The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03009

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Related Items:
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"Let the people knot the truth end the eeuntry is $fe" Ahrehmm Lincoln.
TEN CIM'
iitt ins
PANAMA, K. P 8CNDAT, FESXCART IS, 1331

Ike's ;cffylfes--.".-Seen
4s Se Tesf

TuAMAcviiir fi FS

hewer's huntin and jolf here may represent fir more
but a deliberate plan ef telf-

man 1111 t vi i i
testing; before ht decide whether to run for a aacond
. tarm. '.;.-;.
, Weather permittins;, his achadula today callad for a
resumption' of quail hunting in tha Broom aagabruah of
Milestone plantation, the estate of Treasury Secretary

Caorja M. Humphrey, th ePreaident host here

Wherever the president goes,
be it the golf course or the quail
fields, not far behind him Is Ms
' doctor, Maj. Gen. Howard McC.
Snyder, always keeping a f riend riend-y,
y, riend-y, but practiced professional eye
on the nation's foremost cardiac
convalescent, 1
When the president walked
f f toe coarse, he shook his
head in the air and said with
an expression ef deep preoccu preoccupation,
pation, preoccupation, to John H. Walter, the
club professional, "F little
frightened not only of the
strokes, hot also, I'm a little
Mr. Elsenhower shot- n iy1
nine hoiea oi gou yCBk??""'
lnce hl sept. 24 heart attack.
H found that he still can drive
the baU'.JOO-yarda,.--
He ws not so satisfied with
a t i nvar nmr 47 Oil
tha pine-bordered Glen Aren
Country Club course; -.'J r,
Snyder commented, That is
the hen or a nesrv rw j
are longer getting oyer the psy psychological
chological psychological injury than you are
The president's feolf followed
the nowmir oi iu
- uaE by the presidential shot-
tun resveroy ---plunged
into his program of relaxation.-
'"''"t"
But all was taeation at
th. hara Humphrey Jlanta,
tie. Tha temporary White
House released today tha pres.
ident's Veto f tb eentrofer.
" -1., i ...1 M Vltl 1
The present played with his
Lloyd. J"--1"- ot
tii club.,na Jti4 .'V niter,
club professional.
dent before yesterday. Jrntte
himself to- pitch and putt shots
with llehter irons. Today a driv driving
ing driving was the first with wooden wooden-faced
faced wooden-faced clubs, that requir a fuller
rfei.v i nr. wisnnhower : did
AV'U, ra"
not swine -with all his power,
i.i J Ima a Via! f at
unyaer cauwoneu jum w

71

1
II

"KZrTHZR SKOW NOR RAIN . .Nor 1 washed-out foot footbridge
bridge footbridge keep Postmistress Pauline Lush from delivering th-mil
at Three Rivers, Calif. When the loading Kaweah River recently
swept away the bridge, the persistent postmistress and her at attestant,
testant, attestant, right, rigged up a cable buoy across the river to replace
the bridge. Postmistress and her mail ride high and .dry in the
tradition that the U.S. mail nmut ge through, u r

P!! rD UP That's sand, not snow, piled' up against this cottage
t 1 jum Island, Masa. Outside walls of the cottage were literally
ni blasted by terrific windstorm, that hit the resort area. Very
little paint was left on the wall. ; (

It fUPt-Prttidanf Eistn

little in reserve and to confine
the round to nine holes.
The president's card of -5-4-7.3.4-7-5-447
was high for the
fnursnme. hut he end Walter Who
played partners won the match,
1 up. waiter ma a nageriy
44 and Meganee 40,
i:':!l::nD:ll:rShpvf
7i:iFc:::rol!:i:!$,
r.r,t ini.rKt i heen ere
ated in the Canal Zone over the
"Million Dollar : snow," wrucn
will take place in tne momi u
Panama, next Saturday to col col-irf
irf col-irf fnnrt for t.h- Polio Cam
paign, according to the survey in
that, area.-
Th "Milllnn TJollar Show" will
be a fashion show with a million
dollars worth of Jewels from the
famous house of Cartler, New
York, to be exhibited. Young la ladies
dies ladies from Panama and the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone will model,-also, new
sprtn creations specially
brought ,to ranama oy mooj
Marcela and Junior Bazaar for
this occasion.
Th ninioini.t,w Corns. Pana
manian and Canal Zone authori
ties will attend tms snow, wnicn
promises to be something new
here. t
The show will start at S:30
im n a t.irVt. r nn sale at
th. wnti wi Ptnimi .and by
members of the committee in
charge of the Polio campaign
Fund.-f' ,n v- -Mr' -j-'-j
Th. xhnw hix been orcanued
in a similar way as the premieres
of Hollywood and Hew York.
Spotlights will be located at the
entrance of the hotel and the
arrival of all the ceieDriues at attending
tending attending the show will be an-
Thr: models from the Canal
Zone will participate in we
'Million. Dollar enow.-

U
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HISTORIC THEATER DESTROYED The Wstoric old Acad Acad-emy
emy Acad-emy Theater Newburgh, N.Y., 4s destroyed by Jire which
caused an estimated damage of over $600,000. The theater,
built in 1887, was one of the best known along the Eastern
'-'Seaboard during the heyday of vaudeville.

Ike's Veto Kills Gas Bill
For 1956, Foes, Pals Say

WASHINGTON, Feb. 18 (UP)
Friend tnd foes of th hoU
nature 1 ? "l f-?td today
that 'President fciseiuiower's ve veto
to veto made it it cold dead duck in
U5. -. i .....v.-:..;
Thty said there is no hope of
gettinr the necessary two-thirds
majority to override the veto-
especially in the house wnicn
passed the bill by only six votes.
Also, there appeared to be no
inclinatloiu.to start over with a
new bill this year despite Mr.
Elsenhower's statement that leg-
islatlon on tha same lines is
"needed." ; v -J
Deem in doom supporters of
the bill raised a cry that the
president vetoed the bin for ''po ''political"
litical" ''political" gain in an election year.
' And a number ef Cengres
slonal leaders said publicly
and privately that th presi president's
dent's president's action shewed he is a.
candidate for reelection.,;
The president .said he vetoed
the bill because of the highly
auestlonable" activities of some
"private persons" lrt pressing for
its passage. Tn at was; an obvious
reference to circumstances sur
rounding the now-famous $2,500
campaign contriounon irom an
oU company attorney rejected
b sen. Francis Case .(R-S.D.).
Mr, Eisenhower lashed out at!
"efforts that I deem to be so ar arrogant
rogant arrogant and so much in defiance
of acceptable, standards of pro propriety
priety propriety as to risk creating doubt
among the American people con
cerning tne integrity oi. govern
mknttl dnimhimV1'. ,..-' f
The president said that ne k
in accord with the roasic oojec
tlves" of the hill which, would
remove producers of natural gas
from direct regulation; py- the
federal power commlssionv BuW
hr recommended that "any new
legislation' v. besides'. assurlni
plentiful supplies by relaxing
controls "should include Vpeclflc
language protecting consumer
in .their rleht to ialflBrices"'"
Democratic supporters of the
bill, unhappy ever its fate.- were
quick to brand 'the- president's
action as "political." Sen.-J.- Wil
liam Fuwrignt (EWirs:.), senate
sponsor of the measure, said the
president was- counmg me la
Intcrnol Revcnucr
Indicted On 120
Charges Of Fraud
NEW YORK, Feb. -31 (UP)
A federal grand jury today indict
ed a 325-pound former internal
revenue agent on 120 counts of
fraud, a list of charges which
could add up to 500 years in jail
and 1.2 million dollars in fines.
George H. Oetting, 41, was ac accused
cused accused of filing ficticious returns
and collecting more than $12,000
in refunds in 1933 and 1954. Assist Assistant
ant Assistant U.S.( Attorney Arthur H.
Christy said Oetting used 43 ficti ficticious
cious ficticious names and claimed refunds
on -each, ..... .,,.n

vor of the electorate In a few
large metropolitan renters."
, Sep. r.Xui S.ktr tD-Okla.).

who sponsored a somewhat sim
ilar measure that was vetoed by
former President Truman, said
the new veto was Mr. Elsenhow Elsenhower's
er's Elsenhower's announcement that he is
running again 4,lf he lives."
Many, opponents of the bill
praised the president's action.
Sen. Alexander Wllev (R-wial
danced a little liar for nhoto.
rapnew and said the action
snows that Mr.1 Elsenhower has
fully regained his health. But a
few, including Sen. Wayne Morse
iu-ore.j, said tne veto showed
a "split intellect" lnce th res
ident favored the principle of
tne Din.
(ssrchflewspspir
f fiJt-C$; Up Causs
Of Elliy Grchnni
S IS.. i Wft .......
1ON0ON, Feb. II UP) The
Unofficial newsoaoer of the
Church of England took sides to
day- with American Evangelist Bil Billy
ly Billy Graham who Was denounced re
cently by the archbishop of York.
ine umrcn- oi England- news
paper, which criticized the ap
pointment of Dr.. Arthur M, Pam Pam-sey
sey Pam-sey as archbishop of York last
month,, said the archbishio-"h a s
used very strong language in an
unsparing denunciation" of -Gra
hsm. -:-
Ramsey said last month t'h's t
Graham's ; -world-wide campaign
of evangelism should be -."treated
with- reserve.1;:..:,.,..,,.:..
The Church of England news
paper said that "many of us who
hold the strongest reservations a a-bout
bout a-bout the preaching of Dr. Graham
would nevertheless go far in v de
fense1 of the right of his converts
and. colleagues. to teach and
preach, witb the Church of Eng
land."
Excited Frenchman
Fires Off Pistol
At Assembly Meet
PARIS, Feb. II (UP) An ex excitable
citable excitable Frenchman who fired pis pistol
tol pistol shots, in the National Assemb Assembly
ly Assembly visitors' gallery was sentenced
today to two months in jail for
creating a new uproar, in c court courtroom,
room, courtroom,
The judges had assembled to
hear the case of George Vincent,
arrested Wednesday after he fired
four blanks from a starter's pis
tol during, a wild Assembly scuf scuffle.
fle. scuffle. ':
The court granted a three day
delay to Vicent's lawyer to pre prepare
pare prepare his defense. Then, suddenly,
Vicent started shouting excitedly
at the iudees. .
They quickly sentenced him to
two months for contempt of court,
then Set Tuesday for passing sen
tence on the National Assembly m

US Authorities
Doubt Soviets
Have A-Rockeis
WASHINGTON, Feb. II (UP)
-American authorities said to
dav they are confident Russia
still hasn't got an intercontinen
tal rocket capaoie ot oenvering
atomic bombs to U.S. cities.
Russia's first deputy premier
hinted in a Moscow speech today
that the Soviet Union has the
means to carry atomic bombs
to "any point of the globe by
aircraft or rockets.''
VS. officials said It's a well well-known
known well-known fact that Russia has an
intercontinental bomber similar
to this country's B-52.
They said it also is conceivable
it has a slow-moving, guided
missile like the American snarK
which can travel about 5000
miles. '
But they insisted there hasn't
been the sllghest suggestion
from any source that Russia has
yet developed the dread inter
continental ballistics missilcn
which would move too fast' for
conventional defenses.
Administration critics have
charged this country will lose
the race for the intercontinen intercontinental
tal intercontinental missile if It doesn't put its
research program en a crash
asls,..,';,..,,.
The United States U working
on a 6000-mile intercontinental
ballistics missile, sometimes call
ed tne ultimate weapon. Ejt ex.
perta don't expect any cour.:: v
Russia Included to come un
with one that works until the
1980 s at the earliest.
Convair has been workint for
several years on the "Atlas" In
tercontinental baUistic missile.
The Glenn L. Martin Co. is do
ing, similar work.
Mercery 3c:.iCiin:n
Dsnbj TV Bggf M
I VI ltiiJ
WASHINGTON Feb. If (UP)
A spokesman for, the brewing in industry
dustry industry denied today that beer
advertising on television "js de
signed to appeal to childrenj'
' "It would be a waste of money,"
said Clinton M. Hester, attorney
tor the united States Brewers
Foundation.
He appeared before the Senate
Interstate Commerce Committee
to answer charges br church and
temperance leaders that TV beer
commercials "glamorize drink
ing to children. -
The committee is considering 1
bill to prohibit interstate liquor
advertising in newspapers, maga
zines, radio and TV.
.
Hester said the proposed ban
would violate the free speech and
free press gusrantees of the 1st
amendment to the Constitution,
the -'due process"- clause of the
5th amendment,- and the 21st
amendment. He said the latter
amendment gave states control
over alcoholic beverage sales.
m also said the bill would cut
beer sales in half and cost the
federal' and state governments
more than 1 billion dollars I year
in tax revenue.
' Chairman Warren Magnuson (D-
Wash.) told Hester the committee
has heard ."substantial" protests
that "spot", beer commercials
were broadcast between programs
which appeal to children.
Hester replied that radio' and
TV stations, not the brewers, de determine
termine determine where, spot ads are plac
ed, r- :
Bicycle Classes
Scheduled Here
Bicycle safety classes for At
lantic side residents will start Sa
turday, March 3, under the direc
tion of Sgt. William Hughes.
The classes are for bicvcla rid
ers from seven years old and up,
and wm Be neid at Margarita. The
second and third week classes will
be given at Gatun.
All children who intend to en
roll should bring their name and
box number on a slip of paper

.wunjhera to. the classes.

n)
o)(0) i I
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U.S. vs. Hus:h
In Sea-saw Rcce
Of Atom Smashers
WASHINGTON, Feb. ll-(UP)
This country seems to be In a
see-saw race with Russia to pro produce
duce produce the world's most powerful
atom-smasher.
The Atomic Energy Commis Commission
sion Commission said yesterday it has au authorized
thorized authorized a group of Midwestern
universities to develop a ma machine
chine machine "that will be the finest
and most powerful in the world"
when it is completed years
hence. v ' .. ;,
The AEC also announced a-
ward of a contract to its Ar-
eonn national laboratory at La-
mont, Hi., for construction of
another atom smasher at the
earliest possible date.
The United States holds the
lead how with the six billion
electron volt bevatron at Berke
ley, Cant : ..
' But before the year is out the
Russians expect to come up with
a 10 bimon-voit emasner.
For a few years, at least, it
will be the most powerful in the
world. But the United States
should resume the lead in 1980
when it is expected a MO billion billion-volt
volt billion-volt atom smasher will be com completed
pleted completed at Brookhaven, N.Y.
How long th. UJ5. lead will
last is a Question. The Russians
are designing new, machines;
with energies ranging from 2$ to
100 billion electron volts.
Since they are already doing
this design i work. presumably
they will complete one of their
new machines before this coun

1

try builds one bigger than theistralned, apart from public opln-1

giani unaer construction at
'-'rst'cn
fcr;(l:ryi!:rPI::.lj
WASHINGTON. Teb. 1S'-(UP
--The Chrysler' Corp.- announced
yesterday it has been given a de defense
fense defense contract to develop and pro produce
duce produce an "intermediate" ballistics
missile- which can be fired from
shipi at targets 1,500 miles away
xne announcement indicated the
company also will be the prin.
contractor : tor development and
production of the ground-launched
intermediate ballistics missile.
: Senstiors have claimed Russia
may launch a 1,500-mile ballistics
missile before the end of this year.
a oaiusucs missus is urea me a
bullet in contrast to a "guided"
missile which is directed v to its
target. .-'
Meantime Trevor '" G a e dm r
former Air Force research chief.
promised to give Congress a de
tailed blueprint for speeding U.S.
development of an intercontinen
tal ballistics missile. This is a mis missile
sile missile with a projected 5,000-mile
range intended to hit enemy cent centers
ers centers from afar with devastating a a-tomic
tomic a-tomic force at enormous sped.
Chrysler's statement was hand handed
ed handed to nesmen in the Pentagon. It
gave no clue how near a 1,500-mile
ballistics missile is to realization.

CUESTION RIDGWAT Gen. Matthew B. Rldgway leftH re retired
tired retired Army Chief of Staff, confers with Rep. Robert L. F.
Slke3 (D Fla), and Rep. George H, Mahon (right), chairman
of a House Appropriations subcommittee, in Washington. The
committee questioned Ridgway about his published charges
that edministratlon defense cuts were based on politics rather
than military ludeement. t I

lei -.ii i

Says

kussia

Planes,

lo Hit U.S. C

MOSCOW. Feb. 18 (Uf)
today that the Soviet Union

drop the hydrogen bomb on American cities and hintci
at globe-circling rockets.
f First deputy premier Anostas I. Mikoyan, in a speech
to the 20th Communist Party congress now in session,
warned:

"In the event of American aggression, hydro5f
bombs can in return fall on American cities, too. Nor will w
the American imperialists be able to hide from these i

l.-L. Tt... II L. -LI.
nomas, i ney win nui we uui
"This time." Mikoyan said,
"war will very definitely not be a
source of enrichment for them.
As its result, they will suffer on only
ly only destruction and annihilation."
The veteran soviet leaaer
hinted that Russia already
may have an intercontinental
missile capable of carrying
atomic and hydrogen wor wor-heads.
heads. wor-heads. He said war was not inevit
able, with one of the deterrents
being the fact that ootn east
and West have; hydrogen and
tomIi hnmhS.
Warmongers:' he ald. ''are te-
Ion, iiart from tr-i Rreat rrlll
t.;-,- -'.rength of the court t f
socialism, by another new w
nortant circumstance
"it is tha anDearanee ot atom
ic and hydrogen bombs not only
In America but also in tne sov
iet Union, as wellas the means
to -carry these bombs to any
point of the (lobe by aircraft or
rocKets."
Mikoyan then added:
'We believe that If anyone at
tempts to droo a hydrogen or
atomic bomb, the best people of
mankind will not allow civiliza civilization
tion civilization to perish.
"They will immediately unite,
will put' the tggressors into
straitjackets and will put an end
to all wars and to capitalism at
the same time."
Soviet uress reports said that
this statement was greeted by
delegates to the Communist Par Party
ty Party congress with "prolonged ap ap-p'lause."
p'lause." ap-p'lause."
"Hydrogen and atomic warfare
can brin about great devasta
tion," Mikoyan said,
"But it cannot result in the
destruction of mankind and its
civilization. It will destroy the
outdated and pernicious reg regime
ime regime of1 capitalism in its im im-perialist
perialist im-perialist stage."
Early this, month,, President
Eisenhower told his news con conference
ference conference that widespread use ot
guided missiles might mean race
suicide. e

Rockets

ICS8S
- A top Soviet official sciJ
has the means to deliver or. 4
a. LIJ- kL ii I
10 niuc incir lavioncs. j
He said there Is no sure meth- S.
od of defense lnt'erceptlon a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst guided missiles.
He said that he thought tha
Soviet Union may be ahead In

the development of some types
or phases ot such weapons but pm

mat the United States is ahead
in there.

- He referred to allegations by
some former defense officials .".
that the Soviet Union had fir-
ed a missile hundreds of miles
Jarther than the United States.
He said the United Etal.r in

giving hlKhest priority
the D
7" W"-.rtr- tint
led r ,if-,, ?-- t
' C jreos in trte n.
ti 10 aumorize 1.2 buzon tea- ;
lara for thi program.
Crcd, I'JIi Prircs
Ordered Cy Cn!::.i
LONDON, Feb. IS (UP) The
British government today order
ed new austerity controls that
will raise the price of bread and -milk
and force buyers to pay j
one-half down on automobile
and television sets.
The controls, reminiscent of
wartime austerity measure,
were announced in the House ot
Commons in an all-out effort to
check growing inflation at home
and curb the drop of British ex exports
ports exports abroad. -.
Disclosure of the program
by Chancellor of the Exch'
ouer Harold MdcMillan brought
shouts of "resign" and
"shame' from the opposition.;
in Parliament.
. - ...
But MacMlllan explained
"there is general agreement t?at
the combined demands of in
vestment and consumption are
growing too fast for our econo-.
mic health" and "something
must be done." i
"We must all join in the bat battle
tle battle against Inflation," he said.
The controls call for:'
1. An Increase In the mini minimum
mum minimum down payments on errs.
TV sets and certain other c-i-sumer
goods from the pre: nt
one-third to an unprecedented
one-half.
i- .- ...... -..
'2. A cut in the government'
subsidy to bakers that will raise
the price of a loaf of bread by
one penny, beginning Feb. 28.
3. A slash in the subsidy on re-
tall milk Increasing the price of
milk by a penny a Quart, begin
ning July 1.
4. Time payment controls n.
certain capital goods, include ;
factory machinery and build buildings,
ings, buildings, with a 50 per cent mini minimum
mum minimum down payment and 2 years
to pay.
5. A reduction in government
capital spending by some 1M
million dollars. This will s'-i
expenditures on school build;r,
expansion projects for national nationalized
ized nationalized industry and, similar proj projects.
ects. projects.

50DielnCrcsh
Of British Plane
VALLETA, Malta, Fib. Is (VP)
A British troop carrier plane
crashed at this Mediterranean is island
land island today. First reports sai l ;
men were killed. The Britain- ;
bound, four-engined York tran
port chartered from Scottish. Ain.
lines smashed to earth on take takeoff
off takeoff from the Maltese airfield t
Luqa,

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THE AMIZICAX

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Ji-37, H STREET

PROGRAM SCHEDULE C
H G G YOUR COfuMUNITY CTATICN
840 KILOCYCLES PANAMA, 1 P.

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TelckB x-:j;i

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i OAFS AND FnOIJISS, I vas stoopir- i:o t1- in
fcolando'-S Hideaway the other day, thinkLi? thoughts cf
the utmcit noIiIIIty,anlJaLs3"bout how Panama came
on with a rush in the later games of the recent Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean serifV" ---
Net thai their hustling; base running was any, sur surprise
prise surprise to me. I inW that' several cf the Panama train
travelled to the tall parlt regularly in that clattering
conveyance of Eed, the Roosevelt rickshaw wallah, and
the sensation of sliding Into second is about the same as
when the floor tails out of Red's cab when it's coin?
down-hill ;'" .. '.". 'v ..v :
So the boys had had plenty of practice.
Another thought I had, again of the purest nobility,
what that the easiest way to tell Carnival week is that
-women become yet more noisy therf thari they are fdr the
lest of the year.- A phenomenon as depressing .as it is
deafening.- .'. ;,
x These thoughts then, I was thinking, when the old
frontal lobe started to quiver in response to a quill wield wield-er
er wield-er by the name of Air Sick, one of this disaster area's
most careful readefs : ; ? -'.:
If he didn't read the drivel with care. he couldn't

! find so many points to dislike.
This rude rustic suggested, for instance, that the
piece is pinned together by Percy the Pothead. Totally
in error; iPotgut, why certainly. J But even the briefest
I inspection reveals the head to be of Jivaro proportions,
' and honed, to & fine point. I make these disclosures in
' the sacred cause of accuracy; and also because I have an
l. obligation to fill out this space somehow. :
But anyway; this student of our sorry section here

thinks Albrook Field, or the operations therefrom, ought
to be shifted. "Not to Tort' Kobbe, as I suggested last
week but to Rio Hto.-i :'?;!V-.; -'Ar' j .', '. ; ;
- He cites a primary advantage of the Rio layout thus-
ljr -'l ?' $-s 1 -f :- .,'., -:;
y.JlTht Jiiturat soiutionjof the Driftwood Room prob problem
lem problem pan be found on that gorgeous, elegant beach: Miles

and miles Tbf driftwood,plain and tancy:, And there are

! sanay hoots oy the pacific ocean, and a changeable ceil

ing done, specially, by ,;the Creator. Diamond-studded
black velvet at night, and brisk blue with snecial white

cloud formations (to Air Force order) tot daytime events,"
with, multicolored pink peach, purple arid gold at suniet
and dawn.. Dawn v is a favorite, time at the Driftwood
Lounge,: i understand.'.'. :r r i
He also mentions that the Rio Hato runway is. suit suitable
able suitable f of airplanes.' -.-Notes that it's flaLKi."?" j---.:

:" Now I wouldn't for the life of me know what put him
1 in mind to talk about the Driftwood Club that way. First
oi all, I couldn't think of the names of all those pretty
colors.' I'm the same sort of character as John Mayles,
t who won't go4 to technicolor movies, Just Black and
White., !-;f v
w rAir Sick's .Hio :Hato suggestion reminds me' of. a
splendid site we had for a railroad station eX home once
t plenty of' space, good foundations, sound ground for
' installing. tanks and ether equipment." Only liitch. that
' there was no cause for .trains to come by that place? and
I no lines for them to run on.!,.-,., -,- ..' :'

;s Rio Hato's kbout the same. Why should anyone go 1
there? And that's flot 'taking into account :,the treaty
provisions .coRcerntai the arts.5 3 i y.mx

T. Ilobbe, oil the tther hand, is right" lndy, and id in
ithe Canal; Zone It. is is -unobstructed an' airstrip4 as

could reasonably be wished lor MayDe.tne runway neeas
a! little I beefing up for the heaviest planes,- but that's
no croblem to mbdernv airfield ineirieeri" ; 'Kk ii 1

j-J; An4.lt: is closer t$ town' tanTocumenif 'lhe-alr-men
are afraid ,of ,bemg. lonely,. Ifjlt's good enough';for'
j cash customers to have to trek to and from'Totiumen. as
. we do, it should be no great hardship for the. outjitslnpw
at' Albrook to dperate from 'K6bbe: e';r r. iv? -.-r. .-!
! .-! Let me nastily add at this point that I on no account

jwish the Air. Jorce to join in tfte civilian airline game of

seeing now mucn mcenvemence tne customer wm tase
before he breaks down screaming. J..., ..:,. .
The Albrook iiea of having an airfield somewhere

near civilization is a brilliant one. I don't like to go into

these matters too far, for we never know how many co couples
uples couples of this column 'get shipped to the Kremlin weekly,
'but I suspect the notion must still be classified top
jcret. -,,-r ;; ., r :v
i 1 Otherwise why wouldn't the civil aviation business

. 'pick it up. instead of persisting in. the tradition of locat-

,mg every airfield naijway peiween ine city 11 serves ana
-(Kitty Kawk, S.C., .y-'u::.. ;- :
i But to have the planes bandy is different, I submit,
to having them in right the attic. Convenience can be
overdone. .'"';:T '"V,-; : ; ;;." :;r -;:r;'',.v ;-"::"-
1 I have been taken to task for a wrong statistic in my
last week' piece. It was a reference to 50 years', or may maybe
be maybe a century's, supply of anchors the Navy had stock stockpiled.
piled. stockpiled.
' It is suggested that the commodity in question is ad-,
mlrals, not anchors.
.. Well, I da not know too much aV-sut tl:e comparative
' initial and maintenance costs on anchors and admirals,
but whatever the nature of the overstocked merchandise,
. my 'point hold3 good that the; Pentagon' could find the
. money.'td'.'transfer'.AKjrook to' Kobbe, ,by rationalizing
present" procurement policies. No ..more of the taxpayers'
: cash. Jvouldbe needed than is being siphoned off right
; now. If there U. any more. -j: ": ;J : " ;
I -Time and-place ls here: and.now.to bring more for-,
cibly to-the public attention my discovery of that justly
celebrated baseball outfit, the Kiwis.
! -There's been an altogether disproportionate amount
of attention given lately to baseball teams with such
names as Caguas and Cienfuegos and Valencia and Ches Ches-'
' Ches-' terfield and what have you.
. : The Kiwis are the team, let it be known They oper operate
ate operate on an arid steppe up behind the Balboa school, and
. fully carry on the traditions of their famed predecessors.
-j Took them in up there the other evening, and was
: delighted to see the ball getting thrown round in the
, traditional Kiwi style, all up tr.i t"r-rt the field.
And often dropped, top, then played with the boot.
1 It did my old heart good to sri the old tactics in ac-
- lion ain. The tactics so justly feared at Twickenham
the Yankee Stadium of British Rugby), and at Johan-
. hesburg., r
What matter if the original bearers of the celebrat-.
,ed Kiwi name play Rugby, and the outfit up behind the
Eaiboa School baseball?
,i m 1 1. 1 1 -11
. nitCY'S FEERLEC3 rCrkTENT this week is based
'on the hope that the boys in the Pentagon have the
capacity to discover somewhere in their .r. '? 1
v..:16.50, .r-"--1:'-': 'fr,' i-. :
I x' Viiinrt Vf-prat Minnn gpe. jz. billion", dollar udet
for this year, a few pennies to transfer the Big League
franchise from Albrook to Kobbe.



:z Errr.it ::::c.L';

ill r J i f .' v
r 7 f t f if
k i lki

l

col 1TOG1I M. ARNOLD, Igineeringr and Construction Director, the Panama Canal Com Com-ranv
ranv Com-ranv deliver T talk Ton "The Dredging Program of the Panama Canal Company" to the
P,ny. UVeA1Jr..-:" V-tl- wTHtanr nainr at C P.O. MesS. Rodman.

Canal zone rosw cwicjr u --a-

Union Agrees To Reopen Talks
With Vestinghouse On Strike

WASHINGTON, Feb. 18 (UP)
ThAFW:iO Electrical Workers
Union agreed yesterday to reopen
bargaining talks with company of officials
ficials officials here Monday in "an all-out
effort" to end the 124-day strike
at Westlnghouse Electric Corp.
tk iminn't arpentancv1 came as

... vannavivinia Department of

t.w nH lnduatrv officially la-

th Hlnut a "lockout" and

.ftjui nnno Westlnghouse em

eloves about S million dollars in

unemployment compensation.
Department Secretary John R
TnrnnatA itid the "prevailing fac

tor" in the ruling was union ac

ceptance and company j rejecuon
of a proposal by Govs. George M.
Leader, Pa., and AverelU Harri Harri-man,
man, Harri-man, N.Y. : '"
cm Dm. 19 the Governors urged

that the employes return to work
at prevailing wages and "start all
nvrr if tin in negotiations." Tor-

(iiatA aid his' labor department

considered Westinghouse, rejection

f the plans "a lockout."
In1 agreeing o meet herewith
company officials', Monday? James
n. Tare v.j union president! ai d

down certain reservations about

the union's position on certain, p
sues to be taken up. f .j

Federal 'Mediation Chief Joseoh
F. Finneg'an, who once thought he

had the dispute near seniemeni,
yesterday invited both sides to try
. ... .... v r! m ;

again, wesungnouse vice irw
dent R. D. Blaster accepted im immediately,
mediately, immediately, Pledging his "full
rAAtwration.,

Finnetfan suggested that the

talks be resumed on the basis of

recommendations he laid down

Feb. 4. He proposed then that the

parties set aside an angry squab squabble
ble squabble over a company time study

and trv to- agree first on other

" Carer told Finnegan the union

will bargain on the basis of the
recommendations.' But he said the
new talk must not include "the
serious reservations placed on
your recommendations by West-
inshouse.'.
This means the union still, wants
to negotiate on the basis.- of its
present contract which, expires
next October, rather than on a

new five-year contract as propos

ed by Westlnghouse. It also means
the union objects to the compa company's
ny's company's refusal to commit ..itself on
procedures for disposing of the
time study issue. -..
At Harrisburg, Pa.,:the State

Bureau of Employment Security

said that while the Westlnghouse
work stoppage "commenced as a

strike, the situation ha changed
and a lockout has existed" 1 since

the company rejected the g o v-

ernors settlement fprmula.

US Ernpbyo Enjoys
Big Working Eds:
On 0:r (ciinlrbs

New Products

MEXICO CITY -(UP) The

Russian laborer works longer for

his meat, the Mexican longer for
his potatoes and the U.S., laborer

gets both for mucn less worn man
either,
' This is the conclusion of the Mex

ican Confederation of Industrial

Chambers 'of;. Commerces which
has prepared a comparison chart
of the amount of work Mexican,
U.S. and Soviet laborers must do
to i earn the same, commodites.
The chart shows: i -
1 If costs H.J U.Srwoder 13 min

utes of working time to buy a kilo

gram (2.2 pounds) or oread, me
Soviet worker 25 minutes and the
Mexican 43 minutes. ,. t ; J
A kilogram of potatoes two-and-a-half
minutes in the U.S.. IS

15 minutes In Russia and 34 min

utes In Mexico. j : '. ?

a Kuogram of meat min minutes
utes minutes in. the U.S., 257 minutes in

Russia and 140 minutes in Mexico.
A kilogram of butter 57 min minutes
utes minutes in the U.S., 54& in Russia
and 176 minutes in Mexico.

A' kilogram of sugar seven
minutes In the U.S., 185 in Russia

and 22 minutes in: Mexico.. ;
One dozen eggs IS minutes in

the U.S., 168 in Russia and 126

in Mexico. y 'N-. '':''

A cotton shirt one hour in the

U.S., 22 hours "in Russia and sev

en and a half hours in Mexico.

Toilet soap three minutes in

the U.S., 24 minutes in Russia and

15 minutes in Mexico.

A radio 13 hours in the, U.S.,-32

days in Russia and 15 days in

Mexico. : tx:i): i. :

A package of cigarettes six
minutes in the U.S., 15 minutes in

Russia and 10 mniutes in Mexico.
TJU

By JOSEPH W. MICHALSKI

United Press Staff Ctrrtspenden!
NEW YORK (UP) Science's

latest contribution to the nutrition
of infants and children comes in

the form of flavored vitamin drops

that can be added to milk or other

food to supplement its nutritional

value.. 3

The research division of a lead

ing pharmaceutical firm claims it

has developed a balanced formula

of vitamins for the new lemon-

raspberry flavored vitamin drops
known as Vi-Syneral Vitamin

drops.' fortified, and at the same
time has done away with the dis disagreeable
agreeable disagreeable "fishy taste" that so
many vitamin preparations have.
The new formula can be added to
milk or can be given separately

since it is extremely palatable, the
manufacturer said. (U.S. Vitamin
Corp., New York 17, N.Y.)

A new metal polish that comes

in tubes and is supposed to be able

to polish all metals to a high

lustre, is now being marketed.

With this product, a housewue is
offered the- opportunity to polish

silverware, gold, brass, copper.

aluminum, chromium, tin ana

nickel from' a single tube. It is

described as. having J an anti anti-tarnish
tarnish anti-tarnish agent capable of maintain maintaining
ing maintaining a mirrorlike finish-for periods
up to six months. (Haider Sales

Co., New York, .Y.)

ATLANTA, Feb. II (UP) -Roy
Karris, strong pro sefrcjatiou
member of the board which con controls
trols controls the University of Georgia
system, said today he plans to
speak at a Negro unit of the sys system
tem system tonight desoite bitter protests
from the NAACP.
Harris, a member of the state
Board of Regents, said also his
speech at Savannah State College
will be of a pro-segregation .na .nature.
ture. .nature. ;

The farmtr kr ef the

Geergla Hewte ef KrMnts
?lv whe was ene ef tf first
te try te eerfte Ttch out
el the Sitter Bewt became Pitt--burgh
had e Neere player said
"if I fe my pesitieii will be the
same as It has always a."
"I shall say to those present

that we have made great progress
in the' South working together in
great harmony and that this har

mony and progress can only con

tinue so long as the two races

live separate and apart."

Hams, an Augusta attorney and

leader in the pro white states

rights council of Georgia, said

"any effort at enforcing the mix

ing of the races means war be

tween the races."

Harris offered to cancel his en

gagement if the Neero college did

noi wam nun to attend but Dr.

W. K. Payne, president of Savan

nas Mate, said the invitation

stands despite the protest.

rayne saia Hams naa "been a

friend" of the' Negro college and

naa neipea in a program of buud
ing up the institution which U i

unit of the University of Georgia

system.
W, W. Law, president of the Sa

vannah chapter of the National

Association for the Advancement

ot tiored People, said Harris1

mvuiuon was a .' source ot ex extreme
treme extreme alarm to those interested
in the education of eur youth and

ine weuare of the couege."

Law urged "all our members
and their friends" to boj-cott the
sceech "as-aa affront en the

hopes and aspirations of the Ne Ne-ro
ro Ne-ro peonle."

"During Mr. Harris career he

has been foremost as a dema dema-loKue."
loKue." dema-loKue." Law said. "Virtually ev

ery repressive act directed toward
the Negro population' in this state
was either proposed er supported

by him. t ..

The segregation issue was kept

at the boiling point at other places

in the South.

.leulsiane State University's

beard ef aveervbere is expected

te announced at a elei meet meet-Ine
Ine meet-Ine temerrew Its new eellty a

tahttt mixed athletic events and

va -sttrf cntranee reuire

tnwms te slew dewn and expect
ed suree ef new Negre nrall-

menta et the cellege whkh baa

a few Negre raduate anMema.

Eleven men prominent in the

pro-white citizens council move

ment in Alabama met at Mont

gomery to organize heretofore in

dependent local councils into "the
. t 1 1. l n a-

ciuzens councus oi Aiaoama, io
fight integration policies handed

down by federal courts.

Temple Israel at Memphis. Tenn..

cancelled his speech at Mississip

pi State Couege a rtugtous em

phasis week program next week.

His cancellation came Just one

day after the Rev. Josiah G .Chat

ham. Catholic priest of Jackson,

Miss.,, withdrew as a speaker be

cause of tne general climate of

affairs in the state" on racial is issues.'
sues.' issues.' .'-...:.

A similar religious emphasis pro

gram planned for the University

of Mississippi this week was sus

pended after five speakers with

drew because the school cancelled

an Invitation to a pro-integration

minister from Ohio..

FUHERARIA NACIONAL
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the level of every pocket
WE ARE YOUR' FRIENDS AND SERVERS, and
because of that we ask your attention, and co-'
operation so we may attend to you as
; ; you- deserve. 1

Tobacco, gasoline and other stale

and unpleasant smells are said to

be eliminated quickly 'and easily
with a new air freshener. In

dividually placed in a cellophane

bag, a figurine comes in a choice
of rose, eardenia. or spice to give

car or home a country-fresh scent,

in minutes. the manufacturer

states. The air freshener is sug

gested for the garage, basement,
attic storage closet, and bath

room. (Valley Products, Philadel

phia, pa.) ; '.;

A new chlorinated safety solvent,

claimed to be free of dangerous
gaseous vapors and toxicity and
safe to use, is now being packaged
in pint, quart, one-gallon and five five-gallon
gallon five-gallon cans. Suggested for cleaning
watch movements, .bicycle parts,

carburetors, rifles, typewriter type.

mimeograph equipment, hat I,
clothing, and for removing chew chewing
ing chewing gum. Its solvent properties are

described as paralleling those of

carbon tetrachloride-yet retaining
the advantage of 20 times lower
vapor toxicity. (Sealed Liquids Co.,
New York 59, N.Y.)
Envoy Redly Li!ics
Go!f; Ddlds Ov;n :
toss h krthh v
BUFFALO. N. Y- (UP) U.S.

Ambassador George Wadsworth of

Buffalo, a golf devotee, makes use

of his hobby to leave a distinctive
reminder behind him whenever he

changes posts in the foreign serv service.
ice. service. He simply "builds'1 a golf course.
In 40 years of foreign' service,
Wadsworth has panned and super supervised
vised supervised the construction of four golf-

courses.. His latest layout, The

Dunes, a nine-hole layout in Jidda,

Saudi Arabia, is described in detail
in a letter received here by bis

brother H. Cowles Wadsworth.,
Before Saudi Arabia, the 62-year-

old Buffalo native built courses on
embassy grounds in Iran, Turkey
and Czechoslovakia. In the latter
country, Ambassador Wadsworth
was limited to two holes, one at

each end of the embassy grounds.

The Dunes, Wadsworth explained
in his letter, is an all-sand layout

where "sneakers are recommend

ed for footwear. Bunkers were

made by piling up rocks and cov

ering them with sand. To make
the greens, Wadsworth said, the
sand was oiled, 'then rolled hard to
make a smooth surface. Each cup
is a hollow wooden cylinder driven

into the sand.

Ambassador Wadsworth, who last

visited Buffalo two years ago. is

a former golf champion of all the
Balkan states. Before World War

II, he competed in the Balkan

state-tournament in Sonhia..Bul

garia, defeating the British army

Populal'n Growing

CHICAGO f UP W Ristntf num

bers of youngsters and oldsters are

making the nation's non-wdrklng
population loom,, the Federal Re Reserve
serve Reserve Bank Of Chicago says.
The bank reported in its month monthly.
ly. monthly. Business Conditions,, that more
than half the United States' post

war population gain has been in
the under-20 age group and about
14 per cent la the 65-and-over

group..

This Is contrary to the 1935r45

trend, the bank said, when' the

working age group accounted for

the bulk of the total population in

crease.- y.:.

The bank. said" the nation's non non-working
working non-working population probably will

grow more rapidly than the work
force in the next 10 years.

High birth rates during the war
and post-war period were respon

sible for the rising proportion of

youngsters, it pointed out. And old older
er older persons are accounting for a

blffcer proportion of the nooulation

because more people are living past

middle age. ..
During the 1935-45 decade, about
a million persons a year were add

ed to the 20-63 working' age pop-J

ulation. Since that time,: the bank
said, the number has dropped: to

less than 800,000 per year, and a
further moderate drop Is expected.
However, the "bank predicted a

sharp increase in the labor force
at the large crop of post-war ba babies
bies babies come of age between 1965

and 1975.
The bank said current population

trends indicate that labor shortages
are likely to remain chronic for the

next 10 years during periods ;of

good' business.,, . .; v.

If predicted thaf pressure to' cut

costs througn uie use oi laoor-eav-ins
eauioment will continue strong,

Continuance of the trend toward
a shorter work week, longer vaca

tions and earlier retirement will

accentuate the tight labor market,

the bank said.

NSW YORK (UP) Isaac

Stern, Amerif an-bora and trained

vioiimst, will mks a concert tour

in the Soviet Lruon this spring

becoming the first American musi

cian to concertize there since the

end of World War II.

Stern was invited to mike the

tour by the Soviet government

David Olstraxh, Russiaa violinist.

has given a highly successful se

ries of concerts in the United

States this season.

Stern's tour will take five weeks.

The plan is for concerts in Mos Moscow,
cow, Moscow, Leningrad, and other major

dues, and for appearances with
orchestras as well as in recitals.

The New York ; Philharmonic-

Symphony gave the world pre

miere of the newest work of Ralph

Shapey, youthful composer, on

reo. t, with Dimitn juitropouios
conducting.' It is a one-movement
symphony in five sections, entitled:
"Challenge: The Family of Man."
The work was inspired by an ex exhibition
hibition exhibition of photographs at the Mu

seum of Modern Arts with the uue,
"The Family of Man."

On the same program Jascha

Heifetx. violinist, was soloist in

Beethoven s violin concerto,. He

will tour Europe this spring and

then hang up his bow for all of

next season in order to have a

sabbatical" year of rest.

The sixth concert of the season

of Thomas Scherman and the Little
Orchestra, featured two rarely
heard sacred works the 50th

cantata of Johann Sebastian Bach

and Schubert's A flat. Mass which

he composed at the age of -22.

The orchestra was joined by the

Trinity Church Choir. The program

also included Ralph vauenan wu

llama' little known work, "Flos
Campl," a suite for viola, small

chorus, and orchestra.

Unl3 B:sk Store
Sleeked By B:rl:r

mnwrrnrv rllf TlP A

rr.v.h.ir.H iiiu. man whs i-vps story butis not always present,

u,..ir .vi.n.iu. r.a.nni Lovely Luclne Amara was the

i... nimt hnir itnr nneratiou Mlmi, Jean Fenn the Musetta, and

here Giuseppe Campora the Roldolfo.

l'eqsloneer Ed Baker's way of

The Metropolitan Opera season

has advanced to the first presen

tations of "La Boheme" and "Der

Rosenkavalier."
i

In the first.. a pleasingly youth

ful cast gave the piece of the aura

of youth which is required by the

keeping in touch with : the local

browsing set is a lo-iooi-wiue snop

known as the ."Nook" which seems

to have in stock almost any paper-

In the Utter. Lisa Delia Casa

sang the princess role for the first

time at the Met. and otto dei-

mann gave his first Baron Ochs.

Rise Stevens was back in her ac

tirtS'JUP&i sa1 aaw -a-3s "ssir

CJ' 1 jilt'. h

!ol:4.:

($1 ct ii);.na: ;.

ROLEX OYSTER PERPETUAL WATCHES
Stainless Steel Case, 25 Jewels ...... $105.00
U. S. PRICE v..;.....,..i.. 165.00
YOU SAVE ........ 57. or.. 60.03

CULTURED PEARL STRINGS:
Standard lenjjths, fine lustre ..... from V19-S5
U. S. PRICE ........ 42.50
YOU SAVE 113 or 22.55

100 WOOLEN CARPETS & RUGS
Larje variety of sixes, modern color,
plain designe v" i (
4 x 6' .....$35.00 .V.. .8 x 10 y $105.00
6 x9' ..... 80.00 .9 x 12', 10.00
These prices are way below those in U. S. A.
Lots of Parking Space in Front of Our Store

NEW!!!

range from mysteries' and science ,Uer mce "52-53 season.

fiction to the most exaueo. xypes

of non-fiction.

The friendly proprietor never;
deals with wholesale bookmen. His i
amazing backlog of reading matter

has been .built up strictly

through benevolent haggling with;
his many customers.. ., (
Ed has 'a standing policy that j
makes it possible for customers, to!
bring in their own books and trade'
them for newer volumes at- the

ratio of three to one. If a steady
visitor doesn't want to take home
all the books he's entitled to right
away, Baker keeps a credit list for
future withdrawals. s-
"But they (the trade-ins) must
be good titles and in good con
dition," he said. '.'And nothing that
t have a surplus of."

For the energetic owner of the
"Nook." who's onlv been in the

business about five years both as
a hobbyist and .an, active seller of
small editions,'; a great deal of
reading 1 impossible. ' '
"I used to yead almost all my
stock," he said, '"but my eyes
bother me ,and I can only read for
about an hour each evening.' I try
to look at. a .dozen or so pages in
each new book so I'll be able to
tell my 'customers what they're
about.' '. '.
The retired U.S. Customs official
knows '; exactly where each and
every one of the' 'thousands of
books he has acquired is. When
people come in with a particular
story in mind,, for which they pay
10 cents if its a standard 25-cent
book or 30 cents if it's the "giant"
size, he goes to a spot and plucks
it out without any effort at all.

SPORT O DRESSY
for her v
cool casual colorful

SlvMS

fpr him

PANAMA

COLON

mm
... 1 ,. . ., .

- . ... -..'.: I

. - .... ,T ''
,.' i'

mm

)iTlCt

SAVE TIME and MONEY Hr

in fist; powerful, luxurious and modern SUPER CONVA1RS 340 .;.
C94.00 one way ... $171.0Q round trip' flights every Friday

V. i leaving locuwifn at tau r.i.

Select one of oar easy 'Credit plans:
Fly Now fay Later
(Up te 21 months to pay)
Jnt say"Charee it to my account"
UT TO S MONTHS TO VAT)

mv ni.'Wiiif- iiiKWii'

F infarmatlon mo yeur travel aeent er eall 2-J43I

J

A

X
I
';

champion in ue unai round. ..



3

Wo Skinned Knees? Borink
Prudden Says They Point Up,
The Forgotten

American

Bj'WARDCAKNEL

t" I WHITE PLAINS. N..Y. -, NEA1 .From No. 5
Hillside Avenua jn White Plains, there is an uncomfort uncomfortably
ably uncomfortably clear view of failing American physical fitness.
;-t According to Bojuije. Prudden ;who-works here, the
country Is failing .haPM.peopl. Wf forgetting their

bodies -i
, (v mind -what the Army
says about our poor condition.
Never mind what' athletic coaches
ev. Take a look at the kids to-
4.. nn arms, no shoulders, no
chests and worst' of all, no
skinned knees.'
hri the course "of her professiorf professiorf-l
l professiorf-l work, Bonnie Prudden has a
mihUterd physical fitness tests
to thousarida of children lu hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of places around the world.
They ere simple tests: sit-ups,.
g i elevations,' fingers to- the the-floor.
floor. the-floor. And the results."
At Hillside Avenue, Bonn I i e
Prudden is trying to change the
statistics. Th building used to
be 'a gramfflaf choolr Todajr it
is her Institute for Physical Fit Fitness
ness Fitness vri t h "gyms, danoelas
rooms, trampolines, mats, ropes,
wings, parallel bars, saw horses.
In the course of a week, 40
mea, Women, nd children -will
pass through these rooms to lesrn
how to use their bodies again.
Here are young mothers doing
post-natal exercises; here are
business men liquidating their
corporations; here are youngsters
with "bad eyes,- Irad-fe.-emetwn-al
problems, learning to walk up-j
jinhti thworld"
"Emotional problems are easy
to' 'spot." Bonnie ... Prudden said.
Physical tests are a sure Rive Rive-aay
aay Rive-aay of all kinds of pressures.
Aid very often we refer our stu-
duniS 10 cover kiiius ui iicii,
U works both way
Many of
the institute students have been)
referred by medical doctors, psy
AhiafHst. school teachers, wor
ried Darents and people who have
ati;:cnsfully conditioned th e m-
selvc. here.
i'That' what It is condition-J
Ing.'V'she said. "And our whole
atff 'has to work overtime to
evbrcbme the pressures working
arrr.in.t us."
uh as:
l.i M'imma. Every time she
sees the kids running, climbing,
doing,' Mamma says: Don't.
You'll hurt yourself." This is the
aiirost way to scare a child from
devefiping his natural senses and
aV.iitrcs,
''i '"
?. Too many poor physical edu education
cation education instructors : for too many
years. They were good athletes
onceand they are interested v in
prowls alone, nevejr caring why
a chi d can' or; wonl strengthen
3. Coaches. They are Interest Interested
ed Interested too much ia icing the cake
before it's baked in developing
skillC and techniques of competi-.
This homemaker iascrubbinf soil
tnat is washable aid soft te the

1
new furniture upholstered in the
liL'ht, bright contemporary colors
is causing more thaa one tug of
war between a fashion-conscious
homemaker and her prudent hus husband.
band. husband. ; f .i v
That the lovely clear shades
add life and beauty to a room is
hard to deny. But sofas and easy
chairs in most families must aisj
offer comfortable relaxation to
tne man who wants to nap, loll,

The contemplated purchase "of.terial that many leading manu-,

.ibuuW or put hi hudiia.wiUkTeii

out being reminded to be careful
of the cover.
A compromise you 11 be seeine
i hearins more about -thi
ng is a vinyl upholstery ma

dy

Bo
7
h
I
"Ne arms, ne sheuldert ."
tive sports 'before their team are
ing good condition.
4. Progress. We take buses,
autos, trains and planes. We don't
7-
mre- ror
air
There's no question about the
fftPt fhftt &a unmnn fft-mirei aMai
her hair Bets thinner. What usad"
to be a luxuriant mop, io thick it
couldn't hold a hat. eventually bs-
comes more and more skimpy. ;
Tor women with coarse h a i r
that tends to ; lie--down ,; properly
and hold its shape anyway, this
is soarlra -liability. fThe-thln-nina-out'.oi
age may eveiumaie
her look very slick and soignee.
But for women vith. fine nair,
the. problems of its fineness per-
sist as me nair grows inin. a
wontaa Wha thinks.-. "Aa. now ny
hair is thin, I won t have to have
it trimmed every week'', is in for
a surprise, a wui inzz up jusi s
is always has, perhaps worse as
the hair grows oier.t;
And lot oalr lacRtng la natural
thickness and natural oils, the aid
of a-beautician becomes even
more important.-
The stylist can trim and thin
the hair so that, what there is of
it will lie down close to the bead
and cover it. It will also look
thicker. '.,;,:
If you're accustomed to perma
nents. the professional salon can
condition your hair so that the
permanent won't dry it or cause
it to frizz baaiy.
off the tofa which l npholatered

touch. Large easy chair is sue covered

-
.... .am a ... ..cJn. fni. 4hA.it MAW
1:... . 2- f
This .material Is not.tht. same
as the fairly stifi, nonporous plas-
tie you se on dinette sets. It has!
a cellular construction mat is air,
oorous but not water porous.; so;
it can oe wasnea ana scruymja
without damaging the backing
" The air porosity is said to be
enough to insure cool and com-
loriaoie ventilation. :
nand of fine leather. Of the piec pieces
es pieces I've seen, prices of sofas and
v-iie- covered with this new ma
terial have he midw-w-h-wpn
1 tne lowest priced fabric coverings

I'l,,,!...,!,-!.

'BONNIE PRUDDEN IN ACTION:
. . "and ne skinned kntes."
climb fences or trees. We don't
run. We hardly walk. And it's
not our fault alone: Progress has
made streets dangerous and cut
down trees and done away with
walkable fences. How often have
you seen a kid with skinned knees
these days. Hell suffer, for his
cleanliness later.
lonnit Pruddan's carefully kept
card file 6f her students tells the
story of her technique and her
success. tOn card, for example,
for 14-year-old boy gives his
vital etatiatlcs and his score on
the basic physical fitness tests.
The card also says: "TLC" Tend
er Loving Care. r
At least once each session this
ooy must be reached by tne in
structor witn a person-to-person
talk. The institute must find out
why he has failed the tests, what
is blocking him from learning, i
There is also an entry on th
same card for an afternoon two
montns ago: m,ued today.
For Bonnie Prudden, this kin
of physical fitness is a way of life.
sne is 42 and iooks au. 5 n e
moves like a ballet dancer and
talks with the breathless enthusi
asm of a cheerleader.
But her words are heavy with
the facts of life:
"It's easy to reach the mature
people who come here. They're
merely re-learning what they
once had. It s tne young eenera
tion I'm worried about 15 to 2
years old. They never had it and
by now they might be afraid te
learn how."
with a new alr-poreni vinyl
wun a new ir-nnin
'ered with the material.
3
and the'highef priced genuine
.. ..
IPJtthAP j-.
Th rnl.ira are numerous and
rang ifrom white. jpiak, s .to i 1 1.
green, tangerine and sky blue to
soberer .shades, of dark, g re in,
crown, uiai-ji. 4
s 1 I
Ordinary soiling w a s n e s off.
KeaWer soil can be scrubbed with
cleansers,- and greasy spots yjeld
to solvents. At this -time, manu manu-farturers
farturers manu-farturers are usine solid colors
and are.iaakto2,tbe covering
covorinjt
uaiiahl- on aome. of tut.r wosi
nmular designs.
...

Developers ot the material say.sieau ui r

"Leak at the kids today

7.
hin
Those glittery clothes are lus luscious
cious luscious to wear, but unless care is
exercised, they may be a little
touchy to keep up.
Those gold and silver plated
raorics are made by plating 100
per cent nylon tricot knit with jl
gold or silver colored coating.
They are soft, pliable and luxurious-looking.
But they shoulo be guarded a-
gainst lipstick and other spots
and ftainsMosto1 the. spotting
reagents that a commercial soot-
ter in a dry-cleanink plant must!
use to getthem, out will also jre-
move uie goia or suver-coiorea
particles from the nylon.
rney can be hand dry-cleaned
or hand wet-cleaned, however, if
the.garment design permits and
not too mucn is expected in re
mfival of those stains.
The f-brics are difficult to press I
ith hanil irnn Th irnn Anaa'
hot glide over the surface easily!
and has a tendency to stick to the
fabric. A dry-cleaner can do it I
...ui. .... ...I-,, .n..t.i
Willi 9C, UOItlK .OUCViaL IJillSIUUK
equipment to press with steam
and iir without any pressure on
the fabric, ';
vlf you heed 'to" 'no touch-up
pressing at home, do it on $ h e
wrong side with the iron set for
acetate.
. it- -.T ': -' I
.Babies catch -colds from 1 each
Other' with east, A tactful -moth-other,
with ease. A tactful moth mother
er mother both Inquires, and informs a a-bout
bout a-bout sickness In the family be be-fore'
fore' be-fore' visits take place. A Baby's
tojd may never get serious,-but it
may De protracieo.
One' child.' nlavlntf In IVia. narV
obviquly. 'Jsad jhiji, shoes on.' the
wrong feet. A ,'iriend kindly
pointed it out" to rthe, Bab y's
mother 'and; .was 'astonished v to
discover that1 this.."is medical
prescription for curing a certain
IpotXsult. a v w-i.k;J
'If ; Babv aonetite talcefi a sud
den spurt, ho may .shove, ip
moutrauis tnat wouio maite an
adult aaa. fhey're so, large. ; The
secret is an impassive face while
he does it. Eating when he's
hungry W the ultimate in good
manners for nun."
, ,i
Some mothers, to save laundry.'
let Baby wander around the

Strength Needed Jo Tuns Out : :

Ccmplaintrs Seeking Magic

Y
MRS.
MURIIL LAWRENCE
THIS morning, Mrs. D.'s widow widowed
ed widowed mother telephoned and like
the dwarf in the fairy tale asked
her to perform three impossible
.... ,.,
First, by complaining about her
insomnia again, she asked Mrs.
D. for peace of mind. Second, by
complaining of eyestrain, she ask asked
ed asked Mrs. D. to return her vigorous
youth. Third, by declaring that
she could not survive her ap approaching
proaching approaching JSth wedding anniver anniversary
sary anniversary witnout Mrs. D.'s dead fath
er, she asked his child to restore
himJo uf. .- ,, A
. r. L-,. r-. .,..)
tJnlikt the maiden in; the fairy
tale, poor Mrs. D. did "not register
the fact that impossibilities had
been demanded of her.
t She was oppressed by the feel feeling
ing feeling that she had somehow failed
her mother. Unreasonable .though
it was, it soon hardened into
heavy 'Conviction? ;
Billy trustfully shewed) her theJ
THE result was, when her young
hsler tie'B'inm'in nis weierrn
tanned him .in exasperation in
' .1 I .fttlnit knilr saailv it rniild
FT .. 14

Drum-shaped design of refrigerator in the "Kitchen t TeraomW
allows delirerymaa U store food from the outside. Exterior doort
n refrigerator and staple storage cabinet ea bt locked. Tttra Tttra-tablea
tablea Tttra-tablea route te faciUUte fterinf

Jomorrow A
By KAY SHERWOOD.
A LOOK into the 193 Kitchen
M Tnmnrrnw rives the homeniak-
er somewhat the same feeling that
Aladdin must have had-when tne
genie jumped -out qf the, lamp to
answer his wishes, ' 1
Only In this rase, the 'genie
a large corporation with a full
statf .of talented engineers, de designers'
signers' designers' and researchers who've
called on such 20th century magic
as electronics and ultrasonics ; to
conjure up the answers to more,
leisurely and carefree homemak homemak-ing..
ing.. homemak-ing.. v
t Thl Icitchen is highlight of a
barklina industrial exhibit
which opened recently in New
York and will, go on tour this
winter.1::.- l-! "" V
Tn unnrpciate the marvels dis
played' in this-i experimental' but
workable kitchen, tmnK 01 soma
of the major and minor aggrava aggravations
tions aggravations .' that have promoted you to
' mutter. "I Wish..."1 s
""I wish the dellveryman
wouldn't track across my clean
'floor." Okay. In the Kitchen of
Tomorrow,: the remgeraior ana
Stanle StOrBSe CBbinetS are rOtat-
ing drums with, two sets ot doors
o that they 'can be loaded. front
the outside as well as inside. Push
knttirii nniin'kn1 rlnte-rinnri and
uv - r ----
rotate the turntables of specific
sections; ? v : l
l wish I never! had ita wash
another dish or break another
fingirnail scrubbing the pots and
pans.'! Th a ta a : cinch; -j Here's
the t ultrasonic dishwasher which
uses ' inaudible h i g h-frequency
sound waves to wasn," nnae, ury
and' sterUize a? tailieliois dishes
in cthree fsmimitissi'i
' At -a ; nearby self-rinsing, sink,
there s a power-driven pot scruo
ber. If you should! get." your
hands wet. .. there's a warm-air
hand drver.i ; ( u 'Jtx-bi Hi
"I wish I could find lhat recipe
for Bohemian Try ftread.? t Ho,
hum, girls,-, this is strictly child s
niav. Steo rover to tne 100a prep
aration .'center. press the code
button tra the recipe filet and, up
comest the bread recipe division,
Select the. one.. you want,- insert
the I coded 1 card in the magic
recioe -makeri and an IBM unit
will "readmit.4 r"-f." -r
i. Ties, another: oufionDrys :in-
gredients are accurately measured
and;-dispensed tn the s propet or order,'
der,' order,' To encourage your ; culinary:
hosfe ni'diaDers or trainW pants
and a shirt. It certainly wont
hurt ;BabyJut ,it may do. gradual
damage to. mother' morale and
esteem abou her nome ana was
' Conditioninc e Tna t's putting
Baby on the toilet "long before he
has control. It -works with some
Babies ana --aoesni.wun otners.
But don't press any rigidly con-
ceived olan to the point where
Efoy protests wmcnecry,
i
his father slices of an off-hand
cold dinner
ne oojecied. And crying over
her dishes in the kitchen, Mrs. D.
tnougnt despairingly, "Oh, dear,
since Papa went, what a prob
lem Mama is getting to he!
Which is as silly as calling rain
a "problem'! because it wets your
coat. 1
IT is the nature of ram to wet
our coats just as it' the nature of
complainers .to make us feel guil
ty. So what we do with one is to
put up an umbrella and with the
other, learn to see the real de demands
mands demands behind the complainer'i
complaints.
When he asks the possible like
a reasonable being who can ac accept
cept accept the, limitations of his earthly
life, we give it to him with kind
ness and good will. But when he
starts demanding like the dwarf
in the fairy tale,; we find we have
to end our telephone conversation
-Developing this strength, not
Mama, is Mrs. D. s problem.
parents .should he particularly
alert to magic-demanding com-
plainer and. ihdt. fatal Jt acuity
for making us feel guilty, incom
petent and a;rarr'".t:r.g. Young
life is easily infected by depres depression
sion depression in this environment.

ML L I

cnen
talents, a colored picture of ; the
completed dish ir projected on
the screen for you to see.
1 Over et the cooking center,
more, .wishes, have been beard.
The oven, for example, has a big
aouble-walled 'elass dome 1 sd that
food can be baked,- broiled or
barbecued In full Triew.v .;';
A marble coantertop u h d e r
whieh a r e compact induction
heating units "takes over' the sur surface
face surface cookery,', The- great speed of
such unit (Water' said to boil
in seconds) is as surprising- as
the f act that thern arble ;, never
gets not io tne toucn. -
Loss Knows
HIsllt5Eltkkct
By DICK KLED'ER
NEW YORK (NEAk If "you're
tired of beef and lamb, and pork.
ry bear.- There would 'seem ,tn be
:a lot 0 beaneatini gome on. ar
ound nthe country, if you can be-
ljeve Ruth. Mil'ett's mail. -'
A month or so back. NEA Serv
ice woman's .columnist -wrote, that
she had bear in her ireezer and
didn't 'know how to-cook H.i Since
then she' beta Cih4cJ with ms'',
cookbook, h recipes and haiplui
handy hints en. how to.Uir jl,bejr
pto gooa earing....
eelolul Handy Hint Nov It
the bear a twild flavor teem tp be
the bear's wild flavor seems-to be
concentrated, in the fat. To make
ol' -r grizjly 5 taste idecent, the .fat
must be slieed off.The fat makes
it taster like eld bear" .wrote-airs.
C. Uilli.m. Hill nt Ynnvvill.
Tensj.t'even If it w i cub.", And
Mrs.. John R. Bailey of Maryville.
Tenn.. rohimes, in .with Helnful
Handjr Hint No.-IA "tet, some
one use tne fat for 'soap-making
that likes to do that sort of Uiing."
I Halpful-Handy .Hint t N,.,
use a young beac-r Old i bears
taste like well.ld bearst Irma
u Pearce"f BiloxC Miss.,, wrote,
Vlf abe tbear -is a' veteran, bis
Strength .can be neutralUed; by -a
judiciqu use of garlic," but,that
tnay be' going ifrom the frying
pare tb-the- garUc. C. H.. Wolfe of
paston;'w,Pa., summed Tup- the
which-bear-to-cook bvfestloh like
thU:."It al) depends if it is a She She-bear
bear She-bear or a He-bear. He-bears taste
strong."
; Helpful Handy Hint N. U U-1
1 U-1 concentrate on the 'gravy,- A lady
from Memphis. Tenn.: sent llong
a lovely "mouth-watering recipe,,
for t "mushroom fravy to serve
ith nice roast of bear tThen
;he spoiled it. "gome folk," she
wrote, Vprefcr te throw the bear
away and eat me gravy.; f.
"Helpful Handy Hint Hi,
fThis one should come as-a-sur-
orise to the bears.) A lady from
.

There's an exotic look cooked with precision tailoring in these new blouse's, Elch. and glowing
i$t "taft Wk Tthls siiH paisley print with stand up collar that winds around in hew.
EST CJtll i Vd (rifht for front panel and cuffs of blouse in new b end ef acetate and

blouses .are ,irm. nj p"""
.. 1 8'C"
t rt r-
r

RerVe the 1951 "Kitchen f Tomorrow." Foed-preparatios eetr
Is in the background. Featured is a motorised etrria ad vli'AtT.
out that mevee on a track from kitchen te dlnlnr area by rmet

control. It contain outlets for ap?!lBcet.

' -r ti-i irii f '.'-. -f-'r r

z:oaaeavviui vv

One innovation that comes
close to granting my wish to sit
through a dinner without jumping
up once is the motorized serving
and utility cart
This cart boasts storage and
serving space,- outlets for- small
appliances, warming oven and
tray, insulated ice storage." It
could also,, 1 should think, tote
the damp : cloths needed to mop
up the tnilk that's bound tc be
spin?dr;q f
If ypu're not already groggy
from;; this big dose Of wishes wishes-cdmeJtrue,
cdmeJtrue, wishes-cdmeJtrue, take a list look aMhe
planning center. Besides a "tele
Angels Camp, Cafif adWes Ihus Ihus-lyi
lyi Ihus-lyi iNever eat any beat meat un,
less it is well-done, even, if it. is
red meat. It is of the pork fam family
ily family and you can get .poisoned on
Jt It lsnl cooked endugh," So
next time' you- see? a bear, "tell
him'' he "should 'be saying ""pink"
i The majority of Ruth's j:orre-
nnn.1nt unit fmm Tnnp5pe
whicb must be full ot eatin'-type
bears, surprisingly, were were a
couple of letters from Pittsburgh,
where there must be more-bears
than ordinarily supposed.
: Masr al th reetoes dealt wiA
roast beaf; bear steaks or bear
stews, but there was one for "bear-
k...M. Tt ..ma 4mm M Ti! CrilJ
burn of Kansas City,- Kan,- end ad
vised that the meat be ground
tip and barbecue uce added "if
it has : too much gamey flavor."
fOne of the most unusual came
from Mrs. C. A. rioeger, one 01 tne

LOOK (d D
u,:''sri;:-! ff' J
' .st jv- ft K

.n M J It Ml

':nh) i ',; ..A
1 1 ,L
.v. -V ,11, t.t c't r! x:
-f It I" !"
t. a 1 1 lA s u ;) f ""
-'- it 1 f 1 ;

rV, Me?he nM t the rrin,' Surrounded by corfulsptays, Both

""? 1 ".."

onaei'S'

vision telephone, there' e mes'
sage recorder and Jelficrjbj!r.aji
push-button dialing.
il jou ust wa"iatJ io get awa
from this rooni of marvels for
awhile,you- tan still eep-your
nana on tne wneei, tnanks to a
telephone signaling device you
Slip m'jyour pocket.-. This-en be
tuned to 'atart up- JO different,
oprrationsr; You telephohr home,,
put the device to, the mouthpiece mouthpiece-and
and mouthpiece-and aignal.eals to start cooking,.'
windows' to close or doors to, open1
to let the dog-out
fteiephone
'( ,. What tnore can you aske1-';
Si !&?.?;$,, -9,.:
Pittsburgh bear-eater. She ald
it should be -prepared like ? good?
old, Pennsylvania Dutch; sauer-t
braten Insert-bacort until- meat,
is. weUJarted on e)spickt'; as ,wa
caU, it," Then it 1 cooked with
wine, sugar, cloves, ,bayleve
(Steyepe more, rno less. J, onion,
black, eppereorn a n i lemoa
slices ff Wtths- all P thaty the pear ia
pretty ),: camouflaged.' t- 4

- ..... . . 1

Anoier,'jiovei -wayi ef ehefwg,
I1,? l5??Jl-'th festWWMrs.r,..i
w. B. Gibba of Marion? N.O who's,
been, preparing. Jjear lor hex fam-.

mr" yearsf aoe- aesb way to-.
rit'; i- to. lill.,-niost.. of .the
wild ,,taste. This Icaa Je done. by',.
pavbpiling .about-li op 21 min minutes
utes minutes 'just as you. do .pint beans."'"
And you all know how to parboil
pintp beans. .' :

. Anaong,tle. cookSf vhtf ..wtbte in, in,-jhpbiggeat;
jhpbiggeat; in,-jhpbiggeat; toatrovergy seems to to-be
be to-be what to. erya with bear, Mrs, i
Max.Xolbe pf Msuj: lUM says lev
serve jit with pkled crb apples,,
pnines ftuffed .with, cream heesej
cranberry jellyt orange, slice, but-;
(ered lima, beans, need potatoes
ajld pinlwnple sherbet!, ..'..-;

! -r w ',,
$6iWty,' Tenn. say fanjied yams
"are" as necessity," 'hot pepper rel;
ish waS' Invented to' serve with
bear meat;".' and also hdvisas side',
dishes of turnip and raisin salad,-1
applied takd twjth hone, 'glazed
earroi strips and hot 'southern bis''
COits vTna-de; With buttermilk;'' ;
j In other"- sectiop of' the coun 1
fry? nherltsa dlfTerehce of
opinion. Mrf'Hoeger-ith "lauer-'
braten lady frpm Pittsburgh says
rdiimplinfi fre' 'a must.'' 'Mrs,
Frank Kagemefr ttf WOouis,'
M..!is" all but- fob ibur cream, f
Another'" Pennsylvania corre-'
spondent f plumps fon sauerkraut,'
red 'cabbage and apple sauce.
Perhaps' the wisest Ma came
from j Mrs.f Glenn Rutherford 'of
Harirfislonr Ore.- What "Mrsr Ruth Rutherford
erford Rutherford does with ''her! hears ia
simpler than,.aH th marina'ting,

stewing, roasting, iryipg, parDou.
fuif:ad such, like-the-ether -sug.
eested.
'I take mv bear to. the local
not nmnanv M fsh urrltihv "anff
have smoked sausage made. Wo 1
have enjoyed them." ; )
I
v-i
,'JOY ZTA ZVi
''1 U e?"t)l
-ftrf

if-1



SH-.5AV, II"

'.T J?, 1V.J
f.l"M31T AMI
r.(.t his
and Oil i
Pa
tut

CONEY' ISLAND
RIDES THRILLS l l
Opens Daily at Curuntlu Fair Grounds
Week Nights 5 p.m. Saturday 11 ajn. Sunday 1 p.m.
Everybody Welcome Refreshments

natn.t
oaa.
icnvide
or
Jij Slafjers
it

:,

SPANISH AMBASSADOR, COXDESA DE RAEAGO :
HONORED BT 11R. AND MRS. ROBERT McGRATH 1
Mr, and Sirs. Robert R. McGrath, g,ve cocktail party last
eyenin at their tesidenre in El Coc del Mar in honor-of th

Rabago. The honoree s are. leaving .aoon.fpr, a new jsost in Bei-M

rut, Lebanon. ,.;, 4
On Tuesday,; the Fst Ladytof Panama, and President of
the Red Cros Mrs. Oiga A. de Atias, will award the Gold Medal-at
Merit 14 the Condesa of ttabago in recognition of the
semeee-eha M rendered 4th Panama Red Cres. -- 7-7;

Dr. and Mr. R.,.Whit 4 ; t
Due Friday, to Visit -,v-.v.,-j
CZ Dentel iociety t r .
ti Edward R. While, trustee
fnr fte Faurth Dental District of
the United. States, which, includes
the t'anar Zone Dental society,
will arrive ia Fanama Friday wb
his wife lor a rthree-day visit w"tj
the local society. The couple will
stay at the Hotel El Panama.
Df. White is past president -of
the New Jersey Dental Solely,
past 'firrt vice president of th A A-rnerican
rnerican A-rnerican Dental Society. a mem member
ber member bf the Legislative Committee
of the American Dental Associa Association
tion Association and consultant in all diagnos diagnoses
es diagnoses U.S. Veterans Administration.
He also holds honorary degree
of S.A.C.D. at Columbia Umversi Umversi-ty'ima
ty'ima Umversi-ty'ima t.E.I. at S.eton Hall V'nU' V'nU'-ersity,
ersity, V'nU'-ersity, So. Orange, N.J.'
Or, .White wilt speak and. pres present
ent present slides at a breakfast meeting
before the CZ. .Dental Society at
. the Tivoli Giiest "Hoiist next .Sa .Saturday
turday .Saturday at 10 a.m..
Mn. Bewdtn Ward
Henered At Reception
Mrs. Bowden D.- Ward, Nation National
al National President of the, American Le Legion
gion Legion Auxiliary, was honored Fri Friday
day Friday night at a reception held at
the Army-Navy Clubi Fort Amad Amador,
or, Amador, prior Jo her departure y ester-
Mrs. Ward arrived on the Isth Isth-muf
muf Isth-muf last Tuesday on n official
visit to the Department of the Pa Panama
nama Panama Canal Zone Legion Auxilia Auxiliary
ry Auxiliary She was the honored guest at
number of social events during
her five-day visit. V
Mr and Mrs. Gottlieb
Entertained
At Pinner :
Mr mmi Mr F.rnst Konn enter-
tained at dinner recently in honor
of Mr. and Mrs. Heiberr uouiieo
of Parkersburg, West Virginia.
The Gottliebs are house guests of
EabW and Mrs. Nathan Witkin.
The affair also honored Mr. "and
Mrs.' Leornard Gottlieb of Miami
Beach; Florida, and Clarksburg,
mh ffuast list included Mr. andl
Tiff knmAA QAUvmnn IVlfSE RU
Alh Friedman of Bentwood.
Tnntr tland. Mrs.
ana Rabbi and Mrs
tr?
Mr. and Mrs. Heffelfihoer
Feted At tarbeeue
Col, and Mrs. Willis E
Ij)rd
k, n r-,, ;
Nofre Dame Gets )

New Atom Smasherr""

' SOUTH BEND, Ind.(XTPJ A
doit-yourself project that s out of
the ordinary is rising in the Uni University
versity University of Notre Dame's science
hall.
Scientists Jiere are bullding a I,;
000,000-voit atom-smasner
increasingly powerful electrostatic
seneratori to be installed on the
campus -i' will be one of the
strongest radiation sources in the
world, the university said.
It will produce X-rays of high
Intensity and penetrating power of
500,000 roentgens per minute. The
mechanism will be housed in a 15 15-ton
ton 15-ton tank 32 feet long and eight
feet in diameter. Concrete walls)
and a roof 37 inches thick will pre-
vent radiation leakage. 1 t
)

Leek atomizer on a set 'of? well known perfume bottles not only
applies frserance, but assures no leakage. It's permanently fixed
n the. ten.. The bulb rotates from a locked position at the side

to the front, where itV read

-By-Af.lCIA HARTNKA Beauty Kdilor '.' '

K . t r .

gave a paibecue recently at their
residence in Bella Vista in honnr
of Mc. and.Mrs- WUiiam Heffell Heffell-iiiger
iiiger Heffell-iiiger vvha are returning to i'aje(-
tfvitle, Arlfapsas, ; after, i four
year, residence in Panama
Included with the InU' hnrtnr
guests were Capt., and Mrs., Grah
am 01 ueiray seacn, Florida, who
9 ho tho hmioa flnrtcfe in DinorM
of Miss Phoebe Harris. The Grah
ams are leaving me istnmus soon.
Mrs. Mercedes Smith
T Give Lecture
Mrs Mercedes Alegre Smith will
sbeak at the Balboa YMCA USO
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Her subject,
Costumes and Customs of Pana Panama,"
ma," Panama," is the first in a series of
weekly lectures on Panama to be
held- at the "Y." f
!Mrs. Smith will falk of the tia tia-tlonat
tlonat tia-tlonat costumes, such as the polle pollers
rs pollers montunof and chingo, and on
the history of Carnival and the
history of the dance. Costumes
will be on display and dancers
from the Professional School will
perform dances such as the tam tam-horito
horito tam-horito and Duntn. The series is
open to the public without charge.
Signal Officers' Wives
Club Hold Luncheon
The Signal Officers' Wives Club
held a luncheon at the Abroook Of
Bed-Ridden Giri
Learns By Phone
MONTOUR FALLS, N. Y. (UP)
. Spunky Alice Hager doesn't at attend
tend attend classes. But she's one of the
smartest students of the Montour
Falls grammar school.
The : bed-ridden girl, suffering
from a serious curvature of the
spine, has been keeping up with
her classes through a two-way
communication system set up be between
tween between her home and the school.
1 Thirteen-year-old Alice's : eighth
grade teacher, Mrs. Lela Potter,
reports that the two-way telephone
svstem tins nrnviHot nrlrlari inlnr.
"j - r m, ...
est in their studies for- the girl's
( from her bedside- telenhone: the

' UcherTceur460US yunSter V answers
k i y!JS J Fneri questions of her .teacher, and hears

dents. The invisible pupil also reads
ner classmates over xne fiager
- ; I 1 1
home grammar school network.
11 1 j 1 1 n . 1
uniooeiea Dottier
r n ex
BtfFFAI.n. NV f!'P So.
img isn't believing where unidenti
fied drugs are concerned. The face
may iook laminar, out it can t be
trusted unless the name is known
positively. .....
- Many a patient has gulped tab-
lets 1 from an unlabeled bottle only
to find out he has swa owed the
to find out he has swallowed the
wrong medicament. Consequences
can be serious, even fatal, warn
chemists of the Arner Co., drug
makers.
Rarely can a patient, or even a
doctor, tell what a medicament
contains simply by looking at it.
Once the original use has been for forgotten,
gotten, forgotten, unidentified drugs should be
thrown away. All unmarked drug
bottles and containers should be
cleaned out of medicine cabinets
at least once a year.
1
to spray. In thirteen frarrances.

'

firers Club last Wednesday. Mrs.
Wesley A. Glenn and irs.' Clif
ford T. Jackson were hostesses
at the monthly, eet-togetber. Wel
comed into the ftroup were- two
new members, Mrs. Jars J. kqs kqs-eell
eell kqs-eell and Airs. Alfred Bynum.
t Farewell were said to Mrs. R.
W. Watson and, Mrs. Trueman H.
Wifiinw 'bo .depart Jor the States
ia two weeks. The door prize of
three linen guest towels was won
by Mrs. Jasper- J Gonco. Special
guesU were Wis.- inurmao u.
Ward. Mrs.: Uiana u xsogie ana
Mrs Leland L. Woods, ; j
Uni!:n:S Sociely
Opens Series 01
Panel Discussions
; TVi TTnitartan Society is of-
ferlnr the second of a series of
panel discussions under tne pen-
ind Conference In the Liberal
Church" this mornin? at 10:30.
L: Caiman A. Batalden, astaln
pornfiinnnnff in liik unnri win
dr-Hno- bs moderator, and Mrs.
Leta Harmon, educator. Mis. C.
R. Bowen. psyc.Watrlc case work
er. Earl A. Meiioeiinau. civiuan,
and Army LL. Louis A. Kauf
man. :-' ,
1 Ills uwiiram"
on "two articles, published in
"The rhrlstian Resiater"; "Tecn-
ntcs of Constructive Controver
sy," by Malcolm s. K-nowies. eu?
ucatoy. and ?'Koaas-10 akicc akicc-ment.S
ment.S akicc-ment.S bv the economist, Stuart
rhnsfl. The overall theme as
sumes the premise that "comro-
,a.c chntilH Via norented as DO til
inpvithi and desirable, and
that "the causes of controversy
1 he determined, under
stood and dealt with." The spe spe-ifi
ifi spe-ifi itin "Will 'dodrine the
Issue' ever really hold a church
together?" may, ll time Termu5.
lead to consideration oj wider
Implications of problems of the
atomic age and the conclusion
that, "somehow! 'homo saniens
has to learn to get on with his
An lnvitaton is extended .to
ary Interested persons in the
Repubite ol Panama or the Ca Ca-noi
noi Ca-noi 7rtnp fn attend the meeting
and the J coffer' and discussion
T,i-inrt that -follows. The Unita
rian Center is located jn Ancon,
Puildinir ,362. Ancon eouievara
hetween -. Tivoli Avenue and
Frar.gipani "Street.-f
Politico! Chasm ;
mi MOINES.. Ia', -(UPKiMu'
nicipal Judge Don Tidrick and his
wife were addresfving ynnsimas
Uir2l xrnrf'tin was reidine the
narmes "and addresses from list
while hia wift wrote itbe.ni ;on, en-
"Mr and Mrs. Hiirryt .. ne
hppiin: Mrs. Tidnck wrote that
much before her husDana rena me
last name. She said she already
fc.,1 .inl a rtrA in tll COUD fi.
They uied to thin" to soma piper
trionric with the first name of
arrV' t0 sond it to but could
w k 'o( none wlu) had not already
J
l.n iolrM P9ra t.
wrru 'll 1 w
Sn fnr Christmas. iHaa. uemo-
A..t narfv s Truman 01 inn
nendenreMo.. received a ford
from lifelong Republican Tidnck.
iA facial
I faelfl mask ifoj- home use i$
I smoothed oh.ndrtes and is te-I
moved witli, eool water alter
1 Mpre" and.; more, faeiabi aw be being
ing being marketed for- home4 use. ,r ,t
f A new one is a pink product in
a flattish jar. It Is Bmoothed on
the face and dries from a deep
tink to a very light, pale one. It
Is kept on for about five minutes
and is then- rinsed off with- tool
Water. f,-,,
, This facial application, is ?, 4e-igned-.tp
tighjep the facial mus mus-eles
eles mus-eles and cause a tingling sensa sensation
tion sensation after it is removed.
1 The makers alse point out that
men may like it as an aftershave
finisher because of the same, ting tingling
ling tingling action, 1 -f.

mm m
' ::'.
I

CANAL ZONE USO and YMCA

ieejieral: U.S. Afmy Caribbean, afid discuss gome f the problems. in handling the YMCA 'and'
jUSO programs here, included atnohg the visitors is Misi Baring Morrison, overseas, director
'of the USOt who is spending a-week touring Canal Zone facilities. 'The callers, left to right ;
jinducle: Miss Dorothy Brickroan, .assistant, director of JWB-UgOj Eabbl Nathan' Wilkin;. Ar-
mold HodRson; director YMCA-U$0; Miss Morrison; McGarr, and;CIiaplain (Col.) If. F. Dono- ,'

van. usakuakib Chaplain.
; rv-
V i v
1 1 -
I -V -3"

" if- JSUw:t,wf'W ' '""j S ..iiiikwh A

1

if x ? 'V

MSGT. VEEN ON H. STOKES, First Sergeant of the 23d M P
Company at .Ft. Clayton; receives' the oath from Col, Arthur J.
gauser, Deputy Post Commander,' Ft, Clayton. Stokes Is one of
fifteen men from his unit !who recently reenlisted.
. '" V '. (U.S; Army Photo)'

Delicate Operation Restores
'..r-K'-n''';'--' r'r i--

SAN ANTONIO. Tex. '-TUP V-
The 35-yiar-old wie pf an airman
is learning, all over again wpat the
world .sounds like.
' Mrs. Helen Dodsort's hearing be became
came became defective .when she was a
child- At the age of eight her: par parents
ents parents were spanking her hecause
they thought she wasn't paying; at
tention. Her teachers thought sne
was backward; She finally gave up
achc-01. r A --V ';-" 1 '"i
Bv 1947. when she 'moved with
her parents to Wichita, Kan., to
work' in the "big Boeitig 'Aircraft
plant there, 'she was'aimot com
pletely deal.
' Two years laler she went to an
ear specialist for,lIie'jCir.tlnlc'.:He
found that a tiny bone, called, the
stapes, which-is supposed to trans transmit
mit transmit sound vibrations wa coated
wilh a hard deposit that prevented
it from vibrating.' : "'" v, ;
He said '' delicate operation
would restore her hearing but she
would have to go to New York or
California for the operatoin. v :
She couldn't afford that, so the
hnnffht a hearing aid.. Wilh It, she
could voices reasonably well' and
could' hear machinery 'near at
hand.
Thert she ; moved back to "San
Antonio. Two years', ago she' met
John Dod$on an Air Force .veter
an, and m July last year mey weru
.married He went .back t Into the
Air Forces 1 '
She went to doctbrs at Rahdhlpli
Air Force Base, Lt, Col. Ralph N.
Extra Year Brings:1;
2 Rutgers Degrees-
NEW RURNSWICrC;N.jj-fUP)
Usually the bright young- men
on the campus re long gdne when
their not-so-quick-to-eatch-on tlassr
mates are still struggling for their
degrees.1 But' not' so at Rutgers.
Under a new policy of the uni-
versity, the. lad; wwi tne mgni
Lq'.'s will wind up spending an I
extra year in the. ivy halls. How-j
ever, at the end of that time they'll:
walk off the platform with two 1
bachelor degrees : instead of the
usual; one. 1 v ? -i ( -i- j
- Some 37 members of the fresh-
man elasa enrolled last fall in the.
unique program under which
they'll be awarded degreesiin en-i
gineering and the- arts. The idea I
behind the program -is to produce 1
engineers with a broad background I
in the humanities and vice versa. 1
The program, now in its second!
year, is open to outstanding stu-i
dents with unusually broad apti-j
hides in both engineering and the 1
liberal, arts. About 56 students,
have enrolled so : far., I
. Otto C. Bender, who will be the!
first graduate under the new set-!
up,- will f face a unique- problem j
when r he attends the ceremonies
next June how to get in two lines!
to receive two degrees.? t I

J...:.-

;'- V V

leaders call upon Mat. Gn. Liohel C. :McGarr, cOmmandinc

-.f-.... -
- rvv7:j .'5rV
; ; ,S.'.
A s 1
- 1 V f
v: V
Kfaus, a "doctor In the school' of
aviation, medicine at. iKandolph
was one of two doctors tin the Air
Force j qualified to perform the
operation she needed.
Meanwhile, a Los Angeles sur surgeon,
geon, surgeon, Dr. .Howard House, had de developed
veloped developed a new technique that was
much neater and less painful than
the one commonly -used. It re required
quired required 'the 'insertion of a' pne'u
matie 1 instrument '4- much like a
tiny version of .an. air hammer
such as is used to break up pave pavementthrough
mentthrough pavementthrough the ear drum into
the ,-irin'er v vsf. This instrument
chips away the growth around the
Stapes. ....
One week before Mrs. Dodsnn's
husband took off for Newfound Newfoundland,.
land,. Newfoundland,. Kraus operated on her right
ear. When the local effects of the
Operation wore off, she was appal appalled
led appalled by the racket around her.
She was used to living in almost
complete silence. Now every foot footfall
fall footfall outside her room sounded
thunderously.
Just before Christmas the oper operation
ation operation was performed on her left
ea r. And for the first time the
sounds of the world came fully
alive to her.
"I can' hea? again!'' she w w-claimed.'Such
claimed.'Such w-claimed.'Such a wonderful feel feeling,
ing, feeling, hearing all the sounds that-1
hadn't known existed since early
childhood.";- ;

Wife

STARLIGHT BUFFET
. .. . .. .. from 7 p.m., 9th floor 1
' Treat yourself, your familpand Mends
to the sheer delight that is! found only in
this wonderful event! ,'
Superb food, 1ett music, and loveliest
....sf .views from thi Bella Vista Room or the
, . .. outside Terrace', ;
J Muiic for dancing by Clarence Martin's Orchtttra.
12M per person, Call Max, 3-1660 for reservations.
1

r T

the finest In nightly dinning and dancing ...
1 CLARENCE MARTIN'S ORCHESTRA
, In the alr-conditlonedj Bella Vista Room.

, HAlr.coX:
, plays the piano tonight from
', ' 10 to 2 a.m.
in tht Balboa Bar -(Alio
on Tuea., Wii, Thert.

A
, tu.s. Army fhotoi
. Each node far inclusion In thli
column should mbraittetf in lpr,
wriltfu form and nailed la one of
Urt box numlwrj liMrd daily So.
cialand OHwrswis,- r drMvcrcd
by h.nd to Iht oltlce. Katicn uf
nitelingi cannvt be-acxptd fc If It.
plivnt.
Tower ciub Meets
Tomorrow Night
j The 'Tower Club of the Cathe Cathedral
dral Cathedral nf 'St l.nl- u,;ifm
- - -.v wiii men lUIUUi
row evening at :30 in Bishop Mor-
uau uuuer me aiection of Mr.
Donald Musselman of the Balboa
High School Speech and' Drama
Department. Members have been
asked to call J'anama 3-6148 or
Panama 3-2765 for reservation,
for the catered supper.
Dr. Nichol Addrisi.j'
Cristobal Club Monday
A new film on ranrei- uritt h.
presented before the Cristobal
noman s uud tomorrow at 7 p.m
in conduction with a talk by C01
W. W. Nichol nf
iiuh members may bring guests
10 me meeting, ami there is no
Charge for the film and lecture to
be given at the Hid Cross Lounge
in Cristobal.
Caribbean Colles' Club
Will Meet Tuesday
The regular meeting' of Ihe Ca Caribbean
ribbean Caribbean College Club will be held
at the Red Cross rooms is Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal af 7:30 pnV. Tuesday. As- Ihe
Uleratuje, study group has charge
of the program for" this meeting,
Mrs. O. D. CheeTcwill give a talk
on "Panama Three H u n d r e d
Years Ago,!' and will illustrate
her: talk with musical records,
maps una sxeicnes. ....--
'"Membership ;ln the Caribbean
College- Club is open to; anyone
wno nas successluily completed al
least one" year, or its equivalent.
Of college' study.
Rotary Altar Society
T Meet Tuesday
The regular monthly meeting of
tne jnosary Altar society of the
Sacred Heart Chapel in Ancon will
pe held Tuesday at 7:30 p.m..' All
members have been utged to .at
tend since important business will
he taken up.
Refreshments will be served by
Mrs. Molly Edmondson and Mrs:
Maria Meriwether.
Business Venture
pays For Studies
VERMILLION, S D. (UP) -Here's
a different slant on the
"work your way through college"
angle.
' Wynn A. Gunderson a junior and
business major at the University
Of South Dakota, operates and
owns the ''..Clothing Cupboard, a
men's store her?. The shop, which
is only 24 feet wide and 27 feet
deep, is styled after a 1 old English
tailoring shop.
for Sunday
entertaining.
nothing belter
than our
mum
A Klrkeb; Hotel

it .vm

' ia Tin aaj" I J

First-
comes

Most satisfying amongst good Scotch
UTiiskies fs "Black & White" with a
tradition for extra quality that makes it
the first choice of the connoissvur.V

Disiilled and Bottled in Scotland

(II
!l

SCOTCH WHISKY
1

- K'H VI .) V klMI liMillM iOM .....
tAHiS aUCHANAN CO. LTP.. CtAIOOW. ICOTIAN vvv.
DISTKIBIITOR:
( AGENCIAS We H. DOEL, S. A.
: CENTRAL AVE; 8.28 ,: "V. TEL -2-2.771

Hive your iires
retreaded the
7ire$fone
. Factory
..'MctW.Waylv
- 0 New Tire Safety
Thorough tir inspec inspec-'
' inspec-' tion before and after
retreading.
Firestone Retreads
Give you same HIGH
QUALITY tread mate-
' rial as new tires!
7
AUTOMOBILE ROW 39
FR-129S-29

'. I.V.. :

".it

Quality
w
JL
rtt
1
13
'
for
v6.70 x lS
A
t i
Uil u
J ; TEL. 3-4564'
i,..''.

eajfva-r

. r
f

:
71



YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 15 DIFFE.1EHT LOCALITIES U THE CITY

H It!?' 1
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA

t II i
LIBRERIA PRECIADO LOURDES PHARMACY LEWIS SERVICE HOUSEHOLD EXCHANCE FARMACIA EL EATURRO
y BUNDITJM ;.N.-;. ... M U tataa-nttta Ave, Ttrall No. 4 J. So do ta At Ne. 41 farqae Lefevre I Street
n Agendas Internal, da Publicacionet FARMACIA LOMBARDO FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDC3 f FOTO DOMY FARMACIA "SAS"
rUK Xe t Lattery rtai e. K Stre 4 Ml tMl imn frh nmraaina Ait. Ml n ML i renae m
12 WORDS CASA 2X100 MORRISON FARMACIA LUX FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS NOVEDADES ATHIS
x. v, Crtl Am 41 . . iO a JaJ; Ave aW t Ceeel imM (I stnel Ne. IS : 7 J V KnaSa An, ;

lal4ld.lUIAVe.(a)
, FOR 4
12 TOILD3 h
i

COMMERCIAL 0

PROFESSIONAL
., CANAL tOHt POLYCLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
Dr. C. t. Mbren p.
D D-S. (Georgetown University) M-D
Tlvell (4th of July) At, He. AM
(opposite Aikwh School PIyroid)
TL S-ZOU Panama.
' RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM RIDGE
rbone Panama 2-0532
TRANSFORTK IAXTIR. S A.
Packan Shippers Moyn
sjJ-1451 2-256 V
learn Riding at
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding ft Jam ', "'W
1 ft 5 p.m. '-0279
er by ppoinfmenf.
"We ihapa Tour Figure"
BODY-REDUCING
famous VteLtvj Machine
Swedish Messaje Steam Bata
(or male and female
0RTEPEDIA NACI0NAL
(Dr. Scholia)
St Juste Aroaamena f t-TSiJ
HARMETT & DUNN
I I ROOM DANCE STUDIO
"TEACHES UNTIL VOl) LEARN"
Balboa: 1-423 at raa.t S-U64
Studio El Penama Hotel
Dog and Cat
CLINIC
Cille 40
No. 2-66
Tel. 3-1902
j LOOK
You Can Now, Buy Auto Auto-mobile
mobile Auto-mobile Insurance by, tele telephone.
phone. telephone. Immediate Cover Coverage.
age. Coverage. Dial Panama 2-5000
FRED HUDDLESTON.
Save on direct shipment
iTop quality fishing
equipment
il V10LETTE SUPPLY
SERVICE
' Panama 3-6818
Number Of College
Degrees Declines
W ASmNC.TON fTIP i- The
number of students earning college
, Jegrees in 1954-w aroppea oy
more than 4,000 from the previous
arnrlpmif vaar
'.'The nation's colleges and tint
versiues granted 354,443 earned ae-
srei rlnrinff 1954-55," reOOlted
S M: Brownell. commissioner of
education in the Depsrtment of
Health, Education and weuare.
Bachelor and- first professional
Acrfrm amniintpH to S87.401 durind
the. past academic year, compared
to 292,880 such degrees in law-ai.
Men received 183,602 bachelor de de-nut
nut de-nut in 187.500 in, 1053-54.
The number awarded to women
toUled 103,799 as against 105,380
inTJ53-54. ,
ttnui.u.r th 'afpond level ae-
erees master and second profes-
siorai rose irgm oo,o cumcu
by both men and women in 1953-54
icq mi th onmmissioner satd.
W ,J,w-.,
Doctorate degrees dropped from
,9tS to 8,840, but the number of
women earning aocwrsw c6im
increased ffom axa 10 m.
iMrORTANT CROUP OF
MIDWEST BUSINESSMEN
AND INDUSTRIALISTS TO
AKKIVb IN rANAIVlA IWAi
An important group of
businessmen from Kansas City
currently making ft tour of
Bouth America with Pan Amer American
ican American and Panagra, will arrive
in Panama on February 19th.
Many members of the group
have important business inter interests
ests interests throughout South America
and are making this trip to
click these interests and ln ln-ves'.'gate
ves'.'gate ln-ves'.'gate the possibilities for
future investments. The morn morning
ing morning .following their arrival they
win- be received by His Excel Excel-lerv,
lerv, Excel-lerv, President Ricardo M.
Ari..i Tr.r-at"the Presldencla.
Thy will continue their trip on
Fe!;:aary 22nd bound for Mex Mexico..'
ico..' Mexico..' : ' Advt

FOR SALE

Automobiles
FOR SALE: 1 953 Mercury it it-dan,
dan, it-dan, $1300. Phene 2-3762.
FOR SALE : 1950 Chevrolet 4 4-doer
doer 4-doer sedan, excellent condition
powerglide, radio, heater, new
lira; brakes ana' peworglide
overhauled in 1955; motor re reconditioned
conditioned reconditioned January 1956. Phone
Albrook 4226. Quartan 69, Al Albrook.
brook. Albrook. v
FOR SALE: 1952 Studobaker
Cemmander 2-door, radio, heat heat-ar,
ar, heat-ar, good tirai. Prica $700. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone Kobba 224t.
FOR SALE: 1953 Hillmaa
Minx 4-deor, duty paid, perfect
condition. Juan Pucci, Phone 41
ar 198, Colon.
FOR SALE. 1953 Studabakar
Cornmandar hardtop, all extrai,
including five monthi insurance.
Pricad for quick sale Phone
Balboa 3425.
FOR SALE: 1955 Ford ferdor
fedan, two-tone, ww tirei. Last
than 6 monthi eld. Below local
value. Leaving for States. 3-4179
Panama.
FOR SALE: 1953 duty paid
Oldimobile, automatic transmis transmission,
sion, transmission, powar brakes, shaded glass,
radio, wsw tires. Can be fi financed.
nanced. financed. Call Panama 3-4870.

Memphis Censor Is Sidelined;

Everything Real
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (UV
Lloyd Binford, who caused blood
pressures to rise in Hollvwood
during 25 years as chief movie
censor here, is on the sidelines
today and with him has gone the
idea of "personal censorship,"
The 89-year-old Binford battled
Hollywood studios with words and
legal papers in his crusade against
movies to which he variously at
tached such words as vile, jecter
ous, licentious and filthy -t"
But last fall Memphis elected a
new mayor, Edmund Qrgm, and
Binford announced that he would
not accept reappointment as
chairman of the censor board.
The handwriting was on the wall,
Orgill wouldn't have renamed him.
(Jrgni named a special commit
tee which said that censorship in
Memphis is "not needed,"
Binford, whose caustic com
ments on films started the "ban
ned in Memphis" advertising slo slogan
gan slogan for the movies, even changed
his ideas some in his last days as
censor chairman.
The man who once said be
looked "not for the good movies
but for the bad ones" and who saw
his censor's role as a means of
"protecting" children said he
didn't think strict regulations were
needed. y -j
'I think the censor board has
been a very liberal one in the last
six months," Binford said as he
stepped down from his job.
In vears oast Binford automat
ically had banned movies involv
ing Ingrid Bergman ana inarue
Chaplin because he didn't approve
of their private lives.
"SadistiCr unmoral and immoral"
was the way he labeled "Strom "Strom-boll,"
boll," "Strom-boll," a film starring Miss Berg Bergman..
man.. Bergman.. -.-- i
Of "Duel In the Sun, which
' L'.A Slmvt.U!. .'.v

TIME OUT FOR MOTHERThese four puppies may end up
cackling instead of barking, and it wouldn't surprise owners Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Browne of Nashville, Mich. For the pups have
been "adopted" by the Rhode Island hen shown with them. Shs
moved in on the pups three weeks after they were born, and

-4h. pups' mother dida'tmiada bitae's aaard
nsmorl 'R. la an4 whan ,k.'. lfllHn k

tlons she romps in the fields while the hen "puppy-sits

FOR RENT

Apartments
ATTENTION C. 1.1 Just built
modern furnished apartments, I.
2 bedrooms, hot, cold we tee.
Phone Penant 3-4941.
FOR RENT, Modern two-bedroom
apartment, living-dining
room, maid's and laundry roomy
screened, hot water. Far further
details please call: 3-4946 r
3-6737.
FOR RENT. Unfurnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, two bedrooms, two baths,
maid's room, sitting-dining room,
porch, garage, $100. At Bella
Vista, N. Obarrie Street No. 23.
See Oe Castro, Avenue "B" No.
9-42. Phone 2-1616 Panama
f OR RENT. Nicely furnished
apartment including refrigerator,
porch, parlor-dining room, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, kitchen All screened.
Tiled. $60. Apply 112 Via Bali,
sario Porras, near Roosavelt The Theater.
ater. Theater. FOR RENT: Penthouse apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 2 bedrooms en the sixth
floor of the 'Cja da Ahorros"
building, en the corner of Cen Central
tral Central Ave. and "I" Street. Phone
2-0720.
FOR RENT: Furnished studio
apartment. Also room with pri private
vate private bath and entrance. Suitable
far bachelar. El Carman, Avenida
Primera No. 77, opposite rice
track.
Peaceful Now
Hollywood called a western with
stark realism, Binford had opined
"It is stark murder. It is stark
horror; It is stark depravity. It is
stark filthy."
One critic said that if Binford
had his way, he d censor gals on
a windy day."
.Binford once refused to permit
a private showing of ."Lost Boun
daries for Memphis ministers,
The mayor s new committee,
which called for an end to cen
sbrship, urged that moves be la labeled
beled labeled for "adult only" or "family"
audiences, with no actual censor censor-shin.
shin. censor-shin. i'T believe there should be some
mild form of censorship. Binford
said. . ..
The committee said that under
Binford the Memphis censor board
had become one of the two most
powerful censor boards in the na
tion. The Atlanta board was com
pared with the Memphis board in
the report.
In the past years, Binxora turned
thumbs down on many movies
dealing with the racial issue, too
much crime, juvenile delinquency,
and anything considered "inimical
to the public safety, health, mor
als or welfare."
Binford once said the Mempms
law didn't spell out sufficiently
just what was inimical to morals,
Akiv that the law didn't provide
fnr "adult nlv" showihes, al
though by agreement .that was
done with the movie, "Blackboard
Theaters lust across the Mis
sissippi River from here may find
th eninir roueh now. Any mm
turned down by Binford automat
ically played across tne river un un-der
der un-der that slogan "Banned in
Memphis."
But things aTe different now.
i

FOR SALE

Household
FOR SALE Steinway cornel
spinerr with beating element,
$200. Kebbo 6244.
FOR SALE: 25-cyclo Frigid Frigid-aire,
aire, Frigid-aire, good condition, $50., misc.
dishes, fcitchenwaree, cleaning
eauipment. etc. Apt. lll-D t
call 12-5266 Cambea.
GeoinpMc Briifs.
WASHINGTON Worcester.
Mass., whose industrial career be
gan in 1685 with a gristmill, has
produced inventors who revolu revolutionized
tionized revolutionized manufacturing around
the world, the National Geograph
ic oocieiy says.
Eli Whitney built the cotton fin.
and pioneered mass production:
Elias Howe patented the f i r s t
lock-stitch sewing machine; Eras Eras-tus
tus Eras-tus Bigelow invented a power car carpet
pet carpet loom.
The first American piano wire
came from a Worcester mill. The
city originated the steam calliope,
the street lunch cart and some
day, the first Valentine greeting!
cara in me united States.
Both lacrosse and a forerunner
game known as tokohhon (stock.
ball), or shinny, flourished anions
American Indians long before the
coming of the whHeman, the Na Na-coming
coming Na-coming of the white man. the Na-
out in a new book on Indians of
both North and South America.
Djakarta, capital of Indonesia.
is bursting at the seams with
more than 2V4 million people. It
is grievously short of h o u s i n a.
Most homes are shared by at
least 2 families.
The kilts worn by the famous
Evzones of Greece sometimes con contain
tain contain more than 40 yards of mate material.
rial. material. A tasseled cap, braided jack
et, leggings and red shoes with
black pompoms complete ,,the
warrior's outfit.
The island of Mauritius in the
Indian Ocean was the home of the
extinct dodo bird. Although the
island is British, it was named for
a Dutch; prince. The, majority of
the people are Hindu and Mos
lem, but they speak a F r e n c h
patois. v
The town of Ribe, Denmark,
was famed in medieval times for
its "code of Justice." tinder the
code women were given preferen
tial treatment. One ruling was, "a
woman who has stolen and is sub subject
ject subject to be hanged, shall, instead,
be buried alive because she is a
woman."
Fresh sheep blood mixed with
flour makes a raw pudding prized
by the Sherpas of the Himalayan
regions v
Catania, second city of Sicily. Is
built on nine layers of lava poured
out by Mount Etna. Three are
prehistoric, the last as recent as
1669. Modern eruptions nave not
reached the city, although several
flows have nearly touched it.
Burrows due by armadillos oc
casionally hold strange neighbors.
One in Texas housed the digger
in his den at the end, while a
four-foot rattlesnake and a cotton cottontail
tail cottontail rabbit used side chamgers.
The maole syrup industry each
year brings millions of dollars to
Vermont, xsew xoric,. Wisconsin
and other states. An average tree
vields 15 to 20 gallons of sap,
which boll down to a little more
than a quart of syrup.
Florist Gives Out
Number Of Rival
HASTINGS. Mich. (UP)
If florist Chip St Martin has a big
increase in business In 1956, he
can thank florist Harm Wilcox, his
only competitor in this central
Michigan community. i
Wilcox had a number of nerson
alized calendars made up to send
to his customers at Christmas. Af After
ter After he had mailed them all out, he
noticed they had the wrong tele-
pnone numoer.
Wilcox made a quick check and
discovered that the telephone num number
ber number on the calendar; belonged to
St Martin. -Wilcox Said hc; does
nearly 75 per cent of his business
by telephone.
Firing RangeTests
Arms For Aircraft
BUFFALO. N.Y. -OJPJ- Cor
nell Aeronautical Laboratory Inc..
is going ahead with plans to build
an underground firing tange for
researcn on aircraft smau arms
and ammunition.
The 1000-inch range is being
constructed under a contract with
U.S. Army ordnance and is ex
pected to be ready for use in six
months. :
Airrilntf ti PAT. Affiniola''
range will be used to study inter
nal, external and terminal ballis
".7"" Um mtVUAO
tics of guns and small rockets
investigate the aerodynamic and
stability characteristics of nroiec-
tile bodies at supersonic speeds,

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
OX 2031, ANCON, CJL
10X 1211. CRISTOBAL. CX
FOR SALE
miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Pian,, tmat
r medal. Ideal far smalt apartment.
3r4 af November Street, House
N. 3-91, Ream dawrrttairs,
Paaanta.
FOR SALE: Airplane 415-C
5-hp. Erceupe, A-l cendftien.
Owned by aircraft mechanic.
Bargain for ejuldt sale. Minahart,
Colon Airport, Phone 1414.
FOR SALE: Cocker Spaniel, J
years eld, blende female, $30.
Call Cambea 6-203 after t p.m.
WANTED
Apartments
ARMY OFFICER and wife (n
children) want furnished apart apartment
ment apartment for a few months only.
Better section. Room 256 Tlveli
Guest House. Balboa 2-2111.
Switzerland's

Trade Makes Big Gain In 55

e ZURICH --(UP) The value of
uwiss waicn exports -for 1955 is
expected to surpass the 1954 figure
of 1,039,916,000 francs ($242,924,378)
by at least 50,000,000 francs
($11,680,000).
Statistics 1llf rMsaeavt ktn,
by the end of November 1955, the
Swiss watch industry already had
waicnes, watca parts and
movements w n r t h on
frn"j225-798'512). Increase
v a,oiu,3a8 irancs ($8,087,362)
over the figure for the correspond corresponding
ing corresponding 11 months of 1954.
cincre,s.? ums In the United
States, the statistics revealed,
made onlv a at rht .nf -l
r...: tc -, O"- wvub ui. UIC
.r waicn xPOs to- that;
The United States still heads the
-,S.LSr Swlfs "tch1 clients, with
yu. vuin 'totaling 271,864,851
irancs (163,507,629 This figure
viuj (,iau,4ui irancs
$1,810,494) below the November.
1954 mark. -
, Swiss watch experts, although
"most satisfied" with the way
watch exports developed in 1955,
are still "gravely concerned" with
the situation on the American
market and fear, "further Ameri American
can American measures to .restrict free
trade."

Show Celebrates 76 Years
Of Help To 300 Teenagers

BUFFALO. N.Y. UP) Ten
years is a long time to keep a teen teenage
age teenage weekly radio show alive, but
me man who dreamed un Buffaln'a
popular "Hi-Teen Time sava tn.
day that nt was well worth the
enon even though our ingenuity
was taxed a bit at times."
William Schweitzer, nroeram di
rector oi WEtJK, Buffalo, can look
back with a great deal of pride on
nis Brainchild. An uncertain fledg fledgling
ling fledgling when it started as a fun.
dance and music party for teen teenagers
agers teenagers on Jan. 19, 1946, it survived
many a rough period and grew Into
a real audience matcher on other
rvise "dead". Saturday afternoon
periods.
Moreover, It provided whole i
some fun for .teen-agers and or
ganized their energies behind
many a needy project f
Three men are responsible for!
the program's rise Schweitzer
who mixes a fine sense of pro promotion
motion promotion with his executive duties;
Cy King, then manager of :WEBR
and noW executive editor of the
Courier-Express, Buffalo's morning
newspaper, and impresario Bob
Wells, a music teacher and flute
player.
"I believe we have contacted
some 300,000 kids from the Buffalo
area during those 10 years,"
Schweitzer said, "and I', feel the
show has been a good influence on
practically all of them.
"We collected money for ; the
March of Dimes polio campaign,
food for Europe in the post-World
War II days,' and contributed eight
collapsible wheel chairs for the
Buffalo Crippled Children's Guild,
These came from the voluntary
contributions of the teen-agers who
attended our dance parties. I don't
think there is a single community
drive that we haven't plugged for
or collected for in all those years.
me show s first anniversary.
Jan. 1947, Schweitzer recalled that
he put the show in Buffalo's mas
sive Memorial Auditorium for one
performance.
it was the only time we
charged admission," he said. "The
kids paid 25 cents a head to get in
and we give them $5 worth of
entertainment i You know, we
jammed that auditorium -with 10,-
000 children and contributed the
profits to the March, of Dimes fund
drive that year."
At the moment, "Hi-Teen Time"
is working, a new gimmick, to col-

RESORTS

Shroeoel'a hnkM
fceech t Santa CJeaa. TelepbeM
l hemoea, Balbee 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. On mne
Ims Casino, Lew rates. Pbee
Balboa) 1166.
PHILLIPS OceensJd Cattagaav
Sante Oam. Bex 435, Balbeak
fbeaie PanaPM i-1177. Crrate Crrate-M
M Crrate-M a-1673.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENTi Coal furnished
room for gentleman, near Ancen
Post Office. Phone 2-3020.
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
FOR RENT: For efficH. the
jend end fourth fleers of the
Caa da Ahorrea'' building, car car-nar
nar car-nar of Ctntral Avenue and "I"
Street. Phene 2-0720.
Watch Export
Such steps, they said, would be
most unjust in the case of Switzer Switzerland,
land, Switzerland, as this country, with only
5,000,00g Inhabitants, purchased
Americaff goods worth $175,200,000
uiuuig me utsi u months of 1955
The United States, with a nnriitla.
tion of 162,500,000, purchased Swiss
goods worth onlv SIM mo onn
. "rthwmore,. they added, whUe
omumnna increased its imports
from the United States in the first
11 months of 1955 over the similar
1954 period, Swiss exports to the
United States dropped.
While the sale of watches to most
aouin ana central American coun countries,
tries, countries, with the exception of Bolivia,
Chile, Cuba, Peru and Argentina,
alSO Showed a downward tr.nH
this jwas offset by increased sales
to European, African and, Asian
Total sales to tnrnnaott mm.
tries jumped from 276,692,279 (m)
francs v($64,635,316) for January January-November.
November. January-November. 1954. to Sffi.ru urn fm
francs ($69,433,980) for January-
nuvcuiuer. aaoa.
Sales to Asian mtmtrtae fti.ij.
ing the near and Middle East
went up from 152,881,142 francs
($35,113.0351 to 169.O0A.1fil Irani..
iej,4eu,wu;.
lect funds for the ,1956 polio cam campaign,
paign, campaign, a girls' popularity contest
among 70 Erie Countv hi oh
To vote, each student must
deposit 10 cents with a ballot in
sealed boxes set up at schools.
corn or a desire to rnmhst in.
venile delinquency "Hi-Teen Time"
opened in a U.S.O. club on Buf Buffalo's
falo's Buffalo's Niagara Square, moved into
Kleinhans Music Hall, the Elks
Club and finally came to roost in
puduc ballroom which it rents
entirely each Saturday afternoon.
teen-agers must dress and act
properly or they are not members
of the club for long. Smoking in
the building and wearing 1 dunga dungarees
rees dungarees are taboo. Boys must wear
ties and girls skirts.
f "We've 1 had fashion shows to
stimulae better dress among the
youngster s, Schweitzer said.
xes. i reel we nave had some
good influence on those sho stayed
wnn us.
Helicopter Needs
Government Boost
CHICAGO (UP) The hell-
copter will never be able to com compete
pete compete with surface carriers as a
means of public transnortation
without government assistance, ac according
cording according to Fred MvGlass, director
of aviation for the Port of New
xork Authority.
Helicopter service "wirf virtual virtually
ly virtually price itself out of the market."
if it is required to be completely
self-sustaining,, he explained in an
article in the Northwestern Uni
versity Journal of Air Law and
Commerce.
Glass predicted,' however, that
government aid will be forthcoming.-;
, v v .:
He predicted that the aero-cab
market probably will develop first,
followed -shortly by intercity serv
ice and somewhat later by sub
urban operations.
"The helicopter must struggle for
public acceptance," Glass said. "It
is not unreasonable to except a
period of at least 10 years before
it can attain a reallv substantial
pia:e in the transportation pic-

FOR SALE
Real Estate

OONT MISS this eppartanfry:
New country borne et the meat
beautiful aite in Dolaga, ideal
dimate: Three bedreems, dining
". living roam, kitchen,
Pjrch, ektctricrry, 6800 metw
level Und, ideal for tennis
cea)rt, etc. Beautiful lampe
Q-inke" type. 20 miles from
David. Phene 3-3940, Martina
Esa.ufvel de Peugher, last 30th
Street 4-29 ar Garde de Parades
family, "Villa Naaareth," Dele Dele-ga.
ga. Dele-ga. Province of Chiriqui.
Wanted to Buy
WILL PURCHASE yeur business
for cash. Businesses with proven
income will be beught far cash
from $10,000 to $100,000
available. Submit yaur propoei propoei-tien
tien propoei-tien glring details te Bex PS PS-134,
134, PS-134, Panama American.
WILL PURCHASE for cash yeur
income property. Real estate with
proven income. Write Bex ER ER-134,
134, ER-134, Panama American.
i' V
s.
- t
... V
2

FRANK G. MILLARD (left), general counsel to Department of
the Army, talks with Maj. Gen. Lionel c. McGarr, commanding;
general, U. a Army Caribbean, during a oneway tour of Army
Installations in the Canal Zone vfsterday. Millard visited -the ;
Jungle Warfare Training Center, and the USAICCARIB School
during his tour.
v (U.S. Army Photo)

BRIG. GEN. JAMES B. BUR WELL, deputy chief of staff, opera,
uons, Headquarters Continental Air Command, is shown beine
greeted by Col. E. W. Napier, (right) deputy commander, Head Headquarters
quarters Headquarters Caribbean Air Commandupon arrival at Albrook Air'
Force Base, yesterday. Burwell Hew to Albrook to negotlaU
agreements with Caribbean Air Command officials reeardlni.
, reserve training flights in this area
- (Official USAF Photo)

Relics 01 Girc::b
h II. Y. Ccl!:cl!:3
v EAST OTTO, N.Y. (UP) The
bow, quiver and cap of the once
mignty Apache chieftain, Geron Geron-imo,
imo, Geron-imo, are proud possessions in the
home of Mrs. William Maier here.
A former resident of St Louis,
Mo.. Mrs. Maier recalls family
tales of Geronimo's reign of terror
in New Mexico and Arizona in the
1880's, his final capture and death
in prison at Fort Sill, Okla.
Her father. Albert Ruemmeli, a
midwestern industrialist traveled
the old Oklahoma territory a great
deal and purchased a large part of
tne Maier Indian collection in 1903
from Sam Strauss, a trader at Fort
Sill. Mrs. Maier has carefully pre preserved
served preserved the original bill of sale.
ine largest item in the collection
is a battle head dress five to six
feet long. There also is a full bead
ed Sioux vest weighing almost five
pounds. Apache toys, a fan made
from eagle feathers, beads of ante-

FOR RENT;,;
Iloases )

FOR RENT.-Twe-bedreent cha chalet,
let, chalet, living-dining roam, garage,
maid's room with aortic, ail
screened. Traneisthmias) High
way. Phene 3-1275 or 3-3141.
FOR RENT: The perfect bom
for family with children. Throe
bedreems, two) bathreome, big
farderi, small peel, barbecue,
rancha. ate. lairiui aaiahba.a
B. -A. I CKA t
n."M fiww mviuaina wrar anoi
gardener. Phone 3-2079.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalett
Living-dining room, twe bed-
rooms, kitchen, bathreenv CaH
3-5542 fat infermatien rrem 5 i'
p.m. t 7 p.m. ; I1
LOST b FOUND
LOST Dog, white rith light -brown
, markings on head and
ears with few light markings en
body. Tag number 2883. Phone)
Navy 2253, 2275 at 2221. Re Reward.
ward. Reward. ,;, ; -? 7
f .3
J
More Pearl Divers
Needed By Aussies
DARWIN (UP) More Japs-"
nese pearl divers are needed in
Australia.
Darwin's leading pearler, N.
Paspaley, said pearl production
alone the Wpst ii.ctroii.
been increased more than 50 per
cent since Japanese divers were al allowed
lowed allowed back into Australia last
muiic auer neing Darren as a re result
sult result of World War IL
- A total of 161 Japanese divers
are now WOrktnir th uratere in th.
vicinity of Darwin and Broome.
rine Japanese divers have
given the Australian pearling in industry
dustry industry a new lease on life." ha
said, "but we need more of them.
There are still many untouched'
pearl fields off the Australian
coast All we need are the divers"
to work, them."
IiriTTT'lrCCLlI. TOWUOT' IIU1 HBiarUIJTbTsm
I an, ntinri n isrnf'itM 4aaaa aaaal aiL ..
articles are in the collection.

V



i f
1 1
trti in
1 IV 0 LI
35c. 20c.
Resortes in
"SOT IN OOLFO"
Also:
Marga Lorez In:
DE CARNE
SOMOS"
Spanish program
lu;:
68c.
"
Sic
CniVH-i:! TI::::rd.::
!c. 39c.
a m In SuperScope and ; Technicolor
t'Z 5 . ... 1
Ralph MEEKFR : ; V
Maria ENGLISH
J. Carrol NASH In:- v ;-
DESf XT SAHCrS;
;.iiii:AiRt.
R I O
Double i:i
V C 7 OR I A
"TWO
GOOD
PICTURES'
. .......
v,-
i i km i
S;e iOc.
. In Yav'olon ard
rv....:d
Bob Kone in:
"THE SEVEN LITTLE
FOTS
Plus
Dane Clark in :
BLACKOUT'
55c.
6Dc. SOc.
Week End release
Robert Mitchum Jan Sterling In:
"MAN WITH THE GUN"
A man -who lived and breamed vio violence...
lence... violence... his gun was for sale... and
so ... was his life...!
Shows: 1:16, 3:10, 5:04, ( 51, 1:51
Mc.
Z'c.
33c.
The favorite of the public
ra.-Mra fT..rrycX
i !.: .'J.uay
Joan EINNjs.IT in:
"There's Alwcys Tomorrow"
All of his life... she had been
"the other woman"
1:15, Ml, 5:24, 1:57, S;5S
CinemaSccpe
TONY CUHT2S In:
"THE fURfU MASK"
" 1 in technicolor
. Also the best comedy of ha
, famous. mule:
FRANCIS JOINS pHE NAVY'
Marlon Brando in-
"DESIXEE"
Also: ; :
Victor Mature In:
"VIOLENT
SATURDAY"

fit

: :rU

Ifibbsr WcGees; Say They're Bored With All;
liiMova!rtieyerlbirfedrO Being A Star...

r
i
I 1 f t '
KIM ZNOVAKj. "I learned to
' eipect the Went Xrom men."
I 0 0 ?-'.-x
" .. . "A "''
FIBBER McGEE AND MOLLY:
iC50e
i -. n r.

'it;lW yORK:'-4" One' of thd hatdest working people In the
gsw.Yoii theatre is Hry orr, an actress who appeared In "The
esptrate HoW tor only one 'scene which' lasted six minutes.
Buvbefore she eten appeared in that scene, Miss Orr -reveals
she had already done a good" part 6f her night's work,

Because she understudied "Nancy
Coleman,, one of the leads in tbe
ply In-' addilion1! playing her
own role, Miss Orr 'got to the thea thea-tM
tM thea-tM each' night1 ntore than half an
hourf before cuftail' time, g h e
spared- her arassing 'room' with
another actress, Patty'- Peardorf;
who .was onstage right from the
start of the play.. Once JUiss Peard Peard-on
on Peard-on had left thejdressirig rqomfc Miss
Orr was left alqn for an hour
apd i quarter.. tv5.-r
-"Being in; a theitrical aresing
room i while -the show is en down
below is like foating in a-space ship
in the stratosphere"," r Miss Orr
says." 'You're 11: by yourself in
yeur own i world jftid ire1 able to
sleep, jerchanoefo-dream, or,' as
in. my case; to swrite'. to e i r
heart a ontent.'fA jr.-. -rv
Miss Orr's writing career began
when she was in a play called
"The Wife Takes a Child."
-J'We wer trin out In Boston,"
she recalls, "and-I had a vague pre-monition-
that the censorious city
was as far as the wife would erer
take that child. However, the' play
did reach Broadway in another
version tailed 'Three's a Family'
but by that time my part had
been written out and I wasn't in
it Instead I' was In 'a play' of my
own called' 'Wall-flower,' the first
act ; of which had 1 been written
while I was waiting for. cues dur during
ing during the two-week tryout' of "'The
Wife Talces a Child' in Boston.
,-),-. - ? 1
, ( 1 Noodlod 1
"The jeason I had embarked -on
such a hazardous undertaking was
thiTT' Durirf retisarsals of T h e
Wife'Ihad timidly- suggested 'a
change. in, the, script to tlia author.

C ,w ... J
! JL

1 iJmyrrmrTi

By DICK
NIW YORK
(NEAT 5- Ma

McGee ;and' Molly ttf yon -i-' my be coming to TV. The had
their first trio to New York la six years and spent ten minutes

iflf their precious two weeks conferring with NBC brass. (Much

of the rest of the tlmej poor Manoirspem m xta wimv case oi

-food
poisoning.) t ,. ; ....
, "We're Iwred," ,Molly' said. f
':jWe don't Have enough tc a,"
said Fibber. "We do this ., 15 15-minuttt,
minuttt, 15-minuttt, f ive-a-week radio show
for NBft But we do it in two
weeks -then we hav two weeks
elf. Ni if we 4eould try TV- on
a once-a-month basis, on Mm ."
'"Nobody knos us any more,"
Molly sakL ''My newspaper boy
said to me, 'Arc "yon Mollye' I
said 1 was, and asked him1 if he
listener to me. i'No, he said,
'but 'my mother and father ; have
told me about 'you.' r" ;
'Wonder why those filmed dra dramatic
matic dramatic shows on TV aren't as good
as the Jiye onese. One explantioa
is' moneymoney for, the play playwrights.
wrights. playwrights. If they write, for live, TV,
they can stUl sell the rights.: for
'movies or .plays. If it'r on ; iilm,
'that's -aQ.' l 1 kl '-V.,'"--i
Paddy Chayefsky Is a good ex
ample. He won't write tor a film film-rt
rt film-rt show whv should he He fig

ures to make over $100,000 oniof

"Marty." H sold n o t h e r TV
icrtnt. "Catered Affair." to Hol
i:
"Nobody, know ua any more.
n(, Scenes,
Henry Ephfon, and lie had round roundly
ly roundly put me in my .place, with the
remark that f should stick to my
acting and he would do, the writ
ing. This smaV snub inspired me.
I'd do the very opposite! I'd show
him!. Which I dial Im very
grateful to JHenry toe seedling me
into, writing my own play."
....... ,f
("'While' she was'playing in "Wall-
flower,''"' Miss "Orf wrote another!
play. "Dark Hammock" which, of
course, included : a part for her.
The play didn't last long on Broad Broadway
way Broadway ; but she I still gets amateur
ani, stock, royalties from it and it
hasrbeen done several times on
television, several times- with Miss
Orr in her original part.
( "WhiU 'Dark Hammock' was
struggling' in labor out of town,"
Miss Orr reports, "Just to keep
my mind off the -pangs I knocked
out my first short storyvU whs
called ?,The. Wisdom of ; Eve,'1 It
ended up in Cosmopolitan, on the
radio- for NBC and eventually on
the -screen where they, changed
the title to! "All About Eve" and
gave tt the Oscar.
t "I couldn't have beetf more' sur surprised.
prised. surprised. I'm an actress, not a writer.
I can't write at all unless I'm act acting.
ing. acting. If I'm not acting, I'm too busy
looking for .jobs to write. And too
unhappyl" '. ;- i
: Ji 1,1 .' ', t; l,t ii nvi tvf I' 1 I
I "Hot Potatbei U'.
. 5- -vl il-.- :
! NEW YORIC VP) French
fries cooking tip: cook them in hot
fat until they're' soft but 'not
&rovmetfrDrain-tmt!f- .ftftfThree'
minutes before serving. then, with
the fat hot, 'brown them quickly.-

IT 4 V,-iA

t:

X I

KLEINER)
aridn'and Jim Jordan Fibber
),J fjy V L.' J
lywood lor $50,000. "Kiddle of the
Night, another TV show that wijl
soon,' bow. on Broadway, can orini
him close to a million with, a mo movie
vie movie sale plus his weeVly Broad Broadway
way Broadway percentage as author. If he'd
done any of these on film, he
would have made mayh $1,000
eacn. rcnoa.
i Nancy Berg, New York top
1 model and a TV personality a a-I
I a-I round Broadway, got a 1 a g m
i with a story about a dull frind:
"He writes in his diary 'Dear
Diary: What'a New'
j Now that Herb Shriner is defi definitely
nitely definitely finished with "Two for the
Money" when his contract runs
out this fall, the speculation is
who'll take overe The wise money
is on Fred Allen. The show was
originally created for him, but at
the time his health wouldn't per permit
mit permit him to do it. Now he's fine..
The sob. streamed is the window
the hotel suite, throwing a
beam of light on a fetching pot
of azaleas and mimosa. It also
illuminated an empty chair at the
luncheon table and the tall blonde
quickly shitted to the sunny seat
("That will" mike for better pic pictures,''
tures,'' pictures,'' she Said., And the photo photographer
grapher photographer from the magazine, who'd
been following her for two weeks,
smiled and kept on shooting.
: This was Kim Novak at lunch.
Currently, the busiest and hot hottest
test hottest Jwx office blonde In the pic'
, ture business, Ki mhas been in
the" public ; eye lest than twe
i years; but she' adjusted fast,
I Now she has her. biggest part,
' in "Picnic." i
' The waiter came for the orders.
Kim studied the menu while the
photographer and the publicity
man and the publicity gt andthe
reporter ordered. "'
"Can you make me a special
lalad of tomatoes, cucumbers cap
irs'and souncreame" she asked.
The waiter' assured her that was
nune imeiv.
;i never dreamec, or being' a
star," she said. "I never plan
.L.-J.'l A ILit .1 A'J..-!
anean,- just anil wuo iuo tiav.
I've done that for a long time:
II learned to eipeet the wreat
i from men, I was disillusioned.
No more; I don't expect things
any more.
She nibbled at her tomatoes, cu cu-lumbers,
lumbers, cu-lumbers, capers and sour cream.
The photographer kept shooting.
The phone rang; it was a man
she'd met some months before
e.nd she instructed the publicity
gal to tell him she'd call back.
I "I -Iive jtt the studio uun
Hollywood, rori gins oniy.
IH
Jiavt to move in October a girl
tan .only stay three years. I like
t there. They lock the door at
12 and don't allow men' above the
first floor. It's good for .me I'm
Weak-willed. I need discipline.
The best way to avoid temptation
,s to be guaraea against u.
On CBS Radio's "Make Up Your
ind,'' Margaret Whiting .recalled
he poenr. which her kid sister,
Darhara. had written to her when
Barbara was six. It went like so:
I.hate Margaret. T. ... -She'd
make a good target;
She iiings eh thinks i
I thin she stinks.
Tips OnEuropsdrp
I "CHICAGO1 CCV'Jy Armour
Research Tbundatibn "says Ameri American
can American ..corapaniest now ean'.'keep
breast, of European technological
developments at less than the cost
!f one good researcher. .' .'
The foundation. ranch ff tl tl-inoii
inoii tl-inoii Institute of Technology; an announced
nounced announced it is 'setting up. an office
In Europe ttffimncl ideas .and
techniques of; potential, -valufe : in
the American market to the partic participating'
ipating' participating' "companies, ' ;
I Dr. Haldon A. Leedy' director of
the 'foundation, said,, the .program
"is- designed to meet the increas increasing
ing increasing need for up-to-date informaton
about research and development in
urope. ; ,
He said the foundation Initially
ill establish ; an European, office
taffed by four engineers under
mt 'sponsorship of 16 non-compet-g
companies; Sponsors : will he
Sought in froups of four : fx-
iiDiy irom me rnecnanicai, en.in en.in-cal,
cal, en.in-cal, chemical producing and chem-'i
ioal engineering industrlesi .. (,

fUt KOYttS TV RADIO'. )(

HOLLYWOOD (NEAW The
Women: "Forbidden Women," an
Italian movie starring Linda Dar-i
nell, that turned out to be forbid forbidden
den forbidden celluloid for U.S. audiences, is
in the bands of the censorship jury
again after re-f limine of some
scenes and the addition of others.
Linda plays a shady lady in the
flicker but says she can't under
stand .the original ban on the film.
She told m betweaiu scenes., of
''Deception," her 50th Vntury-
f ox-hour teieinmrv. v
t 'v taken "my tlflW-yaar-eld
liufhttr-(Lo Marlty) to too it
twice, and t wouldn't fako liar To
ony ohioctionobfo film t hopo it
can, bo roloasod In., this country
now boaauso if' fnd boit otr otr-formnroovoitin
formnroovoitin otr-formnroovoitin
Marilyn Monroe is miffed again.
This ttme at JSritish icribe who
wrot an imaginary conversation
between her and' Sir Laurence Oli
vier, slated to be her next leading
man,. The grammatical, errors Jie
put t in' i MMMMMMM's .mouth
ooaned it wider -than usual-
tntldo on the casting of Anita
i Ekbere oooosite Robert Ryan in
"Back From eternity.", is tnai.uie
assignment will wipe. out the con-
tracuthe Swedeneart naa wiui me
Massour Bros, to star in a tele
film 'series'. "Slieena. Queen of
the JuneW." .:
. La Ekbari failed to roporT for
the loooard-skin chore and Irish
McCulla was substituted. The Mis-
eurt wisely hold on It their son.
tract with Anita. Thort an unknown,
and will aot big chunk of the
W,m ahe'a ,ottlnt froin RKQ.
Gloria 'McGhee, making her tUnp.
debut in r&ierra stranger t
good, bet Jor a JV Emmy noml
natlnn fnr her excellent oerform-
ance j in, the double segment
VMedic." show. If she gets the nod,
it'll b the cheapest, Emmy per-
( M kininm.
'Gloria. was paid, a total of $S50
for both shpws as; the baby killer.
"Th richpst IBSO I ever earned.''
she grins, "but I'd have paid that
much -for, the chance." t
; Iva Marie faint is getting; the
come-hither sign from Columbia
for a icost'arring role with Mario
Lanza -and um .MovaK in me re
make of "Golden Boy., rr y
, fexVected" fireworks failed ,,tf go
bf whamZsa ZsaXabor and Lisa
Ferraday met) face to. face en the
set of "Death of a Scoundrel.', The
foreign dolls have bean carrying on
a feud, but Lisa told me;
"Zsa Zsa walked' Hint up to me
end sold the was sorry for. what
she, had said about mo two. years
go. It takes real person to do
that. You can't help but love this
wmn.'
-y But producer-directors Charles
h-

SIWW11SG AT WVR SERVICE
CENTER THEATRES TODAY

Diablo Hts J:S0, 1:15, m
Wiumn O'HAttA
Geort NADKJt ,'
."LADY GODIVA"
. colon : ".
-. .. V I .-. i.
Man. AVCHIKO ANNE
1 JWargarita t:S, :15, l:30
Mhrlljm MONROE
' Tom IWX1L a
"SEVEN YEAR lrCR"
CiMmtScop Colon
MH.
"SVENGAU",
A I h afS A
drXtliUA
v.,..v.:i)EU,a;i.:.?

ht uys ' .
hmr4$t whB
the'"f : I :-
iO0
(evetare v f
Dfonkitnphu
-Ji mmm
:w ':tX sm '-Ginuaaai kus M&MU&ji.-
ALSW H0W1NG MONDAJl

rAKAISO :15 S:20
- f'lNIERBUrrgO, MELODY" 1
SANTA Cai'r rr. I
. Alan LADD
s:r

. J : O '-a -H

Martin Isn't Jumping for joy ovef
the dove-and-olive-brancb at the
gals are staging. He told Lisa:
TYpp're Weodsl X.wis Jj-jping to
nave some tun with you two wniie
we re making the picture." i
, Lisa is the new doll in Broderick
Crawford's life. -', ' T
'. Dorothy Dandridgo is having a"
conference with Producer Buddy
AdJer about the big starring pic
ture in the works for her at 20th
Century-Fox. Not-too many Tears'
ago, Adler produced a picture
titled .rHarlenv Globe -Trotters."
Dorothy, thert a hewedmer to films,
had a small role as the feminine
interest . .
. r - -f f
Bit she rememhart:' "They were
always threwmf basketballs at mo
instad of kisses."' i
Chalk tip 'three 'best-sellers for
Dale Evans in the last 12 months
Her two books "Anael UnaUW
and'My Spiritual Diary,"- and, her
song, "The Bible Tell Me SO.
Film On Arizono
Offered By Bureau
WASHINGTON (UP) X new
28-minute- motion picture -depicung
Arizona and its natural resources
may be borrowed free from the
U.S. Bureau of Mines.
- f ...
The film of the nation's newest
state was made by Hollywood
crews and -show! views of the
Grand Canyon man-made, dams
and- agricultural .' developments,
primed by irrigation systems. The
Painted Desejrt,.. Petrified,? Forest
ana sagusro are inciuaea in me
filmy ( ,1 i,.' '.'
It may be obtained from the By-,
reau's depositories in 39 states.- Re
quests also may be sent to Graph
ic Services, Bureau ot flimesr w
Fotbes St., Pittsburgh 13,. Pa
A nrosDective borrower must have
a 6-millimeter sound projectorand
an ;experlenoed .operator,. r.7i
t
,Help$ Egg Market
'EAST UXSING, Mich. A (UP)
A poultry expert ; Michigan
State University says farmers
should "cultivate a hen-house man
ner" to increase' egg-vroduetioh.
The expert. iDon r Miller, says
"talking to the birds or knocking
on the door before entering the
pens will, wan the birds of your
arrival. x
"Every successful poultry man
knows that the secret of remaining
on good terms with his birds is
to keep them calm," he said.
GARTROA '-? I'M
It's Always Fair Weather"
ne. "LADY CODIVA".,. v .,
GATUN ti3l--7:W
"MOONFLEET'' Color!
iTaw., "UXCHAINEP" -
CrtstobaI 2:S, 115, f lS
Ait-LvaaitKDef
Glenn JOKO' ;,, :
Dorothy McGUIItX
, VXRIAL?
Also Showlnf BIONBAT;
JL
ir-Condiii
2:30-4:30
Air-Conditioned
6:30-1:25
il
LA BOCA
1:8t
STRANGER"
"NOT AS A
CAMP BIERD
S:1I S:ll
gllvenn. MANGANQ t
JLiJ' a;M j)'U ....

J-

Excess Profits Checked Checked-In
In Checked-In Government Business

WASHINOTON. Feb.; If (UP)
House. investigators today s-5
sailed ft big Jet plane company5
a vnvemment "suhalalarv'
u... i
asaurw ks. owuew gwiww
pronrs.
.. -1 v S
The label was pinned on Northl
Aecn Avibon, intM oy nR
F. Edward Habert (D-La.. He
bert heads a House Armed Scrv-I
ices subcommittee investigating1,!
whether military plane 'makers
are reaping excessive profits." I
, j
The i2stimon ha hronrht
out that North American has
.' rent-free use of more than 95
m llion dollars in government
'facllltfis while working on
; military orders, which repre;
sent J9.SI per cnt of its busi- j1
nesa. ; -, ';A-;
4-- S '-tii---:;--. t-.i Vl 'j
- The company made 32.3 mil-
lion dollars in after-tax profit (
.last; year. and awarded ?.A mSU
Mori dollars in bonuses to 1,001
officera and employes !n i i-ear
ear i-ear 'Iftcentiye" program, :
Hebert told North American
President J L.-AtWood that 4you
are government employes. You
are a eovernment subsidy, work working'
ing' working' entirely for the government:'
P Atwood objected to the use of
'Subsidy" and Heijea-t ehansea it;
io "subsidiary..' He said the firm
trovemment-ow,ned fciliiies and
nayintr salaries and dividends
Kteji. Leon. F Gavin .fRPsv)
aid Korth Amecan -rhi
"guaiftnt.ee .profit", oa Its .busi .business
ness .business 'with the government lit
demanded that the Air Force
and Naw he asked to evtilain
why Hh wvernment'iii not get-
ting W little, better .break:
Hebert sked'AtwinSdLwhetbnr
he i was- familiar wtin xh Air
Force regulation rebulrlng sne.
clfie approval' of salaries and
Jbonuses of mor8 than ,$35,000 if
thej? are. charged against gov
ernment contracts. Atwood said
he. was not.
The plane builder defended
H;he rent-free, use of government
plants and equipment. He saicj
North American's arrangement
wai "not unique" iri the indus industry.
try. industry. '

urphy First Hero Toortrayllbsc!f Oh Screcn

. i
it.

Theatre-mark the first time in history that a hero has porkayed himself on the
acreen, revealing the epic events which made him t great soldier. Filmed in Technicolor
and Cinemascope, To Hell and Back" bring? to the screen the war exploits which mada
Audie Murphy the most decorated hero of World War IL Murphy received a total of 24
decorations and in June, Commander Patch decorated him with the Congressional Medal of
Honc.-Filmed -iteehnlcolor-end-CinemaSeop
will PRE-RELEASE AT THE CENTRAL, Theatre on February 22nd. Aclvt.

Atwood iUo 'defendecT the cal

aries and bonuses. He said the;
bonus plan was designed to keepi
ton nersonnpl
rsonnei wun me nrm. ii
. i .iv.t- K
jwr ,penu,- ne .na;vw
.
n .

. tilizaUon. weed-control, keeping the,
HI said North American, 'owes, free of insect ind diS(!Se

' pik u jiuuiuu B"u)
cannot -afford to buy trie -plants
and equipment- lt.needs.- He de-i
scribed the rent on the eovern-f
ment equipment as Yinconse-
quentlal" as far as the goveni-
ment is concernf d.,
ABriHiaff

Wednesday To The Bella Vista
Theatre: "Tie View From

i:Popeys;.He

, tK J?..ii f

X'- 'JOne of the most important properties of the year, the
best-selling .novel -''THE VIEW FROM POMPEY'S HEAD
emerges now as a Cinemascope fllnf production, opening on
Wednesda";? W the EEIXA VISTA Theatre j
A romantic drama with a component OTjmystry and
suspense, "THE. VIEW FROM POMPEY.'S BEAD ls.-n vtU
beat and fflrcefurstory, uncommon in Hollpood,tirr.iich
good tastd and maturity tlend 1 nan outpokenly Joi thright
drama. ' A-tTt
In the' key roles are three of thestroneest new 'Person,
alitles of fltodon, Richard Efn. V merf" MitcpeL
exotic DanaWynter, new English import certainly
.I,.,.. v. i.n- msin. leiinnnwnr. in American movicj-

CUL'THB W-VHOM POMPEY;Ss HEAD'111 ,tart

wcuiicnvia.y Kb uic
. r f X. ...
ji. .v j-ii.' xii-vjgqt if . !l c 3
"tr
I af.
'. Vft ;
;ti.i
:; l.v

Corn ell Ci yes Tip
For Better Crapes V
GENEVA, N. Y. (UP) A
two-step formula for producing hisJi
yields of quality grapes has been
developed Oy the Cornell Universitv
agricuiiure station here after ii

years of crop study. "-
According -to the Cornell grape
specialists, the two major factora
succeswui grape proaueuon are
r ,-t-.
moou sun rxposuie
and applying
. m.-,.iT1 r 4p..

Cornell recommends adeouate fr.-

i T x .
damage and the-' we :of. a1 nvei
and-one-half-foot trellis.
ror glanced pruhjrig the tor
ncllstation recommends that 39
bud5 be left -for the 'first pouM
of pruning and 10 bitds foi each
'additionat poimd of onming : r
i:
11
:
t.



srxDAY, rizzvM.1 is, i::i

Li) cii) fl ej.-
1 ; j v
1 1
1 1

Polemon To Get Stiff
Test Against Alormina
And Persian Countess

,Tii tni vlpntin'e' un-and-coming- three-year-

ibid chestnut Chilean-bred colt Polemon is the prob probable
able probable rnutuels choice to score his second feature vic victory
tory victory in a fortniyht when he goes against Persian
Countess, Kadir and Alormina in this afternoon's
featured $750 seven-furlong sprint for Class B im imported
ported imported horses it the Juan Franco race track.

Polemon was to impressive win winner
ner winner over Albatross and Blake Blake-mere
mere Blake-mere in last week's seven furlong

dash for Class C imports, inciua
.j m.it rh tlan rilll WIS A

lormina which is also scheduled

to go in today's mam evenu
. iTnvijti- th nice all the

way to the homestretch where he

Kait under pressure. loasy
nuel Ycaza will replace Hector
t.., aWruini Alnrauni and the

apeedy son of Eoyal Phoenbc-Taor-

' '. ...v :
Juan Franco

Mutuel Dividends

peeay ion oi ivuji" 1 ...

mina s nope is rieu uw !-.- i-wum ji.uu, a-x.w, .ww.
19 jo all the way. He will carry 2-Golden Wonder 4.40, 2.60.
eoly lOi as compared to 116 he jGonzaga 2.80.
;toted last week,
'Improvinia.pprentice rMer A- seCOnTrACE
uMVL Vttvn 1-Carraway 1130. 4.40. 3.40.
,hel-v S with his 2-Panlcus 3.80, 2.60.
surprised many raubirds wun ms .

Vool and heady ride aboard Va
Mnr.ll' star this 1 a S

time out. Polemon will carry on
ly 110, pounds.
Lir -,.ti,t-i rHiV ? consider-

d by most "experts" the horse
. i ... .,; s-i-.111. will anm

to peat, virguio wui --Antonio
Antonio --Antonio Eskildsen's hard-running
'Argentine-bred chest horse. Kadir s

impost Ol iz may Fiwe w.
bit more than he carry to 'Victory.
b...i.h rMtniAsa 'Will IfrttC tne

parade to the starting and w,U

have leading jocaej uu
ouez handling her reins. Despite
ill this, she is rated only an out outside
side outside chance to score an upset.
Her 118 pound handicap is consi considered
dered considered too much on this occasion.
I Another point of interest on to today's,
day's, today's, card is the scheduled debut
iof three of the reportedly expensive
Argentine-bred throughbreds sent
jierVto race under his colors by
wealthy Argentine turfman Conra Conra-rlo
rlo Conra-rlo Maggiorini. They Aadet,
gemipleno and Rosier which, are
plated to run in the first race..

t FIRST DOUBLE: Z3U-UU,

THIRD RACE
1Tara ri Sarin. 4.80. 2.20.

2 Moonshiner 2.20.

ONE-TWO: 820.

FOURTH RACE

1 Souvenir 8.20. 8.40.

2 Proton 2.20.

QUINIELA: 8.40.

FIFTH RACE

1 Daniel 8.40, 3.40.
2 Petite 2.60.

Todav Encanto .20
:' In Cinemascope t
9 Humphrey Bogart In
THE LEFT HAND OF GOD
Plus Joan Collins in u
"ADVENTURES OF SADIE"

Today IDEAL .25 .15
William Bendix In
"CRASHOUT"
Frank Lovejoy in
"MAD AT THE WORLD".

FIRST RACE

SIXTH RACE

1noti Hova 7.60. 3.00. 2.20.

2 rtrnnern 4.00. 2.80.

3 Single Slipper 2.20,

SEVENTH RACE

1- anda Real 12.00. 5.00, 4.20.
2 Dark Sunset 4.60, 4.00.

3-Lion' ciaw z.eu.

SECOND DOUBLE: 38,30.
EIGHTH RACE.

1 Febrero n 27.00. S.80. 3.40.

2 Melendez 2.80. 2.60.

3 Elko 4.80.

QUINIELA! 18.00,
NINTH RACE

1-FCllac 21.00, 14.00, 5.60.,
2. Dlvieprlncess 5.40, 4.4,
3. Pugilist 3.80.

ONE-TWU 3.v,

TENTH RACE
1 Blakemere 4.00. 2.20.

2. Cachafaz 2.20.

ELEVENTH RACE

1. Genlzarlto 2.60, 2.20.
2, Oolden Corn II 2.20.

Juan. Franco Tips
- By CONRADO

1 Rosier (e)
2-Malaf&
S Paparrorra
4-oCurazalena

5 Joe

Br'sk

Matruh
Okiland
Rlna Roi

Naranjaxo

Juan Franco Graded Entries
r.T. Bors JocST Wgfc COMMENT, ODDS
tit Race "Sateiar inn. Fif.?yft $500.00. PmI CUi 12:43
tlRST RACE CP THE DOUILE

1-CtrtUlero

2 Brisk
3 Uttle Fool
4 Opulento
5 (Andes
6 (Semlpleno
1 (Rosier

J. Samaniego 110 Makes local debut
r. Alvarea 113 -Will fight it out :

A. Vergara 114x Vastly improved ,.
A. Visquez 110 Better this time
,.V. Ortega 115 One-time Argentina

C. Iglesias 113 -Has good rating
A. Ycaza 115 Reportedly class horse

top.

15-1
2- 1
3- 1
31
3-2
3-2
3-2

2n-.Ract H-Z" lmMt4 tVz P,i.Fri $409.00 Pl Clt V:15

SECOND RACI Or THE 0OVILI
1 Matruh H. Ruiz 113 -Usually disappoints :. : 3-1
2 Malaga F. Hidalgo 115 Should win again -. even
3 S.Windsor O. Chanis 110 Not-against these- v 30-1
4 Vertlcordla O. Montero 107x Goes wide, on turns 10-1
5 Choya 5. CarvaJal 109x -Worth a small bet '. -J
8 M. SUpper A. Vasquez 113 -Should be close up f-1
7- Beduino H. Reyes 113 -Ran well in last 3-1
8 Kunerstin J. PhllllBS 115 Way down in class 10-1

9 Newbrightori O. Mirarida 109x -Until next rainy season 25-1

iti Rite "H" Nativei 4Vi Fs.Few $275.00 Nl CUtet 1:45

ONE TWO 4
1 Papa Rdrra B. Aguirre 115 Distance. .to liking
2 Little Blue A. Oortzilez 105 Good at short -distances

3 Slrena B.'Saeza 102x Needs more aisiance.

4 Enriqueta
5 Don Popo
6 Okiland

A. Jordan llOx-Lack early speed
F. Hidalgo 106 Could go all the way
A. Ycaza 108 Ran well in last

3-2

8-1
15-1
25-1
2- 1
3- 1

4th Rut vE" Niy,-i'7 :f$u Pmm $275.00 Cle 2:20
,' QUINIEU

1 Rina Roi
2 Don Jaime
3 El Pasha -.
4 Curazalefta
5 Redondita
6 Lady Edna

M. Ycaza 115 Post position; helps 4
B. Baeza 97x Could, get up'herer
A, Vergara 115x Regaining form stowly
V. Brown 115. i WiU fight it out J
AS Gonzalez :104 ; Must go lower :
B. "Aguirte 110 Will be beaten favorite

2-1
10-1
15-1
21
S-l

3-2

5th Rac "C-D? NatiYM Vi Fjt.Nn. $325.00 t- Cleset 2:55

1 Joe
2 Metto
3 Julie
4 Valarla
5 Naranjazo

V.. Brown 106 Racing to best form
M. Ycaza 115 -rBad trailer all the way
A.' Gonzalez 113 Closed well in last i
S. CarvaJal 109x Showed .nothing in lastj.
A. Vergara 117x Form indicates .

3-2

15-1
3-1
10-1
even

6th Ract "HO" lmrt. 1 Mil funi -$400.00 -l Cleiet 1:35

1 Don Danl

2 Cascador
3 Hurlecano
4 Orn. Star
5 El Regalo
6 -Espagirieo

7 Rlscal

8 .Discovery

FIRST RACE OF THE DOUIH Vv't .'
C.uiz 113 Early: speed only'
G. Montero I05x Handicap. .may Jielp'- "i"
A. Gonzalez 1M Should' be close up .7
F. Alvarez 113 Distance only handicap
B. Baeza 102x Not against these,
. lyf." Ycaza 115 Early speed only H-

B;-A&Uirre ll nouia, reicin, nc s
w ,H. Rulz 118 Longshot specialist

io-i
-r's-i
8-1
3-2
10-1
25-1

even

10-1

7th Race "6" fti 7 Fg i.Fhm $450.00 CIVs 4:05

SECOND RACE OF THE BOUILE '.
'.v --'.'.. '- A v-,-.:';" ,v;','
1 Salustlo O. de 'Le6n lWx Not tgainst these
2 Y. Prince V.- Castillo 115 Loni overdue . i,
3 C. Prince 1 S. CarvaJal 109x Not;..ng in month.
4 Gay Spot A. Oonzilez- 100 Could get up here
5 Oro Purito A. Vasquez 110 No. 1 contender v
6 Pont6n A. Ycaza 115 Prefers moddy going
7 Greco R. Gamero 100 Must drop more

8 Amat J. Adames 109x -Nouiing to maicaie

9 Marlanna B. Baeza ssx-roor euon iasnime
10- Alminar .M. Ycaza 106 '

20-1

3-2
:so-i

4-l
a-i

s-i

13-1
25-1

. S-l

Stk Rie "F" NativM

1 Bagdad
2 Filon
3 Regia ;
4 Arranquin
5 Col. Girl'
6 Ika

7 FoJletlto

414 Fi.FUru $275.00 Pl CUite 4:40

QUINIEU 1 1

B. Baeza!tlllx Has strong' finish ; ; 4-1
p.. oodov 112x Sharper than ever i i 2-1

R. Gamero 109 Could surprise
A. Ycaza 111 Consistent performer
O. Montero 106x Returning to form
A. Enrique 118 Can't go much lower'-

. A. Gonzalez iua mazing eany speea

8-Sherry Time M. Ycaza 118 -Serious effort now

10-1
2-1
5-1

10-1
8-1

4-1

6 Rlscal Ornamental Star

7 Young Prince Oro Purito
8 Filon Arranqum
9 Lifeboat Reynold
10 Polemon Alormina

' o nnounccs

2nd Ai:."UAL EL PAHA!

iriviTATiouAL tee:::i$ touhiiameut
O Mixed Doubles
O Men's Singles O Men's Doubles
Feb. 22, 23, 24, 26 (No play Feb. 25)
x (Niht playing only)
$2.00 entry fee per event Jor players
ENTRIES MUST GE IN BY 6 p.m. SUN. Feb. 19
at Cabafia and Tennij Club, El Panama
' Prises for winners and runners-up ;
!' Winners will be invited to play in the -First
Panama International Tennis Tournament
(Feb. 29 March 5 at El Panama)

Admission prices for tournament '50c. nightly except final ($1.00)
Refreshments and Snack will be served at Moderate Prices I

:T """"r i ii in. mini. n 'it-!' i 1
1 Kbkeb, Hate! XCyj

9th Race fi 7 Ffli.Furw $600,00

ONI TWO
1 Fuerte L- Tufi6n 107x-Not until rains come
2 Iguazu' R.s Gamero 110 Runs wide on turn
3 Grey Juan A. Vasquez 115 Better each time ouf
4 -Lifeboat M. Ycaza 110 Will improve here v
5 Vulfcanlzado J. Jimenez 107x Ran well in last
6 Bradomiii S. CarvaJal 113x Should be. close up
7 .Reynold F. Hidalgo 113 Dangerous contehder

8 (Ma. Stuardo B. Agulrre.iw Last ppespt count v
9 (Lexden A. Gonzalez 103 Gone jour again

FmI Cletti 5:15

10th Rict '"
1 P. Countess
2 Polem6n
3 Kadir
4 Alormina

lmMrt4 7 ffi.Fnrt $750.00 FmI Clese
A! Vasquez 113 Doesnt lack courage
A. Vergara HOx Gets real test here '
V. Castillo 128 -Weight handicaps
M. Ycaza 108 Could go all the way .,

S0-I

'3-2

3-1
T4-1
4- 1
"2-1
5- 1
S:l

5:40
f-1
even
tl
21

NO TIME TO' WASTE-Andy Semin'ck, left. PhlUes, catcher.
''teams with Coach Benny Bengough to give Mack Burk, $40,000
worth of bonus rookie from the University of Texas, tome re

' ceivirtf ties; Burk reocrted to the Phillies' rookie camp ti

Clearwater,Fla.

Pro Scouts. Agree On Floyd
'He Won't Make It Here'

NEW YORK (NEA) Every'

body had the same opinion, of Dar

reu rioya. airman s sconng wiz

ard.' .. is "-. ;,'"

"He won't make it in the pros

and you can t compare mm with
Frank Selvy,", was the report of
basketball men who have teen him
in action

Floyd., at 'six feet and 170

pounds, resembles a'' heavy-middleweight:
His shoulders are
wide. He has a terrific touch with
a basketball, but 'his deficiencies

arev glaring,1. r.. i V s .

For example, he -is vumeraDie

when f the other fellow has -the
ball. And on offense, his moves
are too patented. His best shot is
iumn hrrtum tchil AH thai mAVtt

from either side across the key

hole. He tries to drive in from the

ritrht side or irom either- corner.

He isfast. running with. the4

"ipringy step of a r track man
warming lip between events. His
foi-1 she""- nd jump shots
have a soa touch to them and

they commanl every break the

nm can produce
But Floyd's teammate of a cou

ple of years back, 'Selvy, is rated
the better player by far. Selvy (6 (6-3)
3) (6-3) had more height, better move.

Here and there,' Floyd shows epar epar-kle
kle epar-kle he can change direction twice

on -one play, something few pros
can do. .-

As a college 'Shooter,.' however,

he has few. equals. Give h i mr a
step and lie goes up and scores.

DarreQ riey

"He would have a tough."1- time
making it up here,' Sonny Hertz
berg, the Knickerbockers' scout,
said .after watching Floyd get his
normal 32 against New York Uni-

yersity. ' '

r -- v r -
.

Editor: CONRADO SARCEANT

J.C Hands Oolboa Migli
1st Defeat In Twiloqp

r

11th Rice "IlimiMtW ln -tViKru $60000 p.t ciesas.
1 Tiger's Teeth B. Airulrre 118 Knocking at' door
2 Our Fancy B. Baeza 107x-Would pajr off;
3 c Brand O. de Leon lOOx Must improve more
4 Atom O p. Godoy 103x Showing improvement .,v.
5 Turf Lodge A. Vasquez 118 -Will flght it out
6 Paques A. Gonzalez 103 -Better this week;

.even
25-1
15-1
' 15-1

3- 5
4- 1

T

. ' '''"

V"t-"v vv., .

Less To Sell

se This Way!

i Ym a (I f. vm tt real

price vm tell tt lew ewt te
. yu w!tn ran fc:e Went
At f h Panama Americeaw

If yMra kuyini, vjliinfl, Mntini
fcirinj er twapains, i
, r the Want Aiu

7 '-PAN AM A

V AMERICAN

' ADOLrft RUPP; the' Baron o! I

the Blue Grass country, Js. taking

no cnances on geiuna hhshuuicu
in his old' Kentucky home...' he's
installed a recording device in his
office to transcribe all interviews.

Suair Ray Reblnten In )cKr-
In, fr the OUeit'. re-match, lnr
IstaO that Ms camy tb-thim
Irtf ke dene agtln by the llC't
Merry Mendl. whe privately,
picked Swar te lose te Reke last
time in Chlcaie. :
The Yankees got themselves' a

colorful one in Micky McDermOtt

the erstwhile winter skating in

structor at Grosslnger's who once
called boss Irving.' Jaffee, i the

Olympic speedskating hero,, "with
this plea: "I'm in jail in Paterson.

Got puicnea ot anving wiuioui my

license. Come: set .me .out."Ask-

ed Jaffee: "The cop knowiwno you
are?"... "Ne." ... "Well, w h y
don't vou tell him and he'll let you

go?":.., "Heck with himl" fumed
Mickev. "I don't like his looks

anyhow." So he sat In jail four
hours while Jaffee made the 200-

mile round trio from the moun

tains to identify and spring him...

McDermett cavil neve maee n
In the pr hackey ,leeavee if ha
warafi't a kali pleyer ...,end Ms,
ability, en the Glance fleer shevld
fPt te pitching ceach Jim
Turner, a davata el. the mama
end cha-chaha himseli tit the
last year. '.-..'. ;
Thi Ra'.nh Elisworth-Mish Ten-

nev racina- entourage is a cinch

tn Invade Florida for the 1 Gulf-

stream Pak meeting, or why did

Tenney ask racing secretary Hor

ace Wade to Une up a smau
arjartment for him ... and ready a

shtoment of three-year olds-for

th Florida Cerbv Santa Anita

weather.: and not the publicized

sore hoof, retarded the training of
Tenny's jri?e pupil. Swaps. V

Makin i.sta an te man wun
his vaultlrtf f ale atfdVt P Villa Villa-neve's
neve's Villa-neve's Den Iran hit "Tenan"
nickname kiiUad he a y
"V.Tian I was a J I vi te like
awlw tirVH tf ".

Larry Boardman. the Connecti

cut lightweight who could be one

of boxine s s amor boys, is nana

led by his tep father, who's in the

a. j(V A

.. '"TV ?-

PACIFIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE
SECOND HALF STANDINGS
Team Won Lost

Balboa High School ... 3 1
American Legion ...... 2 2
Lucky Strike .......... 1 2

Junior College ........ 1 2

Thursday's Result

Junior College 4, Balboa High 3

nionaay s Game
Balboa Stadium, 7:15 o.m.

Junior College vs. Lucky Strike

Tn c.Z. Junior College nine

eked out a 4 to 3 victory over

Balboa High Thursday night for
their .first win over the school
boys this season. It was the

fourth meeting of the school

teams this year and the High
School had three straight wins
over the JCERS and were shoot shooting
ing shooting for their fourth win without
a defeat in the second half race.

With, the Interschol title

League play completed, coach

Stewart. Brown oi college came
up with a revamped lineup with
the addition of Abdlel Flynn,

Lee cotton, and George Dansby.

Flynn took over the catching du duties
ties duties from Gla vein, who returned
to shortstop, Lee Cotton took

over at second base nd George

iransDy went w ins ouuieia..

Lambert Manterani ana
Wayne Wall were the opposing
pitchers and both boys turned
in good games. Mantovant
scattered seven hits, walked
six and struck out eight bat bat-ters
ters bat-ters with Wall allowing fire
hits, walking I and striking
ut five Collegians.
In the ton of the third Hixh

School scored the first runs of

the game, pushing across two

runs on Danny Wlnklosky's sin

gle that scored Magee and Hotz.
College tied It up 1n the fourth

with Flynn opening;, with a free
pass and stealing second .from
where he scored when Reyes lost
the handle on the tail end of a

double play ball. Wood advanc

ed to second on Reyes' error and
came in with the tying run-on

Mamovanri single to right.

wign ecnooi went ahead Mr

one run in tne nith on a, single

by Reyes,' Hotz's sacrifice and

Danny Wlnklosky's third single
of the game. College won the

game when Wall walked Flynn
and Dansby to open, the sixth

ana both runners moved ud on

Glavelll's fly to right. Joe Wood

slashed single into right field
and Flynn scored but Dansby

was out at the Diate on Kirch

mier's, throw to Hotzv The throw

arrived in plenty of time to nip

Dansby, who crashed into Hotz

in a hard slide, but Hotz. thoutrh

shaken up blocked" the runner

orr and neid the, tail for the

putout 11 i

Wall walked Mantovanf and

- Mickey McDermett

restaurant business..., but the win

over champ Bud Smith d o e s n" t

mean ne s in line for a crack at
the title because feasting 'off

pop s vuues, young (19) and grow

ing Larry can't help growing

ngnt into the .welterweight dm-

sion.f ,'.. -..

The Detroit Red Wings must
be making ;wp the .$M0t it ceat
Red Kelly te switch te forward

In mld-teaaan money he' car.
talnly would have wen es an all-

league del erne "man for the sixth

straight year. .

Jackie Robinson, who remem

bers what it was like to break in.

Is branching out his fields to give

a Helping shove to young Megro

singer Jimmy Randolph ... whom

he discovered four years ago.

Jackie 11 introduce Jimmy and Ms

first recording on i Monitor

broadcast .

'Ralph Baard. hU katkatball
career entingM in the fix web.
Is hack en the 'hardweeds .with

a service team m Japan.i vn

kattan kv tha waV. .

Between you'n'me. despite all

the bickering, the Floyd Patterson

Hurricane Jackson elimination

match will come off in May.

Hoplac to load the bases and

Jim McXeown singled to score
Wood from third. Mantovanl

tried to score from second but

Joe Cicero's perfect pear to the

piiiie gni wanioyani wun noiz
for the second time la the in

ning guarding the plate and tag

ging out tne runner sliding In.
The run put the College- ahead
and set the stage for some clutch

pitching by Mantovanl as he

stopped Balboa's last 'ditch rally
In the top of the seventh.-

The loss cut the Balboa High

School's lead to one game over
the second place American Le Le-gion.
gion. Le-gion. Monday night the last

week of play in the second half

gets underway with Junior Col College
lege College meeting the third place
Lucky Strikers. Balboa High will
meet the Legionnaires Tuesday
night and play their last sched scheduled
uled scheduled game against Lucky Strike

on Friday night. A win over

both teams will give Balboa

High the second half flag and
put them into the championship

playoff against Lucky Strike, the

iirst half winners.
Lucky Strike and American

Legion are still in the running;

ior me secona naif race and
both teams will meet the school
teams in next week's games.
Th box score: ; v

High School

Cicero, cf

scott, 3b
Magee, If

Reyes, lb

Hotz, c

Kirchmler.rf

wmkiosky, ss
Sutherland, 2b
Wall, p

IICUI.U ........

Ab
8
'4
4

3

.
.4

4
0
3'--'

1

R R Po A
0 0 0 1

0 'I

0 0

x' Struck out for Wall In 7th

Janlor Coi'tf

Cotton, 2b ....... 2

J. McKeown, 2b .. 2

Herring, 3b .......3

Blackall, rf ...... J
Jefferles, rf ..... 1

nynn, e ..... 1
rton)i if

Gtarellt, ss .,.,; 7 -0 9

Wood, lb ........ 3 2 .1
Mantovanl, p . , 2 o 1
Hopiak, cf ....... X 0 0

oil
0 1 1
0 1 1 SO
OS 1

0 0
2 8 0

0 0

. Score By Inning
Balboa High 002 010 OT
Junior College 000 202 x

Winning pitcher: Mantovant
(3-6). Losing pitcher: Wall (2-2).
Struck out by: Mantovanl I, by
Wall 8. Bases on balls: Munto-
vani e Wall 5. Stolen v bases:
Blackall, Herring1, Flynn,' Magee

z. wuuciosirv a. Kur.neria.nn. nac-

rlf Ices: Hotz., Utapiresr p. Corrl Corrl-gan.
gan. Corrl-gan. flcorerj Mead, j Time -of
game: 2:13.

Louisville's Scouts

Like: Other Campuses

. By JIMMY BRESLIN

LOUISVILLE. Ky. (NEA) -I

tne university of Louisville head headed
ed headed for its fifth straight National In

vitation Tournament bertn this

year serving as a good illustration

or why basketball recruiting is not
only for huge schools with sprawl sprawling
ing sprawling campuses. .'

It only takes a couple of good

boys to give you a big league bas basketball
ketball basketball program and' little Louis

ville, with Coach Peck Hickman

getting the lob done, fits In here.

The scholL' for example, arop-

ned football scholarships last year.

Its football players had to go out

and get Jobs to pay tneir way

through school. In basketball, Hick

man is limited to five scholarships

for incoming freshmen. But that

can do the Job, if the five kids you
eet are the eood ones.

- - ...

Hickman seems to nave a nami

of making a bid for his boys a

little behind the others, out u nas

not prevented him from getting

them. .. ;.--:v'

JERRY DU PONT, a 6-10 sopho

more from Nashua. N. H.. is an

illustration. The University ol Day

ton thought Du Pont was a fine

Drosnect. so the Flyers nrougni

him down in the summer of 1954

and got him a construction job.
Du Pont lived in the Dayton dor

mltories. which! if you want to

be nasty about it. is not considered

proper by the NCAA. He had not
been enrolled in the school yet.

From out of nowhere. Du afont

decided to pack his bags and fly
down to Louisville, where he now
is moving through a sophomore

season with big things expected oi
him in the future, ;

Dayton's Tommy BiackDurn was
a cinch to howl to the heavens ov

er the move by Du Pont, except

for the little dormitory item wmcn
forced him to forget about it.
New York University knows a-
bout this, too. Last sprif?!, Alex
Mantel and Don GolusteinT two
products of Brooklyn high schools,

I accepted baskeball scholarships

. at N.Y.U. To make sure it was a

closed issue and nobody else
would come in and grab the bova

Coach Howard Cann had Mantel

IM nnMcfoin rjuriet! a num.

on the University Heights campus,
take out class cards for their sub subjects
jects subjects of the next September and
do all the signing necessary to en

roll.

Enter Louisville.
"WETE NEVER BEEN out of

New York and some people from

uroisvuie want to Jly us down
there," they told Cann. ''We pro

mised we wont stay., We lust want

to look around."

However, thines at Louisville
changed this. They returned t
New York only to pack bags and'
head down there again in time to
be the big wheels on this year'i
hot Louisville freshman team.
"they were given the works
clothes, a day at the track, every every-thing,"
thing," every-thing," a member of N.Y.U's ath athletic
letic athletic department says.
Basketball at Louisville Brings
in $30,000 a year and the athletes
who leave schools in New York
and Dayton recive the minimum
room, board, books and tuition.

Home games are played in the
Jefferson County Armory, seating
6,000, but a new arena, seating 18r
000, will be opened on. the state

fairgrounds, a mile from tne Louis Louisville
ville Louisville campus, next falL This

should help Louisville's future con

siderably. That is, as long as tuck tuck-man
man tuck-man knows how to get the good

boys. : ;, '. j

"We have alumni who help us

out around the country with notes

on ballplayers," he says, out our
varsity has five boys from in instate'
state' instate' Peck's freshman team, howev however,
er, however, lists only three from Kentucky.
The rest hail from' Terre Haute.
Silver Creek and Elisabeth, lnd.J
New Tort, and Bradford, Ohie,

NEXT: North Car! ma Stat
feea enywhere far a player.



srxsiT, ixr-rt-KT is. vis

' 7
a
' LS
Snead Musi
Beat
' (List in a snie of ?c close close-up
up close-up en how ci"'f -te basket-

v:V.;-;''':---:;vWHSS IT COUNTS""";
I v ci- : for: wcs i

CVfJ'V ft I I
ilWkkillli
... x ... . v ..;'u14w
..-..,

TUB DSTKOT
rD WWGS'

fi:P KELLY-
, HSHOTONLV WENT
fROM ALL" NHL
TO FCRWAJZO

' "V '',"r'

r

AT TWl :A

.a

.' A -MA'

t lP THt-CiMCH

ALL

JOE WILLIAMS

r. j -rr.'.i'Lis :
, i
Tilt ctver f tr? i.Jvtiiity of

iortn t;r- -J rrc.r.ure t?:;i

tht s.-ry c( taskrttt! in tnla

quift, or.e-movlt colleje town.'

the cci'-1. Cipt .Te:ry Viy Viy-d
d Viy-d form r.. covm picture. Mc-
Gulre is fast-tilkiny product

et New York't GiesnKti VU-

Uge. Vayda 1j t 6-4 senior from

Bayonne, N.J.

North Carolina, you e, has

Inserted itself Into the present
day basketb!! growth. With Mo

Guire doing' the recruiting, the

Tarheels list only three native

players on their I3-man' roster.

Seven learned the name in the

New York, metropolitan area.

ThU season'.i stronz freshma!

team Is headed by four boys

from the same area.

"We are branching out next

year," Mcauhe cracks, "we re

coin? to ta.ke in staten Island."
While McOulre, who coached

at Et. John University of
Brooklyn, produces laughs with

nis tales of the Brooklyn Tar Tarheels,"
heels," Tarheels," North Carolin takes it
more seriously.
The alumni the :' prof esslonftl
type, Always ready to fire or;
hire for dear old alma mater mater-insisted,,
insisted,, mater-insisted,, three seasons back, that
North Carolina State could not
be allowed to run away with
basketball laurels.
They hired McGulre In 1953:
with Carolina sports writers do-J
in tht ground work, 1 and this
season sees the move starting to
pay off. The Tarheels are na

tionally-ranked and the fresh
man team Is loaded.

And whllft Woolen Gymnasium

seats only 5,632, plans art to ex expand
pand expand it to accommodate 10,000

To men this point from the

low fortunes prior to 53mc

Guire has done a lad-handing
lob of talking to the best hljth

school stars in the New Yorlc

area.

': : 1 ...r..ii wit.' let' It

. Connie Mack went back l""',; Vhen hV wrote,
unlikely Mr. Shakespeart W4 him 1. M wtvn tht
"f or thera was never yet phiiosopner wno v
toothache patiently."
Connie was without qu estion JjMjet
human., ,rr(v4J. '
and whip-lash language.? fir;'. ?; -

would thrk how"to be truculent or obscene but Just
Th Mme the old'tntleman hd a har temper, flippe
luick 1W kept an idequate stock of buss words and was not
aCe haVsh,Pd at times
T.MQst of Connie's known rhubarbs were r with ;Pchers.
Hhad a Ulent for, sarcasm that belied his kindly,
Miier?S A .tock Mne he resemd for pitchet who

took his bumps too matter-of-factly was f

. tUMT vnu trvinff m win; r k

of tnVto lo but, of course, Connie never :meant it that

Ehmke's dramatio victory over. the Cubs in the opening game
of the 1629 World Serle.3. "J -',
Although the bony right-hander had pitched but 55 b b-inM
inM b-inM lit" season and hadn't worked in six weeks, Connie picjc picjc-t?IS
t?IS picjc-t?IS Woro!, d George Etmahaw, 'who had won
20 and 24, respectively.
-.-.--'-
I DOG-HOUSE HERO
; in winning for' the Athletics, 3-1, Ehmke, who was then
h ianhed 13 for a Series record. He more than made Connie's
HVinff Snd in the view of many... foolish gamble stand up.
Sw p Connle-cherl3hed thla

. Ther art oonflictln versions of how. .Connie happened

to atart Ehmke. -Eddi Collins waa Connie'a rignt-nana man
and it always seemed to mi he would know a$ much about
the decision as anyone else ... and, further,, would, b to bet-
a a. rlv Knilt it. ;

Accordinr to Collins H Uated back to Connlt'a' habit of

wranelinr with pitchers who momentarily stirrea his wram.
TMmke had been hammered baflly by tht Yankees. Connie haa

an alternate line for such situations. M"That' the. last, game
you'll ever titth'0''m" 'I ,t .r.
Collins-told mS thr-famillar ultimatum was-delivered to
ft,mVA "hut th rlnser we pot to, the SerWs' and the more

thought Connie gave to all those right-handers In the Chicago

batting order (seven) the more, convuicea ne mbwuk wut
rested Ehmke was the logical starter'

NEEDLE FOR COBB

There is no record that the great Grove ever got. the ulti ultimatum
matum ultimatum treatment, thoueh he was Involved in a, number of

wrangles with the timeless managerotthe AAAs.; '.
Once, Mickey Cochrane told, me, they even traded exple expletives
tives expletives in the dufout, Crov. tristinr at criticism, exploded,

"Aw, the hell with you." Connie! Jumped to his feet, shook
his inevi,1ble score card under; the- star left-hander's snout,

and cried: And the hell with you. too."

Even Ty Cobb was not immune to Connie's Infuriating but
little-known needMnr tactics, is -',.,.

The AAAs were blowing a flouble header to the Tigers (or

maybe it -was the Indians) and Cobb, who had gonejiltiess all

afternoon; was starting for the-plate when Connie called to
Jilm: x ,
"Mr. Cobb lfithis pitcher is too good for you Just say so,
nd I'll send one of my other boys in to pinch hit for you."

piC'0rrTkt o, Niah.lv inm
f '1 "S 1 ELACIUACK)
f -s- (Ti CRAPTAELB

nil HVk-

slot MAc:::::r3

Talent which used to reach Citv
College of New York or New
York University or St. John's

now shows up at Chapel Hill
For some, such as Harvey fialz

of Brooklyn or Lenny ROsen ROsen-bluth,
bluth, ROsen-bluth, who halls from The
Bronx, a stop-over at Greenbrier
Military Academy in Virginia for
prep-school polishing was arranged.

Once at Chape! Hill, McGulre

sees his players don't leave be

cause or academic woes through

a svstem of tutoring. Graduate

students receiv t2 an hour to

see that basketball players don't

fall behind. Throughout a year,

it r'n- into, money, but that's

serond.iry.

To get thft horses, McGulre has

a New York -agent, Harry Got-i
kin, t member of a Brooklyn

basketball family.

- Gotkln sees in the neighbor

hood of 300 hlfrli school games a

year. He spends a lot of time

talking to prospects ana usually
gets what he wants. ;
Danny Lotz, 6-7 North Caro Carolina
lina Carolina freshman ; from Northport,
Long Island, is an example. Lotz

was -signed, sealed and readv for

Wake Forest when Gotkin show

ed up..He snoke to the boy's fa

ther, a Baptist minister. Ootkin,

the Reverend Lotz mused, re
minded him of a friend of an

other reglous faith he once had.

Fellow turned into an excellent

Baptist fv.":, : r

A couple of weeks later, younr

Lotz was at North Carolina and

Wake Forest's Bones McKinney

was wondering what happened

Harry Ootkin had a question
about it. too.' i

"Frank," he said tof McGulre.

''what am I going .to do? The
Reverend Lots, he wants I

should become Baptist.",-,
jv i "-. .v ..- .;
Even In Coo!:-r
Fontin:to Is
Hot Ice Item

HSfEW YORK (NEAT -li One
of th maior rusnn for thr Mw

York hangers success at both Na

tional Hockey League play and the

box of nee is Lou Fontinato.- But

yoa wonder why.''
Fontinato. the burlv defense

man', seems to be off the ice in a

penalty box ai. much as he is in
attion.f: i i 4 wit
He has already surpassed ) the
Ranger record ef 14S minutes in
a penalty box set by Ching John Johnson,
son, Johnson, who helped make the Broad Broadway
way Broadway Blues the toast of New York
at ont time.
And Fontinato now is heading
for the all-time hockey mark! of
167 minutes in the cooler, held by
Red Horner, Toronto's old ; tough
guy.
Fontinato, unpredictable, but
hard-hitting, has helped 'w h 1 p
hockey interest in this city to a
point where sellouts are common.

, AfeC HOLDS TvUXNIY
Rochester, N. Y. t- (NEA) -The
American Bowling i Congress
Tournsmect will" be hld her
from March 3 to May 20. A focal
of 5,815 teams have entered so far.

y))sy 'c'-.

1 miSi 1

,,-.;,.. i'.pX' r , : v

. . ' ' NT""" rTT7lT:! '""4
i 1 v" 'A

" f a.- ,! 'CV?

., ,. .,,

' R nhf'Tn?

.
i. (Whit to Look for
. "tt Today' Corrida)
- ; "f Alt IN PAMPLONA"

r.
' I
If
it

I!

m n

!

.i 1 .. :

: I-

Calendar In Open

SPftlNC'tlCGlN'O Fa? Crocker of, Montivedeo, Uraguay,'
J blast out of s trap during women's golf tournament t Miami, Fla.-

'111,

it i
lit

tfl!

' 1
j
X i ? .,

V By JIMMY 1RISLIN 1
NIA Staff Crrnrftnt
NEW YORK (NEA -The

talk around New York these days
turns, naturally, to where the sun
is shining at. a guy1 can have a
cup of coffee without having to
keep one. eye on his coat or cog cogging
ging cogging up a quarter for somebody

else to do the Job.

So it was expected that Fred

Corcoran would talk about the

stars of his promotional stable

Sammy Snead and Ted. Williams

when he slipped into a seat at

lunch the other day.

Both Snead and Williams are in

Florida these days, "either fish-

ing or talking about hitting," Cor

coran was saying. "Ted will save
a solid spring training for himself

this year an if be gets over it
without some crazy accident, he

should have a good year. You

know what he always says. 'Old
T. S. W, is never going to bavt
bad year.'"

WHAT ABOUT SNIAD then?

This was the obvious question and
it is asked annually, beginning at
this time and lasting right up to

the point where he drops out of

contention for the United States

Open. Snead, you hear each year,
is the man to beat. This year, the

saying has changed a bit:' Tm
is tht year or it never will be,"

Just to reintroduce an old sub sub-jecVthe
jecVthe sub-jecVthe case of Samuel Jackson
Snead against tht United States
Open is a running battle which
saw tht first shot fired'- in U937.
Since then Snead has been in ev every
ery every U.S. Open. i
But the event always has meant
frustration to Sam. Hands down,
he is the best piece of golfer the

country has had in the past IS
years. Smooth and strong. Sam
puts together rounds which can
make you forget anybody who cv-

er played the game. He wins ev every
ery every major tournament except tht
Open with ease.

Put Sam In the Open, howevf

and yoa have a wreck. Jfe cam t
close, losing a playoff to Lear.,

Worsham once. But he never took
it all and now he'll be 43 by tee

offt-ime at Rochester. ;

IP HI DOES IT this year."

Corcoran says, "he will be one pf
the two oldest to win h. Ted Gray .,

was 43 when he won it at Inverness

in 1920. He holds the record. :

"Snead still has his game. May Maybe
be Maybe he needs a little more rest now'

he can't go through that whoJa

tour but for one tournament,
he still has the goods. ? -.
"And if h wins the Open, I can't
think of another golfer, outsicta
of Jimmy Demaret, who could
cash in on the thing like Sain',
could. He would turn the Open i
to a big money item." iZ
, "They'd have to build a raw -bank
for Sam. You know; the pros
always say Ha gen is the first man
ia golf to make a .'million and
spend it. And Sam is the first to,
make a million, and save two."
It would appear then that tho

end of the string is coming up for
Snead. "He's going to play tvetf
year," Corcoran insists, but'
somehow that 43 has a habit Urf
turning into 44 a year later. .- -It
seems hard to think of Snead as
being too old to Win a golf tourna tournament
ment tournament but not nearly as hard as-it
will be to think of him as a guy
who never won the U.S. O p e-n. -And
this probably will happen un unless
less unless he makes it this time.

OUT OF DOORS

Hitk XX

This is demostration of superb

beauty and perfection and of the
hiehly developed artistic sense

that good "banderilleros" can dis display
play display in the second phase of the
corrida. With nothing else but the

two banderillas (darts) m Mi
hands, tht bandenllero runs to

ward the charging bull, meets
him fact to face and places, the

two darts into the bull's shoulders

where thev must remain as if they

are one. This xeat was first per

formed by tht famous Mexican

bullfighter Rodolfo Gaona in the

Pamplona (Spain) bullring.

"AGAINST THI FENCI"

The matador or the handerillo

exposes himself to a great deal of

danger as he places tht darts
into the bull near to the fense
where he is practically without
means of escape. One false move

into, the ; bull near to the fence
This stunt is rarely performed.

rwn Treut in The Ntrth PUH
iy AL McCLANI
FJthtnf Edittr

AT one time the North Platte

River, which rises in the Medicine
Bow Range west of Laramie, Wyo.,
was considered one of the best

trout streams in the country. :

It has been overfished in recent
years, and the quality of the ang ang-lini
lini ang-lini is not what it was, but the

North Platte continues to attract a

great deal of casting talent simply
becsuse it Is a beautiful river, es especially,
pecially, especially, down that long valley
between 'Encampment and Sara Saratoga.
toga. Saratoga. .....
That's about as good a recom recommendation
mendation recommendation as we can think of,
and some largt trout art still to
be had If you fish carefully.
Brown trout art present in the

North Platte and its tributaries.

Here, as elsewhere, the browns
tend to leave ttfe main river and
the larger side streams as the
season advances.
Local experts make fine catches
br carefully fishing in small
meadow creeks, using dry flies,
sizes IS and 38. In dealing with

brown trout it pays to try any
little,- slow moving meadchv
stream where the water Is fairly fairly-deep.
deep. fairly-deep. It naturally follows that siieU
able brown trout never take a fly -except
when a few feet away

from a log Jam, a brush pile, or,,

a dense weed bed; always a plact
where your leader is apt to re
broken. ,
There is a "sleeper" In thiv
part of Wyoming which you should
look into the Salt River. iuof;t
of its rather short length Is v "ii
Star Valley, an isolated dairy
farming district, remote from any
city 'or main highway. Afton jj
the community center,
;. :" .-. .v4.. ,.f'
The Salt River is a deep slow'
moving stream with open, grassy
banks, except for a few willows,
, Here is ont major trout stream,
accessible by automobile and with
no serious drawbacks, that hns
nevei been exploited. Being glas-
sy-smoothl it is best to use dry
flies.' Look for tising fish along
the weed beds. Late June is con considered
sidered considered the best time to fish' tht
Silt

"HISH PASS"

Freauentlv the first oass in the

third' phase is called "helped by

the high pass."' which belongs in

,tht category of ,the "death jss."

Tht technique consists of moving
no' part of the body but the arms.

This makes the bull pass under
the cape without touching causing
him to turn sharply and immedia

tely charge .again to another

'high pass.'!

ICKLUM3T IN AAU

Lon

Akron' Cv N2A)

Srhhinrtt' former I;..!iar. All

4-Aiin, mw w-wi'h tne Feuna
I Cats rf tti Nstnnal nr1nvtna
Lakcibiiil League. 1

I

2 ... .. .:.; ..... ":,...:..1,.J..::,..s.,&,. ... ..-.

HF WANTS OUT -Refereo Frank Udvari tries to climb out ; of
th! Madiso? Squire Garden nk as Lou Font.nato of the New
York Raneers (dark jersey) and Montreal Canad.eM ClaunV
provost (feft) ind Floyd Curry Ai) bang each other around.-
I .... m

lh:ni!:y lies 'En
Uurcry Fcr Fen

MORGANTOWN. West. V.

(NEA) Hot Rod Hundley's idea
of how basketball should be play

ed has spread to his West Virgi

nia university teammates.
. In spare .practice moments, the
UAN(ain..M tiaira whtnnMfl lin A

trirlr nlv for n lati in tfime

when they're well ahead and

people are looking tor a snow.

"It i a football formation with a

long downcourt pass reports

Rene Henry.

t. ;i.' :rr

NATIVE LIQUORS

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V;:at ::

HOME DELIVERY

Opposite Panama RR Station
X Tel. 2-0356 -r2-0359

PAMAf.lA'

American

1

FULL STZ.LD AI:ZJ3 Al TTi;c-r O' So ?"? ViV' Ys t -'-"r, holds a national I
record lor tne inumuuai meatey. reli. -lit iud. 8 ytuds in '2.11.2. Wigsins, breast-stroking r

CAN FILL YOUR NEEDS!

"k here, is a senior.



,7

u SJ Li
!ci::;:i!i To Ui

vl liiJ ii mi.J
4j I lliiiij LltiMlvtal

"Let the people
list TEAR

Wanderer On Band

' By EUGENE BERGERON
After a lone talk' with James
Zotek of the Smithsonian Institu
tion office in Balboa Weights, i
Prided that a trio to the Island
of Barro Colorado was a m u 1 1
with me, as I am an enthusiastic
outdoorsman, amateur herpetolo herpetolo-gist,
gist, herpetolo-gist, hiker and mountain climber.
I decided that this looked like
a fairly wild area and of more
tna. passing interest to lovers of
nature anf. animal me in us u u-'
' u-' final habitat. . :
With this in. mind I boarded a
train at 7:15 a.m. Feb. 14, and in
'less than an hours time 1 was
'.t the dubious little town of Fn-
ioles. which of course means
; "beans."
loles vou board i the
' Smithsonian Institution's launch
and proceed across Frijoles Bay
to the island of Barro Colorado
and in about IS or 20 minutes land
at the headquarters oi tne isoo isoo-!
! isoo-! ratory and control arek for the is
land. ." -i.-;-,-.. .'
J was handed a map of the a a-rea
rea a-rea showing, all of the trails and
points of interest. It a p pe a r a
there are a total of "over 50 miles
"oZ trails on the island, which is
a' protected biological area set a a-'sfoe
'sfoe a-'sfoe by the Congress of the United
Slates and wmcn is aamimsieicu
w th Smithsonian Institute of
Waihintrtnn B.C.
v No hunting is allowed and no
firearms are permitted on the is
land. The animai iue is iiuicv.u
from molestation but visitors, are
most welcome to photograph any
wild life they happen to see in
the area.' .
At the lab. a mess hall and oth other
er other facilities are provided. Meals
are served to visitors. A small
rh.r! of Si is' made for the
meals and launch transportation
to and from Fnjoles and tne is island.
land. island. This charge covers every everything
thing everything except the rail fare from
Balboa to Fnjoles-140 for the
round trip. v ,
The island of. Barro Colorado is
one of great tropical beauty, tro tropical
pical tropical palms of all kinds in protu protu-,
, protu-, lion. The fresh water area is suit suitable
able suitable for swimming and is parti particularly
cularly particularly inviting as the water is
clear and clean. There are no
dangerous fish, in the immediate
area and it is perfectly safe for
swimming. (
Upon landing at the taboratorto
'docks one has to climb a seem seemingly
ingly seemingly endless concrete step area,
which is steep. This ends at the
laboratory. The trails start from
this" area to all directions of the
island. .
1 arrived at ft a.m. and imm imm-dialelv
dialelv imm-dialelv hit the trail after; photo photographing
graphing photographing a koala which is loose
m tne area and will eat out of
. your hand, Shy but rather tame,
. they are a beautiful type of ani animal
mal animal and quite, similar to Austra Australia's
lia's Australia's koala beat, which is a bit
smaller.
I started out on the Nemessa
trail then branched off- onto the
Wheeler trail and went directly to
the tower which is in the center
f the island.
Along this route t saw several
eoalis. They immediately jumped
on a tree and started climbing
rapidly. 1 managed to photograph
one a few feet up the tree as he
hesitated a moment, glancing at
me wtih great curiosity.
From the area of the tower, I
started out on the Gilbert Person
Fueses house
TODAY .75, .40
I 1:30, 4:00, :3ft, 9:00 P.M.
Th secYeta of the atranftft
Mansion on H the Hill!
E ii i
r
1 1
ihikhm Jv..i f.Li. t nam

-i .'., '. ''': S '.-'

CM WW I

know the truth and the
PANAMA, K. Fh SEND

there on the Nemessa trail backcreeks which had spring water in

to the La bora tono area and from
there proceeded on the Donate
trail and to the area of the Har
vard trail. ' .'"v':
On this route I saw more koa
las and many gray-faced monkes.
way up high in the trees chatter
ine away. A I had no telephoto
lenses I could not photograph
mem.
Along these, trails, were many
javelmas or wild. hogs.;. They
scampered away in treat haste
While on the trails 1 could hear
the roar of cats, in the distance
but it was not until I was in the
area of the Raymond Chapman
trail In the' vicinity of the Big
rree.that I was jarred out of my
easy going gait by a sudden roar
of a. cat only a hundred feet a-way.-
''
I got a look at him. It was a
black panther and of goodly size.
After one roar he -jit off like a
streak into the jungle. :,
This was the only cat I saw on
my whole trip, which exceeded 20
mile. I hiked from 9 a.m. Quite
steadily and alone until 3:30 p.m.
I had one canteen of water but
ran short v ; v-,.'
However I crossed numerous
.A
u-
' "I
i jrt.'.V'i

WIN ACQITITTAL Mra. Trleda Katz ets a. hug from her
daughter, Lenore (rlghtlvln Cleveland after she was acquitted
of conspiracy. Her husband, David Katz. was previously freed
of the same charge. Mrs. Katz was one of 10 persons being
tried in a three-month Smiths Act trial. Four were acquitted
and, the other six were convicted- of conspiring to overthrow
i ;the U. S. Government.,

t
!APT. R Hv EMERICK, chief,
Industrial : Division and chair
man, industrial Training' Com Committee
mittee Committee la shown- presenting cer certificates
tificates certificates Of participation for the
completion of the recent course
in elements of thermodynamics.
The course is a pre-requisite for
courses which are to follow The
next course will be principles ot
mechanical refrigeration which
is now In preparation. Notice
will be given when thls course Is
to- atarfc.
Reading from left to rieht in
the first row are Capt. R. H.

y :
CN v.
!' III

5

iffl

country'it iafe" Abraham Lincoln,

AT, FEBRUARY If, 1
.them and I concluded that it was
fit to drink and filled my canteen
and drank copiously of the. ceoi
rnr water... '.'
The trails are quite wide and
the best it has ever been thy plea pleasure
sure pleasure to travel; over. They are in
truth very easy trails on foot. In
most places they exceed five feet
in width and are wejl kepi
During my. 20-mile hike 1 saw
the following came: ten javelins.
three koalas,' six or more condors,
twenty or, more monkeys, (gray (gray-faced)
faced) (gray-faced) a dozen or more guinea
hens, one panther (black cat) one
blue. racer 'snake..,:';,." ;v;-.
I expected to see more reptiles
but as the reptiles of this area
are nocturnal it is doubtfulif "Vis "Vis-istors
istors "Vis-istors will he them during the day.
The island appears to have an
abundance of wild, animala of all
kinds but of. course- they sat ay
clear of the trails and when hu humans
mans humans approach ; the are where
animals happen to be they ; (the
animals) take off into the 'jungle
without --.delay'.. They seem -to be
more scared of 'humans than; hu
mans of them.-' -'- U''.',-.-;-.'Vi'
The institution also furnishes a
guide for the jungle :' trail trips.
,v,
- ji
i r
Emerlck and Theodore P. Mc-
Oann, Navy Public Works:
Second row: Louis S. Damiani,
Maintenance Division;- Allan L.
Blaney, Industrial Division; Tw-
sion; James C. Slade, Mainten Maintenance
ance Maintenance Division; James I Rlne-
hart, Industrial Division; John
T; O Donnell, Jr., Industrial Di
vision; Stanwood O.' Specht,
Electrical Division; waiter E.
Marek, Maintenance Division;
Harvey sauUr, Maintenance Xli
vision; Willard E. Percy, instruc
tor..

TEN CENTS

Colorado

This is included in the fee for the
day's outing. 1
; I preferred to hit the trail alone
as I like to cover at least or more
miles on my jungle trips and have
no desire to be hampered by no novice
vice novice in a group as no real mile mileage
age mileage could be covered in that man manner,
ner, manner, i
I had planned t coverall trails
in one day but due to having to
catch the 4:15 p.m.. launch back
to Frijoles I was forced to iut
short: my coverage of the island.
, I plan to stay overnight on the
island in a future trip and cover
all of the trails in one day if pos possible.'
sible.' possible.' '.;-: ':" :
Everyone should see Barro Co Colorado.
lorado. Colorado. One needs to aee it to ap appreciate
preciate appreciate it in all its. beauty.
SI::ll!iIIWcikcr
PITTSBURGH -(UP) lamese
Sams., of nearby Bndf eville., com
bines the oddly matched careers
of steel worker and singer; She
does an outstanding job at both.
'At a steel worker the husky 31-year-old
girl has handled, jobs in
the Bridg eville plant of Universal-
Cyclops Steel Corp., it is believed
no woman ever attempted.
At t singer with the Bob Trow
Quartet she has drawn the praise
oi aucn nauonaiiy anown singers
as Nat "King" Cole and Tony Ben
nett. Between shifts at the steel
mill she has appeared on Pitts
burgh radio and television shows.
Two years ago, Miss Sams and
the Trow group just missed ,-a
chance at the big time after their;
recording of "Soft Squeeze, Baby"
won wide acclaim. The other mem
bers of the group also have otherl
jobs, and the offers of New York
auditions never came when they
an naa tree time.
t
Miss Sams got the nickname
"Lum" when she took a man's job
in the Universal hot mill during
World War II. She was 1 at the
time.
In six months, she was operat
mg a charging machine, a tricky
device which loads the roaring
steel furnaces. Since then she has
been made production clerk in the
cold mill "Lum" is one of only
lour women m the mill s pro
duction department.
miss sams nas been sinsine
since she was in first grade. She
sang in the St. George's choir and
at school parties. In 1947, she vol volunteered
unteered volunteered to do a song in a night
club- and was immediately hired
tor a paid engagement.
Her best break in the music field
came when she attended a party
in 1951 and met Bob Trow, a com com-mercisl
mercisl com-mercisl artist with a flair for har
monic arrangements. From that
meeting came the Trow quartet. 1
Third row; Leonard E. Case;
Maintenance Division;' James E.
Shobe, Electrical Division; Rob Robert
ert Robert D. Lawrence; Industrial Divi Division:
sion: Division: Henrv E. Mav Jr.. Tndnx.
trial Division; Mllford K. Bailey,
Maintenance Division; Homer B.
Cooper, Industrial Division; Jas.
R. Folsum. Industrial' Division-
Boyd w. Ferry, Maintenance Di
vision; Maurice W. Sherry, Jf,
Industrial Division. .-.,
Those hot shown in. the' pic pic-tui.
tui. pic-tui. who. aka- "conmleted . the
course and received certificates
are: L. Cellucl. Navv Public

PHILADELPHIA (UP). A

historic Indian wampum belt has
been adopted by a global organi organisation
sation organisation of scientists as the emblem
of their first American meeting, to
b held here this year.
The Hiawatha wampum belt will
symbolize "free communication"
at the 5th International Congress
of Anthropological and Ethnologi Ethnological
cal Ethnological Sciences next Sept. 1-9 in the
University Museum of the Univer University
sity University of Pennsylvania.
It will be pictured on badges to
be worn by delegates to the con congress,
gress, congress, among whom will be many
of the world'a outstanding scholars.
The Hiswatha belt is said to be
the original record of the forma formation
tion formation of the Iroquois League the
Indian "United Nations." It is now
in the New York State Museum at
Albany. ' V-
. Its adoption oy the congress 10
symbolize "free communication
among members of the scientific
community all over the world" was;
recommended by Dr. William N.
Fenton, secretary-general of the;
congress. Dr. Fenton is an author authority
ity authority on the Iroquois and assistant
commissioner for the Museum and.
Science Service of New' York State.
On the belt, a pine tree and
four squares linked by lines rep
resent toe nve inaian nations in tne
Iroquois League. The figures are
white, the background dark purple.
The tree, in the center, stands
for Onondaga Castle. On one side
are squares, representing the Mo
hawk and Oneida nations; on me
other squares representing the Ca Cayuga
yuga Cayuga and Seneca nations.;
Hiawatha, an historical figure,
had little in common with the
Longfellow Doem of that name.
An Onondasa by birth and. a Mo
hawk bv adoption, he was the
spokesman for Deganawidab. who
spearheaded formation oi tne iro
quois League.
Austrulb (ontrcls
6ra$s!::pp:r PI
MELBOURNE (UP) -'The
worst Krasshoooer plague in Aus
trailian history has : finally been
controlled. : ? 5"
Victoria s director of Agriculture,
P. Ryan, said more than $500,000
was spent in tire ngnt wmcn cov
ered some 400 square miles in
Victoria and. New South Wales
Ryan said the use of airplanes was
a big factor in controlling the move
ment of the hoooers.
Crops and pasture land valued
at more than $35,000,000 were
threatened by the hordes when they
began their overland march in vt vt-rrmhw.
rrmhw. vt-rrmhw.
"It has been a desoerate fight,"
Ryan aaid. "but with the aid of
the four planes, we have won ont.
"Without them the losses would
have been terrific, as we had
to cover three times the area of
the 1953 plague." v
It is not yet known how much
damage was inflicted upon indi individual
vidual individual farmers by the insects which
seemed 1 to bubble 5 out of the
cround bv the millions. Ryan said,
however, that he did not believe
the losses would be very Heavy,
and added that most of the.de
voured pasture lands would be re restored
stored restored by a good downpour of rain.
Swarms were sighted that cov
ered an 83-square mile area. Four
planes, .'three of them American
DC3S, were in tne air from dawn
to dusk during the height of the
battle spraying tons of insecticides
over the infected areas. The hop
pers were so thick in some areas
that highway traffic was stopped
and the swarms clouded the sun.
Planes furnished by the R.A.A.F.,
the Army and private airlines were
used in the fight.
Works: Alton J. Havwood. Indus
trial Division; Paul w. Kramer,
Industrial Division; Alvln Lim,
Industrial Division; Gordon; C.
Reif. Industrial Division- Haspv
Updyke, Industrial Division;
Paul H. Zimmerman, Industrial
Division;' Charles A. Stewart,
Locks Division: Robert J. Rov.
Locks Division; Ernest M. Krue-
ger,. Locks Division; James A.
Mable, Locks Division ; William
H Keller. Jr.. Locks Division:
Joiuuwc4P..lectricai.DivJ-
sion.' :.

; FRONT

,' INTERldR view

Christian Science

In Balboa, ;
dlally tnv ted to attend ''Onen
House" at the Christian Science
Reading Room in Balboa on
Wednesday from, 2 'to 7:30 p.m.
rne Readmir Room occupies
Building 808 on Balboa Road,
next to the Canal Zone Credit
Unl6n Building. -
First Church of.Christ. Scien
tist,- Ancon. is located at 560 An-
con Boulevard and .Its Sunday
aervices at 11 .m. and Wednes
day-evening meetings.; at 8 are
open to the public. The Wednes Wednes-dav
dav Wednes-dav evenlnor meetintu include
testimonies of Christian' Science
healings.- Sunda? School con convenes
venes convenes at 9:30 Jn the mornins- for
children -and young people; tip to.
tne, age or ;zu years. v
LUX o
WEEK END
mm 6QC.-

Jl:15 1:11 :M l;5J 1:5$;
SHE WAS THE OTHER, WOMAN '.

tiieoe
11
.if'
STAI
. f...
..

entrance U Reading Room at 101

of one sectkoa the.air-conaitioned Reading Room.

Will Open
such is Bible concordances, Bi-
we, dictionaries, and other aids
to tne; study of both the Bible
and Christian Science are avail available
able available at a reference table.
" Convenient"' reading; tables for
svuay as well as comfortable
chairs for reading enable the
Reading Room to serve about 20
persons at one time.
- The monthly Christian Science
Journal, the. weekly Sentinel,
the Heralds in. their several lan language
guage language editions, as well as the in international
ternational international dallv newsnaDer.-the
Christian Science Monitor,, may
op read or obtained.
-Quarterlies for the reading of
the religious dally lesson are a a-yailable
yailable a-yailable In both Spanish and
TODAY
RELEASE
'IOC. mm
-
ti.t t' s
yean tf (
wirfi
"'1

Balboa Road,

ding Room,
Wednesday
by order in several other lan
guages.
a Although authorized Christian
Science JlUrature is available,
for -. sale, this Is an accommoda accommodations
tions accommodations to visitors and, is not the thereat
reat thereat purpose of the reading
room!. The real purpose is to en enable
able enable visitors to examine, read
and study the Bible and Christ
ian Science literature ; without
charge.
BALBOA TIDES
SUNDAY, If IRUARt l
hich; low
t:it .m 2:44 a.m.
:0I p.m. ': I ;04 a.m.
; TODAY
CENTRAL
i 0.60 0.30
" SHOWS:
1:1, :!, S:M, C:5(. t:S2 a.m.
I
f
A-
- I' if i' r.i f.rmj.w
fs l
. i
r.::::TiJlGnEI
1



!
f
t
v i:
t
'-- s
I
s
;

n
uuv
1

'C ...,. V

0

5l

lCU.".ij4jl

r)TTSM pole carving is a lost
art, but anyone can create
miniature totem facsimiles. It's
amusing handiwork for a nuny
day or when Junior's home with
the sniffles.
A curious collection of totem
figures is provided, left and
above, for a starter. Additional
figures, symbols, etc., are left to
the individual's Imagination.
Color and cut out the figures
rovided; pasta or tape these
about a candle or paper tube.

fiinffrfrfi T K?

1 i 1 1 T.TJ

Wings, below,
and beak, at left,
may be attached
to figures bear bearing
ing bearing dotted lines.

1 Beak
Is three dimensional

I
If

Burning Out
DETER PINCH has decided
to give up smoking as soon
as his cigarette supply runs
out
He calculates that if he
smokes one a day, he will be
able to smoke on 19 more days
than he will If he smokes two
a day, but none every third
day.
How many cigarettes has
he left? :
fU-IMP S8 UJIIU.) jo Cp
aao v Ap 6 u pautnguoa
j gg 'Asp ,0J 1 a.iojjjaqx
iap acai jo u)u no Xa enomi
joa n! jnq 88 (oui nJ sq
Asp pj;n Aj3A euon pa Xsp
04 i Kip k nj u MnsjBSfp

FIND SEVEN HIDDEN FIGURES

OMSlY has a.

i

It's All About Love
VyHAT do you know about ra-
V moua loves and lovers? Let's
see. Give yourself two points for
each of the following questions
answered correctly. Twelve or
more is a good score.
1. Who was Cinderella's sweet sweetheart?
heart? sweetheart? V" ..
2. Priscilla Mullins had two
rivals for her hand. Who were
they?-.
3. What famous poet was In
love with Beatrice Portinari ?
4. What waa the name of the
nun beloved by Abelard?
5. What, English king abdi abdicated
cated abdicated because of his love?
6. Princess Margaret recently
turned down
7. Who was the sweetheart of
the famous Admiral Nelson?
8. Washington Irving led a
happily married life. True or
false?
Joiaqaeq w art -8i8i '8 "oi
liuivH pT 'pussimox JVd
1IIA pJP3 9 S)ooh ?ua
g it!pu)8 WIH Vu 9PtV mot
1 'Uui.mo JU.icj 'i :jMiv

HOW quickly can you take five
wooden matched such as
those shown above and form a
five-pointed star with them? It's
easy, but there's a gimmick In Involved
volved Involved which It may take some
time to discover. ;
The answer is given below, but
no fair peeking.
It's a good trick to keep In
mind for an Impromptu perform performance
ance performance at a party some time.
mw n jo Mod joj
onj u ip)BU qD8 pusg :oDos
Crypto-Ouote
HISTORY beara out the fol following
lowing following sags observation re regarding
garding regarding our beloved first Presi President,
dent, President, made more than a century
ago by Daniel Webster. It la pre presented
sented presented here in the form of a sub substitution
stitution substitution cryptogram.
CXGADUZMTC X VDOPH
GMXJ D0 MAP YDIBXBPUM
TS ZCPXM CXBPG, GADUDUZ
ODMATJM MCDULEDUZ Tl
TQGSJTXMDTC, CDMA SEPXI.
KJPCPYDSPUM EDZAM.
Clue: Initial word of the quo quotation
tation quotation Is the subject's name.
Wn trapu3uq -jojo qij 'uon
jnoqo la Xuhmuiaj wioqli autum
'sauiBU )9jX jo )U9tunuuy eq) U)
IBH pan -nonaums8ia :aoinos

T

vivid imagin imagination.
ation. imagination. He fancies
seeing a number
of creatures
which he saw at
a zoo recently
hidden In the
drawing at right
He has named
the following:
Lion
Elephant
Seal
Duck
Kangaroo
Otter
Giraffe
How many of
these can you
find?

Riddh

es

V7HT Is'spoiled
" food like a
cook's apron?
uio)t aqi iumi
tain i :aa.Hiuy
What tongue
can wagyet
never speak?
ani(t I JO ns
-aot ei4X ttaMtuy
What Is bought
by the yard and
worn out by the
foot?
jmnn no ai
jadiBO i natvy

' ..

Helping Yourself

A DOGHOUSE MIX-UP

Case of the Turnabout Evidence WHO IS SHE TRYING TO DRAW?

AVERY" OTINOB, con man and
forger, realized that he was
an exact double for Tom Pinto,
famous singing eovboy : star.
Studying Pinto'a picture in a
magazine, he noticed a scar over
Pinto's right eye. "Just some
make-up for a similar scar over
the right eye,'' be murmured,
"and I'm Tom Pinto, even to
height and weight." ;
Through a confederate, Avery
obtained Pinto's cheek to a char
ity organization, The forger then
duplicated the signature on an another
other another check for $3,000 and teok
It to a bank. The check was
cashed without question.
So impressed was bank guard
Hugh Delme with the celebrity
at hand, that h pointed the star
out to the next entrant. "That's
the famous Tom Pinto," he
beamed. "Here is his picture In
the latest copy of 'Show,' a pk

are magazine I Just bought

Out of politeness, Detective
Murray looked at the photo. It
showed Pinto playing a guitar.
The scar over his right eye, a
memento of rodeo days, was
clearly visible. A gardenia was
evident in his right lapel, a ker kerchief
chief kerchief slowed in the light pocket
of his suit jacket which was but buttoned
toned buttoned from right to left.
It took the detective but a
few seconds to absorb the de details
tails details and to compare the picture
with the forger. By this time
Pinto was at the exit.
"Mr. Pinto?" asked Murray,
bkrrmg the way.
"That' right, said Avery,
smlhng. "Did you want my auto autograph?"
graph?" autograph?" "No, I want YOU!"
You Be the Detective: How
did Murray know that Avery
was an lmposter?
jsa Auoqd BH ""M BlU ir!U
-OB ft BIO UO JO pB3)6UI pm
map 8il no jto t.oiuij pxnjod
'jn)ad aiuvff am uaa pi'l
-)ua.idd 'Xjav 'fuotitaj amo pu
isol.in(l noB oo) auop saijo t
'paft.iovei nq peu isnouqo uuz
TAKING LEAF.
AMAPLK tree has 17 branch branches,
es, branches, each having 11 leaves In
May. If each branch doubles its
leaves in a month, how many
leaves hajs the tree at the end of
seven months? '
'caiJ BAtq Pino AB9 ,JJj am
jo (B pus jaqiuanaQ aq Um pTio
if joj 'auou AiquqOJd :hiV .:

26.
xMr 3 19 21
ft I is, u

WANTING to draw a certain picture
and aot knowing how presents a
dilemma for the youngster above. Will
you help her?
She'd like to complete the profile of a
famous American, one aout whom it'a
been said more words have been written

than any other. We celebrate his birth

day toward the latter part of February.
To bring the picture to the foro, draw
a continuous line following the. dots In
numerical order. Begin at dot 1; end at
dot 28. Where two numbers designate
one dot, use the dot for both.
' -aojftauiHM

ajoof) 'jionoa Jno jo jatOM

. DWEf REPORTS on select new
books of Interest o Aome
craftsmen, hobbyists and collec collectors.
tors. collectors. Selected by Clark Kinnaird.
The New American Stamp
Catalogue, 1956 Edition, edited
by George A. Tlamsa (Grosset &
Dunlap, 244 pages: $3). Historic
background, designs and values
of each provisional stamp or
postage issue in this country
from colonial times up to Oct.
1955. A major reference work
for the philatelist, excellently Il Illustrated.
lustrated. Illustrated. The Magic Key to Successful
Writing, by Maxine Lewis (Pren (Pren-'
' (Pren-' tice-Hall, 257 pages: $3.95), is a
clarification, by an editor of. a
national magazine, of what hap happens
pens happens in the course of developing
into a competent, weir paid
craftsman. It does not make the
process appear easy, and should
be of sound, practical value to
the aspiring writer.
The Beseler Enlarger Guide,
by Charles H. Coles Greenber
128 pages: $1.95), and Revere
Movie Guide, 8-16 mm., by Ed
Mankus (Greenberg, 126 pages:
$1.95). Newest editions to the
Greenberg Modern Camera
Guides series, which now has a
hand-book o practically every everything
thing everything concerning photography.
Baseball Mix-Up
SOMETHING went wrong aa
the teletype in the newspaper
office was tapping out a seiUu.-.ea
written by its sports editor, who
was covering the big game. One
key of : the teletype failed to
.. strike, so this was produced
I E M E F A E D f I E I 1

r i a

SOC dogs have
their own In Individual
dividual Individual houses.
One night they
got mixed up and
with the excep exception
tion exception of the dog
occupying house
number two, all
entered the
wrong houses.
Can you get
each dog located
in the right
house within
ten moves?
Make six
counters the size
of the jmmbered
houses, number
them from one

to si and place each on Its correspondingly num numbered
bered numbered house. Dogs one, two and three should occupy
the houses now tenanted by four, two and five re respectively;
spectively; respectively; four, five and Btx should be where six,
one and three are.
"t '8 '9 "ft '9 T '9 '1 T, :oiOj
II j jaeod 9t() 9M U PH laAOiu uax :aoinoy
Word-Builders Project

BEGINNING with pet,
add one tetter each
row and complete the puz-'
zle with enterprise, as

indicated in diagram.
Clues to words between
are given in the

definitions below.

p

N

R

R

G S.
Insert the same letter eleven
times In the above and yotf will
complete the sentence. What did
the sports editor write ?
..stuiau) au)a o) paatro)
Dtui iiin not pas lomn usa9

,.n iaia M1 'JJI "ltl

FUN BLOCK WITS TEST

IE i iti jeQ 1u1 1d1 iG
.;.' :
WW. U4U. Li--
. :
.:....: ....v.' ;..'....'. v. w. v.
V:" .'.'.'.M. 1 f '" 'VM'XK' '.'I'.'.'.'A1 11
v ;
'. .!.'. ,.v.v.v .vi-.v.; .v.v.v.- ;
t

uia (gpo'ssyopp'. With Wisdom front the Uibk

1. Domesticated animal. 2. One-half of a stride.
3. Precipitous. 4.Annoy. 5. Large snake. 6. Mere
ostentation, 7: Those who show sincere regret. 8.
Active undertaking.
-auoqs U3AJS mioijmijap eifl oi Saipuodoaj
joa ipjoM Un inoiii asmduaiua oj pd uiojj auh'.i3
-o.id jo vueaiu aiqignod jaifio jjb staqj, ejajuad-m l vsua)

It's Your Move

IT IS Interesting to find how
many smaller words can be
foond within larger ones with without
out without rearranging the letters. The
following word game suggests
some challenging examples. You
can develop your search further
as a pastime.
' To complete the key worda
which appear In skeleton form
in the diagrams above, copy each
letter now showing in the empty
blank or blanks directly beneath
it. Then, using the letters In the
lower blanks, guess at missing
letters and try to form short
words, likewise placing the same
letters in ail blanks of respective
vertical rows.
When the correct letters of the
key words are found, shorter
words will be formed throughout
the blank spaces of the diagram,
horizontally, of course.
'iuauiaj;nbaj eqi jaam enop
an pae jsqa gpjo sqj, :uomihy

Private Fractions
ALL nine of the digits togeth together,
er, together, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 6, 7, 8 and
can be arranged to express many
different fractions ranging from
one-half down to one-sixth, aa
' shown at left,
ro i rlin and possibly
i tA even lower.
"FOR j jflll No particular
ml,22 111,8 eems to
'0R 4 JieH apply to the
i lltl these frac-rORt-rffll
tions. It is
4 simply a mat matter
ter matter of experiment.
There are probably a large
number of different ways In
which other tractions may be
formed as the range of the nine
figures Is large. In each case,
however, care must be taken to
use all nine digits.

By Eugene Sheffer
HORIZONTAL
1-Wlcked.
4 What word found 71 times In
the Psalms Is probably a litur liturgical
gical liturgical sign? IPs. 4:2)
8-What is the 20th book of the
New Testament?
14 God.
15 Liable."
16 Winged,
17 "The spirit Indeed is but
the flesh is weak" (Mat 26:41
19 Smirch.
21 Personal pronoun. ..
22 Electrified particles,
33 Blast.
24 Father of Canaan (Gen. 10:6)
25 What sort of prophets did
Jesus warn against?
27 Couches. 1 i
28 Jewels.
29 Moslem titles.
30 Brother of Pispah (l.Chr. 7:
. 38)
31 A judge of Israel (Judg. 10:1)
33 Word denoting scorn.
34 Feminine name.
36 Value.
39 Symbol for lithium,'
40 Part of a passport
41 Became greater.
43 Exclamation.
44 Go In. I t
46 Hazarded.
48 Aptitude.
49 Mountain In Thessaly.
M Spread for drying.
52 Exultation.
63 Upon what did the Philistines
place the ark to return it to
house of Israel? (1 Sam. 6:8)
55 Harass..
57 System of belief.
58 Lyric poem.
59 Mythological deity.
60 Fertile soil.
61 District Attorney (abbr.)

oz r,snc v

63 Digits. .. .
66 With mouth wide open,,
68 Amalgamate, -- r
"70 Pedal digit..- -
71 Fifth. month of Jewish year.,,-
72 Profoundly wise men.
73 Chop.
VERTICAL

1 What did the one sitting on
the white horse have? (Rev
6:2)
2 Blackbird.
3 Samson and
. 4 Backbone. ....
5 Sea eagles.
6 Ship's day-book.
7 Indefinite article. 1
8 The son of whom was one of
Solomon's chief officers? (1 KL
4:10)
9 Who was Mordecai's father?
Esth. 2:5)
. 10 Entire amount ;
11 Mother.
12 Place to which the children of
Israel went after leaving Sue Sue-coth
coth Sue-coth (Num. 33:6).
13 Appears.
18 Deprivation.
i 20 Hop kiln.
23 What did Jezebel use to close
the letters she wrote in Ahab s
name? (1 KL 21:8)
24 Hearken.
25 Story with a moraL :
; 26 Anew.
27 Awn.
28 Shine.
30 Paid notices.
32 Was in debt
34 Ventilates.
, 35 Heron.
37 Triumvirate.
. 38 Loathed.
40 Waistcoat
42 The Sea.
45 Lacerated,
47 Solar disk,. '.- .
C ItSC, Kins Festares SySdlctte, lot.

48 City included in the inheri inheritance
tance inheritance of the sons of Aaron

U Chf. 6:80)

. 50 At a distance.
52 Snatch, t
l53 Musical passages.
x64 Maxim.
. 56 A son of Simon (Mark 15:21)
57 Arrives. A.

69 What did Mary anoint of
Jesus? (John 12:3)
60 Stringed Instrument
62 Mineral spring.
63 Cut stone.
64 Fish eggs.
65 Stitch,
67 College degree.
69 Symbol for sodium.

T a T" 7ft 7" 6 7" 8" 1 11 12 13
lIIIlIIIllIIIII
1 1 1 vaA 111 EM r

ml

if-I

1

fWwy 'p'AZ i

4 0 ft A 0 0. &

A ', 'A

vmrm
mm nmm i'.wtm a

rmt mm mm, tw
i '- if-

By Millard Hopper
Long-time Open Checker King
WHITE'S desperate. But he's
not panicky. It takes him.
Just three moves to out-maneuver
Black and win. White moves
first, travelling up the board.
Can you play his game?
OE-ftf-DT-i-H-o
lHtM 1;,Bia "5-t 9)ihaa "IT-SK
S'TI8 'St-81 saAOUl 0qA inujnos

61-t

H 3Hr)S3LJVSkr LIvF J-
3 o T r, 3 -l i Nin "ifd v 9 y
S 'a 1 q w n n J y v G
r i7t v o "i n o v j i" ijCi c
a 3 II 5 "Ti d Tp 'J vjfi
A Ml -i 1 "-' i
i tjjvj" ".K'' ? r v ri 2-JT, ill :
V H I; 3 i''-'1 ? s l a Tn
h I o A 1 yf. tf. H
viol v h v 'V': v iiv
. lr- V
on -iK' n j v i J y p
H"' 2 Jj 1 "-' 5 -L 2 iM:
3 1 1 V1' 'i H O f liiNj!.")

CnOSSWORD rCZZLG SOLUTION

,

rut if.
tf
i
I
i
LJ
...L.i
L.



f

TV

.: ; AN OBSTACLE CLEARED Barry Peterson (left) and Betty Wells clear a six-footdwall j,
; as part of newly-installed obstacle course at Albert Monroe high school, Los Angeles. 1
i.ii V 1 1

EVEN A CHILD CAN DO IT

M

RS. ALBERT HUTTON of Cleveland is a brave woman who doesn't believe every

thing she reads. So, when she heard about the Dow Chemical company's claims

for properties of a paint ingredient "so easy a child can do it" and "can be washed
4 up before the paint dries" sre decided to put them to the test. With the firm's help,
. : she assembled five small children, ages two to five years, cans of red, green and light
' green paint and some brushes and rollers. Object to paint a bedroom. An hour lat lat-.
. lat-. er, two walls of a second floor bedroom were covered with an unusual and ugly pink
color. After the party, Mrs. Hutton and two volunteers scrubbed off the paint that had
' 1 spilled on the woodwork. The test was a success. The bedroom will be repainted.

l
I

L

Ready or (ftom left) Jorad Pack, Barbara Burry, Pom Cwrtiss, Mark Davis, Mikt HwHon,

fl

i

Mik (Itft) switch! (o a sooty brush whil Mark (right) ttrttchts vp for a high spot.

J

Jored gets soma htlp a thr ftammatts roll away. Thart's a dropcloth n carptt.

HE'S ALL EARS Lamar Ratliff, 16-year-old Baldwyn, III., farm boy inspects a field
of his corn, which won him a unique honor; He grew 304 bushels of corn on an acre
1 1 1 J li .1 1 1 : 1 .. 1 t I -.

ivi tana. lor unimurmeu guy uwtneis, mats muun ukc a runner mailing uie iuui-
minute mile. He was later awarded $1,000, which will go toward a college fund.

M

AIR-MINDED These eight Chinese girls arrived in Sun Sun-hingdale,
hingdale, Sun-hingdale, England, for stewardess training. Girls are (from
left)' Jenny Wang, Edith Chun, Shirley Dee, Ruby Huang,
Mary Jo Kay, Grace Eva Chang, Lily Ning and Rosie Wou.

1 WtgW"'Mg.rTy

V
V

i

! i
W .11 X
i t V .-

QUITE THE LIFE, HAY? Lovely Allison Hayes found this stack of hay too hard to re

sist, so she just settled down for a few moments' rest. She's on a ranch near Tucson.

.. Asa, jau' ,, ittw

ntHNk)iMi IMA j

MEDITERRANEAN BOUND This unusual overhead view, of

the luxury liner, Constitution, shows the spacious deck, ;

swimming pool and pjay area. The liner is scheduled to sail
from New York on a 58-day cruise through Mediterranean, t

1

A PRIZE GOAT John Patrick, Pulitzer Prize author of the
stage hit, "Teahouse" of the August Moon,", paid the top
price of $450 for this goat, "Diamond Lily," at a goat show
in Cincinnati, O. The stage play features a goat, also.
Xing Features Syndicate

L

"THE EISENHOWER CHAIR" Pat Percy admires a chair whose upholstery depicts the
life of President Eisenhower. The wing chair was shown at a Chicago furniture show.

4



On Skates At Balboa

.
Roilerdrome
(See Story en Prjfj 2 end 3)

Supplement

PANAMA, K.- Tn SUNOAY, FESSUABT 19; 1956

-I

-J; I
f



fcKATING COSTUMES are worn by some of the girU, Those above are, 1 to r, Pat Mercer
Becky Abell, Lynne Jones, Agnes" Du be, Marcia. Musser and Danielle named.

7.'. : :

RENEE DUKE doe trio, one of the many special skfttinf styles culled during the eyeninr.

AT THE SKATE RENTING WINDOW, Mike Krautheim gets
better look at Mar eta Musser than the reader does.

J

Balboa's

. Txr and pix by Marti, president, with George
RALPH K. SKINNER) Lochnet- and DaiuHarnell as fiist
and second vice-presidents. Mrs.
For a really graceful i g h t, Temple Plowman is secretary and
watch a pair of experienced skat-1 Mrs.. Ann Marti, treasurer,
era whirl around the Balboa. Rol- The .Canal Zone Roller Skating
lerdrome. At an amazing jspced, I Club is strictly an amateur orga orga-they
they orga-they smoothly glide round andlnization and professionals may
round, often, doing intricate steps tot join it. It is expected that it
and making ballroom dancers' will afliliate with one of, the two
look positively awkaward by com- national skating clubs in the Unii Unii-parison.
parison. Unii-parison. j ed States laier.
That's the experienced ones, of! Present membership is 72. Mem-
i hers are welcome but they must

else again. The only time beginn beginners
ers beginners possess grace is when it is a
given name Grace.
The Canal Zone Roller Skating
Gub has a large rink at a build building
ing building in the Navy 300 area at Bal Balboa.
boa. Balboa. Simplest way to find it is to
drive to the Port Captain's Build Building
ing Building by the Balboa Docks, look at
the sign by a road there, and then
follow your nose. Plenty of park parking
ing parking space when you get there.
There is a large spectator's gal gallery
lery gallery at the Rollerdrome, so that
parents and friends may watch
and wish they were skating, too. too.-No
No too.-No charge for admission for spec spectators,
tators, spectators, at any time.
Heading up this club Is Ted

be working members, not just

folks who want to skate. There s
a lot of work to running a club
and new members:jnust be will willing
ing willing to help.
The club is open to U.S. citizens,
15 years of age and older. It costi
$5 to join and 50 cents a montd
dues. We'll mention the admit admittance
tance admittance rates later.
Four nights a week, Monday,
Wednesday, Friday and Saturday,
the rollerdrome is open to chil children
dren children up to 12 years of age from
six to seven o'clock, From seven
to seVen-thirty is a teaching period.-
No charge for teaching, be because
cause because it is generally on a voiu.iiri voiu.iiri-ry
ry voiu.iiri-ry basis of the more experienced
helping the beginners.

ROLLING ALONG are, 1 to r, Fairlee Skinner, Mary Smith, Karen Magnuson, Brink Miller
...and Peggy Acktt. '. - v r.

BF.CKY AF.F.LL and fieoree I.ochner are miehlv smooth as the t

; skate together at the Balboa Rollerdrome.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19 VZq



RINK GUARDS Tom Hardy, left, and Dave Stewart, 'maintain
tafety and decorum at the rollerdrome.

Rollerdrome

At 7:30, those 13 and older take
the floor and hold it until 10. On

Saturday afternoon there's a two
to four o'clock period when anyone,
regardess of gae, can skate.
For the unitiated, there is music
at all times while skating. What's
more, it is boosted from a hi-fi-set
over a fine public address sys system.
tem. system. Special records intended for
skating are used. These provide
the rhythm which is so essential
for the skating.
Different types of skating are
announced at intervals. First ev everyone
eryone everyone skates, then just men or
just women, then Just couples.
Sometimes a trio set permits only
those skating in groups of three
persons.
Then they hava a John P au
Jones sort of skating set where
one changes partners constant V

two rime guards are in constant
attendance. They maintain ord order,
er, order, assist newcomers, keep traf-1
lie flowing, see that regulations
are obeyed, "and are generally
' handy. They are popular with all
the skaters, and especially with

the kiddies, to whom they are her heroes.:",
oes.:", heroes.:", ::- -
Only the rink guards and "Boot "Boot-eie"
eie" "Boot-eie" Leves, the skate boy, are
paid. All the other -workers are
club members who perform their
duties, free.
The expenses of running a rol rollerdrome
lerdrome rollerdrome in Balboa are consider considerable.
able. considerable. There is a nominal rental,
but electric costs are high, for
there are many lights.
. Two. watchmen guard the place
day and night. There are insur insurance
ance insurance costs, maintenance of skates,
replacement of equipment, etc.
However the club is more than
solvent and recently ordered 1000.
extra wheels to place some of
their reserve skates in service.
Available for renting are about
75 pairs of skates at present.
There will be more soon. Most of
"the members and many of the vi visitors
sitors visitors have their own shoe skates,

but these are not essential. They
just help one skate better.

Many local servicemen helped
to set up the new rink in Balboa,

and gave Freely of their time

and services to get things rolling.

Mrs. Marti, who is at the rink at

all times when it is open, com

plimented the servicemen on their
unselfish participation in the rol

lerdrome Work. For example some

of them served as rink guards un

til professional rink guards could

be employed.

Bates are moderate for value
recieved. Children under 12 skate

for 10 cents admittance and 10

cent to rent skates during the
hours when the rink is available
to them. Youngsters 13 to 14, who
aren't eligible for membership,
skate for a quarter and rent for
IS cents. Adult members pay a

Si:

SMALL FRY skaters are, 1 to r, Linda Casslbry, Paulette Larocea, Juliene Boley
: and Michael Boley, ...
quarter admission and rent skates.

for 15 cent. Non-member adults boa is the Marti family, who are cover are Marie Eberem and

pay so cents to get m ana a cenis snown on uie oaac cover. They

for the skates,

It's quite a sight to watch. Folks
who have never seen rollerdrome
skating may not realize how pret pretty
ty pretty it is to watch. Those who see
it, find it easy to wish to participate.::-,;.;,.
: .V---1
Visitors welcome, say the club
officials. And, by the way, the

biggest skating family in Bal-j

are, 1 to r. Teddy. Ann. Jo Ann.

Ted and Douglas. Girls on front

cover are Marie
Renee Duke.
Come over and
skate!

watch: And

. H.WHmftJKWff,'W-'

ROGER HARNER stamps Judy Crosby's wrist to show she has
. paid at the skating rink.

V

X,

1 Sfc

LYNNE JONES and Joseph Hogue were among the many
talented skaters on the floor,.

IT

V I

hi:

.? Ti :

EESX'S PART ef the eollectioa f yoangsters w he have a fine time each Saturday afternooa.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY-1?J



TH EfeTANAMAjAMERI CAN
OWMIS NO UILIHIO TH PANAMA AMIHICAN MIM, INC
FOUNDED V NIKON OUNIVtt IH

1
, HAHMOOIO ARIA. COlTOa
7
H ITRKI P 0 BOX 'S4 PANAMA. R. OP
Tf.Ll"MON 2-O740 LINfSI
Cash addhcs MNAMIOKAN. Panama
179 CENTRAL AVINU IfTWtlN '2TH AND ISTtf ITUITt
COi.CN OfIC
FOREIGN REPREM.NTATIVtS JOSHUA B POWERS INC
349 MADISON AVE. NEW YORK. 7 I N. Y.
IMII. KAIl
f Month in advance C .70 2 80
FOR MONTHS """- 1.80 -IS OO
Fo EA m advance SO MOO

Two Poems
By EJinor Wylie
THE PURITAN'S BALLAD
My love came up from Barnegat,
The sea was la his eyes;
He trod as softly as a cat
And told me terrible lies.
His hair was yellow as new-cut pine
In shavings curled and feathered;
I thought how silver it would shine
By cruel winters weathered.
But he was In his twentieth year,
This time I'm speaking of;
We were head over heels in love with fear
And Tialf-a-f eared of love.
His feet were used to treading a gale
And balancing thereon;
His face was brown as a foreign sail
Threadbare against the sun.
His arms were thick as hickory logs
. Whittled to little wrists;
Strong as the teeth of terrier dogs
Were the fingers of his fists.
Within his arms I feared to sink
Where lions shook their manes,
And dragons drawn In azure Ink
Leapt quickened by his veins.
Dreadful his strength and length of limb
As the sea to foundering ships;
I dipped my hands in love for him
No deeper than their tips.
But our palms were welded by a flame
The moment we came to part,
And on his knucVles I read my name
Enscrolled within a heart.

WILD PEACHES
(An Excerpt)
I '
When the world turns completely upside down
You say we'll emigrate to the Eastern Shore
Aboard a river-boat from Baltimore;
We'll live among wild peach trees, miles from town,
You'll wear a coonskln cap, and l a gown
Homespun, dyed butternut's dark gold colour.
Lost, like your lotus-eating ancestor.
We'll swinr In milk and honey till we drown.
The winter will be short, the summer long,
The autumn amber-hued, sunny and hot,
Tasting of cider and of scuppernong;
Alljseasons sweet, but autumn best of all.
The squirrels in-their silver fur will fall
Like falling leaves, like fruit, before your shot.
The autumn frosts will lie upon the grass
Like bloom on grapes of purple-brown and gold.
The misted early mornings will be cold;
The little puddles will be roofed with glass.
The sun, which burns from copper into brass,
Melts these at noon, and makes the boys unfold
Their knitted mufflers; full as they can hold,
Fat pockets dribble chestnuts as they pass.

Herewith find solution to Sunday Crossword Pua-

cle No. 624, published today.

Answer for Sunday, Jan. 8, Cryptoqulp: TOO

MANY BRAVE RESOLUTIONS SUDDENLY
SEEM VERY UNREASONABLE IDEAS.

24

IS

MlSlTRlAf -?FMP E R "i H H

TIRE LE ARN ,A jL JNE ;H Ul fc
evTl i r rIfMeIr e n all 'a rT a
We o T b c w? T oV gcMb rinFo r
- IklKlI tC LIAS Sf tBHAfet -AjPjS
I STItOR: 'MjOOSlf? 4SEPIAL
MATT ijk A A K nK.E OA
A L ElEf OIN AiG E R POS El ij RA Y
5yV A R Lby.". ft V&m Alft'F
WO O Eg Tf blS T A H 1C "TjHjM r-
' ndR v' Tg ailia1 .D.R7vii,
CilW era" hair i ji aD c jo r ipiu.mit
HITS! Hpfil Cob HpNY L I
A n te. 5Jd it 4llL A N I
ATeTlA j r- iTTj-. iTP. &CjTAL
TlRjY ST, E N'U L TV 1. Mi- LI--'"'
TAjR ifjR'oyt ,L AjVA'
jJIX eTRMAlL5 NyjN' A NTelLlA.
CwtOfc' 0 VfcMAlRKH I N C ii ATM
ojv A l 1 o E mTh Qe per n m :;
LTATOIYl aDbTLErMTETRTYL ..toMAN

. ii

'MPrMANIfAl HriDT" CflTC tflB urn e: u t . .7. ..

Vii j j . .1 J r I oiA-jcHi-viu ijiverne jvec s neart literally stood
itlll durinf a delicate thre-hnur hoar! ntur-omi c ir:. ft .. . 1 lwvI

5hlO. But Lavernp ved through it ih. : ...f VYe'ana'

, ----- - ...v u.iiiuih inakiniic in unuio ai ieii SUOSlltuted for her
SCTF tl00df Xygen .thrUgh her The heart of Laverne. seen at right in oxygen

L . .r r ivncu a umiiuimaiion. j.ne operation was the firt
f hi o hert-,un machin. developed at St. Luke s HLpiurunder gran
TOW! the Cleveland Area Heart rv cik c j: .t K T gram

. .., uv.v. iiuu.it, aireciea me researcn on the machina

The Washington Merry Go Round

ly DREW PEARSON

WASHINGTON Virginia's Har Harry
ry Harry F. Byrd, Senate tax ciar, has
authorized testimony on a plan to
give away surplus farm commodi

ties to social security pensioners

ana people on public reuei rolls.
Under the plan of Sen. Robert

Kerr (D., Okla.), recipients would
get stamps exchangeable for food

and dry goods at local stores.
"We've had a lot of inflation but
there's been no increase in social
security checks," says Kerr. "This
plan would help reduce farm sur surpluses
pluses surpluses and at the same time would
give social security annuitants a
much deserved raise in benefits
without increasing their monthly
checks."
If okayed, Jfcrpi bill will appenr
as an. amendment to the social
security legislation now before
Byrd's Finance Committee.
Simultaneously; Senator Cape-

hart (R., Ind.) is bombarding the
State Dept. with appeals for some

sort of plan to give away most

of our (8,000,000,000 farm surplus
to Europe and Asia. Ca pen art has

informed Undersecretary of State
Herbert Hoover. Jr.. that a drama

tic scheme of this kind must be
put across to help the farmers. 1

Capenart is up for re-election in
Indiana, where farmers are rest-1

less. '-.'

In order to save the GOP farm

vote, therefore, Hoover and Benson

are working on a farm surplus give

away that may dwarf anything the
Democrats dreamed up in the

balmiest new deal days.
DISGUISED BR ANNAN PLAN
What neither Senator Byrd nor
Senator Capehart nor Senator Kerr
seem to realiza or if they do they
don't like to mention the nastv

word is that they are advocating
in effect the Brannan Plan.
The Brannan Plan is nothing more

nor less man letting farm prices
seek their natural low level to bene
fit the housewife, then paying a sub
sidy to the farmer.
What ex-Secretary oi Agriculture
Charley Brannan argud was that

a large part of the farmer's profit
went to the middleman, the proc

essor, me meat-packer. So he pro proposed
posed proposed that houswives get the full
benefit of American agricultural
abundance, by letting farm prod products
ucts products fall in price by removing price
supports.
In turn the farmer would be paid
a subsidy for a certain stipulated
production.
Though Eisenhower called this
"moral bankruptcy," his admin administration
istration administration has now adopted the Bran Brannan
nan Brannan plan for wool, a commodity
largely produced by Republicans
m Wyoming, Utah and Idaho. The
Brannan Plan for wool benefits not
only the big sheep herders who got
the subsidy, but the wool manufac manufacturers
turers manufacturers in New England, also large largely
ly largely Republicans. They pay less for
their wool.

CAPITOL NEWS CAPSULES
Promoting the vice president president-Eisenhower
Eisenhower president-Eisenhower privately is opposed
to Herbert Hoover's proposal that
an administrative vice president
be appointed to help run vhe gov-

! eminent Like Harry Truman, Ike
'believes such a setup would be
unconstitutional and would also
merely duplicate the work of Sher Sherman
man Sherman Adams who,: more than any
other man, runs the US..A. today.
Eisenhower doesn't want to offend
Hoover, however, so he'll let Con

gress kill the Hoover plan on capi capital
tal capital hill.
Hell's canyon on river Nile
Pakistan, Iraq and Iran have pro protested
tested protested bitterly over the American
offer to help Egypt build the As Aswan
wan Aswan Dam on the Nile river. These
countries complain that the United
States has been doing all sorts of
favors for Egypt, simply because
it's flirting with the Reds, while
northwest Senators protest that the
aid shipments to them have de decreased
creased decreased just because they've re remained
mained remained loyal allies. Meanwhile.
Ikemen are doing for the Egyp Egyptians
tians Egyptians what they refused to do for
Americans at Hell's Canyon.
Next H-bomb Blast The bie

B-36 that is going to drop an H H-bomb
bomb H-bomb from 50,000 feet next spring
will have to be extremely careful

or it will be blown up by its own
bomb. The last time an H-bomb
was exploded, in the Pacific, a B B-38
38 B-38 more than 20 miles away had
its bomb-bay doors blown off and
part of its aluminum skin melted
by the heat. That was 20 miles
away. The B-36 that drops the II II-bomb
bomb II-bomb next spring will be only 10
miles above the bomb it drops.
GENERAL PROPAGANDIZES
The public row with Gen. Matt
Ridgway may be only the begin beginning
ning beginning of Ike's troubles with his for former
mer former Army cronies. Ridgway'g suc successor
cessor successor as Army chief. Gen. Max Maxwell
well Maxwell Taylor, has written private
letters to other retired generals urg
ing them to speak out for the Army
Though the letters are carefully
worded, Taylor calls on his retired
comrades, in effect, to follow Ridg Ridg-way's
way's Ridg-way's sample. Taylor doesn't open
ly ask them to blast the adminis administration's
tration's administration's budget cuts, as Ridgway
dd in his controversial magazine
article. But the clear implication
is that they should take advantage
of their retirement to spread the
Army's point of view.
"I am writing to you," says Tay Taylor's
lor's Taylor's private letter to one gen general,
eral, general, "to enlist your continuing
support in interpreting the Army
to the American people. I realize
that this letter is not required to
alert you to the role which retired
officers of long service can play
in explaining the needs ana? pur purposes
poses purposes of the Army. However, you

will probably agree that, to keep
informed of Army thinking on im important
portant important military subjects, it may
be useful for the Chief of Staff
from time to time to communicate
to you the Army's thoughts on
these vital questions."
Taylor's -letter -declares flatly
ttint tU -J-

uihv V11C ZlllHT IS UlC HilUUO I
' t. u j ,t i .

iirsv une oi ueiense, wnicn mignt
be challenged by the Air -Force
whose planes are kept on 24-hour
alert to head off any enemy attack.
ARMY ARGUMENTS
However, the Army chief offers
some strong arguments; though his
letter isn't exactly designed to pro pro-mote
mote pro-mote interservice harmony.
'There' is no one kind of war to
engross our attention," he warns.
"There may be large or small
ones: lone or short ones- wars in

the jungles deserts or polar re regions.
gions. regions. We must be able to deter or
win any kind of war. It is particu-,
larly important to prevent or to
put out the brush fire before it can
spread jnot a general conflagration.-
This requirement calls for
ready, mobile army forces.-
"The Army is the service organ organized
ized organized and armed to fight any kind
of war," "he adds. ;"By the Tango
and power of its- weapons it is
capable of a measured annliration

of military force. It has the flexi-

uuuy io mane me punisnmem xk
the crime."
This is-the line' the retired gen generals
erals generals have urged to take "as n
active spokesman for the Army
in your community." Taylor's let let-ter
ter let-ter cautions, however, that the line
might change. ...
f'l would not .suggest that the
foregoing represents military dog.
ma to which the Army stands com committed
mitted committed for all lime or to which
the Army asks, its members to
subscribe as art of faith." writes
the Atmy Chief of Staff. "We are
thoroughly aware of the need for
flcxbility of thought to prepare the
armed forces to meet the military
and political conditions which are
so rapidly changing in the modern
world. I hope, however, that the
above points will be of some as assistance
sistance assistance to you in , .helping you
to explain the roles and missions
of the Army to the public which
needs to understand them."--
Belweent he lines, the Taylor
letter is interpreted as an appeal to
retired generals to join the Ridg Ridgway
way Ridgway campaign for a bigger Army
budget.
NOTE: Taylor is already in the
doghouse with President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower for making unauthorized
remarks recently about guided mis
siles- Taylor told of Army Navy

I plans to develop a 1,500-mile mis
sile, though Ike had ordered a tight
'lid on all missile news.

ft- A 11- flAlfll



Pefer Ed son In

'1
Vashingfon News Notebook j-
.V'"-'
Crescendo Tipping Coincidence
. Taking Turns Mink Perfect Hosll
on

Washingt

WASHINGTON (NEA) The
main point about the natural gas
act amendment, exempting inde independent
pendent independent producers from price reg regulation
ulation regulation by Federal Power Commis Commission,
sion, Commission, is that it has at last been
settled, after years of wrangling.
Only time will tell whether it
has been settled tight or wrong.
But you won't be hearing much
about it any moreV as Congress
tackles other more important is issues
sues issues in the Eisenhower program.
The dramttic preliminaries and
sideshows really eclipsed the ma-
' 1 A : 1- I

jor principle ai siane in mis gas
battle.
The lobbies of gas producing
companies, fighting the lobbies, Of
retail gas distributing companies,
made it obvious from the first
that millions of dollars were in involved.
volved. involved.
The naivete of the Nebraska cit citizen
izen citizen who tried to -donate $2500 to
Sen. Francis P. Case (R-SD) fur furnished
nished furnished an amazing touch. One of
the first rules learned by all con congressmen
gressmen congressmen is that they can't take
campaign contributions from people
outside their own state as a Vote
payoff. Experienced lobbyists know
this, too, and don't even try it.
The gas amendment divided the
Senate down the ime of states po-
pulated principally by bas con consumers
sumers consumers in big comestk markets.
There were exceptions, of course.
Sen. Alexander Wiley (R-Wis), rep representing
resenting representing consumers, opposed the
amendment. Sen. Joseph R. Mc McCarthy
Carthy McCarthy (R-Wis) inserted a state statement
ment statement in the back of the Congres Congressional
sional Congressional Record, favoring the
amendment.
Sen. Paul Douglas (R-Ill) proved
again that no matter how well-pre
narH nr well-intentioned, a three-
day speech changes no votes and
is a waste of everybody s time.
But to get the real perspective
on this natural gas battle, it's only
necessary to review the similar,
tidelands oil rights case.
After a five-week floor fight in
3933, in which the future of the
entire universe was made to ap appear
pear appear at stake, Congress confirmed
the coastal states' title to their off offshore
shore offshore mineral rights, within their
r

i' -'

fHNGER-TIP CONTROL-Trying out this new push-button, six-

mp.h, wheel ehair is polio patient Aanenne Amos, a, v w
IVjork. University Medical Center's Institute-ef Physical Medicine
d Rehabilitation. It's said to b .the. first effective battery battery-powered
powered battery-powered wheel chair. The chair has passed all tests for safety and

usefulness by the institute's Self Help Device omce, wnicn i
Jtoanced by March.pjLDimeigrBn

historic boundaries. The federal
government Was given title to what
lay beyond.
Once this was settled, the issue

disappeared like magic. It has
scarcely been heard of since. In the
meantime, however, the federal
government was given title to what
lay beyond. ;
Once this was settled, the issue
disappeared like magic. It has
scarcely been heard of since. In the
meantime, however, the lederal
government has held three sales
of its rights, off Texas and Lou Louisiana,
isiana, Louisiana, .v- .v.. .. ... ...
It has let 230 oil and gas leases
and five leases for ulphnr recov recovery
ery recovery rights. The first year's rentals
paid to the federal treasury total
252 million dollars.
It Is interesting to observe here
that President Eisenhower's aid to
education proposal this year calls
for grants to the states of 250
million dollars a year for five
years. So if the proposal by' Sen.
Lister Hill (D-Ala) and others had
been adopted to use tidelands
revenues, for aid to education in
all states the money would be
in hand to pay for it.
In both the natural gas act
amendment and the tidelands oil
case, the producing states have,
gotten just what they wanted, t
In the 'case of the natural gas
act amendment, there have been
arguments galore, both that it will
result m higher prices t consum consumers,
ers, consumers, and that it won't. Nobody
knows the answer to that one for
sure.
But with the amendment passed,
exempting independent producers
from federal rower commission
Drice regulations, the consuming
public may have only the antitrust
laws to fall back on for protection,
in case prices go up.
There is one slight indication of
the way things may go. It has been
noted that some New York stock
brokers have already issued mar market
ket market letters advising investors which
producing company stocks stand to
gain the most from passage by
Congress of this new amendment
to the Natural Gas Act : of 1938.
i
7'

Larsen

WASHTNGTON (NEA) About
this time of the winter the cocktail
chase begins to get out of hand.'
Other evening, for ; example,
Adm. Arthur Radford, Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, had
seven "must" invitations. So he
sent his wife and aide to three,
went to three himself. :Thea the
weary trio rendezvoused at the
seventh. r -
Even Rep. .Henry Dixon (R (R-Utah),
Utah), (R-Utah), a quiet, elderly former
schoolteacher' who doesn't drink,
reported that he has been out 10
consecutive nights to affairs he felt
obligated toattend.
Sen. John O. Pa tore (D-RI) fas
made it a definite rule not to stop
by outings unless it's in connection
with his state. That cut him down
to six evening functions last week.
Bat then there are sociable
solons like Sen. Albert Gore (D (D-Tenn).
Tenn). (D-Tenn). At his third stop at a party
the other night he reported:
"Getting around is stimulating.
I love it."
An expensive annoyance of at attending
tending attending several parties each night,
especially when they're held ia
hotels, is tipping the coal Toora
attendant. But Rep. John W. Me
Cormack (D-Mass) has found the
answer. If he isn't going to stay
long he just keeps his coat on and
his bat in his hand while he tips a
drink and chats.
"Saves time and money," "he
says realistically.

Walter Wihchell In

THE LINCOLN WARS
Abrahma Lincoln's area of strug-,
gle was not Jxwnded by Fort!
Sumter and Appomattox, His bat battlefields
tlefields battlefields extended from Kentucky
to Washington. Armed with a
steadfast faith, Lincoln constantly
fought for humanity's fundamental
decencies. His battles, however,
were not always triumphant. His
personal life was burdened with
, anguish. He was a laiiure as a
'businessman and was defeated for
' the Senate and Vice-Presidency,
i His passion for peace collided with
I the bloodiest of wars. Lincoln
was never a stranger to struggle.
His fight began against the forces
iof nature in an 18x18 cabin and
I continued aeainst the forces of
darkness. Although his hopes oc
casionaliy wavered, his courage
never faltered. For 4 Lincoln was
not just a fighter he was a ngnt-
,ing champion.
One of his epic battles was with
Stephen A. Douglas, of course.
Before a tribunal of the Ameri
can people, the parry and thrust of
their logic ana eloquence maae n
an, historic duel. The battle was
fiercely political as well as in intensely
tensely intensely personal. Both Lin co In
and Douglas had courted the girl
who was destined to become Mrs.
ijncelh j. .,, f The lightning -flash of
Lincoln'a wit was evident
throughout the debate. When
Douglas urged an extension of
slavery, Lincoln noted: "Douglas
holds that a thing may be law-
fuUy driven away irora, a pla.ee
where it has a lawful Tight to
be." He described his opponent's
interminable monologues :"'Explan'
ations exDlanatorv of things ex-
Dlained." When Douglas ignored
facts. Lincoln snapped: 7'I don't
want to call him a liar but I don't
know what else to call him." Dur
ing the debates, Lincoln coined
his classic admonition: "No man
is good enough to govern an another
other another without the other's consent."
A dozen words encompassed the
best definition of democracy..
Incidentally, when Lincoln wag a
Congressman. he introduced a
bill to abolish slavery in the Dis
trict of Columbia. It was aefeatea.
Had the bill passed, it might
have prevented the Civil -War.
His stormy career reached a
thundrous climax during -the civil
strife ... War was abhorrent to
Lincoln. He described it as "n
ttraptive rainbow that Tises m
showers of blood.". Unfortunately,

By DOUGLAS LAKSEN and KENNETH 0.

COINCIDENCE
..DEPARTMENT;!
Two young gals who attended an
informal reception given by Mamie
Eisenhower recently have fathers
who were in Ike's class of mis at
West Point.
Both dads. Col. Thomas S. Taylor
and Col. Earl E. Gesler are now
retired. The girls, Margaret and
Mary respectively, happened to be
standing next to each other in the
receiving line. .-.:
; When Mamie learned both were
daughters of the President's class classmates,
mates, classmates, she beanled and said, "Oh,
I'll have to tell Ike."
Neither the most Reverend
Patrick O'Boyle, Archbishop of!
Washington, nor Nicaraguan Am Ambassador
bassador Ambassador Sevilla-Sacasa are what
you'd call slim men. And their
bulk presented a serious problem
the other night as they sat next to
each other at a crowded head table
during a dinner party honoring the
memory of former Secretary
of,
State lordell Hull.
There just was not enough room
for both of them to eat at the
same time. But also being reason reasonable
able reasonable men they compromised. The
archbishop ate his soup and then
shoved back while the ambassador
ate his. And so on for the rest of
the meal which featured rare
Toast beef, ;
What with their woes' about
shrinking sales and profits, the
members of the National Auto Automobile
mobile Automobile Dealers Association at
he was trapped in
tragedy of i
history ? which made war inevit
able. Although he attained the
Presidency with a decisive ma majority
jority majority in ; the Electoral College,
he bad a minority of the popular
vote, ihe nation was split wide
open on every major issue. Con
sequently, the most shameful de
famation was leveled at the Presi
dent by the press and politicians.
But his faith in the people remain remained
ed remained constant. His appraisal of the
political turmoil and savage na national
tional national partisanship illustrated Lin Lincoln's
coln's Lincoln's genius for stating the truth
with humorous simplicity: "The
people will decide. If they turn
their backs to the fire and get
scorched in the rear they'll find
they hive to sit on a blister."
Lincoln's passion for peace never
descended to appeasement. Men
of little faith and less cour courage
age courage urged him to Compromise.
Lincoln was aware, however,
that amity could not be purchased
by blackmail. When his critics
warned that he would destroy
the Union, Lincoln shot back:
"You say I will destroy the Un Union
ion Union and the great crime will be
upon, me? That reminds me of
a thief who holds a pistol to your
neaa and mutters: "Stand and
deliver, or I shall kill you -and
then you will be the murder murderer'."
er'." murderer'." Always a hard fighter, never
vindictive", Lincoln loved the sol soldiers
diers soldiers who fought for him and had
compassion for those who fought
against him. He never once utter uttered
ed uttered a vicious word against the
Southern people. He always spoke
of Dixie's fighters as "these
Southern gentlemen." Incredibly,
the man who despised, slavery nev never
er never bad (ny hatred against those
who believed in it. He explained:
"They are just what we would
be in their situation."
He was constantly under attack
from friends as well as foes.
Sec'y Stanton, a member of his
official family, reviled him as
'.'that damned, gawky, long-armed
gorilla" . In a turbulent era
filled with hatred, misunderstand misunderstanding
ing misunderstanding and partisanship, Lincoln was
almost continually the target of vi vituperation.
tuperation. vituperation. Much of the sniping
was triggered by a hostile press.
After he was elected, the N. Y.
World editorially proclaimed; "The
election of Lincoln means that the

GILMORE

Gilmore
their recent convention here were
enough to break your heart.
But ia spite of their adversity, -it's
apparent they're keeping up
a brave front. Speaking of the
dealers' wives, one observer re remarked,
marked, remarked, "I've never seen so much
tear-stained mink in my life."
Af t dinner the dealers threw
a mink stole was given away as a
door prize. The winner already
had a mink coat. But that was
okay because the one she won was
a different color. It's nice to have
a change of mink.
Probably the most able, en enthusiastic
thusiastic enthusiastic host in town is Pakistan
Ambassador Mohammed Ali. Not
only does he personally supervise
preparation of the menu, but he
makes sure every guest samples
at least one of the dishes.
At the most recent reception at
the embassy he wrecked the diets
of his guests with curried chicken -which
is cooked with cinnamon
sticks Alaskan salmon and rou-
melade sauce, hot relish and a
rare Pakistan dessert called sha sha-hitukra.
hitukra. sha-hitukra. Former President Truman's
right-hand roan, John R. Ash Ashman,,
man,, Ashman,, has no children, but he has
just joined the Parent-Teacher
Association of Rollingwood, Md.,
the posh suburb where he lives.
The citizens there are in an up uproar
roar uproar over integration of the Rol Rollingwood
lingwood Rollingwood schools, and many of the
nonparents have joined the PTA
to make their influence felt in the
dispute.
Wew
Union will not be restored and
slavery will not be abolished."
Although Horace Greeley waj
influential in securing the
nomination for Lincoln, Greeley's
paper vigorously attacked him.
When a Cabinet member urgeJ
Lincoln to settle" the dispute by
publicly responding to Greeley's
editorials, Lincoln offered the fol-
lowing canny lesson in public re-J
lations: "Mr. Greeley owns a news newspaper,
paper, newspaper, a very widely circulated
and influential one. I have no news newspaper.
paper. newspaper. The press of the country
would print my letter, and ro wo'Vil
the New York Tribune. In a Ii
tle : while the puWic would for sat
all about it, and then Mr. Gre? ey
would begin to prova from my
own letter that hs w.-.s r'7V, n- 1
I, of course; would hi heTple to
reply."
Lincoln once visited a toi.ij ia
a hospital and nattoeJ hs w-.s
reading an anti-Iinco'n papsr.- H H-chuckled:
chuckled: H-chuckled: "If you can read ail
digest the. contents of that pM2?,
I think you will sure"y gel wa.'l."
His belitUers and lucre were
many looked upon him : as a
strange and comic p .vsouavy.
They were unable to grasp i3
magic of his character or the i
dor of his concepts. Evsn the'eor. the'eor.-cise
cise the'eor.-cise eloquence of his Gettys'o
Address was fceneraliy coraei by
the pre3s.The Chicago Times L
sisted Lincoln hid vilif'ed the mc.i
who died at Gettysburg.. The Har Har-risburg
risburg Har-risburg Patriot wrote: "We o:m
over the si'ly remarla of thS Presi President,
dent, President, for the credit of the nV!m
we are wiliin? that the veil e ob oblivion
livion oblivion should be dropped vr
them" . Tha CWsago Timet d'3 d'3-missed
missed d'3-missed Lincoln as .less refi.ial 'Vi?.n
a savage and the London Timsi
opined that "r.nythjng more d"'l
and commonplace it. would not be
easy to produce,"
There have been times wlien
Americans have tended to -squander
this precious legacy. Never Nevertheless,
theless, Nevertheless, the nation's faith has cot-
Lstantly been renewed by Lin?o'n's
living memory. He was a fi"!iter
who battled for truth and free freedom
dom freedom and sought only to conneer
bigotry and ignorance. His might mightiest
iest mightiest triumph was not on the field
of battle, but the part he played
in binding the nation's wound s.
Through the long niht of strife
Lincoln envisioned the bright
dawn of national unity.. And where
there
is light there ; is Lincoln.

York

I
i
4
4
i

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1956

PAGE i?.lVii
H.
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1 (
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Premier Sunday Cross- Word Puzzle )

624
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4

"FLAX SCUTCHING BEE," painted c. 1860 by Linton Park, an
American primitive painter. Flax scutching was an elaborate
process requiring many hands. Wet flax was dried oyer a fire
(left, background) and cut into pieces by a man at a breaking
machine. Neighbors then beat the flax with paddles to remove
wood fibres.- Neighborly cooperation was a common practice in
early America. The purpose of many social events was primar primarily
ily primarily utilitarian. Seasonal gatherings were held to pick berries,
husk corn, scutch the flax,, tap the maple trees all to a
boisterous accompaniment of feasting, gossiping, dancing and
rustic flirtation.
Primitives, Old Masters
Owned By Chrysler Family

BY NORMAN SMITH

NEW YORK, Feb. 18 (USIS) -Walter
P. Chrysler, Jr., is one of

toe nation s business industrialists

southerly route, but which are go going
ing going separately, approxima t e 1 y
two miles apart.
During the 3,000-mile journey,
state police will keeD an eve on

His sister, Bernice Mrs, Edgar he caravan. They, in turn, will
W. Garbisch has plenty to do run- send an hour-by-hour schedule of
ning a large household. Yet both j movements to local police along
of them have devoted much of the way. All of the arrangements
their adult lives to collecting fine for the trip took some three years
paintings and art objects, with the of planning. On top of that, the
main objective of making them a v. shipment to Portland will be ac-

ailable to all. companied by Dr. Francis Newton,

Their tastes, however, are deci

dedly dissimilar. Mr. Chrysler has

a collection of over 2,000 paintings
representing all schools. No. sum
has been mentioned recently as

to the value of this magnificent
array, but a selection of 1000 of

these paintings was recently as
sessed at $3,500,000.

Mrs. Garbisch, on the other

hand, not only prefers the primi primitives'
tives' primitives' approach to painting and
design, but has restricted her in interest,
terest, interest, in the main, to Early A A-merican.
merican. A-merican. She and her husband
have assembled a a prodigious
sampling of this genre and have
turned most of it over to the Na

tional Gallery of Art in Washing

ton, as a national treasure.
The Chrysler collection is cur currently
rently currently in the news of the art
' world because a display of the
1000 items mentioned above ha
iott bgun a year-long four of Hi
larger art galleries in the West Wester
er Wester United States.
First stop is Portland, Oregon.
The way this collection is being
shipped is a story in itself. It is in
three large trailer vans which not
only are traveling along a secret

art curator of the Portland muse museum.:,'.
um.:,'. museum.:,'. But whatever the time, effort
and money (this unusual ship shipment
ment shipment will cost $25,000) required to
arrange the scheduled tour, Chrysl Chrysler
er Chrysler and his associates will be am amply
ply amply repaid by the interest and en

thusiasm these paintings are
bound to arouse in the cities in
which they will be shown.
For it is quite an unusual dis display.
play. display. The pieces range from the 15th
century to our own day, and in include
clude include Spanish, Dutch, Flemish,
English, Italian and French mast

ers. :
There are, in this 1000 painting
group, names like Cavallino, Cas Cas-tiglione
tiglione Cas-tiglione and Stozzi from Italy; Van
Dyck, Reubens and Rembrandt
from the Low ; Countries, Largil Largil-liere
liere Largil-liere and Poussln from France.
Yet the most impressive section
of the show is from the 19th and
20th centuries: And here the

French are outstanding.
The Garbisch collection is in
striking, and in some ways quite

refreshing, contrast to this assem

blage of Europe's artistic titans

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h-

"HER FAVORITE TOY," painted about 1825 by an unknown
folk artist. The painting is now part of the Garbisch Collection
on loan to the National Gallery.

1 Feigned
8 Minute
groove
10 Document
15 Display
19 Fag
20 Find
out
21 Place
ina
row
22 Cavity
23 Harm
24 Disre Disrespect
spect Disrespect to
what Is
acred
28 Tune
27 Ordinary
29 Mountain
in Asia
Minor
80 Chief
ruler
32 Enjoy
33 Division
35 Gather
3 Point
of orbit

39 Hill.

pointed

1 41 Europear

1 43 Leafol

47 Signify
49 Weaken
51 Varnish
V gum
52 Grayish
green
63 On
shielded
' side

54 Wild
ass
i 57-Propound

HORIZONTAL
59 Shallow
receptacle
60 Flood
61 Rise
62 To
trim
64 En Engrossed
grossed Engrossed 66 Genera
tion ;
67 Gloomiest
69 Devilish
71 Variety
of
wheat
73 Strong.'
hold
74 Insignia
of an
office
75 Dull
76 Light Light-colored,
colored, Light-colored, of
v cigars
78 Of mar marriage
riage marriage 79 Tainted
' 82 Of that
man
83 Inter-"
rogative
85 Soft-
finned :-
fish
86 Small
horse
87 Hawaiian
garland
88 Stake
90 Stulm ...
- 92 Growing
94 Bombast
95 Placed
again
-97 It is
cont.)-

99 Blast,
. as
frost
100 Aldehyde
102 Ap Appointed
pointed Appointed meeting
103 Class
105 Rim
107 White
poplar
108 Wrench
110 Fish
of
salmon
' family
112 Fluid
rock
114 Interior
118 Domestic
pigeon
119 Taper Tapering
ing Tapering cigar
123 Passage
124 Arching;
over
127 Persia
128 Egg Egg-shaped
shaped Egg-shaped 129 Cotton
drilling
130 One
having
"disease
of
Naaman"
131 Ennead
132 English
. title
133 Funeral
oration
134 Abrasive
135 Fret
away

1 Prow
2 Swarm
3 Jejune
4 Rock
5 Clever
6 Ring on
harness
' pad
7 Unusual
8 Fury
, 9 Block on
which
metal is
shaped
10 Sunshade
11 Malt
liquor
12 Sharp
sound
13 Again
14 Thread
15 Most
16 Wind
17 Medley
18 Carry on
the
-l person
25 Dutch
village
28 River in
France
31 Relieve
33 Steep,
rugged
rock
34 Cleansing
agent
36 Heap up
S7 Chaff.
like
bract

VERTICAL
$8 Reso Resolutely
lutely Resolutely 40 Ridges
Of drift
42 Dross
of metal
44 Stroll
45 Saw
46 Stratum
48 Perch
60 Oceania
82 Kind of
cloth
55 Indian
acrobat
56 That
which
Imparts
circular
motion
58 Indian
61 Goat
antelope
63 Legend Legendary
ary Legendary hero
65 Cloth
with un uncut
cut uncut loops
68 Black
beetle
69 Indian"
weight
70 Nothing
72 Injure
74 Having
flat
75 Deep river
channel
(S.Africa)
76 Map ;
77 Ocean
vessel
78 Insane
79 Learn
80 Punitive

81 Name
84 Held
86 New
Zealand
edible
mollusk
89 Situated
toward
the east
91 Tinge

93 Deposit of
sediment
4 Discount Discounting
ing Discounting 86 Brain
canal
98 Family
name
101 Cavern
103 Pebbles
104 Acid
106 Tree
of the
"elm
family
109 Positive
' pole "
111 Male ?
relative
113 Enraged
114 Pagan
deity
115 Blaze star
116 Leaping
. amphibian
117 Cotton
fabric
119 Metal
conduit .
120 Emerald
Isle
121 Miss
Turner
122 Over .
again
125 Fit up
126 Surround
; ,--.--wf.

. CRYFTOQUIPS

1 XLL JWMB YCWDH CHGLKFXQLMG GFTTHMKB GHHJ
Idhcb FMCHWGLMWYKH QTHWO.

It offers an uninhibited approach, work spanned the 19th and 20th

completely unauecteo. by acaae- centuries

mic rules: since most of the artists

are literally unknown, the viewer
is not influenced by reputations

Joseph Pickett (1849 1919) is

probably the best of these. A groc grocer
er grocer by trade, he painted purely for

but can observe the pictures, withl pleasure, depicting local scenes

and landscapes, some of them
done while he sat in his shop, gaz gazing
ing gazing out the window to the hills in

the distance. His work was not
"discovered" until 10 years after
his death. :- ,-
' The city, specifically the smok smok-ey
ey smok-ey industrial center of Pittsburgh

at me turn oi me century, was

jonn &.ane'8 suDject. He was a

house painter, and used some of

the medium of his trade on his

picture.
Horace Pippin, a Negro primiti

ve painter wno died less than a
decade ago, used to draw pictures

on wooden cigar box panels. Most

full objectivity,

There was a display of about 100
items from the Garbisch collec collection
tion collection at the National Gallery some
months ago, but plans are now un underway,
derway, underway, reports chief curator
John Walker, to set up a perma permanent
nent permanent show of these stimulating
primitives.
Probably the most obvious qua quality
lity quality of this work is its charm. Sec

ond, we are impressed by its ima-

Smativeness and the general free free-om
om free-om of expression that it imparts.
While' most of the early primi primitive,
tive, primitive, or as some call them "po "popular",
pular", "popular", painters are unknown,

there are 'at least four extremely prominent of modern-day primi

talented ones whose lives and tives, of course, is Grandma

Moses who, at 90, is still active
with-brush and pencil. She remi.
nisces in detail in hap nitn.A.

, p.vtuics,
hilt APlaolnn4 lv .ti. ,.

--. ..w.u.UUHU. one paiuui a nis-

ioiicbi scene as sne thnks it might
have been.
Most of the Garbisch pieces,
however, are of an earlier period
than is renrpspntoH x

these four ."masters.' Many of

"icu me porirans, irom the A
"Ifrican Limner tiod f between
1790 and 1863. After t!t, with the
advent of the photograph and the
popular lithograph, the number of
these primitive portraitists dwind dwindled
led dwindled almost to extinction.
Fourtunately, however, much of
their work remains, providing us
not only with some authentic and
charming historical material of
their period, but also with a fas fascinating
cinating fascinating chapter of America's va variegated
riegated variegated folic art history.



YO.UD-WIDE

ISTHMIAN
SPORTS'-

Former Soviet premier Malenkov has told the 20th
Commuuit Party congress in Moscow mat fre fremiti
miti fremiti ttuiganin heavy inuustry program is tne ioun ioun-dation.
dation. ioun-dation. 01 jounaations' ior tne soviet economy,
s This was the new Malengov speaking. .uuiiDg his

term as premier he had emphasized increased con-

A PLAN, already approved by the forces that be
m the canal .one, wm consonuute au Oi Uie Cz, ure ure-ngnung
ngnung ure-ngnung l&cmues unoer one cniei the fanama ca canal
nal canal Co..
rne system, which will call for the hiring of 146
local-rate jiremen, ana trie siasmng 01 two uozeu u.

comer inuustry. This led to nis resignation last year s-rate jora, uepenas on tne approval oi the uanai
and nis confession of incompetence as premier.-' ,6one government's ouoget lor cal Year lWf.
7- It it goes tnrougn, tiie cnange-over wui become
Chrysler Corporation announces it has received effective sometime auer next January.
as Important deiense contract. The contract to pro- Although tne Canal Co. announced that only 12
auce id-hundred mue ballistic missiles to be launch- UJS.-raters would face rilling," a iiremans union Oi-
ed from ships. ticial maintained tnat it wouid cost American 'jx joos.
T He figured into his setimate the additional aozen cm-
One of the men who knows president Eisenhower lians now employed by the Armed Fwces wno would
best believes he will run again. oe oereft of woric.
Edgar Eisenhower the president's brother Not only would the new plan mean a slash in Jobs
made tne prediction at a political rally in El Centro, for U.S.-raters, but. according to John F. Rice, at Lo Lo-Cahtornia.
Cahtornia. Lo-Cahtornia. cal 13 of the Firelighter's Un.on, it will also bring a a--
- a-- On the Democratic side, Governor George Leader bout a 'tremendous lessening" oi the overall fire pro profiled
filed profiled nomination petitions today to put Adlai Steven- tectlon on the Isthmus. '
sou's name on the presidentijU primary in Pennsyl- Rice also commented that It was vrather strange"
vania April 24th. that the Joint Fire Board, usually well-informed on
, all rjronosed changes affecting their facilities, was

not advised of the plan in aavance. Neither were
they asked to approve or discuss it, he added.

- Saudi Arabia's ambassador is holding an emer
gency meeting with the state department thlsv after

noon on an arms snipment dispute.
An aide to Abdullah Al-Khayyal says the am- Many Panamanian employes in the Zone will be
biasador will ask the department to lift Its sudden hit by the two percent Income tax they must now be-
Bspension today of a shipment of 18 light tanks to gin paying the Panama government next March 15.
hie country. The Panama government announced that dead-
( The United Press revealed yesterday that the line for compliance with the terms of the 1955 treaty,
tanks were to have left New York by ship today for Other non-U.S. citizens who work for the Canal Zone
the Arab nation. but live in the Republic of Panama will be subject to
.. ,- the 'tax.. ..... i
f Several congressmen protested that the state Spokesmen for both CIO locals 600 and 607 said
department should first consider Israel's request for there was much grumbling about the tax because the
59-million dollars worth of American arms to count- employes felt it would leave a big dent in their take
ef shipments to Arab nations from behind the Iron .home pay. V
" The department announced a ban today on all Five Army men attached to the Inter American
arms shipments to the Middle East pending an in- Geodetic Survey were spotted and picked up by a
v estimation of the matter. search craft near Tonosl, Veraguas after their small
. ; boat capsized. ;
! Adlal Stevenson accuses Vice President Nixon of The men were located on the beach and evacuat-
tirnlng the Eisenhower crusade into a Republican ed by an Air Force 26th Rescue Squadron helicopter.
ctmpai0n The courts were crowded during two trials held
He charges Nixon was crediting the GOP Inept this week at the Ancon courthouse.-".' -v
for the supreme court decision against racial segrega- One involved the sentencing of John A. Blanchard,
tton. Stevenson says the desegregation ruling "was found guiltv of assaulting a policeman who was trying
not a partisan act, but a judicial act, and an Amerl- to arrest him. 4
can act" Said Judge Guthrie F. Crowe, before imposing a
t ' three-year penitentiary term, "The nubile must re-
He' charges Sixon wis crediting the GOP sped a policeman carrying out his duty, or our sys-

notice tne Eisennower crusaae "win go lurwaru on iem ui iuw einwitciiicmi uiu uo iuumh

the lowest level." Stevenson made the charges in

a speech prepared for delivery m salt lake oity
i . i

t Westinghouse officials have accused the Pennsvl

Blanchard nulled a gun on policeman Jesse R.

Martie who was arresting him for trespassing.
- The second case which seemed to interest Zone-spectators-concerned
a Hotel Tlvoll clerk who because

vania Department of Labor, of helping to prolong the of Infatuation with a young co-worker began dipping

roirmnnv's 124-dav Strike.

The department nas laoeiea tne aispuie a -iock-

out" And 23-thousand Westinghouse workers have married and hid three children

into the till to the tune of $818. Hickson A. Belizaire,
47- had been a loyal Canal employe for 28 years, was

been granted some three-million dollars In unem

ployment compensation.
' A department spokesman says the ruling was
mainlv decided bv the comnany's rejection on an ap

peal to return to work while negotiations started over pended for a "period of five years.

again. The striKing ajli-uiu eaectncai wwners vn vn-nion
nion vn-nion had accepted the proposal.

In defendine him. William J. Sheridan, Jr. point

ed out the flawless record and the fact that Belizaire
had never before gotten Into trouble.
Taking all these factors into consideration the
Judge imposed a two year penitentiary sentence sus-

But Westinghouse says It will appeal the ruling.
The company calls It a ''highly improper and un unjustified
justified unjustified effort" to help strikers prolong the walk walkout.
out. walkout.

THE LIQUOR PERMITS are trickling in. .j. So far
close to 200 have been issued Zonians on the Pacific
side.
bill with a blast at what he calls "arrogant" person
In thA.pas industrv.

-r : . rr. v.- uj The measure would have freed some five-thou-
. An InlernaUonal affairs writer has attacked the d natural gas producers from direct rate regula regula-United
United regula-United States foreign policy whde hints froin Yugo- Uon b the Feiefzi Power Commission,
slavia say, there may be big changes in the Soviet for- senate consideration of -the bill produced evidence
eifm policy. r . that Senator Francis Case was offered' 25-hundred
; James Warburg says U.S. foreign policy Is tom- rtollar. i on behalf of a ga.? comoany president in the
pletely inadequate and may lead to' defeat without hope the South Dakota Republican would vote for

war. Warburg says in a speecn prepared ror aenvery f""

in New York that U.S. foreign policy is static in a rap rapidly
idly rapidly changing world.
He accuses both political parties of following a
hopelessly out of date foreign policy.
From behind the Iron Curtain, a Yugoslav gov government
ernment government spokesman says Soviet Communist Chief

Khrushchev's speech at the Moscow party congress

In his veto message. Mr. Eisenhower said: "A

body of evidence has accumulated indicating that
private persons, apparently representing only a very
small segment of a ereat and vital industrv have been
seeking to further their own interests by highly ques questionable
tionable questionable activities.
"These Include efforts." he said. ". .so arrosant
. a to risk ereatin? douht among the American neo-

may change Russia's foreign policy. The spokesman concerning the integrity of governmental process-

says tne cnanges wnicn are similar w xugosmy ai- s
titudes may come soon.

. Brital nis tightening its belt again, this time to
check inflation.
i- The British government has ordered new austeri austerity
ty austerity controls similar to the wartime measures. It hopes
the action will check growing lnflaion at home and
curb the drop of British exports abftoaS.
' The Army's vice Chief of Staff the Undersecre Undersecretary
tary Undersecretary of State... and a Defense DeDartment expert
sav the United States must remain strong.
. General Wiljiston Palmer told a conference of A A-merican
merican A-merican mayors that American foot soldiers along the
Iron Curtain are preventing an immediate war. Palmer
savs we need a huge stockoile of atomic weapons to
hold back the Reds from global war.
Undersecretary of State Herbert Hoover, Junior,
told the conference in Washington that Russia's rise
Jn military power poses a threat to our. securitv be because
cause because new weapons expose this continent to direct
nttaok-
And Jolrn Williams, a machine tool specialist in
the defense department told Senate Investigators U.S.
nllies are elvlng Russia a three-to-five-vear boost, in
t war-makinPT potential. He savs the West Is selling
strntefric machine tool's to the Communists thus per permitting
mitting permitting them to concentrate on the production of
' orms, .

President Eisenhower has vetoed the natural gas
fcUNDAYy FEBRUARY d9;

CUBA'S SMOOTH-PLAYING CIENFUEGOS team
are the chempions of the eighth Caribbean Series
after their hard fought 4-to-2 victory over Puerto
Rico's Caguas Wednesday night.
In the second and final game of the series, Pan Panama's
ama's Panama's Chesterfield slaughtered Venezuela's Valencia
nine 18-to-0 to finish the series .in a tie for second
place with Puerto Rico.
At the end of series play Cuba had won five con contests,
tests, contests, with one loss to Puerto Rico; Panama and Puer Puerto
to Puerto Rico each won three and lost three; and Venezuela
was able to triumph only once while losing five games.
The Clenfuegos triumph gave Cuba its third series
win, but it was th efirst championship for Cienfuegos.
Puerto Rico has won the most championships championships-four;
four; championships-four; Cuba is runner-up with three wins; Panama
places third, with one victory; and Venezuela has yet
to win a series.:.- -
. Pedro Ramos, the Cuban righthander wlw pitch pitched
ed pitched his club to the championship, made hR series rec record
ord record 2-1 as he scattered seven hits one a homer U
first baseman Lou Limmer la the eighth inning inning-Losing
Losing inning-Losing hurler was Paul Stuff el who was followed
to the mound by Jack Phillips and Roberto Vrga3.
In the nightcap Wally Burnett and Don Elston
gave up two hits apiece as Venezuela went down in
ignomlnous defeat. Burnette, who was taken out In
the eighth frame when Panama seemed assured of
the victory, -was the winning hurler.
Five homers featured the game. Clyde Parris
blasted a grandslammer in the first; Elias Osorio
bad one with a runner in the sixth and be hit an-
other with the bases empty in the ehjhth. Hector
Lopei knocked one out of the park with two on In
the seventh and Danny Schell poked one with none
on in that sme-mm.
Panama's home run spree caused three records to
be broken. The five were the most for a team in any
one series game and Panama's total of 12 roundtrip roundtrip-pers
pers roundtrip-pers was tops for any series. The 18 runs were also the
most ever scored by one team in a series garne
An All-America candidate from Holy Cross may
pass up pro basketball to remain eligible for the Olym Olympic
pic Olympic Games in November.
Tom Heinsohn says he may play amateur bell
with the Peoria, Illinois, Caterpillars when he is
through at Holy Cross. Heinsohn says he has a good
offer from the AAU club for a job and some bask bask-'
' bask-' etball. He say he has applied for the Job. -'
The Holy Cross captain says he hasnt heard a
rumor that the Boston Celtics wiir draft him and
trade him to tfew York for Ray Elix. Says Heinsohn
"I have heard reports the Boston coach Red Auer
bach doesn't yant me because of my temperament.
Heinsohn adds "I'd like to have him ask people who

MIUVT nnv 1 v. ... - 1 ,,
at Holy Cross think I'm a pretty good boy-
In the Midwest, the feud between Ohio State and
Davton is becoming hotter, Ohio State has refused to
apologize to Dayton over charges' of tampering witn
a Buckeye player- In fact, Ohio Staie says.1 would
welcome Dayton taking the case to the N.C.A.A.
National driving cnamplon Bob Sweikert will de defend
fend defend his Indianapolis Speedway crown In this years
5)0Swelkert will drive a brand new roadster entered

Tuesday by A. B. Lathrop for a group caueu n-acm,
Associates of Indianapolis. Sweikert raced irr 10 cham-
pionship events last year, and finished fourth or bet better
ter better in all- but two of them. ,,
ier IS. if. oi-Aim pntc.red another car

Tuesday. It will be driven by Johnny Boyd, one of the
drivers who figured to the four-car smashun i in last
year's race which took the life of Bill Vukovich. T.es;
dav's entries bring the field for the Memorial Dy
race to 11. .. -- h.:
- A seven-year-old gelding-"Blue Vc4r-raced to
a head victory Monday at Santa Anita in the $30,000
San Lufo Rey Handicap. .
Blue Volt, outrun for the first mile, began to ad advance
vance advance on the infield portion of therfrw and
just beat out "Lychnus" at the finish. "Allied" was
third in the field of 11 starters.
Blue Volt's time for the event was j flat two-mlnutes-and-28-seconds.
He returned $J1.60. -$5. 80. ..
and $3.80 across the board. It is the, first time Blue
Volt won ; at the meeting. - v v
A leading colt of 1055 which ran Into trouble late
in the year has started working out at LaureL Bos Boston
ton Boston Doge" was shipped from Massachusetts one week
ago and Is being pointed for the Caoitol and Maryland
Sprint Handlcans at the Baltimore track. Boston Do?e
won his first 10 starts last year before losing t he
Swift Stakes, The olt hurt a foot late in the year
but seems to have recovered.
The Southeastern Conference has slapped Auburn
with another stiff penalty.
Conference Commissioner Bernie Moore fmecWUt fmecWUt-burn
burn fmecWUt-burn $2 000 recently for offering $500 each to Harrv
snd Robert Beaube twin hieh-school football players
from Gadsden, Alabama. The Conference Executive
Committee Monday put the college under indefinite
- probation for the same offense. Auburn also Is barred
indefinitely from football bowl game.?.
The committen ordered Auburn to "present nnsl nnsl-tive
tive nnsl-tive evidence" that it is trying to avoid future viola violations.
tions. violations. The college is threatened with susoenslon or
even expulsion from the conference if it happens a-galn-
, ;
The University of Louisville has accepted a hid to
the National Invitation Basketball Tournament for
-the fifth straight year. ...
- Louisville is the seventh team picked for -the New
York tournament March 17th through the 94th. Al Already
ready Already In the field pre defending champion Di'ouesne.

Davton, seton nan. Marquetie, w-avier. oi yjiuu unu
unbeaten St. Francis of Brooklyn. Five berths remain
-open.-
i. 'Louisville htis.won 19 pris. more than anv oh oh-er
er oh-er major team thi season.' The Cardinals hve i"t
only once. by nine nolnts to Western Kenti"'. t
Uned Press board of coaues ranked Louisville fifth
in the latest weekly ratings.





Co:hic supplement

- "N, 1 I POPEiB, (OC JO SOUV I (01 LL SEE "AT 1 TfEE' FA HE CAU GET)
h O-. A 6iFr-ioRA?nwis Yn" i3-dome;- likes res Vs to A
dj-fc' TOR ME, PIUEASE AUMT JOMES rj j U'SEFUL" 7 :FT)P
jj ffll cn A
AUUT JOMES. VPS tOE I 1 I FRAGILE, U H llTGOESV0' 10ILL PAD S
DOES MOT JMOCO, FOUND AlMT TO BREAK, ThJCOUGH I TME BQTTOAA AMD y
10ANT1T T poPEYEU JT?? ) XJOOH. THE SIDES, YC
BROKEM.1 LOTS OF J u7 ilKV ) 700 nSl
I" MOUV iaF- PUTS VI IPOKI'T TIE MV FINGER, SU3BE'PEA. 0U PIP THAT ALL I SHOULD BE
S OM ThAE. TOPV I tOAMT HOLD STILL N VOURSELVES (lOORWNS
-r TO STAVVOo AM' DOMT Puit)n AXSTQg "X
4'-). xfftprr f$ t --t

1 r. -j4m.f 1 a ..... 'h uy-. s. t v 1

(JOtO FOC THE KIAMEfU

LET ME JKIOIO lOMEM VOU ARB )

READV FOR TH' PITCHEk. JT f S

i 1 1

4 1 1 1

: V'yr (OE ARE 1,1,, A :

c." A -.1, l.J

5S



HOW ABOUT THE V CASPER, VOU

SAME VOICE, SAME:

T I'M OFF TO THE BANKERS
-rrtMWPMTJrtN.BOVe' I'VE

. 'V JUST TIME TO CATCH

WW,

JL.

NOW THAT WE'RE RIO OF
THE BOSS I'LL 6lVe THE BOYS
A LAUGH AFTER LUNCH
WITH MV IMPERSONATION OF
THE OLD BOV IN ACTION.' I

CAN EVEN IMITATE
HIS RASPY

VOICE TO

REPORTS ON THAT OUOHTA BS ON
UTAH PEAL76R-R-) THE STAGE.'
I'VE A NOTION TO THAT A
CJTALLV3UR. PERFECT

kSALAWES.'T.lMITATlON OFl

inc. owss.r

MOTIONS YUU P
ALMOST SWEAR, IT

WAS THE BOSSk

HIMSELF IN

" 1 1

I'LL WAVE YOU UNPER- Y THS OLD BOV V THAT'S, T

eNJAM!NiU?. V THAW NAPOLEON

PLUNKE2.:

THE V-'V ." rfv' err

NAPOLEON, SU Wy-vvU

OF FINANCE,

P i s

f

IT?

17s Ms-

) I

IF THAT ABAQABA MOTOP

CONTRACT ISNT IN THE

MAILS ..TODAY, I LL PIKE

ALL OF .YOU-ARUMF-F-F

WHERE ARE THE?
ESTIMATES ANDi!)

CASPER, VOU'RE CLEVER

W A. THAT 6 A KEKrfcOl

bo

j 'TV

jT .. f f S V

h

I'M JUST'AN AMATEUR AT

IMPERSOMATIONS, BUT THAT

OLP SOURPUSS IS EASY

TO MIMIC:

-I

A f V) vr in

ER AH- V I MlSSEP MY PLANE; BUT IT WAS J
SPLUTTER" - WORTH 1T-T0 SS MVSELF AS OTHERS
gzi, Bees,! 7s- -rcpg ME" HAJyrf
V; 1 i. r
J

GEE, I'M 6LAO YOU
HAVE A SENSE OF.

.a WflS UNUY

I'VE A JOKE IN STORE FOR VOU

SALARY" NOW Lcr iift-V

ME SEE YOU IS'' JL
i l a Decrki ATP -isikJ

A MAMTAIrllGT!:X'rx

NO, NO, BOSS, NOT

THATi I COULPN'T

FACE TOOTS AGAIN.'

THATS YOUR PROBLEM,
MOT MINE.' HAW-HAW.' I'M
SURE GETTING A KICK OUT

OF HAVING THE

LAST LAUGH,

1

I

n

7
fi.ii. tit

HE JUST PR5TENDEP
HE WAS COINS AWAY

TO SNEAK BACK AND

CATCH U5 jry

OFF X.
SUARO.1 S

HE

V

'S A CAfiEY ONE.'

CASPER" HE KNOWS

ALL THE TRICKS.'

y

.X.

'A

L

7

1

L SURE FELT CHEAP

WUBM,THe BOSS WALKEP

IN AND CAUGHT ME 0O1N6 1 'i

MY IMPERSONATION Or, 7 -'

HIM J-

v

UX

1

.

K'ft TrKT'V yYWntf ATB, Inf., B1HT BBSPS

TOOTS, I'LL CET THE
OLD FOX JUST
FAKED A TRIP TO

find out what goes

ON

WHILES
HE'sf ,tft

HE'LL PROBABLY RELENT ABOUT

CUTTING YOUR SALARY, BUT

NEVER FORGET HE DIDN'T

.GET RICH E3y

S LETTING

Ml HLLr

J rU- OUTSMART
1 1.' i : M
....ii.iiii i '.ii mi- 1 f ii in irfl mi In i' ri m .. ,(



I WAS COUNTlNGr

THIS HCW DIP

' YOU 0OYS

J?J?EAK JAIL?

7- .-V.

.J neii -ii id

FROM A CHAIR BACK

. it

7 j LOCK.

TPS

PUCK PETERS'

V J?UNAWAY HORSE

SHOWED UPATTHE

IRON MINE WITH

PART OF A

MESSAGE 5CRATCW

PC? ON THE SADDLE

'JFOASSIPy FIGURES

OUT THc KEFC II,

' j WE'VE LOST HIM AW-D

i THE RANSOM MONEY

4 tap mi wif

74

... ..

UJ,



, I L

WvX HI HOWS My .--v
-fli Lte gy-g)
; '' t"

l waxen: J A L - -"?

"tc" e; c- -. if' J

f VM TOP POP !hj

.y-. A BOP SHOP
X THOUGHT TO
( TPV A CHEESZ- r

LUMCr!

WHAT

GOES.
DOLL

7

V I'M

it-'c:'

?A5s

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its

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STOP DATJNG C7THe BOVS INJ ALL

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MOST SORRy TO INCONVENIENCE ; fT'S OKAC CPPJP Y&J )
yOU. MR-.HAZARE.' BUT THE 8AS I WWT TO AiX My V.XTY

fV MUST ES OPENED BEFORE I CAN UXIHLUP'

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1

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H LiEAVtNS EANGKCK FOR TOKVO,

JOHNNy IS A80UT TO PASS THROUGH
CUSTOMS CABEVINS A SUITCASE i

THAT, UNKNOWN TO HIM, HAS BEEN fcf

SWITCHED By A STRANSE GIRL IN
THE AIR TERMINAL

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HAMV.PH7 I MJ5T VA"r VCLf, SKIP THE RULES,

AA!2. MA2A,X13ArC2,tr:.V3 TO HEALTH I IST My

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L0OK5 UKS NO ONE WANTS T

ft, KfNO rKATURW S V' DM ATS. TMH RlGHTff TtRSFRVEP

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Itr EZ YOUR COLLAR, Tf T Tl""" 1

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TP BE TRAVEUM WTH

US GOLAgKYS

HONEST, RELPA- THAT
FLANNEL SHIRT-COAT

POESUT LOOK VERY WARM

HAVE VOU 60T ANYTMIN6

HEAVIER FOR WHEW THE

SNOW AN' ICE COMES?

7 AHO' NEEDS 1TWMEN J

I ttODPO TUP R4LM TT?EES

w m

POWM IN FLORIPy. A

1.

I P1PNT KNOW

WE'RD GOt TO

FLO H I PA.1 1 TH0U6HT

OMLV RICH PEOPLE

OOULP AFFORD TO,

DO THINGS LIKE

v i mm i tit r

4

fiHnPS-THATS US tSOLARKyS Yi

PAA SAVS HES THE K CHEST

i TEM-CEHT Ml LL10f4AIRE IN THE

WORLD WE GO NORTH AN

JSOUTH WITH THE B1RP5;

TV

6EE-IS

If I Ao 1 1 ft IV

VDUR PA

IS CALLED

vLUCKyF

SHORE WE AllsIT 60T NO MONIES

BUT WE EAT GOOD AN WE.

SLEEP 600P, AN'- OH, THE

TIRE'S REAPy. PAWS

A'CALLIN'US.'

-UK,

C'MOM, EVER'BODV.' GIT ON BOARD.'

sJIST A WAYS VONDER IT WON'T

BE LONG. NOW COME A RUNNIS4

WHAT YOU
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lLT NOW A w

NtCE,HOT
- baths;

i MORALE

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I'M rrrxwG TO ASK

HERB TO COME OVER

AND PLAY A CaAWlfc

OF RNUCHLt

WITH Mfc

WAT A PlTy A

TO THINK A BIG,

HEALTHY MAN
COULD FALL TO

SUCH A LOWLY

STATE

jfOA&wOOlP. LETS )
S r-rr HELP HIM GET
f V BCK H'S SELF. I

p r oh-no-no-

; 7 NOT THAT'

-.7 III. W V li

A SHAVE

AND HAIRCUT i

DOES WONDERS

FOR A MAN'S :

LUCKY I HAD

I THIS ELECTRIC

HEDGE

CLIPPER

V :::...!!.'

1 r &

LL

1 THANK

VOU :

LIFE

1

rovou (gooo A
! NEW VxJ"? LUCK

t could you J.
SPARE A man ( ; o T
I A QUARTER ft '"p
7 FOR A CUP -T
. f t

. 1.
v .COULD VOLj SPARE ) f j
;Vfc A POOR MAN J
A NICKEL FOR ?
f (a CUP OF COFFEE ?

OS1

; --. ..y.-f 1 FIRST WELL FILL )
. VOU UP WITH
vfc 'ii) ( GOOD NOURISHING J
j flpSj .FOOD
g If

t-f .-- ( DOESN T THAT

-X JS FEELGOOD?

J

e J" ( L

; NOW TOUCAN FACE ) V" (THERE ARE NO i
- V THE WORLD WITH r At" ( LlkJSJPTT V
i RENEWED J( J7 -V r A HEIGHTS VOU. '
cInf.dInce tTc p v yX catrj f
' ANOSELF-AVW5 :CrTONOW
; v.

NOW WE CAN GO

IN MV HOUSE

AND PLAV OUR

WITH A CLEAR

CONSCIENCE

GAMS' OF PINOCHLEY

.J

N

WELL. ANYWAY, WE

GOT HIM ASKING

FOR QUARTERS

iM3icnu w

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NICKELS

5

r

H
;
. i

1 'S Sf y

THAT'S ALWAYS

A GOOD "t ""S
START G

WE'LL. BURN UP HIS

OLD CLOTHES AND

FIND HIM 5QMt

KlEW THINGS TO

WEAR
DOORBELL.
RINGING
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