The Panama American

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Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02980

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Related Items:
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Full Text
i

M. I C II N AT 1 0 H A IRWATI

mm

Jlst TEAR
Eden

0

ay Aid Talks
Washington

In

LONDON, Jan. 19 (UP). Prime Minister Anthony Eden's
firm endorsement of "deterrent power" as the path to peace to to-hiH
hiH to-hiH hfr fnr important Anelo-American policy

agreements In the forthcoming Eden-Eisenhower talks in Wash-
tagtAntop item In the conference between Eden and President
Eisenhower is the explosive situation in the Middle East Edens
government will iwue a white paper today on its part In a recent

flareup in me trouDiea area.
The disclosure that surplus
British tanks sold as' "tractor?"
were being transhipped through
Belgium to Egypt brought the
government under heavy tire
from conservative as well as op opposition
position opposition Laaorlte circles.
Eden came out In support of
v,pnrv of U.S. Secretary of
State John Foster Dulles that
peace can be maintained through
the "deterrent of nuclear weap weapons"
ons" weapons" in a major address last
night." Dunes outuneu uiewiw
In his "brink; of-war" Interview
with Life Magazine.
Eden's speech was hopeful
4n rtinlnmats who had turn
ed openly pessimistic on the
outlook of the Washington con
ference arter tne jjuues
view provoked angry British re
action.
Th riinlotnats said Important
rfiff.rnfPc still remained to be
ir' f 'o-American
to su, "rt t- e 6-,:au;y ol de deterrent
terrent deterrent power" provided a foun foundation
dation foundation for agreement...
' Eden spanned domestic and
international issues and defied
an undercover "Eden must go
movement with the declaration
that his government is "not on
its way out." nftft
Eden told an audience of 4,000
Bradford, a north
TTnainnrt industrial area that
east-west relations have chang changed
ed changed "not for the better."
"Remove f.hit deterrent or take
risks in pretending that it is not
v.orA nnrl the world outlook
would be terrifying indeed," E
His rousing address served
notice that he has no intention
of bowing to his critic's charges
of "dithering" and foot-dragging
1n nfflr.it. .'- ..
"This government is not on
its way out." he said. "We were
not elected for six or eight
months hut for five years. 1 in
tend if God wills to be there
in office on tnat flay.
Girls With Classes
Touch Off Passes
MANCHESTER, England, Jan.
19 (UP) A 21-year-old insur insurance
ance insurance agent admitted in court
today that he has an over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming desire to make passes
at women's glasses. The Judge
sentenced him to three weeks
in a mental hospital for steal
lng three pairs off the noses cf
their wearers.
r

, ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF TEE ARMY George H. Rode Roderick,
rick, Roderick, who arrived on the Isthmus early this week, is greeted
as he steps from a helicopter at Fort Kobbe by Colonel Rob Robert
ert Robert E. Coffey, commanding officer there Major General Lionel
C. McGarr Is at right. Piloting the helicopter, in which Rode Roderick
rick Roderick made an inspection trip is Captain Jack Ray. Yesterday
Roderick visited Rio Hato, where he was met by the Mayor of
Penonome, Guillermo Tatis, and Major Celestino Camarena
of the Panama National Guard.-

f

mot

Policy

Paris Assembly
Meets In Mood
Of Antagonism
PARIS.'Jari. 19 (UP)-France's
newly-elected National Assembly
met tnr 23 minutes todaY hi Ml
atmosphere of bitter antagonism
that promised to Keep me na nation
tion nation without a stable i govern government
ment government for a long time jo xome.
The 594 deputies, with. 32 'to
be elected later, assembled lor
the first time under the presi presidency
dency presidency of their aged "dean, 88-vear-old
Communist Marcel Ca-
1 ranee's next gover.iimtiiu
rai-Wn. in accordance With
HlMim nresided by right
of age. In the traditional speech
by the oldest deputy, ne nppea
Into UJS. Secretary of State John
Poster Dulles for three times go go-Ins
Ins go-Ins to the "brink of war." :
Then, in a quavering voice, he
called for a "popular front' gov
ernment to include tne commu communists.
nists. communists. But there was little likeli
hood of that.
The Assembly is divided Into
four hostile blocs, each too small
to rule without cooperation from
hated rivals. But the leading
candidates for premier already
have rejected inclusion of the
Reds in any prospective cabi cabinet.
net. cabinet. Today's first session was" large largely
ly largely ceremonial and procedural.
Following Cachln's brief speech,
the deputies began prjanlzln;
into committees to validate their
own elections before choosing a
new speaker next Tuesday. The
two leading candidates iorui
post are one-armed sociailRVAn sociailRVAn-dre
dre sociailRVAn-dre Le Troauer and Catholic
Republican Pierre Schnelter. :
Meanwhile Radical Pierre
Mendes-France and Socialist
Guy Mollet pushed confidently
ahead with plans for a new gov government
ernment government '. -;'
Foreign Minister Antolne Pin Pin-ay,
ay, Pin-ay, a Rightist independent,
warned Mollet and Mendes Mendes-France
France Mendes-France that their minority
government would fall prey to
the Communists if it tried to
gain office alone.

"Let the people

US
'Wide

For Sneak Sub
Attack, Solon Says

WASHINGTON, Jan. 19 (UP) -Rep.
James E' Van Zandt said to today
day today U.S. coasts are "wide open"
for a sneak attack by Russian sub submarines
marines submarines armed with guided mis missiles
siles missiles carrying atomic or hydrogen
bomb warheads.
The Pennsyvlania Republican
proposed that the United States
serve notice that any potential en enemy
emy enemy submarines found within 50
miles of its coasts will be sunk.
Van Zandt made the proposal in
a United Press interview, and pre prepared
pared prepared to take it up with Navy Sec
retary Charles S. Thomas at a
House Armed Services Committee
hearing.
Adm. Arleieh A. Burke told the
Committee yesterday that by Jury
1957 the United States will have
less than half the submarines which
Russia already has. Burke, Chief
of Naval Operations, said Russia is
second only to the United States in
naval nower. .
Burke and. Thomas appeared to
support the. Navy's proposed $1.4
billion shipbuilding program : f o r
the fiscal year starting July 1. It
includes a new 60,000 ton supercar supercar-rior,
rior, supercar-rior, the world's first atomic-pow
ered surface vessel a guided'mis guided'mis-site
site guided'mis-site cruiser six more atomic
powered sumarines, guided missile
frigates and destroyers and a start
on an atomic-powered supercarrier.
i Van Zandt said, "w mvtr as as-uma
uma as-uma that Russia has submar
in which can carry and launch
guid4 missiles with atomic or
hydrogen warhaadt."
Yesterday Sen. Henry M. .Tpk
n D-Wsh.) Ruii rr"' 'l
will test-Iu e a l,5u0 nuie ballistics
missile before year's end.
He said this would add "ballistic
blackmail" to the Soviet "arse-
Hawaiian Islands
Pararescue Group v
Wins Jump Contest!
The second annual pararescue
competition meet held this week
in the Canal Zone was won by
the Second Air Rescue Group
whose headquarters are in the
Hawaiian Islands. -
Technical Sergeants Francis C.
Dean, 35, and Ted R. Hawkins,
29, of the 31st Air Rescue Squad Squadron,
ron, Squadron, Clark Air Force Base, Phil Philippine
ippine Philippine Island compiled 849
points out of a possible 1000 to
win the trophy. Sgt. Dean, whose
hometown is White Hall, Illi Illinois,
nois, Illinois, is a veteran of over 140
pararescue Jumps, who served
during World War TI in the Eu
ropean theater of operation, ssi.
Hawkins from Lenoir. North Ca Carolina,
rolina, Carolina, also a veteran of World
War II serving in the Pacific-
Alaska areas, has made over 158
pararescue Jumps.
Nine teams competed in the
competition representing rescue
units asstcmed world-wide, rne
other eight teams finished in the
following order: Seventh Air
Rescue Grouo, North- Africa 806
points; Tenth Air Rescue Oroun.
Alaska 801: Sixth Air Rescue
Groun. Newfoundland 797: 12th
ir Rescue OrouD. Germany 764;
Fourth Air Rescue Group. Call,
fornia 740; Third Air Rescue
Groun. Janan 737; Fifth Air Pea-
cue' Group, 'Massachusetts 693;
Ninth Air Rescue Group, Eng-
lanrt.R73.
Tricky wknrfs on Monday.
Tuesday and Wfdnesdaw made a
diff'"u)t obstacle for all jumrw
particulfriv on te water Jnmn
ohase where shiftlm? winds
caused manv of the lumpers to
overshoot ther tar?ets, thus
adding diffieUles to their
reachin? the life raft. ;
One naramidifl had an anxl
ous mnmert in the w"tr juwo-
in" when tn snroud line or i
'chute ct off the copv form
inn- wht Is cal)d "Mae We
which increases, the sneprf of the
dewent. Aart from h'ttlntj.the
water with greater force the
Jumnerwas unliilured.
Th Trenaion or the Dori
Fl'cHnser Tonhv to the Second
Air Tjewue Groun team wil' e
made tomorrow mom'ne. Te
t)on FTcWneer TVonhy i in
honor of th work done hv P".
Gen. Don FMeWnr of the U.R,
Air Force durlne World War F.
Gen. Flicklriffer made th first
nararescue Jump in the China
Burma area tn p'd ?0 survi'nrj
of a crashed P-9 aircraft. The
"oted commentator. Frie Sevar.
eid. was one o the 20 to whom
""lirvmser administered aid. Sev
irpjd mentions th Incident in

his book "Not so Wild a Dream."

know the truth and the

PANAMA, R. P THURSDAY,
Open
nal of conquest" and "destroy our
greatest single advantage in the
contest for air-atomic supremacy
our system of advanced over overseas
seas overseas bases."
Jackson made the statement in
a speach to the National Security
and Foreign Relations Commis
sions of the American Legion.
Mtro possession of such a
weapon, ho said, would permit
the Kremlin "to blackmail our
allies within Its range into neu neutrality
trality neutrality or wore."
Senate Republican Leader Wil
liam F. Knowland also addressed
the Legion group. He said that Rus
sia's objective still is world domi
nation despite the Soviet smiles
displayed at last summer's "sum
nut meeting at Geneva.
Jackson urged the Defense De Department
partment Department to abandon what he call
ed the "antiquated idea tnat mil
itary efforts can be increased only
in time of war.
"In an all-out atomic-hydrogen
war, our industrial might would be
pnnsienpd to a nuclear graveyard."
he said. "Today we' can prepare
for war only in time of peace."
Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, Army
(Continued on Page 6, Co, 8)
Armed Forces
Seek Money
For Building 1
WASHINGTO.N Jan. 19 (UP)
The Defense Department to
day asked Congress to authorize
$2,012,283,000 for new military
construction projects this year
at nome ana aoroaa.
The Air Force would Ret Ji.;
137,585,000 in the proposed 1956
military public works hill to
continue improvement and ex
pansion of its global air base
network.
The Navy would get 2418.728.-
uuu and the Army 1305,670,000.
The bill would authorize sale
of $150,000,000 worth of surplus
agricultural commodities, the
proceeds to finance construction
In foreign countries of housing
ior American military xamiies.
A $300,000 item was earmarked
to build homes and special com
municatlons facilities in Wash
lngton for the Chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff and four
assistants on his staff.
The Pentagon said the bill in
cluded 3,740 "urgently needed"
new family housing, units cost costing
ing costing a total of $79,814,000. That
housing was separate from the
comomdities for construction
proposal for foreign areas.
The program called for New
York at 292 installations In 47
states (all but West Virginia (
and the District ol Columbia
Construction also would be au
thorized in Alaska, Hawaii, the
Caribbean area, Newfoundland
Europe. Africa, Pacific islands
and the Far East.
Probationer Gels
Ono-Ycsr SsnSance
For 0!d Dfrgbry
A man who violated probation
which had been imposed on him
two months ago following a burg
lary conviction, was ordered to
serve one year in the penitentiary
oy Judge uutnne jr. urowe yes
terday.
The defendant,; Nicolas Acuna
was completing a 30-day jail sent
ence.in Balboa for vagrancy when
ne was orougni Deiore xne nign
er court for violating his proba
tion.
On Nov. 1 he was found guilty
of burglary after he entered a
partially abandoned building in
La Boca and made off with 15
pounds of copper screen wire
He was given a suspended sen
tence, on the condition that he did
not violate any rules in Panama
or the Zone.
On Jan. 10, Acuna was picked
up for vagrancy in Balboa and
sentenced to 30 days in jail.
Now, upon completion of the 30
day sentence on Jan. 25, the pris
oner will be turned over to (iam
boa to serve the one year sen
tence imposed yesterday for viol-

at ing his probation. ;

country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

JANUARY 19, 1956
UN

Lu-y 'ax

FILES PETITIONS Gov. Lane Dwinell (left) of New Hamp Hampshire
shire Hampshire files petitions entering President Eisenhower's name in
New Hampshire's flrst-in-the-nation primary, March 13. With
the Governor at the State House in Concord is Deputy Secretary
of State Harry E. Jackson.

President Permits Name

, ..': ..'
In Primaries;

A

1 w
A.
WASHINGTON. Jan.' 19 '(UP)
President Eisenhower said to
day he has no objection to his
name being entered in presiden presidential
tial presidential primaries,; But he emphasiz emphasized
ed emphasized that thia-, did not mean he
would run again.; V;
He also told a jam-pacKed
news conference w his first In
Washington since Aug. 4 r- that
"my luture me must oe care
fully regulated, to avoid exces excessive
sive excessive fatigue." j
Mr. Elsenhower was subjected
to ; intense questioning about
politics although he tried to
head It off with- a prepared
statement about the primaries.
He said he had not reached even
a tentative decision on seeking
reelection." He added, however,
that he ewas busy consulting
trusted friends and associates on
the matter.
Mr. Eisenhower's first big
press conference since his heart
attack SeDt. 24 drew a near-rec
ord crowd of more than 280 re
porters to the conference room
on the fourth floor of the old
State Department building.
He appeared to "be in good
spirits, and laughed heartily
several times during the meet meeting.
ing. meeting. ,-,';-;,.'.
He showed some residual evi
dence of a light sun-tan he pick
ed un recently m Florida.
The President's cnier political
commentary of the day was in
the form of a telegram to Harry
E. Jackson, deputy secretary of
state of New Hampshire, wnere
Mr. Eisenhower's name has been
filed for the presidential prefer
ence primary.
"I do not feel that I should r
terpose anv oblectlon to such
entry," the President said in his
telesram.
He added." however, that he
wanted it clear that "lack of ob
jectlon cannot be construed as
any final decision on my part
relative to candldacv for a sec
ond term In the office I now
hold."
The President, reading slowly
frow the telegram, continued:
"It would h me tn pretext
that mv health can be wholhi
restored to an excellent xtate
in which the doctors btlitved
it to be in mid-Sevtember.
''At the same time my doctors
A. A. Milne
Celebrates
74th Birthday
HARTEFIELD, England, Jan. 19
(UP) A. A. Milne creator of "Win "Winnie
nie "Winnie the Pooh" and "Christopher
Robin" observed his 74th birth birthday
day birthday today with Christopher at his
side. Christopher ,is Milne's son,
now 36 years old. Milne has been
ill since he suflered a stroKe

J

Stresses
n
J
report to me that the Droeress I
am making toward a reasonable
level of strength is normal and
satisfactory. My future life must
be carefully regulated to avoid
excessive fatieue. Mv reasnns fnr
obedience to the medical author
ities are not solely personal; I
muse ODey tnem out Of respect
for the responsibility I. carry."
As to when he will mnV nn
his mind about reelection, he
said this "personal decision...
will be rendered as soon as it Is
firmly fixed in my own mind."
"I shall strive to see that it is
based as to my best judgment on
the good of our country," he
said.
He thought there should hp a
careful study by Congress and
tne Attorney General, in con
sultation with the Executive, to
resoive constitutional doubt on
who ha.3 the Dower tn ripHnra o
President physically unable to
execute his duties.
He has not set a date for his
so-called "final" major medical
examinations. It has been py.
pected that these examinations
would be held here sometime a
oout tne middle of February.

Pearson Recalls Benson
.... i
Once Vetoed Soil Bank Plan

By DREW PEARSON
One letter which the Eisenhower
administration would certainly like
to forget is in the files, of the
Agriculture Department, in which
Secretary Benson's department
takes vigorous exception to the soil
bank plan that President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower is now proposing to Con Congress.
gress. Congress. On July tet, acting Secretary of
Agriculture True D. Morse sent a
letter to Congressman Harold Cool-
ey of North Carolina, Chairman of
the House Agriculture Committee,
flatly opposing the bill introduced
by Congressman rred marsnau,
Democrat, of Grove City,' Minn.,
which provided exactly the same
pian mat rasennower js iiuw juu'
posing.
Again on Sept. 30, the Agricul
ture Department sent the same
letter to Senator Ellender of Loui
siana, who is chairman of the Sen
atp. Agriculture Committee.
Though Secretary Benson didn't
sisn the letter, his acting secre
tary. Morse, stated that a commit
tee of all affected agencies in the
Agriculture Department nad stud'
ied the proposed soil bank plan.
Their recommendation was nega
tivp
Here are nertinent auotes from
the letter of July 27 in which the
Agriculture Department vetoed the
soil bank plan:
ml "This is in response to your re-
O.U est iorths.lcpartjncat'a.,. views

lM 0

ecretary

Best' President

Has
ver

WASHINGTON, Jan. 19 (UP) President Eisenhower
said today he considers John Foster Dulles the best Sec Secretary
retary Secretary of State he has ever known.
Mr. Eisenhower stoutly defended Dulles despite the
uproar over the Secretary's "brink of war" statements. H
said he has complete faith in Dulles as a man devoted to

peace.
In effect, he emphatically 're
jected Democratic demands that
he fire or reprimand Duiles for
saying the administration 'walk 'walked
ed 'walked to the brink" of war three
times and that this is the "nec "necessary
essary "necessary art" to maintain peace.
Mr. Eisenhower also reject rejected
ed rejected charges by Gen. Matthew B.
Ridgway, rormer Army Chief
of Staff, that "political con considerations"
siderations" considerations" dictated the ad administration's
ministration's administration's new look mili military
tary military program.
The President said he5- h a d
never been euilty of making
military decisions out of defer deference
ence deference to politics.
If he had let politics mnuence
military decisions anytime since
mo the President said, there
would never have been an inva
sion pf Europe and Allied forces
would never have
Atlantic 'in wona v. .tr u. -
said he had been subjected, to
military advice of every kind
over the years and that it was
often deeply felt but sometimes
At bis news conference, the
President also: ';
1. Asserted that prospects for
world peace have brightened
over the last three years despite
the great letdown in the high
hopes for peace connected with
the July summit meeting- at Ge Geneva.
neva. Geneva. But the President would
not say there was cause for
complacency in the world situa situation,
tion, situation, particularly in the Middle
East; :
2. Declined comment on re recent
cent recent informal suggestion by So Soviet
viet Soviet Premier Nikolai Bulganin
that another summit meeting
mioht hp fruitful. The President
said he hadn't even heard the
suggestion and therefore had ro
comment. r
In supporting Dulles to the
hilt, the President said the ad administration
ministration administration is presenting the
wnrin with a nroeram of peace
hasert on moral Drlncioles and
iiist.ioe. At. some noints. he oh
served, we have to stand firmly
behind those principles and that
perhaps could be interpreted as
standing at tne bnnic or war
(Continued on Page 6, Col. 7)
on H. R. 2420. The department
recommends against the enact
ment of this bill.
"IL R. 2420 authorizes and di
rects the secretary to establish
policies and programs for the use
of acreage diverted because of the
establishment of acreage allot allotments
ments allotments on basic commodities. The
declaration is made that acreage
diverted from allotment crops in
creases tne planting of other crops
not under acreage allotments and
will tend to increase the surplus
of non-basic commodities. In ad addition,
dition, addition, the bill points out the need
for increasing soil fertility."
"The program would be very
costly. Estimated payments based
on Z5 per cent of average yields.
assuming full participation, would
ne about $490,000,000. (Administra
tive costs and cost-sharing con
sarvation payments are not in
cluded in this total)
''Since the bill requires that ap
proved practices be carried out
on the acreage qualifying for pay payment,
ment, payment, the job of determining the
acreages, locating them, measur
ing and checking practices would
require a great deal of administra administrative
tive administrative supervision and effort, result resulting
ing resulting in difficult and expensive ad administration."
ministration." administration." "A committee composed of rep representatives
resentatives representatives of the different agen agencies
cies agencies in the department were asked
to study H. R. 2420 and report the
probable.. cUccte. of. Uie.JMlL.'l

FIVE CENTS

Called

known
Radeglia Says
Per on Wishes
To Leave RP
BUENOS AIRES, Jan. 19 (UP)
Vlttorio Radee-lia. : fnrmsr
private secretary of Ex-Argen
wiic rresment feron, today ex expressed
pressed expressed the opinion, that the de deposed,
posed, deposed, dictator wants to leav
Panama becauxe "si rrnpni"n a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst him is v ;- :
several d-s ago' by. av
police,' toidi newsmen of ih
headquarters of the Army's in information
formation information service that.Pem k.
said that nhe best thing they
have in Panama ar th
groes."
"While driving nmnmt. ti-.
town he would iav
tos. But when he cpts hair tn
the hotel, I can't tell you the
things he would say about
them," Radeglia declared.
Asked if Pernn
to
stay in Panama he said:
I believe he wants to leave,
because lately he has felt inse insecure.
cure. insecure. He claims a campaign
(against him) which began in
November, ever since we arrived,
is underway, peron declares thai
the priests are behind it, how however,
ever, however, of late he has been trylnj
to get dose to the clergy. Why? -u
"It seem's that a banquet ii
being organized in Panama in
get Peron and the clergy to-
gether and it is said that a Pan Panamanian
amanian Panamanian Bishop will attend the
banquet."
Agenls Keep Risers'
Crossed As Msrfeon
tonsils Qnal
The Llberlan flagv ship Mari Mariposa
posa Mariposa which last July underwent
about $50,000 worth of repairs
when she. ran into the Gaillard
Cut and received extensive dam.
age to the f prepeak tank, wsi
again transiting the Canal to today
day today and this time agents
Payne and Wardlaw said they
have their fingers crossed.
The damage to the fi.072 7rnss
ton ship was so heavy that the
ranama uanai Co. for the first
time In five years, reactivated
the Balboa drydock to permit
repairs to the damaged freight freighter.
er. freighter. The Canal also waived thej
usual $25,000 charged for re reactivating
activating reactivating the drydock.
Last time the 476 ft. long shlo
was carrying a cargo of 8507
tons of lumber. Now the Mari Mariposa
posa Mariposa is loaded with 9,700 tons of
coal from Hampden Roads. Va.
bound for Japan.
Last July the ship's owners, -Chadris.
Ltd. agreed to put the
Mariposa into drydock after the
"special concession" was mads
by the Canal. The Cristobal
drydock,-which Is only 353 it.
long wa too small to service
the damaged vessel.
The Mariposa is expected t3
complete its transit late today,
KALUGA TIDES
FRIDAY,
HIGH
8:10 a.m.
p.m.
JANUARY 20
" 2:20 ..



TEE f AN ASIA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWS PAP EH

THURSDAY, J ANT ART IS, V l

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
rXIP ANO lutlh6 THt PANAMA MC
" rouNoco nilmn hounkvili in it as
HARMOC (O IA. tonon
7. H 'enter F O Bo 1J4. Panama o
TtlOHOMt 2 740 S tiNt
Coil AOOOfSS. FANIMEMICAN, PANAMA
COLON 0"'C l 17 CtNTHM. AVINUt fTWHN 12TM ANO 13Tt Ttn
POUtlON REMIIeNTATIV, JOSHUA POWtR. INC
S45 MAOIAON Avt. Ni VoH 17 N. V..
. ioet
Pt MONTH, m
rt (II BONTM. IN APVANCt i i?"22
FON ONI VIA. IN r -""- 18. SO 14. Oo

TMIS 1$ TOUR fORUM THI READERS OWN COLUMN
Tka Mod Boi'i ara op forum rw Nader a Tka m Anurfeaa.
'(rfttr. ara laMirta" frottfully aaa r atadtoa' la wholly eeafidtaml

II ya conttibuta a tetter don't ba Impotitnf If aoata't apaeaf tfca

tail doy Lit tan ara publiihtd la tha order racaivad.
Piaat try to kaap tha lettan limitad td on P taaoth,
Idarrtity of lettar wrrttrt it bald m itrittatt contidanca,
Tha M-wtpapcr tjum na raiaaatibilirv far ttataataat a apialaw
axprauad ia lattart frow raadar.

THE MAIL BOX

MOVIE QUEEN SPLASHES SUNDAE, SO HOW?
Sir: -.
t want to take this ODDortunity to compliment you and your

staff fnr omittirnr certain nublicity from your papers. It seems

as if all one has to do these days is wear an ermine bathing suit
in Korea and one becomes famous overnight. Guess it just
doesn't take brains In this day and age.
Can not say that it was a pleasure, but 1 had the opportunity
to meet Miss Terry Moore at El Panama on Saturday night
While eating a chocolate sundae in the coffee shop, she scooped
the whipped-cream off the top and splattered it all over the
dish and removed the marischlno cherry and set it in the middle
of the table. : ;;
Her only remark in Spanish was that "It always happens"
- as the whipped cream fell to a melted heap on her lacy dress,
Why she persisted in speaking Spanish, I do not know for I
told her that all I could pcak and understand was "Kapaso,"
This of course flowered her ego and she only continued. Why
an American has to speak Spanish to other Americans, is beyond
my limit of comprehension.
Between you and me, I have nothing against ermine. It is
a fine fur for royalty, but it's not fpr Terry Moore.
Joey

Labor Neiv s
And
Comment

"Weil, the .World USED.to Be Round"

Sir:

TRIED AND TRUE

Not an original, but a verse packing a message for all of us.
"There is so much good in the worst of us,
And so much bad in the best of us,
That it hardly behooves any of us
To talk about the -rest of us."
The Prophet

Let's fat

Answtr to Previous Puzzlt

Fin

i
; m

ACROSS
1 Green
vegetables
B Potato Potato-S
S Potato-S Watch
ornament
1J Singing voice
13 French river
14 Chemical
suffix
15 Laggards
17 Soak flax

blubber InMi.m
1 Source of
venison MEKe
88 Small (Scot) SgSgL

itANfe T B Nli'
S Z C A 2 TTi
T O N I" j X Ml't-lf
A N TP M A tT J U Jj T
R f 5 I Tf I X
515;'.. ctt
' 1 I 4 tr "1 oUT '' 1
a" v 'i" a; s i7j f rIKI T!

DOWN
1 Bygone
2 Girl's name
3 Upon
4 Planted
8 Great Lakes'
canal (var.)
0 Cheap, skates
(slang)
Rmnlnva

8 Writing .tables 23 Russian city 43 Run away
fl Structure 89 Baseball 45 Retinue

10 Bread spread markers ,46 Hireling

28 Ancient shield 47 Negative .votei

SO Heraldic band48 Alwvi

t rnther

fihatilnirota
eating
29 Kind of bomb
82 Wipes Out
84 View
favorably
38 Wish
37 Repair shoes

88 Winter vehicle)'

99 Often used ia
stuffings
41 Seine
42 Civil War
general
44 Irish clan
46 Isolates.
49 Eaten away
S3 Male child
84 Values too ....
highly
66 Born
67 Mexican
money
68 Followers
69Worm
60 Formerly
61 Not ont

31 Encounter

33 Lateral parti
33 More
profound
40 Evaluate

80 German king

81 Observed
S3 Essential
being
83 Decay

Z 1 rTT
rjj jr r j-
' a fjir.
T T I
TW w' M'W vTfW
TTT-1T"'t"TT.T
F""" ry Jj-
I I I t I I I I ?

I955t;cc:at:;s
';,.:;;::. J 4ri W

KOrAN CATTLE C EAT, IS

SAD COMPARISON Dejected National Safety Council officials
pose beside a poster comparing estimated 1955 traffic deaths and
the number of Americans killed in the Korean War, The 1955
I toll of 38,500 is 7 per cent and 2500 lives greater than J954's total
of 38,000. The 1955 record is the highest since 1941. Added to
this are the 336 traffic deaths over the recent New Year's week weekend.
end. weekend. Shown abova in Chicago, 111, are David Baldwin, left,
director of traffic for the council, and George Stewart, executive
Lviee president. .; ; ,.. ,;. '.-

ViA 1 r lITj'ht i (I if

MO0EKATE

n MUVY
f) MODEIATt
Q LIGHT

' Station in January is experted to be near or above nortuul
i i t s Southwest and along the West Coast, Subnormal amounts
tra gae for the rest of the country.

by VICTOR RIESCU
If you find yourself on some
television quiz show, you. will win
that pot of gold by betting the mas

ter of ceremonies there is more
electronic gear in just one new

jet fighter plane than in an entire

commercial TV broadcasting' sta
tion.

After reading this you'll know

that a super-sonic interceptor of
enemy bombers now costs $1,000,-

000, whereas our first fighter went
for $50,000 in the day of biplanes

and horse marines.

You can say with authority that
there are 7,000,000 items in the con

struction of a modern submann

which now takes $10,000,000 out of

the U. S. treasury,-while its first

tin ancestor in the frigate days put

us back only sz60,ooo.

And the Pentagon tells me it

takes as much piping and duct

work to air the aircraft carrier

Saratoga as it does to ventilate 20

theatres the size of the Radio City
Music Hall.
These and many more miracles
of modern war take a lot of know know-how.
how. know-how. There is an uneasy feeling
in the Pentagon that while we have
a terrific potential for turning out
these death-spitting weapons, we
just couldn't start doing it tomor

row night if we were blasted to

morrow morning.
For some three years there has

been steady stream of willing
industrialists supported by work working
ing working forces of skilled men back

home into the rentaeon. xne dus-

inessmen have wandered around,
sometimes finding the right head headquarters,
quarters, headquarters, most times not. They've

come seeking answers to one ques

tionwhat would they be expected

to do if war came. Mostly, these
production men would find one or

two ouicers. semom wouia mey
run into all the men who are need

ed to answer their question com-

This has oeen worrying me ren-

.l.(.u 1. rml1,a tirlth th.

fact that it takes 1,500,000 parts WASHINGTON (NEA) The, Under the acreage allotments i What this percentage will be Isn't
to make up a Nike guided missile, "Vf"? dirt or suitcase farmer now in effect, say that the 60 specified. But the general assump assump-and
and assump-and that it will be woe to us if jwU find himself in weeds as high.'wheat acres were cut down to 50, 1 tion is that it wouid be something

wp have to whin un a terrific force id.s "n eiepnanis eye wften fie sits or that the 20 cotton acres. were more uian the profit he would

OS tJI 8 0
Itiu ViiiliAw8M'ii
OEonY-Go-Rouno

L. -..

It DOril P

WASHINGTON If a Senate'

COmm tlPO mvr uir ".r-

S w find fQb BcSaa
o Z Tit '".Un.d. things were beingcfa!

:c t'cu m pq at an extremeiv hieH iv!

U. r ... .

mm ennuon uu company to drill There were even reDorts of eaiia

m tne Lacassme wildlife rpfupp

hitherto barred for oil exploration.

Among tnem are two high offi officials
cials officials of Seagrams Whiskey, one of

from Sherman Adams in the White
House.

Gen. Frank Schwengel, the very

tKm E-il:- t-i. 7-1 vii, a j

Finhi : c very C10.se fi,0P man J" Seagrams, now called
tlbenhower. Slater was one of on vLo-ii !'.

hhk.epmHaterS wh lrav,eled!ment. He visited only the P to?
with the President on his plane brass
when he flew from Key West to! ;

Washington on Sunday.

Officials down below still resist-

, Villi tW UUWU UCIUI, 0 1 Hi I C O I t-
ihe Lacassme waterfowl refucp -j .u..: ......

in the tidclands oil area of South-ik,! k j t t 'u

iJLTlf "oT cotentmw
fi Progress.. called again, Thi.

Department under an act of Con

gress to protect wildlife. It dates

oack to 1935 and is considered one

of the most important bird refuses

;in the country. Hitherto these re-

ifuges have not been open to oil

NEA Umct, inc.

Peter Ed

son In Washington

time he got what he wanted.

About one week later the In Interior
terior Interior Department ok'd the oil oil-prospecting
prospecting oil-prospecting plans of the Frankfort
n;i r...u i. ii aaa -.

T1 ITT atlemPlS Lacassine game 'efu e nea
in .Pnnfr.eip,y' 0,1 comPaiues the Gulf of Mexico in South Cen Cen-to
to Cen-to acquire leases. , tral Louisiana. This is not far from
In the case of the Lacassine 'the coveted tidelands oil area
refuge, four attempts were made that the federal government and
to drill for oil while Oscar Chap- the state of Louisiana are squab squab-man,
man, squab-man, Democrat,: was secretary of 'bling over in the courts.
the interior, the last application)
having been made by E. A. Mc-i Almost simultaneously, Secre Secre-Kcnna
Kcnna Secre-Kcnna on Oct. 2, 1952 just a month tary McKay came up with new
before Eisenhower was elected, (regu'ations authorizing oil and gas
His application was rejected by leasing on 252 of the other 264

Chapman on the ground that oil game refuses. All 252 were opened

nrnxneptinff and on ins wnulrf 1n.,ln nil rlrilhnff

jure the purpose for which Con

gress had set aside the refuge.

to start throwing this stmt to-
cethi
The Pentagon has reason indeed
to worry.'
Always" it has been the fate Of
the democraticjworld to win a war
long after the white crosses and
Stars of David have been raised
on too many graves of too many

young soldiers. Always we nave

started siowiy, taxing two years w
get our assembly lines rolling, be before
fore before we began smothering the en

emy in the third year.
Rut now there is The Bomb. And

in the era of the Thermonuclear
Thing the elements of time and

space are neutrauzea. no we are
now preparing to roll immediately.

Under tne direction oi j. ijewis
Powellcoordinator of the Produc Production
tion Production Allocation Program, the Pen Pentagon
tagon Pentagon is dispatching teams of spe specialists.
cialists. specialists. They began country-hopping
last October when they put
the show on the road in San Fran Francisco.
cisco. Francisco. Then they met with indus industrialists
trialists industrialists in Los Angeles. Last week
thpv hriefed nroducers in Boston.

This week they meet in Philadel

phia.

At these sessions the industrial

ists are told what the government
will expect of them regardless of
what they are making now. The
teams will go any place where a
group of businessmen set up such
a session.

While these teams nave Deen

talking to businessmen, the Office
of Defense Mobilization has been

making certain tnai mere wni oe
skilled men ready to start handling
the millions of parts for modern

weapons. t , ,
It has 8 special list of skills for
use by the Selective Service boards.

Young men wno posses m biuuo
soon will need serve only three to
six months in the Army instead of
two years before they go into the

ready reserve.

Thus there wui ne i muiiinum
of disruption in the development
of the kind of men who ean throw
1500,000 gadgets into a bomb on

hort notice. .
Maybe this time we'll be ready.

T!::3y Pinch'

Creeds Oiio-Ihird

Filler Air Force

wAcuiTMr.TON. Jan. 19 ( UP)-

Alr Force, monthly magazine of
the Air Force Association, said
today that" almost one-third of
the fighter force of the tactical
air command "la grounded for
lack of adequate maintenance."

The magazine aiso reponeu
that because of a "money pinch"
a ik fnrrenilots in Korea "can

hpiw maintain nroflciency in

landings and takeoffs.' Overall,

it said, the Air force is scuin;
ennneh money "to fly about 70

ner cent of the hours" required
to keep it "combat ready." t.
The magazine discussed the

"Money Pinch" in in ecmonai

entitled "wnai trice ourvivaw.
As a publication of the influen influen-tioi
tioi influen-tioi Air Force Association the

magazine often reflects official

Air Force inmKing.
The editorial noted that last

fall many of the new superson supersonic
ic supersonic F-100 jet fighters 'were

standing idle because or a snori snori-age
age snori-age of trained maintenance per personnel
sonnel personnel Since then, it said, "the
situation hasn't improved it's

getting worse. Right now almost

a third of tne wnoie ngnier iwce
of the tactical air command is

Krunded for lack of adequate

maintenance.
An Air Force spokesman could
not immediately confirm or deny

that one-third of the tactical
air command whose mission
t-ahorfc-ranga ait operations

ranging from blasting enemyi
bases to ground support-Is'

"grounded."

down with pencil and paper tOCUt down to 15. On top of this, normally make on this acreage,
figure out what he can get out of pile the soil bank plan, in two! Since he wouldn't have to buy

rresiaent Eisenhower s new soil parts. 4

bank. Take the-case of an aver- .. .. . 'harvest the croo. his costs of on-

see Farrnpr .inhn numin .a art one, tne reserve plan.- is r-nn unM v.. HnaH nri

eraUng 160 acres, of which 120!:iraed o reduce cash crop produc-counted a. saVing. The 50 acres

Generous Doug McKay
Some months passed, and with
the Eisenhower administration now

in office, McKenna applied again,

June 10, 1953. This time he ap

pealed direct to Secretary of the
Interior 4Generous Doug" McKay.

At that time conservation groups,

worried over possible changes by

the new administration, made var various
ious various representations to the Interior

Department, and although several

to oil drilling.

Speed Up Leases

The new rules were a complete
surprise to eame-refnpe experts.
"Generous Doug" McKay on the
sprung at a meeting of McKay's
.ever saw them until they were
Harry J. Donohue, Interior De Department
partment Department special assistant, got on
the telephone, issuing orders to
Earl Thomas, assistant director of
the Bureau of Land Management Management-He
He Management-He said the gas gilapplica gilapplica-He
He gilapplica-He said the eas oil applica

tions were to be placed ahead of

interior, no oil leases were actually

seed or fertilizer or cultivate or signed during 1953-54. :

ine pressure oi me conserva-

oil leases for game refuges were all other business. In other words,

prepared and on the desk of Orme get the leases issued pronioi

Lewis, assistants secretary ot jne

; u."s usivjcu vi. Hp rpHiirpd bv 10 acres
So it is proposed to reduce cre-ftM

If in the north, sav he had th( Va,aV S h. lel-. crP wou ??,.wZ?.a

60 teres in, wheat. If in thetake a loss on this idle acreage., t,a er SlfS

auuin, bay ne naa zo acres m cot- So the government proposes to pay i ::'"rin m wnniH h

and the remain na in in .. k t iu .,i; vviw t"-' v

v u OVJ-JJII11I tcmagc Vk 11JC VB1UC Ul

have been under cultivation.

,To make It simple, say that he
had 60 acres in corn or other feed

grains

At that point the Frankfort-Sea-grams
group was the only appli applicant
cant applicant with an approved operating

tlonists was too great. plan, so its leases were tne oniy

Meartwhile independent oif man; ones involved. It tooic oniy two

ton

beans or peanuts,

the crop he could have raised

(Continued on Page 4)

Mutual Inveslmcnt Fund Hay Be Dollar For You lm
Answering Tho :::.)
Not everyone has the opportunity of answering the $64,000 question but nearly
everyone can take advantage of Mutual Investment Funds.

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

fl)
(2)
(3)

Let Me Tell You A Little About Mutual Fund
It Is an Investment company which pool the surplus dollars of millions of investors,
some large some small and puts the resulting millions of dollars in the stocks of fine
corporations, industries on which our growing population depends for the necessities
and comforts of life.
This large amount of money makes it possible for the Fund to put your money to work
not in just a few but in hundreds of securities of leading companies In many different
industries. -, . ...
The Fund Is able to hire professional management to choose these Investments care carefully,
fully, carefully, to watch them constantly and change them when they, think it is time for a
change.
You don't need a great deal of money to become a Mutual Fund investor, because you
can Invest as little as $100 or as much as $10,000.
You don't need a great deal of experience, because Mutual Fund provides professional
management and supervsljon of your Investments hour by hour and every business day
of the year.
The market risk of buying individual security is reduced In Mutual Fund because your
money is spread over many different securities and only a very small part of your
money is dependent on the fortunes of any one.
You Have A Choice Of Three Ways Of Investing
For current Investment Income, taking all dlvldendsin cash. '
For accumulation of a fund for retirement education of children, or other purposes,
by reinvesting all your dividends in additional shares, thereby building up the number
of shares in your account.
Many Mutual Funds offer systematic Investment plans, which enables you to purchase
shares regularly. Such plans generally call, for minimum initial Investments of aa
little as $90 a month. These plans are fully voluntary.
WE CAN ASSIST YOU IN SELECTING THE MUTUAL
" FUND TO FIT YOUR NEEDS
CALL i
AGENCY "DICK'' DEHUM60R

Tels. 34984

34985

No. 43 Automobile Row

For a worthy charitable
investment we recommend
that you attend the Annual
Spring Festival of the
Cathedral of St. Luke's at
Morgan's Gardens Feb. 11, 1955

McKenna decided he was not in
fluential enough to budge the In

terior Department. So he interest interested
ed interested the Frankfort Oil Company, a
subsidiary of powerful Seagrams
distillers, one of the big three of
the liquor business.
Seagrams was a $20,000 contri contributor
butor contributor to the Republican national
committee' in 1948 also a heavy
contributor to the Democrats.
Three Seagrams directors and of officials
ficials officials have also been friendly with
Elsenhower. ' ;
Ellis Slater, president of Frank

fort distillers, is a leading mem

ber of the Augusta, ua., gou iud
that built the little winter .White
Hnnse for the Presidnet. lie is a

fromipnt ffo fer witn lKe. nas HI-

i tended his exclusive stag dinners,
visited the President in Denver on
'Labor Day, again in Denver on
ISept. H, Played bridge with him
in Key West on Jan. 5 and was
ene of three Intimate friends who
flew" back to Washington with him
on Jan. 8. '.. .
Frank' Schwengel, president OI
Seagrams and a long list of Sea Sea-grams
grams Sea-grams subsidiaries, is a retired
major general who first knew the
President when tbey served in
World War I.
Jay Gould, executive vice presi president
dent president of Frankfort distillers, was
invited by Eisenhower to visit him
in Denver, Sept, 14., ,;
Inside Lobbying
After the Seagrams Frankfort
officials took over McKenna s oil
K.tirm thinoa hpcarl to move.

First McKenna called at the In-

tenor ueparimcui u '.' ,7
with various Frankfort officials to fc

Introduce them.
Then on Sept. 30, 1955, the Frank Frank-fort
fort Frank-fort people moved in full force.
They were so confident of success
that they submitted an operation
plan for oil drilling in the Lacas Lacassine
sine Lacassine game refuge. They seemed
to have assurances from other
sources that their plan would be
adopted. ..
Career officials in the fis and
,;Miif rvire were flabbergast

ed. They had served through many
years when their chiefs above had

wnririn Hnv to brocess them, and

they were Anally issued on Dec.
with a back date to Dec. 1. :
NOTE Congress passed the
first Wildlife Refuge Act under
President Teddy Roosevelt and wl
the inspiration of the famous con conservationist,
servationist, conservationist, Gifford Pinchbt. Each
game refuge is authorized by Con Congress
gress Congress unless it is a gift by the
state or a private Individual

t't4i:t-i'Mi I I iE.'.i::..,'; .

. I X i ': :' i

LOOK. NO "LEGS"! No.
termites aren't trying to under
mine telephone service at Leav Leavenworth,
enworth, Leavenworth, Kan. A Kansas City
motorist accidentally clipped
off the pole, leaving the cross cross-arms
arms cross-arms hanging on the wires.

w i i i i i rtivr i rii -aBBfc a, r

w am

"Take my coffee bottle off him! H couldn't

re&cua tr.jfcr.a ircma hyy i:zL



THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 133S

0"

GEE PANAMA AMERICAN ,AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NTlTSPArER

!"i!)' y

'I

i 1

1

7 r
1 bt" rt-f

I

A new CE air-conditioning' unit which has caused widespread
t amazement.

A

Man from Mars dem demonstrates
onstrates demonstrates the ultra ultramodern
modern ultramodern television sets
and high fidelity ra radios
dios radios and record
players.

Cordially invites you to visit its exhibition of the

latest ana most modern

GENERAL p ELECTRIC 1956
household electrical appliances, Starting ofomorro

... n

at (Justo Slrosemena SCve. and 28th Street
TELEVISION SETS:
Kitchen Centers (five lovely color combinations to choose from)

9 Radio consoles
Irons
Dryers
Stoves
Fans
. ... (,
Mixers

Refrigerators
Dock radios
Dishwashers
Water Heaters
Electric frying pans
Toasters

Washing Machines
Wall Refrigerators
Battery radios
Vacuum cleaners
Electric ovens
Percolators

A demonstration of the
. most perfect CE auto

matic washers and
dryers.

.age t:;::j

I (I

'V



TOf ESDAT, JANTAUT 13, VZi

THE FAXAMA AMERICAN
' INDEPENDENT P Alt! NEWSrAFER
FACE FOUR
tx crnitcE wtNru
SIDE GLANCES
EyCaibrcith
m 1
ccn'T rav coy with 1
(I HAt A HUNCH IT WAf KwoCP
I'P PS BETTER'
... whata;evic
prepare;? to
I
1
E, CABLE: I'VE JL'ST
CO E FROM AN E"E
WOtlP FAii. INTO JAPANESE
HMPS. YCU Mli5T KNOW THE
ANSAE THAT,
WITN'55 Vi'0 SAW
TWO AEN WRECK My
YOufcs tower:.
IFICOt'LPASK
CAR-WITH FU5 CHECKER
ONE FIR5T..
IN IT.'

OllC? FAa WTO JAPANESE

SETUP' WHO WEaE THOSE MEN .'

I A.

NBC-TV has the holiday fever.
They're working on plans for a
series of regular spectaculars,
bjs?d on the major holidays.
Titre'd be a Christmas show, an
Iner show, a Thanksgiving show
-4. and on down almost to Arbor
IW, Each would be televised on

thf; xact holiday, with songs andi

diamatizations telling the story ot
the occasion. No date set for the i

first one.

This may bt G roue ho Marx' lut';1

year with VYou Btt Your Lifa." 1

1 t..,.

I
) r

Colonna

Hik. contract is up.at.th tnd of

the- curront staion and Groocho

Glf Younf

naa a tar parr in tht comma

wW r. on h it wll.hltd ;mw miiiwi or vrswi.

laerals, do an occasional gutsf T . ,
spot and othtrwUo just relax. 1 tc, You" oOlcially- called
. "hast on the Warner Bros. Pre-
'sents" TV show. Besides introduc-
A FEW FAST FACTS: Robtrljing the drama of the day, he MCs
Q. Ltwit signed Hermoino Gingold the "Behind the Cameras" portion,
for a series of guest spots on his: in which Warners plugs their mov mov-daily
daily mov-daily CBS-TV show . Lanaiies via a four-or-five minute scg scg-Hornt
Hornt scg-Hornt leaves for England in April I merit including some interviews,
for a six-month stay. While there,; backstage scenes and film clips,
she'll try out a TV idea if the j "Its vary timt-c iniumlng
English like it, she'll bring it overwork," Gig says. "I havtn't had
here later CBS-TV has defin-jtimt to do any acting on my own.
itdy decided that spectaculars are 1 1 don't work tvery day, but I novar
here to stay. Instead of this sea- know whtn I may havt to work,
son's one a month, next year They'll call ma today to work to to-there'll
there'll to-there'll he twice as many . .! morrow.
NBC-TV will colorcast "The Boy "But it's in my contract that
Friend" when that happy musical ji can do some outside acting, and
concludes its present road tour ... j I sure am going to do some. I

Kddie Cantor and tddn Fi$hr:have a two-year contract, and af af-vti
vti af-vti double up and do a pair ofter my two years are up I'm corn corn-spectaculars
spectaculars corn-spectaculars together in '56. Eddie,' jng back to New York. I like it

O: discovered Eddie F.. remem-i here. I like Hollywood, too, out

I

mfnl

til. r .-si A f

MS

T. M. U I. fit Off.
Oft. f Ml ky NCA Unm. fa,
tVMffit!-It'll

1 1 11 i

II

KKECDXS AM) BIS ntCCNUt

Can Tou Fif ure It?

By MEKRILL HlUSSZX

"I'm not "a photographer and I don't need a modell"

Iwr.

TV TOPPERS

what I want to do is another

Broadway show and just go to
Hollywood for a picture once in
a while." ,

He'll be very welcome, especial-

'MILIUM DCKUC Unv.-iv;.
When I was sick, the doclorjly wlth tne irls-

wanted to operate. I said I didn't
hui thi timp' I told him he'd

havi to"touch up some of mM-fftU
A-rayS. . I..k,.u rinm Shaw, and'

DICK'S QUICKIE: Johnny Car-

xpl a nation of how ho got

fltoSitec Truo Life Adventurcsj

TVas BOTTLG-NOS6D DOLPHINS

JlAfter listeneing to Jtrry Colonna
ig, one might jump to the con con-tlusioh
tlusioh con-tlusioh that the new ringmaster

of ABC-TV's

havo Johnny Carton snow, ana

I was available

TWIN PARENTS
T.tlDWAUKEE (UP) The

"SuDer Circus" puts twins in the family of the county

a great strain on jus voice. JerrytrCgister ot fleeas, uyae naoei naoei-says
says naoei-says 'taint so. iman, don't believe in getting out
;"I used to be a trombonist," he 0f step., Mrs.. Donald Hanna gave
84ys, with a wiggle of his mus-ibirth to a-flon a.t 7 a.m. recently,
tsjehe. "And I learned how toiHer twin,- James Haberman, 23,
breathe correctly, I breathe frombecame tnf! father of a son 30
iltiwn here.'' And he pointed down inutes iater,
somewhere south of the mustache, i ... .
vKh is a good place to. breathe ,.

lAnn.
,lf you'vt boon watching "Suptr
Circus" lately, maybe you'vo do-(
titd a slight chart "m format.
1 i-.it it tine the --!v
f, m Chicago to New i
We figure that it's l..: pt;ojIc
i home that count," Jetry sas.
in Chicago, they'd, play, to,. the
aticlicnce in the studio use acts
that were bi and bold. Now we're

playing to the home audience. And
!c use some- acts like one we
had with a duck that the studio
audience can't see. But the folks
home like it better, we think.
Tliere is also at least one Col Col-olna
olna Col-olna song per show. This, ever;

body UK.es. ' t '
Also-ran$i Don't giva up. Latest
losor to makt good In a largo
Way U Robert Rounsoville. One
upon a try-out, he failed to make
th Metropolitan Opera Auditions
o the Air. Later, he wa good
enough to make the Met. And now

6V

I UIVV

The overage monhos faith. You
con tell by the way he drives o
car. enue

NG TONG serves

CHINESE DISHES
at El Runcho Garden
S P.M. ON

vr 1 1. 1

- ..IT M 4 f

Jv VA-V- l i A PLAYFUL
Vjt'Jl Y'fX X"MOOP THEY SWIM

. r J I oMty mave M j Talk about Zif
TWtKTr cents, BARGAINS
f, Y SO I GOTTA GET
4 CENTS CCHnry-f, SUuMOROUS C
wqdLN, t A cC 14 for 1T

r Took wors of this

UowMAMy
have "rtml

auooetherT

' rCfMATLLSC
TvvenTt- I EXACTLY
. TW6MTY CEHT5

HOW WHY OF EACH
V KATOO 6T?S TO-

ALLEl OOF

Hiya, BoyJ

By V T. UAHLW

" 'fm R,,hll RrWVfd

OTHEK V-

VJITH EACH

VOmSTLINJtS,

""'"'V TMNY MY NATURE TO (SET 1
DI5C0URAfiEDBUT HUNTIN''. fj
I BO THI5 15 TEXAS.'X ONE U'L (X HORSE IN A K,VV I
' KMm! THERE 5URE IS PASTURE LIKE THIS r4Y'
A LOT OF IT.' PANGA COULD BF OUITE A
-!-NEAR A5 BIG CrH A JOB! JW,7VVA Kl

0.

7 V5(

BOOTS AND BEX BUDDKf

You Don't Say!

BI EDGAR MARTI

ElN3 A)R-'u?:CATHIN3
MAMMALS,THEV SIMPLY 60
a v Dutrfctfol tf Km feUtM !iar

Faltering Philip
fbjltp'i Ufe ta filled with bruises.
(Veil-worn ttepi and run
Repairs would lew bis bone like new
. A. aassifleds. frit th rich! Clue'.

SOO'RE MT.

SQ01UE? I'M

socrra

tt066LE&-

YHODGVO

PERHAPS yOO rGWT
BE AWOTWER TO
COWE "TO EXPRESS

5WMPATVtf.

r;. . i

Ml. Of-,GVtt' I

CAME TO RETURM

OMt OF EX.UE'5

T)REfSES WE r

LEFT AT 4
OUR MOOSE-

i 1

TIT .. P, 7J.

ettWlvhE, UHEV) SHE UEWJE3, SOO

SEROE tE TEft WJ
THE OtAWOM r

1

"rn in

M '.Nki

CAPTAIM EA8I

Wasted Work?

tTLE STORI OF MARTHA WAY

About Mrs. Marshall

By WILSON SCRUGGS

ATrEZNOUVEBEEMHEPE OU7NS THE WW? HE? HUE3V WAS 1 N
1 MHLEVaUKWWTWEU BETOSTEO WUEO !N ACTOM.SiC V.'D.Tj
rVAU. BYVJAME.THATS MCS TO PECES.WHEN HE TUKWEO UPJJ I A
t4 WAPSHAU. OWE OF THE fl PSOU SHE HOWJDMT KUEVS )
' I J HAffWlSS ONES. IT. HE EVEN CAME TO SEE HE?.." J

Meanwhile m

CENTECVTLLE.

Us. .UNAeSHALL OF EASTMAN J

JJ SIT?' '.'WK

MKewttK, r- UU9!

r piscnxA's ror

That's Our Girl

By AL TtRMEEB

-wellTis
f GOT MY BONUS)
v f-ROM the rrrTTs

A FRUIT

CAKE.'r

Lin

7

Pi

WE'RE LUCKY

At. L JENNY LU'S

iFATHtM QUI ww -f

a& 1 1 :

. A.

Too?. 1SI b Hf Srvlt. he. T. M, K'B. 1). S. Prt 0-

Tk&re1. ou fihallv pip it,

PAPl BUT WHV YOlTP MAE

&UCH A CHOKE OP WRITING

0YCe CALVIWT I'LL UEVER

KNOW

-r- iir

I j

L M

t i .r.',v

J 1 -f5. Kl, PR AWM TWO 5TWP5
'i o11' IW THE TIME IT- )
f?J 3 SrW,'i THERE'S TH' POOR

WHV. 6A-&YI
WHAT A UICE

CARLA' THI

1$ ROVCB CALMIM!

HE'D LIKE TO &EB

j

I'VB WRITTEM
HIM REPEATEW.Y

ABOUT REPRINTIN&I

C6RTAIN &TRIP5

BUT HAVE HAP

NO REPLY 1

Bl LESLIE TURNER

on.0M! What a cOimcidewce'.

JKR. CALVIN. WHOE LETTER

YOU'VBJUST AN&wEKtPi

. l i II la wmrwa I

VIC FLINT

Eels Sees a Picture

BT JAY UEAVILUi

SOU 60TT LEAVE, EEL. IV J.

N6P ASBESTOS VMALLS TO

9USS6Y. MOW ABOUT i HOLP A 6UV A& HOT AS VDU

PUTTING AA UP FOR 7 M5U SHOULDN'T HAVE KILLEP

A FEW PAVS?J

THAT COP

Si

IVE OT A ROU.ER RiNK.
IT'5 CLOSEP NOW. PUT IT'S
IM THE VMPPLE OF NO-WHEPE-A
GREAT PLACE

TO HOLE UP.' y

X. M. U. M W-

A

ICL TARGET JTtrl OUT Pkumm
tak4 MHt mpM m txat J I itrO
itoMinK with toly Uitnw Layirf

ilMtwl uf al ttw fioi Uofl

murt awr ms nun i'

Hi 1h. Fl."

12-2?

HAPPY

a.

! I'LL PAY YOU AFTER

.1,7 YOU FINISH

V SHOVELINSTHE

IV WALK. RUM!

I

IT'S A N

BACK-'

BCEAIN'

JOB. BUT

NEED TH

POU6H!

SCRAW.KIO.

YA BOTHER

ME J

T

HOW MUCH,

L0N6ER
BEFORE
VOU'RE

THROUGH?

Ya Can't Win

1

Like TbatT

CAN'T

ANY FASTER

jyTwHAT'S TlA

A

m

Mi

( I WANT TO TRY 0UT
VMY NEW ROLLER 1

-V. .i .

JUK BOAltUIWO iiOLSB

'yssp,yyz'sA'.

4&S?2'A fee The tell pj?

.scoimm.' iticust tme wam- ii:5 a
; 'H6 DAY5 OF IflSS FikJD YOUC l-V, ,t

SlTlONi.'- ?y TME WAY,

VOU'Lt 6Et A &OOD U&AL

UAJOM EOOIUI ltl Oi l WA1

H 4 K. WUXlAiM

i

we

Lose

MOMcY

i

Aioee of im'54

-I'M DEVELOPING

1 OF COMbiDEC

!' Aei c'mcv. I

WA6W4T IT ? no

'AE&NOU GOlMS

TO WAp -rm

A REALLY Bl6

DSAL AMD

Fill vouc

6CT A

6

A

AViM65

ACCOUNT
OF t. 56

7:

vt

r b t

A

ZoiNO IF HE
THINiK6 OP
IT VOL) WONT
HAM 5- TMATx

1

OH. HE W'AMTS TO &Q

OUT BUT HE STAMPS

Hsl TH' DOOR LOOK IN'

FER PCX3S AN' STUFF
AN' MAKES MB HOLP
TM' POOR OPEN FER

MINUTES AN' MINUTES.' I

SO I'M eiVIN' HIMTH

6ENTLE BUM'S RUSH.'

M

WHV MOTHERS &ET fi!:Y



THl"R?.D T. JANUARY 1 ln:S

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN IMEFrDENT DAILT NEWSrAPM
r.u
riz

I

3ocia i and Otli

icnuidc

lo t 5037, -Anion

or

'erj

IL 134, Pa,

f
:

&j Staff,

Vmm iCrVmmU. ft..,. &a Pt J t L.U L mJJ fmflf. U ..-...La

'Beatification Of
iCardinal Discusser!"

IfTl

: ..
- i 1
I,
1. :. i
j K

f

.
.-.- v 5
i i

3

, i Parker chaplain Mrs. Edith
Vos3 K.S.N. u.- Mrs. Edith Kppley
i PN G. R.S G.- Mrs. Vera
iBolok P.N.G LSVG-Mrs Lucil Lucille
le Lucille fcmilh PtN.G. inside guardian
-Mrs. Mavis McGlade outside

guardian-Mrs. Mary Kate L'n L'n-oerwood.
oerwood. L'n-oerwood. Following the Installation Mrs.
Schuberg, Noble Grand of Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal Rebasah Lodge No. 2, present presented
ed presented Mrs. Stern with a Past Noble
Grands pin as her first official
duty..
Refreshments were served in
the banquet hall which was ap appropriately
propriately appropriately decorated. Forty-eight
members and friends attended
the Installation. ;
(continued on Pat ?)

V-

r

V'-

iCcrbilftcIyWi!

Si if li Pi."t(!?w :-Argper.ts for the teatt;; :
'M. Wwi.kUi J :t:cn vI tte late Span;: Cir';i?
, J .; r.al Rafet Merry lel Val t.:a.t

! WASHINGTON. Jan. 19 UP)-' presented today to the f;-

VATICAN' CITY. Jan. 19 f

Home builders from all sections of )Jea l onarega.on or nut- i, ,r
the country predicted today the.s?Er-un ny anr.our.C3d
new relaxation of government; .,
rrptlit rnrh nil!" smir hnm rnn.' Merry al, Was ,'-'U,l

jstrucUon in 1958, : secretary of state from im

ThU-ty-one builders agreed that: 1914. Hedied in 1930. America

;home building probably will -.- de,! noveiut Henry. woiion Kooxton
el'ne about 100.01 units this vear; included some of Merry Del IV a! s
I compared to the hight 1955 rate of! activities in his recent beat ?e.i-

FIRST JUNIOR RED CROSS CLASS Pictured

years who graduated last week from Albrook Air

are 22 students In the age group of 12 to 14
Force Base's first Junior .Red Cross class.

Standing. 1 to r, Mary Wilson, Marianne WUson, Penny Webb. Randa Vaughn, Carol Vauirhii!

uorotny Tnece Patricia Smith, Kay Schmidt; Eugene PerryrDea Dee Martinez, Bervle Miller
Sitting, I to r, Rita Asuilar, Kay BurUngame, Karne Cronk, Jeri Deemer, Carolyn Dillon Bar Bar-5?.
5?. Bar-5?. haircloth, Cheryle Green Sue Lively. Three students absent from the photogranh are
Nellie Lannam, Linda GUI and Sharon Cockran. Instructing the course was Mrs. Doris J Dillon

Republicans Rrippsd leds Clairn Ballcon Black Bears Don'l

CANDIDATES AND GOVERNOR -- Governor
mires the chest of silverplate, which will be the sec ond do or
nri?P nt the Canal Zone Police Ball to be held at the Hotel ej
anamlmSfS 2 Holding the prlzj "gffgg?-.
for queen of the ball. Left to right: Diane Staples pal poster,
Beverly Crawford, Jo Ann Sorrell and Angela Valentine.
CHEZ F.LOISE' FASHION SHOW PLATS
TO APPRECIATIVE AUDIENCE i
Those who attei.ded the fashion show 'Chei Eloise'' last
. night which was organiiland stagedJ.yMiss Elois Munroe,
home economics teacher ol Balboa High School, were Im Impressed
pressed Impressed by the dresses thaMhe students had made, and the
poise with which the girl? modeled before a large audience.
, Miss Munroe has put on these excellent fashion shows, for
charitable lunctions in the past, but this Is the first timeshe
has incorporated her entire Household Art Classes, consisting
of ? girls, in the project. '-' .
Th show was held on the front lawn of Balboa High
SchooL

J'

Governor Gives Buffet Lunth Tickets and reservation are be be-For
For be-For )6U Lawrence Seaway Mem- ing handled by Kuss Meissner
bers .puolicity by Bui lialvosa the bar
Governor John S. Sej bold was y Bui Bailey ana tne Master oi
host lor a bullet luncheon this; Ceremonies is Mai Hart. t
noon at the Tivoli Guest House.! 1
Attending the luncheon will be of-.Knapps and Hicks
ticiali oi the Saint Lawrence Sea- Have Visiting Relatives
way and Members of the Board off Mr. and Mrs James Rowe, Jr.,
Directors of the Panama Canal : who have been visiting their aunts
Company -, ' "and uncles; Mr. and Airs. Robert

V i-i - ..1 ji,. fijiapp, Air. ana mis. jauies
Irfn-CirliB i KnaPD and Mr. and Mrs. Robert

Weeding On Saturday ; iH. Hicks, for the past two weeks,
The marriago of Miss Jeanninej will be returning to theit home in

m. Dor g a n to .Mr. William R. I Vincent, AlaDama, iriaay evening
Carlin jr., Will take place at St.iMr. and Mrs. Rowe were accom
Mary's Church, la Baiboa, Satur-lpanied by Mis. Rowe grand
day at 5:30 p.m. ; l mother, Mrs. P.earl Knapp of Blr-

A reception will follow imme-.iminghain, Alabama. Mrs. Knapp
diately at the felk's t'mb, La Boca will remain on the Isthmus for
Road. No formal Invitations haveUeveral months, during which time

been issued. AH lriends of the i she will be the house-guest of her

cam otic Ui biclMlon la this
column should Mbmillcd ia type type-wrillen
wrillen type-wrillen form tit mailed to an of
the box numbers liftted dally in "So "So-rlal
rlal "So-rlal and tMhcnrcr." or delHtted
tr band tm (ha Wflr. NotUaa m4
meetiujf caiuiiM ba accepted aj taia
Balboa Federal
Credit Union Xo. 5849
Holds Annual Meeting
The annual meeting of the mem members
bers members of the Balboa Federal Credit
Union No. 5849 will be held at the
Pacific Service Center On Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, beginning at 7:30 p.m.
The Union will be entering its

8th year of operation and all
members are urged to attend as

there will be a general election of
hew Board Directors for the 1958
term. In addition to the special re reports
ports reports from the Treasurer and va various
rious various Committee Chairmen a brief
talk will be delivered by Mr. W.G.
Purdy, Agricultural Credit Spe Specialist
cialist Specialist of the Panama Ministry of
Commerce.
Also appearing on the program
at this meeting will be The Mod i
e rnaires a popular male singing
group.

children, Mr. and Mrs. Robert

Knapp, Mr. and Mrs. Zeno Knapp

and Mr, and Mrs. itobert hicks.

Installation Of Officers

families are invited.

Rotary Altar Society :
Makes Plans For Spring Fair
Mrs. Louise Allen, president,

presided over .the regular meeting qi Cristobal Rebekah Lodge No.2

or tjie Rosary Attar society on The Officers of Cristobal Rebek Rebek-tne
tne Rebek-tne Holy Family Church on' Mon-an Lodge No. 2 and Isthmian Ca Ca-oay
oay Ca-oay evening. in. tne Church hall. Inal Rebekah Lodge No. 1 r were

Plans were discussed for : the installed, in a joint installation at

Jloly iamuys bprmg fair wnicnuhe Cristobal Masonic Temple
is to be held on the Knights of i Monary. : ";'
Columbus'; grounds in Margarita f Miss Grace Williams P.N.G. ae aeon
on aeon February 11th and 12th. ned as Special Deputy with the
Father James M. Kelly," C.M.,! following installing team: deputy
Spiritual Director, spoke to the,; marshal-Mrsi1 Clara M. Chambers
members. "iP.N.G.. deputy warden Mrs.
. Mrs. Virginia 'Kelly and ,Mrs. Maude Lawrance .P.N.G.; deputy
Maiiueiite Schommer w e r e iSecrtary Mrs Lucille S m i t h
hostesses for the evening. H.N.G. deputy treasurer Mrs

Edith Eppley P.N.G.. deputy char
iPlain-Mrs.- Marie Carlson P.N.G

ViUor Frnm I'tica V

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Smith of! deputy inside guardian Mrs Ella
,ni.. .xi ...:n -.... ,n Crt i r . :

uiiia.'iew lum.viu mv. Sa Saturday
turday Saturday evening to spend a week at
the iHotel El Panama with their
son,'. Joe, who is stationed at Fort
Amador in the Canal Zone.

Beachcombers Brawl

What promises to be thelivliest,,

saltiest ball of ; them all will be
held. Saturday : night,' Jan.- 28th,
when the Balboa Yacht Club holds
their annual Beachcomber's Brawl
for members and their guests,
and pipe in their new officers,
Costume is a necessity part ol
the fua (for members) is getting
group together aheadof time to
plan the costume and table de decorations.
corations. decorations. Anythings goes from,
eras skirt to too hat.. ',

- Sam Moody is in. charge ;Of de- Mr : Virginia Faris

corations. Group are asked to be i Mrs. -Maxine Dixon K.S.N.G.

on hand at 10 a.m.. of the 28th to j Mr. "Violet. Deakins P.N.G LS LS-fecure
fecure LS-fecure their table locations and jN.G. Mrs. Phyllis Turner P.N.-decorate.-
. G. R.S.V.G- Mrs Maude Lawr-
Camera fans ususally have aiance PN.G. L.S.V.G- Mrs Lydia
field day at the special entrance Plaisance Inside guardian Mrs
where guests are really at a dis- toiga Roe outside guardian -Mrs.
advantage. No one enters with Agnes Coleman. '-fusician Miss
dignity. One of the main "features : Crace' Williams P.N.G.
in the Tug-of-War between -the! For Balboa conductor Mrs.
sailboaters and the Powermen. 'Ruth Straus warden- Mrs. Peggy

Brown P.N.G, organist M i s s

Grace Argo and soloist -Mrs. Faith
Brundage.
For the occasion the Lodge
Room was very beautifully decor decorated
ated decorated with fern and old-fashioned
nosegays; ; V
Mrs.' Margaret Schuberg was
installed as Noble Grand of Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal Rebekah Lodge No. 2 and
Mrs. Marie Bennett is the new
Noble Grand of Isthmian Canal
Rebekah Lodge No. 1
The following Officers were also
installed to serve for the year:
For Cristobal- Vice Grand Mrs.
Mable Bath secretary-Mr. Lorey
Wray -P.N.G. treasurer- Mrs
Leta Robinson P.N.G. conductor

Mrs. Luella Gullickson warden-

chaplain

PARAISO FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION MEETING

The Paraiso Federal Credit
Union will holds its membership

annual meeting at 7 .pm. Tuesday
at the scince room of the Paraiso
School.

Principal matters on the agenda

will be nomination-election of of officers,
ficers, officers, treasurer's and commit

tee reports and presentation of a
guest speaker who will be an announced
nounced announced later.

It i 'requested' that j members

present their pass-book to tne of office
fice office for examination during the
course of this month.

For josl Economy, ;
High 1927 Spending:
WASHINGTON, Jan. 19 f UP)
The Council of State Cham Chambers
bers Chambers of Commerce accused the
administration today of tossing
economy out the window and
proposing 1957 spending "above
the amount at the height of the
Korean War."
In an analysis of President
Eisenhower's new $65.9 billion
spending budget, the council
said both foreign and domestic
spending- is on the rise, with
"costly new legislation" likely to

add still further costs in years
to come.
"The only reasonable conclu conclusion.
sion. conclusion. ..is that no material ex

penditure reduction from the $85
billion level is contemplated for
the next few years at least," it
declared.

Exploded, Injured
13-Year-0ld Youlh

VIENNA. Jan.. 19 (UP) The
Communist Czech radio charged
today that an exploding Radio
Free Europe propaganda balloon
injured a 13-year-old boy and
damaged his house.

Radio' Prague said" the balloon
exploded at Irieny, near Presov.

lit caused $2,750 worth of dam

age to the house of : railroad
worker Ladislav Jurcik and hos hospitalized
pitalized hospitalized his son,' Milan, the re report
port report said;
It was the latest in a series of
Red attacks on the balloons
which Radio Free Europe re released
leased released from the West German
border to drop leaflets into Cze Czechoslovakia,
choslovakia, Czechoslovakia, Poland and Hun Hungary.
gary. Hungary. RRdlo Free Europe officials
said neither' o fth etwo types of
balloons used is dangerous.

Like To Bs Punched

LEWISTON, Mich, (UP) -Alex
Gallon, 32, has decided to
leave b'ar-baiting to Davy Crock Crockett.'.
ett.'. Crockett.'. Galton, a Romeo. Mich., insur insurance
ance insurance salesman, was posting no-'
hunting signs on his mother'!
property near here recently when'
a five-foot black bear ambled up
Ia a,l i

m Jircyei.-i ms worK, uaiion took a
poke at the curious bruin.
The bear swung back and
knocked Galton down, tearing his
jacket and two shirts beneath and
slashing his arm. Then the bear
sauntered off.

Thie Hvpta1i with Pn rnmrnt i

forecasts.
They also predicted that home
ipnccs will go up this year, with

the "typical" house costinsf about
$15,000 1300 more than in 19ii.
The builders, who held a two two-day
day two-day round table conference with
federal housing and financial of- i
ficials on Mondar and Tuesday,;
tailed newsmen in to discuss the;

J 1956 housing situation. j
I Most builders felt the restora-1
tion of 30-year mortgage terms'

undert he governments mortgage j
insurance program will help keep i
lDi6 home building from falling!
much lower than 1955.

NCTONC serves
GIINESE DISHES
at El Rancho Garden
5 P.M. ON

Large Assortment
of MOULDING
, We MAKE
PICTURE FRAMES,
for pictures,
diplomas, etc.
CLASS
and MIRRORS
' Mucbleria ;
"EL DIABLO"

16-26

Central

Tel. 2-2404

Ave.

Eton's- cdri

I New Liquid KillsRoaches and Ants

?3 o,'E;

CArwLzoriEcoEDiT union
'). ANNUAL MEETING NOTICE : Q
I accordance with Article VII, Section. 1, of the by-laws, the
Annual Meeting 'of Members will be held at the Diablo
Clubhouse on:
FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1956 at :39 p.m.
BlIIET SLPPLR WILL BE SERVED at 6:30 p.m.

The purposes of the meeting are as follows:"
Reading and approval of the minutes of the Annual
Meeting. --
Reports of Directors, Supervisory Committee, Credit
Committee and the Treasurer. ......
Unfinished "business and new business. '--
Action urjon proDosed dividend to be declared as re recommended
commended recommended by the Board of Directors. -f
Lirctmn of Officers.

1 i

2CQ0 ipoHaii rooms
Sensible rates Include raC
Many rooms with Television
7th VE. f",'f Vf'f
t50tSt.i..W ltiwi
ON TIKS SQUARE AT IADI0 CITY
'Cabl Address: THETAFT

Si

r

Tel. 2-0925

Scientists Discover Easy Way to Kill Crawling Insect!

v r
i
i ,':' : ..
; ? : ;'.;

Need lots of pep ?1

'An
ff JremiT
7 tk i
mater of J

Soup.

The juicea of different, garden-

j Irelh vegetable are blended into
I thil famoui drink. Youngster lovt
! it lively flavor, and thrive on it)
I vitamin-backed' ' 1

food nets. At meal mealtimeor
timeor mealtimeor between
meaUV-8 live
j them the refreth refreth-!
! refreth-! ment they want,

ROACHES and ant are the!
most difficult household pests
to tontrol and they ean b brought
into th home at any time. Science
has recently discovered t colorleys
brush-on insecticide that not only
kills, but controls erwlinf pent.
. It isealled Johnston' NO-ROACH.
Developed after year of t t-...h
...h t-...h KO-HOACH i an invis-

ible,' odorless, atainles liquid, so

powerful that one application re remains
mains remains effective for month. Bast
Kfi-ROACHmavbebrushed

on, without havina; to move your
.A. ut nun. It is not a contami

nating; spray or wy povdei,

BELLA VISTA COMMISSARY, CALLE 46 ESTE
and at your local commissaries. 1

contains no DDT, no sodium flu fluoride,
oride, fluoride, and no phosphorus.

Effective for Months t
Simply brush Johnston s

NO-ROACH wherever rcachts,

ants. ilverfish or wattrbugs are

found, around kitchen, cabinets

and ink woodwork, on baooaros,

window tills and door sun. insect
that walk over the coating becom
paralyzed and die within two or
three hours. The coating will con continue
tinue continue to kill all insect that walk
over it for months to come.
Guard against crawling insect

thJi BioitrwyjgukfiLrfy-

rr- it v

ENRICHED CREME
SHAMPOO WIT HE G G
that'-puts SHI N E' in your Hair

.!-Sw this ALL-NEV

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results. See k try it ia your
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!3YDcr.0Ti:rt:.r:i
' ; "Tel..M925
' Automobile Row Xo. 3(T.

m m m m i km m . m

AND

BRASSIERES, Inc.

TIVOLI BRANCH STORE No. 6 TIVOLI AVENUE
are pleased to announce to their patrons the visit of

!-

' .......-., ,. ....... .,, .... I
Exclusive Representative for Exquisite Form
Brassiere' Inc. of New York' City
who vill counsel you,; free-ofharge, on the:
requiremenfs, style .and type of brassiere best
suited to insure you a. youthful, ashlonable ashlonable-figure
figure ashlonable-figure at all times (
TOMORROW: FRI DAY
9 12 noon and 2'-. 6, p.m.

TIVOLI BRANCH STORE No;, 8 TIVOLI AVENUE
'.Across Ancon'Pcst Ofllce.

Because ft i nitura't nitura't-.
. nitura't-. own hair heautifier, th
1 e( in Richard Hudnut
Enriched Crem Sham.
1 poo give your hair
gloriously soft textur
and brilliant sheen -1
makes it eaiy to man man-ape,
ape, man-ape, silky and ihiny -'
lubricate the hair as
it cleans, wiikoat
dryiiif.

".1

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i
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i
' J :
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frtmstWM...
tn'l it washes
mi kt)i)tifii4 wiSI

Richard Hudnut

THE FABULOUS '5G POMTIAC

Foun-ooon ccd STATion yAGo:i
; Name the job arid this sleek new nine-passenger; Station, Wogon does it
for you in the handiest way. The appearance and grace of a sedan are combin combined
ed combined with the convenience of over nine feet of carrying space! ;y
i '"'': -v 0?3 DISPLAY t:07 AT

JLROME E. STEINER
Secretary.

ROBERT VAN WAGNLR"
President.
nd the nourish
"'nt they need.
V,
FANAMA-
COICM
..' v.'
MflMlhlni ff ff rha 4 Ihingf



rnr p ajama American ax independent da hi niwspaffr
TCFRSDAY, JANTAXY If. 11
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
taw t u .. t m a s
- 1 1 n rrs
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA

PAGE SIX

-"--''"-"-

3

(:3 ) : 1 l

L- -J

MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS

COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
CANAL ZONE POLYCLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
Dr. C. Z. rabreia Dr. ''
D.B.8. (Georgetown University) M.D
Tlvetl 4fti at Jul?) Ave, No. IMJ4
(opposite Anrnn School PUyfround)
Tl. 2-2011 Panama.
RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE f
JIM RIDGE
Phone Panama 2-055..
TRANSPORTES BAXTER. S A,
PocktM Shipper M
Wntl-24S I 2-2562
, Learn Ridint
' PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Ridini & Jumping dona daiW
I to 5 p.m. Phone S-0279
or bv oppoinrmant.
"We ahape Your Flann'
BODY-REDl'CING
J famous MrLevy Machine
Swtdiih Mnsaga Steam Bath
for male an female
ORTEPF.DIA NACIONAL
(Dr. Scholls)
58 Justo Arosomana Ph. 3-ZSIT
Luis A. Victor
To Be Honored
Willi Rally TonighJ
Liils A. Victor, former Canal
Zone employe who now presides
over the Ancon chapter of the
National Association of Retired CI CI-will
will CI-will be honored to-
niclit with public testimonial in
V.i-jrn Ana r'.aa.
' The testimonial, sponsored ,by
T';iini)it' Social Security Fension-
! Societv of whtcn ne is we
' .under will get underway at 8
p m., and will include a number
vt selections by the Republican
flarid. r-l.,.:::.:,:
delegations of Panama firemen,
the Lions Club, teachers and sev several
eral several other organizations will con contribute
tribute contribute to the demonstration in
Victor's honor, ;'; :-
Victor will be cited during the
tleraonstration for his efforts on
behalf of retired Canal Zone work workers
ers workers and his interest in local civic
activities, especially m the Santa
Ana district.
Billy Graham Set
For India Sermons
BOMBAY, India, Jan. 19 (UP) (UP)-American
American (UP)-American evangelist Billy Graham
prepared today to launch a preach preaching
ing preaching tour of India with his first
sermon at the huge Vallabhai
Pstnl starluim tomorrow nieht.
r.r.iVinm arrived here last night
and was greeted at the airport by
hundreds of Indian and foreign
Christians who cheered, waved andl
satie hVmns. He will fly to Madras
Saturday and from there will visit
Kottayam, Delhi, Calcutta and oth other
er other places.
By Telephone
Immediate Coverage
Dial Panama 2-5000
: FR1".D IIl'DDLESTON

w : """"""""

lAl

hti

PEEVAK &

Batteries
Tires & Tubes
No. 31
Automobile Row
Tel. 2-4li24

NEW
Uuarantccd 12 Months
1st Line
100 Level
Size Clack White Wall
CP0x15 15.S0 18.50
670x15 15.95 18.95
710x15 16.95 19.95
700x15 R.5..22.5-
CC0x15 23.95 25.95
320x15 24.95 26.95
W;ih Ol I I ires
Of III U

LIBRERIA PRECIADO LOURDES PHARMACY LEWIS SERVICE HOUSEHOLD EXCHANCE FARMACIA EL BATURRO
t Street Ne. U IH2 La Camo.uilla TlveU No. J. Pee d la Ossa Are. No. 41 parat Ufevre T Slroo
Azencias Internal. d Pubiicacionet FARMACIA LOMBARDO FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS FOTO DOMY FARMACIA "SAS"
( I Utta riua M teM HJ leatni Avoaeo iart ro and ft ia Porta 111
CASA 2ALDO MORRISON FARMACIA LUX FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS NOVEDADES ATH1S
Central A, tt 4tk ( July Ave J ;.. 'H Central Avtaaa , W rees No. U V .a bail At.

FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE: Oinin room tat,
bedroom iat. Pya radio and pick pickup,
up, pickup, rafriferafor, wicktr ft, ii
trova. Call 1158 Colon.
FOR SALEChiM'a crib. po.
Hi lints, Oriantal ruf 10 x12',
4-burnar fa trova, lamps, Grand
Fathar clock, china cloiat. Tal.
phona 3-65S0.
FOR SALE: Stateiida living,
dinin, bedroom and kitchen fur
nitura. Mjhojiny bat and Laun Laundromat.
dromat. Laundromat. Call Panama 3-5404."
No. 52. Apt, 3. Dr. Alberta Na Navarro
varro Navarro Street, El Canjrejo.
FOR SALE: Beautiful mahoga mahogany
ny mahogany bar with upholstered chairs,
gtat liquor cabinet with three
mirror. A real bargain. Cash or
terms. Potted plants, baby high
chair, small dining table. Phone
3-1024, 2-4902.
WANTED
Houses
WANTED:- House suitable far
diplomatic mission, 4 bedrooms,
3 bathrooms in Bella Vista P.O.
Box 577 Panama,

LR. Sommer's Bid Seems Low
On 2 Dig Reconversion Jobs

Bids for two Important phases
of the Panama Canal Company's
power conversion project were
opened yesterday at Balboa
Heights with offers entered from
nine local and United States
firms. :., ,: :
L. R. Sommer, Panama con contractor,
tractor, contractor, entered ; apparent low
basic bids for the'two jobs which
cover the replacement of the
high voltage transmission lines
between Madden Dam and Mira Mira-flores,
flores, Mira-flores, and the construction of a
new switchgear and transfer
yard at Agua Clara Diesel plant,
however.: the ultimate low bid
will depend on which, if any, of
the several aiiernaie nems are
selected. :A ii--'
The bids ere divided into two
schedules covering- the work on
each side of the Isthmus, with
various alternates In both sched-
ules.
The basic bids for the Atlantic
side work ranged from $232,150
entered by L, R. Sommer to
$408,590. Bids' for the replace replacement
ment replacement of the transmission lines
with heavier copper conductors
ranged from the low of $478,775
offered by L S. Sommer to $1, $1,-040,021.
040,021. $1,-040,021. .,
Two other lcal bidders en entered
tered entered offersThese were Bildon,
inc. and the Electric Service
Company.
The six bids entered by States'
firms were by the Midland Con
structors, Ind., of Chicago; Don-
jovan Construction Company, of
sti paul; Central Engineering
and contracting Company, of
Tulsa: Nat O. Harrison Asso
ciates, of Miami, and Cleveland
Electric Co., a South Carolina
firm, Richards, and Associates,'
of Carrolton, Georgia; and
Sachse Electrical Company, of
Lake Charles, ta. The latter firm
has already been awarded two
major power conversion con con-tracts
tracts con-tracts i "-
The most competitive bidding
came on the DroDOsal to replace
the transmission conductors
with aluminum wiring, with lit
tie difference between the offers
entered by Sommer and Buaon,
The replacement of these con
ductors, which includs the re replacement
placement replacement of some transmission
towers and the reinforcement of

lowers KIM UIC ICIUlUltcuicui, ui .j rn.,t,l,nHAn
oOhers, was offered for bid In Erwlneerlngv and Construction
two separate items with Iourj?rMtor who Is th contracting

alternates.
WAINBERG
TIRIiS
TUBELESS
Size Black White WaD
670x15 18.95 21.95
710x15 19.95 23.45'
760x15 ,21.95 26.45
-EOOxlS 219-21ro9S--820x15
27.45' 30.95
No Muniin2 Cliarge
Doii t .!.

( ;

i HI

7.

FOR SALE

Automobiles
FOR SALE: 1950 Hudson four,
door, excellent condition, radio.
Duty paid. Phone 2-1594 or 2 2-3550.
3550. 2-3550. FOR SALE: 1954 Austin Se Sedan,
dan, Sedan, perfect condition, $750
cash. Phone 3-C550.
FOR SALE: 1950 Packard 4 4-door
door 4-door Sedan, law mileage, good
condition, new paint and seat seat-cover,
cover, seat-cover, radio with front and rear
speaker, $700. House 769-C,
San Pablo Street, Balboa.
FOR SALE: 1954 Cadillac
Coupe, excellent condition, low
mileage, radio and white side side-wall
wall side-wall tires, power steering, power
brake. If interested phone Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal 3-1248.
FOR SALE: 1948 Fordor Ply Plymouth,
mouth, Plymouth, good condition, $225.
Phone Navy 3485
FOR SALE: -CHEVROLET PAN-
EL HALF TON, 1952 model,
' perfect condition. Phone 2-4902.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED: Trailer approxim approximately
ately approximately 1000-lb. capacity Call 2 2-3809
3809 2-3809 Panama,
The two basic bids were for
Increasing the transmission cap capacity
acity capacity of the conductors between
Mlraf lores and Summt, and the
lines between Summit and Mad.
dem Dam, with, heavier copper
conductors. Two atlematesr Dro-
vlded for the replacement with
aluminum conductors, and the
?S fh.1 ffinat5 provid
rthe contractor to keep the
copper removed.
Bildon, Inc. entered bids for
only the replacement of the
conductors with aluminum. For
the two projects, he entered a
bid of $37.3,900 compared by
$390,775 bid by Sommer, with the
old conductors being retained
by the Canal Company. The two
bids- for aluminum conductors
with the old conductors becom
ing the property of the contrac contractor
tor contractor were $321,535 by Sommer, and
$316,200 by Bildon.
The offer entered by Sommer
for the replacement of lines with
copper conductors for both items
was approximately $100,000 low
er than any other bid.
The alternate bids under
Schedule A. covering the Atlan
tic Side work, were for the re relocation
location relocation of the -44,000-volt. 'un 'underground
derground 'underground cable connecting the
Fort Davis switching station to
the Agua Clara Diesel plant;
Installation of a new connect
ing cable; and construction of
an overhead line connecting .he
two power installations.
The work on the Atlantic Side
will permit the combining of
two switching stations and s
transformer station into a sin single
gle single Installation at the Agua Cla Clara
ra Clara plant. The work on the hish
voltage transmission line will be
required, since the size of the
existing conductors would result
in wider' voltage fluctuations
after the change to 60-cycle
current. Since heavier transmis transmission
sion transmission lines -will be used,, some
towers will be replaced and oth others
ers others reinforced to bear thg addi additional
tional additional weight
Th bids were opened yester-
dflv bv Col.. Hugh M. Arnold,
Company.
Col. Arnold announced that
awards will be made alter a
complete tabulation, and analy
sis of the bias.
The low bids were all within
the Government estimate oi tne
cost of the work.
r:zczssi7Y
The Church of Our Lady of
Fatima, now in construc construction,
tion, construction, needs: 100 yards to re refill
fill refill the floor of land, 60
yards of sand, 60 yards of
stone and 300 bags of ce cement
ment cement for the concrete. floor,
rather Guillermo Sosa will
be very grateful to those
-who fiiii a iuuie of it foijhls.
purpose, and will be sure
the Elessed Mother of Fa Fatima
tima Fatima will eive the reward
to them. Fox 203, Panama.
Tel. 2-5117.

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031, ANCON, CX
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
REPAIRING washing machines,
refrigerators and all hinds of
electric accessories and general
painting. Isthmian Work Shop,
Phono 3-3308. Via Espana 57.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Applique blouses
and skirts. Carnival wear. Visit
us at Ludigrama, No. 18-23 B
Avenue.
CHEAP! Chevrolet and Morris
1951 in perfect condition; Rol Rol-leiflex
leiflex Rol-leiflex 2.8:c camera and others.
Call 3-6369 from 12:30 to
. 1:30.
FOR SALE: Betsy Ross spinet
piano, $450; large carved cim cim-phor
phor cim-phor chest. $25. 1556-D Balsa
Street, Balboa. Phone Balboa
3477
FOR SALE: 410 Winchester
pump shotgun, one semi-auto
matic .22 rifle. Call Balboa 2 2-1723.
1723. 2-1723. FOR SALE: 8" Craftsman table
saw with 1 -bp. motor $80 with
motor, $50 without; 6" Crafts Craftsman
man Craftsman Joiner with Vi-hp, motor,
$80 with motor, $60 without;
15" disk sender pnd 4" drum
Sander combination with Vj-hp.
motor and suction system for
sawdust $40. All motors 25-cy-ele.
House 769-C, San Pablo St..
Balboa.' :.-
F0R SALE: Bottle Creek health
builder massage machine, like
new. Phone 8-4619.
: FOR SALE: Office eauipment:
, Steel desks, wooden desks, chairs,
; safes, fluorescent lamps, V-X
cables, doors, etc. Phone 2-4902,
FOR SALE: TWO ADMIRAL
AIRCONDITIONING UNITS 41
ton, practically new. Reasonable
prices. Monthly payment possi possible.
ble. possible. Phono 2-4902.
Panama Line
Sailing
Seventy -1 e v e n passengers
have been booked to sail for
Cristobal Thursday afternoon
from New York aboard the Pan Panama
ama Panama Liner Cristobal, according
to the advance passanger list.
Also sailing will be 2ft passen passengers'
gers' passengers' lor Haiti.
The complete advance list of
passengers for Cristobal follows :
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Apteker;
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bertoldl;
the Rev. Charles H. Corcoran;
Mr. and Mes. Charles G. Dep Dep-pen;
pen; Dep-pen; Mr. and Mrs. Peter De
Stefano; Mr. and Mrs. Jepth B.
Duncan; Mr. and Mrs. Manuel
Epstein; Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Goldenthal; ; Mr. and Mrs. Ed-!
ward Goldman, and Msgr. Mi Michael
chael Michael J. Guerin.
Edward Otto Hatscheld, Lee
R. Hayes; Mrs. Marjorie Healy
and son, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac
Hecht; Mr. and Mrs. Edward J.
Henriquez, Miss-tJatharine Herr,
Dr. and Mrs. Ell H. Herzog, Mr.
ana Mrs. irwin Hoover, Mr. and
Mrs, James R. Hunter and S
children, Mr. and Mrs. Paul I.
Klevan, Mrs. Henry La Gran
deur, Mrs. Edwin Lane, and Mr.
and Mrs. w .R. Lweu.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mlzrachl.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Moran,
Mr., and Mrs. Kenneth E. Mor Mor-ley,
ley, Mor-ley, Mr. and'Mrs. Morris Moyel,
Mr.; ana Mrs.' aimer j. Nords
trom and 3 children, Mr. and
Mrs. Sandy Pesce. Mr; and Mrs
Edwin Rollka, and Mr, and Mr.s
James M. Ryan. .
Mrs. Emily Schraffrani Mr.
and Mrs. Lewis A. Schwab. SAi,
and Mrs. David Small, Mr. and
Mrs. Walter H. Smith. Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Spies, Mrs. Robert
Steerei, Mr. and Mrs. Dewitt
Van Valkenburg, Mr. and Mrs.
C. H. Wilhelm, and Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel Wilkes.
1st Ldy To Reso
in
l!:r Pn!:!:: Chores
In SI:? V;i;:i !!:o
WASHINGTON, Jan. 19 (UP)
Mrs. Elsenhower plans to re resume
sume resume some of her public chores
soon, just as the President has
resumed his normal office "rou "routine,
tine, "routine, It was learned today.
' But the first lady's schedul-
relaxed since last spring ap
parently will not Include the
traditional White House state
receptions or dinners abandon abandoned
ed abandoned since the President's heart
attack.
The entertainment veto is ex expected
pected expected to extend to the state
dinner for British Prime Min-
wier Aninony r.ucn v.nen riear
rives Jan. 30 f-rrptary of State
John Foster 1-"-ps will do the
honors.

RESORTS

PANAMONTE INN, BOQUETE,
AT 4000 FT.
offer the bast in climate, water,
food and accemmedations. Rates
including 3 meals, from $8 sin single
gle single and $14 double occupancy.
Wire reservations.
Gramlich' Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modern conveniences,
moderate rates. Phone Gamboe
6-441.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mil
past Casino. Low rota. Phono
Bolbe 1866. (
PHILLIPS Oceansido Cartage.
Santa Clara. Bex 435, Belboo.
Phone Panama 3-1877. Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal 3-1673.
Shrapnel' furnished houses on
beach at Santa Clara. Telephone
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
Baldwin's furnished apartment
t Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Proback. Balboa 1224.
FOR SALE
S Real Estate
FOR SALE: Heuses in, Santa
Clara, fully furaisned. Leaving.
Must sell. Phone 6-441.
FOR. SALE: Bargain: 3 hectar hectar-as
as hectar-as of land, level at El Valla. For
information, Phone 2-3137.
Help Wanted
WANTED: Experienced nurse nursemaid
maid nursemaid with references to cara for
two small children. Must live in.
Apply at Martin, S.A., Juste A A-rosomene
rosomene A-rosomene Ave. No. 37-11 dur during
ing during the hours of 9 .m to 12
" noon and 2 to 4 p.m.
Curundu Juinininig
Pcol GrcL-p Pkns
Dr Scascn Events
.Dry Season activities of Interest
to Canal Zone and Panama resid
ents have been planned by the
uirunau bwlmmlng Pool Associa Association.
tion. Association. First event of the season will be
a moonlight cruise on Gatun Lake
ahnarr) tho fVrrv Prvcirlant Pnrriii

on the evening of Jan. 27. The boatlf m J r Ca AM
will leave the Gamboa docks tllGiHienMwU iCl Alj
7 p.m. and cruise out on the lake!
toward Gatun, returning to Gam-! I- Tf I ntt AfliaA

boa at 11 p.m. There will be an
orchestra aboard for dancing and;
free beer and sandwiches served!
during the eveningg.
The next event will be the big-!
gest fair and exposition that the!
Isthmus has ever had on either)
side of the international boundary.
All the merchants of Panama will
be invited to display their merch merchandise
andise merchandise as in past fairs.
Fred Rudeshiem will be back
with an augmented horse show.
He has many of the same riders,
but with more experience, and
many new riders also.
Biggest attraction of them all
will be the "Coney Island" amuse amusement
ment amusement park with its eight big rides
and other attractions which have
never been shown in the Canal
Zone. There will be a big ferris
wheel, whip, loop the loop, swings,
merry-go-round and other amuse amusements.
ments. amusements. Mule Hzsicd 'Dolly'
Kelps Ycung kiQtt
Win A Corn Ccr.lost
CHICAGO, Jan. 19 -TJP)-La-mar
Rathff, 18, first person to
harvest 300 bushels of corn from a
single, acre, said today he doesnt'i
want -to be a farmer "because
there s no money In it."
Lamar and his father, who farm
near Baldwin, Miss., came to Chi Chicago
cago Chicago to receive $2,000 in awards
from Farm Journal magazine.

a junior in wheeling High.a- sir i I
School. Lamar cot 11.000 and hitr III I ftfJf I"""

father the other i nnn LsmarilVI VJ LWi i.VWs.l

sam ne will Use the money "fori
college." Il
A quiet, slight youngster, Lamar I
said he plowed his acre with a!
sine e cr aiA ti,
that he could have dnn- a i
wun a tractor. i
Lamar said that although there
is no tractor on his father's farm,
the family has an electric refri refri-geator,
geator, refri-geator, a washing machine and a
freezer, and hopes to get televi television
sion television soon. ;
Lamar told newsmen the feat of
raising more than 300 bushels per
acre "didn't take too much hard
work." He said he found time last
summer for swimming and other
activities.
Although Lamar is a Four W
Club member and belongs to the

uiure farmers or America, he
said he has about decided not to In an, editorial In the' -AFL-follow
farming as a career. He ; CIO official monthly publlea publlea-has
has publlea-has a brother in Memphis "ho isition, Meany fiald congressional
an interne and said he may follow i priority also, should be trlvtm to
i' tut-brWhrr's--ioottrT.--- OecHnino- farm -Twifee and f ei ei--
- ei-- The. farm youth said he plowed era! aid to education,
ninelimes with a single-row plow!

Behind his mnln amt iiiiiiitoH
uwice. He said he plowed 12 sub-
Uoil once to a depth 'of IS to 7i
I inches. His hnmnn- ii,M
iharvested a Labor Eay.,J

Apartments

ATTENTION G l.t Just built
modem furnished apartments, 1,'
2 bedroom, hot, cold water.
Phone Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENTs Beautifully fur furnished
nished furnished apartment one bedroom,
largo porch, dining roam and ;
kitchen, bath and hot water For
married couple without children,
, Apply personally to Cuba Avenue
No, 38-29, next to Comisariate ;
Don Bosco. ':.;;','-:'' :':'."'; -:
FOR RENT : 2-bedroom apart apart-.
. apart-. ment, tcemplotely furnished. Pai Pai-tilla
tilla Pai-tilla sector Phone 2-4638 office
hour; ;'...-: ;; ; : '.'.'-
FOR RENT: I-bedroom apart apart-ment,
ment, apart-ment, completely independent.
Jose de Fabrega Avenue Na. 12
- (Pasadena), from 5 p.m. to 7
p.m.
FOR RENT: Two large rooms,
apartment in new building! hot
water, neatly finished. Avenida
Jose Fee de la Otsa (Automobile
Row) in front Firestone Ricar Ricar-do
do Ricar-do A. Miro, S.A Phone 2-3436.
-AMERICAN Army couple would
like to share their apartment
with childless G.I. couple. Apt..
5, Bldg. 63 4th July Ave.
FOR RENTs Modern apartment,
furnished, for 3 month. 52nd
Street No. 21-4, Campo Alegre.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR. RENT: Chalet: 3 bad bad-rooms,
rooms, bad-rooms, hot water. 47th Street,
Bella Vista. Phone Fort Clayton
4289 office hours, after Curun Curun-du
du Curun-du 5118.
FOR RENT: 2-badroom chal chalet:
et: chalet: garage, etc. 50th Street No.
50, facing "El Baturra." Tele-;
phone 3-3377.
' FOR RENT
.'Miffeellaneoiiis''
FOR RENT: Spasiaua lotala,
ground. Justa Arosemen Ave--;
nue No. 37-11. Inguir 37th
Street Ne. 4-23.
Mrs. Unibarosr
III lIJIQII VIHtU
i MRS, PAT UMBERGER HAS
'V '-; ': .;' ;' ;'):.' .-.'.,;
. RECEIVED a letter and -certl-
cate of i service, for:, serving as
Distaff "vice-president ;. of .the
NCO are ; afrom "Albrook Arr,
Force' Base Commander.rCol.
John W. Oberdorf. Mrs..'Um Mrs..'Um-,
, Mrs..'Um-, bevger is the wife of 4TSt.
' Robert L. Umber a er, ; ; B a s e
iHousins; NCOIC. She has held
' the Vice-President position
for-the past four' months.
e p si
rff"'l f"p'f
' ",v
.'..(. vxt' t io ntv
WASHINGTON. Jan. -19 (UP)
! AFL-CIO President George
Meany urged Congress today to
cut taxes lor low-income iami iami-lles
lles iami-lles this year If ; an "adequate
defense program" also can be
maintained. ..:
But the nation's ton-1 a b o r
leader said Congress "first and
foremost": should enact "a truly
effective foreign policy pro program"
gram" program" that is bi-partisan. He
criticized the administration for
"failures in the cold. war,". but
addend that "criticism alone will
j get us nowhere."
t .aM n, o vr,!k.h-iti,m'
five YMr $1 Ir0 r 1 f1 1
a'l rrv i i
, a t
. i j t ;

Kooms

FOR RENT: Small bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished for single person. Apply
personally to Cvba Avenue No.
38-29, neat to Comiaariate Dap
Bosco. .'.v.::
FOR RENT: Furnished bedreem
. with porch, bath, hot- water and
available food; for married cou couple
ple couple without children. Apply per personally
sonally personally to Cuba Avenue No. 38 38-29,
29, 38-29, aoxt ta Comisanafo Don
Bosco.
FOR RENT) Urge furnishod
room. American couple. Kitch Kitchen
en Kitchen privilege, refrigerator, etc.
Bus stop near. 3 1st Street 9..
Eisenhower
(Continued front Page 1)
But such a Position, he emoha-
sized, depends on the actions of
ouiers. ; ,.
On his part, however, Mr.
Eisenhower said he would go
to Congress whenever the is issue
sue issue of war arises. He said that
is the only place he would go
in that event.
Dulles' "brink of war" state statements,
ments, statements, Jn. a Life Magazine in-

i j v i
terview, created an internatlon-'af

al storm ; of criticism. The sec-lis chairman of the Senate House
retary told a news conference Atomic Energy WiUtarv Applies' Applies'-he
he Applies'-he would not have phrased the tions subcommittee, and as such
statements for publication the has access to many government
way they appeared but Insisted secrets, v
the WOrld mUSt 1p artinrtoa
will 'go to war, if necessary,, ta g' t t 1

WtffiLSSfS. ....
er leading Democrats called
on the President to repudiate
'Dulles' statements or dismiss
'.him. '; ;',-;..',.
But leading Republican Sena Senators
tors Senators came to the Secretary's de defense,
fense, defense, arguing he did no more
than enunciate America's long long-term
term long-term policy of deterring war by
standing firm In the face of
Communist threats, .; , ;
The President was most re-;
lactant to enter the "brink at
war controversy and care carefully
fully carefully limited his comments a a-boot
boot a-boot it.
He would hot say whether he
had ever decided,-as the Life
article said, to use atomic bombs
in the Korean and Indochina
crises. And he said at the out
set that he did not read the
article, although he had seen
some of the allegations aoout
what Dulles had said. -;
nut tne presiaens aia flay, in
discussinar peace prospects over
the last three years, that cross
ing the Yalu river into Man
churia would have snooted in
ternational opinion. The srticle
had said the President naa de
cided to- carry" the fight into
Manchuria with tactical atomic
bombs, if necessary, to bring
peace to Korea.
Five l,f27 Members
El:ci:d To Zcno
Ctnccr XcfSniiloc
Five new' members have been
added to the Canal Zone Cancer
Committee, to fill vacancies re recently
cently recently created by members leav leav-ins:
ins: leav-ins: the Isthmus. Colonel Charles
O. Bruce. Canal Zone Health Dir Director
ector Director and Chairman of the Can
cer Committee, announced today.
HIV IICW lllCISIUOIff, JIII..UUUH m,
member of the Board of Trustees,!
were unanimously elected at the
quarterly meeting of the Cancer
Committee held this week.
Colonel Chester O. Frake, of
Quarry Heights, was elected as a
Committee member and a Trustee.
Other new committee members are
U.S. District Judge Guthrie F.
Crowe; Philip L. Steers, Jr., Pa Panama
nama Panama Canal Company Comptrol Comptroller;
ler; Comptroller; Paul M. Runnestrand, Exe Executive
cutive Executive Assistant to the Governor;
and B. I. Everson. Transporta
tion and Terminals Director.
Col. Bruce also announced
appointment of a commitlee to
intiffate and reuort at the nexti

quarterly meeting on the possibili-L j VtmVm
ty of extending the services of the;l1 l.-,-iWIrIu.ao;l
Canal Zone Cancer Committee by 1 -""-"

assisting the Tumor JJoara oi uor uor-gas
gas uor-gas Hospital in its record keeping
and follow-up work on cancer pa patients.
tients. patients. Lt. Col. JI. B. Webb, of Al Albrook
brook Albrook Air Force Base, was ap appointed
pointed appointed chairman of this commit commit-tec
tec commit-tec Discussion of preliminary plans
for the Annual Cancer F und .Drive
to be held during the last half of
May featured the quarterly meet-
lD?t was also announced i hat Col
William W. Nichol, Chief of, the
Surgical Service at Gorga Hospi Hospital
tal Hospital and a member of the Cancer
Committee, is completin g Pja"
for a series of illustrated talks on
cancer to. be given to-various or or-cao
cao or-cao er io r s F ,rila.

.Ziar talkt wasjbourg and Southampton

fiu a.i.f au-ttcd mnch-fawabs.
aticnlion. ,. ,
qhe talk" we- direclt P"m;
,1 arily to women s e i
l. :!-,.- 8-'(ii-f eon.P'ete ftt-tai-s on

MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS

Position Offered
WANTED: Steamship company
need bilingual correspondent,
preferably with steamship eaper.
ience. Mail application to P.O.B.
5062 Cristobal, C.Z.. giving cur curriculum
riculum curriculum and references..
WANTED: Experienced Spanish-English
stenographer, perma permanent
nent permanent position, adeguato remuner remuneration.
ation. remuneration. Phono 2-3483.
APPLICANTS for Army Servica
Club Director (woman I desired:'
Preferably single; between age'
26 and 40; graduate accredited
college; United States cirixea.
May substitute for college expe experience
rience experience in social, recreational or
similar organisation. Call Staff
, Service Club Director, 87-5203,
Special Services, USARCARIBV
Frt Clayton.
US Wide Open
(Continued from Part 1)
chief of staff, announced last week
that the Army is putting "every "everything
thing "everything we've got" into developing a
ballistic missile with a 1,500-mile
range. .' .
; "Such; a weapon, which is' fired
like a shell, would be a step to toward
ward toward the intercontmental ballistics
missile with an estimated 5,000 -mile
range and speed of about
10,000 miles an hour
I uiu iiui give me source
hi nrir-tinn 1
Jackson did not give the source
i wcai-itaie lounciis

Seek Ccnflnusnce :
Of Minihly CcnfzbsV
The Congress of Civic Councils
operating in the townsltes of La
Boca, Rainbow City, Santa Cm
and Paraiso has issued an an announcement
nouncement announcement favoring the contimt contimt-ance
ance contimt-ance of the "shirtsleeve s confer. -enees"
held monthly with Balboa
Heights: executives for th past
several. .years.. ':;:,
The announcement takes note ef
the fact that the customary tour
of duty of the present Canal Zone
Governor expires early next 7um- .'
mer. ; .'".,' ;.,. ': ''" -r. f
It said In part: ,v ;
. "The Civic Councils, now in their
third year of operation, were es established
tablished established through the constructive
help of Major General John S.
Seybold, Governor of the Canal
Zone. During this period they have
served as a means of not only
obtaining much needed improve-
ments and facilities, overdue for
many years, but have also been
instrumental in lifting the cultural
and social life of -the -Canal Zone
local rate communities.
The monthly shirtsleevg conr
ence in which the representatives
of the V Councils meet with
Governor Seybold p r o v id ides
es ides a medium through which th
community has direct contact with
the Canal Zone administration.
These conferences held in I the
board room at Balboa Heights have
been of great benefit to the resi- ;
dents, and untold good not only
in solving many outstanding prob problems,
lems, problems, but in improving employ-
er-employe relationship has been
obtained. -'-'' ;
"In fact. the. establishment- of -these
Councils and the good they
have done during the present re regime
gime regime represents another great link
in the chain of democracy on the

Canal Zone.' (
"The Councils have proven very
invaluable in many instances and
have succeeded in obtaining! re reconsideration
consideration reconsideration of some vital issues
affecting local rate residents, v
"It is the hope of the Congress
that there will be no change in this -democratic
policy and that this .
tvpe of representation needed en
the Zone for many years may con con-tinue.
tinue. con-tinue. J

Ccrcr.:3 K !!:!:s :
. I..l- frT'!fs
I f 1 T-! "J UuiiJ
J """"
A 43-day autum Mediterranean
cruise has been scheduled, for
Cunard's famous cruise liner Caro Caro-nia
nia Caro-nia next Sept. it was announced
today by G. L. Bowen, general pas passenger
senger passenger manager of Cunard in the
United States. The voyage will
cover 10.146 miles with visits to
16 ports in 15 countries.
Planned in response to popular
demand, this cruise marks the
Caronia's third consecutive voy voyage
age voyage to the Mediterranean during
the- autumn season Ports of ca t
will include: Funchal, Malaga, Pal Pal-ma,
ma, Pal-ma, ViUefranche, Naples, Messina,
Dubrovnik, Athens, Dardanelles
,. 'io;n iKianbul. Haifa. Alexan-
dria. Malta, Tangier, Lisbon, Cher Cher-.
. Cher-. j CAii.u.mntAn An ex-
Doing anu ouuiu-i'.j""".
tensive, program of shore excur-.
sions.. is being.. mnd bythe
American Express Company.
The 34,0W-ton CarOma, largest
liner ever built esp'ciahy for
cruising, will provide luxury h"i
ecnrnmoflation lor passensei



THURSDAY. JAM

13, ln'S

cirouo, rvou CENTRAL Theatre I U X THEATRE HIVE-IN Theatre CECILIA THEATRE .. ,. ycro:
J BANK NIGHT! .... TOE RED.-CIRCLE . SIMULTANEOUS WEEKEND RELEASE! . Sensational Italian Double! Frank Loveiov, in V 3 PICTURES!
, Chapters 3 and 4 Kirk DOUGLAS, James MASON, Paul LL'KAS and Peter LORRE, in rmirivn MWFY THE SHIP OF TFlE CURSED TOP OF the WORLD s
' jane Russell, in CALTPS0 20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA nzs AJp uor fx exile
' rvbERWATER y v In TECHNICOLOR CINEMASCOPE! in For AdiUs Only. " STRIKFH
L N D E It i A 1 LK s ,., C0XXEST : The Mhtest Motion Picture of Them AU... In- Also. REBELLION OF STRIKER
. Also: i Shows at the CENTRAL Shows at the LUX: COURTROOM SCENES THE HANGED SCOTLAND YARD
- and 1 10 - 8:55 p.m. 1:5 3:46 6.21 8:58 p.m. SEVEN ANGRY MEN with Silvana Pampanini and . with . 1
TOE FRAME TWO PICTURES I ' PRICES: 0.73 and fl.40 Sofia Loren Pdro Armendarte,. FRISCO TORNADO

Sociat and
Balboa Rainbow
Installation
The Balboa Assembly No. 1
Order" of the Rainbow for Girls
will have an open installation on
Friday, Janiiary 20 at the Scottish
Rite Temple in Balboa. Miss Sixie
Lee, Stoudnor will be installed as
Worthy Advisor at this time. The
program will begin at 7.30 p.m.
The public is cordially welcome.
Emblem Club
Holds Installation
The Cristobal Emblem Club No.
52 held their installation at the
Elk Home In Brazos Heights Sa Saturday
turday Saturday night. .' v
The Lodge hall was beautifully
decorated with, palm fronds, and
each station was banked with
purple agapanthus, in gold bas bas-kets,
kets, bas-kets, the emblematic colors of the
-Mrs- Ann Hentschel Supreme
District Deputy of Balboa Emblem
club No. 49, installed the new of officers,
ficers, officers, and the foUowing Supreme
Suit assisted: marshal, Mrs
Jeanette Cain past P r e s i d e n t,
Mrs T, J. Dee vice president,
Mrs. Dorothy La Croix chaplain
Mrs Ann Pennockv secretary, Mrs
Charlotte Tully guard, Mrs Adel Adelaide
aide Adelaide Seldon. ...
Mrs Fanny Kaplan was the re retiring
tiring retiring president, and the incom incoming
ing incoming officers were: president,. Mrs
Dotha Cougher Jr; past president,
Mrs Fanny Kaplan vice presid presid-ent
ent presid-ent Mrs Geraldine Cellucci fin fin-ancYal
ancYal fin-ancYal secretary Mrs Margaret
Larrison treasurer, Mrs Mary
Livingston. : recording secretary,
Mrs Jeanne Benson correspond corresponding
ing corresponding secretary, jMrs Manum White
3 year trusted; Mrs Jane Huld Huld-nuist
nuist Huld-nuist marshal, Mrs Helen Crow Crow-ell
ell Crow-ell asst. marshal, Mrs. B 1 1 U e
Crump chaplain; Mrs S e 1 ma
Wainio 'press correspondent, MM
ur,,pre firier historian, Mrs
Alberta Roth 1st guard, Mrs Ger -trude
Allgair 2nd guard, Mrs
Owen De Tore. v-
Mr Hentachel ..turned the, gavel.
, over to the new president M r s
Dotha Cougher at the close of in installation.
stallation. installation. Mrs Cougher then pre.
serited Mrs Fanny Kaplan the
' past president's pin. v
Mrs J W. Nelson furnished the
music, accompanied by Mrs Mar-
' guerite Schommer who sang some
beautiful selections. .
The Installation -was followed by
a buffet supper, and dancing to
the music of "Larry Lane..
Mrs Jane Huldquist- was the
Mistress of Ceremonies for the ev
ing. Mrs lluldquist Introduced Mr.
J -Relehan, Exalted Ruler and
Mr. George'Tully, District Deputy.
Jr. past president, Mrs Fanny
Kaplan and president, Mrs Dotha
:SfendlSoMrSHe
schel for a few words at the close
,' oU her .entertaining.';;:::::
Members and' guests' present
- were: Mr and Mrs; G. Bonzoumet,
Mr and' Mrs. P. Cahill, Mr. and
Mrs. J. Sarich, Mr and Mrs. J J-.'H.
.'H. J-.'H. Whit. Mr and Mrs. Wi W. Huff Huffman,
man, Huffman, Mr. and Mrs. J. Hentschel,
Mr and Mrs. G, A. Tully Jr., Mr
and Mrs. G. P. Allgaier, Mr and
Mrs E. H. Cougher, Mr and Mrs.
W. .F Russoo, Mr and Mrs. R F.
Huldquist, Mr and Mrs H. D.
Smith, Mr and Mrs L. A. Lam Lam-son,
son, Lam-son, Mr and Mrs D. E. Grler, Mr
and Mrs A. L; Livingston, Mr and
Mrs L.; Cellucci, Mr and Mrs S.
H. Crowell, Mr and Mrs R. .C.
Crump, Mr and Mrs M. M. La
Croix, Mr and Mrs D. Kapplan,
Mr and Mrs Louis, Mr and Mrs.
F. Day.' Mrs, H. V. Cain, Mrs, J. J.D.Lowe,
D.Lowe, J.D.Lowe, Mrs. P. P. Monaco, Mr.
end Mrs. L. L. Seldon, Mr. and
Mrs'T.'J.' Dee, Mr. and Mrs. R.
Wainio. Mr. and Mrs. F, J: Wainio,
Mrs. S. Wainio, Mrs. A. Rockhold.
Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Jones, Mr. Dan
Cellucci, Mr- and Mrs. J. Erlcgsm,
USGAIssiisGairi
For Candidates
In Coming Vote
Officers of the Election Com Committee
mittee Committee of the United States Cit Citizens
izens Citizens Association have extended
a further opportunity to ; its
members to- participate as can candidates
didates candidates in the election for dele delegates.
gates. delegates.
The officers have asked all
members who wish to become
candidates and active in the
work of the Association, to con contact
tact contact the chairman by calling
phone 2-2196 after 5 p.m. any
. day prior to Monday. Jan. 23.
Shortly after this date the bal ballots
lots ballots for voting will be mailed to
each member, with the closing
date tentatively set for mld mld-nieht,
nieht, mld-nieht, Jan. 31.
, This additional opportunity to
file for candidate is extended,
.an announcement said, because
it is believed 'that jome mem members
bers members were not reached in the orl orl-Rina
Rina orl-Rina irequest for candidates, tini
to vacation absence, or change
rf Siddress.
Trie "orsranlaztion has reqnest reqnest-"
" reqnest-" Cd trie"' fa!!' toopfratiorr-of -nil
in c tribe rs.- ;
The announcement added that
tlr.i. aid not permit attempts to
.m:K wrsonal contacts in this

Ott

tdrwiAc
'Continutd
Mr. and Mrs. Stinson, Mr. and Mrs.
R. Noperski, Mr. and Mrs. D. VV'ad VV'ad-dcll,
dcll, VV'ad-dcll, Capt. A. L. Livingston, Mrs.
M. Duncan, Mr! and Mrs. 1. Gaskil,
Mrs. J. W. Nelson, Mrs. N. M.
Schommer, Mr. and Mrs. E. H.
Benson, Mrs. J. M. Morrison, Mrs.
A. Pennock, Mr. and Mrs, R. E.
De Tore, Mr. and Mrs. T. G. Relih Relih-an,
an, Relih-an, and Mr, and Mrs. P. T. Roth.
Batea Decorating
Demonstratoin
A lecture on "Batea Decorating"
accompanied by an exhibition and
demonstration will be presented
by Arthur Mokray, inrecior w me i
USO-JWB Batea Decorating Qas Qas-ses,
ses, Qas-ses, at the USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center on Wednes-(
day, Jan. 25th at 7:30 p.m. I
A cordial invitation is extended
to alL to attend.. 7
Episcopal Church
Holds Annual Dinner
nn Mnnriav ovpninu the annual
dinner and meeting of the con-
gregauon 01 mc jdihov-ui"" hu
of Our Saviour-St. Margaret con convened
vened convened at the Parish Hall of St.
mat t, a i a vi., o
Z. One hundred and fifteen mem member
ber member were present to enjoy the cover-dish
dinner arranged by a com-,
mittee of which Mrs. Robert
Neely was chairman. She w as
assisted by Mesdames Harry V.
Cain, Charles E. Stepp, Clarence
H. Browne, Edgafd W. Millspaugh:
and the young ladles ofjhe parish.
Th mnptino was oDened with
prayer offered by the Rev. Milton
A. Cookson, rector, who presided
The Rev. John H. TOwnsend, D. D.,
was the guest speaker who pre presented
sented presented a comprehensive review, of
the extension of the Church's
work during the past ten years
the District of the Panama Canal
'nn. Nt9rima. Costa Rica. Co
lombia, Panama and the Canal
Zone) under tne ieaaersmp 01 me
bishop, The Rt. Rev, R. Heber
Gooden, S. T. D. v
The first action of the meeting
Was an unanimous vote 10 apply
for recognition as a Parish, with
r,A,aA 4a(MB St Marearet'S Mis''
sion' was erected this past year
and the first services ncia on &utj &utj-day,
day, &utj-day, Sept. 25, 1955. ';?::
The following men were elected
to serVe on the Vestry for 1956:
Dr. S. J. Aycock, Miehael F.
Greene, Hcbert O. Engelke John
Blennerhassett, Robert T. Thomas,
James B. Dorow, Capt. Robert
H. Emerick USN, Loren V. Mac
Kenzie, Sr., and Perry Francey.
Members of the new Vextry were
also elected as delegates and al alternates
ternates alternates to the Thirty-Sixth an annual
nual annual Convocation of the District
to be held at the Cathedral of St.
Luke, Ancon, on Saturday, Feb. 4.
.Reports were presented on the
work of the various organization
rfiirino tho Tiast vear: Church
Schools, Choirs, Woman's Auxilia
ry, Youth Fellowship, Acoiyie
HnlMa Parish Treasurer, and the
Rector's report to the congrega-
tion. A special commenoauon was
given to Capt. Jules F. Dietz for
his service as chairman of t h e
Building Committee and to Mr.
Virgil Reed. Dr, Townsend closed
the meeting with the Benediction.
Cassiopeia Lodge
To Inskll I!e7
Officers Monday K
L. O. A. S. (AU) F. S.. Will
conduct its 23rd, installation cer ceremony
emony ceremony Monday evening at the
Court Brock Lodge hall. The cer ceremony
emony ceremony will be conducted by Past Past-Master
Master Past-Master Norman H. Amburslcy.
Those elected .four the January January-December
December January-December 1956 term are: Leon V.
Deterville-Worthy Master, Edna
Samuels-Deputy Mistress, Wilfred
S. Scott-financial secretary,
Ernest P. Jarrett-assistant secreta secreta-tv
tv secreta-tv Tipnnis r.rant treasurer. Na
omi L. Steele and Sadie Morgan-
ngnt and lett Minsireis, respectiv respectively,
ely, respectively, Cacilda Greene and Lucy M.,
Todd-right and left Stewards, res respectively,
pectively, respectively, Cyril Davis c u 1 1 e r
Guard, Esteban Blanchard in inner
ner inner Guard, Fergus Bell-chaplain
and Ida McLean-chart guard.
Blanchard, Bell and Davis-thrustc-es,
V. Rex Archibold, Norman IL
Ambursley and St. V. C. Peterkii Peterkii-auditors.
auditors. Peterkii-auditors. : At the conclusion of the cere ceremony
mony ceremony a buffet will be served. The
ceremony will be preceded with
the Installation of the Light of
Cassiopeia Juvenile lodge, to
; which the parents of the, juveniles
are invited.
Creeks Ganging Up
On Rightist Chief
ATHENS, Jan. 19 UPV-A ''pop ''popular
ular ''popular front" alliance of six political
parties was formed today to op op-pose
pose op-pose Rightist Premier Konstantin
I Kararnanlis in next -month's Orwk
'elections. A joint communique said
i their chief purpose will be to "fi?,ht
;the Kiphtist government, establish
'a proportional electoral system
land re tore democra'ic libertirs."

By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Strcic

mj ;. A ssbj
SS9J A e KtJ
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wpts mog :
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You sometimes read in the text
books of a grand slam that can
be made only by wnat is known
as a triple coup. If you came to
the conclusion that such hands
never actually came up in play,
you wouldnt' be far wrong. Just
such a hand did, however, turn
up in the match between Norway
and Italy this year in the Eu European
ropean European Championships.
Both teams actually stopped
short at six hearts, but both trem trembled
bled trembled on the verge of bidding the
grand slam. If the grand, slam
had been bid. as shot in the bid
ding diagram, any ranking expert
would make the grand slam' by
means of ihe triple coup.
Dumy wins the first trick with
the ace of spades,, and the ace
nf hparts is taltpn tlpplarpr trots
to, his hand by ruffing a spade
in order to draw anotner round
of trupsr with the king,, ;
Sihpe West discards -a snarl e on
the second trump, the situation
is all too clear., ooutn must now
finrt snmp viv of nrevpntinff thp
:loss of a Irump: trick to East's
South must plan to ruff 'twice
mnrp in his own hand, after Whieh
thp ImH must hp nlarprf in the
dummy, eventually aast s trumps
will oe picKea up even tnougn
dummv cannot r lead" a trump
through 'him;:
After drawing the second -round
of: tramps with the : king,' South
continues with a club to the dum
my and a club ruff. He ges back
to dummy' with a' top diamond
to ruff another club, and then
dummy is re-entered with the sec
ond top diamond: Mow aummy
continues to lead 5 high clubs
through heart until he- trumps.
Whenever East trumps' the party
is over since South can overruff
and take the rest of the tricks
6 Joiled For Vote
Frauds In Chicago
CHICAGO: Jan: 19 fUP -U.S
District Judge Julius J. Hoffman
today impossed prison sentences of
three' to five years and fines up
to $4,000 on six men found guilty
of vote frauds in the November,
1954, congressional election here.
All were workers in the Chicago
r irst Ward. They were charged
with vote fraud conspiracy which
resulted in 71 fraudulent ballots
being cast in the election.
Compared with pre-war figures,
the number of passengers carried
on British Railways annually has
risen 32 per cent and the ton miles
of freight 40 per cent, while the
total of passengers transported is
over one billion.

tTTE FAN AMI AMERICA AN

2nd Blast Rocks Flaming Oil!

Tanker; Hulk Sinks To Bottom

v .. 0 .- : (Would bring $350. If the farmer is
LAKE CHARLES, La.; Jan. 19, He had sailed on the SalemP811 haU thl.s' heU et ?175-
(UP) A fully-loaded, 130,000 bar-; Maritime previously and had de- return f.ir th! tin. farmrr'
rel tanker, which was turned intocided to go back to sea. Two broth-! . a

a iurnace luesuay nigiii u.y s iiiuu
aerous explosion mi cauii uiauy
crewmcmbers aboard, has been
shaken by still anotner Diast.
At least two men. one of whom
n shin insneetor and not a

.mK. in fli;Hnu;arv RpvnnlH nf MaDlewood 1
Moe,I tTch5; rht cLt tur & iAiv7M&
blast Tuesday night. Coroner liar- near Lake tnaries. tie was sniP
ry Snatic said 24 or 15 other, men inspector who happened to be on

were listed as, missing.
Twenty-one crewmcmbers were
accounted for including eight who
a."T." :i" ; "rr.

S." lat i tot. of 000,OM bu it wai The farmer could sell the certifi certifi-The
The certifi-The hulk of 'the tanker. Cities expected to go far beyond that "tes back to CCC for cash Or
cot r'. V k Maritim. sai. Th. tankpr had iust loaded easo-lhe ake the commodities,

em. out of New York, settled on theihne and kerosene lor a z a.m. sau-i"

muddy bottom of Lake tnaries
harbor about 10 a.m. Shortly af
terward a hatch blew open, send sending
ing sending a new sheet of flame and black
smoke high into the air. No one
was injured in the second blast.
State ponce ana aepuiy snerms
set up roadblocks to keep persons
awav from the ship, which was
resting in two pieces on the bot
tom of the uacasieu mver.
Cities Service m New York re reported
ported reported that the Salem Maritime
left there with 41 men, including
her master, John Rugman, of Mil Milton,
ton, Milton, Mass., who was missing.
But there were at least iwo aa-
ditions to the crew en route here
and some dock workers were be
lieved among the missing.
One of the two bodies recovered
was identified as that of Joseph
Aauilana, 29. a messman of Port
Arthur, Tex.
Voting On Ifafural
Gas Bill Exfccbd
To M Vcci
WASHINGTON. Jan.-19' (UP)
Senate Democratic Leader Lyndon

B. Johnson expressed hope today dicated they wil pass, leg slation
the Senate can begin voting on the, today to convert their 120,000 120,000-natural
natural 120,000-natural gas bill by the end of next! man police army into a full-fledg-week
,ed Wehrmacht :
. The new "people's army" would
Johnson, praising the senators I be included in the east bloc "NA "NA-for
for "NA-for the "night plane" of debate! TO" headed by, Soviet Marshal
thus far, emphasized he was not -Ivan Koniev.
calling for any" debate limit on the . .''" tA:
measure to exempt independent! '"Th .?ast German radio mdi mdi-natural
natural mdi-natural gas producers from direct! cated !?e cUm inay be taken
federal regulation. when the Peoples Chamber, the
Rut h PvnrpRp1 hnn fh- vnf. lower house of East Germany s

ing stage may be reached by late(fubber-stamp Parliament

pext week. The Senate debated tne
measure for the third day today.
Johnson said the time element is
completely in control of the Sen Senate"
ate" Senate" and there is no other pres pressing
sing pressing legislative business awaiting
the lawmakers.
Johnson said advance prrdictions
the bill would lead to bitter, party-splitting
debate among Demo Democrats
crats Democrats have not come true. Demo Democrats
crats Democrats from gas producing states
generally support the measure and
those from consuming states op oppose
pose oppose it. Republicans for the most
part are keeping quiet,
i Fate of the bill, already passed
by the House in somewhat differ different
ent different form, is in doubt. It probably
will hinge largely on the debate
and pressure on uncommitted sen senators,
ators, senators, -'
Opponents claim the measure
would add hundreds of millions of
dollars annually to consumer gas
bills. Backers claim the consumer
will be protected through increas increased
ed increased production.
Sen. Price Daniel D-Tex. a sup supporter
porter supporter of the bill, told the Senate
today the "surest way" to increase
consumers' gas bills would be to
continue federal regulation of nat natural
ural natural gas producers.
Daniel said the key to consumer
prices lies in increased procution.
He said removal of controls would
spur producers to search for new

gas wens ana an ampie nuppiy
8 A L
SATURDAY ONLY!
r
THE STC3Y CFTKE PRISCN
HTBinrl 11
lit
' -ji .HiiK!:iin,y;r
wuKinat k'mim
a tnier't Vitst mutim!
STil-Cni mum m wir V,
LATE SHOWS
DIABLO HEIGHTS

will keep consumer prices Iow,"!erior to allied tanks in NATO.

"'VQ WAY CUT"":

INPF.rEXUFNT PIIT SrWSFAPtR

ir i iw ioujv mm iu mc 1."
line uuv i u.w. i jwi
time to get on board and stow his
gear away when it blew up.
nt' v iHVn.in athat o
tentatively identified
Two barges and two docks were
j a Krio tho tinker
hnord

it current market prices.lficld made a runoff unneccessary.l"

ung.
Seaman Joseph Kelo a d i 0, of ;

Jacksonville, Fla., who was injur- The wheat he might feed to bis
ed, was in his bunk when the shiplcnickens. Cotton isn't edible, but
blew up. , it might be used to plug up cracks.
"I ran to the fantail and there Assuming' this Is all clear, turn
was a machinist," he said. l now to the second or "conserva "conserva-don't
don't "conserva-don't remember who he was. He i tion reserve," part of this pro pro-spoke
spoke pro-spoke briefly and decided to jump, igram

I don't know whether he did or
wnetner ne even suiviveu. v
. .
swam downstream w try bimij
keep ahead of the flames that were i
SDreadina all over the water ar-
ound the ship. I had to keep
mg water over my neaa oecause-
of the intense heat of the flames
around me.

... .j. ;i tu .hiw -v,,n.!inree-year lor mayoe lonaen con-

"I milllP II MriHK Llir Dllll .1IUU I
whee I thought I wouldn't make!0
'it."
last German Reds
7ii Convert Army
jlnlo A Vehrms

ni hut ther. was a time or twoltra with you to take more land

precisely,. But President Eisenhow
BERLIN, Jan. 19 (UP) InefJ total fieures of 350-million

East German Communists have in
meets
to approve a friendship pact witti
Communist China and "pass oth other
er other laws."
One of the other laws probably
will establish the "people's army."
It had been demanded in a cam-
paign of "spontaneous resolutions
suDmittea to tne cnamoei
groups throughout the Soviet zone
J More than 100,000 persons pa paraded
raded paraded in East Berlin Sunday In a
well-organized demonstration urg urging
ing urging creation of such an armed
force.
It In a regular newscast, last
night, the East German radio said:
"The People's Chamber of : the
German Democratic Republic to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow will discuss the friendship
pact with the People's Republic
of China."
"The delegates also will pass a
number of laws. In the last few
days the People's Chamber has
received resolutions and petitions
demanding establishment of a pow powerful
erful powerful people's army for defense of
the-German Democratic Republic."
Western officials said it now was
clear the Communists plan to con convert
vert convert their" seven police army divi divisions
sions divisions into a Red wehrmacht.
The police army has a force of
approximately iuu,uuu lucu. t""
an air force and navy-of 10,000
men each. It is equipped with more
than 1,000 Soviet-made tanks, some
of them reported heavier and sup-
B OA
Sunday & Monday!
CLSA Itrwax
EXPLOSIVE PRODUCTION OF I
my.
1
vex
C1NEMA5COPU
WMCC0lC.tKMiC&O I i
FRIDAY 10:30 P M.
II MARGARITA
T 1

Peter Edson

I (Continued from Pare 2)
reduced
Kit (hiAN nHnii Yf
land averaged two thirds of a bale
"j witvc v ta. Ai Li 1 m 1
to the acre, at $175 a bale, its croDi
this reserve acreage in any cash
cron and not to raiop llvKtnclf nn 1
ha"a. "l J?
.1 J 1-
." ,tX: I.'1
s grass, to hold the soil, I

r Hieni wouiu not oe in casn, i yesieraay s tiemocrauc primary.
b0W but irt Commodity Creditlthe only ejection Uiat counts in
rorD01.ation "certifiratpa koierf'thi iiatp cav fnrmpr r.nv Farl
vest" 'LMIS.? li

- ---- --- -- ;
J helv'
government-held sur
alcnt amount of j
urplus wheat (or!
jhold them on his farm for a price
V'. ;T; 1 ...
r,se-
Tnls is applicable to all the rest!
of the land the farmer has under:

regardless of crop lin thM 7
uniilrt pven hp ann irah p in Now ; ..... . .,. .:. I

,,- ,n, ihn l,,!,,
- "::, v'i t" "r":
""f" 6 ."V,c f"'
throw-'nment would say to t armor John
L"The government will make a
three-year (or maybe longer) con
.
01 proaucuon.

It must not be planted in othertne si0t machine-buster who as

leash crops or grazed
For the first year, President Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower says the government will
pay "a fair share of the costs
I of Dlantine this land in trees or
! grasses, or building rainfall catch I
i basins to conserve tne sou. inere inere-j
j inere-j after the government would pay
'the farmer annually to keep this
land m reserve.
These payments are not staled
er's total figures of 350? million
dollars to take. 25 million acres
out of. production the first year
would average $14 an acre,
The exact amount will vary from
region to region, based on past
production. So it Farmer John put
25 acres more in conservation re reserve,
serve, reserve, at an average $14 an acre,
he could collect $350 the first
year, possibly less in succeeding
years. This, with the $175-$180 from
the first part of the plan, would
give him a total take of $525. This
is an average. A separate calcula calculation
tion calculation would have to be made for
every one of America's six million
farms choosing" to take part in
the soil bank plan.
An elaborate locomotive and car-
testing plant is being constructed
on British nanways to oniam
i r f of t- pei.ormance of
roiline slock w a wide range if
speed in all
conditions.
weather and track
NC TONC sve9
CHINESE DISHES
at El Rancho Garden
S P.M. ON
Keop them one
jump alidad!
Having fun and playing playing-hard,
hard, playing-hard, children constantly
burn up energy. ROYAL'
' GELATIN helps replace it.
" ROYAL GELATIN is simple
L to make... thrifty, tool
7 glorious
"fresh fruit" flavors I

1

v

! Brother Of Late 'Kingfish'

Wins Sweeping

- 0 x 1
NEW ORLEANS, Jan. 19 (UP)lspecches in Loubiana's Vast
Louisian reversed its political Icountrv.
field yesterday and returned solid-! "But we won't be' raiding

crossroaas govern mem,
1UUI
fish
I1M1 LUI1K BI1U
f i

now esonused bvlenc tn tho nl mnih inn;,i

Ms brother.
Almost complete returns
from!
primary

four opponents in the contest fori"18 'hat f Politicians wonder-
governor. His majority over the j ,n." ne W1 s,1,ck. with the nation-

.
ivni, i oio r u .(.. on

precincts reporting, Long had 391(bord.s UP b?.Mj Kennon ;
380 votes to 177,248 for New Orleans ministration would have to go.

Mayor Delesseps Morrison: 90,032
i for Fred T. Preaus; 57.G61 for
rrancis t. ureveniDcrg ana 4j,7U
lor James AlcLemore.
Long took on the dotnifiant per
cnnalitin'te anH icenna fhat ham fur.

ured in state government in thejPnslbIP ,1 him, ?hai
TO vpare cinptf hia hrnthpi wfle act 1 Want It,

sassinated and bested them all
JH.W ..VV ..."

Morrison was the "boy wonder", Cnnf Will PrnKo
r.f Wa, Orlnono nAl!ii.e etui ron. VvllUIC If III I I UUW

. li.- u r.-.u-i:.
state. Preaus was the choice
V
Gov, Robert Vt Kennon, the "Ei
senhower Democrat" whose crush-
sonhower E
:ng victory
over a -Long candidate
I four years ago appeared to spell
I the end of the family's hold on

(the state. McLemore'was said toiturers possibly amounting to "tern
have nad the support of the ardent!of millions of dollars;"' iZ

u-,,. v-j ...nnnrt
.hihiv iihu vwv umiwui
iPr0 segre?ation group, the "soutli-
crn Gentlemen." Grcvemberg was
state police chief gave bct-loving
Louisiana its first big gambling
clean-up,
One of Long's first victory quot
es dealt with gambling.
"There ain t going to be no big
time gambling" in Louisiana while
I'm governor," he said in the back
woods drawl he used for stump

'shdirisG at your service center
. THEATERS TONIGHT!

BALBOA 6:15 8:05
.H.iONniTioNrn
1 m A mrrmm h
fiii n u r
vii iif.iir .11
iiuif liii
Trldiy "Strtni Wore A Gun

Iff I! I?f LI i: m

fi JOAN T VTVICA

' i
RICTOD A I Robert MITCIIUM Olivia de HAVTIXAND
SK22!dL : "NOT AS A STRANGER"
:IS S:3d - Ffldiy "SHOTGt'N"
1 1
PARAISO 6:15 7:401 IU BOCA I'M
"SCCARFOOT" I. j"Firemen Save My Child'
SANTA CRUZ 6:15 $:3() ICAMP BIERD 6:15 7:50
"SKABENGA" II "Care of The Outlaws"

f i
2 ls'

nn
J L J
;.
.Yl thr'i t big differenct
in ih Karor of Hcioz Mus
urd . not too sharp .V. not
too wild ml right, with
Hcint flavor, Heinz quality.
he ir tit
mum mmm

Yin

TAGf 5TVFN

Victory In La.
up
no
Dingo games or cnurch socials,

King-.either," he said. That was a refer-

(custom of raffles and bingo games
io raise civic or cmiren tunds
vj.v,vmutn via-&vu uunn
Long also made a curious re-'
"wiuc aic in me coming ;
election year, lie said tne state

"They're nothing .hut surkholes;
of graft and waste," he said. I'm,;.,
going to sec to it that those guvs

lare responsible to me the gov'.
ernor, That s the way Eisenhow-
er operates. He's got euvs re-rt.
s the way-
a
AUtO UVCr LflOrgCS
- : ......

WASHINGTON. Jan. 19 (UPW
Sen. A. S. Mike Monroney, D.
Okla. today announced heari n g s!, ;
starting tomorrow on alleged ov-

ercharges by automobile manufac-
He said that, allhoiiffh rar ar
assembled in many parts of tin?
nation, .some manufacturers al
legedly are charging for shipping
an cars rrom Detroit: I ?

The second largest telescope in
the world, second only to that at

'Mount Palomar in California, h&vsu"
i been unveiled at Hamburg,
Germany. 3

DIABLO IITS. 6:15 7:55 ;
Bud ABBOTT and
LOU COSTE1 1.O. in
"RIO RITA"
Friday "SKABK N(i.V
GATUN 1:00
"ESCAPE TO BURMA"
Frl. "VANISHING PRAIRIE"
MARGARITA 6:15
S:25
Kirk DOUGLAS
Lana TURNER
"Bad and The Beautiful"
............
Frl. "TEN WANTED MEN"
n
o

jj,,,,, iaH I'll lil iiliina V iwt" 'n''a
- ; ,' "i I

4

S t
1 i



TZE FAXAMA AMERICAJS AN 1ST E P E NT' FNT BAILT NIW5PAPP3
THt'RSOAT, JANUARY 13, 133S
(UiiD
"7 Tj 7!
!
-'V: '

p.m;e ru.ni

Spur Cola Increases Lead
AVith 2 Wins Over Yankees
t IIIB 0 .p -
-' By J. J. HARRISON JR.
-! ' A battered Carta Vicja club, still licking the
wounds inflicted by the Spur Cola Sodamen last
'night, will attempt to get back into the Pro League
race when they tangle with the Chesterfield Smok Smokers
ers Smokers in a single game at the Olympic Stadium tonight
at 7:30. ,
Last night the Sodamen took both ends of a dou dou-bleheader
bleheader dou-bleheader from the Yanks, 9 to 6 and 10 to 2. TUe
victories boosted the Sodamen's lead to three games
over the Smokers and dumped the Yankees further
down in the cellar, four and one-half games behind.

Yankee manager Al Kubski
will start Bill Harris, the ace of
his mound staff, while. Smoker
pilot oJe Nachio has assigned
Humberto Robinson to do the
twirling. V...
Harris and Robinson were both
winners in their last appear appearances.'
ances.' appearances.' Bill beat the Smokers 4
io 1 Sunday morning in David,
elving up only three hits, for
his third triumph. .
The Smokers, behind Robby,
won out over the Yankee 3 to
1 the day before. Humberto a -lowed
six hits In picking up his
fourth win.
' The' last time they opposed
. n ti in a tPi-rif-
lc duel ensued with the Yanks
winning out 2 to 1.
The property of the Milwau Milwaukee
kee Milwaukee Braves, Robinson isje isje-ported
ported isje-ported to have returned nil
1958 contract to the Braves
front office, unsized, became
he was offered the "nim-j
major league salary ?60u0
per year. ...
.Robinson spent most of 1955
with Toledo, Class AAA Ameri Ameri-c
c Ameri-c an Association, after beginning
the season with the parent
Braves. ...
He won 14 games with Toledo
tnd moved up to Milwaukee near
the end of the season to finish
up with a 3-1 record.
Last night in the first game
the Yankees seemed to be on
their way to a victory with a 5,
i lpqrf m the third inning,
but the tide began to change in
A1 :
m
4 Ml
; f
'fit
!
Lloyd Mangrum
.
' JELLO, THERE Out for
nmfe than a year because of
Cli :..',.;g and separated ribs, foyd
J ngrum served notice on the
touring golf professionals that he
" was back in the thick of things
bymaking every tee a winning
ona in the $30000 Los Angeles
C; cn with 272 for the holes.
7crv tncanlo
WAHOO! $115.00
i Z In Cinemascope
--1 Spencer Tracy, in
" "BROKEN LANCE"
-. Plus: Glenn Ford, in
' "FOLLOW THE SUN'
J5
Todc IDEAL .70
I David Farrar, in
."OBSESSED
.10
Allan Nixon, In
PREHISTORIC WOMEN"

the third when the Sodamen tal
lied three times to come to with

in one run of tying the score.
When the Yanks got in an another
other another marker in the top of the
fourth to make the score 8 to 4,
things looked bad for the Soda Sodamen.
men. Sodamen. But in their half of the
same inning, they crossed the
plate twice to deadlock the game
at six-all.
ttn the bottom of the fifth,
with two outs, Clarence Moore
singled and stole second. He
trotted in ahead of Herman
Charles later when the lnfield lnfield-er
er lnfield-er blasted a long homer over the
left field fence to put the Soda Sodamen
men Sodamen out front 8 to 6.
Hector Lopez' fifth homer in
the sixth accounted for the fi final
nal final run.
Winning pitcher was Stan Stanley
ley Stanley Arthurs, who took over
from Carlos Thorne in the
third inning, Thorne came to
the mound in the same stanza
to relieve starter Jim Tuger Tuger-son.
son. Tuger-son. Arthurs got his first win.
In the afterpiece, Vibe rt
Clarke breezed to his second win
as his mates gave him three
runs in the first. They were
never headed after that.
Carta Vieja's Ed Monahan was
the loser in the nightcap, drop dropping
ping dropping his second decision against
three victories. Art Sewell made
his Panama League debut in
this game and was touched for
five runs, two of them unearned,
in the elgthh Inning.
Toronto Buys
Don Johnson
i" i It a-
From Orioles
TORONTO, Ont., Jan. 19 (UP)
General manager Rudy Schaffer
tonight announced the Toronto
Maple Leafs' purchase of right right-handed
handed right-handed pitcher Don Johnson
from the Baltimore Orioles of
the American League for an un undisclosed
disclosed undisclosed sum. .... : :
,, Johnson had an outstanding
year with the Leafs in 1953,
wnen he was the International
League's leading pitcher with an
earned run average of 2.67 and
in 41 games, won 15 and lost 12,
fanning 148 opposing batters.
But his 1955 record with Balti Baltimore
more Baltimore was two wins and four
losses.
Schaffer said: "Don's right
arm is going to be a big help to
us this year and we hope he'll
come up with a year as he had
with us in '53."
Saddler Retains
126-Pound Title
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. IP IP-CUP)
CUP) IP-CUP) World featherweight
champion Sandy Saddler last
night successfully defended his
126-pound crown by TKO'ing
Flash Elord of the Philippines
in 59 seconds of the 13th
round. Both fighters tipped
the scales at 125 pounds at
the weigh-in.-..,-,..,
A profusely bleeding cut,
over Elorde's left eye caused
referee Ray Flores to stop the
contest. On three previous oc occasions,
casions, occasions, the referee had per permitted
mitted permitted the contest to continue
after an examination of the
cut by the Boxmg Commis Commission's
sion's Commission's doctor.
The referee and two judges
all had Saddler ahead 67 to
65 at the end of the fight.
The United Press scorecard
had it Saddler 68, Elorde 64.
Elorde drew blood from Sad Saddler's
dler's Saddler's nose in the ninth and
it continued to bleed to the
finish. Sandy also ha" a slight
cut over his right eye.
The large crowd repeteadly
booed Saddler's foul and
roughhouse tactics.
Opn Nightly from
f :00 p.m.
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER-
CIIUCK-A-LUat
SLOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
ir-C.nndltionrd Rlor

Mossadeq Early
Choice To Vhip
Empire Honey

The Stud Miura's classy little
Chilean-bread chestnut colt
Mossadeq today was the eariy
favorite to defeat the Cua'dra
Dona Merce's big English -bred
black horse Empire Honey in
their scheduled match-race Sun Sunday
day Sunday afternoon as the result oi
his brilliant five furlong work workout
out workout yesterday morning at the
Juan Franco race track.
Mossadeq, which will be rid
den by King Flores, carried the
latter over the five furlong
distance in 1:04 4-5 on the
still slow racing strip. How However,
ever, However, the most eye-popping
thing about the spin was, the
12 2-5 for the final furlong
down the homestretch.
Last .Saturday both horses
worked out over the one mile
distance. Empire Honey was
beaten bv stablemate Albatross
In 1:53 doing the last furlong
in 15 3-5. A short while later
Mossadeq turned the same dis distance
tance distance in identical time. However,
Mossadeq was even more wobbly
at the fnish than Empire Hon
ey finishing the final eighth in
16 1-5. Empire Honey has not
been given a fast workout since
last Saturday.
The scheduled match race is
listed as the tenth on Sun Sunday's
day's Sunday's program. The race will
be over a distance of one mile
ami five-s'xteenth. Roth horses
will tote 126 pounds, Guiller Guiller-mo
mo Guiller-mo Sanchez will do the boot boot-in
in boot-in aboard Empire Honey.
Claudio Endara, Mossadeq's
owner, and Ricardo Miro, owner
of Empire Honey, have botn de
posited checks for $1,000 with
track manaeer Alberto de Oba Oba-rrlo
rrlo Oba-rrlo as a side bet. The track
management a d d e d Incentive
with a ?i,ooo winner-take an
purse.
AT THEIR FINGERTIPS I
Scotty Gncsheimer jumps high!
to score with a fingertip shot J
for Ohio University as Ja'ckj.
Smith of Western Michigan at-;
tempts to block it. J
Panama Insurance
Fishing Awards
Winners Announced
- The Panama Insurance Com
pany's fishing- awards for the
year 1955 have just announced
by the Awards Committee of the
Panaam. Rod & Reel Club which
met with a representative of the
Insurance company. Three
catches are new Panama Bay
records.
Largest Marlin men's" class class-was
was class-was caught by John J. McCon McCon-aghey.
aghey. McCon-aghey. It was a 901 lb. black
marlin caught near Cocos Pt. in
November, a new Panama Bay
record.
Largest marlin women's class
award goes to Velma A. Burk Burk-hart
hart Burk-hart for her 698 3-4 lb. black
marlin caught near Bona on
Aug. 1st, another new Panama
Bay record. Mrs. Burkhart also
receives the award for the larg largest
est largest sailf ih in the women's class,
another new Bay record. Her
155 lb. sail caupht between Pi Pi-nas
nas Pi-nas and Las Perlas in December
gives her this record.
Largest sailfisri men's class
goes to Lt. Col. Eugene P.
Richter for his 145 lb. sail caught
in the Perlas Islands in July.
The award for the most out outstanding
standing outstanding catch of the year will
be decided at a later meetine
attended by reoresentatives of
the leading fishing clubs of the
Isthmus.- Da te for Ihe actual ar
warding of trophies will be an announced
nounced announced -soon, while in the
meantime the names of the win winners
ners winners will be engraved on Uie
permanent trophies on display
at Hotel El Fnnama all year
rounj.

-.tj
- vu m I
.....
v V

Navy Plays Powells Tonight;
Tars Nip CHS To Widen Lead

p;,'.'
'" ':...
t

, (NEA Telephotc)
NAMED BY PLAYERS Between halves of the Pro Bowl Gertie
at Los Angeles, Harlo nHlll, who played end for the West, is
awarded the Jim Thorpe Memorial Trophy by Virsl! Plnkley
(right), publisher of the Los Angeles Mirror-News. Hill, of the
Chicago Bears, was elected Pro Player of the Year by the pro
players themselves in a poll conducted by NEA Service. The
East defeated the West, 31-30. :

College Cage Scores

' SOUTH
Wm & Mary 81 Virginia Military
Scwanee 76 Miss State 72
Bridgewater 81 Randolph-Macon
Milligan 83-Emory & Henry 70
Nnrthi.at T. 73 Delta State 69
East Tenn 70 David Lipscomb 63
Frostburg 67 fotomac a
Benedict 77 Morris Brown 66
Virginia State 85-West ,Va SU
Rollins 83 Tampa 71 :. 1
EAST
Hnlv Cross 81 Dartmouth 67
Colgate 84 Hobart 62
Niagara 84 Toronto tmiv. oo
AlfroH 7Riiffaln fN.Y.t TchrS 67
St. Bonaventure 83-Sampson AFB
70
WnclminefKr R7 WaKh-.Tftfl 55
Connecticut 93 New Hampshire 56
Slipper Rock 65-California (a.) 75
Williams 82 Massacnuseus oa
Gannon (Pa.) 62 -Thiei a
Grove City 77-Clarion 73
Baboson 65 Gordon si
MIDWEST
Cincinnati 71-Xavier (O.) 66
Western Reserve 83 Case w
Hiram fi5Finn 4 ((!.) 57
Hope 82 Michigan Normal 76
Beloit 77 Carroll 55
Missouri Vallev 68 Wm. Jewell 62
BaTcer 78 Ottawa 71
llamline 95 Gustavos Adlphus 79
Souttern- 84 Huron 74
Pgnnni fin Simnsnn fi2
Yankton 82-Gcn Beadle Tchrs 78
Mankato 90 Augsburg 70
St. Olaf 85-Carleton 73
Macalester 82 Minnesota uuium
60
Jamestown 101-Bismarck 76 ,,
Ball State 106 St. Josephs 67
Greenbille (111.) 100-Shurtlcff 91
Huntington 95 Concordia 88 m
Indiana Central 85 Franklin 70
Vincennes 107 Lincoln Bible 61
Butler 66 Indiana State 64.;
Oberlin 85 Otlerbein 77
Miami (O.) 93-Ohio Univ. 70
Ohio Northern 93 Cedarville 71
Defiance 106-Findlay 100
Muskingum 95 Ohio Wesleyan 84
Adrian ,76 Alma li ......
"'"""SOUTHWEST"" T"
East Texas 66 Sam Houston State
AbUene Christian 69 McMurry 55

If yvu'ra buylna. wRIbj, Mntinf .'

th Wont Ad.
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FAR WEST
Seattle 89 Oklahoma City 84.

Idaho State 63 Colorado State 54
Regis 88 Gonzaga 83.
San Diego State 59 Redlands 55
St., Marys (Calif.) 73-Humboldt 42
Santa Clara 72 Fresno State 69
Rocky Mt. (Mont.) 95 North Mont.
2 t
West Montana 82 Montana Mines
83
San Jose St. 61 College of Pacific
32
Portland Uuv. 74-Portland St. 58
. HIGH SCHOOL
Pompano Beach 64 Vero Beach 48
Belle Glade 68 Clewiston 50
Palm Beach 64 Riverside Military
57
Central Catholic 54 St. Ann's 31
Miami Edison 53 Miami Jackson
43
Seacrest 46 Lake Worth 34
Fort Pierce 72 Stuart 52
Archbishop Curley 49 South Dade
30 '
Jort Lauderdale 63 Miami Tech
61
Sanford 54 Palatka 48
Titusville 58 Lyman 42
Inverness 56 Bushnell 40 5
Apopka 73--Eustis 28 '
Groveland 52 Tavares 32 -Wildwood
69 Webster -32
Lake Wales 69 Webster 32
Lake Wales 69 Wauchula 41
Orl. Edgewater 74 Day, Bch 1
Seab'ze 73
Jacksonville Paxoh 49 Ocala 4'
Auburndale 89 Fort Meade 57
Winter Park 80 Lakeview 56
Deland 67 Bunnell 48 V
Umatilla 59 Mount Dora 30
Sebring 48 Frostproof 42
Orlando Boone 64 Lakeland 57
Bronson 35 Chiefland 34
Trenton 58 Bell 39
Cedar Key 50 High Springs 25
Mayo 99 Greenville 63
Ovied 77 Clermont 18 -'.
Live Oak 70 Monticello 48 ;
Jax Bch Fletcher 68-rSt. Aug.
Ket'n's 60
Bald win 57 St.' George, Ga. 43
Baker County 40 Hilliard 30
Reddick 64 Williston 50
Fort McCoy 72 Hawthorne 37 i
Gainesville 69 Lake City 3?
Seville 55 St, Augustine D&B 65
New Smyrna Bch 75 Crescent City
49
Jax Bishop Kenny 49 Jax Du
Pont 47
Jax Lee 58 Day Bch Mainland 37
Miami Beach 61 M. Patrick 51
North Miami 53 Hialeah 38.
St. Theresa 3ft Coral Shores 17
Miami High 82 Coral Gables 47
Costs Less To Sell
a House This V7av!
Toa Mil It fatt vou gaf vou:
ariea you Mil ft ttt ln cmt tf
yea whan you run tittl Wan'
Ad in Hit Panama American
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pXtTA'tXA
AMERICAN

STANDINGS

W L Pet.
.2 0 1.000
.0 t l .000
.0 1 .000

Navy
(C.HJS.-Powella games pre previously
viously previously reported in standings
ruled no-game and tobe re replayed)
played) replayed) Tuesdays' Results
Navy 3, CHS. 2 (? innings).
Tonight's Game
Navy vs. Powells
The Atlantic side rains reced-
ed long enough Tuesday night
and the Atlantic Twilight League
fans were treated to .another
thrilling game. This time it was
the Navy nine, presentiy ieague-
leaders and strong contenders
for the 1956 championship, and
the underdog Cristobal High
ocnool team.
. After being mute witnesses to
a few exhibition games be
tween each of the teams in the
loon and Army Atlantic and in
which the Soldiers outplayed
each of the three teams, nardly
a few of the Gold Coast fans
expected the game that they did
see at Mt. Hope Stadium Tues
day.
Clemens started on the hill
for the Navy and though be
allowed only three hits in 7
and 1-3 innings, he was lifted
In the eighth in favor of Hep Hep-pelftnr
pelftnr Hep-pelftnr who shut out Cristobal
for the final extra-inninr and
two thirds, to take credit for
the win when Navy pushed a a-cross
cross a-cross the winning tally in the
ninth.
fiaoan went the route
for the losers ana pitcned gooa
enough ball to be a winner al almost
most almost nnv nitrht. but Tuesday.
Bazan was nicked for 7 scat
tered safeties, including a tnnie
in 'th .ninth "tnat sneiien ne-
feat Piemen sent 11 C.H.S.
batters back via the strike out
rnnt and Henoelfinc added
three to that total. Bazan struck
out 10 Navy batters. ;
PrUfnhai rlrew first Wood In
the top of the fifth; Concepcon
oDened by drawing a want ana
Newhard singled to center to
li-ootv th -faliv alive Roth-run
ners advanced on a wild pitch.
and wnue cnarne jt ears was rbi
tins s Hf on an error bv Naw
third-baseman, Schuster, both
runners scored. But Navy lost
no time tying it all up in their
half of the fifth on an infield
sincle bv Zaletel, an 'error by
Cristobal s pitcher. Bazan ana a
squeeze bunt by Rhodes.
Both teams battled evenlv
until the bottom of the ninth
when, with two down, Zaletel
tripled to right field, scoring
moments later while Schuster
was at bat on an error by
Cristobal's backstop, Charlie
Fears.
Zaletel was the leading hitter
of the night with 3 hits in five
trips, including what proved to
be the game winning blow, while
Concepcion led the Cristobal at
tack wth a pair of hits.
Tonight the oeiending cnam-
pions, Powells, will try to avenge
the defeat suffered at the hands
of Navy on opening day. Fans
will not soon forget the 6 to 5
win by Navy that day, in a game
that went two extra-innings be-
for j a decision: could be reach
ed. -. ..
So far only two official games
have been completed In the At
lantic Twilleht League, and both
have gone extra innings. The
other games, exnioitlon contests
against Army, have not been
quite the same story. Noel Gib
son, Powells playing manaeer
and Steve Sobkowlak will take
to the hill as they both did on
opening day. to match pitches
for this "big" one.
Along The Fairways
Royal Monnted Ringer completed
At Summit
The Royal Mounted Rineer
Tournament at the Summit Hills
uou ciub was completed Sat
urday and Bud Myers was the
last player to cash in on the
weekly prize. He collected two
bottles of the sponsor's product
with a net seventy, even par.
me oest score or the week.
There never was much doubt
about the low gross prize. It
went to Howard Tettenburn with
a 62. Tet also collected for the
most birdies (8) and for the
best In nine (39). He get3 a
total of six botles of Royal
Mounted Whiskey.
Randy Waites. the cash res
lster expert from the Instrument
repair shop copped off four bot
tle" of whiskey.
Other players who sahred In
tne loot were: Ben wunams. a
bottles for second low gross and
the best initial score. Leo Ebe Ebe-renss,
renss, Ebe-renss, 2 bottles for third 1 o w
gross and the best out nine. Ebe Ebe-renz
renz Ebe-renz matched Tettenburn's In
I nine with a 39. Doc Anderson
I collected two bottles for his sec sec-!
! sec-! ond low-net and Buff Myers -got
i a Dome tor third low net.
The Tournament Committee
Wishes to thank the distributors
'of Royal Mounted for sponsor sponsor-!inr
!inr sponsor-!inr the tournament. The pvh.es
Ul be awarded v!r.y t nooti.

PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
Teams Won Lost Pet. GB
Spur Cola 13 8 .619
Chesterfield ............... 11 12 .478 3
Carta Vieja 9 : 13 .409 4
LAST NIGHTS RESULTS (2) Olympic Stadium
Spur Cola 9-10, Carta Vieja 6-2
TONIGHT'S GAME (Olympic Stadium)
Carta Vieja (Harris 3-3) vs. Chesterfield
s Robinson 4-4)
Game Time: 7:30

Double
(First Game)
Carta Vieja AB
Bartirome, lb ....4
Shantz, 2b .......4
Porter, If 3
Dickens, 3b 3
Phillips, rf ....... 4
Wilhelm, ss ......4
Kropf, cf .........2
Dabek, c .........3
Hockenbury, p ...2
Hlggins, p ....... 1
R HPO A'
i i l l
0 0
I 2
2' 1 1
2 2 0
1 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
0 0
30 6 7 18
Spur Cola
Moore, ss ...... ..,.4 113
Charles, 3b 3 3 3 0
Glenn, cf ........3 2 15
Lopez, 2b .........3 2 12
Kellman, e ...... .2 1 1 6
Grenald, If 4 0 0 1
P. Osorio ,rf .,...4 0 12
Gordon, lb ...... .3 0 2 3
Tugerson, p ......0 0 0 0
Archie
Brathwaite' ...'...0 0 0 0
C. Thorne, p .....0 0 0 0
Arthurs, p 2 0 0 0
23 9 10 22 6
Archie Brathwaite hit sacri sacrifice
fice sacrifice fly for Tugerson in 2nd.
Score by Innings t
C. Vieja .,...302 100 06 7 3
S. Cola .....013 221 x 9 10 i
Summary
RBI's: Dickens 2. Wilhelm,
Archie Brathwaite, Kropff Hoc-
Kenoury, Keiiman 3, uoraon,
Charles 2, Lopez. Earned runs:
Carta Vieja 4, Spur Cola 7, Left
on bases: Carta Vie a 8. Spur
Cola 7. Home runs: Charles, Lo Lopez.
pez. Lopez. Two base hits: Porter. Bar
tirome, Hockenbury, Kellman.
Sacrifice hits: Archie Brath
waite, Kropf, Kellman. Stolen
bases: Kropf, Moore. Hit by
pitch: C. Thorne (Dabek). Wild
pitch: C. Thorne. Struck out by:
Hockenbury 1. by Arthurs 5.
Base on balls off: Hocicenbury
4, off: C. Thorne 1, Arthurs 2.
Pitchers record: Tugerson : 3
runs, 4 hits in 4 innings; Thor Thorne
ne Thorne 2 runs, 1 hit in 2-3 inning;
Hockenbury 6 runs, 7 hits m 3
1-3 innings. Errors: Spur Cola 4
(Moore, Charles, Lopez, oren-
ald). Carta Vieja 3 (Wilhelm 2,
Dickens). Losing pitcner: Hlggins-
(2-2). Winning pitcher:
Arthurs (1-1). Umpires: Thorn Thornton,
ton, Thornton, coppin, Williamson. Time
of game: 2:35.-" ;

OUT OF POORS uith &

Bean Jut Aren't THAT Big
BY WARREN PAGE
i Shooting Editor ;
on thp wav dnwn from Maine
last year we parked alongside a
hunter who had a fat black bear
lashprl alnnffsirlft his buck. He was
mighty proud of it, too, and pas-
ded us the mlormauon mas we
information that the b'ar weig
hed 550 pound.
. it riifln't nat unless he'd sack
ed it with sashweights, because
any black bear oi any. s u c n
ujpicht is a nhrnnmenal sDecimen
(rifnnnlprH rhieflv in the imagi
nations of excited hunters and
sensation-minded newspaper re
porters.......
Tho lafo Wnspa Sarber. who
spent two decades or more as a
kish U Wildlife Service agent in
the bear-infested islands of South
eastern Alaska, once laugneo ai
the idea of blacks over 500. Hosea
aairt hnt hoM ripver seen one
and he'd made personal acquain
tance with tnousanas inai ue
honestly estimated at over 450.
We weighed "big'' black up
in the Yakutat area one after after-noon,
noon, after-noon, on a scale arrangement
which checked out my won weight
correct to the pound, at 275. So
all bears aren't bom .weighing
nn Thv anter his lifp. weiChlDS!
just a very few ounces and
mighty few of them leave k wun
heft enoueh to nush a scale ve-
yond the 300 mark.
Alleesamee deer, 'lo near me
bous talks about their November
kills, you'd get the idea that
there never was a whitetail buck,
a decent one, that didn't consid considerably
erably considerably better Rocky Marciano's
pmmdage.lwo s-ceutury-wdsbts
would seem to be as common as
dirt. .
ron't Wamo fhp hnvs for brag
ging a bit, of course, but just be between
tween between you and me and the amp
Ipost, w!u;e a lew fiatne,

i

Barreled
(Second Game )
Carta Vieja AB
R HPO A
0 1 10 0
Bartirome. lh ... 5
Shantz. 2b1 4
0 0 1
fnimps rr .4
1 Dickens, if 3
0 Wilhelm, ss ......4'
3 Kropf, cf 4
0 Glamp, 3b .......3
0 Patton, c .........3
0 Monahan, p ......1
0 Hockenbury
Sewell. n (I
0 1
0 0
7Dabek ............0
32 2 5 24 11
Spur Cola Cola-Moore,
Moore, Cola-Moore, ss ........ ;4
Charles, 3b 4'
Glenn, cf ....... 4
Lopez, 2b ........3
Kellman, c .......5
Gordon, lb .......5
P. Osorio, rf 5
Grenald, If .......2
Clarke, p 5
1 2
2 9
2 3
0 3
! 0
37 10 13 27 9
Hockenbury filed out for Mo Monahan
nahan Monahan In 7th. -
Dabek walked for Sewell In
9th.
6core by. Innings
C. Vieja .v. 010 001 0002 5 S
S. Cola ...310 010 05x-10 13, 2
. Summary
RBI's: Lopez 8, Gordon, J. O O-sorio,
sorio, O-sorio, Grenald, Glamp, Kellman.
Earned runs: Spur Cola 8, Car Carta
ta Carta Vieja 1. Left on bases: Spur
Cola 11, Carta Vieja 8. Two base
hits: Dickens 2, Lopez. Sacrifice
hits: Lopez, Grenald, Glamp.
Stolen bases: Gordon. Hit by
! pitch : Monohan (Grenald), Wild
pitches: Monohan 2. Struck out
by: Clarke 2; By: Monohan 3.
Base on balls off: Clarke 3. Off:
Monahan Zt Sewell 2. Pitchers'
record: Monahan 5 runs, 10 hits
in ff .Jhnings. Errors': Spur Cola
2 (Moore, Charles), Carta Vieja
3 (Kropf, Glamp 2): Losing
pitcher: Monohan (3-2). Wln Wln-pitcher:
pitcher: Wln-pitcher: Clarke (2-2). Double Double-plays:
plays: Double-plays: Monahan, Patton, Barti Bartirome.
rome. Bartirome. Umpires: Hinds, Coppin,
Thornton. Time of game: 2:35.
gan and Minnesata whitetail to
over the 300 mark on the hoof
each year, the average mature
whitetail buck grosses 150 or less.
I brought a ten-pointer home
from Michigan's Upper Peninsu Peninsula
la Peninsula once, that hefted 187 cleaned
and five days dead. A super-deer,
he had probably walked around,
at around 250 at his best.
Not all of a buck is eating meat,.
either. By the time the hide
hed, neck, and feet have been
taken off, extra bone disposed of
and the carcass cut up and tos tossed
sed tossed intoJyour freezer locker, the
chances are you won't have much
over 100 packaged pounds, if
that,, and if you've been unlucky
enough to put a high-velocity slug
ruinously into a quarter, the ire ire-zer
zer ire-zer bill may tally only 75.
But no matter how dismayingly
small the finished weight of you
buck may be, let's hope he eats
well the smaller ones are use use-allymore
allymore use-allymore tender than. those semi-
mythical giants, anyway.



TlilT.f DAY, JAXUAKT 1?, 1?S3

TUS FA-NAMA AMERICAS AN LNDLFENTINI IU1XI KEWSPAfEIt
1 ""
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v
0
.
V.. Hi t

r n t m n m f"
I V ; ft r i ;
ii

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S -; I

BEST FOOT FORWARD Tom Payne of Iowa appear to hav
his foot smack dab in the fare of Frank Howard during a Big,
Ten game at Ohio State. The photographic oddity just a bout bout-shows
shows bout-shows the- pattern of the contest, for the defending champions
trampled the Buckeyes, 88-73.

PACIFIC TWILIGlTt LEAGUE

W
Gibraltar Life ...... 3
Police .......v ..V
Spur Colo I
Elks H14 -0
Lincoln Life ........ 0

Pet.
1.000
' 667
.500
.000
.000

Spur Cola 1, Elks 1111 1
In one ol the most exciting
ball names ever witnessed m the
six years of Little League may
on the Isthmus, Spur Cola, last
' year's champs, yesterday bat battled
tled battled the Elks Lodgemen to a 1
to 1 tie in a contest that went
over the regulation number ol
Innings.
Two days consecutively t h e
Pacific Little League has put on
overtime battles. Yesterday s
eame went three extra innings
and darkness called halt to ac activities
tivities activities without a decision being
Teached.,.The two teams play
Saturday morning to decide the
nney."4;;,:-:'.;,:
Bobby Dllfer, started on the
mound for the soft drink lads.
The second batter, Hern, got a
hit A walk to Fields and a hit
bv Lincoln scored one run. At
this point Dilfer, put on the
, brakes, and gave an exhibition
which set a new record for Lit Little
tle Little League play in the league.
Bohby set down the next twelve
. batters in. a row via strikeouts.
In fact, after Lincoln got his
hit, Bobby did not allow any
man to reach first base, except
Hfn who walked in the sixth.
Hern was one of the stars for
. the Elks. Not only did he get on
,' basr three but of the four times
he faced the pitcher, but In the
5th inning he pulled a fielding
play that fans will discuss for a
Ion? time to come. Durtnsr the
Inning starting pitcher Wil'lams
weakened. Three hits and an
error produced one run and te
sacks were full of 8Durs with
two out. Boswell tagged one that
- bonrtci over the fence for a
home run, but Mr. Hern had oth.
er ideas. He leaped and snared
the pellet as it was going over
the wall.
Since Little Leseue rules pro-
hlbit any pitcher 'to hurl more

than six innings, both teams

marched out two new cnuckers,
Rybicki for the Spurs and Blcak Blcak-ley
ley Blcak-ley for the Elks, Bleakley faced

ten -batters, nine of these went

down on strikeouts, only Bowen
escaped when in the eighth he
wp'ked.

Rybicki, on the other hand,

aid not wniif many, oniy one.
but h was tough in the clutch clutches.
es. clutches. In the ninth Bleakley led
off with a single but didn't scor scored.'
ed.' scored.'

Williams was also a strike

out artist. He fanned 11 Spurs.
A total of 20 Spur Cola' men

went down via v the strikeout
route, whereas 15 Elks bit the

dust via the strikeout method.
. There were 35 strikeout in all,
a record of some kind for Little
Leagues down here.
The box score;

Spur Cola AB R H

Bowent 3b ,t.,.. ,,.,,. .3 0 1
Chase, ss ....... .4 0 1

boswell, c ? ; .-. ; '.:. ,t. 4 0 n

Dilfer, p, lb .....4 0 0
7e!n!pi lb. If 4 0 0
--... 2b ...4 1 0
Albrltton.'c f 3 o o
.v. nis, cf A 0 0
Rvbick.1 If. p ....... 0 2
Whitney, rf ............3 0 1
Elkg 1414
Stoudnor, 2b ....... ,...3 0 n
Hern, cf 2 1 1
Bleakley, p ...... .......1 0 1
Field, ss ............. .,2 0 0
Lincoln, c ....v.. ...4 0 1
William, p, ss ....4 0 0
Cross, c. ...4 0 0
Devore, rf 3 0 1
Burton, 3b 3 0 0

Berger. lb ............. S 0 0
Ganele ran for Bleakley In
the ninth.

DOUBLE-BARRELED
Ames, la. (NEA) Barney Al Al-leman
leman Al-leman collected six Iowa State let letters
ters letters in football and basketball.;

SCORING DEMANDS
Chapel Hill, N. C. (NEA) -North
Carolina has a new electric
basketball scoreboard which has
three-digit slots.

-mim in

rx

- 4

. 1 1 TV

28 modern "Santa" ships uniting the
Americas with fast and frequent
service.

WEEKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
S.S. "SANTA CECILIA" .....Due Cristobal, C. Z., Jan. 20
S.S. "SANTA INtS" ........Due Cristobal, C. Z.. Jan. 25
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
S.S. "SANTA BARBARA" ..Sails Cristobal, C. Z, Jaft; 24
S.S. "SANTA RITA" ........Sails Cristobal, C. Z.Feb. 3
FROM U. S PACIFIC & WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA
' TO BAI R04 AND CRISTOBAL. C. 7.
SS. "SANTA ANITA". .,. Due Balboa. C. Z., Feb. 8
S.S. "SANTA CRUZ" ...Due Balboa. C. Z., Feb. 23
TKOM CRIS103AL AND llALBOA, C. Z. TO HIE
V.rST C:AST CENTRAL AMFRICA & U. S PACIFIC
S.S.;"SANTA FE" .Sails Cristobal, C. Z., Jan. 22
Calboa only
PANAMA AGENCIES CO
..... CElblUBAL: 2131 ll'Sb PANAMAi 2-0558 055?
.. BM.!'fA: 1501 2159

Foul Decides
Game In Final
Eight Seconds
By JOHN GRIFFIN

NEW YOKK, Jan .19 (UP)

North Carolina's stirring upset
of bitter rival North Carolina

State, the nation's No. 3 team.

stole the show from triumphant
Dayton and Louisville today ai

all three bid to move higher in

the national basketball ratings.
North Carolina, ranked lHh

nationally, was all steamed n?
last night to avenge an 82 -60
shellacking by State just 11 days

earlier in the final rouna ol the
Dixie Classic Tournament.
And the Tar Heels got their
revenge In a pulse-pounding, 73 73-69
69 73-69 game that was not settled
until the final eight seoends of
play. A "possession' game and
a zone defense were the keys in

the victory that kept North
Carolina in first place in the

blazing Atlantic Coast Confer
ence race.
Dayton, the nation's No. 2
team, ran its perfect record to
13-0 matching that of na national
tional national leader Sin Francisco,
by drubbing Villanova, 7 1-30,
And 10th-ranked Louisville
rolled to an eye-catching 83 83-75
75 83-75 victory over Memphis State
to set its record at 14-1,

But the two Carolina rivals
waged the toughest battle on

the winners' court at Chaoel

Hill.: N.C. with 19 seconds left

North Carolina, which had Mown
an earlier 10-point lead, led by
71-69. State called time out and
set up a play it hoped would tie

the score. Vic Molodet of the
Wolf pack drove down the slat

for the payoff shot but nlxtive
Lennie Rosenbluth blocked it.
With eight seconds left, the
ball was squirting around losse.
on the floor. Jerry Vayda of
North Carolina grabbed it. was
fouled, and added two free

throw that clinched the

triumph. Rosenbluth had 21
points to top Tar Heel scoreri.
but Ronnie Sbavlik had 24 for
State. The game left the rival"
with identical 12-2 marks and
started both aiming at their
"rubber match," Feb. 21, on
State's court.
Like North Carolina. VI1U VI1U-nova
nova VI1U-nova played a deliberate "pos "possession"
session" "possession" game i hopes of up upsetting
setting upsetting mithty Davton. But H
only stopped the fivers for 1'
- minute nd than the pu""
away easily a seven-foot B
Iihl too- scoring honors with

19 points.
Six-eight Charley Tyra, Louis Louisville's
ville's Louisville's All-America candidal,
nut fn a brilliant show in' the
Cardinals' sixth straight win. He
tallied 28 points and his re rebounding
bounding rebounding proved the factor that
broke the tame open. Win Wo' Wo'-forid
forid Wo'-forid led Memphis State with 29
ooints but State suffered 1 1 c
second loss In 12 games.
In other leading garnes last
nl"ht: Columbia tied idle Prin

ceton for the Ivy League lead bv
trmmring Yale. 80-54: La Salle
r"Ud t bet Uennsylvanta. 4 4-52,
52, 4-52, despite 25 points by Peon's
Joe 8tnrgis: six-six Lee Colllr
sank 28 points and nabbe-i 25
rebound to lead South Carotin i
In a 94-79 rout of arch-rival
Clemon: West Virinl routed
Pittsburgh, 8-70: St. Ponawn.
ture nipped Plena, 62-l; nth nth-ranked
ranked nth-ranked Okihoma Tjltv edged
Seattle, 74-70, at Seattle to a a-venge
venge a-venge an upset the previous
nieht: ?0th-rnnked St. Lo)
routde Deoaul. 89-71; Wichita
ripped Tlrke. 85-7. in the Mis Missouri
souri Missouri Valley Conference: an
New Mexico and M. downed
New Mexico, 58-51, .......

GALLING HIS SHOTS

i- s

iiV

GCUZALSS'
emir. Ai-KEAy
TOUGH BKQuCrt
TO HAHOLE OK
COUST (HES
DOMINATING ThE
pao rouR)...

Langford Was So Good
l ie Could Name Round

7 :V'

... iUl

' ; "J 6ivN6 TONY
? TBABERT m

: TOUCrH A TMft

EXCHA6i4,TOO:

Bowlers Score With Pin Method, Too

"'I ' -1
'il'.r?;.,v.;:5:.,5
r-'' t
v. j
i I

hi

By HARRY GRAYSON
NEW YORK (NEA) Sam Lang Lang-ford
ford Lang-ford carried more fighters than a
busy bellhop does bags during a
tourist season.
The Boston Tar Babv had to in
order to keep busy, Tnam" was
that good. In the opinion of many
old-timers, he was the grea test
fighter they ever saw. He came
closer to any other to being able
to name the round.
Joe Woodman, who man aged
Langford for the first 18 of the
22 years he fought, recalls that his
charge was just 20 years bid and
weighed no more than 147 pounds
when he had Jack Johnson on the
deck at Chelsea, Mass.. Apr. 26.

1906- losing a 15-round verdict to
the man who was destined to be

the heavyweight champion.
Bill Crowley, the referee, gave
the decision to Johnson, but the

Doxing writers violently disagreed,'
recollects Woodman, still hustling
young savages in New York at 91.
We cnased Johnson through out
the world, but Li'l Arthur wisely
would have no more of Langford.
They were matched again in
London, but Johnson ran out."
LANGFORD WAS 17 and had

been boxing only two years when

he beat the immortal Joe Gans

and held Jack Blackburn even.

The Tar Baby never attained

championship brackets.

'He would have been middle

weight champion had Stanley Ket-

ehel lived three months longer,"
states the venerable Wood man,

flatly. "After their 6ix-round fight

in Philadelphia, he was matched
to box Ketchel 20 rounds in Los

Angeles. He would have knocked

ut Ketchel.

The long-armed, short-nec k e d

Langford, nearly as wide as his
five feet six-and-a-half i n c h e a,

weighed 172 pounds at his peak.

Langford, wnom wooamman tes

tifies was not yet 70 when he died
In Boston, inspired more stories

than any other gladiator.

. f fill i-nrtt" swam mm m i im I" fiTl in--" ' W.infjiwji,A-.i -Oy
TARGET Sylvia Wene aims directly at the pins when pin bowling, adjusting her body in Hoe
- Vth the 1-3 pocket. If you're not doing well as a spot bowler, thi pin method may be your dish. J

Ninth of 16 Illustrated and instruc

tive articles written for NEA Serv Service
ice Service and The Panama American.
By SYLVIA WENE
Match Game Champion
WHILE most top-flight keglers
recommend spot bowling, the pin
method is OK, too.
Some of the game's greats
wouldn't consider knocking down

pins any other way.

If you're not doing well as a
spot bowler, the pin method may

be for you. -. --
Get a true starting position.
Draw a bead on the 1-3 pocket.

Line the shoulders tip," adjust

them to allow for your hook.
Keep your eyes on the 1-3 tar target
get target through the delivery, until
the follow through has been com completed.
pleted. completed. "'

If the result is a strike start

with the shoulders in that posi position
tion position next time. Otherwise adjust
to the right or letf.
Although I am in the spot
bowlers' camp, pin bowling makes

sense. I directly at what you are trying
It merely means that y6u aimlto hit,

by
JOE WILLIAMS

"It was at the Claremont Rmk
in Brooklyn in 1909 that Morris
Harris discovered his fight with
Langford was ending earlier than
he expected," remembers Wood Woodman.
man. Woodman. "Sam extended his gloves al
the start of the sevtnth.
"This isn't the last round, Sam,'
said Harris.
" 'It is for you,' said Sam."
WOODMAN RECALLS A bitter bitterly
ly bitterly cold snow storm in Cheynne
on Washington'! birthday, 1910,'
Sam didn't like it," was eager to
get back to the sunshine of Los
Angeles. At the arena, Woodman
checked and found that if Sam hur hurried
ried hurried a little, they could make a
train due about the time the fight
would be finished if it went the

I limit. Nat Dewey went out in one,
and they made the train with time

to spare.
Arriving in Londot. for a match
with Ian Hague in 1909, Lang,
ford was asked about the referee.
"Ah carry man own referee,"
said Sam.
"But, Mr. Langford," sa id the
British journalist, "The referee
has to be English." .. 1
"Heah's maw referee," said Sam,
shaking his right first. Hague
went out in the fourth.
Langford won the heavyweight
championship of Mexico and suc successfully
cessfully successfully defended it in his last
fight in 1923, when he could scarce
ly see and had to feel his way."
"Had not a seeing eye dog been
against the rules, Sam Langford
would have knocked out guys un until
til until he died," concludes Joe Woodman.

MAKES WILLIE RUN
Hialeah, Fla, (NEA) -r Of all
the tracks he rode regularly in
IflSS Hislpnh Parle wan th nnlv.

lone where .Willie Hartack wasn't
champion.

Wherever people of distinction
meet you'll always find
v ' : 'V'.1 "-' ; '.. il

TV

i

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

New Orleans Service

Arrive'
Cristobal

Great White Flee!

S.S. "AGGERSBOnC ... .. . ; , Jan. 19
S.S. "SANTO CERRO" .Jan. 22
S.S. "MARNA" Jan. 28
A Steamer ; . ... . ; ....... i t t r . . .... Jan. 29
S.S. 'YAQUE" Feb. 5
S.S. "MORAZAN" .Feb. 12

Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo

New Vork Service

Arrives
Cristobal

S.S. 'OrTA" .....Jan. 20
S.S. "FRA FERLANGA" .............Jan. 23
S.S. "LIMON" ... ... ... ..................Jan. 30
A Steamer ., .....Feb. 6
S.S. "COMATAGUA" Feb. 13
...........
Weekly saslinzs cf twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Lcs Anzeles, San Francisco
" -, and Seattle- ; '.
Special roiisd tnp fares from Cristobal to New
York, Lcs Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle.
To New York $240.00
-.' To Lot Angeles and San Francisco .,..$270.00
To Seattle $255.CO

TELEPHONES:

Cr.:5TOSAt 2121

PANAMA 2-204

As an effortless form of exercise, jumping to conclusions is
not without its points, but when the activity is applied Induc Inductively
tively Inductively there is always danger of embarassment, especially among
the dogmatic (male and the catmatic (female).
For reasons which should be starkly clear, this logically calls
attention to Ben Hogan who, though ostensibly retired, is cur currently
rently currently participating. In the annual. Birrg Crosby bunker festival
on the West coast.
Moreover, he has engaged quarters In Palm Beach for a
month's stay during which time presumably he will hone his
blades for tne semmole, a tournament whimsically patronized
by the American aristocracy and scattered remnants of defunct
European nobility.
Irom there, he may or may not Journey to Augusta for the
Masters, as has been his custom In previous years, his decision
in this matter having not yet been made known. Even so, the
probabilities are deemed favorable.
He has definite commitments to play in two Texas Opens
to be held some weeks later, at the termination of which he
should be at the top of his game, abundantly ready to challenge
for the Big One, If so disposed.
However, It was at the Big One last year that he remarked
the ordeal has become too trying and declared the National
would never again see him as a competitor.
To confirmed conclusion Jumpers the evidence available
probably appears sufficient to warrant firm assurance that the
tine print in Hogan's retirement declaration is significant by the
omission of the word positively.
. ? '"'' '."
PRESTIGE AT STAKE
In this they might very well be wrong. Hogan has created
his Image as a preeminent golfer on the National. The National
is the yardstick by which creatness In his profession is maesured.
All th eothers are cf secondary importance.
At 43, the odds are against Hogan ever winning the Big one
again. To continue to try, only to fail, would diminish his his historical
torical historical position in much the same way as frustration in like
circumstances dulled the brilliance of Joe Louis.
Hogan has a great deal of money Invested in the manu manufacture
facture manufacture of clubs which are marketed under his name, and since
his name is still synonymous with supremacy, any action that
might tend to jeopardize its value as a sales force would be
foolish.
How he fares in the secondaries, where winning or losing
has comparatively small effect on national prestige, need not be
of any great concern.
Actually, these lesser events offer a fruitful field for busi business
ness business exploitation, a felicitous climate for impressing prospective
customers and attracting publicity.
For these reasons, conclusion Jumpers may be prudently
advised not to strive for record distances. None of them is like likely
ly likely to be picked for the Olympic team, anyway.
....... ...
SLIP WAS SHOWING
: No one has ever won the National five times. That was
Hogan's goal in his Parthian shot in "Frisco last June. He made
it a near thing. Indeed, in popular opinion, the score board not notwithstanding,
withstanding, notwithstanding, he was still the best at the end.

To this extent, then, he chose a propitious moment to an announce
nounce announce his reirement. Inwardly, he may have felt he had reach reached
ed reached the end of the line, anyway. And the record did seem to point
that way.
Hogan had been beaten In three of the last four Opens, and
his mark for the Masters. . the only secondary that has prestige
value. . was identical. He had lost the Big One to fellows like
1 Boros and Furgol, and now be had fallen before an utterly un un-!
! un-! known.
. The Implications can scarcely have been lost on him. Hence,
i there is no sound reason to believe h ewould lend a receptive
L.far to the familiar siren song of yports.-, "Give it one more
VuJrl.'' -. ; '".

m m n m mm m ,i j .a u ri mi

1 m r.-J I
5 c? i

fc a

T nffo a PAT.T. Ut AT T. fttn k,'t.Ao.

:i
. compliment you can pay.

!

in

it

At the golf course or at the yacht
. club distinguished people always
smoke PALL MALLS.
PALL MALLS are made of the
world's fiost tobaccos especially
blended tor people whose
good taste demands the best.
PALL MALL'S longer length filters
the smoke giving you cooler,
longer-lasting, full-flavored smoking
enjoyment If you haven't
discovered the enjoyment of emokirx
PALL MALL, try one today 1'
Choeso

MF1

JU

for good fast a

AU-o53

' m.rftVvwMM aj-MK: rwv. v&



5SGIu:S!!
J
u
.Read story on pagz 8

"7

Solon
Reports
'Bribe

.wwiii,.
Aft INDEPENDENT
DAILY KEYSPAFER
O

I 1

...

(NEA Telephoto)
pr nTrrTi vf COVERING A canvas covering is laid by soldiers to prevent water from erod-
ta&m-Heavy rti brought on new fl00ding ln northern
California, forcing thousands of persons from their homes. ;

n
i

; (NEA Telephoto)
J HECTORS CLASH IN CHURCH Rival rectors conduct different
but simultaneous services at the Protestant Episcopal Church of
I the Holy Trinity in Brooklyn, N. Y. In the pulpit, a replacement
1 pastor, the Rev. Robert Kollock Thomas, attempts to lead a
service while Howard Melish (left) leads parishioners in hymn
J singing. Melish had been voted out as rector by the vestry for
alleged left wing support. Seated between them (background)
; is Melish's Jather, the Rev. Dr. John Howard Melish, who was
t l ousted as rector In 1949.
Lawyer To Probe Pastor
WHo Held 'Rump' Service

NEW YOR.K Jan. 19 (UP)-A
church lawyer was ordered today

to decide wnetner tne tiev. wiinam
Howard Melish should be disiplin disiplin-ed
ed disiplin-ed ior conducting a "rump"
k service in the Brooklyn Protestant
-,- Episcopal Church from which he
bad been ousted.
Melish's tenure as acting minis minister
ter minister of Holy Trinity Church has
. been the subject of a running bat battle
tle battle between the church and lis

General Harrison
Returns To Zone
Lt Gen. William. K. Harrison,
Jr., Commander in Chief, Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Command, arrived via
commreclal aircraft early thi
morning at Panama's Tocumen
Airport, following completion of
a medical examination and min minor
or minor skin operation at Walter Reed
Hospital, Washington, DC. Lt.
Gen. Harrison departed for the
hospital on Jan. 6,

FRIDAY VEEKELD RELEASE
LUX THEATRE

ft

From ttii
Stage play by
Btrrnpnnnrrc
mho gave yon V
V ; -V i.
if v-W

x

11

r;;:cE-iSliFi::3EKDaL ceInIgeh
JJIfWlWMIttml, JAMBPOIflomllnMntiiliybyCUfFOROODETS
)i ii Okkwo or R0BE.RT ALDhlCH dwh4 Umw Mini

- t

U
r
r
bishop, the Rt. Rev. James P. De
Wolfe, for six years.
. Last Sunday, Melish and the
Rev. Robert K. Thomas conduct conducted
ed conducted services simultaneously in the
church.
The standing committee of the
Episcopal diocese of Long Island
met with De Wolfe for three hours
yesterday. The officials directed
Frank Sincerbeaux, advocate of
the ecclesiastical court, to investi investigate
gate investigate the situation and "report
speedily back."
De Wolfe termed the situation
"scandalous."
VorkWeeklnUS
Down To 42 Hours
WASHINGTON.' Jan; 19 (UP)
Americans are working fewer
and fewer hours, the Census Bu Bureau
reau Bureau reported today. It said the
average work week was 42 hours
last' year. It was 44 hours in
1947. i

On""!!

IZTtZZT
mm
CP
0 FILM
SICUYIVC3D
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They'n
Hfiere,the
' ( : good and the
odd tn tne
vNvJ screen's','E
story of one
( 'jr of its stars

I
i

A-Cruiser

Plans Rapped
By Rep. Cole
WASHINGTON, Jan. 19 (UP)
Kep. W. Sterling Cole (R-N.Y.)
said today Navy plans to build an
atomic-powered cruiser are un
wise because the ship would be
obsolete by the time it is finished,
He levelled the charge in the
face of an appeal by Adm. Arleigh
a. BurKe lor congressional
approval of President Eisenhow Eisenhower's
er's Eisenhower's $1.4 billion naval shipbuilding
program.
Burke, Chief of U.S. naval oper operation,
ation, operation, warned the House Armed
Services Committee that ahv de
lay in the program may be "fa
tal, "rapid ascendancy in the
naval field its fleet is "second now
only to the United States."
The Presidents' budget in includes
cludes includes $88 million for the world's
first atomic-driven surface war
ship a guidtd missila cruittr.
Cole, former chairman of the
Joint Congressional Atomic En
ergy Committee, said he would not
oppose the Navy's cruiser plan.
But he said it is "premature" Un
til atomic reactor development
is further along.
He said Congress has appropri appropriated
ated appropriated $70,000,000 for development'
of an atomic power plant for a
surface ship and plans have not
yet been completed.
Kep, Dewey Short (R-Mo.) dis
agreed with Cole. He said, "we
have get to start some time. We
can't wait to get perfection. That
may toe fatal."
Burke argued the cruiser would
give the Navy a start on operat operating
ing operating experience in an atomic sur
face ship.
He said the vessel could operate
independently of the rest of the
fleet because of its long range and
"it might be able to defeat any
air attack or any submarine at
tack that can be launched against
us." .
'I am convinced that a b o 1 d
program in nuclear propulsion is
not only warranted nut mandatory
in submarines and in surface ships
as woil," the admiral declared. "J
St. Lawrence
Officials Make
Partial Transit
A party of 14 officials of the
St. Lawrence Seaway today
made a partial transit through
the Canal aboard the 56U-ioot
cargo ship Haurakl.
The group, which consists of
U. S. and Canadian officials
were scheduled to debark at
Gamboa around noon today, and
later this afternoon would visit
the Port Captain's Office in
Balboa t round out their first
hand Rllmpse of Canal opera operations.
tions. operations. The officials arrived yester
day by military plane, and are
expected to return tomorrow
night. They were accompanied
bv Secretary of the Army Wilber
M. Brucker,

Opening Friday at the:
CENTRAL THEATRE

r h'EN KNEW HIS
rr- MfA
G!
j it'Ari

1 (
.
4 V ...
.! f-

WASHINGTON, Jan. 19 (UP)

itep. jttum l nompson R-Mich. said
today she was offered a $1,000
campaign contribution "bribe" to
get the Air Force 1o build a jet
fighter base at Cadillac, Mich.
She refused to say who made the
oner, ihe said she does not know
the names of persons who planned
to contribute the $1,000 to her
campaign fund but presumed they
were residents of Cadillac, in ber
congressional district.
Air Force Secretary Donald A
Quarles announced last August
that the serivce plans to proceed
with construction of the base at
Kalkaska, Mich., despite the heat
ed objections of Miss Thompson
that it rightly belongs in Cadillac.
The Air Foree originally select selected
ed selected Benzie county,- in Miss Thomp
son's district, lor the base. Con Congress
gress Congress blocked that site because it
would intenere witn a music
school in the area. Congress also
vetoted as too costly the choice
of Cadillac.
Kalkaska, the site finally chosen,
is in the district of Rep. Victor A.
Knox R-Mich. Miss Thompson has
said Knox already has a base in
his district. She accused former
former Air Force Secretary Harold
E. Talbott of pulling "a fast one"
in the final selection of Kalkasaka.
Miss Thompson made her
"bribe" statement in a letter to
the Wexford County, Mich., Jet
Air Base Committee. It had asked
her to clarify published reports
that she had been offered a bribe.
She said the bribe offer" was
made after the House Armed Serv Services
ices Services Committee had turned down
Benzie county because of its prox proximity
imity proximity to the Interlo'chen Music
Camp.
"Shortly after that I was ap approached
proached approached in the city of Washing
ton by a man who apparently had
assumed the role of intermdeiary
between some people in Cadillac
and myself," she wrote. "I now
state that he told me bluntly that
I 'must support the air base in
Cadillac' and then added "the tad tad-iliac
iliac tad-iliac boys, are going to give you
$1,000 for your campaign.'
The bribe reports have been cir cir-culating
culating cir-culating in Michigan and Washing Washington
ton Washington since last s u m me r. Miss
Thompson said, "never, at any
time, have i xnown tne number oi
persons who sougnt to tnoe me.
Never, at any time, have they been
identified to me by their names."
Asked to identify the person wno
offered the bribe, she told report reporters.
ers. reporters. "I'm not telling you that.
There are some things you can't
divulge.
AEC Touches Oil
Hush-Hush Atomic
Safely Explosion
LAS VEGAS, Nev. Jan. 19
fTTPi The Atomic Enerev Com
mission has. set off another ex
plosion in us current saieiy
series to determine whether
atomic devices, can be detonated
accidentally.
Th AEC refused to eive details
of the blast which was set off
yesterday on atomic proving
rounds 75 miles north of Las
Veeas."' v .-..; .-:,..',,-:
"Today's test resulted In a
detonation of low exnlosive force
creating a low altitude could
pnrrvine minute amounts .of ra
dioactivity," the AEC said, "n
radiological problem Is expect expected".
ed". expected". The safety test series beean in
November." At that time the AEC
said scientists were seeking to
learn If atomic devices could be
detonated by shock rather than
by triggering them.
FURY... BUT NOT HIS FACE!

. uiM.ru rTW U!C I !D P'fT L'flT Vt l!S"FI

m;i :; 1 1 ; u v:
i;uvt Mi i is:
ii
i miph" t

"Let the people

31st YEAR

Dollar-Srarved NY Amateurs
Grab Ford Stock From Sharks

iVtfW VORTT. .Tan. 19 (UP)
More than 300,000 Investors
snapped up the record w,zuu,-
000-share offering oi.Jora mo-
tni- rvimnnnv stork tri n matter
of minutes yesterday and then
saw the value oi tneir invest investment
ment investment rise by $63,750,000 in less
than 90 minutes.
VnrA mnHo its sner.tarnlnr en
try Into Wall Street's future at
9 nm nn a, wave of demands
for the stock that far exceeded
the supply. ;
In trading throughout the
TTnit.od Kt.at.p.' and Canada and
In markets in London and Ams
terdam, sales of the Ford stoctc
were sharply rationed to from
nn share for individual inves
tors to 30,000 for a large institu institution.
tion. institution. A result the huvers who
obtained the stock for the o-
penhig price of $e.au a snare
were confronted in New York
)th nffprs iiri to 470.75 6.25
over the opening price, by 10:30
a.m. some sold ior quicK proi-
lts, but brokers reported moss
investors were banning an to
their purchases.
In tne nveiy Minaon marii-.
et, the price opened at an A A-merican
merican A-merican equivalent of $71.87a,
share, but later dropped to
$70.75.
Rrnbcr. tn fThfcaco. Ran Fran-
cisco, Pittsburgh, Atlanta, Cleve Cleveland,
land, Cleveland, Dallas, St. Louis, and
other cities reported diey had
never seen anvthin like the
clamor for stock ln the $2,400,1
000,000 Ford company, wnicn
old Henry Ford launched In 1903
with $28,000 and a two-cylinder
Lizzie.
The historic sale marked the
pnrt nf trip M.vear-old comna-
hy as the nation's largest pri-
vateiy ownea concern ana we
beginning of Its public owner owner-htn
htn owner-htn Tt. rprinreri the Ford fam
ily's hold on the company to a
voting power of .40 per cent, but
spread tne remaining cu per
ppnt. nf t.hp vntp sn t.hm that
the Eords were guaranteed con
trol ior years 10 come.
Brokers reported mat tnou-
CZ Sailors Take
Unscheduled Dip
As Cayuco Capsizes
Police wondered yesterday when
they received a report at Gamboa
that there was a man floundering
in the water opposite the Gamboa
Golf Club whether the military
who were conducting parac h u t e
maneuvers in the area had left a
jumper behind.
They Immediately Sent a
launch to the scene to investigate,
and found not one parachutist
but two Navy enlisted men en enjoying
joying enjoying a swim.
The sailors Robert C. Taylor, 20
and David A. Rue, 21, had fallen
into the Chagres when their cayu cayuco
co cayuco capsized in high waves.
They told police that t h e y
hadn't actually planned on the
dip, but since they found them themselves
selves themselves submerged and wet, decid decided
ed decided to enjoy the swim.
Wearing only trousers, the men,
both from the 15th Naval Pistrict
were' helped aboard the launch.
Later the cayuco was righted and
picked up by the sailors.
at
,9

rais over mh;;:g you've mr seeni

T1IP flftH T1!P pinfMP

Ht LtU. rt YlAh IK'

mil iilw, nil. riioi,r.
nm'niiRm im v ,rrV t

El FILIl

fcji'ij,,.,)::

1

' tarnnq: ROBERT NEWTON KIT TAYLOR

know the truth and the

PANAMA, R. P, THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 1956

sahds of persons who never have
owned a share of stock before
dug into their savings to buy
into Ford. Some large Investors
were angered by their Inability
to get more than 25, 50, 100 or
200 shares, brokers said.
"The amateurs are putting
Ford away in great quantities,"
a Pittsburgh broker said. "They
just want to say 'I own a share
of Ford.'"

PC Comptrollers Office
Reorganization Effective

Completion of a general reorgani reorganization
zation reorganization of the Panama Canal Compa Company's
ny's Company's Office of the Comptroller has
been announced by Philip L. Steers
Jr., Comptroller. The final phases
of the reorganization become ef effective,
fective, effective, this week. The reorganiza reorganization
tion reorganization will provide a more eifective
and better coordinated line of au authority
thority authority and responsibility.
Relatively few personnel changes
except in duty, assignment and
responsibilities are involved in the
reorganization, 'a 'Balboa Heights
announcement said. ;
, One of the principal changes is
the abolishment of the Fiscal Divt
sion as a unit. Floyd H. Baldwin,
now chief of that division, has been
made general auditor and heads
the General Audit Division, This
division consists of the C 1 a i m s
Branch, of which James L. Fulton
Is chief and the Internal Audit
Branch, of which George Gir Gir-ard
ard Gir-ard is chief.
Other Dersonnel chances are Ar
thur J. 6'Leary. from chief of the
Accounting Division to assistant
comptroller-accounting; J. Patrick
Coniey, of the Claims .Branca, to
assistant to the Comptroller and
Thomas H. Scott to chief of, the
Accounting Policies and Proced
ures Staff. f
The latter unit replaces the form'
er Accounting Systems Staff which
Scott headed.
The treasurer Will now report di
rect to the Comptroller. Joseph C
Turner is treasurer and his unit
was formerly part of the Fiscal Di Division."
vision." Division." :; r:
The' other unit of this division,
the Payroll Division, headed by
Howard E. Turner, is being trans transferred
ferred transferred to the Accounting Division.
The Accounting Division will be
under the direction of the assistant
comotroller accounting. John t,
Fisher is assistant chief of the, Ac-
rmintins Division and In addition
to the Payroll Branch, other
branches of the division ana per personnel
sonnel personnel in charge are: Agents Ac Accounts
counts Accounts Branch, James.R. Johnston
General Ledger and Processing
Branch, Donald M. Luke' and Re-
Is Bulganin Sick?
Moscow Clams Up
MOSCOW. Jan, 19 (UP) The
Press DeDartment of the For
eign Ministry said today lt has
"no information" 'on reports
that Premier. Nikolai Bulganin
may be ill.
Speculation developed that
the 61-year-old Premier Is ailing
because he has failed to make
" public appearance since Jan.
PRICES: J5 ,40
TODAY-

f '-V
country is safe Abraham Lincoln.

A. E. Pontinp, vice president
ln charge of Blyth and Com Company's
pany's Company's San Francisco office,
said the demand for Ford
shares there was unprecedent unprecedented.
ed. unprecedented. t
"We had a lot of people who
don't care whether the stock
goes up or down but just want
shares so they can 3ay they
bought at tne first public of-
ports and Reconciliation Branch
J. Everett Heady.
No change will be made under
the present reorganization In the
Budget and Rates Division which
was recently established with War Warren
ren Warren Pitman as chief.
This unit consists of the Budget
Branch headed by LeRoy B. Mag Mag-nuson,
nuson, Mag-nuson, and the Rates and Analysis
Branch of which Russel J. Jones
is chief.
The Plant Inventory and Ap Appraisal
praisal Appraisal Staff will continue to be
headed by Col. Edward B. Jennings
The branches nf thi unit nnH m
chiefs of each are the Plant Ac
counting Branch, Albert M. Jenk Jenkins,
ins, Jenkins, and Plant Appraisal Branch,
Frank A. Baldwin.
San Bias Waiter
Jailed For Theft
t . (.
.. ...
t A San Bias waiter at Ft. Xob Xob-be
be Xob-be Post Exchange today was found
guilty of petit larceny and sentenc sentenced
ed sentenced to serve 10 davs in the Rsihna
jail.
In addition, Federico Solis, the
23-year-old defendant, was given
a $100 fine which was snsnpnHvi
on the condition that he renav th
$85 he stole from the San Bias
Association of Ft. Kobbe.
Originally, Solis was cha r g e d
with crand larrenv. but this was
dismissed todav on a motion
manp nv i.nn ASNifsrnni uiRrripr. at.
1 1. 1L . ., .V.fJ ..I
tnrnpv Morton J.' Thomson, and
the San Bias waiter was rebooked
on the lesser charge.

Thi year, more than ever. Uncle Sam
hopes that's the way it will work out.
And the best way to do-it-yourself is
to use the handy, plain-talk directions in
step-by-step form in your
NEA INCOME TAX PRIMER
For 14 years; it's been the do-it-yourself
tax guide for millions of newspaper readers.
It's yours again EXCLUSIVELY in

"of he Panama American
Slarlinq tomorrow

V

. Haven't You Seen It Yet? Don't Miss It I
You'll Be Grateful For Our Advice
TODAY LAST DAY
a:CEHTRAL-LUX

VALTDISNcY

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v j w'" W W
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FIVE CENTS

fering of Ford stock," he said.
"It's the most unusual stock sale
ever held."
E. O. Cartwright, Dallas. Tex.,
resident partner of Me r r 1 1 1
Lynch, Pierce, Fenner pnd Bea Bea-ne,
ne, Bea-ne, said the stock sold so quick quickly
ly quickly it "went out the window."
Atlanta's Courts and Compa Company
ny Company said the reception given the
Ford stock was "overwhelming"
The brokers said they believed
most persons bought the stock
to keep it, not for speculation.
Chicago brokers said the stock
sale was spectacular in their
area also.
"There is a tremendous de demand
mand demand in the Midwest," : Chi Chicago
cago Chicago spokesman .for Blyth & Co.
said. "It would be Impossible to
estimate the number of shares
which could have been sold. It
would read almost like the na national
tional national debt."
In St. Louis, officials of A. O.
Edwards Si Spns said they could
have sold 10 times more Ford
stock than the 148,000 shares
they were alloted.
Wall Street brokers said that
the Investment world generally
would benefit from this unpre unprecedented
cedented unprecedented stock offering because
it brought many new Investors
Into the market. :
CZ Tax Statements
Come Out Jan. 23
It was announced today by the
Comptroller's Office at Balboa
Heights that withholding tax state statements,
ments, statements, Forms W-2, reporting wag wages
es wages paid in calendar year 1955 and
taxes withheld, will be distributed
to U. S. citizen employes of the
Panama Canal Company and the
Canal Zone Government on Jan.
23, together with pay checks which
are being distributed on that day.
The withholding tax statements
are furnished in duplicate. One
copy is required for filing with
the final income tax returns and
the duplicate copy is for the tax taxpayer's
payer's taxpayer's record.
w J v 'Ul

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