The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02834

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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, . PANAMA, It MONDAY, riBRUARY 23, 1958 WTK CPTW f
Ii!liDIrDtssli Liikf
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ills

V!ntrml Avenue todiv had tht look of a bit city In the United States on Washington's Birth-

day- ft traditional date for atores to offer mid-winter bargains to office and industrial workers

on the loose for tne honaay. ;
Todav ahonneri seemed In a harry. te catch up after Friday afternoon's and Saturday

morning's nut down. And 300 passengers oft a cruise ship were due early this afternoon.

f Both novelty shoos and cantinaa welcomed jump-booted paratroopers here from the States

for Just-concluded Operation Banyan Tree. There were other Canal Zone military men, some in

anitorm, some not. :,"'?'r".'

- 1 ' (NEA Telephoto)
; i h .1.1 .imKft 10 nrnrlfft

rHE FAYBOLIi Steven r'i otZ?l

ils-father Ret). Steven uariei.-'-vu-xww v ,r
irietoS office T Young Carter is on the government payroll
JJJS? 1 .-ti Vartw hired his son to handle his

o relaWons The college student is the highest paid em-
rei. ,r"irl -J. i. T is nnt. imsual for members of

4$ relatives to worlc for JSr rtuft many

j -veteran vjongressiuca

.1.

tliHcal Kinfolk Aides

ressional

Fire

lfw,TTWi'rfM'WtIFt' fiouse

licta .-Ladrv CbrVs A.

It said yesterday i ne
a Swrens ongresamefl
their xelativet idei, Jr
- THian& Reoublicas om-

. tfc "current Juror ever

akr .-putting

,and otner xeiauv yu
payroUs.ta radio inter inter-Ciutuai
Ciutuai inter-Ciutuai w Reporters floufld-

' -Iba : knew ef

i An their ; staffs

L.m itaMses where they

U-. rv well" in setting

lent help tsrwm, inew .iumi.
L rvrmment on COB'

R Bra J 1

f4nAs to hir an additional

kalaried assilstant. bik oierv oierv-Lvnot
Lvnot oierv-Lvnot no -maior chanees li

Lcme-stainding practice of hir

belatives.

nmon Mitckine House pay-

records found that at least 10

members of the uouse nave

i relative for their nices,
fding one congressman whose
nmJtt m : was out on the

fcUsi : mt sMi noo a vear. Further,

records js&owea, max, .. at

U the raeanbera wno won re re-tion
tion re-tion last-November bave per per-L
L per-L n4u v aom last names on

. -navmiij. That fisure is only

Ugh estimate, because it does
show 'ibe relatiyei wh,o hv

terent last names.

Crowded Centre! Avenue Celebrates

Nontniryu Washington s Birthday

busc Demo Seeks

lblic

irASHINGtON, Teb. 3-TFI)

. House Democrat Touay uu-
i n riimct the Presi-

hVu council of economic ; advij

to hold pubUC neanngs
ce and wage increases "which

U. t threaten" the nation i

i1

momic siaoiuiy.

aep. Henry S. NKeuss i"-w-
I 4 also would spell

t in more detail goals of the em-

wmfent aM m iM ana reuuue-

Unta fni th nrcsident's economic

. t -n-nlH makit

itt-bUitv and sustained eco-

nuc' grvwut ipecuw tuv" .-t
A Harvard University economist

iA -vitmrAv that the admuus

ation is uuttine too much empha

k on fighting M and too

tie on achievlnz maximum co-

Imie '-arrowth. :T v.

Dr. Sumner Hichter said on a

lvision Troeram f NBC-Meet

be Press) that it is impossible v to

hriieve the. maximum growth of

hico the nation is capable with with-it'
it' with-it' herring -some inflation.
Commerce Secretary Lewis 1 L,

trausa.aDnearins on another TV

ro-Rram also predicted that l9S
ouki be considerably better than
758. Her forecast "noticeably At-

reased -unemployment" beginning

'v April rit seasonal, factors pre-

Strauss' Virned v that f 4.500.600

American worKfTs jods are enain

ered by the Soviet trade war.

About years ago, -more pre

cise' surveys showed that 90

Bouses 'members -and 28 senators
hvwt close relatives on their staffs.

ne M-iinat -appearea endan-

eeiea y me publicity wuld, al allow
low allow House members to cmnlov a

$14,16ar a year aide. The top .pay

iot House Stan memoerr now is
$13,M4 a year, compared t $!,-

.w ior senationai assjstang. ,Th

same bW was before the House
last year, but failed tor-art vth

flow for1 action,? j

USS Jasper Due

To Leave Zone

For Mothballing

ine us Jasper, .headed tnr

mothbaUs, wUl bid f areweU to the
Canal Zone this spring.

weaaea ior new acxipnmAnt- .t

the same time will ba her fmir

onicers.

Li Robert R. Rdbertunn 3r th

Jasper's captain,,has been named
to the faculty of the U.S. Naval
Academy. He will leave tn if9

following decommissioning of his

buip mi juaypon,. ia,
, Lt (jg) Keith B. Hanlon will be

aetacned to inactive duty In
March. The Jasper executive offi

cer pians to seme in St. ptr

burr. Fla.

Lt. (jg) Michael J. Nash, Jasper
gunnery officer, has orders to the
destrbyer USS Forrest Royal at
Newport, R.I.
Lt fg) John R. Mullen win m

to duty on the staff of the First Na-

v-i iisinci ai Boston, Mass.

Panamanians likewise were

out in volume. Some workers

had failed to set their pay. or

come of lt, on Saturday. This

was due partly to the general

strike, oartlv to the banics nav

ing : closed for the national

mourning on tne oay.oi tne
funeral of President Urnesto de
la Ouardia's mother. ;t v--

The' German flan passenger

shlix Berlin docked in Cristobal

with a load oi states tourists
early' today. w

Oyer 300 passengers board boarded
ed boarded ft special- train bound for
ft ferry trip through GaiUard
Cut. .This was; to M followed
by shopping and sightsee sightsee-inr
inr sightsee-inr tour around Panama City.

Otherwise the Isthmur was

auiet. esoeclallv the Canal Zone,

where no serious accidents, had

been reported up to noon.

Picnics were the orcer i

the holiday. The Sunday School

front the Balboa. Heiehts Bap-

l...' ...L i J"L-ji.v-''

U8b inurcn was ua.vuiK eue ni
Summit Gardens; a' big group

from Faraiso was eaunr and

eniovlng events at the Pedro

Miguel Athletic Held.

Meanwhile A united Press

International dispatch from

Washington said bargain-hunt

era stormed the- V canltal's

f a m'n n G eorg a- Wh it ena

birthday, sales, today like the

British charging Bunker Hill.

: To the hardy and the a a-tlent
tlent a-tlent went the spoils 3 cent
sunglasses, 99 cent auto tires,
$3 washing machines and 22
cent power mowers.

One of the most sought-after

bargains ; was a 1951 Chevrolet
at the "carry away price of 99

cents. The advertisement didn't

explain -what fcarry away

meant. But In previous years

similarly-priced autos had to be

towed from the lot.

An extra police detail wcis as

signed to the downtown area
to break un traffic jams. A

group of detectives circulated

among the mobs to nab shop

lifters. The crowd was swelled

by- government, bank and school

employes, whoso offices were
shut.

Shoppers came from as far

away as 100 miles to buy 1 cent

boats (you had to purchase a

new rord first, or course), 69

cent, auw radios -and 99 cent

suitcases. For those who Weak-

Hew Rodman Doctor

ened in the face of the stam

peding hordes, there was $2.22

gin and 11 cent aspirin.

Many of the bargain-hunters
began lining up in front
of the stores last night with
blankets and thermos bottles
of hot coffee to ward off the
40 degree chill.

The champion line-waiter

was 62-year-old W. Townsend
Raolee who set uo cam.i in

rront of one store Friday night.

eu nours Deiore tne sale began.

witn a cnair, books, blankets

ana otner comiorts or home.
He wanted a 99 cent typewriter.

Mac Khrushchev
Meet Initiates

Treaty

Cultural

Britain Replacing
Havy Vilh A-Age

Fleet

Fifth Army Plans
Reserve Unit Shift
In 13-Slafe Area;

CHICAGO. Feb. S3 (UPIV- The

Fifth Army today planned reas

signment of some reserve officers

and enlisted men to reinforcement

and control units as part or a in

state reserve unit reorganmuon.
Lt. Geo. William H. Arnold,
Fifth Army commander, said "on "only
ly "only limited loss of personnel" is an

ticipated in realignment to match

the army's new five-group "pen

tomic structure.
One-fifth of present reserve u

una wm uv .euniiuaoeu( lie aiu,
while others will be relocatad and

many will receive new designa

tions.
In an effort to minimize the re

organization s impact on manykne Canal Zone by his wife Joanne

vumiiiuuiuM, m iu, personnel

wne lose a ready reserve unit as

signment will be transferred to
reinforcement training units, con

trol groups, the standby reserve,
or if eligible, the retired resrv.
States included in the Fifth Ar

my area are -UinOisIndiana, Wis Wisconsin,
consin, Wisconsin, Michigan Minnesota, Iowa,
MlfiBmiri Vq.i.i KTk-.Rv xt.i

Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado

A World War II merchant mari

ner who had his shin, sunk from

under him is the new doctor at the
Rodman Nava Station,
Lt.' Ralph D. Comer, veteran of
therBattle- of ;the -Atlantic 'tt a
purser" ana pharmacist aboard lib liberty
erty liberty ships, arrived aboard the Gib Gib-bing
bing Gib-bing Feb. 6 from Portsmouth, Va.
The new assistant medical offi officer
cer officer was rescued in 1946 when the
ship he was aboard split in two
after-, striking Goodwin Sands, a

sand bar off Dover, England.

.The masts of at least 50 ships

are visible at low tide above the

notorious sand trap, according to

Dover fishermen.

Conner, 31, is a graduate of the

Medical College of South Carolina.
He completed his internship at the

U.S. Naval Hospital at Ports

mouth. He has been in the Navy
two years and one month and
plant to make it a career.

A. native of Kansas City, Mo.,

Dr. Comer was accompanied to

Capacity Crowd Attends Farewell

or Local Salvation Amy Captain

A capacity crowd turned out.lt

night, at the Salavation Army Pa Pa-namaity
namaity Pa-namaity Corps ir. Guachapali to

oia isreweu 10 tne sectional Youth
Rhodes, who after more than two
years on the Isthmus is returning
to her homeland Canada after five
years in the West Indies, includ including
ing including two in Jamaica.

!Ud by sectional officer Mai. and

Mrs. J. Sundberg and supported
by Maj. and Mrs. W. Bishop and
Envoy Moseley. representing Fa Fa-raisO
raisO Fa-raisO corps, tribute, was paid to
Rhodes, a popular youth worker.
Groups from Rio Aba jo,, and Pa Panama
nama Panama sang, spoke and. .presented

41. t n.l.lt- ik

tain for her zeal and work in train training
ing training centers of the Salvation Ar

my as "well a at Vacation Bible
School 'held in 11 Centers on the

Txlhmus for the last two summers.

C. E. Tabt represented friends

on the Canal Zone Pacific side and
the Rev Elmer O. Nelson spoke

for the clergy m Manama aao

Canal Zone. v
t A vocal duet by the A 1-c Rus

sell Haimsburzer and 'Selections

were bv Panama City Corps song'

iters and the band in addition to
BTOup-singing by a number of

vmin. Dcoole. vi

t Mrs. Bishop, offered a dedica dedication
tion dedication prayer for the newly-woovat-d
hall and youth center of the

comm.. Cant.- Hohodes exwessed

her sratefulriess'r and" said she

hopcx to return, to tne w. mates or

ranama after her fiirimicrh Wv r.

nada.

She will leave from ryiianhi

"Wednesday for New : York after

wnicn sne wm fly to Toronto.
Caiptl Shirley Cox of th East-fn

United States, who has .been ap appointed
pointed appointed to succeed Capt, Rohodes
as sectional youth officer, is slated

to arrive sometime next month

from Jamaica where she has been

stationed at headquarters and the

institute ior the Blind as teacher

for blind handicapped children.

LONDON, Feb. 23 (UPIV- Bri

tain is rapidly scrapping her obso

lete World War II Mavy and re

placing it with a smaller, stream

lined atomietage fleet, the govern

' The Earl of Selkirk, First Lord
of the Admiralty, announced in a

government White Paper that in
the five years ending December
i960, new shups reaching the Navy

will include one aircraft carrier,
three cruisers, 24 anti-submarine

frigates, eight anti-aircraft frigates
13 submarines and 109 minesweep minesweepers
ers minesweepers and small craft.

The total cost of the Navy this

year, the White Paper announced,

will be $1,218,149,600. That is near nearly
ly nearly $88 million more than last year.
'IThey Navy is passing through
a period of rapid technical change,

the White Paper declared. "The
large number of ships and their

weapons, built for the most part
durine the last war to meet the

need of theii time, are being re

placed by a fleet smaller in size,
but designed and equipped to meet
future conditions of Naval war warfare,"
fare," warfare," The White Paper said work will
start this year on three of four
planned guided missile destroyers.

MOSCOW, Feb. 23 (UPI) Russia and Britain

agreed today to begin, work on a new cultural affairs

treaty linking the two nations.

British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan and Soviet

Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev decided at their first formal

conference to put the job of writing a cultural agree-

mem m rne nanas or a special committee, authoritative
sources said.

Creation of the committee was the first concrete result
of Macmillan's summit visit to Moscow. The two leaders

conferred for tw6 hours and 25 minutes.

The opening of the Little Summit talks in the Kremlin
coincided with the 41st anniversary of the Soviet ArihV

and Navy. The official Communist Party newspaper

rravaa usea rne occasion ro warn the West against start starting
ing starting a war. It also criticized the aareement rearhfxT i

Cyprus laslweek by Britain, Turkey and Greece.

?Nr'n,' .kP,n w'm Mac
i'!' jPIre.ch to hi.
rtconna Usance" miion
Moscow siirca his arrival t Viw
jc.v.Airp,portn,whff

s. Macmillan thenwntj VKbrushchev, Demit Tmt; v'

'?unTh,nCrence table Bus-
wft'h hLBrrSh Prima mMst hd
with him Foreign Secretary
wyn Lloyd, and' Eg&J
Moscow Sir Patrick Reilly Ex. ",
cept for interpreters, no rae else
was persent. e "f8?, t
Macmillan and Khrushchev early'
5n J tV Russian baritone "hi' T
sang a folk song and the EneUsh' -'anguage
ballad "If I Loved 1 YoU?T-:,
They watched ice skaters on" a
?SLrb3J,,ke aund weatM sfSfS -nde.
At lunch the chiefs of gov government
ernment government offered toasts in cham-
forfh6"8!" jokes 13-
sSesmaanCCOrdlng t0 Briti

The two

Macmillan and Khrushchev met
in the premier's office in the Coun Council
cil Council of Ministers' conference room.
Both were accompanied by their
top advisers.
The first session lasted 2 hours

25, minutes.. Macmillan then wen,t

dross thetive.rora

Before meeting with Khrushchev.

Macmillan paid a courtesy call on

S. R. RashidovL vice chairman of

the Supreme Soviet (Parliament),
who was acting on behalf of ailing

resident KUmentt Voroshilov.
Macmillan, who arrived here
Saturday, was the. 9Wt ef
Khrushchev yesterday at the tat tatter's
ter's tatter's dacha, or country villa, 50
miles southeast of Moscow. The
villa was built for the late Josef
Stalin and is one of several main maintained
tained maintained by the government.

The British and Soviet premiers

spent more, than three hours m in informal
formal informal talks at the dacha in snow snow-covered
covered snow-covered Semonovskaya village. De

tails of the talks or the subjects

covered were not disclosed.
A British spokesman said the

two "covered all subjects of mu

tual interest." The Tass news a

gency said "questions of mutual
interest were touched on" during

tne taucs Deiore and after lunch.

It was assumed that the topics
included the questions of Berlin

and Germany.
The talks at the dacha were

and their two children, Nancy, 5. iarfnall I AnlltlllOC
and Ralph David, 1. They reside I iIQIJIIqII tVlllinilCi

at Farias.

Havy Probes Loss
Of Marine Xhuting
While Out On Pass

HENDERSONV1LLE, N.C., Feb

23 (UPD Navy officials began
an Lavestigaition today into a week weekend
end weekend parachuting expedition by four
vouns marines which ended in

the death of a young sergeant
whose 'chute failed to open.
The four had come from Camp
Lejeune on a weekend pass to try
out their jumping techniques in a
field near here. But the outing end
m) when Set. Ronald Hess. 21. of

Johnstown. Pa. plunged about

2,700 feet to his death in a pasture.
'The investigators, from the Asn Asn-ville,
ville, Asn-ville, N. C. Naval Reserve Train Training
ing Training Center, were expected to seek

to determine if the parachute failed

because of a malfunction or De-

causevHess failed to pull the rip
cord." .'

T

CZ Officials To Hear RP Protests
Over Alleged Treaty Violations

Panama officials are expected formally to denounce alleged
violations of the 1955 Panama-U.S. treaty tomorrow at a meet meeting
ing meeting In the Panama Foregn Office.
Scheduled to Attend the meeting are Foreign Minister Mi Miguel
guel Miguel J. Moreno Jr.t Dr. Octavlo Fibrega, chairman of the
Foreign Relations Council; r Panamanian Ambassador to
VTashlngton Ricardo Arias; U.8. Ambassador Julian F. Har Har-rtngton;
rtngton; Har-rtngton; Lt Gen. Rldg ely C. Galther, commander In chief
Caribbean Command, and Canal Zone Gov. William E. Pot Potter.
ter. Potter. :--:-'- I..-'" '
Tanama's pretests are believed to be centered on the new
Single Wags which went into effect on the Canal Zona yes yes-terday.
terday. yes-terday. ,, vv,.-...,;rv.".,v.:"1 v,.. . ."
j Panama Is clalmlnr that the new wage policy discriminates
against Panamanians, In violation f the treaty and me memorandum
morandum memorandum of understandings.. J

To Gain; Doctors
Make Ilo Prognosis

Ft. BRAGG ,N. C, Feb. 23

(UPI) Gen. George C. Marshall
continued to show signs of improv improving
ing improving today from the effects of two

strokes and a bout witn pneau pneau-monia
monia pneau-monia but Army doctors here were
still rantinim in their Droenosis.

Co. Georee Powell, chief of me

dicine at WOirack General Hospit

al, said Marshall spent a restful

day Sunday but his condition re

mained serious.

He reported the 78-year-old sol

dier 'Statesman was still being

fed intravenously and through a

special tube feeding apparatus.
Powell said Marshall was "hold "holding
ing "holding his own," after his second
stroke, a veek ago today, which

came about a month alter a m 10-

er one. Jan. 15, at nis winter

home in Finhurst, in. l., near nere.

Busy Canal

After some slacking off last

week from the alltime-high average
of over 28 ships a day for the first

balf of February, brisk business
has Canal dispatchers, pilots and
lock operators on the jump again.

Blue-water ships for a total ot
31 got through yesterday, and a
similar number was booked ufi to

noon for transit today.

BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, FEB. 24

Time

4:17 a.m.
4:42 p.m.

HIGH

Time

16:17 am.
10:58 pm.

LOW

Ht.
15.8 ft.
16.3 ft.

Ht.
1.8 ft.
-105 ft.
f
. .(,

- i

Brazzaville Cops
Claim Tribal War
Ended On Congo

BRAZZAVILLE. ConKo Republic

(UPI) Native police and the

Erench-led army of this three three-month
month three-month old republic yesterday
claimed complete control of the
Coneo River capital city where

more than 100 were killed in trio
al warfare last week.

Jive-snorts reopened yesterday

night and the same irrepressible
Africans who butchered one an another
other another with spears and knives in

four days of rioting got rid of

their excess energy dancing to

get ha- in the sweltering heat.
"Talking drums' and other bush
telegraph devices brought thou,
sands of women, children and
timid warriors back ftom the
savannah grasslands, where they

fled from the storm center of

rioting.
Returning tribesmen of the war warring
ring warring M'Bochi and Balali tribes

found the army in control under
French command, just as it was
before the former Frenoh colony
became a republic only three

months a co.

Thev also found hospitals

jammed withhundreds of persons

clubbed, slashed and mutilated in
the no-quarter fighting that turned
the two native shantytowns on

either end of Brazzaville into
cities of terror. Doctors said

they performed more than 141
operations during the 72 hours of
fighting.
Police yesterday released a top
M'Bochi leader named Bany who
was jailed Saturday night for car carrying
rying carrying arms in defiance of the po

lice and military crackdown
Still in jail was Jacques Opan
eault. former premier whose M'

Bochi People's Party, demand for

new elections was the spark that

touched off the fighting last Mon
day. ... v.

well," he said. 'They wwlve??
relaxed He added that "thev ,T
laughed a lot." y-,u
ofTacmPre"'W"fulJofn
Th. full I text of his soeech af 's
Kremlin dinner Saturday night
n wh.ch he warned
danger ef "muddling" Into war
w., e.rriad in the paptrs, includ including
ing including his declaration that colonial-,
ism and imperialism war by-
gone episodes.
Observers noted it was the first
time in years that the Soviet pic picture
ture picture of "the aggressive West" had
been contradicted so effectively iri :
the papers reaching, millions of
Russians.
The papers hailed Macmillan's
return visit" for a 10-day state
tour a reference to the fact that
he said Saturday he had last been
in Russia as a private tourist in
1929. :
What really set the Russians to
cheering was Macmillan's hat. InV

the West, he is usually impeccably

auirea in nomourg or oowier.
When he stopped from his Com

et fetlintr at the airport Saturday

he was wearing a foot-tall hat of
white fur he had bought in Rut-'
tia back In '29.
It stood out like a beacon over

the squad black, Russian hats

sported by Khrushchev and other

welcoming dignitaries.

When he doffed it to a croup of.

Dolitely applauding Russians, they

hurst into cheers and laughter.

Macmillan grinned.

laughter. V
- :

lm l.awvs Ask

i.MnfK Sentence
for U.S. Airman
URAWA, Japan, Feb. 23 (UPI)
Japanese prosecutors today de demanded
manded demanded a sentence of 18 months 1
in prison without hard labor for S.
California airman accused of kill-
ing a Japanese music student last.
autumn at the U.S. Johnson Air
Force Base. "," V 1
The prosecutors demanded .the
sentence for Airman 3c Peter F..
Longpre, 20, of Lakewood. Calif,
when the airman's trial resumed
at the Urawa district court today.
Longpre is being tired for tne
shooting of music student Sachiyn-v
ki -Miyambura while Miyamura
was riding on a passenger i trait
through the base about 20 miUs
northwest of Tokys last Sept. T.



THX PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY KtWSPAPt
M0NDAY7 FEBRUARY" tS, 1358

fcTXGTTWO k

' THE PANAMA AMERICAN

E OWNS AMD PUBLISHED SY TMg PANAMA AMIICAN MS. INC
L rWNMl V MUM OUNS)KVtU. IN ISSS
C .. MAMMOOIO ARIAS, torrent Q i j'
L !-7 H 4tTttT .., r. O B0 134. f4Vi kl eHf
U "-mintew l-74i 13 LKWi v'
J. Casli ADDnu. PANAMtftiCAN, Panama
i'COlOM OWet. It 17 CCNTHM. AVINUt HTWffN 1 ITH AND 13TH STRUTS
ji PSIISM r)IPeIirrTlvi- JOSHUA POWERS INC
F BAB Madison Avr. Ntw York I7) n. y.

lKft MONTM IN ASVANCL.

M ("MONTHS IM aADVANCf.
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TMn IS YOUR FORUM THI READERS OWN COLUMM
J Ths MarLlea ,s een fsm foe readers el TW fafcsAir America,
tatters ara receive arerefiilly and art handle --rW wWHV cenfidential

y If yea cost rife Hts a letter dent M imparisnr it ytim appear m
tat day. Lattsra are ub!ihsd is the atdtr racslrad. ' J
Mease try to kp tjte Utters limited t im pee tent.
Identify of latter writers it hold in strictest confidence,
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CHIVEROS

' 1 Mt'
Labor News
And
Comments

U 0

You've just had a quiet evening at home. During this time you

ik every measure of safety into consideration, fiou did not try to

firvmir radio instead vou called in the radioman, you am not use

amy gas around your house, neither did you. attempt Jto clean your
spark plugs on this day instead you left them, at the garage to be
taken care of. You wanted some peace and quiet. In order to have
ft, you had to play safe around the house.
Around 6 p.m. you decide to go out. With your car out of service
Kt have no other choice but to take, a bus & get where you wanted
ft go. So you wave at one, any one.' You $nter the bus, take your
seat. The driver decides to get some gas, so he enters a service sta station,
tion, station, order? one gallon of gas, ',- ;
i The gas station operator, after clearing his pump,, is now ready
ft serve your chauffeur. At this point the chauffeur decides to get the
ifaoney to pay for the gas. While doing this be suddenly places a cig cigarette
arette cigarette in his mouth. This doesn't bother you; no, not at all. But
then he does a nice thing that could blow you away from this earth
ik a second. What does he do? Why, he only struck a match to light
His cigarette, while being served one gallon of gasoline.
7 "You look around. About 12 people are in the bus behind you.
yofi're now thinking of how many of you are about to be blown to bits
"tut then you suddenly notice that the pumps has stopped. The
Aauffeur pays for his gas. and you're now on your way. So you say
to yourself, f "Oh well nothing happened this time."
i f Ai you go along, your chauffeur is driving behind a bus that is
aVM pick tip tw passengers ahead. To yfer aurprise, your chauf chauffeur
feur chauffeur immediately .swerves to his left to overtaw the bus m front, on on-rlftfind
rlftfind on-rlftfind another bus parked on his further left. 'He barely makes it
Suwgh the middle. Now he encounters another bus coming up the
toad towards him, so he swerves quickly to his right, back Into his
lane.
t While- the chauffeur is eoing through these motions of "extremely

lOtOuS driving, you Develop ine.seiisauuin vi iiiinu"i ),.-.
btrtfiSegineyoU're swallowing your own blood.
ivn hBn trins You so throueh the motions of pressing your

clutch your brakes. To complete it, you notice a stop sign ahead,

1UB Wore a busy intersection.
I'Xwhat does your chauffeur do? Why, he eases into second gear,
glides: into the'interseclipn, almost crashes into the side of another
t55cfe which has reached the intersection first.
Anyway, you finally reach your destination. When you pay the
rMufffur, you npte his facev As you walk ouJ,of the. bus, you make
wiflitjKpf the number in your mind, decide never to take this bus
IffYesi thi is what is happening to a lbffotra? chauffeurs today,
people are marking them. Why? Because a great number of them
ht forgotten the art of safe driving, and their responsibility for the
lives of the people they are carrying.
chauffeur Should never get angry when he stops for a passen passenger;
ger; passenger; without being asked to do so and he or she does not then enter
the bus. Maybe he's not aware that he is not the only one who drives
that particular bus. Maybe, the nffter driver gave thit person a fright
f We must'admit that therexat tomi&ktiGf

amns the buTStbp hail Mw tm,

. . . i .i i i

' However, it must be impressea upon cnauneurs Dy me peopio nm
the authorities that anytime a. person enters a bus, that person is
placin his or her life in the driver's hand. If he choses to perform
liuntslike blocking off another bus, speeding around curves, making
sudden stops and so on, it would be nicer, if he performed these stunts
Ihen he's driving alone not with other people's lives at stake.
It is not every chauffeur who indulge! bt these stunt practices,
ut it would be best if those who do so stopf ljr stunts. A nick nick-a
a nick-a drive does not mean we do not care abouvtjng alive.
A chauffeur might receive a nickel from every passenger. He
Sight consider this a small sum, but for every chauffeur's informa informa-n,
n, informa-n, the job is as Important as many other Jobs in the sense of re responsibility.
sponsibility. responsibility. t. Chauffeurs must remember to drjve smartly, and not hurt one
tiuaoeiMtlA)) ahIv f st lneea Af

.Xarl Anthony Lebert

FRUIT PRICES

From the viewpoint of this Army wife, less than a year on the

Banal Zone. I would be interested to know what keeps fruit prices

In Men in the commissaries and Chinese markets. How much over-

lead Is involved, in an orange? Nature takes Care of the production
ted, and labor to pick them certainly must be'dirt-cheapl V
V The only major cost that I can see would be transporting the

iruit from the Interior to the Zone. Yet the seedless oranges have
been a nickel apiece ever since I got here.
i Then there's the price of papayas, which grow a few steps from
the markets. All they have to do is cut it off the tree. Yet I have
iaid 60 cents for one.

i' The Army commissaries have been shipping in pears, plums and
leaches from Chile and selling them at the fantastic price of 35 cents
iii pound. Generally speaking, they are hard, green and tasteless,
ii Even Stateside. apples sell for 20 cents a pound, which I consider
stiff clip for fruit which has been bruised on its long journey. Is it

really necessary to sell them tor that price?
My biggest complaint about fruit prices started last week, how

ever, when the native watermelons started arriving at Corozal. What

a bargain. Just as my mouth was watering to the desired purchasing

stage, I heard the man say nine cents a pound." And I used to com-

tain aooui we ursi melons ui me season, smppen norm au me war
om Georgia, costing a measly five cents per pound.

By the timecybu discard the rind and seeds of these basketball basketball-zed
zed basketball-zed melons, the little bit that's left to eat has become so dear you

plight as well chew up dollar bills.
r Somebody around here must be makine olentv. thanks to these

fruit sales. I don't expect anyone to give me melons and papayas,

but I honestly believe the prices are out of line.

Fruitless

By VICTOR RIISIL
About noon time on May 1, a
voice famil ar to all America will
be hurled by loud speakers across
Berlin's border of-civilization into
the Communist sectors. It will be
the voice of the main speaker at
a monster May Day rally. It will
be the voice of Walter Reuther.
For Reuther, it will be the second
mass rally in as many weeks. The
earl er one will have been held
in Washington, probably on the
mall from which loud speakers
can throw his voice onto the White
House grounds.
Walter Reuther is on the march.

It has I ten a long time since he
has hit the open' streets. Except
for a few strikes, he has not done

it since the thirties. True, Reuther

will be o.ie of a small task force

pf national AFL-CIO chefs now
being formed at labor's high com

mand M-.fsion in rueno iuco. bui
it will be WaKer Reuther's action
program which will roar through

the country in the next eight weeks.

It will stir virtually every, indus

trial city in the nation. As Reuther
sees the action program, there
will be local rallies. Mayors and
other city officials will be asked
to come, listen, speak and promise.
The officials will hear of jobless

men and hard-hit communities and

factories. In Mich gan, the poli political
tical political leaders will be told that un

less something is done, thousands

of men will never work again.

It will be pointed out, for ex

ample, that a United Auto Work

ers Union survey reveals that the

auto industry produced 80,000 more

cars in 1958 than in 1957 with
70,000 fewer auto workers. It will
be said that Chrysler, for example,

can produce its quota without re

calling ever 20,000 of its for former
mer former hourly workers.

Out of the local rallies will swine

delegates to regional and then state

demonstrations. Governors and
Senators will be invited. And from
these stentorian town halls hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of defecates will be sent to
Washington. That is the mechan

ism for the "March on Wash'ng-

ton about which you ve heard.

The marchers will not be a

Coxey's Army. Nor will they to

merely deputations eomg uo the

Hill in Washington. These 'will be
hundreds of towns'olk converging
on the Capitol. They will want a
joint session of Congress to listen
to their spokesmen. They w'll
want President Eisenhower and

Labor Secretary James Mitchell
and Commerce Secretary Lewis

Strauss to listen am' to promise.

The slogans of the thirties will

be heard throughout the land

and the Capital: With, unemploy

ment high in scores of communi

ties which earn the r daily bread

poverty in the midst of plenty."
They will have more than rhe

toric. In Reuther's portfolio in
Puerto Rico is a 19-point program
for vast government spending.
This was outlined in his Adminis

trative Letter dispatched from the

Auto Union's national headauarters

on Feb. 16.It talks' of the mobili-

feation of the action proeramHts

structure and its ttrgets. The tar

gets are the, 19 points t- including
a gradual reduction in the legal
work week and improv:ng com community
munity community facilities, for example.

Reuther and the Auto Union of officers
ficers officers spell this one" out. They
want the unemployed used to im

prove community recreation, fire
' 1 1J 11!.! -. 'L I ...

aim ponce iacuiues, ana parsing
space. This is the WPA construc construction
tion construction approach.
Reuther wants a technological
Change Commission to study the
"machine which runs machines"
and cuts jobs.
The 19-point action program
which will resound through JSe
hundreds of rallies also will de demand
mand demand tremendous school, highway
and hospital construction and slum
clearance. The Build'ng Trades
will, therefore, swing in hehind
Reuther though it would take
the newest IBM machine to meas measure
ure measure the affection and previous co cooperation
operation cooperation between these two forces.
There will be a demand for
greater defense spending, heavier
international aid and a drive by
he UN's Internat'onal Labor Of Office
fice Office (Geneva) to raise wages in

nations such as Jaoan. This would

cut foreign competition.

It will be the prelude to '60. The

labor leaders aren't forgetting

the world "political" when they
call this an action program.

Your Needle's .Stuck, Bub

NEA Sonic, Inc.

Walter Winchel! In New York

NSW YORK HEARTBEAT

Celebs About town: Joe DiMag-

gio, champion autograph giver,

obliging an army ot, admirers -at
the Hawaiian Room. Most popular
celebrity of all. .Hoagy Carmt

chael, composer ot atarausi,
(and so many other hits), occupy

ing a rear booth at tne Js.mDers
returning Dorothy Donegan's sa

lute. .Jayne Mansfield, Mho has,
dyed her eyebrows white to match

her hair, contirming tnai ner reai

name is Vera Jape, Jf aimer. .uina
Lollobrigida'i husband in town on only
ly only 3 hours between planes lunching

at Romeo Salta's. .Darryl Zanuck
borrowing the N. Y. Mirror fifoni
The Little Club doorman to read

about former friend Beta Varvrs

accident in Paris. .Hugh Q'biaan
and Jack Lemmon riding, sv pair

of giritt(farVftbblsiftfieShr

ry-Neme-MTOtfCmielCBIli les

Boyer at Madison ana 60th ab

sorbei in the financial page of a

morning gazette. .The Duchess

of Windsor holding the door open
at Claude's salon on E. 64th so a
deliveryman with a package could

enter.

' Sallies In Our 'Alley: 'A group'

of showfolks were discussing Gweu
Verdon's big hit, "Redhead." One

predicted it would run for two
years at least. "That's Broadway
for you" -said another. "A good

show has a great future. On tee tee-vee
vee tee-vee all a good show has is a great
past". .Overheards at Al Coop Cooper's
er's Cooper's Gov. Rockefeller sure is a
fast guy with a huck. Ours:"

CHANGINC COUNCILMEN

It seems that this weekend is going to be calm after all. so it

mighty be a good idea to briefly analyze the trouble we have been

paving in Panama Lity during tne last tew days.

! There are several things my untrained mind is unable to under

stand. How could a group of citizens numbering no more than about
J000 consider that it has the authority to appoint new councilmen?
I Why did President de la Guardia come up with the excuse that
he had no legal authority to fire the Councilmen, then several hours
fater the Governor announced that he had named new kouncilmen?
Since the recalcitrant councilmen finally requested temporary
Rave, why weren't their alternates called in to serve? After all, only
the councilmen and some, municipal officials have been charged with
Jhishandling city funds. : ? ;
ft As I said before, tt is all too perplexing for me, although it is
Suite obvious that no attempt was made by anybody to follow correct
;gal procedure.
President' de la Guardia, whose mother 'died -while he was1 mak mak-ng
ng mak-ng Ms speech, said he id pot want to set.i precedent by firing the
councilmen in violation of the constitution, yet he has allowed his
, jPanama provincial governor to do just that. How can he expect to
; recuperate the people be have lost in his government with such

Torch is for Frankee (How 4oesi theme from "Peter Gunn" and

he .remember them all?). .im-." Autumn Leaves" ace images, loo

clair Robinson's shock over his

jilted tiancee s suicioe recently has
made,;liim so iU, kin flew to be

WKh him. .iNina Bell of Kesruer s

Digest weds banker John Alien
soon. .His pals report that Eddie
Fisher is this mixed up. He wen I

to a public relations expert lor ad advise.
vise. advise. He was told: "'lane tne kicis
ot Disneyland". .Instead of taking
his own children (which was The
big idea to win back: tne public)
he took Liz's. :

Tonus Milian, a young CuDan,

must be talented. Actors's Studio
waived all rules to let him in. .
Never. acted on a stage when he
applied' 6 months ago. In the

late "Maidens and Mistresses
his performance was rated nign

Seen on rear of a truck: "Don't

Hug Me. I'm Going Steady."

Midtown Vignette: Buddy Holly
a rock-and-roll star, died in a plan1
crash in the West recently. .He

had been hoping for another Bir
Hit Record after enjoying several

. .But tor over a year he didn

rate one solid click, platter. Now

the music shops along Broadway
call his newest disc a smash. It

was released the day after he was
killed. .Are you ready for the
title?. ."It Really Doesn't Mat Matter
ter Matter Anymore"
Memos of a Midnighter: Don't
invite Merv Griffin and Tina
Louise to the same party. Oof ly
angreh at each othe. .Mrs. Cary
Grant (divorcing the star) is dat dating
ing dating a Beverly Hills medic. Says

she 11 never again wed anyone in
show biz, .Noel Coward and Lau Lauren
ren Lauren Bacall are inseparable in Lon-

Roadway Sketch: Newsweek
Magazine ran a roundup ot unaer unaer-der&ructies
der&ructies unaer-der&ructies in tne Kwav snows. .

But omitted the most interesiu-.
of them all. ,Her name is xw..
leen Widdoes, an American girl,
ready at a moment's notice to
substitute iar France Nuyeni in
"The World of Suzie Wong" Ma
her Oriental disguise. .Kathleen
also appears as one of the Ame American
rican American tourists in the hit. You prob probably
ably probably have seen her on dayume iv

soap operas. .A beautiful girl!

very talented and ner we story
is fascinating.
TCasPol Characters: Liz Schrftfft

of the candy clan hired a' regisu'
ed nurse ior.,10 days to watch
lier ailing Irish set.er, Cocoa. .Ca .Ca-ra
ra .Ca-ra Williams of "Never Steal Any

thing bmaii was once the voice t-

ot Porky, the Pig at the Disney

Studios. .The music critic who
does Greek oross-word puzzles
while reviewing concerts. .France
Nuyen, star of "Suzie Wong, a
recent picture of despair on the
backstage stairs long after the cur curtain
tain curtain dropped. Two of the girls try trying
ing trying to snap her out of it. No date,
nowhere to go, no fun in being a
Broadway star. .When "Whoop
Up" folded the cast threw a "vic "victory."
tory." "victory." party! Everyone showed up
except pne of the leads, who
growled: 'I have no desire to be
with those people." (End of Poo Poo-foo).
foo). Poo-foo). I

VAS!iir:GTo:j
Derry-Go'-Round
. t DRSW PEARSON

Tjmes Square .Circle: Ed Wynn,
the star, almost 73, has found a
new Fountain of Youth. A divorcee
named Annette Lea. .Annabella,

once wea to ly power, is consi
dering a marriage proposal trom
French writer PhiliDDe Brosaier.

Chas. Revson (head of Revlon) is
back from, Florida where he
boughT a yachtMorioo,000, plus
crew of 14. .Ktye.BallaM' most

serious suitor in a wood is Dr.

r.awara uiaca. .Liz Kenay is

signed for the lead in "All That

uuners" xo be fUmed at Hal Roach
Studios . .Paul Muni, tho star.

has a .completely equippW home
beneath his dwellin at Tranru

Beach, Cal. Bombproof and row!

uea wim. oxygen and. food for 5
years. .Nilda. Terrace, vocallurn

at vasa uugat, sings it this war war-"Whatever
"Whatever war-"Whatever Abbe Wants Cugie

SERMON

Bhady manipulations?

1! Persdexeel

I De-ranked and de-sected, the chaplains (6r one at least) are back
jwltb sermons on Yawn Patrol,
f j don't listen to this program daily. When I do turn it on, some some-jtimes
jtimes some-jtimes I come in late or leave early. But one day last week the ser sermon
mon sermon had the "captive ipot" just ahead of the long newscast at 7
o'clock; "" ' ' 1 "r
N Lenaer Dellihtaal

Broadway Stage Door: Garbo's
new companion is Lars Johnnson,
former newsman whom she intro introduces
duces introduces as her sec'y. .Kim Novak's
date a lot of the time is restau restau-rater
rater restau-rater Dan Stampler. .The King Kingston
ston Kingston Trio's record kidding John
Foster Dulles is hairdlv "gor.l

taste" at this time. .PlaywrigSt
Arthur Miller and director Elia Ka-
7fln nnro Vorv PlneA aa Mm T nttit

oon. caas oi laughs, and What- er. ."Donna" and "Diana" the

no. .iney say Jill Corev's Tall snncrs furin oici, n..

- .'O w .tt.u fUffbdO.

Curtain Calls: "Th ri

ed," one of the better playa, at

iub coronet ineater, axg Time

casi. .joni James- album of the

late nan Williams songs. Th

new irench beauty. Edith

ueorges, in the soon-due aim
from France, "House on the Wat Waterfront".
erfront". Waterfront". .Lee Fredericks int
ertaining routines at Glen .Cove

supper.. ...Nat (King)
ftteitvalbum, "Wedcome tc
the C ub". ."Hoodlums, Los An-

acies, oy ace newsmen Ted Prag Prag-er
er Prag-er and Larry Craft, on the news-

stands today. .The amusing ditty

voewecuu for you, East For

Nationalist Guns
Lame Commv Ship
In Formosa Strait

TAIPEI, eb, 2i (UPI) ChU

nese iNatton.iv gong in the Que

rn oy Islands crippled a small
Communist ship In the Formosa
S'rait last night, the Defense
Ministry announced today.
A Minatry Announcement said
the Quemoy batteries opened fir
when the sh'p, df about 200 tons,
was detected moving west, along
the Red-held China coaet shortly
after dark.
The (next morning, observers
discovered that the ship had been
grounded near Weitout, either ac accidentally
cidentally accidentally or perhaps to keep it
from sinking. P has beet) impos impossible
sible impossible to determine whether mart
were any casualties.

THRU COMMIIS SENTENCED

CAIRO (UPDrA United Arab
Republic orimlhal cdurt yesterday
sentenced three '"alleged Commu Communists
nists Communists to prison terms ranging
from three to five yean for anti anti-goverment
goverment anti-goverment activites. ' The de defendants
fendants defendants were accused of dis distributing
tributing distributing leaflets signed "Commu "Communist
nist "Communist Party" calling for changes in
the present social and economic
systems. The Communist Party It
outlawed In the UAH.

r

L

BOLEX lH0
i

Qamsiha Shop
Hotel El Panartii TeC HM

The Late Watch Unn u.m n'An

has taken up cigar smoking. ".
Gary uoooer had hu m

i i:. ..

uaraio ti Morocco because he

lorgoi io up ue doorman. -.Glo

ria van wwei, last seen in "Wish

xou- were Here," weds Richard

fiaozei on tne zist, .Harper's Ba
zaar's elegant fashinn witn.- n:.

" feeland,; came to swanky L' L'-Aigion
Aigion L'-Aigion with an escort whose sport
shirt was tieless. He was hustled
into a coatroom where snare eta.

I r kept. .vThe 20th Century

f1" realty deal will be

gneq ipaay. The sum involved
mav bt 7n miiimn

t .jj-r- -r. ,nuu anil
Luigi, assigned by RCA-Victor to

veveiop new -nits and-talent, have
been given an entire floor to doo
ql' on. .Life plans a series
Of passport photos of Importants
Duke Niles of Tune Pan Alley and
Hope- Holiday of the musicals are
i 'VI)Jtf; M'ion Avenue
passerby: Marie Torre and Judy
Graland and not mn one Dirty
Look.

WASHINGTON The full story

bf John Foster Dulles' heroism
faas not jet been told.. Probably it

can't be told in tuu lor some umc.
Thia writer, when in Mexico for
the inauguration of President Lo Lopez
pez Lopez Mateo, reported that the aec aec-retary
retary aec-retary of state was suffering great
pain, had two doctori standing-by

one mgnt, out went inrougn mib c
deal of shaking hands with, several
thousand Americans at an embaa embaa-v
v embaa-v rntinn nlus the formalities

of th Mexican inauguration, with

out letting anyone know now w ne

wai.

He even refused to call off his
trip to San Francisco to speak before-;
the Chamber of Commerce,
remarking to a friend that, if be
was auffering, from cancer, one or
two days would make no difference
In reaching a hospital.
Back in Washington, Dulles rest rested
ed rested a few days, then flew to Paris

for the meeting of katu..
- The European statesmen who, sat
opposite him had no idea they were
talking to sick but courageous
man. He had. to pass up four dip diplomatic
lomatic diplomatic functions and curtail his
work, but faitWully attended the
chief NATO conferences : r.
Once again, he came back, to
Washington to find his doctors a a-mazed
mazed a-mazed at his stamina and sternly
warning that he would have to
slow down. .,
He did slow down for a while,
went to the West Indies, then came
back to throw himself into the
pressing nroblemi of Mikoyan'l
visit and Berlin.
MRS. DULLES AGREES

President Eisenhower argued

with him, threatened to order him
Mit nf th state Department. Fi

nally he decided Dulles would nev

er be hanpy u ne were not ai wum
n Ttiillis screed. Most wom

en want their husbands to retire
after a certain age, but Mrs. Dull Dulles,
es, Dulles, knowing her husband, knows
that ,he lives1 only to pilot oin
oressing foreign affairs toward the
goal of peace. If he retired, he
wamM K restless, unhappy, and

mipht not last. .'
chnrtiv hfnr he went to Eu

rope this last time, Dulles's pains
Started comip? back. Fe refused
to be hbsmtalized. In London he
ma tn Prime Minister Harold

MimiiTii that he was ill and

would have to undergo another

oneraOon. Nor did he, tell Gerr.

Charles de Gaulle.

The only European in wnom ne
confided was Chancellor Konrad

Adonsupr 83-vear-old leader of

West Germany who nas become

Dullei's close ffiena. int ;iwo

have sometimes differed, some-

timfef haveJ.beeri Irfitattd 'at:ech

other, but there is sreat basic trust

between the wo, and Dulles con

fided that when he returned to

Washington he would have to un undergo
dergo undergo another operation.

The chancellor almost broke

down and wept. Dulles told the

"?d German not to worry, that the

United States would not let Ger

many down.
When Dulles flew back to Wash

ington he was racked with pain

and fatigue. Under-Secretary of

State Chris Herter was in South

Carolina taking warm baths for

his arthritis, which at times makes
it difficult for him to walk. Dulles
urged Herter to finish the trcat
ments. He himself went to ? the

hospital and has continued to di
rect major State Department poli policy
cy policy from his bed.

The secretary of state is suffer suffering
ing suffering from lesions, an aftermath of

his previous operation: a hernia,

and from diverticulitis;' In addi

tion, he is 71 years old.
WHITE HOUSE ADVISER

His doctors have! told him that
the odds are very rauch against his

returning to any active day-to-day

direction of the State Department.

They have told him that the only

cure for his complicated physical I
j : i . i I

uisirms is long rest, not a necuc

-1

12-hour day with tie burdens of ths)
world on his shoulders, - --But
the dogged and 1 dedicated
Dulles is determined to settle the
Beri rii. after which he wiU
probably be content to retire to
the status of White House adviser,
leaving the active direction of the
State Department to someone else.

VIOLENCE DOESN'T PAY
From LitUe Rock, Ark., hat
come an offer to help rebuild the
dynamited Clinton High School in
Tennessee. ( t. ,
George Reimer of Little "Rock't
Reimer Plastering Company wrote
to the Contracting Plasterers' In International
ternational International Association, -declaring
his "wholehearted" support of the
Clinton High School project t
"My own feeling.'' he wrote. M

that regardless of one's personal
convictions concerning integration
vs. segregation, there should never
be violence of thit type connected
with it. -'

"It seems to' me that in rnnnr.

ahng in this worthy undertaking
we can make known our viewi on
the subject of thit kind of violence

m sucn a way as to let unions know
where we stand and our disapprov
al of it wherever, whenever and bf
whomever it is instiaated No miL

ter how right the. cause, coercion
by violence is wrong,"

xnutk -, The PlasterersMnter.

national Association is supplying

all the plastering material and su supervision
pervision supervision for rebuilding the Clinton

scnooinouse,- a

- CAPITAL CHAris
Senator Fulbright. new chairman

of the Senate : Foreign Relations

committee, got only 20 minutes'
advance, notice. -before tt, was an an-nounceii!
nounceii! an-nounceii! ;Dulfesfmld Hfnter the
hospital. Thlr camei-just aftelr the
State- Department ; promised? 'to
keep Fulbright completely inform

ed of every -possible develonment

affecting foreign policy. ... J. Ed

gar' Hoover persuaded Eisenhower

to -tone down his recommendation
for anti-bombing legislation." Ike

called for Federal orosecution of

dynamiters of schools and church churches
es churches only if they .crossed state lines.
AttorneyGenerafe iRogers f believed
church and school dynamitincs

themselves should be a Federal
crime", but Hoover cnmolained this
would go-to'tar. The President
sidedVith Hoovercn'&h.'' yt
ACA. PAYS:VIStT -' vm,v
CAIRO fUPPlbe youn Aga
Khn exiled on1 PreHent? Gmel
Abdel Nasser wft rheUnited Arab Arab-Re(wbllca'yeterdayi
Re(wbllca'yeterdayi Arab-Re(wbllca'yeterdayi Later the A A-ga
ga A-ga flew to wan. 'n aouthern E E-eynt.
eynt. E-eynt. to see the tomb of h e grand-,
father iwv2tM."-- -Stff-

1

The famout editor, Horace
Greeley, was ptrhapa the
greatest molder of public opto
ion of hi or any other time. At
the aga of 19. in 1828, he and
two associates founded the New
York Morning- Poet probably
the first two-cent newspaper,
ever published. Within three
weeks, the Morning Poet failed
Six years later, Greeley found founded
ed founded the New Yorker, considered
to have been th finest newt
paper to the TXS- to that Urn

Boys and Girls

Antwer to Previous Puzifs) I

m ease .a

asw

1

V 1

ACROSS
1 Gwyn
1 Queen of
Scots ;
Houston
12 Operatic jolo
II Toward the
sheltered side
1 Samuel's
teacher (Bib.)
IS Graphie
17 Lettuce

18 Inquirer

JKW
1 California city

ddess

S wipe with the,

tongue
Tardier
S Damaga
fi Strangers
7 Paper
measure
(Barks

f Exudation

28 Ponder

?8 Mythical
hiintau

10 raMil ti in u

1 Realms T T ni.iT. -rways

21 Check

16 Mountain

cai-lal

11 Lack

S3 Barer

Aek A

" 4nel or J0n nymnhs-.;.

ISO.) n T.J m.7

SGdS Hyfi-l- foanveaael

2 rsmoua '"lcu 5

, 25 Portent

Shore

45 Small-nallt
. 48 Auction
47 Decorate
48 Fiddling
Roman
80 Western state
St Bristle
63 Home of
-Adam and Eve
J5 Vegas, ;
Nevada

22 honorable f fri III L I H" IH hi I
4 Surrender 'lit- 5 fr -. 7 t FtFr
26 Snake-haired P
monster
BS- WEKTT--r-r-rr
44 Distinct part, K WT ,t ...
.4 r-rmrti --u
,MMures af"?'- IT T : TT"TTT'JmmT"T'm'
.---d'oeuvre T fTr J- Jp
leaiuaie 1 lis J r f J f J f ' W

-

t

- I
1
.1



rant f::cr

THK PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAUl KW8IPAaJA
MONDAY, FEBRUARY M, 1959
pro jllasser, Cravds
DAILY' LENTEN
T5 EASY TO
(
DdUBLt'YOURl MONEY

r.,: i .,. .. ...... ... -..-.I, J8-BH?!BB!!K::,r

mill! , I" I'
r iI,iui!',ii..w J- T T : -t- L...

- 1 IU

MeDitAflONS

BEIRUT,? f.&
,NasserarowdsJttreO. and
bine4 five f.?
1 towa Beirut yesterday in an out-

city's -elebratipa, of the ..UnltedJ
Arab, .Bepubflei; 1 It I t anniver-

-Gangs of "pro-" awl' anti-Nasser
youths clashed n fist -fights in

the D.ean w ctm.i
thetrolley attacks. ; '.

U'Awuww j
en trucklbadir itf helmeted troop

. into the city to separate we nv

- gangs .mm picvcMfc tu"'-
i-nm riint.ini? into wider violence.

AUleast two persons were in-
mix a .. 4.1 iakiil 'W

JUrea.'DOm CX inem niemwuv.
the CbristianAFaUngist Party that

backed ex-rresioem i;amui
Th. irktintf hrnV Ollt SfteT WTO

Chamoun .youths scrawled slogans

dnouncing.'U.A.R.Presiaent ua ua-mal
mal ua-mal Abdel Nasser on street cajs
tfcriuivh the fiitv'S BaStS

' Moslem .quarter where tte popu-

lauon was cieoraunB u
anniversary, v. j." ". .'.

gered by the slogans; wedas wedas-aengers
aengers wedas-aengers out of the1 street cars,
then smashed the jvindows, npped
out seats arid attempted to set

mam ; onrtm i.

two double 'trolley- cars and .ia

before! poU lKattered the flero-.

.The: tivlpwi' "4

the City S mam square in Mulv,v

uurry oi suisa r-

lice and troops moveom.
OP!AATicauP:;;:--;r

leased by the NationaltoUte
of Statistics today reported that

is ' jr-1 i i -fy v "sw

- If t

- .uv.n.V. frnm us wh0 ioured the US.'Army Ca ribbean School, Tort Gulick, during i recent visit to the Canal Zone,

IIT1 v aHaw mwim wv w l. i u MIm. HAM n Brifll K MllllTIl Kfin llllll.ftl BIL LUHIU"

arm. German Grnic' Tov" M JU"D
do. Bolanos. th froth BoUvia. (U.S.'Army Photo) , v ' .'

I

Scout Executive Gets

Freedoms Foundation A wore

the population of eity of Par Paris
is Paris r& 3,020,000 on Jan 1.

The TP
was 'sg

is reacoea a,iwu,wv r r-The
The r-The ;populatioaof fJ pns

was set ac wwwm:

.. . 1. a n

' 1 Tete' G. Smith,
To Be Eagle Scout
1 -A.--Tu- o. Smith

RftTboa:" Heights will be
8m?3?V S JSuS
v.4tThat.. milk this v cv.m

nirtto. at -Cristobal aWM

Smith will 6fllclalltr' becomes"
Easle Scout.' -f
Smith;, whose "lather Ji baj
- .... n-otinn ni vision 1 or

y.1 Sfjikt. rria nnvftrnment. iA

amSr ot Troop to Balboa

VAMjEY FORCE; -Pa. (UPI) '1-

Freedoms! Pmmdationo at Valley

Forge "yesieraay r weseniea s
principal annual awards to Dr.
Arthur A. Schuck, chief scout
executive of the Boy Scouts of A-

menca, and un. uarios r. tw tw-mulo,
mulo, tw-mulo, Philippine annbassador, to
1U. -YTUJ CUfaa ;

The organieeon also announced
thoaamee. of -,moie n .700 indi

viduals,--orgauuauoDS- ana scnoois
lAWtsH for awards in the foun

dation's $100,000 awards program

for tneir comnouuons rowara a

better understanding 01 tne Amer American
ican American way of life .during; 1958.
' Schuck teoeiveds the foundation's
highest .honoi(. the George Wash Washington
ington Washington Award? and a check for
; nun

I"!""".' .... . 1, j

He was cited: tor nu -monu-

mental contribution to our. const!
. .... 1 1 1 nniniln

revered chief, scout exeeutivt of

the Boy -scouts ot Amenoa, auu
"hia ..forthright natritism.

skaJledu admifiistratjyeworks and
leadership by example in charac

ter building WHICH nave maas

'aMmtinff'.. a. helftved WOfQ in CV

orv. knm i-i America."

i.S.nhiUlr: rpffpivpri t fie uliru

George t Washington Award pre

sented in tne, lounoanon a iujjea

The roop -t'V0"",u.' "JT.ZI JCBrmer.,rrswisra fls1' W

Cathedral of Bt. w 8l FBI director

troop's lnstituuonai-KfpieBc-

tatlve- is Jiuwnia ,j,
, The Honor Court session win

be hew m, f"

the Masonic1 -eyiB iu uiuy

Lt'boV; iofih D- MCElheny
of the Canal Zone Govwnmejtf
will be toejrmclpaMD5a1k'!rS
the evehlngwr J 1
In addition to smith becom becoming
ing becoming an- Eagle Scout, V other
Scouts who have advanced to
Star and Life Pcouts ajso will
be recognized. ;

judge iiOreu- d.
wiU give the i'.'flntrodufitiopr to
the court? -whlifc.JTavjKcall
event will, be nndrttie? flec flection
tion flection ot the CanAE Zone Scout
Council's '' Advancement Com Committee
mittee Committee whose chairman Is Dis District
trict District Attorney Rowland Hazard.
The '.ceremony "will start at
7:30 p.m. and all friends of
8coutlnC;ffiyi:?!tend.
' Scot;IJeader",
iU Due flere -tToilay ''
A top leader of Boy Scouting
in, the United States was
scheduled to arrive in the Ca-'
nal Zone today ;for an intensive
week ol,. meeting : wither local
Scout leadens and 'Officials,
He-. is Neilii Ct Cornwall Jr.
Deputy Regional Executive of
Region Six Boy Scouts of Ame America.
rica. America. Cornwall will meet with lo local
cal local Canal -Zone Scout officials
and their committees, observe

vncir,,-- wpei ttuuus, una uv vx
them !ohv the -',-iatest thihklhfe

uivuivnig fiuuuuoK metnuas ana
procedilres.",.j v'. ,.v.
Dan v Daniels. Canal Zone

Scout Executive, stated that
Cornwall visit 4'wiU .give local
Scouting;; the benefit)' of cross cross-pollmatian
pollmatian cross-pollmatian ides&v -He; Is
constantly traveling throughout
Region., Six which includes the
Carolinas," Georgia'"and Florida
as well as the Zone, and Is in
a position to observe the latest
techniques and developments in
Scoutlpg."
The local Scout Council af affiliated
filiated affiliated with Region Six iduri iduri-lng
lng iduri-lng the past year., A month ago
Frank Rogers, a, director of
engineering service with -i the
National Rov. Scout Connpil

also visited the Canal Zone.

councu to give it tne oenent
of his experience in establislx establislx-Ing
Ing establislx-Ing the big new Scout camp, at
. gion.Si. s. ; "r
The visits of both Rogers and
Cornwall r- tnarte -at no

pense ,to s- the local, council. huU

arc parsvoi uie ceneiis gained.
K....W L ... i l ... ... n .

FIU tASES MOUNT

LONDON UPI)-Th' Minislty
of Health said today that ..about
10-million persons.' had been 'af 'affected
fected 'affected ;so f aj Jx The. influenza epi epidemic
demic epidemic sweeping Britain The fig figure
ure figure waMa highest ;nce- ft a e
great epidemic of 1951 Some
hospitals,- with ; an "unprecedenied
v number of sick nurses, have had

Ver. i it.

Romulo was presented, tne loun-

datioa's special freedom leader
chin aiuarH fnr hs "lrnfailinff' ar

Ucula. te, exemplary devotion to
the cause of freedom.,
ttnmnln way the sixth individual

.outside the United.. States" to re receive
ceive receive tfie lafa")i th'past :de-

caoe. rrevious wmucis
kte Presideht Ramonv Magsaysay
of the Philippines, the late Presi President
dent President Carlos Castillo Armas of

Guatemala; Mayor Ernst Reuter
r.t Woct Rprlin f!ha'ncielmr Kon-

rad Aoieriauer of West Germany,,

ana Sir Winston vnmcuiu vnmcuiu-rhn
rhn vnmcuiu-rhn foundation's national awards

MoflfnH nf is1i irrantR .isf and

George wsmngroa noqor juwb
t. ohnnl !nra,rH- included

pilgrimagestfo WalteE jJMf?

wards, ana uwrge nauiw

honor ihedals.
t?M fircf timv thp founaa

it .4-1' V Hfuuina,! OhMVll

aon preseincu n aywiw iT i I

leadersniip awaros w uiiw Dtnyw

accentinff in-

dividual responsiotUty- These,, a-r

vards went -TOamo wb.'u"-'
dependent School District, San?Aii-
1W Fiiolid Ohm oubllC

schoote. and imsa uiua. puhmv

schools. :,-sS,

a jury compised of. 10 statej. su supreme
preme supreme Court jurists and 20 elect-
j rjt noifinfial naTTintlfli

veterans a'VrVitectubstW
organization. Dr. Giylord.; :P.

Harnweii, uresioeni.w.wu7"-.

sny oi reuaayiyxuia, -nva mla"m
trative chairman, ?"..; v. ;

7

lMHL. finiaui J.IJH..IJUUIIU1UIIIWU I
I

'hlOPEdLY; CARED F0R,W!LL

- 1a5T A LI FJETi w t

I 1 I' J

3 i - I

I 1

! ( PrtwiUd by the Department
of Christian Eop f the
f nitranal Church in fha Mis

Canal Zone.J
Your Evtriint Bible Readins:
Ecclailattet 5:1-7
PARROT --3TYLI PRAYING",
" i-
"Guard yeor afept whan ymt'"
gd te the House of God; to
draw nor to listen Is better
than te effar the sacrifice f
fools."
Good church-KoiBB people in ev

ery age have been tempted to
pervert their public worship into
"the sacrifice of fools," by which
is meant the mechanical offering

of tnougnuesr oaDDie to ixoa as

a sacrifice of praise and tnanks-

(rivitis ; whether, our form oi wor

ship is highly formal or purely
informal, the temptation is the
same. If-we think mat we are
not tempted to this, we are only
deceiving ourselyes.
Tha nahai in KceleMaateS'

urges us to go td the house of

God to listen, as wen as to oner
our prayers in worship. It is ex excellent
cellent excellent counsel. Even if the ser sermon
mon sermon is far from the best 8 and

there are few sermons so bad

that you can't get something
frnm thmthora are still the

Holy Scriptures to be heard; and

in many cnurcnes tne neipiui

guidance of a' oeaumui uturgy.
There can be found no justifi justification
cation justification whatsoever for staying a-
uim frnm th : hniia nf Gfld on

Sundays or at flther times, fpr
then we deprive ourselves of

ven the opportunity ot nearuis
God speak to us.
Samuel grew strong In spirit
because he :sad with all his
Viaartr "Sneak. Lord, for Thy ser

vant heareth." Go to church to
listen as well as to worship, and
God will speak to you in a way
to strengthen our spiritual lives

day by day.

vi n our

There ore tvtoifclosJeS c',sr
dents those iri the ;tdp; half ;of .;
their class and thc'whq rnoke
the topJialf possible. ommo

t MEDICINE MAN SAYS A Hutchinson, Kan, druggist placed

FASI ALARM BOX
T .TTTT V. CmiTF.. Win, fTIPIl

Town board members complained

today mat corner lire aiarm
boxes were a: nuisance. They have
Vw An nsAfi onlv for false alarms

for, -the' past two years, 4he board

said. ',

fl

SATINA CARRIES YOU SMOOTHlY

THRU THE, IRONING HOUR 1

'titty

i.'.r), 1 i

Safina

a

; )it BIO Ironing
eld In tht tilth box.

mi it ft I j.)

To. Wffi rtiAi

i;lLDEMS3
iff Fashion
mL LUCHO AZCARAGA M
1 W& EVERY MONDAY If
;M7 W 6:30 to 7:00 b.m ?7.nfl
d i T Y0UR COMMUNITY 1VETW0RK .((M
' e TW KKocylcs H n n 1090 Klfo-Vclei, :
jjpANAMA i H0Q COLON (jf; ;
EF. v- vyy i

.p.

nsr.

. . ,
(WSJ)) 3?

,t hi

4.1

ief-Prop

. pflMMO W ROUMOVM ''

to Sci akca. Set Sckcdar, O

ttzd W? czi tt pziszz

(TUESDAY, THURSDAY, SATURDAY)

''''' ''' '

Lv. Panama 11:45 A.M.
Ar. San Jose 12:05 P.M.'
Ar. San Salvador 2:00 P.M.
Ar. Guatemala 2:55 P.M.
Ar. Mexico City 5:45 P.M.
Ar. New Orleans 6:55 P.M.
DIRECT CONNECTIONS TO CALIFORNIA
Lv. Mexico 7:45 P.M.
Ar. Los Angeles 11:25 P.M.
Ar., San Francisco 2:05 A.M.

FREE WEEKLY RAFFLED

eij

OSCAR 'b'ANlttf BARRETTO.' ,?
ALBERTO M AN VILLE 11 '
. v DOrtXE?tUTA;; .;
JOSE D. HUN
. JUUO CAMACH0,H.
; V. 7 fyTmCK V. SYLVESTER

. CARLOS MANUEL QJtUO
HARVEY CELMAN
If Your Soles Slip Ends in"0"
You Won Too.
DOUBLE CHECK YOURS!

T

Distinctive Wedding Elands

Free "Chictf.'-'de;-Qro 'Stomp$
THE JEWELRY SORE

,.W,f7 CENTRAL AVE.

(137)

Where You Doable Yqiv Money Free

1 llff ?
' f iff f1!

II

MCA VtSCOVMf SCffVKf
PHS94MMCD CAMNS
MST SMOOTH
SSWNT SAfl
TWO ABMAST SCATfNO
tARM PKTUM WINDOWS
NO VIBRATION
, ; See your Trove! Aoent, on
ikCA International amines
Cone B, 1 El Cangrejo
Tel. 040

- ..- -v.

I

u

IT PAY5VT0 LISTEN TO

YoW'.-OMMUNrnr Network ill

BFCAUSF

'tio;
- ;

-,
-.1 HT

BfCOMf

STATION HOO tthn ve
llrtt'nlNfl Imihm by
plavlns faverlte
reenethi
STATION HOG h fivlna
away valiiablt tifft to i
mtmbtrt.

a member of the HOO Fan Club
and get your lift! Simply hene
ia your full name i V
aMreu when yen aik fer your
raqueitt.

But hmjurnbsA.J You MUST be listening to-

STATION Kjra

' 'T "4'
..AND von mutt be a memoer In ardor t rtkte la thlet

'''Mr.

'macrloui ilve-away Brearani

PHONE StAtON HOG PANAMA 2-3066

" and get your HOG MEMBERSHIP CARD.
, Your .Community Network HOG

30 K. tiirima

i09o.?.-eif.

taw

Ai iuiu wjr v even eineigeuvj
eases. 1 ; ib.uu:..

kMv



v.

FAG FOTJ
1 not ruriMi America m txpuixuix t dajmt Ktrrsf ipo v
' MOJfDAT, FEBRUARY 13, W M
Box 134,
if- AW
c1PersonslDieilriRa
octal ana yin
terwiSe
: Fires :
Staff.
6;
anama
4-

O

across

I-

I-

f1 t fnpftmmh, fflirndfti,

...,Jt mS L mJ L uLlm

PORT KOBBE OFFICERS' WIVES SALUTE ALASKA
WITH SPEAKER, DECORATIONS AT LUNCHEON
Alaska was glvan a tropical salute at the first 195 maating of
tha Fort Kobba Officers' Wivas luncheon last waak at tha Kebba Of Of-fiears'
fiears' Of-fiears' Club.
A study in contrasts was off rod by Mrs. 0 aorta B. Rasar of
Quarry Heights, who presented highlights of her residence in kodiak,
Alaska. Tablas wara dacdratad with snow scants, Igloai, totem polos

and small flags to honor tha forty
Hostesses for the luncheon
meeting were Mrs. H. R. Lasco Lasco-k,
k, Lasco-k, Mrs. L. S. McGoff and Mre.
C. C. Cain Jr. Mrs. James Dick Dick-coo,
coo, Dick-coo, the nev president, conduct conducted
ed conducted a short business meeting.
The board for this year,; an announced
nounced announced by Mrs. Dickson, in includes
cludes includes Mrs. Ralph Jones Jr., hon
orary president; Mrs. Dickson
president; Mrs. Claudine Grady,
vice president: Mrs. Dolores
Froeshner, secretary; Mrs. Clara
Airall, treasurer: and Ms. Cecile
McGoff, assistant secretary-trea
surer.
Committee chairmen include
Mrs. Mary Lawley, bridge and
caftasta; Mrs. Roberta Hanna,
cook book; Mrs. Jane Schwarz,
ntrtiinment: Mrs. Jaen Bohden.
hopspital; Mrs. Dorothy Brazil,
hospitality; Mrs. Barbara McMil McMillan
lan McMillan hospitality kist; Mrs.. Eld a
Tuckerman, publicity; Mrs. Haiel
Turk, telephone; Mrs. Joan Mur Mur-ninghan,
ninghan, Mur-ninghan, thrift shop; and Mrs.
Jane Cox, welfare.
Among those attending the
luncheon ai guesti were Mrs.
Raser. Dorothy Sehrecengost, Kay
Tomlinson, Jc Ann Chedeater, Rose
Leach, Ruth Ruby, Gale Bucha Buchanan,
nan, Buchanan, Noni Jaschen, Arlene Ca Ca-pelle,
pelle, Ca-pelle, Joanne Cockle, Kay Pan Pan-tell,:
tell,: Pan-tell,: Pat Grill, Mary Lou Miller,
Betty Van Wyck, Andrea Franks,
Ann Keely and Grace Anderson.
Door prizes were won by Ma Mabel
bel Mabel Leslie, Jane Bond and Louise
Mathlas.
Named To Dean's List
Miss Carol Perantie, second
year student at Pembroke Col
lege, Providence, R.I., has been
named to the Dean's List for ex exceptional
ceptional exceptional scholarship.
She is the daugher of Mr. and
Mrs. H. I. Perantie of Balboa.
Saturday Penny Social
Is Hlflhly Successful
THe Caribbean College Club's
annual Penny Sac al, held Satur Saturday
day Saturday evening ,at the Stringers
Clutt. was wef attended and term
"highly successful" by club mem members.
bers. members. Anthony Raymond served as
master of ceremonies, and Mrs.
A., A. Whitlock of Margarita en entertained
tertained entertained with accordian s-e 1 c-
tions".
Prize winners included Miss
Diane Shore of Gatun, who won
the prize donated by the French
Bazaar, and David Wilder of
France Field, who won the Sura Sura-ny
ny Sura-ny donation. The painting "Fish "Fishing
ing "Fishing Village" donated by Mrs.
Vera Pryor went to Mrs. R. T.
Connelly of Margarita, and S.
S. G. Simmons, British consul to

Set the one and only
GERM-FIGHTING TOOTHBRUSH
ammmmmm o Reaehet you Surgically Sterile t
O Mult to Uy Aetivtly Anil-
Pti to "P montfu in urt I
P InhibiM w itryl ALL type.
of ttlto tkat fill on 4r hold to it I
NEW If
n Or. West's II
I Miracle-Tuft 69'

Your Community Network

830 Kilocycles
PANAMA

L, pAtti tiJ DnvJ imti L

m Psmmm 2-0 HQ 107U
- ninth state.
Colon, won the tablecloth given
by Mrs. Harry Eno.
The mystery prize was won by
A. L. Logan of Coco Solo. More
than 150 prizes donated by club
members also wera awarded dur during
ing during the evening.
Hostesses for the social were
Mrs. W. S. Grady, Mrs. D. G.
Peters, Mrs. V. L. Morris and
Mrs. W. E. Rushng. Mrs E. W.
Wrenn was general chairman for
the event, with Mrs. J. F. Man Manning
ning Manning co-chairman.
Punch, coffee and cookies were
served by Mrs. E. W. Argo and
her committee.
Clayton Bridge Club
The Fort Clayton Officers' Wives
DiJh. fMt.k ...til tOTm-vi...
afternoon at on at the Clayton
Off cers Club
Mrs. Jack Morgan, 87-3134,
handling reservations.
IS
Rod Cress Cray Ladies
Capped In Ceremony
Graduation exercises for Gray
Ladies of the American Red
Cross were conducted last week
at the Red Cross Chapter House
in Cristobal.
Greeting to the graduating
class were extended by Dr. Bru Bru-nc
nc Bru-nc Eisen, superintendent of the
Coco Solo Hospital; B. I. Ever-
son, vice chairman of the Canal
Zone chapter of the Red Cross;
Leonard J. Meyer, director of .o .o-perations,
perations, .o-perations, Caribbean Command,
Red Cross; and Roger Adams,
chairman he Zone's Red Cross
chapter.
Mrs. Mary Dwyer, chairman of
the Cristobal chapters of Gray
Ladies, and Dr. Eisen presided
at the capping and awarding of
certificates.
Speakers at the exercises in included
cluded included Miss Hester Garrett, hos hospital
pital hospital field director of Gorgas
Hospital; Gerald W. McCurdy, as assistant
sistant assistant field director, Fort Gu Gu-lick;
lick; Gu-lick; Miss Florence Edbrooke, di director
rector director of Nursing Service, Coco
Solo Hospital; Mrs. Ruth Rubel Rubel-1',
1', Rubel-1', administrative assistant -of the
Cristobal :haipter; and Miss Hel Helen
en Helen Armstrong, assistant Director
of Service to military and veter
ana hospitals of the Red Cross.
Miss Armstrong1 i on a field trip
io the Isthmus from national
headquarters in Washington, D....
Mrs. Maxine Logan, vice chair chairman
man chairman of voknteer services at Cris Cristobal,
tobal, Cristobal, awarded service bars to
volunteers.
In the graduating class were
Mrs. Dor's lexis, Miss Mavis
Catherwood, Mrs. Camille Cetti,
Mrs. Edna Coward, Mrs. D i n a
DeFrees, Mrs. Helen, Diez, Mrs.

Casal Jewelry Store
Central Ave. 15-107 Near Fueria y Lux

What's Your Favorite''

David Constabl
Every Tuesday
1090 Kilocycles
COLON

mall J pr-tfttf tt LtmmL tU

Uw. 8.00 -tJ 10 m. mL
Enid Graham, Mrs. Rosa Josephs,
Mrs. Joan Munro, Mrs. Ruth
Pinkham and Mrs. Dorothy Van Van-tine.
tine. Van-tine. Serves bars were received by
Mrs. Audrey Barsi, Mrs. UUa
Hart, Mrs. iola StrAridge. Mrs.
Eugenie Borden, Mrs. Olga Nor Norman,
man, Norman, Mrs. Ruth Puller, Mrs. Ma
ry Dwyer, Mrs. Maxine Logan.
Mrs. Elsie Millspaugh, Mrs. Mar Margaret
garet Margaret Orr, Mrs. Esther Calcutt,
Mrs. Camille Cettie, Mrs. Ora
Clayton, Mrs. Virginia Patton,
Mrs. Barbara Young, Mrs. Helen
Bond.
Meeting
Boy Scout Ceremony
The Canal Zone Council of the
Boy Scouts of America will hold
a court and bridge of hnr
Thursday evening at T:30 in the
Skyroom of the Masonic Temple
All persons interested in the
Skyroom of the Masonic Temple
n Cristobal.
All persons interested In th
Scouting program are invited.
UjI Resnecls Paid
To Rep. Dan Reed
At Funeral Rites
DUNKIRK, N.Y., Feb. 23 (UPI)
Congressional colleagues and
relatives and friends paid their
last respects yesterday to Rep.
Daniel A. Reed, who set I longe longevity
vity longevity record in the House of Re Representatives.
presentatives. Representatives. Some 450 people attended serv services
ices services in Adams Memora'l Church
for the 'Republican legislator,
while hundreds more gathered out outside.
side. outside. Reed's body was laid to
rest in nearby Heridan, only a
short distance from where he was
born 83 years ago.
Rev. George G. Brooks, pastor
of Adams Memorial Church, said
in his eulogy: "Our Edan has civ-
en to family, to friends and to
country a warm, loving soul, a
life of radiant kindness and of
impecable integrity.
Reed, a staunch spokesman' or
conservative government, died -of
a heart ailment in Washington
last Thursday. He has served as
representative from New York's
43rd district for more than 40
years.
'Soul Winning' ;
Drive Annouhcec)
By RP Baptists
The Central Panama Baotist
Associationai Brotherhoold will ho
a "soul-winn'ng campaign next
Monday in the Calvary Baotist
Church at 7:30 p.m.
Special emphasis will be on
"More men for Christ."
The preacher selected for this
ssienment, is the Rev. David H.
Morgan, former moderator of the
Jamaica Baptist Association, and
of the Central Panama Baptist
Associaton up to October last
year.
One week after, a similar kind
of meeting will be held on the At At-'intic
'intic At-'intic side, in the First Isthmian
Baptist Church. Cristobal on
March 9 with the Rev. David A.
Jemmot as preacher.
Armchair Tour
At JWB Starts
iTonight At 7:30
i
j The USO-JWB will present an an-I
I an-I other in its popular aeries of Arm Arm-j
j Arm-j chair Tours tonight at 7:30.
At that time two films will be
shown as the armchair tourists
enjoy trips through France and
Span.
Servicemen and their families,
as well as residents of Panama
and the Canal Zone are invited to
he showing.
Disc Jockey
4:30 to 5 p.m.

. J- 4-1 ';J ..
' Xv if
iwTX -' ; n 'ST?-

if t r m "f i i .ii i in i Sftitx&ett$tH$!

RECEIVES BRONZE STAR

1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, Fort Kobbe, was presented the Bronte Star Medal (Meritorious) by
Col. Ralph A. Jones Jr., battle group commanding officer, at a recent ceremony. Snipes, who also
holds the Purple Heart and the Combat Infantryman Badge, received the medal for his "exemplary con conduct
duct conduct in ground combat against the armed enemy" while assigned to the 505th Parachute Infantry in
September, 1944, in the European Theater of Operations. The sergeant, whose home ft 4a Chester. Pt
has been in the Canal Zone since' October, 1957. He is squad leader in the reconnaissance platoon
M the company. Shown at the presentation, from left, are Jones, Snipes and 1st Lt. Lazlo-Jloranyi-Pogald,
reconnaissance platoon leader. (U.S. Army Photo) 1

wJ
) h

Alger Hiss, recently separated
from 'his wife, has found a new
interest an aspiring young ac
tress who toils as a hatcheck girl
at an East Side night club. .New
York detectives, in Havana to pick
up a fugitive, had a brush with
Errol Flynn at the Havana to pick
Just hot woroage, no blows ex exchanged;
changed; exchanged; Errol doesn't like cops
and lets them know it. .Lin
coln Kirstein, general director 01
the New York City Ballet, is off
to Japan to confer with the chaps
in charge of an ancient and color
ful troupe he'd like to import to the
united states, bo tar they've ne
ver been seen outside their native
land.i,.-!'ix-v i,s-
If Frafitkr Slnatra intends to" sleep
late in tne new apartment he s ta
ken at 40 central rark bo., he a
better have his bedroom sound
proofed; his next door neighbor,
uorotny barnoit, is inclined to
start vocalizing around 11:30 a.m
. .Juliette Greco drew more sta res
than anyone else in the room when
alje lunched at the Colony with Dar
yi Canuck, instead of ner usual
llowing aroun-the-shoulders cif-
mre, sne wore ner nair piled up
under a derby-type hat almost the
sort ot thing worn at horse shows
The state of Oscar Pe.Hiford's
health and band account is
becoming the greatest cause ce
jeore, in me wono oi pop music,
wnn me musician s manager. Lar
ry Douglas, charging that the es
tranged Mrs. Pettiford is responsi responsible
ble responsible tor the rumors that Oscar was
okay after his auto accident and
working again. However, the de
finitive word has arrived from Os
car in Eurone: he's soil ailme ha
writes, and he's broke, so the up upcoming
coming upcoming benefit bash at Birdland
will supply cash he desperately
needs.
For the "What's Next" deDart-
ment: a super-colosal supermar supermarket
ket supermarket network is plotting to offer
culture as a trading-stamp pre premium.
mium. premium. Arthur Rosenberg of ihi
ladelphia (president of Merchants
ureen btamp Corp. and vice-pre
sioent ot the Food Fair chain)
is sewing up a deaj which will
enable Mrs. Consumer to swap hter
Biuiery siore StamDS for record
ings, books or tickets to hit Broad
way piays. .Timmy Everett, of
ine cold Wind and th Warm"
has warned his understudy, Mi
cnaei iiadge, "Stay away from
me u you want to stay healthy
Tl.n 1 1 ..
'"c --uu sianea oecause tne un-
aerstuoy disconcerted Timmy by
iwemig ai mm irom the wings dur
ing a highly emotional and difli difli-cult
cult difli-cult scene.
A top ranking rock V roll song
writer, who pens those.pulsating
uvc wurua ior .ivis .Presley, a a-mong
mong a-mong others, can't seem to find
a girl who wants to listen to the
same sentiments from him. He's
one of Broadway's saddest cases,
haunting those "over 28" dances
in hopes tf masting someone
who'll care.
The Rene Bouche
Tennessee Williams'
poster for
new play.
"Sweet Bird of Youth," sounds as
If it matches the mood of the shoc shocker
ker shocker rather well. To quote the art artist,
ist, artist, it shows "a slinking figure of
a monstrous aging women in pur purple
ple purple sequins, looking just like a
snake". .Ray Anthony, who jiwt
snunied out of the life of Mamie
Van Doren, still likes his girl on
the blond and conspicuous side
He's been daiing San3ra Giles,
who m ght hr ve been invested by
Mamie. .Cubans believe ex-president
Batista has more than Fidel
tastro s revenge to fear as .le
Idles in the Dominican Republic.
Some of the- Mafia boys are mad
at him, too; he collected millions
for the gambling concessions Inat
they're going to have to buy all
over again from Fidel.
Barbara Bel Geddes is lookinc
lover the midtown lofts. She ana

Set. John M. Snioes. of Hpadnuartors tnA H.aimia. rm

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen

her husband, Windsor Lewis, are
thinking of establishing another off
Broatiway theatre. .Old Time
New Jersey politicians can't wait
until "Nocky Johnson's book is
published. "Nocky," now 75, was
the Big Man in the thirties, und
wielded considerable power unnl
he was jailed for income tax eva evasion.
sion. evasion. There's been a bit of shud
dering over the news that he' sin
Atlantic Uty quietly writing his
memoirs. .The current rage in
mnem is "breakfast dances," held
at armories or dance palaces and
drawing crowds in the thousands.
ine festivities start at 10 in the
evening and wind up at 6 a.m
top attractions 'like Lionel Hamp Hampton
ton Hampton furnish the 'music.
ine many-faceted Kim Novak
comes up with another memorable
quote in tne March issue of 'Red
dook. when writer Bill Davidson
asked her what made her rtm into
the ocean with her clothes on, Kim
explained: "I can't stand planning
I like to do things when I feel
u em. i iiKe tne ocean, but I don't
uKe me wnole thing of walking
back for a towel, getting into a
bathing suit, and so on. By the
..lie i uo uiat i don't feel like
awuiumng any more. s u,hn i
'on ia 1oa$ walk alon8 the beach
and I suddenly tel niro o; i
I
say to myself, 'What difference
ooes it make
if my dress docs
I go in."
get wet?' and
Tiny Infanl Loses
Struggle For Lffe
SAN DIEGO. Calif irok i
(UPI) Tina Lou Lutz, a one
pound f:ve ounce baby, born oiifr
months prematurely, died last
night -two days and 35 minute? aft-
here" brn 8t Mercy HopHl
, Physicians said the 12-inch Ion
infant died at 7:20 p.m. At the
time of her death, the infant
daughter of Mrs. Patricia Luts
28, National City, Cal f., wis lii
an isolette equipped with an oxy oxygen
gen oxygen tank.
Tina Lou had been given little
chance of survival by doctors, al al-though
though al-though a baby which weighed 12
ounces at birth survived in Chi Chi-cago
cago Chi-cago in 1936.
The baby was too weak to be
weighed before death. Doctors
had guessed her we!ght to be less
than one pound. The 1 n a n ti
length earlier was determined as
eight inches by dolors who held
a ruler to the isolette.
Frank V. Lanham,
federal f areerman,
Dies In Atlanta
ATLANTA, Feb. 23 (UPI)
Frank V. Lanham, retired ferfar
al career official arid son of the
late Gov. S. W. T. Lanham of Tea Tea-as,
as, Tea-as, d'ed at a private hospital here
yesterday.
Lanham retired about four
years ago as a supervisor of the
realty oTlce and as chief of tens tensing,
ing, tensing, assignment and Mt'lhrition
branches of the federal General
Services Administration.
The elder Lanham was cover
nor of Texas from 1901 to 1900
'.anharn' bro'her. Fritz B. Lan Lanham
ham Lanham of Fort Worth, was a t).S
representative from Texas for 28
yeors.
e is aiso survived by h'l wi-
Is. Clarke of Shreveport, La

BY OSWALD JACOIY
Written for NI A Service
NORTH A I
4k A 8 7 S L
Aiee
81
10878
WEST EAST (D)
awioa 4
kqj vrsi'
10 7 8 KQJ4
K eAQ84
80UTH
4KQ8S
, V832
, A88I
' '-, ...
North and South vulnerable
East 8outh Weat North
te Pate IV Pais
2 V Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead 5
What does a top duplicate play player
er player do about opening 12-point
band?
smetimes they open,' some
times they pass. Here is one that
almost every East, player chose
to open with one diamond at the
recent summer 'Nationals Invart
ably, West responded one heart
wnereupon most East players
chose to rebid to one no-trump.
There would be no morei bid bidding
ding bidding and East would make his
one no-trump contract after losing
four spades nd two aces.
Three Blast piayers raised their
partners to two hearts. Two Wests
made their contracts and tied for
top. The other West was the vic victim
tim victim of very good defense and went
down one trick for an absolute ze zero.
ro. zero. North opened the fice of dia diamonds.
monds. diamonds. The Jack was played f-om
dummy and south signaled With
the nin instead of winning with
the see.
A trumn lead produced West s
king and North's ace and North
Blayed ma three of diamond. This
me South went up with the ace
and gave hit partner a ruff. Two
spader tricks were taken next and
South led with his last diamond.
West could still make his con
tract if he guessed to ruff, high
and oick uo North's ten of trumoi
but West went wrong and ruffed
with the nine, whereupon North
made hii ten spot and set the
1 DoubU l aT I A
' Yon, South, hold:
tQ78 A)
What do you do?
Zr? T
aawir mumt mi .
.w- "Ha
TODAY'S QUESTION
,1"? J,rtoer eontlnuea with a
5e i&tv ub- Whrt55

NEW YORJC. HIPI1 At 1P.t

to persons including p eaiicren,
died during the; week. end 'in
rash of fires that- swept v homes
and apartments,1 1. Unitea jeress la
ternational count showed Sunday.
. The wont trteaAv nni-urrn i-.t
Samrday at CJhrystal CityiS Tex.,
where a mother and aavan'Af her
eighty chUdrea -.a ed u. a lire be-
In oil buraing kitchen store
The tuviei nf Un -. CnPA Pn.
drigues anti one -of her children i
Were found on tha Vfhrt flnnf .n
the four-room frama hnnB Sir
other, children' perished In their
Else When. chlMron whh
ed in firea Included fiv t Cr
field,-Md.; four In Boston; three
in both Hanson. Mian ; ami Trlahn
Falls,: Idaho; two at both Los
Angeles and Shirley, Mass.. and
one at Brockton, Mass.
Thft IM Arifrnlea tracrtulv olon
Killed one map, while seven other
uyiif uieo, ,j) iires at south fort fort-land,
land, fort-land, Maine,-, Lynn, Mass.; Mil Mil-ford,
ford, Mil-ford, N.H.; Chicopee, Mass. ; Go Gothenburg,'
thenburg,' Gothenburg,' Neb.; Rockport, Ind.,
snd New Bedford, Mass.

T rj

HAPPY ESKIMO BOY One-years-old Eskimo Peter Ting Ting-maniak
maniak Ting-maniak enjoys an unusual children's swing in Camsell Hospital
in Edmonton, Canada. The hospital has an exclusive clientele clientele-Canada's
Canada's clientele-Canada's Eskimo and Indian population.

Sign US Pact, Become Soviet Enemy,
Red Ambassadors Note Tells Iranians

TEHRAN, Iran (UPI) The
Sbviet ambassador to Tehr,i
warned yesterday that Iran "deli "deli-n
n "deli-n tely will become our enemy" if
it signs a planned mumal mili
tary aid pact with the United
Stales.' . ...
In a separate statement, Irani Iranian
an Iranian Premier Manuischer Eghbal
retorted: "we are not afraid of
any threats."
The semi-official newspaper (Et (Et-elaat
elaat (Et-elaat reported the gDvernmlent
sent the Soviets a slrongly-worded
note Saturday prtoesting recent
ant -Iranian propaganda.
Ambassador Nikolai Pegov bit bitterly
terly bitterly assailed Iran's "open insult"
to Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khru Khrushchev
shchev Khrushchev by abruptly breaking off
non-aggression pact talks n Teh Teh-rn
rn Teh-rn earlier this month. He said
Iran brushed off Russia as it
would a postage stamp power.
"Iran treated us as u We were
Luxembourg," he complained.
"We had made as majny con concessions
cessions concessions to Iran as possible," he
said. "We even. agreed to let her
sta is the Baghdad Pact.
"We undertook to guarantee ner
independence and territorial in integrity
tegrity integrity ... but Iran was bellicose
from the start."
The ambassador said Soviet
delegates to the Tehran talks ac accused
cused accused Iran of dupl city in break breaking
ing breaking them off. Pegowstad the talks
resulted from Iran's "very own
proposal."
Iran, he wt&fMd, 'Viefihltely
w ll become. our eriemy'lf if signs
t bilateral military agreement
with the United States:'
' The Shah of Iran announced
Saturday that such a pact would
be, signed. Only last, week, the
government announced that de despite
spite despite Russian threats, it was re re-ma
ma re-ma ininf solidly in the Weste-n
eamp. -
Pegov was irate over what he
considered the shabby treatment
given the Soviet delega ion.
.Iranian Premier Eghbal ap appeared
peared appeared unruffled.
"Let them shout and abuse us
until they get tred," he told
United Prest International. ?'If
they think they can Intimidate us
and force us to relinquish our
rights and interests bv these
means they are sadly m staken."
Eghbal picked up a bundle ot
papers from the "incoming" tray
on his desk. He said they : Wers
Radio Moscow tirades against
iran monitored by Rad'o Tenran.
He dropped them unopened in the
"outgo ng" tray to,, ,be. removed

iromU8 offlce.'"'-

'j; I,;

, At Idaho F.Us, fire Of nndeter-'
nined origin Sunday swept the
two i; story frame home of Mrs.
Dorothy iknsen and clalmedf the
lives of three of her four children,
hcluding 4-ear-old twins Wendy
and Bruce.- The fourth child, Vic-
W, 10,' jumped from a second floor
window and was critically injur-
tuo youngsters aged 2 ind 1
also died Sunday in a tire in the r
home at Shirley.' Mas na Vnrt

Deven?, where their father, Spe-
puuBi- o-c ivwnara i larisuan,
s stationed, v ;--r u v
The Crisf ield. Md. fire claim rl

the lives of five children of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Miles; who
yere trapped by flames in ? th
second floor of their fraaie home),
At Boston, four children of Mr.
and Mrs. Orland Watk'ns were
also trapped." when a spaca heater,
exploded near their, bed and ig ignited
nited ignited ,the dwelling., ;
Three children of Richard Sulli-
tan lost their lives when a blaze
swept their farm home. Sullivan,
however, was able to tavs his

eight other chllJrea.
I "You see,", he smiled, "I have have-1
1 have-1 n't got time o read a single"
word of this abuse against us.
"On the contrary, the more the
Russians attack, the greater will
be the unicy of the Iranian na-
ton.
"We must alf die- once and it
is much h?'.!pr In hnnnrnhlv
than live dishohof ably."
Russia-China Ties
Discussed On TV
By Adlaf Stevenson
NEW YORK (UPI) Adlal E.
Stevenson said yesterday he be be-l'eved
l'eved be-l'eved Red China' mushrooming
population ws causing "anxiety"'
in spacious Soviet Russia, but he
warned that the West should not
underestimate the solidarity of
the Moscow-Peip:ng ties; 1
Speaking on the Edward R.
Murrow CBS-TV program, "Small
World," Stevenson also called for
an East Wesr meeting without
fanfare, w'th an advance agenda
ind away from the glare of pub publicity.
licity. publicity.
The twice-defeated Democratic
oresidential nom'nee said he; he he-Heved
Heved he-Heved oo mUch importance ; had
been attached to a summit meet meet-ng
ng meet-ng and that m conseuqence.
had been magnified ''out of all
'woportion." .A .' ''
Author Edward : cranxsnaw,
Brit'sh authoritv on Wie. Soviet
Union, said hi belieyed th "vast
wares'" "of Russia near Chln.t
would some "day prove temptin
to the te"'"'! Chinese Tommur
nlst uopulatloa., ; N'
"Chna ns always oeen an oc occupational
cupational occupational nightmare on the oart
Rttsslan foreipn secretaries,"
Crankshaw'sjid. "It still is.,"
But he saia ne oeievea the un un-ttle1
ttle1 un-ttle1 area of Russia, which
the Cwr Irled to populate and
which Russian Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev also Is trying to pop populate
ulate populate "sooner or.; later are go'nsj
o have ; to receive lmmlerants
from China, either as guests or ;
is Invaders." '" "' ,;
However, he said he'.'' agreed
with Stevens in that to count on
any break between Russia and
Red Chins, n the Immediate fu
ture. or any calculable future, it
reallv ta nut' miri1vti in4 a.

"iv'Vajhi

m..

;iiptir
, I

Mm

ife earAaa.M 1



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: ... .- t "''.',(-...-, ; : t v. v--- :, : :"- v. ";v - ,.,. - v : ...',; ,...'.-'.' -!, .
ft.,4-1'- vvr;; ':'rrV"'lP;"v'''''.V,jv' ';:v;'iV'"1;I)usters of Latin vAmerican Tyrant

r ... :.. -r- n

j .
. ,
s
1 Cti v .11"
'."

1

1

v

1923 Dirtctinfl Anna Nilsson in production of "Adorn i RrtM,

11942-rKisi from Gloria Swonson for his 30th yeor in moviM.

1 I x Tt
; vVv-

Sparking Similar Thoughts in Spain

By DREW PEARSON

'fx

I ,, feBi..,wrCTiiriOTii"i'- iZZ:ZZ

I .MiTpylour. ? As coworkors knew him best. iVi-ous$ tram aopnio u

i.7J3r-TT jrn w t v ; 4 l vi fcn, iurni r turned to films in 1912 to form a company wsw yionee

tBrousnout in worw mw iw wuii ""Yb.7 V. Ji Jl-I- r- h.Mit mnitt Wollvwooo "The Squaw Man," raroa la ax. a
JS:- -n-wi wm.)u died at 77, oroduced 71 fltal in 46 yeart. He brought maw jn wiiywow-w ..R ., of ftTh Ten Commandmentt."

fans at too height of movie larityClorta Swansorr,
rtirir iirr:. "TTT.ir tx.v.-j r- t wr. Bill mooalon. Cassidy)

Bovd and many othexs. ieMille started at a playwright, Uke .Ua lattier, Henry

hi long Vumngm VirfSSTwid a half

Coat wa out at U muuon aoiiars, cunuiucu -
for hU versiop la 1923. DeMilte was also prominent In radio work.

National Engineers' Week' 1 i i

Enigiiieerihg Career In Space Era
Demands, Broad ience Preparation

o what VlnH nf eduational back

ground doea ;young person" need

today lor an engineeruiK:ci?

A. Solid preparation. in a wide
range of basic science subjects and
nlentv of mathematics. s

ficieneo rand t mathematics,, fOh
tmnt -nri mathematics--those are

th kev words heard over and ovr

at career; conferences', for mgn

school seniors interested in en
ineerin8.',,; ;" :

ah ifo nn imrla in an era

Jt .uu v
When industry expects engineers
to be able te work in such exo.ic
new fields as electronic computer
systems; transicor design, outer
space environment, inertial na navigation
vigation navigation devices for space .vehi .vehicles,
cles, .vehicles, atomic energy, rocket fuels
and telemetering.
- This month, atudettts attending
high school career conferences are
haovin- mora about the science re

ouiremenls for engineering as the

members ot one 01 we arsci Viv
fesslons observe National Engm-
n' Wut Fh. 22-28.

What the students will hear at

these career sessions is a message
that gets right to the heart of one

of the most crucial proo.em
ing the U. S. today the encour encouraging
aging encouraging of properly qualified young
tfeople for life work in the fields
of science and engineering.
ENGINEER BUILDER!

vehicle launching' represents the, engineer could not master gradu gradu-concehtrated
concehtrated gradu-concehtrated efior.s of enSiner-Ute courses in sucn tielos a solid

' ''. . T . . 1 1 I mi

ing teams throughout a Wide seg- suie pnysics, nuiueaum, m -ment
of industry. , 9l lectromcs. wuhout this Uieoretic-

The individual engineers in wis ai xnowieage, ne louiu nut uo v
' a.: i ... i. j t a I ti.n.r n f ihA ..fitrQTlinnn tt.

team effort tnnst' hivo- a hnrail

nlan fllM. hftAlrjfnnnil -ft' tla anit

probdth 11 : T"

Th chemk al engineers cannot

simply refer to existing charts and

tables for data on wnat iueis to
soeciiv. Nor can th plwitrnnin on.

gineerg expect to find ready-made

u vices ui gum a rocnev 10 xne
moon or measure the radiation of
SDace a thousand miles from tha

earth.

tooainnui worn at the advanced le

i vel of modern industrial research

ATOMIC INDUSTRY

A whole new industry

energy is being built

' Thpr wai a time when n en

pInPM- bi most likely a builder

of roads, bridges, dams heavy ma machinery,
chinery, machinery, of railroads. He had a
crnorf foundation in basic maUie-

mtlc hut his work could best

V. ti.rlhH no thn nractical CX

1 1 1 ; -t l. l,L,ini nlantlfii

fiiouauou ui luug'uiuTiu i."""v
aws and discoveries.
Today the picture had changed
completely. The engineer is more
likely to be working right up with
ka Tivlriot hemifit. nr other re-

iiph arinhtist aa Indutrial firms

join in pushing back the frontiers

of the unuflKown.
Th noinper U InrrAaainCllv ex

TmiA tv have, or h work-in. to

ward, a Fh. D. His education has
stressed higher mathematics, phy physics,
sics, physics, and chemistry. t
If certain engineering education
trends continue, the student may
find, it he chooses an engineering
career, that his undergraduate col col-course
course col-course schedule, for enaineer-

ini? will be made up entirely of

math and physical science sub-

Tn' understand the kind od edu

cational background an engineer
needs today it Is necessary to grasp
the enormous scope of the icien.
tifle and technological wcpsrfiton

te wliilqh we are now inyoiveo.

inrougn science, mn -Iv
chanrina the faee of the earth,

utlllring atomic forces as sources
- of energy, orbiting devices around
Our planet, the moon, an .even
th aun. 'and la onlv a few years

Sway from tuiUy settina foot
, on other worlds millions of miles
out in space. ;
As a part of this expansion of
. intnllApfuail hnHrnn anslneera

are finding themselves developing
.plant and .specifications in areas
which" are largely uncharted a a-reas
reas a-reas which have been .researched
onlv around the f rinses.

Take, for example, the current

military and civil activity concern concerning
ing concerning the exploration of our solar
system. 'The conquest of space la
so far,'' and wlU continue to be,
ihm anHnroriitrt nf tnllllnna nf an.

gineering man hours Each, apace

Every instrument package "pay
load" in a multi-stage rocket j:alls
for a unique engineering design for
a particular research program.
OUTER SPACE
The further we move 'into outer
SDaee. th 1ar nhvsiricts artH o.

neeri must be able to rapidly In In-the
the In-the way of factual information

regarding temperature, density,

radiation intensity, and the like.
Enelneera wnrkino in th mans

projects have to design equipment
...Ul.k ...111 .. i "j.. .!' ....

uitu Ym luinnum unuer many un

UVWB CUilUlUUUSt 1(-

As research scientists .learn a

bout conditions in the vtcinitv nf

U i I. .. i

uie iiiuuu ana me pianeis; enci

neera mint ha atfla fo renlHltr Tm

. - w ..w .rM 111
corporate this new knowledge into
At.!. a. ..

uur vurrrem equipment oesiun.
Th antenna kVa..ii.J I.J

by ngineers today is:perhaps best

... yvBvtauuaw CUUI.S1'
tlonal requirements set up by ma-

uy luuuBuiut linn! wnn iarae re-
Saorh sstiri fAuolnnmnnr

grams.

Theae firma often evnoot tha

. vnwn
young engineer to continue his edu-
XI A. A. . ..

cauon, ai we graauate level, jn a
number of highly theoretical and
advanced courses.
The reason for this is that in industrial
dustrial industrial research may wedl mean
the difference between Industrial

progress and stagnation,
without a well rounded prep

aration in mathematics and the

basic physical sciences, the young

atomic

on the

tneoretlcal foundations of the "'new
physics." Engineers in this indus industry
try industry must have an educational back

eiouna in atomic theory, io ac-

auire this bacKgrouna in couegc,

tnpv need a solid hieh school pre

paiation in mathematics, physics,
nnri p n e m i a t r v. To atieo.uai.e-

)v enna with these buiecLa in hieh

school the student should have a
Eood undertandine of elementary

arithmetic.

It is inat thi.4 tvne nf analvsis

of our eduational problems that

has resuuea in so many puunc

exDressions of concern over the

future ot science and technology

in the United States. With our mi

litary and industrial capacity so

closely allied with progress in sci science
ence science and engineering, it is clear,
that a great deal. depends on the
achievements of our iutiire scient scientists
ists scientists and engineers.
If these achievements are strong
ly influenced by educational prep preparation,
aration, preparation, it would seem that we
hav no time to lose in making sure
that niir nrnnerlv mialifieri Conner

" I-- I T J D
people have the opportunity for the

nest possible elementary am nign
school background iju math and
science stjjects. f

4

1 -? 1
I -m rrmm wmTmm

1 HSM)w

Latin Amerclana, who start

ed fighting for freedom irom
Spain 15Q years ago but only
now are getting rid ol tnelr

native tyrants, may be inspir inspiring
ing inspiring a similar move In ;tneir
mnt.Her nmint.rv &Dain.'

J M

After 20 yeara of Cianuestme
opposition to Francisco Franco's
Hintntrtrahin hv half a dOZeil

nniitiral btouds. several of these

recently joined to form the
Spanisn Union. Furtnuinioie
they announced publicly that
ic will combat -the government
openly and lay the groundwork
.for a coalition regime "when
. ranco falls."
Thla. knlil ctM nn Out of

wvaw r W
the underground was formal formal-Used
Used formal-Used at a banquet held in
Madrid s Memfis Hotel, the
eveninx of Jap. 25. More than
70 political leaders and a
dozen high army officers at attended.
tended. attended. T.lheraJ Monarchists a fac

tion that wants Don Juan of

Bourbon, pretender to the

SDanlsh throne, to become ine

ficmrehenri nf a narllamentarv

monarchy modeled on England's
were prime organizers of the

H-namnn nninn

Every anti Franco political
group in the country except the
Communists was asked to send
representatives to the banquet.

Among uiose wnicr. accepiea

were the tleft Republican par party,
ty, party, two smaller Democratic

parties, and the Basque and
Catalonian Nationalists. The

latter two made it clear that

their men would be sent only
as observers.

However, three big parties
which have kept Intact through
two decades of persecution
the Socialists Syndicalists, and
Anarcnists -r rejeated the in

vitation because thev felt the

program drawn up by the Un

ion did not guarantee tnem
adequate representation in a
future government.
So serious were those pre present
sent present at the banquet that they
spent nearly six hour! revis

ing the program to meet ob objections
jections objections of the three absent
groups. The modifications a a-ereed
ereed a-ereed on include the promise
that Socialists, Syndicalists
and Anarchists would .take
part in a constituent assem

bly tb draff a new -constitution
and that each would
Bare at leas, one cabinet post
in the coalition regime.
Sociallslar Syndicalists; and

Anarchists (who in Spain, aje

not the old-fashioned ijomb ijomb-throwinir
throwinir ijomb-throwinir variety but sort of

tree-wheeiinor liberals). have

taken the new proposerts under
consideration. One informed
source predicts that -they will

all eventually join- the opposi opposition
tion opposition united front-

Thia informant, a veteran

Latin American diplomat who

returned from Madrid a few

weeks ayo, after serving as his
country's ambassador for six
years, gives the following anal analysis
ysis analysis of Spain's current situa

tion:

"Franco and most of the peo

ple around him were really
shaken by public reaction to the

recent nnanciai scanaai, involv involving
ing involving black-market deals in dol

lars by a lot of, the country's

prominent firms and families.

Spaniards were saying open openly
ly openly that thfs proves no one has
any confidence left In the gov government
ernment government or the national econ-

rtmti Those or us in me qidiw" . i

matic corps who had been thera

some time got the impression
talking with Spanish officials,
that Franco had finally realiz -ed
he would never be able to3
name his successor. r .;r.
"Besides, people all over Spain
. i ,ilAitt4ni tviltlinat . JT t.

nave oeeu iuuuwuis
rfeveionments in Latin America

closely, ever since reruu
thrown out. -
"Every time another dicta-,.,
tor fell io Latin America, the
comments got bolder and
' more widespread. At first you-W
aI. kairil them in the CON

feehouses and bars, but late-.-.,
ly even night-club comedians i
make double-edged Jokes a
bout It."
Three of the liberal monarch"
nruanized the Jan. 29

banquet were called to Spanish Spanish-National
National Spanish-National Police Headquarter'
for questioning, Feb. 4, but were.!
released after five hours' inter

rogation.

incidentally, not a worn oi
the meeting annenrerf in Fran-t

co's rigidly cnotrolled press, yet r
the story is already common-'-
knowledge throughout Spain.

JACK W. NIEBLING, Braniff's station manager at Tocumen Air Airport
port Airport (right) receives a hearty handshake from Robert C; Hatch,
Braniff manager in Panama, and a gold-and-diamond pin in rec recognition
ognition recognition of 15 years of loyal services to the airline, thus becom becoming
ing becoming the first member in Braniff's Latin American Division to com complete
plete complete such length of service. Niebling was station manager for
Braniff in Denver, Colorado, for a number of years before his
j transfer to Panama over a year ago.

OPPORTUNITY

Kalleck Sees Voters Going

Republican In 60 Elections

Fncrineerinir in the aernnd half

nf the 20th Centura is a rareer of

opportunity. Interested young peo

ple or tneir parents may obtain

a free booklet .which gives the ba basic
sic basic facts about tfiis challenging
profession'. i "
The booklet, "Elnglneering. A
Career of Opportunity' is avail available
able available from the National. Society of

Professionil Engineers, 2029 K

Street, Northwest, Washington, D

Fisher Silent On Marriage To Liz;

Friends Predict Nuptials In May

House GOP leader Charles A. Hal Hal-leck
leck Hal-leck predicts that the nation's

voters will elect both a Republic

an President and Congress in lHoU.
Halleck said in a radio interview

yesterday that the voters are

"coming back to their senses.
He added: "I believe a lot of peo people
ple people already are beginning to real

ize what a bad mistake tney maue
by turning against the GOP in
158.'
The House leader declined to
m.soi whn the IflfiO Rennhiiran

presidential nominee would be but

conceded that vice presiaent tucn tucn-ard
ard tucn-ard M. Nixon and New York Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller had a head

start in the race.
U.S. News and World Report, a

weekly news magazine published

in wasmngton, said toaay mat tne
hnif0 for nreairient in I960 has

narrowed down to Nixon and four

Democrats. It said Nixon is well

ahead of Rockefeller for the GOP
nnnif not inn

In a copyrighted article the ma

gazine listed the Democratic frpnt-

-..nnare 11 Kens XTIIBri avmiDK-

ton, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon
B. Johnson, and Adlai E. Steven Stevenson.
son. Stevenson. It said Democratic leaders
put Symington ahead with Steven

son in secona piace ana iveiuieuy

third. L .,
uaiiapVc siatpmpTit came amid

these other political developments

on TV programs:

Kennedy said ne is no. a can-

tMate "at this time" and it would

be inappropriate to announce his

intentions lor a campaign annui
two years away. 1
Con Wurman V.. Talmadfe (D-

Ga.) said he favored Johnson for

u; nurtti'o nrpciriehtlnl nomination.

He called Johnson one of the ablest

men he had ever seen.

- OX-

HOLLYWOOD. Feb. 23 (UPI)

Singer Eddie Fisher maintained
silence today on his plant to mar
ry Elizabeth Taylor but a friend

saia me expected union wouia not
take place until May at the ear

liest and even then the vows
would have to- be taken outside

csinornia to gain any legality.

One of the boyishJooklng 20-

year old lingers friends 8aid

"It's almost physically impossiDic
for Fisher to break away from his

many snow, business commitments
and get married before .May)1
"He has too many 'commitments
till then," the friend, said, "bene-
Ml 1 1. 1. 1. 1 iY.

nil. snows, uuumiiks ana io iun.n,
And he cant marry Liz and live

legally witn her in either. Califor California
nia California or New York s
tlehhle Rpvnnidi wan awarded

an interlocutory decree if divorce

from t uner last tnursaay in a io io-minute
minute io-minute court appearance .during

Which she testified he had become
"Interested in another woman."
Before the divbrce, becomes fin final
al final under California law alio re re-ntrniid
ntrniid re-ntrniid in New Ynrk -the ac

tress must go jnto court again and
apply for the deireeniit she can-
tint An thtd Until' a v.ar hn nit.

ea. uniy mra vwouia r isnw or
Debbie for that matter be free
to marry iln California. f

Fishers friend, however, point
a4 nut nno nnaflihlA' atoniiA tf 'm

cape for the touslerha.'red' crooner

anil the wlnoweil -MJfift l avlnr, nv.

ing, "of course they iould get

marnea overseas ana sweat ,h

out." rtfc .v ; k7it 14

Debbie, apparently without any
burning heart interest at the mo moment,
ment, moment, plans to continue hen film
Work and wllj fly to Spain next
month1 to. make a picture with
Glen Ford after completing a cur current
rent current production- hr Hollywood.'
k i ..,".'( !-.'''.. 'H.i irViiU'a:f MAik ,sr,;'W -'

Ike Visits Farm

Al Gettysburg,

Plays With Kiddies

,,GETTYSBUM)IFaD, 13w

t upi) president tcisennoiver iook
advantage f warm,:unny weath

er yesterday to make an unan

nounced visit to his farm and

romp with his four grandchildren

The President, who' skipped

church, drove away from the

White House cate in his bifl limou

sine Khoftfv before 9 a.m. afriv

ine in Gettysburg a 'little less than

two hours later.

He went first to the handsome

urhito hnncrnlnw at the far north

west rnrnpr of his farm. It belonSS

to nis son ana aaujnier-u.u.w,
Mai. and Mfs. John Eisenhower.

Mra Eisenhower has not vet re

turned from her trip to Elizabeih

Arden's Maine Chance beauty re resort
sort resort in Arizona. .

There was no prior public an announcement
nouncement announcement of the v 1 s i t. The
White Hmiae nrinrinallv said onlv

the President was taking an auto

mobile ride.

White House renorters learned

of the trip, however, and drove

to Gettysburg on their own.

PLANE SETS RECORD

RTRMINOHAM. Ala. (UPI! A

four-entrtne Delta Airlises DC7B

set an unofficial flight record

from Dallas, Tex. ,to Brmingham

Vealerdav nf ('.ne hour and 27 min

utes. It flew at speeds up to 600

miles per hour.

IT'S LIKE MONEY
IN THE BANK

When

iB I- ',.'' '.'t

m (A (a

I dp

at

VI

you buy

AND WIN in our
FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE

1 31

.. I -mr.

Triis

'S LUCKY WINERS

'i(5

Cecil Payne
Maymie Edwards
Corina H. de Walker
Howard J. Shearer
vSsaW0'
Cregoria Huertas
Octavla de Mayorga

Ligia Chiari
Pasouala de Gonzalez
H6ctor A.. Torres
Alexis Lindo
Chenda de Parpja
Carmen Ortiz'
Manuel Ferrer Valdt

For Every Room in Your Home
HOME FURNISHINGS

Style & Value Leaders

ui

4th

Mr. Comfy

amttun tf axom

Of July Ave. & H St

Wd

burnishing Stofifi

Tel. 2-0725

' '44

J

Aviation Pioneer
E. C. Black Dies;

Funeral Tomorrow

JBE-INIXIINUIUI,. ii.n., SVU. -a
(UPI ) Services be held tomorrow

afternoon at petersborougn ior
rvi Pdward C. Rlaek. an aviation

pioneer who died Saturday at the
age of 63.
Rlarlr aerved with the British

and American air forces during
World War I and received the "Vic "Victory
tory "Victory Medal and the British Gener General
al General Service Medal.
In 1924 he led the first mass

formation night flight across coun

W J ....

He assisted in the development
of aviation as a military weapon

between the first and second
unnlrf War Tliirlnt 'ttie ppnnd

war he commanded Shepard Field

at wicnita t am, xexas.
Black served in the New Hamp Hampshire
shire Hampshire legislature between 1946 and
1954 ana was a member of the

New Hampshire constitutional con convention
vention convention in 1956.

San Antonio Go-Op

To Meet Tomorrow

A special general assembly Is

oiifvri fnr tomorrow for mem-

bers of the San Antonio de Pa

dua Cooperative.

Mmebers were asuea to lane

aimer at least, two friends to

the meeting which is being call called
ed called to consolidate and reaffirm
the cooperative atmosphere a a-mone
mone a-mone members. Members will

learn how they can actively

participate in the membership
drive.

The mpptintr will cet nnder-

Why promptly at 7:30 p.m. at

the French society Han.

cent r no t ik Pi irink

KNOXVTLLE, Tenn.(UPI)

Convicted of drunkert driving,
Mark A. Kollock told Judse H.I

P. Pollard he was going to sell
his car because "it always gets
me into trouble."
"Why not qui t d r i n k i n g 1

i- Lstead," the judge asked.
"I lon't guess 1 could do that,"

Kollock replied.
SHIP FEARED SUNK

REYKJAVIK, Iceland (UPI)
The lighthouse service, -vessel

Uermotnr was mlisinff and far

ed sunk off southwest Iceland to

day with U men aboard. Authori Authorities
ties Authorities said the 200-ton vessel, foun
dered in a storm.

I

R3D gcaGucai
CD tUTB

VV..'i'-

-

1 h 1

m vi i m m

A. f,W X ill '4'--V 1 !,

. ,- i:.V V'.':'''-
w., : m1h 4 , iimii im nan n-J.iUii.i.Mi.Titin-il nut- n M -f tt iV "I" '"i1 'fTi -"tl' i iitl 1 'V ". il..... -... m.. .. ..... . ,.

.V
i
I

la



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
MONDAY, FEBRUARY X95S
"TTTTo 1 If If T TT"h o
...
Micks innU nanixnous jwecision
W 1 iJ-

I AGE SIX

k "- -"f W"

Horacio Scores Easy Victory

In Ramoncita.firias

JUST A SLIP Promising bantamweight Hector Hicks of Co'
Ion hits the canvas after slipping in the second found of last
night's battle at La Macarena in which the local lad scored a
unanimous decision over No. 2 ranked world flyweight contender.
Ramoncito Arias of Venezuela.
- (Photo by Rodolfo Mendoza)

Thomas, Delaney Shatter
High Jump, Mile Marks

By OSCAR FRALEY
NEW YORK (UPI) John
Thomas, the fabulous freshman
from Boston University, was vot voted
ed voted the "outstanding athlete" Sun Sunday
day Sunday in the National AAU cham championships
pionships championships for hjs. record-shattering
leap of 7 feet, 3fl inches higher
than any other man has jumped
in history.
Thomas' mark was the most
impressive of five world records
set at Madison Square Garden
Saturday nicht and it earned him
44 points and seven first p'ar
votes among sports writers par par-tic;pating
tic;pating par-tic;pating in the balloting.
Ron Delany of Ireland, who set
a world indoor mile record of
4:02.5 while romping to his 35th
straight indoor triumph, finished
second in the balloting with 34
points and throe first-place votes.
O'Brien Gains Seventh Title
Third in the voting was Lt. Bill
Dellinger of the Air Force on the
basis of his world indoor record
record of 13:37 seconds in the
three-mile event, and fourth was
shot-nutter Parry O'Brien of Los
Angeles, whose world record toss
of 62 feet, 1 inches earned him
the AAU title for the seventh
straight time.
Bob Backus of Tufts set the
fifth world mark when he lr'av'"'
the 35-pound weight, 66 fee.t, 2ft
inches.
The record-happy crowd of 15, 15,-789
789 15,-789 thought it. would see the 17-

Editor: CONRADO SARCEANT

PANAMA
AHOMC
CAN III A.
TQDAY
CAPITOLtO
.35 0.20
DUEL IN APACHE
WELLS
Jim Davis
- Also
PAWNEE
O. Montgomery

iimrn m rai i. urn1' m

k HOMrt

year-old Thomas go even higher
than he did in beating the former
world standard of seven feet, one
inch, set outdoors by Russia's Yu Yuri
ri Yuri Stepanov.

Meet officials raised the bar to
seven feet, two inches and Thorn
as nat wuiitlgi tpitp, ibut his
coaclL wdulinJl M fciV Jxtend
himself.
Staaes Brilliant Final Quarter
Delany scored his victory in the
mile with a brilliant 56.5 closing
quarter that erased his 4:03.4
world niart of last year. Trailing
Hungary's Istvan Rozsavolgyi by
five yards with one lap to go,
Delany turned on the steam,, o
win going away. Laszlo Tabori,
another Hungarian, was third.
Dellinger, who set a world in indoor
door indoor mark for the two-mile event
only a few weeks ago, eclipsed
one of the oldest marks in the
books with his record breaking
three-mile vctory. His time beat
Greg Rice's 17 year old recTd
by almost 1ilne'"MI seconds'."
In other events, Zbigniew Ory Ory-wal
wal Ory-wal of Poland won the 1,000-yard
run in 2:12 67 -Josh Culbreath of
the Philadelphia P i o r e e r Club
cantured the 600 yard run in
1:11.1: Rlias Gilbert of Winston Winston-Sqlem
Sqlem Winston-Sqlem Teachers took the 60-yard
""h hurdles in 7.3; Don Bragg of
Vilianova won the pole vault with
a lean of 15 feet, 1 inch; Yale
won the two-mile relay in 7:39.8,
Morgan State gained the one one-mile
mile one-mile relay in 3:16.6.
AMERICAN
IMtIO
iNnorooi
unto
Mi'tibS!

'ffiHiEATOGsJQDAY

T i v o L r :;
0.35 0.20
Spanish Pictures.-
LA VIOLETERA
- with -Sarlta
Montiel
- Also
LA AMA DE
PIEDRA

V J CJ O
0.15

The Defient One
, Tony Curtis
- Also
Gun The Man Down

Handicap

The Stud 32'i consistent six-
year-old chestnut horse Horacio
was in great shape yesterdzy and
got a perfect me irom leading
jockey Braulo Baeza to easily cop
he (ou one mue uamon Arias
Handicap U the President Remon
racetrack.
Horacio scored by five lengths
while beating the likes of Bright
Spur, Mouche, Alpisa, MichauXr
Playooy, As You Like Her, Jung's
Park, Rosiia Maria, Al Justo, Io Ionia's
nia's Ionia's Pet and Sculptor. He turned
the one mile distance in 1:40 1-5.
A field of 12 second series im
ported throughbreds compet
ed in the Handicap in wnicn ine
owner of the winner was personal
ly awarded a trophy by boxer Ra Ramon
mon Ramon Ar-as who battled Hector
Hicks at the Macarena bullring
last night. Horacio returned $4.60
and $3.20 and the rioraciourigmi
Spur one-two paid $39.40.
Baeza was the whole' snow at
the track yesterday when he rode
rings around the oppos.tion to win
half of the races on the ten-race
program. He scored aboard Ma-
nandoagua, Maese, Sicabu, Hora-
uo and Lady Edna. His rides on
all of them were reminiscent of
the great Paco Bravo as Baeza
came from far off the pace to
score thrillingly in close finishes.
One of his mounts, the native Lady
Edna whipped a field of imported
racers in the nightcap to return
$25 per win ducat.
The day s best win odds, How
ever, were paid by native colt Don
Vito in the fourth race. He re rewarded
warded rewarded his backers with at $35.80
payoff. Corviglia, at $27,60, was an another
other another juicy win payoff.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Corviglia $27.60, $15.40
2. Licenciado $12.40
SECOND RACE
1. Manandoagua $4.60, $3
2. Sunsque $8.60
First Double: $144.80
THIRD RACE
1. Yosikito $3.60, $2.80
- Radical $5.40
FOURTH RACE
1. Don Vitc $35.80, $7.2f
2. Golden Wonder $4.20
Quiniela: $59.20
FIFTH RACE
1. Constantino $4.60, $3.80
2. Critico $4'
SIXTH RACE
1. Maese $3.80. $3.20
i2. Goiwerawmt 44.8(Li i
I a -
SEVENTH RACE
1. Sicabu $5.60, $2.80
2. Distante $4
Second Double: $12.20
EIGHTH RACE
1. Ciria $9.60, $3.60
2. Chito $3.60
Quinitla:$l
NINTH RACE
1. Horacio $4.60, $3.20
2. Bright Spur $5.80
' One-Two: $39.40
TENTH RACE
1. Lady Edna $25, $6
2. Magi a $3
One-Two: $77.20
Service Center Theatres
Continuous Showines
T OD AY
BALBOA 1:45-4:00-6:15-8:30
John Wayne
Janet Leigh
"JET PILOT"
In VlstaVislon & Color!
COCO SOLO 2:30 7:00
Robert Wagner
Dana Wynter
"IN LOVE rAND WAR"
In Cinemascope & Color!
DIABLO BTS. 7:00
Dan Duryea
Patty McCormlck
"KATHY O'
In Cinemascope & Color
You'll Just Love it!
MARGARITA 7:00
Barry Sullivan
Arlene Dahl
"NO QUESTIONS ASKED"
(Repeat Run)
PARAISO 7:0
Lana Turner
Barry Sullivan
ANOTHER TIME, ANOTHER
PLACE"
SANTA CRUZ
7:00
IJerry Lewis
David Wayne
"THE SAD SACK"
In VlstaVislon
( AMP BIERD
7:00
Cornel Wilde, in
"MARACAIBO"
In VlstaVislon &' Color!
R I A
RIO
0.25
0.35
0.20
DINO
with Sal Mlneo
and Susan Kohner
THE BEAST OF
BUDAPEST
with Gerald Milton
and Greta Thyseen

17-Year-0ld
9th Win In

By J. J. HARRISON Jr.
The growing victim fist of hustling Hector
Hicks, Panama's leading bantamweight contender,
was increased today following his unanimous ten ten-round
round ten-round decision win over world flyweight contender
Venezuelan Ramoncito Arias at. the La Macarena
bullring last night. 1 o :

A UPI dispatch from Maracai Maracai-bo
bo Maracai-bo tM today that promoter Lat
CodoA it offering Hicks S100Q
guarantee to moot Ariat .hi-1
return match In MaracalbO,
Hicks, who weighed in last
night at 117, to the visitor's 117 117-14
14 117-14 chalked ud his ninth win in
ten starts since joining the pro
ranks a little over a year ago.
The 17-year old Colon youth
suffered his only setback to for former
mer former bantamweight champion Mel Mel-vin
vin Mel-vin Bourne a couple of months a a-go
go a-go in a close decision.
Judge Harry Boyd saw Hickt
winning last night H-fl, judge
Joso Graham scored the bout
96-95 and referee Rogello Pin Pinion
ion Pinion voted 99-97.
The Panama American
greed with the verdict 98-94.
There were no knockdowns in
the fight. In the second round
Hicks slipped to the canvas and
was helped to his feet by the en-
tlemanly Venezuelan.
Hicks, following, instructions
from his corner, allowed the Ve
nezuelan to set the pace and pat-
iera oi me ngm in me eany
rounds, mixing it up whenever
the loser chose and apparently
getting the best of exchanges in
most cases.
By the time the eighth heat
came around, Hicks was so confi confident
dent confident of victory that he combined
clowning with landing solid punch punches
es punches to the head and body of the
loser.
Arias scored more blows than
the winner but they failed to
have any damaging effect.
The fight was fast most of the
way but in the sixth and seventh
both boys slowed down consider considerably.
ably. considerably. The tempo picked up again
in the last three heats.
At the end of the fight' Hicks
was fresh and unscarred while

Kentucky Halts Auburn's
30-Game Winning Streak;
Top-Ranked NC Defeated

By FRED DOWN
AubtirB and North Carolina
licked their wounds Sunday while
Kansas State and Texas Chris
tian licked their chops in anti
cipation of bids to the NCAA bas
ketball tournament.
Auburnls 30 game winning
streak went by the boards as Ken
tucky scored a 75-56 victory at
Lexington, Ky., Saturday night
and North Carolina, the nation's
No. 1 team, suffered a 69-51 upset
at the hands of Maryland at Col College
lege College Point, Md.
Kansas State, ranked No. 2,
meanwhile, clinched an NCAA bid
with a 62-50 win over Oklahoma
State and Texas Christian won
the Southwest Conference crown
by downing Texas, 72-59. Fourth Fourth-ranked
ranked Fourth-ranked Cincinnati blasted Wichita,
88-74, fifth-ranked North Caro Carolina
lina Carolina State beat Vilianova, 66-56,
seventh ranked Michigan State
clinched a tie for the Big Ten
crown with a 94-87 decision over
Purdue and lOth-ranked Mississip Mississippi
pi Mississippi State whipped Louisiana State,
75-67, in other key games.
A crowd of 12,750 at Lexington
saw Kentucky end the nation's
longest winning streak with a sur
prisingly easy victory over an
Auburn team which hadn't lost
since January, 1958, a nd was
ranked sixth in the country.
20 Point Halftlme Lead
The third-ranked Wildcats ran
up a 46-26 lead at the half and
were never threatened in the sec second
ond second half. A fist fight broke out
with less than three minutes to
play and Auburn's Rex Frederick
and Kentucky's Bob Slusher were
ejected.
A crowd of 13,000 at College
Park saw Maryland, which had
DRIVE-IN
&-Tfmjiv -IS
LAST DAY!
Audie Murphy,
Patricia Owens, in
'THE GUN RUNNERS'
TOMORROW
Mark Stevens, In
'CRY VENGEANCE

Punches Out
10 Outings

Ramoncito appeared to be weary
with both eyebrows swollen and
bruise -under the right eye.
Hicks, appeared to be sure of
victory from the outset despite
the fact that his opponent is con considered
sidered considered in many: boxing quarters
as the main: contender for world
112-pound king Argentine Pascual
Peres' title.' v
His comment after- being de declared
clared declared the winner was: Ramonci-
to's a good boxer I didn't expect
him to give me such a good
fight."
Anas, who praised Hicks as
"un tuen muchacho,? said he
was beaten fair and square al although
though although he felt that the fight was
closer that the officials' seoring
indicated. 1 ; ;
He added that he was bothered
with what he called Jacks' rr a
tic style." -
Ramoncito and Us manager An
tonio Balzan, both said they were
not sure who would ba ; Arias'
next opponent. They plaid to leave
for Maracaibo, Venezuela l before
ine ena oi the week. ;
Arias received V $2500 'ffiM 'ffiM-ranteo
ranteo 'ffiM-ranteo nd oxpeheesi fer Mm.'
self and his mentor. Micks
fought for 22 per cent of the
$3682 total gate. .,; j
In the semiifihal set f six
rounds, veteran Rodolfo Ampudia.
115, scored an UDset kavo win o-
ver Lorenzo. Samuels, 117,, in 1:53
Jose Perez, 126H and :StanIey
Wilson, 125, battled to an unpo unpopular
pular unpopular draw in on one four-round
prelim. The crowd, which booed
ine decision lustily, thought Pe Perez
rez Perez should have earned the ver verdict.
dict. verdict. In the curtain raiser Ernesto
Campbell, 120 14, TKO'ed Angel
Roque Cedefio, 118 34 in 13 of the
second stanza of a match set for
I four.
lost 12 of 19 games, hand North
Carolina its second defeat against
17 wins. The Terrapins connected
on. w.a per cent of their shots,
including 10 of 17 in the first half
while North Carolina made only
18 of 55 field goal tries. Mary
land s Jerry Bechtle was high
scorer with 28 points.
Bob Boozer scored 88 points to
lead second-ranked Kansas State
to a victory that clinched a tie for
the Big Eight title. Kansas State
is assured of the NCAA bid be because
cause because it beat Colorado twice Colo Colorado
rado Colorado being the only team In the
conference with a chance to tie
for the title.
H. E. Kirchner's 17 points naced
TCU to its victory over Texas
NCAA bid as a result of South South-NCAA
NCAA South-NCAA bid as a resul tof South Southern
ern Southern Methodist's 72-64 loss to
Texas. Tech. TCU took the lead
earlv in the first half and led,
3718, with 18:25 gone.
Big O Collects 34
Os"car Robertson connected for
34 points as Cincinnati inched
closer to the Missouri Valley title
and an NCAA bid. North Carolinn
State scored 19 of its second-half
ooints from the free throw line to
overtake Vilianova at Raleteh.
N.C., Bob Andrew's 29 points led,
Michigan State to its foul-filled
triumph over Purdue and Missis Missis-s'ppi
s'ppi Missis-s'ppi State niled no 52 ooints in
(he fir.t half and then beat off a
late rally by LSU.
Houston beat eighth-ranked St.
Louis, 64-57. in the other big up upset
set upset Saturday, 14th-ranked West
Virginia topoed Georpe Washing
ton. 89-86. 15th-ranked Marquette
neat Avier of Ohio. 79-90, and
18th-ranked St. Bonnventure' de defeated
feated defeated Marshall, 90-79. V-
Dartmouth took the lead In the
Ivy League when it beat Prince Princeton.
ton. Princeton. 71-S9 in a ame between
teams that entered the eontest
with identical 10-ft p!oo r--ord"
Carl Belz led Princeton with 22
noins. liudv Tiaiirocpn -'-i
22 for DpHhmouth Which led, 41-
32, at halftime. ;
ffffCnVf HELP for
ASTHMA MUCUS
Aithma and Bronchltla attack ruin
your ilp, undermin your trenr'B
and wakn your htart. Mandate
tarta to work through your blood (
arerooma aRthma and bronchltla at
tacKa. It hlp dlswlvaatranirllns md
eua and promotes frea, asy braath braath-ins.
ins. braath-ins. Mandaco'a action la effeottva ara
In old and atubborn caacn. Oil Mm;
daoa, from any drugitora today and
ae how much batter you alaep and
breath tonlfht, and how much batter
you will f 1 tomorrow. Mendae
tight dlicomforta of Aathma. Broat
hltl and Hay rTr.

BHS CopsJntezscholastic

Dy spaseDau .nampionsnm s

J 1 KLINE TWI RLS
ONI-HITTER AOAINST CHS
Balboa High' School walked off
with the Interscholastie Baseball
title Friday night by defeating
Cristobal 10 to 3.
In garnerinc their ten runs.
Balboa banged out eleven hits off
Lefty Lutz, and sprinkled in
some nifty drag bunts, squeezes,
and double steals;
Actually, the game was much
closer : than the score indicates.
As far; as the fifth Inning the
game .was a one run affair. Go
ing into the fifth BHS was one up,
If a non-understandine nerson
would have. walked into the sta stadium
dium stadium during this, part of the con
test, he certainly would have won
dered abqut the umpires "lot."
Everyone on and off the nlavine
field seemed to be trying to help
tne omciais call the game in
good olel BHS-CHS traditional
fashion..; At times "it sounded as
sports writers', row" mleht be
trying to cut into the umps fee
Dy neiping make calls from the
standi.
One of. the most vailed iibs
heard was that called by person-
aoie tu; Brown j JC : when he
urged both teams to;" "save those
errors' until you meet us please."
The .Tigers got all. their runs
in the. fourth inning when Kline
went 'through a stage of wildness.
The three runs came; from one
base blow by Humphrey down the
right'field line, two base on balls,
and four errors on the part of
:Balboa. r ..: i"
The Bulldogs' started off with
a bang as lead off hitter and
Captain of the team, John Mor Morris,
ris, Morris, started the game with a dou double.
ble. double. Wee Willie Engelke worked
Lutz -for a walk and then Lem
Kirkland and Buzzy Rathgeber sin singled
gled singled back to back. Sweets
Schwarzrock knocked down two
RBI's with a double.
In the fifth, singles by Schwarz Schwarzrock,
rock, Schwarzrock, Ness, and Kirkland produc produced
ed produced two more runs. The Bulldogs
ran their run total up to 10 in the
sixth, by adding 4 more runs.
Kline started the inninc off bv
walking. Jlorris got on with a
Deauutui arag Dunt and was fol followed
lowed followed with singles by Engelke
and Ammirati. Rathgeber added
tne final plow of the evening with
a double.
Humphrey, of course, led the
Tigers in hitting with the only
CHS blow. ;
Three Bulldoes hit I for 4 In
the persons of JCottaiid, Schawa
root, ana Haingener.
Lutz, CHS hurler, faced 34 men
struck out 5, gave up 1 hits, and
walked 4.
Jeff Kline came verv close to
a no hitter for the second time
this season as h spun his one
hit ball game. He faced 31, struck
out 10, and walked '6. h
The box score:
BHS
Ab R H PO A E
Morns, 2b 2 2 1-
Engelke, cf, rf 3 2 1
Ammirati, ss 4 11
Ness, lb 4 11
Kirkland, c 4 3 2
Garciax " t 0 0
Rathgeber, If 4 0 1
Schwarzrock, 3b 4 0 2
Pearl, rf 2 0 1
French xx 0 0 0
Kline, p 110
x For Kirkland in 7th.
xx For Pearl in 5th.'
CHS
Wilder, 2b
Humphrey, If
Kulig, ss
Cotton, c
McGloin, lb
Bruce, rf
Will, cf
Lutz, p
Hernandez, 3b
Umnires: Williams Wnmhio nf.
nciai ocorer: u. Fitzgerald.
House Wrestling
Nets Navy Officer
Fractured Le$
The Naval Communication Sta
tion's commanding officer, Cmdr
Charles F. Concannon, has a no
mmation lor tne wavavai Acade
my wrestling team. His 18-year-old
son Charles, who has been
named for appointment to the
mert;nani. marine Acaaemy.'
If anyone needs proof, the com
mander, has it a broken leg col collected
lected collected from his son while house
wrestling.
The incident happened last
Wednesday on a day started like
any other day. But before it was
over, the commander wished that
he hadn't even climbed out of bed
because- that's where, he Is now
with his left leg fractured in two
places.
At least a month's 'recuperation
has been' prescribed by Dr. Rob
ert F. Leese. district medical nf-
ncer. .-, .,
) The usually quick-moving com
mander took the news lying down
He had no other choice.
TODAY-tNCANTOS.-JOS
Horror!, uorrol
' Marshall Tompson. in
"The Terror Beyond Space"
Richard Andersen, -eri V
"Curse of the" Faceless Man"

a

V
"WHt
BllttlAllf WLlltla

rwnivwa BAVtnanvE ranama a xiecwr rucKi iieni ano ven- a i

ezuela's Ramoncito Arias exchange punches in the eighth round of'-fi'-"

issi mgm s xen-rounaer at lsl Macarena. Hicks, who has lost on-ysi"
ly one pro fight, inten outines ( a auestionable decision' to Malvin tfT

Bourne), scored ar unanimous
" t
ATLANTIC LITTLE
LEAGUE NEWS
LUTHER QUINN
PITCHES, PERFECT GAME
Luther (juinnl; ace Hurler of the
Mutual of 'Omaha team, pitched
a perfect game on Saturday
Feb. .14, at the Margarita Play Playground.
ground. Playground. .no hits. . .no runs. .
no man reaching first, as the At
lantic Little League Giants beat
the Police ,Pals l to 0.
The irony 01 tossing. Qus maST
terpiece, howeye,r was that Big,'
uu uiu nut. get. cieuii lur me ,wiu
because Little League rules state
that no pitcher can be on the
mound for more than six innings
in one game. .and it took the
Mutuals seven to put the game
on ice. But this Was not all. Lu
ther, had twirled five innines ;of
tbej gaine ori January .. 29 w.en
raitf nfad the play&tf field a ve
ritable quagmire in less than ten
minutes and caused the game to
be a continued affair.
When Saturday rolled around
and the teams were ready to; be
gin play again, ;it was ruled that
Quinn was still pitching the same
game anj,$ttmpiar couia;;joniy
go one inniiigw make his'six aaM
that Kenny Karpmsky P 0 Ii c 0
pitcher, whp had thrown four in innings,
nings, innings, previously when the game
was postponed could chuck 4wo
more innings. :-
Mutual was the first to bat on
Saturday and came up with one
hit to make their total three for
the game to that point as Luther's
brother, Li'l Larry .-smashed out
a double. As Quinn rcame to the
mound for his sixth inning warm-
up, he had struck out thirteen
allowed no hits, had neither walk walked
ed walked nor hit a man, and his team
naa given ninuperfect support,'
The few fans. 'who were on hand
held their pria' as:the-first JPal
player came to batJ-.ft Was still
Lu's day, however, a he struck
out the batter, whiffed the second
hitter and their- marked up his
sixteenth "K" as W set down the
eighteenth and .final batsman to
face him. Lather 'icame off the
hill with the ijpUiuse the-eo-ple
still ringing in "his ear -ds he
sat down onf the ench.
Kenny Karpinskl'did a fine. Job,
too, for the; Police as he struck
out 11, walked two and gave up a
double to Wayne Seeley in the
second, a single fo' tarry Quinn
in the third, and : alsoSa .'double to
him in the sixth. The Pals play played
ed played perfect ball in the field, also.
Doug Billison, the winner, came
on to relieve Quinn and retired
the Police 1-12-3 in the seventh.
Vern McNamee tOok .over for
Karpinski and ran into trouble
with the first batter, JSeeley, by
walking him. Wayne went to sec second
ond second on a wild pitch as the next
batter fanned. Charlie B!alkowski
then tagged Vern for a hard
game-winning smash thru the in infield
field infield to score Seeley. .and the
Mutuals made a mad dash to the
soda line after offering congratu congratulations
lations congratulations to the losers.
The box score:
Police
Crump, ss
Mason, 3b
McNamee, c, p
Karpinski, p c
Hakanson, R., 2b
Owen, ss
Hotsko, cf
Hakanson, L., rf
Carden, rf
Smith, lb
Totals
Mutual
Quinn Larry, 2b
Evans, c
Billison, ss, p
Quinn Lu, p, ss
Highley, If
Seeley, cf
R'cfkohl, 3b
Bialkowski, 11
Leon, rf v v..'..,.
Dockery, rf
AbRKE
3 0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
21 0 0 0
2
2
3
3
3
2
3
3
1
(V 0
0 0
Totals
.23 1 4. 0

s

-Iv'''v-'1 '-b- f :

t hJa, I .... i-XJi
i ) W l """"

awiiliiii intim i iiftiiiflidk iri

t. YT.il J 1. .. .. .
decision' in the hard-fought contest, -v
(Photo by Rodolfo Mendoza) '.
xOne out when winning run

Score by innings idi

Police 000 000 00 a

Mutual .u 000 000 11 4 0n

rift .; fn'.n.

. Standing as of Feb. II
(Second HalfJ;
W L
Coca Cola
Elks.
Mutual .4
1

-1 A. '. .' 6

1 r'O'nK

Pirates ,.,

0 1'n.tf

mice i-.,v.
Legion
0 'p

0 .i.i.ri

r
Cokes Beat Police i to 1
The Coca Cola Bottlers beat the
Police Pals.pn Monday ,Feb.;, 16
at the Marearita Plavernnnd in

the: first earne of the aeemd :hU!. .,,,1

sv". .v-..-- K. v '..-.-fur

It was anyone's gamemtil tha.
last half of the: sixth inning when
with the score 1 to 1, Ralph; Ben Ben-der,
der, Ben-der, the, Bottlers' pitcher,., slam
med a ,baH.;0Ve-'e; --Weield
wall with a runner. on base give
Cok6sifSiMoir.i ThenVS
were noptrtsMeji Ralph got hf
four baggerH,t:i;' .-:-.,:,t 'N'XS
Both Bender,- and Vern McNa-
mee, Police twirler, hurled excel excel-lent
lent excel-lent ball. Ralph gave up single
to McNamee in the first arfbT
Richie Hakanson in the sixth.
Vern allowed three hits, a double
to Terry, Tobin and a, single to.
Bob Hutchings in the first and the1
homer to Bender in the .ifi v

Bender struck out in and na''

four base on balls while' McNa- 11

mee wnnea eight and also allow-"'
ed four walks.

The box score:
Police,
Crump,, ss -Mason,
3b
McNamee, p
Karpinski, c
Hakanson: Richie, 2b
Owen, rf
Hotsko, cf .-. :. 1
Cooper, If- . :
Carden, If
Smith, lb

Ab R H K-'
2 0 0 0" i

3 1
3 0
3 0
3 0
1 0
3. 0
10
1 0
1 0
0
0
Totals
21 1 2 Z
Coca Cola
Willford, 2b
Tobin, ss
Sanchez, lb
Hutchings, c
Bender, p
McLeod, 3b
Griffon Hollis,
Snyder, 'rf
Stanford, If
0 1

1 0"tvo

0 Ht.it

1
1 -9
0 r-
0 o

cf

0 -S.'i
n

totals

19 3 3 l",n"

No outs when winning run, scor"--
ed
Score by innings

Police i 100 000-l 2
Coca Cola 010 002-3 3- 1-s"
MUTUAL OF OMAHA TOPS (UlZ
LEGION, S to, 3
Cash Paulson's tegion team and
Mike Burza's Mutual, of Oma Omaha
ha Omaha club hooked up in a fine ball
game on Tuesday with, the firsts
half champs having to wait untii'i
the fourth frame to take the lead
and then go on to victory by add"'0
ing an ."insurance' run in thC
fifth to take the game by a scow
Of'5 -io: 3. v .' nj'.I
The Legion boys started like
house on fire by scorine tw'cein .it

the, opening Inning but their ad tf

vantage was. soon wiped, out at 1

the Mutual Marauders came up : 1
with a brace of runs on their first n
time at bat. ;n '1fr i;i
sThe losers tallied aain .in.itnon'
second and held this one run Jeadwil
until 1 the fourth when Bursa 'a?i.
gang exploded for two runs io goA
ahead 4 to 3. The Gatun club v
could not get. going in their laiti
" ,t ioiitihued irom pag V-m

seawrn'

1 I

,1 bi



. .. -. .. : j..-- : .' ." ',... : ....;..-: . v t i , : '.... ; -: v

" r - : : I

bv

J i '!

JOE WILLIAMS

Eewi, ttt E. ArrQ of W Sr
ration, you come across a sig sig-nilicinuy
nilicinuy sig-nilicinuy prppttetip tem', b' te
juy who aetignsd and pnnteq e
natiMi'.' fiMt. mnnev . vfl

Almost two centuries wer v to
com ani go, however,- oeiore
the symbolic relationship, batween
the .korse and ; the : muey ; p.jjis
would be properly toterprevd,-tn-d
ihn lmnftcri intn D I t 6 14 C a 1

enmniml beneficence. By-,1858

the ana would have : beoom! "iis-

tin&iftsbabi xitW ; thevpther -at:
vital., iwnomic iactor in We 21

states where letting Is legalized,
nnhm MfisRMi.sio bet by.: 43,

72 T;PiiffiHm! descendant ftlast

utm. thai fartfaird looltinS; IH)'

callyS--ingenious states--'diverted
$222,49,651into ther treMunes
by fay of taxation. 'At first
glance, this; would seeHi tobe n
Btufiii in Af innt vat. according

to Mayor Bob Wajsner, just

" "Give us off track betting and
we'lFfatteir thrkitty-by $200 mil mil-lion,
lion, mil-lion, .with, the State and iNew
York City putting it down the2
middle," he has assured tb Leg

islature., y-
This. voO'll note, is only $2

000,000 tes than was reaped by
all the other states combined in
$58, -including New York, whose
i8i.459.392 take was nearly three

tinrwi greater ?thanny fellow

worsninDoer .n ut ww uo

ahrte.- '3

List you-let the reckless notjen

Mayfir BCbjnereiy paciaireo,,. a
Batch of thlr air and t smidkcn

of moonbeam in arriving at this

imnosinB fieure. it should be not

ed that a survey conducted by his

committee found 8T percent of

the interviewee so deliriomly

stimulated by the prospect of bet-

alomst incoherent.

Statistics cooked In partisan fat

can beguil the most jaded palate,

and there've been times when

the Jneaeer nutrient content of

surveys placed the chef in an

awkJvard defensive position. The
Major's committee does not state

howl many were interviewed, of

identify the various social and e

conamio spheres to which its dill

gence was applied

BSSSSaaSVaV

Mantle Next

Big Goal For

14f IU

of the deslrabiilty of the project.
Nnt that matters of this nature

evet appeal to give politicians
vrv--much concern Although

Mayor Bob,-;W iWS percem
aoDrobation .and i $200;; million

pledge, creates the impression

tnat every man, woman aiju cuuu

in New Horki state i a no.-se
layer the ratio is a e t u a 1 1 y

small. .su small as to be tncOb
sequential as vote wnsiaera

ion?-'-w- it, i j- -.
1 This isi one reason state and mu

leipal governments, -turn to the
tracks so' pssually. ;:;and blandly
when theft; budgets get fouled
ap, Wch Is practically time with without
out without end: erfreed.oe no fear

of repercussion rtr "reprisal.
i The traeks havejl-.'sure thing
going for themt and can't miss,

no matter how tenrand mucn

thev aire taxed. The only real vie

tim Is the horse' player- but he's

always too absorbed m .trying -to

set even to jnuawn. ado siuic

it's not their ox that's- being gor
ed, all the others cheer.

Unlike Mr, Revere, tne pouu

clans don't even have to print

the money. They just slap on an

other tax. or an extra Tace to the

daily card, and presto! They

have performed a remarxame an

of statesmanship.

Politicians' Pal

Which

What?

Chances jre 'though, that' even

the widest' and most pains-taking
survey on this subject, hitherto
untriedr in ouottntry HffUtertN
; fore wholly lacking in practiced
precepts, would fail to accurate accurate-ly
ly accurate-ly reflect either the state of mind

Lnamp

i

Both as a source of revenue

and a docile object of exploit

tion, the race horse jjOmjia mgbt.

ctosei W liemrKtM: pMiRciant.

est friend, and in some states,

actually represents the difference

between a bankrupt ana a preca

rimnlv solvent administration.

consider these neures: m isfiu.

first vear of the machines, New

York picked uo $5,596,948 in tax

m frnm the flats alone. Last year

it Was $42,902,633.-Iti 19. years of
lecalization. Albany has banked

$481,830,468. It used to cost the

horse player 11 cents tax to maite
a two 1uck bet. Now it cost him
17. In the beginning, he had to

stand off only six races, in ext. it

was seven. Soon, u was eigm.
Starting in March, it will be nine nine-1
1 nine-1 .10' really'.' with the' dally dou

ble. Anvway. it adds up to ?90

more races.

What has been happening here

is common to racing throughout
the country today. More and
mnr taxes. Biseer and bleecr

takeouts. What mystifies jus Is
why,ie 25.( other.Xttes; ren't
dtppfatflntd'th; r4?y. M sure is,
mighty peculiar! You think tthey
might be running dope, or ome-thing.?

ctlFF HAGAN,, revealed as a
pro lcager oi varied talents, ex explaining
plaining explaining what it was like io play
10i- ;Aaolph Kupp at Kentucxy:
'You weren't supposed to tmnK.
. norwards like myself weren't
allowed to hanaie the ball on a
fast break. -You had to fit into
his system."
pritiim of the pros:

Thr r no natterns to the

way; they. play basketbaU" . .(
and'-he may be right. .
Tk nm evpention in tne Pi

tional Basketball Association is
Syracuse under Paul Seymour
. i which plays like the beBt
coached team in the league, even
i nlavitr. Bill

Sharraan of the Celts described
s.vmnur a a the "toughest guy I

vee faced because he played me
ointa v.n when I didn't have

the ball and didn't let me get

rios to the basket.". .and as

urn iftaeh. Sevmour spends more

time on defense than any pi her

phase. A

Beb Cousy's tip to youngsters:

For my money, the bounce pass
thu best in basketball any

where within 15 feet of the
baskt".. V
ri Mail Armv'a new arid

coach, Is teallstic if nothing1 etfse
th touchest part of his job:

"Gomg out and v recruiting the

anm hnva.". .how has beconi

tng the head man affected him?
. '."I've ldst 10 pounds- alysady"
wntphinc the quarterback's

wrnt fall won't' reveal the

lonelv end pattern, despite Kod

ni.iV'' rsvelations i.The Kay

dets had several other systems

of relaying signals to their Bann

er.

- Kaow what widening the goal

eostt' tor next fall means to the

rollrPM a round the nation'

At Ueast $100,000 expended for

new -standards.

rtna nf th tmishAat tiew names

on the sports pages Is that of
New York Boxing Commission

. chairman Melvin Krulewlteh.

"It means 'kbit's son' in Polish,

he explained, ,rand one time when
T vii no i triii to New Orleans

a young man earn up1 to- me and

introduced humseu, 'I'm yo' eou

ain. auh. .MeGill KinB.?. ',

Rulv Carpenter, oroienv of Phil

lies! owner Bob and a Yale grid

prospect in his own rltfht, is en

gaged to a debutante now living
in England v f r' -;
Misin reason that ,Ben Hogan's
golf club concern -down Tsxas
way had such a tough time get getting
ting getting on its feet was the perfection'

By TIM MORIARTY

NEW YORK. Feb. 23 (UPI)-

Now Uiat ttiey hare finally corrall

ed their best sniper Whitey Ford

the New York Yanxees loaay

turned their anenuon tomeir pig

siege gun Mickey jvianae.
Ford, threatened earlier with a
pay cut: was given a $3,000 raiee
when he signed his 1959 contract
for an estimated $35,000 yesterday

nd immediately joined me worm
Champions in workout at tber
ft. Petersburg Flav camp. 1
The stubby southpaw had balked
earlier at certain clauses In his
new pact, one of which reportedly
was aimed at governing his actons-on
th field. However, the
Yankees insistedonly that Ford
make an hdnest' effort this year
to adhere to a strict diet, which is
supposed to prevent a recurrence

ol the arm miseries that have

bothered him .n the past.

The diet, prescribed by doctors
at the Maya Clinic prohibit the
use of jwotoin moat, or alcoholic
beverages. Ford Is permitted 0I'
ly broiled chicken, fish and lamb.
"I should finish the season at a
rugged 130 pounds," quipped Ford,
who reoorted at 182.

Despite assorted arm ailments,
Ford nai a nifty earnd-run-aver-tee
of 2.59 for seven season wlvh

the Yankees. He has won 105 game

and lost only 40 (including a
mark last year), giving h m a win
ning percentage of;.?24 the high'
est career mark in baseball histo-
rykaotle if due in camp Thursday
when the Yankees will launch full full-scale
scale full-scale drills. However, he has in in-dcated
dcated in-dcated he won't leave for Florida
until he is offered a "fair" eon eon-tract.
tract. eon-tract. i-n,
"nnre vou show uo in camp,

youre oeaa, aeciareu mj,
who received an estlma ed $75,000

last year and wants at least a

$5,000 raise.
Th netroit Tieers also 38 deal

ing with a potential holdout ar ar-vov
vov ar-vov Tfupnnwho opened a bargain

ing session with gefnerat inager

Rick Ferreu yesteroay i
land, Fla., but refused to come to
tA,J. vnonn who led the Titers

with a .319 batting average last

season, has been offered a raise,
u h!nv. it lan't btv nouBh. 1

' it nrA Anton. Fl.. feneral

manaaer John McHale of the Mil-J

BrayesWuhed joi

acquire some miieio .pui,w TV
during a tour of oilier National

League training camps, mui a
Schoendienst hospltaUzed with tu tu-berculasls
berculasls tu-berculasls and Mel Roach stlU
limping with a knee' Injury, the
Braves are "hurting" at second
b8''l" don't have n.yipgwdef:nlte
in mind," McHale said. I'm just
feeling out the other clubs to see
what they have to offer. Maybe
we can open up the market a lit-,
tie
Don Prysdalo, who JMrM
disappointing 11-13 roiord with
the Los Angeles .Dodgers last
,ar, hurled U minutes of bat
ting practice without taking
deep breath.
"Ddn had good stuff and also
showed fine control," manager
Walt Alston declared.
Elsewhere along the tracing
iron: The St. Louis Cardinals de devoted
voted devoted a two-hour workout to bunt bunt-!,
!, bunt-!, nAuriv.acauired Don Hoak re

ported to the Pittsburgh Pirates

camp a uay aueau m -worked
out w'th his new mates,
catcher Sammy white signed his

. nir.i-t w.im tne nea ox. anu mc

San Francisco Giants announced

pitcher Ramon Monrant wui oe

placed on me voluntary rwmu
list if he refuses to report.

'Sj-, -r X

Palmer, Bolt Latest
Permanent Invites
To Masters Tourney,

UZZtE PACKAGES -In background, Philadelphia coaches, Ken Sylvestri. left, and Charlie
Gassway try to figure out which is which on finding two sets of twins in their rookie school at
Clearwater, Fla. Left are Russ and Dan Casteen, outfielders. At right are Rob Haines an in in-fielder,
fielder, in-fielder, ana brother Richie, an outfielder.

Chico Martin
No-Hitter For

"Chico" Martin with a no-hitter I Womble, 2b

in hia credit in his last Pitching Egan, 3b

assignment came right back in McNatt, If

TMtiiHiv'i American Legion Ju- Kiamco

nior Baseball league an(T pitched Lord, rf

hit. second consecutive no hitter xDolan

a hia team mates slaughtered Ch

ange Kist 15 to 2. Martin nas yet

to be defeated and his recora npw
tnd af S wins and no losses.

Martin in recording his second

consecutive no hitter allowed but
thr man to reach first on wealks.

Two of these walks came in the

6th inning which produced the two
tallies for Orange Kist.
V$?estlnghouse had a field day
at the plate rapping out 13 nils.
Sims Allen led the hit parade with
two doubles and a single for three
times at bat. Other extra base

hits were recorded by Ray Amato
with a triple and Allen Scott with,
a double, Morris hit the only hbme

nm'nl1hc eame.

1irtSAltiniia urViA lrplirtil1 whn

the Iirst nau oi tne- American u

gion Junior Baseball League With

9.atraight victories has now run

their string of consecutive victo
dee to 10.

In the other game played at Bal

boa Stadium the visiting Spur Cola 1
item the Gold Co a&'downif iJ

nama Insurance 5 to l. me soie
run of Panama Insurance was
home run by Dick McNatt.
It was a vastly improved Spur
Cole team which knocked off Pa Panama
nama Panama Insurance 5 to 1. Playing
without their regular catcher Weir,
who had been sidelined with in injuries.!
juries.! injuries.! showed a lot of spaed on

the baser which enabled ithent; to

score five times on but three nits.
Of Spur Colas' three hits Russ
Stromberg collected one and Jules
Damani got the other two. Strom

berg who is the Spur Cola fire call

artist was convened to a catcner
for Sunday' tilt. Manager Lu

ther Quinn advised that this his

only a temporary situation and

Stromberg will be seeing mound
duty very soon.
The box scores for yesterday's

games ioiiow:
FIRST GAME

Hurls Second
Westinghouse

By DAVID M.M0Mt
Defending ciampioa'A ln o 1 d
Phlmer, N.t onsl QpenMchampijn
Tommy, Bolt, and1 PSA "champion
Dow Fins terwald were named Sat Saturday
urday Saturday as the latest permanent is-

vitees to the Masters "tournament
and w 11 bt In the field when the

1959 tournament gets underway
here April 2. "

Palmer edged the defending
champion Doug Ford, 284 to 285,
last year to e rn his place on the

permanent list. Bolt shot i 283 rn
the open at Tulsa, Okla.,- and
Finsterwald a 276 in the PGA at
Havertown. Pa., to join palmer
on that 1st
Clifford Roberts, chairman of
the Masters tournament cdmmlt
tee, announced that.98 invitations
have been sent out to eligible
players. Five others will be. nam named
ed named later. Thev nclude one nomi nominated
nated nominated by ballot by all former Mas

ters champions, one by amateur
champions, one by National O O-ren
ren O-ren champions, tnd two o'.hers

by the PGA.
k '
Ton Never Acpeared

0 0
0 1
1 1
0 2
0 0
0 0

2 Dombrosky, cf

U 1 4 20 14

Flumack, If

22 2 0 17 11

x Amato for Bright, 7th.
x Dolar for Lord, 4th.

Home run: McNatt. Bases on
balls off Hakanson, 2. Bases on
balls off Kiamco, 6. Struck out by

Hakanson, 10. Struck out by Kiam Kiamco,
co, Kiamco, 6. Winning pitcher, HakaB-

son. Losing pitcher, Kiamco. Two
Base hit, 1 (Damaini) Spin- Cola

Spur Cola 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 5

Panama Ins. 0 1 0 0 0 0 01

SECOND GAME
Orange Kist

Methney, c 3

Roe, 3b 2
Sullivan, 2b ,; 3
Corrigan, ss 3
McGowin, p 3
Eberanz, rf 1

Amato, ss

Bradshaw, 2b
Morris, c
Allen, If
Scott, lb
Carroll, cf
Rodgers 3b

Price, rf
Martin, p

Westinghouse
5 I

1 1
2 1
2 15

0 13

30 IS 13 21 18

Bases on balls off Martin, 3. Ba Bases
ses Bases on balls of McGowin 8. Roe 3.

Struck out by Martin, 11. Struclf
out by McGowin, 5, Roe, 1.-Winning
nilcher, Martin. Losing pitch pitcher,
er, pitcher, McGown. Two base hits, 1
Srott (Westinehouse),. Three base
hits Amato, Allen (2) Home run,
Morris.
Oranee Kist 0 0 0 0 0 2 02

Westinghouse 6 3 4 0 1 1 x 15 of the first three

Ten of the 98 have never ap appeared
peared appeared In a Masters tournament
before. They include Tommy -Aa-rn,
Deane Bemarr, Jack ffick-

laus, and war wettiauier wno
are members of the 1959 Walker
Cup team; Bob Goetz, TOmmy
Jtcobs and Don January who

finished among the top 16 in last
year's U.S. Open; Dick FoO'e
and Roger McManus, quarter-final
'sts in last year's U.S. Ama Amateur:
teur: Amateur: and Buster Cupit who fin

ished among the top eight in the

1958 PGA. t
Amttig the long list of former
masters golfers invited to try
their luck six weeks from now
are three-time w nners Jimmy
Dpmsrpt f 1940. 1947 and 1950)

and Sam Snead (1949. 1952 'nd
1954), two-time champion Ben Ho Ho-gan
gan Ho-gan (1951) and (1953, and such
other recent champions as Jack
Burke Jr. (19565, and Cary Mid Mid-dlecoff
dlecoff Mid-dlecoff (1955).

Hortnn Smith, winner of two

Masters (1934

and 1941). head the -list of "o

timers who have been maxing
the annual tr p here since the mid mid-die
die mid-die 30's. 3
The ? Listed
j Here is the list of the 98 prsV-1
tesslon 1 and amateur golfeff"
Who have been invited to play tc
Jie 1959 Masters:
Tommy Aaron, Tommy Armour, ,1
Jim Barnes,- Deane Beman.AStan-.-ley
. Bishop, Tommy Bolt,' Juliuf-

poros, Hiuy uurxe, jacx curst A
Jr.,. Walter- Burkemo, B 11 Camp Campbell.
bell. Campbell. Bill Casei Jr., Dick Chap
man, Carlie Coe, Tom Creavy,
Buster Cupit, Jimmy Demaret.
Flndley Douglas. .
George Dunlap Jr., Olin DutrC--.
Charles Evans Jr., Johnny Far
rell, Jim Firrler, Dow Finster Finsterwald,
wald, Finsterwald, John Fischer, ack Fleck
D ck Foote, Doug Ford, Ed Fur
gol, Marty Furgol, Vic Ghezsd
Bob Goetz, John Goodman, Jesst
Guilford, Ralph Guldahl, Waltei
Hagen, Bob Hamilton.

Chick Harbert, Claude Harmon ;
Chandler Harper Fred Hawkins
Jly Hebert, Lionel Hebert, Ber
Hogan, Jock Hutchison, Bill Hynd
man, Tommy Jacobs, Don Jan
uary, Jimmy Johnston, Bob one.'
Jr. Herman Keiser, Charles Koo
ss, Ted Kroll, Lawson Little
Gene Littler.
Willie MacFarlane, Fred Mc
Leod, Roger McManus, Tony Ma
nero, Lloyd Maugrum, Billy Max
well, Dick Mayer, Al Mengert
Dick Metx, Cary Middlecoff, By
ron Nelson, Jack Hicklaus, Ec
Oliver, Frtncis Ouimet, Arnolt

Palmer.

Sam Porks. B 11 Patton, Henry

Picard. Johnny Revolts, Phil Rod

gers. Bob Rosmirg raui ivunyun
Gene Sarazen. George Sargent
Denny Shute. Horton Smih. San
Snead, Mike Son-V. Frni
Stranahan, Bob Sweeney Jest
Sweetser, Frank Taylor, Jm,
Turnes'. Bill Turnesa. f
Ken Venturi, Art Wall, Harvit
Ward, Jack Westland, Ward Westt
laufer, Bo Wininger, Craig Wood
Lew Worsham, and Charlie
Yates.

'ul Seymour

ist drive of the Little Master.

who personally supervised the

manufacture of the early line of
clubs and ordered, "Throw 'em
out.". .because they didn't meet

his specifications. .

If you think you're going to get

much news out of Joe Cronln as

the American. League prexy

check his habitual opening gam

bit with, newsmen: "What

new?" ...

The baseball player reps, un

daunted by the abuse reaction to

tneir 20 percent profit sharing re

quest -of the owners, are ready

ing another pitch to raise their sa

lary standards when- they meet

loom in Florida. ...

Latest entry In the stakes to

nab George Shaw, the. second

string quarterback put on the
market by the Baltimore Colts,
is the New York Gianti. .even
if they have four quarterbacks

already in tow .and Frank Gil Gilford
ford Gilford wants to be one, too. .

Between you'n'mey add Bill

Sharman to the- list of unhappy

basketbaU players (George -Yard-

ley tops the pile) .Bill's grum

blihg because Red Auerbach's

been shuffling, him in and out ol

tne lineup, cutting down ms play playing
ing playing time. .' ,;Cy,.

Anyone
cania

Spur Cola
Ab lHOA
WiU, cf 3 2 0 0 0
Damaini, ss 3 2 2 2 3
Belanger, lb 4 10 6 0
Stromberg, c 3 0 19 0
Hakanson, p 3 0 0 1 10
Corrigan, 2b 2 0 0 2 2
Geddos, 3b' 4 0 0 0 2
Berselllno, if 1 0 0 0 0
xBowers 0 0 0 0 0
Kunkel, rf 1 0 0' 0 0
Rice 2 0 0 0 0
24 5 J 20 17

'scotch

but men who know
whisky say- ;

, x Bowers for Borselllno 7th.
x Rice for Kukell 4th.
Panama Insurance
Bright, F., cf 3 0 0 4 1
xAmato, ss 10 0 10

Bright, T., lb 3 0 0 0 0
Pearson, c 2 0 0 4 0

Scott, p 2 0 0 3 1

FUUMER.GRIAVE$ ;

' NEW YORK (NEAy V-yGtBt)

Fullmef .nd Wilfie Graves, mid-

dleweights, fight 10 rounds at

Madison Squart Garden,-Feb. to,

- I
j 4

FELIPE E. M0TTA E HIJ0
. T:it.'-lUiPt;I

Problems i tm$ wood-
hound doesn't take Hklng to

the dog shows he's forced to

ntor around tne 'aat thee;
days. And he shows ii Bo Bo-aides,
aides, Bo-aides, would you bo happy it
your namo was Short Bred
Bully BoyT He's from Jersey.

.OfElCIALAlISX .OF THJTI0NAL10HERY-.0 BENEFICENCE

PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 2085, February 22, 1959
The whole ticket has 52 piecea which comprises the two series "A" and "B"

First Prize"
Second Prize
Third Prize

9980
4257
7957

$52,000.00
5 15,600.00
$ 7,800.00

Ha.
oose
etso
0280
0380
0480
0580
0080
0780
0880
080

f
PrlxM
1SS.00
1SS.00
1118.00
158.00
156.00
158.00
156.00
156.00
158.00
1,800,00

No.
1080
1180
1280
1380
1480
1580
1680
1780

I 1880
' 1980

f
Prl'e
150.00
158.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00

156.00
158.00
2,800.00 I

No.
2080
2180
2280
2380
2456
2580
2680
2780
20
29S0

S
PrlM
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.011
156.00
158.00
2,600.00

So.
3080
3180
3280
3380
3480
3580
3680
3780
3880
3980

f
Prlw
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.04)
156.00
156.00
2,600.00

No.
4080
4180
4280
4380
4480
4580
4680
47N0
4880
4980

(
Prizes
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
2,600.00

s s I
No Prize No. Prtae 10. Prtre- No. Pr!w
5080 156.00 6080 156.00 7080 156.00 8080 156.00
5180 156.00 6160 156.00 7180 158.00 6180 156.00
5280 156.00 6280 156.00 7280 158.00 8280 156.00
5380 156.00 6380 156.00 7380 156.00 8380 156.00
5480 156.00 6480 156.00 7480 156.00 8480 156.00
5580 156.00 6580 156.00 7580 156.00 8560 156.00
5680 156.00 S680 156.00 7680 156.00 8680 156.00
5780 156.00 S780 156.00 7780 156.00 8780 156.00
5880 156.00 6880 ISO.Wt .7880 156.00 8880 156.00
S980 2,600.00 6080 2.600.00 7980 2,606.00 8980 2,600.00

Mo.
9080
0160
0280
9380
9480
9580
IMRIt
9780
880

s
Prltr
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.60
156.00
156.00
156.00

Approximations Derived From First, Prize

0971 520.00 7S 820.00 9975 520.00 9977 B20.00 9979 520.00 0982 B20.00 JJ84 520.00 9986 520.00 9988 520.00
Stri 520.00 S974 520.00 9976 520.00 997S 620.00 t81 S20.W MSS 520.60 SPSS BSO.OO S98T S20.00 SPSS 610.00
Approximations Derived From Seiond Prize ..
S S S S I s
02S7 260.00 1287 260.06 2257 260.00 3257 260.00 5257 260.00 6257 260.00 7257 260.00 8257 260.00 9257 266,60
Ui isloo '42M 13olo 4252 IsTm 4254 I3I00 4256 moo 4259 lSJ.OO" 4261 136.00 4263 130.00 4I6S 130.00
424 130.00 4251 130.00 4253 130.00 4255 130.00 4238 130.00 4260 1S0.00 4282 130.00 4264 130 00 426S 130.00

Approximations Derived From Third rrize

0957 156.00 1957 156.00 57 W6.00 3957 156.00 49ST 156.00 6957 186,00 S9ST 150.00 S957 156.00 9957 156.00
7046 104 00 7950 104.00 7952 "104.00 7954 104.00 7960 104.00 7959 104.00 7961 104 00 7963 104.00 7965 104.00
7949 104.00 7981 104.00 7953 104.00 7955 104.00 795S 104.00 7960 10440 1 TMI 104.00 7964 104.00 7966 164.00

Prlxe-winnlng Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawlne; were sold at: The 1st. In Panama, 2nd. In Panama anH 8rd. In Panama
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in 0 and not Included In the above list win Fifty Two Dollars ($52.00) each
The whole ticket has fifty-two pieces which comprises the two series "A" & "B"

Signed by: The Governor of the Province of Panama JOSE A. CAJAR ESCALA
The Representative of the Treasury, JAIME DK LA GUARDIA JR.

WITNESSES: Jalmes Speer. Ced. 29-00-4053
Ceclllo Cedeno B-Ced. 20-171

RICAKDO VALLARINO
Notary Public, Panama

PABLO A. PINEL M.
Secretary

Tho winning ticket with the last cipher and with the two tart
etDhera apply only to the Flrrt Prtz.

The ririt Prtie and the tnd and 3rd Prize are drawn separately. The up-

NOTE:

.-i.tin.,. mrm Mlnilatul m the Pint. K-mnd and Third erlrea. In ce

a ticket nhould carr- the numbara of each prize, the bolder la entitled to
claim on vment for eeh, ,

DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
, Sunday, February 22, 1959

DrawLac Number 786
' Fraction

Ticket

First Prire. .
Second Prize.
Third Prize.

r8t
. 57
. 57

$11.00 $220.00
3.00 60.00
2.00 44D.00

The prlne will' be paid h) accordance with the Official Lift of Pan.na b
the offlcea of the National Benerteleat tottery situated en Central Avon.
PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No. 2088 WHICH WILL
TAKE PLACE SUNDAY. MARCH 1, 1959
Divided In two lerlea-ot 2 fraction each denominated "A" and "B"
FIRST PR1ZP
l Firat Vrlm. Serine -A anal B. nf S26.00fl.00 each aarlaa S52.0OO.0O

1 Second Pfitev Serloo A and ..f 7.800 00 each nerle 15.600.00

1 Third Priie. Serle A and 6. of S.9O0 O0 each erle 7.800 0

IS Approximatlona, Serlet A and B, ol 260 .00 each aartea 9.360
a m.m a-ria a mil nf 1 JO0 00 each erle 23.400

90 Prize.. Serlee A and B. of 78.00 each aeriea 1040 00
900 prlzee. Sarlaa A Snd B, of 26.00 eacb aarlen 46.aoo.00

' SECOND PRIZE
IS Approximatlona, Serial A and I, af f
9 Frlsaa. Serle A. M B, of
. 'THIRD PIIIIE
18 Approximatlona, Series A and B, of S
9 Prizea, Serlee A and B. of

65.00 each aarlea f 1.340.00
130.00 each aeriea 1440.00
52.00 eadi aartea I 1.S72 00
78,00 each aarlea 1,404.00

1074 Prizea

ToUl

...17.S.M 4

Price of a whole ticket

Price of a 52nd part

PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXES

.$26.00

0.50

:

. 4 Ii

lie'

I

.o c
.00 f 'b
!5 1



G:L ASS IF

E D

4
e
A GENTS:
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FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
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''fHILLIPS OmmM Cottages
leeta Clam It 4a P. Me Pa Pa-fauna
fauna Pa-fauna I-1S77 Criarobal 3-1673.
Fester cottages, between Santa
Clara end Rie Hart. New law
ratal. Pheaa Balboa 1t66.
terra Aiul Club. Ntw manage management,
ment, management, tatfy dishes, well stacked
bar, music, baths, bear., fithint.
Acceuible by eontrete read. 10
minutei from Panama.
Vaeatlen In hitraria Paamylva Paamylva-tiia.
tiia. Paamylva-tiia. Larta dairy farm an hall
heur from fiattyiburf, four heuri
frem N. Y. C. $37.50 a weak
adult. Family Rata an request.
Kara Lea Farm, Welliville.
FOR RENT: Furnished raam,
ateve, refrieeritor, dauble caach,
private bath and entrance. Ne.
3. 52nd Streak Tal. 3-0638.
Pine Sol Champs
Expect To Retain
Softball Crown
y
LLOYD BiRTO JOSIPH
Pin Sol (Ex "W"), 1953
champs have issued warning to
all other clubs of the Panama
Distritnrial Softball League that
thev are coine all out to retain
their title this season.
Newest additions to the club
are Alfonso "Fancy Dan" Rem;
a veteran of several years activi activity
ty activity in the loop; Irv Haynes, a cap capable
able capable receiver; hurlers Les Dray Drayton
ton Drayton and James Weeks and a pair
of heavy hitting fly-chasers in Bob
Castleman ana Roy Crawford.
these are counted upon to tit-
set th low 4 catcher Ed. Parris
ana au-arouaaer leoiuo reiei reiei-kin,
kin, reiei-kin, standouts f last year's
club. Also gone from the post ex exterminators'
terminators' exterminators' roster ara nustling
Jaime Rivera, and outfielders
George Wickham and Ed Lynch.
However, Ed Parris, who al although
though although will not be able to play.
will dc around to do the master
minding. Hismfield combination
of Reid and Holness is about the
fastest in the circuit. Al Farreli,
last year's short-fielder has been
shifted to third to make room for
the smooth fielding Holness. Lu
tner farm, a southpaw swinger
will handle the arst base chores
Sharing the e itching duties will
be servicemen Len Gittens and
Irv Haynes. Comprising the
mound staff will be Mel P
Rudy Lunch, Ed. Morrell, James
Weeks and Les Drayton; while
dependable Fred Morgan, Bob
Castleman and Roy Crawford will
patrot tne cutner gardens.
FOR SALE
PLYMOUTH BELVEDERE 1157-
ISS Hard-top, automatic drive, two-
tone, iuu new, only 11,008 mlleaJ
white-wall tires in new condition,
radio, doty paid. Tel. Panama 1-1
l"Zl.

Rooms

Commercia

Advertise in this section Ads enly cost $0.85 per col. inch
FOR INFORMATION CALL 2-0740

OUTBOARD MOTOR
REPAIRS
Call LOWE, S. A.
Balboa Ave. No. 7 Tel. 2-4618
Authorized service for
Johnson, Evlnrude, Mercury,
West Bend.
AGENdA de CAMBIO
YSERVICIO
We cash checks and Lottery
tickets at any time.
We are located rljrht across
from the Ancon Bus Stop.
FOR SALE
FR1GETTE
AIR CONDITIONER
FOB AUTOMOBILE
$270.00
, REtUMI RILATIONS
BANGKOK, Thailand (UPD-
Thailand and Cambodia yesterday
i resumed diplomatic r e 1 a 1 1 e n
which were severed last Novem November
ber November as s result of border dis dispute.
pute. dispute. I

. Emmommmmmmmmmmmm

21 RATTAN LUX I
jl FURNITURE I

Apartments

FOR RENT: One. bedreem
apartment, livinf-dinini room,
kitchea, fcathroem, $35.00. Raa Raa-aeyelt
aeyelt Raa-aeyelt Avenue, Las Reinaa luild luild-inf.
inf. luild-inf. FOR RENT: Apartmant: One
bedroom, livina-dininfl roam, kit kitchen,
chen, kitchen, firafa $60.00. Via Parraa
Ne. 60, phena 3-1798.
FOR RENT-Medarn apartmant,
n Central Avenue, far bachelor
ar caupla. Phana 2-3233 ar 3 3-4801.
4801. 3-4801. FOR RENT: Madam, coal,
comfortable two bedrooms apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Calle 50 Ne. 115 (Ame (Amelia
lia (Amelia luildinf). Near 86 Street,
Pa it ill.. Phone: 3-1210.
FOR RENT: Apartment, living
ream, bedroom, dinette-kitchen.
Darien street Ne. 14-21, next
atraet from 4th July. Apply Apt.
2.
FOR RENT: Nice 3-bedream
apartment with three bathrooms,
maid's ream and bath, parlor,
dininf roam, back parch ate.
Completely saraanad, newly
painted, seed price ta right par parson.
son. parson. Phana Panama 3-0763 ar 2
0027.
FOR RENT: Canareje. Furnish Furnished
ed Furnished ana roam apartmant. New
house, new furniture, hat water,
balceny. Call 3-1789.
School Track Meet
Set For Tomorrow
At Ml. Hope Park
Tomorrow evening, Cristobal
Balboa, and Junior College, will
participate in their second than
gular track meet at Mt. Hope
Stadium, starting at 6:30 p.m.
After a good look at the three
school teams last week, it seems
like Balboa has the strength in
the springs and all the field e
vents. Junior College has a good
pay: f neiwmen in Bill .Gibson
ana Jim pesLrfflaeSv Cristobal is
strong in the distance runs and
lacks punch in the field events.
Charlie French will be pushed
by his teammate, John Morris,
in the 100 yd. dash, and another
close race qui be the mile, with
Abel Lagassie (B.H.S.) after re revenge
venge revenge from Joe, Lorenzo (C.H.S).
tnstooai win aaa sverai new
trackmen in this meet and also
will be able to run in both relays
at Mt Hope Stadium. One of the
new weightmen will be Max San Sanders,
ders, Sanders, who plaped third in the dis
cus, against A.C. last week.
Order of events:
6: JO Pole vault, high Jump,
broad lump, discus, idiot nut.
7:00 70 yd. high hurdles.
7:15 100 yd. dash.
7:25 One mile run.
7:40 440 yd. dash.
7:50 440 yd. relay.
8:10 180 yd. low burdles.
8:20 880 yd run.
8:30 220 yd. dash.
1:40 Spring medley 'relay
HEAD FOR BYPASS
ROCKFORD, I., (UPI) A
roadblock set up yesterday to
catch license plate violators net netted
ted netted only violators traveling south.
Police found a resident around
the corner was warning violators
traveling north to take a bypass.
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo.
on new can
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
JUDSON
Super chargers
for your
Volkswagen and Ghia
MGA, Dauphint
50
more power
Cia. Istmena de
Auto Servicio, S.A.
Frangipani St
Tel. 2-1870

Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1951 Ford 2-doer
sedan. Very food condition. Call
3-2420.
FOR SALE: '58 Austin Healy,
100-6, good condition, Ov-D,
6,000 miles $2750. Tal. Balboa
2-1695.
FOR SALE: Plymouth Plaia
1957 fordfor sedan, Push button
drive. 1 2,000 miles. Perfect con condition
dition condition $1650 cash, will trade for
low priced car, Call Balboa 2 2-1744.
1744. 2-1744. FOR SALE: Complete Chevrolet
motor, recently overhauled, plus
ether parts, cheap! House 107 107-D,
D, 107-D, Paraise, ar telephone 4-505.
FOR RENT: Small furnished
apartment or independent fur furnished
nished furnished room. Best residential
section. 43rd Street No. -13.
FOR SALE: 51 Morris Minor 2
door sedan $225.00, Ft. Clay Clayton
ton Clayton 3217 or 7280.
FOR SALE: 1957 Hillman
Minx, excellent condition, ana
awner. Low mileaae. 0302 Cable
Hrs. 2-4278.
FOR SALE:'53 Pentiac 4 doer,
new paint, good condition, wsw
tires. Call Albrook 2215 after
3:30.
Jimmy Annicharico
Wins Rodman Ringer
Goll Championship
Sinking a clutch birdie on the
final hole of the final day, Navy
civilian JinimV" Annicharico yes
terday won the Rodman Ringer
Golf Championship.
The Rodman grounds depart
ment supervisor collected his
"bird" on the 140-yard, par 3 lstn
hole to break a tie with Marine
Ssgt. James Riblett and win by
one stroke with a. Eros s 58.
Less his tto handicapTW had
a net 55, the tamt score that Air
Force S-Sgt. Bob Shank register registered
ed registered in winning the Ringer Tour Tourney
ney Tourney last year.
The women's champion, Mrs. E E-lizabeth
lizabeth E-lizabeth Weber, also came
through with a last-day birdie to
clinch her titl. She had a four
on the par 5, 421-yard No. e hole.
The birdie gave her a final 67
gross, one stroke better than
Mrs. Ruth Wallace, and a 54 net
to make her dual champion.
Last year's women's winner was
Mrs. Nkkie Knock with a net 60.
The most sensational individual
golf performance of the tourna tournament
ment tournament was an eagle fired by 14-year-old
Mel Leonard, the men's
low net champ with a 52.
Young Mel shot a rare S on the
par 5, 481-yard No. 6 hole yester yesterday.
day. yesterday. He was runner-up low gross
champion last year.
The winners were scheduled te
collect their prizes at 4 p.m. to today
day today at a clubhouse party featur featuring
ing featuring a pitching and putting tour
ney and an afternoon cocktail
party and buffet.
Next even on the Rodman golf
calendar is a no-handicap elub
championship next month.
Full day excursion
SAN BLAS
Suru'ir March 1
COPA twin engine
DC-3 Transport,
FIDANQUE TRAVEL
Tel. 2-1661
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co.,
for rate and Information
Tel. Panama I-055J
Monday thru Friday
:00 a.m. to 12:M
2:0e p.m. S:M
Saturday: (: a.m. to 11:0a
The New
s
NIKON
With bullt-ln Universal
Vlewflnder System
Panama
Col6n

mm

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Walnut bedroom
complete. Boy's dresser and chest.
Chast Desk. Tables. Floor lamp.
Sisal rug. Automatic dryer. Book Bookcase.
case. Bookcase. Bar. Chairs. Can be seen
at 0777-D Williamson Place,
Balboa. Phone Balboa 1681.
FOR SALE: Hi-Fi. Mahogany
double bed. Sofa. Wringer wash washing
ing washing machine. Balboa 4491.
FOR SALE: Elactrolux vacuum
cleaner; Muntx T.V. 20 inch
blond console; Bepdix Dialamati
washing machine. 3-5317.
FOR SALE: Westinghouse laun laundromat
dromat laundromat and Twin Clothes Dryer
$325.00.
2 Modern Foam Rubber Sec Sectionals
tionals Sectionals 78" long with Matching
Chair 3 Months Old $350.00.
Mahogany Twin Beds with Pa Pa-starpedic
starpedic Pa-starpedic Mattress, Night Table,
Vanity, Chair $425.00.
Birch Baby Bed with Pastarpedie
Mattress and Chiffonier $125.
Miscellaneous Appliances Call
Panama 3-7234 or 4-1368.
NOW China Closers 22.00.
double beds 12.50, wicker chain
4.50 wardrobes 25.00, dining
room table and 4 chairs, 45.00,
livingroom sets 98.00, vanities
1 5.00, cribs wmattresses 29.00,
sideboards 12.00, small tables
5.50, mattresses 6.50, spring
12.50, metal desk 29.00, pillows
1.25 ALSO beautiful wrought
iron and mahogany living and
diningroom sets at reck bottom
prices Auto Row No. 41 (Ava.
Nacienal Household Echange)
Tels. 3-4911, 3-7348.
FOR SALE: Freexer, Iron and
ironing board, wicker bassinet.
Phone 3-6882.
FOR SALE: Colspot refrigerator
goedf aondition, $65.00.
Tel. 3-
1483.
FOR SALE: 1 sewing machine
(Damascus-Electric) $25.00; I
Porch Glider, $20.00; 1 G.E. Air
Circulator Fan, $40.00; 1 Kit Kitchen
chen Kitchen Table and Stool 5.00; 1
Juice Squeezer, $1.00; 2 Bam Bamboo
boo Bamboo Blinds, $2.00; African Vio Violets.
lets. Violets. 0302 C.Wa Hts. 24278.
HOWTValparaiso (Ind.) Uni University
versity University student Del Richert, 20,
wonders bow that huge icicle
formed on the slender utility
wire. The eight-foot icicle orig originally
inally originally was hanging from the
roof of an adjoining building.
When the weather warmed, the
piece broke loose, slid down the
wire and stuck midway.

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Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Piano, Weaver,
Spinet with Heating unit and
bench $300.00; ". Refrigerator
Westingheusa, 9 eu. ft. New
motor. Rack rafinisked Porcelain
$80.00; Stroller metal, good con condition
dition condition $5.00; Chiafa rocker
with Tray $3 .00; Child's Wooden
slat cliair swing with chains $2. $2.-50;
50; $2.-50; Playpen -' extra-large collap collapsible
sible collapsible $15.00; High chair, $2.00;
Toilet seat, telephone .2-3617,
house 805, Empire Street.
FOR SALE: Wrought' Iran din dining
ing dining room sat $60.00. Youth bed
complete $10.00. Tal. Gatun 5 5-564.
564. 5-564. FOR SALE: One TV tuba 17"
17HP4. One costamar, adjustable.
Call 83-2142.
FOR SALE: 9 ft. Frigidaire re refrigerator
frigerator refrigerator 60 cycle $50, 561 2-D
Diablo. Phone 2-2864 after 4
P.m.
8 eu. ft. Frifidaire 60 cycle, new
unit $70.00, call Balboa 3517.
BRUISED BULL' BILL
ATLANTA (UPI) A -bill in
the state Legislature would re require
quire require the use of electric : buzzers
or canvas flaps to be used in
driving cattle.
Too many bruises on the beet
WWW:?' v" W:::
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cue WALKED ACAINTold by doctors after a M52 skating skating-Kent
Kent skating-Kent that she might never walk again, Alena Murray ia
now striding Into Hollywaod, stardom Here, sl 4sk-ttak
out iwui work by the edge f Spood.

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. f"1 1 11 'id'li'tr ii i n nail hi 1 1 imiii mm I

DEBUT FOR UNDA-iterall the waiting, the stork Is finaUy
arriving on4he 'December, Bride TV show Here is the new
baby; to be called Iindarin real life, Vlkkl Rubine, W Loa
a-1 Ck-I. 1..1J V14..r- AmA T.l i I- M1 Ua i

jiarry morgan. Motner maays is new seen en sne snevy jf

Real Estate

FOR SALIj-4.ote 500 and 1.000
meters. In the Nueva Hipodrema
Urbanizatian, acraes the Remoa
Racetrack. All lots with street
fronts, : aewaia, 'water mala and
electricity. Can W. McBameH.
Tat. 3-2567.
FOR SALELet 1.066 square
meters in the best location af
La Cresta, situated batwesa "V"
Street and new atraet. Far infor information
mation information please call Tel. 2-2170
from t a.m. ta 12 noon and from
2 p.m. ta 5 p.m.
FOR SALE t Fully furnished car cartas'
tas' cartas' 200 meters from Goraona
Beach. Phone Balbaa 4474.
FOR SALE: On Via Arsantina.
El Canerejo, two story residence,
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, studio,
recent construction, $26.00. Cu Cu-calon
calon Cu-calon a Co. realtors. Phana- 3 3-3330.
3330. 3-3330. FOR SALES On highest part of
Golf Heights en 2,300 M2 lot
3 bedrooms raiidence, 2 baths,
studio $35,000 term. C-lon
Co. Maltors. Phone 3-1330.
hais been costine Georsia cattle
men more than a million dollars
a year.
'
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SERVICES

TV SERVICES v
Far leHer Heme Service, Always
Rafy en
U.S. TELEVISION.
Phone 3-7607 Panama, Service
frem 9:00 a.m. te 10:00 p.m.
TELEVISION SERVICE
TV. Radios, Hi-Fi Transfers
specialist. W service aH makes
and medals. We don't pretend te
guarantee ew werk. Wa guar guarantee
antee guarantee it. . .
CRAWFORD AMNCIES.-Tivelf
Ave. 18-20. Tel. 2-1905.
Prefect yaur"homa and prapar prapar-ty
ty prapar-ty against intact damage.
Frempt scientific treatment an
emergency ar monthly budget
basis. Talephena Preato Service,
Panama 3-7977 ar Colon 1777.
Domestic Employment
WANTED General maid, live
in, mutt spaak English. Refer References
ences References reeuirad. Call 3-4409.
WANTED
WANTED TO RENT: Furnish Furnish-ad
ad Furnish-ad apartment er chalet, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, euiet locatien. Phana 3 3-4676
4676 3-4676 during effice heurs.
(Cof tittueA from Pafe 6) l
two trim in the nlate and ended
up on the. short end of a te 3
score.
nnMt. iflrnhT frSrr Mutual arid
Wardie Redman for-Legion were
the starting pitchers but neither
Heed around very long. Ronnie
struck' out ene.-C walked one al
lowed three hits and gave up
three runs in the one inning mat
he pitched. Doug Billison took
VMV far him and want An to win
the game! He fanned ;tJxrj was
nicked for a pair of nits, issued
nary a walk and held the Legion
ritrela for the five inninss that
he was on the mound.
Redman, Legion's ace i pitcher,
struck out twe, passed nobedy,
gave up four solid blows and was
crnrerl nn twice in his tour of two
innings. Henry Shirk pitched three
innings and was tagged for tnree
runs, including the waning score
He wa hit ; twice and walked and
struck-, m1 mtfyt'iM ;
eu wnu me, waof: v.
Once agaitt the Lgion team
looked shaky in the field while
the Mutuals showed their usual
class defensively as they gave
their pitchers, good support.
The boar secret
Legien
Clement, ss
2 1 1
Redman, p, lb
Blair, c
Shirk, lb, p
Austin, 3b
Coffin, 2b
Brians, ef
Dugan, rf
Thomas, If
Totals
MS I 3
Mutual
duinn, Larry, 2
1 I
1 1
Dbckery?5rf
Billison. Sb, p
Quinn Lu, ss
15 van." e
1 2
Seeley, rf
Highley, If j v,
Bialkowski, lb
RiefkohU p, 3b
Totals
Scare by Innings
210 000-3 S
' 200 21 5 6 1
Legion.
Mutual
Elks 17, Pirates 1
The Elks, who finished second
in the first half of the Atlantic
Little League, scored a smashing
17 to 1 victory over the Pirates on
Wednesday in one of the infre infrequent
quent infrequent one-sided games played this
year. Ordinarily when these two
clubs meet, both teams spray
hits In all directions and come up
with several fielding gems. This
was not the case on Wednesday
as the Elks pounded out 13 hits
and erred twice. The Pirates, on
the other hand, were able -te fig
Nick Brooks for but three hits
while they made eight boots m
the field.
Brooks was very wild 'in the
first few innings is he gave up
eight walks. He settled down to towards
wards towards the end of the game as he
finished with eight strike outs.
Tom Hickey, who went aH .ths

. 3 HR. SHIFTS
$40 ear iveak far aebvahift.
Teu may work mere than aae
shift, let, 9:00 12:00 neon.
2nd., 2:00 5:00 p.m. 3rd.,
special aarvkeman'a shift 6:00
9:00 p.m. Transportation fur furnished
nished furnished far servicemen. AH ethers
mutt have autemebikv If yea
ara sales-minded end ambitieua, -aaa
Robert Navat, International
Hotel 10:00 a.m. ar, 7:00 p.m.
Monday. '. t

JR. ACCOUNTANT WANTED
Pesitien; effered by America
Firm aparating in Celen Free
Xane ta parson with accounting
training and experience. Apply
in writing te: Junior Accountant
P.O. Bex 536, Celen, R.P.
Miscellaneous
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER A DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, CJL,
PHONE BALBOA 8709
Wanted to Buy
WANTED TO UYt J...,
medal 57 er 58, cash. Call Ree-
trepe, telephana 3-4095, Pana Panama
ma Panama Gity. i.i.
WANTED TO BUY Cains el
all countries bought at tap prices.
Immediate cash payment far any
siie eollactian. Call er write Kar Kar-lay,
lay, Kar-lay, Box 1237 Cristobal, C.I.
Tal. 3-1.11.
wjay. for jPJrates, pitched bet better
ter better ball than Ae store would in indicate.
dicate. indicate. Several of the Pirates' er
rors ame with, two er more of
Milt Sanders menJon base while
some of the (Elks'its just did
drop in safely beyond the out outstretched
stretched outstretched hands-of the fielders.
Tommy struck out three and walk.
6r VvSekffmU 'Motta
had three for four, including a
double, and Johnny Sander three
for five, likewise with one twe
batter. Jerry Pabon had twe dou doubles
bles doubles in his five trips te the plate.
Geoff Thompson got two of his
teams three hits and Jim Ebdon
had the last of the trio of Howl
struck by RandWilringstad's
team.
The box score i
Elks
WiU, rf
Sanders John, ss
Pabon, 3b
Brooks. N..
Ab R M I
4 2 1
(Motta, V?M'l
DeBoyrie, er
Hopkins, b
Fettler, 2b
Acheson, lb 1
Brooks R. rf
Bedsworth, xtf
, Totals y4 t'
MrafiM
Tortorlcl.ltif
xHardison
Hickey, p
Christoph. f
16 IT M I
Wiberg, in
Thompson, ss:
2
Nuneiy.'tf
Ebdon, 3b
J
1
Sanders bod, an
ft 6 2
xxGegg
Smith, rf
1
1
re
Spector, If
xxxDe Frees
Totals. 20 1 S
x Batted for Tortorici fat 6th.
xx Batted for Sanders in 6th.
xxx Batted for Spector in 6th.
Score by innings
Elks 604 02517 13
Pirates 001 0001 3
NO SALE
TURIN, Italy (UPI) -Giovanni
Pennellv, 34, has been eentenced
to 12 years in prison for trying
te sell his pretty wife,. RaffaeHa,
to another man. Hie prosecutor
said PenneMa wanted, money for
gambling, and when his wife ob objected,
jected, objected, he stabbed her, te
chest.. - y
FIVE FISHERMEN DROWNED
OPORTO, Portugal (UPI-Five
fishermen dflowned'i yesterday
when tw boats eapswed off JBe
Douro River bsr. Two others
swam to safety The boats were
putting out. 4 see when a wave
caught them end toppled the me
into thevwater. 1
WAYWARD BUS
aim Ttalv fUPTi A driver-
less bus with 50 perions aboardj
sped down a bumpy mountain
road at more" than SO miles an
hour iuesoay neiore passengep
U tn 'mi tun Tha
BOITJI M lm n .v mwy
bus was traveling fast when Hie
door flewopen and the driver fell
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MOOTAT, FEBRUARY ti, 1139

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT PAILI NEWSPAPER

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DESCRIPTION OP A WAN WH0 P05EP
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I SCHOOL. A FEW WEEKS BEFORE

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(QiifgCaiByar True Life Adventures

SECRET

of LIFE

iPwe BUTTERFL-V 17INES ON

IslBiTAK rf EXTRACTS FROM MAN4

PIFFEKEKT XINtTS OPFLqWERS

BUT ITS CATpRPlUJ-AR.
CAN SUBSIST ONUY ON
A CERtTAJN VAR1HTV

(films

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World RlihUIUMml

A WHITE ADMIRAL.

Ci THE HONELSUKUE

FROM A BEWILDERING'

VARIETY OF PLANTS.

THEN SHE LAMS A SIN-5LE
E.3 ON, EACH LEAF.
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SIDE GLANCES

By Calbraith

Witt

MAJOR HOOPLR OUT OUR WjVI

Bf J. R WILLIAMS

"32 '.
WW-

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WHY ISN'T -MRS. YjHfjIS club BY UO'CLOCKANV LATER1

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9

'My folks have Invented a new dance. It's
. called a waltz!"

!

US Soldier Nabbed
With Narcotics
At German Posl

Children Watch -As
Man Stabs Wife
Who Read Comics"

TARANTO, Italy, Feb. 23 (UM)
Farmhand Cosii.-.o Spaznalo, 28.

AUGSBURG. Germany, Feb. 23 stabbed and wounded hfl wife in

fUPD M ilitarv Dolice investieat

ing suspected traffic in Hasish
v.hich U. .1. servicemen allegedly
brought back with them from Le Lebanon
banon Lebanon have made oiM : arres it
was announced today.
"24h Infantry Division head headquarters
quarters headquarters said that Pfc. Dalton L.
C. Chase of Edna, Texas, was ar arrested
rested arrested two days ago in Augsburg
for alleged possession of marihuana.

"Chase, who was apprehended in
Augsburg, J half(a pound of Le Lebanese
banese Lebanese hasish in liis possession at
his arrest," the announcement
ba d.
"The ar es' wa the result of
long inves'igatlons by military po police
lice police criminal investigating autho authorises
rises authorises wheh began when dv'eion
troops retuined from Lebunon. Mi Military,
litary, Military, police are continuing their
investigation." ..

front of their five children laKt
night because she read com i t
strips. ;
Spagnolo, who disapproves of
comics, returned home in the vil village
lage village of Sava after an evening; 3
the inn. He found his wife Anna
Bianca, 28, asleep with a comie
book in he.- hand.
He woke her up with slaips fa
the face and when she turned to
flee he s abbed her in the neck.
Mrs. Spagnolo was taken to the

hospital with two serious wounoa.

Police are looking for tn nui

band.

r

SNEAK RIDES COSTLY
TOKYO (UPI) The Japaa
Na ional Railway Corp, estimate
ed today that passengers sneak sneaking
ing sneaking rdes on its trains robbed the
corporation of nearly 14 millioal
dollan annually.

'Used to be you could size up a new neighbor by what
time smoke started coming out of his chimney
In the morning!"

faltering

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AfOVMS PANAMA AWAYS

PANAMA-MIAMI
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3:15 Dinah Short ..
4:00 TrMton ;
3:30 Advonturt Tomorrow
4:30 Mr. ,Wiiard
5:00 Roy Rogm
3:3fl PANORAMA
7:00 rtlKh XMd To Danger

7:30 Royal Playhouse
100 Club CcheckarBoard
1:50 Movl Ttma: Thay
Drive By Nifht
10:30 Slurs of Jau
11:00 CFN NEWS
11 15 Enc: Voice of rireatone
and SchllU PUyhovaa

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ft.; -xJEwr 'it:.-'' g S.-
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Big Nicosia Celebrationis
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nxrrc m action Patrons of a hotel casino gather at a dice table as gambling concessions
nnerations in Havana for the first time since the overthrow of the Batista government.
fXfini? for the time being, will be limited strictly to tourists and Cubans earning oyer
$Ko a year Identification for well-heeled Cubans will be issued by the government tax

division.
More Batistamen
Face Firing Squad
HAVANA, Feb. 23 (UPI)
Eight convicted "war crimi criminals"
nals" criminals" were executed today by
firing squads.
Six soldiers of former dic dictator
tator dictator Fulgencio Batista's army
were shot at Pinar del Rio,
four of them giving' the
"Ready, aim, fire" orders to
the firing squads themselves.
Two former Batista police policemen
men policemen were marched into the
dry moat outside Cabana for fortress
tress fortress here and executed by
liring squad.
.Seven or eight more soldiers
will be shot tomorrow at Pi Pinar
nar Pinar del Rio, authorities said.
Britain's Flu Deaths
Continue To (limb;
Aged Worst Hit
LONDON, Feb. 23 (UPI)
Deaths from influenz more than
trebled last week after doubling
the week before, the Ministry of
Heart!- reporte." today.
tuA.; total of 455 flu deaths were re recorded
corded recorded in Britau. during the week
ending Feb. 14, more than three
t'imes the 144 deaths during the
previous week.
The Ministry emphasized that
the flu now afflicting Britons is
mostly of the mild type, lasting
only a few days.
. "In the majority ot miiuenza
fatalities it is the elderly patient
kwhiais succumbed," it said. "No:.
tewer than 302 of the 455 victims'!
Bave Deen inose over ta years oi
age.
It said the flu outbreak, which
t AiA tint Hpsnriho as an pnidpmic.
ii "scattered' and "widely differ-,

ing" throughout the country, al- three years' just to have the ex ex-thougih
thougih ex-thougih many parts of Britain are tra time? he asked,
effected. Hoffa convened his board of
,The ministry said flu "rarely directors here today. He' said
has severe after-effects if proper the union will discuss plans for
care is taken." several announced teamsters
At the same time, deaths from organizational drives,
pneumonia increased again 1,373 Hoffa said a shorter work
pneumonia deaths during the week week would not improve the un unending
ending unending Feb. 14, compared with 986 employment situation,
for 'the week before. "If a man only had to work
..'The ministry of Health said, four eight-hour days at one Job,
"such seasonal illnesses as bron- he'd just have to make another
chitis and pneumonia are usual at I part-time job probably for less
this state of the winter." pay," he said.

DOROTHY

B am m

mum

WEDNESDAY!

i

V

WKU.'.LmWiiiri,ulLMJMMi.Wilvi.1ml

3 InarlH

Bergman Jurgens Don at

If m-it

BOBEL IENIWRT

NAACP Would
Beyond Token

TAMPA, Fla. (UPI) The Na National
tional National Association for the Ad Advancement
vancement Advancement of Colored People end ended
ed ended its Southern conference yester yesterday
day yesterday with a pledge to "seek to
greatly accelerate desegregation
in those states which now have
so-called token integration."
The delegates from six southern
states asked in a conference
statement that local branches con continue
tinue continue their fight for total integra integration
tion integration in all public facilities and
urged Negroes not to ease off the
fight in states which have allowed
only token integration.
The conference statement also
called for more work to end dis discrimination
crimination discrimination against the Negro in
housing, labpr and industry, and
segregation in hospitals "partially
Holla Wants Higher
Wages Rather Than
Shorter W61R Week
MIAMI BEACH, Feb. 23 (UPI)
Teamsters president James
Hoffa says he is more interest
prt in hieher waees than in a
shorter work week.
"We're not
going to worry
idurs off uhtil
living standards
said at a news
Vim if. a fpw
weve raised
. f irst Hof fa
'conference yesterday.
"Who wants to stand
still
with the same wages for two or
PRICES: 75c. 40c.
- TODAY
1:00, 2:25, 4:30, 6:40, 8:55 P.M.
NlcGUtRE and FESS PMtKER
Taehnleolor

A Deeply Moving Story Of A
Boy And Homely Yellow Dog!

WEEK END
RELEASE I
dirt Dftk-rf

Hasten Gains
Integration

or wholly supported by federal,
state or municipal funds."
It also called "for complete in integration
tegration integration of staffs and personnel
of these hospitals and medical
centers.'
The conference said "the rapid
increase in population in this re region
gion region points up the need for more
and more low-cost housing and to
demand that such housing be
open to all qualified applicants
without regard to race, creed or
color."
The statement also urged suc
cessful completion of the south
wide drive for three million regis
tered Negro voters by November
of 1960.
It charged 'thertf are inequities,
subterfuges and discriminatory
practices on the part of elected
and appointee public officials.
which can only be solved by mai
sive and wise use of the ballot."
In the four years since the U.S.
Supreme Court's '"desegregation
ruling, the statement" said,' 51t is
clear to all concerned that in the
southern states and the District of
Columbia it has been demonstrat demonstrated
ed demonstrated that desegregation can be
started and Completed within a
reasonable time."
But it laid "the late develop developments
ments developments in the states of Alabama,
Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Lou Lou-i
i Lou-i s i a n a, Maryland, Mississippi,
North Carolina, South Carolina
and the District of Columbia, indi indicate
cate indicate that the political leadership
is still bent upon defiance of the
Constitution."

Runaway Film Actor Sterling Hayden

And 4 Kids
PAPEETE. Tahiti, Feb. 23
(UPI) Swashbuckling actor
Sterling Hayden who defied a U.S.
court order and sailed for the
South Seas with his four children
last month aboard an ancient
schooner has arrived safely in the
Marquesas Islands, it was report
ed today.
Word that Hayoens -iooi
schooner, the Wanderer, had put
in at Taiohae in the Marquesas re
moved anv doubt that the run
away actor had purposely flouted
tne oraer Darrmg mm irom laiung
his children out of the United
States.
Hayden originally planned to
sail to Tahiti on a film-making
venture when he left San Francis
co Bay last Jan. 18, but recent
bad weather may have delayed
the vovaee to this island paradise
nearly 1,000 miles south-southeast
of the Marquesas,,
The actor aiso piannea to ao
some filming in the Marquesas,
which like Tahiti, are French pos
sessions. The Marquesas are 3,600
miles from San Francisco.
If Hayden had a radio aboard
his yacht, he never used it. Noth
ao had Deen seen or neara oi
the Wanderer since it left Caufor-

STREAMLINED Pigs twually end trp thaped like tausagei inese J
Only iTmontesrid, the Welsh silts, or low won a prize in London livestock show lor their
flne length and exceptionally good hams." '"-

WASHINGTON, Fab. 23

whether President Eisenhower
State John Foster Dulles.
Sens. Stuart Symington

the President to name a successor to Dulles at once. But

Mass.), John J. Sparkman
hower should wait.
Despite his illness, Dulles

ferred for 45 minutes yesterday with Vice-President Richard M. Nixon on the Berlin

prc&lem.

The secretary's brother. Allen W. Dulles, director of the

also called at the Walter Reed
situation.
Physicians treating Dulles
were encouragea Dy me iaci
that he has shown no adverse
reaction to radiation therapy.
The treatment, which began
Friday, will be resumed today
after, a one-uay lapse.
The call by Symington and
Humphrey for the immediate
replacement of Dunes reneciea
growing concern over the un uncertainty
certainty uncertainty of State Department
leadership as the West moved
'A
b

ii iiiu llilil.liiiiiili.liin .mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmktMmmmmmmm w I

DRAVVIMQ A BEAD Hunting lor twigs instead of animals
is forester Hugh HilL Be uses a 22-caliber rifle to shoot off
the ends ot branches from a superior pine tree in Baldwin
County, Ala. The twigs will be grafted to rooted stock to grow
Wgh-quality trees for fee wood pulp Industry.

Mak South Sea Port

ma.
The 42-year-old actor, last seen
on U.S. television four months ago
in 'The Old Man" on Playhouse
90, was awarded custody of his
children early last montn in a Bit Bitter
ter Bitter custody fight with his former
wife, Mrs. Betty Anne de Noon
Hayden.
Mrs. Hayden went to court,
however, and got an order forbid forbid-ing
ing forbid-ing Hayden from taking the chil
dren out of the country. Los An Angeles
geles Angeles superior judge Emil Gum Gum-pert
pert Gum-pert issued the order on her claim
the Wanderer was unfit for a
long voyage and the volunteer
crew was inexperienced.
But the schooner slipped quietly
out of San Francisco Bay on a
Sunday morning and it was days
later before "hail and farewell'
letter were received by families of
the crew.
"He'll kill them alT Mrs. Hay
den cried. Then she went back to
court and charged in a criminal
complaint that Hayden conspired
to commit several offenses, child
theft among them.
Also named in the complaint
were ten crewmen, charged with
consmracv to commit contemm ot
court, endagenng the lives of the

(UPI) Key Democratic senators were split today ove

should immediately replace

(D-Mo.) and Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Min.) called for

(D-Ala.) and Richard L. Neuberger (D-Ore.) said Eisen

continued to keep his hand
,
Army Medical Center to give
toward negotiations with Rus
sian on Berlin.
The United States, Britain
and France have proposed to
Europe that the Big Four for foreign
eign foreign minsiters meet to discuss
the Berlin and German issues.
Momcw radio said the West Western
ern Western proposal of fered nothing
new but no formal reply from
Russia is expected for a weeK
or 10 days.
The Soviet Union has an-
14-
children, and contributing to the
delinquency of miinors.
Hayden, dissatisfied with his
life in Hollywood, where he ap appeared
peared appeared in more low-grade B pic
tures than anything else, decided
to get away from it all on a lei
surely trip to the South Seas.
He said bfefore he left that he
had gone into debt "up to my
eyeballs" to make the "dream"
voyage to the South Pacific.
"If I can't make the voyage,
I'll lose the ship, too," the fisherman-turned-actor
said.
Hayden couldn't afford a regu regular
lar regular crew, so he advertised for adventurous-mined
volunteers to
sign on. When the Wanderer sailed
it was manned by a ragtag crew
of eight men and five women.
First mate Philip Africa brought
his three children along. V
Hayden warned all along the
court order or not, he would not
make the voyage without his chil children,
dren, children, Christian, 10; Thor, 9;
Gretchen, 8 and Matthew, 6.
Ostensibly bound from its moor moorage
age moorage at Sausalito, Calif., for Santa
Barbara across San Francisco
Bay last January, the rickety
schooner instead headed out to
sea.
ilk. MUM

cancer-stricken Secretary of

Sens. John h. Kennedy (u-
in foreign affairs. He con
Central Intelligence Agency,
him a breifing on the world
nounced It will turn' over its
sector of Berlin to East Ger
many by May 27 and give the
German Beds control over tnc
Western access routes to Ber Berlin.
lin. Berlin. The West refuses to deal
with the East Germans.
Symington said he did not
think Dulles could run the
State Department from a hos
pital. Humphrey said the nation
must- have its strongest and
best aualified spokesman at the
fnreiBm nolicv helm "at this
verv critical period."
However. Soarkman said he
did not see any need for mak
ine a replacement. He said Dul
les "may bounce back" from his
ailment if given a reasonaoie
time.
Kennedy said he was not
prepared to ask that Dulles
quit. He said the secretary
should be given at least eight
or nine days in which his
physicians could determine hi
response to the radiation
treatment.
Neuberger, who' recently un
derwent a cancer operation,
said the President and Dulles
doctors "should be allowed a
decent interval in which to de decide
cide decide the secretary's future with
out being hounded to force his
resignation.
Sen. Karl E. Mundt (R-S.D.)
summed up GOP reaction when
he flala, ne noped Dunes would
remain in government service
But if Dulles should retire,
he added, there would be no
great change in direction of his
policies.
PUFFING Fiery Simone
Girard lights up between
scenes of a new Paris play.
She's cast as Madame DuBarry,
favorite of King Louis XV.
Though the role is the first for :
the 22-year-old beauty, she's j
been givtn critical acclaim. j

J rtftmiSiTmMWlfe'i v-'"-

I

, CU1 amount Presents
I R --.,c),;.v Jfc$k
I A f'ityjJ
I WED. TOv..,:il,i
I 25 'S&i

JERRY IEWIS is funnier than ever os f he
bachelor "father" of "ROCK-A-BYE BABY the

Paramount Technicolor comedy-with-tnusic in
VistaVision which arrives at the Central on Wed Wed-j
j Wed-j nesday 25. , v ,

NICOSIA, Cyprus (UPI) -Nearly
1,000 Cypriot prisoners re released
leased released by the British streamed,

out of detention camps to freedom
yesterday. Their liberation touched
off one of the greatest celebra
tions ever seen an this oncp-em
battled island, p ..
British troops- were confined to
their camps to' cut down the risk
of clasnes witn thef lubiiant Cyp
riots who poured into the streets
aj;;the first reports that all deten detention
tion detention camps, had been closed and
all detainees freed.
Troops in one section of the
Mediterranean sland were report
ed to have stoned carloads of re
leased Cypriots an incident re
fleeting bitterness', over the
amount of blood spilled in the past
iour years,
To Cypriots, however, the re
lease meant the official end of
the long"emer.,gency" on this dis
puted island, the acceptance of
their independence.
As wildily cheering detainees
many of them bearded, streamed
Overseas Telephone
Traffic Tied Up
By Break In Cable
LONDON, Feb. 23 (UPI) -Trans
Atlantic telephone traf
fic piled up today after an un
derwater break in the 2,000-mile
cable that normally carries most
of the calls between Europe
and America.
Officials at the postal tele
phone office, here, which
handles calls for the cable,
said that they were now being
routed by the 16 radio channels
in use before the cable waa laid
two and one-half years ago
The radio calls are often dis
torted by atmospheric condi conditions.
tions. conditions. The break is believed to be in
the section off the-Newfound-land
roast. An American cable
repair ship 'is en route .to the
spot to begin the process of
hrincinir un leneths of cable
and testing wiem. Tne jod is
expected to take several days.
The break was reported over
t.h weekend, when telephone
traffic normally is ugftt. bui
there were delays of more' than
an hour today when tne weers
business calls started..
You Can't Fool
The Drunkomeler,
Pathologist Proves
NEW YORK, Feb. 23 (UPI)
A Hrnnknmeter test can tell
you've had one for the road wheth wheth-pr
pr wheth-pr itc dnrlip bread, a slice of- o-
nion or whiskey, it was brought
rait in Offllrt todaV. -'
Ravmnntp Hollinde. of Fxeeport.
N Y., was cleared by a jury of
a charge of drunk driving on theN
basis of a court aemonswauun
which indicated drunkomcter
tests can be influenced by chemi
cals other than ialcohol. :t "?
Dr. Philio' Rosenblatt, a Brook
lyn pathologist, showed the jury
four test tubes containing a per per-maneanate
maneanate per-maneanate solution used in
Hiriinkomfiter tests.
He put alcohol Into one, garlic
inipp in another, onion juice
third and acetone into the fourth.
ThP niimle color of the perman
ganate solution turned colorless in
each case. .' 'it . ,.
He claimed Hollinde had a dia diabetic
betic diabetic condition which produced
enough acetone in this system to
affect th6 drunkometer. The jury
agreed and cleaired Hollinde of
the charge.-

into the-island'! cities, theem-i
turns of Greek Cypriots exploded
into an orgy of celebration,

it was virtually impossible ;tt;!
move an the heart- at Niemria teJ
causepf the"; crowds f ahoutin.
"the emergency, is. reaUv endintf.Pli
and, ''we're happy-we're happy
The: detainees, many of. them
political prisoners, had beer ot-ii
dered released by Cyprus Gof.'f
Sir Hugh Foot, who returned!!
from London Saturday. The t.
lease -was a result of last weet'i!
London Cyprus government which!
established independence for &.!
island. ;i, ; 4
But. the bitterness of VMM kl
struggle between' Greek Cypfloti
and Btritottvtill remained likeHt
ugly cloud over the celebration;
uOne incident wag reported oit
the huge detention Camp "K"!
Soldiers stationed at the cahip
were said to, have, stoned many!
tamees Into the capital.
One eyewitness reported th-' ha J
saw 30 vehicles stonedLhe.cass:
were held un far some fimpt
the travelers feared to tun ffiaj
gauntlet. .;
;Britenir:aod -Greeks mingledi$
the rapidlgifawihg (torcmg ia m
trucks and lmseiaiiTvincf
oners rolled .down' the old "niureer
mile" that had been the seenSfl
frequent and bloody incidents!-1
At one -point:, church beMs rfflil
out. But they stopped abruptly iwS
cailSfr the rin pin k f
bells Is beingreserved iiar -tft
m next weelfcwhe;tfie )Si
Kfled S"lek Cypr lader, ArMi'l
bishop Makanos, returns to the
" b ponenr ao to
Weefe End
CENTRAL
1:15 3:47 :1 9.1s
8:51 PJW. 0.40
BIG BOOK!
BIG CAST t
BIG PICTURE!
"X MaB'
THE
LAST
HURRAH
um nmam'
OIANNE fOSTER Ptf 061301
Week Emf
3:08, 5:02, 6:56
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The Chill Of The Tomb:
Won't Leave Your Blood-
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;horroroh
DRACULA1
,' :, COLORS i ;
Michael GOUGH '.Z !!
f Christopher LEE

wrt ...

ine

e ra rji4

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