The Panama American

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Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02994

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Related Items:
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list YEAR

"HOW ABOUT A SMILE?" Mrs. Gay Treliving tries to coax
baby Martin to smile for her. She's happy that the seven-month-old
infant can leave with her tomorrow after having
been hospitalized at Gorgas for the past three months. The
child was stricken with a high fever from a mysterious infec infection
tion infection which has left him partially blind.

Plucky British Mother, Baby
Leave-On Note Of Happiness

What began as i hard luck
story three months ago today
teems slated for a happy ending.
The journey of a pretty, blond
British girl -who was in transit
here three months ago will be re resumed
sumed resumed tomorrow. She was forc forced
ed forced to leave the ship which was
taking her and her three youngs youngsters
ters youngsters to New Zealand when her
baby, seven-month-oltf, Martin, be became
came became seriously ill.
."If not for the wonderful doe-'
- lors and hursss t Cosyas," she.
(id today with t, grateful
smut, "ne wouldn't b liv
now. I still think it's miracle
he lived."
Mrs. Gay Treliving of Kent was
on her way to join her husband,
Ernest, who enlisted in the New
Zealand Navy in May when her
youngest child was stricken. For
several weeks hope was aban'j
donned that the baby would live
his fever rose to ii)8, and the
distraught mother said today she
prayed for his recovery.
The fever has been attributed to
some Virus infection, but the ex exact
act exact nature of the infant's ill illness
ness illness has not been Discovered.
Little Martin is partially b 1 i n d
from the crippling fever, but to today
day today doctors agreed that he could
be transferred to the Rangitiki's
; hospital. The British ship is ex expected
pected expected to arrive sometime today
and will leave for New Zealand
tomorrow. Earlier it was believed
that Mrs. Treliving would leave
without the baby.
White Preachers,
!!cp Ministers
Ts!k Segregation

MACON, Ga., Feb. 2 (UP) Dr. Hill, a key figure in two
White and Negro ministers of Ma- groups that studied civil defense,
con churches met jointly today j was named today as scientific
in an effort to thrash out the director of the "weapons evalua evalua-touchy
touchy evalua-touchy ; issue of segregation in; tion group" advising the ,J o i h t
church. i Chiefs of Staff. ';

Some 75 ministers, almost two-
thirds of them Negro members of
' the Evangelical Ministers Union of
Macon and the rest pastors of most
of the city's big white churches,
gathered -at, the invitation of Dr.
r King Vivien, president of the white
' ministerial association. i
The discussion was built around
the theme, "We are one in Christ
what next?" Dr. DeWitt Mat Matthews,
thews, Matthews, panel moderator, said 'no
one here would debate the first
part" and he wasn't-sure any an answer
swer answer had been obtained to the sec sec-:
: sec-: ond. But getting the groups to-j
gether was a long step forward,
he said. V
The Rev. Charles W. Ward, pas
tor of the Negro First Baptist
Church, said his view of -complete
integration means "there'shouldn't
be any doors closed to me be because
cause because I'm black,"
Dr. Henry Stokes, pastor of the
white First Baptist Chunch; said
most of the supporters of segre segre-.
. segre-. gation base their opinions on "de "detached
tached "detached lines of scripture from the
9M Testament."
; But Christians should ; d e ri v e
their understanding of the racial
issue from "new Testament exam
ples of Christ. For all who wish it
our Lord has given us a blueprint,
'he said. :
Another white pastor, The RevJ
Reese Griffin of Bass Methodist
Church,1 said he thought vacation
Bibla schools and women's church
societies would be good places to
besm br-Kine down the racial bar

Agents for the ship, Norton and i

Lilly said today that a special
nurse was placed on the vessel at
London. She will take charge of
the baby until they reach New
Zealand at which time he will be
hospitalized. v-
The plucky, 27-year-old British
mother today said she must ex express
press express her deep appreciation to the
Canal Zone police force, in partic particular
ular particular to Sgt. James Hatcher, Mr.
and Mrs. Bill Adams, Mr. and
Mrs. Homer H. Summerford and
Mrs. Steve Higdon before leaving
tne istnmus. Air f orce uiapiain
Sink was also extremely helpful
to her during her stay.
Meanwhile, her other two chil children,
dren, children, David, 5, and Anne 4, are
jumping with excitement, for the
'prospect of seeing their daddy is
near. ... ;
This will be the first time that
"
Only 15-Minule
Advance Warning
May Co Possib!
ruiw
WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 (UP) -A
civil defense expert told Congress
today that at best it may be pos possible
sible possible to provide only 15 minute ad advance
vance advance warning against the dread
intercontinental ballistics missile.
The expert. Dr. A. G. Hill of
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, .., said present radar
warning systems are designed to
detect enemy planes rather than
supersonic missiles which w i 1 1
come crashing down from near
space.
He told a House Civil Defense
subcommittee that "a great deal
of effort" must be devoted to build building
ing building a missile warning goal may
ho nnlv 15 minute."'
After hearing his testimony, sub
committee Chairman Chet Holi Holi-field
field Holi-field D-Calif. Commented that "65
to 70 million people are subject to
annihilation in a single night" by
a surprise enemy assault.
Caffey In D. C.
Set To Explain
Georgia Speech
WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 (UP)
j Mai. Gen. Eugene M. Caffey,
the Army s top legai onicer, re returned
turned returned here today to give his su superiors
periors superiors a full account of his con controversial
troversial controversial speech before the Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Legislature earlier by U. S.
Rep. John J. Flint Jr. (D-Ga.)
Caffey said he was misinterpreted.-
! The Army handed out a state statement
ment statement after Caffey 's arrival today
saying he "states again that his
sole intent was to compliment
Rep. Flvnt's ability to, make ,. a
speech.". ' ."
Flynt had denounced the Su-
oreme Court for its ruling outlaw-
1 jng segregation in schools. Caffey
Iwas quoted as saying: "If I were
going to make a speech, I would
hone to make one like that.1'-
Rep. Adam Clayton Powell (D-
N. Y.) has called on President
Eisenhower to remove Caffey on
grounds he violated his oath to,
uphold the- eonstimtKHi. . ,i

"Lef the people knote the truth and the

Red Fleet Of Herring Poachers
Retreats, Waits Sister Ships

AALESUND, Norway, Feb. 2 ships and 850 crew members, in in-(UP)
(UP) in-(UP) A big Russian fishing cluaing 50 women were detained
fleet involved in a three-day bat-jln the Norwegian port.

tie with the Norwegian Navy re-
treated to the horizon today toi
await the release of its sister
ships held captive in Aalesund
Fiord,
The release of the vessels, in including
cluding including an 8,000-ton factory ship,
was demanded ... by the Soviet
government in a radio broadcast
from Moscow. A Soviet embassy
official also arrived from Oslo
to confer with the skippers of
the captured vessels.
Another small ship found
poaching herring from Norwe Norwegian
gian Norwegian waters was forced Into
port by navy patrol boats yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday. In all, 14 Communist
Treliving will see his new son.
The baby was bom just six weeks
after he had left for his assign assignment
ment assignment in New Zealand.
For the entire family it will be
a happy reunion, and the small,
cheerful mother takes leave of
the Isthmus with many fond m e e-mories
mories e-mories of what she calls "won "wonderful
derful "wonderful hospitality."
"I never will be able to thank
the Americans enough or forget
them," she said
Prince's Ccr Items
Anolhsr; Injured
Lady Still Charmed
wni-LYWOOD. Feb. 2 (UP)
Actress Grace Kelly's Prince is
.kAFmini. All Aft luhftn inVAlvP.d

in a traffic accident, says a!. Jhe LiberalsaVe" been wag wag-woman
woman wag-woman driver who met hlm n8 press and radio campaign

over dented bumpers.
Mrs. Nancy Kaufman, 29. of
Malibu, Calif., said a car driv driven
en driven by' Prince Rainier III of Mo Monaco
naco Monaco struck the rear of her hus husband's
band's husband's British sports car .Tues .Tuesday
day .Tuesday night. Mrs. Kaufman, who
was with her husband, Albert,
suffered slight neck injuries. A
doctor put her neck in a tem temporary
porary temporary brace.

The nrince. uninlured and.of the pary's provincial direc-

drivlng alone, won an American!
fan, though,
despite the acci-
dent.
"He was very charming," Mrs.
Kaufman said. "I felt very sor sorry
ry sorry for him. He was so upset and
apologized several times."
She said the Prince's car ram rammed
med rammed into hers at a stop signal
near Bel Air where he is stay staying
ing staying in a rented home. A spokes spokesman
man spokesman for Miss Kelly's studio said
he was en route to see the ac actress
tress actress when the accident occur occurred.
red. occurred. His car struck the Kauf Kaufman
man Kaufman auto "very lightly," the
studio said. The Prince drove off
after exchanging names and in insurance
surance insurance information.1
Marilyn Visffdly
Denies Romance;
Admits llrs Awful
NEW YORK, Feb. 2 (UP)
A report that playwright Arthur
Miller has left his wife for Mar Marilyn
ilyn Marilyn Monroe brought a sorrowful
admission from the shapely ac actress
tress actress today that she has been stric strictly
tly strictly a wallflower lately.
"I haven't been dating, she
said. "I have no romance. It's
awful." ;
The reports of a new romance
for Miss Monroe came after Mil Miller,
ler, Miller, author of the prize winning
"Death of a Salesman," disclosed
his 15-year marriage to his college
sweetheart was on the rocks.
Miss Monroe, whose marriagei to
former baseball star Joe Di Mag Mag-gio
gio Mag-gio ended in 1954, said she and
Miller are "just friends."
"There is nothing between us,"
she said.
Mrs. -Miller agreed that Mari
iyn had nothing to do with the Mil-

ler marital difficulties. Miller also!plateau and. v.

denied reports he has been dating
Miss- Monree.""-"----

PANAMA, R. t THURSDAY,

Mil

The battle started Monday
when a fleet of more than 70
Russian vessel set up fishing
operations as close as one mile
irom the shore of Norway in
violation of the four-mile terri territorial
torial territorial water limit.
Radio Moscow called the In Incident
cident Incident "a misunderstanding." it
said the Soviet fishing indus industry
try industry ministry "expects a .speedy
consideration by the Norwegian
authorities of this question and,
the release of the detained ves
sels." V
But the captured crew mem members
bers members appeared in good spirits
where they were. They sang and!
waved to Norwegians who
crowded the docks for a look at
the foreigners.
Armed torpedo boats patroled
nurwegian waters 10 Keep tne
remainder of the big fleet at
Day, However, fishermen be believed
lieved believed the boats were already'
full and could do no more fish fishing
ing fishing before unloading. This was
impossible because the factory
ship was in the hands of the
Norwegians. V
Some sources interpreted the
invasion as a brazen attempt by
Russia to break the four-m;e
shoreline territorial treaty with
Norway. Captains of captured
boats told Norwegian authorities
they knew thev were fishimr nnlv
a short distance from shore, but
contended the waterj were not
ui Norway territory.
1 jj s
Cc:CI:n Set Fcr
Show Of Strength
Both the opposition Liberal
Party and the National patrio patriotic
tic patriotic Coalition CCPN) have sched scheduled
uled scheduled demonstrations of strength
tut- wie weeicena.
inviting Panamanians to a we!
come demonstration for onnost.
tion presidential candidate Vic
tor ooytla who is scheduled
to arrive tomorrow from Miami.
The opposition's- show of
strength will begin at Fifth of
May Piaza tomorrow at 5:30 p.
m., the time Goytia is expected
w arrive inere irom Tocumen.
The CPN. on the other hand.
has converted the installation
orate originally scheduled for
last Saturday, into a demon.
stration, -which party leaders
hope will outshine the opposi opposition's.
tion's. opposition's. Goytia's arrival at the Plaza
win oe ioiiowea oy a parade a a-long
long a-long Central Ave. to Santa Ana
Plaza where four speeches, in including
cluding including Goytia's, will be deliver delivered.
ed. delivered. The other speakers are at attorney
torney attorney Dr. Felipe Juan Escobar,
ex-President Dp. Daniel Chanis
Jr. and Prof. Alva Rosa Diaz,
who will speak on behalf of
Panamanian women.
Scheduled for 4 p.m. Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, the CPN rally will also be begin
gin begin at Fifth of May Plaza and
parade along Central Ave. to
the Encanto Theatre where sev
eral speeches will be delivered in
the presence of presidential can candidate
didate candidate Ernesto de la Guardia Jr.,
President Ricardo Arias Esplnosa
and Alberto Aleman, chairman of
the CPN Provincial Board, and
otner party jeaaers.

Moslem 'Knights Don Armor Of Crusades
ToPayHomageTo TouringQueejn atKaduna

KADUNA, Nigeria, Feb. 2 (UP)
Moslem "knights" sporting the
medieval armor their ancestors
wore to the wars against the
crusaders paid homage to Queen
Elizabeth, today in Nigeria's
"crocodile land."
The tourinff Queen and her
husband, the Duke of Edin
burgh, stepped from a modern
airliner which took them from
Lagos, capital of Nigeria, into
the midst of a tameau that has
not changed since the Middle
Ages.
Moslems sat astride horses in
a colorful line from the airnnrt
to this capital of the Nigerian
I Their horses were draped in
qvul

country is safe

FEBRUARY 2, 1956
i i
Pcron Seeking
RP Residence
Juan Domingo Peron is to
apply for Panamanian resi residential
dential residential status, a spokesman
for the former Argentine pres president
ident president said yesterday.
Peron arrived here as a
tourist His three-month tour tourist
ist tourist term here expires Monday.
Peron spokesman Carloi
Pascall said the ousted strong strongman
man strongman is most comfortable and
contented In his present Ho Hotel
tel Hotel Washington quarters, and
has no plans to wove.
Earlier there had been re reports
ports reports the Peron party was
seeking a small house In Pan Panama,
ama, Panama, with a year's lease.
Aufo Named
No. 1 Killer
In States
CHICAGO, Feb., 2 (UP) Ac Accidents
cidents Accidents killed 92,000 Americans
in 1955, and the auto was the
No. 1 killer, the National Safe Safety
ty Safety Council said today.
Mishaps injured 9,200,000 Oth Others,
ers, Others, the council said, and exact
ed an economic loss estimated
at a whopping $10,300,000,000..
Motor vehicles claimed 38,300
lives in 1955 accidents; all eight
per cent increase over the 1954
count. The number rose each
month from March on, to a 14 14-year
year 14-year high for the last month of
thi year, :':yf
The all-accident toll of 92,000
compared with a total of 9,432
in 1934, an increase of three per
cent. Despite the increase, the
per capita accident death rate'
was the second lowest in the
history of accident records. The
1955 rate of 56 per 100,000 popu
lation was bettered only in
1954. when accidents killed 555
and of each 100,000 population.
The Safety Council said the
eight per cent Increase in high highway
way highway deaths was the major fac factor
tor factor in the higher all-accident
death total.
The 1955 traffic toll was 2,714
above the 1954 count of 35,586
and about 1,670 below the all all-time
time all-time high of 39,969 established
in 1941.
The December toll climaxing
a 10-months rise was 3,960, up
12 per cent over December, 1954,
and the' largest monthly total
since December, 1941.
Police Investigate
Death At Sea
Aboard 'Beauregard'
Canal Zone Police today
boarded the tAmerican freighter
S.S. Beauregard to investigate
a previously reported death of
a crewmember.
They learned that Joseph R.
Wing, a 57-year-old boatswain,
had been found dead on the
floor of his cabin on Jan. 28.
The Hawaiian-American crew
man was buried at sea off the
coast of Mexico after ship's of officers
ficers officers were unable to locate his
next of kin.
This was Wing's first trip on
the freighter. He had signed on
in San Francisco.
Investigation revealed the de-
ceased had comDiained or a
shortness of breath while work working,
ing, working, and was heard to exclaim
that he couldn't breathe just be-
I fore his body was found on the
floor.
The horsemen wore armor
plate and trappings made of fin finest
est finest Damascus steel which have
been preserved over the centu centuries
ries centuries for special occasions.
Thousands of other Moslems
whose forebears conquered this
land of crocodiles and brilliant
flowers centuries ago stood be behind
hind behind the knights to cheer their
Queen.
The residents began arriving
in Kaduna last week and assem assembled
bled assembled In a special camp of grass
huts built to hold 6000 people
and 3000 horses.
Tomorrow will be their great
day.. -In
honor of the first reiernlns:

6ram Lincoln.

(51
Panama DA
Files Brief
In Remon Case
Attorney General Victor de
Leon today called for Supreme
Court confirmation of tne juag juag-ment
ment juag-ment handed down by the Supe Superior
rior Superior Court of Justice regarding
some individuals detained in
connection with the Jan. 2, 1955,
assassination of President Jose
A. Remon.
De Leon's brief, consisting of
43 pages asked the supreme
Court to confirm its decision to
call confessed triggerman Ruben
O. Mlro and six alleged accom accomplices
plices accomplices to trial. The six named
were Rodolfo St. Malo, FedericO
A. Hyams, Jose E. Tejada, Luis
C. Hernandez and Camilo Gon Gonzalez;
zalez; Gonzalez; also Mrs. Teresa Castro
Suarez, who is accused of har harboring
boring harboring a criminal. y
De Leon also asked the Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court to uphold the Su Superior
perior Superior Court's decision which had
given provisional freedom to
some of th other persons ques questioned
tioned questioned in connection with the as
sassination.
Defense attorneys were given
48 hours to nresent thlr aid. nf
the case to the Supreme Court.
Canal '$ Contraband
Control Functions
Due f or Uiiilication
Under provisions which have
been made by incorporating cus
toms,. immigration and contrab
and control in a single operational
unit, the Canal Zone Government's
contraband control function is to
oe re-established within the Civil
Affairs Bureau.
A directive was issued at Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Heights today to integrate the
present Contraband Control Sec Section
tion Section with the Customs Division of
the Civil Affairs Bureau. Official Officially,
ly, Officially, the action will become effec
tive Feb. 12.
J.B. Clemmons, Jr., will con continue
tinue continue as Chief of the Customs Di
vision and all customs operators,
jui-iuauig comraDana control ac activities
tivities activities which have been conduc
ted as a separate Contraband Con
trol Section headed by Philip) L.
Dade, will be centered at the pres present
ent present Customs Division headquart headquarters
ers headquarters on both sides of the Isthmus:
on the first floor of the Port Cap Captain's
tain's Captain's Building at Balboa and the
second floor of the Administration
Building at Cristobal.
Billy D:nsels Out
On B:il Following
Assault On Trainer
NEW YORK, Feb. 2 (UP)
Dapper Negro singer Billy Daniels
appeared in court yesterday on a
charge of wounding a Negro fight
trainer in an after-hours drinking
establishment. He was released in
$2,500 bail for a hearing Feb, 28.
The crooner of "That Ole' Black
Magic" was charged with felon felonious
ious felonious assault and carrying a con
cealed weaoon in the shooting of
James Jackson, 33.
Jackson was wounded In the
shoulder Tuesday morning. Dan
lels, 40, was arrested at his apart
ment in the afternoon and was
unable to apoear at his last per
formance at the Copacabana night
club.
Asst.'. Dist. Attv Carl JVergar?
told magistrate Thomas Cullen
Jr. that both men were drinking
and began to fight in the drinking
place. Vergari said three shots
were fired. One struck Jackson,
but his wound was not serious.
country, the Moslem horsemen
will perform their "charge."
Some 2001 riders will race their
horses full speed at the Queen
and then rein to a sudden halt
just yards from where she
stands. .-.
Usually the superb horsemen
halt within inches of a person so
honored, but the British author authorities
ities authorities are takinsr no chances with
the Queen. -., ...
The horsemen will stop 20
yards from her.
The Queen and her husband
also -will watch a parade of 8000
men in full tribal regana, zoou

US, UK,

Will Plan Ways

fo Avoid War

. WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 (UP)-The United States,
Britain ond France soon will consider new peace safe
guards in the Middle East.
The proposals they will discuss range from having more
United Nations observers check frontiers to threatening
joint military action against the side starting a new con conflict
flict conflict in the Arab-Israeli crisis. t
A call for three-power talks on the "increased risk
of war" in the Middle East was made yesterday by Pres

ident Eisenhower and British Prime Minister Sir Anthony
Eden.
It was contained in a final communique on their
three days of conferences at the. White House.

Sen. Walter F. Georee (D-
na, i. chairman of the Senate
foreign relations committee, fa favored
vored favored the Elsenhower-Eden de
cision. :,
He said "the tripartite decla
ration of 1950 (nrovidlnir for
British-American-French action
if Arab-Israel frontiers were vio
lated should be very firmly re
stated.
In another maior action..-the
two Allied leadPri! w-nci ...led
China that any aasrea;..uii in
thn Far East would he countered
bv 1oint British-American mili
tary might.
The warning was couched In
general terms, but both U.S. and
British spokesmen said combined
action also would be taken if
Formosa were invaded.
This agreement assumed ad
ditional significance in view
of Britain's long-cool att'tude
toward the Nationalist Chinese
government on Formosa and
threats by the Red Chinese,
repeated this week, to take
Formosa "by war if necessary."
Although the Eisenhower-Eden
talk, were over, the British
Prime Minister remained in
Washington today for separete
addresses to the senate and
House.
Tonight he will make a radio-
television report to the American
people before leaving tomorrow
ior Ottawa, Canada.
In addition to their comma
nlque, Mr. Eisenhower and Eden
issued a 'Declaration of Wash
ington" designed to show that
Russia's new economic aid offers
to under-developed nations' are
aimed at political conquest, ra rather
ther rather than any humanitarian de
sire to help out a needy friend.
OOPS'. MAYBE'.
Isthmian eroun-hoe exDerts
a little out of practice in this
latitude contessed themselves a
bit uncprtnin 1 whethpr tnriav'R
bright sun would mean six weeks
more of the peculiar rainy, mug muggy
gy muggy weather everyone's been com complaining
plaining complaining of.
Back in the States now, if the
toothv little fellow sees his sha
dow on Feb. 2 Ground-Hog Day
tradition says his area is in for
six weeus more of .real winter
weather.
If Ground-Ho Tiav Is over
cast, so much so that the critter
can't see his shadow, it means,
according to tradition that
spring will come early.
But it s summer already in the
Republic. School's out and every everybody
body everybody is trekking to the Interior
forjvacations, sun or no. M

IVgSLEET e,

FIYE CENTS

France
It also expressed the West's de desire
sire desire for peace.
The declaration was hailed by
Senate GOP leader William F.
Knowland (Calif.) as an able
statement of the free world's
desire for "peace with honor"
which made clear the United
States and Britain will not fc
"paralyzed" in event of a r :
attack.
CHS Ac!;iifo:!Iv
Staff On I ibnd.
The administrative staff of Bal
boa riign School will conuuet a
general meeting of parents Mon Monday
day Monday at 7:30 P.M. in the high school
library.
The meetine is aimed at. araua.
intine the Darents of eighth, ninth.
tenth, and eleventh grade students
with th administrative staff and
with pertinent information re regarding
garding regarding the courses of study that
are offered.
During the meeting many topics
of interest will be discussed, such
as the subjects available to in incoming
coming incoming freshmen, the number of
subjects that can be taken, the
extra-curricular program of Bal
boa High School, and the require requirements
ments requirements for graduation and entrance
into college.
The following members of the
counseling staff will be on hand ;
to answer questions: Miss Marie'
Weir, girls' advisor; Harold Zier.
ten, assistant principal-counselor; ;
T.F. Hotz, principal of Balboa
High School; and Frank Castles,
assistant principal in charge of
the junior high school.,
All parents are i urged to at attend.
tend. attend. Red Arms To Egypt
Detailed In Photo
CAIRO, Feb. 2 (UP) -Four
Russian photos in the Egyptian
armed forces magazine today
showed that Egypt received arms
ranging from Mig jets to armor armored
ed armored troop transport trucks in its
deal with Communist Czechoslova Czechoslova-jjg
jjg Czechoslova-jjg One picture, with traces of the
Lenin and Stalin mausoleum at
Red Square in the background,
showed six-wheeled armored troop
transports carrying Russian
troops. :
Another picture, with the back background
ground background blacked out, showed anti anti-airrraft
airrraft anti-airrraft guns drawn by trucks.
The last picture showed th e
Migs, which the west alread 1
knew Egypt had received.
'Patricia' Due
Tomorrow With 200
Tourists Aboard
The tourists keep coming.
Tomorrow over 200 sight-secrs
will disembark at Cristobal when
the Patricia docks. Cruise pas passengers
sengers passengers will be taken to the Pa Pacific
cific Pacific side for shopping and ara
expected to leave around mid midnight
night midnight Persons Travel Bureau' is
handling their itinerary.
Next Monday another t't
cruise ship, the Mauretania is
due in Cristobal with scve!. ; l
hundred passengers.



TT2 r vNuva akisicax an tstazszixt rAiti xrwsrAris

TIirSSDAY, FirrCAUT 2. 133

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
MnifQ AND euUfD v THI PAXM wr:HieN PRESS. INC
rOUNCfcD T kH-SO HOUNSEVtLt. I 11
HAMODIO ARIA. t3ITO
7 H Strict P. O. Box 134 Pnm. k. of P.
.,1 TELt'HCni 2-0740 15 Llxts
Cll ArDt. PANAMtPICAM. PNM
CaLON Orrict 12 17 Central Avtuuf tii '2tm no 13TM TttT
OM!0 BCENTATIVI. JOSHUA B. POWERS, INC.
. J49 Madison Ave. Ne YORK. 7i N. V,
. LtOL 'l
Month, in advance
J0 MONTH. IN AOVANCE J
-0 ONE YEAR. IN ADVANCE 18. SO

trwti n tou ronuM rut riadks own columh
' Tit Mail Bm h lw r M4r Th '""
titttn r rtttivaa r.Mully m r taW fai wholly coMhl

If MPtribytt lttf don't

LtlMx H ayblitftta M taa
FIim tr kp th Ittttn limited to oi P9 "itv.
Id.irtiry of Uttr writm is hold M trict cfidnca.
Ti ncwtpoptr ingnwi no ropoiibilirr itttomonti tt lolin
mpmtti i Uf fro rdr,
llH E MAIL 30X

GOING
Sir:

:t .m ne of those many happy Air Force dependents that

listen to the rain, noisy: brats, cats, dogs and drunks, or see
neglected children playing in the streets, drinking dirty water
irom the gutters on the Base, while their mothers are off Jo
a sport or club, I wont hear mothers cursing their children
or whipping them every ten minutes. ...
When I'm going to church I won't see women with no
V respect for God's house, that wear V-necks and backless dresses
- or thin blouses with no slips. There won't be walling babies,
Tkids kicking the pews or bottles fed to babies as if they were
in amovie. Jui gangsters and their
molls "l blue jean slops) who could use soap, water and shoe
POli I1 won't need my overcoat to wear to the movies. Where I
L adi going the sun shines all the time.
I had wonderful care from the doctors and-nurses while at
Gorgas. We also have very good teachers at Balboa and the
Sisters at St. Maryi are God's precious gilt to our children and
' the catholic faith.
L'.S.A.-Bound Air Force Wife
.v (Not my first tour overseas)
COMING BACK
. 6ir: .... .',
I have been stationed in the Canal Zone for the years be be-"
" be-" tween Itt&i and lfl8. During most of those years I was provost
-Sergeant at i. Sherman. I am retired now and expect to make
a trip to Panama!
, I would like to hear from anybody that is still there that
remembers me, as I had a number of civilian friends on both
slaes, although mostly on the Atlantic.
. MSgt. Joe Wcinlak, Rtd.
3905 Broadway
West Palm Beach, Fla.

LETTER FROM RONNIE

sir
I am Ronnie Matthews, and

Monte Vista School. I need a copy of any newspaper or maga maga-?ine
?ine maga-?ine of your country.
I also need two coins and paper currency and five postal
stamps. The above material is needed for a school project and
I would appreciate very much if you could help me. Thanking
you in advance.
Very truly yours,
Ronnie Matthewi
3426 N. 38th St.
Jan. 3, 1956
, , .Phoenix, Arizona

V

vre eMAvr.trvre Barrv Dodd. 12. of South Ockendon,

Essex, appears delighted at having two pythons slither around his
neck at "The Schoolboys' Own" exhibition In London's Royal
Horticultural Hall. Everyone seems calm, so the snakei art
twbabl harmless. Or r they? .

SIDE GLANCES
VMM
TM Ibf. us. Off.
S 1956 1, Nf .... k.

m ni -ii.
"Jr .' 1 - -
i i I
A

, "I'm surprised to see Vur ney.tor Jonej attheoperaf attheoperaf-Ha's
Ha's attheoperaf-Ha's a real lawbrow never pretends to appreciata

somethin,i

b imporiint doom'! appw the

AWAY
I am in the seventh grade at
i 1 f 1
i I
By Colbroith
he doesn't like!"

s h

A i ? ;

jAgornr c?i tnz
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Strcico
NORTH
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AKQ953
46
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WEST
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A K Q 9 T
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SOUTH (0)
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North-South vul.
South
2
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Pass
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34
4
5
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Pas
Opening lead 10
There was a time when the news-
paperman s favorite game was
poser, but the modern newspaper newspaperman
man newspaperman is more likelyt ban not to be
a bridge fan. Typical of this young
er generation oi news gatherers is
Bill Gallico, well known New York
newspaperman, who manages to
give a good account of himself in
bridge tournaments when he can
find time away from his profes
sional duties.
When today's hand was played
in i recent tournament, Gallico
held the West cards. Naturally he
thought of leading th king of
spades against the contract of six
hearts, but he stopped to think
matters over and came to a better
solution to his problem.
The bidding made it obvious that
South had the ace of spades. It
was also clear that South had a
self-sufficient trump suit. If Gallic
led the king of spades, as every
other West player did, South would
win with the ace of spades, draw
trumps, and take whatever dia
mond tricks dummy could furnish.
Was there any way to scotch this
plan? Gallico saw that the only
chance was to cut the communica
tions between the North and South
hands. This might be done if he
led a diamond immediately instead
of giving declarer the chance to
draw trumps Detore aiamonas
were tackled.
r.allicn tWpimnn nornpd the ten
of diamonds, and this brilliant lead
defeated the slam contract. De
clarer had to win in dummy witn
tha ana nf diamond, and he had
to continue the diamonds at once
a oivn thm tin fnrpvftr.
Declarer cashed the king of
riisesirrlinff a SDade
from his hand, and then agonized
in the attempt to cnoose peiweeii
a th rd diamond ana rounu u
clubs. 1 ..
It didn't matter which South
.w if h IpH thp third diamond.
w.ct uiniiiH ruff jinrf take the ace
of clubs. If declarer, instead, led a
club from the dummy, West would
take his ace of ciuds ana reiurn
irmn in mke sure that South
would eventually lose a second
club trick.
1 1,
FISSION FASHION-Ve.
Iuro walks a street in Chicago,
111., wearing his atomic-agt
outfit. It's a suit designed to
protect' the wearer from H H-bomb
bomb H-bomb fallout. Weighing only
IS ounces, it's made of tightly
woven Italian silk.

.1

"This Deep It's

MM

ffiS
SVTVMIPV i n.tr. Ii. 'Om nt
the reasons I admire this country
is for a tmng we usea to have,
whicn we aont have any more
nameiy, oare-knucitied journalism.
We have oecome lottuy pome to
each other in me American press
in recent years.
Practically nothing remains of
thp ercat teuri between the lion-
fus-'lammea Uenver r ost and the
Kocky Mountain News. The clam clamorous
orous clamorous days of Charue Mac Arthur
in tne dug chew aog newspaper
business in Chicago aie gone, lor lor-ever
ever lor-ever dead. Most of today s young
try wouia noi unow inai uie leim
"circulation slugger was aerivea
from the employment of nara Doys
to prevent nvais from seuing pa papers.
pers. papers. To slug as into suomission.
in manv noprs in America todav
it is difncult to get tne name oi
tn& nnnnuilinn an tMi nt tin I OQQ th A
puoliiner aies ana you get to run
nis ooit out ot simpie courtesy.
uic uuuusiiiuu ail ink inuvkjB miu
AUC VIM luvux Rim wi.it wwimv.. w
Uvif.iii Ann. I'na Anna flcfiirt dllPlfl
between jackals are frowned on and
i l.:u i a. .... 4k.-
piayea aown wnicn iu ay u.v
fu. m.ii-.tiM u nr tinnncH in prm
about what one newspaperman
thinks about anotner.
Whether this is true is not ger-
mAne It i imDortant to the news
paper-man to use his platform to
take a wallop at an opposition char
acter wno has jusi lanaea mm ono

(
. ...... ;
JjP JWMil
(. a,: mrli" I ilm

Peter Idson In Washin

WASHINGTON (NEA) His-t
i. .ii ...n. in
tory repeats all over the page in
New Hampshire Deputy Secretary
nt State Hnrrv F. Jackson. This is
the letter in which the President
says he does not feel ne snouia
Interpose objections to entering his
name in the March primary elec
tion.
After giving his supporters wis
build-up for their hopes, the Presi Presi-A
A Presi-A tint in th rp breath, knocks
them down again by saying that
"this cannot be construed as any
final decision on my part rela relative
tive relative to a candidacy for a second
term." -'
Almost exacuy tour year a8u,!
Gen. Eisenhower was playing the
-. nt at and mouse With
same gam ui
public and politicians on whether
he was a presiaenum
On Jan. 6, 1952, Senator Henry
ri-w i nAa JrJ (R-Mass). an-
tflUW UV"ftvt Tn"
nounced that he was entering Eis
enhower's name in me new namy namy-skP51mtari"
skP51mtari" namy-skP51mtari" Hen .' Eisenhower
ireleased a statement from nis
i no iicaw wwj
North Atlantic Treaty urgamiv
headquarters in Paris. It was
u.j 4ha mam careful DOtu-
sides-of-the-question language used
in the current letter in""-""- -said
yea, no and maybe but per per-hn.
hn. per-hn. not. Anyone could read into it
anything he chose. .
Many people flia just urn
are now doing witn me so iciiei

P. A. CLASSIFIEDS

Politics This Deep

f?f2 I r, ?Y

3

J

tiyisic.)

Too, Too Polite
By BOB RUARK

in the eye, because newspapermen
are people, too, subject to frustra frustration.
tion. frustration. It is bad form to set very
angry in print, any more, as being
below the flignity or me paper. me
end product is that the juices run j
unless you can holler and heave a
chair once in a while, without
some job-frightened copyreaoer i
cutting the guts out of your anger.)
But out here they are still hairy;
in th purs and short in the tem
per. There was one day when the
august puDlisner oi one oi
nrnnerti and the auzust publisher
of another set of properties slugged
it out in full view ot au me mem members
bers members of Australia's sanctum sanc
torum, the Bandwick race course
in the members enclosure.
They prey on each other's staffs
shamelessly, and they fight open
battles in their columns and in
inn r axiniii mis. auu ii
their editorials, and they win, joy
fuUy pinch each other's properties
m purchased stuff. :
X Ui cAouiyi:, W
rr.t.rtBnk alunff ati A t thA Sun
the other day. The Sun had spent
t i j aML A Km lAmanAiv I
hock ox ouuk w muj mwj
momAin ftnH had been ballynoo-
ing like mad. On the day the first
insiaimem ,v"'
naa inaucea nantw l"
cable a full story of quotable parts
from Jhe memoirs, and neatly slic
the" "top off the other bloke's jour journalistic
nalistic journalistic egg. There was electricity
"There is no question of, the
iVit nf imoHpin citizens to or-
vioht nf American citizens to or
ganize in pursuit of their common
onnviotinne fien. Eisenhower said
in his statement of four years ago
"I realize that senator wage ana
his associates are exercising this
right in an attempt to place before
me next July, a duty that would
transcend my present responsi responsibility.
bility. responsibility. In the absence, however, of
a clear-cut call to political duty, I
shall continue to devote my full
attention and energies to the per per-nrmanee
nrmanee per-nrmanee of the vital task to which
I am assigned." J
c,.witta trie fart that President
Eisenhower's chief concern today
hi. t,..llh wherein his DrODlem
four years ago was that he had
another JOD. wnai yyu
up with Is the 1958 version of the
1952 thought.
He says now, "freedom to select,
nominate and elect a candidate to
.wmi. nfii. t hasic to our Amer
ican political system. Because I
deeply Deiieve inai evmjr vu.
should have the widest possible
choice in expressing his own pref preference
erence preference in such matters, I would
hope that the accident of my illness
and the necessary period for deter determining
mining determining the degree of my recovery
would not have the effect of inter
fering with the privilege of every
member of our party to express

It's Suicide''

rriMrllnv nn fha ta1nhnna Ilka VOU
never heard.

Apart from active intramural of the U. S. Information Agency.
r .ii ii. ... -4...ls- i n J 1 a am

warfare all the tinners concentrate
on what they consider people would
like to read, not what they are
sunnnnpH tn read. In mv 12 vears
of in-and-outing here, I never pick
up a dull copy or an Australian
newspaper. They hit the personal
story hard. Not since some ancient
Meyer Berger have I read as fine
a piece of copy as me xeiegrapn s
account of a wedding between the
srinn nf iwn annrmouslv wealthy
families, In which this meeting of
the mighty was traced straight
back to the immigrant forebears
nri thair mishcart
I do not entertain much hope of
getting this piece printed, dui it
seems to me that we have gone
aurfnl sentlnmanlv sinfe" I W8S a
pup in the business, and we had
started turning me omer nw
even then Dignity is a great thing,
hut T never, felt it had too much
business in newspapers, except to
lose circulation.
We are not really a dignified
medium, since we deal daily with
whn are lareelv un
dignified In the practice of their
ta liv iThank God. II I
gentleman from The Times was
saying here tne oiner aay, me
Australians still love a orawi
his preference for the presidential
candidate oi nis cnoice.
Reading or hearing this new
statement, people who have
thought all along that Ike will be a
candidate for a second term are
now convinced he will run again.
People who have believed he will
bow out are now equally sure.
In 1952, Gen. Eisenhower kept
this guessing game going for an another
other another three months. On March 7,
1952, just before the New Hamp Hampshire
shire Hampshire primary, he again refused to
say whether he was a candidate,
Hb uirnta thin evasion tft Robert P.
Burroughs of Manchester, a former
GOP committeeman;
"I have no alternative but to
adhere tn the inirit and intent of
my public announcement of Jan. 7
Even after the iwarcn u,
New Hampshire primary, which
h won Ken Eisenhower would
say only that "any American who
is so nonored Dy so many uura
Americans should be proud." That
didn't say he was a candidate and
would run.
President Eisenhower now writes
to New Hampshire, "I am deep deeply
ly deeply gratified that the petitioners
have -expressed this kind of p-re
have expressed this kind of per personal
sonal personal confidence in me." That
dnesn't make him a candidate or
say he's running either. t
in 1952 sucn a siaiemem uu uui
come till April 11
y i
O .IV awut J

gion

ZAiINiT0N De-'Pi,e Presi-!Force wanted to cooperate,' high high-neni
neni high-neni tisennower s statement that er-UDS in the Defpns Dsnart

his health never would permit him
- . ... H'"'H III in
to be as vigorous as before, Re-
uuuvau vuiigressionai leaders
continue to be optimistic that he
will run again.
What they base their optimism
on is a bit hazy. But one clue they
cite is one of their own recent
meetings with the Presidnet at
which he made this quip about
running again:
"I've just been given a new
reason why I should run again,"
the President said.
Continuing, he said that some someone
one someone had told him that if he could
not run in November then he
should resign now. j
Republican leaders who were
present jumped at the conclusion
that if Ike was physically able to
continue in office until November,
he would be physically able to
remain in office thereafter.
Under The Dome
The two Senators from Arizona,
Democrat Carl Hayden and Re Republican
publican Republican Barry Goldwater, have
made a secret deal to help each
other get elected. The deal was
put across by Hayden's Adminis Administrative
trative Administrative Assistant, Darrel St.
Claire. It provides that Goldwater
will give only token support to
the GOP candidate against Hay Hayden
den Hayden this year and Hayden will
give only token support to the
Democratic candidate against
Goldwater. ... This is a big
break for Goldwater. Nobody could
defeat Hayden, but Goldwater is
in danger. . Sen. Prescott Bush,
Republican of Connecticut, is also
in danger. He is bug-eyed for fear
Gov. Abe Ribicoff of Connecticut
will run against him, even wants
Ribicoff appointed to the Supreme
Court if there is a vacancy
So far there" isn't. ... Ike is
slow at learning the great game of
politics. He has appointed Dr. Don Donald
ald Donald Bridges, brother of the some sometimes
times sometimes critical GOP Senator from
I llHlca tniiiti uui ociiawi xivm
Mur Tfamnshirp Stvlp Rridees.
as head of the Religious Section
Senator Bridees has been a con
stant meat-axer of uma tunas.
With his brother on the payroll
maybe styles win pe more
tolerant.
Civil-Rights Secrecy
Cenatnr Dnuirlas of Illinois has
withdrawn his threat to attach an
anti-lynching rider to the natural
gas bill. The Senate parliamentar
ian warns him that any civu civu-rights
rights civu-rights amendments w o u 1 d be
thrown out as not gerjnainc iu
natural ffa. . .The little blOC
of civil-rights congressmen is get
ting more secret aoout us ut-
stage huddles man me was auoui
AJninha wertTaU's ooeration in
side Dixon-Yates. Those who met
in Congresman Huge tcoti s oi oi-fice
fice oi-fice to discuss an anti-lynching
wn Moontiv were Jimmy Roose
velt; Charlie Diggs, Negro Con-
. n.u.lt Tnhn rim.
gressman irom ueuuii,
gell, newly elected Democrat from
r-.,;t. riirir Rnllin? Kansas
City Democrat; also the following
... J. Ti.ii.. tir..h
Republicans: iom reuy v
John Heselton (Mass.), plus Scott.
Their guarded statements .after .afterward
ward .afterward sounded as if they had been
discussing the latest secret guided
missile. ... Worst diehard oppos opposing
ing opposing any civil-rights legislation is
Congressman Forrester of Georgia
who holds a key spot pn the Ju Judiciary
diciary Judiciary Committee..
NAACP workers, Lamar Smitn
and G. W. Lee, were killed in
Mississippi while getting Negroes
registered to vote,, A third was
seriously wounded."
Ice Carnival
hetween the supposedly
unified Army, Navy and Air Force
now has extended to me oi. ram
ice carnival. Navy daredevils are
planning to steal the show from
Air Force daredevils at the ice
carnival January 29. , ,
Carnival officials originally ask asked
ed asked the Air Force Thunder Jets,
an aerial acrobatic team, to dem demonstrate
onstrate demonstrate precision flying during
the carnival. But though the Air
Going Places
ACROSS DOWN
1 Harbor. Ordered
Maine
4 He goes with Mtat
i Jr1. a ,, SWlng-shaped
12 Trench friend
7 Suffix
;13 Sad cry
8. lea cream
i4bpoKen
containers
! 15 Accomplished Russian cny 26
IB Unpleasant 10 Former times 27
ness
18 Redactors
20 Greek letter
21 Mongrel
ii Girl's name-
17 Fancy
19 African city
23 Three timet
24 Graf
1 22 Followers
124 Made thread
25 Seed
! 28 Greek goddess
containers
37 High priest
! -(Bib.)
30 Courteous

rl 3 I t' 5' b l f f f f
1 1 Ii
r" j """if"
" "
tZ-JLJiEJ-
t x 1 p
"'
T) Z

32 Slanted type
1 34 Ancient Vrf a,
; Turkey
3$ Shade of red
36 Worm
17 Gaelic
39 Amounts (ab.)
40 Aleutian
I island
41 Jaoanese sash
4Z Whirls
45Vegetawe
49 Secrets -1
Fruit drink
r52 Author,
Stanley
Gardner
83 Nested boxes
;54 Chinese
leverage
E3,Undesired
1 plant
J Mexican
' laborer

1 N- v '"cfTrnM
i.iEnny-6o-uou;:D
trDngwrcAnsoH,

i turned the invitation down. Mean-
whllp tho Nai'v'a HsrAl.irit tn.m
the Blue Angels,' didn't bother to
ask the Defense Department for
permission, but went ahead and
agreea to stage aerial acrohaucs
for the ice carnival.
Since the Blue Angels had al already
ready already accepted the Defense De Department
partment Department gave them official per permission
mission permission to go ahead. As a result,
the Air Force stunt fliers will be
grounded while the Navy's Blue
Angeles perform.
Washington Pipeline
Since Secretary Dulles has
called U. S. Ambassador Byroade
back from Egypt to advise on the
Near East during the Eden-Eisenhower
conference, he might also
call back Edward B. Lawson,
Ambassador to Israel. Byroade is
considered Very Pro-Arab, Lawson
is friendly to Israel. The Eden
conference should have a balanced
picture. . Senators Knowland,
Bridges, et al, the right-wing Re Re-publians,
publians, Re-publians, are getting some handy
ammunition against foreign aid
from the General Accounting of office.
fice. office. GAO has done a country-by-country
survey of foreign aid and
come up with evidence of some
minor mismanagement, tisennow tisennow-er
er tisennow-er opponents in the Senate intend
to use these in their battle against
foreign aid. . General Rid g-
way ain't said notnin- yet. nis
next installment in the Saturday
tfveninir Post reallv lets Secretary
of Defense Wilson have it. .
The Democrats have coined a new
slogan for the Republicans who
boast they are the party of Abra Abraham
ham Abraham Lincoln. The Democrats now
call them "The Party of Lincoln
and Cadillac." . Adiai Steven-
nn hai henn advised bv Sen. Lyn
don Johnson and Speaker Sam
Rayburn to stay out oi me naiurai
van fieht. It looks as if he is
fniimiMnrr that advice. . A move
has developed inside the Air Force
to reverse the trial oi oen. oiuy
muohnii father nf th Air Force.
Under military procedure it s pos possible
sible possible for any court martial to be
corrected if it' can be proved van.
injustice was done, wrtainiy
was the case with Billy Mitchell.
. . One event In his career Gen.
Douglas Mac Arthur would like to
forget is that he served on the
tmu.. nfitnhnii ennrt martial ana
voted against him. Maj. &en.
Byron Gates, former commander
of Chanute neiuy-"-r "-j
agreed with the Air Force to plead
&y,to articl.15.ThU wodd
e ve him a repnin" ;r"
favoritism to one msurance com com-pany
pany com-pany in selling GI insurance.
RISKY -Ingrid Bergman, th.
controversial star who left her
husband and Hollywood for re-:
marriage and movie-making in:
Italy, caused one of Hollywood's
biggest hassles in 1955. The de debate
bate debate was ever the casting of
Ingrid in "Anastasia." Many
movie-makers and theater own owners
ers owners believed her conduct had
made her unpopular with fans.
But Producer Darryl Zanuck
took the chance. Exhibitors era
watching the picture's box box-office
office box-office record with keen interest.
Answer to Pravious Punlt

MlUlKl I All-
Tv r s
A T ' '&
zrzz
STAN
5 X N p
r" "St r inn"
- '- A
if M 5 iL:'
A, N T l

gs Pt A Si
u jm 7 t gK
N D H P
" T"J f e"r n j
I Z 5. R 15 I
' Vk o W?l
Jill ZLh.t.

Vital .organ
41 Producer,
Wells
42 Small duck
43 Funeral pile
44 Poetic island
Remove
Z8Hoster
29 Chills
31 African fly
94 TUwfoiiln
46 Air (prefix)
38 Lying on back 47 Notion
40Put up a 4ruii
poker stake. 80 Tear



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN IVDEITXTrvr DAILY NFWSPAPEH
FAG 2 TT
Ike Asks Congress To Raise
Postal Rales $405 Million

TTIUnSP.V', FEBr",T ?, I'i-S

r
i

(Bnol rUh

WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 (UP) -President
Eisenhower asked a
skeptical Congress today to raise
postal rates about 405 million dol dollars
lars dollars a year, including a one-cent
boost for each ounce of first class
pf) air mail.
His recommendations, designed

to wipe out virtually all of the
chronic postal deficiencies were
coupled with a five-.2ar 780 mil million
lion million dollar program for replacing
and modernizing post office build buildings
ings buildings and equipment.
In letters to House and Senate

leaders, the President asked the
lawmakers, who have been nota notably
bly notably cool toward postal increases,
to:-
1. Raise an extra 295 million dol dollars
lars dollars by boosting postal rates on
first class letters from three to
four cents an ounce.
2. Increase air mail rates from
six to seven cents an ounce, pro

viding an extra 16 million dollars.
3. Approve two successive an annual
nual annual increases of about 15 per cent
each in second class rates for
newspapers and magazines. This
would bring in about 17 million
dollars in extra revenue.

4. Provide for a 30 per cent in-

mail which consists largely of ad advertising
vertising advertising matter. This would yield
an extra 77 million dollars.
This is the fourth straight year
that Congress has been asi;ed to

raise postal rates to put the na nation's
tion's nation's mail service on something
close to a break-even basis.
Mr. Eisenhower las vear called

for only a one-cent increase in the
first ounce of first class mail and

airmail to raise 350 million dollars

more. His new proposal would

make each ounce costa, a penny

more.
Rep, Wilbour Mills (D-Ark. crit

icized the administration for an anticipating
ticipating anticipating postal rate increases- in
predicting a 400 million dollar
budget surplus next year. He said
Congress is unlikely to authorize

tne increase.

In his letters to Vice-president
Richard M. Nixon and Speaker

Sam Rayburn, Mr. Eisenhower

said there is a pressing need for
better post offices as well as for

hieher noutal rates.

lie 'asked for funds and lease
authority to undertake a. five-year
program "to bring our postal es establishment
tablishment establishment up to date." This, he

said, would result in new effi-

crease in the rate for third class ciencies and economies.'

W

By United Press

Discipline was king in Hitler"s
Wehrmacht, and was exercised

wun special relish by the non

lu.iuiaaiuiit-u uuaers. ineir.main
object, it seemed, was to turn

every hapless private under their

command into a saluting robot who
lived only by and for the regula regulations.
tions. regulations. Hans Hellmut Kirst, who

spent ten years in. the German
army makes this theme the subject
of his novel. THE REVOLT OF

uuiviNt-K A&UI Little Brown V

Herbert Asch played the disci discipline
pline discipline game like the good soldier he

was and Kept his contempt for his

hide-bound superiors well under

control. In fact, he was recom

mended for promotion by the de

tested bergeant-Maior Schulz. But

when his friend and fellow gunner

vierDien, a gentle youth, was
hounded to the point of suicide by

we saaisuc iujs, Ascn decided
to rebel against the system. He

started by disregarding certain or

ders given by his NCOs and citing
the regulations to prove his points.
Eventually, of course. Asch would

have been ruined in spite of his

sharn wits", but for his couraeeous

girl who knew a thing or two about
handling a recalcitrant military

du Doling in snrewa tasnion.
This is an entertaining story
bubbling with sly humor. And even
though the characters seem more
like caricatures at times, they
don't spoil the fun .

FIRE TRAGEDY JN BALTIMORE Firemen pour water on the remains of a hall which was
swept by fire in Baltimore.. At least 10 people have been reported dead. t

Elks Begin Annual

Search For Leaders
Among US Youlh

Are flying saucers real?

they interplanetary craft or just
hallucinations?
Some of the best scientists in the
United States can't agree. Neither
can the Army, the Navy or the
Air Force.
But the question is one that re refuses
fuses refuses to go away. The first authori

tative book on the official U.S. Air

Force investigation of flying sau

cers gives a fascinating new ac

count of these phenomena

FATHER AND SON prepare to make an addition to the family
album. The new entry Is the appointment to the U.S. Naval
Academy of William E. Lewis Jr., (left), son of Comdr. William
E. Lewis. Although the new addition will fall several pages
from the commander' appointment, they both bear the sig signature
nature signature of the Rep. Joseph W. Martin, minority leader of the
House. presently serving as assistant chief of staff for opera operations
tions operations at the 15th Naval District. Lewis was graduated from
Attleboro High School in Attleboro, Mass in the class of 1931
and received his appointment to the academy the following
year. His son received his appointment 23 years later while a
.,member of the senior class at Balboa High School.
. 1 (U.S. Navy Photo)

Mollet To Visit Strife-Torn
Algeria; iViOscow Trip Follows

PHISifb: I (UP) -Premi- once the .RGR and MRP declared

ev Guy Mollet began preparations
today for a trip to strife-torn Al Algeria
geria Algeria and a new diplomatic mis mission
sion mission to Moscow to discuss
France's most pressing foreign
problems..
The Socialist leader, who took
over from outgoing Premier Ed Edgar
gar Edgar Faure yesterday, was expec expected
ted expected to go to Algeria next weefc to

launch a new reform policy. He 'elections

prooabiy wm nead lor uussia next

month to confer with Soviet lead leaders
ers leaders on world tensions.
Mollet succeeded a s m i 1 i n g
Faure in a brief ceremony in the
Hotel Matignon. Faure s hook
hands with his successor and com commented;
mented; commented; "until next time."
Faure's small left Republican
Rally (RGR) threw its votes to
Mollet in the near record National
Assembly ballot which confirmed
him as head of France's 22nd post-j

war government by 420 to 71 ear

ly yesterday. v ; a'.-
The voting lined up the Social Social-Its,
Its, Social-Its, RGR, the Catholic Popular Re Republicans
publicans Republicans (MRP) and P re r r e
Mendes France's Republican front
for a possible "third force" major majority
ity majority against the Communists on the
left and the anti-lax followers of
Pierre Poujade on the right.
The Reds gave Mollet their
Votes, but he did not need them

their support

The Premier still has no perma permanent
nent permanent majority in Parliament, how however,
ever, however, and political observers be-

ueveu ne wouia lino the going
rough. To stay in office, he must
rely on either tne Communists, his
life-long enemies, or the RGR and
MRP, the center-right coalition he
and Mendes-France fought In the

Mollet's wide-swinging program
gave top priority to the Algerian
crisis where nationalist terrorism

has brought death and destruc

tion. The Premier, plans to meet

witn his cabinet tomorrow to set
the stage; for his trip to North
Africa, probably next Tuesday

or Wednesday.

He hopes to arrange a truce
that will end "terrorism and blind

repression and to reinforce the

"indissoluble" union between Al

geria and metropolitan France.
He promises free elections, admi administrative
nistrative administrative and economic reforms
and liberation of political prison prisoners.'
ers.' prisoners.' " :
Mollet had accepted an invita invitation
tion invitation to Moscow as secretary-general
of the French Socialist party.
Diplomatic sources expected the
Kremlin to emphasize, the invita invitation
tion invitation now that Mollet is premier.

THE REPORT ON UNIDENTI

FIED FLYING OBJECTS by Ed Edward
ward Edward J. Ruppelt (Doubleday) is

sober and fact-filled including rec

ords of cases regarded as "clas

sics in flying saucer lore.

Ruppelt admits he is not a 'be 'believer'.'
liever'.' 'believer'.' or a disbeliever. He has
seen too many "unexplainable"
UFO reports fall apart upon in investigation
vestigation investigation that proved they were
birds, light phenomena or mis mis-identification
identification mis-identification of common objects.
But, he writes, "Everytime I get

skeptical I think of the other re

ports, the many reports made by

experienced pilots and radar oper

ators, scientists and other people

who know what they re looking at.

Scientific progress will help the

UFO investigators, Ruppelt says.

and "slowly but surely these peo

ple are working closer to tee an
swer closer to the proof : May

be the final proven answer will be
that all the UFO's are merely mis mis-identified
identified mis-identified known objects . Or

maybe the earth is being; visited by
interplanetary spaceships. Only

time will telL"

The Republican party formally

introduced the advertising agen

cies to presidential politics in 1952,
with such promising results there
seems no doubt they will be re retained
tained retained by both sides for this year's
campaign. John G. Schneider, who

used to be an adman himself, is
willing to surmise that by 1960
they will be so dominant that the
man the people choose that year
will be less a president than a
"product."

THE GOLDEN KAZOO, (Rine-

hart) Schneider s first novel, is a
hilariously satirical report on the

agency-dominated i960 campaign,
written with a pointed chuckle at
both parties and at such other
American institutions as television,
the newspapers and the cocktail
.party. '
The story's principal character

is JBiande Keacie, president oi

Keade & Bratton, inc., and master
mind of the Republican campaign

His chief enemy is BS&J. thet
agency handling the Democratic
candidate, but he is not without

foes in his own camp like the
copy supervisor who deserted to

the Democrats witn K&ts s secret
campaign plans, or the Republican
candidate's wife, who ran off with

a "White Russian from Brooklyn
just after her pregnancy

had given her husband the best

rating in the campaign.

I The annual search of the Elks
Are i for outstanding voune leaders is

underway.
T. G. Relihan, Exalted Ruler of
Cristobal Canal Zone Lodge No.
1542, announced today that the
deadline for filing entries in the

Elks National Youth Leadership
Contest is Feb. 15. The contest is
open to boys and girls under 19
years of age, on the Atlantic Side
who are American citizens and
gives recognition to youngsters who

nave distinguished themselves as
leaders.1 While the emphasis is on

leadership, entrants are also judg judged
ed judged on citizenship appreciation;
perseverance and resourcefulness
and sense of honor.

The boy or girl selected as the
outstanding leaders of this com community
munity community will be entered in the na

tional contest. National awards, i i-dentical
dentical i-dentical for boys and girls, are
$1,000 in U. S. Defense Bonds for
first prize; $500 in bonds for sec second
ond second and $300 in bonds for third
prize.

The contest is sponsored by the
youth activities committee of the
Gran Lodge of Elks. Dewey E. S.;
Kuhns of Charleston, W. Va,, chair chairman
man chairman of the grand lodge committee,
emphasized to Relihan the lead leadership
ership leadership contest was not a scholar scholarship
ship scholarship competition.
"Superior scholarship is not a
requirement", according to
Kuhns. 'This contest rewards and
encourages boys and girls who arej

recognized as leaders by their
classmates, teachers, clergyman

the type of youth who is marked
for future leadership responsibility

in our democratic sonety

In charge of the local contest is

youth artmty noramittee of Lodge

No. 1542, composed of M, M. La

Croix and J. WhiteEntry blanks

and the rules for the contest may

be obtained from Paul Beck, Pnn
cipal, Cristobal High School.

Visitors To Preach

Sunday Al SI. Paul

fit
H

DOG'S LIFE Lassie, the fa famous
mous famous dog star of movies, is now
faring better in TV. He drew
only $263,000 In seven years of
movie stardom. His home home-screen
screen home-screen earnings last year, plus
personal appearances, earned
$100,000.

: r

(I -.

; b Knl1-

I ;-'v'

Vlsitine clergymen from Cos

ta Rica will occupy the. pulpit of

St. Paul's Church on Sunday.

At the 9 a.m. service of Holy

Eucharist Rev. Francis M. Har Harrison
rison Harrison will preach and at Even

song, 7 p.m., Rev. James H.
Schaffter will deliver the ser sermon.
mon. sermon. On Wednesday night at 7:30

p.m. the Knights of St. Paul 'will
hold their monthly meeting and

win elect a board of trustees.

Following the meeting the mem-

Ders win oe addressed by Carl Carlton
ton Carlton Morales on the life of Rt

Paul. All members and persons
wishing to affiliate with, this
group are free to attend.

Patau's Deaf h

Dims GOP Hopes
For Senate Control

WASHINGTON Veh 9 !'nm

ui uov. raui Patterson
of Oregon gave Republicans a set

uolhl iwiay in meir struggle to Te-

guiii coniroi ot tne Senate,
GOP CamDaien mnnaaora V.J

been ouhting on Patterson to un-

aeai aen. wayne L. Morse, the
former Republican and former In In-dpendent
dpendent In-dpendent who turned Democrat
But, Patterson died of a heart at attack
tack attack yesterday .three days after
announcing he would run.
Some key ReDuhlirsns in ti.

Senate believed the White House
had pressed Patterson to seek the
Republican nomination to oppose
Morse in the election Nov. 6. They

ueuevea mat tnat tne samp

White House encouragement had

gone to uov. Arthur B. Langlie,
who is still noncommittal, to chal challenge
lenge challenge Sen. .Warren G. Magnuson
in Washington.

Republicans are in no mood to

write off Oregon, however. They
would rather beat Morse than any
other Democrat in the Senate.

Patterson's death was one of a

series of recent events which dim dimmed
med dimmed the never-bright GOP pros prospects
pects prospects of winning back control of the

Senate this year. :

Only two days ago. Ambassador

to India John Sherman Cooper
said he intended to stay at his
job instead of going back for an another
other another try at a Kentucky Senate

seat. .-. ...

Leo Cardono
To Give Concert
Al Albrook Theater

Leo Cardona, Internationally

known concert pianist and com

poser, will be presented in a re

cital at the Albrook Air Force

Base Theater Monday at 8 p.m.

pror. Cardona's appearance
is being sponsored by the Al-

wook Officers' Wives' Club. The

proceeds of this recital will be

used for charitable donations by
the club.

Cardona's concert program

will feature compositions by
Scarlatti, Beethoven, C h opin
and Debussy and will Include
many of his own compositions.
He won first place in the 1953

Ricardo Miro Cincuentenario

contest of music of Panama with

his Spanish dance composition
"Baile a Orlllas del Guadalqui Guadalquivir."
vir." Guadalquivir." Monday's concert will see
the first public performance of

Tickets for the

oruoK wui be 75 cents and may
be purchased at the theater pri prior
or prior to the performance.
Justice Department

Finds l!o Race Bias

In Jlt Scbclb

WASHINGTON. Feb. 2 lirP

The Justice Department said to-1

aay it nad found no evidence of
racial discrimination in selection of
a trial jury in Cobb County, Ga.,
and closed its investigation of the
conviction of a 28-year-old road
gang prisoner.
The investigation was touched

off by a Supreme Court reversal
of the conviction of Amos Reece.
The tribunal found that no Negro
had served on the grand jury in
the county in 18 years.
The Justice Department said
Reece will be given a new trial.
Acting Atty. Gen. William P.

Rogers said that county juries,

since August 1954 have been "cho "chosen
sen "chosen in a legal manner without un unlawful
lawful unlawful discrimination." The depart

ment also said the HI found the
county had revised Its jury list at
that time so Negroes were repre

sented. ;
Reece was charged with raping
a white housewife in 1953 while
serving out convictions of assault

with intent to rape and stealing.
He was working on a Georgia
road gang at the time of the al alleged
leged alleged assault.
The Justice Department Investi

gation aroused a storm of protest
in Georgia. Cobb Sol. Gen. Luth Luther
er Luther G. Hames Jr. said officials
"deeply resented" it and claimed
it was inspired by the National As Association
sociation Association for the Advancement of

Colored people.

Pictured above is the Sears, Roebuck SILVERTONE Television Set that received
the 3 hour TV show from Station WJTV in Miami last Saturday night. Con Con-gratulating
gratulating Con-gratulating Mrs. John F. Heme of Ancon, proud owner of the SILVERTONE
set, is Mr. Nick Simon, Sales Manager Sears, Roebuck, S. A.
, Mrs. Heme's TV Set was a 60 cycle receiver, however; Mr. Heme easily
and iucxitukaivtiy converted iC td 23 cycle In his own home."

7

(

DALLAS STREET SCENE-Snow is an unusual sight In Texasj
but it's nothing compared to the sight of a man on skis in down-n
town Dallas. He's United Press photographer Shel Hershorn, who
found the skis were the best method of transportation to get
around on his downtown assignments. Three inches of snow wer
blanketing Dallas at the time. Officer C B. Byrura holds bade
traffic to let Hershorn cross the crowded intersection.

'J.V

i.

X5

TREE "PLANTING" FOR LIFE-Alrmen at Bunker Hill Air
Base, Indiana, "plant" discarded Christmas trees along a twoH
mile runway. They'll be used as markers In snowy weather. Tht
base appealed to civilians in the area for 4000 yule trees, and that'i
how many were received. . -..

Direct Shipment
al

lo7 prices lop codify
Baiid Instruments
and Electric Organs

Call for Information

t VillisniVioletlo Supply

t Tel. 3-631S Box 282, Balboa, C. Z.

LACSA
lSUPER-i

- VPf J

flights
weekly

to MIAMI
""-"brTta '" -Grand
Cayman
and Havana

LACSA SUPER C
the "heart" of Latin America!

-. mm i fc'.

Fly Now Pay Later
., or...',
"Charge it to my account"

For information see your travel agent or call 2-3133

Service to
San Jose
Mexico
'Grand Cayman
Havana
Miami
San Salvador
Puerto Rico

I-

!!--:n;t,Ml!-

i,- a w y
iff I



TIIZ PANAMA AMrivIf AX VZZfSXZrST PlfLY lv?IMPFrl

1 ... liiLKMJ.u, rrr.r.i akt T. r

Jailed Abortionists Ask
tizltecs Trua Life Advcni urcs
TtUKI AXD THE URATES
r
. Reduction Of Sentences
' .if ;. vmjr
Viljea-.-.!. .
O : ' f
i term, said he would decide on

-a

CJ'E7 K WITHOUT J '. : .
A 5-5-frCCM? K
T-T-TEA.M.' TrWlfV -VA

.,0

u
CI
IN
11.
n
J
8
t
I

1 i

hearing arguments tomorrow. :
The petition by defense coun-I
sel did not suggest any reduced!
time. i
It merely asked a reconsider-J

auon ior tne reason mai me
sentences were too severe in

-view of all of the fact? and cir

cumstances surrounding this

case." ,-. I
Since the district attorney s
office recommended the defense1

!iask for lighter sentences, It west

1 believed likely that Carroll j
would grant the couple lighter!
' terms in county prison Instead 1
of the state institutions.
: The prison terms handed the!

j) Schwartz couple were In sharp!

contrast to the suspended sen sentence
tence sentence given Mrs. Gertrude Sil Silver,
ver, Silver, 49, mother of the victim.
All three pleaded no defense

to charges, resulting from thej
fatal abortion attempt in the1
Schwartz apartment last Aug.;
94

The suspended sentence srlven 1

Mrs. Silver, wife of a wealthv
food market executive, was de denounced
nounced denounced by Earl M. Ostreicher,
the young Miami Beach, Fla.,
motorcycle policeman who elop-

eci with tne pretty 22-year-old1
heiress, exactly two months be- i
fore her death. I
"There Is a auestlon In mv i

mind as to wehther a kinship1

vs.-cr- j
ff

NO DEFENSE Mrs. Ger Gertrude
trude Gertrude Silver, mother of Doris
Jean Ostreicher, who died
during an abortion, leaves a
City Hall anteroom In Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia on he"r way to face

charges along with Mr. and gives a person license to take
Mrs. Milton Schwartz, part ln an abortion without pen-
Bim inrtnm. r, u V ,TTnJalty'" Ostreicher said before
PIIILADELPIIIA. Feb. 2-(UP) leaving for Miami after attend attend-Attorneys
Attorneys attend-Attorneys for MUton and Ros-iinr the two-dav trial

A FAIR OP --sf f
THRESHER SHARKS 4
ORCB A SHOM- OP FISH VIOLENTLV V
THRASHING THEIR OREAT TAILS TO HEKP THE
PKEV T06ETHEI7, TO FKOVIPE A FISH t7IMNEK TWO.

alie Schwartz, Jailed for the a

bortion death of heiress Doris
Jean Ostreicher, filed pleas to today
day today for reduced sentences.
Judge Vincent A. Carroll, who
nent Schwartz to a state prison
tor three to 10 years and ordered

A:rs, Schwartz to the state In

He revealed he hired a Phil

adelphia law firm to "take sucli

legal action as may be contem contemplated"
plated" contemplated" here. f
The dead girl's father, Herman &
Silver,, said he is selling their
SWank ranfh tvno hnma in .1", i

. V. llUtllb 141 OtJ I
Urban Melrose Park and that!

dustiial home for women at the family would move from

""""-j. ra., iur an inueiuiiienjnuadeipnia

;.V

' 1 S'ttV.

ntECUJSS AND BIS ntlEKDt

Guess!

E MZhRXLL BtOSSU

This note passing

MUSr STOf

t.m. us ru. ,..

For the last time I am not going to pose for a
snow man!"

I'LL TAkTE THAT yV'T.

I -? r-

I'm eoiN6 Tb copy
WMAT" i'Ve FOUNP
in This Non-.jusr
TO See tp rumfokd
uses correct

1H by Unrln, Im. T.U. U.S. to. Off.

Answer.
Tomorrow'

ALLC1 OOf

Best of Care

0J ?. T. BAMtO

GEE, I WOULDN'T.

, KNCW WHERE -BUT MEBBE I

RECKON I'M TO FINP A CAN D05UMRN..

PRETTY BAP A DOCTOR. 7 I'VE HAD SOME

HIT, 5TRAWGEE. J THIS TIME EXPERIENCE

BETTER GET OF N?HT.. ALONG THAT

vOWRt, '' 2-X UNE

IT'S MY

HEAD,

DOC

'n

" -0 Mfe

laililiaffiAL;

YEH... ITS BV.EEDIN'
A MITE, BUT A FEW

SHOULD TAKE

CARE OF THAT

( .5TINuS,EH? I F1GGEREP
oh Air would... now lets I
( Vii W J SEE IF I CANT RUS
V 7A fu A BANDAGE J
j-Oh CXJTATH'TAIL 7;

BOOTS AND HER BUDDOJ

' ''

Her Attitude

Bl EDGAR MARTI

CRACE-FUL.CESTURE-For the : first time In history, the
royal flag is hoisted at the palace of Monaco while the prince is
absent. Usually flown only when the ruler is in residence, the
flag was raised in honor of Prince Rainier'j engagement to actresi
urace Kelly. o

Faltering Philip

thiltp't lift: Is filled with bruises.
(Veil-worn teps and rags he oses.
Repairs would leave Ills home like new.
' A. Classifieds, Jurt the rleht clue

T

VOU LOUWGE 10
LUXURV, VOO UOULD
fcEGROD&t OTHERS

THE WCt TH)K)GS )M r--

3 SQUIRE.

I

'I 1 1rT -rt ttc r J "'.mi V 1

1 V1FE J MRS. CASH. H UJi

WELL X LIKE LUXURIES, "TOO. ftUD
l'WE )WS1S7ED OM HftOHOG THEM,

WO MATTER

WOW w

HUSBftlOD

GOT THE

CASH.

SO UHPiT? HE GOT
CAUGHT PCT VT, THAT'S
ALV....UH1CH OAS

H FAULT, THE
STUPID JERK 1 I

HOPE TWEV SEWO t f-vl

50 sears! f

4r U
" Vi;5Mi -3 I
, i wla s.rK.. wt. ruin u.t

CAPTAIN EAS1

That's Different

By LESLIE TURNEI

rat stori or martiw w

Billy Is Disappointed

By WILSON SCRUGGS

J

J MI,BiU.Y.HOW l

FINP Auwr tup ui.iui?. utpeuAi 1

HEY,VCW,ISHE WDVTBECOW-

COMIKJS, HUH7 fj FOe OiMi'tJ,

SILLY. HIS HOTEL

SAD HE

CHEOTEO

'"it

artrr ..jn

1 f- 4 F---i.

5 to

Meanwhilcata

MEW ENGLAND
SANlTAeiMU

fHAVEVOUPWlFFS

. HAPPENfy DEATH CE2T1FICATB

PISHT HERB, MZ.

WA7SHAa.BELC'EJ

Me, We DO EVEeV-

( HOW DID IT )i

7 rTV PCTT WERE, MZ. N

ft r. 4li' :' N

I HATE T? FIKE THKT OkkV.IIM

VOU EA$Y..6lir I V)0 HARD FEELING

ArFOKP A GL0B&- I CAM CANCEL THl$

rsisciLLA s rur

Grounds for Curiosity

By AL TCRMEER

: ?MM.'?THAT Tm ( YOU'RE MUCH
COFFEE J Th I VTOO YOUN&
I v S SURE f"' J I --v!!'
' ( SMELL'S ) 3x,
' '' ,; ncT MINP, VUlMX V I

OLD Z ( )
HAVE TO J"tr
7 BE TO J (Y y
i SMELL. V v ')
COFFEE j V J 7

i TK0TTIU3 GALHP WITH AM' i ASREEMENO
it ALLERGV FOR &UfrlNE$$! MPy
GET EA$V HIS SEVER AWCE PA-r --

h

YOU 6,ENK0UT&" A YEAR'& CONTRACT TO

HOWE I CALLEP OH 6UPPLV PLASTICS FOE AU

A FEW PK0SPECT5 FOR THEIR TV CA&INETl
McKEE PRODUCTS, AWP IGKEM SCOTT, THIS I

50LP ONLY OWE. 6UT LENPIP, W B0Y1

ITS A HOMEY ;

HERE'S HIS X WHl HAVE YOU GOME BEKSECK'H

CHECKi WRrV GET EASY MY PAPPED CHAIR..

1U TAKB THI& HARP OKIE! I'M

GOING TO LET WW IW OM OUR.

EXCITING ECRETl

JtUEE

1B

Njpks

?(fl 195 by NE 8c'c,

TTT1I

III I" I

'-'"g

MCRTY MEERLE

'The Boss

By DICK CAVALLI

rEEKLf)
V7 WANT
tziizl

Li

YOU'CE IN

EXCEPTIONALLY

60CO VOCE TOCAY,

P?l3

1)UR BOiUlDUfO irotss

MAJOM BOUrLI Oil OIIB WAI

Cl(i! ttl NNX

This Is Closer

Like ThatT

vy y cED(?ic,
IT J "YA DUMB
yv" aUCK.I'M
-j-'v gonna teach
; Jt) va t; sit up

HE'S MOVIN'

CMON.SITUPAN'

GIVE YA A

WIENIE I

1

11

' you C'N DO IT, t )
,cedi?ic...uf; (ik

7N'

VOU C'N DO

CEDPIC...UR

BOY

Wtrner 1

Q 10S

T.M. Htf. U.t. PM Of

Will

: TH5

THEIR MOUTHS

KOP OPEM LI
ENTRANCE

TUMMEL WMEM Vv'E
TELL' EM ATH0M5

HOW UNCLE

AM05 SkATcO

Hi 5 IKllTIA

CW.THE

LJ-5 U aLJ n U C DC ATtTi rTi

PACK AMD MTn tub CnAorww

iTT'eKv ; J -S 'HEY MiGMT
THE OTHEC 1 I inn t rvrr-

.SKATERS ANY FikTms7w5?

if 1

T'

-JI

'Vf IWhNttlUnta w l.t ... Vl

.jjju-' HOW 6I2AC& 6I2AC&--
- 6I2AC&-- FUL WAS

1

CIRCUMSTAMTIAL EVIPEMCE

II:



; I

rrlaf and Olicr

wide

Z4 134,

or

Rj Slaffirs

Box 5031 nc

on

ft J 1 I t

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2-0740 2V-.il )OQnJ II

tnt'j.

MEM

Fach nmir for inclusion In this
ffllumn should suhmiurd in tp.
-.mien (arm an maiir' t on M
thix nttmtorc listed daily In "So.
rial and tiiherswis-.'' or drtivcrrd
liy hand t thr olfir. NotlcM f
Ineeunfj cannot kc accrjxe. hj- rte.
phonc.

L Boca Civic Council

ivift Monday Evening

j- The regular monthly meeting of

line l coca civic council will be
held at the study hall on Monday
at 7:30 p ro.

E. L. Fawcett. Dresident nf the

Congress of Local Rate Civic Conn-

cils and other representatives of the

congress win fte In attendance.

Keports from committees func

tioning in the couneil are anticipat anticipated.
ed. anticipated. :

,4

W

V'

V t

7

1

1

I 1 U- .-

OLD AND NEW OFFICERS Of the Fort Amad
lation ceremony at the Army. Navy Club, New
Hume, treasurer; Mrs. Leslie C. Wootl, vice-pr

Cieorse W. HIRKins, secretary. Old officers an

Mrs. Conrad Untlerdahl: Mrs. Richard J. Raste

former viee-Dresident: Mrs. Lionel C. Mcuarr,

Rowan, former president, and Mrs. John W. 8

or Wives' Club got 'together at a recent instal instal-omcers
omcers instal-omcers sitting from left are Mrs. Albert G.
esldent; Mrs. Genes Perez, president, and Mrs.
d distinguished guests standing from left are;
tter, former treasurer; Mrs. John G. Appel,

Mrs. Louis V. HiKhtcwer; Mrs. Chanes A.

emmons, former secretary.
. a a m. .

... i u.a. Army rnoio;

PANAMA'S FIRST. CARNIVAL QUEEN WILL BE GUEST
OF ISTHMIAN HISTORICAL SOClETlf NEXT TUESDAY

; SpotHrhllnt the approach of the l;o Carnival, ana aiso

taklni a backward look, the Isthmian Historical Society has
invited Panama's first carnival queen and members of her
court to be honor guests at their meeting on Tuesday evening
tt 7:30 at Tivoli Guest 'House.
Mrs. Frank Morrice, 'formerly Manuelita Vallarlno, who
reigned In 1910, will be present with one of her maids, Marie
Arias Smith. One or two other members of the court may
Also attend.
The ladles will tell the story of how the first of the
formal carnivals, as we know them today, was born when
the Panama Republic was only six years old.
The principal sneaker for the t

evening will be Lt. C'oJonel Leroy ;.. The baby's paternal grandpa-,

M- Ulodell oi fort utuicK, who rents are Mr. ana airs, victor H.
will talk, and sliow slides of the, May, Sr., of Gamboa. The mater mater-ecrnt
ecrnt mater-ecrnt work done by the Army at'nal grandmother, Hrs. Lena Ham Ham-I
I Ham-I U't San Lorenzo arid the recent bletnn, makes her home with her
woi't done by the Army at Fort 'son-in-law and daughter in Hous Hous-SaJi
SaJi Hous-SaJi Lioenzo and the recent discov-' ton,
eriPS that nave been made. I
Islhmian ..Historical S o c i e t y: Miss Watts Honored
membefS 'my biinj guests and! With Bridal Shower At Gatun Club
the publie is cordially invited toi Miss Betty Lou Watts was hon hon-attend
attend hon-attend this meeting. ored on Saturday evening with a
...... . i bridal shower tendered at Gatun

; Yacht Club.

(hornet &inc Glares
1, Par, Wilh J.U
0 J)cc dream done J

New Liquid K ills Upachcs and AnI?

judge. Other role's in the cast were

played by Mrs. Dorgan as the
hriln 1 Wtrrl na f Via ninnm

iuv iTiisj, u m hl? nit giuuiu,
Mrs. Zimmerman as the pappy
and Mrs. Johnegen as the flower
girl.
One hundred guests attended the
gay affair.

Vitaa Butcher Sings
In Chorus Vilii
Ooslon Symphony
Miss Wilma t. Butcher1 daught daughter
er daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 0. Butch'
er of Balboa, was one of the New
England Conservatory choristers
chosen by the Boston Symphony
Orchestra to sing Debussy's 'Mar 'Martyrdom
tyrdom 'Martyrdom of St. Sebastian" with the
orchestra in two performances on

Jan. 27 and 28. The January 28

parformance was broadcast over a
a, US. wide radio hook-up..
The New England Conservatory
Chorus has been chosen each year
for the last five years by the Bos Boston
ton Boston Symphony Orchestra to per perform
form perform one major choral work with
symphony, requiring at least 120
voices for performance. In addi addition,
tion, addition, a smaller group of the Cons Conservatory
ervatory Conservatory Chorus has been called
upon by the orchestra each year
to perform another choral work
requiring about 60 voices.
."The Martyrdom of St. Sebas Sebastian"
tian" Sebastian" is Debussy's only choral
work. This performance required
a, chorus of 133 voices and was
recorded by RCA Victor.

Coat and Tie Dance
Planned Saturday
The Army and Nayy Club, Ft.
Amador, has announced a coat
and-tie dance for Saturday eve evening.
ning. evening. Music will be furnished from
8:30 until 12:30.

MOON MAN

Terry Ford Brings
Guest Home For Visit
Mr. Terry Ford, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Terence O. Ford of Bella
Vista, has returned from an extend extended
ed extended tour of Europe.
. Accompanying Terry was his col college
lege college fraternity brother, Ted Cass,
who will visit him for one month.
Mr. and Mrs. Ford held an at
home on Tuesday evening for their
son and his house guest.

.GREENWICH, Conn. (UP) -A
burglar broke into the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. llolden
by crawling through a window in
their son's bedroom. The burglar
kept the three-year-old quiet by
saying he was "the man in the

moon and telling him to go back
, .1 TU L 4- I. ,.

Hi aicirp. i iitrn uc went in aiiiuntri
room and stole Mrs. Holden's mink
coat,.

r.nia, reo. i (in om-;
an a struggle for womanly curves,
ran today into the upside down
icecream cone effect of Lanvin-'
Castillo's '"'Cornet Line" which'
makes bosoms preacriously high

and almost extinct.
Castillo of Lanvin came forthl
yesterday wila the only "Look"
worthy of the name this season.)
Today, on the third day of the Pa-4

ns spring dress collections, Jean
Desses is presenting a more con conservative
servative conservative approach t o w a r d the
fashionable silhouette' for the next
six months.
Castillo's comet line featured a
silhouette which flared out from
shoulder to hem. ..the waistline
often moved up to wiiere the bust
used to be. The bustline. '. almost
non-existent.
Castillo also came tin with "ca-

nezous" flared, waist lennlh bo-!

leros which broke the line in
daytime dresses.
' Tho cartoiout gava the tffoet
of two icacraam eon ntsMtd
one en top of the other.
Underneath the canezous, Prin Princess
cess Princess style dresses flared out in
one continous line broken only by
drapes knotted under the bust, or
breast high martingales.
Castillo's "maternity" look in
dance dresses startled even hij
most fervent admirers'. Flounces
jutted out from under the bustline,
in one and two tiers, in what can
only be described as a very preg pregnant
nant pregnant way. The mannequin's for forward
ward forward carriage heightened this im

pression.

Underlining his shortened bust bust-line,
line, bust-line, Castillo showed diagonal mid midriff
riff midriff pockets, and appliqued fringed
ribbons, To heighten his cone sil silhouette,
houette, silhouette, he placed scquined bows
and Spanish combs atop the man mannequin's
nequin's mannequin's Chignon.
Tall crownte1 hats and sleplne
wavy brims topped the "cornet"
by day;

His coats won applause. Flared
in a single line by day, they took

on foreign glamour at night.
The "burnoose" was a favorite.
Of a black satin striped in white,

the hooded warp was lined and
edged with white chiffon. Under Underneath,
neath, Underneath, a white chiffon dress flow flowed
ed flowed out under the bust in a less ex exaggerated
aggerated exaggerated line.

In a late night show, Maggy
Rouff chalked up another defeat
for the pre-besem couturiers.

tr

uer styles brought 'reminiscent)
sighs from all former 1920 flappers.

la general, mis is a uu uriuuu utc.

times but certain details are to be
found in many 1956 collections.
Bosom less and walstless, her
clothes dropped to the Wds and
were fixed there with low-slung
martingales and buttoned panels.
"Many jersey and wool dresses
wpre saihered on bands. This de

tail fitted dresses under the bosom1
and at the hips. Jackets were!

caught low In back.

Wi! WAKE fRIENDS

Scientists DiscoverEasy Way to Kill Crawling Insects

R0ACHE3 and ants are the
most difficult household pests
to control and they can be brought
into the home at any time. Science
has recently discovered a colorlesf
bwsh-on insecticide that not only
kills, but controls rrawlinff pests.
It is called Johnston's NO-ROACH.
Developed after years of re research,
search, research, NO-ROACH it an invis invisible,
ible, invisible, odorless, stainless liquid, so
powerful that one application re remains
mains remains effective for months. Best
of all. NO-ROACIf may be brushed
on, without having- to move your
pots and pans. It is not a contain!-

oatinf spray or meaajr powder,,

contains no DDT, no sodium u-

oride, and no phosphorus.
" Effect! for Months

Simolr brush Johnstn

NO-ROACH wherever roaches,
ants, silverftsh or waterburs are
found, around kitchen cabinet
and sink woodwork, on baseboards,
window sills and door sills. Insects
that walk over the coating become
paralyzed and die within two or
three hours. The coating will con
tinue to kill all insects that walk
over it for months to come.
Guard ag-ainst rrswliiiy insecti
this modern N0: ROACH, way.

WWTWt7

ONue

When some teen-agers get in
a car thev hlow the horn con-

stantly-everx time they pass a:
friend's house, every time theyj
.see someone they know, when-!
ever they go by to pick up a!
friend. I
All that their horn blowing!

really says is that they are)

showing off and haven't as
Igood manners as they should i

hate.

Ietv Arrivals

Cuhan Ambassador to ranama, ... f
Dr Ki'uwisco Miratida y Varcna. Hostesses were Mrs. T. Lutrot'
acjjniuahird by his wife Lone ar-iMrs. G. S. Zunmcrna, Mrs. J. A.l
riv,-rt it. their, new post In Paha-' Johenen. Mrs. J. H. Ward, Mrs.v

ma. iV.. B. Hedniond and Mrs. F, A."

' I Dorgan .
'Leans Ftv New "Orleans Quests were sealed at a U-shap-i
Mr. Vereker Mais, Representat- ed table beautifully decorated with

Ive of the Chiriqui Land Company,1 silver-ana WWlc flowers, baoy orch

Ambassador's Wife
Uives Card Party
UntnHalnine for a Brnnn of her

friends, .''Mrs. Estcban Chalbaud
Cardona, wife of the Venezuelan
Ambassador to Panama, gave a
card party at the Embassy Resid Residence
ence Residence on Tuesday.

and Mrs- Mais have left for a vaca

tion trip .to ew Orleans.
BirlS -Announcement
Mr.wt- Mrs. Victor H. May,
Jr.ir. Houston, Texas announce
the-'blrth of a daughter born on
JanlhG 21. The baby has been
ri a Sandra Jeanne.

.

ids 'and ferns. The centerpieces
were bridal dolls.
Designs and decorations were
made by Mrs. T. Lutro. j
The bride-to-be sat in a throne thronelike
like thronelike chair decorated in ilver-and-white,
under a trellis, with a large
silver heart as a background.

The bridal table was covered.

!with an army-and-navy tablecloth

decorated with sliver candlesticks.!
The large white cake was decorat-;

ed with pink tiowers.

Luncheon-Swimming Party
Is Birthday, Celebration
i or all ner friends wno came to
wish her happy birthday, Mrs.
Guillermo Anureve tenuercd a
luncheon and swimming party at
her residence in E Cangrejo on
Tuesday,

Miss J. H. Ward
punch.

served the

COWFKOW53E There's a
reason why Shirley Richardson,
13, is. wearing both skirt' and
Hacks as she works at the
schoolroom blackboard. The
Thompsonville, Conn., girl, iso isolated,
lated, isolated, from her class for six
weeks due to a schoG ruling
a gai nit slacks, compromised
with officials. She'll wear both.

Guests were surprised by a hil hilarious
arious hilarious sit of a mock-marriage by
Mrs. Sutro, who impersonated the

afrMillliatl laiiiiriii 11 milium in tHM it. J

HEADS DRIVE National
chairman of the 1956 1 Heart
Fund is Gen. Mark W. Clark,
former commander-in-chief in
the Far East. General Clark is
now president of the Citadel,
famed military college at
Charleston, SC.

Spaghetti Dinner For K. of C.
bohio Inauguration
The Cristobal Knights of Columb Columbus
us Columbus 1689 has made plans to inagur inagur-Bie
Bie inagur-Bie their recently built bohio with

a spaghetti dinner.
Tne bohio is located in the yard
of the Knights of Columbus build building
ing building in Margarita. The date is set
for Sunuay, and spaghetti wil' be
uni-ueri hptu ppn the hours of 4 P.m.

and 8 p.m. A charge of 50 cents lor

adults and a cents ior cumueu
will be made at the door.
AH friends, families and memb members
ers members of the Knights of Columbus
are invited.
Reservations Close Today
1- or College Club's
Carnival Tea ;
The Annual Carnival Tea of the
Canal Zone College Club will be
uj n catumdv. at the Armv-Na-

vy Club, Fort Amador, from 3:00

to 5:00 p.m.
This tea is open to members and
their guest. .
Reservations must be made by
calling Mrs. Howard Johnson, Bal-boa-3372,
or Mrs. Walter E. Colo Colo-lastire,
lastire, Colo-lastire, Balboa-2608;
The last time to make reserva reservations
tions reservations is today at 6:00 p.m.
Colon Rotar) Club
Elect Officers

Mew othcers lor laae were e e-lected
lected e-lected by the Colon Rotary Club
at a meeting this week at the

Strangers Club. They are:
Joe Harrington, president; Er Ernesto
nesto Ernesto Estenoz, 1st vice president;
A. P. Heyde, 2nd vice president:

Rafael de Boyrie, 3rd vice presid

ent; J. v. ceverhoudt, secretary,
and William Middlemas, treasurer.
(Continued on Page 7)

X

it- ?

MEXSANA'

t no Is, rcrrcvhci
and nuoUien skill
irritation. A
rrliahle mfdlcaled
iowdr.

V

Dr. MAI1FRED0 EliGEL and FAMILY
take thin means to express deepest appre appreciation
ciation appreciation and sincere thanks for the mani manifestations
festations manifestations of condolence and kind sym sympathy
pathy sympathy shov n during their recent hereave
ment.
Panama, Feb. 1, 1956

Strained Meats
in Glass Jars
for your baby
7 VARIETIES OF
FULL-ILAVORED MEAT
...DELICIOUS AND HEALTHFUL

I1

Nesdlotsofpep?
Drink... v

r-mt
trademark
of tm

The' juices of 8 different, garden
fresh vegetablei are blended into
this famous drink. Youngsters lovt
Its lively flavor, and thrive en it
vitamin-packed. .......u v.

(oodneu. At meal

timt or between WT
meala V-8 gives .1
them the refresh-
ment they want, : V

and the nourish

ment they need.

t iM aeiMHiiaa far vm t Mn0

"h.

I

t-wi. aiiwj"iani.i'a i

a f..w.

I

if '1 .!'- : ity:-i.y lit
J x
;'; '''' '' ' i
-' ,k

i

Prettier than evcr...wilh v.

4

Pepsodent's exclusive oral detercent
makes your smile fdrettier than ever because
it cleans teeth cleanest of any leading tooth
paste. It keeps breath fresh gives you clean

mouth taste for hours! Try it today!

1 ALSO WITH (K&Sgh-i .:
L f CHLOROPHYLL
l 'i--wyc't'' te'1'':';5
ttV ''"!, '' y'P ''.'Jf( .'(: A''''' ''itj'T' A-."- ''- .J .', ,.:',.i, A

1 V. A

-'"1

I

dliwonrJgrfull
BEEF LAMB
LIVER PORK
LIVER AND BACON
BEEF HEART VEAL

I

Fa

amous for extra quality and richer taste, Heinx

Strained Meats for babies are now available the fird
available in convenient glasijart!
Each appetizing variety Is RICH In nutrition protein,
iron and B vitamins. Heinz Strained Meats build strong
arrr.l and legs, strong nerves and muscles. They increasr
vitality '. . help children grow more rapidly. Meat-fed
babies were shown in recent studies to sleep nvore soundly
and relax more readily than babies not receiving meat.

sssa1 Of course, the jars let yeu what you'ra

hro. buying. You can heat baby'a meal right in

Tut 7," tnem . serve nun iroui tue jar, ioi. aihi

r-yXHl they're easy to store. Yes . Heinz Strained

Meats are firil: in quality . In convenience. Ask for
them today!

nnr
l -1
MM

L-JLJt

U I

I "I .1

'J

1 3 LJ

I VJ

cm

bTRAINED MEATS FOR BABIES

AT LAST!! YOU CAN io

TT

210

1

PLAN YOUR VACATION NOW to take advantage of this NEW, LOW, TOURIST EXCURSION FARE!

(round trip)
Stil)jc to (avernmtnt approval.

GOOD FOR 30 DAYS!
Eff eclhc April 1, 1936
tlirouh March 31, 1957

WONDERFUL LIMA and PERU AWAIT YOU With their
many interesting things to see and do!... their wonder wonderful
ful wonderful silver, furs, weavings, leather goods to buy for your
self and friends!

See Your Travel
Agent or

Ave. Tlvoll l, Td. 2-0971
. or Holrl tl Panama
Colon: Tel. lit I7

Nj y pn nr

I 1

I N T E R N A T I

V a a..t i.
O N A L

A I R WAY S



TTS FAX ASIA A3nrJCA.t AX TSZTTZtX-ZTT BAS.T NTTr"?!!!
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT J4 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
S-. v
V v t f
rV A 1 J
f i f
1 i-
If
'J
i
1 I i
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA

FACE srx

LIBRERIA PRECIADO LOURDES PHARMACY LEWIS SERVICE HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE FARMACIA EL BATURRO
IBtroeiNe.U ia U Cviilta Ave, TrreU He. lIhONlnXfctt hrw Idmi I ilrat
Agendas Internal! de Publicaciones FARMACIA LOMBARDO FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS FOTO DOMY FARMACIA "SAS
No S Lottery rlase, :, ZC "B" Strait .-. MS Cental Anm wsrae in. l B It fiitanlUl
CASA ZALDO MORRISON ; FARMACIA LUX FARMACIA VAN-DER-DUS NOVEDADES ATHIS
Centra) Are. cs 4th ( July Are J It It Central Areas i M Street No. B V laaaaa At

'MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
.minimum
FOR
12 WORDS v

COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL

CANAL ZONE POLYCLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
Dr. C. E. rihrtri Or. K.
D.D.S. (Georieiowa University) M.D
Tivoll (4th of July) Ave, No. HAM
(opposite Ancon School PUyfround)
TeL 2-20U Panama.
RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM' RIDGE
Phone Panama 2-0552
TRANSPORTS aaick.
Packets Shipper Mover
Phone. 2-2451 2-2562,
Leirn Riding ot
PANAMA R'OING SCHOOL
Riding .'.imping clossas doily
3 to 5 p.m. Phone 3-0279
or by eppointment.
"WE will relieve Your"
FOOT-TROUBLE
corns, ctllousses, nails
CHIROPODIST
(Dr. Scholls trained)
ORTEPEDIA NACIONAL
58 Justo Arosemena Ph. 3-2217
New Books
Several authoritative books on
television were placed in circula-
tion this week by the Canal Zone
Library.
They include two books on tele tele-:
: tele-: Visi6n repair and servicing, and
three covering the subjects of TV
production and programming, and
television writing and selling.
One, which should be of partic particular
ular particular interest, is the "TV Repair
Book," by Robert Hertzberg, an
outstanding authority,, which in includes
cludes includes more than 300 photos and
illustrations to make each step
and procedure clear to the,, ama amateur
teur amateur rcpariman.
The complete list of books and
their authors released by the Li Library
brary Library this week follows:
Non fiction-Handbook of Tel Television
evision Television Repair, Hertzberg; Ele Elements
ments Elements of Television Servicing for
Bench and Field. Marcus; The
Television Manual, Hodapp; Tel Television
evision Television Programming and Produc Production,
tion, Production, Hnbbell; Television Writinf,
and Selling, Roberts; Grandfath Grandfather
er Grandfather Stories Adams So Near and
Yet so Fav Ki,vrr""'H: Robert
Benchley, My Life for my Skeep,
Duggan.
Added to the Vertical File-Your
Federal Income Tax; for Indivi Individuals,
duals, Individuals, 19.r)5, U. S. Internal Reve Revenue
nue Revenue Service.
Fiction Mary of Caris'brooke,
Barnes; High, Wide and Hand Handsome,
some, Handsome, Bishop; Snaketrack, Bon Bon-ham;
ham; Bon-ham; Gideon's Day, Creasey; Lo Lo-bo
bo Lo-bo Valley, Floren; Puma Pistol Pistol-wr
wr Pistol-wr nn Alkali Creek: The
Bath Tangle, Hayer; Poison in
Paradise, Hocking; Chronicle of
the Calypso, uipper. jemwiKu,
TheLobo Breed, Martin; The Silv Silver
er Silver Leopard, Mason. -.
Sydney Thomas,
Daughter Visiting
Relatives Here
Sydney Thomas of Los Ange Angeles,
les, Angeles, Calif., and his daugher
Betty, arrived last Sunday for
a visit with local relatives and
friends.
The Thomases are at present
the guests of his brotner ana
sister-in-law. Mr. and Mrs. Al
bert Thomas, at their residence
on 4th Street In Parque Lefe
7, ;frf,-V -It n
i
By Telephone
Immediate Coverage
Dial Panama 2-5000
FRED ni'DDLESTON

FOR SALE
Household

FOR SALE: Crosley Shelvador
refrigerator 9.5 cu. ft., 1951
modtl DC-9, very good condi condition.
tion. condition. Phone No. 3677
BARGAIN: Mahogany dining
table and chain. Cood condition.
Phone 3-6775 Panama
FOR SALE: Scrvel refrigerator,
vanity dresser, gal stove 4-bura-er,
gasoline compressor, electric -motor
1 Vi-hp. Automobile Row
No. 29, Phone 2-4721, Ek-uc
South.
FOR SALE: Various household
articles, including living room
furniture, beds, etc. Phone 3 3-3192.
3192. 3-3192. Ave. Justo Arosemena,
Apt. Riviera No, 10.
FOR SALE. Frigidaire 7 Tap Tap-.
. Tap-. pan stove, tables, chairs, chest,
bookshelves, junior bed, 2 mat mattresses.
tresses. mattresses. Leaving country, Panama
3-3587.
FOR SALE: Freexer upright
Hotpoint G.E., 60-cycle, 12 cu.
ft., brand new. Call Balboa 4106.
FOR SALE: Rattan living room
and bleached cedar double bed bedroom.
room. bedroom. New. Phone Panama 3 3-0321
0321 3-0321 week days after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Moving. Must sell
dining room set, excellent condi condition.
tion. condition. Any offer. Phone Balboa 2 2-2981.
2981. 2-2981. House 0840-C. Balboa.
fOR SALE: Westinghouse re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, 25-cycle and General
Electric, $40 each, Phone 2 2-2911,
2911, 2-2911, Balboa.
FOR SALE: Mahogany youth
bed by Cowes with innerspring
mattress; Italian accordion. Tap Tap-pan
pan Tap-pan gas stove. 5329-A Davis St.,
Diablo Heights.

Face the Fact of Guilt

Br Re. Sebastian Miklass

TODAY WHEN everyone Is
stressing self-expression and the
accent is on freedom, it is not
popular to speak of sin and guilt.
Sin is such an unprogresslve idea
and word; you must toe practical
and utilitarian: therefore deny
sin, because without It you make
things easy and get things done.
And' as for guilt: child is too
young; to be blamed; ana an
adolescent is too mixed up and
Ignorant to be responsible; and
a manure person
Is too busy and
under too much
pressure to be I
guilty of wrong wrong-.
. wrong-. doing; and old
people are too
senile.too feeble feebleminded
minded feebleminded to com commit
mit commit a crime.
THE WORLD
is so eood. so Milklas
kind; it has its own kind of con concessional
cessional concessional which whitewashes sin
by denying its existence or by
not ftdmlttinn the euilt. No one
" is to be accused; only excused
This is a world of saints with
out guilt, sin and punishment.
Let us put aside irony and
face the facts. Pick up your
dally newspaper, and its front
naee will read like a pace out
of the catechism telling you of
original sin and Its consequen-
CPU.
Murder, rape, divorce, ju
Iran
Jury: Are these virtues or vUes?
The desire for notoriety, iame,

i t. It.-, i ?ittpiiii
I j v V r
? v s :s i !: i ri ; m fwsmmmm xp-'A t -m
, . '''s' ' '' "f
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J : : . ., i i j M v
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Meters .y t -Tftft' ifrtV W M iifflrMtf fai n ..l in... IT ...I J

LONG TIME TOCETHER Meet Uncle Ned and Aunt Rosie
Kearney, of Memphis, Tenn. They're believed to be the nation's
longest-married couple. Uncle Ned is 103 years old. Aunt Rosie is
believed to be in her late nineties. They figure they've been mar married
ried married 82 years, since one of their sons is 81. They've had 19 children,1
but only three sous are now living. Their grandchildren and great greatgrandchildren
grandchildren greatgrandchildren are estimated to total 60. That cylinder the Kearneys
are holding is not a rolling pin. It's a stick of candy. They like
candy and snuff..

FOR SALE
Automobiles

FOR SALE 1949 Dodge Pick Pick-op
op Pick-op truck. Priced for quick sale.
Armed Services YMCA, Cristo Cristobal.
bal. Cristobal. Call 3-2164.
FOR SALE: 1953 Cadillac Se Sedan,
dan, Sedan, in very good condition. New
nylon blowout proof tires and ra radio.
dio. radio. Any cash offer around $2800
will be considered. Phone 2 2-2638,
2638, 2-2638, "Porrat," Plata 5 da Ma Mayo.
yo. Mayo. . .! :
FOR SALE: Sunbeam Talbot Se Sedan
dan Sedan (Sport Car), 1953 model
radio 'end sliding top. Financing
facilities. Call Mr. Eskildsen,
Panama 2-1669, Colon Motors,
Hillman dealers.
FOR SALE: 52 Ford, black 2 2-door
door 2-door Customline V-8 Fordomatic,
good condition, new tires $750.
Call Balboa 6326.
FOR SALE: 1953 Buick Super
V8 RIVIERA, AIR-CONDITIONED,
dynaf low, radio, rear seat
speaker, neater, wsw tires, pow power
er power steering. Trade-ins accepted.
Terms. SMOOT & PAREDES.
S.A.-
FOR SALE: 1953 Olds Super.
88, duty paid, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, power brakes, radio,
white sidewall tires, shaded glass,
new car condition. Call Panama
3-4870.
FOR SALE: 1951 Pontiac Cat Cat-alina
alina Cat-alina 8-cyl., 43,000 miles, ra radio,
dio, radio, leather interior, undercoat.
Call 86-4225 between 6 p.m.
and 8 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1952 Pontiac de deluxe
luxe deluxe 2-door sedan, hydramatic,
fully equipped $950. Qtrs. 66-B,
Fort Kobbe. Phone 84-5125.
popularity, attention that grip!
this nation manes one wonoer. i
WHAT THIS COUNTRY needs
is not a good five-cent cigar; we
have enough smoke ana dust in
our eyes. This country and the
whole world needs a wholesome
sense that will make us recog
nize sin for what it Is: a sense
of guilt that will make a man
feel sorry for what he has done;
a sense of guilt that will make
a man feel responsible for tail
actions. ..V.-.-'- :-v
Shnrtlv before His death Christ
told His Apostles that He would
send them the Holy Spirit.
'And when He is come. He will
convince the world of sin, and
of justice, and of Judgement."
THE HEART of every man
should till with true sorrow and
repentance at the sight of Christ
on the Cross. No man can look
at Christ on the Cross and say
"there is no sin.,",. Christ died
between two sinners; one witn
shame In his heart; the other
without shame. The good thief,
who acknowledged his sin and
guilt and punishment, was sav sav-ed.
ed. sav-ed. Like the good thief, the werld
must face. Its sin and guilt. As
the cross on which Christ died
was planted deep and imbedded
in the earth, so too must the
cross with its shame and uf
ferine be deeply rooted in our
minds and thoughts. Then the
Cross of Calvary will not have
Been in yam.
f hulUt Irt fcrk Wi4il B.

FOR RENT
Houses

FOR RENT: House No. 135,
furnished $100: 2 bedrooms,
living-dining room, kitchen, spa spacious
cious spacious yard- (garden). ''Urbanisa ''Urbanisation
tion ''Urbanisation Miraflores." Phone 2-1456.
FOR RENT: 'Chalet, specious
grounds, ejuiet neighberbeed. 3 3-1201
1201 3-1201 or 2-2724.
FOR RENT. 3-bedreem chalet:
living room, dining room, 2
porches, maid's room, 3 bath bathrooms.
rooms. bathrooms. 51st Street No. 32, Bella
Vista. Phone 2-2260.
St. Mary's School
Oilers Big Prizes
For 2-Day Bazar
Two bier door prizes at St. MaT-
ry's School Bazaar will be a tel telephone
ephone telephone call to the United States
and a weekend for two at Hotel
El Panama.
The Annual Bazaar will be
held for two days, beginning to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow at 1 p.m. on the school
grounds in Balboa.
General chairman for booths
and refreshment stands Is Mrs.
George Benedettl.
Working with her are Mrs.
Rudy Gangle and Mrs. f. Reyn Reynolds,
olds, Reynolds, baked goods booth; Mrs. D.
Real and Mrs. Mike Gomez.
children's clothing booth; Mrs.
Charles Southwell, Mrs. Harry
Stommel and Mrs. Sargent,
wmie eiepnant doom; Mrs. Rob'
ert ThomDson and Mrs. J. Kin.
caid, aprons, fancywork and
piant Dooms; Mrs. Louis de Bl
ase and Mrs. A. E. Greene,
grao-Dap; oootn, Mrs. A. Hender Henderson
son Henderson and Mrs. Kaelln, fish pond
booth, Mrs. P. Loughran and
Mrs. E. Filo, hot dog tooth; Mrs.
Fred Mohl, Ice-cream booth and
Robert Trahman cold drinks
booth.
Entertainment will be under
me aireciion of Charles will
iams.
SouSh Africa Ousts
For Subversive Ads
CAPETOWN, South Africa, Feb.
2 (UP) The government today
ordered the Russian consul-general
to close his office and leave the
country for "cultivating subversive
elements" in South Africa.
Erick Louw, minister for exter external
nal external affairs, also demanded that
the entire consulate staff be re removed
moved removed from South Africa by March
Louw said the consulate ''culti ''cultivated
vated ''cultivated and maintained contact
with subversive elements in South
Africa and formed a channel of
communication between theni and
Russia." -.
Neither Russia nor South Africa
maintain ambassadors in each oth other's
er's other's capitals, but Louw said dip diplomatic
lomatic diplomatic relations would not be af affected.
fected. affected. He said dealing lintvuM the
two nations could be continued
through Russian and South Afri
can representatives in lonaon.
Louw Raid Moscow mrtin hurt
in effect, confirmed the govern government'!
ment'! government'! pharcre. hv inritinc th In.
dian and native populations of
ment,
Tho mintctpr 4 n 1 rl PnrHamont
that the Russian consulate broke
the law prohibiting the supply of
muuiiui 10 natives uy serving a lo
thpm nn th pnnsulatu nrmiso
t x
H nnint1 nut tnnt tha .nnculatA
was esiaDusnea aunng wo r l a
war u when south Africa and
Russia were allies against the Nazis.-
.
The situation now has changed,
Louw said.
Government supporters in the
assembly greeted Louw's an announcement
nouncement announcement with loud applause.
Solon Has Remedy
For Magazine Woe
WASHINGTON. Teh S lVP
Rep. Augustine B. t Kelly (D
raj, saia toaay tne administra administration,
tion, administration, recentlv beset with maoa.
zine troubles, ougt to put out
more ot its news through news
conferences.
In his weeklv newsletter KelW
put it this way:
"I think we ought to get back
to the Dolicv of nrnvidinir natinnal
news through statements and
press conferences where the re.
pojiers can raise pertinent ques questions
tions questions and take the answers apart
not leak stuff out to favored mag magazines
azines magazines in distorted and self-sprv.
ing accounts intended to pay off
politically.
TEETH INTACT
NEW BRITAIN. Conn. (UP)
To reduce tooth injury, the New
Britain dental society last fall pro provided
vided provided mouth guards to members
of the high school football team.
The result: the team not only went
through its season without losing
a game, but without losing a tooth
aaufli-ivea. -av. filling

FOR RENT
Apartments

ATTENTION & 1.1 jus bu.1t
seder furnished apartments, I,
2 bedrooms, hot, cold w a t a e.
Phone PeaanM 3-4941.
FOR RENT: Beautiful apart apartment
ment apartment in Camp Aktgra, 2 bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, perch, dining room, kitch kitchen,
en, kitchen, bath and bet water, snaid'a
room. For married couple with without
out without children. Apply personally:
51st Street, next to the Guate Guatemalan
malan Guatemalan Embassy.
FOR RENT: Large furnished a a-parrment,
parrment, a-parrment, one couple er two. A A-mericaa
mericaa A-mericaa neighbors. 48th Street
No. 27, Apartment Ne. 2.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment
ment apartment including refrigerator, perch,
parlor-dining room, kitchen, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, tiled, all screened, $60.
Apply 112 Via Belisarie Perras,
near Roosevelt Theater.
FOR RENT: Small furnished a a-partment.
partment. a-partment. Pent Avenue No. 23.
Phones 2-0710 and 3-1177.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment:
ment: apartment: living room, dining room,
2 bedrooms, stove, refrigerator.
Bella Vista, 43rd Street Ne. 64.
FOR RENT. 2-bedreom apart apart-ment,
ment, apart-ment, furnished, new furniture,
piane. 50th Street No. 19, beside
Farmacia Van Dar Dijt, $110.
Phone 3-4566.
FOR RENT r Independent apart apartments,
ments, apartments, ana furnished, ene bed bedroom;
room; bedroom; the ether 2 bedrooms, un unfurnished.
furnished. unfurnished. Via Perras Ne. 64.
Phone 3-IS63.
FOR RENT: Studio apartment
opposite race track; alse ream
with bath and entrance, suitable
for bachelor er couple. Call Pan Panama
ama Panama 2-0434 after 2 p.m.
Panama Line
Sailing
IPIiTVitn.nlna naaeaniror si mft-
jority of them tourists, are
scheduled to sail from New Yorn
for Cristobal today aboard-the
Panama l.lnef Panama. TrnrtV-
nine passengers are booked lor
Rort-an.TrlTife Wain
The complete advance list for
uristoDai iouows:
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore T.
Bailey; Miss M. Bunker; Dr. and
Mrs. a. w. uarnie; Mr. ana Mrs
Richard fi. rarroll? nr and Mr
Kenneth Chadwell; Miss Beverly
u. x. cnan; Mr, ana Mrs. oeo
T nla-lr. llnl SI.. .rnJ
vinm, iviaj. vicii. aitu ana.
Clifford l. norbinr Mrs TWillv
Corbin; John p. Corrlgan; Miss
h. jEuzaDetn De voy; Mrs. Dor Dorothy
othy Dorothy Doan; and Mr. and Mrs.
Warren Drouet;.;
Mr. and Mr. Samuel Wis.
weig; Mr. and Mrs. Leo Feinsil-
Der; Mr. ana Mrs. cnarles C.
Flnucant? Mr and Mn w
Lloyd Fisher; Mrs. Harold H.
treuna; Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Gottlieb; Mrs. Eleanor Hansen;
Mr. and Mrs. T.vle v HotHc-
Chester Hart; Mr. and Mrs.
wranam Hatch; Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Hayes; Mrs. Helen Heil Heil-man:
man: Heil-man: Mr. and Mrs. .Tohn wnve-
Mrs, Mary B. Hoye; and Mr. and
mis. xaarim joei.
Mr. and Mrs. Tsadorn n. vm.
man; Mr. and Mrs. Charles C.
Knibbs; Mr. and Mrs. Leon Ros Roster;
ter; Roster; Mr. and Mrs. Charles W.
Krie?; Mr. and Mrs. John Les Les-He;
He; Les-He; Mr. and Mrs. Morton Levitt;
Mr. and Mrs. John Loyer and
ww... ivi i.vi i.. na.i'arrn,. mrw
Myron Maibrunn; Mr. and Mrs
William J. Miller; Mr. and Mrs.
r,uwe.ra j. piietsicy: and Mr.
iu Mrs. naroia Prince.
rMr-T nlMrs-Alber S. Haskln:
MrS. J. W. BnhT.riTi. 1r. j
Mr .r,Harn JV Bchwarting;
.Mlss Ma"t smith;
J,vus- unnKiey smith-
nrfcu MIS." J.U.K,
Wh eiy; Mr. and Mrs. Robert
" '""me.y; ana Mr. and Mrs
Joseph S. Wltherpw; jr.
Bodies Of Four
Americans To Be
Flown To US
CARACAS "v i.
hJPZ bod.!es oi four Ameri:
ut v ?1X ,l.ner Persons killed
last week in a Haht u
.... ""v piauo uiasn in
he?eetteZUe,a WlU bf brUght
' ul, Raymond Phelan
said a plane brinifins the bodies
from the jungle airstrip at higue higue-rote
rote higue-rote is due here shortly before 10
a.m. est.
The remains of the four Ameri Americans,
cans, Americans, Capt, and Mrs. Charles P.
Boughan (hometown unknown)
and Mr. and Mrs Malnnlm VA (Tar.
ton, of Stamford, Conn., will be
reiurneo. to tne united States for
ouriat.
Bounhan V the numer and rtilnt
of the sightseeing plane in which
i'ic iu viccms were living nerp
from Angel Falls at the time of
Uiecrash.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED
alcoholics anonymous Miscellaneous
BOX 2031, ANCON, CZ.
BOX 121 1, CRISTOBAL, CZ. WANTED Cheap transperta-
"' ear in good condition. Call
FOR SALE Cristobal 3-2897..
tliscellaneons Position Offered
FOR SALE: Two 1000-gaL y- WANTED: Beaut operator,
press wood tanks, steal pt, Must speak English and Spanish.
S a M5h- Dt,t'l"0,a Naeional, must be efficient to do every-
.A., 3-1791. thing. Curundu Beauty Shop,
FOR SALE: Sreinway upright
pian., good .edition, $200 er WANTED: Two girl masseuses,
will swap for car. Cristobal 3- both to work parttime. Call Cu-
7. ninj, BMtfy c,net 3113.
H lAltT,?'WS!. 'rnth WANTED: Accountant with
Sob." C'" J"2'"' "Mrience, Bom 177. Colon.
rtiiTcTAkiniki. .i...... WANTED Experienced State-
CTSTANDING BARGAINS- .id. beauty ep.rator, full er
r" f,'-P' PA-22, Super cue- parttime. Genell'a Beauty Shop,
torn. ...t .endrfion, certificates. Cocoli Clubhouse, Navy 3812.
Phone Compaiiia T. A.S. A. 3-
XMZFti M- Wanted to Buj
FOR SALI-1953 eeooter, new WANTED TO BUY-Scr.p lead.
'Vi'?11"" co"diti0 'fc Wp pay 6 cents per pound. Hoja-
-169 Gatun. atena Panama, Phone 3-6122.

n

w.EfN,?E?JNCAft09r
lT'St 53
landintf craft, tuck it undir tt

eeseL riirht k and
tev,", :r zm 7
kii, : ?
tUSUS. ya. It can orlr ha snW
4' I.
'Pi

31
' si i? It!

X-RAY VIEWS OF X-1 These cutaway drawings show the interior of the Navy's four-manj
midget submarine, the X-1. The X-1 was designed primarily to test harbor defenses. In aide view
at bottom, two men are at the airplane-like dual controls, a third is working with sub equipmentj
and a fourth is preparing to exit through a water lock, over which is located one of the two bunks,
on board. Engine room is aft, ballast tanks are forward. At top are template drawings showing
left to right: Engine room bulkhead with access doors and inspection windows; view of cabin looking
aft toward dual control console; view of cabin looking forward toward periscope, oxygen tanks,
crew comiort equipment and communications racks; water lock with crewmen swimming front
scan hatch,.. Air conditioning adds to crew's HT)ti n 1 111

DRAMATIC RESCUE AT SEAA U.S. helicopter rescues crew members from a floundering;.
Japanese fishing boat oft Hachinohe, a port on northern Honshu island. The Tanda Maru was!
whipped by a severe' wintry gale, which ripped through southern Hokkaido and the eastern coast
ot Tohoku. Some 200 fishing boats sank or were washed away in the rough waters. U.S. Air Force
nlanes and naval ships joined Japan's Coast Guard in rescue operations.

-

5 t J' V
J0,NS THE ARMYThe Army
a, JW-"k Slant designed to
midrify t.a u- u
t)Z ZZ-TZ.

J;" ewujgwiens ex ooists and wbeeu sjqi

a we wuraas largrsi ruooer tires, eaca l

riirht fot
V-v-.
. -..iiiWjoilW oi
...i -.

i 9 t K-

RESORTS

VACATIONING IN PANAMONTI
INN, BOQUETI
at 4000 feet ss am experience
nobody should misa. Famous for
its food (specialty: smorgasbord),
and fine accommodations. At Attractive
tractive Attractive bar-lounge with fire fireplace.
place. fireplace. Wire reservations.
Gramlich's Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modern convenience.,
moderate rates. Phon. Garni ea
6-441.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mile
past Casino. Lew rates, f hen
Balboa 1866.
PHILLIPS Oceoneida Cettagee, I
Santa Clara. Box 435. Bolboej. 1
Phone Panome 3-1877. Criate-
bol 3-1673.
Shropnera furnhbed hoesea ess 1
beach at Santa Clara. Telephone
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
Baldwin's furnished apartment, i
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Proback, Balbo 1224. 1
''wineM
T5'
in
has Just released pictures ofii
retrieves stranded orrapdzeS
.T... ir
: -'
- ..W
Li.
I

1



f.VGE EEN
X
f
I 1
i s
f a I ii I t )

1V.T FANAMA AMERICAN AN rNDLFENDEXT DAILY -VEWSPArER

omtouo t 'vol CEilTHAL Theatre L U XT 11 EAT R E DIlIVE-itl Tlicatrff CECILIA THEATRE .. y'cro"M
BANK Alan Ladd 75c 40c. 60c- 30c. 60c. . 30c. The b?st famous musical C' " Jose Ferrer
in: Cinemascope and technicolor Week end release "FRENCH CAN CAN" Rosita Qulntana in:
Tony Curtis in: ; "THE RED week end release The bombshell story of the ''Fixer" Paul Longton ith ln: -"THE SHRIKE''
"S-j MOUNTAIN" .. j0hn Wayne Lana Turner in: .. E. G. Robinson in: v Barbara Payton Maria Felix Jean Cabin and "A LOS 4 YIENTOS" Also-
HOLDLM Also "TUC CCA rUACC" "II I C r A I t. Franeoise Arnoud
Also- THE SEA CHASE ILLEGAL in: PIik- fernandel in- LA VISITA QUE NO Jeff Chandler
Carlton Heston Search the seven seas-you won't find He beats any rap till he raps on kiMOrNCD lJV CAX "At; rC aj rui An TkU," TOCO EL TIMBRE" in:
"T HE in- excitement like this...! the door of Ansel O'llaia. . "MURDER IS MY BEAT All Babd And The 40 Thieves 1UIU "THE RED BALL
LAWLESS" "THE SAVAGE" SHOWS: 1:15, 3:46, 6:17, 8:50 SHOWS: 3:07, 4:52, 6:54, 8:56 Comedy Spanish program EXPRESS''
mi i i. i ii in. .i u i ii i uw in i.i. . i. lii ii -i i. I. . n ii mmim JJM...ai.-...i -U .... j l, .. um-jm.. u. i -1-..-.il. i i . a. 1 1 "- '- -.1-! .1 i..,JLt, i.. .. L ,. ,,L ,.,.,., .,.., iin.iii.u jj..

Alcoholics, You, and Christ

By Re?

SKID ROW every large city
has one. A stranger in town
recognizes it the first time he
sees it. Here gather the der derelicts
elicts derelicts of the city bums, we call
4nm. Men who never work, or
iydom anyway. You see them
leNilng against the wall, and
rhaybe sidling up to ask for a
dime.
They come from everywhere,
the bums of Skid Row. How did

they getthere?
Manv of the

Row's Inhabi- L v

tants are Just

pannanaiers. sQ

, prof essi o n a 1
barflies, pet

ty thieves. But A

tnmt f l.hm

are suffering

from a social-
malady which is eating at the
heart of America, Most of them
are alcoholics. .
IT'S HARD to define an alco

holic. Is his trouble physical,
psychological, or moral? Frob-
shlv H.' sir f.hr Th tmnnr-

tant faci is that the alcoholic Is

a special kind of person with

problems peculiar to himself
He needs help badly.

Noj; every alcoholic is in Skid
Row. Millions are living in var various'
ious' various' walks of life in the United
States. They are doctors and

businessmen and teachers and
even housewives. Many are out

1. ..f-r7

mm

mw w,

R. Brockman

of work and many have lost
their families. Alcoholism for

years has seen the principal

cause of divorce in the United
States.

THE ALCOHOLIC is not just

a drunk. He is the image or
God and the brother of Jesus
Christ. Indeed to the Christian
he is Jesus Christ Himself, who

will one day say, "I was sick
and you cared for me."
Few of us do not personally
know some alcoholic. All of us
will meet them at times. It we
really believe that Jesus Chfist
lives in His members, then we
cannot say, "Am I my brother's
keeper?''
BUT ACKNOWLEDGING his
responsibility, what can the ord ordinary
inary ordinary person do for the alcohol alcoholic?
ic? alcoholic? We all know the splendid
work' being done for millions by
the Alcoholics Anonymous. In a
limited way, the ordinary man
can share in their work by giving
the alcoholic the encouragement
he needs. He can sympathize
and try to understand. He will
remember that the alcoholic is
enduring indescribable torture,
and he will have compassion for
him.' v --';,"!-.
The Heart of Jesus opens to all
men its streams of pity and
comfort and love. Jesus says to
the alcoholic, "Come to me, you
who are-burdened, and I will
give you rest." We can aspire
to do no less than Christ.

Unions Expect Stiff Opposition
To Johnston Retirement Bill

! S)ocia I and OtL

lermie

Youna liurse Slain
By 21-Year-Ofd

For Spurning Love

Editor's Note: This sum summarized
marized summarized analysis of the
lengthy provisions of a new
bill affecting retirement is a
follow-up of yesterday's re report
port report on retirement measures
and action being taken by the
CLU-MTC).
Much opposition is expected
from the Elsenhower Adminis

tration to a retirement measure
introduced in the Senate by the

Atlantic Side Annua
St. Patrick's Day Ball
Set For March 17

The dance committee for Knights j
of Columbus Council 1689, has!

made plans for the coming 43rd i BOSTON, Feb. 2 CUP). To-
Annual St. Patrick's day Ball. 1 lice today charged a 21 year-old
I Tho HqIa will ho vfltnrfiav enninnrl IjMrAt u.ilh fit-mit fi?a hul

bed. V U Cnanges tile lJlMnwh U St Patl-irlr's TJnv: anrillntc in1n tho h(iH nf i nrpttv nnrs.

years to 5 years of service for! the Dlace the Stransers Club inline slurlpnt on a husv street corn-

Colon. The time is 8 p.m. till a(- er here last night.
ter midnight, and the charge is $1 "I don't know why I did it. I
per person. guess I was mad," police quoted

Charles H. Atwood Jr. who was

tions were made.

an employe retiring on an inv

mediate annuity and electing a
joint or survivorship annuity. It
also extends this right to em employes
ployes employes receiving deterred an annuity,
nuity, annuity, a big item is the change
in reductio ntroir. 5 percent on
the 1,500 of his annuity and 10
per cent for all In excess to; no

reaucuon ior ine jirs,t $4,000 of

chairman of the Post Office and an annuity. It leaves the 10 per-

umi service uommniee, ac according
cording according to the Central Labor
Union and Metal Trades Coun

cil

cent for any amount above $4, $4,-000,
000, $4,-000, as at present.
Sect, 9 tg) Changes the 10

The legislation is S-2875. It to m

auction in aimuity due to the
survivor of an unmarried an-

The committee has also decided
on some numbers for entertain entertainment
ment entertainment and there will be servcral
dour prizes Horn the leading stor stores
es stores in Colon.
Tickets will be put on sale ar

ound the beginning of rcbruary.

charged with murder. : j
The victim, brown-cyed Rose,
Marie Da Silva. 18. died 25 mln-1
utes after doctors and fellow stu-1
dents took her to a hospital. i
Three student nurses said they
saw Atwood shoot the girl andi

1

MOYIES TV RADIO
by Erskine Johnson

..V, I 1
t
ml 1. 1 :: in,..,, ,m

sponsored by Sen. Olin D. Johns Johnston,
ton, Johnston, South Carolina Democrat,
Passage would add approxi approximately
mately approximately $500 million to federal
retirement costs. The bill prov provides
ides provides for an increase in deduc deductions
tions deductions from the present 6 to
7. But this would net the gov government
ernment government only an extra 90 mil million.
lion. million. ' v
The CLU-MTC is also study studying
ing studying another measure to revise
the retirement law. It is the so so-called
called so-called "Carlson measure" which
would combine federal retire retirement
ment retirement with Social Security.
, CLU-MTC supplied the fol following
lowing following condensed summary of
the Johnston Bill and its posi position
tion position thereon:
Section -5 (a) would change

the mandatory retirement or
separation age limit. At present
an employe of Alaska or the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone is' automatically sepa separated
rated separated or terminated at age 62.
8-2775 would change this to age
70 to conform to the mandatory
separaion age limit of other U.
S. employes. The CLU-MTC win
ask that the limit' remain at
age 62. ,.

S-2875 will reauire naVment of

,,HOLLYWOOD ,(NF,A -Ex-J meats,", expected to tun from '" Zn

Clusiveiy lours: uouywoou s inree. aim a nan 10 cour nours.r ": '!..; .," ,""

measuring a lot .of movies, by Husband; "Lt' go to tho moV'
rounds instead of n-els these days, i let."
It's' "Come out fighting": instead!

Wifo: "Fino I'll psck."
It may happen.

of "Action," Cauliflower ears are
getting screen tests and make-up

men are prouoer oi amsuc uiat.
eves than creating, handsome pro-
It's a new cycle of prize-fight
pictures, with one producer,
Charles Schnee, explaining:
"TV-is primarily responsible for
r the revived interest in professional
". pugilism. Women and children, as
well as the men, have become ex excited
cited excited followers of the regular fight
telecasts, and prospects are they
- will welcome any quality picture
. with a nriTP-rinu flavor."

FIRST TO REACH the screens

Will DC me uaiuci imy o"
t an expose of the fight "racket"
i with Jersey Joe Walcott and Max
; Bacr in supporting roles.

'The Leather Saint" is in

That famous old radio series;
"The First Nighter," which

zoomed Don Ameche to stardom,

is tne latest teletilm anthology se
ries . Leo Guild tells this:

The occupant of a second-floor
apartment telephoned a teen-ager

wno was playing rock- n -roll rec

ords in an apartment below. "If

you don't stop that horrible noise,"
protested the many "I'll go out

oi my minav .

Replied the kid: "Gosh. I guess

us too late, i naven t played a

recora ior two nours.

tine at Paramount and MOM s ing 1 Glory with

ready to ring the starting bell on I burn, back in 1932 i
the Rocky Graziano autobiography! Brando's fiancee (?) is

and best seller, "Somebody Upt a screen test at Wsrncr

There Likes Me. I Latest sign on the

Beine offered to studios are the

f i Jack Dempsey "arid Barney Ross

stones.

,jiuv. vuv..,. vu.iu n
from HOlly wood stand-ins.
They're now punch-ins.
.

i Jack Kelly, who had a starring
i role in the King's Row TV series
at Warner Bros., and the studio
have called it a day Rossano
, (summertime) Brazzi will team up

Anotner remane coming up

aiage mtuck. starnne Jean Sim

theimons. You saw it first as "Morn

Katharine Hep

. Marlon

slated for

Bros.

bicycle Bine

between sound

Crosby

stages:

rides

"Horo's your Minutt Maid Or

ngo Juico Boy. It's grtst with

gin whit isn't?"

SELECTED SHORTS: Dorolhv

Lamour formed her own company
to film three pictures in Mexico
. , Deborah Kerr nixed that
$100,000 Las Vegas offer for ner-

with Donna Reed in "Wherever! sonal appearances at the Sahara

You Are.'' Rome will background
the story, due for f if mlng in Sep September
tember September . v-Jack Palance and
, his wife called off the divorce
"; plans.- ';....
. "CONE WITH THE WIND," at

three.hours, 37 minutes, is tne cur

rent champion in the department
of marathon-movie going. But now
1 it's "movies are longer than
, ever," with Columbia planning a
four-hour film version of Mackln-

lay Kantor s "Andersonviue" and

two otner movies.

Hotel.

. Success note: Eva Marie Saint,

wno was paw $7500 ior her emot

ing in "On the Waterfront," will
collect $100,000 if she accepts

MGM'g offer to join Liz Taylor

ana Montgomery tint m "Rain-

tree Country.

James Dean's father is said to
be preparing a biography of his

son, who left a diary . Rose

marv Clooney s new stork date

"war. and! may cancel out her planned tele

Peace" and "The TenCommand-film series.

PANAMA AMERICAN

WVf

If"

l3 A JC3

HNEfJ J

.;;j.vy4-iir

11 m St. k -w w

' TV 1

i.k

MltO

inteo roots

WW

mm:.

TzivFiixmnimosT

... i
r

ploye was out of service, Since

this time is not included in the
formula for obtaining credit for
years of service, many believe
that no interest should be charg charged.
ed. charged. ,; .'
Section 6 c) Tlghtens-up the
provisions, under which em employes
ployes employes (police), retire under the
hazardous-position clause. Un Under
der Under S-2875,-the head of the -gency
must give full considera consideration
tion consideration to the degree of the haz hazard,
ard, hazard, rather than the general
duties of the class 01 the posl posl-ion.
ion. posl-ion. .. .:
, Section 11 (a) Lump Sum
Benefits. This section elimi eliminates
nates eliminates the payment of Interest
on any refund of deposits
whether on involuntary termi termination
nation termination or transfer to another
agency not subject to this ale.
The outstanding parts of the
bill deal with the increased
formula. ;
Section 6 (d) provides for an
Immediate 'annuity on a reduc reduced
ed reduced basis to- an emoloye involun involuntarily
tarily involuntarily separated who Is 50 years
of age wtih 20 years of service.
The present Act requires 25
years of service.
Sect. 6 (f) provides for lull
annuity at age 60 with 10 years
of service. preseYit Act calls for
a reduction for each month un under
der under age 62.
Sect. 7 (d) Stops the annuity
of a disability annuitant if
his earnint capacity lg restor restored
ed restored to a fairly comparable lev level
el level not a complete recovery.
Sect. 7 (3) If a disability an annuitant
nuitant annuitant recovers but cannot find
a job, under this act. He is con considered
sidered considered to have been involuntari involuntarily
ly involuntarily separated on the date of his
last annuity payment. He then
Is eligible for an immediate an annuity
nuity annuity if otherwise enitled.
Sect. 9 (a) Retains the for formula
mula formula of 1 percent of average
year earnings plus $25 multiplied
by the number of years service
for the low-paid employes but
raises the Va percent to 2 per
cent multiplied by the number
of years. The ceiling is cut from
80 to 75 per cent ,to make it uni uniform
form uniform throughout the bill. This
section also establishes a mini minimum
mum minimum for total, disability, after
5 years employment, as (1) 40
per cent Of his average salary
or: (2i an amount obtained aft

er increasing the total service i

by the period elasping between :"
the date of his separation due! I

to the disability and the date
he attains the age of 70, which
ever is the lesser.
Another Important
change is the reduction of an annuity
nuity annuity for those retiring before
60 years of age. The new for formula
mula formula changes the present U
of 1 percent of his annuity for
each full month under 60 to
l'12th of 1 percent for each
full month up to 30, thei. l8th
of 1 percent between 30 and
60 months and 1 6th of 1 per percent
cent percent for each month in excess
of 60 months the employe is
under age 60 years at the time
of retirement.
Sect 9 (e) Removes the od-

Ition to eliminate from his cred-

w it, services Ior which no deduc-

cntertainment, Andrew P. Lim
publicity, Bob Johnson, Vendetti,

John Hardy tickets, Bob Mohr,

me 2h if. vpV r in m Martinez. Dick Froncck-door priz priz-Sect
Sect priz-Sect 10 fff ci?S 'i.J.es.-John-StaU, Joe Bai'owski,
m nrnvini J J 1 thS Mii Bizozinsi, Alexander, Alvin
fmm-fiiSS an?Z0Hf & reafucetd P. Lim, Alfred Mushett, Jim Hrin Hrin-immediate
immediate Hrin-immediate automatic annuity to j nLw L anfi nrogram
a snrviuincr nrirtn,,, ,4rf..,.- nccK aas ana program.

H -....... 0 m.mvtv IK W1UUWC1
regardless of dependent chil children
dren children and removes the 50 year
age restriction.
Sect. 10 (a) (2) makes any e e-lected
lected e-lected annuity under section 10
(a) (2) payable immediately
upon deatn of the annuitant
without regard to the age of
the surviving spouse.
Sect. 10 td) continues the
same automatic annuities to sur surviving
viving surviving dependent children and
extends benefits to a widower1
provided he was dependent up upon
on upon the annuitant ior support
However, the toimula Is in increased
creased increased from $900 divided by
the number o children or $3ou'
which ever is tne lesser to;
$1200 divided by number ot the
children or $48u. The ceiling on
annuities to surviving chllaren
is raised lrom $1200 rlivified by
the number of children or $480
whichever is the lesser to; $1600
divided hy the number of chil chil-dren
dren chil-dren or $640 whichever is the
lesser.
- Sect, 11 (a) provides for
lump sum refund of deposits,
without interest, to employes
with less than 5 years service
and permits employes with
more than 5 but" less than 20
years service, the choice of
taking a lump sum' refund
without interest or leaving the
deposit to entitle them to a
deferred annuity at age 62.
Sect. .13. provides for reem reemployment
ployment reemployment of an annuitant in
any position for which he or she
is qualified. At present no an annuitant
nuitant annuitant may be reappointed to
any Government position after
he is 60 years old except in spe special
cial special cases.
Sect. 15 (b) permits the Com Commission
mission Commission to waive recovery from
an annuitant who

a Jump-sum over payment when

The following are the members; then bend over her before fleeing!

of the dance committee! in an automobile. A short ti.-nei

Jim Jackson chairman and: later Atwood surrendered and con-1

fessed, police said.

Mrs. M a r g a r e t MacDonald,
house mother of the purses' home,
said Atwood "had been bothering
the girl for a month."
She said Atwood arrived at the
home earlier in the afternoon to
talk with Miss Da Silva.
"When the boy was leaving,"
Mrs. McDonald said, "Rose
Marie stopped by my desk. She
said. 'well, it's all over. There

will be no more of this.

SiWiriXG AT Y 01) II SERl'lCE CENTER
THEATERS TOMCIIT!

BALBOA 6:15-8:00

AIR-CONDITIONED

m. Iki!
Hill!!:!!
: in' -i- mm nun im ii'ir

I

DIABLO UTS. 6:15 7:53

Rnhfrt STACK

"Bullfighter and the Lady"

Frl.

"siiot;i-n"

GATUN ;
9 Ursula THIESS
"MONSO ON"

Frl.

nVY (ROCKITT"

MARGARITA 6:15 8:10
Kliabrth TAYLOR
ELEPHANT WALK
Frl. 'BOB ltUTHI ASSTORY'

7:5"

Frl. 'TROL'BI.K : IN STORE"

CRISTOBAL 6:15

Alr-Cundlliflnrit
Hildeaarrte NEFF
"SVENGALI" Color:
Frl. "SKVFN AN(.RY MKS"

PARAISO

6:15 8:10 "SPRINGFIELD RIFLE"

SANTA CRUZ

"HELL'S

JZ 6:15 8:4s IcAMl
OUTPOST" jj

CAMP BIERD 6:15 8:18

BLACK WIDOW"

VALENTINE CIRL-Six-year-old
Pamela Schmidt of Minne Minneapolis,
apolis, Minneapolis, Minn., is "Valentine
Girl" of the 1956 Heart Fund...
Pamela underwent successful!
heart surgery over a year ago.

the recipent acted in good
faith.
S-2875, also corrects an In Inequity
equity Inequity for the future only, not
retroactively, for a male an annuitant
nuitant annuitant who retired between
April 1, 1948 and September 30,
1949 and who had to take a
$150 reduction on his first $1500
of his annuity to obtain a sur survivorship
vivorship survivorship annuity for his wife,
by recomputing Ills annuity us us-$1500
$1500 us-$1500 or $75.
sequent to September 30, 1949
namely, 5 per cent of the first
retired Panama Canal emoloye,
Rights of persons separated
before the effective date of thic
act shall continue in the same
manner and to the same extent
as if this act had not been
enacted.
The effective date of S-2875
will be January 1, 1957.

Hey Look!
9 Days Till
FIREMEN'S
BALL
RESERVATIONS
, BALBOA 2392

BALBOA

. When

Great

Talents

STARTS
SATURDAY!

1!

' -irv

f

(

I A

MA nr. c-

Get Together.. ii

'P.- IT'S

ilLUAYS

H"MTI3iIK

A

'iA

rOM M-C-M in

'

CINemaScop(

lirrlno.
G3IE
Kelly

i

AND COLORI

Mr h

hit isnat from

"V 1h M-9-M
nh. RECOMO
S. ALBUM t

DAIl

v cyd doloresu v
' Ciiarisse Gray

Real Cows!
When you use
AVOSET, you're
using real cream
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sterilized to
stay sweet

for months. :
AVOSET
'whips fast,

stays whipped
for hoursand

it's alway:

m

v

healthful, safe
and delicious.

mm

sterilized
WHIPPING CREAM

A

(:::
i

ENRICHED CREME

SHAMPOO WITH EGG
that pus, Sf4(NE in your Hair

LATE SHOW'S FRIDAY 10:30 P. M.
DIABLO HEIGHTS MARGARITA
"N I G II T iA ND I r,M
tit e c i t Y" ILUSTFOR COLLV-

Keeptlidm one
; jump aKmd!
t 1
Having fun and playing
i hard, children constantly
! burn up energy. ROYAL
, GELATIN, helps replace it.
; ROYAL GELATIN is simple
to make;., thrifty, tool
7 glorious
fresh fruit flavors!

Betauie it ia nature's
own hair hutifier, th
in Richard Hudnut
Enriched Creme Sham Shampoo
poo Shampoo giveii your hair
gloriously aoft texturt
and brilliant sheen'
makes it easy to man man-aire,
aire, man-aire, silky and shiny -lubricates
the hair as
it cleans, iibiit
drying.

i c t f

V

jsr hair shtuli
iily U washed
tni heautified with

Richard Hudnut
enriched creme shampoo ilh eg?

)



TUB FA5AMA A?rrrJCAN AN rNDLFENPFNT DAILY KFWSPATTa
SDAT, FEBRUARY 2, 133J
.AbJiesierneia
OffigMiC
9
.1.

PACE EIGHT

T: Don Elslon, Vibert Clarke
. Scheduled Mound Starters

4

v By J. J. HARRISON JR.
It will be righthander Don Elston against lefty
Vibert Clarke tonight at the Olympic Stadium as
Chesterfield and Spur Cpla continue their sizzling
battle for the Panama Pro League championship.
Last night the second place Smokers climbed to
within a single game of the Sodamen thanks to their
3-to-2 win over the league leaders.

. A win for the Smokers tonight
, would place them in a tie with the
Sodamen. Each team would then
have 18-14 won-lost records. A Spur
.Cola victory would again give them
a two-game lead.
Elston made his last start a
winning one over the seven-inning
route last Saturday night to beat
the Carta Vieia Yankees, 5 to
. In Clarke's last starting assign assignment
ment assignment he was nicked for six hits
'and two runs in three innings by
fart a Vieia. The fireballer was
rplipved in the fourth'by Jim Tug
"erson who was charged with the
lrtsi when Carta Vieja scored a
run to win out 3 to 2.
' Chesterfield manager Jot
Nachio's "big man," Humberto
Robinson, cam through tast
night with a six-hitter to give
tha Smokers an important 3 to 2
win over Spur Cola. It was Hob Hobby's
by's Hobby's sixth win against four set-
bBobby Prescott's sixth rounatrip rounatrip-pcr
pcr rounatrip-pcr of the season a long, high
blast over the left field fence which
came in the second inning with
a mate aboard, provided the marg-
in of victory.
Loser Jerry Davie gave up only
. five safeties, losing his second
- game to make his record even. The
' Smokers gave Robinson all his runs
in the second inning, and the Iran
righthander made them stand up

for the rest oi me ,
Elias Osorio, leading off, singled
; to left and was sacrificed by Billy
Queen. Clyde Parris drilled a
' single to left sending home Osorio
' with Parris going to second on the
throw. Umpire Willie Hinds at first
motioned "out" as Parris slid in to
the bag, but he later changed his
decision, claiming that second base baseman
man baseman Hector Lopez had juggled the
bMost of the Spur Cola players
immediately converged on the um umpire
pire umpire at second base and a long and
lively rhubarb ensued.
ir.ett. the next batter, unload-

id his homer to give the winners
l the third It' appeared as though
wiiu id score when
Reinaldo Grenald opened the frame
with a single and Davie beat out
an infield hit to place runners on
first and second with one out, after
Pepe Osorio had flied out. Howev However
er However Harold Gordon forced Davie,
third tcr second, and the danger dangerous
ous dangerous Herman Charles fanned to end
the inning.
Robinson gave "P. spur Co Cola's
la's Cola's both runs In tha fifth. Gran Gran-aid's
aid's Gran-aid's twobaggar and Papa s singlo
brought In one run, and with a
runner on first and no outs, Don
Elston began throwing furiously
in tha Smoker bullpen.-
Davit sacrificed to advance 0 0-sorio
sorio 0-sorio to sacond and Harold Cord-
en popped to the atcher for tht
second out. A single by Charles
brought In Papa for the last run
tf tht game, and Charles was out,
"stealing to retire tht sidt. v (
After this both pitchers settled
down and permitted no more scor scor-"W
"W scor-"W In the ninth Robinson retired
'three "big men" '-Lopez, Leon
" Kellman and, Clarence Moore
ki order. v
"-Lopez flied out to center Kell-
pian popped to second. And Moore
:
'"4
'J
ROCKY Life was rose-strewn
for Dave Kaiser after his field
Roal beat UCLA at Pasadena,
but it's a rocky one back in
Michigan. State classes. Dave, a
ecology major, hopes for a ca career
reer career in the oil business.
Todoy Encantn .75
WAHOO! $115.00
Howard Keel in
, "DESPERATE SEARCH
t Laim Turner in
; "MR. IMTERIUM''
;5
Torfcv IDEAL 20 ...10
Fichard Todd !n
"ASSASisLN""
William Holden In
"MOON IS 1LUL'

went out, pitcher to first, td end
the game.
Bofort th contttt 1 1 a r t d, 1

Chosttrfitld prtudtnt Carlos E la lata
ta lata paid a vitit to tha Smokar
drouing room and gava hit boyi
pap talk.
Eleta expressed his appreciation
of the players' hustle and said he
was well aware of the obstacles
the club had to overcome to get
into a contending position.
The disappointment of not getting
players wno were believed ready
to join the club before the season
started; Davie's appendectomy; the
late arrival of Danny bchell, wal wal-ly
ly wal-ly Burnette and Llston; and
Frank Austin's injury, were some
of the setbacKS Eieta discussed.
"You guys have come a long
way and can still make it," Eleta
insisted. "Win this one tonight ana
you put Spur Cola in a position
where they will be feeling real
pressure."
Nachio announcad that if his
taam takes tha pannant, Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Series reinforcements will
ba Lopaz and Carta Vieja right righthander
hander righthander Bill Harris.
The series, between the winners
of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Venezuela
and Panama, gets underway at the
Olympic Stadium Feb. 10.
Pacific Softball
League
'''. i
By GILBERTO THORNE
Monday's Game
Amer. legion 400 001 049 8 1
Pan Llquldo 004 101 005 10 i
. Home runs; KiipaincK. wr
Moran. Umpire -.i Tamariz. LP
Rennet.

Veeh's American Legion whip-isia In the 15-thousand-meter ski
ped fEutch"; Baker's pan Liqui-' relay. Finland won on a great
do in an 8-innlng thriller which' anchor leg by a mother of four

ended 9-5
The Legionnaires jumped to
an earlw lead, scorine four runs
in the first inning. Pan Llquido
tied it up in the third on three
hits including Kilpatrlck's two two-run
run two-run homer.
Talmarlo'd scored for the Le
gion when Veeh singled in the
sixth, but the beermen tied it up
in the bottom half of the frame.
In the extra inning the Legion
lowered the boom : and raised
their tally by four runs. Pan Ll
quido failed to retaliate.
Top hitters of this game were
Veeh with 2 hits in 3 attempts
and Hamlin with .3 lor 5 (Ameri (American
can (American Legion) andKoslk, Dahn
and Lane, each hitting twice in
four tries for Pan Liquido.
Tuesday
Glud Agencies 002 305 5 1
26th Engineers 000 000 1 0
Lou Helzinger and Glud Asen-
cles overpowered the 26th Engl-
neers in live fast lnnines ofi
splendid soitball before rain

stopped the game. HelzingerJmeter cross-country ski race
who had been pitching no-hit and women's figure skating. The

Dan ior mree innings, ien, an

over nimseii trying to dick up."1", i" me: ski event, but
Oliphant's well-placed bunt in Americans Tenley Albright and

the lower half of the fourth
OliDhant tot the benefit of the
doubt on a close call on first
base. But that was the only hit
they were allowed for the rest
of the game.
Glud scored twice In the third
when Stock walked and tacey
hit. The men moved around the

Dases on ue ia Maters force at.01"1

first. Both men scored on pitch pitcher's
er's pitcher's Helzinger's single to center center-field,
field, center-field, insurance came hv the
form of Stock's three-run homer
in the fourth inning.
umpire Metheney was forced
to call the game in the middle Of
me sixtn wnen tne rain mace
further play hazardous.
The box score:
Glud Arencles
Lacev of ;
Glavelli cf
Ab R II Po E
3 1 1 I
0 0 0
0
n
0
0
0
1
'0
1
2
le la Mater s .
Hehlner p ...... 3
Poster 2b ....... 2
Melawt lb .' 3
Dunn c 0
Lawyer rf ........ 3
McArthur If ..... 3
Stock 3b ......... 2
n
1
1
0

Totals 21 5 5 15
i Engineer
' Harhiccl ss 2 0 0 1
jSharpe If 2 0 0 1
Ollphant 3b -2 0 1 0
Rusell lb 1 0 0 0
Moore cf 2 0 0 1
Nedrow 2b ....... 2 0 0 0
i Adams p 2 0 0 1
Hicks rf 2 0 0 0
iNovinska c ...... 1 0 0 3

1
18 0 1 15 0
Strikeouts: Helzinger 3. Ad-
1, -AdamTfl. PitrhfT'STeroTdriler-'
zinger, 0 hits 0 runs in 5 in
nings; Adams, 5 hits, 5 runs in 5
'nninsis. Home runs: Stock. RBi:
Hclzinser 2. Stock 3. Time: 1:20.
Umpire: Methcnpy.

j j
S J i
i i
- tw- -

ayi""-.-fc'i-i-'

BRAVADO Mexican boy matador Manolo Marquez taunts bull into charging his "muleta"
as he sits on the footrail of the fence during last Sunday's corrida at La Macarena bullring.
Marquez will be competing Sunday against lovely American torera Bette Ford, who is sched scheduled
uled scheduled to arrive here tomorrow from Mexico City. V,

U.S. Favored To Gain Second
Gold Medal At Cortina Today

OLYMPICS
The United States has won Its
first gold medal of the Winter
Olympics and is favored to add
another one today.
Haves Allen Jenkins won the
men's figure skating event at
Cortina, Italy, as the U.S. took
over seventh place In the unof unofficial
ficial unofficial team standings. Ron Rob Robertson
ertson Robertson finished second and Da-
vid Jenkins third, elvine- Amer
ica a clean sweep of that event.
ine second and final section
of the women's figure skating
event is scheduled for today
wJih the U.S. expected to fn.
ish one-two.
Tenley Albright holds a com com-manding
manding com-manding lead in the compul compulsory
sory compulsory figures and Carol Heiss
has a fairly safe second place
margin. The only other Thurs Thurs-day
day Thurs-day event involving the UnS.d
States is a hockey game a-
gainst Sweden.
Four girls from Finland upset
wie worm cnampions from Rus
children. The United states pass
ea up uie event.
.Americans had the best bob bobsled
sled bobsled run of the day... more than
one second faster than Italy's
number-one sled. The number number-two
two number-two American sled was fifth.
American coach Alan Washbond
says "our chances "'definitely
look good" when four-man com competition
petition competition starts on Friday.1
In other Olympic news, a re re-port
port re-port says Tony Sailer of Aus Austria
tria Austria with two gold medals
so far has an offer of $500
a week to coach at an uniden unidentified
tified unidentified American resort ...
American bobsled officials are
trying to keep the 1958 world
championships 'n Squaw Val Valley,
ley, Valley, Cal. ... Canadian hockey
coach Bobby Bauer says he
has "no alibis to make" over
an upset loss to the Americans
last night.
Switzerland and Finland also
won gold medals today, each In
wwuen-g sKiing. only finals tn
uav come in the men's 5n.onn
""ea omics qoesn't nave any
Carol Heiss are evneeteri f
ish xne-two in figure skating.
inai .snouia give the Amert Amert-cans
cans Amert-cans another boost In unofficial
team standings. Right now, the
United States is seventh with 28
i and one-half noints. or t.hnP io
came In men's figure skating
yesterday. Russia leads with 94
Along The Fairways
!
RHOOK LKADS 'FTJM-
I M,T nvis 422 TO 23 'j IN
BtER MUG INTERCLUB
TOURNAMENT
uinau x3iuuk uoiiers took a
commandinsr lead in the first.
n round of the National Brewerips
0 ieer mu? Tournament. The At
n.ianuc siaers lead Summit Hill
n wt to ii'i.
0 ) The first round was played at
1 Brazos Brook last Sunday. The
0 final round will be played at
0 1 Summit Hills Sunday, February
0j5. The matches are played with
n the Nassua system of senrinr
and besides the bis Beer Mnir
Trophy there are trophies for
the individual players who turn
In the best cards.
Players leading for individual
trophies at the halfway mark
are: E. Eder and D. Mathieson of
Brazos Brook with gross 76's and
Eder is tied with McGilberry and
Kandrin for low net all having
72s.
W. Garrison Is leading the
Summit group with a gross 86
and Buster Hare has the best net
score, a 66. Prizes will be award.
! ed after the 'final matches at
Summit Sunday mornlntr
f AST-BREAKING"

: Los Angeles (NEA) UCLA
holds a 20-point per game load ov over
er over its nearest rival in the Pacific
Cbast Conference scoring race.
.I

Fastlich

In one of the fastest games of
the year the Macaws upset the
high flying Palomas by a score
of 6-5. P. Corrigan went all the
way for the winners, while' Geo.
Barbier went the distanc for
Uhe Palomas.
The palomas started the game
by scoring two runs on two hits.
Barbier sent the Macaws down
in order in the first and second
but allowed a single tally in the
third,.
In the fourth the Palomas
came back with one more run
making the score 3-1. Both
mm
1
-4

7nRwLF RPRESENTATIVE-.When Chiharu Igaya took off
L 9m,plcs comPetition at Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy,
tw, ePented Japan. The youngster also carried the colors of
Dartmouth College and worked out with the American team.

V
Y

STRONG-ARMED CUY Phil Mullen, Penn State University
gymnast, isn't using his legs here as he rope climbs toward the
ceiling. Mullen's left les, is artificial below the knee, but he
: does a 20-foot climb in 3.7 seconds..

1
J

League
teams added runs in the. sixth,
for the Palomas they scored one
wniie tne winners scored two.
Going into the seventh, the
Palomas picked up another run
making It five to three, but in
the bottom of the seventh the
Macaws bunched together two
singles, a walk, a passed baJ
and a sacrifice fly for three
runs.
For the winners Amato was the
leading hitter with two for
three incluolne a -double. For
the Palomas Snodgrass had one
of the four hits put together by
the team, a long double.

Ring Magazine
Rates Pastrano
Among Heavies

NEW YORK, Feb. 2 (UP) A
20-year-old light heavyweight
who has outgrown that division
is rated a threat among the big
ger boys.
Willie Pastrano of Miami
Beach is the sixth ranked
heavyweight in the ratings, by
Ring Magazine released today.
Pastrano was the second ranked
light heavyweight in the Decem December
ber December ratings. Young Jack Johnson
also broke into the select circle.
He is ranked ninth off his kayo
over Ezzard Charles.
Archie Moore, king of the
light heavies, still rates number
one in the heavyweight division.
Floyd Paterson is considered the
top light heavyweight threat al although
though although there is talk of his chal
lenging heavyweight king RocKy
Marciano next fall.
Bobo Olson is the chief threat
to middleweight king Rav Rob
inson. Tony De Marco is tne top
contender in the welterweight
division ruled by Carmen Basi-
Uo. The leading lightweight con
tender Is Duiiio Lot. Fred Galla-
na is top ranked in the feather featherweight
weight featherweight class ruled by Sandy
Saddler.
Former lightweight champion
Paddy De Marco is a solid (5-9)
oick over Don Jordan tonight at
Los An?eles. .Sixth ranking
lightweight Johnny Gonsalves
Tuesday night scored his fourth
win in six tries against Henry
Davis. ..Middleweight Joey Gi Gi-ambra
ambra Gi-ambra has undergone surgery
for the removal of a cyst under
his left arm.
Bobby's Blast
Spur Cola
Ab R II Po
Gordon, lb ...... 4
Charles, 3b ...... 4
0
0
!
0 2
1 1
0 5
0 5
2 0
Glenn, cf ........ 4 0
Lopez, 2b ........ 4 0
Kellman, c ......4 0
Moore, ss ..4 0
Grenald, If ...... 3 U
P. Osorio, rf
. 3 1 1 3
Davie, p 2 0 10

:.;. -: 32 2 6 24 9
Chesterfield
Bernard,' 2b 4 0 1 4 2
Schell, if ........ 1 0 0 10
Stewart, cf 2 01 5 0
E. Osorio, lb ..... 3 1 19 0
Queen, c ........ 1 0 0 5 1
Parris, 3b ....... 3 1 10 2
Prespott, rf ...... 3 1 1 3
Houradeau, ss ... 2 0 0 0 3
Robinson, p ..... 3 0 0 0 4

22 3 5 27 12
Score By lnn'ngs
Spur Cola 000 020 0002 0
Chesterfield 030 000 0003 5 1
SUMMARY RBI's: Parris,
rrescou z, iv osorio, Charles.
errors:, parris. Earned runs:
Chesterfield 3, Spur Cola 2. Two
Base Hits: Bernard, Grenald.
Home Runs: Prescott.
plays: Moore, Lopez,
Double-
Gordon;
Lopez, Moore, Gordon. Sacrifice
Hits: Queen, Davie. Hit batters:
Davie (Houradeau). Struckoit
ay. Koomson 4, Davie 5. Ba?e

nl,f.AP:fP 4c Left.? Lodgemen of Elks 1414 turned I
?"?Si-??e?S?Ld i1' SPColatu"1, successive no-hit ball'

i. wummz rucner: Komnson
(6-4). Losing Pitcher: Davie (2
..
2). Umpires: Thornton, Hinds,
vuppm. rime or uame: 2:15.
Sports Briefs
BASKETBALL
NEW YORK. Feb. 2 (UP)
Among the pros, latest National
Basketball Association figures
show Bob Pettit of St. Louis still
leads in scoring with .1033 points.
That s an average of 24 points
a game. Paul Arizin of Philadel
phia is second with 1006 a 22
point average.
The Pirates of Seton Hall have
accepted a bid to compete In the
National invitation Basketball
Tournament in New York start
ing March 17th. Seton Hall, with
14 wins in 16 games, joins Du Du-quesne
quesne Du-quesne ; which entered the tour-
ney yesterday. i
BASEBALL
The 1955 National' League
battins champion has sighed
with Philadelphia for what he
cans "a very nic increase.
No figures were given, as
usual, but it is believed Richie
Ashbum will receive some J25, J25,-000.
000. J25,-000. General manager Roy Hi Hi-mey
mey Hi-mey says "There was no har har-glln.
glln. har-glln. It was just a nice, stpady
conference, lasting about 30 or
40 minutes."
Ashbum, who hit .338 last sea season,
son, season, says the back injury which
bothered him late in the year
has healed. Richie says "I e
no reason why I shouldn't do
better than; last, year but I
don't like to make predictions."
BIBLICAL DECISION
HEBRON, Conn. (UP) The
Rev. Douglas Pimm explained that
he accepted a call here instead of
another offer because he opened
the Bible at random to the second
chapter of Samuel: "And David
said. 'Whither shall I eo up?' and
the Lord said, 'unto Hebron'."

1 f

17
tf

.5- jF.

BLASTIN' BOB Happy teammates greet Chesterfield out

fielder Bobby Prescott as he

loaauig nis sixtn rounatripper a two-run blast in the second
inning which gave the Smokers a 3 to 2 win over league
leading Spur Cola last night. The victory placed Chesterfield
one game behind the Sodamen. The teams meet again
tonight at 7:30.

mem

'Al...LmU'niPliiiiiii,ii'.i.:

PANAMA PRO LEAGUE 4
TEAMS JVon Lost Pet. GB
Spur Cola 18 13 .581
Chesterfield 17 14 .548 1
Carta Vieja m 12 20 .375 6.ft
TONIGHT'S GAME-7:30-(Olympic Stadium)
Chesterfield (Elston 4-2) vs. Spur Cola (Clarke 3-2);
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT (Olympic Stadium) -Chesterfield
3, Spur Cola 2.., :

Ellcs' Ed Bleakley Hurls
2nd Straight No-Hitter

PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Won Lost Pet.
I Gibraltar Life ......
.667
Police ............. 3
.600
I Spur Cola 3
.600
Seymour Agency .. 3
TTllr. till 2
.500
,333
Llncoln Life 2
ah.
Elks 2, Lincoln Life 0

. .A tih ; .. t.h inwlvlLlnitAln i.if

. i-ct nn.
vHma o nn r kphmiu x xii u w uw-

hit, no run performance. W. French ss
The last time Ed pitched he, Ward lb ....
allowed no hits but a run wasiBradshaw cf

scored. Yesterday, however, at

the Little League Stadium, heiNessler rf

entered the Hall of Fame with!
a near Derfect performance
He retired ail the batters in a
row until the last Inning with
Nessler worked him
for a base on balls and Ed re
tired the next two batters to
preserve his no-hit no-run game.
During the afternoon, eleven
Lincoln Lifers went down via
strikeout route and when Big
Ed dirt not mow them down he
was irettinir snlendid suPDOrt a.!
field.
Not only did Ed's arm do all

Vote For Your All-Stars
The annual Pro League all-star game between local and
foreign players will be played at the Olympic Stadium Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, Feb. 5 at'3 p.m.. ;.;,;, rSZ'
Participants, who must play the first three innings, will
be chosen by the fans. Pitchers will be named by the man.
agers who will also be selected by the fans.
Fill in the coupon shown below and place In urns lo-,
cated at entrances of the Olympic Stadium.

LOCAL

....mgr.

4
approaches home plate after un-
V.V
the work, but his bat also con.
t.rthnteri ponslrfernhlv tn t.h vpm
tory. He was responsible for the
runs the Elks scored when he
unloaded a titantic home run
with his battery mate Chuck
Cross on the bases for the only
two runs of the game. .
...
For the losers, Bradshaw and
McElhone turned in spectacular
fielding gems.
Ab
H
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
McElhone, 2b
Beck p
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
r ou
u. x' a i j ti
J. Joyner ....
1
Bowman ................ 1
Fernandez c
Elks 1414
;Stoudnor
2b 3
Field ss ... 3
Burton 3b 3
Bergerner If ........... 0
Lincoln If .........1... 1
Hern rf 2
Devore cf .............. 2
Cross c
............... 2
P ............ 2
I Bleakley
Berger lb
FOREIGN
.lb.
.2b.
.3b.
ss.
If.
cf.
rf.



TISl'tSD AV, FISr.r.l?.Y 2, i-;s

TT.Z T,KSm AnlCAN AN PvErFEXTEXT DAUT NEW SPATES v
0
J i I r:, r.
M y u Cm '4
v
y
If W a
i

i; f f f'-u rj r-
I I ::f ft S k 1 I li I I J? I I P. i

THE BIG STEP
-, t-t ,s-m. iew -r-, ,v r--: .---V
. T
.
1 1

t L l I Ml li

I if 1 "-ifW :

ivy v ;

I

1

Muhlenberg
Scores Upset
Over Temple

By JOHN GRIFFIN

College Cage
Scores

TUESDAY'S RESULTS
SOUTH -:
Xavicr (Ohio) 70... Spring Hill
(Ala) 47

N.C. State 99, Virginia 54

MAinnG iiiwsELF icriovn

r
i

,.xn lf.k 4 t T'T5 1

M1.W IWtt, ttu. V!PrP$hvtPrin R5 Wnffnrrt 1

Ana tnea tnere were iwo ban .; u.:., .., '.r

Francisco and St, Francis.

were tne oniy major-

Those

college teams lelt on the un

beaten list toaay as mignyr

Temple was chargea wivn a

stunning 67-68 upet Dy wun-

lenberg mac enaea uie uwis

winmiK strean ior me seasun

at 13 Karnes.

Temple came to iriei lit me
hartt-iought game at AUen AUen-town,
town, AUen-town, Pa, last night after fall falling
ing falling IS points behind In the
early going, making it up mid midway
way midway in the second halt, and
then waging a see-saw battle
for thi last 10 minutes.

Atlantic Chris'n 89, Appalachian 82

West. Ky. 86, Mdle Tcnn. 78
Emory L Henry 85, Concord 83
Hampton 70, N. C. Col 64
Lipscomb 101, Union (Tenn) 65

Jacksonville (Ala) 94, Chattanoo

ga 74

Lambuth (Tenn) 100, Florence

(Ala) S2
Ga. Tchrs. 90, Erskine 87

Garson-Newman 74, MLUigan 69 1

Knoxville 97, Tenn State 91

Ky. State 51, Wilberfce (Ohio) 48
Piedmont 68, Col. of Charleston 61

Wm. Carey 73, Millsaps 45

S'westera La. 69, N'east La. 58

Fisk 73, Xavler (N.Orleans) 72

EAST

AM AZOEO
WINTERS
TRACK CES
14 A VIRTUAL
UNKNOWN
WHO'D NEVEJ?
WOW PIK
8ZF0RE LAiZ
YEAR. ....

. was fMitt

by
JOE WILLIAMS

Hal Relnfeld's long set shot St. Fran (Bkn) 92, St. Peters (NJ)
Dut the Owls ahead, 64-63, with! 82

1:30 to play. But Cardy Gem- Indian (pa) 91, Slippery Rock 71

ma's basket put Muhlenberg! Adeiphia 85, f rati 66
back in Iront and two freeiKings (Pa) 91, Hartwick 72

throws by Clint Jefrles sealed Bethany (WVa) 73, Allegheny 70
Temple's doom. Bobby Gall pac- Steirbenville 91, Gannon (Pa) 69
ed the winning Mules with 20 Glenville 90, WVa Wesleyan 81
points, but game scoring honors Morris Harvey 107, West Lib'ty 99

an emDiv eonsoiauon--wcnv '"kp"1""" vucjrucj n

to Hal Lear of Temple with 28,

TemDle. ranked seventh na-

92

W.V.A. State 103, Norfolk Col

tlonally by

the United Press ;flrmont 89, Salem (WVa)

board of coaches. Included a 12

point victory over Kentucky in
its winning skein.

Ana so only ban jrancisco

(15-0) and St. Francis o! Brook

lyn (14-0) are left alone in the
unbeaten class among major
colleces. St. Francis was report

ed unofficially to have accepted

a bid to the National Invitation
Tournament, the third team

picked for the 12-team field.

Kentucky scored a stirring
81-76 victory over Duke at
Lexington, Ky., last night in a
game between two Dixie r'vals
both high in the national ratings.

Dayton, the nation's no. a Aueustana (R.L.m.v

team which was knocked from mouth 54

the unbeaten ranks by Louis- McPherson 62. Baer (Kan) 58

ville last Saturday, returned to, Ottawa (Kan) 66, Bethany (Kan)

Newark Eng. 92, Paterson Tchrs
85
St. Michales (Vt) 78, Colby 64
Salem (Mass) 80, Gorham Tchrs
79
MIDWEST
Kansas 56, Okls. A&M 55
Muskingum 83, Hiram 71
Calvin (Mich) 83, Adrian 58
Doane 89, Omaha 82
Wartburg 89. Dubuque 62

Central (Iowa) 73, Iowa Wesleyan
71.-:
Buena Vista 88, Simpson 83
Lewis (111) 86, Loras 72
Mo. Vallev 87. Wm. Jewell 81
Carthage 98, Eureka (111) 74

111. Wesleyan 86, W.Cent. 111.

Yankton 81, Norfolk (Neb) 58

69, won

in

' I . . Ill1

I! WHO'D NSYEX II J
i WOW 4PIKB4 V J.
! SFDfi LAST. V 1

i 'I V

AW

r,i WELL.) t -J
Yip th . l
OOEWT A .-'
( BEAT EVERY-1 : I
CTMlNfi1'-7J'I'A,.

rWS

81 f r-V I

79 i v iv

69,

.Aw i 7 "l n ft i-

Atlantic Teenage League,
STANDINGS Iscore their only run of the game.
! Phillips opened with a single In-

Won Lost to right field, went to second on

Teams
Buirk ..
C P. O.

,Motta ..
M. R. A,

Tuesday, Jan. 31

2 0 ISander's sacrifice and scored cn
4 1 Gibson's solid hit into left field.

12 With bases loaded and two

0 4 out, Eberenz drove a hit Into

left center to score two mates
and place the game on ice for
C. P. O. in the top of the sixth.

CP.O. posted their fourth win! Gibson had a perfect day, get-

of the season with a 4 to 1 vjc-jting two hits for two official
Itory over M. R. A. Tuesday aft-! trips to the plate,
jernoon at Coco Sollto. This is
! the first game played in the. At- The box score;
ilantln Teen-aee I.eaurue slncel

i last Thursdav due to off season C. P. O. Ah R

t rains. jHouser, rf ....... 4
r Favorite turned: in another i Marshall, 2b ..... 2

fine performance as he allowed
only four hits, retired eleven
M. R. A. hitters via the strike strikeout
out strikeout route and issued one free
pass. Max Sanders held C. P. O.

hitless during the first four In-1

nmgs or play but his wildness

accounting for nine base on balls
caused the left hander plenty or
trouble.

After CP.O. had scored two

runs In their half of the fifth

frame on a single by Favorite to

score Ambrose and McGraw

pounded out a base hit to score

Ambrose, 2d ..... 2
Eberenz, 3b ...... 4

r "V. Mr:-;.

wm j .. i

...VT

CATAPULTED

FBONTAHO

CENTER WITH

A 6BN6ATI0HAL

9.5 '100

OH PLAT

BOAKO'S

action and to the winning col column
umn column with an easy 75-37 decision

over Loyola (111.), using only one
first-stringer in the eame. but

taking a 42-15 half time lead J

Dayton's record now is 15-1

tditor: CONRADO SARGEANT

Golf is the one, aame that doesn't make an oldtimer look

ridiculous. .Naturally, the good playeri won't wm as often at,
say, 50 as they did at 30, but the answer lies in physical attri attrition,
tion, attrition, not withered talent.
If you've ever watched the seniors play you know how true
this is. They hit the ball about as well as they ever did, exercise
much the same mastery over their shots, and perhaps most In Interesting
teresting Interesting of all, there is nothing dated or labored about their play.
The popular explanation is that once a golfer has acquired
n absolutely grooved swing, it never leaves him. This may also
be true of the better hitters in baseball, and yet by comparison
they look pathetic when they challenge the calendar.
; "Old-Timer's Day" has become standard in many ball parks
and whether the club owners are motivated by sentiment or
commerce is not necessarily generic to this essay. It la enough
to say the fans go for it pretty good.
iftis department will match its regard for the old-timers
with anyone in sports, but he must confess that when he sees
an elderly Ty Cobb try to go from first to second on a long
triple, or a Tris Speaker, whose venerability is only slightly less
marked, grotesquely stagger under a simple pop fly, he is forced
to avert his gaze.
There must be others to whom this sort of thing is a mock'
ery and degradation of time-hallowed achievement.. That the
owners would contribute to it does not surprise, since it sells:

. that the old-timers themselves seem eager to collaborate in the

oascentty, does.
The old-timer In golf, on the other hand, not only -manages
to hold on to considerable of his talent, but continues to look
the part of a first-rate performer.

Those Low Scores

You ma Lave seen Craig Wood, now 54, win the Metropoli Metropolitan
tan Metropolitan Seniors last fall. Except for a tendency to embonpoint and

a shortened stroke., .which really made for a stateliness not

InaDDroDriate to the occasion... you mieht have had difficulty

in distinguishing him from the Craig Wood who won the Na Na-tonal
tonal Na-tonal Open some 15 years before.
The FGA Senior championsh.it) is now in progress in Florida

and a number of yesterday's headliners are in the field of ZOO,

including oenc Sarazen, Olm Dutra. Johnny rarreu, Tony Man-

era (aI former Open champions, Willie Hunter, Al Watrous,

Denny Shnte, Harry Cooper and the countless Turnesa's.
The test is at 54 holes instead of 72, the regulation distance,
and this is the only concession made to time. Jock Hutchison
won the Senior's Inaugural in 1937. It was noteworthy that he
scored better than in several of the Opens he came so close to
winning in his younger days. ,
This, indeed, has been true of most subsequent winners, and
while it rjives the old boys something to boast of... '.'we are bet better
ter better now than ever". .the seemingly Improved golf is mostly a
reflection of improved equipment and improved playing condl-"lions.-"
Thusunwittingly, the old pros' shed further light on how
the younj pros get those 60s. (

Soda or Water?
Mortle Dutra, defending champion, won last year with 213.
Chick Evans 54-hole score the year he won the Open with a
record was exactly 213. The year Bob Jones won on his way to
the historic Grand Slam he had 212 for the first three rounds.
. Sarazen finished with an iridescent 66 to win his second

Open in 1932. This may not have been the first 66 in any Open,
but it surely was one of the first. Years later, now a senior,
Sarazen, playinq a course only a bit less demanding came up

witn anorner 66.

It would not be reasonable to argue Sarazen was as good in
'52 as in '32; it would be even less reasonable to contend he

was hetler. -
The PGA seniors are bankrolled by Roland Teacher, a eolf

minded distiller of scotch, which bears his name. All told, the

tab runs to 540,000. For winners, a graduated list of cash prizes.
For losers, an aromatic vat in which to drown sorrows. :

A ton conference game

Arkansas nip Texas Christian,
74-72, to tie Southern Methodist

for first place in the Southwest

Conference. The co-leaders

clash on Saturday night.

Little League

PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Gibraltar Life 3, Spur Cola 1

Cent. Okla. 73, S'western (Kan) 66
Kirskville (Mo) 88, Warrensburg

Mo) 76

Quincy 82, Concordia (St. L.) 59

Greenville (111) 75, Shurtleff 66
Central (Mo) 98, Mo. Mines 90
Anderson 90. Flndlav 72

aW;Tndiana Ctx, 90. Hannver 79

Manchester 87, Earlham 79
Ball State 78. Franklin 72

Tnrl. Tflh Rfi. Tri. State (Tnd) 70

will Martkato 66, Huron (SD) 59

Gen Beadle Tchrs 64, Black Hills

62

Vafley City (Ind) 82, Bismarck 59

Jakestn (Ind) 72, Wahpeton Sci.
55 '
So. Dakota St. 73, Augustana (SD)
57

Hamline 82, St. Thomas (Minn) 54

Gus. Adolphus 89, Augsburg 69

Panhandle A&M 59, N'western

Okla 46

6BACE

On a raln-ioaked field Mon

day afternoon Gibraltar regain

ed first place and pushed the

Spurs down to the runnerup position.

The Gibraltar Rocks had on
their batting togs and blasted 11
hits for three runs off the of offerings
ferings offerings of Rybicki. Orr had a
perfect dav with three for three
followed by Bobby Brandon who
had two hits, one of which was
a home run. Dickie Snyder also
contributed two safeties, as did
Gary Hutchinson.
Whitey Fraunhelm twirled for
the winners ind allowed four
hits, two of which went to
catcher Boswell.

urn

Gibraltar
Hunt, 2b .. .. .. .. .. 4
Snyder, lb .. .. 4
Frauhelm, p-c .. 4
Brandon, ss ., .. .. ;. 3
Hutchinson .... , 3
Orr, cf .. ........ ., 3
Wilson ; ., .. 0
Zapo, rf .. .. .. .. .. .. 3
Hanna, 3b.. 3

Hermanv .. .. ., ,. ft
Eisenman .. .. ,, ,. ,2
' Spur Cola

Bowen, 3b .. .. .. ... 3
Chase, ss n
Boswell, c .. .. .. .. .. 1

Whitney, rf .. .. .. .. 1

Dlifer. lb .. .. .. ., 2
Zelnick, rf-lb ,. ,.2
Perantie, 2b .." .." .. .. 3
Rybicki. n .. .. .. ,, 2

Mikulich .. .. .. .. .. 1

Bradshaw, rf ..1

Albritton, lf-cf .2

SOUTHWEST
S. Methodist 92, Baylor 72

Hardin-Simmons 94. Ariz, State 72

Abilene Chris. 78, Howard Payne

70
Austin 87, East Centl Okla. 78
Eastn. N. Mex. 77, McMurry 67
FAR WEST
San Fran. 67, San Jose St.' 40
Cent. Wash 87JTavlor (Ind.) 63

Col. of Pac. 62, St. Marys (Calif)

58
Cal Poly 77. Whittier 56

Western (Colo) St. 79, Montana

St 76
East. Montana 86, Carroll (Mont)
Portland St. 101, Oregon Ed. 62
Northwest (Wyo) Com. 98 No.
Mont. 72
Westmont 80, San. Fran. St. 68
Occidental 80, Chapman 73
Riverside Calif 71, Calif. Baptist

66.

0

II

2 HIGH SCHOOL
2 Miami Jackson 17, Miami High 15
3jSeacrest 51, Stuart 33
OjHialeah 53, Miami Tech 43
l'pomoano 95. Fahokee 45

O'So. Dade 54, Archbishop Curley 32

7

Favorite, p ..
McGraw, lb
Crawford, e
Bird, ss . .

Karpinskl, If
Wilmouth, cf'

H Po A
0 0 0

0
1
0
1
n
2
0

Totals

28 6 21-: 6

M. R. Ai

Favorite, M.
the bottom

White,

Irving,

2b

2b

A. came back in! Marshall, 3b ..... 3

the inning to

GUN CLUB
NOTES

Carle, lb

Gibson, lb ..,
Cabanillos, ss

McGloln, cf ..

Wood, if

1

3
1
3
3

Barfield, If ...... 0

3
3
3

rf
P

1

0
0
1
1

t' 0
.0 0

V.
11
0
1
o.

Mayo, c
PhilliDS.

The Gamboa Golf and Coun-; Sanders.

try dub will hold a Mulligan arEnder

Tournament for all golfers or
the Gamboa Golf club and'oth- Totals
er clubs on Saturday, February

4. Full handicap allowed, if you a-Ender batted for Sanders in

are not a member of the Gam-1 7th.

boa Golf Club, cite your handl-

27 1 4 21 7

can from your home club.

This Mulligan Tournament is
one of the most popular tourna

ments for week-end golfers In

the golfin? field. You may re replay
play replay as many shots as you have
handicap, come on out and loin

the fun, but don't forget to

bring your handicap.
Pri7.fn will he awarded in irolf

merchandise. Entrants fee,' $1.

SUMMARY: Base on balls off:
Favorite 1, Sanders 9. Struck-out
by: Favorite ll, Sanders 8. Win Winning
ning Winning pitcher: Favorite, Losing
pitcher: Sanders. Umpires; Lar.e
and Messer. Scorer: F. Pinto.
Score Br Innings
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M. R. A. 000 010 0-1 4 2

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7 ,7 r r?

Ike Says US
Still 'Nation
Under God'

' WASHINGTON. Feb. 2 (UP)
President Elsenhower said to-:
day the revival of religion ln'
America has demonstrated tm
the world that "this nation still
is a nation under Cod."
The President spoke, briefly,
to a group, of -about 500 promi-i
nent Washington figures, in including
cluding including members of the Cabinet
and Congress, .who met at break-
fast in a local, hotel to pray and
discuss methods of bringing re-
is;iou.s influence to boar on the;
conduct of business and gov-;
ernment affairs.

' Hotel owner Conrad N. Hilton: WASHINGTON, Feb; 2 UP) UP)-.
. UP)-. was the host at the breakfast; Defense leaders are preparing
which marked the start of a drastic actions to speed ballistic

, three day .conference of the tissue -.development and pump
International C o u n c i 1 for more iife into the military reserve
Chilian Leadership. -) program. ::-
Hilton presented to Mr. Elacn-j
hower a sliver plaque on which f t f
was engraved the prayer Mr. ,! If O. I nA-l7P IlPffl
-Eisenhower, offered at thestarti"V. VUWW VWIII

of his Inaugural address In Jan January,
uary, January, 1953. . .
Accepting the plaque,' Mr, 1
senhower said that public re re-:
: re-: action to his prayer taught him
a great lesson,
"It seemed to me a perfectly
natural thing to do." the Pres
ident said.
He said regretfully that there
was a recent time when much
of the world believed that the
United States was materialistic,
arrogant,- boastful and proud.
But he said he was gratefuly
that a recent display of reli religious
gious religious belief in this country
. exemplified by today's prayer
meeting had served somewhat
to dispel this Impression and to
show the world that "this na nation
tion nation still is a nation under God."
Crash Program
NEW YORK, Feb 2 (UP)
Women drivers got a big pat
the back today.
oni
The Mutual Insurance Ri ting
Bureau annqunced that beginning
Feb. 1, automobile liability insur
ance rates will be reduced in most
states for women drivers under 25
years of age who operate privately-owned
passenger cars.
it is considered that young
women are generally subject to
the restraining influence of paren parental
tal parental supervision and family respon-
giouity to a greater degree than
. young men, tne Dureau said.
LUX
L W J m i a it mm

This is the blistering story of the ex-D.A.
who sold out to The Mob. It punches hard. It
shows you the menace of the legal' brain who
makes loopholes in the law for hoods in a jam.
This man is 'The Fixer A terrific portrayal
by mimd 6. m:m:. mim"

7

"Let the people

- sist
Wilson
Takes Subway Ride
To 'Diamond King'
NEW YORK, Feb. 2 (UP) -A
426 carat shimmering blue dia diamond
mond diamond the size of two ice cubes
frozen together was delivered to
its new owner today in a card-
?in on crowded
Messeager Samuel Siegel .--.was,
stunned when the package wrap-
ped in brown paper was opened
in his presence at the offices of
"diamond king' Harry Winston.
king" Harry Winston, who a 1 s o
owns the famous "Hope diamond."
lhe new stone is a flawless ice ice-blue
blue ice-blue South African diamond that
may be worth as much as 2 mil million
lion million dollars when It is cut and pol polished.
ished. polished. It was flown here from
London with 50,000 other uncut dia diamonds
monds diamonds valued at a total of 84 mil million
lion million dollars.
The total was about three times
the vi iip (it tne n ane that Tar
ried the stones, which were sent
by registered air mail.
Siegel, a customs brokerage mes messenger,
senger, messenger, knew he was carrying a
diamond, but he didn't know it was
the most magnificent gem on the
world market
Experts went to work inmmedi-
ately to study the stone and de
cide whether to try to retain it as
a single gem or cut it into small
stones. The cutting mav take more
than a year and cost $20:000.
0.60-
0.30
SHOWS: 3.07, 4.52, 6.54, 8.56
r

meNTio r Warner Bros. coTARmNa
NINA FOCH HUGH MARLOWE JAYNE MANSFIELU

tenia Play by W. R. BUttNETT vni JAMES R. Wtm Man M w.ln.r
PriMhwW by PRANK P. ROSENBeRa trct by LEWIS ALLEN

INDEPENDENT

know the truth and the

PAN AM V R. P., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1958

About 100,000 draftees may be
released from the Army six
months before ending their two two-year
year two-year stints so they can join re reserve
serve reserve units and use their experi experience
ence experience to step up training. If the
plan now being studied is adopted,
present draft calls of 6,000 a
month for the regular Army may
be doubled.
In the guided missiles field,
where the Russian challenge ad admittedly
mittedly admittedly is grave, a "czar" soon
will be named by Defense Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Charles E. Wilson with un unprecedented
precedented unprecedented power to push robot
weapons development and produc production..'
tion..' production..' Wilson unfolded the twin de
fense moves at a news confer
ence late yesterday in the wake of
thfl bmissile and reserve manpow-
Congiessional criticism of both
r" t,,- ,r,
wyTconsUnt S of mis
sile progress, today applauded the
decision to appoint a "czar'; but

Billion-Dollar Naval Shipbuilding
Program Gets House Approval 358-3

A
WASHINGTON, Feb. 2 (UP)
The House overwhelmingly ap approved
proved approved yesterday a 1V4 billion dol dollar
lar dollar naval shipbuilding program, in including
cluding including an atomic cruiser hailed
as the forerunner of an all-atomic
navy.
The big navy bill, passed and
sent to the Senate by a 358-3 roll
call vote, also calls for six more
atom-powered submarines and a
start on en atomic super-aircraft
carrier.

TODAY

,: A ,X'

country is safe Abraham Lincoln.

contested a Wilson claim that all
possible is being done to "evelop
intercontinental and 1,500-m i 1 e
range automatic weapons. He cal called
led called for ah "all-out, wartime" effort,--
The tentative plan to bolster the
reserves with men released from
active duty after 18 months serv service
ice service represents a shift in Pentag Pentagon
on Pentagon thinking. Up to now Wilson has
refrained from, using the authori
ty Congress gave him in the re reserve
serve reserve act last year to let draftees
out( early if they volunteer to par-
ucipaie actively in icservc uutis
The Secretary conceded yester
day that there would be some sa
Jcrifice of active Army strenght if
the trained men are released. He
felt the need to speed up reserve
training might justify it,
The tentative plan calls for re releasing
leasing releasing about 100,000 men o n e
out of 13 in the Army during the
next 18 months. They would go out
after 18 months active duty and
0
ine aiom-powereo cruiser, on
which construction is expected to
start late this year, will be the
worlds first atomic surface shm.
The Navy has already begun to
recruit Jts crew.
Rep. Carl Vinson (D-Ga.) chair chairman
man chairman of the House Armed Services
Committee, has hailed the ship as
S sign the day is "not far distant
when the entire American Navy
will be propelled by nuclear pow power
er power plants."
In addition to the atomic ships,
the bill provides for a sixth conventional-power
supertarrier of the
Forrestal class, eight missile-fir
ing destroyers and four special
guided missile-equipped frigates.
Before the bill's passage, Rep.
H. R, Gross (R-Ia.) charged' the
Navy gave a possible enemy an
"open Invitation to destroy the
backbone of the Pacific fleet" by
stationing six aircraft carriers in
San Diego, Calif., during the
Christmas holidays.
"I don't want to see another
Pearl Harbor," Gross declared.
Vinson told Gross his point was
"well t a k en" and the Navy
"should not have had six carriers
in one port at one time.
The shipbuilding program Is for
the fiscal year starting July 1. It
represents a 110 million dollar in
crease over money appropriated
for the current fiscal year. To Today's
day's Today's bill merely authorizes the
program. Actual funds must be
devoted separately.
The atomic cruiser Is expected
to cost 88 million dollars. It will
be equipped with guided missiles
as well as atom propulsion. Vin
son's committee has said know knowledge
ledge knowledge gained in its construction
will enable the Navy to develop
'other large vessels" powered by
atomic energy.
The atomic cruiser, the commit
tee said, was approved as an in
termediate step between the rela
tively small nuclear engine for i
submarine and the "very complex
installation planned, for a large air
craft carrier."
TtaTcIirMsawt1

fri "n r ? I, I inf" Mr!,! --

. V Mil.:iiU."i'ilj?i'jgg

MtKTill
CAMERON MITCHELL

FIYX CENTS

agree to serve 2V4 years in re-
serve units.
The Army said today that its re
serve program has attracted -II,'
971 men since It started last Oc
ber, of whom 8,184 are taking, or
will take later, six months on ac
tive duty and 7V4 years in the re
serves
In announcing his plan to name
a special assistant for guided mis
siles, Wilson said his aim was to
give a "good push" to all phases
of missile work. The man he seeks
will operate with all the Secre Secretary's
tary's Secretary's authority. Wilson said,
even to reporting to President
Eisenhower and the National Se
curity Council.
Fatheads
' NEW YORK. Feb. 2 (UP)-The
seat of a fat man's problem is in
his head, a specialist in obesity
said today.
Dr. Robert E. Olson, head of
the University of Pittsburgh's bio biochemistry
chemistry biochemistry and nutrition depart department,
ment, department, told the National Dairy
Council that 90 per cent of human
obesity is due to abnormal im impulses
pulses impulses arising chiefly in the front frontal
al frontal lobes of the brain.
These lobes are associated with
emotional distress, Olson said.
That means, he added; that when
life becomes too much for some
persons they eat too much.

Ex-Zonian Takes Busman's
Holiday At Lock Controls

The ODeration of the Panama
Canal locks is an old story to J.T
Neely, who was employed as an
engineer at Gatun during con construction
struction construction daus. Nevertheless he
spent part of his day ashore from
the SS Maasdam yesterday at
the Miraflores locks control tow
er.
He also made a tour of the Pac Pacific
ific Pacific side to look up old landmarks
and admire new developments in
the Canal Zone. Two things he
found oracticallv unchanged were
the Balboa Heights Administra
tion Building and the Balboa Pra Pra-do.
do. Pra-do. Noelv has enoueh inside know
ledge of the Panama Canal locks
to eive a tourist lecture nimscii
he came to the Isthmus in 1912 as
Slow Burners?
HONG KONG, Feb: 2 (UP)
Communist Chinese let fighters
chased a Nationalist Chinese jet
out of south China and almost to
the border of this British colony
today, according to informed
sources. ...'",.'
The Nationalist plane landed at
Kaitak Airport here.
The pilot. Maj. Lee Shun Ling,
told British authorities he had been
on routine sea lane patrol when
something went wrong with his
engine. v';:'"-?
However, the sources said the
Royal Air Force tracked the plane
out of south China and over the
China Sea being chased by Com
munist fighters.
PRICK: .75 .40
TODAY
1:30 3:45 6:15 9.00 p.m.
f is-'
l-MXRi
'Ml
am

Qnema5cX3P AjS0-

PUNTS
and STUNTS

I!:!:rn:li;:r!:!i!y
Tc;:c Al Opening
Of Medical Congress

Top medical specialists from
the Western Hemisphere gather gathered
ed gathered in Panama this morning to
start a three-dav discussion of
problems connected with mater maternal
nal maternal mortality in the Americas.
wmriv ion delesates from 18
countries of Central, South and
North America and the Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean met in the auditorium of
the Faculty of Law oi tne na national
tional national University to hear Presi President
dent President Rlcardo Arias deliver the
opening remarks at the Second
Central American Congress of
Obstetrics and Gynecology.
Th official welcome was
made by Dr. Sergio Gonzalez
Pni7 Minister of Public Health
nf Panama. He stressed the
Pan-American nature oi ine
Congress, pointing out that it
had brought together outstand
ing specialists not omy vwn
Central America, but from the
other Americas as well.
Hp said Panama awaited with
Interest the conclusions of the
Congress which he said would
assure "the blessings of a hap happier
pier happier maternity and better and
more staDie neann jur mum mum-ers
ers mum-ers of all latitudes.
nr' Julio Armando Lavergne,
president of the Panama Obste Obstetrical
trical Obstetrical and Gynecological Socie Society,
ty, Society, was elected President of the
Congress at the administrative
meeting held last night at Ho Hotel
tel Hotel El Panama. In his remarks
to the delegates this morning,
Dr. Laverene nointed out that
the Congress will take up ma maternity
ternity maternity nroblems which beset
Panama along with the coun
tries of Central America,
Th rnrwross which will meet'
The Congress, wmcn w l meet
in Hotel El Panama, will hold
scientific sessions tomo r r o w
morning, afternoon arid night'
and Saturday morning. It winj
adjourn Saturday afternoon at
3. The adjournment session will
h hold In f.h Polyclinic nf the
Social Security Bank. j
a field engineer with the Mc-
Clintic Marshall Construction
Company of Pittsburgh. His job
was to supervise the installation of
the leaves of the lock eates. which
had been manufactured bv the
Mcuintic Marshall Comoanv.
He spent a few months at Pedro
Miguel but most of the next vear
and one half he was stationed at
uatun. After the locks were com
pleted he took a position with the
uepartment Terminal Construe
tion under Adm. H. H. Rousseau.
who was then engaged in the de
signing and construction of the
piers nnd docks in Balboa.
Like most old- timers, Neely re remembers
members remembers that he led a cav life
during the early canal davs. A
bachelor, he ciiurted the Iwal bel
les, danced at the Tlvoli Hotel
and the Union Club and won
number of medals as a champion
tennis player.
for 30 years, up to his retire
ment in 1953, Neely was citv struc
tural engineer, builoing inspector,
and zoning administrator tor the
city of Norfolk. :
Since hh retirement, he has
been living in Norfolk but occasio
nally takes a cruise during the
winter. This is the second trip he
has made to the Canal Zone but
it is the first time, he says, that
he has had a chance to look up
bis old haunts.
Today

CENTRAL

M'UZMGLaOTDCGD

f

J.

WINS DESPITE PAIN Tenley Albright, 20-year-old Newton,
.Mass., ice ballerina, fought off the pain of an ankle injury to today
day today to win the women's Olympic figure skating championship
with a brilliant performance in free figures.

Bitter Arctic Cold
Wave Stuns Europe

LONDON, Feb. 2 (UP) -Bitter
Wasts from the Arctic plunged
Europe into one of its worst cold
waves of the century today,
thS'hreatSfue?
pueg and brought widespread e
lectric power breakdown in Bri
tain
There was an earthquake in Si Sicily
cily Sicily and southern Italy. It snowed
in Rome. Sunny Venice had a sev
ere snowstorm. Hungry wolves
were reported prowling remote
parts of Sweden. Rivers and
canals were frozen in Germany.
It was 45 degrees below zero in
northern Sweden and 23 above in
Venice. It warmed up in Moscow
temperatures rose from 25.6
below zero to 7.6 below.
Britain had its coldest night of
the century, and roads were re reported
ported reported "fozen solid" from the
English Channel to northern scot-
land.
It was clear and sunny in Lon
don, but cold. Ten miles away in
the county of Kent, a raging bliz
zard blotted out the noonday sun.
Regional boards of Britain's na
tionalized electric system turned
off power at breakfast time when
the demand for electricity grew
too great.
Liveroool had its worst blaze
since German bombers fired the
city in World War II. The whole
fire department of the city turned
out. to fight the stuDDorn names.
But the water froze, and the fire
finally was smothered by sheets
of ice. When the blaze was over,
the firemen couldn't return to
their stations immediately. The
fire trucks were frozen solid.
BALBOA TIDES
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3
HIGH LOW
8:39 a.m. 2:35 am
9:03 p.m. 2:53 p.m.

in Cinema

SHOWS: 1.15 3.46 6.17 8.50
0.75 0.40

i" r i
n

Birmingham, which was t h a

coldest spot in England when the
freezing wather first hit Tuesday
night, got a pleasant gift. The Ja Jamaica
maica Jamaica Rum Association sent the
city a shipment of rum to be
given to "the most deservine out-
door workers." It went to the
city's street cleaners.
Swans were frozen into ponds a-,
long the river Thames in England, :
Germany and France opened ;
"warming rooms" for freeaing cl- i
tizens.
John H. Tyrrell,
Former PC Employe,
Pics InTrion, l!C
John H. Tyrrell, well-known
retired Panama Canal employe,
died last Sunday In Trion, N.C.,
acording to news received by
friends on the Isthmus. He was
60 years old.
Mr. Tyrrell was employed as
payroll supervisor at the time
of his retirement in August 1952.
He was first employed by the
Canal organization in February
1918.
He was employed for about
three. years when he left the
service, being reemployed only a
short time later as clerk at Gor Gor-gas
gas Gor-gas Hospital. From then until
his retirement, most of his serv service
ice service was in the Health Bureau.
The payroll work of the Health
Bureau was transferred in 1945
to the Personnel Bureau and
five years later to the Payroll
Division when that unit' was
formed.
Mr. Tyrrell was born in Chel Chelsea,
sea, Chelsea, Massachusetts.
He is survived by his wife,
Bertha, who was employed for a
number of years as a nurse at
Gorgas Hospital.
Funeral services were held
last Monday in Trion.

Scope

Directed by
RAOU1WALEI1
L- hort!