. Pastor
." iS a.m.
Sunda) scnooi
Brotherhood, Tuesdays .....
Praver Services, Wednesday!
WM.U., 1st 3rd Fridays
GA.i H A, ft Sunbeami.
Fridays
7:00 o.m.
7:00 pm
3:30 p m
Salvation Army
- fNoo-DenomlnaUonal Bvanfelistla
; Meetings)
THK PACIFIC SIDE
SeViCapUuTind Mrs. M. McDonaH
toFebSSry Street, Phone: 28-200ia
11:00 Holiness Meeting.
3:00 btriday School.
7 d0 Salvation Meeting.
LA BOCA C.Z.
Lieutensot Pansy CampbeU
Building No. 1080, Phone: 1-285J
11 :00 ilolinesa Meeting.
3:00 Sunday School.
7 :30 Sx'vaUon Meeting.
PARAiSO, C.Z.
Fnvoy Mrs. C L. Moseley
Guiara Siieet ;.-
11 :00 Hnlinesa Meeting.
3:00 Sunday School.
7 'M Salvation Meeting. ...
- YHB ATLANTIC SIDE
COLON CINTRAL
Senior ( apu and Mrs. C. Moonsawmy.
lith Street. Phone: 38-73.
- 11:00 Holinesa Meeting.
3:00 Sunday School.
7:30 Salvation Meeting.
COLON 1H1RL. STREET
tlajor Fdnt Bingham
11:00 Holiness Meeting.
3:00 Sunday School. .
7 '30 SkivatioQ Meeting.
RAINBOW CITY CZ.
Envoy i. G11L
St Kiits and Jamaica Street
11:00 HoJinesa Meeting.
3:00 Sr.nday School.
7:30 Solvation Meeting.

fin 4la,3

Union Churches
IVbera all Protestant! cooperate with
amity In essentials, liberty In non non-aaaenlials
aaaenlials non-aaaenlials and ehar'ty ta ill tklan
THE ATLANTIC SIDE
CATUN
Rev. Bay Blakely, Paslo
Phone 5-355
i 9 :45 Church School
11:00 Worship Service.
3:45 p.m. Sr. Youth Follswshlp.
6:00 p.m. Jr. Youth Fellowship.
MARGARITA
The Rev. 4-aul H. W. Olander. Pastor.
Phone -lS8.
9 3d Bible School.
10:45 Worship wvtea and Church-tlm
ejursery.
M Youth rallowsnlB.
-. """rot" PACIFIC BIDb ""
BALBOA
The Kev. Oscar W. Olsen, Pastor
Balboa Rd. at San Pablo St
Phone 2-1486 Church Office 2-3238.
: 9 JO Church School Free bus service
Parsonage Discussion Group.
1030 Worship Service The Expanded
Session for Nursey. Kindergarten
Primary and Junior Depta.
Church-time Nursery for children
under 3.
tM Junior-High Fellowship.
:00 Post-High Fellowship.
7:00 Seifior-iiigb Fellowship.
GAMBOA
Dr. Walker M. Alderton. Minister.'
Office Pbona ft-470 Residence Phone
-130.
9:30 ajit Church School.
10:40 s-ra. Morning Worship Bervle.

Mcth

THE MKTHODIS1 CHURCB
, (Brltifb Conference
. Rev. William H. Armstronj
16th St, Panama City
9:60 am Morning pravet and Sernme)
1:00 p.m. Sunday School
9:15 dm Evenint Praver and 8ennoa
XR1NITY MfclHODlSl CHUKCH
1th Street and Meiendat Avenue.
C16n. RJ
Rev. Samuel Walden, Minister
90 a.m.Momln Service ana Boly
Communion.
3 pm. Sunday SchooL
1 :15 pm. Evening Service,
(Holy Communion 1st Sundays)
Monday, 7 JO p.m. Prayer Meeting,
KBKNEZKH MKTHOII181 CHUBCB
Rainbow City. CZ
.... ev.&uuul "'"-tt
&iHiUijr ei vK:ee a a4n. ana pm.
fuiiU 'V Srhnol for all ages at 9:30 p.m.
"Tour Invitation To ernmhla,"
Tuesday 7 pjo, Prayoi Meeting.

111 ili'J

Caavthat a tka aiainr'lairtii n Hia Onai Zaa. in rke rtrwiaat
urwa at PiMni a4 Cal, Raywfcnc W Fmbm, af4 elca
I U rtotaa r aaa aaa arcaaaa al tea fa4 aanricaa- H tiviliaa
hben, (raa4i M rraagara.
Aa uaUr eerrka, rHa Tea Pan AaMrkaa liaH bale, ky
ataaaaaimHaws, atict aawn t wtnaip ea4 akat auli acrnittaa.
IJiHat ar regatta' fraiaj Hma r tiaaa. Daaamiaatiam aavii
arf ee fwa caafrottai ara liar4 aaa "Otkai Orarcbaa Aa4
Strvkaa." A aaacial liatmf aj ktckiatal Hi iW'ncaa a Amy Mars.
Am fritr bataa aaa Navel eteBeaa.
Mi'jaatart. cauca aacrarartae 4 dtaalaiaa ara aakaa) fa IatVai
the atwt aaik in rritin by WeaaaaJay aoa at tke la teat il a ay
thanaet far tiia comin Saturday'! caurta

Christian Scientist
CUK1M1AM SCUACA -UtiiKUliA
rVat Chureb rt Cnrwv bcientimt Anew
M0 Ancoo Boulevard.
Sunday II 00, WedneMlav I.-M aav.
Sundav School :S0 a.m
rtrw churco M Chrui, acianoai, Crtiloba
13tb Street Botivai Hihw
ainii. 'Vfwww B-ai
Sunday 11-00 aja. Wednesday 1:00 p.m
Catholic
ST. MARY'S CHURCH Balboa
Sunday Masses: 7:00. :00. 10:00
and
UiH!?i'S Maatct: S. 1143 am
Ud 6 00 pm. ..w
and 7:00 to 80 p.m. Thursday, before
First Friday: lWQ w a:w p..
Miraculous Medal Novella: 7:00 PJP
"cShST class, altar th. :M ma
on Sunday. . ..
Figh School atuay wiu
WaJnesday.
SACRED HEART AncoB
Sunday Masses: 5A5, 7:30 A 9:30 a.
Holy Day masses: 5:55 a.m., an J a
p c..,.,rf. l-an tn k-oo and
v.onivBsii'u.
7:15 to 8:00 p.m. Thursday befora First
Friday l.t p m.
Sacred Heart DevoOons: J0 pm
Fridays. MM
cstecnism uasai -i w
on
Thursday.
OCR LADY OF FATTMA-Curundai
Sunday Mass at 8:00 a.m.
Holy Day Mass at 8:30 p.m.
Confessions: 6:00 to 6:45 pjn on Sat
10
Catechism tiasai muuw
am
ST. JOSEPH Para Iso
Sunday Masses at 7:00 and 8:13
Holy Day Masa at 6:00 p.m.
it? .-I. u.mm Of1 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday 3 JO to 4:30 and
6:30 to 7:30. .
Catechism Clasa: sunaay .uv w .w
p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novenai 7:00 p.m
ontnu.,. .. ,.aa
rnnvrt insxrucuonai uunuj f.w
p.m.
ST. VINCENT'S Panam City
Sunday Masses: 6:00 and 8:30 a.m.
u.l.. n.. M.aaa' K-HB mnd &MI a.m.
nui, uaj n.w,
'(It It falls on Saturday the Masses are
6:00 and 8:30 a.m.i
7:00 to 8:00 p.m. Thursdays befora First
Friday 7:30 p.m .
Miraculous Medal Novena and Sta
,i .a ... r VriAav 7 -nfl n m.
Catechism Class: After 8:30 mass on
"convert Class! 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.
IT. THERESA'S Cocoll
ui hun Mm! b oo am. (It It falls
on Saturday 8:30 a.m.
Catechism wass. a.v .w
Monday.
Confeselonat 8:00 to 1:30 a m. Sunday,
8T. JOHN BAPTIST DE
Parque Lefevra
Sunday Masses: 630 and I 8:30 im
TV C7K LJay o ..."
i ... vl mau, B'flA a.m
n. anu -i" a.,
Holy Day Masses: o:vu
P'rv,f..(nn.! 8:30 to 4:30 and 1:00 to
8:00 pm, on Saturday
Miraculous meaai j
P-m .. e.,...
Catecmsm uiass: a:o p.m. j
Convert Class: Monday 7:30 p.m.
' ST. THERESE-S La Baca
Sunday Mass: 7:00 a.m.
Holy Day Mass: 5:30 p.m.
conressionsi miuium;
Thursday before First Friday 6 JO p.m..
s,n Heart Novena: 7:00 p.m. on
Friday a .... Thimihi
convert whitoi v.uw v-" ...
ATLANTIC SIDE
: ST. JOSEPH'S Colon
Sunday Masses: S:, 8:00 and 9:13 a.m.
Holv Dav Masses: 5:45 and 8:00 ajn.
rnnf'essions: Saturday 4:00 to 8:00 and
7:00 to s:w p.ra ...
Miraculous meoai noywwi nwwvmj
6:15 and 7:00 p.m.
Sacrea nearx novena:
c- t.. r.nlnfl !SrvlMa 7 'OA n m.
ronv-t class: 7:15 nm. on Mondays
and Thursdays. ,.
Catechism wass: ounaay tv.ia u.
11:45 a m. a:ou p-m. to :iw p.m.
riM, f.!t,v F.vnncltlnn of Mont Bless
ed Sacrament all day. Reposition at 5:30
a.m. Saturday morning.
First Saturday Devotions to our Lady
of Fatima The Holy Rosary 5:00 a m.
sri rMmimlnn Iniri,ft i nn fnr end
dren Mondaya and Thursdays 6:00 to
:uu pan.
MIRACULOUS MEDAL Cristobal
Sundav Masses: 7:00. 8:00 and 10:30a.m.
Holy Day Masses: 6:00. 8:00 a-m. and
5:15 p.m.
Confessions: Saturday 4:00 to 5:00 and
7:00 to 8:00 p m. After Rosary each eve-
" Miraculous' Medal Novena: 3:13 and
7 -no n m. on Monday.
Catechism Class: Alter a:uo Mass on
Sunday.
First Friday Exposition all day during
the school year.
First' Saturday: Mass at 1:00 am.
HOLY FAMILY CVCRCH Margarita
Sunday Masses: 7:00 and 9:30 a.m.
Holy Day Masses: 6:00 a.m. and 5:15
p.m.
confessions : e:oo to :w ana im to
8 00 p.m. Saturday.
Miraculous aneaaJ. Kovena: 1:00 a m.
on Monday.
Church History eroup every Tuesday
at 7:30 pm.
Teen-Aaie Club: 7 JO p m. on Wednes
day- .. .
Latecnism uass: ewi p.m. inursaay.
., First Friday Devotions: 7:00 p.m.
Inaulry-Discusaion Group every Fri
day 7 JO p-m.. .; i .'- ;
; ST. VINCfCNTS-Ralnbow City
Sunday Massess; 6:30 a.m. and 8:00
a.m.
Holy Day Masses: 6 KM a.m. and 6:00
nm.
Confessions: 4:00 to 5:00 and 7:00 to
g:oo p.m. Saturday.
Catechism Class: 10:45 a.m. on Sunday.
Convert Class every Monday at 7:00
P-m. . ..
Miraculous Medal novena: 70 njn
on Tuesday.
Sacred Heart Novena: 7:00 n.m. on
Friday.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION Gatua
Sunday Mass: 8:15 a.m. -Holy
Day Mass: 5 KM p.m.
Confessions: 6:30 to 7:00 Dm. on Sat;
urday.
Catechism Class: 4 m p.m. en Monday.
OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSEL
Gamboa
Sunday Masses: 7:00 and .in am
Holy Day Masses: 6:00 a.m. and 8:00
p.m
(jonrtjions Saturday at 7:00 n.m anri
aiier an evening aevouons.
Baptisms oy appointment
Miraculous Medal Novena; 7:00 nm
on Tuesday.
Sacred Heart Novenai 7:00 n m n
Friday.
bunday school: 3:30 p.m. on Sunday.
Religious Instruction Claia fnr rhd.
dren:. 4:00 p.m. on Thursday.
Religious Instruction for adults (Con (Conducted
ducted (Conducted In Spanish): 7:00 p.m on Mon
day.
Convert Instructions By appointment

-l n r- -a n n

' 1 i! 1

Episcopal
The RL Rev. R. Heber Good en, S.T D.,
' Biabop
The Vary Rev. M. Ricbard MacDonald
ANCtift. cat
TEC CATHEDRAL OF (T. LUKE
SUNDAYS
7:30 a jn holy Communion.
1:30 am Santa Communion (4th Sua
day).
9:13 u.. Church School.
9:45 tin Escuela Dominicat
11.00 a oi. Morning Prayer and Sermon
Holy Communion. (First Sun Sunday).
day). Sunday). 7:00 p m, a-vening Prayer and Sermon
WEDNESDAYS
8:30 an,. Holy Communion.
7:00 pra Evening Prayer.
HOLY DAYS
6:00 a m Holy Communion.
8 '30 a m Holy Communion.
DAILY
8:15 em. Morning Prayer.
12:00 Mi.-da Missionary Prsvers.
CHURCH OF OUR SAVIOUR
Third Street New Cristobal
The Rev. Milton A. Cnnkinn p
SUNDAYS
Holy Communion 7:30 am
Church School ........... 9J0 ajn.
Morn.ng Prayer
and Sermon 11:00 jn.
(First Bunday. Holy Communion)
Vesper Service and
Youth Fellowship 6:00 pm.
WEDNESDAYS
Holy Communion g-30 am
Choir Rehearsal 7:30 p.m.
A House of Prayer for all people.
COCOU
Charrh ( St Andrew
The Rev. William W. Baldwin. Priest
in Chans
SUNDAYS
Holy Communion
Family Prayer and Church School.
9 JO a.m
Morning Prayer and Sermon 11 ajn
(H C first Sunday in Month).
Evening Prayer. 7 JO p.m
Weekday Prsver 8:00 am
CflKOZAt
Chapel of the Good Shepherd
Th- Rev. Clarence W. Hayes
8:00 140 Every Friday; Morning fray
(H.C. 1st Friday i
OAMBOA
St Simon'i Chntch
The Rev. John Spear. Priest 10 Charge
SUNDAYS
Mornipf Prayer. 1st and 3rd.
Sundays 10:30 a.m
linlv n-vnmnnlnn mnit Car
mon, 2nd and 4 lb Sundays .. 10:30 am
Sunday School 3:00 pm
youth fellowship i.w p.m
Evening Prayer 7:00 p.m
MONDAYS
Girls' Friendly Society ... 6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS
Evening Prayer and Sermon 7:00 pm.
THURSDAYS
Holy Communion 9:00 am
Woman's Auxiliary, 2nd and
4th Thursdays 7 JO pjn
LA BOCA
t Peter's Church
The Rev. John Spear. Priest la Charge.
SUNUAI9 -Choral
Eucharist and Sermon 7:00 a.m
I Morning Prayer and Church School
10:00 a.m.
Children' Eucharist. 3rd Sunday! 10
a.m.
Holy Baptism 6:00 pjn.
Evensong and Sermon 740 tin.
MONDAYS THRU SATURDAYS
vHoly Communion ,. 7:00 a.m.
Evening Prayer .......... 7:00 nm.
except Saturday!. Compline 7:30 p-m.
1st TUESDAYS & 3rd MONDAYS
Woman's Auxiliary ....... 7 JO pm
MARGARITA
Church sf St Margaret
Cornet oi Eipsve Ave, Brazos Blvd.
The Rir. Milton A. Cookie a. Pastor
SUNDA fS
8:30 am. Church School
9:30 am Morning Prayer and Sermon
(1st Sundays, Holy Communion)
4:30 n.m. Confirmation Instructions,
f ALU Hr.CO
Chanel of The Holy Comforter
Ven. L. B. Shirley, Priest In Charge
Every Tuesday 8:30 a.m. Holy com com-PARAISO
PARAISO com-PARAISO St Alban's Church
Thi Rev. David A. Osborne,
Priest in Charge
SUNDAYS
8:00 a.m. Choral Eucharist sermon
12:00 Itouo Infant Baptism
8:00 n m. Church School
(held In Building 131)
5:00 p.m. Youth Fellowship
7 :00 i m. Evensong and Address.
2nd AND 3rd WEDNESDAYS
7:30 ptn. Woman's Auxiliary and Al Altar
tar Altar Guild Meeting.
PANAMA CITY ..
St Paul's Church
The Ven. Lemuel B. Shirley, Reetet
The Rev. Fits R. AtweU. Deacon
SUNDAVi
6:00 am. Holy communion
9 00 a m Suns Eucharist A Sermon
10:45 am Morning Prayer and Church
School
12:00 nocr Holy Baptism
7:00 c.m Solemn Vesper!
TUESDAYS
8:30 a m Holy Communion
WEDNESDAYS
: 6:00 am. Holy Communion
7 00 o.m. Evenlna Pra ver
THURSDAYS AND FRIDAYS'
8:30 I m. Holv Communion
HOLY DAYS
6:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
CHRIST CHllRCB BV-THE-8EA
R de P
(Opposite Hotel Washtngtont
The Ven. Malnert J. Petersen, Rector
Th Rev Henry A. Blake
Associate Rector
SUNDAYS
6 '00 a m Holy Communlntv
9:00 a.m Choral Eucharist and Sermon.
- 10:30 a m Church School Session
, 7 JO pm Solemn, Evensong and Ser-
WKINKSDAYS
60 am Holy Communion.
7 JO pm Evening Prayer and Sermon
JO nm- Adult Confirmation Class
THURSDAYS
8:00 pm Praver Guild.
FRIDAYS
140 am- Children's Eucharist
SATURDAYS
10:00 a m Junior Confirmation Class.
7 JO pro. Comollne nnA Meditation.
HOLY DAYS
6:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
RAINBOW CITY
Chonh of St Mary, the Virgin
Th Rev. John A. Spalding,
' Priest n Charaa
SUNDAYS
Sung tucnarist ........
Chur-.h School
ir.FMiaiirie onrl K.rmnn
- 7 JO a.m.
9:43 a m
7 JO p.m
134 pm.
WEDNESDAYS
Even-Kn and Sermon
Tuimsnivs
Holy communion. ........ t:oo am.
. GATUN ...
, . St George's Church
; Th Rev. John A. Spalding, I
Priest in Charsa
1st AND 3rd SUNDAYS
Holv Communion 9 JO am
2nd AND 4th SUNDAYS
Mornirg Prayer
and Serrron 9:30 a.m
Church School, each Sun. 10 JO a.m.
RIO ABAJO
it Chnsfopher's Chnreh. ;
I i raroae i-etevr.
TB Rev Clarence w. Hay,
Priest in Charge
Hol Comniiintor . .. IJfie m
Sunday School 10:30 am.
Baptism, f to 6 pm 2nd A 4th sun-
taya.
- Evarung Prayer- Blbl Studs. pm.
1st and 3rd Sundays
Woman' Auxiliary End Ith Sundar
1:00 p-m.
Holy Communion Waxlnaeaay. I cm

P yTI "3 "J

I! n l3S
Othsi Churches
CHVRCH Or THE NAZARENK
Ancon, CZ
Minljler: Rev. Elmer O. Neisoe.
Box se, Ancon, CZ. Balboa zfcOI
Sunday School
8:45 am
Morning Worship 10 JO a.m
Youth Service ............ 6:45 em
Evening Service .......... -7 JO p.m.
N-FJd.S, Service 70 p.m.
Praver Meeting, Wed. .... 7:30 pm
NATIONAL BAPTIST CHVRCH
Panama BP, 23rd Street East
Rev. &. N. Brown. Minister
SUNDAY:
Divine Worship 9:30 am
Sunday School ............ 3:00 p.m
Sunday Masses ..........I 145 U:45
nit. b d-P. Sundu auitiui at
: m
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
Meeting Thursdays at 7:30 pjn. and
Sundays at, 4:00 pm. Wirt Memorial.
806 Balbva Boad, Balboa.
CHURCfl OF .JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAI SAINTS (Mormon)
Sunday meetings to th JWB-USO, La
Boca Hoaa. Balboa, rr unary ana priest
hood 8 JO a.m. Meeting: Sunday SchooL
i2a a.m.: Sacrament Meeting, 10 &0 am
Atlantic Branch
- Building 200, Schoolhous Road.
. Gatun. Canal Zone.
relephone, Gatun 364 or Crst6bal 2897
Sunday scnool 10:00 am. Sunday bac bac-ement
ement bac-ement Meeting 6:30 pm. Prieshood
Meeting 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prinary
6:30 pm. Wednesday Relief society meet
ing as announceo.
tusvnub rBuiuiAjss
CHURCfl
Rev. Paul Hoiloway, Pastor
Office, Curundu 5105
Home, Curundu. 7116
Sunday School 9:45
Morning Worship 11 a.m.
Youth Meeting ............... 6 p.m.
Evening Worship 1 pm
OLD CATHOLIC CHURCH
t Raphael Th Archangel
13th St Wast No. I
Holv Eucharist: Sunday ai d)0 am
Tuesdays, Wednesday and Thursday
630 am.
Sacrament oi Unction (Heauna bar.
Act) First Sunday of each month at
7 JO pm
Meant Hatlbel. chrtsttaa Charek
Panama I F
Hi Rev T- Jne. a D Bishop
offiaatint.
Morninii davotio a- t0 am
rellowship tVorshiB at ...... 11:00 am
junday School at 3:00 p as.
Jivin Service wi 140 pm
BAHA'I CENTER
BAHAl'S CENTER
Urbanlzaclen El Carmen. Panam City.
uuoroiai iiu, ana wutuwiwi.
Thursdays .'....8:00 nm.
Celoa, 8th A Front Street
Study Classes...... Thursdays, 1 JO pm
BETHEL MISSION CHVRCa
Espalaba St, Paralso, CZ.
Rev Waldaba H. Stewart, Paster
Sunday: 11:00 am Worship Service.
3:00 p.m. Sunday School.
7:15 p.m. Gospel Service.
Mondav: 7:30 Young People's Society
Wedneidsy: 7:30 Mid-week Christian
fellowship.
Thursday: a:oo unotr nenearsat.
Friday: 7:30 Women's Missionary So
ciety.
THE CHURCH OF GOD
7038 Eighth Street Colon
Rev. G. W. Grsjtdison, Psster
Sunday Schol 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.
Night Service 7 JO pm-
FIRST CHURCH OF GOD
Cor. Jamaica and Trinidad Sta.
Rainbow City, Canal lone
Rev. G. W. Grandisoa, Faster
Morning Worship 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Night Bervic r.w p-m-
THE CHURCH OF GOD
New Providence
Mrs Mauda Hlnes. Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Momlng Worship Il:oo am.
Night Service lau pm.
THE CHURCH OF GOD
. Panam City
Car. "N" and Marian Arosemena Its.
Rev. Wm. J. Johnson. Pastor
Sunday School .............. 9:30 a. m
Morning Worship ........... 10:30 a.m.
Night Service 7 JO p.m
THE CHURCH OF GOD Rl Abaje
Mente Oscur Rd14th St.
Rev. Wm. 1. Johnson. Paste
Sunday Schoo 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.
Nigni aervice .. ...... ...... iv p-m.
CHURCB OP THE FOURSQUARE
GOSPEL
(Full Gospel)
BALBOA
At Rebecca Ledge. Balboa Road at La
Boca Rd. Rev. and Mrs. Carl V. Thomp
son, Pastors.
Sundav School ..10:00 am
Morning Worship 11:00 am.
Youth Service 6:30 p.m.
Evangelistic Service 7:l p.m.
CHURCH OP GOD (Pentecostal)
Rev. B. E. Watson, Overseer
ni - 'IP Im n-mhna
Churches at Paralso, CZ. (Rev. and
Mrs. Herman a.Whytoj. Coldn. RP.
(Rev. Fernando Lorence), Rio Abajo
(Rev. and Mrs. Charles Haynes), and
CaUv (Rev. and Mrs. Clifford Greaves).
Sunday and weekday service at all
churches,
Posts and Bases
PACIFIC SIDE
Protestant '. ;
Sunday School
Morning Worship 10.00
rhnrrh.Tlme Nurserv School.... 10:00
FUKl tun lun
126) 1:00
Momlng Worship ...10:15
Wednesday Evening Prayer Meet-
Ine and Bible Class I JO
FORT KOBBE
C,nriaw KihAAl I Rllllfline NA
- 7u7 jo
Morning Worship ............... 10:45
i T whUU. s-3n
ALB ROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Sunday scnool ,, :.hj
Arf.ii, nihi. rio rmn Clubt.. 9:30
Morning Worship ,..9:15 A 10:45
Youth Fellowship 6:30
Kevemng worsnip i
II C NA V AT. STATTOM llwlmin
sunaav scnool ................. :"
Morning Worship ,. 1140
Holy Communion First Sunday
IKth Nn HFAnOTlARTirnS CHAPKL
rioiy communion i episcopal... i .vi
Morning Worship 9:00
Holy Communion First Sunday
of Month) i.
CathU
FORT AMADOR
Daily Mass 6:30
Sunday Masse 8:30 A 9:00
Confessions. Saturday ...6:30 A 7:30
Sunday 8:30 A 9:00
FORT CLAYTON
Daily Masa .................... 6:45
Sunday Masses ..7:45 A 9:00
Confessions, Saturday ..,7:30 A 8:00
Sunday Mass .................. 10 JO
FORT KOBBE
Saturday Mas 8:00
Sunday Masses .7:00 4k 9:00
Snanlsh ... B-00
COKOiAL.
uauv mass :3i
No. 711) 7:00 A 830
. Confessions,' Saturday (Building

ALMOOK AIR FORCE BASE
Daily Mass 4 -CO
Saturday Mass 7 00
Sunday' Masses 7:45 A 11:45
Sparmh 7:00

U.S. NAVAL STATION, Rodman
Daily Mass
Sunday Mass .,
4 -on
9.30
Jewish
FORT KOBBE
Saturday 2:00
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Saturday SJ0
USO-JWB (Balboa)
Friday ., 7:30
ATLANTIC SIDE
Protestant
FORT DAVIS
Sunday School ................. 9:45
Morning Worship 110
Midweek Fellowship, Thursday.. 1 JO
FORT GULICK
Sunday School ................. 9:45
Morning Worship ............... 11:00
Youth Fellowship, Sunday 6:00
O S. NAVAL STATION, Coco Solo
Sunday School ................. 9:30
Morning Worship ......... . ... ll:0U
iloiy communion First Sutday
of Month)
Catholic V
Daily Mass ....................
Sunday Mass
Confessions, Sunday ...........
7:30
9:30
1.45
FORT GULICK
Daily Mass
Sunday Mass
Snanith
7:00
7:45
8:45
Confessions. Saturday'
.6:00 A
7:00
U.S. NAVAL STATION, Coco Solo
winy mass
Sunday Masa
7:00
9:00
coco sor.rrri
Sunday Mas
7:30
Jewish
FORT GULICK
Tuesday
7:15
Seventh Dav
Adventist
VmVIu C.r,.!.u I. TI --l
foiiows " "u vnurcnes as
SATURDAY:
Sabbath School 9:30 a.m.
Divine Service 11:00 a.m.
Yfi,ttt. Mt!n. .n
Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer
Parifie jtiri S.ii.mJ m. H-ii nt.,.,..
Pastor W. H. Waller Tel. 28:3 350S
vaDo veroe, Ave. J. F. de la Ossa No.
Chnrrllln ISth V. VT m
Pueblo N-1 1 -w 1 1 K.......n .j
------ v.nwi, .IU
ana iui BIS.
Rio Abajo 11th St. No. 27
Balboa tThan-l ABU r..ill. BJ n.t
- - wu.. i.oi, nu. sai.
boa (Saturday only).
spanun (.nurcnea Panama and
CrisiAhola riatrl-
Pastor Ruben Ruiz
Panama, Calle Darltn No. 3
Cristobal, 16th A Bolivar Ave.
Gamboa A Frijoles.
Distrlrt Paatnr A A C.U.I.
Tel. No. 6-102
Gamboa Praitt Parkway Frijoles.
Atlantic Side Colon and
Cristobal District
Psstor Neblett Tel. 38:826
Colon 3rd St. A Central Ave. Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 16th A Bolivar Ave.
central office: Gavilan Road Tel. 1 1-1859.
1859. 1-1859. Jewish
Boca Road. Balboa CZ. Ba'bbi Nithas
ft Jijun. jjirt-cior.
Srvt- w Vrlriav. V9A Bt m flite1aaB
50 pm
(set an iistingi of Jewish services
under Posts, Bases and Stations).
" . f
nlds C'lbn and 36th Street, Bella Vista.
Panami City. Services 1:00 p.m.
Lutheran
REEDEMER LUTHERAN CHURCB
Balboa Road at Wight Street
. Rev. Robert F. Gussick, Pastor
P.O. Box 666, Balboa.
Sunday School, Bible class 9:00 a.m.
Divine Service 10:15 s.m.
Divine Service at Margarita Sunday
TM pm. .

IT COSTS YOU LESS lo own the

I i ":: xL?rii t V, ill

Red Cro

i3
From th tart ef rha Red
Cress blood program in January
1948 through Jun 1955, a total of
15,277,400 donations of lifa-saving
blood war obtained from volun voluntary
tary voluntary donors by th Red Cros for
civilian us and national defens.
Of this number, J,2C?, 51$ war
collected last year in coramuni coramuni-tiet
tiet coramuni-tiet wher th blood program op
rtt. Your contribution to th
Red Cross hlps rcruit blood
donors and keep th staff 8 of
blood cntr on th job I
Bids Taken On 23
Air Force Pieces
Sealed bids in quadruplicate will
be recieved on JUarch 27 at 10
A.m., at the Corozal General De Depot,
pot, Depot, by the Property Disposal Of Of-ficdr
ficdr Of-ficdr for 23 items of Air Force
property. All items are located as
building T-1067, Curundu.
The propety includes:
Furniture, electric equipment
and supplies, scrap metal, scrap
aluminum, auto and truck bat
teries, kitchen s l n k s, cabinets,
transformers, marine engine, gas
meters, and air compressor.
Sealed bids in quadruplicate will
also be received April 2 at 9 a.m.
by the Property Disposal Officer
at Corozal for a patrol boat, the
42-foot "Caney Fork," located in
Lake Nicaragua.

Maxime Cocktail Lounge Gets
a Westinghouse Television Set

- .' j .j-p.....

LmB U5Ta v lt afcvWWOWW

Always the first, Maxime Cocktail Lounge has bought a Television Set from Jack
Mercer of Westinghouse, Pemco, S. A. Now the many people that come to spend
wonderful hours at the Cocktail Lounge will have the opportunity to watch the Tele Television
vision Television programs. Until Television arrives to Panama, this Set will show "closed
circuit Television," every Saturday and Sunday afternoon.

See 1956 Models on Display
ORDER-YOURS-NOVJ-.

SIDE GLANCES

n if1

y.tt. n- u s e. oe.
1 11 i'ia i I e

, "He wants to talk to Dad about me, Mom! Do$ our
! whole life have to wait till the TV blows a tube?"

:i;s ;;: ..si.... W-

'- '.v.:. iL ;

UVUc3CsTDi3G17QZ3

IS?

ByCcihrcsi.i

v.t
t j I'll
FINEST...
,VAi'.

STATES

PRICES
on direct delivery to the
Canal Zone!

1 VIA ESPAftA
rhone4)383

H



SATCKDAT, MARCH IT,
PAGE FOUR
'(fur Efsfe't True Life Adventures
TESSI AND TZ2 P32ATZ3
Think U.S. Has Quiz Problem?
Take Look At Italy's TV Woes
The Amazonian
vmas of side ...
J ALL li
THE MC5T iCK JTU?4
T,V5 TO S; FS.V.AU IJf AX
i F!CM ftT'O NOW,
I nut TATTOC FSE. M 5
'"V
TCLCH MY
1 4CSS-E4? ?
v

THE P.4X.1MA .AMTKICAM AN INDEPENDENT DAILY. NEWSFAFEH

ti

1 1

MILAN (CP) The organ-out of a nationwide uproar over a
izers of Italy's state-owned TV,contTofaKotto when they atumbled
xic avnorinnrp. art eo- azain over a theater play that

in thrnnoh nonderous volumes

and checking with experts to make
sure all questions in the $8,000
Double It Or Leave It" quiz pro program
gram program are correct from now on.
The slightest slipup, as experi experience
ence experience has shown, is liable to touch
off something that is a cross be between
tween between a revolution and an erup eruption
tion eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. .

TV officials learned this me nara

The controfagotto affair involved
a mathematics professor, Lando
Degoli of Capri, lie had answered
a scries of initial Questions on od-

era and was aiming for the $4,096-

aoiiar stage 01 me payon,
OiiiTTn.-KtiT MiW Rnnpinrnn. son

of a New York lawver. asked the

fateful question:

In what ooera score, if any. aid

ncwALD JACOBY

Written fr NEA Service

NORTH D 25
A
KQJJ4
QJ4
WEST EAST
AQ9M2 A 1087 5
V92 VKQ87
762 A
K7 10532
SOUTH
AKJ3
V A 109 3
109 53
A
Neither side vul.

East South
"Pass IV
Pasa 2 N.T.
Pass Pass

North
!
2
3 N.T

Wtt
Ps
Pass
Pass

Opening lead 4

nay. They had barely maneuvered! Giuseppe Verdi use the controfa

Degoli. in the glass isolation cab cabinet
inet cabinet perspired and clasped his
hands nervously. He was one of
the few persons in Italy who knew
what a controfagotto was a
rarely used double bassoon but
he didn't know the answer to the
question.
"Try a guess." Bongiorno urged
" 'Falstaff?"
"Wrong,' said Bongiorno. "It's
'Don Carlos.' I'm sorry, Professor
Degoli."
There was an immediate out outcry
cry outcry in the press. Newspapers con contended
tended contended Jhe question was too tech technical
nical technical tn hf asked in a auiz on

nnora Rut th firpworks reallv

; started when opera experts pointed

out that Verdi also used tne con con-trnfnpnttn
trnfnpnttn con-trnfnpnttn in "Macbeth." written

!20 years before "Don Carlos."

Degoli became a sort oi national
hero overnight. Newspapers scored
the program day after day.
! The TV network finally gave in.
'It appointed a committee of ex ex-1
1 ex-1 nirts which ruled the ouestion was

!not over-technical but re-admitted

Degoli to the game on grounds
i the program's own answer was
i miclpariin?

The verdict left Degoli free to

withdraw with his previous earn earnings
ings earnings of $2,048, or to face a new
$4,096 question. Degoli disappoint disappointed
ed disappointed his fans at his next appear appearance
ance appearance on the show.
"I am no hero," he said. "I'm
quitting."
Degoli then delivered a long ti tirade
rade tirade against "this cruel game"
and said public interest in hjs case
had wonTV thousands of new sub

scribers.

So television won a sort w morai

victory, Degoli's popularity was
cone and the quiz show was more

popular than ever.

But a new misuse nau
into the ofogram that very day.

Thi fnllnwine dav. the press out

cry started all over again.

This time the "victim was wrs.

Pinri a nhilosophy

teacher in Salerno. She failed to
answer the last of an initial set
of five questions on American

plays.

The question was, -wno wvmc
'Four Saints in Three Acts'?" Mrs.

fiori failed to designate tne au author
thor author as Gertrude Stein.
1 But. as Mrs. Fiori and. the press

found out the following day,

Four Saints in Three Acts" was

written as an opera libretto, and
thus is not a play in the accepted
sense. .

The TV network refused to an annul
nul annul the question and re-admit Mrs.
Fiori. She has threatened to sue
the program.

,. t 1 Err

puts up vekv .fSr.'?rJ!ii

LITTLE FRONT. HE S GO THIN w UmM
'f' THAT HE 2AN Hlt?B 5EHINt7 A KEEP.
1 -lS tawtHhV)

Which is the right suit to develop
first when you are playing the
hand at a game in no-trump?
Usually your best choice is the
longest suit in the combined hands,
but this isn't always the case, as
today's hand indicates.
West opened the low spade, and
dummy won with the ace. It was
nnu 1111 tn South tn develon one of

the three other suits. Which was

tne correct cnoicer
If South begins with the dia diamonds,
monds, diamonds, the longest suit, East will
take the ace of diamonds and lead;
a spade through : the king-jack.
This permits West to develop his
nuit before South ban establish
nine tricks. South can get two
spades, one heart, one club, and
Jour diamonds for a total of eight
ancksl The defenders take the rest.
Actually, South must begin' nvith
(lie shortest suit in the combined
'handSr-clubs! "At the. second trick
he leads the queen of clubs for a
- finesse, losing to West's king. Even
though the finesse loses, there is
no harm in letting West gain the
lead. A spade continuation would
give South a free finesse, and any
other continuation would merely
he'p declarer.
If West returns a heart, as good
a defense as any, South captures
an honor with the ace of hearts
and knocks out the ace of dia dia-rrwmds.
rrwmds. dia-rrwmds. 1
Now the spade lead comes
through South, but it is too late.
Ci.ith ic in finsitinn to take two

unades. one heart, four diamonds

QUICK ACTION

r.Tl Attn B APTDS. Mich. (UP1

The municipal administrative

aide in the city s complaints ano
information department recently
solved the 209th complaint record recorded
ed recorded hv Ihe bureau. He comrjlained

and two clubs, for a total of nine thnt his job was "getting monoton-

tricks. ous ana soivea u oy quuuiiK.

I 1
1 1 1
r-1 0 r-, P

'mm

mUCCXS AND EM TVSXZ

1 immiun

V 1 'M I --A- ,.:t4.- w 1

It's a Buster!

tt MJCKKILL RLOSSiai

t-17

'Let m itay up another hour or I'll report you for j
income tax evaaion!" I

Faltering Philip
Philip's life ti filled with bruises.
Well-worn ateps and nigs be nsea.
Repairs wonld leate bit borne like new.
L Classlfieda. ftut tbe right clue'

IHJE STURV OF MARTHA WAT

inn 1 inmM u 11111 u iTTTT'TTTT

I f UkH HMt L HAVE AM W

! fs9 WmvO0AUyl VW,YE$ M3C.VBBVAOIW5.y B
vS

Confirming It By WILSON SCRUGGS

I

RrAFBAo: hast iaombws Xsmiit! tsuTW il
W.VEWIWIW5.BO5E795 C TvHI'!
"jT" AFiwHoues aso. V Cli' "'
X 6UESS W 5 UTVBV J

JUNe.MOWCAN 1 n. CWPCY J
pO HOMWORJC AMP I V
LISTEN TO WAT BOP 1 HT T
AT THE SAE j

YOUACTNTeNlKtf
tN0U6M TIME TD W6 W6-CLASSICS
CLASSICS W6-CLASSICS 1 DOUBT
IP YOU KNOW THC

DlffgREMCB pc'

opysseyv THINS

Re IMSTAM6E, WAT
WORP OF SIX LETTERS
COiTAIMS SlKVvCRDS
PESIDES ITSELf, WITH

OUT IRANSPOSftlg

. a 1 (i 1 r-rv a

tl TW4 Hit, .., w.TH..t. ,tW 1

mist n.t. a s ror

She's For It

89 AL JTCRMEEB

GEORGE Lv
WASHINGTON A
! V WAS TRULY J I
( h MAN OF r fOJU
HEROIC X
(Jtature.')

1

MILITARY GEMIUS.XI

innn A -tp r- a & i

STAUNCH PATRIOT

AH, PRISCILLA!) SoyTN
WOULDN'T IT ( I'LL J
8E ORAND IF ) VSAY,

..WITH ALL THOSE
HOLIDAYS WE'D J
NEVER WAVEa
TO GO TO j
SCHCC

BLGS BUNNY

Open for Business

Like That.

r
1

v Hw

t. L. I V
T.M 1 U. Pt K
-22 X

A1IXI OOf

Medical Man

Cj T. T. BAMLDI

f jF t'i 1 Oct TJ""-! waj. 'fOfil I OH, I'D HAD A LITTLE "T"" ...WHERE P3
PFTJS MV APETE SAKE, TRAINING, BUT MOSTLYrT MUStAvQU GET I PR1ILLKS
r BEING A DOCTOR!) ON THOSE ( OO AU RIGHT. VOU WO MEOtONE I GAVE .1 BEEN- WAYrVA O'
fiHAA! ITS NO i OLD TEXAS I PERKED J ABOUT r ",TJ1 HT r3
VyONOER HE A COWWKE& tM RCHT.YBElNfi A iGOOD STUfTiyf s v

BOOTS AND EUX BDDDISS

GWe More?

T CD OAS MARTU

iwJiL

VOU 7VHWX J WWWEP

TXAXM

VS TOO...

XVL. ID UXU "TO OM, 1 OWE

UWKT'S THE

tWTTW DTTM

WOO ? r

m. tf v t. r .i oii

WGMT JUST ftS C7ELL GET iETTLtP WAVJD4?.

Bra atoct.TW ywpix come
O0TT 1 EEM VitLVOEt CftW!

LC2?

CAPTAIN fiAll

Knockout

By LESLIE TURNM

(S)n the third
floor pr.keu.

Z7

youu FEEL

'7 WNHAT HAPPENEP,' YOU'RE TIU,

SEE TO-NOW TMJ5

I RECALL THE

TLlAklLr' (A IT

HAcHEt THAT 1
WWTONTHAr,

PLAKIC f

THAT V5 TWtSB 0W
AGO1. HE THIWK5VOU'
PEAP! AOKEEPTO
PAV f 200,000
TOMORROW FOR ALL

THEN tA LEAVES I J

If

7

AJJS VOUK5AN6?

I'LL 5TOPHM..IU

TELL HIM RADIATION

DESTROYS KEUON;

IJM 50 PK01N9T,

vouaue(T.i.rr

TOO LATS1 THEN WUV

BETTER FAKE MANE5IM

AMD HOT ADMIT WHAT

MAI teAffuED M lEVADA

HELPED PfcrRMP Mli

ar'lti"

MORTI MEEKLI

Duck!

By DICK C AVAL LI

HOW P0 YOU LIKE f
MVCD6TUME RAKTVT 1 SURE IS, 1
iSNTrrExcTrm? 7 f have

. XHKINPOP.
s. I WORRIER I
NO, I I IHOPEHE J
HAVENT... J I BEHAVES
why? "J m&dx-y

ipcnTliie N
THE COSTUME J WHO
HEPCKEP J J PIPHE
t; CMAUJ
2-21 kyWt twikt, Im.

OtIB BOAAUIMO UOLSJ

njuott nourui

JL1 OIW WAI

bO YOU TOWN CRIERS "A PPJ

WHERE X CnN.FINu

HB'i MAKlM TROU0L6

! LBAmDEk, Ah

I'VE 60T A

t AE66ASa X

i WANT TC

DgLlMCK.

tiJUII P VOll

CAN EfJJOV

CANVT HAMC

MUCH FONIf4

A TRACTION)

QCWWABTZ. IS
i TROMSER THAiJ

ekttZt. TOf

60T A 1

eiSHT HAnID

LIKE A BALE OF

HAVWlTW
, KsiOCKLE47

1

-TTP-C

Itrv a mo'S

i46TCAD,WK

TMI&'LL MAKE A

SKATE WMEM Tn
WATER FREEZES,

SO WE'Rfc MAKIN
A KIWPA STA9
TO GIT DOWW TO

IT EASY.'

Voh, i ees sour W r-f
PARDOW--ITHOUjHTI XJ I

vou was TK.VIM' y i i
I TO RAISE TH' rrf M
I WATER UP TO I

-4J

THE APPROACH



mtT.iHT, makcji n. isi

THE, PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
ru:r i:

l and Jthcvwi5e

social an

By Stajfc

Of

erS

Box 503 7, A.x

con

2-010 m i-Vlit

PATRICIA MARKUN WINS NATIONAL AWARD
IN JOURNALISM COMPETITION
Notification has been received that Patricia Markun of
Balboa Heijhtv president the Canal Zone branch of the
pen Women, has won first award in the nation in the bien biennial
nial biennial joarnalism competition of the National League of Amer Amer-kaa
kaa Amer-kaa Pen Women.
A letter U the local branch from Theresa Stevens of
Seattle, Wash., national chairman of journalism for the Pen
Women, brought greetings and congratulations on the award,
which will be presented at the authors' breakfast at the
Hotel Statler In Washington, U.C., on April 6. during the
biennial contention of the Pen Women Since Mrs. Markun
will be unable to attend, the award will be accepted by the
local branch's contention delegate, Mrs. Mary Inman Tassin
of Alexandria, Va. ,
The subject of the competition was an article on travel,
for which Mrs. Markun submitted a 2,900 word piece, "Grand "Grand-parents
parents "Grand-parents Love Panama." Coincidental, the monetary award
in this journalism contest had been donated by the Canal
Zone branch as the Grace Bennett Grefe award, named in
honor of the late writer and Pen Woman whose early death
' last year brought to an untimely end the writing career of
one of the Isthmus' most talented women. The prizewininig
niece, which was submitted in competition with the work of
MM Fen Women writers in the U.S., appears in current
issue of MONTH IN PANAMA, the magazine which was
founded by Grace Bennett Grefe several years ago.

Mrs. A. T. Soymojr
To Visit Interior
Mrs. A T. Seymour, Sr of
North Carolina arrived last Morw
day morning at Tocumen Airport
nd is the houseguest of Mr. and
Airs. J. A. Pavliok.
Mrs. Seymour will be in Panama
for three weeks and extended trips
have been arranged to the San
Bias Islands and David for her
entertainment.

Miscellaneous Showor
For Miss Florence Weir
A surprise miscellaneous show shower
er shower was given for Miss Florence
Weir at the Tivoli Hotel by a
group of thirty girl friends today.
Mrs. Preston Cau
.Will Hold Opon House Today
Capt. and Mrs. Berbert Wolfe
Jr. of Miami, Florida are visiting
in Panama. Mrs. Wolfe, the for for-mer
mer for-mer Sofia Hilbert, is Vice Consul
of Panama to Miami. Mrs. Pres Pres-iAn
iAn Pres-iAn r.au is holding "Open House

this afternoon at her country home

in Arraijan and wouia use iu in invite
vite invite their friends to drop in.
In II Vallo V
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Duran are
spending their vacation in El Va Va-lle
lle Va-lle kecompanied by their childen.
Goldtn Wedding
Trnrl Mrs. Dennis Reeder are

receiving' congratulations Mr o m
their numerous friends m Panama

on the event of their aircn. weuoinB
sointversary.
The Reeders who are' very well
remembered here where Jx.
Reeder was attached to the Pa Panama
nama Panama Hospital Staff for a num number
ber number of, years, are now living in
Miami, Florida.

Cocktail Party For
Mary Watson
A cocktail party was given re

cently at the residence of Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Ostrander for Miss
Watson who is leaving in a few
days for the United States.'

Harry S. Casler Will Bo
Speaker At Tower Club Meeting
The Tower Club (couples' club
associated with St. Luke's Cathe Cathedral,
dral, Cathedral, Ancon) is pleased to an announce
nounce announce that its speaker for the
March meeting will be Mr. Harrv
S., Casler, Public Affairs Officer
of the U. S. Embassy.
Supper reservations may be
made by calling Panama 3-2765
or Panama 3-6148'or Balboa 2-2fi55
for Monday 6;30 p.m., Bishop Mor Morris
ris Morris Hall.

Off To David
Mr. Jacob Maduro President of
the Lions Club of Panama is in
David where he attended the Na National
tional National Lions Convention which was
held in David this morning.
To Vacation In CI Vallo
Mr. and Mrs. Eric Delvalle, Mr,
and. Mrs. Max Delvalle and their
daughter Vilma and Miss Patina
Rodriguez will leave today for
then- vacation in El Valle. ;
"Ceminfl Out Party" Hold For
Little Linda Joanna Johnson
A coming out party was given
recently fo little Linda Joanna
Johnson six weeks old daughter ot
Lieutenant and Mrs. Mize Johnson
of Fort Kobbe. The event was held
at the home of Mrs. L. E. L ed ed-hetter
hetter ed-hetter of Diablo Heights wih Mrs.
L. L. Woods of Fort Kobbe as co co-hostess.
hostess. co-hostess. J
, The refreshment table was dec decorated
orated decorated with pink balloons ribbons
dolls and flowers and was presid presid-do
do presid-do ver by, Mrs. J. E. Claunchoof
Fort Kobbe. Guests presented lit little
tle little Linda Jo with many lovely
gifts and good wishes.

Daughter Born To

Robert C. Calvit

Mr. and Mrs.

Monthly Moating Of
Balboa Woman's Club
The regular monthly meeting
for the Balboa Woman's Club was
held recently at the U S. '."Swal '."Swallow"
low" '."Swallow" chartered by the club for a
day's outing to Taboga Island for
members and guests,
The following members enjoyed
the day swimming, hiking, sight sightseeing
seeing sightseeing and card playing.
Mesdames Patsy Ryan, Leon a
Saarinen, Helen Quinlan, Co Jous Jous-tra,
tra, Jous-tra, Helen Childress, Ruth J e n n-kins.
kins. n-kins. Rose Casey, Nancy Schroff,
Marilyn Angus, Sara Rowley,
Florence Klipper, Maia Nordinsj.

Mary Ruppel, Elsie Ettinger, Ruth
Bourgeois, Wanda Mann, Marge

Johnston; uons rarrii,;j,iarguert rarrii,;j,iarguert-ta
ta rarrii,;j,iarguert-ta Bouche, Emilie Bolton, Louise
Merchant, Elsie Garcia, Blanche
Shilling, Margarie Hodgson Doro Dorothy
thy Dorothy WynshaW, Evelyn Harrington,
Edna Howarlh and Mary Worley.
The guests included the follow following
ing following Mesdames, Doris Posey, Mar Margie
gie Margie Maxwell, Gloria Brown, Mary
Aanesen, Dotty Tsikuris, Estelle
Frankel, Jeanne Elia, Flora Hack
Sally Crane, Margaret Brtnne Brtnne-man,
man, Brtnne-man, Florence Morrison, Susanna
Katalik, Mary Days, Minnie Cur.1
tis, Azzie Holgerson, Jerrie O O-dom
dom O-dom ,Arline Osborn, Lorraine tan
dreth, Ligiu De Armas and Mr
Chas. D e Armas.
Sorority "Rushees"
Held Mooting ;
The members and new Rushees
of Beta Chapter, Beta Sigma Phi
Sorority met in the home of Ruth
Morris for a Model Meeting de designed
signed designed to better acquaint the

Kusshees with the activities and

ideals of the Sorority. Kay Klontz.

Vice President presided over tho

meeting in the absence of Nancy

Ramsey, President. After a brief

business meeting, a record espe

cially made for the Silver Anni-I

versary Year Rush Seasons bv

the Founder of the Sorority. Wal

ter W. Ross, was played. Mr. Ross

told of the achievements throueh

twenty five years and read a let

ter from Margaret Chase Smith

of Maine on her pleasure in join

ing a Maine tnapter. Mr. Ross

welcomed the Rushees to the larg largest
est largest Greek 'letter Sorority in the

world and asked for them to stand

and introduce themselves and tell
of their personal likes and hob-

ternational Emergency Loan
Fund.
Glenna Thomas, program chair chairman
man chairman for the evening presented
Mrs. Ethel McDermitt, well
known Atlantic Side Artit
v ho traced tne influences, through
the years in American Art. Airs.
McDermitt prefaced her talk with

the remark that many people

make, "I dont know much aoout
Art, but I know what I like.' like.'-Through
Through like.'-Through explanations and pic pictures,
tures, pictures, she wove her topic through
the pretty, the sentimental, the
photographic and the primitives
trends in the American Art Scene
to complete her talk with the sin sincere
cere sincere hope that through the Chap Chapter's
ter's Chapter's Cultural Program we would
better understand paintings and

say at last "I like what I know."

Members enjoying the evening
were the Sorority Sponsor, Marion
Green, Kay Klontz, Kathleen Huff Huffman,
man, Huffman, Glenna Thomas, Mary Dan
ielson, Jean Judge. Ruth Morris.
Mary Roddy, Betty Ogilvie, Dor Doris
is Doris Leeser, Jean Coffey and Betty
Slaughter.

Pledges present were Anna

Mae Butcher. Barbara Es;olf,
Diane Cancellier, Joanne Reccia

and Alice McGann, and Rushees

Boots Mitchell, Pat Bailey and

Kelly Wainio.

' I PiaSSi iiii m TO f
lObscrvcd Tc:rrov
'Al SI. Peter's

With the beginning of passion passion-tide
tide passion-tide tomorrow, the congregation of
St. Peter's church in La Boca will

! gather at 7 a.m. for Holy Cora-
munion.
I This celebration will be choral
(with sermon by Jhe Rev. Job n

tpear, priest in cnarge.
Other services scheduled for
Passion Sunday are morning pray pray-Passion
Passion pray-Passion Sunday are morning pray prayer
er prayer and church school 10 a.m. and,
evensong T;30 p.m. the Monthly
children eucharist will not be.
held.
' . ; i
Sunday after next is Palm Sun-,

day, when palms will be blessed

aim aisiriDutea to the congrega

tion oetore the sung eucharist.
The Parish Welfare Council is
assisting with promotion of the ba bazaar
zaar bazaar being held by the Woman's
Auxiliary as an Easter acitivity in
aid of the parish. The bazaar will
lake place around the premises
of the church on Easter Monday
night.

T"-
I f
- f - ...J

Don't be muled!
Disregard the price!
Demand tlOUXTinT
at all times!

It enjoyc tr.e tartest sales volume In Panama. United
States nd other countries, mainly because It does net
crtate difficulties with your fcalr. It does not Itch or
otherwise tother your scalp!
It nevei fails to give the results desired!
Distributer In the Republic of Panama and
the Canai Zone
JULIO VOS
No J Street Tel 2-2971 Panama

REX PHARMACY

COLON

Stmi-Monthly Candlelight Danco
At USO-JWB

The semi-monthly "Candlelight

Dance will take place on Sunday,

at 8:00 p.m. at the USO-JWB Arm

ed forced Service Center.
Dancing to latest recorded- mii mii-six
six mii-six will be a highlight of the eve

ning, especially to the popular ;
Cha-Cha-Cha music. j

The young ladies of the USO USO-JWB
JWB USO-JWB Club have been invited to

this affair.
An invitation is extended to mil

itary personnel and their families

to attend.

A daughter was born to Mr. and; bies. At this time Boots Mitchell,

Mrs. Robert C. Calvit of Diaolo
Heights on March 13th att he San

fernando Clinic. The infant will
receive the name Helen Irene.
Paternal grandparents are Mr.
nd Mrs. C L. Calvit of St. Pe Petersburg,
tersburg, Petersburg, Florida and maternal
grandparents are Mr. S. C. Patch Patch-ert
ert Patch-ert of Miami, Florida and the late
Mrs;- Patchett, All grandparents
formerly resided in the Canal
Zone and are now retired.

Kelly Wainio and Pat Bailey

stood and gave a brief biography.
Thomas L. Thomas, friend of Mr.
Ross sang a song recorded espe especially
cially especially for the Rushees.
In the Get-Acquainted Program.

Betty Slaughter gave a brief re

sume of the Social and Service
Highlights of Beta Chapter for the
past year: Ruth Morris explained
the International Endowment Fun
and Jean Judge spoke of the ln-

Plan to attend Church this Sunday
AT THE' V
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
BALBOA HEICHTS, C. 2.
9:30 BIBLE SCHOOL (Classes for all ages)
,10:40 MORNING WORSHIP
. "CHRISTIANS ON THE OFFENSIVE"
Childrgn't 'Chapel 10:40 Robert Snyder
6 :30 3TU TRAINING IN CHURCH MEMBERSHIP
7:30 "THE WILES OF THE DEVIL"
Believers Baptism at Close of Service
COMPLETE NURSERY SERVICE SPECIAL MUSIC
-RADIO OUTLET -HOXO-

USO-JWB Plan Juglo Trek

A jungle trek across part of Las
Cruces Trail has been arranged by

the USO-JWB Armmed Forces

Service Center for members of the
Wilma Miles Enlisted Wives' Club

and their husbands.
The trip, which has been plan
ned for today is under the guid

ance and direction of Mr. Elmer

Stevens, Structural Engineer, Pa

nama Canal Company and Vice
President of the Panama Canal
Natural History Society, who will

be assisted by Mr. Wesley Town
send, Engineer in the Survey's Pa

nama Canal Company, and Advis Advis-ef
ef Advis-ef of an Explorer Post for tfte

Boy; Scouts.. Both men are .well

known on the Isthmus for (heir
knowledge of outdoor life.? -''4

The group will start theif trek

at the' Madden Road ending at

the site of the old town of Las

Cruces on the Chagres River. This
will be one of the few groups of

women to nave made this cross

ing.

Ihose going are EM and Mrs.

D. C. Geissler, Yeoman and Mrs.
L G. Reihle, EM2 and Mrs. A, J.
Bernard, and Mesdames Eleanor

Feltenberger, Eloise Hannah and

Lena Caley.

Mr. A. J. Bernard is President
of the Wilma Miles Enlisted

Wives' Club.
Class In Corsage Making At
Balboa Woman's Club

There will be a special meeting

oi tne Arts and Crafts Group of

tne Baiboa Woman's Club at 9
a.m., Monday, at the home of

Mrs. Helen Wentworth. All mem

bers interested in learning to

make corsages are requested to

bring flowers from their yard

and suitable ribbon as Mr. Lucille!

Torstenson is going to give in instruction
struction instruction in the art of corsage
making.
Program Of Dancing For
Gorgas Pationtt
A program was presented at
Gorgas Hospital Recreation Room.

last night at 7 by the pupils of

Mrs. Ann Lattin's School of Dance

Although this little troupe is in

the last stages of practice, re

hearsal, lessons and costume fit

tings for their annual Review
"Little Show of 1956" to be pre presented
sented presented at the Hotel El Panama
March 25, Sunday- afternoon, they
gladly ponded to a call from Miss
Sara Bomberg, Red Cross Rec Recreation
reation Recreation .Supervisor recently for en entertainment
tertainment entertainment for the patients at

3 r17&yinF
TASTES
BETTER

Social Page MISS RIMA RLPOLL.
MISS RIMA RIPOLL of Panama has been chosen to represent
St. Mary's of Notre Bame, Indiana, as delegate to the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Convention to take place at the University of Notre
Dame, Indiana. Among those attending this convention will
be Adlai Stevenson, Senator from Tennessee (Dem.) Estes
Kefanver, and Governor of New York Averill Harriman. Miss
Ripoll has also been chosen to represent her college at the
Youth Assembly of the United Nations which is being held in
Indiana. Miss Ripoll is a freshman at St. Mary's where she
is studying on scholarship. During the past year this pretty
and talented young lady has appeared in several stage per performances
formances performances at college.. She also appeared at the "Day of the
Americas" celebration in 1955 where she danced the tvpical
dances of Spain and also appeared in Panama's National cos costume,
tume, costume, the "pollera." Miss Ripoll is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Salvador Ripoll of Panama. Mrs. Ripoll who teaches
Spanish Dancing at the National Schooi of Dancing has lent
her talents and that of her group for Canal Zone affairs on
numerous occasions and is well known there. Mr. Ripoll is a
businessman and part time sculptor and artist of merit.

Million Buffolos
A Minute
Due Tonight
Miss Karan Barlow is the pretty

must-i wuu win oe icaiured in

Mars in The Night" a show that
promises a million laughs a min minute.
ute. minute. This show will go on Rt the

chid Atlas every night starting to
night at 7:30

itesponsible lor. .raising those
million laughs a night .will be Ncl

oaiey, comedian. Another po

puiar singer featured will be

urace Lombard. Lucho Muno
and his new orchestra will piav
for dancing and Al Loman. wri-

known M. C. will be in charge of

we lun ana ironc.

START THE DAY THE HAPPY WAY!

Firh notice for Inclusion to tht
column should nuhmillcd In type typewritten
written typewritten form and mailed to one ot
tlie box numbers lilted daily In "So "Social
cial "Social and Otherswise." or delivered
by hand to the office. Notices of
meetings cannot bt accepted bj tele telephone.
phone. telephone. Canal Zone Art Ltagua
To Maat

The Canal Zone Art League

win meet on xnursday, March 22,
7:30 p.m., at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. A. Houston, No. 515 Manza Manza-nillo
nillo Manza-nillo St., Ancon.

Guest speaker will be Mr. Hen Henrietta
rietta Henrietta Shaw. Members are invited

to attend, and guests will be weki

come.

Book Review Croup
To Moot
The Book Review Group of the
Canal Zone College Club will meet

Thursday, at 9:30 a.m. at the

home of Mrs. Roland Williams,
506 Terminal Drive, C u r u n d u
Heights.
Mrs. William Allen will serve as
co-hostess. The Lost City of the
Incas by Hyrum Bingham will be
reviewed by Mrs. Dtlbert Thorn Thornton,
ton, Thornton, and colored slides of Macchu
Picchu will be shown. All mem-

Gorgas, remembering their last

performance there, when the joy
of their audience, watching them

perform was equaled only by

their own joy in the privilege ol
performing for them.

bers interested in the Book Re Review
view Review Group are invited to attend.
Death Btnafit Assn.
Holds Annual Mooting Monday
The Silver Employes' Death
Benefit Association will hold an
annual meeting of the board of di directors
rectors directors at 7:30 p.m., Monday in
the Rainbow City Lodge Hall
for those on the Atlantic side.
At 9 a.m. on Sunday, March 25,
a similar meeting will be (held in
the auditorium of the Pacific Serv Service
ice Service Center,, for those on the Paci Pacific
fic Pacific side.

The auditor's and the secrets

ry s reports for 1955.. will be pre

sented at both meetings: Other

business for transaction will in

clude the election of represent
tives to the board.

r

100 Pure Instant CcJfea

Better Flavor y t
Cup after Cup

X2

' This specialized tablet is approved by
more doctors, trusted by more mothers
than any other brand. You're sure of
accurate dosage. Your child will like
its orange flavor. Refuse substitutes
get St. Joseph Aspirin For Children.
WORLD' LARGEST SELUNI ASPIRIN FOX CHILDREN

Blends
better
flavors
betterl

it's doublo-craamcd! Smoother
creamier richer in mustard flavor -1-ron't
fade out in cooking. Better for
cold cuta, hot meata, sandiricbea, tool
Different because it's
DOUBLE-CREAMED!
World' i largest telling prepartdmuatant

"""Atstr'aTattablrrat
your local commissaries.

SANTA CLARA BEACH
WHERE ALL THE lilCEST PEOPLE
' ENJOY
THE SUII MID SURF
Visit our Rcfresqircria cn te Bench

EverReady
THE INSTANT
Cocoa
Made Right in the cup!

JUST LIKE YOU-your
children want a hoc drink,
mornings. For the one that
builds real Energy Reserve,
get Nestle's EverReady
Cocoa. It's imtant just 3
teispoonfuls in a cup and
add hot water! It's deli
cious you'll love that rich
chocolate flavor!

WHOLE MILK AND SUGAR ARE ALREADY IN IT!

1 lb. and

' lb. witt

Hear

our new

singing sensation
ANITA RAVEL
d'n the Bella Vista Room)

WiUwM.ji5iiS3!S '.I

How anyone can be so easy to took at, and to easy to listen to, Is a mystery
to us! But come and find out for yourself that Anita Ravel and her singing ars
bound to make your evening in the Bella Vista Room doubly pleasurable.

Anita, whom the tropics have lured from a highly successful
tour in Mexico, sings twice nightly at 8;30 and 11:30 p.m.

NO COVER CHARGE
NO MINIMUM
Call Max, 3-1660
for table reservation.

k-.. MUM

A Klrkebj Hotel

LA VIE

MESA" Restaurant

(beside the Maxim Cocktail Lounge)'

ml

Announces under new administration
that their new Cooking Chef special special-ixed
ixed special-ixed in Italian foods, will personally
attend his customers

O "Lasona"
O "Cannelloni a la Rossini11
O "Spaghetti in different forms1'
and all kind of I talian foods.

A 4

Via Espana 117
Tels.
.3-4S70,.3-457r,



SATTTDAT, i:T.CU 17, ir.J
PAGE SIX
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
rTT)
' f J f .... . t 4 s
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA
LIBRERIA PRECIADO
I Street No. 11
Agencias Internal, de PuSlicaciones
Ne. S Lottery PUta
CASA ZALDO
LOURDES PHARMACY
182 La Carruqullla
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
ho. U "B'f Street
MORRISON
LEWIS SERVICE
Av. TlveU No. 4
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
149 Central Ave.
FARMACIA LUX
1(4 Central Avenue
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANCE
J. Fee. de la Osta Ave. Na. 41
FOTO DOMY
Jasta Areaemena Ave. anaVU St
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS
H Street Ma. S3
FARMACIA EL BATURRO
Farque Letevre I Street
TARMACIA "SAS"
Via Forres 111
NOVEDADES ATHIS
Via Espafia Ave.
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
Central Ave. 45
4th ef July Ave. J St.

TH2 FAN ASIA AJIEHICAN AN IXDEPEXDEXT DAILY KIWATra

Kill
I i iTiim i i

I

COMMERCIAL &

PROFESSIONAL
CANAL ZONE POLYCLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
DR. C. I. FABRIGA, D.D.S.
DR. R. AVILA JR.. M.D.
Tlvoll h ol July) Aye, No. 21AM
(opposite Ancon Sehool Playground)
Tel. 1-2DII Panama
RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
4
I JIM RIDGE
Phone Panama t-0552
TftANSPORTtS BAXTER. S A.
1 i . U ...I.
Packer! snipper.
fhenes a-24Sl 2-2562,
' Learn Ridim t
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding t Jumoin dosses. ol
I to 5 P.m. Phone 3-0279
oe bv appointmarrr.
-We ehape Vour figure"
BODY -REDUCING
j famom McLev Machtnrs
Swedish MMge Steam Bate
lor male and female
0RTEPED1A NACIONAL
(Dr. Scholls)
gS Josto Aronemena -- Pa- -"''
HARNETT & DUNN
, BALLROOM OANC'fc STUDIO
Balhoat 2-4239 or Pn.t i-W
-TEACHES UNTIL SOU LEARN"
Studio 1 Panama Hotel
San Bias Islands
Tour Is Slated
A special trip has 'been "ar "arranged
ranged "arranged to the San Bias islands
for Saturday, March 24,-by the
Panama Tourist Bureau. The one
day plane-boat excursions to the
Islands have also been scheduled
for Sunday April 1st, 8th and
15th.
The last Darlen trip for the
season hag been planned for
Sunday,' April 22, and to Volcan,
David and Boquete on Sunday,
April 29.
Military personnel and their
dependents, please call the USO-
JWB Armed Forces -service cen center.
ter. center. Balboa 1072 for further In Information
formation Information and reservations.
Acolytes To Make
Monthly Corporate
Communion Sunday
The members of St. Vincent's
Guild of Acolytes of St. Paul's
Church will make their monthly
corporate communion at the 8
a.m. service of Holy Eucharist
tomorrow.
They will also convene for
their monthly meeting at S p.m.
when matters of importance will
be discussed.
The Vnlerhfn nf Rt. TPnnl will
hold their regular monthly meet meet-.
. meet-. Inn on Wednesday night at 7:30.
READ THIS
Are you Interested for a ridi ridiculous
culous ridiculous low price, In a beauti beautiful
ful beautiful lot at Panama's closest
and finest beach resort? Yon
can pay as you see fit, We
want nice neighbors and
money in ne ob ject. CORO CORO-NADO
NADO CORO-NADO BEACH 49 miles from
Ferry. Call Eisenmann Pan Panama
ama Panama 2-4505 or see Castilia at
Coronado.
i.i a CHnicp.
irvrc.n.
SALE
t v
. Lmb- ,r-
Ave. Eloy A If aro 15-159
Tel. 2-C510

FOR SALE

Household
FOR SALE: 0n refrigerator,
electric, like new, $250. Ona
lady's vanity $30. Call 3-1791.
FOR SALE. Westinghouse 9-ft.
refrigerator, 25-cycle, only 6
years old. $100. House 760-C.
Barnaby Street, Balboa.
FOR SALE: Rattan furniture
with spring cuihion: lava teat,
chair, and 2 chaise lounges; ana
upholstered slip-covered couch
three-seated with spring cush cushions;
ions; cushions; tw arm chairs, elip-cover-d.
Call Balboa 2617.
FOR SALE: .Modern style 3 3-seat
seat 3-seat davenport with green cover,
excellent condition $65. Phone
Albrook 2131.
FOR SALE: Zenith Trans Transoceanic
oceanic Transoceanic portablt radio $50;
Webcor 3 -speed portable record
player $50; both excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Alto day bed $7; table
lamp $7; Royal, portable type typewriter
writer typewriter $30; brand new picnic ica
chest $10; lady's "d man's golf
clubs with bags $60 and $75;
misc. hand 'luggage, all sixes and
prices. Phono 3-0732 after 6
p.m.
FOR SALE: Mihegany table, 4
chairs, new licorera, A-1 con condition.
dition. condition. Reasonably priced. Rio
Abajo, 4th Street, 2373. Blake's
family.
FOR SALE: Drestars, chiffon chiffoniers,
iers, chiffoniers, sideboard, china closets,
chairs, tablet, desks, fans,
stands. Many items. Phone Bal.
2571.
FOR SALE: All household fur furnishings.
nishings. furnishings. 0766 A Williamson
Place. Phone 2-4312, Dicker Dicker-ion.
ion. Dicker-ion. FOR SALE: Radio Hallicrafter.
Cheap. House 531 Chagret St.,
Ancon. Phono Balboa 2870.
FOR SALE
ftealTEstate
FOR SALE: Completely fur.
"iihed house In El Valla an 23
era. Concrete construction, two
tiled batht, tiled kitchen, tiled
f loon, two bedrooms, hall, liv living
ing living room, two porches and car carport.
port. carport. Staal window frames, elec electric
tric electric plant, etc. Furniture include!
gat refrigerator, stove and hot
water heater, linens, dishes,
kitchenware, radio, record play player,
er, player, etc. Inspection any time.
Stewart Eagan, El Valle.

Roberts Ready For Fast
Start In Quest Of 7th
20-Win Season k Row

NEW YORK, March 17 (UP)
--Robin Roberts, training as dil diligently
igently diligently as the most ambitious
rookie, was primed today for a
fast start in quest of his seventh
straight season in the 20-victory
circle.,. ..
Normally a slow starter in the
spring,1 the 29-year-old Philadel
phia star started off with one
of the most unimpressive show
inR of his career and was hit
hard in, early exhibition eames,
causing some critics to wonder
out loud wnetner ms arm naa
gone lame under the strain of
hard work.
But the evidence of his ear early
ly early outings this sprinjr suggest
that this could finally be the
year the durable right-hander
reaches the 30-victory mark.
RobPn'g top effort was 28 wins
in 1952 and his 1955 total was
23. -. .v
Roberts turned In his second
consecutive spectacular p e r r-formance
formance r-formance vesterdav when he re
quired only 38 pitches to shut
out the Cincinnati Keas ana
gain credit for the Phillies' 8-4
triumDh. It was an even more
impressive performance than
Robin's first spring outing, on
March 12, when he took six
warmup pitches in the bullpen
and then shut out the Pittsburg
Pirates, 8-4.
The New Yorn xanKees, si..
Louis Cards, New York Giants
and Cleveland Indians also were
encouraged by splendid perform performances
ances performances by pitchers who figure to
be key men tnis year. ;
Mickey McDermott, making
his second appearance of the
spring for the Yankees yielded
one hit and an unearned run in
five innings against the Cardi Cardinals.'
nals.' Cardinals.' Before McDermott took over
for New York.i however, rookie
Bennett Flowers struck out five
Yankees and faced only 12 bat bat-ters
ters bat-ters in i our perfect-innings.
Flowers, who had a 12-9 record
for Buffalo last season, repre repre-setns
setns repre-setns some of the "new blood"
Fred Hutchinson hopes will solve
St. Louis' mound problems.
Johnny Antonelil, a bitter i

FOR SALE

Automobile
FOR SALE 194 J Buick Super,
excellent condition, radio, duty
paid. Reasonable. Call Balboa
2729.
FOR SALE 1954 Ford OH V.
V8 2-door sedan, turn signals,
heavy undercoating, exceptional
condition, $1290. Call 6-739.
House 0258-D, Gamboa.
FOR SALE: 1956 Chevrolet
Club Coupe. High power VI an angina,
gina, angina, power glide transmission,
radio, custom interior, wsw
tubeless tires, tinted glass, di directional
rectional directional and back-up lights, de deluxe
luxe deluxe tufone finish. New, Must
trade for eld car, financial rea reasons.
sons. reasons. Balboa 2-1515.
FOR SALE; 1953 Hillman
Minx Convertible. 2354-B, Bal Balboa.
boa. Balboa. Phone 2-1405.
FOR SALE- '49 Packard Sedan,
duty paid, very good condition.
Any demonstration. Room 331,
Tivoli Hotel.
FOR SALE: 1953 Pontiae con convertible,
vertible, convertible, excellent condition,
wsw, RTH., all extras $1350.
Call Fort Gulick 88-510.
FOR SALE: 1954 Chevrolet
BelAir 2-tone 4-door, standard
shift, 11,000 miles, $1450. Tel Telephone
ephone Telephone Balboa 1366, residenct
2356-B. Balboa.
FOR SALE: 1951 Chevrolet,
1951 Morris convertible in per perfect
fect perfect condition and cameras. Tel Telephone
ephone Telephone 3-6369 Panama.
"The Servicio Cooperative Inter Inter-americano
americano Inter-americano de S a I u d Publics''
tells to the best offeror the fol following
lowing following automobiles: A '51 Chev Chevrolet
rolet Chevrolet carry-all, a '51 Willys Sta Station
tion Station Wagon, a '51 Chevrolet Se Sedan.
dan. Sedan. Information concerning this
sale could be obtained at the
"Ministerio de Prevision Social."
3rd Floor, office No. 302,
FOR SALE- '51 Morris Minor
4-door. Forced to sell at bargain
price $725 cash. Perfect condi condition.
tion. condition. Can be teen at Jivillo Gas
Station. Ask for Duke.
MUST SELL: Bargain, 1951
Morris Minor convertible. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone Panama 3-3516.
WANTED
Automobiles
AUTOMOBILES WANTED
We buy automobiles Models
1950 to 1955. WE PAY CASH
ON THE SPOT. Autos Eisen Eisen-man,
man, Eisen-man, S. A. (Beside Coca Cola
Plant), Phones 2-2616, 2-4966
Panama,
disappointment for the Giants
when he had a 14-16 record
last season, looked like the 21 21-game
game 21-game winner of 1954 as he shut
out the Indians for four in in-nings
nings in-nings at Las Vegas, Nev. The
Ind ans won 5-4, after rally,
ine; against rookie Ernie Bro Bro-glio
glio Bro-glio for four runs in the sixth
Inning and addSna; the "win "win-ner"
ner" "win-ner" in the seventh.
That, incidentally, gave the
Indians an opportunity to dis
play tneir "lock up artist" of
ana Kay NariesKi demon demonstrated
strated demonstrated mid-season form in
shutting out the Giants for the
last four frames to gain credit
ior. me win. NanesKinad a 9-1
recora as a relief starJast sea
son.
Elsewhere:
xiib tsaiumore orioies won
their first game of the spring
when thev snanDed a siy-trame
'losing streak with a 7-6 verdict
over me Chicago Cubs, despite
homers by Bob Speake and Hank
sauer.
Manager Lou Boudreau an announced
nounced announced that Hector Lopez, a
.290-hitter as a rookie third
baseman last season, would be
iriven a chance to play in the
Kansas City Athletics outfield.
Frank Thomas unloaded his
first homer of the spring and
Roberto demente and Jack
Shepard also hit hard in a 14 14-hit
hit 14-hit attack that gave the Pitts Pittsburgh
burgh Pittsburgh Pirates a 10-0 victory over
the Detroit Tigers.
The Quickest
o friendship is to begin sponging
2 ....

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031, ANCON, C.Z.
BOX 1211, CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Skeeter, goad con condition.
dition. condition. Suitable for 1 0-hp. $20.
1950 6-cyl, Ford, radio and
heater. Good condition. Call 6 6-294.
294. 6-294. FOR SALE: Venetian blinds,
all sixes. 38th Street 4-78 (13).
FOR SALE: 75 shares El Pan Panama
ama Panama Hotel. Mutt sell immedi immediately
ately immediately Best offer. Write Bex 134
B2.
FOR SALE: Young and old
ducks for Eatter. Ave, Ernesto
T. t,ef evre, P a r a, u e Laf evre,
House 32.

Tri-Post Troopers Clinch
Panama Area Armed Forces
'56 Baseball Championship

PAAF STANDINGS ENTERING
THE FINAL ROUND
Team
W L
22 3
16 9
13 12
12 13
7 18
5 20
Pet. GB
.800-
.640 6
.520 9
.480 10
.280 IS
.200 17
Tri-Post Troop,
Fort Clayton ..
Fort Kobbe ....
Army Atlantic
Navy ..........
Albrook AFB
Tomorrow' Gamer
Fort Kobbe vs. Troopers at Al Al-brrok
brrok Al-brrok (night), Fort Clayton vs.
Albrook at Clayton (night), Ar Army
my Army Atlantic vs. Navy at Davis,
Wednesday V Game ;
Troopers vs. Fort Clayton at
Amador, Albrook vs. Army At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic at Albrook (night), Navy
vs. Fort Kobbe at Coco Solo.
Saturday, March 24
Atlantic vs. TroonerB at
Davis. Albrobk vs. Navy at Al
brook (night), Fort Clayton vs.
Fort Kobbe at layton (night).
Sunday, March 25
Trnnnftra vs. AlDrOOK at Ama
dor, Fort Kobbe vs. Army Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic at Kobbe, Fort layton vs. Na Navy
vy Navy at layton.
Wednesday, March 28
Navy vs. Troopers at oco Solo,
Army Atlantic vs. Ft. Clayton at
Davis. Albrook vs. Fort Kobbe at
Albrook (night).
The Tri-Post Troopers clinch
aA tviolr Mrnnr1 straight Pana
ma Area Armed Forces baseball
crown Wednesday night with an
8-0 -win over Navy, ine victory
r.hn Trnoners a six-game
lead over second-place Fort
Clayton with only five games re
maining on ine scneame.
warrv Rimnson drew the non
or of pitching the champs to
the pennant, and they couldnt
have maae a Deiier
uftw ftnhhed Suitcase had the
Middies in the satchel, so to
speak, fanning 20, walking four
and giving up tnree ouigiea
his cohorts romped merrily a a-cross
cross a-cross the plate with eight tal tallies,
lies, tallies, six of them gifts of the
fumblv Navy Infield.
Pearinor flown au tnc way.
' . IS XT-
Simpson never failed to fan less
than t.wn ner Inning as he came
within one of Clayton's pitcher
Ed Monahan's record of 21.
Twice he hreezed the aide and
at one point faced a string of
five bewildered batsmen who ei either
ther either whiffed mightily or lust
pretended they -were seeing the
third one go by. Only one man
reached third, via a bad throw
by Trooper catcher Pat Galla
gher, ana tnree, maae n w w
Simpson was no less potent
platewise; rapping out two time time-iw
iw time-iw cino-iPQ tn drive in the champs'
first two runs'. He was matched
by arroll Pullen, while Bob May Mayer
er Mayer lofteri a. triDie to the right
field wall and Vic Haddock sac
rificed another run m.
Score Bv Inning;
Navy 000 000 0000 3
Tronn. 001 111 04X 8 10
Swan and Hefflefinger; Simp
son, and Gallagher.
Tn nther cames Wednesday
Fort Kobbe moved one notch a a-head
head a-head of Army Atlantic in the
torrlrl race for third place, eds
i iu.nnt, atpn 0.7 while
Clayton's Monahan shackled the
Bushmasters, 7-2, on four hits.
Starting off the sixth and fi final
nal final round tomorrow, the Troops
lmeet.Kobbe.atL, Albrook :;.and
layton hosts the Flyers in wu
night games while Navy and Ar Army
my Army Atlantic tangle at Fort Davis.
Jose Rosarlo punched out
three hits in five trips to launch
a Kobbe rally that carried 1.

RESORTS

Gramlich'a Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Madam conveniences,
moderate rates. Phone Gamboa
6-441.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mil
past Casino. Low re tea. Phone
Belboa 1866.
PHILLIPS Oceenside Cottage,
Santa Clara. Box 43$, Balbeew
Phone Panama 3-1877, Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-1673.
Shrepnel'a furnished houses en
beech et Santa Clare. Telephone
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
LESSONS
ATTENTION WEST BANK I
Ball dancing classes are avail avail-abya
abya avail-abya to you now. Ann Lattin's
School of Dance, Cocoll Club Clubhouse
house Clubhouse Studio (upstairs). Monday
evenings 7:30 or phone Balboa
2-4415.
past the Flyers In the bottom of
the ninth. Rosarlo, who, won two
shutout victories for the Llfe-
Uners last week, started things
on wun a double in the iour iour-run
run iour-run eighth, then tripled in the
next frame to send Don Taylor
across witn tne winning tally
The Round Fan nicked un his
ninth win, while Len Rubacha,
relieving Steve Klsio in the 8th.
bore the loss. Bill Wood figured
In the "Liners' lfl-hit ban-ate
with three singles, while Mario
LaMaestra and Les FelicianO
aouoiea for the losers.
: Score By Innings v
Albrook 013 001 0207 II 4
KObDe 030 000 041-8 18
Kisio, Rubacha (8) and Feli-
ciano; Rosarlo and Walden,
l!d Monahan put on somewhat
of a one-man show of his own at!
uaytoru. striking out 17, walk walking
ing walking two. and allowing one earn
ed run. Erj .Lopresto enjoyed i
perfect night with a triple, dou
ble and two Singles. John Kelle.
her collected three-foMour and
can ca vi solved Monahan for
tnree of the A's four singles,
Score By Inning
AA 000 010 0012 4
Clayton 020 022 01x7 13
Klussman and Tavlor; Mona-
nan ana Meaaer.'-.-'T-.r--i--:r-
New. Books
The twentv-first edition nf the
U. S. Camera, a volume that has
achieved international recognition
by offering in book form a display
of superb contemporary photogra photography,
phy, photography, is among the books placed in
circulation mis wees: oy ine can canal
al canal Zone Library.
In this volume for 1958, the fine
photographs are complemented
with a special 74-page feature on
Edward Steichen, a foremost fig-'
ure in American photography who
reached his 75th birthday last year.
ine complete list of new books
and their authoris announced by
the Library this week follows:
NON-FICTION Integration of
Religion and Psychiatry, Biddle;
What is Communism, Ketchum;
Nuclear Geology, Faul; How to Use
Hand Tools, Popular Mechanics
Magazine: The Encyclopedia nf
Ont board Motorboating, Bowman;
Gardens are for-People. Church;
U. S. Camera: Two Years in the
Antarctic, Walton; Two Legs to
Stand On, McKee; American Herit
age.
FICTION The Sea and the
Stone, Clift; Peace at Bowling
Green. Crabb; The Giant's House
Laing; The Fittest, Macgregor; Da-
nen Venture, .Terry; ana. Angry
Hills; Uris.
Panama Republic Periodical Ar Articles
ticles Articles Geology of Isabeia (Aibe
marie) Island, Archipielago de Co Colon
lon Colon (Galapagos) by A. F. Banfield
and others. (In Bulletin of the geo
logical society of America; v. 57,
No. 2; Feb. 1956; P. 215-234).
Pcnin.ir.li.n Film $tl
ToSbvAIJVB-USO
A new film in color, especially
produced for Esso-Standard Oil,
depicting the ancient history of the
( entrai American countries n a
Panama with their social, econo
mie and cultural developments will
be shown at the USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center on Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Produced by the John Bransby
Productions and photographed by
Thomas Draper, this is one of a
series of film interpreting life in
the United States and foreifia coua-
The program has been arranged
in cooperation with Esso-Standard
Oil, S.A. ine puDiic is inviieu.

FOR RENT

Apartments
ATTENTION & I.! Just built
modern furnished apartments, I,
2 bedrooms, hot, cold wares,
Phone Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT: Modem apartment
at "El Cangreje": 2 bedrooms,
etc., garage. For mere details:
Phone 3-4966 or 3-6737.
FOR. RENT. Furnished or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished one-bedroom apart-
furnished one-bedroom modern
apartment, garage. 168 Via Bel Bel-isario
isario Bel-isario Porras.
FOR RENT: Apartment, con concrete
crete concrete house, living-dining room,
bedroom, kitchen, yard, parking
space, $50. Urbanixacion "La
Pradcra," Sabanas, facing La
Garantia furniture factory. Tel Telephone
ephone Telephone 3-2796.
FOR RENT; Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, Inspected, screened, all
camforts. Via Espana, haute be before
fore before Juan Franca.
Help Wanted
WANTED: Responsible woman
for cooking and cleaning. Must
have character reference. Call
Panama 3-6301.
Dons, Utah, A
Canisius Among
NEW YORK. March 17 fTJP)
Bill Russell said the San Francis
co Dons were "adding a new
spokt to the wheel" and it looks
as though it'll take a tough road
block to keep them from rolling
to their second straight N.C.A.A.
basketball championship.
The Dons opened their hid to
retain the crown last night by wal
loping UCLA in the Pacific Coast
Coast Conference champion, 72-61.
Russell, the 6-10 All-America star,
played his usual brilliant game.
That wasn't news, it was tne
play of sophomore Gene Brown
that made things look bright for
the champions as they scored
their 52nd straight victory. Brown
is a replacement for K. C. Jones,
the team captain ana AU-Amenca
guard who isn't eligible for the
tournament.
"Gene is lust a new spoke In
41,. nifcaal DilCsoll i A Snri
.lie nucoi.
Brown made him look like a iirst-
class nroohet by leading the indi
vidual scoring with 23 p.o i n t S
Brown's long range snooting
crushed u.C.L.A.'s hopes in tne
second helf.
Non-Cifizen
(Continued from Page 1)
the minimum benefits that ac accrue
crue accrue to worker in the employ
of the U.S. Government.
"Despite the provisions of
the contract, it 1 well known
that In actual practice, nei neither
ther neither the letter nor spirit of the
contract i observed insofar as
the worker baslo rights are
concerned.
'Th eight-hour day, a basic
work-week, overtime compensa
tion holiday nav. vacation time,
injury compensation, sick leave
are nrar.tica.nv unneara oi m wc
personnel relations between the
contractor ana.nis employes.
'It is an interesting lace ina
the contracting firm does not
operate under the labor laws
ef the U.S. Government nor of
the Republic of Panama, nor
do the term of the contract
provide for the rights of toe
worker, who because of the
high rate of onemployment in
the Republic of Panama. Is on only
ly only too glad to eke out livinr
under almost any conditions. -"iTnilmited.nressure
and inti
midating tactics are practicea in
restraining workers irom de defending
fending defending their interests while in
the employ of the contractor.
"However, some more courage
ous workers upon the termina
tion of their employment sees:
recourse in the labor courts of
Panama. There are now numer numerous
ous numerous cases being pursued in these
courts as may be attested to ny
tfose de la Rosa Castillo who is
an employe of the U.s. Air Force
on the Canal Zone, the president
of one of our local unions and
a practicing attorney in the Re Republic
public Republic of Panama," Rerrie went
on. -
"There continues to be a scnooi
of. thought that any lmprovea
standard of compensation for
workers on the Canal Zone
would have an adverse effect on
the economy of the Repuouc oi
Panama." 1
"We cannot but insist tnat
this Is a most fallacious view viewpoint
point viewpoint that i counteracted by
the express opinion of the
Panamanian Government, ts
presidents, former presidents,
Chamber of Commerce, His Ex Excellency,
cellency, Excellency, Ricardo M. Arias, E
President of the Republic of
Panama, and leadinr citizens.
Ernesto de la Guardla, Jr., has
this to ay,
'That the minimum waEels"'a
part of the Panama Constitution
and while its application has
certain delicate economic prob problems,
lems, problems, plans, have already been

FOR RENT

Ilouses
FOR RENT: Three-bedroom
house, garage, maid's room, stove
and refrigerator. Las Cumbret.
Call Balboa 3179.
FOR RENT: In Golf Heights,
targe unfurnished house with 4
bedrooms, office, living room,
dining room, kitchen, 3 bath bathrooms,
rooms, bathrooms, glass enclosed patio, bar,
maid's quarters, double garage,
orchid gardens. Call Mendei b
Zubieta, Phone 3-3337.
FOR RENT: Chalet unfurnish unfurnished:
ed: unfurnished: 2 bedrooms, office, servant's
room, and all modern facilities.
Near La Salle College, El Can Cangrejo.
grejo. Cangrejo. Call 3-1382 between 5
p.m. and 7 p.m.
FOR RENT: 3 -bedroom chalet,
2 bathrooms, garage, at Via Por Porras
ras Porras No. 135. Can be seen from
to 9 a.m. and 6 to 8
p.m.
Phone 3-2636.
FOR RENT: 2-bedroom chalet.
Living dining room, bathroom,
kitchen, maid's room. Las Cum Cumbret,
bret, Cumbret, Boyaca Street No. 2107.

and M, Tucky, Iowa, SMU,

NCAA Basketball Winners

In the other regional game at
Corvallis, Ore., Utah defeated
Seattle, 81-72 and meets San Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco tonight.
Here's how it went at the other
sites:
At Lawrence, Kan. Oklahoma
City downed Kansas State, 97-93,
and Southern Methodist defeated
Houston, 89-74. Oklahoma City
and S.M.U. clash tonight.
, Meetings
Mature itudy Group
Cot Together
The Nature Study Group of the
Canal Zone College Club will
meet Wednesday at 4 p.m. at the
home of Mrs. Roger W. Adams,
124 Ridge Road. Mr. Walter R
Lindsay, will discuss tropical
piams.
Rotary Altar Society
To Meet Tuesday
The Rosary Altar Society of Sa
cred Heart Chanel in Ancon will
hold its regular monthly meeting
this Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. follow following
ing following recitation of the Rosary.
All members are urged to be
present,:. ;.;.-!
Hostesses for the evening will
be Mrs. Margaret Hero and Mrs.
Catherine Filo.
mad to establish a minimum
wage in the Republic. As far as
the Panamanian workers in the
Zone are concerned, I consider
it as a conseauence of the new
treaty between Panama and the
united States that these work workers
ers workers should be' compensated
equally with U.S. citizen em-
pioyea in that part of our terri territory.'
tory.' territory.' 'v"'.::
"We submit that the Federal
Government as an employer
should not nut economy before
proper personnel practices; that
wnere mere is no diminution m
work, its working force should
not be reduced: and it is not .a
sound practice to effect econo economies
mies economies at the expense ofworkers."

Musical "Great" present Cavalcade of Jazz in
"THE BEIIIIY GOODMAII STORY"
coming at the CENTRAL Theatre Tuesday 20th
- in PRE-RELEASE!

PMWUiMiiul.UJIi.il i. mm I,'-'- hi i Hi Mm iiiiunuuuij.il .u i.ih.il ...ii in ... i n,iT
.... ?
V.
,111 WWili Hill II I 111 i iimt it mmt -.ll. .liMlun in urn win ..nui.i.li i.m ii.niiiii..il.iiiiii ..Hi.im.uirriaa., i,,..,

Benny Goodman coaching Steve Allen in the proper
fingering for the clarinet playing Allen supposedly does In
Universal International's Technicolor musical biography,

-1'lhe Benny Goodman Story,'! which co-stars Allen and D"n D"n--
- D"n-- na Reed. The clarinet playing heard in the picture is tLat

of Goodman himself, the
of Allen, who portrays the

FOR RENT

Miscellaneous
FOR RENT Space appropriate
for office, beauty parlor, com commercial
mercial commercial business, etc, in new
concrete building named "Mon "Monterrey"
terrey" "Monterrey" an Ave. Argentina, "El
Cangrejo" district. David F. da
Castro, Ave "B" No. 24. Phone
2-1616
Wanted Position
YOUNG MAN, bilingual, looks
for position in any serious office
or store. Write Aptdo. 313 Pan Panama.
ama. Panama. FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT: Clean furnished
room. All modern conveniences.
Best residential section. 43rd St.
No. 13.
WANTED
Houses
WANTED: Vacation quarters,
6-8 weeks, April I on. Army
couple. Call Balboa 1405.
At Iowa City, la. Kentucky de defeated
feated defeated Wayne, 84-64, and Iowa's
Big Ten champions survived inju injuries
ries injuries and a fist fight to whip More More-head
head More-head State, 97-83. Kentucky tac tackles
kles tackles the Big Ten color bearers to-
nignt.
At Philadelphia-Hal Lear's m
points helped Temple beat Connec Connecticut,
ticut, Connecticut, 65-59, and Canisius defeated
uanmoutn, 66-58, to set up its tus tussle
sle tussle with Temple tonight.
On Mai-oli 99 U. j.ils.
winner meets the Iowa City sur
vivor lor me Eastern regional
crown and the Corvallis and Law Lawrence
rence Lawrence winners will play for west western
ern western honors at Evanston, 111. The
regional champions then play for
the N.C.A.A. title.
Eye-Docs May Trad
Degree For LI Bars
The Department of the Army ha
announced that a limited number
of additional Optometrist will be
commissioned in Medical Service
Corps, US Army Reserve, for ac active
tive active duty during remainder fiscal
year 1956. -. . ;.,,
To be considered for active du
ty during fiscal year 1956, com completed
pleted completed applications must reach De-
partment oi the Army not later"
than 11 May 1956. AnDlications re
ceived after that date will be con considered
sidered considered under fiscal year 1957
program, Appointments will be
made in grade of 1st Lt or below.
Eligibility is limited to U.S. citiz citizens
ens citizens who are graduates of a school
of optometry giving a full four year
course acceptable to the Depart Department
ment Department of the Army. Applicants must
volunteer for a two year tour of ac active
tive active duty.
Information' regarding submis submission
sion submission may be obtained from the Mil Military
itary Military Personnel Procurement
Branch, Adjutant General's Office,
US Army Caribbean, located in
Building 3, Fort Amador, telephone
Fort Amador 5157. ;
visual playing being taken care
King of Swing. Ad vt.



TSS r.lJCAMA A.VTXIC.W AN nT-f:FEnt.V T PAItl KtWSrATtt
fAf.E 5 r ri
11
1 I j :
1
CAH TOLO
T I V 0 L I
35c, 20c.
A Great Double!
MONSTER from THE
OCEAN FLOOR
, Plus:
G ROVE
CEflTOALTIieotre
LUX THEATRE
DniVE-IIl Tlisatre
(0c. ; SOc.
BURT LANCASTER
and DIANA FOSTER
V -'': ;.: in
THE KENTUCKIAN
In Technicolor and Cinemascope!
CECILIA THEATHE
t O
V IC J Ok I A
TWO
GOOD
PICTURES!
: v ": ;:
3Se.
0c.
Double in Spanish
and for the first time
In Superscope!
FX TESORO DE LA
1SLA DE PINOS
Plus: ;,'.-"''
LA MESERA DEL
CAFE del PUERTO
?5c.
40c.
"5c
40c.
60c.
30c.
LOTTERY NIGHT!
In Cinemascope and Technicolor I
Audie MURPHY, in
TO HELL AND BACK
The exciting true-life story of,
America's most decorated hero!
Shows: 12:55, 2:3S, 4:. 6:52, ):0
In Technicolor and Cinemascope!
John WATNE Lana TURNER, in
THE SEA CHASE
In CinemaScope and Technicolor!
Edward G. ROBINSON, in
I L LEGAL
WEEKEND KELEASE!
That Joyous New Musical Hit!..,
Janet LEIGH Jack LEMMON
and Betty GARRETT, in
MY SISTER EILEEN
Shows: 3:00, 4:02, :25, 1:50 p.m.
Lewis it Martin, in
THREE RING
CIRCUS
Plus:
SUNSET
BOULEVARD
with Wm. Holden

SmETUI. -MARCH 17,

tlOLLYra

UOYIES 'TV- ADIO

Erskint Johnson

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) -r Be Behind
hind Behind the Screen: There may be a
hortage of movies from Holly Hollywood,
wood, Hollywood, hut there's no shortageof
celluloid spectaculars headed lor
movie theaters this summer.
Television changed the habits of
moviegoers. Also the habits of
movie makers. Fall and winter
were the big movie months before
TV. Now the summer months
the drive-in movie theater season
- put the accent on the movies-are-better-than-ever
claims.
And the summer of 1936, plus

the year's fall and winter, appears

movies, their answers were the
same.
"Sure, Americans are football-

mad." I was told. "But they dont
want to see football movies. They

see football real football ev

Traffic Control Added To Training

Of Fort Kobbe Distaff Organization

In addition to the normal instruc instruction
tion instruction in the techniques of communi
cation, 1st aid, child care, an.l oth other
er other jobs pertaining to their duties in

case of a disaster, tne tori jvonne

Japanese, Soviet
Peace talks May Be
Hailed Temporarily

TOKYO, March 1? (UP-

Historian Stresses
Imporlanl Reserves
01 Latin America

Japanese Foreign Minister Na-

. mora Shieemitsu told a narlia-'

consisted ui lectures, graining iiims, ,.f '""IZllZ -j ,L. ,,V..iUl
and practical applications o les-)" V"" tthe W0Trld
sons learned. The main purpose of "rHP"" talks between Ja-;

Distaff organization now receives,the course is to train the wom-!lL ".Yia may De susPena--

i.tnM.tinn in ti-hnifinpV nf traf- en to dirrt traffic in and arnund cu '""furi" y.

JIUU IIVllVU w 1 " " - -----

fic control, according to Capt. John the disaster control command post,

L. Smith, Kobbe's Provost Mar- thereby releasing M.P.'i for other

ery Saturday and Sunday during jshal. tactical duties,
the season on TV." I. Tim instructor of the course is The women's first actual work

to be Hollywood's greatest ''' jthator food counter now features

Sounds logical: Who wants to the 544th Military Police Platoon

see an actor score touchdown'
in a movie when you can see a i

college or professional star score J Iff h In f Tnlnll
nrip on vnur home screen for reallVlvllH fcAlHMli

and for free?

HOLLYWOOD DRIVE-IN

casbord of aood movies since the

great TV panic of 1951-52.
Promised and hoped for are
these norie spectaculars:
"The Ten Commandments,
"The jspirit f St. Louis," "Mds
Dick," "Alexander The Rreat,"
"War andPeace,". jekdna Ferder's
"Giant." Grace Kelly in "High
Society," Mike Todd's "AROUND
THE Aorld IKN -? Days," "he Km
and I," "The Opposite Sex," and
many oes.
Free entertainment at home on
TV screens forced Hollywood to
junk quantity for quality, and it's
paying off for Hollywood movie
makers. Theater owners, however,
are wailingjbout a deficiency of
150 feature pictures a year and
talking about organizing their own
moviemaking companies.
HOLLYWOOD'S booming for

eign market, now delivering al-i

most as mucn revenue as uie qo qo-mestic,
mestic, qo-mestic, market, is another blow
to U.S. theater owners, who claim
Hollywood is becoming over-anxious
to make pictures to please
the natrons in foreign' countries.

Other day Abram F. Myers, gen general
eral general counsel of a big theater cir circuit,
cuit, circuit, singled out stories with a
football theme as an example. He
said there hadn't been a good foot football
ball football picture made in several years
and yet Americans are football football-mad.
mad. football-mad. '!-';- -' '
Hollywood's answer to Myers, I
Idscovered unofficially, is typical
of the change in movie making
since television. When I queried
three top executives about football

"Smorgas-burgers" . Favorite

targets of comedians last year,
according to the National Laugh
Foundation: Arthur Godfrey, Prin Princess
cess Princess Margaret, Liberace and Mar Marilyn
ilyn Marilyn Monroe . Twentieth-Century-Fox
has budgeted $10,000,000
in the production of five telefilm
series during 1956. Two of the se series
ries series will be based on characters
in the hit movies, "Mr. Belvedere"
and "Broken Arrow" ... Ruby
Dandridge, mohter of Dorothy, is
warbling in a Hollywood night
club.

Liberace's telefilm series is get getting
ting getting a shot in the arm bigger
budget and top name guest stars
. ; Orson Welles' big Las Vegas
night-club salary and the money
he ets for his next TV appear appearance
ance appearance on a CBS spectacular will
even him up with Uncle Sam's
tax collectors, He was $50,000 in
debt to the U.S. . Eddie Fisher
is recording an album of 21 Oscar-winning
tunes.

will come up in the next Disaster

control exercise. In the night as assembly
sembly assembly problem, on the 28th of

Opens Today At JVB
The third annual orchid ex exhibit
hibit exhibit arranged by the Canal
Zone Orchid Society in coopera cooperation
tion cooperation with the USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center, opened at
the USO-JWB Club at noon to-j
day and will remain until tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow at 10 p.m.
Featured as a highlight of the
exhibition is a collection of pure
white hybrids, the Cattleyas,

loaned by Harry Dunn, wnuci
orchids with colored lips and
various shaded lavender and
purple flowers are also on dis-i
play, In addition to species of,
orchids In flower from Costa Ri Rica,
ca, Rica, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecua-j
dor, Venezuela, Brazil, and from
India the Philippine Islands,
Hawaii and the United States.
A special exhibit has been
planned which will demonstrate
the various uses of the orchid
corsages. Mrs. R. J. Mahoney, j
creator of this unusual display
In past years, again will be re responsible
sponsible responsible lor this arrangement.
Msmhers of the Canal Zone

YOU'RE-NEVER-tooold note: Orchid Society and the commit-i

Katie Johnson, a British actress tee in charge or the exniDHui
in Alec Guinness' current comedy,! be present to explain the orchids
"The Ladvkillei-s' lust -celebrated, to the public '
her 78th birthday. She came out j A cordial invitation is tend-
tn nl.fl.ti W first rl fft t.h MilhHf hoth Of thft Cft-

major film role and won the Brit- naj Zone and the Republic or
ish Film Academy's "best British Panama to', attend the -annual j
nrncc" .onni fnr nrhiii vhihlt. The committeel

. vn .a.iioi,te4 that narrmra 1 n--l

Allan ICUUV-l.bU y, -

One of RKO's old movies Justithusiasts do not use rlooa lights

February, the women were team

ed up with trained M.P.s and ob observed
served observed the techniques used in di

recting traffic. They also learned policies

hand and arm signals.
It is believed that this is the first
time on the Isthmus, if not on any
military post that women are to
be used in the control of trailic in

m i.ntinn rt-i rm n A Dftcf h a

a AAl.vlt.ai ViUllllliauu ivo, mi;mt
The graduates of the first class
are; Mrs. Phyllis Courier, Nellie
Stone, Coleen Palermo, Esther Alt Alt-man,
man, Alt-man, Bernice Underdahl, Betty
Grffin, Mildred Bogle, Opal Hough
ton, Barbara Gromme, Florence
Weir, Marion Howard, Lorena Ben Benson,
son, Benson, and Marjorie Jackson.

He said that Tokyo and Mos Moscow
cow Moscow have reached agreement on
many questions but that naviga navigation
tion navigation and territorial Issues still
are unsettled.
The London talks between the

two nations, Shigemitsu told the

Upper House Foreign Affairs
Committee, may be halted to al allow
low allow both sides to restudy their

QUITO, Ecuador, March 17
(UP) British historian Arnold
Toynbee said today the role re-,

served to latin America in the his-1
tory of mankind will be governed ;
by the cultural, moral and psycho psychological
logical psychological qualities developed by its
peoples.
Here on a Latin American tour,
Toynbee remarked:
"Latin America holds great re reserves
serves reserves for mankind because of
the vast resources its possesses.
But these material resources are
not enough bv themselves. In or order
der order to make them fruitful, the peo
pies living in these territories

must have cultural, moral tad
psychological qualities." j
Latin American countries are in
various stages of development, i
Toynbee pointed out. "Peoples like!
Uruguay are at the level of the
most advanced countries in Eu-i
rope, such as Switzerland and'
Sweden, while Paraguay and some
Central American countries are1
at a more primitive stage," he
said. i
i

, Toynbee expressed special inter interest
est interest in countries having mixed po

pulations such as Bolivia. Ecus
dor and Peru, saying that the
manner in which they solve their 1
racial problems would have world worldwide
wide worldwide effects.
The historian observed that In
most Latin American countries
there is marked contrast between

the wealth of a few and the pov poverty
erty poverty .of the most, "I saw in Me:;
ico the efforts that are he i n it
made to attain a more eqmtabja
distribution of wealth and I sup suppose
pose suppose the same thing is being riona
elsewhere."

BALBOA
Tomorrow and Monday!

sold to TV Is "Hit The Deck."

Look quick and you'll see Tony
Martin as a sax player in the or orchestra.
chestra. orchestra. The year was 1929.

"trF A V WEEKEND RELEASE!
rODAl 0 0.60 0.30
DRIVE-IN

From Adventuring Giants Like Him
America Drew Its Greatness!

MIDNIGHT SHOW!
HUMPHREY BOGART, in
"THE AFRICAN QUEEN"

The exhibit will be arranged I

In the Game Room or the USO-i
JWB Club which Is located oni
La Boca Road, Balboa.

WHAT NOT TO DO

EVANSVILLE, Ind. (UP) -Police
had an easy time locating

the burglar who took three bill billfolds
folds billfolds from homes in a suburb. The i

i thief left his own wallet at the

scene and was traced to his home.

,r j irMi V
f s
'il
V"
'"''. v

1

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1

illicit-

) pick-up
H ::::: ::. date

V . )

with

V 7a soldier
; -a-
r: picture
" of very
v -very
special
, greatness!
L J

SHOWING AT YOVR SERVICE
CENTER THEATRES TODAY

DIABLO HTS. 5:30 1:25
John WAYNI

"HIGH and the MIGHT!"

CinaroiScop Color!

Sun. Gntlemn Mur; Brunettei'

GAMBOA :15l
"Stranger On Horseback'1
Sundiy "LOVE IS A MANY
SPLENDORED THING"

GATUN 7:M
"Brinr Your Smile Alone"

Sun. "NIGHT ( THE IIVN'TER"

MARGARITA :15 -1:10

Robrt MITCHVJM
Shelley WINTERS

"NIGHT of the HUNTER"

Sun. 'HIGH in THE MIGHTY'

CRISTOBAL 6:15 8:15

Ir-loneittdB
Jck WEBB
"PETE KELLY'S BLUES'
. CinemaScope Color
AIm 8hewlm8VN. MOM.

B A I af. A Air-Conditioned
r L U XJ r 2:30 Alio 6: 10 8:00

Cv.

Warner Eros.

7

A1

IN

Sunday and Monday "THE SEA CHASE"

" ''ay --
' -' v' -'
W 7 Mm
nnnnKanlaaanWtaiHknnnnVn vnWHtnWnnnnnWnntnW

FORTUNE HUNTER. Rory Calhoun hits new heights In
his zooming career as the cynical American who handles
machine guns and women equally well in "The Treasure
of Pancho Villa," an Edmund Grainrer production for RKO.
filmed in Mexico in Superscope and in Technicolor. Gilbert
t Roland- and Shelley Winters also star in this picture that
opens next Thursday at the Lux. Advt.

THE SAVINGS BANK
Institution Guaranteed by the State
Pays 2 Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
We make, loans with guarantees on first mortages
or other securities.
25c. -50c. -$1.00 and ?5.00
CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks.
Individual safety deposit boxes, for jewelry and
documents, in 4 different sizes.

OFt ICE IN PANAMA
10!) Central Are. at
corner of "I" Street

COLON BRANCH:
Front St. at corner
of 7 th hi.

(i. A. De KOIX, CARLOS MOIYNES V...
Manager Sub-Mansgrr
HOURS:
. From i0 a.m. to 12;X0 p.m. t;
SATI'RDATS:. from S:M a.m. (o 1J.00 p.m.

... JSj..

1 t ...
l I .:: i It'

But ill all in tU UtteM't

K.ido Kti&uatio

ELECTRIC SERVICE
' ;will'bc off in the City of Colo

in the following areas :
Avcnida del Frente
.":.. Balboa Ave, East and West
Bolivaf Ave. West side
from 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.
on Sunday, 'March '18, 1956.

It takes a lot of work to keep
pace with your demands for more
and more electricity Every year
new facilities must be planned

for and added to enable us to meet the growing elsctric needs of Panama.
So, please consider this brief interruption of your electric service as a sign of growth
and progress. The work will be done at o time when it will cause the least inconve inconvenience
nience inconvenience to you. A short interruption now will mean. more power qnd more dependable
service for you in the future.

t
t:
t t

-

' 1 ;

I
. 0

i
I
.L

Cia. Pammmde ftmza y 'i
:!5 7:4s1 IsANTA t
IMS" I I L.11
OMAN" II
. PaRAIsn
CRUZ :15 S:3
Urn TUR4ER
FHE-HELEASE WEDNESDAY 21
and "WICKED WOMAN
THE PRODIGAL"
nf ihe LUXTIicatrc
CAMP BiUUa Ji. SS "TOP CVICjld'iaUVI''



f KiOT
lift iiir.ni

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INCEFEXBEN'T DAILY XEWSPAFm.
SATLT.DAT, MAf-CH IT,
Seed
f o
H U
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en
, t i I t :
PS. -I..
OlLillllKIiULfc).
1L Jl O

silo

4 Toreros Meet Bull
Apiece At Macarena;
Golden Ear To Winner
Spain and Mexico will be vying for honort tomorrow
aftarnoon at La Macarena bullring in a 'golden ear" bull bullfight
fight bullfight The corrida, a benefit for the children of the inmates
of Palo Seco, will feature two Spanish bullfighters compet competing
ing competing against two Mexican matadors for the golden ear which
will be awarded to the one who gives the best perform-

ance.
The rivalt are Manuel
of Spain; Manuel del Pozo
Mexicans El Charro Eliseo

Each of the four matadors will tight one pure-Drea

bull on the benefit program sponsored by Salomon Var Vargas,
gas, Vargas, with a number of Canal Zone organizations selling

tickets.
Among the) organizations selling tickets are: Balboa
JWB, VFW, American Legion, Legion Auxiliary,' C. Z. Police
Assn., Albrook Officers Club and Albrook NCO Club.

Diamond Diggings
By Victor Gray

The fourth o( a series of close
dps and evaluations of Major
League Clubs for the 195S season
MILWAUKEE BRAVES (N. L.)
Around the vicinity of County
Stadium in Milwaukee can be seen
scores of fans buying season tic tickets
kets tickets and, with no small amount of
..a.. i.ii:Rrt ,nAk ntkat '-this
OpiimiblU, leillllg cavu miin
is the year."
After two unsuccessful attempts,
it is expected that this year Char Charlie
lie Charlie Grimm s charges will wind up
not as the accustomed bestman,
but this time as the real McCoy,
the groom.
Milwaukee boasts the greatest
pitching staff in the senior circuit.
Long Gene Conley 6' 8", completely
cured of the injury he suffered last
year along with such stalwarts as
tou Burdette, Bob Buhl, Ray
Crone, righthanders; and crafty
Warren Spaha and, Chet Nichols
as southpaws, one cannot see the
Braves in any other position but
first place. In addition to the a a-Knvi
Knvi a-Knvi mentioned chuckers. there
will be Panamanian Humberto Ro Ro-.
. Ro-. t 1.1- oj -, "noi"
pinson, up xur ius tuu. uji
Jlurff who last year with Atlanta
won 22 ball games and the veter.
ans, Ernie Johnson and Bob Jolly
to handle the relief chores.
At first base will be a sound,
Joe Adcocic, whose physician gave
him the green light to play this
season. Adcock, a veteran of sev several
eral several seasons of National League
play is one of the most dangerous
hitters of the circuit, Danny O' O'-Connell
Connell O'-Connell at second and Johnny Log Logan
an Logan at short, both stars in their own
right will handle the middle sta station,
tion, station, while slugging Ed Matthews
will take care of things around the
hot corner
' Ready to step m if needed, will
be classy Felix Mantilla, who hit
.273 with Toledo last season (we
are asking local fans to forget

Powells Keep 2nd Half Hopes
"I ...
Alive With Win Over Army

STANDINGS
! Atlantic Twilight Baseball
(Second Half)
Won Lost Pet.
Army Atlantic
Powells .........
tfavy
6 2 .750
6 3 .667
2 5 .286
C. H. S
15 467
4
. THURSDAY'S RESULTS
Towells 6, Army 5 (9 Innings)
TOMORROW'S GAME 2:15 p.m.
Army Atlantic vs C.H.S.
, ByTREVpB SIMONS
Though they fought valiantly to
orevent it. Army Atlantic s nopes
of wrapping up the second half tit title
le title of the Atlantic Twilight League
was halted, at least temporarily,
Thursday night at Mt, Hope btadi
be reached. The win placed Pow
ells, 6 to 5, in a contest that went
nine innings before a decision could
be reached. The wn placed Pow
ells just one half a game behind
the pacesettine Army nine and puts
added importance onto Sunday af
ternoon s game between Army At
lantic and the cellar-dwelling C-
' 'The rough route of nine innings
was handled by Powells playing
manager, Noel Gibson, who hurled
even-hit ball for the winners.
Loose playing afield, a total of sev
en errors bavins been committed
by Powells fielders, kept the go
ing tough for the Powells work workhorse.
horse. workhorse. Army Atlantic had to use
four pitchers to try and halt the
Powells bid to stay in the fight.
Powells batters collected 9 hits
off the (Offerings of Welks, Lorenze,
O'Hara and finally Rice. Gibson.
who boosted his battm? average
.14 points to .347, and Vince Ridge
led it, hit parade with.. pairif
hits in four tries.
Powells went into the sixth in
ring with a two run lead, only to
have Army knot the count without
a Case hit. Gibsons control fail-
ea as ne waiKea me iirst two

Navarro, known as Navarrito

(Rayito) also of Spain; and
Gomez and Manolo Marquez.
Mantilla's performance In. the re recent
cent recent Caribbean Series), Frank To Torre.
rre. Torre. Brooklvn-born Puerto Rican
who hit .324 with Toledo, George
Crowe who handled the UHtia
sack in the absence of Adcock and
Jim Pendleton who returns after a
good season with the Toledo Glass
Sox. Quite an infield.
In the event that the hichly-rat-
ed Wes Covington makes the grade
the Braves will, for the first time
in the history of the National
League, sport an all-Negro outheia.
In riht field will be the reliable
Hank Aaron, who last year led all
the Milwaukee hitters with a mark
of .312, in center it will be the spee speedy
dy speedy Bill Brutton and in left Coving Covington.
ton. Covington. Covington comes to tl braves
from their Jacksonville farm in
the Sally League where he walk walked
ed walked off with the batting champion
ship with the high mark or .J54.
He played with Caguas in the re recent
cent recent Caribbean Series, and for a
rnunle of eames occupied the clean
up spot. Also available for outfield
duty Will ds me veterans Anuy
Pafko and Bobb" Thomson.
Returning this year to shoulder
. .. i i i .i: : 1 1
tne DUlK 01 tne caicmng amies wm
be hard-hitting Del CrandaU.lt is
the consensus of the fans that Del
improves as the seasons roll by
and is the nearest thing to Brook
lyn's peerless Roy Campaneua.
Del Rice, acquired from the
Cardinals in a trade last season for
catcher Charlie White and outfield outfielder
er outfielder Pete Whisenant will be the sec second
ond second string catcher. A competent
receiver, he will also see action in
pinch-hitting roles.
Here is our opinion of the Braves:
(Catching: Very Good Pitch Pitching:
ing: Pitching: Strong, with plenty of depth.
Inlield: Dependable, with plenty of
power. Outfield: Fast, reliable,
powerful and with good reserves.
Finish: First or Second.
ters; then a pair of costly errors,
o"e by Gibson himself and anoth another
er another by Louis Dedaux posted two Ar Army
my Army thllies and set the stage the
extra-inning contest.
After Powells had gone hitless in
the sixth, seventh and eighth fram frames,
es, frames, Leslie Rinehart broke the ice
with a single to center to open the
ningh. Deoeaux went down swing swinging.
ing. swinging. Rinehart stole second and John
Hall bounced back to the pitcher.
Rinehart's antics on second base
so unnerved the Army pitcher, Rice
that he failed to get Hail at first
and all hands were state. Swear Swear-ingen
ingen Swear-ingen was safe on an error and
the sacks were loaded. Louis Hoop
er then hit a roller to short on
which Rinehart raced over for the
winning run on a close play at
home.
ARMY vi. C.H.S. TOMORROW
Army Atlantic has another
chance tomorrow afternoon to wrap
up a second half win in the Atlantic
Twilight League. Their opponent to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow will be the last place club,
C.H.S.; a team that has knocked
at the door of victory several times,
but has succeeded in posting only
one in the win column aU year.
Though Army will be heavy fav favorites
orites favorites to take this one and force
the league into a post-season play-
oil they will not soon forget that
it was this same C.H.S. nine that
started PoweUs on a three-game
losing skid that all but overthrew
their hopes of making a clean
sweep of the 1956 season. Nor will
they overlook the fact that Cristo
bal High has a pair of good chuck
ers in Kaisei Kazan and Wamba
Lung, either of which, if right,
can be tough in any league.
Powells are first ,half winners
and are just waiting around to see
whom they will play for the cham-
pionship if they are unable to cop
I the second half tliemsel vesTTTAr
my and Powells will have to play
for the second half title before the
play-off for the championship can

begin. Tomorrows game starts atjjasr nigni witn me latter winning

oat-u:ia p.m.

Annual Pan-Canalznaer

Downng journey,
Begins Tonight
A week-long sanctioned bowling
tournament uie fan-canal io. io.-in
in io.-in g. Association Annual Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament will get underway here to to-nignt.
nignt. to-nignt. ..
ran-Canal and armed forces dig
nitaries wm get Lie ouiciai ena oi
Uie program utf wnen tney roil xt
uiis uuwu uie Lt acys iu uie ua.-
boa bownng tenter. Alter tuat,
iiowevtr, iu ruiuiig wm ue uuuc
by nopeiui Kegiars. Tne program
ucguu at i
ray, as well-as me tourney, is
govueu oy we Aima-ica
"Vsmg ti" handicap 8ystenl( e;
quauzuig every oowier cuaui.es
i picuig up tne uiue iouvaa,
lue touruanicni is open every
night to tne public, lue re is no
auuissiun tudrge.
Thirteen teams tonight wiU be
rolling lor record, lue live-man
teams up are: the Army technical
services omcers ot fort Clayton;
the JoUy Bums of Albrook Air
Force base; the Wahoos of the
Balboa Mean's League; the Sioux
of the Diablo Commercial League;
Elks from the Margarita's Men's
League; the Aces of Margarita;
the Seymour-Agency team of the
Diablo Major League; Agencia
Glud of the Diablo Major League;
Sky Chef Restaurent of the Diablo
Caasic League; Summit HU1 Golf
Club team of the Diablo Major
Lea'ue: the Max R. Stempel and
Son team of the Diablo Major
League; and the r asron Navy team
from the Coco Solo Intramural
League.
Deadline for checking into the
tournament's director, C.A. Schec Schec-kcr.
kcr. Schec-kcr. is 7:30 tonight.
The post-tourney banquet and
dance has been changed to Friday,
April 13. Tickets are on sale night nightly
ly nightly at the bowling center.
Fastlich
League
Won Lost:
Palomas
Pumas
Conejos
Ocelots
Macaws
Jack Sutherland's Ocelots took
the Conejos Into camp Friday
afternoon to the tune of 11-2.
The coneios failed to eet a
hit of the combined offerings of
Ammirati and Reynolds. Walks,
wild pitches ana passea Daus
proved the unaoine oi tne cone-
Jos. ; ...
Jonnny EngeiKe was tne leaa-
ing hitter of the aiternoon get getting
ting getting 2 for 2.
The box score:
Ocelots
AbR H Po
3 110
W. Engelke, cf
McNall, If
3
3
2
2
1
2
1
2
0
2
0
J, Morris, 2b ..
J. Engelke, lb
Ammirati, p-3b
Thompson, ,ss .;
Schoch, c ......
Dombrosky, rf
Womble, rf '....
R. Morris, 3b ..
Reynolds, p .
Totals
19 11
Conejos
5 15 6
Chassln, 2b ..... 1
Scott, cf 3
Parker, ss l
uoasey, p .......
Hadley, If .......
Seise, 3b .........
Musser, lb .......
McNab, c ........
Crook, rf
Totals
16 2 0 15 7
SUMMARY Errors: J. Morris,
J. Engelke, Parker, Seise. Runs
batted in: w. EngeiKe, r. Mor Morris
ris Morris 1, J. Engelke 2, Thompson 3,
J. Morris 2. Two oase hits: J.
Engelke, J. Morris. Stolen bases:
Ocelots 6, Conejos 5. Left on
bases: Conejos 6, Ocelots 6. Bas Bases
es Bases on balls off: Godsey 7, Am Ammirati
mirati Ammirati 4, Reynolds 1. Strike outs
by Ammirati 4, Reynolds 2, God Godsey
sey Godsey 3. Wild pitches: Godsey 2,
Ammi rati 1. Passed balls:
Schoch 2, McNabb 3. Winning
pitcher: Reynolds. Losing pitch
er: Goasey. umpires: MOhl and
Diaz. Scorer: Mead. Time: 1:40.
liafional Basketball
Ass'n. Playoffs
To Begin Today
NEW YORK,' March 17 (UP) (UP)-The
The (UP)-The National Basketball Associa Association
tion Association playoffs begin today with the
Boston Celtics entertaining the Sy Syracuse
racuse Syracuse Nationals in a nationally nationally-televised
televised nationally-televised afternoon game and the
St. Louis Hawks playing host to
the Minneapolis Lakers at night
The Boston game begins at 3
p.m., EST.
The winner of the three game
series between the second place
Celtics and the third-place Nation Nationals
als Nationals will play the first place Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia Warriors in a five game
series for Eastern Division honors.
The best-of-three scries between
St. Louis and Minneapolis will de decide
cide decide an opponent for the first
place Fort Wayne Pistons in the
five-game Western Division finals
The Division champions then will
iiiutH. iu a seven-game series I0r
the play-off title.
St. Louis and Minneapolis tic,
for second place and played off
lua a,

Duel 4f Mounf Hope Tonight

i X

i
' i

GETTING READY Bantamweight contender BattllnV Byron
Cumberbatch, who fights Toto Ibarra In a ten-round, 120 120-pound
pound 120-pound main bout at the Macarena bullring March 25,' goes
through a skipping, session at his training headquarters at the
Maranon Gym. The slim, flatnosed battler TKO'ed Ibarra In
seven last Dec. 18 to hand the youngster from Chirlqui his only
setback In six professional outings. Cumberbatch has suffered"
only one defeat in his last seven appearances. He was stopped
In seven by 118-pound title holder Melvm Bourne in a cham-!
pionshlp bout Jan. 29. .-

TIMBER TOPPERS Al Guldet, left, and Danny Mescall will
be running in the low hurdles for the Albrook Flyers Friday
night in the Balboa Relays, and they are gunning for the first
two spots. On what has been seen thus far, they rate the
edge, with Guidet the returning title holder in the lows, hav-;
lng won last year in the very fine time of 21 flat. Guldet has
a 9.9 hundred to his credit made In the Southeast AJ. Con-:
ference meet last year, but he admits to pushing 38 years of
age and says he will have to limit his competition to the relays
and hurdles this year. -(Official U.S. Air Force Photo)

-i .. i .'.

I i ir i

Me

5mons

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tlUMtWIIMSUMI
MAKE IT
VAT 69
UtdUnctcm Docuo

J

Sofo

Coach Bill DeLaMater has nam
ed Lou Hiliinger, famed Canal
Zone softball pitcher, to go to the
lull in the opening game baturaay
evening. March 17, when DeLa
Mater's Pacific side Glud Agen
cies team meets manager Paul
Moser's Unisport Atlantic aiders
in the first of two games to be
played under the lights in Mt
Hope Stadium. Opposing Hilzing-
er will be Raymond Simons.
And when the first pitch is
thrown by Simons at T o ciocx
the softball fans in the Mt. Hope
stadium are in for exciting soft-
ball. It has been quite a spell
since Simons and Hilzinger have
hooked up in a pitcher s battle.
The last time they met fans saw
some great softball. Tonight's
game promises to be an exciting
one.
De LaMater himself may take
the mound in the second game.
Bill has shown he is undefeated
in league play this year that he
is versatile enough to come from
either the shortstop or second base
position to the pitcher's area and
throw. Edmundo Torne will op
pose DeLaMater in the second
game of the evening.
Both teams are well represented
with defensive and offensive
standouts. Sam Catlit, Harry Fos
ter, and Albert Husted are known
base stealeri on the Glud Agen
cies nine.- Georee Mikez r Bob
Lawver ran nnk th hall
Moser of unisports has at his
flisoosal some heavv hut sumi.
era led bv Leslie Rinehard -fiil.
bert Smith, and Bremmer Jorg-
siaa, recently returned from a
statesside tour of duty. Defensive Defensively
ly Defensively Moser is counting on Luke Pa-
luiuuu, mra unans. ana nrnoia
Manning to aid pitcher Simons in
tne quest to silence DeLaMater's
stickmen.
First earn stnrfincr time 1 n'
clock in the Mt. Hope statium.
Pacific Divisional
Softball League
CERVIZA BALBOA, 195i
PACIFIC DIVISIONAL, SOFT
BALL LEAGUE CHAMPIONS
fi With Robert H. Rferhpr ni-in.
cipal of the La Boca Latin-A mm.
jican High School presenting the
ruuic division League tropmes,
the Cerveza Balboa "tWrmon
were crowned as the 1956 cham
pions of the Pacific Divisional
SoftbaU League.
Also rereivinff trnnhio. frnm
Beecher, were Edgar Roberts.
Datting champion: Georee Grif
fith, homer, champion; Eduarda
Morrell, pitching champion; a n d
tne national Distillers "Rummies'
runners-up for the second consec consecutive
utive consecutive season.
The "Beermen' g a i n e d the
championship by defeating the
National Distillers in a 2 best of 3
playoff series held at the La Boca
ball park. Monday, C e r v e z a's
pitching ace, Morrell, blanked the
"Rummies" in thrillinv a a
" W kW V
game with S Campbell homering
ior me winners and loser John
Morris allowin? 5 safeties:
Tuesday, thft Distil Ipm nvertnnt-
the "Beermen" by a score of 10
tO 4 With Amos MilwnnH crnininu
the victory aeainst leaeuA rham.
Dion hurler Mnrr11 urhn urn a cnnl-
to the showers in the third inning
aner allowing 9 runs and 4 hits
along with a grandsiam homer by
E. Arias. .;,-.-;...'.'
Wednesday. Cerveza won t h
1956 championship by downing
their rivals, National Distillers,
behind the Citrhinu nf Mni-rell
who handed "Rummies" t h e i r
4th shutout, by him, 6 to 0. John
Morris was tapped with th de
feat, giving up 9 hits with T. Pe-
icrKiq ana n. r lemmings snarmg
oatung honors.
ressivc Loprl
Vin To Earn lib
Shot Al DeMsrco
NEW YORK M.arch 17 (UP) -Isaac
Logart's convincing victory
over rugged Gaspar Ortega put
him today hot on the trail of the
welterweight crown, once worn by
his fellow townsman from Cama Cama-guey,
guey, Cama-guey, Cuba Kid Gavilan.
Because of Logart's lopsided de de-sion
sion de-sion over the rangy Mexican In Indian
dian Indian in their nationally televised
10-rounder at Madison Square Gar Gar-den
den Gar-den last night, matchmaker Billy
Brown opened negotiations today
for a contenders' fight with ex
champion Tony DeMarco at Mia Miami
mi Miami Beach on April 27.
They are now rated right be behind
hind behind ex-champion Carmen Basilio,
with DeMarco of Boston, number
two, and Logart. number three.
Cuban Ike, scaling 147 pounds
to Ortega's 150, had 20-year old
Gaspar almost out on his feet in
the final round of the Mexican's
frist Garden main event and first
TV bout. But he couldn't floor the
tough Indian nor dull his lust for
battle.
Ortega finished the b r u i s I n g
though one-sided contest without
havmr-been- kave-m--bi-38
fights. It was his sixth defeat, Lo Logart
gart Logart registered his 42nd victory in
52 bouts. The official voting was
6-3-1-, 6-3-1, 7-2-1. And the United
LPress agreed, 7-2-1.

1
tIUL..., rTTBiSBEM)'... i

Editor: CONRADO SARCEANT

Darniy Winldosky Wins
Pacific Twilight Loop
Batting Championship

Dannv Winklosky. r a n e y
shortstop of the champion Bal Balboa
boa Balboa High School team, copped
the 1956 Pacific Twilight League
batting championship with a
.406 average.
Ten or Winklosky's thirteen
base hits came in the last five
games of the second half and
Dannys big bat was a major fac factor
tor factor In the High School's second
half win and helped send the
Schoolboys Into playoff with
Lucky Strike. "The leading bat batter's
ter's batter's best night was a perfect
"lour ror four" against the Jun Junior
ior Junior College on Feb. 16.
Webb Hearne. Lucky strike's
ace pitcher and first baseman-
outfielder, was the runner-up in
tne batting department with ten
hits in twenty-five trips to the
plate for an even .400 average.
LucKy srlke manager Larry
Jones and Balboa High's fancy
first sacker. Raymond "Grlllo"
Reyes were tied or third place
in the batting race with a .353
average.
Batting averages of Twilight
players who played in six games
or more are posted beiow:
Player
Winklosky, Dan
Ab R
32 5
H Pet,
13 .406
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Second Half Standings
Team 5 Won Lost Pet.
Gibraltar. Life ..... 4 1 .800
Lincoln Life . ..4.2 .667
Elks-1414 ...... ...i 3.3 .500
Police w . i . ; ... 3 4 .4Z9
Spur ifCola ? ....,... a .4 ,3
Scvmour Agency ... 2 A
Spur Cola 3, Police 5
In a well played ball game
yesterday afternoon the Police
defeated Spur Cola by score of
live to tnree.
.The Police scored three runs
in v, first, innirnr on three eon-
VUU v ------0
cAPiiMv hit. hv Demnsev. Ash-
MfWMM w 1 1 1 1 J
ton ana Browaer ana a wuu
nitrh : ThA Rnft rrink lads came
right back in the second to score
two runs. Diner arew a waii
fnllnwprl uth A hit and
iJV V V14 ww ti
Rybickl drove in both runs with
single, v
Th nrlnnlnv nirift for Police
A..v II ........ o ...... - j. -
tii. iKnr,H in t.ViA t.hird when
n i, i v muu. w. w -
Browder. hit a ball that got a a-way
way a-way from the shortstop, a nit
ana stolen Dases Dy uenungcr
i nrnwfW frtllnwed hv a nit
by Corrigan brougt hin the two
runs. A oeauuiui eaten oi a uu
fnul nnn lm off the bat of Bettis
was made by Boboy Bowen
xofnhAr fnr thA Rnur C.OIA team
VHVV.IVI vfH
Spur Cola's final run came in
the ith mnino. KVDlCKi leaaniK
nft wa nuftlked. Mounts hit a
ball tnat got past we rigns new new-et
et new-et and Rybickl scored.
Brown was the winning pitch pitcher,
er, pitcher, his first win in three starts,
allowlne three hits, walking six
-i .. 'i .. i 1. 41 .1 .J
nnj cfriirinir mit. four Dilfer
pitched for Spur Cola giving up
live runs on six uiw wko
and six strike outs.
The box score:
Spur Cola
Ab
, 4'
. 3
, 1
, 3
, 0
. 3
3
, 2
. 3
R H
perantle, 2b ..........
Albrltton, cf ..........
Chase, ss .............
0
Zelnick, lb ...........
Dilfer, p
Bowen, c
Boswell, If ............
Rybickl,. 3b ...........
Mounts, rf ............
22 3 3
FoVce
Dempsey, 3b ,........
Ashton, ss ....... ......
Browder, lb ............
Dehllnger, cf
Bettis, If
Corrigan, T. 2b
Brown, P

Additional Sports
On Page 6
V fir
C17

"7
oil

V

Hearne, Webb .. 25 6 10 -400
Jones, Larry .... 34 8 12 .353
Reyes, R. ....... 34 6 12 .353
Ridge, Bob ..... 38 2 12 .333
Halman, Jerry 23 13 7 .304
Scott, Ed 38 5 ,11 .289
Moody, Jim .... 39 8 11 .282
Wood, Joe . i . 32 3 9 .281
McKeowri, Jim 36 4 10 77
Norton, E. ...... 37 6 10 70
Magee. John .... 32 6 9 .269
Pechette, Bill 30 9 t MS
Herring ......... 36 3 9 .250
Sutherland, O. .. 28 7 8 JJ31
Long, Dale ..... 28 3 8 30
Cicero, Joe ..... 38 8 8 .222
Curdts, Bud .... 27 5 8 22
Hotz, Tim ...... 32 5 7 .219
Kirchmler, Ed .. 19 3 4 J10
Koblick .......... 21 3 4 .190
McGlade, Chas. 27 4 5 .185
Dunbar 23 4 4 .174
Cortez 18 2 3 .167
Johnson, R. ...i 25 2 4 .160
Sullivan, Bill ... 25 2 4 .160
Blackall ........ 13 1 2 .154
Giavelll, Chas. .. 36 5 5 .139
Jefferies ........ 29 2 4 138
Herbert, Bill ... 22 1 3 .136
Mantovani, L. 35 5 3 .088
I Wall, Wayne ... 12 1 1 ,083
lllopiac ......... 26 2 2 .077
(French, Charley 26 1 2 .077
Kosik, Gus ..... 20 4 1 .050

Potter, c 2 0 0
Sebastian, rf l 0 0
Priester, If 0 0 0
Catron, rf i o 0
22 5 6
ZyUitOnmf S, tiki
'Behind the two-hit pitching
oi woraen French Lincoln Life
moved within a half game of the
league leaders Wednesday after afternoon
noon afternoon by defeating the Elks nine
by a. score of eight to aero.
The two hits for Elks came In
the bottom of the fourth inning.
Craig Stoudnor leading off lifted
a single into right field followed
by Jackie DeVore's hit to the
same place, however a strike out
a pop up to short and a fly ball
to right ended the inning.
Lincoln Lifes first run came in
the top of Inning number one.
Gene Beck leading off beat out
a slow ground ball to first, took
second on a passed ball and
came in to score when Jaime
Ward's ball to first got past the
first baseman. Two runs scored
in the third on a walk and two
singles. The bisr inning- for Lin Lincoln
coln Lincoln was the fourth when ten
men went to bat. Bowman lead leading
ing leading off drew & walk, went to sec second
ond second on McElhone's slow ground
ball back to the pitcher, Beck
hit another slow grounder to
short and all hands were safe
when the shortstop was unable
to make a play at any base.
Ward singled to right center
scoring Bowman, McElhone came
in to score on L. French's ground
ball to second being thrown out
at first. Beck scored on a field fielders
ers fielders choice on a ball hit by Wor
den French and W. French scor scored
ed scored the fifth run of the Inning
on a single by Ledbetter to left
field. ','
Worden French pitched the
ing up no runs on two hits walk walked
ed walked two and struck Out seven. Ed
Bleakley lost his first game of
the second half allowing three
runs on three hits walking one
ana striKini out live, sammy
Field relieved Bleakley with two
out in the third inning giving
up five runs on six hits, walked
two and struck out five.--'
The box score:
Lincoln Life Ab R'H
Beck, ss ............... 4 2, 3
Ward, lb 4 1 1
French. L. 3b .......... 2 10
French, W. p ........... 3 1.0
Bradshaw. c 11
Ledbetter, cf 3 0 2
.Tovner 3. If ........... 3 0 0
IBowman, rf 0 10
McElhone, 2b
r Jnvner. C. .10 0
Farnsworth, If 0 0 0
Nessler, rf ............. 2 0 0
Bishop, 2b ............. z o
Engelke, cf 0 0.0
30 8 9
, Elks
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
DeVore, rf ...........o 2
rieiu, ij, p
Williams. 3b 3
easiey, p
Mulllns, 2b 2
Hern, ci
Y". IV 9
DCIKCll Jio ,,........
Perkins, If
xx uncoin .............
Berganer, If u
20 0 2
x-Struck out for Ledbetter In
sixth y
xx-Flew out for Perkins In 4vh.



SVU "DAT, MtRCfl 17, mt

izz r.iKA.'u A?:rnicAN an im? pendent daili .NEivsrura
jf rf ff O
AC?
e
b jl
...;
- iJ
s'LiJ Li tKsL
i III 1 t r (i

n -77n

DETERMINED Mickey Mantle Leans into a batting practice
pitch at St Petersburg with mouth-opening effort

by
JOE WILLIAMS

MIAMI BEACH-- THIS IS SOMETHING Bernard Cimbel has
told neitner trie press nor Macy's but an Intimate source here
reveals he s now aggressively opposed to the August blackout
oi Mew xork racing. As one oi the Big Town's official drum
beaters for summer traae from tourist sources, this is a matter
in jwiiicn the oia college heavyweight champ has more than
acaciemi; interest, battling Bernie was slow in answering the
bell agaonst the tiaratORa taddists. But then, he comes with a
rush and closes resolutely. .

NORMS SWEAR HE'S NO closer to a match for

iiivi iiii ui.tui ritis ivj cwsei' to a maion ivi

the

was here for a week but the manager and the promoter did
noi get together. Meanwhile, the champion, who has ballooned
up to 215, is with the missus on a South American cruise. It's
taken for granted Marclano will fight at least once this year.
His contract with Norris has expired and no effort has been
made to renew it. The IBC chief seems less concerned about

this than the absence of a standout challenger. It an imme immediate
diate immediate choice had to be made, it probably would be one of these
three: old Archie Moore, young Floyd Patterson or jungle boy
Tommy Jackson... and whatever did become of Jersey Joe
Walcott?
Thanks, in no small measure, to the fine work Tommy
Byrne did for the Yankees last season (just about put them
in the World Series, that's all) two other Pacific Coast League
pappy guys are getting comeback chances down here .
George Munger with the Pirates and Gene Bearden with the
Braves. The Yankees brought Byrne up from Seattle after
he won 20 and lost 10, but what Interested them most was that
he fanned more than he walked, and that meant he had finally
.done something helpful about his control. Munger may stick
as a coach, if nothing else; Bearden isn't given much chance.
MOST OF THE YANKEES, by the way think Gil Mc Mc-Dougald
Dougald Mc-Dougald can make it at short If Casey Stengel lets him work
at the job long enough. They could be Dlased. Not many
neutrals share the same belief. One of these In days past was
quite a shorstop himself. "This is one position you don't mas master
ter master overnight," he said. "The hardest infield play to make is
the one on which the shorstop has to go deep into the hole to
his right, glove the ball, turn and throw. In fact, I think lt'3
the hardest play in the game. If McDougald was just starting
out I'd say he couldn't miss, because he's a fine player. But he's
never played the position and he's no longer a kid." Actually,
McDougald Is only 28, but as the man says, in the eight years
he's played professionally he's either been at third or second.
C. J. Devlne, a .400 hitter in Wall Street, John Hanes a
prime mover in New, York's Dream Track . apparently
so-called because of the aura of somnolence surrounding It .
and Leslie Combs, jhe famed Kentucky breeder, are the big
they own 2i. t '.wio a share ht w"ld come to.
the y own 20. At $40,000 a share that would come to .
now don't tell me; I want to see if I can work it out myself.
Two, four, six, eight ... yes, it adds up to 5800,000 worth
of the horse, who incidentally will set a new record for total
money earned in equine fiscal circles if he wins the $190,608
Gulfstream Handicap Saturday. And who's going to stop him?
Santee's lawyer doesn't practice down here, and the AAU is
notoriously prejudiced against four-footed racers, which fact
no doubt explains a lot of things.
'
THE ONCE ULTRA SWANK Oasis Club in Palm Beach
is now a winter gathering Dlace for elderlv scientists who lee-

Ed Bradley's gambling casino and the upper structure served
as quarters for his croupiers stick men and dealers. On oc occasions,
casions, occasions, the aristocratic loafers of the 20s and early 30s en encouraged
couraged encouraged private exhibitions of the manly art. One such saw
Tommy Loughran do a "spot of sparring" wlth,a dashing scion
of the Stotesburys. It was Jollv good fun, really. Lou?hrn
was getting ready for Primo Camera at the time. Phillip
Scott, the cojlapsible Britisher, was another matinee performer.
But all I seem to remember about that affair wss that Ph'llip
was served tea in his corner between rounds. You see. they
wanted to make, the Britisher feel at home . you do see,
don't you? ; ..

Th3 Pacific Steam Navigation Company
" (INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER MM)
FAST FREIGHT AND VaSSENGER SERVICES
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
S.S. "KENUTA" .March 31
S.S. "CUZCO" ... . .. .April 13
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, KINGSTON,
HAVANA, NASSAU, BERMUDA, SPAIN AND FRANCE
M.V. "REINA DE LPACIFICO" (18,000 Tons) . .May 14
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA,
TRINIDAD, SPAIN AND FRANCE
Y S.S. "REINA DEL MAR, ,'20,000 Tons.) I
(Air-Conditioned) f Jane 19
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. 'PIZARRO" ...... ..... . ..... ... .March 22
M.V. "SALAMANCA" ...... March 2J
ROYAL MAIL LINES "LTD.HOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "LOCH RYAN" .... March IS
S.S. "DURANGO" ......... ... . . . .:. .. ..March 28
TO UKCONTINENT
S.S. "DONGEDYK" ....March 18
S.S. "LOCH AVON" . ...... ..... ... ..... ... . March 28
All Sailing's Subject to ChTngTwithout Notice
PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CoM Cristobal Tel.: 16545
rr..n,rrr.Trr- (PANAMAAvePeru Jio. 53 Tel. 3-12278
lu 1 BALBOA Term. Bldg. .Tel. 2-1905

y MURRAY OLDIRMAN

YORK (NEA) Bob

Petut of the St. Louis Hawks was

elected today to recieve the first
annual President's Trophy of t h e

in a poll of players conducted by

iNtA service ana lne ranama A
merican.

The award, embiemaLc of the
Most Valuable Player in the

NBA, marks a new phase in bas

ket oauY

First came the George Milan

era, extending over five seasons.

The little man broke through to

enjoy a brief fling as Bob Cousy
reigned for a couple of seasons.

The PeHJt aerWd threatens to

obliterate the luster of his prede predecessors.
cessors. predecessors. A sophomore stripling
of only 23, he was the NBA scor scoring
ing scoring leader virtually from the
opening shot, hitting close to 25

points a game.

But mere scoring doesn t quali

fy him to dominate the game.
"Pettit right now," says Joe
Lapchick, the Original Celtic, "is
better than Mikan at his best.
Why He's more basketball play-

The game has never seen a

more graceful nor more versatile

8-9 performer. He has the full
complement of scoring weapons,
from taps to' jumps to outside
sets, and he's the outstanding re re-bounder
bounder re-bounder in a league of kangaroo

characters.

His closest competition on the

80 ballots by the eight teams of
the NBA came from scoring rival

Paul Arizin of the Philadelphia

Warriors. Arizin trailed Pettit by

12,33 votes to 21

In the second flight came Cousy

with 11 adherents and Mel Hutch

ins of Fort Wayne with nine. The

Syracuse Nats' Dolph Schayes and

Boston's BUI Sharmin picked up

a couple of votes each. Rookies
Maurice Stokes ef Rochester and
Tom Gola of the Warriors re received
ceived received single mentions.
Pettit will receive his trophy

from NBA President Maurice Po-

doloff between the halves of next

year's Ail-Star came, a particu

larly appropriate occasion since it

was in the same extravaganza mis
season that Pettit's status as the
league's No. 1 player was clearly

asseted. He dominated the game.

In regular season play he per

formed a virtual one-man job lift lifting
ing lifting the St. Louis Hawks into a
playoff spot. In his rookie cam campaign
paign campaign of 1954-55, playing for a last
place team, he earned the unique

distinction of being voted to the

official all-lea 2ue team.

This is the same lanky kid who
nlaved an entire season with the

Baton Rouge (La. High School
freshmen and never scored a
nnint!

It's the same kid who was cut
from the hieh school sauad as a

annhnmoi-e and was forced to

set his experience in a church

league.

Evan after he'd become an All-

America center at Louisiana State
there were skeptics who insisted

he'd never fit in with the pros he
was strictly a gunner who lacked

stamina, so they said.
He's articulate, handsome, un unmarriedand
marriedand unmarriedand a jitterbug of note
back home in Baton Rouge.
He's also modest. He had to be
convinced by his cousin, Frank
Brian of the Pistons, that he had
the stuff to cut it, in pro ball.
When apprised that a plurality of
the players in the NBA had de decided
cided decided he was their best, his com
ment was simple:
"Gosh!"
Charles trRcberls
Cops 33rd'$ Rifle
Firing Compef ilion
The 33rd Infantry's G Company
Master Sergeant Charles L. Rob Rob-erts,
erts, Rob-erts, with a 222 of a possible 250
score, Friday won the 1956 regi regimental
mental regimental rifle firing competition. ;
Following Roberts m scoring
was SFC William J. McFeeley of
I Company, who had a 21 score.

SFC Donald M. Barenaba of L.

Comninv. who fired a score ot

217. Fourth Dlace went to SFC Ce

cil L. Stevens of E Company, and

fifth to SFC Tyrel A. MmiM of

Heavy Mortar Company. They ha
cores of 210 and 206.

In team completion, the Second

Battalion who had group score of

834 of a possible 1,000 won hand

ily over the Third Battalion and

the Provisional Battalion.

Stevens, PFC Joseph L. drego:

of H Company and Sgt. Teuais

FogeL Morris, B.H.S.
Relay Team Establish
Interscholastic Marks

Bob Fogel, Charlie Morris, and

the BHS 880 Relay team of Dan

ftinklosky. Bud Curdts, Joe Trow Trow-er,
er, Trow-er, and Charlie French all set new
meet records as the Interscholast

ic League meet was conducted at

Balboa Stadium last Thursday

sight. Other outstanding efforts,

although establishing no records,
were turned in by Bill Rakin in

tne 440, Curtis Jeff enes in the
vault, and Dorman Fulton in the
discus.

Fosel. running for J.C.. toured

the 4 laps of the mile in 5:02.4 to
establish himself as the favorite in
mile in the Balboa Relays next

Fridav. He won without being

pushed, although Bob Toothman of
BHS made a race out of it f o r
three and half laps before Fogel
pulled away at will.

For the third straight meet

Charlie Morns-, outstanding uus
shot putter, went into the record

breaking business. This time it
was his own meet record that he
broke with a put of 48 feet even.
Charlie has a best of 48 ft. 7 in.
This year, but he will have to add
about 15 inches to that to be a a-mong
mong a-mong the top three in the Relays.
The BHS half mile relay team
registered a mild upset by win winning
ning winning the race against the CHS
team of Allan Robinette, Eddie
Smith, Kaiser Bazan. and B o b
tiiwe took the baton for the

final leg about 4 yards to the gooa

of Charlie French, BHJ ancnor

mm. but at the iinisn. rrencn

had just about reversed the situa situation
tion situation with a three stride edge on

The winnuif time of 1:37. l

lowered the meet standard set by

a BHS team in 1954.

Rankin won what was probably

the best race of the evening when
he ran a very nice 440 to win in

54.6. He looked unusually strong

in winning, with teammate tuyian

Lane edging Ed Scott of BHS for
second, and Dave Hawthorne also
of CHS taking fourth spot from
Jim Selby of BHS in a real photo

finish. With three quarter mileri
like this- Cristobal High looks like
a sure favorite in the mile relay
event for the Balboa Relays.

Curtis Jeffenes had no troume
at all in winning the pole vault at I
11 ft. Curtis is going to be defend-1'

ing his vault title won last year in
the Relays. In throwing the discus I
130 ft. 5 in. Dorman Fulton showed
that his 131 feet plus of last week I
was no fluke. With throws like this J
Fulton gives the Bulldogs added i
strength they heretofore had not I
counted on in the platter slinging
event. "..:;:';...
A brief summary of the m e e t l
from the point of view of the Bal-!
boa Relays it looks like this fori
the schools. Junior College is a de-
finite winning potential in the pole J
vault with Jefferies and milk with L
Fogel, while Manuel QuezadaJ
must be rated a possibility in the I

high jump.
Cristobal High is the probable

winner of the mile relay, and has
point getting potential in the 880 I
relay, low, hurdles with George.l

Detore the surprise winner Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night in 22.8, the high jump
and broad iump with Bob L-owe,

and an outside chance for placing
in the high sticks with Bill Gibson.

chance of the three schools with
strong winning possibilities in both
the 440 and 880 ralays, and' the
strength t- place in the medley re relay.
lay. relay. Bill Coffey should be right up
there in the broad iumo. and doi-

sibily the high jump. Bill Halvosall
is given only the slighest of I

cnances in me poie v a u 1 1 dui
Charlie French should pick up
some needed points in the 100
while Dick Richter is given a
chance of placing in the h 1 g h i.

Charlie Morris and Dorman Ful

ton will have to be at their best
plus some to place in the shot or

discus.

Very briefly this sums up the
potential of the three schools for
the Balboa Relays this F r i da y

nigni, siarung at 7 p.m. at Balboa

Madium.

Results of the Interscholastic
League Track Meet, March 15,

ijt.
High Hurdles: 1. Richter (B), 2.
Curats (B) and Gibson (C) tied,
4. Forrest (C) Time: 16.8
bhot Put: 1. Morris (B), 2. Des Des-Londes
Londes Des-Londes .(B), 3. Fearon (B), 4.
Bazan (C) Distance: 48 ft. (a
new meet record)
100: 1. French (B), 2. Winklosky
(B), 3, Smith (C), 4. Lane (C)
lime: lu.3
Mile: Fogel (J) 2. Toothman (B)
3. Rodriguez (B), 4. Feeney (B)
Time: 5:02.4 (a new meet record)

440 Relay: l.BHS (Sutherland,
Barbara, Perkins, WheeJer), 2.

CHS (Steibritz, Hall, Broks,

runups lime: 46.5

discus: 1. Fulton (B), 2. Des-

lx)ndes (B), 3. Gibson (C), 4.
Wills B) Distance: 130 ft. 5 in.
440: 11 Rankin (C), 1. Lane C), 3.
Scott (B), 4. Hawthorne (C)
Time: 54.6
High Jump: 1. Lowe C and
Quesada (J) tied. 3. Matee (B). a.

Coffey (B) and Barbier (B) tied.

Height: 5ft. a in.
Low Huurdles: 1. Detore (C), 2.
Sutherland (B), 3. Sorrell (B), 4.

rorrest t) Time: 22.9 i
Pole Vault: 1. Jefferies (J), 2J
Halvosa (B), 3. Fulieton B), 4.1
Corrigan (B) Hight:ll ft.
Broad Jump: 1. Coffey B), 2.
Lowe (C), 3. French (B), 4.
Smith (C) Distance: 20 ft.
220: 1. Wheeler (B), 2. SUibritzl
(C), 3. Holt (B, 4. Brooks (0)1
Time: 23.8
880: 1. Jenkins (B), 2. Sehroed Sehroed-er
er Sehroed-er (B), 3. Brakins C), 4. Lagas-I
sie (B) Time: 2:10.5
880 Relay: 1. BHS (Winklosky,1
Trower, Curdta, French) 2. CH-1
S (Robinette, Bazan, Smith,
Lowe) Time: 1:37.1 (new meeti
record). 1

EXERTING A STRONG PULL

-s- V Player in
f- ,? '-- I BASKETBALL jf
ts- 'rxn-? I '$ St. Louis' 7 A
iV' Mr- v ii buy Jr3$2
r )b) f -ir ....-selected by -the
Vii"V t ; I receive ihe first
r- .ill, ; J 4faJUftftUAt join-t
?4Jr- '" ( I '-'
I iJ W mvsmmrimm If t Sfl

The Popular TRIO EL ARR&tiQUE
plays Fridays and Saturdays at the
CLUB 4:30

In the alr-condltioned Balboa Bar
from midnight to 4:30 n m.

Meet Your Friends Here Listen
To Your Favorite Music
(Mfhlrip On Tht House at 1:3(1 u )

News Of The

Schuurman of H. Company were

the members of the winning team

Stevens' 223 led the way

The top 18 individual scorers

will compete in the Panama Area

Armed Forces shoot-oir Apru zw.
Trophies were awarded to win
ners of Colonel Robert Coffey,
regimental commanding officer,
in post-shoot ceremonies.
HITLESS TRIO
Bradenton, Fla. (NEA) Of

the three catchers in the Milwau Milwaukee
kee Milwaukee Bravers' camp, Del GrandalL

the rugular, has the hibhest bat

ting average, .238. Del Rice hit

.197 behind him and Bob Rosselli

bit .222 at Toledo.

Balboa junior High
Swim Meet Tuesday

The Balboa Junior High School

ChamoionshiD Swim Meet will be

held at the Balboa Pool on Tues-1
day night. The 18 event program I

... ft 1 9 mm

it : r 0

......... r ..... ..,. ..

RAFFLE

CARTA VIEJA
CONTINUES TO PAY

Prizes for March 18th :

will start at 7:00 p.m. Over 1501

swimmers will take part in th

championship meet.

Th AntQtant in thi mr r

winners ef first, second, and third

places in a series of homeroom J

meets which nave Just been com

pleted. Over 250 swimmers parti participated
cipated participated in the preliminary meets.
The contestants will be going all

out to win the coveted Champion Championship
ship Championship trophy for their homeroom.

With 11 finalist, (i. ...!..

event it will be a nip and tuck bat

tle in every race.

jZ

$400.00 (Accumulated)

60.00

Todoi i (ncant9 1 .20
Double in Cinemascope!
Richard Widmark, la
"COBWEB"
Gene Kelly C. Charlssc, in
"HIT THE DECK"

Today IDEAL 20c.
At 9:00 p.m.
LOS MONARCAS DEL AIRE
- Also: -TW6PICTLTc5I

Limited seatina facilities will hp

available for spectators. The gen

eral public, particularly parents.

I
840.00 (Accumulated) v
TOTAL ... $ 1,300.00 J

is cordially invited to attend and

see the youngsters in this meet.

AVOID VEMtliAL

DISEASES

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kydactirt line 1112.

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Sit SANITUSt from
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fiuij Sbn C&tia Okja, fan Tftonbjwna "Oho", Cbth Bwai

and all products of

j V1NICOLA LICORERA and DESTILERIA CENTRAL
I ANOTHER WINNER!! The 2nd Prize of $420.00 (accumulated) was won

I on Sunday, IWarch 11th by Mr. Alberto bcrrano, Jr., of David, Chiriqui, ..villi ticket

I
I
I
I
1
I

THE SANITUBE CO.. NEWPOR'..' (Pit!



i

HELD Mrs. Rhonda Bell
Martin, 49, Is shown after her
arrest in Mobile, Ala., on
charges of killing one of her
former husbands. Police said
she admitted killing; two of
her five former husbands,
three children and her mother
with arsenic poisoning.
Little League
Girls 6, Boys 5
Eleven babies were born in Coco
Solo Hospital during the week end
ina Wednesday March 14, accord
ing to the regular hospital report.
During that period, 89 patients were
admitted and 89 were discharged.
Babies were born to the follow
Ine American citizens: Pfc. and
Mrs. James H. Prewitt, of Coco So
lito. son: Set. and Mrs. John R.
Bayroth, of Fort Davis, daughter
and RMI and Mrs. William D.
Cark, of Coco Solito, son.
Babies were born to the follow following
ing following parents of other nationalities:
Air. and Mrs. Earl H. Curry, of
Colon, son; Mr. and Mrs. Jose 0.
Velasquez, of Colon, daughter;
Mr. and Mrs. Roy A. Carter, of
Colon, daughter; Mr. and Mrs. Eus Eus-torio
torio Eus-torio S. Morales, of Rainbow Ci Ci-tv,
tv, Ci-tv, daughter; Lt. and Mrs. Rodri Rodri-go
go Rodri-go Trujillo, of Colon, son; Mr. and
Mrs. Everald Brown, of Colon,
daughter;' Mr. and Mrs. Andres
Esquina, of Colon, son; and Mr.
and Mrs. Cecil Houghton, of Rain Rainbow
bow Rainbow City, daughter.
Yleslinghouse
Selllemcnl Hear Nov
WASHINGTON, March 17 (UP)
Federal and ouside mediators
met with company and union ne negotiators
gotiators negotiators today in a redoubled ef effort
fort effort to settle the 152-day Westing Westing-house
house Westing-house Electric Corp. strike this
weekend.
Sources close to the negotiations
laid they hope for a settlement
within 48 hours. But they empha
sized there still is no certainty the
lone drawn-out negotiations will
end soon. They said several dif
firence still must be resolved.
The mediators, meeting with of officials
ficials officials of Westinghouse and the
striking AEL-CIO Electrical Work Work-.
. Work-. en Union, hope to end the walkout
on the basis of a "package" con contract
tract contract proposal submitted to both
tides two weeks ago.
The comDany accepted it but the
union termed it "unacceptable."
One of the union's chief objections
involving the issue of shifting in incentive
centive incentive pay workers to flat hourly
rates, has been sustantially re-
tnnvpd.
But the union1 also has objected
to a nrovision for arbitration of
36 discharged strikers. This issue
still has not been settled, along
with several other points, accord
n tn informants.
The "package" proposal calls
for a five-year contract, retroac retroactive
tive retroactive to last October, with wage
increases raneina from a mini
mum of 25 cents an hour, plus
frincrft benefits.
If a settlement is reached, the
union's Westinghouse conference
board must approve it. The board
has been on call to meet here
since Thursday,
BALBOA TIDES
SUNDAY, MARCH It
HIGH LOW
7:3 a.m. 1:30 rut
7:52 p.m 1:51 p.m.

THE STORY THAT SHOCKED THE WORLD!!

TUB
Urn Ufff Mmtn
'ALABAMA PULITZf
PRIZE IXPOSS y
r"i it m
IflTitftfU Mmrr

kh

1

"it tJie people
31st YEAR

Lovelady Wanfs Less
More Career Civilians

Rufus M. Lovelady, national.reau and (6) military assistant

j vice-president of the American
Federation or Government Em-
ployes, came out for less military
control of civilian junctions or
the Panama Canal company, in
testimony scheduled for presen presentation
tation presentation in Washington today.
The testimony is part of the
hearing of the Senate committee
on interstate and Foreign Com Commerce
merce Commerce Is conducting on S.2167 or
the Magnuson Bill, dealing with
the proposal that control of the
Panama Canal Company be
transferred to the Commerce
Department.
Lovelady's testimony was to
be read to the committee by
James A. Campbell, AFGE presi president.
dent. president. Lovelady limited his com comments
ments comments to the sections of the
bill he considered of greatest
importance to the general wel welfare
fare welfare of Canal employes.
"Present law provides that
the Panaam Canal company
shall be represented by the Pres
ident of the United states or
such officer of the United States
as may be designated by him,"
he said.
"The President has by Execu
tive Order designated the Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of the Army to administer
the affairs of the Canal Zone
Government and the Panama
Canal Company.
"S.2167 would by substantia
law transfer this responsibili responsibility
ty responsibility from the Secretary of the
Army to the Secretary of Com Commerce
merce Commerce and removed from the
Pres dent the authority to des designate
ignate designate whom he pleases.
"The Canal Zona has been
traditionally governed by an Ar-
mv officer appointed by the
President and confirmed by the
Senate, t ,:
"I believe it can be said with
out fear of successful contradic
tion that this long-establisnea
practice has operated to the
benefit of this enterprise, parti
cularly as regards keeping it
free from noiiticai natronage
"The officers selected lor tnis
Important assignment have al always
ways always come from the Corps of
Engineers and have been men
with years of highly successful
engineering and administrative
experience.
.."We are not convinced me
proposed change would Im Improve
prove Improve either the operations or
management of the Panama
Canal.
"Certainly not unless It were
spelled out clearly In law that
the Administrator and all other
appointive officers are selected
on the basis of their demonstrat demonstrated
ed demonstrated experience and ability rather
than their affiliation with any
iwiiwi. . '.
"We are strongly opposed io
any leelslation that would make
the office of Governor of the
Canal Zone' or its equivalent a
rjolitlcal plum. It has never been
such: we want it kept that way.
"There are those here wha
reel and I believe justifiably
so that the military are in
control of too many function
of the Canal establ'shment.
"For example, in addition to
the Governor and Lieutenant
Governor, Army officers are at
the head of the following activ activities
ities activities of the Canal Zone Govern Government
ment Government and the Panama Canal
Company: (1) Health Bureau
(2) Engineering and Construc Construction
tion Construction Bureau, (3) Gorgas Hospi
tal, (4) Corozal Hospital. (5)

most of the specialized nrofes'W tm? yed by contractors in

alonal services of the Health
"KCfS: .75 t .40
- TODAY
1:30, 3:10, 4:55, 6:40, 9:
p.m.

1
-" 7

''h i

INDEPENDENT

ON
knout the truth and the

am

PANAMA, R. P., SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 1956

to the Governor,
"Navy oincers are assigned to
the Panama Canal in the follow-
ins capacities: m Marine Bu
reau Director, (2) Chief of the
Industrial Division, (8) Captain
of the Port of Balboa, ana (4)
Captain of the Port of Cristobal.
'We see no sound reason why
career cfvil'ans would not per perform
form perform as well or better as the
head of these functions.
"On the contrary, we believe
It would be In the Interest of
the service to break with tradi tradition
tion tradition in the appointment of Ar Army
my Army or Navy officers to these
posts," Lovelady declared.'
"S. 2167 would also amend the
present law by changing the
method of determining certain
costs.
"The new language would re-
oulre the ReDUblir of Panama to
tl
pay for cost of Immigration and
customs service provided by the
Canal Zone Government and for
the cost of providing schools for
certain of Its citizens.
"The bill would also provide
that other agencies of the Gov
eminent operating on the Ca
nal Zone shall bear their proper
snare of the cost of maintain
ing the roads, highways, sewers
and other facilities and services
common to a community on the
oasis or tne ratio oi military
personnel to civilian citizens of
the United states and --of the
Republic of Panama employed
by the Panama Canal Company
and the Canal Zone Govern Government.
ment. Government. "These changes meet with our
approval and we respectfully
recommend that the committee
give them favorable considera consideration.
tion. consideration. "We have held the opinion
from the beginning that the
present Board of Directors of
not less than nine nor more
than 13 (in practice lt has nev never
er never been fewer than 13) Is larger
than Is necessary.
"It is also our opinion that
some members of the Board j

Phooey!' Say US-rate

(Continued from Page 1)
down and argue with manage management,
ment, management, that would be the solu solution."
tion." solution." The CLU. offclals contended
that the law providing for the
$1 minimum has been in effect
for some time, but "has been
Ignored by all concerned." NN
They said that this has re resulted
sulted resulted In the various contracted
jobs being performed at a low-
..i. rnof f fh. lrt .. f
,C","V i ui if V j
the laboring man hired to do
the work.
"This continued neglect." they
said, "has now come to a head
and It now appears possible that
either the government or the
contracts may be liable for pay payment
ment payment of unpaid wages required
by the Fair Labor Standards
Act." I
They refuted earlier testimo testimony
ny testimony made by contractors that the
application on the Zone of the
$1 an hour minimum would
have adverse effects on the ec economy
onomy economy of the Republic of Panama..-
.
The labor representatives
pointed out that figures indicate
there are only about 1200 peo
Bu-J.f' fk. .n .e n..
were earning 40 cents an hour,
and were Increased to $1 an
hour, and that they worked
full time the year round, the
witnesses maintain that the
maximum annual increase
would1 be approximately $1, $1,-500,000.
500,000. $1,-500,000. They could not se ethey said,
how the Republic's conomv
would be disturbed bv this, but
on the contrary, would be help
ed.
"It would also reflect to the
advantage of the United states
who supplies the Republic with
most v of their imported prod
ucts," they added.
one or tne committee mem
bers, Orvin B. Fjare (R-Mont.)
asked the CLU how many mem
bers they had. Hatchett told him
about 1100. It was also brought
out that none of their member
ship earns less than $1 an hour
Chief committee Investigator
Russell C. Derrlckson then ques questioned
tioned questioned the witnesses concerning
ine siaius oi Howard Munro,
who, he said, had appeared be
fore their subcommittee last
week.
It was explained that Mnnm
when Congress is. not in session,
inuina mj wic victual ZjUIIC XO re-
sume-nis-T)osHionwiin trie ra.
-, i, , v
nal company, and that he is In

DAILY

$ nc oil

country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

have been appo'nted with very
little regard for thefcr qualifi qualifications
cations qualifications for the post, but more
for the purpose of giving
them recognition for their con contribution
tribution contribution to a party or for rea reasons
sons reasons of business association.
"Regardless of the existence
of any real basis for this opin opinion,
ion, opinion, it would be difficult If not
Impossible to convince employes
here that some members of the
Board haVe not proposed chang changes
es changes knowing them to be detri detrimental
mental detrimental to the best Interest of
the employes.
. "We would favor the proposed
change In the governing body If
the language were amended to
stipulate clearly that these nine
governing officers shall be sel selected
ected selected for appointment on the
basis of proved outstanding
qualification for the job and not
as a reward for their services nr
contributions to any political
party or Individual," Lovelady,
went on.
"It Is noted that S.2167 pro-)
vides that 'In determining!
whether or not a facility is self-l
supporting, the corporation shall!
allow as cost the Items of over
head, maintenance and opera
tion, depreciation, interest on
investment, and a proportionate
snare or tne net cost or the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone Government.'
"We do not know just how this
would be interpreted and ap applied.
plied. applied. ''We do know, however, that
some of the facilities used for
purposes other than actual tran transit
sit transit of ships include such as
commissaries, schools, police and
fire protection, sanitation of the
Canal Zone, hospitals and dls-
ptnsarles, housing, maintenance
or buildings and grounds, recrea recreational
tional recreational facilities and the con construction
struction construction and maintenance of
streets, sidewalks and highways.
"Because of our unique situa situation
tion situation and the fact that we are
Isolated and set apart from
areas in which such sery'ce
would be provided by city,
county, state, and Federal rov-
constant contact with the union
here." .. :: ;,:.-...".-'.
"His position, and testimony Is
based on Instructions which our
body gives him," Hatchett ex explained,
plained, explained, v
When questioned closely as
to what their union prefers
Hatchett said that they would
much prefer the statutory min minimum
imum minimum to the administrative
minimum.
"From past experience." he
said, "I would rather take my
chances with Congress than
with industrial negotiators."
Damiani added that thev were
not asking for anything. 'There's
a law and it should apply," he
said.-'
"Concerning the contractors'
arguments, if the minimum
were enforced It would break
them, not have an adverse ef effect
fect effect on Panama."
Damiani also said that the
subcommittee should realize that
since tney are government em
ployes tney nave no bargaining
power. -. f
"Seventy-five ner cent nf the
time 'we get what we want, but
in this case, we feel the statute,
which was In effect should be
eniorcea.
Coate was questioned concern

Nobel Prize-Winning Madame Curie Dies;
Famous Frenchwoman Found Radioaciiviiy
PARIS, March 17 (UP) Irene, day by U. S. immigration officials! Later she attended the faculty
Joliot Curie, NobeL prize-winning) when she flew to New York for a of sciences, where she f received
discoverer of artificial radioacti- speakine tour under the leftwlnc'her doctor's deeree. after she met

vity, died In a hospital in Paris'
tooay. &ne was 59. ;
Madame Joliot-Curk. was tn e
famous daughter of famous par-,
ents, Marie and Pierre CurieJ
discoverers of radium.
She became one of the most'
time but was refused membership
in the American Chemical Society
in 1954 because of her pro-Com-mnnist
leanings.
She and her husband Jean
Frederic Joliot, won the
Nobel 1
prize in chemistry in 1935 for their
discovery the year before of arti artificial
ficial artificial radioactivity.
They both became Involved in
leftwing French activities, though,
and the French government drop dropped
ped dropped him from its atomic energy
Mmmiceinn in 1Qn miA hun in
19ll
i. u u.j
Curie.
Aotat maudlin; tfuiim vui ic 1
was held on Ellis Island for one I

NEWSPAPER

nro cents
Brass,
in PC
ernmenfts, we feel strontly
that the product sold by the
Panama Canal (transit of
ships) should pay the cost of
operatin these essential non-revenue-derivinr
activities.
"In this view, we are mindful
of the fact that the retail price
of a stalk of bananas, ton of
coal, or kilowatt of electric pow power
er power Is derived bv taking Into con-
s deration all the costs invoivea
in getting the item to the con consumer.
sumer. consumer. "We contend the principle is
the same In the case of tolls at
the Panama Canal.
"We believe, therefore, that
the users of the Canal should
pay a larger share of the to total
tal total cost of operating the wa waterway
terway waterway and all of its auxiliary
appurtenances.
"If the Congress should disa-
gree with us, then We believe It
should at least give consldera
tion to rebating a large part of
the $5,000,000 to $8,000,000 a year
we pay as income tax for the
purpose of defraying the cost of
schools, police ana lire protec
tlon. recreational outlets for
ourselves and our children, con
structlon and maintenance of
streets and highways, and the
other usual considerations our
counterparts in the United
States get in return for the tax
es they Dav.
"Anything less than this marks
us as second-class citizens.
"Our primary Interest lies tn
endeavoring to prevent tiny
changes in the law that might
by faulty Interpretation require
us to contribute as much or
more of our salary to the oper
ation of the Panama Canal en
terprlse than we now are forced
todo.
"We trust the committee will
keep in mind our position In its
deliberations In regard to the
proposed legislation and act in
a manner that will brine some
relief from the financial burden
now being borne by the employes
here."
Union Men
ing unemployment in the Re
public of Panama. He said lat latest
est latest census figures (for 1950) in indicate
dicate indicate that there were then over
12,000 unemployed In the city of
Panama. He calculated that this
figure has doubled now. ;
; Later Lovelady said that he
felt the application of the
minimum would not ease the
unemployment situation great
ly.
Although the CLU ''; members
are not directly affected by the
application of the $1 minimum,
labor officials said that .their or organization
ganization organization on the Zone was
"constantly doing things" for
non-organized labor, that the
benefits they reaped were ap applied
plied applied to everyone on the Zone,
whether they were members or
not.
Hatchett added that they were
talkng this stand In order to
protect the U. way of life.
"If we don't do lt, other coun countries
tries countries may come In, take them
over, and use their potential
Sower to set them' against the
.8.," he added.
Fjare remarked that he felt
the standard of living In the Re Republic
public Republic would Increase "far more
rapidly"; if they organized their
own labor unions than if they
depended on Uncle Sam.
joint Anti-Fascist Refugee, Cora
mittee.
Mme. Joliot-Curie began study
ing science at an early age,
After her father died as a re
i suit of his experiments she began
aiding her mother in research'

It was while working with heii
mother that she first met her bus-! Thus, her own children, a girl
band, a chemist who joined' the born Jn 1927 and a boy born in
laboratory as an assistant in 1925,11932, wen able to carry on the

Their overnignt tame 10 years
later brought them demands, for
lecture tours all over the world
including America. v
Born in Paris, Sept. 12, 1897, in in-rene
rene in-rene Curie was only an infant
when her parents made the rev revolutionary
olutionary revolutionary study of radium,
She was still very young when,
her father died. Soon afterwards

she.startcd .studying, aLa, privaieinceIacultxarii-JJniversitv

scientific school founded by her
mi.
mother

7 Paris Caucus

I t A

4

Mew of buslne sewion of Paris, Fraoe. Caucua, March 15 to IT, 1919, where America Lerio
wm bora.
American Legion Observes Birthday

Throughout the entire free Dem.
ocratic world today, The American
Legion, the largest American vet veteran's
eran's veteran's organization, is celebrating
the 37th anniversary of birth,
some 17,000 Legion posts and their
14,000 Auxiliary units are celebrat celebrating
ing celebrating the occasion, each in their own
manner.
Department commander Black
announced that locally, the Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic side posts were celebrating the
anniversary with a fish fry and pic picnic
nic picnic tomorrow. The Legion depart department,
ment, department, along with Panama Canal
No. 1 will hold their official celebra celebration
tion celebration on the evening of the arrival
of the Legion national commander
J. Addington Wagner on Friday, at
the American Legion Club. Depart Department
ment Department Executive Committeemen
observed the anniversary along
with their executive committee
meeting held yesterday at the Le Legion
gion Legion Club, Ft. Amador.
Reviewing the history of the lo local
cal local Legion organization, it is re remembered
membered remembered that as men. returned
from the services to resume their
employment in the Canal Zone,
they became aware of the infant
Legion organization back in the U U-nited
nited U-nited States, and in 1920 several
veterans got together, among
whom were Bill Stevenson George
Greene, Frank Wang, Ralph Kirk-
patrick and Fred De V. bill, and
met at the old Century Club and
decided to form the American Le Legion
gion Legion on the Canal Zone. They met
again at the old Ancon Lodge,
which has long since vanished and
was in the approximate location
of the Ancon Commissary, and
went through the procedure of for formal
mal formal establishment.
Spanith American War veteran
Candy Boyle htlpd in th orga orga-nintion
nintion orga-nintion and prtwnttd tht ntw
Lagion organization with itt first
ttr of flags. Tha ntw organiza organization
tion organization was named Panama Canal
Post No. 1, and in order to re re-caive
caive re-caive ill charter from the Nation National
al National organization, alto became the
Dpaartmanf of Panama Canal.
On Armistice Day, litzu, tney
held their first celebration at the
old Century Club, with Sam Heald,
then superintendent of the Panama
Railroad, as guest of honor.
The local Legion's first nven
tion was held in 1920 at .:'' boga
with Elbert S. Waid being elected
as commander, and Fred De V. Sill
elected as first vice commander.
Shortly after, Mr. Waid passed a a-way,
way, a-way, and Sill took over as c o m m-mander,
mander, m-mander, and was elected again' at
the convention tne toiiowing year
Post No. 2 was organized on the'
Atlantic side of the Isthmus, when
members realized the difficulty of
operating with a small member membership
ship membership scattered so far apart, espe especially
cially especially with transoortation being
what it was in those days. .This
ike Declares April
As Anti Cancer Era
WASHINGTON, March J7 (UP)
President Eisenhower today
proclaimed April as cancer con control
trol control month and urged all Amer Americans
icans Americans to support agencies work working
ing working to wipe out the disease.
He said cancer seriously af affects
fects affects the nation's health and
welfare "in loss of lives, distress
and Incapacitation of our citi citizens,
zens, citizens, and the lessening of our
productivity In the amount of
billions of dollars."
and married Joliot, she continued
working with him in the labora laboratory
tory laboratory until her mother died in 1934.
At that time, her name was. le
gally changed to Joliot-cune, .as
i there were no direct male d e s
cendents to carry on her parents'
name.
name.
She became undersecretary
of
State for Scientific Research in
Leon Blum's first cabinet of June
4, 1936, a high honor for a wom woman
an woman in France at that period when
women had not yet been permit
ted to vote. :
She was a orofessor at the sci
1 and became a member of the A-
tomic Energy Committee in 1946.

Where Legion Was Born

post was named after Elbert S
Waid, the first elected commander
Ntathaniel J. Owen Post No. 3 fol followed
lowed followed shortly, and was named aft after
er after a local employe, who had been
killed in action during World War
In addition to the above mention mentioned
ed mentioned posts, the department of Pana
ma tanai one also consists of Cha-
la City, and Arruba Esso Post No.
1 in Arruba, N.W.I.
record of service to God and Coun
try, has become, along-standing ha
bit of the American Legion.
WHAT THE AMERICAN LEGION
IS AND STANDS FOR:
For God and Country, we
associate ourselves together for
the following purposes:
To uphold and defend the con constitution
stitution constitution of the United States of
America; to maintain law and
order; to foster and perpetuate
one-hundre d-per-cent American Americanism;
ism; Americanism; to preserve the memories
and incidents of our associations
in the great wars; to inculcate a
sense of individual obligation to
the community, state and na nation;
tion; nation; to combat the autocracy of
both the classes and the mas masses;
ses; masses; to make right the master of
might; to promote peace and
good will on earth; to safeguard
and transmit to posterity the
principles of justice, freedom
and democracy; to consecrate
and sanctify ouricomradeship by
our devotion to mutual helpful helpfulness.
ness. helpfulness. It's a far crv from the cradle
19,19 when the founders .had to
build an organization among veter
ans who had no money and no jobs,
what have you

Today the worth of the Ameri-; States is immensely active cbam

can
0.75
0.40
In TECHNICOLOR and
CINEMASCOPE!
J:00 4:02 6:25 8:59 p.m.
BlCGESf
; happiest
FUMSHOWl
0FAa
If
JANET LEIGH
JACKlEMHOili t
technTcolor mt7
OnemaScopE:
"t OlUUBl PICTUBC
mti mm mm uvwt ou nm ne mum

1-

v:

V.

i

1 zhtw

1

national dues alone to establish th
stability of their organization
They have a National Headquart
ers building in Indianapolis thai
few organizations can match. Thej
have a seven-story Washington, D
C, building to house their legisla
tive, rehabilitation and economii
staffs. j

Ihey have more than a thous

gres River Post No 6, Bertram T and national, Department and Pos
uayton Post No. 7, located at Gam- publications. Leaders of all walk'
boa and Ft. Clayton, respectively, of American life who belong t
Guatemala Post No. 1 in Guatema-,The American Legion, from thi

President down, make up a dis
tinguished directory that reads lik
a volu me of "Whn' Whn in Amor.

ccieDraung ot us annual birthjica." More than 5 per cent of al
anniversary, every March 15 to 17 1 American Legion Posts today owi
with new dimensions to' its great i their own homes.

Started Overseas
The American Legion is the onh
veteran organization in the Unitei
States which was started by fight
ing men overseas. Its ranks todai
i include more Purple Heart vet
erans and more decorated com
bat men and women than all othei
organizations combined.
The American Legion came int(
being at a caucus held in Paris
France, of some 1,000 delegate!
from the first AEF on March i;
to 17, 1919. It Was at this caucui
that the American Legion wai
hamed.; The name "American Le
gion" was suggested by an office
of the '36th Division, Major Mau
rice Gordon of Madisonville, Ky
Major Gordon is- still living, prac
ticing law, at Madisonville.
Following the Paris meeting, i
continental Caucus was held in St
Louis, Mo., May 8 to 10, 19l; a
which the organization of The A
merican Legion was completed. I
was at this caucus that the Pream
ble to the Constitution ot The A
merican Legion was drafted and a
dopted. This preamble has beei
hailed as a classic of English li
teraiure. Many groups have organ

days of the American Legion in ized and tried to improve upon i

but failed to do so.
The first national convention wa
held in Minneapolis. Minn.. Nov

to the far-flung domain of thej 10 to 12, 1919. It was at this con
greatest fighting men's society to- vention that the Indiana Delega
day. The sun never sets today on tion proved its superior Hoosie:
The American Legion with its 58 salesmanship and landed the !oca
departments and 17,200 posts in tion of National Headquarters foi
the United States, its possessions! Indianapolis. The Hoosier Capita
and territories and overseas out-jCity has been the veteran capita
posts. I of America ever' since.' ;
Gone are the days when the. Today The American Legion ii
founders pf the American Legion considered the n a t ion's greates
swapped membership dues'for set- bulwark of Americanism,, is rate
ting hens, eggs, fence rails or as the No. 1 Public Enemy bv th

I Communist Party of the Unitec

region at an its ecneions pion of adequate national security

national, Department, : District nas earned an international repu
county and Post is conservative- tation as a leader in child we!
lv estimated at more than $300,- fare and is one of the greatesi
000,000. Legionnaires since 1 9 1 9 community service organizations
have paid more than $150,000,00 in in history.

LUX today CENTRAL

0.75
0.40
In CINEMASCOPE!
12:55, 2:38, 4:45, 6:25, 9:00 pm
THE EXCITING TRUE LIFE ST0RT OF
AUDIE MURPHY
AMERICA'S MOST DECORATED HERO!
4 n
'I
III
audie r.:u:niY
MARSHALL THOMPSON

, mi h