The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03030

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Related Items:
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Full Text
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an i:;:efe:;:ent
DAILY KEYSPAFkR
i in
TKE COSMOPOLITAN
CAPITAL...
CANADIAN
1 -ti
I! i) (Til I (o (I I j) If II f (T,l ii I
'Zf tftr people know the truth and the country is safe Abraham Vncoln,
i
WHISKY
Li
INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS
Slit YEAR
FIVE CENTS
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, MARCH 12, 1956

1

v ('
4 i

I

1132 mph

BRITISH JET
SETS WORLD
SPEED MARK

LONDON, Mmh 1J (UP)-A
British dlt-wlngtd itt, flying
t lmett twice th ptH of
iound, his sot now world oir
spood rocord of 1132 mph, tho
Royal Aoro Club announced yts yts-tordoy.
tordoy. yts-tordoy.
The clocked flight by the Kai Kai-rey
rey Kai-rey Delta "Droop Snoot" jet broke
the previous American-held rec record
ord record by more than 300 mph, accord according
ing according to the British announcement.
The Fairey jet wai piloted by
British test ace Peter Twiss, 34.
The record time was an average
of two flights over a regulation
test course,
BEAT U.S. RECORD
The flight shattered the record
of 822 mph set by U.S. Air Force.
Cni Horace Hanes last Aug. 20 in

an F100C Super Sabre fighter at
Edwards Air Force Base. Calif.
Twiss flew the course between

Chickester and Ford, England at

n Hitiide of 38.000 reel, more

ihttt eAuan miles 110.

tii. nffioiai xneed still must be

Mnfirmed bv the International

A.rnnautioal Federation to be n

tered in the record books. But the
Royal Aero Club timings are gen

erally faultless.
. On his first run, Twiss avor avor-aged
aged avor-aged 1117 mph. On tho socond,
- with tho wind on his tail, ho av-
.....J 117 mnh.

Delta is nicknamed

u- 'nmnn Snoot" because the

pilot can lower its needle nose for
better visibility while taxiing.
He then cranks it back into
streamlined position for the take takeoff..
off.. takeoff.. :
EXPERIMENTAL PLANE
. ... TTniite th Simpr Sabre,-, t h e

Fairev Delta "is not an -operation-'

al fighter. It is n experimental
research aircraft. r
Amorican research.- p Ion
havo achieved .peed, in the vi.
cinity of 2000 rnph In inert
bursts at high i,itudM i,itudM-ftor
ftor i,itudM-ftor air drops from bomber
that forriod thorn W. n
But no U.S. research plane 01
the Fairey Delta's category has
gone for the record across the reg regulation
ulation regulation measured course under
hich-precision control conditions.
The dart-shaped Delta h a
razor-thin wing spanning only 2b

feet. 10 incnes

Arab 'Big Three
Agree On Plans
To Counter Israel

. CAIRO, March 12 (UP) The Arab "Big Three' to today
day today announced completion of "coordinated Arab defense
plans" to meet any Israeli aggression.
The meeting of minds was announced in a joint com communique
munique communique issued at the conclusion of the "Summit" con con-ference
ference con-ference of the leaders of Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Syria.

Premier Gamal Abdel Nasser been laid Hnwn tn rnnntaranf et

ui tgypt, iung oaua or sauaijtempts. exerted throueh the

Baghdad pact to bring pressure

Arabia and President Shukri El

Kuwatli of Syria met here to co coordinate
ordinate coordinate political and military

policies.

The statement said that "an

all-inclusive plan has been laid
down to coordinate Arab defense
plans in order to face any act
of violence Israel might resort
to."
The Big Three also said that
agreement was reached to guar guarantee
antee guarantee the security of Arab na nations
tions nations threatened by the "sunolv

of Israel with arms which allow
her to persist in her policy of
aggression."
(France came under bitter de denunciation
nunciation denunciation during the week-long
meetings for reported offers to
sell 120 Mystere jet fighters to
the Israeli air force).
The joint statement under underlined
lined underlined the opposition of Egypt,
Saudi Arabia and Syria to the
pro-western Baghdad pact. The
pact links Britain, Iraq, Iran,
Turkey and Pakistan.
"An all conclusive plan has

x 1 I'M

t

ffiW7

n r;

f W

ADVENTURE ENDED

on the Arab countries, endanger

ing Arab security and disuniting
the common Arab front," the
communique said.
It said that the Big Three of
the Arab world also agreed that
"all possible support should be
given Jordan and every help ex extended
tended extended to her in the event of
any foreign pressure or Zionist
aggression."
It added that King Hussein of
Jordan already had been advised

of the complete readiness of

Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Syria
to assist Jordan and stand by
her side

(Jordan has been under heavy
pressure from the three Arab

states to Join their "neutralist

camp since King Hussein fired
British Lt. Gen. Sir John Glubb

as commander of the Arab Le

gion). i

The communique said that an
"all conclusive plan has been setj

up. regarding the situation aris arising
ing arising from the attitude certain

states have adopted by allowing

tne recruitment or their subjects

in the Israeli armed forces.

It is a singie-seai,

Kalian President
Gels Tickcr-Ttp3
Brc:Sv;5y GrcsILf

J. WW 7

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fcnrii.nl... I -M. fe-t ,-rt"U. utill hurm.mJ mm!SL.:.X 3aw ii. ihii, .iiiiil i .i.m.llj

British

Ml

U. S. Tanks For

riircusli Sum
CAIRO, March 12 (UP) An

American cargo ship sailed in a
convoy down the Suez Canal to today
day today carrying 18 U.S.-bullt tanks
bound for Saudi Arabia.

The ship, the James Monroe.

arrived at the mouth of the Ca Canal
nal Canal last night. It was Immediate Immediately
ly Immediately met by an Egyptian port po police
lice police motorboat carrying six arm armed
ed armed policemen.

A few hours later it joinea a
convoy for the trip to Suez. From
there it will go to Tamilian on
the Persian gulf to unload the
tanks. - -.'- --

The tanks, 18 Walker Bulldogs,

were anoted to Saudi Arabia un under
der under a previous agreement.

ur... .w t.4i ,i liie biuu a tilwtBi". Jl.

visun prog ram race uic .naura t in ji v, tha
that the trend was characterize

by political, economic and social
factors which the West must meet
with adequate measures.

.NEW YORK,. March 12 (UP)
Italwn President Giovanni -Gron-chi
receives to day Broadway's
ticker-tape welcome from a city
rich in Italian-American tradi traditions,
tions, traditions, Gronchi also will tour the city's
garment center and will be hon honored
ored honored by a civic luncheon and a
United Nations dinner.
The Italian President, who re

cently met with President Eisen Eisenhower,
hower, Eisenhower, last night urged the West

to meet the recent trend of com

petitive coexistence" by forming a

"true community of nations, each

one on an equal looting.

Gronchi said over the CBS tete-

Gronchi was guest of honor last

tanks would be transshipped be

fore they arrived in Tammam.
"There is no question of trans

shipment, either here or any anywhere
where anywhere else," he said. "My orders

night at an ItaUan American din- are to unload the tanks at Tarn-

representative and Gov. Averell

Harriman of New York

are

crewmembers of 16 different na

tionalities

If

gined aircraft powered by a Rus
Roy ce Avon jet.
Jobless American

Jailed In Balboa
On Vagrancy Count
An unemployed American was

lutf oSft baufter Vj
n? vaerancy was lodged hower. the President's personal Aboard the 7000-ton ship

against him.
He Is Earlle C. Davis, 39-year-ol?
former civilian
the Army who was PicuP by
rnal zone Police on Saturday
Smoon while hanglmt around
the Balboa Clubhouse.
Davis had been doing odd Jobs
around town. Last weekend ne
took a ear belonging to one or
the used car lot owners In Pan Panama
ama Panama City who had been giving
him sporadic work, and drove to
' The defendant failed to return
and the owner notified police
that both the car and man were
' missing, r r ,r:

Saturday afternoon, according
trr the dealers', report, Davis call call-um
um call-um and said he was "desper

ate," and asked his benefactor

' to meet mm at me caiuoa viuw viuw-house.
house. viuw-house. The dealer notified police
' that navis had contacted him.

and they picked him up at the
clubhouse. He was charged with

vasrrancy ."being witnoui legwi legwi-mate
mate legwi-mate business or visible means
of support." A
In the Balboa Court today Da Davis,
vis, Davis, when asked to testify took
the stand, but broke down and
began sobbin? when he spoke of
his three children he claims to
be supporting. He is separated
' fr"v''s -wife. v :
Balboa Magistrate ; John H
Cemin? continued the case until
thl afternoon to give the de defendant
fendant defendant time to "compose him himself."
self." himself."
Uwi.iU W
MEXICO CITY. March 12
(UP) Luciano Alejandro Cha Chavez
vez Chavez rushed excitedly Into the

police station today shouting,
"My Cadillac has been stolen."
' He was unable to give the
license number, however, be-

CANTUTA CREW MEETS PRESIDENT Better-fed and happier than when they were fish fished
ed fished out of the Pacific by the U.S. Navy, four members of the crew of the ill-fated raft Can Can-tuta
tuta Can-tuta meet President Ricardo Arias, who had spoken to. them by shortwave radio during their
90-day drift. From left, Joaquin Guerrero, Argentine; Eduard Ingris; Peruvian, leader of the
expedition: Mirko Gurecky, Czechoslovakian; Andy Rost, Dutch and President Arias. The
Cantuta crew took off lrom Tocumea this morning, homeward-bpund for Lima.

Cracldo

Limits Terrorists
Bomb-throwing

NICOSIA, Cyprus, March 12 (UP) An ominous end
unreal silence has settled over Cyprus.
Terrorist activity has been small.
A few bombs have been thrown, but nothing on the
scale that was expected as a protest against the deporta deportation
tion deportation of Archbishop Makarios.
Observers said the stiff British crackdown after ths

arrest of Makarios was largely responsible for putting a

clamp on lane-scale terrorist operations.

..

, I f

? 1 K

i m

i

The silence came during these

developments:

Bishop Photios of Paphos, cler

ical successor to Makarios, vow vowed
ed vowed to "take up where he left off"
in the colony's defiance of Brit Britain.
ain. Britain. The black-bearded, 44 year-

old bishop was visiting Egypt

when Makarios was arrested.

Documents were found impli

cating Georghi Dighenis, leader of
"Eoka," the Underground terror terrorist
ist terrorist organization, with wholesale

"liquidation plots,"

Security oolice found bombs and

ammunition in the residenca of

Archhishnn Makarios af'.er H t

f .... M j r.

f)n rit Britain's most famous

wartime heroes was seriously in

jured in a riot. r

Makrarios himself was en route

to exile in the Seychelle Islands

m the Indian ucean. v

FIVE BEARDS AND A BABE Natalia Mazuelos, only woman member of the Cantuta crew,:
poses with bearded officers of the USNS Greenville Victory, which brought her and her com companions
panions companions to Panama. ."'.''

w

1.1

YOUNG LOVERS In Greer,-S. C, 12-year-old Susie Goode"
klsses her 21-year-old husband, Robert, Jr., as he leaves tor,
work. The voun? roimtp live with Susie's Barents which

Trusradlllacis-thrTiame-T:lves her plenty of time to" plaf wltlThcr layorite Christmas'
his burro.

Franco-British
Disarmament

Plan Drawn Up

PARTS March 12 (UP)

Premier Guv Mollet' announced

today tnat- France ana mnam
will present a new plan for
world disarmament. He called
on the united States to support

the proposal.
Moilet made the announce

ment at a lunch meeting of the
Foreign press Association short

ly before iacine lour crucian

votes of commence in me na national
tional national Assembly on his Algerian!
policies.
It came shortly after he flew
back to Paris from urgent one one-day
day one-day talks in London with British
Prime Minister Sir Anthony
Eden that brought "wide agree agreement"
ment" agreement" on future British-French
joint policy.
His speech to the foreign cor correspondents
respondents correspondents reflected the new
look emphasis of French diplo diplomacy
macy diplomacy on disarmament and eco economic
nomic economic aid to backward countries.
"In several days there will be
a Franco-British plan for dis disarmament
armament disarmament and everything per permits
mits permits us to hope that it will have

the complete support or tne

L'

tTntteeTStateroyernment,41
said. ,,

NATALIA MAZUELOS thanks Mrs. Arias for the hospitality
with which Panama greeted the castaways. They met during

Draft-Dodging Case

UpJoLHearing

Af Cristobal Today
A nreliminarv hearing on the

removal to Puerto Rico of a Pana

manian doctor, Jaime L. Barraza

of Coco Solo Hospital.. charged

with draft-dodging was set tor this

afternoon in the WistoDai Magi Magistrate
strate Magistrate Court. y
The 32-year-old opthamologist has
been indicted in Puerto Bico on a
charse of failing to report for in

duction in the U.S. Army.

Barraza was a r r e s t e d last
tWfi.tncsriav bv Cristobal Police

and posted $3,000 bail set in the
case. The complaint was received
from Asst. District Attorney J. M.
Thompson, Jr. who was acting at
the request of the U.S. Attorney
in Puerto Rico. They have asked
for Barraza's removal from the

Canal Zone to Puerto Kico w stana
trial. : -.

Barra?a. it was learned as at

tending the University of Tulane m
1952 wnen he decided to visit Puer Puerto
to Puerto Rico. A draft board there gave
Kim m Uw draft number, but after

he returned to Tulane he received

nntirn that his classification naa

been changed to 1-A. The doctor

then wrote ana xpiainea no
serving a medical internship at
Goreas, but heard nothing further

from them until he was arresiea.

tt nrnhaWe cause is found today,

Barraza will be bound over for
trial to the District Court which will
decide on the government's appli

cation for a warrant or removal.

CZ Police Seek ;
Two Winners

Of 'Ball' Prizes

Two women won first and sec

ond prizes at the door prize draw

ing of the Canal Zone Policeman's

ball, but two prizes remain un

claimed.

Police are still looking for the

holders of numbers 3105 and 1383,
third and fourth prizes of the

drawing."' ' ;' : 'y
First prize winner was Dorothy
M. Lowe of Curundu Height with
ticket 4200. A Gorgas Hospital
nurse, Clara A. Zapponl copped
second prize with number 2144.
Holders of either the third or
fourth prize winning tickets are

L

DEPORTED Pro-Greek na nationalist
tionalist nationalist leaders on Cj'prus
ArchbishOp Makarios (above)
and the Bishop of Kyrenia
have been arrested and de deported..
ported.. deported.. The British also sent
troops throughout the island
colony to back up a new get get-tough
tough get-tough policy against terrorists.

Greece Demands
US intervention
In Cyprus Fight

ATHENS, March 12 -(UP)
Greece today demanded "decisive
intervention" by the United States
in the explosive CvDrus disnutu

lest it alenate this country from

the West.

Handsome Greek Premier" Con.

stantine Karamanlis told a group
of visiting American news editors

oreeks demand that the TTnitM

States, which leads the world, in intervene
tervene intervene decisively in the quarrel."

'u tne united States refuses in

use their power to discipline ths

western world in lavor of justice
and liberty, one may be concern concerned
ed concerned about the future of the fr

world," he warned.

het-iart-shrr-fashiorrttomro

ground are Guerrero, Ingris and Gurecky.

Station.

HexicEn Surviver
Fnrn FFshrni Crut
Housed Al CcrozrJ
Two Mexican seamen who were
adrift off the coast of Mexico for
three days without food or water
arrived here yesterday on board
the Norwegian freighter German
which rescued them at sea.
The two survivors, Hector
Diaz, 28, and Jesus Cota, 34, ara
now in the Corozal Quarantine Sta Station
tion Station awaiting repatriation back to
Mexico.
They said today that the hatfery
on the 40-ft. fishing boat Flanvri.
go on which they were crew,
members went dead, and they hn J
rudder damage. The' little cr: ;
J : r. i .1

was aunu lor mree nays cr,K)
the men were spotted by'the pass passing
ing passing freighter, v
One of the men, Cota, was --conscious
conscious --conscious when the rescue i
fected. He was lying on the r
and rescuers worked on him t -hours
before he could he rr.
The men had no food or -the
ship for three days, they s ;
According to Fenton and O
gents for the Germa, Vor. y .
ors are to be repatriate i t-i
be made lor them.



THE PANAMA AMERK S AN INDl PENDENT DAILT NE'TSPArEU
MONDAY, MAf.Cn 13, in

PACE TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
' rMC9 NP ruli!lt;eD THl IICN EaS, IMC.
- rousceo r ncloN ou4iveui. i. i2
HAHMOOIO ARIAS. tt'l'OK
7, H fmeiT f o Bot 134 pnw, d w f
TiiEPMOSt Z 0740 S LiM
Ctt AbEKEIS. PANAMIR1CA. PM
Coto 0FHt 'I 17 CriTs. A.txut in!X "2-tH C ISth STaCft
FOflitl DlPKISENTATlVit JOSHUA e. PO'.VtRS, INC
",-'." 349 MOISO Avt Nl 'OHK. 7 I N
Pt Month m I no I
OA MONTH IN ADH'JCt 80 X
o ohi vim. i-i T "-t 18 SO t OO

TM15 IS IdUH FORUM THt HEADERS OWN COIUMN
tha MaJ Ion it apan tanim a rlader at Tha Pimm Amtricon
latttri civd gratefully a4 art fctndlad ia a waollv caaMtnl
aaanaet
It ctatributa a letter n bt impotent tf It a'aaia'l appaai
lul 41 Lallan ara publisha Ida racaivaaV
- Plaita try ta kata tha latter limited to ana paae length.
Identity of Icftc wtitar i held in itricfeit cantidene.
Tkit atfrsaapat ravmti aa ratpot-bility far srattattitft ei apmioro
xprutf ia latter from readtrt.
THE MAIL BOX

PEROMSM OR DEMOCRACY?
Sir
Has The Panama American become the forum for a high high-pressure
pressure high-pressure group 'GPtermined to whitewash Peron and disparage

Labor News
And
Comment

The Waves Rule Britannia

By VICTOR RIESEL

Comrade Khrushchev's own clan
is riding across the south. Leading
the pack is the front man for a

Soviet atomic spy now in Alcatraz

The Kremlin's carpetbaggers have
deliberately invaded the south at

its tensest moment.

Having virtually no Communist
Party belowv Mason-Dixon just

one member in Mississippi, 96 in
Alabama. 196 in Texas, 135 in
Florida, 50 each in Georgia and

Louisiana. 95 in North Carolina,
15 in .South Carolina, 21 in Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee and 5.1 in Virginia at the latest

, public FBI count the pro-Com

munists decided to set up a propa propaganda
ganda propaganda front.:
They chose this moment of the
south' wracking political and so sociological
ciological sociological pain to launch a new
drive for the freedom of convicted
atomic spy Morton Sobell. They

tha TTniteit States'?

-.. ppmn's cast is a matter of Dublic record. Anyone who cares

"to read the facts knows that he is an evil man dedicated to sent one of their veteran labor
self -aggrandizement. The present attempt to picture him as a raen, Aaron Schneider riding
brnevoTeiifc protector of the common people looks very much like through community after commu-
' the work of a well-paid professional press agent. Dont be de- nity. In eight cities they set up

reived bv it ineatiquaners lor me aovieieenng
tin tiiinicina ritien of the United' States would ever pretend j "National Committee To Secure

that our country is perfect. Until human nature can be chang changed
ed changed by law, there, will continue to be, in every country, prejudices
and wrongdoing. l,
-n,'-.,miirH i-a tho heiipf. however, that free public

. .,ntin hns anH. mill continue to overcome many of these .committee hel!quarters m Miami

eviis II present conditions, bad us they are in sports, are com -1 Orlando, -New Orleans, Houston,
pared with what prevailed 20 or M years ao, anyone can see Austin, Dallas, Atlanta and Win Win-that
that Win-that much progress has been made; and that's about all one S(0n-Salem. These are the cities
an hmv'for in a democracy !in which their own reports boast

Tn the i.nev ease, as in the others mentioned, a totalitarian i 0f headquarters. Their report re

government could, of course, bring about immediate compliance
with the law, but at. what cost? Who would want to accept
the other conditions that accompany a completely authoritarian
The fact is, we are on our way to self improvement by dem democratic
ocratic democratic means. We should not let rabble-rousers blind us to all
that has been accomplished by dwelling on a admittedly
unsolved problems. Do you think for a minute that there are
not worse problems in Russia? And is Panama Itself free from
racial and economic problems? L,r,1 t
There have been evils in the world since the beginning of
time, and there always will be. The most we can dp is to
work constantly for the betterment of all the people through
thp ballot box and by democratic methods.
But don't let zealots confuse your thinking. Ask yourself
which you honestly prefer: pcronismo, Stalinism, Hitlerlsm or

the freedoms guaranteed by a democratic rauumwu, uou

Justice For Morton Sobell."

They're now ready to pour their
poison into the troubled political
lifestream of the south from these

I

veals no addresses.

Schneider's trek through the
south obviously coincides with the
turbulence of the tragic integra integration
tion integration conflict. The drive for Sobell's
freedom was as dead as a Pom Pompeii
peii Pompeii an statue. The Sovieteers ran
through more than a $1,000,000 col collected
lected collected for the atomic spies' cam campaign.
paign. campaign. The money has all been
spent and some government agen agencies
cies agencies are mighty curious over
where it all went.
The comrades were searching
for other irritants when, suddenly,;

they were told to get busy again

Democratic Strategy
By PETER EDSON

iuv iiccuuim i u,,t -on. on me &oneu ireeoom cainyaiKii

the assumption that men a'e""Ma"a lru "u And to start in the South. Theyiman Paul Butler of Indiana says

allv tmnroved world.

We have a long way to go, true; but let's not deceive our ourselves
selves ourselves bv thinking that Peron or his ilk would do onything to
help along the process. Apprajsal

A.F.R.S. PROGRAMS

Protestant Church groups as well

as labor and Negro organizations
were interested in their drive.
Schneider, for example, walked
in on the New Orleans Anti-Defa-

Sir: ) .. Jtn mation League. Its officers lis-

ThP noor nroRiaminK in tne evenings ovei me nuucu juw 4llct ,- ennh fn jparn

Pariln has been the subject of much discussion at parties i, u. ,." hMHi fnr

have attended in recent months. ....
The steady diet of dramas and soap operas that have been
eulled from several major networks and given to us in a con concentrated
centrated concentrated dose every evening is a source of worry to we who
contemplate laying out several hundred dollars for television
sets soon. Many of us feel that It would be a waste.
The afternoon programs, during which time I suppose tne
prottramlna director listens to his own radio, usually consist of
a variety of music tftahW Pleases almost everyone. How
about swltchinn it abound? ,' jlt:v S .
Let's have music lor mosVof .the evening and let this
programing character listen to his dramas in the afternoon
At least, let's mix it up a bit. Or, if it's the colonel's wife that
likes her evening soap operas, then please find out for us when
the colonelis going to be shipped out. Anjeia ilead
.'i -:tt , , -, ; 11 ; '""

oroceeded to attempt to make it I he has been figuring all along that

appear that Jewish, Catholic and the man his party would have to

WASHINGTON (NEA) Dem-i 1952 loo late to do much good

ocratic National Committee Chair-' in that campaign.

Butter s idea now is to get the

4 M

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j ::. ? .-M"-WMiilrt..wHMwi
ir. "."-'
1
I

CLAY "CAR" Here'i how cars of the future are designed at
; Ford's Dearborn, Mich., plant. Clay artists create full-size and
' scale models complete with windows, chrome and enamel finish
for various acceptance tests. Using techniques of a precision
sculptor, the specialists form the clay over laths, much as is done
In plastering walls and ceilings. -.

who he was. He then headed for
the League's national headquarters
in New York and told them that
he had been sent by the New Or Orleans
leans Orleans group. The ADL leaders
listened politely but made it clear
they'll have nothing to do with
him or his committee.

NOTICE
The Board of Directors invite,
all stockholder? of the
CIA. CHIRICANA DE LECHE, SA
to the annual meeting of its "stockholders to be:
held on the 15th of March 1956 at 8:00 p.m. in -the
main hall on the Panama Chamber of Commerce
Building.
. CAMILO QUELQUEJEU
Secretary.

Nonetheless, Schneider's report
on his southern trip feiakcs it seem
that he was well received by this
league, which disdained him, and
by other religious groups as well.
He lists a series of these lay and
church organizations, Intimating
they were sympathetic. This de deliberate
liberate deliberate effort to hook respectable-anti-Communist
organizations to a
Soviet spy parallels the maneuver maneuvering
ing maneuvering of the National Negro Com Commission
mission Commission of the Communist Party.

This is the Party's official Negro

propaganda and agitation division

It has been contacting units of the

National Association For the Aa-

vancement of Colored People try-1
ing, by one camouflaged maneuver
after another, to corkscrew its way
into the crisis despite the great
damage Communis taint would do
to the Negro cause.
Schneider was chosen by the So Sobell
bell Sobell Committee because of his
union organizing experience. He
once was an officer of the pro pro-Communist
Communist pro-Communist United Office and Pro Professional
fessional Professional Workers Union. When he
went South recently, he contacted
those union' officials who would
hear him.
The Communist Daily Worker
reports that, a sub-regional direc director
tor director of the Packinghouse Workers
Union, AFL-CIO, is included in one

of Sobell committee s sponsor nsis.
I This could mean still more
trouble. For such sponsorships
'could give some of the White Citi Citi-!
! Citi-! zens Councils a chance to shout
that labor is fronting for a Soviet
spy, '-
I This is obviously false but it
could be used by the neo Ku Klux
Klan elements now riding again,
i The south could well do without
i more fuel for the labor civil war
now developing behind-the-scenes.
Some of the White Councils have
! already completed their plans for
! launching a labor division. Jim
I llanna, president of the Mississippi
i Industrial Union Council has told

his colleagues that the drive is on

beat in November would be either
President Eisenhower or an Ike-

picked successor.

The Hoosier thinks the Demo

crats can take him, and they are
mapping a national campaign
which they think will do the trick.

The impression which the news

papers now give of Eisenhower s
great popularity is false, says But Butler.
ler. Butler. He thinks the President today

is less popular than any of the

last three Republican presidents
was at the end of his first term.

Eisenhower, says Butler, is the

first President in U.S. history to

lose control of both houses of Con Congress
gress Congress in the middle-of his first
term. Butler thinks the GOP is in
real trouble.
Chairman Butler doesn't doubt
that the Republicans will have
more money to spend on the cam campaign
paign campaign than the Democrats.
He says he is depending more

on small contributions. Within the
next few weeks Democratic head

quarters in Washington will an

nounce several new. type subscrip subscription
tion subscription plans to get small amounts

from large numbers of voters.

One of these plans is a moduica

tion of the party membership tick ticket
et ticket subscription proposed by
Beardsley Ruml in September,

didates was that while the half half-hour
hour half-hour speeches held the partisans,
the Hooper ratings on these shows

maxiumum amount Defore the con- dropped way down. This was par par-venlion
venlion par-venlion opens in Chicago Aug. U. 'ticularly true where they knocked

After tne convention, the money, off popular network shows

peak is past.

The fund raising will be kicked

off in Washington April 21 with

a $100-a-plate, Woodrow Wilson

Centennial dinner at the National

Guard Armory. It will highlight

the customary Jefferson-Jackson

day celebration.

Butler is budgeting for a three-million-dollar
presidential cam

paign this year, plus another three
million for congressional cam campaigns.
paigns. campaigns. This adds up to a million
dollars less than the Republican

National Committee s budget.
' Chairman Butler says he'll wait
until after the Chicago convention
to see what type of campaigning
best suits the personality of the

candidates he'll have to work with.

In the meantime, he intends to

talk to all the leading, announced

Democratic candidates to see how
much whistle-stopping and plane plane-hopping
hopping plane-hopping should be done, and where
the campaign itinerary should hit,
One thing is certain. The Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic candidates won't be waging
any kind of a front-porch cam campaign.

They'll introduce a number of

new radio and television tech'
niques.
The 1952 experience with all can

Butler therefore plans to Concen

trate on five-minute programs,

They will be spotted at the begin

ning of the network programs so

that announcers will say, in effect:
"Stay tuned now, for a five-minute
broadcast from the Democrat Democratic
ic Democratic National Committee, to be fol

lowed by 25 minutes of 'I Love

Lucy' or whatever it is.

Butler ajso plans to use a num

ber of panel shows, which do hold
up on the Hooper scale. One idea

is CBS President Frank Stanton's

proposal for a series of face-to-face
TV broadcasts between the
Democratic and the ? Republican

candidates. But thinks this would
get out a far bigger vote than

i35Z's 60 munon.
Butler says this face-to-face de debate
bate debate would help conserve the Pres President's
ident's President's health.

"If the President's health doesn't

permit this much activity," says

butler in a challenging manner.

"then maybe another look should

be taken at the panel of doctors

reports.

"The President's health is auto

matically an issue,'" says Butler.

"For even if he lives out a full
second term, he would end it older
than any other President in

office."

WalterWinchell In lew Yor

.0

THE BROADWAY PARADE

.lived with them for a while to get

be:

close-ups. The title was to

Irving Berlin, wealthiest of the '"Blondes Prefer Gentlemen"

songwriters, has an offer of $l,'How the cost of producing shows
000,000 to compose a score for a I has changed since 1943: The origi-

Paramount picture He just gava nai production ot "Ukianoma"

the "Ziegfield Follies" his famed

song, "A Pretty Girl Is Like A
Melody," for only $1 . .Johnnie
Ray plavs the faraway places

(such as South Africa) because $1,000

that's r where he recently netted
$46,000 in a month. You need only
one smash recording and the
world buys it. He is currently play
ing return dates in Australia.
Anita Ekberg's latest movie is
"Zarak Khan," filmed abroad. She
performs as a four minute dance in
it in her skin. -.Peggy Ann Gar
her, starring in "Bus Stop" in Bos
ton, and Albert Salmi of the N.Y.
cast know This Is It. Week-end
flights, etc.1 .Janet Leigh's ex expected
pected expected 'image is costing her $300,-
win mL. ... -L. 1

iuUUU. Hie money sue Bpmiicu mi
4.0 "PL10"110"' u0ffi"f 3 films, .The WiU Mastin Trio

AFL-CIO and launch competing

groups. This would result in a
civil war within the civil war.
Which would give the Kremlin s
m-ivnto rinn pxartlv what it seeks-

explosives dumped on the fire of

racial feuding in me soum.

V-'"'

To Stockholders oi the
Pznzma Insurance Company, Inc.
;' ..:'..... ..
The annual meeting. of the Panama
Insurance Company, Inc., will take
place on Wednesday, March 14, 1936,
at 4:00 P.M. at the of fices of the Com-1
pany, at Campo Alegre. Via Espana and
Kicardo Arias Street.

THE SECKFrAKY

him last in "Kismet" when he

thrushed 'Stranger In Paradise"

. .In San Antonio a movie mar

quee billed her as "Princess Grace
Kelly" . ,The Blue Angel phoned

Roberta Sherwood (at Miami

ceacni iasi nignt onenne ner star

domunseen and unheard. .Hey-

wood Hale Broun, son of the late

colyumist, plays a lead in the

! soon-due drama. "I Soy." Ray-

ana wait untu tney areara up a, mono Massey stars,
program for her .... Joe E. Lewis!

was beim interviewed about his' Director Elia Kazan is shooting

career. "I made two pictures uij "Baby Doll" in Brooklyn. He will

Houywooa, ne aead-panned. "one1 introduce Carroll Baker, "the sex

grossed $400 and the other was a lest blonde in years. -A product

cost $85,000.. .The cost of the cos

tumes and orchestrations for the

musical, "Shangri-La," due June
6th. .CBS pays Marie Wilson

a week just to sit around

flop."

"The Search For Bridey Mur Murphy"
phy" Murphy" author, had his attorney send
warning letters to music publish
ers and recording -firms, who pub
lished songs with the name Bridey
Murphy in the title. Said he would
sue.-, .Liberty Records -was one
firm that got the letter song-writer-publisher
Frank Loesser is an
other. Their song is "Bridey Mur-

was Her Name." There are

riN'

are billed over the star Sammy

Davis, Jr., on the Broadwav Thea
tre siL'n for "Mr. Wonderful" be-

K.iicA iholv etnniraM veiih hirri cave'

so. First-Nighters .will wonder. j S1X tine mmt ma. .
-. You cannot copyright a title m the
I -i United States. .Elsie Janis' story
Dorothy Collins latest record i will be w r i 1 1 e n by Marguerite
ing. "Seve n Days," and Kavi'-iourtney daughter of the late star

Starr's "Till I Waltz Again With Laurette Taylor. She wrote "Laur-

iou are soiinu-miKeN. com summ summed
ed summed better as "Rigoletto" .Frank
Sinatra's article on teevee In Red
jyok explains why he chucked it
for the simnle life of Hollywood
. .Marlon Brando's pater is now
on the Paramount fH'wond) staff
. .Lucille Ball's full length black black-mist
mist black-mist mink set DeM back a mere
$20,000. .Max Liebman and Allen
Boretz, now prosnering Broadwa'--ites,
once co-auth'd a flop named
"Off To Buffalo." It ran a week

.Jerry Wald, who has 25 per-'
cent of the movie, "Piniic." and Time assigned a writer to do
"The Harder They Fall," will earn! the Mike Todd cover story for Au

at least a million this year with
taxes taking 91 cents from every
dollar. .Rich is better?

of The Actors' Lab. .A playboy
(at the next Stork Club table) was
telling his ladv friend that he would
soon be appointed an ambassador.
Jim Hagerty, who would know

about such things was about to
edit the fellow but changed his

mind. .when Adial Stevenson was
cocktaued at Sardi's the other sun

down, a cameraman suggested

photo with the candidate between

Shelley Winters and Jayne Mans Mansfield.
field. Mansfield. An aide-de-camp okayed Shel
ley but feared Jayne "was too high-

powered" .Buster Keaton dashed

back to Hollywood (after his Mar

tha Raye click) for "The Buster

Keaton Story." It ought to be good.
There's a lot of story in the for former
mer former M(1M star, who niDhs- "I dnn't

ette," her mother's biog. .Before-even know anybody at MGM any

sue pusseu miss Mains ineu us more .Vivian Blame, led up

Courtney to write it. .They say;with H'wood. will dwell here after

NBC's secret weapon for the Com

edy Hour is a series of filmed
satires spoofing movies. .Count

the divorce.

Carol Channing's first movie tune

C'MrleS de PolignaC (PommerVits wire tn tancrle with notwnrlr run

champagnen Lanvin perfumes, etCisors. It is "A Corset Can Do a
will be Rainier's best man. He is Lot For a Ladv" . Sinful word

the Prince's uncle. .Cugat is'iee here and there. .Richard

rushing home from Rome. Because
kin are using the family name for

a band.

Hayes' first platter (since his in

duction into the Army) is "The
Str of 33 Steps" which may

make him rich. He returns to muf mufti
ti mufti June 27th . .Simon and Schus

ter will publish Judy Garland's

Edward G. Robinson was in
great haste coming out of the stage
door at 'Middle of the Nimt."
An autograph hunter persisted. .
"But I'm in such a hurry!" said

"Edwardr

gust. The writer flew East withtiife gaga. .Joe Morris, an editor,
Todd the other night but couldn'ths suing over the film, "Three

lain mil vcvauoc uc Jiajcu gui
rummy all the way to N.Y. Hasn't
one paragraph yet. .Mrs. George

Orwell, widow of the novelist, is
reported bitter about the movie
version of his book, "1984." They
will change some scenes to keep

vour initials." insisted the ccst. z.1 ing his first dramatic role on

The book Anita Loos planned on Broadway, gives a too account of
the Gabor Family didn't jell. She himself in "Time Limit!" You saw

Stripes in the Sun." Alleges it is
not based on the life of a Sergeant

as purported but on a piece of

fiction he wrote for a mag, con

frere Lee Mortimers lady fnepds
are invariably Oriental. Now go on
witL the gag. ... .Frank Farrell

he- quieU-r-Jlicbard -Kiley r play 4 asked tw.jv.Ouue dolls whaLthey

were whispering about. "We were

(Continued on Page 4)

17ash!;:gto;i
r.teY-Go-Rou;:D
It Dngy PCAHSON

WASHINGTON' TV,. t,.c;.

uepartment is planning to step1
gingerly into the red-hot racial
question in the South with a set
01 recommendation, fnr Inn,

forcement that will probably make

uuui siues gore.

The recommpndaf inn. will tn

" ... i VI
stiller protection of th Nirrr..'

right to vote not only in federal

out in state ana local elections. If
approved by the White House, they
will be sent ta Cnnpi-K th.

recommendations of President Ei-

sennower.

AS Of todav. the instil TWiart-

ment irfterprets the present law
as giving the federal government
DOWer to intervene nlslv in iaA

eral elections: Rrnartenino intsr.

yention to apply to local elections

is sure to set ou a iuror in some
states and will meet vigorous on-

position in rnnprccn Hnuever

House Republicans have enough

votes, u lined up with Northern
Democrats to pass such a bill if
thev wish. Whether it

by a Senate filibuster is another

matter.

While this legislation in hminrl

to create bitterness in the South

wegroes wiu claim it does not go

tar enougn. xney want immediate
intervention in Montgomery, Ala.

Bridge Vs. Italy
Italian diplomats are among the

most polite and gracious people vin
Washington, so you won't hear it
mentioned above a whisper. How However,
ever, However, they are afraid the Com

munists won't be so courteous about

President Eisenhower's failure to

give the usual White Hous dinner
for visiting President Giovanni

trronchi of Italy.

No one really expected this din

ner at first. The Italians knew the

President had been ill; so were
most agreeable about overlooking

dinner which is strict protocol

when the President invites the head

of a state to visit him.

What upset things was the fact

that one day before President

Gronchi arrived, Eisenhower went
to a dinner party in celebration of

John Foster Dulles' 68th birthday

On top of this came an announce announcement
ment announcement that Ike had sat up until
12:30 a.m. in Thomasville two

nights before, playing bridge.
Naturally, with this appearing

in American newspapers, it will

be picked Up immediately by Ital

ian Communists tJ show that the
President of the United States
doesn't hav enough regard for

the President of Italy to put nim

on a par with bridge and a birth

day party.

Gronchi-GoRound
Presiripnt flrnnrhi. who tonic of

fice without the blessing of Am Ambassadress
bassadress Ambassadress Clare Boothe Luce, has
now won her 100 per cent support

She regards mm as me great nope
of Italy, feels that the President of
Ttalv mav heenmn like the Presi-

ent of the United States, a real

power, not just a figurehead. .

Gronchi has injected a vigorous
nnl stahilir.inff hand into Italian

politics, requires cabinet officers

to call personauy at nis omce wnen
thev want Hprrpps and laws signed

. .He has traveled au over xtaty

since assuming oftice. nas Kepi in
close touch with Premier Segni. .
Mrc T.nre has Kiinnorted him bv

switching American aid money to

projects whicn would ouua up tne
Italian working classes and win
vnte. avuav frnm communism. .

Gronchi gave up smoking at 63

to strengthen n voice tor pumic

speaking, i .He naiea to arive a
iir cnealr nnnr F.nelish. Mrs.

Gronchi speaks better English,

loves to drive a car. . .state
nenartment officials were red-

faced about a confidential memo

which went the Inter-office rounds,
avnlaininrt that fLrnnphi'ft name

was pronounced "as- in donkey"

Emmett Till Murder
Attorney General Brownell has

now taken a definite and official

stand that there is no way the Jus

tice Department could have inter intervened
vened intervened in the Emmett Till murder
case in Mississippi.
In reply to a letter from Con Congressman
gressman Congressman Clyde Doyle (D.. Calif.),
Assistant Attorney General War Warren
ren Warren Olney, writing for Brownell.
states categorically that the Jus Justice
tice Justice Department cannot intervene,
also that it cannot intervene in
two other Negro murder cues.
"Emmett Louis Till was kid kidnapped
napped kidnapped and killed by private
dividuals," Olney wrote Congress Congressman
man Congressman Doyle, "his body was found
within three days of the kidnap kidnapping
ping kidnapping and he was not transported
across state lines. These offenses
were thus violations of the laws
of Mississippi only and not of any
federal statute. This department,
therefore, had no jurisdiction or
authority to take any action in
connection with the latter and no
investigation was conducted."
Referring to two other murders
of Negroes in Mississippi, Olney
wrote Congressman Doyle:
"We assume that the two 'adult
Negro citizens' referred to in the
fourth paragraph of your letter
are Lamar Smith, who was killed
at Brookhaven, Miss., on or about
August 13,1955, and the Reverend
George Wesley Lee, who was shot
to death at Belzoni, Miss., on or
about May 7, 1955.
"Preliminary inquiry in connec
tion with the death of Mr. Lamar
Smith showed that he was killed
not because of the exercise or the
attempt to exercise his right to
vote, but in a controversy and fight
with private individuals over his
alleged illegal manipulation of ab absentee
sentee absentee ballots in a purely local
election. Such facts, of course, in indicate
dicate indicate no offense under federal
statues, and this department has
henc; been unable to take any
action.
"Extensive investigation was con conducted
ducted conducted in connection with the death
of the Reverend George Wesley
Lee to determine whether he was
killed, as had been alleged, be because
cause because he insisted upon his right to
vote for the purpose of intimidat intimidating
ing intimidating others in the exercise of this
right. The investigation, despite its
thoroughness and dispatch, has
failed, up to now, to establish the
truth of such allegations, or any
violation of federal laws."
Concluding his letter, Olney put
the Justice Department categori categorically
cally categorically on record for tighter laws to

protect Negroes' right to vote.

"In the opinion of tne Attorney
General," he wrote, "existing fed federal
eral federal law is not sufficient to protect
the right to vote as the same is
secured or intended to be secured
by the Constitution of the United
States. Accordingly, the Attorney
General is preparing to recommend
comprehensive legislation in this
field to the President for transmis transmission
sion transmission taihe Congress, It is Relieved
that such legislation will reach the
Congress in time for aciton att his
session." S :- '"'':" '

NO GIFTS

LINCOLN, Neb. (UP) The
Lincoln board of education has
adopted a resolution outlawing
certain small gifts, such as apples,
from pupils to teachers. Also
teachers may give no presents to
students only cards on such days
as Valentine's Day.

Nta
2-27

The person who works ond saves
will some doy have enough to
divide with those who dtdn't.

Happy Holiday!

Answer to Previous Puzzle

ACROSS
1,4,9 Tonight is
12 Before
13 Clothe
14 Crimson
15 Bind
16 Viper
17 Born
18 Pieces out
20 Contender
22 Pigpen

24 Wager

25 Entangles

S Tomorrow
starts a new
4 Leaven
5 This is the
of 1955
6 Augment
7 Regret
8 Wait on table
9 Sea eagle
lOSwerve
11 City in The

Netherlands

19 Worm

Pl IS I IP IA IT IE I ISIM j I IP
TEeTERft.lN.40T
C L E N J1"2..B.S
pieia ? SRO S SE D
overbIIer hie.
SOLE "tEfo 7? A
JJTJS TTf5 eTTsI pm"g

25- your
resolutions
28 Range
27 Rip

128 Compass polnt21Follower
;?2tchw y, 23 Color
34 Merrymaker

tonight
135 African worm
36 Brazilian
macaw
37 New Zealand
parrot
38 Land parcel
39 Clamp
40 Auricles
42 Individual
43 Harem rooms
44 Stitch

49 Burmese wood

sprite
48 Salamander
30 Steals
53 Metal
54 Treasure
58 Fairy fort
60 Social insect
61 Muse of
poetry
62 Table scrap
63 Driving
command
84 Most unusual
65 Tiny
DOWN
1 Seine
2 Great Eke""

29 Presently
31 Baton
32 Assam
- silkworm
33 Knocks
41 Mariner's

direction

51 Horns and
whistles will
tonight
52 Forefather.-
53 Label
55 British money
of account

43 Siouan Indiwi 56 River in
45 Anesthetic Switzerland
47 Zeal 57 Route (ab.)
48 Number 69 Female saint
49 Grafted (her.) (ab.)

I1 li li I H IS K 11 18 I j jio ill
T" 3
m-
1 -rt M .-.' :
X """""" Wtssk 51 35"""" w
W '. iT" : IT"



Tin PANAMA AMERICAN AN DfDErENDrXT DA ELY NETVSFAFr.il
fACr Ttl
High SchooJ Girls Who Staged
Fake Kidnap Freed On Parole
Ct!:':rni3 Uicrer Separate Fund-Raising Drives
'PrcIfrSMYlb
r
A(i:r C::n3 M:i Launcned liy uemocrats, laUF

mont, march 12, r.'s

St
Many

NEWTON. Iowa, March 12

(UP) Four happy high school
girls walked out of jail today and
into the arms of their parents aft
er serving a brief sentence for
, cooking up a fake kidnaping sto
ry.
The girls, released on parole
after spending two days of a 30-
day sentence behind bars, were
joyous as they stepped into the
four waiting automobiles for a
long drive back to their homes in
Newton, Iowa.
"We're Just tickled te death
we get off ae easy," said one of
the teen-agers. "You can be
sure we'll never do anything
like this again."
Their parents greeted their
daughters warmly but had little
to say except to ask photograph photographers
ers photographers that no pictures be taken.
"The girls have had enough pub publicity
licity publicity and all the punishment they
need for their prank," said one
father.
The girls Gloria Jensma and
Loue Davis, both 18, and Jeanene
Fahrney and Judy D a m m a n,
however, beamed happily for the
pictures.
The youngsters said they still
had one worry whether they

Pope Pius Imparts Blessing
As Snowstorm Pelts Vatican

VATICAN CITY, March 12 -(UP)
Pope Pius XII today re resumed
sumed resumed his series of private au audiences
diences audiences with leaders of the 51 spe special
cial special delegations who attended the
ceremonies connected with h i s
80th birthday and the 17th anni anniversary
versary anniversary of his coronation. ..
The Pontiff was scheduled to re receive
ceive receive the mission chiefs from
West Germany, Portugal and the
province bf Quebec, Canada. He
also was expected to receive spe special
cial special Dutch Ambassador Jonkheer
Mark Van Weeden and the Prince
of Cursi, representative of the ti tiny
ny tiny Communist run Republic of
San Marino.
Most of the mission chiefs plan planned
ned planned to present birthday gifts to
the Pontiff during the private au audiences
diences audiences in the Pope's library.
The interviews were expected to
last about 20 minutes each. Pope
Pius received most of the other
51 mission chiefs in the days pre pre-cedding
cedding pre-cedding yesterday's solemn anni-
The Pope stood at an open win window
dow window in a snowstorm yesterday to
Impart a blessing to the world on
the occasion of his birthday.
Some 50,000 persons ignored
occasional claps of thunder and
Week Of Prayer
Continues Tonight
At SDA Church
A week of prayer which began
on Saturday last in the Chomllo
Seventh-day Adventish church will
continue tonight and each night
-throughout this week, it was an announced
nounced announced today,
The theme of the week is "The
Discovery of Living" and the lec lectures
tures lectures for each evening will be pre presented
sented presented by well-known youth speak speakers.
ers. speakers. Tonight's speaker will be Edward
N. Brown, one of the leaders of the
church. His topic will be "Living
on the Straight Way."
Wednesday: "Resource for Vic Victorious
torious Victorious Living" by Carlos L. Ab Abbott,
bott, Abbott, local Elder of the church.
Thursday: "Communion With
Heaven" by C. D. Christensen,
president of the Panama Confer Conference
ence Conference of SDA.
t Friday: "Living for Outreach"
by Talbert Weeks, missionary vo volunteer
lunteer volunteer leader bf the Young Peo People's
ple's People's Society.
Saturday: (11 a.m.) "Living To Today."
day." Today." Speaker to be announced.
All meetings will be interspers interspersed
ed interspersed with special musical numbers.
The public is invited.
V 1

Sic ; ii-tfiT)
'-li'h !J s"'SsVt! fillip" If

would be allowed to return to
their classes at school. Beyond
thet they said they were glad
"its all over."
The girls were were paroled by
Walter L. McVey after each was
ordered to pay $5.24 in court costs
for their kidnaping hoax which
sent 28 carloads of officers on a
search for non-existent abductors.

I Authorities said the whole affair
cost more than $1,000, and U. D.
Dist. Atty. William C. Farmer
said he has referred the matter to
the Department of Justice in
Washington. He said he felt the
matter of giving false information
in connection with the federal kid
nap law "should not go unnotic unnoticed."
ed." unnoticed." .
The girls were Sentenced on
charge of disturbing the peace.
They spent their time in a four four-cot
cot four-cot cell at the county jail.
A sympathetic jail matron bak baked
ed baked a cake for the girls and Me
Vey said he had received a flood
of telegrams, telephone calls and
letters from all over the country.
He said the majority endorsed
his action. He said that after two
days of confinement the girls "had
learned their lesson and had been
sufficiently punished."
the mixture of snow and rain
that pelted the cobblostonod
square of St. Potor.'s to bo bless blessed
ed blessed and shout "viva il Papa"
(long live the Pope) and "augu
ri" (happy birthday).
The Pontiff delayed his blessing
"urbi et orbi" (to the city and to
the world) for 14 minutes in the
hopes the storm would let up. The
Vatican said the Pope was disap
pointed that the weather forced
him to remain indoors. He was
bundled in a white errrune man
tie during the two minutes he
stood at the open window.
The blessing followed an ages
old ceremony in the basilica of
St. Peter's, attended by 35,000
persons including official repre
sentatives of 51 nations. Los An
geles businessman John A. Mc Mc-Cone
Cone Mc-Cone served as President Eisen-
nower s personal representative.
the huge church, largest in
Christendom, was decorated in
red and gold drapes and lighted
by candles and indirect electric
lights for the solemn mass com
memorating the Pope s birthday
which actually was March 2, and
the anniversary of his reign to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. The Pontiff was carried down
the central nave of the church on
a chair while other officials wav waved
ed waved ostrich-feather fans. Twenty -nine
cardinals, including James
McGuigan, archbishop of Toron Toronto,
to, Toronto, Ont.; followed in their scarlet
robes trimmed with ermine. Pa Papal
pal Papal guards with halberds lined the
path.
The Pope prayed for a few min minutes
utes minutes on the tomb of St. P e t e r.
Then the triplecrowned tiara was
placed on his head and he ascend
ed the golden throne to hear the
solemn mass.
After the so-minute ceremony,
the Pope: was carried out on the
chair, bending to the left and right
as he was carried along to impart
his blessings.
Red Cross
In Veterans Administration
Hospitals, patients are htlped to
recovery by Gray Ladies and
other trained Rod Cross volun volunteers
teers volunteers who assist hospital staffs
in rehabilitation of patients.
Your support of the Red Cross
helps finance the professional
leadership and training which
keeps these volunteers on the
jobl
FREE LUNCH
4 6 p.m. DAILY
EL RANCHO

MERCED, Calif., March 12

(UP) It was a real fine funeral
that Bill Hawkins' pals put on for
him. "
One of his grieving friends do
nated a suit so Bill could be bu
ried in style. Others chipped in to
buy a burial plot. And all of his
buddies attended the Masonic fu
neral services on Feb. 23.
The only thing wrong was that
Bill wasnt dead. They buried an
other man.
The mixup came to light when
the 74-year-old laborer strolled in into
to into the home of his friend of 30
years, Charles A. Bunch last
night. Bunch was one of the
friends that had identified a man
struck down and killed by an au automobile
tomobile automobile Feb. 19 as Bill Hawkins.
More than somewhat startled.
Bunch called Coroner Kenneth
Riggs who was even more disturb disturbed.
ed. disturbed. He had the dead man exhumed
and his fingerprints sent to the
state capitol at Sacramento for i-
dentification.
As for Hawkins, he was "pretty
shook up," said Riggs. He had
been away on a trip to Sacramen
to.
RADIO RECIPE
ORANGE, Conn. tUP)-Police
Chief Carl A. Peterson said freak
weather conditions brought in
broadcasts from San Antonio, Tex.,
New Orleans, La., and Laredo,
Tex., on the Orange police radio.
"A couple of women police dis dispatches
patches dispatches were talking back and
forth about a recipe for fried
chicken," he said. "I was hungry
all day."

If you want Bourbon at its best call for
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whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.

Special Offer

ivuviiii&w jvw viiivv iiiiii inauwyoiif

furniture of the besl qualify

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21-02, 7th Central Ave.
Tels. 2-1830 2.1833

faftir.,,,fWilni,

3i

WASHINGTON. March 12 (UP)

The Democratic and Republican
national committees today launch
ed separate direct appeal" cam campaigns
paigns campaigns at the "grass-roots level"
to encourage small political con-
iriouuons by average voters.
The campaigns aDDarentlv end
ed any possibilty of a joint Republican-Democratic
effort to pro
mote ranK-and-tue deonations, Such
a program had been proposed by
publisher Fhuip L. Graham of The
Washington Post and Times Herald
and others.
The Republicans said their cam campaign,
paign, campaign, based on that theme, "thank
you, Mr. President," will be con
ducted by women volunteers. They
will go from door to door seeking
one million contributors.
The Democrats will use spot tele television
vision television announcements to solicit
"small contributions from the rank
and file of the party." A trial run
will get underway tomorrow over
TV stations in Des Moines, Iowa.,
ana uayton, Ohio.
Graham had suggested that the
Advertising Council, a public serv
ice organization, conduct an edu
cation program to persuade voters
to contribute small amounts to the
party of their choice.
The idea was to eliminate the
dependence of parties and elections
candidates on big contributions
from a comparatively few indivi individuals
duals individuals who might have special axes
to grind. Interest in the proposal
was heightened by disclosures of
"campaign contributions" during
the-recent fight over the natural
gas bill.
Both Democratic National chair
man Jraul M. Butler and CrUr
National Chairman Leonard W.
Hall originally endorsed the plan.

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS

'.;.-. ;::(' '11 8 I'"

. W M.YS&M-:.

XmW m trWE FLOORSI &

m IF1VE FLOORS It. i

ATMOS

MASTERED By JAECER-LECOULTRE IN 1936
IT IS KEPT IN MOTION BY VARIATIONS IN
THE TEMPERATURE. i'
IT GOES INDEFINITELY WITHOUT ANY HUMAN
AGENCY.

But the Republicans later said they
were unable to get men of com comparable
parable comparable rank to serve with Demo Democrats
crats Democrats named.
Former President Truman and
House Speaker Sam Rayburn were
to have been matched with former
President Hoover and Rep. Joseph
W, Martin Jr. Mass, a former
speaker. But Mr. Hoover and
Martin declined to serve.
The Democratic committee said
the Republicans "refused to parti participate"
cipate" participate" because they already have
"raised 5 million dollars from
large contributors."
Sen. Richard" L. Neuberger (D (D-Ore.)
Ore.) (D-Ore.) called for congressional ac action
tion action on his bill providing for fed federal
eral federal financing of political cam campaigns.
paigns. campaigns. He appeared on the CBS
radio program, "The Leading Ques

tion," with Sen. Carl T, Curtis
(R-Neb.).
Curtis said the proposal is not
"without merit" But he protested
that it would deny, the right of
free speech to a citizen who might
want to buy an advertisement and
oppose the regular candidate for
an ottice.
In their TV campaign the Demo
crats will hit the theme that they
have less than $75,000 in their war
chest while the GOP has 5 million
dollars.
Hall said the Republican drive
will emphasize participation by
women.
"We believe," Hall said, "that
the women of America will want
to express their thanks to Presi
dent Eisenhower for many things
for his inspiring leadership, for
the peace, the prosperity, and pro
gress his administration has se
cured for our people."
DISCOUNT
ti!mimmim urn's -.mmmm

1

El

. .... ... J I ; f::

V 4 I Vf CVT1 construction withstands 40 (F)l

lit ill ml II tv" JT higher road temperatures, 15 mile
I i W I rVj I Y&W 1 per hour higher sustained speeds

I I I blowout, puncture and skid orotec-

II I tion. y

m mi iirr i nr. ".t i" lima v is

". r.Ji!;. : i II Automobile Road No. 39 Tel. S-4SR4

ii.it -j. s .(

furNiTURE SI UKt

- V

BEACONS OF WELCOME Four beacons, together generating
almost two billion candle power of light, are being installed atop
New York's Empire State Building, and this sketch shows how
they will look up there. They will be placed 1092 feet above
5th Avenue and 34th Street. Engineers say they will be visible
from the air as far away as Boston and Baltimore. Persons on
the ground up to 80 miles away will be able to see the beacons,
which will cost some $230,000. The building's management hopes
the lights will be regarded by visitors as "an air-age supplement
to the American welcome so long extended to ship-borne visitors
by the Statue of Liberty." Installation of the beacons is expected
to be completed by April 1.

Sa fer-fronqer-Run

"5001IRES 1 a IS
Il Are strongei 'than J
even 6-Ply Rayn and X
I more economical j-uw

(7H .'f; fU, id (

y w v v

!N OUR

MSgt. Charles Hunt
Mamy R. Edivorde
June A. Stevenson
Javier Lasso de la Vega
M. Chiloni
Lt. Carlos F. Vega

Home of Vertical Blinds and

t s

Much Longei

ww via a i i K- 1

YOU CAM WIN
i ipgiKBiH? law mm

FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE

THIS WEEK'S WINNERS:

Rattan fifeaJquarters

4
V i
(SELF-WINDING I
17 JEWELS
WiTEl IESIJUM
ssKi-iESisnai
snEtr jtconi m
THIS WEEK'S
LUCKY WINNERS:
t Marie Bennett
e Edna Reed
Paul Bachman
Abigail Brid
e Berta de Aleman
Ina Siao
. j"
Leah Cross
Edith Henriquez
Joy Fleifehman -.,1,;
Veronica Meekan
"Hill
e Lucky Ann .Murphy
Mary Denlt
AND THEY WON
FOR FREE!
TAHITI
18-47 (137) Central A,Vc,
A
i

0

F. R. Olson
Vilma Deutsch
Eugene L. Buonvivi
Margaret H. Collins
Dra. Hermelinda de Varela
Florencia Garcia

Plasti-
oam

i r
VOBfJGB fl DAl2ifJ OTR BIT Til. 2-2
"OM FURNITURE. CRACETimiOVEUESIMOMESL.
VvotLwtHui



IMGE FOl'R
MONDAY, MARCH 12. 1?"
Kr GE02GE WTXTE3
f 7 :.frfi,Qu:drcjl:!fB3rn
tofe- Truo Life Adventures
:sy AND TUS rniATri
XT I
Doing Very wccly
BIRDS, so-cmxsv V'ss A

Tire PANAMA AMERICAN AN' INDLTEXEEXT PAIIT NEWSPAPER

t . LT:f' 'ris. fo.iv .'ll peN S'i- .. ah lee.N TiloJJ
lJ,'Jh CA?S5ThEFAT7EC J ? XX'KE A I kny
7-'Jfb iX SrTcf? KEEP IP TmE L -T-', UUjTf 5w-T... i
t s HA?-80tLB7RCUTiN5. W il" 5HOlJl17
if" ..Wr4lC
ihl5 i" --""i .-,fii! s

By OSWALD JACOBY
Wnttn for NEA Scrvic

NORTH
A A J 8
V 8643
S2
65

WEST (D
AS
V Q J 10972
A J 6 3
A J 4

EAST
Jb 10
fAK5
K Q 9 7 4
KQ83

SOt'TH
AKQ96 4 3
V None
108
A 10 9 7 2
Both sides vui.
Wni North Eist South

Taw 4 V
f pss 5 v rs
5 4 Double I'as
Pass

RICHMOND. Va March 12
(UP) Doctors, nurses and blood
donors today stood by ready to
airi fnur onp-dav-old babv aids.

'but hospital officials said the

'quadruplets "were doing very
;! nicely" despite dangerous blood
'condition.
:! The quadruplets were born late
; Saturday to Mrs. Richard H.
Shaia, 3?. wife of a Richmond res restaurant
taurant restaurant owner and the mother of
i five other children. The girls
1 1 ere delivered normally within 14
minutes.
. , :
.! Dr W. Hughes Evans, who deli-

. Hi ...... j
"armi rendition." buti

'added that they migni neea com complete
plete complete blood transfusions because
; of an incompatible blood condi condition.
tion. condition.
(i The four girls, .still unnamed,
were being kept in isolettes. which
j!Dr. Evans described as "high "high-fi
fi "high-fi powered incubators." The biggest
.'igiri weighed four pounds, seven seven-i
i seven-i ounces and the smallest, threo-

nniiiwls 12-ounces.

i The father said he was greatly j

Wet opening bid today was the ed a"d ? C .-w. Cn. .rf
lo-caltcd weak two-bid? showing births went well We hope and
a tiroug trump suit but somewhat I Praf the get along a" r,ght' he
less than a normal opening bid inisaiv' n,. r... vii
bilii cam .sirengtn pHHin0fi0M nf .wino Hnnr

South ru Ipfl thp first husi-t lerl i "r...? -.--

Pass
P.1S5

Opening lead V Q

TV.

f h-l "ByioNs HEAVY WIN
vvT kT33S stows SWALLOWS
3? 4 LV-s AKg ViHlRLtD AWAY

a trumi) to dummy's ace. and re

turned a club towards his own!

N.C., said "We're glad it s four

instead of live.

IShaia would have four "and pos-

clubs, West played the jack andl, e JS'VurS Seri ffld
East wavered. After brief thought,! i t?,l ?ma
tast allowed the iack of clubs to I be at least fo,,r chlldren-
tasi allowed the jack ox clubs to Fortunately ,he shaia'g have a
"OKI. ...ilk tiyra hmlfiuimi

Ai (li s nn nt Wt d iln't knnu; 11,1 wn i.,

vnal to do. Jf he led the ace of

diamonds, he might discover that
South had a five-card club suit
and that he could establish the
suit and discard a diamond from
; dummy.
; After much thought, .West
guessed wrong. He led another
heart, and South ruffed. South now

Irulfed two low clubs in the dum-'
my, establishing his last club, andj
J; got to his hand in time to discard:
a diamond from dummy on the
JJlast club. South thus succeeded in!
making his doubled contract. I
J West scolded his partner for fail-
lln to overtake the jack of clubs
with the king. East should havei
J'done so in order to lead the king!
of diamonds. Jt was clear that

J West had the ace of diamonds for
ihis opening bid, weak though it
"was. It was vital to get two dia dia-tiwvnd
tiwvnd dia-tiwvnd tricks before South could
eslnblish the clubs.
'; West was at fault for failing to
Idrdn the lack of clubs under the

'c on the first round of that suit.

"lhlt Tlav umuM fnrrn his nartnfrt"

".to twin the second club trick andj

return a diamond. It was true that

Kust had made a mistake, but West
' had no right to complain since he
had missed the opportunity to

make absolutely sure of the correct

, defense

They have three other girls and
two boys, ranging from one and
one-half to nine years old. Mrs.
Beddingfield has cared for the
children for the past several
months.

Walter Wmchell
(Continued from Pate 2)

wondering," lee-heed one, "if it.
is true what they say about Lee,
Mortimer!"

, yy-7rSM-' TSRNS AMP SA

. J 1 .... ft -m TV. it ..

A'

KKXCJQXS AND BIS rSDOTOt

Man

By MkRXLL 8L0SSZS

OLD DIPLOMA
ITHACA. N.Y.-(UP)-One of
eight diplomas awarded at its first
commencement in 1869 has been
riven liarif to Cornell University.

Mrs. G.L. Kammerer of Hemp

stead, L.I., presented for the ur ur-rell
rell ur-rell archives the Bachelor of Arts
diploma of her grandfather,
George F. Behringer, who became
a minister and a professor at Hart Hart-wick
wick Hart-wick Seminary. He died in Nyack,
N Y. in 1909.

Broadway hears that it may take;
years before the Shuberts unload!
their theaters, despite the 2-year,
deadline ordered by Washington.!
They can request extension after!
extension and hold off for ages, i

Until they make financial deals!

they like. .The papers mention
Chas. Siragusa a lot. He is the;

U.S. Narcotics Chief in Italy wnoj
makes Lucky Luciano, Joe Adonis j

and other underworld people very
unhappy. Mr. Siragusa started his
career as accountant for a Broad
way pressagent. ."The Court
Martial of Billy Mitchell" has a

new, title in Britain. It is "One
Man Mutiny" . .Average radio
audience in the U.S. according to

surveyors is as follows: 16 million
per minute in mornings. 15 mil million
lion million in the afternoons. 17 million
between 8 and 9 p.m. .Andy
Russell's first Cinemascope film
in Mexico is reported a hit. Chief
backer is exAmbassador O'Dwyer
, .Capsule criticism of a special
material writer for teevee lieadlin
ers, many of whom have lost their
censors: "He makes unknowns
out of stars" . .Critic Ashton
Stevens quotable line: "The real
worth of any critic is his reader
following. The only reason a news
paper gives a column to a dull
play is with the hope that the
critic will not make it a dull col
umn.'

------------ i
I .I"1. 1 l!

SfjJ,' T.,. VXHl Off. J I

Chum. 'touts face Teas me Iw

twee Nor wappy witm I LtsreM-

WM,r TOU WAVE fDILtUKW- I I MO f

VJ 1 HAVfc AN CEAI

r rv v-

Traof

BOXES.
siatr

CORNED Just

BcEF
MAN.

for Me'

pROves

WHAI

people

HAVE

L HAVE

J

I ATE MIW6 cw -VWl

Ht WAT J SCHOOL

X

$1S ty W ttrtn, Im. T.M. i. OA Of. Vi

'Bt careful nowS Don't hit your f inr

Faltering Philip
Philip's life ts filled with bruiseo.
(Vert-worn ttepi and rap be uses,
((pairs would leave hit home like new.
. A. Classifieds, ftut the right cine'

TU STORY OP MARTHA WV

Checkup

By WILSON SCRUGGS

...H.. .i - . -. .-m-mm

1 1 j

ALLXT OOP

Whose Side?

e f. t. ha Mir

. WCW! S NO

WELL. THAT WONDER

WONT TAKE THIS IS

LONG, DID CALLEP

IT? ( A TOUGH

rf 11

I RECKON THAT.

DEPENDS ON YEH-

WHAT SIDE THAT'S GOT

YOU'RE ON. J MEVM3RRIED

TOO!

I

mi

H y IW W TJI. way t

BOOTS AND HIR BSDDBf

Organ'zation

ST EDGAR MAXTUI

WSS BOOTS, OWOWt

UEU.-U, MftYBE VT'S TIME TM'
CWERftGE WE. UftS GETTtM' ft

tomxy, it EftTiw, sEftu.
OOTi)J, CWORCW GOW, CEUM?
VUTTERKy S0V5-OT"P-6OM. r

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T-KOM tOOWTOUW.'HEVEWk ?0BLKnY...VORE1

TX30R-TOD001?...

rT"f TI

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CAPTAIN RAI1

Busy, Busy!

ftj LESLIE TURNER

L V)HV,5,I?-.V

I MAIJUFACTURER 1 1 1 1
J EXACTW TH' $AM& I (
T THtrE-M WE'VS
4 FURNISHED f,; i
V FOR YE5lV5
tti'
'
- -

WELL.THCy ROTH THKEAT6M

TO $Ui.aW THkT PART OF

OUR NOVEM&ER PEllVERIfeS

PEF6CTIVB

THAT (T 6U0PBNLV

t)t4INr6fiRATEP TODAY

W APPROXIMATELY 5 fM-i

LEAVIW9 MRNV OP THEK

. CUSTOMER MlFNWEPi

INCuupiNe Ab:

G0H,60THNS

PIPIT1. BUT

W POSITIVE rr

WAS All TH' SAW

EVERY SPOOL & THOSE ORDER IT4 MR&KSU!
BACK TO THE COHON FIELPl $M9 SHE MIT

HAVE THE FACTS WHEN I KETUKM 5EE VPU TOPAy,
FROW AKRON TOMORROW! N0WtT'S URSENT1

I MU&T PACK-

im b Nij Inc. T.M. .. U.S. r J. Qui

MORTY MEERLE

Harrow Escape

By VICE C VALL1

rRlSCILLA'S POP
'

That's Our Girl

Bj AL YtRMEEB

T WAHfT "DcflVE WU

A KAtSt. WtCKLC. KJ1 in

Pq IT WILL GET AEOUNP, ANP

J.LL rlAvt TO CrlvE
EVEPYBOCY ONE.'

(W C3UE.SS WWATP A,
r I WON'T HAVE -C1

TO TAK5 A BATH

TONIGHT

r

By.

7 y)r

What's New?

Like TbatT

Mb V 1 L: I 1

EMPLOrEES WITH OTHER RRM5

HEAR ABOUT IT. AND THEY
PEMANP RAISES.' LABOR

TROUBLES RUN RIOT
, STRIKE LOCKOUT

2-16

THEY ALL ST RAteE5. . COST OF
LWINctCjOES UP. INFLATION 6ET5
IN.THEN BAMCJ THE BALLOON

:8UI?5T5..MEq tALL OVER AcrAIN

I M STILL NOT SURE

HOW, BUTI JU6T

TURNED ROWN A RAISE

AND SAVED THE WHOLE

COUNTRY FROM

EOONCWIC
DISASTER

Mfe

HIR KOd RUING IfULSE

MLUOM BOOPU UIJR WAI

Al l, R, WILUAUS

look. MACK FIRST TIAAE

nNNIBAL HAS LET HIM.

HIT THE SOFA THIS
Week:"-' is the
MMOR ACTLTALLY

ASLEEP, OK DID

WITH AW IMUIAM

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THIS i$

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HIM INTO A

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7

Hts Mies has ffovueD

OUT OP THE PEK PEK-S"Pll?ATlOW
S"Pll?ATlOW PEK-S"Pll?ATlOW PROJECT

HE HOOKED
ALVIN AkID LEAWDER

WITH OLYMPIC HBZO

lAU, AMD EXCUSED

WEISMT LIPTER

WITH SPLIT

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'In

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'WHAT? VOULL

HAVE TO THROW

HIM DOWN AMP

TIE HIMUPt BUT

I DON'T WANT

THAT--! WANT

VOLVO IT TOLPA

FEW THIWaSlF

"lOU ASKEPAGUY

INAGARA6ETO

CHAN66 A TIRE WITH

TH' CAR JACKEP OP

'EM ALL TRAINED I AW TH' MOTOR RUNNlW

, TO BE EASY A IM GEAR-THIS

TO SHOE.' S S BABV IS IM

V HIGH

1

7

It

HEROES ARE MAPE-NOT BORN



MONDAY, MARCH It lt.t

THE PANAMA AMEHICAN AN LNDtrEXBEXT DAILY NEWSPAPER
pace mi
Panama
;'3 Little Words' In Oric!;cr
Amendment Could Spsll Chapi
04,
Docial and Jtlici
wide
or
By Staffers
Jbo 503 7, S?.icon

if' fft L mmyj If Udd

PKESIDEXT OF PANAMA AND MRS ARIAS AT JUAN FRANCO
The President of Pantma nd Mrs. Arias were present
yesterday at the Juan Franco racetrack to witness the nw nw-inr
inr nw-inr of the "Francisco Arias Paredes Classic' the annual
feature at Juan Franco honoring the memory 0 the Chief
Executive's late father, Don Francisco Arias Paredes.

fritish Consulate Tee
the
scene of a tea eartv on Friday in
bonor of Mrs. J. N.. Garrett. Mrs.

Vrfne Denhom and Mrs. Ruththe Ft. Clayton Officers wives

Humphries all of whom will be,
leaving Shortly.
Hostess at this aiiair was Mrs.
A. H. B. Perkins
Guests present were
Mesdames
Insrid Weise, Enid Scott. Thelma:
x,ntf Marw Hunnicut. Ins Il
hes, Anita Ness, Irma Burlando.1
1.1 uiiur sm. a. Rnvrie. Mi

ruja Leigh,' AUce Bech. PwIuWl.. Travathan, tehnet. Wiastow
inf.. A E.rtUr I Rin- Jnhnsnn Rnmpm. Cook. Hauehev.

den Poddv JohEbloed. Luisa Ze-
rega, Marge Morris and
Humphreys.
Nellie
Pete Brennen On Vocation
U; S. DEputy Marshal Pete
Brennan, is vacationing in New
York City and his home town of
Boston. He sailed last week for
New York on the Panama Line
and will be gone for two months,
Dr. Lene Crtswell
Honored At Brunch
The Canal Zone Branch, Nation National
al National League of American Pen Wom Women,
en, Women, entertained with brunch in
the Garden Room of the Tivon
Guest House on Saturday morn morning
ing morning in honor of Dr. Lena Creswell,,
author and lecturer of Albuquer Albuquerque,
que, Albuquerque, New Mexico, a former 5th
National Vice-President of t h e;
League
Hi- Hreswell. 82 years young.

recurned Friday from a trip whlcn Fish, Ford, Fowler, Fancy,
included Curacao, Trinidaa, Ecua- French, Grubbs, Heck, Haughney,
dor and Peru. She is accompa- Herndon, Keeney, Kihlgren, Krue Krue-nied
nied Krue-nied by her niece, Miss M a r y Lovelace, Messner, McClung,
Creswell of the Latin American McGinn, Marden, Peca, Phelsp,
Mission, San Jose Costa Rica. Dr.powen( Robertson, Sauser, Sey Sey-Cresweil,
Cresweil, Sey-Cresweil, founder of eighth Penimour) strom, Taffee, Van Ernst,
Women chapters in New Mexico, van Nosdale, Voortmeyer, Wal Wal-plans
plans Wal-plans to leave Costa Rica March 'ton, Wells, Washburn, Wienshel Wienshel-iOlh
iOlh Wienshel-iOlh to found a chapter in ban baum.

Juan, Puerto Rico.
As the 2uest of Mrs. William N.
Taylor, State President, NLAPW,
the cresweils visited tne raft, "La
Cantuta," Morgan's Gardens, din dined
ed dined at tne Skychef and atteneded
the Theatre uuiid'A production of
"Suds in Your Eye.''
Those attending the: brunch in included
cluded included Mrs. Tayror,' Mrs. David
MarKum, Brancn President; Mrs.
Charles De .Young, Mrs.. Maurice
M. Morton, Mrs; : i'aul' A. Bent?
Wl.W
Visiting From" The Far East
Capt. George M. Almsteaa who
arrived in ranama JSaturday att att-r
r att-r -completing a tour of duty. with
tne US Aimy m the Far Last is
the house guest' Of his mother anu
tainer-in-iaw Mr. ana mrs. canos,
Guevara. :
Canal Zone Girl Scout
tyeek Proclaimed
In honor of the 44th Anniversa Anniversary
ry Anniversary of the organization, Governor
John S. Seyboid has declared tins
week Girl bcout's Week in the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone..
special atienuon was canea in
the proclamation to Monday,
March 12, the anniversary of the
oate of tne founding.
In bis proclamtiou, the Govern Governor
or Governor asked all members of the com
munity to join in paying tribute to
Girl Scout Leaders and members
and to assist in bringing to the
attention of more girls the citizen citizenship
ship citizenship training offered in the orga organization.
nization. organization. .t.::,,,,.,;,: ,,.
Reception In Henor pi
His Holiness Peoe Pius XII
Monsignor Paul Bernier. Papal
vening to celebrate the XVII An Anniversary
niversary Anniversary of the Coronation of His
Holiness Pope Pius XII. The' af affair
fair affair will take place at the prem premises
ises premises of the Papal Nuncio from 5
to 7 p.m. i
Invitations have been sent to
members of the Diplomatic Corps,
high Government- Officials, the
Clergy and personal friends of the
Papal Nuncio.
Leaving Shortly
Mr, and Mrs. F. Bremner who
are leaving shortly for the United
States on vacation were tendered
a farewell dinner by Mr. and Mrs.
Carlos Piad recently.'
Also honoring the departing cou couple
ple couple with a farewell dinner were
Air; and Mr. Raul Piad. Jr. .... ,
Mevie Officials Leava
Visiting here for a short stay
which terminated yesterday when
the party left by plane for Mexi Mexico
co Mexico were Mr. Reginald Armour, ex
ecutive vice-president of Republic-
Pictures international, Carles A.
Rosenblatt, sales manager and
Gerald Fernback all of the same
company.
Cocktails At Cece Sole
Hosts at a cocktail party on
Wednesday at their quarters were
Commander and Mrs. Franklin B.
Hopkins.. The party was given in
honor of Captain Bowen F. Mc Mc-Leod,
Leod, Mc-Leod, Commander Fleet Air Wing
11, Jacksonville, Florida. About 40
guests attended.
Mrs. Hopkins is the former
Blance Belden.
Assembly and Tea
Given By IAWC
The Colon Unit of the Inter Inter-American
American Inter-American Woman's Club held a
General Assembly and Tea on
Monday at 3:30 at ther headquar headquar-ters.
ters. headquar-ters. cpt. R. H. Emerick, USN was
n I rl '-A. nnl If.. CmJ.a
Ba. ba played several piano selections.

2.0740 m 2-0741 Lt

Regular Monthly Luncheon
Of Fort Clayton Officers'
i Wives' Club
The regular monthly luncheon of
Club was held on Wednesday, at
si. viayion uuicers i u u,
wrs. i. a. wasoourn, presiuem,
presiding
Mrs. Washburn welcomed the
new members, Mesdames Cheal,
IKeenev and Connor and guests:
the Misses Sue Washburn Teresa
and Pennv Matz: the Mesdames
Brickman, Dunn,' Miller, Schully,!,
Heath. Herndon. Sevmour. Silver-1
ston and vraig
Mrs. Washburn introduced Mrs.
Brickman who presented the guest
speaker, Mrs. Kipoll. Mrs. Kipoll s
subject was the San Bias Islands
and her lecture was delightfully
entertaining.
Mr. Fred Bush dispalyed a col collection
lection collection of molas, beads and shells
that was most interesting. The
nostessew, Mrs. G. Fish, Mrs. R.
Ebbs and Mrs, Fields beautifully
decorated the tables with coral,
shells, boats and hibiscus. The
bead table was decorated with a
replica of the San Bias Islands. A
delicious Panamanian luncheon
was served. The door prizes were
won by Mrs. Kihlgren and Mrs.
Heath. The following ladies were
present, Mesdames Ayv Bradber Bradber-ry.
ry. Bradber-ry. Barnes, Collins, Cooper, Cox,
cheat. DeSibour. Ebbs. Fields.
Benefit Penny Social
At Gamboe Civic Center
The Gamboa Women's Club
will hold a Benefit Penny Social
on Thursday April 5 at 8:00 p.m.
in the Civic Center building. Re Refreshments
freshments Refreshments will be served and all
members and friends of the com-
munity are invited to attend. -j
The special community project
Hrill Ktt natu Aiirlaina fnr IVia fr,nt
.vt 'i : k rii
Center Building. , ,l
Anyone interested hiav get in
. ... ...
contact wun airs, muaigu, mrs.
Bates, or Mrs. Sellers.
Orchid Chapter. T Hold
Charity Ball, Card Party
The annual Charity Ball and
Card Party sponsored bv the Or Orchid
chid Orchid Chapter No. J, OES will be
held Saturday evening. April 28,
from 8:00 p.m. until 12:00 at the
Hotel Tivoli Guest. House, Ancon,
C. Z.
This benefit affair will raise
funds for Charities.
The door prize will be a Sterling
Silver Coffee and Tea Service. Al Also,
so, Also, there will be individual table
prizes,
Tickets are $1.00, per person and
may be purchased from members
of the Chapter, or. at the Tivoli
Guest House the evening of the af affair.
fair. affair.
The public is invited to attend,
HOW TO TAKE AWAY POWER
OF 'OTHER WOMAN'S' WILES
These unhappy wives, for the
most part, have one thing in com common.
mon. common. They think their husbands
are dopes for falling for feminine
flattery,
Maybe they are. But if they are
then why aren't the wives being
as smart as the other women
in using that weakness in their
search for happiness?
Why should a wife sneer at her
husband's susceptibility to the flat
tery of other women? She could
just as easily say to herself, "If
u s iianery ne wants then he can
get it right at home. I'll put it
i ,L
on jusi as micit as me next wom woman.
an. woman. Once he is used to a steady
diet of it maybe it won't turn his
head so much when it comes from
gome other woman."
Honestly now, do you "know any
husband whose wife is always sing
ing his praises who is a sucker
for the flattery of other women?
It Won't Be A Notable Experience
bure. tne husband whose wife
gives him all the flattery his ego
demands win be pleased by the
flattery of other women, but he
won t be bowled over by it.
"The reason why the "misun
derstood" husband can so easily
be mad$ to feel that "the other
woman" tnderstands him is be because
cause because the other woman doesn't
fight against his susceptibility to
flattery and attention. Instead she
feeds his need for it. Presto, he
feels "understood."
There's nothing in the marriage
ceremony wmcn says a wife has
to be "sensible" and unflatteringly
frank as soon as the "I do's" are
spoken.
- It usually takes a certain amount
of flattery for a woman to win a
man' love. So why should she re
sent a man s need of feminine flat
tery just because he has become
a husband?
ABOUT TIME
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. -(UP)-Will'am
J. Hurley has just retired
lrotnuheQ..ofnce.aftcrJlaking,
what he termed "a temporary job''
146 years ago.

MO -J mtf

IIEETISGS
Cach nolle lor Inclusion In thii
celnma houl tubmitted In typt typt-ttrittca
ttrittca typt-ttrittca lorn n4 nailed one at
the trai numben listed dally In "So "Social
cial "Social and Otherswhe," or delivered
by hand to the of lice. Notice of
meetings cannot be accepted by tele telephone.
phone. telephone. :;
Regular Monthly Meeting
Of Balboa Women's Club
The Balboa Women's Club will
go to Taboga for their regular
monthly meeting. On Wednesday
mTfv"fr80m Per' 17
W ieave from Pier 17, Balboa
morning at 8:30 a.m. The launch
W Jour 0 lunch or your
b"v. at Taboga.
can
"frvat'ons ca fItUry,H
01 Mare lle! 2 3450
Atlantic Social Club Meets
The Atlantic Social club met re recently
cently recently for their regular business
meeting.
Mrs. Hays, president, presided
over the meeting. Keports were
made by all other otnciers and!
committees.
The Constitution and by laws
were read, discussed and approv approved.
ed. approved. They will be stenciled and
each member given a copy.
It wna rlpiriH tn hflvo u enrino
an; MBr,h w i,m- a-M n
hnilriim. IS. rmr mm; rlnhhauJ
Members-will pay $1.00 per cou-
pie, guests $U0 per couple. Res-
ervation can be made in advance.)
ad .... u-: .. 1

kmd'0f ThV dub 'wi,. i w'a. oeA!J
nish the main course and" softj.be souP( is hearty JS.

One west Mrs' McLean w a
present at tne meeting, ane was;
weicomea Dy an
After the meeting adjourned re
freshments and games were en enjoyed.
joyed. enjoyed. Wong Tongs, cake, and cof coffee
fee coffee were served by Mrs. Houser,
Mrs. Bernstein, and Mrs. Kimball,
who were hostesses.
VFW Post 3835
At Cocoli
Meeting Tonight
The regular Post meeting
be held tonight at 7:30 p.m.
will
All
members are urged to attend this
meeting in order to complete im important
portant important business and the revised
By-Laws of the Post. The nomi
nation for officers for the year
1956 thru 1957 must be submitted
at this meeting in order that
pnefal, election ; of Post officers
"ci u ,u"u" iua,L" ?'
ParpAcnmnnte urtlr Ko ctorvari aft.
Refreshments will be served aft
er the meeting also a special la
dies night from 7:30 to 10:00 p.m.
will be held m the Club, Members
are invited to attend. :
MIGHTIER THAN THE GUN
BLOOMINCTON, Ind. (UP)
Deer hunterr managed to bag just!
one deer in Monroe County during!
the hunting season. During the
i,ame month, eight oeer were Kinedi
by cars.

t'csww A,

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-V".
VA'5
For

4

- -r-mnning- round
..'. ...
Make yours a winning round by

calling for "Black& White". Distilled
and bottled in Scotland; it is Scotch
at its very best. '

Distilled and Bottled in Scotland

11

mm

SCOTCH
ly palntmant
k lata King GaariaVl

UHIS lUCHANaH a CO. LTD., OlASOOW, SCOT.
DISTRIBUTORS
AGEFICIAS We II. DOEL, S. A.

XENTRArTAVETScT

A

BELLA QUINTERO AND HER BROTHER RAIL, will exhibit
the beautiful costumes of Panama when they do the famous
"Tamborito" at the St. Patrick's Day Ball which will be held
at the Stranger's Club in colon, March 17th. For Information
and reservations call Coco Solo 8544.

m
men can
enu
LUSTY MAIN-DISH SOUPS
lARE PACKED WITH NUTRITION
By BAYNOR MADOOX
( NEA Food and Markets Editor
, .
7" ZIZ nl tlVthV f L m i k,
luncheon or supper
These .soups are made with eco economical
nomical economical nonfat dry milk. One
quart of liquified instant nonfat
dry milk is called for in each
recipe, but this is most economi
cal. The family-size package of in
stant nonfat dry milk makes 12
quarts (3 gallons) for only about
7 cents a quart,
Chicken Chowder
(Makes 8 1-cup servings)
One-quarter pound salt pork,
finelv diced. 1 mediums-ize onion,;
diced, 1 cup wnuc rice, cooKea,
2 cups diced cooked chicken or
2 (6-ounce cans chicken, diced, 1
quart liquified instant nonfat dry
milk. V run flour, l1 4 teaspoons
salt,? Vi "teaspoon peppery 1 tea,
spoon poultry seasoning.
Saute salt pork, in large skillet
over medium heat until lightly
browned. Add diced onion; saute
until tender and lightly browned.
Stir in chicken and rice. Remove
from heat. Pour liquified instant
nonfat dry milk into 2'2-quart
saucepan. Sprinkle flour and sea
sonings over surface. Beat with ro
tary beater until just blended; add
chicken 'tnitxure. Cook over low
heat, stirring constantly, until
I chowder begins to thicken.

i

viV T.J

ww... tin.

o.
n
rrr
VIIISSCY
Scattti Whlilry Dl.tfJltra
lamas Vuchanan $ Co. liA
TEt2-2771

. if
' '"al

M n

Frank and Potato Soup
(Makes 4-4 servings)
Four medium-size potatoes,
cooked, 1 pound frankfurters, 1 ta tablespoon
blespoon tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon pap paprika,
rika, paprika, l quart liquified instant non nonfat
fat nonfat dry milk, 2 tablespoons minced
chives or onion, l'a teaspoons
salt, dash of pepper.
! i !ce. m rge skillet; add
paprika, potatoes and franks and
cook 10 minutes, stirring occasion occasionally.
ally. occasionally. Pour liquified instant nonfat
dry milk into large saucepan. Cook
over low heat until piping hot. Stir
in remaining ingredients.
COMING FRIDAY
beautiful singer
ANITA RAVEL
with tho
sultry voice
Bella Vista Room

for and added to enable us to meet the growing electric needs of Panama.
So, please consider this brief interruption of your electric service as a sign of growth
and progress. The work will be done at a time when it will cause the least inconve inconvenience
nience inconvenience to you. A short interruption now will mean more power and more dependable
service for you in the future.

Ci(i. Pmiwiem dc dnerza

-J

Dr. Lena Creswell: author anrt
lecturer of Albuquerque. New
Mexico, was entertained at brunch
by the Canal Zone Branch of the
National League of American Ppn
Women, in the Garden Room oft
tne 1 ivou ouest House,
Dr. Creswell is the former 5th
National Vice-President of the!
League.
SICKER BARGAIN
SM IN N E A P 0 LI S -UP)-A
Jan sville. Wis.,, newspaper ran
the following ad: "Will the woman
whose little boy laid his sucker on
an end table in our store please
come in? She can have the end'
table for just $1 with the sucker I
still intact.' 1

RADIOS
&
RECORD PLAYERS
Tivoli Ave. No. 16
JUST RECEIVED
" NEW RECORDS

Hut ii'l all in tkz intcAzit
of LcttcA. IcAAjLicz jot yau
'ifou Mutant a Hi century
K-uta KticwUh

ELECTRIC SERVICE
will be off in ALL SAN FRANCIS FRANCISCO,
CO, FRANCISCO, GOLF HEIGHTS, EL COCO and
PAITILLA.
From 4:00 a.m. to 4:20 a.m. the
INTERRUPTION WILL BE TOTAL
in all the suburbs including EL CAN CAN-GREJO,
GREJO, CAN-GREJO, LAS CUxMBRES and TO TO-CUMEN
CUMEN TO-CUMEN from 4 a.m. to 6 a.m. on
March 13, 1956. J

WASHINGTON". March 12 (UP)'
Sen. Thomas C. Hennings Jr.j
said today that "three little words")
m the revised Bricker amendment:
might wreck the government's!
treaty-making procedures and kill!
30 per cent of all U.S. treaties i

since 1789.
The Missouri Democrat, calling
on Congress to give the proposal
"careful scrutiny," predicted it
will be defeated just as was the
original Bricker amendment in
1953. Hennings voted against the
proposal when it was approved by
the Senate Judiciary Committee
last week.
He denounced" as "deceptively
innocent" modifications made by
Sen. Everett M. Dirksen (R IM.)
in the constitutional amendment
proposed by Sen, John W. Brick
er ( It -Ohio). It would spell cut
the effect ef treaties on domestic
law.:
The Dirksen amendment reads:
"A provision of a treaty or other
international agreement which con conflicts
flicts conflicts with any provision of this
Constitution shall not be of any
force or effect." Hennings center centered
ed centered his fire on the words "any pro provision
vision provision of."
He said in a statement that the
amendment sounds like a "pious
affirmation" of the present doc doctrine
trine doctrine that the Constitution is the
1. ...

It takes a lot of work to keep
pace with your demands for more
and more electricity. Every year
new facilities must be planned

supreme law of the land. But in
reality, he said, the three words
might have a "devastating im impact''
pact'' impact'' on U.S. foreign affairs.
"They would make the consti constitutionality
tutionality constitutionality of a treaty, new er
eld, depend en compliance with

every prevision ef the Constitu Constitution,
tion, Constitution, instead ef en the Constitu Constitution,
tion, Constitution, at a whole," he said, "Under
the Dirksen amendment a provi provision
sion provision ef the Constitution ceuld be
torn from its. context and used
at etest ef a treaty's validity."
"For example, the 10th Amend Amendment
ment Amendment reserves to the states and
the people powers not otherwise
delegated to the federal govern government
ment government Tested on that provision
alone, it is possible that more than
30 per cent of the treaties made
by the United States since 17S9
might be ruled invalid."
Hennings said such "basic"
treaties as those dealing with
friendship and commerce, extradi extradition,
tion, extradition, migratory birds and narco narcotics
tics narcotics control "might run afoul of
the new wording."
HIS LITTLE CHICKADEE
DENNIS, Mass. (UP)- A one one-legged
legged one-legged chickadee visits a backyard
Ceding station owned by Warren
Wiggmton every d'y. The chicka chickadee
dee chickadee never lets any other birds
share his bath, scolding them all
away.
Take advantage
of our Club rian
y Jluz

I

,J i,

j.i iii i

't
!r
i :
I



PACE SIX

TITS PANAMA AMERICAN AN TSZZ.TZ'ZZT TAUT KHT?iJm
MONDAY, MARCH 1 12 J
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
) y
r
(' a.. i
i,
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 STREET, PANAMA

LIBRERIA PRECIADO LOURDES PHARMACY LEWIS SERVICE HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE FARMACIA EL BATURRO
MINIMUM T Street No. U 182 U Crtquill An. Tivell No. 4 J. Fee. ae la Om in Km. 41 yarque Lefevre T Street
Agencia$ Internal, de Publicaciones FARMACIA LOMBARDO FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS FOTO DOMY : FARMACIA 'SAS"
FOR tit. J Lattery Pli No. U 'B'' Street 1 Central At. Jiuta Aroaemtna Ave. aa 33 8t Via Fwrai 111
n? CASA ZALDO MORRISON FARMACIA LUX FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS NOVEDADES ATMS
12 WUKD3 Central Ave. ii 4th of Jul Ave. ft i St 14 Central Avenue MStreetKa.il Via Eapafia Are,

COMMERCIAL r(
, PROFESSIONAL I-
CANAL ZON POLYCLINIC
DEHTAL-MEDICAL
DR. C. I". FABREGA, D.D.S.
DR. H. AVILA JR.. M.D.
Ttll (4th ot July) A., No. 21AM
(opposite Aneon School Playground)
Tel. i-HU Pnm
RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM JUDGE
Phon ranama t-OSSl
TRANSPORTS iAXTIR. S A,
Packer Shlppen M;r!
Ph.net 2-2451 2-256.
Learn RWint
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Ridina fr Jumpini elntseyrfolle
3 to 5 p.m. Phon 3-0279
or by appointment.
Wa shape Tour Figure"
BODY-REDUCING
1 famous McLevy Machine
Swedish Message Steam Baw
(or nial and temal
IJRTEPEDIA NACIONAL
(Dr. Scholl) ;
SI Justo Aroaemena Ph. S-RH
HARNETT & DUNN
BALLROOM DANCE STUDIO
"TEACHES UNTIL VOL LEARN"
Balboa: 3-4239 or Pan.i 3-1664
Studio El Panama Hotel
Save on direct shipment
Top quality fishing
equipment
V10LETTE SUPPLY.
SERVICE
Panama 3-6318
Meetings
mwmum m i
Death Benefit Association
Holds Annual Meeting; Monday
The annual meeting of the
board of directors of the Silver
Employes Death Benefit Asso Association,
ciation, Association, is scheduled for 7:30
p.m. next Monday In the Rain Rainbow
bow Rainbow City Lodge Hall for officers
and members on the Atlantic
side.
A similar meeting: will be held
at 9 a.m. on Sunday, March 25,
In the auditorium of the pacific
Service Center for those on the
Pacific side.
Among the business for trans transaction
action transaction will be the auditor's and
the secretary's reports for 1955,
and also the election of repre representatives
sentatives representatives to the board of di directors.
rectors. directors. Vancouver Club
To Hold Dance
Easter Monday
The Vancouver Club of the town
ef Santa Cruz today announced
completion of plans for a "Rock
and Roll'' dance at the Santa Cruz
Service Center on Easter Mon Monday."
day." Monday." ..
Victor Boa and his orchestra
vill play for the dance, which will
also feature prizes for the guests.
LEGAL NOTICE
"""UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"
Canal Zone
United State District Court For The
District of Canal Zona
Balboa Division
In the Matter of the Estate of Sarah
I. W. Baker also known as Sarah Evan Evangeline
geline Evangeline Weeks Baker, deceased. No. 9316
Probate.
NOTICE TO CftEDITOBS
Notice i hereby given that all persons
having any claims against the Estate of
Sarah E. W. Baker also known a Sarali
Evangeline Weeks Baker, deceased are
required to file tnelr cleims. supported
by vouchers, and properly verified, with
the Clerk of the United States District
Court for the District of the Canal Zone,
Balboa Division, at the Courthouse, An Aneon,
eon, Aneon, Canal Zone, or with the Executrix,
6ara Antoinette Huff, co Van Stalen,
Ramtez & De Castro. P.O. Box 124, An Aneon,
eon, Aneon, Canal Zone, (No. 1864 Tlvoll Ave.)
en or before the 21st day of December
1956, or they will forever be barred.
Dated at Ancon, Canal Zona this 20th
lay of February, 1956.
(s) Sarah Antoinette Huff
Executrix.

- mi ...n1- Ww, ""-' -mrv- r ir -, ,,'ir..- ,,, IjSj !' ..i
( Automobile SjT-T I
mO-mi

FOR SALE
Household

FO RSALE: Franklin sewine.
machine, perfect running condi condition
tion condition $50. Call 6-74$. House
1 1 7, Gambol.
FOR SALE: Mahogany living
room act (settee, two chain,
table), bees and mitcellaneoui
furniture. Houi 207, Gorgji
Road, Balboa Height!, after 4
p.m.
FOR SALE: Many household
article!, bedroom and parlor fur furniture.
niture. furniture. 52nd Street No. 2, apart apartment
ment apartment 6.
FOR SALE: Living room set and
telephone table, dining room let,
bedroom let. Call 88-235.
Dulles Talks 1 Hour
With Indonesian
President Sukarno
DJAKARTA, March 12 (UP)
Secretary of State John Foster Dul Dulles
les Dulles held a one-hour talk with In Indonesian
donesian Indonesian President Sukarno to today.
day. today. Dulles, who flow here from Col Colombo
ombo Colombo en route home from the
SEATO Foreign Minister's confer conference
ence conference in Karachi, Pakistan, was re
ceived by Sukarno at the President'
white colonial-style "Merdeka pa
lace located on Djakarta's main
square.
Dulles was accompanied in his
meeting with Sukarno by U. S.
Ambassador Hugh S. Cumming and
Assistant Secretary of State for
Far Eastern Affairs Walter i. Rob Robertson.
ertson. Robertson. Indonesian Foreign Minister A-
nak Agung Gde Agung was repre represented
sented represented at the meeting by Russian
Abdulgani, secretary-general of the
Foreign Office.
Dulles later called on the Indo
nesian Foreign Minister. But be
fore he left the presidential palace,
the American Secretary spent some
moments admiring the paintings
in the palace. Sukarno is a con connoisseur
noisseur connoisseur of art and has a sizeable
collection of paintings.
As Dulles left the palace In an
embassy car, another minor inci
dent occurred. A group of people
tried to wave a Danner on wnicn
was written in Indonesia, "we do
not want war." Police immediate immediately
ly immediately seized and tore the banner and
Dulles' car passed on unmolested.
NO EXCUSES
NEW BEDFORD. Mass. (UP)
The whaleman statue in this
once-famous whaling town was
dedicated in 1913 to the whaler's
motto: "A dead whale or a stove
boat."
RACE

26 modern "Santa" ships uniting the
Americas with fast and frequent
service.

WEEKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
S.S. "SANTA MARGARITA" Due Cristobal, C.Z. March 14
S.S. "SANTA MARIA" ......Due Cristobal, C. Z., March 18
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
JVF.ST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
S.S. "SANTA ISABEL" ... Sails Cristobal C. Z., March 13
S.S. "SANTA LUIS A" ....Sails Cristobal, C. Z March 20
FROM U. S. PACIFIC & WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA
. TO BA1 BOA AND CRISTOBAL. C: Z.
S.S. "SANTA FE" .......... .Due Balboa, C. Z., March 28
S.S. "SANTA ANITA" Due Balboa, C. Z., April 11
FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z. TO THE
WFST CM 4 ST CENTRAL AMFRICA & U. S PACIFIC
. S.S. "SANTA FE' .Sails Cristobal, C. Z April 4
'Balboa tniy ..... y ..

PANAMA AGENCIES CO.

( CRIVlOBAlt 2131 2135
, BALBOA i
ttXXXX)tXWtWMtJM

FOR SALE
Automobiles

FOR SALE: 53 Pontiac-S 4 4-door
door 4-door tcdan with hydramatic, 4
new tires, only 1 8,000 mil!,
$1200. Balboa 4180.
FOR SALE: 1950 Crotley Sta Station
tion Station Wagon, excellent condition,
$250. Phone Navy Ceco Solo
772.
West Germany Envoy
Presents Papers
To Soviet Prexy
MOSCOW, March 12 (UP)
West German Ambassador wil
helm Hers presented his creden
tials today to Soviet President Kli-
menti Voroshilov to become his
country's first acredited envoy
to the Soviet Union.
The Soviet government organ Iz-
vestia immediately reminded
West Germany that reunification
was only possible through direct
talks between the Bonn govern government
ment government and Communist East Ger Germany.
many. Germany. Vnrnshilnv and Haas made brief
formal addresses in a 30-minute
ceremony in the white marble
Catherine Room of the great
Hemlm palace.
Haas marlp a strone rjlea for
Herman rpunifiratinn which he
called the "main problem facing
thi Orman DeoDle." He express
ed hope the exchange of ambas
sadors would be a step on tne roaa
to this goal.
The Wpst German Ambassaddr
promised to do all in his power to
fulfill in a successiui manner me
furthering of German Soviet re re-intinn!
intinn! re-intinn! for this Dumose and said
it was most important to "devel
op reciprocal knowledge ana un
derstanding between our iwo peo-t
pi" ...
Voroshilov repuea in,a yieyaicu
speech and both retired to an ad adjoining
joining adjoining chamber for informal
talks.
The Izvestia article accused Bonn
of "showing illusions about the
possibility of resolving the Ger German
man German question behind the backs of
the peace-loving German D e m o o-cratic
cratic o-cratic Republic (East Germany.)
Shortage Of Cars
In Hunqary Uds
Horse Buggy Trade
VIENNA, March 12 (UP)-Com-munist
Hungary is stepping up
Droduction of horse-drawn car
riages 'because of a shortage of
cars, Hungarian newspapers re
ported today.
The newspaper Magyar Memzet
V..MVM.i
n
- PANAMAl 2-0556-0551
1501-2159
JfJ3

UN

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031. ANCON, C.Z.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC. Dr.
Leon C Brathwalte. Office 2nd
St. Amador Guerrero 200$. Tel Telephone
ephone Telephone 3I2-A, Colon.
BEAUTIFUL DRESS MAKING
done. Call Miu Poyce, Panama
3-2051.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
The new ideal VENETIAN BLIND
it superior at amaxingly low price.
Match-itick bamboo drape. For
free estimate call Roberto, Phono
3-4904. Workshops at Producto
de Madera, S.A., Kodak Yard,
Panama.
FOR SALE: Young and eld
ducks for Easter. Ave. Ernesto T.
Lafevre, Parque Lefevre, House
32.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS VARIOUS ITEMS
FOR SALE
Sealed bids, for opening In pub public,
lic, public, will be received in the office
of Superintendent of Storehous Storehouses,
es, Storehouses, Balboa, for the following
items:
INVITATION No. 247 Baler,
buckets, weed burner, conveyor,
crane, drill, engines and parts,
centerfruga-hydroil purifier ma machine,
chine, machine, sliming machines, main main-tainers,
tainers, main-tainers, pumps, screed, tractors,
winch, shotgun, compressors,
sewing machines, scales and cen central
tral central mixing plant. TO BE OPEN OPENED
ED OPENED 9:00 A.M., March 16, 1956.
INVITATION No. 233 Pipe
finings. TO BE OPENED 10:30
A.M., March 16, 1956.
INVITATION No. 238 Arrest Arresters,
ers, Arresters, carbon brushes, circuit
breaker parts, elevator parts, fan
parts, fuse elements, generator
parts, indicating instruments and
parts, meters, food mixer parts,
sewing machine motor parts, rec rectifier
tifier rectifier parts, relay parts, resistor,
rheostats, starter parts, transmis transmission
sion transmission system parts, rods, breakers
and switch contacts. TO BE
OPENED 2:30 P.M., March 16.
1956.
Invitations may be obtained from
office of Superintendent of
Storehouses, telephone 2-1415.
said a tool factory in the south
Hungarian town of Mohac has
started production or norse Dug
gies and will turn out an estimat
ed 200 of them this year.
Informed sources said the short
age of transportation i$ so acute
in Hungarian towns that most res residents
idents residents have to rely on bicycles for
geuing arouna.

UN

TED FRUIT COMPANY

Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service

S.S. "TELDE" ................................. March 12
S.S. "TIVIVES" ...March 18
S.S, "MARNA" .March 19

S.S. "CIBAO"

S,S. "SIXAOLA" ......April 1
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo

New York Service

S.S. -LIMON' M March U
S.S. "HEREDIA" ..March 19
S.S. "CANDIDA" March 22
S.S. "COMAYAGUA" .....March 26
S.S. "SAN JOSE' v.....;,.,,,,..,...,.,,,.,,,,,,. April 2

Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle-
Special round trip fares from Cristobal to New York,
San Francisco and Seattle.
To New York and Return . ...... 240.00
To San Francisco and Seattle .... $365.00
TELEPHONES:
CR3TOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2904

FOR RENT
Apartments

ATTENTION G. 1.1 Just built
modern fumithed pertmeritt, I,
2 bedrooms, hot, cold w a t
Phono Paname 3-4941.
FOR RENT: Unfurnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, 2 bedrooms, sitting, dining
rooms, 2 baths, kitchen, garage,
$100, at Bella Vista, N. Obarrio
Street No. 23. See Do Castro,
Avenuo "" No 24. Phone 2 2-1616.
1616. 2-1616. FOR RENT: Completely fur furnished
nished furnished apartment in El Cangrsj
for 2 months. Available April
the 5th, to reliable couple er
single person. Phone 3-491 1 of office
fice office hours.
FOR RENT: Modern two-bod-room
apartment In Bella Vista,
51st Street No. 42. Call Zubi Zubi-ta,
ta, Zubi-ta, Phono 3-3337.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, 2 bedrooms. San Francisco"
do la Celcta, 16th Street No. 6,
near Roosevelt Theater.
FOR RENT: One, two t three three-bedroom
bedroom three-bedroom apartments, madam
conveniences, hot water, garage.
El Cangrejo. Reasonably priced.
Apply: 2034 7th Ave. Espsna.
Phone 3-5692 Panama.
FOR RENT: Apartment, three
bedrooms, maid's room and bath bathroom,
room, bathroom, balcony. Jose Gabriel Du Du-que
que Du-que Street No. 3, for informa information.
tion. information. Soviets At Work
On New Color TV
LONDON, March 12 (UP)
Soviet scientists are working on-
a new type of television which
combines color and black-and-
white Images on the same
screen, radio Moscow reported
today.
The broadcast said such a
combination system makes for
better televiewing.
It is based oil the principle
that the human eye does not
riisr.lnenlsri t.hn pnlftre nf vara
small images, the broadcast said.
yniy Dig ODjecis win ce m coior
on the new screens, It added.
RAYON LANDMARK TO GO
BUFFALO, N. Y. (UP) E. I.
du Pont de Nemours and Co. Inc.,
has decided to raze-the building in
which the first rayon staple pro produced
duced produced in this country was manu manufactured
factured manufactured back in the 1920's, The
structure carried a $675,000 price
tag, but du Pont said no suitable
buyer made an offer. Rayon manu
facturing in the plant was dis
continued in May, 1955.
Arrive
Cristobal
...March 25 1
Arrives
Cristobal

FOR RENT
llouses

FOR RENT: Chalet: two bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, bath, porch, living .room,
dining room, kitchen, maid's
room and bath. Aquiline d la
Guardia No. 24. Phono 2-1178.
Position Offered
WANTED EnglishSpanish ex.
pert accountant. Send letter de detailing
tailing detailing age, experience and ref references
erences references to Apirtado 3056 Panama...'-
'
E M PL OYMENT OPPORTUNI OPPORTUNITIES
TIES OPPORTUNITIES always open for experi experienced
enced experienced and inexperienced clerical
personnel. Register at Panama
Personnel, corner of Mexico Ave.,
and 25th Street, next to Escof Escof-ery,
ery, Escof-ery, or call 2-4655.
AuIoRams Whirling
Prop Of TWA Plane Plane-Driver
Driver Plane-Driver Injured
DENVER, Colo., March 12 (UP)
A 22-year-old Air Force civilian
employe, paralyzed from the waist
down by polio, was seriously in injured
jured injured today when his car rammed
into the whirling propeller of a
Trans World Airlines Constellation
which was preparing to take off.
Authorities were mystified over
how th,e car got onto the runway
at Stapleton Field or why it hit
the plane.
One of the propellers of the four four-engined
engined four-engined plane sliced through the
driver, Bryce Bredehoft, in the
head. Doctors said he would not
be able to be questioned for two or
three days.
The plane's crew members and
control tower operators spotted the
lights of the car following the plane
as it taxied away from the loading
ramp en route to its takeoff posi position
tion position at the head of the runway short
lv after midnight.
The tower operator said he saw
the car pull over to the side of
the fence, apparently to let the
plane go on, but few moments
later the crew reported it felt an
impact and the engines were stop
ped.
None of the 26 passengers and
crew members of the airliner was
injured. The plane, en route from
Chicago to Los Angeles, was
erounded.
Bredehoft's father, Melvin, of
nearby Brighton, Colo, said his
son, a civilian clerk-typist at Low Low-ry
ry Low-ry Air Force Base here, suffered
a polio attack when he was five
years old. It left him paralyzed
from the waist down, nut tne lain lain-er
er lain-er said his son was an excellent
driver, operating a car with the
aid of braces.
The father said hii son had gone
to a party last night, but apparent apparently
ly apparently left it about midnight to go home.
Club Alteniira
To Hold First
'55 Dance April 7
rinr.. AHnmira tndav Announced
t1ntin tn a "flnrinfftim HfinPAf tn
uiaiia ivi oiuijhihv mm.w
be held April 7 at the Casino Vi
na del Mar in ian iranusco ue
la Caleta.
This will be the first venture of
the Club since its third anniversa anniversary
ry anniversary dance last September.
The announcement said male
guests will be required to wear
suits and female guests will' be
urged to wear t h e i r loveliest
dresses.
Carlos Jarvis and his "Sonora "Sonora-mica"
mica" "Sonora-mica" orchestra will play for the
dance.
Four RP Students
On Honor Roll
At Arkansas U
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Four
students from the Republic of Pa
nama, who afe enrolled as stu
dents in the University of Arkan Arkansas,
sas, Arkansas, earned places on the honor
roll for the semester which ended
Jan. 28, it was announced today.
The students all enrolled in the
College of Agriculture and Home
Economicsare Antonio Jimenez Jimenez-Escobar,
Escobar, Jimenez-Escobar, and Eduardo E. Truji Truji-llo,
llo, Truji-llo, both seniors, and Eudoro Jaen
and Jose A. Martini, Juniors.
on

RESORTS

PHILLIPS Oceenside Cottage,
Santo Clara. Box 435. Bolboew
Phono Pinomo 3-1877. Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-1673.
Shrapnel's furnished house on
beech at Santa Clara. Telephone)
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. On mil.
past Casino. Law rote. Phone)
Belboe) 1866.
WANTED
Houses
WORKING COUPLE need vaca vacation
tion vacation quarter starting April 1 5.
Phono Navy 25-3301.

Pacific Softball League

By GILBERTO THORNE
Second Half Standings
W L GB
Glud Agencies Stars .60
signal i i-2
. a
American Legion .... 3 2 Zft
26th Engfineers ....... 1 5 a
Cerveceria P. Liquido 0 6 6
Next five jjames:
March 12, Pan Liquido vs.
American Legion.
March 13, 26th Engineers vs.
Glud Agencies.
March 14, Signal vs. Pan Ll Ll-auido.
auido. Ll-auido. March 15, American Legion vs.
26th Engineers.
FridayMarch 16, Glud Agen
cies vs. signal.
Glud Agencies 200 000 35 7 1
Amer, Legion 000 000 22 3 4
Glud Agencies made it six
straight by downing the third
place American Legion 5-2.
Charlie Giavelll and A. Husted
paced the winners with two hits
each. Fritz cneney strucic out
three In-winning his third game
m the nan.
The box score!
Glud "Stars" Ab R H Po E
C. Giavelll. If .... 4 12 4 0
J. Pescod, lb .... 4 2 13 0
L. Jones, cf, 2 1 12 0
A. Husted, ss .... 4 0 2 2 1
C. McArthur. rf .. 4 0 0 0 0
B. Lawyer, c 4 0 0 5 0
B. Stock, 3b 2 0 0 0 0
B. De la Mater, 2b 2 0 0 4 0
F. Cheney, p 2 1 11 0
Totals
28 5 7 21 1
American Legion
Mindt, rf 3 0 0 1 0
O'Conner, 3b 2 0 0 10
Hartman, 2b 310 2 0
Nelson, If 3 0 1 2 0
King, lb 311 5 0
Gorski, ss 3 0 0 2 2
Banner, cf 3 0 1 6 0
uortez, c 2 0 o 12
Moran x 1 0 0 0 0
Veeh, p 2 0 1 0 0
Newman, p ...... o 0 0 1 0
Totals
25 2 3 21 4
SUMMARY Stolen bases: J.

The Pacific Sfeam navigation Coipiny
(INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840)
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SAMANCO" ............March 14
S.S. "KENUTA" ..................... ............ March 31
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, KINGSTON,
HAVANA, NASSAU, BERMUDA, SPAIN AND FRANCE
M.V. "REINA DE trAMPICO" (18,000 Tons) ......May 14
TO' UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA,
TRINIDAD, SPAIN AND FRANCE
S.S. "REINA DEL MAR, (20,000 Tons.) ;
(Air-Conditloned) "M
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. "POTOSP ..March 13
S.S. TIZARRO" .........March 22
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD.IIOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "DUITENDYK" ............................ .March 14
S.S, "LOCH RYAN" .March 19
; TO UKCONTINENT
S.S. "PARAGUAY" "... .March 10
S.S. "DONGED YK" ........ .......... i ........ .March 19
All Sailings Subject to Change Without Notice
PACIFIC. STEAM NAVIGATION Co, Cristobal TeL: 16545
vnitn rn rvn fPANAMA Ave. Peru No. 55 Tel. 3-1257S
"KU co- EBALBOA-Term. Bldg. TeL 2-1905

MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS

FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE. Beautiful four-room
residence situated on 1 80O
aquare meters, located In II
Cangrejo. Call 2-0350 during
office hour.
FOR SALE: Chalet at Santa
Clara: 4 bedrooms, 3 bathe, liv living
ing living room-dining room, kitchen,
tile floors, completely furnished.
Cash $5,500. Call 2-0027 or
3-4603.
INTREPID
HARRISBURG, Pa. w (TJP)
Pennsylvania's Republicans select
ed the party's 195S candidates at
a January meeting on Friday the
13th. J
Pescod 2. Three base hits: Gia Giavelll
velll Giavelll Double playsi" Giavelll-De
la Mater. Bases on balls off:
f!hinv S. Veeh 7. Newman 0.
Winning pitcher: Cheney 3-0.
Losing pitcner: veen z-i. um umpire:
pire: umpire: Metheny. Time: 1:15. Scor
er: W. Peterkin.
Sienal
1233 141 327 25 2
120 000 0 3 5 6
26th Engl.
Signal took over second place
after scoring a great bunch of
runs and allowing the 26th En Engineers
gineers Engineers very little. Everybody hit
and everybody scored when Sig Signal
nal Signal beat the Engineers 27-3. En Engineer
gineer Engineer Lopez had a brief pltch pltch-fnsr
fnsr pltch-fnsr career, facing1 three bats batsmen,
men, batsmen, being responsible for three
runs and the loss of the ball
game.
The box score:
Signal Ab R n Po E
Hill, ss 5 4 111
Stewart, 3b .6 4 5 0 1
Matsomoto, If ... 5 3 4 1 0
Mohn, c 7 1 3 6 0
Bouk, 2b ........ 7 2 1 4 0
Tingler. lb ...... 6 3 3 8 0
2111s, cf 4 4 2 2 0
Vol, rf .......... 5 a- 3 u-w
Gfba p 6 4 4 0 0
Totals
51 27 25 21 2
' 26th Engineers
Carlucci, ss 3 11 1.2
Veres, lb-rf 4 0 1 9 1
MnrrU o.lf 9 0 0 10
I v ....... w "
Mowes, ci ....... s u u u
Lopez, p-lf-c .... 2 1 12 1
Allison, 2b-p-C ... 2 0 0 1 0
Adams, p ........ 2 0 O 0 0
Richards, 3b ..... 3 0 0 2 1
Nedrow, If -2b .... 1 O 0 3 0
Knlssel, rf ....... "1 0 0 0 0
Russell, lb 1 0 0 0 1
Totals
26 3 5 21 6

: SUMMARIES Two base hits:
Mohn, Stewart, Vol, HilL Home
runs; Tingler, Grba, Matsomota,
Mrdrow Eases on halls off: Grba.

13. Lopez 2, Allison 4," Adams 2.
struck out by: uroa wpez u,
Allison 1,' Adams 2. Innings
nltched by: Lopez 0, Allison 4,
Adams 3, Grba 7. Winning
pitcher: Grba 2-1. Losing pitch pitcher:
er: pitcher: Lopez 0-1 Umpire: Metheny.
Time: 1:25. Scorer; W. Peterkin.



TZZ PANAMA AMERICAN AN LNDiPENT5E.'l DAILY NEWSFATM
face 5r.uv
DHiVE-IN Theatre
CECILIA TifEATHE
R I O
VICTORIA
Bomba, in
THE JUNGLE
MASTER
. Plus:
TEXAS CITY
C AH T OLIO
f VOL!
35c. 20c.
Bobert Mitchum, in
MAN WITH THE
GIN
; Plus:
THE BIG KNIFE
with Jaclc Palance
CENTRAL Theatre
LUX THEATRE
GREAT RELEASE!
I ALEX NICOL
f .V in ... -;-X
BLACK GROVE
35c.
:oc.
35c.
20c.
55c.
40e.
0c.
30c.
60c.
30c.
Shows: 1:10, 2:52, 4 55, 6:58, 9:01 p.m.
Panic... Horror... with the greatest
horror picture of all time
TARANTULA
- Plus:
ARTHUR KENNEDY, in
THE NAKED DAWN
In TECHNICOLOR!
In Cinemascope!
Humphrey Bogart. in
THE LEFT HAND
OF GOD
- Plus:
Edmund PUrdom, in
Prince and Players
MARGARET LOCKH OOP
and
ORSON WELLES
; in
TROUBLE IN THE GLEN
Joan Crawford and
Barry Sullivan, In
QUEEN BEE
- Plus:
MASTERSON OF
KANSAS
Burt Lancaster Dianna Foster
and Diana Lynn, in
THE KENTUCK1AN
In Cinemascope & Technicolor!
A mountain of a man... The story
of the great American!

MONDAY, MAF.cn H, irS

SIDE GLANCES

-J

By CoibrGithiVaiiress Suspecfed

Of Poisoning Eight
Kinfolk By Arsenic

'I'm looking over the help-wanted ads just in case

the boss is on a reducing diet again!"

HOLLY?

.RiiX

MOVHS TV RADIO

Erekine Johnson

E

MOBILE, Ala., March 12 (UPW.

Estate police today ctiecKea me iaie
' r I . . U.-.Unt." Sit ft.

OI Oiner lurnitr uuauoma m
49-year-old waitress already sus-j
pected of poisoning eight relatives,;
including a spouse and her five
daughters, for their insurance. I
Mrs. Rhonda Belle Martin was
arrested in Mobile and brought to;
jail at Montgomery pending the;
exhumation of seven persons, all;
buried in this area, who died in;
the agony associated with arsenic
poisoning. ...
She was charged specifically;
with the murder of her former
husband, Claude Martin, who died
in 1951 at the age of 50. His body
already has been examined and,
found to contain traces of arsenic..

Claude Martin's stepson, nonara
n n ,,sni Mm Martin s

junior, is her present nusoana. nei
treated at a U.S. Veterans i

Hncniial at Biloxi. Miss., recent

ly for an illness which had the

symptoms 01 poisoning, yyucu k;
rinrtnrs found he had

been treated at Mobile a month
previously for the same ailment j

they began maKing ibms.
fnnnH rfpfinitelv to be suffer

ing from arsenic poisoning and the;

doctors turned ineir iinmngs v.
to Alabama state officials.
For two months, the case has
been under investigation. Exhuma-
.... If-- 1la4in'.

hon oi tne ooaies oi mis. miau
young daughters, her mother and
another former husband, George
W. Garrett, who died in 1939 at
ra is erected to begin next week.

Garrett was the father of four of

the dead girls. The children an
died between the ages of one and
it

All the suspected victims died;
between 1934 and 1944 in various:
places in Alabama. Mobile police
reported today there were '"some!
other former husbands" but It is

not known if they were alive or, u

Janet Leigh. Jack Lenmon, Betty Garrett
Co-Star In "My Sister Eileen" Fun Show

"My Sister Eileen," Colum Columbia
bia Columbia Pictures' new Technicolor
comedy starring Janet Leight,
Jack Lemmon and Betty Gar Garrett,
rett, Garrett, opens Thursday at the
Lux Theatre. Based upon the
hilariously triumphant Broad Broadway
way Broadway hit play of the same
Xname, "My Sister Eileen" has
Deen called the freshest, fun funniest
niest funniest and most joyful love-

and-laughter hit ever to swin?
Its way across the Cinema Cinema-Scope
Scope Cinema-Scope screen.
"My Sister Eileen", is the
story of two girls from Col Columbus,
umbus, Columbus, Ohio who come to New
York seeking careers as ac actress
tress actress and writer, respectively.
Eileen Is a cute, curvaceous
and thoroughly delight I u 1
blonde charmer; Ruth, her
older sister and the would-be
author, views with wry hu humor
mor humor and a touch of envy the
manner In which every man
around reacts as soon as he
sees Eileen. Advt.

- A it

Anyone for the Conga? Brazilian cadets thjov teaching
Janet Leigh (center), Betty Garrett and Kurt Kaszner the
steps of their native dance in Columbia's fun film, "My
Sister Eileen," in ( InemaScope and color by Technicolor, at
the Lux Theatre Thurday. Jack Lemmon ro-stars.

T

T I

UML

TOMORROW CENTRAL
THE TOP PICTURE OF THE YEAR!
THE GUTS, THE GLORY, THE HEART AND HUMAN STORY

0FTHE MEN WHO WENT,..

rpA TTT1

.

MINT Ml
TECHNICOLOR

, MARSHALL THOMPSON CHARLES DRAKE GREGG PALMER JACK KELLY
A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE

AT SEA, OFF NEWPORT HAR-j litik boy lost and a radio "dis-1 dead, how they died.

Police found insurance papers and

"some bottles" at Mrs. Martin's

home in Mohile. State toxicologist

BOR, Calif. (NEA) Going tress signal brought a. small

to a ure on a palatial private! harbor excursion boat to the "res "res-yacht
yacht "res-yacht is something that only could : cue of the stranded cress, j,

happert in Hollywood; .' V J: :IT. WAS 2:20 p.in.' and by this': Nelson Grubbs took the bottles for

iu uiV.Ke .iaas -ourning oi nine mere wre enougn cnam-anaiysis. Officers declined to dis dis-the
the dis-the S S, Henrietta off the coast of pagne corks around to build a sea-!cuss the insurance papers except

linn iiuy seasiue icui iuw was suing iau. xsui no one mougnt oi f 0 comment that the case appear-

a false alarm.

So was the Idea of taking the
Hollywood press corps to a fire
on a yacht. The yacht didnt sail
and the fire didn't start.
Mike's wired invitation read!
"Press party going to sea on
location for 'Around the World in
SO Days for the burning of the
S.S. Henrietta off Newport. Will
board yacht Caniui to put out to
sea where the sequence is being
filmed with David Niven, Vic Mc Mc-Laglen,
Laglen, Mc-Laglen, Jack Oakie and Cantinflas.
Lunchion will be served aboard.
The yacht Canim was beautiful
to heboid. She was 100 feet long

and U'.'ded with waiters, lood and!

dnnK

it.

So we all went to a fire on an et."

ed "definitely an insurance rack-

excursion ooai instead oi on a

palatial chartered yacht. It was
still something that only could

nappen in Houywood

Mrs. Martin's relatives all died

after violent nausea and diarrhea,
the usual symptoms of arsenic.

Mrs. Martin said there was "no-

But as I've mentioned. It was a!.u:w u-

fl.cs . uuus iu UIC tllOlJSCO.

wwov ami ill

MiL-A TtxAA naH k...M:M. 41. I

S.S. Henrietta, in which David Dan 3 RIB Frlflhlr
Niven, as Phileas Fogg, makes the rHllOllHI 1 1 wlyjlllwl
last ocean leg of his 80-day, round, .
Lk52 trip from New York toiRun$ Info Trouble

Mike Todd, wasn't burning the
Henrietta five miles at sea in the
glory of its full sails and churning
paddle wheels from a barge

weighed down with a full movie

Mine-' Todd,- whi tr.tioduced a! crew, sound truck, the big Todd
,.. a. ........ 1 n.l.l A f I A f I 1 ?

new sueen techniqu lodd A-O,

and is making mill cns with r;c
mo.x "Oklahoma! is a lavish
hOSt. V
BUT AT the 10 i.m sailing time
there was no blast from the ships
whist'fc starting thi sea safari to
see a fire at sea.
Ony of Todds prtss agents had
gootl ;

The Canim couidn t leave its sup

A-0 cameras

radio station.

and a short wave

In Japanese Waters

at the Balboa Bay club, under its a sound stage back in Hollywood,
insurance papers, until the owner, Todd merely was photographing

was aboard. The skipper thought
the press agent had invited the
owner. The press agent thought
the skipper, had seen to this nec necessary
essary necessary bit of sea etiquette.
No one bad invited him.

By the time he was 'located, in

TOKYO. March 12 (UPWA Brit

ish ship today rushed to the rescue
of a Panamanian freighter in dis dis-tc
tc dis-tc nf t ertuthprn Janan. while

AGAIN TODD'S mess aecnts' JaPanese Coast GVard boatS uPed
,H 8 to the aid of two Japanese fishing

vessels. t
The British ship, identified as
the "Enis," radioed this afternoon
that it had reached the Panamani Panamanian
an Panamanian freighter which flashed an SOS.
off Nagasaki prefecture in the
southern island of Kyushu, the Ja Japanese
panese Japanese Coast Guard reported here.
The Coast Guard identified the
ship as the 7,282-ton "Mes-Sathov-ri"
and said it had radioed that
water was puring into her holds
and that she was listing "heavi-

had goofed

The ship runs out of wind and
fuel in the movie and to keep
steam up, Fogg buys the boat and
has its life boats, superstructure,
paddle wheel coverings and bunks
torn up and fed to the boilers.

But all this cad been filmed on

the S.S. Henrietta at sea in its
various stages of being dismantled.
This was the first of several shoot shooting
ing shooting davs. with Todd dirertinw hv

--n j j ,.

camera barge. However, no complete report has
hftn received from the rescuing

Los Angeles 50 miles' away, it was! lunch was delicious, the drinks British ship about the fate ot a

were bonded, and the S.S. Hen

riettas figurehead looked just like
Gina Lollobrigida.

. NOT SPORTING
NEW v HAVEN, Conn. -(UPV-

Burglars added insult to injury

noon. ''Lunch, announced a deck
steward. At 1 P.m. the Canim
still hadn't sailed and there was
talk about the horror of running
out of food before the yachUeven
left its mooring.
There were also some nasty
cracks that Mike Todd would have
to retitle his biz expensive movie

to "Around Newport, Harbor in! when they took $2,000 from an'

'80 Pays.""The press agent finally automobile dealer s safe. I hey
gave up the Canim's owner as 'used the company's tools to open it.

crewmen aboard the Panama ves

sel or the condition of the ship.

snowim AT If OUR SERVICE center
THEATERS TOWG11T'

BALBOA 6:75 .8:15
AIR-CONDITIONED

His Big
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JACK
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1

DIABLO IITS. 6:13-7:55
Will ROGERS. JR.
Nancy OLSON
"BOY from OKLAHOMA"
Tun. "Madame BUTTFRFLT"

MARGARITA 6:15 7:45
- Richard CONTE
Constance SMITH
"THE BIG TIP OFF"
Tun. "TIIK JAZZ SlNftKR"

CRISTOBAL 6:15
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lervings from each packoge. When
you ihop-ask for Royol Pudding.

0 tf&Us

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J



MONDAY, MAE.CH IZ, 1S31

Ft f; ITT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN IN2EFEX2ENT DAELT KIlTJrAFEi:
-0)0 .-n o i -i
r 7 o rt
n
e&d.
r.iT'o'll (PTi'S

0

Ail

Batters. Collect 18 Homers
In Sunday Slugging Spree
By EARL WRIGHT
NEW YORK, March 12 (UDi-The pitchers are
supposed to be ahead of the batters in spring train training
ing training but the hitters pounded that old theory to bits
yesterday by collecting 139 hits, including 18 hom homers,
ers, homers, in eight major league exhibition games.

The managers shuttled 54 pitch pitchers
ers pitchers into those contests and the bat batters
ters batters showed who was boss from
Florida to Arizona by making 105
runs. Thirty-seven of these were
produced by the 18 homers.
Even the pitchers got into the
long-range hitting act. Right hand handle
le handle Vernon Law of the Pittsburgh
Tirates hit a four-run homer to
pace an 11-1 triumph over the
Kansas City Athletics and left
hander Johnny Antonelli joined
Willie Mays and Ray Katt in pro producing
ducing producing the trio of two-run homers
that enabled the New York Giants
to whip the Cleveland Indians for
the second straight time, 11-5. ?-
Here's how some of Sunday s
other batting heroes mistreated the
pitchers: .... 1 j
Infielder Ted Lepcio hit a-f and
slam homer off rookie right hand hander
er hander Ralph Mauriello and drove in
-tu-r run tn IpnH a 17-hlt at

tack that crushed the Brooklyn
Dodgers, 17-5. A crowd of 1,570

watched the Rett iox aeieai c
world champions for the second
straight time at Miami, Fla.
Outfielder Henry Aaron hit two

consecutive homers over the 433 433-foot
foot 433-foot centerfield fence at Braden Braden-tnn
tnn Braden-tnn Fla.. and Bill Bruton al6

homered to help the Milwaukee

Braves whip the rniiaaeipma rnu rnu-lies,
lies, rnu-lies, 8-2. Aaron's drives were the
first ever to clear that part of the
wall.
Ctnttr fildr Mickey Mantle
hit thrw-run homr with two
out in the eighth inning to flivt
th Now York Yanktts 4.3
triumph over tho St. LooU Car Cardinals
dinals Cardinals at St. Petersburg, Fla.
Walt Moryn's three-run homer
and Monte Irvin's two-run homer
sparked the Chicago Cubs to a
13-5 victory over the Baltimore
Orioles at Mesa, Ariz. The Orioles
helped the Cubs by giving eight
walks and they made seven errors.
Ten of the 16 runs scored in the
Giants-Indians game at Phoenix,
Aril met MtpH from homers. Mays.

who led the majors in homers last

season witn si, nas mi wree m mo
last two games. Rookies Dick
anH Carroll Hardy each hit

two-run homers in a losing cause

for the Indians.

Sports Briefs

THE WEEKEND SPORTS SUM SUMMARY
MARY SUMMARY SATURDAY
MELBOURNE, Australia (UP)
-John Landy, the Australian who
holds the world mile record of 3:58,
stopped to aid a fallen team-mate
and then ran the last quarter in
57 6 seconds to win the mile in
4:04.2 at the national track cham championships.
pionships. championships. I MILWAUKEE, Wis. (UP) --Wt
Santoa, barred from ama ama-ttur
ttur ama-ttur track by tho National A.A. A.A.-Y
Y A.A.-Y ran on tho strength of a
court ordar for tho -second

'.straight woak and won tho mvi mvi-Wion
Wion mvi-Wion MiU )n 4:10.5 at the Mil Mil--
- Mil-- Iwi'jkoe Journal Cjni..
NEW YORK (UP) Tom Court Court-ley
ley Court-ley lowered his flat-floor half-mile
hiark from 1:52.6 to 1:52.2 in
fetaining his title at the Pioneer
Club's indoor track meet. Ham Ham-Ion
Ion Ham-Ion Dillard won the 60-yard high
hurdles event in 7.5.
I ARCADIA, Calif. (UP) Bobby
Brocato won the $115,000 San Juan
Capistrano Turf Handicap at one-three-quarter
miles at Santa Anita.

i ST. AUGUSTUS, Fla. (UP) ;
Wanda Sanchez won the Florida
East Coast Women's Amateur Gqli
: Championship with a 4 a n d 3
triumph over Mary Patton Jans-
sen.
' Bowie, Md. (UP)-Dark Charg Charg-i
i Charg-i vo-and-ono-half fur furlong
long furlong Mist Maryland Stakes at
uoforo a trick record
crowd of 25,917.
SUNDAY
, FENSACOLA, Fla. (UP) The

final round of the $12,500 Pensacola
Open Golf Tournament was post post-until
until post-until Mnnrlav because of

hoavv rain. Don Fairfield of Casey,

hi loarU hv two strokes with a

206' for 54 holes.

ATrr.TicTi r.a HTP Louise

th Women's Titlehold-

ers Golf Tournament with a 302 for

72 holes, beating Fatty Berg Dy one

stroke.

nivTnwi Rfini Fla (UP)

John Gibson of Duarte, Calif., won

the 200-muc moiorcycie i ic mu,
an average speed of 94.21 miles per
hour.
rtion ravnt (UP) Low

Hod of Australia won tho mon'a
Anglos title af tho Egyptian Lawn
Tennis Championship by defeat defeating
ing defeating Sweden's Svon Davidson, 1 1-,
, 1-, 4-3, 4-6, 4-4.

Fastlich
League
STANDINGS MARCH 19, 1958

Second Half
Won Lost
Palomas .- 4 V
Pumas 3 3
Macaws .2 3
Conejos ............'2 3
Ocelots 2 3

This Week's Games
Monday, Macaws vs Pumas
Tuesday. Palomas vs Ocelots

Wednesday, Conejos vs Macaws

Thursday, Pumas vs paiomas
Friday, Conejos vs Ocelots

Friday's Sumary
Palomas 11, Conejos 0

Palomas
Eastham, cf
Pederson, ss

Barbier, p
Garcia, 3b

tsnoagrass, c
Allen, If ........
Dolan, If ....
Ruiz, rf
Caldwell, rf ...
Sander, lb ...
Kline, lb .....
Rathgaber, 2b
L. Corrigan, 2b

Ab
4
3
3
2.
0
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
0

II Fo
1 1

Totals

23 11 8 15 6

Conejos

Franglone, 3b
Bradshaw, 3b
Scott, cf .....
Crook, If
Parker, ss-p
Stewart, cf ..
Chase, c-rf ..
Godsey, rf-p
Hadley, rf ...
McNabb, c ...
Seise, ss-cf ..
Chassln, 2b ..
Musser, lb ...
Hern, lb ....

17 0 3 15 6

Score By Inhut
Palomas 623 0011
Conejos 000 00 0

r
-. .,.4
I ' V
v. f : x
, "" -, I
, i
f H- rrl

T-WJ

f s K : 1 J
I -- "'i8i' wimmu. l-smisr. -g

kditor: .CONPADO SARCEANT

BHS Places Nine On All-Zone
Interschoiastic Baseball Team

' it

'SJ

i.U,

'7 'J

J

JA

gives your shoes
the brightest

deepest
shine

SUMMARY Errors: Fran Fran-elone,
elone, Fran-elone, Scott, Parker, Chase 2,

Chassin 2. Runs batted in: East-

ham. Barbier. Allen 2. Ruiz 1.

Wild nitch! Godsey 2. Passed

ball'; Chase. Snodgrass. Struck
out by; Parser Godsey 2, Bar

bier 7. Base on Dans on: paricer
4. Godsey 5. Barbier 4. Left on

base: Conejos 6. Paolmas 7. Win

ning pitcher: Barbier. Losing

pitcher: Parker. Umpires: com
gan and Diaz. Time of game:
1:35.

II Pele-llavana
Boa! Race Inters
Final 100 Miles

ST. PETERSBURG. Fla., Mar
12 (UP) A fleet of trim rac

inir craft turned down the final
le of the St. Petersburg to Ha Havana
vana Havana race today with three
yachts fighting for the lead in

calm seas.

A nlane that flew over the

spilini? vachts last night report

ed they were spread out over a
50-ro'le area in the vicinity of
Drv Tortueas. about 100 miles

from the finish line m Havana

harbor.

The 67-foot cutter Moku,

owner M Fred S. Guggenhe' Guggenhe'-mer
mer Guggenhe'-mer of St. Petersburg, was sail sail-In?
In? sail-In? far at sea and had a sl'eht

edge on the 44-ioot siooo wnis wnis-pering
pering wnis-pering Wind, owned by Nor Norman
man Norman C. Holmes of Corpus
Christi, Tex., which had cho-

CLASSIC WINNER Juan Franco newcomer Melendez streaks over the finish line one length
ahead of Polemon (on the outside), Salero (middle) and Embassy while Reynold is another
length further back In 'the $7,500 added Francisco Arias Paredes, Classic. Melendez, under a
smart ride by ace jockey Alfredo Vasquez, turned the six-and-one-half furlongs in the rela relatively
tively relatively slow time of 1:21 45. (Bottom) President Ricardo Arias Espinosa, son of the late Don
Pancho in whose honor the race was run and the Ruest of the track management, congratu congratulates
lates congratulates jockey Vasquez while owner Enrique (Con qui) de la Guardia (extreme right) looks on.
.
Melendez Cops Th ril I -Packed
Pancho Arias Paredes Classic

r ,.

A

r Ally) &

'

r

J.

I V xn KIWI nrnttetc vour

nJ!.' .''( shoes and makes

T, ;

yTj;0them last longer

Melendez. a well-proportioned

four-year-old Chilean-brfd black
colt, yesterday- afternoon flashed
across the Juan Franco race
track's finish line a one-length

winner in one of the most thrill thrilling
ing thrilling renewals of the annual Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco Arias Paredes Classic be before
fore before an overflow crowd.

Polemon was second a nose a-

head of salero while the latter
was onlv a head in front of

fourth place Embassy. Closely
bunched behind these were

Reynold, Mossadeq, Blakemere

and Empire Honey tnen came

Rosier and Albatross, the latter
a poor last five lengths back of

Rosier.

The winner's 65 per cent of,
the $7,500 plus $2,625 in added
money gave owner Virgin'a de
la Guardia a total purse of
$7,500 for Melendei', splendid
win. Place horse Polemon pat
$1,500 more into Valentin Mor Mor-rell's
rell's Mor-rell's coffers while Salero
earned $750 and Embassy $375.

The start was good but, as

usual in the; running of. this

sprint race when there is a large
field, several horses bunched on
the first turn with only Embas Embassy,
sy, Embassy, Empire Honey and Melendez
getting1 clear sailing. Several
horses, including mutuels favo-

sen a
land.

course closer to the is-

escaDed serious injury.

According to local rule, the

stewards should place a horse
behind any affected horse which
might have a better placing at

the finish. In this Instance, Cno

ly, the affected horse, did not

cross the finish line and was

the last nlace finisher, m effect,

Tilln Tilin was disqualified and

placed behind Choly.

3.60,

rite Mossadeq, ran into trouble causing her to fall. Jockey Emi

and had difficulty getting clear lio Dario, upon Choly, narrowly

racinpr the rest of the way.
Empire Honey engaged Em Embassy
bassy Embassy in a head and head bat battle
tle battle to the mile where Empire
Honey cracked and Melendez dis dis-Dlaced
Dlaced dis-Dlaced him. these two continu

ing their battle to midway down

the homestretch wnere jueienaez

drew away to score by luiiy one

length while Salero and polemon

closed strongly to outiast embassy....;

Polemon was forced to race
wide on the first turn and
even wider entering the home homestretch,
stretch, homestretch, losing much ground,
then wound up with a brilliant
spurt when straightened out In
the final eighth. He made the
place in the last jump.
Joekev Alfredo Vasauez; de

serves much credit for his heady

ride on the winner. Melendez re

turned $9.80, $1 and $3.40 across

Xiic bosrcl
The winner's time was 1:21 4-5

the same employed by Tony in
winnlnc a Class "D" race on

Saturday. The fractions were 7,'
30 3-5. 55 1-5. 1:21 4-5,
A disoualification was correct

ly ruled in the final race of
the card by the track's stewards
when the winner of the race,

Tilin Tilin, badly crossed Choiy
in the final yards of the sprint,

The All-Zone Interschoiastic

baseball squad is made up each
year by recommendations from

the coaches of the three schools
involved in the league. This year
the mythical team consists of
two pitchers, one man at each
other position, and four reserves.
Following is a list of the players
chosen with a few comments on
each. They are in order of the
position they would play on such

team.

PITCHER Lambert Manto-

vani (CZJC), Lambert proved to
be one of the best competitors in
the league this year. He pitched
almost every Inning of every
game for his team, and his noise

and control never wavered even

into extra inning games.

PITCHER Ed Kirchmier

(BHS). Big Ed had the most im.

pressive record of the season. He
didn't lose a game, and came

through- like a veteran when
called in on relief. He was a

strong- pitcher, never seeming to

ure even alter some rueeed base

running; Along with his steady
throwing, he was quite a man at

me piate. at Droke up a couple

oi oau games with timely hits.

CATCHER Tim Hotz (BHS)

Tim was without a doubt the
hardest working player in the

league. He took a lot of knocks

defending the nlater. but almost

always came up out of the dust

with tne bail. Tim was also up
with the top hitters for the In

terschoiastic jeason. v

FIRST BASE Ramon Reves

(BHS). Some of the bovs on his

team referred to Ramon as a
tower. He can' be credited with
making a lot of bad throws look
good. At the plate he was the
leading batter on his team. Many
of his hits were for extra bases.
He batted In the clean up slot.

SECOND BASE Owen Suth

erland (BHS). Owen was as good
an infielder as was seen on the
diamond. He made it very hard

lor oauers to sneak one bv him.

On offense, he managed to draw

B.H.S. Defeats Coronado High
In 'Telegraphic' Track Meet

The Moiu was winner of last

year's race.

The 80-foot yawl Valiant,

scratchboat of the fleet, was re-

norted a very close third after

'eadlnft a field of 25-yachts dur

ing the first nart or trie annual
race. The Valiant is owned by

William E. Carl of Corpus Chris
tl.

The three leaders, apparently

oinc different wav in the no

tional course around Dry Tortu-

Tas.' wrre SDread far aoart on

the ocean but were almost a
breast.

Fourth was the little Finister-

re, 38-foot yawl out or Nassau
owned bv Carlton Mitchell. The

Cuban yacht Ciclon, a 51-footer

bwred by Manuel Garcia Nava

of Havana, was fifth..

Next came the Callooah, 50 50-foot
foot 50-foot yawl owned hy J. M.
Brown of Bermuda; the 47-foot
ci'tter Flvinp Dutchman own owned
ed owned by' J. W. Fershey of Hous Hous-ton.
ton. Hous-ton. Te., and Georjre Pear Pear-son'
son' Pear-son' 39-foot yawl Cella out of
St. Petersburg.

The yachts were expected to
start crossing the finish line
sometime this morning. The

first boat over the line, however,

not necessarily the winner.

The rac is decided on a handl-

-;an haMs.

JOSEPH GROSSMAN S.A, IS Avinid Ctntrml, Panama, .P.

With the Balboa Relays less

than two weeks away, the Balboa
High track team has been getting

in some strenuous woric in prepa preparation
ration preparation for the bi2 Relays which

will be run off on the night" of

March 23 at the Balboa Stadium.

The Bulldogs have always been

amons the too tems in the Re-

lavs, and the bovs have an in

tense desire to take the honors

this vear after missing them by

two points in 1955. With the most

lnexuenenced squad t ne u 1 1-

dogs have had in many years

their -work t8-cut out ior mem.

As part of their preparations tne

BHS thin clads engaged in their
annual "telegraphic" track meet
with Coronado High of California.
By winning this meet 54'4 to 49'A
the local high schoolers .'showed

that they are in dead earnest

both sprints, ran a leg on the win winning
ning winning relay team and took third

in the broad jump. Bill Coffey

was another double winner, tak taking
ing taking the board jump and the high
jump. All told the Bulldogs took
eight firsts in the twelve event

program.
Results of Coronado v Balboa
' High Dual Track Meet, March

100 yds: 1. French (B 1.04). 2

Miller (C) and Rutter (C) tied at

10.6.

22: yds: 1. French (B 24.0), 2

Miller (C 24.2), 3. Wheeler ( 24.3)

440 yds: 1. Vann (C 55) 7. To

bin (C 56.5), 3. Scott (B) and Al

len C) tied at 56.8.
880 vds: 1" Jenkin (B 21.571.

Yates (C 2:1.76), .3 Jadovitz (

2:19.4).

Mile: 1. Roberts (C 5:05.2), a

Nelson (C 5:21.2; 3. Toothman (D

The dividends1:
FIRST RACE

1 Dainty Duchess $6 20,

2.40.

2 Maruja $3.60, 2.20.
3 Gaucha $2.20.

SECOND RACE

1 Dixie $5.60. 2.60, 2 20.

-Rada S3. 2.40.

3 Mrs. Halligan $3.20.

First Double: $15.
TniRD RACE

1 Ika $4.20, 2.40.
2 Rlna Rol $2.60.

One-Two: $11.40.

FOURTH RACE-

1 Lady Edna $3.80, 2.20, 2.20.

2 Cara de Sapo $2.20
3 Moonshiner $2.20.

Quiniela: $6.
FIFTH RACE

1 Daniel $37.60, 3.60.

2 Tlngat $2.20. '

SIXTH KALE

1-Xucky Test $11.40, 4 80.

2 Arpegio $2.60.

SEVENTH RACE

1 Double Four $4.20, 3. 2.80.

2 Master Melody $4.40, 3.80.

3 Renector $5.40.

becond Double: $3z.

EIGHTH RACE
1 La Guarareaa $18.80, 15, 6.
2 Elenita $3, 2.80.
3 Filon $6.60. :
- Quiniela: $38.90.

a-

hmif thpir task ir. the forthcom- 5:21.9).

ina naitMia Reiavs. mm uuraies: l. Kicnter id u

;3), 2. Love (C 19.0), 3. Curdts (B
Most noteworthy performance by 1 19.1).
any Bulldog was the record shot Low Hurdles: 1. Tobin (C22.8),
Dut of Charlie Morris. Morris2. Sorrell (B) and Barbara (B)

hpaved the 12 pound iron ball 48, tied, at 23.1.

ft 5 in. to rub out the tormer
record held by Ry Nickersher of
j, c. Not content with this, Char Charlie
lie Charlie came back later in the week
anA mished one out 48 ft. 7 in. in

the dual meet with Junior College.

680 Relay: BHS (French Scott,

Winklosky, Wheeler) 1:39.0).
Shot Put: 1. Morris (B 48-5), 2.
Pieczenthowskl (C 45-0, 3. DesLon DesLon-des
des DesLon-des (B 41-10).

High Jump: 1. Coffey (B 5-fl), z

NINTn RACE
1 Melendez $9.8$, 4, 3.40.
2 Polemon $4.20, 3.60.
3 Salero $9.40.
One Two: $37.
i TENTH RACE

1 Old Smuggler $3.80, 2.60, 2.20.

2 Lion's Claw S12.80, 3.QU.
3 Andes $2.60.
ELEVENTH RACE

1-Ornamental Star $5.80, 3.20.

2 Empire Magic $3.80.
TWELFTH RACE
1 Tilin Tilin (disqualified).
2 Mufieco $83.80, 12.20, 12.
3 Souvenir $46, 17.20..
4 Little Blue $7.

Morris has his eyes set on' a toss Magee (B) and Cisneros (C) tied

over the 50 foot mark tor in is
year, and with that kind of desire
he is going to give the weight men

trom tne services u mcj

handle

can

at 5-5.

Broad Jump: 1. Coffey (B 19-4),
2. Allen (C 19-1), 3. French (B
18-10).

lrTthr"Rel ays--trr M rth fPol Vault i-4 Cisneros 4 C 10 it-l, i

Gentle winds not over 10 miles 23. ; f.iaivosa (a a. miuer v

an hour and only small swells, Charlie French was tne largcsi.sw. n
were reported for most of the point getter for the Bulldogs in. Final Score: -Balboa High
race Uhe Coronado meet as he annexed Coronado High 49V4.

54Vi

a lot of walks, and his scattered
hits came when they were need
ed. Owen could be depended up upon
on upon to steal a base when the time
was right.

THIRD BASE-Ed Scott (BHfii

Ed was a spark plug- on his team,
and was as strong a competitor
as you would find In any league.
He held down his position at

third adequately, and made
some fine plays. He was one of
the strongest batters in the in inter
ter inter interschoiastic league and a
very dependable bunter.

SHORT STOP Dan WinWn.

ky (BHS). Danny could really
cover the ground on defense as
well as offense. He made a num number
ber number of outstanding plays, and
took the routine ones in his
stride.

LEFT FIELD John Maget
(BHS) John probably had aa
fine a fielding record as any one
else in the league, plus the out outfielder's
fielder's outfielder's primary prerequisite,
the ability to hit. His batting batting-average
average batting-average was right up at the top
of the list.
CENTER FIELD Joe Cicero
(BHS). Anything that was hit to
Joe was routine, or at least he
made It look that way, and woe
be unto any runner who tried to
take an extra base on him. Joe
had the best throwing arm In the
league. On offense, his favorite
pastime was stealing bases.
RIGHT FIELD Kaiser Ba
zan (CHS). The mainstay of the
Tiger team both In the field and

at the plate. He was capable of
hitting the long ball which ht
proved on occasion.
RESERVES Charles Giavelli
(CZJC). He worked behrlnd the
plate for the Green wave. I
Luke Palumbo (CHS). He was
a hustler on first base for hit
team. :
Wambo Lung (CHS). He did
some good pitching for his team.
Charles French (BHS). A
Freshman who held down his
right feild position ill fine style.

PA A Golf Tournament Moves
Into Second Round At Gamboa

Torfov Errcanto .35 20
Double in Cinemascope!
Betty Grable, in
"HOW TO BE VERT,
VERY POPULAR"
Robert Newton, in
"JOHN LONG SILVER"

Todc- IDEAL 20 .10
James Stewart, in
"THE GLENN MILLER

STORY"

Dana Andrews, in
"SMOKE SIGNAL"

FIRST ROUND MATCHES COM

PLETED IN THE PAN AMERI

CAN AIRWAYS AMATEUR TOUR

NAMENT AT GAMBOA

In the first round matches of the

PAA golf tournament, Ray Barnes.

the medalist, had a win over Harv Harvey
ey Harvey Beall 3 and 2. Barnes displayed

some excellent golf and from all

indications it seems he will beat the

old medalist unx and go on to win

Shaw over Jacks on the 20th hole,

both playing fine golf. DesLondes

got a pass from Pearson, a strong
contender for the championship,
who had to default because of sick

ness. The same for Fields who pick

ed up a win as Norm Lewter bad

to default because of an arm inju

ry- . . v..

Jack smith took the old favorite

Tony Jankus 2 and 1. This win puts
Smith as the top contender against
medalist Barnes. Smith plays Ses-

well in the next match Sewell won

over Cal Riggs on the I9tn, as

Riges missed a 2-foot putt. Stov-

all over Hinkle 2 and 1. Bill Dickens
had an easy win over Davidson 8

and 6.

In the first flight, Perez took Con

ners to the 19th before he won

Chuck Matthews dropped putts
from al langles to take Donovan

3 and 2. Young Jack Perantie won

Miller going to the 19th. Howie

Engelke had no trouble with Fire

man Welborn who put out his

fire on the 13th. Chadwick won ov

er H. Perantie 4 and 2. D. Bean

took a win from Big John Hermann
4 and 2. McGowan over Jorgensen

3 and 2 and Dicker won from Bel-

lefleur 4 and 3.

The players in all flights seem

to be very evenly matched with few

exceptions sevem matches going

extra holes before a wm was deter
mined. AH second round match'
es must be played by 6:00 p.m.

Sunday, March 18, official starting
time 9:00 a.m. Arrange your own
matches. They may be played any

time during the week of the 11th
through the 18th. Pairings for sec second
ond second round matches during the week
of the 12th through the 18th. Pair Pairings
ings Pairings for second round matches are
as follows:
CHAMPIONSHIP FLIGHT
R. Barnes vs C. Shaw, J. Des DesLondes
Londes DesLondes vs G. Field, J. Smith vs
B. Sewell, J. Stovall vs B. Dickens.
- FIRST FLIGHT
G. Perez vs C: A. Matthews, J.
Perantie vs H. Engelke, M. Cahd Cahd-wick.vs
wick.vs Cahd-wick.vs D. E. Bean, McGowan vs

T. S. Dickel. - --SECOND
SECOND --SECOND FLIGHT
J. Kincaid vs S. L. Henry, T.
Spencer vs Deslondes Jr., B. Cof Coffey
fey Coffey vs E. F. Wysocki, Lally vs.
C. Youngblood.
THIRD FLIGHT
C. Murphy vs McGinn, A. Cor Cor-sale
sale Cor-sale vs M. L. Mills, Fish vs W.
Williams, W. A. Davis vs K. Tay Taylor.
lor. Taylor.
FOURTH FLIGHT
H. Johnston vs R. L. Milis, J.
Stuart vs JacCoubray, L. Collete
vs wTToungr RrwrBHsarvrir:
Euper.
FIFTH FLIGHT

Brown vs A. Roby, M. Cherry vs
McNamaraL. Norby vi C. Farn Farn-sworth.
sworth. Farn-sworth. SIXTH FLIGHT
H. Carey vs H. Colbert, A. Wag Wagner
ner Wagner vs M. V. Smith, R. McAmu
vs R. E. Fisher, A. Kline vs N,
Cobb.
SEVENTH FLIGHT
L. Moynihan vs Ritter Tankers Tankers-ley
ley Tankers-ley vs R. L. McCIain, B. Wheelei
vs J. !M. Collins, L. Toth vi R

wuiiams.

Albrook Triuniphs

Easily Over C.I1.S.

Treck & Field Tesni

Albrook Air Force track team

scored at will in every event to

take a 78 to 31 victory over the
CH S trackmen. The Flyers look,
ed impressive for the Balboa Re
lays which will be held on March
23 at the Balboa Stadium.

Travis, Albrook's sprlntman,

scored a first in the 100 yd. and

220 yd. dash; and Clark, the Fly Flyers'
ers' Flyers' distance runner scored a
double win in the mile run and
880 yd. run. :,
Rankin, C.H.S. quarter miler,
scored another victory, with a
last minute dash to the finish.
Rankin is now undefeated this
year in three dual track meets.
Robert Lowe, C.H.S., scored a
first in the high jump and a
second in the broad jump.
Results:-..-.-,-'.
120yd. Wgh hurdles: 1st Mes.
call, 2nd Scott, A.A.F., 3rd Gib Gibson
son Gibson C.H.S. T, 16.6.
100 yd. dash, 1st Travis, A.A,
F., 2nd Ouldet, A.A.F., 3rd, Hall,

AJV.F. Time: 10.7.
One mile run, 1st Clark. A.A.F.,
2nd, Heizman, A.A.F., 3rd, Brae Brae-kins,
kins, Brae-kins, OH.S, T. 5:28.9.
440 yd. relay, 1st, A.A.F. (Mes (Mes-call,
call, (Mes-call, Hall, Guidet, Travis), 2nd,
C.H.S. Time: 47.1.
440 yd. dash. 1st. Rankin,
C.H.S., 2nd, Lane, C.H.S., 3rd,
Trufant, A.A.F. Time: 57.2.
180 yd low hurdles, 1st, Mes.
call, A.A.F., 2nd Detore, C.HJS C.HJS-3rd,
3rd, C.HJS-3rd, Scott, A.A.F. Ti. 23.3.
880 yd. run, 1st, Clark, A.A.F.,
2nd, Brackins, C.H.S., 3rd, D D-hon,
hon, D-hon, C.H.S. Time: 2.21.1.
220 yd. dash, 1st, Travis, A.A.F.,
2nd, Stiebritz, C.H.S., 3rd, Hall,
A.A.F. Time: 24.6.
880 yd. relay, ist Albrook
(Jones. Mescall, Guidet. Travis).
2nd. C.H.S. Time: 1.38.8.
Discus, 1st, Fluellen, A.A.F,
2nd, Gaurllys, A.A.F., 3rd, Ba Ba-zan,
zan, Ba-zan, C.H.S. Time: 131' 1'.
Shot put. 1st, Fluellen, A.A
2nd, Clark, A.AJ1., 3rd, Bazan,
C.H.S. Distance; 48' 4".
Broad Jump, 1st, Travis, A Ai
A.A.P., Distance: 19, 5".

High Jump : 1st, Lowe, C.H.5..

2nd Plarlr a a T rwtOre.

S. Walker vs J. K. Hare. E. K. C.H.S. Height: 5' i!

1



MONDAY, MAItCII It 1951

THE FAXAJiA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NETS'SFAFEIt
t.kz:
t 1
I 1
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y vj li t
! J VJ
. 'ml m m V

9! 1
t i I
2 L i

i 0 ui I II Q 1

':yV
JOE WILLIAMS

MIAMI BEACH. One of the hardier perennials of sprinf sprinf-eamp
eamp sprinf-eamp journalism concerns Itself with the dearth of bit-leajue
first basemen. There aren't enough top notchers around to
tart a tame of jacks. Morbidly, the question is insistently ask asked:
ed: asked: Are first basemen a doomed race?
It's true that more than half the clubs have either a prob problem
lem problem or an absurdity at first base, but to say a dearth exists
Is to imply there was once an abundance, and that would not
be correct. '
Practically from the beginning of organized baseball we
have had fewer genuine bis leaguers at first base than at any
other position lor example, once the All Time Ail-Star selector
gets past Hal Chase and George Sisler he's through. That's not
true of any other position. t. u,
Remember we are discussing men who had the skills to
play the position, not musclemen whose hitting was of suffi suffi-"
" suffi-" cent virulence to offset shortcomings in other particulars.
Why is it we are able to develop men of consummate talent
in clusters everywhere else on the field, but rarely do we
produce a first baseman who can hit, throw, field and run in
the truly bit-league manner! ., .
What's the reason? The mystery? After all, It's been a
full quarter century since Sisler saw big-league action, and
even longer than that since Chase was in uniform.

There's a reason ail rigm, dui no nijsiery, iou mignv t"o
ay baseball plans it that way. ,
Naturally, a manager prefers a lineup of nine bonafide big
leaguers, but if a concession to skill must be made, he follows
precedent and makes it where it will hurt the least.
First base Is one position where muscle is not only used
as a substitute for ability, but is encouraged as standar pro procedure.
cedure. procedure. Sisler's views on the subject were solicited. He's down here
with the Pittsburgh Pirates! in fact, he's their Secretary of
Agriculture, or farm director. He agrees that much of the cur current
rent current mediocrity is attributable to baseball's laissez-faire atti attitude
tude attitude toward the position.
"I'm not of the school who believes anybody can play first
base," the Hall of Famer said. "Actually, there is nothing fun funnier,
nier, funnier, or rather more pathetic, than watching a man try to play
it who can't."
HODGES BEST TODAY
Sisler explained why managers don't hesitate to play an
ill-equipped man at first, provided he can hit, and also why,
in many cases, the man makes an acceptable appearance.
"If a fellow can't move in the outlield, or the Infield," he
said, "it's noticeable, but put him on first base and it isn't.
Mistakes are not easily seen there, though, of course, they are
incf os Hamuatnir as mistakes made in anv other Dosition.

"Most present-day first basemen know nothing about shift shifting
ing shifting their feet on thrown balls, and few are capable of making
the throw to second (on the first-to-second-to-first double play)
properly
Sisler names Gil Hodges of the Brooks as the best first
baseman in the game today, an excellent example of a young
player, who recognized the possibilities of the position and
obviously worked hard to exploit them.
"I've always maintained first base Is what you make it,
he added. "You can either play it big league, or use it to get
by."
Sisler played it big league. With due deference to the
judgment of others who make Chase their choice, I nevertheless
wonder how anyone could have possibly surpassed Sisler.
I saw him all during his peak years, when he hit .353, 341,
.352, .407, .371 and .420 successively. Only Ty-Cobb ranked with
him as a hitter then, nobody with a glove at first base.. He
stood S-lOVa, weighed only 170, but, of course, he was lucky.
nobody told him first base was easy.

PLAY IT WITH BATS t
Some musclemen become career first basemen and leave
high ratings behind them. The Yankees' Lou Gehrig was a
tremendous hitter but an ordinary first baseman. He needed
help by the second baseman on balls hit to his right, a glaring
John Mize, Hank Greenberg and Jimmy Foxx were typical
of long-ball hitters who took command of first base by force.
Bill Terry, the last .400 hitter the NL has had to date, gradually
developed into a fine play maker. None of his contemporaries
made the 3-6-3 D.P. better.
Steve Bllko of the Cards and Zeke Bonura of the White Sox
were of the "funny-pathetic" group sisler mentioned. One day
Bonura let a ground-hit ball go through him. The inning over,
manager Jimmy. Dykes asked catcher Luke Sewell if Bonura
should have had the ball.
"Io," deadpanned Sewell. "Not Bonura, but any other first
baseman! would have had it."

I
i
i

Farm League

Team

Won Lost Tied

Cymos

....... 8

Jlwis 5

H Mutual or omana 0
U Tobleranos 3
fj Hamadan Grotto 3
'! Life Savers .1

i i Results Of Last Week's Games
? March 5, Tobleranos 5, Mutual
of Omaha 4:
Yl March Kiwis 15, Hamadan
t: Grotto 2.
1 March 7, Cyrnos 3, Life Savers
f; 0.

"! March 8, Mutual of Omana 5,
I Hamadan Grotto 1.
I March 9, Kiwis 9, Tobleranos 7.
i Schedule For Week of March 12
l I : Through 16
Make up of tie games to decide
: First Half Championship.

' March 12, Kiwis vs Tobleranos

- March 13, Kiwis vs Life Savers
fchedule Starting Second Half
; ; Play In Farm League
- y v r-
March 14, Mutual of Omaha
v. Cyrnos.
t March 15, Life Savers vs Ham-
f Ian Grotto.

March 16, Cyrnos vs Toblera-

! arm League Baseball Slan'i
j The Kiwis team must play off
1 0 air of tie games against the

" oleranos and the Life Savers,

1 ore the first half champion champion-.
. champion-. ) in the Farm League can be
t arly decided.
Last year's champion, Mutual
c Omaha, and runner-up, Ham-
an Grotto, are out of the run-
1 ng in this half. .Mutual lost a
2 to 1 game to Cyrnos; and a 5
to 4 game to Tobleranos, to put
Itself out of the picture.
t v T11 !at. mftnae'r THarl RarH

record with eight wins and two!

losses, but Ted Albritton's Kiwis
can catch them by winning the
two tie games they will complete
on Monday and Tuesday -For
the most part the games

have been closely contested, -and

agers took quite a gamble on the
success of the league by placing
rigid restrictions on the use of
player personnel.
In a joint meeting with the
Little League managers, the
Farm League managers voted to

eniorce the loliowing restric restrictions:
tions: restrictions: (11 .'No pitcher over 10 years
of age could be used to pitch the
first two innings of the game.
After the second inning an 11-year-old
pitcher could be used,
but each team Is restricted to
using one and only one 11-year-old.
Twelve-year-old players are
not permitted to pitch. j
(2) In these same iirst two in innings,
nings, innings, the catcher, first base baseman,
man, baseman, short stop and center field fielder
er fielder can be regulars, but the other
four members of the starting
team must be new players or
players who had very little play playing
ing playing experience the year before.
,(3V-ln -the. riext ., scheduled
game the manager shall start
four other and different players
of the Inexperienced category
for the first two innings. In this

Champ Dons
Remain Idle
Until Friday
By JOHN GRIFFIN

NEW YORK, March 12 (UP)

iac n..jK.A. DasKetDall tourna tournament,
ment, tournament, "Bigger and better than
.v.." uri.k n 1 1

iui uauuuai cnampion can
Francisco favored in a 25 team
field, opens tonight with a tntai

of five games at three sites New

Yorx, tort Wayne, Ind., and Seat-

ue, nasn..

Action tonight and in four ntW

first-round games tomorrow night

wm cicar me occks lor regional
competition at four other sites this
Friday and Saturday.
San Francisco, ranked the na
tion't No. 1 team at the end of
the reguUr tea ion by the Unit,
d Pratt board of coachet and
favored to win the N.C.A.A.
crown for the tecond straight
year, will be idle until Friday
night, when It meett U.C.L.A. at
Corwallit, Ore.
But North Carolina State, rank ranked
ed ranked No. 2 nationally, will be one
of the 10 teams in action tonight.
Here's tonight's program:

At Madison Square Garden.

New York N 0 r t h Carolina St.
(24-3) vs. Canisius (17-6); Holy
Cross (22-4) vs. Temple (22-3).
At Fort Wayne, Ind. More-

head St. (17-9) vs. Marshall (18
4); De Paul (16-7) vs. Wayae U
niversity (17-1).

At Seattle, Wash. Seattle (17-

9) vs. Idaho St. (18-7).
This year's N.C.A.A. tourna tournament
ment tournament field is the largest in histo

ry, one more than last year's. It
includes 12 of the teams ranked
among the top 20 in the nation
actually 12 out of a possible total
of 14, since six of the teams in
the teams in the top 20 are from
conferences represented by other
teams.

ZEROED IN

MATCH 14
COMING UP
IN GKXTiNGS
HOTTEST

riyal&y;

BSTWtZM

Here's
games:

a size up of tonight's

I Q -If 11 VfltO CHAMP

rv I; ivviMon qoks in me rouunes i

Mitt

ill" ..ifiJl

0fi

OUT OF DOORS with

ffldM

At New York North Carolina
St. favored on height oyer Cani Canisius,
sius, Canisius, despite broken wrist of six six-eight
eight six-eight star Ron Shavlik, who plays
with a cast. Canisius, "hot" wth
10 wins in last 12, banking on six six-one
one six-one Johnny McCarthy to spark an

upset. Holy Cross and Temple rat

ed even. Six-seven Tom Heinsohn

of the Crusaders needs just 13

points to beat Bob Cousy's school

scoring mark of 1,775 points. Tern

pie firing double-barrelled attack

with Hal Lear (22.2 points .per

game) and Guy Rodgers (18.5).

At Fort Wayne Morohtad-

and Marshall nation's two high,
ott-tcoring teami, expected to
ttage adding machine battle,
but Morehead won two regular
tea ton nuttings (102-89 and, in
overtime 101-105). Do P a u I,
which hat beaten top notchert
like Kentucky and Notre Dame,
counting on Re n Sobietxcxyk
(22.7 polntt per game) to halt
Wayne's H game winning
streak.

At Seattle Seattle and Idaho

State meeting or fourth straight
year in a tourney first rounder.

Seattle solid choice because: 1. It

beat Idaho State twice during reg

ular season, 89-77 and 84-67; and
2. State ace Les Roh is ineligible

as a fourth-year player.

Handlers and Their Dogs
By JOE STETSON
Dog Editor

OBEDIENCE training classes

have been the subject of much dis

cussion among those who have
heard them talked about, but are

not really familiar with them.
"What do you think of theme''
I'm often asked.
. My reply is usually "They're a
wonderful idea for the handlers,"
or words to that effect.
To those who persist in know knowing
ing knowing just what I mean by that I ex explain
plain explain that the dogs do learn some

Santa Cruz Sports

By G1LBERTO THORNE
The Sanla Cruz Workingmen's
League is enjoying tremendous
success in the community. The
games are attended always by a
large crowd of shrieking fans. I
The league is sprinkled with
ball players of former baseball
;nd softball fame in Panama and
the Canal Zone, also with players
who are enjoying current fame in
sport activities, i.e. "Buddy"
Campbell, Phil Malcolm, Wilbert
"Balmy" Brathwaite, Earl and
James Holder, Ignacio Paschal I I-ra
ra I-ra "Chippie" Barber, George
"Hawkeye" MiLer and many oth others.
ers. others. In their most recent engage engagement,
ment, engagement, Dredging Divison Shops ek eked
ed eked out a 6-4 wm over Miller's Hydro-Survey.
"Chippie" Barber and

way every manager is honor nw ooys jumpea aneaa in tne iirst

tuning wjui uuee tuns.

Survey recoverec two runs

bound to see to it that every boy

on his team's roster is an active
player for a minimum of one in inning
ning inning of every two (2) games
played bv the team.)
Last Monday night the Little
League managers reaffirmed
their confidence in these re restrictions
strictions restrictions by giving the Farm
League managers a vote for the
continued use of same.
The relationship between the
Farm and Little Leagues is much

closer this year as the result of
a decision by the directors to as assign
sign assign the Farm clubs to parent
Little League teams much as is
practiced in organized baseball.

As a result, the following assign
ments were made.

Farm Team Affiliate
Cyrnos . .... Lincoln Life
Hamadan Grotto ... Police
Kiwis Spur Cola
Life Savers Gibraltar Life
Mutual of Omaha Elks
Tobleranos Seymour Agency

in

the second inning on successive
homeruns by "Cherry" Edwards
and "Hawkeye" Miller. Phil Mal Malcolm
colm Malcolm doubled scoring "Balm y"
Brathwaite in the third.
Shops scored twice more in the
fourth and Survey was four runs

behind when they came to bat in

the seventh. Muler walked, Eve

lyn doubled, Gomez tripled in two

runs and died on third oase.
SANTA CRUZ WORKINGMEN'S
SOFTBALL LEAGUE
Standings, March 10.
, v W. L GB
Dredging Div. Shops .3 0 0-Aids
Aids 0-Aids to Navigation 2 1 1
Hydro-Survey 12 2
Dep. Moroto .03

Pacific Women's
Softball League

STANDINGS

Won Lost Pet.

Alfredo Aleman Jr. 3 1 -750
t t nrirto-est.one 3 2 .600

a..... a
Arsi Cola 3 2
Cerveceria ........ 1 4

certain things, but far more im important
portant important is what the handlers learn
about their won limitations.
How simple and logical it all
seems when they're told, yet how
difficult for the more complex hu human
man human mind to consistently think on
the level of the dog and modify
its behavior so that commands
and methods are most effective.
This was recently driven. home
with emphasis to the good wife,
who, like many an owner, gets to
feel that training must be simple.
A much-needed class was being
organized locally. I suggested she
join it so she would learn to
know first-hand the exact methods
recommended by the obedience
training fancy. She was rather re reluctant,
luctant, reluctant, since she found no difficul difficulty
ty difficulty on occasion in handling my te

levision
used.

She finally went along with the
idea when I agreed to let her use
a little dog already acquainted
with elementary obedience.
The first two sessions were
pretty much enrollment and dem dem-constition
constition dem-constition by the teacher. The
wife's interest was quite indif indifferent
ferent indifferent and her enthusiasm nil. At
the next class the dogs were to
heel, sit, stay and come on lead.
It was here the commands were

mixed, the lead wa3 tight or slack

at tne wrong times.
The little dog. ordinarily auitc

capable of completing his routine

on his own, performed poorly and

at tunes was on the ede of con confusion.
fusion. confusion. Was this bade No! It was
the clearest demostration she
fectineness was letting the little

could have had that her own inef inef-dog
dog inef-dog down.

You should See them work to

gether as a team now. Don't let
anybody tell you that obedience
classes aren't good for the handlers.

College Cage
Stores
(Saturday Night)

UCLA 97, Southern California

84,

Corneli 81, Dartmouth 71.
Pennsylvania 70, Princeton 69.
Columbia 78, Brown 68.
Yale 89, Harvard 73.
Stanford 70, California 68.
Villanova 76, LaSalle 73.
Temple 89, St. Josephs (Pa.) 82.
Oregon State 59, Oregon 49.
Colorado 75, Kansas 67.
Idaho 78, Washington State 71.
Stroudsburg Tchrs. 75, Wilkes

71.

Atlantic Softball
League

STANDINGS

Unlsport 11

Tigers Club ....II
Green River 7
Ft. Gullck 5

Gashouse 2

Gibraltar ............. 1

Won Lost

2
2
5
7
10
12

Last week's games started the

last round of softball for this
season. All the favored teams
came through with easy victo

ries, on Monday, the Green Riv River
er River team crushed Ft. Gullck by 11
to 10 score. Gullck took a 10 to 1
lead in the second inning, but
from then on they fell to nieces

defensively. McGaughey and
Fortner, Green River sluggers
hit back to back home runs in
the last Inning.

Tigers Club scored a 11 to 2

victory over Gashouse on Tues Tuesday.':
day.': Tuesday.':

Wednesday's game saw Ft. Gu

llck take Gibraltar by a 10 to 7

score. With the score tied in the

last inning both teams failed to
score and in the 8th inning the

Army men unloaded with three
runs, featured by Ferguson's
home run.
Thursday, the Unlsports team
stayed in the flag race with a 21
to 5 victory over the Gashouse. t
Friday's game started off in
the order of an upset, but the
Tigers had too much for the
Greenmen and won by 11 to 4
score. Diaz, Tigers pitcher, gave
up four scattered hits. Morales
and Morris, led the hitting at attack
tack attack for the Tigers Club.
This week's games:
Monday, Ft. Gullck vs Unlsnorfc
Tuesday, Green River vs Gas

house

Wednesday. Tigers vs Gibraltar

Thursday, Gibraltar vs Gas Gashouse
house Gashouse Friday, Ft. Gulick vs Tiger
Monday, March 19, Unlsport v
Green River.
(Last game of season)

LOOSE COWS
'
PITFNIX CITY, Ala. -fUP)
Russill County Sheriff Lamar
Murphy warned he is going to m
pound any stray cattle ambling
across county roads. Murphy M'd
loose cows have been resoonsibl
for lour recent traffic accidents.

600
200

League. The deadline for this
option is March 15, and all Farm
T.paciio nlftvert on whom nn nn-

itlon has been exercised become

free ocrpnts When the T.lt.t.ln

Little Leasrue managers will t

the -ealiber ef play rme bn-very,have-a prkwity-4n xerelsinr-ri-iciOTelyfollowing--4he--develor-i

s"' iwumuiuuii rignis on me piayers 01 ment 01 the players in the Farm
in view of the fact that the man-their affiliates in the Farm'League.

Next Games

Monday, Mar. 12, Arsi Cola vs

T.A-T. Brldgestone at La ooca.

iwondav. March 12, Alfredo

Aleman Jr. vs Cerveceria Nacio
nal at Santa Cruz.

Wednesday, March 14, Cerve Cerve-irA
irA Cerve-irA Narinnftl vs Arsi Cola at

Paraiso. .
Wprlnesdav. March 14. T.A.T.

Brldgestone vs Alfredo Aleman

Jr. at santa uruz.

Fridav. March 16, Cerveceria

Nacional vs T.A.T. Brldgestone
at La Boca.

TYidav. March 16. Alfredo Ale

man Jr. vs Arsi Cola at paraiso.

TXT. Brldgestone 7, Arsi Cola 1

Monday at Paraiso, the soda-

pop" lassies 01 Arsi uoia engag

ed the "Brldgestoners" iroiu
T.A.T. In a decisive match in
which the "Brldgestoners;' over overpowered
powered overpowered the opponents by a
score of 7 to 1. Scoring in the
two early frames,- T-A.T, con controlled
trolled controlled the game all the way un until
til until the "poppers" scored their on only
ly only run in the 4th inning. C. Dor Dor-vllle
vllle Dor-vllle pitching brilliantly, gained

her 1st win 01 tne season allow allowing
ing allowing 4 hits while D. Campbell a
veteran, took the lost.

Alfredo Aleman Jr. 5, Cerveceria

Naoonal 3
At La Bocar Tuesday, the

league's leaders Alfredo Aleman

jr. whipped the "beer-makers

from Cerveceria Nacional in a

thrilling game, by aoone or 5 to
3. The league's cellar squad, Cer-

vecria Nacional. lea tne game

nervously by two runs until the

'-lpollticos" or Aiireao Aleman
Jr. showed authority in the 4th
inning by scoring 3 runs onr 4

hits with D. Joseph clouting the
game's only homer. E. Stewart
took the lost for the "beer-makers"
while L. Bailey chalked up
her 1st win of the loop. Batting
stars were: "Tiny" Walker with
3 in 3 for the losers and V. Aus-

tin and G. Reyes with 2 in 3
each for the winners.

Paraiso- Major Softball league
There will be' a special meet

ing of the Paraiso Major Softball 1

League at the Paraiso Civic Cen Center
ter Center meeting room on Tuesday,!
March 13, 1956 at 7:30 p.m., as!

announced by Mr. Rudolph 1
Prince.

All prospective managers and

players are cordially invited to

aitena so mat, tne preparations
for the 1956 'easonnc other 1
Items' of importance can be dis- j
cussed. '1

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1931, Sunday, MarcMl, 1956
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided In two series "A" it "B" of 22 pieces each

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

6450 $ 44,000.00
2575 $ 13,20000
4940 $ 6,600 00

PRIZES ARE PAID, WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

N
0030
01.
250
(I3,)0
0450
055A
IW50
l75
R.Sft
0950

Prn

I No

Prliei 1 N

132.M
132.ee
132.00
2,200.00
132.00
132.00
132.00
112.00 1
132.00

1050
use
1250
1350
1450
1550
JS50
1750
1050
1930

. 132.00
132.00
132 00
132.00
2,200.00
132.00
132.00
132.00
1S2.00
132.00

. 2050
1 2150
2250
I 2.150
I 2450
I 2550
J 2S.-.0
2750
2S50
2950

PrUui No. rrliet No. Prlut No. Prize No. Prlloo I No. Print
I I I I I I
132 00 30.10 132.00 4050 132.00 SOM 132.00 SOSt 132.001 7050 132.00
132.00 3150 1.12.00 4150 132.00 gl50 132.00 0150 132.00 7150 132.00
132.00 3230 132.00 4250 132.00 5250 132.00 O250 132.00 7250 132.00
132.00 3.150 132.00 4350 1.12 00 5350 132.00 0350 132.00 7350 1 32 00
2,200.00 3450 2,200.00 4450 2,200.00 5450 2,200.00 0450 44,000.00 7450 2,200,00
132.00 3550 132 00 I 4550 132.00 5550 132.00 0550 1.12.00 7550 132 00
1.12.00 3650 1.12.00 4050 132.00 i SO50 132.00 0050 132.00 7050 132.00
132.00 3750 132.00 4750 132.00 S750 132.00 0750 132 00 7750 132.00
'-iJ2.ee; aase- n:.oo m 112.00 ssso 132.00 050 112.00' 7sso 132.00
132.00 3150 132.00 1 4950 132.00 5950 132.00 0950 132.00 7950 132.00

No
0050
0150
0250
8350
0450
0550
8050
8750
g!0
S950

f rfMO
I
132.00
- is2.ee
132.00
132.00
2.200.00
132.00
132.00
' 112.00
132.00
132.00

No
050
1M
0250
350
450
550
050
750
950
950

PllMO
132 00
132.00
132.00
132 00
2,200.00
132.00
132.00
. 132.00
132.00
132.00

Approximations Derived From First Prize

' i t r '' ' ' '-' I
0441 440.00 (44.1 440 00 044S 440.00 8447 440.00 8440 440.00 0452 440 00 8454 440.00 8450 440.00 8458 440.M
6442 440.00 I 0444 440.00 0446 440.00 6448 440.00 6451 440.00 6453 440.00 645S 440.00 6457 440.00 I 6459 440.00
Approximations Derived From Second Prize
I I I :7 1 .
57S 220.00 1S7S 220.00 3571 220.00. 4575 220.00 S57S 220.00 6571 220.00 7571 220.00 S57S 220.00 1571 220.06
2506 110.00 2308 110.00 2570 "llO.OO 2572 llToO 2574110.M 2577 llToO 2570 110.00 I 251 110.00 2583 110.00
2567 110.00 2509 110.00 2571 110.00 2571 110.00 2576 110.00 2571 11000 2586 116.00 2582 110.00 2584- 110.06

Approximations Derived From Third Prize

" :-. V ..., .' 0 ': 0 .."''' 0 :... I .'
946 132.00 1940 132.00 2940 132.00 3940 132.00 $946 132.06 6946 132.00 7946 132.00 8940 132.60 j 9t0 132.06
4931 .. 88.00 4933 98.00 4931 88.00 4937 88.00 4939 88.00 442 800 4944 88.00 4940 88.00 I 4948 88.00
4932 88,(f 4934 88.00 i 4930 98.00 4936 88.00 4941 86.00 4943 88.06 1 494S 88.00 4947 r 88 00 I 4949 88.00

Prize-winning Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing were sold, at: 1st .In Code, 2nd and 3rd In Panama
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in 0 and not included in the above list win Forty-four Dollars (114.00) each
. The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "B"
I
Signed by: ALBERTO ALEMAN. Governor of the Province of Panama. C6d. 47-12155
' The Representative of the Treasury ANTONIO MOSCOSO B. V

WITNESSES: Manuel A. Samanlego. C6d. No, 47-50506
Jose S. Lopez, Ced. No. 59798

ALBERTO J. BARSALLO
Notary Public. Panama

PABLO A. PINEL M.,
Secretary

MATF" rhe wlnnln ticket! with Ih lat cipher and with the two Urt
I t. ciphen epply only to the First Prize.
The First Prizo end the 2nd end 3rd Prizes ore drewn aeperateiy. The ap approximations
proximations approximations are calculated on the First, Soeond and Third Prizes. In case
a ticket should carry the number of each prize, the holder la entitled to
claim payment for each.

dravi;:g of the 3 strikes
Sunday, March 11, 1956

Drawing Number 632

First Prize.

Second Prize

v Fraction Ticket
50 $11.00 $220.00
75 3.00 6000
-40 2.00 40.00-

The prizes will be paid In accordance with the Official List of Fanama In
the offices of the National Beneficent Lottery situated en Central Avenue.
Plan of Ordinary Drawing No. 1932 which will take
place March 18, 1956

'A"

Divided In two series of 22 fractions each denominated
FIRST fRlZE

1 First Prize. Series A and B. of
1 Second Prize, Series A and B. of
1 Third Prize. Series A and B, of
II Approximations, Series A and B, of
6 Prizes. Series A and B, of
60 Prizes, Series A and B. of
600 prizes, Series A end B. of

$22,000,000 each series
0.6A0.00 each series
3.300.00 each series
. 220.00 each series
1,100.00 each series
00.00 each series
22.00 eech aerie?

, SECOND PRIZE
,11 Approximations, Series A and B of f S3.00 each series
Prizes. Series A and B, of 110 00 each series
- THIRD PRIZE
Approximations. Series A and B of S 44 00 each series
I Prizes. Series A and B. of 66 00 each series

and "I"

m. ooo oo
13.200.00
O.600.00
7.9'0.00
19,8' 0 00
11.8SO.00
39.6(10 00
f 1.9S0WI
l.OtOOO
I 1,584 20
1,188.00

1074 Prizes TOTAL $149,73200
Price of CLwhole ticket $22.00
Pric6 of a forty-fourth part ........ .50

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.Read sfcry cn pago 9
. Ui INDEPENDENT WlllEXi&
DAILY NEWSPAFER
.

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it'

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-id
NEW MISSILE A new su supersonic
personic supersonic Rulded missile, the
Talos, blasts off from its firing
stand during a test. The Ta Talos,
los, Talos, which is reported to have
a substantially greater range
than the Army's Nike, soon
will join the Nike In guarding
America's shores against air
attack.

2 Hours Of Bottoms-Up Toasts Cheer
Danes, Soviets At Gay Moscow Party

c
MOSCOW, March 12 (UP) -Soviet
Premier Nikolai Bulganin
glowingly announced to an excep exceptionally
tionally exceptionally cheerful cocktail party to today
day today that he will never forget how
he and President Eisenhower
"drank martinis to world peace
and friendship" at the Geneva
summit conference last July.
In a scene of much conviviality,
Bulganin, Soviet Foreign Minister
V. M. Molotov and Danish Pre Pre-mier
mier Pre-mier A. H. C. Hansen exchanged
pleasantries and bottoms-up toasts
for two hours. Hansen tossed a
-Viimnatn class over his shoul
der and smashed, it, and then led
a chorus of Danes in a rousing
rendition of "Auld Lang Syne." Syne."-The
The Syne."-The occasion was a party at
the Danish embassy at the con conclusion
clusion conclusion of Hansen's state visit
to Russia. The party was In hon honor
or honor of the birthday of King Fred Fred-rib
rib Fred-rib nf Denmark.
Tnn Knvint officials -attended ex-
pnt Communist -party First Sec
retary Nikita S. Khrushchev. Bu
ganin explained he was not feel
At nnp noint. Hansen asked
whether Buleanin was drinking
champagne or martinis.
smiiina Rulffanin said: Presi
dent Eisenhower opened a patlr to
martinis during the intervals Be Between
tween Between sessions at Geneva.
"We cannot forget those mo moments
ments moments when we drank martinis
te world peace and friendship.
"I hope we shall continue to
do" so." -:
Hansen praised Bulganin in a
toast as "remarkable Soviet Pre Premier."
mier." Premier." : ;
To which Bulganin replied:
"I am just a simple Soviet ciu-
LAST DAY! .75 .40
3:00 4:50 6:45 9:00 p.m.
Scandalous Society Drama!
V'rtV COLOtl,
Dtunu
QnbmaScOP v
h STEREOPHONIC SOUND
0 WEDNESDAY"
r ire
LIFE, LCCIlC
and A"-
IN
SAT.EVL!
pnai i
B WW I
f ALASAMA PULITZER
1 PRIZE EXPOSE

i.iu in mini i.u.

o

Blip r

"Let the people

31st YEAR

96 Sout hern Solons Denounce
School SMreQatiori Decision

WASHINGTON, March 12 (UP)
Ninety-six southern congressmen,'
denounced the Supreme Court s
school segregation decision yester yesterday
day yesterday as a "clear abuse of judicial
power that Has fanned ures ot
"hatred and suspicion" in Dixie.
The lawmakers 19 senators and
77 House members issued a
declaration of constitutional pnn-
ciples" pledging them to "use all,
lawful means" to reverse the de
cision and "to prevent the use of
force" in carrying it out.
"The unwarranted decision of
the Supreme Court in the public
zen placed in a certain position
and I am trying to serve my peo people
ple people as well as possible. May they
live in peace and prosperity."
Thereupon the goateed Premier
offered a personal toast to Han
sen and said "You have to drink
bottoms up -whether you like it or
not."
After that, it was nothing but
bottoms up.
Once Bulganin asked if he could
drink to the dissolution of NATO
and the Communist Warsaw pact.
He settled for a toast to "peace."
Molotov toasted good r a I a a-tlons
tlons a-tlons among peoples and nations
nd said he hoped R u s s I a's
feeders could "repeat the occa occasions"
sions" occasions" when they drank mart! mart!-nis
nis mart!-nis with President Eisenhower.
"I am an old man'," Bulganin
said at'one point.
"No, you are middled aged,"
Molotov interrupted.
"All right, we are middle aged,"
Bulganin replied.
, During- the party, Hansen pitch pitched
ed pitched a champagne glass over his
shoulder and shattered it against
a wall. Three glasses were bro
ken in all. One bounced over the
shoulder of Sam- Russell, corre
spondent of the London Daily
(Worker.
Hansen, Bulganin and Molotov
held the floor for two hours, toast toasting
ing toasting and chatting.
Seldom since Russia opened its
borders to a stream of foreign dig dignitaries
nitaries dignitaries has there been such a jo jovial
vial jovial party.
SERVICE, PLEASE!
OSKALOOSA, Iowa (UP)
There are days when Jack Craig
wonders if he hasn't taught one of
i his two pointer dogs his lesson too
well. He keeps the dogs in a pen
at the back of his lot and if he
toesn't take their supper to them
jy 4 p.m. each day the older dog
jumps the fence and trots to the
house. There, standing on his hind
legs, lie puts a paw on the button
and rings the door bell until he
gets his food.

J4 kV-i) n
M r' v'''
','
" '-"

PISPLAYING PANAMA'S NATIONAL. COSTUME, the Poller. Is Miss Universe Hillevi Rombin (left) who later switched to a whits satin
bathing suit (right)' last night at the fashion show at Hotel El Panama under the auspices of the Panama Red Cross and Burdine's iri Miami.
Three of several Miami models who arrived here yesterday display their charms in bathing'suits and daytime apparel. The affair last nljht,
-rmcferthe- sponsorshirrrrf Panama'rfhtHdyrMrtrtWgarasTaitlen premfrerrt- Ca
nal Zone officials, and diplomats.

know the truth and the

PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, MARCH 12, 1956

ichool casts now ii bearing the
fruit always producad whtn man
substituta nakad power for titib
lished principle," the declaration
said.
The statement was considerably
milder than the original draft
which some southerners refused to
sign.
But it was one of the strongest
criticisms of the high court by a
group oi congressmen in iclciu
years.
"We regard the decision as
clear abuse of judicial power,"
the southerners said. Dixie con congressmen
gressmen congressmen appealed "to our people
not to be provoked by the agitators
and trouble makers invading our
states and to scrupulously refrain
from disorder and lawless acts.
But they commended "those
states which have declared the
intention to resist forced integra integration
tion integration by any lawful means." And
they appealed to non-southern
states to consider the possibility
that they too one day "may be
the victims of judicial encroach encroachment."
ment." encroachment." The statement, scheduled for
presentation to the House and
Senate today, was signed by the
senators from Virginia, North Car Carolina,
olina, Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Flo Florida,
rida, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Ark Arkansas
ansas Arkansas and Louisiana,
Sen. Price Daniel signed but
Senate Democratic Leader Lyndon
B. Johnson, also from Texas, did
not. Johnson said he had not seen
the statement and understood the
congressmen did not ask him to
sign because they did not want to
appear to be trying to dictate
Democratic or Senate policy.
Tennessee's senators, Estes
Kefauver and Albert Gore, did
not sign but four Tennessee House
members did. Kefauver, a candi candidate
date candidate for the Democratic Presid Presidential
ential Presidential nomination, goes much
further on civil rights than most
Southern lawmakers.
The House members represented
11 states. The declaration was
signed by the entire delegations of
Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia,
Louisiana, Mississippi, South Car Carolina
olina Carolina and Virginia. Two Virginia
Republicans Reps. Joel T. Broy Broy-hill
hill Broy-hill and Richard Poff also sign signed.
ed. signed. The statement of principles grew
out of a series of meetings by
southern senators in the office of
Sen. Walter F. George (D-Ga ).
The original version was drafted
by a group headed by Sens. Rich Richard
ard Richard B. Russell (D-Ga.), John C.
Stennis (D-Miss.) and Sam J. Er Er-vin
vin Er-vin (D-NC).
The final version traced at
length the legal background of the
high court jdecision which threw
out the previous concept of equal
but separate facilities for white
and Negro pupils. Instead, the
justices ordered integration of pub public
lic public schools within a reasonable
time.
"This unwarranted exercise of
power by the court, contrary to
the Constitution, is creating cha

country is safe Abraham Lincoln.

os and confusion in the states
prineiplaly affected," the con congressmen
gressmen congressmen said.
"It is destroying the amicable
relations between the white and
Negro races that have been creat created
ed created through 90 years of patient ef effort
fort effort by the good people of both
races. It has planted hatred and
suspicion where there has been
heretofore friendship and under understanding."
standing." understanding." The statement added that "Out "Outside
side "Outside agitators are threatening im immediate
mediate immediate and revolutionary changes
in our public school systems. If
done, this is certain to destroy the
system of public education in some
of the schools.
The signers conceded "we con
stitute a minority in the present
Congress," but voiced "full faith
that a majority of the American
people believe in the dual system
of government which has enabled
us to achieve our greatness and
will in time demand that the re
served rights of the states and of
the people be made secure against
judicial usurpation.
Expressing "the gravest con concern
cern concern for the explosive and dan dangerous
gerous dangerous condition created by this
decision and inflamed by out outside
side outside meddlers," the declaration
et forth four main points:
1. "We reaffirm our reliance on
the Constitution as the fundamen fundamental
tal fundamental law of the land."
2. "We decry the Supreme
Court's encroachments on rights
reserved to the states and to the
people, contrary to established
law and to the constitution."
3. "We commend the motives of
those states which have declared
the intention to resist forced in integration
tegration integration by any lawful means."
4. "We appeal to the states and
people who are not directly af-
House Of Commons
Takes Second Step
To Outlaw Hanging
LONDON, March 12 (UP)- The
House of Commons is expected to
take another step towards the ev eventual
entual eventual abolition of hanging today
when it votes on a bill that would
outlaw capital punishment for
murder.
The House Voted on Feb. 16 to
either suspend or outlaw capital
punishment. Today s action will be
on a bill to put that vote into law.
n,,.' f -1 j f
ine voie is expecien uns auer
noon. It may be delayed by a pos
sible debate, and statement, on the
deportation of Archbishop Manari
os from Cyprus.
Today's vote will be on the sec
ond reading of a bill sponsored by
Sydney .Silverman, veteran white
haired abolitionist. It would out
law hanging for murder, but keep
the death penalty for traitors and
for the services.

' -:, .t ..4 ., I- ,. i
TV i - I t
- '!iW'
J:y 'hi

FIVE CENTS

fected by these decisions to con
sider the constitutional prmcipes
involved against the time when
they too, on issues vital to them,
may be tne victims or juuiciai
encroachment."
Ervin. in a separate statement,
said he hoped the declaration "will
receive earnest consiaerauon uy
reasonable people everywhere and
will be a lamp of moderation in
these crucial days."
Pro-Segregation
Student Leader
Expelled By Bama
TUSCALOOSA. Ala., March 12 1
mpi Leonard Wilson, zu-
year-old pro-segregation student
leader at the university oi Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, has been expelled for his
part In the campus race riot that
preceded expulsion of Negro coed
Autherine Lucy, it was announc
ed today.
The University Board oi itus-
tees said it had expelled Wil
son, suspended four other stu students,
dents, students, and approved disciplinary
action against 25 others.
The trustees' action followed
an investigation by a university
committee formed recently to in investigate
vestigate investigate the riotous demonstra demonstrations
tions demonstrations over the entrance of the
26-year-old Negro coed, later ex
pelled herself for bringing charg charges
es charges against the university that
she could not prove.
The trustees said three other
students under investigation
have withdrawn from the uni
versity and will not be readmit readmitted
ted readmitted unless, at the completion of
the investigation, their records
have been cleared."
The trustees added that "In
vestigation of other students
will continue in the event of ad additional
ditional additional pertinent information."
Chaplin Takes Trip
To Youthful Haunts
LONDON, March 12 (UP) -An
unshaven Charlie Chaplin arrived
back in London yesterday after a
36-hour sentimental journey to the
haunts of his youth.
Chaplin left on Saturday with without
out without suitcases and without telling
anyone where he was going. He
visited all of the north of England
towns where he struggled as a
young comic 45 years ago. He took
trains from town to town, and got
off when his mood suited him.
Newspapermen caught up with
him once, by accident. He selected
a hotel in Leeds which was full of
journalists holding a dinner-dance.
He tod them: "One thing im-
pressed me. In the market place
everyone was so well shod. Thank
God. It was not so once

FIREMEN TAKE TO THE WATER Firemen in flood-stricken Salamanca, NTkelprepar- r
ed for any emergency as they replace their engines with a boat after flood waters from he he-Allegheny
Allegheny he-Allegheny River almost cut the city in half.

'
Cold Wave Moves
Into US Midwest
On Heels Oi Storm
CHICAGO, March 12 (UP) A
cold wave moved into the mia mia-;pRt.
;pRt. mia-;pRt. Inst, nifht hptiind a harraee
of late winter storms that para paralyzed
lyzed paralyzed traffic and took the lives
of three persons.
The ennw utorm reached bllz
zard proportions in a wide belt
irom tne uaKoias io miuuibuii.
dumping as much as 1 mcnes
of snow.
Six to seven-foot drifts on
main highways cut off the
nnrt.hprn third Of Michigan's
Upper Peninsula from the rest
of the state.
. Near Sparta, Wis., a search
party of 20 men and an Army
snow plow recovered the bodies
of two Illinois National Guards Guardsmen
men Guardsmen killed when their plane
crashed during y e s t e rday's
storm.
Tn smith nakota. a woman
died trying to buck high winds
nnH hlinriincr snow in an effort
to get aid after her car stalled
In a drift. v-
Winds on the edge of the storm
were clocked up to 64 miles an
hour in Chicago where signs,
scaffoldings and communication
lines were knocked down.
Two Men Missing
As US Destroyer,
Cruiser Collide
HONOLULU March 12 (UP)
Two men are missing and three
were injured in the collision oi
the heavy cruiser USS Columbus
ortfi ho dnctrnvor Flnvrt B. Parks
in the South China Sea during night
maneuvers Saturday, me wavy
said today.
Tt said a rnurt nf innuirv Will
be held as soon as possible aboard
the Columbus to investigate ine
oofiHont in whirh ihf hnw section
of the destroyer was sheered off.
The missing were laenunea as
Seaman Jackie E. Johnson, of New
CaMe Tnd and Seaman Willie L.
Lipscomb of Durham, N.C.
The collision occurred while the
vessels were engaged in task force
nnoratinna 'nff Luzon. Holes Weri
driven in the cruiser in severaW
places above the water line. The
destroyer, which suffered all the
casualties, lost 50 feet from its
bow section.
The Parks, accompanied by the
Columbus, was able to proceed
under its own power towards Subic
Bay in northern Luzon, where
emergency repairs will be made.

a-hTJ.LE,iIFE-SAyE? Slx-weeks-old Kathleen Van Slyke.
whose cries saved her family from drowning when flood
waters engulfed their Nassau, N. Y., home, gets a thank-you
kiss from her brother, Jimmy.

Red Cross Appeals
For New Magazines
. A, public appeal for magazines
is being made by the Red Cross
otnee in Cristobal
Several thousands of magazines
are distributed monthly by t h e
Red Cross office on the Atlantic
Side but the shelves are ndw prac practically
tically practically bare, according to the an announcement.
nouncement. announcement. The magazines are
distributed regularly to Armed
Forces personnel at lonely o u t t-posts,
posts, t-posts, the hospital patients, and
crews of ships.
Magazines may be brought to
the Red Cross office in Old Cris Cristobal,
tobal, Cristobal, or arrangements can be
made to have them picked up by
telephoning 3-1671 or 3-1632.

TOMORROW o At 9 p.ra.

S N E A K
PREVIEW!

TODAY

RELEASE
" f AT THE
L-.TJ- X
A picture that
you never will
forget
ALEX NICOL
. -r in

BLACK
-GROVIT

, -1
"Ai
l
1
Vj '.miiiiseiwiirtiitswaaisieaii'wifiTiTiinil fcrl-J

BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, MARCH I
i
HIGH
4:1 a.m.-
LOW
10:32 a.m.
10:52 a.m.
4:34 p.m.
Representative
Of Cyma Visiting
The Isthmus
.The local "agent of Cyma
watches was being brought up
to date today on tho latest im improvements
provements improvements of these famoui
Swiss watches by Claude
Schwob, a representative of the
makers of Cyma watches.
Schwob said his company
nas several large scaie im improvements
provements improvements planned for their
watches. (Mercuno)
CENTRAL
0.75
0.40
1:10, 2:52, 1:45, 6:58, 9:01 p.m..

I MM iW jliWiWIffliilifflllMflSWWW
A MOUNTAIN
OF a ilANt
- t'
QncmaSccpS
print fcy
Technicolor1 jk
i t&i "- -!-