The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02970

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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IN GOOD SPIRITS President Elsenhower laughs heartily
with his brother, Dr. Milton Eisenhower, at Key West, Fla.,
shortly before he ended his vacation and returned to Wash Wash-"
" Wash-" ington.

Icy Storm Glazes
Eastern Seaboard

NEW YORK, Jan. 9 (UP)
A mid-winter storm with winds
of hurricane force turned the
eastern seaboard Into a tveach tveach-ous
ous tveach-ous sheet of ice today, paralyz paralyz-inj;
inj; paralyz-inj; automobile transportation in
, metropolitan '.arcas-i. . ,,,.?J.
The "very large storm' hover hovered
ed hovered between the Atlantic coast
and Bermuda.
. The U.S. Weather Bureau in
Washington said the offshore
; storm caused the freezing drizz drizzles
les drizzles which glazed the nation s east
coast. w-:N- 4i ''
Traffic slowed to a snail's pace
in most city areas of New York,
New Jersey, Pennsylvania and
some of the more northern sec sections
tions sections of New England.
police department switchboards
were flooded with minor acci accident
dent accident calls. Orders went out to
EderT Is Best
In Top Post
-Rab Butler'
t vnrM Ton 0 (UP). R. A.
T7..,ir thp mnn rumor said
would replace Sir Anthony Eaen
as Prime Minister, declared last
night he will support Eden be because
cause because he is "the best Priue Min Minister
ister Minister we have."
Butler voiced what appeared
today to be1 the public view of
the majority of Eden's political
colleagues and the somewhat
penitent Tory newspapers.
Reports that Eden was on the
way out as Prime Minister and
leader of the Conservative Par Party
ty Party reached their zenith over
the weekend. They apparently
frightened news papers and
T "nameless politicians into be believing
lieving believing they had gone too far,
too fast.
Or, that all the criticism had
merely been a warning and that
Eden has now learned his lesson.
Conservative politicians and
Tory newspapers alike do- not
want to sabotage Eden's mission
to Washington, later this month
for talks with President Eisen Eisenhower.
hower. Eisenhower. -They do not want to
weaken the Conservative Party
in the face of growing socialist
strength under new leader Hugh
Gaitskell.
The Daily Mail,' one of the pa papers
pers papers which led the attack on
Eden last week, practically apol
ogized toaay.
: "...We took the line we did
not wanting to embarrass the
'Government but to ginger them
up by informing them of public
feeling," the paper said in a
front page editorial.
"Those who call for the re resignation
signation resignation of the Prime Minister
are being ridiculous."
The conservative Daily Tele Telegraph
graph Telegraph did not backtrack from
its criticisms of Eden. But it
made excuses for him on the
same issues it had accused him
of "dithering" over.;
-"There i"! nftsiPn of n or&n or&n-ized
ized or&n-ized move to snnplant the Prime
Minister," the Telegraph said.

A
f

, i
' -Ms
t. 1
-i
motorists to slow down.; cars
crept aiong treacnerous streets
or staiiea ueipiessiy.
In New York City. Dr. Wil
liam Jansen, faupenntenaen of
bcnoois, cancelled al school Duses,
-e&esu'ians touna wanting on
some streets virtually impossible,
cozens were hospitalized ytlta
injuries from ialis. Scores oi
automobile accidents occurfed
along the Eastern Seaboard.
The drizzle so fine it could
be caileu a mist began falling
late last nignt, glazing streets
ana siaewaiKs witn a aanger
ousiy slippery film. The fiim oe
gan to disappear during t he
mornine rush hour as teinner
atures rose suddenly in the ireak
ish storm.
Chiang Kai-shek
Plane Used By 3
China Defectors
TOKYO, Jan. 9 (UP). Radio
Peiping said last night that three
Nationalists delected to Commu Communist
nist Communist China in the personal plane
of Chiang Kai-shek's younger
son. '-
The broadcast said the three
defectors were a pilot and
ground crew of the Civil Air
Transport Company.
They took off from a Talepi
aimnrh ah fl:10" ft.m. Raturdav
and landed at an air base in Fu Fu-lrlpn
lrlpn Fu-lrlpn Prnvinr.e nnri rer.eived a
warm welcome from the Com Communists,
munists, Communists, the broadcast added.

(
y ) r

THE MALARIA-STRICKEN WIFE of a National Guard earri earri-'
' earri-' son commander at Coiba is being helped off the 26th Albrook
Rescue Squadron Plane which brought her here Saturday for
hospitalization at Santo Tomas Hospital., The patient. Mrs.
Aurora de Sousa, 45, had been running a high fever for ten
days and was apparently suffering from malaria. Shown giv--in
her assistance are (L to 4 CpL Eenitcz LuU E.t Z:X Ju?.n,
Souza, Jr., the sick woman and Dr. ledoia Ccdeiio of fcanto
Tomas Hospital. (U.S. Army photo)

French Begin'
HecHc Hunt
For New Govt.
PARIS. Ji2. A fUPV nn. nf
the most dramatic wwif in
French parliamentary history
opened today with party chiefs
laving the eroundwork fnr naJ
tlonal conference in search nf a
government.
The former OanllistV Ik n s )
have scheduled a meeting for
tomorrow, and anti-tax Mesiah
Pierre Poujade, whose right wing
movement won 52 set aftpr
the Jan. 2 voting, is to hold a
National Consres hecinninir
Saturday.
Socialist Leader Guv Mollet
has called an extraordinary
Congress of the French Social
ist Party for Jan. 15 and 16, and
Pierre Mendes France's Radicals
are to meet Jan. 16.
With elections results a week
old Frenchmen have no more i
idea who will form the next gov-l
ernment than they had before
they voted.
Although the election results
showed' a slight general move to
the left, the new Assembly will
be made up of two extremist
mocs on enner side or two ap apparently
parently apparently irreconcilable Center
groups. wv;
Reading from left to right
there a"re the Communists (150
seats), ; ? the Republican Front
(160), '' the out-going govern governmental
mental governmental Center-Right Coalition
(200 and the .o-called Ueo Ueo-Fascist
Fascist Ueo-Fascist Poujadlsts (53.
' The Communist have been
beating the drum for anew
Popular front government, 'such
as Leon Blum headed before the
war.:
the Republican Front led by
Mendes-France and Sdciallst
Party Leader Guy Mollet 'has
been quick to reject the Red
overtures; .. ..,...,!,
Crime Doesn't Pay ;
Pickpocket Picked
MEXICO CITY, Jan! 9 (UP) -Pickpocket
Jesus Ramirez Sanchez
sadly told police yesterday that, a
few moments after lifting his first
wallet of the New Year he was
beaten and robbed by two thugs.
Ramirez Sanchez said he lifted
a "fat" wallet from a customer in
a cafe and was assaulted after he
haH loft hefnre he even had had a
chance to examine the billfold.

Bad Check Artist Swindles
Stores, But Not Old Cabbie

A foet.talkintf Chileno who skin
ped town after he passed bad
checks last week left in his wake
V

fAr people know the truth end the

PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 1956

s In terrnenr

JERUSALEM. Jan. 9 (UP)-A
curfew on Jordanian' Jerusalem
was lifted today following-an
ergy of anu-western nots out
(the aftnosphtre was described as
"Sitlll tense."
AM elsewhere, the whole Mid
east waaJfl ferment.
Unofficial sources saida-aum
ber of "CommunJt were ar arrested,
rested, arrested, in conntction with yes
terdays rioting in Arab Jerusa Jerusa-lem
lem Jerusa-lem during which the U.S. Con
sulate was attacked and the stars
and stripes ripped down. The
Anglo-Iranian Bank was also at
tacked.
The Jordan capital -of Amman,
where mobs wrecked American
and British offices yesterday,
was Isolated. Telephone and
telegraph communications were
cut early today apparently at
Etf Molls, Swears
Order Of Ths Day
For Frigid Zcns
Cold early Monday morning?
Sure.
Blankets gotten out of storage?
At Balboa Heights, anyway.
Icicles on the eaves? Not quite.
More specifically. Chief Hydro-
prspher W H.' F' 'nger. puts it
Thp Ipmnpraturit it R A thai
Heights dropped to 66.4 degrees
early Monday morning, me low lowest
est lowest temperature recorded since
Jan. 12, 1951 when the themome-
ler inaicaieu oo.i aegreea.
Thin i. th icht time that
mnrtnr nf fiR Apgren or he-
low nas oeen recoraea in ine a-
nal Zone during January since
1QOK
Monday morning's 66.4 degrees,
however, did not set a new rec rec-nrHwTh
nrHwTh rec-nrHwTh lowest temoeratuure on
rarnnt fnr Ttalhoa HpiffhtS. is 63
degree's, recorded Jan. 27, 1910.;
Meanwhile the temperature of
the sea water at Balboa is also
rfrnnnini? Water temperature re-
onrHoH in the 24 hours ending it
8 a.m. Monday showed a low of
77 degrees. The drop in the sea
tmtW9ni- is in annual pheno
menon, brought about by the up-
welling of deep cold water in ra
ami Raw similar mid water DC
cur. Hurinff the drv season alone
much of the r acme coast.
several wiser, but poorer Panama Panamanians.
nians. Panamanians. The Panama Secret Police has
reports that Victor J. Caffarena,
a Chilean national who tried to
pass himself off alternately as a
rich buyer of horses and also as
a representative of German firms,
managed to get out of the coun country
try country on Jan. 2 headed for Costa
Rica before his various schemes
were discovered.
Hardest hit wax n wrier nf Nmi.
dades Los Angeles who said that
me lau, good-looking swindler with
a neat balck mustache told him
he was travelling here to purchase
race horses. For a one-week pe period
riod period Caffarena stopped by the
store each day to compare prices
on merchandise
The storekeeper said today that
on uec. ai, me uuiean made his
killing, by picking out $102 worth
of men's clothing, pins a nylon
suitcase and paying for it with a
check, which bounced when at
tempts were made to cash it the
loiiowmg week.
There seemed to be some ques question
tion question as to how manv nacennrte
Caffarena was using. On the check
ne iisteo no. 825-318. The Panama
Secret Police who took the num num-her
her num-her noted on this departure from
Toeumen said it was No. 918. At
the KOOSeve t Hotel where he
tablished residence for a week he
gave his passport No. as 1812-032.
Chilttn Consul Gabriel Osta
today danied any previous knowl knowledge
edge knowledge of Caffarena and said he
had been notified of the cat.
Two others who were taken in
by the fast-talker were a taxi-cab
driver whom he paid with $25
check, which bounced, and man
ager of the Hotel Roosevelt whom
ne swinaiea out ot $2U.
At one Panama establishment.
Caii'areiia told t;,e cnun.r he l.-'id
(Continued on Page 6, CoL 7)

country is safe Abraham Lincoln,

the order of young King Hus
sein. Jordan was without a gov
ernment.
(BBC) in London reported
that new demonstrations had
broken out in Amman today.)
Them xuaa nn nnsitlve nffirla!
news from the Jordan capital
since last mmnignc
Amman was heliever) ctlll
der a strict curfew. Arab Legion1
troops were roaming the littered
streets late last night, according
w repons wnicn reacnen uere
before the communica 1 1 o n s
blackout.
Unconfirmed reports gp6ke of
demonstrations in Blu and He Hebron.
bron. Hebron. ;
Eighteen persons were wound wounded
ed wounded in yesterday's Amman riots,
according to news disnat.ehe
from Beirut. Western nffleee
wrecked in Amman included the
u.3. roint 'our aid headquarters
and the British Miriniea.it. nonir
A number of British and Ameri American,
can, American, private automobiles were
stoned, overturned on set afire.
There was nn mention c-ihc-u
-- .... v.. VA AJAAWiOll
or American -casualties.

Obligation? OX An Exile Political Guest
Editorial Translated From "EI Panama America"
Some weeks ago we discussed the obligations and limitations
of a political exile. We indicated then that It was the duty of our
country to offer the best possible accomodalons and laciiities'to
the Argentine citizen Juan Domingo Peron, until recently Presi President
dent President oi his country, and that it was natural for those who sym-

pathied with' the political tendencies of theexrte to try to make"
nis stay in our midst as pleasant as possible.
We assumed that it was just a case of an exile, although it

prooaoiy coma oe tnar, oi a guest 10 wnom tne com tesy oi tem temporary
porary temporary residence was granted. We also indicated that the political

refugee or exile had at the same time, certain obligations to our
government and among them, at least, la that of doing every every-ning
ning every-ning humanly possible to avoid complications between our coun country
try country and his with regard to his stay here. ; s
In addition, it snould be taken into consideration that Pan Panamanians
amanians Panamanians who for any reason sympathize with the ideas or-political
practices of the exile or quest, are under obligation to re refrain
frain refrain from any act which could be interpreted as that of collabo

ration with the exile or guest that would, tend to create problems

between the Republic and the country to wnicn he belongs.
Now, both abroad as in Panama there have been comments
regarding the' actions of Mr. Peron himself and of some Panama-'
nlan citizens, which, if true, could lend themself to sentiment un unfavorable
favorable unfavorable to" the best interests of our country, since Panama main maintains
tains maintains the most cordial relations with Argentina.
Time magazine has summed up the situation thus:
thing humanly possible to avoid complications between our couii couii-eampaign
eampaign couii-eampaign of sabotage and harassment against the revolu revolutionary
tionary revolutionary government that threw him out? Last week, after at
. least seven brush-fire insurrections In 24 days, many Argen Argentines
tines Argentines were beginning to think so.'
We believe' that our country has a right to offer Mr. Peron all
accomodations and necessary facilities during his transitory stay
amone us. with all the dlenitv It demands. But at the same time,

we repeat, he has the inescapable obligation of avoiding any pos possible
sible possible complications of the International relations of Panama which
has offered hmv hospitality at a time perhaps that Is most dif difficult
ficult difficult for him.

Blonde Cinderella HeadsForHollyvoo(

Grace Says Prince

CHICAGO, Jan. 9 (UP),
Grace 1 Kelly was heading for
Hollywood and her last full-time
fling at movie-niaklng today.
The blonde Cinderella girl said
that movies will play a support support-inir
inir support-inir role, if anv. in her life after
her marriage with Prince Ealnier
III of Monaco tms spring.
The handsome Prince jwill be
hnnn in his own Palace, she said.
And she indicated she will let
her royal husband and his sud sud-jects
jects sud-jects decide whether she should
continue as a movie queen.
Miss Kelly aso revealed she
didn't fall In love with her prince
rharminir until Christmas Day,
just three weeks ago. His pro
posal followed wunin tne wee&,
she said.
While Miss Kelly went by train
to Hollywood, her Prince drove
to Palm Beacn, na., ior some
skin-diving and deep sea fish
ing. He will rejoin his 26-year-
old fiancee in the movie capita
within a few weeks.
There was growing speculation
that "It was all settled" that the
Prince and the movie queen will
be married in a religious cere
mony in her home town of Phila
delDhia in June after sue nn
ishes part of her film commit'
ments.
A civil ceremonv will probably
follow in Monaco, where the
Prince's subjects have Insisted
on a first hand look at the royal
wedding. ...
The poised and beautiful Miss
Kelly spent 12 hours in Chicago
before bcarcllr.g a 'train, for Los
Angeles.

Rfvipwmn lL

Security Laws
WASHINGTON. Jan. 9 (UP)
The Supreme Court with four
major national security cases on
its docket, convenes today to de
liver opinions. v
After rendering decisions and an'
nouncing new cases accepted, the
nine justices will then adjourn un
til next Monday.
A constitutional test of the 1950
Internal Security Act, designed to
crack down on the- Communist
Party as an organization was the
top Communist issue before the
high court.
Under the act, the government's
principal legal weapon for fight
ing subversives, the party is re
quired to register with the Sub Subversive
versive Subversive Activities Control Board as
a Moscow-dominated organization,
to disclose its finances and' to -lab
el its propaganda.
Party leaders contend the act is
unconstitutional in several respects.
They argue, among other things,
that it violates their mur amend amendment
ment amendment privilege against pos s i b 1 e
self-incrimination.
"Security issues are involved in
two other important cases the
Court has under advisement.
She greeted newsmen in the
swank Beau Nash room of the
AmDassaaor west noiei ana re revealed
vealed revealed that, as far as she was
concerned, it was love at second
sight between her and Rainier.
She had met her future nus-.
band Just once, in Monaco last
year, before he came to this
country, Then he came to her

GRACE KELLY ENGAGED TO TRINCE-John B. Kelly, Sr., offers
-Ranter HI t! Monaco,- his wUi!is.ILeilit.and 5Ctrr-s-d":.htrr
adelphla Country Club, where the youn g couti

7

Put

0

Of

econcl TesTii

jefore Adviser

.WASHINGTON jan. 9 (UP) President Eisenf?cv:cr
today was ready to start talking "objectively and inten intensively
sively intensively with his "most trusted advisers" about whcth:r
he should seek a second ierm.
He said he would put the question "right up to tl 2
forefront" for a final decision now that he has endci 'i
south Florida vacation and returned to the "full svir.3"
of the presidency.
But he said the question requires "thorough stup stuping"
ing" stuping" and is "complicated," and that his health and .3
sense of duty as well as political factors must be consum consumed.
ed. consumed. As a result, he said, he cannot tell when his find ci ci-swer
swer ci-swer will be given. He said it might be March and it r.il.t
be later.

Mr. Elsenhower flew back to
the White House yesterday aft after
er after U days of work and play at
the Key West, na., Navai tsase
as part of his recuperation from
a Sept, 24 kept attack. t
He said he felt "very much
better, stronger and much more
able to eet about." From now on,
he said, he expects to be "back
in the offl"p as v r w 1."
. Mr. Eisenhower made
comments to reporters in a 13
minute news conference his
first since Aug. 14 before leav leaving
ing leaving Key West.
He emphasized the state of
his health as a factor in reach reaching
ing reaching his decision on a second
term. He noted that America
elects every four years and that
it is a "very critical thing" to
shift control in between eleo
tlons. :
Mr. Eisenhower apparently was
suggesting that he would! want
to be sure his health would per permit
mit permit him to serve a full second
term before agreeing to do so.
He said that "always some
thing happens that Is untoward
when a government Is changed
at other times", than at regu regular
lar regular elections.
He also noted that there -was
a stock market decline as a re result
sult result of his heart attack. .;
He said that in reaching; a
final decisln on his 1958 plans,
"I will want to talk with some
of my most trusted advisers." 1
He was asked who some of
those advisers were and wheth

Will Rule

parents Philadelphia home on
Christmas Day at the lnvitatlpn
of her aunt and uncle, she said
"I fell in love with him on
Christmas Day' she told the
newsmen. '- ;
Once they are married, Miss
Kelly said, she will follow the
European tradition that the hus husband
band husband is ruler of his family.

nvs cr

F 3
n
ItJU
er he already had talked v,;:.'.i
some of them.
The President said he h: i.
mentioned two Press Stiiuy
jams C. Hagerty and y,iz t-.i-ther,
Dr. -Milton Eisenhower.
: "But," .lie aded, "I v. ; ;
ing about bringing thh l. -bout
a second term) iv
the fnv.-ironV'C'K

Wsiabouu'it objectively u

siveiy We 'haven t done t
Apparently they haven't
to bother me."
Although the President did
not name them, others in his
"trusted adviser" category pres presumably
umably presumably would include presiden presidential
tial presidential Assistant Sherman' Adams.
Attorney General Herbert Brow-
nell, Jr. and former Mew yens
Gov. Thomas E. Dewey all im
portant figure since Mr. Elsen
hower's success! ui 1952 cam
paign.
He presumably also would con
fer with GOP National Chair
man Leonard W. Hall.
Suicide Seals Self
In Gas Soaked S
TOItREON, Mexico, Jan. 9 (V?)
Vicente Rios Perez, 70, con,, .t .t-ted
ted .t-ted suicide Sunday by makm a
large canvas sack, soaking ii i 1
gasoline, getting into it, sewii a
from he inside and setting u tn
fire.
The Roc,
"After my-marriage, -my c
phasls will be on marriage." ?'
said.
- She saiM "I don't know" vi.
asked whether she would con
tinue to star In movies. But sh
indicated she would follow tfv
wishes of her husband and th
natives of the tiny Riviera prin
cipality over which he rule-.
conprat.il
atic-r.-? h



I

TITO
TBI PANAMA AMIF.iCAN AN INrtriNSINT CAILT KlZS?kfl
MONDAY, JANUARY 9, I?: 3

- THE PANAMA AMERICAN 1
tmip AND fUKIIKig BY THl PANIM AMERICAN fUI, INC.
roUMOIO T MUON HOUNitVIUt, IN MM i
NAIIMOC IO AHIA. IPITOR
7. M TirT P O BO 'J4. PAN. t
TlitrHONt 2-0740 Lines)
CAIlt ADOKI. AfMMSBICAH, PANAMA
C C"1C1 1178 ClNTHAl AVINUI mH 12TH AND tSTH TIrt
rOMlSN IFMINTATIV, JOSHUA P. POWiaa, INC.
S4S MADitON Ave Nl VcrnC (17 1 M. V.
1K11 tT
' MONTH, IN .7 1
, fit NSNTHA. IN 80 ?2
le oni tia. IN -"--- 18.90 14.00
i nri n rout rcnuM thi mabms cwn coiumh 1
Tfca Mtd laa fc ftrvm to raafen at Tke "sauna AmarUe
I l(fTki ra racafvee' arattftilla aa4 art fce-le' ia wh.lly ttl.dMul
l rta cantrifcyra a knar daa'r e Inpatient it a daeta't ata ta
: atir eay lettari art ubliihta' ia tha areaf tcra.
. Plttit try te lha Mer limiua la ana Mia laaath.
lMity f Utttr writare it kali a ttricfa aaatia'eace.
'Ti aevaaetef enemas aa raipiikilir let stewaeata at aaiaiaw

' 9i?Hn4 la lettan frara teaser.

. v'. SAN ANTONIO BUGLE
:;t We tossed well-used 1955 out of the door and will see if
'We fan do better in 1956. Thafi my only resolution. We had
but little to kick about and managed to clean up that Christmas
C turkey on New Year's Day. .. ,-ftnft
' The old year did a landslide business with more than 33,000
c deaths in this country, so we stayed home holiday week
; I t i "Sp keep to the toll down. While we didn't have a sing.a
' ; accident in the city, the county didn't fare so well A final

. k Ls not in, but h i smau. ine preswtnv ox ou iuinu
, r College, Dr. Lawton, aged 68, was killed and his wife
y injured when his station wagon left the road at a culvert
-?f the street Inside the city limits of KerrsvUle Saturday

(. 'entry caused by heart failure,
- eemi very few of my old friends missed sending greetings
eason, and two came back with second cards, stating they
. already looking for my '56 greeting. Will do the best I can,
u am not so sure. it
,iVlth all the rain, snow and cold In most of the country, we
tare still dry and warm. '... ' . .,
Water supply reserves have doubled in the country in the
'past 10 years, but there is not half enough. The storage on ihe
IrIo Grande has almost doubled as have the rains up the river
and its tributarys but not half enough yet. ;
-Borne day we will get a portion of the Missouri River divert diverted
ed diverted down our way. Mr. Haskins says the Mississippi but it's too
lexoenslve for the land it would serve Possibly SI, Possibly No.
. Sincerely.
-I
' "Pop" Wright

WATTCATCHER

Sir;-
'"After reading In the Mail Box about the large receiver TV
antennas, the big screen on Ancon hill that will dampen out
the TV signals irom Panama City, and the trade winds that
blow the signals back to Oatun from Colon, I have decided to
come to the aid of my good neighbors in Panama City and Colon
so that we will get better TV reception than those in the Canal
Zone. ":" '-X '.-:: 'v.,,;
Now, as I recall the Armed Forces are only going to use 200
watu. That means that the large antenna In the Zone will use
up all the wattage and none will be left for my good neighbors.
. Here Is the dope first we have to steal the screen off An Ancon
con Ancon hill-and cut it up into small pieces about a square foot in
size. This is placed on the small antennas and formed inty a
cone. As the antenna is turned the cone scoops up all the watts
thus leaving the CZ with, very poor reception.
h p- Batman,"

THANKS
ir: v
Have von met a lariv whose

(his unexpected pleasure during the 'Xmas holidays at a party, i while. Here you have the spread spread-Che
Che spread-Che speaks fair Spanish, and moves through a mixed group of ""I ? new principle in labor

;people with crArm and ease.

, -that iweet xnenaiy smue that makes you feel at home any time.
he can talk about almost any part of the Republic of Panama,
because She lived in the Interior and has traveled over it a let
la the four years she haa been here. c
Panama Is fortunate to have this person among the Amer Americans
icans Americans who live In the Republic of Panama. There is room fcnd
much need for more people especially women like her here If
only to give us just some of that pleasant outlook on life, that
;she has.
, This letter Is to say, thanks to you Charley for the many
things you have done for Panamanians, and the nice kind words
jou always say about our country. If ever you leave us I for one
shall be very sad.

GORGAS

I The Sergeant's Wife who objects to "foreign" doctors (Mall
r-xr Jan. 5) had better learn to put her values in the correct
J
.; i seriously doubt that the Army doctors back In the States
4nckhalf the time and personal interest In her case as have all
yt Panamanian doctors I have seen at Gorgas.
Best she be told that the merits of a good doctor are not
Judged by his ciifcenshlp or his color or his creed. It's my
I pinion as a service man's wife, and I feel I speak for the major majority
ity majority of us. t5 .t r v.- i s Wife is being very petty and not at all
, e f .; z .: r the, Army or her country like her to be.
A Navy Wife

Mil 3
I i'.'
If. :

. ..... .. X .. ; .' J

l-t-' hin of
r 9"1 f-t t;3

CHARLEY

"
first 'name i Charley? T had 1
She Is kind, gay, pretty, and has
Your Deal
DOCTORS
T. M ., v r.t -m
r,;i 2 o'clock f;r."-- pretty
fa;i?r.an t i L"

Labor News
And
Comment

ay VICTOR RIESCL
When losses in just one strike
climb towards the halT-a-mlaon
aoutr mark, there are pome
mighty determined people on both
tides fighting for what they be-
uve are hie and death issues.
You can be sure, that's the story
of the three-month Westinghouse
strike.
Over $300,000,000 were lost in
!l days in production, proms,
wages, and smashed cars, homes
heads and factory windows right
across the east. Money was also
spent for special deputies, legal
maneuvering and to bail out sail
ors supplied by the AFL-CIO Sea
farers Union as pickets in Haiti
more. There, the Seafarers Inter
national dispatched 100 able-bodied
men a day until the striking In
ternational Union of Electrical
workers made a peace pact with
the. Baltimore Police Dept.
The union agreed not to miss
picket and the Police Dept. agreed
not to curtail peaceful picketing.
Money was being spent by both
sides for photographic equipment,
proiessionai pnotograpners, uooq
ngnts ana mm.
The spectacle filmed will never
be shown at your local movie
house. But it will be carefully
gone' over. The union filmed all
non-strikers going into the plants
The company filmed the pickets
and officials tell me they even
planted hidden microphones near
the gates so that the language of
this industrial war and the picket
captains commands could be used
later, if necessary, in legal action
This is war, all right. War as
In the old days when John Lewis
refused to evacuate factories his
followers had seized. At that time
Michigan s Gov. Murphy (circa
1937) threatened at first to use
the militia. Lewis shouted that he
would tear off his own shirt and
stand bare-chested in a plant win window
dow window so the first shot would hit
him.':-''-'
It's always thus when strikes
get out of hand and run on and on.
Every labor leader knows that at
a certain moment in marathon
strikes '. mass pickets have been
thrown around plants and the care careening
ening careening rocks and clubs then have
ricocheted politically into high of
fices, in the past this tactic has
brought swift government inter
vention from City Hall on up to
uie wnue House ana a quicx ena
to the strike.
But a call to the White House
revealed that Mr. Eisenhower nev never
er never had any plans to intervene.
True, 10- pro-labor Senators called
for a Senate investigation of the
stoppage but that didn't help.
uniy the White House could
force a showdown and President
Eisenhower loni aeo served
notice that he would be neutral.
So the Westinghouse Corp.. in
words of the pros in this business,
made an "investment" in this
strike. The "investment" cost man
agement $15,000,000 a week. But
management -fisures it worth
"la ""? 'Boulwareism", the
Wall Street Journal once called
it, because it was "invented" by
Lemuel Boulware, head of person personnel
nel personnel and public relations for Gen General
eral General Electric.
Boulware, an Iron-principled,
stentorian fellow Who plays us
newsmen the unfair trick of know knowing
ing knowing as much about labor as we
think we do, has a simple theory.
Make an offer to the union. Don't
make it higher or lower than you
will actually settle for. Stick by
it. Take a strike, even a long one
if necessary, to establish the fact
that your oiler is not for bargain bargaining
ing bargaining but for signing.
Today Boulware has a five-year
contract for GE from the same
union which struck Westinghouse.
There you have the issue for
which Westinghouse fights. Once
the principle is established, the
union is expected to bargain in
the future but to understand that
the first offer is final and no
Strike cap move the corporation.
The union feels that it can't ac
cept this theory because it would
give mem no margin iur uargam uargam-in.
in. uargam-in. So. the union, too, lost heavily
for a principle. About $1,000,000 a
aay in wages nas neen sacrmceu
by 55,000 workers.
It's toush all around. .Manage
ment has taken a chance on losing
its market. The union men are in
great need. No one could predict
how it would end. But everybody
knew how and when it began. That
was the time for calmer action.
SIREN TROUBLE
CHICAGO (UP) Fire Com
missioner Anthony J. Mullaney has
marie it easier to use the sirens on
fire department ambulances. Last
June, he ordcrea me sirens useu
only in extreme emergency be because
cause because drivers were driving 'by
sirens instead of common sense.
But ambulances were running into
trouble getting through traffic
jams, and now Mullaney has given
his permission to sound the siren
in those ugm spots.
-I
"1

f: 3m
"wIM"aaMaalawaMaiaMt ... ,f f. .r m)rM.1r., -T1-M Wl ff --, .. h.1,..wW. tH .. ..

UN
WASHINGTON (NEA) Ac
tions of the United Nations Gener General
al General Assembly's tenth session, just
adjourned in New York, will get
their real tests within the next
few months.
Fast will come the 12-nation
conference in Washington, begin beginning
ning beginning Jan. 23. It will make plans
for a new U.N. specialized agency
to promote and control world de development
velopment development of atomic energy for
peaceful purposes.
A draft charter will be written
for submission to the next General
Assembly which meets in Septem
ber, 1956.
The olan is to create a new
"Atomic Energy Organization"
AEO. It would operate something
like the present World Health, Civ Civil
il Civil Aviation, Food and Asriculture
Organizations, or the Economic
and Social Council
The Russian bloc wants to have
this AEO set up under the Security
Council. This would -make it sub subject
ject subject to Russian veto control. But
the United States and most other
nations want international atomic
energy development as an inde independent
pendent independent organization, like World
Bank, reporting only to the Gen General
eral General Assembly.
A second big test of this year's
U.N. work will begin ia February
when the five-nation Disarmament
Committee meets again in New
York.. It will have before it the

Walter Winchelllri

Lenden Latter
. "In England, when you find the
door of your safe off its hinges.
you dial 909, That's the CID (Crim-
which has a branch in every local local-inal
inal local-inal Investigation Department)
ity headed by a Yard trained
man. Your phone call turns out
his squad cars. Nobody carries
guns in the British cops and rob robbers
bers robbers fraternity it just wouldn't be
cricket. In a recent Tangiers fra fracas
cas fracas between British and, U.S.
smugglers, one New Jersey char character
acter character exposed a big pistol which
was promptly taken away, from
him by a gentleman in a Savile
Row suit who chided him in tones
reminiscent of Ronald Colman.
"The modern London criminal
has a lawyer, an accountant, an
agent, and a clipping service. He
also nas a Business.
"Last year in London, in a one
way side street, a KLM armoured
guard was carrying two small
crates of bullion worth J112,W0,
Sunddenly, he, didn't have it. Sev
eral cars and trucks just happen
ed to be stalled, cluttering the
tiny street and paralyzing traffic.
Nobody ever did know exactly
what happened.
"The drama critic of British
crime is Percy Hoskins of the
Express. He had been predicting
for weeks in polished prose that a
big job was in the making. There
had been an epidemic of jail
breaks and certain specialists were
on me sweet
"Now there was a run on papers
as London s seven big dailies tea
turcd the theft across eicht col
umns. In the West End pubs and
clubs where the thespians who
piay cops ana roDbers mmgje witn
the cops and robbers themselves,
there was a buzz of conjecture.
Top ins. actors and even superin superintendents
tendents superintendents showed up within min minutes
utes minutes at the Star Tavern, the Mai Maisonette
sonette Maisonette Club, Les Ambassadeurs,
and other hangouts, for a polite
census or tne opposition teim."-
"Eddie Chaoman has a business.
' 'nufactures cowboy boots for
cnnaren. lie also has 4-3 convic-
uous tor safecracking and other

Potcmkin Show

ill A I IT VS' V;;.:

Faces Stern
By PETER EDSOII
resolution, passed by a 56-to-T vote,
endorsing President Eisenhower's
U.S. -Soviet exchange of date and
aerial inspection system.
The resolution also includes for
consideration Premier Bulganin's
proposals for reduction of arma
ments. So it is believed there is
more chance for action oh arms
limitation than heretofore.
The U.S. Air Force display of
high altitude aerial photography at
the U.N. is credited with exerting
great influence on the delegates.
It convinced many that the Ei Eisenhower
senhower Eisenhower plan was practical and
that it should be put into effect.
A third U.N. test is related to
both atomic energy and disarma
ment.' It will come from a 15-na-tlon
committee meeting early in
1956. Its assignment is to plan for
the distribution of information on
atomic bomb fall-out, for the pro protection
tection protection of civilian populations.
In spite of several apparent set setbacks
backs setbacks on some of the key inter international
national international disputes, U.S. Assistant
Secretary of State Francis 0. Wil Wilcox,
cox, Wilcox, in charge of United Nations
affairs, is optimistic over tha re results
sults results of the tenth General Assem Assembly.
bly. Assembly. The bottleneck on admission of
new members was finally broken
by the package deal to take Is
16 new members.
There is still much misunder misunder-staTTcfinz
staTTcfinz misunder-staTTcfinz of the U.S. position on
this vote. But it is explained as
offenses, all of which were erased
from his record for his bravery
as a counterspy during the war.
So presently, lie was.receiving his
old friends, Inspector Griffith and
staff in his Kensington flat. While
he poured drinks and chatted about
the dog races at White City, a
police technician painted his wall
fixtures and door knobs with acid,
looking for gold that might have
been disguised as ornaments.
"Billy Hill is a soft-spoken Cock
ney who owns a doll factory. On
the other hand, Billy has done so
much time, seventeen years, that
although free as a bird his diet
is restricted to oatmeal with an
occasional slice of Spam this be
ing the standard menu in the Lim Limey
ey Limey big houses. An impresario of
crime, Billy was the producer of
the famous Dartmoor Riots. Billy
doesn't drink or smoke and when
he tells a story, it is a big busi
ness deal. A check always chances
hands, and Duncan Webb of The
People (4 million every Sunday)
or Ken Smith of the Kemsley
Newspapers (who tends bar, at
the star on Sunday anernoonsj
takes down every comma. Then
the presses start rolling out front
pages in millions with the byline,
By Billy Hill, King of the London
Underworld.
"Odhams Press oaid Billy 24.
000 pounds, that's $72,000 (bona
fide price) for one -part essay,
And foreign syndication rights
brought more top money from
French, German and Australian
publishers.
"The day of the bullion snatch,
the inspectors called en Billy at
his place of business, tad ever so
politely and with many apol?'es
they searched the premises. Ihis
included opening 40 thousand doll
boxes, which required a squad of
a dozen patrolmen operating in I I-hour
hour I-hour shifts. No trace of the gold
has been found yet, but the police
did arrest two minor league hood
lums who were somehow implicat implicated.
ed. implicated. But as Eddie Chapman says,
'The chsps who did it don't even
Know who did it!'
"Another bullion job didn't quite
come off.' The two gonni'fs as assigned
signed assigned to this operation were sus suspicious
picious suspicious of thrir information. Ten
c'ratinj the cargo depot at London

Tests

consistent with an American pol policy
icy policy first established bv the late
Sen. Arthur Vandenberg's resolu-J
tion of 1948. ;
This declared opposition to the
use of the veto to bar any country
from U.N. membership. The U.S.
has persuaded a number of other
countries to follow this policy. As
a result, only Russia and Nation Nationalist
alist Nationalist China cast vetoes this year.
On the admission of Communist
sateuttes, the U.S. didn't vote.
Increasing membership to 76 na nations,
tions, nations, however, makes necessary a
reorganization of all U.N. agencies,
including enlargement of, the 11 11-nation
nation 11-nation Security Council,, This
means eventual .revision of the
U.N. Charter. ; ;
The General Assembly's 1 43-to-6
vote, with nine countries abstain
ing, set 1957 as the year for show
down on Charter review. But the
issue is liekly to come up for de debate
bate debate next year.
Admission of new members, by
the way, may lead to reduction of
the U.S. Share of U.N. financial
support.
U.N. .refusal to take up the
troublesome situations ia Algeria,
Cyprus and South Africa is taken
as a good sign. It showed to many
critics that the U.N. was not con
cerned' with internal disputes of
any country. In other words, it
showed that the U.N. is not drift
ing towards world government;
faYom
Airport late at night, they found
the shipment but each pig of gold
was coated with aluminum. They
panicked, thinking this wis not the
gold but i nlant. Thev got awav
from there quick. But not before
one of them, a do-it-yourself fan,
took along one small bar. Safely
back' in their hideout they quar quarrelled,
relled, quarrelled, then fought, breaking the
furniture to- such an extent that
the neighbors, only to get some
sleep, called in the police. The
police spotted the metal bar, and
me iaas are now doing seven years.
"The experts say that the great greatest
est greatest burglar England has aver
known is George Chatham, now
doing ten years on a trumped-up
charge because the Yard couldn't
tie him to any of the crimes he
authored. When out ef trouble,
Chatham usually lives in an out
ef the way boardine house. Drink
ing and cirls don't concern him in
the least. Ha has organized some
oi the most brazenly successful
crimes of the past generation,
when he makes his score, a film
comes over his eyes and he shows
up at the dog and horse tracks,
inrowing his money at the book
makers until it's all gone.
"Recently, Chapman took crime
reporter Bob Musel to a pub, He
explained that years ago top offi officials
cials officials of the Yard had had a meet
ing with a whole family which
for generations had troubled the
Yard. Every member of this fam family
ily family had shown a chronic tendency
to rob. 'What are we foinc to do
about you,' said the delegation of
detectives, 'hew can ue help you
turn legitimate?' The spokesman
for the family said that they, toe,
were weary of the chase and would
welcome a chance to quit. 'If we
just had a little pub ef eur own,'
he said, 'just enough te occupy
the whole family. The laws of
tngiand, like our own, normally
prevent known criminals from en-
gaing in the sale of alcohol. But
Scotland Yard recommended that
the license be granted in this ex exceptional
ceptional exceptional case. Today, the pub is
one of the be:l in the neighbor
hood.. And. coaoay.ia ..that ...rub's
management has had even a pu ik iking
ing iking ticket ever since.
"A short while ago a Leicester

(Continued oa Fage 4

h)2

uinnY
a.
WASiriNr.Tnv s-n'v-l
fauver hasn't said much about it
puDiiciy, but he has discussed with
Senate friends the idea of asking
the Senate to acooint
sel to prosecute those guilty of
pioung; Aaorpne wenzeu of the
bit First Boston Finanr Cnmnm.
ny inside the hurls-m hrin w
me Durnose m hatrrnn h n ,.
on-Yates deal.
ADDointment nt fiftArlfl! .Canal
counsel would be an unusual
procedure. It would
over the head of Attorney General
urowneu wno is supposed to pros prosecute
ecute prosecute for the Covernmpnt. md v.
ins in effect that the Sonnto ha1
confidence in Brownell.
However, Senator Kcfauver fig figures
ures figures Brownell will never move
against officials of his own admin administration,
istration, administration, includine Eisenhnwor'n
budget director, Rowland Hughes,
ana Aamirai Strauss, chairman of
the Atomic Energy Commission.
And there seems to be some raon
to back Kefauver up.
irst, Brownell is too busy try trying
ing trying to prosecute members of the
Truman administration for mat matters
ters matters which Brownell knew about
three years ago and which need
noi nave wauea for action uu an
election year.
Second. Kcfauver nolnts nut that
Brownell, while sending a staff of
is prosecutors to St. Louis to "get
Truman,! has completely neglect neglect-ad
ad neglect-ad the conflict of interest nf sr.
Secretary of the Air Force Harold
moon ana reier Mrooei, tormer
public buildings administrator..
If these men were cuilty of a
conflict of interest and thev rer.
tainly resigned in a hurry then,
unaer uue is section 434, U.S.
Code, they were punishable by a
fine of S2.000 or two vears in isil
or both.
J Precedents Far, Prosecuters
Kefauver has been looking up
certain precedents for the appoint appointment
ment appointment of special counsel to eo over
the head of the Justice Denart-
ment. One is the appointment of
umis v. urandeis as special
people's counsel in probine waees
and hours and the Ballinger-Pin-
cnot case, cranueis did such a
notable job for the public that he
was later appoint to the Supreme
tourt.
Another possible precedent was
the appointment of Owen J. Rob Roberts
erts Roberts and ex-Sen. Atlee Pomerene
of Ohio to prosecute Albert Fall,
Harding's secretary of the Interior
and Attorney General Harry
Daugherty in the Teapot Dome
scandal. The country had lost con
fidence in the Justice Department.
so Calvin uoolidge appointed these
two to go over the head of the
Justice Department as special
prosecutors, Like BrandeiS, Rob Roberts
erts Roberts did such a good job that he
too was appointed to the Supreme
Court.
In the recent Dixon-Yates case.
Kefauver plans to point to various
Brownell failures, the latest being
his dismissal of charges against
the Greek shipping magnate A.
S. Onassis, who happened to have
been a client of Browncll's when
the attorney general' was practic practicing
ing practicing law in New York.
The case against Onassis in
volved buying American ships,
men iransierring uicin lo loreign
flags. The case was largely de developed
veloped developed by the Justice Department
under Truman, though the final
indictment was brought under
Brownell. Brownell's subordinates
did not know at the time, how however,
ever, however, that their chief, the attorney
eeneral. and his law firm. Lord,
Day, and Lord, had represented
both Onassis personally and his
company, U.S. Petroleum carriers
suddenly found that they had in indicted
dicted indicted the client who had been
advised by Brownell and his law
firm that it was quite legal for
him to transfer American snips to
foreign flags.
Naturally, all this would have
been highly embarrassing if the
Onassis case had ever come to
trial. It would have show that
Brownell as attorney general was
30th U.S. President
ACROSS
1 30th U.S.
President,
r Coolidge
1He
president upon
Harding's
sudden death
I Shakespearean
king
4Vacant
5 Sickest
6 Not elsewhere
specified (ab.)
7 Honey maker
8 Puff up
9 Crate
18 Pewter coins
13 Interstice
14 Click-beetle
lsGastrepod
mellusks
II Church fett
If Swarm
II Trials -19
Not fresh
23 Verbal
contenders
17 Angers..
31 Heavy blow
32 On tima (lb.)
33 Cupola
of Thailand 26
11 Encounter 27
12 Makes 26
mistakes 29
20 Symbol for 30
tellurium
21 Smells 35
22 Type of boat 39
23 Medicinal 40
quantity 41
24 Grafted (her.) 42
25 Has existed
34 Stalk
35 Part of "be"
31 Den
37 Evenings
(poet.)
Ik Doeter'a
clientele
41 riant
exudation
43 1.;s wife was
- Anne
Gofc'hua
Coolidga .
4iCwk
extensively ..
HAssiiliflg -13
Feast
sumptuously
llPaddler.,
S3 Spheres ef
action
E ;.7N
1 Ready money
5 T'':"n river

W AMitliaU

a W
- to uoo

prosecuting a man for dow some something
thing something which Brownell as a private
lawyer had advised him to do.
So just before Christmas tha
criminal case against Onassis was
quietly dropped.
These are some of the reasons
Senator Kcfauver wants to appoint
special Senate prosecutors to ex examine
amine examine the whole Dixon-Yates dal
and other conflicts of interest such
as Harold Talbott and Peter Stro Stro-bel.
bel. Stro-bel.
Senator Jcnner of Indiana has
been whispering around the Capitol
that his senior colleague, Senator
Capehart, will be whipped in In Indiana
diana Indiana next year by a quarter mil million
lion million votes',..'. The supposedly im impartial
partial impartial commission just appointed
to study the Eisenhower-Bjownell
security program is considering
Julian Sourwine to be staff direct director.
or. director. Sourwine is the out-and-out
McCarthyite who just finished a
witch hunt against one of the
world's great newspapers The
New York Times. He subpoenaed
22 of the New York Times staff
for secret examination . One
congressman who didn't let any
grass grow under his feet this
summer is young Jim Wright of
Texas. Wright, 33 years old and a
freshman in the House of Repre Representatives,
sentatives, Representatives, delivered 104 speeches
to his ever-patient constituents,
also appeared on 11 television pro programs
grams programs during the three and a half
months he was back in the Lone
Star state. He didn't travel
abroad . Congressman Victor
Anfuso of Brooklyn .favors tho
death penalty for dope peddlers.
He contends they're committing a
crime worse than murder by de degrading
grading degrading our youth ... Newsmen
covering the United Nations agree
that the agency with the .most
captivating title is "Sunfcd. the
special United Nations f und for
economic development. Sunfcd is
the UN version of former Presi President
dent President Harry Truman's "Point
four" program for helping back backward
ward backward countries threatened by com communism.
munism. communism. It does not refer to Key
West Eisenhower has prom promised
ised promised to back Secretary of Com-"
merce Weeks 100 per cent in his
firing of Civil Aeronautics Admin Admin-strator
strator Admin-strator Fred Lee. ',

rr
i
LOSING HIS "SIGHT"-'
"Fay," a seeing-eye dog, takes
her master out for the last tima
in Indianapolis, Ind. Fay, her herself,
self, herself, is going blind. She's been
guiding Indiana State Sen. Tom
Hasbrook, blinded iti World
War 11, for, 13 years. Now
she's retirin?, and Hasbrook
must train a new "eye" dog.
Antwer to Previous Puzzla

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Limbs
Indolent
Horse color
Exude
Weights Of
India"
Mimic
Palm lily .'
Buries
Renovate
Chatters
(Coll.)
43 Tumult "."
44 Hebrew
month
43 Quote
. 47 Type of
molding
48 Pulsate
49 High note) in
Guido's scale
50 From himself
52 Grains (ab.)
53 Rodent

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4
THE TAX. M. AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART XFWSrAPES

U uuLtur vore qkishus coxrs lasis ir ir--
- ir-- L0NG W2?.voy tsnsi k ru:m-s
;0f lliny Dasircycrs

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v

THAT COLLEGIATE LOOK-Thil ."' model-T Ford U the
eroud possesion of Bill Robeson, right. UniversityiUnoi
Senior at Urbana-Champaign The 12th auto Robeson has restored
: In two years, this one has gleaming brass radiator and headlights.
high bod and straps to hold down the top The Chicago stu
Oent finished ft with 14 coats of hand-rubbed lacquer His-only
, casualty with the car. which averages 28 to 30 miles jer gallon
of either gasoline or kerosene, was a broken wsist while crank cranking
ing cranking the car to start it Examining its four-cylinder engine are,
left to right, classmates Gerald Pullen. Princeville. Ill; John
Craves. Wyoming. Ill, and Max Whitman. Monmouth. Ill

BONN, Germany, Jan. 9 (UP)

West Germany has asked the V

nited States for a six-vcar loan of

a "considerable number of de

stroyers for her new navy. De

fense Ministry officials disclosed

today

The actual number remained a
secret. But it was said to be, suf sufficient
ficient sufficient to provide the foundation
for a small but tough, hard-hit

ting coastal defense fleet until West

tierman snipyaras can duuo. inemi'
themselves. : f
The sources said the U.S." hasr

not yet answered the request soLr

tar as was Known nei e. ;

rne luiure oerman navy win
have 20,000 men -and a fleet. of
destroyers, minelayers, minesweep minesweepers,
ers, minesweepers, J'T-boats 'and small submarin submarines
es submarines not exceeding 300 tons. It will
be based at Wilhelmshaven on the
North Sea coast and Kiel on the
Baltic coast.
Defense Ministry sources ,' said
the first units will be handed over
by the U.S. Navy to the. Germans
at Bremerhaven in the near fu future.
ture. future. ;
These will consist of old German
world war two minesweepers cap captured
tured captured by the Americans at the end
of the war which have been operat operating
ing operating in recent years under the U.S.
flag" with mainly German crews.
Most of the German crews will be
taken over by the new West Ger German
man German navy , ?

;

il

IV

h

wv"

fj

J

STEPPING-STONE This high-flying porpoise uses his brother's
back to get closer to the food. He pulled this stunt at the Sea-,
ouarium at Marineland, Fla. r ,. . ..:

.x?f Jyjiwi?.'

'wi-

n .' V

a .. -... m t

t

RETIRES Archibald Ryce,
mechanical helper at G a t u n
Locks, retired December 31 aft after
er after almost 40 years of continuous
service at Gatun Locks; Locks
employes' gathered at the Ma Machine
chine Machine :;hop. "Where informal cere-moni.-s
.were held to honor
Archie on his last day ol work.
' Howard R., Harris, mechanical
gupeviso r. spoke highly of
Archie's record and presented
him with a framed certificate
of termination in recop:nition or
his many years of faithful and
loval service. v
On behalf of the many u. S.
rate employes under whom
Archie had worked and been
closely associated with for many
years, G. G. Thomas presented
the retiring employe with a
purse. ;. '';.
Ryce was born in Barbados, B.
W.L on. Christmas Day, 1903,
and came to the Isthmus.with
his parents.- arriving here on
. Sept.' 2f 1909." Shortly after his
orrlnal ho went, t.n work with the

Isthmian Canal Commission as

Between iaua ana

Keeper Of Seel
Now Displays
Historic Emblem
WASHINGTON (UP)- Thanks
ii Plirrlia Mqa T? rh irHnn iha "Tin-

tion's school children will find a
I new stop on their schedules when
they visit Washington in the usual
Ibusloads come spring.

It will be tne second noor ui me
State Department where a ma machine
chine machine vital to the operation of the
omiarnmont iH hnilspd in hl'and

ijlnew display.

The machine is tne otticiai ureal
Seal of the United States of Amer America,
ica, America, And little Mrs. Richardon
hhe is under five feet," tall in heels
hoc Iha hin titlo nt Kppnpr nf the

I ,uv yj v t--.
I Cool

For. the 12 years she has neia

thn inh tup nnric-naireu. vuuiik-

lookine grandmother from High-
. .... ...'J .4 Ik, bio

more, o.u. nas irieu iu gci wc
toric emblem displayed properly.
Draws Up Program
"After all, it belongs to the peo

pie," she said in an interview.

"And it is one ot our great Heri Heritages,"
tages," Heritages," For years, Mrs. Richardson has
seen disappointment wirttcn on
faces of students and other capl capl-backroom.
backroom. capl-backroom. where, the seal was al almost
most almost hidden before. How' that her
efforts have paid off, Mrs, Richard Richardson
son Richardson hopes things will be. different.
She now is procesing a program
to send out to schools all over the
country, bearing data on the seal
and its new location. ',,
. AnH ch is ppttins the seal s new

home listed on local guide books.

In the prominent new exniDw,
the 6eal, locked in its mahogany
case, stands in a glass cage, also
locked, surrounded by walls lined

with historic documents oi iuo iuo-year
year iuo-year history. .,.
Since the seal gives official sta status
tus status to the nation's most important
documents, law forbids its use on
any document not. signed by the
president and countersigned by the
secretary of state.
But Mis. Richardson has been
known to twirl the precision precision-weighted
weighted precision-weighted horizontal bars and place

thp ininnni on uhm suw v.

The first small German-built pa patrol
trol patrol craft, minesweepers and. PT PT-boats
boats PT-boats are not expected to be launched-before
spring 1957. The first es escort
cort escort vessels will be launched 'in
1958 and minesweepers in 1959.
Defense ministry sources said it
will be 1960 before any destroyer
built in Germany is ready for serv service.
ice. service. .'-::.

Louisiana Voting
Machines May Ruin
All Night Parties

BATON ROUGE, La. Jan. 10

(UP) Louisiana voting machines
are on their way to ruining the
tradition of the all-night election
party,

Louisiana Secretary of State

Wade Martin Jr., predicts that
Louisiana voters because of the
machines will know by 10 p.m.
on Jan. 17 who will be the state's
new governor.
Red-Faced Coppers
Rest While Gunman
Swipes Bonk Loot
' NEW ORLEANS, Jan, 9 (UP)
An 18-year-old grocery .delivery
boy said a gunman .heid.him up
lust as he left the ',bank with
$720 .he received after,. cashing
his employer s. checks.
., Lloyd Rosemore, a Negro, told
police of the robbery which oc occurred
curred occurred in front of the b a n k,
which is located Just across the
street from 2nd District Po'ice
Station. 1

Rome's Premier Will Stake
All On Vote Of Confidence

ROME;" Jan.? 9 (UP) Premier
Antonio Segnl may soon stake the
life of his Cabinet in a series of
confidence .'Votes- -to show the: na nation
tion nation that-he does not need Com Communist
munist Communist support, political sources
predicted today.
Rome's leading pro-government
newspaper II Messaggero advocat advocated
ed advocated the move to dispel fears of an
unofficial "opening to the Left."
The fears increased after the Red
election gains in next-door prance.
Amintore Fanfani, dynamic lead leader
er leader of Segni's Christian Democratic
Partv. said in a speech he un

derstood the Premier planned to
follow the suggestion.
Segni was expected to raise the

confidence issue. on numDer oi im
nortant bills coming before Par

liament sometime this month or in
February. They hiclude a controv controversial
ersial controversial law on Italy's newly-found
oil deposits, a new laW on admin administrative
istrative administrative elections, a reform of
land tenancy contracts and a re reorganization
organization reorganization of state controlled in industries.
dustries. industries. - .
The purpose of the confidence
tests would be to show that the
Center Coalition is firmly behind
Segni and can push through his
measures without unwelcome help
from'the Left. ..,!. '-,.:';' :.'T
' The Communists nd the telloWr
traveling Socialists, ;,Qf S ,t al io
"Peace' Prize Winner Pletro Nen Nen-nl
nl Nen-nl have been trying to get a" foot
into the government door in re recent
cent recent months by; volunteering sup support
port support for. Segni in Parliament.
Their votes saved the day for
the Premier on .a number j of oc

casions when members of his own

four-party Center Coalition desert deserted
ed deserted him by abstaining or just stay staying
ing staying at home.
The confidence votes would force
Coalition members to forget their
years-old feuds for a while and ral rally
ly rally around Segni. Government sourc sources,
es, sources, hoped this would revitalize the
unenlhusiastic Coalition.
If Seeni'i supporters all stick

by him, he would win a confidence;

test by at least nan a oozen voies
in the 590-man Chamber even if
the Right and Leftwing voted com compactly
pactly compactly against.
William Welch Dies;

Funeral Services
In Colon Tomorrow
William Welch, a former em employe
ploye employe of the general manager's
office, of the Panama Canal
Commissary Division, died last
night in Amador Guerrero Hos Hospital
pital Hospital after a brief illness.
A Jamaican, he was 71 years
old.'.-'- :
Funeral services will be held
tomorrow afternoon' at 3 p.m:
In the Weslyan Church; ."Colon.
Burial will follow in the Mount
Hope cemetery.,
He Is survived by his wife,
Catherine, and his children.
Winston Roy, ; Mrs-.. Ha r o 1 d
Mountoute and Lucille Downer,
and several grandchildren.

water hov

1918 he worked for the LC-a. er t0 demonstrate the process.
tVi i hvdrn -elertrlfi substations I r-L. ior. im the samDle).

in Oatun ann joaiboaToro Polnti ij io0f inre. a dav she

and .the Gatun. oams ana DacK-j t moa

fills.

when nuestioned as to his fu

ture plans he said that he would
not return to his home in Bar Barbados
bados Barbados but : would spend his re-

stamps official documenis, n
those luckv enough to be, around

at the right time.
Those who catch her on the
premises also may come upon ex extra
tra extra bits of information, such as

tiremen1;in Colon-with his wife,jtne act that when .the design was

Lilian, and their 14-year-old son,
Audrick.

FILLER FACTS
Overseas exports of cattle were
greater by air than by ocean ves vessel
sel vessel in 1954 for the first time. The
U.S". Department of Agriculture re reports
ports reports that more than 90 per cent of
the important poultry and about
75 per cent' of imported horses
came by air.

If farmers

away, a 21

being drawn, Benjamin ranK in

thought a lurney, nuu o" v-,
should be the proper emblem.
"But said Mrs. Richardson, it
was feit that the turkey gobbler
.. .. . klffor and n shflW-Off.

was- a . j
while the eagle soared above and

was aggressive more symuuiit
what we wanted to be as a nation.'
TOP THIS!

Jr I

11. ... 1

Car's acting up? Needs Repairs?

j-1 COLPAN'S SHOP has
M The Boss Who Cares I!

... -i' :::'

- .... uh wmn

Our service Dept. is open all Day

" J (,JU WCCft

We work..'.
You take the siesta
Call Crosbie ;
For an appointment
. Panama 3-1035

1 AMM? IMM

The largest on Automobile Row ..

mfw VfiRIC f I IP 1 The Amer-

ers gave their wheat ican Can Company has perfected a
.-cent loaf of bread still closing machine that can put

U3I C3 Ol E3i

would cost the consumer 18 cents.

Some 2,200 Americans lost their
lives in accidents with firearms in
195-1 half of them in their homes.

tnn" nn 1.000 cans a minute

Only 10 years ago, a closing rate
of 225 per minute was considered
excellent, according to a company
spokesman.

!

;

DEMAND LEADERSHIP Socialist leader Guy Mollst (left)
and Pierre Mendes-France confer in Paris, alter which the
leaders of the Republican Front coalition demanded that their
group select the new premier. The coalition, representing a-'
bout one-third of the new Assembly elected Jan. 2, was form formed
ed formed in opposition to the center-right coalition of France's Pre-'
1 .,'- mierJEdgarj'aure. .

FELIX'S TIVOLI BRANCH ONLY

1 TOMORROW TUESDAY

LAST DAY of our JANUARY SPECIALS!

4
3

i

i
i
1
I

3

2 SI

REDUCTIONS UP TO y2 PRICE OFF!
Hurry. and see

Casual Dresses from $5.95
Afternoon Dresses : 8.95 I
Cocktail Dressesi ......... .....from 1 4.95
si70 7 n 1 K m n Of 14.1 n 971

I
Blouses, sport and dressy .......from -1.95
I
Remember: Tomorrow is the last day,
: Take advantage! fc

I

-!

TIVOLI BRANCH STORE No. 6 Tivoli Avenue ONLY
across from Ancon Post Office

I

C

unnnnotiaannapnnnDDna n n r

j t

I

re

Beauty to treasurer

,11

Value beyond measure"! ?$&t;f ?y 0 4

,ro'

This Weeks FREE Winners:

Lloyd O. Rogers
P. B. Hutchings
Berta de Alemin
Tomas Keefe

Arthur Hubp
i Cerardo Arias
F. Humbert

Francis Mainierl

All Slips Ending in O Win. . Check YOURS!

n

TAHITI

18-47 (137) Central Ave.

' 7

A

r

.. r
i

AND THE INDISPUTABLE RESULT IS THAT
YOUR BEST BET IS

CQMUCasn DARIB U STREET.- TEL.2'2lli

HERE ARE THIS WEEK'S WINNERS IN THE s-

pfj7i

FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE:

in.
u ?

S. Turbyfelll
Mrs. A. Fidanque
B. Phillips
Benltna de Morales
Maria Z. de Cordova
Marta Valdes

Rosaura Gondola
Diana Vareas de Pefia
C. II. Reifel
Lt. Robert Reinke
Charles S. Smith
Belisario Porras Jr.

John J. Herring
John O. Keller
Charles A. Frejrhaus 1
J. M. Thompson
Amoy Chanf
. John O. Keller

Shop Rattan -(Headquarters
Home of Vertikal Blinds and Plast?-

viz? imaammnj

"OUR FURNITURE GRACES THE LOVELIEST HOMES"

oam

P. A. CLASSIFIEDS

r

.

1



AMERICAN
rNDirE-VDEXT DAILY NEWSFArnt
MONTVAT, JANUARY 9, L"
SIDE GLANCES
By Calbrcith
TXT.r.Y A-ND TUS TISATLS
With Zonians
In the Service
pj czr.zcz VTSVl
EXPRESS
' y,y v nc? i lca-,e7 ycv cas to
t t 3 C'-ZCKZ?

Tnr pan a."

"7! ? .f firf;

Tl KNEW NCJ "1 I J

i wctirsr ,NP.A" S J I

(Istnmian wf tb family
members or friends in the
V. S. Armed f orces arc in in-rited
rited in-rited to contribute to this de department
partment department by mailing- data to
the Zone Serviceman's Edit Editor,
or, Editor, Tbe Panama-Americas
Box 134. Panama. tt. P. In Information
formation Information as to servicemen's
whereabouts, their promo promotions
tions promotions and excerpts from their
letters art of particnlar in interest)
terest) interest) Photographs are used, but
nono can be returned.

By OSWALD JACOBY
Wntttn for NEA Strvic
NORTH (P) n
A J84
VNone
KQ1054
A974
WEST EAST

M4 i &i(r i

t 1

i53 AKQI07i

iu o 9 J A K J
J7J 49S3
102 K
SOITH
AA92
VQIM3
A
QJ33
Neither tide vull
North Ewt South West
Pass 1 Pas Pass
JN.T Pass 4 'Pass
S Pass Paw Pass

Vfvui i i ll 1 1 i p w J

SgUim Jsckson
Ends Ranger Course

Ggt. J EMMIE L. JACKSON

tVHT CAMPBELL, Ky.,

immie l. jacKson. son of Mr
and Mrs. Philip D. Simmons
Box 825 Balboa. Canal Zone,
Panama, has recently complet completed
ed completed Ranger School where he was
promoted from Corporal to the
rank of Sergeant. Sergeant Jack Jackson
son Jackson was promoted because of
his ability displaced as leader
while at Ranger School.
Sergeant Jackson has just re returned
turned returned to his unit and Is now a
squad leader. The school he just

wuiMiea was one lasting lor
eight weeks and consisted of
rueeed training Thp t

'If North doubles for a takonut was broken rinvn lntn Sn.omn

SSuih is almost sure to bid hearts. (training and Mountain training

ucav, una uiay cause cuiuumod; ne is presently assigned to
and it may cause a disaster if."L" Company of the famed 138th
brutli jjiets his teeth into the bid-! Airborne Infantry which was
dir" ,, "... ... . Inoted for its operations in the

djouro iwnn ma one or nis mi- racmc durine world War IT

Jtarlier this week I discussed

; oneiiy an unusual bid of two no no-.IfUuip
.IfUuip no-.IfUuip tuat didn't mean what it
seemed to mean. Today's hand
rvcs me th chance to o into this
loiter more fully.
AVnat should North do when the
opijnini,' bid of one spade is passed
,a r o u n d to him? Certainly he
''shouldn't sell out to East by pass-
,1n

: 1

V

'A

SI

T. M. IUf. II. i. fm OK.
tf. m t, MA Unm. Im.

t r

"Ho aignod chocks for more than $15,000 today with without
out without looking at themand now ho' beefing because the
price of candy bars went upl"

ntrcxixs and eis nttscK

Who Gives?

ft KZftltaL 8L0!S3

; nor suits? Which one? After all, he
iiuay get only one chance. If he
Picks. the wrong one, he may run

j into a loss instead of producing a
; profit.
The unusual overcall of two no-
tiump solves the problem when
J your partner is an expert. He
i knows that your bid asks him to
choose one of the minor suits. He
also knows that you have a good
jenough hand to feel reasonably
safe at three clubs or three dia dia-Imonds.
Imonds. dia-Imonds. v

Walter Winchell
(Continued from Pare 2

square Theatre was robbed of all

receipts during the last perform performance
ance performance of the night. As the burglar.

carrying a small satchel full of

currency walked out of the lobby,
he encountered a policeman smok

ing a cigarette. He stopped, scold scolded
ed scolded the constable for smoking on
duty, threatened to report him,

urn men icn me tneatre. t he har

dtefsSE Trus Life Adventures

In today's band. South read theh.css bull was so unnerved he left

message accurately. Since South the theatre, too, and was gone

had ouite a eood hand, bo respond

ed with a jump bid in his better

minor suit. This led to tne excel excellent
lent excellent contract of five clubs.
There wasn't much to the play.
VSouth won tlie opening spado lead
with the ace, cashed the ace of di di-!amonds,
!amonds, di-!amonds, and entered dummy with
.the ace of clubs to discard his Ids-

ing spades on top diamonds. West

when

later.

the alarm sounded seconds'

On November 29, a man who

Knows many secrets about the
British underworld, arrived in New

York on the S. S. United States-

tins is father George Lone, fath

er confessor to London's safecrack safecrackers.
ers. safecrackers. A chaplain assigned to thp

British paratroops in Burma dur-

rntfed, and East later got the king ing tne war, ne made many jumps
of clubs, but. the game contract with bis men. T o d a y Father

;was safe.

After o person learns to moke
! the most out of life, most of It Js
- .pone. : oniao

Oeorgc is frequently seen in the

company of the top professionals
of London's crime world. He was
on one Riviera jaunt with some of
the boys when a big job was pulled
and Intropol actually sent out an
alarm for him. But cops and
robbers alike revere him the way
his paratroopers did. His ten o' o'clock
clock o'clock mass on Sundays in the lit little
tle little nhurch in Kensall's Rise is
known as Burglar's Mass."

WHERE ELSE?
MILWAUKEE -(UP)- As pre prescribed
scribed prescribed by law, all downtown side sidewalks
walks sidewalks were nice and clean after a

recent snowstorm except one. The
city-owned triangle at the flagpole

memorial hadn t been touched.

I ir'Aiti:"'
1 wu

' f OU, BAZOO
f V I BOTTS AMD I
WMATS WROM&. ARE PFFT7 J

You'll soom I Bur

FOR&cT M'M ( I He
TMERF ARC K
OTHER a

K BOYS RcoLLf

Retmempeu,
DEAR.TM6
OUTCOMtT
OF "TOUR.
FIR5T v
QUARREL
ESTABLISHES

1

y Ri ir eiolFBnrJY' MUST WA'I

etVEN HIM IMfc WMEfiVfti

m

roe) M-V

w ? :i'-:)

Vin-rri i U X

Ctr. 1MI k hi m. T. M IUf U. Wf.

JJULEI oor

Beau Brummel

07 T. T. OAML

The SEYCHELLES NUT
IS THE WORLD'S LAR66ST
SEBP, SOM6TIM6S Wei6HINS

A.S MUCH AS 4-0 POUN176. -

The tree, a species of pam palm, is foouo
OMLV OM A TIMV ISLANP N THE INDIAN 0CEAM.

SO MDU'RE GOING 'WS RIGHT, CXXZXA, ME
- ( TO BE & GENTLE IAN' TH' BOSS PREED
p -sV fTJOM NCW THATD BE Trf BE5T
1,1 ?.IXvON,EH2 rSjrAWAY TEET TH"
A rV'PH TTV VHl full benefit
Tk'S' V- Sdf W PECU1AK

WELL THEN. DOW ( YEH, I WAS
YCU THINK 'tOU'D JU6T F1XIN'
BETTER 5TAKT ( TO GO LOOK
OUT BY TRYING I OVER MY
TO PRESS THE V WARPQOBE!

ha! ass, V
( EH? YEAH, V,
V man! : V.
lw(
tm. m f m wo. .?..

BOOTS AND BtR BUDDOf

Fop's on the Phone

I EDGAR MARTIN

W V- SPEWOUS. J

REGRET TO SAV
W LFE, ADft,
VCAOi SHEIL
HWC OTH VOO
AtOD ME CUAUStP
UTH KOIOftPHOG
UWVESS tLUt
WOME At OV)CE

Ml

VELlL...tORE, 1
...THffrt WOO

'V NfA Sorvi

j 'l I

iz-i7

c. hie. T. M. (.. U. I

CAPTADi RASt

An Old Letter

.ITIL SIORI OF MARTHA WAS NE

Picture of Jim

By WILSON SCRUGGS

S 1 1 nmrCTiar

I

1. 'Y Tmmm

THE WW? ENDED OOLV
FOB CUNT MARSHALL. A

COUPLE OF BOVS wTTW HISH

BOOTS TOOe WETOANAZI PE-

OTEAT FOB WEACY BOM8ABOEES. I

STAStOTHETCUMTL.

PATTOKiSAWW

CCASVtEO
THTOUGH

tup raprfh

wire...

ri

TWENUtNTTOHEADJ.

THE SIGN AT THE GATE
eWO HOSPITAL-QUIET.'

IDCWkNOWWHICH

LOOVEOBEST.

THE FOOT?
OK THE
NUCSES.

A

I mt A PICTUPE OF JW AND WE

STANOWS W FCONTOF HIS SHIP.

DO SOU HAVE

HECE7rDLOVE

TO SEE

:rr.

rat

r..v

r

VDUIfWOW,SOU BENWDME

OFMJIW-.NMAtWWS.'

r

JUST A AMNJUT6, BICKI.

'p MjU VE eOT AMV

CHRISTAAA5 gHOPP1Nle

TO PO IT WILL KVfi

TD WAIT

y LfeT A 60, EJ. ...I. PIP T

.Y PUNT. HESCOVMW6 A I

X OV6B. PLEA 66-- 1

1 -.5, J III

I POW'T WASH MDU PHONIN6 THE
COPS. AMP VOU'D PO IT OUCkEB

THAN I CAN SAV, 'REVVAEP.'

OU'B 60WWA STICC AROUMt?

POK THE PIKBWORKS

. T. M. Dtf U. S ( OW.

By LESLIE TURNER

TwEsrry minutes pass, amp them..

HERE Hg
MOW Dn WHAT

I TELL SOUW

V

ilMlTN

1H

12-17

VIC FLINT

Instructions

By JAT OEAV1LIN

FRISCILLA'S For

Tbe Limit

I "CHPISTMAsN S
li SHOPPINKS; Rf YEsX
rBOTTs?PA FEW
-w. -Ir-1 THINGS )
AcsPOR MY
. 7BRLE

Bj AL rtRMEEB
1 N

I GOT MIM A SLffD,
SKATES WONOQRAPW,
FOOTBALL. crMJUrtv 5i irr

I K AIN:

THE KIND THAT
V MAKES REAL JM

.

a.

tUHiLltt..W.pfc. T-" 'j, nit uj

WHAT BO vnu

WANT ME TO DO..

WOIL HIM??,

r.

'r-T

50WE WEN AK6 Y HEAVENS!

5CT5, CAKLM50KE1 HERE ONE

B&VT THEIR WIVES OTHERS ARB VOU RECEIVED

CROOKS.OR WISERS1 BUT WE. S1)C VEAKS

1 .1 1 l AHT WKITB LETTEUA

- er ni

5

THE WORE URGENT NOW I RECALL WHEW

a dp .1 1 f .. . I 1

II l! TU KTO 1H6 I TMI5 tAW6i KOU
WORE PAKfcLVZEP Z S0 THRILLED TO HEAR

BL0CK..A PHOBlAi lAFTER 20 VEAK$l

LAN'l &Letf NKSHli'

1

7""

yES. IT WAS A FLATTEKlMa X TH HAft SOT
OWE, TOOl SWE'O REAt WV STRIP TO STOP, DAI
FAITHFULLVl t WEANT TP AU5WERI VOU'LL AiiSWE!?
ANP POUR OUT WS 60UL1 VOU'LL HER TOW&HT.CC

MEVER KNOW HOW I TRlfcP ILL GET Y3U W
HOW I IMP AWAKE M3HTgf A,PP01MTmE;T iMTff

AP&YCWATRwJ

1 r jS-i

MAJOH HMOPt.1ti 1 UI1B WA1

BUGS BUNNI

rjorizonlal

Like fbst?

YA N

COME
rTW

PLACE,

T7

17 WANT A PO&rtJMTl

IN A TYPC4L A
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Sir

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THAT'S WHAT I WANT..

NOW HOLD IT

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NOW,FUDDSy4 I'M '"N
ALMOST FINISHEO .' V

SI?ETlM6S,6MUFFy MO, THIS ISrt'T

A 6IPT HEH-HSH -I DROPPED

IN AT A WHITE- ELEPHANT SALE v
AsiD 5PJTTPO TH14 MACRL7.

PEDESTAL -I-HAVB A BUSHEL

of idea6 what to do nith

IT--! WAY CAfMS A

CLASSICAL gUST FOR, IT

I M A SCULPTORO

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PAN A! A' I i':H
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FAREWELL PARTIFS PUNNED
rOR MS. AND MRS. GLION CI RTIS
Many parties ha?e beerV planned for Mr. and Mrs. Glion
Curtis, sice Mr. Curtis has learned of his transfer from First
Secretary of the IS Embassy here to Counsellor of the IS
Embassy In Nicaragua. ,
Mr Curtis will leaie for his new assljnment Friday, Jan.
2, but'.Mrs. Curtis. will stay in Panama until their children S
. school semester Is completed. ," .,,-..
. ffXt- and Mrs! Rene
i-uius wiii of fiiVen by i lac, Air. Luis Azcarraga, Mrs
tain them with a dinner P11 ft r-rpmonv
Thursday Thev will attend anoth- after me ceremony.
er. dinner -Wyndajr f i Bu9bM.polift Wtddio
home of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry, tm Pjm MirJrili
James. -,nsm' p-u 0; Miss Mary Jane Bugbee. daugh-
Mr, and Mrs, W ill.am Price Mrj RU.har(J "g
the consular bemce Jl g Bugbee of Forestville, C o n n e c c-dmner
dmner c-dmner ior Mr. and Mrs. turns,, ggt
Sunday. .... iThnma .1 Polite nn Saturdav aft-

Mouday, they will auena cut m.
tail party 8'ven h Miss !? t
Richardson. Tuesday the Counsel Counsellor
lor Counsellor of the U. S. Embassy and
Mrs.' Robert Ackley will entertain
in their honor with a cocktail par
ty.
a c -A MV
Robert Boyd will
give "a party for the popular cou couple,
ple, couple, Wednesday.
Mr. aid Mr. Jack Burton
Here (or Visit
? Mr. and Mrs. Jack Burton ar arrived
rived arrived today from St. Louise, Mis Mis-S&They
S&They Mis-S&They tr fiends of Mr and
Mrs. Glion Curtis, and will stay
it the Hotel El Panama for sever several
al several days. They are on. a trip
throughcuc South America. ;
u:.. u..ikirf .'.' .'
Marriaie SeltmniiH
Lupitg

laSSVSJ! HMr,.c.,.c,,i,f..,,d.h,.r.

?: i!5rf
nieht. The nnoc .:";;
!igiinnnrable Deputy of the
r. . vi.. .nH Mrs. Juan B.
tionai Assemuijr ..-
Arias The groom Is the son of Mr.
Wd Mr" Federico Humbert.
' Given ln-m'nwV l-Jf;
r the bride wore a gown. of white
silit neau de soie. and imported
French lace embellished with cry
fal bead Her voluminous veil was
if illusion tulle. She carried boa boa-Aut
Aut boa-Aut nf white flowers.
Mus Mmuelita Arias, maid o
nonor was attired in a. gown of
Jose cotoed tulle. Bridesmaids
were Mis?Rita Arias, Miss. Irene
GuLado. Miss Tanya 4Zub.et
Twis Vilma Arosemena. Miss
Jffi sSS. .;Mi DrUMSrAna
ilvd I Misi Vilma del Valle Miss
Ana Evrlma Vall?,rmo ana u"
Julia f ny. .Au m uo.. -r
rials titUC'IUlie; :.
. r,llof. waQ
Mr. -Rene QriUac was best man:
. hrMperoom. Ushers were
Mr Diego A. de Jimenez. Dr. Al-
f edo Kuido, Mr. Adol o Icm
Mt Robert de la iiianh''n Mr:
Jorge Zubieta, Mr. Roberto -Boyd,
Jr., Mr. Carlos A, St. lalo, Mr.
Ricardo A. Lince, Mr. Juan Anto Anto-io
io Anto-io Sta. Mr. Antonio Zubieta,
Z Mr Javier Guardia. and Mr.
Roger Maduro, .
Serving as flower girls were
Diana Isabel Brm and Mam An Antonio
tonio Antonio Motta, and Irene .Coreo.
. They were escorted by Jose Ra Ra-mon
mon Ra-mon Arias, Raul Anas. Jr., and
Manuel Arias. Train bearers were
Maria Victoria Arias. Patric Boyd,
fd Debbie Arias. Alberto Aleman
HI and Jaime Brid carried the

; Besides me paiKins i "v h00d nome was in Leirtm, iuil-ui-al
couple, sponsors for the wea-j A $he is graduate of the

ding wera n i university oi iuu:iusun. ucj
dent f the Republic of Panama !to visit in the Canal Zone, for a a-tnd
tnd a-tnd Mrs. Ricardo Arias, JIJ-!"a: bout. two weeks.

samnn Arias. Mr. and Mrs
Enrique Jimenez, Mr. and Mrs.
- Anlonio Zubieta, Mr. and M r s.
Florencio Icaza, Mr. and Mrs.
Juan de la Guardia, Dr. and Mrs.
Edgardo Burgos. Dr. and Mrs. Er Ernesto
nesto Ernesto Zubieta, Mr. and Mrs. Jor Jor-re
re Jor-re Arias, Mr. and Mrs. John
I. Moses. Dr. and Mrs. Julio A A-leman,
leman, A-leman, Mr. and Mrs. Juan de la
Guardia, Mr. and Mrs. Alejandro
de la Guardia, Dr. and Mrs. Adol Adol-fo
fo Adol-fo Arias, Mrs. Aqmlino de Boyd,
Mrs. Carmen E. Arias. Mr. Bey
Mario Arosemena, 'Miss Wally A A-rosemena.
rosemena. A-rosemena. Mr. Juan Francisco A A-rias,
rias, A-rias, Miss Dolores Arias, Mr. Raul
Jimenez, Mrs. Lupita C. de Lewis,
Mr. and Mrs. Roberto Motta, Mr.
Roberto Azcarraga, Mrs. L e a h
yii. de Azcarraga, Mrs. Asuncion
vda. de Humbert, Mrs. Maria T.
a Sertao. Mr. Raul Cochez, Mrs.
Esther E. de Orillac. Mr, Eugene
ASUlCl Wi ue ..... ."o""
McGrath, Mrs. Lydia C. de Do-1
minguez,, Mr, and Mrs. M a r i ov'

' NOTICE
Pus to t!i 3 tremendous ncccptnncc
of cur SALE vc ere extending it
f cr enc rr.crc day closing positively
t:n:crrpv nlht.
(Opposite the Ancon Post Office)

4 Shf.r,

, h Marearita Union
Church.
The Rev.: Paul H. VW.Olander
officiated at the ceremony. The
bride who was given in marriage
by her father, wore a street
length dress of white' brocade and
a fitted cap of tiny white flowers.
She carried a bouquet of orchids.
Miss Diane Peterson, the bride's
nnlv attendant, wore a nink nvlon
dress and fitted pink floral cap to
matcti me onae ane wore j
pink rose corsage.
Mrs. Richard Bugbee, the moth
er of the bride, wore a m a u v (
lace afternoon dress with pink ac
cessories and an orchid corsage
Mr Walton ft. Prrsnn w a I
best man for the groom and Mr.
Harry a. stone was usner.
.. re"". held followin.
the ceremony at the Hotel Wash
lnetnn
. Mrs. Polite is employed by the
Schools Division and Sgt. Polite is
with the canal zone police de department
partment department in Cristobal,
Judge Altman's Sen
Will Oet Army Commmitsion
Norwich University has an announced
nounced announced that William A. Altman,
son of Judge and Mrs. Edward A.
Atlman of Balboa, who was re recently
cently recently chosen a sone of the out outstanding
standing outstanding seniors of the school,
winning a place in the 1955-56 edi edition
tion edition of ."Who's Who among Stu
dents in American Universities
and Colleges," has been accepted
for a commission in the Regular
Army.
Mr; Anrf Mrs. Dick Turbyfill
Visitina For Two Wtaks
Mr nnrt Mm Dick Turbvfill of
fj-eiw York City arrived Saturday.
morninK for a visit with his par
ents .Mr. and Mrs. Subert Turby
fill nf niahla Heights.
Dick Turbyfill grew up in the
Canal Zone, graauatea irom cai cai-boa
boa cai-boa High School, served his mili military
tary military service at Fort Clayton, and
attended the Canal Zone Junkor
College. :
He graduated from the Univer University
sity University of Texas in 1952 and since
that time has been employed in
aw Vftik r itv.
He is now assistant Director of
Claims for the New York city ot ot-fifA
fifA ot-fifA nf h Retail Credit Company
in addition to his work as a free
lance singer. -
Mrs. Turbyfill isis the dramatic
ennrann known orofessionally as
Suzanne der Derian. Her child
n v. vw
.. .-it.. :i it: :
First Graders Give
Musical Program
The Cristobal Woman's Club
held the first meeting of the New
Year, with the vice President Mrs.
A. Arthur McLean presiding.
The new Rhythm Bank of South
Margarita School, under the direc direction
tion direction of Mrs. Eugene Hamlin, pre presented
sented presented a most emojoyable pro program.
gram. program. Twenty-nine first grade
chidren, with their own master of
cremonies, and conductor, gave a
eood demonstration of what can
be done with rhythmic instru
ments to help in Education.
The speaker for the day was Mr
E. 0. Daley of the Power conver
Kinn unit, who cave a most infor
mative ilustrated talk on Our
Universe." ..
Mr. Daley has been with the Mi
rIIOrc5' VUSJCI VOlUiy 1U! Ill II J
years, and was able to inform the
embers on the wonders of the sky
raflores Observatory tor

f34,Pa,a

een at the Canal Zone point of
observation.
New members were Mrs. Verna;
Chadd and Mrs. Nora Green. Thej
guests were the Mesdames Harry I
McGinness Jr., Thomas Robert Robertson,
son, Robertson, Robert Stewart, George
bloomer and Harvey Smith.
Mrs. Lesletgh Davis gave the re-,
port for Philanthropy,, and ': the
Elks and Gatun Union Church
were thanked for their fine con contributions
tributions contributions to this important work
of the Club.
Mi's. J. F. Meehan was appoint
ed chairman of reservations to the
Federation of Woman's Clubs con conference
ference conference to be held in san Jose in
February.
Any club member in good stand standing
ing standing may make reservations to fly
to Costa Rica to the conference
by phoning 3-1932, as soon as pos possible.
sible. possible. Mrs. George Engkle was host hostess
ess hostess for the day, assisted by Mrs.
R. DcBoyrie and Mrs. E. I
'Roades serving at the tea table
and the Mesdames J. T. Petersen.
A. R. Campbell, H. I. Teinncn. C.
V. Russell, G. W. Wertz. J. I. Emi Emi-Hani,
Hani, Emi-Hani, W. F. French, E. Castillo,
CAmcs Walsh, and S. M. Hamil Hamilton.
ton. Hamilton.
Painl Faur Program
tebe Discussed at Luncheon
The regular monthly luncheon of
the Fort Amador Officers' Wives'
Club will begin at 12:30 Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday at the Army-Navy Club, Fort
Amador.
headlining a panel of experts,
who will discuss' the Point Four
Program world-wide, will be Mr.
Taolr .Vanohn Prnffram Officer of
Point Four. Mr. Vaughn will pre present
sent present as his panei : Mr. Wilfred
Purdy, Specialist in Credit & Co Co-Mrs.
Mrs. Co-Mrs. Edward Harold,
Specialist in Community Develop
ment and social weuare; vv. iuh iuh-nalcd
nalcd iuh-nalcd Solis, in charge of Plans
and Agricultural Study: and Mr.
Francis Montanari, Sanitary Engi Engineer.
neer. Engineer. Attending members and
guests will have the opportunity
to ask questions regarding Point
Four and receive answers from
Mr. Vaughn and his panel,
Th rp0n ar pmi-annuai reuon
from the Nominating Committee
will also be heard.
Hostesses for the luncheon will
be Mrs. Robert Garrett, and Mrs.
i lYmrothan Reservations will
IAJUIO AV,
be accepted until noon Tuesday by
Mrs. Louis Toth, 82-5228. Members
and their guests are cordially in in-uitnrf
uitnrf in-uitnrf in attend what nromises to
be a very informative and inter
esting session,
Gaorgt H. Carnright
Givan Retiremant Party
Mr. George H. Carnright was
honored with a retirement party
bv the. Commissary Division em-
nWves and friends on Friday eve
ning athe Elks Home in Brazos
Heights, Mr. Carnright has been
employed with the Commisary Di Division
vision Division since July 26, 1927. He and
Mrs. Carnright. sailed yesterday
on the SS Cristobal and plan to
make their home m the southern
part of the United States.
Mr. Richard L. Sullivan, Gener General
al General Manager of the Commissary
Division, presented 'Mr. Cornright
with a wristwatch as a retirement
gift.-
Those present with the guest of
honor and his wife were Mr.R. L.
Sullivan Mr. G. N. .Engelke, Mr.
and Mrs. Lee Sparks. Cmdr, Carl
Juth, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Baltozer,
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Ashton, Mr.
and. Mrs. William Cawl, Mr. and
Mrs. S. L. Churchill, Mr. Harry
Ailant, Mr. and Mrs. W. S t a a t s,
Mrs. and Mrs. C. P. Shay, Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Day, Mr. and Mrs. T.
G. Relihan, Mr, Jim Brynes, Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph White, Mr. and
Mrs. A, G. -Tuttle,, Mr. and Mrs.
Geo. Allgaier, Mrv and Mrs. James
McDade, Mr. Harry Seaman, Mr.
and Mrs. John Stevens. Mr. Ha
rold Rodell, Mr. Roy Sankcr, Mr.
and Mrs. M. K. Bailey, Miss An-1
eela Reilly. Mr. and Mrs. Earl
Stone, Mr. and Mrs. W'm. LaCha LaCha-pclle,
pclle, LaCha-pclle, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Orvis,
Mrs. and Mrs. John Dugan, Mr.
Wallace C. Bain and Mrs. and
Mrs. Albert Collins.
v
f

I fcm Over Shrimp, Yams
In Quickie Main Dishes

V"
t
i I

JMmmmmm . from Louisiana comes the recipe for this quick taste
treat. It's yams-and-shrimp, sWllet-simmtred with treen peppers.

By GAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Markets Editor

Mrs. Jane Stolz, of Tucson, Ariz.,
- wife of an Air Force navigator and j
mother of two small daughters, is
I a collector of quickie main-course t
I dishes. Among her most prized I
! recipes are these specialities which;
a fnpnrt hroucrht hark for us fromi
Louisiana:
-, New Orleans Yam Skillet
, (Makes 4 servings)
One -pound -shrimp, cooked,
shelled and devemed, 2-3 cup
French "dressing, V. cup butter or
margarine, 4 medium-size Louisi Louisiana
ana Louisiana yams, cooked, peeled and
sliced lengthwise; ; 1 medium-size
green pepper, sliced; salt and pep pepper..
per.. pepper.. ':.' : ;
Combine shrimp and French!
dressing; let stand 2 hours. Melt!
butter or margarine. Add yams
and cook -until browned on all
sides. Add shrimp-French dress dressing
ing dressing mixture and green pepper.
Sprinkle with salt and pepper to
taste. Cover and heat to serving
temperature, about 20 minutes, i
BY MRS MURIEL LAWRENCE
OV Ratnrdav afternoon, nine
Lveacld Fred was about to leave
for his friend Whitev's to see their
favorite TV program. He was
mniinlinp his hike when its left-
ihand grip slipped off. So he made
for the kitchen, so intent on mena mena-ing
ing mena-ing tspe that he ignored the foot footprints
prints footprints he was making on the just just-waxed
waxed just-waxed linoleum floor.
His mother called his attention
tn them And -was so irritated that
she not only snatched her mend mending
ing mending tape from him, but also for forbid
bid forbid all future Saturday afternoon
TV at Whitey's.
Fred's, father was 'installing a
cellar storm window. When. Fred
reported his mother's penalty, he
agreed that it seemed unjust. Lat Later,
er, Later, he told her so. Said he cheer cheerfully,
fully, cheerfully, "Instead of making the kid
respectful of this beautiful, shiny
flnnr vnu inst made him mad.
I think you swung a little wide.
Better reverse yourseu on tms ge
neral crackdown,"
HIS wife did.
Next weeek it was her turn to
question his treatment of a child.
In the presence of their teen-age
daughter, she, reminded him that
he'd been ducking a decision on
an out-of-town party. "Tell the girl
vf.ilhj i
s

u
7 i

it

Yams and sausage-Stuffed Peppers
l servings;
Three large green peppers, 1
pound bulk sausage, 4 medium-size
Louisiana yams, cooked, peeled
and mashed; ili cup minced onion.
" teaspoon thyme, Vj cup chicken
bouillon, salt and pepper to taste,
2 tablespoons fine, dry bread
crumbs; 2 tablespoons grated,
processed Cheddar cheese.
Cut green peppers in half through
stem. Remove seeds and mem
brance. Cook pepper halves in boil
ing saltd water 5minutes. Drain
and cool.
Cook sausage meat over medium
heat untd well browned; drain.
Combine sausage, yams, onion
thyme and chicken bouillon: mix
well. Season to taste with salt and
pepper.
Fill pepper halves with yam mix mixture.
ture. mixture. Combine bread crumbs and
cheese; mix well. Sprinkle cheese
crumbs over yam mixture.
Place peppers in shallow baking
pan; add hot water to a deptn oi
Vi inch, bake in moderate oven
(350 degrees F.) 45 minutes.
one thing or the other, dear bul
Frr these are parents who, lov
ing eah other, find differences
from each other acceptable, So
they feel no need whatever to hide
them from their children. Thus
instead ef pretending a united
front Jn discipline, they can give
justice, to their youngsters, instead
THE expert's suggestion that
parent! disagreements upset
child is misleading. What upsets
film is hidden resentment in our
disagreements unadmitted... but
bitter leellng that Seizes on a dis.
cipline argument to argue other,
more serious conflicts.
Under such circumstances, tne
effort to pretend a friendly united
front can be confusing to the child,
denying what he senses is the real,
antagonistic truth. But a disagree
mem, tree of such secret angers
and sinerely concerned with the
child's welfare, can be actually re
assuring to. him, illustrating his
value to both parents.
Dr.' Hilde Bruch, a psychiatrist
whose book '"Don't Be Afraid of
Your Child'.' seems to me truthful
and genuinely reassuring writes:
"... An intellectual decision which
does not do justice to the fact that
parents do have and are entitled
to dlfierences of opinion,- carries
the danger of grave misinterpre
tatioq by. the child."
mix) ifff

.J

card mitUe lor inrlkOon IB (his
clunin h)i.ld mihmitied in tp.
nrittrn form td itiaitrd l etie.ol
II. e txm nuniben (hied niji In So Social
cial Social and iHerrt,'v or dt li rrd
b txnd in Ih ulfic. Nniitt
nirflin. cannol be accepted lti
caeaa.
Newcomers' Club
Will Meet Jan. II
The Newcomers' Club Will nice!
at the home of Mrs. John Camp Campbell
bell Campbell in Margarita house 8 25 5-A
Jan. 12. The speaker for the day
will be Mr. Btiand well known
woman photographer, who will
give an illustrated verbal trip to
the members of Panama.
Hostess assisting Mrs. Cmapbell
will be Mrs. Eleanor Donahoe.
Any Newcomer to the Isthmus,
living on the Atlantic side, inter interested
ested interested in meeting other Newcom Newcomers
ers Newcomers and learning more about the
new surroundings, may contact
the president Mrs. Howell Wynne,
or Mrs. James Johnson for an ap application
plication application card. Meetings are held
once a month, with field trips oft oft-e
e oft-e taken between meetings. This
applies to the wives of service
men as weel as civilians residing
on the Atlantic side, who have not
been here longer than two years,
The first to become "Oldtimers"
will leave the Club next April, the
annual luncheon meeting.
Cancer Film
Show In Cristobal
Col. W. W. Nichol, chief of the
Surgery Department of Gorgas
Hopital, will show a Him on can cancer
cer cancer to members of Cristobal Wom Woman's
an's Woman's Club and their guests, at 7:30
p.m. Monday. Feb. 13 at the Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal Red Cross Lounge. This film
will be shown to women only.
New Books
A thesis written on the United
States Amateur Athletic Union
and its effects on track and ficll
sports by John C. Fawcett. Phys Physical
ical Physical Education teacher at Bal
boa High School, is being featur
ed this week by tne vanai z,wii&
Librarv in its list of new books.
The "thesis was written by Mr.
Fawcett for his master's degree
in nnvs if Hi education at San Die
go State College. He is a grad graduate
uate graduate of the University of Red Red-lands
lands Red-lands and came to the Isthmus in
J)46 after serving, in the Armed
Services. He teaches physical edu
cation and is tracK coacn ai mc
high school, and is in charge .of
athletics fort he sen
ior and junior high schools.
Mr. Fawcett received his mas mas-i.,,
i.,, mas-i.,, )t.roe iast June after leave
of absence from his school duties.
His thesis is a historical analysis
Mf' MAKE FRJEMDS
A V
A party telephone line is sat satisfactory
isfactory satisfactory only if each of Its
users is courteous and consid
erate and willing to keep tele telephone
phone telephone conversations short. ""I'd
like to talk longer, but I'm on a
Darty line" is an easy way oi
ending a conversation that
drags on, and on.
And certainly you should
hrinc vnnr rnnireraaf inn to a.
quick close when you realize
someone is trying to get the
line.
END OF LINE
ATir.IfSTA Me (VVt Thfl
firhmanski family has been a fix
turein Cony High School. When
Betty Ochmanski, youngest of a
family of 10 children, graduates in
1957 there won't be" an Ochmanski
in the school for the first time in
28 years.
Th misnamed American hem
lock, unlike the Old World tree
whose juices killed Socrates, is
poisonous to neither man nori
beast.' .

r J M

Hi-Fi
Record Players

K

r i

TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF OUR CLUB PLAN

V

ANNUAL BANQUET AT PALO.SECO Rt. Rev. Reginald Heb?r
Gooclen, Bishop of the Panama Canai Zone last week presided
over the Annual Banquet for inmates of the Palo Seco Hospital.
The Ven. Lemuel B. Shirley, Rector of St. Paul's Church Pan Panama,
ama, Panama, the priest in charge of work at Palo Seco accompanied
Bishop Gooden, together with a group of members of the chflir
of St. Paul's Church and Rev. John H. Tovnsend. Dr. Ea
Hurwitz, Superintendent of the Leprosarium and Mr3. Hurwit
were at the table with Bishop Gooden and Father Shirley.
Guest of honor were Colonel and Mrs. Charles O. Bruce. Col.
Brce Is the Health Director of the Panama Canal.

of the AAU and its effect on track
and field. i
Also being featured this week H'
the Library is an a r t i c 1 e "Do
snakes comment suicide' in the
Natural History Magazine. It was
written by William E. Luudy, Pa Panama
nama Panama Canal employe who has con
tributed manv tides to publica
tions on the fauna of the Istinius.
The complete litl of new books 1
and their authors announce.lt his ;
week by the Library followsr I
Non-fiction: Population on the
loose. Pendell; Responsible free freedom
dom freedom in the Americas, Del Rio;
The 'world's fighting planes,
Green; The Sadler' Wells ballet;

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tone and an attractive cabinet .;. yet plays only 78-speed .1
records ... Rejoice! Now you can amaze your friends and
loved ones by playing 33y, 45 and 78-speed records on
your old one-speed set., .at a fraction of what a new, expen-s::-
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speaker and amplifier. Put in ONLY a Wcbcor high-fidelity
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R ADLO S

AT

Cyinos

AVE.

a history and an appreciation, Ma Mary
ry Mary Clarke; An Historial analysis
of the Amateur athletic union of
the United Stales and its effect on
tack and field. Fawcett; .Admiral
ambassador to Russia. Standiey;
Scarsdale, Hansen; Who c o if .) d
ask for anything more, "Merman;
Autobiography, Muir. Edwin; t v v-il
il v-il War on the western border, Vic
naghan, James.
Fiction: The recognitions, (d
di; Chidren of the stone lions,
Hackctt; The magnificent en
mies. Maas; The great man, Mor-'
gan; The lion's skin, Teilhet; and
Poison in the pen, Wentworth.

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(TERMS)
New; Larger, Lnxurior
Location 'f
VIA ESPASA & 45th Street
Bella Vista Phone 3-1285
TIVOLI



?!ilXDT, J M'AST in
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
7'J T-WV o
Jr.
A-
I
d' Li to--' W
IV!-- .; -;V v:
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LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 H" STREET, PANAMA
LIBRERIA PRECIADO
' i street k. u
Agendas Internal, da Publicacione
' K I Letter? Plaia
CASA ZALDO
,.;. Centra! Ave. U ', s ",
LOURDES PHARMACY
IM La OurroeuiUa
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
- m m w
MORRISON
4th at July are t at
LEWIS SERVICE
.''., Ave TtvsU N.
. FARM AC! A ESTADOS UNIDOS
141 Central Aveaa .
FARMACIA LUX
' .. iH Central Artaue '.
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
J f i li Oua Ay. Mo. 41
FOTO DOMY
Jut Atmomk Ave. aad S3 St.
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS'
.'.'' 5J Street Ne IS ";
FARMACIA EL BATURRO
frq Lefevre 7 Street
FARMACIA "SAS"
U Forra Hi
NOVEDADES ATHIS
Kspaaa Av
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
MINIMUM
, FOR 4
12 WORDS

TCI F AFAMA ASmc.lJ. ... O IXCIf EXEENT DAILY SITYSPAFEX

PROFESSIONAL

CANAL ZONE iOIACLIMC
i DENTAL-MEDICAL
Dr. C. r. rbrf ft Br. H.
D O S. (Geoi f etow a Vniveroly) M.U
Tivoll (41b ot July Ave.. NO. Jl A 2
(oppoull Ancon School Playiround)
: Tel J-MIl rnma.
( RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM RIDGE
f hone Panam 2-055J
TRANSPORT! BAXTSR. $A.'
,l racked Shipper! Mrt
JPhontt 2-2451 3-2562..
tiB Ridini t .
: PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding Jnmpi9 cl dail
i f 5 p.m. PhoM J-0279
y ppointm wit.
-W hap Vouf rigure"
BODX -REDUCING
T famoiu McLeA-y Machine
Swedish Mewage Steam Oath
for male and female
0RTEPED1A NACIONAL
i (Dr. Srholls)
58 JiHla Arosemena Fh. $-2217
i HARNETT & DUNN
BAI.1KOOM DANCE ST D10
A CHAKM SCHOOL SUITK 111
Balhoa 2-4238 or Panama 3-IMO
Studio El Panama Hotel
I!
Joe Deady Sets
Indoor Record
For 3-4 Mile
.NEW YORK, Jan. 9 UP) Joe
Deady, a last-minute substitute
for West Santee, set a new world
indoor three-quarter mile record
of3:01.2 last night In the Now
York Metropo"tan Track and
Field Championships. ... (.
The. 27-year-old former I.
. CM A champion from 'George
town University shattered by
1.4 seconds the old mark for a
Standard-sized board trae'e set -H
years ago by the late John
. Jiorican.
Beady, out of 'competition for
the past four years while serv serv-in
in serv-in the Air Force, entered
the race after Santee was
scratched becaus eof a sore calf
muscle. The Marina Corp lieu lieutenant
tenant lieutenant from Quantico, Va., hold hold-el1
el1 hold-el1 of the American mile record
iti 4 :00.&, warmed up for the
lice but could not loosen the
liiured limb,
t Deady beat Joe La Pierre, an another
other another former Georgetown cham champion,
pion, champion, by 20 yards, with John
Kopil and Alex Breckenridge
traillnp; in that order. Deady's
time equalled the large track
record net In 1940 by Borlcan
on Dartmouth' eVHap, which
Ims been Ulsmantled.
(.... ...'.
:Tt:rre other records were set
-' i t e me"t. at. John's of Brook Brook-3
3 Brook-3 t f "t a world Indoor two-mile
i mark of 8:07.8, with Jack
'-don, Ron Colino, Frank
" umiem and Tom Cawley run run-:
: run-: ntr; successive half-mile less In
t :. u order.- The former stand
:-"d of 8:09 was set by Bayonne,
:('J., hlsh school in 1953.
IStcw Thomson, former Yale
Mhlete. threw the 35-pound
eijht 60 feet 5 1-4 Inches. This
was 11-4 inches farther than
the throw of Bob Backus, who
Ust year set the former stand standard
ard standard of 59 feet. 10 3-4 inches.
The fourth mark set was a 24 24-ftiot.
ftiot. 24-ftiot. 9-inch lean in the broad-
iump by Georfte Shaw, the Pion Pion-ffr
ffr Pion-ffr Club's 1952 Olympian.
Horace Ashenfelter of the
N.Y.C.A., Olympic steeplechase
record -holder, won the three three-iiiile
iiiile three-iiiile run in 14 minutes, 21.3
fcconds, some two hours after
':. had placed second in a
mile won rv Nyu's Ike Matza
in 4:20.4. Matza won by 20
yards. t .
j'm' Gathers of the Pioneers
;r. the 60-yard' .dash 'n 6.8.'
j ; o!ids, beating Andy Stanfield j
( irnjc 200-meter co-record :
i ..;:ir. Lindv RemiRlno. 0'.vmi
;;" Jim-meter chajnoion. a.
: iii fvj at the start and went
: -ed
T-.-o.iv. "Tforrnf was all all-,
, all-, n n .-..'(,i.'e i-o-"iitp it
re nt rj.jr rj.jr-"r"
"r" rj.jr-"r" kit-,

FOR SALE FOR SALE
Honsehold Automobilet
: FOR SALI: Livini room suite, FOR SALE: One Cadillac four,
wine, overstuffed, in good condi- 'deer ttdae, H4I model, l-eyl.,
lion. Platform recker, end table color blue, perfect condition,
and lamps. Phone Albrook &- pood for taxi or far laroe family
4198 in the Interior Call Walker, tef-
tZi7m 7 n ene 2-5435 or 2-1077.
FOR SALI: Sii-strand Rattan .
large end tables, 2 ottomans and Position Offered
2 pain matching drape $300; .
' dining room let, light mahog- ; WANTED: American beauty
any, china closet, buffet, fable operator. T.M.C.A. Beauty Shop,
and 6 chairs $300; on Maytag Balboa, CZ. Phone 23677.
double tub washing machine, (0 w.u. r
" cycle $60 Qtrs. 2016-A, Cu- WANTED: Spanish English
rundu Monographer with experience.
' ; ' ,, '.', i, '. Permanent position. Box 3205,
: FOR SALE: Sitting room tot: 2 Panama, R.P. ( ;
kit chaira and sofa, glaHtop WAklTr
table. Cheap, 4th Street 26, WANTED : Competent seertta-
Miirachi nr fonhorthand-typmg. M.
i- ow English perfectly and have
1 FOR SAL!: Leaving Isthmus, Mveral year experience. Phone
" selling househild furniture. In- 3'0M3 Panama.
; eluding refrigerator, gas ttove, f mpalvuciut 7T1
living, dining room eeti. 4 beds. fM;TMI1NT W"'ty for
2 bicycles. No. 10 Tivoli Ave. qualified wlesmen on full time
.' Phone 2-4247. r pait time basis. Must be ex-
' ' Perienced, have record of previ-
FOR SALE: 3-piece living room ous success and references. Call
let, wardrobe, I dining table, Tropeleo, S.A., for interview p-
J porcelain table, 2 double beds portunity.
spring and iMttress), 1 dresser. ""wikiTih. w 7
Rio Abajo No. 2U3, room 10. Z.l 5 T t l'
Phone Kobbe 2182. fn,g and packing shrimp at
Pesouenaa Oceamcai da Panama,
FOR SALE: Lamps, 2 beds S A- C,ll 6a., pargua Lefevre,
(mattresses), chain, tables, rtu- to Fobrlca Cigarrillos Pa-
, ,di couch, 25-cycle refrigerator, 3 name In Rio Abajo.
' wicker hain, bed end. dresser. ;
Rdi7 Program, ArW,y At,ant'C
HOG-840 Lead In Armed

Vour Community Station
(Telephone: 2-3066)
tVbsrs 100.000 People Meet .,
Presents
' j .. .
, Today, Monday, an.
P.M.
4:00 Feature Review
4:30 What's Your Favorite?"
. ( requests taken by 2
Phone till 3:00)
I 5:30 News.
5:35 What Your Favorite
(cont'd)
6:00--AUen Jackson (news)
6:15-rBLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
' 6:00 Alle Jackson (news)
6:30 Melachrino Muslcale
8:45 Old New Orleans
7:00 ORGAN AIRS
' Ncstle's Chocolate)
7:15 Freddy Martin Show
7:30 Report From The y.S.A.
8:00 Music By- Roth
. 8:30 Proudly We Hail
9:00 You Asked For It ...
(requests taken by
' phone till 7:30)
10:25 News
10:30 One Night Stand
10:45 Temple Of Dreams
11:00 Concert Under The Stars
12: Sign Of
Tomorrow, Tuesday, Jan. IB
A.M. -;';.' V7::..;"
6:00 Sign On Alarm Clock
Club (requests taken
by phone till 7:00)
7:30 Morning Salon Concert
8:15 Church In The Wildwood
8:30 Musical Reveille
9:00 News
9:15 Church In The Wildwood
10:00 JENNIFER'S JOURNAL
- (Cutex St Odorono)
10:05 Off The' Record,
(requests taken by
' phone till 8:30)
11:00 News
11:05 Off The Record (cont'd)
11:Sn Mp'pt ThP Kntertninp
I 10 -On Nam, t
AM b J
P.M.
12:05 Lunchtime Melodies
12:30 Sweet And Hot
1:00 News
'1:15 Music Of Manhattan -K
1:30 Sons Of The Pioneers
1:45 Serenade In Blue
2:00 Instrumental Capers
2:15 Singing Americans
2:30 Tex Beneke Show
2:45 Hank Show And His
- Rainbow Ranch Boy3
3:00 Piano Patterns
3:15 Sammy Kave Show
3:30 Music For Tuesday
.4:00 Feature Review
4:30 What's Your Favorite
( (requests taken by
phone till 3:00)
5:30 News
5:35 What's Your Favorite
tcont'd)
8:00 Allen Jackson (news
6:15 PT UK GIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
6:30 Your Dancing Party-
(1:45 Do It Yourself
7:00 ORG ANAIRS
.... i-
"Nesues lyiiucumLci
7:30 Report From The U.S.A.
8 00 Musical Theatre
8 30 Educating Archie
9:00 vou se& For It
"eouests-r-taken by
phone till 7:301
,1:'"i-1 ns
10:30 Vulc From Hotel
Kl Paamna
10:45 Temple Of Dreams
IV UuK'tt.t-L'ndcr.-'Ihe 2tari.

Army Atlantic took a one-camel

lead in the Panama Area Armedinella: Wiginton, Leggett (9) and
UntiAAe IlnrAKn I T ao (J1 A t n l wu

unocuoii Ajcrtne odLiu uiiy
nisjht, handing the Fort Amador
Troopers their first setback, 4-3, in
a game played under protest by
the Troopers.
In other contests Saturday af afternoon,
ternoon, afternoon, Fort Kobbe moved into a
tie with the Troopers, defeatina
Fort Clayton, 4-1, and Albrook AFB
scureu us nisi victory, o-u over
Navy.-.
Games this Wednesday see Ar Army
my Army Atlantic at Kobbe. Navy vs.
Clayton at Coco Solo and Albrook
ncainl (hp Trnnnnro nnrlpr Ihp
lights at Albrook Field. I
Saturday night's rhubarb came1
in the ninth inning when, with the,
score 4-3 in favor of the A's, Troop-!

er pinch-hitter liarry Simpson was ",l3 ""-uiuuig a mpie oy imra
called out for interference with a! baseman Fred Aleguas, but left 11
fielding play. Simpson bad singled! branded on the bases. i
to lead off the inning. Then hadi ;Jm King hurled four innings for
stolen second, and on catcher Bob'avy, striking out 10 and giving
Stephenson's grounder to the short-i"P two hits. Navy errors account account-stop,
stop, account-stop, Jasper York.vhe stopped onjed for five of the Flyer runs. 1
his way to third while the ground-1 ' R H E
er came towards him. then iumo- Navy: 000 000 000 0 6 7

ed over ti an continued to third. Albrook: 012 012 OOx 6 6 2j
York, who came in for. the ball!
directly behind Simpson, bobbledlll.,,-,.-,---, nuLI!!...!.
the play and the base umpire call-;8SD2D2r rUDHSllCl

ed saie all around. The plane um-
pire, Lew Helsinger, however,i
called Simpson out for inlerforinc;
wiui me piay, wnereupun uie ii op-
ets siormeu out oi uie uugom to
argue. But Helsinger rem a i n e d
steadfast in his decision, and Troop-

urcemthatgthe S.biSW EW Y0RK' Jan'' 9 ( Wb Wb-ed
ed Wb-ed under nrofes !,rd W" Sloclim' Presit,eit
None of Atlantic's runs w er American Newspaper Publishers
earned, as the Troopers committed;Asn- and executive vice president
six errors. Trooper pitcher AIarty!n.d general manager of the Phila Phila-Wiginton
Wiginton Phila-Wiginton pitched magnifuie n 1 1 yid.elPm ,Bulf h?,8 bTee,n aw,aid aw,aid-for
for aw,aid-for eight innings, fanning 16 andle sold m.eda of the Internation Internation-walking
walking Internation-walking only one but threw wild! Benjamin tranklin Society lor
to first in the fourth inning, allow-, his "outstanding service m up;
ing two runs to score. holding the ireedom of the press,"
. R h $ it was announced today.
AA' 100 200 001 4 6 2 The announcement was made by
iwf... -Ann ni7'MWV" 3 fi Brig. Gen George L. Bliss, socie-

. .....1 VVV V. -
Cardinal Spcllman
Leaves Fcr 4-Day
Visit To US Traps
Aid 111.10

Cardinal Spellman.' Archbishop-of .Pieviuuoiy. u.. "w""
New York, has left here for tl..f, Hw
four-day visit to U.S. troops mthr!31 Ambassador an en R.

. IV V 111 A J, ej a It. a v A r

DMTf Tin fi

V4 German Ambassador to'mu Harold E. Slassen, Edward

the Holy See Wolfgang' Jaenicke,; 'f-e;. K-ttwine and
wno saw Spellman off at.lhe air- h ..Kettenng' an0

port, said the Cardinal will be sjnooert Momgomciy
luncheon guest of Chancellor Kon-j
rad Adenauer tomorrow. !vii p' Oiippn
Spellman. who met Pope Piusi Voting or Jueeil
XII during his four-day visit to(j0 Resrin Next Friday
Rome, left, earlier. ; ,",.,'
. Alter spending four days In Ger-1 at Hole! El Panama
many ,-he plans to proceed to, Par-1
is for one dav and then, return to J Thp first vote, count dance to

New York. '

The Cardinal said his slay mireign over February's four day
Rome reminded him of the happy i carnival festivities will be held
12 years he spent. here as astu-lat Hotel El Panama on Friday

dent and young Priest, t

Sfeemg Spellman ou at tne air- aRer of El Panama says, wnai
port, in addition to Ambassariorjnicer way to break a supersti supersti-Jaenlckc,
Jaenlckc, supersti-Jaenlckc, were Mons. Joseph Mc-tion than with the raising of
CeouL'h of the Vatican Secretariatithe Carnival Flacr. Oueen Mar-

of State; Mons. Martin J. ,0'Cod-
.... c 1 X 1.

nor, recior oi uie ituin niiinmuinci cuuib taaii ycui ui iaiic
College in Rome, and Chinese Am-jthe blue and white flag which

hassatior to tne Vatican c n eo u
King Sic
HOT SPUDS
DES LACS, N. D. (UP) -baked
potatoes could be had for
the taking here recently. A ware-

house fore cooke&.$:U),0G0,Wprt&,of;

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031, ANCON, CZ.
BOX 1211, CRISTOBAL. CZ.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: AKC registered
Boxer Puppies, male and female.
5773-A Sibert St., Diablo.
FOR RENT: For offices, the
.second and fourth floor of the
Caja do Ahorrot Building; also
penthouse on the sixth floor.
FOR SALE. Henry J 2-door so.
dan $250, .economical motor; 1
GE washing machine, 25-cycle
and extra brand new motor, both
$75. 11 2-A Gambaa, Phono 6
717.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE: Houses in Santa
Clara,, fully furnished. Leaving,
mutt sell Phone 6-441.
FOR SALE: 5 hectares land on
Trans-Isthmian Highway, 9 miles
from Colon. For details call Pan.
ama 3-2471 after 5 p.m.
Takes 1-Game
TCIik. man TsnrmViii fC A Dad
i aiepnenson
Kobbe riehl-hanrler Jnio Unsnrin
four-hitted the Lifeliners over Clay Clayton
ton Clayton and batted in two runs as the
'Liners scored all four of their runs
in the fourth inning.
Ed Stemska hurled Kevpn inninoe
for the Cavaliers and was tagged
for the loss
R H E
Clayton: 000 000 010 14 0
Kobbe: : 4 9 j
f ui.ion., nca,u io iiu mceu
ter; Rosario and Cooper.
Steve Kisio evened his record
1-1, he hurled the season's
shutout, striking out six and
walking four. Navy collected six
r i (
fc .,.' J ,;'r
KeCwIf C$ AlfGlQ
jOf Franklin Society
- ...
piCiUClll. A il.OCU1fDI.lUII Yt 111 lit
made at the society's 33rd annual
meeting in New York, Jan. 21,
when the society will commemo
rate the 250 anniversary of
Franklin's birth.
Slocum. accepting the award,
will deliver an address entitled
"250 Years Later.''
The society's medal, awarded in
recognition of service in keeping

t.;with iranKim s pnuosopny,, n a s

: , j j
rlpclrlp which .'.debutante will
Ithe 13th. Joe Cunningham, man-
cela de Janon who reigned with
1 1 .4fl w.lra
"lgmnes ine Deginning oi ut;
I ,.,!, r,,n
- t UL lull.
Present at the dance will be
the candidates who have been
invited to run for Queen. They
will make merrv appearances
with their supporters. 1
vounw tor queen at El Pan-

rviintiii. nils:, vicii. vaiiuo vv

FOR RENT
Apartments

ATTENTION G. 1.1 Just built
modern furnished apartments, 1,
2 bedrooms, bet, cold watts.
Phone Penamo 3-4941.
FOR RENT. 2-bfdroom apart apart-ment,
ment, apart-ment, hot water.' Ricardo Arias
Street, Campe Alegrt, Inquire
37th Street No. 4-23.
FOR RENT: Modern two-bedroom
apartment, porch, living living-dining
dining living-dining room, maid's and laun laundry
dry laundry room, screened, hot water.
For further details please call
3-4946, 3-6737. r
FOR RENT; Modern apartment
2 bedrooms, living-dining room,
$70. 16th Street No, 6, San
Francisco, near Roosevelt Thea Theater.
ter. Theater. FOR RENT: 2-bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, hot water, stove, refriger refrigerator.
ator. refrigerator. Clayton 6110 business
hours.'. ,'.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart-
n, ifitiwuing rvrrig II IT I f
porch,' dining-parlor room, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, kitchen, garage $60 Ap Apply
ply Apply 112 Via Belisario Porrai,
near Roosevelt Theater.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apart-ments,
ments, apart-ments, $45 and $55, North A A-mericen
mericen A-mericen neighbors, homo com.
fort. Phone 3-0471.
Inlernalional CARE -(onferencia
Will Be
Held In Washington
The VvecntivA nimr.fr'. f

CARE. Richard Reuter,.has an- ?PP7P rThe ts
nounced from Headquarters in I fe continued to be
New York that there will be an feIt for 5everal hours hours-International
International hours-International Conference in.
Washington, DC. for the week! f worst damage was to a
beginning January 23 l"ew home overlooking-the cen-
Thls Is. the first Iternational!ral Boulevard that winds along
CARE Conference since the me-1 he "hore- The house was re re-morable
morable re-morable one held in Panama diced to wreckage In a matter
Citv in Juhrnf 1953 lofieconds.

The International Conference
scheduled for January in Wash Washington
ington Washington has a particular slnl-
finance as to time and Dlace
CARE will be celebrating Its
10th Anniversary and the City
of Washington will offer consul consultations
tations consultations with representatives of
various U.S. Government Agen Agencies.
cies. Agencies. Mission Chief of Panama. Mrs.

Mary G. Lowrie. will attend theer inside the new 41-story, $40,000, $40,000,-conference
conference $40,000,-conference in Washington andi000 Prudential building is con con-will
will con-will also meet with Executives! trolled at a panel in the third
in New York to discus., plan-basement. By setting- switches ..nd
whereby CARE mas continue to I dials- the bui!din8 engineer can
be of service to the Republic ofireRuIate the air conditioning at
Panama. I any place in the building.

Nominations Open
For Curundu Civic
Council Members
Nominations will be 'open for
members of the Curundu Civic
Council and the Curund'i Wel
fare Council at an open meetin?
at the Curundu Clubhouse An Annex,
nex, Annex, Wednesday at 7 D.m.
Candidates must be over 21 years
oi age, civilian employes or tne
United States Government and
reside in Curundu or Curundu
Heights.
Ur
VnjruTrCf -!.,--

1st PRIZE

362020
L

Present your tickets before Friday Your tickets
! TOTAL...
' I. $800.00 (Accumulated) 2. $660.00

RESORTS

Shrapnel' furnished houses on
beech ot Santa Cloro. Telephone
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mil
past Casino. Low re tea. Phono
Balboa 1166.
PHILLIPS Oceansid Cottage,
Santo Clare. Box 435, Bolboe,
Phone Panama 3-1177. Crista
fcal 3-1673.
GramJich'i Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modern conveniences,
moderate rates. Phono Gamboa
6-441.
2 Criiically Hurt
AsAcspiilco Quake
Shaffers Hew Home
ACAPULCO, Mex Jan. 9 (UPl
A tronir earthauake ...racked
this coastal resort city early yes yesterday
terday yesterday seriously injuring at least
28 persons, possibly more, and
damaging seafront villas.
At least fwn rftfsnns vuere rri
tically injured. Numerous oihsr
persons suffered minor injures
ana cuts irom flying glass. It
was1 not immediatelv known
whethtr any American were a a-mong
mong a-mong the injured.
The strong tremor hit at'l:10
a.m.. loltine houses anrf tmarl
hoiela in. this southern tourist
center on Mexico's Pacific coast.
Tourists, many of them Amer Americansran
icansran Americansran into the street Most.
I01 -mem remained out in the
The two persons gravely In Injured
jured Injured were in the house.
Street lights burst on the Im Impact
pact Impact of the first tremor,,, shower showering
ing showering glass on pedestrians.
PANEL SHOW
rmnr.n t-m m.. ......i.
CSS BSSB S6S9

VfTV TlfrrTIM V, llivniivmn. TUP.' CHIIlITiMrniTCi nrr r in

At The "CENTRAL"

I K?& DOUGLAS JA.'mES MASOM pali lcxas pma lcf f

r .
2nd

f?. U D!iriH! r

207209
lZ'Z

FOR RENT
.-Miscellaneous

FOR RENT; Spacious locale,
ground. Juito Arosemena Ave.
nue No. 37-11. Inquire 37th
4-
FOR RFMT. rut:...
... viii,n in cvffl
mercuil raw in front of Hotel
El Panama. Please apply foto El
Halebn 9-12 a.m. 2-6 p m.
Tel. 3-1179. J
Bad Check
(Continued from Pate l
a recommendation from the Ger
man tnarge D'Affaires, repre-i
sentetl German manufacturers, and1
was in the process of Dublishinir!
ja supplement to a "widely read'
newspaper in Panama." The Chi-!
i lean tried to collect money in ad-t
, am.c mr me aa, out uie store own-
1ICI ICiUSl'U,
"I told him it wasn't our policy
to pay in advance for things liko
that until wo see the ads in print
and ho teamed terribly disap disap-'
' disap-' pointed when he couldn't col collect."
lect." collect." ho recalled today.
It could not be learned today
whether any "other storekeepers in
Panama had been approached by
the DSeildo-salp.sman nr uh(hor ho
was successful in his attempts to!
swindle other dealers. I
The Panama Sprrpt Poli
a record of the case, but cannot ask
for Caffarena's extradition unless
the amounts fie swindled totalled
more than sl.ooo. Should h vr
I return to Panama he could be pick
ed up ai once.
wiie oia-iirn caa-anver wno
drove th Chilean around for
AL - .1 . . .
On old-time cab-driver who
three day was wiser than the
rest, when Cattarena didn't pay
up, he went to th police and got
an order demanding payment of
the $12.50 ca far due. He was
paid in cash.
s .'..
Ttl.t hpfnrp hp ctontprl n,..Inn
out bum checks, Caffarena pulled

uut iuu iic uou uiosiicu earner koi. t.inory r iveuy, com
at the first National City Bank andjmander. of the 1806th AAC3
later withdrawn. While at the Juan! Group, and Major Nicholas Sal Sal-Franco
Franco Sal-Franco racetrack prior to his de-j pas, director of operations,
parture, he was reportedly admit-! 1806th AACS Group. ..
ted to the presidential box. as if I- ::- s.

he were a VIP, one observer saidj
torlav
Last Monday, on Jan. 2, Caf-
, ... ..
fai'Pna rllprkpfi nut nf Inp nnnca
------ .... ...,
iplt. Ann tnm thp pipr.r hp was
.... ...
transferring to Hotel International. I
However he asked the cabbie to!

stop in front of the International Pups A Collecting Guide for Jun Jun-'
' Jun-' where he hirea a ooy to take his'ior Geologists."
haps tn thp P A A nffirp Caffaronal

never checked into the hotel, bull More than one million acres of
made connections immediately and 'tillable land go into non-agricul-eft
Panama on TACA Flight 100!tural use in the United States
for Costa Rica. every year.

BOS D Q t3 CI ta
antl "LUX" Theatres
. . .. a.'-a
JANUARY.
PRIZE
1

are valid for a whole year Keep them carefully
$1,900.00
(Accumulated) 3. $440.00 (Accumulated)

"FOR SALE
Boats & Motors

FOR SALE; Leaving toon and
will sell my boat very cheap. 1 5
ft. with cabin and 16-hp. out
board motor, $275. Call Margar Margarita
ita Margarita 3-1644.
WANTED
Apartments
, WANTED: Responsible work working
ing working couple desire vacation quar.
ter end February. Reference
furnished. Balboa 2-2580
OX VISIT-Maj. Gen.. Dudley
D. I-Iale, conunandef of the U.S.
I" J oiu nii.tuiumuiu
"ons Service arrived at Albrook
ll- fT.- si j. ft A. J ... i
Airways ana Air Communlca-
Air Force Saturday to viist the
AACS facilities, operated by the
ioug.ni Mts uroup and assign assigned
ed assigned squadrons, ....
tn.11 i i .
P t I 1 .11 11. I I IT n D THPH.ATl... J. V
AACs facilities at Albrook AFB,
Hale will also visit the AAC3
squaorons at Kamey and. Kind
i ley Air Force Bases accompanied
r- i' PEBBLE PRIMER
CHICAGO w frmv
hounds'.' are looking after ""pehbla
inun, of iWa m....i tt:.
r.r. w.v vhivo61i inmim nis
: ., Art,pA,,M. tu
iuij uiuocum. iiic UIMllUllun 1
publishing a book by geologist Mrs.
Delia Cox, entitled "For ;-Pehhlo
C3 E3 BSE3 BZ3 K3 BZ3 aCETj
on JANUARY 13 of I
,
ffflarf Ci a 3 ISB
u
8th
3rd PRIZE
p
u
1

092536

12:00 Sign Off

the potatoes. .-. I
Advt.



DRIVE-Ul Thestrp
CECILIA THEATRE
60c. 30c.
WEEKEND RELEASE!
WILLIAM BENDIX, In
CRASH OUT
Also: .-.
MAD AT THE WORLD
.VICTOR I 4
Jclxr.y V."f..-..-nv..i;cr
JUNGLE MOON
MEN
- Also: -IT
CAME FROM
BENEATH THE SEA
APtTOitO
T I V 0 L I
CEiITOAL Theatre
73c. Uc'
35c
:oc.
35c. 20c.
Robert Mitchum, in
THE NIGHT OF
THE HINTF.R
- Also:
'SUMMERTIME
75c
40c.
60c. 30c.
John PAYNE Faith DOMF.KGLE
SANTAFEn PASSAGE
Also;
TROUBLE WITH STORE
In VistaVision
James Siewart. in
STRATEGIC AIR
COMMAND
- Also:
SANCAREE
with Fernando Lamas
Z-3C 20c.
"Joi McCrea, in
' l CHITA
-flus: -THE
BOB MATHIAS
BTORY
Great Release:
Romance and Suspense Filmed
in Fabulous Monte Carlo!
Cary Grant
Grace Kelly In
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
"TO CATCH A THIEF'"
VistaVision and Colqr
Shows: 3:0S 5:04 7:00 3:00 p.m.
Technicolor Superscope Release!
John PAYNE Ronald REAGAN
Rhonda FLEMING Coleen GRAY
in
TENNESSEE'S PARTNER

LUX III EAT OE

mm

UNDER
MICE
JUrrORT

WHEAT
MIU 8U.
1,021

; .. ;
i ; )
i
:
i )
1
; j

COTTON CORN
MILLION MILLION
IAUS IUSHELS

11.1

c
t i
t
i
f i
is

1,024
i I
)
r j
i
-
r
,

sea

WKi).!08 I

FOOD, FATS
AND OILS
MILLION

960

u bl

.'.V. 1 1 -rf jf ,.JJ II

OFF THE MARKET Cross-hatched part of ban on this graph
how the large proportion of stocks carried over from 1955 that are
under price support. These tremendous surpluses hae been bought
vp by the government or are held under loan or purchase agree agreement:
ment: agreement: Idea is that keeping them off the market will help sustain

THE RECORD SHOP: Pat Boonei
is one of th? top young singers
around. But lie isn't putting au his
eggs m one career. This is a level
headed boy, and if he meets three
others like him, he can form a
quartet called the "Level Head,"
lie figures a college education is

a handy thing to, have.

r

1

V

Pat is a student at Columbia

University. An "A" student, no less. I

hto nun mutes on the New xorK

ment: Idea is that keeping them off the market will help sustain jSubway and his pals are calling
prices. But such surpluses are one of the biggest headaches of farm njm xhe Millionaire Straphang-

eutlook for 1856. Congress IS aviwj ieeini mint w vt luuwr
reducing production.

1
f t

- ,,

: -r fl jek i n f lrrrt l V ::;rT

pJ Y0X n j

id ,kr EnkiM Ji I 1 ;
:'.i. ;:.-v:,'-; o' ::'.".,.".' ;. : '.-1

cr," which is a little oeuer man

being cauea "ine veivei ros.

Pat Boon

Corky Hal

.An inl Apacl in ei naut Monffl nrni.

a. .. L ...kHtnaf 4 ... RAAM . x . . n

uo one rtctni unj inn -!ec is uene fNorman x'resenis

,was approached by a lady ho, what he presents are some musi

pal n nnrl pns that tnrno nf

the big record companies overlook

...,.! "Arpn t vou Pat Boone

tne Singer i e scru uu niv ........ llle 01g reoiu cuiupauies ovcijuuk.
Godfrey Show?" Pat admitted h10lie sucn ls a new called

was and tht lady asKta it i j simpiy corky Hale." Corky is a
could knit him some wfyle socks.; beautiful blonde who plays Ihe
This happens rarely on the subway, narPi pjano and ute an dhow
even to Pat Boone. many girls do you know who can

. ; ij i do that? Even non-ueautiiul ones.
Pat's a 21-year-old ret.rel-with s. by. VerB0I Duke and

j Virginia Will Vote Today On Plan
For Statc-Aided Private Schools
RICHMOND. Va Jan. 9 (UP)-1 The State's powerful Democratic
An expected record turnout of Vir-: organization as well as virtually
ginia voters will decide todayiall State leaders lncludinB Gov.
whether thev want a state sup-! Thomas B. Stanley and all Senat-

ported private school system to ors and Congressmen, nave mrown

evade mixed classrooms. j mwr uppi vmiuu "'uv :Z
Registration for the referendum! Scattered opposition has xqme
set a new record and election of-!from State Sens Stuart B.. tmcr
fiii ., M anH Armistead Bootlie. as welt as

tnn tha npar fi''n fWm nnrenne u.-hn' from rcllBlOUS and CIVIC grOUpS

. i. in. l- nnA Kmym nrt'ani7.ations.

cast uuiiuis in uie isioi picsuiiMi- .-c,. : .. .
tial election, the previous-high, i Tlieir chief objection is tne

The voting will be on a proposeu aiaiu s Vum ok.
constitutional amendment which; be destroyed by the p3,110" n
would nermit the state to foot the private school setup but Stanley

tuition bill for any. parents ho-said he would see e

object to enroling their cmwrenj iai ne u m
. .... .. .. i. ii ,whih nrnuif ps that an till-

in lniegraiea scnoois. ? r-- - srhnnU..

The amendment is the major cicm sysiem ui

point in an anti-integration pro-twin De mamuuitu, ..

gram prepared-by a commission yne .i"ulc"', v7, la
on public education headed by raised if the amendment is passed
Stale Sen. Garland Gray during a is that of obtaining p cho J
15-months study of the school seg- for those parentsv w ho refuse to

regation problem. isena u:u, r v
If the amendment is approved by(schools. i f tne
publip vote, the Virginia Leg.sla-! The assembly will put P
ture will set another referendum 'tuition funds under tl PJ
for naming delegates to a consti- but it will be up to the paren s,
" t ,,n thp'and the different communities to

amendment. provide the private institutions.

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) -t Close Close-ups
ups Close-ups and Longshots: The big debate
cf 1955 movies vs. television television-wound
wound television-wound up. the year with a blaze
of wordage from a home-screen
producer who- was quickly an answered
swered answered by a nettled movie execu-
tlVG. ''''''
Units movits "waka up,. TV Is

son-in-law of the famous country
and western singer. Red Foley.
i um .inolntf fnr Dot Rec-

man QtH if. "T warn mDH.iH AAAi . . '' h..f nlaanv

u z '..r.u":r ords tor aDoui a yijs"'

i went i Kepi pumping into myiu..

wife.'

This is Hollywood, Mrs. Jones:
The Santa Claus on the roof of
a Hollywood reslaurant every night
rturina ihn. hnlirlnva wi, mmitA an.

i .iuH.a..B, 1. 1 1 vi 1 1 vi m ii u uiv i m v.

OOinfl aDSOrP COniroi l linn mi nmii ujr ua; iib wuiltcu
Jntirt business," prdictd Worth-) as a villain in a movie western!
ington B. Miner, preductr of two;
hit TV shows, "Mtdie," and "Fron- Not in tho script: "I likt him
,jr I personally ,-. and bolitvt ma, that's
Said Miner, "Things are moving la tough way to likt him."

ranidlv that either the major

1113 .
hearts of Tans, juke boxers all

sorted Boones.
-There's an Interesting story be behind
hind behind 'the Decca best-seller, It s

Almost Tomorrow, nyine
Turn of the boys, Wade

Buff and Gene Adkinson, are stu

dents at the universny m

nirK'S PICKS: Snm pood rec-

Uje uick jjyraan ino uviuwt
does its usual fine job with "Bau "Baubles,
bles, "Baubles, Bangles and Bead." Others:
"The Little White Duck" (Dorothy
Olsen, RCA( ; "Pauline" (Jack
Plies, .Decca) ; "Steel Guitar"
(Vickl Young, Capitol); "Fall In

Love, Fall In Love" (Larry Starr,

Ap TV will. assume (lorn

inance; Wy feeling is that the stu
,nn!r linawarft and unap

preciative of it, but TV has rev.

olutionizeuiiory ituntj;. -"
our story with fewer and longer
,iiMiii Thorp i ninrp mature and

finer entertainment today on TV

than Hollywood ever otierea

in July, Walt Disney Production

siock nas dropped almost 28 points.
It's an eyebrow lifter,
Thesc-modern-movics note: Re Remember
member Remember when the hero and heroine
galloped off together into the sun-
SPt. Thprp's ctill a snniipt In '"Writ.

ten on the Wind," but Bob Stack

WILLIAM PERLBERG, produc-iand Lauren Bacall fly into it in

er of such movies as "The Coun- his private DC-3!
try Girl'" and "Little Boy Blue,")
was quick to answer. SELECTED SHORTS: William
"He's imagining things," saidiHolden and Jane Russell won the
Perlberg. 1 Hollywood Women's Press Club

."It would bt Silly nt arjueo awaru as me years uiosi coupera

back, "to argut that iv nas not
changtd tht fact of tht tnttrtain tnttrtain-mtnt
mtnt tnttrtain-mtnt busintss and that it is not
doing fina things. But tht two busi busi-ntssts
ntssts busi-ntssts art stparatt and will as as-atntiatly
atntiatly as-atntiatly rtmain thtt way.

"Although we "will oe making

During the course of a doumc. if . ,. .. (Th. Four Joes

date, with girls, waaei a ,.,...

bragged that c" r, tin.. Canitol): "Rom.-nce Mo" (D

song of the mo Marc0 sisfers. DeCca).

i nVinf ehn knrW fl

and they invited him to the house

to play some oi ms kuiihiuj""-

,TV TOPPERS

GEORGE GOBEL (NBC-TV): I
. tnvpHn that was soignee.

'That's a French word, wit means,

well, it means reniea j
means.

vT FARMER'S SHARE MARKETING MARGIN

r

n

c?. it. 55c

aic JJ j"

49c

47c

48c

47c

45c

43c

41c

ANNOUNCE ENGAGEMENT Sing?r Julius La Rosa. 28, and
Rosemary Meyer. 24, look like a very happy couple after La
Rosa announced their engagement la New York. Miss Meyer
is secretary to another well-known slnger-Perry Como. ;
'.''.I; ;-.V vW;vl.::.,.::;.';'l-: l::::,l-B

... . Mm' ii-J t I tat inn fNnrornn'): one ofSthe moift

u "h eZrWh.t h rdidiS enWial pianists. Barbara Car Car-had
had Car-had to do something. JVhat ne o u, r Me
&VXirl"iir (RCA)-You should

far vmi couia say unciBvc,

tive actor and 'actress . Diana

Lynn's dating Agent Henry Willson.
They were engaged before she dis discovered
covered discovered Andy McLaglen, son of
Vic . .. MGM's film version of
"Teahouse of the August Moon"
will be filmed entirely on location

r ,. tv.., ,ilV ho in.i in lanan tar Marlnn RrnnHn

ijiiulv:, kiic.f r. in i'. r
creasingly distinguished and ouri Glenn Ford and other members of
medium wilt always retain fifstithe 'cast 'sail' in February. .. ..

command of, the outstanding tai- ... !; ird be a pity too
i:... ;M Tha Dnvu Thootpi in Mnnnn thing. 11 U UK r lJ

LNext year more o the same. iS.D., is auctioning off 350 pounds
But with competition between Ilol-iof ham every Saturday night to
lvwood and TV 'growing fiercer help .s"olve the farm problem."

than ever, tne public win reap mejit isn i me nrsi ume, n ougn, mai at.ance Since Bill is an
harvest. of bettcr-than-evcr enter-! there has been ham at the movies 8na' .nrt b mt a lot of

tainment in. both mediums. ' Westerns, gangster dramas f""" aTs0 EOt some offers
. .. land war stories, in that order, laughs. He aibu bui
THE WITNET: There's a large, have dominated movies for the last to make ot her e turned

auvicw iiiiuiugtaiju vi uuu iiupc s w jt.u. v ,u" .11 rfnwn for a sound reason,
hnmp .frampH nn th wall nf hU eatecor ics in 65 per cent of aU them all down,, ior a sum u

.1 .... Tl at- f 1 .1 (in.if;i.n Curlrlnn tVmtlfillf TlTflll

Pop pianists at work the cur

rent rage, Roger Williams, js

nirint hv a t rm n nrrnnstra on nis

hew Kapp album, and the results

are delightful; the spanisn com

nnspr.niamst. Ernaitl Ltcuona. IS

featured on "L t e u o n a Plays

for Two" (RCA); iaix plan
piavc fnr Twn" (RCA) : 1azz oian.

ists Tatum, Peterson, Wilson and

Powell show off "nano interpre

1947-49- 1950 ..195K. 1952 1953 1954 1955,
"MARKETING MARGIN" There's a big spread between whar
food costs the consumer and' what the (prmer gets for it. That
difference is called "Marketing margin" the expense of market marketing,
ing, marketing, processing and transportation. As chart show's, such charges
have increased steadily in the last few years. Based on a market
basket of farm foods such as was bought by. city-families in 1952,
59 cents of the consumer's dollar went for market margins in 1955,
: only 41 cents to the farmer. And the market margin outlook for
1956 is upward. '.

SHOWING AT YOUR SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TOMGIIT!
RALROA fcW5 8 '35 DIABLO UTS.' 6:15 "J:55
DALdKJA O.I J O.JJ Barbara S'l'ANWVCK
AiK-inM)nuv'M J Rb,r, RYAN
"ESCAPE BURMA"
sf ji MARGARITA 6:15 7:50 j
('' fellilCfi "ROBBERS ROOST"
k&wtJ' co",r'-
t-' y ifrt I I CRISTOBAL 6:15 8:25
' :7 ZifttP Bob HOPE
i Si1t t& "SEVEN LITTLE FOYS"
Tnrvd.v -MC.T FRr lf!HT" TW. TllirU.OSTNDICATIi-
PiRiicrt fi t', 810 LA BOCA 7 1)0
T)RAnNET" "ABISMOS I)E PASION"
k. 4NTA CRl'Z 6:15-7:50 CAMP BIERD 6;I5 -. 8:15
"Cave of The Outlaws' "THE PURPLE PLAIN

it meet

lore iuu vuuiw
was a big college hit. They made
wording, and; Dteea bought

it. Two friends,- i.ee i uinci

Eddie Newsom, rouaa ouv
'iffiust to" tie all the Joose
ends together. Wade and the gal
are now engaged. If Hollywood ev;
er makes "The Wade Buff Story,
they 'll probably change the whole

Operatic recordings you'll like:
Angel's "Die Fledermaus'' cap captures
tures captures the gay spirit and lilting mel melodies
odies melodies of this work and the German
dialogue, too:1 the great Leonard
Warren, on RCA,' sings some of
Verdi's baritone arias: Camden

has a good reissue, "Favorite A A-rias
rias A-rias From Favorite Operas."

of the great

Roy Hamilton, helped his boy. out
;...Jur.-., latpst New 'York per-

den. Beneath is the legend: "Be: films, Sudden thought: irouDie wnn
it ever so humble there's no placeibig screens Is what they do to

V like a.DC-6." ; .A Holly woods-'small ideas.

Hit haiiVa nil staffe. blinded by

the potlight.' Cook expjainh, "you
can't count the house.

BUSY JUDGES

CHICAGO (UP) Circuit court

judges here are experimenting
with a double-shift to accommo accommodate
date accommodate the rush of cases. The plan

calls for one judge to work a court courtroom
room courtroom from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
another to take over from 2 p.m. to
7 p.m. In December, 13 extra out-of-city
judges were called in to
help five regular judges in the test.

f

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY !i (gRACI I

New Orleans Service

Arrive?,.

Cristobal

Great White Fleet
S.S. "AENOS" -Jan. 13'
S.S. "YAQTJE" -', . : .... y. . ...............
S.S. "AGGI RSBORG" ....................... ... Jan. 19
S.S. "S4NTO CF.RRO" xJan. 2
S.S. ""MARNA" .:.. Jan. 28
A Steamer .... ,. Jan-
S.S. 'YAQUE"
"S.S. "MOKAZA.N" . : . . . ... Feb. 12
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
New York' Service Amve
... : s Cristobal
'
ITsT "SANJOSE" .". ................ k Jan. 9
S.S. "PARISM1NA" i .. .Jan, 16
S.S. "OTTA" ; .....Jan. 20
S.S. "FRA BERLANGA" Jan. 23
S.S. "L1MON" ...... ... .Jan. 30
A Steamer ........ ..;..:;. Feb.
S.S. "COMAYAGUA" Feb. 13
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York. New Orleans. I.os Angles. 5an Francisco
and Seattle.
Special round trip lares from Cristobal to New
York, Los Angeles. San Francisco and Seattle.
To New York ................. $246.00
To Los Angeles and San Francisco ....$270.00
To Seattle" .... ........... . ... '. .$365.00

rELEPHON'ES:
CK:5T0BAL 2171 PANAMA 2-2904

11
11

ULT.,

' ihtn"unlt!nt the V'ft.'.l.l lb'' I

: Americas with fast and frequent

4 C1
v:kkly service from new york
to west coast of south america
S.S. "SANTA RITA" .. .. . .Due Cristobal, C. Z. Jan,
', ss "santa i.iiisa" ......Due Cristobal, C. Z., Jan

j WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
' S.S. "SANTA MARIA" ......Sails Cristobal, C, Z., Jan. 10
S.S. "SANTA MARGARITA" Sails Cristobal, C. Z., Jan. 18
FROM U. S PACIFIC & WEST COAST
; CENTRAL AMERICA

fil BALBOA AND CRISTOBAL. C. Z.
SS. "SANTA FF.'' .....Due Balboa, C. X., .Tan. 1
S.S. "SANTA ANITA" Due BaJboi, C. Z., Jan. 19
FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z. TO IHE
WEST COAST CENTRAL AMFRICA & U. S. PACIFIC
S.S. "SANTA FE" . K.. ...... Sails Cristobal, C. Z., Jan. 27
Balboa Only
PANAMA AGENCIES CO.
CRIMOBAL: 2131 21.15 PANAMA; 2-0556 0557
BALBOAi 1501-2159

TODAY LAST SHOWING! 0.60 0.30
DRIVE IN THEATRE
JOHN PAYNE FAITH DOMERGUE .
- ROD CAMERON, in
"SANTA FE PASSAGE"

X 4-1

'KM

i r. .- v.v:

:fcjLt;v-.iff'"illlliii

ii

Also: Norman Wisdom and Margaret Rutherford, in

"TROUBLE IN. STORE"

LUX

J

DOUGLAS

SI MULTANEO US RELEASE!

. at the
CENTRAL-
THEATRES

OPENS FRIDAY 13
"20,000 LEAGUES
UPsDER THE SEA"
based on the celebrated novel by
Jules Verne, Is the mightiest film
: in Walt Disney's .career. Holly Hollywood's
wood's Hollywood's outstanding 'Academy A-
ward winner has given the drama dramatic
tic dramatic sea story a lavish oroduction in
Cinemascope and Technicolor, with
an Impressive cast starring Kirk
Douglas, James Mason, Paul Lukas
: and Peter Lorre.
In connection with this nroduc-,,
tion Mr. Dlsnev says: "In prepar preparing
ing preparing our dramatic serein version
and fllmine the action and sea seascapes
scapes seascapes off the Bahamas and In our
- own laree studio marine basin, we
felt that we had cantured all the
hair-raisin and intriguing ele elements
ments elements that have kept f
"20,000 t.fa'gi fs under
THE SEA"
perennially alive, through Its fabul fabulous
ous fabulous literajv history. The human
drama within the "Nautilus"; the
fit.'ht with the giant squid: the
"onen sea nursult of Captain Nemo,
and his prisoners to the final blast
of doom at Nemo's atomic rjower
nlant, . all corn- to the screen with
th snme solendor thnt chamcter chamcter-izcA
izcA chamcter-izcA these events in the book.
"Loele and sentiment hav en en-rourpffprl
rourpffprl en-rourpffprl me t," hrinw "W 000
lEAGU UNDKR THE SFA" to
the public as a motion picture
Loeic becau the screen can en enhance
hance enhance even the most vivid rtescrin rtescrin-tions
tions rtescrin-tions o' the resourceful and Imagi Imaginative
native Imaginative Jule Verne. An Sentiment.
becii onlv in motion pifture
rould the hsroes of mv vouth final finally
ly finally come to life to thrill all lovers
of lustv adventure as they once
thrilled me."

"20,000 LEAGUES
UNDER THE SEV

: i'' v?' f III
, .. -, .

fT
I

3

I r f
4 i

ft 1 1 1 1 4f 1 4 i J A JS.fc.



ftuE EIGHT

THE FAN A MA A3!IItICA5r A!' D(TEmurXT CULT XTVtSTAIZZ
JIONDAT, J AM' ART IV!
0
i
I'OWCI
T 1 7 N VTN
sees
i u if m i J
! C" l f I '!" Tf f r
n ir-n n?
llMlJir M 11-

'Thwarted' Bullfighter
Earns Most Applauds

; : ; By DAVE CONSTABLE
A bullfighter who bravely but f utilely attempt attempted
ed attempted to kill both of the bulls he fought with one swift
rapier-like stroke earned more plaudits than his
more (Successful competitor yesterday before the
capacity crowd which saw the opening of the 1956

bullfight season at La Macarena bullring.

Mexican matador Pepe Luis
Vasquez, who demonstrated a
great deal of valor, dexterity
and admirable footwork gave ev every
ery every indication he would be the
''star" of the corrida as he faced
the first bull of the afternoon.
With effortless ease he played-
The buunot too close but with.
eriougn unesse w earn a acuca
jjt "oles".from the appreciative
fWlGQker5.,When the time for the
kill came his lunge with the
sword was forceful, but his tim timing
ing timing was off. .
,J Vasquez swift, sure stroke went
V but it, waj low on the bull"s
back Instead of between the
jqrelegs. He called, for another
sword and tried again after
working the now-wear7 bull I
sqnie more
but again he mis-sed
Empire Honey,
Mossadeq Race
Set Jan. 22
f Juan Franco horse owner
nflaudld Endara, under whose
; silks track championship aspi aspirant
rant aspirant Mossadeq races, .has ac accepted
cepted accepted the challenge of Ricar Ricar-do
do Ricar-do A. Miro and Dr. Adalberto,
.Muller, co-owners of Fmnire
Honey, for a one mile and,
five-sixteenths match race,
. which has been set for Jan.
22. Both horses will carry ,120
pounds.
( In the four meetings he--tween
the two they have fin finished
ished finished ahead of each other
Jt-iee. .. .1
The" track's management hm'
Agreed to put up a $1,000
bourse for the winner. The own owners
ers owners have reportedly agreed on
Z side bet of(t least $1,000 for
fthe winner-take-all event.
- n ...
TODAY! .60 .30
:30 4:35 6:43 9:10 p.m.
; DcmIG James
I Day-Caghey
I A matt ITTHM U-THI SIU-
"love Me
OrLcnveMe"
.0.cr..vcopM
miSIDENTE
THEATRE
. v AIR-CONDITIONED I i
TODAY! -.60- .30
3:15.- 5:10 -.7:03 T 9:00. p.m.
41
s
fiom
. M-G-Mt
COLOR md
Cinemascope
iNE BAXTER
STEVE FORREST '.
M SSSE C5SKI HUIIISE KflUC -11031 FURCO
fnmntn 20
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I .. Bctte Davisi 4n
"t;,;; viugin qveen"
; Hcot nraciv, tn
I "ir::;Y ww.k so young"
I Tcdc, -IDEAL 20 10
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I Kailmriiie Hepburn." in
I MING OF I.OYT."
' "-Tifri-oarwwHti
f "HER 12 JIKN"

.i .. inn y"--

the vital spot although the sword
went way in.
It took a third thrust which

again failed to find the rlgnt
spot to finally bring the weaken weakening
ing weakening bull to his knees, where a
stab with the polnard just be below
low below the base of the skull extin extinguished
guished extinguished the last glimmer of life
to the accompaniment of boos
and catcalls.
....
Vasquez got back into the
fans' food graces by showing
his courage when his compe competitor,
titor, competitor, Mexican Jaime Bolanos.
came out to fight his first bull
of the afternoon.
Vasquez briefly played the bull
from a kneeling position and
then stood up, teased the bull
and looked away and ud at the
"a"Qi ne
4. 1
sidestepped the
bull while the
lasi-cnaiging
crowd roared Its approval.
He was again plagued either
by bad luck or faulty timing
when he attempted to kill his
second bull after a crowd-pleasing
series' of gaoneras. manole manole-tinas
tinas manole-tinas and veronicas. For the sec
ond time his first thrust went
down the bull's back instead of
between lts withers.
He showed courage,' however
as he used the sword again aft
er the' bull had shaken it out
and strutted around the ring to
tne tune 01 the applause which
experts claim he was not en entitled
titled entitled to.
Bolanos who put on a more
perfect performance from start
to finish failed to earn as mucn
applause as Vasquez although
he daringly pirouetted a3 he
played the two bulls he fought
and .killed them each wlih one
thurst of his sword.
On his first bull his thrust
was near perfect, but on his sec second
ond second bull, many regarded him as
lucky because although the
sword had oniy been thrust half
way in and a little. 0 f center,
the bull soon staggered and fell
mortally wounded.
v Bolanos'" wilt perform! again
at La Macarena 'next Sunday
afternoon, but the name of his
opponent hat not -been a
nounced.
The new management of the
bullring under Kelso plans to
present ten corridas in all, three
more with pure-bred Mexican
bulls and six with younger
bulls.
Next Sunday's "bullfight, like
yesterday's, will get underway at
4 p.m.
Orphans Get Milk;
Bernard Bcerless
Finance Minister Alfredo A A-leman
leman A-leman said today he is sending
n nersnnal check., emilvalcnt to
the value of ten barels of beer,
to the Don bosc oorpnanase,
for the purchase of milk for the
orphans.
It was said Aleman had made
a promise to donate ten barrels
of beer to infielder Pablo Bern-
I ard of Ihe Pro League's Chester Chester-!
! Chester-! field Smokers, for every home home-!
! home-! run he hit this season.
Bernard hit a roundtrlppcr
last Thursday in the game the
Smokers took from Spur Cola 5
to 3, in 13 innings,- and since
that time the minister has been
under pressure to make good
what was considered a promise.
In a letter to El Panama Ame America
rica America today, Aleman denied mak making
ing making any, such promise. He said
his gesture would prove that ths
cost of the beer meant nothing,
but what wars important was his
personal interests "hurt bv
loke the owners of a newspaper
have'trled to exploit, to the ex extreme
treme extreme to offer to pay my debts1
when they do not pay their
own." '
Yesterday a Spanish-language
afternoon paner carried n humT
1 orous cartoon showing the ten
I ton-els of beer Bernard w a s
si'pnosed to have placed
I strategic points for the con con-Isumptloiuof
Isumptloiuof con-Isumptloiuof his Iriends.
a
M 7. W '

Robtnso

Lucky Strike Tops Standings
In Pacific Tvilight League

Classier Field
More Heated
For This Year's
During the past several years,
the Panama Open golf tourna
ment has turned out to be a per
sonal match between Roberto de
Vicenzo (sponsored by Viceroy
Clgarets), and Sam 8 n e a d
(sponsored by Hotel El Panama),
the famed mashle swinger from
the hills of West Virginia.
nevertheless, last year .it was
a different thing and this year
it promises to be a tougher fight
ior the prize money. Last year
two surprises showed up at the
tournament. They were: Antonio
Cerda. the easy playing golfer
and Arnold Palmer, the young
U.S. pro. Both gave a decisive
battle against Roberto de Vicen
zo and Cerda beat him in the
last hole of the tournament to
take the Open by one stroke.
Tht g rot 1 f tht fairways hiv
staged ipma stirring batrlas in Pan Panama.
ama. Panama. Whtn Snaad mada hit tint
apptaranca in tha Panama Optn in
1952, it was just about concadad
that ha was a cinch. But than Rob Roberta
erta Roberta da Vicenio took tha first priia
money.
In 1953, Sam Snead was back
for revenge, but he again finish finished
ed finished second to the Walloping Gau Gau-cho
cho Gau-cho from the Argentine wh is
now a professional at the Mexi Mexico
co Mexico City Country Club. Snead re returned
turned returned for a third time in 1954,
and finally he made it.
Slammln' Sammy was unable
to participate In 1955 due to an
ailing back as a result of an in in-lury
lury in-lury earlier in the Miami Open,
but De Vicenzo was here and
just about had his third title in
four years all wrapped up whn
Tony Cerda, sponsored by BVD,
came blazing down the final twp
holes with birdies, to nip De Vi Vicenzo
cenzo Vicenzo and Palmer1 by a single
stroked -.. -V-
So, of the past four Panama
Opens, De Vicenzo has won
twice. Snead once and Cerda
once. And each of them will be
back for the 1956 event which
starts next Thursda v at the
beautiful Panama Golf Club on
the outskirts of Panama City. -But
the Panama Open will not
be a three-man competition this
year as the list of professionals

Polemon Juan Franco
Feature Race Winner

. The Stud Valentino's hard hard-running
running hard-running three-year-old colt Po Polemon
lemon Polemon yesterday proved that his
third place finish the previous
week against the track's best in
the $2,000 New Year's Classic
was no fluke when he raced to
a two-length triumnh in the
featured $650 six-and-one-half
furlong sprint at the Juan Fran Franco
co Franco race track despite repeated
interference.
Cachafax was second wlthSa wlthSa-lero
lero wlthSa-lero third, one length further
back.
These three horses went .off
almost evenly bet in the mu mu-tuels.
tuels. mu-tuels. Barlyon and Chlvilingo,
the other two starters in the
race,', were rank outsiders justi justifiably
fiably justifiably so as the result. of the
sprint proved.
The start was almost perfe:.
but Salero under Pancho Rodri Rodriguez,
guez, Rodriguez, hustling rider managed to
take a slight lead over Cacha Cacha-faz
faz Cacha-faz in thl run to the first turn
while Polemon fell bacic and
found himself in a "Jam before
reaching the backstretch.;
Salero and Cachafaz raced
like a team all the wa.- down
the backstretch. At the Jar end
of the backstretch, Polemon
rushed UP and appeared to be
passing the two leaders when he
ran smack, into anomer jam
between them and had to pull
up. Polemon finally got back In
stride again and came on a
gain on the final turn to ease
past the leaders then gradually
drew away in the run to the
wire. Jockey Luis Giraldo was
easing up the Chilean bred
chestnut son of Polo Sur-Sobe-rana
at the wire.
Polemon $6.20 win dividend
was substantial for a five-horse
field but a far cry from the $78
returned by the veteran Disco
very coupled with Donny Boy,
very coupled with Oonny Boy,
winner of the sixth, for a $838
doubles tops for the day.
Giraldo was the only rider to
score more than once. He aLso
won with Avlspa.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Charlie McCarthy $3.20,
t.ift:
2 Tcmy U, 2 20.
3 Don Dani $2.20.
260,

To Provide
Competition
Panama Open

that will play against them
shows.
For instance there is Arnold
Palmer (sponsored by Chester
field) who was second last year
even though it was his first time
in Panama. It was also his first
season as a pre.' Since then, -he
has gained a world of experience
on the tournament circuit in the
States. He will be the man to
beat In this year's tournament.
And then there is Doug Ford,
who recently was voted the Golf Golfer
er Golfer of the Year by the Profession Professional
al Professional Golfers' Association. The oth other
er other pros believe he is the bright brightest
est brightest star in the world of golf to today.
day. today. There is also Chick Harbert.
sponsored by ESSO, who is a
great match player, He has been
PGA champion and runnerup
several times. ;
George Bayer will be here to
make the other pros worry about
his long shots. His long shot
will be a dangerous thing in -the
Open. If he can control his short
game as good as his drives; he
might easily become the next
champion.
And what about Id Furjol, whose j
' .record speaks for (Half. He was the
1954 U.S. Open champion and won
almost every ; ether championship
that year. He was telected the Pro Professional
fessional Professional Golfer ef the Year In
1954, and has alto about 10 years
"experience as pro, .'.-'
'. An interesting item about the
1958 Open is that the three pro professionals
fessionals professionals regarded as the three
greatest long ball hitters in golf
history will be competing here.
They are Jimmy Thomson, Geo.
Bayer and Chick Harbert, We
will see who is who right here In
Panama,
-rTha professionals will start
teeing off at 12:30 next .Thurs .Thursday
day .Thursday and will play 18-hole rounds
for four consecutive days in
fluest of the $7500 in prize mon
ey. Amateurs will play in the
mornings with the 15 low scores
coppln? r beautiful silver prizes
donated by the Pan American
World Airways. 1
Tickets are already on sale in
Panama and Canal Zone golf
clubs.
SECOND RACE
1 Radical $6.20, 5, 2.40.
2 Don Jaime $5.60, 2.80.
3 Dr. Bill $2.40.
First Double: $22.20
THIRD RACE
1 Rabiblanco $5.80, 2.60, 2.20.
2 Don Brigido $2.60, 2.20.
3 La Guararefia $4.
j One-Two: $10.40
FOURTH RACE
1 Verticordia Jli.fin sn in
2 Cormorant $13.40, 8.20.'
3 Dlxie $4.
Quiniela: $65.60
FIFTH RACE
1 Yosiklto $5, 4.60
2- Daniel $3.
, SIXTH RACE
1 Donny Boy $15. 9.80, 7.20.
2 Valley Star $8.60, 4.80.
3 Merry Mason $4.80.
SEVENTH RACE
1 Dlscovery $78, 41,60, 5.80..
2 Matruh $3.40. 2.60
3 Salustlo $2.80.
Second Double: $838 :
EIGHTH RACE
1 Avispa $3.80, 3.20, 2.20.
2 Engreida $3.60. 2.60.
3 Regia $3.20.
Quiniela: $6.20.
NINTH RACE
1 Topocalma $14, 8.60, 3.80.
2 Mayflower $11, $5.40.
3 Iguazii $2.80
One-Two: $165.60
TENTH RACE.
1 Polemon $6.20. 4.28.
! 2 Cachafaz $3.20.
ELEVENTH RACE
-Golden Fu n$7.40, 3.80.
2 Dlsque $2.80.
IT HASN'T ENDED
Norman, Okla (NEA Both
Oklahoma quarterbacks, Jim
Harris and Jay O'Neal, have an
other year of football competl
tion left. Both are .'uniors.

'- BATTING .500 tin. Which he won all five of his! flee hits: Shnntz. Horkenbi-ry.
Morgantown W.- Va. (NEA) bouts, hit Kunoi almost 'at will; Stolen hasps: Bartirome 2. Dir. Dir.-In
In Dir.-In 14 years, West Virginia Unl- throughout the fight. While do-jkehs, Stewart, Prnnt. Pi;'ed

ersitv- hfte-niftvM iti-six difler-i

ent collegiate basketball tourna-iand
ments and won three of them,

PACIFIC TWILIGHT LEAGUE
STANDINGS
Team Won Lost
Lucky Strike 2 0
Junior College ........ .1 1
American Legion -.1 2
High School .........,0 1
Yesterday's Result
Lucky Strike 7, A. Legion 2
' Tuesday Night's Game
A. Legion vs B. High School

Lucky Strike took over undls
puted possession of first place in
the macule Twilight League yes-
American Legion 7 to 2.
w j - n
The winner scored three runs!

in the third after being held inlnette in 6th.

check by the Legion's Werner
Bass. Manager Larry jones
un
loaded a bases clearing triple to
right field scoring Curdts
Hearne and Halman. Lucky
Strike added two more in the
fourth on doubles by Hearne and
HaJman. Bob Rowley was re
sponsible for the other two runs,
chasing Larry Jones home with
a triple and then Stealing home
with plenty to spare. Bin sum
Van also collected a triple to
lead off the sixth but the next
three men went down in order
leaving Sullivan stranded.
While the Lucky Strikers were
making their two doubles and
three triples good ior seven runs,
Webb Hearne was noiaing tne
Legionnaires in check. Hearne
held the Legion scoreless until
the after, giving up his first hit
in the fourth to Kobllck. Pechet Pechet-te
te Pechet-te led off with a single in the
fifth but was erased at second
as Moody grounded to short.
Kosik overthrew first base on
the attempted double play with
third from where he scored on
Moody going to second.
A passed ball sent Moody to
third fro m where he scored on
an Infield out. In the sixth the
Legion got their other run on
two infield errors and Bill Pe-
chette's single.
Hearne posted his second win
givin gup 3 hits, striking out 6
and walking none. Werner Bass
went the first four innings with
Roy Conrad finishing up for the
Legionnaires.
Tuesday night the American
Legion meets the Balboa High
School nine. Jerry Johnson i
the probable pitching selection
for the Legion with either Ed
Kirchmler or Wayne Wall get
ting the call lor the High School.
Lucky Strike AB R HFO A
Halman, c 3 116 1
Rowley, lb .......3 117 0
Jones cf 2 1 12 0
Dunbar, $$ ..3 0 0 1 5
Klrkland, rf ......3 0 0 1 0
Kosik, 2b 2 1 0 3 2
Sullivan, 3b ......3 xt) 1 O l
Curdts, If ....N...2 1 0 10
Hearne, p ........3 2 10 0
24 7 5 21 9
A. Legion AB R HP
Kobllck, If .......3
1
Cortez, 2b .. ......2
Dougherty. 2b ....1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Norton, ss '...,. 3
Pechette, cf 3
Moody, lb 3
McGlade
3b
Bass, p ....
Conrad, p -;
Hartman, c
McCall, rf
x Cuccia ..
xBatted for Conrad in the sev
enth.
Score by innings:
A. Legion ...000 011 02 3 0
L. Strike ....003 220 X 7 5 3
Winning pitcher: Hearne 2-
0). Losing pitcher: Bass (0-l.
Struck out by Hearne 5, Bass 6.
Conrad 1. Bases on balls: Bass
4, Conrad 1. Two base hits:
Hearne and Halman. Three base
hits: Jones, Rowley and Sulli
van. Stolen base: Halman, Row
ley. Umpires: Corrigan and
Mohl. Time: 1:55.
Tcnny. Ccmpa Toys
Willi Th2i!:ndrl
Vilicfiai (unci
MANILA, Jan. 9 (UP) World
flyweight boxing challenger
TannyCampo today with Thai Thailand's
land's Thailand's Vitichai Kunol to win a
unanimous decision in their 10
round bout at Rizal Memorial
Stadium open air arenar Satur Saturday
day Saturday night.
Campo weighed 118 pounds,
and Kunoi 111 pounds.
The bout was dull throughout
because the Thailander refused
to mix It up with the veteran
i Filipino, an dCampo lacked the
i punch to floor Kunoi
Camno. fresh from a U.S. tour
Iniz so he found time to flown
display the tricks he kam
ed in the U.S. ,

Burnette Burnetii
SATURDAY NIGHT'S GAME

Spur Cola AB
Gienn, cf .........5
R HFO A
0 12 1
0 2 0 5
Cnanes, 3b .......5
Lopez, 2b .5 0 13 2
Thome,' lb 4 0 1 11 0
Moore, 5s -..4 1 11 5
Keliman, c 4 0 1 5 0
Grenald, If 3 0 2 1 0
P. Osorio, rf 4 0 1 1 0
Clarke, p ..2 110 0
Davie, p .........2 0 2 0 1
38 2 13 24 14
All R HFO A
Chesterfield
Bernard, ss-2b
...4 2 2 0
7
3
1
2
0
0
n
Parris, 2b-3b .....4 0
Stewart, cf ......4 0
E. Osorio, lb .....4 1
Schell, If .........4 2
Queen, c ..4 2
lumlnelll, 3b .....2 0
Houradeau, ss ...1 0
Prescott, rf .......4 0
Burnett, p ..2 0
14
0
0
! Roberts 1 0
Elston, p ..,,....0 0
. . 1 1
I 34 7 10 27 22
Roberts struck out for Bur-
score bv innines:
Spur Cola,
001 0UI 000 2 13 3
cnest.
111 102 Olx 7 10 3
v Summary
RBI'$; E. Osorio, Queen 2, Lo Lopez,
pez, Lopez, Prescott: Grenald. Earned
runs : Chesterfield 6, Spur Cola
2. Left on bases: Chesterfield 4,
Spur cola 11. Home runs: Queen
Two base hits: Grenald, E, O30 O30-rio,
rio, O30-rio, Schell. Sacrifice hits: Gre
nald. Stolen bases: Queen. Hit
by pitch: Davie (Tumlnelli).
Wild pitches: Clarke, Davie,
Struck out by: Elston 1: By:
Clarke 2, Davie 3, Base on balls
off: Burnette 1. Pitchers' re
cord: Clarke 4 runs, t hits in 4
Innings; Burnette 2 runs, 10 hits
in s innings. Errors: Spur Cola
3 Glenn,, L6pez, Davie); Ches
terfield 3 (Burnette, Stewart,
Houradeau). Losing pitcher:
Clarke (1-1). Winning pitcher:
Burnette (1-1), Doubleplays;
Bernard, Parris, E. Osorio; Ber Bernard,
nard, Bernard, Houradeau, E. Osorio. Um Umpires:
pires: Umpires: Thornton, Hinds, CoppSn.
Time of game: 2:25.
Steady Eddy
First Game
Chesterfield AB R HPO A
Bernard, as ,,....3 0 0 0 4
Parris, 2b .........2 10 4 0
Stewart, cf 3 113 0
E. Osorio, lb 2 0 0 9 0
Schell. If ...3 0 0 0 0
Queen 3 0 O 10
Tumlnelli, 1 3b ,,..3 0 0 ,0 5
Prescott, rf .,.. 1 0 0 1 1 0
Grimsley, p ...... 2 0 ft 0 2
Hughes, p ........0 0 0. 0 0
22 2 1 18 11
AB R HPO A
Carta Vieja
Bartlrome, lb
Shantz, 2b ..
Phillips, rf .
Dickens, If ..
Wllhelm, ss
12"
0
2
0
0
3
0
4
0
Kropf, cf
Glamp, 3b
4
Dabek, e ,,
Monahan, p
Totals ...27 7 11 21 11
Score by Innings:
Chesterfield 000 101 02 1
Carta Vieja 101 212 x 7 11 1
Sumary: RlB's: Phillips -2
Shantz, Dabek, Bartlrome
Kropf, Stewart. Dickens. Earn
ed runs: Carta Viela 7, Chester-
neia 1. Leit on bases: Carta
Vieja 8. Chesterfield 2. Home
runs : Stewart. Two base hits :
Shantz, Phillies, Dickens. Sacri Sacrifice
fice Sacrifice hits: Phillips. Glamp. Stolen
bases: Prescott, Bartlrome. Wild
pitches: Monahan, Grimsley,
nugnes, struck out bv: Mona
han 3. By; Hughes 1. Base on
balls off: Monahan 2. Off:
Grimsley 3, Hughes 1. Pitchers'
recora, unmsiey a runs. 8 hits in
4 2-3 Innings. Errors: Carta Vie Vieja
ja Vieja 1 (Monahan). Losing pitch pitch-Grimsley
Grimsley pitch-Grimsley (4-2). Winning pitch pitcher;
er; pitcher; Monahan (3-1). Umnin-
Thornton, CoPnin. Williamson.
Time of game: 2:02.
Hocked!
Second Game ;
carta Vieja AB R HPO A
aarurome. lb ...,5 1 3 9 1
Shantz, 2b .......4 114 4
Porter. If 5 1 21 0
Dickens, 3b 3 12 l" 3
Phillips, rf .......4 Q' 1 3 0
Wilhelm, ss ....,,.3 102 3
Kropf, cf 3 0 12 0
Patton, c .........3. 10 4 0
Hockenbury, p ...3 0 111
Totals .
Chesterfield
..33 6 11 27 12
AB R i; FO A
Bernard, 2b ...... .4
Parris, 3b ...4
Stewart, cf, i.,,,,,4
E. Osorio, lb .....4
Schell, If 4
Queen, c .........2
Prescott, rf ......3
Houradeau, ss ...3
A. Osorio, p ...... s
Totals ......... .31
Score by innings:
4 27

iOi

R H E
C. Vieja 000 220 101 6 11 1
Chest. 000 000 0000 4 0
Summary: RBI's; Kroof .2,
Porter, Dickens, Porter, Barti-
rome. Earned runs: Carta Vleia
6. Left on bases: Chesterfield 6,
Carta Vieja 6. Three base hits:
Kropf. Two base hits: Port.fr
Dickens, Bernard. Sren. Sa-i-
rwiis: paf.cno. Struck out hy
A. n.-,orin B.--Tttrv T-,nrtrthnrv- 4
Ease on balls off: A. Osorio 4.

Carta Vieja Sweeps Tvinbil!
To Advance To Second Place

. By1 J. J. HARRISON JR. :
Lanky righthander Humberto Robinson, who
apart from being Chesterfield's main starter is also
their bullpen mainstay, has been named to oppose
Spur Cola's Jim Tugerson on the mound tonight at
7:30 at the Olympic Stadium.
Last night, the Carta Vieja Yankees took two
games from the Smokers, 7 to 2 and 6 to 0. Satur Saturday
day Saturday night. Chesterfield trounced the Sodamen 7 to 2.

3 add ROBINSON Sports Sthe.
0 i It will be Robinson's first start.
3 ilng assignment since Dec. 30,
n I when he was beaten 2 to 1 by
J I Bill Harris and the Carta Vieja
ii aimers in me iirsi game m a
. ...
aouoieneaaer
Carta Vieja also
won the second game, 10 to 7,
Since that setback, his fourth,
Robby has made three relief ap appearancesall
pearancesall appearancesall against Spur Co Cola.
la. Cola. He saved one match and was
credited with his second win in
another. His record stands at
Mart fr La(urt btlitv Hum Humbert
bert Humbert should rtilly b credited with
three victerici. The loop'i official
cerer choie give lefty Ren
Grimtley the decision in the feme
the Smoker took from the Sod Sod-mee
mee Sod-mee 6 to 5 lirt Tuetdey.
Robinson allowed one runner
to get on base a walk to Stan
ley Arthurs in two and one-
third innings. Gsimsley gave up
five hits, one run and two walks
in two and two-third frames.
Grimsley had taken over for
Wally Burnette in the fifth with
the Smokers ahead 6 to 4.
Tugerson sports a 4-0 record.
In his last outing, Thursday, he
worked six sessions against
Chesterfield and left the game
with his team leading 3 to 2.
Bob Trice took over on the
mound and forced in the tying
run in the ninth. The Smokers
won out In 13 Innings, with Rob Rob-lnson
lnson Rob-lnson picking up his second ver
dict.
Cirte Vieja maneee Al Kubikl
tl befinninfl t look 11 though he
knew what he hit been talking
about all along.
Kubski. who even when the
.situation appeared hopeless in
sisted that his team would soon
get going, could be justly called
today the league s No. 1 oracle.
Last night the Yanks, behind
-
PANAMA
Teams Teams-Spur
Spur Teams-Spur Cola.
Carta Vieja..
Chesterfield...

LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS (Olympic Stadium)
Carta Vieja 7-6, Chesterfield 2-t)
SATURDAY NIGHT'S RESULT, Olympic Stadium
Chesterfield 7, Spur Cola 2
TONIGHT'S GAME (Olympic Stadium) ;
Chesterfield (Robinson 2-4) vs. Spur Cola
(Tugerson 4-0)
Game Time: 7:30

Revised Pro League

Schedule For '55-56

Jan. 9 Monday Chesterfield

10 Tuesday Spur Cola vs. Carta Vieja (2) 1
11 Wednesday Chesterfield vs. Spur Cola

12 Thursday Chesterfield
13 Friday Spur Cola vs.
14 Saturday -. Carta Vieja
15 Sunday Chesterfield
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23:
24
25
26
27
28
29
in

Monday Open Date '
Tuesday -Carta Vieja vs. Chesterfield
Wednesday Carta Vieja vs. Spur Cola (2)
Thursday Carta Vieja vs. Chesterfield
Friday Chesterfield vs. Spur Cola (Mount Hope)
Saturday Carta Vieja vs. Spur Cola
Sunday Spur Cola vs. Chesterfield
Monday Open Date
Tuesday Carta Vieja vs. Spur Cola
Wednesday Chesterfield vs. Spur Cola
Thursday Carta Vieja vs. Spur Cola
Friday- Carta Vieja vs, Chesterfield (Mount Hope)
Saturday Chesterfield vs. Carta Vieja
Sunday Spur Cola vs. Chesterfield (2)
Monday v- Carta Vieja vs. Spur Cola
Tuesday Chesterfield vs. Carta Vieja
. 1 Wed. Sour Cola vs. Chesterfield

Feb

2 Thursday Chesterfield vs. Spur Cola
3 Friday Carta Vieja vs. Spur Cola (2)
4 Saturday Carta Vieja vs. Chesterfield
5 Sunday All-Star Game (3 :30 p.m.)
6 Monday Spur Cola vs. Carta Vieja (2)

Off: I Hockenbury 2. Errors: Car-
ta Viela 1 (Dirkensi. Lon'
pitcher; A. Osorio (0-1). Wln

rilns pitz-her: Hockenbury (l-li. spnn t,ra!r'n vitn wm -a r
Doubleplays: Queen, Hoviradea't; BO rookie -wonders, will have on on-Wilheim,
Wilheim, on-Wilheim, Shunt. Bartirome. ily 24 on hand when they bitl

I thnnirMf-Htnrl Wlllimn-r,oo-
pin. Time of game: 2:31.

the brilliant pitching of first E4
Monahan and then Big Bill
Hockenbury took the bargain
bill for their fifth straight win
over the Smokers to move into
second place one game ahead of
Chesterfield and four behind

lvalue lcaui"K uui
, Monahan gained hit third win
against one Ion. All hii triumpht
have been ever Chesterfield. Hock Hockenbury
enbury Hockenbury picked us) his first victory
to even up his record. r
Grimsley, who was relieved by1
Tommy Hughes in the fifth in inning
ning inning of the first game suffered
his second setback as compared
to four wins.
Alberto Osorio went all the
way in the afterpiece to drop his
first decision. He has no wins.
Monahan allowed one hit a
hnmpnin t.n mil Stwart tha.
sixth with two out. The other
Chesterfield run, which was un
earned, came in the fourth. -Hockenbury
permitted four
hits all singles in the second
game, and was never in any er
ipus trouble.
fattinf star of the night was,
Carta Vieja first baseman Teny
artireme, who had six kite in
eight tries to the klate. to haast
his. batting average to .171 tops
in the circuit.
Bartlrome had one base hit
more than the total the Smok Smokers
ers Smokers collected in tooth games.
jtuidski was ejected by plat
umpire Willie Hinds in the
fourth stanza of the nightcap,
after he protested vehemently
when Dan Porter was called out
on strikes. ."
Saturday night at the stadi stadium,
um, stadium, the Smokers defeated th
Sodamen 7 to 2. Winning hurler
was Burnette, his first, over Vi Vi-bert
bert Vi-bert Clarke,' who suffered nis
first defeat, Both now have even
records.
- ..r 1
PRO LEAGUE
Won Lost
10 4
6 8
7 11
Pet.
.714
.428
,389
GB
7
5
vs. Spur Coja
vs. Carta Vieja (Mount Hope)
Carta Vieja
vs. Chesterfield (David, 3:00 p.m.)
vs. Carta Vieja (David. 8:00 a.m.)
FOU MEN ONLY
Pittsburgh (NEAI
The
jPirates. who usuallv launch
woikouU at. Fort Uve.ru' Fla
'Manager Bobby Bragan says.



TILE TAXA'SA AMIHICAN AN INCErENTENT DAUI XEWSfAKJl

.'.u.Mu, -- -- ' "" "'"' 1

S

V.'

By DAVE EEROMO
SAN FRANCISCO (NEA)

Jim KeSly, the veteran Minne Minnesota
sota Minnesota coach, feels the time lapse

between the Summer Trials ana
the Olvmpic track and held
competition at. Melbourne in
December will help, rather than
hurt the athletes he's going to
condition.
Kelly, who is head coach of
the American track and field
squad, thinks "it's possible to
present a better conditioned
team in December than if we
followed the usual routine and
jumped oft Immediately after
the Trials. , ,
"With the Trials scheduled lor

June 29-3D at the Los Angeles
Memorial Coliseum, any college
athlete will have time to attend
summer school and make iull
plans to be absent from classes
in the fall," Kelly points out..
"And everyone will' have a

chance to compete in summer
meets, too. Then well assemble
the team around mid -October
and have five weeks in which to
prepare lor the Olympics.

i!

CWITPH Doris Hart left, who turned professional after twice

it nome wearing tern ,AA, Mn.,.,

uii. rh.Hlr tWeh.nnel .wimmer.

JOE

by
WILLIAMS

(The

Bowl. (The spauans wuu u, nranre Bowl,
. Oklahoma over Maryland by 28 In the Orange bowl

: S00GeoSubeych4over Pittsburgh by six in the Sugar Bowl. (The
fver'lexai Christian by four In the. Cotton

B0WlV two faclm-tube brain u 'remarkably
' more perceptlVe thaa its human counterpart. None of the pro pro-'
' pro-' fesLonarekDerts saw Oklahoma as a runaway victor over ary-
Christian could ame..the scoie
8gaiSeSaf &tron poses to football ixpertlng --all forms

of press-box clairvoyance, m iaci ia wu umm., v.--. ,-.

Mai Whitfield

t 0 CjUO

o Bei
By HARRY GRAYSON

I I I

i y I kj m

7f O

R

KING CETS A BATH -Nashua's group of handlers makes sure he looks like the million and a
quarter paid for him. Top horses get a once-over quickly, but Nashua is surrounded at Hialeah
by handlers. He's even allowed to nip as he does here to workout boy Bill McCleary.

prc-

metallic

. i.rv.! iv. ...wionf matter rtntatron nnerates in a less

n.M than a mnre distineuishea relative, its

brain celirare nourished and activated by similar sources.
''' PROFESSION IN PERIL
' In arriving at its Bowl game prophesies, datatron glutton gluttonously
ously gluttonously eorged on such succulent tidbits as season scores, yards
gained, passes completed and intercepted by each team and
kindred pertinent and delectable data, a spoon-fed formula
prepared by Dr. Martin Klein, Pasadena scientist, who was mov moved
ed moved to observe: "This opens, up exciting possibilities in the field
oi sports forecasting."
Far datatron, yes, but not for us who pretend to prophetic
gifts that would reduce even the'delphic oracle to the squalid
sham of a' gypsy tea reader.
The one hopeful thought is that the machine .may have been
blessed with beginner's luck. As far as is known, the formula
made no allowance for breaks of the game, not infrequently an
important factor in competitive sports.
Onlv Oklahoma was unaffected by the caprice of fortune.

The Sooners actually outclassed Maryland, and their winning
margin might well have reached 28, as fantastically indicated by
the machine.
A tying point-after was nullified by a penalty In Mississippi's
upset win over TCU, a questionable pass interference call led

to Georgia Teen s one-toucnaown victory over fih; ana a reck reckless
less reckless attempt to pass from the end zone probably cost UCLA a
14-14 standoff with Michigan state.
But why quibble? The bounce of the ball and the whim of
an official often combine to make the professional expert look
good, too.

"With the Armed Forces giv

ing us full cooperation, I think
this situation will give us a bet

ter conditioned team by De

cember than if we Jumped off
right away."

Kelly fs counting on all but

two or three of the 1952 cham
pions for the Melbourne compe

tition. Past Olympic champs Mai

Whitfield, the class of any mid middle
dle middle distance field, and Harrison

Dillard, perhaps the premier
hurdler of modern times, are
the big returnees.

Kelly will receive coaching

help from six aids selected from

the NCAA meet, three from the
Armed Forces and six from the

AAU Championships.

ALL CHAMPS
Hialeah (NEA) Nashua

housed at Hialeah Park in t h e
same stable with the champion
fillies: High Voltage and Misty

Morn. ,....-..,

Tatum Quits

Maryland;
Returns To NC

COLLEOE PARK, Md., Jan. fl
UP) Jim Tatum, who built
Maryland into one of the na nation's
tion's nation's strongest gridiron powers,
resigned yesterday and accepted
the head football coaching job
at the University of North Caro-
Tatura'a resignation, effec effective
tive effective Jan. 31, was accepted by
Maryalnd President Wilson H.
Elklns, who said no decision
has been reached on a suc-

The resignation ended weeks

of speculation that Tatum was
ready to quit Maryland, which
is considering a limited football
de-emphasls. North Carolina,
Big Jim's alma mater, is report reported
ed reported to have signed him to a live,
year contract at $15,000 a year.
The drawling North Carolinian
came to Maryland from Okla

homa in 1947 and built the Ter

rapins ... into a national iootoau

power, in his nine years wun

the Terps, xatum s spiu- t teams
wpn 88 games, .lost 20, and tied
6 and, have played njlye bowl

games. .:
. In the last five years, Tatum
guided the' Terps to three un unbeaten
beaten unbeaten seasons.
His 1955 squad won 10
straight games only to lose to
Oklahoma 20-6, in the Orange
Bowl. It was Tatum's second
defeat in five bowl appear appearance
ance appearance s both to the Sooners
and both in the Orange Bowl.

Elklns accepted Tatum's re resignation
signation resignation with "deep, regret" and
said the university will Always
be Indebted to him lorjhls "many
contributions."
Tatum, Who was close to tears
as he announced his resigna resignation,
tion, resignation, said he decided to leave
Maryland mainly because his
family has wanted to return to
North Carolina for years.

Proper Bowling Shoes
Brake Slide On Final Step

First f it illutrttd and In Instructive
structive Instructive articles writttnfor
NEA Strvlc
By SYLVIA VYENE
Mitch Game Champion

-, .. t
V :

Hill 11 """" ll

A girl who means to roll more

than an occasional game should

own her own ball, carefully drill

ed to hand span and finger size.

Establishments permit custom'

ers to use house balls, but it's dif difficult
ficult difficult to find the prooer one and

chances ire that it won t be avail

able next, time.

You need a bag in which to-tote

the ball, along with socks and
shoes. The latter are a necessity.
They can be rented, but it's much
nicer to have your own.

NEW YORK (NEA) The
spectator at sports events leads a
vicarious life. Even television
hasn't changed this. A guy watch watching
ing watching a fight from his living room,
for example, gets puffed-up if the

fighter he roots for scores'!
knockout.

In Brooklyn, Duke Snider ham

mers a home run and the .moo in

the corner tavern takes it as a
personal insult if anybody m e n-

tions Mickey Mantle for a lull

week. Why not? Didn't they Just

win another one? i

Boxing people malign this type

of spectator. When there's a dull

fight going on, from some place
in the audience a itn will scream

for blood. At the final bell, one of
the fighters will growl: "That guy
who was yelling. If he doesn't like
the way I do it, why doesn't he
get in here himself instead of stay staying
ing staying out there where it's safe?"
BUT THIS CORNER rises to the

defense of the average people who

like sports but have to go to work
in the office or they don't eat regularly.

Start with Coney Island. There's

a group down there, all working
fellows, who can tell you the lat latest
est latest fight results or the batting av averages.
erages. averages. But they like te swim,
They call themselves the Tolar
Rear A C. The first time the tem

perature goes below freezing,
they all show up in bathing suits
and go in the ocean for a swim.
When they come out, they roll in
the snow to get warm. .,
Do you know o fa fighter or ball ballplayer
player ballplayer who would do that?

off the job for two and a half

months and owed everybody.
But they can't stop him. He goes
right back.
Name me a baseball player who
would do this. The only thing thr'y
seem to do is hunt for birds with
big guns.
. rf
Another guy I know is a comp comptometer
tometer comptometer operator. AH week long,
eight hours a day plus plenty of
overtime, he stands on bis feet..
BUT ON SATURDAY morning

he is up at four and on his way t
the golf oiirse. He totes his o v
ban around liif place for 3 hotej
and if there's sta! some hght left
he goes another nin to polish
short game.
Name me a baseball catcher who
does this. Most of the time they
lo home after bending down; for
only two hours a day and soa$
their feet.
And what about the race track?
That's my payoff punch. Ill match
any veteran horse player's moxie
with anybody's, including Rocky
Marciano.
How much nerve do you think
it takes to know nothing about
horse and let go up to the wim-

dow and bet this month's rent?

' The purpose of owning your
shoes is to allow the proper a a-mount
mount a-mount of slide and to brake it on
the final step. To accomplish this,
shoes for a right-handed bowler
come with a leather sole for the

left foot and rubber sole for the heads for

right. It s just the other way a-! center.

THEN THERE'S a friend of
mine who goes nuts for skiing, lie
doesn't have the natural timing to
go through a revolvin? door with without
out without bruising the nose. But the min minute
ute minute the snow hits, he packs up and

some New England ski

round for left-handed bowlers.

Proper bowling equipment is In Inexpensive
expensive Inexpensive and it. lasts for years.

He works as a salesman and
two years ago he took a swoosh
down some mountain and wound
up with a broken ankle. He was

Here's Vote k h
Against S, F.
As 'Best Ever' 'C
PHILADELPHIA (NEA) -Ed-ddie
Gottlieb of the Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia Warriors is one coach who
disputed the "best ever" ta
given the 'University of. San
Francisco's basketball team
"Kentucky's Beard Gro?a Gro?a-Jones
Jones Gro?a-Jones club was a better one,"
Eddie savs. "So was that Loiu
Island University team with
Sherman White and Ray FelU.
"Bill Russell is a good ball ballplayer,
player, ballplayer, but he certainly wouldn't
overpower players like I've men mentioned.
tioned. mentioned. In fact, I wonder if he
could hold his own." ;

EQUIPMENT .VljU.We"
has the equipment shoes, prop-eriy-nttcd
ball and bag.

OKLAHOMA TOP BOWLER 1
For once, the No. 1 ranked team played is if it warranted
the accolade. Viewing in immediate succession the Orange and
Rose Bowl games, it seems highly likely most videots must have
agreed Oklahoma would have beaten either Michigan State cr
UCLA without herculean effort.
This was a squad of tremendous depth and power; exquisite
balance and almost uniform skill. It struck with flash-fire
swiftness, and in this respect was reminiscent of Red Blaik's
better Army teams, which relied so importantly on gettinr the
lump in the line.
Maryland also- had muscle in abundance, but It was not us
skillfully or as ingeniqusly integrated as the opposition No No-was
was No-was it as competitively inspired, if this was, as heralded, a showl
th t 7Q tW coaches' Bud wilkinsn left Jim Tatum for

La Boca Sports

Ml.i.R JE!. 53 " i tour.

bchoois continue to share honors
. in baseball and xnfthaii an th

. split for the second time in the
current interschools tournaments.
Like their first meetings, prior
to the Christmas holidays when
Rainbow City took the boys' base baseball
ball baseball contest and La Boca earning
its win with the girls, last Friday
the lads from Rainbow City edged
the Pacific Sidcrs 6 to 5 while La
Boca's lassies made it two straight

'with a 9-0 whitewashing over the
Atlantic Side gals. .
Next Friday afternoon both
schoolwili tangle for the third
time, and keen rivalry will be the
feature of the day's activities as
the Pacific Side boys will endeavor
to enter the win column in hopes
of taking the remaining g a m e s
which would aid them in k"irini!

a clean sJaie lor La Boca High

nament.

PACIFIC DIVISIONAL
SOFTBALL LEAGUE:
1 1.1 -L. 1

suiMuuKii an pians were com

pleted in a meeting held last week
by the Pacific Divisional Softball
League, league president Rudolnh

Prince has extended the deadline
to Jan.-10 in order that other

teams not registered with the cir-

cuirt for participation and would

like to do so may seek entry at

Tuesdays meeting to be held in

the office of the La Boca Play
ground.

'To date four teams have regis

tered. Each afternoon members of
the various squads can be seen
whipping themselves into shape
for the opening engagements Sun-

mond. The teams are evenly bal

South Defeats North

12-2 In Senior Bowl

BIRDIE'S AVERAGE RED
V Cincinnati (NEA) The av average
erage average Cincinnati player who will

greet Birdie Tebbets at the Tam Tampa
pa Tampa training base will be 27 years
old, stand six feet and weigh 190
pounds, according" to publicity
man Hank Zureick's figures.

If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER," America s smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS

MOBILE. Ala.. Jan. 9 (UP)

Vicious Rebel line play gave the
south a 12-2 victory and a 4-3
series edge In the 7th annual
Senior Bowl, opposing coaches
Paul Brown and Buddy Parker
agreed today.

Brown, coach of the profes

sional champion Cleveland
Browns, singled out i key fourth
down play In the second period
as the turning point of the con contest
test contest which attarcted some 35,000

fans Saturday to see the na

tion's collegiate football stars in
their first play-for-pay venture.

"It was when the Norm tail tailed
ed tailed to score on that sneak In
the second period, Brown said.
"That goal line stand of ours
turned the tide In our favor."

The North, impotent. during

the first period, came to life and
drove from the South 43 to the,

13 where quarterback Jerry K K-chow
chow K-chow of Iowa tried four straight
neaks The last fell a yard short

of a first down and the Rebels;

tnnk over on their lour to nae

out the half with a 6-0 lead.

Parker, menior oi .me wewim

Lions, pointed to a fumble m

the fourth period as trie crucial

play. With four minutes remain remaining,
ing, remaining, the South held a 6-2 edge
and Mississippi Southern's

neorse Herrinar punted.

Michigan state s uary jlowc
was jarred loose from the ball
by a hard tackle and the South's
alert Tony Sardisco of Tulane
fell on it at the North 38. "That
did it," said Parker as the South
drove to a score with Don Mc Mc-Ilhenny
Ilhenny Mc-Ilhenny clipping off 21 yards on

the first piay.

cash for the winners nd $100
each for the losers. Instead of

an offensive battle, the de defense
fense defense took all the honors, es especially
pecially especially the Southern shock
troops led by 265-pound tackle
Don Goss of SMU.
Coss. who will play for the

Browns in pro ranks, was voted
the game's most valuable line lineman
man lineman while Childress was select selected
ed selected the best tiack on the field.

The fans had also been ex
pecting a passing show but Ken Kentucky's
tucky's Kentucky's Bob Hardy of the South
threw only five times and while
Reichow and Wisconsin's Jim
Haluska, completed 13 of 32
passes, they failed to connect at
the ri"ht time.

Once halfback Tow Troxell of I

Miami of Ohio dropped a Hal Haluska
uska Haluska pass in the end zone and
on the next play, halfback Whi Whi-tey
tey Whi-tey Pouviere of Miami, Fla., in intercepted
tercepted intercepted a Haluska toss' to end
a fourth period threat.

In The
Letter Box

Panama American
Sports Page , . ..

bin
Please print in your mail to edit editor
or editor column the following to all
those who have something to do
with the official scorer of the Pa Panama
nama Panama Professional League:
"Teach Mr. Leo Eberenz how to

score or chanze him ln-fore he

Auburn fullback Joe Childress embarasses this country with hjs

cracked two yards for both of

the rebel touchdowns, the first
after a 66-yard first period
scoring march and the second
In the last period. An Auburn
teammate, center Bob Ucar Ucar-brought,
brought, Ucar-brought, Ironically gave the
Yankees their two points when

he flipped a high pass into the

safety,

dav. J?n. 15. on the La Boca dia

this rear the -wraivTMTOTv Mv,imond.-The teams, are evenkiaitendeone lor a

won all tournaments to date a- anceri and heated rivalry may be

gainst Rainbow City, breaking e-1 anticipated this season. prises as well as $300 each

lack of baseball rule savvy. The

Caribbean Series will begin next

month and many who know the
game are coming to Panama. Sup Suppose
pose Suppose he pulls a similiar decision
like the one of Jan. 3?. ..or dur during
ing during the Series? How about show showing
ing showing him the rule and then have
him give Robinson his deserved

victory?.

The game prouutcd twosur- r '" hanks

;ach ml vmccni urcene

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE

PANAMA. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1922, Sunday, January 8,
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided in two scries "A" ti "B". of 22 pieces each

1956

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

3620 $ 44,000.00
2072 5 13,200.00
0925 $ 6,60ooo

N
02
I2A
22A
32
M2
20
M2
072

t
132 M
IS2.0D
132.IW
m.tm
12 Mi
2,2M.
1.11 M

520 132.M

No
102
112
122
1.12ft
142D
IS?
1R2
172
l2t
192

rl7eNo rrlufiNa rrtoflti rfiwiNi Prli N Trim I H f rl N

'. iMM i
132.00 1
mm
1.12. ft
132 M
132.M
2,?(1.0
mm
: 132.M
1.12.0(1

202
2120
2220
242
2520
2?
2720
?2
2S20

132.00
W.M
, 132.00
1.12.00
132.00
132.00
2,200.00
132.00
132.00
1.12.00

3021
3120
3220
3320
342
3520
,3112
372
3(20
am

132 00 I 4020
J32.00 (4120
132.00 4220
132.0 (432
132. 442
I3I.00 1 4S20

44 000.00
132.00
' 132 0
132,00

fi?0
4720
4(20
492

1

132.001 K020
1.12.00 SI20
132.0 522
1.12 00 I 032
132.0 S420
ir.2.001 S320
2,200.00 5B20
- 13? 00 R720
132.00 SV
132.00 592

132.M 132.M-'
' 132.M-' 13 00
. 132.0
132.0
132.00
132 00 1
2 0.0 I
132.00
132.0
132.00

1020
112
122
032
(420
052
72
0I'
2t

132 00
132.M
132.0
132.0

12
112
722

732

13 0 T42
132.00 7520

2,.0O
13?.
1120
132 M

720
W

7'0
702

132.00
13200
132.00
132.00
13.00
2.0.0
13.
132.0O
132.0

I2

04?
S7?

132 0
., 1SS.M I
132.0 j
132.0
13T00 i

. tS.0 4" -2
? 0.i0 J 01
13 0 07
m 01
152.0S

02
0120
22
32.
04

rn
I32.W
1320
132.0
132.0
132.00
132.00
2,200 0
132.00
'13'.00
132.00

:!

Aporoximations Derived From First Prize

3011 440 0 3013 440.0 Mil UI.H 301T 44. I 301 4(0.0 3022 440.00 I 3024
3612 440.M 3814 440.00 I 3611 444.00 361 J 440.0 3621 44 0 1 3623 440,0 3S2S

I V. I ....

44.N 1 J2 440.TM1 I
44(1 M I' 3627 440.M 1 32

f
440.0
440

Approximaiions Ucrivcd From Second Prize

072 120.00 1072 220.00 3071 220.00 4072 820 QP 5072 J20.M 6072. 220.M Wt VMM W7I 220.M M7S tUM
2003 1100 2065 110.0 2007 1100 206 110.0 271 11M ?OT4 II. 27 11 J' J'J-JJ
2064 110.00 2066 110.00 106S 110.06 J 207i 110.00 2071 110.00 1(11 2077 110.00 MT U0.00 M 110.00
Approximation? Derived From Third Prize
1925 132.0 2923 132.M 3921 132.0 492S 132.00 525 132.M 0925 132.M j W2J .' i3',M S tSS.W j 3I
7l SS.M MIS M.M tm .. 22 ; MM 0924 M.t W27 M.00 -I J03I MM j
091? S8.00 0919 SS.M' S2t 11.00 923 11.00 M2S l 0 0121 lt.00 W UM M

Prize-winning, Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing were sold at: First and Second in Panami: Third in Colin.
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in 0 and not included in the above list win Forty .four Dollars $14.0t each
" The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "U"

Signed by: ALBERTO ALEMAN. Governor of the Province of Panama Ced. 47-12135
The Representative Of The Treasurv R1CARDO A MELEND22

PAELO A. FIN:
Eccretarv

WITNESSES: 'Jos D. Hcnriqucz C. Ced. No. 3-1325?
- IIainie,.i:ciiriaac2.Ccd..lJo 47.-50211.

JOSE GUILT ERMO BATALLA
Notary Public. Panama



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list TEAR

PANAMA, E. P., MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 1956

FIVE CENTS

Congress To Get Imaginative

9-Point Farm Program Today

The regular monthly meeting of

the Canal Zone Central Labor U-nion-Metal
Trades Council, AFL-

CIO will be held Sunday, Jan. IS,
at 8:30 a m. in the Margarita

Service Center.
Officers for 1956 will be install

ed at this meeting by 'William

Humber a retired machinist with
over 50 years of active member membership
ship membership in organized labor. Humberg

attended the recent convention in

New York at which time the two

labor organizations were merged

into one union, tne ArL-ciu.

WASHINGTON'. Jan. I (UP)

tl resident Eisenhower sent Con

g-ess an "imaginative1, nine-point

larm program today designed to

relive present farm "difficulties"

and help ward off future trouble

. Key feature of the program
drafted by Agriculture Secretary
Ezra T. Benson is a "soil bank"

-plan

i at government would pay
farmers to reduce plantings In an

' fiiort to cut down surplus produc

lion, generally considered number

one farm problem.

" It headed for Congress as the

lawmakers plunged into their first

full week of work In an election

'year session that will be devoted

chiefly to such hot political issues

as taxes, aid to education, high

ways, and foreign aid, as well as

if rm policy.
'.ouse Democratic leader John

W. McCormack (Mass.) and House

COP Leader Joseph W. Martin
Jr., (Mass.) generally agreed to today
day today Congress will put debt reduc reduction
tion reduction ahead of any tax cuts this
year, as President Eisenhower has
U""ested.
- Martin said he hoped Congress
rnuld do both.

- The House leaders also agreed
Consress will approve some kind

tf highway building program and
generally go along with the Pres President's
ident's President's stepped-up foreign aid pro program.
gram. program. Martin foresaw the possibility
of a fight over ar- anti-segrejja-tion
amendment In the school
The chief Issue in the farm po po-licy
licy po-licy fight was pinpointed by Mc McCormack
Cormack McCormack and House GOP whip
Leslie C, Arends (D-I1U -m a de debate,
bate, debate, on the CBS radio program,
"The Leading Question."
- McCormack noted most Demo Democrats
crats Democrats supports a -poller of high
rifiid farm price supports.

Arends endorsed the administra administration's
tion's administration's flexible support program

and said Benson and his a i d e s

have .drafted some "very good"
proooslsXto go with it.
Presirftli) Eisenhower said at
Kev WesV before returning to the
capital today, the thing he likes
tbout the administration's new
program is its "imagination."
"It approaches the problem In
the effort to relieve the economic
difficulties, of the farm communi community
ty community at present,", he said, "but it
does so with an eye to the future,
particularly in the conservation
He said the soil bank plan is
aimed at "getting land into the
proper kind of crops, instead of
into those that bring a pile-up of
surpluses."
He described the nine-point pro program
gram program as "many-sided" and said it
would be a "very splendiid" addi addition
tion addition to present laws.

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PREPARING FARM MESSAGE President Elsenhower (center) -works on his special Farm mes message
sage message which the Administration plans to send to Congress Jan. 10. Seated around the table in
the President's Key West, Fla... oKlce are (left to right): Fred Seaton, deputy assistant to the
President; Under Secretary of Agriculture True D. Morse; the President; Gabriel Hauge, econ economic
omic economic advisor; and Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson.

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if

It

In his State of the Union mes

sage last Thursday, President Ei

seniiower also said the program

wm strengthen individual commo

dity programs, revoce controls

where possible, reduce carry fl flyers,
yers, flyers, and call for "substantial

funds" for research to develop

new markets lor farm goods.

It also includes a rural develop'

taient program to help low-income

farmers and calls for "vigorous"

action on the great plans rehabi-

litatinn nrnnram

President Eisenhower appeal appealed
ed appealed for congressional support
"regardless of party."
Republican congressmen h a v e
said that, farmer participation in
the soil bank plan would be volun voluntary.
tary. voluntary. Those taking part would be
paid in cash or "in kind' for tak taking
ing taking out of production acreages of
corn, cotton, wheat and .rice, v
This land would be planted to

such conservation crops as grass.

There is disagreement among

Democrats and Republicans over
the amount of cash payments

iarmers should receive under the

program.
Chairman Allen J. Ellender CD-

La.) of the Senate Agriculture

Committe contends such payments

should be at least 750 million dol

lars, or about twice the reported

administration figure. :

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75o cf Elderly Americans Have
lb Income, Or Under $1,000

WASHINGTON. Jan. 9 (UP)

sriy three-fourths of Americans
mr 65 either have no income of
t:.. r own or get less than $1,000

a year, the Twentieth Century fund

reported today.
v ith a steadily increasing popu

lation of persons over 65, the fund

estimated 38 per cent of these eld

erly persons have no income of

their own; 38 per cent have a
yearly income under $1,000, and 11
per cent have an income between

1,000 and $2,000.

Only 15 per cent have $2,000 or

lhe iwentietn century fund, a

private organization devoted to re

search and education, made the

estimates in a study of 'economic
nerds of older persons.
It was prepared by John J. Cor Corson,
son, Corson, a management consultant, and
John W. McConnell, an industrial

viets To Honor

Oenjamin Franklin
MOSCOW, Jan. 10 (UP) The
Af ademy of Sciences of the U.S. U.S.-S.R.
S.R. U.S.-S.R. was reported today planning
to celebrate the 250th anniversary
i Benjamin Franklin's birth on
Jan, 17.
The Academy was said to be
! '.inning meetings on Franklin at
iscow University. The American
i' honored in the Soviet Union as
a liberal statesman and scientist
' 1 was an honorary member of
t Russian Academy of Sciences
-i T i was founded in 1726 by Pe-
e iire ti. iew Rimttim tran-'
t i of FranVin's autobio-jra-'
.y an:I Poor Richard's Almanac
i.f i s ii to be published.

relations professor at Cornell U U-nivcrsity.
nivcrsity. U-nivcrsity. The study revealed that since

1900 tne number of persons over

65 has quadrupled, while the total
population has only doubled.
There now are nearly 14 mil million
lion million persons in the older age group.
3;i!3lipn3li$l$rS
Joy Rids. In Pbe
To RedMsiaknd
TAIPEI. Jan. 9 (UPh-Unof-

ficial sources said today a dis discharged
charged discharged Nationalist air force
pilot and two friends apparently
flew a small Cessna-170 trainer
from Formosa to the communist-

held mainland last Saturday.
Chinese quarters, sensitive con concerning
cerning concerning such defections, refused

to comment. However, the unof unofficial
ficial unofficial sources identified the pilot
as Wei Ta-Wei, a one-time pilot

trainee discharged for misconduct.

The sources said he and two

friends idenltfied by Peiplne Ra

dio as Lianga Feng and Tl Hsiao-

Wu took the plane from the Tai Taipei
pei Taipei Flying club. Radio Peiping

said the plane was the personal
property of Gen. Chiang Wei Wei-Kuo,
Kuo, Wei-Kuo, youngest son of the Gen

eralissimo.

Nationalist sources said Wei
was recently released from a Tai Taipei
pei Taipei jail -where he had served a
sentence for a criminal offense.
They said he was not a political
prisoner.

THE SECOND SESSION on the 84th Congress which reconven reconvened
ed reconvened last week will receive President Elsenhower's new farm pro program
gram program today.

ilixon Celebrates
43rd Birthday With
Top-Ranking GOPers

WASHINGTON, Jan. 10 (UP) (UP)-Vice
Vice (UP)-Vice President Ricard M. Nixon

celebrated his 43rd birthday yes

terday with the help of the nation s

top Republican officials.

lhe vice president attended a

birthday party given in his honor

by the Chowder and Marching So Society,
ciety, Society, a social club founded by 15

younger Republican members of

the House during the 81st Congress.
Nixon, who represented California
in the Hous, was a charter memb

er.., .

The guest list for the party, held
at the National Press Club, includ

ed about 400 guests.
Also invited to attend were all
GOP members of the House and
Senate, all members of the Cabi Cabinet
net Cabinet and their undersecretaries, and
Chairman Leonard W. Hall and oth other
er other officials of the Republican Na National
tional National Committee.

Panama Crewmen
Survive Explosion
COPENHAGEN, Jan. 9 (UP) -The
crew of the Panamanian ves vessel
sel vessel "Aly" which struck a mine
Saturday morning in the North Sea
was rescued late yesterday, the
Naval Command said.
The second lifeboat of the Pa Panamanian
namanian Panamanian vessel was found by the
Swedish vessel "Brittania" shortly
after another lifeboat with seven
survivors was found.

The second boat had 10 men a a-board.
board. a-board. No one was killed by the
mine explosion.

Study Of Charges

By Fuerza y Luz
Is Suggested

The formation of a commtjtee
to study the costs charger by

me Fuerza v Luz Power

Light Company. In Panama has
been suggested bv member of

the Panama National Assembly.

The suggestion' came from

commission already m existence
composed of auditors and elec electrical
trical electrical engineers who are now
studying existing contract be between
tween between the company and the
Panama government.
A member of the' commission
said he felt it was essential that
the manner in which lights for
gas and electricity are comput computed
ed computed be studier in nn attemnt to

break down the formula used.

E. W. HATCHETT
The legislative program for the

present session of Congress will

be submitted to the body at this

meeting for approval by the leg

islative committee and the date of

sending a represenative to Wash

ington will be selected.

The following officers will be in

stalled for the year 1956: Presi

dent, E. W. Hatchett; first vice-

president, Louis S. Damiani; sec second
ond second vice president, John Rice;
legislative representative, Howard
Munro; alternative legislative re representative,
presentative, representative, and chairman of the
legislative committee, R. L. Bla Bla-ney;
ney; Bla-ney; Wage and grievance boards
labor member, Curtice Co ate;
first alternate member W. & G.
Boards. Louis S. Damiani; second,
E. W, Womble; secretary, Walter
Wagner; Truestees, George O.
Lee, Euggene Breakfield and

J. M. Purvis; treasurer, Walter

Fischer; Sergeant-at-arms, A. J
Davis.

Police Seek Parents
Of Youths Held For

Stealing Groceries

Two youths who were charged

with stealing groceries in front of
the La Boca Commissary are be

ing held today at the Balboa jail

on $25 bail each until all attempts

have been made to contact their
parents.

The boys, aged 17 and 14. both

pleaded not guilty to the theft of
a sack of groceries worth $6.43 last

Saturday, but the case was conti

nued until this afternoon.

Balboa Magistrate Judge John

E, Deming asked police to try -to
contact the boys' parents, and
was told that the youths had ear earlier
lier earlier given fictitious' addresses in
an attempt to prevent their fami

lies from finding out they were

being held in custody.
"I don't say I am going to send

you to jail," the Judge told the

youthful defendants in the Balboa
Magistrate's Court this morning,
"but your folks may be able to

give you some help."

One of the boys said his mother

has a heart condition and his broth

ers and sisters were working,-and
he was reluctant lo have them

called into court.

SEASON OPENER Mexican
toreador Pepe Luis Vasqueu
(above) teases the bull into
charging: at hls cape from a
kneeling position to jet back
into the good graces of the
crowd which booed him earlier
when he fruitlessly stuck three
swords Into his first bull be before
fore before H died. His countryman
(below) Jaime Bolanos, struts
around the ring after killing
his last bull with one d e f t
thrust of his matador's sword.
Although Bolanos' footwork
and proficiency with the cape
were as colorful as Vasquez'
and his killing of the bull
more perfect, he failed to draw
as much applause as his op opponent.
ponent. opponent. The bullfights, which
opened the 1956 season at La
Macarena bullring, were at attended
tended attended by a capacity crowd in including
cluding including many Zonians and
shutterbugs. v

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Sharpshooters Hunt
Throat-Slitting
Algiers Rebel Band
ALGIERS, Algeria, Jan. 9
(UP) French Legionnaires and
Algerian sharpshooters were
out in force today to hunt for
a rebel band that slit the throats

oi two renenmen aunne a

bloody weekend of nearly 50
killings.

The Frenchmen were Al-

phonse Casanova, 50, and h i s

friend Albert Massari, 42. Their

bodies were found just outside
Constantlne yesterday, with

their throats slit. They also had

been shot several times at close

quarters.

Close to Batna. lust north of

the mam chain of the Aures

Mountains, French troops start

ed an action yesterday with a

large group or rebels and cnas-

ed them into the rocky heights.

A French officer said "the ter terrorists
rorists terrorists fought like devils."
Three French soldiers were
killed, while the French found

the bodies of 29 rebles after the
battle.

In various other small engage engagements
ments engagements the French killed 13 reb rebels
els rebels and took more than 20 prls prls-ner
ner prls-ner r , ,
Rebels swooped on a group of

cars travelling along the road
from Bone to Sou-Ahras, but
were quickly driven off by auto automatic
matic automatic weapon fire.
Meanwhile, both here in Alge Algeria,
ria, Algeria, and m neighboring Morocco
all eyes were on Paris, and the

results of the elections.

Both Algerians and Morocca'tfi
hoped for a Socialist or Men Men-desist
desist Men-desist government, which they
thought would the more easily
grant them a greater' measuie
of independence.

Panamanian Held
On Burglary Rap

A burglary charge was lodged
against Gregorio Rios today, and
the case was bound over for trial
W the U.S. District Court at An An-con.
con. An-con. Balboa Magistrate today found
probable cause against the 22-year-old
Panamanian Hrfenrtant ii,.i.A

ed with unlawfully attempting to
enter house 5S7.Y in Annn

29 between the hours of 7 and 9

; Bail was fixed at $500.

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The toughest thing obout ghost
writing is catching the right spirit.

Madcap Runaway Bride-To-Be
Trysts Willi Her Jilted Fiance

He pointed out that there
seemed to h a riisrrennnpi In

that the profit was being calcu-

lateo. on "tne investment and
not on' the capital," and tiat
this criterion was one hf the

angles which wouift he riisr

ea. The commission also felt that
the only way in which reduc reductions
tions reductions could bp made In t.hpnrWc

is now oeing cnarged was with

me installation ot a Hydroelec Hydroelectric
tric Hydroelectric plant, because the company
now spends huge sums to import
fuel. ...
The report will be wesented
to the Assembly durlnjr the

course of this week.

BALBOA TIDES

rCESDATTJAMUART 1 0
HIGH low

'51 a.m. 8:11 am.
2;30 p.m. 8;29 p.m.

'-ROCHESTER, N. Y., Jan 9 (UP)
-Runaway bride to be Juliette

Whele has met secretly with the
fiance she deserted in a madcap

escapaae witn an old flame Satur

day. A patchup of the broken ror

mance seemed imminent.

The contrite Juliette, member of
a prominent Rochester family who
skipped out on her own wedding

to tiee to JNew York City with
playboy Stephen Hahn, reached,

me man sne jilted, jack Owens,
24, through a Catholic priest yesterday.

The 20-year-old Juliette said she
wanted to see Owens "to talk
things over."
Owens, still dazed by the sudden
smashup.of his romance, agreed
to the meeting at a suburban rend rendezvous.
ezvous. rendezvous. Owens, an Air Force sec second
ond second lieutenant and a football hero
at Colgate University several years
ago, had said Saturday night he
would "not marry Judy now."
But today, he indicated he still
loved the pretty 20-year-old bru brunette
nette brunette and that a reconciliation was
possible.
On leave for his wedding, Owens
has orders to report back Jan. 19
in California for assignment in the
Far East.
"If" was learnctf JJ'UlictlcV'fattiPfv
Harold J. Wchle, a retired business
man who owns the Wchle Convevor

Co. Here, still fondly hoped Owens

would become his son-in-law. Wehlel
was outspoken in his anger at I
Hahn, an unemployed local play- i
boy with a large income of his

own. .
Juliette vanished early Saturday
with Hahn. Detectives called in by
the Wehle family found out the
couple had left for New York City
in a station wagon after borrow borrowing
ing borrowing $500 from friends at a Friday
.night party.
Juliette was clad only in a night nightgown
gown nightgown and housecoat when she van vanished
ished vanished from home, but left town in
clothes borrowed from a friend.
The heiress anrl Hahn ?K left

town only seven hours before her

scneauiea marriage to Owens
Within a 12-hnnr nerind afiar s

hectic search by police, Juliette and

mim wcjc uucr in nocnesier. iney
had driven to Syracuse, hopped a
Diane to New York ri tv anrl re

turned by plane to the airport

uere.
Juliette and Hahn losmprl nf fh

police search for them when they
telephoned home after reaching
New York. They assured their
parents they had not been married.

"It's Onp fnr th tinntc tVio

downcast Owpns salrl when' hi

learned Juliette had returned home.
"I was feeling on top of the world
when I left Juliette early Friday I
night."

0 DAY

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' li'- 'iff:

BENEDICT SOGEAUS
JOHN -PAYNE
RONALD REAGAN
RHONDA FLEMING
COLEEN GRAY

Brel Kit-tern-

M m
TtCMNICOLOW

IMPORTANT: Tomorrow Tuesday at -9 p.m. will
take place the drawing for the dresses of the' fol fol-lowing
lowing fol-lowing department stores: Rhoda, Antonio's, Felix
Madura.;. Also

"SNEAK-PKEVIEV-