The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02871

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
.V J:

THE CITY OH THE

-VICEROYS J

L V frO M A'i. A W Ifr V

"Let th people khtne ths truth ndih tiwmtry k $cft" Abraham Lincoln.

Throughout the world Fj
more people buy
than any other
Tssemrt' I
imported whisky Kj
:
-. Sv't..'.'.:'

PANAMA, ft, 1 MONDAY, MARCH M, 1959

I .,, AM MM ...l,1.., V" v .

:
inniiii i u.m 1 1 -ti n.i ti ii :i j p imni-innr miM r nn " i nmimnnnnn-ffijnfftl tint" "iT rriiilir -rr -irr t t V "nltf r Vf ------ftennniifni-riri n n nrrrrrnT----

200 singers from the Canaf Zona and Panama formd choir which presented special ipusic for the Pacific side
fort' Amador. Wallace Woodruff was the -eh oral director and Hans Janowitz accompanied the choristers at the organ.

3ls rjesu, Lamb w god, Keaeemef." --i sy.; Army mow;

brns Attend Sunrise Services At: Ft. Amador And Ft: Gulick

Sr.5 Kenneth C. Seeley and Gorsas

troduce their small charges at Fort

as m operation during macule side

e community prpjec sponsored by

Jouncii ot tne i ort uayton service
director, Mrs. Elizabeth J Haber Haber-the
the Haber-the U.S. Array Signal Service, Fort

LT.S. Army- Photo)

yt-Sitters Wage 1
rs On Easter Morn

ers
itfa
-ib-

brk

ibn

The men kept the youngsters a

mused with -games, music and

stones, and also made sure that

the right formula was heated

and ready when, a child's feed

ing ume rolled around.

The gloriou story of the .Resur .Resurrection
rection .Resurrection was retold in song and
Scripture on hoth sides of that Isth Isthmus
mus Isthmus yesterday, a the most Signi Significant
ficant Significant day on the Christian calen calendar
dar calendar davpeo .

iMfA AAmaffir 20Qfltveronji

from the- Canal zone sna Fanama
mef for the unified Armed Forces
Protestant Easter Sunrise Service,
while about 600 civilians and mem

bers of the military joined in wor

ship at Fort Gulick. t
All the traditional symbols of
th glad Mon; marked." both
gatherings from triumphant an anthems
thems anthems to displays ef, spring fin-;
ry. :,..'-'. .."
Addressing the congregation

which thronged an area by the sea
at Fort Amador was Bishop Reu Reuben
ben Reuben H. Mueller, who spoke on the

theme of the Resurrection.
Meuller. president of. the board

of bishops of the Evangelical-Unit

ed Brethren Church, also serves as

chairman of the Chaplains' Com

mission of the U.S. Armed Services
and vice president of the US Na

tional Council of Churchei ef

Christ,
Guest speaker for the Fort Gu Gulick
lick Gulick service was the Rty. Regi Reginald
nald Reginald Wheatloy, pastor of the See See-wall
wall See-wall Methodist Church, Panama
City. His sermon title was "A
Thunderous Dawning."
Chaplains from the armed serv
ices had the assistance of ministers
from the Zone and; the Republic in
arranging the Easter rites', Chaf
lain(Col.) Silas E. Decker, U.S.:
Army Caribbean chaplain, was
chairman of the planning commit committee.
tee. committee. '
At Fort Amador in as area hy
the sea, trumpeters from the 776th
Air Force Band;1" Albrook; Air
Force Base, sounded church "call
to inaugurate, the dawn service. :
Under the direction of CWO Her Herman
man Herman W. Enclert.' the band also

played a prelude, Bach's "Arioso.T

and a postiude, irounod "Marca
Pontificale."
Special music, pretentttf- by

iall I
,uld sit
".. tw
ore I ;
rot I
ere I if $
the 6. R li

i

200 choristers from the Canal.'
Zone and Panama, Included the
invitation to worship, which was:
:"Jesu, Uamb ef God, ; Redeem Redeem-er."
er." Redeem-er." The singers were directed
by Wallace Woodruff wun Hana
ianewi iifi;Hifc,J
Chaplain (1st it.)" Robert f. Wei Wei-son,
son, Wei-son, ehaplain, Albrook Air Force
Base, gave the invocation and the
call to worship was pronounced by
the Rev. Robert F. Gussick, pastor

of the Redeemer Lutheran Church

of Balboa,
Other ministers from the Canal
Zone taking part were the Rev.' Os Os-car
car Os-car ,W. Olsen Jr., of Balboa Union
Church; who read the Old Testa Testament;
ment; Testament; lessen, and the Rev. William
H.Jieebe of Balbao Baptist Church,
who, delivered the benediction,
Military chaplains assisting were
Chaplain (Cdr;) James W. Whit Whitman.
man. Whitman. 15th Naval District, who read

the New Testament lesson; Chap Chaplain
lain Chaplain (Maj.) Frederick Zigan, Ca

ribbean Air Command, who led tne
congregation in prayer, and Deck Decker,
er, Decker, who introduced Mueller. Chap Chaplain
lain Chaplain (1st. Lt.) William D. Froesch Froesch-ner
ner Froesch-ner of Fort Kobbe conducted the
offertory,
The traditions! faster hymn,
"Christ the Lord Is Risen Today"
was sung by congregations at
both the fort Amador and Fort
Gulick service.
';-f: ,''.
i CWO Ernest K. Moth directed the
7Sth Army Band from Fort Clay Clayton
ton Clayton at the Atlantic aide worshipi
Where selections included the
"Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's
"The Messiah," and two Bach
compositions, "Jesu, Joy of Man's
Desiring" and "Sleepers Wake."
.Vocal soloist was Mrs. Shirley
Smith. t ?
.The Rev. Sylvanus A, Scarlett,
pastor of the First Isthmian Bap Baptist
tist Baptist Church; gave the call to wor worship,
ship, worship, the Rev. Theodore E. Frank Franklin
lin Franklin ef the Margarita Union Church
offered the prayers, and the bene benediction
diction benediction was pronounced by the" Rev.
' '!.. .'
' i -v- - :. !: ft' (,

ere

ich-

nes

MS

ICR,

pic

ces
the

En

cil,
fity

lek,
trs.

ror-(

as

ive

Pa-,
ive

4

1 Af

. :-'U '; Wpf '" ill I. v si

if
WslHSSlBBe WAMraMSHNBi

Joy

William Livineston. missions sec

retary of the Church of God, Pana

ma and Costa Rica.

Militar personnel taking part in
the ".Fort 'Gulick observance 'were
CoUJ CeciTHjunei commandant, .ef
the TJ.S. ;jLrmy .CaTribbean' School,
who react the Scripture lesson, and
Chaplain (Maj.) Carroll G. Chaphe,
Fort Gulick iost chaplain, who pre presented
sented presented announcements.
The smooth functioning of both
services resulted from weeks of
prior planning on the part of the
chaplains and ministers with reo reo-'resentatives
'resentatives reo-'resentatives of the military serv services.
ices. services. :
Preliminary activities included
Installing public address sys systems;
tems; systems; arranging seating, parking
and emergency medical aW for
the thousands of persons in the
congreqationi; providing ushers,
and setting up altars and speak speakers'
ers' speakers' platforms.
On the Paeific side special trans transportation
portation transportation arrangements were
made. Hours before dawn drivers
were readying the Army buses
which oicked up choir members at
central meeting points.
Other buses carried eroups of
servicemen from Fort Kobbe. Fort
Clayton and Albrook Air Forces
Base to the Amador site.

The
June's Dcndi

M Observed

Worldwide

NEW YORK (UPD- Christians

around the world rejoiced, medi meditated,
tated, meditated, paraded on Easter Sunday,
amid different scenes and
different climes hut with the

same hone a nobler life for all

mankind.

They came once again to those

spring-basked hills of Jerusalem

to hail the Resurrection of their
Saviour almost 2,000 years ago-

the most glorious chapter in his

tory's most off-told tale.

Ana irom tne pulpits of the

great cathedrals, from humble

country churches, dawn glinting

mountain slopes and even ships

at sea, the sermons told: "He is

not here: for 'He is risen."

Cole and rain cut into attend

ance at outdoor services m -tne

Southwest and East, but 20,000
persons filled Hollywood Bowl, in
a clear Easter dawn.
President and Mrs. Eisenhow Eisenhower
er Eisenhower attended services at the Get Gettysburg
tysburg Gettysburg Presbyterian Church
near their farm. Mrs. Eisen Eisenhower,
hower, Eisenhower, like millions of other
ladles, sported new finery.
In Rome, Pope John XXIII said
Mass In St. Peter's Basilica and

prayed that international leaders
would end their discord "in, the

superior interests ef peace M tne

world.'V

In Moscow, -though, the Joytui

There wis- bft'JEaster. parade, -h

lone sign of the holiday came
Saturday night, when the city's

only Roman catholic cnurcn neia
Easter Mass for a capacity con congregation.
gregation. congregation. An unprecedented number of

foreign nilerims Doured' into Ho-

---.

ly Jerusalem as bells Degan 10

toll throughout the City. Anion;?

the pilgrims were Mrs. Eleanor

Roosevelt and Queen Mother iUi
zabeth of Belgium.
The ancient city, now a con contrast
trast contrast of old and new, basked in
almost perfect spring weather.

Officials said many pilgrims were

further encouraged to make the

visit by the current comparativa

border calm between Israel and

her Arab neighbors.

Relative stability in Jordan

brought out 6,000 worshippers to

ceiewaie me itesurrecuon ana,

while the bells tolled, thousands
of the Jewish faith began their
pilgrimmage to Israel for the

coming holiday of Passover,
marking Moses exodus from E
gypt.
And through it all was laced
the idea of e -nobler life for ell
mankind.
At the Hollywood Bowl. Agri

culture Secretary Ezra Taft Ben

son said the greatest events of

history are those- which affect

the greatest number of persons

for the-longest periods of time,

840 Mark Passed

'

Francisco Perez, 64, a Nicara-
- 4nrA .drunk and unable to

Kuan i"ullu x.. v.
care for his ewn safety, will spend

the next 20 days in Balboa jau re recuperating.
cuperating. recuperating. He Was triei in Balboa Magis Magistrate's
trate's Magistrate's Court, as was Francisco
Delgsdo, 42, Panamanian, who was
driving in the Canal Zone without
a license. The fine was $lQ.
Violet M. Pile, 29, Panamanian,
was also fined $10. She appeared
in Paraiso commissary with a bor borrowed
rowed borrowed card.
Blood Is Sought
For Panama Girl
Hurt In Accident

, A call' for four pints of blood

mo, u.hpH tndav by relatives of

Evldelia Grajales, a 20-year old

Panamanian girl wno was injur injured
ed injured in en accident involving a

leen at Rio Hato on the same

day exercise. Banyan iree was

held jth ere.

Miss 1 Grajales. suffered Injuries
toher "legs and will have to un undergo
dergo undergo ? plastic, surgery st Santo
Tomat. Hospital, where she was

taken alter tne acciaeni.

1 However,' doctor s say sht need
a total of five pints, of which

her father Has already giveu

Donora may make their contri contributions
butions contributions at the Blood Bank of San-

FIELD MASS-haplaln CLt. Col. OregorV R. Kennedy eelebratea a field mass on Easter morn

ing, held in the erea near the UhraJy at Fort Amador ; (UJS. Army Photo "to ;Toas Hospital.

With More Than

2 Days To Spare
A new monthly record for ocean-going traffic thropgV"
the Panama Canal was set at the close of business yes yesterday,
terday, yesterday, according to official Panama Canal figures,
For th first 29 days of March, there were 851 ocean,
going commercial and government-owned vessels transit-'
ing 'the Canal. The previous record of 840 ocean-gbfnj
commercial and government vessels was set in March;
1957. -r w
It was the third consecutive month that traffic Ml
the Panama Canal had broken a record.
In February, traffic, with a daily average of 29.4
ocean-going vessels, set a daily record. There were 825
ocean-going commercial and government ships using the

canai during the zs days ot February.
In January a new monthly record was set for the
number of ocean-going commercial transits of the Pana

ma Canal when there were 826 or 13 above tht previous
record" of 813 set iii October 1957. .?

Easter Sends Most; Isthmians

Easter 1959 has come and gone
a; i1 " -e 1 ".ry
and the long holiday weekend.
All churches in Panama ana
'') v ? ten. ay w- rc
thronged with worshipers 'during
the late morning services,!
During the brilliant afternoon,
Panama's Central Aventfe stream streamed
ed streamed wih family groups and ele elegantly
gantly elegantly turned out young ladies.

At the start ot me long wee

the dry season but gardens and
flower beds appeared thriving
and well tended
Before Easterday there were
many exploration trips into the
deep hill country and mountains
from the provincial cities. Trai
velers journeyed by jeep and on
horseback. Hardier souls went
on donkeys, or even on foot.
For most, the long homeward
trip began yesterday aftmnni..

..j LnJrolc nf Panama as well hnr rlncnlf. tu- -i

cnu .,. r c uie vnocicea roaas no

as manv vanai uvuk "ws acciaenis nave been
made the trek to the Chiriqui ported.

mountains or to. the coast for the In the Canal Zone thpre

.11 j i

re-

hol'ay.
Thy went by private cars,
by buses and by planes. A pe pe-tt
tt pe-tt CO ' ''
took travellers to David. A char chartered
tered chartered bus carried Veterans of
Foreign Wars and their.fami their.fami-lies
lies their.fami-lies to Bwquete, with sightsee sightseeing
ing sightseeing stops en route.
Unfinished stretches of the Pan

American Highway,

children's egg hunts,
Clay'on on Saturday

.inu ( ri. Amador
afternoon.

were

at Fort
afternoon

on Sunday

How miny iti iy m
dering in the ground was .tie,
revealed, perhaps out of deftrv
ence to veuthful vanity. .,

-anai zone noli OhrnmA,'

so go tne l"e -one renorr the long wkenl
and ousLy.iwas unusually Deaceful. without i

I serious arrest to mar the Easter

lesuvuies.

but worth the trip." V
, n visitors hi;-.d

ed for the Boquete, oriEtiVolcan :,t ?V
mountains, but some worked their i .At Balboa Heiehts there Wert-

way back as far as Remedios ZVJKnf

soort in the sea.

In the lowlanas and the vaiies
it often seemed there were more

cattle than people.
Farms had the

arid look of

:r ly a: 8 7 -" 'W;;
' yyh &YM
I y ' WKMr
;"A' 'Aa H'- -: :
A y
I v, f.;j
.::::::::p:':
'i A j
awianaHHMMiiMMan

rne customary nost holiilav Anli

drums. The sighs were for the
holidav-at-an-end.
In Panama all business ahUjt
down on Good Friday. Even the
local pubs were silent, deserted."
and locked.
But desoSte the Easter mood
at least two persons In Pertain
me were less than loyous ovejit
the weekend. h A'S""
One was Hermann Vogelsanger",.
a 44-year-old Swiss In transit
who was strolling Sa'urday neat
the Panama Legislative Palace,
when he was accosted by three
teenage boys. Voee'lsanger report.
ed to Secret Police that tne
youth eneaeed his attention
while 'he other two came up
from behind and manaeert to
snatch hi wallet. In which he
was carrying 25 $100 bills in U.S.
curacy.
Three unidientlfierl teenaers
were arrested about three
hours later but the money htS
not been recovered. fH
Secret nol'fe are also Aivestt Aivestt-gating
gating Aivestt-gating he Fnav night fkbhery
o( more fian 2000 worth of jew
els from the home of Esmeralda

Nf In Panama.

But bv and large it was a qui-'

et holWay. in keeping with the
spirit of the season.
i.pek Shutdown.

Crlrlnft Wnrlf i

SUNRISE SERVICE Bishop Reuben H. Mueller, vice-president
of the National Council of Churches ot Christ in the U.S.A.,
delivers the Easter message at Protestant sunrise services held

fy we sea u ion Amauur. vu.is. juiuji (

Service on the Thatcher retry

will be suspended for a period 'ot

approximately two weess Begin Beginning
ning Beginning Wednesday, it has been ant

nounced by the Marine Bureau.

The shut down will De necee-1

sary to permit the contractmj
firm working on the West bridge

approach to surface tne detour
section of Thatcher ; Highway
which hy-pasies the excstion
rsa.

4

1 i
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I.
S'
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1 V

fklit TWO

111 PANAMA AMEUCAN AN TXDlttStHXt DAILY XZWSfAPES
MONDAY, MARCH 16, 1951

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNIO AND rUBuaMIO v TH PANAMA AatfmeJkN -faieaV IMC
rUMO av MUM MUtttmUk,.iM .
MARMOSIO AftlAS. Mnf. '" 1 1
-t M atTT O BI 134. PANAMA. R. F F.
TtLawaHI t-74 II IWH)
' CAM.I APOKIMh PANAMItMCAN. PANAMA
''mwi Ornea, IS 7 Cintrai Avcnui arrwiiN 12th and tlTH arRirr
FWM -WmiWNTATIVMi JOSHUA POWtRf. .INC,
44 madiom Av.. niw York iU .T-C :
, iwmi i. ai.MiM r"0 t BO
snt MONTHm o is oo
p Out Viaa m AovAwe 10 BO t4 OO
THE MAIL BOX

WASH IN PANAMA
"; Since the tubjecti of discrimination, SO-SO, equality, the lingle
wage, end what-have-you teem to be the order of the day, is it per permitted
mitted permitted a lone outsider to pose a few pertinent ;juestiona which t im
stre our good Panamanian neighbors $;fafWt?lWhi?i,n'
siver? They are: e s
l. Before becoming so exercised on the matter, of the single
mage, eqnal pay, etc., why does not Panama qopm$thing -toward
aising her owtfiivage scale? If I were a.fierk, machinist, tenogra tenogra-iier!
iier! tenogra-iier! or electrician in Panama, I would be Ju.cky' Indeed if I earned
S much as one-fourth the wages paid Panama Canal Company em employes
ployes employes in the same caoacity. Why, then, should the taxes of United
Slates citizens be subsidized to raise the wage standard and provide
retirement for.jf5 group of non-citizens simply because they work for
fjUS organization? -t
I can recall quite vividly that.When IJirst entered business in
ianama, one of her most ardently stressed Inducements was the
fiw cost of labor. Does she still offer that inducement to -outside
opital, and if so, why should the United States be expected to sup supply
ply supply the deficit by paying increased wages?
3 2. In demanding a 50-50 split of the Canal gross revenue, will
ganama agree to shoulder 50 percent of the. operating costs of the
aterway including of course, the increased salaries to be paid to
?n-U.S, citizen .employes? "'
3,Since we are on the subject of reciprocity, does Panama agree
ft repay to the United States 50 percent of all the 'sums which have
Been -spent in the past for "rious Panama projects such as the roads

i'l. -V", .,
Rijarkous ;
j Comments

flbilt and streets paved: Cie sewage and water systems: garbage
Collection and disposal; Panama's section of the Pan-American High Highway;
way; Highway; the cleaning up of unsanitated areas; Point Four's agricultural
iid; and other Improvements too numerous to list in entirety?
3 For years I operated a business in Panama, from which I have
Seen retired long since and am now living in Panama.' During these
lears I have never seen any outstanding indication of concerted ef ef-fdteon
fdteon ef-fdteon the part" of Panama or her influentisl itin to-bfetter ei-

r-'tner the wage or livmg standards of her low class.
-t(5o why should the onus of that situation be foisted upon Uncle
'

I I would venture to state that, if the payrolls of the various com companies
panies companies operated and staffed by Panamanians could be exposed for
public edification, it would ho found thejrpay scale is n hieher
than the bare minimum applicable anywhere in Panama for such
work, and undoubtedly nowhere near tfcfc) scale being paid on the
Canal Zone for the same work.
' Now that "iustice" is the most important issue on, the agenda,
why not quit calling names (like a lot of little children, at play) and
get right down to cases?
. Strict Reelpmlty

CHCR.RSRA HOSPITAL

During mv riding around the area and talking with the working
class, whom I greatly admire for the load they carry at such low
wages, one of them employed at tubercular hospital in Chorrera told
me good one that sheuld b given tmblicitv and investigation.
He told me that during the San Miguel fire, when the poor peo people
ple people who had been burned out were assembled at the Stadium in Pan Panama
ama Panama for the ourpose of distributing to them various item received
from the Americans in the Canal Zone, there wjS nerson heroine
'in this distribution who is now emolovedSatliio, Chjrrera hospital in
a position connected with charity patients.
The person now employed at the Chorrera hosoital tooV home
from the stadium 12 sheets and 12 pillow cases, along with other
Items intended for the poor neoole hurned out. my informant told me.
At the Chorrera hosoital the story is oinf round that the per person
son person in question has taken home food simolies Intended for sick Pa Patients
tients Patients hams canned eoods, suear, coffee and other hish priced
aoodjNffs and, ht. ,Mlhe moment around St suoolies. j
it She parts MJing me this sad story stai1 tthe nerson re,
puttdr taVih tfies supplies says no one Swiflnierfere because of
!hel"oerson' friendship with someone with a large farm located at
3apira. This farm cwner has plentv at influence.
If the Panam Council wa criticiied th? dishonesty, how aboat
throwing a little listht on the Chorrera hospital?
This letter is wr'Hen by a Gringo who wants to see all Panama Panamanians
nians Panamanians get a square deal.
; .Siiff.i.'WUMam Worker
fl PITTANCIS AND $MA,iJfSl
The labor unions of the Isthmus seem to be sincere in their
fight for a fair payday for the Canal Zone's Local Haters. Here's
hoping they continue a hard and successful fight for the working
man. It has been proved in the US and elsewhere that, without un unions
ions unions the working man is helpless against his employer.
( Some 40 years age in the US laborers without -unjons, were
faking $2 a day about what a laborer gets in Panamatoday. It
was then, and it is now, a discrace to expect a,- man to support and
Educate a family on such a pittance.
But at least a US laborer 40 years ago could buy two large bags
!f groceries for $2. Imported coffee was eight cents a pounds How
much food can a Panamanian laborer today buy for $2? Practically
nothing.
I If Aquilino Boyd and a few more of those' tthttttiot the anti-US
horn were sincere in their efforts to imptove'ht'ctaiditions of the
forking man they would start right in Panamaot in the Canal
lone. ''itf
' They should do something about the shameful living conditions of
ie poor folk who live in that Shantytown along the Tocumen high highway.
way. highway. Someone should take a movie of that place) and send it to the
United Nations for review.
I cannot see how Panamanian statesmen-can talk about US dis discrimination
crimination discrimination unless it is to turn attention frpnr; conditions such as are
typified by this Shantytown. Is the proposed gag Jaw aimed at pre presenting
senting presenting newspapers publishing accurate, detailed: stories of the ap ap-filling
filling ap-filling living conditions the Panamanians living fn the shantytowns?
I, WkV DIscrlmHMtinaT

; PANCANAL PINANCli
t The president of the Panama Canal Cdmpanr recently told a
JrouS of government accountants: "For five years we have spent
16,000 a year to support a happy group ofGAOers and convince
"ftent that oufoounts have integrity."
!, Burmg that same five years the GAO ha reported: "Tho losses
4n the business "'vities are attributable to the high cost incurred
Jh employing US ;en in positions that could be filled locally."

' Perhaps the 1 "r of the governor-president could be partly ex explained
plained explained by the prrr ncr on the Isthmus of the fourth member of a
quartet of investigators President Eisenhower sent to find out the
fjicts of labor-management relationships here.
Following the report of the Siciliano trio to President Eisenhow Eisenhower
er Eisenhower it would appear as though Gov. William E. Potter was trying to
Say to the Bureau of the Budget's Earl J. Donnelly, 'Who failed to
appear in any of the published pictures of the accountants' banquet
or the diplonia presentations: "I tried to sell Mutual of Omaha, I
teteci to sell Le Tourneau, and now I am trying to sell the idea that
we are not a profitable venture."
Hut Donnelly surely must already have decided that the current
labor situation, especially that concerning When Actually Employed
(WAE) and other part-Hme employes is one of the worst be has over
seen. 'v"
He has surely reminded Potter that the governor himself and
other high officials testified before Congressmen considering the
Single Wage legislation and in so testifying had much to say about
retirement, leave, better treatment, the dignity .of man, and the
need to keep one's word if one is to remain respected.: ';:.
Surely Donnelly has already told Potter: "Matt, you mad a
mistake in those figures you gave at the accountants banquets The
unrecovered net Investment of the US in the Canal Company ii $534
million. The assets are $481 million plus 30 million on old Panama
Canal bond atill outstanding, a three percent ao-year loan issued in
Wll, maturity 1961.
"This leaves only $3 million unrecovered."
Finance expert Donnelly may also have taken the opportunity
. that no one Is jtupppsed to work for a company and at the same time
be covered by US Civil Service Retirement.,;
Meantime l 'would remind "Dock Employe". (Mai! Box, March
12) that article' 5, section 1 (a) of the approved bylaw of the once
great powerful Local 900 up till Feb. 17, 1S5 prohibits me from
Joining or contributing to the unity-is strength movement. I would
only note that Local sou's last election seemed strange to me. There
was no room on the ballots for write-in votes, and those elected were
' part of the election jury.
May I quote a statement by Serafino Rbmauldi on' his last visit
l to the Canal Zone: "My impression is that the non-citizen unions are
anxious to become affiliated with the Central Labor Union, and that
Jh latter would welcome the non-citizen locals."
I Nen-CkemeloM

1Y ROIIRT C. tUARK
NAIROBI, Kenya In recent
dispatches from Africa I am a a-fraid
fraid a-fraid that I have dealt poorly with
the more frivolous aspects of a sa safari,
fari, safari, but there seems to have been
so much yelling and blood-letting
on all sides that pursuit of the
greater three-toed sloth seems rel relatively
atively relatively unimportant.'
I had' meant to tell you about
what it is like to have gout in both
feet when three large elephants
have taken a firm stance between
von and the jents' room.

The shower of doom-palm nuts
on your tent as the jumbos push
over the trees-Is somewhat less

soothing than gentle April rain.

Mama could have told you
something of what it feels like for

a eirl to be playing a quiet game

of gin rummy, with another lady
when a lioness with a grievance

suddenly appears at. 40 yards from
the mess tent and lets out a mighty
series of angry growls.

Mama also could certainly tell
you what it is like to be left in an

open car and suddenly confronted

by two lionesses, suitably eouipoeo

with tiny cubs and evilly disposed
therefrom, when the noble white
hunter and the noble husbands are
off shooting birds in the high trass

the lions had just come out of,
There was the usual sudden

sickness which needed sudden air

craft because all the bridges were

down and cars were imoossime

an in the best Hemingway tradi tradition
tion tradition except nobody died.

And then then was the matter

of the mighty curs which I, as the
senior witch doctor, laid down in

order to procure a leopard for a
client whose, luck in leopards was

poorly and whose wife was dead

set on having a leopard skin for

her hearth.

The curse eventually produced

the leopard, but it also produced
unseasonable rain in sheets and a

slight cyclone that blew the camo

completely flat I have definitely

given up witch-doctoring, sinee I

do not seem to know my own

strength. t

And there was the situation of

the lady and the rhinos and the

buffalo that smashed io a friend
of mine, a professional hunter of

great skill and experience, and
the buffalo that almost got another

friend of mine who managed to

stick his eun against its neck as it

boiled out of bush and swished
by. .-, : ,-.f .- .'

I suppose I could have told you

what it is like to do 700 miles In
'wo days over roads "Mch rne

from awful to impoibie. with re resultant
sultant resultant wear on health "d temoer.

Or about the dust and he hrvn

xles and the stuck lorr'es and the

thorns thcrtugh tbejoot vrlAHft

scorpions' Iff the" fehlf and 'U the
other things-which go to make up

safari: .

Some of it has to do with being

clean at the end of the day. sittin?
around a camit fire with ?in and

tonic while delicious smell om

from the cook tent and eryhod

s embroidering his experience of
th day. ;

There arlf cerWuf trMmohs. too.

as People who hunted seftouslv
scored their last-minute achieve achievements
ments achievements with leopard and lion and

buffaloes, all in glorious technicol technicolor
or technicolor for future tales aromd camo

tires in Madrid and Denver and
Boston.

And a personal triumph as well

the discovery that. It was much

more fun to look at it ann near a-

bout it than to shoot it mvelf.

with one exception. There is

still one cantankerous leooard

loose in the Masai whose hide I'll
have someday, because he did ev everything
erything everything wrong that a leopard is
supposed to do right and reduced

me and Mr. Harry Selhv to furious
frustration. He was also the big biggest
gest biggest leooard we ever saw and we
almost had him five times.

I could expound at some length

I suppose on the bit trouble that

is almost certain to haonen in Ken-

va next month when the old Mau

Mau leader, Jomo Kenyatta, comes

loose from imprisonment, for

JV Spring, 1959,

ii ' Win
HM.;s.,..u.. ... ,S1W

WalterW

incheli In New York

MAN AlOUt T01 j
n,A kA tfton.Mrs. Albert

Laiker duet at Moflteio Bay baa
t.HMA' "HrA" Tbitliizit! .

jaavisuB vv-Bi
Diane Varans jil of -Hollywood

("I found tt was etroyui me i
't rnv turhecaus of bril

liant college etudent Jtonald Gait,
would it?. ..Joe DiMaggio is bat

ting .1000 witn Tneaa neison, me
Bremen beauty in the Latin Quar Quarter
ter Quarter girl-asylum. ."Suzie Wong"
leading lady France Nuyen (a

newcomer to Broaawayj no longer
ituiVi tn nrnriurer JOlh Llftin.

who hastened her climb to fame

...Didn't they, catch someone close
to ftinrU Swnnfirlffllnf her lew-

el ease?... Jerry Lewis reported reportedly
ly reportedly tells chums that he, too, is sort

of mint witn s. uavu, jr. uian i
say why... Actor Arthur O'ConneU's
favorite city is Julie London..
"First Impssiont, th new mu
sicaL. is selling tickets; Into Aug-
nat nHptat n KirK.tr

(Peggy Lee's former mate) next

weds Marion Louier... isn i uan
Whitney's Big Interest (since her
xnlitiiatlnn a areel micrnit wfi.i

flings big parties?... Libby Hoi

mars, jates are witn scientist

Henry Allen.

Julie Wilson's latest is James

Cardell, a Chicago meat packet...

The Lobster crowd suspect jockey
Conn McCreery secretly marred
Dorothy Lowthian (of BklynV at
Miami Beach ... Nelson Sealbre.
young "owner of Brazil's top rac

ing stable, is trying to put his

brand on actress Leonora Corbett

...Redbook editor Robert Stein and
his Mrs., have a short-short in type
...Harry Millard of "Last Mil?"
and Diana Hyland of "Sweet Bird"
have a madness in their me method..
thod.. method.. .Maureen Stapleton's recent
groom (Max Allentuek, exec for

nrndnper Kermit Bloom fardenl

married Mr. B's casting director,
Vaughan Believer, two days after
the divorce.

Prince Aly Khan gave a. solid
gold whistle (with his royal crest)
to the doorman of the Cafe Louis

XIV...The new song, "Little Did 1

Know," is by August Chamben

once radio operator on the lll-fat-

ed Andrea Doria... Heiress Isabel

Durcan and publicist Raymond 0' 0'-Connell
Connell 0'-Connell merge in May.. .Ditto Pat

Newell whose fadda is Pres. of

J. Wilter Thompson; the ad a gen

cy. She becomes Mrs. J. Beres

ford. He's veep at McCann-Enck

son...The cover-girl set is buzzing

about a husband s revenge. Cut

off his prominent cover gal wife's

bair...The Miami Beach scenes m
"Some Like It Hot" (starring Ma
rilvn Monroe) were shot at Coro-

nado Beach, Calif.'' (Oops, ""'there
foes my Florida pass). ..Julius L
loss's 3 bandaged fingers catrie

from being a Do-It-Yaself bug.

mo has-becorn a national hero, a
much-plucked symbolic haro.

Kenya will be your country to

watch, it seems to me, in this free-for-all
which currently tears Africa
asunder.
But I don't think I'll go into de detail
tail detail on any of these things right
now because tomorrow I have a
date to go fishing.

Gwen Verdon's huge success in

"Redhead" makes her No. 1 Iholce

for the film biography of Gertrune
Lawrence, a natural.. .Janet Gay
nor is the designer of a new tyoe

of bed.. Songstress Betty Campbell

weds Air Force Cant. Clinton Mat
thews in May...Sinatra's Girl Fri Fri-dav.
dav. Fri-dav. Gloria Lovell. tepees at the

St. Moritz. Next door to the star'

local retreat.. .Robert (NBC) Sar Sar-noff's
noff's Sar-noff's new contract gives him
1130.000 ner annum with a yearly

increase of lOGs until his wage is

1200.000. Then there's his expense

account.. .They say Danny Thomas

spurned the male lead in tne turn,
"Marty." which elevated Ernest
Borghine to stardom. ..Ginger' Rog
ers, who is sooo rich, still rates
$12,500 per TV song-and-jig.
The legends that Sir Anthony
Nutting and Jeanne Murray Van Van-derbilt
derbilt Van-derbilt mav wed have taken a

sudden twist. Movie producer J.

Mankowitz appears to have aer

Interest.. .Joni James' pair of re

cording clicks ("There Must Be a

Way" and "There Goes My
Heart") figure to net her $100,000

from concerts. Starting at Came
gie Hall in May... Lord and Tai Tailor's
lor's Tailor's pert executive "Patsy" Bos

GLIDDEN PANAMA, S.A.
Announces the consolidation of iti operations with

tic- soon weds George R. Edwards,

British Amines exec. . thlckie

James' most persistent pursuitor

is rmuy Mainuner ueist iy. a
night guest at her V'Stable-' on

56tft...rais wonder "who tne Dai

las oil man is. who courts actress

Claire Euce by phone. ..Hungarian

beauty ilona Bata is taking pro

ducer Richard Krakeur's mind

off his "Masquerade" which foia
ed after the premiere.

I

pAjTOASIITOOri
Merry-Go -Roikjd
V .r.--1 1 1 W t A 1 1 Q W 1

4

K

1

House has been sitting on a dy bled about the lack of knee room;

of the deadlv ooinson accumulat

ing in pur sofl and food- from

raoioacuve tauout.

IU1UII.UVI I1I1VUU iiu4i.Wi UHU W1UI U1C. UIUVUl!
The report urges that the prob-1 communications problem, couldn't
im -f rJI VtU., llMif lu r Sfllva thai rnmmilniitfnna

lem of radioactive fallout

taken away -; from the

linen away-; irom tne : Atomic moa in ma new commiues
Energy Commission and put un- room. Ht finally ordered ff
der an entirely separate govern- echoing loudspeaker system n&r
ment agenc -preferably the'Dc out. : i ;

partment of Health, Education,

ana. weuare.'.- .,.t.i .
The report, so, far suppressed,
recalls tho Charges made by AEC
rnmmitlinnitr Tom Unmi in

1953 and denied by Adm, Lewis
Strauss, shetf chairmsn of the A-

lomic iwiergyr commission, v that
Strontium SO. th nninn i7nlnn

ed in the air after nuclear An An-plosiona,
plosiona, An-plosiona, :.w endangering the
health of thejsatlon. m

ouica uicu, ,.uuciurs ana scien scientists
tists scientists have become more and more
worried verStrontluni 90, and
the manner in which -it setths
in the nones where H

cancer. They fear : that- the chil children
dren children f today: may grow Tip into
a warped generation tomorrow.
Even if nuclear a

ped,i fallout' from past explo-
innt will niu' thlj l,i

of Strontium 80-to--three -times

today's accumulation." -Sientista
explain that tha fall

out in the atmosphere will ; gr a-

quauy arm to eirm during the
next 10 VearS. and will JnruH

evenly over most, of the earth's
surface,, except the polar regions.

xne radioactive deposits In the
New York area, far aramnU

double in 1951 what was record

ed in use. This is the only area
where long-term measurements

are avauaoie.

The greatest danver mnti vnm'

milk, which provides 80 1 per-ceut
of the calcium in the American
diet. Spot checks by both the A-

tomic Energy Commission and

me ruDiic neaitn service reveal

me -strontium w in milk is ris rising
ing rising at a r1ihirhinB .iaiA":rf::i.: a:

sorbed into the tyHk

. Some icieniisti- WlW J. a

- i( T W VI 111
E.C is tar tM nnnnnKnrI .KA.t

radioactivity In ;food, and point

w siaiemanis oy commissioner

From the March 18th headlines:

pkJoe-touis an bos-Angeles at

torney Martha Jefferson secretly

wed a, week. ago "...rrom tne WW

column of Jah.-lBtn: "Ex-cnam
pion Joe Louis' big interest is Mar
tha Jefferson, a coast Portia" ..

Angle, Dickenson's legs in the "Kio
Bravo" film make most gal's
stems look like piano stools.. .The

Nick Gavlaros.iAtra5. Baer. TV
historian) expect their next image
iir June...Iliir Hayes and Florence
Henderson's big laugh-getter at

the St. Regis Maisonette: An im

pression of Maria Callas and the
Met's Mr. Bing dueting: "Thou
Swell".. Jimmy ,Hoffa's shrug on
why the Teamsters'. Union keeps
growing:, "Because a teamster

brings home a : fat pay envelope.
That auWniat)csUy,:'allies us with
the strongest of all Unions The

Wives' union ...One foreign car
advertises it this Way: "Loads of

room for 4V4 people.''
i .....
Gloria Vanderbflt Lu met's party
brought gilts For The Girl W ho

Has' Everything. Actress Susn

Pieshette gave her a 125 pink ele elephant
phant elephant pin-cushion and Carol Grace
brought her a box of monogiam monogiam-med
med monogiam-med pencils.. .The Presidents of
tho N, Y. Times and N. Y. Her Herald
ald Herald Tribune (Orville Dryfoos. and
Howard Brundage) are Dartmouth
college men, (Rah-Rahl)... "Flow

er Drum Sdng" and "Red-head"

are the musicals most in demand

"Sweet Bird" and "Majority" lead
is the straight plays. ..Guy Wood,
who wrote "French Foreign Le Legion,"
gion," Legion," the hit song, rightfully pro protests
tests protests the statement that his tune
is anything like "Goody-Goody."
His musical veracity is herewith
acknowledged.

Snat rnmmsrM W. chairman'.

warren Maenuson. whn -nm.

solve .tne communications pro-

new eommiLee

The ffuards at "each rlnnr rfia.

Covered their rnrenMnn r)iVa hail

no telephones, essential for clearf
ing visitors and making emeri

cam. worters nao to cms.
el through marble to install tel telephone
ephone telephone outlets.

In the daiilinff new icitjhiii a

steam pipe broke and swamped
the floor. Because the architect
had' neglected to inrlnrf a riratn

or cut-off valve, the water sptJ-,
ed down an eleyator shaft before
th. mtmm ..AU L it. .aT mm

Tu t ,:wuiW D anui ou in

vne oasement. i

.NO b IUZZINO ILIVATOM
Greatest Sna(nrlal !.. h.l k...

directed a rain it th ...

vice. Senators are accustomed to
summoning elevator! with three

u fiVi "vwi uHea,v:-' tne new
Dullding. however .lvtn k,,

tons light up instead of buzzing.

""K"-wo or iae operators

Tr li oenatwiai : rank by
the light. Retnir- -1

kept waiting st their floors just

chUecrs'offichaVered to r?

vmy. bui inose wnose offices are
nearer nthar aia,a. j

wu wouia
have to walk farther, so insist
on. reolacins t.h n.mf.h.i.j

LKghtl with "old-fashtoned buz-

LonC-lerfferi aanitnra -'.: wliniai

knees have been bumping s s-gainst
gainst s-gainst the underside of the new
desks, are inclined to blame Den Den-nis
nis Den-nis Chaves, Jr. for their bruises.

ne is me pisynoy son of Jv'ew
Mexico's Senator fhivn whii

heads, the builduig"eommittee. :

x ne vivacious Denny, jr.: wan wangled
gled wangled the fttrniture contract 4; for
Haas-Dodson- after his" father
disqualified the low bidder 4 Se Senator
nator Senator Chavez happened to fly

Wlllard T.ihhv rii.m(..i, k. i.:-ulback to Washintrtnn in th miH

radioactivity of Minnesota .-wbeat j? 2 j r? elec.ion campaign

s oemg no naiard to- public! vu- u"uu

health." :"!s:r:xe:sij

yuo anu one-nan nines tne mx-

"Pum. permissioie concentration

evennejess, uooy was not con

cernea

ANGRY MUTTIRINO

Stem Offic .: Tiirnifurk

I; eligibility had already been cer-

uuea oy we arcniiect, was

C1IICU, I JJ WW MAviiabvi, 'Wa Ilia

Aw,.. uiie i mi iiir mmnn in, h.u vuiirn uiucii.

secretreport prepared undef Dr. Al ult, Stern's $61,S00 bid

Kusten? Morgan of Johns Hopins w L na Ha-Dod

UWversltt;ifrthtft;;ai e uJCw.

Health jervics:;ileting Wek Wek-nesses'
nesses' Wek-nesses' in the AEC's program
regulate rradiation : safety v and
urging transfer to another aeen-

"There is need tar a w.tl..f:.

I TT .UtvUll
'5r'.comprenensive Program of ra-

uiauun control, rocused in s sin single
gle single agency nd operated in close
ooordinatiencWltbrj state and local
governments," sttes ,.the stUI stUI-suppressed'
suppressed' stUI-suppressed' report.

i-'-i

SINATI'S S.O.B.

The nation's most illustrious
tenants are in an uproar over
their fsncy new Senate Office
Builriinff

I : Rhnria u,

dore. Green .grandpa of the S S-nate;
nate; S-nate; is so displeased that he has
threatened to remove his name
om the metal plaque listing the
senators who served on the com committee
mittee committee which designed the new
building.
The first lenstnri -hait .....J

iy moved into the jnarble mauso

leum mis montn when the out outbursts
bursts outbursts began. More (han one in indignantly
dignantly indignantly referred to the Senate
Office Building by its initials -S.O.B..
Short senators complained that
they could hardl peep over the
rostrums n 'the grandiose l?er-

amra -.was am km

etr cosi to. tne taxpayers lor

ui crampeu new aeSKS, ptUI DOoK
cases apd tables, ran oyer, AH,-
00a ' '''
Now the architect! has offered
to jack up the desks on casters to
make more leg room lor the dis disgruntled
gruntled disgruntled senators..
And the muttering gets an angrier'
grier' angrier' Mny ; senators don't like
the plaMment of electrical out-
lets Which Hmitl tha rrin...l

of desk. Some complain about

lack of closet space; others about
lack of light in what closet pace
there is.
If it didn't mean investigating
themselves. enitnr mio-ht .-,.

, si t,m
call for a Congressional investi

gation

Listen To
The OAS
ffldriamericari
(Record Show
12:30 p.m.
HOC-YCM
Every Sunday T

CIA. PINTURA GENERAL
. y.
at its headquarterg on National Avenue, and we are pleased
to advise our clientele that
Mr. JOSE ARONNE
has heen named distributor of
Glidden and General Faints
' ' ?
at his new store located on 17th street. (In front of Social
Security Building) Tels, 2-1891 and 2-1895

Dr. John Maloney isv fightir.
former wife June Lockhard for vi visitation
sitation visitation and nhone nrivllecraa nf

their tots. She's in town for k

riaynouse 80... Howard r. Hohl.
who managed swank hotels in
Bermuda, is the Honey Plata's
new General.,. The Hy Perlows
(Marie McNaraara, former NBC
XV color gal) expect an image
any week... Ludwig Bemelmang is
painting Lena Home at his Gra Grain
in Grain ercy Park studio...Tourism In
Cuba is coming tod slow for hotel

owners, iney are shaving rates,
a sure panic sign ... Sonja Henie
searcher fnr half .n

he '8t' her, one-lnch-quare dia- j

aiunu nni in I 'SWSDK Spot. She
almost clouted thej man at a
nearbv tabla whn KaiH

jjoke'V .,; Ooloresi Hart of 'Tue
Pleasuretjlit ompany" enjoys
dittOAWith Frank i Freyman, the

majtuavox magnate..;, uon't cough
near-actor Robert Cummings. He

uvwi aimotb iuu' pus a say.
RCA Victor and ; -the Warner
Bros. reeorHln firm.

WOO the McGu ra Kl.tar. 4

Coral..w Audrey v lleadows' coast

v?f H" UT' v. i Hermann ...
Model Carmelite ttibbs and jovk jovk-ftWilly
ftWilly jovk-ftWilly Hartaek lettheir romance
fade...Th Richard Cehmane (he's
an odltor at Cosmooolitan) nam named
ed named their jaaughter-Pleasant Ann
Thimothe of Hoagy Carmicoael,
wh?JJ?,d n day; was one
of the first to accompany the old
eowbov-Indian films at the puno
iSiiii nlckel1ona ... Andy
Williams H'wood visit is most en
loyabie because of Kathy Nolan
iooks like the Real Thing be
tween Conrad. Hilton and Alens
Murray. A constant duet aince bis
return from Calro...Sign on rear
of truck: "Free Virginia McMa
nusl"

The Rolex Oyster

't .f ' .,'
s Z-pvil for reliability and accuracy', the Rolex

. jIv.Iat 9 Aval r,a wta n (ha mmI ...... .1-.

, witches in the famous Rolex range. Its anv
, ing precision is perfectly and permanently
protected against dust, djrt and perspiration
jby ;the 100 waterproof Oyster case. As
with all Oyster models, this watch is fitted
t with the exclusive andTamous'.VTwinlock,
t double safety winding crown which senwt.
down tni thi tost thus forming, in addition
j,' to a second seal against Impurities, an ints-
rl part of the case, itself and not e mere

; r,v"'""n yo oraac unoer tirain.

m

V:Iii't';"i"1''',':,''''-)' 1

' 4, V- "a-ir i -

CINTRAL AMIRICA'5
LIADINO JIWILlIRt

Across The Chase Manhattan Bank



A 7-;

nioxr3 ay. ijfXiteir so; 19S9 :
i STBS PANAMA AMEBIC AJ VAN EnreNPEST JWT.WSPAJPEE
PARI THXJC3

V

r.

ft.

j. f

,T""'4i f!

f f I 14 f V 'r if0?Ui,o h' St
iijjLl"WlinrjifW.iiaiiMniiiiiMrff 'flM'"ltl "ffr'"i I . IIM'""""IIMWI' 111,1 nmwiinimmwwi J

SIXTY.SI YOUNG DELEGATES to the LaYibbean Girls State left

organisation- concluded its week long1 sessions. (U.S.' Army Photo)

Arttii&'atirHeMrs,

To Represent GZ Youth In- WdshftigfoM

i ii an mf a gfffmmmtftafn 8&iiwiiSi'iiii

P
'Xi4Lli4 i' riieiyr' ii 1
v 1; ...... ;

'l LEILA LEONE, (left) of Colon and Anna Cheung, (center) of
' Panama City receive special Pan American awards at the final

Caribbean Gnjls State assembly at Fort Clayton Wednesday eve eve-,
, eve-, ning: Making the presentation is Mrs. Bertfta'' BWwiii" director of
Girls 'Static' Te fw,,ere Msevers Versefiliri IbepubUc

i,.
re ons(
..pf.Pajwn.
"
Girls Chow Up
mi
to
ftirls way ; -tJaditionallywbw.
'bird-like appetites but MSgt.
Glenn W. Plucker-car tell you that
chen girls are busy they can dhow
lap as heartily sis any; boy-
The sergeant is in, a pbsition tjH
Compare,' as "mess sergeant foi:
fhe joint kitchen and messhall
which dished out three meals a day
n$ evening refreshment to the
116 delegates to Crossroads Boys
State and Caribbean Girls State in
the USARCARIB Annex Building a$
Fort Clayton,,;, s .? I;
AnyoMTplaTiiSnlstffiila
ectwill do well to -recruit ft least
aixj conks. a mess steward -nd
plenty of San Bias kitchen pphce..
; 1 .J
; riucKer irom netraquariers
battery, 4th- Gun Battalion,
Artillery was assisted by jk
p.5 Archie L. Cunningham and
Sp.4 James L. Pratt, of the bat battalion's
talion's battalion's D Batti'W(orBe
Jakubowski tndasft
; .Jiosepn
Sour a. of A Battjetyr.;Tta Edward
G. Elwell Jr., of: C-fiattiry and
Pfc. James Li:MhhsH of the
534th Military fWKaCompanJ
. ... &fr'8&,T . h
i i'u ij 10 Tlgni ,r"

""" "" ' ' -W0I0W mm .nit mi
It
;;'
; !; V" '
i IwlllL illliliil :
A y, ttSf
' ' "'', J' 1'"IV-
T I I H IIIIINIIIlViWHIIIIIIrtn'IfflTIIIII

1.,....' .! A: AU. . ..II A J. i. d L A I - V

. U1U .jy-vuuiiuu,. nu -secreiarjijwjpiswaneive ijauarjiu.H. ,ATroy

Tta TTW ''"V'? v"-- "" I

l.(aS.,Armyt,hotd)t

HeartijY A? Boys
Sp.4 Leo F-'BraCot Headquarters
Battery, 4th .Gun Battalion, baked
the pastry- mighty popular item
With young legislators,
" Operating ; ''e'''biiilding for. the
two civiQ .organiiatjipns required a
project "tfffieelf &XKpt. Guy M.
WatSon, of ,";Heaflq,uaWe.rs, Fort
Claytoh, whose responsibilities in include
clude include the mess. .-
MVSgt. Roy W. Walter, of Head
tain whili
Pace and Sic. Robert J. Wood of
the U.S. Army Garrison, at Clay Clay-torir
torir Clay-torir wereeoordinatolrs-JPvt. James
1Q. Long, oLthe Clayton garrison
IhUndied dnvWA assignments
L SdVs and Girls States delegates
rv. t! ix i j a i i
UDOKV a 101 01 neia inps rana uiey
rode on convoys of-Oouses provided
byJUbe,U.S4rinx Transportation
SMfirviife.'W
'Tnjss jne
fiear that Fort
Clayt bji, b,efftiost to the com com-bined
bined com-bined y aw,Cfl States at the
refluestM?ffie;iericiin Legion
and itsfauxunrara
oniey general ua watcheidorr

quarters Battery, 4th Gun Battal Battalion,
ion, Battalion, B3n,dfeJspecryr'ojects for
Hi pantain while Kfc. Georce E.

the USARCAKIB. annex by Army

! '-' "O.?-' ;

Huff And Webster

Alfred William ArehibaM and

Boys Nation in Washington, during latt July, at the Canal Zone del del-gates
gates del-gates sponsored fcy fthi4ta,departnjtnt of theuAtf iean ,Legion,i
Colonel John C, Nickerson, ir.,' director of Crossroads BeTys' State,
announced as 1959 Boys State ended at Ft. Clayton.
Girls Nation representatives from the Zone are Christine Huff
and Nancy Webster of Caribbean Girls State. The. girls national
session- alto ; is scheduled 4or it ; Julyu In Washinoton,j and,; the Jw

delegates will be sent by the local

iary.
Selection of the girls was announced by Mrs. Bertha Brown, Girls
State director during an awards assembly.

Archibald, newly -elected gover governor
nor governor of Boys State, ; apd Hesters;
speaker of Vjthe.: ljlj'tlNi
honored at the filial awards assem assembly
bly assembly of the boys organization at the
USARCARIB Annex,. Fort Cayton.
They received gavels of, their of offices;
fices; offices; as did also Lt. Gov. Ray
Caldwell.
Parents alspiwere.pn banfy to. see
(He Boys, State delegates 'vceiv'ft
diplomas for their attendance at
the week-long session in cinzensnip
and government. v
Both Boys State nd Girls State
delegates were, invited to attend
the Governors banquet 'and .ball,
an annual affair.' at the American
Legion Club in Fort Amador- last
Thursday evening.
In the closing session of Boys
State legislature,1 Archibald ap approved
proved approved measures which encouraged
establishment of junior eivic coun councils
cils councils in Canal Zone .communities
promoted opportunities for mere
young men from Central and South
America to attend Crossroads Boys
State, urged shorter driver training
courses in the Canal Zone high
A- 0
Lt. Gov. Ray CaWwell, speaker
Pftoto t:". '"'

bus'Thursday noon as thi civic

y
Crady Hesters, Jr., will attend
department of the. Legion Auxil-fl
schools and four courses per year,
anc established a- committee to
promote coopeiatitto befweeni)B6s
Sfcte and Girls 'State: ': v. "'"
The idea of junior civic coun councils
cils councils to represent the younger set
in ech Canal Zone community
became very popular issue in
both the Boys and Girls States.
''''-,! J ', V'.'l I r,
THe Caribbe2nvGirl State'dele
gates' closed out 'their sessidn8"' iind
lft the USARCARIB Annex at Ft.
Clayton after a tarewell assembly.
Outstanding delegates of both
Crossroads Boys State and Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Girls State are expected to
be; on hand next year .for thfc .an .an-jjual
jjual .an-jjual session louring' the fiastr.
holidays to assist new delegates.
, In particular, Archibald and
Christine Huff of the boys and girls
organization .respectively ,willbe
needed to preside over the opehing
meetings next year until new chief
executives are elected. .
It Is traditional for the two gov
ernors also to head the staffs of
junior counsellors.
f V
I

p 0k til!

pribij to the
of the Hou

Awards Ass'erritily fa
st!
House Grady Hesters, Gov

Congressman

jTicTBuy Up Gettys

WASHINGTON (UPI) Rep.
James M. Quigley (D-Pa.) has
carried to the Senate his fig
for more money to clear junk junkyards
yards junkyards and beer parlors off two
Civil War battlefields.
Owelty's appeal called on the
Senate to restore $1,250,000
chopped out of the 1960 budget
by the House.
The money would have been
earmarked for further land pur
chases at the' sites of the battle
of Gettysbwin .ftulgley's dis district
trict district aJK&the two battles of Bull
or Manassas, near Manas-
Va mpng others.
The Pennsylvania congressman
said in a statement, that southern southerners
ers southerners in particular should be inter interested
ested interested in preserving m6re Gettys Gettysburg
burg Gettysburg areas, some of tbem adjoin
ing President Eisenhower s farm
for historical parks.
"In one section land occupied
and fought over by men of Texas,
Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi,
Georgia, Florida, South Carolina
and Virginia units is now occu occupied
pied occupied by a line of souvenir shops,
garages, beer parlors and trailer
courts," the congressman said.
"The famous peach orchard is
GAO Slashes Navy
Request For Hew
Aircraft Engines
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
General Accounting .Office, con
gressional watchdog -over so'vira
LnvpendKns 'rajpnedia' Ns
vfortier r w snoi(jo prs
wrtof a(ttniii!e.
The accounting office (GAO)
told Congress the engines would
not have been needed if the Navy
had stepped upMts pfoce'tiures for
overhauling airplane motos as
did the Air Force.
In addition,' the GAO said, Na Navy
vy Navy plans call for (he purchase of
another '33-milliori". dollars' worth
of the Wine-' engine j. The" -report
noted :"a,'geWrtMack'of expedi expeditious
tious expeditious handling of these engines in
almost every segment of the pipe pipeline."
line." pipeline." The Navy.' however, said it is
going as fast as is advisable on
engine overhauls. f
The" GAO said1 tfc.e Nre "aid
JoW'elO'ays 1ftjrTfeoval,ih!pM
mew, overaaar and retarn of en engines
gines engines to an operating base. It
said an extensive GAO survey
last year showed the procedure
actually took an average of 275
days.
But Air Force experience sug suggests
gests suggests that 150 days would be
"reSkswTHbW tae&Wtomaidi ft
rcolmfendeff fltat Sffi'Wsvy adftptfj
such 'a sehedule.: -
Ih comments" submitted with the
GAO report, the Navy rejected
the GAO suggestion. It said it
cannot "compromise its readiness
by reducing the present pipeline
planning factor." It said the GAO
failed to take mobilizatlofi BeeSs
into account.
The Navy also eotrtplathed' that
the GAO survey, conducted' last
year, did not 'study truly repre representative
sentative representative engines. It said the
GAO failed to recognize improve improvements
ments improvements in the Navy's mahagement
of its v spare engines.
The 'TGaO ;told congress
that
the. Navtfeswise "desfibt
justify) '"the"' pipeline- fa'ctof'-nor
the continued procurement of ex excess
cess excess engines now under contract."
That underlined a GAO recom recommendation
mendation recommendation that the Navy recom recompute
pute recompute its heeds at once and "can "cancel
cel "cancel those quantities' of engines un under
der under contract that can be econom economically
ically economically terminated,". ,.. .,
BLACK&

rV-

f MIS SWCHANAW CO. I.TD.. OLAlaOW, ItetLANl

AGENCIAS W.
I 'r"ft i 1

I "ii: ';li(it t- f i 0

29-15 AutOmobUe

Fights

on
rSites
surrounaep.pnttnfeejSiMi iy pri private
vate private holdings which could be used
for commercial .developments," he
said, "and one famous hill on the
Union right, flank is now a junk junkyard
yard junkyard ana garage duriip."
The' government afready has
bought arid turned Into battlefield
parks "pianv'of 'the'fielfls through
which the bloody' battle if Gettys Gettysburg
burg Gettysburg faigeff in ;July" of 1864.
Eisenhower asked ,$1,'250,000 in
his butlget for the 'fiseai year be
ginning July l to buy up more
battlefields. The Hoitse- Appropria Appropriations
tions Appropriations Committee turned down the
request and the fultHcmse went
along with the-veto..
Quigley -saw he 'was -enlisting
the elp .of 'Civil War roundtables
and slate Civil War centennial
commissions for what he termed
"the second battle of Gettysburg."
AIYMCA Aols
Swimming Champ
ine of .the nqst 'bopul
at "the UfeO-JWr
ar activi-
ties
Armed
Force's SeArice fnter' i the' 'tie-1
ginners' class fn bridger
Meeting every Wednesday at
7:30 p.m., the -group is under the
direction of Pfc. Richard Spero,
Who has taught bridge for five
years.
However, bridge .J? fey no means
the only activity -ini which Spero
has ben activ and proficient. To
most people a degree in law, as
well as membership in two of the
best known bridge clubs in New
York would be enough. Not so with
fcnero.- i
At an early age somebody Dushed
him ,iato-the tyisjterand,eyer since
heeiia-beenM t hme there
op land. In 4949 he, was an Ail A-
mencan Hign, bchpol swimmer, be being
ing being Junior National butterfly cham
pion. Entering the University of
Michigan the next year, he was
a member of the University NC NCAA
AA NCAA championship team and the
RiMopaUoV?11 J At a n c e
cHampipnsh'm kam,, After going
inw, service, Spero was a double
wiuiici in me rirsi Army swim
ming championship in August 19j8
specifically in the 100 and 220
yard, breast stroke events.
Originally' frottt Ne York. Soe-
roMfr naw- stfattonoTd t-Tprt Ama Amador,
dor, Amador, and is assigned as legal ob
server me courts of the Repub Republic
lic Republic of Panama.
Allamira Sets Up
For Minoav Picnic
Tickets for Club Altamira's-out
ing to Puerto Calmito on Sunday,
are now available at No. l "Q"
street, (Vincensini-bldg.) from 4:30
until 7 p.m. daily and all day Sat-,
uJay.,-MWa aflnewpadiover the
weejkenfl -,,
The first fund-raising event of
the club is scheduled to depart
from the Legislative Palace st
7:30 a.m. Sunday.
Arrangements have been mad?
with leaders of the interior !ow.i
to ia,ssure ,that,iprije!sV!pt, all bev
erages ,wll be atrtprewuung city,
r'atess Natiye
jNauye .aisnes..,wm ais
also be
prepared m
addition to the
big
welcome planned
Capitalinos were reminded to
ta'" along their cameras, bathing
suits, as well as some, drinking
water. v'oconuts are. plentiful ii),
the area and sold beiow
city'prices, it ',wa. stated.
WHITE
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H. DOEL, S.A.
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1

rjttit four
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN TXDEPEfcDKNT DAILT NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, MARCH SO", 195

1

octal ana Ksuxerwiae

4 SufiM :

Box 134,
jPanama

Si Jt L ,JLjt.Uc PvJ.b740 J-0 741 LU 8:00 J 10 Jf

SOCIAL EVENTS COMPLIMENT GENERAL ATE,; -MARINE
CORPS' COMMANDANT, WHO IS VISITING HERS
' Gtntnl Randolph Patt, Commandant of tho Marina Corpt, who
rrivtd at Albrook yettarday for a threo day visit on the
will bo Mod this ovoning at dlnnor party given by Co Richard
W Wallace and Mri. Wallace at their quarter. Col. Wallace it the
Commandant of the Marine Barrack here.
Last evenina. General Pate was guest of honor at a dinner par party
ty party given by Rear 'Admiral and Mrs. George Wales at their Fifteenth
Naval' District quarters.

Holy Week Guests
At Panamont Inn
Among guests from Panama
City who were Holy Week guests
It Panamonte Inn, in Boqune,
were Monsignor Luis Punzoio
Apostolic Nuncio to Panama; the
iJ9iHnr nf Italv to Panama

and Mrs. Maioli and their S',n .enjoyed a pinata party

Franco: Mr. Oscar Wenborn; Mr. : porch.

ana Mrs. Alexander Nikolajevic;
Me. and Mrs. Paul Kramer; Miss
OlJve Brooks; Mr. and Mrs. Alva
roiVilianueva and Mr. Luis ViUa ViUa-nutva
nutva ViUa-nutva Meyer; MrJ and Mrs. Vigo
Larsen, their son Erick and daugh daughter
ter daughter Sonia: Mr. and Mrs. Mue

With Mrs. Collins' parents,
Capt. and Mrs. Hans Elliot, they
were among a number of neigh neighbors
bors neighbors who attended an Easter egg
hunt in the Collins yard and tiow tiow-er
er tiow-er garden yesterday, after prizes
had been distributed to youngsters

finding the most eggs, the children

on me

Mr. and Mrs. Rozmeski

Announce Son's Birth
Mr. and Mrs. Paul V. Rozmes Rozmeski
ki Rozmeski of Cocq Solo are receiving t t-gratulations
gratulations t-gratulations on the birth of tlieir
son, Jeffrey Paul, at Coco Solo
hospital last Monday. He is their
second son.
Mr. and Mrs, Juan Flores fat
Coco Solo are the baby's mater maternal
nal maternal grandparents. The paternal
grandmother is Mrs. Margaret
Rozmeski of Bridgeport, Conn.
Mrs. James Calvert and son
James of San Antonio, Texas, are
visiting for six weeks at the Roz Rozmeski
meski Rozmeski home in Coco Solo. Mrs.
Calvert, the former Gloria Flores,
is making her first visit to the Ca Canal
nal Canal in several years.

' Lett Lament

Answer to Previous Puzzl

Dr. and Mrs. Carlos Pedereschi
of Boquete, With their two daugh daughters,
ters, daughters, were Easter week' guests of
Mrs. Pedreschi's oarents Mr. and
Mrs. Carl Ael Janson, at the
latter's country home in El Vol-

Carlos de la can.

Gehm and Mrs

Giiardia.
Guests from the Canal Zone
inoluded Capt. and Mrs. William
Jopes of Albrook AFB; Mr. and
Mds. Mark Dillon and children,
an I Mr. and Mrs. J. E. MclCin MclCin-ne
ne MclCin-ne and children.
Qtfier Boquete visitors and re re-'Si'dents
'Si'dents re-'Si'dents entertained at the ho.el
with several cocktail parties and
a barbecue during the weekend.

Cristobal Woman's Club
Announces Meetings
Meetings for this week of 'he

Meetings

Girl Scout Training
Courses Open Tomorrow
A basic leadership training
course for adult Girl Scout lead leaders
ers leaders will open tomorrow morning
at the Fort Clayton Education
Center. Classes will be held from
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. and are open
to all interested adults.

Mrs. James Whitmore, who will

ACROSS
1 Capital of
Latvia
5 It
overrun by
theU.S.SR. 1
in 1940
8 Its capital Is
the second
largest Baltic
after
Leningrad
12 Poems
13 Indonesian
o Mindanao
14 Cupid
15 Low sand hill

, 16 King (Fr.)
1 17 Ancient
Persian
; 18 Dine
19 Fruit
21 Driving
command
22 Spanish jars
24 Inclines
: 26 Intelligence
, 28 Lowest
' 29 Light brown
30 German river
1 31 Ignited
32 Group of
matched pieces
33 Greek
gravestone
, 35 Flout
. 38 Frighten
'39 Attempted
41 Torrid
'42 River valleys
46 Persian

gateway
47 Crafts
49 Disencumber
50 Mexican coin
51 Encounter
52 Individual

53 Press
54 Icelandic saga
55 Small tumor
56 Domestic slave
DOWN
1 Western cattle
show
2 Standards of
perfection

3 Well-born
4 Peer Gym's
mother
5 Distort
6 Above
7 Goby steamer

8 Card game

Hit 5I

19 Assaulted
20 Weather
conditions
23 Horn
25 Church

36 Sea ducks
37 Motive
38 Disgrace
40 Sluggard
43 In a line

festival season 44 Contour

27 Grafted (her.) 45 Biblical

9 Greek letters 28 Not as much

10 Rat 33 Grooved
1 1 Large plants 34 Made lace

garden

48 Station (ab.)
50 Pastry

I Z -I) 14 15 l 17 3 17 llO-lll
j jj
ij it iT"
eiiliiielii:
w
TW wa rf!T
ZZZ LZZ r
Mill T I

Cristobal Woman's Club have.be the instructor, especially ure

been announced by club officials, i prospective leaders from Districts

Easter Visitors
At) Boquete
Mr. and Mrs. J. Winter Colhns
oflPanama and their three daugh daughter
ter daughter were guests of Mrs. Alfredo
Mi Collins and their family at Fin Fin-ca'Lerida,
ca'Lerida, Fin-ca'Lerida, outside Boquete for the
Easter holidays.

Mrs. Morgan's
Flower Courses
Start 12th Year
"Mrs. Pat Morgan will begin her
1213) year as an instructor in

lltwer Arrangement ai u'e em emboli
boli emboli Y.M.C.A.-U.S.O. in a new
coarse starting Monday, Apiil
13th at 9 a.m.
The new rourse will conlinuc
for eight Monday mornings cover covering
ing covering a wide variety of subjects,
particulary related to tropical
plants and materials.
Mrs. Morgan will give actual de demonstrations
monstrations demonstrations of arrangements in
cut flowers, dried and exotic ma
teuial, fruits and vegetables. Stu Students
dents Students will also be given opportu

nities to make arrangements

The regular board meeting of
the club will be held tomorrow at
nine o'clock in the Red Cross
rooms in Cristobal.
On Wednesday evening from 7
to 9, the flower arranging class
will be held at the Marganta
Club House. Interested oersms
may contact Mrs. A. Me-l.v,
chairman, or Mrs. Thomas Fels,
instructor.
The Woman's Club monthly
meeting will be held Wednesday
afternoottat 3 In the Cristobal Red
Cross rtoritfMrs. 3. Peterson
and her Aromfffittee will be in
charge uf The social' hour.
The musical program will fast
ure solos by Mrs. E. C. Webster,
accompanied by Mrs, E. J. Genis.
Officers for the coming year
will be elected.

Two and Three to attend. T1ip

aieas include Baiuoa, Fifteenth
Naval District. Fort Amalnr Al

brook, Curundu. Diablo riaimn

Fort Kobbe, Rodman Naval Sta Station,
tion, Station, Cocoli, Gamboa and Rous Rousseau.
seau. Rousseau. A course for voliint

of leaders will start Thursdv

morning from 8:30 to 1U15 a m
at the Margarita Little House.
Miss Iola Arnold, executive di director
rector director of the Canal Zone Girl
Scout Council, will be the in instructor.
structor. instructor. Later classes will be held each
Tuesday at the Balboa Union
Church and each Thursday at the
Margarita Little House.
Further information mav he nh.

tained by calline the Girl Scout
office, Balboa 1350.

Legion Auxiliary'
To Hold Rummage
Sale Wednesday
Panama Canal Unit One of the

'I TOLD YOU SO'

America

hold a rummage sale Wednesday
morning at 9 at the Paraiso Boy

Scout House.

Any members of the unit or

LeROY, N. Y. (UPl) -Village
truck driver Clarence Perrv was

tired by the mayor when he re-

iusea to drive a load of rocks a

cross a frozen reservoir. He got
the job back when his replace

ment, Leonard Vaughn, tried it

and barely managed to leap to

A ; through the ice Into six. leel ot

ties HJ liidjte duaiitiiicnio. i i. i a
The course will culminate in a I other persons i whe w i h to con n-

ephone Mrs. Dorothy Knox, Bal Balboa
boa Balboa H47; Mrs. Joan O'Conne1,

Balboa 2341f ; or Jyjrs., m u t 1 1
. h ti .ni "Hew

water. I UUr,&

, By- OSWALD JACOBY...
f Written, for NIA Service

WEST
AQ95
J83
10 97 2
10 8 5

NORTH 4
AAJ83
J8S
t32
EAST (D.)
A8
- V 1085 4 2
AKQ
QJ74

HArtABMAHABHiiiMaaHeaaBaaeaaaBaaaHMaMealDslAttaadeSMeflHaal

r i

1 vK-:w::

' ill

SOUTH
AK 108 7 4
V AKfl
8B4
AK
East and West vulnerable
East South West North
Pass 1 Pass 2 4
Pass 4 Pass Pass
Pass
Opening lead 10

The Professor's jump to four
spades was a slight overbid but,
the Professor likes to overbid a
little.
)
East lost no time taking his
three high diamonds and con continued
tinued continued with the', queen of clubs.
The Professor won the trick, play played
ed played the king and another spade and
finessed dummy's jack without a
moment's hesitation. When East
showed out the Professor had the
rest of the tricks and his game.
"Why did' you take that trump
finesse?", asked the student
"Isn't theplay for the drop a bet

ter percentage?"

"The play for the drop is cer

tainly superior if you have no
other information," replied the

irotessor. "But this time the

finesse was almost a sure thing

Last had dealt and nassed. He

is a good point count bidder and

promptly snowed up with nine
points in diamonds. His lead of
the queen of clubs surely indi

cated the jack also so that brought
him to 12 points. Add the queen of

spades and he would hold 14.
"If East had actually passed 14
high card points I was perlectly
willing to pay'off to him but I
sure would have ,been surprised."

" C-I "-F
igillii lllllllllilBit f f-X1
X1 f-X1 IIIIIIFII f
'i.Miii;;ii.MM.n

PROUD MOMENT Saver bars signifying promotio nto tH
rank of captain in we U.S. Army Reserve are pinned on MSgt. i
Ralph F. Browning by his wife, Julia, during a ceremony at th
office of the U.S. Army Caribbean engineer Browning, admin- i
istrative iNCO in the military division of the i Engineer Section at
Fort Clayton, plans to remain on active duty in the rank of mas master
ter master sergeant. His hoine is in Atlanta, Ga, (U.S. Army Photo)

DCy THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
E r by Dorothy Killgalkn

BROADWAY BULLETIN BOARD with a pair of lovebirds the other
I tit --

mguv. uciiB YYeBsoii ma4e no se-

4

MRS. PAUL A. BUGAS removes the first lieutenant's bars from
her husband's uniform following his promotion to captain. Bu-
gas -is executive -officer ,C -Ccvtihy, 1st' Battle Group, 20tM"'
I Infantry stationed -at Fort Gulick. (U.S. Army Photo)

flower show nut on bv the students.

Those wishing to take the
cojirse, which is free, are asked to

call Balboa 2839r Z75S. or res'.si

er j at the "Y" .qfjfice in Balboa Black, foi lp4. 'p-,.

Cify Boy, Now Country Rdbhi, Tends Flock
Of Jewish Poultry Farmers In New Jersey

Q The bidding has been:
North East South Weit
1 IV. '?
You, South:teld:
AAggf VK74 4)832 54 2
What do you do?
A Bid one tpade. You haven't
(tot much of a- hand but you do
hold four pretty rood spades.
TODAY'S QUESTION
The bidding is the same as in

! the.question just answered.

.You, South, hold: v ...
7$- V8 5 4 4A K 44 2 4K 10
Mfhat do you do?
Answer tomorrow

I ri avprri ntiM I'

j A BUTTER
'A jjj Outdoors!

ff ALDENSJ
ll Fashion

. si iu nil a sj it i n II ii

i m

I inriiA urinnir.i

g' i in nu hi i hk k mm i

m

- I EVERY MONDAY I F 1

6:30 10 7:00 P m
t i PBS PANAMERICAN BROADCASTING ( (
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HOG WH

NEW YORK CUPI) Among
15 men ordained at Yeshiva Uni University
versity University yesterday is a city ooy
who has become a coritry rabbi,
ministering to an orthodox Jew Jewish
ish Jewish congregation of poultry farm farmers.
ers. farmers. The congregation of veteran
New York Rabbi Leonard M.
Buchen, ?,6, is scattered over the
central New Jersey countryside,
ust off the Nnw Jersey Turnpike,
ict Perrineville.
It is one of the oldest farming
communities in the United States,
but it never had a full-time rabbi
until Buchen was engaged two
y?ars ago.
"When I come (o thp city," he
said in an interview, "I'm known

to my colleagues as the farmer

rabbi.
Buchen, a good-natured, ener energetic
getic energetic young man who received a
mathematics decree before study studying
ing studying to be a rabbi, said the prob problem
lem problem of his rurfil community is
about 300 families rirobably are
much the same as they would he.
if the settlement were 1,000 mile?
from th bi" 'own. instead of an
hoik's bus ride away.
Because his congregation is of

the orthodox .Tevis'i fMth, it is
governed by rigid religious rules.
Riding in an automobile on he
Sabbath is forbidden, for example.

Buchen's followers must walk'
to servics. One of thema man
in his 80's, trudges four miles
e-rh w.-y every Saturday.
The f'rst Jewish weekend serv service
ice service is scheduled for sundown on
T'rid.iv. This often conflicts with
the farmers' schedules, Buche'n
said, and many of them are con con-si'lently
si'lently con-si'lently late.
"ThrV don't watch the clock,"
' said, '"rhey come in late and
then sav 'Who knows when it is
5 o'clock?'"
Buchen said one of his biggest
jobs has been to reconcile the
differences between the old and
young members of his congregation.

'The old .timers are quite set
in their ways," he said. "It is
-iiffieult to change them. But I
have managed to bridge the gap
between old and young with com compromises.'
promises.' compromises.'
He said that his members often,
'iave little time for the synagogue
because many are community
'eaders, serving on town councils
nd Boy Scout councils and per per-orming
orming per-orming other civic t ks.
The con"reation. named e
"irst Hebrew Farmers Association
Perrineville, was founded in
010 by immigrants from Europe.
thp depth of the 1930's depres depres-on,
on, depres-on, the group formed the stlll stlll-mrishing
mrishing stlll-mrishing Central Jersey Farm Farm's
's Farm's Cooperative. Later came the
ntral Jersev Credit Union and
- Sunripe Tomato Cooperative,
'n recent years, the farmers
e stressed noultry and egg
ming over truck crops.
Vhen Buchen. fresh from YesM YesM-,
, YesM-, arrived in Perrineville, a for

mer slimmer resort, he found a
synagogue, a community center
and a burial grount. i ut there
were no regular services, no
youth programs arjd no education educational
al educational classes.
He organized Friday and Satur Saturday
day Saturday services, a weekly youth
I'orum, a Hebrew Sunday school,
a teen-age program and an adult
education program.

A rabbi doesn t have hours,

he said. "I'm the rabbi, the sex sexton,
ton, sexton, the cantor, the t "achcr. the

nrincipal and the youth director.

T visit the sick and bereaved and
perform weddings. I'm Johnny on
Ihe spot.
"My house is open 24 hours a
clay. People knock on my door at
all times of the day or n;giit. Tiia
first morning we were there, at
0:20 a.m. there came a knock on

the door. A rnan presented, me me-with
with me-with a 'sket of plums as a wel welcome
come welcome gift.
"lie had been up for thre
hours, working on his farm. I had
been sound asleep, being a city
boy."

LUCKY STREAK
BUFFALO, N. Y. (UPI)Judge

Michael Zimmer conceded both

men were lucky when Marvin

Epps, 31, pulled the trigger of a
.38 caliber pistol twice while
pointing i: at bartender John

Lewis' head and the gun misfir
ed both time.

"You're lucky too," Zimmer
told Edds. "You would 'we

wound up in the electric chair
Now you'll just go to prison."

Soviet Ready To Talk Disengagement
Of Troops From East-West Borderland

MOSCOW. March ?0 -(UPIV-The
Soviet Union delcarcd yester yesterday
day yesterday that it was pren;ini to dif -cuss
'he "disengagement" of
Communist and Western troops
from the East-West bonier area

in Central Europe.
A statement released by the of official
ficial official Tass News Agency said the
Russians were ready to partici participate
pate participate in' talks for such a disen disengagement
gagement disengagement or for the "establish "establishment
ment "establishment or a zone of limited troqp
contingents and armaments, and
inspection."
A "freeze" on East West Troops
in Central Eurooe, rccompanied
by appropriate inspection m e a a-sures,
sures, a-sures, has been suggested by
British Prime Minitscr Harold
Macmillan.
The Soviet Union also renewed
its call for a non-a?"rc-smn ""j:
to be signed between tlx- NA'i 0
and Communist Warsaw Pact nations.

The soviet statement, which
Tass sairi w."S made public "in
infection wi'h this week's NATO
Council meeting in Washington
also declared that an East-Wes'
summit conference would be
most useful.' j
II added, however, that if tho ;
government of thp Western
"O'vers were no' yet ready to pnr- I

Ucipale in summit bllts, "tho
Soviet govcrnmep believes that
a conference of foreign ministers
of the countries concerned could
be convened to consider th ques question
tion question of a peace treaty with Ger Germany
many Germany and of West Berlin1."

A foreign ministers" conference
limited to these two subjects hfid I

been officially proposed to tne
Western Allies by the Russians
in a note of March 2. The- West

ern reply, deliyercd last Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, agreed to an East-West for foreign
eign foreign ministers' meeting May 1,
hu1 reserved the right of "11 par participants
ticipants participants to brine up whatever
subject th-y chose.
The o'ficial Soviet statement

made these o'her points:
Thc NATO powers were urg

ed to reach agreement on the
Polish "Rapac'ki Plan" to estab establish
lish establish a denuclearized and rocket rocket-free
free rocket-free tone in Central Europe.
This, is said, would ''greatly
ease the tension prevailing in
Europe and would have a favor favorable
able favorable effect on the entire interna international
tional international sltuatym."
On the Berlin issue, "the So

viet government believes that tty
most realistic way of settling
this question would be to grant
West Berlin the status of a de demilitarized
militarized demilitarized free city, In the ob observance
servance observance of which status the U U-nited
nited U-nited Nations would take an ac active
tive active part.
Nucleai; weapons should be
outlawed and removed from na national
tional national armaments, and conventlal
arms and troops should be sub substantially
stantially substantially reduced.
Yesterday's Soviet statement, In
general, summed up past Russian
positions,

Meals taste
better

with.

oo ti&e&L,.

2 tiirm

yML 1

ilil

Use it on rice See how
dtllcloui it; It with to
food, paghettl, mtat,
ggt, -alad every everything.
thing. everything. Add .MaggI ; Katchup to
all i your- maals and
varybody will ba da da-llghtad.
llghtad. da-llghtad. ""KETCHUP I

MmmB

' MIlC 1

i M i a, d

llVi '(-i VW

Pat Wymore is considering
flying to Cuba to catch ud wl h
Erroi Fiynn and attempt some
kind of a decision about their ra
ther nebulous matrimonial situa situation.
tion. situation. Friends expect her to ask
for a 'legal separation as a start

er. .Hal S.anley, once Kay siarr s
bridegroom, is Jane Wyman's
current favorite escorE'PiGarbo
fans who believe the legends that
The Great One never wears any
thing but a slouch hat and a
be? t-up rain coat should have
Italian fashions at Ohrbach's the
other day. Greta wound up buy

ing three coat?- wM-e mue-cy,

Balpnria eaw.biaeir taffeita'AaaH

vin Castillovrwrap, and Monsieur

A S giamors RiacK saun uenca
coat t :

Universal will try to talk long-

term contract wi h Lana Turner
because' her latest flicker, "Imi

tation f Life," is breaking box
office records with its first dates.

At the Roosevelt Theatre in Chi-

ftago&for ihnce,lt topped every

film that's played the nouse in

37 years. .The tew existing co

mes of the Steve Ailen-JacK K.e

rouac album. "Poetry for the Beat

Generation," havp become collec collectors'
tors' collectors' items offically. Randy Wood,

president of Dot Records, yanked

all the copies, he could find off

the dealers'.jshelves, explaining

that he woulcnt't want Oir't CVM:
dren to bear- "such of'-co'of

ftuff." (Next question: Who'll be
the first to start making an''

selling bootleg transcriptions of

the raritie'?) x
The tradition that -there's al always
ways always a 'woman at the bo'tom o'
everv fellowfs trouble is suonorte'"
by the motTeeenl Police Deo."'1 Deo."'1-ment
ment Deo."'1-ment scandal, it was a quar r
with his wife that sent ex-con Jo Joseph
seph Joseph Luberda off on the bine 1;iat
pnded in his arre't for drunken
driving and the discovery of his
cssh boodle and hi mys'rious:
lists of names., .JEthel ..SV'ers
,goes from 'bne inspiration. cole to
another. Follnwin" her movlnf
nerformance i" "The Sound and

the Fury," fhe'll he featured in a
relieious film produced bv Billy
Graham. .Mutual Hen-'s hon?
they can help solv the problem
tat se"m to exist Jn the Johnny-Meyer-Dixne
ndrson rnirK-ge
7. Zsi fiabor's. da at thp V.n.n'

Iforizoi the o'Vr night was 'writ

er Andre So't. No. warri on her
erstwhile "fiance,'' Hal 'HayeV, 'HayeV,-cept
cept 'HayeV,-cept that the wags are saying she
lost at least 10 pounds when she
returned his engagement rlnc.

Nobel Prize winner' Albert Ca

mus has come up Vffth another
Paris smash as successor to his

nit aaaptauon of William Fau d-

ner's "Requiem for a Nun," the
new triumph being his French
version ot Dostoievsky's "The

rosseSKed." since It runs three
and a halfhours at ths A'ntoino

Theatre, the producer -Simone'

nernau, nas arranged to, have
food served to the aaidience-'ree.
believe it or not between acts.
Pianist Barbara Carroll n agent
Burt Block looked. like -a se

rious romance as f dt'tw
at the Left Bank. A'lc-an firan:
son. once First Lad v of New-York.

I. vi'ifn-" f.he pli!ih-laces' .with
her Doberman as prt of a tiair-

coionn nromotton evnoaiw,-

says she's nannler at: her old ioh

of modeling than she r-wai In Gra-

01 Maminn Tha Tno Hnma

Rlcardo Montalbanivende'ta has
reached the po'ntwhe'" l's eve"
apparent to the audiences at
"Jamaica.'' -. f;
Harry Kafl's plans to marry
Joan (Sohn, widow of the movie
magnate, seem to have fallen be behind
hind behind schedule, and there's con

siderable wagering amemg their

inenua mat me ceremony won i
ever happen.,'', .NB,C hai plehtv
of time to let tha heat around

Eddie Fisher cool down before

they put him back in fhsrmess.

He has more than a decade to so

on nis contract with the ne;worx,
(They have the most cosh

employment line; Wally Cox col

lects a stunning fee for doing ao
solutely nothing, as do Phil Har Harris
ris Harris and others who were signed 1r
: large bursts of optimism.). 'Lin 'Linda
da 'Linda Darnell and Robby Robinsor
'made the Latin Quarter- scene

cret of His adoration of Lisa

Reinhart, the TV and films ac actress.
tress. actress. .When marriages and it's
never really funny, but Linda
Cristal's reason for leaving her

misoana oi less man a year (Boo
Champion) certainly comes, under
the heading of humor. She tells

friends: "Our neuroses weren't

compatible."

Fire Commissioner Cavanagh
forced Stella Adler to move her
East 77th St. acting studio be because
cause because of fire hazards and viola violations.
tions. violations. There were too many student
and not enough exits in ihe very
old building. ;For an example of
how to age beautifully, see Billie
Burke in "The Young Philadel Philadel-phians."
phians." Philadel-phians." Her secret appears to be
utter femininity and a constant
smile. .Birdland is blueprinting
an all-star con-erf in memory of
Lester ("Perez") Young, the great
tenor sax man who died Jast week.' week.'-Proceeds
Proceeds week.'-Proceeds Of the event will'gt to
ettffbllsh'a-ifi-usicarscholarship5'!
his 'name:
Of course the first to sign up for
the memorial tribute were Count
Basie and his gang. .Gina Lollo Lollo-brigida
brigida Lollo-brigida and director Chrisian
Jaque, recently divorced bf Mar Mar-tine
tine Mar-tine Carol, are a hot. feud in
Europe. Christian blames Lollo
for encouraging Martine lo leave
him, and the gorgeous Gina has
been retorting with unflattering
comments on his, shortcomings.'.1.

Joan Caiilfield figures to Be more

than $1,000,000 'plus residual rights
from ber TV series in her di divorce
vorce divorce agreement with Frank
Ross.

Two Lofj 01 IKf;
Mweriy. On Sale
Two lots of Air Force prooerty
have 'been advertised for bid by
the U.S. Army Caribbean Proper Property
ty Property Disnos'l Offi". v

One includes 33 items of 'ussble
merid). such fond sery'c e-ouirj-ment,
miicellaneo' riivW e-
nn1nmnt offie fiiftiitnre, hnd
too1,-. lard"'P'',. ai,fflmotive. enm enm-"OPfn's
"OPfn's enm-"OPfn's "' l'?ht. 'ivtiire-A 1944

tT'ick frfcr wuh duatvrear

whels H; rv-eviin'er eni'"ft. al al-p"
p" al-p" is tn b dU"d of. Blj on
this prfU'' iriii bi onned at 9
a.m. Anr" 13 'n the bid r6om of
Building 706,,. Corozal.
'he 'secorti iot l m"de un of 28
fram" o .ilae Fore r-oner-ty.
Clearing an' food jervlp -qulrment.
misee'lswous airrraft
insfrumens. crn iron, electrical

Mtifw""' r''ng are amonc
ther". Bids ar" fn be' opened at
ln:i fr.nr. An-'i 13 In ebid room

of VorwM b-i'l'nit '708. 1

- r-i- 171,1.?. Willi-', jnuai uc ouuiuit-
fled ii a"i''r?inlicte. are to be
cealed. Arrangements o inspect
the ironar'-w can b T'de b pon pon-tn.tini
tn.tini pon-tn.tini the Pronerv bioosl ; Of Of-flee
flee Of-flee t Cr-nro' 1.49 or Sgt. Reoor
at Curundu 425., : "'is

Litfle League

Boys 5;

Girls

!. SOya OuwiuraDoiow uh win
to two In tha blrtha at Coco

801O Hospital ; ounni wob
which ended ; at midnight last
Wednesday according to tha
hospital report. During the aama
period M- patients were admit admitted
ted admitted and 68 were dlscharftel
Tha girls "ffero born to Mr.
and 1 Mrs. Rlto Jrritiuv of Ll Ll-mon;
mon; Ll-mon; and Mr. arid Mrs. Roberto

Martinet, or vown. -Parents
of the bovs are Mr.

and Mrs. Victor McOarry,' ot
.ita' fit. anA Mr TVin.

mas Metcalf, of Fort Oullck;
Mr. ; and Mrs. Ronald Thomp Thomp-ton.
ton. Thomp-ton. of Colon; Mr. and Mrs.;
Paul Rotsmykl, of Coco Solo;
and Mr. and Mrs. George Hud
gina.. of Margarita. j



IftlXDAT, MARCH 0, 19S9

-J

THE PANAMA AMZRICAM AM INDEPENDENT DAttY NEWSPAfE I

PAGIR73V

ill

lang

A

Mvai

TAIPEI, March 30 (UP,I)--A Tlbttan rebel leader personally visited Taipei last week and received promie of

Nationalist Chinese help, a weli-ihformed newspaper laid today. '.. : :
The English-language China New said the Tibetan chief left Taipei with President Chiang Kai-shek's personal
letter promising. all available aid which the" Nationalist government can give to the antj-Commilnist fighters.
The newspaper said identity cf the rebel leader could not be disclosed.
His report indicated that he was one of the chief sources for Nationalist Chinese Intelligence information on the
Himalayan uprising, which was described by Taipei" before last weekend's m firmation from Communist China.
Th i China News laid the Tibetan, resistance, official delivered a jetter addressed to Chiang from many anti anti-Communist
Communist anti-Communist Tibetan' leaders.

Reportedly Rr om i es Ti bet

laDie Aia 10 riani (teas

The Tibetan underg round
chief Ispent six days in Taipei
nnnfmrrinar with kev National

ist officials before departing foi

an ; nndificlosed ; aesunauon,; uw
newspaper-said. 'Mt
It was the first specific re report
port report f direct contact between
the Tibetan anti-Communists
and -:, Chiang's gove r n m a t,
whicte pledged" to 'a series of
statements last week to give the
rebels all possible assistance.'; ;
The Tibetan leader discles discles-ed
ed discles-ed that Communist China at attempted
tempted attempted to introduce Its mass
labor communes into Tibet,
j This was the last tit a se series
ries series of Bed Chinese supp"
sive measures which touched
off the rebellion, he said.
Chiang said the Tibetan re revolt
volt revolt wasj the first evidence that

Mainland were 'acting. In uni unison"
son" unison" with Nationalise armed
forces to end Communist domi domination
nation domination of China.
' 'You must be prepared to
shed blood, anu accelerate aid
to the revolutionary movement
On the Mainland Chiang told
iome' 60,000 students In. a rare
public, appearance.
Chiang spoke to the student
; rally in front of Taipei City
Hall during the Observance of
Nationalist China's Youth and
Martyr Day.
"You see right before your
eyes the ruthless and inhuman
acts of the Communists and the
sufferings of our people on the
Mainland who are actually liv living
ing living In hell," he said.
"If you should fail to rise to together
gether together against the Communists,
who are in reality traitors, then
the same fate may beiah us."
Jubilation swept across Taipei
this E&sjer Sunday in the wake
of Peiping'S admission that anti anti-Communist
Communist anti-Communist Tibetans hao. risen
In ravoit against the fleas.
A Chinese Communist an announcement
nouncement announcement charged tnat tne
Nationalists were airdropping
equipment to antl-Comm list
forces inside Tibet,
I The newspaper China Post,
tiQfcI reliable sources, said
Nationalist pilots have been

airdropping r1 supplies, loth .1

Tibetan rebels for sometime
and that efforts, were being
made to step up .operations.
"Chiang told the -students that
"our victory in the battle of
Quemoy and the anti-Commu-nisi;
uprising in Tibet are the
first instance of the 1 synchro synchronization,
nization, synchronization, of military movements
on the China Mainland with
military actions in the Tawain
Strait."
Quemoy and Tibet, he added,
"are the first evidence of our
ccipatnots un tne Mainland
acting in unison with our arm armed
ed armed ioces."

ue uaiai uina, gou-King
of XiDC, was injured serious seriously
ly seriously in a fan from a hill while
i.eeuig: to ref uge from ihe
Chinese Communists, accord-v
ling lo persistant prince rr rr-poitt
poitt rr-poitt In New, Delhi and the
;bracr areas.
The reports could not be con confirmed,
firmed, confirmed, rne heas have sealed
off ail noimai commurications
between Tloet ana the outside
"TSL.'ld since tne ftrui-u-jiimtuus'.
revolt, fiared in the sacred city
'il Lhasa last .week.
Except for Red China's state state-menu
menu state-menu Saturday that it had

smashed the Lhasa revolt and
set -up a puppet government,
all hews on the Tibetan situa situation;
tion; situation; has been brought out by
traders and refugees who made
their way to the border.
There were no other details.
Meanwhile, reports In
Gangtok, capital si Sikkim
state,' said the Tibetan rebels
had captured one of the two
; largest airfields In Tibet.
' The exact whereabouts of the
Dalai Lama were not known.
But diplomatic sources said
the Reds tfad sealed off all pos possible
sible possible escape routes leading south
to the border and called In a
special manhunting staff to
track him down.
A usually '-reliable Indian
source in the border town of
Kallmpong said the Dalai La Lama
ma Lama and some 40,000 of his sup supporters
porters supporters had moved near the In Indian
dian Indian frontier, probably seeking
asylum from the Reds.
The source Said fc"nior La Lama
ma Lama already in. India was seek seeking
ing seeking -a meeting with Prime Min Minister
ister Minister Jewaharlal Nehru, pre, pre,-sumably
sumably pre,-sumably to work out arrange arrangements.
ments. arrangements. However, official Indian
sources categorically den 1 e d
these reports.
The Peiping regime Saturday
anndunced it had deposed the
Dalai Lama and Installed a new
government of Tibet under the
pro-Communist Panchen Lama.
A communique broadcast by
Peiping said the Dalai Lama
was "under duress by the reb

els" an indirect admission
that he had escaped from his
Potala winter palaee in Lhasa.
Despite the Reds' claim to
have "completely smashed" the
revolt, reports trickling across
the border said the fight was
continuing.
Tibetan exile leaders )n In India
dia India pledged a fight to the death
to. win freedom 'for the ancient
Himalayan kingdom and save
the Dalai Lama from Red op oppression,
pression, oppression, 1
The pledges were made by
spokesmen for Tibetans living
in India who travelled to New
Delhi to appeal to Nehru to
take ud their cause against the
Communists.
G. Tharchln, editor of the
Tibet Mirror and leader of the
strongest delegation from the
border city of Kallmpong, said:
"We'll fight until the end. As
long as a single Tibetan Is alive,
he'll fight the Chinese oppres oppression."
sion." oppression." former Premier Sllum Luk-'
hans;wa of Tibet voiced a simi similar
lar similar Dledge after a mass braver
meeting of Tibetans and India::
Buddhists for the safetv of the
Dalai Lama. The 25-vear-olri
DalaiLama is revered as a god
by Tibetan Buddhists.,
Lukhangwa accused the Reds
of taking away Tibet's autono autonomy,
my, autonomy, slaughtering Tibetans and
causing "immeasurable damages
to us and our monasteries,"
Members of the Tibetan

ii -nn mi mm,, j fcagfoi

delegations in New Delhi said
some 5000 of their country countrymen
men countrymen were killed by the Reds
in the Lhasa uprising.
v The Reds also were said to
have burned, at least two of
the largest Jamasteries In
Lhasa after the yellow-robed
monks joined fierce tribes tribesmen
men tribesmen in the fighting against
the Reds.
Lukhangwa, who also led a
Tibetan delegation here, said
"communism is the enemy of
all religions and that is why
the Tibetans are revolting a a-galnst
galnst a-galnst the .Chinese."
Communist China, has suf suffered
fered suffered a major loss of face as
a result of the bloody revolt
in Tibet, Western diplomats
believe.
.Whether the Red Chinese
have succeeded or not in crush

ing the uprising, sources 'said,
widespread repercussions are

inevitable particularly in In India
dia India and Malaya.'
The Russians suffered a simi similar
lar similar propaganda blow over Hun Hun-gar.
gar. Hun-gar. The violent suppression of
, the revolt, it was believed, is
bound to weaken the, Cold
War neutralism otmany Asian
countries which have been
friendly toward the Peiping
regime since the Bandung
conference four years ago.

Britain has been following
the Tibet uprising with close

interest but some detachment

Since Britain oult India she

has ceased to have the direct

interest in Tibetan affairs that

she did in the early part 'of the

20th Century. There has been
no official British comment oi

the uprising so far.

India has Inherited Britain's
earlier stake In Tibet, and dip diplomats
lomats diplomats here are keeping a close

eye on how the Indian govern government
ment government reacts,
.Informed officials and dip diplomats
lomats diplomats in London believed
Nehru can hardly ignore ma major
jor major military action by Red
China in a country that bor borders
ders borders on India and from which
thousands of refugees have
SOUffht. sanctuary in India in

L recent years, -;' -

Despite Red China's invasion

and annexation of Tibet In

1950, Tibet's trade and com communications
munications communications with the outside
world for many years have been
through India rather than Chi

na,
Diplomats do not expect arm

ej intervention by India. But

Wiey believed India is iikelv to

reconsider her whole neutralist

poncy towards Red China and

pernaps the Soviet Union, too

in tne luture.

COL. CECIL HIMES, commandant of the U.S. Army. Caribbean
School, Fort Guljck, pins the school cerst on Capt. Jose Lopez
Fontanez, newly assigned officer, who will assume the duties of,
unit officer, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Lopez
arrived last week from Fort Penning, JGa. His home is in Ca Ca-'
' Ca-' guas, Puerto Rico. (U.S.-Army Photo)

In H Jl "' I
J f I
11 I
1 l i A
-'A (A -.it ,-;
7 -i
i til 4

I, II I

Film Daily Names
'Bridge' As Best
Movie Last Year
NEW YOfcK mpn "T!,

Bridge on the River Kwai," which
won the Motion Picture Academy
Award, was named the best pic pic-'ure
'ure pic-'ure in 1958 in "Film Daily's"
mh annual list of the ten top
films released last night.
''Bridge," the story 'of a British
Officer who Was a Drisnnmr nf h

Japanese in World War II. re

ceived 240 first place votes in a
poll of motion picture critics, re
viewers and commentator. A Ion

Guiness starred in the movl

the British officer.

"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof !.

ring Elizabeth Taylor, placed sec second
ond second in the poll with 221 votes.
The other top ten, in order of
their standing, included: "Gifri

"Auntie Mame," "The Defiant
Ones," "Witness for-th Prn.rn.

tion," "SeDarate Tahlps "Th

Long Hot Summer." "The Vr '-

Lions," and "The Big Country.'1

BARN IS LIGHT ENOUGH Man. is catching up with the cat. A mechanical eye has been
developed, a low- light-level television earners tube can "set" in near total darkness. Louise
Estes demonstrates the new tube, developed by Ganeral Electric in Schenectsdy; N.Y., above.
She appears, on monitors in both pictures,, one taken in normal light, left, the other In dark
ness The tube is fan more sensitive than the human eye, or even the human eye aided by
night binoculars. This la a new electronic spprosch differing from infrared rays. Potential
ruses are varied. Militarliy, it could enable submarines to see much better ahead end below
w hn submerged, or permit trucks and tanks to travel without revealing themselves
with headlights. Its use will be eonflned 4o ciosed-circuit television.

Idaho Congressman
Presses Agreement
For A-Tesl Ban

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Frank Church urged the govern

ment yesterday to continue to

seek some form agreement limi

ting atomie tests even if the cur-

rene Geneva talks fall.

The Idaho Democrat, a member

of the Senate Foreign Relations
Disarmament subcommittee, said
he would continue to press for a

Dan on lust above-ground tests u

a brotder agreement could not be

resetted,

However, he said in a state

ment, such efforts should be
made only if Geneya negotiators
"have exhausted every possible
avenue of approach and explora
tion in an attempt to get the en entire
tire entire job done in one package."

Church said he feared the Rus

sians would never asree to the

kind of inspection system "that

reasonable men would reauire to

police the suspension of all types
of nuclear testsY'

If that is the case, he said.

"we ought to seek a lesser bbiec-

tive that would end contamina
tion of the earth's atmosphere, en

iniernauonai controls system intt
would give us a start toward big

ger objectives in the years to

come.

Church and Sen. Albert Gore
(D Tenn.), a member of th

House Senate Atomie Energy
Committee, have urged that the
United States ston atmosDheric

tests by itself as a show of jnnrf

faith if no agreement is reached

at Geneva.

q'!iii'.w'l'':.!ynrw-T.iii!.w.i. jv.,11- .k.iin wi"!1?1.111, .1.1.. iiiii..i..w,.ljw iniiwnnm..iVWP

1

NEW LOOK IN-EEPS-Now undergoing flight tests is this strange looking "aerial Jeep J'
which combines the uUlity of the familiar Army vehicle with the hovering and flying eapa- r"

Diuties 01 a neiicopter. In its first night, the aerial jeep rose vertically on two columns of air
and hovered under its own power. Two small horizontal propellers located within the body
provide both lift and forward movement. Designed and built by Plaseckl Aircraft Corp. of
Philadelphia, Pa., for the Army, it is called a major break-through in the field of ducted
f An-ntnri0llri oiri.ro ft aammmm.. I. -1 J 1 : , . .. ....

- !, ; c -"- -"-c uniyaiijr aisu ucvciupiug muan i or civilian use, me
Mr, which will carry four passengers at speeds up to 150 m.p.h. j

pro-

Beihel Mission
To Start Spring
Festival Thursday
Among the many special

Jects planned for the n?w year of

tne uetnei Mission Church in Pa Pa-raiso
raiso Pa-raiso is a 'hree-day spring festi festival
val festival from Thursday, through Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday. The three-day festival will be begin
gin begin on Thursday and Friday at 5
n.m. ant1 on Saturi11' at noon con continuing
tinuing continuing into the- nieht.
A variety of activities for the
en'ertiinment of youn and o'd
are planned. There will be soup soup-thing
thing soup-thing exciting every hour.' includ including
ing including nfew and 'nel game. Two of
the features will be: a hula hoop
contest for the children and
to race for teenagpr. On nf tne
nights, a temi Hn will be one
of tlie special features.
The women "f the church are
weoaring fo the saV nf many
kin'1' nf rwstriei an dishes.
A Saturday socdai 'H be arro
c,nn nollo. wWch -win b erved
at "oon on church lawii.
The commfHe in chpr?p con con-Rlst
Rlst con-Rlst of T -'lli un 'Rlno" rhair'nan;
Leonp'x Roberts. Viiicunt or.
ra. r.me"iev M'''1l"-'. .T"tii
B'ewnrt, r'ann'ms Hurke, Li'Iian
W",,nn. Alvin KftnAe,
tv he Wethl M!c'n f!ht'r',,, C,o
ell in aid of its bw'ldini; project.

Judge Crowe To Be
Guest Speaker
At Cavalry Baptist
The Calvarv Baptist Church's
Royal Ambassadors will hold a
recognition service tomorrow at
7 p.m., when a number of dojs
will receive their 'rank as pages.
This will be the first of its kind
here, at Calvary.
Judge Guthrie Crowe, of the U.
5. District Court. Acon. will be
present to give the Royal Ambas Ambassadors
sadors Ambassadors a cnarge on the subject:
"Good Citizenship."
The Rev. Harold T. Gruver, di director
rector director of education and promotion
of the Southern Baptist work in Pa
nama and on the Zone, will .ve
the invocation and read the Scrip

ture Lesson.
Other Royal Ambassador chap chapters
ters chapters in Panama and the Canal
Zone have been invited to bring
greetings.
After studying the life of Adoni Adoni-ram
ram Adoni-ram Judson, who went to India
and Burma to serve as a mission missionary,
ary, missionary, the youths of the church de decided
cided decided In favor of naming their
chapter after him.
The Rev. Louis A. Sealey, who
has been preparing the boys for
their rank, will preside over the
program; and Albert Buchanan,
counsellor, will also take active
part.

CUBAN AMBASSADOR ARRIVES
TOKVO 'TTp'n tv. Mrin AT--"-raT.
Cuba's newly annol"'
-i3ssadr,T' to .Tin, arrived i
TnVvo yesterday to assume his
post.

APPLICATIONS
ARE INVITED
for Radio, TV and Hi-Fi
Repair Concessions at the
Tort Gulick and Fort Clay Clayton
ton Clayton Exchanges, as sepa separate
rate separate operations. Interest Interested
ed Interested parties should contact the
Central Exchange Office,
Bid;. No. 154, Ft. Clayton, in
person for interview. Pro Proposals
posals Proposals must then be submit submitted
ted submitted in writing not later than
May 1, 1959.

Oxford Student's
Body Is Sealed
In Narrow Crevice

CASTLETON. England (UPD (UPD-The
The (UPD-The hodv of Neil Moss, 20-vear-nld
Oxford student, was sealed
forever yesterdav in a narrow
rock crevice 1,000 feet under under-ground
ground under-ground where he wa fatallv trap trap-Ded
Ded trap-Ded last week while exploring
Peak Cavern.
About 50 cave-exploring enthu enthusiasts
siasts enthusiasts attempted to retrieve the
body of Moss, but it was too
'irmly wedged In ,the crevice.
They finally had to fill the shaft
with rocks and rubble.
The attemnt to rescue Moss
had to he tivpn un because of
foul and deadly air near ho
corkscrew shaned shaft called
"The DpvII's Hole.' into which
Moss fell last Tuesday.
Jt was the poisonous air that fi finally
nally finally suffocated Moss after he
had bem down in the hole 40
hours. The niipht of the young
"xplnrer recal'ed fnr many the
desth of Floyd Collins in a Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky cave in 1925.
Castleton nolice permitted th-
rave-exilorer to try to get Moss'
body out. althou"h thev disap disapproved
proved disapproved because of doctors warn warnings
ings warnings that because of the shortage
nf oxygen in the shaft, some of
hp cave exnlnrer might suffer
permanent brain injuries.
The decision tn leave Moss bur bur-'ed
'ed bur-'ed in the t'mnel met with the
sad anproval of his parents, who
said that efforts tn retrieve the
soHv mirht risk other lives.
Among those on hand yeserday
'n try tn pet the hody out was
Tune P"''ey. 1R. wo twice at at-empte
empte at-empte tn rescue Moss while he

was still alive.

Casal Jewelry Store
Central Ave. 15-107 Near Fuerza y Lux
fluAimh
"What's Your Favorite'
David Constable Disc Jockey
Every Tuesday 4:30 to S p.m.

PBS PArtAMERICArf BROADCASTING SYSTEM
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FAGE SET;

THI FAN AMI AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER;
'MONDAY MARCH 30, 195.,,,

Miauke&Moivs

NL Champs Suffer 13th Setback
In 18 Grapefruit League Games

NEW YORK, March 30 (UPI) ThinfcS are get
r so tourii for the Milwaukee' Braves that they

kAi f hit I'lnitinnotl l-farlff

The stags ering Braves suffered their 13th exhi exhibition
bition exhibition loss Iii 18 games yesterday when they bowed
to the Reds, 7-3. : V

The National League champions
are hiving t rough spring but
three actors made this a parti particularly
cularly particularly humiliating defeat.
It came at the hands of their
favorite "cousih$;"
The losing tocher was Warren
Sfcahn, Milwaukee's ace. left-hander.
The winning pitcher was Mi Miguel
guel Miguel Cuellar, a rookie left-hander
who isn't even on the Cincinnati
roster. r,
All these facts, made an impres impression
sion impression on Birdie T e b b e 1 1 s, the
Braves' new vice-president, and
he let loose today with a blast at
the Braves' "complacency" as
"as one of our big problems."
Tebbetts pointed out that the
only competition for jobs on th.;
Braves is at first base and second
base and he accused the other
players of "taking it easy through throughout
out throughout spring training." He warned
them that only the wartime St
Louis Cards (1942-43-44) have Deen'
able to win three straight pen pennants
nants pennants in the last 35 years in the
National League.
The Reds battered Spahn, a 22-
game winner last season, for six
runs, including four homers, in
five innings.
Milwaukee usually masters Cm
cinnati simply by showing up at
the park. The Braves, eased their
way to the last two pennants by
compiling an 18-4 mark against
the Reds in 1957 and a 17-5 record
against them in 1958.
It was tht same story when
Milwaukee belted Cincinnati, 11 11-5,
5, 11-5, in their first 1959 exhibition
clash March 15. But No. 2 came
TODAY ENCANTO 35-201
George Montgomery in
I "TOUGHEST MAN IN
TOMBSTONE"
I Audie Murphy In
"THE GUN RUNNERS"
EFFECTIVE H&P for
ASTHMA MUCUS
'.f' n.v.m iLttacka ruin
your ileep, undermine your u..6...
w?h5ourMbioid
AllOmiMIU ........ v U
oroom. 8tlrm and bronchitis at-
Ucks. It helps dissolve siranBu..B
cus and promotes free, easy breath breath-SS.
SS. breath-SS. Mendaco'. action is ..
in old and stubborn cases. Get M en -dieo,
from any drug-store today anfl
ee how much better you sleep and
brUthVtoulirht, and how ""better
iou will leel tomorrow Mndc8
IlghU discomforts of Asthma, Bron Bronchitis
chitis Bronchitis and Hay Fever.
Silvestre
Cuba Ave.
SPORTS

by Conrado Sargeant
Daily at 7:00 p.m.

PBS PANAMER1CAN BROADCASTING SYSTEM

M
TODAY
CAPITOLIO
S5. tOc.
THE BADLANDER'S
with, Alan Ladd
Also:
THE RELUCTANT
DEBUTANTE
with (Buidra pti

up yesterday and the Reds teed
off on Spahn.
Frank Robinson, Dutch Dotter Dotter-er,
er, Dotter-er, Johnny Temple and Pete
Whisenvt nicked him for homers.
Robinson : also .homered off Joey
Jay in theeventh.. Cuellar allow allowed
ed allowed the Braves eight hits "and iwc
runs in the first eight innings. It
was Cincinnati's fifth straight vie
tory.
Frank Malzone, Willie Tasby,
Jim Bolger and Ralph Terry
were, heroes and Willie Mays re
turned to action in other Sunday
exhibitions. ; ;
Malzorie's- two homers sparked
the Boston Red Sox to a 9-7 victo victory
ry victory over San Francisco, but the
Giants took the defeat lightly be because
cause because Mays returned to the lineup
for the first time since March 12.
Mays, ..sidelined after suffering
a bone-deep gash on his right leg
while sliding home, tripled off Ike
Delock in the first inning and siid
into third to show he has fully
recovered. Pumpsie Green smash smashed
ed smashed a pinch-hit homer for Boston.
Eddie Bressoud, Orlando Cepeda,
Jackie Brandt and Andre Rodgers
homered for the Giants.
Tasby, Baltimore's rookie center
fielder, bit. two homers to help the
Orioles edge the Pittsburgh Pir Pirates,
ates, Pirates, 6-5. His second came with
two mates aboard in the seventh
and won the game.
Bolger's 10th inning homer with
Carroll Hardy on base gave' the
Cleveland Indians a 4-2 victory
over the Chicago Cubs. Bblger; an
ex-Cub, hit his. homer off Dick
Drott, who relieved Taylor Phil Phillips
lips Phillips in thfeighth.
Terry, a right-handed pitcher
for the Kansas City- Athletics,
won his, own game with a two-.,
run Aoubleti the fifth. The Ath Athletics
letics Athletics edged the Washington
'Senators, 3-2, in a game called
after seven innings because of
rain.
Rain washed out or halted yes yesterday's
terday's yesterday's three other exhibitions.
Rain at St. Petersburg hailed
the New York, Yankee-St. Lours
Cardinal game, jin tfie eighth with
the score tied at' 3-all. The Yan Yankees
kees Yankees had runners on first and sec second
ond second with two out and two strikes
on Jerry Lumpe when the down downpour
pour downpour forced umpire Charley Ber
ry to call the game.

It was the same sto'ry at Clcar-
watet. whereJJieSk,Xp.lUS!AV.di;
nals held a 5-1 lead over the Phil
adelphia Phillies when rain nalt nalt-ed
ed nalt-ed play in the third inning.
The Detroit Tigers and Los An Angeles
geles Angeles Dodgers called off their
game at Lakeland because of wet
I grounds and hoped to play a double-header
today at Vero Beacn.

& BrosteHa
27 02, Pan am 4

PARADE
n
(g

'Q'MiiA'irEES TODAY

tivolj:
I5c. t0o.
8ATONARA
with Marlon Brando
bad mMfy$
COUNTRY'
Q9. Montgomery

VICTORIA
X5c. 15c.
THE REVENGE OF
FRANKENSTEIN
w with JPeter Cushing
0MXM9o,
CAPTAIN
, PIRATE

Pacific Softball
League
By GEORGE SINCLAIR
SECOND HALF STANDINGS

Teams
W L Pet. Gb
3 1 750
2 2 500 1
2 2 500 1
1 2 333 lVj
1 2 333 W
Abernathy Unis.
Cerveceria B. L.
Maduro Jantzen
Mauricio Ambas.
Glud Mariners
Today's Game:
Mauricio vs Abernathy Unis.
JANTZEN TROUNCES THE
MARINERS
Maduro Jantzens deieated the
Glua Mariners by a score of 9 to
3, 10 ue .fan Liquiao lor tne ec
una p.dce in me loop, naram
went ine route lor Mauuro to iin
tne victory while on me otner
nand tiODuie sianeu ior me mai maimers
mers maimers ana was ine loser; rioboie
uau tilings in tne ut uiiui uic
7 in wnen ae lost control ana whiK
ea o uauers ui suctessiou.
tie was renet oy xveny who
waikea ine iouowhi oauer aua
men came two souu oiows uy luiu luiu-bin
bin luiu-bin ana nsn tne iauer s anve
Deing a tnpie, tne omy extra oasj
blow ot tne game, ueiore i.iey
could retire ine stue, me jantzen
.boys crossed me pi ace o umes, tu
ta&e away wnat moKed Line sure
win tor tne Miners. .
Mungin ior" tne Mariners '-with'
2 ior o, ana Gagne 3-3 were nest
batters ot tne cuy.
The box score:
MADURO JANTZENS

( Ab R H O A
Padron, 2b 2 10 0 0
Male, 3u 3 111b
naney, ss 3 1113
Kusseu, lb 1 1 1 J u
aloiey, n 110 0 0
iiarumg, p 2 2 10 0
Auins, ri-lb 3 0 12 0
Woooihs, c a 1 1 8 0.
Sprahngs'cf ' 1 0 0 0 0
isn ci 3 110 0
Vargas If i 0 0 0 0
Heau 11 1 0 0 0 0
Tota.t 24 9 7 21 ll
MARINERS
Skandanfis ss' 4 -0 H) J 2
bKaia c 4 0 1 a 1
Wignt If 4 0 0 1 1
houie np-3b 4 0 10 2
Kelly 3o-p 3 0 0 3 0
iviungin it 3 121
Gagne 2D 3 2 3 1 1
Burton lb 2 0 0 7 0.
Edwards of' 3 0 1 2 0:
Totals 30 3 8 21 8
7

Score by Innings
M. Jantzens 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 79 7 4
G. Mariners 0 2 0 1 0 0 03 8 2
Open Net Tourney
Entries To Close
To morrow ART
The inscriptions for the Open
Tennis Tournament will close at 6
p.m. tomorrow. This tournament
is sponsored by Autos Omphroy,
singles; and Aurora Store, dou doubles.
bles. doubles. It will be inaueuarated on Sun
day at 9:00 a.m.
Games" will be played off Wednes Wednesdays,
days, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays and
both courts will be used simulta
neously. All tennis players who
wish to compete will please con contact
tact contact Juan Fernandez at the Olym Olympic
pic Olympic Swimming Pool, Tel. 3-0286
Manama.
The following are some whn wilt
take part: Richard Pincus, Bill
Heie jr., Connie Ball, Mechail
Linson, Bud Stoop, Alex Newman,
Hans Newman. Saverio M c 1 ( i
George F. Hercich, Juan Maduro,
Juan Hoythe, Alberto Loney, Cres Cres-lyn
lyn Cres-lyn Guardia and Harnoldo Suarez.
QUAKE RECORDED
ST. THOMAS, Virgin Islands
(UPD Residents of thi idonH
city were awakened yesterday
by a prolonged earthquake that
shook buildings and rattled win windows.
dows. windows. No major damage was re
ported.
RIX
S5c.
tOc.
NAKED AND THE
DEAD
with Also Ray
: Aiwtvv
THAT NIGHT
. with John Peal

1 1

Quidico Scores
In $750 Seven

m o
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Teams WL
Giorauar Life 6 2
tins 1414 5. 3
Lincoln life 4 5
Spur tola 4 5
Seymour Agency 3 5
Police 3 5
Spur Cola 4 Police 0
Paul Zelnick and Carl Mable of
the ipur Cola divided the pitching
chores and held the Police boys to
three hits anu blanked them from
crossing the storing planter, ine
win for the Spur Colas meant that
they emerged trom the cellar, and
they still have a chance to-finish
up as runnerup team in tne sec second
ond second half.
Danny Hele, the third sacker
for the Spurs, was one of the, two
Spurs that collected two hits, but
it was Bobby Mikultch that : stole
the' know with a booming Corner
and a single. Jeff Riley the Po Police
lice Police chucker, did a commendable
job but his teammates did not get
any runs.
The box scores:
SPUR COLA
AB R

Hele 3b 3 1
Bowen 2b 2 0
William's ss 2 0
Hoenke lb '30
Horsley c 3 1
Robertson rf 2 1
De La Pena If 3 0
Mikulich cf 2 1
Fiaanque cf 1 0
Zelnick p 2 0
Mable p 10
POLICE
Short rf 3 0
Askew, rf '10
Doherty 3b 3 0
Micek If 2 0
Darden If 10
McGrath c 3 0
Catron cf '20
Evans 2b 2 0
Riley p 2 0
Brennan ss 2 0
Bundy lb 1 0

Lincoln Life,5i 'n
Sevmour Aaonev a
Bobby Ostrea, with 12 strike-1
outs handcuffed the Seymour bat batters,
ters, batters, until the last inning, when
the Seymours rallied and gave the
Lincoln Lifers a real scare, when
the last batter was retired at first
base on a very close and disputed
mouna ior Seymours dui gave
way to Pat Kennealy who pitched
well in relief. Paul, Robinson sec
ond sacker for Seymours, with a
single, double and triple starred at
the plate.
The box score:
-LINCOLN- LIFE
Douglas cf 1
Farnsworth cf 2
Engleke ss 3
Francis lb 4
Ostrea p 4
Kiamco c 3
Kelley 3b 1 1
Deming-3b 1
Jacobson rf 3
Phillips If 3
Trim 2b 3
SEYMOUR AGENCY
P. Kenealy ss-p
Watson cf
P. Robinson c
Black p-ss
P. Rogers 2b
Canavagio If
Blaney 3b-2b
Farrell lb
Brogie rf
Stabler rf
B. Kenealy 3b
3.0
ATLANTIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Mutual of Omaha, 1959 Atlantic
Little League champs and the re resurgent
surgent resurgent Pirates played to a 10 to
10 stand off on Tuesday ai the
Terrori came back from a nine to
TUMI urnnH innlnff deficit after
having followed the precedent set
by the cokea ine aay oetore Dy
using some of their very young
nl a vers and starting Larry Quinn
on the mound.
Bill Reif, Ken Bernstein and
Bernie Mam were among those
in the starting lineup whiie some
of the regulars were stationed In
other than their usual positions.
Larry Quinn pitched t,he first
two frames and gave up nine
runs, after allowing four hits and
six base on balls. Ronnie Riefkoh
came on in the third and was tag tagged
ged tagged for a run oh- one hit and two
walks before he was relieved by
Doug Billison with two outs and
two on base.
Doug forced Mike Nunely to
ground out, Larry Quinn to Harry
fwirerv to end the innlne. Billi
son looked the best he, has all sea
son as he struck out the next five
men to face him and then caught
rurfr ThnmitMMi'i ood ud to end
the curfew game. t 10 all;
Tommy HocKey pitcnea a very
good game for the Pirates despite
thaonr twt nermittwi hut six
' v nvv 1
hits, struck out eight and walked
only one. Seven 01 tne Terror s
runs were, unearned s the Pirates
made seven errors in the field.
Eversrdo Urriola Jiit a home
nut In the first with two on to put
fha Plra4a mil f rnnr hv i 1 In II
score and it looked as if they were.

on their way. Going into the third
seven runs down, Mutual put to together
gether together two singles and a hit bats batsman
man batsman for five big runs as the Pi Pirates
rates Pirates came uj with three errors.
The Pirates came back to score
their tenth and final run in their
half of the inning. The Burza men
tied the game in the fourth oh two
hits, another ''pinked" hitter and
two more fielding errors.
Les Highley had a double while
Larry Quinn, Wayn., Seeley, and
Geoff Thompson each got two
hits.
The Omaha boys sport, green
caps and there is the color of Erin
running thru their stockings but
the guiding lights of the champs,
Mike Burza and Gordon, Reif,
took on a bright crimson hue
when their strategy to break the
tie jn the fifth inning ran afoul as
Geoff Thompson, Pirate .catcher,
pulled the hidden ball trick on
Wayne Seeley. Wayne had singled
gone to second -on an error and
to third on a wild pitch.
On Che next three pitches by
Tommy Hickey, Wayne made the
break from third as if he were to
go all the way in an attempt to
score his team's eleventh run.
Each time he got far from the
bag, iThompscrfdrove him back to
third as Hickey covered home.
On the fourth break, however,
Wayne kept coming towards th,e
plate as Thompson just stood
there and Hickey walked back to towards
wards towards the mound as he would or ordinarily
dinarily ordinarily do to resume pitching.
From the Mutual bench came
the shouts Df Burza and Reif, "Go
ahead, Wayne, go ahead." Mean Meanwhile,
while, Meanwhile, Randy Wikingstad,, who
with Pete Tortoricl, has done a
fine job With the Pirates this year,
played along with the plot by yel yelling,
ling, yelling, "Tommy, throw the bill
home." In came Wayne beaming
irom ear to ear- but as he was
about three steps from scoring.
Geoff turned, took the ball from
his big mitt, and tagged the dumb dumb-foundded
foundded dumb-foundded Seeley.
All the cats in the stand said
that it sure was a cool play, real really
ly really cool, man. For Mike and Gor Gor-die,
die, Gor-die, walking off the field after the
game was called, it seemed like
it avaa the last mile as many oPthe'
spectators-tegan a take-off on the
Bud Abbot and Late Lou Cos'ello
joke of "Who's on first."
By the tim the board of strate strategy
gy strategy had reached the street, I he
taunts of "Hey, Mike, who'? go
the ball?" and "Where's the ball,
Reif?" had grown to a loud din.
Yes, .it really was a bill anH the
that Geoff Thomrron ihd
wailing for Wayne Seeley was the
most.
The box score:
MUTUAL OF OMAHA
Ab R
Quuin La., p, 2b
Hip '.; -"If., p, 3b
McBride, ss
Billison, 3b, p
Quinn Lu., c
Highley. If
Dockery, lb
Bernstein, rf
3
J
3
2
3
3
3
2
0
1
1
2
2
1
1 0
2 0
0 0
1 0
2 1
24 10
Bialkowski, rf
Reif, 2b
Mans, cf
Seeley, cf
Totals
PIRATES
Christoph, ss
Hickey, p
Thompson, c
Urriola, If
Wiberg, lb
Nunley, 3b
Sanders, 2b
Tortorici. cf
Smith, rf
Totals
1
4
3
2
1
2
2
3
22 10
Score by innings
"'Mutual
025 30
10
10
" Pirates
541 00

North-South Basketball Tilt
Draws Only 500 Spectators

RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) Pio Pio-moters
moters Pio-moters conceded yesterday that
Saturday's North-South All Star
same, which drew a crowd of
about 500 in an arena whicn
counts its basketball fans in me
thousands, probably will be the
last one. 1U
The game brought five of tnp
nation's top scorers, two outstand outstanding
ing outstanding coaches and more than a
dozen collegiate stars to the huge
Reynolds Coliseum. To the pro promoters
moters promoters it brought nothing but dig
appointment. T,hey had not ex ex-necterl
necterl ex-necterl larfie turnout, but the
srrrall crowd, was a surprise to
even the most pessimistic.
"We'd like to put a game on
again next year," said Ed Pow Powers,
ers, Powers, one of the four promoters,
"hut well nave 10 una a amer-
ent place."
Powers and the other promot promoters
ers promoters still believe the idea of an
atl-atar fame is sound and Boitit
to the tense 114-109 overtime vic victory
tory victory the North squad won Satur Saturday
day Saturday as an example of the excite
ment u oners.
Tho rmtnnmo wan almost an
exact duplicate of the first North North-South
South North-South All-Star game here last
year when the North won a T10 T10-109
109 T10-109 victory before a slightly larf larf-er
er larf-er crowd of about 1,000
Tne Nortn, oenina most ox ine

Easyfyi&ory
Furlong Dash

The Stud Maqui's classy Chilean
colt Quidico scored an easy tri triumph
umph triumph as expected In the featured
j750 seven turlong sprint for sec sec-and
and sec-and series imported thoroughbred
yesterday, afternoon at the Presi President
dent President Remon racetrack.
Quidico was considered so supe superior
rior superior to the opposition that he waa
excluded from the betting. He fin finished
ished finished fully four lengths to the
good with jockey Jose Talavera
pulling on the reins at the finish
line.
Bright Spur, the mutuels fav favorite
orite favorite in the betting, got m to fin finish
ish finish second by a neck while Play Playboy
boy Playboy was fourth only a half length
further back. Hostagador, Alpina
and Lobo trailed in that order.
Brigh Spuf returned $4.60 in the
mutuels.
Quidico's time for the seven fur furlongs
longs furlongs was a creditable 1:26 3-5 on
the slowed up racing strip.
The day's best win dividends
were Aeriel Trumpet's $20, Ame Ame-Iis
Iis Ame-Iis $21.80 and Nebrisc $15.80. The
Amelia-Nebrlsca double paid $249. $249.-60
60 $249.-60 tqps for the day.
Virgilio Castillo and Daniel Bar Barret
ret Barret shared saddle, honors with two
victories each.' Caillo scored a a-board
board a-board Chito and Nebrisc while
Barret brought hpme Dinaniita
and Amelia.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Aerial Trumpet $20, $4.20
2 Eros $2.40
SECOND RACE
1 Salale $8,' $6.20
2 Mar'lla $22.40
First Double: $199.80
THIRD RACE
1 Dinamiia $2.80, $2.20
2 Go'den Tap $3.40
FOURTH RACE
1 Bngab $11.80, $5.20
2- Silvsr S".i $3
Quiniela: $22
FIFTH RACE
1 Chito $4.80, $2.80
2 Blanquita $3.20
SIXTH RACE
.lmea;'$2M:$9
2 Rhea Calls '$6.40
SEVENTH RACE
1 Nebrisca $15.80, $7
2 Germanio $4.20
Second Double: $249.60
EIGHTH RACE
1- Naipa $8, $3.20
2 Carmelita $3
Quiniela: $5.20
1 Manuela Pedraza $9.20,
2 King's Park $3.60
One-Two: $32.
' .TENTH RACE
1 Titita $3.20, $2.40
2 Frijolito $2.60
$4.20
ELEVENTH RACE
1 Quidico (Excluded from
ting)
2 Bright Spur $4.60, $4
3 Artie Princess $4.40
One Two: $21.80
bet-
Stevedore Morris
Cops Rainbow City
Softball Crown
The Stevedore Morris team
of the Rainbow City Open Clas Classification
sification Classification Softball League took
its third straight pennant Satur Saturday
day Saturday by defeating Pantra 6-1.
game, pulled even in the fourth
quarter and Hank Stein of Xavier
(Ohio) pushed the margin to 101 101-08.
08. 101-08. John Richter of North Caio Caio-lina
lina Caio-lina State, voted the game's out outstanding
standing outstanding player, sank a free
throw" and then tied it up with a
bank shot in the final seconds.
Stein came through with seven
points in the overtime to give the
North the final edge.
Notre Dame's Tom Hawkins
was high scorer with 28 points.
!d"rive-7n?
&TODAY-:s
"FLAME BARRIER"
with Arthur Frans and
J Kathryq Trowley
Tomorrow j
I
I PETER CUSHING
Mellss STRIBLING In
I
''HORROR of DRACULA"
. In-TECHNlCOLORl j

' - v. 4 4 , I
,. ""!., ' I J" -"' 1 I. II I ' O'.'ii '..-i-...
y mt mi i ..mm wwrnxfw iss; ? i' ,iniisj ' .'
I . -. .1
) j '
....... i intr'
. j i ; -f -urn ,.
A "4 -S ,.d - -VWtW
f( '. ,,,f ,.', -muz-
I- ,-.v wi mi r
'.. '.';i ml
-
... 'v ..-,v-.v-v-v.,-.,.h.,.J '.'.'.WA'v.v.w.v.'.VA' $Dt&mtMtV 1
I '" r .
i I f I t rr
'.'.-:':':t:':'T-T.v.v,v.-Kv::'X;-':''''.,.-K $ "aOV1
- .I 9 i
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ii.iriioi inimi- .vrftaj. ..... 1 (

DUFFI F PUNCHY Thi eioM
' ing its bow at shows. It is made
can he nnwrpH hv naHlec nr

, in a 35-inch bag. Just the thing for lonesome fishermen.

ii 1 1
By OSCAR
NEW YORK (UPI)-The golf
ing brigade is taking dead aim
today on next weekend's Masters
tournament and while the old
war horses of the wedge will be
on hand it s plain that the young
sters of the tour will be the de
ciding factor. i:
You can t, of course, scratch
out'such.isenlijntintai'.'favoritesTag'
Ben Hogan and Sam Snead -'on
one of their occasional visits to
the tournament scene. Nor the
middle-30's brigade vhich took
ovec in their wake.
But tournament golf is gettingo
tougher and tougher, just becaus".
of the sheer numbers of fine
young players hitting., the tour.
Goosie Sums It Up
J. C. Goosie, known variously
as the "por man's Jimmv De
maret" and a cross between
Dizzy Dean and Li'l Abner,
summed it up best of all.
maret" and a rmtn hptupon
Dizzy Dean and LiT Abner,
summed it up best of all.
"A year ago I shot 282 in the
Caliente Odpi and tiprl (nr o,.
ond." he exolained. "This venr T
shot another 282 and tied for
23rd."
That ninnnints how the tomnn
and calibre of golf is increasing.
me yuungsiers are in mere
after their share.
Just a couple of years back'1,
when such as Snead, Hogan, De-

Roy Harris, Basib Among Fighteri

f t II I T
rnpnilUsn in
NEW YORK (UPi) Heavy Heavyweight
weight Heavyweight Roy Harris will make his
network television debut .and a
pair of former middleweight
Champions Carmen Basilio and
Bobo Olson will appear in non non-televised
televised non-televised scraps this week along
the boxing front.
TJ n yi n nt Pt Anil Ghnf Tiw
will take1 on Donny Fleeman of
Mirllnrhinn Tp .. WpHnpcdaV
night in a 12-round. return bout
for the Texas heavyweight title.
The fight will be carried r by
ABC-TV, starting at 10 p.m.. e.s.t.
Harris defeated F 1 e e m a d 'in
their first meeting for the "Texas
state title last Dec, 1. He has suf suffered
fered suffered but one setback in his 26
pro fights to Floyd Patterson
last summer in their world heavy heavyweight
weight heavyweight contest, 'which- was show,i
on closed-circuit TV.
A pro since 1955, Harris has
scored 9 of his 25 victories by
knockouts. Fleeman has registered
26 wins in 29 fights since turning
pro in 1955.
Olson will trade punches with
Rory Calhoun of White Plains,
N.Y., in a 10-round bout at San
Francisco's Cow Palace tonight
Calhoun, who now claims weight weight-making
making weight-making was an ordeal for him,
has decided to campaign as a light
heaviweight.
Basilio, resigned r to the tact
that Sugar Ray Robinson won't
fight him again, meets Arley Set
ter in a tune-up at Augusta, fcr.,
tomorrow night. It will be Bast Bast-lio's
lio's Bast-lio's first fight since he whipped
Art Aragon litst September..
Next Friday night's nationally nationally-televised
televised nationally-televised 10-rounder will pit wel welterweight
terweight welterweight Charley Scott of Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia against highly-rated Isaac
Logart of Cuba at Washington's

- and.a Vialf fnnt hnat mdV

of neoprene-coated nylon,
a small mirhnar4 Tt Aakat
FRALEY,

maret and Lloyd Mangrum, t&';'
name, a fpw. wprp .naaclno inift

fholt foHinit Al', Ihau J.,J'"" 1 "l"

nated the game. Name any event" "M" Lr
and they still stood high on the'.' -1,1
list of favorites. il4k', il4k',-Then,
Then, il4k',-Then, as they bowed out except"r
ffif fWPD cinn ol onnatiianiae tUa oOij J

train. no QLtmi-..tl. ,, wr

This -isv thedwrreniMep aleWetfrt
statesmen," including s.u ch ar!'"
Jackie Burke, Doug Ford, Julius0" h
Boros. Carv Mirlrllernff still hot

Art Wall and Jay and ionel He- V.,,:
bert.
Many P!ayer$ In 20't 'v Vi
The big six 20-year olders are "Ai4)
Gary Player, the cocky 22-yearV-rl
did South African; 27-year oMj ". jo

Ken Venturi and

burly Billy Cas-i.' 3ff

per; 28-year old

fjpnp T.it.Hpf' '-!.-'

coming back with a npw tam

ironed out by little Paul Runyin.i.jst
PGA champion Dow FinsterwaldV--
rand rugged Arnold Palmer, bothf,,,,,
29.
Yet there are- a flock more in
their 20's who might catch fire a- (f
any moment.
Just to name a. few, 23 years-.: i
old threats are John McMuUia"
3Joe Campbell, the husky blond.i.jvt 4l
former Purdue vbasketball 3tar- v
and Dave Ragan, a Rip. VifrhuX'",
Winkle sleeDer whn hits th naU

iike Hogan-: Tommy Jacobs, 24,-wS

ana o-year-oia uoug sanaers. 'VI
Georgia boy from the University"
of Florida.
' 1 : ; : )

a wi in i -bib

Artmn hir Wnay"

New Capitol Arena. Scott wai
virtually, unknown until he oeat"
Logart earlier this month at Nejft
York-

Service Center Theatres
TONIGHT
BALBOA Air Conditioned
6:15 8:20
Glenn Ford
Ernest Borgnine'
'TORPEDO RUN" ;
In cinemascope & Colort
CC SOLO 1 7:00
Ingrid Bergman V '-
Curt Jergens
"THE INN OF THE SIXTH
1 HAPPINESS" .."
In Cinemascope & Color!
DIABLO m&Xt'i-M
David Brian Lynn Barry
"GHOST OF THE CHINA
- SEA" "'
MARGARITA- 7:00
Dareen : McGayin
. Maegle Hayes
The Case Against Brooklyn"
PARAISOt
r Frank Sinatra
7:00
THIT JOKER IS WILD'V
In yistaVlslonl
SANTA CRUZ 7:00
'"NAKED IN THE SUN"
f and "LAST HOLIDAY"
CAMP, BIERD
7:00
Julius LaRosa
Phillis Newman
"LET'S ROCK'f,

J

"4
JfleM

""V



1. 4 '-

y MOND AY. MARCH SO, 1959
TEE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAHY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
4
Former Champ-
Floyd, Johansson
mm um i mim mimiii
y
' i
'Wj. r-
iorishfp Bout
Goes Aaamst
JOE WILLIAMS

, : r

:rf,

LOSING LOOK i The key to riding horses on, a muddy,,
track to ito-.finiso first Trailers look1 like Gil LFIeuer,
Who. iolwwe ,thi'itelel ;around Florida's Gulfstreara Park,
oval and seemed to, pick up all the mud thrown by flying hoofs;

JOnce Bashful Mickey Mantle
r NowRpugh On Sports Scribes

By MURRAY OLD EftMAN
ST, PETERSBURG, Fla (NEA)
When Mickey Mantle came oit
of Commerce, Okla., to become
a big thing 'witttther New York
' slick setrourtesy of a gift-from
nature batting style he was, at
his wordiest, bashful.
Success has changed him. And
If you, talk to sports writiers it
hasn't,, been for .the better Most
of theiri would rather talk to Ted
William. '
Basically, he's a good kid and
his friends are confident he'll be become
come become easier to live -with. Right
bow, however, he requires a bit
t-patience. '

oeven vr ko, wucu ire un
ttaath: nf writers. Now I don't
give a d-. I say what I want."
Mantle told us uus Decause
we're pegged in his book as a
fuy who doodles "Ain't you tne
one that did that drawing of me
and my paw a 'few years ago?''
The! 'first day Mantle reported
for, -spring training thise year,
he singled out one of the New
York-camp followers.
"Ydn," he pointed. "You ain't
getting nothing from me- You
wrote1; a (blank) story about me
during the winter."
'Me? What'd I do?"
"You had me using double neg negative:"
ative:" negative:" V
IT'S PRETTY TOUCH to cov cover
er cover the Yankees and not talk to
Mantle, because he's Casey Steri
gelVmost important muscle boy.
And -the general impression a-
mong observers is that this
spring he's in the happiest frame
f mind of his career.
Wej walked over to his stall in
the barracks-like clubhouse the
Yankees use at their Miller Hug
gins practice field and said we'd
like to talk to you a few mm-,
UtM,. Mickey. ;v,.-
" "I can't see what about," he
drawled blandly.
Well, there has been somie
tuff written about you having a
bad shoulder.
"Aw, that's a lot of blankety-

Wsame'9'a"' big- leaguerr ''MiokeyertnloosenHigjpiyeUednwepthe
confesses, v "1 was vjcared to fence, J'Hey,. Mick, tell Johnson

Y blanlf Nothing wrong with it."
a He left us standine in the mi

; Vle PJ PlH Infinitive to escape
f.the direction of Gus Mauch's
imng cubickTat the nt.hor end
the room. WKpn h ram nut
he lat down next t Bin sitnw.
'n, got jabbed in the ribs, grin-
"ri&?-ba?.hful me, .was call call-ed
ed call-ed !;Elmer" by buddy Whitey
for and enjoyed being one of
the toys. p
Finally, ha sauntered
wav-hack.
all the
' Efojying yourself, Mick?
What's the matter?
"Tjto much baseball.!
WCKSY WILL TALK when
!ou,aiay away irom me sens!,
vej areas of the sport in which
e makes his primary living. He
Ilojvs he likes bowling, "but I'm
oti very gooa at n." Better than
Berfa? "Yeah.','
.Ask him hew h : feels about
the ; booing and he even hears
cattails during the games the
Yankees play at Al Lang Field
in ai Petersburg, toe and Man
MuITm "I wr ...u
"K(,U give you his baleful, frox,..

I

en-ev'ed look and crobablv walk
away'ThiSiis in the domain of
H..-T.11 .rtisi S -"T- -i
ui ueaa nrmKers, put snyness
as much as rudeness is the ex explanation.
planation. explanation. Ever since he got
burned by too many agents' an
gling to do his business his first
two years up, Mickey has been
sensitive to strangers and suspi suspicious
cious suspicious of loaded questions.
.Where a Stan Musial can par parry
ry parry gracefully,- Mickey can v only
retreat. Yet he's eenuinelv one
of the gang when he's around
tne other players, without a
trace of prima donna.
IT WAS RAINING, and Mic
Key bad Jus street clothes on to
go for the day. A recruit nltrJi.
(DarrelL the bull nen ratchet-1
that Turner (Jim, pitching coach)
wants him to come out and catch
us. He's in the shower."
Turner was nowhere around.
Mantle, catchine th unirit aI,o.
diently turned tail and went back
into the clubhouse to agitate
Johnson.
As Mantle was about to leave
for his beach home, he was ask-
AH inn,HH 1 A
vi viuuig swunmingf
"Nah, I don't know how to
!wim- .Always too busy playing
baseball."
rJKKJ vealing thing
Mickey Mantle had said all lay.
Along The Fairways
The Pan American Airways Golf
tournament now being played at
Gamboa Gpjf ,Club has moved to
e "?ftnd week, of pky with some
of the favorites advancing, while
some have dropped by the way wayside.
side. wayside.
Here are some points of inter interest:
est: interest: The No. 2 hole at Gamboa af after
ter after all 197 entrants had attempted
to qualify was parred , total of
42 times, with the hole played 394
times this is some kind of record
fop a tough "hole, i, Kf
H Oie fish thM Jiang arbundNo.
2 hole under the bridge like golf
balls as a steady diet they are
getting fat to the tune of 35 golf
balla during the qualifying rounds.
We understand that from now pn
they are like any respectable
Same fish and will eat nothing ht
Dunlop balls, something about the
aneusn paint.
The pro shops on the Isthmus
are doing a thriving business also
on new and used golf clubs, now
wise mis instance tor example:
One of the better golfers on ttie
8th, hole during his qualifying
rouna nit a Deautifuj tee shot to
within W.yajrds of "the hdle. look looked
ed looked the slhot over and took hi fav-
orite club (wedge) and lined it ud
then proceeded to belt It a good
feet???, notfhine was aaid
lined it up again and b'aded It a-
cross the 8th preen and down the
back sida????. nothine said.
Hned it up again and banged over
the green to the front where he
wa in the first olace, nothing
said???? He calmly walked t0
He nearest, 'ree and wraoped the
ciun around it, then looked up and
Said, "'his is something l'vn want wanted
ed wanted to do for a Inn? time."
tMBH vou nave tne paira wee s
on No, 3 holeKthat are reputed to
Then vou have the palm tree's

Rory Calhoun

By SCOTT BAILLIE
SAN FRANCISCO (JPl)-CarI
(Bobo) Olson, who never has lost
fiuht in the Cow Palace, le,a ls
with hii chin against the tales
there tonight wnen ne mee ires ires-swingings
swingings ires-swingings Rory Calhoun of White
Plains, N.Y., in a lp-rqund lignt-
neavyweignt doui.
It marks the fourth and most
important comeback fight for Ol Olson,
son, Olson, who held the world middle
weight title for two years then
was sent crashing into, retirement
by way of knockout alley. Among
tnose. wno nasieneo me ou-yer-
old Hawaiian's departure by
stretching him were Archie Moore
(once), Ray Robinson (twice) and
Pat McMurtry (once). The latter
defeat came when Olson was us using
ing using his first shot at coming back.
Bobe's Sternest Test
But now a "new" Bobo, pre
sumably free of the domestic
troubles which had beset him, is
n action. He has stopped three
opponents since making his sec
ond run on a comeback last Oc October.
tober. October. All were hopelessly out outclassed,
classed, outclassed, however, and included
unknown Don Grant, a Paddy
Young who seemed far over the
hill, and Tommy Villa who sought
an armistice after taking one in
the midsection and became Ol Olson's
son's Olson's sparring partner.
Olson gets his sternest test in
Calhoun, a smasher who is dead
ly from the outside if he is on
target. Rory, who has a record of
39-6-1, stopped Al Hauser in his
latest outing and is five years
Olson s junior.
However, they say around the
cigar stands that Bobo is a 35
favorite on grounds that his mer
ciless body attack will be tco
much for Rory to handle.
Early End Predicted
Local experts also are 'predict
ine that the fight is a cinch to
end early. Both men are hard
hitters but both also can be stag
gered.
During his decline and fall
from the middleweight heights,
si i i i i .r
Olson was knocked out four times
in seven contests. Calhoun also
has been in trouble a lot al
though he only has one knockout
against him. That happened here
eany in 1958 when spider Webb
got off the canvas for the second
time to flatten Rory in the fourth
Both managers admit 'they are
going ior me suaaen ending.
"I want Rory to finish it off be
cause I lust don't trust home.
town otiiciaung anywnere, says
f rame Bacnman, who has been in
tne game since 1917.
"It will end early." agrees Bil
ly Newman, Olson's new pilot.
uodo wui go to wont on cai-
noun g middle and wear h i m
down."

Final Nationals-Celtics Tilt

Listed For Boston Wednesday

NEW YORK, March 30 (UPD
National Basketia
Eastern Division playoffs into a
decisive seventh game at'. Boston
Wednesday by deteating tne Lei-i
tics, 133-121, yesterday at the war
Memorial Auditorium.
Syracuse built up- a 91-72 lead
with five minutes left in the third
period but 'suddenly went dead.
With Gene Coiiley grabbing re rebounds
bounds rebounds and Frank Ramsey con connecting
necting connecting for points in rapid fire
order, Boston closed the : gap to
95-89 in the next 4Vi minutes be before
fore before Bob Hopkins and George
Yardley made it easier for Syra Syracuse
cuse Syracuse with baskets.
Again in the final quarter, Bos Boston
ton Boston closed to within four points,
but at this stage Syracuse's ace,
Dolph Schayes, was on. the bench
getting oxygen.
With Just five minutes left in
the final period, Boston (railed by
113-109. John Kerr connected on
a layup and Yardley, who was 13
for 27 from the floor, dunked an-
have at least 8 golf ball still in
the branched from the -qualifying
rounds.
The P A A is still going on so
if you want to see some of this
going on drop out to Gamboa and
watch the golfers play for tha
beautiful prizes to. be given to the
winners by Pan American Airways

I.

TVi man couldn't say just wiien
hFlight 818, northbound, would be
announced, rreny soon, ne uupco.
Visibility, poor, was getting-'increasingly
poorer. Greasy, bloats
ed clouds hung low over, the Tanv
pa airport.-' .. a
Waiung, our gaze idly fell on
a crewless DC-, its silver Dody
darkly splashed, as the rain, now
in its fourth straight day, pelteu
th field, ceaselessly. What was
this? We looked again. Through
the haze we spelled out tne strange
bold lettering:. .Los Angeles
Dodgers.
-
And now Gabe Paul, young gen general
eral general manager of the Cicinnati
Reds, traveling bag in hand, was
gloomily explaining:
"The Dodgers have been wash wash-erf
erf wash-erf nut at Vera Beach, too, so
we decided to get together and
play some games in Havana, we
wp eoine to fly over in tneir
plane. We've been waiting Here
two Hours tor Clearance, wow iwj
tell us Havana's also closed in."
What had been one of the best
weather-wise training season in
years abruptly came to a compete
water-ldeeed standstill. . ."The
managers are ready to make us us-cisions
cisions us-cisions on questionable players,
but to Jo this with any confidence
they must see them in competi competitive
tive competitive action."
It was suggested then, since the
rains bad been state-wide, no one
club would be more disadvantage
than 'another. ...
"That may be true of tne ciuds in
Florida," he admitted, "but what
about the Giants and the cubs
thev've missed very little training
in Arizona? Then, after a pause
"Maybe we : won't nave to
worry too much about them, any
way."
Perhaps not about the Cubs but
the Giants had been in contention
most of '58 and there appeared no
reason to believe they wouldn't
take up where they left off.
One Mor Pitchar
"Even so, I don't think they've
got enough pitching to go all the
way," insisted Paul, "Also, they
can't be altogether sold on their
infield. Actually, I give, the s Pi Pirates
rates Pirates a better chance than the
Giants."
The Reds' executive would not
be alone in tabbing the Pirates
as a serious threat. We were to dis discover
cover discover in our tour of the camps
that quite a few baseball men held
the Pittsburgh entry in rather
high esteem., ,The irony, in this
?ilrtahbsj i "that if the pirates:
should happen to make it, they'd
have this young man to thank
most of all.
The Pirates needed a strong bat
behind the plate, a sure glove at
third base, a starting left-hand
pitcher. They got all three in a
deal with Paul, who coveted long long-ball
ball long-ball hitting Frank Thomas- If the
deal makes the Pirates a potential
winner, it cannot have been a very
good one for the Reds.
"We naturally think it was a
good one," protested Paul. "We
got what we wanted. It may not
be enough to make us a potential
winner but it's a step in that direction-.
We heed one more pitcher,
a starter who can take his reg regular
ular regular turn; and if we land him' as
I hope we will, then yon'll see (re
other and then a revitalized
the ame
Dolph found Kerr for one of
his eight assists on the next play
to put the Nats in tront, lis-nu.
And after Bob Cousy cut the
margin by two points, Dolph sent
Syracuse hopes soaring again
with a three-point play under the
basket against Bill Russell. Doiph
culminated nis 3-point periorm-
ance with a long hook shot one
minute before the end and that
was it for the battling Celtics.
All games in this series have
been won at home. And in Bos
ton where it will conclude on
Wednesday night, Syracuse oas
never been closer than 21 points.
Syracuse outscored Boston by
nine field goals in this rugged
tussle in which Tom Heinsohn of
Boston was ejected for threaten threatening
ing threatening to hit Referee Sid Borgia ar.d
then following it with verbal
abuse. Frank Ramsey of the Cel Celtics,
tics, Celtics, their leading scorer "with 26
points in 35 minutes of play, also
fouled out as did Bob Hopkins
and Hal Greer for Syracuse.
From the floor the Nats were
49 for 109 while Boston made goo 3
on 40 of 105. Helping Schayes
considerably offensively was
Yardley the second high Nat with
32 points. He played all but the
last minute of the game:

real significance of the Thomai

n?ai'
In spite of the burgeoning Pitts Pittsburgh
burgh Pittsburgh boom, the Braves were still
the NL favorites, yet. Paul had
made no mention of the defending
"They -could do it,'fc he nodded.
"In fact, any one of four or uve
clubs in this league could. But the
Braves have infield problems, not
only at second but at short end
thy may find the going awfully
rough.'
v Gilliam to Bravas?
One of the problems is the
stricken Red Schoendiest, who is
lost to the Braves for the seasoi.,
possibly to baseball for all lime.
It was the Redhead who pulled
the Braves together, stirred their
pride, gave them confidence, led
mem into the World Series.
Thus, he constitutes a douhie
loss, manually and inspirational inspirational-ly.
ly. inspirational-ly. A deal is pending for Jun.or
uiuiam oi tne uoagers; if the
Braves are willing to sacrifice
front-line mtchine strength th
deal, we are told, can be ma-Je
Mechanically, at least, Gilliam
would make more than an ade
quate replacement.
The other problem is Johnny
Logan the shortxtnn. whn pi
dropped to .226 last season. Even
tne most consistent players have
inexplicably suffered "off var",
and this, of course, could have
nappeneato Logan. However a
source close to the clufr advises:
"He's going to miss Schoendiest
plenty. You see. soma nf the Red.
head's class had begun to rub
u un mm. un nis own, ne'ii brood
and beaf more than ever."

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF
, PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA r ;
Complete Prize-wifiaing Numbers In the Ordinary Drawing No. 2000 March
The whole ticket has 52 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and

'Ne.
001 s
0115
02 IS
0.115
0415
0515
0015
0715
0S15
0915
Friz
150.00
150.00
156.00
158.00
150.00
150.00
150.00
W
2011
2111
2215
2.115
2415
2515
1015
1115
1215
1315
1415
150.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
150.00
156.00
2,600.00
156.n0
156.00
1515
1615
2615
2,000.00 Hi;
2715
26 IS
21S
IM.oo Iff 15
150.00 I 1115

"" "' 1 '" i i ii I 1 j, 'iJfi niiiiiif iri nii y'hiu, i n,i i1
Approximations Derived From First Prize
-
57076 ?20! mm 11?, J"2 M I T' KO-M S721 620.00 5723 s'o.06 I
5707 520.00 5709 520.00 5711 520.00 5713 520.00 5716 520.00 5718 520.00 5720 520.00 5722 520.00 5724 520.00 I
Approximations Derived From Second Prize ;
1775 260.00 2775 260.00 3775 260.00 4775 260.00 5775 260.00 8775 260.00 7775 26000 8775 260.00 9775 260.00
Vtn 'im- fJS JJJ? !! V2 1MM W74 13 o7o M1 13oToo Om 130.00
0767 130.00 0769 130.00 0771 130.00 0773 130.00 1776 130.00 0778 130.00 0780 130.00 0782 130.00 0784 130.00
Approximations Derived From Third trize w
. r, 1
S f t a t -' '' a
0952J56.00 52 156.06 2952 156.08 3952 156.00 4952 156.00 5952 156.00 6952 156.00 8952 156.00 9952 154.00
7944 104I0 7940 104.00 794S 104.00 7950 104.00 7953 104.00 7955 104.00 7957 10' 7959 104.00 7961 104.00

Prise-winning Numbers of yesterday'g lottery Drawing were sold at: The lst.,Panama, 2nd. Colon and 3rd. In Panama
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in 5 and not included In the above list win Fifty Two Dollars ($52.00) each
The whole ticket has fifty-two pieces which comprises the two series "A" & "B"
Signed by: The Secretary, of Government DOMINGO GONZALEZ H.
The Representative of The .Treasury. HARMODIO BARRIOS Jr.

WITNESSES: Ernesto Arce, Ced. 8-596
Manuel E. Rodriguez, Ced. 8-21-637

NOTE:
The wlnnlna ticket with
clohtrs ddTv onlv to the
The Pint Prize arid the 2nd and 3rd

proximatlom are cali-ulated on the First. Second and Third prizes In cssa
a ticket should carry thi numbers of each prize, the holder la entiUed to
claim payment for each.
DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, March 29, 1959

Drawing
First Prize. .
Second Prize.
Third Prize.

15
75
52

Set For June 2$
GOTEBORG, Sweden UPI)
Promoter Bil) Rosensohn says the
world heavyweight title bout be between
tween between Floyd Patterson and Inge Inge-mar
mar Inge-mar Johansson will take place
June 25 in New York.
By settling the date, Rosensohn
also gave the green light to a
number of Swedish travel compa companies
nies companies which will ship nearly 4,000
Swedish fight fans alross the At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic for the bout.
In New York, Cus D'Anu'o.
Patterson's manager, said he did
not know June 25 had been se selected
lected selected as the date. Previously.
June 23 had been suggested as
the date.
Rosensohn did not say wncre
the bout would be held in New
York. The Yankee Stadium is
available from June 21 until July
3 while the Yankees are on the
road. Rosensohn also has an op
tion on the Polo Grounds.
Rosensohn also said Patterson
first would fight Brian London,
former British heavyweight cham champion,
pion, champion, at Las Vegas, Nev., proo
ably May 1.

Henry, Perez
Bout Postponed
A four-bout professional box boxing
ing boxing card which was to have bten
featurod by an eight-rounder be between
tween between Eloy Henry and Roberto
Paraz at the Colon, Arena last
nlflht was postponed.
No now data-hat bten sat for
the card.

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

5715
0775
7952

t
Prlwa
156.00
150.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
f
Frlie
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
No.
3015
3115
3215
3315
3415
3515
3615
156.00
2,600.00
156.00
156.00
3715
3615
3915
156.00'
tht lait clphtr and with tho two lait
First Prlz.
Prizes are drawn separately. Tha r
Number 791
Fraction
Ticket-
$11.00 $220.00
3.00 60.00
2.00 40.00
PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOU

iiiiiiiii
Hi

I1''

EXECUTIVE SEAT -Earl Blaik', retired Army football
coach, didn't find it hard to take when he began duties as
vice-president of a New York manufacturing corporation.

Read Our

,v$52;000.00

ItA HT
M,..H: -V

$ 15,600.00
$ 7,800.00

No, PrliM No. Pr'j Nof'' "prize? No!1 $fi No. Prizt No: rPrUM
4015 '156.00 5015 156.00 6015 156.00 7015 156.00 8015 156.00 (015 156.00
4115 156.00 5115 156.00 6115 158.00 7115 156.00 8115 136.00 0115 156.00
4215 156.00 5215 156.00 6215 156.00 7215 156.00 8215 156.00 0215 156.06
4315 150.00 5315 156.00 6315 156.00 7316 t56.00 8315 156.00 9315 156.00
4415 156.00 5415 156.00 6415 156.00 7415 156.00 8415 156.00 0415 156.06
4515 156.00 5515 156.00 6515 156.00 7515 156.00 8515 156.00 0515 156.00
4615 156.00 5615 156.00 6615 156.00 7615 156.00 8615 156.00 9615 156.00
I 4715 2,600.00 5715 52,000.00 6715 2,600.00 7715 2.RO0.O0 8715 2,600.00 9715 2.600.00
4815 156,00 5815 156.00 6815 156.00 7815 156.00 8815 156.00 9815 166.00
I 4915 15646 5915 156.00 6915 156 60 J 7915 1 56.00 8915 156.00 9915 156.01

ALBERTO J. BARSALLO
Notary Public, Panama

The prizes will he paid In accordance with the Official List of Panama la
tha offices of the National Beneflclent Lottery situated on Central Avenue.
PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No. 2091 WHICH WILL
TAKE PLACE SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 1959
Divided In two serie of 26 fractions each denominated "A" and "B"

FIRST I
1 First Prlre. Series A and B. of
1 Second Prize, Series A and B. of
1 Third Prize. Series A and B, of
18 Approximations, Series A and B, of
9 Prizes. Series A and B, of
90 Prizes. Series A and B, of
900 Prizes. Series A and B, of
SECOND
18 Approximations. Series A and B.
3 Frizes. Series A and B. of
THIRD
18 Approximations. Series A and B,
9 Prizes. Series A and B, of
1074 Prizes
Price of a whole ticket
Price of a 52nd part
DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

Classifieds

BENEFICENCE
29, 1959
"B"
PABLO A PINEL M.
Secretary.
PRIZF
126.000 00 each series $52,000.00
7,800.00 each series 15,600.00
3.900.00 each series
260.00 each series
1,300.00 each series
7.600 00
9.360.00
23.400.nn
78.00 each series 14.0401
26.00 each series 46.800.00
PRIZE
of t
PRIZE
of $
65.00 each series $ 2,340.00
130 00 esch series 2.340.00
52 00 esch series $ 1.872.00
78 00 each series 1.404.00
Total
$176,956.00
$26.00
0.50

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1 r
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSFAPEB
. ... MONDAY, MARCH 19 1981
PAGS -EIGHT
L A o o I r ic u
PbfGDfl36nh:OffffOB'

. vW" J ;: AGENTS: ;;'Xt' V ': .:y-h;r, i i:
THIS SPACE CJMALE I feN& V ' ?' ' I
,.,nT,rti?rirpHrtiuF 9740 I BSfD-jjo.s strt 1?wbbison 4ttof ia ''pjt, nmSv-ju'itoSSiAwtMI''? FAt- FOR INFORMATION .TELEPHONE 2-0740 I
FOR INFORMATIONtTELEPHONE 2-0740 I abmac I
ft3- I Mtotiv cVmu ' 'in iiiiiii ii'' ' I

For 02 e m tt

. If- 1 ah II e. I

irOIr ciQUU & I

.

i i ill III III

Resorts

Foster cottages, between Santa
Clara and Rio Hato. Now low
ratoi. Phono Balboa 1866.

PHILLIPS OceaMldo Cottages
Santa Clara R. 4 P. Pliono P P-aame
aame P-aame S-1S77 Cristobal 1-1673.

Houses

FOR RENT: Furniihodf homo,
3 air-conditioned bedrooms, big
yard, 1.250.00, Cucalon y Cia.
Realtors, phone 3-3330.

Commercial Sites

FOR RENT: Professional or
commercial office on ground floor
Edifieio Urraca, corner Ave. Bal Balboa
boa Balboa and Federico Boyd, 82 square
meters, $125.00. Call Panama
3-7038.

EASTER CEASE-FIRE
TAIPEI, Formosa (UPI) The
Communist Chinese on the Main Mainland
land Mainland observed, an. Easter cease ceasefire
fire ceasefire and did not shell the Quemoy
Islands, the Nationalist China De Defense
fense Defense Ministry announced.

The Communists normally shV

the offshore island on odd-numbered
days of the month, but ap apparently
parently apparently held their fire Sunday
because of the Easter holiday.

The Communists also observed

a ceasefire last Christmas and on

the Western and Chinese New

Year's Days.

Apartments

Automobiles

FOR RENT: Wonderful apart apartments,
ments, apartments, $35.00, $40.00. Specioua
2-rooms, $25.00. 15th street
No. 6, Son Francisco. '-

FOR RENT: Two. bedrooms
completely furnished apartment.
30 Ecuador .Avenue," facing the
sea and British' Embassy.

FOR RENTr---Furnishe4 r un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished apartment at El Can Can-grejo.
grejo. Can-grejo. Two bedrooms,- living
room, dining room, kitchen, bal balcony,
cony, balcony, maid's room, garage. Al Alberto
berto Alberto Navarro street No. 48.
Phone 2-2883.

FOR RENT: Small furnished
apartment. Excellent residential
section. Clean and independent.
43rd Street No. 13.

FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 52nd. Street Bella Vista.
Tel. 2-1661, dfuring office hours.

FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, two bedroom, living din dining
ing dining set,' San Francisco, 86 Street
No. 6. Near Roosevelt Theatre.

FOR RENT: Modern recently
painted apartment, hot water,
two bedrooms, Ijving-diningroom,
kitchen, porch; 43rd Street No!
27.-"

FOR RENT: Large and modern
three bedrooms apartment, liv liv-ingroom,
ingroom, liv-ingroom, diningroom, 3 bath bathrooms,
rooms, bathrooms, hot water, maid's room,
garage, etc. Manuel Maria Icaxa
Street, "tormentor'' building.
$180.00. Tel. 3-4994.

FOR RENT: Living room, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, dinette, kitchen, apply
Apt. 2 Calle Darien No. 14-21
next street from 4th uly Ave.

FOR SALE: One half ton Van
1956 Morris Oxford. Duty paid.
Condition first class. Tel. 1269-J.
Colon. 13.190 Ave. Bolivar.

FOR SALE: 52 Oldsmobile 4
- door sedan, $375.00. Phone 86 86-2203
2203 86-2203 Albrook.

FOR SALE: 1957 Ford 6 cy cylinder,
linder, cylinder, 4 door, sedan. Can be seen
at 0813 Plank street, Balboa.
2-2319. $1450.

FOR SALE: Buick 1956 Special
4 door, Riviera 15,000 miles, ex ex-cedent
cedent ex-cedent condition, many extras.
Call Balboa 1432 after 4:00 or
any time weekends.

FOR SALE; )954 Ford station
wagon, 9 passengers, country
sedan, Fordomatic,. $900. 793-A
Tavtrniila St., Balboa, phone 2-3406.

FOR 'SALE: 1957 Dodge Cus Custom
tom Custom Royal, blue book price
$2,100.00, 2-4338, 460 Ancon
Boulevard.

FOR SALE: Packard 1948, 4
door sedan, complete new brake
job, 1959 C. Z. inspected. Good
tires. Good running condition,
bargain $200.00. Phone 2-3218.

FOR SALE; Beautiful Sunbeam
Alpine Convertible Sport car.
For information call 3-1 141 from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

To Reduce Vulnerability, Pentagon
Orders Dispersal Of Missile Pads

Lakers Defeat

Hawks 106-104

To Ties Series

WASHINGTON, March 30 (UP1
In th face of Rusia's grow

ing missile might the Pentagon!

.Has oroerea luimcr uio'
of U.S. missile launchers to re-i
duce vulnerability to surprise at attack.
tack. attack. Moreover, Russian advances in
rocketry have been interpreted
by the U.S. Air Force Chief of
taff as "an indication" that the
trategit Air Comma wndithin 18
months may have to be put on
a 24-hour "airborne alert."
These developments were dis disclosed
closed disclosed today with the publication
of a 1,017-page transcript of heavily-censored
testimony on the
defense budget at closed hearings
of the House Defense Appropria Appropriations
tions Appropriations Subcommittee.
The transcript indicated that
subcommittee chairman George H.
Mahon (D-Tex.) and other Dem Democrats
ocrats Democrats -were not convinced that
President Eisenhower's defense
budcet is adequate.
Thoy probed for ways to bol bolster
ster bolster U.S. defenses in view of
administration admissions that
Rusisa will outstrip the United
,States in production of .inter-,
continental ballistic missiles in
1960, 1961 and 162.

But .the military officials from

.Defense Secretary Neil H. McLl

roy on down sided with the
President in rejecting a "me-too'

policy of trying to match Russia
missile for missile in the long long-range
range long-range rocket field. They insisted
that the United States, ven aft after
er after surprise attack, would have e e-nough
nough e-nough retaliatory power left to
destroy Russia.
Air Force Secretary James H.
Douglas testified that the Perfa-
(on decided in early February to
isperse its missile launchers "to
create more targets.'
Under the new plan which

Home Articles

FOR SALE: One refrigerator 9
cu. ft., $100.00, telephone Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2-3791.

Miscellaneous

p
FOR SALE: Complete dining dining-room
room dining-room set (mahogany) seats, 8
excellent condition.. Tel. 2-1362.

FOR SALE:' Leaving Isthmus
Kelvinator refrigerator, pantry,
typewriter. Tel. 3-1739.

NEW FLIGHT SERVICE

HONG KONG(UPI) The

Ceylonese government airline, Air
Ceylon, expects to start regular
flights to Red China late this'

year, the company's managing di director
rector director said.

J. L. M. Ferbando arrived here

from the Communist Chinese
Mainland where he and fellow
delegation members signed a bi bilateral
lateral bilateral air agreement in Peiping.

12-31

it's too bad that exercising a
bad temper doesn't improve it.

Douglas asid eould be carried
through without changing the budg
et-HiX launcher, will be isolat isolated,
ed, isolated, instead of set up in clusters

oi mree. mere still mil be nine
launchers to a missile sauadron.

The air chieftain, Gan. Thom Thomas
as Thomas D. Whito, said the ppresenf
alert undor which bombers ara
ready to leave tfta ground on
15 minutes' notice is adequate
for the .paxt 12 to 18 mo.iths
because Russia's attacking pow power
er power is still based primarily on
planes rather than long-range
missiles.
Asked by Mahon how much an

airborne alert would cost, the
Air Force figured it would add

anywhere from $37,000,000 to $1, $1,-156,000,000
156,000,000 $1,-156,000,000 to annual d f e n s e
costs depending on the number
of bombers kept in the air. White
said the administration may call
for funds for an airborne alert in
next year's budget.
If more money were spent for
defense, White suggested there
were better ways to spend it than
for additional long-range missiles.
He observed that an all-out ef effort
fort effort to develop an earth-circling
satellite for reconnaissance over
Russia "might pay us more than
any single thing we can do."

WINS SHOWDOWN VOTE v
TOKYO (UPI) The govern govern-mept
mept govern-mept of Prime Minister Nobusuke
Kishi easily crushed a non-confi

dence motion yesterday with a 253

142 vote in the lower house of

the Japanese diet.

The non-confidence motion was
submitted by the opposition So Socialists
cialists Socialists who charged that the
Kishi administration was respon

sible for th,e severence of rela

tions between Communist China
and Japan.

N York. March 30 (UPI)

Rookie sensation Elgin Baylor has

Minneapolis fans excited today ov over
er over the club's chances of winning
their first National Basketball As Association
sociation Association championship since 1954.
Baylor, with 33 points, outsor-,
ed St., Uuis't power-punch of Bob

squeaker over the .Hawk and the

Western division piayon uvie.

Minneapolis will meat trie win winner
ner winner of Wednesday's Boston-Svra-cuse
Eastern Division final for
th N.B.A. crown. The titl
round will begin Saturday on
th homa court af tha Eastarn
champion;
Svracuse tied the series at three-

nil vesterdav bv beating Boston,

m.121 on the sharpshooting of

Dolph Schayes and George Yard-

ley.
Bavlor. the former Seattle All

America who was the NBA's

"rnnki of the vear" this Season

saw his shooting efforts pay off

as St. Louis' defending champions
outscored Minneapolis 14-4 in the
last five minutes for a near come

back victory.

The teams split the first tour
games. The Lakers surprised ev everyone
eryone everyone by taking a 3-2 series lead
Saturday night by beating tlhe
Hawks in overtime at St. Louis,
the first time the Pettitmen had
been whipped on their home court
in 19 games. It also marked the
first time a home team had lost
in the current final playoffs.
Syracuse, refusing to give up on
the tradition, sent the Eastern fin finals
als finals into a decisive seventh game
with their War Memorial audito auditorium
rium auditorium triumph.
It was th "old pros," Schayes
! VarHley, who turned th
trick for Syracuse. Sehayas, play playing
ing playing with an injured to that al al-o'
o' al-o' sdelin'd Him. scored 39
points, whil Yardly, who play play-ad
ad play-ad all but tha last minute of th
gam, tallied 32.

OSAKA, Japan (UPI) A lead

ing Japanese electrical company
has introduced a transistor idio
that is smaller than a pack of
ordinary-sized cigarettes.
Its dimensions are 2.8 inches
long, 1.7 inches wida and 0.6
inches thick.
The producer of the radio, Mat Matsushita
sushita Matsushita Electrical Industrial Co.,
plans to produce 10,000 sets a
month, chiefly for export to the
United States. The cost will be
about $40 per set.

FOR SALE: Easter bunny, East Easter
er Easter eggs, Easter chicks, all kind
of assortments of fine candies
and chocolates at reasonable price
at Salon Lili, next to Hotel El
Panama.

FOR SALE: Bird every,. an be
used for small animal cage $25.
For yard only. Phono 83-2139.

FOR SALE: Girls 14" Sohwinn
bike. Good condition $15 00,
all Balboa 1432.

FOR SALE: Portable typewriter
wc and Spanish characters $40.
Call Saturday or Sunday, before
5 p.m. 6338 B, Los Rioa, Canal
Zone.

FOR SALE: Hi-Fi stereo com complete
plete complete with cabinets and quality
components for tap and records.
Phone Curundu 2203.

FOR SALE: Limited lots of
smooth faced Terracote Blocks
5 "xl2"xl2" $130.00 thousand
cash 4"xl2"xl2" $104.00.
thousand cash. Alfareria, S.A.
Phone 3-0160.

Boats & Motors

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Lots IO and 1.000
meters, in Hie Nuev Hipodromo
Urbanixarior across the Remoa
Racetrack. All let with street
fronts, sewage, water main and
electricity. Call W. McBamett.
Tl. 4-0976.

FOR SALE: Lot 1,066 square
maters in the best location of
La Cresta, situated between "V"
Street and new street. For infor information
mation information please call Tel. 2-2170
from S a.m. to 12 noon and from
2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

FOR SALE : Completely furnish furnished
ed furnished three bedrooms residence in
El Vail de Anton, with living living-room,
room, living-room, diningroom, terrace, swim swimming
ming swimming pool, 2 bathrooms, kitchen
and additional room with electric
plant. River on property. Tel.
3-1302 and 3-1456.

Motorcycles

FOR SALE: '59 NSU "Super,
fox" 125 cc. '59 Maico "Sup "Sup-ersport''
ersport'' "Sup-ersport'' 175 cc. Excellent me mechanical
chanical mechanical condition, $300 each or
best offer, Balboa YMCA 12-2
p.m. and 6-7 p.m.

FOR SALE: Ariel "Squere
Four" motorcycle (4 cylinders)
in perfect conditions. Call Tel.
3-4796 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Miscellaneous

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A", DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, CX
- PHONE BALBOA 3709

All cameras bald (a ur Repair
Department 90 days after this
publication will be sold at the
cost of the repairs. Kindly call at
our stores for your repaired cam-,
eras as seek a possible. KODAK'
PANAMAHTD. Panama-Colon.

FOR f ALEi-t-A.K.cY registered
jBoxer pups. Calf' Navy J68?

FOR SALE: AKC, blond and
silver cocker spaniel puppies.
Champion and show stock sired
by general-tuff-guy. Call Pana Panama
ma Panama 3-4678.

WANTED

WANTED: Experienced boot
builder, apply at once. .House
Own Streets iatbea.
Phone. 2-4207.

SERVICES

TELEVISION SERVICI
TV. Radios, Hf-Fi Transfers
specialist. We service all make
and models. We don't pretend to
guarantee j work. We
anteest. .-V
, CRAWFORD AGENCIES, TiveB
..Ave. 18-26, Ti. 2-1905.

V ---.
', TV SERVICES
For .Hr Home Serviee, Always
Rely i.v
U.t TELEVISION, i
Phone 3-7607 Panama. Service
from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

WANTED: Chalet A bedrooms,
living rooms, garden. At El Can Can-grejo
grejo Can-grejo or Campo Alegre, up to
$600.00. Phone 3V792d;

WANTED: Bachelor rom ef
srhaH 2 room apartment. Call
S142 (Navy),

FOR SALE: 15 fiber glassed
new runabout remote controls. 30
h.p. Johnson motor, excellent
condition, 2 gas tanks. $500.00.
Fort Clayton 6230.

FOR SALE: 14 foot fibarglassed
plywood runabout, controls, trail trailer,
er, trailer, convertible top and wind windshield
shield windshield $350.00. Phone Balboa
6384.

AROUND TOWN

o

This is the time of year that we

take time out to wish all and sun

dry a happy Easter and a thnst thnst-like
like thnst-like year. At this time when the
whole big world seems on edge, it

is a refreshings thought that men

can take time out to reflect ana
to realize the sacrifice of the man
God for the world. i

c

ommercna

mm

Advertise m this section Ads only cost $0.85 per col. inch
FOR INFORMATION CALL 2-0740

Condolence goes out to the
Campbell family in Colon over
the demise friends, George
Campbell.

A real gone bon voyage party
was given in honor of Mrs. Nata

lia Curtiss Davis last Saturday
evening at the home of Miss Wor

rell of P Street.

The popuar "Nattie," was to

take o the U.S. over the weekend

to meet her hubby in Forida.

Among the many student nurs nurses
es nurses to be graduated in special
ceremonies at the National The Theater
ater Theater in the capital city is Miss
Gloria Blackman, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. J. Murray Black Black-man
man Black-man ef Parque Lefevre.
Congratulations to tha local
Florence Nightengale.

As the pace increased and the

date draw closer for the Club Al-

tamira outing to Puerto Caimito
next Sunday, members of the

group announced that tickets will

be available at No. 1 "Q" street
from Monday, at 4:30 until 7:00

p.m. daily until Friday and all day
Saturday.

Next Friday, Sandra Maria
Thomas, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
George G. Thomas will be observ observing
ing observing her natal anniversary. Con Congratulations
gratulations Congratulations to Sandra.

While of the subject of birth birthdays
days birthdays in line also for greetings are
Mrs. Daisy Lashley on Saturday,
April 4, and Mrs, Olga Tyrell on
Sunday, an evening which she
plans to enjoy at the Altamira Cai Caimito
mito Caimito outing.

The Bartenders and Waiters put

themselves a real swank joint out

on J Street, with all the modern

conveniences for a real dressy

and comfy recreation center ior

nice folks.

Thought For Today: Nothing ts

more simple than greatness, in
deed to be simple is to be great.

ATLANTIC LITTLE LEAGUE
By BERTON CINIV
The Coca Cola Bottlers and the

Legion club met at the Margari

ta playground on Monday, March
23, as the Atlantic Little League
began its last week of the 1959
season.
And what a meeting it was as
the Cokes fielded all of its young youngsters,
sters, youngsters, eight and nine-yeafr-olders
who have sat on the bench uncom uncomplaining
plaining uncomplaining most of the 8eas0&,to do
battle with the; seasoned Gatun Gatun-ites.
ites. Gatun-ites. '-
In what, turned euf'Whe strict

ly mayhem, the Legion let loose

all of its hidden atomic power
to smother the Junior Varsity 2$
to 1, with 25 of the runs being earn earned.
ed. earned. However, such future stars as
Kenny Field, Bobby Griffon, Rich Richie
ie Richie Wainio and Tommy McLean
were given a chance to play.

Only Hollis Griffon, playing short

stop for the first time in nis life,

and young Jim Snyder were able
to hit Wardie Redman, who took

over from Henry Shirk on the

mound m the fourth. Redman, in

cidentally, had a real big day

with a home run, three doubles,

eight runs batted in and scoring

four times himself.

Orrin Clement, with a twe bag'

ger, and Danny Holcomb, one of

Legion's promising youngsters, had

four for five while Jackie Blair

had a perfect day at the plate with

four for four, including a two

base hit. Wally Brians and Shirk

had two doubles and a single and

Lou Austin three for five, all sin
gles.

ine Bottlers committed seven

errors in the field while the Var

sity did not miscue once. Legion
had 27 hits as 42 men officially

came to the plate.
The box scorn

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

Great White Floct
New Orleans Service

Arrive
Cristobal

LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co..
lor rates and Information
Tel. Panama 2-0552
Monday thru Friday
P:M a.m. to 12:0
Z:t p.m. to 5:00
Saturday: 1:0 a.m. to Il.a

REPAIR, SALES 4c
INSTALLATION SERVICE
, RADIOS TV Hl-n
rONO'S RECORDERS
REFRIGERATORS
AIR CONDITIONERS
ALL WASHING MACHINES
SOUND SYSTEMS
COMMUNICATIONS

sth St. na Via Bar
TeL I-T48

AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO S6 Mo.
t 'en new cars
AGENCY DEH LINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-498S
All Types of Auto Insurance

REQUEST GRANTED
BUFFALO, V. Y. (UPI) -Police
said Thaddeus Andrzejak,
24, called the station during an

argument with his wife and
asked to be arrested. Officers

who ffeKnonried to the call com

J plied when they discovered poll

Icy slips in his pocket. He was

lined sioo on the g;amoiing

charge.

Th New
NIKON'
With built-in Universal
Viewflnder System

. Panama Colto

v OUTBOARD MOTOR
REPAIRS
vCaJlL0WE,; S.'A.4. v
Balboa Ave. No. 7 Tel. 2-4616
Authorized service for
Johnson, Evinrude, Mercury.
West Bend, Buccaneer, Elto.

"YAQUE" 4. ....Apr. 4
"MORAZAN" Apr. 11
"I'T.TIA" Anr. 18
YAQUE" Apr. 25
Also Handling- Refrigerated and Chilled Carf

New York Service

Arrivss

" Cristobal
"COMAYAGUA" Apr. S
4'FRA BERLANGA" Apr. 12
'METAPAN" Apr. 19
"SAN JOSE" Apr. 26

CRISTOBALW.C.CJL FEEDER SERVICE
"TEXITA" '. Every (15) Days
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles. San Francisco
and Seattle.
SPECIAL ROUND TRIP PASSENGER FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return 1240.00
To 8an Francisco andOr Seattle and Return . $365.00

TELEPHONES:

CRISTOBAL 2121

PANAMA 2-2904

as Sanders made wholesale
changes in the Elk's lineup.

jonnny banders came out of
the game along with short stoD

Nick Brooks and 'first baseman
Billie Acheson. '

Bob Will moved from risrht to

third, Dick Brooks went in at

short stop, Matt Manning took ov over
er over in center as Ralphie DeBoyrie
took over at first, and Twingo
Brooks filled in at tigth. to the

. Jerry rapon, who has.a,b(J

lee, went taFseeond for Bill e Hon

kins and made the final out by tak

ing uanny noicomD's fj&

Jack Sanders was touched for

five hits and five runs in the two

innings that he worked but show

ed that he is still a control jritcb
er by not walking a man.

Henry Shirk started for Lteion

and lasted until the third when he
came out with two on and nobody

out. Hank has been bothered late

ly by a swollen thumb and it was

evident that it was bothering him
as he passed seven Elk's batters.
He slowed only one hit but the

many waiks Jead to the seven runs

Wardie Redman finally nut out

the fire in the third after giving
up two runs on a walk, a hit bats batsman,
man, batsman, and a double by Georgie
Bedsworth, who caught for1 the

other mm Jfcafnfc. iini
Shirk;swarai&hen' wenPo&toS

nv oi me next six natters 'Oir

stmes.
Lou Austin Redman, and Jack Jack-ie
ie Jack-ie Blair each had two hits with
Lou and Wardie getting doubles
and Jackie a- long triple. Orrin
Clement also had a two bagger.

Preiser yeur fcoin an
ry ajalnrt Intact a
Prompt acientifit treatment m
emergency r monthly feurfflet
batfc Telephone Pronto Service,
Paami777 Colo 1777.

CAMERA 1EPAIRS. All make.

an work guaranteed. Call NAT,

Kigj, Colo 8057, 7tfc St.

Domestic Employment

ag.
J

WANTED: Immediately malf
with references, far American
family, l 3-1566.

Today's Opening
STOCK PRICES

NEW YORK, March SO (UPI1-

Stocks responded to favorable
business news today with a gen generally
erally generally firm movement at the opening.

Gains were small for rh most

part and only a few big blocks ap-

COCA COLA AB R M E
Wainio, lb 10 0 1
Bender, 3b, f 0 0 0 1
Fields, 2b 10 0 2
Williford, 2b 10 0 0
Tobin, p 2 0 0 0
Hutchings, Jb, Jb 2 0 0 0
Conley, c 2 0 0 0
Griffon H., ss 2 0 12
Snyder, cf, If 2 0 10
Griffon B., if 10 0 1
McLeod, 3b 0 0 0 0
McLean, rf 0 10 0
Stanford, rf 10 0 0
Ttls M 1 I 7
LEGION
Clemen, ss 5 4 0
Brians, 2b, c 5 13 0
Blair, c, lb 4 4 4 0
Shirk, p, rf 5 3 3 0
Jackson, rf 0 10 0
Austin, lb, 3b 5 5 3 0
Redman, 3b, lb, 5 4 4 0
Holcomb, rf, cf 5 2 4 0
Coffin, cf, 2b 5 110
Wood, If 3 2 10
Goguen, If 10 0 0
Total 42 28 27 0
Score by innings:
Coca Cola 001 001 2 7
Legion ... 779 528 27 0

The box scorei
ELKS
Will, rf, 3b
Brooks A.i rf
Sanders Ja., 3b, p
Brooks N., ss
Brooks R., s
Sanders Jo., p
DeBoyrie, cf, J
Manning, cf
Acheson, lb
Hppkins, 2b
Pabon, 2b
Fettler, If
Bedsworth,
Totals

LEGION
Clement, ss
Brians, 2b, c
Blair, c, lb
Shirk, p
Austin, lb, 3b
Redman, 3b, p
Holcomb, rf
Coffin, cf, 2b
Wood, cf
Borcellino, If

Totals

AB R H E
110 1
1 0 0 0
2 1 0, 0
.3 X; ll ll-.
. ll-. 0 H

2 1
- 2 1

0
1
0
2
S
17

ATLANTIC LITTLE LEAGUE
Milt Sanders Elks and Cash
Paulson's Legion team played their
last game of the 1959 season on
Wednesday and after Milt and his
coach, Ray Will, had given every

boy on th bench an opportunity
to play when the team got out in

front nine to two, the Elks took

the measure of their friendly arch

rivals front Gatun by a 9 to 7

score. The winners got but two
hits during the five-inning game.
Johnny Sanders, winning pitcher,
hurled three innings and left the
gams leading 9 to 2. Ha allowed
thaiB hit fcll 1ntflA tin nn.

bttA Hit. MM a.aiAAO, Mf wuc
walk, and fanned three. Broker
Jack pitched the fourth and fifth

I
I
.3
3
3
2
2
2
24

1
1
2
0

2

2

0 0

0 0 &
10 0
0 fc' 0
7 If

Score by Innings:

Elks .T A 135 009
Legion 101 147

HONOR A-BOMB DEAD

2' S
B. 1

on the taps.

ACT Ind
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium Ltd.
Amer Cy ana mid
Amer Motors
Amer Tel and Tel
Anaconda Copper
Arkansas Fuel
.AVCO Mfg
Beth Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bicroft Uranium
British Pet
Burroughs
Canadian Eagle
Celanese
, Cerro de Pa sco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler ,-
Cities Service
Coastal Caribe
Creole Pet
Crown Cork and Seal
Cuban Venezuelan Oil
.? EI Paso Natural Gas

..r'awcmid Engine
Fargo Oil

Jelmontret
General Dynamics
General Electric
General Motors
General Plywood
Gulf Oil v
Harsco Steel
Hayden Newport
Howe Sound
Imperial Oil 1
Intl Pet
Intl. Tel an4 Tel
Loriljard
Martin Co.
New Eng Tel and Tel
TJnrfhrrtD Ai

nii WflU-iealnn

Pancoastal
Panylsraef
Pantepec Oil
Phillips Pet
Pur Oil
RCA
Reynolds Miftal
Royal Dutch' Shell
San Jacinto
Shell Transp
Signal Oil and Gas
Sinclair, Oil :(j
SoconyMoblft'
Sperry.Rand"
Standard Oil )SJ
Sterling Precision
Studebaker-Packard
Superior Oil
Texas Gulf Pjods
Underwood.,.' -.r
United Canso : it
US Rubber
US Steel 'Mz?:
Universal Cyclops
Westinghouse Ele
Wheeling Steel;

NAGASKI. Jaoan fUPIi A

repository for the- remains, of 5,500

persons who died nearly U years

ago in the atom bombing of Na

gasaki was unveiled yesterday.-,
On the sround floor el the two-

storied structure v will be placed
the remains of unidentified vic victims
tims victims of the bombine. The second

floor will house statue of Kan
non, Buddhist goddess of mercy.
The building cost $10,000 to con construct.
struct. construct. It was financed by con contributions
tributions contributions from Japanese eivie
groups.

50
40b
lib
18
St
25
9
33H
I3tt
50
Sb
85b
T
42 V
mb
32k
45
48b
60V4
59
1
56
37
11-lft
-35
9
1-28
6b
64b
V 80
'45V4
24
116
38
16
17

38
38 y

84M
'fife;
4
T-18
1
51
46
56
80
43
JOVib
19
36
65b
45
23
51
5
12
1835ms,
, 28b
23
, lb
55
89
3834b
79
55

BLAST AGAINST REDS
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaya
(UPI)-r-The: Mslsyan government
today t Condemned the Chinese y
Communists use, of force in Tibet
to Suppress a' rjevolt. ;
In an official statement, the f&r
elen minister's office said: "We

have hot had much information

on Tibet, ,but it 'is clear now that
the Chinese regime has admitted

thew hasvbeear a revolt we
country v ;
"It is also eleat the revolt kaf
been suppressed with fores and M
appears to be very similar. i U5
ia Hungary.

'4



PAqE NINR

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
tNDAY, MARCH SO.. 1959
l WlLSOMJKXUttG
By GEOJtGK WUNDER I THE STOEY CP MART1U-1MTNR
V Kit AND TH PllATU
4'
AS COWS N, OR.
I RN N0U,TH0U6H, THAT 606
'would be pajmfully tmtuism f
HAf IF WAIT IONS ENOUGH JUlS??"
HE LEABJEO fO COME UEKE TD TELL
THIS SPOT. see
KNOWI
1
tf At WCKMEAB
PRISCTLLA'I POP
A Hen n Him

VOU SEE, MES. WkYME, HE HAS COJFIWdI
1 ID ME THAT HE 1$ V6KYMUCH Ikl LOVE
Oi lif" R&

nil t.wwwiiau --
111 I I MW W, WKw VI 1
M l J WtfAJE. AS YOU MUST HAVE
1 1 I 'GUESSED, I CAME HOT TO I
1 1 J-Pki

' mlmmmmm iiiii nnrj

l vlni I ii I i-T iiWjfJ -h 1

ALU? OCt

irifcion and bi

XOITY MEED.t
i

rT m ''
'.i r :'t v' ..

;jt scrum tv cs rs&xa

Cf MERRILL WLOSSKR

HK5M IQ- S A 60IHCR eVeRf-

BOPf TRIES TO COPT

ANSWERS

and evtRYeooY TOO

PR(HNOl.r HOPlM(3 I'LL DO

r. :

Mmm-awilsom!s
soQsesTioi pax

I SOAEBOOT- WHO SNED THS -
iSVdAccnrtM DeSPEEATE' WeANTS US

lb turn this ito a
r nb DCCOOKinENCE

SCH00&.V

V,

Worst?

f. f, HAMLIN

WELL, HOLLER AN V

CHEER! LOOK ALLEY"

WHO? HEREH OOP, I

A.

HIM-J

ha... i SELH I

S-iC

fiOONESS, B0Y- V YEH! MY YES-AND

YOU AREA COULD IT I GOSH.ZEL. I DOE3KTT TURN UP ITS BAD

SlfaHTJ JU5T BE tOUVEV WHAT A .PRETTY SOON ITS ENOUGH

LIKE YCW JUST COME PEAUJ

HAD A' 1 FROM THE

-7- 7LWI til

JZ

f

jL VERf APT TO A

f ALL SME TALKS ABOUT
i IS GETTING A HORSE x
COD UPC? RIDTUriAYj

I TOMORROW!

PRISCILLA, HONEY

YOU VE JUST

FORSET ABOUT

THAT HORSE

OOT TO J

HYOU KNOW! TWEn

I l nkic rmra ni-! id 1

BIRTHDAY!

t. mi t. n w.i, t.m, .. u.. m. on.

' OH. POP POP!!

THAT'S JUST WHAT

I WANTED!.

BI GS MINN!

0n Good Turn

f HOLD IT, K
yA SYLVESTER I
' YA PROPPEPTH'
I BLUEPRINTS YA I
WAS CMSCfttJ

YA BETTER WATCH
VERS ELF T'DAY...I
HEARD TH' BOSS SAY
ANYBODY CAU6HT I
v LOAFIN' WIU BE J

2 SHALL BE ON I
MY TXSJVNj jW

I SAV-ISN'T THIS

WHAT YOU JUST

CAUTIONED

A6AINST?

3

In Friendly Mood

ftj UMAX MARTIN

pcseves. tcs. OYc. ?ov

1

JTj; 1W by NEA 8tyle, Int. T.M. pn, on,

Suddon Dtith

LESLIE TURNER

f -' n -.. .,-' 1 1 tAi r .u TillB' Z1 MOTmUfi UMl&T I

MARINE PISH
TSli tT THT5

SOUTH AMERWiAM
FRESH W ACT ETZ
CHARAC1NS
(orHakwet fish)
actuallw move
their petorau

PINS UKE VNINOO

TO PUV.

Sims"
'arid EiBht Rrrii

Unioid

tl DICK CAVALLI

I GETTING cJ? fla
I ABSENT-1 4
VMINlW OSftl
ciL
ijl) im y tA (m. T.M. U.. PH. (X).

"SC"",ir,w6 pcwerpul. reiTORAu :
- C m22lEsC?5 op total -VMgl
"W NEEDEO TO PO THIS OMB THEM A
5 STRANSB HATCHET-UKE LOOVC.

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Cathraith

OUf BOARDINU HOUSE

wttk MAJOR ROOPIJI OUT OUR WAf

BE J. K WILLIAMS

SCENE-. A CHALLENfie HURLED AMD A

UALLSNS APPSPTED' VET THE ONB IS A mONbTEK

flFA MAN AND HIS OPPONENT 1 A MERe rrnKxlcoMio,

tUKt tliHX UAS AflOUT AS Umt fMAJCE AS A 6LIN4-U5S DAVID

P3lUA ASAINST GOLIATH; THE- UOCh T THINK. UKJN IT.1H& MCKtr

CrSr rrOuTKASES MY SCNSB OF FAIR PLAY UM-Wy;.'-

I iT""4"

-V 50ME0N& MUST STOP IT

fS'akV-. g -that'll Kesrvou WHAT PIP YOU
i$tm XTV.TH6RB TtLL I SEE U WAWT IN HER A
SGl V WHAT YOU WERE -s ROOM?' JZ
V3QGK' VpoiM IN MY f JZ,
"Sja A NTWHY POl'T YOU AST
JTl 1 Xr'" A WHUT PIP SHE WAMT I
A' ; IMMYPOCKITf. ITS
aSdJfjL tALLUSMtSHESlTS
IT) 1 AWAY WITH MURPER- 1 Off
lAO

It3 "Nt T.M. U.S. PitToHN.
J-' 1

!? 1 1 ') ft 9d

T.M H
( IH NIA tanilM. K"

"See! He holds the hoop and I jump through itl"

! "Yiou don't -rrvnjf'a. little competition, do you?M

"If an army, marches on Us stomach, I guess our kid
can manaee to get an education the same way!

PANAMA
KINGSTON
(Jamaica)

ir

A

. Tayt
.,-' i I
3:00 CFN N$WS . 1 3
3flS Billy Dalileli u
4 : i 1'miirj
4:30 Mr. WInrd ;
5.0 Boy Rogers f.
5:.T PANORAMA
7:00 Clrnw Room Cxmern:
General Math No. J (

JV Program

7:.t0 Four Star Anthology
1:00 Guy Mitchell
1:30 Movie Time:
Rhapsody In Blu
11:00 CFN NEWS
11:15 Inc: Voice of Ftvestone
and Schlltz Playhouse

Courtey of Aetovlas Panama Atrwaft'
PHONES: PANAMaI 3-1057 a-1698 3-1 699

OFFICE HCURSrSfrom 8 a.m,' to 6 p.m

!4

0 Jfc). Panama 1090 Xa. Colon

o'i
tiJ



' 1

. ' s H '..i'hx m j-. ',;,'' '. ' v J i '
i!Wy 'Calhoun-tietigh ft

ODO
.,'(.

v J- .'.-km h

se
fyuu iiury on page Q ;

II B M--MW

VV If.

. jk.,
i-'i

I
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I I
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if i
II ; 1
in i .null in ii in i mi mini i mini mum I i in i in j iDiiii. i i iiiii in nwii nun i mi in n i "T i niin.i.i nm i mi il

JASPiR SAILS AWAY Crew members of the USS Jasoer.

past 12 years, line up on the ship's decks for a last goodbye. The
fii;,wiH be decommissioned and sold. (Navy Photo)

ISS Jasper Casts Off Last

leister Fired Shot In Anger;

rij&tsadiaf 'i.iaftwell salute to
the: home port she had known for
more than a decade, the Uhh Jas Jasper,
per, Jasper, 'the" Navy's "workhorse" in
the -'Panama area, this morning
steamed' away from a Zone pier
for the last time
The Jasper cast off its lines
from a Coco Solo pier at 10 a.m.
tftWf headed ior her new, and final,
dutyt station, Norfolk, Va. She is
traveling with the USS Nipmuo, a
fleet 'ttfg with three barges in tow.
During; the Navy ship's 12-year-tbur
here!, the Jasper accomplish accomplished
ed accomplished nearly every task except the
eoe f or which she was designed
enjsing submarines.
' ;?erhapj the Jasper's most gal gal-apt
apt gal-apt gesture while here was the
lea rescue of 18 crewmen off the
Colombian schooner Gloria five
AST DAY!
pM 4:00 6tf0
75 .40
9:00 p.m.
. ,TH LOVE
1HAI WAS
FORBIDDEN
itHEtlHIURITl BEST-SELLER
IS ON THE SCREEN!

(LJ

r

I1' $h pSl
' 1 j f I
-f -amniMMiDim. S
4i"ii tmm tiv A.:
4 mn HuaER FrjE2
lewis i AX
: tea
WEDNESDAY 0

' j
Yi Yf I ii' Ml"-'
I-UHjiJ Newman
V Sff in JOANNE
zJl Woodward
1 i:W "0LUKS
v Vr"f a JACK
. .:,7& COLOW by Dt LUXE
h 1rll"

years ago. Jip'GloAa wm fl5uhd
ering in a storm in nearby Atfan-
tic waters, her food, fuel and wa water
ter water gone, when the Jasper answer answered
ed answered the SOS.
The Jasper also served as the
rescue vessel for a Panama Na National
tional National Guard launch, which had
been drifting for four days on a
trlP"brt fr?IH he pent I colony
at Coma.
Routine duties included an an annual
nual annual voyage to Portobelo, to take
VIP guests to the festival of the
Black Christ. Boy Scouts used her
on indoctrination cruises. During
the Armed Forces Day obstrv obstrv-ance.
ance. obstrv-ance. this year,,. the. Jasner had
the boy and" girt "Admirals for a
Day" aboard.
Her services have not gone with without
out without notice. In 1957, the Jasper won
the coveted battle efficiency "E"
for excellence in her class. She al also
so also received the "E" in 1955.
Though equipped as a killer
craft, the Jasper has remained a
true lady of the sea through her
18-year career. She has never fir fired
ed fired a shot in anger, and most prob probably
ably probably never will. The Jasper is oe oe-mg
mg oe-mg shelved. After reaching Nor Norfolk,
folk, Norfolk, she will be decommissioned
and sold by the Navy.
The commanding officer, U.
Robert; R. Robertson, and his
crew members will be reassign-,
ed to new duty stations.
Panama and the Canal Zone will
remain a prominent part of these
men s personal lives, as weil as
the Jasper's history. ''
HITS AGREEMENT
v T0I (UPI North Viet
Nam lharged today that Japa Japanese
nese Japanese plans to pay World War II
indemnities to South Viet Nam
was part of a VS. plot and said
that it would not recognize any
Japan-South Viet Nam reparations
agreement.
The statement was issued by
the North Viet Nam Foreign Min Min-ltry
ltry Min-ltry in Hanoi and reported by
the New China News Agency
Jhfux ?ateiTent "reiterated
(North) Viet Nam's non-recognition
of the Japan-South Viet Nam
agreement on war reparations,"
the agency said.
The Andes Mountain ex.
(tend more than 4,500 miles
I from the shores of the Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Sea to the southern tip i
of South America. They form
the longest unbroken wall of'
mountains far the world. Snow Snowcapped
capped Snowcapped peak range from 6,000
to 22,000 feet Mount Acon Aconcagua,
cagua, Aconcagua, fori the bprdet between
Chile and Argejntmai Is the
highest me-imtaut in the West West-era
era West-era Hemisphere. It reaches
22,835 feet above sea leveL

6 QnejNilepedU. Brltaanlea

Navr Batrol craft which has served
Jasper tailed from Coco Solo this
Panama Line;
USS Falcon
Answering c a Question otir what
he would re'member about his du duty
ty duty herp, one of the Jasper's sail
ors, George T. Aller of Des Moines
Iowa, replied, "I will remember
Panama mostly for the climate.
the good times and the people."
His sentiments were reflected
by Lt. (jg) John R. Muller, en engineering
gineering engineering officer, who remarked
that he would remember "the Pa
namanian people and their wav
of life, the music and the beauti beautiful
ful beautiful country of the Interior."
The Jasper had Coco Solo for
a home port when she arrived
in 14. In November, 1957, she
moved to Rodman Naval Sta Station.
tion. Station. Though' the "Jaisoer is homeward
bound today, her pier at Rodman
is not deserted. Another trusty
craft, the USS Falcon, a coastal
minesweeper ana a comparative
youngster at four years of age,
arrived last month to take nn
where the Jasper left off.
Ui tV 1 1-?ft
' The suvest way to losse ridte
is to tell them somethmg for their
J CMC
PRESIDENTE
Theatre (No. 1 Peru Ave.)
NOW PLAYING!
IMS J. MTHM RANK OMAMMTION fM
DIRK EOGARDE
BRIGITTE BARDOT,
The Sensational
French Sex-Pot,
In The Most Amusing
Comedy of the Year!
PLUS:
; WALT DISNH&'S
"ALASKA ESKIMO""
In Technicolor!
Academy Award .Winner!

VliT V WON J

-in. Canal Zone waten for the

morning ior Norfolk, V., where
Veteran
Taking Duties
CARLOS KIAMC0
Carlos Kiamco
Named Finalist
For Scholarship
A senior at Balboa High School
is representing the Canal ?one in
a competition for five college
scholarships offered each year by
tbe-Armco Foundation, Inc. of
Middleton, Ohio, to high School
seniors planning careers in civil
engineering.
He is Carlos F. Kiamco, a honor
student and son of Ireneo Kiamco.
Kiamco Sr., is an engineer and a
member of the faculty, of the Uni University
versity University of Panama; ; ; ;
s ' vn-
The Bfelboa High School senior
Is one of 34 finalists from the con continental
tinental continental United States, Hawaii,
Puerto Rico, and the Canal Zone.
He was selected by the Canal
Zone Society of Professional Engi Engineers,
neers, Engineers, an affiliate of the National
Society of Professional Engineers.
The national group is administer administering
ing administering the program, at the request of
theArmco Foundation.
The Canal Zone's representative
in the nation-wide competition is
vice president oi me uaiooa, rugn
'School -chapters of the National
Honor Society and the National
Math Honor Society.
With the rank of cadet lieutenant,
he is a platoon leader for the Jun Junior
ior Junior ROTC. At the recent annual
Field night, he1 was awarded a sa sabre
bre sabre as the best platoon leader. He
is also a member of- the Student
Council for the High School.
He was born in Panama City and
will be 1 years old in May.
Dulles In Florida
To1 Recuperator
Decide On Future
WASHINGTON, March 30 (UPI
Secretary of State John Fos Foster
ter Foster Dulles flew to Florida today
to recuperate from massive ra radiation
diation radiation treatments for cancer and
to ponder a decision on whether
to remain in the Cabinel.
accompanied by his wife a doc

Japanese Floating Fair Docks
At Balboa Aboard Atlas Maru

The 10,000 ton Japanese motor motor-ship.
ship. motor-ship. Atlas Maru, a unique float float-in
in float-in industrial faie, docked at Rat
boa yesterday iff' its long swing"
through major Litin American
,AH holds .ot tne vessel nave'
been converted to; exhibit pavil
ions containing samples of the
vast range of products manufac
tured in modern Japan.
Balboa is the twelfth port tht
Atlas Maru has visited en its
Latin American tour.
Her last port was' Barranquilla.
Colombia. Vron Balboa the float
ing fair will travel to Acapulco,
Mexico, San Francisco, Honolulu
and finally back to Japaji.
A large special staff for the
trade fair travels byyair between
ports, and is on hand to answer
visitors questions, whether in
Spanish or English.
Stiichi Sataki, Ctnoral Man Manager
ager Manager of tho floating fair, said
tht Japanese Embassy tonight
will bo tho host for a spocial
! qe "-'an. aboar'' ho
Atlas Maru. Guests will be Pa Panama
nama Panama and Canal Zone govern government
ment government officials as well as mem members
bers members of the diplomatic corps.
Icy Strait Delays
Ship Race To Open
St. Lawrence River
MONTREAL, March 30 (UPI) (UPI)-The
The (UPI)-The British freighter Manchester
Mariner and the German ship
Volumnia were, in a 'race today
to become the first ship to doclc
here direct frpm overseas since
the St. iwrp""'? Rivrr- trn'e o o-ver
ver o-ver nearly three montjis ago.
But heavy ice on the Cabot
Strait, in the Atlantic at the en entrance
trance entrance to the Gulf of St. Law Lawrence,
rence, Lawrence, dashed hopes that the
1959 shipping seaon would open
tpday.' The winner is not now ex expected
pected expected to" arrive until late this
week.
Port of Montreal officials had
figures on the first ship docking
todav. arH pJsnnpH rincksidp '?r '?r-emonles
emonles '?r-emonles in which the captain
would be presented with the tra traditional
ditional traditional award of a gold-topped
cane. J
An official season opening to today
day today would have tied an early rec record
ord record set in 1954 and resulted in a
cT-,. jr-orrT .''"v rr-' r"r'
which the harbor nearly 1,000
miles from the sea was closed.
The Volumnia, owned by the
almost 24-hour lead over other
contenders fn-tlhe race.
Hawaii Exoected
To Vote 10-1
For Statehood
. WASHINGTON (UPI)-i-Hawat-lan
Delegate John A. Burns pre predicted
dicted predicted yesterday that the islands'
175,000 registered voters would
vote 10-1 in favor of statehood.
Burns also said that -Hawaii's
present j appointed governor, New
York;born Williams F. QuitthV'fold
him last week he would, schedule
Hawaii's' first national fttmary
elections for the. third veek in
June and General elections for
the third week in Julys
Hawaii will elect a new gov
ernor, a state cabinet, two na
tional senators and one House
member. The primary 'must be
held .within 90 days and the final
elections within 130 days after the
vote on statehood.
Quinn has yet toformally call
for the statehood referendum, an
action that must be taken within
30 days of. March 18, the day
President Eisenhower signed the
Hawaiian biaienooa am passed
bv Consress. .
Burns, Hawaii's last non-voting
delegate to Congress, said ne
planned to be a candidate for one
of the Hawaii s first elective ot
fices. He said he had not yet de
cided which one.
,4
A .villi liuur !?
t

P- iv f t s

FECT FURLOUGH,", coming WEDNESDAY .at
CENTRAL Theatre! The riotous story of the Army's
champion wom'anchaser, chosen by 104 love-starv-
..;..'$. to $iiidfateMl6)iakfafari$ktth two

delicious dames; '. tentphy Xlj&TIS and Janet
LEIGH, with Lmd?ClSTAK$:in "THE PERFECT
FURLOUGH",.. CinemaScope and Color, too.;

A private previevi for Import-

export -.representatives will be
held tomorrow and the fair will
Ai.' .il , ,, a
oe open to wt, general puouc ne ne-ginrjlng'ednesdaj;.
ginrjlng'ednesdaj;. ne-ginrjlng'ednesdaj;. i
Army Has Openings
In Finance Corps
For Reservists
Department of the Army has
announced that applications are
being accepted for a limited num
ber of reserve commissions as
first and second lieutenants in
the finance Corps, with a con concurrent
current concurrent call, to active duty.
Reserve officers not on active
duty, who meet the requirment
may volunteer for active duty
under this program.
To be- eligible an applicant
must have a master's degree in
accounting, business administra
tion, commercial science or eco
nomics; or he should now be eh
rolled in a t. course leading to
such a degree. Department of
the Army will consider requests
to waive the master's degree re
quirement when an applicant has
other compensating qualifications,
but such applicants must hold
baccalaureate degrees.
Full1 Information and instruc
tions on submitting applications
can db ODiainea mrougn uie V V-S.
S. V-S. Army Caribbean Adjutant Gen General's
eral's General's Office, Fort. Amador.
GrQveside Service
For Mr. Scanlon
Sef At Corozal
Graveside funeral services will
be held at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow
at Corozal cemetery for James
,M. scanlon,- retired Canal em em-siloye?
siloye? em-siloye? who Hiied Thursday morn morning
ing morning at Gorgas Hospital.
The graveside services will be
conducted by the Rev. James E.
Power, of St. Mary's Church.
Mr. Scanlon was employed by
the Canal organization from 1919
until his retirement in 1945, most
of this time at Mindi Dairy. He
W9 a foreman at the tim of his
retirement; T T :
Weather Or Not
This weather report for the 2
hours ending 8 a. m. today Is
prepared by the Meteorological
And Hydrographic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATUR&:
High 0 M
I- LOW 75 78
HUMIDITY
High ........ 88 80
Low 48 67
WIND:
(max. mph) N-19 N-82
RAJN (inches). o T
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 78 i
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake
Madden Dam
. 83.77
231.36
BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, MARCH tl
HIGH
Time
8:52 a.ni.
9:17 p.m.
Ht.
14.t ft.
13.9 ft.
LOW
Time
2:09 a.m.
3:11 pjrt.
Ht.
6.5 ft.
1.1 ft.
VH
LViwovni
'

I t 1

1

i

TOP: MARTNlR R1TRF fieri Panrfrilnti To'a

of. the Marine Corps, arrived at Albrook Air Force Base yester.
day afternoon for a three-day visit. He was scheduled to makt
official calls on inilitary and Zone government heads, and to'
Inspect military facilities, on both sides of the Isthmus. The'?
general is shown, with Rear Admiral George Wales, center, corn.. 1
mandant of the Fifteenth Naval District, and Cel.1 A". KriencUer Z
who is traveling frith Pate. ; '(Navy Photo)'

Taylor Suggests Cuban Revolt Could;
Tngger Mpfiyak 1 1 iti Latin America i

WASHINGTON, March 30 (UPI)
Gen. Maxwell Taylor, U.S. Ar Army
my Army Chief of Staff, has told Con
gress the recenti Clibaft revolu
tion could be the begmnmg bf a
series of upheavals in Latin A
merica.
of explosions" throughout most of
i.aun America. 11 tney develop developed,
ed, developed, he said, they would give the
communists a chance to move
in. '
TavTrni mA fho fDtomoTito.
during recent closed-door hearings
oeiore tne fiouse Appropnaoons
committee. His testimony w a s
made public today.
The testimony showed- that Ar.
my officials listed the Revolt led
oy r mei Castro as one ot is "re
gional
ra 1.1 m iron Ufa..1
Which
.....nm .in. J ; TV 1 1 1 1.(1
have. occurrfdisajc World iiWr
TT: ThtV nffir.iAlB maia tliove. i annul.
ed need to maintain U.S. mill.
tary strength. : e
Democratic Representative
George Mahon asked Taylor
whether the Cuban revolution had
any significance for either the U
nited "States, ot Russia. l:
"There could be ihdirectlv."
Taylor replied. '"That, could' he
the starting point of a series of
governmental upheavals in the
Latin American area of which
the Communists could take im
mediate advantage and in the
long run build .up a secondary
iront. .
"I do hot place Castro in either
camn. T do not mak any asser
tions with Tegard to that. The on
ly thing that I have to say with
regard to the Castro-Batista mat matter
ter matter is that it is a war. There is
no such thing as an, unimpor unimportant
tant unimportant wa$ in the world npw,''
"Throughout most of Lafi'n &
merica there are possibilities of
explosions, some purely in the
form of civil war, some in the
form of wars across frontiers, be
tween neighbors."
Mahon askprt- "Tiiii th jtlro nf
our army or the nuclear deter deterrent
rent deterrent or anv nf thnse tartars have
anything to do with limited war
Number 18, the war between Fi Fidel
del Fidel Castro against Batista?"
"I would say our overall strat strategic
egic strategic deterrent strength is always
present as a political factor
throughout the. .world regardless
of what"ii(happaifi ,i Taylor
said "WhoiV T' itrc th' 1 m nmi.
tanee bf limited Var I certainly
recognise tnB eontinuou require
ment ror mis nmoreiia- or protec-
weapons. Dealing with, something

DOUBLE PROGRAM RELEASES

Picture 1:48, ff:00 8k0.75
fir
GEORutMDER-JomA mii
BRIAN KEITHr VIRGINIA Tltlff 1

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like the affairs ifl Cuba, wfiich if
revolution or subversionthe type
ui inmg mat nas occurred at ma-
hi,;ia1u..k1.... .... .
wra piatjss-we see primari primarily
ly primarily an army requirement relatea
w sustained cfimhsf An th
ground," which is an army task;.
I ami not anptrpstina thn- .!
American' army function in the
v,uoa anair, nut army forces
have-" been the deciding factor."
TODAY CENTRAL
LAST DAY!
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