The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03017

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
0.-3 Fhr.2 A!i"Th Vay

: J
.1 i: S; -I i! iS M (fil -. H ;'!'! !l I ( M I
"J tJi people know the truth and the country is safe Abraham Lincoln
CASADIA.Y IHI ISKY
,1 : ?
( im k asa
INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS
1 1
t and EASTER! Air Lines
Shi TEAR
PANAMA, R. p., MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1958
PITE CENTS

1

J L J

Maybe the Answer
President
Weec of

WASHINGTON, Feb. 27 (UP) President Eisenhower
today began a week of fateful decision.
Barring a change in his tentative timetable, before the
week is over Mr. Eisenhower will say publicly whether
he intends to run again or retire from public life after a (
heart attack and nearly 45 years in Federal service.

Floods Menace
Europe; Death
Toll Near 1000
LONDON, Feb. 27 (UP) The
nf winter out of
Europe, leaving millions of ddol-
lars of damage ana neany i,w
dead, today brought the even
greater threat of floods and ava ava-lances.
lances. ava-lances. Rivers throughout Europe are
bulging with grotesque masses of
ice formed during the month-long
freeze up. Mountainous areas are
blotted with accumulated snow.
Any but the slowest thaw will
turn the silent, paralyzed rivers
into gushing torrents of water
sweeping across fields and towns.
It will turn the giant mountain
snow formations into mushy
globs slithering down into the
valleys carrying all before it and
Mine Alpine .passes In northern
Italy already are blocked by aya-
i i lonHuli.ipi arrnss the
rnimtrv have interrupted tram and
highway traffic. 1 .'
Soldiers ond volunteers work worked
ed worked steadily to strengthen the
banks of swollen rivers In hopes,
of preventing floods., Heavy ram
in the Abruxzi area is speeding
the thaw. ; ; ,
Huge cakes of ice, already loos loosened
ened loosened by the thaw, floated into a
hridtftr at
Mauthausen, Austria, yesterday
and stopped an train irauic.
French weathermen predicted
that nation would thaw out this
week and hoped it would take
at least a week because ice in
some rivers is up to 12 feet thick.
Heavy mow in Spain has trip tripled
led tripled the danger of floods in the
. Murcia. province of the ; flat
southwest, which suffers regular
spring floods. Crops, already
frost-bitten, now are likely to
be drowned as wall.
; Increased temperatures, howev however,
er, however, helped!- Spain dig away the
snow. Villagers of Piernal in Pla Pla-sencia
sencia Pla-sencia turned out to shovel a path
to the nearby tuberculosis sani sanitarium
tarium sanitarium so they could bury a wom woman
an woman who died there,,
in pArtnoal thn thaw allowed
rescuers to finally dig the Porto-,
Braganza train out oia snuw
bank that imprisoned it for two
days.
r
)

. (NEA Telephoto)
HUNTSMAN President Eisenhower carries his rifle over his
shoulder as fie starts out on a turkey hunt at Thomasville, Ga.
As the party left in their hunting carts, White House physician
Howard McC. Snyder said the President "might be safer than
before because he has learned to slow down and guard his
v physical condition more carefully.

Is 'Yes, But..
Begins
Decision
Unless he discovered some
disturbinir factor within himself
during his recent 11 -day vaca
tion in South Georgia, the Chief
Executive should have enoush
information at hand to say "yes"
or no" by Wednesday.
It is on that day that he is
tentatively scheduled to hold a
news conference.
Mr Eisenhower ,was not def definitely
initely definitely committed to a public
answer by Wednesday, but he
has said he expected to be
ready temake a decision by
the end of this month and was
inclined to make it at a press
conference.
a niimher of Rerjublicans fa
miliar with the President's re
cent reasoning expected him to
announce his wlllinsrness to run
again, but sources truly close to
Mr. Elsenhower expected a yes,
but" answer.
According to this report, Mr.
Eisenhower would say M?es, I
will run, provided my health
remains good."
But the ho campaigned
against Mr. Eisenhower in 1952
as th Democrats vice presiden
tial nomlnfee seru jonn J
SDarkman (DAla.) said yes
terday he did not eeneve Mr.
Eisenhower would run again.
He said Mr. Elsenhower would
not discuss his health so fre fre-nuentlv
nuentlv fre-nuentlv and with preoccupation
unless he planned to bow out.
On this, his first working working-day
day working-day in his off'ce since Feb. 15,
Mr. Eisenhower planned a busy
schedule.
His announced appointments
held little promise of political
enlightenment. l
They included meetings with
the National Security Council,
the joint chiefs of staff and
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles and separate greetings to
an old personal friend, Xt, Gen.
John D. O'Daniel, and to Italian
President Giovanni Gronchl,
who was scheduled to arrive for
a state visit in the early after
noon.
i
ft- --iaw

I
L

SCREENLAND'S VIVACIOUS TERRY MOORE congratulates Leo Hayes (left) of Fort Gulick
n2 to,Die,yer.of?uarry Heights following their victory over Canal Zone stars, Webb Hearne
and B ll Hele, in the men's doubles finals of the El Panama Cabana Tennis Club's Second
annual Invitational tennis championships. Hayes also won. the men's singles title for the
second successive year. In private life Terry is Mrs. Eugene McGrath of Panama City. An
u"Kff tCaturln man US; and "ars, let-.

Community Chest Donated $26,140
To 13 Civic, Charity Units on CZ

A total of $26,140 was raised
for 13 local, civic, community,
and charity organizations by the
recently concluded Canal Zone
Community Chest campaign.
This total exceeds slightly, the
amount resulting from the pre
vious year's drive, and campaign
costs were nearly $400 lower, it
was stated today by Roger w.
Adams, campaign chairman, in
a -comprehensive interpretation
of the campaign results.
However, there were 13 orga
nizations this year compared
with last year's 12 and as a
consequence several of them are
receiving less than last year, he
pointed out. r
uorozai tiospiiai s recreation
and rehabilitat'on fund was a
participant in earlier years,
but had not required funds
year before last but returned
to the Chest group for the 1955
drive. t
Adams report revealed (1) the
major sources of Chest Income

Sakhmo Is Subject Of Whole Lecture
On Britain s High-brow 7 hi rd Program

LONDON, Feb. 27 (UP)- Bri British
tish British radio's high-brow "T bird
Program," whose listeners are
prepared for anything from a lec lecture
ture lecture in French to a play in Greek,
jumped last night with a new and
strange "sound, mean and low low-down,
down, low-down, the jazz trumpet of Louis
Armstrong. v j
The "Third Program" rarely
descends from the rarified heights
of Elizabethan Rondels and ob obscure
scure obscure chamber music to anything
like jazz, but ol' Satchmo got the
honor of a whole lecture to him himself,
self, himself, complete with recordings of
his swing classics of a quarter of
a century ago.
The lecture was given by Dr.
Eric Hobshawm, lecturer in his history
tory history at Birkbeclc College of the
University of London.
Why history? Well, Satchmo
won't like this but as far as the
"Third Program" goes his style

u
f i
4 1 ..
this vear: f2) t.ho nmnnnh snp
cifically designated to individual
organizations by donors; (3) the
formula under which the alloca allocations
tions allocations to the individual organi organizations
zations organizations were calculated; and (4)
the amounts going to each of
the 13 organizations as a result
of the drive.' .-.. ;y. :
Malor sources nf Wmnnlffn
contributions were:.
U.S. rate Panama Canal em-
nlftVA 1nilii!ln tURi ... t
Zone teachers and other schools
pmninvps.' ih.i.ih mnsn; nn
comnarpfl with last. vkqVi. incot
rate Panama Canal employes.,
..... j : :'
vtvai (aown jauun scnooi enn enn-dren,
dren, enn-dren, $1027 (up $60); special
gifts frombusiness firms, etcet
era, jziho aown snuu); retired
Zone employes. $185 (up $26);
USAP, $2198 (up. $380); Navy.
12fi1- Arrtivr fiflfi9 fun. t1Qnv
Gross total raised was 27,380.12.
Te gross total together witn
the $741.61 reserve from 1954
amounted to $28,121.73 to be
stopped evolving in 1930. And
that's way back in historical
times, ask any teenage fan.
It's been a long time since the
curious "Third Program" did any anything
thing anything like last night's "The Art of
Louis Armstrong." -It is one of
the three British Broadcasting
Corp. networks and only about
100,000 Britons are supposed to
have the I. C. to listen to it as a
steady diet.
As a reward for their intellect
they often hear plays with themes
and dialogue that would shake the
families listening in to the otheri
networks,cthe "Home" and the
"Light." Recently, for example,!
the "Third" allowed a character
in a play to use an Anglo-Saxon
tour-letter word.
Last night it treated ol Satchmo,
like any of the famed glories of
the past the frieze of the Parth Parthenon,
enon, Parthenon, Michaelangelo, Alozart,

i()fi

hi
I f
II
accounted for, Adams revealed.
The $26,140 for chest-support-id
asencies nlux Hnm nf
IU34.90 plus $646.83 set aside
tor tms jail's advance campaign
costs, exactly equal the called called-for
for called-for amount, he nointerf out., un.
nor contributions that continue
10 arrive after the end of the
drive, will, be added to the; re reserve
serve reserve for the next, rumnalirrt h
, ------ f-n
sald. .....
Adams emnhasliprJ that' a Ko.
sic rule of the Chest is that con contributions
tributions contributions designated for a spe specific
cific specific agency go to that agency
resiardless nf anv nt.hAr rnnqi.
derations.
This was the case this" year,
when every agency received
more than the total designated
for it by individual donors, he
said.
As is customary in local Chest
drives, the Salvation Army was
the agency to which the ereat ereat-(Continued
(Continued ereat-(Continued on Page 6. Col I)
Dr. Hobihawm assumed that
most of his listeners had at least
heard of Armstrong and proceed
ed to explain why jazx "aficion "aficionados"
ados" "aficionados" regarded him as, "the
greatest instrumental jazx player
of this or any other recorded
period."
He emphasized his verbal points
with such recordings as "Knockina
a Jug," (1929), "West End Blues"
(1928), "Strutting With Some
Barbecue" (1927), Mandy Lee
Blues" It's Tight Like This,"
"Perdido Street Blues," "When
It's Sleepy Time Down South,"
"Potato Head Blues."
What makes Louis the greatest?
Dr. Hobshawm said it this way:
"The essence of bis style in ex
pressionism ... the direct transfer
of emotion into music ... He can
convey this emotion more power powerfully
fully powerfully and in a purer, form than
anyone else."

Wisliiifecii

Heads For Bella Vista;
Brands Eviction Order
Small Deed by Small Men'
Evicted guest Juan D. Peron left the Hotfl Washington at 12:55 p.m.
today for Panama. He was expected to move to a Bella Visla address."
The ousted Argentine dictator left the hotel without the letter he had asked
from the Panama Canal, setting out that his eviction was not due in any way to
arrears of rent or unacceptable conduct.
He was told that it was not the hotel's custom to provide departing guests with
such documents.
Peron had spent this morning packing. The baggage of his three-man party
almost filled a station wagon. (
On leaving, he thanked the manager of the hotel, shook fiands with the staff
that had attended him during his three-month stay there, and posed willingly for
photographs.
He had no comment today on his ouster, but yesterday said it was "a small
deed performed by small men."
His application for a Panamanian residential permit was still in the works today.

The Peron party was travelling
across the Isthmus in the grayi
Cadillac Peron has been using
since shortly after his mid-November
arrival at the Washington.
Driving was Isaac Geloberte,
who has been acting as Peron's
chauffeur since reaching here
from LArgftttm. .shortly after the
deposed '..dictator.- arrived. Bidiiifi
with Peron was Carlos Pascal!,
former Peronista ambassador to
Panama, who often acts as Per
on s spokesman.
With Peron as tie lerr tne noiei
was Colon's mayor, Jose D.vBa-
USCA Meets
Next Sunday
At Margarita
TVi hnard nf rfirrtnr nf the
U. S. Citizens' Association Willi
meet Sunday at 3 o ciock in me
Margarita Service Center, to con-
iHp hiicinpi in ennnprtinn with
the scheduled March 16 hearing
in Washington of the Senate Mer Merchant
chant Merchant Marine and Fisheries Sub Subcommittee
committee Subcommittee on the Magnuson bill,
s. 2167, concerning the administra
tion of the Panama Canal, i
Transportation will be furnished
v. Tisr.A mpmhen from Mt. Hone
station to Margarita Senice Cen-;
ter for racuic aiae.ueieaaie who
take the noon train.
Pfc. WhoJumped
From MP Jeep
Dies In Gorgas
vtr Harlev L. Franklin of B
Tattrv ooard AAA Battalion,
vnrt riavton. died saturaav ai
Gorgas Hospital. His home is in
Greenville, Tennessee.
u-rank n suffererl neaa injur
ia last. Wednesday when he
iiimnad frnm in MP leeo after
having been arrested for intoxi
cation. ...
r

' (U.S. Navy photo from NEA Tele photo)
BASE SET UP Situated near the foot of Cr ater Hill is the Navy's Hut Point advance air
operating base established during operation Deep Freeze at Ross Island, Antarctic The
wooden structure (left, center) is the main headquarters of Capt. Robert F. Scott, leader or
a British expedition, established in 1902. The radar screen (right, center) is part of the
ground control approach aircraft facilities.

zan, who has been close to Tcron

since tne tormer strongman reacn reacn-ed
ed reacn-ed the Atlantic-side city.
Yesterday, Pron had given
the impression hit chief dittrtii
t being erderei tut of the
United Statti gevernmtnt-ewned
hotet w that th world might
i-Iikik.' r bahii.d in hi rent.
Hence his request, not met, for
a letter that this was not so.
As for the eviction itself:
Peron called his ouster inex inexplicable
plicable inexplicable plnpricking and said:
"The only reason we're leaving
the hotel is because we, were
asked to."
He implied in laying this that
there were no grounds for the
request.
He added he had no interest
in who was responsible for his
ouster and quoted an old pro pro-Verb:
Verb: pro-Verb: "He arrives late at his house
who stops on the road to throw
stones: at the dogs who bark 'at
him.? .
Cartier's Gems
On View At Hotel
A grand total of two million dol
lars in jewelry is being exhibited
in the salon Pan Americano of Ho Hotel
tel Hotel El Panama.
This is the complete collection
brought down to Panama by Car
tier of New York, part of which
was exhibited on Saturday night
in a fashion show held at the Ho
tel on behalf of the polio vaccine
campaign.
Admission is 50 cents a person
and money collected is also for
the polio campaign.
.
The exhibition is open from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. today and tomor tomorrow.,
row., tomorrow., i

He described the ouster -as a
"small deed done by small men"

and said "caluntnles have been
invented" about his stay there"
as in anything any politician
aoes."
But he said there never had
brn the slight pt. comn!;!!t
.from tM y
Peron saLl the hart u,m-.& la
ment had been very correct in
its dealings with him and that
the ouster was the product of
persecution which had been go going
ing going on for a long time.,
"By now I am used to thlj!
sort of game," he said. "Ten
years in politics is plenty of
years to know well there are
many bad men and liars..."
But he said any hotel not own owned
ed owned by a government would "not
be able to commit such an ouU
rage," and that any business
man wno ma not give him the
service he had paid for is a "bad
businessman and a skinflint."
"We are movinr in -hna-
that our next landlords will fc
better and more decent."
85 Rainbow I iigli
.... Sis-,
School Students
To Get Diplomas:
Eighty five members of ".the
graduating class of RainbowCity
High School will receive fieir rli rli-plomas
plomas rli-plomas during the eighth com commencement
mencement commencement exercises to be" held
Wednesday r.ight at 7:30 o'clock
in' the Rainbow City Gymnasium.
Members of the class, will be
presented by O. B. Shirley,. Prin.
cipal of the. school to Sigurd E.
Esser,-Superintendent of Schools,
who will then distribute the diplo diplomas.
mas. diplomas. Speeches will be made by. boih
Miss Annetta Josephs. Valedicto Valedictorian
rian Valedictorian of the class and Sylvia John John-sin,
sin, John-sin, Salutatorian. :



XKZ PANAMA AMTItlCAN AV IXDirEXDENT DAILY NEWSrAFC
Monday. rrr-r.rAF.Y ::, ir.s

PAGE r,vo v-

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
MO KUtUfHra TMI MANAMA AMCMICAN NUt, INC
rOUNOlO r HtLfON OUMlY tl.1. it, );
' HARMODIO AHIA. tSITO
7. H rurrr P. O. Bo 134, Paham. R. or ..'-
- TtlfrxONI 2-0740 '5 L'sfSt
CAILI ADDBIV PANAMCHtCAN. PANAMA
CM.OW Officii I2.I7W Cintral Avinuc atiwrtM (2th and '3th mini
. FMiltN RCPaMCNTATlVfa, JOSHUA B. POWERS. INC.
'- J45 MAOIMM Av. Niv VoK. 1 17 N. Y. -.
. . tOCL il
MONTH. tM -""' 1-70 2. SO
--. ... a to i3oo
e oni via, in ta.so 14 oo

rs tcu reUM thi macehs cwn coiumm
Tl I fe aaa tan. in ta Marfan at The Panama Amtiieaa.

lattert ara lir aratifultv art liaadlaaJ ia a whalhr coaMtatial

It aa raatrikiita a hrtti rfaa't te Imaatieal tl eotta't eaeaei

J Mil aay Lai tan ere auUiiaa1 ia the eeer racaivaa.

runt irj ta atta int larrarc iimuaa ia aaa paia ki

- latrrtity at kftar writtrt U ktla r ttrittart eealWtme.
'Tktt Mcwtaeaar mamea na raiaaatiailitf let dattajtal

axacut4 ia Uttarc from readers.

alt aa t iaiein.

I -THE MAIL BOX

FIEEFIGHTING PLANS

Labor News
And
Comment

"0

rrc 1

By VICTOR RIESEL
Junior Senator Dick Neuberger,
of Oregon, is a courageous man.

He wants the government to give
the Democrats and Republicans

some $11,000,000 each to fight one

another in this presidential elec

lion. And he would pass a law
banning large political contribu

tions Irom unions and businesses.

I don't mean that it takes cour

age to ask the government for
$22,000,000. That could, come out

of the bird-watching division of the
federal Fish and Wildlife Service.
Where this ex-newspapermen may
find himself in trouble is in his
reference to a $23,000 contribution
to his campaign by labor. Neu Neu-bcrgcr
bcrgcr Neu-bcrgcr called this and all other
political gifts "evil". He may yet
get himself known as the man
with the gray flannel tongue among
the unions which support him.
Neuberger's law would prohibit
contributions of any thing more
than $100. It is presumed that this
means direct or indirect contribu

tions. For example, Dick Neuber-

ger got $23,000 from unions in earn,

but many times that in services.
Oregon unions mailed 98,000 let letters
ters letters supporting him in the critical
Senatorial campaign there in 1954.
They made 160,000 telephone calls
getting voters to come out. They
supplied and gassed up 100 cars.
They fed scores of volunteer work

ers. This comes to a neat on oi

t
' t

tSlr
; -Irhis Is not intended to start a round-table controversy,
"thi-'intent Is merely to point out to tnose concerned the
pa.le position adopted in airing their case before the public
frith-its subsequent statement that carries no "file' from the
tlrf:5en."
ZAt would appear that whenever the study of the opera-!
itioni of the Panama Canal company and Canal fcone Qovem Qovem-Jmeni,
Jmeni, Qovem-Jmeni, which periodically is maae by the Comptroller General
Jof the United States and the Audi, of the Company-Government,
Is pursued in connection with the Government Control
.Corporation Act by that section of the auditing committee
headed by Mr. Newman brings torth drastic recommendations
!tor efficiency and economy to the Government, certain parties,
instead of airing and washing their linen in private, forget
themselves and oo all their washing cn their front porch.
I A statement released by Local 13 (what a bad lucky num number),
ber), number), without the signature of the President ef the local (he
inust be askeered to let us know who he is) states that they
"ooDose the hiring of local-raters as llremen on the Canal Zone

.because the Fire Department was set up to protect the lives currency and a considerable poll
, j --.. .j fk. TTv.tfayl ctota. ntti.fina oiirf j tVia inuact. t .. : u. i ; m.ti.

TU yUpci-Jf Ul WJC Ulilbu w.u luivov
Jnent of the United States In the Canal Zone, and the citizens
Aake an oath to give this protection and swear allegiance.
This statement points out, like a siren, that "aliens"
'(meaning Panamanians) cannot take this oath nor can he In
conscience fulfil it and still remain a citizen of another coun country.
try. country. It further points out that only United States citizens
Should be used as firemen.
Mr.) Editor, the intent is plain, but the reasoning is, stupid.
t have two sons. One was lust discharged from the United
States Army and the other is still on duty, I cannot say where
lot security reasons.
Both of these boys are Panamanians and used to work on
Canal projects as local-raters. Both took the oath of loyalty
to the United States and defended the government with their
lives. One of my sons wears the oak leaf. Tell me which
fireman on the canal Zone wears the oak. leaf.
I work for the Canal as a watchman and I protect the
property of the United States Government and will do so with
my life If the need should arise. I nave worked for 37 years j
and am a Panamanian and called local-rater. i
In 1915 two watchmen paid with their lives protecting
government property. Do you remember that? These men were
killed by some men who were later hanged In Gamboa. These
men came to steal dynamite just to fish. Cousins of the men
who were killed are still working for the Canal and they, too,
would protect the property of the United States Government
with their lives.
It is good to say that you are going to fight to hold your
Jobs, but do not for heaven's sake always take It out of the
local-rater and insult him. He is just as loyal to the United
States as you are, possibly more so. Who is to tell?
Who protects the lives of your children in the school bus
put the local rater; who cooks' for you but the local rater
that you so hate and wish to see starve to death. Your fight
Is not with the local rater, your fight Is with -the changing
times. .Time marches on, you know.
Your light Is with the General Accounting Office (GAO.

just to you right). These are the facts that ,yqu cannot
evade: L. a smalll area as the Canal Zone, less ihajj few
years wgo there were 23 fire stations. The US raters were
employed In 7, there were 16 in the other agencies (all this
dope appeared in the Star and Herald and The Panama Amer American
ican American some years ago from Newman's report, remember) and
itjas pointed out that there was too much fire equipment

ana wmi you ieuows were aoing absolutely nothing, so what?
; Newman said that the payroll for you fellows totaled $1, $1,-200,000
200,000 $1,-200,000 annually for a population In the Zone of a little over
50,000 souls.
He compared the population In the District of Columbia
which amounted to 825,000 people and the payroll was Just
14,800,000.

! I believe that you are able to do better mathematical
gymnastics than I can, so just figure the awful difference.

ir youu remember, that during the years the fewer fires on

ine canal zone, the more firemen were hired. Newman said
that. Just check it..
Nwmn fiirthf tnlil th riniYiti.All rinnovni ..j. tv.

- v'u i vvuiwvuet uliWClA atllU bilC
Comptroller General in turn wrote the Speaker of the House
ef Representatives: Dear Mr. Speaker, there is presented
Jitrein report of the audit of. the Panama Canal Company and
the Canal Zone Government and In it you will find that the

losses or canai property by fire have been small and that the

average loss oy lire is aoout. JiOQ.
i Fire loss over a 10 vear neriod w In t.h virtnlt.v f tl

200.000 and "we believe (this Is Newman), in vlta nf th tma'n

losses In the past and the replacement .of wooden structures

jvittt concrete in recent years,; that annual fire-fighting pay payrolls
rolls payrolls of $1,200,000 and maintenance of extensive fire-fighting
facilities in the Canal Zone are unwarranted." .

. : That was Newman, no local-rater coaxed him to say and
dO that.
! Kewman occupies a position in eovemment of thK-hirhMt

water; and in view of his objective approach to the problems

uuironwnK vne uanai ana nis recommendations he was pro
pioted, remember? ;

There seems to be a grave misunderstanding about the
proposed schedule In connection with the "firine" nf th fir.

men. The Panama American said on Its headline that 12 US
raters will go (RIF) and that 146 local-raters will be hired.
There Is a widespread feeling amongst those Interested that
this means that 14u will be hired to replace 12;- that Is not
. true.
This Is the case as passed on to me by the fellow beside
me: 12 will be RIF from the payrolls of the Company Govern Government
ment Government and approximately 130 Armv anrf Naw nersnnnPi nn

used to do that Job on the reservations will also go back into

u""v""' v wm jiuk oe mjc quui.a as puousncd it will be
about one for one, Instead of 12 for 1. v
- LOcaI 13 must realize that every worker of the United
- StaUs Government, whether he is a fireman,- laundryman.
elcctrlcan-helper, carpenter, dock-man, winchman, foreman,
chauffeur, motor-boat man, baker, clerk, hospital attendant,
(loctor, nurse, truckman, in addition to being hired to perform
certain duties within his limitations is also automatically hired

v y .v wim iua very me, tne property assigned
to his care. So remember fellows, you do not have a mono-i
poiy on the protection of government property. We have done
it in the past and will do it in the future.
"rrlt Z??d?om y,apu l? .much and m the wrong place you
IS tLTMy.UrJT insteadJ of, Just a Iew- the government
might Just get sick of you and give out the fire-lighting job
on contract, then where wlU you be. Everything is on con contact
tact contact you know, so wateh your step. , caution, i go slow. ;
Who do you think does such a fine job 'in Panama and
Cblon in the line of fighting fire? Panamanians friend, Pan-
f&ulftt J wh0' m'Bht be Kd Wea to consolidate
the activities of your department with those of the depart department
ment department in Panama and make a Panamanian the head. All these
things may be done so watch your step. i
Don't yap too much or they may send you home on the
next boat because that little house you live in in the Zone
is Panamanian territory. Get it?
We are Just as loyal to the United States Government and
would sign a declaration of allegiance if so permitted. Another
bureau should be established by the Company-Government
and named Bureau of Efficiency and that would surely cook
your goose. These are not the days of "Uncle Tom." This is
the day of Bunche, Carver, Frederick Douglas, Benjamin Bari Bari-neker
neker Bari-neker and many others.
: It is suggested that you do not agitate to your complete
detriment, as Canal history shows that everytime you agitate
the results back-fire and you lose much more than you gain.

.This is a friend of the Fire Department of the Republic!

of Panama

tical contribution, not to mention

the size of the printing bills.

Now if this friend of labor lead

ers across the land really means

to push a law banning sizeable

contributions, he would have to
try to include .these indirect out outlays.
lays. outlays. If this were possible it could
cripple much of labor's political
action. Most of it is based on in

direct gifts of manpower, publicity

and airwaves time not on nnan nnan-cial
cial nnan-cial "gifts."
These make for a powerful poli

tical machine, which can never be
outlawed. Its opponents can only

build one to compete witn it.

There is. for example, the most

effective of all labor political action

operations run by Walter Reuther

and his umtea Auiomomie woo wooers.
ers. wooers. This union now is the landlord

of a building occupied by Chrys

ler officials, and the structure gets
into this piece by way of being
one of the indirect contributions to
labor's political action.
The UAW recently purchased the
offices from Chrysler, which gets
out in June. Then the building

will be turned into an air-conm-tioncd
labor college, which will be
compulsory for all union staff mem members.
bers. members. It wilL graduate a brilliant
corps of regional officials, for they

will be especially irainea in eveiy
bit of union acitivty.

Evcrv staffer will get a rounded

duration in everything from auto

mation to legal action. But at least
nn pitnert in each subieeffrom

each region will be developed so

that everv section of me iana wui

have a sauad of men who are tops

in their lines. This will make quite

a team. And. most certainly, mere

will be a political expert among
them, which won't, of course, pre

clude any ot tne omers irom ucuib
politically trained too.
In each campaign, this team of
experts will find itself lending its
talents to the local union's candi candidates.
dates. candidates. This is legal. There is no
wav to stop it. Nor is there any

way to count its cost. But it cer

tainly is a political coninouuon iu

the candidates, indirect as u is.
This will be just part of the
UAW's political activity. The en entire
tire entire union is geared to such action,
especially for the presidential cam campaign.
paign. campaign. For example, last month
union headquarters in Detroit pub published
lished published 14 special editions of i t s
newspaper, the United Automobile
Worker, for 14 areas across tne
country. The voting records of the
congressmen and senators in
those areas were reported.
These sent -to hundreds of thou thousands
sands thousands of voters members of the
union, to be sure but voters none nonetheless.
theless. nonetheless. Here, too, is a political
contribution, indirect, but never nevertheless
theless nevertheless a contribution. ,.
Some of the:e papers were dis distributed
tributed distributed at a series of; meetings
Ka nthpp Snndav morning in De

troit's congressional aisincisr r,v-

ery district in being Dronen uowu
into section of 10-precincts with a
AwMnr fnr each. Every congres

sional district will have a special

congressional chairman, running a
enoxini pnncressional campaign or

ganization. All d 1 r e c t e d quite

brijmtiy oy union peuyic
if thi s the kind of "large cam

nnntrihiitlons" the Oregon

Senator wants to outlaw, he ll Jose
his friends inside labor. It these
aren't what he has in mind, he s

really finessing tne senate

WASHINGTON Th Ampriran'cniill nrni.-. it ,ir,(il

public, not always versed in the spoken Senator Casn r.nn

manners and maneuverincs of the

world's greatest deliberative body,

mf,.t K?ilff ihe PS1?? States 'received heavy oil-gas contributions

NEA Unkt. Inc.

Loan Program Urged
By PETER EDS0N

WASHINGTON

San Francisco manufacturer and

a Phikdelphia banker both Re Republicans
publicans Republicans have joined forces
to give the Eisenhower adminis administration
tration administration a sharp jab in the tail.

They urge the U.S. government

to get going on a new, long-range,
billion-dollar-a-year, foreign eco economic
nomic economic development loan program
for Latin America, the Middle East

and Far East.
They want this aid to direct the

revolutionary forces in the under underdeveloped
developed underdeveloped countries along, lines
compatible with U.S. national in

terests instead of toward interna international
tional international communism.
The two tycoons who make this

recommendation are J. D. Zcller Zcller-bach,
bach, Zcller-bach, president of Crown Zeller Zeller-bach,
bach, Zeller-bach, and Howard C. Petersen,
president of Fidelity Philadelphia
Trust Co.
Both put 'forward the proposals
as spokesmen of the Committee
for Economic Development. This
is a research and educational

group. It Is made up of top execu

tives from over 100 of tne most
progressive big business concerns
in America. Zellerbach is new

CED national chairman. Petersen

is chairman of its subcommittee
on international economic policy.

Zellerbach served as head of

the Marshall Plan mission in Italy

(NEA) Alfor three years and played a lead

ing role in preventing that coun

try from going Communist. Peter Petersen
sen Petersen seived as counsel and assist assistant
ant assistant secretary of the Army in
World War II.
"Since the Marshall Plan," says
Zellerbach, "our economic aid
programs have become inhibited
and their effectiveness weakened.
Then we had the imagination, the
leadership and the wherewithal to
save Europe. Now we need the
same kind of imagination to save
Southeast Asia and the Middle
East."
Critics of the Eisenhower admin administration
istration administration frequently say that lack

of imagination is one of its weaknesses.

"So far." says Zellerbach, "we

have been operating largely on a

cnsis-to-cnsis basis, we have been

fighting fires instead of trying to

prevent them from Meaning out...

, The Eisenhower administra

tion isn't often talked to in this

tough fashion by its own sup

porters.

After making a presentation of

his case to ben. Taul uougias

Economic Committee, it was sug'

gested that "Dutch Uncle'" Zeller Zellerbach
bach Zellerbach be invited to Washington to

put his plan over, then run it,

"You and I know there is no

escape from substantial foreign aid
expenditures for many years

ahead," said Zellerbach later in a

talk to newspapermen

"What happened in Czechoslo

vakia and China and almost hap

pened in Guatemala can happen

elsewhere.'

Referring to what is happening
in Inrlia nil Rnrma urWhmit. man.

tinninff thneA imintiiA snpfififtftllv iCase.

Zellerbach declared that: "Even
when we are not able to enroll
an underdeveloped country in
military alliance, it may still be

of vital importance to us. The loss

' 1 I 1 V

ffi,frr;nmi

. x 1 ... : EMU.. ..L

M lliwlIlilVI Vii

alRRY-L'O-UGO

it cn:v; pzatizou

Pandora's box.

That was why Johnson, who has

must be amazed and flabbcrcasferl

at some of the things that have
been happening in the investigation
of natural gas lobbying contribu contribution
tion contribution offered to Senator Case of
South Dakota.

Here are some of the thin? thi

public has a right to be. amazed
over:

Amtramant Na. 1 mieht be ex

pressed over the way the SDecial

Senate committee skirted right up
to the point of asking John Ncff,
the Superior Oil lobbyist, whether
he had contributed to any other

senator, out carefully refrained
from doing so. Senators are sun-

posed to want to keep their ranks
free from lobbying pressure, but

mev aucKCd questions which tnight
embarrass them.

Amaitmant No. 2 mieht be ex

pressed over why the special com committee
mittee committee was composed as it was:
of two octogenarian Democrats.

Oeorge of Georeia and Havden of

Arizona, both busy, both up for
re-election, and both in need of

raising campaign funds themselves

mis year; plus one very alert pro-

gas Republican, Bridges of New

Hampshire: plus one verv honest

but naive anti-gas Republican, Thye

oi Minnesota

Amazement Na. J might be ex

pressed over why Senator Lyndon
Johnson, the Democratic leader.

together with Fulbright of Arkan Arkansas,
sas, Arkansas, author of the gas bill, were

almost savage in their attitude to toward
ward toward Case when he first announced

receipt of the $2,500 contribution:

also why the SenUe leaders boxed

in Senator Hennings, chairman of

a regularly appointed committee,
with power to probe these cam campaign
paign campaign contributions, and refused to

let him investigate.
Amazement No. 4 might Je ex expressed
pressed expressed over where and whv the

committee picked Charles W. Stead-

man, completely unknown in Wash Wash-ingten,
ingten, Wash-ingten, and why Steadman at first
treated Case as if he were a culprit
suspected of wrongdoing.
Amazement No. S might be ex expressed
pressed expressed over why Vice President
Nixon hastily ruled that the regu regular
lar regular committee of the Senate, the
Election Committee, entrusted with
the job of probing these matters.

(was barred from probing the Case

SENATE PRESTIGE AT STAKE
What some senators don't seem
to realize is that the public is not

to communism of a so-called 'neu- on'y amazed, but concerned and

tralist country could be just as worned ver t.ne Prestige of the

damaging.
Zellerbach and Petersen recom recommend
mend recommend that economic aid be put on
its own feet, instead of subordinat subordinating
ing subordinating it to military support, as is
now done to make it acceptable
to Congress.
Zellerbach primary,, purpose
would be to protect American se security
curity security and its sources of raw
materials.
He recommends particularly
that the government loan program
be used for basic developments
like harbors, railroads and public

works. Private investment, he

says, will follow naturally for in
dividual industrial developments.

Walter Winchell In NewYortt

Memos of a Girl Friday

Dear W. W.: Grace Kelly's clan

reserved four suites on the liner

Constitution for the wedding trip
to Monaco. Guests to the event

will have to worry" about their

own accommodations at nearby

Cannes. All press inquiries are be being
ing being directed to the Consul-General

in N.Y. He is working directly witn

the press attache at His Serene

Highness palace. .Billy Daniels
recent ex-wife (Martha Braun) has
struck pay-dirt: fcgain. Betrothed

to Fred Nesbitt, Denver uranium

speculator . .Perry Como s wed

ding-gift to Julius. LaRosa: Sum

mer replacement on nis aaio.ee

night teevee spot. . Eddie Arcaro

told a oat of mine that if he had

whipped Nashua once more last

Saturday, Nashua would nave iau iau-en
en iau-en apart. v
! Spotted at the Vanderbilt's Pur

ple Tree: Jack Astor with steel
heiress Jo-Anne Daum. .Peter
Funk, very youthful editor of Faith

magazine, becomes a pappy for

the 7th time soon. .Virginia Cope
land, star of "The Saint of lecct

er Street," and baritone Gary Gor Gordon,
don, Gordon, 3rd (a Cleveland socialite),
will make wed-lines. .After a
dozen years of bliss Daricn,
(Conn.) Socialiste Nancy Green
(cousin to Billy Leeds, copper zil zil-lionaire)
lionaire) zil-lionaire) is in the Southland ac acquiring
quiring acquiring her freedom from Edward
Bertram of Cannon Mills .Nan .Nancy's
cy's .Nancy's richer than Barbara Hutton
and Doris Duke, hails from Mont-;
clalr, N.J.

Elizabeth Taylor has another spe specialist.
cialist. specialist. The traction treatment isn't
giving her much relief from pain.
Husband Michael Wilding is also
a casualty. Fell from his horse on
location. Broken ribs, Movie stars
have troubles like us commoners

I saw Pamela Churchill (Win

nie's ex-dghtr-in-law)' at the Latin

Q. with Milton Holden, whose bud

dies are the Windsors.. .Elizabeth
Mason (you saw her in "Can-Can")

has established residence in cai,
to melt from her former ever

lovin' . .Handsome Washington
lawyer Eaton Chalkley appears to
be No. 1 (as of an hour ago) with
Susan Hay ward.

Senate. They like to think of their
senators as honest men.not subject
to outside press ire and outside dol

lars. ..

Typical of the reaction of the

public is a teleeram I received

from William i Wilcutt of Drakes-

boro, Kentucky. It reads:

You are to be congratulated if

you will start a drive for public

donations in order that Senator
Hennings may carry on his inves

tigation. I would like to be the

first to contribute $50."

That's how the American public
is reacting to the limited probe
of the gas lobby.
Meanwhile, here are some of the

answers to the points mentioned

above which have the public puz
zled.
CASE OPENS BOX

for his own campaigns, nleaderi.

coaxed, and finally threatened Sen Senator
ator Senator Tom Hennings of Missouri
when Hennings wanted to broaden
the Senate probe.

Hennmgs is j former district at

torney, from St. Louis. He is a
relentless prosecutor and prober..
He has long been working for re reform
form reform of the present campaign con contributions
tributions contributions system which puts al almost
most almost every member of Congress
under obligation to those who fi finance
nance finance his campaign. Knowing this,
neither Johnson nor GOP leaders
trusted him. They feared he would
probe too deeply.

That was why Johnson maneu maneuvered
vered maneuvered to force Hennings' resigna resignation
tion resignation from the Special Elections

Committee, which has charge of
probing. campaign contributions.

various Republicans backed John-i
son. Believe it or rfbt but only two
senators on the Rules committee
supported Hennings' demand for a
broad probe Gore of Tennessee
and Mansfield of Montana, both
Democrats. ;
MYSTERY LAWYER
Mystery attorney Charles W.
Steadman was picked as special
counsel for the committee by Sen Senator
ator Senator Styles Bridges of New Hamp Hampshire,
shire, Hampshire, a strong defender of the gas gas-oil
oil gas-oil group who voted for the natural
gas bill, despite the fact that his
state, New Hampshire, needs cheap
fuel. '.. ; .;, ,:-
Bridges had known Steadman so socially,
cially, socially, knew him as a wealthy
Cleveland corporation lawyer, born
in Nebraska, married into the Fen Fen-wick
wick Fen-wick Manufacturing Company of

ueveiand, wno could be depended
on first to put Senator Case on the
chopping block, second, hot to pro
into any other senator's campaign
funds-.' vr' v
Steadman has not disappointed

him. He has reflected the private
remarks of Senator Bridges that
every contribution received by Case

and every vote he ever cast should,
be investigated.

The Special Investigating com

mittee was composed of two elderly
Democrats and a naive Republican

so Bridges could dominate it. He

was immediately able to pick coun.
sel, the chief key to dominating any
Senate committee.

NIXON'S CONTRIBUTIONS
Finally, it's interesting to note

the role of Vice President Nixon.

When the Special Investigating
committee first met. it met in his
office which is unusual. Second,
he immediately ruled that the Hen-;
nings Election Committee had no
jurisdiction also unusual. The vice
president gives rulings from the
presiding officers' xhair, not in
private.
However, take a look at the $18, $18,-000
000 $18,-000 personal expense fund raised
secretly for Nixon when he was in
the Senate and you can understand
why he wanted to slam down the
lid on the Pandora's box of gas-oil
contributors.
For the biggest contributors to
his $18,000 personal fund were gas
and oilmen. Not only were they the
heaviest contributors, but they were
greatest in number a total of 15.

Shaw's "The Admirable Bash

villc" (written in 1901) is having
its first professional New York
showing at the Cherry Lane. Ditto
for "Dark Lady of the Sonnets"
penned in 1910. . "Lease of Life"

(starring Robert Donat), at the

little Carnegie, is getting the fast fastest
est fastest play-Off -dates of any "art film"

. .I'hyius Penman, one of the

better legit publicists along Broad Broadway,
way, Broadway, is in Mexico still grieving

for her husband.-. .One fait mag

describes movie hero George Na Nader's
der's Nader's home as being "tastefully
decorated with a real he-man au aura."
ra." aura." (Girls hanging from the chan chandeliers?)
deliers?) chandeliers?) . .Unless some big horse
shows up (in the $100,000 Flamin Flamingo)
go) Flamingo) Whitney's "Career Boy" will
be a 5-2 Winter book Derby favor-

ite.v .:, ... -,:,. ..
58th Street (from 3rd Ave. East)

is trying to, become the gay set
capital. One place there which has

a sign saying "closed for altera alterations"
tions" alterations" may never open again. If

you look real closj you will see a

small notice suspending the joynt's

license. ."The Ziegfield Follies

(Continued on ..rage tl

Senator Case, a modest Metho Methodist
dist Methodist minister's son, serving his first
term in the Senile, violated the
unwritten rule of the Senate

namely, never to talk about some something
thing something embarrassing to a fellow sen senator.
ator. senator. By mentioning that $2,500 out

loud, Case opened the Pandora's

box of political contributions which
various other senators and con

gressmen had been given or prom

ised in one of the most shameful
lobbying sprees this writer has seen
in Washington.

Manv a newspatirmen knew

about this lobbying limey, but few-

1 .MANY A SLIP
virwtNr.TfiN. Conn. (UP)

After driving 48 hours with a com-.

panion, Samuel youiovsny iiu. w
swerve-their truck to avoit two

other vehicles, k ovenuiucu,
five minutes from home.

LIFT UP YOUR -HEARTS

(A Lenten feature of the Pana;, the other side who stand on planks

Fair Play

a a t- l' J Al. a,.!ona lai1a

ma-American, preparea ny me aria-ngeu v vanuua icvcio.
Rev. M. A. Cookson, Episcopal!
Churches of Our Saviour-St. Mar- LITTLE BOYS ire used for

this worK because tneir lingers are
small and they can do fine work.
From behind, it often does not

garet.)
THE MASTER DESIGNER

Read Psalm 73. "Verily, veri verily,
ly, verily, I say unto thee, When thou
wast young, thou glrdedst thyself,
and walkest whither thou would would-est:
est: would-est: but when thou shalt be old...
another shall gird thee, and carry
thee whither thou wouldest not...
And when he had spoken this, he
salth unto him, Follow me. St.
John 21:18,19.
ON MAKING inquiry I was told
that an oriental carpet is made
as it hangs from the ceiling. The
artist stands in front facing the
side that people will later walk on.

HhouUJii&lnstUcUon$ ASlo

color and pattern to little boys on

look like much of a pattern.
1 INQUIRED what would happen
if one of the little boys made a
mistake, using the wrong color.
"Suppose someone bumps his arm
and he blunders." The reply was,
"If the artist is great enough, he
can weave all the mistakes into
the pattern."
WE ARE on the wrong side of
the carpet. We make mistakes our ourselves
selves ourselves and others make mistakes
that sometimes hurt us and our
plans very much. But God weaves
them into the pattern. At the cen

ter injueross -which on one side

make no sense, as our tragediesleycs

make no sense, but in God's fi

nal design it is a symbol of tri

umph.

AT THE END of the day, the
Master will call us from behind
wherr we have been working, and

shew us the completed design of

our uves. and we shall say. "This

is the Lord's doing, and it is mar

vellous in our eyes."

SPIRITUAL, progress Is spelled
out in the word "obey." Our Mas

ter Designer expects us to faith

fully follow His guide as He re-
.Is His way to us one step at
a time, in the little things of our

daily lives. All He asks on our
part is to yield ourseves up to His

guidance and direction.
"I will instruct thee and teach

thee in the way which thou shalt

to: I will guide thee with mine

I LITTUM MSS T

Sometimes when a man gives
up the horses to get morried he
winds up with onother nag. Nt

Housing Problems

Answer to Previous Puzzle

3 ElgffiM'

I I I

3 Moderate
4 Capital of
French
Morocco
5 An door
I Belgian

seaport

ACROSS
1 water
heater
4 House top
Ego
12 Hail!
1$ Church part

14 Group of three 1 Charge

15 Hebrew utter 5nop
18 Something to Great Lake
be avoided 10 Italian coin

11 Enemies
17 Salt lake
mineral
Tl Lariat

1 Tin! -,'tU i
SK;t! 1 p5 o pre
54 j f n o o m
?.!ili," gtr
T T a. e ? f i?N'

18 Get on an

airplane
20 Regions
21 Consume
22 Observe
24 Possessive
pronoun"
28 Scent
27 Spanish hero
30 Expunger
32 Confined to
zones
34 Bury
35 Shiny paint
36 Scottish river
87 Prejudice
31 Mud
40 Moistens
41 reetlike part
42Helivogiaa
meitaitcry
45 Where
convicts live
41 Forgive nets
81 Card game
82 Revise
83 Gaelic
84 Greek letter
85 Spreads to dry
86 Golf mounds
87 Indian weight
DOWN
11 Harness part
: 2 Kitchen
' accessory

23 Seeps

27 Feminine
garments
28 Passage in
the brain
29 Remove ""
31 Burnt wood

24 Pay attention 33 Titles

41 Evergreens
42 Worry'
43 Counsel
44 Organic
" compound
46 Got up
47 Short letter

25 Sea eagle
26 Circle

1 40 Serves table 30 Harden

1 12 B I tt 15 lb D I Id 1 t0 III
r"" r- r"
T ""
(5 : : I.
T" T" T ;;5'iS ib W
r-T-; 3 1
J T TT



?: -at t, n:rr.r nT :t, vr,

TIIE rAXAJLI AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

Senate Probers Get 'Documentutbn'
On Charges Against Ford Motor Co.

"WASHINGTON, Feb.,1 27 (UP)-1
Senate investigators said today
they have obtained "documenta "documentation"
tion" "documentation" nf charges that Ford Motor
Go. asked its dealers to contribute
to President Eisenhower's 1952
campaign.
Sen. A S. (Mike) Monroney
(D-Okla.), chairman of a Senate
Commerce subcommittee investi investigating
gating investigating auto industry practices, said
the group now will try .to "pres "pressure"
sure" "pressure" or "duress" on the dealers.
He emphasized to a reporter,
however, that his subcommittee is
interested only in the "pressure
angle of the charges, first .aired
last week by a iormer vu.asv
Ford dealer.
If the contributions themselves
need further scrutiny, he said, the
subcommittee will turn over its
information to a special committee
set up last week to investigate
lobbying,' campaign contributions
and possible improper efforts to
influence the Senate.
The special committee was crea created
ted created in the wake of the disclosure
by Sen. Francis Case (R-S.D.) that
an oil lobbyist offered him a $2,500
campaign contribution during Sen Senate
ate Senate debate on the now-vetoed nat natural
ural natural gas bill. .
The select committee is expect expected
ed expected to meet Tuesday and name Sen.
Albert Gore (D-Tenn.) to head its
inquiry. Senate Democratic Lead Leader
er Leader Lyndon B. Johnson Tex. predict predicted
ed predicted yesterday the investigation will
produce a law that "will put the
influence peddler in a strait;
jacket."
Sen. Charles E. Potter (R-Mich.)
said today that the inquiry was a
"healthy" thing that will help build
up respect for Congress in the
minds of the people.
Potter, who was interviewed on
the ABC-TV program, "Celebrity
Parade,' said the pressure exort exort-ed
ed exort-ed in connection with the gas mil
was unparalleled in hi experience.
But he said no "improper"; influ influence
ence influence had been exerted on him.
Monroney's committee got into
the picture when Milton Patner,
run nan PorH dealer:
testified that a fellow dealer told
tti j iA if 0 PViinaffrt ftp ft 1-
ers to kick in $50,000 for Mr. El Elsenhower's
senhower's Elsenhower's 1952 campaign.
Patner said he replied "nuts
when informed he was down for
$1,000. The witness, who said he
IrniMii
Ford dealer who ignored the re
quest, testmea ne iosi nis ueuiei ueuiei-ship
ship ueuiei-ship last year after resisting com company
pany company efforts to get him to handle
more cars. .
Several other Ford dealers from
other cities who testified the same
day said they never were tapped
ir Ficpnhnwer'a camoaien.
tvi -
Monroney disclosed today, how however,
ever, however, that the subcommittee has
obtained a copy of "a letter, pur purporting
porting purporting to come from the Qliice
of Henry Ford II." He said the
MEAT. COURSE
tvr t i Tir TTPW The nro-
motion committee of the Pella
Chamber ol commerce nem
special meeting to plan a program
,to help farmers getbetter prices
for .hogs. The main course at the
dinner was steak. r
NOT; THE TYPE Lovely
actress Linda Darnell is back
In Hollywood after two and a
half years of movie-making in
Italy. I And she's back with without
out without marriage ties, having di divorced
vorced divorced millionaire brewer Phil
Liebman. She says she's no
longer the type to be married.
What is
Cha-Cha-Cha
Piner Laurie makps hpr

... ,..,....i.i..I.,..i,. n,,-. ., m.
I
:: ::::-:::
:.....:..::::.
ii;f'f..:i-i.s-f

"Ain't Misbehavln'," technicolor musical comedy In which
she co-stars with Rory Calhoun, Jack Carson and Mamie
Van Doren. "Ain't Misbeavin' will open next Thursday
- March-1 at the- LUX Theatre. Adyt"

letter urged Ford dealers in an

other area to contribute to the
GOP cause that year.
, Monroney refused to identify the
area involved but said it was not
in Illinois.
The senator added that Ford and
the heads of the nation's other auto
firms will be asked whether they
know anything about such cam campaign
paign campaign requests when they appear
before the subcommittee next
month to testify on their market
ing practices.
Colon CouncHinan
RenionMendezTo Be
Honored Al Program
Colon Councilman Ramon' Men Men-dez
dez Men-dez will be honored today by the
Guaracheros Club which has se selected
lected selected him as "Councilman of the
Year." ; r ; :
The program honoring Mendez
will coincide with the observance
of the anniversary of the founda foundation
tion foundation of Colon. Beginning at 5:30,
it will feature music by the Con Concordia
cordia Concordia Band under the baton of
George H. Van de Suze.
Mendez will receive a scroll in
scribed with the citation and the
resolution to adopt today as "ra-
mon Mendez Day" from Francis
co Villa mil, president of the club.
The entire program will be eon-
ducted at the Juan Demostenes A-
rosemena Park around the bust of
the late President Jose A. Remon.
Several Colon organizations will
join with the Guaracheros in hon honoring
oring honoring the popular Colon council
man.
Scout News
Judge Crowe To Give
Address for IBS
U. S. District Judge of the Ca
nal Zone, Guthrie F. Crowe, will
address the ouicers Of the Pacific
District of the International Boys'
iscout of the Canal Zone tomor
row at 8 p.m.
The eminent jurist who is vice-
president of the Boy Scouts of A'
merica, Local 801, consented to
the address in aid of the Pacific
District membership drive which
started today and will continue
through March 5.
Before a large crowd at the Pa
raiso Theater a week ago yester
day. Judge Crowe, at the intita-
tion of several civic groups in
Paraiso community, spoke on the
causes and remedies of juvenile
delinquency. He declared that the
slow rise in the Canal Zone is no
immediate cause of alarm; but he
urged his adult listeners to pool
their resources in" planning" and
providing wholesome activities to
restrain the sudden impulses of
the youngsters. He recommended
that these future men and women
be encouraged to join the Interna
tional Boy and Girl Scouts of the
Canal, Zone, the inflences of
which will mold their character
and develop them into decent and
respectable adults.
During the membership drive
campaign, parents, guardians and
friends are asked to use their ev
ery influences in making the proj
ect successful in securing a max maximum
imum maximum number of enrollments in
the International Boy Scout move movement
ment movement Registration is free and
scouts will distribute enrollment
blanks. Enrollment blanks also
may be obtained at the main of-
fee in paraiso.- --
Phenomena! Aurora
Borealis Stretches
Across Alaska Sky
FAIRBANKS, Alaska, Feb. 27
(UP) An aurora borealis of the
type seen only four times in the
past 40 years stretched across the
northern sky here early today, U U-niversity
niversity U-niversity of Alaska geo-physicists
reported.
Dr. C. T. Elvey said the north northern
ern northern lights contained a pure red
arc. Such a. phenomenon is so un unusual,
usual, unusual, he said, that Norwegian
Geophysicist Karl Stromer has re received
ceived received only four reports of the arc
in 40 years of research.
Dr. Sydney Chapman, chairman
of the international geo physical
year 1957-58, was visiting the cam campus
pus campus here and saw the 'arc. He said
the current sun spot disturbance
probably caused the rare light.
this 7. ? 7
...? NOOO ...
stncinir nH Aartrntr rtohnf In

V.

r
-

TOUR OF THE PACIFIC SIDE included a stopover at the Canal Zone Penitentiary by the
candidates for Queen of the 18th Annual Policeman's Ball. The names of Diana Staples,
Beverly-Crawford, Jo Ann Sorrell, Pat Foster, and Angela Valentine appear on the tickets
now being sold by Carial zone Policemen for the Ball on March 9 at El Panama. Votes
should be cast before March 7 for the Queen of the 18th Annual Ball.

1 Of Lasl 3 Rebels
Ailing, Bui Says:
'I'm Hot Dead Ye!'
GATE CITY. Va., Feb. 27 (UP)
John Sailing, 109, one of the
last three Confederate veterans,
lay ill in his mountain locked
home today hut he sent out word
"I m not dead yet.
"General" Sailing was first re
ported to be suffering from virus
pneumonia. But Deputy Sheriff
Kyle Baker drove 22 miles into the
hills to make a personal check
and found tne oia reoet down with
a deep chest cold.
Sailing told Baker to reassure
his well-wishers. He said he was
supposed to have appeared at a
Democratic meeting in Bristol,
Va., last week but had been ad
vised not to travel because his
cold might develop into pneumo pneumonia.
nia. pneumonia. This led to the report that he
bad pneumonia.
Sailing has been confined to his
bed or a wheel chair since he
broke his hip two years ago. He
had plowed his own farm until
he was 107.
The old warrior, who hopes to
celebrate nis lloth birthday May
15, still has a full head of black
hair and 'most of his teeth.' He
lives at the home of 4 daughter,
Mrs; Hughey McCamey, on a farm
one-half mile from the village of
iiant.
The only other Confederates still
alive are Walter Williams in Tex Texas
as Texas and William E. (Uncle Bill) Lun Lun-dy
dy Lun-dy of Laurell Hill, Fla. The union
army has only one survivor, Al Albert
bert Albert Woolson of Duluth, Minn.
British Calholics
Urge Firm Position
Willi Visiling Reds
LONDON. Feb. 27 (UP) Ca
tholic clergymen in north London
today started up a petition urging
the government not to let the
forthcoming visit of Russian lead
ers be misinterpreted.
Soviet Premier Nikolai Bulga Bulga-nin
nin Bulga-nin and Communist Party First
Secretary Nikita Khrushchev will
visit Britain in April. Jesuit
Priests in Hampstead today started
a petition urging Britain to main maintain
tain maintain a firm moral position in deal dealing
ing dealing with the Russian visitors.
The resolution asks the' govern government
ment government to press for the liberation
of Russian slave laborers. It adds
"that fny visit to this country by
Communist rulers shall not be
conducted or celebrated in such a
way as to imply toleration of the
evils inherent in Communist philo philosophy
sophy philosophy or the abandonment of the
subjugated people."
HI-FI
at
Tivoli Avtv No.
TAKE ADVANTAGE
CLUB PLAN

-1 r

1

US Government to Crack Down
On Tax Dodgers, Delinquents

WASHINGTON. Feb. 27 (UP)
Internal Revenue Commission
er Russell C. Harrington said to today
day today government tax collectors
"are going to do everything" in
their power to crack down pn
tax dodgers and delinquents. :
He said the i e r v 1 c e Is
strengthening its collection, pro procedures
cedures procedures in order to reduce the
amount owed the government
for back taxes "to its barest
minimum." V
He also said the service is
conducting spot checks through throughout
out throughout the country to uncover indi individuals
viduals individuals in professional groups
who try to avoid paying their
taxes by falling to file returns.
Harrington, who succeeded T.
Coleman Andrews as commis
sioner last December, discussed
tax law enforcement in a speech
before the sixth annual midwin midwinter
ter midwinter conference of the Tax Exec
utives Institute, a private organ
ization ol tax experts ol corpor corporations.
ations. corporations. Harrington assured the ex experts
perts experts his officials would give
them "a firm, fair, impartial ad
ministration of the federal tax
laws." He indicated he respects
the taxpayer'! fight to take all
the tax-cutting deductions w
which he is entitled,
"we want every cent the eov
eminent Is entitled to, but not
one penny more," Harrington
said.'
He said that most people "will.
ingly file returns on which they
assess tneir own taxes ana mane
payment."
"Unfortunately, there are a
few people in the community
who neelect these responsibili
ties, thus getting a free ride at
our expense," he said." I have

To Stockholders ol Ihe
Panama Insurance Company, Inc.
The annual meeting-ol-! the Panama
Insurance Company, Inc., -will take
place on Wednesday, March 14, 1956,
at 4:00 P.M. at the offices of the Com Company,
pany, Company, at Campo Alegre, Via Espana and
Ricardo Arias Street.
- '..-..,
TIIE SECRETARY

RECORD PLAYERS

16
OF OUR
Permit

V
1
J

i
no use for such people and we
are going to do everything in out
power to bring them Into line."
Harrington said ne nas neen
"concerned about the matter" of
the amount of back taxes owed
the government "even though It
is reasonably low In ratio to the
amounts of money we collect
annually."
He said "another area of con
cern" is the possibility of self
employed persons not filing re returns.
turns. returns. He alluded to the Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia attorney who was found
to have failed to file a return
for several years.
He said the government since
last June has been conducting a
spot check and survey through throughout
out throughout the country of the tax re returns
turns returns of some 84 business and
professional groups. He said that
investigators uncovered only 57
cases of failure to file returns.
Isle Royale Takes
Credit For Mines
"HOUGHTON. Mich. -(UP)-Ma-
terial has been found to indicate
there were mining pits on Isle
Royale in Lake Superior as early
as. 2000 B.C., accordng to Dr. R.
W. Drier, professor of metallurgi metallurgical
cal metallurgical engineering at Michigan Tech,
Drier said charred wood un unearthed
earthed unearthed during an archaeological
expedition to the island has been
dated by the radioactive carbon 14
method in the Phoenix Memorial
Radiations Laboratory at the Uni University
versity University of Michigan.
The professor said the ancient
miners heated copper-bearing
rocks with fire, then poured water
on the rocks to split them.

25 cycles your problem?

us to take care of it.

Old Ap nuchUfcr
Thsn Vcrking Class

CHICAC o, Feb. 27 (UP) Busi Business
ness Business and pruiessional men feel
tl.ey reach old age some five to
i0 years later than workinc class
men, a University of Chicago re research
search research expert "said today.
Warren Peterson of tne Univer University's
sity's University's Committee on Human Devel
opment said his survey snowed
similarly tliat upper middle class
women associate the age oi do
with a good looking woman while
lower ciass women select 25.
Peterson said his findings were
based on the one phase of the
Kansas City study of adult life, a
research project conducted by
his committee.
He said his group interviewed
240 men and women aged 40 to
70, representing lour social class
categories.
The sabiects were asked ques
tions requiring a definition of the
periods of lue and the placing jm
a chronological age with a descrip descriptive
tive descriptive term such as "young man,"
"mature man," and "old man."
'The tendency among middle
class men is to divide tne periods
of life at 30, 45 and 65. In the up upper
per upper working class, the middle age
and old age divisions are moved
up five ; tars to 40 and 60 respec respectively,"
tively," respectively," Peterson said.
In what he called the "lower
lower class," Peterson found that
the periods of life are moved up
to 25, 35 and 50 with little b u t
Milk Bollle Steals
Show From Russians
At Leipzig Fair
LEIPZIG, East Germay, Feb. 27
(UP) A clanking milk bottle
machine from West Germany stole
the show from the Russians today
at the opening of the annual Com Communist
munist Communist trade fair.
Hiiee rrnwds of East Germans.
wandering through displays of
nachinery and consumer goods
from 37 nations of fll! oolitical
stripes, passed up Russia's pic
tures oi atomic spac snips to
watch a shiny macnine in tne west
German pavillion wash, dry, fill
and cap miiK Dottles.
The Russian pavilion overshad overshadowed
owed overshadowed the entire fair grounds with
a high spire topped off with a red
star. But its display of phot phot-graphs
graphs phot-graphs of model atomic space
ships of the future failed to draw
crowds like those at western ex exhibits.
hibits. exhibits. The Chinese Communists d i s s-played
played s-played .a pair of air. compressors
and farm products in a giant ball,
Their guides passed out literature
fthiut 'tmfinata An thm fl Wall"
and "Chinese landscapes" which
had nothing to do with trade.
WIN IN
HERE ARE
B. G. Allison
Gilma M. Cinidi
Virgilio Vasqiiez
W

...;'

snw tar

(MUMM UOm

CO RUES 'll

.progressive decline expected after,
150. : ;.
I Regardless of class, however,!
women place more emphasis on f
the age of 40 as the critical point
in their life, he said. S
! The study found that women

gear the periods of life primarily
to the family cvcle.
but divide life
sharply at 'before
40.'
40 and "after
at TAHITI
Great buys for a great
1
Man's Dress Set
from $1.95

See The New

FUMA LUX
Electric Lighter villi Flashlight

THIS WEEK'S
Miguel A. Rodriguez
Pedro J. Vallarino
Dioselina Cogley
Emelia Hanten
Sol Sayles
Mrs. E. C. Arnold

AND THEY WON FOR FREE!

OUR FREE
THIS WEEK'S LUCKY
Kenneth N. Woodcook
C. M. Gre'nlaw
V. C. Douglas
" ": mm

AND
I)

JLJ i

DAME fJ OTQEIT TE .2-210

f.-V t

guy
Fine Lighters ."
from $3.95
rf r,
LUCKY WINNERS:
Frances Ciuliano
Dolores Skibinski
Gustavo A. Membreno
Cecilia Van Kirk
Michael Wynne
Maria Liakopolas

TAHITI rr
18-47 (137) Central kvt..- SZJ :;

RAFFLE
.-
"it
I
T(flV
n
I 41.
itr
lino
f
iy
WINNERS:
Mrs. Beatrice Sergeant
Myra Spicker ,,
Anne Schneider
mm
inn? ri r
Lr

1;



rsrrrrNrrM. tati.t rrr?r.,n
;nct, rr:
:t .:. !:!
T:: :r.i and ti.2 r;:ua
Walter Mnchcll If YC'J DcYl'D!'
tcys Tru3 Life Adventures
v "" UJ. r
- -ft v

TH? PVM Avrr.ic.w

(Continued from Patf

r.e of ihe ij "'

VTryThi$I!3vTI;!:3

is bvlcotod at KOO.OfX), or.

co. Uie-t shows in ail history. It will

r!,ar.;c $3 a tickrl at the Winter

Ca.'Jen. scaled to Cross $70,000

pf';, an all-time high. .Joanne; ST. LOUIS (LP) For tnose,
Conuollv Patmo cot herlit-tul hand. who don't "dig" Beethoven and;
kiM bv Merrick Watson at Cha- Mozart, St. Louis University has.
teiu Madrid. Hj is Jamaica's top-;, device to help with the spade-i
rated polo star. You met her!WOrlc. j
recently on your front page. i its inventor, Ernest C. Krohn.
Icalls it a theme-tracer." '
Nothing much is heard of Com- jt enables listeners to follow,
ra le Molotov any more. But his themes through a symphony or,
brother in law (Sain Karp oLjonata. j
B ideeport) is cleaning up in Conn.j Krohn built the device himself.;
realty. One of that State's ten rich-; it consists of a box, about the sire
vt men. (Capitalism is better. eh.;of a hi-fi speaker, with parchment i
A'..1I lirA1! ,n.t li.rji ani lil Q mat iim faA ThV Jir!

wlicn vou work for WincheU. I just, lighted from behind by electric;

TALE NiTS UPON VE PL.K-LE-7 KePTiwe.

' Ths I (3 U AN A
"' JT THE C3ALAFASOS ISLANPE
. AN LIVE 1M 6ALT WATER
""N....THS OMLV UZARP
"' s --- eo EN POWER

fend out what stunt men get to
fall from a building (40 feet) to
the sidewalk. .$250! Diana Barry Barry-more's
more's Barry-more's collaborator (Gerold Frank)
blocked a move to send her to a
sanitariaum. He insisted he nced-

bulbs.
One strip reads "Introduction
another First Theme," still an another
other another "Second Theme," and so on.
Music-lovers watch the screen,

uhile Krohn manipulates the lights

e& her in N.Y. to finish her auto-Jin accompaniment to recordings

bi,;? If she reveals all it shouldjThis way, listeners learn to spot
o :?iIick '"I'll Cry" .You'll adore) themes, their repetition, exposition
Coi'teU Borchers in U-I's pic, and development.
VNcTcr Say Goodbye." Scads of Krohn has visions of developing
class, a la Garbo and Bergman. his device into a veritable orchestra

of blinking lights, one for each

DRACO VOLANS

CP JAVA t
EUIPPEP TO
. fly

v w

III lias some innovations ot . (1 (i,: l,. ;
W text that will rock J?.."

wis his title. .They say the Jrorq; .:.:. : ..,. j
Wor Co. has the teevce scoop' ,Ie maintains that if ou dont
of lie year. Sponsoring all sessions in n
of both Nut'l conventions. The I aiiia nftAfl 1 tm
Gfn'l Motors exec who slugged !LU If VI JUCWU Lllllll
bandleader Gene Wms at that f ....
YU& party mayet 2 to 5 years Qy VlSCGIISin
',, Reachini for Stardom is like nnvAl'KFff (VV iiwr

this: Cute Pcsiyy McCay quit after speed nmits anj nior express
4 years as heroine on the CBS highways arc needed to reduce!
yrosram. "Love of Life, to work; traffic fatalities in Wisconsin, ac-i
-for $10 per as the love-sick ingenue cording to the safety director of
3p "Uncle Vanya." with Franchot the State Motor Vehicle Depart-.
Pasadena, Cal., will be inter- nu,nt,
e.ied to learn that Ike's vacation Director R. C. Salisbury Madi-i
place (Tliomasville, Ga.) call? it- son, told a group here that no?
o!f "The Ro.;c Capital of tliCi highway in the slate is fafe under;
V-'orld" .. .Teresa Brewer, the son?! presenl speeJ jim.;ts
stur has 3 darling images, all dif-, said the present limit of 65
fercnt. Kathy, 5, has brown hair, miles per hour in darhr.e and 55,
and brown eyes. Susan, 4, ha sj miles per hour at night is too high
bl.nde hair and l)!i:e cyct. Mesmi,ieven on newer highweys bccause
l's. is a redhead with grey eye i there are too many places where
. .Teresa has hor own private traffic can enter. i

Theuttle SASILISUS

'actually run on water

Rainbow!

Salisbury suggested that the;

s)jeec limit be lowered, more ex-i
pressways be built with limited

mat highways oe

- Playwright Arthur Miller says;

The U.S. is as bed as Hissi; m1 access, and

ittatmeiil of artisis w.'.ose Vicwspau-olled more extensively than at;

differ from the majority. .rraps.ipiescnt.
but there's so liuicli more money in; Noting the recent increase in the;
i over here. .When teevce was!sjze 0f the Wisconsin Traffic Pa-i-ih
its diapers I remember you MHtrol, Salisbury said the expansion i
tromiccd the coined word "vidiofj should help reduce highway deaths
",. .Well.' a science fiction yarn, because motorists tend to drive
i'ust published) uses it for a title j more, carefully when they know
V .The now building on Park Ave-; the law is enforced. i
)jiie' ul 53rd ''l-havc a onc-ncrc'
ADD WINCUKLL npe,,', whole plan. I think the idea's fin.1
p.-ws director with his own pvo-crer.

f;a.!ls. inX ""KannVi The scooper dupers overlooked!

the -betrothal of Gen. Vinegar

yffjf

ro

rtnr
G
0
B

T M. !, U l.

OP-

rE-vH-'T rc-3 v, -i r-csv w". ah

4L

rszcsixs axd e tkzzz

"Better Late-

car irzasnx blossts

"It vm a iplash-and-run driver

trAnre In Wnsliinffton... "Fanny

bit the 5 million gross mark. Josh
Logan enjoying another laugh,

Joe" Stilwell's nevview.Yale sen

ior Judson Morris, to pretty red-

j! NBC is shocked over the mail, red I Judy Bathon Her Pater a

Tliils as a spectacular.

V .CinJ thiir h nwlne of Beverlvjlocal barrister. .Eva Marie Saint
.f,v nwmg tl ;ir snowmfi ueeiiy w u

out the lin' kin- Ilcr husband, film direc direc-io
io direc-io !tor Jeff Hayden, is a realilive of

E on of Dignity: N ever'the novelist. .Agent Vic Jarmcl,
JailfSa Garbo K chick" .J&S"

trmeo Fave is hed over a ion-"tr-""
5-mi the Cameo "Real good as of this paragraph. Olga James
. tkai ttlmin A Vil- of "Mr. Wonderful" says she
wn'ertamer that woman. .a M. ,,. lV,nt ., miiv pnat

ti c niKht club vsnls to change its
Ian me to the Underworld and dec--ple
the walls with photos of fa-'rnou-i
gangsters but the likker au au-Sioritics
Sioritics au-Sioritics are very bored with the

bought herself that new mink coat.

But it was delivered back-stage in
Phillv by a ur.iformed chauffeur.
Tch-Tch.
Your Girl Friday

Faltering Philip
ihi:tp'l Uf Is rilled with brutset.
(VU-won atepa and rap he asea.
ffplrs woold leave his home likr new
A Classifieds, tint the Hgh I clue'

ly?jP

iat '.? nr mirth w

.Celebration

By WILSON SCRUGGS

i,
t

'MS, CUNT, ITS EITHER
THWOB'ECJTCf

"TCHCHAMSSMVWkMe

ivn wriff A cifis f

..Ail kktit "".'lllHS

k,KARTHVfy

i

I

WEU..W.MATS THE MATTES W-TH ESCOWM5

so happy wo one wu. bscosnot wu i

X' 1

4 T ,,

7"

lSTEMrAroSSS,CHAKPASS'e FO? ESrCYCMff,

AWO IS A CaUEKOAS, ONE WITH A

awiaaaiMiliMiT l. 'i'" r Iha 1 ' IT 1TI r'Tilf r "iiiniiiirniinnrniini'l

Mother Knows Best

B AL TtRMEEB

SAY. FJ?K,MAVf TOU

W1NTFIEIZEP THIS CAR,

WINTERIZE

YOUR CAR

1 It 6ETTER .1
GET WlM

Fll I

Lets stop pr
THp House np
TAKE CARE Of

POT

90

AA A-

j lli l ir

wis.

A 1 .hi

V t

If tA tmtok IM. I Jt. V M. Olt-J

AIXC1 OOf

Ob, Didn't He?

Cy f T. BABOCI

THE5ERXK5

yOU SAW LAST

WEEK-WERE

i THEY GOING

I PUN NO-THEY ---- NO THANKS-I'M

, MlG-im BEEN..' ...HCW HUWT1N' KM

THEV WA f ABOUT ONE J FELLA.-GOTTA

HEADED J FDR THE KEEP UP ON

KIGHTjbV V ROAP?V MVTDES.'

TO FORT A

SfW5 USE WASTiN" TIME TALKIN'

TTHAT VOKEL..PBOBLY NtyER

HEARP OF A MEDICINE

fiHUW, LET ALONE y

OL COC MILLER:

3 W 5

a-3

1

iH4 t Kf toH4, b. T il.

.aM a'

U lUf. UJ. Fat LBi

BOOTS AND HER BttDDOf

Fite Bucks This Time

SI EDGAR MARTI

1 WfWt TWB

TOR?

1 i

fr. VW A Wt THE tOOR
OVO.tM.HT. ir

woo
iOOKV

TSX-TftX TMfWX&. TtT1 RErttMBER, MUST V
TRlXE "0 OOR Of VOBUt 5.?)RH V)0 f-""

il u. l I

u-

2-3

T -.. ux t m.

CAPTAIN RA8I

Royalties?

tt LE3US TURNER

t MAD TOAK vnn.

APVANCE ROyALTIES

WKU fAlP TO
MCI 0 ACT L-EI i Atl

If ajM PROPUCTION

tlti'KNi

FORGET IT, MR5. KELLl

WB'LL MAWAGE WITHOUT

HIM, SOWEHOWi AklP THE

WILL BE DEDUCTED

prom royalties mdu'P

KECEIvE lATERiAkWWAY

COME-... ILL SHOW YOU WHERE WE'LL
BREAK GMimP IN A FEW DAY5 FOR
--Tr0UR KEW ItfaON PLAMTjg-
L

- -L s f,ME' i1"6 wa M0CKe
Jf ...ANO VBXTX 6 THS TRA6EPV TO THINK,
-WEEK WE'LL ABOUT 6U5lNE5A..BtlTrPUKf
JJ PLACE A HUGE TO PI5CU55 VOUR CONTRACT
1 ORPERfOR NEW hm-f WITH WATT-.-
1 CHINES TO i S
J fROWCE T J 1
. VTHETC; IaJ.
iii-n -ini, ,S t: 61 WE gtn Hi. T.M, INT- ftt W

MORTT MEEKLB

Bus'nessmen

By VICK CAVAltl

LESTER

1 WANTS TO

1 KNOW IF

I'LL MARRY

WHAT f THAT'S NO A I J YOU SHOULD TAKE A"
lifi"5 ( iT? a.odv TO TH lNK r- JJr
MOM. V IN A HURKt, t AOhilT J
C?y PR1SC1LLA-. A BUJ- S YEsT
SS Srr- lis i you're

p'LL TEUO
HIM TO
(CALL BACK
(VI 'A S AFTER

f HCNfeTHATFa2Um?

v-rsAPDLLAg glLLj-j

my mother ave
- f ME APOLLAR
AWHAT'jA I FCK THE STORE
WRONtft I S AND I LOST- j
, sonny? vjn" x

I

1 Mk.r

I J fA

THERE'50UR

POLLARANPAN

EXTRA FIFTY CENTS

Toeowrrnvjyi

- miTimYHiliM. v

I)K KfMRIIIKO irOLSI

majom aoom tt OIIB WAt

KX I. WUAUKl

SOPPY,

STOP MOVIM YA

SILLY FELINE I CAN'T

GET A PICTURE IP YA

KTEPS TURMIN
i nf An!

-v-i 1

4 w

YEKy l

a

...BUT I AW HELPLESS

.- BTPO(?E THIS

IBPESISTISLE F0I?CE
Uillll TTO L"TC lief

nivn r

UMMMi

It's No Soap

r

l.lkt .-

YA PAID CASH, AM' I'Ml

GETTIN' YEK PICTURE
OR ELSE! j

7
DETERMINATION

IS ONE OF YOUR

MOPE ADMIPA8LE

ATTRIBUTES

lDOMOU THINK THIS

I rrArii c nrtll e--V cms

IVflatteps me?; dpoolin"

T.H IUf Ul Pit. Off I

i

05B

6EORS5, WE'LL

HOLE-lM-TWS-

Paper idea fob

One edition

A STUNT --SST

Hl$ PICTURE, AMD

HE'LL WRITE US

A FEW LIMES.'

UW-HAK THAUk YOJ, FELLOW

JOURNAL 5TS- BUT I

YOU'LL VAtfT A C0MPR6"

HEN6N5 CHROKIICLS OP

AIY .EXPLOITS -6;5

SAWS H0MTIN5,

SCIENTIFIC-

1 61T HE

6U0RT

THS PAPER
15 TIGHTER
THAU ANJ

ACRC3AT

PAMTS

JD6T

EIGHT-1

LINES 1

P1

THERESMETHOPIM 1

MI& LAZINESS. He A
COIsl'T LIKE LOAFER
OR WINPBAoS ABOUND
AMP THEY AIN'T 60IK1'
TO HAN6 AROUNP WHERE
TH' TEMPTATION TD SIT .

POWN IS SO STR0N6,

OR WHERE TH' BO&d

MAV THIWK THEV

JU&T JUMPEPUP

OFF A PAV BEP

llvl I THEY'RE MERELY

, 7 FOR LUNCH HOUR,
"! T-4- BtJT HE LEAVES 'EM )
' i Tl THERE TH' HULL. J
rTmmtmm- DY, LOOKIN' LIKE f
7. I 1 7 TH' WAIT1M' ROOM
r ri coctortdo V
I I i A-?a -vi oj ir i

'EM OUT OF J
N SI6HT7

I I .Jl .N V

4m "0 km

THE FENCE oi

7

,iiii,ifci.'1



..ijk msama amit.ican an iNrrrrNL-rxT dily NnvsFArnt
pace fm:
Constable Tells Nightmare Mr?i:i:eiL
SIDE GLANCES
By Caibraith;
C i Y- I A t tA hJt. tiufcf uS

moniuy, rrrsrART ;:.

: lest asallUlll"'05i!

By OSWALD JACOBY
Wrirttn fer NEA Strvice

SI

o African! i j
id ran but
bed sticks j V"

NORTH 4
A Q 109 752
VI4
K7
M5
WEST (D) CAST
A J 6 4 J A A
10 7 5
Ml 4A10I3
A.QJ107 043 J
SOUTH
AK
V AKQJ632
Q JS4 -K
North-South vut.
Wert North Cast South
Pass Pass Pass 4 V
Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead A 3

! DUR5W, Feb 27 il'P) A 23-i "They were chanting and crying

.'rear-old European constable has:,ah..an..san. jvvo Airica

iifid for the fir t limp hi "nieiil-irnnstablcs 'turned ft

Imam" mna.lwmr hid tn ixnxnp' tnnhWpl'riPR (kfiob

ienrag'ed African tribesmen wbo'came hurtling through the air and;
; Wednesday massacred five rmlice-! struck them down, and seconds j

"men who found their dagga (mari- later they were being battered to
jjuana) fields :a the Drakensberg death.
Mountains. J "We raised our hands and Ser-
i Theunis Kniecr described theigeant De Lange spoke to the 1M-

swift attack bv 40 tribesmen wholPI (force) in Zulu. They never;

t ii . i .. ... I. i I .1 .i.,I-a.

"Three of us white men stood

with our backs against an eight

Dounced on the small probing po

nce-patrol of eight and battered

three African and two turopean

I constables to death. Kruger and

( 7 ( i
J HtA T7- rf

A hupp man-hunt nf n 1 a n e s

jeeps and foot patrols has so far

rounded up 32 triDesmen dui misi
'and ram today blanketed the high
1 Drakensberg range and the search
was held up.
Kruger said the patrol had fin finished
ished finished the 'dagga raid and were

heading back to camp when the

Africans streamed down ttie

mountains toward them.

foot bank, our guns drawn.

It Isn't rude to refuse a drink

u t- n ii i.niit K . r e .

juui -uus uiici5 yuu Ollc

ine Kr.u:Bver -j

two African policemen escaped, tribesmen in a half-circle around! not so gracious ways of refusing.

U. i A Slllin A "Kn tho.iU ... I-

"I saw one raise his kerrie and
I fired. -The kerrie crashed into
my face and I fell.

"De Lange and Sergeant Koorts
nm; cvon hart timp to shoot"

Kruger said he jumped up, dash

ed up the DatiK ana looKing, saw
nnfhin? but tribesmen raininc

I blows."-

South has 19 p6ints in high cards

in touay a nana, and you may aisu
leei lntiuieu iu couju iour points
lui his two singieions. iius gives
juu i total ot 1 points. 11 you
msit DPifin to add uoints for uie

leiujth m the vsoim iieart sun, you
may com, to tne conclusion mat
tne Souln naud is worm an opening
biu oi Wo iieai w.
iNouiiuK couiu ue further from
the irum. It is aiways uaugeiuus
to count" smgleion King ooin tor
iis hign caru vaiue anu also lor
its snuitness-vaiue.
xue oesi way to judge the value
of an unusuaiiy fraKisn hand is by
using your common sense as a
briaye piaycr. 'ine soutn nana win
oovwusiy tase seven heart tricus
and anout two diamond tricks op op-pomte
pomte op-pomte almost any uummy. Tne
iiand win produce game u orin
has a iittic help. A aiara is prae prae-tically
tically prae-tically out of the question alter
North passes. South should open
one heart in first or second posi position,
tion, position, but is quite justified in open opening
ing opening with four hearts opposite

West led the three of spades on

the sound theory that soutn was
unlikely, to have strength m spades
tt k morio a nrp-pmntive bid in

hearts. East won with the ace of

spades, dropping the king tfom tne
i-..n, uori Rnct knpw that it was

possible for South to have another
, -.J- wioct micht have

low suaue, "v o-
led low from only three spades
hu the lack. The more

... hnwpver.

that West had led from a four-
.v. .nit nd that South had,

dropped a singleton king.

U.S., Russia, 10 Other Nations
Start Conference On Atom Bank

WASHINGTON Feb. 27 (UP) 12-nation meeting, 72 other conn

ReBrpsentatives of the United tries wm oe invitea to an interna

Stains Russia and 10 other na

tions will begin negotiations here

today on a cnaner tor me wunu

"atoms for peace agency propos

ed by President Eisenhower.

Disputes are expected on sever

al points, including Russia s msit msit-enrt
enrt msit-enrt that the new' agencv be sub

ject to the Soviet veto in the Unit

ed. Nations security i-ouncu. ne

United States opposes this.
American nffinals are ODtimist-

ic that the disputes can be work

ed out, and mat agreement m
principle can be reached in two
u-opto This ontimism is based on

th hplipf that nressure of other

nations, including cold war neu neutrals,
trals, neutrals, will induce Russia to give

up its veto nemana. ine meeiniB

could break down u Kussia is au
amant on this point,
Tho ntnms" for neare aeencv

which Mr. Eisenhower proposed in

a speech betore tne u.n. ueneiai
Assembly on Dec. 8. 1953, would
supervise an international "urani "uranium
um "uranium bank."

Minuie no tnank vnn" s

much better than a self-right.

coug, i aon t arinic

Acting on tms ashumiiuu... tonne power projects ami
returned a low trump. It was clear. pe8Cful (lseg of tne at0m.
that the spades and clubs rteefl lea, I Russ.ia agrees to parti

no

Nations which have substantial
auanlities of atomic fuels, notably

the United States and Russi a,

would contribute materials to tne
Konir rhich would then help un-

r 'derdeveloped countries launch a-

nnrtirinatp

ut TPact nan 10 8CI ... n e t.l.., ih tnnk

at once. to prevent oecian:i i',prohably wouk" come out ot tne
fflo a diamond m the. dummy. tJ hiHnn wnrth. nf. fissionable U-

This excellent defensive "waneuv-1 -. which Prestdent Eisenhower

jfaipi the contract, ooum won, B, ..j.,. 1hi. wppi- fnr atomic

the trump return with the ace and ej, jieydopment at home and
rptnrned a low diamond to -dum-

mv's king, but East won wiin ne
Tee of diamonds and rrtunjedthe
ten of heart. Now South was
doomed to lose two diamonds as
well as the two black aces.

(MM

tional conference to consider the

aeencv charter.

Participating in today s meet

ing will be the United States,
Russia. Britain. France. Canada.

Australia, Belgium, Portugal,

South Africa, Brazil, India and

Czechoslovakia.

Russia will be represented bv

Ambassador Georgi N. Zaroubin.

The United States representative
will be James J. Wadsworth, de deputy
puty deputy U.S. delegate to the U.N.
Scotland Yard Sel

To Crack 'Perfect
Crime' Of Murder
LONDON. Feb. 27 CUPV -Scot

land Yard's murder squad set out
today to crack what may be a
perfect crime.
A grave digger found the body
of a young woman in Hampstcad
Cemetery, located in an artists'
and w r i t e r s' neighborhood of
North London. The body had been
covered with a layer of leaves.
Medical experts said the woman

has been dead for as long as 18

months, but they had not yet de determined
termined determined cause of death.
First investigations g.ave no
clue to her identity. Ail Scotland
Yard knew wt:s that:
The woman apparently died on a1
summer night. She wore a light;
dress. j
She may have been married or I

broad. la widow. She wore a wedding!

Should Russia balk at joining band.
the agency on a veto-less basis, She may have been the victim;
the United States Is likely to give of a sex maniac. One hand was
up the idea of an international u- clenched into a fist.
ranium poo). The international a-! She was slim, apparently be-1
gency might then become a kind,tween 20 and 23 years of age. and'
of clearing house for technical in-1 dressed dramatically. She wore!

formation about peacetui uses oi.d'hck siocmuss aim cimume jew

elry.

IMhe host is equally polite he
won't insist.

HUNTING YARN

CARUTHERSVILLE. Mo. -(UP

lois may go down, as another
tall, tale, but the man who tells it,
Don May, is an agent of the

states Conservation Commission

Slav sairl that a.h;U v:.

. ...mi. mttc HUHllUg UIIS
winter, his dog pointed in an old
muskrat hole near a stream. He
tried dragging the dog away bv the
collar,' but the animal insisted on
returning to the hole.
Finally, May laid down his gun
and poked a stick into the den
anrt nut flow thro t..:i

. ... uiiiv ifuaii.
"The worst part," he said, "was
that I didn't even raise the stick

ana yen Doom.'"

T II Pat. M

"t don't suppose hi has very much money, Mom but
we're not getting married tifl after payday.'

CLOVERBLOOM
Butter

C j -Kf

THI
IUT

BIST AND NOTHING
THI IIST IS LABILID

BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE
MEE COMPANIONSHIP'S
ONE

"How can a-husband and wfle

.,31 ca'n't venling done nown

atomic energy. Without Jlussian

participation, tlie tmted htates
would be the only major contribut contributor
or contributor to the bank. Under such cir circumstances,
cumstances, circumstances, U.S. officials proba proba-blv
blv proba-blv would elect to extend atomic
aid under bilateral agreements
with individual nations, as is he-

a limited scale

nfford to hire a baby sitter.

reader asks. And then she aomiw,
"That's our. problem. And u there
is any answer to it, I don't know
what it is." v
. 1U.. a onewpf A

. u Lc.Tll'aa, haVe tolformation

eTeifTp7 and act away from projects

home to find companionship. They
can find companionship right at
home. That is, if they understand

what the word really means.
A husband and wife working to to-cether
cether to-cether to paint a room or relinisn
an old piece of furniture are find finding
ing finding one kind of companionship.
This is the companionship of a
hA husband and wife reading side
by side are finding another kind. of
companionship. This is the quiet
peace of having a loved one close
by with no need for words.
A husband and wife playing with
their children or taking them on
the simplest kind; of outing are
sharing a companionship that in includes
cludes includes the whole family.
A husband and wife marketing
together, deciding whether to buy
the roast of beef or the roast pork

Then there is the companionship ;

" a husband ana wiie teei wmu
invite a few friends in for an eve evening
ning evening of talk. And the kind of
companionship they discover in
listening to music, discussing f the
makine plans

for the future, helping each other

ever rough spots.
VV.. ;ofcm itnpsn't depend

on what you do with another per-.

son or where you go. ii
on a lively interest in each other
- and the world outside. It depends
r" .miit in pninv little things

and on two persons liking to be

together. ,.
' So don't ever think you cant
nnmnaninnsllin without mon-

ty or the conventional entertain-1

ment mat money i:u uuj-
Many" an older couple has dis discovered
covered discovered that the period of their
lives" wlien they were closest to-
onil mlnvnl each others

company the most was the period
- strnffffle when money was

acarce and possessions were few,

i A maior U.S. argument lor So

viet participation is that it would
nut an end to the race that has

been developing between the two
nations to supply underdeveloped
nations with materials and in

to start atomic power

TOO MANY JOBS
WATE11VLIET, Mich. -(UP)-Alden
Bridges said he resigned his
job as part-time janitor at the
local school because he was too
busy with his duties as mayor.

If agreement is reached at the

! ..

I i

' SKATE CRISIS
' HARTFdRD, Conn. -(UP)- In
the midst of a long cold snap,
aports istores .reported a "desper "desperate"
ate" "desperate" situation. There was a severe
shortage of ice skates. One whole-
"salcr said ills next trfilpmenrwasn't
due for three weeks, "and that's
already sold out."

HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE

Down
Payment

Modern upholstered 4 piece
living room sets

Mahogany dining room tables
and 4 chairs 4.50
Modern wardrobes with
mirrors inside '6.00

with

Monthly
Payment

6.50 6.50

4.50

6.00

Mahogany licoreras
sliding doors

Vanities with
and stool .

large mirror

6.00 6.00

5.75

Complete Mahogany double
beds' with flowered design .... 4.00
Kitchen cabinets 4.50
Double Hollywood beds (new styles) 5.50
Rattan Living Room set:
3 pi. sofa, 2 arm chairs
3 tables 13.50

4.50
5.50

'13.50

Also: Executive desks, Wrought iron and wicker
porch sets, youth beds, folding beds, innerspring
mattresses, chests of drawers, rocking chairs! etc.
EASY PAYMENTS

i

HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE

Rational Ave. No. 41

"""WTtXTy, selTan

- Tel. 3-4911

exchange aTTlypes oTTumiture.

j Kenmore

.. .. -V f II'

0

SPEED

Blender

PORTABLE RADIOS

REGULAR

$ 39.95

WITH COUPON

REGULAR
WITH COUPON.

.$29.95
. 25.55

J p.

This coupon is valid till
tomorrow Tuesday
The Panama American.
Feb. 27

20" FAN
REGULAR
5 69.95
" WITH COUPON
$ 59.99

This coupon is valid till
tomorrow Tuesday
The Panama American,
Feb. 27

This coupon is ; valid till tomorrow Tuesday
The Panama American, February 27
ROASTER OVEN

regular .
WITH COUPON.

$69.95
. 58.88

KENMORE WA SHER

This coupon is' valid till tomorrow Tuesday
The Panama American, February 27
'"KEN 00 RE-IRON

mt w'uJ '" ''"'Yr'tf

(5i.no'!j)

White porcelain enamel
For that mid-week wash
REGULAR

$59.95
WITH COUPON
$ 48.88

This coupon is valid till tomorrow Tuesday

Completely automatic timer has a
1 full 30-minute range. Washes up
; to 3 shirts, 8-10 diapers up to
I lbs. dry laundry. Three-blad
agitator 'action gives cleanest

washes. Motor is 110-120 volt,
AC.

The Panama American, February 27

REGULAR $5.79,
WITH COUPON. . 4,88
This coupon is Valid till tomorrow, Tuesday
The Panama American, February 27

MANAMA Tivoli Ave. Tel. 2-0931

i t

COLON Melendez Ave. and lUih bl. lei.

i

- s.-
ML
HIM



.MONDAY,- FEEECAEY 2V I" J
--
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
1
I
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR ACENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA

' THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN : INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

i
L" if-
'1- ; a M f
MA

:: MINIMUM
i: FOR
12 FORDS

COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
CANAL ZONE FOlWXINiC
iEIITAL-WEDICAL
TH?C. B. More. -Dr. Av
D.D.S. (Georgetown University) M.D
ftvelt (4th ot Jul)
(opposite Aneon School Playground)
T Tel 2-2011 Pnm.
" RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
9 jm RWGE
r, Phone Panama 1-0552
TRANSPORTES BAXTER. S A.
eckacf Shipper Mjw
Phone 2-2451 2-2562,
Lear Riding et
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL,
Riding Jumpinf etasiei doil?
1 1 5 a.m. Phone 3-0279
or by appointment.
WE Will relieve Your"
FOOT-TROUBLE
corns, nllouasm, mill
CHIROPODIST
Dr. Scholia trained)
noTPPPniA NACIONAL
Ulll wa -' ...
M Juito AsfoeemeM Ph. S-2217
LOOK
You Can Now Buy Auto Automobile
mobile Automobile Insurance by, tele telephone.
phone. telephone. Immediate Cover Coverage.
age. Coverage. Dial Panama 2-5000
FRED HUDDLESTON.
Save on direct shipment
Top quality fishing
equipment
VI0LETTE SUPPLY
SERVICE
Panama 3-6318
Equipmenl Shuffle
Will Expand PAA's
(ajkeity To Panama
Air expansion and modernization
program designed to keep pace
with booming tourist travel to
Mexico, Central America and Fa Fa-nanra
nanra Fa-nanra will bring additional DC-6-B'a
Jto Pan American World Air Airways'
ways' Airways' Latin American routes this
Bumper.
This DC-6B's will replace Con Constellation
stellation Constellation aircraft on the Latin A A-merfcan
merfcan A-merfcan routes. They are 40 mpn
faster and will carry 79 passen passengers!
gers! passengers! compared to 66 on. the Con Constellations.
stellations. Constellations. Four of the DC-6B's are being
shifted from PAA's Pacific-Alaska
Division, where they are being
replaced by Boeing Stratocruiscrs
on PA routes between Seattle
and jAlaska. ; "
PAA officials said the addition additional
al additional n-en-no-.nna-itv which the
DC-6B's will provide is needed to
aervtj the additional travel demand
between the Houston, Brownsville
and tNew Orleans gateways and
Mexico, Guatemala, El Savador,
Honduras; Nicaragua, Costa Rica
.and -Panama.
First of the new DC-6B's will be
delivered to PAA's Latin Ameri American
can American division in May and others
will follow later in we summer
The Stratocruisers will be plac
j iri daiiv cprvipft between Seat
i ya enntViaact Alaska in JutV.
providing flights to Ketchikan and
Juneau, it was announceu uj uj-lis
lis uj-lis G. Lipscomb, PAA system
vice president, traffic 'and sales.
TWina Alienist. Stratocruisers
will start operating nonstop from
Seattle to Fairbanks. And as ad additional
ditional additional aircraft become available
i tdaa'o rQnonnrific routes.
the Stratocruisers will be placed
on. all Alaska routes, mciuumg
Whitehorse, by September.
o.; Wnuin Foii-hanks ana
OC1T1VC unirvvi.
Nome"wiII continue to be provided
by Skymasters, ; :
LEGAL NOTICE
UNITED STATE3 OF AMERICA
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
TOR THE UISTKILT ur i miim t.v.-
BALBOA DIVISION
In the Mutter of the Estate ot
. Sarah E. W". Bakrr
also known an
Sarah Evangeline Weeks, Baker.
deceased
Nn. 93l(i Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
NOTICE in hereby given that all per persons
sons persons having any claims against the Es Estate
tate Estate ot Sarah E. W. Baker also known
as Sarah Evangeline Weeks Baker, de deceased,
ceased, deceased, are required to file their claims,
eupported ,by vouchers, and properly
verified, With (he Clerk of the United
State District Court for the District of
the Canal Zone. Balboa Division at the
Courthouse. Ancon, Canal Zone, or with
the Executrix, Sarah Antoinette Huff.
c") Van Rirlen. Ramirez de Ca'tro. P.
O'. l?o 124, Antvm, Cni!l Zone, INorln INorln-t
t INorln-t Tivoli Avenue) mi or before the 21st
day of December 1938, or they will for forever
ever forever be barred,
I);ted at Ancon, Canal Zone
tins 20th dav of Fehr.i.-n v. l!''l.
() Sarah Antnitictie Huff
1 Lxcculiix.

' UBRERIA PRECIADO
1 Street N o. U
Agendas Internal, de Publicaciones
Wo I Letter Plaza
CASA ZALDO
' Central At, tt

FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE: Bendix automatic
washer, good condition. Cheap.
3-4896. 7th Street No. 7 El
Cangrejo
FOR SALE: Going away. Three
bedroom teti, one dining room
let, one living room let, three
bamboo leti, gas stove, two Chi Chinese
nese Chinese rugs and other furniture.
Juan Pucci, Telephone 41 or
198 Colon.
FOR SALE: Philips radio, rec record
ord record player RCA, stove, twin bed
with table, good condition, Tele Telephone
phone Telephone 3-3258.
FOR SALE: Baby's crib, spring,
mattress $13. Entrance Via F.
Cordoba, Vista Hermota 2047,
Apt. 1.
FOR SALE: Maytag fully au automatic,
tomatic, automatic, 60-cycle, 3 years old,
$250. Navy 3313.
FOR SALE: New State semi semiautomatic
automatic semiautomatic tewing machine. Al Al-brook
brook Al-brook 4231. $120.

Community Chest Donated
(Continued from Pare 1)

est total of donations was des designated,
ignated, designated, The Corozal Hospital
recreation and rehabilitation
fund was next In Donularitv.
Total designations, and total
Chest fund allocations to the In Individual
dividual Individual agencies for the year,
are as follows:
Salvation Army, designated
$2,397.53, total Chest money
$4,120; Corozal Hospital fund, de
slgnated $1,137-77, Chest total
01440; Boy Scouts of America,
designated 0963.82, total $4,400;
Girl Scouts of America, desig designated
nated designated $504.27, total $3,600; Sum Summer
mer Summer Recreation (U.S. and local
rate) designated $290.37, total
(U.S. rate.) $1,200, total (local
rate) 1,200; Balboa YMCA-USO
designated $267.84, total $2,800;
International Boy Scouts of the
Canal Zone, designated $261.24,
total $1,600; C. Z. Civic Councils
(U.S. and Local Rate) designated
$230.13, total (Cristobal-Margarita
Civic Council) $100, total
(Local Rate Civic Councils Con Congress)
gress) Congress) $240; Jewish Welfare
Board-USO, designated $202 53,
total $2.00; International Girl
Scouts; designated $118.35, total
$1440; Cristobal YMCA-USO, de designated
signated designated $88.75, total $2,000 $2,000-The
The $2,000-The $26,140 total represents
80 per tent accomplishment
for 1955, Adams said.
' Had the campaign's toal goal
been achieved, the total distrib distrib-distrlbuting
distrlbuting distrib-distrlbuting the campaign pro pro-uted
uted pro-uted would have been $32,675. In
ceeds, the Chest prorated the
mnnev evettlv on an 80-per-cent-
of-orlglnally-budgeted basis. This
left the $046.83 reserve xor me
'Camera Series'
Continues
At Balboa JWB
Tho. second In the "Camera
Series" under the direction of
Eugene Derr, acting president
of the Diablo Camera Club, will
be presented at the USO-JWB
Armed Forces Service Center on
Wednesday at ,7: 30 p.m.
Derr win discuss ine operation
of cameras exposure meters,
lenses, over and under exDOSure
in photography. The lecture-dis
cussion penoa win De muMu-tueu
with coiorea snaes.
Thrv remaining two lectures
will be presented on March 7
and 14, featuring picture com composition
position composition and a colored slide- cli clinic.
nic. clinic. I V;

VS STEEL OFFICIALS VISIT PANAMA Shown above at Tocumen airport after they
aiichted from the private plane which brought them from Lima, Peru, are officials of United
states Steel Company and prominent local businessmen and their wives who received them
at the airport. From left to right: Leight R. Cramer, Resident Vice president, First National
City Bank of New York; E. M. Voorhees, Chairman, Finance Committee and Director of Unit United
ed United States Steel; Mrs. Walter Donnelly; B. F. Eioner, Resident Manager, Cia. Interamericana

. n -..11

Walter LOnilt;Jiy, opcviui ivcjjicawitaiiAYe ui wahlku iot-ai'o utv lit uuuwi -,
Joseph P. Spang, Director of United States Steel and President of The Gillette Company; Mrs.

Cramer, and Ralph Lindo of Lindo & Maduro, Panama representatives for the steel company
The group of distinguished visitors stayed Saturday at El Panama, and left yesterday foi

n j do nh i mnn tT 1

Kt.nart. Fin Mr. and Mrs. Donnelly have many friends on the

tour here as Counsellor of the

LOURDES PHARMACY
1UU CarrasqulUa
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
No. IS "B" Street
MORRISON
4th ( July Ave I St.

FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE. 1953 Oldsmobile
Super "88" 4-door, hydramatic,
power steering, power brakes,
rear teat speaker, heater. Origin Original
al Original owner. $1350. Call 84-4292
or after 5 p.m. 84-2298.
FOR SALE: 1951 Pontile Cat Cat-alina
alina Cat-alina with all extras. Two new
tires and battery. Call 84-2206
any time. $900.
FOR SALE: 1954 Chevrolet
Model 210, $1395 cash, $1500
financed. Call Ft. Clayton 87 87-3228.
3228. 87-3228. FOR SALE: 1953 Mercury.
Phone 2-3762.
FOR SALE: 1954 Chevrolet
Del Rey Club Coupe, power glide,
4 new tubeless tires, excellent
condition, original owner $1600
cash. Phone Balboa 2-3140 aft after
er after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Chevrolet Station
Wagon 1951, 4-door, 8-pas-
senger, good condition. Balboa
1642
next drive's expenses.
At the outset of the planning
for the drive the 13 Chest-supported
organizations, due to in increased
creased increased needs, asked the Chest
for a total of more than $55,000,
Adams revealed.
Chest officials felt that It
amount and thus were forced to
slash budgeted funds by more
man $22,000 to the more realis realistic
tic realistic goal.
In concluding, Adams noted
that local community, charity,
and civic needs were hot re reduced
duced reduced by the mere reduct'on of
the Chest budget, and he
acknowledged that the limita limitation
tion limitation in funds is working a se severe
vere severe strain on some of the or organizations.
ganizations. organizations.
( "The Isthmian public's sup
port or its local acitivlties and
organizations through the Chest
drive was Inspiring fully regarding-
the thousands of hours
of hard work donated by our
hundreds of volunteers," he said.
"But our needs here are even
greater. The Chest and the
people and the leaders In our
community will be confronted
with a solemn challenge in this
coming year's Community Chest
campaign."
41 Persons Killed
T
'n Worst E. German
Railroad Crash
BERLIN. Fpb. 27 (UP-)- The
death toll in East Germany's most
serious post-war railroad crash
was raised to 41 today when nine
persons succumbed to iniuries in
Soviet zone hospital, the East
German government announced.
An official government announce announcement
ment announcement said the injured persons died
despite medical aid given them by
East German doctors.
The disaster occurred Saturday
when a freight train pulled by two
locomotives smashed into a pas passenger
senger passenger express train taking visi visitors
tors visitors to the East German industrial
fair at Leipzig from Dresden; The
crash took place between the towns
of Oschatz and Riese in the Soviet
zone province of Saxony.
The East German Transport Mi
nistry said the crash was caused
bv the freight train when it ignor
ed a stop signal in thick fog and
rammed into tne sioe or tne ex express.
press. express. -. -
rinni-nr.nv.tr.4i.. a nf ITnUJ Ocntno CI .dl

nr a jit ni'irtiirrv ur rntvirt rpnrpsHni.a vps Tiir h s ,ppi riiiiuiauv.

U. S. Embassy several years

LEWIS SERVICE
At TivoU No. 4
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
14) Central Atmi
FARMACIA LUX

MISCELLANEOUS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031, ANCON. C.Z.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
FOR SALE rV
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: 20-cu. ft. Interna International
tional International Harvester Deep Free,
table top model, like new. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone 3-1 848. house 72-A,
New Cristobal,
FOR SALE: 1 B clan hydro hydroplane
plane hydroplane with 10-hp Mercury rac racing
ing racing engine $150; I model 20
Higgins 12-gauge shotgun $30,
Phone 3-1741 Cristobal.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS VARIOUS ITEMS
FOR SALE
Sealed bids, for opening in pub public,
lic, public, will be received in th office
of Superintendent of Storehous Storehouses,
es, Storehouses, Balboa, for the following
items:
INVITATION No. 245
Miscellaneous unclassified fer ferrous
rous ferrous icrap and miscellaneous
iron. TO BE OPENED 9:30 A.M.
March 2, 1956.
INVITATION No. 225
Cable, cord, and wire. TO BE
OPENED 10:30 A.M., March 2,
1956.
INVITATION No. 229
Tape, thread, putty, insulation
material, pip covering and fit fit-tinqs
tinqs fit-tinqs TO BE OPENED 1:30
P.M., March 2, 1956.
INVITATION No. 230
Adapters, boxei, coven, condu condu-leti,
leti, condu-leti, condulet parti, eonneetori,
coupling!, raceway fittings,
studs, wishers, receptacles,
straps and valves. TO BE
OPENED 2:30 P.M., March 2,
1956.
Invitations may be obtained from
office of Superintendent of
Storehouses, telephone 2-1815.
FOR SALE: Upright piano Kim Kimball,
ball, Kimball, in perfect condition. For in information
formation information phon 929-L Colon.
FOR SALE: Treasure rummag
household arlieUl, building ma ma-terial,
terial, ma-terial, power, tools, hand tools, j
electric motors, fan, fixtures, I
' wire, Mixmaster, garden hose,
' garden tools, lavatory, plumbing
fittings, -windows, doors, paints,
pots, pans, dishes, tool boxes,
clothing, outing tnt, picnic or
beach cottage articles, 35-mm.
slide projectors, screen. From 5c.
tools to $200 antique!. Sal 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday to Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. Garage, corner Amador and
Plank, on block behind Balboa
YMCA.
Piedmont Loop
0
To Disband
COLUMBUS, O., Feb. 27 (UP)
Prpslrip.nt. Genree M. Trautman
of the minor leagues announced
today the -neamont uaserjau
League has folded.
Trautman said- Judge Ben
Campbell of Petersburg, Va.,
league president, notified, him
in a telegram the seven club
presidents had decided the
league would disoana, enecuve
today.
A Trautman aide said some of
the seven clubs had had poor
ntt.pnrinnrp and that the entire
league had a "poor 1955 season"
and "poor seasons in tne pasi.
The spokesman said the club
owners apparently "just got tir tired
ed tired of losing: money."
Trautman, in announcing the
pnri nf thp leanip todav. said
Judge Campbell's telegram was
dated Saturday, ana inai 11 re relayed
layed relayed a decision of the clubs."
The folding of the league had

in CAnfh AmPrtna' Mn TtllhtlPr'

for
Isthmus lrom Mr
Donnelly's
ago.
(Advt.)

WANTED
Apartments

ARMY COUPLE desires vacation
quarters around March 14. Pref Preferably
erably Preferably Balboa References. Cam Cam-boa
boa Cam-boa 6268.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE 22-ft. sailing sloop
"Dee," w5-hp. outboard. Call
Amador 2243 or may b ien at
Balboa Yacht Club
Seybold To Be
Guest Speaker
At Initiation
Special guest snpatpr npvt Vr'i.
dav morninff at the Phi That 9
KaDDa initiation-assemhlv in the
Canal Zone Junior College will be
uov, ionn a. JseyDoia.
TLa reremnnv Is nnnn fn thn m.V.
Uc, and a general invitation is ex-
tenaea to ail to attend at 9:30 a.m.
in the Lectin-. Rnnm nt tho nnl.
leee huilrlino arrrirHiner tn CnWi
Turbyfill, faculty sponsor of the
i 1 1 i- . .
lut-Bi cuapier oi uie national non
ui giuup,
SDecial erilPsfs fnr th "CVVinlar
shin Dav" affair at thn lnnal onl.
. V .WVM. V V
two Natinnal Hnnnr Snr-ietw oroimu
in caiDoa ana u r 1 s 1 0 b a 1 High
acnoois.
Ellen Joan Smith, president for
1SS3-56, .will be in charge of the
initiation ceremonv for students
whose Over all eraiip avpraecs
since entering college, here or
eisewnere, nave put them at the
ion ot an reffular full time stu
dents. Four soDhomores arirl thrpp
freshmen are scheduled to enter
the national fraternity on Friday
morning by this initiation.
President Smith will Via aeeis?
ed by the other active members of
the local chapter. They are Mil Mildred
dred Mildred Damerau, Betty Flatau, Sa
ra tioiK, Virginia Jhvam, Margarita
Latorraca, Mary Rose, Justin
Wong, and Mike Zimmerman.
Zimmerman was initiated last
year at the chapter in Coffeyville
(Kansas) College, and is a "trans "transfer"
fer" "transfer" member to the chapter in the
local college. 1
been rumored fnr snmp t.!m
There were reports that Traut Trautman
man Trautman was "actina- sbva thp
Piedmont."
But an aide explained today
that Trautman had no power to
do more than "encourage the
league to continue." As presi president
dent president of the National Association
of Professional Baseball Leagues,
he could do no more, thp spokes
man said.
The Class R lpncno te mmniw.
ed of teams from Sunbury, York
and Lancaster, Pa.,- Hagerstown,
mq.; ana Lyncnourg, Newport
News and Portsmouth, Va.

iV i

1st PRIZE

332376
1

Present your tickets

" TOTAL.. '.$1,1 2 0.00
1. $100.00 '2. $300.00 (Accumulated) 3. $720.00 (Accumulated)
The firtt prize of $1,400.00 corresponding to Lottery drawing of
February 19th, was won by Mrs. Josefina Molina de Harding.
Get them buying. .
end ell precis of "VTIOLA UCG?JQA A!!D DSSTilEPJA CEillM"

1
c

HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
J. ft ae b Oesa At. No. 41
FOTODOMY
Jwt Aihmoi At. and U St
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS
II Street K. tS -..

FOR RENT
Apartments
ATTENTION C. I.I Just built
modern furnished prtmnti, I,
2 bedreomi, kot, cold w t ft,
Phon Ponane 3-4941.
FOR RENT i MODERN apart apartment
ment apartment in Pueblo Nuevo, $25
monthly. Phon 3-6168, Alcidei
Garcia Correa
FOR RENTi Larg apartment,
furniihtd and unfurnished.
House 25-A, 3rd St., San Fran Fran-ciic.
ciic. Fran-ciic. FOR RENT: Ideal for bach bachelor
elor bachelor or a couple, one-bedroom
apartment, very modern, hot wa water,
ter, water, all screened, near El Pana Panama
ma Panama Hotel. Call 3-3421 Panama.
FOR RENT: Nicely furnished
one-bedroom apartment facing
the park on Ave. Peru near the
Lux Theater, No. 57. Phone 3 3-0746
0746 3-0746 or 3-3099.
FOR RENT: 2-bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment unfurnished. Living-dining
room, all icrened. San Francis Francisco.
co. Francisco. Phone 1464 Balboa.
FOR RENT: Apartment, vary
comfortable, furnished, hot wa-
tr, one bedroom. Second Street
No. II. Perejil. Phone 3-0533
or 3-2694.
FOR RENT: 3-bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, all modern conveniencei,
new building, hot water, garage,
maid'l quarters. Reasonably pric priced.
ed. priced. Apply 2034, 7th Ave. Ei Ei-pana.
pana. Ei-pana. Phone 3-5692 Panama.
FOR RENT: Completely fur furnished
nished furnished apartment in El Cangrejo,
for 2 month!. Available end of
March to couple without chil children.
dren. children. Phone Panama 3-4911,
office hour
FOR RENT: Small furnished
apartment. Clean and comforta comfortable.
ble. comfortable. Best residential area. 43rd
Street No. 1 3.
Mrs. Mary Carter I
Died Recently
In California
News of the death of Mrs. Ma Mary
ry Mary C. Carter, former resident nf
Ancon, and wife of Roland S.
Carter, has been received by
inenas on tne istnmus.
Mrs. Carter died Jan. 13 In
South Pasadena, Calif., where
she and her husband had been
living for the past several years.
Jvir. and Mrs. Carter lived In
Ancon for a number of years.
He was employed as a clerk in
the former Correspondence Bu Bureau
reau Bureau from 1917 -until 1930.
She was employed as secreta secretary
ry secretary with the U.S. Army.
HOT DOG
MOUNT VERNON, 111. -(UP)-An
electrically-heated doghouse at
the Woodrow Gowler home caught
fire at 2:45 a.m., routing the dog
whose barking awakened the fam family
ily family who called firemen.
2nd

. rOM i

I "

k ,meinrtiwMi

763516

t:
before Friday Your tickets
j r

FARMACIA EL BATURRO
rrqa Letcvre 1 Street
FARMACIA "SAS"
Si rerru Ul
NOVEOADES ATMS
' Vie Enpeta At.

RESORTS
Gramlich'i Santa Clara Beach
Cottagei. Modern conveniencei,
moderate rate. Phon Gamboa
6-441.
FOSTER $ COTTAGES. One mile
pes Casino. Lev rat. Phone
olboo 1861
PHILLIPS Oceentide Cottage.
UMq Clare. Boa 435. Bolboe.
Phono Panome 3-1177. Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-1673.
Shrapnel' furnished houses
beech tt Santa Cioro. Telepho
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE: Beautiful let at
Coronado Beach. Price from
15c. square meter. Make own
terms for payment. In Panama
call Eiscnmann 2-4505; in Cor Coronado
onado Coronado see Castilla.
FOR SALE: U El Vail, charm,
ing 2-bedroom cottage on love lovely
ly lovely grounds in belt neighborhood.
Completely furnished and equip equipped
ped equipped at incredible bargain price
of only $6000. Wolff and Co.,
5th. Street No. 7-29, Phon 2 2-2388,
2388, 2-2388, FOR RENT
looms
FOR RENT: Furnished room,
near Ancon Post Office. Bachelor
only. Phone 2-3020.
LOST b FOUND
LOST: White gold embroidered
watch set, vicinity Roosevelt Ho Hotel
tel Hotel or Army-Navy Club. Reward.
Balboa 2-1475,
FOR
ilding
Store or
86 "A" Ave.
1
FEBRUARY
PRIZE
L
are valid for a whole year
i r:-r-j r 1 r

Wi.i; : y.'-ri vi: I
Now in stock. .. limit. d quantity i "V'.lTi I
Britain'! Finait Loudspakr j Xs "2tS I
"WHARFEDALE" rfeK I
Htadquirten For all 1 V I
Hi-Fi Equipment Alwayi YVlCOT 1
top quality modestly priced I 1 B

MINIMUM
FOR
12 TORD3

FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENTs RESIDENCE
Via Espana, suitable for Embas Embassy
sy Embassy or large family, furniihtd or
unfurnished. Phone 3-6168, Al Alcidei
cidei Alcidei Garcia Coma.
FOR RENT: 2-bdroom chalet,
maid' room, garage. Entrance)
Old Golf Road on Via Espana,
facing Institute Panamtrican.
Phone 3-5141.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet:
3 bedrooms, living room, dining
room, porch, kitchen. 50th Street I
and 9th San Frincitc. phone 3- j
2132 after 2 p.m.
RCA Now Ranks
Among Top 25
Industrial Firms
NEW YORK, Feb. 27 (UP) -The
Radio Cornnratinn nt mri
reported today it had sold 4 jnil-
oii aonars worm or goods and
ysrvices each working day last
year and now rank. nn nt th
nation's top 25 industrial firms.
iuA, a leading company in tht
bnnmini plpptrnnire fioM it.
sales topped the one billion dollar
soai set, ai me Deginning ot 1955
and its earning rose substantially
over 1954.
The annual report to T G A'i
170,122 stockholders was signed by
Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff, board
chairman, and Frank M. Folsom,
president.
The report showed sales climbed
12 per cent last year to. a new
peak of $1,055,265,165 from $940, $940,-950,220
950,220 $940,-950,220 in 1954. Net income of
$47,525,465, or $3.16 a share, com compared
pared compared with $40,525,459, or $2.66 a
share the year before.
SALE
Suitable for
Industry
Tel. 2-2226
, 1
26fh
3rd PRIZE

1 f 'psari .-"xaj
h 1

fflffl
tm 'r-
li. 1 11 1 '"" .

168433

Keep them caretuiiy
i i
j f

I



FACE 5L" FN"

(

?t:rT. rr.:r.rr.r

l?-3

- -TKg TANAM .AMERICAN ,-. AX INTFJEXPEyT PAILT MUMPER -,

I 1

I ii I i )

in

s

f

Cl TOUO
35e ZOc.
In Technicolor and
Cinemascope
Tonv Curtis

Coleen Miller In:'
Till: PURPLE MASK
Also:

11 FORBIDDEN CARGO

r; vol'

35c.

20c.

Silvar.a Mar.cnno in:
"MAMBO"
Plus
Grace Kelly.
Cary Grant In:
"TO CATCH A
THIEF"

CENTRAL Theatre

60c.

0c.

WEEK END RELEASE

Joan Crawford, all honey on the
outside, all Iury on the inside...
in'
. "QUEEN BEE"
Shows: 1:05, 2:38, 4:43. 6:48, 8:53

LUX THEATRE
75c. 40c.
PRE-RELEASE
1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9.00
Stewart Granger
Jean Simmons
in".'
"FOOTSTEP IN THE FOG"

DHiVE-in Tf.cntr
60c. 30c.
Robert MITCHIM
Jan STERLING in
"MAN WITH THE GUN"

CECILIA THEATRE

60c.
In

30c.

Technicolor and Cinemascope
Kirk Dourlas e Paul Lukas

Peter I.orre Jame. Mason in:
"20,CCO LEAGUES UNDER
THE SEA"
Also: John Favne, Rhonda Fleming in
"TENNESSEE'S PARTNER"

R I O

35c.

In Tfcunicnlor and

CinemaScop
Georg Sanders &
Virginia Mayo in:
"Kin; Richard and
the Crusaders'
Also;
Randoluh Scott in:
Riding Shotgun1'

VICTORIA
"LADY
GOD1V.V
A!.:o:
-MAN FROM
BITTER RIDGE''
in Technicolor

h

Social and 0i

Box 134,

wiviAe

or

Staffers

Box 5037,

anama

r

If

ml Cm444

'H i-

ml), 7m'4M,

Unr- 9.00 tJ "If

i.()7AO .2-VW

i

v'V

FIRST LADY OF PANAMA RAISES FLAG

AT VACATION IMir

First Lady r nam

Olja de Arias,

raised the

the Trans-

Mrs. Miriam McDaid

Esther Bullock. .
Mr Steve Ramcy, Commander
and Mr. Fay Brown, First ; V i ce
Commander of Post No. 2, were

present to ducu s p.-

Barbecue wmcn
on March 3rd.
-. ...viiiarv will be in charge

of the Cake and Ice Cream, Thrift
Sl trich Pnnd at the Bar-

becue. Members or friends wish-
ucvuv.. ..rnir mav

in. uiia "4V""'p;nam Lions Club on ine r r-n
n r-n yesterday for the Panama i. u. ,eremonies

Highway M JaJtta P l -inaugurating
the 196 J lJJ ions Clut.
privileged boysi ran e Pj "gg, Fuerxa y Luz representa representa-;
; representa-; A'Vaa d?FenaCay Lur 'cooperates with the lions
n.f; this worthy tenure.

ino in in sic iu ...

. .! T,i 0air wi he Kiven by the'eontact any member of Aux.hary

Th omin-"" v"' jor and has been exienueu

The Dommica.r.-rVrPoen- wives of Panama. .,

iiversary of the Independence u., iupptt Rib

Dominican Republic.

Fiftiith VftddinB
CUbration ShtduUd

Mr. and Mrs. w. rth

Atrs. Adela Calderon ae aosa sum

tcrtained at a buffet supper lasi

evening for tne Loum aim vno
sa de Rabago.

A.

1

M EETINGS

,- w
. -w .'

... a

M

A

The Spanish Ambassador Count
de Rabago was given a luncheon
today by the Spanish Chamber of
t Jhoir hpadtiuarters

WT f .nniineiuc fc ...v"

and sister-inlar. m ... -m the Spanish Embassy BuiioinB

and

r ... J H.

D.K, ...in nn siveu a um-

ncr tonight at the home of Mrs.
Elisa Maria E. de Heurtematte.
The hosts of this affair will be
Dr. and Mrs. Adolfo Anas.

vJ-t ,.n relebrate their, fiftieth j ch.mbtr 0f Cemmtrei

".. ... An nl 1111:11 1U. r

wedding annivei5j y .v,i.
and iister-mlar. ,.

Adelaide gamcu iu
pic swimmer,
The Hal Sandert
Oivin eufI.L4-w Sanders

Mi and Mrs. nai"i" v
will cnlertain at a .ba'hwue J D,vid j ,,ier
their beautiful home in El d Befor, Hi Departure
del Mar on Tuesday, m orfer to;enttrt. David $ celc.
apJ 'xi- Sanders-birth';, h.-cir n and sur-

ceieDiave,"- iDiaieu v T hnnnnpt
j... ...uih u todav.- .'9 honored at a banquet

Ji

eedVd V Dr Luis Casco Diaz
. ri,iK rprpnt V. ur.

William Sjhier is Dr. Casco Diaz

Th. R.b.rtM.th Ri Horning

, Mr. ana "-;" m - 0 w wunam oj"
are returning home torn or r o w brotner.in.iaW.

from a snori r : ..
"T" TirUl, Miss Barbara Holbrook
"Suds In Your Eye" VV-aJT.rmin.tes Vacation Hare
Tickets are now,on -sale-at Dag olb k ,s return;

Ech noltct for Inclusion in this
column fhsuld lubmltted ..!
wruttn form and milled J
lh bo humbm listed dUj 'o.
cial nd Otbtrswise," or deUvered
by hind to th !". Notices of
meetinp cannot be tccepted by tele telephone.
phone. telephone. : u..tm at Pariiea Tenioht

Residents of Paraiso. Canal Zone
are invited to attend an important
meeting at the union's office at
7:30 p.m. tonight.

Consular Official
In Singapore

Plunges To Death
SINGAPORE. Feb. 27 (UP)

Bhiit stvins. an American con-

c,iiat' nffiri.it. nlunccd 100 feet

to his death today from his apart-
ment where a party was in pfo-j
gress. ...
Stevens, 30, a Bostonian, was,
general clerk of the U.S. consulate!
here. Friends described him as as-cheerful
cheerful as-cheerful and sober at the party.
Consulate First Secretary Nicholas

"j:T-
.1:1 u i

1

COFFEE-PICKERS, ft woodcut by Costa Rican artist Orabado
de Francisco Amighetti. is one of the attract ye i lst
in the new issue of "Centroamericana," a cultural quarterly
on sale in Panama and at Canal Zone Service Centers The
magazine has individual sections devoted to the countries of
the mid-American Isthmus. This issue's Panama section has
interesting photographs by Flatau of the Balboa statue, tomb
of Chief Nele Cantule in San Bias. There are also poems in
Spanish by Elsie Alvarado de Ricord and Caspar Octavio Her Hernandez
nandez Hernandez An illustrated article on the history of the Panama
Railroad completes the Panama section.

By United Prm

I Was Japan's constitution im-
tSAL-nri itnnn th Tana new A hv fit TV

Douglas MacArthure Was its con controversial
troversial controversial "no war oause con con-crivpd
crivpd con-crivpd hv an American or a

Japanese minde Will the document
survive as the supreme law of
Japane These questions have
stirred the Japanese and inter

ested historians lor almost ten
years.
Recently,, new light has been
shed on the matter of the consti constitution
tution constitution in hooks written by two

men who took part in 4hc Occupa Occupation
tion Occupation of Japan. Maj. Gen. Court Courtney
ney Courtney Whitney (retired) has written
extensively of the birth of the
extensively of the birth of the
Japanese constitution in Mac Mac-ARTHUR
ARTHUR Mac-ARTHUR HIS RENDEZVOUS

WITH HISTORY (Knopf).

Whitney was chief of the uc-

cuDation government section m

Tokyo when the constitution was

written m mo. e was men. u

is now, MacArtnurs uwe uiuuu

and confidant.
uamirf s Onielev. nrofessor

emeritus of political science at
(Via I TmvAre iiv nf Minnesota.' who

lltC VIIMVLUHJ t
was a research consultant tor
SCAP in 1946 and 1947, has writ written
ten written a dissenting opinion in 1H.
NEW JAPAN GOVERNMENT
AND POLITICS (University of
Minnesota Press). John E. Tur

ner, assistant proiessor w

cal science at

collaborated on the book.

Whitney admits mai wwiu u.
used strong persuasion to get tne
Japanese to agree to an American American-drafted
drafted American-drafted constitution. To Whitney s

way of thinking, that persuasion

did not amouni iu
the reader cannot easily distm-
quish one from the other.
Quiglry and Turner take quite a
diHerent view of MacArthurs ini initiative.
tiative. initiative. "Nothing could be more

.t.:-... than nar ivPiivitti mav

immm

tl

tVi Li f

1 1

MQVliS TV RADIO
by Erskint Johnson

mini
I. if r

Ml
liHNMMdl -mm

1

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) -. Be- Th."$itrn Stranjir" fcurrtntrC
hind the Screen: Natasha Lylcss.ron tht sound ttagts 1 the firtt" J
the dramatic coach who never left Hollywood mevit ever to bo medvi

Marilyn Monroes side during hcrjwith Jopanoio-Amonean iponw-.

zoom to stardom, has a new stu-i imp. The company's Nippontiy
dent who's baekfield is never in sounding namo, Nactroma Prod.,,
motion. It is UCLA football star ii American spoiled backwards.-
Ronnie Knox. Last season's mo; t
hiryhlvr nuKHifAl r.lAaturaaror hfic! MHf rhanaprl itc minfl tknrl hn

one more year at LtuA and inen;aeciaea 10 let orace Kelly do her
he'll try film acting, jown singing in "High Society."

I one u sing uireo songs, There s one
Thiri'. nlrparlv a film artrrss soln and nnp ilupt pui'h with nine

in the Knox family Ronnie's 22-, Crosby and Frank Sinatra. .....
year-old sister Pat. And Ronnie j NOW. IT'S a feature movie based
has been working in his spareion the old "Our Gang" kid come-

time from college as a film cut- dies, revived in recent months pn
ter at Allied Artists studio. iTV as "The Little Rascals." Hal

A3 usual, wiiuv a ...v Jluat.ll. ami Ull lie lllall WI1UJ
quacious Harvey Knox, docs most produced them in the early 30s,

u laiAHiij .u, J v j Tvu uinnc iiic l:luic unilljj Mill
Says Harvey: i discovered in a nationwidet alcht
"Sure, wo re going to take contest. The contest will be staged
crock of acting. Why not look at by each of the 161 TV station
John Wayne and Johnny Mock which are showing the old films.

! fields to become movlo atari." .,..,.j ,u. ... .. i

Alan Young ays he's developed !uick, you can see TV's Hottest
a TV format for the bon vivante.new star Phil Silvers, playing a
titled, "Do You Trust HIS Wife?" t role with John Wayne and Jean
' Arthur in "The Lady Takes .,
bbibm tuiTTAu :iIChanrp" en nld rrinvip purt-pntlv

dakdara ami iwn, uic iiiui T. ...

maiung i rounds, noiiywooa re-

iusea to iBKe a cnance on rni).

star turned commercial spieler on
the "$64,000 Question" show, will

co-star with Barry Nelson in a
Broadway-bound play, "Wake Up.

Darling" . The "Errol Flynn"

theater, a series or as nan nour
telefilms, is due for production in
London March 1. Flynn will host

the entire series, star in some

films and co-star in others with his
wife Patrice Wymore.

The grapevine it twisting with
the report that the "Robert Mont
gonory Presents" TV show will
move to Hollywood on film.

Judy Garland's set for another ;J
TV show on CBS April 8. But only k I
a half-hour this time.

Susan Fonda, who's divorcingjkj V PifV Rnllpf
Henry Fonda, is dating hotel own-1'. I.VIlJf WUUCI

er Irwin Kramer in New

York

'Bail

n.u j ,un.i ma, no inHinntinn

- l-Crto in XUUl J t N au VnrK IIUS alicuiv"" r.,,l n IV

Theatre Guild's next production. h spent two weeks a-i gt was co.h0st of a party
Reservations can be made by t restaurant last night for a
",."Z nita Hove, Baiuua irii,inU'B Irn here was ,-.;;, in AniArirnn Vice Consul

I'aLlLQK AUAPt j iviiaa iiviwivi. T t via 111115
1513. ; ... j niehts!'one of combined business and, h ? of.

The play wiu ruu. f pleasure. Me is o.. tne party. auj .u. "v

'news bureau 01 viiuu. 1 was missing. m

. . .L UmA

begging Monday, March 5.

Dinnor Fer Nw Ambaasador

n.r ForNow Ambassador Mtttinfl 0f Th. Elb.rt S. W

Mr. and Mrs. Jorge Am,rin W "." "lna

air. nn . Vnn. ".'V

dos were hosts at

members

on a parapet about 100 feet below

his apartment.

Bate at a dinner hon-rf fte Elbert s. Waid American

oring the new Ambassador ;";iLegion Auxiliary me

le, and Mrs. juuo lu

y.

Uou Guest For
M5!AAADS.e of Ft. de Le,
seps Area has as her house guest
for an extended stay her mother,
Mrs Ida Upton, who arrived from
' St. Petersburg, Florida yesterday
by plane.

' .. : f.,..j. .,nt M Mrs. Bullock

TrEntortaln i who is visiting the Isthmus for a
The Army-Navy Club will lie -two months vacation, was a vis
Solon Accuses Administration
Of Spreading Farming 'Myths'

(Bcsi SeIen

wptb nrcsent: ... i e

dames Alicia Arnold. Frances Gil Gil-fev
fev Gil-fev Jem Chandler. Bertha Brown.
Miriam McDaid, Jenny Redmond

Estelle McLam, iua '-
1iuSbHay!!;!(Cpmpil.d by PubH.h.r,' W.ok.y,

uiv a r.p. a dier. iaa iu:vuv., o:itiam

sencia Quinn, Esther Bullock ana,
Ags!rHendrik. S M8CKinlay
ed as a new member.- Mrs. Nina Aanior

MARJOK1K WUtti'viiMijaiAn
Herman Wouk
CASH McCALL Cameron :-Iawley
TEN NORTH FREDERICK John
O'ilara
AUNTIE MAME-Patrick Dennis
300N ISLAND Kenneth Roberts

NONfiction
GIFT FROM THE 'SEA -I
Morrow Lindbergh

Anne

OPENING THURSDAY at the
LUX THEATRE

y'VrJe WCALB01

M REGINALD GARDINER -BARBARA BRITON
THEATRE MATNo.203

k UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE

ISlaagSalPa

an movie . uean niaiuua

about-to-be ex, Jeanne, says she

wants to go "as easy as possiois
on him in their property settle

ment. No matter what she gets it

will be a jolt for Dean. He s al

ready paying .5.500 a month, to
his first wife and their four children.

T A 'i. C 1.t :

... ....... ii n uicir nKniirn

AUI1U1 -,.":.,. In the UUl at ',, VW -lOHTM,. wail"
i order to be lawngXir book home screen show plot to be so d
t.-,c ; thiv sav in their dook. ...... ,: ... afariin'e

"In doing so, Wi:- "1j
authors to have been unwise and
to have Placed in Jeopardy what what-ever
ever what-ever contribution the able and s.n s.n-re
re s.n-re scholars of Governnt see-

tion had maae lowaiu. u
system of government.
Erico Verissimo is Brazil's fore fore-mnet
mnet fore-mnet novelist and in a new pay

M ilan) oemonsir.ies
His previous works have been long
novels but NIGHT is a shorter
work with a fast pace that comes
to a climax with Running impact
n is about a man on a city street

:i rempmberinB not""'

HI llltZllLa

SALZBURG, Ausiria, Feb. 27
(UP) The New York City ballet

will give its first Austrian per-
formance at the Salzburg Music
Festival here this summer, it waj
announced today. The company
will appear for three nights dito
ing this year's Mozart Festival.
- 't i
.

Mm

tr

" ........ J r ,.

WASHINGTON. Tcb. 27 (UP) -Sen.
Hubert 11. Humphrey D D-Minn.)
Minn.) D-Minn.) acensert the administration
last rtisht of preading "niyth" a-noui-tna
farm problem to win sup support
port support for it liexijjlts price fupport
svstem.

no ftranaed as "sheer raiiaey

I INSIDE AFRICA John Gunther
I A NIGHT. TO REMEMBER

ing in two opposite directions" Walter Lord
by providing rigid price supports THE EDGE O 1H 5,t'A 5,t'A-thai
thai 5,t'A-thai would 'wild- up surpluses I Rachel. Carson
..!-,- t0.A,t- r rfcm-B.cinn hii THR -- POWER O -POaHlVJ!.

",lr"'.' v'V TutMVlKr.Nnrmart Vincent

11 1 11 1 V. ..-".
Peale

farm economy

While there in "no easy solu

tion" to the farm problem, Pot Pot-tor
tor Pot-tor said, the administration's

he administration argument that 1 nine-point "soil bank Program
rigid 90 per cent of parity trap-1 comes, nearer t me core ot
ports,- as provided in the,' new, the matter.
Senate- farm bil', would increase! But he added that the benefits
farm production and add to the! of the program might not be felt
surplus problem. i by -the farmers before the fall
u,.ni,,r 'i' mtmW nl the : elections. v-

...f r Aet. f lun,nhrit; a vtuunpli sitmnnrfur

of the Democratic bill, which in-

THE SCROLLS FROM THE DEAD
SEA Edmund Wilson

BE PREPARED

c.nota Am-ipi'iltnro Cnmmittee. de

bated the farm issue with Sen.
Rorner E.- Capehart (R-Ind.) on
the NBC-TV 'American Forum"

program.
! '. .
Capehart said that the system
of price supports used is only of
secondary importance. He laid
the only effective way to ease
the current cost price squeeze
on farmers is to reduce the. gov government's
ernment's government's lurptuf of com modi modi-ties.
ties. modi-ties. :..
The Senate today enters its sec-
nil u.aelr nt riphatp on the DemO

cratic-sponsored bill to junk flexi-
II. ,,nnno In fnid, nf thpl

rluHns thp nil hank nlan. rharffpd

that the administration has helped
push prices down by talking so

much about the "curse" of

pluses,
Ho said it hot been "dragging
Its foot" on proposals to dispose
of excess production. If the Rus Russians
sians Russians had such an egriculture
fist" by distributing the surplus surplus-bo
bo surplus-bo "making friends hand over
first" by distributing the surplus surplus-'
' surplus-' os to poorer nations throughout
the world.

ranphart renlied that the ad-

CTHUC-JSUUU3U1 CU will w ju.ii . - . ,,
We price supports in favor of thel ministration has done a good job
.. . I m 1 I ll..nnl i,natinn hill- nnarlc

h ij i nfin tnrmu a. arm uiuu ie- uu mt h"1-""""

aZ.. r hnnino in rpar-h a voteinew lcsislation giving it more

. .,. i .1 il. I atithnritv tn lie thft SlimhlSPS

- t. m ... r jr!-t. 1l..W.mi ini'ieton 'll llrAQHv, hoc-

Sen. Utaries m-. roller ( n-imcu. ; i nuiuym l l f
said on the ABC-TV program such authority, but has ; not taken
"Celebrity Parade" he doubts that1 advantage of it.
"the biU will be approved. But Tlie admlnistrattotr -ftaT-looker?
said a swilch of one or two votes .upon oburidances as if they were
m:rht push it through.. la curse r?thcr than a blessing,
Ve iaid "The present bill is go-'.he caiJ.

COLUMBUS, Ind. -(UP)- Con-i

trary to current rumor, city police
are not engaged in a drive to
"clean up" headquarters. The dust
pans and brooms recently made
standard equipment' in all patrol
ears are for clearing the street of

sur-1 broken glass and debris after

accidents.

f

IV

MEXSANAl!

and 'aootben- skin

'i
I-

-ehab.e medicate'1
.....Jan

1

"Mail

OPENING WEDNESDAY 29 at the
CENTRAL THEATRE

and

The story of
: the 'Sky-Tiger
who became'
.; America's first
' Triple Jet Ace Ace-nd
nd Ace-nd the girl
he celled
-'' 'Butch'

.- 1

I S

17 aB1

nlLYCGIl

Aire Swm$

7. tt0mmm

WarnerColor vJNEMASCOFC hwoww smm

xww(b) HENRY BLANKE-DMboo eovut

mbenng mn .i,. '--h

Ihn. himself or the past. Out

7u. .iioHmvs come two oewaii

ter of corruption, the other a
sadistic hunchback. The confused:
mind of the lost man ts eaw RW

to their depraveu uui"

a white-ciaa iiguie i
syrSoUzing without conscious.
K the Sight between good and
evil for possession of a sou'verw-,

SusvertonFes'for introspective
readers. .

Th. C.n.dl.n ;;ntt.l J

frozen, uinosputti --:
summer lasts three weeks and,
? ..j.u: i. .ivtrpme as to make

men who Uve were me
not only th' Eskimos who cal
themselves Krangmal t "The Peo
pie Beyond"), but a sizeable num

ber of wnne men.
Father Raymond de Coccola. a
Catholic missionary from Corsica,
lived among the, Krangmaltt Jor

12 years before mst
oelled him to seek the more tem-
nerate climate of British Columbia.

He shared their homes, weir

their, happincs3 ana u. ".-:r
ship (his vows prevented his
having their freely-offered wives).
"ivnrams" (meaning "It cant

. ...kiu fenpfts tne

fatalisuc "0v.K'v'rZ,'t Father
life) is an episodic ston of Father

Paul King, a Canadian irienu
the missionary, and i lus rated ov

James Houston, a V--- "v;
cial intimately acquainted with the
PTh?bJoTcodvers the lifespan of
NaovaV an i Eskimo girl whom
Father de Coccola helped to deliv deliver8
er8 deliver8 and later helped to bury. Along

rS s a nrtty." Bookr'about
Esktao life appear "fairly frequent
lv but few in recent years have
been as readable and as frank as

"Ayorama,

FIREWORKS

. it Vt 'At .1. I

impact or i v in tne jtsnuMi

Isles as reported by a moviet rade ; GRAND RAPIDS, -iVicn. hp

r"!"" a '.. ..i. I ii. Ii. Li a. w nf li nntnii f

the British Isles getting me nrsi i mrowuus m" s i "T-
imoact of TV, resulting in slower ; crackers down the back of Patrdir
ticket sales, it is estimated that; man John C. Mazurkiewicz while
business drops another 10 per, the officer was questioning Masl?lA
cent all the theaters will be in and three companions about shooUf(t

lllg U1L luctlavivvw. !: :

TOTAL CLOSE OUT
with 50 discount
of HUNDREDS of sterling holloiv
and flatware items "International".
PORRAJ, Plaza 5 do Mayo, Psnema

it

IH It

'Vt ..
,1 :
ll'i.
""ill
)

lii

i)'l

DURAN'S COFFEE
NOW
$0.80 a pound
At All Leadmg Grocery Stores in
' Panama and Colon
"No D133 Cale Diga Calc Duren"

it
-a
i-tf

1

ii v
!'
.n
, l
, i.
. :t

C-q

ill

STUCK

BOSTON -(UP)- After building j
an 18-foot boat in the living room j
of their T-Wharf apartment, Mr l
and Mrs. Karl Mayer discovered)
th ar th e'cxit-rar- only- five-- feet, t

one inch wide. The ooai was uve

SHOWING -AT YOVU SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TONIGHT I

TtAlROA 5:30 1:33

lr-toniliiMirr
John WAYNE
"HIGH and the MIGHTY'
Cinen-mSt'up Clor
Toei. "NAKED STREET"

DIABLO HTS. 6:13 7:40

Richard COXTE
0 RON A ANDERSON
'Case of the Red Monkey"

trues. "DIPLOMATIC COURlbK'

CRISTOBAL
Air-Conditione1
1:15 A 8:13

, Jack SERNAS Kurk KASZNA.R
"JUMP INTO HELL
Tuf. "BOY FROM OKLAHOMA"

PARAISO :15

"STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND"'

SANTA CRl'Z 7 p m. only

KHtrarme nr.rnim.i.
"DRAGON SEED"

CAMP BIERD-:15 8-30-"INTERHUPTED MELODY" CinrmaScopf I

""."IZfcct, two inches wide.

iillil



v.

TOE PANAMA -'AMERICAN -. '.AN ECDrrECbtXT DAILY NEWSPAPER
moxday. rrr.r.iATiY r. mt
T! 71 T 71 IT IT 'J''
Id) asfeetJoall in iaei f MI
o v, n

f

Conference Championships,
Tournament Berths, Old
Rivalries Fill Schedule

NEW YORK, Feb. 27 (UP) It's no time for
Mhe showdown in college basketball with conference
'championships, tourney, berths, old rivalries, and
'everything else on the line in the last full week of
"the regular season.

Ten of the 25 berths In the
N.C.A.A. tournament were filled
today with Southern Methodist,
pe Paul, and Canisius, the latest
.Editions. But before the week Is
over, as many as 10 more teams
could be added to that array as
newly-crowned conference- kings.
ine wanonai juvuauuii ui-i
nament has filled eight of its 12 J
..spots, and announcements could
complete that lineup by the end
of the week.
Southern Methodist barged
iiAo the N.C.A.A. field by whip whip-pin?
pin? whip-pin? Arkansas Saturday night,
80-72. to clinch the Southwest
Conference championship. Trail Trailing
ing Trailing by five points at the half,
the Mustangs sank 25 straight
free throws In a second-half
drive to the title as Joel Krog
led the scoring with 22 points.
S.M.U. (21-2) will meet the un undetermined
determined undetermined Border Conference
champion In a first-round NCAA
jgame on March 12 or 13 at an
undetermined site.
De Paul and Canisius were
picked for the NCAA frsy as

ElPanama Mixed Doubles
Title Won By Art Dryers

Herier Wins
Thj finals in the. mixed doubles
of the El Panama Second Invita I
tional tennis tournament were
won last nif'ht by Maj. and Mrs.
-i Arthur Dryer 7-5 and 6-4.
i Runners-up were the team of
iMarv Morgan and Hans O m e e-.nilsch.
.nilsch. e-.nilsch.
Dryer, who teamed with ; Maj.
TI.eo Hayes' to capture the m en's
11 I 1. I . .. J .. 1 .......
raouuies aaiuraay anernoon, was
'exceptionally strong from the
ihacK court last night. His long
placements were accurate and
(combined with his rushing the net
tt critical moments were proba proba-fbly
fbly proba-fbly the most interesting points.
Mrs. Dryer guarded the net well
and when called on came through
with some, beautiful-to-watch vol vol-jlcys.
jlcys. vol-jlcys. Last year Dryer was also on the
winning mixed doubles team when
(he paired with Mrs. Marge Klop-
per. '
Miss Morgan improved rapidly,
during the course of the tourna-,
ment. She handled her share of the!
Jong game with brilliance. Her!
CASlo M)
7 Vtt

I

I r P SLOT MACHINES
7A!) K y BAR SERVICE
.BACEllMi5 I

2$ modern "banta" ships unltlnj tin
Americas with fast and frequent
service.

WrXKLY SERVICE

TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
S.S, -SANTA RITA" ..... .Due Cristobal C. Feb. 29
S.S. "SANTA CECILIA" . .Due Cristobal, C. Feb 29
WEhKI V SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
S.S. "SANTA MARGARITA" Sails Cristobal. C. Z., Feb. 28
S.S. "SANTA BARBARA" Sails Cristobal, C. March 6
FROM U. S PACIFIC & WEST COASI
CENTRAL AMERICA
f.l Bl OA m CPISTORAL C. I.
S.S. "SANTA FE" ........ ....Due Balboa. C. Z. March 24
S.S. "SANTA ANITA Due Balboa, C. Z., AprU 8
FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z. TO I HE
WFsT f-UST CFNTRAI AMFRICA & V. S PACIFIC
S.S. "SANTA CRUZ" .....Sails Cristobals, C. Z.. March 5

PANAMA-AGENCIES-Cd-l

CRIVtOBAL: 2131 Zm
BALBOA:

"members at large." Canisius
(15-5) will go Into the regional
tourney at New York City, Mar.
12, against an opponent to be
determined later; De Paul (15-7)
will go either into the western
half for a first-round game a a-galnst
galnst a-galnst Oklahoma City, or into
the eastern half for a first-

rounder against an undeter undetermined
mined undetermined foe at Fort Wayne, Ind.,
depending on the final make-up
of the field. Each came on to
earn a tourney bid after having
a 4-4 record early in the season.
Major upsets marked Satur Saturday
day Saturday night's action." in some of
the biggest: Robin Freeman's 43
points led Ohio State to an 87-84
win over Illinois, the nation's No.
2 team suffering its first Big
Ten loss; Alabama routing Kentucky,-101-77
as six-eight Jerry
Harper racked up 37 points to
take a stranglehold on the
Southeastern Conference race;
Wichita upset Houston, 88-72, to
keep Houston irom cuncning me
Missouri Valley title.
Approva
serves were oftentimes not return
ed and when the need presented
she was at the net with the shot
that counted. Omenitsch's timing
was off last night, probably as a
resdlt of so much tennis playing
in the past few days. The usual
sparkle was present but he miss missed
ed missed on the close ones.
i In an exhibition match the first
two stars from the U.S., Mis Bar
bara Bradley and Karol Fageros,'
showed why they are two of the
top. stars in women s tennis today.
Their hard smashes from back
court and perfect back hand
strokes were a pleasure to see. In
this match Miss Bradley topped
Miss Fageros six to two.
The final match of the evening
was an exhibition mixed doubles
between Bill Hele-Karol Fageros
end Dryer with Barbara .Bradley,
which was won by the latter, 7 to
5.'.
The prizes presented last night
to both the winners and runners
up were with the compliments of
the Panama Insurance Co.
- the SKa
1 IT
Open Nighfly torn
8:00 .m.
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER
FROM NEW VUkk
- PANAMA: 2-0556 -0557
1501-2159

Amis Jovell Sf r$
In Madison Garden
ICiA Track Mccl

NEW YORK, Feb. 26 (UP)
Olympic hopeful Arnie Sowell s ir
on-man stint of winning the 1.000
yard, anchoring Pitt to two-mile
relay victory and placing third in
the broad jump highlighted the
IC-4A track Championships before
10,000 fans at Madison Square
Garden last night.
Sowell won the 1,000 in 2:13.5.
tied for third in the broad jump
witn a leap oi a teet, ll u inches
and anchored Pitt's two-mile quar
tet to a new meet record of 7:40
flat in the two-mile relay.
In other feature performances,
Johnny Haines of Penn took his
third IC4A 60-yard dash champion
ship with a world record equall
ing 6.1 performance; Al Hail of
Cornell set a 33-pound weight re record
cord record of 62 feet, 8 V inches; Don
Bragg of Villanova surpassed 15
feet for the fourth time to win the
pole vault at 15 feet, 2 inches and
unbeaten Ron Delany of Villanova
captured the mile in 4:11.4.
Lenny Moore of Manhattan won
the broad jump with a leap of 23
feet, 5-Vi inches. Bruce Moore of
Tufts was second with 23 feet, u
inh.
Ken Bantum, the 6-foot, 5-inch,
235-pound giant from Manhattan
captured the 16-pound s h o t p u t
championship with a winning toss
of 55 feet, 6 inches.
A.A.U. champion Johnny Haines
of Penn twice eqalled the world
indoor mark of 6.1 seconds as he
came on in the last few yards to
win the 60-yard dash crown for
the third time.
Ferrari Co. Accepts
Naserali Challenge
By Entering US Race
SEBRING, Florida, Feb. 27
mr itfiiv's famed Ferrari
snorts car factory grabbed up a
cnalienge irom uie mancian
team today and entered three
cars In the Florida Internation International
al International Grand Prix of Endurance
March 24.
Tn a onhWrnm t.n rflp.lntr sec
retary Reginald Smith, Ferrari
factory president anzo r erran
his tpam of drivers
will be captained by world cham
pion Juan Manuei rangio vi
Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Other drivers of the Ferrari
team include the darin Mar Marquis
quis Marquis de Portago of Spain and
Harry Schell of Paris.
The Maserati factory is ahead
in the International Racing
Federation's world champion championships
ships championships for 1958. A Maserati won
the first event on the interna
tional calendar by placing: first
in the 1,000 kilometer race m
Argentina last month.
The Maserati factory an
nounced last week it plans to
enter three cars in the 12-hour
Sebring race, the second event
on the international calendar,
and Its team of drivers includes
such veterans as Plero Taruffi,
Jean Behra and Cesare Perdissa.
The Maseratls .are entering a
Sebring race as a factory team
for the first time- this year, al although
though although private owners have
driven the sleek little cars here
for the past several years. The
Maserati factory will enter 1.5,
and 3.5 litre cars.
The Ferrari team will race
with three 3.5 litre autos from
the new series just off the as
sembly line at the Modino, Italy,
factory.
Smith also announced today
that three Qeneral Motors Cor Corvettes
vettes Corvettes will compete in the race,
the first time for the American
sports cars in international
competition. i
The Corvettes were entered
by. Raceway Enterprises of
Dundee, IU'nois. The General
Motors plant announced the
Corvettes are not a factory en entry.
try. entry. Heading the Corvette drivers
is John Fitchor Chicago, who
won the Sebring race in 1953 in
one of, Palm Beach millionaire
Briggs Cunningham's cars. ..
Entry of the Corvettes. Smith
said, is almost sure to draw Ford
Thunderbirds into the race and
set up an unprecedented duel be between
tween between the two American cars
over the 5.2-mile Sebring airport
tracn.
Smith said entries for the race,
which gets underway Saturday,
March 24, are still piling up.
FAST START
Peoria, 111. (NEA) In his
tirst organized baseball game.
Phil t-avarrettP nit a single, dou
ble, triple and home run for the
Peoria team in 1934, after he had
been signed by the cubs as
schoolboy.
7odov tncanto .35 .20
James Cagney In
"RUN FOR COVER"
Martin & Lewis in
"LIVING IT UP"
ToH IDEAL 20 .10
Faith Domergue in
COLT"OFTHE COBRA"
Richard Carlson in
"It Came From Outer Space"

4

i.
WMMWt
A

"LAS DOS EN PAMPLONA" is the description given this perfect placing of the "banderlllas"
between the bull's shoulders by world-famed torero Luis Miguel Dominguin in a recent per performance
formance performance in Spain. Dominguin, who has a reputation for winning feminine hearts, is ex expected
pected expected to have local lassies oohing and aahing this Sunday when he opposes Mexico's Alfredo
"Calesero" Ramirez at La Macarena in a "hand to hand."

Polemon
In Classic
The Stud Valentino's steadily
improving Polemon and the
Stud Mlura's track champion championship
ship championship claimant Mossadeq yester yesterday
day yesterday afternoon raced to thrilling
come-from-behind victories at
Juan Franco m the twin featur
ed $1,000 six-and-one-half fur
long qualifying races for the $7, $7,-500
500 $7,-500 Francisco Arias paredes
Classic.
The Classic is scheduled to be
run March 11. The first five fin finishers
ishers finishers in yesterday's features
qualified for the big race.
Polemon was outspnmed
the first qualifying race until
some three furlongs out where
he started to pass horse.i as
though; they were standing still.
Polemon was already up with
the leaders by the time the field
neared the homestretch and
outlasted Emabssy to the wire

Ibarra-Ampudia Bout
Ruled 'No' Decision'

The Panama Boxine Commis
sion last night held up the
nurses nf hantamwelehts Toto
Ibarra, 119Vi, and Rodolfo Am-
pucua, itM'z alter rcieree Kugc Kugc-lio
lio Kugc-lio Pinzon had stopped their
scheduled -- ten-round feature"
bout in the fifth and. declared
the result "no decision."
The f tenters and the referee
Ijave been summoned to aDpear
day at 7:30 p.m.
Both were accused hv Pin-:
zon of "using foul and unor-,
thodox tactics against each
ther." The. referee was round roundly
ly roundly criticized by the irood-s'zed
crowd for not declaring Ibarra
the winner.
Ilbarra suffered a cut on. the
left side of his head aDparentlv
from a butt, In the first round,
which was won by Amoudia.
Tbarra's seconds stopned the
flow of blood bv the time the
second stanza- started, and from
then on the veteran Ampudia
was pounded about although he
kept holdlns; onto his young ri
val each time he received a
blow
ow.
walfwav through the third

heat Ampudia took a rkht cross)Samrrs Medl Ina. 127, won a split

t.n the Inm and. onnarent.lv trfOB'
?v rrom tne Di'ncn, turnea ana
ran tnt.n a neutral rnmer with
.. A 1 1
Ibprra cse on his heels.

out worn lum niuvcu 111 mi
TheTcirTJ muflf4-WPnt1ntr4ioup-heat8

But when Toto moved In tor
the westliHig act which kept
side the ropes nntil the bell
ended the round.

is

-X

- i

Mossadeq Triumph
Qualifying Races

to score by a length and one one-half
half one-half going away.
Apprentice Abundlo Vergara
gave the three-year-old Chilean-bred
chestnut son of Polo
Sur-Soberana a perfect ride.
Polemon reutrned $5, $2.80 and
$2.20. The other qualifiers be besides
sides besides Embassy were Reynold,
Empire Honey and Blakemere.
Reynold cisplayed great im improvement
provement improvement while turning in an
excellent performance. -
Mossadeq similarly came up
from last place in the co-feature
with a brilliant last' quartet
sweep to score in a much more
thrilling finish, than Polemon.
After Alormlna, the early' pace pacesetter,
setter, pacesetter, shot his bolt, newcomer
Rosier forged to the front but
he also wilted under; pressure
and it was left to Mossadeq, Me Me-lendez,
lendez, Me-lendez, Albatross and Salero to
In the fourth. Pinann. who
had been having a hard job
dragging; Amnudia off Ibarra.
warned Ampudia about his
methods. Soon after, Ampudia
took a. blow to the midsection
and. went into another tussle.
Pinzon again tried to separate
the fighters and in the effort he
and Amtmdia. who
be dazed, landed sprawled face
up in ine miaaie oi the ring. As
he got up, the referee tried to
help UD AmDUdia hut the flaht.-
er pushed away the helping
nand of Pinzon and took an
eight-count instead.
J ust before the round ended
Toto connected again and Am Ampudia
pudia Ampudia clutched desperately at
the now-furious Ibarra and they
oopn went through the ropes
a oniO'tne apron almost into
the laps of ringside officials.
Pinzon entered the struggle,
out he and the two fSghters
were soon halfway out of the
ring. Boxin; C o m m i sslon
members pushed them back
m just as the bell sounded
ending the round, 1 and that
was when
aecided he could take no more.
In the eight-round semifinali
in a auii, dreary fight.
Enrique perea, l232, TKO'ed
Arias Mendez, 121, in 2:19 of the
second round of a bout set for
And Melanin Par.heco. 117
earned a split verdict over Juan
Salazar, ll6y2, in the four four-round
round four-round curtain raiser.

"

1 40
stacm b beautiful four horse
nomeswetcn auei with Mossaaeq
proving the best in the Ilnal
sixteenth.
At the wire It was Mossadeq by
a half length, Melendez : by
three-quarters over Albatross
the latter by another three three-quarters
quarters three-quarters over the surnrisinfr Sa
lero and Rosier managed to
nang on ana be the fifth quail
fier. three leneths back of Ra.
lero. Charlie McCarthy and Ga-
usuq were enminaiea irom tne
race won by polemon while Ka Ka-dir,
dir, Ka-dir, Alormlna and Opulente fail failed
ed failed tn mak-a If In thA ntVio. n.ln
uniy two mua upsets were
registered on a uropram dnmi.
nated by favorites. Tap Lady
ijiy.euj ana ocean star ($13.20)
were the two unsetters: Verwa.
ra, who also scored with r.it.tie
Fool in the eighth race, was the
uays oniy naer to score more
than once.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Te Gano $3.40. $2.10 12.2a.
2 Danielo 14. 12.2a
3 Panicus $2.20.
SECOND RACF
1 Must Be $3.20, $2.20.
z uawn song $2 20.
Double: $6.20.
' THIRD RACE
1 Tap Lady V9.60, $19, $7.80.
2 Consentida $5.40, $4.20,
J Golden Fun $5.20.
One-Two: $73.60.
FOURTH RACE
1 Moonshiner 15.20 12 An i in
2 Chepanlta $5.20, $3.20.
3 Fuego $2.40.
Quiniela: $14.80,
' FIFTH RACE
1 Apache $3.80, $2.20.
2 Blue Moon $2.40.
SIXTH RACL
1 Ocean Star $13.20, $14.40, $8.-
. 20.
2 American Maid $10.20, a4.60.
3 Slngle Slipper -2.60.
SEVENTH RACE
1 Lion's Claw $5, $3.40, $3.
2 Valley Star $4.20, 2.60.
3 Florera $3.40.
Double: $72.40.
EIGHTH RACE
1 Little Fool $2.20, $2.20, $2.20.
2 Brisk $2.20; 2.20.
3 Trirreme $2.20.
1 Quiniela: $3.80.
KINTII RAfE
' to
- Da5.sy
1 Polemon $5, $2.80, $2.20.
2U.
Sne-Two $18.
TENTH RACE
t Mossadeq $3.40, $2.80, $2.20.
2- Melendez $7, $2.60.
3 'Albatross $2.20.
ELEVENTH RACE
1 Turf Lodge $3.60, $2.20, $2.20.
2 Charming Prince $2.40, 2.20.
3 LotO-Trouble $2.60.

Best Ball Golf Tourney
Moves Into Third Week

The annual National Distillers
best ball golf tournament moved
into its third week of play with
two co-medal ists winning their
first round matches at the Sum
mit Hills Golf and Country Club
course over the past week.
Botn teams of Pearson-Fulton
and McGowan-Gross, which quali
fied with 67s, won their opening
round matches.
The toughest match of the first
round was that of Chadwick-Con-nor
and Riggs-Vapce. The players
finished all even for the 18 holes
and then started out on a sudden-
death safari. Both teams best-balled
even pars on the 19th hole.
When Vance missed a birdie putt
on the 20th hole Chadwick and
Connor managed to get their par.
Given the break they needed on
the previous hole, they ended things
on the 21st hole.
In the women's division. Pearl
Trim and Peggy Montanye pulled
the upset of the tournament to
date when they blasted the medal
ist team of Syl Carpenter and
K. Call 4 & 3. Pearl Trim had a
very neat 76 over the 70 par Sum Summit
mit Summit Hills layout.
Results;
CHAMPIONSHIP FLIGHT
Pearson-Fulton defeated Mahone-
Lally 1 up. Eder-Galindo had an
easy time beating Jacks-Donovan
5 & 4. Chadwick-Connor were car carried
ried carried to the 21st hole before being
edged by Riggs-Vance 1 up. Jack
Smith-Lombroia threw too many
birdes at Mitten-Beall, winning
handily 4 & 3. McGowan-Gross e-
limmated Perantie-Engelke, 3 & 2.
Hinkle-LeBrun moved ahead with
a 1 up margin over Norstrom Norstrom-Gump.
Gump. Norstrom-Gump. Stovall-Sewell edged Young Young-M.
M. Young-M. Smith 2 & 1.
FIRST FLIGHT
J. Perantie-Drennan edged
Fields-Lanza 1 up. Shive-Moynihan
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Won Lost Pet.
Lincoln Life 1 0 1.000
Gibraltar Life .... 1 0 1.000
Elks 1414 ......... 1' 1 -500
Rpvmnnr AtrencV 1 1 .; .5UU
Rnur r.ok 0 .1 .000
Police ............. 0 1 .000
Seymour Agency 4, Spur Cola 3
last Friday afternoon in the
pacific Litue league ram, ocj-
. J 1 CM.
mour Agency uuwueu mc oi
Cola team by a score of four to
three, however it took ten In Innings
nings Innings to decide the winner, the
longest ball game of the. 1956
season. ...,......wlBi.....
Rmir r.nla scored the first run
in the top of the second Inning
when with two nut.' Perantie
walked ahd scored on Ryblckl's
hit. Seymour came back In the
bottom of the second when
Dubbs led off with a walk, came
in to score on Huddleston's dou double,
ble, double, Huddleston took third on a
passed ball and- scored on Brock Brock-man's
man's Brock-man's ground ball which the
... . ... .. X- 4! I
pitcner .eiectea to mrow w lunu
la the top of the third Freddy
Chase tied the ball came with
the first home run of his Little
League career. Seymour went a a-head
head a-head in the hottom of the fourth
when Boatwright, leading off,
singled, went to second on a
RAILBIRD Jockey Ray Yorl;
holds-up Willie 8hoemakr-13-month'Old
son so he can gei gei-a
a gei-a better look at pop in action
at Santa Anita.

had an easy day winning 6 1
o?cr Moran-Garriel. Epperson-J.
Eberenz edged by Clayton-Hammer
3 & 1. Duffus-Macoubry edged Jud-son-J.
Clayton 3 4 1. Spencer-Collins
won a forfeit over Dickens Dickens-Riley.
Riley. Dickens-Riley. Garrison-Hare defeated Cobb
Stephenson 6 Si 5. Mills-Kraka de defeated
feated defeated Lidbetter-Kayser 1 up. W.
Coffey-W. Wheeler edged Meding-er-Boyd
1 up.
SECOND FLIGHT
Egolf-Montanye had a real tough
time of it, edging by McGinnis McGinnis-Oliver
Oliver McGinnis-Oliver 2 & 1. Favereau-Edstrom
defeated Sullivan-Hazy 3 & 2. Bon-gorni-Thompson
walloped Seine Seine-Ried
Ried Seine-Ried 5 & 4. Miller-Kitte edged
Thomas Henry 3 & 1. Stepehsn-Young-blood
moved past Waites-L.
Eberenz winning 4 & 3.
THIRD FLIGHT
Bob Coffey-Malcolra Wheeler wal walloped
loped walloped Essingler-Jones S & 5. Wigg Wigg-Hardie
Hardie Wigg-Hardie downed Anderson-Johnston
3 & 2. Serger-Adams took a tough
one from Wise-Britt 2 & 1. The
Salterios brothers gained a ; bye.
Thirteen-Tons Hayes-Honn won 2
up over Simons-Jenkins. Tetten-burn-Jamison
had little trouble in
winning with their bye. Bateman Bateman-Lima
Lima Bateman-Lima edged Gregg-Pickford 1 up.
Rodgers-Zornes took the third
bye in this flight.
WOMEN'S FLIGHT
Trim-Peggy Montanye scored the
first real upset of the tournament
when they took Carpenter-Call 4
& 3. Mathieson-Burns edged by
Dial-Stirewalt 1 up. Askew-Jud-son
won easily with a bye. Porter Porter-and
and Porter-and Louis, moved to the second
Daniell were carried to the 18th
round with abye. Zoerners-Cherry
surprised a lot of experts with a
5 & 4 triumph over Hadley-Todd.
Dilfer-Knuth moved ahead with a
bye.

passed ball, advancing to third
on a fielder's choice, scoring on
Huddleston's single. Spur again
tied the game In the fifth. Alt
britton walked, stole second, go going
ing going to third on a fielder's choice,
scoring on a ground ball to short
Slop.
Great fielding anrl trnnA n1t.iti'
tag by Huddleston and Ryblcki
1 A 1 J.T M J M
sepi enner siae irom scoring un until
til until the bottom of the tenth. Ma Mario
rio Mario Callela with one out. Kinder.
I Moses pinch-hitting for Ronnie
rean, singiea sending caneja to
third, Gary Anderson then hit
a Slow proimd ball down t.h
Lthlrd base line, which Spur Cola
r- u j. a
vv v uttJ Cttw VilC TV U111111K
run came home for Seymour.
Great. AefenslvA .mlnva nrl
featured by both sides. In th
tnira uoDoy uoatwrignt made a
diviner catch of a lln drive hit
bv Albritton. In thi fifth .Tohnnv
Zelnick made a sensational stop
or a nara nit ban by Corrigan.
The m of the day was made -bv
Albritton nlavlno renterflelri
for spur cola when In the ninth
mning with one out and one on
Frerif1v Hnrtrtlestnn nf. VinM
a ball and drove it rieen tn fen-
terfield with a hums run lohelerl
on it, Albritton made a beautiful
one handed catch of the ball
i ust as H was coiner over, the
fence. i,.
Hllddlestnn vtl the nrlnnlnir
pitcher taking over from Perra
In the sixth, gave up one hit, no
runs, walked three and struck
out four. Perra pitched five in-
nings giving up three runs on
three hits, walking five and
striking out five.
For the losers, Dilfer pitched
six innings divine no three runs
uu im-ee nits, waiicmg one ana
striking out six. Rybickl pitched
three innings,, allowing no hits,
no -runs', one walk and one
siriKeoui. ine losmcr pitcner was
Zelnick Who nltnhed the tenth
inning allowing one run on two
hits, no walks and one strikeout.
The box score:
Spur Cola
Ab BH
Bowen, 3b .
5.0 0
Albritton, cf ........... 4 1 o
Chase, ss 4 12
Dilfer. p-lb ........... 5 0 1
zeinicK, lb-lf-p ....... 5 0 0
Boswell. c .Vi. 10 0
Perantie, Vn 3 1 0
Rvblckl, lf-R-lf ,..2 0 1
Whitney, rf 4 0 0
33 3 4
Seymour Agency
Carlson, If -..'2 0 0
Anderson. K. 2b ........ 4 0 0
Boatwright. 3b-ss ...... 4 1 1
Uubbs, c ;.3 1 0
Huddleston, ss-p ...i... 4 1 2
Mallory, lb 4 0 0
Rrockman,. R. cf.. 4 0.0
Corrigan, rf ............2 0 0
Perra, p ; i...... 2 0 0
Anderson, G. If t. 3 0 0
Calleja, rf ............. Ill
PearL R, 3b 10 0
Moses x 1-0-1
35 4 5
x Batted for Pearl in tenth.

4



MONDAY, FEnnnnT !"3s

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDLriNDLNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PACK h'!1;
I
(J i 4 Li i :
livfcj uJ i I a v to
f? I
;0 :
u
1 :i
Lam? &t?
t k w-.
as a.-

V."

LICHT TRIPPING Hans Nogler, Sun Valley's "Clown Prince j
of the Skis," trips' his- way down the powder at the Union Pacific i
resort. But Nogler. winner of the Snow Cup race at Alta, Utah, i
this year, knows where lie's heading here. J

JOE WILLIAMS

MIAMI BEACH. The local golf course over tohich the major
Icaoue hallmave.rx decided their chamttionshin Still stands, out

it is in almost, as desperate shape as Ezzard Charles was the

niyni jtocKy Marciano goi mrougn wnn mm m ineir 3
...scarcely i-ecaariizable. v :

To the winner J. O. Alphabet Spink, the St. Louis publisher,
annually presents a 'trophy... the dimensions and tonnage of
, which would have made Ajax pull back the most ambitious day

he ever sue.
In the fiahr. for the countless horrors which have been com

mitted in this championship in the guise of golf, It does npt
come as a surprise to learn that some of the game's leaders
look upon Spin as a fifth columnist.
Lou Kretlow who pitches for the Kansas City AAA's, beat

Al Dark, the N. Y. Giants' captam-snortstop in tne nnajs, t ana
1. His nine 1-nutt creens coninensated for nlssinK the target 13

times. Kretlow's '55 pitching record was d-4. In nine years he has

won only 2a games.
,; Contemplating these lustreless statistics, a puzzled specta
tor commented:

"Noio I get it! The idea is not to iind out who's the test

golfer among the ballplayers, out the worst paupiayer among

. tne golfers."
' Not everyone n creed. A conspicuous dissenter was Fred Cor

coran, who was in golf before the stymie (now dead) even showed
symptoms of being ill. On theiohole, he thought the monkey-suit
fellows did fairly we'd. -
"But I'd 'say Dark's the best of the lot"... and since no
restraining voice or' hand interposed he proceeded to say Just
that.. "He seems to have an instinctive feel for the game and
swings with a naturalness that makes me certain he couldn't
miss if he took up golf as a profession."
One thing is sure. No ballplayer can hope to make It in
pro golf on a part-time basis. The way the game is set up
todav it's a year-round operation, and few can afford the luxury
or risk of an extended absence from the tour.
.

(Harry Gryort is en vacation)
By JIMMY BRE5LIN
NEA Staff Cerrtspondant
NEW YORK (NEA) The
New York Knickerbockers were
having trouble moving the ball a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst a team caUed the Pitts Pitts-burgh
burgh Pitts-burgh Ironmen on a December
night in 1945. It was the first Bas Basketball
ketball Basketball Association of Ameri America
ca America game we had seen and it was
being played in an armory 25
blocks downtown from Madison
Square Garden.
There was more smoke in the
place than people and midway
through the first period the action
had slowed to "a point where cat catcalls
calls catcalls echoed around the high-ceil-inged
place. Finally, the officials

called a bait.
I Pittsburgh, they had discovered,

was using an illegal lone dclcnse.
It had taken some time to tee
this, but it was corrected and
when play resumed, the Knicks
began driving and you had a ball
game.'' s.
FOR THE PRESENT National
Basketball Association which

came out of this old league this
night is typical of the way it has
stepped through its first 10 sea seasons.
sons. seasons. The professional basketball

league has been playing it by ear,
making a mistake here, finding it

out later and then correcting it.

And the progress made has been

either flashy notably New Yqrk,

where the Knickerbockers now
perform more in the Garden than
do the colleges or slow, but al always
ways always solid and lasting.
So it is no surprise to see re reports
ports reports in west coast papers that a

franchise is certain for Los Ange

les or ban San Francisco. And in
otljer major cities around the na nation,
tion, nation, the story is the same.
This is more than a story about
a league expanding, however, and
expand it will. It is, instead, the
construction of another major

winter sport in this country.

The west coast is an example.

it is excellent basketball territo

ry. So is the Rocky Mountain a
rea. The south, particularly in hot hotbed
bed hotbed North Carolina, fits in here,
too.-
Professional basketball would
be a cinch to operate in these a
reas and within two or three years

you can expect it to be in most of

them.
"My idea is to have two divi divisions
sions divisions of eight teams each," Mau Maurice
rice Maurice Podoloff, the president, says
"The west coast is practically a
must here. Los Angeles, San Fran

cisco, Portland, Ore., and Seattle

are virtual necessities."

Television has helped along with

increased on-the-spot enthusiasm

In the past three seasons the
league has televised one game a

ween on a network basis. Its lm

pact has been tremendous.

Pacific Softball

League
By GILBERTO THORNE
Second Half Standings Feb. 26

W L
Glud Agencies ...... 2 0

Signal 2 0
American Legion ... 11
26th Engineers ..... 0 2
Cerveceria .......... 0 2

GB

This weeks's games:
Monday, Feb. 27, American
Lesion vs. Pan Liquido.
Tuesday, Feb. '28. Glud Agen

cies vs 26th Engineers.

What's Best Play For Coaches?
In Ohio, They Lean To Transfer

Wednesday. Feb. 29, Pan

quido vs. Signal.
Thursday, March 1, 26th Engt
ner vs. American Legion.

Friday. March 2, Signal
G'.ud Agencies.

By PAT HARMON x
. .. ."
CINCINNATI (NEA) The Mike
Allen Story is another fascinating
episode in the rounding up and
branding of migratory college ath athletes.
letes. athletes. The public was treated to this
latest case when Allen, a substi substitute
tute substitute on the Ohio State basketball
squad, switched to Dayton this
season.
i Floyd Stahl, the Ohio State
coach, is an even tempered man,
well liked by his contemporaries

because he never pops off. This

U-itime he popped. He accused Day

ton ot tampering" with his play players.
ers. players.

vs.

Last week's -results:
Monday

Glud Agencies 022 100 0-5 7 1

Amer. Legion iuuuuu o v
Home runs: C, McArthur GA)
winning nltcher: L. Hllzlnser.

n

Losing pitcher
pirej Metheny.

Tuesday

o!.i 120 01037 11

Pan Llquldo 000 500 1-6 12 1
Home runs: Mohn, Matsomoto
(Signal), conti, Lane (PLKin (PLKin-nlnc
nlnc (PLKin-nlnc pitcher: Grba. Losing
pitcher: Lane.

The athlatie' switch has been go going
ing going on for years, and some coach coaches
es coaches even have made it their best
play. Last year the University of
Utah fielded a basketball t e am
made up almost entirely of trans transfer
fer transfer students. It was a fine team
naturally.
In a football, game in 1916,
Maryland had in its lineup at one

time eight players who had1

KWlrrheri This urat Hiia in tha lm.

Newman. Un bHion of the vouns M arvli n d

coacn, raui aryant, and tne loose
rules of the first season of post postwar
war postwar college recruiting. Transfers
were elieible anvwhere: Rrvnt

2 didn't like the nlavers MarvbnH

Wednesday

Amer. Legion 010 731 1-13 11 ?
26th Engineers 002 200 15 a
; Home runs: Mindt, Hartman
(AL) Krull (Eng.) Winning
pHcher- Veeh. Losing pitcher:
Adams. Umpire: Wasson. ;

Thursday
Pan Llquldo 000 110 2-4
?-u.a ioonrles 100 102 1 5

JU1U

Both Hands, Maw!

Everyone seems agreed that Sam Byrd, one-time Yankee
with an unspectacular but respectful major league background,
was the top-ranking golfer-ballplayer. Still, he didn't rank one,
two, with the pro stars, and there was no mad rush for his
tervlces after he quit baseball. Where Is he now? Corcoran said
the last'he heard, Byrd was running a driving range in Alabama.
Did you know Walter Hagen started out as a ballplayer?
f Dicky Martin, a distinguished metropolitan journalist, now in
retirement, told me Hagen was promising enough to becreened
by the Phillies. .and this was in thedays when the rookie crop
- was kept to a selective minimum.
Today, of course, it is viuch different: If a spectator hap1-
pens to stop a ball on the third bounce in the left-field stands,
the club offers him a contract. And I hear there's a 7-year-old
boy working out with the rookie squad at Vero Beach. A Brooklyn
scout picked him out of a grade-school catch game.
Hagen was a semi-pro pitcher in upstate Sew York, and
avart from whatever actual talents he may have had, he teas

a genuine phenomenon in that he pitched with either hand.
The Phillies, however, were more interested in his left-handed
hitting, and decided to experiment with him in the outfild.
But before the experiment got very far or maybe before
It even began.;. Hagen was stricken by an epidemic of sore
arms. First the right, thrn the left. It was not his way, even
then, to do anything by halves, as you can see.

mat summer wagen won tne open ior tne ursc time, so
-whether he might have become our greatest golfer-ballplayer
we'll never know. v
.'. .'V :'-.- ':v-':'. ':':'''-: y-
Giants For Fourth

A segment of this year's championship was naturally tele televised
vised televised with Leo Durocher doing the gab-glibing. and it seemed
to me the dandy little executive turned in a first-rate Job, At
least, the nature of his questions and substance of his comments
were no more prosaic or pointless than such assignments cust
tomavily produce.
To local intimates, Durocher confided that baseball must he
prepared to go high if it ever expects him to honor the game
again with his presence and 'virtuosity.
"A straight salary, 1 could never, .be interested in. I'd have

I'm not sure I'd want, to leave Hollywood."
There, there, old fellow. Chin up. I know these are bleak and
grim tidings, but we must see the thing through no matter how
terrible the heartache.
The Giants this year?
No worse than fourth Is the private, "between-you-and-me,
Inside Durocher information.
"They've still got Mays, you know." v j

A LEAGUE WITH SUCH cities

as Syracuse, and Rochester cannot

be considered a major hunk of our
winter sports world. But a league

with Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Chi.

cago and Detroit almost certain

franchises of the near f u t u r e

pius major west coast cuies

would become a major sports
item.
The brand of basketball played
by such as Bob Cousy and Bill

Sharman of Boston, Bob Pettit of

bt. Louis, George Yardiey of Fort

Wayne, -Dick McGuire of New

York and Paul Arizin and Neil
Johnston of Philadelphia borders

on the fantastic at times.

The league is now on a close
par.11el with pro football while it

was being built into a huge sport.

THE BUSINESS OF FOULING
is an illustration. Two years ago.

the league came close to being

ruinca Dy tne rules. A club with
& 15-point lead in the third period
would start to hold the ball and
the fouling and scuffling which fol

lowed emptied arenas.
Playing it by ear. as usual. Po

doloff and his group came up with

tne Z4-second rule something s e
ven colleges need how.

Pro basketball has made mis

takesbut it has corrected them

and gone on. Give it three more
years and it will be the biggest

game in town a lot of towns, too,
Cincinnati Gets
New 'First' With
Nylon Uniform
CINCINNATI (NEA) The Cin

cinnati Redlegs, who played the
first professional game in 1869
and the first night game in 1935

now have another first.
It is a uniform made of nylon

in place of the usual flannel. A lot
of loose-flowing material has been
taken out of the uniforms and the

shirt sleeves which restricted big

armed Ted Kluszewski until he

cut them off, have been eliminat
ed via non-binding material.

The uniforms appear similar to

the vest-type tried out by the Chi
cago Cubs a few years back.

If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER; America's smoothest
whisky.
. -y ,y. .-..': -.: .;
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS

nnme runs: Lane,

fPt. winnlne pitcher

ney. Losing pitcher: Lane.

pire: Metneny.
Fr'day

26th Engineers 301 000 0-4
Sler.al 10103Ox-5

Winning pltcner: ncaij.

ing pitcher:

Metheny.
Batsmen of the week:

jreb, 20,-F,eo. 2')
5 at bats or more,

Herrera

Um-

Los-

Adams. Umpire:

had, so he took somebody else's.

The Big Ten schools, in that first
post-war year, loaded themselves
with athletes from other sectors.
Spectacular heroes of the last
football season switched alle allegiance.
giance. allegiance. Dave Kaiser, who kicked
the field goal that won the Rose
Bowl game for Michigan State is
a transfer from Notre Dame. Jim
Haluska, Wisconsin quarterback,
originally was at Michigan. And
there is that most widely publi publicized
cized publicized transfer of any football year
Ronnie Knox of UCLA, ex-California.
This Is at la st the third time
Dayton has acquired a basketball
prospect from the same source.
Bit! Uhl. seven-foot center on thp

F. Che-kurrent Dayton team, formerly

piayea at Ohio Mate. Ten years
ago, Dayton had another trans transfer,
fer, transfer, one Dick (Razor) Campbell.
Ohio State itself is not opposed
to the employment of transfer stu students,
dents, students, if they're good.

Dick Brubaker, co captain of

Ohio State's 1954 football cham

pions, originally, was at Ohio Wes-
leyan. ..
Dick Hilinski, tackle for the
1954 champions, attended two oth

er schools, including .Notre Dame,
first.
Capital Univtriity had the serv services
ices services of a basketball player named
Jack Undcrman before he went
to Ohio State, v
In 1953 the leading football scor scorer
er scorer among- the state's small colleg colleges
es colleges was Carl Peggs of Ohio Wesle Wesle-yan.
yan. Wesle-yan. Peggs' friends said it was a
shame he wasn't playing for a
larger, more prosperous f i r m.
That's been rectified. Peggs now
is at Ohio State and will he eligi eligible
ble eligible next fall.
Thus the case of Mike Allen is
not a new story. It is even milder
thin most.

Editor: CONRADO SAKUtAN I

Mroolc Track Men Top

Hi In Dual Meet

Balboa

YMCA Chess Tourney
To Begin Wednesday

Gorham Wawefield, chairman

of the Balboa Y.M.CA.-U.S.O.
Chess Club, announced that
their Chess Tournament will he-

gin Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. This
tournament i open to the chess

playing public.

Last year, the tournament was
won bv Homer M. Weeks, who
eventually became the Canal
Zone chess champion, Wakefield
mentioned that this tournament
gives all amateur chess players

an opportunity to better their
game through a friendly compe competition
tition competition with each other player.
Interested persons should con contact
tact contact the Balboa Y.M.C.A.-USO.

PLENTY IN RESERVE
Vero Beach, Fla. (NEA)
Brooklyn used relief pitching in
108 games last season and this
year the Dodgers are carrying
nine bullpen pitchers.

Albrook AFB tracksters took the Magee. Lagassle ran into a
measure of the Balboa High' strong second in the 880 while
team in a dual meet last Friday, Maeee Jumped higher than he
65-48. The Flyers grabbed off 3 ever has before to give the Bull Bull-first
first Bull-first places to 5 for the hlgn dogs their only one-two of the
schoolers but the point buljie ac-:meet by taking second to Coffey
tually came when the. Flyers In the high Jump,
took the first two places In the
shot, discus,, and low hurdles, j The results: .'

Chris Flullen, veteran wcisni
man, was the big gun for the; High Hurdles:
winners with firsts in his .spc-' 2. Scott (A), A.
cialties the shot and dlscust and; Time: 17.8.

a surprise second In the broad i Shot Put: I.

1. Richtcr
Galloway

!B,
(B).

hmm. This cave him 13 points

while his running mate J. Clark
scored 12. Bill Colfcy was the
only double winner for the Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs as he annexed both the
hlah lump and the broad Jump.

The Alhrook team Droved, to

be loaded with .-.versatile per performers
formers performers who were also in excel excellent
lent excellent earlv season condition

With this meet as the only basis
for an, opinion this far, it looks
as if coach Al Guidet has the

team to beat in the Balboa Re Relays
lays Relays on March 23rd. They have
already indicated they will be
hard to take in the low hurdles
and the weights, while Guidet
and a lad named Travis give
t.hm tremendous potential in

t.h snrints and auarter mile. J.

Clark won the 880 as he' pleased
and looks capable of record time

in the event.

It isn't meant to write the
vouthful Bulldogs out of the

picture. In addition to Coffey's

fim double. Charlie French

looked good in winning the 100

over a fast lieia m iu. ana ue
also ran a good relay 220.
Bob Toothman won the mile
without doing much more than
breaking a sweat. Dick Richter
and Joe Galloway, running high
hurdles for the first time in
their lives gave an indication of
solid strength for the Bulldogs.
Richter won and Galloway was
a close third.
Two personal bests were turn turned
ed turned In by Able Lagassie, and John

;!.

Ab H Ave.

Hill (Signal) 6
Krull (Engineers) ... 5
Mindt (Legion) 6
McArthur, C. (Stars) 6

.687

.600
.500
.500

Fastlich
League
Macaws 9, Palomas 4

wnn

half!

Pete Corrlgan's Macaws
Ik. mneHinh T.PaCUfi first

championship when they defeat

ed the Palomas aaiuiuay ";'-'-noon
9-4. The Palomas were urst
to score In the first inning and
held the advantage until uie
fourth when the Macaws scored
twice tq tie the game up. In the
fifth inning Barbier lost control
and the Macaws got four runs
and added 3 more in the sixth.
Corrigan pitched steady ball
for the Macaws and kept the

Palomas away from me .viw,

giving up but 4 nits ana o o3

on balls.

Macaws

Eberenz, c"

navs. 3b .

French; ss 2
p Corriean. D ... 4

Durfee, c . . . 3

E. Corrigan, lb ...
Ammato, 2b ..... 4
Dubois, rf ....... 1
DesLondes, If .... 4

Ab R II Po
2 10 1

0

1
2
0
1
0
0
2
2

Totals

25 9 2 27 9

Palomas

Eastham, cf
Pederson, ss ..... 3
Barbier, p ....... 3
Garcia, 3b ....... 3
Snodgrass, c ..... 3
Allen S. If ....... 2
Ruiz, rf .......... 3
Sander; lb 1
Kline, lb ........ 1
Rathgaber, 2b ... 1

Corrigan L., 2b ... 1

Totals

.0.
2
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

10
0 0

24 5 4 21 0

SUMMARY-tErrors: Macaws
3, Palomas, 5; Runs batted in:
Dufee 2, French 2, Garcia 2; Two
base hits: pederson. Garcia:

Wild pitch: Barbier 2; Passed

ball: snodgrass 2; Struck out by:

Barbier 12, Corrigan 3; Left on
base: Macaws 7,. Palomas 3;

Winning pitcher: P. Corrigan;

Losing pitcher: Barbier; Um

pires: Mom, Neviue, Diaz. ;

BLOWS HIS HORN
HALLANDALE, Fla, (NEA)

Once a year, Jockey Bobby Per-

mane makes an appearance at

Gulf stream Park without riding a
horse. That's When Permane dons

Fluellen (A). 2.

J. Clark (A). 3. Morris (B). Dis

tance: 49 ft. 11 In.
100 yds: 1. French B), 2. Gui Guidet
det Guidet (A), 3. Wlnklosky (B) and

Wheeler (B) tied. Time: 10.4.

440 yds: 1. Travis (A), 2. Jen Jenkins
kins Jenkins (B), 3. J. Clark A. Time:
53.6.
Mile: 1. Toothman (BV,
Heinzman (A, 3. Danehelka
(Ai Time: 5:20.6.
Low Hurdles: l. Guidet (A), "2.
Mescall (A), 3. Scott (B). Time;
22.2. "'
220 yds: 1. Travis (A), 2. Wln Wlnklosky
klosky Wlnklosky (B), 3. Hall (A). Time:
23.4. '
Pole Vault: 1. B. Clark (A), 2.
Fulleton (B), Halvosa (Bi, Mi Mi-gee
gee Mi-gee (B), and Scott (B) tied.
Height: 9 ft.
Broad Jump: 1. Coffey (B), '2.
Fluellen (A), 3. Sutherland (B).
Distance: 19 ft. 7a in.
Discus: 1. Fluellen (A), 2. Clark
(A), 3. Fulton (B). Distance: '34
ft. 8 'a in. ""
880 yds: 1. J. Clark (A), 2. La La-?assle
?assle La-?assle (B), 3. Schroeder (B)

Time: 2:14.9.

High JUmp: 1. Coffey (B), 2.

Magee (B), 3. J. Clark (A). Ht.
5 ft. 9 In.

880 Relay: 1. Albrook (Guidet,

Travis, Smith, .Mescall). Time:

1:37.5.

Final Score: Albrook: 65, Bal

boa High: 48.

Individual High Point Man:

Fluellen (A) 13; J. Clark (A) 12;

Travis (A) ll'A; Coffey (B) 10.

. OFFICIAL LIS! OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1929, Sunday, February 26, 1956
The whole ticket haa 44 pieces divided hi two series "A" St "B" of 22 pieces each

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

3323 $ 44,000.00
7635 $ 13,2.00.00
1684 $ 6,600.00

PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

No
123
22.1
0423
0S2.1
M23
0723
R23
923

Prl7; I So

1.12.IM)
132.00 I
J.12.0
J200.00
132.00 I
132.00 1
132.00
1.32.00;
132.011

132.00

1023
II 23
1223
1323
1423
152.1
1023
1723
1S2II
1023

Pri7 N
132.00 2023
13240 I 2123
132 0(1 2223

Prize a S: Prim

2200.00 1
132.00
132.00
132.00
132.00
132 00
133.M

2323

2423
2S23
2fi23
2723
2S23
2023

132.00

132.00
13200
2200.00

132.00

132.0 I 3523
132.00 I 3023
' 132.00 3723
132.00 3S23
132.0 3821

3023 112.00
3123 132.00
3223 132.00
3323 44,000.00

3423 132.00

4023
4123
4223
4323
4423

132.00 I 4523
132.00 I 4023
132.00 4723
132.00 t 4823
132.00 1 4023

Prli
I
132.00
132.00
132.00
2200.00
. 132.00
132.00
132.00

132.00 5723
132.00 5823
132.90 5023

No.
5023
5123
5223
5323
5423
5523
5623

PrliH
I -.
132 00
132.00
132.00
2200.00
132.00
132.00
132.00
132.00
132.00
132.00

NO.
(023
123
0223
0323
0423
0523
0023
0723
023
1923

Prlicf I N Prixao

132.00
132.00
132.00
2200.00
132 rifl
' 132.00
132.00
132.00
132.00

7023
TI23
7223
7323
7423
7523
7023
7723
723

132.00 7123

132.00
132 00
132.00
2200.M
132.0
132.00
132.00
132.00
132 00
132.00

I No Prl" N $
i 1023 132 W HU 132 M.
0123 132 M t)23 132 M
i 8223 1 32.00 0223 1 32 04) J
18.323 2200.M 323 1200.00 ,i
I 8423 132.00 423 MM
8523 I32 00 S2S UtM
I 8023 132.00 M23 132.04
I 8723 132.00 0723 132.00
8823 132.00 1 23 132.00
1923 132.M M21 1J2 M

Approximations Derived From First Prize

I-:- -- -;-- I ....':.....,.' I ,-'. I
-9314 440 3310 440 33IIT 440 3320 440 3322 440 3325 44 3327 440 3320 44 J33t 44 I
3315 : 440 I 3311 440 3315 440 3321 440 I 3324 440 332 44 3328 440 3330 440 3332 44
Approximations Derived From Second Prize
V :.; -"- I ' : I -: S t I :-.'' t 9
633 22 1833 220 2S35 220 34J3S 22 4035 22 563S 220 835 22 8035 220 M3I 22
7020 :; It 728 110 73 II 7832 11 734 II MOT It 73, 111 741 II 743 It.
702T lit 72 11 7631 "!! 7633 ."111 763 11 738 -:J. Ill 7041 til' 742 111 744 ,lllr
! Approximations Derived From Third Prize
i -' .- "' t '-" .- I I .':';. i t I
084. 131 284 132 384 132 4684 132 5684 132 M84 132 7684 -132 8084 132 M84 132
1875 ; 88 1077 88 17 88 1081 88 1083 88 108 8 I 1688 "T 88 10 88 1 1092 8
1671 88 1678 88 108 88 1882 88 1685 81 1687 SS 1680 88 1611 i : 88 I 1893 it

Prl2ie-winning Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing were sold at: 1st, 2nd and 3rd in Panama-. ;
' The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in 3 and not included in the above list win Forty-four Dollars ($44.00) each
. The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "B"
Signed by: ALBERTO ALEMAN. Governor of the Province of Panama.- Ced. 47-12155
: The Representative Of The Treasury RICARDO A MEUCEZ

WITNESSES: Martin Poveda. C6d. No. 5-2785
Benita de Morales, Cd.,No. 17-329

JOSE DOMINGO SOTO.
Notary Public, Panama

RAFAEL TERAN A.,
Secretary

KJfiTF' Th winning tickets with the lost cipher and with tho Iwa lt
'"U ciphers opply only to th Tirst Prize.
The First Prize and the 2nd and 3rd Prizn ire drawn teparalely. The ap-.
proximatlnna are calculated on tha First, Second and Third Prizes. In case
a ticket ihould carry the numbers of each prize, th holder la entitled to
claim payment lor each. .

DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, March 26, 1956

Drawing Number 630
- Fraction

First Prize.

Second Prize.

v

23
35

Third Prize. 81

$11.00
3.00
2.00

Ticket
$220.00
60.00
40.00

The prizes will be paid In accordance with the Official List of Fanam In
th offices at the National Beneficent Lottery situated on Central Avenue.
. Plan of Ordinary Drawing No. 1930 which will take
place March 4, 1956
Divided In two aerlar of 22 fraction each denominated "A" and "B"
.. FIRST FRIZF.
1 First Pri?e. Series A and B, of $22 000.000 each series $44.000 00
1 Second Prize, Series A and B. or 6.6O0.00 each series 13.200.00
1 Third Prize. Series A and B, of J.. 100.00 each series ( 6no 00
18 Approximations. Series A and B, of 220.00 each series 7,950 00
9 Prizes, Series A and B. of 1,100.00 each series 19.SO0 00
M Prizes, Series A and B. of .00 each series ll.MO OO
100 Prizes, Series A and B, of 22 00 each eries 39,800.00
SFCOND PRIZE

II Approximations. Series A and B of $ 33.00 each series
I Prizes. .Series A and B, of "'-' i 110 00 each series
' THIRD PRIZt.

IRApproximatlnns, Series A and B of $
I Prizes. Series A and B. of

I l.ssn mi
l.osooo

44.00 each -series
16 00 each eriea

. $ 1.SS4 211
1.18.00

1074 Prizes TOTAL $149,732 00
Price of a whole ticket- $22.C0
Price of a forty-fourth part .50

foz and plays trumpet in a band

oii'Shrlnc Pay-af the track:



Mead story cn pags 8

Hot-Rodders' Riot In Daytona
Ends as 85 Booked for 'Affray'

; DAYTONA BEACH, Fla., Feb. 27
i (UP) Police today expected ear-
.iv arretft nf lMders of a ring of
"hot-rodders" who touched off a
wild riot which armed National
Guardsmen quelled with tear gas
I and a show of bayonets early Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. Tolice said 46 of some 85 per-
sons picked up by officers and Na Na-finnal
finnal Na-finnal ffna rHsmpn durine the five-
ihnnr rint were booked on charges
ranging from drunkenness to riot-j
ling but none appeared to be thej
'ringleaders. I
! Hundreds of others involved in j
hp bottle and rock throwing,
fighting, window smasnmg ana
clashes with police escaped ar ar-i
i ar-i rest, police said.
'. The disorders started with
"scratch races", by hot-rod fans
' on the main street Saturday night
I following the day's events staged
' at the National Association of Stock
Car Auto Racing, holding its an annual
nual annual "Speed Week" here.
"We're going to make lot
- mere arrests during tht ntxt
ceuplt of days." a police spokes spokesman
man spokesman said.
"We're getting a lot more in in-'
' in-' formation by the hour and it ap appears
pears appears the ring leaders are local
fellpws."
! Arraignments were set this mor mor-.
. mor-. ning for 11 suspects booked at the
city jail on a variety of charges
nri on Wednesday for 35 others
booked at the Volusia County jail
in Deland on the uniform charge
!of "affray."
' All but two made bond here
! but a doien were still held airly
today at Deland in lieu of bond.
The suspects arrested at the
scene, mostly teenagers or men
in their early 20s, ranged in age
from 17 to 51, authorities said. Of-
0
V,,.. .m-mm
LAST DAY! 75-40
3:05, 4:40, 6:40, 9:00 P.M.
a bold, distinctive
1 :dramaAn-
CNemaScoP
Richard Egan
' Dana Wynter
Cameron Mitchell, in
"THE VIEW FROM
POMPEY'S HEAD"
WEDNESDAY
THEY ORDERED.
HER TO MARRY
A CRIMINAL!
Suspense- :
loaded
iniertiinmenl
based
on tht
true
slory
of i
soldier-ol-
foriuni
and i
high-born
beauty. .
f-, FABULOUS ESCAPE
Ufa hangs by i thread
M-G-M
trwHta
THE
IMS
THIEF
COLOR
CINimaccpS
i 1 If 1IH! niVTIIr
liitu uli in
EDLIUhD PUI1D0I.1
DAVID if Ell
GE02GE-SAKDERS
ROGER MOORE
. An M C M Pieliirt
J

-f "i )T
liirmr i-i mm i I

ficials said none was connected
with the NASCAR events.
By the time guardsmen moved

in with fixed bayoneti the mob,
estimated as numbering 3,000 to
4,000 persons bad caused an esti estimated
mated estimated $15,000 damage to police
cars, parked automobiles and store
fronts.
Fifteen persons were injured,
i three of them hospitalized
"It was mass' Police Capt.
A L. Folsom, Jr., said.
Folsom said the hot-rod fans,
many of tbem teenagers, defied

iisi-jpouce io siup ineir private arag

races on the streets. When a po police
lice police cruiser tried to halt one race
the officers were mobbed by the
crowd, he said.
"The streets were so packed
we couldn't get our cruisers- to the
scene and policemen on foot were
really taking a beating," he said.
Princess Margaret
Visits Last Scene
Of Tovnsend Tryst
LONDON, Feb. 27 (UP) Prin Princess
cess Princess Margaret this weekend visit visited
ed visited the scene of her last tryst with
the man she loved.
r. ... ..w w
I '5-
Group Capt. Peter Townsend spent
one final weekend last October
before" she returned to Londop and
renounced her love for him be because
cause because of her duty to church and
crown.
This time, Queen Elizabeth and
the Duke of Edinburgh were with
her to joint welcome-home festivi festivities
ties festivities for Lord Porchester ?nd his
bride, the former Jean W a 1 1 o n,
daughter of a Wyoming .cattle
rancher. They returned last week
from the United States.
Porchester had frequently' been'
an escort of Margaret during his
pre-engagement days.
A heavy police guard was main maintained
tained maintained at the big country home
during the weekend festivities,
just as it was at the time of
Margaret's meeting there with
Townsend in October.
The setting must have been a
saddening reminder of her last
yew days with Towsend, who
returned to hi duties as air at attache
tache attache in the embassy at Brussels
But Margaret joined in the par
ty for Lord and Lady Porchester.
She went to a Friday night party
for the newly weds at Uckfield
House, and then went to tea Sat Saturday
urday Saturday at Eridge Castle nearby.
Italian President
Arrives For 16-Day
U. S.; Canada Visit
WASHINGTON, Feb. 27 (UP)
Italian President Giovanni Gronchi
arrives today for an historic 16 16-day
day 16-day goodwill visit to the United,
States and Canada &v
His trip,, the first for an Italian
chief of state to North America,
will take him to six Amejiccn ci cities
ties cities and Ottawa.'
The visit is primarily ceremo ceremonial,
nial, ceremonial, but, Gronchi will have meet meetings
ings meetings with President Eisenhower,
Secretary of State John Foster Dul Dulles
les Dulles and other American officials at
which he is, expected to press for
strong' r economic and political ties
inside the Atlantic Alliance. Ad Advance
vance Advance reports indicate he may
have some blunt criticism to pass
along.
The United States rolled out Its
plushest red carpet for Gronchi.
Vice President Richard M. Nixon,
Dulles, Adm. Arthur W. Radford,
chairman ol the joint chiefs of
staff, and other American officials
planned to meet him at the air airport.
port. airport. Full military honors w e r e
scheduled.-
From the airport. Gronchi was
to motor across the Potomac riv river
er river to downtown Washington to
i receive the "key to the city" and
then be greeted by Mr. Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower at the White House.
Chaplin To Film
Story Of Exile
(He'll Be Lead)
I T.nTON. Feb. 27 (UP)
i Charlie Chaplin announced ; to to-inipht
inipht to-inipht he Is going to make a
movii about New York in Eu Europe.
rope. Europe. The film comedian said he
would not go to New York be
cause "theyd probably ecalp!
me."
He told newsmen he would
play the part of a European king
exiled to New York because he
trier, to divert all his country's
atomic research away from
bombs and toward peaceful uses.
In New York, the little ex-king
Is investigated as a communist,
but all turns out well and he
lives happily ever after.
"In New York?" a newsman
asked.
"No, no, no, not in New York
In Europe," Chaplin replied.

"Let the people

31st YEAR
MollM

Meet North

io

PARIS, Feb. 27 (UP) Premier:
Guy Mollet called his Cabinet into
session today to seek ways or
streamlining the ponderous;
French Army into a tast-striking;
force that could cope with a series
of rebellions in North Africa.
Inflamed mobs of Algerian Mos
lems and French settlers fought
pitched battles with Frenvh police
Sunday in two Algerian cities and
new murders and other terrorist
activities were reported in Moroc Morocco.
co. Morocco. Government sources said the
fighting in North Africa was strik strikingly
ingly strikingly similar to that in Indochina
nt0 4 mignty communist Army
that defeated "20 elite French bat-
talions at Dien Bien Phu.
The Cabinet examines the stre
amlining plans before turning them
( ver tomorrow to the National De Defense
fense Defense Committee, the French equi
valent of the U.S. Security Council
Plans call for a sweeping re
organization and adaptation of
troops to the hit-run tactics of the
rebels. The 230,000 men in North
Africa are to be reinforcei Dy tne
20,000 French troops still in South
Viet Nam.
A decisive week in the history
of French North Africa opens to today.
day. today. French governmental decisions
to be taken during talks with na native
tive native delegates, will pave the way
to the creation of new independ independent
ent independent nations in Morocco and Tuni-
Ex-Canal Machinist
William Shauphnessy
Dies In Bath, Me.
Kw of the death of William E.
Shaugnessy, e m p 1 o y e d for 14
vpurma a machinist in the Canal
7nn ha been received on the
Tthmn He was 72 years old.
Mr. Shaughnessy, well known
in New England sporting circles
a fnrmpr rn er DOlO oiayer
ia-Wn in Bath. Maine. In ad
dition to his service with the PaJ
nama Canal, Mr. naugnessy
worked many years at the Bath
iron Works and at the Fore River
Shipyard in Quincy, Mass.
He was a member of the Veter Veteran
an Veteran Firemen's Handtub Association
and a member of St. Mary's Ro Roman
man Roman Catholic Church. L
Surviving him, besides his wi widow
dow widow Adelaide, are- two sisters,
Mrs. J B. Greaney of East Brain Brain-tree,
tree, Brain-tree, Mass., and Mrs. Nellie Han Han-agan
agan Han-agan of Remsen, N.Y.: t h r e e
brothers, Andrew of Washington,
Walter of Cambridge, Mass.; also
two cousins and several nieces
and nephews.
Civil Defense
For Balboa Meets
Thursday Morning
A Civil Defense meeting for
Balboa 'will be held at 9 a.m.,
on Thursday at the USO-JWB,
Balboa.' -' .,
All ladies of Balboa are lnvit-
pa to attend as trie louowing
Important Items will be discuss discussed
ed discussed In preparation for the forth-'
comina National Civil Defense
test exercise: (U maiviauai uu-
ties of Warden Service person
nel; (2) Central center mes message
sage message procedure and (3) posting
of warden maps. t
The motion rjicture "U.S. Civil
Defense In Action" will be shown.
c,naineerV Day
V For Fridav
Friday (has been designated as
Engineers' Day in a proclama proclamation
tion proclamation Issued bv Governor John
S. Seybold at Balboa Heights io
day.
The local celebration of Engi Engineers'
neers' Engineers' Day Is part of the Nation National
al National Engineers' Week which is ob observed
served observed this week throughout the
United States bv the National
Society of Professional Engi Engineers
neers Engineers and by other engineering
societies.
Red China's Woman
Railroad Suryey
Team Starts Work
TOKYO, Feb. 27 (UP) Com Communist
munist Communist China's first all-woman
railroad survey team is working
on plans for a new railway line in
western China, according to a ra radio
dio radio Peiping broadcast. The fem feminine
inine feminine crew includes topographical
surveyors, geologists and techni technicians,
cians, technicians, the communist broadcast
said.

INDEPENDENT

fj)cS CAvVN CN A rfV rf CAC-S

know the truth and the

PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1956

Streamlining'- Army

sia and a better deal for the na-
lives in Algeria technically
French territory,
But in all three territories, and
particularly Morocco and Algeria,
fear on the part of the French
residents that they wiM be sold
out, and on the part of the natives
that they will not "get their free freedom,
dom, freedom, have resulted in murder, pil pillage
lage pillage and riots.
In Oran yesterday, Arabs and
police battled when rioters rushed
a police ammunition store which
they thought would be lightly guar guarded
ded guarded because of the number oi po police
lice police lining the route of the Echo
d Oran bicycle race.
Police opened fire on the mob.
La Monroe, Who How
Calls IIY Home, Has
'Grown Up A Lillle'
HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 27 (UP) (UP)-Marilyn
Marilyn (UP)-Marilyn Monroe said today she
has "grown up a little" after ming mingling
ling mingling with New York's sophisticat sophisticated
ed sophisticated theatrical set
The shapely blonde star, who
plans to make a picture with Sir
Laurence Olivier, arrived here by
plane this weekend with her busi
ness associate, Milton Green, and
Green's wife. Miss Monroe return returned
ed returned to Hollywood to make the film
"Bus Stop."
The actress, president of Marilyn
Monroe Productions, said ahe will
stay in Hollywood until about June,
them return to New York. "My
real home now is in New York,"
she said.
She will return to her dramatic
studies at the Actors studio in New
York, she added. About September,
Miss Monroe will go to London to
co-star with Olivier in "The Sleep Sleeping
ing Sleeping Prinrp
When asked if she was think
ing about finding herself a Prince
like Grace Keiiy, sne quippea
"I'm not that particular."
13 Sudan Police
Held For Deaths
Of 194 Farmers
KHARTOUM, Sudan. Feb. 27
UP) Thirteen police otticers
were suspected toaay penum
trial on charges that they were
responsible for the deaths of 194
tenant farmers.
They will be tried tor negligence
in the deaths of the farmers who
a.iffnmtpri when thev were arrest-
tnr rintino- and COODed UO for
three days in a room 65 feet long
and 20 feet wide in tne prison ai
riomnnstrations Brotesting the
disaster and demanding the resig resignation
nation resignation of the government conti
nued for the third day in
tmnn Ra lwav worKers proclaim
ed a three-day strike, ine ouaa ouaa-ness
ness ouaa-ness Bar Assn. and the Labor Fed Fed-oratinn
oratinn Fed-oratinn nil have started short
strikes in sympathy with the vic
tims.
British IQ Rapped
By Psychiatrist ;
ipswirw. Eneland. Feb. 27
fTipi a nsychlatrist said to
day that half of Britain's popu population
lation population is below "absolute aver-
iiB-e tntellieence." r i
nr. .T. o. Howells told a meet
ing of the Royal Society of
Health that dullness and mental
deficiency sometimes are re responsible
sponsible responsible for illness and worry.
"Re-educational measures are
likely to be fruitless," he said.

A

BELLA VISTA

TOMORROW oat 9 p.ra,

SNEAK
PEE VIEW!

country is safe1 Abraham Lincoln.

Africa
One rioter was killed and three;1
wounded.
Three hundred miles east of
ran. in Constantine, police faced!
fin inorv ITnrnnoan mnh pi0ra1 1
hundred French students fought
street battle with police after
protest march on local administra
tive buildings.
Colonial Secretary
Receives Taste
Of Cypriol Terror
NICOSIA, Cyprus, Feb. 27 (UP)
British Colonial, Secretary Alan
Lennox-Boyd today began high
pressure negotiations to bring
peace to Cyprus but received a
taste of terrorism shortly after he
arrived from London last night.
Masked men armed with at least
four automatic weapons stormed
the police station in the Turkish
Cypriot village of Chatoe 15 .miles
northeast of Nicosia last night.
They drove up to the police sta station
tion station in an automobile at high sped,
dismounted and riddled the sta station
tion station with bullets Police inside re returned
turned returned the fire through doors and
windows and drove the raiders
away.
There was no report of casualties.
It was hooed that the presence
of Lennox-Boyd here would clinch
the bargaining with Nationalist
leader Archbishop Makarios, who
has been stalling over his final
answer to new British proposals
for settlement.
The archbisop s latest letter to
Governor Harding about a set
tlement was -delivered Saturday
night but it brought no hope of
quick agreement.
The suspicious Archbishop Wants
Britain to define specifically how
much power and responsibility fu future
ture future Cypriot Ministers would have
under the proposed constitution.
Publisher Killed,
30 Others Injured
In Temple Melee
SAIDAIJI. Japan, Feb. 27 (UP)
A newspaper publisher was kill killed
ed killed and 30 other persons were in injured
jured injured in a fanatical "nude festi
val, that turned into a .stampede
early today.
The annual celebration of the
400-year-old "Hadaki Matouri"
nude festival in a temple here
reached its climax when Buddhist
priests tossed goodluck charms in into
to into the crowd of celebrants, all of
whom wwore only girdles.
The shouting and dancing cele celebrants
brants celebrants stampeded to reach the
charms. Masazo Yano, 54, publish publisher
er publisher of a provincial newspaper, was
crushed in the melee and d i e d
four hours later at the home of a
friend.

Britain's Chief Executioner Leaves
Hanging Job For Permanent Pub Work

LONDON, Feb. 27 (UP) -Britain's
chief executioner quit his
$42-per-hanging job before the
government could carry" out a
House of Commons vote to abol abolish
ish abolish capital punishment, it was dis disclosed
closed disclosed here. " ..' :
The Home Office confirmed that
Albert Pierrepoint, 45, part time
hangman who once 'executed 17
Nazi war criminals in one day,
has resigned, from the list of ex executioners.
ecutioners. executioners. He has gone back to
full-time work as a barkeeper.
THEATRE

KEWSMFER

FIVE CENTS
Forces
30,CC3 Koreans Jam
i!(aaii (fori ill 11 FrtF
a JbUUl JIbUIUHI I Ul
Billy Graham Rally
SEOUL, Feb. 27 (UPJ-An esti estimated
mated estimated 30,000 Koreans packed Seoul
Stadium yesterday to hear Americ American
an American Evangelist Billy Graham in
the biggest Christian rally ever
held in this country.
A few hundred American service-i
men and foreign residents of this i
Republic of Korea capital were in
the crowd that eagerly listened to
the noted evangelist.
President Syngman Rhee, the
Christian leader of this predomi predominantly
nantly predominantly Buddhist nation, made an
unscheduled appearance in the!

SGdrm told the crowd "we are' WASHINGTON, Feb 21 (UP i--
.nrr that Knr it still diJNegro leaders around the nation

viriflrf W- hone the country willlre rallying behind the Negroes

someda., be reunited by peaceful
means.
"God is also mightily moving in into
to into Korea.",
Shanghai's Last 2
Museum Gets Relics
TOKYO, Feb. 27 (UP) Shan Shanghai's
ghai's Shanghai's last two rikshaws were
taken out of service and sent to
th museum Saturday, Radio Pei-
nins naiH todav.
The rikshaws were the last of
the vehiclet which were introduc
ed from Japan in 1814 to the port
city, the broadcast added.
At the time the Communists took
over Shanghai from the National Nationalists
ists Nationalists there were 5,000 rikshaws with
7,000 rikshaw men in the city. But
with the increase of modern, faster
means of transportation they were
gradually forced out of business,
radio Peiping said.
With the help of the city govern govern-sr.ent,
sr.ent, govern-sr.ent, however, many of them be became
came became taxi drivers, skilled laborers
or became farmers. The aged and
the homeless were sent to old age
homes, it said.
Shah's Wife Nixed
As Ruler Of Iran
TEHERAN, Iran, Feb. 27 (UP)
Authoritative court circles today
denied reports that the Shah of
Iran has asked religious leaders
to waive Moslem law so his wife
can succeed him on the throne.
Commenting on the reports,
originating in Cairo, court circles
said there Is no question of Queen
Soraya' ever succeeding Shah Mo Mohammad
hammad Mohammad Reza Pahlevi. The Shah
has no male heirs.
"All I will say now Is that my
dtcision has nothing to do with
tht prtstnt discission about ca capital
pital capital puniihmant or with tho'
vott against hanging in tht
Houst of Commons," P i t r r t t-point
point t-point said.
Pierrepoint, chief hangman for
25 years, was one of the most ex experienced
perienced experienced executioners in t h e
world. Although he put hundreds
of men and women to death, he
was regarded as the "most hu humane
mane humane killer" in his profession.
He, is the third of his family to
serve as Britain's chief execu
tioner. His father was one and his
uncle after that. The three Pierre Pierre-points
points Pierre-points have been in charge of Brit Britain's
ain's Britain's executions for 85 years a
record unparalleled in British his history.
tory. history. v.--.
Pierrepoint txtcuttd British
World War II tra Iter "Lord
Haw-Haw." Ht put tht nooit a a-round
round a-round tht ntck of prttty blondt
Ruth Ellis, who was ctndomntd
for the murder of one of her two
lovtrs.
He also hanged sex murderer
John Halliday Christie in Lon London's
don's London's gloomy Pentonville Prison.
In private life, Pierrepoint runs
a pub called "The Rose and
Crown," at Much Hole an Lanca Lancashire.
shire. Lancashire. Previously he owned one
called, "Help the Poor Stragg Straggler.''
ler.'' Straggler.'' ,,- ...
Pierrepoint is a short, stocky
man who smokes cigars and hesi hesitates
tates hesitates to talk about hanging.' He
says he carried out his grim job
because "sortieone had to do it."

1

a .ii!ASfe.,V

(NEA Telephoto)
,?tEKTEIP B'S BOYCOTT Mrs. Rosa Parks appear appear-wren
wren appear-wren ner attorney. Charles Laneford. In An

after she was arrested with Negro ieligious and Dolltical lead

A tfifU XT

er w cnarges or Boycotting buses m a mass protest against
v i .bus segregation. . ...

Negro Leaders
Rallying Around
Bus Boycotters
arrested in Montgomery, Alaba Alabama,
ma, Alabama, because of a bus boycott.
Raprescntariva Clayton Powtll
of New York said 12 Ntgro r r-ligloui
ligloui r-ligloui and civic loadtrt will
- touch off tht campaign today by
delivering sermons on tho 15th
Amtndmont, which guaranties
quil rights for Ntgro and Whitt
citizens.
The Democratic lawmaker said
the campaign will reach its cli climax
max climax on March 28 with an hour-
long work stoppage by Negroes
around the nation.
In Washington, 13 TJegro bishops
also joined in the fight to help the
12-week old boycott against segre segregated
gated segregated buses in Montgomery.
Tht bishops', mtmbtrt of tht
African and Mtthodist Episcopal
Church Council, have calltd on
Pprtsidtnt Eistnhowtr and At At-tornty
tornty At-tornty Gtntral Htrbtrt Brown Brown-til
til Brown-til to thlp thtm.
The Negro churchmen, meeting
in Washington, have urged the
President and the Attorney Gener General
al General to end, as they put it, "the tra tragic
gic tragic persecution of innocent A A-mericans
mericans A-mericans in Montgomery."
The bishops were referring to
the arrest of. the Negroes in Mont
gomery on charges that the boy boycott,
cott, boycott, aimed at ending segregated
seating arrangements, was illegal.
The same request was made ear earlier
lier earlier by Representative Clayton
Powell and the White House has
announced it Is planning to have
the Justice Department look into
the matter. .
. BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2S
HIGH LOW
:21
a.m. 11:25 a.m.
5:44
11:49 t.m

TODAY PRE-RELEASE
LUX THEATRE

0.75-
1:00 3:00
SHOWS:
.: t :
4
ll
STEWART
Granger
- Jea.'j
Sif.f.:ons

TdMORROW RELEASE :
DOUBLE JEOPARDY";
with ROD CAMERON

t

1
. ..tltA... .... "7
Negro Borough
Head Praises
US Democracy
NEW ORLEANS, Feb. 27 (UP) (UP)-Hulan
Hulan (UP)-Hulan F. Jack, Negro president of
New York's Borough of Manhat Manhattan
tan Manhattan told an interracial conference
here yesterday that his election to
the highest office ever held by a
member of his race in this coun country
try country was an example of "demo
cracy in action."
Jack, who administers the gov governmental
ernmental governmental affairs of nearly 2,000, 2,000,-000
000 2,000,-000 inhabitants of the Borough,
aaaressed a non segregated au-
oience in uie Loyola University
auditorium as part of the eighth
annual Catholic Interracial Con-
erence here.
Tht West Inditt-Born Dtmo Dtmo-crat
crat Dtmo-crat said 83 par cant of tht votts
cat for him In 1953 wtrt from
mtmbtrs of othtr racts and
crttds, including "tht vttts of
thousands of southtrntrs who
had madt Manhattan thtif ptr ptr-mantnt
mantnt ptr-mantnt homo.
"That was a practical demon demonstration
stration demonstration of democracy in action
which the Communists can never
challenge," he said.
Jack's appearance drew objec objections
tions objections from one Loyola alumnus, At Attorney
torney Attorney Emile A. Wagner, who
disclosed afterward he had stu studied
died studied government files purportedly
linking Jack in the early 1940's
with a number of groups later de declared
clared declared subversive,
Stanley B. Rose, Jack's as assistant,
sistant, assistant, denied the Borough pres.
ident had ever been linked with
Communism and said it might
be a case of mistaken,: identity.
Jack himself said, "Communism
was never an Issue in my career."-
:
Wagner said he had written to
the House un-American Activities
Committee and received a file
which showed, he said, that Jack
had dealings in the earlv 1940's
with organizations later declared
subversive by the U.S. Attorney
general', office.:
0.40
5:00 7:00 9:00 P.M.
liN TAVt IhM SOUIII
inlay CUtlll l.lln. lf

4