The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03023

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
I

Seagram's
! r
hi
YO.
YMbV CilLY KF.YSPAFH
. am i:;:r?c?::EJn
(
i i
r i
H J If
1
Jh. aJ. VJO
hi;: Ch (JF TKt
VXFKOVS...
CANADIAN
I ; r
,

INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS

list EAR
t i
" if
111
!'-
r
f

FAMED SPANISH MATADOR Luis Miguel Dominguin execute
a "derechaio'.' while sittintt on the rails of La Macarena bull-'
jing during; yesterday's bullfight. DomuiRuin was booed after
-1 his first bull, but got ears, tail and hoof for his second.

4
i r
DOMINGUIN executes

t "" t '

'

BLOOD AMD SAND

3
1:11 i
1
i
'I:

JI

DOMINGUIN executes a graceful-high

4 i
GUtK
o r
another derecnt

"Let the people

EL CALECERO (Alfonso Ramirez), DomlnRuin's Mexican op opponent,
ponent, opponent, evades the bull with a "derechazo" as he makes a series
of passes on his knees. Calecero got an ear for his first bull,
two for his second, before the overflow crowd which attended
. .yesterday's bullfights.

a.
u ... ..
pass.
Large Coble-Layer
Tied Up At Rodman
The Aeolus, one ol the Navy's
largest cable-laying vessels is in
uanar waters today, tied up at
rier 2 at Rodman..
The 7.000 ton ship is bound for
ian rrancisco from Norfolk,, Va
tnd expects to sail tomorrow
morning.
She is being transferred from
the Atlantic to a Pacific station.
There are only four cable-laying
ships in the U. S. Navy The Aeo Aeo-us
us Aeo-us is 435 ft. long, carries a 'crew
of 185 men and ten officers,' and
is being skippered by Commander
Merrill M. Sanford.
. In
WASHINGTON, March 5 (UP) (UP)-The
The (UP)-The United States has "no time
to lose" in the race with Russia
to develop space vehicles, a lead leading
ing leading rocket expert said at the week week-ed.
ed. week-ed.
The warning was sounded by
Dr. Wernher Von Braun, German German-born
born German-born scientist who is considered
one Of the world's leading authori authorities
ties authorities on space travel.
He expressed his view in an in indoctrination
doctrination indoctrination film prepared by the
armed forces staff college and re released
leased released by hte Pefense Depart Department.
ment. Department. Von Braun said the Russians are
' f"workinf -hard,fc-n outee apaeoj
: problems, He evidently referred to
man-carrying space ships and sta
jtions for the future as well as un-

I manned earth satellites like the! altitudes of 200 to 300 miles can!
tones the United States will launcbJhclp military planners with a trie-

knotc the truth and the

PANAMA, R. P MONDAY,
"1 :
1 MM ' ?
1
-
1

Martin Sees Chances Of Cut
ill l Ui ,ii.r .J i V i ii 1 1 j i i i tj

WASHINGTON, March 5 (UP) (UP)-House
House (UP)-House Republican Leader Joseph
W. Martin Jr. said yesterday
chances for an income tax cut
this year are "gradually, di m m-ming"
ming" m-ming" because of Democratic
boosts in President Eisenhower's
budget.
Martin, who celebrated his 31st
anniversary as a House member
today, told the United Press: "At
the start of this session of Con Congress
gress Congress I was quite hopeful there
could be a tax cut."
"But that hop is gndua lly
dimming,!', tht Muchutts
Republican declared. :
He said the Democratic c o n n-trolled
trolled n-trolled House Appropriations Com
mittee may have set some kind of
Two Aula Accidents
Tike Lives 01 RP
Farmer, Mrs. Shav
Two persons were killed yestcr
day in automobile accidents to
raise the total for 1956 to seven
Last night a Panamanian farm
er was killed as he walked along
the Trans-Isthmian Highway by a
car driven by U. S. Army Cpl.
Robert Epstein, 28.
Yesterday morning, 74-year-old
Mrs. Sofia Ureta Shaw was knock knocked
ed knocked down and killed near a church
in the Pasadena area by an auto
driven by Juan Barrea Gutierrez,
Panamanian, 50.
The farmer, Santiago Saldana,
44, was en route to his farm in
Maria Eugenia, Chilibre,' when he
was nit by the soldier's car which
was heSded for Fort Gulick where
he is stationed with the 740. AU.

He is being held by Panama po-W

lice pending an investigaiton.
Mrs. Shaw Was crossing the
street on her way to the Santuario
Church when she was knocked
down.

Close Space Travel Race With

in the 1957-58 international

geo-'kv

physical year.
""I think wt havo no timo to
Iota if we want to be first in an
orbit" around the earth, said the
scientist, who heads tht Army's
guided missiles division at Red Red-stons
stons Red-stons arsenal, Huntiville, Ala.
He was- a leading developer .of
the German V-2 rocket in World
War II.
He forecast that a space station
1075 miles from earth, circling
the globe every two hours, could
be a base for Jaomhine of "unpre
cedented accuracy" and jump-off
point for rocket ship explorations
ift-"ieepr-.pa;e."
For the immediate future. Von
Braun strongly indicated that the
satellites this country will send to!

country is ia" Abraham Lincoln.

MARCH 5, 1558

Two Israeli
As Syrians
JERUSALEM, Israel, March 5
mp svrian eunners attacked
an Tsraeli police boat on the Sea
of Galilee yesterday, wounding
and capturing four policemen,
two of whom died.
Israeli threatened to use
force to win the return of tho
captives.
The incident occurred in the
same" northeast corner of the
lake where Israeli commandos,
killed more than SO Syrians in a
raid on their mountain gunposts
last Dec. 11. '' i.
Israel last;week accused the
Syrians of firing on fishermen
on the lake.
Both nations' gave conflicting
rfeports about yesterday's shoot shooting.
ing. shooting. ,.. 1 s
Israel said one of its police
patrol boats ran aground and
when a salvage boat tried to
heln it. Syrians ooened fire.
Four policemen were wounded,
two fatally, and were taken cap
tive along with their boat. The
policemen returned the lire, is
raei said.
Syr a said its forces opened
fire when a group of three Is Israeli
raeli Israeli boats approached the
a precedent Friday when it added
154 million dollars to Mr. Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's budget requests and two
big money bills. :
One bill, which is scheduled for
House action tomorrow, carries
$2,300,000,000 for the' departments
ot jLaoor-and Health, Education!
and welfare. It was cut 67 million I
dollars below the President's re-!
quest.
But tho committee added 221
million dollars to the second mea measure,
sure, measure, a 6 billion dollar bill to fi finance
nance finance the activities of such "in "independent"
dependent" "independent" federal, agencies 'as
the Veterans Administration, Civ
il Defense and National Advisory
Committee for Aeronautics. It will
be considered by the House on
Tuesday. ;
Martin also noted that the omni omnibus
bus omnibus farm bill, now being debated
by the Senate, probably will call
for more spending than was esti estimated
mated estimated by the President in his new
budget for fiscal year 1957 which
starts July 1.
Tho Preident in January
handed Congress a prtcariout-ly-balanced
budget providing for
$65,900,000,000 tn spending.. He
ttimated revenues at $66,300, $66,300,-000,000,
000,000, $66,300,-000,000, leaving slim budget
surplus of 400 million dollars.
While the administration has
frowned on a tax cut until some
debt reduction has been achieved
there has been considerable dis
cussion of the possibility among
congressmen who consider it good
election-year material.
Martin said, however, that the
President based his revenue fore
cast on an assumption that con congress
gress congress would vote to raise postal
rates by 400 million dollar a
year. He said it looks now as
though the measure will not be
passed.
But he" predicted that revenue
will be a "little higher" than the
$66,300,000,000 forecast by the
President and "I think we're sure
having a balanced budget in the
next fiscal vear."
' He warned, "If we keep spend
ing more than the budget asked
for there won't- be enough of a
budget surplus abailable to make
a tax cut worthwhile."
problem of the guided missile
era.
That problem Is to locate
mora txactly points behind the
Iron Curtain that aro Inaccurate Inaccurately
ly Inaccurately mapped now and would be
targets in war.
. For future long-range ballistics
missiles to hit their targets,
launching crews must know just
where the aiming points are on
the earth's surface in relation to
the launching points
That is hard in Russia because
many points are not where lati
tude and longitude coordinates on
present inaccurate maps indicate
Earth satellites can be refer-
ence points, as they whirl about
the globe at 18,000 mph, from

which more accurate mapping reconnaissance
may be possible, The U.S. planslaunching, Von

(0

Cops
Open
Die
Fire
northeast shore near Massa
ilia village to disembark mili military
tary military units "for spying and. es espionage."
pionage." espionage." Syria said two of
the boat fled.
Israeli demanded immediate
release of the -captives or "wc
would have no alternative but
to take action." v
Two of the captured policemen
died of their wounds, i
A United Nations armistice
commission spokesman said the
Syrians handed over the two
bodies alon? with the boat.
Israeli officials arrived at the
northeastern shore of the lake
and found three U.N. represen representatives
tatives representatives with the two bodies.
"This wanton attack must
raise the gravest concern lost
tension in the region be height heightened
ened heightened following repeated Syrian
aggression," an Israeli Foreign
office spokesman said.
. Syria called the incident "new
proof of the enemy's aggressive
Intentions and violation of the
UK armistice and Security
Council resolutions."
This was a reference to the
TJ.N. condemnation of Israel
for the Dec. 11 attack.
Israeli spokesmen pointed out
that the entire Sea of Galilee,
also known as La'tt Tiberias,
lies within Israeli territory. Sys
rian land begins at a point a a-bout
bout a-bout 10- yards inland from .the
northeast shore. ;
Spokesman for Tsrael said
they considered the incident
b ot utmost- irr ily imb'it
with their thinking that the
Arab state are tannine ail ail-out
out ail-out war this summer with M r
jets and other arms supplied
by Russia.
A meeting of an Arab 'war
council." including representa representatives
tives representatives of Egypt, Syria and Saudi
Arabia, the three main Arab
powers, is scheduled in Cairo this
week.
Syrian Premier Said Chazmi
and his defense minister-' and
army chief left Damascus today
for talks which will precede
those with Saudi Arabia.
Civil Defense Week
Of Meetings Listed
Civil Defense meetings have
been scheduled for this week as
follows:
Margarita at the Service Cen
ter, 9 a m, Wednesday; Rainbow
uty at the High school .study
Han, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday; Gam
ooa at the Civic center. 9 a.m.
Thursday; Santa Cruz at the Serv
ice Center, 8 p.m. Thursdayr
All ladies of the respective town
as the following important items
as the following imporatnat items
will be discussed in preparation
for the forthcoming National Civil
Defense test exercise; individual
duties of Warden Service person personnel,
nel, personnel, Control Center messaee pro procedure
cedure procedure and posting of Warden
maps.
The motion picture "U.S. Civil
Defense in Action" will be shown.
2 Treasury Men
Here To Give Aid
On Tax Returns
, Two U. S. Treasury represen representatives,
tatives, representatives, Frederick A. Grey Jr.
and Le R. Cosby, will bo In Pa Panama
nama Panama from today until Friday
to give assistance to U. S. citiz citizen
en citizen tax payers in preparing their
Federal income tax returns.
. They will be available to the
public at the American Embas Embassy,
sy, Embassy, second floor.
to launch the first of 10 by Sept.
30. 1957. i
The film, now being
used In
armed forces' education program
was shown to reporters at the Pen Pentagon.
tagon. Pentagon. A transcript was provided.
Von Braun said the conquest of
space is the "greatest technologic technological
al technological challenge" of the age and that
the U. S. Satellite program will
be 1he "first decisive step."
But his chief interest was In
letting human beings into space
in rocket ships and having
them build space station or
man-made moons. While ho did
not estimate when it would be
. donswether. Ctrmins have said
it could happen in 25 years.
A SDace station would have "ter
rific military importance" for
and missile
Braun said. It

Iks

LZ3

Resentment anc!

legret at Firing

Of British 6

LONDON, Morch 3 (UP)
thorny Eden announced today
I J Dririsn omeers trom the

"resentment and regret" at Jordan's recent conduct.
' Eden, taking personal command of Britain's foreign
policy in an effort to head off threatening war in the Mid Middle
dle Middle East, made his statement to the House of Commons

where a growing rebellion

party members confronted him with a possibly serious
political crisis.
Conservative Party rebels had flatly demanded a
British crackdown in the Middle East and an end to "ap "appeasement"
peasement" "appeasement" following the summary ouster of the Arab
Legion's longtime commander, Lt. Gen. John Bagot Glubh,
by Jordan's King Hussein last week.

Although it ousted Glubb, Jor
dan retained other British officrs
in executive command.
The 15 British officers yanked
out all held key positions in the
Arab Legion, backbone of the
Jordan armed forces.
Eden said some 50 or 6d other
British, officers; serving with the
Arab Legion mostly were not af affected
fected affected by the pull-out order be because
cause because they hold "lesser posts."
Eden said the situation caused by
Jordan's breakway from British
military leadership was "very
serious indeed."
Elen ordered a fleet of trans transport
port transport airplanes to Cyprus to airlift airlift-aa
aa airlift-aa many as 2000 British paratroop paratroopers
ers paratroopers to any trouble spot and to eva evacuate
cuate evacuate British and American civi civilians
lians civilians from Jordan if necessary.
He faced an angry parliament
with members critical of the ab absence
sence absence of both Foreign Minister
Selwyn Lloyd and U.S. Secretary
of State John Foster Dulles in
Karachi, Pakistan at a SEATO
meeting at a time of emergency.
Ten Navy Vessels
Due Wednesday
For 5-Day Visit
. Ten ships of the United States
Fleet will arrive at Cristobal and
Coco Solo Wednesday morning
for a five-day visit.
The group," which is arriving
from San Juan, Puerto Rico, will
depart from the Canal Zone
Monday morning, March 12. v-
Rear Adm. Allen Smith, com
mander of the Task Group, is
aboard the one carrier of the
group, the USS Valley Forge.
Along with the Valley. Forge
will be eight destroyers and one
submarine. The destroyers, the
USS Murrav. USS Beale, USS
Cony. USS Waler, USS R. A. Ow
ens, and the submarine USS Tl Tl-rante
rante Tl-rante will dock at the VS. Na
val Station, Coco Solo, while the
Valley Forge will come alongside
pier nine in Cristobal.
The ships will not transit the
Canal.
i could be used for studies of biolo-
gical and zoological life, cosmic
radiation, meteorlogical research
and observation of planets, v.
Van Braun, gave this outline of
how men might go' about erect erecting
ing erecting an artificial moon:
They would be "shot" Into space
in a three-stage rocket, the top
or last stage being winged so that
it could glide back to earth later.
At times on the upward trip,
men would be subjected to accele
ration making them weigh nine
times their normal weight, a
"harsh" experience but one that
already has been undergone in
.training .devjecs on Jhe round,
In an orbit 1075 miles from
earth, rnen could get out of the
rocket ship into the vacuum of
outer space and, working inside
individual pressurized contain-

n'E CEMi

enera
0
Prime Minister Sir An-
that Britain is withdrawing
Arnh lemnn tn chnw Rntmn'c
from his own and Opposition
r
FIRED The British Foreign
Office announced that King;
Hussein of Jordan had tired
Lt. Gen. John Glubb Pasha
(above), a man who devoted
his life to making Jordan's A A-rab
rab A-rab Legion one of the crack
fighting forces in the Middie
East.
Local 900, CIO, y
Administrators
To Call On Seybbld
The members of the admrnni.
tive committee of Local 900. C-C-EOC,
AFL-CIO, will call on the
Governor-president of the Canal
Zone government, Panama Canal
Co., tomorrow at 10 a.m.
Hrrold, W. Rerrie, chairman;
Reginald Callender, recording and
Corresponding secretary, and Er Er-,,
,, Er-,, V treasurer, will form
the delegation. : ; ': ,.: :
- William H. Sinclair;- adminis administrator
trator administrator for Local 900, will accompa accompany
ny accompany the delegation.
BALUOA TIDES 1-
TUESDAY, MARCH 6
HLGH
11:06 a.m
11:34 p.m.
LOW
4:46 a m.
5:13 p.m.
.Russia
ers with mechanical
could assemble the space sta-
tion.
It,, would be a pre-fabricated f-
iair, snipped up in several rock rock-ets,
ets, rock-ets, wheel-shaped and spinning, it
would have its own gravity. :
This station,, filled with labor ),
tory equipment, could be. protect protect-ed
ed protect-ed against small meteors the on only
ly only abundant kind by thin steel r
dural.
The most "formidable" part c-f
all is the return to earth.
It isn't feasible to take cimc,' 'i
rocket propcllant into space to i-
for a return trip.
Hence the vings.on the
stage of the rocket u.sed fur u,eV.' u,eV.'-bound
bound u,eV.'-bound journey will permit the r
to glide back down throush
mosphcre and land at a nv
mph,.



(7

MONDAT, MARCH S, I"S
- f Af.r TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN IXDt'FENDST DAILY NnTSPAP.1

THE PANAMA

NO ruilKHfS IV THC

fOUNOCO NDJON OUNtVILL l ltl(
. HAAMODIO ARIAS IOITOA
; H Terr P. o. tox 134. panma. H. e W.
' TltlPHOM 2-070 5 UM
Caul Aoodtifc pan American Panama
" fi.OM Orlfc 12.I7H CCNTRAL AVENUC iETWlfN I2TH NP IJTH STRICT
PSAIKN ftCPRMINTATIVtlt JOSHUA POMEP.S. INC.
'J' 149 Madison Ave. Kim Voik. 7 N. V.
. lCl L
.. Pl MONTH. . 2. SO
FOR (IX MONTHS. IN """ 'J j
ONI TIAA, IN APVANC1 1R.S0 24 OO
I MMM 1 I
ti TMlf IS TOUR fORUM THl RIADltS OWN COLUMN ; :
' Tee Mod la It leruw Tfco AmtrieoR
.;;Utttf are mmit4 t'otthilly e4 r hiU!t4 to hoil ceeMaetwl
" II rM tiikj Mtffr rftn'l t kutatitnt l eWa I th

, Mil iy Ll Hn ere pMuhti in th ttiu mcivV
flute lit Ida Ufttn limit te o lonftk.
u Utif kKu wntcn I htli hi itrictuf contidinct.

T RcvtfttM enemas no

THE MAIL BOX

OPEN TO
ir:
r raihmin anA r ar in

' slight details, so I am not going to waste an entire letter, as
fMie did, on extraneous matter. Maybe he ran out of ammuni ammunition
tion ammunition against Peron arid for that reason devoted his last round
letter to talk about the Costa Rican affair. .
t; My problem Is entirely different for I have such a mountain
'of material that It is difficult for me to make It concise enough
5: to fit in the Mail Box. , I
As for the person who signs himself Consistent," I will say
Irito him that I agree with him 100 per cent when he writes;
Theft Is still theft, whether cloaked in gold braid or a shabby
,'pusiness suit."
mi consistent Is quite an orator, but the principal thing I dis dislike
like dislike about orators is that they surround conclusions with beauti beautiful
ful beautiful words. They Just don't give us any proof that what they
nell us is true. ;
3UJ "Traveler," by his own admission, made only a short stay
in Argentina. Probably Just long enough for one of those in
power to fill him up with pr6paganda andshow him around a
T, It t foreigner who didn't know about the grandeur of the
United States were to be shown only the slums of our .large
"jcitles and were fed a lot of Communist propaganda, he could
Easily carry away a distorted idea of our great country. If,
''Traveler speaks Spanish, It Is a shame he didn't have plenty
oJ time to mingle with the common people and learn their
y flews. :
f As for roads and electric power in Argentina, I do not know
if they are good or bad. All I know is that Peron told me the
' lelectric system was very poor in 1946 when he came to power.
jHt said this was due to the fact that during the war it was
J impossible to buy new equipment.
Jii In answer to Calhoun's quotation from Gladys pelmas' ar article,
ticle, article, I am going to quote from the AP News Annual for 1948:
t'1 "This then was the situation when the Argentine "citizens
!bn Feb. 24 went to the polls to choose a president. The elec elec-t
t elec-t tlon, carried out under the watchful eyes of the army, was de-
scrlbed as the most orderly In 40 years.
"Because of distances Involved In some rural provinces, poor
' transportation and the time required to count paper ballots, the
,- hnai returns were not made known until Apr. 8. They showed
"that Col. Peron, 'strong-man' candidate of the Labor party, had
rbeen elected to t six-year term as president over his opponent,
Dr, Jose Tamborlni, Democratic Union nominee.
i' "Peron piled -up 304 electoral votes to Tamborini's 72. The
;;popular tote was 1,474,447 for Peron as against. 1,207,359 for his
opponent. .'
-i "June 4 Juan Domingo Peron was Inaugurated as Argen Argen-Una's
Una's Argen-Una's 29th president."
" There was no revolution In 1945 as Gladys Delmas states.
. In 1945 the people of Argentina demanded that an election
ioe called to free them from the military dictatorship imposed
f Upon them In 1943 when the armed forces seized the govern government
ment government In much the same manner that the present military dic dictatorship
tatorship dictatorship gained power last year.
I am going to quote from a book called "Argentine Riddle"
by Felix J. Weil, native of Argentina who spent years there in
business. Journalism, government and In the -teaching of econ economics.
omics. economics. Weil writes:
;J "Gen. Pedro P. Ramirez came into power through a coup
mtd'ttftt against Castillo on June 4, 1943. Subsequently, on Feb.
;;24, he (Ramirez) found himself 'out in the cold.' He was per persuaded
suaded persuaded at pistol point, reports have It that he was 'fa 'fatigued'
tigued' 'fatigued' to the extent of delegating power to his vice-president,
,;Gen. Idelmlro J. Farrell." . ;
Peron says that the rallying cry "shoes, yes; books no!"
lyts the slogan of the oligarchlsts who were opposed to opening
the universities to the laboring clases. He also says that the
3fw government lr shooting members of his party. ; ...
' He adds that when the people of Argentina get enough of
"this they will revolt and demand a new election. He further
;tatei that when this happen?, perhaps a million lives will be
lost but that the Argentine people will do away with the oli-
garchy once and for all.
peron denies ever saying that he would liquidate a million
of his enemies when he returns to power.-'-----'
? At Calhoun says, there ari six, not five, universities In Ar Argentina,
gentina, Argentina, Ingenlero Carlos Pascali corrected Peron on this point
and Peron admitted that he was mistaken. Pascali formerly
;.waa Ambassador from Argentina to Panama and was living at
the time with Peron in the Washington Hotel.
ft Fascall says that commencing in 1915 he was a member of
I, the Argentine Congress for many, years and later taught physics
"lor 17 years In one of the universities. r
J;; While in congress he tried to get that body to pass laws
?n behalf of the workers, but the majority of the members were
Jf.ot Interested in the common people.
( As a university professor he found that many of the other
'professors were opposed to abolishing tuition and throwing the
Universities open to those who were qualified regardless of
whether they were rich or poor, or members of the oligarchy
ho believe that only a few should rule the rest.
When Peron did away with all tuition, many professors re resigned.
signed. resigned. He says that none of them were fired, but quit In
protest against the abolishment Of tuition.
J;; Many students from wealthy families led demonstrations
and made a lot of trouble. Pascali says that no student was
imprisoned if he was willing to go to school and mind his bust bust-Isess.
Isess. bust-Isess. mi pascali adds that it is ridiculous to say that 1250 professors
Jwere- fired within the first three months, for he says that when
ihe six universities are fully staffed there are only 1188 profes professors
sors professors needed. '-(' v.-;.:-;,- :'-'' :
It This week's Time gives peron credit for-raising wages a
treat deal more than he has ever claimed. Time states that
"fresident Aramburu has granted a ten per cent raise to work workers
ers workers wnose labor contracts expire March 1. Time contrasts this
ith the usual SO per cent to 50 per cent "come and get It,
iJjoys" raises that Peron used to give them.
' If one begins with any given wage in 1945 and Increases It
Q per cent each year, he will (find It upped nearly 1500 per
.cent In 1955. If he .figures a 60 per cent raise each year, it
nill be over 3500 per cent greater by 1955. Had Peron accom accomplished
plished accomplished either of these feats, I am sure that he would notclalm
.an increase of only 500 per cent.
I seem to be more or less out of step with the others lrt
.your column and with the press In general. So I am open to
'conviction. If anybody can produce any real evidence that I
am wrong, I will readily admit It.
An American Citizen

To SI:c!:!;:!:':rs of llio
Pc::.?j hsiiir.ee Ccmpiny, Inc.

The annual meeting of the Panama
Insurance Company, Inc., will take
place ort Wednesday, March 14, 1936,
at 4:00 P.M. at the offices of the Com.
. pyt it CarspoAlf gre aJSsJEpapajijtH.
Iucardo Arias Streets
.''
THE SECRETARY

AMERICAN

PANAMA AHIH1CAN PftUa. INC
roiAibilitr lot srattewiii of eeleieM
CONVICTION
accord on Costa Rica except for

Labor .News
And
Comment

By VICTOR RIESEL
Sixteen slips 1 of paper, which
were scaled in an envelope on r'eb.
14, may" well unloose a civil war
inside labor a battle which will
decide who is the actual leader
.of America's great new labor fed
eration.. : T :
facing, each other will be Dave
Beck, president of the $36,000,000
Teamsters Union, and iicorge
Meany; president of the,AFL-CIO.
This is a heavyweight match neither-man
wants but. from which
neither will run. Neither man likes
to borrow trouble, Both have been
brushing and hushing those who
have clamored for the fight.
But those 16 slips of paper did it.
Those slips are ballots cast in
the St. Valentine's Day election
for the presidency of the powerful
ftew York Teamsters Joint Coun Council
cil Council powerful because all roads
lead in and out of New York from
Miami and from Los Angeles.
Teamsters' picket lines around the
metropolis could keep ovcr-the-
road trucks, "piggy-back" trucks
on rail cars and the new "fishy-
back trucks on ships from tie
iivcring their targo to. and taking
u irom me Dig cay.
The man who controls the New
York Joint Council is, therefore,
a mighty industrial figure in these
United States. Running against the
incumbent was a wiry fellow by
the name of Johnny O Rourke who
has survived bullets and feuds in
this jungle. The incumbent is an
old sour-dough in these wars by
the name of Marty Lacey, who
spits sulphur and brimstone off
and on the public platform so that
teamos frequently move their
ladies out of the hall when the
ancient brother gets up to talk.
On Feb. 14. this being St. Val
entine's Day, both sides thought
they'd massacre each other at the
ballot box and whimsically re
called earlier days when' the
thought would have been, more lit
eral than figurative. The vote was
close. Lacey challenged 18 votes
which were enough to win lor
Johnny 0' Rourke.
International president uavc
Beck then moved in. swooped up
the ballots, had them placed in a
sealed envelope and carried to an
iron box in the Teamsters 5,oou,-
000 headquarters in Washington.
He set Feb, 29 as the day to count
them, after over-ruling Lacey s
challenges. I
That did it. For that was a ges
ture in the direction of Johnny
O'Rourke. one of the few men w-i
side labor who has publicly criti criticized
cized criticized George Meany. O'Rourke is
a close friend, a collaborator of
and In the bloc which looks to a
young Detroiter; James R. Hoffa,
for leadership ana support.
I have predicted here frequently
that, with the years, Jim Hoffa
and another Detroiter, Walter
Reuther, would joust for the lead
ershin of the American laboi
movement. i,ven at tioiia to today
day today is one of labor's legendary
figures. He nasn I nil me neaannes
as often as Reuther, but his crew crew-cut
cut crew-cut head bobs up as frequently
as the red head's in mgn piaces.
So Beck's nod towards o Koume
is a nod towards Hoffa. This isn't
surprising, for, contrary to specu speculation,
lation, speculation, there is no feud between
Beck and notta. in iaci, n
Marty Lacey heard that Beck was
going to count the 16 protested bal ballots,
lots, ballots, Lacey hired himself a prom
inent lawyer, Godfrey Jscnminx
professor of law at Fordham Un-
vcrsity
S c h m I d t immediately made
plans to go into the New xor
State Supreme Court to prevent
Beck from counting me pan,
Schmidt's plans were to charge
that Beck was helping Hoffa be because
cause because Hoffa had helped Beck sell
hi fiirnihir and his home to the
Teamsters Brotherhood for $260,-
000. AH the vice-presiaenis nan
gone along with Beck's request
that the union buy his home and
furnishings and permit him to con continue
tinue continue using them. The opposition
to Beck is led by the Teamsters.
Secretary-Treasurer, Johnny Lug
w'ht wimp of all this Is Beck's
open support of the Hoffa.O'Rourke
coalition which is of vital lm lm-hiauge
hiauge lm-hiauge these men have
just given the controversial inde-
oendent wiernauontu
men's Assn.. $400,000 wn wnicn
to operate. ..
The I LA is not part of the AFL AFL-CIO,
CIO, AFL-CIO, which has its own waterfront
International Brotherhood of Long Longshoremen
shoremen Longshoremen and which wants Juris Jurisdiction
diction Jurisdiction over the docks Soon, riiis
Brotherhood has ucorge memiy
powerful support. Never nave I
seen Meany as angrys r'riK
was insinuated that the AFL-CIO
will not support its own water
front brotherhood.
Now Meany is faced with Becks
approval of the Teamsters finan finan-pint
pint finan-pint an outside union, one ousted
from the AFL. Meany will un-
j.kt)li ir Rprk to StOD tills
w hack Hoffa and
n'DAiirlrn
The struggle between the two
giant personalities inside labor will
15 v.".
labor for a long time.
k. nn wnnever wins w"

Mechnical
B1NDA. New South Wales,
Australia I have been away
from the soil too long to be lejs
than fascinated by the tchmcai
knowledge necessary to big farm farming
ing farming or sheep and cattle growing.
1 do not believe that the average
guy who eats a steak or -lamb
chop, who buys an overcoat or
a head of lettuce knows how far
the farm has left the farm and
gone to the laboratory.
There is a place at Camden out out-tide
tide out-tide of Sydney, for instance, which
has a cow assembly line that a
motorcar manufacturer could loam
from. It is called a rotorlactor,
and I believe there are only two
ii the world one in America
and one here.

Using a system of ramps andiean't'handie is God VJmighty and
turntables. 2,500 cows are milked lh e 1 e m e n t s. We have been

labor'vice a day in the same process,

They are disinfected, fed, checked
for disease ana bredby artificial
insemination. The whole plant
WASHINGTON (NEA)- Howi
about a very little bit of formal
dehyde in your milk today? Just
enough to kill the bacteria and
"keep" the milk longer. Formal Formaldehyde
dehyde Formaldehyde in large doses is of course
a poison. The trick is to use a
"harmless'' quantity. A little too
much and oops, sorry.
Or how about eating foods that
have been "preserved" by new
atomic energy radiation proc-.
6SS6S? " '
They'll kill the germs and make
the foods stay fresh longer. The
only catch is that eating too much,
too often might be harmful. It
takes years of testing on labora laboratory
tory laboratory animals to know what's safe.
In the last 20 years, says Food
and Drug Commissioner George
P. Larricic, hundreds of new chem chemicals
icals chemicals have been added to foods.
These additives are intended to
"Improve" the goods by coloring,
flavoring, neutralizing, sweetening
or emulsifying to mention a few
of the legitimate uses.
The hypothetical examples given
above are just two Of the prob problems
lems problems the U.S. Food and Drugs
Administration is faced with m
this, its 50th anniversary year of
operations.
The business of trying to chisel
away at the pure food laws and
their enforcement is in itself 50
years old. Almost every year
some slicker tries to put over a
fast one in Congress for th,e ben benefit
efit benefit of some promoter of a new

ilifi Iff (0hnt !' that

LIFT UP -YOUR' HEARTS

(A Lenten feature of The
Panama American, prepared
by the Rev. M. A. Cookson,
Episcoapl Churches of Our
Saviour-St. Margaret.)
A SHOCKING RELIGION
Read St. John 5:1-16. "Jcsns
smith unto him. Rise, take up thy
bed and walk. And Immediately
the man was made whole, and
took up his bed, and walked..
In Jerusalem there Is a place
near the sheep market called
the pool of Bethesda. Around
the edge of the pool gathered
the lame,, the.alt. and the blind,
"waiting lor the moving of the
water."
Our attention Is focused on
one man In the crowd. There is
nothinir unusual at all about
him except that he had been

cominij v fr day -o the pool

Jet Assisted Take-Off

Cows Down Under
By BOB RUARK

covers only 30 acres. The animals
are reduced to a machine, since
they are dehorned, are not pas pastured
tured pastured and never met the father
of their children.
On one full day of listening to
Tom Williams, who owns the prop
erty I write from, I never fully
understood one thing he said to
his stockman and supervisor. It
sounded like a long technical dis dissertation
sertation dissertation between a couple of phys physicists
icists physicists and covered such things s
flocks, fertilizer, diseases and
treatments, north paddocks, hay
and grass, and machines. A graz grazier
ier grazier has to be nearly a superstore superstore-house
house superstore-house of knowledge.
. The one thing that the scientific
wool crower or meat orodueer
through a shocking season of floods
here, with consequent disaster. Ana
isuccessive seasons of drougnt can
bankrupt a rich man whose money

A Pinch of Poison

By PETER EDS0N
food, drug or cosmetic chemical
product.; ; ,
It should be made clear that not
all, food processors want the
laws weakened. The more respon responsible
sible responsible trade associations want the
laws strengthened, and their rep representatives
resentatives representatives have so testified be before
fore before the Priest committee.
But among this year's proposals
Is one which would reverse the
present strict prevention against
the use of poisons in food. The
amendment would exempt amounts
of poison considered safe for hu human
man human consumption, j.
' FDA Commissioner Larrick's an answer
swer answer to this one as in the case
of formaldehyde in milk is that
as long as ..we have present pas pasteurization
teurization pasteurization and sterilization, poison
isn't needed. ;
Another proposed amendment
would require the government to
prove food additives harmful be
fore they could be banned. This
is sometimes difficult. The govern government
ment government thinks, all additives should
be proved harmless. All too. often,
new chemicals have been intro introduced
duced introduced before complete scientific
tests of their, safety have been
made. ' l' ;
; Under another amendment, the
government would be reduced to
60-90 days for making A determi determination
nation determination on a new product. FDA of officials
ficials officials think 120-180 days, or even
longer, are necessary for adequate
testing. : -,v
k proposed "grandfather
3
near the gheep-gate hoping that1
h would have a cnance to do
cured. But he never was able td
sret tn the nool in time.
Jesus' was there as you would
expect Him to be wherever there
is human need. Our Lord with
penetrating insight could see
that the man's disease was real really
ly really something deeper than a par paralyzed
alyzed paralyzed ler
' When our Lord asked him,
"Do you really want to get
well?" the man evaded the ques question
tion question and said, "1 lust haven't
anybody to put me into the pool
when the water is stirred up."
"TCl-.itt terpens ts'thafr while I
am trying to get there, someone
else gets down into it first."
He, was sorry for himself. He
had that defeated attitude of
the man who thinks that some

one hns t Uv?j tti ti U

lis all tied up in things that eat

and go moo and baa.
The disease mymamatosis has
killed millions of rabbits which
were eating the land bare. But
the aftermath is that the foxci
who used to eat rabbits are now
preying on sheep and the hardy
rabbit survivors are breeding up
a disease-resistant strain which
will be hard to exterminate. And
the eagles who used to cat rabbits
.r. n,u i,ln nCwiv.HrnnnH
are now seizing newiy-aroppea
lambs.
The kangaroos kick down the
fences, and so do the emus. The
pigs root under the fences and let
m the rabbits. The rabbits eat
the land bare and cause erosion.
The blowflies get at the sheep.
And foot rot comes with the, ...vet
and starvation with tfci dry. t
I think I will continue to write
for a living. I tried to crack a
stock whip the other day and took
off a piece of ear. And I never
could sit on a horse
I
clause" would exempt from regu regulation
lation regulation all additives in use after a
future cutoff date. This would put
the approval of Congress en many
chemicals which FDA considers
questionably safe.
The prize of the lot Is a pro proposal
posal proposal by Rep. Joseph Patrick
O'Hara (R-Minn). It would trans
fer to the courts for trial any
case in which FDA scientists
came ud with a finding unfavor
able to a food processor on any of
ms products.
Chief Judge John Biggs, Jr., of
the U.S. Third Circuit Court oi
Appeals, Wilmington, Del., told the
Priest committee that the already
overburdened federal courts should
not be saddled with technical
cases of this kind. He declared it
would be the opening wedge for
destroying the Administrative Pro
cedures Act under which all gov
ernment regulatory agencies now
operate.
Secretary of Health Education
and Welfare Marion B. Folsom,
under which FDA operates, has
given Congress recommendations
against passage of many, of these
amendments, He has also pro proposed
posed proposed other amendments for
strengthening the la w.J
In one of his proposals, food
processors would be required to
pay the costs of government scien scientific
tific scientific research to prove new prod products
ucts products safe for human consumption.
and so he hardly makes any ef-
ion to get mere nimseiii xne
cards were stacked against him
I What was the use of playinc?
Jesus looked at him and said
quietly, "Oct up, pick up your
mat, and walk!" The man was
waiting for the waters to be dis disturbed,
turbed, disturbed, and Jesus came and cUSr
turned him. He shocked him out
of his Inertia and brought him
back into an active way of life.
Let Christ stir you up. If you
have a problem about which you
have worried and fretted and
through which you cannot see
your way, tackle It! Christ will
say that you can do it, and He
will trivt ywj the powerlo ltd
if you give Him a cnance.
In the name of Jesus: Get up!
Pick up your bed I Walk, Move,
Act! Get going! The man at the
pool found out that Christianity
o e a vy shocktn reltoia.

17as!Ii;:gto;i
f.lERRY-GO-ROUiJD

WASHINGTON Il'n eiv tn'
understand why Senator Knowiand.i
uie our Senate leader, is dcflty
maneuvering to get the gas-lobby
probe out of the hands of forthrieht
young Senator Gore of Tennessee.)
ivnowiand comes from Califor California.
nia. California. And all you have to do is look
at how the Superior Oil Company
influences politics in California
plus the fact that all sorts of gas
money was never recorded as cam campaign
paign campaign contributions, to see why
Knowland warns to shift the in investigation
vestigation investigation to a more docile bipar bipartisan
tisan bipartisan committee.
t Any thorough investigation is
bound to hit a lot of people in very
high places in both political par parties,
ties, parties, so leaders of both parties want
an investigating committee that
will be "reasonable."
Take One small but very signif significant
icant significant fact. The Keck family of
Superior Oil did not record one
single campaign contribution in the
1952 or 1954 election. Perhaps ihey
followed the same pattern they did
when they save 23 Sinn hni
Senator Case cash. Certainly Keck
money nis oeen dropped into both
state and nation-1 elections, with
some $300,000 raised by the Kecks
and kindred interests to defeat
Gov. Earl Warren in 1950.
Warren, now Chief Justice of the
United States, accused them of
waging "a campaign of vilifica vilification"
tion" vilification" and aimed "Bill Keck" pub publicly
licly publicly as the man who was raising
the money to defeat him.
Harold Ickes, the late Secretary
of the Interior and War Petroleum
Administrator who knew his oil oilmen,
men, oilmen, had this to say about Bill
Keck in a letter, May 31, 1950:
"I have long considered Mr.
Keck to be one of the most ruthless
individuals in the whole oil indus industry."
try." industry." GRAND JURY PROBI
Significantly, the man who is
conducting the grand jury probe of
Keek's man John Neff and the
$2,500 case contribution, knows the
Keck situation in California inti intimately.
mately. intimately. He is Warren Olney, close
friend of Chief Justice Warren,
appointed by Warren as counsel
oi tne California Crime Commis Commission,
sion, Commission, in which job he had a chance
to know something about the tech techniques
niques techniques used by oil-gas lobbies to
dominate the California legisla legislature.
ture. legislature. -
Olney will push an exhaustive
Usu, Sin;Z
?' 1 ? 1 w Ca uonuan, Senator
Justice Department probe, while
Knowland, is drying to avoid the
exhaustive Senate probe planned
by Senator Gore.
Here are the facts in the dyna dynamite
mite dynamite Uden California situation
which if it explodes could blow var various
ious various GOP politicians out of the
water in California, and various
Democrats elsewhere. ;
KECK FAMILY SETUP
Chairman of the board of Su
penor Oil is William Keck. Presi President
dent President of the Co. is his son, How Howard
ard Howard B. Keck, who put up the money
for Sen. Case. The Keck family
owns 51 per cent of Superior Oil,
weaitniest independent oil-gas com company
pany company in the nation, with stock
valued at over $1,000 share. It
shot up $110 a share on the day
tne senate passed tne gas bill.
Operating for the Kecks in Wash Washington
ington Washington has been registered lobby lobbyist
ist lobbyist Monroe Butler. He was here
during the gas debate last summer I
and approached various California
congressmen, asking them to vote
for the bill. He also contributed
to some of their campaigns.
Republican congressmen from
California voted almost in a bloc
for the bill, and the amount of
money they may have received
from the Kecks might have been
in Senator Knowland's mind when
he proposed that the probe be tak taken
en taken away from Senator Gore.
Monroe Butler not only lobbied
for the Kecks in Washington but
also in Sacramento. There be lob lobbied
bied lobbied to defeat a conservation bill
similar to that introduced in the
Nebraska Legislature which lobby
ACKOSS
2 Eagles' nests
3 Indian heroine
i Mrs.
Johnson
1 Feminine
appellation
! 6 Girl's name
ii rin whn nti S Conducted
13 Legislative Indian weight
. body 7 Miss
14 Armed fleet Merkle
15 Characteristics Went by
1 River (Sp.) steamer
itr,rkltp Dress
1 Ignited
lft Birds' homes
12 Price
13 Hindered in
growth
18 Art (Latin)
20 Gambling
game
22 Sea eagle.
23 Bitter vetch
24 Feminine
' name
26 Position in
- gymnastics
29 Low haunt
31 Goddess of
the dawn
32 Age
33 Split pea
34 Playing cards
37 Obligation
40 Ermine
41 Mimic
43 Stigma
43 Camel's-hair
cloth
48 Youth
47 Milt drink
4f Anew poisen
81 Analogical
54"Ulymaid
cfAstolat"
83 TV panelist,
Francis
SJHsvingfour
parts (comb.
form),
87 Property item
DOWN
I 1 Actor,
. Cable
21 Command

Young Ladies

25 Go by aircraft39
27 Highway
2 Small islands 40

IT j f f b '7 ft ),.Q
. -n p
j -.-
r Q : ft
w if .-.ji iTjr
T ; rj
ZZZ'- LZ:JTLZE
' : ; pi
I ill U J ' '

r Dn:w PEARSON

ist Neff helped to kill. It was in
Nebraska that Neff gave another
$2,500 to the GOP.
Thus, the Keck family has 'al 'already
ready 'already -set .a pattern of lobbying in
various states, and the healthiest
thing that could happen to promote
honest government would be a
sweeping probe of all gas-oil mon money
ey money ouring into state legislatures
as well as into Congress,
RIVAL OF ART SAMISH
Active in lobbying before the
California Legislature was not only
Keck-Iobbyist Monroe Butler but
Keck-lawyer Harold C. Morton, one
of the ablest attorneys in Los An Angeles.
geles. Angeles. Between them these two
men exerted more power with the
California Legislature than even
famed Artie Samish, lobbyist for
the beer and whisky industry.
On one occasion Morton and But Butler
ler Butler had a showdown with the Legis Legislature
lature Legislature over a race-track bill affect affecting
ing affecting Sant Anita. The Morton-Butler
forces won.
Partner in ihe Morton law firm
was Charles Lyons, who when
speaker of the California assembly
was convicted and jailed for taking
a so-called "lawyer's fee" for in influencing
fluencing influencing legislation. Lyons, a Re Re-publian,
publian, Re-publian, was three times speaker
of the assembly.
To replace him as speaker, Ly-.
ons' law-partner, Harold Morton,
is now grooming his son-in-law,
Joe Shell, newly elected to the
assembly, and already vice-chairman
of the gas and oil committee,
a very important body when it
comes to passing upon lesislation
affecting Superior Oil and other
gas-oil companies.
Young Shell, son-in-law of Keek's
attorney, was active in passing the
tidelands drilling bill governing the
operation of oil companies in off offshore
shore offshore areas: also in the battle over
gas-oil conservation,
This battle, similar to that In
Nebraska, disrupted the California
assembly into one of the bitterest
battles in recent years. The show showdown
down showdown came over a milk-toast sub substitute
stitute substitute for conservation palled the
"Ward Bill" which Mt cont-ol
of conservation in the hands of a
committee of 30 nil-eas nroducers.
The bill was emohatically onnosed
by another Californian serving in
the Justice Department. Stan'ey
Barnes, assista.it attorney penefal
in. charge of antitrust activities.
He charged it with being in viola violation
tion violation of the anti-trust act.
Despite this,, the -gas-oil. lobby
won. Their victory, according to
Assemblyman Lloyd W. Lowrey of
Yolo County, was due to the cam campaign
paign campaign contributions of Keck-Iobbyist
Harold Morton,
"M o r t o n," said Lowrev. "set
himself up as a new Art Samish
who t would rule Ihe state with a
more ruthless hand."
That's the pattern set in Califor California
nia California by the same powerful oil-eas
family that sought to influence the
vote of Senator Case in Washing Washington.
ton. Washington. Red Cross
Three complete replacements
of an "Rh baby's" blood, with
transfusions of blood supplied by
the Red Cross, saved a Roches Rochester,
ter, Rochester, N.Y., infant's life. Antibod Antibodies,
ies, Antibodies, produced by his mother's
Rh-negative blood attacked the
blood cells which carry the vital
oxygen supply through th
child's body. Thousands of suf sufferers
ferers sufferers from Illness in hospitals
served by the Red Cross blood
program need blood dally. Your
membership in and contribution
to ,the Red Cross helps maintain
the blood supply and keeps don-
ors and technicians on the job!
Answer to Previous; Fuzzlt )
30 Girl's 42 Hurricane
appellation 44 Lias anew
34 Small pipe 49 Atmosphere
35 Biblical
A T 1 -
mountain
3S Health resort
Airman (ab.)
52 British money
of account
33 He wrote
"Treasure
Island" (init.)
33 Censures
Louisiana
university
Phase

V 6. A L E E ( N A P
"E. 5 T 7 L. E
T rfu a tj3n.se t
f"l&' T?"N A W 'V 7
uialtil """
iiH..'? A H'O Ail
it A IK L H N at1"'
O fe M l E,; (5 m f
"Oi A T if W I N T
jA T aTJlJ flj L.IAI,;
oy T jo cjTijf t "5
Ajo. x rroi: "ic si. o



MONDAY, MARCH 5, Wfr

TITS PANMMI A?!r?.:CA AN INT rr F NT TXT 1 DAILY KFVTSPArnt
ntrr t:

Want Wons ce To Make

'Hay State Campaign Stops

WASHINGTON," March 5 (LP)
Senate ReDubUean Leader Wtl-i
liam F. Knowland said last night
ce win urge rresiaem tisennow tisennow-er
er tisennow-er to ''go into a few key states"
durmg the fall election campaign
. to help ehaky GOP House and Sen Sen-ale
ale Sen-ale candidates.
Knowland indicated he believes
ccntroj of Congress may hinge on
the President's decision. He said
'. "It is important for a presidential
candidate to get out beyond tele television
vision television broadcasts from the White
. House."
Knowland also said he would
be "very mnch surprised'' H
Vice President Richard M. Nix
oa "takes himself eut of the
race" for second place on the
Republican ticket He said he
knows of no "wide-spread acti activity"
vity" activity" to replace Nixon.
The GOP leader, appearing on
the CBS TV program, "Face the
Nation," agreed with Mr. Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower that there Is no need for
the President to conduct a "whistle-stop'
campaign.
But he Baid the President's de decision
cision decision to curtail his campaign
acitivites places a "greater bur burden
den burden on Republicans involved in
tight House and Senate races.
Knowland said he "expects to
discuss this view" with Mr. Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower and point out to hint
that the position of "some con congressional
gressional congressional candidates will be en endangered.
dangered. endangered. Slilin Accused
Of Causing Damage
To Soviel Stale
BERLIN, March 5 (UP -East
German Communist leadei Walter
tnhrirfit todav accused the late
Soviet Premier Josef Stalin -of m m-flicitng
flicitng m-flicitng "severe damage" on the
Soviet state and Communist party.
Ulbricht, first deputy premier
nd first secretary of the Soviet
zone Communist party, took his
cue from the anti-Stalinist line of
the recent Soviet Communist con congress
gress congress in Moscow.
But in his criticism of Stalin he
went even beyond that made by
the Soviet leaders in their stress
on the new "collective rule" in
Russia.
In an article in-, the East Ger German
man German Communist newspaper Noues
Deutschland, Ulbricht said Stalin
was not "Marxist -classical au author"
thor" author" and damaged the Soviet reg regime
ime regime through his "cult of one per person."
son." person." ..."
Ulbricht said 'that 'without a
doubt after Lenin's death Stalin
did a considerable service m tne
huiiritatf nt Socialism and in the
fight agains the enemy party
groups of the Trotskyists, uu uu-charinites
charinites uu-charinites and the bourgeois na nationalists.",
tionalists.", nationalists.", ', ". v ;
However." he added, "when
Stalin later nlaced himself over
ha narlv and fostered the cult of
one person, there grew out of this
evere carnage to me ooviei siaie
and the Soviet Communist party.
Tha Communist leader describ
ed the official Stalin biography as
"seu-flauery ana -misrepresentation
of party history."
Adenauer's Parly
Emeraes Sfronoer
. ... .... ,
hm Flsciions
STUTTGART, Germany, March
S (UP) Chancellor Konrad Ade-
merged stronger than ever today
-fro' elections in the large state
of Baden-Wuertteraberg.
But the party's control of both
the state government and the Up Upper
per Upper House (Bundesrat) of the fed federal
eral federal government was threatened
Dy me possiumiy ui an ui'l'UItuu"
coalition.
Th Christian Democrats won
56 of the 120 seats in the state
parliament in yesterday's e 1 e c c-tinn
tinn c-tinn siv more than before. The
Free Democrats took 21 and the
Socialists 36, a loss of two tor
;.: each.-;':;"'.' M:.".-1 ;'.;
The .voters gave the Commu Communists
nists Communists a' resounding defeat, taking
away all 'Jour seats they, held in
the last parliament.
Tha IPron npmnrrafg and the
Refugee 'Partv teamed with the
Christian Democrats in the last
coalition' government led by Chris Christian
tian Christian Democrat Dr, Gebhard Muel
ler. ".':''-'r-7"7,7Z.-... ""-:"
Mueller said he would try to
form a new such coalition but
there were reports the free Demo Democrat
crat Democrat and the Socialists would
form an opposition coalition to together
gether together with the seven refugee par party
ty party seats to pit 64 seats against the
Christian Democrats' 56.
Loss of control by the Christian
Democrats would tumble Ade Adenauer's
nauer's Adenauer's 21-17 majority in the Bun Bundesrat
desrat Bundesrat to a 16-22 minority since
the state parliament chooses five
members to the Bonn Upper
House. The five seats now are
held by Christian Democrats.
Heriry Lynch Dies
At Age Of 76
In Suburban Home
Henry Lynch, a retired employe
of the Locks Division, died yester yesterday
day yesterday at1 his suburban home in Lla Llano
no Llano Bonito after a short illness.
A' native of Barbados, he was 76
yes o'd.
Mr. Lynch is survived by his
wile, Martha, and his children.
Icilda, in addition to five grand grandchildren.
children. grandchildren. V
- Funeral arrangements have not
been announced.

"Going into a few key states

maybe New York, New England,!
tne Middle West or trie Far V est,;
would be different from a whistle whistle-stop
stop whistle-stop campaign," he said.
House GOP Leader Joseph W.
Martin Jr., (Mass.) said he also
thinks Ifr. Eisenhower should ap appear
pear appear at "a few big political meet meetings
ings meetings across the country to meet
the people." But he said Mr. Ei Eisenhower's
senhower's Eisenhower's primary reliance on
TV appearances will be "no han handicap.'
dicap.' handicap.'
Martin, appearing on the ABC
TV Program. "Celebrity Parade,"
dso predicted that the President
will be elected by a bigger major majority
ity majority than in 1952.
He forecast that Nixon again will
be the GOP vice presidential can candidate.
didate. candidate. Knowland said the Republi Republicans
cans Republicans should regain control of the
House if they win the presiden presidencyand
cyand presidencyand he predicted t a e y
would. But he said it is going to
be a "much closer proposition"
in the Senate.
Knowland said he saw no rea reason
son reason to believe that "independent
voters" will shy away from the
GOP ticket if Nixon is on it. He
said the attacks on Nixon, come
from people who would not vote
Republican anyway.
Knowland, a rival of Nixon for
California political power, was
asked if he would be willing to
serve as Mr. Eisenhower's run
ning mate if Nixon did not run.
He saw this was an "iffy ques question
tion question which is not likely to occur."
Pressed for an answer, he finally
said: "No person has right to turn
down such an invitation if it came
under the circumstances you
name.

If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER," America's smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS

,.. -."

1 (SCAL
140.00 )
r Oil .'A J
' SS PIECE A
' SET ( Ui.

with vory

62 Po. Service) for 8
, ..i ..... .,.
SoUd Mahogany Drawar Chast
VALUE $30

Now, for the FIRST time ever, you can save
almost 50 when ydu buy famous Watson
Sterling! This Special Sale offers' you sen sensational
sational sensational savings. You "can purchase individual
pieces, add a place setting or two to your
present service or start to build a complete
set. As an extra special offer, you will receive
a $30' SOLID mahogany Drawer Chest at ab absolutely
solutely absolutely no extra cost, with the purchase of a
52 pc. Service for 8! This unusual offer is
available in eight of Watson's loveliest sterling
patterns! Prices start, as LOW as $1.75 for a
single piece; for a complete Service for 8, dur during
ing during this Special Sale! V
LIMITED TIME OFFER

9

pope yarns Diplomats To Take

Long Look At Red Peace Talk

VATICAN CITY, March 5 (UP)
Pope Pius XII told diplomats
fim 42 nations yesterday that
wlstf the Communists call "peace"
is merely a "precarious "t r u c e
during which they await the social
and economic collapse of the th
er peoples."
The Pontiff addressed the diplo diplomats
mats diplomats during a mass audience in
which they congratulated him on
his 80th birthday and paid tribute
to his life-long efforts in behalf
of peace.
Members of the diplomatic
corps to the Vatican also preen preen-td
td preen-td the Pope with 49 white-bound
books on peace at a birthday
aift.
The Pope did not mention Com Communism
munism Communism by name in his French French-language
language French-language address. But, in a cl,ear
allusion to the Communist "peace
offensive" the Pontiff said:
"Such formulas as 'national
nnitv' nf 'sneial nroffress should
nott deceive us, For militant mater
ialism, 'peacetime represents out
a trim, a verv nrecarious truce.
during which it awaits the social)
and economic collapse of tne oiner
peoples."
In an apparent reference to
Soviet offers of economic said to
underdeveloped nations, the Pop
urged utmost caution in consid considering
ering considering offers of a "fallacious
peace" connected with "economic
relations or the exchange of tech technical
nical technical experience."

WATSON
STERLING

Y

t
I

The Pope said also that overly
high hopes placed in technical pro progress
gress progress in recent decades have
"caused cruel disillusion." ;
"Social upheavals following the
application of science in a too
olten materialistic spirit have ruin ruined
ed ruined an. existing order without
reolacine it with a better and

stronger construction," he said.
French Envoy Wladimir D'Or
fnr the diDloma
titc corps, paid tribute to the Pope
for "the work of peace wmcn your
Holiness has conducted ununngiy
for 17 years through continously
renewed storms and difficulties."
Tn Tsnonse. the Pone voiced
hon that his efforts may have
rmicsH livelier desire for peace
in thA world and incited men to
sacrifice selfishness to it.
Easy Gake
NEW YORK -(UP) If any
thing chocolate is a big hit with
your family, try this treat. Bake a
square, one-layer cake, using one
of the mixes if you wish, and while
it's still warm, cover the top with
V4 cup (V4 of a 6-ounce package)
of chocolate chips. Heat in a mod
erate oven (350 degrees) 2 to 3
minutes, or until the chips are just
softened. Remove from tne oven
and spread the softened chips over
the' cake. Serve warm. Makes an
elegant snack for afternoon coffee,
J-
1
1
-

9

ill

A GOOD

Auerbachi Poliak
Richardson
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange

II I I I I I 1

I'll be glad to give you my
views on this and any other
questions you may have on
stocks and investing.

PANAMA BRANCH- OFFICE
J Tivoli Avenue 21-A46
Telephone: Panama 20074
' '.' '";' 4'. ' "'
... : .:.. 1 f..V! i :-' '-
P. O. Box 3474, Panama

NY till II I 1 1

STOCK?

C. T. Richardson, Jr.
Resident Partner

1 1 I I I f i

Um
i
&
4
""



rsct icts

THE PANAMA AMF.-ICAN AN' XSHtltSDtSt MM SZTl St. kTIZ
MONIUT. MAKC3 S. 1!5I
(i&i&szfi-lrue Life Adventures
TtT.Z.1 1ND TZZ flZATTJ
CJ CIO 2 CI KT.vri3
1 jT " C?V trey -a?? cc t
IIohxos Border CcpSf j
notch r
f : i
S

By OSWALD JACOBY
Wntttn for NEA Service

NORTH 1
A J 10 9 S
. VQ54 v
J
a;io
west east
A None 7 $
V J 109 8 3 VK72
AI03 9 S 5 4 2
5 4 2 KJ
SOl'TH (D)
AAKQI432
V A
KQ7
S3
Neither side vul.
Sath He Nrth Esl
2 A Pass 3 A fast
3 A P 3 A Pass
( A P'1 Pas pas
Opening lead V J

ToJoy's hand presents a prin prin-..
.. prin-.. ciple of play that comes along sur sur--
- sur-- -pi i-mg!- often when you're on the
; lookout for it. The idea is lo
keep the opponents in the dark in in-'
' in-' siead of allowing tbera to find out
. whst is living on.
The straightforward way to play
today's hand is to win the first
J",, trick with the ace pf hearts, draw
- trumps, and eventually take the
club finesse. If the finesse suc-i
crotls, all is well. If the finesse
lose, the opponents will almost
surely take their ace of diamonds.
This would be a good enough line
of play if nothing better were

available. There is. however, no

reason to draw the trumps before

taking the club finesse. Why give

West a chance to signal in

d'av)onds, to show the location
, of the ace of diamonds?

South should take the club finesse
at the second trick, If it wins,
there is time enough to draw
trumps then. If the finesse loses,
. however, East may have to guess
whether to return a heart or a
diamond. Opponents have been

Claims Gem Robbery
EL PASO, Tex., March 5 (UP)
Police in this border town said
today they still are on the look lookout
out lookout for a tnysterioua statuesque
blonde mho hoaxed them into

j oenevuijj mat sne was : auhh
! Colby, a New .York public rela relations
tions relations executive, and had been
robbed of $7,800 orth of Jewel-1
ry. ...
I Police had no idea why the

: pretty pirl tried to impersonate;
Miss Colby or why she reported;
!the theft of the valuable jewel-j
:ry. Actually, according to police'
LL Fred Hudson, the stranger!
i lost a handbag containing cos

tume Jewelry worth no more

tnan f i d.
The handbag was recovered
with the costume.. Jewelry intact.
But the mysterious stranger ap apparently
parently apparently bad left town.

Don Cinaglia of Alamogordon.j
N.M. had driven the girl from j
the airport to the Hilton Hotel!

nere ana it was irom his car
that she reported the jewels sto stolen.
len. stolen. The next day Clnaglia was
shown photographs of Miss Col Colby
by Colby and he said: "That's defi

nitely not the Rirl." Cinaglia was:

iieaieu oi any responsiDMty or
the hoax.

ThS African
PAN 6 O LIN
IS A
. NOCTURNAL.

: FOR lfaSCTS

Pm,tmi if tarn ha, tint

I

;,a 0232

...UNTIL. MOUESTEC THEN IT ITSK,? 1MTO A
SA.W-TOOTWEP TKAf. WOE TO THE MOtESTEK TMAT IS
UNPEK THfe KNIF&-UKE OP THE TA1U

Dead Newborn llegro
Babfciinf In Box
On Doris Duke Land

W MAKP FRIPWDS

. j v. I i

1

SOMERVILLE. K. .T s

;(UP) Police investigated toda-y
, the death of an apparently new-

wrn wegro gin wnose body was

I iouna on tne uons Duke estate in
j nearby Hillsborough township.
I Stale police said the body was

iouna ivin? in an ctnntv u.hi.li-

bottle box wrapped lo newspaper)
and an old couch cover.
Special Deputy Leroy Fisher, a!

memoer oi me estate I police
force, said he discovered the body
about 2:30 p.m. yesterday. He
said he found the box behind a
bush about 75 feet from Royce
field Road which borders the es estate.
tate. estate. Authorities said the child ap appeared
peared appeared to be newborn and was
wrapped in recently-dated news newspapers.
papers. newspapers. State police alerted central New
Jersey hospitals to report any
women seeking post pregnancy

treatment.

U U LJ

UNIT

CHEST, v- RAY 0

i

CHEST fo

1

-

T.U.Hif. U.l tot. 0.i

mSmJt

i I-

rXXCCXJ A5D C2S tKCS

It s Real

tar nT&nnx klossu

TOD VierATe MC.
P16(ON Pie

M5U RS A CKWA

BOMB K At

COOL AMP

problem is lyrSi f r -iffc" vc
Solved Bi' the VK f I
FRACTION: t MM S

J&5

WHAT TVoadp?
OURStrWASTAtetM
Tb THE REPAIR Stof

TOW

ml

4 1N NA Santu. IM. T.tt. ,(. U.S. 'l X

AIXET OOF

Doc's Voice

ms f t. UAMU3I

,f..M TM JEUJN YOU THERE'S VVJ WW.' I'D 5WEAR 1J fT BP. THEN WHA Hfc fX
atfT MO GREATER FfeMAEA FDR THAT SOUNDED IT'3 A NOT LIRINfi A HAND 'TAINT
ftW ACHE5 AN' RMNS, BURPS. AN" igfc JUST UKE D. HIM ALL ) TO PREVEMT THIS HlSjiO i
-W W 5PPAIN3 TVAN tXXTOR MtLLQJSSOi 7 MIUER RlfiHT? c PE5TRLJCTV7N OF j M0RE J

BOOTS AND BK BUDDDl

Rubbing It In

1 EDGAR MAIITUI

The member of a group who
talks in a much louder voice
than hi.1! companion usually
pives the impression that he Is
showoff. It is much better to
modulate your voice so that It
doesn't drown out the voices of
others.
You may not attract quite as
much attenfon. but the atten atten-t!in
t!in atten-t!in you get will be more favorable.

, known to guess wrong in this sit

uation.

We can carry this a step farther
by giving East some reason to

make the wrong guess. When West
leads the jack of hearts at the
first trick, put up dummy's queen
of hearts immediately.
As declarer, you know that you

will have to play your ace, of
hearts on this trick, East does not
know this. He will play his kings
of hearts, and will think that this
play has forced out your ace. East
is bound to. assume that you have
at least one more heart in your
hand, and East will therefore sure surely
ly surely return a heart when the club
finesse loses.
This is, of course, exactly what
you want." You will ruff the heart,
draw trumps, and get rid of orour
three diamonds on dummy's clubs.

"Thtt'a rlghtwtwot Mt and ShulUJ".

Faltering Philip
rhiHp'a Uf b filled with braises.
Well-worn atepi tad raga he met.
Hepalrs wonld 4ero his home like new.
. A. Classifieds, Jut the right clue'

tU STORI OF MARTHA WAX

Boy's Admiration

By WILSON SCRCGOS

TMEV CAMS RAW TOW JJ

KEW VOIT TOGEThEk

aw wu sot vae 1 wnt thewu ws stao

MOTHEBISSOIKBTO vSS K'SHTTntsc HsN

WA?eYCUNTWAI7SHAa7

.TOO

!

W WHV( I TH1NW ITS VkONCfeTrFil.

'CL'ni,AMw

SEIMS

5

I'Bff THE (SCfATPST.'

SVE8VBOOY KNOWS THAT-EVEN

worn

WWW HW WJU.)Lt f1
e um trnE .. ... t i

ftXJD I'M CLfVD TO SEE VOITRE
"Bit BOOOGH TO ftWH THAT
wrt mw. fcW, GftVa OE
VWOQ WOULD BE tO WAWE
A5 10 GO TOR A GG

UKE THE UV).aEAXH.F.

"If JV-.

1 0i1
AWMTT
Of THE

XWO

"THEM TOOV)E TT. "TH13 STMOE OP
THE A)ERfcSE WftW.WE'UEBE

TAWIWG ABOOT.JTJW COVLtCT
W6 SOME MOE9 TO BOH.TJ
R SOO UOOV.WT GET A

TWE. -E0EW F0M VOUT?

BEST TWE VPS.

TEfRE TOO

CiAATlTi

CAPTAIN AII

Mystery

y LESLIE TURNER

rniscaLA's ror

Gentle Rem:nder

By AL TCRMEEB

MOM SATO TO TELL

MOU SOMETHING'.

1 L VJ llM I

J BUTS THEN IT
I JUST I fCAN'T BE SO
CAN'T SS'PORTANT

-JOW,YES.lS
7W47'5 WHAT)

SHg
TO

SAND ON ;

THE FRONT J'JJ,

. t.m.. u. .r W. I

' iMt MUV 7 WOT ID AWM.VZ&

nvn iv irw r it ill UF- n 1

flUAKPlM'Ttf SWT?

(a5

T56B iCRAP HWft Y EXACTVVi WiP I

HO tALUEf AMD WE'KEl WMT TO KNOW

THRU 1BmGm,0 WHPir,6Wi tf

TKEV'ICE NO L05 TO JOB TO

U5l THE50MErHlUa V PIWPOUTJ

r

1

ls i nu u&n ftc-LU uupt, OOKJ'T ICMlTW THAT

A WELL KEPT EtVtWAS, ttR.-cKES-J.

TtL WL KEU.7 WJCP-l pfw w wi i-ui.

CA&E WA& STOLEN

M KVA1A..

1 irrcor urtTtliua 44

FACT THAT ONE 0'U

THKif MVK

TO BE TKKE-l

M0RTI MEEKXE

Bad G

-LJILUK
II (clOrA6LPRIf )

IT BOUND WW Y THATiS RWHT,

A HOLE IN THE A RJTTHEEE

MIPPLE AND CAN

iaiPMYFINSR

THB0U6HIT?

A 7 OCE THAM k

V one yi

ueSsTTKlI!

MOtE
TWAN ONE
NOO MEANT j
WAVE A
CHOICE?

OH, NO,

THEVEE

ALL THE

SAME

7

. By 'JICK CAVALL1
mr'r-1-

REAL FEE5H
HOM&BAkEP
P0LWHNLTP5 j

TZTl pick M-tr
2.J j j CAUALLl '1 I
f 1H I Inc. f "V

K KO.tRltlNa IM)L5

hajuh aouru uti om wai

M J K mLLJAMt

ECGS BDNNI

Assistance

LIkt ThatT

..-.,r-T.J- liZJy VPACKET. GLUTZIE..N
.iU D VER DISTUPaN' J

BUM, OkAV.V
LOAFER DON'T 1
...W U BLOW A
Should IVsasketv

ICOME LEFT A LITTLE, WATCH OUT
TVFER THAT CRATE )
r-9 l "S

rJELLO.HAKjlSAL IT' A TCsht

w see you again, looking

AS UTAS A CHIP.M1.1N.

AFTER ALL THESE VfiARS

STILL FLYMS I
$EE OLD

!PTK ?

r v

V HELIC

6KEETIN55,MAI?THAf VER I'M

HEkS AKO THESE SOT X

THE 'COPTER iKh
OM A NEAT LITTLE .TPT

JOg pot SAY DONT

. i cll me THAT'S MY goy

s THAT MlPRa

rILED Or OM TH6

'Si

4

i

tlDFTlPIED

iTME gOPV PAT

TH'HIl l4Tltt. VTDAlIVlk.W

TCAPPlW.' I CA1NT SLEEP IM

rUK MLUSt UN A WARM

MIAHT AM' IP Wu I -IPcm A

WINPfcK TH SMELL IS WUS

THAN TH HEAT.'

1

1

THE FUR COAT



MONDAY. MRCH 5. V'
'

' AMEItltAN
FACE fit

1 and Olli

6

'OX

131,

Panama

iciwide

or

iJij Staffers

Box

503 1, A;icon

, I've other club warn m in his hemi hemi-j
j hemi-j sphere and the I'nited States.
i he meeting wis toliowed by

iEjUi and Leo Krziza's illustrated

colored slides of their tnp around

the world which was enjoyed by

group of 40 members asd their

guests.
Delicious refreshments w

served by the hostesses, Mrs. P.
Barr, Mrs. J. Hidalgo and Mrs.

T. B. Idol

iff u L mttffJ If Itif.

t

mm

P.msm 2P 74 0 v 2Q7U Ulw- 900

tad II :m. tnlf

i

7 "f

f 4,

u

."V r

' ,'.-. "'

n

"M-

PHILADELPHIA. Mar. 5 (VP
The Share Your Birthday

'Foundation arid the Fhiladtl

Knovlond Predicts Close Vole
In Democratic Farm Aid Drive

the

f.i

WASHINGTON. March 5 (IP!

0

exports has contributed sharply

Senate Republican Leader William the heavy buildup of farm surplus- 2'..

voting Thur-

shc.vaown cor

suroort issue,
a tie Agriculture Department'.

; appraisal of the farra export out out-llooK
llooK out-llooK was given to the Howe
. 'Agriculture Appropriations!' s a b b-.1
.1 b-.1 committee in response to questions
raised by Rep. Charles B. Dears
to lU-N' C.) at a secret hearing Jan.

Th npvt mpplir.o will he Aoril

5, with a Penny Social. Mrs. Sel-jphia public school system today

lers and Mrs. Camnbell as host-! announced a carwpaien amons

school cniiaren to snre men

birthday gUts with the children

esses.

l)inner For Dry And Mrs.

David Sohier v

Dr. and Mrs. David Sohier

of

of ; Italy.-

The joint announcement n-as

Boston. Massachussetts are pass-jmade bv Mrs. Elizabeth D. Hei

in g through the Isthmus again on ler of Merlon, Pa., originator oil

their way ajme from South Amer

ica. . -They
were euests of honor at a

dinner given by Mr. and Mrs.

Charles AkiL on Saturday.

the foundation, and Dr. Allen H
Wetter, superintendent of the
public schools.'

Wetter invited the 300 Phila

delphia schools to cooperate by)

holding parties in observance c

the birthdays or children, teacn

Rush Season Blns With

"Proeressive Dinner

Beta Chapter, Beta Sigma Phi:ers. narenta and citizens durmr

sorority oegan meir kusc seasoni the month.

with a progressive dinner Wednes

day evening. Tne guests first as assembled
sembled assembled at the home o( Kathleen

Gifts brought to the partie

will be presented to the childre

t. Knowland today predicted a

"very close" vote on a Democra Democratic
tic Democratic drive to junk the administra administration
tion administration flexible farm price support
program in favor of fixed high
supports.'
He said he "sure hopes"' the
administration viewpoint will pre

vail when the Senate reaches the
voting stage late this week. But
he added that a "realistic appra appraisal"
isal" appraisal" indicates that a$ few as four

votes may decide the issue.
" It was revealed that the Agricul

ture Department has warned Con

gress that farmers, already caugn;
in a price-cost squeeze, are threat

ened with a further loss of over-

eas markets to foreign competi

tion.

The steady- decline in U.S. farm

ings of this very fine unit of
Embassy.

the'

Hoffman in Cristobal for f r u i tj of Italy in honor of those whosH

cup ana irora mere weni 10 uaiunjpirtnaays are celebrated,
jor the main course with Betty Jo;

Slaughter as hostess. Dessert was A Philadelphia school child!

served m Margarita at the home, will o to Italy to help distrib
of Nancy Ramsey. The t h r e eiut the sifts.

nomes were attractively decorat decorated
ed decorated to carry out the theme of Lov Lover's
er's Lover's Eve, Feb. 29.
After coffee, Kay Klontz, Rush
Chairman, proposed a game simil similar;
ar; similar; to Charades with Famous Lov Lovers
ers Lovers to be portrayed. An assort assortment
ment assortment of props: bridal veils, mus mustaches,
taches, mustaches, swords, uniforms, and ac-

cesrjries were furnished and the

hilarious skits began Winners

were judged by popular applause

d Anna Mae Butcher and Mary

niehion as Romeo and Juliet in

AMONG THOSE ENJOYING THE BULLFIGHT
Mrs. Luis Martinz, Dr. Octavio Fabrega, Mrs.
sonallties. r

YESTERDAY at the Macarena were Mr. and
Chela Moreno and many other well known per-

MR. AND MRS. LAWRENCE BARCA, JR.,
ENTERTAIN FOR COMMANDER SAM ORD
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Barca, Jr., were hosts last eve evening
ning evening at a cocktail party at their home in Diablo Heights lor
Commander Merrill M. Sanford, ISN, who is the Command Commanding
ing Commanding Officer of the "Aeolus," now In Canal waters for a brief
Btay. The "A,eolusB Is one of the US Navy's largest cable lay laying
ing laying vessels. '.-', -.-
Commander Sanford is the husband of Mrs. Barca a
mother, the former Mrs. Edna Husum, who was a resident
of the Canal Zone for a number of years. The Sanfords
now make their home in Arlington, Virginia.

.Tennis' Ball At El Panama
A Tennis Ball was held 1 a s.t
night at the patio ot the Hotel 1
Panama, at which Comptroller
General, Roberto Heuretmatta,
presented trophies to the winners
and runners-up of the tournament.
Lucho Azcarraea ahd Clarence

Martin orchestras played. der Lebrun of the Lamoureux Or-'

Among those Joining, in the funkhestra and finished her

weie tennis stars Mario uames oetore ncr marriage, as

leanor Walker. All proceeds will

be in aid of the Salvation Army
School for the Blind.
Mrs; Henderson first started pia piano
no piano lessons at the age of 6 under
Miss Lticy King, a member of the
Bachgeseilschatt. Later she stu studied
died studied chamber music in Paris un-

and Yola Ramirez of Mexico, who
entertained the assemoied guests
with an' impromptu exhibition of
the :'cha-i.'ha-cha. v
Mr. and Mrs. Dick Dellinger,
Mi, and '.Mrs. Fred Gerhardt and-

Mr.' and Mrs. Dick Nelson, reci

procated bv dancing a Panama

cial and business meeting last
Thursday in the Civic Center.
' The meeting was called to or order
der order by the president, Mrs. Juan

Hidalgo with the reading of "A

Collect For Clubwomen" by Mrs.
Rex Sellers.- r
A report was given on the. An Annual
nual Annual Card Party ylpd recently.

The Club presented the annual

charity contribution to the "March

of Dimes" and the Cancer Re

search. It was announced that a

Penny bocia. will be held at our
next business meeting,, April, 5, in

tne civic center,

.Mrs. Aldcrton presented a gift

for the Bntdry Apron rund. A

trip to the Museum will be dis

cussed after Easter,
The President welcomed Mr. E

E, Stern, a new member, into the
dub.
Mrs. Walker, M. Aldcrton who

studies! was 0lt Club delegate to tne uen uen-a
a uen-a pupil eial Federation ot Women's Club

ath Scene tied with Jean

Coffey and Betty Slaughter's por

trayal of Scarlett O'Hara and

Rhett Butler. This Called for an.
other skit to break the tie and Ma

ry uanieison ana Anna Mae

Butcher won with an uproarious

"Samson and Delilah" episode

The winners were presented with

lovely vases.
The Rushees were invited to at

lend a Model Meeting on March
14 to become acquainted with the

aims and principals of the Sorori

ty. Ruth Morris will be hostess for
this meeting.
Newcomers' Cluh Vwits
Places of Interest
In Panama city
Twenty-one nitmbers of the
Newcomers' Club visited P a n a a-ma,
ma, a-ma, Friday. The group was met
at Panama station by bus which

took the party to the Church of

the Golden Altar, and to the Unit United
ed United States Embassy, where Mr.

.Mr. James told of the librarv

facivihties open to all races and

the ideal arrangement of the

books for quick reference in Span

ish and English. There are 2500

members of this library who par

ticipate in the varied program set

up lor their enjoyment and inter

pretation each month with special

musical programs and films
There are 22 different national!
ties represented in this service

Mrs. Casler presented a film for,
the group "The Village and the
Technician," an example of the'

educational films usee! by thi

es and their dampening ettect on;
farm prices. The department said foreign pro-
Sponsors of the Democratic bill duclion of wheat and cotton "i
contend it would pump about 830 expected to continue increasing.
million dollars into the farm econo-' further reducing overseas demind
my this year by substituting flat' for American products. It also.
90 per cent supports on basic farm predicted "furthers increases in
crops for present flexible supports. 1 competition" for foreign markets
Ine senate is scheduled to start in flue-cured tobacco.

MEETINGS

Annual Meeting of the Stockholders
THE PANAMA COCA COLA
, BOTTLING COMPANY-
The Annual Meeting; of the stockholders of The
Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company will be held
on Monday, March 19, 1956, at 4:00 p.m. at the
main office of the Company located at No. 19-A,
Jose Francisco de la Ossa Ave., Panama, Republic
of Panama.

people in Panama each year. Ma

n.V are shown by mobile units.

The last stop was made at the

Presidene

tdur

Crh nUc for IncluulM la this
Mum should lubmlltrd In (pe-

yrritlm fera U( milr4 ( 1
1ht box number littrd daily in "S "S-tll
tll "S-tll and Olhtrswis,- r drlivercd
by hand la the ofdet. Noticea
neeting cannot bt accepted by tele-hont.

Cristobal Emblem Club

The Cristobal Emblem Club will

hold its regular monthly meelmgi

on Tuesday, March bin at 7:30 p.m.

at the Elks Home.
Roy Palm Chapter
Meets Monday Night
The OKicial Visitation to Royal
Palm Chapter No. 2 of the Most

Worthy Grand Matron Sister Flor

unit for showing to some 400.0O0!ence Plummer will" be held at the
nan a m Uann h a annlt iiarm Ufa 1 . t .

stated meeting at Cristobal Maso Masonic
nic Masonic Temple Monday night at 7:30

iencia, where a conductedfed by covered dish dinner to be
of the beautiful "Y ello wiserved ,t 6:15 m x memberi

of the well known professor, So-1 convention m costs itica gave her
lomon. i most impressive report and the
.Durins her married life, t h el highlights of this convention, and

Ambassadress has plajed in cqn-l brought, with her the
certs in various countries mclud-'to"1'""1? of friendships

and the stately dining hallof the 0rdt are cordially invited

nunc iic y0 attend this very special meet-

if a w

visitors.

Room

was held the graceful

runs in the patio gave

turesque greeting to

A Class of Instruction will be
held on Tuesday evening at 7:30
. L .. . I H Y L 1,. 1- .. 3

p.m. uy ine uiusi wuiuiy urana

Mrs. Nathan Fuller and Mrs

Moses Hartmann "ere instrumen-j

tal In planning the luncheon at ft ; : t" rT '' "i""

PI Panama which enneluded the

program for the day.

Members makin? the trip were

Mesdames, Nathan Fuller, Moses,

Hartman, Chas. Chadd, Norman

Hutchinson, B. Le Doux, Lorem

MrKaiu Executive v Secretarv of ; usrspach, James J o n n s o n, &.

the Fmhasev efti.rtiieted a tour of i Blair. Kenneth Ramer, John Su-

the grounds and the Embts:.y

building.

. The Club also visited the Infor Information
mation Information Service of the United

warmest! States where Mr, Cassler gave a
between! most informative talk on the work

er. Howell Wynne, J. Langdorr,

William Stanford, A. L. Wilder
John Campbell "Valter Goggans
and euests were Mrs. Walter 6oe

ans Sr., A. Wilder, Mrs. William

Stanford
Prithm.

Fred Gerhardt and-; ing Belgium,"- Austria and Para

guay, blie nas also played lor the
radio in Belgium, the Argentine,
El Salvador and Paraguay.
Mrs. Eleanor Walker is a Unit-'
ed States citizen having been born
in Lorain Ohio.

She was a pupL of the -late F.

nian 'cumbia'': and "tamborito."

Miss Brltte Marie Jiinson
To Wed
Invitations are being issued for

the lortiiconiiiiK -marriage ot.Mitis Addison Porter, formerly of the

rilte Marie Janson, daughter of i New England .Conservatory and of

the Swedish Consul.. General and

Mrs. Carl Axel Janson to Dr, Car Carlos
los Carlos Alberto Pcdrescht, son of Mr.
and Mrs.- Carlos Emilio Petfres Petfres-chi.
chi. Petfres-chi. i '
The wedding ceremony will take
place on March 11, at 4:30 p.m.
at the Sacred Heart Chapel in Al Alto
to Alto Lino, Boquete, Chiriqui Pro Pro-vice,
vice, Pro-vice, followed by a reception at
the Hotel Psnamonte, Boquete.
Vacationing
Miss Olive Brooks of the staff of
The Panama American, left last
week for a vacation trip which
will take in Mexico and theJJnit theJJnit-ed
ed theJJnit-ed States. . ; .
Luncheon Given t
By Miss Heurtematle
Honoring the participants of Pa Panama's
nama's Panama's First International Tour Tournament
nament Tournament at the Hotel El Panama,
Miss Ceci Heurtcmatte entertain entertain-e
e entertain-e t lunch on Saturday at her
home in Bella Vista.
Two Piano Recital
Scheduled u
A two piano recital will be giv given
en given at" the National Theatre at 8
p.m. March 14 by Mrs. Ian Hen Henderson,
derson, Henderson, wife of the British Am Ambassador
bassador Ambassador and her friend, Mrs. E-

I. Phillippe formerly of the Con-I

servatoire Nationale hi Paris,
Mrs. Walker has (ravelled wide-;
ly and has played in concerts in
the United States, France, the'
Argentine and Paraguay. I
She is now Director of Music at;
the American High School in Bue-'
nos Aires, where her husband,
Air Commodore H. E. Walker, M.i
C, D.F.C., R.A.F (ret) was Brit-(
ish Air Attache.
Tickets art on sale at the Brit-j
ish Embassy (Consulate), Nos!

2-0912 and 2-0913), the Salvation
Army (Captain Hodgson, 0792 La
Boca Road, telephone No. Balboa
3ii93), the, Jewish Welfare Board,
7J2-X La Boca Road, (telephone
Nos. Balboa 1072 and 2617), and
the Y.M.C.A. 836, Amador Road,
(telephone Balboa 2759 and 2839;,

Mr. And Mrs. John Moses
Leaving Soon

Mr. and Mrs. John Moses were!

the honor guests recently at a
dinner tendered them by Mrs.
Hercilia I. Cucalon and Miss Ma Maria
ria Maria lem' at their home.

Gamboa Women's Club Social
And business Meeting
Members of the Gamboa Worn'
en's Club enjoyed their March So

re invited. This will be most in

teresting and all who can are urg urged
ed urged to attend.

Isthmian Rtbakah Ledge

To Held Card Party

March the 24th at the W e r z
Memorial, Balboa there will be 3

door prizes also table prizes and

refreshments. Tickets are .now on

sale.

Mrs.' Luise Merchant is in

charge ot reservations and may

srv nd, '.Mr- Howardlbe reached by oiling. 2-3317.

Carribbean Callage' Club Mtetinas

Scheduled for this month

Tuesday, n'arch 13 at 7:30 n.m

Executive Board meeting at the

neu vivas ruums u urisiooai.
Tuesday, March 20 at 7:30 n.m.

General Assembly at the Red Crois
rooms in Cristobal. Garden studv

group will be in charge of the program.

& v v :
1 :

t

iidertudiend

ckrfof

MJe by irtist-ctftjmen.,in
Ametic' 'silver city where

for generations

been devoting their lives
to this finest of crafts- Ask
about our Place Setting PU.

ail em m

THIS WEEK'S LUCKY WINNERS

Charles W. Crilzer
Feliciano Gonz&lez
D. Halman
Rosa Petterson
Mary Denis
Pat Lawless

Luis M, Barrero
Hilda Sincere
Gladys Gilkes
Irma Wright
Sam McDonouch
Florence Hebert

AND IHEYWO.VFOR FREE!

TAHITI
f 8-47 (137) Central Ave.

f

O Beautiful Italian Hand-Bags
made of transparent plastic aluminum
O Beach Baskets
- ': ,-' 1 .-. ''''-'''' I "'
O Colorful Straw Purses

at

Tivoli Avenue N? 16

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR CLUB PLAN

PHILCO WASHING MACHINES NO DOWN PAYMENT

f -lit

... j o ;

REGULAR. PRICE
$195.00
Special Prize
$ !56.oo

MONTHLY
$9.20

CLUO

$5,00

'i ; .-'i-.-
I PHILCO !. j j WILCO
t (a ;
: i

- i it

Regular Price $285.00
' ' 1
Special Price $ 228.0
Monthly......... $13.45
ciub........,..$ 7.00

Member of Cuentas Comerciales

It's two

uasSiers in one.

HilllU

a si LIE

IV

21-023tb Central Are..
Tels. 2-1830 2-1833

? hi

.

FOR THESE: LUCKY FOLKS WHO WON
IN OUR
?RE WEEKLY RAFFLE!

Judith Barrera -I.
M. Warren
Alice E. Westman
El via Chavez1-'--
Ciro Quintero
Guillermina de Almillategti
J. B. Fortune
Aurora Ponca -Norma
de Cohen

Col. J. C. Frink Jr.
Sgt. Ivan R. Leslie
Mary Kelleher
Alfredo de la. Cuardia.,
Sgt. A. Sloan
Juana F; Zetner
Juana de Dios Montecer
J. Conk tin, Jr.

COME IN AND BROWSE AROUND AND SEE
FOR YOURSELF HOW EASY IT IS TO WIN!
Rattan $eadqua iters
Home of Vertical Blinds and Plast?-0flm
USE OUn EASY CHEDIT TEnr.lS!

T1

!f It

f'm m Urn fir--- r-

I S IffMHfl i 'II f it i I t Jit.

"OVR FURNITURE GRACES THE LO VELILS T-HOMES'-



YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY

A) I '
Vw j

LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR ACENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57

i i

MIMMUM
FOR

12 WORDS
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
CANAL ZONE POLICLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
DR. C. I. FABREGA, D.D.S.
DR. R. AVI LA JR.. M.D.
Tlvoll (4th f Julyl Ave.. Ne. :1AM
ITpLul Ancm School Fl.yirounu)
RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
J JIM RWGE
phone Panama. S-055S
PANAMA WVfKb
la 3
V appamrnw".
win relleva Toor
. corns, eallouwee,
Scholli trained)
ORTEPEDIA NACIONAL
58 Justo Aromen Ph.
Save on direct shipment
Top quality fishing
equipment
V10LETTE SUPPLY
SERVICE
Panama 3-6318
Low-Lying Ciliss
In Central Europe
Under Flood Threat
FRANKFURT, March 5- (TJW
-Rampaging rivers, swollen bv
rains and melting srtow and Ice,
today threatened to flood low low-Ivine
Ivine low-Ivine cities and towns In central
Europe. At least 10 nersons were
reported dead In Austria ana
Germany. r,pr
Fiooa crews saimuofpiu
i i. 'iwmt a( : rivers
Thousands of rjersons were eva eva-tmm
tmm eva-tmm threatened homes.
The Rh'ne pnd Pontine were
rlsmR ommousiyi uuin nw nw-and
and nw-and mountalri-v streams wp-r
i .J lt tni-renta Mint SWell-
ed over thel banks an inched
into river side communities.
The Rhin was about 10 feet
above normal at the West Ger German
man German canital of Bonn an rlslrur.
Residents watched the "Brueck "Brueck-enmaennchen"
enmaennchen" "Brueck-enmaennchen" (Boy nn the
Bridge) statue on th buttress
of the Bonn-Beul br'dp-e. When
the statute is covered, the flood
alarm Is sounded. ;
Further no the Rhine, the
water Inched steadily unwand at
Rtrasbour?!. France. At Met7,
the Mosel river was already over
the danper mark.
Tn Tjiotntinor npi-mnnv. tne
Ai. ....e,
panube was more than one foot
v, tv iq;a HiRnsfpr mark
and Ice cakes were piled on the t
- 1 HJ.1.J 1 r. ifr
rOOIS 01 lliuuuabca iiuuira. a
least eifrht houses -were crushed
by the churninof Ice as It pround
through the village. Twenty-four
others were seriously damaged.
LEGAL NOTICE
United states or America
Canal Zone
United StatM District Court For The
District of ( anl Zone -Balboa
Division
In the Matter of the Estate of Sureh
y W. Baker also known s Sarah Evan Evan-Celine
Celine Evan-Celine Weeki Baker, deceased. No. S316
probate.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice 1 hereby given that all persons
having any claims against the Estate of
.Sarah E. W. Baker also known as Sarah
Evangelina Weeks Baker, deceased are
renuired to file tneir claim., supported
by vouchers, and properly verified, with
the Clerk of the United states uisinci
Court for the District of the Canal Zone,
Balboa Division, at the Courthouse, An-x-on.
Canal Zone, or with the Executrix,
Sara Antoinette Huff, co Van Siclen,
Ramirez & De Castro. P.O. Box 124, An An-con.
con. An-con. Canal Zone. (No. 1R64 Tivoli Ave.)
on or before the 21st day of December
l'j:)6, or they will forever be barred.
Dated at Ancon, Canal Zone this 20th
Hiv of February. 1956.
(s) Sarah Antoinette Huff
Executrix.
The
Largest
on
Automobile
Row

- 1 ; i 1 ) ...... .. .... ...... ... .. ... .,

N TRANS? ORTIS XTIJJ. 1
1 Packer. Shlppr Mvm B
I .... 1-2451 -256Z

14 ,n

LIBRERIA PREC1ADO
I Street Ne. U
Agenda Internal, da Publicaciones
k t Letter Nasa
CAS A 2ALDO

Central Ave. tt
FOR RENT
Apartments
ATTENTION 6. I.I Just built
modera furnished aaaitmanrt. lt
2 bedrooms, hot, cold w e t r.
Phono Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT: Famished apart apartment
ment apartment including refrigerator, til til-ad,
ad, til-ad, ill screened, good surround surrounding!.
ing!. surrounding!. Situated 112 Via Beliiario
Porris near Roosevelt Theater.
FOR RENT: Newly furnished
and unfurnished apartments. Al Al-hambra
hambra Al-hambra Apartments, 1 0th Street
No. 8061. Phono 1386, Colon.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment
ment apartment on Via Porrat No. 1 20,
beside Rooitvelt Theater. Phono
3-5024. v
FOR RENT: Spacious two-bedroom,
two-bath, screened apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Living doom, dining room,
garage and maid's quarters. Pri Private
vate Private entrance, Campo Alegrt.
Phone Panama 3-0873.
FOR RENT: Modern apartment
with two bedrooms 16th Street
No. 6, near Roosevelt Theater,
San Francisco.
FOR RENT: Furnished or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished 2-bedroom apartment
at exclusive "El Cangrcjo." Ideal Ideally
ly Ideally suitable for Diplomat. Indi Individual
vidual Individual bathrooms, dining-living
rooms, maid's room with bath.
Linen, dishes & complete kitch kitchen
en kitchen equipment. Phone: Business
hours 2-0321, Sundays 2-3525.
FOR RENT: Luxurious modern
apartment, completely furnished:
1 bedroom, living-dining room.
First Avenue, El Carmen, oppo oppo-tfte
tfte oppo-tfte No. 94.
FOR RENT: Modern apart apartment,
ment, apartment, furnished, 2 bedrooms,
San Fmncisco 16th Street No. 6,
near Roosevelt Theater. ; ,;
IDEAL FOR COUPLE: Living f.
room, bedroom,' kitchen, etc. "v
Calle Darien No. 8, next street ;;
from 4th July Avenue.
FOR RENT: Apartments: one
small, one big. 29th Street No.
9. Phone 2-3403.
FOR RENT: Modern apartment
completely furnished. Cuba Ave.
No. 12, Apt 3, "Edificio Lare Laredo.''
do.'' Laredo.'' Can be seen 9 to 12 noon
and 2 to. 6 p.m.
FOR RENT:-Unfurnijhed com comfortable
fortable comfortable and 'modern 2-bedroom
apartment with maid' room, oa oarage
rage oarage and hot water system. Lo Located
cated Located In best residential area.
Information: Phone 3-5322.
FOR RENT: Small furnished
aoartm'-. Clean and comfort comfortable,
able, comfortable, '' -'dential area, 43rd
Street No. 13.
FOR SALE
Pft.), Motor
FOR SALE: Cabin boat Com Complete
plete Complete with accessories, 16-ft. by
6.6-ft. wide. Gatun 5-4.15.
Wanted to Buy
WANTED TO BUY : Doberman
Pinscher or soma similar dog.
Call 3-6419 from 6 to 8 p.m.
iV
CHOICE
LOTS for
SALE
Ave. Eloy Alfaro 15-159
Tel.0610

. bzr J- a

saw 1-7-

--X

. LOURDES PHARMACY
1U La CirnHuilla
FARMACIA lOMBARDO
H. ZS -B" Street
MORRISON

40 of lutj Ate 1 St
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE: 1951 Oldsmobita
Super 88 four-door, hydramatic,
radio, heater, $700. Call Balboa
2-6377.
FOR SALE: Nash sedan $200.
Call Balboa 2-1827.
FOR SALE: 1950 Ford 4-door,
excellent condition, good tires,
radio. Call 2-2487 after 6 aft afternoon.
ernoon. afternoon. FOR SALE: 1947 Studebaker
Champion 4-dr., excellent paint,
good radio,' tires and engine.
Wonderful buy at $250 cash.
Phone Panama 3-3499 or see at
No. I Federico Boyd, Bella Vista.
FOR SALE: 1954 Cadillac
hardtop coupe, cobalt blue with
all the extras. Hydramatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, power steering, power
brakes, radio, directional lights,
back-up lights, white sidewall
tires, etc. Can in excellent con--dition.
Will trade for older mod model
el model car in good condition". Call
83-3281 for appointment.
FOB SALE:
1953 Super 88 Oldsmohile 4 Door
Sedan Duty paid Power
Brakes Shaded Glass Radio
WSW Tires Automatic Trans Transmission
mission Transmission Guaranteed Can be
financed Call Panama 3-4870.
Mrs. FDR Wants
Equal Arms For
Israelis. Arabs
NEW YORK. March 5 (UP)
Eleanor Roosevelt recommended
today that the United States move
in cooperation with Britain and
France or the United Nations, to
guarantee existing .borders in -the
Holy Land and canalize the (orce
of arms between Israel and Aral)
nations, i
' .. ....... 4 "" :'
"I consider the problem of Is Israel
rael Israel not just an Arab-Israeli prob problem
lem problem but one that concerns the
whole Free World, as Israel is the
only area in the Middle East in
which a Democratic form of gov government
ernment government is understood by the ex existing
isting existing government and the people
have a feeling that life is hcins
built and made worth while,'! the
former first lady said. . .
Mrs. Roosevelt told over 3.000
participants in the 17th annual con conference
ference conference of the Council of Organi Organizations
zations Organizations of the United Jewish Ap
peal that Israel g problems are in
tensified by the fact the overl
45,000 new citizens a year have to
be settled and absorbed at a time
when Israel must think primarily
about defense in case of attack.
Red China Accuses
US 01 Obstructing
Geneva Peace Talks
:C KNEVA, March 5 (UP)-Com-mum'st
China today accused the
United States of "obstructing a a-greement"
greement" a-greement" at the seven-month-old
ambassadorial talks here while it
is "stopping up" military activi activities
ties activities in the Formosa area.
In a 1,500-word statement re re-lcase1
lcase1 re-lcase1 here and in Peiping, the
Chinese Foreign Ministry hinted
that the talks between U. S. Am
bassador U, Alexis Johnson and
Chinese Ambassador Wang Ping
nan are dragging on without ad
vantage to the Communist side.
Some observers regarded the
statement as a veiled threat.
"The Chinese side cannot agree
to the Sino-American ambassado ambassadorial
rial ambassadorial talks being dragged out, nor
can it allow these talks to be used
by t.ie United States as a tool to
prevent China from exercising its
sovereign rights," it said.
The statement repeated the
draft proposal of renunciation of
force tr the t ormosa region which
it tabled in January. And it again
insisted on a meeting of foreign
ministers to consider the Formosa
question. There were' no new pro
posals n tne message.
. w
An American spokesman at Ge Geneva
neva Geneva declined comment c the
Red charges.
The Reds still are holding 13 of
the1 41 American civilian prisoners
they agrted to release.

LEWIS SERVICE
;. Ava. IWeU Ko.4 '"';'
FARMACIA EST ADOS UNID03
14J Coatnl Aosa
FARMACIA LUX

IH Ceatrtl
MISCELLANEOUS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031. ANCON. C.Z.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
ORCHID COLLECTION (native
plants) and working equipment.
Fifty dollars. Leaving Isthmus,
Phono 2-6384, call after 4 p.m.
FOR SALE: Chiwahwah, fawn
color, trained, excellent compan companion
ion companion for couple. Wants good homo.
Phono 3-1777.
FOR SALE: Lima oak six (6)
drawer dresser wmirror, Holly Holly-wood
wood Holly-wood bed with matching bos
springs and white leather head headboard.
board. headboard. Also 1952 Dodge Club
Coupe, excellent condition w-w-s-w
tires, tubolos. All very
reasonable. Call Fort Clayton 87 87-3217
3217 87-3217 or 87-7157.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS VARIOUS ITEMS
FOR SALE
Sealed bids, for opening in pub public,
lic, public, will be received in the office
of Superintendent of Storehous Storehouses,
es, Storehouses, Balboa, for; the following
items:
INVITATION No. 228 Con Conduits,
duits, Conduits, condulets and parts, and
sealing fiber. TO BE OPENED
10:30 a.m., March 9, 1956.
INVITATION No. 231 Rosin,
tar, wood blocks, Y.I. and Town,
chain hoist parts, brake parts,
refractory brick., fire clay,
brushes, insulating fiberboard,
adhesive, bags for cement, ajuick
lime, chain, drums, and jacks.
TO BE OPENED 1:30 p.m.,
March 9, 1956.
INVITATION No. 232 Cylin Cylinder,
der, Cylinder, gaga and ground key cocks,
grease and oil cups, ejectors, wa water
ter water gages and parts, glasses for
gages, injectors, inspirator and
parts, lubricators and parts, fus fusible
ible fusible plugs, valves, whistle parts,
rods, cranks and stems. TO BE
OPENED 2:30 p.m., March 9,
1956.
Invitations may ba obtained from
office of Superintendent of Store Storehouses,
houses, Storehouses, telephone 2-1815.
FOR SALE
Apartment building:, Rio
Abajo, 18 apartments, producing-
$620 monthly, re recently
cently recently constructed, excel excellent
lent excellent condition. Priced for
quick sale.
Two lots 900 meters each,
El Cangrejo on Via Argen Argentina,
tina, Argentina, best of ava liable
choice hillside property.
Call 2-03C4, office hours.
Argentina Repeals
Peron's Absolute
Divorce Legislation
BUENOS AIRES, March 5 (UP)
Legislation adopted under "the
Peron dictatorship permitting ab absolute
solute absolute divorce in Argentina has
been repealed by the revolutionary
government of President Pedro E.
Aramburu.
Aramburu's executive decree
does not affect Argentina's tradi-i
tional system of legal separation
under which married couples can
be completely separated, legally
and financially, but cannot remar remarry
ry remarry while one of the partners is
alive..
Peron's divorce legislation -was
one of the -main reasons for his
bitter controversy with the Roman
Catholic Church.
f Aramburu said legislation -- on
such a serious matter should be
rconcned to public debate.
He said the Peron administra administration,
tion, administration, showed absolute contempt for
public opinion at the time the legis legislation
lation legislation was adopted. V
The Peron divorce legislation
consisted of an amendment to e e-xisting
xisting e-xisting laws concerning family re relations
lations relations and minors. It was adopt adopted
ed adopted cf S:25 in the morning of Dec.
14, 1954, as a surprise move, with
out public debate,
The new decree further point d
out that the surprise divorce a
mendment was only another of Pe-
ron's blows at the Catholic Church.
r inai soiuijoti tn me divorce divorce-problem
problem divorce-problem I not up to the present
provisional government, the decree
said, but to Congress when full
normality is restored in Argentina.'
7--
1

A'

rosinon urrerea r yi i ucjufv i j rwi

WANTED: 3 bilingual compe competent
tent competent secretaries; starting salary
from $75 to $175 per month.
Apply Colocacionos y Secrotaria Secrotaria-do,
do, Secrotaria-do, S.A., Mexico Ave. East 25th
Street, next to iscoffery Agon
cios.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE: Going away, 3 bed bed-room
room bed-room sets, I dining room set, I
living room tot, 2 bamboo sets,
2 Chines, rugs and other furni furniture.
ture. furniture. Phone 41 Colon from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Large mahogany
wardrobe, 3 sectional with 2 full
length mirrors, $60. Phone 3 3-1777.
1777. 3-1777. '
FOR SALE: 3 Rattan chairs
$75, I rug $15, 2 floor lamps
$15. Phono Navy 3590.
Duo-Piano Recital
Will Aid Salvation
Army Colon Project
A duo-piano recital in aid of the
Salvation Army Women's Hostel
in Colon will be given on March
the British Ambassador to Pana Panama,
ma, Panama, and Mrs. Eleanor Waker,
music director at the American
College in. Buenos Aires, at the
Atlantic Theater in Colon.
The recital will include the
works of Handel and Bach in ad
dition to those of British com composers.
posers. composers. Tickets are now on tale
at $1 each and are available:
In, Colon, at the British Consu
late, the Mayor's oflice, Mrs. w,
Arthur. Dr. de Boyrie, Mrs. Bui
nado. Mrs. Leeigh, Mrs. J. Salas,
Norman C. Brown, N. Jhamatmal,
Capt, Clement. Mooiuawmy, Rev,
Mainert tPeterion, Rev. Wladen,
Rev, Scarlett and. "Mrs ;. McAllis
ter,
At Margarita, from Rev. Cook
son; Brazos Heights, Mrs. S.
Kidd: Fort Gulick. Mrs. J. Davis:
Coco Solo, Mrs. F, Hopkins.
ISt PRIZE

.1 w -i Km" lUVnnuL.
' A I y 1 ' "7
I r 1.

196181
t

Present your tickets fcefore Friday Your tickets are valid for a whole year Keep mem caretuiiy
' TOTAL... $1,320.00
1 $200.00 (Accumulated) 2-$360.00 (Accumulated)' 3. $760.00 (Accumulated)
The) first prx$ of $1,400.00 corresponding to Lottery drawing. of
Ftbrutry 19th, was won by Mrs. Josefina Molina ds Harding. ;
Get them Juyln,
Hon CoAte Okla, dbn Wonhwm "Oho" dni& Batfi

l
1
f
:y
.3

J1 itjiiVH nn
s-t sl riAit".'' J-J

HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
J. fee- 4e la On At X. 41
FOTODOMY
Jasla Aieseng Am tmt H St
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DWS
W Street No. IT

Houses
VACATION QUARTERS avaiU
able April 30-June 30. Furnish Furnished,
ed, Furnished, brand now two-bedroom
apartment near Hotel El Pana Panama.
ma. Panama. Call 2-0899.
FOR RENT: Furnished or an.
furnished 2-story house, 2 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, living room, dining room,
kitchen, bathroom. Downstair,
has til. floors, bathrooms. Bos
422 Ancon, C.Z.
FOR RENT: Chalet at "Afta.
mira," 2 bedrooms, maid's room room-with
with room-with bathroom, garage, Phene 1
5141. ;-..

Browriell Calls On Congress To Close
Loopholes In Present Lobbying Act
WASHINGTON. March 5 YTJPY ural pa hill

Attorney oenerai Herbert Jirown Jirown-ell
ell Jirown-ell Jr. called on Congress yester yesterday
day yesterday to strengthen the present fed federal
eral federal lobbying act to close "loop-
noies that make it "very hard to
enforce."
He also said the administration
will ask the lawmakers this year
tto set up a bipartisan civil rights
commission that would "run
down" charges that "Negroes in
the South have been deprived of
their right to vote." The commis commission
sion commission was proposed by President
Eisenhowe in January.
Browneil s statement came as
Sen. Thomas C. Hennings Jr. de declared
clared declared he will refuse to support a
"clean" elections bill sponsored by
Senate Democratic Leader Lyndon
B. Johnson Tex., Senate GOP
Leader William F. Knowland, and
48 other senators.
Hennings, former chairman of
the Senate Elections subcommit
tee, protested that the bill, aimed
chiefly at general elections for
federal offices, would not go far
enouKh in curbing primary elec
tioa abases;.' Hennings said he will
support his own "reform bill
instead.
Johnson's measure was drafted
as a result of the furor touched
off bv oil lobbyist John M. Neffs
$2,500 "campaign contribution" to
Sen. Francis Case (R-H.D.) during
the fight over the now-vetoed nat
2nd

frctU d "OGIA HCCriElA AI3 DHTI1EPJA CEIiTPJIL" J

3 1
)

FARMACIA EL BATURRO
rare a Lefem f Street
FARMACIA "SAS"
Via rocne 111
NOVEDADES ATHI3
- Via Epfia At.

PHILLIPS Ocoaasida Cottegae,
Santa Clara. Bex 435. Belboo.
Phono Panama 1-1877. Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-1673.
Shrapaer. furahted fcousa. a
beach at Santa Clara. Teleohena
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. On. mil.
part Casino. Lew rota. Phena
Balboa J 866.
Grtmlich'a Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modern conveniences,
moderate ratal. Phone Gsmboa
6-441.
A special senate committee in
vestigating the Case incident re
sumes nearings tomorrow with
testimony from witnesses involved
in an alleged attempt by Heff to
make another $2,500 contribution
to Sen. Bourke B. Hickenlooper
(R-Iowa). ....
The committee has 1mmi 1n.
formed that Neff tried to arrange
an appointment with Hickenlooper
uuuuga a owrm juaxe, Iowa at attorney,
torney, attorney, Wendell Edson, who will
testify tomorrow.
Hennings could touch off a bitter
battle with southern congressmen
by his insistence on legislation to
regulate primary elections. The
southerners have resisted all ef-
wrts to bring primaries under
covereage of federal election laws
Hennings said primary elections
actually choose members of Con Congress
gress Congress "in about a third of the
states." Negroes charge that they
are specifically barred from vot
ing in some southern primaries
srownell, appearing on a TV
program over New York State
stations with Rep Kenneth B,
Keating R)N.Y.). said the admin-
istration is interested in the whole
picture of the lobbying law and
"clean elections."
Urging a full study, lie said the
administration has "some recom recom-endations
endations recom-endations as to how the lobby-
,ing law can be strengthened and
MARCH
PRIZE
L
3 C
n
, j
V J J

810001

FOR
12 5701103

Miscellaneous
FOR RENT: MODERN leulo,
suitable for offices, warehouses,
facing Stadium. Phono J-6168,
Aicides Garcia C.rr...
FOR RENT: Space appropriate
for office, beauty parlor, com commercial
mercial commercial business, etc.. in new
concrete building named ''Mon ''Monterrey"
terrey" ''Monterrey" on Ave. Argentina, "II
Congrejo" district.. David P. do
Castro, Ava. "B" Ne. 24. Phono
2-1616.
Help Wanted
LIVE-IN HOUSEKEEPER wanted.
May taka to U.S. later. Laun Laundry,
dry, Laundry, cooking, cleaning, child child-car..
car.. child-car.. Keenig, 1-1679, Illl-B,
Margarita.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE: Ch.l.t at Santa
Clara, 7200 squaro m.t.rs, 4
bedrooms, living room, dining 1
room, baths. Call telephone 2-
0027 or 3-0763 Panama
FOR RENT
" '"';v
Rooms
FOR RENT: Room with pri pri-vato
vato pri-vato service and entrance. Chile 1
Ava No. 6. Phono 2-1783.
FOR RENT: Largo comfortable
furnished room. Across Ancon
Post Office. Rental man only.
Phono 2-3020. 1

improved." v
Brownell said he believes the
present law prohibits corporations
and labor unions from contributing
to campaign funds. But he noted
that a test case is now pending
before the Supreme Court. He said
he hopes for a court ruling this
spring. .'
The case involves an Indictment
against the United Auto Workers
union. A federal district court dis dismissed
missed dismissed the indictment, stemming
from alleged union campaign con contributions
tributions contributions in 1954, but the govern government
ment government appealed to the Supreme
Court.

4th
3rd PRIZE

017519

3 tr
. ,

u



TTTT TAXAMA AJfTSIrAX A rSTTFFXTFXT PATtT JfTWSMrES
rcs trr t
, A .. Ml
a
i ?
Cif TULIO
35c. 20c,
In Cinemascope and
Technicolor!
Kirk Douglas, In
20.900 LEAGUES
UNDER THE SEAS
Also:
T I V 0 L I
CEuTRAL Theatre
LUX-THEATRE
80c. 30c.
Rorj CALHOUN Piper LAUKII
Jack CARSON Slamit VAN DOREN
in
AINT MISBEHAVIN'
In TECHNICOLOR!
DOIVE-lil Tlieatr
80c. ; 30c.
GEORGE MONTGOMERY
- and
NANCY GATES
, in
MASTERSON OF KANSAS
CECILIA THEATRE
60c. 30c.
ROBERT MITCHl'M, In
MAN WITH A GUN
Plus: JACK PALANCE and
IDA LUPINO, in
THE BIG KNIFE
R t O
VICTORIA
Barbara Stanwyck, in
ESCAPE TO BURMA
- Pius:
TARZAX SHE SHE-'
' SHE-' DEVIL
20r.
35c.
20c.
"aC.
40c.
In Technicolor and
-VistaVision'
Grace Keily and
Carv Grant, in
TO CATCH A THIEF
..- Plus:
CONQUEST OF
SPACE
Tin Tan and Ana
B'rta Lepe, in
LO QUE LE PASO
A SANSON
- AlSO-
LA VIDA TIEXE
r TRES DIAS
Spanish Double
Week end release in Cinemascope
and Technicolor
Alan Ladd June Atlyson in
THMcCONNELL STORY
with Joanne Matz
1:05 3:32 1:56
1
NT

?fcuAT. MAr.cn 35, ikj

!
ii
II
1. 1

O

om

k

MOYItS JV RADIO
fey Erskutf Johnson

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Ex Exclusively
clusively Exclusively yours:- Gordon MacRae
is singing "June Is Bustin' Out
All Over" in "Carousel," but some
modernized lyrics should make it
read Marilyn. Or Anita. Anita Ek Ek-berg's
berg's Ek-berg's breakaway dress made

headlines on New Year's Eve and
now Marilyn Monroe oops a shoul shoulder
der shoulder strap at a press conference.
Mere fun than th fligpole-tit-Tinfl
craze,
Next?.?
Marilyn and Anita don't dare try
lor an encore.

Ml KVW

ELlJ

0

I
I

Government Girls
Getting More Girth
WASHINGTON' (UP) Con Congressional
gressional Congressional secretaries hare crown

I in the last to years. Mrs. Irene

Malloy, a Washington dress shop
owner, says that "they used to buy
size 9 and 10 dresses. Now 16's

and 18's are popular sizes."

It'c vUifintf lirtmon frnm Tpva

" o ------
n,f mmrlA elufo Ufhrt Bra llirinrtl

it up like movie stars tn Holly Hollywood
wood Hollywood today. The oil-rich lads have
taken over as the town's fabulous
spenders and now have exclusive
rights to that old rich phrase,
"Going Hollywood."
One Texan who parties in movie movie-town
town movie-town for a week once a month
is reputed to have five Cadillacs"
lined up in a downtown garage.
One for every day, or in colors to
match the eyes of different dolls,
or something.
PARAMOUNT'S new star, Carol
Ohmart, was introduced to one of
the "I'm a Texan, ma'am" boys
who lit her cigaret with a $150
gold-plated lighter. Then he hand handed
ed handed her the lighter as a gift. Carol,
who-has never seen him since, is
still gulping on the set of "Step

Down to Terror :
"Ha told me he sivt ona away
very time he lights a girl's cig cig-aret.
aret. cig-aret. He laid he bevght them by
the gross!"
The Witnet: Before Jack Lem Lem-.a.
.a. Lem-.a. .,ri1 nn TV' ''The llav Tiin-

Acoln Was Shot," he needled ciircc-i

ror mcK yuine: i ,iuhi yuu i u
a dramatic role. I'm playing John
Wilkes Booth."
Quine'who directed Jack in his
latest comedy, "It Happened One
Night," cracked back:
"I'll bet you 3 to 1 you misst"
MflNacn OFFICIALS are ask-

ing JVlliIU iur uuii-iiiiim& inroiu
nf r.rupp KpIIv for that commem

orative stamp. How about that
front page one after Grace saw her

Fnnce. Kissed ny a sirangc gin
in New York? A collector's item
alreadyIt's still Kelly at bat for
the comics. Guarding an atomic
formula -in a CBS-TV laugh skit,
Johnny Carson quipped to Eva Ga Gabon
bon Gabon V
. "It's the most (important stertt
the U.S. has next to Grace Kelly's
wedding plans."
Rubirosa is putting money into
Dolores del Rio's new independent
movie company in Mexico City
". . Buddy Bacr, shedding writer
May Mann, will try marriage j
again with Roxanne Reed, a for former
mer former Las Vegas show girl .
Ava Gardner's taking daily flying

lessons in Aiaana irom opaui sji
most famous pilot, Milo Parado.f

. . Yvonne de Carlo's slated one
more TV appearance before re retiring
tiring retiring to await the stork.
THIS IS HOLLYWOOD, Mrs.
Jones: "Route 66," the new Dean
Martin-Jerry Lewis film caper,
appropriately became "Hollywood
Or Bust" AFTER Anita EUrrg
joined the cast.
Bob Crosby rented a home at
Lake Mead, 20 miles from Las
Vegas, for his three-week night nightclub
club nightclub stand there. Doesn't trust
himself around those dice .
Hollywood wails about "The Big
Knife" being anti-movktown didn't
disturb its star, Jack Palance,

when he signed up for the film

I and still doesn't.

"I didn't consider it for r against
Hollywood," he says. "I just

thought was a good script.
Now starring in "Fragile Fox,"

! Robert Aldrich's film version of the

Broadway play about a lieutenant

who kills his cowardly captain

during the World War II Battle

of the Bulge, Jack s asking:

"If Hollywood has a right to
complain about 'The Big Knife,'

I the Army vcertainly should be

(screaming about this. It's a GI
I version of 'The Big Knife.'

yistaVisio:!
I acne KimHMN-nNun

I ,, :

b:-1

iM v :

HEIB ISM

Color by TECHNICOLOR

1

'Love, Hate

and Adventure

: amisfst the full fiirv t

' 7 of the tmnira!

" jg.-.

I

I JOHN MAW I

I YfJ M M 1 1 U Uli V

WNOLD HOSS -iMMkattati
w, f ... ;.MidlNiiiriKHi(talflllMIM
STARTING WEDNESDAY
LUX THEATRE

OPENING
TOMORROW

at the CENTRAL
THEATRE

i An Avalanche;

Of Fury!

A

; ; U

ClNDMkSCOPE

print tj
Technlcclsr

4

DlANNETOSTEIf DIANA LYNN"

- Also Stirring

SIDE GLANCES

4 jMm

-lMIl--,, J

By Ca!braithjTeenjna fjm UM

w w w m m mm mm mw m mm w
Ex-Convicl Husband
Held On Drugs Rap

k "Lot ef tfty Jvict on mw rnwi.lt ( iU i rjght rjght-maybt
maybt rjght-maybt m of thm fv you won't htvo to htlp mo

HOLLYWOOD. March 5 (UP)
A teenage starlet vho made her)
nationawide television debut only;
six days ago was under arrest,,tc arrest,,tc-day
day arrest,,tc-day with her ex-convict husband j
on nacotics charges. j
Brunette beauty Rena Clark, 11,
her trumpet-plaver husband. Do-I

mintc ssorrenti, 2j, and her broth-!
er, James, 15, were arrested by
narcotics off.cers who sa;d they
found a half pound of marijuana
in a paper bag in the couple's

le'lroo'T. : i
Sorrenti said his wife was "com "completely
pletely "completely innocent." The actress was;
signed recently by Warner Bros.1
A superior judgfc on Feb. 15 ap-i
proved her seven year contract
which started at $120 weekly!
climbing to $1000 a week if all
oat ions are picked up by the stu-i
dio. I
"I'm worried about what myi
studio will do," said Miss Clark,

an expectant mother She made i

her television debut on "Warner

Bros. Presidents" playing the part
of a jilted bride.
A jiudio spokesman said she
had not yet started work in any
movie but had been used only on
the studio's TV program.

Most studio contacts contain i'
standard "moral turpitude" clas-l

es whiih gives studios the right to
cancel the agreement, if the per performer
former performer is convicted of any crime.

SIHWHG AT YO'R SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TOMGHT!
BALBOA 6:15 S:30 I iablo hts. 6:is 7:43

iN.t nNiiTinrr

-WIUIA IrtNNIfH
HOIDENV JONES

t1 f'TT

Tuedy "NAKED DAWN"

Richard COXti:

Consume SMITH
"THE BIG TIP OFF"
Tudy "JAZZ SINGER
MARGARITA fi lS 7:40
Ricliard CONTB
Ron ANDERSON
"Case of the Red Monkey"
Tu. "DIPLOMATIC COLRIEH''

' '
CRISTOBAL Johir WAYNE
"THE HIGH oid THE MIGHTY"
S IS S:2S Tnmy "NAKED STREET"
PARAISO 1:15 H:M IsAVTA CRl'2 i:lS T:SS
Lunii TURjiFR I 0 CeorRe MoiitKomrrv
"THE PRODIGAL" I'. "SEMINOLE IPRISING"
CAMP BIEKD 1.15 8:30 "STRATEGIC AIR COMMASD"

ml j

,f ?

J'

You know what smokers say about
VICEROYS? They havfe
everything you want in a filter
cigarette and they taste good, too!
You see, VICEROY'S super-filter
with its 20,000 filtering
elements, gives you a cleaner smoke,
; keeps tobacco particles away
: from your lips and provides
: a truly satisfying smoke.
i
... &
, Try a pack today! The first pack
will show you why these are the
' most popular filter cigarettes ever sold.

1 r
r

Hrt or h 20,000
fifferng temrWs of
VICEROY'S jypor.fifor

-'j- ;

'1

MB

V

i j

M&h fa O-ty -tut Unit

VIC-1?o5Ji

.

- f
... a
At 1 f'M
' i
41 III R
. ;
J .. u If I J



B

0
o
omingii
'711 rTji p
V i it h H h s r-
- 1 f : !: M M t- i V

Brilliant Performances

Rated Best
By DAVE

Spain and Mexico staged a bullfighting due! at j
La Macarena bullring here yesterday which left afi-j

cionados divided in their

winner.
Luis Miguel Dominguin, Spain's most outstand outstanding
ing outstanding matador, gave a mediocre performance on the
first of two bulls but dug deep into his bag of fancy
passes and bravado to earn tail, ears and a leg for
his work on the second.
His opponent, Mexican matador Alfonso (tai (tai-escro)
escro) (tai-escro) Ramirez, who opened the corrida, won the
hearts of the overflow crowd of spectators lmrnedi lmrnedi-Lti.
Lti. lmrnedi-Lti. ff hi first "veronicas" and went on to win

Ian ear for his first bull and two ears for his second, t
wnfh TVimlnculn and Cateero The moment of supreme tri--iSSeWBnd
of bullfight, umph for the tw. mto ;
t .nd that courae? many La marred somewhat bv the si?.-t
Macarena fans had seen. jef leather cushions thrown ty,
MGaonera chicuelinas, saitert-some of the spectators, fljw?,
J St3iiSe and other trough the air and onto the,

'louites" were executed with

Sorrar W'n. Mayor Mice! A had- ;
JXlv mttuenced by the rous-; warned t the throve
-.-atinn earned bv Calesero the rushioxa at the start of tne. -$?
hU t5fSS2e- both Mm but prit prit-S
S prit-S his buHs. executed a variety resumed to accept a petxil
casses that broucht the crowd. nomination and his mccfwr.1
its ln ral occasions i Ramon Real has net ret taken
T Both wrre hoisted to the, anj actton in this lesaro. s
smilrters of eroisps of aficlonr-
XTwrmtoradedW arena hnJ Yesterday, tem:pl5 wrr

the last ban the
!i .La ,.,,w mT!M t'-e
4-- to Resound of thunderous
.r'.s'ise."

Poleraon Grabs Foiu-th
Straight Feature Win

'The Stud Valentino's rlasrp; 2 Gaacha 14 S3. JM-iree-vear-old
Chilean bred ,3 iiarsja S4 63.
-Kestriut colt Polemon yestfr- SECOND RACE
'"jtv sped to his fmirth conseca-jl Master Melocy SS 25, 5
rvp victory in the featured $150 2 Arpezio $5.
n:n furlonr sprint for -Cas Bl Fir DonWe: $5S4.
imported thoroughbreds it "the-: THIRD RACE
Juan Franco race track. 1-Panchita $450. 30, 3?ft
Polemon went off an odds-on 2 Cara de Sapo ., 4 40.
mutuels choice and returned 3 Lady Edna $120.
SJ.40.to win and $2.20 place. His One-Twe: $S6J.
tine of 1:29 J-S equaUed thati FOURTH RACE
nlade for the same distance by,l Fuego $4 80. C20. 4 60.
Kosier Saturday. Both Polemon 2 Okiland $4-20, 11.20,
and Rosier ar entrants in this '3 Volador $11.20.
Sunday's $7,500 six-and-one-halfi Quiniela: $15.M.
furlong Francisco Arias Paredes; FIFTH RACE
Classic7. (1 Apache $30, 320.

Kadlr broke on ton but before
the field had gone the first
oitarter. Blakemere had sprint
ed to th front with Albatross
close behind. Kadir and Persian 1
'tuntess followed with Polemon1
tialUne,
'Three furlongs out. Polemon
parted to pass horses and byi
be time the group swung In the
homestretch, Valentin Morrell's
track championship prospect
had already taken command. He 1
maintained his margin to the :
wire under a drive. Abundio Ver
'iUMBS V Lunes Mario 5
AD DPOLEMON . ..

. ......it Jaqulma7) $7.80. 10. ?
?ara, as usual, rode Polemon. 2 Empire Maelc $880. 3 40.
'.Fortunato Hidalgo Jr., with 1 Pugilist G2 20.
xns aboard' Masier Melody and! One-Two: $162.
Coral, was the only rider to tri-' TENTlt R( E
"mph more than once, coral's t-Polemori$3 40. 2-20.
.60 was also the day's best di- 2-Blakemere $2.60.
vldend as mutuels choices againv ELEVENTH RACE
dominated the card, 1-Grey Juan $3 40. 3.
The dividends: T-Chlvllineo $6 60.
n FIRST RACE TWELFTH RACE
1-Golden Wonder $5.60, 3.40, 1-Single Slipper 5, 2-60.
2-40 2 Hurlecano $2M

n n an n nnin

26 modern "banta" ships unitinj the -America's
with fast and frequent
lervice.

wo:kly service from new ukk
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
I s 3ant M4EpriiVx;;DrUe C'l. C-Z. March 7
5.S. SANTA MARGARITA" ue Cristobal, C.Z. March If
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
S.S, SANTA OLIVIA' Sails Cristobal, C. March $

FKOM U. S. PACIFIC & WEST COASI
CENTRAL AMERICA

TO BAI BOA AND
S.S". 'SANTA FE"
S.S. "SANTA ANITA V. .......

FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C Z. TO THE E
FST f-MT CFTRAI AMFRICA & II. S oKCinr.

WFST
S.S. "SANTA CRUZ"
'Balboa i-nij

PANAMA AGENCIES CO. t

UUbiOUAJI; 2131 il35
BALBOA:

Ever Locally

CONSTABLE
opinions as to who w as me
arena.
ftT-:oo'b2jty was advanced ttat
Ca esero arid .Dwnmrmn nuihi
'perform here a rain later Urn
month or ear!? in April ".
,z rroton $ eo
SIXTH RACE
1 Cascador $880. 3.80. 2 60.
2 Gay Spot $10 20. 3 60
3 Youne. Prince $2.80.
SEVENTH RACE
1 Coral $12.60. 5 40, 4.80.
B-Copar $17.40. 7.
3 El Regaio $280.
Second Doable; SSI.
EIGHTH RACE
1 Old Smuler 55.80, 2
2 Kin? $2.60, 2.20.
3 Bariyon $2.20.
'20.
Quiniela:
$4.40.
j
NINTH RACE
CRISTOBAL. C. t
.IWHalhfti r 'i 4i.I1 I

-Sails Cristobal, CZ," March 7

- PANAMA: 2-055$ 0557
1501 2159

jOmcG 4nnua Date For RP

zona Tour ney Sought

i i

t
1 i V
v.V.1

noi-Rir wixytk tv,
DOUBLLS n IN MRS The

v ...
Bob Hoe ieft of Australia sxd Tom Brown of San Francisco,
who dominated the First Annual Panama International Tennis
Qiampicnships this past week, smile happily last night after
ninnir.? their respecUre final round matches. Brown defeated
Sid Seh artz in the men's singles and Howe teamed w ith
Siurler Fry lo lake the mixed doubles from Yola Ramirez and
Mario Llamas of Mexico.

H"
It
r
J

rtmmr

I f

TWO-HANDED SWING Bcb Bwe, the pcpt&tr two-flsteH
Australian, who gave the termii crowds jammin? the FJ Pan Panama
ama Panama Hotel Tends Courts thepsKje many thrills with
his tren-.endous shot-maiir.?d5rg the Panama Intenatkinal
Terkiis Champkaurhips, wtJcn were eosc'uded Ust cisht Itowe

shared In both doubles tenri crwns, winning the men'

bits vi'.h Bid Schwartz &H the
Fry. Kxj unorthodox ue kt tv

triiking roUeys acd bakhi.ls, he texCly'mtr tils a forehand,
as tme cf toe eoS cokfcy pfcise of the tennis eharcpion eharcpion-thips.
thips. eharcpion-thips. v.T.en fee would truut tix uX Jean body into a two two-handed
handed two-handed yolley fcis oppocent tmi'sd e&mt the point as over.

Tfe 8 PaciOc Sf aim Kevin Ccrnpzny

CkCOEFOEATTD ET EOTAL CH ARTIE lift

Royal I I'll

of ftorrn America
FAST rEFIMfT ht rW.K SERVICES
KLIMLLX t.LIU)fk. ASh H EAT COASI

M X. "SILAVf.EKl'
M.V. ItAMAAUr
TO t'JjITID XlSCItm VIA
IIAMM,
M,V. "Etl A lI.L fSlMtUAt
"WrlOI"
"FlZAEEr
' J

ROYAl MAIL USES LmlirjlUM AV.EKIC4 IJM:
TO tiMTH PACTIC 'can
ft.. LOCH Mfth n

to uKtconmztsi

J8. "FAR AGFA y
0
rAtlUC hftAH fcAtiOAJKtt

i

two international tennis stars,
1
I
lrteld. double with Shin
- juuit on hs racquet when
Ifca Hi
t yurth 1
L..;.::..;.Muth ii
CAETACE7CA, KINGSTON
JiA'HAL
tm Twin ,,,Mai II
' V t t t f 4 f f
tit t, tf mi
1 t'imt
1i t '.'.

arm- I

V

i mi i. i.j

rwnnn ui or rect)iJuiirriucuiCnafepionsnip Jn Big Ten pym pym-to
to pym-to the U.S. Lawn Tennis Assocla-j nasties,, amassing more than

uon tor me otnciai awanuny ox,
an annual date for iU future In
ternational Tennis Champion
ships, according to a statement
b Ed Herr of the Miami Beach
Tenuis Association prior to his
leaving for Barranquilla yester
day;
Herr. who served as advisory
chairman for the first annual
Panama International Cham-
plonships, was Impressed with
the larse. enthusiastic support
of the tournament by the Pan-ama-Canal
Zone community and
of the El Panama Cabana Ten
nis club's ability to stace and
carry out successfully this typei
of tennis activity.
He has acreed to represent
Panama at an official meeting
in Miami in May of tennis clubs
participating in the Florida-International
Caribbean Tennis
Circuit, of which Panama is the
newest member. At this meeting.
Herr will make a strong effort
to have Panama scheduled for
its Second Annual international;
Tennis Champidnships at
ap-
proximately the same time.
Tne success or this first
championships and Herr'i ac action
tion action should make it possible
for Panama to hayc an eVen
finer select'on of Internation
al stars than were on hand for
this vear's matches.
Before departing for the city
of Barranquilla Championships,
5-11 March. Herr commented
that all visiting players are in
complete agreement the El Pan Panama
ama Panama Tennis Championships
would take its place as one of
the top tournaments in th Flor
ida-International Tennis Circui
He also said that in relation to
hosnitality extended to player.".
no tournament offered more or
treated th players better. Most
of the Dlayers who participated
here will compete in the Barran
iouilla championships.
1 Last night at the Hotel El
i Panama's Tennis Ball. Comp
itroller Roberto Heurtematte,
honorary chairman of the ten tennis
nis tennis tournament committee, pre presented
sented presented trophies to the winners
and runners-up m the four
events: Singles Tom Brown,
wiBtier: Sid Schwartz, runner
up. Men's doubles Schwartz-
Bob Howe, winners; Mario Llamas-Brown,
runners-up. Wom
en's singles Shirley Fry, win
ner; yoia Ramirez, runner-up;
and Mixed doubles Fry-Howe,
winners; Llamas-Ramirez, runners-up,
"
The presentation and tennis
dance followed the final round
matches in men's singles and
the mixed doubles.
Tom Brown of San Francis Francis-e
e Francis-e lived up to his top seedinr
bv tnrninr back Sid Sch warts
of New York In the men's sin.
ties $-3, C-l (default) before
another capacity crowd of over4
7M people.
After the second set, Cchwairtz
announced he could not contin continue.
ue. continue. He has been taking treat treatment
ment treatment durine the past week for
a strained forearm, but ud until
jiast m?nt he haa been able to
Wff n hi .9111. crnlnir of full
speed. Brown, however, nlaved
his usually fine all-court pame
and would have been difficult
for probably any top any top
piayer to defeat.
In the mixed doubles finals
1 Shirley Fry of St Petersburg,
Ltia ana Robert Howe of Aus

ijtralia edged out a hotly contest contest-;
; contest-; ed match with the crowd-pleas-

ne Mexican combination of YO'
la Ramirez and Mario Llamas,
7-S. X-8.
The ne-sidedness of 'the
Brown-Schwartz encounter Is
evidenced by the fact that in
four games served bv Brown Jn
the second set, Schwartz could
only take on point. In the first
t, Brown lumped to an earlv
lead by breaking Schwartz' first

Kervice game. After that Brown

At Schwartz could not come up
with the brilliant placements he
did Saturday evnlp in turning
banrk Llamas. With Brown ahead
5 to 3v Schvartz tried to hold his
erve. but Brown took the game
and rt liter three hard fought
ceu-ces.
In the mhred doubles, the Mex Mexican
ican Mexican did everything ransible to
?ain a victory from their favor favored
ed favored rivals- Time and again' they
made impofwlble retrieves of the
hard-hit xtrokes of Miss Fry and
th r.illet-llk volleys coming
off Howe' two-flted batkhsnd.
At five-all In the first set. Miss
ff a irArez cmM not hold her serv serv-ic4t
ic4t serv-ic4t aavt the fmu net play of
Fry and Howe, The Australian
thn won the act with his erve
Azn In the xecond et, the
tvo tcms battled on even
trrrt. The crowd cheered en-
thw'laaMeaHy a the men trad
d tremendon volleys nd ovcr-
h"i, maUnt eemlnly Impov
t:",Je ot ech others' over-
hed,.Th irl did Ihelr share
of sUt-makln VtO. Ml Frv h't
tm of Varna' volley so hard
itb a mld-curt forehand that
the Mi wnt by Llamas alnwt
i,U,r, he amiMm hi volley
t'.:,ir ihrmrtt. Ml Eamlre
rwafin tffrtit Dm shot from' the
tetx t.wrt, .

At lv U, lltme h14 hi
f'fnvt i.f'sf,-n"i rfflttie1
; hroUtn ht'mh bftt during
( ff mth. Mama tht dron- 1
i ptt Id service, with double
i-"t prying rnntit,
'.;. bx.lt t-7 thU were

,.,.,,7 CfiihfiXritfricd by d-

jSports Briefs

WEEKEND SPORTS SUMMARY
By UNITED PRESS
SAlLKUAl
CHAMPAIGN. 111. fUP)-im
nn(i vnn its eicht.h Kt.raicht
: . --
twice as many points as runner-
up Michigan.
LAFAYETTE. Ind. (UP) O O-hlo
hlo O-hlo State racked up Its eighth
straight Big Ten title in swim swimming.,;
ming.,; swimming.,; ;..
NEW ORLEANS (UP) Al Alfred
fred Alfred G. Vande rb'It's Find, who
finished fourth to Nashua in
the Widener Handicap at Hia Hia-leah
leah Hia-leah Park, won the $50,000
added New Orleans Handicap
at the Fair Grounds. He paid
$5.40, $4-60 and $3.20.
LINCOLN. R.I (UP) Lincoln
Downs got the New England rac racing
ing racing season off to its earliest
start in history and Into Glory
won the $10,000 Inaugural Han Handicap
dicap Handicap before a crowd of 31,529.
MILAN, Italy (UP)-Llght-weight
Orlando Zulueta of Cuba
and Ruronean featherweleht
champion Fred Galiana battled
to a 10-round draw.
EAST LANSING, Mich. (UP)
The Big Ten wound up its two two-day
day two-day spring meeting by appoint appointing
ing appointing a three-member committee
to negotiate a new Rose Bowl
pact with the pacific Coast Con Conference.
ference. Conference. ORMONO BEACH, Fla (FP)
Ann Quast of Marysville,
Wash., defeated the veteran
Barbara Romack of Sacramen Sacramento,
to, Sacramento, Calif., 4 and 3 to win the
South Atlaat'e Women's Ama Amateur
teur Amateur Championship.
HOLLANDALE, Fla. (UP)
Brookmeade Stables' Co u n t y
Clare won the $18,095 Magic Ci City
ty City Handicap before a record
crowd of 23.864 as Gulf stream
Park opened a 43-day meeting.
NEW YORK-(UP)-Wes San
tee, an amateur for a night, won
the famed Columbian Mile of
the Knights of Columbus Games
as a crowd of more than 12.000
cheered him on. only two other
runners, bom of the Army,, ran
against mm.
ARCADIA, Calif-(UP) Rex
C. Ellsworth Terrang, a sta sta-blemate
blemate sta-blemate of Swaps, won the
$158,000 Santa Anita Derby be before
fore before a crowd of 62,500. He paid
$5.40 straight as the favorite.
SUNDAY
MEXICO CITY (UP) Billy
Maxwell of Odessa, Tex., f'red
a record 24-under par total of
264 for 72-holes to win the
Mexican National Open Golf
Tournament.
FRANCONIA. N.H (UP) Bill
Brandenburg, 16-year-old Jump Jumper
er Jumper from McCaJl, Idaho, out out-Jumped
Jumped out-Jumped a field of 48 on Cannon
Mountain to win the National
Junior Ski Jumping Champion Championship.'
ship.' Championship.' AGUA CALIENT E (UP)
Goldwater ($20.40) and Blueo Blueo-nla
nla Blueo-nla .($40.60) combined for a
$7,725.60 daily double at Ca Ca-liente.
liente. Ca-liente. S. J. Cantillo of San
Diego, Calf., and Claendario
Hernandes, a Mexican customs
inspector, .were the only ones
to hold winning tickets on
the huge double.
BATON ROUGE. La. (UP)
Shelly Mayfield j of Westbury,
N.Y., won the $12,500 Baton
Rouge Open Golf Tournament
with a 72 hole total of 277. three
better than Jimmv Demaret of
Kiamesha lake, N.Y.
Herr, the advisory chairman for
the championship who Is a
member of the VS. Lawn Tennis
Association. He la sending to Panj
ama two tennis racquets for the
ball boy and ball girl selected as
the most outstanding. The two
selected are Donald Shlve, son
of Col. and Mrs. Donal Shive and
Cect Eggleston, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Maurice Eggleston,

2 Teams Each To Be

Added To NCAA NIT
Touraments Today

By JOHN GRIFFIN
NEW YORK, March 5 (UP)
The N.CA.A. and National Invi
tation tournaments were expect expected
ed expected to add two teams each today.
virtually completing the blue-
ribbon fields for these two Di
gest post-season basketball classics.-
:
The N.I.T., which opens at New
York, March 17, still has four
places to fill in its 12-team fieia
and was expected to disclose
two of them today. The top can candidates
didates candidates were:
St. Joseph's (20-4), the Phil Philadelphia
adelphia Philadelphia area: standout; St..
Louis (16-6), the Missouri Val Valley
ley Valley Conference runner-up; Ok Oklahoma
lahoma Oklahoma A. and M. (17-8),
which could tie St. Louis In
the M.V.C.: and Brigham
Young (18-8), the Skyline Con Conference
ference Conference runner-up.
The N.CA.A. has five places to
fill in its 25-team field for com competition
petition competition starting March 12.
Two could be disposed of to today.
day. today. Dartmouth, which clinched
the Ivy League crown, Saturday
by a 80-79 overtime win over
Brown, can have one berth Just
for saying '' Yes," and, athletic
director Red Roue promised an
announcement today,
Iowa, victor by a rousing 98-
72 score over Illinois, in Satur Saturday's
day's Saturday's nationally-televised game,
can clinch another berth along
with the Biff Ten championship
by beating Indiana as expected
tonight. ;
The three other NCAA
berths are reserved as follows:
One for the Big Seven champion.
which Kansas St. could clinch
tomorrow night; one for the O O-hio
hio O-hio Valley Conference cham champion,
pion, champion, to be settled on Wednesday
and Thursday by a playoff a-
mong western Kentucky, More More-head
head More-head St., and Tennessee Tech;
and one for the Southeastern
Conference team, which could be
runner-up to Kentucky because
champion Alabame has five In Ineligible
eligible Ineligible players.
Besides Dartmouth, North
Carolina State, West Virginia,

College Cage Scores

SOUTHERN CONFERENCE
TOURNEY
(Championship)
West Virginia 58, Richmond 56,
ATLANTIC COAST
CONFERENCE TOURNEY
(Championship)
N. C. State 76, Wake Forest 64.
MASON-DIXON CONFERENCE
' TOURNEY
(Championship)
Mt. St. Marys 107, Baltimore
Loyola 86. 3
WEST VIRGINIA
"CONFERENCE TOURNEY
(Championship)
West Va Tech 83, Glenville 72.
SOUTH CAROLINA LITTLE 4
TOURNEY
(Championship)
Presbyterian 91, Erskine 90.
ILLINOIS NAIA PUYOFFS
(Final).
Western Illinois 84, Wheaton 83.
DISTRICT 29 NAIA PLAYOFFS
(Final)
Tenn State 72, Jackson (Miss) 64.
V (Consolation)
Winston Salem 92 Maryland
State 88.
DISTRICT 19 NAIA PLAYOFFS
(Final)
Delta (Miss.) St. 69, Miss. South Southern
ern Southern 52.
(Consolation)
Birmingham-Southern 74, Troy
62,
DISTRICT "18 NAIA PLAYOFFS
McNeese (La.) 76, Centenary 72.
DISTRICT 25 NAIA PLAYOFFS
(Final)
Georgia Tchrs. 112. Stetson 86.
DISTRICT 9 NAIA PLAYOFF
(Final) 1
Southeastern Okla 58, Okla. Bap Baptist
tist Baptist 5.
,' EAST
Dartmouth 90 Down 79.
Yale 82, Harward 69..
Penn 60 Columbia 58.
Princeton 80, Cornell 76.
. Duquesne 83, St. Francis 69.
Canisium 64. Niagara 62.
Navy 78. Army 67.
Fordham 78, Seton Hall 76.
Pitt 100. Penn State 90.
St. Johns 77, CCNY 69.
Colgate 78, Rhode Island 68.
- Hofstra 67, Muhlenbcrs 66.
Yeshiva 86, Brooklyn Coll. 84.
St. Peters (N.J., 85 St. -Bona-venture
74.
LaFayette 111, Rutgers 69,
Bucknell 73, Rochester 70.
Boston Univ. 69, American Intl.
6C. .- ., :
N. Palti, Tchrs 91, ST r e n 1 0 n
Tchrs. 80.
Maine 86, Bowdoin 82.
Suqui-hajina 64, Phila. Tex
61.

Amhrrrt73-WrH?imr-3(.
. Springfield 76, Colby 64.
Middiebury 75, Norwich 67.
Rensselaer 97, Union 85.
Hamilton 87, Clarkson 58.
- Rider 8E, Newark" Rutgers 57.
Worcester Tech 59, Tults 57.

IJ.CL.A, and Houston, all
clinched N.C.A.A. bids Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, by winning conference
championships.
North Carolina State took thm

Atlantic Coast Conference tour.
natnanr In svif1rM IXfab-A bftixial
76-64. in the finals; West Virgi Virginia
nia Virginia won the Southern Confer Conference
ence Conference tournament by nipping
Richmond, 58-56. in tha finals;
U.C.L.A. clinched the Pacific
Coast Conference championship
by beating California for the
second straight night, 84-62; and
Houston fell heir to the Missouri
Valley crown when St. Louis was
upset by Oklahoma A. and M.,
52-49. ..,
Here's how the N.C.A.A. tour tourney
ney tourney looked after these addition
for first-round games:
At New York, March 12-13
Connecticut vs. Manhattan;
Temple vs. Holy Cross; Canl Canl-sius
sius Canl-sius vs. North' Carolina St.;
W(st Virrinla vs n,amk..
-- .... .IIV1IIUVI ".h
large (probably Dartmouth).
At Fort Wayne, Ind., March 12

-De Paul vs. Wayne (winner to
meet Southeastern champion at
Iowa city, March 16); Marshall
vs. Ohio Valley champion (win (winner
ner (winner to meet Big Ten champion
at Iowa City, March 16).
At Wichita, Kans., March 13
Memphis St. vs. Oklahoma city
(winner to meet Big Seven
champion at Lawrence, Kans.,
March 16); S-M.U. vs. Texas
Tech (winner to meet Houston
at Lawrence. March 16).
At Seattle, Wash., March 13
Idaho St. vs. Seattle (winner to
meet Utah at Corvallis, Ore.,
March 16).
At Corvallis, Ore., March 16
San Francisco vs. U.CL.A.
The four regional Phila Philadelphia,
delphia, Philadelphia, Iowa City, Lawrence,
and Corvallis each will pro produce
duce produce a single winner. At Evans Evans-ton,
ton, Evans-ton, ill., March 22, the Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia and Iowa City winner wU
meeUfor the Eastern title afifd
the Lawrence and Corvallis win win-ners
ners win-ners for the Western. Eastern ,.fv
and Western champions will ; 1 1
meet at Evanston, March 23, for
the championship.

Queens 74, Cooper Union 48.

Plattsburgh 81, Albany Tchr 78.
Waterbury Conn 77, A 1 b a n y
Busi. 69.
Hobart 54, Alfred 50.
Alfred Aggies 83, Fredonia 72.
Newark Engineering 90, mont mont-clair
clair mont-clair 77.
Buffalo Unl. 68, Buffalo Tchr.
50. .-
Geneva 134, Waynesburg 62.
Allegheny 68, Wash. & Jefferson
57.
St. Josephs 91, Delaware 77.
Albright 64, Franklin Marsh,
all 60. )
E. Stroudsburg 89, Kutztowit 72.
Lycoming 104, West Chester 88.
Swarthmore 80, Haverford 73.
SOUTH
Kentucky 101, Tennessee 77.'"
W. Kentucky 100, Middlt Tenn.
85.
Florida 82, Georgia 69.
MIDWEST
Iowa 96, Illinois 72.
Ohio State 96, Michigan State
84. ...
Minnesota 86, Michigan 72.
Wisconsin 76, Northwestern 70.
Purdue 73, Indiana 71.
Missouri 85, Kansas State 72.
Dayton 71, Cincinnati 58.
. Oklahoma A&M 52, St. Louis 49.
. Bradley 69,. Notre Dame 63.
Wichita 71, Tulsa 51.
Nebraska 64, 'Oklahoma 63.,
Miami (O.) 96, Xavier (O.f 91.
Crsighton 67, South Dak. St. 66.
Wooster 85, Ohio Wesleyan 65.
Wayne 88, John Carroll 80.
Knox 89, Lawrence 78. r
Monmouth 78, Ripon 73.

Mount Union 98. Hiram ez.
Defiance 94, Adrian 86.
Heidelberg 87, Kenyon 79.
Wittenberg 80. Capital 72.
Coe US, Carleton 63.
Cornell 79, St. Olaf 74.
Western Reserve 87, Case 77. ...
FAR WEST
San Francisco 65, Lo Ang. Lo Loyola
yola Loyola 48 i ",.
UCLA 84, California 62.-
Washington 71, Southern Califor California
nia California 67
Oregon 72, Washington St. 58.
Stanford 72, San Jose State 70.
Utah 71,. Wyoming 64.
Montana 63. Colorado A&M 62.
Biigham Young 99, Denver 86.
" Air Force Acad. 78, Denver
Frosh 60.
New Mexico. 74, Utah State 63.

laano aiaie do. inmnau uu
West, (Colo St. 72, Colo. Mmes
17 ...
Los Aueeles St. 89. Pepperdlne

8S. . .. m v
New Mexico 92, Regis 87.
PacifU Lutheran 80, Gonzag
v-";
San Pitgo St. 78, Pasadena Na Na-zarene
zarene Na-zarene 6
Humboldt 78, Nevada 66.
Santa Clara 40. St. Miry! 1 39.
Chapman 63, Long Beach St. 53.



'MONDAY. VxST.Cn f,

TZZ FAN.t'Ll AJIir.ICAN AN INDiriXDENT DAILY NITf71IT3
on Saxton
10 DQsmo-oo now
a
P J
r
II J

- II

TIGHT FIT Cincinnati's Roy McMillan trirs to fit a shirt Over
the tree-trunk body of Ted Kiuszewski. McMUlan finds the Reds
have to come up with a bigger shirt, unless the Tampa weather
goes to work and slims down the big first baseman.

By JIMMY BRESLIN

i SYRACUSE, N. Y. (NEA)-Thc

small, low ceilmged gymnasium
didn't seem big enougn ior Car Carmen
men Carmen Basiiio. 1
The welterweight champion,
'wearing a pair of long, b r i g ft t
green wool pants, slipped into Lne

: ring tr begin shadow boxing and
5 1 onto he siartcd you were afraia
r he'd go right out the windows
i : longside and wind up three floor
i'down on Wain Street, hitting ped

estrians wiin icu nooks to me

stomach.

When Basiiio goes through his

idaily gynasium louiine, you scp,

he works like a man getting ready
to fight not just Johnny Saxlon,
but the whole world as well. Basi Basiiio
iio Basiiio defends his title against Sax Sax-ton
ton Sax-ton at Chicago Stadium on March
14. If there is anything sure nbwt
the bout, it is (hat Basiiio will be
in matchless condition.
Basiiio shadow boxed in non

slop style. His fists kept cutting

into the air as fast as he could

throw them out, and he gavt a

high pitched grunt with each
punch. In a workout, Basiiio
seems to give it more than even
Rocky Marciano.

Phils 'Corner Drugstore' Club; Crippled
Tea m Needs Medic a I, No t Base ba 11 Skill

By HARRY GRAYSON

JOE WILLIAM

. MIAMI BEACH. Six times a week, from mid-afternoon until
ihe bakerovcn sun begins to dip behind, the distant pines, Jimmy
foxx, ..tht most powerful right-hand slugger baseball ever knew,
': is out on the diamond here coaching Miami V. hopefuls.
Time's starting to nibble at Double X around the edges,
which Is to be expected, since he's no more than a pitch out
from 50. There's a slash of gray in his hair and much of the
heroic home-run muscle has turned to suet,- yet a baseball fan
would mark him Instantly a mile off, by his unfailing smile,
if .nothing else.
Jlmmj was always one of baseball's good humor men, and
though tb,ngs haven't been going too well for him of late, ne
still manages a cheerful disposition and an optimistic outlook.
. The coaching Job can't pay much, but it does keep him in base baseball,
ball, baseball, and that's what he wants most of all.
I d like to be able to write that the money he gets isn't
s important, but that wouldn't be so. For all I know, it may be
; the entire source of his income, and Jimmy has a gracious wife
I and two fine teen-age boys to support.
This lias been Jimmy's home for the past several years. He
i fiad bee-n driving an oil truck in St. Petersburg. "I like it better
here," he said. "And toe are able to live cheaper."
t hadn't been able to find Jimmy in the Miami phone book.
''We. don't have a phone," he apologized. Then in what seemed
1 to be ari afterthought, he added: "We've been moving."
t fi Jimmy aiwav traveled first cabin as a bia leaauer. He was

a free spender and a check grabber. It was almost as if he had

'v. vathologte.al dread of oemg cauca c&eap. jimmys suu paying
7. is tvay, except that when he reaches for the check these days
Jxti tor necessities, not luxuries.
t Jimmv was-a bic leauerior 20 years or- moreHe starred

' on some of Connie Mack's most brilliant teams. Later he went
Uo Boston and had a number of big seasons. The first thing

people ask about a former star in reduced circumstances is:
"What did he do with all the money he made?"
v Jimmy doesn't know what bitterness means. If he did he
might properly say: ;
"All of v.-hat money?
i Branch Rickey has often been depicted as a direct descend descend-.
. descend-. ant of Mr. Scrooge, a not altogether charitable or correct por portrait,
trait, portrait, but compared with Connie Mack, as I learn belatedly;
S Rickey was unbelievably extravagant.
It Wasn't Even Hay
I How much do you think Mack paid Foxx the first year he
J was with the Athletics?
1 ; Exactly $2000. Next year he got a big boost to $2500. And
4 Ihe third -year his pay soared to $3000. Keep in mind this wasn't
fin the dark ages of baseball. It was the late 20s' before the
Iwafi sirpfih nanir when evervbodv had monev.

1 In 1929 Double X made 1S3 hits, including 33 homers, and

i drove in 117 runs lor a 354 BJi. That helped bring Mack nts

urkt nennn-nt sinr mu and auess what Jimmv's vav check was

made out ;or? A grand total of Jot00.
: Tttfi tietif fnrv hit SS homers he. Was workina on a three

year contract that called for $50,000 all told, or approximately

116,670 per season.,
. if Kny hadn't, inlured, his wrist' in August that year he

would almost surely have surpassed the Babe's classic 60 by

threo or four? his swine hankered, he got only three that month,

In September he got 14 or 15. Double X was stronger than the
Babe, and I vas never convinced that he didn't hit a longer, ball.
Foxx finally got Mack all the way up to $13,000. This was In
1!m AnA the nevr. vear the old man sold him to the Red Sox.

You atill want to know what Double X "did with all that

monev he niadeZ"

r .,

"Soo this?" Johnny De John, bis
CO manager, commented. "Well.

everything is like this. Right
from the start. Road work lie

doesn't even open easy. Jumps
right off and goes three, f u u r
miles like a cross country run runner."
ner." runner." 'V..';. V'. V
For the next hour and 20 min minutes,
utes, minutes, Basiiio backed this up. He
boxed three rounds with Phil Lil Lillians,
lians, Lillians, his gym-fighting sparmate,
and Carmen kept pressing every

second or trie way. He a move

in on Williams, bobbing as he

came, and then shoving his rib

wrecking left hand toward the bo

dy. :

Basiiio had a full mask, luttin

down from the headguard, cover-

ing Bis face, and he let Williams

CLEARWATER, Fta. (NEA)
Robert R M.. Carpenter, Jr.,
has become a "yes man' with the
Phillies.
Carpenter, the red hot fan, sits
in the sun back of third -base
watching his club work out at
Clearwater's new Jack Russeli
Stadium. Ask the owner about the
playing personnel and he throws
a thumb in Harney's direction, and
says: "Whatever he says, I say."
Carpenter acted as his own gen general
eral general manager for several years on only
ly only to see the pennant-winning Whiz
Kids of 1950 become the Phil
rJids. While the bncht lads who

n miirklv came out of nowhere to

upset the Dodgers didn't precise- is no early in
lv fall apart, tliey lost consider- southpaw will,
V . t r & It il

able of their eany iooi. .iv .iv-ter
ter .iv-ter changed managers and in the
fall of 1354 brought, in H a m t y
from the Yankee organization to
run the works.

him a satisfactory contract.

Richi Ashburn won the Nation National
al National League batting championsbip
last trip, but limped in with a
sad sacroiliac which could return
at any time.
Jim Grcegrass was treated ior
hemophlebius in a leg. Joe In In-nett
nett In-nett underwent a knee operation.
Once past this medical mess the
Phils have nothing more than the
usual quota of spring aches, pains
and problems. Last year, Mo
Smith had to scramble for pitch pitching
ing pitching after using Robin Robciu,
Herman Wchneicr and Murry
Dickson, the latter now 39. Unlets
Simmons sets it out of his head

that he can't cut loose, and there

indication that t h

Manager Smith

faces the task of developing or

omerwise omaining a pitcher or

two..
If Hamner can stay sound, ih?
Phils have half of a double play

com Din a uon wno

Luckv Pension Guys

rnvY 'sn't. elleible to narticinate in the baseball pension. He

rot out ihe year before it started. The way the plan is working

out, the current ellgibies win ne getting more in pensions man
standout stars like Foxx got for playing.
They will owe the-security of their future not to any signal
rnntrihnttnns thev made to baseball but to an accident of birth;

they just happened to be around when TV started paying off

Dig me new worm setiea cuuuni mui wc opviiavi, im iaiu iaiu-nriii
nriii iaiu-nriii oinniint. t.n at least three times as much as the old one

' The money the players are putting into the fund comes from

a source which was not avauaoie 10 eoxx ana nis generation.,
a source which, obvioushji the current ellgibies did nothing what
rnr In frPUIfi ..-..-V..;' .

--All th time Foxx was telling me hoio tough old Connie teas
with a buck he was laughing, and yet I know he feels there's
something curious about a pension program that is. set up to

helpsoiu and scorn others, ; ... ;
The isut time Cy Younjr was In New York for a Yankee old old-timers
timers old-timers spectacle he sat waiting for his train, and said: ;
'I was hoping they'd give me $50-or $00 to take back home.
I sure could use it." , .
Younsr probably squandered all his dough, too. The year he
won 38 games he got $2300..

PANAMA AMERICAN

. mat

C.5- X;0 J MS-T Mr

1

L I

WW

c turn j i t i i l

' - mm

(IAN FILL Willi NEEDS!

ran swal I h

A vonq man with the money of I long ball. Bobby Morgan has dem-

1 Dul ont neir can auuiu m '. iiiiiauaicu mai ne is iiuuung marc

someone to sutler tne aggravauimiinan a uuiiiy intieider. Kny Smalt

that goes with the riwaueiyjua
Nationals. ....

This year, the ciuns cnanix
depend more on medical science
than baseball skill. As previously
reported, renowned nonesettcrs
cannot find anything wrong with
Curt Simmons' left shoulder, yet
foremost psychotechmeians can
not get the once fearsome left left-h.nd
h.nd left-h.nd pitcher to throw hard. .
Granny Hamner was operareJ
on last summer for a loose tendon
in his left shoulder. Hmey Jell

it necessary to mane sure uih
.... .v,nr-tirtn rnuld swing a na.

with something approaching

h's

land jabs as he pleased. It waslT-L ..m.nMi hefnre sivinJ

obvious Basiiio was nffitrMip."

on a particular move.

AHtr tht ring work and a set

of exercises -which can be best de

scribed as perilous for the aver

age person Basiiio went off Into

a nine aicove ai one end ot me

room and began unditssing.
"I've seen Saxton fieht a counlo

of times," he said. 'Gavilan wah

one of them." He was talking

vicaiiv, vrunuu a neeo nrpatn in

his bod .VWhat do I exnr Sav.-I srheduled to resume

Training Camp

Briefs

And Illinois

me chasing

ton to ao 7 lie u run,
has no law against

him. I don't know about the run

ning, either. You don't win a
championship by running away
At least I didn't win mine by run running
ning running away from Tony De Mareo."
What about Saxtou's hit and and-clutch
clutch and-clutch tactics. Basiiio was asked.

After all, it was observed, that

was now ne won the crown from
Kid Gavilan in Philadelphia.
Wasn't there a danger-of him try trying
ing trying the same style in Chicago?
"If he tries to grab me, he'll
get tired after while," Carmen
said. "I can tug on, & guy's arms
and break them up, too."
"We got a chance to take Sax Sax-ton
ton Sax-ton out," De John said. "After
what Tony De Marco did to him
I can't see how the guy can be

right."

And after Saxton?
De John's eyes rolled. He was
standing by a battered door in a
little gymnasium, but he bejjan
talking about the kind of money

you wouldn't think these places

would bring, v
"We should do $500,000 with
Robinson," De John said
Basiiio smiled. His manager
was talking about Ray Robinson,
of course. And a packed Yankee
Stadium in June.

f Juggsy Magee To Be
Honorary Referee
AI Balboa Relays
Charles F. Magee, well known
sports figure in the Canal Zone,
will serve as the fconorary referee
for the Seventh Annual Balhoa Re Relays
lays Relays to be held th evening of
March' 23.at Balboa Stadium.
, The entire opening ceremony
will be devoted to honoring Mr.
Magee, whose contribution to
athletics for the youth fthe Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone has be;n s great in
time, effort, and spirit that it
defies recounting in article.
"Muggsy," as he Is known
throughout the Zone, has retired

from active service with the Ca

nal and he and his family will be
leaving the Zone in another few
months. It I rulSiored that they
will settle in the Boston area.
The loss to the athletic fortunes
of the Canal Zone will be the great
gain of the Boston area. ,
Plans for the colorful Relay Car Carnival
nival Carnival are moving rapidly along ac according
cording according to word from the meet di

rector. The Balboa Vish track

team recently elected the Queen
of the Relays and her court of. two

girls. :
Shiiley Ransom was honored
by being selected S3 Queen jf
the Relays and the will lie as assisted
sisted assisted by'Angela Lee and Louise
Tate. All three girls are at Bal Balboa
boa Balboa High and have been very
active in school affair through throughout
out throughout their high school days.
Interest In the meet in begin

ning to mount steadily, with more

and more athletes getting into

condition for the big night. In ad

dilion ttrtne events ior tne team

chnn'pioTiship,- there-fiU-alse- be

relays lor the elementary schools
and the junior high schools, These
events annually pack somco f the
rnos thrilling and closely contested-races
on the entire 18 event

3

Sports Shorts

wici cftn
NEW YORK (NEA: -Yu :
line on the r lose ly-b mc4
year-old situaiioa -.:n L rr:-i
number of rom.nees f;r tst
Preakness and Ef.ient VaWr.
There are 174 aimM m e f-'ii-ness
hopper and 1Z1 fcave beea p-t
up for the Belmont.
MONIY MAKERS
NEW YORK (E1 -S?'
Prooks. who rode C:a'.:i. spj
Eddie Arcaro. h Ytui t
hue r !v oi'v jfckrTS r.
! to ride a million-doHir pvirw -..

ner. :

ey doesn t hit enough. The hope

therefore, is Teddy Kazanski, the

$75,000 bonus beauty back from
Syracuse a bit more matured at

the ripe old age-of 22. lie only

has to hit the ball with some slixr

of the verve with which lie field-i

it

All Ashburn, tht incomparable
lead-off man. has to do to 'inset

infields and otherwise stir up trou

ble is stay on his pins, but hr

practically was paralyzed when

nis back kicked up late last sea

son and he had to be helped frou
the field in Chicago.
The Phils require Ashburr.'s
center fielding and speed and

Grecngrass' thump, lor there is

nothing behind them in the ou
field but fill-ins and pinch-hitters

You run into veterans here like

Frank Baiimholtz and Wally Rest Rest-lake,
lake, Rest-lake, and Glen Corbous. who can't
hit nearly as well a-, he throw?.
With Stan F.opata :( first b.i.;e
Lonnett, who showed promise
Syracuse before his knee buckled

ts needed to back tip and p:i
the 35 year-old catcher, Andy
Seminick. -So
Smith awaits th? final medi

cal reports and Harney the ar.rlei

Caroenter

says, xes.

I
1F'

l-j

7

1 I I

J

Tnr.cinM Aria.." March 5 (UP)

ml..v.-.. Miir r.arcia was

-r""'". ... i,A,itc

to resume """""

Willi uh; .v.
j .cnnnHlTKr TO trfBl

ments lor severe suu.. i. h-";-,'-;-

It was feared i urs
the 32-year.old right bander
might have to undergo ap appendectomy
pendectomy appendectomy but trainer Wallr
Bock said the la'ni fnn7'e
from other causes. Garcia nail
an 11-13 record last season ana
is eager to get down to work
early in an effort to make up
for the poor showing.
Rudy Regalado, always a f hie,
spring hitter, blasted three home,
runs, including a eranI slam slammer,
mer, slammer, yesterday as the "Cuccinc
llos'! defeated the "Kresses," 13 13-11.
11. 13-11. in an lntra-squad game.
Herb Score turned in the only
imoressive pitching performance

of the contest. 1

nra AH. March 5(UP :

Clyde McCullough celebrated his
38th birthday yesterday by hlt hlt-tliur
tliur hlt-tliur a homer In an intra-squf d
game and predictins he f will
catch 80 games for the Chicago

Cubs this year.; an

Til be reaay w oy
games If they need me." McCul McCullough
lough McCullough said. "A guy s no older
than he feels." :

McCullough caugm in
games and batted .198 last sea

son.

ST. PETERSBURG. Fla.,
March 5 tP It took man-
ager Casey Stengel onet tele- j
phone call and 14 well-chosen
words yesterday to get infield- .(
er Billy Martin and pitcher
J'm Konstanty to come to I
terms with the New York Yan. j
ktes. "'""!
First, the 64-year-old pilot tel-(

ephoned Martin in New York
and told him to hurry down to
training. Shortly after Martins,
arrival, he signed for an estl-;
mated $20,000. I
Then Stengel spotted. Kon-i
stanty outside the club house,

grumbling about his salary
squabble with general manager.

George weiss. -. i

Get m mere ana get miu

your unitorm, men get oui. on.

the field." Casey bwea ai tnpn-

stanty, who had a 7-z.recora iasi.

season. i

Konstanty signed a lew mo-t
ments after putting on his unl-.

form.
DOUBLE DUTY
CLEARWATER, Fla. (NEA) (NEA)-The
The (NEA)-The Phillies led the National
League in playing doublcheaders
last year with 29. They won 28 and
lost 30 of the games.'

IDEA SPREADING? Stan Lopata, richi. Phillies catcher, taken
hia eeeen'nc, crouching stance and four teaii:'nate line up behind
him to niiimc it. Left to right are Curt Simmons, Del Emus,
""" Jones and Hermn W'hT"'"'.

ATTEHTHHI
PAIIJT DISTRIBUTORS
On' of Amarica't Itadlno manvfot'vrtra Minn fff
td iiiv rrangamantt H nwly ef.(iiJ n tiitiinf
firm Th compl Iin4 (nddti h4t end wWesr hui
M automotive locquort, arm and Wwitttal tea-tag.
Out roprotontotivo will TftM Intorcittd (HfW, Wrk.
Rl( HARD-LEWIS, mm ir?. v.rt ..

MA.

LAST DAW 75 .40
J:M, i.lS, l:Ui.ta,t:N f XL.
An rr.azing tnie tfi:t"re in
5 CINiiuaScopS I

t f
i

'THE KING'S THIEF

Starring

Ana ELTTW
rm4 TlKTm

Raymond Vfassey. la
"SEYr.N AVCKT MFV
Diana Du. In
"WEAK AND THE WIOtnT

Te. tut ZL 7D
James S rt. la
-t ar rorxTKr-
EVerlir.f Ear?en. ia
NAKED Mxrr

.13

COOP BICCEST
ST. PETERSBURG. Fla. (NEA
-Catcher' Walker Cooper, al 6-3
and 215 pounds, is the biggest man
on the St. Louis Cardinal roster.

ft'-1 1
ftm;.7,

is

T ,1 1

.,1 4
I
I

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OP PANJUU
Complete Prize-winninz Number in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1930, Sunday, March i, 1954
The whole ticket hu 44 pieces divided hi two series "A" It "B" of 22 pieces each

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

1961 $ 44,000.00
8100 $ 13,200 00
0175 $ 6,600 oo

PRIZES AJRE PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

ost na.oo i mi nioa smi mat 'saci istM mt som wj.te tact m mt tnm 'bms JJJ 2 Z I
oui m.H nt i.i2M mi ist.oo ui i.o out m.M sm vim sui io imi : io aui- i-" JjJ J" I
21 J32.M imi is?. iw.o jmi ; u?. 2i i.m S2i U2 oo ;ct moo 1HI ntoo ko .;"
0.1l 132.M 1.11 132 00 23K1 IM JO 31 122 M l UJ.M S2KI IM.O0 .0.11 112 OO llt IU OO IMI ..
tm 132.00 4l IS2.00 24l 112 00 112 441 112.00 $41 1.12 00 tl 112 00 241 1M OO 0t Po Owl I
Sl 1J2.00 1.11 112.00 IS1 1120 JS1 112.00 Ml I1M SSt 112.00 S.WI I31N till lll l 'LI;
001 112 0 IMI 112.0 201 112.0 MOI 1.12 0 4MI 1120 Sl 112 0 01 112 00 IMI 11200 OKI 1?
71 ... 1.12. ,171 .112 0 271 112 M 371 112. 471 112 OO J7l 11200 7l 112 0 271 l0 :
l 112.M 1111 132.00 21 1120 3l : 1.12.M 4l 1120 SMI 1120 M 1120 TMI 152 00 nor IfOO L.
tSSl ,2M.(M mi 44,O.M 2M1 I.2M.H Jl I.2M.H0 4I t,20.W Sl 20 t.2O 00 IHI UM SS01 J

Approximations Derived From First Prize

1M2
1SU

44
444

l. I
W.N

ISM
1S

44M
44 H

15
mi

44.M
444O0

mix
ms

.
440
44(.t

1M
142

44 M
444 H

IMS
1H4

440
441 04

ia
1H4

loo I fort 040 0 1
10 00 I 10 040 00 I

iro

4M0J0

Apprcxinsilons, Derived From Second Prize

0 I 0 i i I I I I
1M I20.M I IIH 22 M I 2100 220 M j JIM 12.M j 410 J2I.M SIM) 2TO M J 1M 120 JIOO J ,m
m no 'SM iio i mi it j iht iioo iitoo iot no no no tit no 1 m
S0S2 11 M S4 I14M SOM 11 M IMS 1K.M I'll! 1K.M II U.M SIOS : 1100 HOT 1100 010 I.T

Apprximalionj Derived From Third Prize

ins 1J2.M i tm

1J2 M 3171

1J2.M

IM
1(7

II. M
II.M

11
lt

SIM
SIM

II
m

MM
MM

!!?!

111
IlIJ'

... ....
132.00
KM
U.M

II7S

174
111

.
132 M
M
MM

J"tVs"
ITT
US

IS2.M
IM
U.M

ji;i
0) M

u:.m

HI M
UN

01
112

t M
MM

U

I

Prize-winniha Numbers of yesterday's Lotttrv Drawlnt were sold at: 1st In Veraguas, 2nd In Fnjr.i led 3:4 Li S tl Tsr
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending; hu 1 and not included in the above list win Fortr-'? DoHora tltLM' rati
The whole ticket hti 44 pieces which comprises the two "A and "B
' ': f : '"
Signed by: ALBERTO AlEMAN. Governor of the Province of Fftsv-rci. C5d- 4T iV.li
, The Representative Of The Treasure RICARDO A fL5?ZZ

WITNESSES: Ablllo Canto, Cid. No. 60-915C
Aurello Garcia M., Ccd. No. 47-481S5

ALBERTO J. BARSALLO
Notary Public. Panama

A,

NOTE:

Th winning ticket with iht Uf rlphor on th Uio two Ut

eiBhoro onolv only to th Flrrt Prtio. f

The First rit ni th tn4 on Srd Prut ir drown ikriljr. Tho p p-prxxlnntlon
prxxlnntlon p-prxxlnntlon trt eilrulateO on tti Firit. Sewxl nd ThlM Prizoo. In rtTo
o ticket iheuld carry th numkor of toch prii. tho IhlOer r ontitloO to
claim payment far otrh. f

. Dmii'Jj OF THE 3 SII
t Sunday, March 4, 1956
. Drawing N amber 121

fraction
First Prize. ..;. 61 j tj qq

3.00

ticket

220.00

Second Prize.
Third Prize

00

60.00
40.00

Th prim til pal trrm w ft r"4 t rmMt Ho

too alfirra m too N.iwkm IntliiflK Vm-urf M lm.;-m.

Plan of Ordinary Drmiar N"- VX '.
plare Marts II.

ii viUii

Civi4 in lo tr.o of 8 tmmtjv rt
nisi ttui

-" T"

I Tint Pn S- A irl I if ST"
1 Swj Pr.IO. t-. A ft. ot
1 ThirO Pni Sr A a4 ." S -
IS Aporoicf.irn. Sf A ant ft- atf ;., w-
Ttj.-. Jt'fb A n4 O ff I..'-" .."fl w m
0 Pnia. A a-0 H mt .-.
t0 tram. &na A a t of .a -

:' II frtrt".wW, ftario A 04
t ft if Sci'W A a--4 C. af 1 t

- I

i mt r"

""-1 P Lv is
174 Prt (-
rr::s

-
i s

YntOia ro j
- e t

e t :ti

e cf c itry-

i.

r
0

prosrani.

. . !l



MONDAY, MARCH 5, 1951

rfit PANAMA AMIT.ICAN AN INDEFEXDEJfr DAILY NltVSPATTk
iiiommgum, namirez iivicie uiiiigiii nunurs

o
Brilliant Performances

Rated Best Ever Locally

By DAVE CONSTABLE
Spain and Mexico staged a bullfighting duel at
La Macarena bullring here yesterday which left afi aficionados
cionados aficionados divided in their opinions as to who was the
winner.
Luis Miguel Dominguin, Spain's most outstand outstanding
ing outstanding matador, gave a mediocre performance on the
first of two bulls but dug deep into his bag of fancy
passes and bravado to earn tail, ears and a leg for
his work on the second.
His opponent, Mexican matador Alfonso (Cal (Cal-csero)
csero) (Cal-csero) Ramirez, who opened the corrida, won the
hearts of the overflow crowd of spectators immedi immediate
ate immediate after his first "veronicas" and went on to win
lan ear for his first bull and two ears for his second.

I tk Tinmltinuln and calesero'

dism ayed the kind of bullfight- umph for the two matadors
i f and that courage many La marred somewhat by the sight
Maearena fans had never seen. ;of leather cushions thrown by
GaoXs chicuelinas, salteri-'some of the spectators flying
lias natural passes and other, through the air and onto the
''nuites" were executed with arena.

fEZXZ? "'nomlneumj

irobablv Influenced by the rous-j warned against the throwinr or
" .. j u.. pnioci,th nns nt he start, of the

J? fSceim' both-season, but Ordonez has
nf his bulls executed a varletv resiened to accent a political
passes that brought the crowd nomination and his
& its feet on several occasions. (Ramon Real, has not yet taken
Both were hoisted to the any action in this regard.
1innlrtrs of groups of aficinnr.-j
rlv who invaded the arena ini-! YM-erdaVs -atr receipts were
.frriiatrlv after Dnmimuin kill-estimated at S3n.nnn and br
(VI the last, bull of the after- nossibility was advanced t'vi
rtoon and paraded around H-.r C'alescro and nomingum mi
.in- to the sound of thunderous perform here a-ain later Inn,
applause. I month or early in April.
J 1 '-
I
Polemon Grabs Fourth
Straight Feature Win

I The Stud Valentino's classv;
mee-vear-old Chilean bred j
ecstnut colt Polemon yester-)
f'av sped to his fourth conseeu-
tive victory in the featured $750
sv:n furlong sprint for Class B!
imported thoroughbreds at the'
Juan Franco race track.
Polemon went off an odds-on
mutuels choice and returned;
$3.40 to win and $2.20 place. His
time of 1:29 2-5 equalled that
made for the same distance by
Rosier Saturday. Both Polemon
and Rosier arP entrants in this
Sunday's $7,500 six-and-one-ha!f
furlong Francisco Arias Paredes
Classic.
iKadir broke on top but before
the field had gone the first
onarter, Blakemere had sprint sprinted
ed sprinted to th front with Albatross
close behind. Kadir and Persian
bnntess followed with Polemon
tuai'ing. :
Three furlongs out. Polemon
parted to pass horses and by
tbe time the group swung in the
homestretch, Valentin Morrell's
track championship prospect
had already taken command. He
maintained his margin to the
wire under a drive. Abundio ver
OTIMBS V Limes Marzo 5 ....
D DPOLEMON
gara, as usual, rode Polemon.
Forttrnato Hidalgo Jr., with
wins aboard Master Melody and
Coral, was the only rider to tri tri-"niph
"niph tri-"niph more than once, coral's
"60 was also the day's best di dividend
vidend dividend as mutuels choices again
dominated the rard.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Golden Wonder $5.60, 3.40,
2.40.

26 modern "hanta" ships uniting the
AmerkM with fast and frequent
service.

WEEKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
S.S. "SANTA INES" .......Due Cristobal, C. Z March 7
S.S. "SANTA MARGARITA" Due Cristobal, C.Z, March 11
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK

S.S. "SANTA BARBARA"
S.S, "SANTA OLIVIA'' ..

FROM 1. S. PACIFIC & WEST COAST ?
CENTRAL AMERICA
1 Tfl tUI HOA AND CRISTOBAL. C. Z.
S.Sc'SANTA FE" .. ..........Due Balboa, C. Z. March 24 S
S.S. "SANTA ANITA V. ..Due Balboa, C. Z., April 8 P
FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z. TO THE l
vvp;t oat cfntrai amfrica & -n. s iutw, ?
S.S. "SANTA CRUZ" .....Sails Cristobal, C. Z., March 7
Balbu i-nij.'...' ...; ...-'jj
PANAMA AGENCIES CO. i

CRISIOBAL: 2131 2135
BALBOA:

The moment of supreme tri-.

Mayor Mieurl A Ordonez hndj
-Gaucha $4.60, 3.60.
-Maruja $4.60.
SECOND RACE
-Master Melody $8.20, 5
-Arpegio $5.
First Double: S3A.80.
THIRD R( F.
-Panchita $4.80. 3.80, 3 ?n.
-Cara de Sapo $6.40, 4.40.
-Lady Edna $2.20.
One-Two: S36.80.
FOURTH RACE
-Fuego $4.80. 4.20, 4.60.
-Okiland $4.20, 11.20.
-Volador $11.20.
Quiniela: $15.60.
FIFTH RACE
-Apache $3.80, 3.20.
-Proton $4.60.
SIXTH RACE
-Cascador $8.80. 3.80. 2.60.
-Gay Spot $10.20, 3 60,
-Younar Prince $2.80.
SEVENTH RACE
-Coral $12.60. 5.40, 4.80.
-Copar $17.40, 7.
-El Regalo $2.80.
Second Double; $51.
EIGHTH RACE
-Old Smuggler $5.80, 2
-King $2.60, 2.20.
-Barlyon $2.20.
Quiniela: $4.40.
NINTH RACE
-.Taquimazo $7.80, 10. ?.
-Empire Magic $8.80. 3
-Pugilist G2 20.
One-Two: $162.
TENTH RACE
Polemon $3.40, 2.20.
-Blakemere $2.60.
ELEVENTH RACE
-Grey Juan $3.40, 3.
-Chivilingo $6.6p.
TWELFTH RACE
-Single Slipper $5, 2.60.
-Hurlecano $2.80.
40.

1

Sails Cristobal, C. Z March S
.Sails Cristobal, C. Z March 8

- PANAMAi 2-0556 0557
1501 2159

:
OHca Annual Date For RP

International Tourney Sought

Pi UI.IU.IIHII IIMWWUWIHH.WUH.MII) I.HWIL ,ILI.I .llIIH.IHUU.llll ,H.)(l,pIWyil.u Hi .1 ill u.L ii I

DOl'BI.l.S WINNERS The two international tennis stars,
Bob Howe deft) of Australia and Tom Brown of San Francisco,
who dominated the First Annual Panama International Tennis
Championships this past week, smile happily last night after
winning their respective final round matches. Brown defeated
Sid Schwartz, in the men's singles and Howe teamed with
.Shirley Fry to take the mixed doubles from Yula Ramirez and
Mario Llamas of Mexico.

I
1 "i I J
1 vS f
p-. :?r 7 r r J 1
!- f- f v- 4- m I

TWO-HANDED SWING Bob Howe, the popular two-fisted
Australian, who gave the tennis crowds jamming the El Pan Panama
ama Panama Hotel Tennis Courts the past five days many thrills with
his tremendous shot-making during the Panama International
Tennis Championships, which were concluded last night. Howe
shared in both doubles tennis crowns, winning the men's dou doubles
bles doubles with Sid Schwartz and the mixed doubles with Shirley
Fry. His unorthodox use of two hands on his racquet when
making volleys and backhands, he hardly ever hits a forehand,
was one of the most colorful phases of the tennis champion championships.
ships. championships. When he would unleash his tall, lean body into a two two-handed
handed two-handed volley his opponent could count the point as over.

The Pacific Sieam Kavigalion Company
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840
Royal Maillines Ltd.
OF SOUTH AMERICA
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST

O COt OMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SALAVERRY'' ..March 7
M.V. "SAMANCO" March 14
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, KINGSTON
HAVANA, NASSAU
BERMUDA, SPAIN AND FRANCE
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO" (18,000 Tons) ... May 11

10 UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT

s.s. "POTosr
S.S. "PIZARRO"

ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD.HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
- TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS y N
S.S. "DUIVENDYK" . . .... ... ....... . . ... ..... March 15
S.S. "LOCH RYAN" .March 22

TO UKCONTINENT

S.S. "PARAGUAY"
S.S. "DONGEDYK"

All Sailings Subject to Chance Without Notice
PACIFIC STEAM hAVIGATH)N CO., Cristobal Tel.: 16545
IPANAMAAve. Peru 55, Tel. i-1257$
PORDCO. fNC. 1BAI.BOA Term Bids.. Tel 2-190R

I, i

March nth
...March 22
. March 9
.March 17

1 nois won its eighth straight
Panama will be recommended championship in Big Ten gym gym-to
to gym-to the U.S. Lawn Tennis Associa- nasties, amassing more than
tion for the official awarding of twice as many noints as runner-

an annual date for its future In
ternational Tennis Champion-1
ships, according to a statement!

bv Ed Herr of the Miami Beacnjhin fitatp racked un its eiehth

Tennis Association prior to hi;J: straight Big Ten title in swim swim-leaving
leaving swim-leaving for Barranquilla yester-i ming.
dav. i

Herr, who served as advisory
chairman for the first annual
Panama International cnam-
pionships, was impressed witn
the larec. enthusiastic support
of the tournament by the Pan
ama-Canal Zone community and
of the El Panama Cabana Ten Tennis
nis Tennis Club's ability to stage and
carry out successfully this type
of tennis activity.
He has agreed to represent.
Panama at an official meeting;

in Miami in May of tennis clubs Won the $10,000 Inaugural Han Han-participating
participating Han-participating in the Florida-In-;dicap before a crowd of 31,529.
ternational Caribbean Tennis j
Circuit, of which Panama is the
newest member. At this meeting,! MILAN, Italy (UP) Light Light-Herr
Herr Light-Herr will make a strong effort; weight Orlando Zulueta of Cuba
to have Panama scheduled for and European featherweight
its Second Annual International champion Fred Galiana battled
Tennis Championships at ap-,to a 10-round draw.

proximately the same time
The success of this first
championships and Herr's ac action
tion action should make it possible
for Panama to have an even
finer sclect:on of Internation International
al International stars Uian were on hand for
this year's matches.
Before departing for the city
nf Barranquilla Championships,
5-11 March, Herr commented
that all visit inrr players are in
complete agreement the El Pan Panama
ama Panama Tennis Champions hips
would take its place as one of
the top tournaments in th Florida-International
Tennis Circuit.
He also said that in relation to
hospitality extended to players.
no tournament ottered more, or

treated th,- players better. Mbst:Brookmeade Stables' County! The three other N C A.A.
of the nlayers who participated; Clare won the $18,095 Magic Ci-jberths are reserved as follows:'
here will comnete in the Barran- ty Handicap before a record one for the Big Seven champion
quilla championships. 'crowd of 23.864 as Gulfstream which Kansas St could clinch

iast night ac me hoici ti
Panama's Tennis Ball, Comp Comptroller
troller Comptroller Roberto Heurtematte,
honorary chairman of the ten tennis
nis tennis tournament committee, pre
sented trophies to the winners
and runners-up in the four
events: Singles Tom Brown,
winner; Sid Schwartz, runner runner-up.
up. runner-up. Men's doubles Schwartz Schwartz-Bob
Bob Schwartz-Bob Howe, winners; Mario Llamas-Brown,
runners-up. Wom Women's
en's Women's singles Shirley Fry, win winner;
ner; winner; Yola Ramirez, runner-up;
and Mixed doubles Fry-Howe,
winners; Llamas-Ramirez, runners-up.
The presentation and tennis
dance followed the final round
matches in men's singles and
the mixed doubles.
Tpm Brown of San Francis Francisco
co Francisco lived up to his tpp seeding
by turning back Sid Schwartz
of New York in the men's sin singles
gles singles 6-3, 6-1 (default) before
another capacity crowd of over4
700 people.
After the second set, Cchwartz
announced he could not contin continue.
ue. continue. He has been taking treat treatment
ment treatment during the oast week for
a strained forearm, but up until
last night he had been able to'
keep his game going at full
speed. Brown, however, plaved
his usually fine all-court game
and would have been difficult
for probably any top any top
player to defeat.
In the mixed doubles finals
Shirley Fry of St. Petersburg
Fla., and Robert Howe of Aus Australia
tralia Australia edged out a hotly contest
ed match with the crowd-pleas
ing Mexican combination of Yo Yola
la Yola Ramirez and Mario Llamas.
7-5. 8-6.
The one-sidedness of the
Brown-Schwartz encounter is
evidenced by the fact that "in
four games served by Brown in
the second set, Schwartz could
only take onP point. In the first
set, Brown iumped to an early
lead by breaking Schwartz's first
service game. After that Brown
continued to dominate the play
as Schwartz could not come up
with the brilliant Dlacements he
did Saturday evpnin? in turnin?
back Llamas. With Brown ahead
5 to 3, Schwartz tried to hold his
serve, but Brown took the same
and set after three hard fought
deuces.
In the mixed doubles, the Mex Mexicans
icans Mexicans did everything rjossible to
gain a victory from their favor favored
ed favored rivals. Time and again' they
made impossible retrieves of the
Hard-hit strokes of Miss Fry and
the bullet-likfl volleys coming
off Howe's two-fisted backhand.
At five-all in the first set. Miss
Ramirez could not hold her serv service
ice service aeainst .the fine net play of
Fry and Howe. The Australian
then won the set with his serve.
Again In the second set, the
two teams battled on even
terms. The crowd cheered en
tbusiasUcaily as the men trad
ed tremendous vollevs and over
heads, makin-r seemingly tmpos
sible "gets" of each others' over
heads. The irirls .did their share
of shot-makhiB too. Miss Frv hit
one of Llama's' volleys so hard
with a mid-court forehand that
the ball went by Llamas almost
before he completed his volley
follow throue-h. Miss Ramirez
made some fine shots from the
back court.
At six all, Howe held his
serve as usual. He could not be
broken through once during
the match. Llamas then drop dropped
ped dropped his service, with a double
fault proving rostly.
.'highly complimented bv Ed

r 1 j
(Sports Briefs

WEEKEND SPORTS SUMMARY
i By UNITED PRESS
SATURDAY
CHAMPAIGN. 111. (UPl-Illi-
:up Michigan,
.
LAFAYETTE, Ind. (UP) O-
NEW OREEANS (HP) Al Alfred
fred Alfred G. Vanderb'lt's Find, who
finished fourth to Nashua in
the Widener Handicap at Hia Hia-leah
leah Hia-leah Park, won the $50,000
added New Orleans Handicap
at the Fair Grounds. He paid
$5.40, $4.60 and $3.20.
LINCOLN. R.I.-(UP) Lincoln
Downs got the New England rac-1
inr season off to its earliest
start in history and Into Glory
EAST LANSING. Mich. (UP)
The Big Ten wound up its two two-day
day two-day spring meeting by appoint appointing
ing appointing a three-member committee
to negotiate a new Rose Bowl
nact with the pacific Coast Con-
ference.
ORMOND BEACH, Fla TP)
Ann tfuast of Marysville,
Wash., defeated the veteran
Barbara Romack of Sacramen Sacramento,
to, Sacramento, Calif., 4 and 3 to win the
South Atlanta Women's Ama Amateur
teur Amateur Championship.
HOLLAND ALE, F)a.
(UP)
park opened a 43-day meeting,
wavy yukk. iuki wes
tee, an amateur for a night, won
the famed Columbian Mile of
the Knights of Columbus Games
as a crowd of more than 12.000
cheered him on. Only two other
runners, both of the Army, ran
against him.
ARCADIA, Calif. (UP) Rex
C. Ellsworth's Terrang, a sta sta-blemate
blemate sta-blemate of Swaps, won the
$158,000 Santa Anita Derby be before
fore before a crowd of 62,500. He paid
$5.40 straight as the favorite.
SUNDAY
MEXICO CITY (UP) Billy
Maxwell of Odessa, Tex., f'red
a record 24-under par total of
264 for 72-holes to win the
Mexican National Open Golf
Tournament.
FRANCONIA, N.H.-(UP)-Bill
Brandenburg, 16-year-old jump jumper
er jumper from McCall, Idaho, out out-jumped
jumped out-jumped a field of 48 on Cannon
muuiiiaiii uu will (.lie nauiuuai
Junior Ski Jumping Champion
snip.
AGUA CALIENTE (IP)
Goldwater ($20.40) and Blueo Blueo-nia
nia Blueo-nia ($40.60) combined for a
$7,725.60 daily double at Ca Ca-liente.
liente. Ca-liente. S. J. CantHlo of San
Diego, Calf., and Claendario
Hernandez, a Mexican customs
inspector, .were the only ones
to hold winning tickets on
the huge double.
BATON ROUGE, La. (UP)
Shelly Mayfield of Westbury.
N.Y., won the $12,500 Baton
Rouge Open Golf Tournament
with a 72 hole total of 277, three
better than Jimmv Demaret of
Kiamesha lake, N.Y.
Herr, the advisory chairman for
the championship who is a
member of the U.S. Lawn Tennis
Association. He is sending to Pah
ama two tennis racauets for the
ball boy and ball girl selected as
the most outstanding. The two
selected are Dopald Shive, son
of coi. ana Mrs. Donal stiive ana
Ceci Eggleston, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Maurice Eggleston.

AM V. s

4

:
2 Teams Each To Be

Added To NCAA, NIT
Touraments Today

By JOHN GRIFFIN
NEW YORK, March 5 (UP)
The NCAA, and National Invi Invitation
tation Invitation tournaments were expect expected
ed expected to add two teams each today,
virtually completing the blue blue-ribbon
ribbon blue-ribbon fields for these two big biggest
gest biggest post-season basketball clas classics.
sics. classics. The N.I.T., which opens at New
York, March 17, still has four
places to fill in its 12-team field
anrt u'3c pvnpptArl in Hisrlns
tw0 of them today Tne top can.
didates were:
Si. Joseph's (20-4), the Phil Philadelphia
adelphia Philadelphia area standout; St.
Eouis (16-6), the Missouri Val Valley
ley Valley Conference runner-up; Ok Oklahoma
lahoma Oklahoma A. and M. (17-8),
which could tie St. Louis in
the M.V.C.; and Brigham
Young (18-8). the Skyline Con
ference runner-up.
The N.C.A.A. has five places to
fill in its 25-team field for com competition
petition competition starting March 12.
Two could be disposed of to today.
day. today. Dartmouth, which clinched
the Ivy League crown Saturday
by a 90-79 overtime win over
Brown, can have one berth just
for saying "Yes, and athletic
director Red Rolfe promised an
announcement today.
Iowa, victor by a rousing 96 96-72
72 96-72 score over Illinois, in Satur Saturday's
day's Saturday's nationally-televised game,
can clinch another berth along
with the Big Ten championship
by beating Indiana as expected
tonight.
t.nmorrow nipht- nnp for the n-
hio Valley Conference cham
: pion, to be settled on Wednesday

an-,and Thursday by a playoff a

mong Western Kentucky, More More-head
head More-head St., and Tennessee Tech;
and one for the Southeastern
Conference team, which could be
runner-up to Kentucky because
champion Alabame has five in ineligible
eligible ineligible players.
Betrdes Dartmouth, North
Carolina State, West Virginia,

College Cage Scores

SOUTHERN CONFERENCE
TOURNEY
(Championship)
West Virginia 58, Richmond 56.
ATLANTIC COAST
CONFERENCE TOURNEY
(Championship)
N. C. State 76, Wake Forest 64.
MASON-DIXON CONFERENCE
TOURNEY
(Championship)
Mt St. Marys 107, Baltimore
t ft,Ti qr
; U)y01a 8b
WEST VIRGINIA
CONFERENCE TOURNEY
(Championship)
West Va Tech 83, Glenville 72.
SOUTH CAROLINA LITTLE 4
TOURNEY
(Championship)
Presbyterian 91, Erskine 90.
ILLINOIS NAIA PLAYOFFS
(Final)
Western Illinois 84, Wheaton 83.
DISTRICT 29 NAIA PLAYOFFS
(Final)
Tenn State 72, Jackson (Miss) 64.
(Consolation)
Winston Salem 92 Maryland
State 88
DISTRICT 19 NAIA PLAYOFFS
(Final)
Delta (Miss.) St. 69, Miss. South Southern
ern Southern 52.
(Consolation)
Birmingham-Southern 74, Troy
CO.
DISTRICT 18 NAIA PLAYOFFS
McNeese (La.) 76, Centenary 72.
DISTRICT 25 NAIA PLAYOFFS
(Final)
Georgia Tchrs. 112. Stetson 86.
DISTRICT 9 NAIA PLAYOFF
(Final)
Southeastern Okla 58, Okla. Bap Baptist
tist Baptist 5.
EAST
Dartmouth 90 Bown 79.
Yale 82, Harward 69.
Penn 60 Columbia 58. ..
Princeton 80, Cornell 76.
Duquesne 83, St. Francis 69.
Canisiu 64, Niagara 62.
Navv 78. Armv 67.
Fordham 78, Seton Hall 76.
Pitt 100, Penn State 90.
St. Johns 77. CCNY 69.
Colgate 78, Rhode Island 68.
"llof stra 67, Muhlenberg 66.
Yeshiva 86, Brooklyn Coll. 84.
St. Peters (N.J,, 85 St. 'Bona-
venture 74.
LaFayettc 111, Rutgers 69.
Bucknell 73, Rochester 70.
Boston Univ. 69, American Intl.
6C.
N. Pate Tchrs 91, -,T re n t o n
Tchrs. 80.
Maine 86, Bowdoin 82.
S'-uquUianna 64, Phila. Tex.' 61.
Amherst 73- Wi liams 56,
Springfield 76, Colby 64.
Middiebury 75, Norwich 67.
Rensselaer 97, Union 85.
Hamilton 87, Clarkson 58.
""Hidei 8!, NewaiR" Rutgers 5T
wiiei b.,, iiewam nm-geTs-Tr;
Worcester Tech 59, Tufts 57.

I

UCLA., and Houston, all
clinched N.C.A.A. bids Satur Saturday
day Saturday by winning conference
championships.
North Carolina State took the
Atlantic Coast Conference tour tournament
nament tournament in routing Wake Forest,
76-64, in the finals; West Virgi Virginia
nia Virginia won the Southern Confer Conference
ence Conference tournament by nipping
Richmond, 58-56, In the finals;
U.C.L.A. clinched the Pacific
Coast Conference championship

by beating California for the
second straight night. 84-62; and
Houston fell heir to the Missouri
Valley crown when St. Louis was
upset by Oklahoma A. and M
52-49.
Here's how the N.C.A.A. tour tourney
ney tourney looked after these additions
for first-round games:
At New York, March 12-13
Connecticut vs. Manhattan;
Temple vs. Holy Cross; Cani Cani-sius
sius Cani-sius vs. North Carolina St.;
West Virginia vs. member-at-large
(probably Dartmouth).
At Fort Wayne, Ind., March 12
De Paul vs. Wayne (winner to
meet Southeastern champion at
Iowa City, March 16); Marshall
vs. Ohio Valley champion (win (winner
ner (winner to meet Big Ten champion
u iuwa uuy, Marcn ie).
At Wichita, Kans., March 13
Memphis St. vs. Oklahoma city
(winner to meet Big Seven
champion at Lawrence, Kans.,
March 16); S-M.U. vs. Texas
Tech (winner to meet Houston
at Lawrence, March 16).
At Seattle, Wash., March 13
Iciaho St. vs. Seattle (winner to
meet Utah at Corvallis, Ore.,
March 16).
At Corvallis, Ore., March 16
San Francisco vs. U.C.L.A.
The four reglonals Phila Philadelphia,
delphia, Philadelphia, Iowa City, Lawrence,
and Corvallis each will pro produce
duce produce a single winner. At Evans,
ton, 111., March 22, the Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia and Iowa City winners
meet for the Eastern title and
the Lawrence and Corvallis win win-ners
ners win-ners for the Western. Eastern
and Western champions will
meet at Evanston. March 23, for
the championship.
Queens 74, Cooper Union 48.
Providence 76, Trinity 68.
Plattsburgh 81, Albany Tchrs 7.
Waterbury Conn 77, Albany
Busi. 69.
Hobart 54, Alfred 50.
Alfred Aggies 83, Fredonia 72.
Newark Engineering 90, mont mont-clair
clair mont-clair 77.
Buffalo Uni. 68, Buffalo Tchrs.
50.
Geneva 134, Waynesburg 62.
Allegheny 68, Wash. & Jefferson
57.
St. Josephs 91, Delaware 77.
Albright 64, Franklin & Marsh
all 60.
E. Stroudsburg 89, Kutztown 72.
Lycoming 104, West Chester 88.
Swarthmore 80, Haverford 73.
SOUTH
Kentucky 101, Tennessee 77.
W. Kentucky 100. Middlt Tenn.
85.
Florida 82, Georgia 69.
MIDWEST
Iowa 96, Illinois 72.
Ohio State 96, Michigan Stat
84
Minnesota 86, Michigan 72.
Wisconsin 76, Northwestern 70.
Purdue 73, Indiana 71.
Missouri 85, Kansas State 72.
Dayton 71, Cincinnati 58.
Oklahoma A&M 52, St. Louis 49.
Bradley 69, Notre Dame 63.
Wichita 71, Tulsa 51.,
Nebraska 64, Oklahoma 63.
Miami (0.) 96, Xavier (O.)1 91.
Craighton 67, South Dak. St. 66.
Wooster 85, Ohio Wesleyan 63.
Wayne 88, John Carroll 80.
Knox 89, Lawrence 78.
Monmouth 78, Ripon 73.
Mount Union 98. Hiram 62.
Defiance 94, Adrian 86.
Heidelberg 87, Kenyon 79.
Wittenberg 80, Capital 72.
Coe 95, Carleton 63.
Cornell 79, St. Olaf 74.
Western Reserve 87, Case 77.
FAR WEST
San Francisco 65, Los Ang, Lo Loyola
yola Loyola 48
UCLA 84; California 62.
Washington 71, Southern Califor California
nia California 67
Oregon 72, Washington St. 58.
Stanford 72, San Jose State 70.
Utah 71,. Wyoming 64.
Montana 63. Colorado A&M 62.
Biigham Young 98, Denver 86.
Air Force Acao. 78, D e n v e r
Frosh 60.
Nev, Mexico 74, Utah State 63.
Idaho State 63, Montana St. 67.
West. (Colo ) St. 72, Colo. Mines
47
Los Angeles fit. 89, Pepperdino
8S. .
E. New Mexico 92, Regis 87..
Pacini Lutheran 80, Gonza"jrt
72 ; V',
San. Diego St. 78, Pasadena Na Na-zarene
zarene Na-zarene 6i
Humboldt 78, Nevada 66.
aauia mara u, St: iKirys 39.
Chapman 63, Long Beach St. 59,

o



TBI PANAMA -.'AMERICA
. -AN: INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER-,
PAGE NIK
'Gym Hardly CariH

MONDAY, MARCH g, 1936

1 1

1 4

iyA:::

JL

it"

TIGHT FIT Cincinnati's Roy McMillan trips to fit a shirt over
the tree-trunk body of Ted Kluszewski. McMkllan finds the Reds
have to come up with a bigger shirt, unless the Tampa weather
goes to work and slims down the big first baseman.

I By JIMMY BRESLIN I
i SYRACUSE, N. Y. (NEA)-Thc;
small, low ceilingcrt gymnasium1
I i didn't seem big enougn lor Car Car-f
f Car-f men Basilio.
L The welterweight champion,.
It wearing a pair of long, brign
I I green wool pants, slipped into tne
firing to begin shadow boxing and
fionco he started you were afraid
4 i he'd go right out the windows a a-1
1 a-1 1 longside and wind up three f loori
J down on Main Strcci, hitting ped

estrians wnn ich nui)hs 10 we
stomach.
When Basilio goes through his
daily gynasium routine, yuu sec.
he works like a man getting ready-

to fight not just Johnny Saxton,

. but the whole world as well. Bas, i
i f lip defends his title against Sax-'
'ton at Chicago Stadium on March

14. If there is anything sure abum ;

the bout, it is that Basilio will be
in matchless condition.
Basilio shadow boxed in non
slop style. His fists kept cuthrr;
into the air as fast as he could
throw them out, and he gavt. a
high pitched grunt with each
punch. In a workout. Basilio
seems to give it more than even
Rocky Marciano.

Phils 'Corner Drugstore' Club; Crippled $p0r$ shorts

Team Needs Medical, Not Baseball Skill

1

by
JOE WILLIAMS

MIAMI BEACH. Six times a week, from mid-afternoon until
the bake-oven sun begins to dip behind the distant pines, Jimmy
en-, the most powerful right-hand slugger baseball ever knew,

n out on the diamond here coaching Miami U. hopefuls.
Time's starting to nibble at. Double X around the crises,
. which is to be expected, since he's no more than a pitch out
from SO. There's a slash of gray in his hair and much of the;
heroic home-run muscle has turned to suet, yet a baseball fan
would marl; him instantly a mile off, by his unfailing smile,
if nothing elfe.
Jlmmj was always one of baseball's good humor men, and
though tb.ngs haven't been going too well for him of late, ne
.still manages a cheerful disposition and an optimistic outlook.
The coaching job can't pay much, but it does keep him in base baseball,
ball, baseball, and that's what he wants most of all.
I'd like to be able to write that the money he gets isn't
important, but that wouldn't' be so. For all I know, it may be
the entire source of his income, and Jimmy has a gracious wife
and two fine teen-ae boys to support.
This lies been Jimmy's home for the past several years. He
had been driving an oil truck in St. Petersburg. "I like it better
here," he quid. "And we are able to live, cheaper."
I hadn't been able to find Jimmy in the Miami phone book.
"We don't hare a phone." he apologized. Then in what seemed
to be an afterthought, he added: "We've been moving."
( Jimmy always traveled first cabin as a big leaguer. He was
a' free spender and a check grabber. It was almost as if he had
Kti vathologU-cl dread of being called clreap. Jimmy's still paying
his way, except that when he reaches for the check these days
it s ior neccstilies, not luxuries.
Jimmv was-a big leaguer for 20 years or more. He starred
on some of Curhie Mack's most brilliant teams. Later he went
to Boston and' had a number of big seasons. The first thing
people ask about a former star in reduced circumstances Is:
"What did he do with all the money he made?"
Jimmy doesn't know what bitterness means. If he did he
might properly say.
"All of what money?
Branch Rickey has often been depicted as a direct descend descendant
ant descendant of Mr. Scrooge, a not altogether charitable or correct por portrait,
trait, portrait, but compared with Connie Mack, as I learn belatedly,
Rickey was unbelievably extravagant.
It Wasn't Even Hay
How much do you think Mack paid Foxx the first year he
vas with the Athletics?
Exactly $2000. Next vear he got a big boost to $2500. And
the third year his pay soared to $3000. Keep in mind this wasn't
in the dark ages of baseball. It was the late 20s' before the
Wall Street panic, when everybody had money.
In 1929 Double X made 183 hits, including 33 homers, and
orave in 117 runs for a .354 B.A, That helped bring Mack his
first pennant, since 1914. and guess what Jimmy's pay check was
made put wrl A grand total of $5000.
The- year Foxx hit 58 homers he was working on a three three-year
year three-year contract that called for $50,000 all told, or approximately
$6,670 per season.
If Foxx hadn't, Injured his wrist in August that year he
would almost surely have surpassed the Babe's classic 60 by
three or four; his swing hampered, he got only three that month,
in September he got 14 or 15, Double X was stronger than the
Babe, and I was never convinced that he didn't hit a longer. ball.
Fox.v finally got Mack all the way up to $13,000. This was in
1934. And the next year the old man sold him to' the Red Sox.
You still want to know what Double X "did with all that
money he made?"
Lucky Pension Guys
Foxx isn't eligible to participate in the baseball pension. He
pot out ihe year before it started. The way the plan is working
out, the current ellgibles will be setting more in pensions than
standout stars like Foxx got for playing.
They will owe the security of their future not to any signal
contributions they made to baseball, but to an accident of birth;
they just happened to be around when TV started paying off
big. The new World Series contract with the sponsors, for exam example,
ple, example, will amount to at least three times as much as the old one.
The money the players are putting into the fund comes from
a source which was not available to Foxx aAd his generation .
a source which, obviously, the current eligibles did nothing what whatever
ever whatever to create,
All the time Foxy: was telling me how tough old Connie tons
with a 'buck he was laughing, and yet I. know, he feels there's
something curious about a pension program that is set up to
help some and scorn others.
The ia.it time Cy Young was In New York for a Yankee old old-timers
timers old-timers spectacle he sat waiting for his train, and said:
'1 was hoping they'd give me $50 or $60 to take back home.
I sure could use It."
Young probably squandered. all his dough, too. The year he
won 36 games he got $2300..

"Stt this?" Johnny De John, his

co manager, commented. "Well
i everything is like this. Right
I from the start. Koad work he
doesn't even open easy. Jumps
: right off and goes three, f o u r
miles like a cross country run runner."
ner." runner." For the next hour and 20 min minutes,
utes, minutes, Basilio backed this up. He
i boxed three rounds with Phil V.'il-

nans, nis gym-ngniing sparmnte,
and Carmen kept pressing every
second of the way. He'd move
in on Williams, bobbing as h
came, and then shoving his rib rib-wrecking
wrecking rib-wrecking left hand toward the body.

By HARRY GRAYSON
CLEARWATER, Fla. (NEA)
-Robert R M.. Carpenter, Jr.,
has become a "yes man with the
Phillies.
Carpenter, the red hot fan, sits
in the sun back of third base
watching his club work out ?!
Clearwater's new Jack Russeli
Stadium. Ask the owner about the

playing personnel and he throws
a thumb in Hamev's direction, and

says: "Whatever he says, 1 say."
Carpenter acted as his own gen general
eral general manager for several years on on-Iv
Iv on-Iv to see the pennant-winning Whiz
Kids of 1950 become the Phiz

:uds. While the bright lads who i Simmons gets it out of his head
so quickly came out of nowhere to that he can't cut loose, and thei'i
upset the Dodgers oidn't precise- is no early indication that t h
!v fall apart, they lost consider-, southpaw will, Manager Smith
able of their early foot. Carpen-j faces the task of developing ot

ter chanjed managers ann in me omerwisc ontaimng a pitcher or

fall of 1954 brought in Harney -two.
from the Yankee organization to ; If Hamner can stay sound, the
run the works. Phils have half of a double play
combination who can swat t h e
A young man with the money of long ball. Bobby Morgan has dem dem-a
a dem-a DuPont heir can afford to nay onstrated that he is nothing more

someone to suffer the aggravation(than a utility infielder. Roy Smali-

Ihat goes with the muatieipnia -cy aoesn t hit enough. The hope

him a satisfactory contract.
Richie Ajhburn won the Nation National
al National League batting championship
last trip, hut limped in with a
sad sacroiliac which could return
at any time.
Jim Grcegrass was trealed for
hemophlebitis in a leg. Joe Lou Lou-nett
nett Lou-nett underwent a knee operation.
Once past this medical mess the
Phils have nothing more than the
usual quota of spring aches, pains
and problems. Last year, May 3
Smith had to scramble for pinn pinning
ing pinning after using Robin liobeus,
Herman Wehneicr and M u r r v

Dickson, the latter now 39. Unlets

Nationals.
This ear, the clubs chance
depend more on medical science
than baseball skill. As previously
reported renowned noneseitors
cannot find anything wrong with
Curt Simmons' left shoulder, yn
foremost psychotechnicians can
not get the once fearsome left
hand pitcher to throw hard.
Grannv Hamner was operated
on last summer for a loose tendon
;.. 1,1c l.ft shoulder. l-lamey felt

therefore, is Teddy Kazanski, the

$7.'i, 000 bonus beauty back from
Syracuse a bit more matured at
the ripe old age of 22. lie only

has to hit the ball with some share

of the verve with which he field
it.

WIDE OPEN
NEW YORK (NEA) -You ;et
hne on the closely-bunched three,
year-old situation with the recn.-j
number of nominees for the
Preakness and Belmont Stakes.
There arc 176 names in the Pretk Pretk-nes
nes Pretk-nes hopper and 132 have been put
up for the Belmont.

MONEY MAKERS

-'it i

( TV
4. J-'WiWJf.:

V- NEW Y
VV V:-:' 1 "rooks, w
. VV :. I Eddie An
' J Y j hua. are

7 r-.

YORK (NF.A) -Sieve

ho rode Citation, ard

Arcaro. who handles Nn-

the onlv iockeys ever

to ride a million-dollar purse winner.

Basilio had a full mask, inttin ;. ak" sure that the

down from the headeuard. co- er-: ... .u' t..'i niH swine a ba:

with 'something approaching Ws
former viciousness before giving

ing his face, and he let. Williams
land jabs as he pleased. It w.js
obvious Basilio was concestratir
on a particular move.

After the ring work and a set
of exercises -which can be best do do-scribed
scribed do-scribed as perilous lor the aver
age person Basilio went off into
a little alcove at one end of the
room and began undressing.

"I've seen Saxton light a co'.mle
of times," he said, (lavilan wa
one of them." He was talUin.;
clearly, withou a deeo breath in

his bod .y-What do 1 expect Sax i scheduled to resume

Training Camp
Briefs

TUCSON. Ariz.. March 5 UP
T,iev,, Mikp Garria was

All Ashburn, the incomparable
lead-off man, has to do to 'ipse.)
infields and otherwise stir up trou trouble
ble trouble is stay on his pins, but hr
practically was paralyzed w h f n
his back kicked up late lasi .sea .season
son .season and he had to be helped froi.i
the field in Chicago.
The Phils require Ashburrs
center fielding and speed and
Greengrass' thump, lor 'there is
nothing behind them in the o'.i' o'.i'-field
field o'.i'-field but fill-ins and pinch-hitlers
You run into veterans here like
Frank Baumholtz and Wally West
lake, and Glen Gorhoiis. who can":
hit nearly as well a- he throw.-.
With Stan l.opala ;u first b:i.;e
I.onnett. who showi'i promise a1

Syracuse hetore his knee buckle. I I
is needed to back up and snell1
lU. E .. I 1 .1

"if .w rear-oia caicner. Andv;

-3

-V.- v'uvs J'S
'Mi

workouts; Seminick.

ton to do? He'll run. And llhnc.s

has no law against mc chasing
him. I don't know about the run running,
ning, running, cither. You don't win a
championship by running away
At least I didn't win mine by run running
ning running away from Tony De Marco.
What about Saxton's hit and and-clutch
clutch and-clutch tactics, Basilio was asked.
After all, it was observed, that
was how he won the crown from
Kid Gavilan in Philadelphia
Wasn't there a danger of him try trying
ing trying the same style in Chicago?
"If he tries to grab me, he'll
get tired after a while," Carmen
said. "I can tug on a guy's armr.
and break them up, too."

PANAMA AMERICAN

B8

roaiij,a

"Wc got a chance to take Sax Saxton
ton Saxton out," De John said. "At tor
what Tony De Marco did to him
I can't sec how the guy can be
right."
And after Saxton?
De John's eyes rolled. He was
standing by a battered door in a
little gymnasium, but he beiina
talking about the kind of money
you wouldn't, think these places
would bring.
"We should do $500,000 with

Kooinson, ue John said

casino smued. His manager

was isiKing anout Kay Robinson,
of course. And a packed Yankee
Stadium in June.

Muggsy MageeTo Be
Honorary Referee
At Balboa Relays
Charles F, Magee, well known
sports figure in the Canal Zone,
will serve as the '-onorary referee
for the Seventh Annual Balboa Re Relays
lays Relays to be held the evening of
March' ?3 at Balboa Stadium.
. The. entire opening ceremony
will be devoted to honoring Mr.
Magee, whose contribution to
athletics for the youth o fthe Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone has be;n so great in
time,-effort, and spirit that it
defies recounting in article.
"Aluggsy," as he Is known
throughout the Zone, has retired

from active service with the Ca

nal and he and his family wili be
leaving the Zone in another few
months. It l rumored that they
will settle in the Boston area.
The losi to the athletic fortunes
of the Canal Zone will be the great
gain of the Boston area. ;
Plans for the colorful Relay Car Carnival
nival Carnival are moving rapidly along ac according
cording according to word from the meet di

rector. -The Balboa Vigh track
team recently elected the Queen
of the Relays and her court of two

girls. ;
Shiiley Ransom was honored
by being selected as Queen ,of
the Relays and the will be as assisted,
sisted, assisted, by Angela Lee and Louise
Tate; All three girls are at Bal Balboa
boa Balboa High and have been very
active In school affair through throughput
put throughput their high school days.
Interest in the meet in begin beginning
ning beginning to mount steadily, with more
and more athletes getting into
condition for the big night. In ad addition
dition addition to the events for the team
championship, there will also be
relays lor the elementary schools
and the junior high schools, These
CVCnUnnuallx-jacL-iiQmcQ. X Jlic

most ihnlbng and closely contest

ed races on the entire 18 event

with the Cleveland uwi -day
after responding to treat

ments for severe siomm.u
It was feared at first that
the 32-vear-old risM hander
might have to undergo an ap appendectomy
pendectomy appendectomy but traner Wally
Bock said the pa;n stemmed
from other causes. Garcia hart
an IMS record last season and
is eaeer to get down to work
early in an effort to make up
for the poor showing.
Rudy Regalado. always a fine
spring hitter, blasted three home
runs, including a erand slam slammer
mer slammer yesterday as the "Curcinc "Curcinc-Uos"
Uos" "Curcinc-Uos" defeated the 'Kresses, 13 13-11
11 13-11 In an intra-squad game.
Herb Score turned in the only
impressive pitching performance
of the contest.
MESA, Ariz., March 5'UPi 5'UPi-Clyde
Clyde 5'UPi-Clyde McCullough celebrated hts
38th birthday yesterday by hit hitting
ting hitting a homer in an intra-squad
game and predicting he will
catch 80 games for the Chicago
Cubs this year.

"I'll be reaav cairn
eames If they need me," McCul McCullough
lough McCullough said. "A guy is no older
than he feels."
McCullough caught In 44,
games and batted .198 last sea season.
son. season.

I So Smith awaits tlv final mprii mprii-;cal
;cal mprii-;cal reports and Hamey the ar.tiei-i
'patcd headaches. And Carpenter!
savs, "Yes."

IDEA SPREADING? Stan Lopata, right, Phillies catcher, takes
his eccentric, crouching stance and four teammates line up behind
him to mimic it. Left to right are Curt Simmons, Del Ennis,
.Tunes and Herman WeWi'

ATTENTION
PAINT DISTRIBUTORS
One of America' leading manufacturer! of painti offert
exclusive arrangement! ta a newly organized or an existing
firm The complete line include! indoor and outdoor house
points, automotive lacqueri, farm ond industrial coolings.
Our representative will visit interested parties. Write.
RICHARD-LEWIS, n irw.y, n r.rk i, n.y.

LAST DAY! .75 .40
3:00, 4:15, 5:45, 7:20, 9:00 p.m.
An cmazing true aventure In

CINemaScopE

I

sjrv w
ilk C:
PA., Jf

"THE KING'S THIEF"
Starring Ann BIYTH
Edmund PUR DOM
George SANDERS

Jodos Fnconfo .35 .20

Raymond Massey,.in
"SEVEN ANGRY MEN"
Diana Dors, in
"WEAK AND THE WICKED

7"oaV IDEAL .20 .10

James Stewart, in
"FAR COUNTRY"
Sterling Hayden, in
"NAKED ALIBI"

ST. PETERSBURG. Fla.,
March 5 (UP) H took man-
alter Casey Stengel one tele telephone
phone telephone call and 14 well-chosen j
words yesterday to get infield-
er Billy Martin and pitcher ;
J'm Konstanty to come to
terms with the New York Yan Yan-kecs.
kecs. Yan-kecs. First, the 64-year-old pilot tel telephoned
ephoned telephoned Martin in New York
and told him to hurry down to
training. Shortly after Martin's :

arrival, he signed for an esu-(
mated $20,000. I
Then Stengel spotted. Kon-i
stanty outside the club house
grumbling about his salary j
squabble with general manager,
George Weiss , I
"Get in there and get into;
your uniform, then get out' on j
the field," Casey barked at Kon-i

stanty who had a 7-2 record ia$i,
season, j
Konstanty signed a few mo-,
ments after putting on his unl-,
form.

DOUBLE DUTY
CLEARWATER, Fla. (NE.Vjs--The
Phillies led the National
League in playing doubleheaders
last vear with 29. Thoy won 28 and
lost 30 of the games.

COOP BIGGEST
ST. PETERSBURG. Fla. (NEA )
Catcher Walker Cooper, at 6-3
and 215 pounds, is the biggest man
on the St. Louis Cardinal roster.

OFFICIAL LIST OF IHE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1930, Sunday, March 4, 1956
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided hi two series "A" k "B" of 22 pieces each

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

196.1 $ 44,000.00
8100 $ 13,200 00
0175 $ 6,600 00

PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

N Pf" i No Prif No Prlim Me PtIim N PrlitF i No Ptizw Ne Priiw No Prliw i No
I I I I
tlOBI I.12.M lOfit 1.12.111) 201 1.12.ait J(tfi 132.M 4HIU 1J2.IMI 5(M(t H2M SOBI IS2. TARl 2 M1
IM.M Hl 112.M 21St 1.12.MI Jut 1.12.IW 41l 132.IMI 5IB1 ir.2.IMI S1S1 1.12.IW 7161 K1SI
2fil J32.M 121 1.12.M 221 1.12.0(1 32gl 132.(l 421 192.0K S2BI 132 M 2M I32.0 72(11 "2.0(1 S2S1
a.tai I32.ni) 13m 13200 ski 132.00 3301 13200 mi 132.00 .msi 11200 snot 132.00 73i 11200 3i
04t 132.00 UBl 132.00 2481 112.00 34BI 132.00 4401 112.00 S4BI 132.00 6461 132.00 14B1 132.00 Sfil
0561 112.00 mi 112.00 2501 132.00 3561 132.00 4501 I32.0 5SBI 112.00 6561 132.00 7361 112.00 S16I
0661 112 00 06l 132.00 2661 112.00 3661 1.12.00 4661 132.00 S66I 112.0(1 6661 1.12 00 7661 132.00 S661
0761 132.00 1761 132.00 2701 132.00 3761 132.00 4761 132.00 S761 112.00 6761 112.00 7761 112.00 1761
6l 112.00 11161 11J.00 2861 132.00 3K6I 132.00 46l 132.00 5661 132.00 0S61 132.00 7661 112.00 Sl
961 2.200.DO 1961 44.000.00 2961 2,200.00 ,1961 2.200.W 4961 2,200.00 5961 2,200.00 0961 2,200.00 7961 2,200.00 61)61

Prt I Nm

1.12 00
132.00
132.00
112 00
132.00
132.00
112.00
1.1200
' 132.00
2.200.00

9061
1M
9261
93K1
9461
9561
9661
9761
9961

Prlia
112.00
1.12.00
112.00
112.00
132 00
112.00
132.00
1)2.00
112.00
2,200.00

Approximations Derived From First Prize

i 'i 'i i 'i
1952 440.00 1954 410.00 1956 440.00 1956 440.00 I960 440 00 19611 440.00 1965 440.00 1967 440.00 1969 440.00
1953 44000 I 1955 440.00 1 1957 440.00 1 1959 440.00 I 1962 440 00 1964 440.00 1966 440.00 1966 440 00 197 0 440.0
Approximations Derived From Second Prize
ti I i i i -f
IM 220.00 I 1100 220.00 2100 220.00 3100 220.00 4100 220.00 I 5100 220.00 6100 220.00 7100 220.00 9100 220.00
I I j !-
M9I 110.00 I- 6092 110.00 i S095 llO.OO 9097 110.00 9099 110 00 I 9102 110.00 9104 110.00 9106 1IO.O IO 110.6
192 110 06 1094 110.00 S09 110.00 S09S 116.00 1 S101 110.00 1 8103 110.00 8105 110.00 817 11 8109 110.

Approximation? Derived From Third Prize

i
117S 1S2.00 VIS

0166
017

IS .00
11.00

0IM
119

1S2.00

110
11.00

317J

0170
171

1S2.00 I 4171 132.00 5175 132 90 6173 132.00 7173 132.00

88.00
18.00

172
173

8100
18.00

0174
176

8,8.00
88 00

177
0178

88.00
81.00

179
180

88.00
88.00

0181
182

S I
1J2.W t

88.M
88.00

193
184

132.M

98 00
.0

; Prize-winning Numbers of vesterday'g Lottery Drawing were sold at: 1st in Veraguas, 2nd in Panama and 3rd in B. del Toro
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending In 1 and not included in the above list win Forty-four Dollars ($44.00) each
The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "B"
Signed by: ALBERTO ALEMAN. Governor of the Province of Panama. Ced. 47-12155
TTie Representative Of The Treasure R1CARDO A MELENDEZ

WITNESSES: Ablllo Canto, Ced. No. 60-9150
Aurelio Garcia M., CM No. 47-48185

ALBERTO J. BARSALLO
, Notary Public. Panama

RAFAEL TERAN A.,
1 Secretary 1 ';

kJOTP- Th wlnntm tirktts with tht list ciphor ond with th two lt
'vlt. ciphir opply only 1o the First Prize.
-The First Prut end the 2M nd 3rd Pruts are drawn separately. The ap approximations
proximations approximations re calculated nn the first, Secnnd and Third Prizes, in case
a ticket should carry (he numbero of each priie, the holder is entitled to
claim payment for each.

. 'DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
7 Sunday, March 4, 1 956
Drawing Number 631

. '. Fraction
Firsl Prize. ..... 61 $n,00
Second Prize 00 3.00

Ticket
$220.00
60.00

Third Prize 75

2.00

40.00

The prizes will he paid in' accordance with fhe Official List f P.nimi In
the off ire ef the National Beneficent Lottery liluated on Central Avenue.
Plan of Ordinary Drawing Nn. 19.U which will take
place March 11, 1958

Divided In two lerla of 22 frdions carh denominated "A"
FIRST PKIZF.

t First Prize, Srrlea A and Bo
1 Second Prize, Senei A and B. of
1 Third Priie. Series A and B. of
It Approximations, Series A and B, of
Prizes, Series IA and R, of
00 Prizes, Series A and B. nf
00 Prizes, Series A and B, of

$22 non.OMt each series
.(OO.OO each lnes
3.3OO.0Q each series
220.00 each series
1,100.00 each senea
. M.00 each series
. 22.00 each wrrea

' SFCOND PRIZE
IS Approximations. Series A and B of S SH.00 each series
Prizes. Series A and B, of 110 00 ouch series
THIRD PRIZK
Approximations. Series A and B of 8 44.00 each series
1 Prizes. Series A and B. of H00 each serie

nd "B"
SM don no
18,2000
sift.oo
7,020.00
18,800 00
11.880.00
, S9.t00.00
t 1S801MI
1.010 00

f 1.584 20
1.188.00

1074 Prizes TOTAL JI4S.73200
Merof TTwiiatfiircker $2?.t)o
Price of a forty-fourth port ........ .50

program.



. tv

A
6
n
.Reoc sory on page 8
4
POLICE COURT
in-.

NT

Name

More

B1

BEVERLY CRAWFORD, daugh daughter
ter daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse
Crawford of Ganiboa; Jr. col college
lege college freshman; GS. Mariner:
Girls' State-1955.
II
UllVUbV

Segregation Cold War

ATLANTA, March S (UP) -An
uneav lull in the segregation cold
war hung over Dixie today.
Officials of the National Assoeia
tion for the Advancement of Col
ored People were expected to
make the next move in the case of
Negro coed Autherine Lacy, who
has been expelled from the uni university,
versity, university, but there have been no
indication of their plans.
The next move, however, may
be a defensive maneuver as four
white men in Tuscaloosa. Ala., the
site of the university, have filed
a 4 million dollar damage suit
against Miss Lucy, the NAACP
and four other Negroes.
ARRESTED IN RIOTS
The four men, charged with dis disorderly
orderly disorderly conduct during a campus
riot touched off by the Negro
coed's appearance, were named
earlier by Miss Lucy as four "out "outsiders"
siders" "outsiders" who had conspired with
the university to start the riot.
NAACP officials labeled t h c
suits "either a counterattack to
escape prosecution or two-bit pub publicity."
licity." publicity." Miss Lucy was dismissed from
the university as a result of the
riot, then a federal court ordered
her re-instated but finally the
school expelled her because of her
court charges that the university
conspired to start the riots.
The situation touched off reac reaction
tion reaction across the country.
Tn Minnesota, Democratic pres presidential
idential presidential aspirant Adlai Stevenson
said:
"It is clearly matter of grave
national concern when a girl in
Alabama is denied her constitu constitutional
tional constitutional rights by mob violence or
by subterfuge..."
EYES OTHER STATES
However, Stevenson said that the
rest of the nation should get its
own house in order on the racial
is'si'p before "we cast a
Alabama."
'hoi'"h rebuffed in the Deep
South, Alfred McClung Lee, chair chair-rrsn
rrsn chair-rrsn of the Brooklyn College so
ciology department, said orderly
desegregation is taking
Southern border states
t "!, West Virginia,
Oklahoma, Arkansas,
and Delaware.
place in
such as
Missouri,
Maryland
IN New TUKI SIAIE
Tn Ne-v York, attorney; General
JaCOD fw. jaVUS SaiU tliar reis
. .1- i.ici. f Ai.h.ma

"showed-very clearly the urgent j ate to the recent London confer confer-r
r confer-r itv for a federal anti-lynch-: ence that approved the creation of
Ing law." 1 a Federation of British Caribbean

javits, a prominent ttepuniican,
said in a radio interview that the

necessity for such a law "was! points has always been the proh
shown also in the Till case evcnlem of dealing with the West In
more dramatically and in other dies' surplus population.

t U X today! CENTRAL

0.75 and 0.40
JACK CARSON
RORY CALHOUN
., piper LAURIE
Mamie Vandoren, In
"AIN'T
MTSBEHAVIN"
' MUSICAL COMEDY IN
v TECHNICOLOR!
Shows: 1:10. 2:32. 4:15. R:5,
8 ;!
A HILARIOUS 1
NEW LOOK
?LIFEP
.ml A
' tl V 1

wm

73L r "i-fT A-J

PATRICIA ANN FOSTER,
daughter of Lt. James R. Tay Taylor
lor Taylor of Coco Solo, voted most
popular e'l'l in Jr. College
Freshman Class.

I ..II l
ImUl I III

I i -h if' i
I I x U if J

il,i,-.m'1nm i.-,i,t.i,.ii.,ii,rr j, MnuJf I. t II I -TnT-ff

MISS LUCY ARRIVES IN NEW YORK Autherine Lucy, es escorted
corted escorted by police, waves on her arrival in New York after fly flying
ing flying in from Birmingham, Ala. The University of Alabama, des despite
pite despite a court ruling ordering her reinstatement, announced that
she had been expelled from the university because of "loose"
charges she made against school officials in and out of court.

cases of outrages against Negroes
in the South."
Javits urged that pressure be
ihnnoht tn hpar nn fnnflress tn

Stone at,n:(.G a inw iUat "unnlrl eive the

FBI an absolutely secure place for
getting into that kind of investi investigation."
gation." investigation." Trinidad Minister
Sires 17th Child
PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, Mar.
5 (UP) Mrs. Albert Gomes, wife
of Trinidad's Minister of Labor has
,ui iwiinmu s uiiiii.Mtu m iaiu !'
given b.rth to the.r 17th child and
uuu miy,
r.nmes wa rh rf Tr n dad He e.
conies.
One of Gomes' chief talking
0:75 and 0.40
' ALAN LADD.
JUNEALLYSON
in
"THE McCOHHELL
STORY"
In CINEMASCOPE and
TECHNICOLOR!
IT STARS
AND
ALAN LADD
JUNEALLYSON
1 1

One of these Canal Zone girls will be chosen Queen of the 18th Annual Canal
Zone Policeman's Ball, after all votes are counted on Thursday.
In order to be counted in the voting, ticket stubs must be turned in to any Canal

' Zone policeman before Thursday. Votes or One of these Canal Zone girls will be
counted.
I The winner of the contest will be announced at the Ball which will be held at
Hotel El Panama Friday night.
Tickets for the affair are available from any Canal Zone policeman.

nrRnKians Claim

LSIAIC Z
Neuberger Wants
President To Call
Integration Talks
ATLANTA, March 5 (UP)- Sen
Richard L. Neuberger suggested
last night that President Eisenhow Eisenhower
er Eisenhower call a meeting of Southern. govr
ernors tmd leaders to "counsel the
course on integration."
loucning on integration m a
, neech at the annual hannnet r
c eT Ba7 B'rith
Jew;,.n organj,ajnn NenWoor
T J.e sn organization, Neuberger
sain ne aoesn t "accept the ex
trenusts of either side" but urges
a middle course.
The Oregon Democrat said Geor-
ja cPn Walter P renree hn
f,. Walter F George, who
must seetc re-election this year
over tne possiote strong opposi opposition
tion opposition of former Gov. Herman Tal-
madge, "has risen above partisan
ship and personal ambition to ad
vance the hopes of our nation for
peace.
"I cannot presume to tell a resid resident
ent resident of Georgia how to vote," Neu
berger said, "but still a senator is
an official of the United States
rather than of one state."
Neuberger also expressed hope
for enactment of his bill to fed federally
erally federally finance political campaigns.
He said it is one sure way of
"emancipating" public officials
from undue obligations or commit
ments.
Italy's Ccmmy Boss
Returning to Rome,
Faces Partv Rebels
TtOire : M.irrti S f TTPV Ttalftn
Communist boss Palmtro 'Togliat 'Togliat-ti
ti 'Togliat-ti returns from a "mission to Mos Moscow"
cow" Moscow" today to face party rebels
who are demanding a return to
revolutionary strong-arm tactics.
The rehpls eliimed. to represent
more than 1,000,000 n.embers of
the Italian Communist Pi.rtv. the
strongest outside the Iron Cuf'
tain. -;-'
Thev wound up t two-day meet-
ins in Rome cinema vesterday
by promising to step up their cam campaign
paign campaign to get the party bad"- to the
"Mirxist:Leninist line."
It was not known exactly what
time the 62-year old TogUatti
would" return from Moscow, where
he .attended the recent Commu Communist
nist Communist Party Congress. But he sig signalled
nalled signalled ahead that the Kremlir had
!V"i h'm orders to carrv on with
the "soft" Unejvhich the rebels
6r pi'oUitmg. ni i i i

, .Could Let Reds Enter U.S.

II i f
Kea economic

MOSCOW, March 5 (UP) -Rus-'tion in diplomatic quarters here
sia has announced discovery of that if the Yakhutsk diamond field
valuable diamond deposits in! is fully exploited, Russia may en en-northern
northern en-northern Asia which it claimed will ter the world diamond market
make the Soviet Union independent for economic and political reasons.

of foreign gom supplies.
The disclosure, by ranking Sov-(
let geologist D. L. Shcherbakov,1
was expected to have a major im impact
pact impact on the world diamond mark-j
ets.
tn an interview with the Soviet'
4m.r nA,onnna. Pari CUr Cli h nr.
bakov said diamonds of "particul-'
ar value" were found in the Soviet.
republic of Yakhutsk near Siberia.
The geologist, in a survey of
recent mineral discoveries, said
also that large deposits of iron
ore had been found in the Soviet
areas of Belgorod, south Yak Yakhutsk
hutsk Yakhutsk and Nutansi. He also re reported
ported reported discovery of valuable non non-ferrous
ferrous non-ferrous ores on the Soviet Pa Pacific
cific Pacific coast.
Russia was known to he pros prospecting
pecting prospecting actively for diamonds,
needed here for industrial use. The
western embargo on strategic
goods has prevented Soviet import
of industrial gems.
The disclosure set off specula-
Independent Rabat
Plans Gala Welcome
For Morocco Sultan
RABAT, Morocco. March 5
(UP) A grateful Rabat readied
today to give the Sultan of Moroc Morocco
co Morocco a ioyous welcome home when
he arrives from Pans, bringing
newly-won independence after 40
years as a French protectorate.
But outside the city, the darK
disease of rebel terrorism is tak taking
ing taking a daily increasing toll. It poses
the first maior problem the newly
independent Moroccan government
must solve.
Rabat has taken on a festive air
for the Sultan's home-coming. A
holiday has been declared for all
workers, and the streets or me ci
ty are aflame with red and green
banners, flags, wreaths and les les-toons.
toons. les-toons. Huge pictures of the Sultan hang
from windows everywhere. Signals
hailing the new independence and
praising the Sulta drift in tne mor
nine breeze above the crowds.
But outside the city, in other
areas of Morocco, the joy Is not
so complete. Rebel actions have
taken at least 21 lives in the last
48 hours.
Biggest action was at Fez, 90
miles east of Rabat, where a
c.olumn of goumiers, native Moroc Moroccan
can Moroccan troops, was ambushed.
Early reports said that in a sav savage
age savage clash, five of the be-caped na natives
tives natives were killed and another 33
either were captured or deserted'
to the rebels. :
F View""""?
r

MEMBERS OF "A" COMPANY, ford the last stream encountered late during last week's hike

as Operation "No Sweat" neared an end. The 33d Infantry Regiment s First Battalion
nearly 500 men strong completed the streno us march across the Jungle of Panama in four
rf?yc (U.S. Army photo)

New Diamond Deposits Found;

iii....a

Uiieimve Hydiim iwcn miiicu

This could Hct th current
rangt of diamond pricei, I major
lamont of long-term investment
traditionally considered immune
to fluctuations affecting other
types of investment such as stocks
-nd QOld
The present output of diamonds
' strictly controlled by producers
to maintain prices ai a aauxK
level.
South Africa now is the largest
producer of diamonds. Other
sources include India, Brazil the
Belgian Congo, Portuguese Angola,
the Gold Coast and Tanganyka.
In London, diamond traders
warned the reported discovery
may hint a new Communist eco economic
nomic economic offensive against the
West.
But diamond traders said it
60 Persons Saved
As Vessel Splits
In Gulf 01 Alaska
SEATTLE. Wash.. March 5
(UP) The troopship Gen. H. B
Freeman steamed toward Kodiak,
Alaska today carrying 60 lucky
Dersons saved from a -split and
sinking cargo-liner in the storm-
lashed Gulf of Alaska.
The Freeman's crew snatched
nine passengers and 51 crewmen
from the cargo-liner- Washington
Mail shortly before it sank dur
ing an awesome battering by tne
wind and high waves in a body of
water known to many sailors as
"the crudest sea."
"It was an tfnhelievable rescue,
said Albert R. Lintner, president
of the American Mail Line, owner
of the ill-fated ship.
The Military Sea Transportation
Service here said the Freeman
Drobablv would arrive in Kodiak
sometime tomorrow morning.
The C,000-ton Washington Mail,
en route to the Orient with a car cargo
go cargo of lumber, wheat and flour,
nk about an hour after the Free-
iman arrived on tne scene in an
swer to a distress signal.
The ship broke in two during a
sub-freezing gale 240 miles south southeast
east southeast of Kodiak, the Coast Guard
said. It drifted another 30 miles
before it sank.
The Freeman radioed a terse
message following the rescue o
peratioi. that "all passengers safe
aDoara.-
y
it
4"

'4; '' V ?'--""
u ... -. -; '.;

III! I I" II - &

) j- : J
j .r. 1

I iwiwn iiumn iiH'ifff Mini r tek'k jKfoaNii

JO ANN SORRELL, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles J.
Sorrell of Balboa; Balboa High
Senior; present associate wor worthy
thy worthy advisor-Rainbows; Gins'
State, 1955.
inr Art uinrnn
may be years oeiore Kussia couiu
produce enough diamonds to shake
the present level of world prices.
Merchants based this belief on
Russia's own desperate need for
industrial diamonds and the
present soaring level of world
demand.
$ 100 Million
Ship Building
Program Starts
NEW YORK, March 5 (UP)
The Stavros S. Niarchos group
announced today it has launched a
100 million dollar ship building
program which is believed to be
the largest ever undertaken by
private enterprise.
Niarchos millionaire Greek ship
nwner airi thp npw nroeram rails
for the construction of 20 ships,
appreestino 3fl 400 deadweight
tons.
Three of the ships will be built
in U. S. shipyards, 11 in Japan,
four in Sweden and two in Ger Germany.
many. Germany. Orders for all 20 vessels
were placed in the past six
months.
Biggest ship in the program is
the 46,000 ton sister ship of the
World Glory, which will be built
by Bethlehem Steel Corp. at Quin Quin-cy
cy Quin-cy Mass. This oil tanker will be
the second biggest commercial
vessel ever built in the United
States exceeded in size only by
the liner United States.
Bethlehem also will build two
32,600 ton tankers.
Funeral Services
For Dr. De (astro
Held At Mount Hope
Funeral services for Dr. Rich Richard
ard Richard ce Castro, district dentist at
Gatun who died yesterday, will be
held att he Mt. Hope cemetery at
4 p.m. today.
Dr. de Castro, who was 26 years
old died at the Coco Solo Hospital
early yesterday morning. He had
been a patient there since Feb
2.
The son of Lionel and Adalita
de Castro of Colon, the 'young den dentist
tist dentist was born in Costa Rica. He
was a graduate of Cristobal High
School in 1947, and made his pre pre-dental
dental pre-dental studies in Texas. He ob obtained
tained obtained his degree is doctor of den dental
tal dental surgery in the University of
Pennsylvania in 1954.
Funeral services were being
held at 3:30 this afternoon ir the
de Castro home, 7023 Fifth Street
in Colon and continued at Mt.
Hon.. Rabbi Nathan Wilkin, will
conduct the services.
4

DIANA CARLA STAPLES,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Charles E. Staples of Los Rio:
Balboa High Senior; past wor worthy
thy worthy advisor-Rainbows; former
a 1 1 o rney-general of Girls'
State; and editor of Balboa
High Parrakeet.

Hong Kong Passport Racket

wicurvriTrtM MarM-, (TTP1
Ev.rptf F nrumwrlpht. Amer-

lean Consul General in Hong ea under communist rule ai one
Kong, has warned the State De-jtime or another,
partment Chinese Communist a-1 There also is evidence the Chi Chi-gents
gents Chi-gents can be slipped into the nese Reds may be preparing- to
United States through an tngen- blackmail Chinese in the United
Sous passport racket, it was States illegally into working for

learned today.
He reported confidentially to
the Department in December.
The Department has kept tight
wraps on what he said but has
supplied a summary to tne
House and Senate Appropria Appropriations
tions Appropriations Committees. The latter
have been asked for $500,000 to
step up investigative operations
in Honer Kong.
Drumwright said the Chinese
secure American pas sports
through "a fantastic system of
passport and visa fraud" and
that ''adequate security pre precautions
cautions precautions can hardly be taken
to exclude them.
The United States is in the
process of trying to
stamp out
Grand Jim
H'e racnei. a icueia
ry in New York is investigating!
and another will be convened in!
San Francisco.
Drumwright said "citizenship
brokers" in Hone Kone sell Chi
nese desiring to come to the
United States faked American
citizenship documents for a flat
$3,000. The terms are $500 down
and the balance payable on ar
rival in the United States.
Despite efforts of American
officials to crack down, he re
ported, the racketeers have been
able to get around every obsta obstacle
cle obstacle thrown in their path.
"If Ignorant applicants can
he brought into the United
States under this hijfhly or organized
ganized organized fraud system," the
summary of his report said,
"it is obvious that Chinese Red
agents can be so brought in."
t, So far American authorities
know of no case where a Red
operative has sneaked in
through connivance with the
passport ring. But Drumwright
pointed out that young men ap
plying in Hon? Kong for pass
ports to the United States have

THE RISE... THE FALL OF
Evelyn Nesbit Thaw

From
Tricked into her
first indiscretion

model to
mistress of

in a millionaire s

$40,000,000!

I SVW1H "---

RAY MlLLAND :

itrrtn

Joan Collins

Farley Granger 4-;,
;' ma uinn Atun oNfU oi mmm ,
e.rwrAMU...MCEnAil fJj0
rm.it hud ui kiiw r
MmIV CHARLES BRACKET!. tM w RICHARD FLEISCHER
imm w WAITER REBCn mi CHARLES BRAOCETT

ANGELA VALENTINE, daugh daughter
ter daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl C. Val.
entine of Curundu Hts.; Bal Balboa
boa Balboa High Senior; member of
Drama Club; officer In Rain Rainbows;
bows; Rainbows; will enroll at University
of Miami this fall.
ctnrlioH in Pprl fhinpse srrinitle
and that 87 oer cent have resid-
the Communists.
The passport fraud itself is
not a recent Communist in invention.
vention. invention. Its history joes hack
to the mid-1800's when thou thousands
sands thousands of Chinese came to the
United States to work in jold
f elds and on railroads.
A great host of the original
immigrants and their alleged
offspring have claimed their
birth records were destroyed in
the San Francisco earthquake
and fire.
In rourt cases, the U.S. Gov Government
ernment Government usually has been forced
to prove a Chinese is not a citi-
zen. In many cases citizenship
was simply conceded.
The Drumwright summary
said that if all the Chinese
claiming birth in San Franei Franei-co
co Franei-co before the earthquake and
fire had actually been born
there, every Chinese femalfO
then in the United States
would have had to bear 800
children.
When the 1882 exclusion act
barred Chinese Americans from
bringing their wives to the Unit United
ed United States, many Chinese went
back to China, married and then
returned without their wives.
Occasionally they would return
to China for visits and then
come back to the United States.
On these visits they would re report
port report names of their alleged off offspring
spring offspring to immigration officials.
They usually reported the maxi maximum
mum maximum number possible.
After the exclusion acts were
repealed in 1942, these wives and
minor children became eliaible
for immigration to the United
States. Many of their identities
went on sale to ineligible Chi
nes wantlnai to come to the
United States.
OPENS
TOMORROW!
pennilesi
The Harry K.
Thaw-Stanford
White Murder
of the Century I

n

ii i

ITCSEOPHOMIC WUND ;