The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02963

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
IT. MI6HT AS WELLE2 A R)NPED
; AM' TEN P4Y3, eETTY.' VOUUL'

1

! 1 0

" iilllfjS

A

CUT, F1CELIS IT'S LESS THAN

i mo KJtoip'c; i rn ts x 1

ROCKU6 CHAIR IN

TO THE COMMERCIAL

CITY PEPAETMENT

STDEE WE--A

NEVER V!EA ANYTHI?43 'POUT
N IT.'-VCiJ MEAMT WELLJ ALWIN'
. TO CHCV 'EM A SAVPLE OF
AW WCrK.' CUT IT WAS A
SILLY PIECE OF v

V

.V

y

f IT WAG NOT.' V MAVC2- BUT IN THIS PAY

YCjn WORKMAN- AN' ACE FOLKS POMT BEAT
CM;? IS SIMPLY PATHWAYS TD THSPCCOF
AW N!RCENT.' BACK-COUNTRY CA"FZMTS3S-

YOUn- Xf EVEN F IT IS. A EETTER

V V MOUSE TRAP t

..( J fy-.
: i

ft

NOW VOU 30T THE TROUELE SOMECMZ'S

OF 30H' INTO COMMERCIAL I KNOCKIN' AT

CITY AcSAN TO TKY AN' A -THE FKONT
GIT ANNE'S CHAIR aSNsPOOSi

I HATE TO SAY IT--" wT

(U-50;

PUT I TOLDJA

SO;

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AC

V

A'.-:.a'wpp- mr. : )iM a DU5YM4N took too
VLC.ZiZ.ZPl -FrOVA THE MUCH TIME FINPIW6 THIS PLACE
PCrATTMZNT GTOE.'j) YOU NEEP A PMONEj IF THIS IS.

ATMS IS A CUrsPRISEK' -MS.HAVlAPLV.m

."'- '( '-6STPOWN-TO

AUTHE4nC 1 CAN 0AS1LY ACCHAKOISS VOU3
ENTIRE bUTPUT.' WE'LL START WITH A POZEN

BOSTON ROCKERS- SIX IN PINE SIX IN MAPLE JA

s. gigu Hnr:n

li II X

LCACZi

cci r:o.v we're in dugskeosJ vz"y
, CLZZZ CP VOU TO CZlDTlta

CI LP TO ME V'ITM A CULL
;V CA.V'FLC Or VtXH VJOKi

v t A"'.'.;r:E cleverness;

' IV,

HEY- HOLP ON

r WILL CCMZZOPY TELL ME y VOUE N

WHAT IN TOPHET CUCINZSS-
HAPPENEDT-tr'1 k YCU'ZS IN

1 S



IT WAS MV OWH T-,

FAULT-- I WAS STUPID j

I'LL GO. RIGHT HOME S

AND APOLOGIZE

.TO BLONOic

) -3

TM ATS THE LAST STPAW.
I CAM T STAND IT IM
HOUSE AMY LC'h

I M GETTING CUT

I

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( I'LL. HAVE TO DEVOTE THE REST ") I Tz' .':. : C MERE. S Y0lR)( NOW. WH6Cc ) -'
OF,MY LIFE TO WINNING 1 - (CANDV 1 tf CAM I GET J

- jlV v

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Li MAMA'S NOT ) - I'M V DON'T FEEL SO v.
FT HERE T TM V BAD' Pop
WZLZs sues I 7rl5L : i .mama willT..x

i I GONE LATt COME BACK

WE'LL START I Y

CLEANING TWS HOUSc

FROM STM TO j

STERN

i we'll make it

A PARA;:5."i

v," FOR t-C?

W- N h 'friA.';3 MOW v .. .;
VCr.iCKS OUR FlNSC'luS" T T-.

'j j RETURN TO THE FOLD

n

v

1

THE HOUSE IS SH1NINS

FROM TOP

TO BOTTOM,

POP

ANO I VE FINISHED TEN :
PAGES OF RESOLUTIONS

AUO PROMISES TO EE j

HU53AND 1 ;

V STr -r cam ,"
ST.- : r in
TH; J k : T. :'. :'.-'
' :'.-' ? LOnuIhS fr.;

MAMA, '-t-v
PAPA ISA I

NEW MAN MAN-VOtt'LL
VOtt'LL MAN-VOtt'LL LOVE HIM

now

c,1

r HAD NO INTENTION j

Or LEAVING VCJ. I V.V 5
JUST RCHSS'N-3

FC"? TH;

CLU.J

PLAY

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J OU RS V I 'ON TMUH

L JLT
NOW I 5TKAFE 7HUH I I
CLOUDS WITH THUH
RAiN BULLETS...
AJSQ vtch:
V 7
irmrf
W22 IT
v..
. LEAkj5
MOW
TO
C3TATE
A
; ceop
i
4f, r-r .1;
v:

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Surf. MOW EU5E KiKJ I KEEP SOU

KEECKOvs(S, BKEK.
CKOW5 FRt4 STOwAPEECTSJ
k-AB3l i IS WSaaAc
B LtEvlKJ Hsl
TWAr'S eas-i

SOU JEST ISNI TH"5

A5REEVMMT TO BOTATE

I V ft'",
...
7 I AiMT 'MER.
'Heard o a ckow
4 4 1

' H KwHAT'S THAT V I 1 -11' 'f NOW VUH'LL SEE
PUslK. POWOEBf J MODERN ClENCE
J- L. -- sjy action;,
rr'S PEKv w.-x- fin T
iBUU-ETS.'i 1 Vp --V-:VV,,.. ;
.4 V;... i'- 1 j'' "'" "V --,
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, 1 l7. !i . -,-

.v.--7Nj 1

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-Tg ""sleet fN I ,C- 1
I ( snow ? I "J ,f J

'CJ "" :) 7 J DON-'T CARS W'MAT ii'H;i
f XL 4 : V VVEATWER. (- UREAU CAJ.' ri

IT TAIL-G uS

CUBA.'-

f r-,

-

;.a.;;

&3s2 CAS 3tT"i WHO SiXJ

WITH THAT EERCRQW?

5

rv "F

4

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PALL FEX THAT

THIS WOKJSESJE IS PER

th- b cds;

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I vSeah- ?ut wmwx oxkop )j J (

3 V T7V TK EislTESsAUKl ? S I 1 L

All ciSht, ezzn Ceow. ( ZAggrr, Sou s mow

U. tWVfe IT A WHACK.' f DtK.tMECiTPr3 RUM

AU- SOU TKUliLEi

Fa

,ffUT TMES SUE FOUKO S
SONA NTLLS50SJTS t-ASlM ?

LOOSE SOKEWMAR.!

1 )r"-:-nV- Z'

,-...i,.liiwiiii .i ruiifto y

f

WE XT SAC X'LL

ROTATE TH' COM

WITH B:XC?0!

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ALP- I', A HcAP
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7CCTZVZZYTH',US VE$,JQH'i.CV".YTi'.".'3 I f" "7
y-:.:j me? 70 RSSOLVS -1 fSJSSKT LET'S C0I '. T
TK3 FARTNERSHifJ STOEV TO GET Th.i CV2;j V STH AS A?
-raAR? K5S5CLEi A;? t; :n ws cmE2:

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THIS IS A3 I'LL ES
V") S3, JOHNNY I WAITING WITH
WT h-HsTK!S I EATEP EEATVI,
fKCULrMT TAK2 PARLINSl
. L. s. .i iiiiu'- i
;1 -'
,.

a ca. pjll lp cut ,.
t, :.2 jj;t m v.' liana.go an? ?
C .ICKnvs IT MAY E2 SYPhZy

STRIN3'

R2 NUTS, SYPNEy

'LL KZVER SET

AY WITH THIS -y

f-

OH, BUT TONY. YOU FORGET !:

OFFICIALLY you'RS CZAP THIS

WOMT ES '.I'.TlTwFOR HOW
CC'.'LO I FOSSLY KILL A FZAP

I. .VIZ goc: :vz ASWTZHYl

----'"--'-Y.'

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V.UTH C: 2 r.-ttJON E'JCKS YOU CWJLHl'T
' vaumtjon ?

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THERE'S A' KILLER V
LOOSE ON THIS f t )
LOOKiN' FOR
SOMEDOpy?
-V
MY PAI?D HOPALONCr

' 1

TH' REAR
' PLATFORM,
&ut:he GAVE

-1 &
TRAIM HITS A
CUlVE ANO
THE TYVO.MEN
TCWARO
THE OPEN
SA3GAC3E
DOOK...f
V
! 1 "V.V.".

THE BAGGAGE

'clerk's eeen
: sluggedthem's
..somzcoov else
JN HERE"

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ai Copt. 195V .iiim txyd, Dnrtbrtf! fry K i- S-"""

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a

' ETTA, DO

VDU REALIZE
IT'S ALMOST

..EIGHT O'CLOCK

. i $

My pateh is at

r'-f

x

:A4

Hussy v

AND

...

fWMAT's THf : l

DEA DfAl?YU
THIS 15 ITw 7
BUT PEFiTs
WAS LOVE, AT C

FIRST SI6HTjy

I THIS STASTS

( i i:

6ET Tj-w FA2T; I JT- PLEACH., DAP--

J I CCJLP.HAVw ACTUALLY J IT ISN'T FAIi I

Df v'

ti ti Ti re iir rrff-'irji v .', .. JLi

HAPPENED THE 6UV WILL'SIMPLV) V."": r t

WEAK ABOUT JEFF
". .. ;

7

Ml,

MC5 J CC,U i PAP, PIZAZZ

.S ACT lij

. $ i

v

W,WZMETr!) : HI, Al2TIE.I'M

HI.ETTA r r ALL EEADV

-; 6CCP NI6H7V )
. JEFP-ES-

EXCUZr ME

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Comic supplement

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03(MPy' (o&V, SjCOEE'PEA. ) f"1
f PARAKEET 7THA'5 FWE,'M
MELPINJ.', nl"'
V home- ...

j' :

LI'L 60y THIS
l'A BIRD j I OCHA BE
2y'MA DO 6O0D.',
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("JIM HAS 16 C'iSRES, j NOTCED V
. AMD 'JOE HAS 17 . SOME )
( CHERRIES HOlO MAMV CHERRIES
CHERRIES DO Tr'.S AT TrtE
( jitoo boy'-mas??; Rurr.
,r MARKET.'

"fee

" HE DIDK1' TAliE 1
T ALOMG AWV

- MOhJEVn.

YOU WAT-I6 WEER'ESO

AJPPBIPa y.VtS, AMD

CHAktJb IHtW-

;TO'POPEVE

. V.

i o)iu stop en

Th" -fruit market j

rr

U3HAT??. A BIRD V HE SAID HE 10AS HELpIKo
CMAC3ED 33! SlOEE'PEA DO HOMElOCRJii!;

CHERRIES

TO AE?? A

V

r:'. 'K

51

JAKJE HAS THREE .) THERE
DIAMOM'S, OKIE S ARE 1

WORTH $ IOO, AN'
r4f 04E' UJORTH" $500

7 SOME k

DJAAA0MD5 I
) AT THE

; QQQ-U" J JElOELRV

V TORE'

THIS HAS J

.CjONE FAR
CllM Cli II

.. iOE VES, J MHO'JO, BUT IT

0)AS

OOJN'

I FINE,
POPEVE

03AS AE30UT TO COST

TOO MUCH hKCKZW

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THE BOSS IS A

FIERV- TEMPERED
. DEMON TO WORK
FOR, BUT YOU

CANT MAKE

' TOOTG
BELIEVE

THATJ

ME LORDS IT OVER.
ME PAY IN 'AND DAY. :

OUT, BUT SOPHIE

WONT BELIEVE

. T"U AT PIXUFPf

. LAST WEEK T PLANTED TOOTS
IN MY. ANTEROOM SO SHE
COULD SEE HIM IN ACTION, AND

HE WALKED IN AS SWEET AS

PIE ONLY BECAUSE HIS WIFE

WAS THERE CHECKING UP

5H

K

. y

CASPER I-WISH I
COULD PROVE TO
SOPHIE WHAT A
DEMON HE REALLY

1 1

,lS::;:nr

TELL VOU WHAT, COL. HOOFER.'
PLANT SOPHIE IN YOUR OFFICE

c:r cun rjM ;pp ptp iitcpi c

WHAT A MONSTER

DC l? Axin n irrik I

rKAV, 'J MAYBE SHE CAN

; convince TOOTS

HE'S NO
1 ' AMCEL

S OCH IE, HOW D' YOU LIKE TO

M AkE io for: yourself?:

ALL YOU HAVE. TO DO IS BE AT

SPEND.A COUPLEV Jlr

, ORPCf

'LL BE THERE

AT TWO ON THE

DOT: I NEED

&IO FOR A

NEW HAT:

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YOU 'RE RIGHT ON. TIME, SOPHIE J X
YOU'RE TO WORK IN' MY ANTEROOM.' ,'.) -S I A
BUT PONT MAKE A SOUND THE 1 X

BOSS MIOHT NOT APPROVE OF

YOU HANDLING" THE FILES.'

I'LL BE-

AS QUIET

AS A

MOUSE

i i i i

Jf r" A I I II I

0 1 (few I y
, zL. : JJ.l

CASPER JS A 6ENIUSJ

! WHY PIPNT I THINK OF THIS

BEFORE "? THE DOSS WILL GOME

STORMING IN .FROM LUNCH

ANY -SECOND NOW

AH-H, FOOTSTEPS.'

t.

CCXONuLVOU WERE V THAT GIVE3 YOU) THE COLONCL

s.

A 6LICK 0M NOT TO $15. A WEEK

u "L YOUR. W73 i EXTRA POCKET

ArO'JT TVWT RAICH AAQNEY GWE

vYO'J COT:' rx5JDCCSNTKNbW

PENDS MOST

OF THAT POU6H
ON CANDY FOR
OUR NEW V'"

AOJTlJ 6TEN0S.f

eo!.
- ... r'
-l.,..,wfe.. :.i '.sl.

THEY SAY YOUR WIFE

FRISKS YOU FOR YOUS?

POKER WINNINGS EVERY

NIGHT' YOU COME IN',

"A FROM TVlE CLUH,

;he neves

FINDS HIS

MONEY

1 BECAUSE HE

TUCKS HIS

WINNINGS

ON HIS SOCKS,

COL. HOOFER SURE

PLAYS HIS WIFE FOR

A SAP.1 SAY, THE

BOSS TOOK SICK
i AND WONT

VBE BACK

V

7 TCPAY; I ".

7

COLONEL, THAT WIFE OF YOU!?

MUST BE A DUMB ONE TO FALL
FOR THOSE CORNY 6AGS OF

YOURS'

. Ml
1 j

VMAT'S THAT NOISE M

COL.: HOOFEST3 OFFICE

. ..AM EARTHQUAKE

S:

O

t ; ., 1

A CHUMP OUT OF A'C, WILL YC

:D LVCTiWCrSD

A14KE

HAn

YTHZy fAlP,. J

' "... -. )Y '', 3

u?Yj

V'OU ,ND OU CIGHT C

iYomth to v.lk'.i re:"

TH !;.'";.'

d r""!,T3 f:

V y I II V t

tis 11 in "T'l"" "- 1 1 iii 1 1 1 11 1 ''-iiiM.iMim, 1.. ..... jfc

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THAT'S MY DLOOD MSgt Don O'Neill, 1st Sergeant
of the U.S. Marine detachment at Rodman, beams at a pint
of blood he has just given the nevly-crganized blood bank
at San Fernando Clinic. O'Neill claims he knows his men
better by their blood types than by t!;cir serial numbers.
r v - (See Story on Test s 2 end 3)

Supplement
j
PANAMA, R. p., SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 195

. 'v

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Rodman Marines

A:

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JtAuAb--W AIM m

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LINING UP TO GIVE THEIR BLOOD outside of the operating room at San Fernando Clinic
are (1. to r.) Sgl, Jesus Rodriguez of Puerto Rico, Pfc. John H. Brown of Waverly, N. Y.; Pfc,
Courtis J.-Fontenot, of Bunkie, La.; Pfc. Willis W. Jones of Chatanooga, Tenn.; Sgt. Deleon
11. Tomas of Los Angeles, Calif, and Joe De Maria, Jr: :

,..v.;

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GIVING THE COLONEL the business. ... Here Dr. Manuel Preciado, medical director. of San
Fernando helps Col. George N. Carroll, commandant of the Marine Baraacks at Rodman on
with his coat after giving a pint of blood while Dr. Luis Alfaro deft) and nurses look on. Col.
Carroll has heartily endorsed the program and was the first to volunteer his services.

V I
r

i

STORY AND PICTURES
By HINDI DIAMOND
The Marine Corps known by its

proving that this motto" extends i

beyond and above me call of duty.
Because of their unselfish ef efforts,
forts, efforts, seriously ill people in Pana Panama
ma Panama will now be able to reap the
benefits of a recent good dead.
In a typical tropicaL downpour,
recently a busload of 31 Marines
showed up drenched but undaunt undaunted
ed undaunted at the San Fernando Clinic in
Panama. City. ',-
Their objective to- donate 31
pints of blood.
Setting up a Walking Blood

Bank which can service the sickj

and needy in time ot emergency
was the brainchild of s group from
the .Veterans of Foreign Wars, and
was carried out by Joe De Maria,
Jr. vice-commander who, for the
last two-and-a-half years has been
telling people "Call Joe at any
time of day or night if you need
blood."
Started after a civilian employe
of the Navy fell and broke her
shoulder, and needed 50 pints for

transfusions, the Walking Blood
Bank has never once failed' to
come through in an emergency. In
fact, according to their records.

tney nave Deen a Die 10 suppiy ex

actly aouDie ine amount neeuea,

On every occasion.

Finally, because severju hospi hospitals
tals hospitals have recognized the need for
a permanent blood bank, the idea
was developed to set one up at
San Fernando, to service ail the
hospitals, particularly charity
cases. Dr. Antoine R a i m undo,
working with the clinic medical di director,
rector, director, Dr. Manuel Preciado de devised
vised devised a plan.
Last week the 31 Marines, each
donating one pint of blood were

guests at one cimic. ineir wiwu
will serve as the nucleus for a

permanent bank.
According to De Maria, the need
for donors seems to run in cycles.
Two montns ago, he says things
were slow. Then suddenly a spurt
of accidents and illnesses kept his
phones buzzing day and night.
(He can be reached at Rodman
3876 during office hours and. at
Panama 3-1506 at home.

n

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- A

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FINDING THE PROPER SPOT in patient's arm before Wood
can be taken from the donor is the first step.

ST.V-R,NG THE PRECIOl'S STt'FF. . Dr. Antoine Kalmundo shows a honpil! employe where
the Volunteers bJood will be kept temporarily. r ..,

Hrwilh ftnd solution to Sunday Crossword Tua Tua-kle
kle Tua-kle No. 8 J7v published today.
Amiwer for Knndy, Nev. 19, rryptoquipl .V3-'
FORTUNATE PROSPECTOR FAILS; FOULS I'P
USEFUL GEIGER COUNTEr

CLAlPn5PAlREnAD0Rr ISImT
CBE jf" A P I A L" A P E L f I TT
' A V E R A S 5 A S Sir N A f" El I C 0 N
MjE L I L I T EJ1 T rWrTO MB L AN D
;7'; c o d e; 4S e Iin)eTir t0c :
lLlll L N t" i bTe S.tlf
terr ejtJ ,all 'itIoTr Ht e s t e'r
T R r P I E 0 ST 1Y 0 U Rfe IE R; T A R E
LOT f. Aj 0 TjO V R V L EA N
EjfU UlE ; O EJN S E Rj tijl N DjW E 1ED
" V ,3 to sTe' c r r te fl f oto C
SjH A D I E S T RAT t N gMe I Ju
TOT; If J A P "'3 SIT I CTE" A Si E w
W U l W T C A w A MjE. L f "f R iQ C c j ;
A R 0 0Tb)E"A I pTjhXTa :J
PlMNTdr DJV E "Ad APT IE t S Sit -u
ii 1 Cj p i. t'v as t
SjTiEjA LjT N ij' B A R":PJE NT A G ION
'.tort; ST i Hu L A rlT N 6 wl A" V E
EjP I C iTALjU S' 'fAIPER- ALEE
MeSh,. .'. a CiAiTjE L eim.eIrW L j ya IrId

i.lL IVV.U

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 105G



TAre Blood Donors

' Marines have donated 180 pints
Since the walking blood bank first
started.
They have been called in to help
M variety of cases, ranging from
high society to the poorest cara cara-pesino.
pesino. cara-pesino. Once an urgent call for a hard-to-get
blood type, O-Negative was
received at 8 in the morning. The
doctor needed it for a baby about

to be born where the RU factor
was present. i
First sergeant of the" "Rodman
Marine Barracks, -M. Sgt. Don
O'Neill went to work immediately
and tested everyone he could get
his hands on. Even an Inspector
General of the Marine Corps who
was visiting was nabbed. Three
men were found who had this rare
type and were rushed to the hos hospital.
pital. hospital. The baby died, but the moth mother,
er, mother, -who was dangerously 111 and
considered a borderline case, was
saved because the blood was ad administered
ministered administered to her on time.
On. another occasion a pretty
14-year-old girl needed blood to
combat tuberculosis. She showed
all the symptoms of TB, but since
her father and mother were too
poor to test her, the case was
referred to the Marine outfit.
Two men who had her blood ty typed
ped typed picked up the girl and moth mother,
er, mother, took them to a Chorrera hos

pital where tubercular patients
are kept, and arranged to give
her two pints of fresh blood re required
quired required to give TB sufferers a fresh
start.
Five months later the girl, com completely
pletely completely cured, was released, but
not before she expressed her deep
gratitude for the help she receiv received.
ed. received.
A Panamanian who enlisted here

in the Marine Corps found out
that the program sometimes wor

ked in reverse, tpl. Jimmy Kos
sillo of Panama had often donat

ed to -the blood bank during his
tour of duty here. When be was

sent to the States on a routine

transfer, he recpived a letter that
.is mother was" very ill. Further
inquiries uncovered the details
that she was in a Chorrera Hos Hospital,
pital, Hospital, badly in need of blood. A
quick letter to his former colonel
in the Marines brought the need needed
ed needed results.
Jimmy soon received the good
news that the same outfit he had
once helped had gone to bat-for
him. "Don't worry," they wrote.
"Mom will be okay."
The establishment of the blood
bank at San Fernando will mean
the savings of countless lives from
now on, and the Mamie Corps
can take a bow for contributing so

unflinchingly to this cause.

r

7

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FIVE-TIME DONOR gets a glass of juice while chatting with
tr. Prcciado. Pfc. Thomas Vlado Augenfeld. a Yugoslav befora

he received his naturalization papers 14 months ago. has been
giving blood every two months, a total of five times this year.
"Too much" the doctor cautioned the Marine, and then asked
him to abstain from giving blood for the next three months.
) 'It makes me feel good," was Augenfeld's comment, v

Mtt w-wojyi wo ww

4

,7 )t$i

WATCHING THE
t Jls up is tl. to r

ritOGRESS while the pint-sized container
) Dr, Luis Alfaro, Dr. Manuel Preclado and
Dr. Antoine Raununclo. ......,

ri
M

HERE'S A CIGAR for yofff trouble... MSgt. Don O'Neill (center) profers a smoke to one
of the volunteers. A gay time was had by all,

"

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s I k
. if iS

AN EMERGENCY WHICH CAME UP while the Marines were fillinat up the blood bank,
brought immediate response. Here Dr. Alfaro and threepf the volunteers watch a transfusion
on a seriously -ill patient. ... '. ......

.... 'tf

V.-.. : ':' "
SOME BOYS GRAEBED a quick suooxe while waiting their turn In the downstairs lobby of
the clinic ... ,., .



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POE TS3 CORNER
A LULLABY FOR SMALL BOATS
AH Poems Are From' The New Yorker
O little boats of Westchester,'
Sleep safe from stem to stern,
Forgetting channel, stream, and tide
Until the spring's return.
Hauled high and dry, keels up, you lie
Concealed by canvas covers;
The sawhorse creaks your lullaby,
Bereft of friends and lovers.
...
O racers of reflected clouds
Across a sunken sky,
O skimmers of transparent shoals,
' Which others dare not try,
O ripplers of the moonlit lake
And rovers of the river, 4
1 Sleep now. and wake in time to'take
To April's open water. J y'
By Frances Hlgginson Savage.'
" : A CERTAIN AGE
All of a. sudden, bicycles are toys,
Not transportation. Bicycles are for boys
And seventh-graders, screaming when they talk.
A girl would rather
Take tows, go hungry, put on last year's frock,
Or dance with her own father
. Than. pedal down the block.
This side of childhood lies a narrow land, !,
It laws unwritten, altering out of hand,
But, more than-Sparta's, savagely severe.
Common or gentry,
The same taboos prevail. One learns, by ear.
The customs of the country
Or pays her forfeit here.
No bicycles. No outcast dungarees- :
, Over this season's round and scarless knees.
No soft departures from the veering norm.
But Jthe same bangle, -Marked
with a nickname, now from every arm -Identically
must dangle,
The speech be uniform
- Uniform as the baubles round the throat,
Th ill-made wish, the stiffened petticoat,
And beauty, blurred but burning in the face.
Now, scrubbed and scented,
They move together toward some meeting place.
Wearing a regimented, 1
Unutterable grace.
They travel rapt, each compass pointing south south-Keels
Keels south-Keels to the shoes and lipstick on the mouth.
By Phyllis McCinley.

7; LOW FIELDS AND LIGHT
I think it is in Virginia, that place
That lies across the ey of "toy mind now
iJe fray blade set to the moon's roundness
tike a plain of glass touching all there is.
The flat fields run out to the sea there.
r n and, no line. It Is autumn.
The bare lie is, dark between fences, run
Out to the idle gleam of the Hat water.
wi-?blrd halfway, en a stunted pbst! watching
n?- "f1? slides throuh thm asy as Weed, 1
Or wind, shues over them away out near the sky-
Because even a bird can remember '
The fields that were there before the slow
.!2d a :'h fl edRhlK uh raled
There and covered thrm, a little more each year.
My father never plowed there, nor my mother
Waited, and never knowingly I stood there, ..
Hearing the seepage stow as growth, nor knew
when, the taste of salt took over the ground. -
But you would think the fields were something
To so long I stare out, looking
KeUh L&es or ?ha.d?ws throuRh matted gleam, seeing
Neither what is nor what was, but the flat light light rising.' f
'. By W. S. lSerwia.

No Time tcTBe Indoors

Zfc&ZXJL
immmmmMB- ,. r ... -,

The Washington Merry -Go -Round

WASHINGTON His doctor's
'slow tawn" rnnrt (a fha firm.

trary, the GOP congressional
leaders who met with Pi-oiHint

Eisenhower this month agreed that

up never toosea oeuer or acted
fitter.

The GOP chiefs most nt hnm

had not seen the President face
to face since before his heart at attack
tack attack in Denver, ram in vaMno.

ton with their fingers crossed.

i ney were contused by the roseate
tatements of. Republican national
Chairman Lea Hall on th Presi

dent's health and the recent not-

so-roseate report by Gen. Howard
Snyder, his physician, that he
would have to alnw down SAma

fifiwed the delayed medical re-j

poti was an eaort to stall for
time in order to box out conser conservative
vative conservative GOP candidates from the
race, and those who caw ik th

ara'ua think so.

The question of whether he
would run again wasa't even dis discussed
cussed discussed but durin the- mttine

a legislative matters the Presi President
dent President showed fto visible signs of
fatigue, though he did follow gen

eral nyaer s advice by taking a

ap uring tne lunch interval.
Aa th enrrfiiiianal rhifa filoH

Into tiie cabinet room Congress

man isue Arenas o inunois re re-narked:
narked: re-narked: :

Ytt look nrettv toad b me

Mr. President."

"Well "I feel ftwul kesmeif

Eisenhower. "Just fine "Rut those

tradgeta y doctor has been put

ting ea ase recentiythey say

, accorttiflg to tiie ooctor. They
say I've got to take it easy, to
slow down, ia order to ore vent

fbtu'tte.

"Alavbe the fadirpta are r'..t

hut sometimes I don't believe

them. Actually. I've never felt
better in iy hfe."

KX. DULLES GOES TO EES

th Pan Anner'man TTnmn ati

a phone tall from the Stale De Department's
partment's Department's Office of Protocol dur during
ing during the visit cf Uruguayan Presi President
dent President BatUe ler-res to say that
Secretary of State Dulles would
not be able to attend the oUicial
reception given Berres by the or

ganization ot American Mates.

after 9 p.m.," explained Mrs. Lois

wimamr ot me btatc department

office which handles the dinner
invitations of the secretary.
"The Uruguayans will be very
much upset," replied Paul Murphy
Of the Pan American Union, "after
all, President Eisenhower won't be
able to be here."-
"Why are you having' the re retention
tention retention at. niohl inifteQri tit in tka

afternoonr' Mrs. Williams asked.
IIH 4L 1 f 11 1

i uwi me Brcreiary m siaie wouia
come with pleasure;"
, Murnhv cxnlained that this m aAa

the schedule much too crowded.

-re neid tiie reception for the
President of Guatemala between
five and evui ia the aftemAnn

he explained, "but the President

hhu to leave w we middle of the
reception, to dress for the State
dinner. And whea Justice Felix
Frankfurter and Justice and Mrs.
Burton arrived at a -to thew adri

rwhere is the receiving line?' only

iw iiuu ma i wc rresioent ot uuate uuate-mala
mala uuate-mala had. retired to dress for
dinner.' . y,
"The State Department, how however;,
ever;, however;, remained unmoved. Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Dulles did aot come to the
Pan American reception. Vice
President and Mrs. Nixon stood in
hae, however, graciously shaking
hands.
Oa ton -of this

Laird of the State Department's

pnotocol office phoned to say that
Secrelarv Dulle mnU i

lor lunch iven m honor of the

rresioent t Uruguay by the or organization
ganization organization of American States.
"Secretary Dulles will come for
20 minutes and deliver his speech

MB leave. Mrs. Dulles will
stay for 'lunch," Mrs. Laird re reported.
ported. reported. .
This was what hntinitil Tlu

secretary of state who had em emphasized
phasized emphasized before election that Lalin Lalin-Ameriean
Ameriean Lalin-Ameriean KM inns wnuLl ihm

taken for granted," read his speech
and departed.

MAIL&AG
James Tate, Killeen, Tex; "In
the earlv '50's. ncarbv Ft. llnwi

was deisgnated a permanent in-
Ktallnlion ThA

v. 1 1 1 a 1 1 ivpuiatiuii
launched into a building program
to meet the need. Thousands of
houses, $S million worth of schools,
additional businesses have been
buiit. Killeen has grown to a city
of 27.000. Of this number, possibly
ttv per cent are military or arc

connected with the government.
Like a bolt of lightning recently,
orders were given to move the
third corps headquarters and
first -armored division to inacti inactivated
vated inactivated Camp Polk, La. It is a well
known fact that Louisiana has no
terrain for armored training, that
Camp Polk does not have the
facilities to handle the 2,500 fam families
ilies families immediately affected. The
morale of the men and families
affected by this ill-advised order
has been seriously lowered."
Answer Lousiana's Gov. Robert
Kennon, a Republicrat, made a
deal with the Defense Department
to reopen Camp Polk in return
for permission to stage maneuvers
on 7,000,000 acres of Louisiana
countryside. Kennon carried m a
personal lobbying campaign with
Secretary of Defense Charlie Wil Wilson,
son, Wilson, first coming to Washington,
then inviting Wiiaon to Louisiana.
The governor entertained : him
royally and took him en a hunting
trip. Kennon also persuaded W risen
to give up the idea of operating
a Texas ranch and buy a -4,000-acre
Louisiana plantation instead.
In the end, the Army got its man maneuver
euver maneuver permits, Kennon got Camp
Polk reopened and it looks hae
2,500 families will have to move.
MILE HIGH DIAPERS
Congressman Wayne Hays (D.,
Ohio) brought back a lot of rem reminiscences
iniscences reminiscences from his recent tour
of Europe and Russia, but he's
been trying to keep the Most im important,
portant, important, keepsake of his trip out
of the newspapers. 1
The two-fisted Ohio legislator
also brought back something that
fiicuds think will have a tendency
to meilow him a bit an adopted
baby girl. Her name, is Martha
Biisitta Hays (after the Congres Congressman's
sman's Congressman's ue, Martha)- and she hi
18 months old.
Hays adopted the youBgster from
an orphanage in Western Ger Germany,
many, Germany, flew her back to the United

Stales with the help of airline
hostesses. There, was only one
mishap on the way.
"I am now a member of the
'mile .high club'," confesses the
scrappy Ohioan. "This is a very
exclusive club-which-1 deckled to
organize while I was changing a
diaper one night over. a mile in
the air above th eAtlantic."



fi n

Leber l!cv;s

Oy Victor
HEARD ON--THIS BEAT:
Soviet intelligence officers are
worried by .reappearance in New
York of movfb sequences Uiey
thought they bad destroyed so that
there would be no photographic; ev evidence
idence evidence that the Russians have been
re-writing history with theiri retroactive-lie
technique.
The film dips appear in. a 45 45-minute
minute 45-minute movie put together by
special teams of National Broad Broadcasting
casting Broadcasting Corp. experts who went
through 76 countries add picked up
the celluloid stuff right from under
the noses of communists in- fans
ian film labs and in almost forgot'
ten Czarist archives, for example
The clips have been woven into
a film called "Nightmare in Ked
a movie which proves that anti-
Communist pictures can be made,
dispassionately but excitingly.
What particularly disturbs the
Communists are hitherto unseen
shots of the famous 1936 Moscow
purge trials during which Stalin
wiped out the men who helped
him to power. The film "gives the
Russian Dronaeandists the willies
Kaaqiieb nrtira that tlljl Pnm.
munists did not overthrow the
Czar. ;
Democratic forces led by Alex
ander Kerensky. now living in New
York, forced the Czarist abdi
cation, and launched a free govern
meut which refused to abandon the
'Allie.-during --the war. The movie
also shows that Nicolai Lenin, the
bearded little father- of the revolu revolution,
tion, revolution, was sent into Russia by the
Kaiser and used German money
to kiil the democratic regime.. Len Lenin
in Lenin then made, peace with "The
Hun," just as Stalin did with Hitler
in later years.
The" TV industry, which some
years ago was under attack for us
ing loft-wing players, now de deserves
serves deserves public- credit for producing
and showing- the most effective
exposure of the system which
grinds down men's souls as well
as their bodies .
r v :'. 1.:.
Poor Harvey Matusow, the liar
for hire, lied about his lies in vain.
His attack on the government
boomeranged against the pro-Corn
mmunists who worked with him
when he assaulted the -Dept. of
Justice and the FBI. v -As
a result of Matusow's re
traction of testimony he gave as a
government witness against com communists
munists communists on trial, the Justice Dept.
went out again and ought -even
stronger evidence than it had com
piled. FBI men brought in witness
es who revealed undiscovered corixl
spiracies and "documents." Result
was that the Justice- Dept's case
against the pro-Communist Mine-,
Mill and Smelter Workers and the
United Electrical Workers- is
much stronger, and the Justice
Dept. was, able te, move more
quickly than it .had planned.
Comes Jan. 16 Walter Reuther
will know whether' his union will
be tried on charges of illegally
, using union funds to help Demo Demo-:
: Demo-: cratic V candidates in Michigan.
Federal Judge Frank Fickard will
rule then on -the Auto: Union's
.motion to throw-out the indictment
under the federal election laws.
If the judge does call for a trial,
the decision will have tremendous
impact .on future elections. It will
decide whether union officials,
who direct the expenditure of over
$500,000,000 in annual dues, can. use
unlimited amounts or not one
cent to back their favorite can candidates
didates candidates directly or indirectly. A
decision against the UAW would
really cripple labor in politics, if
enforeed. The unions coileet com

And Comment

Riese!
paratively little In voluntary pol
meat contributions .
It now appears that the first
coordinated drive of the new AFL-
CIO will be launched in three
months against the big department
stores of the nation. This was
decided 10 days ago at a high
command session of the Retail,
Wholesale and Department Store
union. Its chief. Max Greenberg,
has already consulted with and
won approval and money from
ueorge Meany and At L-tJiu or
ganizing director John Livingston
Nowhere else could this happen:
Harry Bridges' left-wing Long Longshoremen's
shoremen's Longshoremen's Union has just official
ly launched a campaign to dis discredit
credit discredit the FBI and to convince
union people not to talk to FBI
agents All this will be hand
led by a "Civil Rights Committee"
set up three weeks ago. One of
its specific duties is to tell mem members
bers members not to answer FBI men seek
ing evident of subversion .
There are still, five influential
unions in this country which spe
cifieally restrict membership to
"while men." A study of 194 ma major
jor major union constitutions by James
is am brick, Jr.- and ueorge- Haas
of the National Industrial Confer Conference
ence Conference Board reveals: -
The Brotherhood of Locomotive
Engineers says, "No person shall
become a member .of the B. of
L.E. unless he u a white man.'
The .Brotherhood of Railroad
Trainmen: -An applicant must be
". .a white male, sober and in
dustrious.
The Railway Conductors:.
any white man shall be eligible to
membership.
The AFL-CIO Postal Transport
Assn: "An applicant must be
of the Caucasian race or a native
American Indian. ."
Enough said
There'll be a tremendous job
boom in the construction field next
year which will skyrocket higher
than even 1955. The construction
union chiefs have been doing some
figuring and they come up with the
startling news that new construct
ion in 1956 will reach a record
breaking $44,000,000,000 (billion).
The jump will be in nonresiden
tial and public constructionBuild constructionBuilding
ing constructionBuilding of new homes will stay at the
current level.- This means contm
ued prosperity in the mass indus industries,
tries, industries, steel, machinery, trucking,
plprtrir al and allied fields.
While we all have been watching
the ftmpingar of Russia s roving
leaders m Asia, their agents nave
been refinanced and reorganized
for new iof illation of Central
America. Wateh especially for the
beginning of a new- Guatemalan Guatemalan-type
type Guatemalan-type crisis in Honduras. The Com Communists
munists Communists are unusually active there
-"especially in the unions. 7 his is
always the first step. ', Infiltrate
labor,-run. crippling strikes, then
take over the government. There
is also intense concentration of
Soviet agents inside Costa Rica
and Panama,; hear the. Big Ditch.
There was a- secret -meeting of
of the Communist Party high com
mand in New York recently. There
it. was decided that AFL-CIO pres president
ident president George Meany is their pub public
lic public enemy number one and is to
be smeared and kept under con constant
stant constant attack. They want to force
him te drop certain of bis advisers
who. are anti-Communist and to
harass him into ill-health if pos
sible. .-V "'

WASHINGTON (NEA Thei

Indies in politics bless em! are
always adding a new touch to
make this sordid profession re respectable.
spectable. respectable. The politics are sordid
that is not women.
The men politicians like to gather
in smoke-fiiied rooms or at $100-
a-plate dinners to show what big
shots they are. But the women
political volunteers carry their cru
sades, right .to the purer levels of
Motner, Home, fireside and .Pin
Money. .. '
The National Federation of Re
publican Women for' instance, is
now promoting a "'Quiet Evening
at Home campaign to raise funds
for the GOP. It was started by
Ruth Parks of Pueblo, a sister1 of
Colorado's Sen. Gordon Allott.
. Mrs. Parks is a member-at-large
of the NFRW Executive Commit Committee.
tee. Committee. But the movement she started
is now said to be spreading.
Under the Parks plan, women
party workers go around selling
tickets for this "Quiet Evening at
Home.";:' '.-. :
If buying a ticket to stay home
doesn't at first make sense to you,
it's just that you don't catch on
quickly ;
The spiel Is that whenever peo-
pie stay home, they save money.4
By not going out, they don t 6pend
it. So the pitch is made to the
family to stay home some evening.
Only instead of saving the
money, the folks are urged to give
it to the Got. i ;
Peoole who save as much as $10
by not going out and then give it
all to the Republican treasury get
special tickets showing that they're
"Relaxed P a tr o n s." Isn't that
cute? '

Walter Winchell In

HOLIDAY TINSEL
The following Christmas saga
co-stars Grace Kelly and Clark
Gable. The plot developed in Afri Africa
ca Africa during the filming of "Mogam-
bo." Her Grace piannea xo sur sur-nriaft
nriaft sur-nriaft Kim? Clark on Christmas
morning by knitting him a pair of
socks. A lauoame enterprise, -aa
Am thm holiday aDDroached,
firar realized she would be
unable to complete her knitting
chore. Since Macyfe lacks a branch
in Tanganyiki, GraW6uldn't pur purchase
chase purchase a gift. Consequently, she
swiped a pair of Clark's, socks,
"Each day," Grace has confessed,
r .4i1a enmethinff else from him.
I owm ..v ....
An rhriotma Eve L filled one ot
his own socks witn ius own uunp
and hung tnem up. n
eesture. but he liked it. Lam very
foiid .of Clark. . ; :
It wiU undoubtedly rock the ent entire
ire entire North Pole to .discover the
Jolly-One's skeleton-rattler. Santa
of course, : is derived from St.
Nicholas Europe's patron saint of
boys. There- is another shocking
fact, however. St.-Nicholas is also
the patron saint of money-lenders,
pirates and. thieves.
Perrv Como's easvcoin. sice-
guy quality stems from a joyous
childhood. As Perry has recalled:
"It as a happy borne. Lots ot
music and singmir. At Christmas
time, we used to lay out a table
that would reach from here te
Times Square. There was room for
thirteen kids and any relatives who
might drop m and there' was hot
food on that table, and somebody
eating it, right from- six o'clock
Christmas Eve througn until mw
night Christmas Night.' , ;
Street-corner Santas are employ
ed by the Volunteer of America, a
a non-profit service organiza organization.
tion. organization. They receive about $7-a-day
plus meals. In New York alone,
they collect $30,000 annually. Each
Santa is admonished to "attraet
attention without being conspic conspicuous."
uous." conspicuous." Which is a remarkable tri triumph
umph triumph of acting.
The traditional Dear Dear Santa
correspondence is consistently j
amusing. Here are two of the morei
chuckle worthy efforts: "Dear
Santa." wrole a little eirl. "I have
one sister and' my dog downstairs
and have you a sometime for the
cat. We need people for the Christ Christmas
mas Christmas tree. I can spell Constanti Constantinople."
nople." Constantinople." . V
The other missive, from a little
boy, was brief and candid: "Dear

n

The Republican ladies also have!
a Back to School movement, and
j and "Operation Coffee Cup
They're trick names for 4000 Re
publican neighborhood round tables
Mfs. Ab Hermann of Washington
is trying 10 organize inrouguuui
the country. The object is: "To
train women to be top-flight sales salesladies
ladies salesladies for the GOP,"
Not to be outsmarted by the
Republicans, the Democratic, wom women
en women have also thought up a couple
of nifties. '". t
One is the -"Read and Sew for
56 Club.". A .letter from Katie
Louchheim. director of women's
activities for the Democratic- Na National
tional National Committee, says she'll be
glad to send anyone lull instruc instructions
tions instructions pn how to start such a club.
A sample press release to feed
to the local papers is thrown in
for free. And for good meas
ure there's also a pattern for cut
ting out and sewing up toy
donkeys.
The idea, savs Mrs. Louchheim,
is to bring together people who
like to sew and make crafts. While
thev are sewing, a leader will
rpad soothine articles to them from
the "Democratic Digest." Then
thev discuss -'cm.
The donkeys are supposed to be
sold. The money, of course, goes
to the Democratic treasury. Neat,
ain't. it?. -:
The Democratic Ladies are also
sponsoring "Teas for TV," (The
difference between Republican
woman and a Democratic woman
is that Republicans favor "Opera
tion Coffee cup,-' we iemocrais,
Teas for TV. )
Anvwav. there's a theme song
for singing at the TVT. Words and
0
Santa: I am trying to be good until
rhrk-imoa PSr Please hurrv."
fireer. Carson has deftly portray'
ed noble ladies on the screen. To
compensate for her goody-gooay
roles, Greer once confided to Helen
Hayes that her secret ambi ambition
tion ambition was to play a Sinful Tmp-
tress. Whereupon, Helen gasped:
"The-wav neob'.e feel about you
it would be like Santa Clans taking
Off his beard before smalt cniiu
ren." v- -v; v'.'7'-.;:
At our educational gift, folks
we present the following: Filling
stork in p with cifts is a throw
back to the legend that St. Nick
once threw a purse down a cnim
ney and saved the virtue of two
girls (in the nick of time) whose
father (hisss! ) was planning to
sell them to the highest bidder.
Martin Luther originated Christ
mas tree decorations. Inspired by
the reflections of the moon and
stars on evergreens, Luther cut
one down and decorated it with
candles.
Christopher Morley's Christmas
card: "Just for a few hours on
Christmas Even and Christmas
Day the stupid harsh mechanism
of the world runs down and we
permit ourselves to live according
to wurammeled common sense.
the unconquerable efficiency of
good-will. We grant ourselves the
complete and selfish pleasure of
loving others better than ourselves..
How odd it seems; how unnaturally
happy we are!" :
The Klamath Falls Herald-News
(Oregon) celebrates Christmas by
publishing only happy news oh its
front-page. Stories of crime and
tragedy are buried on inside pages.
- The Druid priests of ancient
Britain cut branches of mistletoe
from their sacred, trees with a
golden knife. The mistletoe was
distributed as good luck charms.
Since that time, of course, it has
become a token of romance as well
as happy fortune. As someone once
quipped: "The reason for mistletoe
is. to please our elderly female
relatives."
Christmas was not always cele
brated on Dec. 25th. Centuries ago
the celebration took place on other
days of the year usually in the
Spring. Why are evergreen associ-
aifiA with f 'hriatfrnnc? T.r0nrl ha

i' that an evergreen in the house IIAZEN, N. D. (UP( M.iybe
destroys evil spirits and invites ittle Bo Peep didn t have it so
visits from fairies. The reason for, bad after all. Jacob Benz reported
the Xmas abbreviation: The Greek recently that 76 head of sheep had
letter "chi" is an "X." islrayed from his farm here.

music on request to Dem. Hq.,
1001 Conn. Ave., N.W., Washington,
D.C. Title: "There's Nothing like
a Democratic Dame." Purpose of
the Teas is to .raise money for
political broadcasts.
Most intriguing of all the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic women's activities, however,
are the scripts for one-act plays
to be put on before "Read and
Sew" or "TVT" clubs.
There's one called "How to Ring
a Doorbell." It shows Democratic
women workers how to canvass a
block for'votes. It has a companion
act, "How to Answer a Doorbell.
That one teaches Democratic
housewives how to heckle a Re Republican
publican Republican woman canvasser Who
comes a-calling.
The Pulitzer prizewinner for all
this political folk drama, however,
is one called "Fashions for f ifty ifty-Six."
Six." ifty-Six." It takes a cast of six, with a
Narrator to explain the action.
The climax comes when the Nar Narrator,
rator, Narrator, over at one side of the plat platform,
form, platform, says: "Our latest Model
Democrat I the Model Democrat
-as she sees herself-A crusad-
And out tomes guess who!
Eleanor Roosevelt? Margaret Tru
man Nancy K e f a u v e r? Mrs.
Averell Harriman? Governor Stev Stev-S
S Stev-S ex-wife? Mrs Woodrow
Wilson? Nope! None of these.
It's-this will slay you! It's Joan
of Are who strides forward from
the wings in shining armor, ine
stage directions say she na a
"Sword raised, eyes lifted to Heay-

en.
Curtain. frilrt,
Mew York
Wrdinfl Span's gift for Jbe
mind: The joy ot uinsi m
i a joy that war cannot kiu, ior
- is a joy of the soul and the soul
cannot die. .'oveny camioi
the joy of Christmas, for it is a
joy no earthly wealth can Ads.
Time cannot wither Christmas.Tor
it belongs to eternity. The world
cannot shatter it, for it is a union
with Him who has overcome the
world." ;; -; ;:-s ; v
The U.S. has nine towns namltd
Bethlehem-from Connecticut, to
Mississippi. Most of them hold
special observances. All the.Bcmv
lehem postmark.
Heywood Broun's Yuletide es essays
says essays were among his memorab e
neV8edA?.yWers. The yovmger
nodded. Then he was qumec
"Does Cod answer aU your pray pray-After
After pray-After a moment's thought,
expffi:f course n;
swers them one way or another.
The memoirs, of the Japanes
prime minister mc ude this C hnst
L, story: "One Christmas i seni
?toy donkey to Arthur MacArftur,
fte General's son. It was the kind
when you pinched it,
A shook its neaa
it tinea i .i.-.a later
and WT"FJyZ$
it lifted. itsiegS latc.
I went to tne riiuuwj .-. --
SkS by pinching hs legs a nd tail
every iay. So Arthur won t thaiik
y0S-but the general so haPPy-
iS? ..liJ'pte
wanfather opposite b.m.7-
That old man's face was -onr.
Jt the litUe bov'3. n. t hlte
hn-r will w one lr lr-Sr.'shat
Sr.'shat lr-Sr.'shat a thought to make
al love aw ,ls"1" -Xr
ifnoUorourfhjegualities.
at east for the trouh'fl and
SW which we all go through.'
LOST SHEEP

IbUNDA" JANUARY 1. tZ

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FROM V.P. TO SKY WATCHER John Nance Garner, forme
vice president of the United States, has become a" member of the
Air Force Ground Observers' Corps. He's shown above In bit
Uvalde, Tex., home listening as MSgt Jack P. Russell explains
the Job. Russell Is stationed at the Sao Antonio Air Defense
Filter center.

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. ADDED ATTRACTION Bringing new sights to the Eternal City I.
" are these twin sight-seers In Rome, Italy. Dressed In Eskimo (
- clothes, Britte. left, and Kersti Stable attracted much attention j
as they visited the old city as guests' of a trans-Polar' airline

eiLLIONS Of U.S. DOLLARS

o

TRADE
AMONG
1 FREE
WORLD
COUNTRIES

"1 siNO-sovirr
, ILOC TRADE i
WITH FREE WORLD

$110.2

$41.2
ri oh

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FASTERN
EUROPE $1.5
MAINLAND
CHINA $1.0

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EASTERN
EUROPE $1.9
MAINLAND
CHINA $1.0'

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5 1 t$3M

U S S R. $10
EASTERN

EUROPE $2 0

MAINLAND
CHINA $07

I Sharp
noise
8 Extra
10 Venerate
1! Mer Merganser
ganser Merganser J9 Part
of ear
20 Spanish
building
material
21 Part
: of coat
22 South
American
monkey
23 Allege
24 Slay
26 Sacred t
picture
M n

- I mineral ...

29 Definite
article
30- Father
land
32 Body

of law

! 33-Fish-

net

35 Streamlet
38 Place of
- worship
39 Ascer
tain
41 Stak
4.7 Haras!

47 Ring on
1 .., harness
49 Entire
amount
50 Hill.
pointed)
Bl--Canopy

overbed

1938 1 943 july 1954-june195S
HOW TRADg WITH REDS SHRINKS -Chart above, from
Dept. of Commerce data, shows how the Communist nations' share
.of the free world's trade has shrunk since 1938. Although the
dollar amount of trade with Reds has remained about the same, it
is only 2.3 per cent of the total whereas in 1938 it was 7.2 per cent.
During this period, trade among the free world's countries rose
from 41.2 billion dollars' In 1938 to 158 3 billion In 1955. "Eastern
Europe" in chart refers to satellite countries Albania, Bulgaria,
Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Romania. East Germany is In Included
cluded Included only in the 1948 and 1954-55 figures.

62 Skip
63 Goddess
of dawn
55" More
. youthful
58 Vetch
59 Abra ;
; ham's
nephew
60 Medium
of enter-
'.-'' tainment
62 Ferret
out
63 Home
: of lark
65 Stannum
O Musical
'. exercise
68 Thicker-'..
70 Twining
plant
72 Frisk
74 Conceal
76 Cafe Cafe-'
' Cafe-' paw
77 Darkest
80 Grade
82 Existence
85 Child.
88 Faucet
87 Pose for
portrait
88 Refrain
90 And not
81 Downfall
JI3 Burnt
ugar
98 Away ,.
97 Wax
98 Excite
100 Mountain
pasture
land

101 New
Zealand
food
. fish
103 Marine
fish
105 Piebald
horse
106 Color
107 Lessen
109 City in
Prussia
110 Swarm --
of
' bees
112 Prepared
way
114 Great
116 Theft
i 120 Except
121-Plane ;
figure
of Ave
" angles
and five
. sides
125- Civil
- : wrongr
126 Specify
lnsf
129 Billow
130 Poem
131 Ankle
132 Narrow
: gradually
133 On shel sheltered
tered sheltered aide
134 Net
135 Winged.
136 Hard
mineral
137 Enclo-
. sure

1 Bivalve
' mollusk
2 Fondness
3 Son of
Adam ;
4 Plant
part
5 Sedate
6 Medium
DaVincI
invented
7 Part of
church 1
.8 Long
t narrow
inlet
9 Situated
toward
east
10 Strange
11 Son of
Jacob
12 Brilliant.
colored
fish
13 Sharp
reply
14 Oleoresin
15 Quietest
16 Isinglass
17 dEnglish
college
18 Coll
25 Part
of leg
28 Erudition
31 River In
1 Germany
33 Salt
34- Hard)
wood
36 Mining
refuse
37 Dormouse

' 38 Com-
. minution
40 Most
'- facile
' 42 Work unit
44 Grand- -ness
45 Un-
. earthly
46-Drift
48 Kind
of rose '
60 Tower :.
51 River In
England
. 54 Strange
66 Run
- 57 Biblical
Judge
60 Pardon
61 Single
unit
64-Unburnt
brick
l Die for
drain pipe
69 Be nig niggardly
gardly niggardly
70-Use
71 Grief V
73 Concord
75 Convul-
. sive ,.
twitching
, 7?-Blade of
grass,,
' leaf .7"
7i Mo)iam
, medan
. nymph
9 Town in
Belgium
81-Pikelike
sl .

. 83 European 1
' language I
-84 Verdant J
87 Tapioca
. I'ke
- food
- 89 Scatter
92 Small
, bird -64
Beam
95 Free .
87 Ship. -
wrecked
99 Ground
402 Pos.
, .- sessedl :
104 Repose
106 Of the
teeth
107 Of
grand-
parents Nt
103 Equalizer
for
, vehicle
111 Prospect
113 Maltreat ..
115 Incensed 'K,
116 Check
117 European,
sharlf
118 Sister;
of .....
: Ares ..
m-Rlver,,,.-,
. M i
, .Arion .i
121 Bird
note
122 Festive
123 Beyond
124 Want .-
127 Lay
128 Cap

CE1TPTOQUIP

MHWTPRMH E RT BFYCBTORY P W XZD C;' W V M D O tf It7
M C T W M D UTZUTF QYMHRT T.
Arrij tln f olntio: SJ Mi-alefDlitribUttd bf Kinf Futures SyndicU

For The Best lnvfdtoS;& Features

Z::z:mnr?. :ZS'f:--i:yy
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SUNDAY,- JANUARY- l'l'XG

r



e

R

I he
evievj
ee
SPORTS
WORLD-WIDE

W

Or

TO LOOK BACK ON 1955. .point a finger and say
"That was the high spot in sports"... is difficult.
Turf fans, can recall "Swaps" beating "Nashua" In the
Kentucky Derby or the thrilling match race between
these top three-year-olds at Chicago. Those who fol follow
low follow boxing could vote for the September title match
In which Heavyweight' Champion Rocky Marciano
gave Archie Moore such a brutal beating or Ray Robin Robinson's
son's Robinson's upset K.O: of Bobo Olson. But for sheer, overall
drama" let's recall a chilly afternoon of October 4th.
The shadows were growing deeper in the Yankee;
Stadium outfield, but the crowd of some 62,000 Ignor Ignored
ed Ignored the nip in the air, Down on the field stood a slend-i
er, blond southpaw, his spikes nervously kicking that
dirt around the mound.
The big scoreboard in centerf ield read Brooklyn
2, New York nothing as the Yankees came to bat for
the last time In the World Series. Lefty Johnny Podres
peered down at the Yankee batter, husky Bill Skowron,
and nodded at the signal flashed by catcher Roy
Campanella.
Skowron took a savage swing but got only a piece
of the ball. It bounced back to Podres. For a moment
Dodger fans held their breath as the ball stuck in the
webbmg of Podres' glove, but he finally threw to first
for the out. -'-
Bob Cerv, the next batter, lifted a high fly which
Bandy Amoros squeezed in short left center. The Yan Yankees
kees Yankees were down to their last out. Up stepped Elston
Howard,-the rookie long ball threat. Podres went to
his change-upsand the1 best Howard could do was a
grounder to shortstop Pee Wee Reese. -.
For a fraction of a second it seemed the Yankees
might still be alive as Reese nervously juggled the ball.'
Then Pee Wee recovered and threw to first base for
the final out. The Brooklyn Dodgers had won their
first world championship.
There were tears in Peewee's eyes as the Dodgers
pounded and slapped each other excitedly. Five
times' captain Reese had led the Dodgers against
the Yankees in the World Series in 1941, '47, '49,
'52 and 'S3. And five times Reese had to be con content
tent content playing the role of a gracious loser.
The Dodger victory climaxed what otherwise was
an average baseball season. Brooklyn opened the
campaign with 10 straight wins-and took 22 of the
first 24 games. That reduced the National League race
to a battle for second place. .'''
T There was a little more interest In the American
league. It was a four team race until the final month.
Then the Yankees killed vtt the Boston Red Sox. the
Chicago White Sox Jaded and Cleveland went into a
nose-dive.
The New York Giants were the "flop" of the 1955
Season. The World ChamDions went in In the rnmnnlB'n

with a "stand pat" policy, hoping for another "little
miracle." It never happened, and the third place
Giants finished 18 and one-half games off the pace.
. Leo Durocher quit baseball and went Into broadcast broadcasting.
ing. broadcasting. .-:' i.-i
As for the Individual hteh SDots. there was Sam

Jones of the Chicago Cubs pitching the lone no-hitter
of the season. Ernie Banks, also of the Cubs, set a
major leaeue record for shortstops by hitting 44 home
runs. Al Kaline of Detroit won the American League
v batting title-although only .:iwo years out of high
school. And, perhaps above all, there was the return
r f Ted Williams who played a tremendous role in Bos-
ton's pennant surge despite a steel pin in his shoulder.
Many familiar faces were missing when the season
nded. Ralph Kiner of Cleveland retired. Vic Raschl
nd Ed Lopat, onetime backbones of former great Yan Yankee
kee Yankee teams, drifted to other teams and received uncon unconditional
ditional unconditional releases. Infielder BWv Cox retired and Vern
Stephens quit the Chicago White Sox. Sid Gordon was
drooned bv the Giants.
The Baseball Writer Association voted Dauy
, Vance, Ted Lyons. Joe DiMaeiclo and Gabby Hart Hart-nett
nett Hart-nett into the Hall of Fame. Ray Schalk and Home
Run Baker made H; to Cooperstown, New York, on
a special ballot.': v "'-'v, ,"
Looking ahead to 1956, Brooklyn again looms as the
team to beat. Cincinnati, long famed for its murderers
row, came up with improved pitching this year and
mv be the chief threat to the Dodgers.
In. the American League, a recent trade has other
. managers fearing the Red Sox. The maulers of Mike
: Higgins. United Press manager of the year, obtained a
top flight pitcher in-Bob Porterfield and a' solid hit hitter
ter hitter in Mickey Vernon from Washington. So, look for
several trades during the winter as the other contend contenders
ers contenders try to strengthen their garrisons. ;
The 1956 season may be the last time around for
, many veterans provided they aren't dropped before
the first ball is thrown. Shortstop Phil Rizzuto of the
Yankees-is showing his" 37 years. Jackie Robinson of
Brooklyn may hang up, spikes especially if the
Dodgers ask him to take a big pay cut. George Kell
f Chicago-is only 33, but thr third baseman has a
. chronic sore back. There aren't too many wins left in
that once powerful right arm of Bob Feller, either.-
. The sport of kings had two high spots In 1955
' both involving the same two horses.
, The first was at Louisville on May Seventh with
Nashua the stickout favorite in the Kentucky Derby.
Two-minutes, one and four-fifth seconds after the
tate popped Open, Nashua had suffered his third de-
' Jnstead' lt was Swaps who won the glitter gallop
with Nashua never able to stick his nose out front.
, The second high spot came on August 31st at Wash Washington
ington Washington Park in a $100,000 winner-take-all match race
: between Nashua and. Swaps. It alsrt was a return duel
tetTieen jockies Eddie' Arcaro on Nashua and WiJlie
.Shoemaker on Swaps. -
It was strictly no contest. Arcaro kont Nashua
n the inside as Swaps veered ont slishlly at the
; start. ''Heady Eddie" had "Kashna out front by one
.length at the half-mile post, anil stayed there go-
,i. the stretch.
' SUNDAY. JANUARY 1. 1956 1 "''

Heading down heartbreak highway, there was the
never to be forgotten sight of Nashua steadily open opening
ing opening the gap two lengths, three lengths and more
At the wire, lt was Nashua by six and one-half
lengths and looking like he could run all afternoon.
Before Nashua was given a well earned rest In No--vember
he suffered one tjther toss in the SysonDy
at Belmont Park, a feature for. older horses'. Even so,

tha Belalr buuet imisnea two yeais ui iauuB "'
wins, three seconds and one third in 20 starts. Nashua,
now waiting for the winter campaign in Florida, has
earned $945,415 second among the all-time money
winners. "Citation": is first with $1,085,760. But even
more impressive Nashua trails by only $140,000 after
just 20 races. It took Citation 45 starts to reach his
figure.: : "-..
Aside from the Kentucky Derby loss, the three-year-old
story was all Nashua. The colt owned by the late
William Woodward, Junior, went on to win the Preak Preak-ness,
ness, Preak-ness, the Belmont and the Arlington Classic among
others. To cap off the sensational season, Nashua was
voted "horse or the year" and this month became rac racing's
ing's racing's first $1,000,000 buv when turfman Leslie Combs II
paid $1,251,000 at a sealed bid auction for the big bay
WiELUty. ' ".'.'.'. V
As for 1956, there are four standouts for three-year,
', Old: honors;. :::: r. '' ..-v..-;.
"Prince John" put in ftbid for the role of Kentucky
Derby favorite by winning the" $282,000 Garden State
Stakes. "Needles" looked Impressive, winning the Sap Sapling
ling Sapling Stakes. "Nail" must be considered off wins In the-
pimlico and Belmont Futurities. Then there Is "Pollys
Jet," winner of the Saratoga Special and the Stallion
Stakes. v .: s ;...
Sugar Ray Robinson wrote boxing's top story of
1955. The Harlem hotshot disproved the time worn
adage of "they never come back" by returning to
stardom after a two year retirement with a smashing
upset two-round knockout over middleweight cham champion
pion champion Bobo Olson to wear the 160-pound crown for the
third time in his brilliant career.
The former welterweight king first won the ml0
dlewelght title by stopping Jake LaMotta. He lost the
championship to England's Randy Turpin In London
on a unanimous decision but stopped Turpin at Yan-
kee Stadium less than 90 days later to recuperate the
crown. Sugar Ray then quit the ring to become a song
and dance man.
A depleted pocket book and a rising income tax debt
to Uncle Sam forced the Sugar Man to make ,a come comeback.
back. comeback. Robinson lost a bout to tough Tiger Jones but
since then reeled off six straight impressive victories
to earn a shot at Olson. Despite Robinson's two pre previous
vious previous wins over the Hawaiian-Portuguese-Swede, Bobo
was a heavy 4-1 favorite to whip Sugar Ray.
But Ray was a replica ol the Sugar Ray of ten years
ago as he punched, slashed and battered Olson into
.helplessness in 2:51 of the second round of their
scheduled 15-rounder at the covered Chicago Stadium
before 12,466 cheering fans. ; v
The triumph makes Robinson the first former

champion to regain his title a iter a oonaiiae re-
tirement. Despite reaping the year's biggest head headlines
lines headlines in boxing, Sugar Ray was rated only the
runnerui) to Carmen Basillo as "flghter-of-the-year."
However, there was to donbt that Robin-
.son was the "eomebaek-of-the-year.rt
If nothing else, boxing in 1955 proved one thing
there isn't a heavyweight around eapable of carrying
the gloves of heavyweight champion Rocky Marciano.
The Brockton Blockbuster took Don Cockell apart
last spring in one defense, then hammered Archie
Moore into submission in September. Now the pick pickings
ings pickings lookjslim for Marciano. The joke along the box boxing
ing boxing beat is why hold the proposed round of elimina eliminations
tions eliminations to dig up a challenger? One tongue-in-cheek
reply says Marciano could take on Bob Baker, Moore,
Nino.Valdes and other challengers all on the-same
night. J" '' r;':'' '. ::. :-'." 'v'""V;V
Only three divisions crowned new champions in 1955.
Wallace "Bud" Smith took the lightweight title from
Jimmv Carter, then defended it against the ex-champ.

Tony De Marco beat Johnny Saxton for the welter-,
w eight title and, 70 days later, lost to Carmen Basllio.
De Marco tried to regain the title but again was stop stopped
ped stopped in the 12th round. Sugar Ray is the third ?'new"
champion. :
As for other divisions. Marciano remains king of
the heavies, Moore tops the light heavyweight divi division,
sion, division, and Sandy Saddler still, holds the featherweight
-.crown.1 ''r'v : .";...., .v" ;.
The windup of the 1955 collegiate football season
saW the Sooners of Oklahoma standing head and
shoulders over the crowd. Oklahoma, with 29 straight
wins, headed a list of 21 schools finishing the season
unbeaten and untied. Maryland is the only other ma major
jor major school on that list and something must give on
January 2nd at Miami. That's when Oklahoma and
Maryland buttheads In the Orange Bowl In what shapes
up as the top game, of the holiday weekend.
T Michigan State goes Mainst UCLA in the Rose
- Bowl- at Pasadena, California, Georgia Teth a- -gainst
Pittsburgh In the Sngar Bowl, at New Or Orleans,
leans, Orleans, Texas Christian against Mississippi -in the
, Cotton Bowl at Dallas and Vanderbilt and Auburn
in the 'Gator Bowl at Jacksonville.
. As for conference ennmpions, Princeton was tops in
the Ivy League,' West Virginia in the Southern Con Conference,
ference, Conference, Mississlnni In the Southern and Ohio State in'
the Big 10. .Oklahoma won the Big seven,' Texas
Christian the Southwest, Idaho State the Rocky
Mountain, the Colorado Mgies the Skyline. UCLA the
Pacific Coast and Texas Tech the Border Conference.
Doug Ford won "golfer f the year" honors off his
victorv in the PGA. Carv Mjddlecoff won the Masters,
Jack' Fleck the National Open, Tarvie Ward the Na-

ZONIANS BEGAN ENJOYING the long New ear
weekend despite the fact that the duty-tree liquor
promised four months ago was still not available to
them. "'" ....
Some folks have already given un hope of getting
the cheaper liquor, and have adopted an attitude of
Indifference to the question which has plagued others.
A few employes have tried personally to probe into
the situation which thorugh the months has become
more muddled than ever. ...
U.S. Embassy negotiators claimed they were sur surprised
prised surprised when Panama's President Ricardo Arias issued
a decree authorizing the sale of low-duty liquor to
those Zonians eligible who could produce the free free-entry
entry free-entry permit. However, the permits, which must be is issued
sued issued by Canal Zone authorities, ha'ite never been re released.
leased. released. K
Both wholesalers and retailers stand ready to sell to ;
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Zonian, but the one vital form of
identification which will prove the eligibility of the
purchaser is still missing. Clubs in the Canal Zone
have been receiving the duty-free liquor, but none has
as yet been sold to Individuals.
The entire matter has been turned over to the State
Department in Washington for a decision. It was re referred
ferred referred the department by Embassy officials here, and
word as to the disposition of the matter was expected
"momentarily." '. v'-?;;:'. -:;v-:-.' :.
A former manager of aCrlst6bal shipping agency
will spend the next six years in the Gamboa peniten penitentiary
tiary penitentiary for embezzling a total of $21,500 from the Wil Wil-ford
ford Wil-ford & McKav Co. ....
Richard R. Wilson was located by the FBI in Chica Chicago
go Chicago and brought back to the Canal Zone early in De December
cember December to stand trial on two counts of embe zzlement.
The 42-year-old American was found guilty on both
counts this week in the Cristobal. Division of the U.S.
District court arid sentenced to a six year term.
The $27,000,000 suit of 12 steamship companies filed
against the Panama Canal Company took one step
forward when government attorneys asked for a dls dls-missali
missali dls-missali and Federal Judge Lawrence E. Walsh of New
York reserved decision on the motion.
The government held it was an Indispensable party
to the suit since the Company is a government organ-
ization and has "sovereign Immunity".
The court also ordered both sides to present addi additional
tional additional briefs' within 10 days.
A youthful' Colombian inmate of Gamboa made his
third unsuccessful flight to freedom, He is Rafael
Santos, who on Christmas Day managed to escape
from, the penitentiary where- he is serving a six-year
term for burglary. He and aompanion, Jose Echever Echever-ria
ria Echever-ria were recaptured by Canal Zone police 27 hours
alter their escape.
The Panama government was all ready to begin
collecting taxes as of today from Panamanians and
other non-U.S. citizens who work on the Canal Zone
but reside in Panama territory. :
However, president Ricardo Arias revealed at his
year end press conference that the extent Of Canal
Zone cooperation expectable in collection Of taxes was
being soiiRht through -dinlomatic channels
President Arias said that the bet way would be for
Canal Zone agencies to deduct the taxes from the
salaries of their employes, but he no idea what the
results of the negotiations would 'be.-
The citizens committee which had collected a re-
ward fund of about $50,000 for information leading to
the assassin of the late President Jose A. Rem6n, an announced
nounced announced it was returning to the contributors that part
of the fund not affected by legal claims.
"At the same time the rnmmit.tafl pvnr,aj .,.rnri..

over Mayor Miguel A. Ordonez' decision to distribute
$1480 turned over to him by contributors to the win winners
ners winners of the reward posted by the government.
The Mayor said he had the permission of all con contributors
tributors contributors of the $1480, with one exception, to distrl
bute the money.
Panamanians were excited over the prospect of
finding hidden treasure in Old Panama when four
- men started digging in an underground trench earlier
this week hopping to uncover a mysterious iron door.
- After two davs Of (herein? and nnnnvArlnir nnt.h-

ing the excavation was called off. Dr. Alejandro
Mendez Pereira, director of the Panama Museum said
he felt, after examining the underground passageway
that it probably was a secret tunnel used centuries ago
for the defense of the city, ;
The Possibility of disooverinc hidden treasure, how
ever, dimmed considerably. -The museum director's
opinion was supported by two visiting archaeloglsti
Cleveland Morpsan, of the Museum of Art in Montreal,
. Canada, and John Wise of the Museum of Art of New
York. Y, ;
The entrance to the tunnel was discovered near the
intersection of the new and old hifhw'ay connoting
Old Panama with Sap Francisco tie la Caleta Haprr
tional Amateur and Joe Conrad the British Amateur.
In tennis;. Tony Trabert took both the Wimbledon
and US .singles titles, then turned pro. But the Aus Australians
tralians Australians handed the United States a five-nothing
shutout to take the Davis Curt back down under.
" Along with the cheers, 1955 also had more than it?
share of sorrow as several figures in snorts took .the
long count. Racing driver Bill Vukovlch was killed in
a soill during the Indianapolis 500, Death also rlaim rlaim-ed
ed rlaim-ed Harrv Ag;anls, Cy Young, Clark Griffith Ad Wol Wol-gast,
gast, Wol-gast, Dan Morgan "and William Woodward, Junior, to
hame a few. ;'
As for 1956, it should be a standout year with the
Winter Olympics in Italy next January and February
and the summer games at Australia In November and
December.
There will be new thrills new faces new cham champions.
pions. champions. It's all part of what makes the world of sport
such a wonderful place to live in.

SurJat Altitun Staler::;!

PAGE SEVEN



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Grubby Mourners Fill Gypsy's Coffin
With Money, Clothes, Shaving Lotion

- TEXAEKANA, Tex., Dec. 31
(UP) Three hundred gypsies
from 20 states burried a clasman
today in a coffin which undertak undertakers
ers undertakers said was filled with money.
Not only was there money in inside
side inside the coffin, but tht mourners
also threw money on top of the
cofim for five or six minutes aft after
er after it was lowered into a grave in
SecredHeart Cementery. -'
The body in the coffin was that
of Miller Groffo, 43, of Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, Fla., who died of a heart at attack
tack attack while passing through Tex Tex-arkana
arkana Tex-arkana Wednesday, with his fam family.
ily. family. Relatives and clansmen were
summoned to the funeral and 300
cf them arrived from points .as
far away as New York, Califor California
nia California and Florida. :
Though nearly all had big cars,
they didn't spend any money on
-They camped in an around the
- nr,n.!ii home, sleeping on grass
and the carpets and bringing in
sandwiches, foodu and A r inks
which they ate where they tfpet
Understakers, who couldn't move
them out. said they filled the
Ex-Cagcr First Man
To Enter Corps
PHILADELPHIA; Dec. 1 UP)
Sheldon Saffren. 23, a former
hleh school and college -basket-
ball star, became the first man
to enter the Army Medical Spe Specialists
cialists Specialists Corps today.,
The unit, formerly known as
the Women's Medical Specialists
Corps, was composed entirely Of
women 'until today.
Saffren, who captained the
basketball team' at West Ches Chester
ter Chester Pa. State Teachers College,
was piven his gold bars as a sec second
ond second lieutenant at the University
of PennsylvaniaHis wife, Irene,
v?s anions me witnrsses.
saffren, a physical therapist,
will leave Sunday for duty at
Ft. Sam Houston in Texas.

t!.e yesterdays.
space in the coffin that wasn't oc
cupied by the body ," with paper
money and coins. --
The idea was to pay Groffo's
passage to the hereafter. i
They also buried with him ex extra
tra extra clothes,-a hat, a bottle of
shavmg lotion and a razor.
Meny of the mourners were un unshaven
shaven unshaven and dirty.
The reason, said white haired
M. J. Frank of Cleveland, leader
of the Brazilian gypsy tribe, was
that clan members can't by cus custom
tom custom change clothes, wash, Shave
or do anything to improve their
appearance alter getting a oeatn
message.
At the gravseide, the moaning,
screaming .gypsies broke out cas cases
es cases of soft drinks.
Thev drank some and poured
the rest on top of the coffin, as
symbolic toasting of death.
Iniia Prc!2sl Seen On
VM f-inl WWiii vll
NEW DELHI, India, Dec. 31
(UP) Informed sources said to today
day today that while a United States re re-olv
olv re-olv is "rather evasive" India prob
ably will not lodge a formal pro protest
test protest over the recent U.S. Portu Portuguese
guese Portuguese statement referring to Goa
The U.S. note sent this week re
plied to a request from the govern
ment of Premier Jawaharlal Neh
ru. for "clarification" of the state
ment issued Dec. 2 by U.S. Sec
retarv of State John Foster Dulles
and Portuguese foreign, minister
Paulo Cunha.
Contents of the U.S. reply have
not been made public. However, it
was understood it made pointed
reference to the anti western re
marks by Soviet Premier Nikolai
Bulganin and Communist P a rty
Chief, Nikita S. Khrushchev during
their visit to India.
It was understood that the note
pointed out that the statements on
Goa by the Soviet leaders increas increased
ed increased tension and sought to foment
haired between Last and West.
Political sources here said that
while the American note foil short
" of the requnst for "clarification
i India probably will not make
j formal protest to Washington,
'least at tlus?ie.

j..:;'c

"Let tJie people

T)) 1 ; 0
1 V J U v- iJiJ Li u
. try 5 :

A-Engine Test
Is Scheduled
At Idaho Falls
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 (UP)
A close relative ol the world's
first atomic engine for airplanes
is about to undergo exhaustive
tests in the lava badlands of
Southeastern Idaho.
It is an earthbound prototype
of the nuclear propulsion plant
which maj, in the next two or
three years, drive a mammotn
plane into the air for the first
flight powered by splitting
atorps.
The prototype was built by the
General Electric Co. at Evan-
dale, Ohio. It consists of a com compact
pact compact atomic reactor harnessed to
an engine perhaps a turboprop
or pure jet capable of gener
ating tremendous amounts of
nower.
Keitner u.k. nor tne Atomic
Energy Commission would say
anything about the prototype.
Informed sources sa4d, however,
that it .already has undergone
stationary non-atomic tests at
Evandale to make certain all the
moving parts pumps, turbine,
compressors and the like fill
the bill. :
Teta of' Hie whole works, In,
eluding 'Che atomic heat rspr rspr-ator,
ator, rspr-ator, will be carried out at the
AEC's national reactor test sta station
tion station near Idaho Falls. These
tests presumably will last for
many mdnths, as in the case of
the experimental land-based en engine
gine engine which was the prototype of
the power plant installed in the
submarine Nautilus.
US Forces
In 'Good Portion'
In Fcr East- Thomas'
MANILA, Dec. 31 (UP)
United States Naval forces "are
in a good position" here to car carry
ry carry out mutual defense commit commitments
ments commitments made with .the Philip Philippines,
pines, Philippines, U.S. Navy Secretary
Charles S. Thomas said today.
Thomas, who leaves here for
Honolulu and the United States
after a four-week tuorof Naval
installations in the Pacific and
Far East appeared to be impress'
ed with what he had seen.
"Our forces in the Pacific are
strong forces able to carry out
any assignment tnat mignt be
given them," Thomas said.
AsKea ir ne naa noticed any
after-effects- of the "spirit of
Geneva" in the countries Vie vis
ited he said, "I don't feel they
are relaxed. I don't think there
Is any lethargy."
He mentioned briefly his visit
here to the Naval base and air
station at Subic Bay and ad
joining Cubi point; saying,' "It is
one of the most modern bases
have seen in the world." :
Margarita VardQn
Croup To Confer
The Civil Defense Warden Serv
ice meeting for Margarita will be
held at 9 a. m. Wednesday at t h e
service center ineater.
All members of the Warden
Service are urged to attend as W.
G. Dolan, Chief, Civil Defense will
discuss the forthcoming National
Civil Defense tost exercise tenta
lively scheduled for June.
The motion picture "Disaster On
Main Street will be shown 1 and
all residents of Margarita are in
vited to attend.

lhc:s the truth and the.ceuntry is safe Abraham Lincoln,

Alaska, Europe Suffering

n Winter Snow, Flood Grip

ANCHORAGE, Alaska. Dec. 31
, (UP) Snowbound Alaskans
were digging out from the heav heaviest
iest heaviest early winter snowfall in his history
tory history today but officials agreed
"the worst Is over."
'However, the big Job of re removing
moving removing the snow siill is ahead,"
said George Shannon, Anchor
age city manager. "It will prob probably
ably probably take us several days to get
the Job done."
M. R. Ehrock of the territorial
employment service here said
the "help-wanted" sign was out
for men willing-' to shovel snow.
There were 25 applicants but
more than a 100 more men were
needed.
The snow fell steadily for more
Reyi37. Osird ItOs
Ri In Ch:rg2S
r? 'f r "f t
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 (UP)--
An Army board of review today
uphold the conviction or M-5gt,
William H. Olson of Youngsville,
Pa., on charges of collaborating
with the Communists while-a pri prisoner
soner prisoner of war in Korea.
Olson, a veteran of 20 years of
military service, was convicted by
court-martial at Ft. Bragg, N.C.,
on March 3.
He Was found guilty of aiding
the enemy by making speeches
praising the Communist treatment
of prisoners and by writing pro-
Communist and an-American ar
ticles for POW camp publication.
The three-man bo.ara on review
upheld the convictiin andl approv
ed the sentence of a nisnonoraDie
disrharee and imprisonment at
hard labor for two years.
Olson still niay appeal the con
viction to the Court of Military Ap
U if h sn desires.
His lawyers had argued before
the board of review that speeches
nH articles did not come within
the definition of the provision of
the Uniform Code pi Military Jus Justice
tice Justice stating that any person who
aids, or attempts to aia, uie enemy
with rms. ammunition, supplies,
monev or other thing" wiu De sud-
iwt to court-martial.
The board, wun one memDer ais
senting, ruled that propaganda con
stitutes a "thing" under tne pro
vision of the military codo.
Olson, who was also a prisoner
of the Germans m World War u,
is married and has two ctinaren,
. ... ;
The Lord Givqth. .
OAK CITY, N.C., Dec. 31 (UP)
Mrs. W. B. Cannon Jr. gave
birth to a boy today Just three
hours after her 3-year-old son
Allen ran in front of a car and
was killed.
L

i ; - (NEA Radio-Telephoto)
REDS DEMONSTRATE AT MEETING Formr French Premier Pierre Mendcs-France (leftl
points an accusing finder at Jacques Duclos (extreme right), French Communist boss, as the
"two meet to debate Issues in the upcoming Parliamentary elections, The meeting in Paris
turned into a heckling session with Red demonstrators drowning out Mendes'-words as he
tried to speak. Both leaders spoke on different Issues, and no real debate developed.

wiis-

than 60 hours from here south
to Yakutat and the mayors of
both Anchorage and Cordova de de-clared
clared de-clared emergencies at the height
of the storm. However, skies- be
gan to clear and yesterday aft
ernoon was one of blue sKies.
Hundreds of : standard cars
still remained on streets and
highways and taxlcab drivers
were doing a landslide business
with traffic at a virtual stand standstill.
still. standstill.
However, the storm which pa
ralyzed the territory's largest
city failed to slow down Ancnor-
age"s first woman resident, Nel Nellie
lie Nellie Brown.' '.-., ; '..
She snowshoed into town from
here home on a hill three miles
away yesterday, i
"I used to cornel in to town
this way back In the old. days
and I'm still not too old to snow,
shoe in again," she said.
Meanwhile. Europe's tempera
tures took a new year drop to
day, freezing roads and railway
tracks -and increasing the threat
of Alpine avalanches.
After several davs or a nost-
ChriStmas warm spell tempera
tures across the continent dip
ped towards" the levels they
reached In the early part of this
month. And gale whipped eoa-str
al area and drove shipping into
the nearest port.
Thirteen roads In western
England were affected by floods
alon? the river Eve. The Thames
overflowed at Eseral Point- in
London's western suburbs and
snow fell on Dartmoor.
In France a 70-mile-an-hour
gale breached the east wall at
Barf leur, flooding 150 homes.
Police evacuated 750 inhabitants
to higher ground and rescue
workers tolled through the night
to repair tne breach.
tSizxIlnq Election
B2HI0 In France
As fenp-p Close
PARIS, Dec. 31 CUP) One pf
Fierre Mendes" France s Chief
lieutenants won a wee-hours bat
tle with Poujadists today as the
French election campaign took on
an eleventh hour bustle. ,:
Former interior minister Fran
cois Mitterand, frequent target
during the three week campaign
for the insults and rotten vegeta vegetables
bles vegetables hurled by followers of right right-winger
winger right-winger Pierre Poujade, got his
own back at a meeting in his
home constituency of Nevers.
And politicians of all shades of
political opinion s t u m p e d the
country in a last effort to ship up
support for their policies.
The three principle figures of
the campaign Mendes France,
his one time colleague Premier
Edgar Faure and anti-tax crusad crusader
er crusader Poujade, all addressed meet meetings
ings meetings last night. Then they jumped
into speeding cars and roared off
for further meetings today which
will wind up the campaign.

. f .... X f I .! X 1

Dulles A:r::3
Willi 7c;) n:J:
Happy f Icy Year'
WASHINGTON, Dec 31
ttdi spcretarv of State John
Foster Dulles-today Joined Sovi?t
Premier Nikolai Bulganin in
voicing, hope for wona peace mi
1956.
But Dulles declined com comment
ment comment on Bulganin's warning
that H-bomb warfare Is possi possible
ble possible even though et and west
possess weapons of mass de destruction.
struction. destruction.
Reporters read Dulles high highlights
lights highlights of Bulganin's Interview
with Telenews, a US. television
otrencv. lust before the secretary
tnnit off from Washington Na
tional Airport for New York
where he was scheduled to ad address
dress address a group of civic organiza organizations
tions organizations Monday afternoon. -,,
Dulles listened in stony si silence
lence silence to Bulganin's reference
to "those circles which would
like to unleash war, using
weapons of mass annihila annihilation."
tion." annihilation." Dulles also seemed unmoved
by Bulganin's new call for "un "unconditional
conditional "unconditional banning of atomic
and thermo-nuclear, weapons"
and establishment of effective
international controls: t v
Dulles said, I wouldn't want
to comment without ; careful
study." :
He had asked a reporter de
tails about the Bulganin state
ment, : indicating this was the
first he had heard. of it. '-.
A reporter then pointed out
ed hope for peace in the New
ed hope for peace in theNew
Year.
"We can join him in that,"
Dulles said with a smile. "I'm
glad he said something we
can agree with.".
Other American officials said
privately they saw "nothing
new" at first glance in the Bul
ganin interview. They said it
sounded like a rehash of long
standing Soviet policies.
Defense Wardens
Schedule Meeting
The Civil Defense Warden Serv Service
ice Service meeting for rainbow City will
be held at 6130 p.m. Wednesday,
at tne school study hall in Ram
bow City.
AH members of, the Warden
Sn ervice are urged to attend as W
G. Dolan, Chief, Civil Defense will
discuss the forthcoming National
Civil Defense test exercise tenta
tively scheduled for June.
The motion picture "Disaster on
Main Street" will be shown and
all residents of Rainbow City and
Camp Bierd are invited to attend,
!

Mmis
tt
3
ma
L3

V
AS

MOSCOW, Dec. 31 (UP) Soviet Premier Nikolai
Bulganin warned today that the possibility of thernor
nuclear war between East and West was not exekdd by
the fact that both sides now possess hydrogen bombs.
- The Soviet premier, in a question and answer intsr intsr-view
view intsr-view with the American Telenews television company, ex expressed
pressed expressed the hope for peace in the New Year but. warned

of the future:

"It is wrong to assert that inasmuch as east and
west possess hydrogen weapons the possibility of a thermo thermonuclear
nuclear thermonuclear war is automatically .excluded."

"Assertions of this kind," the
Soviet premier said, "can in
fact dull the vigilance of peo peoples
ples peoples who support the elimina elimination
tion elimination of the threat of an atomic
war.. -. 'i
"Of' r""!"," be added, "the
fact that undiT pip cnt condi conditions
tions conditions atomic and hydrogen
weapons cannot be used without
impunity has some deterrent ef-
lect on inose circles wincn
would like to unleash war, using
weapons of mass annihilation."
But the only way to .prevent
a thermo-nuclear war, Bulga Bulganin
nin Bulganin aJd, was the "uncondi "unconditional
tional "unconditional banning of atomic and
thermo-nuclear weapos, the
establishment of effective in international
ternational international control and the
implementation of the related
decisions on this question."
Bulganin was replying to
questions submitted by mall Jast
month bv Charles E. Shutt,
Washington manager of the
American "Telenews television
company. ..
The answers were broadcast
by Moscow radio today and cop copies
ies copies distributed to all ; foreign
correspondents here.
Cyprus, Eriiish
May Be Forlkonifeg
NICOSIA. Cyprus, Dec. 1
(UP) Cyprlot sources predicted
today that a new meeting be between
tween between Governor Sir John Hard
ing and Archbishop Makarios
would be held following the
archbishop's statement that he
"personally" feels the dispute
with Britain is solved.
Confusion followed the Na
tionalist leaders' statement last
night. Some Cyprlots celebrated
it as an Indication that the bat battle
tle battle between Nationalists and
British troops was over.
otners predicted that the Eo Eo-ka
ka Eo-ka terrorist organization would
step up its anti-British attacks.
There was no official confir confirmation
mation confirmation of the report that Mak Makarios
arios Makarios and Hardirtg would meet
for further talks. Thejr last
round of meetings broke down
soon after the tough field mar marshal
shal marshal was appointed governor
earlier this year.
Gaza Sfrip FiSiifing
Cldnis Arab 'jfelBfcr
JERUSALEM, IsraWlJec. 31
(UP) An Israeli patrol and E E-gyptlans
gyptlans E-gyptlans entrenched in a post in
the bloody Gaza strip fought a two two-hour
hour two-hour mortar and cannon battle
yesterday, an Israeli military
spokesman said.
Mai, Dan -Gov said the Israeli
force suffered no casualties in the
exchange. He said the Egyptian
position opened fire first with ri
fles and then with mortars and
tanks guns on the Israeli patrol
near Kisufim.
An Egyptian spokesman said
(hat the Israeli patrol attacked the
Egyptian position twice, tie said
that two Palestine Arabs who
were passing the position were
wounded in the first attack. A Pa Palestine
lestine Palestine Arab tilling his land was
killed in the second, the spokes spokesman
man spokesman said. ' ..

.r'-v-.

: v..'7 t r."

P
The Soviet premier's reference
to thermo-nuclear war was In
answer to Shutt's question as to.,
whether the fact that both ea.i
and west have "this terrible
weapon" excluded the "h- rn' 'e
possibility -of a hydro- i y.-sr."
- Bulganin said" tnat tne atair uy
deadlock "is not at all the f'ti'-t
of the existence of nauar
weapons.
"The fact that go far no solu solution
tion solution of the question of banning
atmolc and thermo nuclear
weapons has been reached is due"
to the "unwillingness of some
powers to set about banning
atomic and nuclear weapons."
He d'd not identify the "un "un-willing"
willing" "un-willing" powers but the Soviet
Union has long maintained
that the United States Is frt frt-idering
idering frt-idering the abolition of nuckj.r
weapons by not agreeing"-1
the Russian formula, ?
The West, in turn, has termed
as "unrealistic" the Russian
plan -..of first outlawing such
weapons on a word of honor
system and then carrying out
inspection.-
Terror, Pressor o :
Slowed Rekibs
Says IXMP CI;::!
NEW YoU. Dec. 31 (UP).
Roy Wilkins, executive secretary
of tho National Association for tha
Adavancement of Colored Peoj Je.
said today ','the bad overshadow
ed the good in race relations ia
1955.."...'-'
In a year-end statement, Wil Wilkins
kins Wilkins listed the following develop developments:
ments: developments: The bad:
"The revival of lynch terror in
Mississippi, the development cf ec economic
onomic economic pressures as instruments
of intimidation, the open defiance
of the United States Supreme
Court decision banning pu'Jic
school segregation, and the er-pa-rent
impotency of the federal
government to provide protect io
for American citizens at ho ne.'
The good: '..-
"The steps taken toward school
desegregation in nine of the 17
states which had required seere seere-eation.
eation. seere-eation. Supreme Court decir,iims
banning segregation in public re-
creauonai lacmuea, i"c
thi interstate Commerce Comsi
sion against Jim Crow travel, ;
the steady increase in meniV
ship in the NAACP."
Panama Extends
Vehicle Licensing
Panama traffie authoritic-s
day extended for 10 davs
time for re-registration of
cles in Panama. p
Tomorrow was the rr
deadline for new lice. ; ;



Km J i
L1-' i
L.
1
o o"
A0V7S TV KASO
UW by
Erskint Johnson
I.

' in

! U r i ui r'

Stage & Screen Predictions ?956
FILM FORECAST: MORE PICTURES, NEW FACES

HOLLYWOOD (XEA Bofard replaced him but Genn. it's

hind the Screen: You got' a haveisaid, wants to collect the salary

nere miles and miles o" nerve

io wear sequtnea amner jacKeis
and white sheared beaereoats.

ut Tiberace isn't the first Hollv-

that would have come to him if
he 'had played the part.

Jean Simmon looks t

woodsman to step into, the clothes- music?! comedy cutit t'mct her
iro many tpltndortd thing i click in ''Guy$ and Doll." She'll

spotlight. chirp, dance and show her gam
The late Tom Mix wore white! with Cyd Charts and LeU Caron

cowboy suits and drove around' m MGM' "Le Girl

movie town in a white convertible

("A;... I.
- ,; t
H ;
.

EDITOR'S NOTE: Darrjl Zanuck; author of the follow following
ing following dispatch forecasting the coming year in the motion pic picture
ture picture world, began his movie career in advertising and then
n writing for Warner Bros. He is now executive producer in
harge of production for 20th Century-Fox.-
' By DARRYL ZAMTK
. HOLLYWOOD-(NEA) Al of Hollywood Is looking for forward
ward forward to 1S;G as an eventful year a year of destiny. i
There ijave been a, number of Important developments
during 1905. At 'ZQth century-Fox our faith In the, incoming
year Is based oa and bolstered by our knowledge that the long
and costly experiments in the field of 55-millimeter have en enabled
abled enabled us at last to bring Cinemascope to the point of perfec perfection,
tion, perfection, ;-. .-;

r

r

NEW FACES for the movies:
Joan Collins is. one of them.

, For the studios, however, there
can be no marking tune, because
the J release schedules must be
met? mtctures must be made. -All
of lollywood has embarked on a
program for the development
of new star personalities.

During 195$ "our ncompany will
release the first two ''.'pictures pro pro-puced
puced pro-puced in &5-miUinw:l-r Cinema Cinema-Scope
Scope Cinema-Scope "Carotisei" t 'ind' "The
King and I." In the "coming year
we think this process will prove
itself the generally accepted tech technique
nique technique of photography for the pro

ducing industry oi tne wnoie wuuu,

Other problem, of lourse. face
the entire -industry .as it starts the
Ne Year. The 'qufettoa ot finding
rrt tn nonulate Our nictures re

mains as always; only currentlytWynter, Virginia Lcith

the problem is further complicat complicated:
ed: complicated: in addition -to the income tax
situation the big name stars today
are being tempted by the pro prospects
spects prospects of owning, their own, picture-making
companies, vv.
For most; this ; prospect must
end in disillusionment for tile ulti ultimate
mate ultimate test of a good picture is the
quality of the story, and there
aren't enough, good stories to go
around. The year 1356 may be
a significant one In educating star
personalities to the pitfalls of
self-production. t ; -. ''

4
t t

.... '.
:Sbme Other Hollywood Views
Dore Senary, executive vice president, MGM: j
About the TV industry: "They're in the same boat mov movies
ies movies wm in 20 years Rgo turning out too much because tney...
havHS)U' much time .to fill and not enough tnaterial.
you .wind up with time-consuming mediocrity, J
Samuel Goldwyn: ...
"The public comes out nowadays only for good pictures.;
They can stay home. and see' bad pictures." s
Don Hartman, production executive, Paramount:
"Unless the motion picture industry finds some new
faces, and soon, it is doomed, Many top stars have set terms) terms)-almost
almost terms)-almost impossible to meet and I can't understand how they
suddenly decided they al.o know all the ramifications ot
writing; direct .ins .and producing, .. ?
Motion i.lctures will eontr ur to improve and they will
be bigger and better during .1958. Each picture will com compete
pete compete on its own.. No longer, can producers or studios mimic

eacn ouicr. ui- Mcuiac .,,

Many young artists have been
successfully launched. To name
only a few comparative newcom newcomers,
ers, newcomers, who seem destined to secure
stardom I think Sheree North.

Joan Collins, Richard Egan, Dana

wynier, Virginia Lcith, Jeff Rich

ards, Irene Papas, Jarma Lewis
Steve Forrest and Tiana Ele And

there are Natalie Wood, Dennis

Hooper, Jock Mahoney, Mara Cor Cor-day,
day, Cor-day, Jody Lawrence, Carol Oh Oh-mart,
mart, Oh-mart, Brian Keith, Kim Novak,
Jack Lemmon and Liliane Monte-

vecchi,

There are many other .young .youngsters
sters .youngsters who are being projected
toward the front throughout the
industry fresh talent being given
the -'break" that should, in virtu virtually
ally virtually every instance, assure the

player a major' permanence- near

tne top, of the Hollywood scene.

And this is a reciprocal isort of

situation, ine motion jutcture fan.

tha real movie-goer, demands
"new faces." Hollywood is moving
to satisfy that demad and will
step up the tempo during 1955.
All major producing companies

have formed a concrete policy fori

increasing the number of releases
in the coming year.
All producing outfits recognize
that there is a shortage of product
generally, We acknowledge our
duty to relieve the distress which
this shortage can .-cause the .exhi .exhibition
bition .exhibition end. of the industry..

L L

with the horns of a steer mounted
on the radiator cap.' Onetime Hol

lywood Great Francis X. Bushman
; wasn't .far behind either of them

in the showman.wip- department.

, A silent matinee idol, Bush Bushman
man Bushman wore mink neckties, drove
a purple car and kept 125 Great
Danes around the house. And in in-j
j in-j stead of autographed photos he
sent his fan silver teaspoon en engraved
graved engraved With his profile. ;
: Humphrey ; Bogert is putting a
,succulent "Nuts" label; on major
studios', warning that stars with
(their own film companies can't

find enough good stories to go
around and that the majors can
outbid, individual companies for
top literary- material. -i
Says Bogie: .- ..,1.,;
M 'African -.Queen' made the
rounds of Uie. major: sfudios and
nobody wanted to buy it, Burt Lan Lancaster's
caster's Lancaster's "doihg all right making
his own movies and so are Frank
Sinatra, Alan Ladd and John
Wayne. You kturw something? The
majors just don't want us rattling
around loose making deals where

George Jessel is reported to be
mighty unhappy over .the chill giv given
en given him : by British rincsiders at
the'' Savoy Hotel cabaret in Lon-

Mlon..vThe.'. spot, has been a Jinx

I'for comedians for years.

They love Room Raymond s can candor
dor candor out at U-L Every other ac actress
tress actress after the 'second feminine
lead with Audie Murphy in "The
Charles. Russell Story" made it
a point to read up on the life of
the western artist and to gab know know-inclv
inclv know-inclv about Russell.
-.When Robin' time eme up at
the catting desk, she shrugged
her shoulder and said: "Charle
Rut sell? Never heard of the guy."

NEW MEN In Hollywood's out outlook
look outlook include Richard" Egan,

dominant in story .''vehicles'.",' The we want tnem- But thcy asked ior
t l :. i . i. . r i . .rif whan t li iwt 1 if AirAmtna rf n n

lcdsuu iur mis is uiui ior me uasi v.-"'w -,w &u

Another continuing problem for
all studios is the: story situation,

For 1956, and for seasons to ful

low, we
tury-Fox

two years tne have sounht to "cor

ner" the literary market,, both as
to published works and s t a $ e
plays. ....
In addition to "Carousel" and

i'The King and I, our important

stage properties include such hits
as "Bus Stop," "Anastasia," "Can
Can," and "Roomful of Roses,' to
name a few.
But the competition has been

intense. At MGM the outstanding

piays to oe made into motion pic

tures include "The Swan," "Cat

m 'a Hot,.Tin Roof," and- -"Tea

house ,of the August Moon." Parar
mount anticipates a great year

with "The Chalk Garden," "The
Rainmaker' and "That Certain

Feeling." Columbia is coming out

with the screen version of'Tic of'Tic-nic."
nic." of'Tic-nic." Virtually, every best-selling book
of recent years has been 'pur 'purchased
chased 'purchased for production, i Tkcre lias
been no stinginess1 of efforror cost
in' Hollywood's determination to
acquire the best and the most im impressive
pressive impressive literary works for trans translation
lation translation on the sound stages.

.' 1

fEWafBobtnTopsAhyS

I r
4

These factors singly, a n.d of
themselves, are j important In
combination we fee that they .are
bound, to give Hollywood a for forward
ward forward impetus which .will make
1956 a red-letter year in motion

believe the t 20th Cen- picture prosperty and accomplish accomplish-company
company accomplish-company will be pre- ment. v-. v

easonDespiieTV

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.

EDITOR'S NOTE: Richard Mancy, author of the 1956
Broadway outlook dispatch below, makes his living as a press
agent representing legitimate Broadway' shows. He does
pretty good at it, too some of the leading' playwrights likq I
Lillian Hcllman will hire no one else. But he i.s also a bril-j t
liantly witty writer in his own right, and one. of the foremost ;
historians of the current theatre. s
" -.; - ;...'..;''(,
1 ; ' By RICHARD MANEY
- 1 NEW YORK (NEA) The Cassandras who chronically
croak that the legitimate theatre is on its last legs, that its
audiences have been captured by radio, television and othetf V
mechanical intruders, that it is only a question of tlma until j
it joins the dodo and the whooping crane In the museum, wera
dismayed on reading Variety's summing up of the lirst six
months of the 1955-56 theatrical season.

Variety, as everyone in the available in New York. Theatre

trarift knows, is the Bible. Baede

J ker, l and almanac of stage folk.
i Its weekly reports on stage and
screen activities, on box office
grosses, on the comings and go go-i
i go-i ings of divas, tap dancers, actors
and Marilyn Monroe, have the
i status of Holy Writ for those who
4 ;make their living in the amuse-
. .ment world.
' i For. the 26 weeks ending Nov.
2fi. says Variety, "the legit box
J office in"New York hit the high high-'
' high-' est total in nine years." What's
; 'more, continued the theatre's
house organ, the gross box office
-business for plays and musicais
Vtv tour, topped the total for any

-season in the last eight years over

the same 26-wecK penoa.-r--.
" It i s axiomatic in the theatre
"that seven of every eight stage
I, production which open in New
York are fated for failure. Yet
ef the 24 new attractions present present-.
. present-. d on Broadway this season but
sovnn proved unworthy.
,, reversal of form is easily

r., '-inr.fi At the season's start

r-tinns or more were

i a
ami

owners thus could be .very choosy

when approached by the man managements
agements managements of stage attractions
seeking shelter, the unworthy

were abandoned or delayed.

The sharing contracts under
which attraction and theatre op-

crate discourage shoestring spec

ulators. Fly-by-night impresarios,

with few exceptions, chuck in the
towel on learning that their
product can be tossed out on jits
ear if the gross box office trade

for a one-set

reach $14,000,

comedy fails jtw

Twenty-five years ago there

were 70 theatres in New York,

and operating costs of both the
atre and attraction were scandal
ously low, by present day stand standards.
ards. standards. Anyone with enthusiasm,

$10,000 and a three-act charade

could eet a hearing on Broadway

Today only the solvent and 'the

popular survive. VI the 17 piays
and seven musicals available in

New York in mid-Dcccmbor, only

one in each category was in fiscal

straits. And the week cite d

vet there I commonly is one of the most

but M legitimate thcalrps pcstdentiai of the year since it !s

in that dread pre-holiday period
when box office grosses usually
shrink bke woo) socks in the
wash.
What's brought about tliis up-1
turn? To this observer it is the

quality of the fare offered in the
theatre this season, the appall appalling
ing appalling lack of merit and quality in
the- plays offered on TV and
radio.

It' my flues that TV has a
suicide complex.' Manacled by
the clock, trying to put two-hour
plays and two-hour motion pictures
into one-hour playing time with
frequent interruptions for com commercials,
mercials, commercials, they have so emasculat

ed andvorrupted even the best of
plays and pictures as to forever
alienate those who rejoiced in

the original.

It takes something akin to

genius to ruin such great t)icturefs

as "Odd Man Out," "The Fallen

Idol" and The Lavendar Hill
Mob," but the vidiots succeeded.
Thanks to the incisions and de

letions necessary because of the

time limit, pictures and plavs no

come almost unintelligible, when

reflected on TV, s mirrors. j
KThi unexpected help from the
common enemy, i.e. TV, ha

proven a boon both to stage and
screen. TV it driving people
back to the theatre in drove. No
one ha vet been harassed by a

" commercial jn a legitimate their
re.n6 one Vet has dared inter'

rupt Hamlet' soliloquy to ad-

vane the miracle properties
of shaving oap, cigarette, or 1e
odorant.

The theatre turviveiflhe stereo stereoscope,'
scope,' stereoscope,' the magic lantern, the, si silent
lent silent movjes' the talking movies,
scrabble and radio, as it will sur survive
vive survive the brash upstart, TV.
The i mechanical noise-maker

has yet to be invented -'that can

in any fashion replace the magic
of thestage at its best. Enjoying

Us most prosperous season in a
decade, the theatre once again

can boast that in. New York it

offers to people f taste and dis

crimination the most stimulating
crttertaurment i available in the
land. ... t
There is still another reason

why the theatre should be proud, i
It is the only amusement- institu-i
tion in the land free of blacklists,.'
sponsor censorship, industry 'r-ta..:
boos, and timidity. Not one of,
its competitors can make such a!
boast. I

couple of years ago. It was a short

sighted move,"
I can't recall Jane Russell ever
being sued, but the word's out that
Leo Genn will take legal action
against Jane, Bob Waterfield and
their Russfield company. Leo re refused
fused refused to do a role in "Run For the
Sun'' for the Watertields on the
claim that the part was changed
from the original 'script he had
been shown. Britisher Trevor How-

This is Hollywood;. Mrs. Jones:
Gary Cooper confesses about a
couphj of "serious' mistakes" he's
made despite his long-time suc success.
cess. success. He had a chance to play
the Rhctt Butler role in "Gone
With the -Wind," with a percent percentage
age percentage of the film's profits, but de decided
cided decided it wasn't for him. "And the
other one," he winced to me,
"wag when I bought 2000 acres of
land in the middle of Palm Springs
in 1932 for $18 an acre. I let most
of it go because I was worried
that,' I couldn't pay. for it." I

SELF-CAUGHT

BISMARCK. N.D. f UP) Po-

fliceman Ray Bossert takes his job

seriously. He was one of tne nrst

to drive throueh a. red light when

a new semaphore was installed at
.downtown intersection. Bossert

wrote himself a tag and paid
$5 fine.

X-

i:

v,

'It

t

r

ELECTRIFIED LEARNING-An electrical board is, adding in interest
terest interest and simplicity to arithmetic lessons,-in., .Mrs. La Kayne
i SuMifs'setond-niHile class in 'Chicago,, 111,; Mrs. -Stumpf. watches
''bovi.asBarba'ra 'Albrecht and Garth Freeman test their, brain
power on the board, on which arithmetic problems ad answers
appear in jumbled' sequence. Light on top flashes when the stu student
dent student applies one end of a 'finder" two radio jackplugs attached
by a long wire, to the problem and the other end to the correct
answer, Mrs. Stumpf's husband, -a "high school industrial arts
instructor, helped her design and construct the1 board, and other

visual aids to learning that she 'uses.' v ''.

cUannn Philip,
; ips l:f i fined with onilset.
1-K'crn svps nd rugs he uses
, ,M leaf 2 H home like new.
T .-ds 1 't th rifht rlue)

.THEATRE'S FIHSTXADT'on marquee of theatre named for her

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

'New Orleans Service

if

-,Arriyei.
'Cristobal

Great White Fleet

S.S. "MARNA" .......
S.S. "SIXAOLA"

S.S. "AGGERSBORG" . '. ';'.'. .... ... ..'..;., .
s.s. "yaqi'e" :..
' s.s. "afnos" . : '.;.'..; ;...':..:,.,,
'.'"S.S. "SANTO CERRO"..... '.'.'.:',,
S.S. "MARNA" ... "'..'. :.

S.S. "SIXAOLA" . ..... .... i . .'. Jan. 29
S.S. 'YAQI'E" Feb. 5
S.S. "MORA7.AN" Feb. 12
S.S. "FIADORKNOT1'' .'.'. ..... .'" .'.':. .'. . Feb. 11
' Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo

..Jan. 2
..Jan. X
..Jan. IS
...Tart. 15
.-.Jan. n
! .Jan. 2
. .Ian. t

New York Service

Arrives
'i "Cristobal

S.S. "JUNIOR"' Jan.
S.S. "IIF.REDIA" ................... ..Jan.
S.S. "PARISMINA" ".Jan.
S.S. "OTTA" .............. .Jan.
S.S. 'TRA BIRLANGA" 1... Jan.
S.S. "LIIMON" i .' ,,.' ;,'. . ... . ,'.'. . .Jan.
S.S. "CHOI.UTECA . Feb!
S.S. "ESPARTA" Feb.

2
9
16
2fl
23
30
.5
6

Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, Nev Orleans, l.oOnseles, San Francisco
;-'"-"i' Vv"'". t and Seattle- :',. ';':
Special round trip fares from Cristobal to New
York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattlev
To New York .................. ....5240.00
' To Los Angeles and San Francisco .... $270.00
To Seattle ................... .. i'.$3S5.00

TELEPHONES:

CR'STOSAL 2121

PANAMA 2-2304

SCRUFFY SURVIVORS of the year 1955, 1 just would wouldn't
n't wouldn't dare tell yotf 1955 will be any better than what you've
been through because you're. .still. all too punchy to un understand,
derstand, understand, anyhow. . .... ', ... '. :, ;
Just so happens I was diligently, doing ray philosophy
lessons in Rolando's Hideaway th? pther day ,(phil 'em
up again), when it occurred to be that it waS not in ac accord
cord accord with the unselfish spirit oi. the season that -I should
go round making New Year Resolutions for myself..-'
What the season really calls for is that I should make
New Year Resolutions for. other people." '.
Then these other people could get on enjoying .the
New Year in a normally reprehensible fashion.
j Trying to" observe', their IWm- home-made" abstemious
resolutions, niany ari hpnest ale man5 a,t this time of year
feelstlike a' curate in a cutie show as the suds surge around
him. .-f ..:y-'.'. ; .,-;.;. -.
Under the plan herein to be practiced, no man need
feel any hesitation about breaking "any resolution JL make
for him, because I hare never. felt any. such hesitation
whatsoever regarding my own resolutions. v
-. This in. itself should do a whole lot to make 1956
more cheerful.
Herewith, then, gift-wrapped and guaranteed to dis dissolve
solve dissolve at the touch of a shot glass, some New-Year's Reso Resolutions
lutions Resolutions for 1956.-.The names are. printed in large type as
an aid to the stricken, on this morning after! ..":.'
GOV, JOHN S. SEYBOLD: "Next time 1 go railroad railroading
ing railroading I must remember not to hit an opn Congressional
switch."
MAJ. GEN. LIONEL C". McGARR: "I must take les lessons
sons lessons on how to build a better speed trap."
REP. JAMES TUMULTY (D-N.J.y: -"Each time I see
myself in the mirror-1 shall, think' a friehdly thought for
the folks at the narrow waist of the Americas..", .,'
f v-r 5'...,4.;5 .,.,;,:..",,''.;;.., v, '..' :
RED, THE RICKSHAW WALLAH: "I shall not ask
persons over 70 nor pregnant women to join the rest of
my passengers In pushing the cab up Central1 Avenue."
NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV;"I shall keep my big mouth
Shut." """, 1 'I V i '.-.

JOHN FOSTER DULLES: "That guy 'Khrushchev's
got something there. "V ',',','
D WIGHT EISENHOWER: "I shall remember that no
real friend would want Me to risk my life in another term,
and I will thus -evaluate the. sincerity of those 'Who-'urge
me to run atta.VA k .rhuf'C. tUJ,
. RICHARD NIXON: "I-must feed my ."dog" Checkers
regularly, in case election year TV tearjerking is again
necessary."
GEN. WILLIAM K. HARRISON, JR.; "I must remind
my men that the-;-Armcd Forces TV station is to bea
morale and-trainirig. 'kid, and thaj: anyesemblane to
popular entertainment is' 'pucely.cpJricidental.V.'', :'
CZ GI's: "We must not laugh at" thVgereVal's.f re reminder."
minder." reminder." v ......
JOE IONIAN; "IhalJ not hold-my breath .waiting
for the iLyfl'ats to getjjae a dunk: d! la'-tluty Jvipr."
J0e1ANAMENO: "I shall not hold my breath wait waiting
ing waiting ior the opening' of the new bridge 'across the Canal
at Balboa."
MARILYN MONROE: T sliall not -holdmy breath."
ADLXl 'feTEVENSON: "I shall continue in .1956, as. I
have in the past, to credit the J:itiz6ns of the United States
with being intelligent people, well-equipped to appreciate
and enjoy a high level of thought and language. I shall
on no occasion join those who insult, the voters bjr talking
in simpleton terms and .thoughts," .i r. lf
JOE MCCARTHY: -''I 'Shall' demand: a'.ohsi'cssional
investigation' Into' the1 insidtous effects-'Of --McCarthy in
government." '' ',. ',' ".'. ',
- WILLIAM A. NEWMAN: "I shall resist all temptation"
to issue a free pass to every tenths vessel' to. transit the
Canal." T
ROLANDQ: "I Just love parties.' t f : :
PORFIRIORUBIROSAl:l,,Iiust"lpVe.',K' !i'"-
CREDE CALHOUNi "I shall continue .Utfda'uhtcd in
my efforts to oyercpme the reluctance of Republicans to
think for themselves." -"'"'
SADEYE SAM: 'I won't kick Lady Agewood so hard
to have her" move over' some when we're bedtfed down
'nights in her Mindi stall. Further, I shall', not, frighten
her at such..times by threatening to report her to Mr.
Doolan. It cufdles her milk." '- v t:
JUAN D. PERON: "I shalfno'tinsist.upori the Hotel
Washington" switchboard operator beginning- an4 ending
every call with an-enthusiastic 'Viva'Perpn!Vv
' RUFUS HARDYr' "I shall strive' q' he, patich.tr with
reporters who ask 'me' whyhips keep .caroming Off the
banks of the Cut. But want them clearly to understand
it wasn't my fault they made the 'thing sop narrow. And
.it wasn't Will Arey's 'fault either.' Npr "Governor Sey-
boidv v . ...
. ., :. 'm:! ( ,i-..(.r-i
PERCY THE POTMAN: "I shall quit waiting till the
last possible moment Saturday nights' to-hack oat' this
junk between writing headlines, answering telephone calls,
wondering who to write nice things, about,' and wishing I
was over blotting up the beer at Rolando's Hideaway' v
There you are, NcV Year resolutions for all; Public
service. That's the keynote of this, column.;,;
PERCY'S JPEERLESS TORTENX this.wcck.l5 sign signed
ed signed expressly to make 1956 a little less -gruesome for you
than its precedcrsor. .There are rea.cons, for selecting 0, as
representing, the amount-pfilow-Uuty..l:3Vor enjoyed Dy
-the average Zonian "over vthe "holidays, or the hopes of
getting 'a reduction in the scale of charges at Gorgas
Hospital. Cut these are sombre thopghunsuitedto the
..season. ..
" On the sain e grounds I must reject the chances of
831,' the total of accidental deaths in the U.S.- over the
Christmas work-end, 621 of therrt on the" foadS
, No, a,"ch ful note should; be struck,. and: it seems
to me that at i outset, of the. year, such as shortly after
midnight last; ;ht, the most cheerful note abroad was
' 1933. .;'; ..;.' "':
.. t. f ""' ' ;
Whclher t Isolds "good &t the "time of reading, or
by the 1 1 a.r . ing; is another: thingt altogether. The
tomato juice, ju please. n.d draw-the, cmtains to
darken the 'l'c .a a little.'S.. ;



i y. n at, i a x r a y i, "?

the son) at A'trr.iciv
. A

Joaal

J ( hi
ana Jtli

Bo,

5037,

'n ( on

lenuida

or

ers

Box m, Pc

anama

J mif L mJ If ,'lJtfi

9pO mV 10 m. mlf.

2-0 740 m 2-V741

ISTHMIANS t'SHER IN NEW YEAR t
WITH TRADITIONAL GAIETT ;
The arrival of 1958 was heraldfd last night in the tradi traditional
tional traditional manner at parties and dances all oyer the Isthmus.
In Panama, the Union Club'a ala New Year's ball drew a
fashionably dressed crowd and the patio of the Hotel EI Pan Panama
ama Panama was filled with merrymakers. . ,. : ..

The Army-Navy Club at Fort

Amador, the I American Legion

and the EllcVClub were all po

pular sports for-Pieifie side cele cele-'
' cele-' brators. On the Atlantic side man-
v couples attended the Washington
'Cottton Club's dance at Brazos
Brook Country Club.
Mrs. Cacitia Pinel Raman
Will Arrive Fram Europe
Mrs. Cecilia Pinel Remon is ex expected'
pected' expected' to arrive from Europe
some, time today. She has been
delayed by airline strikes in Eu Europe."
rope." Europe." '
Jehn yt. Grahams f
Spend Xmas in Jamaica
Mr. John W. Graham oj Golf
tiioht returned from a 5-w e e k

tour of South Amerca and the
Caribbean Islands this week. Dur Dur-ing
ing Dur-ing their travels they visited Peru,
Chile, Argentina, Uruguay and
Brazil. They spent Christmas .in
Jamaica. V
. frctty Beiwi Tp Bttjin
New Art Class At YMCA .. ,.

A new Art crass series wim
begin at the Balboa Y.M.CA.-U.S -O.
on' Thursday, Jan. 5th at 9.00
a mV tinder, the leadership of Mrs.
Betty BenU." well known local art artist
ist artist and teacher. This begins her
sixth year of teaching o ilpainting
t the Y.M.CA.
Classes will be held, each week
on Mondays, at 7:00 p.m. and
Thursdays at 9:00 a.m. v f
- These- interested may call Mrs.
Benti at 2-1463 or meeet her Be Before
fore Before class at the "Y."
'Open Hawii" Ta Henor
Mr. and Mrs. larl Saagrave
i Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Cox
will hold "Open House'; this after afternoon
noon afternoon between 4 and ft p.m. at their
home No. 207, Schoolhouse Road
is Gatun to honor Mr. and. Mrs.
Earl Seagrave who are leaving tor
the States later this month. '
Invitations have no to been sent
but all friends of both couples
are invited to call today.
CPO WWo Club Vi Vi-Caca
Caca Vi-Caca $! t
A steak luncheon was served to
members preceding the December
lneeetihg. The Christmas motif was

carried out in the table decora

tions with ornamental corsages

for each member. Gifts were ex
changed after the luncheon.

A short meeting presided over

by Mrs. Bette Majors was held
during which all charity donations
were accepted.
Italian Violinist
Ta Civ Recital
Raul Osear Lotti, Italian violin
virtuoso, will give a recital at the
USO-JWB Armed Forces Service
Center at 8:15 p.m. on Wednesday.

Preparation Undarway
Far Carniaval Season
Hotel El Panama together with

the Junta del Carnaval is' making
elaborate plans for the traditional
Carnival celebrations which will

take place on Feb. 11, 12, 13, U

Los Carnavales, as newcomers
to the Isthmus may not know are

a traditional yearly pre Lesten
fiesta in Panana, different from
any other Mardi Gras. This is the
time of the year when costumes,
typical musk, the Pollera a n d
Montuno c 0 s t u m e s are used
throughout the Republic. While
the streets during this time are
full of merrymakers in f a n c y
dress, social centers hold their own
Carnival dances".
Asual a debutante will be, elec elected
ted elected to reign over Hotel El Pana Panama's
ma's Panama's celebrations. Voting will take
place on weekends at the hotel
when every cent spent on food or
berage is worth one vote, to be
signed over to the favored candi candidate.
date. candidate. The "Eserutinios" or vote vote-counting
counting vote-counting dances will take place
on Friday nights in January. The
Carnival Flag will be raise on
January 13th by Queen Marcels
de Janon who presided over the
1955 Carnival celebrations. This
will also be the occasion of the
first vote count.
Aerovias Panama Airways will
fly the Queen, her mother, and
the runner up to Miami just be before
fore before Carnival for a good will tour.
Hotel El Panama will take care
of their hotel expenses while

hr Other valuable nnzes are

offered to the sefloritas who run
for Queen. v. :

JcixAirliher.Of- Future:

Smoother, faster, Quiet

Sy ROIIRT C. MILUER 1
Unitad Frass Staff Carraspondtnt

against the back of your seat. Sail
planing must be like this.
The aSDhalt. blurs, the landscape

SYNDEY (UPV- Come along rushes past and nine seeonds later

with me for a preview ot a jet
you'll probably be riding within
four years.,.
The plane is de Havilland's four four-barrelled
barrelled four-barrelled Comet. Ill which recently
broke the London-Sydney record on
its round-the-world flights By 1959
these, and similar jets, will be in
regular trans-continental and trans trans-ocean
ocean trans-ocean service. London will be less
than a day. from Australia, San
Francisco five hours from Hawaii
and Vancouver. 20. hours from

Sydney.

the Diane is in the air.

The other half of the runway lies

unused below.
Pilot John Cunningham takes her
to the sun, but there is only the
angle of climb as an indicator that
the creat Diane is now under the

urging of nearly her full load of

power.
SILENCE IS STRENGTH

Outside the roar mifst be deafen-

I ing. Inside your neighbor chats m

You'll fly eight miles above the D, ihi trav ... .urf,ce

earth with scarcely a quiver or MnmarTe) by a ripple. The air
vibration, and only a constant low speed inji,., ghows eight miles
Whine.from the engines. ; minute. It lies.
Yom duck upon entering the, There.s a cltar sky anead and
heavily pressurized door and find Cunningham highballs. He flattens

immu

Click allco tw lncli.B ta th
col una haul4 iibmilt4 la tyM-
ritm lm and mailed to ana o4
Uit box aumhet ll'lcd daily lu "So "Social
cial "Social and Othwws.-'e," t dlre
a; band la tha ulfica. Natlcaa
mc ctini cannot aa accepted kr Ula-

Caribbean College Clul
Study Groups
The three study groups of the

Caribbean College Club will

meet on the following dates dur-

ine the month of January. Lit

erature study group:, Tuesday

Jan. 3, at 7:30 p.m. at the home

of Mrs. Jonn M. Purvis Jr- No

8024C on 2nd Street, Margarita.

Mrs. D. O. Peters will read a pa

per on "Prominent figures In
Panamanian history." Garden
study group: Thursday, Jan. 12,

at 7:30 p.m., at the home of Mrs

C. O. Kelly, No. 9B Brazos

Heights.

Management of Money study
eroup: Thursday, Jan. 26, at 7:30

p.m., at the Red Cross rooms in
Cristobal. Mr. Louis Gomez will

talk to the group on Banking

ana its services. ., ...

Caribbean College Club Board

The members of the Executive

Board of the Caribbean College
Club will meet on Tuesday, Jan.

10, at 7:30 cm, at the Red Cross

rooms In Cristobal.

Gamboa Women's Club

Th. Garnboa Women's Club

will hold -their first business
meetlne of th vear Thur'd'v,
at the home of Mrs. T. F. Sulli Sullivan
van Sullivan at 7:30 n.m, Mrs. W. M A).

derton will assist as co-hostess

A cordial invitation is extended
to all the club members. ;

Gamboa WomenV Club A"

xnl oamboa Women' rinh

will hold their flrl; hulne!s
meetlne of the vear Thnrsdnv at

wie nmo of Mrs. t. F. Sullivan
at 7:30 n.m. Mrs. W. M, Alderton

win assist as ro-hostes mr.

am invitation is extended to

an me ciud members.

the same deep, sort seats, port

holed windows and plastic interiors
of today's propelled planes. .v
, The similarity ends with the first
movement ofthe plane.
:' '': -"i ; ;
Na Warm-up

out at 20,000 feet and the earth
moves lazily below while you hang
poised in space.

There are no thrashing propel propel-lots,
lots, propel-lots, staccato roac of -exhausts or
tingling vibrations. The four Rolls
Royce engines cut in with a whistle
that never builds up into more
than a conversational sigh in the
sound-proofed cabin.
The plane taxis gently as the
iihark-mouthed jets suck in acres
of air and thrust it back with a
potential of more than five tons.
Outside the long aluminum wings
Way noticeably, their deceptive
strength hidden, by the flexibility
of their construction. .
There are no engine warm-ups
in this plane; no tedious waits at

the end of runways: You swing!

onto the field, get clearance trom The standard of living in West

the tower and sre off and Hying. Berlin is rising steadily, general

. ine nowi mums up tor me nrsi household costs now totalling $136, $136,-time.as
time.as $136,-time.as the spinning blades scoop 000,000 annually, while the money
in the air 'and exhale it with a I spent for. liquors, cigarettes and

thrust so great it flattens you coffee has risen to $50,000,000.

me silence, mere is no changing
of prop pitches, no shifting of

supercharges; only that incessant
soprano sigh that scarcely varies
a degree during the flight.,
- The descent begins more than
100 miles from your, destination.

and the speed stays well above 400

miles an hour until the flaps go

down and, the 10-wheeled landing

gear snaps into place. Your land landing
ing landing is faster, but equally as smooth
as those by todays' transports.
You'll use more runway before
coming to a stop.
At the terminal the sound dies

to a stop,' and the flight is com

pleted. Tickets for the regular

service re avauaoie ai me

i counter slMK't March of 1959.

Caribbean istamp Club"
Will Elect Officer

t; ine nexs .. regular: meptlnr or

...v vwiuuwn, oiamo Club will
be held at the Tivoli "Hotel on

ms ?ay at 7:30 P-m- Elections

y n piace during the eve
nlng.
tl Sons Served
In Armed Forces:
All Canio B:c!r ;: i
By ROBERTA ULftlCH

Unittd Press Staff CarrasparwUnt
GRANGE VILLE, Ida. (UP) Z

idsi mrj. Helen McCulley's
11 sons is home from "Ihe armed

strivices. .
Each one;', including the seven

wno saw overseas duly in. World

war ii ana the Korea conflict,
came through without a Scratch, a
giant size niece of lurk- Mn nr..

Culley attributes tot he fact "we
didn't try to keep .any of them out
of the service."
"I suppose I should have wor worried
ried worried said Mrs." McCtilley,' "but
I've always, let the men folks do

me worrying., And the boys all
wrote often."

1-

t

'.... 1 ....

Yea. will calumet tha i'
tr;.r bakirj powdar, ri
pur baking is sure to coma
rjt pwfaict, light and luaciout
my W! Gel CALUMET UxUyi

The parade of the McCulley into
the armed forces started in 1941
when Marshall, the oldest who now
is 43, and Fay went into the Army.

while to pet used to Z. 1 u V' ,ervmg in
wiiue io gei iisea. io h, cn..u p.rlf th-ator

In 1943 Charles- and-. Kimball

joined the Army. Both remained

in the service until 1945, Charles

in the Pacific theater and Kimball

in France and Germany.

Emmett,' Wilbur and Homer
joined in 1944 and stayed in for

two years. Emmett and Homer re

maiued in the United States but

Wilbur saw duty in the South Pa
cific. ; ,.; :

Alfred was the last to go during

World War II. He went into the
army in 1945 and stayed until 1947,

serving for a time in Germany.

The other three brothers served

in the :Air Force later. George

joined in 1950 and served in Korea,

Jay, the youngest,, now 23, fol followed
lowed followed George into the Air Force

in 1951 and to Korea.'- w

Tom enlisted in 1951. His dis discharge
charge discharge after four years, part of
them spent in Germany, marked

the return home of the last Mc
Culley from the service.
The only girl in the family, Mrs,
Neil (Nyra) Mardis of Grangeville,

is married to a Navy veteran. But
she had "no desire to join the

WACs or anything;'' Mrs. McCulley

said.
'Mrs. McCulley's husband Horn

er. died in 1952. The family had

moved here from its remote cattle

ranch nine years earlier, when

McCulley retired.
Ask Mrs. McCulley if it was a

hard job raising such a large fam family
ily family in the primitive backwoods are
and she says?
"Oh no, it wasn't hard at all.
It was fun. You just stay home.
Of course all the youngsters helped
me a lot. Alt the boys are good
cooks."

I f I t I I t n .11

Lirenners I o eieorare jtn Dirmaay

January 4 With Review, Baseball Here
Celebrating their 37th Oreanira-'time it was under the command the Tanal 7.,-ne in hatlalinns anH

tion Day on .Wednesday, in com-'of Col. Russell L. Wintrop. i detach ments In 1920, the regiment
memuration of the reactivation ofi The present 33rd Infantry regi-lwas united for the fust time1 at

tue j.5id Infantry Regiment : will mental historv dates dark to I'Hfi Vcu t l i.n inn anrl remampH two

be 3oid Infantry's Lifeliners."i when if was first brought into ex-j until 1941.
This year's schedule of-events at istance throuah the National T)e- In mai thi First, hatialinn lofi

Fort Kobbe will include a review fense tct of 1916. It was the third the lone for Trinidad, British
at 11 a m. on Lifeliner field. Pres-j organization in the U. S. Army to jest. indies, and a short time lat lat-entation
entation lat-entation of the Lifeliner trophvibear the title of the 33rd Infan-ler moved to Surinam, Dutch West
will be made to the Post's out-1 try -Regiment. On Jan. 29. 1813, Undies. Guarding the oil and bau bau-standing
standing bau-standing unit. jth first 33rd Infantry Regiment ixite industries, which are vital to

anuea snu consoimaiea in. he Allies, was tne mam rcsDonsh.

vith a regiment of lij;ht artil

A baseball game will take place'was bai
at Raitchcr field between Kobbe 1815 wit:

and Navy at 2 p.m.. and an "n-' lerv.

pen house" policy will be in ef-l The war between the

feet at the Post's Otficeis' club, saw the birth of the second 33rdiFnrf Heed Trinidad heeomino Hip

NCO Club and Service club fori Infantry regiment on May 3. 1816.lharkii.ne of the Trinidad Mobile

biiity ot tne oattaiion. 'the re re-niaimnii
niaimnii re-niaimnii units of the regiment soon

S t a t e s followed and were assigned to

serv-

yisitinlg dignitaries, guests.

icemen and dependents.

tort Davis, Camp Pina and Bat

tery MacKenzle will com-memo-

rate tje celebration with reviews

i ii e m., a.m., ana l p.m. re

spectively. Afternoon, activities

when the regiment was constitut

ed as the 3rd battalion of the
15th lr fantry. This was later "re "redesignated
designated "redesignated the 33rd Infantry Regi Regiment
ment Regiment on Sept. 21, 18t6. In 1869 it
was consolidated with the 8th In In-fantrv
fantrv In-fantrv and redesignated the 8th

will be devoted to field day events Uniatitry regiment,
at all three posts with a baseball! Duiine the first four years of

game between army Atlantic and its present history,-headquarters;

AiDro,K scneauiea ai ron tavis. were estamisnea at limp tm-

ine regiment nas Deen station-pire. tanai zone, which is now a! Reactivated

Force.

The 33rd Infantry regiment un unfurled
furled unfurled its colors in New Orleans,
La. in March, 1944, after spending
the first 28 years of its history
outsme the continental U.S. Three
months later the regiment was in inactivated
activated inactivated at Camp Clairbourne,

and

ed it Fort Kobbe since its reac-jfirinfc' range, while the regiment; Fort Kobbe on Jan. 4, 1950.
tivation day, Jan. 4, 1950, at which was scattered along the length of regiment sent its Third hatt

5or Ifflleat ah

By GAYNOR MADDOX
NEW YORK (NEAV Looks

like "Happy New Year" to meat
eaters and "More Power to You"
for-consumers of eggs, milk prod products
ucts products and poultry.

For the family dinner table, the

eutlook for protein foods at easier

prices is rosy. To the farmer-Dro-

ducer the outlook is not so good.

am on me packing industry and
rail and truck lines the sun prom promises
ises promises to shine brightly. .

"More meat and increased con

sumer 4emand plus full emDlov-

ment for the meat packine indus-

try-that's our outlook for 1956,"
reports Porter M. Jarvis, presi president
dent president of Swift At Co., Chicago.

He experts total meat outmit to

reach or exceed 27 billion pounds,

a uuie more- man last year. But
population growth will hold con consumption
sumption consumption per person to a little
under 160 pounds.
(U.S. per cpita consumption of

meat, althouj; going up, is still
ronsidera bly below New Zealand,
Denmark, Australia, Argentina
and Uruguay, Uruguay tops the
list with 248 pounds par person.)
Livestock gorwersi, enter 1956
with a plentiful supply of feed
grains, forage erops and pros prospects
pects prospects for lower feed costs.T
"However, this favorable fac fac-Ur
Ur fac-Ur is offset by very sharpy drop
in livestock prices in the last few
months," Jarvis added. 'Although
there is good consumer demand,
it is at sharply lower prices This
works a severe hardship on producers.",."-
.''':''''.'':''' '.-.

A spokesman for Armour 4 Co. I

reports that many government
and non-government agencies are
trying to help the livestock grow grower
er grower in this predicament. They are
working on way to produce bet better
ter better meat at lower costs. One of the
latest developments is atilbestrol
feeding. ,.

Savings like this help .everyone!

concerned, Armour s spokesman
said. "Buu when livestock produc producers
ers producers can lower production costs,
they will do, their best to retain
the benefits."
All packers stress the growing

demand for the more expensive
cuts of meat. Also a trend toward

convenience' foods, which also
cost more. Both, Armour" and
Swift report more meat is being
packaged at the plant for the con consumer.
sumer. consumer.
The demand for frozen cubed
steaks, chopped beef patties and
veal liver is growing despite high higher
er higher retail prices. The same goes
for frozen stuffed turkeys, fully
cooked, skinless, and shankless
hams, and fat-trimmed pork prod products.
ucts. products. To capitalize on this strong. buy-i
ing trend, the meat industry plans!
to expand research on "conve "convenience"
nience" "convenience" packaging.
The U.S. Department of Agri Agriculture
culture Agriculture predicts that milk produc production
tion production in 1956 will hit a new high.
It may reach 127 billion pounds

as compared to 124 'i billion for

1955. .. ;
The D. of A. also predicts great

er production of eggs, chickens

and turkeys. Egg prices, in Darti

cular, are Jikely to be lower than

last year.

The food picture looks good to
everybody but the fellow who pro produces
duces produces it. Although the consumer

will have more money to. sDend

according to current estimates,, he
will demand more processed and
convenience foods and better mer

chandizing.

' That means that less of his
budget dollar will go back to the
farmer or raw materials. As a
result, the net income realized by
the farmer is expected to be down

in 1956.

stationed at

the

hattalion

to Korea with the 65th RCT in Oc October
tober October ot that year. During his
time the First battalion served as
the defending "aggressor forces"
on Vieques Island during "Oper "Operation
ation "Operation Portrex" which, at the
time was considered the biggest
peacetime amphibious maneuver
ever accomplished.
The regiment was brought back
to full strength in Ihe spring of
1951 when a new 3rd battalion was
activated.
The present regimental com. com.-mandintr
mandintr com.-mandintr officer. Col. Robert E.

Coffv. assumed command of the

33rd Infantry in Fort Kobbe on

Oct. 1, 1955.

It was during the 35th Organiza

tion Day celebration that the term

"Lifeliners" was adopted as the
official nickname of the 33rd In Infantrymen.
fantrymen. Infantrymen. i
Pacific Rat Studied

To Find Agri Habits

DAVIS, Calif. (UP) Under

the nrniect name. "Pirate,

three-year study of Pacific island

rats now is underway.
The studv is directed by Dr.

Tracy I.. Storer, University of j
California zoology professor here, i
The relationship of -fats to the i

place in which, they live will be
studied in the eastern Caroline
Islands. Life on a "high" island
Ponape will be studied in relation relationship
ship relationship to the way rats live on "low"
islands represented by atolls
adjacent to Ponape.
The study's objective Is to deter

mine how damaging rats are to

sericulture and to public health

Some of the information may be

applicable to rats in the United
States. In the Pacific, however,

they breed faster and it may take

a shorter time to get the desired
data.;.' .:

. ice rex

VIS INDIAN kzjo
at v:s caw

f'l re

rt.co

. A spoonful of lemon sherbet in
a glass of chilled cranberry juice

makes a refreshing appetizer for
lunch or dinner.

Enrollilnt Fipfes

Up Fer Third Year
In Sl3le Colleges

CINCINNATI (UPV-. For the

third straicht year "the trend is

briskly upward" in American col-:

legiate enrollment, Dr. Raymond
Walter, president emeritus of the i
University of Cincinnati, reported!
in his 36th annual statistical study'
for School and Society, educational,
journal. '
In 886 approved universities and
four-year colleges throughout the;
United States and its territories,'
there ; are 1,612,225 full-time stu-;
dents nine per cent-more than in1
the fall of 1954, and a grand total

of. 2,111,4858.3 per cent more
than a year ago. Part-time
students were up 6.5 per cent.
These increases are viewed by
Dr. Walters ava portent of tre tremendous
mendous tremendous enrollmetits to come in

the next decade in consequence of

the soaring youth population."
As in several preceding years.
1955's biggest percentaee gains for
freshmen were in specialized areas
of study, representing a "response
to increasing demands for trained
personnel in an industrialized
nation."
. Mora Ttachtr Dut
However, in actual numbers, en enrollments
rollments enrollments remained greatest in the
broader area of the arts and
sciences.
"It is significant," Dr. Walters
pointed out, "that recent larger
collegiate classes have proceeded
from high school classes which
had smaller numbers than classes

15 years ago.
"Recruits for the depleted ranks'
of school teaching are'on the way

in encouraging numbers, especially j
in regard to men," Dr. Wallers

wrote. "Last year there was an

increase of 19.4 per cent over 1953

in full-lime students starting
courses in the field of teacher-

training, this fall there is an inn

crease of 13.2 per cent ouer 1953.

"However, present enrollments

fall far short of supplying enough
competent teachers and adminis administrators
trators administrators adequately to handle the
nation's great host of children who
will be the citizens of tomorrow."

relax, ..,- i

don't bother with breakfast v

or lunch at HOME today!. . f
COm TO EL PANAMA'S popular
SUNDAY BRUNCH
- from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Balboa Room
You'll get all this for only $2.25 pperson
Choice of complimentary cocktail
Choice of mouth-watering menu
Music for dancing by Papito Baker . ".
, Entertainment by Eric the Great
' (balloon man and magician)
The Sunday Brunch is a 'natural for New Year' day
' Bring the family

And TONIGHT ii just the night to come up to
the beautiful air-conditioned Bella Vista Room
to dine and dance to the music of,
Clarence Martin's Orchestra

IA lew;.:

Klrl:r:iv Hull I

! EVANGELISTIC SERVICES

-with

CLIFTON BRANNON
Evangelist
STARTING TODAY

10:40 a.m.
JANUARY 1 15

7:30 p.m. w
NICHTLY 7:30

FIRST. BAPTIST CHURCH

BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z.

ilMi-VMi iCIENTISTS .TECHNICIANS-

1

A Rol!tifltxAutOfnot combining
svoanor Rolret CDmKvctton wttfi -new,
voluoble technical feohtri
MA
rill high-efficincy Itnifar color
ond black and whilt, 5chnit)f
. Xtnotor f ; 2,880 mm

Inlernol anti-rcfltctian bofflel
(Iht film roceivei nolhmg bvl
imogt intended lor it),. rla
to ptrmit intntonat double
exposures, large focusing knob
with him reminder, odiutloble
focusing magnifiers
greatly incrtated lafety ogoinit
mistakes in operation. f

, kii iimplofy, high perfortntwweEoliei u putrtorif
mtendtd i leke cere of iptciat profatitorftet requirtmfnre. -For
the prtitftt ohd moi future te supply will be limited

i

Joyeria Internacional, S. A.

International Jewelry, Jne.
Panama, Rep.de Panama P. O. Sox 1 8 7 8

EnjoydbjTev

;oh-the-rock$
dr the usual

.... ."
T -7 4

r I
& 'W w,HAMS.ANO HUMBERT
!-,-;:

IMPORTED SHERRY
so liqht n delicious for

Sole Distributor tor the Republic of Panama
HENRIQUEZ & G0RNELL, INC.

STUDK BAKE &

'1

No. 27 Automobile

The Big New President Classic, for the first. time in Panama
' Now ON DISPLAY
- tropical mms, S. A.

Tel. 2-2036 Panama

I, IV

v1



Jlrit ifl'f tjcars
Jo Jliealcr's ht odacij:
Jltcu cliclii I .Scan eZo

Women s World
' .i I y -. a I

Cotton swlmsuit from California Is in roral-and-gold, shows the
rrew slim look in swimwear. This suit, by Rose Marie Reid, hasj
..matching jacket for rover-up against too much sun or wind.
f-fBy Gaile Dug as, NEA Women's Editor.

UUliite JJoude iaLi

M
5r
fytaH &irnkourrr
DOUGLAS LARSEN
..WASHINGTON (NEA) The
new Eisenhower grand daughter
enters life facing two demanding
lets of traditions.
As the child of a regular Army
officer Maj. John Eisenh o w e r,
the son of the President Mary
Jean nil o through life tagged
as an "Army brat." This title
implies precociousness and a cer certain
tain certain lack of "roots" resulting from
living on Army posts all over the
world. ;
But the more colorful and ex exclusive
clusive exclusive ode the child will have to
conform to is that of a. "White
Houscaby."
Evert' 'before the infant is a flay
old traJillon imposes a responsi responsibility
bility responsibility 'on a White House baby.
First, the child must, inspire t h e
President of the United States to
do something zany.
For example, this was the first
act of the present Dean of Wash Washington
ington Washington Cathedral, the Very Rev.
Francis Bowes Say re. Jr. His
- mother was Jessie Wilson-Thayer,
daughter of President Woo d r o w
Wilson. He was born in guest
room on the south side of the sec second
ond second floor of the -White House Jan.
IS, 1915. ': -.. ....
When Francis let out his x i r s t
be low it inspired the usually aloof
and serious President Wilson to
rush to a typewriter and bat out a
two-page press release.
Unofficial protocol rule that
the baby does not actually have to
be born in the executive mansion
to be rated a "White House baby.
The Eisenhower granddaug h t e r
was 'bom at Walter Reed Hsopital.
Actually, only one cnua oi
president has been born there.
Esther, Cleveland holds that dis distinction.
tinction. distinction. She was born during the
tecond term of Grover Cleveland
on Sept. 9, 1893. ....
A new wt tf responsibilities
will face the youngster as soon as
BY
MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE
Mr, Paul G'. writes. "Our five five-year
year five-year n' l Junior has a younger sis sister
ter sister i.iJ baby brother. -Though; he
lines the baby, he's very jealous
of the girl. When she's napping,
We get along five; the moment
she's up, the screaming and fight fight-In
In fight-In J start. I keep telling him that
him m much is her,. It

doc v good. What else can I io.jcni oi jealous child

tor him? Tl.nirt Let consider how we can be-
Tho probability, is, what junH''gin 1( hclp junor release his.
needs most, Mrs. l is ne, could Mrs. G. persuade him to
chance to "dov for you. j become proudly responsible f o r
This idea has not occurred W;putttag his father.s iuncn b0) 1n
jou. has it? That could De, ."";the car every morning? Could he
- ,,aii ii nm( reKcnment all fn.j .....

all the work you have to & a tor
your three poung
Io i- l any, instead of iee'ln8
ahai.-d of it, let s recognize
For
drin's
s'-ren.i.'
upon
tl 8 :
hcavy
demands on
ih would make only one re-
lo Junior s jealousy a a-lo
lo a-lo you. You'd have to see
.jlier demand upon your

8trei.AUJ. ,. .. tJ suggest themselves the instant she.
Ihe resentment would s7h "jsees how egotistical she is to ima ima-you.
you. ima-you. "See what impossible tmngsjgine that she has ,0 do :,.the
are asked of you? Now "j giving to solve his problem., She
wants all your love, all jo ui r ai can gegin to" appreciate the ad ad-tcntion!
tcntion! ad-tcntion! Goodness, Is there no ena vtnUw of making tl;is m on,s
to what's expected of P01- iN'j;security depend, not on her love
this son wants all your i0 ""j declarations, not on the attentions
vmir attention'. Goodness, is tnere hft hag to ghare

l

r f peop'e who con T run
hi it o tnrr J''tljr think
J IWI' T

if: .- I

w
Lnhrt
she reaches .what parents know as
the age of extended destruction.
In this responsibility she will be
ably assisted by her brother David,
7, Barbara Ann, 6, and Susan, 4.
The precedent for, any damage
the Eisenhower brood might do
was set by the famed "W h i t e
House Gang." This was a maraud marauding
ing marauding band of high-spirited youngs youngsters
ters youngsters led by the youthful Quentin
Roosevelt during the Theodore
Roosevelt administration.
The three grandchildren of Pre President
sident President Hoover were more gentle.
But the mob of youngsters which
roamed the White House grounds
during the administration of Fran Franklin
klin Franklin Roosevelt set its own stand standards
ards standards for unbridled activity.
Still another chore for the new
Eisenhower grandchild is to in inspire
spire inspire the President to invent lov loving
ing loving names. Crusty President An Andrew
drew Andrew Jackson was moved to call
the kids which shared the execu
tive mansion with him the sun-

rK; Ti ;i, whif. Wniico" ii. ifwoeeia,' or can o e -Dougnt ouui
12SM.m a. Z annleS f,flllke nimal. four wheels
Sf2 mtl Baby will whirl through the

my eyes "--""

VI 4U. t.... .h!Mii nt"V"

i nwy win iiiv iwi tiimuin v
Mrs. Emily Tennessee Donelson,
wife of Maj. Andrews Jackson
Donelsorf. Mrs. Donelson was the
niece of the deceased wife of the
President and served as his offi official
cial official hostess.
President and Mrs. John Qum Qum-cy
cy Qum-cy Adams had so many relatives
living with them during his admi administration
nistration administration they didn't bother to re record
cord record births.
.Finally, if there are any ques questions
tions questions about the code under which
White House babies must operate,
the oldest living expert on the sub
ject is the Countess Julia orant
Cantacuzene. She is the grand granddaughter
daughter granddaughter of U. S. Grant, born, in
the Lincoln Room of the' White
House.
-SHe is now living quietly in a
small apartment here in Washing Washington.
ton. Washington.
no end to w h a t's expected of
you?'' nd so distract your atten attention
tion attention from the lactt hat the answer
o Junior's jealousy is not your
usefulness to him, but his to you.
"Destructivencss," wrlttes Dr.
Erich Fromm, "is proportionate
to the degree to which the unfold unfolding
ing unfolding of a person's capacities are
blocked."
Blocked capacities is the prob-
Tel(phone Answerer? Wollld his,
fatner snow nim how to seat his
mother at the, table, giving her
the chance to acknowledge h i s
How about putting him in charge
oi uenvering letters irom tne mau
box?;.
These are just sample services
junior can render. Others will
viiiuueii uui uii ni own actions.
nis own Knowicage oi mmseif as
a useful, productive person.
"I have resched the end of my
strength," vrites Mrs. G.
Excellent! Sometimes, before
we can see that children have
strength of their own to use, we
have to reach the end of o u r s.
Such humility is necessary' before
we are ready to really. love them.
As it comes to use with its blessed
release from strain and egotism,
we bepin to see that the jealousy,
disobedience and other problems
whioti nave exhausted our
.strengthJiavft bene .Jiul .children's
protons ana my. oui' aiuui habit
cf monopoliring usefulness;

aduond9n (Cotton 'Lor

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The wardrobe done for Sharon Kay Ritchie, Miss America 1956,
is by American designers in Everglaze cotton. We show Miss
Ritchie wearing three costumes from this wardrobe, beginning
(left) with Ceil Chapman's ball gown in polished cotton en encrusted
crusted encrusted with gold embroidery. Theater ensemble (center) by

mm

A' kiddie car is still a popular
toy. They can be had m the con
ventional shape, with three
wheels,- or can b e -bought built
as soon as he figures; out
If you are moving Baby out of
your room, and this should be
done, if possible, at around six
months, be' sure to take familiar
things with him. This includes
his same bed and toys, his wall
decoration or lamp. This isn't the
time to change beds on him.. ;
A session- with- a professional
photographer can be hard work
for Baby, the photographer and
you. Take along interesting and
favorite toys. Don't -expect much
of him if in an unfamiliar situa situation.
tion. situation. Wear, jangly earrings if they
interest Baby.
A kit of play shaving equipment
can be a big-encouragement, to
older Babv to wash his face. Let
him lather up with a brush and
plain soap. As a big treat, a dab of
shaving' lotiqn can be added at the
end.
The croup kettle just isn't what
it used to be. New ones for the
Baby with a cold include one
that'x a Prpat bis iar. DlUS
steaming attachment. It runs for
hours and shuts itself off when
it's empty, a big help for steam
ing at night.
Six Qood lesblutioni
TRUST COMES from a helping
, hand when he needs it...
By MARTHA M. ELIOT. M.D.
WASHINGTON (NEA) -1956
whatever else It brings will
bring a. new crop of babies, each
one hoping to have good start in
life.
Biggest of all the discoveries the
new baby will make is whether he
can trust the people around him,
especially the ones closest to him
hi nvthrr or hnr substitutes..
If he gets that sure feeling that

4 Cjoo

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...

For Elegant

Short and elegant evening gowns in lace and linen are shown for the. resort season in the col collection
lection collection of designer Larry Aldrich. Imported lace (left) is used for charming dress that has candy candy-box
box candy-box pink satin sash floating streamers to the hemline. Fale yellow re-embroidered linen (right)
-has inserts of white linen lace. Scalloped bateau neckline dips low at back to meet ribbon bow.
By Gaile Dugas, NEA Women's Editor. t ;

3o Provide
FROM WARMTH of mother as
she feeds and fondles him. .
everything his mother, his father,
other people, and even his own
body are trustworthy, he's off to
a good start! .;
Fortunately, most babies do ac acquire
quire acquire the feeling that life i sokay.
Htre art examples of ways in
which a sense of trust can be fos fos-fared
fared fos-fared so that your baby will have
! these warm -all-important fetllngs,
V being "wanttd -and-trottrnff- tnt
others: j

OM A

1 1 UMS

Lawrence Gaines is in print-and-plain polished cotton in black-and-white.
Short ball dress (right) by Emma Domb is in cotton
moire, has new look of more rover-up for neck and shoulders.
Fabric in all three roKtumes is crease-resistant, By (Jaile
Dugas,' NEA Women's Editor. -

Gowns: Linen
'V
A sense of trust comes to babies,
from the warmth of the mother's,
body, as-she feeds and to no le si
him. ; '.
It comes from the plasure her.
hands give him when she bathes (
and olavs with her baby. I
It comes from her smile; the
little songs she sings; her laugh laughter;
ter; laughter; her not being harsh or stern
or shouting.
It comes when your baby tries
y
- fROM PLEASURE .?
fliothft's
, time...
hands at baby's bat,h

1956

inenca
1
And Lace
XL
i

J956

things out for himself; from dis
covering that his hands and feet
will do what he wants them to.
It comes from the added pleas
ure of having his efforts approved
and praised when he reaches out,
turns over, ; crawls, stands, up.
It comfes from being comforted
when he needs comfort: from be being
ing being near one who loves him: from
a helping hand when he needs one.
jjr.O",i ri-covrnY hndj
and feet will do his bidding.'..

By DICK KLEINER
NEW YORK (NEA) When'
Helen Hayes first heard some talk:
that theater people were going to
honor her for her 50 years of act acting,
ing, acting, she was shocked.
"I couldn't believe it", she savs.!
"It just didn't seem like M years.!
I don't keep a diary or records oi l
a scrapbook, and I'd never kept'
track of the years. It a made m e
feci old."
In fact, her husband, playwright'
Charles MacArthur, at first op-1
posed the plans for a "Command:

Performance" of theater people to
highlight the anniversary celebra celebration.
tion. celebration. He thought it would make
Helen Hayes "feel decrepit."
"But I dont feel decrepit," she;
says, with the iaugn that has!
cnarmea uieaier audiences suice
1905. And she doesn't look de decrepit.
crepit. decrepit. She looks pretty much like
what she is a charming 55-year-
old wife and mother, who just hap-!
pens lo DC one ot tne linesl actres actresses
ses actresses the American stage has pro produced.
duced. produced. She started acting as a child in
her naUve Washington, D. C. Then
she was seen .by Lew Fields, one
of New York's leading producers
of that era. And by the time she
wis a teen-ager, she was a star.
She managed to make the transi
tion from adoiescense to maturity;
painlessly, and for the last two)
decades has been almost univer-j
sally recognized, as the First Lady
of the Stage. t
Looking back" on her half century)
or acting,; ueien iiayes i n l n k s
she's bjad a -pretty full and (excit (exciting
ing (exciting career.
'"I have no unfulfilled ambi ambitions,"
tions," ambitions," she says. "I've done about,
everything I wanted to more
than I dreamed I would do. I've
had a few cracks at Shaaespeare,
with varying results. I've made
movies, and won an Oscar. I have
no regrets."
Miss Hayes, as you might ex expect
pect expect from a woman who doesn't
keep scrapbooks, says, "I never
look back over my shoulder I
prefer to look ahead." ;..
And, from that vantage point,
she thinks the theater is in pretty
healthy shape at the moment.
"Of course it has dwindled i n
quantity," she says,, "but the
quality is better than it was. My
contemporaries people like Lynn
Fontanne and Katharine Cornell
and Judith Anderson we iiscd to
wonder : when y o u n g actresses
would come along and elbow us
out of the way, as we elbowed the
older stars out. For years, there
was no one.
"But look now' fine actresses
like Julie Harris and. that f "young
Susan Strassberg and young 'ac 'actors
tors 'actors like Marlon Brando and Mont Montgomery
gomery Montgomery Gift. And f i n.e p 1 a y y-wnghts
wnghts y-wnghts like Arthur Miller and
Tennessee' Williams and Robert
Anderson. The theater is very
strong today." ;., ,;
And there's television. She
thinks it's wonderful and par particular
ticular particular good as a training ground
for young performers. -. r
"It's much harder to get start started
ed started in the theater today, because
there is lesst heater. And there
used to be stock companies, too.
But now television gives a young
actor .a chance to try different
kinds "of parts. The only trouble
is TV always wants new faces
outside of Maria Riva and Eva
Marie Saint, they haven't- devel developed
oped developed any stars, An actor can be
washed up on TV at 25.'' ;;
Hlen Hayes' carter has been a
newsy one, in a non-scandalous
rtfr nt nrav ChA WHO flnulv I n-
volved with the actors' strike that
established Actors aquuy as a
potent ineauicai iuicu. nwi mcic
was the famous "Act of Go d"
baby, her daughter whose birth
V
(.-
IT COMES FROM HER SMILE,

...... .. -.......-J;
IT COMES f ROM APPLAUSE for hU effoiU at growinf. uj?.

,
AND

.25 YEARS AGO, HcieV Haves
. was a demure "Cleopatra."
she maintained was an "Act 'of
God" and therefore she should' bt
released from an existing run-of
play contract. Years later. ther
was the tragic death of this child
from polio.
But mostly it's her talent that's
made her famous. Over the years,
she's run the histrionic gamut
from comedy to tragedy, plavcl
part? as varied as Pollyanna ami
Cleopatra, appeared with leading
men like John Drew, William Gil Gillette,
lette, Gillette, Alfred Lunt, Sidneyi Black
mer, Philip Merivale, M aVric
Evans, and, in the movienlfonald
Colman. Clark Gable, Rslmon No No-yarro,
yarro, No-yarro, Robert Montgomti(y and
Gary Cooper. .
Probably her. best-known. char
acjenzations weie in "Dear Bru
tus," "Bab"; (her first starring
party, "To the Ladies," "fche
StoopsHo Conquer,"- Maggie i
"What Every Woman Know s",
"Mary of Scotland," "V i c t o r l a
Regina," "Harriet" and her recent
appearance in "The Skin of Our
Teeth" in Paris anil New York and
on television. '

; :
MiAKtivG JLB1LLL, Miss Hayes
looked like this on TV.
When Barry Hyams the' press
agent for "The Skm ot.Our Teeth."
unearthed the fact that her 50ih
theatrical birthday was nearm
and the plans for the celebration
were proposed, Helen Hayes says
she wasn i sure what her reaction
would be.
"I would vacillate,'' she says,
'between wanting to do some something
thing something great on broadway to show
my appreciation," and r desire to
go somewhere and rest." bhe'a dc dc-cideU
cideU dc-cideU to rest.
But her idea of rest is four
weeks in Florida, during which
she ii spend one ween acting in,
"The Glass Menagerie". in Miami.
Then she'll come oack to New
YoiK, to start .working on a new
play "Cock-a-Dood.e Dais y",
written by her husband and Anita
Loos.-.
, After 50 years, there's no rea reason
son reason lo expect she'll quit now.
the little gongs ilie sinss...
f n

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J

DUTY OVER LOVE was the ihoire of England's Princess Margaret, right,
when in a tersely-worded statement she revealed that duty to "church and
crown" would have to come before her feelings for Group Capt. Peter Town Town-send,
send, Town-send, left, a divorced commoner. At year s end Townsend slipped back, across
the English Channel to his post in Belgium and hoped for oblivion.:

Of. Sfc&As

i

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f
jflt"r.lnnii,n iitf 1

. .1!

MASS MURDER

Longmont, Col., when a t 1
United Airlines DC-6B
mysteriously exploded r' '
killing -all 44 persons -v.
aboard. Two weeks w I
later the FBI arrested

John G.' Graham, 23,
and charged him with
placing dynamite in the
baggagje of his mother,
Mrs. Da i y King, to
collect her $37,500
flight" insurance.'

1

D OWN GOES
P e r 0 n as Argentine
mob rips his picture
from in front of the
Union Buildings in.
Buenos Aires on eve of
the inauguration of
Gen. Eduardo Lpnardi
as new president.
Peron, long-time dicta-
tor '(1945 1955), was
forced to flee the coun country.
try. country. Lonardi was later
replaced as president
by Pedro E. Arambuiu.

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IN A HORROR-FILLED SIXTY SECONDS the town of Udall, Kan,, was
flattened by a killer tornado. Tiny Udall total population 650 counted: 79
persons dead and another 200 injured. Additional casualties in nearby com

munities in Kansas and Oklahoma brought the death tou to 1U,

"1

:

rue. vvo siuni
the year was the":
heart attack suffered";
by the nation"?
Number One citizen, v
President Eisenhow-
er. One month and t
one day after- the -September
2 4 at attack,
tack, attack, the President ,'
flashed h i s famous
grin for this close close-up
up close-up photo on the. sun
deck at Fitzsimons
Army Hospital m
Denver. By m Id -November
Ike was 1
so well that he flew
to Washington, then

retired to his Get--tysburg.
Pa., farm
. where he will con con-'
' con-' valesce.

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' BRIDQE TO FREEDOM was crossed at Hong Kong by'll U.S. airmen following
sit their release by Red China.. The men .had been imprisoned for two and one-half ?
" '"'years on ''spying1 charges.'-' Col. John K. Arnold, left, in foreground,, and. Msj.'-
Williarfi BaUmer; on crutches,; led-the march to freedom. . ..

TURNCOAT CI'S Lewis Griggs, left, Otho Bell, center, and William "A
Cowait, right, receive clothing at the guardhouse at Fort Baker, Calif.,
following their return to the United States from Red China in July. In
November the men were released by the Army when the Supreme Court
-ruled they were being held unconstitutionally. '

1

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1 1 1

tw tut

"'''J MAIN STREET in Winsted, Conn., was wrecked
when worst flood in its history hit the town. The most
destructive hurricane year in modern history and
1 resultant floods cost the lives of at least 1578 persons
and damage of two and one-half billion dollars..

Jf- .1 WMMMKiim win 1 1 ii'ii'it 11 n H J I

RUSSIAN FARM experts ,'.
v ... touring U.S. were introduce!"
to an American favorite "cot-.-
ton candy" when they inter-''Jci
rupted their farm tour to v;'
. visit the circus in Minneapo- A
lis. Famed clown Emmett
Kelley samples some cab-'."
! bag e.- Russian journalistic ;"r:
" and housing groups ako
i visited the U.S.
- 'f
I r SHOTGUN KILLING 1
I of millionaire William Wood- 'A
ward, left, by his beautiful
wife, Ann, right, shocked
New York society. Couple.i 1
6hown here holding -the ciApyni
i won by their famed horse it
' Nashua in his race with
w Swaps, had been bothered by
t a prowler. Mrs. Woodward
said she shot' him believing 4"

j. he was prowler. :

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I 4

4 1

KiD3 COT THE POINT as 400,000 school children across
the nation were inoculated with Salk polio vaccine. After
months of indecision and doubt government statisticians
revealed' the vaccine was 76 per cent eflective against para4
lytic polio,

POINTED REMARKS ire exchanged by President Eisenhower and Soviet." .""
Premier Nikolai Bulganln on the lawn of the Palais des Nations during the
"summit" conference t Geneva, Switzerland. Eisenhower dominated the con- .''."
feience with his bold jii oposal for international arms inspection. w r

.V....v

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VOU CAN PLACE VOUP; AD AT V. DIFrEilEIlT LCCALITIZ3 i,: Ti.: CITY

, .. ... lis,.
ft
?;f7?t2 WUi. A: J
i .-
-iH
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---
u
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR ACENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA

k J -
I LIBRERIA PRECIADO LOURDES PHARMACY LEWIS SERVICE HOUSEHOLD EXCHANCE FARMACIA EL BATURRb
MINIMUM ISUntKn. il 1U U Carraaaeilla Ave Tivoll Ne. J. fee 4m la Oua Ave. Ka. 41 firqut Lefnr J Street
J rnT? Agendas Internal, de Publicaciones FARMACIA LOMBARDO FARMACIA .ESTADOS UNIDOS FOTO DOMY FARMACIA "SAS"
J tU.iV t9 I Utlery Plata Ko. W ilrl 14) teaual Avteue .Juste Aretnocno Ave aed U St. Via Ponas 111
I 12 VORDS .CASA-ZALDOT. :.- MORRISON J . FARMACIA LUX FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS MOVEDADES ATH1S
' Central Av. ,. '.-' ilk ml July Ave A J tt I '.'. it Central Avenue I) 8trtfNe. U V.a t;paoa Ave.

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MINIMUM
FOR
12 WOilDS

COMMERCIAL b

PROFESSIONAL
A AU ZONfc POLYCLINIC
DENTAL-MEDICAL
Dr. C. t, Fihraaa Tr. R. Avllt Jr.
D.D.f (Oorjetowa t'oivrctll ) M.D
Tiv atl) of JiiI.tJ Ave., No. 21A24
(opposite -Aaron School Playground)
. Tel. i-Mtl Panama-
RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION. INSURANCE.
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Ptrtrne Panama t-0552
TRANSPORTES BAXTER, S.A,
Pockact Shippera Mover
Phonei 2-2451 2-2562,
Learn Ridin et
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
idina Jumpina clone doil
J 2 H 5 p.m. Phone 3-0279
ct bv oppbintmeirt,
Viarehbuse'CflrtsxS
Know Way Around
Huge Storehouse
ASlltTON, (UP) It's a
little eerie at first to watctt those

unmanned flat litt lft trucks, loaded
witji boxes, weave slowly through
a afi-acr room and "know" where
' tO 0. .V" i ?
13iis goes on every hour every
wofk day at a governnient ware warehouse
house warehouse at nearby Franconia, Va. It
'i. Uia linuit nf U nncratpii hv

;eeraj Services- Administration
tnrUBnout tne country w suppiy
the needs of government depart departments
ments departments ana agencies. ,'
Iff also is the largest warehouse
ot fits kind in the world and
supplies everything from sweeping
tn snriiinps to SOvem-
ment agencies in the capital and
neajbv areas.
A small .portion of the 28-acre
HniWina 4s i walled off. for office

space,' oui ine resv oi wc
Worv structure is warehouse. By
comparison, the Pentagon; the
woijlu's largest office ; building,
covers 34 acres. ., ,. :
Oh one side nf the long building,
riant trailer trucks unload their
oods. A railroad siding on the
opposite side brings up freight
cars to Unload. a j
A the crates and boxes are un unloaded
loaded unloaded ihey jire placed on the flat
litt trucks of the '.'towyeyor
fyslem for transportation t6 .the
proper section.
-Church Property
TRTtowveyor- is a type of moncv moncv-ralliweaving
ralliweaving moncv-ralliweaving through em;h aihie o
the1 great lVm divided
intoS1 seven mmberedf sections;.
.AS worker loads -th6 truck and
the sets the section number gauge
on the truck. If it's number seven,
tiruck takes off at its standard
i ft-rt- a minute and continues to
seri-h seven where it automatie-alh-r
ngsa icll. This is the signal
for t mflhcr "workman to unload..
That'll .will not; rinatat any other
8CA?'A official said th
u.,1 so thatMhere is no storage
"ale- farther than 65 feet from
W warehoi
M require 349, a SP
Taut Tjther government ware-
ain are mechanized.
bZM leases the haw
v irf incidentally ( from the
p T Xvenue Methodist Church of
Xi-t York The structure was built
yef orii. , ...,,u. w- onvern-

' V', 'nd he bought for
Kli sVonoS by the church as;
Cn invt-tment.
T-
') t
f.l til!?
ljlloVtS til
mny, gas gas-htavy
htavy gas-htavy m-w-st vie
I in

FOR SALE
Household

i www htwrnv
I automatic clothe dryer, brand
1 Can be aaen at "Agenciat
Farmaceuticas." Centre Medico,
Phone 3.1420.
. iy i.b: rive-piece plane.
ead mr. w
maple bedroom- suite. Can be
acen at Qtri. 10-B, Ft. Clayton.
CZ.
. fOR SALE: Living room sett
itttdio ouch, arm chair. Rattan
chu'r, footttool. matching alip-
. coven, $30; 16'' rotatinf fan,
25-yele; Warina hand mixer,
25-60 cycle $12; yellow budgie
bird (parakeets with cage, lead,
etc. $10; electric alarm clock,
25-cycle $3. Call 85-4189 Cor Cor-xal.
xal. Cor-xal. EW YORK (UP) Because
umuo uanieiu is eager to con conduct
duct conduct Mozart's "Cosi Fan Tutti" in
the new rhamW nnara kn -r t
-- nail ui iB
5cala, in Milan, the New York
rnnnarmonic-hymphony has re released
leased released him from ;, hisen'gagement
as its guest conductor for January
'"His place will be taken bv Pierre
Monteux,'Was Rudolf of the Mei
ropohtan; Xpera-; and Franco
Alitor!, the orchpetra' 9e.Afli.i.
conductor. La Scala's "Cosi" had
been scheduled for December but
was postponed untif Jan. 27. Can Can-telli
telli Can-telli will conduct the orchestra for
lour weeKs beginning March 12.
The tittle Orchestra, Thomas
Sehdrman..'. gave the first New
York performance and one of the
new North American performances
f Jlian OrrPBO-Kalae' "fantatu
de Nayidad" during its December
suuscnpiion concert.
.: On the same program was Mor Morton
ton Morton Gould's "Concerto for t tap
dancer and orcdesfrh
ny. Daniels as ."soloist." It was!
said to be the first tap dance per performance
formance performance in Town Hall. Orrego-
aatas is a cnuean.
Zino Francescatti, French vio violinist,
linist, violinist, will open b'isU season in
the United States in January and
from then until April will con con-certize
certize con-certize in 13 states. He will end
the tour with his 45th concert with
the New York Philharmonic-Symphony.
He made his American
debut with that, nrchoetra in
November, 1939. :
The New Music Quartet, one of
America's .most v'nrlzel chamber
music groups', has been selected
tor me -..international Exchange
Program sponsored by the Slate
Dennrtment It will mW a thrno.
week tour of North Africa, begin
ning in January, and then play in
Italy, t Germany, France, and
Spain. Its tour will be the first by
a quartet under1 th progcanv-
- The rhiin(Ie!lvfafyf3eni re revived
vived revived "Aaron Copland's h a 1 1 e t
music, ."Billy me Kid" for one of
its December concerts. It was
included on the same program
with 1 an orchestral suite from
Ravel's .; ballet music, :"Daphnis
ana tnioe. mm. v
" Richard Rodgers has been forced
to cancel his engagement to con conduct
duct conduct the Philadelphians in an
a)l-Rodger8 concert for the benefit
of their pension fund in March. He
recently underwent surgery and
his surgeon advised against any anything
thing anything so strenuous as conducting.
David Oistrakh, boviet violinist,
was soloist at a concert for the
benefit of the pension fund Dec. 19.
Two days later he played with the
New York Philharmonic-Symphony
in New York in a concert for the
benefit of. its pension fund.

MUSIC

ALL THE GUTS-AND GUSTO QF THE WEST..,
AS IT REALLY VAS!...
"TENNESSEE'S PARTNER"
. Release rtexj. Thursday atjthe "LUX" Theatre

I

Producer Kcnediit Boireatrs ordered two uniformed
guaiils (o keep a!i visitors off the set durjn? the filming of
Rhonda l i mill's bathtub scene In "TENNESSl Y.'s PAHT PAHT-NEH,"
NEH," PAHT-NEH," his KKO production in Superscope and Technicolor.
.Even John Pavne and f'.onahl Reagan, who with Coleen
Cray, also co-stnr jathts film version of the Bret Ilarte west-

VI
them clurinjf tl
Jnlormrd nl I s
era elasmc, wn mi,.:!
"t--fwiivJ-'Wliv i
! for pljl:e fniisunipron'."

Position Offered

WANTED.- Bi-lingual Man,
grapher with experience. TA TAHITI
HITI TAHITI jewelry Store, Central II-45.-
',
New Products
By JOSEPH W. MICHALSKI
United Press Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK (UP)- School
children and adults who take lunch
to school or work no longer need
De bothered with lugging a bulky
carrier after lunch.
They now are offered a metal
lunchbox that folds flat to 7-16th
of an inch when empty. When open,
it measures 8V inches by 5Uhs
inches.
It has a baked enamel finish col
ojed white inside, brown on top and
bmtom, and red plaid on the sides.
(H-S Distributors, Brooklyn, N.Y.).
Special work gloves tailored for
workers handling gasoline ana on
products now are on the market.
Fused to the glove's fabric lining
is an impervious skin based on
Bakelite vinyl resins.
tThe manufacturer says after 24 24-hbur
hbur 24-hbur baths in gasoline, petroleum
nhtha and other
solvents the gloves are still.flexi-
ble. The fabric uning proviues
strength to resist snags and tears.
Piastieote Glove Co.. Inc., Mil
waukee 12, Wis.)
For the first time women who
oloctin tnrkinc ran buV a
vrcni ..tmi'Mv
completely sheer and therapeutl-
.. . ; 1"U mil K1
cany correct siot-KinK. "cw
gauge hose is made with nylon
thread twice as thin and twice as
light as old-fashioned elastic stock stockings,
ings, stockings, the manufacturer says.
The stockings can be worn with
tt tvna nf time, for anv occasion.
i Mi;tinn thov nrnvide the cor-
red graduated support from ankle
to thigh '& recommenoeu uy w
tors. (Bauer Black, Chicago).
There is no need for the shower
n,.tinn t.m hnt nr rnld. A new auto
matic control operates on a thermo
static principle sucn as me iumfl
or air conditioner. .'
You set the control dial, and
from there on the temperature and
water pressure vt the shower re remains
mains remains the same. If cold water fails
or if hot water gets over 110 de degrees,
grees, degrees, the shower automatically
shuts off as a safety measure.
(Powers Regulator Co., akokie,
III.) '
Tvo-Lifed Oldster
Hanging Up Careers
i" ": -. V. .Mi- ..-i.lv .. V
snnwAr.ur, Muh., j- (UP) i
Oeorge Melvin, 92, has lived long!
life.
Melvin, who was a nationally I
i ... tnr mnnv vears. saidi"
IVIIIIVVU 1111,11.. v ---
he has decided to retire from his
second career in the noiei cusmess
which he started at the age of 77.
t.. innA An Movn- MlkH RUDer-
'XlUIIl WWIW. ...l-.T.,-
intendent at a milling company
v .j cmnrt nresulent of
the American Millers' Association
and Michigan Miners Assocm,..,
. At. .iir-,na it a miller. Melvin
became a room clerk at .the
Champs Hotel here ana ourws u t
last 14 years has become widely
known 10 iraveung uicu
guests at the notei. t
.i tkinlr it'c ahnnt time tO tOSS
5- iU onnnoh Cfllfl Me Vlll. WHO
A tl.li.n v .
looks 20 years younger than he is.
.'''"fV''
't: :.?,: t

''' ; '". '.'' '.'..-'. ''
. :-
' -I-
.... J
v.:':,;.-;'V t
XC":':-'.'

of this scene.
hirer's order, IMis rieminjr quip quip-I
I quip-I that the set was off-limits lo
: MUc aU,-arcu't v.e i!iouth:c (hh
' .' i AUvt.

MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031, ANCON, C Z.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. CZ.
FOR SALE
fljiscellaneons
FOR SALE: One electric fan,
large mtal datk, (mahogany eo
lorl, and wash baiin for beauty
parlor. Apply penonally to Ave.
Cuba No.- 38-29, nt te "Co "Co-misaiiato
misaiiato "Co-misaiiato Don Botco."
r
.L
n
!:'
if
"WE WANT . ."-An anU
mated Santa Claus listens to the.
' Christmas" desires 'Of these
.youngsters in Mt... Vernon,
(Wash. Standing 23 feet high, th
Santa moves his arms and has
a loud-speaker-system voice. He
was installed .by lit.- .Vea.-lioa
merchants. .' '. ...:")

FROM WATER TO SOUP-Turtle soup is what these over oversized
sized oversized critter$, wyi wind up in Heinz Sidel, left, and Ernst Scheld
look over some of the 78 giant ocean turtles in cold storage at
Frankfurt, Germitny. .The turtles, each weighing about 150
pounds, were shipped from the .West Indies.

ii

LITTLE; BUNDLE OF JOY-Mary Lee Locke, 3 months old,
. I weighed only ne pound, 10 ounces when she was born in Salt
J Lake -City,.-Utah, Sept. 22. After spending .2t.j months in an
- oxysert-ControHed inctibntor, sh? wpihs live pounds, one ounce.
, Doclot'5 kiJ "she's in "feN( fIiLT,t cr.i. rijiynr" Mary 'to "shown'smlling:-
at her mother. Mis. Willard G Locke.

FOR RENT
Apartments

ATTENTION G. I.I Jutt built
modern lurniihtd apertments, 1,
2 bedrooms, hot. cold water.
Phone Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT; 2-bcdroom apart-,
ment; hot water. Ricarde Aria
Street, Campo Alegre. Ine.utre -37th
Street No, 4-23.
FOR RENT: Modern two-bedroom
apartment, porch, living
dining room, maid's and laundry:
room, screened, hot Water.. For
further detail pleate-, call 3 3-4946,
4946, 3-4946, 3-6737. .'".
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apart-,
, apart-, ment beside Roosevelt Theater,
San Fiancisco, $65. Phone 3 3-5024.
5024. 3-5024. ';'':' -rr:
FOR RENT Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, cool,, clean, gas stove, re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, gauge. No. 182 Via
B. Porras, San Francisco.' Phone :
3-5582.' ''
FOR RENT: Modern two-bed-,
oom apartment, hot water, ga-
rage. etc. "D" Street end Alber Alberto
to Alberto Navarro No. 8, Apt. 1, "El
Cangrejo." ''
Bible Group Budge!
1$ Allien $$$ High
NEW YORK '(UP) A budget
for a956 of $3,858,000 has been
I approved by the American Bible
j Society's advisory council and its
I board of managers. The council is
j composed or 55 denominations and
j 17 women's church organizations.
The new budget represents the
largest peace-time" financial, pro program
gram program ever adopted by the society,
whose sole functions are the trans trans-lalion,
lalion, trans-lalion, publication and distribution
of the Brble without note-or com comment
ment comment and encouragement of read reading
ing reading of the .Scriptures.
The council cited.- emergency
needs' and an expanded program
as reasons for the increase in
budget. Church denominations sub subscribed
scribed subscribed $900,000 this year and
agreed to' trytoreach $1,400,000
by 1938, to meet the heavier de demands
mands demands for Scriptures.
1
1
mm

RESORTS

Crjmlich's Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modern conveniences,
moderate rate. Phone Gamboa
6-441.
Shrapnel's furnltbed house on
beech at Santa Clare. Telephone
Thompson, Balboa 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mile
past Casino.' Lew rates. Phone
Balboa 1866.
PHILLIPS Oceaeside Cottage,
Santa Clara. Box 435. Balboa.
Phone Panama 3-1877. Crleto--bol
3-1673.
Community Plan
For Fun Cited
KINGSTON, HI (UP) The
"Mira"cle of Main Street," in
Ridgelield, Conn., was described
recently by a UniversitypfRhode
iMinu projessor.
Dr. Marvin Rife, writing in
Recreation, published by the
isauonai recreation Association,
said citizens of Ridgefield mapped
out a year-round leisure-time pro program
gram program for its residents of all ages.
The town established a community
center where a variety of activities
for both -adults and children are
conducted.
"The volunteer efforts of citi
zens," he wrote, "have trans transformed
formed transformed the cold skeleton of an old
building into a- warm, friendly
community center,"
Dr, Rife was a member of the
center's board of directors and
program committee chairman for
two years before joining the Rhode
Island faculty,
Among the features of the center
are a canteen for teen-agers, open
afternoons,, week-end ,days. and
evenings and. lassesijn. ballet,
dramatics, dancing, basketball
French, photography jgolf,; a ski
club, a theatre 'guild and educa educa-tinnal
tinnal educa-tinnal movip A rlav'c a m D was
operated last summer... and a day
nursery lor pre-scnooi- cnuuren
was started this fall. ,
Dr". Rife said some of the factors
that contributed to the success of
i ho rt.nl r wprp "pntwi nld hard
work, thorough and accurate rec
ords, competent jeaners response
to public need, public relations,
regular meetings, central office
efficiency, flexibility of program,
inclusive nature of services and
economy,'1, . '. '..
Cardinal Spellman
Going To Hongkong
TATPTir Formosa. Dec. 31
(UP)- Francis Cardinal Spell-.
man,, flnman lauioiiciarcuuiMiuu
of Nsw York, left today for Hong-,
imno after visiting with American!
servlomen in Formosa and with j
the U S. Seventh Fleet. j
Spellman was entertained at din-j
ner by President and Madame!
Chians! hai-snek ounng jus iwu
day visit here.
230 T ANNI Villi sAf IV
STAMP FOR BEN This
stamp will be issued Jan. 17 to
rnark the 250th birthday of
Benjamin Franklin. Going on
sale in Philadelphia, Pa the
stamp.; features a reproduction
of a painting-entitled, ''Frank ''Frank-Jin
Jin ''Frank-Jin Taking- Electricity From
the Sky," by Benjamin West.
PUPPET SHOW TO GIVE
LAST PERFORMANCES
TODAY AT THE
NATIONAL THEATRE
The Italian Puppat .ow that
played: to a capacitv house 1n
Balboa-theatre Uust clt is eiv-
ing 3 final performances today
af the National Theatre at 3, 5
and 8 o'clock, at reduced prices
of 50 cents for adults and 2a
cents for children.
AS this Is the last opportunity
that local residents will have to
see this world-famous puppet
show the management- of tne
Companv wishes 'to advise the
aBubikJIut.theivshoulirjot-miR.ir

-mswr 7 i I V;A;

7

touay s penoimances. j
(Mercurio)

FOR RENT
Miscellaneous

FOR RENT: Sp.ciou. locale,
ground. Juste Aresemeha Ave Avenue
nue Avenue No. 37-11. Inquire 37th
Street No. 4-23.
LOST & FOUND
LOST: Wallet with identifica identification,
tion, identification, personal paper and cash.
Rtwerd. Ethel Helen Daniel.
Phone Balboa 3148
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT: 3 -bedroom house.
Call Panama 3-2633. :

AGIINALDO BOIJTRFAr P., Brazilian Ambassador toPanam,'
talks with Maf ., Gen. Lionel C. McGarr, Commanding General,
.US Army Caribbean, during a brief visit to Army Headquarters'
at Fort Amador-yesterday. The -new Ambassador' arrived In'
' Panama In' early December.,
J '. (US Army Photo)

P ''-v. .w.. i 1;

OVERCOMES HANDICAP One-aimed Max Dobis of St. PauL
Minn., manipulates the delicate parts of a watch he's repairing at
an exposition in Chicago, I1L Dobis, 38, was oneof the handi handicapped
capped handicapped employes who demonstrated their skills at the exposition.
He lost his arm during 'World War II, learned the watch repair repair-skill
skill repair-skill after the war, and now works as a watchmaker in a St. Paul
department store. y

OH, YEAH! A glance at this picture ami you'd think breakla t
in bed and morning serenades were part tit Marine Corps life. life.-But
But life.-But what's really poing on here" Is a pay-nil on a contest. Poit
.and Starboard sections of Naval Supply Center's Marine Guard
et Oakland, Calif., competed to see which could donate most to a
United Crusade fund drive.-' Starboard won. So having brea'r-

l'.-st in lied is Cpl. Herbert A. fchafler, wlu.'a Cpl. lleiuy R. Milaia
.au.uifii,toa.a &(Jd-fi)a;'aijii;lcie3a.uaJQ...a.ti!-;ul!jQ..

WANTED
Aparlnienls.

WANTED TO RENT.- Vacation
quarters, two or three bedroom -with
carport in Balboa. Reply
SRL. Box Panama 134.
for rent;
Uooms
FOR RENT. Beautiful fumith-
' ed bedroom with porch, hot wa
fer, for marired couple without
' children. Meals available. Apply
'personally: Av. Cuba. a 38-29,
. next to "Comisariate Don Botco."
FOR RENT: One small furnish furnished
ed furnished bedroom with bath for single.
person. Apply personally to Ave.'
Cuba No. 38-29. next to "Co "Co-misariato
misariato "Co-misariato Don Botco." '-,
-ii';:.,,':':'
,f A
" -a
1 f
j
;V'

1 f

1 t
f
. ?
4



Is!

I il l I
1 1
:
1 i
CAP IT OLIO
33c. 20c.
N A KEP ..;
STREET
- Also: -ROBBER
ROOST
TIVOLI
33c, ZOc.
Double in Technicolor
LADY GODIVA.
Also: ".
THIS ISLAND
EARTH
CEHTOAL Theatre
LUX Til EATH E
DHIVE-in Theatre
60c. 30r.
GREAT DOUBLE RELEASE!
YVONNE DE CARLO. In
SHOTGUN
In Technicolor! Dane Clark, in
PORT OF HELL
CECILIA THEATRE
R I O
VICTORIA
35c.
20c.
13c.
, 40c.
Great Release!
;sc.
40c.
60c.
3Gc.
1:10 2:43 4:46 -6:49 8:55 p.m.
SUPERLATIVE RELEASE!
Great Heart-Warming Comedy!
BOB HOPE, in
THE SEVEN LITTLE FOYS
In VistaVision and Color I
DOUBLE ATTRACTION!
, Robert Mitchum
in
fcNOT AS
A STRANG ER"
Also: ;. .',
'CANYON
CROSSROADS"
' Double :
l:i Tr'cnnii
"MAN WITHOUT
- A STAR"
'Also:..
TOX FIRE"
Romance and Suspense Filmed
. in Fabulous Monte Carlo!
Cary Grant
Grace Kelly in -ALFREND
HITCHCOCK'S '
r "TO CATCH A THIEF'
VistaVision and Color .; n
ROBERT MITCHUM. in
THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER
KATHARINE. HEPBURN, in :
SUMMERTIME
In TECHNICOLOR!

ti

(Boot Bmh

1 Drive On To Save Lives
:Over New Year Weekend

By United Press

CHICAGO. Dec. 31

Year's holiday

New

The (angled life of a spy is un-

tup r.Y in-fit TiVi'r r'lor San wsterday w ith one oi

Vu" ". f'n':1 most1 intensive drives in the

Jananrw ffrwernmonf. in UWM .infc vIMCd tTCSS piepaieO

War II while he betrayed them toi

me Kussians. The Russian-born
Sorge was a grandson of Karl
Marx' private secretary, He be became
came became a full-fledged member of the

(UP) The' Gov
weekend be-.nessse

the:
to

TAKING ON HALF A HELICOPTER A helicopter that can be dismantled is being tested by
the Air Force as a means of .quickly bringing troops to, combat areas. It's the Piasecki H-21
tandem-rotor helicopter, which carries 20 men. The craft would be dismantled, flown to the land
base jiea'rest 4he combat area, and then reassembled. It would then fly the troops to out-of-'
the-way areas. The forward halt of the H-21 is shown above being loaded onto a C-124 Globe Globe-pinaster
pinaster Globe-pinaster at Sewaii Air Force Base, Tenn. It is the first large helicopter to be portable.

I German Communist party after

Three
Papa

Presents-Laden Quints Find
Dionns III On Arrival Home

Ont., Dec.

r.t r.LANDEft.

(UP) Three of the uionne
Quintuplet? came home' laden
with presents for a New. Years
family reunion. today and found
their father an ailing man.
Annette Cecile and Yvonne
arrived at -the' palatial,; family
mansion, just before dawn :af ter
an all-night,; 400-mile drive over
snowy1 highways from Montreal.
The' fourth and; frailest of the
surviving1 quints, Marie, was left
behind, resting, with friends.
The father, Oliva, who had
been expected to reprimand
them.' for breaklnn awav .from
the family i group; and their
mother, met. them warmly with,
hugs and kisses. But the yarmth
of the welcome was tempered by
the state of ... their lather's
health. .......

31, breaking away from the family

and failing to. come home lor
Christmas. A
: The friend said the girls were
concerned over their father's
health and kept tip a ;. light light-hearted
hearted light-hearted chatter to cheer htm up.
' ."'We think, everything, will be
happily 'settled," the friend
said. .'There was no real- fight
in the family, it was only that
the parents were concerned, that
the girls were being wrorigly in influenced
fluenced influenced by outsiders."
'' He added the quints were ex expected
pected expected to leave for the return
trip to their bachelor girl apart apartment
ment apartment in Montreal Sunday night
' The trunk of the car. in which
the quints came here was filled
with gaily wrapped presents
which they will give other mem members
bers members of their family on New

Year's Eve in the French-Can-' Japanese spy

actum custom.
The girls were brought here
by a brother, Oliva Jr., 19-year-old
Canadian airman, who trav traveled
eled traveled with them In the family's
ehauf f eur-driven limousine. He
had joined .. with two other
brothers, Victor and Daniel, in
backing their father's charge
that the quints were ; breaking
away from home.

serving in the Kaiser's army, be

lhg wounded three times, and
discharged penniless.
Meissner, who knew Sorge per
sonally when Meissner was a
junior attache in the German em embassy
bassy embassy in Tokyo, did not learn
Sorge's true identity until the war
was over. He has collected in this
book a wealth of details about
Sorge 'and his spying unit from
former associates, newspapermen
and official reports. There is some
doubt as to what finally became
of "the man with three faces."
Official reports say he was hung
in Tokyo after his betrayal and
capture. But there are some who
knew him who" believe he was re

turned to Russia in exchange for

Frank J. Clement of Ten Ten-mapped
mapped Ten-mapped one ot the most

tne intensive campaigns, including
na- 1,000 volunteer National Guards

men..' 200 Guard jeeps and ambu ambu-lance.v
lance.v ambu-lance.v on the highways and Air
Guard planes aloft to spot violat violates.
es. violates. In many cities police offered
free coffee or free rides home to tonight
night tonight to revelers too tipsy to drive.
Police shifts- were inciea sod from

persons will dies, a new rec-'sjght to 12 hours, leaves canceled

foi a New Years holiday if and orcDarations made to take

1 li tabulate traffic fatalities from 6

p.m. tonight until midnight next

Monday.
The National Safety Council es estimated
timated estimated that during this period

420
ord

the figure is reached. That holi-, staen measures against offend

aay in mi cost io lives. ,ei-s.
Across the nation state and local Fo; the year Ihe council's fit; fit;-law
law fit;-law enforcement agencies pre-; urcs ihowed 34,090 traffic deaths

pared to throw every available re-thron.:h November. Using well-cs-

source into a grimly determined
fight to save .lives.
The: country was roused by th
tragic toll of "Black Christmas"
last weekend, when an. all,- time,
all-holiday record ot 21 deaths
was posted. '
In addition, the Safety Council

tabllshed statistical .yardsticks it

estimated that December deaths
wou'd bring the 1955 total to a
deadly 38,500.
Even more alarming, he coun council
cil council said, was the fact that for
nine straight, months this ejar.Aip
to and including November, the

Para "Dlorihe" was' "fep'orteirto

be suffering :from a heart, con con-dition.
dition. con-dition. Officials at North Bay
Hospital said he had been there
for three weeks recently for
treatments high blood pressure
and had come several times f or
heart-fxaminations.:. -;;. .-.
Reporters! who sawTDionne
Thursday and. today reported
he looked; much older than his
52 years. sHis hair was much)
grayer anc his face lacked color.
After greeting their parents,'
the 21-yearold quints ate a big
breakfast and-went to bed to
make aid the sleep lost on the I
long1 ride through sub-zero tem-i
peratures.'. ',Thls afternoon- they
got up and, joined the family.

a ciose juenu saia ine inree

L13 Dipper In Ulsh
To Move Bay Sands
In Rdcli:;::!ng lulb

Dyed Hair, Jel Rxr$
Pseudo-Ill Brands

MILWAUKEE (UP) Be Because
cause Because more and more persons who
consult doctors have imaginary ail ailments,
ments, ailments, a Cleveland physician has
devised a list of, ways for doctors
to distinguish the truly ill from the
neurotic patients.

Dr. Leonard L. Lovshin of the

Cleveland Clinic revealed his

methods in a recent speech to

members of the Interstate Post

graduate Medical Association of

North America at their" meeting
here.. .'j,,.,. ,...

announced that deaths for the death, toll was higher than in the

year will total 38,500, making 195oIS9mi mnnths last vear. For No-

ono of the deadlieston record. Ivemmi it was a full 10 per cent

; Only in 1936, lsJJ ana mi were : hieh?r

. 1 .1 no Arift r :

mert' mors inan oo.uuy irsiuc
deaths on the nation's streets and
highways. The record was estab established
lished established in 1941' with 39,969 deaths.:
For this weekend the council set
the pace with an- unprecendented
plea t'r the governors of all 48
states to consider the holiday a
"national emergency'' and use
drastic, measures to reduced ncci-

New Books

Miguel Cervantes, creator of Don
Quixote is the subject of a bipg-

rapny oy ne cusunguisnea Pan-j--W-- -;p th; ..." "Cloud of Islands," an en

isn novelist, oeoasuen juan .atoo.,----, -;---,, mnA 1 tlira ina record of a voyase in-

CERVANTES, .(Vanguard) skitl-l T- to 5tiange. exotic seas-a voj

muy transiaiea into ngusn By:- aPe wnlcn everyone with a
Ilsa Barea conveys the flavor of juu,-v ycorninw for adventure, ro.nan:e.
old Spain and the life and timesi r aP(j h-ip spa will want to take
of Cefvantes.. Those were the dml M W "i the Author Is amonthl
of the Spanish Armada and the. additional, manpower t.9 P c books nlaced in circulation dur-

hattl of Lenanto. Cervantes h m-' s "J issuing narsn f, -t ::,. h 0

self took part in the battl of I warnings to New Years ..ve-;

drunk. .. ;
Gov George Leader of Tennsul Tennsul-vanii
vanii Tennsul-vanii threw an "unprecedented"
force of more than 1,200 state po police
lice police into the fight and ordered all

rc-

Lepanto and sustained many in injuries
juries injuries including the loss of hand.
In Arbo's view Cervantes had only

one story to ten nia ownwmcn
he did superbly in "Don Quixote."
In his evaluation of Cervantes'

work. Arbo writes:

Ing the past week by the. Canal
Zone Library.

"Tlis source I drunKen drivers seized and

was none other than nis own me juij Panama he

and experience, his K.S'.n 'll k 'Scnt to the Galapagos and then

into the mouh, for 'Don tS

The Panama Canal forms the
sett ihs for part of the book
since .the author W. I. B. Crea Crea-iPCk
iPCk Crea-iPCk aboard his 20-foot ketch,
passed through the Canal on his

way to the Pacific islands- scv-

Dr. Lovshin cited these examples
as illustrations of neurotic symp symptoms
toms symptoms rather than organic ailments:
Female patients who dye their
hair platinum blonde or some
other color, wear dark glasses and
offer the doctor written symptoms.

. ALA WEDA: Calif. WUPW One
of the world's largest dredges was
shipped here recently by the Utah
Construction Co. to help complete
an immense ; land reclamation
project. .
Gver a period of years the nia nia-chine.named
chine.named nia-chine.named the "Franciscan" by
worker at a Benecia, 'Calif.,
manufacturing plant who- built it.
will suck up and redistribute

M hnd a lnno- talk With their S'u,' ine wiuom ot groomed: those who pluck their

. -w.u .. -l... it-i ,..vn .'uimB;.oy. 10 JU1 in SUU

acres of tidelands adjacent to this
City. ':,'
It is estimated b? Utah pnpinpprs

that more than,. ll.ooo.OOO cubic
yards ;of ?and,-will be required to
finish the job.
The 207-foot-talI dredeing unit.'

built at a cost of $2,500,000, has a

pivoi arc ot 350. feet

Persons whose

bitten, especially

fingernails are
when otherwise

father, who earlier this week

sternly -reprimanded them for

$cst Selt

en

(Compiled by Publishers' Wek1y)
Fiction '
MARJORIE MORNINGSTAR
Herman Wouk
ANDERSONVILLE MacKlnlay
Kantor
THE MAN IN THE GRAY
FLANNEL SUIT-Sloan Wilson
AUNTIE MAMEPatrick Dennis
THE TONTINE Thomas B.
Costain ,7
CASH McCALLi-Cameron Hawley
', Non-Fiction ...
GIFT FfctOM THE SEA Anne
Morrow Lindbergh
LVSIDE AFRICA John Gunther
THE POWER OF -.POSITIVE
THINKING Norman Vincent
Peale .v;.;
THE EDGE OF THE SEA-Rachel
L. Carson '-
HOW TO t.IVE 3B5 DAYSAYEAR
HOW TO LIVE 365 DAYS A YEAR
John A. Schindler --J
YEAR OF DECISIONS Harry S.
Truman -.. ..;

arc of 350. feet and edees

forward on the bay's surface bv

hurying its 36-inch suction pipe 50
feet into the underwater 'soil! It
progresses seven feet at a time.
Rotating cutting teeth at the
lengthy pipe's end loosen the earth,
and it is then pulled up through

the tube and transported 8,T00 feet
via another pipe-line to where it is
eventually diwcssitai The pumping
rate mainimQd by the gargantuan
soda stiaw is set at 2,000 cubic
yards of sand an hour. ...
AH this is made possible by an

8,000-horsepower electric motor,)

up on the dredge side in a
central control tower. Th,e,cpst pf,

running me sana-snuter g inner
workings is $40,000 a month.,

; Still, another expense,; planners

say, will be to replace the tube
through which the sand travels.
Although':-it is forged Of three-cighls-inch
thick steel, the sand's
abrasive action is expected to wear
out three of them by the time Utah
finishes the fill-in.

eyebrows and pencil in substitutes,

and relatives who accompany pa-i

tients to- the office and answer

more questions than the patients.

Dr. Lovshin Said such actions

are bints of possible mental con conflicts
flicts conflicts in the patients and should be
looked into if a thorough examina examination
tion examination fails to show any organic
difficulties. ...

completely that there was hardly
anything left for him to say in his
other writing." .
Most : mystery tales feature!
private eye, who unravels the
tangled skein of events and clues.
But Barbara, Frost't mysteries
spotlight a beautiful younf woman
attorney, Marks DeLancey, who
gets mixed up in all sorts of
troubles .and has some strange
adventures. In INNOCENT BY BYSTANDER
STANDER BYSTANDER (Coward-McCann) Mar Mar-ka
ka Mar-ka finds herself counseling a
musician suspected of murder.
There have been-two murders and
Marka herself could; logically he
the next victim. Is she trying to
Viiolf man Who" is waiting;

rhanpp fo kill her? Marka can't

called "highway marital law

Shhhhhhh!!
HARTFORD. Conn. (UP) -After
being given an award bv the

National Noise Abatement Council,
City Manager Carleton Sharpe con confessed,
fessed, confessed, in a whisper, that it was
such a hush-hush affair he didn't
even know Hartford had entered
the contest. ' t

The complete list of new books

and their authors placed in circulation-
by the library this week
follows:
Non-fiction : In Search of Se Serenity,
renity, Serenity, Rodley; Not Without
Tears, Day; Great iBritain and
the United States. Allen : RpRion'
Building, Dahir: Exploring Mars,
Richardson;: Automotive En Engines,
gines, Engines, Grouse: Human Relations
in Small Tndustry, Perry; U.S.
Camera. 1955. Perrv; The -Bfst
Arriprican RVinrt. St.nrip. 1fl."5.

.More than one of every five pat-)Folcy; Cloud of Island". C".i C".i-ents
ents C".i-ents issued by the U.; S. Patent lock: Italy. OstriMk: Top New

Office in 1954 were for automotive, York" Citf7n Bpctlr: fnd Fran"?

improvements.

G2I Pi!!3.7 PL-,ch:r'j
Holding 'Soli' Jcbi
- WAYNESVILLE, N C. (UP) -Pinching
plump cheeks is only a
part-time, "activity of politicians,
but it's a full time job for a group
of women here. ;-
The women are employees of

operated by one man who sits high 'rubber company (Dayton) and the

piump cneeKS are inase ot naives
of fofim latex pillows. Edges of the
halves must' be. pinched r together
after cementing. ,. Pinching is a
hand operation because the edges
must be fitted precisely. A protec protective
tive protective skin prohibits, shearing, since

this would expose tne inner foam
to oxidation. Appropriately, the
women are called "pinchers" and
each nips several thousand pillows

a day.

Two of every three passenger
car and tln-pp of everv four irnrkt

believe he's the guilty one (Maybe jbached on the South Shore and

she's in love with him.)' Anyway,; hides that were scrapped."

it's pretty. exciting, wna; wun -icsa'

mancuyerings. an aumennc iriai
scene, 1 couple of; murders and
darned near a third one 1 v

Aaint Herself, Luethv.

Firlion: Leaven of Malice.
Davis;- The Fmicrants, Lam Lam-rnlnir:
rnlnir: Lam-rnlnir: Lfiuh Till You Cry. Man Man-Kowits:;
Kowits:; Man-Kowits:; A Room In Pfir!,. Msnnr

and The Way to the Gold, Steele.

Dining out has about the same
relationship to eating as portrait
painting has to barn painting, ac according
cording according to a book by a famous
'inPrinrtt.' Maurice Creicen VTHE

DINER'S COMPANION (Crown) t

explores th fine pomts of .this,?
"art" such s how the diner,,
should behave, how and" what to

order, What i expect in tho way,
of food, drink, and service, how
much to tie and when. He also has 1

some good tips on dining on ocean f

uners, pianes pi Tr-iT j if
4auranU..Dreicer has .distilled his
dining wisdom from millions w
miles of world travel and visits
to more than ten thousand
restaurants.

r

L

THROWCACK TO A BYGONE ERA Scenes like this showing horses frightened by an auto automobile
mobile automobile were common enough in the early 1900's, but they're pretty rare today. Matter of fact,
dray horses themselves are rare. This picture was taken on Mackinac Island, Mich., where, except
in emergency, no cars are permitted on the island. So when Buick decided to take its 1956 models
there for advertising photos, special permission was ncce-sary. The islands City Council required
the cars to be towed through the city behind horse-drawn carriages instead of running under then then-own
own then-own power. Despite the fact the cars were towed behind slow-moving wagons, this team of horses
. an4.,anpltierb?came frightened and ran away,

Employment Rise
For '56 Is Seen
Bv Job Experts
WASHINGTON (UP) .- Gov

ernment economists predict inai
employment will rise some more

in the first .nauv 01 io dui ui
with the leans and bounds of 1955.

-At the same time, paradoxically,
the possibility of growing skilled j
labor shortages is c ropping up, if
particularly in the .aircraft, ma-
chinery and metals industries, ji
Fot the second half of 1956, I
economists are more uncertain, j
Secretary of Commerce Sinclair,
Weeks has said he is "confident r
that business activity will increase f
in the first six months. For the re-1
mainder of the year, he said he's
"optimistic." !j
Following the job slump ia 1954,

employment rose by a spectacular
5,340,000 in -the first eight months
of 1955. A record 65,489,00.0 persons
held jobs In August. ThisViivas
1,800,000 more than the previous
record set in August, 1953.
iTncmnlnvmpnt started out In

1955 at 3,347,000, the highest level

for the month since 19jO, rose
again slightly in February 1 and
then declined to a low point for
1955 of 2,131,000 in October. This
was still almost 900,000 higher
than the postwar unemployment
low of 1.240,000 in August, 1953,
but 600,000 lower than in October,

SHOWIISG AT YOVR SERVICE
CENTER THEATRES TODAY

Diablo Ills.' 2:30, 6:15, 8:20

tan TUREB
Edmund PURDOM i
"THE PRODIGAL",
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GAMBOA 7:00
"YOUNG AT HEART"
Tum. "THE PRODIGAL1'

GATUfj 2:30 7:00 "'
"MAN FROM LARAMIE"

Tues. "Five Against The House"

Margarita 2:30, 6:15, 8:10

Clark CABLE
.'. Siiwn. HAYWARO .,
"SOLDIER OF FORTUNE
- CmemaSco(e Color!
Mm. "ROMEO, and JULIET"

JL

Cristobal 2:30, 6:15, S;20

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WAtT. DISNEY'S :
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Technicolor'
JkiH Showing MONDAY!

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SANTA CRUZ 6:15 8:15 CAMP BIERD 6:15 7:50
"Mississippi Gambler" I I'Tarzan and the She-Devil'

i

'3

JEWEL OF A JOB Seven hundred work hours antka few simple
household tools created this car for Robert Peder5n a Nors'
Denmark jeweler. He's at the wheel, proudly showing It to a
friend Repairing watches by day, he workod on his "dream -boat
in the evenings. He rebuilt motor and frame and made a
new body from sheet metal. . ,,

1-

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The most modern equipment
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f ACE FIGHT

TRE SFNDAf AMmiCAS
SUNDAY. JANUA-T I. 11
Year's
a j classic 10-;
A n T f
YV

I i f

Empire Honey, Kadir,
Mossadeq Top Choices

; 'Six of the local track's best horses are sched scheduled
uled scheduled to dispute the $2000-addcd purse in today's one
jnile New .Year's Classic at the Juan Franco oval
The "experts" opine that the event should be a
three-sided battle among Empire Honey, Kadir and
Mossadeq.
'iThe probable mutuels choices will.
' Y the entrv of Emoire Honey Pappa Flynn. once an outstand

nd Albatross. Empire Honey was ing contender for the track cham-

a'n1 improsive winner in the $10,'

000 added Nov. 3 Classic and in
his only outing since then romped
to an easy two length victory over
a field that included Kadir and
Pappa Flynn.
Kadir has one of the best re records
cords records of competitors at the Juan
Franco track during 1955. He won
$ight races, Avas second four times
and third twice, never being out
of the money.
Mossadeq has proven to be an
A 1 mud-runner. In his most re recent
cent recent staTts he has been practical practically
ly practically unbeatable, losing only to form former
er former ublemate Mufti in his last five
tarts. Mufti recently was sent to
he U.S.
Albatross was second to Mos Mos-iadeq
iadeq Mos-iadeq last Sunday in an impres impressive
sive impressive effort. He is the fastest horse
!&i this race and could go- all the
way if a flowed to set his pace at

pionship, has been in the doldrums

of a bad slump for months and

only recently has shown signs of

coming out of it. He was seennd

to Empire Honey in his last start

two weeks ago. His workouts in indicate
dicate indicate that he is again in top form
and could spring a surprise.

Polcmon, a promising Chilean-

bred colt, is the "baby" of this
field. The Stud Valentino's pros

pect is only three-years-ojd but
has shown sufficient class to war

rant his owner's taking a chance
against this topnotch bunch of ra

cers. At 112, Polemon will be
getting a 14-pound pull in the
weights from the older horses. The
one mile distance should -be to his

liking also.

All in all, the race promises to

be a thriller from start to finish.
Ten other races art included on
the program.

mm

PANAMA PRO LEAGUE

'Teams-

Won Lost

Spur Cola 9
Chesterfield....- 4
Carta Vieja 4

1
8
8

Pet.
.900
.333
.333

GB
6
6

LAST NIGHT'S RESULT: Open Date
ariUS AFTERNOON'S GAME (Olympic Stadium).

.Chf'&tPrTiM tV.Mnn fUtt vo Smit-Tnla (Trtra 1.1 V 4 Yosikito

fc uame lime: j:u 6 Partai

ingle Game At

Ivrnoic St ad

mm l his

PM.
,- ...... -if

Juan Franco Graded Entries

rP. Hor

Joeke? Wet

COMMET

ODDS

1st Race "I" Imported 1 Fgs. Purse $375 Pool Closes 12:35
F1KST RACE OF THE DOUBLE

1 Copar
2s. Windsor
3 Atom O
4 Chic's Ned
5 Our Fancy
6 Double In
7 Maruja
8 Cadrino
9 Coronelino
10 Fangio

L. Giraldo 114 Distance major handicap
A. Credidio lOOx Little chance at best
F. Godoy 105x No explosion here
V. Castillo 124 in peak form now
O. deLeon 97x Not this time
G- Ramos 105x Depends on start
R. Gamero 103 Has shown nothing
E. Campbell 117x Ran well in last
J. Gongora 114 Hard to be a the re
. b. Baeza lQ5x Might improve now

5-1

10-1
50-1

2-1
30-1

10-1

15-1
2-1
2-1

5-1

Imp. Non-Winners 614 Fgs.
2ND RACE OF THE DOUBLE

2nd Race "Special" 2 and 3 yr.
Purse S500 Fool Closes 1:15

1 Malaga A. Mena 115 Fair trials reported
2 a Star F. Godoy 105x Plenty early foot
3 Panicus J. Gongora 107 Good speed, too
4 Single Slipper M. Ycaza 103 Form indicates
5 Golden Corn H. Ruiz 112 -Looks good in preps
6 Kensington V. Castillo 112 Could score in debut
7 (White Apron A. YcazS 115 -Will fight it out
8 (Hurling Park B. Aguirre 115 -Could help entrymale

4-
3-'
5- 1
3-2
4,1
5-1
2-1

2-1

3rd Race Non-Winners 4'i Fgs.Purse $250 Pool Closes 1:45

ONE TWO . :
1 Disque A. Vr-ldivia 110 No recommendation v 10-1
2 Edtcto G. Montero 107x Nothing to indicate 15-1
3 Con Dlnero II O. Madrid 103x Showing improvement 10-1
4 Blue' Moon A. Ycaza 110 Royal Coup-Purple Spray 3-2
5 Golden Fun B. Baeza lOOx Poor recent races 15-1
6 Don Manuel M. Ycaza 108 -Ran well in. last 2-1
7 Cachlta, K. Flores 117 -Strong race in debut 3-2
8 Erimax A. Gonzales 98x-Good early speed 3-1

4th Race "F" Natives 7

Fgs. Purse $275
QUINIELA

6th Race

1 Eric
2 Chivilingo
3 Fuerte
4 Hipocrates
5 Begonia
6 Tilama
7 Salero

C Imp. 7 Fr. Purse $650 Pool Closet
FIRST RACE OF THE DOUBLE
O. Sanchez 122 Vastly improved
J. Jimenez 107x-Could spring surprise

J. Gongora 108 Last two were weak
A. Ycaza 122 Back in good form
B. Baeza 102x Must go lower
J. Cadogan 103 Would pay well
M. Ycaza 115 Improving steadily

3:35

3-2
30-1
15-1
3-1
20-1
10-1
2-1

7th Race "D" Imp. 7 Fg. Purse $600
2ND RACE OF THE DOUBLE

Pool Closes 4:05

1 After Me G. Sanchez 113 Will fight it out 3-1
2 OndaReal S. Carvajal 105x Early spvd only 15-1
3 Iguazu R. Gamero 115 Runs wide on turns 4-1
4 M..Stuardo A. Vasquez 110 Proven- in-and-outer 15-1
5 Fenix M: Ycaza 06 Stopped badly last V 1
6 (Galisto r B. Aguirre 115 Usually elose tip 3-2
7 (Mayflower 115 Has high rating 3-2
8 Postinovich) A. Gonzales 109x--Could help entrymate 2-1
9 Cachafaz) V. Castillo 115 -J"oor ride in last 2-1

Pool Closes 4:40

8th Race "H" Natives '? Fg.riirse $275

QUINIELA
1 Mufieco H. Ruiz 106 Rates chance -here 5-1
2 Oklland '. H, Alzamora 113 Possible upsetter ; 4-1
3 ITvuvuv 8. Carvalal 103X Quits badly in stretch 10-1

i Avisna L. niraldo 120 Should beat these 3-2

5 Papa Rorra A. Vasquez ll2 Impressive in debut EVEN
6 Historla J. Cadogan 109 Strong finish last, 3-1
7 Choly J. Carrefto 112 Jockey handicaps 5-1
8 La Pampanlni G. Monte. 105x Should be close up.., : 8-1
9 Folletlto A. Gonzales 10Rx-Plenty early speed 4-1
10 Bagdad B. Baeza 107x Has strong finish 3-1

9th Race T" Inip. 7

Fits. Purse $500 r
ONE TWO

Fool Closes 5:15

Pool Closes 2:20

1 Florera
2 Oro Purito
3 Valley Star

4 Marianina

0. de Leon. lOOx Despite weak rider
S. Carvajal 109x Bleeds at times
F. Godoy HOx Last two excellent

B. Baeza 101x Must go lower

1 Regis.
2 Rablblanco
3 S. Velluda
4 Wlnsaba
5 Marllii
6 (Fllon

7 (Don Jaime

R. Gamero 100 Good chance in mud 8-1

J. Cadogan 117 Form indicates 2-1
A. Gonzales 107x Will be close up 3-1
G. Ramos 97x Longshot possibility 8-1
S. Carvajal 103x Top contender here 3-1
B. Baeza 97x Could get up now 2-1
J. Phillips 112 Last doesn't count 2-1

5th Race "A-B Natives 7 Fg3. Purse $375

Pool Closes 2:55

1 Petite

2 Nacho

3 Metto

H. Ruiz 108 Could get up here
B. Baeza 97x Rates good chance
A. Gonzales 96x Usually moves late
A. Vasquez 117 Back In top form
A. Ycaza 110 Should be close up
J. Phillips 112 Poor race in classic

3-1
3-1
5-1

5 Merry Mason J. Goneora 115 Showing. Improvement

6 Donny Boy
7 Persiflage
8 Brisk
9 Riscal

A. Ubidla 105 Apparently off form

L. Glraldo 118 Improving steadily
V. Castillo 112 Could surprise ,;
G. Ramos 112x -Will score soon

10th Race New

Year's Classic
Purse $2000

I 1 Mile
Pool Closes 5:40

1 -Kadir A, Vasquez 126 Consistent performer
2- r-Pappa Flynn A. Ycaza 126 Would pay nice odds
3polemon L. Giraldo 112 Taking long chance
4Mossadeq K. Flores 126 Will fight it out
5 (Albatross B. Aguirre 126 Will set the pace
8 (E. Honey G. Sanchez 126 Seems best on form

3 2111th Race "E" Natives Fgs,

3-1 '1 Rina Rol

Purse $275

L. Giraldo 120 Fastest at getaway

3- 1
10-1
2-1
30-1
4- 1
10-1
EVEN
15-1
15-1

2-1
5-1
4-1
2- 1
3- 2
3-2

League Leading Spur Cola
To Send Bob Trice Against
Chesterfield s Don Elston

By J, J. HARRISON JR.
The league leading; Spur Cola Sodamcn, who
have been idle since they whitewashed the Chester Chesterfield
field Chesterfield Smokers, 3 to 0, Dec. 28, take on the Smokers
in a single game this afternoon at 3:30 at the Olym Olympic
pic Olympic Stadium.
Seeking- revenge for the only' the stadium Friday night was
loss he and his team have suffer Kellman.

ed this season, Is Bob Trice, who
was beaten by Chesterfield Dec.
22 in a 12 to 5 drubbing.
His opponent will be Don El Elston,
ston, Elston, who Is scheduled to make
his first start.
Trice has won four games.
The tobacco chawin r:ght r:ght-hander
hander r:ght-hander who did not have it in
hli last effort, gave up a total"
of four base, hits, seven runs
and walked two Chest; rfleld
batters in four innings of
work.
Elston has been effective In

relief stints. He got a good

workout in a losing ca u s e

Thursday night when the Carta
Vieja Yankees heat the Smokers

10 to 6. t
Elston gave up three :htts and
no runs in four and one-third
innings after starter Wally Bur Bur-nette
nette Bur-nette and Alberto Osorio were
shelled from the mound.
Manager Leon Kellman and
his Sodamen have been sail
in merrily along while rack rack-Ing
Ing rack-Ing up their impressive 9-1
record. V ; r

One of the, happiest men

The Smokers' double loss nut

Spur Cwa six games ahead of
the pack, and placed the Yan Yankees
kees Yankees in a tie for second spot.
Juan Franco Tips

By LUIS HOMER

1 lopar Coronrlintt

z Mnrle Srpper

3 cachlta

4 Rablblanco
5 Yosikito
6 Salero

7 Galisto (e)
8 Avlspa
Vallev Slar
lftFmpire Finney
11 Don Brlgldo :

0. Star

Disque
Marilti
Portal
Hipocrates
rchafai
FoMetito
Oro Purlt
. Rina Rol

POOH-BAH

- SWANSEA, Mas. (UP)
PoUce Chief Arthur R. Ormsbe
is a busy man. He also serves as
town constable, inspector of ani animals,
mals, animals, dog officer fence viewer,
school attandance officer. Hnn.

at tor of slaughtering and auctioneer.

2 C. Girl A. Vasquez 113 Meets tough competition
3 Don Brlirido M. Ycaza 115 Should beat these
4 Lady Edna B. Aguirre 113 Could score again I.,.
5 Fuego B. Baeza 97x Returns from layoff

6 (Montero R. Gamero 109 Last two were poor

3-1 7 (La Guararefia

114 Back in best form-

41
32
2- 1
25-1
3- 3
3-2

: Mil.;
X mm

I'll I ,"!4l';7.J.;.:'! ..Hi
, .J; '(,,-!,' '-; ..,!-::

.A'-iimi .t.v(,i:,'- .,v;.'4ui t-. (v, hi.

Ti mil!, v

J 11 L lit I

J.'J'jJmri J. -.

l.f,,IHr. Ml

"Ml

1W

.3

a

10th Race

1 Mile

Purse: $2000 (Added) Poo! Closes: 5:40 p.m.

'.v,v...v.svx.x.:.:.:.x.:.:.

What could be finer than IIS
f. ;N:f to meet the opportunities : :-j
j :-j : : of the New Year with full
determination to make pill
N this the most prosperous fel

and happiest year of. p :

.them all. For your past., f p

4 business our apprecia-

t tion.

v -Xv.-.

1 KADIR.. (2) A. Vcsqusz ....... 123
2- PAPPA FLYNN (3) A. Ycaza ......... 128
,. ', '."'Hi' , ...
3- POLEMON (5) L GIrddo 112
4 MOSSADEQ (6) K. Flores 125
5 -(ALBATROSS -... . . ; (1) D.A:rrc 123

. ....



1 N .s u 1,1

A
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f.
T : c
J. 1 o

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1 T

ft

!

if

i 'cCllCi

I Jo

Arguirisn

Lossrs In
i --..-,.-
ilia Dovls

NEW .YCTiK (NEAT.- If youihaven't hfard the Engineers con

suspect that the fight camc's dead.hnvt 4ft win Bowl games, even if

you should, drop into our office, they have to turn a Riejicls in the

during the. reason ot good cneeri wrong direction., George Volkert

and headaches. y. l little Jimny Thompson and Stan

flowers will run up slide rule yar

In our frt ;ioe, "smoke sig'naV are

going up, fanned by the dciiows
.behind a long Havana. Sports Edi Editor
tor Editor Harry CTayson, conductor of
this coIuth habitually, istmaking
so much like' a semaphore he can t
get two pinkies down to the type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. Sports Cartoonist Murray
Olderman ducks behind) his pen pen-point.
point. pen-point. '
The fourth annual Battle of the
Bowls is on." Batting 'average to
date; Grayson .316; 1 ttdermaa
.64. -. ,. , .Ei
This is what was picked' up -on
the wiretap (censcJred)!-. J
ROSE BOWL

GRAYSON-You've got to stick
with the champion until he's, beat beaten
en beaten and the Big Ten has won eight
of nine since the Pacific Coast
"ctupir' nut it red neck with that

nart Miohican State came from

behind to beat UCLA in-the same
setting two years ago. This time
the Spartans will break-m front
and stay there like Nashua m the

match race wim awaps. .i.nm
21, UCLA 14. , v
OLDERMAN T-r.You fiot tphave
the ball to win, old boy, and the
way I figure it, he big Bruins will
grind the Spartans down to the
size of library assisants in a ball
control pattern set by Bulling Bob
Davenport and Slippery Sa m
Browni UCLA H, Michigan ,St.ft

A4 I 1 I

si

dage aeainst bulky Pitt. Georgia

Tech 27, Pitt 14.
COJTON BOWL"

GRAYSON Knocked off bv

tfvavy in the .Sugar Bowl a year

ago, the Mississippi Kebcli are so
mad that they're eating guys like
the Texas Christian Froggics, who
could lack the Rebs' all-round bal

ance. 'Mississippi '10, Taxis Chris
tiatt (. 'i :

OLDERMAN Jimmy Swink
could be the star of the day, and
if all "of Texas couldn't manage to

ctnn tho ItnrnpH Fro? ramber

what chance have' those p o V r

little country cousins from- Mis Mississippi?
sissippi? Mississippi? TCU 71, Mississipi 1

' GATOR BOWL

' GRAYSON -r Tom.'Thumb would

nnt have been any more mismat

ched hadhe tackled a giant with

an x than Vandcrbilt is in tak-

inr a run at Auburn, one of the

nation's great college teams. Au
burn 20, VamUrbilt 7.

t 'OLDERMAN r'The Commodor

es, navigating to me.uip umuci t
Guepe, aren't about to be capsized
hv anv Plainsmen, not as long as

they have top deckhands like
Charley Horton. Vandy 14, Auburn

10,

; r,--.'T ,-3

. PJW '111

ORANGE ,B6wC

GRA.YSQ5LUlari.lanJ.",!6,t
load of Oklahoma two years ages
i0dr ,uV T,nin haven't seen

9lh y After you name Ed
VeVeb nd Frank Tamburello Terp
backs have to b mden ti led.
Soroners have millions of. em and
i: in match. Oklahoma H,

JtiiCIUCIl w
Maryland 7
OLDERMAN Those Okies
have been striking oil sojong in
their own backyard, where the
going's soft, they won't know wha
W when they come up against
thbard rock Maryland line an an-chfred
chfred an-chfred by Bob Pellegrini and Mike
larttlusky They'll cap the gusher.

Marylnad 14, Oklahoma. ;
V SUGAR BOWL
-belrunning out of the split T, but
Jo&nnv Michelosen has anaged
to put a lot of Jock Sutherland s
jocl'em-and-sock-'em into hts
ier.ion .of it. The Panthers stirred
up plenty of trouble for Oklahoma.
The same type of game -should
take care of Georgia Tech and
then some. Pittsburgh 21, Gtorgia

Tech 13.

" FAST -WEST v
-GRAYSO-N The East may
h-awllopalong Cassady, but wild wilder
er wilder men than he have been roped
in the West, where there is a lot
of territory to choose from. Stan Stanford
ford Stanford beat Ohio Slate and the way
Southern California closed against
Noiro Dame could be the tipoff.

OLDERMAN Hopalong Cas-

sady in the wiw ana wooiy ii ii-what
what ii-what more natural setting- could

you'ask for a rorpp, wittr i,enny

Moore ou"" guetui i"--sureEil21,A.st.
; cum nnuF r.

OLDERMAN

Seems '.you Taxas Ttch

GRAYSON. Here's where guys
come to the end of the trail and
it's time for them to move over
for Wyoming. Texas Tech plays in
a different league, has two extra extraordinary
ordinary extraordinary tackles and a flock ot
injured Red Raiders are now back
in one piece. Taxas Tach 31, wyo-
m OLDERMAN The Cowpokes
done come a long way, and so did
we to get to the end of this -column.
No time to slip in the saddle
now. Go, go, go with Cowboy Joe
sMsetmoinvannii. Wvomina

TOUCLE TROUELE Harry (left) and Robert Beaube, twin
L ; h school halfbacks from Gadsden, Ala., put Auburn in a double
boiler of trouble. The Southeastern Conference slapped the
Alabama school with a $2,000 fine fur giving .$300 to each of the

brothers in an effort -to recruit.. tnfm. ;

To oLtainjlie lowest Iowtlown on tl." learn colliding in the four major Bowl ganif?, Jan. 2,
ISEA Service and The Panama American vent to the men in po sitioii to know most ahout them.
They are the famous coaches vhose teams tackled the competing squad..
Chuck Taylor directed Stanford jrichigan State and UCLA, the Rose Bowl combatant.
Bud ilkinson of Oklahoma and Maryland's Jim Tatum, vhose creations tangle in the Or Orange
ange Orange Bov4 are disciples of Missouri's Don Faurot, the originator of the split T. Faurofs Tigers
deployed against the Sooners and the Terrapins.
Andy Gustafson sent his Miami of Florida outfit against Pittsburgh and Georgia Tech, the
Sugar Bowl combatants.
Jack Mitchell's Arkansas Razo.rbacks bumped heads with Texas Christian and Mississippi,
who have it out in the Cotton Bowl.
Here, then, are the byline stories and closest prergame line on the Battles of the Bowls:'

iose

Ugor Qrange Qpjfon

Pacific Twilight Looo r
Race Starts Tomorrov :
. v k r -.
.. 1 .. .. JU
The Pacific Twilight Hague, Hotz his hatttrv mat. Red

will open the 1958 season to- Yieldlne. 'ollot'of the Lee Ion-'

morrow afternoon at the Balboa aires, may go with either lefty
Stadium with the defending rov Conrad or riehthandef

champion Lucky Strike team Charlie Hlnz In ouest of their

meeting the Canal Zone Junior inrst win.
College in the -.first, game of a The J956 season'should be one
doubleheader. The game is slat-l 0f the best in recent, years o
ed to get underway at 1 p.m. amateur baseball on the Pacl Pacl-in
in Pacl-in the second game the Amer-nc side with the return ftf th
ican Legion nine will meet the j school teams to the league and.
Balboa High School team wlthjthe addition of quite a number
the game to get underway 20Of Armed Forces personnel to
minutes after the completion of i the rosters of the Lucky Strike.

and American Legion teams.
The league Is governed by ah
Executive Board composed of,
the four team managers, Secre
tary John Fawcett and official
scorer Fred Mead. -'
The Grievance Protest Board
is composed of members who,
have been connected with Isth-:
mian baseball for many years;

whose support and aid will be

the opener.

The Lucky Strikers under
manager Larry Jones will send
lefty Webb Hearne to the mound
with Ed Frankhouser handling
his slants, behind the plate.
Coach Stewart; Brown of College
will send his ace moundsman
Lambert Mantovanl to the hill
with p. Yanes donning the mask
and pads.

In the nlehtcaD coach Karst. wn tn h Taon

?L e Hl?u School team has The members are Mr.. E. '' C:
Jrlll e -ithaLhe wUl send bi" Lombard, Mr. Henry L.' Donovan,
righthander, Ed Klrchmier, out; Mr. O. C Lockrldge, Major R. V.
to the pitchers mound with Tim'Griffiths and Mr. Frank, wildef,'

Chuck Taylor

By CHUCK TAYLOR
Stanford Coach :

I like to see'a "Pacific Coast

team win in the Rose Bowl, but
don't put me on the spot.

Sam Brown ot ulla impres

sed me as the fastest back on

pither side and the most accom

plished runner we faced, including
Howard Cassady in our Ohio State

cam Rnh Tjfivpnnnrt. an exceD-

tionallv hard runner from full

back: and a great blocker, is one

of the more formidable defensive

backs.

UCLA is a sound single wing

team with exceedingly sharp .ex .execution
ecution .execution of the fake pass and run

series. The reason they haven't

UCLA 21, Stanford 13 Michigan
St. 38, Stanford .14.

i at.

run their reverse as mucn xnis
year is Brown's ability to make
yards to the weak side on the

fake pass and run.

If Ronnie Knox is able to puy,

he would cause a rift in the par-

tans' defense, since UCLA opens

up with double flankers to.uti

ire his nassine ability.

Michigan State s Dacxs comDine

speed with hard- running. In our
game, Clarence leaks was their

nor spell (editors:: Walt ; Kowal Kowal-czyk),
czyk), Kowal-czyk), came on.

Quarterback tan Morrau, a

superlative passer, had good control-
of his team and was dan dangerous
gerous dangerous as' a runner. The Spar Spartans
tans Spartans throw primarily on tho run running
ning running play backfield action,

You ve heard aoout tneir mul

tiple offense,, but they are pri primarily
marily primarily a T tearo with flankers
and shift into single wing for

only a change of pace and to get
more power near the goal.
They're in the T with unbalanced
line to the right 80 per cent of the,

By

' Andy Gustafson

ANDY GUSTAFSON
Miami Coach.

IT SHAPES up as power ver

sus finesse in the Sugar xB o.w 1
off what Miami ran into when, the
Hurricanes opposed Pittsburgh

and Georgia Tech.

Pitt is the power team. It has

the v. stronger liner and 'is par

ticularly better at the ends. John
Pahtck and Joe Walton are a

couple of 220-pound flankers who
stand right in the way of the
Engineers' greatest asset, more
team speed- and the threat to

the outside.

Georgia Tech has the edge in

backfield talent with scooters

like a George Volkert, Jimmy

Gaorgia Tach 14, Miami i Pitt
aburgh 7, Miami 21

Thompson, Paul Kotenbcrry and

Stan Flowers featured in i n e
wide sweeps that develop from

the flankers Bobby Dodd features

with his split f.

Wade Michell is an accom

plished quarterback of three

vears' experience, although .he's

nnlv a 'innior with the size to do

just as good a job on defense. Top-'j

py .Vann is vaiuame stanqoy.

most impressivS back, ',-bujtvlater iTech4' can hurt jdu with; passing,
their sophomore right halfback, fV r-. v ; t
a name I can neither pronounce 'Pitt is" playing the split T for

the first time under Johnny

Michelosen. likes to grind it out

along the ground. ,.

The line is big. the type to push

you around and make way for

typically hard runners such as
fullbacks Tommy Jenkins and

Bobbv Gner and halfback Lou

Cimarolli. v

Their quarterbacks, Pete' Neft

and Cornv Salvaterra. do a good

job on the option, the bread, and

butter oi ine ortnoaox spiiv i.

Neft is the1 solid type while the

I'd probably rate Sparta nj unpredictable Salvaterra can

tackle Norm Masters ahead ot
Stanford's fine pair, Paul Wiggin

and John Marshall. They mrow
plenty of linemen at you.
UCLA is 'bigger u and. Us defen defensive
sive defensive line excels.

Michigan Stage has more depth.

break up a game.

RIGHT JOB

SANTA ANA, Calif. (.UP) -Joe
Pica works as a printer here.

By DON FAUROT
Missouri Coach
WHICHEVER team gets

best quarterbacking should

the

prev-

Jack Mitchell

By JACK MITCHELL
Arkansas Coach
MISSISSIPPI whipped Arkansas
r.oundly and physically with su-

ail in the Oranee Bowl eame be-perior blocking and tackling.

tween Oklahoma and Maryland. Noteworthy? Well, we had
Both stay -pretty much with althought Arkansas might win if
standard split or sliding T, using I we could stop their home run
flankers and floaters sparingly. I pass.
My impressions (for what they I v :
may be worth): I Offensively, the Rebels hurt us
Oklahoma one of the best; if, most with their quarterback roll roll-not
not roll-not the finest Sooner squads. Bud lout developing Into an option run
Wilkinson has produced ... trgror pass by Eagle Day or John
mendousr team sneed . morel Blalack. Fullback Paige Cothren,

offensive versatility than Mary- a fine athlete, is an effective fieldj

land because of deeper backfield! goal kicker from 30 to 40 yards,

talent, more backs capable of
breaking a gajne wide open with

Maryland 13, Missouri 12 Ok Oklahoma
lahoma Oklahoma 20, Missouri 0 ..'

long runs and Tommy McDon McDonald
ald McDonald at left halfback could be the
difference Sooner line, spark sparked
ed sparked by center Jerry Tubbs, guard
Cecil Morris and tacke Ed Gray
very fast and mobile. ... big
weapon in Oklahoma attack this
year is the running pass, thrown
by halfbacks McDonald and Bob Bobby
by Bobby Burris, . ,
Maryland always tough de defensively
fensively defensively because. Jim Tatum h
the greatest defensive coach in
footboll. Terps are pointing hard,
and that could be a bad sign for
Oklahoma, remembering how
Maryland got mentally ready for
UCLA and held the Uclans to a
minus rushing yardage ... psy psychological
chological psychological task should be easier
than Wilkinson' .Maryland's

top backs are Ed vereb and
Frank Tamburello, . was most
impressed by Bob Pellegrini at
center, Mike Sandusky at tackle
and Jack Davis at guard ... I'm

not sure Maryland's line mea
sures up to Oklahoma's on a two
deep basis.

They favor the 5-4-2 defense

with very fine tackle play by

Tax. Christian U, Arkansas 0
.Mississippi 17, Arkansas 7

FILLER FACTS
Longer-lasting and more com

fortable shoes may result from re

search on vegetable-tanned leather
insoles done by the U.S. Depart

ment of Agriculture.

Dick Weiss, Dick Goche and
Billy Yelvyrton, Their defensive
quarterback is smart, and don't
challenge that pass defense too
often.

Their linemen waste no time

getting off the mark. Ole Miss

blocking is sharp, its depth ade

quate. The Kebs are alert win
good balance between running and
passing.
y ... :.
' Against Texas Christian in the
Cotton Bowl, they'll run into a
powerful running game. Con Containing
taining Containing Jim Swink for 60 min minutes
utes minutes is like keeping a hold on a
greased porker. He's one of the
best. The Horned Fro? back do

an exceptional job faking.
You can't concentrate emphati

cally on their grourid attack, be-

casue they have a very adequate

passer in Chuck Curtis, who enm

pleted better than 50 per cent.

Texas Christian coaches had

Arkansas scouted to a split T.
Hugh Pitts, their All America

center, is1 tough to fake out of
position, and equally strong

against passing and running. Like
Ole Miss, the Horned Frogs lean
to a 5-4-2 defense and cover very
well against passing.
Their pursuit and gang tac

kling discourage yoO.

by
JOE WILLIAMS

it?'ne,eJ ,aJ?Jhre H?" tPres ogentry, ank quite oten 'the'rf 'the'rf-Jitnvnf
Jitnvnf 'the'rf-Jitnvnf I C?WW, and tndwmg. .Genealogical research, fir
tiistance. reiieah that mown t a,. i

So P niant fertility of that stalwart pwgemtor, b(J.

The taint sordid

fi- n9tH0WlRamuS' be8innln? with the Rose, which was to'seC
the patte n tor the now traditional football season hangovers.
I he Jlrst Bowl game was Stanford vs. Michigan, Jan. 1, 1902.
H!is 4 P'otlonal gimmick designed to focus national atten atten-Roi,0naMv!nCnPCt
Roi,0naMv!nCnPCt atten-Roi,0naMv!nCnPCt Vf y,in Pa?adena. CaUf., called the Festival Sf
Roses a foier.oon fete featurlr.ij rose-festooned floats on pararte.
' I tilt I1 1 lT)t n f t S h nx Ik&a.. j .' m .

A.

,:.:,

- vs.

i 4, T

mm

1 1

DUCKS UNLIMITED Jt' duck hunter's dream, this early morning scene'outside of Houston, Tex. Seconds before 'Photog 'Photographer
rapher 'Photographer Horace Tucker snapped his shutter, this 200-acre lake in the city s Katy area was blanketed from shore to shore with a
carpet of duiks so thick you could see only patches of water. The two hunters here fired away at a target impossible to miss miss-then
then miss-then estimated 200,000 ducks were in the air. Who'll argue this point?

7L

; This apvears to. have been America's lint studied attempt
JuZ,?1:, ? tro their winter ot discontent, an idea sub.

'c''u"eit "l norma wim spectacular returns in liC
ci eased population nvd realty valves. V
4 Jn la?t' Jl?Pda' thouh it waited 32 years, was the first,
ated in 33 and next Monday, with two undefeated teams; dkla-
,JntdJforvland' tt mH a fflm ihat ostensibly has mori
meaning than any of the others. 1 p
Louisiana with the New Orlean.-. Sugar Bowl. Rot InloUhi
CotrByoeThfr,hl f0U0Wed in by Tfxas nd the Dallas
nvan,. c I1, TWsJbi ?. Ir'eans rompletei the list, but the Rose,
Orange, Sugar and Cotton are the four major Bowls. V
. 'i.
How Bowls Grew ''
It will be noted that state industry is emphasized in th
K,"0" Losiana Is the chief source of "Sar c 1
cot on S JenlVhSl,B"'' BowL Texas leads th tion in.
M PI0d.JCtl0vahd.L6f course,, much of Florida'a economy 1.1
ht rt 0n u115' Mrethan once the California innovators muit
ihVOT d th- Prvinciallsi 'o Advertise the Sunklst orange and
the Hollywood peach cake. se
tihVPiH t irulh' th Rose Bowl got off to such '?.'
il!i'a9 tart. what' ttiith Michigan winning; 49-Q,thl-
iWnf motion xoas dropped and not resumed until'
Hi -J ic,?f West, slow to encourage football in
the Viing 'Jiad. 'progressed to a point of jormtdability. j
ws tale Wmgton State beat Brown, 14-0 in the 'I
nr'Zet7T- 3t,e Wowing New Year's Day 2tm la
knlT i PJ"m' lne Pasadens had no doubt They
Knew they had something big.
S9t AnLd;ilnde-,I.n t,he '5 renewal, a record 100,838
rnU ip,0 gate's 17-14 win over CaUfornia. The Johnny Johnny-Tlf
Tlf Johnny-Tlf ly. Bfwls w.e l experience rowin, pains of stmllaf
box-office rapture. : AM have had to rebuild or expand.
lVnnNrr,C?Jnynna?V' Cotton Bowl attendance was only
ta? B'nSWifS- fandard-Enrged facilities enable the Su?
uLff l I.tfanle ,62'000 ind th 0ranKe Bowl close to 70,000.;
Manifestly, the Bowls are here to stay. IT;

Ivy and Ballyhoo'

a fpoi,s ,s can't-mlss field for a promoter with" ariv kin
of sound program. The annual All-Star baseball game wis inl-i
in the arm. Racing was legalized in Hot Springs to helr sell the':
curative qualities of the Arkansas baths. P ?.
rf wJt haH ohahil oeme the most commercially exvloiW
tt sport we have. The Sneads, Demarets, Middlecof ts et aV
tnkrantla Kl? hering mens at tire whiskie fc!
S ,even tumbling Las ,Vegasy
vmliAMt Hnetred-.n0r aIt0,8ether. deplorable. Jam-s'
. o. Hifl?ad 0f he thm Boston' CoMrt and Montreal R.R j
was utilizing sports as a come-on as far back as 1852. He broughC
?J he .Yale-Karvar,d c"ws t0 balUWioo a New Hampshire vaca."
Hon site serviced by his railroad.
.nt'.r1!?, the beglnn'nts of what has become America's oldest
a" ent !6-rlyalry Never underestimate the power of a pre,s

OUT OF DOORS with

DOCS OF DIFFERENT TRADES
By JOE STETSON
Dog Editor

Do Airedales make good hunt-

i

the characteristic -i.4

a degree sufficient fa

and then
present to

make the dog, regardless of brec

a functional pointing dog.
Giving tonuue nn trail U mufi

! r JHM. x: I I .1 i ..

iiik uus; uw, i nnuw uiai uie namrai ioo. iiere (gain, man hat

Ca7Z'

5

Open Nightly from
8;00 p.m.

t.
PLOt-CAR

,"TXTTE
' "ICJACK)
: TABLE
.:-a-luci:
machines
"lond fti.nr

tA.

1

v, U

ASSIFIEDS'I .,..:'

Todov fnconto .35

. Martin & Lewis, in
"THREE RING CIRCUS"
Walter Brooke, in :
"CONQUEST OF SPACE"

20

Airedale was developed to be a

varmint dog, : and in that sense
is, indeed, a hunting dog.
But how about bird shooting or

rabbit hunting: The general an answer
swer answer would be no, thought Aire Airedales
dales Airedales are often important mem members
bers members of lion dog or coon dog packs.

Ye there have been occasional

Airedales that had sufficient in-

j.stinct to point, and desire to hunt
!to make Excellent bird dogs. Some

bred selectively to increase an i

improve the desire to give tong;, -and'
improve the quality of voir 1
as well as the nose and desire
follow the scent.
We expect voice on trail fro i
the dogs so bred, but it is n e t
limited to these breeds alone. Sus Sussex'
sex' Sussex' spaniels notoriously sound c ?
on trail. Often a cocker or sprin
er will sound off once or twn f
when excitied.
The dog is fundamentally "a
gregarious animal and, in na'tu:
travels in packs. The voice (
trail is a signal to the other mes

collie crosses not HHbers of the pack to join the run

t i on anieo Dy wnen making statements as

rocay IDEAL .25

Richard Donning tn
"FIRE OVLU AFRICA"
Maurcon O'Hara in
"CTKATITE UlTH THE
ATOM BRAIN"

have even btt-n good 'retrievers, to
boot. ; .'.,. ;, ',
Kvery now and. then a Labrador
re I'liever shows pointing instinct

ami one I Know was quite siauncn

Collies or
fri'dnfiiUv i

votin;:stTS i. i veiop a -liking) what breeds will or won t can
lor hunting- J'-vcry now and then i can't do certain things, we cl clone
one clone will point and ihe result' is j only speak generally becau
a prcjty gonfl bird (' .often one! there are almost certain to
which will 'double' on squirrel.-; I exceptions dogs that, dest
After 'all.-, the ins! t to point thrir having been bred for nu
is a c!;ir-if 1 i: f i i dogs to -generations to do certain tbir

a crcatcr rr : r c.;ce. It has j revert to their common henls,
jj been intensified in certain breeds
ZL J by selective breeding. Every now (Distributtd by NEA Strvijt

75

i - IV



? ''ijM,; !w s "1 v ...!r..,C. ""' 11 11111 11 11 .. i u -b
; ,r. (7S??r tulles -w:r ;.? r :;. ..v7-n,,r...: zt
rsZx fCrK( fas 1 china v-k; c' -J .wS, ;
iV Av " ? greater rifr,V br.-rV- ..nJ iv- ,r;- fTM

O.Vi 4.17 NAUTILUS, MAKHI'SWK K-J UCCCS- ALRT XPAX ifi

1 2'-T A-- CM
r
V

L .-..ESGiSEA TRIALS. YgAXLOVV... h-.lJl Pa.MEWiNEFU. Pl9 AT 7 fajiL PERJURY CA5..

iWDIIWA

if!
! I'
V
.. f

j Li La

UN

JANUARY

- f-Pahama President Jose Antonio
Remon asssssinaiea oy ma-ihine-gun
fire at Juan Franco
j1tt c Dut 27 per cent of 'its landj
race track.
area out 01 oounas 10 u.o.v.h..
riti7rns.
4-Jocph S. Petersen, Jr., sen
tenced to 7 years iiiiyii3uu-
ment tor iskidk uu"
Tnpnu from National Security
' Agency files.
7 Marian Anderson became first
Negro to sing with Metropoli Metropoli-lw"
lw" Metropoli-lw" tan Opera company.
10-President Eisenhower awd
t Congress for new power to re reduce
duce reduce foreign trade barriers;
I ttrmed such power "essentia
(" for the security 'Of the. United
' fitates and the rest of the
"world."
11 "Bx-Marshal Rodolfo Graziano,
Italy, died at 72.
15 Baron Louis de Rothschild, u,,
died. , ,i
17Submarine Nautilus, first
. jtomic-powered ship, started
sea tests.
riict- rantlirpri
NaUonalisteid Yikiang Island
il :"i.iK;... .tt.oir
?(WRobert P. Tcistram Coffin,
d!5! alfe' declared In
21-Three-day holdout by four con
victs at ftiassacnuseus
T.icn wtort as convicts sur-
rendered to citizen group uf
i negotiators.
Mr. nwiuht. D. Morrow, 81,
24-Pres'ident Eisenhower asked
Congress for authority to de-
,. lend -jformosa
nkr n Vc n Wirmllv. ended its
-tat'o nf'war with Germany
57-Firiancier Serge Rubinstein
strangled to death in
nartment
tt? senate... 85-3, authorized
President to take war action,
if necessary, to defend ior-
mosa. '.
29-Brooklyn Eagle shut down by
; Newspaper Guild strike.
29-President Eisenhower signed
- Formosa defense measure.
FEBRUARY
5 Pierre Mendes-France
ousted
as Frencn premier.
r tt c ith vo. ordered to nc'p
Chinese Nationalists evacuate
' the Tachen Islands.
8-Georgi Malenkov resigned as
U.S. S K. premier, suucetpuvu vj
Marshal Nikolai Buigaum. .
i- Dainion sirliner crashed on
mountain 50 miles northeast of
Rome; all 29 aDoara pensneu
Ronsrsi F.lprtric research lab
Oratory announced creation of
synthetic diamond.
17 Britain announced ability lo

produce the h-mii"".
18 Trans-World airliner, Albuquer Albuquerque
que Albuquerque to Santa Fe, crashed in
' Rocky Mountains; all 16
aboard killed.

20 UgUSt UOUies, BUiiyencu iii?,-
gcrman in a Brooklyn, "ride'
' -murder,- shot Head in East
Harlem.1, flat after a two-hour
Siege by policemen. -22
Small nuclear device, believed
to be best of prototype for mis missile
sile missile warhead, exploded from
tower on Yucca Flat with force
that jarred cities 135 miles
away.
22 Paul Claudel, French diplomat
and poet-playwright, died at 86.

HJ, ESS 13
mm m

iuuay iOirmTnmrT) a it

.-40c. l
75c.

STUPENDOUS RELEASE

NOTE: When you buy your ticket to see "TO CATCH A
TIIIKF," ask for a ticket for the big raffle of three (3)
beautiful dresses from Feliv B. Maduro, Rhoda's and
Antonio's, that will be given away during the show. For
information." caH Tel. 2-25C0.

U r"

J,
if,
4
. 1 J

" i I
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S I J

Color by TECHNICOLOR
win, JESSIE HOVCB LANDS JOHN WILLIAMS
' Oirtcl.d by ALFRED HITCHCOCK
- crnply by JOHN MiCHAf L MAVtS

as
French premier.
27 West Germany's Bundestag
overwhrlmingly approved arn arn-ing
ing arn-ing of Bonn in North Atlantic
Alliance,
27 American comedienne Trixie
Friganza, 84, died.
MARCH
1 Prof. Bruno Pontecorvo, top
British atomic scientist who
disappeared in 1950, revealed
as working i nU.S.S.R. on atom
ic energy research.
2 Rev. George Bissonnette, Amer American
ican American Roman Catholic priest in
Moscow, ousted by U.S. S.R.
4 American Anna Louise Strong
formally absolved of espionage
against U.S.S.R.
7 President Tito said Yugoslavia
was now capable of producing
nuclear energy.
7 Atomic Energy Commission set
off its biggest nuclear explosion
in Nevada; 36th atomic blast
within U.S.
8 Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles warned Communist Chi
na U.S. was no "paper tiger."
H-Sir Alexander Fleming, 73 dis
covercr of penicillin, died.
13-King Tribhubana of Nepal, 48,
16-Strike-bound Brooklyn Eagle,
after 47 days of strike, an
nounced it would never publish
again.
16 Documents, of 1945 Yalta ac
cord made public.
19 Berlin opra director, Erich
Kleiber, fled to West Germany
with family after resignation.
19 Harold E. Stassen named spe
cial assistant on disarmament
. problems.
20 Count Michael Karolyl, ex-
premier and President of Hun Hungary,
gary, Hungary, died.
24-John y. Davis, 81, died.
28 John Marshal Harlan sworn in
as associate justice of Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court.
Court.
31 Joseph Pulitzer, editor and
pumisner ot at. ixiuis fis
. patch,' died at 70. ,
APRIL
2 Southern Philippines rocked by
earthquakes: nearly 200 dead
5 Sir Winston 'Churchill resigned
as Britain s prime minister.
6-Sir Anthony Eden, succeeded
Churchill.
6 Chase Manhattan Bank branch
in Woodside, N.Y.C. suburb,
robbed of $305,243.17.
7 Theda Bara, silent movie star,
died at 65.
11 Virgin Islands' "quickie di divorce"
vorce" divorce" thrown out by U.S. Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court. i
12 Salk polio vaccine revealed as
successful.
13 Gen, Peyton C. March, U.S.
chief of staff in World War I,
died at 90.
15 U.S.S.R. and Austria agreed to
sign a state treaty ending 10 10-year
year 10-year occupation of Austria.
18 Iinre Nagy, Hungarian pre
mier, purged by Communist
Party; Anuras liegedus named
new premier. -18-Dr.
Albert Einstein, 76, died
' in his sleep. ,
25 P resident Eisenhower an
nounced plans for an atomic-
powered merchant ship for a
peace tour.
25 Actress Constance Collier, 75,
died.
28 Civil warfare broke out in Sai
gon, Vietnam, v.
29 Giovanni Gronchi elected third
president of Italy,
i j ca
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23 Edgar Faure confirmed

WAY
2 Premier Ngo Dinh Diem re

tained control of South Vietnam's
army after 15-hour struggle for
cower.
3 Benjamin F. Fairless retired as
head of the U.S. Steel Corp
5 Western Germany became a
sovereign state.
6 U.S. halted flow of polio vac
cine pending further study.
7 U.S.S.R, voted end of friendship
pacts with Britain. France.
9 Main exhibition floor of New
York Coliseum collapsed; 1
man killed.
9 Sewell Avery, 81, resigned as
chairman of Montgomery Ward
& Co.
13 U.S. freed Salk vaccine for
million7 polio shots.
13 Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor nomi nominated
nated nominated to succeed Gen, Mat-
. thew B. Ridgway as U.S. Army
chief of staff June 30.
13 Gene Symonds, United Press
correspondent, killed in Singa Singapore
pore Singapore rioting.
15 Foreign ministers of U.S., Brit Britain,
ain, Britain, France, U.S.S.R. and Aus Austria
tria Austria signed treaty restoring
Austria's independence.
16 Rocky M a r c i a n o retained
world heavyweight boxing title
with T.KO over Don Cockell in
ninth round.
17 Owen Roberts, former U.S. Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court justice, died al
at 80. I
18 New non-stop record for single single-engine
engine single-engine jets set by four U.S.
Thunderjct fighter-bombers in
run of 4,840 miles from Japan
to Australia.
19 Argentine's Chamber of Depu
ties voted to eliminate Roman
Catholicism as the nation's con constitutional
stitutional constitutional religion.
20 Industrialist George A. Sloan,
61. died.
23 Albert Anastasia pleaded guil
ty to income tax evasion.
24 U.S. declared all Salk vaccind
safe, exceprtwo lots from Cut Cutter
ter Cutter laboratories.
25 Rear Adm. Arleigh A. Burke
named chief of naval opera
tions, effective Aug. 16.
25 Kansas. Texas. Oklahoma
. Missouri, Arkansas lashed by
tornadoes; more than 100
deaths: 700 hurt.
29 Britain's first serious railroad
' strike in 29-years began.
30 William Vukovich killed seek
ing third straight victory in
500-mile auto classic at Indi
anapolis Speedway.
31 Chinese Reds announced, re
v lease of four U.S. airmen.
31 U.S. Supreme Court directed
states to end racial segregation
in public schools within "rea
sonable time.
JUNE
2r-Yugoslavia and U.S.S.R. issued
joint declaration on German
and China unity.
6 Ford Company and United Auto'
mobile Workers reached his historic
toric historic 3-yeat pact,' including
modified annual wage,
7 Prime minister Nehru of India
arrived in Moscow on official
Visit. i
9 Swedish tanker Johannishus col collided
lided collided with Panamanian freight freighter
er freighter Buccaneer in English Chan Channel:
nel: Channel: 20 perished; 23 saved.
11 Walter Hampden, actor, died
at 75.
12 Seventy -one persona were
killed, 75 injured at road race
in Le MANS, France, as. auto
plunged into crowd.
14 Seventeen day old railroad
strike in Britain ended.
16 Argentine rebels bomb govern government
ment government buildings in Buenos Aires
in revolt against President
Juan Peron; revolt crushed 24J
hours later.

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17 Theatrical producer John Gol-
den, 81, died.

18 Spanish court ruled Catholics
may marry outside the lanh
19 Jack Fleck defeated Ben Ho-
g an, 69 72, in U.S. open golf
play-oil.
21 Lloyd Paul Stryker, criminal
lawyer, died at 70.
21 President "Eisenhower signed
three-year Reciprocal Trade
Agreements Act.
22 Robert T, Stevens resigned as
secretary of the army.
23 Passport ruled inherent right
by U.S. appeals court.
24 White House announced an "in "inexplicable
explicable "inexplicable and unwarranted"
attack by Soviet planes on a
U.S. naval patrol aircraft over
international waters in the Ber Bering
ing Bering Strait area on June 22.
26 Borrah Minevitch, "King of 'he
Harmonica," died at 52. :
28 Senate voted 4241, to scuttle
President Eisenhower's plans
for atoms-for-peace merchant
.Ship. ;
28 Perjury case against Owen
Lattimore dropped by govern government.
ment. government. 29 Winston M: Burdett, of Colum Columbia
bia Columbia Broadcasting System, testi testified
fied testified he had been a U.S. Com Communist
munist Communist Party member from
1937-1942 and had engaged in
espionage for Russia overseas.
29 State of siege ended in Argen Argen--
- Argen-- tina.
JULY
11 President Eisenhower ordered
cancellation of Dixon Yates
' power contract.
13 Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby re
signed as secretary of health,
education and welfare.
16 Casablanca placed under mar
tial law as result of race riots
17Twin-engined Braniff Airways
plane crashed at Chicago Air Airport;
port; Airport; 22 killed, 21 injured.
18 Big Four Conference opened in
Gen e v a, representing u.o.
. France, Britain, U.S.S.R.
23-Cordell Hull, 83, died.
23 World record for speed on wa-
tpr smashed bv Donald Camp-
. bell with an average speed of
202.32 miles an hour; previous
' record was 178.497 miles an
hour.
23 Big Four Conference in Gen Geneva
eva Geneva concluded.
27 Israeli airliner, carrying 58
persons, crashed in Bulgaria:
Greek reports said Bulgarian
guns had shot down a plane,
confirmed 24 hours later by
Bulgarian government; all 53
aboard perished.
27 Austria formally regained suv
ereientv.
28 Washington news conference
revealed U.S. to launch earth
satellite 200-300 miles into outer
space in 1957 or 1958, -30
Willy Pogany. noted artist and
designer, died at u.
AUGUST
1 Communist China announced re
lpase of 11 U.S. fliers.
1 Harold E. Talbott resigned as
Air Force secretary.
2 Stephen P. Kennedy sworn in
as new in ew xom cuy poucc
commissioner.
2 Crown Prince Rupprecht ofBa-
vana died at 86.
3 James J. Rorimer named head
of the Metropolitan Museum of
Art.
4 American Airlines plane
crashed near Newburg, Mo.;
all 30 aboard killed.
5 Susan Ball, 22-year-old actress,
died.
8 Grace Hartman, of one-time fa famous
mous famous dance team, died at 48.
11 Donald A.i Quarles named Air
Force secretary.
li
I ;
X
SHOWS:
1:10, 2:43. 4:46
6:49, 8:55
40c
Nobody Smilt :
Row, Row, Row
Chinatown,
My Chinatown
fm Tfrd Mary
Th 6ratai
Fthr Of ThmA
i
LI
- to
Angela clapke Pmrfuoad br ici 9am I
Sawn br Mtbilta SWun d Itck (,

id

12 Thomas Mann, 'author, died at
80.

12-,U.S. Ambassador John E. Feu-
nfoy and his 9-year-old son,
Daniel Byrd, killed in car-
truck collision near Hua Hm,
Thailand.
12 Hurricane Connie buffeted New
York area after record down downpour
pour downpour of 6.87 inches of rain.
17 Adm. Arleigh A. Burke as assumed
sumed assumed command of U.S. fleets.
17 U.S. proclaimed definitive code
ot conduct, tor service men
while war prisoners.
19 Hurricane Diane struck with
unexpected fury, flooding large
areas of northeastern Un;ted
States; scores died, damage in
billions. J
20 First International Conference
on Peaceful Uses of Atomic
Energy ended in Geneva after
fortnight.
22 French Moroccan leaders met
in Aix-les-Bains to discuss
peace after bloody disturbanc
es in Algeria and Morocco
which broke out Aug. 20
25 Mamoru Shigemitsu arrived in
Washington on visit to United
States.
28 Australia regained Davis Cup
from U.S. tehnis team.
31 Nashua defeated Swaps in
$100,000 match horse race.
SEPTEMBER
6 Ford Foundation granted $20,
J 000.000 for scholarships.
8 Chancellor Konrad Adenauer of
West Germany arrived in Mos
cow for Soviet-German talks.
8 Brooklyn Dodgers clinched Na National
tional National League baseball pennant.
lo Communist China agreed to re
lease all U.S. civilians remain
ing there.
13 West Germany. U.S.S.R.
agreed to establish diplomatic
relations.
14-Eight-day N.Y.C. pier strike
ended.
1 Tivil war broke out in Argcn
i tina; rebels set up provincial
regime. .
18 British Foreign Office reported
British diplomats Donald Mac-
. Lean and Guy Burgess spied
for U.S.S.R. '."
19 President Juan D. Peron de deposed
posed deposed in Argentina.
21 Rocky M a r c i a n o retained
heavyweight crown Dy unocK unocK-ing
ing unocK-ing out .Archie Moore in nintn
rnnnri in New York City.
22 Civil iwar .declared ended in
Aropnfina.
23 New York Yankees clinched
American League Daseoau pen
nant.
nMai Gen. Eduardo Lonardl be-
. "came 24th president in modern
Argentina history,
Arc!) Su!ci-2 Jqu:d
Kills Tv;o In Ambush
JERUSALEM. Israel, Dec. 31
(UP) An Arab suicide squad
ambushed an Israeli public
works deDartment yesterday.
killing two public works officials
and seriously injuring their driv:
er. it jwas officially announced
tod 91 V
Maj. Dari Gov. Israeli spokes
man, said the ambush was car
ried out by some six "kill or die"
Fadaeen (Arat suicide squna
members) on. the highway from'
BeersneDa to fciatn. ine raaa-
een were dressed m blacK ana
used automatic .r weapons,. the
spokesman said.
Albert Grand, United Nations
truce delegation spokesman, told
United Press that UN observers
had been rushed to the scene to
trace the attackers. Israeli to-
ambush area In an attempt to
follow the Fadaeen to their
place of origin.
Lio Charge Leveled
Al Oilnese Ccnunles
TAIPEI, Dec. 31 (UP)-The Na Nationalist
tionalist Nationalist Chinese today branded
as "a dirty lie" Communist Chi Chinese
nese Chinese claims that they had down downed
ed downed five Nationalist warplanes
and damaged 10 others between
Dec. 13 and 29.
'The air force said there had
not been Nationalist planes, at
all over some of the places the
Communists, claimed to have
downed Nationalist aircraft.
The Communists said 100
groups of Nationalist planes
raided the Southeast .' China
coast In 347 sorties, straflngs
and bombing attacks during the
neriod. The Communists said
their antiaircraft fire downed
five Nationalist planes.
Meanwhile there were no nev
reports of action between Na
fi-ir KTa'HvriaHcfc nlnnPC
I Meanwhile there were no new

ES reports of action between Na Nationalist
tionalist Nationalist and Communist forces

plnn? the island outpost line to to-P
P to-P d?.y.
August Storm-Torn
To Aid New Victim
WINSTED, Conn., Dec. 31 (UP)
This city one of the hardest hit
by last August s floods, started a
fund today for California flood
.,fr

k. Ml SUi m-j
K jr I ,i Mayor P. Francis Hicks said
J J Lithe monrv probably will be sent

Marvsville and Yuba City,:
liravilv damaged in last week's i

disaster. "We know how they.Jj

24 President Eisenhower sufferedl
I heart attack in Denver. ;

24 Leo DurocVer resigned as man-
ager of thj N.Y. Giants
25 Argcntiriwrevolutionarv cov-
ernmfli recognized bv U.S.
26 New York Stock Exchangs suf
fered heaviest dollar loss is
history 14 billion. (
OCTOBER
1 Sultan Mohammed ben Moulay'
Arata of Morocco quit throne
without abdicating abdicating-3
3 abdicating-3 Maj. Gen. Julius Ochs Adler,
62, died.
4 Brooklyn Dodgers won first
World Series, defeating N.Y.
Yankees, 4 games to 3.
4 Premier Marshal Alexander Pa
pagos of Greece died at 71
6 United Airlines DC-4 crashed
into mountain about 40 miles
west of Laramie, Wyo.'j all 66
aboard killed; worst commer-
- s cial airline accident in U S.
9 President Eisenhower's physi physician
cian physician set Jan. 1, 1956, as date
of return to White House.
9 Alice Joyce, star of silent films
; died at 65. ;
12 Bernarr Macfadden,1 87, died.
13 Manuel Avila Camacho. for
mer president of Mexico, died
at 58.
17 Four-day rainfall which loosed
second Northeast flood disaster!
in two months ceased
18 New atom particle found,
known as anti-proton, or the
negative proton.
18 Jose Ortega y Gasset, Spanish
- writer, died at 72.
20 Dr. Hugo Theorell ; awarded
1955 Nobel Prize in medicine.
23 William A. Curley, newspaper
eauor, oieo at oi.
27 Icelandic novelist. Hall-
, dor Kiljan Laxness awarded
1955 Nobel Prize in literature.
27 Clark C. ; Griffith, owner of
Washington : baseball team,
died at 85.
30 William Woodward, Jr., weal
thy sportsman, killed by shot shotgun
gun shotgun blast fired by wife who
mistook him for orowler. r-
31 Princess Margaret announced
I!27 Icrrcrisl Raids
faring In l!:recco
ALGIERS. Algeria. Dec 31 iriIT
Terrorist attacks flared across
Algeria and Morocco today send send-ng
ng send-ng the old year out in a blaze o(
blood, bombings and gunfire.
Clashes between French troops
and AAlgerian "army of Allah"
fanatics raged throughout Algeria
while In Morocco,' which has been
relatively calm over the past two
weeks, security forces engaged in i
numerous tilts against rebel tribes-1
men and- terrorists, i
' At the same time a ton-level com committee
mittee committee sent to Algeria by Premier
Edgar Faure for an on-the-spot
survey was back in Paris and met
Friday to prepare a report.
Informed sources said one of its
members," Gen. Pierre Jacquot,
had come up with plans by which
the forces in Algeria could be us used
ed used to better advantage in the har
rowing "little war' against na
tionalist rebels'.

TODAY

i
i

decision not to marry Group

i 53
-yu reier iownsena.
NOVEMBER
1 United Airlines DC-6B caught
lire ana crashed near xon
mont, Colo.; all 44 aboard
' Killed.
4 Ex-convict Willie Bioff killed by
explosion set off when he
stepped on starter of truck in
rnoenix. Ariz.
4 ouatemalam President Carlos
Castillo Armas welcomed in
iew York.
,5 Mohammed ben Youssef tnr.
many recognized by French
government as Sultan of Mo
rocco.
5 Maurice Utrillo, famous French
ouuer, aiea at u.
6 rord foundation announced
common stock of the Ford Mo Motor
tor Motor Co. to go on public sale in
y January, 1956. for first time
7 U.S. Supreme Court ruled civili-
- ans could not be tried bv court-
K martial for crimes committed
ui military service.
8 In conference of foreien min,
isters at Geneva, U.S.S.R. re
jected r e u n if i c a 1 1 o n of
uermany on any terms but
:v- its own. -!
9 Andre Dubois appointed French
resident general in Morocco.
11 President Eisenhower arrived
' back in Washington.
12 Foreign ministers' conference
on disarmament ended in Ge-
. neva Big Four again failed to
-' agree, on plan for curbing
arms.-:- ,: .. :
13 Argentine government of Mai.
Gen. Lonardi overthrown in
palace revolution.
14 Johh Gilbert Graham, 23, ad admitted
mitted admitted planting dynamite lime lime-bomb
bomb lime-bomb that blew up United Air Air-trr
trr Air-trr lines DC-6B over Colorado, kiH-
i"K m persons, including nis
motner. Mrs. uaisv Km?.
14 Playwright Robert E. Sher
wood. 59. died.
14 President Eisenhower arrived
at Gettysburg, Pa., home to
H convalesce.
14-r-Danicl J. Tobin former head
of teamsters' union, died at 80.
15 Adlai E. Stevenson announced
intention to seek 1956 Demo
cratic presidential nomination.
lo-ssuiian wonammeo Den yims-
sef, returned to throne of Mo
rocco after two vejrs of exila.
18 Non-scheduled airfmer, headed
for Chicago and New York.
crashed shortly after taking off
irom Seattle; 27 killed; 45 sur sur-vivors.
vivors. sur-vivors. -:-
19 Marquis James, biographer,
- died at 64.
21 Pope Pius XII confirmed re
port be saw vision of Christ
during illness.
25 Interstate Commerce Commis
sion ordered end of segrega segregation
tion segregation in busses and on trains.
26 U.S.S.R.' announced recent ex-
piObion of its most powerful
hydrogen weapon.
28 Arthur Honegger, composer,
died at 63.
29 Premier Edgar Faure of
France lost confidence vote in
..." general assembly, but, con contrary
trary contrary to usual procedure, re refused
fused refused to resign. (Subsequently
" invoked old law to dissolve
0.75 0.40
1:30 3-15
5:00 6:50
9:00 p.m.
J Li Ljk u
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30n.cimf((f U.'!rHREY

BOGART

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-
Hit irrA cL ".-;''f s 7 of L h

Abo: "ISLANDS OF LCaL" a Cin :'z

Assembly, order new general
elections.)
30-Peroq party ended In Argen Argentina;
tina; Argentina; newspaper La Prensa re returned
turned returned to. Dr. Alberto Gainz
DECEMBER
Glenn L- Martin, .nionee pilot
and designer, died at 69.
5 AFL. CIO merge.
5 HOnus Wagner, oldtime base baseball
ball baseball great, died at 81.
7-Clement R. Attlee resigned
leadership of British Labor
Party.
9 Sugar Ray Robinson knocked
out Carl (Bobo) Olson to regain
middleweight boxing crown in
second round in Chicago.
12 Ford Foundation granted rec record
ord record $500,000,000 to aid 4,157
colleges and hospitals.
12 Maj. Gen. Frank D. Merri'l,
leader of Merrill's Marauders
in World War II, died, aged 52.

Surplus Vehicles
Stir Belgium Cops
.dkuogejlb, Belgium, Dec. 31
(UP) More than 600
British tanks and armored vehi vehicles
cles vehicles have passed through Bel
gian pons tor the Middle East
this year. Belgian doIIc snurrf
reported today.
The DOlIce rennrt. la
studied by government officials
who are in contact with the
British government concerning
wie ai ilia smpmeni.
Many of the vehlnlps vr r.

conditioned in bond at Antwerp
and Ghent. New engines, head headlamps
lamps headlamps and renovated tracks
were fitted. About equal quan quantities
tities quantities of the rebuilt tanks and

armored vehicles went to Egypt
an Israel, according to govern government
ment government sources. y
The traffic has been frozen
for two weeks following nnhH.
city in the' British and Belgian
yi coo.
York Archbishop
Dies At Palace
YORK. England. Dec. si rTTPt
Dr. Cyril Forster Garbett, Arch Arch-bishop
bishop Arch-bishop of York, died peacefully
this morning at his palace here
auer a long uiness. He was 80.
' An official statpmpnt- it A
from Bishopthorpe Palace said:
"After some days of increasing
weakness the archbishop died
peacefully early this morning.
"Arangements are being made
for the funeral seryice to be held
in York Minister early next
week."
Ads On lnslallm:nl
NASHVILLE, Tehn., Dec. 31
(UP) Oak Motors, hew and
used car dealers, filed a court
suit today to stop C. D. J Coz, a
ffrocer, from certain advertising.
The complaint said Jones has a
sign on the back of a station
wagon he bought from the corn
pany last March reading: :
"If .you want to stay broke,
buy a lemon from Oak."
a
GENE
tNEY
J)
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- z Short!

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k k k k k k k k
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'

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"A typical pace suit .
controlled by the space
man. Small jet would en enable
able enable him to move around."
"THE prospect of interplanetary travel within the
neat future, suggested by the government'!
launching of "Project Vanguard," Is one of the
biggest stories In the world as the new year begins.
There Is vital new reason foi being acquainted with
the known physical laws underlying all "Project
Vanguard" and lesser rocket research and govern governing
ing governing all space travel developments.
Cultivating familiarity with these taws through
ready-made equipment to be found in- almost any
home, is an Interesting- and stimulating hobby. In
many of the discussions of space travel found In
print or heard over the radio Cher are statements
that run counter to basic or known scientific facts.
The home hobbyist, having performed certain tests,
is better equipped to evaluate the space travel spec speculations
ulations speculations He can understand when and where they
are Implausible or Unpractical.
Stjme excursions into basic physics that can be
carried out in the home with simple equipment are
illustrated In these drawings of Jeanyee Wong n
a new book, Experiments In the Principles of Space
.'Travel, by Frankiyn M. Bran ley (Crowell: $2).
,. The device depicted is a "let spinner," which, the
author says, "will give' you a better idea why and
how a Jet engine works.',' Construction details:
Upright and cross-arm pSre made of 4-inch
dowels. Cross-arm turns on sharpened end of Vi Vi-inch
inch Vi-inch brad. For cross-arm bearing, author advises:
"Cut a notch 1, -inch deep and Vi -inch long at the
center Using tin snips,. cut from a tin can a
piece li. -inch wide and 916-ineh long. With x nail
or punch, indent center of tins tin strip and force it
into- notch In the dowel.. (Caution: be careful to
push only on the flat surface.)"
Material necessary for power plant are; A small
STRIKE OUT! A Wits Tester
Bu H.O. Kaufman
TO SCQRE a
striks in the
diagram at right,
that la, to suc succeed
ceed succeed in crossing
out all of the
numbers, you
must find the cor cor-T
T cor-T e 0 t numerical
answers to the
definltians below.
If the answer to
No. 1, for In-
stance, s 0, cross
out 0 in the dia
:(D(6)
(D(D
0
gram; if the an answer
swer answer to No. 2 -is 4315, cross out 4, 3,1 and 5. Etc.
Answers may have as many as five digits. Can you
bowl a perfect score?
Today's definitions: ;
h Thera are this many dayi la a week:
-,2. Soma months have this many days:'.
3. More often than not February has this many
days:
4. Lnap years take place one In
ft. Sum of the digits of 1956 la 21. In what year
' will the sum be 21 again: ?
At xts snrn ettQ f
'jnoj .)iSi 0i -g 'Ojsj ijqx X UUA3S -l :tj4Muy
Reversals Are in Store
(A) Find an odd number under twenty, which
when squared and the product reversed will
give a number divisible by the original num num-ber
ber num-ber reversed?
(B) Find an even number under twenty-five,
,which when squared and the product revers-
; ed will give a number divisible by the origin origin-'
' origin-' al number reversed? .
aimj 'ajjqi (V) muiiios
SLOW AND STEADY
DEMEMBER the fable about'
the race between the tortoise
and the nare? The hare was so
sure that he would win that he
took a nap alung the way. With Without
out Without crossing any black lines, and

without retracing your pencil
llnr v see how long it takes the
tortoise to pass by the sleeping
hare and to reach the finish' line.
Start Is at bottom left. Don't
forget to pass the hare.

yh T: u-fHUM3 tt

t i n ........... it

. THREAD

NUT i
THUMB
TACK
2"X4'8L0CK
dan about 2 Inches' high, 'with a-top, some bell wire
and a block of fight wood
. A tiny hole is necessary In the bottom of the can.
This, it is stated, should be made with an ordinary
sewing needle (no larger) as follows: "Insert a
needle length we through a cork; hold the, cork and
needle at the oroner snot aant '

i ji ii

& STRIP

n

rrr it'-r.'r overheard at twelve

mar." r. ;
For power,, the. author says:
"Cut a candle short enough to fit
underneath can but long enough
so that the flame plays directly
on it. Put a teaapoonful of water
In. tha can; make sure that ths
needle hole Is above-1 the water
leVel, and replace cove?,'' -;. "'
A large nut-la Suggested for.
a counter-balance.
OfAer cfioica nete ooofrs or
hobbyista and Kama craftsmen,
chosen by Clark KinMairii:
Frontiers of Astronomy, by
Fred Hoyle (Harper, 860 pages:
$3). How far we have gone and
what's ahead In astronomy and
astrophysics, by the lucid Eng English
lish English scientist who wrote the well well-read
read well-read "Nature of the Universe" a
few years back. An advanced
work for the home hobbyist
Photo and line illustrations.'
? Boat Carpentry, by Hervey
Garret Smith (Van Nostrand, 178
pages: $5). Tools, materials and
crafts used In building or repair repairing
ing repairing boats explained graphically
for home use. The Illustrations
are drawing's by the author. ;
Training Dogs, by-Col. Konrad
Most (Coward McCann, 239
pages: $5). Illustrated advice by
a leading European expert in the
Instruction of sportsmen In the
management of hunting and
tracking dogs, etc. ":. V

IF THIS wars Hallowe'en,
chances are the missing figure
In the drawing above would be a
witch. But it's New Year's, and
the figure In question is more
likely to be heard than, seen.
What do you generally hear when
the clock strikes midnight? Take
a guess befort connecting dots
and see if you thought of the the-answer.
answer. the-answer. Where two numbers,
such as 1 and 14 above, share
the same dot, use the dot for
both. Afterwards you may wish
to add colors.

Standing Matter
A BIG and a little Indian ver
standing on a bill. The little
Indian was the son of the big
Indian, but the big Indian was
not the little Indian's father.
How? .
Uaijioiu qsipm
10 aipuj Sq iH-ay
WINS
py Euoeni Shetfer t
::'-.. HORIZONTAL
1 What Biblical word means
'Vain fellow"?
5 Meuse river (Dutch).
9-One of the tribe's of Israel
(Num. ,1:41)
14Wmg-shaDed.
13 Eight: comb form.
19 Portion
17 Son of Helem (1 Chr. 7:35)
-18 One of -the chief men of Is
, rael (1 Chr 8:26)
20 Incline the head.
21 Golf mound.
22 Large deer.
23 S-shaped curve.
24 Shore-birds.
2G Theater lobby
28 Son of Jacob (Gen. 30:6)
29 Interdiction.
30 Feels great affection.
34 Hebrew month.
36 In what month of the eleventh
year wa Solomon's temple
completed? (1 Ki-. 6:38)
'37 The Driest Gliashib was allied
with him (Neh. 13:4)
38 Decay
39 Mental strain.
41 Sign of a hit play.
42 Smoothed.
44 Prior; in time.
45 Chase.
4fi Teutonic god collectively.
'47 Greek letter,
48 The turmeric.
49 What sort of faith did Jesus
say the woman with s pos-
sps'sed daughter had in him?
(Mat. 15:28)
51 Dropped.
.14 Son of Abla (Mat. 1:7)
57 River in Switzerland.
58 Move heavily. ;
59 Wrath.
60 Regulations.

About the Year Ahead-195.6
ITOW many dilterent ways can the digits of
' the New tear, 1956,,be arranged In differ different
ent different order 156a. 9051. etc.? Six ways, ten
ways, sixteen ways, twenty-four ways, thirty thirty-two
two thirty-two ways? Answer in one minute if you can.

You Be the Detective
6 H N MAR-
LOW slumpeo
lifelessly at tht"
wheel. Two bullet
holes In the side
of the car spoke
for themselves. -'
Mrs. Marlow re recapitulated:
capitulated: recapitulated: "John and l
had left the party
early. We were
isitting In the car,
when a masked
bandit appeared
Gun in hand, he
knocked at the M :
window. John He frti two hat ihea ran ran-lowered
lowered ran-lowered it to talk to him, when suddenly tie fired
-two-shots.. Then he ran." : ; i 4 s
Detective Murray rolled; up the carTwindowil which
was uxunarred, and ordered it examined for finger fingerprints.
prints. fingerprints. He was studying the wounds In the dead
.man's side when Amlel Sandtric, a business ac acquaintance
quaintance acquaintance of Mrs. Marlow, arrived.
"Getting here a little late or U this the sec second
ond second time around!" the detective taunted.
i "I've been to the mov J' Sandtric beganv
: "Never mind,. I've heard a tall enough story. al already,"
ready," already," Interjected Murray ,-.
' To what, specifically, did he refer T .
, 13t)a 11 'dn opa sqi panoa
jjnn miM iopafl J!IBt lJiiq eqi jou pip
aain A'Mjk 01 tutu 01 MopuM sqi paJ30 pq
aiu pp ei) pjtiinowj qs 'Ji 'pusqsnq jaq )oqg pnq
lipuvq pai(Miu t )iq) ui9 s.M0jn -JH "X umnv
000 d 1 mil
Emma .CMI KCAN
CRYPTOQUOTE
TO THE victors belong the
spoils say politlcos, but Mo Mo-liere,
liere, Mo-liere, quoting Louis XIV, makes
this somewhat "disillusioning ob observation:
servation: observation: Can you decode it?
-: CXCMA DOBO O ZOGO R
XRIIKED JZZOHC, O BRQO
DCE BRGIIJEDCEDT RES JEC
OErMRDC. 1
" ',,-iiJtrr no
pa tns)ao3nm nsv shvui I '9-iijjo
)a3A nil I iJ3 ijaMiuy

- m

"2e W Ok

lin (gnosswooD With Wisdom from the tiible

63 The 15th book of the Old
Testament
64 Living.
65 Military assistant
66 Sly glance.
67 Fashions.
68 Climax.
69 Annexes.
" VERTICAL '
1 Showers V
- 2 One of the cities given the
tribe of Benjamin (Josh. 21:
18)
3 Those seeking office.
. 4 Macaw.
5 He was found In the bulrushes'
and was raised by Pharaoh's
daughter as her son (Ex. 2:10)
, 8 Be in pain.
7 Luzon Negrito.
8 Son of Jacob and Leah (Gen.
29:33)
9 Place where Samson slew
thirty men (Judg. 14:19) -1
10 Personal pronoun.
11 Rodent
12 Epochs. .:
.13 Biblical name (poss.) ,' .
19 Cunning.
?1 Decimal unit ':
25 Equivalence. .1
26 Most faithfess.
27 Pilfer.
29 Sweet roU.'
31 Pictured.
32 Merit
33 Picture taken with a camera.
34 Space,
35 This bird came back to the
Ark. the second time with an
oljve branch (Gen. 8:11)
38 Couch
37-Pedal digit
39 Balconies.
40 A mighty man of valour (1
A Chr. 7:7)
C Klas Features Syndicate, In.

43-f Dress stone
hammer.

45 Daughter of :LokL
47 An outcast
48 Remnant
50 Take nourishment
.51 Blended by melting.
52 Strayed from-truth.

PLAYING THE OLD YEAR OUT

TO MAKE time
go faster to
midnight' at the
j New Year's Eve
party, try "these:
L A Card
Tossing Match.
Place a man's hat
bottom up on the
floor. Place a
marker about six
"feet away. Have
ready some packs
of old playing
cards or cut some
from cardboard.
Each. player is
given ; the ..same
number of play playing
ing playing cards from
10 to 50. Have
guests stand at
the marker one
at a r time' and
try ti togs each
of the cards Into
the hat.
2. Peanut Pick Pickup.
up. Pickup. Place a row
of peanuts across
a card table. Put
a pie Un in. the
center of the ta table.
ble. table. Give each
player two toothpicks. With" these
the player must lift the peanuts
as illustrated above and place
them in a pan. Time each con contestant,,
testant,, contestant,, allowing him two or:
threa mfntites; Person getting the;
most peanuts in the pan unspeci unspecified
fied unspecified ..time wins. Have a play-off
for ties.
S. Bombs Away. Place a large
rruit Jar on the Boor, Provide
guests with 20 to 25 white navy
beans each. Standing erect, and
with hands,' no lower than the
waistline,' the- "bomber" .endeav .endeavors
ors .endeavors to drpri is. many beans s
possible into the fnu't jar.
. Clothes-pins also may be used in
this contest They may make, it
easier for some of the players.
4. Potato Race. Using either
very light, weight rubber balls or
three small potatoes as golf
tails and 'a cans as a g$l! clab,
each 'guest must endeavor 'to
"putt" the potatoes into a circle
four or five feet away,
Magic

lilt

- rj u vv can 1
j :p I an t:I4
3 trees In- 7 rows
' of'1 4 each?", a
'customer asked
Pete Moss, the
nursery man,
twitting him. An An-.
. An-. swering his own
. question : bef ore
, Pete, could, reply,
tlie cus(ocn4r,- a

IN THE PINK FOR
SO M ETIMES,
'tis said, ele ele-p
p ele-p h a n t s 'of an another
other another colof ap appear
pear appear at such fes festive
tive festive occasions as
New Year's One
literally Jn ;the
pink; of condition
appears ln the
diagram at right.
To bring this
beast and the en entire
tire entire scene to the
fore, apply colors
In acc ordinci
wttlr the : follow-
ng -.color: Indicators;-..
; ..
B Blue .,'
O Orange
R Red
Y Yellow
v violet
- P Pink -'
' .1.".- '. !?
Mini-Test
A "typo" on a
f menu read
" c 0 c a s t h u s ."
What was the s
dish? t ; ;
; 'i 1SJ
O 9 9 n 8 JtUy
witb sharp pointed 53 Approaches.. 4
54 First man.
55 Farmyard structure.
56 Dry. i : :
58 Mother of Helen of Troy.
61 Adam's wife (Gen. 4:1)
62 Compete.
63 Note in Guldo's- scale. :

I Z 45 t 1 6 10 11 12. i
iiiiliiiiiiizit
,
:
56 ; '' 40 41.
4Z T 43. "" 7"45'
" I I 1 W I WA I I

5

Number Stumper

puzzlist. drew the diagram above. "Now let's see
if you can take the numbers 1 to 14 and write them
- In the circles so that each and every row adds up to
30," the customer continued. Pete was a little, slow",
in getting it but he finally came up with the answer
below. -.
s Can you figure out his answer, too ? Tim your-
' self Uwthe process-; then let someone else try.
' "t pn t or it
:0T--uio)ioq j)B95 ;t pus ji 01 Uu : pna o-oaj
jxiu Mi pui g om) jxa :g pua a 'It 'i oj3 eni jxb
: j jaiod do 'pjnuAop Iuhjo 01 Jjl

ju

f
NEW YEAR'S
It's Your Move
I,
V,-.
: ''.''A .'. yS
... wmt
HS.
;,lOll"'..v;:l f:f
By MUlard Hopper
Long-Time Checker King
IF THIS were baseball, Black:
might win. He makes two
double plays here, yet loses in
three moves. White, moving up
the board, moves first.
IIPM BJ-61-Ot 13ia 'iI-61 KH'IM 'if
-OZ-tl Kia '91-02 UHM :oo(iius
Si
dtp
31
11 aI.:,i' jSr"
(" 'i
a
t
1
CKOSSWOKD PCZZLE SOLUTION



1
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- T '; 1- :;-'-r

1 ' -r '; 3
' V. W- i ; ; ','

: HER PUBLIC LIFE IS A SONG Rita Patil voa Pilgrim doubles as a professional "pop,
',1 singer (left) in Frankfurt, Germany, wider.tbe. name of Rita Paul, and then reverts
?2- to her role as a Los Angeles, Calif., housewife, romping with her son (right). She is

- currently making films in Germany. jvne.n nnsneol 5ne 11 wne up ,hwkiws

!

n
f i
'-
i

'1
I

'

'S-.

SYMBOLISM AT THE UNITED NATIONS?Can there be a special meaning to this photo
n ViQmVvoi tirifh its vast area of emDtV seats, ex

nf the united in ations ocv-ui ii vuuhui n...vv. - . ,.
pt for one solitary figure working alone? He is Dr. Tingfu Tsiang, Nationalist ;
cepi ivi vue ouiivaijr b o uiovaA11oar n admit 18 new nations.

China s representative ana opponent m yvA6-

PiaURES for the ALBUM

i.

unnnAv ucDAin Tin the world's most famous Christ

mas trees was lighted in New York's Rockefeller Center;
rpntlv. General view shows

nine-foot angels and 65-foot Norway spruce with lights.

?

' Fait panchromaiie film was used hrjhrjght ien with f6 exposwrt o 125th.

Sit

A BIRTHDAY HUG Prime Minister Nehru of India is cm

1 bracing Rajendra Prasad (left), president of India, onlhe 1 ask someone to perform for
77 flatter's 71st: birthday in New Delhi. .The Indian president-;-1 ; you.ln' exchange. for; a print
fpfttn all r,vfr lh worln. I . .i. .....uu.

ANYONE who has looked
at a particularly striking
ii

snow scene may wcu vyo "v
had taken a picture of it for

his album. If he had naa ms
camera ready, here are a few
tips he "might have used to
take those pictures; (1 ) Know
what type of picture you
want.; Get an idea that ap ap-neals
neals ap-neals to' voir on, that tells a

story. (2) Don't be afraid to

v.

. .. v., ;i latter's 71st birthday in New Delhi. The Indian presided
A PUZZLING PROBLEM-Two-year-old Brian Teller is wondering just what to ao ive(J congratuiatory messages from all ovef'the world
with this five-pound crawfish caught by his dad near Miami, Fla. Brian's even, think- Jlr, w

ing about taking it back home to Babylon, N Y., to show it off to the neighborhood
. j I, ii.i ji iiiiiiiiiniLuwiML- i-1 -inin"iiirioiiiii.ifiiiiiinwrrrTiiiiTffl "f"11"" T

i
1 1

T
si:

you in exchange for a print
two. This is especially

il trni nf ermrts subiects. (3)

Pick, the best location. Se

lect, a pleasing background, i
choose the best angle and j
focus your camera on a spot
where the action will take s
place. (4) Select the correct f
shutter speed td stop the mo-W
tion and next the right lens
aperture for the : exposure. I
Then you're on ; the way 1
toward ; a photo you'll be 1
nroud of. Remember skiers-

and skaters look best when &

banking for a stop or-a turn. L ' ..r, .j.Af.rrft t
. : Th camera fan how has story-telimg shot tr on v..

'V

" V j A' CHRISTMAS ABROAD Actress Joan Crawford and her,
. - -, r husband Alfred Steele, kiss as the screen Star's four chil-
; ;;,:::i:::5 TO Z-? v -.t Dr. T7erhner.T. Craun a lead-. Jf and children arrived in New
- r'oni of the man-nirt;e s-UuUe k!. c. .1 Jc 5 t3" take a Tl?:m4nr York fron Hollywood." TheyTI all leave for Etrrepe aboard
(- :rVrf ion by becoming a skin diver at Miami. Fla. Equipped to take to the Queen Mary to spend Christmas holidays on continent
v 1 down amor5 the fish in this underwater shot (right). He s done d.ving before. V VKl;F(atns Syndicate :

Thlpholo was lighted from side on a. clear day, thui b.lnrtg obf snow's IcaLi;