The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:03005

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
ITS

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FfeTTING ON A PUNTO IN THE PATIO These members of the Carnival court of Queen
; Liz showed other merrymakers at Hotel El Panama last night that they could set the pace
Ah"?! h festivities there continue tonight, and close tomorrow night with the burial

H ouse Group Slams Con d it ion
Of Gl Family Quarters Here
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12 (UP) A House banking subcommittee today urged im im-mediata
mediata im-mediata construction programs at United States bases in Cuba and the Canal Zone, in
order to free servicemen's families from outside quarters described as "unfit to house
livestock,"
The subcommittee headed by Rep, Albert Rains of Alabama also recommended
100,000 new family housing units to relieve similar, if less shocking, shortages at
bases on United States soil, including Puerto Rico.
, These were among the recommendations contained in the subcommittse's report
t-n Its tsur cf Puerto Rico, Cuba and the Canal Zone two months ao.

Although critical of the mili military
tary military housing situation in gen general,
eral, general, the reporfc reserved Its bit bitterest
terest bitterest comments lor the Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean area v
The "most flagrante Indica Indication
tion Indication of the military housing
ahnrtara In th Canal Znne.
the report said, is that person personnel
nel personnel working on the Pacific
terminal must live at the At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic terminal, and commute
100 miles daily.
"Existing conditions. ."al ."althoughdeplorable
thoughdeplorable ."althoughdeplorable enough in
time of peace," the report said,
"would become intolerable and
lnexcusaDie snoyia a iw ui
emergency ever develop In the
Canal Zone." :v;--v;vv,
The Coco Solito housing
development at the Atlantic
terminal was cited in con considerable
siderable considerable detail as a horrible
ewnple of the outmoded and
tramped military housing
which exists In the Zone.
Built as a wartime emergency
In 1941 to last only five years,
Coco Solito has, settled two feet
Into the mangrove swamp.
Floors, streets and utility lines
are deteriorating so rapidly that
the government has been forced
1
1

AFTER THE VICTORY Four key men in Panama's 11-innlng:, 2-to-l victory over Venezuela
last night, pose in the dressing room after the thriller was over. Left to right are: center center-fielder
fielder center-fielder Billy Stewart, who hit a long homerun in the 11th frame to put the winners ahead
....... f : .... t
for keeps; winning pitcher Don Elston, who relieved starter Jerry Davie In the fifth with the'

"scdre tied l-I &nfl" permitted w-frmher scoring;- therest rtheaTreOTnd'basernarr'-Hector-Lppez
whose third-inning four-ply blast gave Panama her first run; and catcher Billy Queen
who was flawless1 in handling the pitches.

CARNIVAL,

-If
r
-C X.
to spend nearly $1,000,000 in the
last four years to keep the proj project
ect project open.
Less than 40 per cent of the
available housing in the Zone,
the report said,, Is permanent
and adequate.
Referring to the sort of hous housing
ing housing available in Caminera and
Guantanamo City, the only
towns close to the United State.
naval base in eastern Cuba, the
subcommittee said in a formal
report;
"Words are totally inadequate
to describe how deplorable quar quarters
ters quarters are. Filth, vile stench,
open sewers, disease, rat (infes (infestation
tation (infestation make these quarters un unfit
fit unfit to house livestock, much less
American service personnel."
The : Guantanamo base, the
report said, needs nearly 400
additional permanent housing
units and early replacement of
some 200 "unquestionably sub substandard"
standard" substandard" enlisted men's quar
ter. .:.:..',.......::,
As a step toward remedying
the Cuban-Canal Zone situa situation,
tion, situation, the subcommittee recom recommended
mended recommended that Congress consider
favorably Defense Department

recommendations for.r

the armed services mortem? in
surance program to those areas.
Malta Vote Light
On Integration;
Catholics Leary
VALETTA, Malta, Feb. 13 (UP)
Election officials today counted
ballots cast in the two-day refer referendum
endum referendum on Malta's proposed inte integration
gration integration with Britain, final results
are expected tonight.
Officials slid only 91,441 of the
island's 152,823 eligible vol As par participated
ticipated participated in the balloting Satur Saturday
day Saturday and Sunday.
Supporters of integration offer offered
ed offered voters rides to the polls in
automobiles and ambulances in an
effort to defeat1 opposition led by
archbishop Sir Michael -Gone a.
Gonza contended the Roman Ca Catholic
tholic Catholic Church was not given uf uf-ficient
ficient uf-ficient guarantees that its rights
on Malta would be safeguarded
under a new administration.

t D 1 1

Non-Citizen
US Employes
Ponder Tax
Discussion was widespread to today
day today among Panamanians and
other non-US. citizens working
lor Canal Zone organizations
concernine a Finance Ministry
announcement on the payment
of income taxes. i
The announcement was made
yesterday in newspaper ads bv
Gilberto Sucre, director of In
ternal Revenue, notifying Canal
Zone workers that March 14 is
the deadline for filing: state statements
ments statements on their estimated Income
for 1956.
Sucre's announcement also in
formed these groups that the
taxes are payable from Jan. 1,
1958, In conformity with the pro provisions
visions provisions of the new Panama-U.S.
treaty.
According to the announce
ment, the tax Is applicable to
all persons employed by Canal
Zone organizations with the ex
ception of (a) members of the
U.S. armed forces, (b) U.S. citi citizens
zens citizens and (c) other residents of
the Canal Zone who are not Pa
namanian citizens.
Income tax payments are nay-,
able within the month follow following
ing following which the salaries are earn
ed.
Non-navment within that time
will bring about a surcharge of
5 percent for the first month
and 1 per cent for each addi additional
tional additional month.
In additionthose who fall to
comply with the regulations will
be denied pas y salvo" certifi
cates- which are required lor re
gistering documents, departure
permits and withdrawing mer
chandise from Customs.
Payments will be received in
the office on the fourth floor of
the Finance Ministry in Pana Panama
ma Panama City and at the Provincial
administration of Internal Rev Revenue
enue Revenue in the Post Office building
in Colon.
Civil Defense
Meetings Listed
Civil Defense meetings have
been scheduled lor this week as
follows:
Diablo, at the Service Center
Theater 9:30 ajn. Wednesday;
New Cristobal, at the Wash
lngton Hotel, 9 a.m. Thursday.
All members of tne respective
townslte Civil Defense Self-Protection
Programs are urged to
attend as Emergency Operations
of the Canal Zone Civil Defense
Organization will be discussed
in preparation for the forthcom
ing National Civil defense exer exercise
cise exercise in June. The general public
has been Invited to attend both
meetings. The motion picture!
"Let's Face It" also will be
shown.

m ITS THE CARIBBEAN SERIE

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V;lU. K: I .; .;V', i..y
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I ,.....-.., ..L, .-, .. , M

WINNING BLOW Panama centerfielder Billy Stewart reaches OUCH! Cuban pitcher Sandalio- Consuegra is examined by Dr, Timoteo Suescum (left) and
home plate after hitting a homerun in the 11th inning to give ; t . , ... .v . , .. . .L
Panama a 2-to-l victory over Venezuela last night. Stewart's the Cuban team trainer (with towei) after the righthander was hit on the ear last night by ,,
"blasf T de ove -tho leIt fit!! ncAT cam1 w.vh & ba" of! the bat of Puerto Rico first baseman Lou Limmer in the fourth inning. Consuc Sra
none on and two outs to give Panama her first triumph in the
eighth Carribbean Series which got underway at the Olympic; lunged at a sizzling grounder Jyst before the ball raised to give him a painful injury. The
.Stadium Friday..night. Panama second baseman Hector Ixpe-? 1 .u v , ... ,
.hit a roundtripper in the second to give Panama' a" 6rie-i'uri"TWramendhtihfr
UtBbr'lfig!J? wmltSthuS the fifth- dlscl05Cd the'lnjurywas not serious. Puerto Rico beat. Cuba 7-4 to mo
' against Cuba. : the teams into a tie for first place. , ; .

. r r.nrvi Jin y 1.1. rtin

n
Well-Fixed
Vets Ducking
Hospital Fee
WASHINGTON. Feb 13 rt!P
ine government is spending mil-
i uons ot dollars providing free hos hos-ipitalization
ipitalization hos-ipitalization for well-fixed veterans
i who claim they can't afford private
tare, federal investigators report, i
ine uenerai Accounting Otnce
investigated the situation at the
request of the House Veterans
Committee, headed by Rep. "Olin
E. Teague (D-Tex.).
Teague said he is considering
referring some of the worst cases
to the Justice Department for pos
sible prosecution. He said he also
may make public names and case
histories of some of the offenders
He added that "there are not
many cases of abuse. However, I
am not satisfied with any."
Veterans who go to VA hospi hospitals
tals hospitals with service-connected ail ailments
ments ailments are treated free as a mat matter
ter matter of right. However, veterans
with routine ailments incurred in
civilian life also can be treated
in veterans hospitals, provided
beds are available, if they swear
they capnot afford private care.
- .. ... v ..... .
The GAO, the committee sourc sources
es sources said, showed case after case
of apparent abuse of the free hos hos-nital
nital hos-nital Drivilese. It showed that in
some cases the veteran reported
substantial income and property
but still pleaded inability -to py
In other cases veterans growly
misrepresented their financial sta
tus.
CARIilVAL
' We're in montuno
mood. So no pa per' to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. Back Wednesday.

Actress Terry Moore Secretly Vcds

Panama Businessman Gene HcGrath
Hollywood actress ferry Moore has been secretly "Jed to
Eugene McGrath ef Panama since Jan 1, It was revealed la
The news that McGrath, an American insurance agent who
jives hereha, been married U the actress
was announced in Hollywood by the atar's mother, Mrs. Lamar
KfShe said the marriage was kept a secret until now because
McGrath "isn't acustomed to Hollywood publicity. .
The newlyweds are now honeymooning in Caracas, Vene-
""''Terry nas been a frequent visitor to Panama within the last
two months, and McGrath has been her constant companion
during her short visits here. ...
It is a second marriage for both. Miss Moore, who Is 26
years old, was formerly married to Glenn Davis, former football
star. They were divorced in 1952.
McGrath, who is 33 years old, has a home In Coco del Mar.

n

n
Doctors Wont
Advise Ike
About Running
WASHINGTON. Feb. 13 (UP)
President Eisenhower will have
to decide his political future
without benefit of a direct "yes"
or "no" from his doctors on
whether he should seek a sec second
ond second term.
Dr. Paul Dudley White, famed
Boston heart specialist, said in
Los Angeles yesterday that the
doctors will give the President
"findings and a medical opin opinion"
ion" opinion" on hia health after study studying
ing studying results of Mr. Eisenhower's
latest physical examination.
But when the physicians re report
port report their findings to the Pres-fripnt-
iat- t.nmnrrow or Wednes
day, White told United Press,
iMar trill n,nn rpcnmiiieiiaaiiuu
on what he should do regarding
a second term.
"That choice will be his," Dr.
White said.
The Boston physician, in San
Francisco today for speaklnsr en engagements,
gagements, engagements, will fly to Washing Washington
ton Washington tonight and join the Pres President's
ident's President's other doctors for an an-
alvol. nt ) irlven t.h PrCSl-
dent at Walter Reed hospital,
. t 11am .UI1
saturaav s examination, wuu-u
included X-ray, fluoroscope, car cardiogram
diogram cardiogram and a blood chemistry
analvsis. was ordered to deter
mine how the President has
borne up under the lull loaa oi
the presidency since ne re--.umed
that load at the first of
the year.
' The President has said the
doctors' report will influence his
rtivls nnhilt. not necessaiuy uc
cisively on whether to aeek i
second term.
Tve honestly got to be con-
Ttlr,-H that T ran TATTY tniS .100
efficiently," the President said.
0

tiritish

From Unveiling

Of

vjo turncoats

LONDON, Feb. 13 (UP) Foreign Secretary Selwyri
Lloyd said today that the reappearance in Moscow of
turncoat British diplomats Guy Burgess and Donald Mac Mac-Lean
Lean Mac-Lean "shows how difficult it is to establish relations of
mutual trust" with the Soviet Union.
Lloyd made his observation while-delivering a state
ment to the House of Commons on the strange case of

the two former diplomats who

and popped up unexpectedly in Moscow last Saturday,
Lloyd told Parliament that while the Soviets "profess
so much to desire," mutual trust, they had repeteadly
greeted British questions about the two mert with a con

sistent lack of Candor."

The foreign secretary angrily told the Commons
placed "no credence" in the words of Burgess or Mac
Lean, who denied in their reappearance press conferencs

Saturday that they had Deen
. Lloyd said the Soviet authori authorities
ties authorities probably permitted the two
turncoats to come out of hiding
in ait eifort to "create distrust
and drive a wedce between the
Unite 1 Kingdom-' and United
States governments." -V,
"if iris is the .explanation,
they win not succeed,"- he saia.
He said Moscow also micht
have produced Burgess and
Maclean now so that Soviet
Premier Nikolai Bulganin and
Communist Party boss Nikita
S. Khrushchev could "avoid
awkwurd quest Ion s" when
they visit Britain in April.
Oi the Burgess-Maclean state,
ment oenying that they had
oeen Communist spies while em
ployed by the Bnusn loreign oi oi-iice,
iice, oi-iice, Lioya said "no credence
can be piaced on their words,"
"Suspicion lor known leakage
to the Soviet authorities was
narrowed down to Maclean be
fore his departure," woyd saiu.
"No suspicion was attached
to Burgess before his depar depar-ture,
ture, depar-ture, but strong suspicion tell
upon him when he departed
and this was confirmed by
Vladimir Petrov, (a Soviet
diplomat who sought asylum
In Australia)."
Prime Minister Sir, Anthony
Eden added to Lloyd's statement
by saying that the Committee of
nrivv p.nuncllloM aiit.hnrt7.ed to
investigate security measure, ln
r ... (

the light of the Burgess-Mac-bill

Conclusion

disappeared in May, 195T,
communist spies.
lean defection
its report.
now. had made
"I have given it careiui stud-,
y," Eden said.
"We are now enRaced in con considering
sidering considering -the st.pps 'to V taken
to pive ci'if'ct to it. r vouM
hope to be able to make a stale--,
ment in due course."
Lloyd replied in the Commons
to a question posed by Socialist
Herbert Morrison, who waS for foreign
eign foreign secretary in 1951 when
Burgess, and Maclean fled be-
rund tne iron curtain,
Xloyd said the turncoats' re reappearance
appearance reappearance "brings into clear
relief the consistent, larir nt can
dor of the Soviet authorities in
their statement about these two
men." ;
25,000 Turn Out
To Hear Billy
In Manila, P.I.
MANILA, P.I.; Feb. 13 (LT!
More than 25,000 cheerinir Fili Filipinos
pinos Filipinos turned out last night to
hear American evangeUst Billy
Graham preach in a fnnfh-.ii
stadium.
The stadium was packed to
capacity despite an earlier state statement
ment statement by Archbishop Fufino San Santos
tos Santos advisinsr Catholics to stay a a-way
way a-way from the rally. Graham 'j
ii,uH.,r,(T D I CA v karf ,1,1
fro "s d0VhH"K".S?S
meeting aiso naa
at a neighboring stadium.



rut rANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT PAILT NEKSPAfEa

mondat, rf'f a:;i n. i.

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
ttWP AMD euaLiantO y TMf PtM AMERICAN MMI, INC
rOUNCCS r MI-ION BOUNitVlLL Ik ll
MAMMOOIO AIA. IDITOa
. 87. H imicr P, O. eon 134. Panama, n efP.
TlilAHOM 2-070 9 Lihisl
CABLE ADOICMi PANAMf HICAN, PANAMA
! Caion Crriet. 12.!7 Cintkal Avinui atTwtiN Utm and itm STaicta
I FOKIIGN RtPMttNTATIVt! JOSHUA B. POWER. INC.
345 MAOiaoN Avt. Ntw YOK. 1171 N, Y.

t
I MONTH.' m ADVANCf
JO l MOHtHI, IN ADVAHCt ADVAHCt-POK
POK ADVAHCt-POK ONI VIA. N ADVANCE

THIS ti Y0U rOKUM Trlf HiADERS OWN COLUMN
TIm Med Is It lorum ra raodtri The Panama Americaa
lafrart ara ncaivae frottfully tni era handlW ia wholly taafideafial
aaaaatr. '1
II rantiibuta ttttef rfoiTI Impatient ft eowa I MPMi
Mil aay Uttan ara awbluhaa1 ia lh idi rtcaivtd. .. r

Mairtitr lHr writars it hal1 in ttrictnt caafidtnct.
This ncwtf oper auumtt no retpoMibiliry tor ttittmt ntt aalaiaw
iproiMa in lertert from roadon. .'
7 H E MAIL BOX

-.-.
HOW DO YOU

Sir:
i
i To a "poor" mother of children who evidently was disturb disturbed
ed disturbed by a letter recently submitted by Air Force Wife signing
! herself as "A Poor Mother of Children." Funk and Wagnalls
Standard Dictionary gives the following definition for the word
J "poor"
I. Lacking means of comfortable subsistence; Indigent.
2 Belonging to or characteristic of poverty.
i s. Lacking in good qualities, or the qualities that render a
i thing valuable. ,
. 4. Holding cheap or mean; depreclatlve; as a poor opinion

of someone.
5. Deserving of pity! unhappy; expressive of compassion,
sometimes simply of tenderness or mourning.
6. Miserable; paltry; used contemptuously.
How do you mean "poor"?

As for trying to parapnrase

xnrf in vnnr arivnnt.flpp Find RnmPrhint in that

t book to build yourself up, rather than tear someone else apart,
J then perhaps you would not refer to yourself as "poor mother."
4 Also,, take a bit of time to teach your children not to kick
the pews (training at home on your own furniture helps).
Truly

SIDE GLANCES

. I I
11 jfif

! Tm an only child and you'rt lupposed to ipoil me!"

CSDOI

USE

j fJX for a
! ( deeper,
S .brighter
; y
J "TT. ;:'..'?

v mwi is made witn superfine
waxes and real tanner's dyes. That's why it gives a deep, long long-lasting
lasting long-lasting shine that protects and preserves your shoes. Try a tin of
Kiwi today. Your shoes will look far smarter and last far longer.

; n7nnnnn
J UUU WW U
J A,Kt! jotcph Grossman J.A., 3S Av.
.....

t 2. SO
U 00
24 00
MEAN, "POOR"?
me Diuie; wny not use mat
By Colbroith
SHOE POLISH
n worW'i flnttt shot polish.
In
i Black and nna other cofours,
Central, PANAMA. Republic of Panama

lOCAt.
f t.70
iro
18 SO

Labor News
And
Comment

By VICTOR RIESEL
MIAMI BEACH The Ku Klux
Klan is prowling the night again.
They are hooded. They've got guns.
Thnv htirn rrnssM it nipht
Just i few nights ago over at
Orangeburg, S.C., cloaked Klans-
mn frnm th Parnlinat wpr lninixl
by wool hats from Georgia and
they had themselves a cross-burning
orgy. They're riding all right.
But they'll ride right into some
mighty powerful labor forces who
have, a very neat blueprint pre
pared nere at ine Aru-ciu nign
command session lor non-segregai
n nninniralinn nf the south
Vnu npprl nnlv In be here an hour
to see what this means. For years
the old AFL had met in the "Gold
Coast" hotels, but there is no rec record
ord record of a single Negro labor man
having attended the sessions on this
beach where Negroes are banned.
There's a new spirit now that the
AFL has merged with the militant
CIO.
Three prominent Negro union
leaders wander in and out of the
Monte Carlo Hotel lobby as casu casually
ally casually as though it was New York's
Waldorf-Astoria. At any moment
you can see the Sleeping Car Por Porters'
ters' Porters' A. Philip Randolph, the Trans
port Service Employes' Willard
Townscnd or national office statf
official George Weaver going about
their business in a hotel where Ne
groes were as unseen a year ago
as fur-clad t-skimos.
These three are the advance advance-?narri
?narri advance-?narri nf hundreds nf other Neeroes
who will soon, become part of the
leadership echelon ot tne new At l, l,-CIO
CIO l,-CIO and right in the heart of the
south, too, if labor has anything to
do with it.
From the point of view of the
labor leaders who have spent much
tima nn their new. unionizing blue
print, charts and all, they have to
make these changes u tneir arive
ia tn mwrpDfA T.flhnr hs biff sfakps
in the south. It won't be able to
hold its lines up north if it doesn t
unionize much of the south.
The experts say that 3,000 multi multi-million
million multi-million dollar plants will spring up
throughout the south in the next 10
years. These factories are expect expect-oH
oH expect-oH in prente well over million
new jobs. They'll be turning out
everything from precision electron
ic tn heovv industrial machinery
At least 350 of these production
centers will be textile plants. Cer Certainly
tainly Certainly Emil Bieve's Textile Work Workers
ers Workers 1 ininn will fieht to unionize
these factories and on a non-seg
regated basis. The drive win rou
soon enougn. -' ..
Tliii hivon't )artiH vet Vieeanse
they're deadtracked for the mom
ent by the rivalry Detween me nig
former CIO Textile Workers Union
and the smaller AFL one. Both
want iurUdietinn over the non-nn-
innired textile olants.1 Both want
money and 4 manpower; from 'the'
AFL-CIO national pool now run ny
Jack Livingston, But until the two
unions agree on which one will get
the new memhers: there will be
little national AFL-CIO money or
manpower lor tne anve.
The same goes for1 the chemical
and atnmie enerffv fields down
south. But the union rivalries are
being worked out here now in uve
inner sanctums. The organizing
campaigns .will start when these
disputes are finally resolved. ;
The Teamsters have surv surveyed
eyed surveyed the south very carefully;
Dave Beck, Jim Hoffa and other
nationally prominent Teamsters of officials
ficials officials have spent many hours be behind
hind behind lned dnnri nlanniniZ to Out
the union label on everything that
.. 1 1 mu ..'...' f rtv. m rf title
rOUS. HIS U11V1HR AUIVC w
campaign will be Jim Hoffa, which
..mint fnr his sham interest in
the northeastern Teamsters Unions.
Hoffa says he wants to revitalize
the New York Teamsters Council
m it Mn he used as a weaoon in
the southern drive. And I mighty
powerful weapon u can De.
cnniimm tmclcintr ran be hard
hit as it rolls north if the big over-
the-road trailer trucKs una mcy
can't unload when they get to the
large northern metropolitan areas.
So it goes witn omer union cmeis
tnf'm hi oh pnmmand. They've
just heard an appeal from H. L.
kfitht.11 head nf the tinv Aeri-
ruitnral Workers Union. Mitchell
told the union chiefs tnat mere are
1,500,000 workers eligioie ior un-
irtnliatinrt nil sniithprn farms. Hun-
lUlltCitivavta
dreds of thousands of them are
Negroes. They're engmie ro pay
j.... Thov'r eiieihle for leader-
ship. That means they'lT want to
come ana go iiuu.
the legislatures, the hotels and the
....:.....:;.. ths cmithland.
It may take political friendship
pacts to win uuav r"uu
t0Just last week, the AFL-CIO
chiefs lunched with Tennessee s
vouns Gov. Frank Clements, who
. .itHnrf w th th family
elders. Talk turned to the struggle
of the Negro coea ai ui umvw
. cnma nf the labor Deo-
ole told their southern political
r . a it.. vniicr enme
friends mat me i"", -''
soon when all this is change d Gov
Clements agreed-all this must
change
Obviously the fight Is on.

',

,1

"Book Him

H.l 1 r r - W II' Wk- I I

y y NEA Senic, lc

...i,y .U-- s-,-1
WASHINGTON (NEA) The
gabble, the think pieces and the
thumb suckings on whether Presi President
dent President Eisenhower will run again
drool on and on in an endless
river of words.
Nobody knows for sure from
nothing, But political speculation
is the national sport even more
than basketball. So everybody does
it at every Juke box and bus stop.
There's a story going around that
somebody called up that roly roly-poly
poly roly-poly pal of presidents, George
Allen, and said he finally had it
straight about Ike's running.
"Hurry up and tell me," said
Allen, "so I can rush right over
and advise the President on what
he should do."
But the day Isn't far off when
all this uncertainty will come to
an end. And then you will be sub
jected to another spasm of gum-
Dealings on either ot me two
following varieties:
If the President decides that his
health will enable him to stick out
the White House for another five
years, you can expect this kind of
day-after reaction:
'Republicans today counted the
1956 election in the bag. following
President Eisenhower's dramatic
announcement to the nation that
he would be a candidate for re reelection,
election, reelection, "It was generally assumed that
Vice President Richard M. Nixon

Walter Wincheli In 'New Yont

The Broadway Crowd I
Dcsnile denials. Marilyn's secret!
beauraance was and is playwright
Arthur, Miller. Another playwright
and his wife have been their Big
Front. .Lance Reventlow, Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Hutton's only child, will in inherit
herit inherit $1,000,000 on his 21st birthday
Feb. 24th,. 1957. '.Mary Pickford
("First Lady of Hollywood") re refused
fused refused to permit Pickf air to be
snown on tne msiae uevenyj
Hils" TV how...Gertrude Niesen
song star, and Jac kPepper are a
new two. He was once wed to Gin.
ger Rogers. .Dance Director Geor
gie Hale s wife is in Miami lor a
divorce. .Owen Davis, author of
more than 200 plays, is very ill at
N. Y. Hospital. He is 82. .Ann
Miller of the films and barrister
William O'Connor, a steady date
for 15 years, say they will never
merge, v Shelley winters appar apparently
ently apparently prefers Latins. The 3 big men
in her life: Vittorio Gassman, her
recent husband, Ben Gazzara, her
leading man in 'Hatful of Rain,"
and Anthony Franciosa (same
show), her current beaumance.
Harlow Curtice, head man of
General Motors, invited Tallulah
Bankhead, the noted Democrat, to
attend the G. M. Motorama. .She
refused. "WhatT's he said. 'YoulJ
never catch' me at any damb'd
Republican rally? .... The bigger
they are the harder they keep try.:
ing: Joan Crawford is taking dra drama
ma drama lessons in N.Y. Jeff Hunter
is concentrating on Jeanne Baird.
Not a Baird idea. .All right, some-,
body, please explain what that
bloke in the tie ad on page 75 of
the New Yorker is supposed to be
doing, (tch-tch). ."Stardust" con continues
tinues continues to enrich Hoagy Carmichael
and Mitchell Parish, its parents.
They still get $20,000 a year in
royalties irom the old timer, wnat
movie producer (with a hit on
B'way)'is called "The Call Girl
King" hehind his back?
William Russell is the handsome
lover in "The Man Who Never
Was," made in England, ..The girl
of his affections (in that film) is
Gtorirt3rahamer:The-'two-weTei
unable to meet until the morning
they started shooting the movie. .
They came on the set. were intro
duced by the director, and 15 min

utes later were on a sofa making

for Endangering Our Aircraft"

Do-lt-Yourself Pund
By PETER EDSOM

would again be the President's
running mate.
"From his office in the Capitol
(or from Timbuctu or wherever he
happens to be on good will mission)
Nixon greeted reporters warmly
and said (fill in whatever he says).
"All over the Capitol today, it
was possible to tell Republicans
from Democrats by their expres expressions.
sions. expressions. The Republicans were the
ones who were smiling broadly.
"Meanwhile, from Chicago, ex ex-Gov.
Gov. ex-Gov. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois.
likeliest Democratic candidate to
oppose the President in November.)
issued a cautiously worded state statement.
ment. statement.
"From New York, Gov. Averell
Harriman repeatek.tht he was
not a candidate, while Sen. 'Estes
Kefauver (I?-Tenn) said he would
welcome a test of strength against
the President in (whatever prima primaries
ries primaries are still open).'!
Et cetera, ani so forth, etc.
But if Ike says simply, in the
words of Silent Cal Coolidge, "1 do
not choose to run," you -will be
subjected to both barrels of some something
thing something like this:
"The Republican party was
thrown Into complete consternation
(chaos, confusion, panic or choose
your own word) today by President
Eisenhower's dramatic announce announcement
ment announcement that he would not be a
candidate for re-election.
"GOP National Chairman Len
violent luff. .Cafe Society tried
jazz and bombed. It will become
a striplace. .Actor John Wayne
had such a time returning on the
liner United States. A gang of debs
chased him all over the ship.
The reason Ella Fitzgerald keeps
waving a large kerchief in front
of her face during her song routines
is to shoo the ciggie smoke. .Susan
htrasberg of "The Diary of Anne
Frank" & Dick ("Pajama Game")
Adler linger over their dessert at
Gilmore's. ."Memories Are Made
of This," a lovely tune, is practical
the refrain from the Hawaiian war
chant.
Overheard at RSVP: "It is amaz amazing
ing amazing how Billy Daniels manages
to get into all those jams" . ."It's
more amazing how he gets out of
them!" . .Tom Ewell was at
Saks 5th getting his locks touched
up. "The Innkeepers!" last wee
fiasco, cost backers $60.oon. .A
young producer, who had S turkeys
in a year, cost his mater $215,000
. .Phil Wasserman wishes to sped
the col'm by noting Argentina per-
mitted the newspaper La Prensa
to resume. "This proves," he puns,
that La Prensa is mighter than
the sword." (Pun my soul!). .
Phvllis Ryder and polo playing
Paul Butler share the same Pimm's
cup at La Coquille, Palm Beach
.Chas. Wunn, jr. is at a Mary
land hospital with a rare illness
. .Frank Sinatra gets his name
in the columns with nearly every everybody,
body, everybody, so why not with thrush Penny
Connelly? One of hia loveliest
trys. V;; V-'v v
Ruth Romin'a ex-husband is fee
ing consoled Dy lois Arnom, an
Arthur Murray tutor. .Bruce Nor-
ris (Jim's brudder), president Of
the Red Wings hockey team, ano
Sonny Anderson are burning up
the Chicago skies. He is legally
parted from his socialite wife. .ai
Daff, exee veep of Universal-Int'l
films, makes those hops from coast
to coast to see stunning Annalisa
Soderbloom, one of Sweden's
most gorgeous women. Now dwell
ing on Park Avenue. .21 steward
esses (representing that many air-
HnesV arrive this- week. To compete
for "Miss America." AH have col
lege degrees, six are from the soc
register, nine were models and
seven hold various sports cham

pionships. Most important, all are

itry

Hall, looking serious, told report reporters
ers reporters as he left the White House that
the party would now close ranks
and, united, sweep on to .victory.
"Vice President Richard M. Nix Nixon
on Nixon appeared to be in favored
position as the President's succes successor
sor successor to head the GOP ticket in the
November elections.
"It was immediately apparent,
however, that Nixon would not
have smooth sailing for the
nomination.
"Republican Senate Leader Wil William
liam William R. Knowland. also of Cali
fornia, appeared to be a strong
contender. "Already entered in
Illinois, Alaska (and maybe a few
other state) primaries, Knowland
was conceded to have a head start.
"Meanwhile, there was consider
able' talk in Republican circles of
possible dark-horse candidates.
"Capitol corridors buzzed with
excitement.
"Among the names prominently
mentioned were ex-Gov. Thomas
E. Dewey of New York, Gov.
Goodwin J. Knight of California
and (. . fill in your own favorite).
"What looms ahead is a bitter
(hard, knockdown, long and-or
dragout) fight for the nomination
at the Republican convention in
San Francisco's Cow Palace next
Aueust." r 1
And so on, far into the night,
and days ahead.
single. .Philip Reed s standing as
one of Hollywood's eligible bache bachelors
lors bachelors is in danger.,, .Her name is
Dee Phillips, a magazine author.
Harry Cohn,' chief of Columbia
Pictures, insists that Mario Lanza
put up a bond Of 100 Gs to insure
his appearance daily before the
"Golden Boy" cameras. ; Para Para-mount
mount Para-mount plans to film "The Search
for Bridey Murphy" (a best-seller)
as a documentary. If they can get
clearances from the characters in involved.
volved. involved. .Diana Lynn's new serious
romance is screenwriter Harry
Brown. .Memo to Milwaukee edit editors:
ors: editors: The Commies plan opening a
2nd hand book store there featuring
Moscow books, etc. . .Eugene Den
nis is now top man of the Com
munist party over here, although
Wm. Z. Foster remains nominal
head. Ward Morehouse has writ
ten a piaca on N. Y. drama critics
(past and present) for Editor &
Publisher. Also a Bankhead profile
for Pageant. .Liz Scott'i admirer
is not i-ugene De Rothscnild, But
Anton. (Soddy). .A group of New
Yorkers, including Roy Cohn, won
control of Wall Street's American
Trust Co. , .The Demos will try
to get Marilyn to their convention!
The Commies are experts in eva
sion. To avoid taking out a license
(to take up a collection at the re recent
cent recent Carnegie Hall meeting) -they
peddled a pamplet for 15 cents
and took in over $5,000. .A leading
A.D.A. personality will get the
works from the Dept. of Justice
via aprobe. Raves followed Uobert
Merrill's baritones on the Fire Firestone
stone Firestone Hour. .Ira Lewin, whe hit
the jackpot with "Sergeants," is
incommunicado to chums. Writing
a new mystery opus. .June Lang
comes out of retirement to resume
in films and on the air. Recently
divorced Wm. Morgan of the bank
ing family. . Josephine Baiters
had it. Now works at her own joint
in France. .A brochure by For Fortune
tune Fortune mag savs General Motor's
Harlow Curtice sets asalary of
$750,000 a year. Then the ad mater material
ial material lists his wage at $300,000.
(That's for the raise.)
The new ditty, "Faithful and
True," is the weirdest yet. She
words have a gal being true to one
guy, but the song is punctuated
(Continued on age 4)

" I

lIehry-
WASmxc-rnv s..
, ."ic 13 IJUW
low the moral standards of the1
greatest deliberative body, the
Lnited States Senate, have sunki
today.
Not Onlv did nn 4l,
rule 12 and refrain from voting
" umii gas am Decause he
owns gas-oil lands or stock, but
another pocket-book-interest bill
is due for debate the sugar bill
The sugar bill, already finds one
ien. in violation of Senate rules.
He is Allen EUender of Louisiana!
Senator fllandai. i,h.i...j r-
the South Downs Sugar Company
of Louisiana four acres of extreme extremely
ly extremely valuable residential-oil land on
uie euge 01 ouma, La., his home
town, for only $2,500 an acre,
though the enmnanv s i
. nu i ciuacu
to sell the same land to others at
uiai price, ine land faces the U.S
agricultural experimental station
and ia rnntidrd viAM.i..
choice location.
The South Down Siitr.r r.
vuiir
pany, which owned the property.
i vucijr engagea w looDymg for
the new sugar bill, increasing dom
estic cane-sugar quotas, and us
oresident. Wallare vmnr
fied before the Senate Agriculture
ummmee oi which Ellender is
chairman.
Ellender claims that h rnt th
land cheap because he forewent
ou ngnis. . v
INSIDE LOBBYING
Much more important when It
comes to judging Senate ethics,
however, was Ellender's behavior
during testimony on the suear
bill last summer. As chairman of
the Senate Agriculture Committee,
he not only pushed the bill person personally
ally personally but demanded that Congress Congressman
man Congressman Cooley of North Carolina,
chairman of the House Agriculture
Committee, act on the augar bill
or else Ellender in turn would not
act on the parity price support bill
affecting other farm commodities.
However, here is the real breach
of Senate ethics. On August 1, El
lender Drought two sugar lobbyists
into the highly secret sessions of
the Senate Finance Committee to
discuss the sugar bill. They were
Robert Shields, representing the
beet-sugar lobby, and Joe Ferns,
representing the cane-sugar lobby.
A secret committee session is
not supposed to be open to anyone
outside Congress. The public, the
press are not admitted, much less
the representatives of a special
interest group pushing certain leg
islation.
Once, in 1925. when Sen. Hiram
Bingham of Connecticut admitted
a representative of the Connecticut
Manufacturers Association to a se
cret session of the Senate Finance
Committee, he was officially cen
sured by vote of the Senate.
However, ethical standards were
higher in those days. Senators were
more honest; had more courage.
Today there is not one senator
who dares stand up to move the
censure of Ellender of Louisiana!
though they know about his ad admission
mission admission of lobbyists to the execu executive
tive executive session of the Senate Finance;
Committee. Nor is there one Sen.
who will stand up and challenge
the voting right of Kerr of Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma or Long of Louisiana or oth others
ers others to vote on the natural gas bill
because they have investments in
gas.-.
This is the depth to which the
prestige of the world's greatest
deliberative body has sunk today.
NOTE It was Senator George
of Georgia who helped lead the
censure vote against Senator Bing Bingham
ham Bingham of Connecticut in 1925.
HOFFMAN SUBPOENAS
Bucolic Congressman Clare
Hoffman of Alegon, Mich., who
wears no pockets in his coat and
once was voted down by every
Republican on his own government
operations committee, went to Ar
thur reariman, counsel oi uiai
committee, last week and demand demanded:
ed: demanded: ACROSS
t First name of
Washington's
wife
7 She was the
- widow of
Daniel
Parke
It Idolizes
14 Ester f oleic
acid
15 Exudations
from trees
II Closer
(Rubber tree
9 Body of water
10 Story
11 Passage in the
brain
12 Withered
19 Exclamation
ef disgust
21 Paused
21 Comparative
luffU
23 Faucet
24 Shops
23 Polynesian
17 Cempaif point
chestnut
is newt
50 Before
31 Thwarts
25 Antipodes
21 Perfume
32 fruit drinks
21 English
statesman
27 Sleeveless
garment
29 Large plant
33 Ottoman court
34 Trials
SJBambpolike
- iraM:-
37 Poker stakes
38 Veers
41 Ridicules
43 Feminine
appillatlen
4( Augment
47 Choose
M Testify
33AU
51 Tell
57 Motive
586tepls
51 Scatter
DOWN
1 Female horse
2 Arabian gulf
3 Flower.
4 Three times
(comb, form)
f Fowl i
(Evaluate
IMiw

Washington's Wife

w

Go-IlOu;:d
"I want you to subpoena Drew
Pearson."
"What for?" asked Pearlman!
"Make him come up here and
answer before the House of Rep Representatives
resentatives Representatives as to where he got that
information regarding AI Sarena.
Make him produce that 'Dear Doug'
letter which he says Eisenhower
wrote to Secretary McKay. I want
a subpoena issued for Pearson at
once."
"Then." replied Pearlman, "we
would also have to subpoena Sec Secretary
retary Secretary McKay."
"Oh no, no, no," replied Con Congressman
gressman Congressman Hoffman, promptly drop dropping
ping dropping the matter.
NOTE Hoffman had first de demanded
manded demanded that the Senate Interior
Committee subpoena this writer.
NIX ON NIXON
Ike has a secret, self-appointed
board of strategy of New York,
including some of his closest friends
such as Tom Dewey and Gen, Lu Lucius
cius Lucius Clay.
They are determined that Vice
President Nixon shall not run with
him..
They feel that if Ike does run,
most people, knowing his state statements
ments statements about his own health, would
be voting for vice president.-Nixon,
they feel, would bog down the
ticket, might even defeat it.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
a oanine rnrns nf hloodthirstr
hounds has been secretly proposed
. '.
for the Mexican ooraer pairoi Dy
immigration commissioner w. mi.
c,.,i.iA Cminu is now dninff a

much better job handling immi- V

gration, but his canine soiunon ior
W Maviiin ""wethark" flroblem

,11V .iivniiu.i ...
has given the State Department
nightmares, it wouia piay navoc
with U.S.-Mexican relations. .
tTarlsm fnncrrecsman Adam Obv
ton Powell's anti-segregation school-
amendment is Deaien on tne nour
f h. unncs durine consideration
of the school construction bill, it
might become judicial preceaenw
could then be cited in future court'
.! aimed at reversing the 1954
Supreme Court decision. . .Con.
nf tv A nower have bought
$1,500,000,000 worth of electric home
appliances since worm urm
topping the national average. .
Average expenditure per family
.. .. ti Ron fnr TVA homes, con

trasted 'with $1,350 nation-wide. . :

Sixty-two. per cent oi me nomrs
in the TVA area are equipped with
electric ranges. ;
NAMED Sen. Lestef Hill (D (D-A!a)
A!a) (D-A!a) will receive the first an annual
nual annual award of the National
Mental Health Committee on
Feb. 10. He is being recognized
for .''outstanding contributions
by a public official during 1955
in the fight against mental ill illness."
ness." illness." Senator Hill will be given
a gold key mounted on a marble
base at the Alabama State Men Mental
tal Mental Health Association's banquet
in Bimingham. ; J
Answer to ft tviout Fuzzlt

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30 Solar disk
31 Communists
35 Mariner's
direction
38 Spanish
commander
39 Snakes
40 Musical note
42 Proportions
45 Husband of
- Gudrun
47 French river
48 Ship's bow
49 Number (pi.)
51 Organ ot
hearing
52 Female saint
(ab.)
43 Rowing tools 54 Seine
44 Pace 33 Sailor

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til? PAS A. MA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
pac" xr.:
1
ANAL'ZOn
Of EnifcczzK
Lm

moxday, i erruart n. r:

NORFOLK, Va. Fe'j. 13 (UPV (UPV-A
A (UPV-A spinster bookkeeper .suspect?!,
of tn.beziling as much bj $2.800-1
too 'ihia a savings firm tor
ctarity, relatives and friends
may plead innocent to the charge,1
it was disclosed today. I
Au authoritative state source!
who relused to permit use of hisj
jume said Miss Minnie C. Man-;

gum 52, is reported to be ready
to mate the plea when her case
comes op for a hearing March 6
She kindly old maid, who may
cave taken more cash out of. the
Commonwealth. Building and Loan
Asrn. than the Brinks robbers,
netted in their spectacular haul,
has consistently refused to talk
about the case.
hm telephoned today, she saM
jply, "I don't want to talk to you1'.
nd hung up. j
Some U the kinfolk and friends
questioned by state investigators ;
have also refused to talk and the j
informed ; source said they hae
indicated their belief in her j
'innocence: ',
' Commonwealth Attorney Lin-;
wood Tabb, who will prosecute the
case, said Miss Mangum has!
retained Max Brody, one of thel
itate s most prominent attorneys.
'Federal accountants are work working
ing working in an effort to determine the
exact -amount of the amazing
embezzlement. The firm has been
placed in receivership with its

Nixon Aloof From Efforts
For Presidential Buildup

WASHINGTON, Feb. 13
(UP)
Vice President Richard M. Nixon
is staying completely aloof from
any efforts to build him up for
the presidency while President Ei Eisenhower's
senhower's Eisenhower's 1956 pidiis remain un unknown,
known, unknown, friends said today.
Although he is in a sUong posi position
tion position to bid for the Republican
nomination if Mr L'ser.uovver
bows, out, men in a position to
know insisted thai Nixon ha
neither authorized nor encouraged
any move? in his btlialf.
These informants said Nixon is
likely to issue, an early statement
on his plans, however, if Mr.
Eisenhower should decide not to
seek a te'cf'P.d. term.
The :i year-old vice president
was said to be among iiio:,e
Republicans who arc optimistic
thatithe President will decide to
run 'again Mr. Eisenhower" has
santlto thinks he vii be ready
to announce his dciifion by the
end of this month.
The President started series
6; medical examinations yesten'ay
to determine the sta8 of his re recovery
covery recovery since his heart attack last
fall The results, which he expects

!SCimCHAW' CHUM?,Bambi likes tobacco. Every chance
hit 8in y ? v"id S"Cks her muzzI into the tobacco pouc"

;i, Rvr", u H oypassers often toss to
rier.ButOffret, who farms near Provo, Utah $avs he's rafinnina'
her before she becomes a hopeless addict. BanTbiwM rescued I
-near y drowned., from a mountain stream last July by a 'S?
and turned-over to the Ofrets to raise., y ranerl

Powerful Red Army Unhappy
With Political Commissars

LONDON, Feb. 13 (UP)- The
powerfw Red Army is unhappy
with political commissars and crit criticism
icism criticism irom the Communist party
and is demanding more independ
ence, sourw here said today.
The sources pointed to a recent
rebuke by. Soviet Marshal Georgi
Zhukov issued after party attacks
on military c.-;..manders and pro
fessional Red Army officers.
Condemning such criticism,
Zhukov called for more authority
for. military leaders and more
government backing for high of officers..'
ficers..' officers..' r '-.-
According to Soviet press reports
reaching London, Zhukov; said:
"Various attempts have been
made to criticize during Commu Communist
nist Communist party reelings the service
activity of military commanders.
. "Such attempts must be .con .condemned.
demned. .condemned. Our duty is to strenghten
the authority of the commanders
and to back the commanding of
ficers and generals."
The :lash be; ween the party
p . r tt' A..

esire for control of tEcarffly "anrpwereTtttrtegsrmrTll'luy ,'l!j. Said

1 i

the army s desire for more free-jto be increasingly conscious of its
dom coincides wth the ceriing of la viable position and its latest
the' 20th lomnrrist party congress! rebuke may be au indication of

Sn Moscow on Tuesday.

entire reserve fund of $2,100,000
apparently gone.
Total loss to the lean associa
tion, in which Miss Manguir.
headed the bookkeeping depar.
ment for 20 years, has b e e i
estimated by some bank official
at $2,800,000. The Brink's gan
which was recently arrested ne.
ted only $1,100,000.
Playing a major role in thi

unmasking of the alleged ernbez
zlement was Mrs. Esther Mark
Cannon, young wife of a sailer
who challenged the bookkeeping
"system" Miss Mangum taught a.
her girl assistants.
"She was overheard by an audi
tor making a routine check. Mis:
Mangum fired the girl but sh
was later rehired when the short
ages came to light.
Examiners said Miss Mangum,
a devoted church worker whos
salary was $10,000 a year, dis dispensed
pensed dispensed the firm's money with a
lavish hand. Her "gifts" included
$30,000 to a woman evangelist,
$8,800 for a new church building
and a $1,700 bridal shower for a
friend.
Tabb said she gave "an awful
lot of money to relatives and
friends and she bought a tot of
automobiles, for people."
The examiner said tbey found
she had purchased homes for
relatives at fashionable Virginia
Beach.
to
hear Tuesday, will greatly
influence his decision
If Mr. Eisenhower should decide
to run, it is generally believed
that Nixon again will be his
running mate. The President has
often expressed high praise for the
vice president.
During Mr, Eisenhower's penod
of indecision, there has been much
discussion among Republicans
about Nixon as a possible candi candidate.
date. candidate. But no organization has been
set up and no efforts have been
made to enter him in state pri primaries
maries primaries as was done for his po potential
tential potential California rival, Senate
GOP Leader William F. Know-
land.
So far organized Nixon strength
is apparent only in Wisconsin.
Most of the ?tat. GOP leaders
have lined up a slate of convention
delegates to run pledged to Mr.
Eisenhower in the April 2 prima primary
ry primary if the President consents.
But if Mr. Eisenhower decides
against a second term before the
March 2 deadline, this delegate
slate is expected to invite Nixon
to enter the Wisconsin primary.
Cr-lieism of amy commanders
was voiced at the regional Dartv
meetings in the 16 Soviet republics
wmcn yreceuea the natknal con congress...':
gress...': congress...':
According to reports reaching
Louuon, hule publicity was giv-
eL to t(:ese naeema ciiticisins.
But Red Star, olticial newsoaDer
of tne soviet army disclosed that
proiessmnai oihcers came unaei
lire, at me regional conleiences
viQich were attended by many
army commanders
, Zhuttov s presence in the Rus Russian
sian Russian delegation at the su.mmit.con su.mmit.con-fertMe
fertMe su.mmit.con-fertMe in Geneva last July mark
ski Miner step in th; burgc-OL-ing
poinieal-diplomatic strengtii ot
the army And Zhukoy's exchange
ot ir.tuuiy letteri with Presi' lent
Ei-;cnhcwer last year also rein rein-forceu
forceu rein-forceu the army s prestige.
But rtspite its strengm' and
power, Russian policy experts
said the lied Army ; still has no
direct influence on Kremlin policy
rlppicinnc .
this.

GROUP" DEPART,? -i-. Ambassador Julian F. H
amanian teachers who have been Invited to
versify of' Puerto Rico. This U the first of a
proposed by Vice President Nixon during his
be conducted .-jointly by universities in Certral
f ice-of Education of the United States.- Left
Fernando Saavedra, Jose Abel Rlvas, Emilia V
zaro Arjona, Federlco Velasquez.

Mexican Narcotics Czar Sought
In Texas; 12 Others Arrested

DALLAS, Tex., Feb. 13 (UP)',Ramirez moved the marijuana in-

Authorities today sought a Mcxi
Ci,n narcotics czar believed to be
the bra ins of a smuggling ring
which did one million uoilars worth
ot business monthly in Mexico,
Texas, New York and Illinois until
it was smashed by customs, agents.
Al Scharff U.S. customs agent-m-charge
for eastern Texas an announced
nounced announced the ring had been broken
up yesterday. He said it was the
largest that customs agents nave
smashed in eight years.
Twelve members of the ring
have been arrested, Scharff said,
but the group's mastermind, a
Mexican national, is still at large.
Scharff said he is believed to be
holed up in Mexico.
Federal officers disclosed the
operation to newsmen after arrest arresting
ing arresting Felix Stone Ramirez, .34, ,ex ,ex-cbnvict,
cbnvict, ,ex-cbnvict, in Dallas. Ramirez was
described as the, middleman ior
the ring. V ' .
Ramirez said "ha had done time
i for illeual Possession of mariiuana
national operation, juis arrest end ended
ed ended an 18-d; V watch during which
customs agents and local authori authorities
ties authorities maintaineo around-the-clock
surveillance.
Most of the ring's members
have been charged with smuggling
and conspiracy to smuggle. Eight
of the rrests were made in Hous Houston,
ton, Houston, two in Laredo, Tex., and one
in Chicago. Schar'' said that the
first arrest was made about two
months ago.
In making the arrests, Scharff
and his agents confiscated some
40 to 50 pound, of marijuana and
several automobiles, l he agent
sai : the names of the others ar
rested would not. be revealed un
til indictments have been returned
against them. One is a 32-year-old
woman.: Scharff said.
The man arrested in Chicago
was described as a top figure in
Chicago's narcotics trade. At the
time he was picxeq up he. was
free on bond on a murder charge,
the agent said. ;
Scharff said the gang smuggled
something like 500 pounds of fine finely
ly finely processed marijuana a month
into the United States from Mexi
co for the past six or eight months.
After wading the Rio Grande
with their contraband, the ring
brought the marijuana to Houston
and then into Dallas by automo automobile.
bile. automobile. From Dallas, Scharff said

OSCAR TAILOR SHOP

, .
LADIES
In front

(Wniiim

Tho ONLY :sn-fsp rights to
CcRvcr.icr.J csr.ncIisn via Cusst
Cc!!y Ce'nsfc"s:!sn fa
ONtY j! lit ONI WAY
jJK .TOURIST SERVICE
Caleway Is e'l KsrS&cail U.S. A.
Twlco-o-wtok from Moxke City to

WindsorlDefroil and the Midwest
Camuff year hmiit Trawl Agnt

' AV. T1VOU 14 PANAMA

l

arrlngton says farewell to the group of Pan Pan-attend
attend Pan-attend a teacher development workshop Unl-
series of seminars on education, which were
recent visit to the American Republic, and. will
America and the Caribbean area and the of of-to
to of-to right: Jerry James, cultural Affairs Officer,
aldelmar de Minbiola, Federlco Carchieri, La-

to Lhic.co and New Yors,
On occasion, Scharff said, the
gang would trade their marijuana
in New York for heroin, then
Uansport it back to Texas.
He told newsmen that customs
agents learned that the ring pick pick-eu
eu pick-eu up about 10 pounds of heroin in
New York about once every two
months .
Sharif said that the Mexican
marijuana was packed ki one one-pound
pound one-pound cellophane bags which sold
wholesale in Mexico for $50 Each1
bag contained enough marijuana
for 1,950 cigarets. Marijuana cig cig-arets
arets cig-arets retail ior from $1 to $1.23 in
the underworld.
Block, Tackle, Men
Aid 513-Pound Lady
l;Trip;Tol!$ppalv
DETROIT, Feb. 13 (UP) -r-The
23 firemen, policemen and ambu ambulance
lance ambulance drivers needed to take Mrs.
Willie May Thomas, 39, to the
hospital are going to have to take
her home again.
Mrs. Thomas Weighs about 500
pounds. She is unable to walk.
Mrs. Thomas wanted to go to
the hospital for a checkup so her
doctor called an ambulance to go
gat her. . .. .
When the ambulance arrived,
the drivers called police. T w o
officers arrived, carefully apprais appraised
ed appraised the situation, end called more
police plus the fire department.
With 23 workers on tap. the men
rigged up a block and tackle,
pulled out a stairway bannister
and got Mrs. Thomas C into the
get home again. .:
Her doctor says he does noti
IkinV aha will hd at iha hncnifiill
very long and will need help to
get home again
AN OLD HAWKER
CAIRO. HI. fUP A Ca
nadian goose at least 13 years'
old was killed by a hunter. near
here.? The old bird was banded
in 1942 at the Jack Miner refuge
at Kingsville, Ont. He was leading
a flock when Guy Jones, shot him
down.
for
and GENTLEMEN
of El Panama Hotel
. P. TEL 23407

J

-'""1
Leukeinia-Dooineil
Lad Said Improved
After Lourdes Trip
PARIS, Feb, 13 (UP) A Steub
enville, Ohio, molhe.- said here
today she is certain her leukemia
doomed son "improvec" physical
ly" during his 10-day visit to the
Roman Catholic shrine of Our
Lady of Lourdes.
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Gianna
more and their son, Craig, : 4,
arrived here yesterday by train
from Lourdes and went immedi immediately
ately immediately to Sunday services in the
Cathedral of Notro Dame. They
will leave for home later today by
plane.
Mrs. Giannamore said Craig's
health improved during their pil
grimage to pray for a miracle at
the shrine despite the fact that he
bathed in the shrine waters at the
height of a cold wave.
"Perhaps it is just wishful
thinking," she said, "but we see
an improvement.
"He has been eating twice as
much as when we left on this trip
and his color is mucti better,
; SUPER CAS STATION
FLORA. 111. (UP) A super-
service station designed primarily
for trucks and truck drivers will be
built here at a cost of $150,000. A
major oil company (Pure) is put
ting up the station on an 18-acre
tract that will be able to park 100
semi-trailer trucks. A staff of 33
persons will be needed to operate
the ar-conditioned station on a 24-
hour basis to provide meals, sleep
ing quarters and servicing of the
trucks.
2000 rootless rooms
Sensible rafts include radio
many rooms witn Television
rttlS HOTEL
.rl!EWY0.1K
OMIIMES SQUARE AT IADI0 CITY
Cbl Addrcw: THIAH

A m,mli,mmmmmm.nJ

B13 hit with Sp:rtnn:n

1 ShX,

WINDPROOF

LIQUOR

SCOTCH WIIISKYS:
Ha!-
Dallantine, Black & White,
Sandy IacDonaltl . ......... .
White Horse and White Label ...
CANADIAN WIHSKYS:
Seagram's V. O. ....... ... .
Canadian Club .
BOURBON:

Glenmore ... .

Kentucky Tavern .........

GIN:
Gordon1 8 .
COGNAC:
Martel and Hennessy
Other prices on request

Bodega Nacional
Tivoll Crosslnjc

CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.
Tels. 2-1791 2-1892 2-486

. 0J JcIIlJ frpm 'tk

5; ermines n:::3s
styles. Chcki ef thsir
month s bsrftstoRi
'm rich 10 K gold.
(or Him $12.50
for Her $9.50
Sec Our Urge
Selection of Solid Gold
Carnival Jewelry
THIS

J. L. Maduro
Ruben Baron
Charles Marx
Mr. Cerdeman
Charles D. Agle
Manuel Aguilera Rojas

1

WHOLESALE PR

....

WEEK'S LUCKY WINNERS:

And They Won for FREE!
TAHITI
18-47 (137) Central Ave.

Available With the Following
Sports Designs Engraved On Case

IN COLOR

Bowler, Fishermen, Golfer, Hunter

at
AVE. TIVOLI No.

- Take Advantage of Our

ICES:

$27.17 per case
29.17
32.17
27.17
27.17
29.17
35.17
23.17
35.17

Ancon Liquor Store
Opposite Ancon Post Offico

1:3
TAHITI

Capt. Dahle ;
Charles E. Belden
'Mrs. Charles Sammons
Ofelia Suaio
Eneida Olivares
0 Ollie Sherman

16
- Club Plan



FV.T. rOfR

Tn fA.vt.iA A.:ir.:cA? an iMTErrNriNT rtfi netupafis
M ON DAT, in-RCART 15. 1531
TT-nT 1XD TITS rir.ATTS
7 1 ;
14 fCVETKVj W VSTAT',? TO
Thb ROAD RUNNER op the wsstessn
Uhx&v States prefers to cbbp his
feet 0i the kounp. he fues
IV-
! 4
1'' ssrr.:..r
. t

.

1- r

t
'

i

1 '

;. NEW YORK-(NEA) Marlon'- "I never dreamt of 'be in t a:

and Jim Jordan Fibber McGee star," ih gaid. "I ntvr pln
and Molly to you may be coming ahead; just drift with the tide,
la TV. They had their first trip, to I've, dope that for a lonj time.;
Mew York in six years and spent, I learned te expect the went from!
tun minutes of their precious twomtn. i wat disillusioned. No more;!
vceks conferring with NBC brass., I don't axptcr things any more.";
(Much of the rest of the time, ; .... . i
poor Marion spent in bed with a' &hc nibbled' at her tomatoes,,
case of food poisoning.) .cucumbers capers and iour
We're bored," Mouy said. icream. The photographer kept
' We don't have enough to do,"ihotin- lh,e Phn .ran:. t was
said Fibber. We do this 15-: ,man shed met some months
minute, fivc-a-weck radio show for,betre n .we insU'ucted the
NBC.' But we do it in two weeks. publicity gal to tell him shed cal
then we have two week off. NowjDack-
if we could try TV on a once-a-i '. '.' ' .' j
month basis, on film-." L Jive n the Studio Club in'
Nobodv knows us anv more,", Norwood, tor girls 6nly. I'll have,
Molly said. "My newspaper, 'boy to, move in Oclober-a girl can'
said to me, 'Are vou Molly?' I : only stay three years. I bke it;
aid I was, and asked him if he i there. They ock the door at 12
(listened to me. 'No.' he" said. 'but:l don I allow men above the'
y mother and father have told :rt flow. It g good for me .I'm
rue about you.' weak-willed. I need discipline. The
' ; best way to avoid temptation is to
Wonder why thoso filmed dra.,bc guarded against it."-
Ttntjc shows on TV aren't as good; 1
1: in..A4;..Hl

s me me ones: ui.e u ; 0n CBSRedie'g "Make Up Your
?s nMf?rrnCIr,t0 J uJtv i Mind." Margaret Whiting recalled
rights. If they write for. live TV. I . . .

-; p. i

f '' ' - - J,

. SK

HiS SWAKf Bin-

V

IS TOO QWCK ANP u n,)

CEPT FOK THB

PEAPtJV
feAJTLESWAKE.

3...

1

"'J5y:'!MBT1WA IN XiTUS SLUMPS.

VHRMN If mij rflgtur itmim.

mm hi IL 1 r" V ..1
r (i r; i
, '-yt V V; it

E. .J'vj 'to Thb Roac RUNNER

A 1 t-? yni infi tzv v

fthny can still sell the rights for
Jmovies or plays, if it's on film,
hat's, all.
Paddy Chyfsky is a good ex ex-Jimple.
Jimple. ex-Jimple. He won't write for a filmed
how why should he? He figures to
inake over $100,000 on "Marty."
lo sold another TV script,
"'Catered Affair," to Hollywood for
$50,000. "Middle of the Night," an-
iihfr TV show that will soon bow

&n Broadway, can bring mm close j

the poem which her kid sister,

Barbara, had written to her when
Barbara was six. It went like so:

I hate Margaret.
She'd make a good target.
She sings, she thinks
I think she stinks.

LJk!i

3 ,m.

r "l rr-

rucsiia and cis rxcarct

On Your Way!

IVoer Winchell
(Continued from Pace 2)

ui million wun a movie gate piusi,!, WAK ...t i,,.rti .h w..

J,,S weekly Broadway jerce
JkJ'LAT. ,f, nutsy-fagan,, .One of the networks

is paying off big on a plagiarism
suit. .The producer of "Waiting

these on film, he would have made
jnaybe $1,000 each. Period.

for Godot" reports the pannings

N.ney Btrs, New -ren. : top over here ..hav'e stimulated great
and a TV personality eroond . h m hrin-t in

a laugh witrt a ... D ToV .n. f

tftrnadwav. Oot laugh

-torv about a dull friond: "Ha

ijwritos in his diary-'Dear Diary;
Meat's Now?'"
Z Mow that Herb Shrlntr defi-umits-'y
finished with "Two for the
"Money" when his contract runs out
this fall, the speculation Is who'll
fc'Se over? The wise money is on
."Fred Allen. The show was origi originally
nally originally created for him, but at the
time his health wouldn't permit
him to do it. Now he's fine.

Tfct tun stroamod In the. window

with Bert Lahr. Calls it a contro'

versial must. (Hmmmm). .Fame

is fleeting: A contestant on "Break

the Bank" missed the big coin for

not knowing the names of the 1948
candidates for Veep. (Barkley &
Warren) . .George Gobel has
invested his TV earnings in 13
motels. .Add Hialeah romances:
Mrs. Richard DuPont (of the Wil Wilmington
mington Wilmington dynasty) and Dr. John
Lee, mgr of her racing stable. .
Lee Ann Meriwether (Miss Ameri America
ca America of '55) and movie actor Richard
... : .3 11 1- llknm

ofthc hotel suite, throwing abeam ft" ''s e

fJ.Z Elmer'.," it means Elmer-
lum'matcd an empty chair at thc0"0-. ..

luncheon tame ana me iau oionuc NrnirwaV TOllClTlQ

nnirklv shifted to the sunny seat.

"That will make for better pic pictures,",
tures,", pictures,", she said.. And the photog photographer
rapher photographer from the magazine, who'd
been following her for two weeks,
smiled and kept on shooting.
This wag Kim Novak at lunch.
Cvrrtntly, the busiest and hotttst
box offke blond in the picture
busintss, Kim has boon in tho
public ov U" than two yaarg but
sha'a adjustsd fast. Now sho has
he' bi9B Prt.. in "Picnic"
Th witr came for the orders.

K;m studied the' menu whilethe
v'-otographer and the publicity
nrn and the publicity gal and the

reporter ordered.
"( an vou make me a special
sa'ad of tomatoes, cucumbers,
caDers and sour cream?" she
asked. The waiter assured her that
. was quite likely. I ; :'. ;-:. ;

1 ": r
VP v

I UT I V I i.U I I

I Sml -I 1 PvT VJ A In. II

v u Htm. H t. Fit ON.

klHIIr NIA
. t 1 1

Yj-f Is T I MOW THIS iS TMe IF 'T WAS
. HI I ( M05r IMPORTANT RSdr I NT FOR.TPB
k OF TE 'MOTOR. TMe KWCUTEN VMAES

KWOUTEM VALVESy YOU WOULPMT

- HAVE U3WXtJN
IN THE JAWESWILL6

VIBRATORS A

F YOUR JANESVILLE:
VIBRATORS PIPNT,
V I ATE TtXJJ
UAVB TPOUetH VHH
YOUK fANIFOLP

.y CAPiTUtAioR;

jALOfY OCXIBLE-TAtK. W V
is Alwavs 6000 Foe.
' 6TTINS HP OP p j
- 1

ALLKI OOF

One Bottle Doctor

By f. T. BAMUDt

BVSOSH.IF

THI5 B 5URE 5UMP1N! AMVBOI7

ME. COCTDR COP, OFFICE AROUNP

AK AILAND ONE LITTLE ) HERE GETS

X' BOTTLE OF MILLER'S 7SCK, fM

MIRACLE MISERY IM TROUBLE

MEPtCINEf h FOR GUREJ

wsniSKf.s rrw wnwwii

r-M ,-4.., iSf

Tf-rr

1 A I HEY, IS THERE sHI5 PLACE tS S
BELIEVE X A DOCTOR YEP-TH'V RIGHT POWN TH' I
ME, I'M aAP J "t v HER? I GOT I BEST UN (srREET..YCANT
s THIS 15 A ( y V TROUBLE. J IN 1HE5EV MISS rr A
? HEALTHY 1 --m VrriVs
I Li 1, 31WWIMIlMHmW, I 1

BOOTS AND HER B'JDDBf

Success

81 EDGAS UASTQ

"Cookie ll 'gone? Maybe a prowler, huh?"

Needed For Homes

CHAMPAIGN. III. (UP -Watch
your gteps, a University ot
Illinois safety specialist warned to today.
day. today. Particularly cluttered steps,
dark stairways and steep basement
stairwells.

O. L. Hogsett, the specialist, sug

gested picking the family's worst
offender to keep the stairs un unentered.
entered. unentered. Appoint him chic in
charge of clean stairs. The chief chief-turns
turns chief-turns his job over to the first

i"tairwav etutterer he catches.

Good lights, controlled from top

and bottom switches, ana wnue
oaint on top and bottom steps will

make your stairway safer. Hogsett
said. A handrail will help too.

Faltering Philip
f tulip life ta tilled with bruises.
Rl)-won ttepg end roft be usee.
Repairs would leave bl home like new
' A Claaslfieds. tnet the rieht clue' .'

lUt STORY OF MARTHl W.4I

r

I AT THE OFFICES

CF EASTMAN
A'ATON-

m.aNtHKE'STwE

OZOEZ KZ-SM,

VOtfOSQXUJKCH

eo7

"7

7

(

h!ri!rsil 6i FtI

OO VOUTIU SJ I TOO HB?

HCT ABOUT YOU? UWWlFriWrH'

CSCJMSTANCES; IS DEAD, F

1 R.

Letter to Thelma

-w- 1 11 1 1 ggggggggggejBWlw""jei

ANVTViNSTHE r 1

i in 11 1 1

8 WILSON SCRUGGS

ifeANWWLf, N WACTHA Mir$

rrrm

11 t m

PVHAT I HAVE FAsSXiALaT
THELMA, HAS FINH11 HAPPENED. I
( I HAVE FALLEN IN LOt'E WTH -p-LI
CCHtKO IT VXT I

... f

fKisui LA' ror

Testing

Bi U TCRMEEB

' : v
(I'LL CHUCK MYJ f BECOME -JOB..t---v
A URANIUM V

P WE'D HAVE 1

A JEEP FOR
OUR HOME...

SCRATCH A

UVINQ OUT

Bgei I MC

If DESERT!

1

Mil

1 KwouVutvvJ

"ROGGUtS, 1

I W. USTHERS-. MftO W0TTEMDED TO

CftLL OW SOU TO

I 9LWW "TO THE BOftKO OUST

HUW nuWM WtVKT SUUlKt

lMEAWT TO

---a 1 iv i

BUT TOO WERE WISE TO
SEE TO H THfVT
SQUE OftS PRESENT

grffi!lai:

SHE OftS SO HOSTILE AWD PHOTA60WST)C

SORE WQU THT THE BOftRD U1LL tX3
N4lTWWa TO OPPOSE HER WISHES.

7

1

y-

a::

i

CAPTAIN CAI1

Tell McKee?

By LESLIE TVRNCX

VOU WEKB STUNNEP? WHT
AtAti 11 tt t ? u., tf-i 1 w- f r,

rt hwb wm?e 1 on the pkone that vour hew

THAT PLANB...AMPI StnTHBTIC Ylh& wOKTHLc?

DlEP W THECK&M.V MY WHOLE FUTURE COUN'SEP:

TOOi IF I MPWT SEEN

SO 5TUNNEP BY 5E6'
IMS H.W OF
RESEARCH eilPPSMtf

) POWM THB :

KELL0N TH6 ONLV 0ISC0V6RV VOU
EUER WPB THAT PR0W5EO T(? REALLV
PAV OFPl WOWTH OP TESTd HM PR0VEM

11 INk'eOlKUl.Ubl.B; HUM
r COULD IT 6UD0ENLV FAIL T

ACHIOE

i ; "--t femurs

- .

I TELL McKES WHAT ) KELL.VOU POUT
HAiPPENEPiHEU AflRES J HAVE TO TELL HlMl

WW TO A

fORTUNC FkOIA IT1

MORTY MEEKLE

Not Yet, Mama!

By DICK CAVALL1 ;

WOMEN i-v
AREN'T A BIT l
tPCTICALy

llllt MY50C'V,

7

RELAX, MOM.

HE'S JU6T FASTENING

MY SHOE y

IJ I I

$ by Nf A $rvc. tac

Jl'H Kd.inUtJIO liOLSf

atAJOM OfKirL

IX 4. ft. WILLIAM

EIGS Bi NN

Neyer a Dull Moment

Like rtatt

f TTHAT Lit)
Up J- ALL TH" COMIC )
; S FH BOOKS, BUT
5 'I'p

oh.boyVkcep yce
NEW i PAWS OFF
COMIC THESE,
books! V kio yr

I AWT PUTTIN"EM )
ON TH' PACK TILL J
TOMQggEg ?
i r -OHaL.i
Vn yf I 6USS I CAN

I'LL PEAD THE ONES I ) I
CWL0N4O
s j

WTUP l l!2F OF A iOFT LIPE

I V FALL Of fZOM.&4n-t 16H t7t-LUi.R.
Li TV. Akn v RPil LIAfiT MlMD

HASW'T EVEN EVOLVEC N

rPfc i : v wmLi6 awav the

')Ot.1;iiN iirt, ici' i ita

A PEAK IM

THi WILL fOEWEK

Do 1 MUST COM

gAT'THl'S LETHATO

WITH ALL MY

HEMTAL AND

PHYSICAL

FOKCtS!

T IX.'.'-i l

THE!?S AKI?

takt With

t

' I' BLAST that WMUT v
jfll I V DOPEY 0O6 OF I BETTER I .': 1 Ji
I I I YOURN.' HE LAID I A COXP J r
'1MM 1 1 I thfreomth' vou 1
1 I STEP AW LET I WANT I jl'Jf.i'
in1 iv mestepri&mt r y
JX ON HIM 'FORE TV II j--"
I XV WHAT AU AWFUL ) 9 C
' "OilV WATCH DOS t) I-
f ziLc fl -fez

fx

THE WORRY

v- At,UAI-)'i



iroND.vr, rrcnrART u, vs

nrz fit:

- I r),f i Box 131, Panama
Jjoaat and Jtacnvi5e

or

(By Staffers

Box 5037, Jl;

neon

W Vrmt Jutl L mmU pumpt U LmuuhLh dam.
;', .'" -
IJt miff L J If UpLm Ponoms 2-0740 m 2-0141 Uwrm 1:00 nl It mlf

it:

i -- '. r
:

MOST FUN OF ALL at Carnival time Is driving around town In a big truck tossing st. ..,ntine
and confetti.

Carnival Si Sn Jall Swinf

QueetiA' were crowned Saturday evening at scores of Car Carnival
nival Carnival balls and parties all over the Republic Carnival was
also th, Inspiration ior social gatherings on the Canal Zone.
Queen Maritza of the Union Club received her accolade
In the oldest formal carnival ceremony on the Isthmus. The
Union Club has been feting queens since 1910.
Newer but just as gay and beautiful were the festivities
at Hotel El Panama, where Queen Lis received the crown as
the queen pi four nights of dancing and merrymaking In the
patio. ':.

Yesterday afternoon saw polle-

mtintuna-clad princesses

and montuno-shirted kntgiits

strolling In a paseo up and down
Central Avenue, or driving along
In decorated tars or trucks. A
light rain didn't discourage
many.
Among the polleras, moved
iunmakers in many original
and comical costumes.'
Some formed c 0 m p a rsas
(groups dressed alike) for the
occasion. Another sight for tour tourists
ists tourists and shutterbugs were the
"Diablos Sucios" devil mask maskers
ers maskers who roamed the streets
dancing and beating drums or
what-have-you and, cadging lor
coins irom the balconies,
Two of the most striking wore
flViirirpn.fMthws attached to

ennnv-sanks fnr "skirts." black

ed their skins, added white spots
for decoration, and -topped the
whole with an elaborate chicken-feather
headdress. When the

dancers In this outfit put on a

cumbia and brandished spears J

the coins rained down.
Though baseball shortened the
merrymaking hours for some
revelers, the carnival spirit was
much In evidence.

Toldos drew large crowds,' both

Saturday and, last nignv ,, ......
At the ble carnivals, last night

was pollera night. Even the
grande dames and for mec
queens put on their loveliest cos costumes,
tumes, costumes, donned their special car

nival jewelry and came out for,

the occasion ;
This evening the balls' mctif

Is "mamhiaracho night -when
the gayest revelers form parties
dressed aU alike, or to represent
a central, theme.
Wednesday morning the whole
thing ends with the burial of
eht fish, a ceremony that was
ancient in Spain centuries ago

when the artist Francisco Goya
painted a macabre picture of the
symbolic end of Carnival.
At the Union Club, the fish is
tossed over the sea-wall into the
Pacific. At El Panama it goes in into
to into the pool. Other spots have
their own way of disposing of
the "sardine."

Edward Miller Here
For Carnival

Mr; Edward G. Miller, Jr., Un

der Secretary of State for Latin

American Affairs in the last
Democratic administration, ar

rived Saturday for a four-day

visit as the guest of Comptroller

General Roberto Heurtematte.

The two were classmates at Yale

University.
Mr. Miller is currently asso

elated with the New York law

firm of Sullivan and Cromwell,

He is returning to the States
from Argentina, and will remain

here through Carnival, depart

ing Wednesday night.
Legion Auxiliary
To Entertain

For Visiting President
The American Legion Auxllla

ry, Unit No. 1, Is having a no no-host
host no-host dinner for the National
President, Mrs. Ruby Ward, at
the American Legion club, Fort

Amador on Wednesday from 7-9

p.m.

All Auxiliary members and

Legion members are invited.

Those planning on attending

are asKed to contact Mrs. Joan

O'Connell, 2-2341.

Admission cost Is $1.00 per

person.
The Legion Auxiliary Depart Department
ment Department has issued invitations for
a reception in Mrs. Ward's honor
at the club oh Friday at 7 p.m.
Seybolds Entertain
For Finucanes Tonight

The Governor of the Canal
Zone and Mrs: John S. Seybold
will be hosts for a dinner this
evening at the Governor's House
in honor of the Honorable Chas.
C. Flnucane, Under Secretary of

the Army, and Mrs. Flnucane.

Newcomers Meet

At American Consulate ;
The Newcomers club met at

the American Consulate resi

dence in Colon on Thursday afternoon.

Mrs. Howell Wynne, president,

presided at a short business
meeting. One new member was

received into the club, Mrs. Jane
Lansdorf.
Mrs. Nathan Fuller, program
chairman, announced the com

ing field trip to Panama as wt

lor March 2. AU memDers wan waning
ing waning to go must pay for the trans transportation
portation transportation in Panama, befbre to

night if possible. Mrs. Verna
Chadd, 37-88-306 will receive the
money. The trip will Include a

visit to the Presiaencia, Church
of the Golden Altar and the
American Embassy. Luncheon
and shopping will complete the
day.' '
Mrs. E. W. Larson won the
door prize.
The program for the day was
presented by Mrs. Robert Wiese,
Jr., her topic and "Bolivia" was

Illustrated and greatly enjoyed.

The Consul and Mrs. Wlese have

lived in Bolivia three years prior

10 coming io uoion. The aescrip
tion of that country was so vi

vidly done, that It is a country!

io pian to visit, with us beauti beautiful
ful beautiful mountains, all manner of
sports, skiing all year round for
those that can stand high alti altitudes,
tudes, altitudes, huge tin mines, and in La
Paa the steep streets of the

town. There are also the color

ful Carnivals and native danc dances.
es. dances. The highlight of the after afternoon
noon afternoon was the modeling of two
costumes by Mrs. Wiese, one

irom tern, ana one rrom La Paz,

called a "Chola." vivid colors!

and beautiful textures were not noted
ed noted in the last costume.

The tea table was centered
with a large mask, worn bv the
natives in a special "Devil

Dance" that Is done at Carnival

time in Bolivia, yellow cretonne
placed within the mask brought

(Continued on Page 9))

Frh notice for inclmion in thl
column should submitted in tyrtt tyrtt-writtra
writtra tyrtt-writtra form and mailed 1o an of
the box numbers listed daily in "So "Social
cial "Social and Oliirsis," delivered
bjr hand to the affie. Notices at
meetings cannot ba accepted by tele telephone.
phone. telephone. Ft. Kobbe Officers Wives
Plan Thursday Luncheon
The Fort Kobbe Officers
Wives' Club will hold their regu regu-lar
lar regu-lar monthly program and lunch luncheon
eon luncheon Thursday at the Fort Kobbe
Officers' Open Mess beginning
at 1:00 pjn. t
This program will feature Mr.
Arthur M. Mokray, well known
locally as an instructor in the

art of batea decorating, who will

present a display of iinishea Da-

teas and talk of their history

and the art.

Members are reminded to

bring a "white elephant" to be
used In the club's booth at the
Youth Council carnival.
Hostesses for the luncheon
will be: Mrs. F. R. Hoyt; Mrs. W.
M. Lax; Mrs. J. M. McKinney;
and Mrs. O. F. Thum.
Reservations can be made with
Mrs. Eugene Tapscott, 84-5203,
until Wednesday noon,

American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 1 Meets This Evening

The American Legion Auxiua-

ry; unit 1 will hold a special

meetinir tonleht at 7:30 at the

Balboa Yacht Club, Ft. Amador.

The American Legion Depart Department
ment Department President, Mrs. Bolek will
be a guest. There will be a dis discussion
cussion discussion on changing the consti constitution
tution constitution and by-laws and a discus discussion
sion discussion on nominations lor this
year's officers.

Army's Engineers
Dine This Even'nr

" The Canal Zone Post, Society
of American Military Engineers,
will hold a dinner meeting and

field inspection this evening.
The group will assemble at 6
p.m. at the C.P.O. Club, Rodman,
for dinner and a brlej review of
the "Dredging Program of the
Panama Canal Company" by
Colonel Hugh M. Arnold, Corps
of Engineers, Engineering and
Construction Director, Panama
Canal.
Following this, the group will
board launches to visit the US
Mindi, pipe line suction dredge
operating in the Balboa-Mlraflo-res
area.
Sport shirts should be worn.
Reservations should be made
with Captain Lawrence W. Nor Norton,
ton, Norton, phone 85-2233 or Colonel E.

M. Browder, Jr., C.E., Reserve,

phone Balboa 2323. ,

Cbcclate Heart Ccckies
Right Fcr Valentine's Day

l cup fjiely chopped walnut
meats, 'i cup water, 1 teaspoon
lemon juice. Sprinkle instant non nonfat
fat nonfat dry-milk powder over surface.
Beat with rotary beater or electric
mixer until stiff, about 8 to 10
mmutes. Fold whipped nonfat dry
milk into gelatin mixture. Pour into
a one-quart heart-shaped mold.
Chili until firm, about 3 to 4 hours.
Additional cherries may be used
for garnish, if desired.

FUNCS REFUSED
HARTFORD, Conn. (VP)
Gov. Abraham A. F.ibiclf T?' T?'-veakd
veakd T?'-veakd that I'.amden refused to
aceer-t state tut (yllowir;? the Oct.
15. 19C-5 floods. lie said tiie town's
selectment told hia that, aliiiough
damage to public property there
amounted to $15,000, they felt the
money should go to communities
which were harder hit by the disaster.

3

V

"V'

1 ji. t .. tll r 7iT -UMiini .1 .i. n i ,n mr -ii i nr i"

THEY TASTE BETTER to children if the shape match UM
holiday. Hearty chocolate flarortnx docra't hart, either.
By CAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Markets Editor

The heart of the milk goes Into

these heart-shaped valentine cook

ies. Enriched with instant nonfat

dry-milk powder, they carry a val

uable dividend in protein, calcium

and riDotlavin,

Instant nonfat dry milk, econom

ical, conies in family-size package

(makes 12 quarts), a one-pound

package (makes five quarts) and

a premeasured package of three

individual envelopes (makes one

quart.)
Chocolate Heart Cookiot
(Makts about J doxtn cookies)
One cup sifted flour. cup in instant
stant instant nonfat dry milk powder, 2
teaspoons baking powder, tea

spoon salt, Vi cup shortening, Vi

cup sugar, l egg, 2 squares (2-oz.)

ft

Sift together flour, instant non

fat dry-milk powder, baking pow

der and salt. Cream shortening:

gradually add sugar.- Beat until
light and fluff. Add egg, beat well.
Stir in chocolate and vanilla. Blend
dry ingredients into creamed mix mixture,
ture, mixture, Wrap dough in waxed paper.
Chill in refrigerator, at least V
hour. Roll out on floured board to
Vi-inch thickness, Cut into heart
shapes with floured cookie cutter.
Bake on ungreased cookie sheet in
a moderate oven (375 degrees F.)
until firm, about 10 to 12 minutes.
Remove from sheet at once. Out Outline
line Outline cookie edges with confection confectioners'
ers' confectioners' sugar frosting, if desired.

J Valentine Bavarian
(Makos 5 servings)

One package cherry gelatin des-

if?-

us a

Of snnn

fflrf dollars far ft

V0U BUV Fphm

tnd vvin aut0matica,fy
in our

FREE WEEKiy RAFREI

unsweetened chocolate, melted, ttjsert, 1 cupa hot water. V cup
to&cnnnn vnnilla Avtrnnt 'Ritiff gharri am rA niffAli

ImS(san4
. Powder,

,', Sootha diaper ruh,rn
refreshen and r FM

v rcirvsnca ana pro-

tecu the ikln.

For tunburn, and for your
kill, ui MoxMna
Skin Balm.

W3SAXJ

I l i

.IT !.. J. it ,i

It txm IMITATIONS U

fhi.r.IDICATIDwoyl j
Vo mtmtMaM powte eao re
Move vow babVa Litem Hoik,

Diapgr haft. Viint StaU tad I
f frkkbf Him Jt M AaoMO
rowtkr eoNl I
! FoAmimMbipMlaQyffladf i
; tatcd to teaht, prott and Mp ,)
i M kritatad ikin.Aborbnw '. :

, J Hw wonderfnlly-aBd iiiowrt, j ;
' j k proniotct healing by cuihior i
, k; baby's cbaM tkia agaiiui 1 i
lurtbor irritation. Ott Anuoeaa 1
Mediated Powdt today.
Hit Try Anuneos at our
Miml Foi MaK tin aa atuo. 1
' fcrtely frHjeru: O potteard wiilj
your ttuMMd adareH to Dept.
I I OC. BflttelJAwaCoHilltid. : j
(Offer expires Dec, 31. 1956.)

I N E.

DON'T FORGET

VAtEMT

IS TOMORROW!
We will be closed tomorrow but will be
open tonight until. 9:00 p.m. This is
your last chance to get' your VALEN VALENTINE
TINE VALENTINE CARDS and presents tor your
sweetheart or wife.
Try our delicious CADBURY FRY
CHOCOLATE in heart-sliaped boxes,
; DON'T WAIT, COME IN NOW
MORRISON'S
.. 7 Opposite the Ancon P. .0.

TOnlGIIT

ilE llsGiarrscho

I0GIIT!

Here's the night to delight the "Other You" of anyone!
Express your imagination in the wacky costume you can
wear tonight I Everyone's doing it, and you'll have so
much more fun in costume.
Tonight raffle of a General Electric TV Set.
Electric,
Tomorrbv Comparsa High!.. J
Not too late to. get your group (comparsa) together, to -go
dressed in similar costumes. Call our Publicity Depart Department
ment Department for special music to accompany your group's en-
trsLTice.
"LOOK" magazine will
photograph our carnival flestai f .u
Admission:

Tonight $2.00 pperson
Tuesday 3.00 pperson
- For table reservations,'
rail-Mar. 3-lfifl(i

i

r"": fill

t V),;'
v t
r A I

i

4

."2 KWEEK'S wm,
I. Orreron
Montanfe
Jac,nU 0Jw
GeorM Case
M- Mykland
Allajl EspIn

1102 r 56 M.Mt

"OUR FURNITURE GRACES TOE IOVELIEST KC?H5W 1

lillif:ri
1

now...

He shook! we1!i fwbi cat iswdi ot he
1 did at bird
He shodd b ecrf lonw toW f cxkL
He shovid very likely be jlning srx

HOVJ . Milk giono
is not enough for baby!

' Nourishing Quaker oats is the ideal milk sup supplement.
plement. supplement. There's no need to boy special foods
for the normal baby because Quakes oats is a
wholesome, easily digested food that is already
available in most homes. ,v
Quakes oats is the ideal fir$t solid food for
baby. It provides 40 times as much strength-
.giving iron as whole milk .. 1 11 times as much
body-building protein as fresh bananas. More
iron and protein than' eggs, rice or any other
whole grain cereal : ..
Your baby deserves the best QUAXCI Oars

How to prtpan QUAKa ocrft for bdbvv

- Quakks Bottle FeediBf
mamat woUr I meatun QUAKKt ait
Bring water to a boil add Quaker oats and
pineh at salt cook 10 to 15 minutes, itnun,
add warm milk or water to the liquid. Stir to
obtain desired consistency or use as directed
by your doctor.
Qdaxjeb Spooa Feeding
3 measures water 1 meaturt Qua KM tat
Cook as abovestrain add warm milk or
water to liquid. Stir to obtain desired eon eon-Krtoicy
Krtoicy eon-Krtoicy or nee as directed by your doctor.
Crura PwrMga

w

! helps children grow strong ; j kalpt gwwiMips may strong!

THE CRITERION Of OOOP TAiTSt

THE WORLD OVKR

ttv;

iJ. :r-:-V, m m n mm M '.

LAVUUULiU.

Mm mmimrir.. '. .':

tAVNO .- SOAP. TALC- tAT. ALTS
OUSTINO--POWOEH ANO amU.!ANTIni

V

'JAROCCV 53 OLO-BONO-STREET CONDON



mondat, rrr.r.r.vr.r 11, lr.j
,1 MX
' v OU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
! 1
1 f
ii
LEAVE YOU R AD WITH ONE OF OUR ACENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 .'H" STREET, PANAMA
L1BRER1A PRECIADO
,-'- Street No. 11
Agendas lnternal.de Pubiictciones
.He t Lottery rUa
CASA ZALDO
teatral Are.
LOURDES PHARMACY
lUUCinmulllj
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
, tf ireet
MORRISON
4lk of July Ave i
. LEWIS SERVICE
Am tiveU No. e .'-.'
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
W Cutril Avenue
FARMACIA LUX
U Cental Aveaae

THE f AN AM A AMir.ICAN A.N KVTTLSZIST DAILY SISS SFAPFH

i

HOUSEHOLD EXCHANCE FARMACIA EL BATURRO
J. tf ee la Otu Arc No. 41 1 ra.-qii Lievre t Street
FOTO DOMY FARMACIA "SAS"
Just Arervnena Ave. aae 13 St I"0"" HI
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS NOVEDADES ATHIS
91 Street Xe. a '' V .a Espaia Ave. '''

MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
MLMML'M
FOR
12 WORDS

I

COMMERCIAL &

PROFESSIONAL
CANAL ZONE FOlYCtlNlC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
Tivell th ef Juty) Ave., Ne. HAM
Tel I-2M1 ranama.
' RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM RWGE
Phone Panama 1-055J
TRANSPORTS IAXTIR. S A.
Pecktrs htp9tn
Phones 2-2451 2-2562,
Ltarn Ridinej at
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding 6 Jymaim clt
It 5 P.m. e Phono -027
r by appointmenr
"WE will relieve T
FOOT-TROLBLE
corns, eallousses, nails
CHIROPODIST
Dr. Scholls Uataed)
0RTEPEDIA NACIOiNAL
1 U Justo, Aiosemena -- rn. j-.iii
LOOK
You Can Now Buy Auto Auto-mobil
mobil Auto-mobil Insurance by, tele tele-phone.
phone. tele-phone. Immediate Cover Coverage,
age, Coverage, Dial Panama 2-5000
" FRED HUDDLESTON."
YI0LETTE SUPPLY
. SERVICE
Anything w Any time.
If It's made we'll'
' get it for you.
' Call Pan's irn" S-G3i'
Box 283 Balboa, C. Z.
PAfliafJa flrnSr m
rVUjaUw UlUWli lilJ
ijade Orders His
Followers To Slay
Out 01 Rallies
PARIS. Feb. 13 (tTP) Right-
wina anti-tax crusader Pierre
'Poujadc ordered his followers to today
day today to stay out of anti-government
street demonstrations. He describ described
ed described them as a trap "into which we
are not going to fall."
Poujade said the government
and leftwing parties backing- it
would like to pin the blame for
such disorders on his rightist
movement. '" "'
"They would like to push us into
this trap," he told i meeUn? of
his top lieutenants in his home
town of Saint Lere

, i rT-mrTmWTm'ft0ft

m

Poujade said he was opposed lOjUowever center fielder Priester i Tjemnpv '3b'
w street demonstrations against :,,atn(,red m the ball .about -fourr,i'' JU

nrtv
the Cabinet's Algerian reform po
licy. -'
Poujade' instructions appeared
to mark a change toward more
moderate tactics by his extremist
movement. '
" They were Issued amid mounting
lfftwine accusations that his move
ment was responsible for last
week's disorders in Algiers and
street demonstrations yesterday in
Paris. ;
Anglo-US Dsn.
Crcnl To .Egypl -Virldly
Acccpled
CAIRO. Feb. 13 (UP)-Finance
ATinidpr Abdel Moneim el Kay
souni said today Eeypt has "vir "vir-luallv
luallv "vir-luallv accepted'' a $70 million of of-fpr
fpr of-fpr from the United States and
Rritain to iuoolement a $200" mil
lion loan from the World Bank to
help finance construction of the
projected Aswan Dam.
Kaysouni said the World Bank
will act as disbursing agent f or
the Anglo-American grant to E E-gypt.
gypt. E-gypt. .,
He said that since the bank had
agreed to the loan program, "the
next step is for the bank to ask the
United States and Britain to' car
ry out their joint offer of. $70 mil'
lion. ,..-.-. i :
The Finance Minister's f state
ment followed a conterepce on lor lor-eign
eign lor-eign exchange requirements for
the high dam between himself,
, Premier, Gamal Abdel Nasser and
Mohammed S ii o i b. Pakistan's
" member of the bank's board of
directors. ;
It was understood the $70 mil-
T)ri" fronf' thrnltc(rststf.ran
rilain will b. an .outright grant,
.'vhieh will he followed by future
. .ai:s on a repayment basis.- 1

FOR SALE FOR SALE
Boats & .Motors Real Estate
FOR SALE: 17-ft. Wat, cabin 'OR SALE: lot 1242 Muirt
' cruiser, used an f taking seasoa, meters, Guadalupe Settlement,
in Ne. 1 condition, nowly paint- Bequeto. 60e. square mater. Tel-
ed, $390. Trailer ta fit samo. ophene 2-1706 from I to 12.
Boat it ana-man oporatiea, fa- and 2 ta 5. -
tent pending. $75. Can bo seen ... .:. j
at 2003-C, Jit Street. Curundu. f. SAlfc--Vacation and ro-
Phent 83-6226. P. 0 Broemo. tirement heme, furnished, facing
acftn, beautiful view, 350 yards
FOR SALE:-Star-class sailboat, from Gorgono leach. Only 50
Stainlau rtaal riffinf, twa tuita milet lalbaa. Mara than
sails. Phan lalhaa 3021. $5000 inverted. Satrifie $3500.
Phana Balbaa 4474.
FOR $ALI: Cabin cryisar OaU ;
phin, fully eauipped. inclydinf FOR SALE: A Hat Springs, Aik.
radio, rarieratin nd ihif baautifyl tatiramant
tickle. Call Fart Amader 2221 bama. If Intarastad eaH Djlboa
er Fort CUytan 5124. 3450.
' i '

PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
STANDINGS
Teams Teams-Police
Police Teams-Police .. .. .. ..
Won Lost Pet.
.. 7 2 .771
Gibraltar Life .
Spur Cola. ... "..
Seymour Agency
Lincoln Life. ..
Elks 1414.. .. ..
4
4
4
5
t
.555
500;
500
.375
.250
POLICE WIN FIRST HALF
In two decisive ball games
played at the Pacific Little
League Park last Friday and
Saturday the fans were treated
to some real tnnns ana excue excue-,
, excue-, ment as the Police nine took the
measure of both games by one.
run to emerge as winners in the
! first round of the Lettle League
i season.
I In the first game. the .Police
team beat Lincoln Liters oy a
n nf 5 to 4. The Police scored I

two runs in the first on a walk Joyner, J., If 4
to the leadoff hitter Dempsey Beck.ss .. ;. 2
and the fifth home run of the French, L.. 3b.. ,, ... 2
year for Dou Priester, In the French. W., p 3
second hits by Bettis, Glazer andiBradshaw, P., cf .. .. .. 3
a double by Potter accounted for .Ward, lb. 3
two more Police runs. In the Bowman, rf .. .. .. ., 3

'fourth Dempsey drew a base onMcElhone, 2b ,.3

balls, went to second on a pass-
ed baU and came iiv to score
when Lincoln Life' catcher
threw wide at third base.
i Lincoln Life scored one run m
(the econd on a double by Ward
i and n slncle bv J. Joyner. Two

a single by J. Joyner. ToUshton, ss. .. : 2
nmsame in jn the third when Priester, cf .. 3

w. French was nil oy a pnuncu
ball, D. Bradshaw bitting next
was sat on an error by Police

and both runs;Bro-n, t .. 2

came in on a hit by Ward. The
fmirih run was scored by Brad-
eham nhn ram thl'OUBh With a
,slnge m the fifth, advanced to
second on a grouna Dau 10
ond scored on a baa tnrow 10
first by the Police catcher.
Th thrilttno: moment of the

rame came in the top. oi inei onuon, p, ., ,. .. ,, .i
sixth innin? when the "Lifers" Chase, ss .. .. .. .. .. 3
tried to oull the game out of thejZe'nlck. lb.. ., .. .. .., 3
fire. 'With two outs Gene Beck Baker, c-rf .. ..-3
drew a walk. L, French got. on Ijerantle, 2b .. ... .. .. 2
with a sharp grounder to 'Fhort-Rybicki, cf. 2
stop the throw to second bein? Bradshaw. C, If , .. .. 2
wide and both runners advanced) Whitney, rf,; ;. .....0
a base W. French then came upiloswell, c .t .. .. .. .. 2
to bat and laced a towerln flv :

ball .to deen center wiiicn;T t . 22

hMnih tha fna to their faet:!iiii

feet in front of the centerneia Prlestef p
W8foV Police Brown picked upfeg?; fr.2b.::

the win ..giving uaunir tu,
in out five. W. French pitched
for Lincoln Life, gave up five
run on five hits, walking three
and also striking out live.
pniAC.E 2. SPUR COLA 1
Thi Police won the first halfi
by defeating the Sour Cola team j
Saturday. Doug priester toea uie;
mound for the Police and Ted
Aihnttnn for the Snur Cola lads.!
This was strictly a pHchers' duel
throuahout. Both Police nins
cam In the very first innin? oni

a hit by leadoff tter Dempsey. Two case&. heard durlB ..
I uto&W sesslbn In the Balboa Ma-aJl-5IeKt,DHl
hth"lgistrate's Court were continued

i. IiTt haw rmiv run
Soft Drink Lads their, only run
Scoui News
Chariot Race Feauring
Scoutcapade Saturday
J i n l l rf
i one of the many features of
as
the Ecoutcapade on
c.4,j,
evenine. at Balboa Stadium
Official starter for. the big
event will be 'Wero" as portray-1
ed by Bill "Unc" Hollowell.
All cub Packs are busy making
their chariots and training their
drivers and "horses", which will
be four Cubs. The coordination
of the "horses" running In uni unison
son unison to pull their chariot is the
secret of the race. Timing is
Important Jn a chariot race and
also the skill of the driver, who
will toe costumed in typical old
Roman regalia. ;
Carl Widell for the Pacific side
and John C. Wallace for the
Atlantic side will be In charge of
the scoutcapade reature.
They expect that by race time
atieasf twelve chariot s-ill
come to the post to vie for the
chariot racing championship cf
the Isthmus.

mm

came in the fourth innins on
double by leadoff batter Chase,
going to third on a play to first
base and coming in to score on
a passed oau. Anotner tnruung
end to the ball game came in
the too of the sixth when T. Al
britton led off with a single,
stole second, advanced to third
on an error by the first baseman
but that was as far as he could
get. Priester settled down and
proceeded to strike out the next
three batters to end the game
and gjve the Police the first half
bunting.
Priester gave up one run on
four hits and no walks, striking
out eight. T. Albrltton gave up
two runs on nine scattered hits,
walking three and striking out
two.
The box scores:
Lincoln Life-
AB
R
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
l
R
2
0
1
0
0
1
n
1
0
rnmuuw, c.. ,. ,,
xNessler I
Tot als
; .. ..2ft
AB
. n
Police
Dempsey, 3b.
Ashton, ss.
veiuuiBei. a.. .. ., ., a
Browder. rf .. .. 3
Bettis, 2b.. .. .. .. .. 3
Olazer, lb . ., . ., . 2
Potter, c .. ... .. 2
Totals 20 5 5
xGrounded out for Fernandez In
sixth
Spur Cola
AB
Bowen. 3b
.2
AB
2
2
3
3
3
3
2
3
2
Dehllnger, cf-lf
Brown, lf-cf
Bettis. rf v, ..;
uiazer, c
Totals
.23 3 9
.. The
Judge's Dcnch
un"l Wednesday afternoon.
nn. mn.pr a -irt n.
no, a 45-year-old Panamanian
charged with grand larceny. He
it. accused of stealing a billfold
containing $4 from Jorge Con Con-treras
treras Con-treras at mile post 4 on Thatch Thatcher
er Thatcher Highway. Bail of $500 was flx flx-ed.
ed. flx-ed. Mario L. Bernardez was charg-
9d w"h returning to the Canal
z n rjAnortatton. Th
iiuiic euici ucijuihuuu, iiic
.b 'Basinet fh 7Q-vear.nlri
Costa Rican was also continued
VHUW B,MMWO w kaiv W J v w
until the Wednesday session.
A v Panamanian couple who
were charged with disturbing
the peace, were given a sus
pended sentence on the condi
tion that they do not "use vlo
lencc on each other" for a pe'
riod of one year,
Candldo a Melendez, 35. and
his 95-viar-nlrl trtf P!llnrln
were each found guilty of the
anarge ana placed on one year
proDauon.
Jn warning them to behave
Balboa Magistrate Judge John
E. Demlng asked: "What would
you have done If I had sent you
to iail?"
The woman shrugged and an-

swered-f hat hf?-wmil haytof tted.-oa.acuiring practical

on to leave her little daughter
with if she had received a jail
sentence

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
IOX 2031. ANCON, C Z.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, CZ.
TALLER SAIANAS General
mechanical work and crane work,
painting and f reeling.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
OUTSTANDING IARGAIN. Pi Piper
per Piper tri-pacar PA-22, Super ys-
torn, bast condition, certificates.
Phono Companie T. A.S.'A. 3 3-1110.
1110. 3-1110. Aeropuerto Paititli (Mar (Mar-cas
cas (Mar-cas Gelakartl, Panama.
FOR SALE: Clean 6t Press as as-tablishmant.
tablishmant. as-tablishmant. Pbono 987-L, Co Colon.''":'
lon.''":' Colon.''":' FOR SALE: Uied Croiley con con-tola
tola con-tola modal radio and phonograph
Combination, oscellent condition.
Attractive low price of $91. Hal Hal-man,
man, Hal-man, S.A., Via Eipana Ne. 1.
FOR SALE: Lady's montane
ready to wear. Curundu 2231 2231-A.
A. 2231-A. Phana 5116.
MUST SELL: Moving from city,
20-gal. hot water heater, three
months, new, $70. 3-3992.
FOR SALE: Model railraad HO
trains and equipment. Call Fort
Gulick 18-362.
FOR SALE: site violin,
good condition $27.50. 0815
Plank, Balboa. Phono 2-3408
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS VARIOUS ITEMS
FOR SALE
Sealed bids, for opening in pub public,
lic, public, will bo received in the offico
of Superintendent of Storehous Storehouses,
es, Storehouses, Balboa, for the following
item j :
INVITATION No. 216
Aluminum ingot, anti-friction
metal, brass, copper, nickel, line,
ferrochromium, forromanganose,
ferremolybdenum, ferrotil Icon,
ferrotitenium, ganistor, hardener,
abrasive, Bontonito, nails, iron
ore, rapping plates, brushes, ce cement
ment cement campound, chapters, sand
drier parts, foundry facing, fur-
naco ports, ladle parts, wire, pig
iron, carbon-free liquidisers,
sieves shovels, and swabs. TO
BE OPENED 10:30 A.M., FEB-
RUARY 17, 1956.
INVITATION No. 224
Screw anchors, scythe blades,
carboys, cardboard, Reynolds
Unifoil metal, flatshat papot in
various weights and colors, draw drawing
ing drawing paper, tracing cloth, adhesive
cement, cleaning, nasi preventive
and scalo remover compounds,
lubricating grease, lubricants,
drawing ink, nails, illuminating
and fish oils, pasta for linoleum,
pencils, saws, shears, screws,
s t f i p pi n g, trichloroethytene,
wheelbarrows, wick and line sul sulphate.
phate. sulphate. TO BE OPENED 1:30
P.M., FEBRUARY 17, 1956.
INVITATION No. 217
Steel pioo and tubing, shackles,
- turnbucklet, cargo hoieting, or ordinary,
dinary, ordinary, snatch and tackle blocks;
and spar-aear and chaia hoists.
TO BE OPENED 2:30 P.M., FEB FEBRUARY,
RUARY, FEBRUARY, 17, 1956.
All Hems are located at the Bal Balboa
boa Balboa and Cristobal Storehouses.
Invitations may bo obtained from
office of Superintendent of Store Storehouses,
houses, Storehouses, telephone 2-1815.
LESSONS
ATTENTION WEST BANK
Ballroom Dancing Classes ere
available to you. .new. Con Conducted
ducted Conducted by Pat Ramor, formerly
an instructor in Chicago V lead
ing Dance. Studio. Now an asso associate
ciate associate of Ann Lattin's School of
Dance. Cecoli Clubhouse Studio
.(upstairs). Phono Bel 2-4415.
Dr.
PRINCE CLEMENT EAU
RETURNS HOME Dr. Prince
Clemenceau S. (above) arrvea arrvea-here
here arrvea-here Friday night after spend-Ing-
more than ten years in
Mexico where he' was graduat graduated
ed graduated as a medical surgeon in De December,
cember, December, 1954. The young Pan-'
amanlah, who returned with
hils wife, Mrs, Beatrii Valdivia
Clemenceau, served his intern internship
ship internship at the Juarex Hospital 'n
Mexico fJItT and tnen concen-
knowledge on intestinal para
sitosis in th rural areas
Jamiltepec, Oaxaca.

FOR SALE
Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1951 Studebaker
V-8 Commander 2-door Sedan.
Call 2-1713 Balbaa.
FOR SALE, 1956 Singer Road Roadster,
ster, Roadster, less than 1000 miles $1400.
Dual carburetors. Call Albrook
6274. ;.-.7.
FOR SALE 1953 Ford 6-cyl.,
radio, heater, overdrive end un undercoat,
dercoat, undercoat, 2 now tires, $1100 or
moke an offer. Phone 87-6133,
83-7285
FOR SALE: 1955 Chevrolet
Deluxe 4-door sedan with V8
engine, poworglide transmission,
directional lights, beautiful two two-tone
tone two-tone blue ond other deluxe fac factory
tory factory appointments. New condi condition.
tion. condition. Leaving for States. Must
sell. $1895 -full price. Phono
Balboa 2-1515.
FOR SALE: 1950 Chevrolet 4 4-door
door 4-door sedan. Reasonable. 84 84-6286.
6286. 84-6286. Qtrs. 67-B.
FOR SALE. 1947 Buick four four-door,
door, four-door, in good condition, with ra radio,
dio, radio, 4 new tires. Phono 3-2293.
FOR SALE: '53 Hillmaa Minx
4-door, duty paid, perfect con condition.
dition. condition. First $800 cash gets it.
Phono Colon 41 or 198.
FOR SALE: 1949 Ford Fordor
VS. Leaving for States. Quarters
6306-8 Farfan, Phono Navy
3755.
FOR SALE: 1953 Super-88
Oldsmobilo d) door, automatic
transmission, R6H, wtw, pow power
er power brakes, and other extras. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. One owner.
Phone Fort Kobbe 4171.
FOR SALE: Beautiful 1953
Studebaker hardtop, automatic
transmission and many other ex extras.
tras. extras. Dial 2-2304 Balboa. v
FOR SALE: 1 947 Packard, good
running car; selling for $200.
Call 3161 KobVe, from 4 til 8
P.m.
Fire Burns Down
Roof Of Amsterdam
Diamond Center
AMSTERDAM, Feb. 13 fUP)
Some 200 firemen battled for four
hours today to bring a fire under
control in the famed Amsterdam
Diamond Exchange.
Diamonds worth more than one
million dollars were in dancer
when the flames raced through
the upper floors of the six-storv
building causing the roof to col collapse.
lapse. collapse. The building Is one of the world
centers of the diamond trade.
Diamond brokers could be seen
scurrying through the entrances on
the ground floor carrying suiteas
es hurriedly packed with gems. But
the big strongroom where dia
monds are kept in safes was mot
harmed by the flames.
1st PRIZE
Present your.tickets
f 1. $1,300.00
flat tfwda
Ml-

947744 1 449705
..' ... I' y

RESORTS

Gramlick't Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modem conveniences,
, moderate rates. Phono Gamboa
6-441.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mile
past Casino. Law rote. Phono
Bolboa 1866.
PHILLIPS Oceansido Cottage,
Santa Clan. Box 435, Balboa.
Phono Panama 3-1877. Cricta Cricta-bol
bol Cricta-bol 3-1673.
Shrapnel's furarshed houses en.
beach at Santa Clara. Telephone
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
FOR RENT
: Apartments
ATTENTION G. I.I Just built
modern furnished aportmcnts, 1,
2 bedrooms, hot, cold w t o t.
Phono Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT: Newly furnished
and unfurnished apartments. Al Al-ham
ham Al-ham bra Apartments, I Oth Street
No. 8061. Phone 1386 Colon.
FOR RENT.- Spacious two-bedroom,
two-bath screened apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Living room, dining room,
garage and maid's, quarters. Pri Private
vate Private entrance. Campo Alegre.
Phono Panama 3-0873
FOR RENT: Top floor of home
31 -A Francisco Files Street,
Vista Hermosa. Inquire Chalet
31.
FOR RENT: Unfurnished two two-bedroom,
bedroom, two-bedroom, carport, maid's room
and bath, balcony, hot water
. tank available. Near El Panama.
3-3992. $110.
Swiss Paper Beefs
Over Sophia Loren's
Show-Slealing Eyes
ZlfRICH, Switzerland. Feb. 13
(UP) A Swiss newspaper article
complained today that Italian film
star Sophia Loren's "bedroom
eyes" stole the show from a Swiss
girl ;':ier at the Winter Olympics.
" The' complaint was made In an
article by Hanna Willie carried in
a number of Swiss papers.
It said tht when shapely Sophia
appeared on the scene at the ladies
slalom ski race in Lortina d
Ampczzo, newsreel cameramen
focused on her and skipped making
pictures of Swiss gold medal win winner
ner winner Renee Colliard.
"We are mad because we did not
see the girl from Geneva in her
race for a gold medal," the article
said, "and a bit angry that we
1 had to take another look at So-
- lphia's bedroom eyes, instead of
(seeing tne! intelligent cooperation
l of head and legwork of a Swiss
skier who did honor to ner coun-
'try."
2nd

s t Ujj i

before Friday Your tickets are valid for a whole year

-TOTAL
2.-
(Accumulated)
Get them buying.

Ohjja, dlojt Wuithjiuiia "Oho",

'

FOR SALE
Household

FOR SALE: Mahogany double
bed with mattress and spring, 2
night tables, bedspread. 12 pit pit-low
low pit-low covers, 2 wrought iron lamps.
Excellent condition. Phono 83 83-3216.
3216. 83-3216. FOR SALE: Household furnish furnishings,
ings, furnishings, including new wrought iron
furniture, dishes, luggage, cam camera.
era. camera. Call Balboa 2733.
FOR SALE: Two metal dress dressers,
ers, dressers, two porch screens, and mis-
cellaneous houeehold goods. Tel Telephone
ephone Telephone 3329 Balboa.
FOR SALE: Oak table, four
chairs, buffet, car heater.Tele heater.Tele-phone
phone heater.Tele-phone kulboa 2-4157.
FOR SALE: Westinghouie re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, porcelain, 25 cycle,
good condition, $35. Phone 4-
566.
FOR SALE: 2 G.I. cot springs,
mahogany frames, 6 G.I. mat mattresses
tresses mattresses $30; 1 Steinway upright
piano $300. Phono 84-6244.
FOR SALE: Bad, mattress,
spring, dining table, four chairs.
Address Chorrillo 27th Street.
8-A-67 No. 12. Furniture just
like new,
FOR SALE: Overstuffed couch
and chair; dining tablo and six
chairs; 60-cycic Kenmore auto automatic
matic automatic washer. Best offer. Balboa
2-4356. r-.
Help Wanted
WANTED: General maid for
email house, American family.
To live in. Good salary and
chance to bo taken to U.S. after
six months. Must have health
certificate and references. Houto
No. 47, 1st Ave., El Csrmen.
Phono 3-5712 Panama.
j..

NOT ALLOWED TO WED Wllbert Coffin (right), was hanged
as scheduled shortly after midnight last Thursday at Montreal.
Coffin was convicted in August, 1954, for the 1953 shooting of
a Pennsylvania man on & bear hunting trip. Coffin's common
law wife, Mariorr Petrie (left) was refused TJrmlssion for a
death cell wedding,

FEBRUARY 12th
PRIZE 3rd prize

, $2,120.00
$180.00

FOR RENT
Houses

FOR RENT: Furnished chateti
2 bedrooms and studio. 47th
Street No. 1-02. Phone 3-1306
. Panama.
FOR RENT: Three-bedroom
chalet, swimming pool, barbecue,
$150. Old Golf Club entrance.
Phone 3-2079.
WANTED
Apartments
CANAL ZONE COUPLE desires
vacation quarters qp the Pacific
side from April until Juno, July
or August- Call Lois Spencer at
2-4302 Balboa,
AMERICAN FAMILY, parents of
tw daughters 9 and II years,
desires to rent a furnished housa
of highest quality in El Cangre Cangre-jo,
jo, Cangre-jo, Bella Vista, La Cresta or
Campo Alegre sections. Minimum
period ot time four months. Call
3-5712 Panama.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT: Furnished room
. with porch, good for bachelor or
couplo, kitchen if desired. Apply
over The Chase Manhattan Bank
(Colon), corner 11th and Boli Bolivar,
var, Bolivar, housa 10123. Only Bolivar
entrance. Phono 233 Colon.
Wanted Position
EXPERT bilingual typist desires
position. Knowledge of general
office work. Call Panama 3-5860
afternoons.
i
i.
Keep, them carefully

054894

3. $640.00 (Accumulated)

(huA (Bahu

i

.ai IW..-. J"

it-



THE PANAMA AMERICAN A.N LNDI.FENDLNT DA 111' NXW5PAFER
t
If
I -..3; l-
.. V,'
i;ENTKAL Theatre
LUX THE ATI) K
60c. 30c.
Sterling HAYDEN in:
"TOP GU N"
No man ever drew on him and lived...
; with William Bishop
SHOWS: 3:00. 4:14, 5:54, 7:18, 8:59
UntVE-IiJ Tiicsvis
tClLIA THEATP
B0e. S
K I I
V I C O k i i
35c. 2flc. 35c. 20c.
35c.
20c.
75c.
40c,
30c.
Yt k tai ttlns in Technicolor and Supcrsrspc
Carnival Dance from 8:30 p.m.
on the Waite Heatner Terrace,
with the Orchestra
"La Perfecta of Armando Boza"
also featuring
"TONY MORO"
Isthmian entertainer
Robert Mitehu: Mitehu:-In:
In: Mitehu:-In: .;.
Th? best musical comedy of Bob Hope
In Cinemascope
Victor Mature In:
'Demetrius and the
, Gladiators-'
"BENEATH THE 12
MILE REIT"
with Richard Wagner
"SHIP OF THE
LOST WOMEN
'HEAT
WAT E"
Aoventures of
"CAPTAIN
AFRICA"
piui v; ; ;
"TEENAGE CRIME
WAVE-
The wildest charge' the Sahara
ever knew...
"DESERT SANDS"
with Ralph Meeker Maria Enjlish
J. Carroll Xaish
SHOWS: 1:05, 3:02, 4:59, 6:56, 8:53
"IHt itVfcN LITTLE FOYS"
in technicolor and Vlstavision
Plus Dane Clark in:
"BLACKOUT"
Lost.:. one desperate night of passion
and terror.
"NOT AS A
STRANGER'
Alio:
"THE NAKED
STREET"
- ,.

MONDAY. ITBIXARY II. KS

1 ?

fit

If.

(NEA Telephoto)
DEEP IN THE SNOW OF TEXAS Mounds of snow almost
cover parking meters along a street of blizzard-swept Amarlllo,
Tex A flvC-day storm left snow up to 29 inches deep on level
ground and several feet deep in drifts. At least 30 persons died
in Tea8, Oklahoma and New Mexico as a result of the blizzard.

IIOILYEJ

m

MOVIES TV RADIO
by Erskint Johnson

i 1 1 ft r f w

E

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Behind
the screen: Hollywood's censorship
code is on the operating table for
what may be major surgery.
A sweeping study of the rules,
recently under fire as old-fashioned
in the controversy over "The
Man With The Golden Arm," was
voted by the Motion Picture Asso Association's
ciation's Association's board of directors.
'The film code dates back to 1932,
and there's considerable talk about
making the regulations more flexi flexible
ble flexible to meet the needs of a chang changing
ing changing society There's also a move movement
ment movement among independent film
distributors to establish a special
code seal for foreign movies "too
hot" for Hollywood.
A changing entertainment pic picture
ture picture pf TV competition fused the
re-examination of the "old film cen censorship
sorship censorship code. TV's handling of kid kidnaping
naping kidnaping themes and dope addiction,
both taboo in Hollywood films,
paved the way for theater and pub public
lic public acceptance of "The Man With
The Golden Arm," and-MGM's
current "Ransom," based on the
Ralph Bellamy home screen hit,
"Desperate Decision.''
"If TV can do it, why can't wt?"
it th wail fmovia productrs.
Their argument is sound IP they,
can duplicate TV's good taste. The
niiTPnt tnr)v nf the Hollywood

code may come up with the an-1
swers, including movies labeled i

"For Adults Only."
Tht Ittt Ben Bernie's life story
has been sold for a movie tilled,
"The Old Maestro" v Debbie
Reynolds nixed all movie and TV
offers to be with Eddie Fisher on
his next personal appearance tour.
s She's a gal. who doesn't believe in
separation . Gina Lollobrigida's
1955 earnings, it's said, were $600, $600,-000.
000. $600,-000. But another Italian movie doll,
Sonhia Lor en. tODDed her with

$700,000.
Not in the ( script: Katharine
Hepburn on being an actress:
"Being an actress is a humiliat humiliating
ing humiliating business, and as you gat oldtr
it bacemat mora humiliating be be-causa
causa be-causa you'va got lost to soil."'
This Is Hollywood, Mrs. Jones:

A- iop Banana, a movie version
of the stage hit starring Phil Sil Silvers
vers Silvers which flopped at the box of office
fice office t h r e e y e a r s is a re reissue.
issue. reissue. Phil's TV lick is the rea reason.
son. reason. He'll even be billed as ,"Sgt.
Bilko of TV."
The Witnet": Ilenny Youngman
about his early days in New York:
"I had a night-club boss who was
so tough he used to stab me good good-nights
nights good-nights
Jacki Cloason is considering a

Hollywood movie "The Cheese
Stands Alone." It's the dramatic
role of a top comedian who has a

"deep-seated rejection of people

. . Greer Garson's taking the
dramatic TV plunge in the filmed

"Star Stage series on Bv,

British star Trevor Howard will

play Hasani in "Omar Khay-yam."

Cornel Wilde has the title role in

the movie . .Bob Hope's thumb

nailing, of the British film studio
in which he's making "Not For
Money'': "It's Paramount Wtih

tea bags." V
Fred Allen wrote it to a Holly
wood pal:

"I'm working on a new serum
which will make wrltors immune
to criticism. If it works, I may
return to writing."
Hour-long telefilms now being
produced by Hollywood's major
studios will be released as theatri theatrical
cal theatrical films in foreign countries.
They're already being offered in
England, where "I Love Lucy"
and "Dragnet" just made the top
10-most-popular TV shows, r The

Davy Crockett craze just hit there,
too.Old Davy's ballad is No. 1 on
the hit parade in London, ;

Wool 'lirith

(Best Selen
i

(Compiled by Publishers' Weekly)

ricnon
MARJORIE MORNINGSTAR -Herman
Wouk
ANDERSONVILLE MacKinlay
Kantor
CASH McCALL Cameron Haw Haw-ley
ley Haw-ley TEN NORTH FREDERICK John
O'Hara
THE TONTINE Thomas,. B.
Costain
AUNTIE MAME Patrick Dennis
THE MAN L THE GRAY FLAN-
NRI. SITIT filnan Wll.'

- utvnu I
THE SMILING, REBEL Harnett!

Non-Fiction
GIFT FROM THE SEA Anne
Morrow Lindbergh

INSIDE AFRICA John Gtinther

THE OF THE SEA
Rachel L. Carsnn

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER Wal Walter
ter Walter Lord
THE POWER OF POSITIVE
THINKING Norman Vincent
Peale
YEAR OF DECISIONS Harry
S. Truman.

By United Prota

Serious students of American
history now have an important
new account of the political-economic
events from the Civil War

through World War I in HENRY
WATTERSON, UNRECONSTRUC UNRECONSTRUCTED
TED UNRECONSTRUCTED REBEL (Oxford).
Joseph Frazier Wall, chairman

of Grinell College's history depart

ment, has presented the irascible

individualist Marse Henry in all
his great editorial strength and
human weakness. But Wall's docu document
ment document is more than a biography of
the last of the thundering editors.
It also is a discerning study of a

type of journalism that has gone.

watterson, son ot a lennessee

congressman, was on the Ameri American
can American political scene from the death
of John Quincy Adams, which he

witnessed as an eight-year-old visi visitor
tor visitor to the Senate, until the collapse
Of President Wilson.

And how very much on the scene

he was. Southern-born but a de-

spiser of slavery and a believer in

union forever, ne unnesitaungiy

shouldered Confederate arms when

the break came. Yet his perhaps
was the most potent voice for re

conciliation after the war.
The Louisville. Ky., Journal,

later and now the Courier-Journal,
was a perfect vehicle in its border
locality gateway to the Old South

and tied economically to the grow

ing West for this courageous
spokesman for a new" United

America.

In a sense, this new study also

is the history of the Democratic
party, as seen through the eyes of
its most unpredictable journalistic

suDDorter. :

For Marse Henry didn't, as do

modern-day journalists, reflect his
tory., Watterson made it. His edi

torials and his personal participa

tion bad much to do with the shape
of things that came,
Wall's fine contribution will not
find a ready audience among those

who read for pleasure. It's a schol

arly treatise, outstanding in re

search and unembellished in pres

entation. .-

Of the more than 10,000 new
books and new editions that are

published each year a compara

tively few are winnowed out for
review in the newspapers. Unlike

many other professionals the book
reviewer or critic usually begins

his training as a child. As one of

the best-known reviewers puts it,
"Some children are so engrossed
with snorts and games and tools

and all the intensely active life of

childhood that they have no inter interest
est interest in books. Others can take
them or leave them alone. But I
lived in books. They seemed more
important and interesting than
anything in real life." Thus Orville
Prescott, who writes about books
in the New York Times, describes
the start of his career in his auto

biography, THE FIVE-DOLLAR
GOLD PIECE (Random-House)..
Prescott relates and evaluates
the events of his own life with the
lucid candor that characterizes his
book reviews. His story is an inter interesting
esting interesting one and is studded with in informative
formative informative and sometimes amusing
incidents and problems peculiar to
the armchair profession .
A new edition of STEPHEN
HERO (New Directions) brings to together
gether together for the first time the two
recovered fragments of James
Joyce's first effort at writing in
his early twenties, this is the pain painstakingly
stakingly painstakingly autobiographical narra narrative
tive narrative that emerged finally In more
polished form as A PORTRAIT OF
THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN.
One fragment, running 383 manu manu-cprint
cprint manu-cprint naam. was first mihlished

in 1944. The second, comprising 25

nacino u niihiKnpd npre tot me

first time, ana lanes young oie oie-nhon
nhon oie-nhon Dsprlalus on a visit to his

godfather at Mullingan in the mid midlands
lands midlands of Ireland. Joyce himself
dismissed this early effort as a
"schoolboy's production," but It
nevertheless stands as the produc production
tion production of most unusual schoolboy.
MUNCIE, Inc. (UP) The
famiiv nf a lnral attorney will have

plenty of bubble gum for 1956.
The father gave his small son and
daughter $1 each to buy Christmas
gifts for their mother. The boy

uuugm a uuuoi s wuiiu in uuuuie
gum.

a

If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER," America's smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS

(NEA. Telephoto)
HOME AFTER ELOPEMENT William Zeckendorf, Jr., and
the former Curie Lie, both 26, are shown in Zeckendorf 's
mother's home in New York the day after their marriage In
Winchester, Va. The groom Is the son of the New York real
estate tycoon and" the bride Is the daughter of Trygve Lie,
former Secretary General of the United Nations.

tew
.'Hill IIKItll
cz3

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WELCOMED TRAVELER nappy Marianne iiomu was y
Jnore fortunate than most immigrants on a flight from
the Netherlands to New York. Ilcr boy friend met her.

r

SNOW WHITENS THE WHITE HOUSE This striking photo shows the White House as its lawn was blanketed by snow.

LATEST WHEELCHAIR MODEL Push-button controls are
a feature of this wheelchair, demonstrated by polio pa patients
tients patients Sandra Schnur, 20, and hitch-hiker Adrienne
Athos, 5, at New York's Bellevue institute. Chair can ;
move six miles an hour, turn, reverse or slow down.

MOUNTAINEER' WORKS IN MINE
TN THE COAL FIELDS around Cadiz, 0., there's a new cars. The new shovel, which is at least, 100 times larger
I 1 worker who can dig into the earth and scoop out 90 than the ordinary shovel, will uncover coal seams 90 feet
j tons of dirt, lift the load 97 feet into the air and deposit it below the area. The machine can make a complete cycle
c 290 feet away. This worker is "The Mountaineer," world's once every 50 seconds. It puts dirt in 100-foot-high piles,
c largest power shovel, at Hanna Coal company's No. 12 The 2,750-ton shovel moves on eight crawlers or "cats,"
v mine. The monster shovel was built at Marion, 0., and Main motor generator, which furnishes electrical power,
: moved to its site in sections. Task required 125 railroad could supply the needs of a city of some 20,000 persons.

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JUNGLE FIGHTERS A sinele-eneined Prestwick Pioneer touches down on a landing ,'

i strip at Fojt Shean, deep in the Malayan jungle, where British forces are fighting, : A ,,.

Communist terrorists. Small planes are tne only source oi supplies xor uie iroopi.. ..

To its vry tip, th gigantic power shovel (left) rises 160 feet into the cir. Only one man is needed to operate it (right).

Jnsi J of the shovel looks more like the engine room of a Jarge ship (left). The shovel oven has an elevator, (right)

CHARMER These four
studies of lovely actress
: Grace Kelly were made
. between takes on a Bel Bel-Air,
Air, Bel-Air, Calif., estate where
she is working in a movie

--with- Frank-Sinatra.Sh'

King Features Syndicate

Wth'IfKiSlt i

"TESTING'CERMANJEEP While-visiting- the Porsche-auto-planfe4n-Dui6burg,- Ger
many, Juscelino Kubjtschek! (left), president of BraziVmade a rough-test ride in jeep, (

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Monday. rrnRUAsi 13, ms

THE PA.NA5U AMtRlCAN AN LMtf ENDiNT DAIL1 MY 5TAFEH

Socia I an J Oli emvh

- C0.1i

0

(Continued From Page FIVE) doors in Panama" serif j at the

Small

Sai'joa Y.M.CA-U-S.O., will be

gin on Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 7:30

cut the bright coloring

ficnirp nf tii nancflN u ?r A

.v o' i, autiful, The name of the new series
HPnL -More About Panama"
vS?f lw -75i wiU continue for eight suc suc-Isathan
Isathan suc-Isathan Fuller and Mrs. Lorenz po .iVa T0.ri,..s ;

fpKti"- 5tanf d The titles and lectures will be
rtlV Ail "Costumes and Customs of Pan-
h.rt l,l f Vrrf rsny- m i'!ama-" by Mrs. Mercedes. Alegre
5??.' wnw nt ;fCw VSmlth: "Poisonous snakes of the
t t t w 4fnff fvnrth' J"n&le" by Mr. Kenneth W. Vin Vin-Tex
Tex Vin-Tex 's o r S Sui::ton: Animal, of the Jun-
If Sf Snnt r Lf M;Rai;Jlm": "Orchids of Panama" by
'2aSM?fftiTiJhn 8'Mr-HarrvA. Dunn; "Panama
?r SS' Thnn ?Mt 'nd the Paaama Canal", by Mr.
Mrs JanS wi v Hart: "All About the
a' aifB; San Bias Indians." by Mr. Fred

m E W Larson Nathan Tul iJ- Busch' "Tropical, Fruits and

James Johnson, chas chadd, r" 1 ml-, t. tr
W.Gogglns, Kenneth Ramer,!0. of Panama '.by Mr. Carl

I ; 'Chat' And Save Applesauce Pcstry
I I LINCOLN. Neb. (UP) IV-
NEW YORK. (IT) Food rules should be rr ircrr.beri'd in u-
budget tip: Substitute canned in? new household equipment." Kay
! mackarel for salmon next time' Conway. extension pecia!iT.t at
! you make a salmon, loaf. The fa n-j the University of Nebraska says.
tly probably won't notice the of-' Read both the direction and the
ference, and the mackarel costs guarantee.
I about one-third as mucb. Use, Changes are constantly bcinz

time made in household equipment and
and a careful .study of directions' it

mackarel for salmon next
with noodles, or macaroni
other casseroles.

New Grinder

i necessary to operate some appli-.
'ances correctly. Miss Conway aii.
I She added it is important to.
read the guarantee because many
! guarantees are not valid unless a
I card included with the appliance
,is filled out and mailed immcdf
;ately to the manufacturer.

Shirley Blair. Betty Hartman, A.

L. Wilder, Henry Tryncr, John!

Curtis.

Mr. Elmer Stevens, Canal Zone

tin?

Campbell, Orville Jones.' James 'ngl?.eer' ls chairman or
T:al.w TH- cs, irr f mfnH Course.

t. xt xjtv, i These lectures are free ana

inson and B. Le Doux.

are open to all members of the
community, both military end

civilian. Those wishing to at attend
tend attend are asked to remitter in

was; advance by phone, mall or pcr-

Mr. and Mrs. Moses Give
Pre-Carnival Dinner

given' last evening by Mr. and sonauy'

Mrs, John Moses. Guests dined" ..,.
r. tht unnp. hnmi in n r.anartJl on Auxiliary

jo before tolng.on te'the Union j"

uuo.- ..

j!

1

Sprine clothes are utterly soft and utterly feminine. This means
that the look of hair and skin must follow suit, since the un unadorned
adorned unadorned lines call extra attention to the face. The velvet look
-Is with clean skin. First comes cleansing eream and skin

lotion, then a powder base (left). Then eomes a fine powder 6f
light consistency (center). Don't forjft that the neck needs tht
same amount of attention. Keeping; up a velvety complexion
(right) is easy with a powder-foundation.

tact Mrs. Joan p'Connell, 2-2341

Balboa Club Has
No-IIost Luncheon
A no host luncheon for the
Balboa Woman's Club card group
was held at the Albrook Officers
: Club with the following mem members
bers members land guests present: Betty
Bright, Gloria Brown, Ruth
Bourgeois; Edith Brown, Ruth

Baltozer, Helen Barrett, Leona riin(irf r.rA r

4jiuu"aj 9 iv4vi va4uvwo, ; EntcrtJiiii Balboa
rtttinJ Wednesday
Hifc Pil,?,"111'...?!" The Curundu Woman's

i;i XvrXZSt H!ef0UP wU1 be hostesses to
Held, Naomi- Frangonl, Marie int,na w-.

The American Legion Auxll'a-i

ry Unit No. 1 is having a Rum Rummage
mage Rummage Sale at the Paraiso Boy
Scout shed on Saturday, Feb. 25
at 9:00 a.m.
; Anyone wishing to donate to'
the sale ls asked to pleas con-j

Mme.BonnetSays USFigures
Get World's Best Of Care

Meetings

By ROBERT AHIER
PARIS (UP) One of Eu

rope's top feminine fashion author

ities says her continental counter

parts should take a style lesson
from American women.
"Women in the United States
lead the world in the attentiofi they
give their figures," said Mme. Hen Henri
ri Henri Bonnet, wife of the former
FrencnNambassador to the United

cardlStates and newly-named top ad

the j visor to designer Christian Dior

- Wfu.u . J : .u :iXT. iLu t 4.1..

- .v : ,r : :rJttiuoa women s cara irouD uu; v vv inuri kiuuu vi wumcu idnc

Curundu Commu-ias good care of themselves," shelporUons if you're overweight.

I b 4 ii 'I'UftT'B TtiiA Inn nr In Tnirt.i

best light possible."
A 10-point chart for dress which
she prepared some vears aeo still

holds good, she said. It goes like

tins..

1. Don't shop for the sake of

shopmg; buy what you need.
, 2. By what's becoming to you.

Don't buy a dress because it looks

good on a friend

3. Don't follow fashion dictates

blindly; extreme ideas date quick quickly.
ly. quickly.
4. Be discreet with jewelry.

5. Sli mdown to accepted pro-

Joustra, Margaret Johnston, Au

Jfelfat Jameson, Margaret Gra
haniK Ruth. ; Jenkins,. Florence
Klopper, Anhabelle Leap, Louise
Merchant, Mary Morton, Gladys
DiPasca, Maa Nording, Sara
Rowley, Mary RUppel, Mrs. Rau Rau-klns,1
klns,1 Rau-klns,1 Peggy : Parker, Blanche
Schilling, Lillian StlSman, Ger Gertrude
trude Gertrude Smouse,,. Dorothy. Trim,

Phyllis Turner,

nitv House fdr 'waffle breakfast

and cards.
: For reservations 'please' con
tact Mrs, Merchant 2-3317 imme
diately, . ; :

and Lorraine Zlnt,

"Outdoors In Panama"
Ser es To Be Resumed
Next Week'-
A continuation of the

YES, WE HAVE SOME
MILFORD,. Conn. (U-P)
Just' about very body knows that
hamnai chrkiilrlnffr ho Irpnt in tho

Mane wenizei refrigerator, but truck-owner Dan

said. "That's true too of the mid

die and working classes. In this
connection, European women have
a lot to learn from their American
sisters." ;-' . ':)''-'":-,
Mme. Bonnet, who perennially Is
on the various lists of best dressed
women, also had some advice for
American women as she set about
her new job. -.
Must Bt Adapted -"Don't
let the slim Paris models

and some local extremities scare

lel.Caprtotti of Somerville, Mass.,
t iL II. .anAJ m.

Weill eVCtl lUlUJCI. IIC USCU lfrtl, trK c,Mnn
bottled-eas heater to keep ms ba-'yu JAKT.

nana.lnarlprl Imrk warm The eas Bn Halu- 1,1 "". 10
EIw--Mhtn'- Botift-'a very valuable thing, but it tan
ha"dfinUght JlCSUlt land, generally must be adapted to!

6. Accentuate your good points.

7. Avoid flowered hats with furs;
furs are rich enough alone.

8. Adapt your clothes to your
way of life; understate by day, be

reeal by night,

9. Take the best possible care

of your clothes.
, 10. Pick accessories with the
greatest care.

IU 11W.ll

"Out- baked bananas

New Paris Spring look
As feminine As USA
Despite Dior's Arrow

1Y ROSITTI HAR6R0VI
PARIS' -"(NEA) Like the
clothes in1 current American col collections,
lections, collections, the spring fashions just
unveiled in Pans accent the fo font
nt font imine.
This doesn't mean exaggerated
curves. There are some full skirts
shown, tod, but these have gentle
belling rather than exaggerated
- width, -.'.--..-.-:,
. The' composite silhouette is a
natural-one, with buit, waist and
hips more or less where they
should be. Daytime hemlines are
a trifle shorter in some collec collections
tions collections (H to 17 -inches) but many
stay at the accustomed 13, inches.
If you'vie an average figure,
thc-e clothes will look good on
you. You needn't- wo fry, this
year, about shoving your waist waistline
line waistline down to your, hips, moving
your hips to the back and flatten flattening
ing flattening out -your bust to pancake lev
reK ". : ,':.:,
Here's a rundown oh the col collections
lections collections of top Frenchi designers:
Oiori;, The Arrow Lino jis the
line here, one that's straight and
narrow but with natural, high
hustline. Daytime sheaths are
belted just below the bustline and
are shown eifher with or without
jackets.? Hemlines' are 14 to. il7
inches fronj the ground, depend depending
ing depending on type. The collection in includes
cludes includes some easy shirtwaist styles
as foils to the Arrow Line.
Balmaln: A ;fluid silhouette cou cou-rlei
rlei cou-rlei with a comoletely feminine

look The bosom line Is empha emphasized,
sized, emphasized, there's a define') wai'tlipe
and widened ;but, unpadded ahou' ahou'-ders
ders ahou'-ders Hemlines hit the midcalf.
No .classic Suits at: this house but
Jots of dress-and-jacket types.
Balmaiti shows the cath for
evening but he also I'kes crino crino-lines
lines crino-lines in' both short and sweeping
Jencths. ''a'' :
."menu's Hcim:: A s'lbmette with
f attc''' 'ai"" f i a t-
line,-. fied idri". sortef hem hemline
line hemline and no hips. Th" look here is
trim and f eminin. Thi design er
prefer cnservai'" u's to the
poMiIar' dresgrand-lscket combi combi-nafion.Ve
nafion.Ve combi-nafion.Ve show u"s wiH 1h.t

renew, slim or fun pieafed skti

Fvome tfo"-""" a e oot"

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NARROW LOOK fdr spr'ng
from American designers gives
aq idea of what Paris unveiled.

each individual woman

Very often, .Mme. Bonnet added,
her American friends, tell her a
certain model is not for them be because
cause because the skirt is too slim or the
neckline too plunging.
Any dress must be tried out first
on a person who, is standing, and
then on the same person seated.
Then one can determine if the
skirt is really too narrow or the
neckline too daring," she ex

plained

SULKING, POUTING ARE CLUES

TO LAGGING DEVELOPMENT
Is it possible for a wife to be
too romantic?
It is if her romantic notions
keep her emotionally a girl long
after she should have developed
into a woman. J
You are probably being top girl girlishly
ishly girlishly romantic if
You feel neglected, rather than

happy and contented, during an

ained, ; ( ..levening when your husband is at
Asked what advice she wo"'d home but completely absorbed in

give her new boss, Mme. Bonnet
commented: : ".' ;

"It is impossible to give aavice

to a man' like Dior, who has his or(jet

a good book, a project he is work.

ing on, or just cleaning his guns
or getting his fishing tackle in

own ideas in everything.

- ,. 10 Points
"I will try to relay to him the
American women's desire for
dresses that are easily wearable
. . and place the figure in the

Annual St. Mary's
Bazaar Panned
For April 4-7
' .tht.'.i.JHa' .t A Wl4-1 V A

plans for the holding of the annual

charity bazaar on April 4, a, o,
and. y ... ..
This bazaar is held annually for
the purpose of raising funds .to
help meet the many demands for
charity made upon Saint Mary's
during the year.
The following committees were
elected to conduct the various
phases of. the bazaar:
Executive committee: Fathers
Wye and McNichol, Charles Wil Williams,
liams, Williams, Louis Snedeker; Finance
committee: Charles Magee, Louis
l olfitti. Walter Allen Booth! con

struction; William Mummaw; Pub

licity: f ather vvye, cnaries uar uar-cia,
cia, uar-cia, Ernest Veno, Rudolph Burda
and Louis Snedeker ; . ; ; :
- The grand prize, will be a TV
set. Committees, in charge of the
various- booths are presently pre preparing
paring preparing plans for the presentation
of entertainment, games, novelties,
merchandise and food,, will be an announced
nounced announced soon.
Next meeting of the bazaar com committee
mittee committee will be held on Monday,
Fe": 20 at 7:30 p.m.

You can't bear to hear your hus

band praise another woman.
You get upset if your husband
disagrees with you or criticizes
something you have done, Your
reasoning is that if he really loves
you he would think you perfect.
You feel gypped because mar married
ried married life is not one long honey honeymoon.
moon. honeymoon. V
You are resentful if your hus husband
band husband obviously enjoys talking to
another woman.
You expect your husband to no

tice and appreciate out 1011a ey
erything you do around the house
This is even thoueh vou naturally

take for granted his going to work
every morning and bringing home

a pay checx every ween.
You feel hurt if you hear him
telling someone else some news
he has neglected to tell you first.
You don't want any interest your
hiuhnnd doesn't share and don't

think he should have any that

don't include you.
You deliberately try to make
your husband jealous just to re reassure
assure reassure yourself that he loves you.
You place too high a value on
gifts because you think they prove
just how much your husband loves
you.- 'r
vnu nmit or sulk when your

husband does something you don't

like
You can't enjoy the stage your
marriage is in, now for wishing
things were like they werein the
beginning.
You threaten to leave your hus husband
band husband every time you have a quar quarrel
rel quarrel or misunderstanding.
Those aren't evidences of ma mature
ture mature love but of girlish romanticism.

Few nllar' Vint marv Aann

Will I rnimrlpd or hatpait nortrlineo tnr ,'

vciv jifji ioi t -.!--.. com jacKeis ana aresses. utien, i
with f ?"F -n, fa""" bnk-1 there are" no sleeves at all nut j
nvent sVirts, w the eo'n" r where they are shown. They're:!
shn' here and include x a vivid short1 and straight or" they're!
ccal. Iquarter. length. Lots to f driftv!'

vas;ti ot mnvin: ie "f's ciutton evening gowns, all ex ex-ailhmiette
ailhmiette ex-ailhmiette '" '",ii''i i.V" -n H pertly draped,
cream cone Jt hiw? an : Jacques Grlffet Lots of dress-
welstlme "th fab'c moothM in antt-jacket combinations 1 here
unbroken .'l'n tn bis: en;n-r, yith the emetglng silhouette both
with moderate wid'h at hie. !wilr the -emoeing sn'lH"ntte btth
Rei1ine it th's hwi" r n i -ciht wools for daytime and
ir"hc.'PT'nce 'Irenes arjwn'-n printed silks and lace for dinner.
Hth rV ;.fT't ?;t-e!v i Hemlines are 15 inches here, belts
from the. shoulder to lust below and collars fmve van'sherl manw

sn dsim: A "ery famine time1 colors are hige. spinach

s"-np s'inouer. ianv lec-- im-c"! and navy. For evening
with jacVets oe little boleros. and black, white and coral are the co

some suits witn easy-titted jack, lors most shown.

SllOltMG AT YOUR SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TOmailT!

BALBOA 6:75 8:25
iir.cftSiniTmvrn

M-G-M presents

mum
GLENN FORD DOROTHY McGUIRE
immmmm-'
una ttiros -jnn KBjuuri.' .

DIABLO HTS. 8:15 7:50
HHdrgnrde NEFF
; SVENGALI" Color!
Tue: "DALLAS'

8:10

Tua.'.'.TlIE BI9 TIF OFr"

MARGARITA 6.15
' Susn STEPHEN
"LUXURY GIRLS'1
Tues. "CASABLANCA"

CRISTOBAL 6:15 8:10
Air-Condiiioned
' Gene KELLV
"It's Always Fair Weather"
; Cinenubcop Color r
- 1,
Tun. "Many Riven To Cros'

FARAISO :1 ; SUvana Mangano In "MAMBO"

1 1. 1. uini-.H no.flA.y' and
"LADY IN THE IRON MASK"

CAMP BIERD gJ3

.0 AlHll LAD1J
"DRUMBEAT"

BY MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE
"WITHIN the last six weeks,"
writes the mother, "our 11-year-old
girl's best friend has taken up

with a youngster who has just

moved into our neighborhood

Where she was in and out of our
house all the time, Carol has to

bee her to come over now. When

she does come, she leaves Carol
so mopey nobody can get a word
out of her. How can we. make our
child 'understand how foolish she

is to let everyone see how hurt
she is?"
Not hurt, I think. Just angry.
If Carol's mother has been tel

ling her she's "hurt," it might be
well to change the word to "an "angry."
gry." "angry." Because by calling what the
girl feels "hurt," we convey a cer certain
tain certain Nice Nellie recoil from the

hot, ugly, aggressive emotion al almost
most almost inevitable in this situation.

YET it may be the admission of
anger that can free her from this
nbiectionable dependence on her

friend. . . . ..
-Carol's": aneer. fully felt, can

burn ud her unrealistic hopes of

the other girl. In the heat of it, her
belief in her friend as The Perfect
One will have to crack and with
it, the expectation that this rela relationship
tionship relationship is all she needs.

Out of her fully felt anger will;

FREEZE MILK AND CREAM

MILWAUKEE UPU- A mm.

bination electric meat erinder-icpi

crushpr nnw ininc th ir.no lie f: KT.W Vnrtk' t'Pl WnmS"

labor-savers for the horn Thp. freezer exoerts sav. that homocci-

ffpinflAK ... ; M ..:....n.. ; j : 1 1- i Ann k.

type of food and can be purchased i successfully for one month. To

without the crusher attachment iflthaw. place the cartons in the food

desired. The crusher produces nine I compartment of the refrigerator

sizes of ice. from chunks to chips. I overnight, or immerse in cold wa

(John Oster Mfg. Co., Milwaukee), ter several hours. ;

come the realization that she can

no longer rely on this other girl's

energies to give her companion

ship but must look to her own.

Gradually, the anger will cool

Into solid conviction and then

quite suddenly, our mopey child
will start fizzing social ideas so
fast we won't be able to keep up

witn ner.

nut 11 we allow the anger we

squeamishly call "hurt" to con

tinue unadmitted and unfelt, the

mopmess may continue, too.

INSTEAD of lavishing great

sympathy on it, let's help Carol ex express
press express her anger in direct accusa accusation
tion accusation of her friend instead of mr mr-tryrdom
tryrdom mr-tryrdom of herself.
Anger always has to accuse. If,
like Carol, we are dependent on
someone else's "niceness" to us,
it's very hard to accuse him direc directly
tly directly when he angers us. We don't
want to risk any situation that
would leave us alone without his
support. And we don't want to try
to soothe our anger into believing
it's just "hurt."
I's not soothed. Denied direct
accusation, it starts working on
the indirect kind. It gets us to turn
ourselves into pitiable objects.
Somehow, were going to get that
label "brute" on him, even if we
wreck ourselves to do U.

ill!
jp Row fresh 1

c

I V5

SsS.

mis

: are even fresher

Did you ever see anything to fresh?
r Yes... KOOL cigarettes! Even
when you, have a bad cold, KOOLS
' are wonderful. The cool, lightly

mentholated tobaccos are to pleasant
and soothing to the throat and
mouth. And if you're feeling fine,
you'll feci better when you light
up a KOOL. Enjoy that sensation
of pleasant coolness, enhanced
, by the, cork tip which never gets
. damp nor sticks to your lips.

f -4

Switch from.

'Hota' to

USGDl

1

i (OOt laSS.

iiflCI WW

O. 'm -:. ':-a.

!"5

21 modern "Santa" ships uniting the the-Americas
Americas the-Americas with fast and frequent
... service. ;

WEEKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK"
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
S.S. "SANTA ISABEL' Due Cristobal, C. T., Feb. 15
S.S. "SANTA LUISAV ".Due Cristobal, C. Z., Feb. 22

WEEKLY SERVICE FR0A THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW Y"RK

s.s.
S.3.

"SANTA CECILIA"
"SANTA INES"

.Sails Cristobal, C. Z., Feb. 14
.Sails Cristobal, C. Z Ftb, 15

FROM U. S. PACIFIC & WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA
TO BALBOA AND CRISTOBAL C. Z.
S.S. "SANTA CRUZ" Due Balboa. C. Z.. Feb. 23
S.S. "SANTA FE" ..Due Balboa, C. Z., March 19
FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z. TO THE
WEST COAST CENTRAL AMFRICA & U. S. PACIFIC'
S.S. "SANTA CRUZ" .Sails Cristobal, C. Z March 3
Balbua Only
PANAMA AGENCIES CO.

"
I

CRISTOBAL: 2131-2135 PANAMA: 2-0556-BALBOA:
1501-2159

0557

0&f

Feel freer,

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- J
naturally...
FIGURAMA bra
For the lift of your life, try Figurama
-Bra, the only bra 'with "the" tented"'
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use of bones or steels!
( t Be fitted to Figurama today. .you'll love 4
its comfort and smartness!

T.M.

No. 1 VIA ESPAflA
PANAMA



I AC I EN

TITS FAX .MA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
sicndat, rrrr.uAnT u, i::s
o
iff irnim
to
ariuaiii series
n -
"-- Cr -l.

Panama, Venezuela Wins
Woulil Produce Deadlock

; By J. J. HARRISON JR.
.Panama's Humberto Robinson, the skinny right righthander
hander righthander who pitched Chesterfield to the Panama Pro
League championship last Friday in the playoff
game with Spur Cola, has been assigned to start on
the mound against Cuba tonight as the teams of the
eighth Caribbean Series begin their second and final
round.
Panama and Cuba will meet in the second game,
Venezuela and Puerto Rico in the first.
Last night Puerto Rico defeated Cuba 7 to 4 to
move into a tie with the losers for first place, and
Panama edged Venezuela 2 to 1 in an 11-inning thril thriller
ler thriller to become deadlocked with Venezuela for second
spot in the standings. The victory was Panama's first
in this series.
Saturday night Cuba beat Venezuela 9 to 5, and
Puerto Rico was a 5 to 3 winner over Panama.

Humberto will go against Rene
,3r.,,. d Venezuela's Eml-
110 Cueche will face Tom La Sor-
da of Puerto Rico.
Robinson has beaten Cuba
twice In Caribbean Ser'es play.
He triumphed ever the Hava Havana
na Havana team in 1953 and Ahnenda Ahnenda-res
res Ahnenda-res tn 1955. t
An interesting situation could
exist Jn the series standings to tonight.
night. tonight. ift.er the ames are over.
If Venezuela beats Puerto Rico
and Panama wins over wwa.
the teams would be locked. In a
four-way tie with two wins and
two losses eacn.
Cuba tasted defeat for the
first time in the series last
night as Puerto Rico's Taylor
Phillips hurled a seven-hitter
in the 7-to-4 win.
Loser Sandallo Consuegra
started on ,the mound and
lasted four and one-third In Innings
nings Innings as he gave up seven hits
and three runs. He was follow followed
ed followed to the hill by Ed Morehead,
Marino Pieretti and Gene
Rrarden.
Consnegrat who pitches for,
the Chicago White Sox, suffered
an iniurv on the left ear In the
f nin th innlncr when he attempt
ed to field a hard grounder off
the hat of first baseman Lou
irnnsueira: tell to' the "ground
ahd rolled lh-tfn after lunging
at the ball which raised ana mi
him. He was examma py ur.
Umoteo Suescum who recom recommended
mended recommended that he leave the game.
The righthander insisted on
continuing, however, and was
vnkH in the fifth with two
runners In scoring position, and
one out i
Cuba took a one-run lead In
t.ftn first on a two-battaer by
Curt Roberts, Bob Boyd's Infield,
out and a long fly to rigni Dy
CSilco Fernandez.
Ramon Maldonada's homer
tied up the score in the second
ahd Puerto Rico took a 2-to-l
lead in the third on Vic Power's
Felix Mantilla's theft of home
In the fifth brought in Puerto
Rico's third run to ,makc the
score 3 to 1. Here's how it hap.
pened. r -'
With Consuegra still on the
mound Mantilla was safe on
Fernandez' error." Chuck Har
mon bunted safely and Power
advanced the runners pitcher to
first. Morehead took over on tne
hill and retired Wes Covington
third to first.
I With- Maldonado at bat Man Mantilla
tilla Mantilla raced down the third base
line and slid in before More
head and catcher Son Noble
knew, what was happening.
The play was not even close.
Harmon completed the double
steal by getting easily into
third.
A passed ball In the seventh
aided Cuba in picking up a run
and made the score a tight 3 to
2,' but Llmmer's bases loaded
,

EIGHTH CARIBBEAN SERIES

V'J rA
Teams-
Cuba. s . ;
Puerto Rico
Panama.
Venezuela..

- : TONIGHT'S GAMES
Venezuela' (Cueche 0-1) vs. Pto. Rico (La Sorda 0-0)
Panama (Robinson 0-0) vs. Cuba (Gutierrez' 0-0)
Game Time: 6 o'clock
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
: ; Puerto Rico 7, Cuba 4
7i'Panania2rVcncziicl,rl(ll'tnning'5r) :
SATURDAY NIGHT'S RESULTS
, Cuba 9, Venezuela 5; Puerto, llico 5, Panama 3

double In the eighth and aSin-i
tie by Ray Cash while he was

being walked 1 n t entionally,
brought in four more markers
for Puerto Rico and gave Phil
lips a 7-to-2 cushion.
Home runs in the top of the
ninth by Ultus Alvarez and Milt
Smith after two were out kept
Cuba's hopes alive but Jorge Lo
pez. batting for Bearden fUd
out to center to endthe game.
A long homer by Billy Stew Stewart
art Stewart on a pitch delivered by Jim
Pearce in the 11th inning gave
Panama her 2-to-l win.
Don Elston, who played a big
part in Chesterfield's terrific
stretch drive in winning the
championship was the winning
pitcher. Elston took over from
starter Jim Davie in the fifth
with the score deadlocked 1-1,
and masterfully held the los losers
ers losers scoreless the rest of the
way. Pearce went the distance
to suffer the loss.
Hector Lopez' long drive over,
tne center neia rence m me,
third gave Panama her first run
Davie pitched himself out of
several Jams for the first tnree
innings, but in the fourth he
lost control and walked Pearce
with the bases loaded 'and It was
a tled-upj bay. j$mei ly,
Elston took over In the fifth
after Davie had walked the first
batter Howard Phillips. The par partisan
tisan partisan crowd had some anxious
moments on several occasions as
long drives off Venezuela's bats
sent Panama's outfielders back
to the fences to haul them down.
In Panama's half of the 11th
Manito Bernard was out third
to first and Ellas Osorio f lied
to left. Then Stewart hit his
big blow and the stands rocked
with the thunderous applause.
In the lower half of the 11th
the fans held their breath a.
Carlos Castillo hitting for short shortstop
stop shortstop Jesus Mora led off with a
single to right.' Pierce bunted
into Elston's glove as he at-
ted to sacrifice and there
was one away.
Ello Chacon then hit into a
short-to-second-to-first game
ending doubleplay and even the
staid old ladles in the VIP pa pa-villiort
villiort pa-villiort joined the ie3s dignified
fans in whooping it up.
Panama had won for the
first time in the series and
you could not tell a fan today
that with Robinson on the
mound .it would not be two
straight tonight.
Ellas Osorio, who has been
shaky afield since the s;ries be began,
gan, began, made one harmless error
last night but was spectacular
around th first bass sack. Ber
nard and Lopez also were bril
liant in executing some rallv
killing plays,
;

Won Lost Pet.. GB
2 1 .667
. 2 1 .667
. .. 1 2 .333 1
, . 1 2 .333 1
o

Ciib:n Capers
SATURDAY'S GAMES
FIRST GAME

Venezuela
Ab R II Po A
E. Chacon, cf .... 5 0
1
0
0
2
2
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
U
Phillips, 2b 4 0
Brown, lb .......5 0
Bailey, c ......... 4 2
Downs, II ....... 4 1
Monasteries, 3b ..4 1
P. Chacon, rf .... 2 0
Martinez, rf 2 1
Mora, ss .. 4 0
Cueche, p ........ 0 0
Ladera, p ........ 2 0
Castillo .......... 1 0
Cirimele, p ...... 0 0
Garcia 0 0
Totals:
37 5 9 24 13
Cuba
Roberts, 2b
3
3
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
!)
3
6
3
2
4
0
0
Fernandez, ss
Boyd, lb
Wilson, If ...
Noble, c
Alvarez, cf ..
Smith, 3b ...
Vistuer, rf ...
Ramos, p . .
Gutierrez, p
Total's
Castillo
in 8th.
35
out
9 13 27 8
for Ladcra
rolled
Garcia hit sacrifice fly for
Clrimeie in 9th.
Venezuela
Cuba
010 000 0045 9
240 000 21x 9 13
SUMMARY RBI's: E- Cha Chacon,
con, Chacon, Downs, Martinez, Garcia
Roberts, Boyd 3, Wilson 3, Vis Vistuer.
tuer. Vistuer. Errors: P. Chacon, Vistuer.
Mora, Boyd. Two base hits:
Downs, Bailey, E. Chacon. Three
base hits: Wilson Home runs:
vistuer. Doubleolays: Mora,
Phillips, Brown 2. Ladera, Phil
lips, Brown, iiarnea runs: vec
zuela 2. Cuba. 6. Sacrifice fly:
Garcia. Struck out by: Ramos 6,
by Ladera 4. Base on balls on:
Ramos 1, Ladera 3. Lett on base:
Venezuela 7, Cuba 5." pitchers'
record: Cueche 2 runs, 2 hits
(none out in first Inning). La Ladera,
dera, Ladera, 6 runs, 8 hits In 7 innings.
Cirimele 1 run.
1 nit in 1 mrung.
Ramos 5 runs. 9 hits in 8 23 in
nines. Gutierrez. 0 runs. 0 nits in
i 3 of mnine. Winning pitcher:
Ramos. (1-0). Losing pitcner
Cueche (0-1). Umpires: Thorn Thornton,
ton, Thornton, Guglielmo, Maestri and Oli Olivo.
vo. Olivo. Time of game: 2:01.
u Pobre Pansmaii
SECOND GAME
Panama Ab R H Po
Bernard. 2b 4 2 2 4
E. Osorio, lb ...
4
Lopez, 3b .....
Schell, If ......
Stewart, cf ....
Queen, c
Prescott, rf .
3
2
1
0
Ilouradeau, ss .
Burnette, p . ...
Roberts
Grimsley, p ....
Totals
Roberts rolled
nette in eighth.
34 3 7 24 7
out for Bur
Puerto Rico

'Mantilla, ss ...... 4 0 0 1
iHarmon, cf ...... 4 0 0 4
I Power, 3b 4 .0 .1 1
Covington, rf .... 3 112
Maldonado, If ... 4 2 1 3
Limmer, lb 4 2 3 11
Spencer, 2b ..... 2 0 12
Cash, c 3 0 0 3
Olivo, p ......... 3 0 1 0

Totals
31 5 8 27 9
Panama
100 000 0203
Puerto Rico 000 203 OOx 5
SUMMARY RBI's: Lopez
Limmer 4, Osorio 2. Errors:
Spencer, Osorio, Bernard. Earn Earned
ed Earned runs: Panama 3, Puerto Rico
3. Two base hits: Bernard, Lim Limmer,
mer, Limmer, Spencer. Home runs: Lim Limmer,
mer, Limmer, Osorio, Doubleplays: Pow Power,
er, Power, Limmer; Osorio, Bernard
Stolen base: Lopez. Hit batter:
Burnette .Covington). Struck
out by Burnette 3, Olivo 2. Bases
on "balls off Burnette l: Left on
base: Panama 4, Puerto Rico 4.
Pitchers' record: Burnette 5
runs, 7 hits in 7 innings. Win Winning
ning Winning pitcher:. Olivo (1-0). Losing
pitcher: Burnette (0-1). Um Umpires:
pires: Umpires: olivo, Maestri. Guglielmo,
Thornton. Time of game: 1:53.
In The
Letter Box
The Sports Editor:
Open letter to the Spur Cola
Baseball club and especially to
Mr. II. Lopez.
I have been a Spur Cola fan
for a long time but after the
Feb. 8 Incident I was glad to see
that the championship went to
the Chesterfield Club.
The majority of players show
little or no sportsmansnip and
none of you have any right to
strike an umpire, right or wrong.
and you Mr. Lopez the big
leaguer, should know better than
that. I hope Mr. Find! has taken
or will take action regarding
tnis-tnatWf
You are mv favorite cliih'hiit
I still like sportsmanship.
. . --
Hot Base Ball Fan

DOUBLE RECORD HOLDER Ida Straus, a Balboa High
School senior and winner of the 1954 Grieser Outstanding Girl
Swimming Award, is the holder of the 880 yd. free style record
and women's 100 yd. backstroke record, Ida will have plenty
of competition in the forthcoming swim meet at Gamboa when
she meets Grace Argo and Daniel Harned in the 100 yd. hack hack-stroke.
stroke. hack-stroke. Both girls will be trying to upset Ida in this event so
it should be an interesting race to watch. ..

;iVIUddQUClJ MM 1113

Car n iy al C la ss i c

The Stud Miura's diminutive
but classy and stout hearted
Mossadeq yesterday added an
other feature victory to his im impressive
pressive impressive string by coppinjr the
$2,000 added one mile and five five-sixteenths
sixteenths five-sixteenths Carnival Classic for
imported four-year-olds yester yesterday
day yesterday attemoon at the Juan Fran Franco
co Franco race track.
The classic field was cut to
only four starters because of
early scratches. Two of the
four Mossadeq and Iguazu
went off as the Luis H. Farru Farru-gia
gia Farru-gia trained entry, And the en entry
try entry amply justified their role
as odds-on mutuels favorites.
Iguazu trailed Mossadeq home
to grab place money. Charlie
McCarthy was third and Sale Sale-ro,
ro, Sale-ro, the second choice, wound
up a bad last, '" f ;
Salero (See'undo Carvajal)
shot to the front at the break
and cut out a brisk pace with
Mossadeq going in closest pur-j
suit. The slow starting iguazu
raced third while Charlie Mc
Carthy trailed as his rider kept
him under stout restrains.
Midway down the backstretch
the second time arouna, Mossa
deq moved to Salero, flashed by
him and opened a winning lead.
Mossadeq widened his margin to
a full five lengths turning into
the homestretch. At this Junc
ture, stablemate Iguazu ana
Charlie McCarthy came on rap rapidly
idly rapidly and gained fast on the lead
er, iguazu made a wide turn in into
to into the stretch, losing precious
lengths while Charlie McCarthy
stuck to the center of the strip.
Jockey King Flores shook up
his mount sufficiently to keep
his mind on the business at
hand and he went over, the
finish line fully two and one
half lengths in front of Igua- i
th'rd, only one length further
back and Salero, completely
spent, staggered in ten lengths
behind Charlie McCarthy.
The entry returned $3.20.;
There was no place or show bet betting
ting betting Form prevailed In the majori majority
ty majority of the eleven races but the
Schedule Makes
Slight Favorite
ATLANTA. Feb. 13 rtnM Thp
aoutneastern Conierence basket basketball
ball basketball season is drawing rapidly to
a ciose witn mree teams in a dog dogfight
fight dogfight for first place but the sched
ule has made Alabama a slight
favorite to grab top laurels for
tne first time in 15 years.
ine crimson Tide currently
ranks No. 1 in the SEC with seven
wins and no defeats. Vanderbilt
and Kentucky are both on Ala Alabama's
bama's Alabama's heels with identical 8-1
records.
But the Tide Winds un the last
half of the season with only one
crucial came among six conference
foes. That contest pits Alabama
against the Wildcats while three
of the other five foes are in the
biAs second division.
Kentucky has five more confer conference
ence conference games, includine the one with
Alabama. Coach Adolph Rupp's
quintet must also meet Vanderbilt
lor a second time and the Wild Wildcats
cats Wildcats suffered their onlv lnss t the
hands of the Commodores.
t Vanderbilf'i "big" game will
be with the Wildcats who will be
gunning for revenge and at this
ttige. The Commodores cannot
afford one more lost.
But there's another dark cloud
on the horizon for both Alahama
nri Vamlerhilt. Earh
tf-,,TTT 1 .,--
v V.1'. :v,s. Auourn,., wnicn
rariKS
just behind the ton th tpc
wim a a-.i marie.
Alabama defeated the Tims In
an earlier meeting, 86-77, but Ken

I I

moonshooterj had their innings
too. Native sprinter Miss Marta
put over a 575.80 upset victory in
the third race and counted with
Apache for a one-two combina.
tlon that paid $208. Other Juicy
winners were Money Maker
($29.40), Polemon ($16) and
Falrlyable ($19.60). ,
Apprentice rider Felipe Godoy
was the only rider to score more
man once., He crossed the fin
ish line first aboard Tilln Tilin
ana Fiion.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Old Smuggler $3.40, 2.40.
2 Cascador $2.40.
SECOND RACE
1 Malaga $8.20, 2.40, 2.40.
2 Golden Corn II $2.40, 2.40.
3 Panzaretta $2.60.
' Double; $23.80.
THIRD RACE
1 Miss Marta $75.80, 22.80, i. 40.
2 Apache $4.60, 2.80.
3 Golden Fun $2.80.
One-Two: $208.
FOURTH RACE
1 Tilln Tilin $8.20, 3.80, 4.
2 Volador $8, 4.
3 Don Popo $13.20.
Quiniela: $36.8.
FIFTH RACE
1 Mossadeq (e) $3.20.
SIXTH RACE
1 Money Maker $29.40, 6.20, 6.2a
z young prince $8.80, 7.20.
3 Oro Purlto $2.40.
SEVENTH RACE
1 Dona. Beatriz $7.40, 5.20, 3.80.
iuon uoyo $6.20, 4. -3
Ocean Star $8.40.
- Double: $113.80.
EIGHTH RACE
1 Fllon $8.60, 3.60, 3.
2 Conquistador $7.40, 4.40.
3 Cara de Sapo $5.60.
NINTH RACE
1 Elko $4.20, 3.80. 5.40.'
2 Florera $12.40. 4.80.
3 Pugilist $9.
one;Two: $52.40.
TENTH RACE
1 Polemon $16. 8.60. 3.80.
2 Albatross $7.40, 4.80. ."
3 Blakemere $2.60.
ELEVENTH RACE
1 Falrlyable $19.60. 5.20 4.40.
2- Tlger's Teeth $2.40, 2.20.
3 Charming Prince $2.60.
Crimson Tide
In SEC Race
tucky managed to squeeze out a
win by only one point, 82-81. Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt and Auburn did not meet
previously.
ffhe Crimson Tide has not grab grabbed
bed grabbed the unofficial crown since the
1939-40 season. Kentucky has been
in virtual command ever since.
The Tide, which seldom scores
less than 90 points a game, dis displayed
played displayed its usual scoring punch Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night in whipping Georgia
94-69 with center Jerry Harper hit hitting
ting hitting 34 points to pace the atttack.
Alabama held only a 42-40 half half-time
time half-time edge but surged back strong
in the second half and one point
late in the game whipped in 10
straight points to run their lead
from 10 to 20 points.
. Kentucky toyed with the Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi Rebels, holding them to one
field goal and four free throws
during the' first 10 minutes of the
second half, and emerged an 8 8-49
49 8-49 victor, Center Bob Burrow led
the Wildcats with 30 points.
At Nashville, Tenn., infuriated
Vanderbilt which saw its unbeaten
streak ended by Alabsma earlier
last week ran up its highest point
total in school hlntory by tram trampling
pling trampling Louisiana State 107 68.
The Commodores, tremendous
rebounding was a major factor in
the runaway contest as they grab grabbed
bed grabbed 82 another school rword.
Guard A! Kw.UV.n VASbrArxtW
with 24 points while LRU forward
Roger Kk'M-t, the RKC'i li's-img
scorer, hit 23,
Auburn and fUtU fcffM f

! Pu:rb Rlccn Pzrly

FIRST GAME,
Cuba Ab It II Po A
Roberts. 2b ...... 4 12 3 2
Boyd,
lb ......... 4 0 0 8
d?..M..::: J 5 1
. C 4 1 2 4
Fernandez,
Wilson,
Noble
Alvarez, cf- ...... 4112 0
Smith, 3b ....... 3
Cardenal, rf ..... 4
2
0
0
0
a
o
o
e
Consuegra, p ..... 2
Morehead, p ..... 0-
Tapanes 1
Pieretti, p ........ 0
Bearden, p ...... 0
Lopez, I-
Totals
34 4
Puerto Rico
7 24
Mantilla, ss ..... 5 1
Harmon, cf 4 0
Power, 3b ....... 3 1
Covington, rf .... 4 1
0
6
0
3
0
10
1
7
0
Maldonado, If ... 3 2
Limmer, lb ...... 4 1
Spencer, 2b ..... 4 1
Cash, c .......... 3 0
Phillips, p 3 0
Totals
Cuba
33 7 11 27 10
100 000 1024 7 11
Puerto Rico 011 010 04x 7 ll' 0
SUMMARY RBI's: Alvarez,
Smith, power, Maldonado, Spen Spencer,
cer, Spencer, Cash 2. Errors: Fernandez.
Two base hits: Roberts, Spencer,
Covington. Home runs: Maldo Maldonado,
nado, Maldonado, power, Alvarez, Smith.
Double plays: Fernandez, Rob-j
erts, Boyd. Earned runs: Cuba,
i Puerto Rico 6. Sacrifice hits:
rnnndest. Power. Phillips
Hit
t... Mini.. CmlfH virilH

plkh: PhUUp. Struck Vout byTlmonte. Abbey 115, PikevUle
Mnreheati 9 Pihl I (Ay.) 8'

Consueera,2. Morehead 2, Pihl
Hps 7. Base on balls off: Consue-
gra 1, pieretti l. -wn on dec
Cuba 5, Puerto Rico 6. Stolen
bases: Roberts, Alvarez, Manti Mantilla,
lla, Mantilla, Harmon, pitchers' record:
Consuegra 3 runs 7 hits in 4 13
innings. Morehead 0 runs 0 hits
in 23 innings, pieretti runs
hits in 1 13 innings, Bearden
rum n hits in 23 innings. Win
ning pitcher: Phillips (1-0). Los Losing
ing Losing pitcher: Consuegra (0-1).
Umpires: Thornton, Olivo, Maes Maestri,
tri, Maestri, Guglielmo. Time of game:
2:15; I
Viva Pcnama!
SECOND GAME
Panama'
Bfcfnard, ss
Ab R H Po A
5 0 113
E. OSOriO, lbr ii.ii
Ste'wart, cf
Lopez, 2b ......i.
Schell, If ........
1
2
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
Parris, 3b ........
Prescott, rf .....
Queen, c
1
4
1
4
Davie, p
Elston, p 2
Totals
40 i 7 33 12
Venezuela
E. Chacon, cf .... 4
0 .2 ,0
12 2
0 14 0
1 fl 1
110
Phillips, 2b ...... 3
Brown, lb 4
Baliey.c 5
Downs, If ....... 5
Monasterios, 3b '.. 4
p. Chacon, rf .... 4
Martinez, rf ..... 1
Mora, ss .... 3
Castillo .......... 1
1
2
0
2
0
0
Pearce, p 4 0
Totals
Castillo
11th.
38 1 7 33 14
singled for Mora In
ranama uiu uuu uuu ui
Venezuela 000 100 000 001
..
T
7
RBI's: Lopez. Pearce, Mora
Stewart. Errors: E. Osorio. Two
base hits: Phillips, Mora. Home
runs: LoDez. Stewart. Double-
plays: Osorio, Bernard; Bernard,
Lopez, Osorio. Earned runs,
Panama 2. Venezuela 1. Sacri Sacrifice
fice Sacrifice hits: Brown. Struck out by:
Davie 2. Elston 2, Pearce 9. Base
on balls off: Davie 5, Elston 2.
Left on base: Panama 5, Vene
zuela 12. Pitchers record: Davie
1 run, 3 hits in 4 innings (pitch
ed to one batter In 5th). Win-
nine Ditcher: Elston (1-0). Los
ing pitcher: Pearce (0-1). Um
pires: .Maestri,,Gugllelmo, Olivo,
Tnornton. Time of game: 2:37.
nd tuek In the first half, then
the Tigers went ahead to stay
and wound up on top 77-73. Tiger
center Bill McCrlff was high for
the night with 30 points.
Mississippi State also rebound rebounded
ed rebounded in the second half after a 33-33
halftime tie and pulled away from
Tennessee for a 75-58 decision. Jim
Ashmore's 28 points led the win winners.
ners. winners. In the bfa thriller of the tight.
guard Joe Helms dropped in two
foul shots in the closing seconds
to give Georgia Tech a 79-77 win
over Tulane, The Engineers had
trailed until the last two minutes
of the game. The Greenioa were
hurt near the end of the game by
the loss of high scoring Stan
Stumpf who had hit 27 points, on
fouls.
STANDINGS
CONPERENCI GAMES
Wt
7 0
Pet,
10M
,89
,K!)
.625
,500
,400
,375
Alabama
Vanderbilt
Kentucky
Aiihurn
Georgia Tech
Mm, tlat
Tulsng
Tnn8ee
-9 --7!
3 5 ,375
Florida
Mlijiilkhippl

f

1

Editor: CONRADO SARCEANT

0 Ai
1 College Lage scores
2 v -

SATURDAY NIGHT)
SOUTH
J Miami 94, Tampa 74
JJ Vanderbut 107, Louisiana State 68
JJ North Carolina 83, Virginia 73
0 Richmond 103, Villanova 73
Wake Forest 80. Duke J7
1Q No. Caro. State 95; SO. Carolina 68
x Mississippi State 75, Tennessee 58
W. Virginia 84, Virginia Tech 62
ueorgia Tecft 79, Tulane 77
5 Kentucky 88, Mississippi 49
0 Alabama 94, Georgia 69
2 Louisville 76: Marquette 65
0 Marylane 67, George Washington
0 4ti
0 Notre Dame 70, Navy 63
2 Wash. & Lee 99, The Citadel 67
1 Murray (Ky.) 74, West. Kentucky
0 70
Aiempnis aiate ab, lenn. lecn n
East. Ky. 80, Loyola New Orleans)
69
Auburn 77, Florida 73
Will. & Mary 89, Virginia Military
78
Carson-Newman-78, Emory and
Henry 76
Norfolk Wm. Mary 95, Va. Me Medical
dical Medical 69
Davison 90 Col. of Charleston (S. (S.-S.)
S.) (S.-S.) 86
Lenoir Ryne 106, Catawba 82
Benedict (S.C.) Fort Valley (G a.)
48' :!.
Presbvterian 78. Wofford 74
No. Caro. Co. 68, No. Carolina A
&T 44
Western Carolina 79, Guilford 72
Winston-Salem (NC.C) 81 snaw
(N.C.) 72
Howard (D.C.) 87, Virginia State
85
Tenn. Wes. 85, Maryville (Tenn.)
63
Berea 87, Bellarmine 82
Jackson College 83, Kentucy State
64
0, centre 81, Union (Ky.) 78
Kv. Weslevan 98. Evansville 79
Transylvania 78, Villa Madona 59
Newport News 87, Richmond Pro
86
Frostburg (Md.) 87, D. C. Tchrs,
7
Tennessee Frosh 72, King Tenn.)
66
Knoxville 79, Florida A k M 78
fifinreia Tchrs. 121. Mercer 94
Jax (Ala.) State 86, Chattanooga
63 .
K.nst Tpnn State 78. Milllgan 67
Troy (Ala.) State 61, Flas Southern
i '59 .' ..
S Tnwsnn ( Md.) '58. Lynchburg 54
0 Lincoln Memorial 54, Tusculum 49
2 Westchester (Pa.) 92, Wasn, iflia.)
01 80
0 Lipscomb 79, Birmingham South,
nl 18
u ....... n.
Sewance el, oouuiwesiern vxcuu.;
86 ;
Western Md. 72, Johns Hopkins 63
Mt. St. Mary's 90 Baltimore Univ.
Baltimore Loyola 89, Spring Hill
74
Southeastern La. 96, La. College
90
Florence St. (Ala.) 79. Howard
fAla AH
Bethel (Tenn.) 89, Christian Broth-
pt 73
McNeese 94, Norheast (La.) 62.
Ifipntfinarv 103. Austin (Tex.) 71
Austin Peay 87, union uenn.; o
American Univ. 71, aoanoKe w
EAST
Darmouth 83, Holy Cross 67
Niagara 73, St. John (Bkn.) 64
Yale 72, Cornell 60 ;
Columbia 87, Harvard 61
Pennsylvania 79, Penn State 72
Brown 82", Princeton 79
St. Joseph's (Pa.) 84, Furman 82
Syracuse 77, Colgate 70
Pitt 77, Army 67
Seton Hall 75, Loyola (Cicago)
Fordham 69, Georgetown (D.C.)
68 ;
Manhattan 87, Canisius 85
Colby 98, Connecticut 93
Springfield 64, Boston College. 59
Providence 69, Boston Univ. 65
Rhode Island 104, New Hampshire
Willimantic (Conn.) 83, No. Adams
. i. .- :..
Potsdam 76, Danbury St. (Conn.)
71
Philadelphia Textile 91, Lowell
Tech.
Bowdoin 59. Tufts 55 4 ,
Drexel 66, Haverford 54
Ithaca 77, Hamilton 54 -Thiol
68, Fredonia XN.Y.) 61
Wagner 84, Brooklyn Poly 68
Alfred 65, Union (N.V.) 60
Panzer 133, Hillyer 100
Trenton Tchrs. 72, Drew 69
Rochester Univ. 61, Oberhn 51
St. Peters 68, Assumption (Mass.)
65
Amherst 99, Wesleyan 55
Hobart 71, Allegheny 63
Hofstra 92, Cortland 73 -.
Siena 77, Lawrence Tech 68
Bates 85, Trinity (Conn.) 67
Yeshiva 68, Adelphia 67
MIT 64, Stevens Tech 58
St. Anselm's (N.H.) 74, Mer
rimack 46
Middlcbury 70, Vermont 55
UfAtut.. AA lfnnvnn AO
Northeasten 81. Worcester Tech
72
New Brit.- (Conn.)'- 79, Gorham
Tchrs, 68 -Juniata
84. Dickinson (Pa.) 74
Lock lUven 90, Indiana (fa.) 81
Lchlflh 91. Gettysburg 75
Lebanon Valley 70, Moravian 78
Muhlenberg 87, Albright 84
Cheney (I'a.) 77, Kltztown fifl
Kdinhoro 70, California li a.j es
Hueknell 91. Delaware 82
Lafayette 110,. Rutgers 63
Wah, Jeff, 86, MuHklngum 76
Went Va, We, 88 Bethany (W.Va.)
(il
Mlllenvllie (Pa.) 76, DttvU-Elklnu
-f
Aliieron Broaddus 110j Concord 8!l

2 i ,2:!0l(.inev 71. Carneulu Toch 70

1 6 ,H.hrnmkiH at MamtiicliuttttU. PjkI,,
1 7 .15 storm,

V

)
MIDWEST
Cincinnati 119,
113
Morehead (Ky.J
Dayton 76, St Francis (Pa.) 41
Illinois 111, Ohio State 64
Indiana 97, Michigan 73
Iowa 70, Northwestern 65
Kansas 89, Nebraska 56
Minnesota 77, Wisconsin 71 i
Iowa State 88, Missouri 85
Wichita 86, Bradley 59
Houston 67, St. Louis 66
Tulsa 61, Detroit 55
Western Mich. 84, Miami (Ohio) 71
Kalamazoo 70, Albion 59
Hope 86, Alma 69
Mount Union 69, Marietta 60
Rln firanrin trhin 111
ESiten. Iinois 109, Cent- Michigan
84
Heidelberg- 75, Lockbourne. -'AFB
70
Wash. (St, Louis) 68, Regis (Colo)
Wayne (Neb.) 78, Omaha 76
Pittsburgh (Kan.) 78, Omaha 78
Western Reserve 88,: Fenn (Ohio)
Ashland 90, Wilmington 83
Earlham 76, Franklin 74
Anderson 86, Hanover 61
Manchester 82s Taylor 77
Valparaiso 72, Ball State 67
Butler 87, Indiana State 73
nanume bu, Mmnesota Duluth 63
Jamestown (N.p.) 84, Bottineau
62
Gen. B'e T'rs. 77 S'ux F'lls (S.D.)
South Dakota 73. Iowa
worth Dakota 60 Augustana (S.D.)
46
Millikin 109, Lake Forest 77
St. Olaf 73, Monmouth 61 r
Knox 94, Carleton 62
Wheaton 98, Normtern Illinois 68
Western. UL 108, Illinois Normal
No. Cent. Illinois 86, Augustana 77
vfumcy iv Illinois wesleyan 71
Upper Iowa 103, Buena Vista 81
Parsons 88. Luthern Hnw.v 71 ...
Superior (Wi.) 86, Oshkosh State
83-
Platteville 96. La Cross 79
Eau Claire (Wis.) 88, Whitewater
-:'80 .V
Milwaukee State 98, River Falls
(Wis.) 82
Coe 67, Ripon 57
Stevens Points 94, Stout 77
Beloit 95, Carroll (Wis.) 70
Detroit Tech 84, Aquinas 60
Wayne' (Mich.) 105, Case Tech 54
Okla. Baptist 66 Central. (Okla.) 59
Southeastern,- (Okla.) 82, North North-'
' North-' western 45
East Central Okla. U Phillips
Univ. 82
St. Benedict' (Kan.) 7:Ft.' Hiyi
St. 61 1 -
Rockhurst 91; Loras 85'
Kansas Wesleyan 85 Ottawa (Kan)
60
Emporia St. : 99 Southwaitern
(Kan.) 60
William Jewell 87, Drury 57
Springfield (Mo) 92 .Maryvillt
(Mo.) 69
Central (Iowa) 81, Dubuque 63
Great Lakes Navy 95, Pensacola
Navy 90
SOUTHWEST
Rice 86, Arkansas 65
Texas 74, Texas Christian 67 4
Baylor 85, Texas A & M 66
Arizona 75, New Mexico A&M 71
Abiline Christian 91, Eastern N.M.
68
Miss Southern 71, Arkansas State
65
Ariz. State. (Flagstaff) 94 M.
Mil. 58 r
Howard Payne 84, McMurry 62
Texas .Western 97, Ariz. S tat
(Tempe) 84
FAR WEST
UCLA 81, Stanford 72
Washington 70, Oregon 81"'
Utah 82, Brigham Young 63
California 67, Idaho 58
Denver 81, New Mexico 61 v -.
Colorado 71, 1 Kansas State 53 ";'
So. California 85. Washington Stat
54 '
Colorado A&M 66, Wyoming Si
Seattle 69, Portland Univ. 62 1
Colorado State 80, Colorado 'Col 'College
lege 'College 63
Nevada 68, Humboldt State 57
San Francisco State 60, Cal. Aggies
57
Williamette 59, Whitman 42 v
Pacific Univ. 64, Lewis-uarK ez
Seattle Pacific 87 St. Martins
at- I V mt ,. . .. -j . .
Sacramento State 69, Chico State
61 ...
Montana State 69, Colorado Mines
89
Western Wash. 78, Eastern Wash.
62
Chapman 84, Pomona-Clare't 69
Series Pictures
On Page One



MONDAY, Ft'BEl'ARY n,.l?56

TH2 PANAMA AMIHICA.N AN lNDtrODENT DAILY NE1YSPAFEK
FACE E! M 1
I
f Jf I
LI IS
IQilCiffi
'0 g$ OSt0 Jlf H
Li ji Was"
if Vr win a'

O -L0

: .' tf u

UlfiAtovt .7602:37 ; UCLA, SMU

Only Solid

Loop Leaders

' N 'A

-J3 7Z -r-

ft

NEW YORK, Feb. 13 (UP) -Duke,
St. Louis, and Brieham

Young were jolted by the bieeest

upsets of the basketoall weekend,!
and the result today was that!
three more .conference races werei

scrambled for the stretch run.
Duke's 80-77 defeat by Wake
Forest threw the Atlantic Coast

;Uonierence. into a three-way tie:

wv. uvuid wi-vu luaa iu nuusion
boosted Houston into the Missouri
... .. ... Valley Conference lead by an eye-
'than th flcharman sniialiflp l ..

v"-" -,iasn; ana cnenara Younui 2-fi.i

rout by Utah left the two reams

awi! 41. nRY SEASON FISH

1NG TOtRNAMEN I me nsn.
I d. Gang hooks can be used.
1 This tournament, although; Tandum hooks may be used pro pro-sponsored
sponsored pro-sponsored by the Panama- Mar- vided they are separated by at

lin Club, IS open io au spui u"-h. w

in th runai zone anui e. a uiu&cu iuu

ne

tied for the top spot, in the Skyline

v-umerence.

races

ermen

the Republic of Panama.

2. Entrance fee for each per person
son person will be $5.00 and must be
paid not later than 8:00 p.m.
Friday, March 2. Entry fees will
be accepted by any of the club
officers or Tournament Commit Committee
tee Committee Members. For the conyen.
lence of entrants, a club officer
will be at the Balboa Yacht Club
between the hours of 6:00 p m.
and 8:00 p.m. Friday, March 2,
3. The fishing contest area will
vanatiia Rav. (Fishing from

the bank and docks permitted hi

catch.

4. Prizes for tne iouriiaics official tournament scales which
will be trophies or fishing gear. win be furnished by the Tourna.

5. Suggested rendezvous aie mcnt committee at Taboga Is-

That lust make thtco

disqualifies, typical of the entire national pic'

i lure ior only u.C.L.A. in the

racmc coast Conference a n d

i. A nooKea fish is aisquaiuieopouuiern Aieuioatst- in the South

if injured or mutilated by attack' wesi nave comfortable" leads

of another fish or injured by
propeller.
g. A fish which has been scal scaled,
ed, scaled, gutted, or in any other man manner
ner manner mutilated after being caught
is ineligible for entry.
h. To be eligible for a prize all
entries must be submitted on a
Panama Marlin Club Entry
Blank properly filled out by a
member, of the Board of Judges
i. All fish to be registered for

prizes must be weighed on the

will be Taboga Island.

6 The tournament will begin
at 6:00 a.m. Saturday, March 3
and end at 4:30 p.m. Sunday,
March 4. 1956."

7., prize distributions are
fnllnws

1st Largest Yellow Corblna, 10
per cent of allotted prize money.

2nd Largest xeuuw luiwh,

land and the Balboa Yacht Club

Pier,

J. Weighing time Is as follows:
Balboa Yacht Club Pier, Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday. March 3. from 4:00 to

aS6:00 p.m.

Taboga ancnorage, Boat Huia

from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m sr.turday.r,

iviu.li: ii

Utah'a romp evtr Bright m
Yung itft ch of thtit high high-powtrtd
powtrtd high-powtrtd squad with 4-2 Uagut
rtcord and makes thtir rtturn
match ntxt wttk. Fab. 24, at
probably tha "tall" on tha taa taa-ton.
ton. taa-ton. y--
, Things are very much the same
in almost every major conference:

maudiiiii is amy one-game up on
Vanderbilt and Kentucky in the
Southeastern Conference; George
Washington and West Virginia are
tied in the Southern; Illinois is one

game anead of Iowa in the Big
Ten; Columbia 1 v ahead of
Princeton in the Ivy; Kansas State
a half-gamt ahead of Iowa St. in
the Big Seven ; and Texas Tech
one game ahead of West Texas
St. in the Border.

But U.C.L.A. found itself with a

Perfect 80 mark and a fat two-

Pacific Coast

d 'nnrurunna 4Knl.A .-. i

caiuua. xaciu uhi:j riei, sun- swecD over Stanford. 50-4R snrt hi.

per cent of allotted Pre money. dayi March 4, from 4:00 to 6:00?i ?inrU,:i staS to lo
3rd Largest Yellow Coroma. J jPm Mike the two' meetines between
per cent of allotted prize money. k. A flsh not previously .u.C.L.A. and Southera California!
1st Largest Silver Coibma, JUi weighed for entry must be at the now in second place, on March 9-

per ceni oi juiuimju mv,. xaeni t;iuo rier uy :au p.m. io may decide the champion

onrt T.onrest. silver Corblna, 5

per cent of allotted prize money.
3rd Largest' Silver Corblna, 3
per cent of allotted prize money.
1st Largest Red Snapper, 10
per cent 6f allotted prize money.
onA I.arirest Red Snaoner, 5

per cent of allotted prize money.! der the age of 12 years, who d

3rd .Largest Ken njjpe a
per cent of allotted prize money.
. Largest Grouper cr Jewfish, 10
: per cent of allotted prize money.
2nd Largest Grouper or Jew-,
fish, 5 per cent of allotted prize
money.
Largest Snook, 3 oer cent of
allotted prize money.
Largest pompano, 5 per cent
of allotted prize money.
Largest Jack, 5 per cent of al allotted
lotted allotted prize money. -"
Largest Mackerel, 3 per cent
of allotted prize money.
Largest Other Spades, 5 ptr
cent of allotted prize money.
Largest fish caught by a worn.

an, 5 per cent or aiiouea prize
money. -
8. Tournament rules in gener general:
al: general: :
a. Tackle: All fish must be

Sunday. Thirty-seven points by Willie

INaulls led U.C.L.A, to its second
1. All persons going on a boat straight thriller over Stanford af af-with
with af-with tournament participants Iter a 68-68 tie in regulation time.

must be entered in th tourna tournament.
ment. tournament. The only exceptions are!

VlbW 111 V 111 WLl 13 (4L1U AlllUI 4. 14 U

caught pn rod and reel, line lim limit
it limit 80 lb. test, rod limit 18 oz. tip.

b. Reels: The use of two-band

not. fish.

m. The Panama Marlin' CluV
Board of Judges will Judge all
catches during this tournament,'

ana tneir decision win be imai.
n. No released fish will be
considered for any prize.
o. All participants must be reg registered
istered registered and entry fee paid by
8:00 p.m. Friday, March 2.
9. Beam scales must be used
for Annual contest.
10. Tournament committee
members who may be contacted
for further information are:
John McConaghy, Phone 2 2-3010;
3010; 2-3010; Theodore Schmidt, Phon
2-3019; Chubby Wright. Phone
2-2428; David Bishop Phone 2 2-1387;
1387; 2-1387; Luis Schmidt, -Phone 2-

3703; Audrey Bishop, phone
1387. . .........

Don't wait until the last min minute,
ute, minute, get your entry fees in now.

The Teeny weeny Tournament

fed reels' is prohibited. This rule party will be held on the Beach

applies to handles on opposing at Taboga Island on Saturday,
side of reel. I March 3, at 7:00 p.m. There will
c. The fisherman, must hook! be hot dogs, baked beans, beer,
and bring the fish in unalded.and all the trimmings. The cost

The touching of line, pole, reelj will be pro-rated and paid when

or names oy any person oiner served.

Southtrn Mathaditt hat a 1 Vi
game margin avar both Rica
and Arkansas in tha Southeast,
Confartnca, Including a two-gama
tulfla in tha vital 'lot" colMimn

Arkanias had btan hot an tha
Mustangs' httli, but was cool cool-ad
ad cool-ad off by an l-5 drubbing by

Rica Saturday night.
Duke, rated the No. 10 team
nationally, was the only outfit in
the top 10 to lose Saturday. A A-mong
mong A-mong the others Dayton (No. 2)
ran its record to 18-1 with a 76-41
rout of St. Francis (Pa.) as seven-foot
Billmuhl scored 19; Illinois
(No. 3) pushed its perfect big
ten mark to 7-0 with a 111-64 rout
of Ohio State, holding national,
scoring leader Robin Freeman to
the lowest point total of his col college
lege college career, 12 points; North Caro Carolina
lina Carolina St (No. 4) drubbed South
Caroling 95-68, as six-seven Ron-j

me bnavliK tallica Z7 points ana
grabbed 34 rebounds: Louisville

(No. 5) whipped Marquette, 76-64,

for a 20-1 record; vanderbilt (No.
6) smashed Louisiana St.,' 107-

68; and Kentucky (No. 7) crushed

u

DOWN THEY GO Bones crunching, Hugh Bolton of Toronto white jersey and Tave Creiah Creiah-ton
ton Creiah-ton of the New York Rangers tumble to the ice after a collision in Madison Square Garden game.

1

V

.7

i

OUT OF DOORS with

Honhars Fly High In Illinois
By WARRED) PAGE
Shooting Editor

VERY likely the greatest

concentration of Canada geese to
be found within the confines of the
United States is in the Horseshoe
Lake area, in the southern tip of

the walerfowling season. The eof.

tee snop is bursting at the seams
at 4 a.m. Local freezer plants are
geared to have your birds, two a
late;day being the limit as of 1955.

Tii;nA;. ...u u i: ; : : i

muuuu wnnt me nunsissipi nu lueiy iiignt lines, a farmer

plucked and drawn, frozen

snipped in dry ice, all with
chine precision.

Out near the lake.

the Ohio flow together.

At Horseshoe, a shallow U U-shaped
shaped U-shaped lake which was once a

bend in "Ole Miss," and further
north in Cfab Orchard Lake, the

white-throated Jonkers gang up
in untold numbers. Some make a
short lay-ever before heading
down for Louisiana marshes;

and

ma-.
the:
with

10 acres or more in corn sets him himself
self himself up as a hunting club by the
simple process of digging a few
pits and buying a $100-Iicense..
Hardly a mail box along the back
roads but is topped by one of
these hunting club signs.
Some do well, some not so well.

some, so the local people say, j gunned a couple of davs. is lucky
hang therr all winter feeding on,m being right on the reserve line,
Fuh:-and WiMIife --Sertieeboanty m. that its pits, the front row at
and what little the transients have,ielst, be dug enly 200 yards yards-left
left yards-left in nearby Corn and grain hehinH th lin n.rhin. inn

. . ; t

fields

The official count, when I was
gunning near Horseshoe last fall,
was said to be 125,000 geese; but
it struck me that there were at
least half that many on the small
arm of the lake we could see from
the Miller City road. Every after afternoon,
noon, afternoon, promptly at 3:05. they got
up off the lake and flew out to
feed,
Why five after three? Seems the
state of Illinois has legally decreed
that any shooting of said geese
must take place between 7 a.m.
and 3 p.m. Hence the geese aeem
to wear waterproof watches and

.keep them well synchronized.
The result of this concentra concentration
tion concentration is a thriving new industry.

The hotel business in Cairo, the
nearest sizeable town, goes into
a boom phase for the duration of

goose-crowded lake water.

The batting average runs hicH.,
At the mid-season point, total kill
ran just under a thousand for
Blakemore, perhaps a quarter of
the geese taken in the whole area
to that date. r
Big business in its way, but a a-lot
lot a-lot of shooting for gunners who
otherwise possibly wouldn't get to
see a goose over their scattergun'
from one year's end to the next.--
( Distributed by NEA Service)

LONG TIME COMING :
Nashville. Tenn. (NEA) -Wheti
Vanderbilt beat Kentucky's basket basketball
ball basketball team this season, it marked
the school's first regular season v
victory over Adolph Rupp'i team',
since 1940. A

I ROUNDING OUT OFF-SEASON Bobby Kline, Washington Senators' infielder, keeps his hands

J r""' "vr :i!Durft rja., curing on-season. ne n give op "i londa basa-
balls for real ones soon when Nats open camp at Orlando. w-

1 1 f"CI J'

Optn Nightly fraw
1:00 a.m.
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACKS
CRAP TABLE
POKER
SLOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
41r-Cnltlii4

Eyes Of Three
Continents On
Hialeah Park

Bo gS oitti flP0

Mand lorn ihaaf muiic.
Tape ia clear as glass,
sticks at a touch.

Prelect broken lagornaill
with "Scxdtch" Cellulose
Tape. Trim to fit, lac lacquer
quer lacquer right over it.

Train climbing plants to
trellises. New tape un unrolls
rolls unrolls easier, sticks tighter.

hiif en fit itif

HAND

CELLULOSE TAFI

1 .jm,: : ir-1 ill" .jr

Lad let lh nd

wtV graaa diipaaiar

' 'Distributors: CIA. ATLAS. S. A.
Scotch"-brand rolored tapes are printed tir Panama- -.

user's name and specifications by Cia. j
Atlas S. A., Telephone 2-3458. v
P. O. Box 1057

with

Mississippi, 88-49.

This week's blue-ribbon schedule

opens with an important slate of

eames tonight, in some ot tne

features: Illinois risks its Big Ten

lead against Florida: West Virgi

nia tries td jump ahead in the

Southern by beating William A Ma

rv: Texas Tech risks its Border

lead against Hardin-Simmons; and
Louisville shoots for 21 out of 22
against Xavier of Ohio.
BHS Retires Shrine
Baseball Trophy
In Lwinnlng the interscholas interscholas-tic
tic interscholas-tic league baseball championship
for the third consecutive year,
Balboa High School has gained
permanent possessipn of ,the
Shrine Trophy.
The Bulldogs made a clean
sweep of the league this year
winning 6 out of 8 games played.
Two of the games were no hit no
run affairs; the first one being
pitched by Wayne Wall, a junior
In high school and the second
one by Ed Klrchmier a graduat graduating
ing graduating senior,
The success of the Balboa
team this year can be credited
to fine pitching from beginning
to end, an outstanding defensive
outfield, and an infield that
came up to its ability toward
the end of the season. The Red
and White hitting was spotty,
but above average for the leajue.
The graduating seniors on the
team are: CF, Joe Cicero (cap

tain); JB, Ed Scott; LF, John
Magee; IB, Ramon Reyes; C,
Tim Hotz; P, Ed Kirchmler; cut cut-field,
field, cut-field, Dean Washburn, and in infield,
field, infield, Bill Black. Other members
of the team are; 2B, Owen Suth Sutherland;
erland; Sutherland; SS, Dan Wlnklosky; P,

Wayne Wall; P, Bob Hamilton;

P, George Klrkland; P, Frnl
Harley; Infield, Don Ryter and
Nl!r Llnfortr-trBcrtr Fearon-artd

outfield, Robert French and

Wesley Young. John stucchio a
graduating senior was student
manager for the team.

MIAMI, Feb. 13 (UP -Racing
eyes of three continents will be
on Hialeah this week.
South Americans will ba fol following
lowing following the Argantinian-brad, Venezuelan-owned
El Chama, back
on his second invasion of North
America, after flying up last
Novembar ta win tha Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, O. C. International.

Australians wiH be hoping for
victory for their '1953 Derby wm-i
ncr, Prince Morvi, in Wednesday's;
$2 5, 000 added Bougainvillea :
and again in Saturday's $100,000-j
added Widencr. I
And most of the good old U.S.A. i
will be pulling for Nashua to be-1
come the second millionaire race
horse. .
Like Prince Morvi, the Invading!
El Chama will run in the 1-3 16 s
mile grass race on Wednesday,!
and then come back four days;
later, on the dirt against Nashua,
in the V mile Widner.

-'Usually' horses are ratted 10
days or two waakt between di distance
stance distance racat. But that's only part
of his history-making campaign.
Tha Veneztlan horta will start
again February 29 in tha Jf 50, 50,-000
000 50,-000 added Hialeah Turf Handi.
cap, catch a plane back to Ca Caracas
racas Caracas March 1 for the President's
Cup there, and than pop over
Brazil for two-mile classic.
In addition to Australia and
Venezuela, the Bougainvillea is ex expected
pected expected to have starters from Ire

land, England, France,,. Chile and

the Argentine.
lucky Strike, BUS

At Balboa Tonight
The Pacific Twilight League's
first half winner Lucky Strilie
tackles second half league
leading Balboa High School to tonight
night tonight at 7:15 at the Balboa
Stadium.
Yesterday Lucky Strike
moved Into a -tie w'th Ameri Ameri-can
can Ameri-can Legion by nippim the Le Legionnaires
gionnaires Legionnaires 2-1 in a hard fought
contest,

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winninj: Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1927, Sunday, February 12, 1956
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided In two series "A" & "B" of 22 pieces each

Firsf Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

9477 $ 44,000.00
4497 $ 13,200.00
0548 $ 6,6oooo

PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

No
0077
177
277
0.177
0477
9577
077
0777
0S77
0977

I
1n2.no
irrc.on
1.12.00
KI2.00
2200.00
mm
m oo
in2.fio
132.00
132.00

So Prliw.No Prlzei.No Priict No Prlie. Na.
-: 'I : :. ..'... I I I
1077 1.12.00 2077 132 00 3077 132.00 4077 132 00 5077
1177 132.00 2177 132.00 3177 132.00 4177 1.12.00 5177
1277 132.00 2277 132 00 3277 1.12.00 4277 1.12.00 S277
1377- 132.00 2377 132.U0 3377 132.00 4377 132.00 5377
1477 2200 00 2477 2200.00 3477 2200.00 4477 2200.00 5477
1577 132.00 2577 132.00 3577 132.00 4377 132.00 5577
1077 132.00 2B7T 132.00 3077 112.00 4077 132.00 5077
1777 132.00 2777 13200 3777 132.00 4777 1.12.00 5777
IS77 132.00 2877 132.00 3S77 132.00 4R77 132.00 577
1977. 132.00 2977 132.00 3977 132.00 4S77 132.00 507

PtllM .No.

PrliM i Na

132.00
132 00
132.00
132.00
2200.00
1.12.00
132 00
132.00
132.00
132.00

M7T
SI77
S277
0377
1477
S37T
0677
0777
0077
(977

132.00
132.00
; 132.00
132.00
2200.00
132.00
132 00
132.00
132.00
132.00

70JT
7177
7277
7377
7477
7577
7077
7777
7077
7I7T

' PrliM I No Pflio i fHaoa
I I
1.12.00 1 S077 132.00 1 07T 1SI.00
132.00 SI77 132 00. 0177 132.00
132.00 S277 132.00 v 0277 132.00
132.00 S377 132.00 0377 132.00
2200.00 S477 2200.00 0477 44.ta.00
132.00 S377 132.00 0577 132.00
132.00 5677 132.00 t -ISt.ee
132.00 5777 132.00 77l 132.00
132.00 5677 1.12 00 0671 132.0
132.00 8977 132.M W7 132.00

Approximations Derived From .First Prize

Pm 410 47 440 I 1472 40 I 0474 i i 0476 440 I 47 44 I 0461 440 41 M Hti 440
4t 440 9471 y 440 I 473 ; .. 440 I 47S 440 1471 440 I I486 440 I I4S2 440 1484 440 MSI 44

Approximations Derived From Second Prize

497

4465
448

220 1497

110
110

4490
4491

220
110
no

' '' : f ' ''. "'I
2497 22 3497 220 5497 22 0497 221 7497 221
4492 110 4404 110 449 It 4490 11 4501 110
4493 111 I 449S lit 4498 220 450 lit 4502 110

8407 220 I49T 221
4503 110 4508 11
4504 lit 4501 lit

Approximations .Derived From Third Prize

"M1 2541 132 3541 132 j 454g 132 S54g V 132 S54 32 7J4 'l32 I54t 132? 054 'lSt
- 33 .- 88 0541 ( 88 54j" 88 545 t 88 I 0547 ; --" 0X5" 88 0552 88 T 0534 ;. . IS ," 55l tl
0541 88 t 0542 88 0544 88 t54l 81 0549 j 88 0551 88 055J 88 0551 88 1557 U

Torfov En canto .35 ,20
In Cinemascope!
Robert Taylor in
"MANY RIVERS TO CROSS"
Also: Hildeearde Neff in
"SVENGALI"

Tod IDEM 70
Richard DENNY in
"CAGED -FURY

.10

Tom CONWAY -in
"13 LEAD SOLDIERS"

Prlze-winnlnK Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing; were sold at: 1st and 3rd in'solon, 2nd in Boca, del Toro
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending In 7 and not included In the above list win Forty-four Dollars ($44.00) each
The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "B"

Signed by: ALBERTO ALEMAN. Governor of the Province of Panama. Ced. 47-12155
'Hie Representative Ot The Treasure RICARDO A MELENDEZ

WITNESSES: Pedro Bustamante, Ced. No. 47-13952
Pedro Montes, Ced. No. 18-2193

JOSE DOMINGO SOTO.
Notary Public, Panama

PABLO A. PINEL M.,
Secretary

KIDTF wlnnin UckeU with the last cipher nd with th two Urt
,,w ciphers apply only to the First Prire.
The First Prize end the 2nd and Jrd Prizes are drawn parlly. The p.
prnximatinns are calculated on th First, Second and Third Prizes. In care
a ticket should carry the numbers of each prize, the holder if entitled to
claim payment for each.

D VIG OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, February 12, 1 956
- Drawinf Number 628

Fraction 1 Ticket
First Prize 77 $n 0Q j220.00
-Second Prize. 3.00--60.00
' Third Prize. ...... 48 2.00 40.00

Th prizes will he paid In accordance with tk OfflHal LM af Panami ta
ih (tiers af the National Beaeficent tottery situated on Central Avenne.
Plan of Ordinary Drawint; No. 19?.8 which will take
place February 19, 1958 ;
Divided In Iwa series oi 22 fractions each denominated "A'' and "1"
FIRST PRIZE

1 First Prize, Series A and B, of
1 Second Prize, Serin A and B, of
1 Third Prize. Series A and B. ef
II Approximations, Series A and B, af
I Prizes, Series A and B. of
Prizes, Series A and B. of
100 Prizes, Series A and B, of

$22 000,000 each series
I.SO0.0 each seres
1.300.00 each series
280 00 aeh series
1,100.00 each series
ft.00 each series
22.00 each series

SKCOND PRIZE
II Approximations, Series A and B of $ SS 00 each series
t Prizes. Series A and B, of 110.00 each series
THIRD PRIZE
ISApproximatlons, Series A and B Of $ 44.00 each series
t Prizes, Series A and B. of W OO each series

$44.000 00
13.2"0.0O
.'io.eo
T,t-'0.0
' !.sien
11.10,0
3,M) 00
$ 1.9H0OO'
1.08000
$ i.r,iuio
1.1SS.00

1074 Prizes ' 'TOT A IT SU3,7::00
Price of a whole ticket ........... .$22X3
Price of a forty-fourth part . . . .50



G
((
OtJuu lib Uu a WOu
t if i I l I I : t
' I '
V
J i-' 4.
.Read story on doob 10

p
fl

Crosses Burned
At Florida Homes
Of Negro Voters
TALLAHASSEE, 'Fla Feb. 13 13-;(t'P)
;(t'P) 13-;(t'P) Gov. Leroy Collins called
last night for an "immediate re re-'
' re-' port on cross burnings at t n e
homes of two Negro voters in
' northwest Florida.
: The incidents came to light yes yes-.
. yes-. terday when Robert Saunders,
! field representative for the Na Na-:
: Na-: tional Association for tthe Advan Advancement
cement Advancement of Colored People in Mia Miami,
mi, Miami, said the organization has ask asked
ed asked both Collins and the Federal
Justice Department to investigate
.the burnings. .
! He said NAYCP officials have
-i "been in conference with Federal
t officials in Washington in ef efforts
forts efforts to get' the government to
intervene for the protection of
1 these citizens."
. The crosses were burned a week
'an at the homes of two of 12
I Negroes who recently registered
o vole for the first time in little
'Liberty County.
- He said shotgun pellets pelted
.the home of another new Negro
'VSheriff S. G. Revell said, in
i Bristol he had "checked into
tboth of the cross burnings, but
"1 couldn't find out a thing about
them."
He Found A Home,
He Lost The Place;
Alas, Alack-A-Day
: CHICAGO. Feb. 13 (UP)
.'James McDonough, 32. found his
apartment yesterday, six weeks af after
ter after he rented it.
McDoftough came to Ch ic a o
.from Dayton, Ohio, and rented
an apartment on Jan. 3. He paid
a week's rent in advance and then
iwent out to buy groceries.
. He couldn't find his way back.
During the next six weeks, Mc Mc-iDonough
iDonough Mc-iDonough searched the area where
he thought his apartment was loc loc-jated.
jated. loc-jated. He bought a newspaper ad advertisement
vertisement advertisement and even had him himself
self himself listed as a missing person.
His landlady spotted McD o n n-ough's
ough's n-ough's ad and telephoned h i m
Yesterday at a new apartment he
had rented. She said she had kept
Tiis belongings safe, but had rent rent-'ed
'ed rent-'ed his apartment to someone else.
She added that McDonough's old
'apartment is only five blocks a a-way
way a-way from his new one.

AN INDEPENDENT ctHJ) DAILY NEWSPAPER

Let the people know the truth and ths country is tafe" Abraham Lincoln,

O

31st TEAR

PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1956

FIVE CENTS

Harriman Would Ban Federal Aid
To Defiant Segregated School

Negro Coed Intends I o Return
To Classes If Court Says Yes

BIRMINGHAM. Ala.. Feb. 13
(UP) The University of Alaba Alabama's
ma's Alabama's first Negro student, whose
admission stirred up campus
rioting .has every Intention of re returning
turning returning to classes should a fed federal
eral federal court order make.lt possible,
her attorney said today.
The coed, Autherine Lucy, 26,
is awaiting the outcome of a
Feb. 29 federal court hearing
which Is expected to determine
whether she will return to the
university.
Miss Lucy was suspended by
university officials after several
mass demonstrations by students
and "outsiders" last week end

including the stoning of her au

tomobile at the Tuscaloosa cam campus
pus campus and threats of bodily harm.
Her lawyer. Arthur Shores said
In answer to a question that he
hadn't talked with Miss Lucy a a-bout
bout a-bout what she will do until the
hearing comes up "I guess she
will Just rest, she's gone through
such an ordeal."
The attorney said there was a
possibility she may sit In on

classes at another school or en

gage a private tutor to keep up
with her school work during the
Interim.
But Shores emphasized that
the Negro coed, first In Alaba Alabama's
ma's Alabama's 126-year history, planned
to return to Alabama If the court
orders university officials to re readmit
admit readmit her.
A tense calm has reigned over
the campus ever since the girl

was suspended and four-fifths
of the student body has report-)
edly pledged to abstain from
violence should she return.
It was learned, however, that:
some students may enact a pol-1

icy or "passive resistance" Dy
boycotting her classes although
Walter Flowers, president of the
student body, discounted the
possibility,
"We've looked for any indica indication
tion indication of something on that line."
Flowers said, "but I just don't
believe it's there."
v University president 0. O.
Carmichael has promised that
Miss Lucy will be reinstated if
the court orders it but he said
the city and campus police or

ganizations may need reinforce- he will use all his resources to
ments. prevent "mob rule'on the cam-
Gov. James E. Folsom has said pus.

ir..

1

A

4.

. )tk

i

AUTHERINE LUCY, barred from the University of Alabama
after riots on the campus, attends a. news conference with, her
, attorney, Arthur Shores, at Birmingham.

NEW YORK. Feb. 13 (UP)
Gov. Averell Harriman yesterday
proposed a ban on federal aid to
public schools which refuse to
obey the Supreme Court'a dese desegregation
gregation desegregation ruling. He demanded
immediate federal enforcement of
the edict.
Harriman thus took issue with

the school desegregation stand of
Adlai E. Stevenson, chief contend

er for the Democratic presidential

nomination.
Sttvtnson hat itattd his ep ep-poiition
poiition ep-poiition to halting federal aid
to itgrtgatad schools and hi
support of "gradualism" in ort ort-forcina
forcina ort-forcina tht court docislon.

Harriman criticized the Eisen

hower administration for not act

ing to enforce the Supreme Court

school desegregation ruling in

the University of Alabama contro

versy.

He called for federal prosecu

tion of those who have "violated

the law" by keeping Negro Auth

erine J, Lucy from classes at tne

school.
"I was unhappy that the Presi

dent seemed to take it so lightly
in his last press conference,"

Harriman said.
"Those people ought to be
brought to justice and the at attorney
torney attorney general should be active
in this case and I haven't seen
the activity which I think the
situation demands."
Harriman made clear his dif
fcrences with Stevenson about de

segregation when he was asked
about statements Stevenson made
last week in Los Angeles that he
would not cut of federal funds
from segregated schools or use

federal troops to enforce Integra
tion. .'

The matter came up when

Harriman was asked now ne stood

on a school aid bill amendment

500 Negroes In Souths Once-Segregated State Colleges;

Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina Hold Out

written by Negro Rep. Adam
Clayton Powell Jr. (D-N.Y.) and
supported by Sen. Herbert H.
Lehman (D-N.Y.).

The amendment nrnnnsoi nf.

ting off federal funds to any pub
lie school that refuses to integ integrate
rate integrate the races.

"I am satisfied that Senator
Lehman it taking the correct
petition and I am in support of
that petition." Harriman i4

Then Harriman wax ackMt if h

agreed with Stevenson that only

gradual means would settle' tht
school crisis satisfactorily.
"I think the executive branch
of the government should see to
it that the orders and the decisions
of the Supreme Court are en enforced,"
forced," enforced," Harriman said. I
don't think it's up to the federal
government to talk about 1 0 years
of that sort of thing. We should
see to it that the laws at inter interpreted
preted interpreted by the Supreme Court art
enforced." ;

Princess Maggie May Attend
Kelly 'Rainier Wedding Rites

LONDON. Feb IS n;pfmn

to the John B. Kellys of Philadel Philadelphia:
phia: Philadelphia: I

Buckingham Palace cannot ac accent
cent accent an invitation In vnnr

daughter's wedding to Prince

nainier oi Monaco, u you re tnink tnink-ing
ing tnink-ing of sending one.
This is not to say there will
be no British representative at
Grace's wedding. ; Princess Mar Margaret
garet Margaret might be there. She was
being mentioned in court circles
today as a logical choice.
It's simply a matter of protocol
involving the major difference
between normal etiquette and cus customs
toms customs observed by royalty. :
Normally a bride's parents send
the wedding invitations. But by
British royal tradition, invitations

can not be accepted from private

individuals.
The Queen can accept an invi

tation from a government or a

city, for example, but not.-from
the president of a bank.

iso it must be the. state of
Monaco that Invites a representa representative
tive representative of the Queen to the April-in-Monaco
wedding of Grace and
Prince Rainier.

The nrince himself rnnlH tanf

an invitation to Buckingham Pal Palace.
ace. Palace. But it would have to include

an endorsement from his ministers.-:,-
'.
There is little belief in palact
circles that the Queen herself or
the Duke of Edinburgh will at attend
tend attend the wedding, since they had
scheduled a great number of pub public
lic public engagements before the wed wedding
ding wedding was announced.
Princess Margaret is consider considered
ed considered the most likely deputy. An ard ardent
ent ardent movie fan, she would love to
meet Miss Kelly. It is also pos possible
sible possible that the Duchess of Kent
and her daughter, Alexandra, will
be picked. -. ,

(kit. )Jk-

LAST DAY! .60 -.301

3:15, 5:10, 7:05, P.M.
A delightful romantic
comedy in technicolor 1
t REX HARRISON
t KAY KENDALL In
"THE CONSTANT
HUSBAND"

WEDNESDAY 3

ATLANTA, Feb. 13 (UP) -More
than 500 Negroes have enrol enrolled
led enrolled : in formerly all-white state state-supported
supported state-supported colleges and universi universi-ies
ies universi-ies from Texas to Virginia with
he marked exception of the stern sternly
ly sternly pro segregated deep South
stretching from the Mississippi El

ver to the Atlantic coasi.

Tt wit In this four-state section

nf Miccicoinni Alabama. Georgia

land South Carolina, which almost

half of the. South s Negroes can
k (Vot vinionh ripranstrations

I1UI11C, .
accompanied the first attempts by

a Negro student to auenu cise

f
t
L

THEY

TCLD
TTKEB

SECRETS

Tht

'Psychiatrist')

couch
holds
world of
drama I

it; I

From the

novel abouk

the Strang
(.Mansion on

the Hill!

, l-A

M-C-M pretend in COLOR end In
CINzmaScoFS
iuaaH lAiiaiattka

Ifcja-BACAll

DOYER-GnAIlAr.IE

j

c

at a state institution
learning.,

of higher

nriv npurin A irdrl

judge In "Birmingham has dis dismissed
missed dismissed a contempt charge tiled
against Dean W. F. Adams cf
the University of Alabama for
refusing to admit a second
Werrrn ctnrlvnt. Mr Pnllv Ann

i Hudson (above), to the school.

1 FIRST OPPOSITION
And it was in those four states

that the first organized opposition
arose to the U.S. Supreme Court's
ban on public school segregation
an edict which also aided the re removal
moval removal of college and university

racial bars. V

Seven states bordering that one

time "cradle of the confederacy"
have accepted Negroes in state-

supported colleges with little Jan-

fare.

An eighth state, Florida, has

never accepted Negroes but oppo

sition has not been as outspoken.

The Florida Board of Control

has sent out 62,000 questionnaires

in an effort to learn how students,

faculty, alumni and parents would
respond to -mixed' classes'' at the
University of Florida, Florida
State and all-Negro Florida A and

M.
A survey showed today that Lou Louisiana,
isiana, Louisiana, suprisingly enough, has en enrolled
rolled enrolled more Negroes in white col

leges and universities than any
other state in- Dixie- with more

than 350 taking graduate and und

er graduate courses.
Texas has more than 100 en
rolled.,'

Negroes are well represented at
both Kentucky and Arkansas
schools and in the last states to
bow to the Supreme Court decree,
ten have entered the University of
North Carolina,' 17 in several Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia colleges, and two part-time
in Austin Peay State College in
Tennessee.

In those teven ttatet, there hat
been none of the racial rioting
which marked the entrance of
Autherine Lucy into the Univer University
sity University of Alabama.
Womack Rucker, one of 116 Ne Negro
gro Negro graduate students at Louisi

ana State University, said, "I'm

just another person in the class,

and 1 receive fair treatment."
"LITTLE TOO NICE"

"Of course, when I firse entered
in 1953, people were inclined to be
a little too nice, but that was all

right," Kucker said

"They were trying to make me

feel at home,

Rucker's views were echoed by

another LSU graduate student.

Mrs. Leslie Barnum, who said
"the LSU campus is open to all
and we come and go as we
please. We eat together, and I
have white friends who are still

your friends down-town."

No undergraduates have been
admitted to the Louisiana State un

dergraduate School although A. P

Tureaud Jr., son of an attorney for

the National Association oi Color

ed People is currently seeking en enrollment
rollment enrollment Tureaud has been ordered
admitted by the U.S. Circuit Court

of Appeals and his lamer said my

son intends to go back. He attend attended
ed attended classes for six weeks before he

was 'barred through legal proccs

ses but LSU might appeal. We're

waiting on that.

In Texas, Mrs. I. E. L. Sephas,

a student at North Texas State,

said that "everybody has b e e n
wonderful to me. In every class I

have been fully accepted as an another
other another student."

She called the violence In Ala Alabama
bama Alabama "regrettable'1 and cited
North Texas Stato at "a g o e d
school for others to take a pattern
from."

Six graduate sudents attend clas classes
ses classes at Southern Methodist where

dean of students Mayne Longneck Longneck-er
er Longneck-er said they appear to be "careful'
ly chosen, well accepted and as assimilated
similated assimilated and the relationship be

tween them and their classmates

is a pleasant one.

All state supported colleges in

three teacher schools for girls,

have accepted Negroes at one
time or another and Lester Banks,
executive secretary of the Virgi Virginia
nia Virginia NAACP said "things have been

so quiet, I haven't checked since

October."
Negro students were described
as "not a novelty" at the Universi University
ty University of Arkansas by W. J. Good, as assistant
sistant assistant to the president.
"They have been here for years
and yeart, and there hat never
been any trouble over the mat matter."..'
ter."..' matter."..' .. "'V".-".
The University of North Caroli

na admitted its first three; Negro

undergraduates last fall, bowing
to a federal court order. Seven.

are enrolled in graduate school.

The under graduates, brothers

Papers Reveal Sum
Of Evifa's Assets
Al Peron Election

Virginia, with the exception of er did

BUENOS AIRES, Feb. 13 (UP)

The late Eva Peron claimed a

personal fortune of $400,000 in cash

and jewels plus a suburban home
when her husband, ousted dictator
Juan D. Peron, was elected Pres President
ident President in 1946, it was disclosed here.
Government officials who open

ed the sealed envelopes contain containing
ing containing sworn statements of personal
wealth of Peronist personalities,
made' when they came to power,

found Eva Peron claimed to pos

sess cash and -jewels worth 1,3000

000 pesos then about $400,000 and

a house In the coieeiaies suuum

Jjan Duarte, Eva's brother and
Peron's private secretary before
he fell in disgrace, stated that his
papers were in order and he would
.1 1 U:- Int.. TJa mai.

Leroy and Ralph Frasier and John

Lewts Brandown, agreed white

students "act as if we were of any
other race. They are very friend friendly.
ly. friendly. We like it."

Graduate student David Steph Stephens
ens Stephens said he "had little or no troub trouble
le trouble at all. It's actually like thtv

hardly realize we're here. We're

accepted as highly as can be ex expected."
pected." expected." Stephens has been elected to the
law school legislature. He s a id
there has been "no trouble" over
Negro participation in extra cur cur-ricular
ricular cur-ricular activity.

Senator Seeks
Non-Vindictive
Enforcement
WASHINGTON, Feb. 13 (UP) (UP)-Sen.
Sen. (UP)-Sen. Paul H. Douglas (D-IU.) said
today the government should in in-list
list in-list but "not in a vindictive way"

mat the South end racial segre segregation
gation segregation in its public schools.

He advocated a firm but sym

pathetic policy toward states m
the "Deep South" which, he said,

are trying to evade the Supreme
Court's order to integrate white

and Negro children in their pub

lic scnoois.
....'., .. ... .,'.';v ..:';'...l; .,:;',.

Douglas, interviewed on tht

ABC television program "Celebrity
Parade," said integration is pro proceeding
ceeding proceeding "'fairly rapidly" in bord

er states like Delaware and Ma Maryland
ryland Maryland and with a minimum of
trouble.

"MAN WITH THE GUN"
with Robert Mitchurci
Opening Wednesday at the

Central Theatre

hi.

:.:U

Ml

iLmmtvj

Barbara Lawrence, as a dance-hall girl. Is used as a decoy
to ambush Robert Mitchum in a gun-fight Samuel Gold Gold-wyn,
wyn, Gold-wyn, Jr.'s "Man With The Gun," a United Artists release
opens Wednesday 15th at the CENTRAL Theatre. Adv.

He said the real
the "Deep South."

trouble is in

Bette On The Fence May orito On His Knees

UUIAN

w4 introdnrinl
. JOHN . '.'
I iJi'OL'uMOItoLLhb
LFVANT-Tc;.::,rir Rettig

't ; I
.1 I

He agreed with Democratic

presidential hopeful Adlai E. Stev Stevenson
enson Stevenson that troops should not be

sent into the South at this time

to enforce the Supreme Courts

controversial decision. I

Ttnt ho sHftoH "W shouldn't!

give federal funds for school con-j

struction programs to states anai
(nmmunitiM that are in open I

defiance of the Supreme Court."!

He saw tnis coum encourage
lawlessness and disobedience.
3 Persons Killed

In Toledo Blast
TOLEDO. O.. Feb. 13.-(UP)

Three persons were reported kil killed
led killed and four others hospitalized
early today in an explosion and
fire that demolished building in a
three block area and shattered
windows in the' entire downtown
area here.
Police said there were possibly

another 10 victims trapped in the
wreckage of the three story brick
building housing the H.F. Beagle
Meat Packing Co.,' where the blast

occurred. .'

bL,xi ioii.ii had another successful afternoon at La Macare Macare-na
na Macare-na bullring yesterday as rain failed to keep the "fiesta brava"
from being held. Here she sits on a ledge as she plays the bull
with her mulcta.

FIERY JAVIER (Mayorito) Martinez, 17-year-old Mexican no no-villero,
villero, no-villero, shows his courage and dexterity by making his "pases
with the mulcta on his kn3- Mayorito is scheduled to perform
again next Sunday at La Macarena.

Firemen sounded a second

alarm after a smoldering fire that
followed began licking away at

the ruins.

Too good to mls3 l

'.
... f
i .
' :
-Lii A'

. w

It'i aot often (hit a thejlre manager will
personally recommend a picture to hii patrons.
But it'a not often either, that we see e
picture like "GENEVIEVE." Wheaever it't
been ihown, "GENEVIEVE" hat charmed an an-dicu
dicu an-dicu e and evoked a tvfle of laughter too
aeldom heard theie daya. 1
For "GENEVIEVE," a "deeper that il
produced without fanfare and without benefit
of big name atari, ii an adult picture about
real people in real, believable, but nonetho nonetho-leai
leai nonetho-leai hilarioui ailualiona.
I know how mnch I enjoyed aeeing ttiiai
(ne film. And 1 know that thousand! have
been delithled with the frenhneai and pnrt,
joy in "GENEVIEVE."
- Therefore, I have complete confidence
in enthusiamically recommending thk picture
to you, "GENEVIEVE" will not let me
or you down.

IiincerelybelieTeyoullUioroaghly

enjoy teeing it!

1

Jiiirtertly,
The Muiger

7j i-J

A llnMflll)NiVMt1ilRll iMhM

COtOt sv TECHNICOLOR

01NH JOHN ""t Ky KfNNFTH
SHERIDAN 6REGS0N KENDALL MORE
iwr Smrai W wn turn fnixtt im) tfcnrM kr

A J. Anfe luk OrtKHutM emtauu

LUXJQHEAXRE

0PEr:ir:G VEDr:ESDAY lsih