The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03012

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Army

Missile May

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Cancel

WASHINGTON, Feb. 22 (UP) America's worldwide
military strength will be largely cancelled out if Russia is
first to perfect ballistic missiles', with 1,500-mile range,
the magazine "Army" said today..
The magazine, published by the Association of the
United States Army, jumped on the Air Force for con contending
tending contending that such mid-range missiles in Russian hands
would not basically alter present military conditions.
" At the same time, one of the most urgent calls yet
for a speed-up in ballistic missile development came from
a famed German Who claimed no 'Other-weapons will be
able to deter or win global vwar in the future.

Dr. Walter R. Dornberger, who
directed German V-weapons dev.
elopmer.t in World War II, said
air defenses in five or six years
will make "sitting ducks" of
bombers and even guided missiles
that go no higher than 100,000 feet
and no faster than 2,600 miles an
hour.
The "onlv wav out" for the of
fense is the ballistic missile that
streaks through space at speeds
up to 15,000 Mt'H, uornDerger

told an Aviation writers Associa'
tion meeting yesterday.
Meanwhile the House Armed
Services Committee today ap approved
proved approved five proje.is designed to
-substantially" speed L.S. ef efforts
forts efforts to develop an oceau-span-mi.
j ballistics missile before Kus Kus-tia.
tia. Kus-tia. .. Une action came as Gen. Nath-
an v Twining warned tne Senate
' Aimed Services Committee tnat
- greatly increasing" boviel re-
search program may put Kussia
anead in tne race wr tne inter-,
continental' weapon,
ine House fiioiio okayed four

j.rovt ir f ''1;cct, prelum.

aoly involving lr m issue
testing, ami voted to authorize a
' "i4,4tw,00o expansion of tne auon-.'.-.
tl Advisory Committee lor Aero Aeronautics.
nautics. Aeronautics.
Rep. L. Mendel Rivers (D-S.C),
chairman ot a suocommittee wnicli
handled the projects, said they
juia "suDstantiaiiy" increase ta ta-cilities
cilities ta-cilities for-development ot the
long-range ballistic missile.
The funds for the NACA, the
government's top aviation re research
search research agency, would include

Angry Unionists
Seeking Economic
Relief From Eden
LONDON, Feb. 22 (UP)-An an angry
gry angry Trades Union Congress Gen General
eral General Council meets today to fina finalize
lize finalize proposals to Sir Anthony E E-den's
den's E-den's government for easing Brit Brit-sin's
sin's Brit-sin's straining economy.
A SDecial economic committee of
the TUC, Britain's AFL-CIO, met
last night and informed sources
said they agreed to drive home to
the government the necessity of
protecting the nation's low income
group from 'unequal and unnec unnecessary"
essary" unnecessary" sacrifices to bolster the
Many or Chancellor of tne lx
chequer Harold MacMillan's ans
wers to the economic crisis such
is increased bread and milk pric
es, and steeps increases n down
pavments on cars and TV sets-
have bit the little mar where it
..hurts. v :
The TUC wants the government
to drop purchase tax on kitchen
utensils and it disapproves of the
new bread and milk prices.
The TUC was expected to send
a long statement of its views to
the government today including
suggestions that a family and oth other
er other income tax allowances be in increased
creased increased so wage earners can keep
more of theit wages, and thus dis discourage
courage discourage more demands for higher
pay.
Judge Says 24
LONDON, Feb. 22 (UP) A pret pretty
ty pretty 24-year-old English girl, forbid
den all her life from even talking
to a man alone, was given for formal
mal formal permission by Britian's chief
justice today to have her first
date.-
Lord Justice Goddaird. issued a
verbal decision freeing Kathleen
t Rutty from legal bonds which
' have made her a ward of the gov government
ernment government since she was three
months old. r
Under terms of a legal order,
she was barred from speaking to
a male person alone.
'Now I can go out with a &
or even talk to one." Kathleen
aid, smiling, after the order was
yi uiiuuiiicu.
Lord Goddard's order was the
climax to a long and Uphill fight
for the girl's freedom, waged with

w-' u Wi Ld Lai lb4
INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS
t and EASTERN Air liftei

rears

Strength

instruction of an "atmosphere "atmosphere-entry
entry "atmosphere-entry simulator" at Ames Aero Aeronautical
nautical Aeronautical Laboratory, M e f 1 e t
Field, Calif.
Rep. Carl T. Durham YD-NT C V
said the simulator also wnnlrf hp
used for missile development. It
presumaDiy involves heat prob problems
lems problems encountered when the mis
sile s atomic warhead plunges
down through the atmosphere at
supersonic speed.
Twining, Air Force chief of staff.
told the Senate committee that
Soviet air research efforts exceed
thi, country's and could result "in
tr.3 Soviets obtaining better mis missiles
siles missiles sooner than we."
Trevor Gardner, who recently
quit as Air Force research chief
in a dispute over the missiles pro program,
gram, program, said Sunday he believes
Russia already is "ahead of us"
in this field.
Twininjf did not go that far,
but he warned that Russia is
"greatly increasing" its air re research
search research and development and
fflilld pvt ( (initM
brtitiiil htnh in mi. ,,;;$ jUj wsf
P'nes- 1
Twillinff snnporuft Kefnre h a
Senate committee ; with Air Sec Secretary
retary Secretary Donald R. Quarles, who has
sam mis country is moving ahead
as raoidlv as nnssihls in thn mis.
sile? field. A summary of Twining's
iaieineni was maae puDlic.
The NACA hill annrovpf1 hv fhp
House committee includes $906,000
for the simulator and for improve
merits on a transonic tunnel at
Moffett Field; $8,576,900 for the
hypersonic tunnel and hioh fpm.
perature work at Langley Aero
nautical Laooratory. Hampton;
Va., and $5,962,000 for the propul propulsion
sion propulsion systems laboratory at Lewis
Flight Propulsion Laboratory,
ueveiana.
The committee also approved VA
million dollar for an "imnnrl.nt"
secret project involving aircraft
propulsion and $3,800,000 for a se secret
cret secret Army base overseas.
Speaker Rules
All Lien Equal
In Commons
LONDON, Feb. 22 (UP A
lieutenant colonel ordered a
bafcadier to "sit down" in the
House -if Commons today and
got away with It.
Lt. Col. waiter Bromley-Davenport
and his higher-ranking
colleague, Brig. O. L, Prior-Palmer,
arose to speak at the same
time. :-.
Bromley-Davenport shouted at
Prior-Palmer to be seated.
Laborite W.-R. Williams Inter Intervened
vened Intervened to ask the speaker of the
House if it: was proper for the
lieutenant colonel to give such
orders to the brigadier.
"AH men are equal here re replied
plied replied Speaker W. 8. Morrison.
Prior-Palmer sat down. Bromley-Davenport
went on with his
speech.

- Year Old Girl May Talk to Men

the aid of the National Council for
Civil Liberties.
Kathleen was taken from her
mother at the age of three months
and placed in a poorhouse.
. She later was assigned to live
with relatives but under the strict
supervision of the Royal Eastern
Counties Institution in Colchester.
She charged the institution had
"wrongfully kept control over her
for some years.,-
The girl has been held under a
"place of safety" ruling in Brit Brit-aijMTMental
aijMTMental Brit-aijMTMental Deficiency Act. The
.aci gave local authorities the
right tp -decide where she lived,
and what she did, and whom she
shrm'asee. " '"
But her counsel, John Platts Platts-Mills,
Mills, Platts-Mills, said Kathleen could spell
and do arithmetic just as well as

lb Plays
Cards Close
To Vest
THOMAS VILLE. Ga... Feh 22
(UP President Eisenhower Is
playlns his DOlitlcal cards so
close to his vest that one of his
best friends, Treasury Secretary
ueorge M. Humphrey, has "no
idea" whether the Chief Execu Executive
tive Executive will run again.
Humrjhrev made this abund
antly clear as1 he left last night
tor, wasnington ana New York.
He will speak tonight before the
Institute of Mining and Metal Metallurgical
lurgical Metallurgical Engineers at the Wal
dorf-Astoria in New York.
Today the President, his face
ruddy from long hours of quail
hunting, played his prst If
holes of golf since his heart
attack and started of with a
booming 240-yard drive.
It was the President's second
visit to a golf course since his
attack. He played nine holes last
week shortly after his arrival at
the Georgia plantation of Sec
retary Humphrey.
The big Eolflnz day indicated
that Mr. Eisenhower is making
much more rapid progress to
ward complete recovery than
had been expected. The Chief
Executive's doctors had thought
it would be spring before he
could undertake a full regula regulation
tion regulation round.
The President nlaved on the
Glen Arven Country Club course
with John Hay (Jock) Whitney,
the New York .'nortJ'mfl'i;: John
H. Walter, i up club orofe.vMun-
al, and James C. Haserty, White
House press secretary.
ine Treasury secretary has
been widely credited as having
the Inside- track to the Presi
dent's second term Intentions.
Humphrey, however, punctur
ed more than a few political bal balloons
loons balloons last night as he boarded
the presidential plane,' Colum
bine III, lor his flight to Wash
ington. V
" have no idea at all if Pres
ident Eisenhower will run or
reelection," he said.
Furthermore, he said he and
Mr. Eisenhower had not discuss
ed the second term question
since the President came south
a week ago for a holiday of eoll
ana quail hunting.
Humphrey and the President
new south together a week ago
and have spent the interval In
close companionship, hunting
quail during the day and play
in? bridge at night.
Rumors "inmil'i with n h
quail hunting session on Hum
phrey's Milestone, Plantation
that the secretary, one of the
President's 'trusted associates,"
was privy to Mr. Eisenhower's
big secret; that the President
was discussing the weighty mat
ter with him.
Thus it came as Somewhat of
a shock to certain political quar
ters last night when Humphrey
was asked specifically whether
he, during the South Georgia
holiday, had discussed the sec second
ond second term matter with Mr. El
senhower. :-
"I have not," Humphrey re replied
plied replied bluntly. "We have been
quail hunting and having a
good time.' '"
Humphrey also disclaimed any
knowledge of when the Presi
dent would announce his in ten
Humphrey's remarks demon
strated the extent to which Mr.
Elsenhower is makins his own
decision as he has said several
times he would do. It has been
long accepted by his close asso associates
ciates associates that the second term de decision
cision decision is discussed only If the
President raises the subject.
the doctors who judged her case
and found her wanting.
Kathleen, who formerly was em employed
ployed employed in a hospital, now is a fac factory
tory factory worker.
Asked what she was going to
do on her first night of liberty
she said, "I am going home with
the family."
She lives with her former "su "supervisors,"
pervisors," "supervisors," her half-brother and
his wife. t
Kathleen also said she plans to
continue working the factory but
now she can talk to the boys in
the shop. y
Previously; she said, she, scrup scrupulously
ulously scrupulously avoided all social contacts
at-the-faetor
"If it were found out I spoke to
f young man it had to be report reported,"
ed," reported," she said.

'L A people know the truth and the

PANAMA, R. P. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1356

in n n m px

New Storm Carries Death,
Havoc To U.S. West Coast

SAN RANCTSCO, Feb. 22 (UP)i apparently expanded President
The second disastrous storm of Eisenhower's offer Sunday to pro pro-the
the pro-the winter season covered thelvide U.S. farm surpluses to vie-

west coast today with death and
destruction.
me uuee-uav comoinai on or
howling winds, heavy rains and
drifting snow began easing off to today
day today but floods still imperiled res-
menis oi severji areas. The storms
caused at least seven deaths and
numerous noocis in Washington, O O-regon
regon O-regon and California.
Railroads and highways were
blocked by slides, whole commu communities
nities communities were isolated and com communication
munication communication lines were ripped out
throughout the three-state area.
The U.S. Weather Bureau can cancelled
celled cancelled storm warnings which had
been in effect for 48 hours, but
warned there would still be oc oc-casional
casional oc-casional rain and snow. It said,
however, the huge storm center,
"hanging" almost motionless off
the Washington coast had spent
its fury.
The storm brought death to per persons
sons persons in both Washington and California.

Tum PscnA W.ffh HAi.liiniinn!,..AU ,.,..- U nfAM D..t 1

- v H..vv, ,, H.i.i., vuiiaii UltlUll
a flashdood trapped them while
they were working inside an ir irrigation
rigation irrigation pipeline.
A Meanwhile the United States
expanded its offer of food and
other relief measures to victims
of the bitter European cold wave
to include four Iron Curtain na nations.
tions. nations. .
The State Department disclosed
the action in announcing that U.
S. ambassadors in 19 countries
have hron .ordered to make urgent
report on ilie needs in the
stricken areas of Europe and the
Near East.
In doing so, the department

workers, Clifford A. Hack and his 1945, when parts of Europe were! 8 t ""T
brother, Harold, both in their mid-ravaged by floods, Americar re. Storehousea, Motor Transporta Transporta-30s.
30s. Transporta-30s. were, reported drowned whenllief was accepted hv Russia's satJtlon' and Dredging Divisions,

Church-Working Girl Scout Leader
Arrested For Peddling Narcotics

NEW YORK, Feb. 22 (UP)-A
51-year-old Girl Scout leader and
active church worker was arrest arrested
ed arrested last night as an alleged nar narcotics
cotics narcotics peddler.
Mrs. Tenna Kishis, w i d o w d
mother of a 13-year-old aon, had
been indicted secretly last Nov November
ember November on information provided by
James Pagano, ex-convict and al allegedly
legedly allegedly one of. the nation's big biggest
gest biggest narcotics dealers, for whom
she is said to have acted as an a a-gent,
gent, a-gent, police said.
Subquent surveillance of the
widely respected community lead
er led to "three good arrests"!
and the confiscation of sOme $50,
000 in illegal drugs, police said..
k
4 Sflf A-l.ilnrt!Wli;I'.ov

rOL'It OT THE EEAUTIFl'lllODELS that will exhibit the "million dollars" worth of Jewelry from Cartler at the Hotel El
Panama this Saturday. The models'SreridrAfamtnirtrni T?!Tht.er-'Df-thr-amb99ado-of -Peruj-Misa .Maureen. Keesler.a
brunette from the Canal Zone; Olga Clare, a debutant from Panama, and Carlotita Boyd, a former Queen of Carnival of..,,
the Union Club.

country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

tims of the severe winter weather
i that has gripped Europe for days
, ,
White House news secretary
James C. Hagerty had said at!
Thomasville. Ga. in reply to oues
uons mat the President s offer did
i not apply to Iron Curtain coun
tries.
But instuctions sent to U. S.
envoys to get the program start started
ed started included four Soviet bloc na nations
tions nations Romania, Hungary, Po Poland
land Poland and Czechoslovakia as
well as Communist Yugoslavia.
The department said the am ambassadors
bassadors ambassadors were instructed to in inform
form inform the governments of the af-
te-M'f.' "" ih';i"
American aid could include such
items as food, clothing and blan
kets.
Officials declined to speculate
on whether the Communis: nations
WUUIU OLICUL IIIC IJlltTI. UUL 111
ellites.
TV hi'iA.iiiolre-iM mlrl u;ovn

already has caused nearly 8001'.: tIntr"al Sfcuitj 'Branch;
riootha mi mnr nM nH nnw i ('Ma wstrate Courts;, and the U-

predicted. Additionally, there is a
threat of an influenza epidemic
Sudden thaws in some areas have
raised the spectre of floods and
avalanches.
Besides the f i v e Communist
countries, nations receiving U.S.
aid ..offers ,included Iirttan,
France, Hie Netherlands, Belgium.
Norway, Denmark, -Italy, Frcece
Turkey, Luxemburg, Portugal,
Spain, West Germany and Austria
She was arrested when Pagano
failed to appear yesterday for trial
on a narcotics charge.
Police said Mrs. Kislus was not
herself a narcotics user and -no
drugs were found in her home.
They said she had admitted an ac
quaintance with Pagano.
Mrs. Kislus was described by
her East Harlem neighbors as
"a highly respected" member of
the community. She has been ac active
tive active in the affairs of St. John's
Evangelical Lutheran Church, has
led a troop of Girl Scouts, is secJ
retary of the Triborough Kepub
lican Club and has worked part part-time
time part-time for the board of Elections,
police said,
- 1

Unified
PC Payroll
In Effect

A unified payroll for the Ca
nal organization became an ac
tual fact this week when the
first pay checks Issued under
the new system were delivered
Monday mornig to employes on
Doth sides of the Isthmus.
Because of the size of the or
ganizatlon and the workload In
volved. paydays are being stag
gered and not all employes of
the company-government re
ceived their paychecks on Mon
day.
There will be new paydays for
a majority of the employes, with
checks being delivered this week
over a four-day period. Ail em
ployes of any given division,
wever, will receive their pay
checks on the same day
Paychecks were delivered Mon
day to employes, of the office of
the governor-president; Person Personnel
nel Personnel Bureau; all units of the of office
fice office of the Comptroller; offices
of the Supply and Civil Affairs
.. . i.
General Counsel; Safety
Branch; Administrative Branch;
r Iinillllf
Plant and Duplicating!
brarv. and License Sections.
Tuesday employes of 'the En Engineering
gineering Engineering and Construction Bu Bureau
reau Bureau units; and the Industrial,
Terminals, and Postal Division,
were paid..
Checks normally will he doll;
vcj-ecLSl'cdne? fay i vi",n,T'
the Panama Bailroaa'; t' mniu-
nity Services Bureau units; and
the Cbmissary, Police, and Fire
Divisions, but this week due to
the Washington's Birthday holi holiday,
day, holiday, they will be delivered on
Thursday.
Thursday will be nayday for
employes of the Health Bureau
(Continued on Page 6, Col. 4)
Zonians Spend
Quiet Day Off
Zonians celebrating Washing
ton's birthday with a day off
from work found things pretty
quiet around town today. :'
Police reported a peaceful day
not marred by accidents or Inci
dents. .. '. ".. .
The fact that Panama was
lowlng its regular workday sche 1
ii cave manv zone vorKersi
an opportunity to shop or do er
rands in Panama cuy.
Tomorrow it's back to work lorj
the Canal Zone.

i 0

I U 'til

Wants Congress
To Weigh Policy
On Replacements

The Centra! Labor Union-Metal Trades Council is
throwing its full support behind the firemen's fight a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst replacement by local-raters.
They will ask Congress to appoint a special com
mittee to hold hearings on the Canal Zone and to recom recommend
mend recommend what the future policy will be concerning the re replacement
placement replacement of U.S.-raters on the Zone.
CLU-MTC delegates met and unanimously ap approved
proved approved a six-part plan of action which is aimed at carry
ing the firemen's case to Congress. r
The labor union's legislative representative, Howard
E. Munro, now in Washington, is being instructed to op oppose
pose oppose the passage of the item in the 1957 budget which
concerns the appropriation of $293,000 for the consolida consolidation
tion consolidation of the Canal Zone fire departments.

Last week Local 12 of the Fire
fighters' Union learned of the
Panal' nlnn t.n consolidate all
ot tne firefightlng services on
the Zone. The union proiesiea
the approval of the plan and
pledged they would take their
fight "to each individual mem member
ber member of Congress."
If sDDroved. the plan would
rail inr a.
sash Of 2D u..-rL:
firemen's jobs, and the employ employment
ment employment of shout 100 local-raters.'
, .iL-Ai'iCVaiJk-i-l' 'pi? IV. "1
: action consists of the ioiJoAUia
items:
1. Issue press release in sup support
port support of Local 13 of the Firefight Firefighters
ers Firefighters in their battle for survival.
2. Instruct the CLU-MTC leg legislative
islative legislative representative, Munro,
to have the item in the 1957
budget for the appropriation of
$293,000 for consolidation of the
Canal Zone Fire departments
denied.
'3. Ask Congress to appoint a
special committee to hold- hear hearings
ings hearings on the Canal Zone (similar
t h reoonf. Railroad Hear-
Vllu i vvviiw .....
ings). This group to recommend
what the future policy will be
...lhva in renlacine United
States citizens employed on the.
Canal Zone.
a 4,.niniint-. the tieode In tne
United States with the present
fol-!.,, 1n -at.h and all labor rriag
situation by naving aiucica u

-

zlnes and newspapers.
wav a l employes wro:
their Congressmen and Senators
personal letters.
6. Have all employes request
their relatives and friends in
1

nvi CENTS

1
the United States to write their
Congressmen and Senators.
A local labor leader stated
that to date no government of official
ficial official has seen fit to designate
which positions had "Job securi security,"
ty," security," or in other words, w h o
should look for jobs while on
States leave because of the in insecurity
security insecurity of there not being a job
ncie a year irom now.
Originally U.S. Civil Kervire
Graces i and 2'vc-" ti h f,,,--
hi r'!Cr"li h
- .'rr.e j.".j.Novh this has
ly crept ud to Grade 4. the labor
leader, pointed out. The same is
being done in craft positions,
and more and more Jobs are be being
ing being filled at lower rates of pay,
he added.
The labor official also said:
"This must not be confused
with the CLU-MTC policy of e e-qual
qual e-qual pay for equal work." He
added:
"Wejntend to let our people
In the United States and Con Con-eress
eress Con-eress know what is happening,
because we are convinced this is
not what they wish."
Sabotage
Blamed Oil
Peronistas
BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 22-(UP)
An explosion blamed on Peio
nlsta saboteurs destroyed an Ar Army
my Army arsenal today and damaged
private property for hundreds of
yards around.
The explosion rocked the"!!'
nos Aires suburb of Mlguelete
like an earthquake. Only minor
Injuries were reported, although
the main blast touched off many
smaller ones among storej of
bombs and ammunition.
Morning newspapers said ,. the
explosion was touched off -by
followers of Argentina's deposed
dictator, Juan Peron, now resid residing
ing residing in Panama.-There-was nn
immediate statement from- the
government. s
Two arrests were made. A
traffic policeman identified as
Hector N, Paulette was arrested
near scene, along with a woman
companion. Paulette, who was
dressed In plain clothes, told po police
lice police that a strange man who said
he was an electrician In the nr.
senal warned him and the worn
i? an to leave the area immediate immediately
ly immediately because he expected an explo
sion.
j The main blast occurred a few
'minutes after midnight, knock
Mng down walls and breaking
windows in homes 'within a ra radius
dius radius of several blocks. Although
many persons were cut and
bruised by flying debris, only a
small" child had to be hospita hospitalized
lized hospitalized for treatment of cuts.
Col. Victor J. Arribau, acting
Minister of the Army, denied
earlier reports that an exchange
of shots was heard before the
main explosion.
"jBALUOA TIDES
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21-
HIGH tCW
12:5J a.m. T;18 p..,.
1:34 p.m. 7:50 p.m.

I



r.-EDNESPAT. FEEHEART 22, l.Vi
Till PANAMA AJItEICAN AN INBtPENTENT OA 1X1 KETTSFAF E!t

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
nmB and ULIM0 TMt M1AM MtICM MHI, INC
rOLNDlO MtUUJ WOUNSVLI. It Hit
HAMMOOIO AIA. tCI'O
B7. H STREtT P. O. BO 134, Paham. Il.-Of f.
TlLIPHONl 2-0740 I 5 LINIS1
Ct AOOMSS. PAN AM EPIC AN. PANAMA
CdCON OrUCt; 12.I7W CCHTRAL AvtNUC BETWEEN 12TH ANO ISTH STftECIt
FOKHON REMESEMTATIVM, JOSHUA 6. POWERS. INC.
343 MDiON Ave New YOU. U7 N. Y.
LOCAL "All ..-

t Month, m hovanc
Poll SIX MONTHS. IN ADVANCE ADVANCE-'Off
'Off ADVANCE-'Off ONE Tf Alt. IN AOVANCE

T Mail (si b tpta Ism to nuUn ef The Panama "'ico"
.Uttcn am nuiv4 a.rafciill and ar handa i a wfcollt-conMtiJ
' aiaiinsr. , .
It ya contribute lettef 4oa'f ba Impotient eww t eppo th
- aXt lo Letter ar published in lha Ofdf riYi
" t Plane try la ktp lha Utterl limited la ana poaa langth.
Idtntirf af Ittttf writers I M Jn i!ricft oniidne
J This Miwtptptr wb wtpenwbilitf tor statement opinior
axprausd la Utteri fram reader.
I THIS IS TOUt FORUM THI READCRS OWN COLUMN
mm MAIL BOX

' PERON AND ARGENTINE UNIVERSITIES
'"sir
'l do not feel that I am not keeping my promise to pay no
more attention to anonymous "American Citizen," In writing
tnis letter as the letter in the Mall Box of Feb 16, purports
Uto quote Peron. I shall limit this largely to a single paragraph
;0a S8!!' "There are five universities In Argentina when
there are six. But a university more or less means nothing to
J that great educator. I do not believe that his other figures in
the same paragraph are any more accurate. . ..-
U Now let me quote an American writer, Gladys Delmas, who
lives in Buenos Aires, In a recent Issue of The Keporter.
"During the revolution that brought Juan Peron to power
''in 1945, one of the rallying cries of his descamlsados was "jAl "jAl-arratas
arratas "jAl-arratas gi, libros no!" (-(Shoes yes, books no!"). It was one
the few slogans he did not betray. His whole regime was
anti-Intellectual, and no segment ol the population was more
'consistenly badgered and beset than the universities.
II "The best of the professors were either fired or else resigned
4n disgust at the outset 1,250 in three months. The stuaents
were alternately imprisoned, wooed, regimented, and expelled.
I lectures became a farce, with students correcting the mistakes
ef Illiterate teachers. Entrance examinations were aoolished as
'undemocratic," and were replaced by a "good-conduct certifi certificate"
cate" certificate" delivered by the political police.
i. "ninlomftii were distributed as a reward for party activity.

"One man was eranted an M.D.
.At the Medical School. In one

technician held a professorial chair after all his superiors had
-successively been fired for political reasons.
"A Course In the doctrine of 'Justicialismo Peron's own
caricature of social lustice was obligatory In all faculties."

- Evidently the University stuaents did not like the kind of

education they had to take from Peron as tney lurnea against,
.-him and seized the universities, which now may become auto autonomous.
nomous. autonomous. One other thing in the Peron letter needs correcting.

There are a lot more but they are not worm tne time ana
space.
? Peron as quoted by his defender, Anonymous American citi citi-l
l citi-l zen, says "A large pot was made up by several wealthy fam-

uiies" which, he aaas was usea
iarmed forces to betray him.

Now let us call Miss ueimas, an eye witness to me revolu revolution,
tion, revolution, again.
v "Tne revolution that brought first General Lonardl and

I then General Aramburu to power were largely the work of tne
professional middle class. It Is not the manufacturers and
uusinessmen, or even the great landed proprietors and cattie cattie-Jmen,
Jmen, cattie-Jmen, economically the most affected by Peron's policies, who
have come to the fore since September 16, but lawyers, doctors,
engineers, and other professional men.
"The stuaent boay, the proiessional class of tomorrow, un un-!
! un-! compromisingly liberal in Its active majority; Is at least one
'coherent group on which the professional classes in power can
count for support as they lee. their way amid the entrenched
,. positions- of clerical conservatism and demagogic peronism."
Both Peron and his propagandist, who uses the pseudonym
- of "American citizen,'? are much too careless of tacts toniake
- argument with them possible. So let's cnange the suoject. Mr.
; Euitor, do you think president Eisennower will be a candidate
- lor re-election? v
? Crede Calhoun

i i k.. SHOVELS VERSUS SPADES
. f61r;'. ...
- It was with elation that I read in the Feb. 18 Panama
'American an account of Robert U. Browns article regaraing
I sex-president Peron. Published in a newspaper trade journal,
: ; the article stated much criticism was heard about the manner
I : in which the United Sttaes has accorded sanctuary to the de de-f
f de-f i posed dictator by countenancing his residence In a hotel own own-f
f own-f e( and bperated by the Panama Canal Company.
While bn vacailon in the States last winter, I was frequent frequent-l
l frequent-l 1? asked, "how come1' the tacist dictator had been granted re re-7
7 re-7 luge by a country supposedly busily engaged In wiping out
f j sucir practices among her own citizenry.: All I could reply was,
f ,"When have we ever allowed theories and ldeasl to interfere
wtth actual practice? .v ,;;..,.:,;:.l
Maybe I should have been more realistic and explained thai

ine Hoiei Washington Is operating "in the rea" and that Pe
i ron's occupancy ot a suite will am substantially toward payini
a. few pvnensps

a few expenses.

j i After reading the above-mentioned Item, I turned the nage

t and what did I find? You're, righta full-column bluro m
! praise of Senor Peron, written by an individual who ambigu-
; ously calls himself "An American Citizens." He claimed the
' i article to be a verbatim translation of Senor Peron's remarks,
f ; but. It was quite evident that-American Citizen was impressea
! i by what he termed Peron's "sincerity."

!! I vHow American Citizen could be so dense as to expect any any-i
i any-i i thing from Peron other than a whitewashing of his Argentine

; j activities is more than I can
j DiRianii racketeer can always
tlcrt of his brutalities and

.merits this classification as lully as Al Capone or "Dutch"
EcliUltZi 'v...,. .- ... .;
j j ;.WhiW the offender's station in life may qualify the term
i J applied to his crimes, no criminal is greater than the crime he

.;. i co. .miis ana peron is no exception to the rule.

j ; undoubtedly American Citizen did not read "The Woman

i Wi fi ft ewora" by Maria Flores. a citizen of Areentina. if he

! hid, he would have learned of the flagrant misappropriation
s i ot -public and government funds and expropriation of private
? Jpf perty by Peron and his Evlta all accomplished In the
jnawie of sweet charity. Such thievery Is little better than the
I Jor rations of a confidence man who persuades widows and
foti ans to invest their savings In various spurious schemes.
T.J r Perhaps the fact that Senor Peron stole millions while the
4 confidence man limits his thefts to comparatively petty lar lar-.
. lar-. cey of hundreds or thousands is considered a mitigating cir cir-Jcfi
Jcfi cir-Jcfi istance, but In the lexicon of common decency and official
I maial obligation theft is still theft, whether cloaked in gold
I br1d or a shabby business suit.
J .. Ui' .' v : Consistent
I i """" ':' ":"

PANAMA
CAN FILL

ltf rAAM0

' 1.70 HO
e eo 1300
18. SO 4 00

after nine montns' attendance
science faculty the laboratory
to onoe omcers oi me Argentine
paying
comprehend. Even the most
produce an extenuating exDlana
depredations, and Peron rertainlv
AMERICAN
YOUR NEEDS!

Labor News
And
Comment

By VICTOR RIESEL
CHICAGO If Dave Beck gets
out of Asia, as he now plans, he
will be received, as I saw him
greeted in Europe, by our Foreign
Service and all its facilities includ including
ing including our intelligence and counter
espionage agents.
They will brief him. lie will be
privvy to many secrets. He will
be driven up to the Bamboo Cur Curtain.
tain. Curtain. The teamsters' chief wi see
for himself the troops of the Chi Chinese
nese Chinese Red Star. He will sceNtheir
carbines and machinegun posts.
But he will have to ask the Intelli Intelligence
gence Intelligence people for a glimpse of Com Com-munized
munized Com-munized China's most powerful
weapon its propaganda machine.
7.
If he is properly briefed and looks
real close, he will be unhappy to
learn that an ally of his own West Western
ern Western Conference of Teamsters has
helped somewhat to build the anti anti-U.S.
U.S. anti-U.S. propaganda machine of a gov government
ernment government which slaughtered and
brainwashed our GIs.
This may surprise Dave Beck.
And horrify him, too. But he'll
find it. He will discover that a
full-length motion picture produced
a few years ago by the Mine Mill
end Smelter Workers Uiyon is now
part of the Chinese movie circuit.
It's called "Salt of the Earth,"
and it makes Americans and U.S.
business firms out to be mean
bestial slave-drivers, evil haters of
the colored and non-English speak speak-ine
ine speak-ine peoples.
The film has just had Chinese
dubbed in. Soon it will be shown
by the Peiping government to nun
dreds of millions of captive Chi
nese on double feature bills with
such Oriental Oscar winners as
"The IndiiZo Flower Blossoms," the
story of women workers building
a railroad and "The Battle of Sang Sang-kumryung,"
kumryung," Sang-kumryung," which shows the Chi Chinese
nese Chinese People's "Volunteers".fighting
our GIs in Korea. You needn't
think but a second to figure who's
the atrocity-committing villain in
that one.
The ,Mine, Mill and Smelter
Workers Union.-producer of "Salt
of the Earth," is, therefore, doing
business with the Sovietized Chin Chinese.
ese. Chinese. It either sold the film to
Peiping.eave it to the Communists
or released itt o an agent who did
so. This union soon will be before
the Subversive Activities Con Control
trol Control Board defending itself against
charges that it should, in effect,
be dissolved. ;
Yet we fmd that the Western Con
ference of Teamsters has not only
signed a mutual assistance pact
with this Mine, Mill Union (which
also helped sponsor Harvey Matu Matu-sow)
sow) Matu-sow) but that the Western Confer
ence Deoole are meeting witn Mine,
Mill leaders and planning mutual
wages and Organizing drives.
n I call the Asia film business to
Beck's attention because he was
most eracious in answering a se
ries of questions for me in a unique
transcontinental phone interview
here the other day. As I threwt he
queries t.d he replied our voices
were amplified so that an audience
of 2,000 top business executives
gathered here in the Grand .Ball .Ball-room
room .Ball-room of the Palmer House heard
our voices. ; ;
Beck told us he has ,fno use for
Communists. I will insist on ade-
duate gafecuards so that their un
holy associations do not rub offi
on any of our people.
- The Teamsters' chief, who- also
said he plans to stand for re-election
in 1957 for another five-year
term, thereby put himself on rec record.
ord. record. The industrialists, the news newsmen
men newsmen and other labor leaders now
await action.
Beck, it se ms to me, could do
tne. Teamsters a lerruic seivite
by smashing the Western Conference-Mint,
Mil) alliance. The
Teamsters have ambitious plans.
They were outlined In the phone
interview. Beck disclosed that his
union has already launched a
drive for over 1,500,000 new mem
bers.
BAKED SPUDS
SALEM. S. D. (UP) Fire
fighters had some hot potatoes on
their hands near here recently,
Thev were called to extinguish a
blaze enveloping a truck belonging
to Kenneth Norman ot waienown.
His cargo was potatoes.
SHE'S BEEN PICCED-
Title-winner Liselotte Schraner
seems delighted with this pig,
one of her prizes for being
1jcke4-',Mrf4Iamburg era.
many." The charming 20-year-old
lab assistant is after the
"Miss Germany" title, and she
hopes the pig's her lucky charm.

I W JU J I l

'

Of
I have been looking at a picture
of Harry S. Truman wearing a hat
that perches high on his head,
seems too small and oddly fits nis
skull. If suddenly occurs to me
that very few men of eminence
should be allowed the privilege of
wearing a hat, because on a double
dome c hat sits ill. I
I believe that Adlai Stevenson
looks sillier in a hat than most
tnybody. especially when he rigs
himself up in foreign headdress
as be did in some strange land
not so long ago. Stevenson cannot
wear a Homburg without appear appearing
ing appearing to emulate the bump on the
pickle and he goes much better
baldheadcd.
Thomas E. Dewey never mas mastered
tered mastered hat wearing, nor did Henry
A. Walla jt,. The late Franklin D.
Roosevelt looked great bareahead
but his hat appeared to be flung
at him and was generally turned
up in front. Herbert HooVer was
not much of a hat man either, nor
was Calvin Coolidge. "Silent Cal"
was even less a hat man when he
out on an Indian headdress.
Bernard Baruch looks better in
full dress than any living man and
he can wear a scarlet hunting cap
with great flair. But. so help me,
when he claps on a regular lid, it
sticks up in front, falls too far
WASHINGTON (NEA) Presi President
dent President Eisenhower's latest message
to Congress, recommending revi
sion of the controversial McCarran McCarran-Walter
Walter McCarran-Walter Immigration Act of 1952,
is being interpreted here as some something
thing something of a political document.
It has a special appeal to U.S.
minority groups who want more of
their countrymen admitted to these
shores. The hyphenated-American
vote is considered important in
election year s. This, message
should satisfy local political boss
es who have large numbers of
foreign born to corral at the polls.
The President s recommenda
tions were worked out largely byj
the Department of Justice, under
which the Immigration and Natu
rahzation Service operates.
A flock of proposed amendments
to the 1952 law were sent to Con
teress by Acting Attorney General
William P. Rogers at the same
time the" President's message
went up.
These proposals may go a long
itrr u
(A Lenten feature of the Pana-
ma-American, prepared by the
Rev. M. A. Ceokion, Episcopal
Churches of Our Saviour St. Mar Mar-9rtt.)
9rtt.) Mar-9rtt.) THE ARMY SERGEANT'S
WISDOM
Read Act 24:22-25. "And St he
reasoned of righteousness, temper temperance,
ance, temperance, (self-control) and lodgment
to come, Felix trembled, and ans answered,
wered, answered, Ge thy way for this time;
when I have a convenient season,
I will call for the"
An armv sergeant Was once ex
plaining to a batch of recruits
why the drill and traditions of the
service were necessary. He said
simplyr'a man, has na JOuLaiU)
out discipline."
His words were timely. We must
heed them. Few of us do not see
almost daily evidences of the loose
and sloppy morale to, which mo-

DAnninn ArmfrurM" Hlvmmr

flllMIIIVil VIJIIIJ""

Hats And Men
By BOB RUARK

over his eyes, or sits too high on
his head. This is not true of the
topper which he wears with dis-
Unction, and there are few people
who can handle a stovepipe hat.
I reckon the late Odd Mclntyre
had more flavor to his hats than
anybody else but Jimmy Walker.
They were swooped-up-ofl one one-side,
side, one-side, swooped-down-on-the other
side reaoras.
Walker Stone, an Indian friend
of mine, shoves his head into a
hat as if he meant it to stay mere.
I fancy that I can wear a Hom Homburg
burg Homburg if it is big enough Irt the
brim because a lady once said I
looked like a rlverboat gambler
and I take that as a compliment.
Old Rhett Ruarki sun! i
' Al Smith had a fine way with
a derby, I very difficult headpiece
generally worn only by English Englishmen
men Englishmen with any degree of distinction.
Germans look lousy in any kind
of hat that isn't a helmet. And
there never was a Russian who
looked at home in anything from
head to toe. Where they get the
tailors, nobodv will ever know.
But I think they must be part of
a counter-Communist plot.
There never was a Yankee whd
could wear a Panama and looK as
If he owned it any more than a
Northerner can carry off a Stetson
Truman in that cut-down cowboy

Immigration Quotas
By PETER EDSOII

way to meet the demands of
. is A
senators like Herbert Lehman (D (D-NY),
NY), (D-NY), who has been a leader for
liberalization of the McCarran-
Walter act. But there is consider
able doubt that a majority of the
congressmen will go along with
them even in an electiori year.
It is necessary to dig into recent
immigration statistics to see just
what effect the amendments would
have.
Existing quotas of immigrants
for each country are based on one-
sixth of one per Cent of the wmte
population, census of 1920. This
figures to 154,657 admissible aliens
per year.
Actually, for the last three fiscal
years since the McCarran-Waltef
act was passed, only 81,000, 86,000
and 87.000 Quota immigrants have
been admitted. This is what has
led to, demands for liberalization of
the law.
The new proposal it to base the
total quota on one-seventh of one
per cent of the total population,

your me Arts

dern habits of overlooking or con-
veniently ignoring personal re
sponsibility, have led us.
There are many ways in which
we are wiser and more humane,
and have more "know-how" than
our forebears. We have developed
better skills in the technical and
commercial fields, but we have de declined
clined declined in the matter of icif-disci-pline
the wisdom of iclf-d t e
pllne... : ', j
The secret of wisdom Is to se
life and the world as God seel it;
to see ourselves as God se ti.
It is good for us to get detach
views of ourselves, to save u
from needlessly making ffo! o1
ourselves. One quick look of tht
kind would compel most of to
revise our estimate of miri'iv
The discipline of such"" tl.ttiff" f?
the first step to any abW.njf to-
m ...Jill. iA

reaching reality is to get the
net truth about ourselves itA t':'i
' 1

Vtrfrirv?

.!
hat he afftcts, looking strictly from
Missouri
But Ike makes It very well with
the same sombrero. Ike does not
look Kansas, he looks Texas.
Churchill is one of the few old
bovs who can handle a sauare
figged, high-crowi. bowler, but it
needs the cigar as baltnce and
preferably 4 topcoat with an as
trakhan collar. Eden has gone ott
horribly hatwise since the Hom Homburg
burg Homburg became his trademark. As a
matter Of fact, he has gont off
horribly with his entire clothing
scheme. His coats dont fit any
more and his pants bag in the knee
The departed Damon Runyott
Was one of the aristocrats of the
Snap brim and you don't see many
like him any more. There is prac
tically nobody td b seen In a
straw4oater either, which is good
because I never saw anybody who
looked natural id one except Maur Maurice
ice Maurice Chevalier and that ha( some-
thin fn Art With his lower liD
l tmnK tnat wun me political
shooting season oti deck, the boys
would do well to give a little!
thought tr this hat business. I
mean td say that, after seeing
Stevenson in a hat, I wouldn't trust
him out 6f light aftd I ani not
talking through my you-know-what
He looks just like a man who might
be leaving In a hurry.
according to the 1930 census.; This
would include alien residents and
people of the nonwhite races. It
would make the total 219,461.
Believers in the melting-pot the
ory will still say this isn't enough.
They want I wide-open-door policy.
Under this new plan. However,
all quotas would be rased, borne
60 countries like India and Ethi
opia, which now have minimum
quotas of 100. would be raised
to 200. i
The bigger 'countries would get
more. The British quota would go
from 69.461 to 74,787. The German
quota would go from 25,814 to
38,988. Italy's quota would jump
from 5645 to 10,796.
The big change which the new
plan would permit is to allow un
used quotas from one country to
be distributed among other coun
j tries that have waiting lists of
applicant for admission to the
U.S. as immigrants,
For this purpose, the Old World
tumunaett on ft V
ister a 1'it verdict on tlie evi evidence.
dence. evidence. That comes when the re re-lentlens
lentlens re-lentlens searchlight of God has
kmit turn4 upon ul ifld wl ar
stripped hare of the po with
which we dwiive fiurftlve. and
the Wftfld, Wh a m U torn torn-pelJH
pelJH torn-pelJH to My, "lH. HKjU hst
utrttM me tti kfiowi me," It
Is the hour tt day-bet in the
loul, ;
The tm tA the mHr Is'llifn!
t)( wan wmji a o'i''tjl!i4 aoul
whrvr he "'(' ifif"ff'
mot the wrtifm; Vht flV (M
ihwH tf H1 V,Mt wlil filill
(Ml '(. tmif jfirt'mmi IMt will
fi4 tm tA i4 i"" '''l "t'""
(kh It U U fOT'i'1
thst wl.i'fc i'trnm S M vMn U
t..;U CiA ly.ii(tl hT .1H'I
f--;';
wtw '"'
t i.i.ii.n ii Hi f'-f .f.tuM

'?i t''"'J
Mv-li h-'ih

l.ii

if.2

iilERRY
WASHINGTON To aDDreciate!
me savijie iniensiiy wim wnicn ine
usually suave, usually eenial Sena
ii . :
tor Lyndon Johnson cracked down
on any broadening of thi Case gas gas-lobbying
lobbying gas-lobbying probe, you have to appre appreciate
ciate appreciate a lot of behind-the-scenes lac lac-tors
tors lac-tors that the public didn't know
aDout during the natural gas de debate.
bate. debate. ;
During that debate Georee
Blown, oiejest money backer of
Lynaon jonnson over the years,
and head of the Texas Eastern
Transmission Pipeline, maintained
neaaquarters in the Hay-Adams
House in Washington, keeping a
waicmui eye on wnat went on in
the Semte. Brown, with his broth brother.
er. brother. Herman, is the sparkplu,; of the
big Texas conracting firm of Brown
ana Koot, which has benefited from
various lush government contracts.
including that for naval bases in
Spain. Brown was in' constant
touch with Sen. Johnson during the
name over gas. i
During that debate also. Louie
Jo.uison, former secretary of de defense,
fense, defense, was active on Capitol Hill on
oenau of Columbia Gas, trying to
change votes. Johnson is a Demo-
era l.
On the.hepublican side, Senator
Payne of Maine received heavy
gas-oil contributions when he de
feated senator Owen Brewster.
Payne voted for the gas bill de despite
spite despite the fact that New England is
in need of cheap gas and power.
On the Republican side also, re
ports persisted that the gas lobby
Bad premised a big election cam
paign kitty fir GOP candidates
totaling up to $2,000,000 if the bill
was passed, These reports, extreme
.VirJ
US a Z,h inZ
Republican leaders should mves-
tigate to prove untrue if tiiey are
proposed Hennintrs nrol
lobbying funds in the natural gas
battle.
BACKSTAGE WIRE-PULLING
Here are some of the backstage
moves made both by Republicans
and Democrats to block the broad broadened
ened broadened Hennings probe.
In the first place, shrewd Lyndon
Johnson outsmarted Senate liber liberals
als liberals by calling for a vote at 11
a.m. on a closely confined inves
tigation of the alleged Case bribe.
This was one hour before the Sen
ate usually meets and it caught
the Sen, liberals off-guard though
they had plenty of notice. None of
them Morse, Douglas, Neuberger,
Humphrey was present to demand
a broadened probe. So Lyndon
passed his narrow resolution call calling
ing calling for a special committee to
investigate the Case $2,500 offer
and nothing else.
Meanwhile, Missouri's Tom Hen
ninesii then presiding over a meet
ing of his regular elections com
mittee, had decided to proceed witn
a probe of the entire gas lobby and
its money. He phoned Senator Case
of South Dakota and asked him to
appear at 1 n.m
This immediately got pack to
Johnson He had quickly appointed
his special committee on which
were two older Democrats, George
of Georgia and Hayden of Arizona
Both approaching eighty, they are
not accustomed to break neck
soeed in their Senate deliberations
But 10 this case, Johnson saw that
they moved fast.
Thev met immediately in an un
usual place Vice President Nix
on'l Office. There, Nixon made an
u.iusual ruling namely, that the
special committee had complete
jurisdiction over any gas lobbying
probe. Nixon is supposed to make
rulines In public only from the
rostrum of the senate. But ne ana
Knowland. who disagree on most
thint-s. are 100 ner cent united on
preventing any enlarged probe of
the -i lobby
LYNDON ARGUES
JohSson's office then sent fori
Hennings. Hennings was ready to ;
Travel, Tour
ACROSS
1 Island near
Java
SCamplng
equipment
I Foot (prefix)
12 Leave out
it Century plant
14 Mimic
15 Eart Medi Mediterranean
terranean Mediterranean
native
17 Breast bone
IS Anoint
la Disparage
21 New Haven
show spot
21 Drone
24 Needed for a
travel car
27 Oxidize
Hi Son of Lot
(Bib.)
22 Click-beetle
24 Waken
If property
holding
27 Tree
HI Places
) Expectofite
41 Light brown
42Turk!dh
weight
44 Japanese
'..-'Outcasts.
44Thlrkt
it Heavy drinkei
rmirth
Arabian cillpt
14 MatMmitiral
Ifisirument
M Twiuwni
7J4
tOirtlr nelo
M luMirtf name
MittrtnH ptrt ptrt-(I
(I ptrt-(I Viltf
tmmmt
DOWN
1 Cowboy's
weapon
2 Prayer ending
3 Exist
4 South
European
country
$ Make lace
.. edema
Of prime
ImporUnce
10 Heroic
11 Obligation
18 Closer
20 Unfounded
report'
22 Entices

untrue. Bu. Republican lerders did 7t Zt
just the opposite. They rushed inlJ'lfnviti
L ,m,na.,. i ii don t.Wt'.nt me to mvestigate some
2 "E?"tJ0,h,"i.l,,l !"P?Ie.8.si thing where you yourself said only

i jiiUW I Ml

- tO UOUIID

tt drew pc&nsofi

confer immpdi.-iff.lv inf w4
ml
back that "Lyndon isn't iree He
.-.vv, uu. num in
was conlemng at the moment with
George and Nixon in an eiiort to
push the special probs ahead of
the broadened Hennings probe.
Finally, at 1:40, Johnson was free
Hennings, by that time, was due
to preside over his own committee
meeting at I p.m.
Johnson had a sheaf of yellovr
sheets from a nws teletype in his
hand when Hennings entered. He
tossed him one. It reported that
Hennings had called Case before
his regular elections committee at
2 p.m.
"Senator George says you're in
cc Jtempt of the Senate," the Tex Texan
an Texan told his Democratic colleague
from Missouri.
"Not according to what you your yourself
self yourself said on the Senate floor yes yesterday,"
terday," yesterday," replied Hennings. And he
pointed out that both Johnson and
Knowland had stated that the Hen Hennings
nings Hennings Committee had complete jur jurisdiction
isdiction jurisdiction to investigate the entire
question of gas lobbyingr
"But you are up for re-election
der ?Sena't(! rules you shouldnt be
in. .ma t k.n n
this year," countered Johnson. "Un-
rrhv'HH rZ
Then why did. you appoint
George and Hayden on the special
cori littee?" shot back' Hennings.
"Beth of them are up for election."
Johnson had no come-back.
HENNINGS IS UNMOVED
"For three years," Hennings con continued,
tinued, continued, ''I have tried to get off
this standing committee. But every
time I've tried, you wanted me to
on-to investigaU McCarthy,
of ttf Maryland elections or Pat
in Mou, Mvioft
yesterday the Integrity of the Sen
ate wa involved.
Johnson argued that Hennings
didn't 'mderstand the problem of
natural gas, that gas was an ex extremely
tremely extremely important matter political politically
ly politically in Texas.
This is a matter like- tne Deer
business would be in Missouri,
Johnson said.
"You may be close to Gussie
Busch or Ted Buford down in Tex Texas,"
as," Texas," shot back Hennings, "but the
beer business doesn't influence my
vote in Missouri.' 1
Finally. Hennings went back to
his committee. Senator Case turned
up, with a letter from Senator
George tnat he could not meet wun
the regular committee. He hid in a
phone booth with his arm Over
his face so that photographers
could not snap him.
Thin continued the backslaee
Wire-pulling to prevent any investi investigation
gation investigation of the most powerful lobby
that has influenced Washington in
yeas. ...
Answer to Previous Puiile

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sheltered side 45 Wading birds

26 Wormwood 46 Facts
A tree
28 Unspoken
30 On the ocean
31 Capital of
Switzerland
47 Greek city
48 Blackthorn
50 Unsullied
51 Pen name of
Charles Lamb
33 Pointed teeth 52 Actual
35Turn 85 Father

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THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN' IXDFPEXT! EXT MAILT NTIVSPAPFn

PAcr Trr
14-Y ear-Old, Tvins Indicted
For Murder Of Young Scout
JOIN THE WISE CAR OWNERS.;
Make advance appointments

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(NEA Telephoto)
JOINING IN THE FUN Presidential hopeful Adlal Stevenson joins In a dance with mem mem-i
i mem-i bers of the Boise, Idaho, Basque colony, said to be the nation's largest. The group, dressed
In native costumes, feted Stevenson with a one-dish Basque Lenten meal as he stopped in
Boise on his western campaign tour.

Senators Question American

Working for Tass News Agency

WASHINGTON, Feb. 22 (UP)-

The highest-ranking American ci citizen
tizen citizen employed by Tass, the .Rus .Russian
sian .Russian news agency, refused to tell

Senate investigators yes t e r d a y

he ever association witn comrau
cist spies. ' :
But Harry Freeman, assist assistant
ant assistant manager of th.Ta office
in Naw York, insisttd that thera
was nothinfl in Taw' operations
i for tha Senate Internal Security
aubeommitteo to investigate. Ha
said the ageney's activities ra
Ai.... .1 irni lara MWI DurttU.

Sen. William E. Jenner (R-lnd.)
Ha said the subcom

mittee has received testimony that

the news agency was useaior so soviet
viet soviet espionage m the United States
and throughout the world.
Freeman invoked the Fifth
Amendment against possible self self-incrimination
incrimination self-incrimination when asked if he had
associated with Gerhardt Eisler or
any other persons who were iden-

tilled in testimony quvici. ao.
He first said he did not associate
in his job with persons he knew
to be active in Communist espi espionage.
onage. espionage. 7 ... .
But he quickly "revised" his
icwpf and toot refuse in the

k ..n Ampnrlmfint.

.xwo other JNew York employes

. of Tass, Hays Jones ana mrs.
hasha Small Lurie, swore they

have not been Communists since
wonting for Tass. But they refused

to say whether tnejrnaa ueeu xicua
previously.
Freeman, a small, bald man
with a persistent smile, was the

key witness as ine luucuuumucc
opened hearings into Communist
news media in the United Mates.
he said the group is trying to
'discredit" Tass aud "intimidate
ana harass" its American em em-piuyes.
piuyes. em-piuyes. -Last month," he said in a
statement, "this committee eng engaged
aged engaged In an 'investigation' wnicn
in the opinion of Ine New YorK
' 1 1mes represented an arfort to;
' harass the press and particularly
tha Times. It appears that now
tho committee nas selected tne
'lass news agency as a target of
''.attack.",-.-,-, -,-,:. ; J

auocommittee counsel Robert
Morris read Freeman a clipping
from the Washington Daily News,

a Scripps-Howard newspaper.

The dispatch, dated Oct. 8, 1951,

said Tass reporters tried repeated

ly early in the Korean War to get
information about American mer

chant ships.'. i

Freeman smiled and said "there
is no foundation whatsoever to the

atory. It is completely out of char
acter with our work."

He said Tits compiles a 5000
to uOOO-word report daily for
Moscow from dispatches from
the United Press and Associat Associated
ed Associated Prass, New York and Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, newspapers, magazines
and news releases.

It also covers "developments

wnen .circumstances and our re

sources permit," he said.

Freeman told the subcommittee
he has not been a Communist since
1941 the date of a Tass office

directive banning political activity

by employes. He said he has
worked for Tass since '1929 and
before that for the Communist

uauy worKer.
Jones said he has been in Tass

commercial department for 12

yeays and before that worked as a

seaman.

He said he sends Moscow inform information
ation information about US. commercial and

industrial statistics and certain

market prices.

Mrs. Lurie said she reads all the

New York and several leading out-of-town
newspapers and top news
magazines for "anything n e w s-

worthy for Moscow.

freeman said xass has about

23 employes in New York and
Washington, about 10 of whom are
Russians. He said the acting man manager
ager manager is Leonid Yelichansky, a So Soviet
viet Soviet citizen.

He said Tass serves no publica

tions in the United, States but does
send s copy of its daily report to
the Russian embassy in. Washing

ton. ; i .(.'i". ?-,-: f i-

Slrelo-Frd-ghjer
Crashes; 5 Dead
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. Feb.
22 (UP) A four-engined strato strato-freighter
freighter strato-freighter crashed and exploded
' "like a rocket" in a routine, land landing
ing landing attempt yesterday on the edge
of Palm Beach Air Force Base,
, killing the five men aboard.
The Air Force withheld names
of the victims pending notification
... of next of kin.
Witnesses said the KC-97 Boeing
cargo craft slammed into a road
beside the base in making a low-
altitude approach and skidded on onto
to onto .the base.. . . 1

Democralic Highway

Tax Program Unfair
To Motorists -AAA-

WASHINGTON. Feb. 22 fUP)

ine American Automobile Assn.

said today a Democratic tax plan

to neip pay for a vast new inter interstate
state interstate highway system would bur

den motorists unfairly with "mil

lions of dollars in new taxes,

The motorists' organization told

the House Ways Means Com Committee
mittee Committee that' o p e r a t o r s of. big
trucks should be forced to pay a
larger share of the proposed 51 bil billion
lion billion dollar federal -' state road road-building
building road-building program.

Southern Senator
Seeks Reidoplion
01 Two-Thirds Rule

WASHINGTON, Feb. 22 (UPj (UPj-Sen.
Sen. (UPj-Sen. Strom Thurmond (D-S. C.)
has called for revival of the "two "two-thirds
thirds "two-thirds rule'' .which once gave the
South a veto at Democratic nation national
al national conventions over the selection
of presidential nominees.
Thurmond, presidential nominee
of the States Rights party in 1948,
urge m that course of action in his
weekly report to his home state.
"South Carolina delegates
should go to Chicago determined
to seek re-adoption by the conven convention
tion convention of the rule which would re require
quire require a ote of two-thirds of the
delegates to nominate the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic candidate," he said.

' The adoption of the two-thirds
rule would make it possible to

prevent the nomination oi a per

son who is antagonistic to the

views of the South," he added.

"Also the South would have a

strong voice in party matters a

gain and southern views would be

recognized in the party platform."
Thurmond said "some ele

ments of the national Democrat Democratic
ic Democratic party and some members of
the Republican party "have made

political capital of the segrega
tion issue."
"South Carolina must send del
eeates to Chicago who are ore

pared to fight against this radical

faction of the Democratic party,"
be said. t
, The Democratic party abandon

ed the two-thirds rule at its 1936

convention. Many southern Dem Democrats
ocrats Democrats have bitterly regretted that
action but have figured that they

had no chance of getting the rule
restored. They have no more rea reason
son reason to hope for getting it reinstat

ed wis year.,

WHEELING, W. Va., Feb. 22-

(LF) Tommy and Josenh Wil

liams, 14-year-oid identicsi twins,
were indicted for murder today on
charges they bludgeoned to oeath

a nine-year-old Cub Scout. The

youngsters face a possible death
pentlty.
The victim, David Powell, was
beaten with a piecj of two-by-four
board and slashed with a knife
Feb. 9. He was attacked while can

vassing neighbors near his home
to sell 50-cent tickets to a Cub

bcout benefit show.
His battered body was found
tbe next day beneath a porch of
the Williams' home, only a block
from his own house.
The Williams twins, handsome
hoys with crew haircuts have in insisted
sisted insisted they are innocent. The

youngsters, seventh graders at the
Addison School here, could be sen sentenced
tenced sentenced to electrocution if the trial
jury finds them guilty of f i r s t

degree murder ana fails to recom
mend mercy.

Prosecutor Joseph A. Gompers

nas said robbery was a possible

motive" for the attack on young
Powell although he was thought

to be carrying less than $2 at the
time he was Killed.

The Williams twins, members of

a juvenile "pigeon-killing club,
became prime suspects in the case
after a pearl-handled pocketknife

belonging to one of them was

found beneath the Cub Scout's

body. They were arrested Feb. 11

after stains on a pair of blue jean

overalls belonging to Tommy Wil

liams were found to be a u m a n
blood.;.
The nature of the slashes and
bruises on young Powell's body
had led police to suggest he may
have been tormented or tortur tortured
ed tortured before receiving the fatal
blow which split his skull.
Gompers said he gave the strand

jury results of a laboratory com comparison
parison comparison between the types of blood
of the victim and the blood on

the overalls but did not announce
the findings publicly. A blood bloodstained
stained bloodstained cap found near Powell's
body also was included 'in a pile
of clothing carried into the grand
jury room.
Judge David A. McKee ordered
the twins to appear for arraign arraignment
ment arraignment on the murder charge Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday.
The brothers told police they
recently joined a juvenile gang
of pigeon killers. The members

nailed the wings of (Iain birds

to the wall of their house trailer
club house as "trophies" and
chopped off the heads of wound wounded
ed wounded birds to demonstrate their
"bravery."
The boys, sons of a Wheeling
steelworker, have been held at the
county juvenile detention home
and county jail since their arrest.
Before the grand jury retired to
consider the case yesterday Judge
McKee reminded the members
"the heinous nature" of the of offense
fense offense made it ncecessary to han handle
dle handle the case in reeular criminal

court channels rather than under

juvenile law.

for our Regular Servicing. .

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" MZfMr 'iATlAf Call Crosbie

The largest on Automobile Row Panama 2-1035

12-Year-Old Youth
Slays Mother, Dad
BE ATTYVILLE, Ky ., Feb. 22 22-(UP)
(UP) 22-(UP) Two charges of murder
were filed today against William
Brangenburg, 12, who confessed
slaying his father and brother last
Friday and burning down ;;. their
isolated cabin home.
The boy, a fifth grade student
until he quit school several weeks
ago, yesterday admitted the fatal
shootings of his father, Brack
Brandenburg, 5, and his brother,
Luther, 19.
The good-looking boy told Sher

iff Hampton Palmer: "I reckon I
just went crazy." He was returned
to his cell in county jail after to today's
day's today's court hearing.

11

W$ vacation time for the teen-age crew
and we're everything to make them look nice.
Smartest styles from 7 to 14 yrs. old
Petlal Pushers

Capri sets
Bermuda shorts
Blouses

'In

Italian style Pants
and many others

T "1

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(uvunv

Ave. Justo Arosemena No. 40-59
(Across Maria Inmaculada School)
Tel. 3-1126

SPANISH COURSE FOR ENGLISH SPEAKING
PEOPLE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA
The University of Pnm U offering this Summer Term in Intensive
Snunlsh Course for English Speaking people from FEBRUARY 28th to
, APRIL 18th, 19S6. Classes conducted In periods of SO minutes four days
week from MONDAY through THURSDAY at evening hours suitable to
people working at daytime. v
ELEMENTARY: From I to I p.m.
INTERMEDIATE : From I to 7 p.m.
ADVANCED: From 7 to p.m. (Special attention dedicated to con conversation,
versation, conversation, composition and translation).
Registration opened at Secretary's Office (main building of Unlver Unlver-:
: Unlver-: llty) from t to 12 and from S to D m. Hh School TVolom rwiulred
of students enrolled for credits. Students for non credits are also ad admitted.
mitted. admitted. Certificate of Attendance will be given by request.

mc wuuuiuce is uuuMuei mg morning tn II
bill to raise gasoline and diesel! ?m"' gR

gallon, tii e taxes from S to 8 cents

a pound, bus, truck and trailer

excise Uxes from 8 to 10 per cent,

and to impose a new tnree-cents-a-pound
tax on retread rubber.
Truckers and rubber manufac manufacturers
turers manufacturers have endorsed the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic proposal, which would raise
an estimated 12 billion dollars o o-ver
ver o-ver the next 15 years or about
800 million dollars & year.
John S., Giles, chairman of the

AAA's highway committee, said

Dig irucKers sncuia pay a larger
share of the new highway cost be

cause their heavy vehicles do

West Germans Agree

To M Troops Cost
Willi Three Allies

BONN. Germany. Feb. 22 (UP)

West Germany agreed today to

negotiate with the three western
allies on their demand for conti continued
nued continued payment for allied troops sta stationed
tioned stationed in West Germany.
The Bonn government's agree

ment to negotiate was contained

in notes handed by Foreign Minis

ter Hcinrich von Brentano this

S. Ambassador

Conant. British Charge

D'Affaires Roger Allen and French
Charge D'Affaires Christian de
Margerie.
A western allied spokesman said

the negotiations might begin next
week. The western allies probably

wui oe representee by senior offi officials
cials officials of their embassies here.

14

CLOVERBLOOM
Butter

Sit

-4?

A,

TNI BIST AND NOTHING 1:i, 11-? A

ders of owners of passenger cars

ana lignt trucKS,
In place of the Democratic plan

Giles proposed: A half cent tax
increase on gasoline and a. 2-cent

hike on diesel fuel, a 1 cent a
pound boost on tires weighing less

than 45 pound and

a 5 rant in.

mucn more damage to the nation's) crease on heavier tires.

Highways.

He said congressional aonroval

of the Democratic tax plan would
lead to a drive to eliminate high

way tax differentials now imposed

on Dig tfucks Dy tno states.
"The inevitable result," he said,
"would be the shifting of millions
of dollars annually onto the shoul-

INTO THE TUB
BRISTOL. Conn. '7TJPV

Charles Gallagher, who weighs 200
pounds, fell through the 1 roof of

his home into his bathtub 10 feet

below. He wasn t hurt.

V

JET BOMBER CRASHES The wing section of an Air Force all-iet Stfatofortress bomber
lies on-the ground at Tracyrcamraftertn
pJJf. ght m!e.tab0.d died in the crash. This was the first crash of a B-52, the Air
iorces new eight million dollar intercontinental nuclear weapon carrier.

JAc (P&opkof (pmama
find Jim Canal dm
are cordially invited by 4
CLAY PRODUCTS S. A.

i

to the concert which will be given by the
National Symphony Orchestra, under the
direction of Herbert de Castro and with
Panamanian tenor Mario Gutierrez as so soloist,
loist, soloist, Wednesday at 8 p.m. at the Olympic
Stadium with the cooperation of the De Department
partment Department of Beau Arts and Publications
of the Ministry of Education.

Admission is Absolutely Fre.
The concert will be broadcast over Radio El Mundo,
Onda Popular, Radio Miramar, Your Community
Station, Radio Balboa,. Radio Urraca, HONZ, CPR,
' Radio Independiente.

!WescTay7Tebruary2Z7

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AEETIIIG OP MILITARY NUNLO the CPO Mess, Rodman, Cmdr. V. L Mahoney, Vice-president, pre

sided, Robert A. E. Hall of IACS read the minutes, and Col. Hugh M. Arnold spoke on the dredging program ot
the Panama Canal Company.

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- .'"""tl.TT "T'.'"""r,'-"T''4""''Jr h i. L.u i u. 'ntnnisr at the American Lezlon

A lftr hiiiiirn The Amercan Lesion Auxiliary, unit i neiu a m-..v.
I0 HOST DIIiJIER club la.t week, for the National President, Mrs. Ruby Ward, left to right, front row s,t s,t-.
. s,t-. m, u. ii ii,u di.g Mr. Amta McKeown. Mn. Eleonor Becker, 2nd row, Mrs.

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DbnctCCADC AT TDAnilATin1! Capped and gowned in the front rows, professors at Panama University
PKUrCjjUlO Al uKAuUAIIUll listen to the speechmaking at last Friday's graduation. Behind them,
a large graduating class sits ready to receive its diplomas for degrees earned In the various schools of the
University which is rapidly taking a leading place among educational institutions in Latin America.

I
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RECTOR AND PRESIDENT

Dr. Jaime de la-Cuardia, under whose guiding hand
Panama University has gained new stature as an
Institution of learning, arrives for the graduation
exercises. Rector de la Cuardia accompanies President
Ricardo Arias, whose aide,- Col.. Raul Arias,- walks
behind them.

COME AND SEE ME IN OAK RIDGE
Judy King offers an invitation to her friend Mary:
Cosgrove, as the latter tells her goodbye at a despe despe-"
" despe-" dida given for the King family of Ancon Friday night. ;
Judy left on Saturday with her parents Dr. and Mrs.
Avery King, her sister Sue, and her brothers Andy and
Jim. Dr. King is planning to start private practice in
his specialty as a urologist in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

'

V

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...

rnnCDFFn 1C THF rn'inFCA Ladies pf the diplomatic corps-gathered at the Union Club'for a farewell
UULOrCCLJ IU InC LUitUCjA despedida. honoring the Condesa de Rabago, wife of the Ambassador of'
Spain. They are leaving soon for his new post in Beirut, Lebanon... The condesa has been active in civic work
during Jier.stayj)iiJhaJsthmus.-Among Qther.projectssheasjcbairmari4p
charity by the ladies of the diplomatic corps.1

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No. 11-18 Centr.i i.

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AN INDir i-M 1ST f)Vll? M U SFVFTh
W EDNLsDAY. HEKIAHY 21, r;
PACE
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
.
... v
-' w w v w tJ O
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA

UIF PANAMA AMERICAN

:r i 1 I
rrJ

LIBRERIA PRECIADO LOURDES PHARMACY ; LEWIS SERVICE HOUSEHOLD EXCHANCE FARMACIA EL BATURRO V sT-1
1 Strttl K, U 1 U Crr4squill va ttvoU N ( i Tt it la O&sa Ave. M 41 f:u Ufcvrt Street JlLlIlJ3I
Ancias Internal, de Publicaciones FARMACIA LOMBARDO FARMACIA ESTADCS UNIDCS FOTO DOMY FARMACIA "SAS" FOR
" No I Ultery PIi Jko 2C "B" Street I teatral Avenue s Just AroM-meaa Avt. and V St VI Porris til -.'"'
CASA ZALDO MORRISON FARMACIA LUX FARMACIA VAN-DER-DUS NOVEOAOES ATHIS 12 WORDS
Itntral Ave, 4th of Julj Av J St ..Central Avtoue :. S3 Street .Nt, Kspaia Ave.' '.'j

MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS

COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL

CANAL ZONE POLYCLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
r. C. r. Fibre Dr. R. Atflj Jr.
0 D.S. (Georgetown University) M.U
Tlvoll (4th of July) Avt, No. HAM
(opposite Ancnii School Flayiround)
Tel. a-2U Panama.
RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
, JIM RIDGE
Phone Panama 2-055!
TRANSPORTES "BAXTER. SA.
Pockets Shipper Mover
Phonos 2-2451 2-2562,
learn Riding et
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding t Jumping
3 to 5 P.m. Phone 3-0279
hv aooointment,
"We shape Your Figure"
BODY-REDUCING
T famous McLevy Machines
Swedish Message Steam Bath
for male aod lemaio
DRTEPED1A NACIONAL
(Dr. Scholls)
58 Justo Arosemena -- Ph. J-Z2U
-, ,. lu.wniiutgagrg
HARNETT & DUNN j
mi l. ROOM DANCK FTUDIO I
TEACHES UNTIL .YOU LK ARM" -ffi
Balboa: 2-4239 or Pan.: 3-16G0 I
Studio El Penama Hotel j
ii.iM,iiii,Ml.ET2i3I3iaiW'i 'Lf.
Dog and Cat
n iMir
"" '-Ail
' f Dr.JVF.rMndMa.
No. 2-66
'let. 3-1902
.LOOK
You Can Now Buy Auto,
mobile Insurance by, tele telephone.,
phone., telephone., Immediate Cover Coverage.
age. Coverage. Dial Panama 2-5000
.FRED HUDDLESTON.
Save on direct shipment
Top quality fishing
equipment
V10LETTE SUPPLY
SERVICE
Panama 3-631S -;.
Indiana Gal Bakes
I Best Cherry Pie ;
SLoot Goes To Ike

i
t CHICAGO, Feb. 22 (UP) An-
liette Hunt, 17, Indianapolis, Ind.,
. today won the national cherry pie

i oaKing contest.
J Her pie was judged the best
front among 1,000 contestants from
all 48 Btates,. Hawaii and Canda.
Miss Hunt s pie was picked as
est from among 49 finalists in the
bake-off" held annually to celc celc-rate
rate celc-rate Washington's Birthday.
Miss Hunt will receive a $500 1
cnoiarsnip, tne electric ranee she
serf in the pranri hallrnnm nf the
! Iotel Sheraton- to bake her win-.
J lung pit
1 Ind Wa
" t I She p
i Winning
Ping pie; and trips to JNlew lork
asnmfiton, .- -planned
to tke the prize-
nnin? nie In th Whitn Hnnsp
I'riday for President Eisenhower.
4 '
CHOICE
LOTS for
SALE
.Lorn,
1-Ltk
Ave. Eloy Alfaro 15-159
Tel. 2-C610

,
'

i I l l ;

FOR SALE
Household

FOR SALE: Twin beds and
night table, stove, radio, record
player and typewriter, very good
condition. Calle F, Cangrejo, Ed Ed-ificio
ificio Ed-ificio San Jose, Apt. 5.
FOR SALE ; Large couch, 2 liv living
ing living room chairs, center table,
Maytag washing machine with
both 60-cycle and 25-cycle mo motors.
tors. motors. Call Panama 3-3924.-
FOR SALE: 3-pc. Rattan set.
.Cheap. Balboa 1716.
FOR. SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE: In El Valle, charm charming
ing charming 2-bedroom cottage en love lovely
ly lovely grounds in best neighborhood.
Completely furnished and equip equipped
ped equipped at incredible bargain price
of only $6000. Wolff and Co..
5th Street No. 7-29, Phone 2 2-2388.
2388. 2-2388. FOR SALE: Building, consist
14 apartments all furnished to
American families, best residen residential
tial residential district. If interested apply
Federico Boyd No. I or phone
3-1516. Motive sale, leaving for
States.
FOR SALE
Motorcycles
FOR SALE: Harley Davidson
motorcycle 74, lots of chrome
and extras. Make offer. Paitilia
Airport, Pan., 6 a m. to 6 p.m.

GOP OK's Bipartisan Probe
Into Congressional Lobbying

- o
WASHINGTON, Feb. 22 (UP)
The Senate Republican P o 1 i c y!
Committee yesterday unanimously I
approved creation of a special bl-
partisan; committee to conduct a
wide- open" investigation of lob-
hying and other attempts to
in-
tluonce Congress.
The action by about 40 of. the
Senate's 47 Republicans assureif. a
"'far-reaching and thorough" in inquiry,
quiry, inquiry, into lobbying and campaign
contributions. The Senate Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Policy committee 'approv-
'ed the move yesterday.
GOP Committee C h airman
i Styles Bridges (N.H.), who made
the announcement after a meeting,
said the proposed investigation
"will be wide open."
He said Republicans favored cre creation
ation creation of an eight-man committee
of four GOP members and four
Democrats.
Even before the GOP session,
Senate Democratic Leader Lyndon
! B, Johnson Tex. told reporters
he expects the special inquiry ., to
run until next January. He said
Republicans favored creation of
an eight-man committee of four
GOP members an four Demo Demo-crats.
crats. Demo-crats. Even before the GOP session,
i Senate Democratic Lfiader Lyn
don B. Johnson (Tex.) told report reporters
ers reporters he Jxpects the special inquiry
to run until next January. He said
the group may gtt as much ; as
$300,000 for its wprk.
The special committee plan
was an outgrowth of the $2500
"campain contribution" offered
Sen. Francis Case (R-S.D.) by
an oil lobbyist In the belief that
Case favored the natural gas bill.
President Eisenhower vetoed the
measure, chiefly because of Cas Case's
e's Case's disclosure.

"KISS OF FIRE"
OPENING TOMORROW AT THE LUX

Barbara Rush attempts to dissuade Jack Palance from a vio violent
lent violent attack against treacherous Rex Reason in a key drama drama-.tic,
.tic, drama-.tic, .sceaa Jrom ...UivmaJrlnternUonal's. Jechnicplor-,'Kis8'
Vi Fire.',' Martiia Ilyer is also starred- Advt.

FOR SALE
Automobiles

FOR SALE '55 Mercury two two-tone
tone two-tone hardtop, power brakes and
steer, Nygaa ww tires. Call 86 86-5239
5239 86-5239 duty hours, 86-6172 after
duty hours. Chaplain's Office,
Albrook AFB.
FOR SALE: A 1953 Chevrolet
Carryall, back seats removable.
Priced right. Phone 2-5027 Pan Panama.
ama. Panama. ' .''. -.'
FOR SALE: 1954 Ford Ranch Ranch-wagon,
wagon, Ranch-wagon, 13,000 miles, (-cylinder.
$1500. Telephone 2-3115.
1528-B Almond St., Balboa.
FOR SALE: 1953 four-door
Packard Clipper sedan, four new
tires and battery, low mileage.
Original owner, excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, $1000. Federico Boyd No.
1 Phone 3-1516.
FOR SALE: 1951 Pontiac four four-door,
door, four-door, good tires and engine;
1949 Cushman motor scooter.'
2-3775 Balboa.
FOR SALE: $600 cash, Chewy
hardtop convertible '5 1 clean,
duty paid, excellent. Owner leav leaving
ing leaving Friday. Pfu)ne 3-0327 Pan-
FOR SALE: 1951 Buick Super
hardtop, automatic transmission,
4 new tires, excellent overall
condition, $825. Call 82-5222
'fill 4 p.m., 84-5104 after 4
p.m.
FOR SALE: 1950 DeSoto 4-dr.
Leather upholstery, backup liehts,
fluid drive, excellent condition.
Call Balboa 2-2775.
A federal grand jury is investi
gating the incident.
So is a special Senate commit
tee headed by ben. waller t
i George ID-Ga.), who told newsmen
this group will ask for a 10-day ex-
tension of its March 1 deadline
for filing a report.
The George group also took
testimony from John Wishart,
Nebraska state GOP finance chair chairman.
man. chairman. .
He was questioned about testi testimony
mony testimony that John M. Neff, lobbyist
for Superior Oil Co., contributed
$2500 to the state Republican fund
after determining that Nebraska's
two GOP senators would vote for
the gas bill. Neff also offered the
$2500 to Case.
Bridget said the Republicans
wanted the special inquiry to
cover the lobbying activities of
foreign governments, Americans
for Democratic Action, the Com Committee
mittee Committee for a More Effective Con Congress,
gress, Congress, the CIO and ether labor
unions, postal, trucking and sug sugar
ar sugar lobbyists and the activities of
government agencies.
He said the special committee
also should look into "any im
proper or illegal lobbying to influ
ence Congress." He saia the new
group would take over after the
George committee ,m a k.e g its
report.
Democratic Leader Johnson said
the new group will have "all the
powers that have been possessed
by any special committee" and
perhaps a few more,
lie declined to speculate on a
possible chairman. But a probable
choice was Sen. Albert Gore (D-
Tenn.). chairman of an Elections
subcommittee which had planned
an independent mqurs.
Other Democrats suggested

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031. ANCON. CZ.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. CZ.
INVESTMENTS: North Ameri American
can American desire to invest in estab established
lished established Panama businesses requir requiring
ing requiring capital for expansion. Write
details of proposition te Box'SA Box'SA-134
134 Box'SA-134 IPanarria American).
WILL PURCHASE for cash your
income property. Real state with
proven income. Write Box ER ER-134
134 ER-134 (Panama American).
WILL PURCHASE your business
for cash Businesses with proven
income will be bought for cash.
From $10,000 to $100,000
available. Sumbit 'your proposi proposition
tion proposition giving details to Box PS PS-134
134 PS-134 l Panama American),
Join Democtie- Digest Club
Republicans welcome.
Telephone 3-0943. Write care
Panama American.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Beckwith Baby
Grand piano,' perfect condition.
Reasonable price. Call 33, Colon.
VENETIAN BLINDS The new
IDEAL Venetian blind is supe superior.
rior. superior. TROPICAL roller shades,
traverse curtain rails. For free
estimate and samples call ROB ROBERTO,
ERTO, ROBERTO, Phone 3-4904
FOR RENT: Space appropriate
for office cr commercial business
in new concrete building named
"Monterrey" on Ave. Argentina,
"El Cangrejo" district. David F.
de Castro. Ave. "' No. 24.
Phone 2-1616
FOR SALI: 16" 25-cycle elec electric
tric electric fan $15; four A-l doors,
I ,4 x 30 x 84, bras hinges and
locks $5 each. Phone Gamboa
6-441.
FOR SALE: One hundred dif different
ferent different PHOTOGRAPHS of
SC0UTCAPADES (fklboa) at
Foto El Halcon, across from Ho Hotel
tel Hotel EL PANAMA, 9-12:30 and
2-6 (including this Saturday),
Unified
(Continued from Pare I)
units; Offices of the Marine Dl-I
rector, Balboa Port captain ana-
Cristobal Port Captain; Locks
Division; and Aids to Navigation
Section.
rwith the adoption of the uni
fied payroll all employes of the
Company-Government are now
being carried on a common roll
within their organization re
gardless of citizenship or rate oi
pay.
Since the pay period of the U.
S.-rate employes has been used
as a basic pay period for all em
oloves. a chance was made m
the paydays for the local-rate
employes.
To avoid, undue hardship In
making the change for local-
rate employes, a one week in intervening
tervening intervening pay period was estab established,
lished, established, January 22 to 28. Checks
for this period were delivered on
the regular paydays of February
7 and 8. Deductions for this
period were made for one week
only.
possible members are Sens. John
F.. Kennedy (D-Mass.), J o h n L
McClellan (D-Ark.) and Clinton P
Andersta (D-N.M.). Bridget said
the GOP meeting did not discuss
any possible Republican members.
George announced that his four four-man
man four-man group will resume public
hearings next Tuesday.
He said witnesses will include
Wishart; Neff; Elmer Patman, Te
xas attorney lor superior Ou and
possibly Howard B. Keck, preside
ent of Superior.
AF To Resums Hiinl
Fcr4l!in Missing?
Since February 7
HOUSTON, Tex., Feb. 22 (UP)!
The Air Force said today it
would set up search operations in
Mexico to resume a hunt for four
men missing since Feb. 7 on a
flight to Brownsville, Tex.
The missing men.- pilot Joseph
Shiver, George S i m o n, C. M.
Ebersole and Eugune A. Mills,
formerlv of Indianapolis, Ind.,
took off in a one-place Beechcraft
Bonanza .plane and haven't been
heard from since. 1
A mass aerial search for a week
by Air Force and civil air patrol
planes failed to turn up any trace.
The wife of the pilot has offered
a $500 reward. ,.
Sauadron commander Kenton L.
Ashvrorth of the 47th Air Rescue
Unit at Ellington Air Force Base,
said a seven-man crew in a SA-
1 amnhihian Diane will continue
the search from Vera Cruz, Mex
ico.
Ashworth said the area round
Mnntrrrev and Tampico will be
oAarrhad ihorounhiv bccaiiFe of a
report that the missing airplane

was last seen in that area.

Apartments

ATTENTION G. I.I Just built
modern furnished apartments, 1,
2 bedrooms, hot, cold water,
Phone Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT: Spacious apart-
ment in Bolivar Building, 52nd
Street and Federico Boyd Ave.
Bedroom, large living dining
room, kitchen, bathroom. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone Panama 2-1661.
FOR RENT: Luxurious' modern
apartment in El Cangrejo: 2 love lovely
ly lovely tiled bathrooms, 3 bedrooms,
big tiled kitchen, bright, sunny
$110. Phone 3-6016 after 7
p.m. or mornings.
FOR RENT: Apartment, very
comfortable, furnished, hot wa water,
ter, water, one bedroom. Second Street
No. 11, Perejil. Phone 3-0533
or 3-2694.
FOR RENTi Apartment: two
bedrooms, dining and living
1 rooms, including hot water heat heater
er heater and maid's room with bath.
Good location; one block from
Hotel El Pinarna. Phone Panama
3-0972.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, one couple or two. Amer American
ican American neighbors. 48th Street No.
27, apartment 2.
FOR RENT: Small furnished
apartment. Clean and comfort comfortable.
able. comfortable. Best residential section.
43rd Street No 13.
FOR RENT: Apartment 2 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, living-dining room, kitch kitchen,
en, kitchen, mosquito protective. San
Francisco. Phone 14$4 Balboa.
FOR RENT: Available March
1st, 1956: Furnished 2-bedroom
apartment at exclusive ''El Can Cangrejo.'
grejo.' Cangrejo.' Ideally suitable for dip diplomat.
lomat. diplomat. Individual bathrooms,
dining-living room, maid' room
with bath. Linens, dishes and
complete kitchen equipment.
Phone business hours 2-0321,
Sundays 2-3525.
FOR. RENT; Available March
1st, 1956: 2-bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment unfurnished. Individual
bathrooms, dining-living roams,
maid' room with bath. Phone
business hour 2-0321, Sundays
2-3525.
FOR RENT: MODERN apsrt apsrt-t
t apsrt-t ment in 1 Pueblo Nueve, $25
monthly. Phone 3-6168, Alcide
Garcia Corrca
LFOR RENT: Modern twe-bed'-:
room apartment, living dining
room, large kitchen, maid' end
laundry room, screened, hot wa water.
ter. water. For further details please
call 3-4946, 3-6737.
FOR RENT: Spacious two-bedroom,
two-bath screened apart apartment,
ment, apartment, Living room, dining room,
garage and maid' quarters. Pri Private
vate Private entrance. Campo Alegre.
Phone Panama 3-0873.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, bedroom, dishes, garage,
garden, hot water., 9th Street No,
47, San Francisco.
Canadian Students
'Invade1 Hew York,
Hois! Union Jack
: WATERTOWN..N.Y.. Feb. 22-
(UP) Canadian students "invad "invaded"
ed" "invaded" northern New York last
night and observed George Wash Washington's
ington's Washington's Birthday by hoisting the
British flag in several communi
ties.
The students, front Queens Uni University
versity University in Kingston, Ont., stole in
to Watertown, Alexandria Bay
Clayton and Lai areevuie unar
cover of darkness and ran up the
Union Jack from school flagpoles
On each pole a proclamation
was pasted reclaiming the territo territory
ry territory "in the name of George III,
King of England.". The proclama
tion als- denounced teorg wasn
ington as "a subversive, scoun scoundrel,
drel, scoundrel, traitor, turncoat and rebel
without cause."
Police quickly pulled down the
flags this morning after receiving
phone calls from irate citizens.
Paratroopers Take
88-Mile Hike To
Dull Their Sorrow
London, Feb. 22 (UP) -one'
hundred British pcratroopers
slogged across the English coun countryside
tryside countryside on an 88-mile hike today
to work off their "disappointment'
at not being sent to Cyprus.
The officers and men from the
Signal Squadron of the 16th Inde Independent
pendent Independent Parachute Bridge Group
walked with full field kits trom
Aldershot to Bournemouth.
"The march was arranged be
cause the men were disappointed

at not going to Cyrpus with the ana needy in the, city of Colon,
brieade' explained S a u a d r o nl Recently he donated to The Salva-

C.mmander Maj. J.G. Geary.

"I thought it would take the edsejioTr-wtnch-wilt fee -used as hostel

off their disappointment.

Kooras.

FOR RENT: Cool furnished
room, near Ancon Post Office.
Gentleman only. Phone 2-3020.
Panama Line
Sailing
The Panama Liner Ancon is
scheduled to sail from Cristobal
Saturday with 93 passengers for
New York. Eightesn passengers
are booked lor Port-au-Prince,
Haiti..
Those sailing for Haiti on the
Ancon are Mr. and Mrs. Adrian
Broggene- Mr. and Mrs. Carl K.
Carlson; Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Herzberg; Dr. and Mrs. Julio
Lavergne; Mr. and Mrs. C- D D-McWiiliams;
McWiiliams; D-McWiiliams; Claude Martin; Mr.
and Mrs. Allan Polacneck; Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Slmpklns;
Mrs. Mildred Thompson; Mr.
and Mrs. Herman Wachtel
The complete advance passen
ger list for New York follows:
Fred Adamson: Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore L. Bailey; Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Baler; Miss Cjara
Bdckmeier; Mr. and Mrs. Ar
thur Brucks; Mr. and Mrs. Hans
Bush;
Miss .Vera Ceruttl; Mr. ano
Mrs. Michael Cineuina: Mr. and
Mrs. David Cohen; Julius Colby;
Mr. and Mrs. Thornton J. Con
verse r Edward Corlppo; Mrs.
Wiley F. Corl; Charles Coyne;
Mr. and Mrs. Jonn l, uum uum-mincs:
mincs: uum-mincs: Mr. and Mrs. Gorton Da
vis: Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A.
Demarest: and Mr. and Mrs.
William F. Dougherty.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris B. Fician
que; Mrs. Mary Fisher; Mr. and
Mrs. Cai Trantz; Mr. ana Mrs.
B. K. Frebelkorn; Mr. and Mrs
Piatt A. Frlck; Mrs. J. Emi! Ger-
ich; Mrs. Phillip D. Hirtzel; Mr.
and Mrs. Helge N. Holmes; Mr.
and Mrs. John Hoye; Mrs. Mary
B. Hoye;
Mr. and Mrs. Elizabeth J. Kir-
kus and daughter; Sam Klug-
man; Mr. and Mrs. Charles S.
Lee; Mr. and Mrs. Norman Mc
Kay- Miss Mary A. Marino ; Mrs.
Ruth K. Medgyes; Mr. and Mrs.
Earl Mills;-Mr. and Mrs. Alexan Alexander
der Alexander Milne; and Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Murphy ;
Dr. and Mrs. John D. O'Con O'Con-nell
nell O'Con-nell ; Mrs. Isabel O'Connor ; Mr.
and Mrs. William H. Paquin;
Mr, and Mrs. Edward H. Pet Pet-sonk;
sonk; Pet-sonk; Mrs. Sydell B.. Plum; Dr.
Herman Pits; Mr. and Mrs. Mi Michael
chael Michael Prunera; ;
Mr. and Mrs. Henry J.
Schultze; Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A.
Self; Mrs. Irving R, Smith; Mrs.
E. L. Stoneson; Mr. and Mrs. Ed
ward Swartz; Eugene Sweeney;
Mr, and Mrs, Lester Talmud;
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Tode;
Dr. George W. Van Benschoter;
Mrs. Edgar A. Weber; Mrs. Al-
berfF. West; Mr. and Mrs. L. J.
M. Wezenaar; Mrs. R. Gray Wil
liams; and Mr. and Mrs. Rene
Wolf and son.
2 Local Residents
Ciled For Service
To Jalvalion Army
Word has reached the Isthmus
that Gen. Wilfred Kitching, inter international
national international leader of the Salvation
Army, has bestowed iipon two
well-known local philanthropists
the Salvation Army Order of Dis
tinguished Auxiliary Service.
. The gentlemen thus honored are
Capt. Clifford Payne and Dr. Har
ry Eno. The medals and certihc
ales will be -presented during the
current visit of Lt. Commissioner
George W, Sandells, territorial
commander of Central America
and West Indies area.
The Order of Distinguished Au
xiliary Service was instituted in
1941, to express The Salvation Ar Army's
my's Army's appreciation of those out
side Us ranks who have further
ed its work. Only one other per person
son person has received the decoration
on the Isthmus the late Wilson
Kromer, one-time comptroller ot
the Panama Canal.
Capt. -Payne has over a long
period di years given valuable sup support
port support to the organization. During
ine second world War he was in
strumental in raising large sums
of money towards the mainten
ance of Salvation Army relief
services In the front lines. More
recently, he has made other sub
stantial contributions to the work
of the local organization.
Dr. Eno has long been a staunch
friend of The Salvation Army, giv giving
ing giving its officers the benefit of his
medical skill; at Christmas-t i m e
the generous doctor sponsors Salva
tion Army distributions to the poor
tion Army three buildings in Co-
'lor needy women.

RESORTS

Gramlich't Santa Clare Beach
Cottages. Modern conveniences,
moderate rates. Phone Gamboa
6-441.
PHILLIPS Occenside Cottage,
Santa Clare. Bex 435. Belbee.
Phone Paneme 3-1177. Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-1673.
Shrepnel'i furnished aotnea ea
beech et Santa Clore. Telephone
Thompson, lalboa 1772.
Baldwin' furnished apartment
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Smith. Balboa 3681.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mile
past Casino. Lew rete. Phone
Balboe 1866.
"If-
' I
V

LT. COL. GEORGE P. BAHLER, Commander 26th Air Rescue
Squadron, is seen receiving the Squadron Flying Safety Award
from MaJ. Gen. Ernest Moore, vice commander MATS The
award was presented the squadron for maintaining a negative
accident rate during the past twelve months. Four 8A-16
amphibians and two SH-19 helicopters accumulated more than
3,000 hours accident free flying time during this period This
is the third such award presented the 26th Air. Rescue Squad Squadron
ron Squadron since its activation Nov. 14, 1952.
' (Official USAF Photo)

Arniy Ciyes Brief
Okay To Unlawful -Wife
As Dependent
WASHINGTON. Feb. 22 (LY)
The Hourse Armed Serv ces
Comittee closed a bK loon
hole today In a bill to create
a medical care program for
sercWemen.
The b.Ul listed amonr depend dependents
ents dependents the "cunlawful wife" of a
serviceman.
Rep. Frank C. Osmera Jr.
spotted the typographical error
ana tne committee voted to
make it read "lawful wife."
Wealthy Ago Khan
Reported Improved
- CANNES. France. Feb. 22 (UP)
The Aga Khan, 78, reported in
serious condition Minaay, leit well
enough today to sit up in an arm
chair and read the newspapers.
rnysicians said the fabulously
wealthy leader of the Ismaeli Mos
lem sect had managed to shake
off a fever.
, When he was flown to his villa
here last week from his annual
visit to Egypt, he had to be car carried
ried carried from his chartered plane in
a stretcher. His wife, tne aegum,
said Sunday shj was very worried
about his condition and nis son,
Prince Aly Khan, rushed to his
bedside "" ""
SIDE GLANCES;
ri v
T.M, Mn. V Pat. Off.
f; ttM by NIA te)r)e, IfM.
I 4il

"5.nr:
IP rail
ff -h
v ': i -ff

"How'did vou ever manase to dre8 In time for any

thing in the Navy? You've been there 20 minutes de-
1 batin? which of those Christmas ties you'll wear!

Wanted Position

IXPIRT TTPIST. bilingual,
knowledge ef English language
and general office work. Call
Panama 3-5860 afternoons.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT: RESIDENCE en
Via fspana, suitable for Embas Embassy
sy Embassy er Urge family, furnished er
unfurnished. Phone 3-6168, Al Alcide
cide Alcide Garcia Cerrea.
FOR RENT: 2-bedroom chalet,
maid' ream, garage. Entrance Old
Golf Road en Via Espana, facing
Institute Panamerican Phone
3-5141.
'A
w
V
"A
t-Ti
Free Europe Press
Denies US D:!!
T l r.I. f
llUlUwy UWUI Udill
MUNICH, Germanyj Feb. 23
(UP) The American sponsored
Free Europe Press today flatly de denied
nied denied that any of its leaflet-carrying
balloons were in the) area
where a Czech plane crashed Jan.
18 killing 22 persons.
Communist Czechoslovakia
charged yesterday that an Amer American
ican American balloon was responsible for
the crash.
Free Europe Press, sister orga organization
nization organization of Radio Free EuroDe,
said launching records prove that
"no balloons were launched to the
entire region of Czechoslovakia
where the crash took place either
on Jan. 17 or 18, the day of the
crash."
A spokesman for the anti-Communist'
agency branded Red at attempts
tempts attempts to blame the crash on A A-merican
merican A-merican balloons a "tactic clear clearly
ly clearly reminiscent of the German war warfare
fare warfare accusations .levelled against
U.S. airmen during the .Korean
conflict."
He said that in addition '.to the
evidence furnished by the launch launching
ing launching records, the possibility of a
free Europe balloon causing the
crash was ruled out by their
aize. ' .-
. 1 1 q
By Coibraith

- i'

1



v, r

t. Ttrr.rr.Y v.. !';
the r.NAV.. a.vit.icin an iNrtriNrENT rui.v nlusfafir
"

:' "bniVE-ITJ "TiiealreT CEClLIl TiiEATBE ; vicToTiT:
60c. 30c. I
POPULAR NIGHT French double, prohibited BNK NIGHT .......
il. 10 per car for miners. $500.00 old prize ; t Vf
. 4 .,.., "IGNORANCE" Gary Coooer In GOOD
. Robert STACK loNORANCE "BLOWING WIND" ncTURESl
. John taylor in: 'TWO A M O N G i "his m 4 jfsty' ;
"WAR PAINT" NUDISTS' H!?iSn?

CAPITOLIO I T V O L I
. CENTRAL Theatre
Technicolor and Cinemascope
Pie-Rslease
The truf story of America's most
decorated hero, Audie Murphy
"TO HELL AND BACK"
with Audie Murphy in person
LUX THEATRE
60e. : jflc.
Barbara STANWYCK
h RL'D Mar MURRAY
Joan BENNETT in:
"There's Always Tomorrow"
All of his life.. .she had been
'"the other woman"...
1;U, 3:11, 3:24, 6:57, 8:53
t James Stewart in:
GLENN MILLER
STORY"
in technicolor
'THE BLACK
CASTLE"
bank:
t Kirk Douglas in:
MAN WITHOUT
STAR"
"MISSISSIPPI
GAMBLER"
7

.Social and

Jij Staffers

AMBASSADOR OF GREAT BRITAIN AND MRS.
HENDERSON GIVING DINNER TONIGHT FOR
t'ONDE, CONDESA DE RABAGO
' The Ambassador of Great Britain and Mrs. Leslie Mender Mender-son
son Mender-son will be hosts this evening at a dinner honoring the Ami
bassador of Spain and Condesa de Rabajo, who are leaving
soon for Lebanon.

Other Parties
For The Rabagos
On Monday evening at the Union
Club, the members of. the diplo diplomatic
matic diplomatic corps and their wives enter entertained
tained entertained at a despedida buffet honor honor--
- honor-- ing the Rabagos.
Mrs.1' John S. Seybold, wife of
the Governor of the Canal Zone,
was hostess for a luncheon today
at El Panama Hotel honoring The
Countess of Rabago.
Mr. and Mrs. Canos Uiaio en entertained
tertained entertained with an evening party
honoring the Rabagos.
Mr. Shaw Leaves
With Nuca, Ntphtw
Mr. John W. Shaw left last week
aboard the "Rangitane". for Eng England
land England accompanied by his niece
and nephew, Sandra Margaret,
and David Stewart rroniu, wnoj
have been visiting with the Shawsj
for the last 7 months and are:
now returning to their home in
Liverpool.
OES Past Matrons Plan (
Entertainment For
Mrs. Plummer
Mrs. Florence Plummer of Penn Pennsylvania
sylvania Pennsylvania will be the honoree at a
no-host luncheon on Saunday at
12:30 at Hotel Washington.
Sponsors for the affair honoring
the visiting official of the Order
of Eastern Star arc the C.Z. Past Past-Matrons
Matrons Past-Matrons Associations Mrs. Plum Plummer
mer Plummer is due on the Isthmus Satur Satur-day.
day. Satur-day. .C i -.- ''r-Z.J $ :v j
Those planning tolatlend are.
asked to make their" reservations!
before Friday with Mrs. E. L. Slo Slo-cum,
cum, Slo-cum, Cristobal 1300, or Mrs. Wer-,
den French, Balboa 1828.
After Sunday's .luncheon thr
group will attend the exhibit of
the Orchid Society.
Panamonte Guests -J

Among recent guests at the ra ra-namonte
namonte ra-namonte Inn, Boquete, have been:
Mr. Juan Ehrman, Dr. and Mrs.
G. W. Christiansen, Dr. and Mrs.
C. J. Schork, Mr. and Mrs. Sigo
Fallembaum, and their children,
Miss Toni and Master Jackie Fal Fal-'
' Fal-' lenbaum, Mr. Luis Bcttsa, Mr
Frank Klock, all from Panama.
Spending a week's vacation at
the Panamonte are Mr. and Mrs.
Felix B. Maduro, and Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Fidanque.
Coco Solo Officers'
Wives' Club Luncheon.
The Coco Solo Officers' Wives'
" Club had their monthly meeting
and luncheon at the Officers' Club
on Friday.
Mrs.' F. A. McCain called the
meeting to order after a delicious
luncheon which has been planned
by Mrs. S. M. Hembree. Mrs. W.
J. Rascoe, and Mrs. Ivan Vinko Vinko-vich.
vich. Vinko-vich. Welcomed aboard were Mrs.'
F. B. Hopkins, Mrs. P. J. Mason,
and Mrs. W. T. Higgins. Farewell
' was said to Mrs. J. E. Bugg.
The door prize, a crystal vase
was won by Mrs. E. J. Westvig.
Special guests were Mrs. 'Jordon
and Mrs. Savino. ;
Spanish Classes 1
In Margarita '
Spanish classes will be taught by
Mrs. Teresa Comber twice a week
from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at St.
Margaret's Parish Hall in Marga-
rita. Applications can.be made by
calling 3-2537.

Dr. And Mrs. Fabrega
Change Residence
Dr. and Mrs. Ociavlo Fabrega
have change their residence to
30th Street, number 6, where they
will be at' home to their friends.

Relieves prickly heit and diaper

rashes. Refreshing to the skin.
Protect it.
MEXSANA is not a talcum. It is a
V" starch-base powder.

Otlier

wide
Clayton Officers' Wives
Consider Constitution
The Fort Clayton Officers'
Wives' Club held its regular coffee
and business meeting last week.
Hostesses for the meeting were
Mesdames Ash, Cluver and Bry Bryant
ant Bryant A revised constitution was pre-'
scnted to the members and will;
L ..... J . .1.. MMwf kur-i I
De VUieU U'UI1 l UlC ucai uuai-
ness meeting.
Litvins Have House Guests
'lat Nathaniel Litvins of Ancon
have as their house guests his
parents Mr, and Mrs. Harry Lit Lit-vin
vin Lit-vin of New York City.
The Litvins arrived here last
month to attend the musical debut
of their grand-daughters, Ruth
and Naomi with the National Con Conservatory
servatory Conservatory of Music in Panama,
Farewell Party For Dr. Engel
Mrs. Manfred Engel was host hostess
ess hostess for a surprise farewell parly
at the Sunday night buffet at Ho Hotel
tel Hotel El Panama in honor of her
husband, Dr. Engel, who is leav leaving
ing leaving on a trip to the United States,
Europe, the Near and Far East,
Included were Comdr. and Mrs.
Harry Ransom. Mr, and Mrs. Na Nathan
than Nathan Sharp, Mr. and Mrs. Saul
Jacobs, and Mr. Henry Sommcr Sommcr-freud.
freud. Sommcr-freud. Second Film On
Life Of St. Paul
Cli.mlnn TAinArraw '
The second film showing in the,
"Life of St. Paul'' scries will be
shown-at- -tR -BttlboV 11 Y.M.C.'A-l
U.S.O. tomorrow at7i30 p.m.
The titles of the two reels to be;
exhibited this week are "The Con-
i f Co,,l" anrl "The Vpars!
of Apprenticeship."
There is no charge for admission
and the public, is invited.
U. S. Health Expert
Passes Through HP,
Finds Ex-Co-Worker
A man who has been one of the
great influences in public health
work in the United States passed
through Panama yesterday and
met one of his employes living
here.
Dr. Charles Wilinsky of Boston,
Mass.; who has been in charge of
the city of Boston's health work
for 25 years was pleasantly sur surprised
prised surprised to find an old co-worker,
Miss Dorothy Brickman, in Pana Panama,
ma, Panama, ' '
Miss Brickman. now assistant di director
rector director of the JWB-USO helped Dr.
Wilinskvqpt uo the first full time
department of volunteer services
. -m- ml. : ln,.a 1
in Boston in iio. mis iaici uc uc-came
came uc-came a model for many hospitals
throughout the United States.
Dr. Wilinsky, an early believer
in getting the public to actively
support hospital, volunteer work,
said yesterday he was "very much
impressed" with the tremendous
improvement in public health fa facilities
cilities facilities oii the Isthmus.
He visited various public health
authorities yesterday, after a ten ten-year
year ten-year absence from the Isthmus.
Dr.. Wilinsky former director of
Harvard University medical school
teaching hospital and former pres president
ident president of the American Public
Health Association, was visiting
here as a cruise passenger on
board the Empress of Scotland
which sailed at midnight. He was
accompanied by his wife.
1 j
' AVEXSANA a medicated
powder for your baby.

' tU. Pa

nam a
or
box 503 7, A .u on
Rarh nolle tor inclusion In this
column should nibmitted In type type-written
written type-written lurm and mailed to one of
Jhe box numbers listed daily in "So "Social
cial "Social and Olherswtse," or delivered
by hand, to the of lice. Notices o(
oieelmgs cannot bt accepted by tele telephone.
phone. telephone. Book Review Group
meeis 'tomorrow
The Book Review Group of the
Canal Zone College Ciub will meet
tomorrow at s:su a.m., at te
.j ti iMis. bred Gerhard!, 19
oeventn at., uolt Hcignts. mis.
nu.li a.. L. Adams will act as co co-hDstesr.
hDstesr. co-hDstesr. "Ten North Frederick" by John
UHara wm be reviewed by Mrs
George V. Daniels.
Crislobal-Colon
Rotary Tomorrow
The Cristobal Colon Rotary
CIud will gatner as usual tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow at the Strangers Club.
Gem And Mineral Society
Meeting On Friday
The monthly meeting of the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone Gem and Mineral &ocie &ocie-lv
lv &ocie-lv will "e held in the Palm Room
of the Balboa Y.M.C.A. on i imay
....jit. at 7:30 D.m..
h embers ot tho society v i 1 1
speak on lapidary -work and re re-liitea
liitea re-liitea suojects. 'ihose interested
are invited to attend.
Laymen's Fellowship
ut Margarita Church
Meets Monday
The Laymen's Fellowship of llio
Margarita Union Church will meet
Monuay in the Churcn assembly
room. .;;:, J'-
, The gussl speaker, fortho, eve evening
ning evening iU be Mr, Charlie Brand!,
wuu was assistant project engi engineer
neer engineer for Contractors Jliil project
13 A., ) :
Mr. Brand! will exhibit detail
charts and picture ot tne remov removal
al removal ot tiiousuiius of tons ot earai
and rock from this hill, and what
was accomplished, in removing
this hazara from the banks oi
the Panama Canal.
Dinner will be served promply
at 6:30 p.m. and it (s requested
tiiat all reservations be turned in
today. :
Clayton NCO Wives
Meet Next Week
Th Fort Clayton Non Commis Commissioned
sioned Commissioned Officers' Wives' Club will
hold their regular social on Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.. at the Fort Clay Clayton
ton Clayton NCO Club. "'-"
There will be a Max Factor
Cosmetic demonstration conduct conducted
ed conducted by Miss Rosa-Maria Cardenas.
Guests arc invited.
liazi Killer 0! 7
U. S. War Prisoners
Released On Parole
HEIDELBERG Ge.rmany, Feb.
22 (UP) A former Nazi navy cap captain
tain captain convicted of the wartime kill killing
ing killing of seven U. S. war prisoners
has been freed on parole from
Landsber Prison; the U. S. Army
announced today.
The Army said Capt. Kurt Goe-
be1', former commander of all!
military installations on the North
Sea island of Borkum. was parol paroled
ed paroled by unanimous decision of the
mixer Allied German clemency i
board. ;
Goebell was sentenced to death
by an Allied war crimes court
March 22. 1946. on charges he took
part in the killing of seven cap captured
tured captured U. S. airmen on Borkum
Island in August, 1944.
The sentence was commuted to
life imprisonment two years later.
Goebell subsequently won two
more reductions of sentence. The
last one, in September 1955, low lowered
ered lowered hi term to 28 years and.
made him eliglhle for parole, of officials
ficials officials explained. ...
i -s r
The X-roy hos mode it possible
for people other than women to
see through o man, W(A

... r-v

For An Exciting Dessert
Try Abend Chiffon Pie

A REAL PRODUCTION, somtthlnr to brlnr 0h- rn .w
auacsd rhlffon pie just melts on th tw. C J shs
By GAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Markets Editor

We ent to dinner In White
Plains, N.Y., last week and dis discovered
covered discovered a new dessert. That's good
news in most homes. So here
goes ;
Almond Chiffon Pie
Two egg yolks, slightly beaten;
VM cups milk, Vi cup sugar, 1
envelope (1 tablespoon) gelatin, M
cup whipping cream Vi teaspoon

teaspoon salt, tablespoons .Ug.r.iM nYD" A,"V.??T

l paxed -mch oie shcU. a mOnds.r
blanched and toasted; tender-thin
tiakes of coconut, toasted.
Blend egg yolks with '4 cup of
the milk in saucepan, Add remain remaining
ing remaining milk, Vi cup sugar, and gelatin.
Mix well. Cook and stir over
medium heat until mixture begins,
to thicken and coats a dry metal
spoon. (Do not boi.) Remove: from
heat. Chill until mixture thickens
slightly; Whip cream and fold into)
inicKenea mixture. Aaa aimona
extract; blend.
Beat egg whites with salt until
foamy throughout. Add 4 table tablespoons
spoons tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons at a
time, beating after each addition
until sugar is blended. Then con continue
tinue continue beating until mixture will
stand in stiff peaks. Fold into
gelatin mixture. Pour into pie
shell. Chill until firm. Garnish with
toasted coconut, sprinkled between
rows of toasted almonds.
To toast almonds and coconut.
Air Force Widow
Files $100,000
Suit Aqoinst U.S.
NEW YORK, Feb. 22 (UP)-The
widow of a retired Air Force of officer
ficer officer who was killed in the crash
of a bomber, has filed a $100,000
suit a&ainst the government.
Mrs. Estelle 'M. FasS, Delano",
Fla., has charged the government
with negligence and carelessness
in operation and maintenance of
a B25 which crashed last Septem September
ber September after taking off from Mitchel
Air Force Base. Her husband, Lt.
Col. Maurice I. Fass, 55, was one
of six killed in the crash.
Mrs. Fass claimed her husband
was going to Denver to arrange
the pay.nents on his pension. She
said he had retired a short time
t jioi e,

Card of Thanks
Tie SEXTON FAMILY express llieir
most sincere gratitude for the kindness
and floral tributes of the many' friends,
of
RAJ-P H E. SEXTON

Th3 Amcrictn Insurance (cmpsny
extends an invitation to all persons, private or
corporate, in. the Republic to present to the
Superintendent of Insurance an claim that they
may have against this Company .as a result of
its insurance. activities In Panamanian territory
up to December 31,. 1953, date on which the
American' Insurance Company 'notified the Na-
tional Government of the termination of its
insurance business in Panama.
THE AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY
Panama, February 21, 1956.

1

Si-
Spread almonds
aiaiwy in a nun layer on a shallow
bakinB nan. Phifo in mnrim-ota
oven (350 degrees F.v). and toast 5
10 minutes, or until golden brown
Stir often to toast evenly.
v"'w "'. nuroe
A mother complains: "The teen teenagers
agers teenagers in our neighborhood have tak taken
en taken over our home. They drop in at
all hours, take possession of everv
comfortable chair in- the living
room, keep cither the TV or the
record player going full blast, mon monopolize
opolize monopolize the telenhone.- f
''My husband and a wanr nnr
daughter, n, and our son; 15, to
feel their friends are welcome Rut
mey leel so welcome they have
practically crowded their father
and me out of the house.' What
can. we do about it?"
ftiaKe a few house rules and
stick by them. The kids won't r-
sent it They'll respect you for not
letting them run over you.
One mother I know has told her
teen age daughter that she can
have her friends after school but
the house must be cleared out half
an nour Before her father arrives
home from work.
She has also made it known that
there is ta be no drop-in visits
by carloads of teen-agers after din
ner on school nights. Also, Sunday
is family day and the house be belongs
longs belongs to the family. On that day
it is not to be used as a junior
USO.
Her daughter hasn't suffered any
by these rules. The parents are
no longer a couple of displaced
persons.
It would help, of course, If you
could get together with other par parents
ents parents of the neighborhood and could
make a few rules in common.
But even if you can't do that, vou
certainly have the right to; make
your uwu nouse rules,
jrhere is a big difference between
making your children's friends
welcome and completely turning
your nome over to tnem.
A few rules, pleasantly but firm
ly enforced, will make the diffr-
ence.

WM 5,-

II
."' f
iBELLE TOWER Qn. West
j Berlin. Germany, hairdresser"
thinks this is the perfect hairdo
for the pre-Lenten carnival
season. And it would 'seem to
be just the tiling to top off a
gay time. j
li
ij&ma. m hi
A-HEAD OF HERSELF'
What looks like an atomic-age
coiffure really isn't. Called
"Martian Madness," it's sup supposed
posed supposed to be a preview of hair
styles in 3000 A.D. It Was crt;-1
ated by D. Aris. Linda Powers
sports it"t a futuristic hair,
style show in New York City.
,
HEADY FUTURE Here's
how the well-tressed woman of
, the year 3000 will look. At
least, that's how hair stylist
Walter Ketisch sees it. Ruth
Raskin models his heady crea creation,
tion, creation, "Celestial Vampire," at a
futuristic hair style show in
New York City. .'
Peter Edson
. (Continued from face 2)
Would hf rlivirlfwi Inf a fan ni-ln.
cipal areas Europe, Asia, Africa!
anu racuic ucean. At tne end ofi
each year, the unused quotas in
each area would hp nrlrfori nn anrl!
distributed' to othci copntries in
H1C UICB, r '
Distribution wntilrl hp hv nrinrifv
That is,- the first- unused entry
Permit would en tn the immigrant
havinff th parlioct : rncfictrtinn
date on his application, regardless
ot country, it would work out
something like this., ;
For the vear ending last June 30.
there were 59,125 unused entries
m the European quota. They were
largely in Germany and Britain.
Hut there were 62,202 applicants
who couldn't get in because their
countries' quotas were used up.
These were largely in Italy ; and
Greece. Distributing the '59,125 un unused
used unused entry permits would almost
clear up the' backlog of 62,202
seeking admission, in one year.
'-, WAC ,;"V';.;;
SOUTHINGTON, Conn: (UP)
When she learned her aunt
planned to join the Women's Army
Corps, Miss Ann Cassella c" South South-in0'ton
in0'ton South-in0'ton decided to do likewise, but
was urned down because she
wasn't 18. The aunt. Miss Ida
Santo, decided to wail. After a
month, both were -worn in and sent

fie

BY MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE
Until recently Kit and M a r g y,
ninth grade classmates, have been
best friends. Now Margy has ac acquired
quired acquired a "steady" boy-friend.
Instead, of, Kit, it's Joe who
walks hoine with h sr. from school.
Her weekends are filled by dates
with him. Her talk, once specula speculation
tion speculation of what sonv dream b o y y-friend
friend y-friend would say and do, is now
filled with references to what the
red one has actually said and
done.
Last Saturday Margy telephon telephoned
ed telephoned Kit to say that, she could come
over to supper if she Were want wanted.
ed. wanted. Joe she explained, has to
break their movie date because of
a cold.
Eagerly invited, Margy never
arrived. Telephoned, her mother
said vaguely, "Why. Joe's'mother
asked her over there for supper.
uidn t you know? I guess she was
in a hurry. . ."
To comfort Kit, her m b t her
said, "What a wa; to treat a good

friend like you! If this is how she's there is no peace.. We are enuaHv
going to behave toward a girl betrayed by tiiose wno credit lis
who's as loyal as you are, you.with kindness not yet developed.

better let her so.
But Kit has been unable to let
Margy go.' The Implanted vision of
herself as an unappreciated biit
devoted friend to Margy has made
it impossible.
The belief that she cherishes
Margy when in fact she feels fury
at her forces her to continue
to
depend on the other girl for all her
companionship and exposes her

SHOWIMG AT YOUR SERVICE CEISTERZ
THEATERS TOSIGUT! r

B A LB O A
2:30 4:30 6:30 1:30
DiRECT rnum PARIS, FRANCE 1

dime y. -a Jeanne
Kasscit s Qsxa

fl "Geotlexiieri
MarrvBniiiettBS
enter by jeclitucoior
ALSO SHOWING THURSDAY"
FABAISO :1S
:30
Susan HAYWABD I
"WITH A SONG IN MY HEART"!
SANTA CRl'Z :15 S;40J
Robert MITCHUM I
"NOT. AS A STRANGER' : 1
SB

TOMORROW AT
WEEKEND

;,.:'
i
V
,

Ul0,

nni i it 1 1 ii

M i fi pin 5cren fl y RANALD If acDOUGALt Based en t oH ( tdn it
m U.'.l U- A JERRY WALO PRODUCTION. ti.rni.tfb, RANALD KacDOUGALl

to increasing snubs by Margy that
naturally increase her rage.
In these situations, we do, not
Comfort .children by endowing
them with noble feelings toward
the ungrateful friend. For Kit
needs to b3 made aware tf her
critical indignation with Margy so
she'll be freed from the ne?d'o
cling to'her and begin the devel development
opment development of criticai, judgment for
wiser uiendships. : J
Let me pass en these illuminat illuminating
ing illuminating remarks on the function of an anger
ger anger by Dr.- Erich Fromm: Writiog
in his book, "The Forgotten Lan Language,"
guage," Language," he says:
- "If rage is permitted to be felt
conscious)),' it can be the basi. or
healthy rebellion; H tan 4ead ttf a
re-orientation in terms of self-assertion
and eventually,, to freedom
and maturity. Once this aim 5 is
reached, the rage' will disappear.
ThuSj'.ags is sometimes- a neces necessary
sary necessary step in the healthy develop development
ment development and is not irrational." J
We are seduced, ..the Bible sajs,
by those who crv "Peace-! when

COSTLY DOG
.if
BISMARCK. N.D. (UP)
lice Sergeant Ray Ukich was asljf-d
to pick up a stray do" and took;
his. own car rather than a police
cruiser. He got the dog, but, while
stOBDi'ns st a eressine.. another car
rammed into his car to the tttne
of $150. I,
DIABLO UTS 6:15 1:55
Williata BEND IX '
. Arthur KFNNRDV j,
"CRASHOl'T f
Thtini. "1V1 nl HINO At.ONti
GAM BOA t:00
"SVENGALl Color'.
Trl "fNCHVINUP''
MARGARITA S;15 S 00
I Eli-ov HIR.SCH i : ,'
. "UNCHAINED"
3
Tlmr. "Pl.fNnKBnf Ilia StN"
CRISTOBAL 6:15 1:10
Alr.l'nilitiiHil
Robert MITCHUM
ShitUey WINTERS
"NICHIT of the HUNTER"
Thtirs. "THE BIG KNIFE"
I.A OCA : tiM f
j Ralph MMkM-
"KISS ME DEADLY"
au.. u.1)muh ii ii
CAMP BIERD 6:15 7:5
'ME TRAES DE UNA ALA"
J
THE CEI1TRAL
HELEASE
She's so
n
excitingly
good...;
when ;:
i I I r" .1 i
woncferfiillv
oad!
mm urn inn urn

to Fort "McClcllarirAla:

)



V,T DNESDAT, FIKirABT SVI-J

PAN'JMV AMERICAN AN lNTErENTEXT HAILY NEW Sr ArEH

- lsTKTTt: 'tL'd

1,111 rtfl .1 -i

rrTT. .,rij. j inner uo.iseq r

Tl

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Srcic

WEST
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NORTH (D)
AK7IS
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EAST

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North
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Pass

SOUTH

A K Q J 10 8
81
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North-South vul.
Eut South Wwt

Piss 2
Pass 4 NT.
Piss 5 NT.
Pass 8 4
Pass

Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass

Opening lead J

-L.

Activities

itoa&tezjs TruD LlfeAdyentin

One of the worst leads that you
can make against a slam contract
is a trump. This seldom costs you
m trick airectlv. but it usually

serves to turn control of the hand

over to declarer. In most slam
contracts, declarer welcomes the
opportunity to take control of the
hand at the earliest possible mo moment.
ment. moment. In today'! hand, West was un unwilling
willing unwilling to lead away from his king
or from either of his queens. Hop Hoping
ing Hoping to avoid the loss of a trick,
West therefore opened a trump.
South took full advantage of this
feeble opening lead. Declarer drew
three rounds of trumps and then
led a diamond, allowing the enemy
to win the trick!

The defenders were- now help help-We
We help-We Fact marls his best trv by

returning a club, but South put up

the king of clubs in oraer w save
nnmmv'g ace for a later occasion.

South then cashed dummy's top

diamonds, ruffed a diamond, and
got back to dummy with the ace
of clubs in order to cash the last
oiamond. This gave him his
twelfth trick, allowing him to ful fulfill
fill fulfill the slam contract.

By Cus Mellander
Although last Wednesday wasn't
an official holiday, a number of
students elected to take their cuts
giving the school a ghost like ap appearance.,!
pearance.,! appearance.,! guess they were car carried
ried carried away during the "burial of
the fish".
Today is an official h ol d a y,
George Washington's birthday.
"He's the guy that built the Wash Washington
ington Washington Bridge" quote Joe Wood.

Anyway a numoer oi siuaenis
plannned to study today, that is,, a
very small number of students

planned to study, ine majority oi
the students will spent the day
lounging around golf courses,
swimming or probably just
sleeping.
Some people say a team's made
out of stars, But our J.C. team is
made out of courage and drive.
A will to win that's strong and a
defeatist attitude that's weak,
We played sixteen games so we
were bound to win one.

rnnsmientiv. our J.C. nine suc

ceeded in defeating the up-to-now I
undefeated Baiboa High School

team. Lambert Mantovani as us-,
ic.iai nitrhcri a hrillant came, and:

his team mates came through with
some real hitting power. There
was also large crowd of J. C.
fann in the stands, their frequent

exuberant exclamations sparked

JC's team and ramea ine ui s
school team.
tv, .oonnH nmntinp of the Circu

lar Track Club was held yesterday

afternoon. These boys are iryiK

to promote stock car races w r-

nama. New iaeas ana suggesuu
re needed to get the club roll

ing". See either Jerry ru
Cleve if you can help them out.
JC boys are getting in shape for
track season, that means no more
late hours and no more of issa and
dm Fnopl former high

school track star may not be able

to participate this year wr w.w.
VLm. tt-num savs hell be hard

to replace if he doesn't change his,

"FAMILIAR SCENES 'AT IC:
t.u.. c.nonii'i nrinu shirt, r eat-

k... in MnC ade's hair. Frank

Fuller's new fuzz top. Poems by
7.."i-..j ,t.,HontQ in the lounfie.

Th rehashing and retelling ol

. a ovnprirnrPS in uie

weecuu ,.r.-

lounge.

IN) AN IMPISH

LKSHTN1NG '-x
SOMETIMES PEKF0STMS "V"
PECULIAR FRANKS. :

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' A7 Li" I O'NESE NATCSALI5T -7
w J-'-.' I ANrCTV INTT.llC-ENCE
'.,-,.. TT SOURCES

A . ..i

IT '5 CHIT-CHAT ThATCNLY VcOaX
CLO?E TO ThE ChAEfE (CEP Jr' Y'Hy
pc.ircAL as? a'il:ta?y eA?5 rr ro oj

WOULP EVES HEAR AN!

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up fcn a rota:

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THE EMTIKE FISH POFULAl ion ur n ri"" n.n

West could have defeated the
alam if he had made a more enter enterprising
prising enterprising opening lead. A heart open opening
ing opening would have forced out declar declarer's
er's declarer's ace at once. When South even eventually
tually eventually gave up a diamond trick,
the opponents would be able
to cash their hearts.
Even a club opening lead would
V ...nrlrorf m it better tOT IM

nave nwi k-
defenders. South would win the

first trick with tne King m kiuu,
to be sure, but. East would get the
.1 nr.a nnt itnmmv i ace

of clubs before the diamonds had
been established. This would defeat
the slam. 'In general, a good rule
, to remember is that a trump lead
i. rfwirahle aeainst a slam only

when the bidding makes it clear
that declarer means to rutt ex extensively
tensively extensively in the dummy.
BRACELET HAZARD

, NAUGATUCK, Conn. (UP)

Robert Beret was suut
v.. ki- Mnnri'a hracelct. Berce

told police one of the charm s on
the- bracelet was a small-caliber
cartridge which, he feared might
explode. It did while he was trying
a. tha nrimer from the

1.U AXklw

bullet.

rsfrf UMtt CDICMne

T CAM SE6 ffcHJ CLEARLY

n

- AW 1 1 77. Nk

a.

v I "I I t1MtUlinlMkl

TPS PLACE IS SIMMY

LOA.PEP W1 H rmjvic

CURTIS APPKVwCHESTOU

- stops IN f-KUNi v-Ji

Je'S SPFAWNfiTbTtXl
NOW FOR AM ETPA.
DOLLAR woutOTbu like
To HEAR WHAT HeS

aATlNCj r

That BUSTS mf, but iJilpa saip
J 1 iA.r 1 licit rtlAl

SOWtlHlNo PkJI M l"-lV'f I
c:c 1 1 mil CruruMA UFP--

K SHE'S A POLL

CaM. 1Sf k. MCA bM. T M U. S P

ALLCT OOr

Medicine Runs Low

"We really could turn out the mud pies

with tnat gaagex;

If ypu are writing a note to
say that you cannot accept an
r..in nu Rhnnld eive some

good reason for not being able

to. It IS nou tuwii" v-
.m snrrv vnu can t ac-

cept. You must try twice as hard
to sound gracious when refusing
an invitation as when accepting

one.
irnv in necentine vou are al

ready Indicating that you are

pleased to be asKea

Faltering Philip
t'hillp't lift! Is filled with bruises.
Well-worn steps and rags he nses.
palrs would leate Ws home like new.
r A. Classifieds. Inst the right due?

f : SOm, SHERIFF. I HOW O VOU TrfONf
X TH' OTIZENS MAKE OUT WTHTK
r J WELL. HOWS OF MAVERICK WITH THAT I BAD WJW
THESE J ARE DOJN ALL BUSTED aJT OW
? 'ill U
iProfiy-iiJ

GOOD GOSH, ) 'SALL IN A CAY5

NO VvONUfcW WUKKbu

HE WAS" y HOW FAR lb H

CRAZY

fif f T. OAHLE1

J.

'BOUT EK5HTEEM

MILE... vVVIYT

50MEBODV

ICKCVERi

THERE? I OTHER

!

f NO... IVE

r (SorsuMt i

-rf business

J fi. I'M- CM'

BOOTS AND QER BHDDIBf

No Dollar Today

T EDGAR MARTU

RhTSw KT SCHOOL

f ft STPnOE OF

sont CRtEP r-vn

POT OP

OKDEftVlTXW'T

WAWE ft tOLVftT?. TA01

PROBABVf CP WO WPOJTTftXX ftt 111

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O II n lldSLly1, P. JIS'' V PORE
g1W6ylmr., Inc.T.M, t U.g.Ptt. OH. "'Vl 1 pT- -:

IHE STORI Or MARTIH Wt

By WILSON SCRUGGS

CAPTAIN

Condolences

f LESLIE TURNER

IP THEKE'4 AHTHlNfl INEt

4 TAKE CWtE Or FOR W,
Pt CA&C ICTIIfi ULiniAjl

fl t I i kAWD THAT VACATION I THAT 1 WOKJT BE Afllff TO SAV J j :
n -:- 'Amn- pujS Ttv I r TAlff.THATS AM )rn I TV"JsO I WAITTHA. BV THE WAV. WHAT r j

wuiMiA il k www w-mrr

I VOU HME OUR PEEPEJTV

I YOUR HU58WJD WAS 1 1 N 1 ,;
I A FINE (A AM i AND A il Kv'JJ 1 1 1
JrxGWAT sceviTfcrjy?1 J ffT- j

.

HATE TO BRlNfl THI$

UP... BUT
MUST IDENTIFY HIM.
WASH TUBSS CAM FLV

OUT THERE TOPAY i

I vmi'dP ROTH ,0 KIWD'V

TO THIMK. ABOUT THE I
DETAILS THAT MUT
a attendep TO..; A

n r

1

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IDENT1PICATI0N

ISDIrFICULTi

WHO WA

7

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I OOM'T KNOW. HE HAD
KIO OENTAL WORK P0M6
OUK CARRIAGE

TWO YEAR A60..N0R

WENTIONEO ANY

PRIOR TO THAT!

ft

WELL,

LET'4 HOPE

IT WON'T BE

t WECE55ARV,

.ANYWAY!

oof- 19b6 by NEA b:

vie., IntTT. M.

H-i. U, 8. P.I OH,

MORTT MEEKLK

Shoo!

By DICK CAVALLI

pRisciLLA'S ror

Matter of Modesty

By AL vCRMEEtt

S'OU MEAN YOU
. Ml5;!r TUti

SIMPLE QUESTIONfJ

rmim.

SURELY

CAM

ANSWER

'0

UII.IILJ If

we EARTH'S

WE

TUP

WUMAN

ARE'.")

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THEN

WHY DIDN'T 1

YOU SAY

SO?i

HATE TO
SOUND

ii iwp TM

. BRAGGING J

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--reAP

MAKE ME

PRETTY 1

,K1P5?

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TTTTiiiiu nr. vi

I KNOW. THI5 STUFF

REALLY MCRXSI

1 "1

---30 e1

t by NC IwiM. Hi CAUILU

QUR BOARDING UOL8I

MAJOM HOOrL JtlOUR 1

HIT I

Wilt Hl

Who's the Star?

Lft That

(SKATIN'S EASY.CICEPO... J
V-- 71 NOW TRY IT
vyALWEJ-X

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LET WE'LL
go fJri
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( tVW.f THAT WAS j

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aaz kcAl iwlPkTtAKi A WOLE IM THB PArfck

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OTHcK AT 1 ABLE ;n,

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A KMOTTY CNe,

MAJOR.' I'M A

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t.,w--.i'M. k , . ,,,. nnri n-Wui Hnfonscless men

OUTDOOR BARGAIN BAbtmtm t iiwuinmus ui .. ..
storm a store in Hamburg, Germany, which is selling carpets, linens and other items
". . ...... i. . :-. 4k u;MMf dflmiinnrl .ihA forms.

at less than half price because a water pipe ui.m. m ui uuuu,ue .... p.

- r

; V: i

PROTECTORS Of THE NORTH These lonely sentries stand guard in northern Ontario
as part of the three radar networks which are sprawled across Canada. Within reach
of warning stations are fighter bases. Canedian air defense command is near Montreal.

3i V

'LIGHTED C1GARET Tho glow of the cigaret this televised
s rmAVinrt nine An lv mirv nf lipht in the room where

I H I TV camera picked up her Image. No ordinary TV camera,
Wc a linht.nmnlifvinfr 150.000 times') Lumicon demonstrat

ed by co-inventor Ralph Sturm in New York preview.

i,, .-.-ir

ISMWII!mHWMWW

'V'

HAT HARVEST TIME

IF A QUIZ show emcee ever li"ty4 f f
asks you where panama J, K J 1 ?
IS-ifc nrn matip tpll him thev ; f J

hats are made, tell him they

are made in Ecuador and you few

will be right. This misnamed If

headgear is made high in the

Andes where a cool and dry ,(
climate makes weaving a per- f
feet profession. .'This year, ri
some four million hand-made j
hats will be produced and
the United States will get
about 90 per cent of the total. S
As many as 100,000 persons -fZ'
continue one of the last few
handicraft industries to with-

stand the machine age. Hats j-.

is,.?'

tltUIIM - ...
are constructed of a native

nalm straw. A top-erade -9'Y '---V

straw hat requires as long as
three months and may cost . I ,
$150. Straw is cut and dried, -"

tnen SOia lo wumt'ii vn.-avv.-i. i f

id !

K THIS ITALY'S VENICE? No, this is anotner vemec, w; w : 7; u:;,i
IS imi 1 1 ai i VCIN"-cr. 'tc f. hnmrs and abandon their autos. (

rams- flooded we communuy,

t

.;i.'?Vr'f','

They weave me crowns anu s s -s

brims and the hat bodies are
sold to nrofessional buyers .,

who bid for choice Jots,
, 1. il. -I .j. A. : n a f V'

men nnisn uis viiwauuns ui s

washing, ironing, sulphunz sulphunz-inir.
inir. sulphunz-inir. hammerinir and sorting.

Then they're shipped off.

f

J"

1;

jj

A PEACH FROM PARIS Lillian Montevecchi hies herself to the California seaside to
ffJfiteiS work for her American film debut in Meet Me H Las Vccjas.

1 cuiiau wiiiffl'i rinesn't bother to -read

it ii jNuiy""5"1-' ..........
i fc . wo.teo hp livps in the Valley of

J winter weaua-i uw', ww-mv t

the Sun in Arizona, uere snes oui su" aw"v- i

I I

v

if ill J
1 U'-" '"J A ;

If' i v
r I '....
1 J
4 ' '
- i i tS . , 4 t
j f. U' 4 "

i Women bunch matching ttrondj o,f straw, then tell them.

f
V

Theit hat are scrubbed. Soaping gives a brilliant whiteness. Then they're sulphurised.

1

t ,;
. 1
I.



FACE TEN

THE PAN AMA AMERICA AS IXDEFEXIrXT DAILY KETVSPAP..
WEDNESDAY, EEDHUAHY S3, 133S
PoM'-WaY Deadloel
O
n

i. I

Duke, Wake Forest, N.C.,
N.C.S, In Basketball Tie
For First Place In Loop

NEW YORK, Feb. 22 (UP) An unheralded
North Carolina State substitute, who has warmed
the bench for most of three seasons, was the princi principal
pal principal cause of a four-way sharl-up for first place to today
day today in the Atlantic Coast Conference basketball race.

Canisius overcame a poor start
to defeat Villanova, .89-81, and
virtuallv clinch a berth in the

NCAA tournament for the sec

ond straight year. The Tide
turned In favor of Canisius
when co-captain John McCar McCarthy,
thy, McCarthy, who was held to six points
in the first half, hit six times
from the field, four times from
the foul lines and set up several

other scores. McCarthy was indi

vidual hlch scorer with 22

points.
Southern Methodist clinched
a tie for Its second straight
Southwest Conference title
w'th an 89-68 triumph over
Baylor as guard Ronnie Morris
of Shawnee, Okla., hit for 21
poitnts for the Mustangs. SMU
now has a 10-0 Conference rec record.
ord. record. In other games last night, St,
Louis defeated Drake, 96-81;
Eastern Kentucky State upset

Louisville, 88-84; Pittsburgh top
oed Carnegie Tech, 85-81; Co

lumbia defeated Harvard, 78-55;

Texas tamed Rice, 94-82; West Western
ern Western Kentucky State licked Cin

cinnati. 85-74; George Washing

ton beat Georgetown, 70-67 in

overtime, and Muhlenberg de defeated
feated defeated Bucknell, 100-86.
Along The Fairways

Lou Dickman was the unsung
sub who scored eight points in
the final four minutes last
night to give the Wolfpack a
come-from-behlnd 79-73 victory
over North Carolina.
As a result of Dickman's he heroics,
roics, heroics, North Carolina State,
North Carolina, Wake Forest and
Duke all are tied for first place
in the Atlantic Coast Conference
with identical records of 10
league victories and three de defeats,
feats, defeats, Duke rolled over Virginia,
92-58, with center Junior Mor Morgan
gan Morgan scoring 24 of the Blue Dev Devils'
ils' Devils' points. Bob McCarthy and
Wistar Nelt'gan each netted 14
po ints for the losers.
South Carolina dropped Clem Clem-sort
sort Clem-sort into the Atlantic Coast; Con

ference cellar by beating the Ti

gers, 89-83, in a game which

twice saw spectators running
out on the floor. Grady Wallace

was individual high scorer as he

led South Carolina to victory

with 35 points.

BHS, Albroolc
Tangle Friday
In Track Meet

Balboa High track .team wil
lio.si ttie Alurook f lyers in the
first meet of the season for both
teams this Friday at Balboa Sta Stadium.
dium. Stadium. The field events will start
at 3 p.m. and the track events at
3:30. The meet was announced
earlier as Thursday, but has been
changed to Friday.
'I at Bulldogs held their Inter-

class meet last week but Friday's

get together will be their initial

outing against someone other than

lettiiiiiiaics. xicsuua ui uus meci

point to a young and inexperienc inexperienced
ed inexperienced team for the. red and white,
There are only eight returning let let-termen
termen let-termen on the team, with one
not in condition for competition
as yet. The high jump, broad
jump, weights, 440, and mile are
the only events with experienced
performers.
Bob Toothman is counted on
heavily in the 4 lapper, and Eddie
Scott will be among the top quar quarter
ter quarter milers in the league this year.
A shoulder injury has sidelined
Bill Coffey from the pole vault
but he will turn his talents to thli
high jump and broad jump. In the
latter he has had some experience
being' one of the regular jumpers
for the Bulldogs last season.
Johnny Magec will serve dou:
ble duty, working the high jump
and pole vault. In both events Ma
gee is an old hand. '.'.
The thin clau lands from the
hall of BHS seem to have a con

centration of experience in th e
weights, where 3 boys paint a ve

ry encouraging picture.

Charlie Morris, school record
holder at 47 ft. Vi in. is out to
better that mark this year. Jim
DesLondes and Dorman Fulton re return
turn return to the discuss ring where they
shoufd collect many points ; over

the season.

Not much Is known about the

Flyers, but they have been work

ing out faithfully and coach Al

Guidet looks for plenty of point

production in the hurdles, weights,
and vault. This dual meet will

serve as a fine medium for gather
insight into the relative strength

01 me two squads for the forth'
coming Balboa relays.

Sanfley Hurls
1-Hit 7-0 Win
OverCH.S.

. STAN DISCS
Atlantic Twilight Baseball
League (Second Half)

Powells
Army Atlantic.

V.H.S. .,
Navy. ,.

Won Lost
, 10
. 1 0
.01
,. 0 1

Pet.
1.000
1.000
.000
.000

MONDAY'S RESULT
Army Atlantic 7, Of.S. 0
TOMORROWS CAME iTHURS.)
Powells vs. C.H.S.

GOLF NEWS FRDM THE
AMADOR LAMES
Jeane Morris won first place

in the "Nine Hidden Holes" tour tournament
nament tournament held at Fort Amador on
Thursday, Feb. 16. Bea Fish and
Irene Robinson tied for second
place. Alyce French won the Low

Putts competition.

There will be a tournament as
usual tomorrow. Players are re reminded
minded reminded that they may compete
morning or afternoon.
Announcement has been made

by the Amador Ladies Comntit-

ree that tne annual Amaaor la ladies
dies ladies Handicap Tournament will
be held in March. There will be
four davs of qualifying play be between
tween between March 1 'and March 4. The
first Week of play will begin
March 5 and continue every
week thereafter until the end of
the tournament.

PANAMA WOMEN'S GOLF
ASSOCIATION

The PWGA girls had a lovely
day for their tournament and

Inter-Club match at Panama
Golf Club last Saturday. There
were some beautiful games play played
ed played also. Svlva Carpenter came

in with a, gross 82. Wilma Banks
had low net Of 63, Ruth Cherry

69, Katherine Purdy 71, Harriet

Serger 72, Edith Matmeson t
Jane Huldtquist 73, Kay Call 74,
Lynn Jones 74, Bobbie Hughes
75, Bev Dilfer 75, Joan Claire 76

and Nellie Peterson 76.

The prizes were extra nice due
to the efforts of Kay Call and

the generosity of Jack shor who

donated a bottle 01 scotch ana

National Distillers who gave
bottle of gin.

In the lnter-club match Pan

ama took high points with 394,

Amador came second with 310,

Gamboa 306, Brazos Brock 275

and Ft. Davis 155. The last

match will be played at Ft. Da
vis next Saturday, Feb. 25.

The next monthly tournament

of PWGA will be held at the Bra Brazos
zos Brazos Brooks Golf Club on March
17: Check your sports pnge for
further data.

By TREVOR SIMONS
Danny Concepcion's one-out

single in the seventh inning with

one' mate aboard ruined a no no-hitter
hitter no-hitter for Armyis pitcher', San Sanfley,
fley, Sanfley, as Army Atlantic made
their debut in the Atlantic Twi Twilight
light Twilight League with a shutout per performance
formance performance against Cristobal High

bcnooi, winning 7 to 0 and tying
Powells for first place in the
early stages of thr second half

race.

Sanfley's winning performance

was done with the greatest of

ease and was marred by a pair

of walks and an error by second

baseman Schmidt. Seven High

School batters went back via the

strikeout route.

Kaizer Bazan went the dis distance
tance distance for Cristobal High, allow

ing 5 hits and 7 runs while walk walking
ing walking 9 batters. Bazan gave up 2
of his nine walks and 4 hits in
the third frame when Army
dented home plate five times.
Powells vs. CH S. Tomorrow
Tomorrow night at 7 o'clock
at Mt. Hope Stadium, the Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic Twilight League schedules a
Cristobal High-Powells game.

Pacific Women's

Softball League

STANDINGS
Won Lost Pet.

Itfedina-Black
Stirring Up

emifina

Bill S

Great Interest

SLAMMIN SAMMY Tough Sammy Medina, onetime champ
of the Isthmus, takes on improved Black Bill in an 'eight 'eight-round,
round, 'eight-round, 128-pound semifinal on the Caras Nuevas card at the
National Gym Sunday night. Main bout on the program is a
ten-rounder between Toto Ibarra of Chiriqui and Rodolfo Am Am-pudia
pudia Am-pudia of Colon. Medina won a unanimous verdict from Rafael
(The Bull) Brathwaite in his last outing Dec, 11, and Black
Bill was a winner by unanimous decision over Manuel
' Prescott Jan. .29.

Sunday's eight-round semlfi

nal between feat herweights

Sammy Medina and Black Bill

has apparently aroused as much

interest among boxing I an. as

the ten-round main bout in
which Toto Ibarra clashes with

Rodolfo Ampudia.
Just two years ago Medina
was considered. a washed up,
punch-drunk former champ.
Persons who had watch'd the
courageous "Chollto" rule the
126-pound ranks for years all
agreed that Sammy had reach reached
ed reached the end of the road and it
was about time he bung up the
gloves for good.

cut Medina, wno was never

known to be a quitter when he
was at the top, was not giving
in so easily. After several unsuc unsuccessful
cessful unsuccessful comeback attempts he
got going. His last two bouts, in

wnich he won consecutive deci decisions
sions decisions from Rafael (The Bull)

Brathwaite, showed that Sammy

is sxiu iar irom finished.

V

HlUfffrBiir 1 it. ii

Editor: CONRADO SARCEANT

Cabana Club Invitational
Tennis Tourney To Begin
Tonight At El Panama

Arsi Cola
P. H. Royal

Alfredo Aieman
Lou Gelate's IX

Jr.

TA.T. Brldgestohe 0

1.000
.000
.000
.000
.000

a

announces

THE OPENING TONIGHT
2nd AISIIUAL EL PANAMA
lilVITATIOllAL TEliillS TOURNAMENT
Mixed Doubles
Men's Singles Men's Doubles
Admission: 50c. nightly except finals ($1.)
Wed., Feb. 226 n.m. :
Thurs., Feb. 23 6 p.m. ;
Fri.. Feb. 247 p.m.
Sun.. ; Feb. 26 7 p.m.
(No play Saturday due to "Million Dollar Fashion Show")
Winners will be invited to play in the
First Panama International Tenis Tournament
(Feb. 29 March 5 at El P.mtma)

iWcTcTTFdm otiTHwrbc'cue'ancI
drinks sold during the tournnment
at moderate price

This Week's Schedule
Thursday. Feb. 23, Alfredo Ale

man Jr. vs Lou Gelate's IX at

Paralso.

Thursday, Feb., 23, Panel Hi

gienico Royal vs Arsi Cola at La

Boca.

Friday, Feb. 24, T.A.T. Bridge

stone vs Alfredo Aieman Jr. at

Paraiso.

Friday, Feb. 24, Lou Gelate's

IX vs Fapel Hlgienico at Santa

Cruz. ...

With a crowd of approximate

ly 1,000 attending, the Pacific
Women's Softball League got off

to a trying start Monday at San Santa
ta Santa Cruz ball park. The opening

day ceremony was performed

superbly by the "Veterans" of

yesteryears which included Mrs

Z. Thorne on the pitching

mound, Mrs. C. Dunn doing the

c-attmg and Mrs. E. Holder re

ceiving the pitch.

Honored guests included Mrs

C. Belanfonte, E. Malcolm, Miss

R. Butcher, Alfredo "Baby" Ale

man Jr. and representatives of
the various teams playing in the

1958 season. .'.

Following the pre-game cere

mony, the soda-pop" lassies of
Arsi Cola defeated the "Bridge-

stoners or T.A.T. by a score of
6 to 2 behind the great pitching
of Joyce Anderson who, gave up
only two safeties and struck cut

8 opponents, while Jaclnta

Thomas went all the way for the
losers giving ud 9 bingles but was

enecuve in the latter frames.

Arsi Cola showed nower in the

two opening rrames by gather gathering
ing gathering six runs with J. Boyd and J.

Morales collecting extra-base

hits while the Bridgestoners of

iji.i. got over tneir nervousness
and scored their 2 runs in the
3rd inning. J. Morales led her
team in batting with 2 hits in 3
trips Including a homer' while
T. Malcolm collected'! bingle in
1 official time at bat for the los losers..'.
ers..'. losers..'. .

Boosting Starts
For 'AH' Berths
NEW YORK fNEAl '-.Tim

I All-America nominees are pouring

iu, wun we Auanuc uoast confer conference.
ence. conference. Big Ten and the Pacific

Coast each boosting the highest
number three.

The Atlantic Coast Sports Writ-

1 ers Association recommends that

Ronnie Shavlik and Vic Molodet
of North Carolina State and Len Len-nie
nie Len-nie Rosenbluth of North Carolina
be given priority.
From the west coast, the drums
beat for Willie Naulls of UCLA
and K. C. Jones and Bill Rusell
of San Francisco. The Big Ten
names Robin Freeman of Ohio
State, Julius McCoy of Michigan
State and. Carl Cain of Iowa.
The rest of the -nation gives
boosts for Si Green of Duquesne,

Kod Hundley of West Virginia, Dar-

The Cabana Club Invitational

Tennis Tournament for Panama
and Canal Zone tennis players

will get underway today at 6
p.m. at the Hotel El Panama. -Major
Leo Hayes will defend
his singles title and is one of
the favorites for this year's tour tournament.
nament. tournament. -- .,
The Fort Gulick Army officer
has been awarded the top seeded
spot while Webb Hearne, who
lost to Hayes in last year' fi finals.
nals. finals. Is NO. 2. 1

Today's matches will be limit limit-men's
men's limit-men's doubles and mixed dou dou-ed
ed dou-ed to the- men's singles, while
bles matches will start tomor tomor-row
row tomor-row evening. Top seeded team in
the men's doubles Is Hearne and
Bill Hele. Maj. Hayes and Mrs.
Arthur Dryer were awarded the
top spot in the mixed doubles
eyent. " :;
The time schedule for today's
matches:
(All players are requested by
the tournament committee to
report at least 15 minutes prior
to time set for match. This will
facilitate tournament play.
6:00 M. D. Franciskini vs. E.
J. Henriquez, Greslyn Guardia
vs. George Gercich.
6:45 Eugene Frankel vs. J. H.
Daughteridge, Julio Plnllla vs.
F. H. Ladky.

7:30 Silverlo Melfl ...vs. Roy

Glickenhaus, Jorde Erhardt vs.
Ramon Ramirez.
8:15 R. B. H. Stroop vs. Gor

don Bell, Leo Hayes vs. winner

trancisKim-Henrlquez.

9; 00 E. M. Barrera vs. winner

Guardia-Gerclch, George Motta
vs, winner Frahkel-Daughter-
idge. : ;v 8 :

9:45 John Perry vs. winner

Pinllla-Ladky, Hans Omenitsch
vs. Earl Omphroy.

v 11:15 Webb Hearne vs. win

ner S troop-Bell.

The pairing and matches for
Thursday night will be the fol

lowing:
MEN'S DOUBLES
, Motta-Pinllla
Daughteridge-Franclskinl
Eisenman-Omenitch
Barrera-Eleta

Prlest-Newhouses
Melfi-Omphroy
MIXED DOUBLES
Heurtematte-Eleta
Mr, and Mrs. Glickenhause

' Mr. and Mrs. Plambeck
Perry-Eisenman
Boyd-Woodruff
Morgan-Omenitsch
NOTE: Players should call the

Cabana Club to find out their

starting times. ':.

Dee Fondy Off To Good Start
For Cubs' First Base Job

NEW YORK, Feb. 22 (UP)
Manager Stan Hac kof the Cubs
claims first base is "wide open,"
but if big Dee Fondy keeps hit hitting
ting hitting the way he has been, the
job will be a closed proposition
soon.
Fondy, faced with competition
from Frank Kellert, acquired
during the of f -season r : from

Brooklyn, and Bob Speake, who

broke in spectacularly last sum summer,
mer, summer, highlighted the Cubs' bat-tin-
drill at Mesa, Ariz,, yester

day with consistent long blows.

During his second turn ax oai,
Fondy hit one of the longest
home runs' ever seen at Mesa's
Rendezvous Park.
At nearby Scottsdale, Arte.,
where the Baltimore Orioles
are training, bonus baby Bob
Nelson slammed two balls over
the right field fence. The first
injury of the spring was also
reported when minor league
catcher Leopoldo Moncado of
Eagle Pass, Tex., suffered a
broken nose in a collision with
infielder Marv Breed:ng at the
Orioles' camp.
At St. Petersburg, Fla., Cardi

nal manager Fred Huxcnmson
had his players concentrating

on singles instead 01 nome iuuo.
During a fiye-inning lntra-squad
game yesterday, Hutchinson laid
do"wn a rule that a ball hit over
an outfielder's head v was out.

That still didn't stop some of the
players from swinging hard and

rookie Bob Kana was cauuu
for a drive that bounced off the

in 1 -i'..-- "t 1 i..;n "t, hppn ft three-oaEeer,

.v,n.ucj ui wuisYHie, pui ..Mo rinn Tun.

Burrow of Kentucky and Don Bol-I Kou-ue """1V-1U",7
HAiiMr nf nmrctnn drum of Pittsburg. Calif., was

I And the nominations are just the batting sianuuui oi x.-
m hIaitH l r trlA

Phillies training site, Clearwater,

Fla. Landrum collected two
doubles, a single and a walk as
a team coached by whit Wyatt

aeieaxed one lea by Wally Moses,
8-6. .
The White Sox took the'r
first batting practice at Tarn Tarn-pa,
pa, Tarn-pa, Fla., where the latest ar.
rivals into camp were pitchers'
Mike Fornieles and Paul Stuf Stuf-fel.
fel. Stuf-fel. Manager Marty Marion
announced he will hold an lntra-squad
game tomorrow in
preparation for a rookie ton ton-test
test ton-test with the Cards Sunday.

Outfielders Bob Cerv signed
his contract with the Yankees,
making a total of 33 players
who have come to terms with

the club, cerv batted .341 in 55
games last season,
Shortstop Chlco Carrasquel a-

greed to terms with Cleveland,
but the Indians still haven't
been able to satisfy Early wynn,
Gene Woodling, Jim Busby, Bob
Avlla, Vic Wertz and Joe Alto-

belli..,'....
At his Wither bee, N.Y.,
home, southpaw Johnny Po Po-dres
dres Po-dres of the Dodgers, who Is 1 1-A
A 1-A in the draft, said he "knows
nothing" of a published report
that he would be called into
the' Army next month. Podres
said he plans to leave for
Brooklyn's spring train Ing
camp at Vero Beach, Fla., In a
few days and would have left

earlier had 11 not been for ?H-

Outfielder Jim Piersall- and

first baseman Dick Gernert both
signed with the Red Sox at Sa Sarasota,
rasota, Sarasota, Fla., the club's training
site.
'-" i

v

1

'Ns

r

BLACK BILL

Medina won by a split decision

in nis nrst encounter with
Brathwaite Oct. 31 of last year.
The fan clamored for a return

bout and on Dec. 11 they were

matched again.
This time Sammy left no
doubts who was the better of
the two. In a performance that
was reminiscent of the days
when be was champ, he a a-droitly
droitly a-droitly maneuvered his rival
Into the ropes on repeated oc occasions
casions occasions to pound him w'th
right and left combinations
while the crowd applauded
lustily each time.

Balboa
Lead In

High Increases
Twilight Loop

PACIFIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE
'.'.'
Second Half Standings
Team Won Lost

Balboa High ........ '. 4
Lucky Strike 2
American Legion ...... 2
Junior College. ........ 1

Brathwaite fought back game,,
ly in that battle but it was Sam Sammy
my Sammy all tne way. Medina has not
appeared in the ring since that
time.
Black Bill, who is Medina's

opponent this Sunday, is anoth

er Ilgnter who has shown great

ny-hued battler- who is handled Teams

by Aubrey (Cojo) Woodruff, hasCP.O.

won nis last inree iignts, the
first two of these by knockouts.
On Caras Nuevas' last pro program,
gram, program, Jan. 29, Bill, a 2 to 1 pn pn-derdog,
derdog, pn-derdog, earned a unanimous
verdict over Manuel Prestott.

Outweighed by three pounds-.

Black Bill carried the fight ail
the way and outboxed and out out-slugged
slugged out-slugged the sharp shooting
Prescott from start to finfeh.
The fact that both Bill and

Medina like to. mix up things
from the opening gong could
make this match a highly inter interesting
esting interesting affair. The fans are look-
ing forward to what promises to
be a battle royal between the

two crowd pleasers. 1

Tuesday's Result

Balboa High 6, Amer. Legion 1

Thursday's Game

Amer. Legion vs Junior College

The Balboa High School as

sured themselves of at least a

ti(. in the second half by beating

the American Xegion last night

6 to 1 behind the two-nit pitcn
ing of Ed Kirchmier.

The aeieat eiiminaxeo xne re

gion from the race and the big
game of the year will be Friday

night when the High School and
Lucky Strike tangle. A victory

for the Hieh School will send

them into the Twlloop playoff
against Lucky strike while a loss
could cut them in a tie with

Lucky Strike, who have a post

poned game witn junior vouege
slated pending the result of Fri Friday
day Friday night's game.

The legionnaires scored xneir

only run in the top of the first
when Norton was safe on Scott's

boot at third. Norton stole sec

ond and after Bill Pechete went
down on strikes Norton scored
on Jim Moody's sharp line drive
single to right.

After the first Inning only one

baserunner reached third on
Kirchmier with Bateman walk walking
ing walking to open the fifth and being

sacrificed to second by Mcuiaoe.

Bateman reached third base on
a balk by Kirchmier but was out
a moment later when a squeeze
play backfired and Hotz caught
Bateman sliding home for the
second out. Cucalon then bounc bounced
ed bounced out second to first to end the
inning. ;

Norton singled with two away

in the sixth for the second base

hit Off Kirchmier and was
stranded as pechette whiffed lor
the third out.

In racking un his fourth win

in six decisions, Kirchmier walk walked
ed walked only one batter and sent nine
back to the bench via the strike strikeout
out strikeout route. Hinz lost his first
game after notching 4hree wins,
giving up eight base hits and
striking out four School hoys.

Balboa High scored what prov proved
ed proved to be the winning runs in the
bottom of the first with Cicero
rapping a hot shot, by third for
a single. Cicero stole second and
continued to third when the
throw went through to center center-field.
field. center-field. Scott struck out and Ma Ma-gee
gee Ma-gee went out pitcher to first
with -Cicero holding at third.
Reyes lined a single Into right
to score Cicero with the High
School's first run. Danny Win Win-klosky
klosky Win-klosky unloaded a long triple to
left center scoring Reyes with
the second run which proved
enough to win the game.
High School iced the game in
the fifth with Owen Sutherland
opening the inning with a triple
and scoring on Klrchmier's cir circuit
cuit circuit clout to deep right field.
Klrchmier's roundtripper was
the first home run hit In the

added two more runs in the bot bottom
tom bottom of the sixth on singles by
Reyes and Winklosky and two
infield errors by Legion.

American Legion
D. Johnson, if..;,
Norton, as ......
Pechette, cf .....

Moody, lb
Long, 2b
Bateman, c
McGlade, 3b
Cucalon, rf
Hinz, p .

Ab R II Fo

Balboa High

Cicero, cf

Scott, 3b
Magee, If
Reyes, lb

Winklosky, gs

Hotz, c .......
French, rf ....
Sutherland, 2b
Kirchmier, p..'.

0
A
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

t Score By Innings

Amer. Legion 100 000 0 I
Balboa High 200 022 X

Winning pitcher: Kirchmier
(4-2). Losing pitcher: Hinz (3-1).

Struck out by: Kirchmier 9,
Hinz 5. Bases on balls: Kirch

mier I. Balk: Kirchmier. Sacri

fices: McGlade. Stolen hasee

Cicero, Scott, Winklosky and
Norton. Umpires: Mohl and
Corrigan. Scorer; Mead. Time of
game: 1:45.

Atlantic" Teenage League

STANDINGS

Gavilsn-Ballarin
Boiil Postponed
Unli! March 8

PARIS, Feb. "22 (UP) "The
battle between former world wel wel-terwleght
terwleght wel-terwleght champion, Cuban born
Kid Gavilan, and Frenchman Ger Germinal
minal Germinal Ballarin, scheduled at the
Palais Des Sports here Thursday,
today Vas postponed until March
8 after doctors declared c o 1 d d-stricken
stricken d-stricken Gavilan unfit for fighting.
Promoters at the Palais Des
Sports immediately announced the
new date. v .. ..
Gavilan, 30, apparently affected
by Europe's worst cold wave in
years, was Unable to continue
training today and remained in
bed.'
The Kid, who dropped such an
unpopular decision in England
earlier this month to British Peter
Waterman that a British board has
opened an investigation, has pub publicly
licly publicly announced he wants another
crack at the British fighter.
The British Board is scheduled
to meet tomorrow in London. Un Under
der Under the British rules, the referee
awarded the fight to Waterman, a
decision which brought boos from
the all-British crowd.
Meanwhile the Palais Des Sports
promoters said tonight that the
battle between .Valere Benedetto

an Jawjuer Herbillon for-4h wel welterweight
terweight welterweight championship of

France, which had also been
scheduled for Thursday night, has
now been postponed until Sunday
afternoon.

7

Buick 5

Motta V 3
M.R.A. 1

'Won Lost

2

2
4.
8

M.R.A. chalked up their first
win nf t,h season Monday with

a u tn A vir.torv over Buick. The M.R.A.

defeat nlares Ruick with their Buick

backs to the wall as they must
win their next two games a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst Motta to end the first
half m a tie with C.P.O. In case
of a tie. a sudden death series

will be played Sunday afternoon,
starting at 3 p.m.
Bill Gibson got predit for his
first win as he held Buick to two
well scattered hits, a single by
Trimble and a double by Bowers

as his team mates went on a
scoring spree. Mayo hit a double
for the only other extra base hit
of th game.
Trimble started for Buick,
worked four innings giving up
eight runs on three hits with
Bowers taking over in the fifth
and being tagged for three runs
on one hit and Pernlgottl giving

up three runs on no hits in, tne Tne box score:

sixth. I
The second half schedule will .Conejos

start next Monday, 4:30 p.m., atFrangionef 5h

uoco soiixo, u.;g.

Pernigotti 4. Struck out by: Gib.
son 4 Trimble 6, Bowers 2, Per Pernigotti
nigotti Pernigotti 1. Two-base hits: Maya
and Brown. Winning pitcher:
Gibson. Losing pitcher: Trimble.
Umpires: Lane and Johnson.
Scorer,: F. Pinto. ,.

Score By Innings
- 305 03314 4 3
.000 01& 6 2 3

FastlicH
League
Conejos IS, Pumas I
The first game in the second
half of the Fastlich League play played
ed played Tuesday afternoon saw the
Conejos slaughter the Pumas to
the tune of 18 to 6. Both pitch pitchers
ers pitchers were very wild and bases on
balls were the main reason for
the Pumas defeat.

'The bpx score:

Ab It II Po

M.R.A.

Erving, 2b ....... 1 10-
White,-3b ........ 2 1 0
Cabanollis, ss .... 4 2 0
Gibson, p 3 2 1
Carle, lb ........ 4 11
Mayo, c ......... 1 3 1
Hall, If ........... 2 2 0
Wood, Cf 3 1 1
Sanders, cf ...... 1 0 0
Ender, rf .........2 1 0

Totals:

23 14 4 18 9

Buick

Scott, cf ........ 1

Parker, ss ....... 2

Chase, c 2

Ab R H Po
.4111

Hadley, If

Godsey, p

seise, ri ..
Chassin, 2b
Musser, lb

Totals

21.18 8 12 4

Pumas

Will, W. cf
Lawrence, If :..
Will, J. rf ......
Hopkins, rf ....
Hanna, rf
Pernigotti. ss-p
Trimble, p-cf-ss
Donahue, 3b .
Sanders, lb
Palumbo, c ....

Morland, 2b

Bowexsil-p-cX-

Totals

Marquard. 2b

Schwarzrock, ss
Webb, c .......
Reynolds, p ...
Hele, cf .......
Trower, If .....

Stahl, 3b ........ 2

OIKiamco, rf
0 Scott,, lb

0
1
1
2
1
0
1

2 0
1,0

Totals

15 6 5 12 6

0

0
0
0

0 1, Pumas 5. RBI's: Stahl, Klam

l
0
1

SUMMARY Errors: Conejcs

Summary Base on balls

Gibson 4, Trimble 7, Bowers

co, Musser, Franglone 2, Godsey
4, Chase 3, Seise, Parker, Scott.
Wild pitch: Godsey 2, Reynolds.

0 Struck out by: Godsey 2, Reyn

.00 olds 3. Base on balls' off: God-

' u Hcvnn rlo Left, Viosp'

23 6 2 18 2 Conejos 6, Pumas 6. Winning
. I pitcher: Godsey. Losing pitcher:

off: Reynolds. Umpires: Mohl and

4,1 Diaz.



THE PANAMA AttlTlICAN AN INPITENDFNT DAILY NEWSfAITn
FACE riEVr'i
Q
0
fa I
i 1
g W

v.rrsNrf day, rrnnrAnr iz, vs

Nov a Pane;' son

!

i!
NO ACTION -Floyd Patterson
i caienaar moves, someininr a

by
JOE WILLIAMS

ti,i. i. in llrsl ol tlkj-tH "ties on pay-aj-jou-we
SrSeo paying a fee, which might range Irom say, a dime
40 VSilar misapprehension about pay-as-you-see is that it
ihSfthe end of free television altogether. This isn't so,
and ft? mic ?Vnwer can be. To exist, the networks
mfst have Sponsors, and to command and audience the spon-
hnVSi television probably will always be
rPe No Promoter is going to- risk the. gamble ol pay-as-you-!H
imfess he treasonably certain he's got a show the viewer-
WrfietS a bit premature: As of now thereis n0 Vy
is.yZ s!t tvMri. The Federal Communications Commission
J'L, tirkinr the matter around for many months and ap ap-eMto!lt
eMto!lt ap-eMto!lt tor decision than it wa, when ;the .first
WttTii
the woc drir'e? : probably simple enough. The agency will, set
asiri Tone of. the channels for the exclusive use of toll televi television
sion television possibly two. if prospects seem to warrant it. Meantime,
all' the other channels wUTcontinue free as in the past.

ALL SET TO GO
Mechanically, pay-as-you-see has been, ready to move for
a couple of years and at least Jhree companies, have demon demonstrated
strated demonstrated the .practicability of their, systems before the JCC
These differ only in details. The basic technique in all are the
same! This concerns a master device which controls the plc-
tUrThe device can be attached to any set, presumably at nom nominal
inal nominal cost. For paying viewers it brings-in the picture In the
normal way. But for the nonpaylng viewers there is only elec electronic
tronic electronic snow with toe martini yips. ;;: An "unscramblerv it s call-
Cd Tht companies propose different ways of connecting. Para Para-mount's
mount's Para-mount's telemeter calls for a coin box, Zenith offers a ehoice
of methods, including phone billing, and Skiatron (if that's the
correct spelling) depends on a decoding card that is inserted
Into a slot on the set. -. :;: ""f' "
The companies have Invested millions In their products.
Naturally, they think they've got something the public wants.
They expected a green light long before this. Now there are
signs they are getting restive and Jumpy.
. Last week, for example, Zenith did something a Washing Washington
ton Washington supplicant rarely does. A company spokesman stepped out
boldly and called upon the FCC for immediate action. A yes
01 ""The FCC, however, did not so much as flutter a ponder ponderous,
ous, ponderous, collective eyelid. Moreover, it is the view of the politically
astute that the FCC will maintain this attitude of astringent
detachment until the Presidential election is over, at least.
Whether pay-as-you-go investors are correct in assuming
they've got something the public wants remains to be seen.
1 The FCC reveals it has been 6nowed under- with letters,
telegrams and postcards by the thousands. Some for it, some
again' it.' .

' STARKLY STATED
Congressmen and Senators have been getting into the act.
New York's Emanuel Celler (D.) started the legislative ball roll rolling
ing rolling with a bill that would keep all the channels open for ail
the people, all the time. The dissident politicos argue that the
air is free,; but insist that if it belongs to -anybody, it's the
people. t ':. .......
Our own public servants are also in there pitching. The
other day at City Hall, council president Abe Stark denounced
the parties back of pay-as-you-see as "self-seeking monopolists,
attempting to destroy free television in the United States."
Mr. Stark added that pay-as-you-see "might cost some New
York families as much as 1100 a year."
At the same meeting Louis Hausman of Columbia Broad Broadcasting
casting Broadcasting brass said the scheme was "a betrayal of 4,000,000 fam families
ilies families who had paid $1 billion for video sets.':. . The nicest, most
luscious and roundest round numbers City Hall has heard in
years.
The networks, of course, want no part of pay-as-you-see
and we'll take a further, look at this phase of the rhubarb in
tomorrow's epic.

mm
v, i -r
r

& m

j I fjl f? SL0T MACHINES
! Uy rlf barIservTc
'! LEMCiil-J,i .Conditioned Mtar
v....'..

has been sittlnr still while the

younr Burner shouldn't do.
Open Nightly from
1:00 p.m.
4
' ROULETTE
VA 9.1 fRT.Antf.T APTTl
lT CRAP TABLE

By JIMMY BRESLIN

NEW YORK (NEA) Every
time Custy D'Araato starts tu
stammer and duck matches for
his Floyd Patterson, memory al always
ways always takes us back to a March
Bight in 1948.
That was a brisk Friday night
and at Madison Square Garden a
fighter by the name of Billy Fox
was. at a few punches past 10
o'clock, standing politely on his
ne uiie peopie cheered for Gus
Lesnevich, the well-liked light
heavyweight champion wha had
broueht tins a Bout.
Fox was a hot house fighter of
the first order and under the care careful
ful careful management of Frank (Blinky)
Palermo, the Philadelphia charac
ter, Billy had compiled something
like 55 straight wins, mostly by
knockouts. He had never been in
a real fight, people learned later.
But his background was sure im imposing.
posing. imposing. ;
HIS RECORD WAS so startling,
in fact, that it bad kept Gus
cautious throughout an earlier
fight, which ended in a 10th round
KO. But Lesnevich did it within
one this time and the people cheer cheered
ed cheered to see a fraud such as Fox, who
innM harplv fieht unfrocked.
This is not meant to say that
Patterson is another Fox. Far
from it, for Floyd has left and in indelible
delible indelible impression here. But he is
hrtno hunriled as it he were a hot
house special and, please,, don't
touch.
Pnttprsnn has not even ctven the
Firct eiffns nf willingness to start
up the ladder the only way a top
fighter canby taking on the best
around. Instead, his manager tos tosses
ses tosses him in with such as Archie
McBride. Jimmy Slade, Cal Brad,
Dave Whitlock,- Esau Ferdinand,
Ivon Durrelle and what have we
urhiin insisting that Marciano is
the 1956 target. But Custy promp promptly
tly promptly ducks any legitimate pre-Mar-ciano
tests, or he has so far.
As D'Amato appears reluctant
to find out, there comes a time
when every fighter has to be tos tossed
sed tossed in c:i his own with no apparent
pHoa Even 'All Weill did it with
Rrw-lrv Marpitino. Weill cut his
eager but at that time quite clum clumsy
sy clumsy charge in with Joe Louis in
October of 1951.
MnWOS DRESSING ROOM
inntrnri lilt moroufi before the
fight. The boxer, his trainers and
the rest of the Marciano eniourgae
walked the floor in sheer agony
molt in cr for -rine-time. Thi: was
the big testand nobody was cer
tain what wouiu nappen.
Marciano, of-course, got over
enma hori rAnnH.t snH came on to
ball everybody out with his power
in the eigntn round.
Louis himself is an example of
hnw a hpawwpitfht e h a m o i o n
should be developed. The Brown
Bomber was in there almost every
month on his way to the top in
iq'ik mH 1017 mpptino such as Al
Ettore; Jack Sharkey and v Max
Schmeling. Der Max ' bombed
irni nut with right hands in 12.
but one beating shouldn't ruin a
good young fighter. In Louis' case,
they say it ncipea.
Am the OTHER HAND, vou
have fighters such as Corn Grif Griffin.
fin. Griffin. In 1934, he was a bright pros-
k.., n Kit t aa wpll nrfkfprtpn
uuv " r -7
by his managet. So when James
J. Braddock, supposedly washed
up, took him on, Griffin didn't
know how to cope with it. This
was a real lignter ne was m wun
.n ProHHnrlr strptrhod him in
mil a.mv.
three. From there, Jimmy went
on to the title.
iv 4 ma ta should read ud on
these things. There are, tot tx
ample, some people arounu mm
tn na Paltprsnn hit on the
n uuv vj wv
Chin. The suspicion here is that
D Amato mmseu aoesn i rhow
mill hunnpn It mi eh t be a
good thing to find out by putting
the km .in wun sumewu? w u
could bang a bit. He'd have to
learn from it. ,
a hnt hnnap iiehter. the records
show, almost always gets into
trouble at the most inopportune
times. You overcome this chance
by working him a lot. inai s some something
thing something Patterson hasn't been doing.
Army Transportation
Tops Cerveceria 4-2
a r m v TransDOrtatlon
Hnn nlflvlnff un-
der the leadership of "Busy Bee"
Snencer and benma tne onuiani
pitching of Leroy Springer,
chalked up its second consecu consecutive
tive consecutive victory Monday in the Pa Pacific
cific Pacific Divisional Circuit.
The squad has been real hot
in recent games in the chase be behind
hind behind pacesettlng National Dis Distillers
tillers Distillers and Cerveceria Balboa,
whom they aroppea m iwonaay s
tilt. 4 to 2.
Th nnihna tsam. which trail
ed the league leaders by a half-
eame ud to Monaay, appeared
tho lnffical choices to take the
Army Drivers into camp. They
nnpnpH thp frav scorlnof a sinsle
marker, which they counted on
to be at least tne margin or vic victory.
tory. victory. But the motormen struck
back with two tallies In the low lower
er lower half of the inning and push pushed
ed pushed across two more insurance
runs in the later episodes.
Th National Distillers are
still leading the circuit with six
wins and three aeieats, ionowea
bv Cerveceria Balboa witn live
victories .and four setbacks,
while Armv Trans portation
stands on the third berth with
four successes and a like num number
ber number of losses. Max Heurtematte
is in fourth place with three tri triumphs
umphs triumphs and four losses, and is
followed by Deco, last year's ti ti-tlo
tlo ti-tlo hnldws. who marked the win
column three times while drop
ping six engagements.
Army Transportation will take
the field again this week against
the league leading Distillers. The
contest is scheduled for Friday
afternoon at 5 o'clock, and a
large throng'oT spectator is ex expected
pected expected to turn out to see Army
Drlvprs In their attemnt to mnvo

Alston's Idea Of Spring Training
Better Be Everybody's This Year

ANN BAQGS, women's tennis champion, of Denmark, who will
compete In the international tennis tournament which wllb
take place at the Hotel El Panama from Feb. 29 to March 4.
Tennis stars from the United States, Australia, Sweden, Den Denmark
mark Denmark and other countries will compete.

PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Second Half Standings
Won Lost Pet.
Elks 1414 1 0 i-owj.
Police 0 0 .000
Gibraltar Life ..... 0 0 .000
Lincoln Life 0 0 .000
Snnr nnla 0 0 .000
Seymour Agency .,0 1 .000
Elks 3, Seymour. Agency 0
ED BLEAKLEY HURLS THIRD
NO-HITTER
In a Spectacular pitching ex exhibition
hibition exhibition Monday afternoon big
Ed Bleakley of the Elks gave the
Little League an outstanding
send-off for the second half
when he pitched his third no no-hitter
hitter no-hitter of the season" blanking
the Seymour Agency lads and
winning by the score of three to
nothing.
Th first, hatter to face Ed
Bleakley in the first innln? was
the only base runner, getting to
first, on a walk and stealing two
bases and dying on 1 third as
Bleakley bore flown. Bieasiey re retired
tired retired the side on strikeouts in
the second, third and sixth in in-nintr
nintr in-nintr nnrl rame within one of
enuallne the strikeout record
with fourteen.
To onen the thiM for W F""
Dickie Hern walked, took second
on a passed ball, too tiiuu we
same way and came in to score
the Elks first run on another
passed ball. Elks scored their
other two runs in the fourth. Ed
Bleakley led off with a single to
left and went to second when
the ball got past the left fielder.
Lincoln popped up to the catch catcher.
er. catcher. Charlie Cross struck out.
With two out Michael Burtorilt
a hard ball to short and was
safe at first, Bleakley taking
third on the play, Dickie Hern
walked loading the base3, Bleak Bleakley
ley Bleakley was forced in to score when
Bereer was hit bv a pitched ball.
The last run was scored when
Stoudnor drew a walk forcing in
Burton from third...
For the Elks, Bleakley was the
winner giving up no runs, no
hits, one walk and striking1 out
fourteen. Gary Anderson started
for the Seymour lads and gave
up but one hit, three runs, six
walks and struck out four. Ma Mario
rio Mario Calleja relieved Anderson In
the fourth with two out and bas bases
es bases loaded gave up no runs on
it.-.., .....

it you warn uouroon at its
"GREEN RIVER' America's
whisky.

Sold

at all1

- i 1
I I f i

j
three hits, no walks and r.o
strikeouts.
The box score:
Seymour Agency Ab R H
Carlson, If q o
x Pearl i 0
Anderson, k. 2b .2 n n
Boatwright, 3b .20 0
Dubbs. c . . : . .. t n n
Huddleston, ss . .... . 2 0 0
Anuerson. u. p 1 0 0
calleja, p 1 0 0
Mallory, lb ............ 2 0 0
Brockman, R. cf 2 0 0
Corrigan, c. rf ........ 2 0 0
18 0 1
Elks '
Stoudnor, 2b l 0 0
DeVore, lb 3 0 Q
Williams, ss 2 0 0
Bleakley, p J ?
Lincoln, If . 2 n n
Field, If ............... 1 0 1
Cross, c 3 o i
Burton, 3b ....... 3 11
Hern, cf 1 1 n
Berger, rf 0 0 0
10 1 t
x Struck out for Cftilson in
"1
HELPS Carl Boldt,, 6-4 ju junior
nior junior college transfer, gives San
Francisco an outside scoring
punch to back up Bill Russell,
K. C. -Jones and company as
thby head for a second straight
national college basketball title,
n I.'. 1

leading bodegas and bars.

-BEVARE-OF-IMITATIONS-

NEW YORK (NEA) Brook

lyu wrappeu up tne National
League pcnnim last year wun a
shotKing eany charge which saw
tnem u.ej of tne mst 22 Kmes.
it was a formality alter that.
This year, you can lind a mob
of pcoptu y,dM minic tne Dodgers
will taxe it bigger. By August,
they'll tell you, sruo&iyn cvuid be
so lar ahead of tne pack that tne
wnoie thing would be suiy.
r or Waiter Alston, tins kind ot
enmusiasm must oe tunny. Last
season, there were many wno
seemed to led tnat Alston would
not gut tne Dodgers back to Eb-
bcts meld from spring training.
A Hip tnrougn back newspaper
tiles knows im.
"Th way Walter Alston is
hanuiuig tne Dodgers," one New
York Wi'iter proclaimed, "mere is
serious doubt as to whetner the
team wui reach Brooklyn in one
piece.
'He has Pet Wee Reese at sec
oriel, on Mouses in me outiicid
and has yet tu use Jacxie Kouin
son. tie is shuttling around a vet
eran lineup as 11 Una were a sanu
lot team.
"refnaps Alston thinks he's still
in the busn leagues. Alter appear
ins irozen through mucu 01 last
year, this could oe the case. May
oe he hasn t reaiizea ne is tne Dig
leagues Well, he'd better. The
season is icss than two weeks
away and Brooklyn is definitely
noi reauy to open tne season cor correctly."
rectly." correctly." lucre were more, day after day,
in tma exact train ot thought.
with a cnampiuiismp unucr his
belt, Alston is approacning spring
training with the same aluiuuu
he hao. last year except he can
be counted on for hiure "lane
caaige" melhoas than before.
'Tin going to train my club
the some wy I did last year,"
Alston said over the winter and
his voice had a tinge of "and t I -hope-sornetouj-say-ne
aoesn t-liKe-it"
to it.
The Alston who will take over
Brooklyn again this year may be
the same, sound baseball man he
aiways was, but it is fairly certain
that it is not the same quiet, re retiring
tiring retiring gu.
" Il't snmelhinu. I'll alwavs
have. 1 won it and I guess they
npvpr ran take it awav from me."
Alston said all winter when he tal talked
ked talked of the first world cnampion cnampion-ship
ship cnampion-ship he and Brooklyn ever 'had
won.
It seems U have given him con
fidence. He sneaks more forceful
lv and with some animation for
the first time in his major league
life around here.
Vnr vmnln he was smilina
easily and swapping stories with
Commissioner Julius Meuana aur aur-ing
ing aur-ing one of the eating contests
tiuaoA hv Nf-w York newsDaoer
people this cold season. A year
ago, this woman t nave oeen Al Alston.
ston. Alston. He would have been quietly
awav in 1 corner and seeming to
hope nobody would talk to him.
That's why this corner, for one,
would like to see somebody take
typewriter in hand and blast
Alston's tactics this spring1 as they
did last. The training will be the
same crazy-quilt pattern. It will
lend itself to the same type of
story.
And we would like to see the
players squeal when a Roy Cam Cam-panella
panella Cam-panella is put In the No. 8 slot or
Jackie Robinson isn't used at all.,
We'd like to see it because this
is not the eld Walter Alston they
are dealing with. It will be a
oiiv wp think who will fix every
body with one short Jolt.
This is the year, as wc see n,
that the Dodgers make another
runaway of the National Leaeue.
And it also is the year when Wal Walter
ter Walter Alston establishes himself as
f. fair-sized baseball personality.
1 it t : B
Dest call tor
smoothest

BY LEAPS AND GOULDS

1 rmm

OUT OF DOORS
Th Dog Rtgisttrlng Agendas
By JOE STETSON
Dob Editor
HAVE you wondered about the
various dog registering agencies
and the significance and scope of
each? There is considerable over overlap
lap overlap in their activities and a cer certain
tain certain amount of competition be between
tween between the stud book agencies.
The American Kennel Club has
the largest registry. Except" for
the blue tick, Walker, Plott and
similar hounds, practically a 1 1
.bench show activity is carried on
through the AKC and its licensed
and sanctioned shows.
In addition all beagle field
trial activity, including that of
the International Beagle Federa Federation
tion Federation and its association and mem member
ber member trials, as well as retriever,
English springer and cocker
spaniel field trials are conducted
under the AKC. So are Brittany,
Weimaraner and a large portion
of the German shorthair trials.
The United Kennel Club, which
is second in number of registra registrations,
tions, registrations, might be called the scent
hound association. Under its -regulations,
hound bench shows and
hound trials are run. Coondog
trials operate under the U.KC,
as do various types of live and
drag hunts for foxhounds.
The traditional registry for the
field and field trial pointing dou
Is the American Field Dog Stud
Book, Thus we find the large
majority of huntirtg and trial type
English pointers and English set
ters, with some Irish and Gordon
setters, registered with the Amer American
ican American Field Dog Stud Book and
the large majority of pointing dog
trials run under their regulations.
Some German shorthair and other

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Greal White Fleet
. Arrive
New Orleans Semo Cristobal
. s.s. "aten'asmJ hVi :2
8.S. "MARNA" .......... s.i.i...i .......Feb. 38
S.S. "MORAZAN" ............ . , . .......... i March 4
S.S. "SIXAOLA" . ..... ... . . . . ....... ,i .March 11
S.S. "TELDE" ...........March 12
S.S. "YAQUE'' ...March 18
S.S. "MORAZAN'' i March 25
S.S. "SIXAOLA" .April 1
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo ;
New York Service Arrives
. t Cristobal
S.S. "PARISMINA" Feb. 27
S.S. "CHOLUTECA' Feb. 27
S.S. "FRA BERLANGA" ................. ... ..March 5
S.S. "LIMON' .................................March U
S.S. "CANDIDO" ........March 14
S.S. 'METAPAN" March 19
S.S.rCOMAYAGUA" .... .............. .March 'it
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los An?cles, San Francisco ;
and Seattle.
Special round trip fares from Cristobal to New
York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle
To New York $240.00
To Los .Angeles and San Francisco ....$270.00
To Seattle $365.00
-TElPHONS
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-250

,w.7 THE JUMP
-swot;,., j, i

with
German pointing breed trials, of
late, have been American Field.
In general, the functions of
these registering agencies are
similar. Their objectives, though
arrived at with some differences
, in method and philosophy, are
j primarily to improve the breed
I in question by fostering good
I breeding practice and maintain
ing proper records for the pur
pose.
There are some differences in
their requirements, but funda fundamentally
mentally fundamentally their basic operation is
founded upon demands that rec recognize
ognize recognize the value of purebred
stock and representing K as .such
by proper registration for eligible
individuals.
In some breeds, such as setters,
shorthairs, cockers and others,
breeders feci it advisable to reg register
ister register their dogs in two stud books,
perhaps for the prestige that one
might have over the other in the
eyes of certain prospective puri
chasers or breeders.
(Distributed by NEA Service)
Todoi Encanto .35 20
In Cinemascope 1
Humohrey Bogart In
"THE LEFT HAND OF. GOD"
Plus: Joan Collins In
"ADVENTURES OF SADIE"
Jodcy IDEAL 20 .10
Spanish Double
"UNA GALLEGA EN LA
HABANA" t ;
Lllla del Voile in ?
"L V J I' R I A"

closer to the top.



Bus Boycott
Leaders
Arrested

AN INDEPENDENT
KEVYSFAFER
TO),

WUtem- 'DAILY

MONTGOMERY. Ala. ,Feb 22
(UP) Three Negro ministers
were arrested today to start
wholesale rounding up of uj
persons indicted on chargei of
illegally boycotting city buses in
a desegregation dispute.
Three two-man teams or ne ne-putlea
putlea ne-putlea left, the county jai 1 at
8:30 a.m., each carrying a hand-

fui of warrants, me
sons arrested were brought in
about half an hour later. ..
They were the Rev. R. D. Aber Aber-nathy,
nathy, Aber-nathy, head of the boycotters
negotiating committee and pas pastor
tor pastor of the Negro First Baptist
rhurrh- the Rev. R. James

Glasgow, head ol the N e g r o pRAYING 0N the WATERFRONT

.Baptist Youth center nere; ana

.1

Iff fif people know tht- truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

31st YEAR

PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1956

FIVE CENTS

Benson Asks Farm GoodsSwap

With Reds For

k Arnn Hoffman

While being booked at county
jail they declined to make any
statement. All three were charg charged
ed charged with violation of the state
anti-boycott law.
Deputies found the three at
home and there was no distur disturbance
bance disturbance while they were taken in into
to into custody. A few Negroes had
gathered at the Jail, but they
remained orderlv-

The Job of bringing all the
nersons indicted into custody

was expected to last for severa
hours.

A grand jury returned Indict Indictments
ments Indictments asainst the huge list yes yesterday,
terday, yesterday, The jury's presentments
said the boycott was one sign of

"a growing tension between tne
races" in the city.

fnr. inWH in a Jewish urayer

led by two men. atop a crate, right, in the ear ly morning noure on r '"I,

i i UMtnnt n u m in., a. T n M n or i! n r u i.riK I c K bvi Manila

loading U.S. tanks bound for Saudi Arabia after a delay of several days.

Canal Hires 3 Hew
Permanent Employes
Three permanent new employes,
one of them from the United
'States, were hired by the Canal
organization during the first two

weeks in February, according to
information from the Personnel
Bureau.
The new employe from the U U-nited
nited U-nited States was Marjorie R. Pat Pat-tison,
tison, Pat-tison, of Washington, Pennsylva Pennsylvania,
nia, Pennsylvania, who has been employed as a
nurse at Gorgas Hospital.
The other two new employes

worked formerly with the Canal
organization. They are John K.
1 Daily, Electronics Mechanic with
the Electrical Division in Balboa
and John. A. Hunt, Commissary
' distant with' the 'Balboa Pom Pom-missury.
missury. Pom-missury. Mr. Daily was employed from
1952 to 1955 as an electronics me mechanic
chanic mechanic with tht Electrical divi division.
sion. division. Mr. Hunt worked from 1947 to
1953 with the Commissary Divi Division.
sion. Division. He resigned in 1953 in order
to enterm ilitary service.

Holiday Truce Halls
Violence At Four
!el Bomber Plants

FARMINGDALE, N.Y., Feb. 22
(UP) Strike violence at the Re-
public Aircraft Corp. stopped to-
day and both the company and
the union said they would observe
the George Washington holiday.
The jet plane manufacturing i
company said nobody would workj
on the holiday and the union saidi
onlv token pickets would patrol;

the gates of the cempany's four
Long Island plants.
The truce brought peace m the
strike for the first time since Mon Monday
day Monday when fighting broke out be between
tween between pickets and non-strikers and
continued spasmodically .through
the first two days of the week.
At the same time representa representatives
tives representatives of the striking IntTnation IntTnation-al
al IntTnation-al Association of Machinists
(AFL-CIO) and the company an announced
nounced announced they would meet Thurs Thurs-dav
dav Thurs-dav in an attempt to negotiate a
settlement in the four day old
strike.

The meeting Was the first since
negotiations broke down on Satur-,
day, just before the strike was

called,
Fistfights, arrests, and Injuries
occurred repeatedly on Monday
and Tuesday.
At least 76 persons, most of
them strikers, were under arrest
and dozens were treated for in

nuries. Most ot tne arrests occur-

Ill 77 l?i7fvi
i ,X J

LOADING! UP A tank for Saudi Arabia is shown being load loaded
ed loaded on the James Monroe, a freighter at a pier in Brooklyn.
After lifting its 48-hour embargo on arms for the Middle East,
the State Department gave the go-ahead for shipment of
18 tanks.
Dulles Returning From Vacation
To Face Tanks-for-Arabs Ruckus

WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 (UP) (UP)-Sccretary
Sccretary (UP)-Sccretary of State John Foster
Dulles ended a Caribbean vaca-
tiir, Inrtou anrl turnrri his atten-

red Monday when violence flajtlon' to. the .'controversy over U.S.

both in tne morning ana in nolicv in the Middle Kast.

WASHINGTON. Feb. 22 (UP)-

Agriculture Secretary Ezra Taft
Benson urged Congress yesterday

to give the administration authori

ty to trade some of its troublesome

farm surpluses to Communist coun

tries for badly-needed strategic
goods.

He assured the House Agricul

ture Committee that the adminis

tration would use such authority

only when- "it is clearly in the in

terest of our country."

Benson rejected the contention

of Chairman Harold D. Cooley

(D-N.C.) that this would amount to

"commerce with Communism.'

He said he does not know of "any

disposition within the administra

tion "to trade with Communism."

H mtnfioned Citchoslovakia
as ont Sovitt sattllit which
might ; b willing tp part with
strategic materials, scare in
this country, for torn of this
country's overflowing farm sur surpluses.
pluses. surpluses. Benson went before the commit

tee to plug the administration's

ugregy n ems

farm program. It calls for a con-( 'The Senate is scheduled to begin meet the need for farm .credit

tinuation of flexible price supports debate within a day or so on a

and features a "soil bank under
which farmers would receive one

billion dollars a year for diverting

land from surplus crops.

evening.

It broke out again yestcrflny

al

the start of the normal day work
shift about 7 a.m. It exploded a a-gain
gain a-gain toward evening.

riiiis nrrivinff bv plane some

time in the afternoon, was expect--j
t conir in artv briefing from

hi airirs on the furor over a ship-

TODAY

.75 .40
1:00 2:43 4:49
. 6:55 9:00 P.M.

RE-RE

CENTRAL

Iroudly

marching with
the GREATEST
"THE BIG PARADE"
"ALL QUIET
ON THE
WESTERN FRONT
"SERGEANT YORK"
.,,,,...'.
The exciting
true-life story
of America's
most decorated
hero
AUDIE
MURPHY

. JJ Ji Ji J
As & i jjf J"'f 4.

ment of 18 U.S. tanks to Saudi

Arabia a dispute which broke

out while he was away, from

Washington.
Dulles and undersecretary of
state Herbert Hoover, Jr., will be
questioned about t h e shipment,

probably Friday, by the Senate

Foreign Relations committee.
Another State Department offi

cial, assistant secretary George V.i
Allen, faced probable questioning i
on the same issue today during!
an appearance before the House
Foreign Affairs committee in clos-;

ed session.
' The tank shipment was heited- i

ly denounced by some 'members
of Congress who objected to this
country sending arms to en A A-r.b
r.b A-r.b nation in the troubled Mid Middle
dle Middle East et the same time that
it was delaying action on Is

rael's request for U.S. arms aid. I
After the Congressional protests :

mounted, the administration dec declared
lared declared an embargo which halted the
tank shipment. i :

But the ban was luted some 43
hours later, and the ship bearing

the tanks for baudi Arabia departed.

Administration Informants ore-

dieted that the forthcoming Con

gressional investigation will show
that President Eisenhower himself
ordered the temporary embargo.
In trying to calm the controver controversy
sy controversy over the tank incident, Dulles
must also seek to mollify influen influential
tial influential chairman James P. Richards
(D-S.C.) of the House Foreign Af Affairs
fairs Affairs committee.
Richards accused the State De

partment Monday of treating the

House wee a -weaK-minaea illegi

timate son" in not keeping him

Informed of tne tanK aeai.

The tank incident end the In Investigation
vestigation Investigation sparked by it will put
the Administration on the spot
to far as. Israel's, arms request
Is concerned. Israel is seeking
1U million worth of weapons.

Dulles now will be forced to tell
legislators why the administration

has not acted on tne Israeli re

quest, and how many more arms

it plans to snip to me Araos.

; Th result mav be that some

defensive weapons will go to isj

racl soon.

Retired Nayy Man

Dies At Gorgas I
Robert E. Blackwell, a retired
Navy quartermaster, died yester yesterday
day yesterday afternoon at Gorgas Hospital.
He was 60 years old.
Mr. Blackwell, an American res resident
ident resident of Chorrera, was a veteran
of World Wars I and II.

Military funeral services will be
held Friday at 10 a.m. at the

Corozal cemetery, and will be fol followed
lowed followed by burial at Corozal.
He is survived by his wife, Ma Mary,
ry, Mary, a son, Harold, both of Chorre

ra, a father, Arthur, of Lincoln

Park, Rhode Island, and a. broth
er Ernest, of Randolph, Mass.

Salvation Army
To Hold Public

Meeting Thursday

The Salvation Army will open

its 52nd annual congress with a

public meeting on Thursday at 8

p.m. in the Pacific Service Cen-

ter. ;

Chairman for the occasion will

be Assistant U.S. Army Chaplain
(Lt. Col.) Roy A. Morden. Speak Speakers
ers Speakers will include Gov. John S Sey Sey-bold,
bold, Sey-bold, British Ambassador Ian L.
Henderson and Deputy Alfred
Cragwell. Lt.-Commissioner G. W.

Sandells, territorial commander of

Central America and West Indies
area, also will be one of the
speakers.

!' Music will be provided by the

Salvation Army band and song

sters and guest musicians will be
Rev. A. Zylstra and the King's

Four Quartet.
The general public is invited,

'Wanton' Student
Makes Mistake Of
Pelting Policeman
LONDON, Feb: JI (UP) --Architectural
student Patrick Hug-

gins, 24, was fined $2.80 today for
"wantonly discharging a -missile,

to wit a snowball, to the damage

of persons in Kensington Court.
The target was a policeman.

rival Democratic bill to restore

rigid 90 per cent supports on cot cotton,
ton, cotton, corn, peanuts and rice.
The House passed similar legis legislation
lation legislation last year. The. Agriculture
Committee hearing was designed
to consider what instructions to
give the House conferees who will

work out a final version of the

bill with Jhe Senite.
Cooley said earlier he was
certain Congress will send Pres President
ident President Eisenhower a bill calling
for high rigid supports.
Benson has said he expects
Mr. Eisenhower to vote any

sucn measure.
Benson gave his testimony in a I

hearing room overflowing with
proponents of rigid supports. Herd-1
ed into the committee room by
the National Farmers Union a
strong foe of the administration
plan these farmers wore large
buttons proclaiming: "We have a
date in 1956-parity." v
But Benson said high rigid sup supports
ports supports "have obviously failed" to
protect farmers" income. He plead pleaded
ed pleaded with the committee to give the
present flexible system, providing
for supports at from 75 to 90 per
cent of parity, a chance to work.
He said the flexible system has

been "smothered by the surpluses

accumulated under pur past pro

grams.
The secretary also urged sped
en the "soil bank" proposal se

it can go into effect his year.

He said this may not be possible
if Congress delays action a month
or two.

The Agriculture Department,

meanwhile, announced that specia

farm operating loans have been
offered to eligible farmers and

ranchers in 13 states

when it is not available from com-

mercial banks, cooperative lending
agencies or the regular lending
program of the Farmers Home
Administration.
The states are Alabama, Arkan Arkansas,
sas, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, I n d i a n a,
Iowa, Minnesota, Mississippi, Mis Missouri,
souri, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, South Caro Carolina,
lina, Carolina, and 22 counties in South
Dakota.

Alton B. Cassnova
Dies In Florida
After Heart Attack

News of the recent death of Al

ton B. Casanova, forrmer employe

of the Mechanical Division in Bal

boa, has been received by rela relatives
tives relatives on the Isthmus. He was 41
years old.:- "''..' ':"":v

Mr. Casanova, who was born in

Corozal, and was the son of a
well-known Canal Zone family,
died suddenly at his home in Mia

mi, Florida, after apparently suf-
fering a heart attack.
A-graduate of the Balboa High
School, Mr. Casanova took his ap apprenticeship
prenticeship apprenticeship in the Balboa Shops
and was employed for several
years with the Canal organization,
He work as a civilian employe
with the U.S. Army on the Canal
Zone until 1950.
Since that time he has been liv living
ing living with his family in Miami
where he was employed with the
Eastern: Airlines.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs.
Jean Casanova, and two daugh daughters,
ters, daughters, Jeanie and Dawn; his moth mother
er mother Mrs. Bertile Casanova of Mar Margarita
garita Margarita and a brother, Roland, who

is employed with the Industrial

These loans are designed to Division in Cristobal.

TODAY o BELLA VISTA

JOHNSON. ..k. M
fk is tviry kit
enly m in Wi been!

,1 ti

MANNING... wms
ki5 ten i they r
t sulktytl

KtRRIGAN...K wM'it
Purple Hurl lit wot after,
K wit tklttt homtl

MAXIA...whM Wr
b dote a vokim wtntt
soimom IwUt

Siaihino

AUDIE MURPHY. MARSHALL THOMPSON CHARLES DRAKE

EmECTfG BY J iSS I H1BBS-WRfTTfK FBH THE SCEEEK BY 1UII PCD W ff Ifflft..

j

Mother Of Rainier
Plqns Gala Ballet

NEW YORK, Feb. 22 (UP)-A
famous ballerina and surrealist

artist Salvador Dau have been
rrtmmissinnpd hv the mother of

Prince Rainier III of Monaco to

stapB ft hallet m Monte Carlo in

hnnnr of the nrince's "forthcoming

marriage to Grace iveny, n was

announced yesterday.
The "Coronation Ball" ballet., to
ho claooH in the Monte Carlo O-

npra Hiukp Hiirine the week-lonfi

celebration before the wedding,

will be filmed, in color lor worm

wide distribution.

At 'the reaiiest of Princesss An

fninette. P. ainier's mother. Toni

Lander, prima ballerina of rthe
TnnHnn Festival Rallpt will create

thrliallcrand-ar-Trrlt-Mam-wer

Sandoz will write the music ana
Dali will desicn the sets and

X

1 X ifl

xmm x ...... )

it mmmmp

llll I X.. '" ":,.,. f "'

; I 1

! li

1 UUU

tit

1 .'-' '-:

r i

i

PRICES: 75 & 40
0 SHOWS: 1:00 2:35
4:40 6:00 9:00 P.M

Me?

7

A

i j

, 7WaV ,hsr, .!'
X-

v jr i i ...

n 1 1

What ki;:d of tovvii

IS FO.'.'FEY'S HEAD...
AI!D WHAT K!"D OF
"VERY RESFECTACLE"
PEOPLE ARE TIliSE?

20h CUNTUM-TQX
preienls

)

i i in

I ' I 1(11 M i ' (

ClrMEMAScOPt'

T)ie Greet
er-Seffer That

"UndreiMi Repufah'ons"
H On The Saeenl

WITH MAGNETIC
STEREOPHONIC SOUND!

COLOR by DE LUXE

Richard EGAN Dana WYNTER Cameron MITCHELL

Sidney Blackmer Moriorie RamUad Dorothy'ParricfDavii '"Rotemorie Bowe Iwn tKt NoVel bylMon Biwo"

i costumes.