The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03025

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
r

Hi

Seagram's
to DUOIIOS AIRES
AN INDEPENDENT -HElV:
DAILY NEWSPAPER
THE COSMOPOLITAN
CAPITAL...
'A A
mmtm
CANADIAN
WHISKY
ra
lin.nDAnnrin
I H f U IN --3 1- ;j
C
INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe' Abraham Lincoln.
31st TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1956
FIVE CENTS

am

! I

r.
Ml

William E. Potter
Named to Succeed
Governor Seybold
WASHINGTON, MarTh" 7 "(UP) President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower nominated Brig Gen. William E. Potter of the Army
Corps of Engineers yesterday as new governor of the Pan Panama
ama Panama Canal Zone to succeed Maj Gen. John S. Seybold.
The 50-year-old officer now is a member of the Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi River Commission stationed at Omaha, Neb. His
nomination is subject to Senate confirmation.
He is expected to take over his duties in May when
Seybold is due for retirement.
Potter has been division en-! Prior to his assignment in Ne Ne-gineer
gineer Ne-gineer at Omaha for nearly four! braska, Potter was assistant
years and is native of Oshkosh, chief of engineers for Civil
Wis- Works. He is married and has
He was staff officer at U.S.! two daughters.
Army Headquarters in Eurooej He is a graduate of the US
during World War II and later j Military Academy class of 1928

served as aisinci engineer in
Kansas City and in Anchorage,
Alaska.
Seybold Proclaims
Girl Scout Week
March 11 to 17
In observance of the 44th
versary of the Girl Scout
anni-
orga-
nization, the coming week of
March 11-17 has been proclaimed
Girl Scout Week in the Canal Zone
by Governor John S. Seybold.
In his proclamation, the Govern Governor
or Governor asked all members of the com community
munity community to join in paying tribute
to Girl Scout leaders and mem members
bers members and to assist in bringing to
the attending of more girls the ci citizenship
tizenship citizenship training offered in the or organization.
ganization. organization. Special attention was
called in the proclamation to Mon Monday,
day, Monday, March 12, the anniversary
date of the founding.
RP Assemblyman
Illueca Admitted
To Canal Zone Bar
In the presence of too legal
officials of Panama, and the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone, Dr. Jorge Illueca, a
member of the Panama National
Assembly, was admitted to the
Canal Zone bar today.
District Court Judge Guthrie
P. Crowe performed the brief
ceremony which admitted Illue Illueca,
ca, Illueca, one of the outstanding mem members
bers members of the Assembly who re recently
cently recently was sent to the United
States to express Panama's con confidence
fidence confidence In the rapid ratification
by the Senate of the new U.S. U.S.-R.P.
R.P. U.S.-R.P. Treaty.
Attorney Woodrow de Castro,
speaking on behalf of the Bar
Association., welcomed the new
member and said that they had
felt it was ''very fitting" that a
member of the Panama Legisla Legislature
ture Legislature be permitted to practice In
the Canal Zone.
He added that the C.Z. bar is
"unique in that we have gath gath-ered
ered gath-ered here citizens of many coun countries."
tries." countries."
The young assemblyman told
the court he felt it was a "great
honor" to join the Canal Zone
Bar Association, and said he ap appreciated
preciated appreciated greatly the "very kind
words" of the Judge and of. his
colleague De Castro.
Present at the swearing in
ceremony which began at 9 this
morning, was Manuel J. Men Men-dez,
dez, Men-dez, president of the association;
Octavto Fabrega. former Foreign
Minister of Panama now in pri private
vate private law practice, and many
lawyers from both sides of the
border., - -'.

-' "- mm.11... 11 '" -11 J 'iiimiv
- f''
t I

" )t
--m, -1 1 ., 1 i-i-rr I 'i kmmSfaAi

CONGRATULATIONS FROM THE JUDGE . .District Court
Judge Guthrie F. Crowe offers a cordial welcome from the
bench to Dr. Jorge Illueca, who today became the newest
member of the Canal Zone Bar Association.! Illueca is a Pan Panama
ama Panama National Assemblyman. Present at the ceremony in the
U. S. District Court at Ancon today was president of the Bar
.' "'ociation, Manuel Mcnriez, and Octavio Fabrega, former
' Foreign Minister of Pfnams.
(Photo: Hindi Diamond)

Ferry To Stop Al g
Nightly Beninninq
Sunday For Repairs

In order to permit extensive
repairs to the fender system ofj
the Thatcher Ferry slips andi
ramps, ferry services will be sus suspended
pended suspended each night from 8 o'clock
until 6 a.m. beginning Sunday, it
has been announced at Balboa
Heights.
The ferry service will be sus suspended
pended suspended during these hours
nightly for approximately the
next three months while thej
contractor completes the proj-i
ect.
The work of repairing the
Thatcher Ferry ramps and slips

was started in December by the
Bildon, Inc. Repairs to the floorjTfl ft Hlllhh flilt
system of the west-side ferry I U UCl UlUMlJ UUl

ramp and the fender system of j
the east side' ferry,: slip wWe
completed during the first phase
of the General Rehabilitation
Protect.
The work still to be done Is
the $21,000 job of repairing the
fender system of the west side
ferry slip and removal of dol dolphins
phins dolphins of the west side ferry slip.
Distaff Council
To Hear Lecture
By Army Surgeon
A talk
by
Col. G. E. Leone

Army Caribbean,''?1 the command role before the

Sureeon,
U.S.
on "Treatment ana Management
of Mass casualties Following a
Major Disaster," will nighlight
the 39th meeting ot the execu executive
tive executive council of the Panama Area
Distaff councils, at 9:30 Thurs Thursday
day Thursday morning at the Quarry
Heights Officers Club.
As Leone's remarks have a di direct
rect direct bearing on the life-saving
operations of the distaff organ organization,
ization, organization, all key distaff Derson-
":wi?:uu'
importance toward, furthering
their programs.
Mrs. L. c. MeGarr, past presi
dent of the executive council
will be presented the presiding
chairman's gavel and block by
Mrs. W. C. Morse, current pres
ident and presiding chairman.
A discussion, conducted by
Mrs. H. B. Marshall on "Distaff
Participation In Surprise Disas Disaster
ter Disaster Control Exercise," is sched scheduled
uled scheduled for the first part of the
meeting. -Leone's talk will fol follow
low follow and Mrs. Maorse will close
out the meeting. .-.- v ;

fe

Israeli Leader

Can Avert Middle

,

ft r w i i

ifilltpp

TAKES COMMAND Brig.
Radi Innab, the Jordinian As Assistant
sistant Assistant Chief of Staff, has
been appointed head of the
Arab Legion. He replaces Lt.
Gen. John Glubb Pasha who
was dismissed by King Hus Hussein.
sein. Hussein. State Department
Urged Britain
LONDON. March 7 firp) The
United States u:'ged that Britain
withdraw Lt. Gen. John Bagot
Glubb from his Arab Legion com command
mand command before he was fired, Glubbs
former aide reported today.
Brigadier J. C. Broadhurst,
former second in command to
Glubb and former equerry to the
late King Abdullah of Jordan,
said the U.S. State Department
"made repeated promptings
that a change be i..ade in the
Arab Legion command.
In a letter to the London Daily
Telegraph, Broadhurst said he
was warned two months ago that
"all was not well in Jordan.
"Among other remedies, he
said, "I urged a dignified changing
inevitable, with no access of good
win, was lorcea upon us. washing washing-tons
tons washing-tons State Department made re repeated
peated repeated similar promptings.
"Yet all the warnings were neg neglected
lected neglected and King Hussein and his
advisers acted with the curt un un-ceremony
ceremony un-ceremony of a long frustration.
King Hussein said yesterday j
that Glubfc "remained deaf to my 1
repeated orders.
"He repeatedly preached s e r-
mons to the officers and tribal
"verting
that Israel
was
irnnur th.n ih. w
diplomacy was unhand foXl
ish, Hussein said.
The king described his firing of
Glubb as a "surgical operation
and denied that it was meant as
a "slap in the face at Britain.
He rejected reports that t h e
ouster was the first step in a move
away from alliance with Britain.
HusMin'i ptrsond ihitf of Cab Cabinet,
inet, Cabinet, Behjat Bet Talhouni went
a step further, and denied that
Egyptian Premier Gamal Abdel
Nasser or King Saud of Saudi
Arabia had any influence in the
dismissal."
"Glubb remained deaf to mj re
peated orders, King Hussein said.
"I lost faith in Glub'a judgment
and loyalty to Jordan.
"But though we disagree with
Glubb it should not mean we
slapped his country in the face.
"I have today instructed my
! government in w r i t i n g that
jGlubb's ouster does not change the
I existing relations between Jordan
land Britain, that the remaining
British officers in the Arab Legion
I will continue in this job as pre previously
viously previously and in fulfillment of their
existing contracts, Russem said.
"Since my assumption of con constitutional
stitutional constitutional powers in May 1953
until recently, I had repeated repeatedly
ly repeatedly warned Glubb that he should
reform tht army's administration
eliminate corruption and the
spoils system and help streng strengthen
then strengthen (he army morale which
was continually w e a k e n e d by
Glubb himself, the King said.
The King said Glubb has pro proposed
posed proposed since the summer of 1954
that Jordan should evacuate the
major part of the western bank
of the Jordan River in case of
Israeli aggression.-
"I repeatedly asked Glubb to
draw uo a defensive plan since
we wanted to defend every inch
of Jordan terr't.o, y and cannot
accept the theory oi "evacuation
he sin!
"But all was in vain. Glubb
remained dta( to my
orderj.
repealed

JERUSALEM, Israel, March 7
(UP) Israeli Premier David Ben
Gurion said yesterday the United
States bears "moral responsibili responsibility"
ty" responsibility" for averting war between A A-rab
rab A-rab nations and Israel.
Bn Gurion said the United
States could fulfill such a re re-iponsibility
iponsibility re-iponsibility by granting Israel's
request for arms aid to counter
deliveries of Soviet arms to the
Arab nations.
Ben Gurion told the Knesset

tfarliament) the chances of peace
in me middle r.ast are decreasing!
but he promised Israel would not!
start a war
it i
I ne iiirii won a voie oi commence!

in me iwiessei Dy a margin ot bbisn Lt. Gen. John Glubb as com

W li.
The Israeli leader spoke as:
1. The Israeli Foreign Ministry'
accused Egypt of three acts of
"aggression" in border incidents
;and demanded an emergency,
1 meeting of the U. N. commission
jto discuss the charges.
I 2. The leaders of Egypt, Syria
ana satifli Arahia met in a Cairo
"summit" conference to plan their
future rnle in the Middle East.
The conference could have fateful
consequences for both IsraeHand
the pro-western Baghdad pact.
) 3. lt was disclosed in Paris that
Israel has placed orders for
: French S10 rocket missiles as an
answer to the Stalin and T34
tanks Egypt has bought from the
Soviet bloc.
In his Knesset speech, Ben Gu Gurion
rion Gurion stated his nation would guard
the peace as long as possible. But
if war should break out, he said,
Israel would fight until, victory,
""hut from desperation.' nor with
demagogy but confident of the na nation's
tion's nation's strength."
He said responsibility for avoid avoidance
ance avoidance of war was not in the hands
of Israel but would rest with the
United States if that country does
not accede quickly to Israel's re requests
quests requests for arms.
If war breaks out, Ben Gurion
added, the responsibility would
be Russia's for supplying arms
to the Arab nations.
An Israeli foreign ministry
spokesman complained to the U.
N. Mixed Armistice Commission
about the following alleged "acts
of aggression" by Egyptians:
1. A raid of Egyptian patrols
Zone Parents Urged
To Check Dales Of
Salk Vaccinations
Parents of children who nave
received the first two poliomyeli
tis vaccine inoculations are re
minded that the third and last in
lection shmiM h rerivoH nnt lace
,u ..
monuis auer me sec-
The dates on the blue immuniza-
ca fil'd ut AtJ
first and second inoculations
should be checked and if the seven-month
period has elapsed, the
third injection may be obtained at
the out-patient medical clinics or
the first aid stations in the vari various
ous various communities.
Vaccination with the Salk vac vaccine
cine vaccine began in April but was halt halted
ed halted when similar prrgrams were
suspended in the United States.
The program was resumed in Ju July
ly July on a large scale and up to date
a total of 8,394 children in the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone between the ages of six
months and 15 years have perti perti-cipated.
cipated. perti-cipated. In addition, the vaccine
has been administered' to 123 ex expectant
pectant expectant mothers.
Parents also are advised that
those children who have not re received
ceived received either the first or second
polio inoculation may do so at the
out-patient medical clinics or the
first aid stations during the reg regular
ular regular hours.
It is suggested that these injec injections
tions injections be received before the chil children
dren children leave for the States on vaca vacation.
tion. vacation. There will be no charge fer any
of these injections.
PdnCanal Pilots1
Attorney Departs
William S. Tyson, Washington
attorney for the Panama Canal
pilots, left early this morning aft after
er after having spent a week on the
Isthmus.
Tyson was here primarily to at attend
tend attend a hearing on the Canal pi pilots'
lots' pilots' ease in which they are seek seeking
ing seeking to recover over two million
dollars in back pay and other
compensation they claim is due
them since July 1, 1952.
The attorney wound up his visit
here by attending an accident in-
yestigation case, yesterday which
1 invoivea a canal pilot.

DeclareYUS

East War
into Israeli territory at Hatzerim

west of Beersheeba.
2. The killing of an Israeli sol-
dier when his car hit an Egyptian
land mine at Nir Itzhak near the Rear Adm. Richard E. Byifl,
Gaza border. veteran polar explorer said yester-
3. An Egyptian shelling attack day on his fifth return trom th
againsst three Israeli positions at Antarctic that he would get to to-Kissufim.
Kissufim. to-Kissufim. gether with the State Department
The Israeli spokesman said one to decide what will be done in the
Egyptian was killed and two cap- matter of claims by the different
tured in the three incidents. nations which have explored the

in Lairo, Egyptian Premier (ia-
mal Abdel Nasser met with King
Saud of Saudi Arahia and Svrian
President Shukry El Kuwatly in a
-j 1
i luiucicmr iiuiiraij auvdiiL-t'u
toiiowing Jordan s ouster of Bnt
i mandcr of the Arab Leeion.
The three Arab countries were
expected to consider ways of
widening the split between Jor Jordan
dan Jordan and Britain and to offer to

Taxe over orirain s 11 million tprs at Fort Amador, the grey-hair-dollar
subsidy to Jordan's Arab ( ed poorer told newsmen that the

Legion
The Arab
leaders also were ex-
pected to consider joint action a
gainst Israel.
,
, Paf 3150 Rorf
I Ml HWW vmi va
Formed To Fight
Delinquency
Officers to form a board of
directors to combat juvenile de

In American-School in Parai.oer by w.

Those named were:
Ellis Fawcett, chairman; Eli-:
sa Davis, vice-chairman and
Pearl E. Ford, secretary-treasur-:
er.
Members elected to the nego negotiating
tiating negotiating committee were: Cecil H.
Hall, Rv. W. H. Stewart. Al-
fred B. Warner, Joseph Bishop,:
Eric Oakley, Mildred Sawyers,
G.L.A. Davis and Karl Harris.
Aim of the group is a long long-range
range long-range program to fight against
juvenile delinquency in paraiso.
Next session for the board of di directors
rectors directors will be held March 14.
Representatives of various com community
munity community organizations and civic
workers are expected to attend.
Army Deputy Here
On Official Visit
Edward A. Bacon, deputy assist assistant
ant assistant to the Secretary of the Armv,
Civil and Military Affairs, arriv arrived
ed arrived on the Isthmus bv plane early
this morning from the States for
a visit of several days on official

business- I Byrd said that the nations par-
Bacon handles matters relating cipating in the IGY project will
to t'.e Panama Canal in the office! exchange scientific lrJormation.
of the Secretary of the Army. He)
has visited the Canal Zone on pre-! Wnen asked about Russia's wil wil-vious
vious wil-vious occasions. His last visit was: linenpss to collaborate: the Admi

lUlT V" Le". !'her,h.e WS
here to attend meeting of a spe
cial committee of the board of di
rectors of the Panama Canal Co
BALBOA TIDES
THURSDAY, MARCH 8
HIGH LOW
12:48 am 6:51 a.m.
1 :28 p.m. 7:28 p.m.

nmrnrr-i 1 1 ivm rrrrn rumtw irrT t"-'r""A-" r-'ji-'jia nimji.jwi,
fD lf '
'- f 1 1 "- I i-S
fit. I -i I -i :f1;::r

CHATTING JUST BEFORE PLANE TIME In R ear Adm. Milton E. Miles' quarters yesterday
; was Rear Adm. Richard E. Byrd, returning fr om his fifth expedition to the Antarctic. Shown
with him are his son, Lt. R. E. Byrd, Jr., Capt. stevan Mandarich, both of Byrd's staff, Byrd
and Miles. Byrd la officer In charge of US An tarctlc Programs. He and three members of
his staff returned to Washington yesterday af ternoon,-

35 NA7I0NS

EXPLORING
ANTARCTIC
South Pole.
The 67-vear-oid Admiral arrived
i Balboa vestcrdav afternoon a-
. ,.
hoard llic liner iianguaia irum
;New Zealand and left for Miami
;at 5 15 nm via Pan American
v
35 NATIONS
At a press conference held in
Rear Adm. Milton E. Miles' quar-
question of claims, wtucn will rc
taken up with the State Depart Department
ment Department was a "delicate matter."
Thirty-five nations, including
Russia are to participate in the
International Geophysical Year
1957. Argentina and Chile have
already made claims on AnMrc
tic areas. I
Byrd remarked that one lm
nortant lesson he was briRgim
back from this expedition was that.

, there are places in the AntarnMciMami 1 piup"' 17

1 suitable for permanent bases be
DIFFERENT CLIMATE
"The climate is Quite different
nnnnnnfJtfw I
from Panama," the wiry Admiral
said with a smile. "It gets pretty
chilly there." He added that it is
50 degrees colder there than on
the North Pole.

ing last July discussed one or
Byrd recalled that 25 years agojtwo m0ves Russia was making in

he sailed to the Antarctic on
.'

wooden icebreaker, "City of NtwIBulganln m effect acscnoea
I tUx m-immr. n ,irohl nnmmPr.

Vnrlr ThU timo h shin was Ihe
USS Glacier with a, 000, horse
power.
Tht Admiral said thM thouoh th
xptdition was a military ent.
iti main feature ws scientific
work. Ht id that for ovory
scientific man left in the Antarc Antarctic
tic Antarctic eemp there are two or three
retinge.
RUSSIANS
ral said contacts had already been
made with' the Russians at IGY
meetings in Rome and Brussels,
and they indicated they would co
operate.
He was accompanied here by his
son, Lt. Richard Bytd, Jr., Capt.
Steve Mandrich and Maj. Murray
Wiener of his staff.

Won't

!

What To Do About
Political Future

WASHINGTON, March
!1?wer said. it is up to

Nixon to chart his Own political future
"

Mr. Eisenhower told his

no criticism of Nixon as a man, an associate or a running
mate on the Republican ticket. But he said he has not
presumed to tell Nixon what he should do about the cam
paign this year.
The President also said that if his general physicial
fitness to conduct the burdens of hard work in the Presi Presidency
dency Presidency showed signs of definite deterioration, he would
then step aside and put the matter before the American
people.
He said he was not speaking of a brief illness such as
a one-week attack of influenza, but basic inability to per perform
form perform his job as he sees it.

Other hishlishts of Mr. Eisen-
hower's news conference
1. He regarded as favorable
thp immediate reaction of Soviet
Premier Nikolai Bulganin to his
! r.
clear weanons. He said this
j R, should to... ,;
up any opening that looks like
it might lead to lessening of in
I t'ernationai tensions.
2. He said he believes the
United Nations should take ur
gent and early action on the
tense situation in the Middle
East, with Israel and the Arab
world agreeing to abide by
U.N. armistice terms.
3. He disclosed that Bulganin
at the Geneva "summit" meet
the Middle East. He added that
wlcoe "'"V"
cial. 4. As for the present day
. J
prospects of peace or
war, ne
said he believes the world has a:

wakened to the tact that global nTnomasvn,e u
war Is getting well-nigh un-l The conference turned to the the-thinkable
thinkable the-thinkable and that he believes I President s health w h ques-.
the uneasy peace or cold war is i pointing out that some
coin to take a different direc-!Democrats are making it an is-

tion.
5. lie agreed with Defense
Secretary Charles E. Wilson
that there has been too much
emphasis on this country's
guided missile program as far
as puhlic discussion is con
cerned.

DUU WHS, I1C U.: """:KI. U.. 1 on U V. Is t

minimize the dreadful impor-
in. f rfovolnnincr o wpanmv

that could be hurled against an.one
enemy j. !-; In o.v onntVior tal-m

In this development,. he saia
he feels that point-point accur
acy is more important than dis
tance.
ferenee. Mr Fisenhower reacted!
sharply when a reporter cited a
published report that some
0f
his advisers are urging him
to!
"dump" Nixon and that the
President has suggested to Nix Nixon
on Nixon that he stand aside and per-

1 ffl

Tell VP

7 (UP) President Eisen-
Vice President Richard M.
news conference that he hat
haps take a cabinet post.
With energetic seriousness.
the President said that if any
one ever had the effrontery to
suggest to him that he dump
a person he respected as much
as he did Nilxon the resultant
commotion would be widely
heard.
U;' Eb;.ho Ver ""kaki he has
not presumed to tell the Vice
president wnafne snouta do m
the forthcoming campaign,
But he has told Nixon h
should be one of the comers of
the ReDublican Party because
Nixon is young, intelligent, tal talented
ented talented in the affairs of govern government
ment government and deeply dedicated to
the same principles for which
Mr. Eisenhower stood.
The President then pointed
out that he had asked Nixon
to chart out his own -course, then
to tell him (Mr. Eisenhower)
what Nixon wants to do.
Firmly, the President added
that h never has gone beyond
Ihol U flotlv that MlvnM
1 fci v- aac oc..u i.nwj i..,, .,,.-'-
niu noi visit mm wiuic ne w
sue.
The President started wit
hy sayine that he has tried to
he honest as hp posslhly could
ahout his own condition. ""
To the Democratic charge that
if renominated and reelected, he
would be a "part-time Prest-
t dent." Mr. Eisenhower shrugged
inn 011UUIUC13 etiiu oaiu ijc ia uvsv
Romg 10 aeienu nmiMU Bisv
- TI VaI
11C fldV4 11" "UUlM iiuv tia v.
the decision unless he felt he
could last out the next live
vears). f
Today, he was asked Wha! he
woulOdo if-he found out before
the Republican convention in
August xnai nts pnysicai conai-
tion was below par.
Mr. Eisenhower said that tin-
less he felt uo to his duties he
would no longer be In the
Whit. Houe and no longer be
avallaMe. He said this was a
promise.
l ater' in the conference a re reporter
porter reporter wanted to know whether"
this meant be would withdraw
from the GOP race If he found
that his health was not up to
meeting the burdens of the
Presidency.
The President .seemed mildly
Irritated. He said he did not
want to he held to a week's case
of the flu.
Instead, he said he was talk talking
ing talking about his general organic
fitness to carry the burdens of
hard work that go through the
year. .. z
At any time, he feels that his
general organic fitness does not
permit this, he said, then lt goes
before the American people.
The questioning shifted back
to Nixon. A reporter wanted to
know whether Mr. Elsenhower
would have his 1952 partner. As
a 1956 running mat. if Nixon
chose to remain on the ticket.
The president countered that
he is not going to be pushed in in-to.
to. in-to. a corner.
Then he said emphatically
that hf has no criticisms of Nix
on as a man, associate or run
nine mate.
The President declined tj
guess when asked whether h
thought he would carry as
many Southern states this year
as he did in 1952.

:':.!f

I

: 'vt i
tisl
f



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDLPENDENT DA1LT NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, MARCH t, 153d

f AGE TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

MO FUllHED r THE PANAMA AMERICAN PDIU, INC

reuNoto r neleon kounceveli. it 112s
HARMODIO ARIAS. eoito
1. H Titrr p. O. Bo 3. Panama,, n or r.
TELEPHONE 2-07AO 5 Lines'
Cable Aodsess. fANAMIRICAN. Panama
SaHON Office II 171 ctNTL Avenue between '2th ano 13th Ihiui
FtMIION REMEEENTAT1VES. JOSHUA B POWERS. INC.
343 Madison Ave. New Vok. U7i N. v.
local t mail
Rr Month in 70 $ 50
0 ix months. in advance p 13 03
OR ONE YEAH. IN AOVANCE lfl.SO 24 00
VmII IS VOUH rORUM THI READERS OWK COLUMN

Labor News
And
(Comment

"The Enemy's On Top of That Mountain CHARGE!"

-?;."-'.rrC

By VICTOR RIESEL
Apparently the time has come
o talk of a young man from De

troit who is moving rapidly in the

Tka Lla.l lAt Ml ABM forum tar ridden at The Panama America

letters art ftctirtj aretefully and art handlee" in wholly confidential ; public press from labor lcadnr to

aaaer. legend.
If m rsntriDuta a letter don't ba Impotient II It doain't opseef thr i mat the time has come is

it day Letters art published in tha order received.
lane try to keep tha Icttart limited te one page length.
Identity ef latter writer! ri held m itrictejt confidence.
Thia nnrtaaaar eum no reiponiibility let itatementi at epinioiu
pressed in letters irom readers.

THE MAIL BOX

PF.RON AND POLLYANNA

I
r

Sir:

An American Citizen's' letters make me sick. I've .read many

controversial subjects in the Mail Box. without submitting an an answer
swer answer to anv of them. But now I've had all I can take from An
American Citizen's" sickening promotion of Peron. I'm inclined
to believe he is really a Communist, wishing to stir up sympathy
for Peron under the guise of being an American citizen. Or he
may be an incorrigible Pollyanna.
However though I'm well aware of the proximity of Peron
irl Panama, I'm also aware of the proximity of coral snakes. The
latter are beautifully colored, but quite deadly.
J It "An American Citizen" would stop coloring Peron as the

"forsaken champion," he might realize his tangs are 01 neiM iji

lit retirement, so that all y.ou see

ob

vious from the cataclysmic fact
that he and Walte: Rcuther flew
into New York from Detroit for
speeches on the same day last
week. They spoke within a mile
or so of cacli otho and he
made the headlines the following

morning, not lleuther.
That was last Monday, not px-1
actly the day the earth stood still, ;

out the aay the nations top labor

loaders took time out to listen to
the "other Detroiter 43-ycar-old
James R. Hoffa. ninth vice vice-president
president vice-president of the Teamsters Broth Brotherhood
erhood Brotherhood and reputed to be one of
the country's most powerful union
chief.'.
Certainly he is the fastest travel traveling
ing traveling labor leader these days. He
hit New York for two hours.
Reuther stayed overnight. In those
two hours, Hoffa touched off a
controversy inside labor which

: could result in a split within the

hzc Ills tangs are 01 neta y : iassive AKL-C10 and perhaps in
is his bold, gentlemanly, m-,thc !auncnmg of a competing la-

necent exterior. lt , i bi federation.

To anything Crede Calhoun nas written in icuuiah t happened swiftly. Hoffa got

1 i.n hpfnrn p.irlpr nf Ihp rnntrnvpr.

! s i a 1 independent International

Lnngshorem'ens Assn., which was
ousted from the AFL in 1953 on
charges now as well known as
ihey deserved. Hoffa pledged the
iLA support, even against the

AFL-ClOs own Longshorcmens

rrjay yet write, though I doubt he has the stomach I sjJ ''A

WHO'S "WE"

Sir

This is in reply to the jerk who signed himself "Fair Play"

n fV mull Onv nf Feh 2P

All I'llb itinii wwn u. .i ....

Who does he think he is i.inaoergn u ne uucmj l, .iwi : i nlon. lie told the ILA chicls that
does he get this "we" attitude? He says "We feel that as $10o,000 had been deposited on
Americans' we realise that all phases of this treaty, etc." Just thrir behalf in the LaSalle Na Na-Who
Who Na-Who does he think he is? The elected representative of the ) tional Bank of Chicago. Oddly
American residents of the Ianal Zone'' I'm sure that if "Fan enough, this made them unhappy.
Plav" holds anv office, it must be an insignificant one. For they knew what the public

Fair Play says tnat Loveiaay piacea us m nuMwunau.L UIU u

conierence wiin ocu

MnIHnne fnnr vparx acn when he had a

...,, TT.1 U,i n L-1 1- In'O

tor Guy N. cuueue at tne ci ranania mwi uy aiMi.(
ponsib!e statements.
' If "Fair Play" will take the time to read again the news newspaper
paper newspaper reports of that conference he will find that Lovelariy re recommended
commended recommended that the best way to bolster Panama's economy
would be to require that all Panamanian citizens employed on
the Canal Zone reside in Panama, and that they be denied com commissary
missary commissary and other privileges to which residents of the Zone are
entitled.
. "Fair Play" might take note that several of Lovelady's re recommendations
commendations recommendations at that conference are now in the process of
being put into effect, and come Jan. I, 1957, many others will
become effective.
" It is not unreasonable to believe that a few other recom recommendations
mendations recommendations of Lovelady may be effecteci, including his opposi opposition
tion opposition to the covering of non-United States citizens under the Ci Civil
vil Civil Service Retirement System.
"Fair Play" says our Government obtained through this
treaty certain concessions whicn will prove beneficial to the

The II.A leaders will gel little

of this money. The bank nas been
authorized to pay these funds di directly
rectly directly to duly established credit creditors
ors creditors mostly John L. Lewis.
Then Hoffa drove lo the airport
and flew to other fronts. From
Ihe AFL-C10 national headquarters
and George Meany's personal
aides came wordt hat the entire
Teamstres Union now faces in investigation
vestigation investigation and, under Section 10,
Article Two of the federations
constitution, also faces suspension.

Meany is in the process of com

Pil

warn

''

tf;Si';:,i:vj:!v;''Vi:,iNEA Serrict, Inc.

i

rrfie Washihgton
AIerry-Go-Round
y DREW PEARSON

Domestic Trend
By BOB RUARK

SYDNEY, Australia If I ever, before long poor old Pa is eitheri These types disappeared, leav

get married again, which seems whipped into submission or is seek- ing a lovely memory of some love

unlikely with Mama standing overling a fresh set of features to gojly women who spoke softly and

me as I write this, I doubt very

much it it would be to an Ameri American
can American woman.
Mistake me not, our women
are as pretty as any and prettier

with the breakfast toasl. who generally imparted the idea

The chief trouble with American that the visiting Joe was one heck
women, from a male standpoint, is of a fine and important fellow,
that they are spoiled rotten by their The basic difference between the
husbands and lovers. This leads Aussie lassies and the American

than most, but thev have a half-1 straightaway to an inability to rec-1 girls is that a man who marrie

municating with Teamsters Dave;smartncss these days that makes ognize faults in themselves. ;an Australia feels like he married
Beck to "ask the facts and warn; a man uneasy in their presence.! The American woman general-; her; the man who marrfes an
him not to toleratcTloffa's liaison! in a short summation, as a mari- ly docs not work hard enough to1 American feels like she married
with the ousted longshoremen. t al eamhle. hr Amrriran woman kreti hrr mind out nf mischief 1 him II is an nnrnmfnrtahlp tor.

Beck, however, will not order has rut her own throat.

and it is dreadful when an idle! ing in a home where there really

Hoffa to desist. Not because he j I blame a lot of things for this woman has time to think. She con-1 is room for only one pair of pants

United States in the discharge of its responsibilities in the can't but because he won't. Heffa.sad state, but basically 1 blamcljurcs up ogres, she sees phantasms! in the clothes-press

Canal Zone, Why didn't he name at least one such concession

it he is so sure of himself?
Does he consider that the replacement of United States
citizens with others, at locality rates ol pay a benefit to the
Canal Zone? Since he is so fluent with the pronoun "we" in
referring to Americans on the Zone, it is assumed he lays claim
to-. United States citizenship. I can assure him there are sev several
eral several 'thousand Ameriqans on the Canal Zone who do not share
his Views, I would go so far'as to say that his is a lone voice
crying in the wilderness as regards the benefit that may accrue
to the United States as a result of the 1955 treaty.
Did it ever occur to "Fair Play" that Lovelady is the elect elected
ed elected representative of a substantial segment of American citi citizens
zens citizens employed on the Canal Zone, and that when he uses "we"
he does so with the authority of those he represnts?
Perhaps "Fair Play" is too naive to realize this. On the
other hand, it may be that he has been here so long that he
has lpst the ability to think as Americans do. Then, too, it
could be that he is grinding his axe via the Mail Box for per per-spnal
spnal per-spnal reasons.
t; Regardless of "Fair Play's" reasons for spouting off as he
did, I should be glad to wager him that there are four Amer Americans
icans Americans who subscribe to Lovelady's thinking to one who believes
as b.9 says he does, I am confident that "Fair Play's" views are
foul play to the vast majority of Americans on the Zone.
Whuz Wright

wants the East and Gulf coast

longshoremen to tie in with a ter terrific
rific terrific southern drive of the Tcam Tcam-slcrs
slcrs Tcam-slcrs whicfy will start i'n the big
ports. Beck will say that's Hoffas
problem.
What Meany will say privately
will be unprintable. But publicly
he now appears committed to oust
the Teamsters if Hoffa doesnt
abandon the Longshoremen. Hof Hoffa
fa Hoffa wont.

the American male. land she winds up angry and frus

It is not particularly necessary tratcd. At the end of it, Mom

to take a tent peg to the little

woman to keep brder In the house.
But a certain amount of discipline
is necessary, and we American
males have been sadly lacking in
enforcement.
We largely live in terror of our
women, which is certainly not the
correct shape of things. Mama
frowns and we wither. Mama

Sir:

ADVICE TO PERON

' This is advice to Peron from one who was in Argentina:
' For many years you controled livec and fortunes in your
cbuutry. When a few brave men rebelled against your regime,
you led. Instead of remaining to win or die you came here to
fight with your pen, talk nonsense, and possibly even plot
against your country from here, abusing Panamanian and
American hospitality to the point that you were put out of
the Washington.
If you were a good Argentinian you would show it by ad advising
vising advising those who still believe In you not to obstruct the efforts
Qt the present government, and to avoid disturbances and possible-bloodshed,
for according to your own statement you fled
Argentina for humanitarian reasons.
-You have had a full life. You have had everything that a
matf of your position can hope to attain, Live quietly now and
let. Argentina become again what it once was before you came
to mower; a free country where nobody is required to keep your
pictures In bis house or .place of business whether he likes it
Qr not.
e-'And do not.' consider yourself a God or a saint. You are
Just Jlke any other man, .possibly a bit slicker.
. Do not forget the advice I give you for. I am sure that your
eourjtrymen will be grateful to you for It. If you truly love
JOUr- country more than yourself, your ambitions and desires for
powjir, send word to the Peronistas that still remain and urge
them to cooperate with the present goevrnment.
I wish to spend vacation next year In Argentina.

, Un Cantincro

COLLAR BAR

Sir:

JJntil now, had believed that segregation only existed In the
less-educated areas of the United States. I now see that It
also exists right here in the Zone.
t Only difference, as Bohio Joe brought to our attention, is
the difference in collar color. Not in the color of one's' skin.
" ; Curundu Joe

Ths American Insurance Company
iV' extends an invitation to all persons, private or
:;' corporate, in the Republic to present to the
Superintendent of Insurance any claim that they
' may have against this Company as a result of
its insurance activities in Panamanian territory
up to December 31, 1953, date on which the
' American Insurance Company notified the Na National
tional National Government of the termination of its
insurance business in Panama.
- THE AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY
.Panama, February 21, 1956. .

ii meany uir-s uusi me icam-1 cc r,,i,,,c -j ;

sters and I have not eve.- seen Mama does not contrlbte
evidence of Meany backing downl thilt mh .,...

from anything he slices a huge
chunk from the movement he has
just welded together. Meany will

have the influence to do that. But
he may hesitate to decimate, his
organization. If he moves, how however,
ever, however, this may happen:
Tha Teamsters could take With
them several unions with millions
of members, a'l of whom are de dependent
pendent dependent on the men who drive
trucks. The Teamsters now have
a "Four-Way Pact, for example,
with the 835,000-member Carpen Carpenters,
ters, Carpenters, the Hod Carriers and Com Common
mon Common Laborers and the Operating
Engineers.
In Florida, Beck appointed Hoffa
; r.e leadership of a bloc of con construction
struction construction trades unions totalling
some 3,000,000 members.
There are Teamsters pacts with
the 300,000 Meatcutters and Butch Butcher
er Butcher V.'orkmens Union and the re retail
tail retail union. The Teamsters just
gave the Hotel and Restaurant
UFAvlfarc tnnn flAn tnr Ihnil Miami

Tiuincio f.inf,w tut v....
Dnank cti-ilra Thorn aro nthpriHlUCn

JJt.a... flHJBl,, H.v.

The American male lives and
actually wriggles under the lash
of wifely disapproval. He wriggles
for a while and then he crawls out
from under, seeking a pat instead
of the whip. The new wife who
pats him on the head immediately
breaks out a whip with a longer
thong as soon as she's secure. And

knows all about everything except

men. She has forgotten that her
wdrser half,, at best, is merely a
small boy susceptible to flattery,
indignant against competition, bit bitterly
terly bitterly resentful against intrusion into
what he fondly believes is mascu masculine
line masculine prerogative.
The American Mom has not
learned yet that, as a small boy,
her masculine dependent develops
a murderous stubborness when
shoved, whereas he becomes like
a ewe lamb when cajoled.
During the war, the Yanks fell
immediately in love with the Aus Australian
tralian Australian female, not all of whom
met the troops at the docks, wore
dirty hair, too many orchids, slop sloppy
py sloppy sweaters and were generally
believed to have emerged from
under rocks.

If I were to attempt to sum up

the American man, 1 would say
he is a weakling who is frightened
to fight lor his domestic rights
because he has been born and bred
on the assumption that Mom is
always right and Dad is always
wrong when a smack in the chops
might have leveled things off a
bit.

If I were to try to sum up the
American woman, I'd say she's per perpetually
petually perpetually sore because she wants
to be a woman in her spare time,
with handkerchiefs picked up and
hands kissed, but the rest of the
time she wants to be chairman of
the board.
She's frustrated because she
can't reconcile the two desires.
And this makes her pretty impos impossibly
sibly impossibly rude on the female side and
incompetent on the other.

nflation Threat
By PETER EDS0N

WASHINGTON (NEA) The
eight months' rise in the Bureau
of Labor Statistics wholesale price
index has made it something to
watch for inflationary pressures
and future business trends.

The total increase hasn't been

i n rt It ;n

aro nthpr u.uvti, i.v puuus. lb is nut nuw

agreements, but these are with onsi$'creJ ala'n8' W'th .the in:
such unions as the Machinists who!dcx ,basced on l947"1?.4? Pcs of

will not go along with the Team

sters.
But Beck and Hoffa will have
support if they are ousted. They
will not go alone.
In fact, the closer it gets to the
ouster, the -stronger will be the
behind-the-scenes pressure to keep
the Teamsters in. Many have criti criti-c
c criti-c zed and investigated Hoffa, but
many have worked with him on
the strike and organizing fronts,
including Walter Reuttier.s own
Auto Union.
If this internecine war starts' in inside
side inside labor, neither side will be
without heavy artillery or troops.
NO ICE
SOUTH BEND. Ind. (UP)

Tinrnonerative weather almost

ruined the annual St. Mary's Win-

ter Carnival. An unscasonai maw

melted ice on tne lane ana iorceu
500 guests to settle for box lunches
and an indoor dance.

nearly 5,000 commodities as 100.

the rise has been from 109.9 last
May to 111.8 in January, 1956. The

Feb. 14 weekly index stood at

112.1, a further fractional rise.
This is not the postwar peak.
That was 114.8 in 1951, when there
was some real Korean war infla inflation
tion inflation around.
Any further rise this year could

nave some serious political as

well as economic consequences

Where this will show is in the

way wholesale price rises are
passed on to consumers. This

would be reflected in the much
better known BLS "cost of living"

index which is the basis for wage

adjustments under many union la
bor contracts.

One of the biggest talking points
in the Eisenhower administration
argument is that it has stabilized
consumers' prices and prevented
inflation. A two-point rise in the
cost of living index, following a
similar wholesale price index rise,
would cause some real yelling.
Only an unusual combination of
circumstances has kept the whole wholesale
sale wholesale index, and the consumer in index
dex index as well, from rising faster
than they have.
In the wholesale index, farm
product s' prices have drop
prcd steadily from 113 in 1951
and 91 last May to 84 in January,
1956. The processed foods index
has dropped similarly from 111 in
1951 and 102 last May to 98 in
January.
This decline in farm and food
prices is what has keot the cost

of living index steady at 114.2 last

May and 114.7 in January. Con Consumers'
sumers' Consumers' prices on rent, transpor transportation
tation transportation which includes autos, house household
hold household furnishings and services have
gone up.
While this has been going on,

the wholesale index for all com commodities
modities commodities other than farm and food
products has gone up five points
from 115 last May to 120 in
January.
This is where the real inflation

ary threat lies". A principal cause
is the rise in steel prices up 11
points in the past year and 45
points since 1949. The machinery

index rose six points in the last

year, 33 points since 1949. 1

Only in textiles and hides which

are mainly processed farm prod

ucts and a few miscellaneous
commodities like notions and

jewelry, have wholesale prices

aroppea.

Several explanations are given

for what has been happening.
. The principal one is general re recovery
covery recovery from the post-Korea reces recession.
sion. recession. Unemployment has been re

duced. The demand for goods and
services has increased. This gave
the excuse for raising many whole

sale prices.
Wage Increases In steel, automo

biles and other basic industries

(Continued on Page ti

LIFT UP YOUR HEARTS

(A Ltntan feature af tha Pana.

m-Americn, praparad by the
Rev. M. A. Ceokion, Episcopal
Churches of Our Saviour-St. Mar.

9a ret.)

THE LORD MUST BUILD
Raid Psalm 127. "Unless tha
Lord builds tha house,, those who
bukld it labor in vain. '.Unlets tha
Lord wathces ovar tha cjty, the
watchman stays awake in vain."
THE WRITER of this Psalm is
saying that there is no use to trv

to build a better life, a better
world or a. better anything with without
out without the help and approval of God.

He is saying that God must be the
center of everything we under

take. He talks of God building a
house, and- then of His Watching
over the city,

ANY UNDERTAKING must 'be
the will of God and must be con continually
tinually continually watched, over and sustain sustained
ed sustained by Him. This was the kind of
building Christ spoke, of. The
Kingdom must indeed come, and
in such a kingdom the will of the
king must be done. "Thy will be
done."
GOD THE KING w o u 1 d not
reign as a dictator, or a benevo benevolent
lent benevolent philosoper-monarch, but as a
loving Father whose children, His
subjects, gloried in His kingship.
Therein lies our true freedom: we
simply put ourselves at God's dis disposal.
posal. disposal. THERE IS only one real free freedom
dom freedom Aot man, the freedom to
choose and obey God. Any other
apparent freedom is slavery, even
though it may be slavery in clever
disguise. "Unless the Lord builds

the house. ." In God's service is
our "perfect freedom."

WE BELIEVE that we are not

doomed to live eternally incom

piete and frustrated lives. We

long in our hearts for the fulfill
ment of our lives through the on
ly one who has the power to nil
fill.

WE LONG to help build this
temple "not made with hands."

But this life is not our temple:

lor u is God s house, and He is
the real builder. We are only His
laborers, ; working together with
Him. Only with this belief can our

lives take on meaning, have a pur
pose 'and a destination.

By accepting God as the Mas Master
ter Master Builder we have a guide and
basis of life, that which .gives

heart meaning and purpose to a
nything and everything we do.

. WASHINGTON Latest wrinkle!
in the controversy over 18 tanks to'

Saudi Arabia is a question as to
whether they will be received by
the Arabs since they are being
shipped on a Jewish-owned vessel.
Hitherto no vessels owned by
Jews have been permitted in Egyp Egyptian
tian Egyptian or Arab harbors or anywhere
near Egyptian or Arab waterways.
The SS James Monfoe on tt'hirh

the 18 tanks are proceeding to I
Jedda is chartered briefly bv a
Greek firm, Hellenic Lines, but is!
owned by the family of Jacobt
Michael, 120 Wall Street, New York, j
under a complicated arrangement .'
The arrangement is so complicat-i
ed and so roundabout that it took!
some time to track it down. I
Mr. Michael, a strong Zionist.!
would not make himself available i
lo answer inquiries. Repeated calls
to his office brought the reply that j
he was out. Calls to the Liberian;
embassy and the Liberian Deputy
Maritime Commissioner, Albert' J.

Rudiek. at 261 Madison Ave., also
failed to shed much light on the
ownership of the vessel. Officially,
the ownership was registered un under
der under Seacarriers, S.A a Panama Panamanian
nian Panamanian firm. But Mr. Ruck said he
could not go beyond that, and be besides,
sides, besides, he was distrustful of tele telephone
phone telephone calls.
The Panamanian embassy in
Washington said it was equally in
the dark. The James Monroe sails
under a Liberian flag but is regis

tered in Panama, thus does not

have to comply with American
wage and safety standards. The
Panamanian embassy, however,

said it did not know who o.'n"d

Seacarriers, S.A., though admit-1

ting Seacarriers was a Panama

nian firm.
"How do you know this company
isn't going to ship behind the Iron
Curtain?" the embassy wa- asked. :
"We don't. We leave that to
jou," was the reply. ;

MORE RUN-AROUND
After several hours of telephon telephoning,
ing, telephoning, the press relations spokesman
for Jacob Michael called to say
that Mr. Michael did not now own
the vessel, that he had sold it. and
that his attorney, Abraham Pom Pom-erantz,
erantz, Pom-erantz, would speak for him.
Mr. Pomerantz stated that Mr.
Michael had once owned the vessel
through Seacarriers, S.A. but had
sold it on March 11, 1955.

"In that case, he would have to;
record the sale with the Wartime!
Administration in Washington," i
Mr. Pomerantz was reminded.
"That is not necessary.''
"Who did he sell the ship to?"
"Mr. Michael cannot reveal this. i
He docs not wish to embarrass the!
other party. He has absolutely no!
control over the ship. He cannot!
say more." I
Various questions were asked as!

to why Michael could not reveal the
name of the new owner, without
result.
However, the records of the Mar Maritime
itime Maritime Administration were conclu

sive. They showed that he had sold

or transferred the ship only to his

wife.

Maritime records stated that the

vessel, a Liberty ship, was built

in Baltimore in 1943, named the!

John W. Powell, and sold in March,
1951, to the Anchor Steamship Cor

poration, which Michael controlled
The vessel at that time was oper operated
ated operated under the American flag.

REAL OWNER

On Nov. 15, 1954, the vessel wasi

transferred to Panamanian registry

and Seacarriers, S.A. with :ho

approval of the Maritime Adminis

tration. Approval was given by1

the Eisenhower administration un under
der under a policy followed at that time

vhcreby Liberty ships could be

transferred to foreign flags to take
advantage of cheaper labor costs,
if the USA retained the right to
reclaim the vessel in time of emer emergency
gency emergency and provided the vessel did
not trade with Iron Curtain coun

tries, Fifty-sevei. such vessels
were transferred to foreign flags
under this policy.

Records of the Maritime Admin Administration
istration Administration showed that Seacarriers
was and still is owned by Mrs.
Erna S. Michael and by the Astra
Management Corporation, which in
turn is owned by Mrs. Michael, and
in small part also by the Polaris
Corporation, a Swiss Corporation,
which Mrs. Michael dominates.
There was no record of any othtr
sale or transfer.
Asked if there would have to be
a record of such a sale, the Mari Maritime
time Maritime spokesman replied:
"Yes. that was one condition of
the original sale. There would hava
to be prior notification and approv approval
al approval of a sale before it was made.
A bond was posted to guarantee
such notification."
COULD HAVE STOPPED SHIP
In brief. Mr. Michael, if he trans transferred
ferred transferred the SS James Monroe at
all, transferred it to his wife. She
has now chartered the ship for a
brief period to Hellenic Lines,
which is carrying the tanks to
Saudi Arabia. But according to
official government records, the
ship is still owned by the Michael
family, and it's barely possible
that the Saudi Arabian govern government,
ment, government, in view of Israeli-Arab bit bitterness,
terness, bitterness, might reject the tanks and
demand that they be delivered in
another vessel.
Shipping experts pointed out that
Michael's own crew and Captain
were still in charge of the vessel,
and that under the usual New York
produce exchange time charter he
or she still retained final control
of the ship. Not only does his cap captain
tain captain sign the papers and bills of
lading, but an escape clause in the
charter permits him to c?ncel the
voyage because of strikes, riots,
civil disturbances, or any force
measure.
Thus he could have canceled
because of Zionist picketing of the
ship in Brooklyn or the strike of
seamen for higher pay when tlicy
found they would have to go into
Near Eastern waters.
Finally, he could cancel because
his wife's property was entering
waters adjacent to Israel where
the Israelis might seize it en route
to Saudi Arabia.
Michael was described by his
spokesman as a refugee from
Frankfurt. Germany, and a strong
Zionist. His wife was described
as one of the top Zionist leaders of
New York.
Other sources said that Zionist
circles in New York were very
much disturbed over the whole in incident
cident incident and resentful of Michael's
part in it. In Frankfurt he was
engaged in steel and department
stores. Since coming lo to the Unit United
ed United Stales he has become the owner
of-the Simpson Creek Collieries;
New England industries, a; holding

corporation; Mandard internation international,
al, international, a trading concern; and six ship shipping
ping shipping companies. His property in
Germany has now been restored.

APPEAL SEAL This is the
1956 Easter Seal, sheets of
which will go into an estimated
33 million American homes
from March 10 through April
10. Bright blue and red, the;
iseals will appeal for funds to1
aid crippled children. Th East- i

ler Seal campaign, is sponsored t

oy tne National Society for'
Crippled Children and Adults.

Monroe's Mate

Answer to Previous Puzzle

ACROSS
1 Mrs. Eliza
Monroe was
in
New York

5 She bore him

DOWN
1 Foundation
2 Heavy blow
3 Bellow
4 Inherent
5 Color slightly

j..,v.tr ft Affliction

Hi father 7 Individual

was a former

British
officer
12 Wild ox of
Celebes
13 Electrified
particle
14 Golf mounds
lSChair
16 Born
17 Allowance
for waste
15 Straying
20 Victim of
leprosy
21 Contend
22 Dance step
23 Doctrine
2 Bed canopies
30 Exist
31 Hurled
32 Perch
33 Mine (Ital.)
34 Short barb
35 Pedal digit

, 36 Doctor's client

38 Encounters
40 English river
41 Salt
42 Challenged
45 Storehouses
49 Scope
, 50 Writing tool
52 Story
53 Phial
54 TOO
55 Wicked
56 Sweet potato
57 Legal Point
58 Genuine

8 Certify

9 Harvest
10 Simple
11 River in
Belgium .. .
19 Louse egg
20 Endure
22 Nuisance
23 Pack round
with clay
24 Assam
silkworm
25 Tidy

O O a 3 l (t L. O M A 9.
AGO I P B A fw A M A
BATERAR ena
E 6 gB LL?
pTX N T A P AJSSi
OH REjSThJUANCE
?5oSer'i5jtor
CAP mFHUB.
sno AT??jTR.lr?lNT
CON nEc?"so J
ABE Tf" PETE TANj
SOSSI ARB? ?HL

26 Small pastry 39 Click-beetle
27 Royal Italian 41 Dispatches
family name 42 Crockett
Tumult 43 ODCratiC SOlO

.29 Female 44 Paper-measure!

saints (ab.) 46 Lay a street
31 Walking stick 47 Pen name of
34 Accomplish- Charjes Lamb
ment 48 Vend
ii PArfor-t tvnesi SO Golfer's term.

38 Entangle 51 Compass point!

I i3 iT"
5 nr ;v
5 rlFllr 1- 1
a It
w II IF"
s 1 iff
1 1 g izzz
ig p h f f
" 50 51 ""5T"r'""
55 W TZZ.
, (7



pace Tnitr"

PANAMA AMERICAN AN tVDFTFNDFXT DATLT ?TETVSFArFTt
1954 but average prices were down a 10 P" cent chanse either way.
oCinqcrie Can (3e Glc
(I
Net Farm Income Shows Drop
I five per cent. Most of the price; e largest dec'mes were n per
decline was in meat animals es- cent in bouih uahoia, ivuii:-iiLu
pecially hogs and in wheat. : I New Mexico. The largest increase
Cash receipts in 1955 were below; was 31'ptr cent in Maine because
1954 in 30 states, above in the otli- of a bumper potato crop. Cash re re-er
er re-er 18. Most of the changes were ceipts in A'ibama were up. liPff
relatively' small, however, with cent and in North Dakota la pef
only six. states showing more than cent.
anion:
Of 1 Billion Dollars In '55

TTT

r i V.. i U rs
ov rV 1; t it k :
' 111 "4T j! )
. Li d i J J J I, i 1

WASHINGTON, March 7 (UP) 'income this year. But this did not

The Agriculture Department re

ported today that net farm income

dropped one billion dollars last

year, a sKid or nine per cent lrom

1954.

The decline resulted from a 2.5

I'ntrimmed nylon lingerie and robe (left) can be dressed up and
Siven newness with touches of lace. Lace, once thought of as hard-to-sew,
can be managed with ease with an automatic sewing ma machine
chine machine with designer discs (inset). A tailored white slip gets

champagne lace on the midriff, top and bottom; black lace with1
an all-over fan pattern goes on the pale blue tricot gown (both
center). Cafe-au-lait lace with scalloped edges makes the robe
bright and glamourous. j

take into consideration income

farmers may receive from the administration-supported
soil bank
plan now pending m the Senate.
The department reported that
farmers built up their crop inven-

per cent drop to $33,200,000,000 tones in 1954 and 1955. But the

in gross income and a I per cent 'increase was smaller last year.

rise to $22.400,000,000 in produc- It also said some of the per ca

tion costs. This left net farm in- pita income decline was due to a
come at $10,800,000,000. j one per cent increase in total

The department said farmers farm population to 22,200,000 pcr-

retained only 32.5 per cent of their sons. Much of this increase, how

gross income in 1955 the smallest
percentage on record except in the

depression year of 1932.

It also said per capital income

of farmers dropped to $860 last

year, six per cent below 1954. In

contrast, per capita income of the
nation's non-farm population rose

nearly five per cent in 1955.

Last November, department ec

onomists predicted a further de decline
cline decline of 400 million dollar in farm

ever, was made up of persons who
work in the city but have moved
to nearby rural areas. Thus, while
technically included in the farm
population, they derive little or no
money from farming.
Farm cash receipts from mar marketings
ketings marketings declined nearly three per
cent last year to a total of $29. $29.-400,000,000.
400,000,000. $29.-400,000,000. The volume of market marketings
ings marketings was up two per cent from

Monroney Cautions Democrats
To Minimize Ike Health Issue

BY ALICIA HART,
NEA Beauty Editor
UNTRIMMED nylon lingerie
and breakfast robs that have be become
come become a liability to a wardrobe
through wear and washing can be
brightened up, if you're a home

aewer.

makers of a Swiss automatic sew-;qued to the skirt. It takes 3A yardl

ing machine. I of 36-inch lace.
For a pale blue nylon tricot) A tailored nylon slip gets cham cham-gown,
gown, cham-gown, a black Chantilly-like nylon; pagne colored lace. The lace, in a
lace with an allover fan pattern is! flower pattern, is used to yeil the
a good choice. I midriff, with a medium size zigzag
It can be cut to the exact dimen-' stitch. Narrow matching lace can
sinns of the bodice and t h e n be used to edge the bodice. The

spwn to it. usina a medium size5 bottom gets a five-inch strip cut

bodice.

Cafe-au-lait lace with a scallop scalloped
ed scalloped edge can dress up a plain beige
nylon quilted robe. Th-; scallop

stitch of the machine is used to

blend with the scallop of the lace

The Peter Pan collar and cuffs are

edged with matching lace. The
edging is ruffled by p u 1 1 i n e a

t j. wnnriprfnl fnr these; Zlffzas sulci, wicn overcasts uui uuiiy mc pan-cm aim acvu tu-uueou u ..s-

Blain items They can become and finishes the seas. The lace- the hem with a stitch that over-, sewing o.i with a medim zigzag
e amorous and new looking. Lace covered bodice is- then sewn back! casts and flnisnes the edges, it stitch with overcasts and finishes
glamorous ana new looKmg. i medium.sized ukes 2,a yards f 5.inch !ace or on all edge. It takes about 2 i
used as edeine with a little effort overcast stich to avoid raveling, the bodice and hem, 2 yards of yards of 3-inch scalloped lace, lVa
as turnmg a hemT according to the' Cutouts of the fan can be appli- half-inch lace for the top of the' yards of matching 2-inch edging.

W. Germany Clears
Last Major Hurdle
Toward Rearmament
BONN, Germany, March 7 (UP)
West Germany today cleared the
last major hurdle toward rearma rearmament
ment rearmament and formation of a 500,000 500,000-man
man 500,000-man armed force to join is the
defense of the Free World.

. The lower house of Parliament

Bundestag; a P P r o v e d two ot
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer s
major defense bills, on their sec second
ond second and third readings.
The arms bills went to the Bun Bun-desrat
desrat Bun-desrat Upper House whete final
approval is expected March 16.
Only .Adenauer's signature then
will be necessary to make them
law. '.
In his first major parliamentary
test since the break with the Free
Tipmnprat Dartv. Adenauer won

approval of the soldiers bill and a
mea-ure containing 14 changes or

additions to the Constitution neces necessitated
sitated necessitated by rearming.
The hill embodying the consti

tutional revisions passed by a vote
of 390 to 20. The soldiers bill was

approved by a show of hands.
The deputies also overrode

rightist move to calif he new army

by the same term useu uy mucn
Nazi hordes, "Wehrmacht." In In-oaH
oaH In-oaH thp House decided the new

armed forces will be known as the
"Bundeswehr," the Federal De-
r I.' r-

With passage of the two bills,
West Germany will be able to
start troop training. The current
schedule provides that 96,000 vol volunteers
unteers volunteers will form the cadres of the
first six ot the planned 12 division!.

Men Are Not Equal

By Bishop John J. Wright

IN MANY Important ways,
people are not equal. Of course,
all men are equally the creatures
of God. All men are entitled
to equal justice before the law.
This is the basis of our democ democracy:
racy: democracy: all men are created equal.
But genuine Christian democ democracy
racy democracy does not say that all men
are equal In every respect. Equal
opportunity, equal justice, equal
rights of course. But unless
we recognize that In many

Important ways
men differ and
should differ,
then democracy
Is doomed.

democracy!
WILL decay and
die unless we I
recognize a n d
encourage a kind!
of unequallty of

the snnl There Wright

must always be people better
than the rest In many ways.
Some men must always be more
holv. more competent, more

public-spirited and more self
sacrificing than others.

In the name of democratic
equality some men would make
it a crime to be different, to
strive to be better than the
normal run of mankind. They
would make it a crime to Insist
upon our differences.
NO ONE would try to say that
all medical techniques are equal equally
ly equally effective. Nor are all business

procedures equally well-advised.
Not all forms of government
promote public welfare equally.
It is the very destruction of
democracy to admit that Com

munism, for instance, is just as
good as any other form of gov government.
ernment. government. Some men would say that
democracy requires that we
eliminate all differences. They
argue 'that all shades of human
thinking are equally accurate.
They say that all religions are
alike. "It doesn't matter what
yoa think or believe," they say,
"in a democracy all have ttielr
say."
NO DOCBT a democracy Is In
danger when essential equality
Ls neglected. But a democracy
Is no less endangered when Im Important
portant Important differences are ignored.
If It didn't matter what you
believed there would have been
no purpose In Jesus Christ's
coming to preach the truth la
"all .men. H It didn't matter
what we said, as long as we
believed it, we would have no
right to put Communists In jail.

As Christians we are obliged
to recognize the equality of all
men: to give every man his due;
to be generous to all; to fight
for the equal rights of all groups.
BUT AS CHRISTIANS we are
also obliged to resist being equal
With all In virtue, In belief, in
service to our country. In these
things, we must all strive for
common unequality.
t PhH rotun Itrvlci, WnWnltM n, C

Burdine Official
Here For Fashion
Show At El Panama

Frank A. Peterson, vice presi president
dent president and sales promotion manager

of Burdine's arrived here yester

day auena tne Burdine s "sun "sunshine"
shine" "sunshine" fashion show which will be
held at Hotel El Panama Saturday.

The fashion show Is sponsored

by First Lady Mrs. Olga Arias and

is a benefit of the National Red

Cross.

WASHINGTON, March 7 (UP) (UP)-Sen.
Sen. (UP)-Sen. A. S. Mike Monroney (D-Ok-la.)
today, urged Democrats to
base their campaign against Pres President
ident President Eisenhower on his adminis

tration's record instead of playing
on the health issue like a "stuck
whistle."

Monroney said Mr. Eisenhow Eisenhower's
er's Eisenhower's health will be an "unavoida "unavoidable"
ble" "unavoidable" issue. But he said the Presi President
dent President also should be charged di directly
rectly directly with responsibility on such
issues as the administration's
farm and defense program.
Sen. Estes Kefauver (D-TemO,

now campaigning for the Demo-

andicratic presidential nomination,

took much the same position in
a speech at Rochester, N. H. He
called on Mr. Eisenhower to make
"decisions" on disarmament, de defense
fense defense and Russia's new "econo "economic"
mic" "economic" offensive.
Kefauver, who has taid h will
not use the health issue if he
wins the Democratic nomina nomination,
tion, nomination, also announced that he has
entered Maryland's May 7 pri primary.
mary. primary. He said he will "actively
campaign" for the state's 18
convention votes.
In the Senate, Sen. Francis

Case (R-S.D.) told Democrats

their attack on Mr. Eisenhower's

"Let alone whether it is in good
taste, 1 do not think it is smart

politics for the Democratic chair

man to launch his attack upon the
fact that President Eisenhower

had a coronary from which the
doctors say he has made a good

recovery, Case said.

Monroney told reporter that
miny Democrats always have
assumed that Mr. Eisenhower
would be a one-term president.

Hence, he said, the President

'has enjoyed a political sanctuary

such as no other American has
had in history" while Democrats

centered their criticism on his ad
viscrs.

"He and his party have a record
to defend," Monroney said, "so he

can't sit on a summit and say

who me?
Monroney is a supporter of Ad

lai E. Stevenson for the Demo
cratic nomination. He thinks Mr
Eisenhower can be beaten and be

lieves the President's decision to
run should strengthen Stevenson's

chances for the nomination be

cause the Democrats now know

they must field the;r "first team.'

LUCKY PLATE

KIMBALL. S. D. (UPl-r Mavor

heaitn would De as seii-aeteauns! Ray Brooks is not superstitious

as wouia nave Deen a campaign iu,s j956 automobile license plate

against tne laie president noose-;nurr,bcr is 13-1313.

velt s crippled condition.
Case said he was "amazed at

the savage way" that Democratic
National Chairman Paul M. But Butler
ler Butler "has started the Democratic
campaign" with the issue of Mr.
Eisenhower's health.

D

Partomn
2-1033

Colon
446

f

JO

i IT

ux.

miii) oo

NOW SPECIAL
Mahogany Chairs (need refinishing) 25
Immitation Bamboo sofa (without cushions) .. 2.00
Tables 50
Beds with Springs 15.00
Chests of Drawer 15.00
Kerosene Stoves (NEW) 9.95
Wardrobes (Mahogany) 29.00
China Closets (Mahogany) 12.00
Many Other Bargains in Both
New and Used Furniture

No Down Payment

Easy Terms

HX Household Exchange

41 National Avt. (Auto Row)

Tel. 3-4911

WE PAY CASH FOR YOUR OLD
FURNITURE

WATSON
STERLING

I V V Jf a

.WO

n

CLOVERBLOOM
Butter

i

THI

1 1 ST AND NOTHING
THI IIST IS LAIIIID

$140.00
ON A
52 PIECE

SET

with every

62 PC. Service for 8
SoUd Mahogany Drawer Chest
VALUE $30

Now, for the FIRST time ever, you can save
almost 50 when you buy famous Watson
Sterling! This Special Sale offers you sen sen-sational
sational sen-sational savings. You can purchase individual
pieces, add a place setting or two to your
present service or start to build a complete
set. As an extra special offer, you will receive
a $30 SOLID mahogany Drawer Chest at ab absolutely
solutely absolutely no extra cost, with the purchase of a
52 pc. Service for 8! This unusual offer ls
available in eight of Watson's loveliest sterling
patterns! Prices start as LOW as $1.75 for a
single piece; for a complete Service for 8, dur during
ing during .this Special Sale!
LIMITED TIME OFFER

Eliminate

9 SI

OUBIB i

Insist on
GENUINE

PARTS
to assure
Top Performance
for your
Cars and Trucks

MADE RIGHrajjf FIT RIGHT ..

LAST LONGER

You can be SURE. .
t you buy THROUGH.

1 JW MM(ftr- IMfffA

The largest on Automobile Row

'
:..

0

11m,



THE PAXiMA AMERICAN AX INDEPENDENT D.ULT NEWSPAPER' t-
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7. 11JI

F.GE rftl'R

r JACOSY ON ERIPCt

By OSWALD J4C0BY
Wntftn tor NEA Sirvici

NORTH D i:
A 'J
A l) J It. 9 4
8
HE?T EAST
AKS Q J 9 4
8 5 2 V A J 10 9 6
653 8 7 2
J in 3 6 J A
SOUTH
A 10753
y K 7 4
K
K Q 7 5 3
I'. .rIM-So;.!h v'jl
North Eavt South Mst
1 1 V : A Pass
1 PnV. 2 t. f,ss
3 N T. P.w Pas' Pa.s
Opomng 'c.-i V ft

"f'lc.oe comment on the ai-com-p..n
nig liand," reo,ui!ts a Brook Brook-j
j Brook-j ii reader. 'Our defense slipped,
ami we'd like to know how to
avuid tiiis kind of error m Hie
ii.Uii'e
West opened the cialU of hearts,
dummy ptsi up the iieen and Kast
won with the aee. K.ist continued
with the jack of hearts, and South
took the third heart trick with his
-
".-uuii' now overtook the kin of
djjjmondb with dummy's ace and
proceeded to run the diamonds
from the dummy. East threw one
spade, but then not worried about
throwing any more. He therefore
(Jiscarded the fast two hearts.
, "It was now safe for declarer
to lead a cltih from dummy. East
fook the ace, but South was able
to get his club trick in time. In
(acl, South took two club Jrieks
nd thus made his contract with
?n overtrick
,' "It s easy to see thai East .should
have thrown away three spades
tnsiead of Rivinp up the hearts,
lind he done so, he would have
del the contract with four hearts
$nd a club. The question is: How
t-ould East know while the hand
)vis being played''"
, Ejst couldn't be sure about the
jui.ide. situation.-but it should have
jieen easy for him to find the rijjhl
play nevertheless. East can see
that declarer is bound to make
ix diamond tricks and the ace of!
Rpwles in addition to the heart j
trick that he. took at the beKinninK.
These add up to eiyht easy tricks
for declarer. If South also has the
Ions' ot spados. there is no way to
defeat the contract.
East must proceed on the as assumption
sumption assumption that his partner hai the
king 'of spades. If this is not so,
declarer may make an extra trick
or two, but these are unimportant
tricks. Only if West actually holds
the king of spades can the con contract
tract contract be defeated.
There is nothing hard about find finding
ing finding the right play if East assumes
that his partner has the king of
spades.. It is then easy for East
to "discard three spades, leaving it

up to his partner to coiurot mis
suit.

Junior College
Activities

By GUS MELLANDER

Friday night was a festive one,
tor JC students. Gloria Samson j
started the rollicking evening off!
; by having a birthday party at herj
i house. Friday was also Frank
(Fullers last night in Panama. j
'several of his friends organized a
going-away party that the participants-
shall not soon forget.
rooms and other dens of iniquity,
wondering how they survived the;
night. Saturday morning rolled a-,
' round rather unexpectedly and fori
those poor souls who had to get
tip it wasn't a pleasant morning..
Save the 17th. j
Mid term exams are going to
be thrown at us just before Eas-:
ter Vacation, so you belter start,
to study now No hay ninguna otra!
manera. Save the 17th. j
Overheard in the halls, class-,
rooms and other dens of iniquity,
"Why do women spoil their natur-i
al beauty by .smoking'.' No girl has
ever appeared more feniimne by
having a cigarette hanging from

her face. Future husbands, how
would you like to go home kiss
vour wife and smell a camel''

iikims True Life Adventures

TERRY AND THE PIRATES

M GEORGE WUSl'M

Early Bird?

Ths WILD TURKEY
15 AN 0RiSiMAL NAT1V&
AM5RICAV. D55RT5 h!S
WE.'SMT (35 'ivr
MORE) HE VEEPV
FLYER.

The OB3LES
15 FIERCELY
PROTECTIVE OP
H'S HAREM Of
10 TO 15
HENS.

$&z& Wilt Turkeys cance or "TURKEY TROT

r WWEM THE RHYTHMIC IMPUL-feE STRIKES THEM.

Dominant item of conversation
in collegian circles this week was
the Student- Association picnic to
Fort San Lorenzo on March 17.
It's going to be a all day affair
with the SA footing most of the
bill. Permission blanks will have
to be signed by your parents and
returned to the office before you
can go. See .Mike Zim or myself
'for the blanks or any addtional in information
formation information you may need. Save the
: 17th for the picnic.
I've been so busy -stud ins late late-lv
lv late-lv that 1 have neglected to com comment
ment comment on the newcomers to JC. But
by now 1 trust, you have all been
charmed bv Cynthia Orrs smile.
Beverly Crawford's sparkling
eyes and Allison Davidson's quick
w'it. In fact al) the new students
have been a welcome change to
our ivy covered halls.

What JC Professor said," when
fc call your name, please answer
whether' vou're here or not."
Well that's all for now," "See ya
later you alligators."

rWfLW& f 81EN0S

NIA

S3)

l raw

"1

I'll 1 M, f 11. p,,. Of,

AT IT, POP. 7Sl FlNP NO RlfthESS HERE, SO JIVL trto X., r- -T-s.'Vrfv I

3 f 'CCTAL AH EXPRESS.' T; 1 ISTtCKT PIASTER CN OuR V 'AK I' rZ. "2

ZwimUKKP Kf tij tASTEP EN5INE5 ANPOji PEW PAYsJ WeM VJjM

TnUHi FIVES' Cll lliCKICf, PC fv.EANA- bWCC FKcNr P C J. '.;
tcA,n k.1 W(.FC"i hEK SO Fa' K. REPAYS POO'S ?EPUTAT1CN fCK "Op" &l 1

1 I uU

FAX CUES 41KD Bit finCUM

It'll Blow Over

V MEkKItX HlOSSK

f VtXJ PI6 TME BASK.
STEPS- FIRtr. BEMP'
rN BOW wuees.' FEET Tb Tb-.
. Tb-. 6 ETHER i Keep xbUR
' rz J WW LOOSE

C30, MAN VOUSE
THF BEAM, BAZOO
5

l,'5,iMf n LHEcK UT.PtAK.' IHI3 rw rnjBAW.7 ... if
"T! i JJ't- LA4T ANY lOMSEfcTrfAM W 71
' .' -x"' ftfl vlLL OLP CHARLESTON ,-- I

4IXCT OOP

Doctor Is In!

j f. T. BAMUM

I -A 7HW (r WHY HUT Mt 1 ALU WtW-'IS Ml

Y'HAFTA HAVE WjR FRlENt OOTTOCA T'THINK OF IT,

HA LICENSE TO ) MILLER AINT HE ; DiDN T YOU SAY

tl PC&rrvT IN JAJL! A ? OU WAS A A

-YEAH.1 ATS

f WHY, RIGHT,'
ER, AHA HE SURE

y-jA SAID GtMTLENM

ALL RIGHT.. 7 EH. LANPEU
( LETS SEE WHAT '5 V iN THE FW J
VOUf? 4 THAT wCWH JWL! A I

fj

BOOTS AND HER BVDDOtS

For H!

1 EDGAR MAR TU

'Of course it's good ths bakery made it!'

PRECAUTION
YOUNGSTOWN, O. 3 (UP) -Detective
Peter Polando is using
the stairs now because he knows
bow prisoners fee' when confined.
' A .self -operating elevator in city
jail stalled between floors recently
and the detective was trapped for
an hour.

T!ivoni. shmild sunervise their I

v,iirfrorvs uu of the teleDhone.i

;A child telephoning another
' .. u: nntHn. Vi s

cnud at meaiume, or caiimg

same house a dozen times a aay,
or calling on Sunday afternoon
when the man of. the house is
trying to take a nap can be an

awful pest.
If a chid is old enough to use
the telephony he is old enough
to be taught consideration lor
the rljrhts of others.

Faltering Philip
ftultp's life Is filled with broiset.
lTeil-won step and ruf h dsm.
Repairs would leATC bis home like new.
1 4. Classifieds, fast the right elue'

IIIE STORT OF MARTHA WT

Billy Agrees

By WILSON SCRUGGS

iwvm CUNTS OKW

WITH WE.ru. T8Y TO MWSi

rriffTOHM-HONEST.

SOW Pi -oo 1
OT f TOxMEt OP

we, Id settle t-or

S WOKST T600PW1SS

fiRpiGE r

BOOTS. 1 TH)K)X VOD

fWELOOS

lDEft!j

fit-

-1 fc-ft

n;j-v.v.v.vA

9 HM tWI! t.ryttt,V, TM n .. "'V

CAFTAIN EASI

Just Like That!

Bl LESLIE TUKNEM

MEAWV.'HILE,aT
aiNT'S HOTEL-

WrcFITESH gsaarl: tj
OUT OF THE aWgfil

1 1 p

il

4. cat liCHMii-rtiittJ2.T)nTLii

SHSOKOVE OFF I , ILi

mti i ,iti i A l It -'? J

rTKvy nc lap

WHEW SHE PUNT.

HAVE HBZ OX

YeTERPAy

z

;TT 1 jj

' 9 1 11 1

AwyWAV. MK.todKEE SAYS

NOT TO WETI0M 'ER OVEi?

TRIFLES, JU5T THREE DAYS'

AFTER HER HUSBAWP

KTRAfilC PEATH

MsKEE

Bern

IRM HAH

m my n

U6.TAKBIV X rUSgfi.QJICKl VOUR WFE'$

COATi MlSSi OMTH&PHWEl 6HESALM061

HV&TERItHi:

1 vcas.'Lj 2-1 &,

MORTT MEEKLE

Help Yourself!

By 01CB CAVALL1

fRISCILI.A'S POP

Dress Rehearsal

By AL tCKMEER

-1

ECGS

,

YlPES-

THE BOSS J

I!

rPS MB.GRUMBLX )

r UcAKf r

2-H

xthatN
? BETTER
EWALX

ITtLBE

TAKEN CARE

OF IN A

MINUTE,

MCCTY'6

CDMlNfiTDSEC

JILL TONIGHT,

llll ill! J Q

BLfi

156 by HE Strwrt. tw

He Didn't Miss a Snore

tlk Tint

1 i0?J DOUGH f UIW TUHUfi

:Aregcou6H MAKES A

BU6SV'S SOAO V WOI5E LIKE

that i

.PiWJ

wi-

ONLyU KJUSTASI FI66ERED...

rtAem V tu"i A-rv fpi imp1:

asleep;

k

1- "W

TMS OUSHTA

, WAKE Th'

VIM!

& T I'M..

VJL h UA Ptf M

stAJOH tiour I t 't ll WA1

SilYOU il)KE ARE AS FA.T A$ aJ
rCHlNESE. IDOL.' WELL, 4

PJMCHtKS CAM BECOME A DULL f E'-TTEI? MOCK IT OFF

CHDES IP CARRIED TOO FAR D ,crL,RC tsLKArcr-

xe.FFi. WALL 'VJ6.TAKS Tft"'
A CPcAi ia m y I A POTTY Kto FE.'6ttr&u

T(?OTOPTDTl4g (?OOM5 : J

AND COOL OUT SV TiJG-J- 1

IMSTU&- i1

MATTRE55E

ALISTHSiOlCS

PROJECT LOMS

ENOOSIA FOR

TSA AND

CRUMPS'

mrthaV

-A 11

FOE -vs.

(7 1 Ss.V W

(SoOL OUT, .

1

!!V01LI PUT THAT W.COOP WIGHT.

ti i tilt i n

HI

I i I It tSN.

I SAIP TAKE

!i HIM FOR A WALK

"MOT CARRY
HIM UNPER

hH4V ocrfKC cu-i-L. ;

UUrTTttlTUH4lUlU! ; 1,1 1

MM

ALWAYS SMOOPIM'

CWA6L)yHE It

SQMS UPA BAR BARREL
REL BARREL OF EAIW AW'
I HAVE TO WIPE

EVERV HAIR PRy

Mil

r.'.'. 1

Si

All! rfitV i

!

WHy MOTHERS GET 6RAV

JS.WiLUANiji

' l'4lf 1,1. I,,.



THE PANAMA AMERICA! AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
pack rrffc
? I Oil &- P
Social and Jtlicnvi5c
anama
4
or

IVEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 195

By Staffers

,m J ff4mm!s, Ulfntft, Bulb, pmrliu uJ Vruat Jujl It mtiU fnmpitt I hnmmh iLm.
fl mitt L mJl If t.t.pkuu Pm 374O m 2-074 Lb 9:00 J II :m. mff

u Jl
1 -A V YrAv-iddJL'

I "i -i I- I l I 1

- jrT -3 v -i
F-fcf -.--if

v -x JTJ
I 4 f .m ..m,

REAR ADMIRAL' RICHARD E. BYRD holds a press interview yesterday afternoon upon his
arrival on the Isthmus from the U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze In the Antarctic.

BEAR ADMIRAL RICHARD E. BYRD LEAVES
Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd left yesterday afternoon
by commercial plane for the United States after a few hours
stopover on the isthmus on his way home from the U.S.
Navy's Operation Deep Freeze In the Antarctic.
Admiral Byrd was formerly director of the Panama Canal
Oompany and attended a board meeting here in 1954.
Before his departure, the Admiral lunched with Rear Ad Admiral
miral Admiral M. E. Miles, USN, Commandant of the 15th Naval Dis District
trict District at the Admiral's quarters.

President And Mrs. Arias
On Vscalion
The President 6f Panama, Ri Ri-.cardo
.cardo Ri-.cardo Arias, Mrs. Arias and the
children left yesterday to. spend a
vacation in El Valle.
While in El Valle the Presndent
will-utilize his time visiting vari various
ous various place's in the interior on tours
of inspection.
Dr. And Mrs. W. T. Bailey
Havt Daughter
Our congratulations to Dr.
w 'ST. Railev who are
and
the
nira'nii "nf a pirl born yesterday
morning at Gorgas Hospital. Both
mother and child are doing well.
Mr. and Mr. Basilio Ford
Are Vacationing
Mr. anfl Mrs; Basilio Ford ate
on a tour Of South America where
they will'visit all the principal ci cities.
ties. cities. .' v.
The Harry Caslers
Give Cocktail Party
A few friends gathered last
night at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Casler of Golf Heights to
welcome Mr. Raymond Puccinelli
well known American sculptor.
Mr. Puccinelli gave an illustrat illustrated
ed illustrated lecture on Monday night at the.
University of Panama and anoth-
er lecture ana -ium uiusuauuB ...
work, in the USIS building, yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon.
Today, Mr. Puccinelli will conti continue
nue continue on his lecture tour through
.South America.
The Eugertt Lombards
d ;. .u
ine Executive secretary in. in
ranl Zone and Mrs. Lugene.JjOm-i
bard were guests of honor at a
dinner tendered them by Mr. and
nirc F.nrinup He la Guardia at
their home last night.
Mr. Frank A. Peterson
Arrives Today
Mr. Frank A. Paterson, vice vice-president
president vice-president of Burdine's, will arrive
today from Miami by plane, to at attend
tend attend the Red Cross Gala Ball and
Fashion Show at the El Panama
Hotel on Saturday.
Miss Janson Honored
Miss Brittemarie Janson w a s
guest of honor at a kitchen show shower
er shower given by Mrs. Arturo Lince on
Monday afternoon at her home in
Campo Alegre. Miss Janson will
be married on Sunday in Boquete
Chiriqui.
Mrs. Oglesby Given
Tea Party
Mrs. T. E. Oglesby was enter entertained
tained entertained at a tea party yesterday
afternoon at the Union Club by
Miss Wally Arosemena and Miss
Angela Arango. A large group of
friends of Mrs. Oglesby were prcs-j
ent. i
Mr. Johnny McMurray
Going To U. S. ..
On his way home to tne umieu
S'ates, Mr. Johnny McMurray will
stop over a short while in Havana
on business.
Stn Born To Caotain And
Mrs. Fernando T. Davila
rant nnd Mrs. Fernando T, Da
vila of Fort Gulick are the proud 1
rrents of a fine son born recent recently
ly recently at Gorgas Hospital.
"'ifi little chap weighed in at
eight pouhds and will be chris christened
tened christened Carlos Felipe.
Theodore A. Aanstoos Registered
At Hotel Washington
Mrs -Theodore A. Aanstoos, whn
has been visiting her son Mr. Ed-f
ward R. Aanstoos and his fa mi
v nt Rodman, is now registered i
at the Hotel Washington.
-s. Aanstoos is sailing on the
S. S. Cristobal on Saturday, to re re-t
t re-t 1 to Annandale, Virginia, where
she .makes her home with her .son .son-i
i .son-i i,v pnd daughter, Col. and
M-s. George M. Jones.
E :e Salt
e Mary Bartlett Circle of the
G nboa Union Church are spon spon-sr'ng
sr'ng spon-sr'ng bake sale March 9 at 10
a.m. This will be held in the Sun Sunday
day Sunday School rooms;

Each item placed on sale will
be strictly homemade, no package
mixes. The pre-Easter sale offers
a large assortment of good things
to eat including breads, assorted

buns, cakes, cookies, bars, dough J
nuis, Drownies, ana a variety ot
pies.
Free coffee will be served dur during
ing during the entire selling hours.
"Life Of St. Paul"
At Balboa USO-YMCA

The fourth film presentation in.tional Library and the Cathedral.

the Life of St. Paul will be shown
at tne uaiooa ymua uso on
Thursday, March 8 at 7:30 p.m
The Second Missionary Journey
will be the opening picture, follow
ed by lhe Visit to Corinth.
The public is invited without
charge, to attend the series.
Monday Duplicate
Bridge Game Winners
Winners of the duplicate Bridge
games played each Monday eve
ning at seven o'clock at the Tivo
li Guest House were: 1st, Col. and
Mrs.-.F. W. McGinn; 2nd, Mr. and
Mrs. K. E. Frauenheim; erd, Mrs.
H. I. Horn a with Mrs. F. Brady
and 4th, Mr. and Mrs. G. .W Alex Alexander.
ander. Alexander. While House Wants
Legal Opinion On
Treaty Amendment
WASH fNfiTON March 7 ftTPU
The White House has asked tne
justice Department tor a legal
opinion on the new simplified
version of the Bricker amendment
to spell out the effect of treaties
uton domestic law, it was learned
today.
The department and other a a-gencies
gencies a-gencies of the Fisenhower admi administration
nistration administration have opposed other
'versions of the constitutional a a-mendmeiit.
mendmeiit. a-mendmeiit. origLirlly proposed
hv Sen. John W. Bricker (R (R-Ohio.)
Ohio.) (R-Ohio.) But m'ormants Said the White
House iias asked the department
what it thinks about the new modi modified
fied modified proposal, drafted by Sen.
Everett M. Dirksen (R-Ill.). It was
approved, 11 to 2, by the Senate
Judiciary Committee.
Instead of the more complicated
provisions of the Bricker amend amendment,
ment, amendment, the Dirksen substitute would
say simply:
' "A provision of a treaty or oth-"
er international agreement which
conflicts with any provision of
this Constitution shall not be of
any force and effect.
Attorney General Herbert
Browned Jr. declined comment on
I tho npw vprsinn Rut nthpr Knnrcps
indicated that the Justice Depart Department
ment Department at this point agrees with Sen.
Thomas C. Hennings Jr. (D-Mo.).
ti .. 1 i ii i :ii
rienmngs wll0 "iyu -i""J
in committee, said the revised
language still would "raise grave
constitutional questions.'
On- source said that the neces necessarily
sarily necessarily vague and imprecise" lan language
guage language of the Dirksen amendment
could mean "anything or nothing"
depending upon the court's inter-
prefjtion
. Why does O mirror olways look,
so unfriendly early in the morn-.
. ing;
Nue

1

x 503 7, J?;xcon
Girl Scout Senior Round-up
Patrol Tours Panama
Ever-mindful of the 1956 Girl
Scout theme, "This Is Our Com Community,"
munity," Community," and the 1956 Girl Scout
slogan, "Believe, Belong, Build,"
the Canal Zone Girl Scout Senior
Round-up Patrol is busily col collecting
lecting collecting local historical facts and
native artifacts as its contribution
to the "Americana" exhibits at
encampments this summer. Mrs.
Theodora Campbell recently con conducted
ducted conducted the girls of the Patrol on
a tour of Panama City,
The morning itinerary included
Santa Ana Plaza, "Sal Si Pudes,"
Lottery Plaza, Native Craft Shops,
La Merced Church, Old Wall, Pla Plaza
za Plaza Herrera, San Jose Church
(Golden Altar), newspaper office,
Flat Arch, Las Bovedas, Union
Club, Methodist Mission, Munici Municipal
pal Municipal Palace, National Theater, San
Francisco Church, Plaza Bolivar
and LaSalle, the Presidencia, Na
Alter lunch, the group visited
the Panama National Museum,
where the curator, Dr. Octavio
Mendez P, graciously showed the
girls the famous collection of gold
huacas; the last historical site
visited, was the ruins at Old Pa
narna.
Miss Carolyn Corn will Represent
ine canal one Girl bcOuuts at the
Aii-aiates encampment in Cody,
Wyoming, while light of the- fol following
lowing following girls will be delegates to
the Senior Round-Up in Highland
State Park, Michigan: Beth Bail-
kowski, Karen Coate, assistant pa
trol leader: Kathleen Cox. Clau
dia Davis, patrol leader, Margue
rite Engelke. Marian Hower. Mar-
tha Johnson, Martha Miller, Jean
Seaman, Mary Lou Washabaugh,
and Caroline Zirkman. These girls
are to be commended for their
stamina and sportsmanship. Ever
since their selection as candidates
in January, they have oarticiDat-
ed in a strenuous program under
supervision of Mrs. 'James Whit Whit-more,
more, Whit-more, Volunteer Trainer and her
stall, lhe girls will have annroxi-
mstely two months more of rug-
gea, intensive ana extensive train training
ing training in the various skills and tech
niques they need.
'Variety Night'
Sunday At JVVB
The monthly "Variety Night"
will be presented at the USO'-JWB
Armed forces. service center on
Sunday, at 8 p.m.
The program will be highlighted
with a preview ol music and
dramatic presentations from the
Balboa High School s production
of "Finian's Rainbow" which will
be presented at the Balboa Thea Theater
ter Theater in April: dance exhibitions by
the Harnett and Dunn dance
team ; prestidigitation by Sgt.
Paul Copp of Albrook Air Force
Base; vocal selections by Pvt. Pe Peter
ter Peter Terricin of Fort Davis, accom accompanied
panied accompanied by SP3 Benjamin Whitten
of Fort Clayton and the JC Trio;
SP3 Jack Boggs of Fort Amador
will act" as master of ceremonies.
Russia, Denmark
Issue Call For
Trade Conference
MOSCOW, March 7 (UP) The
premiers of Russia and Denmark
today issued a joint call for a con
; r..k,.
ference in Copenhagen to normal normalize
ize normalize trade relations between the two
countries.
The call was made In a Joint
communique signed here by Soviet
Premier Nikolai A. Bulganin and
visiting Danish Prime Minister H.
C. Hansen.
In addition, cultural ministers of
both countries signed a protocol of
Soviet-Danish cultural relations..
Red Cross
The L. family's savings were
down to $19 when the flood
struck in Woonsoclut, It.!., Jast
August. The Red Cross came to
the family's aid with a grant
of $677.13 for food, new cloth,
in? and furniture. Help Ike
this is tiven in some 300 disas disaster
ter disaster relief operations each year.
Join the Red Cross and keep
its disaster task forces con.
stantly on the job!

1 f I f I

-iMSf" ..... ':,:....,.:..
fcll f )IUIIIMI illMTl 11 US

BY MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE j
LLOYD'S mother feeds his new'

brother each mid-morning arpund
10 o'clock. i
A week or so ago she noted that
Lloyd's behavior changed at this
time. As she'd settle down to feed
the baby, the four-year-old ener energy
gy energy that had been so purposefully
expended in shoving his train a a-cross
cross a-cross the living room floor would
be replaced by a certain languor.
Leaning .his head against the da davenport,
venport, davenport, Lloyd would begin to
suck his thumb, his face taking on
a look of dreamy reflectiveness.
Just as all our faces do when an
old song, an old love letter or
some other sight, sound, smell as associated
sociated associated with intense, precious ex experience
perience experience of our past evokes a sud sudden
den sudden yearning to re-live it.
LIKE 11s, Lloyd is struggling
with nostalgia for his past. The
sight of his mother feeding h i s
brother is an almost unbearable
reminder of the delight he ex experienced
perienced experienced as the baby she used to
feed with similar intimacy. He be becomes
comes becomes suddenly very discouraged
with a present that no longer al allows
lows allows him four-month-old satisfac
tionand to comfort himself, be-
bins to suck his thumb.
Do we then feed they baby in
privacy?
1 shouldn t, if 1 were Lioya s
mother. Instead of protecting him
against his memories of past de
light, I'd try to make them bear bearable
able bearable by sharing them with him.
Each notice for IncUi'ion In this
column should submitted in type typewritten
written typewritten form and mailed to one ot
the box numbers listed daily in "So "Social
cial "Social and Otherswise," or delivered
by hand to the office. Notices of
meetings cannot bt accepted by tele telephone.
phone. telephone. Welfare Group
To Hold Meeting
The Welfare Group of the Pa-
raiso Civic Council will hold a
meetine at the Paraisn r.vmna.
sium on Wednesday commencing
ai b:uu p.m.
This meeting will deal with the
finding of workable programs
which could be channeled to as assist
sist assist in the combating of juvenile
delinquency.
Added to the niaht's nrnuram
will be the showing of 16mn movie
films furnished by the United
states Information aervjee.
Mrs. Mildren Sawvers rhair-
man of the Welfare Group, re
quest all parents and friends to
attend.
Officer Of Justice Lodge, Elks
Meet Tonight
The Officers of Justice Lodge,
Elks, will meet tonight at the Pa Pacific
cific Pacific Service Center at 7:30 p.m.
It is asked that members be early
to expedite the large business a a-genda.
genda. a-genda. Vienna Conductor
Ouirs After Boos
VIENNA, March 7 (UP) Con Conductor
ductor Conductor Karl Boehm has resigned
as manager of the Vienna State
Opera House, the government an
nounced today. Boehm was booed
at the opera last week by music
lovers protesting his six-week tour
abroad, during which he made a
guest appearance in the United
States.
FAO Chief Resigns
Due To III Health
ROME, March 7 (UP) Philip
V. Cardon of Ogden, Utah, re
signed today as director general
of the United Nations Food and
Agricultural Organization because
of ill health. Cardon, 66, formerly
was an official of the U.S. Depart Department
ment Department of Agricqulture. He has been
head of the FAO for the past two
years. i

jyiEETISGS

if okc;Si 11
M 1 1 the wrr I V
LiV ihat contains
rffWTTI Wn,fLus 1
I I n0iSid Ju

Lanolin Plus Liquid Make-Up makes
your skin look NATURALLY perfect!

fV LIQUID MAKE-UP
AGENCIAS LATINO AIERICANAS
(CANDANEDO Y CIA. LTD A.)
Aptdo. 212 Tel. 3-4864

I'd make the babv's mealtimes

a time for stories of Lloyd's baby babyhood.
hood. babyhood. I'd say, "And so, after I'd
fed you like this, you'd eo to sleeD.
And I'd wait and wait for you to
wakfc up so we could begin to have
lun. un, it was so wonderful when
you woke up! First, I'd put you in
your carriage...."
BUT when the baby's feeding
lime was over, 1 a lead bis broth'
er back to his present.
Instead of continuing to support
his yearning for a four-month-old
satisfaction, I'd give him the one
that belongs to him a sense of
his useful importance. I'd ask him
to collect the clothespins as I re
move the baby's wash from the
line. And to' help me carry it into
uie nouse and fold it.
After a while, I should expect
Lloyd to show happier acceptance
ot nis tour-year-old life at the ba baby's
by's baby's mealtimes.
Through my stories of his baby babyhood,
hood, babyhood, Id have reassured him of
its dearness to me. By making his
past express love to him, I should
hope to release him from yearning
xor u.
m
men can
enu
OLIVE AND CORN CASSEROLE
IS OLD-WORLD SPECIALTY
By GAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Markets Editor
From Utrera, Spain, in the heart
of the olive-growing district, come
these two recipes featuring Span Spanish
ish Spanish olives.
Senora Tona de la Serna lives
there with her husband and two
young sons on a hacienda studded
with olive trees as far as the eye
can see.
She is an expert in Andalusian
cookery, supervising her staff
while they prepare succulent dish dishes
es dishes on wood-burning stoves. In a
fine handwriting, she jotted down
these recipes for this column.
Spanish Olive Corn Casserole
(Makes 4-6 servings)
One-quarter cup butter or mar margarine,
garine, margarine, v4 cup olive or salad oil,
'-2 cup finely chopped onions, Vk
cups finely chopped green peppers,
1 medium-sized tomato, chopped,
1 No. 303 can whole kernel corn,
rained and chopped, H teaspoon
pepper, 1 tablespoon sugar, 2 egg
yolks, J 2 cup chopped pimento pimento-stuffed
stuffed pimento-stuffed green Olivers, "2 cup seed seedless
less seedless raisins, 2 hard-cooked eggs,
chopped, Vt teaspoon thyme.
Melt 2 tablespoons butter or
margarine; add 2 tablespoons olive
or salad oil, V cup onion and 1
cup green pepper. Cook until on onion
ion onion is tender. Add tomato and cook
10 minutes. Add corn, pepper, su
gar and egg yolks and cook, stir
ring occasionally. 10 minutes.
Meanwhle, melt remaining 2 table
spoons butter or margarine; add
remaining 2 tablespoons oil, V cup
onion and Y2 cup green pepper.
Cook until onion is tender. Add
olives, raisins, eggs and thyme;
mix well. Spread half of corn mix mixture
ture mixture in bottom of greased Hi-quart
baking dish. Top with olive mix mixture
ture mixture and remaining corn mixture.
Garnish with additional olives, as
desired. Bake in moderate oven
(350 degrees F.) 20 minutes.
Sea-Food Salad With Olivennaise
(Makes 4-4 servings)
One pound shrimp, cooked,
shelled and deveined, 1 6'i-ounce
can crabmeat, drained, cup
chopped green pepper, 1 medium medium-sized
sized medium-sized onion, finely chopped, 'A cup
chopped eelery, V4 teaspoon pep pepper,
per, pepper, 1 cup mayonnaise, Vt cup
chopped pimento-stuffed green
olives, 1 tablespoon vinegar, 1 cup
coarsely crushed potato chips
crisp salad greens.
Combine shrimp, crabmeat.
green peppers, onion, celery and
pepper. Toss lightly; chill. Com Combine
bine Combine mayonnaise, olives and vine
gar; mix well. Add olive mixture
and potato chips to shrimp mix mixture;
ture; mixture; toss lightly, but thoroughly.
Serve on salad greens.

Hides every little imperfection, yet
never leaves a thick, artificial-looking
mask. Works to soften and smooth
your skin permanently, every minute
. you wear it!

i

i K
-
.

NEWLY ELECTED OFFICERS of the Fort Clayton Disaster Control Distaff Council pose with ;
Mrs. Peter S. Peca, "Honorary President. From left to right are: MrsrThomas J. Wllllami,
NCO Vice President re-elected to the post she held In 1955, Mrs. Joseph R. Walton, 1958
President, Mrs. Peca, and Mrs. John D. Mack, Vice President.

m. fm11.11
COLLEGE DEGREE IS AN ASSET,
WHEN GIRL GRADUATE WEDS
Should parents who, at real sac-s
rifice to themselves, send a daugh-l
ter through college feel that she
has forfeited her chance to "use"
her education if she marries as
soon as she finishes school? I
I know from my mail that some
parents do feel that way.
But let's listen to what Dr. Wil Wilbur
bur Wilbur Kitchener Jordan, president of
Kadcliffe College, a man who has
done a great deal of thinking about
the place of women in today's wo
has to say.
"Half a century ago college wom women
en women either did not marry or mar married
ried married very lat. Today collge wom
en marry often as other women!
and marry somewhat younger. 1
"So it is critically important that
these women have resources of
adaptability that men don't have
to have. For example, a man who
moves from one city to another
takes his job skills and his re resources
sources resources and habits with him. He is
pretty much in the same groove
no matter where he is. But a wile
needs to re-adapt herself more
completely."
And then Dr. Jordan points out
that a liberal education supplies
these resources a wife needs to
make herself adaptable.
There are other good reasons
too. why a college education is im
portant to a girl even though she
never uses it to earn a pay cnecK.
In large measure, the wife sets
the "tone of family living, tdu
cation of the wife, therefore, raises
the cultural level of the home
The wife, also, is the teacher within
the home. It is just as important
for the teacher a thome to be well
educated as it is for the school schoolteacher
teacher schoolteacher to have a good educational
background.
Then, too, if a girl marries a
man with a college degree, she is
better able to be his intellectual
equal and his intellectual compan companion
ion companion i fher education isn't greatly
inferior to his.
A liberal education is put to as
good use in the home as it is in
any business or profession..
Requiem Mass
A rermipm tyihsq will Ko ttnlri
Saturday at 6 a.m. at Christ
, .
uuurcn oy-me-Bea, colon, in
observance nf tho nnnlvBrcom nf
the death of Mrs. Louise Gayle
Rowe. The mass was arranged
for by her daughter, Mrs.-- May
Dean.

falsi 1 (Panama pwinu
BURDINE'S SUNSHINE FASHIONS
, featuring
the most beautiful girl in the world,
"MISS UNI VER SE
and
7 lovely Burdine's models flown from
Miami by Aerovias Panama Airways (APA)

Sponsored by Dona Olga Arias de Arias, Panama's First Lady,
for the benefit of the Panama Red Cross
the latest CATALINA swim svit3, and cocktail, evening
and daytime dresses by outstanding designers will be shown.
Coiffures by CHAL'S BEAUTY SALON
DANCING TO THE MUSIC OF TWO ORCHESTRAS
Clarence Martin's and Lucho Azcarragat
in the starlit patid from 8:30 p.m.'

IHIS HAIUHUAX, MAKUH 10.

Admission: $2. Tickets on sale at
e Lou Glud's, 85 Calle Estudiante
APA Office In El Panama Lobby

Pitas make table reservations
early with Max, 3-16W (

v f ' '

" "W&H
' ; ( it'll
' v is Mi.
:l
time relieves
prickly
heat.

u w

Avoid indigestion vj
P-ff colicky trying ff
VwJ v spit-ups if

Now you ton
help your
bottle-fed baby get

FULL NOURISHMENT

from his formula

Robinson's 'Patent' Barley added to
baby's formula makes cow's milk more
digestible, prevents stomach upsets.
Only when your baby digests his formula
thoroughly does he get the nourishment
he needs to grow strong arid healthy.
Get Robinson's 'Patent' Barley today
See how baby enjoys every feeding .
gets more from every feeding!

ROBINSON'S
4

CM 1

1111471

A Kirkcby Hotel

V

nfM

MP

A medicated powder

that cools and at the same

skin irritation and
patent' BARLEY

iS J a1".
-Ai itmi hm, n ifi t v """'

11

I 1

I



I

' PAGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
" EDVESDAT. MARCH 7, 195J
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 UH" STREET, PANAMA

" aaaMaaaa. P l"
i 1

LIBRERIA PRECiADO LOURDES PHARMACY LEWIS SERVICE HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE FARMACIA EL BATURRO
; Sired o, 11 1S2 J.a C arrasquilla At. Tiyoll No. 4 J. Fco. d la Osa Ave. No. 41 Parqu LrOvrt 7 Strwt
Agencias Internal, de Publicaciones FARMACIA LOMBARDO FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS FOTO DOMY FARMACIA "SAS"
No. 3 loitny Plaa Na, 26 "'B'' Siren US Oniral Avt. Juslo Arosemena Avt. and 33 St. Via Farraa 111
CASA ZALDO MORRISON FARMACIA LUX FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS NOVEDADES ATHIS
(iiuial At. ii 41 It of July Ae 4 i St. 164 Central Avenue 30 Slreel .No. 53 Via fcspana Ave.

MINIMUM
FOU
12 wokds
MINI.MU3I
FOR
12 WORDS

4

'JOMMERCiAL b
PROFESSIONAL

! CNAL ZOM POI VCUMC
J DENTAL-MEDICAL
f DR. C E FABREGA. D.D.S
j DR. R. AVILA JR M.D.
! Ihnli (4th JulM Air. n 21 VM
, Uppoii'e Am"" Sihool PlaiiiTOunil)
i Tel. 2-J0II Paiimna
j RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JDI RWCE
I Phnnr Panama 2-0552
4-
, 'NSPCRTtS BAXTER. S A.
Pockets Shippers Mover
Phones 2-2451 "JjllL
Learn Riding ot
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
RnJing b Jumping classes doily
3 to 5 m. fnone 3-0279
Of by appointment.
-WE siill relieve Vour"
roor-TRon;..K
corns, tallousses, nails
( IJIROPOIHST IJIROPOIHST-'
' IJIROPOIHST-' yut. S. bolls (joined)
MXmWk NACIONAL
r,s Juslo Aiojwmcoa Ph. 3---I7
! have 4mi direct shipment
lop quality fishing
equipment
VIOLET Ti: Sl'IMM.Y
SERVICE
Panama 3-K318
Doomed 2-Year-0!d
jdenllcal Twin
Goes Home To Die
ST. LOUIS. Mo., March 7 (IT i
Kathleen Jo Van Lo Van I.opik.
I. who doesn't yet realize that her
identical twin sister has died of
iiupjieniia went home today to watt
for death.
" Kathleen and her sister. Eileen,
were taken to a hospital two weeks
ago when it was learned wnn wei e
suffering from the incurable can cancer
cer cancer of the blood.
"" Eileen died Feb. 2fi but the
fjarents, Mr. and Mrs. John Lipick,
said Kathleen has not yet missed
her sister. But she is bound to
yonder "when she sees her empty
crib in iheir bedroom, Mrs. Van
Lopuk said.
"When the asks about Eileen,
we'll just tell her she is in
Heaven with Jesus, she said.
A plot for Kathleen was marked
beside her sister's grae.
Two lot 900 meters each,
El Cangrejo on Via Argen Argentina,
tina, Argentina, best of available
choice hillside property.
Call 2-0304. office hours.
CHOICE
LOTS for
SALE

i 1 1 "
'. aRMaaggnaHaSSVaflBBValtaaaaoW i aw-wwiw'HiwiwMuiL
i FOR SALE: I t
l larialn: 1 lr foiulillonet Sylva- B ?' t ''Vt 'J, s
ii 3 t h.p. Ill) volls in perfect E ? -
J ndltlon Bfdured to Sirrll.oil J f fV V ft ftj
i q.,lL.k tale. B aleelrle V'lH. 3 '"A ' 1
I t lure (flHorewenl) tor SIMM. K f C i tf 1 ; f 3
If Phone Panama 3-0220 8-12 2-5. H V' 5f-Jf
i t "V -5p; -V
l FOR SALE 'J J
Aparlmen: buildins, Rio I
Abajo. 18 apartments, pro- j",. -' E t 1
i ducinie $620 monthly, re- 1 1 '- f M. K'
centlv constructed, escel- i
lent condition. Priced for ' ' 1
I (J I1 -J' ":; a A

I Bl l?l l'nn, m nwt -'kn lrrn. ai ft ... s -' ....... .. 3 V i a

Una. best of available II f V 1 I "' I
choice hillside property. I I J 4 V
CalU-0364. office hours. I f - .. .,. J I
niiiia iiaiinin w -" 4 vyn"'"1'1"""
1 wj2..!. y' .. I I '' '-s-
JtZtf aT J "j f "4 ft- 1 11 mil, nl-.ia, ilir-nn--, f B&i.-x.-. T.jt jllll)

5 aT-V-TOl

7 ft

Z Ave. Eloy Alfaro 15-159

Tel. 2-0610

FOR SALE
Household

FOR SALE: 3 Rattan chairs
$75. 1 rug $15. 2 floor lampi
5)5 Phone Na.y 3590.
FOR SALE : Black end tables,
25-cycl washer, QM dresser
and table. Balboa 2-3144.
FOR SALE: 1 living room set.
38th Street No. 4-78 13 i
FOR SALE: 9-cu, ft. refrigera refrigerator
tor refrigerator SI 00. Bayano Street No.
0589. Ancon. Phone 2-6416
Balboa.
FOR SALE: lift refrigerator,
60-cyclc. Call 86-2184.
FCR SALE:- Living room suite,
excellent condition, $75; West West-inghouse
inghouse West-inghouse automatic washer and
dryer, 60-cycle. encellent condi condition.
tion. condition. $225; boy's 26" bicycle,
f.iir condition, $10. Phone Fort
Kobbe 4171
Panama Line
Sailing
Sixty-nine passengers are
scheduled to sail from Cristobal
for New York Saturday aboard
the Panama liner CriMoba'
EUht passengers are booked for
Port-au-Prince. Haiti.
Passenger for Haiti
and Mrs. Auustin ('.
Mr and Mrs. Alan Blau :
Mi's Charles Clise; and
Mrs Milton Etfenbeim
are Mr
Benton.
Mi. ant
Mr. and
The complete advance ua
en-
gfr list tor New York follows:
Mr. and Mrs John R. Auw'-r
trr: Col and Mrs. B. S. Barron
Miss Clara I. Baaidrit: Dr. and
Mrs. Tracy M Bisscil: Peter H.
Krennmr Mrs, Sybil Burger;
Mrs. HtTlinda F. V. De Carter
and son: Mr. and Mrs. John B
Clark: Mr. and Mrs. Hubert D.
Clayton, Jr.; Mr. and Mrs. Rus Russell
sell Russell E. Cooley; Mr. and Mrs
James Connors; Mrs. Lucia B. de
Fernandez; Mr. and Mrs. Thom Thomas
as Thomas M. Field; Mrs. Theresa Frat Frat-tarola;
tarola; Frat-tarola; Georce Goodhue and
son; Mi', and Mrs. Harold Haft'
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Hazard :
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Jacobson,
and Mr. and Mrs. Marco Jimenez
and :.on.
Ii'viiifr. Krentz: Mr. and Mrs.,
; Harry Lebovitz: Mr. and Mr. Al Alfred
fred Alfred R. McBride; Mr. and Mrs.
'; Thomas C. McBride; Mr. andi
:Mrs. Edward Munves; Mr. and
:Mrs. August J. Orbach; Mr. andi
'Mrs. Thomas Pappas; Mr. andi
Mrs. David Rabiner; Mr. and
Mrs. William Rector; Dr. and
Mrs. Murray Rubenstein; Mr.
iand Mrs. W. P. Rudow; S. G.
, Russell; Mr. and Mrs. Irving
; Schwartz; Mr. and Mrs. John 11
l Shadrick; Mr. and Mrs. J. Bar Bar-jstow
jstow Bar-jstow Smull; Miss Zelda Stjebel,
(Mrs. Eiizabetn W. VanBomel;
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Z. Wallow Wallow-er;
er; Wallow-er; Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wood
,11, and Miss Minxiie Zaccaro.

n.OWr.RS FOR THE POPE A little child presents Pope Plus
XII with a spray of spring flowers In an unprecedented cere ceremony
mony ceremony where 225 boys and girl from 25 nations presented the
Pontiff with a cake, a white dove, and flowers. The event took
place in Vatican City pn the occasion of the Pope's 80th
birthday.

HELP WANTED
Accountant- preferably with a university degree.
Good salary for selected applicant. Must speak and
write both Spanish and English and have at least
five years experience in general accounting, com computation
putation computation of taxes, etc.
Apply in persona to Mr, A. Acevedo Cm person-,
nel director, Compania Panamena de Fuerza y Luz.'

FOR RENT
Apartments

ATTENTION G. !,! Just built
modern furnished apartment!, 1,
2 bedrooms, hot. cold villi,
Fhont Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment
ment apartment including refrigerator, til tiled,
ed, tiled, all screened, good surround surroundings
ings surroundings Situated 112 Via Belisario
Porras near Roosevelt Theater.
FOR RENT: Newly furnished
aid unfurnished apartments. Al Al-hambra
hambra Al-hambra Apartments, 10th Street
No. 8061. Phone 1386, Colon.
FOR RENT: Furnished or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished 2-bedroom, apartment
at exclusive "El Cangrejo." Ideal Ideally
ly Ideally uitab!e for Diplomat. Indi Individual
vidual Individual bathrooms, dining-living
rooms, maid's room with bath,
linen, duties & complete kitch kitchen
en kitchen equipment. Phone: Business
hours 2-0321, Sundays 2-3525.
FOR RENT: Apartments: one
small, one big 29th Street No.
9 Phone 2-3403.
FCR RENT: Unfurnished com comfortable
fortable comfortable and modern 2-bedroom
apartment with maid's room, 9a-
rage ana' hot water system. Lo Located
cated Located in best residential area.
Information: Phone 3-S322.
FOR RENT: Luxurious modern
apartment, completely furnished:
1 bedroom, living-dining room.
First Avenue. El Carmen, oppo opposite
site opposite No. 94.
IDEAL FOR COUPLE: Living
room, bedroom, kitchen, etc.
Calle Oarien No. 8, neat street
from 4th Jily Avenue.
FOR RENT: Small furnished
apartment. Clean and comfort comfortable,
able, comfortable, b residential area. 43rd
Street No. 13.
FOR RENT: Modern apartment
in El Cangrejo Development: two
bedroom, etc., hot water, all
screened. Further particulars,
please call 3-4946 or 3-6737
Panama.
FOR RENT:- Furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 2 bedrooms. San Francis Francisco
co Francisco 16th 5tree No 6, near Roos Roosevelt
evelt Roosevelt Theater.
FOR RENT; Modern 2-bedroom
apartment with maid's
room and hot water system. Lo Located
cated Located in best residential area.
From 1 to 6 p.m., 3-0601.
FOR RENT: Completely fur furnished
nished furnished apartment, kitchen uten utensils
sils utensils and linen, one bedroom, liv living
ing living room, porch, dining room,
garage, garden, hot water, G.I -inspected.
9th Street No. 47,
San Francisco, near bus stop.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR .SALE; Now U-ft. boat,
1 2-hp. new Elto outboard motor
and trailer for $500, or the boat
for $200, motor $350 and trail trailer
er trailer $50. Call 3-2506.

FOR SALE
Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1952 Dodge Se Sedan,
dan, Sedan, automatic transmiision, ra radio,
dio, radio, heater, $750. Call 2-IS27
after 5:00
FCR SALE: 1951 Studebaker
Comm. V-8. radio, 2-door se sedan.
dan. sedan. 2-1713 early evening.
FOR SALE: 194S Cadillac 4 4-door,
door, 4-door, fully equipped, $725. Tel Telephone
ephone Telephone 86-2200 Albrook
FOR SALE: 1 948 Chrysler se sedan.
dan. sedan. Windsor model. Phone 2 2-3484.
3484. 2-3484. LESSONS
DO YOU WANT to learn Span Spanish?
ish? Spanish? Experienced teacher will
teach you. Write Bo 929 Pan Panama.
ama. Panama. v'!,Sil''. 4ir
CSVST
J Pilots Rescued
After Plane Crash
On Mount Fuji
TOKYO, March 7 (UP)-A U.S.
Air Force Tescue team today1
brouiii two pilots to the base of
Mount Fuji after tlicy crash land-1
e their transport plane near (he'
mountains peak two days ago and
survived. :
A Far East Air Force spokes-;
man said he received a report at
4 p in. that the four-man rescue
squad and the two American pi pilots
lots pilots had reached the bottom of
Japans famed mountain.
He said both American airmen
were "tired but .happy,
A Marine weasel chugged part
way up the mountain to carry the
pilots down, although they had to
use snow shoes during most of the
descent from the snow-c 0 v e r e d
peak.
They were being taken to Camp
Fuji, a U.S. Marine base, for the
night and will be flown out by
helicopter Thursday if the weath weather
er weather permits.
Maj. John C. Fowle of Lake Lake-worth,
worth, Lake-worth, Fla., and t'apt. Earl Pres Preston
ton Preston Kelley of Clear Springs, Md.,
burrowed their 0-47 two-e n g i n e
plane into Ihe snow near the top
of Mount Fuji Monday.
Thev scrambled out of the
wreckage and found a Japanese
weather station, where they were
cared for until the U.S. Air torce
rescue team reached them.
Bethel Mission's
YPS To Observe
Anniversary
The Young People's Society of
the Bethel Mission Church will ob observe
serve observe its anniversary on Friday at
7:30 p.m. with a musical program.
The Kings Four and other
groups- and individuals are shced shced-ulcd
ulcd shced-ulcd to take part.
EDEN IN FUR-Pieces of fur
form this portrait of British
I Prime Minister Sir Anthony
j Eden. Fur has been used in
1 the .works of surrealists, but
I this one, on display in London,
! Is believed to be the first cOn- 1
ventional portrait in fur. It waj
! done by M. J. Laroche.

I I.

V t-., ft;., i.w o i
V it

MISCELLANEOUS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031. ANCON, C.Z.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Book and ornament
table $15, 4-plece Rattan bam bamboo
boo bamboo set, just like new $15; 4 4-burner
burner 4-burner gas stove Magic Chef
$50; refrigerator 60-cycle $100.
Phone 213-A. Colon.

FOR SALE: 1950 Chevrolet
Deluxe, excellent tires and en engine.
gine. engine. Refrigerator Westinjhouse,
all porcelain Excellent condition.
Cristobal 2138
FOR SALE: Grand piano, Pye
radio, wardrobe, dressing table.
Phone 1 158, Colon
-.? V

t

at coroza,

! Russians Showing No Progress
'' ,, ,,
; 'n Battle Of World Longevity

0
BOSTON (UP) An Ameri-1
can dot (or sas KusMdii suenlisti
have done nothing 10 increase
man's chances ot living longer nor
have mey contributed anything newi
((ward (he treatment of cancer.
Dr. William Dameshck,' head of
the blood research laboratories at'
the New England Medical Center's'
Pratt Diagnostic Clinic, termed
Russian longevity experiments'
"traditional, unorthodox and thus
far, unproductive." j
Dameshck, who returned lo Bos-!
ton recently from an 11-week
around-lhe-world tour which in-'
eluded 10 days in Kussia, said the
I Russians "are playing down their
! life experiments but are still
working on the cancer problem."
; They are mainly interested in'
I the production of anti-bodies to'
fight cancer but as yet have
j made no claims for it "just as
j they have made on claims relative
lo their life-prolonging experi experi-j
j experi-j ments, he said. i
The doctor said longevity exper-j
iments, some of which make use use-of
of use-of "deep freeze" methods, arej
based on attempts lo stimulate tis-
sue and were instituted in the So-1
; vict Union some 25 years ago, Hei
! said their initiator died at the age;
'monial."
1 'I
The professors and doctors he.
questioned about the prolongation'
experiments admitted little or noi
progress" and "gave the impres-j
sion the entire area seems to have!
been de-emphasized." Dameshek
added that there are no such ex-;
periments being carried on in Mos Moscow
cow Moscow or Leningrad.
The hematologist said the Rus Russians
sians Russians are carrying on "unorthodox"
experiments aimed at bringing the.
dead back to life.
"One man in particular," he
said, "Dr. Vladimir Ncgovsky at;
Moscow, has been doing such work.;
Mostly, he has been experimenting
with animals -i. injecting blood into
the arteries and administering elec-;
tncal shock an', the like." ;
These "Frankenstein experi
ments also have been unsuccess-1
ful, though the Russians have suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded in revlvinc "dead" patients,
on operating tables, but Dameshek j
added:
'We do that here, and there s
nothing very sensational about it."
Another "necative result exper-j
nnent underway in the boviet union
according to Dameshek, concerns!
the, use of blood from cadavers
for transfusions. He Said these ex-j
periments have not progressed be beyond
yond beyond the "hospital aid station"
station" stage and have "made
no impact."
"All1 interesting though I'd
call some silly," he said. "In my
opinion, they have proved noth-
intr ttur thnl'a thpir huslnesS.
ine ivuKsiaus iwvc uccu in
forming some good work in many;
other scientific fields. In the blood-1
study field, for example, Russian!
and American research are aoout
the same in certain areas like
preservation, substitution and frac fractionation."
tionation." fractionation." Dameshek said a lot of non non-substantiated
substantiated non-substantiated claims hfave been
made on behalf of the Russians
such as Ihe alleged fact that few
persons in the Soviet Union are
afflicted with heart disease.

FOR RENT
Houses

FOR RENT: Furnished or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished 2-story house, 2 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, living room, dining room,
kitchen, bathroom. Downstairs
has tile floors, bathrooms. Box
422 Ancon. C.Z.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE: Chalet at Santa
Clara, comfortably furnished,
7200 square meters, 4 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, living room, dining room,
3 baths Call telephone 2-0027
or 3-0763 Panama.
v '-' ', It
"In (he many hospitals I visit visit-id,"
id," visit-id," he said, "1. found quite a few
cardio-vascular and coronary
thrombosis cases.
"In this country the chief cause
of death is heart disease, while in
Russia the majority die from in infectious
fectious infectious diseases such as tuber tuberculosis."
culosis." tuberculosis." Damesliek's trip was in con
junction with his position as pres president
ident president of the International Society
of Hematology, which hold its sixth
bi- annual congress here in August
APPLIANCE
BARGAINS
Refrigerator "LEONARD"
9 cubic feet, 25 cycles,
used a little over a
year, perfect condition
lean be financed)
originally $398.00 . .5198.00
Refrigerator
"LEONARD," 4 cubic
feet, used a little over
a year perfect condition
(can be financed)
originally $260.00 .... 160.00
Freezer "LEONARD"
Brand New!
7 cubic" feet, chest
tvoe lean be financed)
originally $395.00 .... 295.00
Washing Machine
"WHIRLPOOL,"
completely automatic,
excellent second hand
buy 95.00
Washing; Machine"
"HOOVER" slightly
., used and in excellent
condition 10.00
Washington Machine
"HOOVER," 25 cycles,
Brand New!
Originally $98.00 .... 68.00
Washing Machlnp
"WHIRLPOOL" "Baby"
excellent for the
children's clothes,
handkerchiefs, diapers,
etc. Bargain for
only! 15.00
Dryer "WHIRLPOOL"
Oas Brand New!
(Can be financed).
Originally $385.00 .... 845.00
Electric "Range
"WESTJNGHOUSE"
Used In very good
condition ; 69,00
Water. Heater "UNION"
for sink small,
practical and efficient 30.00
Via Espana No. 1

RESORTS

Baldwin! furnished apartments
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Smith. Balboa 3681.
Gramlich'j Santa Clara Beach
Cottages Modern conveniences.
6-441,
moderate rates. Phone Gamboa
Shropnel's furnished houses on
beach at Santa Clara. Telephone
Thompson. Balbai 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mil
past Casino. Law ratal. rhano
Balbaa 1866.
PHILLIPS Oceonslde Cottage,
Santo Clara. Box 435, Balboa.
Phone Panama 3-1877. Crista
bal 3-1673.
jl 'i '-'

Wildly Cheering GOP Women
Hear Ike Talk Moral Values

WASHINGTON, March 7 fUP) fUP)-Presidcnt
Presidcnt fUP)-Presidcnt Eisenhower told 1.500
wildly cherrirjg Republican women 1
yesterday the GOP must base its;
program on "moral and spiritual'
values to be a true political party.
Im his first political appearance
since his second term announce announcement
ment announcement last Wednesday, the Presi President
dent President said:
"If a political parly does not
have its foundation in (he deter determination
mination determination to advance the cause
that tc l'iaht that iL wYinrol ll,An it
j "uL tj mat is luuiai 11
is noi a pany nut merely a con conspiracy
spiracy conspiracy ... to seize power."
In a surprise appearance fore
the Republican Women's Nation National
al National Conference here, Mr. Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower stood under huge pictures
of himself and Vice President
Richard M. Nixon. A large ban-.
ner proclaimed "Peace Prosperi Prosperity
ty Prosperity Progress."
With enthusiasm reminiscent of
the 1952 campaign, the GOP wom women
en women screamed. 6qiualed and ap applauded
plauded applauded madly as the chief exe-
Ferry Service
Between Mexico,
Cuba Ready Soon
MEXICO CITY, Mar. 7 (UP)
Ferryboat service between
Mexico and Cuba will become a
reality this year, a government
tourist bureau source said.
Inauguration of the ferry serv service
ice service will make possible a Gulf cir circuit
cuit circuit tour, loti(f urged by tourist
promoters in the United States,
Cuba and Mexico.
Mexico is pushing- completion
of rail and highway links to
Puerto Juarez, on the southeast southeastern
ern southeastern tip of the Yucatan peninsu peninsula,
la, peninsula, and ferries 'will' operate be between
tween between that port and Cabo San
Antonio on the western end of
Cuba.

liilrlil
ir

O
- i K
I X ;
V :
II, 1111 iiin-t 11

LOOKING INTO THE FLTURE? President Eisenhower
shades his eyes from the sun as he gazes at bronze reproduc reproduction
tion reproduction of the famous statue "The Discus Thrower" which was
presented to him by Italian president Giovanl Grbnchl in the
White House Rose Garden. .

FOR RENT
Miscellaneous

FOR RENT; MODERN locale,
suitable for offices, warehouses,
racing itadium. Phone 3-6161,
i Alcides Garcia Correa.
Help Wanted
WANTED: Experienced maid.
Cook and general housework and
care of one child. English speak speaking.
ing. speaking. Recent references required.
Balboa 3460.
WANTED
Houses
WANTED: America caupl
urgently needs vacation quarters
around March 15. References.
Call 2-3601
cutivc was conducted to the plat platform.
form. platform. As the President left the hall,
he stopped at the door and raised
both hands ahnv his heurf in hi.
familiar 1952 campaign salute.
Women, chanting "We like Ike,"
streamed out of the hall to ap applaud
plaud applaud as he descended the stairs to
the lobby of the Statler Hotel.
President Eisenhower's name
was entered in the presidential
primary ballot in Indianapolis
yesterday Gov. George N. Craig
predicted the President would
win ill 32 delegates to the GOP
national convention in the May
I voting,
Mr. Eisenhower went to the
women's meeting directly from
the White House where Republican
congressional leaders told him his
decision to run for re-election "will
improve" the party's chance of
regaining control of Congress.
Senate GOP Leader William F.
Knowland Calif, said the Presi President
dent President was in "great spirits" and
"showi d a good sense of humor
in our discussions."
At the womens gathering, Mr.
Eisenhower said he was counting
heavily on the women of Amen Amen-'ca,
'ca, Amen-'ca, with their responsibility lor
raising its young, to support high
moral and spiritual values in po political
litical political life.
He alsO'urfcd the -GOP women
to to:j the public how far his p;
gram nas gone, -wnat is left
do and what it means to
to
the
country and the .world.
Such a process, he said, is vital
lo the selection of "the leaders
under which we are going to
work" He wished the Republican
women success and good luck in
"the months ahead.
ReDtiblican National -Chairman
Leonard W. Hall told the conven conven-t'on
t'on conven-t'on republicans had a "right to be
happy' because Mr. Eisenhower
agreed to run again! But he
warned the "hardest fight the Re Re-nublican
nublican Re-nublican Dartv has ever had" lie
aheao. . v
:-!!j'i:::':i -'
r a
;7
1

5
ii

H
! T
i
-' t
j i
f
! I



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN 1XDLFENDENT DAILY NEWSPArER
FACE SEVEN
,(T(7 tfe tern Wmm oto m &&mjimmmm
CAM TOL0
7 I V O L I
BANK NIGHT'.
THE BRIGADES
- Also:
CENTRAL Theatre
IV X THEATRE
DRIVE-IN Theatre
Popular Night: S1.10 PER CAR:
Clark Gable Ricardo Montalban
Maria Elena Marques, in
Across The Wide Missouri
In TECHNICOLOR 1
CECILIA THEATRE
60c. 30c.
BARBARA STANWYCK and
FRED MacMURRAY. in
There s Always Tomorrow
v Plus:
GENEVEIVE
The sensational Technicolor
comedy...
R IO
23c Bank Night!
$500.00 Gold Prize:
Gary Cooper, in
VERACRUZ
- Plus: -John
Wayne, in
RED RIVER
VICTORIA
THE TIGER
AND
THE FLAME
Also:
RETURN OF THE
BADMEN
In Cinemascope!
JCirk Douglas, in
20.0M LEAGUES -IXDER
THE SEA
- Also:
AFRICAN
ADVENTURE
5e.
40c.
75c.
40c.
Shows: 1:18, 2.52, 4 53, :3, p.m.
Technicolor Weekend Release!
Burt Lancaster Dianna Foster
and Diana Lynn, in
THE KENTUCKIAN
In Cinemascope & Technicolor!
A mountain of a man . Tiie story
of the great American!
John Payne Marv Murphv, in
HELLS ISLAND
In VISTAVISION!
Love hate and adventure amidst the
full fury of the Tropics!
3:04 4:39 6:54 8:52 p..
THE CREPPER
GREEK

WIDXESDAY, MARCH 7, l95ff

SIDE GLANCES

By Caibroith

, i Ov I

i "I'm going to leave the price tag on this valentine-,
Hrschel will know that if I spent 30 cents I'm not
kidding!"

HOLLYM

mo.

MOVfS,- TV WDO

Erskine Johnson

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Close
ups and longshots: Boy meets
airplane can be as exciting as
boy meets girl.
Even when he kisses the pro propeller
peller propeller for good luck.
"The Spirit of St. Louis,"
Charles A. Lindbergh's story of
raising $15000 to build a plane
and then flying it solo across the
Atlantic, may not be a movie stu studio's
dio's studio's idea of a surefire, rock-and-sock-'em
plot, but Director Billy
Wilder believes it will be.
"If I can have Audrey Hepburn

wind up with Humphrty Bogirt,"
ht told m, "I can have Jimmy
Stewart wind up with an airplane.
And a man's search for 25 cents
can be as interesting and as ex exciting
citing exciting as $1,000,000 holdup."
There's another reason for the
lack of worry frowns on Wilder's
face about his film story of a man
an an airplane, "It's refreshing,"
he says, "because I don't have
to worry abut a phony second-act
curtain. This plot is for real."
The U.S. state department
doesn't believe Russia will claim
John Paul Jones as a Russian in instead
stead instead of a U.S. hero.
A movie producer, Sam Bron Bron-ston,
ston, Bron-ston, wa worried ahout it when he
started preparing a film biogra

phy of America's first great sea
fighter, That chapter in his life
when he fought as a rear admiral
in the Russian navy against the
Turks gave Producer Bronston the
jitters.
Would the state department ob object
ject object if he stuck to the facts and
included that chapter of Jones'
life in his movie? Bronston asked
the department. The reply just
came from Washington:
No objections from the state de de-'pertinent.
'pertinent. de-'pertinent. THE WITNET: .Overheard at

Frascati s: "He s been in sol

many movies jie uvn ui an bail bailment
ment bailment with only three walls."
Not in the Script: Veteran actor
Aliyn Joslyn about appearing in
his first western:
"Already I bet I can outdraw
such stars as Noel Coward and
Alec Guinness.' T
This Is Holyweod, Mrs. Jones:
Virginia Mayo of the body beauti beautiful
ful beautiful hides It all under cotton hoop
skirts in a new film, "The Proud
Onee.' To "keep up the morale
of the crew," Director Bob Webb
pinned a photo of Virginia in a
. bathing suit on the door of the

sound stage. It's appropriately la-

oeiea istfUKt.

Secretary Queries j Oil Lobbyist's Activities Improper
erSrWar!But Not "WJen. Geoige Says

WASHINGTON. March 7 I P P-Air
Air P-Air Secretary Donald A. Quarles
said today the Air Force has the1
power to deter war even if Rns-j
?ia should be first to develop inter-,
continental ballistic missiles. i

Quarles said in a
pared for the fourth

speech
national

pre-Re-

ae compa-

ONCE EACH YEAR soldiers from the various p osls jo to the firing range to fire the carbine
for record. Here Col. L. C. Pittman, post com mandant, Fort Amador, presents trophies ia
the men with the ton three qualifying scores. They are from left to righf: 2nd Li. Thomas
Noll, Fort Kobbe, who took first place with a score of 198 out of a possible 200 points; Sn-3
Edward Beasely, Fort Amador, second place wi th 196: and Sfc. Arthur S. Pue, Fort Amador,
third place with 194. These men are the high scorers for the fiscal year 1956.
(U.S. Army photoi

WASHINGTON. March 7 a'P George said there apoears to
Sen. Walter F. G?orae tD-Ga.'-be "no Question" but that .the

said today the activities of oil nionevi olfered bv Neff mme

lobbyist John M. Neff were from the "personal funds'' of
"manilestly improper" but ap tfoward B. Keck, president' of
patently involved no -illegal Superior oil, and was passed to
a Neff by Elmer Patnian, $35,000-

ne maae the statemeiu to re- a-year attorney for th

porters as the special four-ma'-, ny

publican Women's Convention that:""" T"'!m" MU s acllv"ies were
he was not 'belittling" the mipor-, ,tedK v:rt. 011 'ts. Pr The 'intended to bolster sentiment

tance of developing missiles at"', w" -UI '7"'"T' i""'VUM cAisiea ur to per

II practicable speed.

I am

when they are developed either
by us or the Communist world
they have to take their place in
the whole arsenal of weapons and
in the whole complex of airpuw-cr."

concerning Neti s oner of a 5:'.- suaae others-members of ;the

merelv saving that if and!auu campaign conuiouuon to eenaie to support the bill."'
,i;,..inni...i.hr:Sen. Francis E. Case iR-SD'. Georee said the milv mrinp

Neff offered the fund to Case that actualiv changed hands iac iac-in
in iac-in the belief that he favored the cording to the testimony, vjeut
natural gas bill, since vetoed by by way of a regular campain
President Eisenhower. Case rc-: contribution tu Republican stafe
jected the offer, reported it to funds in Nebraska and never has

j uie cenaie ana voieu agamfci "een spent.
Quarks gave his views amid aithe bUI- Unless the "mere effort"1 0
running eontroversv at the 1'cnla- GeorRe who said he was make a campaign donation cos,
lion and in Congress over whether, speaking for himself, told news, stitutes an offense, he said, he
Russia or America is ahead in the!me" activities on be- can see no "illegal acf desenb desenb-development
development desenb-development of long-range cuided'f11 of the gas bill 'undoubted- cd in the testimony,
missiles of the ballistic tvpe which'1?' constituted an attempt to ..

Teenager Confesses

; Allacking Woman,

Kidnapping Couple

ii.ill ctvaslr ti.tu-.n fnnlinrnt; at nuuieuLe Ulp Senate

speeds up to 15.000 milers p e r t The hearings brought out that
i,ou. Neft s activities on behalf of the

Hp pave a rundown of the Superior Oil Co. extended int)

strencth the proposed $16.5 million ilv states. He admitted yesier
Air Force budeet for next vear-oay he offered anothe

will. provide and said the air arm, campaign contribution to Sei,
"has what it takes" to prevent: Be-urke b. Hickenlooper R-Iat
wll. if Hickenlooper was "in favor" of
"I believe this is true not only .the gas bill,
now but for the foreseeable fu- The special committee has un un-ture."
ture." un-ture." Quarles said, "regardless, March 10 to write its report.
he i Geoje said, however, that the

the first in breakine through with committee's counsel believe, thp Ull'f J

the tremendous new missiles that; record is too lone to bs reviewed

Earths Kill's bioeraohv will

have much to say about Orson
Welles, He called her the roost
beautiful and exciting woman in
the world when he starred her in
a play before her big night-club
success . Kirk Douglas will
collect better than $500,000 for his
first independent movie, "The In Indian
dian Indian Fighter," on a 25 per cent
capital gain tax arrangement. The
reason so many stars are form forming
ing forming their own film companies
these days . Vanessa Brown
nixed the anti-Hollywood play,
''The Unthinkable Lobster."
Noel Coward's ranting about
playwrights devoting too much of
their art these days to plots with
a message about the little man.
Argues Noel:
"Thi little man is 'dull and unin uninteresting.
teresting. uninteresting. And plots with a mes message
sage message are boring. When we're going

to a play or movie friend of
mine always says, 'If it's a play
with a messaqe I won't dress.'

Toss the "Marty" film hit about I
a little man to Coward and he

! admits it was an exception. Says

he:
"That wasn't solemn like all the
others, It had great humor and
charm."

I
M- I
S ? f l 1 4 aLM.MJ
V I

you hear discussed.

properly in that time

Another .special eighl-nia':
Senate- committee is laying the
groundwork for a broader inves investigation
tigation investigation into ail lobbying activities.

Senate OKs Tax
Exemption On Gas
For Farm Work

WILLIAMSON. N. Y March 7
'tlM A J(i-year-o,Ui former' in inmate
mate inmate of a reform, school was eap-

in a barn ne;ir here tnrlav

and confessed he kidnaped a-Syracuse
couolp and attacketf a
woman motorist, police reoortjpd.
The youth. Bruce V. McKonna
of Massena. Y Y., also admhled
com mil-line two holdup in Syra

cuse, police Inspector Wilham
Driscoll said
I Police said McKenna was rr rr-:
: rr-: leased from the State Training
.'School at Industry, N. Y, four
! months ago and has been Irving
i with his mother. --Mrs. Violette D.
McKenna Gregory of Massena
! since. His father and brother
i drowned last May, .I ttj 5

;uctt.enna aamuiefl ne halted a

Note from film director Al San San-telling
telling San-telling Singapore: "Hope the
Grace Kelly thing is real. Sorry
I'm too old and not a prince.
But don't quote me. Or the other
10,000 guys." :
Yup, Kelly's on the front page
in Singapore, too.

Peter Edson
C (Continued from faae tu
also provided an excuse for rais-
in wholesale prices. More steel
price increases are expected later
" this year. :
With further wage increases
. from new union demands and from
the minimum wage increases from
75 cents to a dollar an hour on
March 1, other wholesale price in-
creases are anticipated.
The seven per cent increase in
. freight rates now set for March 7
would have a similar upward pres-
su'e, '.-
Industrial purchasine agents who

buy large quantities of raw and

semmnisnea materials cianv me
ron'"etition for available supplies
lodr is so great that jt has al al-rady
rady al-rady forced prices, up and infla inflation
tion inflation is here, right nvt.

M-G-M To Release
All Future Films
Of Ealing Studios
;rAS'M-toerpve8ident of
Loew'a inc. and Sir Michael Bai Bai-con,
con, Bai-con, and Keginaiu baKtr of aai-.
ing Studios Ltd. of Great Britain,
announced today that an under understanding
standing understanding had been reached be be-tween
tween be-tween their respective organiza organizations
tions organizations for a long-term arrange arrangement
ment arrangement under which all motion
pictures to be produced by
Ealing will be released ex exclusively
clusively exclusively by M-G-M.
Actual' production activities
will take place at the M-G-M
Studios near London.
under terms (' the understand

ing, Ealing will produce not less
than three motion pictures per
year all with top budgets.
M-G-M has agreed to finance
a major portjon of production
costs.
Eallne have been the most

successful motion picture studio

in England. AmonK their re
cent rjroduct is "The Lady.

killers." starring Alec Guinness,

just released and acclaimed by
critics a record-breaker at the

Sutton Thrive in New York,

"Cruel Sea," "Man in The White
Suit", and "The Lavender Hill

Mob" -v- nossiblv the greatest
American box-nffice suocess of

anv British motion picture com

THREE EMPLOYES of the U.S. Army Caribbea n Engineer Section with a total of 79 years
service last week were presented letters fro m Mai. Gen. Lionel C. McGarr, commanding
general, USARCARIB, upon their retirement. Col. Richard F. Ebbs, SARCARIB Engineer,
presented the letters at a brief ceremony to (I eft to right) Maxwell Phillips, who began work working
ing working for the government In 1911; Egbert S. Mill er, who is ending 18 years service; and Levi
A. Roach, who is retiring after 24 years. 1U.S. Army photo)

eay.-

CO WHEKE YOU MAY, II PAYS YOU TO KNOW AIOUT PAN AGRA'S SEHVICES FUST

. ft. L

Only Panagra offers 14 flights
a week to Lima you can take
off whenever you wish! Two
really top-notch services: deluxe
El Inter Americano, now flying
DC-7B's, finest and fastest in
South America and thrifty El
Paciiico offering maximum
tourist class comfort.

L DC-7B's

PAN AMCKICAN CXACf AWWAYS

See your Travel Agent or Panagra'i offices: Panama
Agencies Co. Calle "L" N 3 Tel. 20556 20557 -Panama, R. P.

Greece Halts Relay
Of British Radio
For Jamming Move
ATHENS, Greece. March 7 (UP)
-.Greece today stopped the relay
of British -programs by Athens

radio n retaliation iur diuimii wash f Tn' 'it.ik t rmi

jamming ot ureew uiimui.ms 1 tie henate today unanimouslv ap- car occupied by William -Jftnno
t-'yprus. proved a bill to exempt gasoline and Phyllis King, both 26. k s t
..... n,o:used, on farms from the two-cents-: Sunday and forced them to drive
Athens radio officials said tne!B-gallon federal gas tax. The mea- at gunpoint to Red Creek, near
order came from Premier Con-:slire j, parl of presidcnt Eisen.' Syracuse.
stantin Karamanhs. Previously howcr's nine-point farm program.: "The auto became stuck in a
the Greek government held mat The bill was returned to the, ditch and .McKenna jumped mil
radio Athens broadcasts ivcre not.iFou.se for consideration of a S-n- :mtl ha'ted a car driven bv Mis
official and were the sole respon-iate rhange. The Senate amended Barbara Cuirmines. of Clvdo. N.
sibility of radio station otticiats. tlc jjouse l0 requj,.c co.,iract.v. Police s.-id the youth ordered
, ; operators of heavy farm mafiiina-: Miss Cummings to 'drive off the
British Signal Corps experts on,rVi such as harvesting combines, 'lic'.w onto a dirt road where
Cyprus were reported ast night 1 conlinue (o pay thc Ux he' attacked her.

10 nave uu(uii jaiuiiuiifi in. -"'"'

"'oice of the ratlierlancl Droao Droao-casts
casts Droao-casts to the Mediterranean island.
The programs have been the sub subject
ject subject of British protests on grounds
they were inciting terrorism and
murder.

Police Confiscate
'Stay Awake' Pills
Used By Truckslers
COLUMBUS. Ohio. March 7

(UP) Sheriff's deputies today
confiscated 60 "stay awake" tab tablets
lets tablets from truck drivers in an ef effort
fort effort to break up use of the drug.

Deputy Don Spafford said tne

investigation started after he

heard dnvers relate stories ot

"seeing snakes" in their cabs and
tanks on the highways.

Spafford said two incidents led

him to the crackdown on use of

the drugs benzedrine ana desoxyn,1
which, in tahlet form are known
as "bennies," "benny-heads" and
"peanuts."
Spafford said he began hang hanging
ing hanging around truck stops posing as
a college student looking for some something
thing something to keep' him awake while
studying.
The deputy said the drivers told
him of their experiences. One
driver said he nearly wrecked his
rig when he thought he saw a
nine-foot snake in the cab. Anoth Another
er Another told of almost jack-knifing his
unit when he thought he saw a

column of tanks moving onto the!

road in front of him,

SHOWim AT (WR SERVICE CEMEIi
THEATERS TOMGHT!

DIABLO HTS. 6:15 8:15

Jnck PALANCE
"THE BIG KNIFE"
Thnrs. "ISLAND IN THK SKY'

2

7:00

ri A MHO A

Richard CONTE
"Case of the Red Monkev

Fri

"THE 8QCARE RING"

1

BALBOA Air-Conditioned 6:15 8.05.
DICK i nPRRIP

; POWELL REYNOLDS

Thursday "CHIEF CRAZV HORSE"

Joan COLLINS
"THE SQUARE RING"

Thurs. "SECRET of the LCAS"J

41

9

PARA1SO '15
"AtOONFLEET''

IM

CRISTOBAL 6:15
V- 'fifhttanr''

Frank Loveioy. in
' MAN AT THE WORLD
. .. ...

Thun. "Hans Christian Andtrsr

II A m
"SrMISOLE IPRIStNG"

fciSl . ,., i jryinl i. )
SANTA CRUZ : 1:201 -ICAMP B1ERI) f:li 1:00
Knrv CALHOUN II Hablnd i) Caslellano
"THE LOOTERS'' i I "8 U 8 A N A

ir GO WHCm YOU MAY, IT FAYS YOU TO KNOW ASOUT ANAGA'S SEKVICIi HUT

If you want Bourbon, at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER' Americas smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS

(Advt.)

v



THE PANAMA AMERICAN

AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7. 1931

RCA VICTOR PRESENTS
The Big Change in styling and performance
which makes all other TV sets seem old-fashioned.

NEW "High and Easy"
Tuning
NEW "4-Plus" Picture
Performance
NEW Balanced Fidelity
Sound

Compare Prices!
DO NOT PAY MORE

FOR

' Panama Radio s JPf
L'.y XS if RCA Victor 24-inch VincentTlll

Central Ave. No. 9-13 (Across La Merced Church)
Tel. 2-3364 2-2566

RCA Victor 24-inch Vincent.

Striking new consolette with

new "4-Plus" Picture Quality.
Two speakers. New '"'High '"'High-Side"
Side" '"'High-Side" Tuning. Model 24T6285.

Free $55.00 Tessar Telephoto Lens

for each Exacta Camera
(the most versatile Reflex Camera),

Equipped with unique full automatic f-1 :2 Zeiss Biotar len
or Macro Kilar lens the 35 mm. Zoom lens

INTERNATIONAL JEWELRY
CAMERA HEADQUARTERS
155 Central Ave. near Central Theatre
Phone 2-1803 or 2-2316 Panama1

So light, so tiny. . it can be worn
in a woman's hair, or clipped to a necktie

v.

Remarkable clarity and Dependability
0 Operates for only about 10 a week
0 New, Highly efficient Dime-size Earphone

CRAWFORD AGENCIES

"J" Street No. 13-A-30 Tivoli Ave. 18-20
Phones 22142 2-3265 2-2386

I r.t

. m i i

l -tit! - 1

. ?$r: .-.ii-v'.T v. J

v iv Vyk 1'!; -tXA
!-' m .V" "'Sfrjl
t : V v J
J-' 'Viv I I M ' r
; J ; r i 1 I
wtwon iitiiw,T, wi ww fii.-iirirrii -iiii ii,,ri-.r.i.iri" --, iiit .w:ain.infr iw aM-ciwirwiii!!!.-! iTMa; maaui if f f-rr i.ru ii.r.t.niMi,iii.ir. ., i nni nj.

A IOIMT DtrcnTinM CAD "CkiriMCCDC rUV" Was he,d in honor of theociety of American Military
A JUiNI KCWtPHUN rUK CriVllllCCKO UAT Engineers, the Sociedad Panamena de Ingenieros y Ar-
quitectos, and the American Society of Civil Engineers on "Engineers .Day." Here Panama's President, Ricardo A-
rias, and Canal Zone Governor John S. Seybold chat with guests at the reception held at the Union Club. President
Arias was honored during the day with a buffet dinner-dance at the Union Club. Also presented were Brigadier
Ceneral Louis T. Heath, Chief of Staff, Caribbean Command, Brigadier General Louis V. Hightower, Chief Staff, U.Si
Army Caribbean, and engineers of the Inter-American Geodetic Survey.

4

ii

mmmm

I

Y

Mi

. y h.J

DC A IITICI II CnAMICU CCMADITA Dresses'the part at the capacity attended bullfights at Panamas Ma
DtAullrUL brANIjli JCNUKIIA carena last Sunday. Left to right in the picture are: the Venezuelan
Ambassador, Lieutenant Colonel Esteban, Chalbaud Cardona,' Miss Pilar de Heredia, and Mr. Manuel Heredia,
Councillor of the Spanish Embassy.



THi: PANAM' AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPt.
PAGE NINB
At FELIX'S
Coltui
is cottons cart ti
cottons..

WLrXESDAT. MARCH ?. 1554

Pv,:, i 1
I W4(' i A J

UAfJCICCCIV TAMTICn IM DCH TADC ,s Mrs" Smith as she appears in "Capers of 1956" in the
nUrtLtjjLY lANVlLtU IN KtU lAPt roe 0f "Miss Red Tape.'' The show, was presented by the Of-ficers-
Wives' Club of Fort Culick on Saturday night. As can be seen by the picture, a good time was had by all.

J 1

' ff l 1 rt i

1

I

' ) -V'

1; z.

LADIES, ORCHIDS AND BOUGAINVILLEA
Zone Past Matrons honoring Miss Florence Plummer, Most
Worthy. Crand Matron, General Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star -end also honoring Mrs. Lillian Long
Worthy Grand Warder of the General Chapter, of the Order of the Eastern Star. Places at the luncheon which
took f I ace at the Hotel Washington, Colon, were laid for forty-four people. r

z C ( j.

r & y&

1

ft V

. H

' 1

:v-:v.s,: lwtfia.,0 rurmimmrti .jiiiH'i.in'ii mMmtm -f'T "'irc

rt .--.. i rfAffTf ... I ...I.x 1 P X...... I' Ji a

I ATMCC TAIfE DADT IM TDAMn CIM Al C v e 8 1 uioaturuay nigni. near row irom leu xo
LALHCj rAKI m: VlKAIlU riHALC right are the Mesdames J. M. Trinidad as Miss Infanti'y, R. L.
- Harllee as Miss QuartenViaster, J. W. Snodgrass, E. J. Blumenstein as Miss Engineer, J. E. Smith as Miss Red
Tape, J. A. Matos as Miss Military Police. Front row: the Mesdames C. M. Shoemaker as Miss Ordnance, J. R.Ta-
pia as Miss Armored, H.J. McGinnis Jr. commentator for the "Fashions,'' S. M. Lucas as Miss Artillery and H. M.
- Kloak as Miss Red Cross. .

V
H,

So much fxcitrment
at FELIX'S . Radiant,
rool cottons art
brightening our stores!
We're ready for Junior?.
Ri:d misses alike .
in newsly silhouettes
for all occasions .
Sheaths and boffants
in delightful prints
or ob.in colors .
And Prices so riant:
from 16.93
Sizes 7 to 1;
10 to 20
14' 2 to 22' 2

NEW STORE
No. 22-06 Central

Ave.

BRANCH STORK
No 6 Tivoli Ave.

NFW PARKING
METERS on 22nd St.
(Corner of
our Main Store)

'.-:.:

D

TOP CUADES ONLY

SELECT YOLR PRECIOUS STO."VE
FROM OLR LARGE SELECTION Ot

FINE GEMS

0

mm

Just say:
"Charge It"

fiKBFGWQ

Jewellers
Ask jour friends, they will recommend us.

Visit

flmacinMmM

Coiner of 7th Strest and Bolivar Avenue
C 0 L 0 N

during
IRISH LINEN WEEK

M A R C II l l to 17
and see the

FABULOUS ASSORTMENT OF
PURE LINEN FABRICS

CANAL AGENCIES, S. A.
Exclusive Representatives
Cathedral Plaza Phone 2-0324
Panama City

U
III1

With One Dollar as down
payment and the payment
of the First Week of our
Club you can obtain any
item you need that's ou
easy payment' plan.

(xJJwt jyiM want to maksi a pAMsmi
h a pumd oh to youAMlfr
our large assortment of jewelry and sihtr gift items and
our Easy Payment Plan will help you give Letter gift.
Wrist Watches, Diamond Rings, Pins, Medals,
Chains, Rosaries, Rings, etc.
Silver Frames, Trays, Plates, Cups, Cases, Cigarette Cases,
Candlesticks, Silverware, Cocktail Shakers, Jar'f.
BOHEMIA CRYSTAL 1TOIS;
Vanity Sets, Vases, Sets of Goblets and Classes, Liquor Sets
an dmany other items.
Electric Toasters, Coffee Pots, Mixers, Kitchen Clocks,
. Table Clocks, Alarm Clocks, Radios, Lamps.

C AS A SPORT, S. A.
FURNITURE O. HARDWARE Q JEWELRY 0 HOME ARTICLES

JEWELRY and SILVERWARE DEPARTMENT

11-88 Central Ave., Panama"

T



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPtls
WEDNESDAY, MARCH T, ls
Dodgers Not Too
orried
9 T J
t Jrodres Induction

FACE TEN

Ajbou

W

"Johnny's loss will put more of
a burden on our pitching," man manager
ager manager Walt Alston conceded. "But
if our young pitchers are as good
as we think, we'll still have good
pitching."
The three prime candidates to
replace Podres as the w o r 1 d
champions' No. 1 left-handed start starter
er starter are 24-year old strikeout whiz
Karl Spooncr, who had an 8-6 rec record
ord record last season; 20-year old bonus
kid Sandy Koufax, who was 2-2 in
12 games in 1955; and 27-year old
Ken Lehman, who had a 22-9 rec record
ord record and 2.76 earned run average
for Montreal in the International
League.
tht Brooklyn high command's
chief reason for accepting the
news calmly is the belief that
the team's basic strength still
is its top-to-bottom run of power
hitters. Secondly, it was point pointed
ed pointed out that Podres for all his
World Series heroics had only
a 9-10 record during the season
and actually was not a key man
in winning the pennant.
The 23-ycar old fodrcs was told
to report to Ticonderoga, N.Y.,
for induction March 15 but may)
ask that his papers be transferred
to the Vero Beach, Fla., board;
which announced yesterday that hei

then would be .:lated tor induction
in the April ,uota. Either way,
Johnnv will miss the next two sea seasons
sons seasons unless discharged for "hard "hard-i.m"
i.m" "hard-i.m" r nipilical reasons.

The Dodgers, meanwhile, were,
gratified bv the steady progress ol
shortstop 1'eewee Keese. who sul-i
fered a pulled back muscle last;
i--;,i., Th sfi.vpar old team capt-,

tin was up and around for the fust
time since the accident yesterday
and said he'd resume workouts
next week.

Brooklyn High Command
Believes Team's Strength
Still Run Of Power Hitters

y FRED DOWN
NEW YORK, March 7 (UP) The IJrooklyn
Dodgers viewed World Series hero Johnny Podres'
imminent induction into the Army today as too late
to help the New York Yankees and too early to be
of much comfort to their National League rivals.

Manager Marty Marion produc produced
ed produced major surprise yesterday
with the announcement of his
tentative opening day lineup for

the Chicago White Sox. It had
slugger Minnie Minoso leading off
followed by Nelson Fox, George
Kell, Larry Doby, Jim Rivera,
Sherman Lollar, Walt Dropo and
Luis Aparicio. Marion was ex- j
pected to pair Minoso and Doby j
in the Not. 3 4 slots.
Vic Wertz, stricken by polio last
August, checked into Cleveland's
Tucson, Ariz., camp and said he
hoped to be the Indians' regular
first baseman. Wertz, who hit 1-1
joiners in about half a season last
year, seemed completely recovered
and manager Al Lopez already has
indicated that he will be the team's
regular first-sacker.
As usual at this time of the year,
rookies continue to hog most of

the headlines in the various camps.
At Clearwater, t'la., rookies Selh
Mnrnhoarl and Dalk firren nitch-

ed three scoreless innings each in
the Philadelphia Phillies' intra intra-j
j intra-j squad game; rookies Ralph Terry
and George Maier yielded only one
hit by rookie Bob Martyn in
the New York Yankees' seven-inning
intra-squad game at St. Pe Petersburg,
tersburg, Petersburg, Fla.; rookie pitcher Joe
Albanese suffered a separation of
his left shoulder when he fell field;
inu funpiiex in the Boston lied Sox'

batting drill and rookie lied Mm If
a 27-ganie winner for Dallas in the

IVvas l.i-.imif last season. was:

named to start for the Milwaukee
Braves in Saturday's exhibition op opener
ener opener with the Phillies.
Elsewhere: The Detroit Tigers
said they have made a final offer
to holdout first-baseman Earl Tor-
.,..,. Tho NIeui Vnrlr fiiants an-

nouneed they will give lnfieldcrj
tractor Tableman a trvout in thel

outfield... and Ray Jablonski was

rated the Cincinnati neaiegs ino.
1 third base candidate by manag manager
er manager Birdie Tcbbetts.
Along The Foirwoys
FORT DAVIS LADIES' DAY
Following is the line up of
matches for the Fort Davis Han

dicap Championship Tournament:
Jean Alexander vs Jean Stire-walt.

Mary Bucolo vs Bye.
Erlene Dials vs Dort Cram.
Ruth Tortorici vs Bye.
Ruby Kruger vs Viola Pavlick.
Louise Reynolds vs Bye.
Louise Johnson vs Loretta Park.
Mary DuBois vs Bye.
First matches must be eomplet eomplet-ed
ed eomplet-ed by 6:00 p.m. Sunday. Full han handicaps
dicaps handicaps will be used. Second match matches
es matches begin Tuesday, March 13 and
must be completed 6:00 p.m.
(March 17. Girls, get in touch with
your opponent and make yo u r

golfing date.

Dons Retain
Season Long
No. 1 Rating

NEW YORK. March 7 CUP)
The high-flying San Francisco;
Dons have hit the jackpot.
The final ratings by the Unit United
ed United Press board of coaches have;
selected San Francisco the na-i
tion's number one college bas-
ketbali team lor 1955-56.
Thirty-two of the 35 leading
coaches who make up the United
Press board picked the Dons in

first nlace. San Francisco's tots

of 342-points is just eight short short-of
of short-of a perfect score.

Three first-place votes did net
so to San Francisco. One each

went to third-ranked Dayton...;
fifth ranked Alabama. .and
seventh-ranked Louisville. Sec-!
ond-ranked North Carolina1
State did not 'receive any first--,
place votes. I
The final top 10-teams are
comprised of four teams from
the South ... three from the j
Midwest. two from the Pacific
Coast. ..and one from the South-;
west. i
Here is how the coaches picked
them San Francisco. .number 5
one. North Carolina State two, I
Dayton three, Iowa' four, and A' A'-jabama
jabama A'-jabama fifth. Southern Metho-I
(dist hit the sixth-slot. . Loui-,
ville was named number seven,

...Illinois number eight... U-C-L-A
nine and Vanderbilt 10th.

VV ,V V !.-ir'-?',1"-, fcduor: CONRADO SARGEANT

t Fi 1 fLtriiuhl If

jfc a xkJi js 5 --v.. ... e-Snga,.. .j. - .!mvio4n. Ifcwwi tf.:a. j PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
, i ' Second Half Standing
4, A U -'""..". Team Won Lost Pet.

'. It Gibraltar Life 2 1 .667
-X- A ) i ... ,r J Lincoln Life 2 2 .500
",. ' - '.-. Seymour Agency ... 2 2 .500
i. ""l. " i Spur Cola 1 2 .333
r 'y " I Police 1 3 250
" 3 Police 2, Elks 10
5 1

tTjii -'i "'"lnWNI'Tlwr1lWllff-tllHMI nMtf1lflirrriw -h-MlliiiMiMiiiiitiiiiliiiiliWWWi IiM' lBiiWWMwliM n igiiTr it -1M"iTW-i'inTrff-H fr N -If-Thr-Jr, Ti 1 in aMn Ai

Fl'H.Y RECOVERED Mexican matador Juan Estrada, fully recovered from the wound re received
ceived received in his leg several weeks ago, is schedul ed to perform at La Macarena bullring Sunday
in competition with El Charro Gomez, another popular "novillero." Estrada is shown here
with the bull which gored him, shortly before the accident.

San Francisco Ends
Season With 25th

Marly Marion Has

High Hopes For 2
White Sox Rookies
MIAMI. March 7-(UPl It
may be a little early for manag managers
ers managers to go out on a limb about
their rookie prospects . but
Martv Marion of the Chicago
White Sox doesn't think so.
Marion has comp out strongly
for two 21-vear-old White Sox

hopefuls catcher John "Honey" i Powells 4

Romano and outfielder Jim Lan-lArmy Atlantic 4
dis. Marty savs both have a veryic. H. S 1

Cristobal High Cuts Powells
Victory Skein In 1-0 Thriller

STANDINGS
Atlantic Twilight Baseball
(Second Half)

Won Lost Pet

Navy

1

800
.800
.200
.200

MONDAY'S RESULTS
C H S. 1, Powells 0
FRIDAY'S GAME
Navy vs. Powells

, I
h

t

I-'.yVt'

Pacific Softball

League
By GILBERTO THORNE
Second Half Standings

J of Capua

SKI HICH-Joe Capua of Wy Wyoming
oming Wyoming is the smallest man (5-8)
on his team, but the sharpshot sharpshot-ing
ing sharpshot-ing Cowboy is top scorer in the
Skyline Conference.

DONATES BOOKS
OWOSSO, Mich. (UP) There
weren't many reference books at
the rural Center School when Pvt.
Robert Andrews was a student,
but the young serviceman is cor correcting
recting correcting the situation. During his
five years in the Army, Andrews'
donated several sets of encyclope-i
diss and an assortment of other
books to the. school.

Golfing Gossip from the
Amador Ladies

Mary Biggs won low gross In
the "Tee to Green" tournament
last Thursday at Fort Amador.
Pearl Simms won low net and
Sylva Carpenter came In second
with Irene Robinson third. Low
putts were won by Alyce French.
Lee Knuth won low medalist
in the Spring Handicap Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament with a net 65. pairings
were announced as follows:
Championship Flight Amador
Handicap Tournament, L. Knuth
vs. B. Dllfer, Bea Fish vs. B.
Hayter, E. Perantie vs. B.
Hughes, C Bishop vs. J. Morris.
Second Flight: H. Schull vs. M.
Bettors, M. B. Williams vs. N.
Knight, M. Tubbs vs. M. Mallo Mallo-ry,
ry, Mallo-ry, H. Clark vs. H. Serger,

sood chance to make the team

As a matter of fact says Ma Marion
rion Marion "I'm considering them a
part of the club." He says "they

will have to work themselves off
it before we send them back to
the minors."
Romano a beefv youngster i

fighting excess fat and some mi-j By TREVOR SIMONS
nor m.furies--has nevertheless The Powells nine-game win win-hit
hit win-hit .380 in seven training games, ming streak came to an abrupt
As for Landis, Marion says he encj on Monday night when Cris Cris-does
does Cris-does everything well." 'tobal High School, behind the
Manager Charley Dressen of magnificent pitching of Arman Arman-Washington
Washington Arman-Washington also is hopeful a- do Lung, surprised the league league-bout
bout league-bout one of his rookies second;

baseman Herb Plews.
Dressen says he wants to give
Plews every chance to win the
position from Pete Runnels.
Meanwhile, Charley wants Pete's
bat in the lineup, so he has an announced
nounced announced that Runnels will play
the outfield throughout the ex exhibition
hibition exhibition season.
Elsewhere along the baseball
trail .
Brooklyn's young right-handed
speedballer Bill-y Lees pitched
his first batting practice, of the

feels sore. However, manager
Walt Alston liked the way Loes
threw and trainer Harold Wend Wend-ler
ler Wend-ler said he doesn't think Billy's
soreness will be serious.
Catcher Wes Westrum of the
Giants hit two home runs to today
day today and accounted for all the
runs as his team beat another
squad 3-nothing at the Giants'
camp. President Horace Stone Stone-ham
ham Stone-ham told newsmen he is inter interested
ested interested in a plan of New York of officials
ficials officials to build a njew ball park
closer to Times Square than the
Polo Grounds.

Bonus-baby Jim Small is get getting
ting getting a trial at first base with
the Detroit Tigers at their camp
in Lakeland, Florida. Small sign signed
ed signed for $30,000 with the Tigers
last June when he graduated

from high school. Manager Buc-

ky Harris says the youngster will
play first base Saturday against

Washington in an exhibition

game.

Agencies Stars

W
5

Signal 3
American Legion 3
26th Engineers 0
Cerveceria P. Liquido 0

frlnd Aeencies made it

straight Monday by beating Pan watched a third strike

leaders and fans alike with a
thrilling 1 to 0 victory.
Cristobal High School had
played six games in the first
half and wound up with a zero
and 6 record. Their losing skein
continued in the second half and
their streak of losses was

stretched to ten consecutive
games before Monday night's
thriller. And it was the brilliant

pitching of Lung combined with
a timely first inning single by
Kaiser Bazan with Luke Palum Palum-bo
bo Palum-bo on second that did the trick.
Lune allowed only two hits,

struck out 9, hit three batsmen

and walked a pair in the last in inning
ning inning when he puled out by strik striking
ing striking out the side. The only real
serious threat to Lung's victory
came in the fifth and he came
through that crisis like a champion.

Noel Gibson opened the fifth
with a triple to deep center and
Hooper was hit by a pitched ball.
Hooper stole second and Powells

had runners on third and sec second
ond second with none out. Lung got De

deaux on a liner to second, the

runners holding. With Gene Mc-

Gaughey at bat, Powells' man
ager called for the "squeeze

play. When McGaughey missed

the bunt Gibson still tried to!

' score but was taiged out at
GB home. McGaughey filed out to

deep right field to end the
threat.
The only score of the game,
Cristobal's single run, came in

5 ; the very first innmg. Rankin

drew a free pass to start things
five, going. After Charlie Fears had

go by,

Perfect
Triumph
By JOHN GRIFFIN

Yesterday afternoon the Elks
scored eight big runs in the first
inning as they defeated the Po Police
lice Police by a score of ten to two. The

win gave the Elks undisputed

possession of first place.
The Elks started out with a
bang when thirteen men came
to bat in the top of the first in inning.
ning. inning. Eight runs were scored on
two hits and five free passes giv given
en given up by Dehlinger pitching for
the Police. With two outs Walter

third doubling up Farnsworth
for the first of two double playi
turned in by the soft drink lads.
Spur Cola scored three runs in
the second. Chase led off by
drawing a walk. Dilfer and Ry-

Jsicki bunted safely, Mounts drew
a walk forcing in Chase from
third, Bradshaw popped up to
first and Zelnick lined a ball to
centerfield driving in two more
runs.
In the fourth with two away
and Bradshaw on first by vir virtue
tue virtue of a fielder's choice, Zelnick
again helped his own cause by
tripling down the right field
line. Spur's last two runs came
in the fifth, Albrltton singled to
center, stole second and scored
on Chase's double; Chase stole
third and then proceded to steal
home.
Louie French was the losing
pitcher giving up six runs, on

six hits, four walks and seven
strikeouts. John Zelnick won his

first game of the second half al-

4'i

Liauido 9-7.

The Cerveceros, as usual, play played
ed played a good game, making the first
two doubleplays of this second
half and holding onto the lead
for one inning before giving up
six hits and seven runs in the
fourth, and finally the ball game
when they failed to score more
than one run in the seventh,
leaving two men stranded.
Lane was once again the un unfortunate
fortunate unfortunate loser for Pan Liquido.
Lou Hilzinger had a good day on
the mound striking out 15 bats batsmen.
men. batsmen. At bat, Hilzinger homered
twice in the fourth inning.

AT LA MACARENA BULLRING

B
U
L
L
S

SUNDAY,
March 11th
at 4:15 p.m

!

MATADORS
JUAN ESTRADA
and
CHARRO GOMEZ

; -r ;-. Shade
Fir( Row 17.(1(1
Second & Third Rows ... 6.00
General , 4 (10
. Children 2.00

Unshaded ft S'tade
6.M..:
5.00
3.00 -1.30

Unshaded
$5.00
4.00
2.00
1.00

Tickets on sale Jit: Cafe "Iherta." La Concordia Druistore, Central Hotel,
Tivoll Agency, Vina del Mar, LI Panama Hotel, and at the Bullring. Re Reservations
servations Reservations at Tel. 3-4SJ9.

JUST
RECEIVED
the famous
CONVERSE
TENTHS SHOES

SIZES FROM i
lo 12'2
No. 47 Central Ave.
' Tel. 2-2504.

Score By Innings
Pan Liquido 012 201 1-7 8
Glud Agencies 100 710 x 9 10

The box score:

Pan Liquido

Ab R H Po

Kosik, 3b 3

Piotrowski, ss
Hamlin, 2b .
Lane, p
Roach, lb ...
Mikle. If .....

I Hughes, rf-cf

Stringer, c ..
Campise, cf .
Herrera, rf

Luke Palumbo grounded to short.
Dedeaux threw to second to
force Rankin, but Rinehart's re re-lav
lav re-lav to first was wild and palum

bo advanced to second. Kaizer
Bazan came through with a sin single
gle single to center that scored Palum

bo from second.
Vince Ridge went' the route for
Powells and pitched well enough
to be a winner. Ridge scattered

three CH S. singles, walked a.

pair and struck out six batters.
His only real trouble was in the
top of the first, but it turned out
to be more trouble than he had
figured it would be as the lone
run stood up for victory.

The box score:

Powells
Rinehart
Hall, lb

Swearingen,
Highley, rf
Gibson, 3b
Hooper, cf

0i Dedeaux, ss

0 Fortner If

McGaughey
Ridge, p ..

2b

Ab R H Po

31 7 8 18 2

Glud Agencies
E. McArthur, If-rf 4 1
E. McArthur,, lf-rf 4 1
J. Pescod, lb ..... 4 1
L. Jones, rf . . . 2 1
C. McArthur, If . 2 0
L. Hilzinger, p ... 3 2
D. Lacy, cf ....... 2 1
B. Stock, 3b ..... 1 0
B. Lawyer, 3b .... 2 1
Catlett. 2b 3 0

!r. Dunn, c ...... 3 1

B. De la Mater, ss 2 1

21 0 2 18 10

Cristobal High

ttanKin, cf 2 0

Fears, c .. 3
Palumbo. lb 3

1 i 0 Razan. ss 3
2 2 0 J4ing, p 3
2 2 QiRobinette, rf ..,,.2
1 o 0j Croft. 2b ........ 2
0 0 0 Ramsey, if 2
2 10 Elizey, 3b ....... 2

1 3 0:
0 l 'o!
1 0 0!
1 00
1 13 1
0 0 1

22 13 21 5

28 9 10 21 2

SUMMARY-Stolen bases: Ko Kosik,
sik, Kosik, E. McArthur, D. Lacy, Dunnj
2. Two base hits: Lane 2. Home
runs: Kosik, Jones, Hilzinger 2.

Double plays: Hamlin-Roach,!
piotrowski-Hamlin-Roach. Bases!
on balls off: Lane 4, Hilzinger 3.1
Struck out by: Lane 3, Hilzinger
15. Winning pitcher: Hilzinger. i
Losing pitcher: Lane. Umpire:
Mctheney. Scorer: W. Peterkln.
,Timr J-JS I

Trrltv Encnntn 35 20
Double in Cinemascope!
Clark Gable, in
"SOLDIER OF FORTUNE"
Leslie Caron, in
"DADDY LONG LEGS"

rode 'WAi ?Q
Rosita Arenas, In
"LA GHANA BLANCA"
Lilla del Valle, In
"LA RIVAL"

JO

NEW YORK. March 7 (UP)
The national champion San -Fran

Cisco Dons cleared the decks for

cieiensr o! their N.C.A.A. tourna
merit championship todav hv rlns

ing the books on a record-busting
perfect season of 25 victories and

no aeieais.
Win No. 25 for this year and No
51 in the streak that has smashed
the major-college record came
easily by an 82-49 score last night
before a record crowd of 15,732 at
San Francisco's Cow Palace All All-America
America All-America Bill Russell paced 'the
Dons' scoring with 22 points, help helping
ing helping them break the game open af after
ter after being held to a 31-24 halftime
margin.
Th triumph marked tht final
eollegiatt appearance of K. C.
Jon$, who was namtd along with
Russell today to the United Press
All-America team. Jones, ineligi ineligible
ble ineligible for the N.C.A.A. tournament,
received a two-minute standing
ovation from the crowd when he
left the game with six minutes
to play.

Next stop for the Dons is a March
16 date with U.C.L.A., the Pacific
Coast Conference champion, in the
first found of the N.C.A.A. crown
they also will equal a streak of 55
victories posted by Peru, Neb.,
Teachers 30 years ago, recognized
by the N.C.A.A as the all-time, all all-college
college all-college record.
Kansas State became the Dons'
latest rival for the N.C.A.A. crown
by clinching the Big Seven champ championship
ionship championship last night with a "sweet re

venge" 79-68 victory over arch archrival
rival archrival Kansas.
The game marked probably the
last home-court appearance for
Dr. Forrest C. (Phog) Allen, Kan Kansas'
sas' Kansas' famed and controversial
coach who must retire in June
when he reaches the age of 70.
Kansas fried to give him vic victorious
torious victorious sendoff by seizing a 45 45-37
37 45-37 halftime lead, but Kansas State
caught up after eight minutes of
the second half and then pulled
away. Six-three Fritz Schneider
paced state with 36 points.
Kansas State was the 23rd team
to enter the 25-team N.C.A.A. field

and will clash with the winner of
a game between Marshall and the

undetermined Ohio Valley confer conference
ence conference team in a first-round" same at

Lawrence, Kansas, March 16. The

icaguc crown is me wiiacais nrst
since 1951, when they went to the

inx.a.a. tinais before losing to

Kentucky, 68, 58.
Unfilled N.C.A.A. berths are: 1.
Member-at-large to meet West
Virginia t New York, March 12.

Has been offered to Ivy League

cnamp Dartmouth, which hasn't yet
accepted; 2. Ohio Valley Confer Conference
ence Conference team. Three-way playoff starts
tonight with Western Kentucky vs.

lennessee recti, winner to meet

Morehead St. tomorrow.
St. Louis (18-6) became the 12th.
and last team to enter the Na National
tional National Invitation Tournament field
yesterday. Parings have not yet
been announced. Therest of the
N.l.T. field is: Duquesne, Louis Louisville,
ville, Louisville, Dayton, Seton Hall, Niaga Niagara,
ra, Niagara, Marquette, Xavier (O.). St.

Francis (N.Y.), St. Joseph's (Pa.),

Lafayette, and Oklahoma A.&M.
The tourney opens March 17. .

The N.A.I.A. tournament, which
opens in Kansas City Monday with
a field of 32 smaller-college teams,
disclosed it has filled 17 of its

berths by completed district eli

minations with four more places

to oe tilled tonight.
Managing Is A
Personality Job

VERO BEACH, Fla. (NEA)-

The key to managing, Jackie Ro

binson says, is knowing how to

Brown relieved Dehlinger and;

with the bases loaded issued allowing two runs on six hits, two

walk to force in a run, a double 'walks and five strike outs,
by Jackie DeVore, his second hit The box score:

of the inning brought in the;L!ncoln Life
seventh and eighth run. The Farnsworth, lb
Elks scored twice more in the Beck. 3b
top of the third. Burton led French, L. p ..
with a single to center. Hern! French, W. ss

followed with a single to tneiBraasnaw, c

same spot. A stolen base and a
passed ball followed by DeVore's
third hit brought in the last two
runs for the Elks.
The Police scored their only
runs in the first inning. Demp Demp-sey
sey Demp-sey led off with a bunt single,
took second on a passed ball
went to third on a ground ball
to the short stop. Dehlinger was
walked and both runs scored
when Browder lined a double be between
tween between left and centerfield.

The big man at the bat for
the Elks was first baseman
Jackie DeVore who had a per perfect
fect perfect day, hitting two singles and
two doubles with four trips to

the plate. For the Police Demp-I Zelnick, p

scy hit safely three times. .Mikulich, rf

Ed Bleakley won his third
game of the second half giving
u ptwo runs on five hits, walk walking
ing walking four and striking out nine.
Dehlinger was the loser being
responsible for eight runs on
two hits, five wadks and one
strike out. Brown allowed two

uns on three hits, issued three

free1 passes and struck out four.

Ward, 2b-lb 3

Joyner, J. If
Bishop, cf .
Joyner. c. rf
Ledbetter, 2b
Bowman, rf
Nessler, cf ..

isowen, c
Whitney, rf
Albrltton, cf
Chase, ss .
Dllfer, lb ..
Rybicki, 3b
Mounts, 2b
Bradshaw, C.

Spur Cola

Widle plaver8

Tk'nl

The box score:

Elks 1414
Stoudnor, 2b

Berger, rf 1

DeVore, lb
Williams, ss

Gangle, If
Bleakley, p ........
Cross, c
Burton, 3b
Hern, cf

Mullins, lb

Field, rf 0

Egolf, If 1
Lincoln, c 1

Ab R H
2 2 0

1 0

1
1
1
0
1
1
2
0
0
0
0

Fastlich
League

Ab R H
,201
.301
3 0 0
,311
.301
,301
,200
,10 0
,010
1 0 1
.000
10 0
22 2 6
.300
..3 0 0
.311
.221
,311
.111
.200
,210
,202
.000
21 6 6

PUMAS 4, CONEJOS S

. 26 10
rorce
Dempscy, 3b 3 1
Ashton, ss 3 0
Priester, cf ...3 0
Dehlinger, p-lf 2 1
Browder. lb" 3 0
Glazer, c 3 0
Corrigan, T. 2b 3 0

Bettis, lf-rf 0 0

Brown, rf-p 3 0

The Pumas vesterday defeated

4 1 the Conejos 4-3 in a well played,
0 hard fought game at Fastlich
o! League Park.
1! walks by Conejo pitcher God God-0
0 God-0 sey got him in trouble in both
lj the second and third Innings and
lithe Pumas were never headed
0 after that. Parker came In and
0 put out the fire in the third and
0 pitched good ball from there ort.
0 Reynolds started for the Pu-
I mas but was relieved by Stahl
7 after the Conejos had scored
! three runs.
I Parker was the leading batter
' of the day with two for three
0 and driving in two runs.
0 1
1. The box score:

U Pumas Ab R H Po

"Steiner, rf 2 0 0 0

Priest, 3b ... 0

23 2 5

LINCOLN LIFE 2, SPUR COLA 6

Mondav afternoon last place

Spur Cola knocked Lincoln Life
out of first place by winning the

game with six rung lo two.
The Presidents scored first
in the ton of the second when

Worden French leading off lift

ed one of zelnlck s pitches over
the scoreboard in centerfield.

The second Lincoln Life run
came in the third inning on a
walk to Charlie joyner and con.

secuuve singles by Farnsworin
and Beck.

One of the fine fielding plays
exhibited by Spur Cola also hap happened
pened happened in the third inning, with

the bases loaded and W. French
batting, French hit a hard line
drive which looked like a sure
hit over short stop but Freddy
Chase made a leaping one hand
catch of the ball and ran to

Schwarzrock, ss

Webb, c

Reynolds, p-lb

Hele. cf

Stahl, 3b-p ...
Ciamco. If
Pearl, 2b
Scott, A. lb-rf

Totals

17 4 3 15 6

Conejos

Frangione, 3b . 2

PLENTY FOR ALL
Chicago (NEA) The Profes Professional
sional Professional Golfers' Association sum summer
mer summer tour is worth $649,000 this
year. There are 22 tournam3nts
on the schedule.

CHAMPS STAYED AWAY
New York (NEA). Madison
Square Garden had only one
championship bout in 1955 the
featherweight match between San Sandy
dy Sandy Saddler and Red Top Davis.

R. Scott, cf

Parker, p-ss
Chase, c ....
Godsey, o-rf
Hadley, If
Seise, rf-ss
Chassin, 2b
Musser, lb
Totals

17 3 4 15 2

. Score By Innlnrs
Pumas 010 004 3
Conejos 002 103 4

SUMMARY Errors: Pumas
0. Conefos 0. Rims batted In:
Hele 2. Pearl I, R. Scott 1, Park Parker
er Parker 2. iStolen bases: Reynolds,
Webb, Hadley, Double mays:
Musser (unassisted). Left on
bases: Conejos 8, Pumas 7. Bases
on balls off Godsey 7, Parker 2.
Reynolds 6, Stahl 1. strike outs
by Godsey 1. Parker !v Revnolds
1. Stahl l. wild pitches: Reyn Reynolds.
olds. Reynolds. Passed balls: Webb. Win Winning
ning Winning pitcher: Reynolds. Losing
pitcher, Godsey. Umpires;. Mohl
and Diaz. Scorer: Mead. Time:
1:45.

tine in "Real.' Robinsor not

es; that, "some' players do Letter

when publicly shamed. I'll d, o ai
better job to prove the manager's
wrong. I know Don Newcombe is
that way." 1
Robinson, in looking at other
National League managers, thinks
that Charley Grimm is "too free,"!
and that Birdie Tebbetts "has just
the right amount of everything toi

' i b a good .mana g

In Tennis Equipment
. . Your Best Buy is

AT

No. 47 Central Ave.
Tel. 2-2504

I



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1956

THE FAXAMA AMERICAN AN .INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER 'v
PAGE ELEVEIf

Bill Russell Dominates
Sky-Scraping Lineup

On The Alleys. .

SEYMOUR INSl'RANCEMEN

FORGE AHEAD IN MAJOR
KEGLIN'G LEAGUE AS SUMMIT
HILLS DEFEATS STEMPEL

By MURRAY OLDERMAN

The Seymour Agency insur

ance keglers increased their lead
He was the consensus. standout cf jn the Major Bowling League

tnat one busman, "and lu buudHeinshofm typif.es an increasing tWeweS a toe S
Horn tnere: Brotner we got turn.; breed in basketball, first set by Je M r stempe insuiance insuiance-vncn
vncn insuiance-vncn it came lime to put togctn- Tom Gola-the big man with the mgn e takto- a i thrM-po'nt
kethail team, at tne heau 01 me had three years, to perfect them, T tpam
assembly line stood San Francis-; and the pros predict he'll step y
S a.HnXfkVla reSCm"!ri into ihcir game next year: For Seymour, Harry Colbert
Thats w 'ent on a mpage, scoring
a sweco ?h ? MA champion 1 mLlkH G''eCn' l'"13" 2 1 ? 0 8ames 2". 232 and 180 for a
?hio and he's done nothTnZc P 1" f," 3 S0lfulff,"1 (and clc" --"ne 626 total, followed by Ham Ham-fi?
fi? Ham-fi? cancel out hS sitmu Ts 'u'"' Wlth br,llial?t seonn mer with games of 218.. 208 and
in hiMorvn. Mikan I' ? V'' an 'n'- te-!''Vc;?n: 180 for 608. These two held up
piayer in bistoiy-tne Mikans whose place near the top ol the c d,,h c,,t)(.r .hn

ana Luisettis uiauuea ever uum-naljons scoring lists is materiel
inated a season like the giant 6-10 ; evidence of his ability,
tamornian wnn tne i-o wing

spread.

SECOND TEAM

Willie Naulls, UCLA
Bob Burrow, Kentucky
Bill Uhl, Dayton
Rod Hundley, West Va.
K. C. Jones, San Francisco
THIRD TEAM

To make sure ..Bill won't be
lonesome, our board ole xperts
around tne nation backed him up
witn. complementary cnaraciets;
Ron, Shavlik of North Carolina;
Male, lor lancy snois arouna tne
ktyhole; Tom Heinsohn of Holy!
cross, with the outside snot a big
corner man needs; Sihugo Green
of Duquesne, a treuienuous Oliver
and playmaker, and Robin Free-!
mar. ot Onio btate, the jumpsnoot-i
ing little gunner 'Who can blast1
OKn a game.
You sit mulling ways to stress'
the group potency oi this years
Ali-Amenca seiectionsx. proba-

'bly the strongest ever and the

thought occurs; now a me omei
team manage to maneuver tue
ball into position to shoot? i
.;!., onllono mi inlet liai

ever'had'th rebounding strength! Jy Harper. Alabama : Dick
i .i, Inmnorahio H.mcii' Games. Scton Hall; Hal Lear,

Shavlik, a springboard 6 8, and
Heinsohn, an ague 6-7. Add Green
in the backcourt, a comparative
shrimp at 6-2'A wno can equal any
of them in leaping.

had only 486, 472 and 506 re respectively.
spectively. respectively. For Tahiti, McElroy
had 566, followed by Lane with1
563 and Larrabee with 551. )
The Ready Kilowatts from the
Fuerza y Luz butchered the second-place
Stempeleers by taking!
the first two games and pinfaii
with as fantastic an array of I
strikes as ever occurred at Dia-I
bio. While the Stempel keglers!
were forced to hit the headpin

i to score strikes, Luttenberger
F Joe Holup, Geore Washington and Pilachowski of the Fuerza y

t i.en KoseiiDium, Carolina. Luz team were able to scoiei

t ...
! ..- :'- ' .' -:

'LA.iiiiOrtirwrniifi:-4i,"r"ir- r M r,M" ft -"rTrf frtr -rri -it ri t s g r-. ,

. w
" f . V t

C Temple Tucker, Rice
G Paul Judsou, UCLA
G Joe Capua, Wyoming
HONORABLE MENTION:

est Able, Western Ky.: Phi! Rol Rollins,
lins, Rollins, Louisville; Charlei Tyra,
Lousville; Jim Reed.. Texas iecli
Jim Krebs, SMU; Art Bunte,

Utah; Al Rochelle, Vanrterbilt;

. strikes by hitting any pin at!
I random on either side, Including
'strikes by hitting the 6-pin. This
! murdered the efforts of the
For Stempeleers, as Thomas scored!

a splendid 6 scries, with games!
of 212, 217 and 216, (his highest
of the season i, and Ronnie
Welch scored his season high
series with games of 224, 209 and
224 for a terrific 657.

THERE'S CATCH HERE Casey Stengel can only use one of these Yankee receivers at a
time. But ori herra, left, is plenty food enough. Others are, left to right, Charlie Silvera,
Darrrll Johnson, Alston Howard, Morris Thacker and John Blanchard.
Yanks Give A.L Vegas Touch
Too Many Combinations

Temple; Tom Hemans, Niaga Niagara;
ra; Niagara; Darrell Floyd, Furman; Ju Julius
lius Julius McCoy, Michigan State;
Morris Taft, UCLA.

This scoring by the Fuerza y
Luz team against the Stempel Stempeleers
eers Stempeleers duplicated the same type of
play of 13 weeks ago, when the
same two teams met and the
Fuerza y Luz boys scored high

Squeezer! out in the rusli for game and high 3-game series of

Like Russell, Green is a repeat-; the first five college players of the the league. The scoring on Tues--

er from last years lop live picks, jyear such a close eonliTdor.day night was the highest' by
and a virtually unanimous All-;aj Russell's running mate at tan Fuerza y Luz since that tim.',
America, too. His season was made' Francisco. K. ('. Jones, urulouiit-jover three months ago.
more ditiicult by the fact he was edly one of the beM floor leaders;
surrounded by mediocre personnel jn the country and one ol lh. top1 While the Stempeleers weie
at nnnucsne and still managed to1 defend r-i. being dumped into third olarj

drive the Dukes into a National He heads an equally competent with only four weeks of play len

Invitation Tournament hid. 'second cast nmsiung next to me m the 28-week season, the Sum-

Shavlik, who broke nis wrisi top m tins competition is no ic-.mlt Hills Golf Club was taking

licction. over tne last-place, luckless A
They don't mak' them like Rue- gencia Glud team for four noints

by

JOE WILLIAMS

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sporti Editor

t --'if. 4?v-

4 w ,Mf iTi

ST. PETERSBURG, F I a. -(NEA)
An experienced baseball
man gets dizzy watching the Yan Yankees
kees Yankees work at wire-fenced Miller

; Unpins Field on St. Felershurg's
MIAMI REACH. -As uoii'i e heard. Nashua and Sicuus aren't : north side.

mi silt luyemer in a ruuoer matcn uuicn neii;, aier an.
It isn't that they arc ulleiglc to rubber, or matches, either, or

luui. mr.uer. its ptsl that the yumhle is loo great.

Both sides would iu.st as soon foraet it. Swaos beat Nashua

in Hie Derby and Nashua came back and beat him in the Chicago

CLOSE CALL Death came close to Picador Narho Cannons in
a Mexico City bullfighting arena. Carmona, whose job it was to
enrage the bull w hile riding a well-padded horse, was hurled to
the ground when the charging bull uoset the mount, upper photo.
The bull gores the horse's unprotected belly, center Dhoto as
Carmona rolls clear. At bottom, the bull kicks up its heels tri triumphantly
umphantly triumphantly over the fallen Narho. But Matador Joselito Huerta,
right, and other? rushed to Carmona's- aid, distracted the bull
and saved the picador, lltu'ita inier killed the hull.

There are so nianv of them.

The American i.tauue cham

pions cut down their farm system.
The idea was to have more miali-

ly and Ipss quantity. But New York

the last week of the regular sea season,
son, season, made the logical jump from

the 1955 second All-America team, sell and company

every year.
I

III '5SU,P2NZ T"'K te II JZ.

COLL MB BASKETBALL fSSm"

mamma

to move Into second place by one

point over the Stempel team.
For Summit, Jacobcr scored
587, followed by Jamison with
547. For Glud, McGarvey had a
splendid 628 series with game?
of 239 thigh game in the league
for the eveningi, 188 and 201,
followed by Frank Granata's 589

with games of 175, 189 and 225.
Summit plays Stempel next
Tuesday night, on alleys 7 and!
8, to determine which Is going;

to chase Seymour to the finish1

line. i

In the final match. H. I. Ho-!

ma tilesctters took three points

irom tne raoine Colonial Insur

anccmen. Bud Balcer scored a

588 series with 157, 193 and 238,

followed by Motykiewicz with

552, as George Zeletes led the
Colonial Insurancemen with 59?
with 187, 203 and 203, followed
by Schirmer with 574.

Ronnie Welch's 657 series was

the high series for the night.

xne present standine of the

teams:

Seymour Aeencv

bummlt Golf Club 57
Tahiti jewelry 53
H. I. Homa Co 51
Colonial Insurance 47
Fuer?a y Luz 37
Agenda Glud 20

Won Lost Pet.
. 62 34 .651

39
43
44
49
59
76

.594
.552
.537
.490
.385
.203

The ten high-average bowlers

are now;

Name

Games Ave

COffey 72 204 15

I Balcer 72 19758
IJacober .. ., .. ,. 69 1914-64

Colbert 69 19061
McGarvey 38 18819
Schirmer 69 1866fi
Hammer 66 18526
Lane 60 183 14
Kunkel 69 18263
Ellcnberger .. .. ..38 18229
KOBBE BOWLINC
CHAMPIONSHIP
With "strikes" and "spares"
crashing; galore, the 1956 "Life-1

liner" Bowling championships
were concluded for the post of

r 011, is-oDoe. winning teams from
each battalion and special unit,
namely, "C" Comoanv. First Rat-

1 tahon; 'F" Company, Second

Battalion; Service Company
Provisional Battalion; and the
937th Engineer Company of the
Post's separate units, compared
for the Post championship.
In one of the most exciting
and closest matches held here
in recent years, First Battalion's
Company "C" nudged out Serv Service
ice Service Comnany by a small margin
of 82 pins.
Sp-2 Robert Henk, of the 937th
Engineers, was high man for
the tournament with a' nine-!
game average of 176. Following
very closely in second place was
Sgt. Gerald Kleits of Company
"C" with an average of 173.
The final team results were
as follows:
"C" Company'...... 7,203 pins
Service Company . 7,121 pins
937th Engineer Co. 6.930 pins
"F" Company ...... 6,648 pins

match-play singles, which is tu say, in a horse against horse slill has numbers, class, balance

lest, bo they stand even-stephen, and who is there to prove and over-all speed,
by words or figures that one is truly greater than the other1)
A third meeting, however, would remove the subject beyond Casey Stengel hasn't had it so
all further controversy, which would be fine for the winner, but uood in eight springs. The Bom Bom-the
the Bom-the loser would suiter incalculable loss in prestige, and that l)(,rs haven't possessed so much
would mean sharply reduced stud fees. talent since Joe DiMaggio first
Who, tor instance, would want to breed to a twice-beaten showed up 20 years ago. And this
Nashua if he could breed to a twice-iictorious Swaps . or comes after winning six pennants
vice versa? and five world championships and
The situation poses not only a dangerous economic risk but finishing second in seven outinjs.
a needless one, and because it does you can bet all the piazia pies ; Yankee haters had better get used
in Naples Nashua ard Swaps probably will never meet again, j to them.
Potentially, the two picture horses represent millions, liter-'
oily, in stud fees, and it is hardly necessary to remark that1! THE YANKEES ARE like one of

businessmen do not customarily discourage the fulfillment o!thosc D'J? Las Vegas gambling i
such opportunities, ihouscs. If you play them long
i enough say 154 games vou've,
Nashua is still here and Leslie Combs, the enterprising and I got to lose. Thcv have too manv

engaging Kentuckian, who put the syndicate together which! combinations.

relieved the Hanover Bank of the horse for $1,251,200, persists , ,. ;
in savin0: Manager Stengel announced his

Tf Swaps comes we'll be very happy to take him on." starting pitchers before the re re-It
It re-It has been noted, however, that Mr. Combs' expression atSuTs r,cPort(,d on Byrne,
such times is mnrh Inss rarllanl than mhnn h. ct.viri.. i th HirlCy, Larsen and McDermotl.

winner's circle tenderly carrassinz S100.000 Durses. sn' H. mav ?.eil.in(l J.hcm ivJ. GI"n- Morgan,

stanty, Sturdivant and two of
three recruits who can throw the j
hall through a brick wall. For ex-!

ample, Mark Freeman, who put in
three years with Binghamton of
the Eastorn League before enter entering
ing entering the armed forces has only to
get a piece of the plate to make
It. :

Professor Stengel once more will

double and triple team the enemy

He has the best left-hand hitting

catcher in the league in Yogi Be

rra, the most formidable right-

hand batting catcher in Elston

Howard. Backing them are

Charley Silvera and Darrell John
son, a stylish recicver who bat

ted .306 for Denver. Johnny Blan

chard will go out only because he

is too bright prospect to be in
the dugout. He belted 34 home runs
drove in 111-runs for Binghamton.

someone out of a job," says Slcii is pull left-hand hitler of tre-
Ke. 111 c 11 cl 0 us power.
"Norm Sicbcni has the Stadium
The principal concern is about swim;." says Paul Krickell, vet-
this big St. Louis 22-jcar old's cran chief scout,
arm. He hurt his shoulder in a
fall in the Mexican Lcacue. where That's why the American
. ., ., League has been lopsided for the
he went after two years in the arm- hrMfr part of 35 vfars
eel forces. Previusly. ho had two Too many guys with the Stad Stad-ancl
ancl Stad-ancl a half years in the minors. He ium swing.

be that his definition of happiness has a variable quality.

It's Bad Business
I trust. I do not give the impression Mr. Combs is playing
the duck for Swaps. The physical evidence alone is sufficient
to refute any such idea. He has Nashua entered in the Gulf Gulf-stream
stream Gulf-stream Handicap, set for March 17. To get action, all Swaps
has to do is show up.
Rex Ellsworth who speaks for Swaps (and with only the
laintest trace of whinny 1 is shipping a number of cavalry units
here for other exercises, notably the Florida Derby, but he's
made it official that "Swans won't be ready."

Swaps was withdrawn Irom the recent Santa Anita Hnnrli

cap when it came up mud, but in an earlier effort, his debut

ui, a 9-ycur-uia, ne ran like J. taqar Hoover was after him.
Mr. Ellsworth explained he hadn't scratched Swaps from the
handicap on account of the mud . "he just wasn't ready."
Swaps has a sore-foot history of long standing and must be
gentled in training. Even so. the likelihood of his ever being
"ready" for another go at Nashua is to be seriously doubted.

mi, cusu:urui is a yuoa ousmessman, too.
Actually, if -there were a third meeting, Nashua would run
the greater risk, for he not only has a 50-50 standing in indivi individual
dual individual competition with Swaps, but he can scarcely miss becoming
the greatest money earner in the history of racing.
All he has to do to pass citation's record of $1,085,760 in
equine bank deposits Is win his next race down here. He's shy
only $47,745. As the richest horse In the world, Nashua's posi position
tion position would be dramatically pre-eminent; he'd need another win
over Swaps like Yogi Bcrra needs ballet, lessons . and keep in
mind he could get beat, too.

r.ILE SUIT BRIGADE
New York (NEA) Thsre are
18 umpins on the National League
staff ibis season. The oliest in
point of service is Babe Pinclli.
This is his 21st year.

Set Fee at $15,000
t This is a possibility the realistic Mr. Combs recognizes,
.though he probably feels Nashua would beat Swaps six times
a week and twice on Sunday, if they played double-headers in
horse parks.
. If all goes according to plan, Nashua's stud fee will be the
highest American breeding has ever known.. Mr. Combs has

iciuauveiy net me ngure ac ?ia,uuu. Tne highest up to now?
ersll0de?,aV sure'" he told e,"aybe Royal Charg
Mr.' Combs holds title to Royal Charger's services, too.
Where does Nashua goes from here?

io newuiorK. we nope to run him quite a bit around
there, but that will depend on the weights. We won't retire

mm univ. me season is over. -.
Mr. Combs has stated he won't permit Nashua to c&mr in

ounce more than 130 pounds . ;. And this in itself shows what

a Hive, cuiwiuerwM:, numaneisort oi cnap the old Centre College
football player is. ..

It r t O

Optn Nightly from
8:00 i.m.
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER
8LOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
Alr-Condlliontd

BECAUSE HE IS the most de

pendable hitter in the group, Sten

gel hopes Gil McDougal can play

shortstop, but the Yankees are not

going to be hurt there, regardless

George Weiss has been trying to

lind a replacement for Phil Riz

zuto lor eight years, but Little

Scooter opened and closed last sea

son and stuck out in the World Se

ries.

Billy Hunter is still favoring the

break above the right ankle. -Jerry

Lumpe, up from Birmingham, was

the best shortstop in the chain

Woody Held manufactured IS home
runj. and drove, in 87. for Denver.

Tony Kubck, only 20, moved from

tjumcy of the Three-Eye to Denv
er last season, because he can hit

throw and run. Tom Carroll, the

bonus beauty, has to be lugged

along.

Billy Martin will keep the fire

lit under the club at second base

There are the customary three

first basemen Joe Collins, Bill
Skowron and Eddie Robinson. Col Collins
lins Collins also plays right field. Skow

ron car. double at third base, where

Andy carey starts. Mcuougata

of couse, cn play anywhere in the
infield. So can Jerry Coleman and

noooy nicnarason.
TH6" YANKEES WERE beaten

in "th World Seriei because their

entire outfield was out of whack.
Mickey Mantle for the first time
is starting as sound as he possi possibly
bly possibly can be. Hank Bauer is his ro

bust old self and Irv Noren ap

pears to be back on two good

knees after operations on them.

Llston Howard will be available

for outficlding when not catching.

bob cerv can bust the ban.
Four new outfielding faces are
attracting attention Norm Sieb-

ern, out of the Army; Lou Skizas

ana wnney Hcnog, on from Den 1
ver; and Bob Martvn. sraduatcd

from Binghamton.
t'That there Sicbern could push

NV7

For

EXTRA

STRENGTH

VITALITY,
and STRONG NERVES
take

fOSFERINE

m

sitCISUIlB,.

L tOL I BO

9Tu. 'Mi"""::

LC frawa

Lw4t. iT? ..(..iom i 0
IS... Vr r i-L .S.H.. k. ui'1;

IV., 7"i :-P!

k T-iorTTT

. LJ9C1D0 J
V' w una ciW

tt N.

11 i a 'w.Mi

New energy and strength for you I
That is the result of ukint
Phosferine every day. You will
have stronger nerves, a better
appetite, a keener brain. Signs of
weakness will vanish and vou will
enjoy life. Get Phosferine now ..

The Greatest
of all Tonics



rscr. tfn

THE PA.? A.M. A3!TRICAN AN Pv'ELrOTE.Vr DAILY NTWSr.iTti
VTEDXrSDAY. Mir.ClT T, lSst
J.
ersHot Too. Worried. About Podres9 iTsidtactioii
I M li

o

Brooklyn High Command
Believes Team's Strength
Still Run Of Power Hitters

By FRED DOWN
NEW YORK, March 7 (UP) .. The Brooklyn
Dodgers viewed World Series hero Johnny Podres'
imminent induction into the Army today as too late
to help the New York Yankees and too early to be
of much comfort to their National League rivals.

"Johnny's loss will put more of
a burden on air pitching," man manager
ager manager Walt Alston conceded. "But
if our young pitchers are as good
as we think, we'll still have good
pitching
The three prime candidates to
replace Fodm a the world
champions' No. 1 left-handed start starter
er starter are 24-year old strikeout whiz
Karl Sooner, wno had an 8-6 rec record
ord record last itason; 20-year old bonus
kid Sandy Koufax, who was 2-2 in
12 games id 195; and 27-year old
Ken Lehman, who had a 22 9 rec record
ord record and 2.76 earned run average
for Montreal in the International
League.
Tha Brceklyri high command t
chief reason for eeeepting the
news calmly is the belief that
the team's basic strength still
is its Krjvto-kstfom run of power
hitters. Scndly, it was point pointed
ed pointed out that Podres for all his
World Series heroics d only
a 10 reeord during the season
and erfruallv was rtot a key man

in winning the pennant,

Ia rpnort to Ticonderoea, ix.i..

for induction March 15 buj may
ask that his papers be transferred
lo the Vero Beach, Fla., board
which announced yerterday that he
then woul-l he sieMKl for induction
In the Anril qauta. Either way,
Johnriy will miss tie next two sea-1
sons unless discharged for "hard

ship or medical reasons.
Tiie Dodgers, meanwhile, were
gratified by the steady process of
ahwistp Peewce Reese, who suf suffered
fered suffered a pulled berk muscle last
Friday. The 36-year old team capt-j
tin wis vj nd around for the first
tiw since the accident yesterday
ant'. shS he'd resume workouts
next week.

r

Dons Retain
Season Long
No. 1 Rating
NEW YORK, March 7 (UP) (UP)-The
The (UP)-The high-flying San Francisco
Dons have hit the Jackpot.
The final ratings by the Unit United
ed United Press board of coaches have
selected San Francisco the na nation's
tion's nation's number one college bas basketball
ketball basketball team for 1955-56.
Thirty-two of the 35 leading
coaches who make up the United
Pres3 board picked the Dons In
first place. San Francisco's total
of 342-points Is just eight short
of a perfect score.
Three first-place votes did not
go to San Francisco. One each
went to third-ranked Dayton...
fifth ranked Alabama. and
seventh-ranked Louisville. Sec

ond-ranked North C a r o Una

State did not'recelve any .first
place votes. -

The final ton 10-teams are

comprised of four teams from

the South ... three from the
Midwest. .two from the Pacific

Coast. .and one from the South

west.

Here is hpw the coaches picked
them San Francisco. ..number

one, North Carolina State two,

Dayton three, Iowar four, and Al Alabama
abama Alabama fifth. Southern Metho.
dist hit the sixth-slot .Louis

ville was named number seven

...Illinois number eight... U-C
L-A nine and Vanderbilt 10th.
Marly Marion Has

Hioh Hopes For 2
While Sox Rookies

MIAMI, March 7-(TJP)-It

may be a little early for manag

ers to go out on a limb about
their rookie prospects ... but

Martv Marlon of the Chicago

White Sox doesn't think so.

Marion has come out strongly
for two 21-year-old White Sox

hopefuls catcher John "Honey"
Romano and outfielder Jim Lan Lan-dis.
dis. Lan-dis. Marty says both have a very
good chance to make the team.
As a matter of fact says Ma

rion "I'm considering them a

part of the club." He says "they
will have to work themselves off
It before we send them back to
the minors."
Rnmanrva hppfv vminirstpr

... ., t.i o

. ouihcicw ana nay jaoiunbM w;ftgnting excess fat and some ml

Mar agar Marty Marion produc produced
ed produced a major surprise yesterday
with tha announcement of his
tenralve opening day lineup for
tha Chicago Whit a Sox. It had
slugs r Minnio Minoio loading off
toilet d by Nelson Fox, George
Koll, Larry Doby, Jim Rivera,
Shaman Lollar, Walt Dropo and
Luis Aparicio. Marion was ex ex-pecteJ
pecteJ ex-pecteJ to pair Minoso and Doby
in th No. 3 4 slots.
Vic 'ertz, stricken by polio last
Aul'us. checked into Cleveland's

Tucsoii. Arir. camp and said he

hoDed to be the Indians' regular

first taseraan. Wertz, who hit 14

homers in about half a season last

year, itemed completely recovered
and manager Al Lopes already has
indicated that he will be the team's

regular first sacker.
As usual at this time of the year,
rookie continue to hog most of

the hw dimes in the various camps.'

At Clearwater. Ha., rookies Seih

Morehad and Dalls Green pitch-

1

r

-nil l",V

i

arm m i n.lW-i. MMl)lpg ,rW:!l,l,l ,, ;t,n. .'-ajgK,,.. pJWgS,

tditor: CONRADO SARCEANT

PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Second Half Standing

Team

iElks 141. ......
Gibraltar Life--,,
r Lincoln Life ...
- Seymour Agency
1 1 Spur Cola
1 Police

Won Lost Fct.

3
2
2
2
1
1

,.750
.667
.500

.500

.333

.250

The 23-vear old Podres was toldd thnc scoreless innings each in

the Philadelphia Phillies' intra

s-quad lame; rookies Ralph Terry
and Geirge Maier yielded only one

fcit bt rookie bod Manyn in

the No a York Yankees' seven-in

nint? intra-sauad came at St. Pe-

tersburi!. Fla.: rookie pitcher Joe

Ai banes e suffered a separation of

tax left shoulder when he fell field

ing tun oes in the Boston Rel Sox
batting drill and rookie Red Murff,
a 27-gane winner for Dallas in the
Texas .league last season, was
named 4 start for the Milwaukee
Braves n Saturday's exhibition op opener
ener opener wit h the Phillies.
Eisew iere: The Detroit Tigers
said they have made a final offer
to holdout first-baseman Earl Tor Tor-geson...
geson... Tor-geson... The New York Giants an announced
nounced announced they will give infielder

"? Forler I'astleman a tryout in the

ricd O i Lincuinau neaiegs mo.

1 third base candidate by manag
cr Birdi e TebbetU.

Police 2, Elks 10

FULLY RECOVERED Mexican matador Juan Estrada, fully recovered from the wound re received
ceived received in his leg several weeks ago, Is schedul ed to perform at La Macarena bullring Sunday
in competition with El Charro Gomez, another popular "novillero. Estrada is shown here
with the bull which gored him, shortly before the accident.

Sari

Season

Francisco

With

Ends Perfect

25th

Triumph

Cristobal High Cuts Powells
Victory Skein In 1-0 Thriller

STANDINGS
Atlantic Twilight Baseball
(Second Half)

-

Along The Fairways
FORT DAVIS LADIES DAY
Follow Ing is theline up of
matches for the Fort Davis Han

dicap Championship Tournament:
I Jean Alexander vs Jean Stire-
wnlt.

Mary Bucolo vs Bye.
Krlene Dials vs Dort Cram.
Ruth Tortorici vs Bye.
Ruby Krugcr vs Viola Pavlicli.
Louise Reynolds Vs Bye.
Louise Johnson vs Loretta Park.
Mary DuBoia va Bye,

. First matches must be complet complet-'j
'j complet-'j aU by 6:W p. Sunday. Full han han-J'dicfips
J'dicfips han-J'dicfips w ll be used. Second match-
' es begin Tuesday. March 13 and
roUit b completed 6:00 p.m.
1 1 March If. Girls, get in touch with
I your opjonent and make yo ur
Jrgolliisg t late.

Joe Capua

Colling Gossip from the
Amador Ladles

Mary Biggs won low gross in ipoo Gr0undS

nor '-lnjurles-khas nevertheless

hit .380 in seven training games.
As for Landis, Marion says "he "he-does
does "he-does everything well."
Manager Charley Dressen of
Washington also is hopeful a a-bout
bout a-bout one of his rookies second
baseman Herb Plews.
Dressen says he wants to give
Plews every chance to win the
position from Pete Runnels.
Meanwhile, Charley wants Pete's
bat In the lineup, so he has an announced
nounced announced that Runnels will play
the outfield throughout the ex exhibition
hibition exhibition season.
Elsewhere along the baseball
trail...
Brooklyn's young right-handed
spcedballer Billy Loesr-pitched
his first batting practice of the
spring training season and r r-oo'rted
oo'rted r-oo'rted that his right arm sl
feels sore. However. manager
Walt Alston liked the way Loes
threw and trainer Harold Wend Wend-ler
ler Wend-ler said he doesn't think Billy's
soreness will be serious.
Catcher Wes Westrum o! the
Giants hit two home runs to today
day today and accounted for all the
runs as his team beat another
squad 3-nothing at the Giants'
camp. President Horace Stone Stone-ham
ham Stone-ham told newsmen he is inter interested
ested interested in a plan of New York of officials
ficials officials to build a new ball park

closer to Times Square than the

SKI HICH-Joe Capua d Wy-

omuig is tne smallest man ts(

ihe 'Ten! to Green tournament

last Thursday at Fort Amador.
Peart Si Tims won low net and
Sy& CHrpenter came in second

on his team, but the sharps!!-, Iitne Robinson third. Low

ing lowQoy is top scorer m tnt
Skyline Conference.

DONATES SCOXS
OWOSSO. Mich.-UP)-. There

weren't mny reference books atlcharnpU nshtp

the rural Center School when Pvt

Robert Andrews was a student,
but the young serviceman is cor correcting
recting correcting the situation. During his
five years in the Army, Andrews'
derated several sets of encyclope encyclope-diss
diss encyclope-diss and an assortment of other
book to the,' school. ..

smtts wt re won bv Alyce French,

Lee Knuth won low medalist
In the Soring Handicap Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament tilth a net 65. Pairings
were announced as follows:

Flight Amador

Kandtea,) Tournament. L. Knuth
vs. B. DUfer, Bea Fish vs. B.
Hayter. E. perantie vs. B.
Hughrs, C. Bishop s. J. Morris.
Second I'-lfght: U. Rchull vs. M.
Bettors, M. B. Williams vs. N.
Knight, M. Tubbs vs. M. Mallo Mallo-ry,
ry, Mallo-ry, H. CI irk vs. H. Serger.

Bonus-baby Jim Small Is get

ting a trial at first base with
the Detroit Tigers at their camp
in Lakeland, Florida. Small sign signed
ed signed for $30,000 with the Tigers
last June when he graduated
from high' school. Manager Buc Buc-ky
ky Buc-ky Harris says the youngster will
olay first base Saturday against

Washington in an exhibition

game.

Powells i

Army Atlantic
C H. S.

Navy

Won Lost Pet.

4

4
1
1

1

1
4
4

.800

.800;

.200
.200

MONDAY'S RESULTS
CH S., 1. Powells 0
FRIDAY'S GAME
' Nayy. vs. Powells
v By, TREVOR .SIMONS
The Powells nine-game win winning
ning winning streak came to an abrupt
end on Monday night when Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal High School, behind the
magnificent pitching of Arman Armando
do Armando Lung, surprised the league-

Pacific Softball

League
By GILBERTO THORNE
Second Half Standings

Glud Agencies Stars
Signal
American Legion

26th Engineers

W
. 5
. 3
,3

0

GB

HI

Cerveceria P. Llquldo 0

Glud Agencies made It five
straight Monday by beating Pan
Liquido 9-7. :
The Cerveceros, as usual, play played
ed played a good game, making the first
two dOubleplays of this second
half and holding onto the lead
for one Inning before giving up
six hits and seven runs in the
fourth, and finally the ball game
when they failed to score more
than one run In the seventh,
leaving two men stranded.
Lane was once again the un unfortunate
fortunate unfortunate loser for Pan Llquldo.
Lou Hllzinger had a good day on
the mound striking out 15 bats batsmen.
men. batsmen. At bat; Hllzinger homered
twice in the fourth inning.

Score By Innings

j Pan Llquldo 012 201 17 8

Glud Agencies luiruux y iu

AT LA MACARENA Bl'LLRiNfi

B
U
L
L

. SUNDAY,
March I I th
at 4:15 p.m

MATADORS

JUAN ESTRADA

and

CHARRO GOMEZ

rirM Row
(.rnrral .....
C'nilrttm

i S M.
-HM i

I a.tt

t'lfhadta'

IN
I M

T'wk-rt (a .!(: Cult "lheri." la Conrnrrfia frur-tim. frnlral HotH.
IfA't tmr. itel Mar, t! Panama H'tttt, al Ihc Bullrinf. R-nrrH'-m
at 11. 3-4,'wS- ., (.

JUST
RECEIVED
the famous
CONVERSE
tek;:i5 shoes

SIZES FROM
41: to 122
Jlawtlcte

The box score:
Pan Liquido Ab
Kosik, 3b w... 3 -Plotrowskl,
ss .... 4

Hamlin, 2b ....... 3

No. 47 Central Ave.
' Tel. 2-2504.

Lane, p ......
Roach, lb, ..
Mlkle, If
Hughes, rf-cf
Stringer, c ..
Campise. cf ,
Herrera, rf

H Po
2 1

31 7 8 18 2

Glud Agencies

E. McArthur, lf-rf 4
E. McArthur, lf-rf 4

J. Pescod, lb ..... 4
L. Jones, rf ...... 2

C. McArthur, If

L. Hllzinger, p
D. Lacy, cf .......
B. Stock, 3b .
B. Lawyer, 3b .
Catlett, 2b . ;

K. Dunn, c

B. De la Mater,, ss 2

rr'
leaders and fans alike with a
thrilling 1 to 0 victory.
Cristobal High School had

played six games in the first

nau and wound up with a zero
and 6 record. Their losing skein
continued in the second half and
their streak of losses was

stretched to ten consecutive

games before Monday night's
thriller. And it was the brilliant
pitching of Lung combined with
a timely first inning single by
Kaiser Bazan with Luke Palum Palum-bo
bo Palum-bo on second that did the trick.
Lung allowed only two hits,
struck out 9, hit three batsmen
and walked a paljtfn the last in inning
ning inning when he puled out by strik striking
ing striking out the side. The only real
serious threat to Lung's victory
came in the fifth, and he came
through that crisis like a cham champion,;;
pion,;; champion,;; --
; Noel Gibson opened the fifth
with a triple to deep center and
Hooper was hit by a pitched ball.

Hooper stole second and Powells

had runners on third and sec second
ond second with none out. Lung got De De-deaux
deaux De-deaux on a liner to second, the

runners holding, yith Gene Mc-

Gaughey at bat, Powells' man

ager called for the "squeeze"
play. When McGaughey missed

the bunt Gibson still tried to
score but was tagged out at
home. McGaughey filed out to

deep right field to end the

threat.

- The only score of the game,
Cristobal's single run, came in

tne very first mning. RanKin

drew a free pass to start things
going. After Charlie Fears had
watched a third strike go by,

Luke Palumbo grounded to short.

Dedeaux threw to second to

force Rankin, but Rlnehart's re

lay to first was wild and Palum

bo advanced to second. Kaizer

Bazan came through with a sin single
gle single to center that scored palum
bo from second, v

Vince Ridge went' the route for
Powells and pitched well enough
to, be a winner. Ridge scattered

three C.H.S. singles, walked aj

pair and struck out six batters

His only real trouble was in the

top of the first, but it turned out

to be more trouble than he had
figured It would be as the lone

run stood up for victory.

The box score:

Ab R II Po

0 0 3

Powells

Rinehart, 2b ..... 1

Hall, lb 3 0
Swearingerc 3. 0:
Histfiley, rf 2 0
Gibson, 3b ........ 3 0
Hooper, cf ....... 1 0
Dedeaux, ss 3 0
Fortner, If ....... 1 0
McGaughey, If ... 2 0
Ridge, p ....... 2 0

21 0 2 18 10

Oi

1 13
0 0

Rankin, cf

Fears, c
Palumbo, lb
Ba"zan. ss ...

n Uine. n .....

oiRoblnette, rf
nj Croft, 2b ...
0 Ramsey, If
0 Elizey, 3b .

0
0
0
0
1
1

Cristobal High

2

3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2

0
11
6
1
0
2
1
0
0

By JOHN GRIFFIN

22 1 3 21 5

.28 9 10 21 2

SUMMARY Stolen bases: Ko Kosik,
sik, Kosik, E. McArthur, D. Lacy, Dunn'
2. Two base hits: Lane 2. Home
runs: Koslk. Jones, Hilzinger 2.
Double plays: Hamlin-Roach,
Piotrowski-Hamlin-Ronch. Bases

on'bans orrrXane ivUlMn-rerS.

Struck out by: Lane 3, Hllzinger I

15. Winning pitcher: Hilzlnper.
Losing pitcher: Lane. Umpire:
Metheney. Scorer: W. Peterkin.
Time: 1:45.

Tr,v Sncnntn 35 20
Double in Cinemascope 1
Clark Gable, in
"SOLDIER OF FORTUNE"
Leslie Caron, In
"DADDY LONG LEGS"

TooV- 'Of A 70
Roslta Arenas, In

"LA GHANA ELANCA

lilia del Valle, in
"LA RIVAL"

.10

N,Wi YORK. March t HTP

Tl. ::...

iub nauonai cnammon San Fran.

cisco Dons cleared the decks for
defense of their N.C.A.A. tourna

ment cnampionsfup today by clos

wg the books on a record-busting

rw..vv siuuu hi. victories and
no defeats.

Win No. 25 for this VPSl- nnrf M

51 in the streak that has smashed
the maior-colleee rernrd m

easily by an M score last night
before a record crowd of 15,732 at
San Francisco's Cow Palace. All-

America biu Kussell paced the4

yuu scoring wun 22 points, help helping
ing helping them break the game open af after
ter after being held to a 31-24 halftime

Tha triumph marked tha final
eollaBiata appearance of K. C.
Jonas, who was named along with
Rusiall today to tha United Prtts
All-Amarica team. Jonas, ineligi ineligible
ble ineligible for tha N.C.A.A. tournament,
racaivad a two-minute standing
ovation from tha crowd whan ha
left tha game with six minutes
te play.

.Next stop for the Dons W a Mamh

1ft date with U.C.L.A., the Pacific
Coast Conference chamninn in ih.

first found of the N C A A

iney aiso wiu equal a streak of 55

victories posted by Peru, Neb.,
Teachers 30 years ago, recognized

uy me .ua.a as the all-time, all

vuuege record. .;

Kansas State became the Dons'
latest rival for the N.c.a a rrnwn

by clinching the Big Seven champ championship
ionship championship last night with a "sweet re revenge"
venge" revenge" 79-68 victory over arch archrival
rival archrival Kansas.
The game marked probably tha
last home-court appearance for
Dr. Forrest C. (Phog) Allen, Kan Kansas'
sas' Kansas' famed, and; controversial
coach who must retire in June
whan he reaches the age of 70.
Kansas tried to give him a vic victorious
torious victorious sendoff by seising a 45 45-37
37 45-37 halftime lead, but Kansas State
caught up after eight minutes of
the second half and then pulled
away. Six-thraa Fritz Schneider
paced state With 34 points.
Kansas State was the 23rd team
to enter the 25-team N.C.A.A. field
and will clash with the winner of
a game between Marshall and the
undetermined Ohio Valley confer conference
ence conference team in a first-round" game at
Lawrence, Kansas, March 16. The
league crown is the Wildcats' first
since 1951, when they went to the
N.C.A.A. finals before losing to
Kentucky, 68, 58.
Unfilled N.C.A.A. berths are: 1
Member-at-large to meet West
Virginia t New York, March 12.
Has been offered to Ivv I .pa (tup

champ Dartmouth, which hasn't yet
accepted; 2. Ohio Valley Confer Conference
ence Conference team. Three-way playoff starts

tonigni wun western .Kentucky vs.

lennessee lech, winner to meet

worehead St. tomorrow. -St.
Louis (18-6) became the 12th,
and last team to enter the Na National
tional National Invitation Tournament field
yesterday. Parings have not yet
been announced. Therest of tha
N.l.T. field is: Duquesne, Louis Louisville,
ville, Louisville, Dayton, Seton Hall, Niaga Niagara,
ra, Niagara, Marquette, Xavier (O.l. St.

Francis (N.Y.), St. Joseph's (Pa. J,

Larayene, and Oklahoma A.&M.
The tourney opens March 17.
The N.A.I.A. tournament, which
opens in Kansas City Monday with
a field of 32 smaUer-eollege teams,
disclosed it has filled 17 of its
berths by completed district eli eliminations
minations eliminations with four more places
to be filled tonight.

Manasing Is A
Personality Job
VERO BEACH, Fla. (NEA1
The key to managing, Jackie Ro Robinson
binson Robinson says, is knowing how to
handle plavers
Writing in "Real Robinsor not

es that. "some' players do letter

when publicly shamed. I'll d, o a;
better job to prove the manager's;
wrong. I knotv Don Newcombe Is!
that way."
- Robinson, in- looking- at other i
National League managers, thinks I
that Charley Grimm is "too free,"!
and that Birdie Tebbctts "has justj
the right amount of everything to i
be a good manager."

Yesterday afternoon the Elks

scored eight big runs in the first

inning as they defeated the po police
lice police by a score of ten to two. The

win gave the Elks undisputed
possession of first place.

The eiks started out with a

bang when thirteen men came

to bat in the ton of the first in

ning. Eight runs were scored on
two hits and five free passes giv given
en given up by Dehllnger pitching for
the Police. With two outs Walter

Brown relieved Dehllnger and

witn the bases loaded issued a
walk to force in a run. a double

by Jackie DeVore. his second hit

rfof the inning brought in the

racrcuiii una ciguiU lull. xnc

Elks scored twice more in the
top of the third. Burton led off

with a single to center, Hern

followed with a single to the
same spot. A stolen base and a
passed ball followed by DeVore's
third hit brought in the last two

runs for the Elks.
The Police scored their only
runs in the first inning. Demp Demp-sey
sey Demp-sey jed off with a bunt single,
took second on a passed ball
went to third on a ground ball
to the short stop. Dehllnger was,
walked and both runs scored
when Browder lined a double be

tween left and centerfleld.
The big man at the bat for

the Elks was first baseman
Jackie DeVore who had a per perfect
fect perfect day, hitting two singles and

two doubles with four trips to

the plate. For the Police Demp Demp-sey
sey Demp-sey hit safely three times.
Ed Bleakley won his third
game of the second half giving
u ptwo runs on five hits, walk walking
ing walking four and striking out nine,
benlinger was the loser being
responsible for eight runs on
two hits, five waJks and one
strike out. Brown allowed two
runs on three hits, issued three
freg passes and struck out four.

third doubling up Farnsworth
for the first of two double plays
turned in by the soft drink lads.

Spur Cola scored three runs in
the second. Chase led off by
drawing a walk. Dllfer and Rv- ;

blckl bunted safely, Mounts drew

a wane forcing in Chase from
third, Bradshaw popped up to
first and Zelnick fined a ball to
centerfleld driving in two more
runs.
In the fourth with two away
and Bradshaw on first by vir virtue
tue virtue of a fielder's choice, Zelnick
again helped ills own cause by
tripling down the right field
line. Spur's last two runs came
in the fifth. Albritton singled to
center, stole second and scored
on Chase's double; chase stole
third and then proceded to steal
home.
Louie French was the losing
pitcher giving up six runs, on
six hits, four walks and- seven
strikeouts. John Zelnick won his
first game of the second half al allowing
lowing allowing two runs on six hits, two
walks and five strike outs.
The box score:

L'ncoln Life Ab

Farnsworth, lb
Beck, 3b ......
French, L. p
French, W. ss

Bradshaw, -c
Ward, 2b-lb
Joyner, J. If
Bishop, cf .

Joyner. c. rf
Ledbetter, 2b

Bowman, rf

Nessler, cf

!
1
o
l
1
l
0
0
0
1
0
0

The box score:
Elks 1414 Ab R H

Stoudnor; 2b .......... 220

Berger, rf
DeVore, lb
Williams, ss ............
Gangle. If
Bleakley, p
Cross, c ..............

Burton, 3b

Hern, -cf

Mullins, lb
Field, rf ..

Egoir, if .............
Lincoln, c .........

. tat a.4.

22 2 8
Spur Cola.
Bowen, c 3 0 0
Whitney, rf ............3 0 0
Albritton, cf .VS 1 1
Chase, ss .....2 2 1
Dllfer, lb 3 11V
Ryblcki, 3b ............ 1 111
Mounts, 2b' 2 0 0 1
Bradshaw, C. If ........ 2 1 0
Zelnick, p 2 0 2 l
Mikulich, rf 0 0 0

21 6

Fastlich
League
PUMAS 4, CONEJOS S

26 10

force
Dempsey, 3b ......
Ashton, ss ; .

Priester,. cf ..
Dehllnger, p-lf
Browder. lb" .-.

uiazer, c .
Corrlgan, T.

Bettis, lf-rf

Brown, rl-p

2b

The Pumas yesterday defeated
the Conejos 4-3 in a well played,
hard fought game at Fastlich
League Park. :) v
Walks by Conejd pitcher God God-sey
sey God-sey got him In trouble In both
the second and third innings and
the Pumas ere never headed

0 after that. Parker came In and
0 put out the fire in the third and
0 pitched good ball from there on.
0 Reynolds started for the Pu--I
mas but was relieved by Stahl
7 after the Conejos had scored
. : three runs.
Parker was the leading batter
" of the day with two for three
0 and driving in two runs.

The box score:

23 2 5

LINCOLN LIFE 2, SPUR COLA 6

Monday afternoon last place

Spur cola knocked Lincoln Life
out of first place by winning the

game with six rung to two.
The Presidents scored first
in the ton of the second when

Worden French leading off lift

ed one of Zelnick's pitches over
the scoreboard In centerfleld.

me second Lincoln Life run
came in the third Inning on a
walk to Charlie Joyner and con

secutive singles by Farnswortn
and Beck. v

"One of the" fine fielding plays
exhibited by Spur Cola also hap happened
pened happened in the third Inning, with
the bases loaded and W. French
batting, French hit a hard line
drive which looked like a sure

hit over short ston hut Freddv

Chase made a leaping one hand
catch of the ball and ran to

2 Pumas
".Steiner, rf

i Priest. 3b . .

0 Schwarzrock. ss

Webb, c

Reynolds, p-lb

Hele. cf

Stahl, 3b-p. .
ftlamco, If .....

Pearl, -2b

Scott, A. lb-rf

Ab R H Po
2 0 0 0

PLENTY FOR ALL
;Chicago-fEAJ The Profes

sional uoners Association sum

mer tour is worth $649,000 this
year. There are 22 tournam3nts
on the schedule.

CHAMPS STAYED AWAY
New York (NEAV Madison
Square Garden had only one
championship bout in 1955-the
featherweight match between San Sandy
dy Sandy Saddler and Red Top Davis.

Totals

17, 4 3 15 0

Conejos

Frangione, 3b . 2
R. Scott, cf ...... 1
Parker, p-ss .... v. 3
Chase, c 3
Oodsey, p-rf ..... 3
Hadley, If ....... 2
Seise, rf-ss ...... 2
Chassin, 2b ...... 1
Musser, lb ...... 0

0
1
2
0
6
0

trr o'

i 0 1
1 0 4

Totals

17 3 4 15 2

. Score By Innincs
Pumas 010 004 3 d
Conejos 002 103 4 0

SUMMARY -i Errors: Pumas
0. Conefos 0. Rwns batted In:
Hele 2. Pearl l.R. Scott 1, Park Parker
er Parker 2. Stolen bases: Reynolds,
Webb, .Hadley. Double nlays:
Musser (unassisted). Lef y on
bases: Conejos 8, Pumas 7. pases
on balls off Godsey 7, Parkier 2.

Reynolds 6. Stahl 1. StrikeLeuts
by Godsey 1. Parker V Reynolds

1, Stahl 1. Wild pitches: Reyn Reynolds.
olds. Reynolds. Passed balls: Webb. Win Winning
ning Winning pitcher: Reynolds. Losing
pitcher, Godsey. Umpires;. Mohl
and Diaz. Scorer: Mead. Time:
1:45. .

I

In Tennis Equipment
i . YdurBestBuuis

wmon

No. 47 Centra! Ave.
Tel. 2-2501

I



TITS PANAMA AMrr.ICA.V-. AN INDEPENDENT DAILY SIltS?im v
TAcr rirvo
it S
Cfl
f.!
i) jL-U "v
u -i
if

WEDNESDAY, MAHCU ".

" .4 7? 7? 1
i ; A

n f)fs n
LLP

' JL .A. j U J. jJL- ii

Bill Russell Dominates
Sky-Scraping Lineup

By MURRAY OLDERMAN
NEW YORK (XEA) '-- The

oasKeioau cuaca says, uci t
tnat one big man, and In bund
irom there.' Brotner, we got him.
Wnen tt came time to pui togctn togctn-er
er togctn-er tne 1956 NEA All-America oas oas-kctbaJ
kctbaJ oas-kctbaJ team, at tne head ot tne
assembly line stood San Francis Francisco's
co's Francisco's itia Russscu, witn a reserva reservation
tion reservation dating bacK to 1955.
"ihats wnen he let tne Dons to
'a sweep of the NCAA championship,-and
he's done nothing fcince
to cancel out his posiliou. It s
piajer in history tne Mikans
and Luisettis inciuued ever uom uom-inated
inated uom-inated a season line the giant 6-10
tamorman witn tne i-a wing
spread.

To make sure ..Bill won't be
' lonesome, our board ole xperts
around tne nation backed him up
i witn complementary cnaracters:
Ron.Shavnk of North Carolina
Mate, lor tancy shots around tne
keyhole; Tom Heinsohn of H 0 1 y
cross, with the outside snot a big
corner man-ncetiS; Sihugo Green
of i)uquesne,-a treuienaous Oliver
and playmaker, and Robin Free Freeman
man Freeman ot-Ohio Mate, the jumpsnoot jumpsnoot-ing
ing jumpsnoot-ing little gunner who can blast
oon a game.
You sit mulling ways to stress
the group potency ot this year's
AU-America selections- proba probably
bly probably the- strongest ever and the
thought occurs: how'd the other
team manage to maneuver tne
ball into position to shoot?
: Certainly no college quintet has
ever had the rebounding strength
of the inocmparable K u s s e 1 1;
Shavlik, a springboard 6 8, and
Heinsohn, an agile 6-7. Add Green
in the backcourt, a comparative
shrimp at 6-2Vi wno can equal any
o them la leaping.
- it n a vannat.

Like KUSSeu, ureen is

er from last years top rive, picks,
and a virtually unanimous All All-America,
America, All-America, too. His season was made
more difficult by the fact he was
surrounded by mediocre personnel
at Duquesne and still managed to
drive the Dukes into a National
Invitation Tournament bid.
Shavlik, who broke his wrist
the last week of the regular sea season,
son, season, made the logical jump from
the 1955 second All-America team.

He was the consensus standout cf
an area whose basketball perform performance
ance performance is scnond to none in the na na-yion.
yion. na-yion. :
Heinshohn typifies an increasing
breed in basketball, first set by
Tom Cola the big man with the
moves of the little man. He's
had three years, to perfect them,
and the pros predict he'll step
right into their game net year
without slackening pace.
Like Green. Freeman also

played on a so-so team and ele elevated
vated elevated them with brilliant scoring
bursts. He's an intense tewmician
whose place near the top oi the
nation's scoring lists is material

evidence of his anility.

SECOND TEAM
Willie Naulls, UCLA
Bob Burrow, Kentucky
Bill Uhl, Dayton
Rod Hundley, West Va.
K. C. Jones, San Francisco
THIRD TEAM

F Joe Holup, Geore Washington

F Len Kosenmutn, larouna

C Temple Tucker, nice
G Paul Judsou, UCLA
G Joe Capua, Wyoming
HONORABLE MENTION: For
est Able. Western Ky.: Phil Rol Rollins,
lins, Rollins, Louisville; Charlel Tyra,
Lousville; Jim Reed, Texas lech
Jim Krebs, SMU; Art Bunte,
Utah; Al Rochelle, Vanderbllt;
Jery Harper, Alabama; Dick
Gaines, Scton Hall; Hal Lear,
Temple; Tom Hemans, Niaga Niagara;
ra; Niagara; Darrell Floyd, Furman; Ju Julius
lius Julius McCoy, Michigan State;
Morris Taft, UCLA.

Squeezed out in the rush for
the first five college players of the
year wm such a close contender
as Russell's running mate at San
Francisco. K. C. Jones, undoubt undoubtedly
edly undoubtedly one of the best floor leaders
in the country and one of the top
defenders.
Ho heads an equally competent
second cast Finishing next !u the
top in this competition is no re reflection.
flection. reflection. ,.,
They don't make them like Rus Russell
sell Russell and company every year.

-.

IP VOU CONT,.TWIM THE-J-5
VMPOV(Mfiv
TAKE -A), iodic- AT
COLLEGE BASKETBALL ELtTB.'

f .ml lie

k?t bar

1 -J

V t-
... v iteg-:ii.l
V.' i J (

J1 V ,v A I

j T 3

''"'.IK- :

iOnThe Alleys.

SEYMOUR INSURANCEMEN

FORGE, AtitAU I7i JUJUii
KEGLING LEAGUE AS SUMMIT
HILLS DEFEATS STEMPEL
The Seymour Agency insur insurance
ance insurance keglers increased their lead

in the Major Eownng League
Tuesday night at the Diablo
Heights Clubhouse alleys by tak taking
ing taking three points, from the strong
Tahiti Jewelers as the second second-place
place second-place Max R. Ste,mpel Insurance Insurance-men
men Insurance-men were taking a three-point
shellacking from the lowly Fuer Fuer-za
za Fuer-za y Luz team.
For Seymour, Harry Colbert
went on a rampage, scoring
games of 214, 232 and 180 for a
tine 626 total, followed by Ham Hammer
mer Hammer with games of 218, 208 and
180 for 606. These two held up
Kaelin. Rogers and Soyster, who

had only 48S, vvi ana duo re respectively.
spectively. respectively. For Tahiti, McElroy

had 586, touowea Dy juane wiui
563 and Larrabee with 551.
The Ready Kilowatts from the
Pnra v I.H7. butchered the sec

ond-place Stempeleers by taking

the first two games and pimau
with as fantastic an array of
ctriiroo oq pver nprurred at Dia

blo. While the Stempel keglers
were forced to hit the headpin
to score strikes, Luttenberger
anrt Pilachowskl of the Fuerza y

Luz team were able to score

strikes by hitting any pin at
random on either side. Including
nt.rikM hw hitting the 6-nln. This

murdered the efforts of the

Stempeleers, as Thomas scored
a splendid 6 scries, with games

Of 212, 211 ana Z16, mis nigncsi
nf t.h sMsnni. and Ronnie

Welch scored his season high
series with games of 224, 209 and
224 for a terrific 657.

This arrtrlnir hv the Fuerza V

eers duplicated the same type of
day of 13 weeks ago. when the!

same two teams met and the

Finra v T.ii hovs ispored men:

game and high 3-game series of
the league. The scoring on Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night was the highest- by
Fuerza y Luz since that time,
over three months ago.

While the Stempeleers were
being dumped into third placa
with only four weeks of play leir,
in the 28-week season, the Sum-'
mlt Hills Golf Club was takin?,
over the last-place, luckless

geneia Glud team for four points
to move into second place by one

point over the Stempel team, i

V I
For Summit, jacober scored

587, followed by Jamison wlUv
547. For Glud, McGarvey had a

sDlendid 628 series witn gamej

of 139 'thigh game in the league
tot the"evenlhg), 188 and'. 201,
followed by Frank Granata'a 589
with games of 175, 189 and 225.
Summit plays Stempel next
Tuesday: night, on alleys 7 and
8, to determine which Is going
to chase Seymour to the finish
line.-

In the final match, H. I. Ho-

ma tilesetters took three points

from the fading Colonial Insur-

ancemen. Bud Baicer scored a
588 series with 157, 193 and 238,
followed by Motykiewlcz with

552, as George Zeletes led the
Colonial Insurancemen with 593
with 187, 203 and 203, followed
by Schirmer with 574.

Ronnie weicn's 657 series was
the high series for the night.
The present standing of the

teams: -

ail.L

D0E6NT

TOP 'EM

ALL?

4? ?,"X-V?v 1

P

MA

Seymour Aeency

Summit Golf Club 57
Tahiti Jewelry .... 53

H. I. Homa Co. .... 51

Colonial Insurance 47
Fuerza y Luz W1, 37
Agenda Glud ..... 20

Won Lost Pet.
. 62 34 .651

39
43
44
49
59
76

.594
.552
.537
.490
.385
.203

The ten high-average bowlers

are now;

Name

Coffey .. .. .. ..

Baicer ., .. .. ..
Jacober ... ..

Colbert .. .. ..

McGarvey ., ..

acnirmer .. ,. ..

Hammer . ....
Lane .. .. ,,

Kunkel ,,
Ellenberger .

Games Ave
.. 72 20415
72 19758
.. 69 19164
., 69 19061
.. 38 18819
., 69 1866f!
.. 66 18526
.. 60 183 14
.. 69 18263
.. 38 182 29

, KOBBE BOWLINC
CHAMPIONSHIP
: With "strikes" 'and "spares"
crashing galore, the 1956 "Life "Life-liner"
liner" "Life-liner" Bowling championships
were concluded for the post of

Fort Kobbe. Winning teams from
each battalion and special unit,
namely, "C" Company, First Bat Battalion
talion Battalion ; "F" Company, Second
Battalion; Service Company,
Provisional Battalion; and the
937th Engineer Company ot the
Post's separate units, compared
for the Post championship.

in one of the most exciting
and closest matches held here
in recent years, First Battalion's
Company "C" nudged out Serv Service
ice Service Comoany by a small margin
of 82 pins.
Sp-2 Robert Henk, of the 937th
Engineers, was high man for
the tournament with a' nine nine-game
game nine-game average of 176. Following
very closely in second place was

Sgt. Gerald Kleits of Company
"C" with an average of 173.
The final team results were
as follows:

"C" Company 7,203 pins

service company .. 7,121 pins
937th Engineer Co. 6,930 pins
"F" Company . . 6,648 pins

r.LUE SUIT BRIGADE
New York (NEA) Thore are
16 umpiri turn the. National League
staff ibis season. The oliest in
point of service is Babe Pinelli.
This is his 21st year.

i
T

YC7

A

' it?'

I

THERE'S A CATCH HERE Casey Stengel can only use one of these Yankee receivers at a
time. Rut Yogi berra, left, Is plenty good enough. Others are, left to right, Clurlie Silver,
Darrell Johnston, ELston Howard, Morris Thicker and John Blanchard.
.. ;. ;.. ... .... ..
Yanks Give A.L Vegas Touch
Too Many Combinations

i, : : -ii

by
t d ty wi? t f i if O

I 1 1 1 : i

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor

1

-.w' I f
,-"!
. S, f
.
IL ... A-f

1

i 9

v.

.1

:JF-A m'

r

-Am

MIAMI BEACH. As you've heard, Nashua a?id Swaps aren't1
Wing to get together in a rubber match dotcn here, after all
It isn't that they are allergic to rubber, or matches, either, jor
that matter. It's just that the gamble is too great.
Both sides would Just as soon forget it. Swaps beat Nashua
in the Derby and Nashua came back and beat him in the Chicago
match-play singles, which is to say, in a horse against horse
test. So they stand even-stephen, and who is there to prove
by words or figures that one is truly greater than the other?
A third meeting, however, would remove the subject beyond
all further controversy, which would be fine for the winner, but
the loser would sulfer incalculable loss in prestige, and that
would mean sharply reduced stud fees.
Who, )or instance, would want to breed to a twice-beaten
Nashua if he could breed to a twice-victorious Swaps ... or
r.ir v.maH

'The situation poses not only a dangerous economic risk but

o neeaiess one, ana oecausc u aoes you can oet an me pwztu pica
in Naples Nashua and Swaps probably will never meet again.
Potentially, the two picture horses represent millions, liter liter-tUy,
tUy, liter-tUy, in stud fees, and it is hardly necessary to remark that
businessmen do not customarily discourage' the fulfillment of
such opportunities.
Nashua Is still here and Leslie Combs, the enterprising and
engagmg Kentuckian, who put the syndicate together which
relieved the Hanover Bank of the horse for $1,251,200, persists
in raying:
"If Swaps comes we'll be very happy to take him on."
It has been noted, however, that Mr. Combs' expression at
such times is much less radiant than when he stands in the
winner's circle tenderly carrasslng $100,000 purses, so it may
be that his definition of happiness has a variable quality.

It's Bad Business
'. V'.. .J. :
I trust I do not give the impression Mr. Combs is playing
the duck for Swaps. The physical evidence alone Is sufficient
to refute an;' such idea. He has Nashua entered in the Gulf Gulf-stream
stream Gulf-stream Handicap, set for March 17. To get action, all Swaps
has to do is show up.
Rex Ellsworth who speaks for Swaps land with only.the
faintest trace of whinny) is shipping a number of cavalry units
here for other exercises, notably the Florida Derby, but he's
made it official that "Swaps won't be ready." .
Swaps was withdrawn from the recent Santa Anita Uandi Uandi-c&p
c&p Uandi-c&p when it came up mud, but in an earlier effort, his debut
as a 4-year-old, he ran like J. Edgar Hoover was after him.
Mr. Ellsworth explained he hadn't scratched Swaps from the

handicap on account of the mud -. . "he just wasn't ready."

Swaps has a sore-foot history of long standing and must be
gentled in training. Even so, the likelihood of his ever being
"ready" for another go at Nashua is to be seriously doubted.
Mr. Ellsworth is a good businessman, too.
Actually, if there were a third meeting, Nashua would run
the greater risk, for he' not only has a 50-50 standing in indivi individual
dual individual competition with Swaps, but he can scarcely miss becoming
the greatest money earner in the history of racing.
All he has to do to pass Citation's record of $1,085,780 in
equine bank deposits is win his next race down here. He's shy
only $47,745. As the richest horse in the world, Nashua's posi position
tion position would be dramatically pre-eminent; he'd need another win
over Swaps like Yogi Berra needs ballet lessons . and keep in
mind he could get beat, too. r r

-Set Fee at $15,000

" This Is a possibility the realistic Mr. Combs recognizes,
though he probably feels .Nashua would beat Swaps six times
a week and twice on Sunday, if they played double-headers In
horse parks. ''.. .... '. r?
If all goes according to plan," Nashua's stud fee will be the
highest American breeding has ever known. Mr. Combs has
tentatively et the figure at $15,000. The highest up to now?
"I couldn't say for sure," he told me, "maybe Royal Charg'
er's tlO.600 fee."
Mr. Combs holds title to Royal Charger's services, too.
Where does Nashua goes from here"!
To New York. We hope to run him quite' a bit around
there, but that will depend on the weights. We won't retire
him until the season is over."
Mr. Combs has stated he won't permit Nashua to carry an
ounce more than 130 pounds . And this in itself shows what
a nfee, considerate, humane sort of chap the old Centre College
football player is.

time ,v4.

.-- r"S 2i

ightly from
a.m. '. ..

ROULETTE
(BLACKJACK)

CRAP TABLE ,
POKER
SLOT MACHINES

BAR SERVICE
Air-Cftnilitioned at '.

ST. PETERSBURG, F I a. -!
(NEA) An experienced baseball!
man gets dizzy watching the Yan-i
kees work at wire-fenced Miller
Muggins Field on St. Petersburg's

nor Ui side.

There are so many of them.
The American League cham champions
pions champions cut down their farm system.
The idea was to have more. duali duality
ty duality and less quantity. But New York

still has numbers, class, balance

and over-all speed.
Casey Stengel hasn't had it so
good in eight springs. The Bom

bers haven't possessed so much;
talent since Joe DiMaggio first i
showed up 20 years ago, And this

comes aner winning six pennants
and five world championships and
finishing second in seven outings
Yankee haters had better get used
to them.
THE YANKEES ARE like one of
those big Las Vegas gambling
houses. If you play them long
enough say 154 games you've
got to lose. They have too many
combinations.
Manager Stengel announced his
starting pitchers before the re regulars
gulars regulars reported Ford, Byrne,
Turley, Larsen and McDcrmott.
Behind them are Grim, Morgan,
Staley, Kucks, Rip Coleman, Kon Kon-stanty,
stanty, Kon-stanty, Sturdivant and two of
three recruits who can throw the
ball through a brick wall. For ex example,
ample, example, Mark Freeman, who put in
three years with Binghamton of
the Eastern League before enter entering
ing entering the armed forces has only to
get a piece of the plate to make
it.V-:..4 ,,-.,-..w... '- ;,.;...v. ....:';.!.
Professor Stengel once more will
double and triple team the enemy.
He has the best left-hand hitting
catcher in the league in Yogi Be Berra,
rra, Berra, the most formidable right right-hand
hand right-hand .batting catcher in Elston
Howard. Backing them are
Charley Silvera and Darrell John Johnson,
son, Johnson, a stylish reclever who .bat .batted
ted .batted .306 for Denver. Johnny Blan Blan-chard
chard Blan-chard will go out only because he
is too bright a prospect to be in
the dugout. He belted 34 home runs
drove in 111 runs for Binghamton.
BECAUSE HE IS the most de dependable
pendable dependable hitter in the group, Sten Stengel
gel Stengel hopes Gil McDougai can play

shortstop, but the Yankees are not

going to be hurt there, regardless

George Weiss has been trying to

find a replacement for rnu mz mz-zuto
zuto mz-zuto for. eight years, but Little
Scooter opened and closed last sea season
son season and stuck out in the World Se Series,
ries, Series, Billy Hunter is still favoring the
break above the right ankle. Jerry
Lumpe, up from Birmingham, was
the. hist shnrtstnn in the e h a i n.

Woody Held manufactured 1 home

runs and drove in 87. lor uenvcr.
Tony Kubek, only 20, moved from
Ouinpv of the Three-Eve to Denv

er last season, because he can hit,

throw and run. Torn carron, me
bonus beauty, has to be lugged
along. V- "c:

Billy Martin will keep the fire

lit under tne cum at secona Dase.
There are the customary three
first basemen Joe Collins, Bill
Skowron and Eddie Robinson. Col Collins
lins Collins ilsn Tilavs richt field. Skow

ron car. double at third base, where

Andy Carey starts. Mcuougaia,
of couse, cn play anywhere in the
infield. So can Jerry Coleman and
Bobby Richardson.
THE YANKEES WERE beaten

in -th World Series because their
entire outfield was out of whack.
Mickey Mantle for the first time

is starting as sound as ne possi possibly
bly possibly can be, Hank Bauer is his ro robust
bust robust old self and Irv Noren ap

pears to.be back on two good

knees after operations on them.
Elston Howard will be available
for outfielding when not catching.
Bob Ccrv can bust the ball.:

Four new outfielding faces arc

attracting attention Norm Sieb

ern, out of the Army; Lou Skizas
and Whitey Hcrzog, on from Den
verf and Bob MartynrErJduated

from Binghamton.
"That there Siebern could push

CLOSE CALL Death came close to Picador Nacho Carmona tn
a Mexico City bullfighting arena. Carmona, whose Job it wis t
enrage the bull while riding a well-padded horse, was hurled ta
the ground when tbe charging bull unset the mount, upper photo.
The bull gores the horse's unprotected belly, center ohoto. as
Carmona rolls clear. At bottom, the bull kicks up its heel; tn-
umphantly over the fallen Nacho. But Matador Joselito Huerta,

right, and others rushed to Carmona's- aid, detracted the bull
and saved the pirndor. IIuirta later killed the bull.
:r iz 7 ;
someone out of a job," says Sten- is a pull left-hand hitter of tre-
ge. j ineiulous power.
! "Norm Siebern has the Stadium
The principal concern is about ; swing," says Paul Knckcll, vet vet-this
this vet-this big St. Louis 22-ycar old's cran chief scout.
arm. He hurt his shoulder in ai .
r it .u i t ...h... That s why the American
fall in the Mexican League, where', caguc haj Wn ,npsl(,e1 for the
he went after two years in the arm-j better part of 35t years.
ed forces. Prcviusly, he had two Too many guys with "the Stad Stad-and
and Stad-and a half years in the rninors. He ium swing.

I K-A I

For

EXTRA

STRENGTH,1

VITALITY,
Ilk STRONG NERVES
take

mm

rf; '. ""'T'Tai. .. KTtir narmi mmI i4-jik 4a finn f S l

I. 1 i?7 A Thai is the result of taking

LtOLIDO

, fcl tMr -1

fSn u.itol i

f- 'wt ti tm. v
t,srr,""5.'

Phosfcrine every day. You will
have stronger nerves, better
appetite, a keener braio. Signs of
weakness will vanish and vou will
enjoy life. Get Phosferine now ...
The Greatest
of all Tonics



'J ?

0
h J s v
' A
V I
v .,
7
.Read story cn caca 1Q

. f i mm'. ,,L 1t.,
V ;
"i

iStrEKDOT HW

M

faints

DAILY

NEWSPAPER

6

"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln,

31st YEAR

PANAMA, R. F WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7. 1958

FIVE CENTS

INDICTED Rep. Thomas J.
Lane (Denv, Mass.) ha been
indicted by a. Federal Grand
Jury in Boston on charges ox
evading federal income taxes,
more than $38,000 In Federal
taxes from 1949 to 1951.
Flowering Trees,
Shrubs On View
Al Summit Gardens
Central American heme plants,
the purple flowerin jacaranda
trees, and the bfonzc shower
trees, all native to Panama, will
be among the attractions this
week durine the Saturday morn morn-ln
ln morn-ln tours of Canal Zone Experi

ment Gardens cnnauciea oy ko.
sham. suDerintendent of the

Gardens. ,.
The hemp plant is used widely
In this part of the world for the
manufacture of twine. Also in
the fiber class is the abaca
plant, used for the manufacture
of marine rope, a specimen of
which also can be seen growing;
at the Summit Gardens.
Sharp has reported that the
con?ea, which nroriuce a profu profusion
sion profusion of light-colored purple
flowers. Is now in bloom and can
be seen at the gardens.
The Saturday tours start at
9.00 o'clock in the morning from
In front of the Summit Gardens
office and continue for. two
hours, during which time visi visitors
tors visitors will be shown ihe many
points of interest and will be
given an explanation of the va various
rious various flowering trees and shrubs.

AWeapo
Seen As Por-csfahf God

WASHINGTON, March 7 (UP)-1
East-West agreement on P r e i i i-dent
dent i-dent Eisenhower's idea of ban banning
ning banning production of nuclear wea weapons
pons weapons probably is years away.
There is considerable doubt the
goal may ever be reached.
Long international negotiations
would bt required, even if Mos Moscow
cow Moscow so vo its gonoral OK to tho
the idea put forward by tho
President ia fait latest letter to
Soviet Prm ior Nikolai Bulga Bulga-nln.
nln. Bulga-nln. The President's Tlan would pro proceed
ceed proceed this way, if all goes well:
1, The United States and Rus Russia
sia Russia would agree to put into opera operation
tion operation Mr. Eisenhower's "open
skies" clan to exchange aerial

reconnaissance and military blue blueprints.
prints. blueprints. Moscow has been throwing

cold wager on this idea.
2. The United States and Rus Russia
sia Russia would agree to put into oper operation
ation operation Bulganin's plan to station in inspection
spection inspection teams in both countries
at key communications points
such as ports, rail centers and air airfields.
fields. airfields. The President has said he
would buy the Bulganin idea if
Bulganin would agree to the "o "o-pen
pen "o-pen skies" plan.
3. Then the combined air-ground
inspection system would be put

through a trial period to make

sure it Would warn of any milita military
ry military buildup by either side.
4. If it did work, then the Unit United
ed United States would be willing to try
to work out an international agree agreement
ment agreement to keep stockpiles of all nu nuclear
clear nuclear weapons from increasing.
Weapons used for testing appa apparently
rently apparently could be replaced during
this period. I
5. As the weapons stockpiles are
prevented from increasing, nuclear-producing
nations would
make joint contributions of fis fissionable
sionable fissionable materials to an interna international
tional international atomic agency. This would
bring Mr. Eisenhower's Decem

ber, 1953, atoms for-peace plan in into
to into the overall nuclear plan.
Tho whole tchomo of things up
to this point is ploguod by tho
obsonco of any sciontifie assur assurance
ance assurance that clandestine manufac manufacture
ture manufacture and hidden stores of nu nuclear
clear nuclear materials can be uncover uncover-ed.
ed. uncover-ed. Scientists so far haven't solved
this problem. But they are work working
ing working on it.
Mr. Eisenhower nevertheless ex expressed
pressed expressed rconfidence that agree agree-ment
ment agree-ment on nuclear safeguards can
be reached.
Then, he Aid, "my ultimate
hope is that all production of fis

sionable materials anywhere in

the world will be devoted exclu exclusively
sively exclusively to peaceful purposes.
But the problem doesn't end
even if an agreement is reached
on nuclear weapons.
There is no sign yet that the
United States will give up its
present stockpile of nuclear
weapons without parallel iron ironclad
clad ironclad agreement on control of
conventional weapons and man manpower.'
power.' manpower.' It's interesting to note that Mr.
Eisenhower talked only about ulti ultimately
mately ultimately banning production of wea weapons.
pons. weapons. He didn't say a word about
scrapping those on hand.

Senate
By

Investigators Outraged
Tracle-with-Russia Muzzling

WASHINGTON, March 7 (UP)-on controlling strategic shipments
Top administration officials told to Communist countries,
outraged Senate investigators yes-j 2. A letter from Commerce Sec-

leraay uiey nave ordered ineir suo- retary Sinclair Weeks saying that

Report

US AUihorilies

102 Polio

m t mm. at

lases in 45 nours
BUENOS ATRES, March 7 (UP)
i-Puolic health authorities renorr renorr-ed
ed renorr-ed today that 102 new cases of in-i
fantile paralysis had occurred ii
the past 48 hours. Six were fatal.
Official fiaures showed that
most of the latest cases were in
Buenos Aires metropolitan area.
Since the outbreak started l a a t
June therehave been 1.140 cases
throughout Argentina. Deaths to totaled
taled totaled 85
' Reopening of primary and sec secondary
ondary secondary schools was postponed to
April 1, by order of the Ministry
of Education. Normally, the
schools reopen during the first
week in March after the summer
vacations.
In Washington, the Stale De Department
partment Department announced that 21 iron
lungs are being rushed here. They
will be broueht from Boston by
a. U.S. Air Force plane.

Surgeon Tortured
Into Telling Where
lis Kepi His Money
EVANSVILLE. Ind.v March 7 7-(UP)
(UP) 7-(UP) A robber forced a 60-year-old
surgeon to reveal where he
kept his money today by using a
nair nf nliers to bend back the

doctor's finsers and pinch bits of

flMh from his palms.
Dr. Justis F. Wynn was bound
and tortured by the armed Intrud Intruder
er Intruder who broke into his home and-esr-sped
with $3,000 in cash, police
.said.' : ,;-
Donald Lockwood, 31. a nephew
of a brother-in-law of Wynn, was
arrested and charged with the
rohbery. .
' Wynn told police he jumped out
of bed and struggled with the in intruder
truder intruder who was carrying a revolv revolver.
er. revolver. A shot was fired into the ceil ceiling
ing ceiling before Wynn was slugged with
the butt of the weaoon.
Police said the robber placed a
pillow case over the head of the
rlazed surgeon, bound, him with
friction tape and then tortured
him into revealing that his mon money
ey money was in the pocket of his trou trousers.

IMPORTANT NOTICE
The Management of the Central Theatre takes pleas pleas-ure
ure pleas-ure In advising its distinguished patrons that arrange arrangements
ments arrangements are being made to present the stage to per performance
formance performance of "La Trlpulaci6n de Ia Cantuta."
; If as we expect our negotiations are successful, "Trl
pulacion de la Cantuta" will appear on our stage on
Friday qr Saturday coming.
: BE ON THE LOOK-OUT FOR FURTHER INFORMA INFORMATION
TION INFORMATION ON THIS STAGE SHOW, WHICH WE WILL FURN FURNISH
ISH FURNISH THE PUBLIC SHORTLY.

Dulles Tells SEATO Delegat es 'Trojan Horse'
Russia i Tactics Pose Threat To World Peace

KARACHI, Pakistan, March 7 7-(
( 7-( UP)SeCretary of State John
Foster Dulles said today Russias
"Trojan horse tactics still pose
a threat to wo'ld peace, even
though the dangers of war have
lessened.
Dulles, in a spech to the first
closed session of the Council of
Ministers of the Southeast Asia

Treaty Organization, said the
Kremlin has chanced its policies.

But he warned the dangers of
Communist expansion have not

been eliminated.
Moscows new tactics of eco economic
nomic economic and political lnfiltratioa
in contrast to its former reliance
on violence still presents a
threat to peace, he said.
American conference sources
disclosed that Dulles, in his 45 45-minute
minute 45-minute speech, said Russia had
made two major changes in policy:
Emphasis on collective leadership,
and tolerance in foreign policy.
The sources said Dulles told rep representatives
resentatives representatives of the eight SEATO
nations that Russia switched to a

collective leadership from the one-

man rule of Josef Stalm because
"no single man stands out.
He said the Russians had seen
their foreign policy, "which over
the 10 post war years emphasized
violence, was failing. They since
have adopted a policy of "reliance
of diplomatic means to gain their

ends, he said.

"There is less danger of war lion dollars in the-past two years

now than when violence or threats

o: violence were being utilized,
Dulles, said. But he added that
"There is no indication of a di di-minutation
minutation di-minutation of military prepara preparation
tion preparation on the part of the Soviet U U-ion.
ion. U-ion. Dulles cautioned that the pre present
sent present situation is "not one where
the Free Nations can forego these
military efforts which provided a
deterrent to the strong Soviet mil mil-itarv
itarv mil-itarv nower.

Dulles, obviously replying to as assertions
sertions assertions sometimes made that the
United States failed to give ade ade-ciuate
ciuate ade-ciuate attention to the economic

.md militarv reauirements Of its

SKATO allies, pointed out that

Washington has provided 300 mil

tit
1

' "RICES:

- .75 4 .40

TODAY

1)0, 2:50, 4:45, :45, 1:00 p.m.

Y

-) Tha Rie.-The Fall of

Evelyn

7
f
. )

I

(

CinemaGcoPE
' IN JTtREOPi:ON'IC SOUND

From penniless model to,
mistress of S40,GCQ,pl

.'Jnr.'jM'i

Ray frlJLLAND Joan Collins-Farley GRAiicEX
. inti n r r tt qt is t n isp rtwu, hwmw n : n awiif itr-f cut
k CKAJtlXS BRACKiiTT iw b liCHAJC fUiSCHEH h WJU.TU K158 CEJUtlC lUCVUX

China Reds Accused
01 Holding 13 U.S.
Political Hoslages

WASHINGTON, March 7 (UP) (UP)-The
The (UP)-The United States accused Commu Communist
nist Communist China today of holding as "po

litical hostages" 13 Americans it

promised to free six moths ago..
The charge was included in

formal State Department reply to
Red China Ambassador Wang
Ping-nan. He said in Geneva Sat Saturday
urday Saturday that the United States is

Indefinitely "dragging out cur current
rent current U.S. Chinese negotiations
there. L .v ;-.'V ',
The State Department s a 1 d
Wang's charge ; "contains nothing
new." It repeated that "The Com

munists so far seem willing to re

nounce force only if they are first
conceded the goals for which they
would use force."

.' The Geneva meeting" was, "ar "arranged
ranged "arranged to work out the release of
U.S. and Chinese nationals still in
each others' countries. The United
States also has been trying to get
Red China to renounce the use of

force in the Formosa area. 1 -Speaking
of Wang's latest criti criticism,
cism, criticism, the department said:
"It's failure even to mention
that the Chinese Communists still
hold 13 Americans in prison, de de-spite
spite de-spite their agreement of last Sep-

t tember six months ago that

these Americans would be permit permitted
ted permitted "expeditiously to exercise
their right to return to the United
States, cannot be overlooked.,
"This only reemphasius that
these Americans are being held as
political hostages."
Construction Man
Falls To Death At
Busy Intersection

Ceremonies Mark
Admission Oi Ford
To Slock Trading
wfw YORK: March 7 (UP)

Ford Motor Co. stock was ad

mitted to trading on -the New
York Stock Exchange today with
one of the rnst colorful floor
ceremonies in the 184-year his history
tory history of the Exchange.
The stock opened on a 1,300
share block at $62 a share, up
12 Vt cents from the previous
closing told price on the over-the-counter
market. But the
tsrire was 2.50 a share lower

than the original offering price

of $64.50 when 10,200,000 snares
were sold to the public for the

first time last Jan. 18.
At the ceremonies Benson

Ford, youthful vice president of
the motor company revealed
that Ford now has more than

350.000 shareholders. Formerly

all stock was owneo by xne roro.
family and Ford Foundation.

Ford's newly acquired stock

holder family Is the third Ian

est in American Industry. Only
American' Telephone and Tele Telegraph
graph Telegraph Co. and General : Motors
Corp. are owned by more people.
Georgi Ualenkov
To Visit Britain
LONDON. March 7 (UP) -For

mer Soviet Premier Georgi Malen Malen-kov
kov Malen-kov will visit Britain next week
on his first trip outside the Iron
Curtain, the Foreign Office an announced
nounced announced today.
Malenkov, now minister of pow power
er power stations, will head a delegation
of power plant experts. He is sched scheduled
uled scheduled to arrive March 15, the For Foreign
eign Foreign Office said.
The delegation will tour British
power plants during a visit expect expected
ed expected to last about three' weeks.
, Malenkov's trip will precede by
one month the scheduled visit to
Britain of Soviet Premier Nikolai
A. Bulganin and Communist party
chief Nikita S. Khrushchev.
Screaming Indiana
Tornado Kills One,
Injures 25 Others

to Thailand, Pakistan and the
Philippines. This sum was four
times what they received in the
two years before,' creation of
SEATO, he pointed out.
"SEATO has justified itself,
Dulles (aid. "This area is more

safe, more secure, more happy
now than it was when this organ organ-iiation
iiation organ-iiation was conceived.
British Foreign Secretary Selwyn

Lloyd also addressed the council.

He said there was a continuing
threat c Communist aggression in
the SEATO area, that British in-

telligenca reports showed Red Viet

Minh foi-ces in inaocnina nave

been increased from four to five

divisions since the last SEATO

minister? conference in Thailand.

Llovd also warned of increased

Communist attempts to infiltrate

free nations through the "econom

ic door. "He mentioned specifical

ly India, Burma and Afghanistan.

ordinates not to testify about stra strategic
tegic strategic trade between Russia and

this country's allies.
The order was disclosed as two
Defense Department experts,
speaking cautiously in accordance
with the new directive, testified
their department protested in 1954
against the U.S. agreement to a
relaxation In East-West trade
rules.
Ont said it was his perianal
pinion that th itemi ptrmitttd
t bt shipped to Russia under the
relaxed rules could be of "direct
assistance" in building up the
Communist war machine.
The Senate's Permanent Inves Investigating
tigating Investigating subcommittee provided
the backdrop for this tstimony by

making public:
; NEW DISCLOSURES
1. A memo from Defense Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Charles E. Wilson forbidding
Pentagon employes to tell Con Congress
gress Congress about their recommendations

the questioning of subordinates in

stead of top officials could lead
to "i;ross Inaccuracies, and can
jeopardize the safety of the nation,
by laying bare to hostile eyes in information
formation information harmful to the public
interest."
Beth erdtri indicated that top
officials responsible for East-West
trade decisions are willing te
testify. But subcommittee mem members
bers members reacted angrily.
Sen. Henry M. Jackson ( D D-Wash.)
Wash.) D-Wash.) exclaimed that "This is not
national security, but a national
coverup."
Sen. Joseph W. McCarthy (R (R-Wis.),
Wis.), (R-Wis.), ranking GOP member and
former chairman, noted that he
had criticized former President
Truman's administration ior its
secrecy rules.
; SENATORS ANGRY
"Right now," he added, "I'm
beginning to look back on the good
old days of Harry Truman."
Asserting that Wilson and other
officials do "not have the right
to muzzle congressional witnesses,

McCarthy demanded that the sub subcommittee
committee subcommittee act immediately to ob

tain the desired : information.
' Subcommittee Chairman John L.
McClellan (D-Ark.) assured him he
would call a meeting as soon as
pysible to consider the problem.
' fha iihnnmmtH i iHTnntinff

An American empioyea as eiec,to iearn what the United States,

American Drives
Wrong Way Along
Gaillard Highway

through Harold E. Stassen, i t s
chief negotiator, recomended in re regard
gard regard to increased East-West trade
r a, meeting inParis in August
Although this country bans any

strategic shipments to Russia, it

agreed to permit 14 other free

tronics engineer yesterday was

found guilty of drunken driving,)
fined $100 and sentenced to spend;
10 days in the Balboa jail.
The defendant, Everett J, Spen
cer, 47, was charged with driving
at 80 miles an hour in the wrong

direction Monday afternoon along

the section of Gaillard Highway
not restricted to one-way traffic,
He entered a plea of not guilty
and told the Balboa Magistrate

that he had taken a large dose of
APC tablets to deaden the pain hi
an infected arm. The infection
was caused by attempts to erase
a tatto mark on his arm by rub rubbing
bing rubbing it with sand-paper.
Imring the trial Spender, who
works for the Civil Aeronautics
Administration, admitted drinking
after taking the tablets. Medical
testimony introduced showed that
the effects of alcohol on the hu hu-min
min hu-min body can be quickened by
drugs. .w;-.-.'.
According to police, Spencer's
automobile was seen speeding a a-gainit
gainit a-gainit traffic in the One-way sec section
tion section of the highway, between the
"300 area and Diablo Crossing
which is under repairs. He ran

spvpral nnrnmin? cars off

read, accordine to a oolice renort The Transit Authority said It

There were no personal injuries! has issued new passes to its em
and damage to the cars was slight, ployes.

New Yorkers Eat
Cake, Have Free
Subway Rides Too

NEW YORK, March 7 (UP)
Some New Yorkers have been eat eating
ing eating their cake and having free
subway rides, too, Transit Author Authority
ity Authority officials disclosed today.
Instead of paying regular 15 15-cent
cent 15-cent fares, these riders have cut
facsimiles of subway employes'
passes out of blue and white card cardboard
board cardboard boxes in which ccstomers
carry home baked goods- from
stores operated by Horn & Hard Hard-art,
art, Hard-art, which also operates The Au-

the; tomats.

nations to send previously-embargoed
items to the Russians.

DEFENSE AID TESTIFIES
The Defense Department's posi position
tion position on the matter was outlined
by Jam. Jack H. Fisher, depart department
ment department adviser to the joint com com-mittee
mittee com-mittee on machine tools, and by

..wv.. n. n.imra, ue-panment re representative
presentative representative on the committee. v;
Fisher told the subcommittee
that the committee, over his pro:
tes, voted to remove 77 types

oi macnine tools and production
equipment from the embargoed
i H "mt ,h decontrol-

. ngiiuniii cor
ing mills, are "practically indie indie-peniable,"
peniable," indie-peniable," to the manufacture ef
tanks, naval equipment, aircraft
and other machines.
Martino was asked if some of
the items deleted from the list
could be of "direct assistance" to
the Communist war machine
"My personal opinion is yes."
he replied.
Asked what Hems he thought
could safely be shipped to the
Russians, he replied:
"I wouldn't give them bobb ?
pins nor baby diapers."
Judge Refuses
To Waive Jury

Trial For Sabofeur
DENVER, March 7 (UP) -Dis-trict
Judge Joseph McDonald to today
day today denied a defense motion seek
ing to waive a jury trial for ac accused
cused accused plane saboteur John Gilbert
Graham. . .. v;;
; V
McDonald made his ruling after
hearing arguments by prosecution
and defense counsel at an hour hour-long
long hour-long hearing attended by the 24-year-old
defendant.
McDonald said a study of Colo-
rrfn tinr "fnmnlll" kU t. I...

- vv.")v..Mtu til Kl IV V 1 1 .T
the motion, which had been filed
by Graham'i three court-appointed
attorneys. :'

Graham U acrused nf niacins

several sticks of dynamite in his
mother's luggage b e f o r e she
boarded a United Air Lines plane
last Nov 1. The plane exploded
over a northern Colorado farm 18
minutes after leaving Dtnvir'i
Stapleton Air Field, killing 44 per persons.

1

Woman Acquitted
Of Intent To Kill
Admirer By Auto
HACKENSACK, N.- J. March 7
(UP) A 28-year-old woman, ac accused
cused accused of attempting to run down
her former admirer three times
with her automobile, was acquit acquitted
ted acquitted today of charges of assault
with intent to kill by auto.
A jury of five women and seven
men deliberated 45 minutes before
announcing the verdict'
Louis De George; 28, of Jersey
City, N.J. had testified his former
sweetheart, Rose Sambogna, of
Palisades Park, N. J. attempted
to run him down three time nn

Nov. 9,., 1955, as he tried to step
off a curb.
Miss Sambogna denied she tried
to run him down. She contended
he forced her to stop by stepping

oti tne curb as she tried to pull
away.-. ....

THE NAVY'S LARGEST cable-laying vessel,, the 7,000-ton Aeolus which left Balboa yesterday
bound for San Francisco from Norfolk. The ship is being transferred from the Atlantic to a
Pacific station and is 435 It. long.

Author's Condition
Reported Improved
COLUMBUS, Ohio,' March 17 17-(UP)
(UP) 17-(UP) Hospital authorities report reported
ed reported today that author Louis Brom Brom-field,
field, Brom-field, admitted last week as a
pneumonia patient, was In satis satisfactory
factory satisfactory condition.

MONTREAL, March 7 (UP) -Jean
Dompierre, 39, a construc construction
tion construction worker, fell 110 feet to h i s
death today onto one of the city's
busiest intersections, when he slip slipped
ped slipped while working on the Jacques

varuer. tiridge,

Immediately afterward. 75
low workers silently walked
their jobs for the day.

ICEHTRAL

0.75 V"fj.40
1:10 2:52 4:45 6:58 9:01 p.m.

"THE KENTUCKIAN"
THE STORY OF THE GREAT AMERICAN ADVENTURER...
THE FRONTIERSMAN!...' AN AVALANCHE OF FURY!...
In TECHNICOLOR and CINEMASCOPE!...

TODAY
RELEASES

LU
0.75

x

0.40

3:04 4:59 6:54 8:52 p.m.

JOHN PAYNE MARY MURPHY, en
"HELL'S ISLAND
In TECHNICOLOR!

99

MARiON, Ind ; March 7 (UP) -Authorities
today reported a young
mother killed and at least 25 per persons
sons persons injured, three seriously, in a
roaring tornado that ripped a mile
and one-half long trail of destruc destruction
tion destruction through this city.
Two nersons reported Trussing in
the aftumath o1 the stwm. Mrs.

' -un. Ea'wx anlJia. one-i ear-o Id,

fel- clnid. weie founu to be safe hours:

off; alter poi re began searching the
wreckage ul tlick home. 1

i

I : " -V ,1(1 r
'iv jj" 'II 'i n
t .- k. r Tw n II

S f ; mmio,iM

"To a dame like her..
love is also a

weapon!'

r