The Panama American

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Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02814

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
" -I

TOURIST FL1TES
HDMFWARn nnrl
C h LZ"Z:? THIS
YO. S
!VHKUILy NEWSPAPER
AN INDEFCJDEKJ
:ss?A
wean
MA k via -'
f AWPIW WHISKY
faartas
no.
TeL Panami 8-0975 Colds 179 :
'Let the people know the truth and the country U tofe" Abraham Lincoln,
1 I
i PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1959
Sttb YEAR
rm cam

Panama City funds

afion

Lncfer Investig

Sonr sources speculated today that Mayor Alberto
Alerrran i and ftw6 city officials and : the chairman of the
Panamatfity Council may be suspended "during an investi investigation
gation investigation of the handling of city funds ordered by Attorney
General Hermogenes de la Rosa, J ..

At the same time it was report

ed that Councilmen Mario Velas Velas-ques
ques Velas-ques and Hernando Martir and
municipal treasurer Victor D'Anel D'Anel-lo
lo D'Anel-lo were to be summoned today to,
explain certain expenditures.
Vliinu raMrtollv' will ha

asked to explain tern paychecks
for non-existent city ob and
Mai'Jlz about an $1800 check paid
to a third person for the install installation
ation installation of four luminous fountains
supposedly at Cathedral Plua'
D'Anello-will be questioned abmit
checks made out to business plac places
es places which "have not sold anything
to the municipality."
The officials who may be sus-

PanCanal Company
Adds 12 Jmnloves
To Local Payrolls
. Twelve 'hew "employes, three of
whom have been assigned to the
new Central Employment Office,
joined the Canal organization dur during
ing during January,, AH. but tone were

inrea eaiiy;y ; ? yrpr,
1 New Central Employment office
employes are Louise L. Jones of
San' Antonio, Tex.; test rating ex examiner
aminer examiner Samuel E. Lambert of
Pittsburgh, Pa., qualification rat rating
ing rating examiner; and Raymond A.
LeTourneau of Berlin, N, H. qua qualification
lification qualification rating clerk.
' Five of the new employes are
with the Health Bureau. They
are Arlene N. Segraves ofPhil ofPhil-lipsburg;
lipsburg; ofPhil-lipsburg; N. J., medical radiplogy
technician, who : was recruited In
the States; JoAnn C. Arosemena
of Rockwell City. 4owa. Lil

lian J, Sczeukowski, of Pueblo,

Colo.V and Ethel- M. Buker,', of
Eastport, Maine, staff nurse i at
Gorgas Hospital;, and Ruth R.
Beck, Hancock County, Ohio, Cler Clerical
ical Clerical typist at Coco Solo -.-

Other new employer -are' Maria
C. Borst of Erkelenz,' "Germany,
dictating machine transcriber with
the Engineering Division, Betty
J. Slaughter of Springfield. Mt.,
retail store supervisor; Rita M.
Hoyle, ef Colon, clerk-typist with
the Meteorological and Hydrogra Hydrogra-jmie
jmie Hydrogra-jmie Branch; and Mary K. Rob Roberts
erts Roberts of Springfield, Mass., recrea recreation
tion recreation assistant with the 'Division
f Schools. -j' -"

pended are D'Anello and City Au

tutor Leonardo uonte ana council

chairman Samuel Lewis Galindo.
The Investigation was ordered
by the Attoney General follow
Ing charges that city funds were
being misused.;
In addition, Gustavo Trius. pres

ident of the Panama Chamber of

Commerce, had requested the mu

nicipality to publish a list of the
expenses on which the councilmen

had based their move for increas

ed city taxes.

First step in the-, investigation
was an audit of the city's "books by
the Comptroller General. The au audit
dit audit has revealed several discrep discrep-anceis
anceis discrep-anceis including the granting of
contracts without bids.
The belief that D'Anello, Ale Ale-man,
man, Ale-man, Conte and Lewis may be sus suspended
pended suspended during the investigation is
based on the fact that municipal
contracts must have the approval
of all four before they fan be
granted.

s. Pwraaictes Proliferate

I wa-m o4W- ?M''l

44 V-".. mmlo MmmmMmm

Top Consultants,
,
Engineers Eye

Far Future

Near

MEMBERS OF THE PANEL OF CONSULTANTS of the House Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee are shown in confer conference
ence conference with Canal officials durintc their two-day meetlnc here on the Isthmian Canal problem. Gov.,W. E. Erttcr is shown at the
head of the conference table. At his right, in order, axe: Lt. Gen. Leslie R. Groves and John E. Slaiter, panel members;. Bernard
J. Zincke Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee counsel; Lt Gov. John W. McElheny; and Capt. W. S. Rodimon, Marine
Director. Seated at the Governor's left, in order, are: Hartley Rowe, panel member; Howard T. Critchlow, staff director of the
panel of consultants; John D. Holleni chief of the Executive Planning Staff; M. N. Qujide, senior partner of Parsons Brincker Brincker-hoff,
hoff, Brincker-hoff, Hall and Macdonald; and Roseii! Howe, of the Canal's Enelneerinf? Division. Other Canal personnel attending the confer conferences
ences conferences include Lt. Col. Robert D. Brown, Jr., Engineering and Construction Director; Hugh Norris, economist of the Executive
Planning Staffj Wells D. Wright arMRobert Donaldson, of the Engineering Division,

Suspect Robbery-Murder Plotter

SaysStcry Figment pilciaslnatlpn

f 'if

' The Man accused of ulntflnr th fnftlhm-rlitrh VAniilfeif In

the death of 77-year-old American Thomas J. Marine Friday
night today described the story aa a figment of the-imagination
of Juan Lumbreras, Spaniard, 38.3 .,
Lumbreras and Jose Felix Prartn. 9i. Panamnnlan hi Inna

ffjsed to laying In wait for Marine when he returned to his Centra
Avenue apartment last Friday night and attacking him and his

wne, iirs. Kiia o. marine, iney singled out Juan Areos Hermo Hermo-so,
so, Hermo-so, a 33-sear-old Spanish geologist, as the one who plotted the

roDoery.

IIY Tugboat Slriie
Should Ii0lll:nipdr
C::;:;!.o 01 Ancon
The Panama Liner Anconv due
to berth at her North River pier

in New york today U expected to
encounter ao trouble because of

the three-day old tugboat : strike
that has crippled harbor traffic, a
Balboa Heights spokesman laid.:
It was recalled that during form

er New York strikes, this Panama

Line vessels' have been, able to,
maneuver to and front their piers

without tugs. sitfcj.vf

Today, however theres Is under'
ttood to be .considerable ice in
New York harbor, 5 where deep
Winter conditiohe prevail.
' The Ancon is e sail southbound

oa Friday, .,

The Panama Line's ether shin.

the Cristobal, is now at sea bound

for tli Canal Zone.
. 'Meanwhile from New York, a
UPi 'disnatch resorted tte strik

lag tugmen and tug owners had

renwed negotiations to w ard
-wage agreement,"'..-

? Representativel at) Local 33 of

tne national Maritime Union and
the Marine Towine and Transoor

tation Employer! Association were
scheduled to meet with federal

and eity .mediators. V .'

More than 4,000 tugs'; an4 barge
workers, walked off their iobs laat

SahirdaV'' ait mlriniirht in .unnnrt

a demand for a ti an h6ur across-

the boara wage increases. The em

ployers have offered a il-cent-an.

hour wage increase spread over
' two years. The present basic hour
y wage ranges from $15 to $3.

This morning, in a confrontation
with Lumbreras before District
Attorney Dario Sandoval, Aros
described his countryman as a lit-:
tie unbalanced.
Lumbreras claimed that Ar-zos
gave him $50 to take care of ex expenses
penses expenses involved in the attempted
robbery, but Arzos told the D.4.
he gave him the -money to help
him to leave Panama.

The D.A. said he would cross ex

amine Lumbreras and Prado to

gether this afternoon in an attempt

to clear up discrepancies in their
statements.

Yesterday, Mrs. Marine told

the district: attorney: "They
didn't kill me because God is

good." 1 ;

The widow appeared before

the DA.1 yesterday, to give her
account of the attempted rob robbery
bery robbery which resulted in the
death of her husband. Her ap appearance
pearance appearance forced Sandoval to
call off the scheduled confron confrontation
tation confrontation between Lumbreras and

Prado. i

She said she came home about

10:30 pm last Friday night and
found the iron door leading tip

to the building locked.

"I opened it with my key and

started up the stairs, believing

that my husband had not come
home jret because I found the
light off in the corridor," she

declared.

"As I reached up to pull the
cord, I felt two hands, like
two pincers, grab me by the
neck front behind, but I man man-aged
aged man-aged to shake them off
enough to scream.
''The per son who was
squeezing my neck threw me
to the floor and kicked me
on the hip," she continued.

"The (first one to attack me

was a dark-skinned man, but

he soon got heln from the other

man. Between .the two of them

they beat me about the head

and, face,,--, c-r.' :
'"One of them put his hand
in my smooth.., Later they
threw the contents of an ash
can Into my face. They also
hit me with a blackjack.

ffivery. time 1 could manage

Mrs. E: M; Sassp
Was Buried Today

Funeral services were held this
morning lor Mrs.., Emma Maduro

Sasso, the widow of Abraham Sas
so, who died here yesterday.

. Mrs. Sasso is survived by her

son, JacobOj' and her daughter,
Chita, in addition to her brothers,

Salomon and Joe MadurO. and his
sister Mrs. .Judith Delvalle-Henri-

quex.. .,.-

Merriti-Chapman & Scott Only 18,55

unaer Next Lowynyv minion vviaenmg

Fanama Canal was blossoming today with
plans and performance.
Top-ievel planners appointed by the House Mer Merchant
chant Merchant Marine and Fisheries committee were here
pondering whether the long-range future of the wa waterway
terway waterway lies in a sea-level Canal, some form of im improved
proved improved locks Canai, or a new Canal altogether in Ni Nicaragua.
caragua. Nicaragua. Engineers of the big New York contracting firm
of Merritt-Champman and Scott Inc., happy at hav having
ing having entered ihe apparent low bid of $7,363,675 on the
two-year Cut-widening job, were planning the de details
tails details of how they will go into action when, as expect expected,
ed, expected, tl ey are awarded the contract. Th's phase of the
short-; ?tre Canal improvement program is the larg largest
est largest capital project on the waterway since the Third
Locks.
Meanwhile all hands making do with th? Canal
in its present forrt put through a record 86 ocean oceangoing
going oceangoing commercial vessels in January.

V screamed for help and strug'

gled to get their hands out of

my mouth. Then I jost eonsci'
ousness.

t don't know who loner I was

6ht, but j heard voice calling

me from below., still dazed

managed to answer that I had

been attacked by thieves and

that they should break down

the door to get in.

I saw my keys at my feet,

but I couldn't get up off the
floor. I dragged myself along
and threw the keys towards the
iron door.

"Luckily It went right through

and the persons outside were
able to open it and come to my

aid.

"Before they took me away

te the hospital I saw my hus husband
band husband lying on the floor. I

Went over to him and remov removed
ed removed the undershirt tied around
his neck and the gag that
bid been placed in his month.

n touched him and ms oooy

was still warm, giving the im impression
pression impression that he was sleeping."

Mrs. Marine saia no awempu

tKwas made to rob her, al

though she had some money

and her jewelry witn ner.

'In an effort to stop them

from beating me, I offered them

the keys to the office and told

them to go ahead and steal, but

they insisted on beating me.

-1 sooKe to tnem Dotn m ang

lish and Spanish, but they paid

no attention."

Nineteen large Contracting firms
from all sections of the United
States entered -competitive bids
for the widening of the Parawo
and Cucararha reaches of Gail Gail-latrd
latrd Gail-latrd Cut with the New York firm
of Merritt-Chapman and Scott,
Inc., entering apparent low offer
of $7,363,675.

It was only $18,515 under the

next lowest
Bids for this project, the larg
est since the Third Locks pro!
ect which were offered for con

tract by the Canal, were opened
at 1 p.m. yesterday at Balboa

Heights. The formal bid opening
was attended by a large" crowd,
including representatives of con

tracting and supplying nrms.
Also attending were Gov. W.

E. Potter and representativpi of
the Canal Company's Board of

Directors, and the panel of con

sultants of the House Merchant

Marine and Fisheries Committee.
Bids were opened by Lt. Col.

Robert D. Brown, Jr., Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering and Construction Director,
who announced that bids will re require
quire require full evaluation before an.

nouncement of the award..
Most bids were in a nar narrow
row narrow range. Whil the bidding
range was almost five million
dollars, four of the large com companies
panies companies anterad offers of less
than $8,000,VOO.
The high bid was $12,244,150,
this being one of two above the
ten-million-dollar .mark. Second
and third low bids of $7,S82,10
and $7,762,000 wre submitted by
the Hyde Construction Co., of
Jackson, Miss., and Vinell Inter International
national International Corp., of California, re respectively.
spectively. respectively. Tecon Corp., of Dallas, which
did the last big Gaillard Cut job,
was fourth with $6,960,500.
The bidders formed an al

most complete roster of the
major Amtrean contracting
firms engaged in this type of
work, f They represented all sec sections
tions sections of the country from New
York 'to- San Francisco, and

from Texas to Nebraska;
The Cufrwidening job will in involve
volve involve the removal of 5,400,000
cubic yards of material: the drill drilling
ing drilling of some 1,000,000 linear feet
of blast holes; and the use of 2, 2,-250,000
250,000 2,-250,000 pounds of explosives.
The two sections of the Cut will
be widened from 300 to 500 feet

at bottom depth.
The' following firms entered
bids in addition to Merritt-Chapman:
S. J. Groves and Sons Co.,
New York: Gibbons and Reed

Co.. Salt Lake City: Western

Contracting Corp., Sioux C.ty;

Wunderlich Contracting Co., Oma

ha: Thompson Cornwall, inc

New York; Morrison, Knudsen
Co.. New York; J. A. Jones Con

struction Company, Charlotte, N

C.r Williams Brothers Overseas

Co.'. of Tulsa, and Massman Over

seas Construction Co., of Kansas
City: Peter Kiewitt and Sons,

Cia., S.A., of Venezuela; Guy F.
Atkinson, Co., San Francisco;
Hyde Construction Co., Jackson,

Miss- Elmhurst Contracting Co.,

Inc Corona, N. Y.; A. S. Wil Wil-strom.
strom. Wil-strom. Inc. Shaneateles, N. Y.;

Tecon Corporation, Dallas; Grafe
Callahan Construction Co, Los
Angels; Nello Teer Co., Durham,

N. roster construction ionv
pany and L. R. Sommer, of Bal Balboa;
boa; Balboa; and the Vinell Internation
el. Corporation, Alharabra, Calif California.
ornia. California.
The only local bidders enter entering
ing entering the competition ware the
Foster Contruction Company
and Stmmir with a joint bid
of S8.990.H7.20.

Several of the other companies

entering bids
the Isthmus
contracts in

are well known on
and have had large
the Csnal Zone.

Among these are J. A.

Construction Co., Tecon Corp

Williams Brothers, and Wunder

lich Contracting Company. The
latter was a contractor for the
excavation of the new Galun
Locks in the Third, Locks project.
Unit prices entered by Merritt Merritt-Chapman
Chapman Merritt-Chapman and Scott were: Exca Excavation
vation Excavation 97 cents, a cubic y ird;
drilling for blast holes, 98 cents
to $1.30 a linear foot, depending
on sizey explosives, 40 cents a
pound; highway relocation, 5,000
square yards at $4,60 a square
yard; construction of Ro Gran Grande
de Grande spillway, $28,675,; and reloca relocation
tion relocation of Cucaracha signal station,
$14,000.

Speed Of Light
Surpasses Sound,
Waiters Advise
ATLANTA (UPI) Car-hops at
a local drive-in restaurant are
passing out cards bearing the fol following
lowing following poem:
When you want to call your
waiter
And you're sitting all forlorn
You will get him to you quicker
With your lights than with your
horn.

For there ain't a man among us
Who has eyesight that has growed
To the point where he can look
around
And see whose horn has Mowed.

Members of the panel of consul consultants
tants consultants appo.nted by chairman Herb Herbert
ert Herbert Bonner, of the House Merch

l anVMjrinp and .Fisherles,CiViamilT'

ot tne plans evolved m past studies
by which the Panama Canal miglft
be altered to provide adequate
ship trans'it capacity in the fore foreseeable
seeable foreseeable future.
The consultants are end ng a
two-d-y study in the Canal Zone

Jones; today with a Ino tnrough Gaiil-i;

Cut late this afternoon to inspect
he Cut, returning after dark to
see experimental lighting recent recently
ly recently installed.
En rou to the Zone last week
they visited Nicaragua where
they nspec.e l the Pacific harb harbor
or harbor and locks site and made a low
tevel flight over the proposed
Nicareguan canal route.
Those making the trip are Lt.
Gen. Leslie R. Groves, Hartley
Howe, and John E. Slater. They
are accompanied by Bernard .1.
Zincke, assistant counsel of the
Merch nt Marine and Fisheries
Committee, who has been assign assigned
ed assigned t0 work wlb the panel since
its appointment in November 195?,

and Howard T. Critchlow, staff

director of the panel.

Three of the consultants on the
six-man panel were unable to

make the trip this year. They are
Dr. S. C. Hollister, dean of Engi Engineering
neering Engineering of Cornell University;
Francis S. Fr el, president of the
American Society of Civil Engi Engineering;
neering; Engineering; and E. Sydney Randolph,
consulting engineer, who held ma many
ny many prominent engineering positions
with the Canal organization be before
fore before his retirement.
The consultants have a busy
calendar for their two-day visit
and are holding morning and af afternoon
ternoon afternoon sessions.
Their attention is being devot devoted
ed devoted primarily to Panama Canal
plans en which extensive engi engineering
neering engineering studies were completed
during the Isthmian C C-dies
dies C-dies of 1947, and te traffic sta statistics
tistics statistics and projects contained in
a recent report of Stanford Re Research
search Research Institute.

Several ofihe plans for a futur
Panama Canal develooment in ih

1947 stuffies have been evaluate

elgineeVihg firm of Par ion t
Brinckerhoff, Hall and Maedonal
to show the effect of moder
construction methods upon cost c
the various construction plans.
Here to present details of ths
study is M. N. Quade, a senio
partner in the firm. The final rt
port of the consultants has not yc
been submitted.
Yesterday afternoon's sessio
was devoted entirely to Quade'
discuss:on of the engine-ring sti
dies and evaluation methods 0
costs.
His presentation followed a dif
cussion of the five modificatio
plains on which studies have bee
made.
This discussion was led by L
Gov. John D. McElheny, wh
heads a working group for th
ad hoc committee of the Cans
Company's board of director
named to study the broad prot
lem of future Canal traffic an
facilities.
The plans which Partem,
Brickerhoff, Hall and Macdonald
have studied range from miner
modifieat ons of the existing wa waterway
terway waterway to conversion o h Can Canal
al Canal to a sea-level waterway.
In its contract for the study, th
consulting firm was authorized t
study and evaluatr some substan
tial modifications of some of th
various plans developed in the 11
47 studies.

PART OF THE LARGE CROWD of representatives of contracting and aupplying firms which attended the bid openings yesterday afternoon for the widening of
of Gaillard Cut is ihown in the above Dioture. Seated with his back to the camera is Lt. O0L.R.D. Brown, Jr., Engineering and ConstrucUon Director ana

contracting officer of the Canal Company, who opened the bldf ,;; i

Bigger, Belter Gas
Station Is Planned
For La Boca Area

Bids for construction of 1 an
gasoline service station to be lc
cated in the new townsite of L
Boca are now being solicited h(
the Panama Canal Company. Thi
bids will be opened Feb 16 In thi
Administration Building at Balbo
Heights
After its completion in about si:
months, the new station will re
place the present gasoline servic
station at Balboa Heights.
In addition to ample facilities lo
the sale of gasoline and oil, provi
sion has been made for a lubrica
tion and car washing service, tip
changing facilities, battery rents
service and a small sales stnr
where batteries, automobile at
cessories and otherjperts can b
purchased. "
The new station will be locate
off La Boca Road a short distanc
from the proposed new townsite 1
a location which is consider
more efficient for the Pacific aref
The station has been designed 1
facilitate the movement of traffi
through the area and to provid
space for at least 50 cars to wa
in line for service. Gasoline w)
be supplied to the station by grai
ity feed from storage tanks seal
by.

1

t



raua twu

THfJ PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB

JTHE PANAMA AMERICAN
-OWNB and ruiliixcc r TH1 PANAMA AMIHICAN mul. INC.
' .-, rouNOie NtLSON BOUNStVILL m
HAMMOOIO AMIAS. (OITOK

IS-ST hVtmjt P 0 8o 134 or P.
TIltPHONl 2-0740 S UN(I
Cuii Addmh PAtIA M CIVIC AN Panama

'aN Officii 12 i' Ccnthai Avcnui cvwrtN '2th and ISth STrterre

rewtian PepptsiNTTivi josmua b romra irw.
34S MADlON AVI NtW YORK tT N. Yv

,-t "owtm i Advamcj 70 f SO

l V UAU1UI IM InVlNCl BO ' W

PIOf TtAK IN APVAWC' B0
THtStt VOUt FORUM THI READERS OWN COLUMN

24-OO

' Tke Mtil Boa h ad open forum tot readers of The Panama American.
Letters ere received irarerully and art dandled ii a wholly confidential
manner.
,.f vu. contribute a Itttar don't t impatient ii it down I appear the
aMay. Lotters are awh'isked in the order received.
PIait try to keep the letter? limited to one P lenpth.
identity of letter writer ii htld in strirtert confidence
Tii newspaper ejsumej no responsibility for ttatementi or opinions
expressed in letters from readers.

? THE M A I L BOX

BUS DRIVERS AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
Sir:
They yell "communists" emy time somebody questions his
tishti or merits They yelled it when their "Veep was spat upon and
I&ise U Seated m Peru and Venezuela. Did they ever stop to
ithiwhy these thing, happened? Well I ow nd they kwwto
Idown inside and everybody else knows why .Because of the rotten
itricks ana poor policies played upon all of Latin America, especially
aPB jmwa on ihv way home from work yesterday when I suddenly
ieciied to have one for the .ppntite. so 1 pulled into the nearesUpmt
of my choice and who do 1 come upon but some old buddies of mine,
K to thm to be exact, sitting at the bar behind a couple of cold cold-Sng
Sng cold-Sng Baiboas and with just as cold looks in their eyes. Figuring
Td befn the object of their look, and not. knowing why I dee ded
Should find nut what I'd done. Well upon investigating the matter I
was nlieved to hear that I was not at fault, but was more than
ihocked to hear wh the cold looks
You see all three guys happen to be. operators of the buses that
haul Sam's voung citizens t0 school from the Army, Air Force and
Navy baVg in the Canal Zone. Thev had gotten their notifications
as to their standines in this equal pay hoax the day before and how
any of then- managed to finish the day's work safely after seeing
the contents of the letters is plainly miraculous.
Now, would anvone think that all these men who operate these
buses (the non-US group) make and will ever be able to make is no
more thar 86 cents per hour, the same as a man driving a four-ton
dump truck? How on earth is it nossible to classify a man who has
for a minimum of hours and an average of 40 miles per day the lives
of 40 children in his hands with another hauling four or five yards of
rock or dirt? These children are the dependents of some of the top
brass on the CZ. others are dependents of lesser servicemen but
regardless of who they are now they could very well be the future
representatives of Sam. Yet in the job description set no for these
bus operators a section reads as follows: "No responsibility is vested
in this job for the discipline and control of the children.
Who is responsible for seeing that each child has a seat or that
the behavior on board the bus is of such as not to distract for even
the smallest fraction of a minute the driver' a ntion to the road
ahead once th bus is in motion? ...
My friends took me back to the year 1956 in showing me the
whole plan as it was set up. The treaty was signed in 1955, and up
until then these drivers had carried the same job title as the U.S.
bus drivers (automotive equipment operator.)
The following vear Sam started with his conniving against the
non-citizens retracting their title and changing it to Bus Driver. The
US drivers retained their title as automotive, equipment operators.
Know why? So that the two groups then could not be compared later
on.for similarity in watjes since they both carried different job titles.
At this time the pay for non-citizens was from 80 cents an hour to
92 cents an hour, the U.S. group around $3.01. Next on July 13, 1958.
the job was reclassified as a grade 9, one grade less than formerly
and six cents less, or 86 cents an hour. Now in the letters they re received
ceived received last week notifying them of their "equal pay status" they
learned that they, are considered still two cents overpaid, since any
man now entering this pay level will only be paid 84 cents in hour
as tops. The title has also been changed from Bus Driver, LM-5703-09(4),
86 cents an hour"tn Track Driver (Heavy), M-5703-7, 71 cents
to 84 cents an hour. Through the grandfather rights, those already
at 86 cents will retain same. I guess until the analyst comes around
again and says it should be 84 cents.
What kind of efficiency can Sam expect later on from the non non-citizen
citizen non-citizen group of employes when he resorts to such conniving in or order
der order to keep lrom giving them a few cents more?
Panama is to blame to an extent too for the resulting situation.
TO. 4.A. .. Ua1 klnln nnA intOKApt 4 lncA oil Pfimmor.

AIJ? LICHIV Ilt.'gUUiUUl B HttU HiailllJ UUC iiiwicn iu ,wai mi v
rial activities in the Canal Zone and have the money pouring into
Al. L : ... Irk.,, Ann't Iaa inlApnrlnH in tVlQ

working class on the CZ or they would have never left the whole
labor equality section, all its loopholes, in the hands of Sam. They
jput too much trust in Sam and what was the result? Sam put the
same loopholes left by so-called defenders of the workers around

uie necHS oi anu jusi iiir.'rciy iiuncu uicm um. nu mc nu, ci a,
including myself are no better off, except for a scant five percent of
i.r. i .L. ... tk. Kt T hn'

125 UT IC55. 1 RUl I1U II1UIC UlclU MIC UClll 111 lllc ucfti, uui i iiouu I,
pected anything as these friends of mine had.
Some of them tell us that our own government (Panama) asked
for it, but Panama only asked for this by placing too much trust in
Sam, leaving the whole equality plan up to him, so he conveniently
adjusted it to suit himself.
Sam continues to pour millions of dollars into the Far East and
other places more economically established than Panama, yet more
apt than Panama to jab him from behind at the wink of an eye. He
claims he's helping these areas fight communism, a thing that hard hard-Jy
Jy hard-Jy exists anywhere in Latin America, especially Panama. He can

spenu ouutin'i ior uie rar casi anu cuiupe, uui ne tan i nliciiu a
couple of million to better the economic situation of a people serving
him loyally rver since he set up shop in their territory. This is what

ne cans ueinucrnty
He should practice what he preaches. I hope this Isn't the end
of Panama s fight for justice to its people, and may this letter begin
flow of others showing the implementation of "equal pay for equal
work" in thii Canal Zone.
May the eyes of some influential persons with liberal consciences
IrjJVMhir'gton who may act to do something for our benefits, come
across this letter also.
Hopeful Harry.

Labor News
And
Comments

FT. GULICK DISPENSARY
Pir:

I would like to add one more word of support for the Ft, Gulick
Dispensary. This is the first time in over eight years of Army life
that my husband has been stationed in a location where it is possi possible
ble possible and practical to avail ourselves of the medical facilities offered

by the Army. So I do not compare the services offered at Ft. Gu

lick with those of any other Army dispensary, but rather with those

available to civilians who have complete freedom of choice in their

selection of a doctor.

We have in the past had good general practicioners, pediatri pediatricians
cians pediatricians any gynecologists (at from $4 to $8 an office call). These were
men in whom I had great confidence and from whom we received
good medical care but not once in those eight years did I have
a pediatrician call me at my home after office hours to inquire about
a sick baby he had seen that morning. Both Dr. Canabel and Dr.
Izquierdo did this more than once when my infant son was seriously
ill And r know from talking to other parents that this is standard
Procedure with them when the illness is serious.
On three occasions during the past year my daughter became
!1! or had an accident after sick call hours were over. In each case
the NCO who was on duty either told us what to do until sick call
the next day cr contacted the doctor who was Medical' Officer of the
Day and he prescribed medicine, ordered an X-ray (with instruc instructions
tions instructions to call him as soon as it had been read): or in one case, made
arrangement to have her hosnitalized immediatelv.
And speaking of Medical Officer of the Day. it is interesting to
check that column in the Dailv Bulletin and compare he number
of dav it falls to each Doctor in comparison with all other officers
and NCO. Awl to remember the 30-dav period when Dr. Izquierdo
was the only Doctor on post and therefore had not one moment dur during
ing during that time when he was not on call.
I do no: need a Doctor to hold mv hand when I am worried or
to hand me the aspirin himself. I do want a competent, interested
physician on hand when a eerious 'Uness or accident falls our lot.
I know of no intTce when this has not been available to anv
who needed it at the Ft. Gulick risoenar and I, along with
many others, am ext--emly. grateful to the Doctors, and the entire
staff for the excellent job they do and the manner In which they
do It.
A Grateful Dependent.

By VICTOR RIESEL
PITTSBURGH They could plate
the Golden Triangle here with ura uranium
nium uranium for their bi centennial cele
bration ior what the coming steel

str.ke will cost. Quietly, the men
of steel those who make it for

those who sell it are preparing

for a S20,000,000-a-day walkout.

If that sounds like a lot of in

gots, betieve me, it is a snort

count. During the last 43-day stop stoppage,
page, stoppage, U.S. Steel lost $3,000,000 dai daily.
ly. daily. And big as it is, the company

employs less than one-third of the

bas.c steel workers, it is the ba basic
sic basic steel workers who will be hit

ting the bricks this summer in a

bid for a billion dollars worth of

raises and benefits.

With average steel pay runnnv

about $120 a week, some 600,01

strikers will be losing about 112,

500,000 daily. And the strike may
run two months. The last one in

'56 ran 43 days. This one will be

tougher because the companies arc

going to dig in for the long hot
season. It will be 1959's biggest
labor story.
This was obvious when leaders

of the Big Steel companies and

the big United Steel Workers ol
America met in closed session
some three weeks ago. Among
themselves they knew tlat thij
has to be a long strike because
the companies can't take a billion
dollars out of the till after last

year s recession. If they can't

take it out of reserves, the only
way to raise the money is to raise
prices, they say. But this isn't the

year for raising steel prices five

or six bucks a ton:.
If the industry yeilds and jacks
up prices just six months after
President Eisenhower has called
for an end to inflation, the cor corporations
porations corporations will run into their worst
public relations storm in years.
Furthermore, a hike in prices will

hit the auto industry, which has
trouble enough. If high auto prices
keep sales of cars down, less
steel will be bought. So the steel

companies have decided to take

the union on in a showdown fight.

But let no unrestrained iov

spread through the Soviet Union's
21st Communist Partv Coneress.

This will be a quiet type class
war. A propaganda war, in fact.
The 11 major steel corporations

nave banded together to make the
kind of stand the auto and airline

industries tried.

When the final bargainine roils

around, these companies will be

represented by four steel execu executives
tives executives two from U.S. Steel, one
from Bethlehem and oncfrom Re Republic.
public. Republic. Facing them w.ll be u u-nion
nion u-nion president Dave McDonald and

tne other top officers,"

in uie nanas oi tne men ot Bio

Steel will be a solid industry proxy,'

iu -gu up kj point in wage nixes
which can be justified by increas increased
ed increased productivity.

In McDonald's hands will be the

power to strike already voted bv
the union's strongest units, the 228
locals of District 1, Chicago area.
The industry war cry will be
that "Inflation Robs Us All" and
that the un.on will be responsible
for chipping away at the dollar.
The companies will argue that
in the past three years each steel
worker's wage has jumped $10 a
week. The companies will point out
that they already pay more than
the auto industry does.
This will be countered by union
charges in the press and on the
radio and TV screens that Big
Steel, can afford to pay because
it will be rolling close to sapaciiy
production.
The union will ask for "substan "substantial
tial "substantial improvement in wages, sala salaries
ries salaries (of white collar workers),
hours of work, incentives, job
classifications, supplemental un unemployment
employment unemployment benefits; pensions, in insurance,
surance, insurance, vacations, holidays, week weekend
end weekend premiums, holiday and shift
differentials and other working
conditions."
A cautius prediction here is that
for the first 4ime since Dwigit
Eisenhower took off,ce he will
abandon his traditional White
House neutrality. He will appoint
a commission and personally call
in all groups, some circles be believe.
lieve. believe. All this will make bigger head headlines
lines headlines than Berlin. Wait and see.
CABBIE DEATH TOLL HIGH
FRANKFURT. Germany (UPI)

The title of Germany's most
dangerous profession" has been
given to the nation's taxi drivers.
Despite strikes, protests and se-

curity precautions, more than 100
cabbies have been muf lered, with
robbery the main motive, since
1945.

Night

TUESDAY, EBRUABT-aV 19 J

mare. .

NA Service,

Walter Wincheli In New York

THE KINGS OF HOLLYWOOD

The sunny realm where Merlin

and Midas co-star with Cinderel Cinderellahas
lahas Cinderellahas been ruled by kings.

1'heir imagination and showman

ship made possible the film in

dustry. The greatest ot tne crown crown-bearers
bearers crown-bearers was Cecil B. DeMille. .
His flair for the flamboyant was
expressed by his celluloid epics
as well as his shrewd sense of
exploitation. He once purchased
a $1500 chinchilla-trimmed night

gown which a star merely drag

ged across the floor during one
episode. Other studio executives
were aghast by what they con considered
sidered considered such wild extravagance.

DeMille countered: "Wait till you

see wnat tne siauo mgntgown

means to the box-office.

!Pk liiulininil. nlAhfrfniirl, llAVM

1AUV llUIU4WUf UJIlVgUVVJI J M J
crashed countless dailies. Several
editorialists denounced DeMille

for squandering coin. It was lat

er estimated that the $1500 night

gown publicity added a quarter

million dollars to the flicker's

gross.
DeMille, incidentally, had the

distinction of emerging victorious

from skirmishes with reviewers

Although his films were frequent

ly deplored as artistic failures,

they were usually financial won

ders. DeMille delighted in defy

ing critics. Back in the early

days of cinema-making, review

ers accused him of stressing sen sensationalism
sationalism sensationalism and speed. He replied
by producing a pair of films at
the same time and completed
them within a month. Both were
panned by critics and both shat

tered box-office records.

DeMille's brother once explain explained
ed explained the secret of his success: "One
thing I always admired about my

brother Cecil is his ability to bite
off more than he can chew and

then crew it."

Goldwyn moaned: "It's not e e-nough
nough e-nough to be good I never was
bad on purpose in ray life. Sup Suppose
pose Suppose next time I make a stink stinker?
er? stinker? I'm worrying and worrying

and worrytng about that."
Although DeMille's 'The Ten

Commandments" cost over $10
million, it represented less of a
risk than the $5000 he once gam gambled
bled gambled on a new idea pictures that
moved. DeMille, Jesse Lasky and
Sam Goldwyn each contributed
$5000. Out of that $15,000 invest investment
ment investment came the zillion-dollar mo motion
tion motion picture industry.
Hollywood's de luxe showmen
have always been gamblers. They
bet fantastic siuns on their judg judgmentand
mentand judgmentand they were usually
fight. Their logic is probably best
exemplified by the following.
Wheb Louis a. .Mayei .wash Mis Mister
ter Mister MGM, an executive ported

on negotiations for a story: "It

would make a great movie but
we'll have to let' it go. The au
thor wants a hundred and fifty
thousand for it and I don't figure
it's worth more than a hundred."
Mayer responded: "Do you
mean to tell me that a story ii
great at a hundred thousand and
not at a hundred and fifty? A
great picture is a great picture.
If it's good it'll bring in ten mil million
lion million at the box-office. What the
hell is fifty thousand dollars?"

gle year. It inspired a pair of
memorable films, "Doorway to
Hell" and "The I'ublic Enemy,"
and resulted in the gangster mo-'
vie cycle. These flickers were lu

crative. More important, however,

they represented an innovation in
film-making: Movie journalism.

.The pioneering endeavor still

exercises a tremendous influence

over the film industry as well as
television.

Ideas are the treasures of show showmen.
men. showmen. And they rarely allow their
imaginations to be -bounded by
the limitations of money. A se sequel
quel sequel to the chinchilla trimmed

nightgown story is this one: On
one occasion DeMille purchased
a huge amount of royal brocade

at $200-a-yard. A friend inquired

"How will customers know if .it's

real brocade or a $2 substitute? V

DeMille smiled: "They won't

know. But my actresses will. Can

you imagine a woman wearing

$3000 worth of brocade and not

giving ner best performance?"

Another throne-sitter who has
given Movieville much of its fire
and fervor is Sam Goldwyn. One
of DeM lie's pioneer partners,
Goldwyn has continued to lead
the parade. He is a dedicated
worker, a super-salesman and
a perfectionist. Shortly after one
of his films won nine Oscars,

Mayer, by the way, built his
empire on the simplicities of life.
Most of his films reflect his de devotion
votion devotion to such -fundamental insti institutions
tutions institutions as Home. Motherhood and

Marriage. He once explained: "If

75 percent of the American peo people
ple people didn't feel as I do about the
American family, I wouldn't be
in the film industry." Out of that
philosophy was created Holly Holly-wood's
wood's Holly-wood's mightiest studio.

Another showman who ha' a
decisive influence on the film in industry's
dustry's industry's surge was Darryl Za Za-nuck.
nuck. Za-nuck. And it all began as the
consequence of a fate.ul vagary.
. .Zantfck once read a news item
disclosing that 486 Chicago mob mobsters
sters mobsters had been riddled in a sin-

Read Our Classifieds

Ml

England's queen Victoria
was so charmed with the book

"Alio in Wonderland," that
when she met its shy author,
she asked him to send her a
copy of his next book, which
he promised to do. Some time
later, the Queen received a dif difficult
ficult difficult mathematical work by
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
the same man, a math profes professor,
sor, professor, better known by his pea
nam of Lewis Carroll.
6 Kacyelnneo'la, BritaaMe

WALKER

Silvestre b Brostella
Cuba Ave. 27-02, Panama

II

"SPORTS PARADE
by Conrado Sargeant
Daily at 7:00 p.m.

M
Your Community Network

830 Kilocycles
PANAMA

1090 Kilocycles
COLON

Not many people are aware of

the efforts and the immense de
tail that went into DeMille spec

taculars. A fantastically complex
operation produced "The Ten

Commandments." Historical re

search alone cost hundreds of

dollars. Over 1800 reference books

were utilized as well as 'numer 'numerous
ous 'numerous ancient documents which sent
researchers to the far corners of

the globe. Then there was involv

ing thousands of people. Camels
and a zoo-full of other animals

were used. Expensive sets were

built some towered as high as
100 feet. Of course, the writing of
the script, -the signing of the
stars, the rehearsals these were
all part of the massive plan. .
DeMille was in command of the
project. All that toil and coin for
a few hours of entertainment.

In common with other royal
personages, Hollywood's kings are
often surrounded by sychophants
They do their utmost to express
their devotion. Some folks in Mo Movieville
vieville Movieville have made a career out
of the affirmative nod. This phe phenomenon
nomenon phenomenon has produced many flip flippancies.
pancies. flippancies. One of the classics con concerns
cerns concerns the time Zanuck sternly ad admonished
monished admonished a submissive' under underling:
ling: underling: "Don't say yes until I'm
finished talking!
The majestic manner in which
DeMille operated was once gra graphically
phically graphically detailed by H. Allen
Smith, the author-humorist. To
wit: "He arrived with dignity
and a slow, deliberate step. He
looked neither to right nor left,
ignoring the mob of studio em employes
ployes employes gathered on the side lines.
He spoke not a word but came
on into the sunlight and stopped
finally along the big Technicolor
camera. His eyes were fixed on
the scene before him and they
stayed there. He took off his hat
and tossed it over his shoulder
without looking back. A hind
came up and snatched it before
it had traveled two feet. He took
off his necktie and cast it into
the air behind him. A necktie
man grabbed it. Slowly, the Mas Master
ter Master unbuttoned h.s jacket, still
staring fixedly at the scene. He
let the jacket slip from his arms
but it. never came to the ground.
A jacket man behind him swept
it out of the air as it started i
fall. I was surprised than to set
Mr. DeMille roll up hit owr
sleeves."
That was Cecil B. CeMiUe-tii-.
King of the Land of Dreams.

17asihi:gto;j
Merry-Go-Round
MttPnaw PEARSON

WASHINGTON Before chair chairman
man chairman Warreu hagmison ot the
Senate Imer-staie Commerce com commit
mit commit ee cMurms lke't newly ap

pointed Undersecretary of- Com Com-niercfc
niercfc Com-niercfc he ought: to five, him a
eareful once-over, -

John Aliens the ex-Congiressmaa

from California who got this co

veted post, was once under in investigation
vestigation investigation by the JusJce De Department
partment Department vor the part he played

as attorney ior tne ; King oi
Northern California gamblers.

Cnin Bok Hkg, Congressman Al Allen,
len, Allen, a resident of Berkeley, Cal Cal-if.
if. Cal-if. had set up a so-called trust
fund which the Chinest gambler
used to evade around $100,000 of
income taxees.

After the scheme was exnosed

in Federal court, Chin Bok Hing
took it on the l.-m and forthright
At orney-general James McGiran-

ery began probe of the con-

gressman. Aid Herbert Brown Brown-ell
ell Brown-ell replaced McGranery as attor attorney
ney attorney generM, the probe of the Re Republican
publican Republican congressman quietly e-

vaporated.,
Came last November and Allen
was defeated for 're-election.
Shor'ly thereafter," ex-congressman
James Patterson of Connec Connecticut,
ticut, Connecticut, another Republican who
lost out in the Democratic land landslide,
slide, landslide, was giver, -ah OK by Vice Vice-president
president Vice-president Richard M. Nixon to
be Undersecretary of Commerce
in charge o transportation.'
Suddenly West Coast shipping
interests got busjf. They want a
man in chare, of tran?nortation

friendly t.o then-.. Some of them
quietly suggested to Nixon's office
that they ..ad been heavy contri contributors
butors contributors to the Grand Old Party in
California; Overnight Patterson
found himself out oMhe running,
while ano' hf lame duck. John
Allen of California, was in the
running. v v
That was how the man under

investigation for setting up a

trust runa" ror cnin Bok Hing

Koi into tne fiisennower ntue ca ca-bitnet.
bitnet. ca-bitnet.
TEAMSTERS SONANZA
The McClellan Rackets Commit Committee
tee Committee i scheduled to rehash n
old, old story on Jimmy Hoffa
told in thij column as early as
April 13, 71954, with new evidence
reported on March 18, 23, and
28, 1957.
It's an important story and is
worth rehashing if the Republi Republican
can Republican senators on the committee
will dig little deeper in'o some

of their own close Wends.

The 'tory pertains to the man manner
ner manner In which Jimmy Hoffa, to together
gether together with a local of the Broth Brotherhood
erhood Brotherhood of Electrical workers,
placed around $20,000,000 of union
welfare funds in the hands of the
union insurance agency between
1948-52, an agency ooerated by
Rose and Allen Dorf man, wife
and son of Hoffa's intimate
friend, Paul Dorfman, who is
boss of the Waste Material Hand Handlers
lers Handlers Union in Chicago and an in intimate
timate intimate of gangster Johnny Dio.
Ro e and Allen Dorfman turn turned
ed turned the business over to the Union
Casualty Co., and for this sim-

ple little transaction received
vonu&iSMona .ii excess ot i,ooo, i,ooo,-w
w i,ooo,-w ueiween Xvooerr 1949, and
June--!, io3., ......
gauMfltiyV -when the House
Govwrnwen-.up-.M)nJM Comm.c Comm.c-tee
tee Comm.c-tee tegin pmmng this, 1 tn e r
probe s was.,, my.nouwy called
otf. It ., was called oft at about
u.e linw -ne a u-ggg uuo
the embarrassing quesuon of
waat hanpene,!; to eaecK i? for
$102,000, payabl . to Auen Dorf Dorfman
man Dorfman which was not aespo&eo to
us in.ursnce -. agency' oank ac account.
count. account. ., v, .
Wnen congressmen asked Dorf Dorfman
man Dorfman if he ht.d paiu this" or any
part of it to Jrniuiy Hot-a, he: re re-msed
msed re-msed to answer, lime alter time
he pleaded the 5th Amendment.
WHO iMJLLED WIRESt .
Then suddenly, as the House
commi.tee ws striking pay dirt,
its probe bruptly t enueu. I re reported
ported reported at' the time that the
probe was terminated as the re result
sult result of a deal whereby Jimmy
Hoffa and the Michigan team teamsters
sters teamsters .would support sen. Homer
Ferguson, .lepuoiicaa, toi? Re-election.
Postmaster-general Arthur
Summe.tield, tfcen Republican
buss oi Michigan, is credited
with arranging the deal though
he denies this.
. However, i t deal was made.
Said committee counsel William
F. McKennar "We. were silenced
before we could make-public cer certain
tain certain important financial-legal as as-pects
pects as-pects of the Teamsters i opera operations.
tions. operations. ', H ; i ', V
Said GOP Congressman Clare'
Hoftman Q- Michigan: "Our sub subcommittee
committee subcommittee on labor rackettering
ind welfare iur.ds had barely en entered
tered entered upon its Uvea igations when
apparently for political rea-bns it
was liquidated.''
Said anothei Republican Congres
man. Wint Smith of Kansa

when asked where the pressure
was coming from: "From so
high that I can't even discuss
i.."
Rep. Charlie Halleck of India Indiana,
na, Indiana, now GOP leader of the Hou
was the one who carried "the
word" to calf off the probe.
But if th&t probe had been con continued,
tinued, continued, a lot of racketeering' com complained
plained complained of today would not have
taken place, a lot of welfare
funds would have been better
protected. The probe, however,
was canceled.
Significantly, Republican mem
bers of the Senate Rackets Com Committee
mittee Committee are new demanding that"
they have equal voice with the
Democrats on the 5 (committee.
They claim they don't trust the
Dempcratl to be tough investiga
tars.. Se.tj'Joh'.. 'McClellan of A
kahsas, wnb frequently votes Re"
publican. supports them.
Republican senators Mundt and
Gold water, who are on the com-,
mit ee, could easily prove their
sincerity by calling Summerfield,
Halleck, Hoffman, and 6ther Re Republicans
publicans Republicans involved, and get to
the bottom of why the Hoffa
probe was called off.
Watch and see what happens.

Popular Pairs

Answer to

IS

Puztle

ACROSS
1 and
robbers
S and
parcel
9 He and
12 Landed
13 Greek porch
14 Marble
15 Clinging
17 Exist
18 voce
19 Irritates
21 Sea eagle
23 Before
24 Diitress signal
27 pop
25 Biblical name
S2 Blackboard
34 The mauve
34 Pays
37 Former or

)l Gjpddesi
41 Worm
42 Cheat bone
44 Aid and
46 Plain to be
aeen
49 Cripples
53 for tat
84 Type measure
It Literary
scraps
57 Italian river
58 Ireland
59 Oriental coin''
50 Organ part
61 Disparage
DOWN
1 right like
dogs and

margarine
8 Half-
4 Fine Of
affairs
5 Greek letter
6 Made amends
7 Rake
8 Sample
S Tie

10 and 26 Biblical Good

hounds -U
Female sheep
(Pi.)
16 Girdle'
20 Treatise
22 Scandinavian
24 Underling
25 Russian city

Previous

28 N on rehearsed
30 Poems
31 Indian weights
33 Savory
35 Artitta' stands
40 Nubby fabric
43 State of India

45 Adhesive
46 Japanese
outcasts
47 Clinging
48 Nostril
50 bos:
51 Unbleached
52 Prophet -55
and reel

12 p h I? ii n i8 nnr
r"-' R
xLr W C
nnrpr" rpa nr
i-mr-mr
jr--r--j f r-t
5T 2r""." JTT"""s7

BILLIONS IN WEAPONS
TOKYO (UPI) The Ki'odi
News Service reported 1 0 u a j
Japan has received slightly mor
than one billion dollars worth
weapons from the United Stat;
since 1950. At the same time,
reported the Japanese gover
ment would ask the U.S. not
I reduce drastically its military all
to Japan,

NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING
TO THE STOCKHOLDERS OF CUSTODIA
Y SEGURIDAD, S. A.
Pleat take notice. A Meeting of Stockholder! of Cua Cua-todia
todia Cua-todia y Seguridad,, S A. 1 Panamanian Corporation
will be held at the Suite 305 Ambar Motors Building,
City of Havana, Republic of Cuba the 5th day of March
1959 at 2 o'cloclc in the afternoon for the purpose f
electing a board Of Directors for the Company and to
approve the accounts of the company, as of December
31, 1958, and for such other purposes as may lawfully ,,
come before said meeting dated January Z7, 1959.
ANASTASIK D$ SAINT PHALLE, Stockholder
LAWRENCE E. BRINN, Stockholder V,



s

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3. 1959
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPfft
PAGE THKEf
Advisory Group
Created To Study
Church Problems

1 H jriir i f iff1;! jjri
3 s' 5

iiwr.AKi7ATinv DAY A eroup of high-ranking dignitaries reviewed a parade marking the 10th Anniversary of the U.S. Army Caribbean School, Fort

fiiiiirit saturaav waxcnine siucenis uum n ichuw hu uiui "" " wB..v, v,..-w
majidinff officer 4th Gun Battalion, 517th Artillery; Maj. Gen. Charles L. Dasher, commanding general, U.S. Army Caribbean; Col. Cecll(Himes, command command-i,T
i,T command-i,T tiK jrmv rnrihhPfm Rrhool Jose Maria Gonzalez, Governor of Colon Province; and Col. Ralph A. Jones, Jr., commanding officer, 1st Battle Group,

20th infantry. .The young lady In front was not a part of the official reviewing party

she just sneaked in to get' a better look, at the parade.

; i (U.S. Army Photo)

BUCK HILL FALLS, Pa. (UPI)
The United Church of Christ
created an advisory committee on
the city church yesterday with
clergymen fromm Greensbur, Pa.,
and Chicago as co chairman.
The committee is composed of
pastors of city and subuiban
churches and state-conference and
synodical executives of the Con Congregational
gregational Congregational Christian Churches
and the Evangelical and Reform Reformed
ed Reformed Church.
The new committee will advise
the city work staffs of the home
missionary agencies of the two de denominations.
nominations. denominations. Elected co chair chairmen
men chairmen were the Rev. Dr. Paul Pon Pontius,
tius, Pontius, minister of Trinity Evangel Evangelical
ical Evangelical and Reformed Church,
Greensburg, and the Rev. Dr
Clarence F. McCall Jr., supr n n-tendent
tendent n-tendent of the Chicago area of the
Illinois Congregational Christian
Conference.
The committeee recommended
study of improvements for church churches
es churches of the United Church in the 15
major metropolitan areas. These
would include the holding of con conferences
ferences conferences on urban deterioration
and renewal and the introduction
of a program of cooperation be between
tween between churches in the inner city
and the suburbs.
"In this manner, the leadership
and strong resources of the sub suburbs
urbs suburbs can be turned toward so)v
ing city-church problems," a com:
mittee resolution said.

Dance Music
A La Society

By DICK KLEINER
NEW YORK (NEA)-"Everybo-dy's
hopping on the band wagon,
says Ben Cutler, and the band
wagon he means is one with real
bait'dsS'the current craze of dance
band albums, cut generally by so society
ciety society band leaders and chock-full
of danceable tunes, generally in
tnrm Cutler says Lester

Lamn originated

the idea and

iptv hand leader

in the swim. Cutler, one of the
biggest society band leaders, is
the latest to try. his baton t rec recording,
ording, recording, wlh.'.'JJWS.'.r
on MGMU .-
"These .albums are selling, says
the handsome. Cutler "because
peopletwant to dance.. Bands went
ly for themselves, it seems, and
people lost interest, You couldn t
dance to them. The proof of this
is that the bands that are still po-pular-Welk,
Lombardo, Kaye
are the ones with simple, dance dance-able
able dance-able styles.
I've had a band since '32, and
I toyed with one even before then.
And, basically, I'm playing the
same kind of music now 1 was
then. It's a little less ricky-tick
now, that's all. And of course,
the repertoire has changed. But
its simple, danceable arrangements
and you can always hear the rae-
lBen Cutler is a name you may
know,- even though you don t
know a society dance band from
a gan-'danCfer-First,, if you re
an old, Ivy lague:sporU ian,, yw
may remember Kim as -4f Va
ball player back in the mid '20 s.
Then h decided to; capital on
his athletic reputation, his good
looks and a big singing voice. He
tried Hollywood for a while, be before
fore before he turned to Broadway.
And nis singing career soared
until he played opposite Mary
Martin in "'One Touch of Venus.
After that, "I figured that one
credit would, keep me in good
how it didn't." Bv then he

married, had children and

needed more security, so he turn-
ait tn -hand leading.

He still loves singing and,, last
year, he was on the road for 60
nights in 60 different cities with a
mall oDera comnany. But that

was 'tfor kicks."

There' a record album out

ow that may herald a whole
new career for Cesare Siepi, the

Met's1, great basso. It's "Easy to
Love" on London Records (only
stereo now, but monaural will fol

low soon). It is a collection oi

Cole Porter songs,,, done beautiful
lv. I

This' isn't such a departure for
Kini at that. The tall, handsome

singer likes to remember that, at
15, he was a member of a jazz
tinging group in 'Milan. But it's
actually been a long time between
pop engagements for him al although
though although he's followed pop songs
and singers.
But he made a point of not lis listening
tening listening ,to any Recordings of the.,
tongs he sings in the album
"not because I don't admire the
gingers,' but because I wanted to
come by something of my own."
And he has.
There's a strong possibility this
all may lead to a musical come comedy
dy comedy career for Siepi, something he'd
like very -much provided the part
was right and he could sandwich
it in sqmehow.
But no night clubs.
'l don'think they woujd be for
me," he ,iyi. "I don't have what
Is, known as a. routine."
Dick's Picks:" Th lovely voice
of Felicia Sanders makes pretty
music with "Tonight", on Decca.
Others: "D6n't Go,T fGeorula Carr.

Dot)! "f Want a;Good Home for

Ky cat (Betty. Johnson, Atlan Atlantic):
tic): Atlantic): "St. Louis, Blues Cha Cha"

Cesare Siepi

Ben Cutler

ren, Dot); "15 Girl Friends" (Ni

no Tempo, KCA); "Aiexanaei' s

Ragtime. Band". (Sarah Vaughn
and T BiHy Eokstine, Mercury);
"My Darling" (-The Deirays, War Warner
ner Warner Brothers); "Glad Rags" (Ten (Tennessee
nessee (Tennessee Ernie Ford, Capitol);

"Rainbow Riot",. (Bill D o g g e it,

King),. nr, .. iu,--.;

Girl vocalists with good recent

albums Canta Maya s A Lon?,
Long Kiss" on Roulette makes

pretty listening; Sallie B 1 a i r's

"Hello, Tiger" on MGM is the

best that she's done, with a smash

ing cover picture, too; more good
stuff from Billie Holiday on Dec Dec-ca's
ca's Dec-ca's "Lover Man"; and another
great one from Eydie Gorme on
ABC-Paramount, called "Gorme
Sings Showstoppers.''
Two fine voices on new records
one, a Camden release, is "The
Art of Kirsten Flaestad," and

the recordings date from '35-'37

with "enhanced" sound that helps
some. The Other, on Columbia, has
Eileen Farrell singing scenes from
Cherubini's "Medea," and it is a
beauty.

Swans In Trouble
As Oil On Thames

Bring; Fire Threat
LONDON, Feb. 3 (UPI) A
sheet oi oil floated slowly down the
Thames today, bringing the threat
of lire and destruction to aozens
of ancient Engiish villages lining
tne river.
Fire brigades manned the banks
of tne Tnames ana otticials warn warned
ed warned against throwing lighted match

es or cigarets into tne oil wnich

nad escaped Irom a damaged pipe
in the Kennet Canal at Beennam.
"The stuff was so inflammable
that a lighted match could have
set the river ablaze from bank to
bank," one Thames conservancy
board member reported.
The oil trapped hundreds of
white swans, maliaras and other
birds along the river and officials
ieared many would die of starva starvation
tion starvation belore they were rescued.
The Royal Society for the Pre Prevention
vention Prevention ot Cruelty to animals res rescued
cued rescued dozens of birds thus far, tak taking
ing taking them to clinics to be cleaned
and' fed.
RSPCA workers said they found
the birds, some of them the pride
of the Thames villages, sick, gasp gasping
ing gasping and overcome by the deadly
fumes, their feathers clogged with

the grimy oil.
RSPCA Chief Inspector Fnest
Temple said, "It will take two or
three days to round up all the
swans in trouble."
"It is impossible to say how
many smaller birds may be lying
on the banks, dying of starvation
because they can't move," an another
other another society official said. "We ure
hopping that some of the oil will
evaporate."

LatAm Mission

Names Soerheide
To Field Office

The Rev. Lester J. Soerheide,
veteran pastor, missionary and con
ference speaker, has been named
to the office of Deputation Se Secretary
cretary Secretary of the Latin America
Mission of Bogota, N.J., accord according
ing according to an announcement by the
Rev. Kenneth; G. Hood, L A.M.
Home Director.
Recently returned from a term
of service in Panama, where he
managed -the Editorial Caribe
evangelical bookstore and served
as auxiliary civilian chaplain to
the U.S. Armed Forces in the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone, Soerheide has been as associated
sociated associated with the Latin America
Mission for nearly five years, in
both Panama a"nd Costa Rica.
Previously, with his wife and
three children, he served as a

home missionary in the Kentucky

mountains and served churches in

Pennsylvania.
' While serving the Slippery Rock,

heide was instrumental in the es establishment
tablishment establishment and continued mana

gement of Seneca Hills Bible Con

ference.....

While in Panama he acted as

coordinator for' the Billy Graham

Cursade n early 1958.
Wheaton Colleee and Louisville

Seminar were ,the major contrib

utors to nis ministerial education.

Th.

man who marries a dmnm

usually winds up wishing if had

Attorney Confirms

Hank Greenberg,
Wife Gel Divorce

CLEVELAND, Ohio, Feb. 3
(UPI) Attorney Victor DeM3ico
confirmed reports today that Hank
Greenberg, former general man manager
ager manager of the Cleveland Indians,
Indians, and his wife, Caral, have
been divorced.
DeMarco, one of the. attorneys
who represented Mrs. Greenberg,
said the divorce was granted
about 10 days ago in a rural coun county
ty county in Alabama. She is the daughter
if New York department store
owner Bernard Giiribel.
DeMarco refused to disclose de details
tails details of the split for what ar arrangements
rangements arrangements had been made for
custody of the couple s three chil children,
dren, children, Glenn, 11; Stephen, 9, and
Val, 5.
The couple married in Bruns Brunswick,
wick, Brunswick, Ga., in 1946, a month after
Mrs. Greenberg was divorced
from Edward Lasker of New York
and Chicago after 11 years of
marriage.
Mrs. Greenberg filed a divorce
suit against Greenberg in Miy
1955, charging him with gross
neglected and extreme cruelty.
However, the couple was reconcil reconciled
ed reconciled in February 1956.

Vauxhall Is Tough
Tough small car seems to
be the Vauxhall Victor. The

British Goodyear test group-'

has used a Victor for over
a year arid driven It more
than 200,000 miles. The
car is loaded 25 percent
above the regular load re recommended
commended recommended by Vauxhall.
The engine was exchanged
after 110,000 miles and
was replaced by one which
was restored after operat

ing better than 120,000

miles.

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SHOW-OFF Barbary sheep seems to be clinging to the brick
wall like a fly. He's caught by a high-speed camera after
racing tip the wall and just before springing back in a playful
leap. The sure-footed beast is at the Prospect Park Zoo in
Brooklyn, N.Y.

Canada's Maritime
Provinces Seek

Import Embargoes

OTTAWA (UPI) -Representatives
of the maritime provinces'
sagging coal industry yesterday
asked the federal government

either to impose embargoes on the week end layoff of some 4,

u.a. imports or 10 increase suu suu-ventions
ventions suu-ventions on eastern shipments to
allow Nova Scotia poducers to
compete in the rich Ontario indus industrial
trial industrial market.
A delegation, headed by Nova

Scotia Premier Robert Stanfield
and including officials of both the
Dominion Caal Co. and United
Mine Workers of America, put the
request be ore Prime Minister
John Diefenbaker and other cab
inet ministers at a three-hour
meeting on Parliament Hill.
The government promised "se "serious
rious "serious consideration" to the pro proposals.
posals. proposals. The meeting was held following

100

miners at Dominion's Cape Bre'on

mines. The layoff was for the
month of February, but a spokes spokesman
man spokesman said it undoubtedly will be
extended if no government action
is taken on the crisis.

Dear Friends

Due to the fact that I must repair
primary lines, I'll have to suspend elec electrical
trical electrical services tomorrow February 4th,
from 3 a.m. to 6 a.m. This interrup interruption
tion interruption will take place in the area includ includ-&d
&d includ-&d in the limits of Avenida Central,
Avenida Justo Arosemena, Calle 37 y
Calle 35.
Thanks for your cooperation,
K-LIST0 KIL0VAT10.

l Imii rtt 4 It C add tw Wwi )

AT OUR
PRE CARNIVAL

UP TO

SALE

50

lo
DISCOUNTS

H SUPER K
M MOIST
I yl BEAUTY lu
XM emulsion r

DEW IT
YOURSELF!
SUPER-MOIST BEAUTY EMULSION!
Super-Moist re-activitates to create natural moisture
as in youth, from within... a sort of "dew-it yourself"
operation.
Nothing could be more needed or welcome in this'
dry-skinned age. Super-Moist gives a day-long, moist,
fresh Ipok with or without make-up... and the mois moisture
ture moisture lasts I
It makes all the sense in the world. No woman can
afford to be without it. Do Come in very soon and

see for yourself I

llliss oCaura (Burgos,
SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF

will five beauty consultations from 9 a.m. to 12 noon

Feb. 7 and classes rrom s to p."'., up io
Friday, Feb. 6.
Make your appointment today Tel. 2-2648
MOTTA'S

: 7

(Guyr Lombardo, Capitol): "Nobo "Nobody
dy "Nobody But You" (Mtmit Van Do-

1 r '
-1 -1 M.



fagi roxm

THE PANAMA AMERICA? ATI IKPEPEPPCTT 0.111 NtWSPAPF
TUESDAY, EBSTjAKY 8, 1951
i and Ollierwfoe
Slafjm
8c
134,
THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Doroiby KHIgalkn
t t I ai k
Cucumbers, Norway Sardines
anama
Y OSWALD JACOBY
Written far. NIA Service
Combine In Appetizer. Salad
2-0 740 r 10 HI Ltvtm S.OO mnJ 10 mlf.

1

i TT"Tin"nnTTrTT-irfyTfri' in imp 'liinoir-"iinmirinaiwniiu iiiHiinin.iiiminiiiiui lenweemj
'' I
fcinnwimnnniiiiiniWiiM.-i ,w ao,..4 fWW-- .i(iiwiinriiinpninirnnnBnri7i

MISS PATRICIA PECK

ENGAGEMENT OF MISS PATRICIA PECK TO
MR. JACK ELCROTH IS ANNOUNCED TODAY
Mr. and Mrs. Harfy W. Peck of Port Gulick announce
the engagement of their daughter. Patricia Klalne, to Mr.
Jack Manning: Elcroth, son of Mr. and Mrs. Karl Elcroth of
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Miss Peck was graduated from Cristobal High School
with the class of 1957 and has attended the Canal Zone
Junior College.
Mr. Elcroth. an alumnus 'of Northern State Teachers
College, Marquette, Mich., is presently employed with the
Household Finance Company In Grand Rapids.
Invitations have been issued for a February wedding.

Caribbean College Club
Postpones Penny Social
The Caribbean College Club has
announced that its annual Penny
Social, originally planned for th s
Saturday evening, has necessarily
been postponed.
The event has been re-scheduled
lor March 7 at the Strangers
Club in Colon. Club officials stat
ed that all tickets which have-been)!
sold will be honored on the new
date.
At Amsdor Club
The For' Amador Officers' Open
Mess will present a "Carnival at
8:30 Friday even ng.
Miss Ana Elena Boyd, Panama
Coffee Queen, will reign with her
court, and Lucho Azcarraga and
Mb ensemble will provide music
for dancing.
Mrs. Elena Aleman de Tapia,
known as National Queen of the
Pollera," will attend, displaying
t'ie traditional costume and jewel jewel-ry.
ry. jewel-ry. tiroups dressed in similar cos costumes
tumes costumes (comparsa) will be wel welcome.
come. welcome. Members planning to attend are
requested to make reservations.
Balboa Woman's Club
Plans Trip To Island
The Balboa Woman's Club will
sponsor an outing to Barro Colo
rado .Island February 28.
Members and guests will board
a ''rain at the Balboa Station at
7;15 a.m. for Frijoles, then con continue
tinue continue to the island by launch. Af Af-ter
ter Af-ter a guided tour of the game re refuse
fuse refuse in the morning, luncheon
will be served. The launch will de depart
part depart the island at 3 p.m. for the
return trip.

El Puerto Libre
Salsipuedes and "B" Avenue
EVERY TUESDAY
6:30 to 7:00 p.m.
Your Community Network
mod

830 Kilocycle
PANAMA
j-

Members of the group are ad

vised to bring a change of cloth clothing
ing clothing and sturdy walking shoes. A
nominal charge will cover the
transportation, tour and lunch.
Reservations must bp made by
Monday In order that arrange
ments can be completed. The re
servationi committee Includes Mrs.
Sara Rowley, Balboa 3674;. Mrs.
Ttesste Luce, Balboa- 1488; -Mrs.
Lbretta Snodgrass. Balboa 23R4;
and Mrs. Mary Worley, Balboa
4203.
About Saad Members
Name New Offlctrs
At an annual bus'ness meetinq
at the Ancon Masonic Temple,
Nobles of Abou Saad Temple nam named
ed named new o'ficers to lerve during
this year.
Divan officers are Subert Tur Tur-byfill,
byfill, Tur-byfill, Potentate; John A. Ever Ever-son.
son. Ever-son. Chief Rabbsn; William R.
Dixon, Assistant Rahban; C. Wil William
liam William Homa, High Priest and Pro Prophet;
phet; Prophet; Burton E. Davis, Orental
Guide; George P. Fulljan, Record Recorder;
er; Recorder; C. W. Kilbey, Treasurer. Lle Llewellyn
wellyn Llewellyn Zent nvas appointed Temple
Director.
The first social event of the year
will be an introduction party Sat Saturday
urday Saturday evening for Nobles and their
ladlpc Th npw Divan officers
will be presented and guests will
have an opportun ty to insnect the
new Temple Units Buildin". where
the party will be held. Cocktails
will be served from 6:30 to 8:30
p.m.
Nobles visiting in this area are
Invited to attend.
Gamboa Church Circle
Announces Meeting
The Mary Bartlett Circle of the
Gamboa Union Church w'll meet
1090 Kilocycles
COLON

Meeting
Special Iducatlon Oroup
The newly-organized Special E-
ducation Association (SEA) will
meet toforrov. at 7:30 in Room
109 at the Balboa Elementary
School.
The objective of the association
is to provide special education for
chidren with physical and mental
defects. All parents, teachers and
other interested persons are Invit Invited
ed Invited to attend.

Wednesday, Feb. 11, at 9:30 at the
home of Mrs. Juan Hidalgo, Sixth
Avenue and 95th Street, San Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco de la Caleta.
All members and friends of the
church are in vi ed to auenu,
Cristobal Thespians
To Prefenr Play
The Thespian and Dramatics
Club will present a single perform performance
ance performance of the play 'Inside Lester"
Thursday evening at 8 in the au auditor
ditor auditor urn of Cristobal High School.
Tickets will be sold at the door.
Curundu Women's Club
Meets Tomorrow Morning
The Curundu Women's Club will
hold an important meeting tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow morning at 9 in the Commu Community
nity Community Building. All members are
urged to attend.
Refreshments will be served.
Miss Newhard Named
To College Who's Who
Miss Carol D. Newhard of Ga Ga-lun
lun Ga-lun Is one of 23 Colorado State
College students who have been
honored by selection for 1 sting In
the new edition of "Who's Who In
American Colleges and Universi Universities."
ties." Universities." The election U i recogni recognition
tion recognition of student leadership and
service.
Miss Newhard, daufihter of Mr.
and Mrs. F. A. Newhard of Gs Gs-tun,
tun, Gs-tun, is a senior majoring in ele elementary
mentary elementary education. She is a mem member
ber member of the Student Activities Com Commission,
mission, Commission, Sludent Union Board, Re Religious
ligious Religious Council, president of the
Women's Re'idence Hall Council,
and an active part'eipant in intra intramural
mural intramural sports.
Mr. and Mrs. Perkins
Announce Sen's Birth
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Ray Per Perkins
kins Perkins of Washington, D.C., an announce
nounce announce the birth of their first
child, a boy, on January 26. He
has been named Michael Ray.
Mrs. Perkins is the former Do Doris
ris Doris Jane Pabon of Cristobal. The
baby's maternal grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Pabon of
Margarita. The paternal grand grandparents
parents grandparents are Mr. anc' Mrs. Howard
Perkins of Crouseville, Me.
Cept. and Mrs. Lacy
Have Guests Prom Atlanta
Capt. and Mrs. Harry T. Lacy
of Los R os have as guests for
two weeks her brother, M. L. Mc-
Kenzie, John Neal and Jimmy
Coleman, all of Atlanta.
The visitors timed thir mid midwinter
winter midwinter vacation to coincide with
Panama's Carnival festivities.
They are also visiting Taboga and
the Interior.
College Club Plana
Meetings This Week
The Canal Zone College Club
has planned two events for this
week.
Tomorrow morning at 9:30, the
Wednesday Morning Study Group
will meet with Mrs. D. J. Paoluc-
ci, 6255A Boqueron St., Los Rios.
I Mrs. Harold Feeney will be co
hostess. Mrs. Audrey Kline, pub
lie relations consultant, will speak
on her profession.
All members and other college
women are nvited to attend.
The club's February meeting
will be a tea Saturday afternoon
at 3:30 In the Fern Room of the
Tlvoll Guest House, Following the
tea, a fashion show will be pre presented
sented presented by students of Miss Eloise
Monroe, with Mrs. C. A. Beall Jr.,
offering musical selections.
Reservations should be made
with Mrs. R. C. Stockham, chair chairman,
man, chairman, Balboa 1709, Or Mrs. Lawr Lawrence
ence Lawrence Chambers, Balboa 3688. All
college women and guests are in in-viied
viied in-viied to attend.
3 wear Hearts
NEW YOUK (UPl) Valen Valentine
tine Valentine heart ckles with raspbe-ry
Jam filling are pretty enough for
a party.
Si t together 1 cup sifted en enriched
riched enriched flour, teaspoon salt and
cup sugar. Cu' in cup short shortening
ening shortening until mixture .resembles
coarse crombs. Blend in 1 cup
uncooked rolled oats, quick or
old-fashioned. Add 3 tablespoons
water and 1 teaspoon vanilla, mix mix-inn
inn mix-inn lightly.
Roll on llfhtlj Toured board to
6-inch thlekneses na cut with
hear -shaped cutter. Place half of
..wkies on undressed cookie sheet
spoon about Vt teaspoon raspberry
jam on center of each and top with
remaining halves from which
ce..ters have been cut with smal smaller
ler smaller heart-shaped cutter, Seal edg edges
es edges by pressing with fork. Bake in
400-deg,ee oven 12 to 15 minutes.
Makes lVi dozen cookies.
I
CUTICURA Talcum
Acts Like Magic
Fin, aoft delightful delightfully
ly delightfully fragrant Cuticura
Talcum containa de deodorant
odorant deodorant antiaaptio
C-8 (Haxachloro (Haxachloro-phana).
phana). (Haxachloro-phana). Kaapa tha
akia fraah and sweat.
Soothaa sunburn.
Preventa, relievos
heat and diaper rash,
feet IrrlUOona Burt

1

BROADWAY BULLITIN BOARD
It's fireworks time backstage at
the Broadway musical "Jamaica"
because Ricardo Montalban in intends
tends intends to do a television film in
California during the week's va vacation
cation vacation oue nlm next montn, and
Lena Haine doesn't want to per perform
form perform with an understuay as her

leading man. Producer uavio Mer Merrick
rick Merrick tr.ed to block Montalban by
tak.ng him belore Equity on the
grounus tnat Ills weex off didn't
constitute a bona fide "vacation"
if he sDent it working, but the u-
nion ruiea in Montaloan's favor,
decreeing that an actor can do
anything he pleases during his ho-
l.day even act.
CBS, which made tne i r o n t
oaaes with tne Eaward R. Mur-
row vice documentary, has anoth another
er another social study in the works on
drug addiction. But this time
the cops know about it in aavance,
which Is why there were enough
plalnclothesmen to solve a score
of cr.mes swarming through tho
studios the other evening... EMU
Flvnn returned to Cuba to conti
nue his coverage of the Castro
triumph. He plans to become an
official foreign correspondent, fly
ing to the trouble spots or tne
wo.-ld (including Russia) to write
his Impressions of global prob problems.
lems. problems. The Serge Rubensteln estate,
faced with a $100,000 lawsuit, sett
led out of court for $12,500 and no
headlines. The attorneys involved
figured It would cost them that
much In time if the hassle reach
ed the courts, and they weren't
anxious for additional publicity ,.,
French millionaire Gilbert Fenal
Is honeymooning In Cairo with
Maud Messin, a beautiful Swed-
sh model wna s said to come from
a wealthy family In Stockholm.
He courted American cover girl
Nancy Berg a couple of ytars io,
and was widely rumored to be
her prospective bridegroom, but
the romance fizzled and she found
true love with Geoffrev Home.
Andy Williams has been otter
ed Summer shows by three TV
networks all of them impressed
by the program he had last year
but he plans to say tio lo any:
thing that doesn't Carry over Into
the Fall.
If just half the celebrities invit
ed to Portugal tor the four-day
carnival show up, It should be
quite a party Among those asked
are Ingrid Bergman, tn-i Duke of
Kent, Arthur Millet and wife, All
Khan and Orson Welles. Salvador
Dall has been enkaaed as one of
the designers, and Maurice Che-
You're missing a lot If u u-Aren't
Aren't u-Aren't Interested In bucomlng
a friend of anyone who isn't in
your own age group. The enthu
siasm of those who are younger
man you are is catching, and
those who are older may teach
you something.
Keep wishing thlnas were the
way they were once. They nev never
er never will be again, so you might
as well get pleasure out of things
as they are.
Keep putting off the things vou
would really like to do. It is nev never
er never convenient to make the effort
required for self-expression. There
will always be other demands on
your time, other ways of squan squandering
dering squandering what leisure you have.
Face that fact and you won't
keep putting off the things that
are really lmporant o you.
Never make the first gesture
of friendship. You never really
choose your fr'ends if you sit
back and wait for others to come
to you.
Won't let anyone do anything
ror you Because you don t want
io ue maeoiea 10 anyone. Those
you allow to help you are as in
terested in you as you are in
them.
Are highly critical of other peo people.
ple. people. You have to accent Deoole
as they are instead of picking
mem io pieces if you want to he
close to them or to really enjoy
their friendship.
Aeep wisning you could go
oacK ana ao things differently
instead of forgettting the' past
ana deciding to do better ugh
now and in the future.

PANAMONTE INN,
BOQUETE

M The ideal port
h the rich and
Highlands.

1
Modern conveniences, first rat
food and drinks plus unfailing

i

friendly service are all yours at
moderate prices.
For reservation simply wire
Panamonte Boquete or see your

travel-agent.

valier It billed as master of cere-
MMlr Va Ml4 AA ..mi

Singer Tommy Edward alleges
he was offered $36,000 to do a
four-week tour of the English
province! hut turned it down be
cause "a message from the solr
It world" advised him against It
...syaney cnapiin never let no no-elle
elle no-elle Adam out of hit eight dur.ng
the Ed Sullivan rehearsals, ro
tnat idyll's on again.
The men's locker room of the
Town Tennis Club wai the scene
of a robbery. The thief or thieves
took clothing at well ti money
and jewelry, so many of Gotham's
elegant blades were forced to
brave the chilly weather In shots
and sneakers In order to get home.
There are all kinds of trade
rumors hinting that the picture
"Al Capone" li encountering re resistance
sistance resistance from the city fatherj in
Chicago, where they'd Just as soon
forget about the gangster era,
There even have been reports
that the film may hive to hold its
world premiere elsewhere but
why, for Heaven's sake? All you
have to do to hold a premiere is
rent a theatre, and anybody can
do that.
Dick Avedon will shoot a spe special
cial special series of pictures to be used
in the promotion of Marilyn Mon Monroe's
roe's Monroe's forthcoming flicker, "Some
Like It Hot." He was chosen at
her request,.. Anybody know where
Rose Murphy is? Julius Monk
has been searching for her to sing
at his Downstairs Room, b u t
hasn't turned up a clue.
Talk of Tangier Is the romance
of Tallulah Bankhead'i inter Eu Eugenia.
genia. Eugenia. 58, with night club Impresa Impresario
rio Impresario Michael Eaton-Eland, 39 ...
There's an Interesting contrast of
styles In the forthcoming "Rang "Ranging
ing "Ranging Tree" Gary Cooper, who nev never
er never took an acting lesion In his
life, and Karl Maiden, an Actors
Studio product.. .Ronnie Burns, ion
of Geoge Burnt and Grade Allen,
appears smitten over Anna Gali
na, whose dad is head of a fam famous
ous famous perfume firm.
Princess Sorayi hit another
prospective Romeo queuelng up:
Prince Ralmondo Orslnl, whose
brother F,llpp0 made headlines
with actress Belinda Lee..,Donal,l
"Red" Barry makes quite come comeback
back comeback In "The Last Mile," with
Mickey Rooney. but he'i still pro
ceedlng with his plant to become
an ordained minister of the church
of L'fe In California,,, Esther Wil William
liam William had a ball during her New
York visit with one brief excep exception.
tion. exception. A process server gave her a
summons notifying her of a suit
tome woman Is bringing against
her swimming pool company.
One of "The Platteri" facet is
own side order of woe. Herbert
Reed, one-ffith of the singing
group, is being si oped with a
divorce suit accompanied by a
bid for 1,000 a week alimony.
MAKE FRIFNOS
aHUfv.
The Joneses go on the theory
that it is too much trouble to
teach their children to take care
of the furniture. They say they'll
wait unt l the children are older
to buy anything "good." Mean Meantime,
time, Meantime, the youngsters treat other's
furniure as roughly as they do
their own.
Anyone who goes by the Jonei'
theory should keep their children
at home.
COO coo
INDIANAPC LIS, Ind. (UPD (UPD-The
The (UPD-The Indiana House -passed a bill
eliminating a law against hunting
doves de.pite a plea by Rep.
Samuel Power that "the coo of a
dove is a musical sound . this
is one type of bird where the fath father
er father stays around after the babies
are born."
I
of entry into
fertile Uuriqui
'o4Aii n

- NORTH II
4H0M1
VKS
711
4AIIS
WIST BAST
IS Q
VJ9M fAQSSS
AKJ )
sJII XaQ74l
SOUTH D)
AXJ6S
10 7
Q10I4
K10
Bait ind West vulnerable
Sent Watt North Baal
le Past I Pais
Pas Pas
Opening lead t) JC

When your partner leads a king
against i tuit contract and you
noid aoubleton, your normal cor correct
rect correct pity li the higher eird.
Thfi asks your Dinner t con
tinue the suit ind glvet you t
cnanci io irump tne intra ieaa.
Like ill rules there ara nlantv
of exceptions Somotlme vou
may have lure-trumn tricks which
you do not want to give up. in
other instances you may expect
that declirer will be able to over over-ruff
ruff over-ruff you.
in the recent Shrveport tour tournament,
nament, tournament, Ed Theus of Oklahoma
City had a third reaii.n inr nnt it.
ing his partner to come on. Ed
wsnted to pick up tricks in an another
other another suit first.
Hence, Ed olaved the rfpuce of
d amonda it trick one and Hymn
Greenberg of Tulsa promptly
snifted to a heart. Ed took his ace
and queen of hearts and then led
his other dlimond. Bvrnn polled.
ed tricks with his ace and jack
ana men lea i fourth diamond.
This gave Ed j chance to over over-ruf
ruf over-ruf the dummy ind the hand was
doton one trick.
If Ed had tignaled high on the
first d amond lead Byron would,
have continued the suit where whereupon
upon whereupon the declarer would have
wound up with in overtrick in in-stead
stead in-stead of down one.
IS
O The bidding hat been:
Wert North Eaet Sooth
1 Double IV a
Pass JN.T. Pas ?
You, South, hold:
AAK8T6 AQS 84
What do you" dot
A Bid three spa4e. I'm hat
already foroed to genw and new
m W.ia ftM &J MtJi
Milt. f-iy ;;fr
TODAY'S QUESTION
Your partner bids three no
trump. What do you do now?
Aaawer Tomorrow
Steel Production
Due To Run Highest
In Past 20 Months
NEW YORK (UPI)-Steel pro production
duction production last week hit a new 18 18-month
month 18-month peak and output this week
is da'ed to touch a new high in
almost 20 months, the American
Iron and Steel Institute reiported
yesterday.
Estimated production for the
current week is placed at 2,256, 2,256,-000
000 2,256,-000 tons, which would be the best
since the week beginning April IS,
1957.
Actual production last week of
2,178,000 tons was the best since
the week of June 17. 1957, when
mun lurnea out 2,181,000 tont.
This week's estimate, If
achieved, would be eaulvalent to
79.7 per cent of the industry' an annual
nual annual rated cpacity, or 140.4 per
cent of average weekly production
m me i!M7-4 period.
The Institute said laat week's
actual production wai equil to
76.9 per cent of capacity and a
production index of 185.8.
A month ago the mill operated
at 73.6 Per cent nf eanaoitv and
produced 2,085,000 ton. The pro production
duction production Index was 129.8.
A year ago, when steel produc production
tion production was declining because of the
recession, the mills turned out
1.4H7.000 ton of steel. That was
equal to 54 per cent of the then
raiea capacity of a production
Index of 90.7.
St. Alban's
Church To Hold
Picnic Feb. 23
-St. Albin'i Church ortanlcariona
t Piraito have completed plant
ior a picnic io (jnorreri on ren.
23.
Football games, other outdoor
games and horseback riding will
be tome of the feature! of the pic picnic.
nic. picnic. Tickets are belnf sold bv
church members. Buses will leave
the Paraiso church at 7 a.m.
Special Case
GREENWICH, England (UPD (UPD-It
It (UPD-It cot Itah G. Hamilton S5.60 In
court yesterday because there are
certain kinds 01 robbery Scotland
Yard does not handle.
He dialed Scotland Yard't emer emergency
gency emergency telephone number, 999, and
thouted 'Tve been robbed."
Hamilton reported h had put
coins in an automatic cigarette
vending machine and nothing
came out.

TASTY Norway tardlne rest en cucumber slices In this ap appetiser
petiser appetiser itlad. Add dressing, s!nd It lives up to Hi name.

By OAYNOR MADDOX
Nil A Peod and Markets Editor
Appetizer lalidt make a wel
come and different first course.
You'll enjoy them for a change
Cucumbers, beett, apple, hard hard-cooked
cooked hard-cooked eggs, all combine d;ll d;ll-ciously
ciously d;ll-ciously with those plump Norway
sardines packed in olive oil. hx-
tra garnishes can be str ps of pi pimento,
mento, pimento, watercress, chopped onion.
Sardine ind Cucumber
Appetiser Sl'rtd (4 servings)
One (3 ounce) can Norway
sardines, 1 large cucumber (wiu
rind), sliced; pimento, cut Into
strips; lettuce leaves, finely chop
ped; witercress (gzm sh), dress dressing,
ing, dressing, salt, pepper, to taste.
On a salad or luncheon plate,
arrange a ring of sliced cucum cucumber
ber cucumber (leave the rind on for addi
tional color). In the center of
the cucumber ring, arrange a
bed of finely chopped lettuce
lea vet. Cover lettuce with -5 or
6 whole Norwiy tardlnes. Gar
nish with criss-cross ttr.pt of red
pimento ind iprlg of fresh wa
tercress. Serve with choice of
dressing.

Senate Investigation Uncovers Lax
Filing System Of Secret Documents

j WASHIISGTbN Senate
ivestigatoYsTclafined' credit to to-day
day to-day for forcing reforms on a gov government
ernment government agency that could not lell
If its secret documents had been
stolen because It did not know the
con ten. s of its own Hies.
They also called for a legisla legislative
tive legislative crackdown on a "vicious
jacket" costing small businessmen
up to 50 milhon dollars a year
and aired case in which a Civil
Air Patrol offieer allegedly embez embezzled
zled embezzled the fruits of ai. embezzlement.
The Senate permanent investi investi-ga.lng
ga.lng investi-ga.lng subcommittee reported on
the cases in reviewing its 1958
work.
It began checking into affairs
of the armed services technical
Information agency last April
when John W. Dukeminier, e Li Library
brary Library of Congress employe,
walked off with 548 classified pa papers.
pers. papers. Proved Laxity
Dukeminier said he took the pa-
ripm in it-nva that thn affencv.
then operating in the Library of
congress, was lax on security. n
lost his job.
But the subcommittee taid the
agency not only did not have an
inven ory o' its documents, but
could not estimate closer than 200, 200,-000
000 200,-000 to 300,000 the number of te te-cret
cret te-cret papers on hand.
As a result, the Investigates
said, the agency could not tell
Army Coach To Join
Avco Corp; After
Leaving Academy
NEW YORK (UPI) -Col. Earl
(Red) Blaik. who .resigned Jan. 13
as head football coach and athletic
director at the U.S. Military Acad Academy,
emy, Academy, will Join the Avco Manufac Manufacturing
turing Manufacturing Corp. Feb. 16 as a vice vice-president
president vice-president and member of the man management
agement management committee, it wii an announced
nounced announced todiy.
The innouncement wm made by
Emanuel said Blalk't offices would
be in the company's New York
headquarters.
Blalk't resignation from his posi positions
tions positions at West Point becomes effec effective
tive effective Feb. 15. Thus Blalk, 62, one of
the nition'i most successful
coaches, will not be "out of work"
a tingle aay wnue changing jobs.
on Sunday, Army named Dale
Hall, Blaik's No. .1 assistant the
past three sea torn, to succeed him
as head coach. '
. When he resigned hit Army
posts, Blade said he planned to
"accept one O' several opportuni opportunities
ties opportunities either In TV or busineit.M
"There were several factors en entering
tering entering Into my decision to go with
Avco." Blaik raid.
The movi tc Avco it not Blalk't
first venture Into indu try. Before
his coaching activities overshad overshadowed
owed overshadowed hit o'her itterettt.1 he hid
successful builnstt career first is
i home builder 'In' Diyton,' Ohio,
and more recently n president m

an oil company Jn OJuanoma

-1, Vic

Sardines and Rosebud leeti
(4 servings)
One (344 ounce) can Norway
sardines. 1 can rosebud beets, 2
bTd-cooked eggs, finely chopped,
" -ing of parsley (garn th), dresa dresa-mg.
mg. dresa-mg. In the center bf a salad or
luncheon plate, arr nge a small
mound of finely ciiopped nard nard-cook?d
cook?d nard-cook?d egg. Ring the mound w.th
small whole (rosebud) beets. Top
the finely chopped hard cooked
egg with 5 or 6 whole Norway
sardines. Garnish with a sprig of i
psrtley and terve with your
choice of the follow ng dressings:
1. Wine, Vinegar Dressing: One
part wine vinegar to 2 parts o o-live
live o-live oil. salt and pepper. Mix
thoroughly.
-' 2, Gourmet Dressing: Two ta tablespoons
blespoons tablespoons mayonnaise, 2 tble.
spoons chili sauce or csttun 4
teaspoon, dry or prepared mus mustard,
tard, mustard, salt and pepper. Mx-thoroughly.
8. French Dressing: One part
white vinegar or lemon Juice to
2 parts olice oil, salt end pepper.
Mix thoroughly.
If it file -had been rifled or whit
Wat mttsini unless the thiol
fessed,
, In the Civil Air Petrol case, the
investigator said they learned
last summer that Lt. Col. Hugh
M. Pierce Jr. of the New VoHr
CAP had aolicitert tho ifnnsHnn .J
eight yachts for the group, n Air
Force civilian anviliarv onri than
sold the vessel for his own bene-
nt.
Thev ald Pierre tmaA tU
- - -" uovw MIC 111
ey for investments, an airplane
aim several car-, including one old
Roll Rove. Ua mil omiaVif h
Lt. Col. Alfred W. Sutter .Mina
command- of the CAP wing, but
me suDcommitree said sutter paid
hi own personal bills with S34.350
he forced Pierce to return.
Explaining the small businesi
racket, McClellan said certain
salesmen persuaded businessmen
to sign contracts by promising that
their firms w.mlH h ma in
short period of time at inflated
prices.
A.rtuallv. he mM the
firms in question were in businesi
only to advertise propertiet but
did not, at bonafide broken, han handle
dle handle the sale. They generally
change 1 per cent of the property
va'ue In advance.
The report said the saleimen ac actually
tually actually were "fait.tallrlna
dence men" who took advantage
vi uwners w iarms, rancnes, hard hardware,
ware, hardware, stores, taverns, and the Ilk
through "all typet of oral decep deception."
tion." deception." r
Mom Replaces Dad
In Indiana Jail
For Court Conlempl
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (UPI)-A
mother of seven children traded
places with h- husband in Ma Marion
rion Marion County jail Sunday night
under terms of a joint sentence
Imposed on (he ee w
tempt of court.
Mrs. Catherine Robbins ind
her husbsnd, Perry, were sen sentenced
tenced sentenced by Juvenile Court Judge
Harold Fields to spend ilternate
weeks In jail for failing to pay
the Welfare Department $21 a
week for support of their 12-year,
old wayward ion.
The sentence wis handed down
last Wednesday ind Robbins was
jailed until Sunday night when his
wife entered a cell and he wai
trued for a week to resume hit
job. The couple it scheduled to
exchange piacjs nenina oan next
Sunday night when Robbins' work working
ing working wife will be free to return to
her job for I week.
- Fieldi saib the indeterminate
jail' sentences would continue un until
til until the'-Robblai pay the Welfare -Department
$21 week plui $1,200
they already owe, or prove they
are unable to pay and continue
to lupiport themselves and their
other ilx .hlldren. ,-
However, the judge said he had
Information the parenti hid i
combined Income of more ?m
$600 a month, Their Income did
not include some unemployment
Insurance' they alto hid drawflV
Fields iiid.

i'

.ft
,1 v.-.t 7
.' ; ... ... ;. ..



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY t, 1959

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
PAGEfTTI

.I
4

FORD That' what this construction it called. In effect this is
certain areas there an? BmU streams that slow down and some

rain, and water begin to rise
Id biidg even though it may be

M8&Wffl8amiafo II I issssdStMiy "iiWIWMW WiiiiiiiiiHiu. MWlllltteMWh!m.Wl1llN!IIMMW

BUILDING BRIDGES is just one of the many lobs assigned to the Sl8th Engineers, attached to
the 1st Battlr Group, 20th Infantry, Fort1 Kobbe. This site is at Rio Hato, where the unit is repair

ing roads, building bridges

5ICili Engineers Building Bridges,
Fords For Exercise Banyan Tree'

Preparing the Rio Hato training
area for Exercise Bayan Treo
due tt take place nexc month
was the mission handed the 318th
Engineei Company (Combat) ear early
ly early last month. 1
There w.s little doubt in any anyone
one anyone mind, that this is an import important
ant important ass.gnments. Much will de depend
pend depend on the kind of work the unit
has done and will continue to do.
because thousands of troops will
take part in Exercise Banyan Tree
including paratroopers and
others elements of the U.S." armed
forces.
Since it started work on the, Rio
Hato training, area about 75
miles due west of Panama City
the 517th Engineers, command
nave constructed two br dges and
have nearly completed another
bridge and nemerous frods.
Two to three-thousand-foot land
Hi?ever lb. pain of Rftoumatlym.
itlaa tiff muicie and
koM?ND from yf
?nc" ROMIND quickly Wwiu.
..ti rIIf 10 you can nleep, or
and llvt in comfort. Don)
!iltellV I Gt IIOMIND todl

' t
- -I (
Iltili
!
S
tnree or lour xeet aDove its normal
partially, covered with water.
and constructing fords.
lng strips for aggressor forcfes in
Exercise Benyan Three have been
graded and cleared and the unit
already la working on a land ng
strip and drop zone for friendly
forces. The outfit also recondition reconditioned
ed reconditioned about 31 miles of roads anJ
constructed six miles of new roads.
The unit is equipped with a port portable
able portable concrete mixer, towed by a
two one half ton truck, lt hH
poured some 80 cubic yards of con-
Consumers Co-Op
Schedules Meeting
for February
The Panama Consumers Coope Cooperative
rative Cooperative will hold a general assem assembly
bly assembly on Feb. 16 at the Ricardo H.
Newman high school, oppos te the
Panama Legislative Palace. The
meeting is scheduled to start at
7:30 p.m.
The agenda Includes: opening
remarks by the vice president, re report
port report on the operation of the coo cooperative's
perative's cooperative's gasoline station, read reading
ing reading of a combined auditor's and
treasurer'! report, and open fo
rum.
A All members are expected to at
tend.
A
V

'

: 4
1! v
v v -v v
r

a "bridge" constructed hy ihe 518th Engineers at Fort Kobbe. In
times halt vehicles and equipment when there has been a torrential

aepm. inis lora is oum across we
(U.S. Army Photo)
crete in building the roads and
bridges
For members of. the unit, how
ever, it was just another job. The
kind of a job they know how to
handle,
, ana
handle right.
Dead Sea Scrolls
Will Be Discussed
At YMCA Lecture
The opening lecture in the aeries
"Adventures in Religion" will be
held on Thursday evening, at 7:30
at me naiooa x.m.j,a,-u.s.o.
The subject will be "The Dead
Sea Scrolls" and the speaker, the
Rev. Robert F. Gussik, pastor of
Redeemer Lutheran Church.
There will be photographic co copies
pies copies of the ancent documents
which were discovered in recent
years in the Dead Sea area. Old
Bibles and other materials will al also
so also be on display.
Gusslck was a missionary In
Guatemala, and li a graduate of
Concordia Seminary In St. Louis.
He did graduate work In Old
Testament studies at Butler Uni University
versity University and Is an associate mem
ber of the Amerlcam School of
oriental Research.
U QD

1

stream ana provines a gooa soi-

(U.S. Army Photo)
Rockefeller Slakes
Political Future
On Big NY Tax Hike
ALBANY, Feb. 3 (UPI) Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller, mentioned
as a contender for the Republican
presidential nomination next year,
has staked his political future on
a reco-d tax increase for 5 mil
lion New York State wde earn
ers.
Some of Rockefeller almost ar
dent suppor'.crs said the new Gov Governor
ernor Governor who beat New U e a 1 i $ h
Averell Harnman by 550, 'TOO
votes last November, had taken a
major politic jI camble in ri'is.ni'
income taxes 150 millin doilurs K
balance the 1959 60 state budget.
The tax hike would provide mure
than half on what is nep'lci to
avert what ho terms "fiscal disast
er for the State.
The eovcrnor's su.uorter ald
there were two sides to th tax
raising plans nd it will take a
year 10 (terermine success or
failure.
"If Governor Rockefeller gets
New York Stale out of the red and
on a pay-as you-go basis after on
ly one year in office, bo has maije
a tremendous accomp' shm?nt and
it should set him right with not
only the Dopie of the State but
people all over he country," one
supporter saia
Lt. Gov. Malcolm Wilson, a
ma! sorini in Rockefeller' ramn.
aign last fall, declined to recognize-
the New York Governor ai a
candidate for the White House but
thought he "would make a terrific
President." He said that from ma.
hy conversations with liockefefeller
he is convinced the Governor will
spend the next four yejrs in Alba
ny.
Demoted Red Leader
Pervukhln Makes
Full Recantation
MOSCOW, Feb. S (UPI) De Demoted
moted Demoted party leader Mikhail Per Per-vukin
vukin Per-vukin apologized to the Commun Communist
ist Communist Party Congress today for fail failing
ing failing to back the leadership against
the Bulganin-Malenkov anti-parly
group.
Pervukin, former Deputy Pre-
m.er and Presidium member, was
the first of those associated with
the anti-party group to make a
personal recantation before com communism's
munism's communism's highes body.
"To my bitter regret, he told
the delegates at a closed session,
"I must state that at a time
fraught with responsibility for the
party, I was unable to discern
the ati-party plans of that group.
Pervukhln gave full endorse
ment to the reforms and the new
seven-year plan of party leader
Nikita Khrushchev.
He also said he "fully agrees"
with the indictment of the Bulganin-Malenkov
group given in the
report of the December central
committee meeting when Bulgam Bulgam-ln
ln Bulgam-ln confessed his part in the plot plotting.
ting. plotting. There was no indication that the
actual particpants in the anti-Dar-
ty group follow Prevukhin to the
rostrum. It had been demanded by
previous speakers that they be
"brought to account" before the
Congress.

SENSATIONAL "LITTLE WONDER" FOR 1959
THE LA03CX SER'ES 0F FAMILY CARS
ON DISPLAY AT TROPICAL MOTORS, S. A.

Air Force, Army
Chiefs Say Go Slow
On Nuclear Pads

WASHINGTON (UPI)The na nation's
tion's nation's Army and Air Force chiefs
said yesterday tb United States
should ao slow In Joining Russia
in any agreement to ban nuclear
tests and outlaw production 01
atomic weapons.
Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, army
chief of staff, told the Senate dis disarmament
armament disarmament subcommittee that "a
ban on nuclear weapons will not,
in itself reduce tensions or elim eliminate
inate eliminate the danger of war or sur surprise
prise surprise attack."
Taylor said such an agreement
would require a bigger buildup of
conventional land, sea and air
forces unless the Communist bloc
nations also cut back their non
atomic forces.
Gen. Thomas D. WhiU, Air
Force chief of staff, said there
should be great caution and de deliberation
liberation deliberation in concluding any arms
control agreements because such
agreements "mus: he capable of
positive and precise control and
enforcement."
White said the development of
outer space weapons "constitutes
the primary military threat
against us. As long as there is
such a threat we must maintain
a counter force to serve as a de deterrent.'
terrent.' deterrent.' Tsylor and WhiU testified be behind
hind behind closed doors and their pre prepared
pared prepared testimony was made public
by subcommittee Chairman Hu Hubert
bert Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Minn.).
Adm. Arlelgh A. Burke, chief
of U.S. naval operations, told the
subcommittee last week that "un "under
der "under a nuclear test ban our current
strategy and requirements would
undergo no major changes."
However, he said a test ban
would freeze certain 'mportant
planned developments and "iriiiib "iriiiib-it
it "iriiiib-it our ability to meet future ap applications
plications applications of Soviet military pow power
er power which cannot be completely
predicted at this time."
Taylor said that even If atomic
weapons were banned, no doubt
new, non-atomic weapons could be
developed in time which would
rival nuclear weapons in power.
CLASSROOM SHORTAGE
WASHLNGTON -(UPI)- Ade
quate Jjssroom space was lack lacking
ing lacking for 1.843,000 elementary and
nigh scnoni students at the start
of the current school year, the Of-
tice of Education reports.

Fresh Trade Winds May Kick
Rough Seas In Sunny February

The following weather conditions
are based on past records and
may be exipected to occur In the
Canal Zone and vicinity during
February.
Weather: February is normally
characterized by steady dry sea season
son season winds and weather, but there
have been several exceptions, the
most recent being February 1951
when measurable rain occured on
20 days at Cristobal and on 13 days
at Balboa Heights.
The average total rainfall for
February is 0.63 inches at Balboa
Heights, 0.56 inches at Maiirln
Dam and 1.57 inches at Cristobal.
The range from driest to wet wettest
test wettest on record is zero to 2.96 inches
at Balboa Heights, trace tn 3.71
inches at Madden Dam, and 0.04
inch to 12.37 inches at Cristobal.
The average number of days
with measurable rain is 3 at Bal
boa Heights and 13 at Cristobal.
Temperature: The dally highest
and lowest temperatures will av average
erage average 89 and 72 degrees at Balboa
IMF, World Bank
Endorse Plans
To Hike Capital
WASHINGTON Feb. 3 (UPI) -The
Internat.onal Monetary Fund
and the World Bank have endors endorsed
ed endorsed plans to hike their capital to
cope more effectively with the
free world's financial problems.
The world Bank's authorized ca capital
pital capital would be increased by more
than 100 per cent from 10 1 bil billion
lion billion to 21 billion dollars. The
bank's board of governors un un-anmously
anmously un-anmously approved the moe
yesterday In a preliminary vole.
A further vote, to be taken by
Sept. 1, Is required of the mone monetary
tary monetary fund would be hiked from
$9,211,000,000 to $14,325,000,000.
Thp fund reDOrted that countries
holding more than 99 per cent of
its present shares have voted in
favor of the increase.
Subscription quotas of most
fund member-nations would be in increased
creased increased by 50 per cent. In his
budget message to congress, Pre President
sident President Eisenhower asked congress
to approve promptly the proposed
U.S. contributions t0 both agenc agencies.
ies. agencies. The U.S. subscription to the mo monetary
netary monetary fund, by far the largest,
will be from $2,750,000 to $4,125
000,000. The U.S. guarantee to the
bank would be raised to $5,080,000,
000.
O
o

Congressional Spacemen Contend
Administration Penny Pinching
WASHINGTON, Feb. 3 (UPI) Members of the House Space committee charged
today that eh National Space Administration has taken a penny-pinching approach to
the international space race.
High-ranking; Democratic and Republican membert said they 4elt certain the na nation's
tion's nation's space program could be speeded up despite Space Administration claims that it
is moving ahead as rapidly as possible.
Members particularly expressed skepti cism of statements by top Space Admfn!srs
tion officials that there are no more projects they profitably could spend money on If
they had it.

The statements ca.ne as the
committee summoned Gen. Thom Thomas
as Thomas D. White. Air Force chief o
staff, and other top Air Force of officials
ficials officials for the second day of the
hearings.
The four day inquiry opened
with testimony from Space Admi Administration
nistration Administration director T. Keith Glen Glen-nan
nan Glen-nan and deputy director Hugh L
Dryden. They outlined space pro program
gram program goals over the next 10 to 15
years.
Glennsn told the House Space
Committee that Russia was 18
months to two years ahead in dev developing
eloping developing the powerful rockets need needed
ed needed for exploration of deep space.
He also said under questioning
that he "wouldn't put it past" the
Russians to succeed in placing a
man in space this year. The Unit United
ed United States does not expect t put
a man into an orbit around earth
for about two years.
Glennan s chief asslsant, Dry Dryden,
den, Dryden, injected a surprise note into
the hearings by predicting the U U-nlted
nlted U-nlted States would need 10 to IS
years to put a man on the moon moon-some
some moon-some five years more than esti
mated by some experts.
Rep. James G. Fulton (R-Pn )
snapped that if the first Ameri American
can American did not reach the moon be before
fore before 10 to 15 years, "there'll a
man there saying 'nyet' when he
arrives."
The House committee only last
week released a series of state statements
ments statements by space experts predicting
that with enough money and ef
fort an American could reach the
moon within a decade.
The experts included Dr. Herb Herbert
ert Herbert York, chief scientist for the
Pentagon's advanced reserach pro projects
jects projects agency.
Glennan said he had "no hesi hesitancy
tancy hesitancy in predicting we will close
Heiahts and 85 and 77 degrees at
Cristobal. The highest and lowest
temperatures on record are 95 and
64 degrees on the Pacific side and
90 and 69 degrees on -the Atlantic
side.
Humidity: The average relative
humidity will be about 76 per cent
at Balboa Heights, 78 per cent at
Cristobal, and 77 per cent at Mad Madden
den Madden Dam.
Clouds and sunshine: The sky
will be partly cloudy during most
of the day time and mostly clear
at night. There will be an aver average
age average of about 8 hours of sunshine
daily or 70 per cent of the amount
possible.
Fogs: Nighttime and early morn morning
ing morning fogs may be expected occa occasionally
sionally occasionally over the Gaillard Cut sec section
tion section of the Canal and the central
section of the Isthmus along the
Trans-Isthmian Highway but none
sre likely to -occur at either of
the Canal entrances. Most of the
fogs form around midnight and
may be expected to dissipate be before
fore before 8:30 a.m.
Winds: Fresh northerly trade
winds usually prevail with an av average
erage average velocity of about 15 miles
per hour along the Atlantic Coast
and about 10 miles per hour along
the Pacific Coast.
The maximum velocity for a 5 5-minute
minute 5-minute period is not likely to ex exceed
ceed exceed 35 miles per hour but inten intensified
sified intensified trade winds may average
about 20 miles per hour for 24
hours at a time along the Atlantic
Coast and cause mclerately rough
seas.
Labor Statistics
Chief Sees No
Unemployment Dro
WASHINGTON (UPI) Ewan
Clague, commissioner of labor
statistics, predicts that unemploy unemployment
ment unemployment will not drop back to its
pre-recesslon level until the end
of this year.
Clague also predicted Sunday
there would be a "substantial in increase"
crease" increase" In personal Income in
1959. He said lower prices for
meat, especially, pork, and pos possibly
sibly possibly lower prices for fruits and
vegetables might hold the cost of
living steady.
Addressing the convention of the
Potato CIip Institute, the commis commissioner
sioner commissioner said, 'employment will
continue to gain as business re recovery
covery recovery proceeds but. . unem unemployment
ployment unemployment will not be reduced to
prosperity levels until the end of
the year."

A -m,- mmmm mm
111. 1 V- w 1
s t T ,!ir 1 h if 1 1
y .ft I? v a,
ft I fl

BUT WE DIDN'T VOLUNTEER! Air. Force captains William
Bradbury, above, left, of Houston, Tex., and Tom Bogan, right,
of Goodland Ind., have been notified that they are among tin
110 candidates for the first U.S. manned space flight. Station Stationed
ed Stationed In Alaska, the officers were bewildered by their selection.
They didn't apply for the aslgnment, they said.

the gap" In the overall race into
space against Russia. But under
repeated questions he declined to
say when.
He said merely pouring more
money into the U.S. progrr.m
would not appreciably speed 'I up
,but only give greater guar J lees
of success.
As the House committee be ran
trying to determine where
United States stood in he space
race, President Eisenhower told
Congress in his first annual space
report that "a beginning has been
made of which we may well be
proud. But we cautioned that
"We are. ..only just over the
threshold.'
He expressed confidence the na nation
tion nation "has the knowledge, the will

Make a practical valentine gift
WALL TO WALL

f4
i&dsMktMJL.

Also just arrived
fabulous
GENUINE CHINESE RUGS
MAILYN KWANLIN
TAPE I TUNCSHAN
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Vse our Easy
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'YOU CAN WIN IN OUR
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and the skill t0 move ahead
swiftly and surely1' in space technology."

The President s comment are
contained in a 53-page annual re report
port report required by the National Ae Aeronautics
ronautics Aeronautics and Space Act.
Much of the report was devot devoted
ed devoted to formation last October of the
space sgency now headed by
Glennan.
Glennan gave this resume of
U.S. space plans for the immuui immuui-ate
ate immuui-ate future:
Hurl a 10-ton space craft into
orbit around the earth by 1962.
Fire a two-ton space crai.
'into deep space far beyond the
moon" by the same year.
Orbit a 75-ton space craft a a-round
round a-round the earth by 1965.
at the size,
color and
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most wants!
COTTON
DYLON
SISAL
Extended Terms
Glome cJurmshing
H St. Tel. 2-0725
FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE"
3J
A

r r 1



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, EBRCARY 459':
Carta Vieja-Marlboro In Pinal
i;oni

PAGE SET

Ifletpg

Yankees, Smokers Score
Bargain Bill Triumphs

The Carta Vieja Yankees, who trounced the
Kings 9-5 last night to nail down third place in the
Panama Pro League standings, play the second place
Marlboro Smokers tonight for the last time this sea

son.
In 11 meetings the Smokers hold
a 7-4 margin. Ace lefty Boh Milo,
the owner of a 7-3 record, will face
the Yankees' John Anderson (2-6).
Tonight's will be the last ap appearance
pearance appearance of the season for Marl Marlboro.
boro. Marlboro. Tomorro wnight Cerveza Balboa
meets Carta Vio.ia and the season
winds up Thursdav niaht with a
game between Cerveza Balboa and
the Kings.
In the first game of yesterday s
doubleheader righthander Leonar Leonardo
do Leonardo Ferguson tossed a four hitter
for his third win against no de defeats
feats defeats as the Smokers edged Cer Cerveza
veza Cerveza Balboa, and lefty Pat Scan Scan-tlebury
tlebury Scan-tlebury 2-1. Scantlebury has a 2-7
record.
Homers In the fourth and sixth
frames by Bill Gabler and Geo.
Altman accounted for the Smok Smokers'
ers' Smokers' two tallies. Two errors on
one play by second baseman A A-lonso
lonso A-lonso Brathwaite in the seventh
TROPICAL
0.60 TODAY! 0.40
GREAT FORTUNE NIGHT!
$150.00
Be One of The Lucky Winners
of These Cash Prizes!
1st Prize $100.00
2nd
3rd
4th
25.00
15.00
10.00
1
THE FORTUNE NIGHT
PLAYS AT 9:00 P.M.
On the Screen:
SENSATIONAL DOUBLE!
Cornel Wilde
Jean Wallace, In
"MARACAIBO"
In Technicolor
Dana Andrews
Ljtnda Darnell, In
"ZERO HOUR"
DRIVES
IN

EVERYONE

VAU KHALI
CLEARANCE SALE
Fifteen 1958 VICTOR SUPER 4
Door Sedans must be sold this
week to make way for
1959 MODELS
now on display

PANAMA
T0DAY
CAPITOLIO
5.25 fl.15
BANK 125.00
"RAILS INTO
LARAMIE"
John Payne
"THE LAWLESS
BREED"
Roclc Hudson

o'

a bobble and a bad throw set
the stage for in unearned run,
the only tally scored off Fergu
son
Ferguson struck out eight bat batters
ters batters and walked only one, while
Scantlebury, who ajlowed six hits,
fanned seven and walked two.
Hector Lopez dropped to 13
points behind batting leader Les
Peden as the Cerveza Balboa in in-fieldpr
fieldpr in-fieldpr had one hit in four trips to
the plate to make his average .383
The Kings catcher, whose BA is
39t3. has not appeared in a game
since his- team sewed up the pen pennant
nant pennant with a 5-4 win over the Smok Smokers
ers Smokers last Friday night.
In the afterpiece southpaw Bill
Proul and his mates pounded
starter and loser Bud Black and
reliever Stan Arthur for a total of
lfi hits as Prout breezed to his
fifth triumph in eight decisions.
Black suffered his third setback
as eomoared to four victories.
Bill Kern blasted a two-run
roundtripper for the Yankees in
the fifth inning and Teofilo Peter Peter-kin
kin Peter-kin smacked one with none on in
the ninth.1
Prout himself had two safeties,
drove in one run and scored one.
Paginjr Carlos Thorne
Gil Morland, Cristobal man manager
ager manager of C. B. Fenton and Co.,
would like to get in touch with
baseball player Carlos Thorne as
soon as possible.
He has a contract for Thorne
from the, Houston Buffs of the
Texas League at his office.
Sports Briefs
NBC GRANTS CHARTER
WICHITA, Kan. (UPI) The
National Baseball Congress an
nounced today that the Greater
Long Island Umpire Association of
New York has been issued a
'charter in its 1959 National Asso Association
ciation Association of Umpires. Sam Susser
of Flushing, N.Y., is president of
the Long Island group.
BETTER

COLON

oti2esJ0DAY

T IVOLI
0.35 0.20
Italian Picture
"EL ESPADACIIIN
MISTERIOSO"
Also
"CLAMOR DE
VENGANZA"

VICTOR.! A
0.15
"SEMINOLE"
Rock Hudson
- Also
"OUTLAW'S
CAVE"
M. Carey

Sturdy Fergy

FIRST GAME
Marlboro Ab R H
Po A
Mitchell, rf 4 0 1 2
Brathwaite, 2b ...4 0 0 1
Altman, cf 4 1 1 2
Prescptt, If 3 o 1 1
Gabler, lb 4 1 1 11
Bernard, ss-3b ... 4 0 1 1
Hardaway, 3b .... 3 0 0 0
Houradau, ss . . 1 0 0 0
Cobos, c 3 0 0 9
Ferguson, p .... 3 0 1 0

Totals 33 2 6 27 8
Cerveza Balboa
Moore.c ss 4 0 0 2 1
Roberts, If 4 0 0 2 0
Parris. 3b 4 0 113
Lopez, 2b ..... 4 0 1 1 1
Osorio P.. rf .... 4 1 2 4 1
Grenald, cf 4 0 0 4 0
Kellman, c 3 0 0 8 0
Charles, lb 2 0 0 5 0
Scantlebury. p ... 3 0 0 0 0

Totals
32 1 4 27 6
Score By Innings
Marlboro 000 101 0002 6 2
C. Balboa 000 000 1001 4 1
SUMMARY Errors: Grenald,
Brathwaite 2. Runs batted in: Ga Gabler,
bler, Gabler, Altman, Charles. Earned
runs: Marlboro 2. Two base hits:
Parris, Ferguson. Home runs: Ga Gabler,
bler, Gabler, Altman. Struck out: by Fer Ferguson
guson Ferguson 8, Scantlebury 7. Base on
balls: Off Ferguson 1, Scantlebu Scantlebury
ry Scantlebury 2. Left on base: Marlboro 6;
Cerveza Balboa 5. Winning pitch pitcher:
er: pitcher: Ferguson (3-0). Losing pitch pitcher:
er: pitcher: Scantlebury (2-7). Umpires:
Thornton, Hinds, Williams. Time
of game: 1:55.
Prout's Bout
SECOND GAME
Carta Vieja Ab R H Po A
Bartirome, lb .... 4 1 1 10 0
Davalillo, 2b-ss ... 5 0 1 3 4
Wilhelm, ss 4 1 1 1 2
Thorne 1 0 0 0 0
Jacobs, 2h 10 10 0
Parsons. If B 1 3 1 0
Kern, cf 51240
Schmidt, rf 3 2 2 3 0
Shantz, c 51350
Clark, J., 3b .... 3 1 0 0 1
Prout, p 31202
Totals 40 9 16 27 9
Thorne flied out for Wilhelm in
7th.
Kings
Austin. 2b 3 1 2 2 1
Diaz, 2b 0 0 0 1 0
Green, ss 4 1 1 1 4
Henley, cf 3 0 13 0
Peterkin, cf . . 1 1 1 1 0
Hunt. If. .....50080
Osorio E:, lb .... 4 0 0 5 0
Heron, 3b 5 0 1 0 2
Gladstone, rf . . 3 1 2 3 0
Alston, c 41120
Black, p 20111
Arthur, p 10000
Totals 35 5 10 27 8
Score By Innings
Carta Vie 011 122 1109 16 2
Kings 001 010 0215 10 1
SUM M Aft Y Errors: Davalillo
2, Alston. Runs batted in: Prout.
Bartirome, Kern 2. Heron, Dava Davalillo
lillo Davalillo 2, Parsons, Shantz, Alston,
Peterkin. Two base hits: Austin,
Green, Bartirome, Schmidt,
Shantz. Three base hits: Alston.
Home runs: Kern, Peterkin. Dou Dou-bleplays:
bleplays: Dou-bleplays: Davalillo, Wilhelm, Bar Bartirome.
tirome. Bartirome. Sacrifice hits: Green,
Prout, Bartirome, Davalillo. Hit
batters: Black (Clark). Wild
pitch: Black 2, Arthur. Passed
ball: Alston. Struck out: bv Black
2. Prout 4. Base on balls: Off
Black 6. Prout 3. Left on base:
Carta Vieia 13, Kings 9. Pitchers
record: Black 8 runs, 12 hits in fi
13 innings. Earned runs: Carla
Vieja 8. Kings 3. Winning pitcher:
Prout (5-3). Losing Ditcher: Black
(4-3). Umpires: Hilzinger, Corri Corri-gan,
gan, Corri-gan, Harrelson. Attendance: 361.
Tim cf game: J 34.
f wrao"--
fODAY EfJCAfiTO .25 -.15
WAHOO! 125.00
Frank Sutton. In
FOUR BOYS AND A GUN"
Susan CumminES, In
"TOMAHAWK TRAIL"
DRIVE-IN
A JtSJfT COMEDY!
it Kay.
Cwrt Ju-gwns, in
'ME AND THE COLONEL'
TOMORROW"
POPULAR NIGHT I
$1.10 PER CAR!
Richard Conte, In
"THE RAIDERS"
In TECHNICOLOR!
RIO
0.35
0.20
FAT
SACK
Jerry Lewis
- Also: -RUN
FOR
COVER
James Cagney

: '"
fiffrfliMlii "JImnMiiitfiHfliwriMmiiinMiiiiin'""a mr miJ tmmmj) mmiiMinniiiiiniinnH'-"--nniiin

GAMBOA MERMAIDS Gamboa's bid in the highly contested 13 and 14-year-old girls med medley
ley medley relay and free style events. The medly relay in this age group for girls should prove to
be one of the highlights of the 7th annual Gamboa Civic Council Swim Meet Sunday, March
1. (Left to right) Jane Hearne, Nancy Morency, Edna Glass, Brenda Rogers and Grace Figueroa.

CHS Takes Atlantic Twiloop
1st Half Lead With 10-7 Win

HOOFBEATS
By Conrado Sargeant

TVio anriinn nf Argentine two-
year-old thoroughbred colts and
fillies originally scheduled for this
afternoon has been postponed un until
til until a later date, it was announced
yesterday.
The reason is mai me iracn.
management plans to make one
hit unrtinn whpn another croup of
Argentine racers arrive. As soon
as the final group or two-year-oius
;o iho npu7 ftatn for the auc
tion will be announced by track
manager Pablo A. 'lhayer.
ouo
a ttoi nf 11K 873 was bet over
the weekend on the races at the
President Remon racetracK. Sat Saturday's
urday's Saturday's total was $55,547 while on
Sunday $61,226 were pusnea
through the tote machines.
Tim nmnlint wa eered includes
off-track betting in Panama City
and Colon.
0O0
i,,;iwmn Pivpra and Herastico
n;i(,r termor! ihe list of susoended
iockeys over the weekend with 12
meters each when both were set
down for almost identical infrac infractions
tions infractions last Saturday
Rivera, who lost his whip dur during
ing during the tenth race while riding
mutuels favorite Kadir. was
penalized tor grabbing Braulio
Baeia's leq in the homestretch
while the latter drew alongside
with Charieleia. Rivera let go
when Baeia raised his whip men menacingly
acingly menacingly in front of his face.
With only a few yards to go
Baeia hustled his mount and
won by a half length.
Pitty similarly attempted to get
an arm lock around Ricardo Pres Pres-tan's
tan's Pres-tan's leg while riding Tinela in
Saturday's nightcap. Prestan won
the race in a photo over Alhajar
while guiding Escardillo.
Apprentice riders O. Ospino and
ivi n,imor wpre eiven three
months to acquire more experience
in riding race horses. Both were
ruled incompetent by the stewards
after their performances over the
weekend. L
Guillcrmo MUorn goi
for changing his course while rid-
Service Center Theatres
TONIGHT
BALBOA 6:15 & 7:55
Boris Karloff, Jean Kent
"THE HAUNTED
STRANGLER"
COCO SOLO 7:00
John Smith Fay Spain
"THE CROOKED CIRCLE"
DIABLO HTS. 7:00
Gene Kelly
Debbie Reynolds
"SINGING IN THE RAIN"
(Repeat Run)
r. a mho 4 7:00
Frank Lovejoy Barbara Hale
THE COHMlti imsBflnu
GATUN 7:00
Mala Powers James Best
"MAN ON THE PROWL"
lumntRlTt 7:00
Ginger Rogers Barry Nelson
THIS final innviiinu
SALESLADY"
In SuperScope & Color!
(Repeat Run)
PARAISO
MOVIES CANCELED
Graduation Exercises
SANTA CRUZ 7:00
"QUANTRILL'S RAIDERS"
and
"nOLD THAT LINE"
CAMP BIERD
MOVIES CANCELED
Graduation Exercises

ing Joyero without having enough

margin in which to do so. His
maneuver caused Dona Linda to
get crossed and suffer a cut on
the right foreleg.
Jockey Jose Talavera netted a
$5 fine for dropping his whip while
riding Mellizo in Saturday's fifth
race.
Chivilingo and Domitila were
suspended for eight meets for their
poor performances.
Colifato, which was found to be
lame after his weak effort, was
suspended for two weeks.
oOo
The Panama American won
the tipsters' contest for the montf
of January with a total of 307
pojnts with The Panama Trib Tribune's
une's Tribune's Luis Romer the runnerup
with 291. Alberto Montilla, who
makes the selections for the
weekly Spanish language news newspaper
paper newspaper "Ya," wound up third
with 289.
The Panama American is also
leading the tri-monthly contest
with 48 winners as compared to 45
each for Ya and El Pais and t2
for The Panama Tribune.
oOo
"King" Carl Rennert's classy
Irish colt Bright Spur returned to
the races in vastly improved form
and won a thriller by a neck over
the consistent Vergniaux.
Bright Spur may yet become the
first flight performer that many
knowing horsemen predicted that
he would be after he reeled off
three victories in a row before los losing
ing losing form and going sour.
oOo
As usual, Baeza was the win win-ningest
ningest win-ningest rider over the weekend
with five victories. Alejandro
Ycaza was next with four while
Bias Aguirre, Felix Sanchez, A A-mado
mado A-mado Credidio and Guillermo
Sanchez won two each.
Jose (Tito) Sitton was the "owner-trainer
of the week" with two
triumphs in only two tries. His
Nebrisca and Coltro both scored
impressively.
Kobbe Widens
PAF Baseball
League Lead
The Fort Kobbe Regulars in increased
creased increased their PAF league-lead to
one full game 0"er the Fort Clay Clayton
ton Clayton Cavaliers this weekend by
taking close two-run decisions from
the Amador Troopers and the
Army Atlantic Falcons.
The Regulars, playing at home,
had to come from behind for the
second time in a row on Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, to defeat the Falcons 5-3.
The Kobbf team has had its trou troubles
bles troubles in the pst week with the A-
mador Troopers and again on
Saturday against the Falcons.
The Regulars opened scoring in
the first frame with a lone tally
on three singles and a Falcon er error.
ror. error. In the top of the second, the
Falcons struck for a lone score
on two singles and a sacrifice.
They increased the lead tot 3-1
in the third as Bob Stallsworth
led off win a single. He stole
second and went to third on a
balk by the Kobbe hurler. He
then scored on another balk. Alt Alter
er Alter a fly out, a walk and a single,
an error accounted for the other
two runs.
In the sixth, the Regulars tied
the score on three consecutive
singles and a steal of home. In
the seventh, they increased the
lead to 5-3 after two were out on
Cal Edghill's single, another sin
gle, a walk and a misjudged pop
fly single behind first base. The

Standings
Atlantic Twilight Baseball
Teams W L Pet.
Cristobal High 3 1 .750
Powells 4 2 .607
Bells 2 3 .400
Alumni 1 4 .200
Sunday's Results
Cristobal High 10 Powells
Thursday s Cam
Bells vs C.H.S.
By TREVOR SIMONS
Cristobal High swept into first
place and became a def.nite
threat for the first half champion championship
ship championship in the Atlantic Twilight
League when they toppled Powells
by a 10 to 7 count in a hectic Sun Sunday
day Sunday afternoon of baseball at
Mount Hope Stadium'.
Brian Lutz, making his first
Twi-Loop appearance for 1959, ef effectively
fectively effectively spread out 6 Powells
hits in all but the second inning.

In that frame; the Tiger pitcher
lost his control and gave up four
successive walks .and three of the
S!X Powells hits for a big 6 'run
inning that temporarily put" the
defending champs in front.
Harry Dockery, who tamed the
Tigers with- a 7-hit performance
on January 18th, was greeted like
a long lost cousin. Dockery lasted
only three innings, giving up 7
hits and all ten runs to even his
season record at 1 and 1. ehris
Haas finished the game for Po
wells and completely halted the
Tiger assault, limiting the winners
for only hits and no runs in the
last four innings.
The Powells fielders contributed
generously to the Cristobal win
with a record 10 errors, three by
the usually dependable Louis De De-deaux
deaux De-deaux who was as eratic as the
game. Dedeaux turned in two of
the most amazing catches of the
season going far back in the fourth
and fifth frames Ijo rob Donahue
and Cotton of what appeared to be be-sure
sure be-sure "texas leaguers".
J.m Will was the big stick for
the Cristobal High 10-hit attack
with 4 for 4, all singles, Harry
Dockery had 2 for 3 to pace Po Powells.
wells. Powells. CHS vs BELLS IN FIRST
HALF FINALE THURSDAY
As this story went to press the
results of Monday night s game
between Cristobal High and Alum Alumni
ni Alumni had not yet been reported, but
with Powells now having complet
ed all their games of the first half
Crisobal High has only to defeat
Alumni and Bells to be first half
champs.
Cristobal High has a 12 to 5 win
over Bells in their previous en
counter on January 12th. but Sun
day's results prove that previous
records have no bearing on the
outcome of any baseball cime.
Thursday night these two teams
meet once again in what should
be the final of the first half.
Score by Innings
Cristobal H. 1 4 5 0 0 0 010 1 4
Powells 0 6 0 1 0 0 07 6 10
Falcons were unable to tie the
score in their remaining two op opportunities
portunities opportunities at the plate and the
sco-e remained 5-3.
Sunday, .the Regulars came
from behind once again, against
he Amador Troopers. Behind 6-1
in the fifth inning, thev came
storming back with two runs in
the sixth and five more in .the
eighth to take a close 8-6 deci decision.
sion. decision. The Troopers left 14 men
on hase as thpv hH oavpii !iit2
and committed four errors. The
Regulars had six hits and also
had four trrorv
In the Saturday game between
the Regulars and the Falcons
irom Army Auanuc, a inpie piay
was executed as well as two dou double
ble double plays. It was the first triple
play this season.
SWEEPS WOMEN'S EVENTS
ORANGE, N.J. (UPD Cariu
Cone of Ridgewood, N.J., swept
all three women's events for the
second straight year in Saturday
night's Metcalf Memorial swin
meet. Miss Cone, national back
stroke, champion, won the 100
yard backstroke, 100 yard butter
fly and 100-yard free style.

Editor:. CONRADQ SARGEANT

'I 1 I I, jj ' l' '' '. lay" V

PANAMA PROFFSSinNAI I CAr.iie

- xwivrimi L.L.nLUUii r .f
Teams K M CV CB W L Pel." dfh
Mngs ...,i...,x 8 6 9 23 12 .6$7 J
Marlboro 4 x 7 8 19 16 .543 4
Carta Vieja ...,6 4 x 5 15 1 9 .441 71 :
Cerveza Balboa 2 4 6 x 12 22 .333 1oJ

Totals ....12 16 19 22 69 69
TONIGHT'S GAiWE v
At Olympic Stadium: Marlboro (Milo 7-3) vs.
Carta Vieja (Anderson 2-6)
Came time: 7:30
. LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS (2)
(At Olympic Stadium)
First game: Marlboro 2, Cerveia' Balboa 1
Second game: Carta Vieja 9, Kings 5

WIBC BOWLING TOURNAMENT
At the second annual meeting
Oi the Panama Women's Bowling
Association, held at the Margari
ta Clubhouse, on Sunday, Jan. 18,
it was decided by majority vote
that the 18th Annual W o m e n's
Bowling Tournament would be
held at the Diablo Bowling al alleys
leys alleys on the Pacific side of the
Isthmus.
The Panama Canal Zone Wom
en's Bowling Tournament will be
held on Friday, Saturday, and
Sunday, Feb. 20, 21 and 22 at
the- Diablo Bowling Alleys.
After figuring the cost of the
tournament, silver awards, etc.,
:t was found that the originally
planned entry fee of $3 per event
would not cover the cost. There
fore it. will be necessary to raise
the entry tee per event to $3.50.
' Closma date for snterine the
'tournament is1 Feb. 13. Air appli1
cations accompanied by the en entry
try entry fee must be received by the
Tournament Chairman no later
than the above date.
For further information and sub submission
mission submission of entries contact the
Tournament Chairman, Mrs. Reg Reg-g'e
g'e Reg-g'e Schmidt, PO Box 458, Canal
tome or contact her by phone at
baiboa 2-3019.
Application forms are being pre prepared
pared prepared and will be available in a
"ew days.
MARGARITA
BOWLING LEAGUE
Fourth Week
The Schriiiers continued their
drive for the championship as
cney iook me second place Aces
for three points to hold a two
point lead. Carpenter led the Fez
Men with a 477 as Gorsk: led
the Aces with a 519.
A split with Wright Bros ena
bled the Naval Station to move
into second place. Strong led the
Naval Station with a 481 while
the best the Plumbers could pro produce
duce produce was a 474 by Bartram.
BHS, JC Inlersauad
Track Meet Set For
Tomorrow Evening
Two evenly matched teams
made up from a combination of
BHS and JC cindermen will be
showing what they can do this
Wednesday afternoon at Balboa
Stadium.
This will be the first outing for
the JC entr es but it i anticipated
that they will come up with some
winning performances. The BHS
boys have the advantage of more
practice behind them as well as
the competition of last week's in in-terstjuad
terstjuad in-terstjuad meet.
The mile event should show Abel
Lagssie of BHS going under 5:00
in the mile. WJth determinatiori,
one of the 440 entr'es should get
in the low fifties. A good jump by
Solly Tousieh or Doug Pajak in
the broad jump event could
stretch the tape out to 21 ft.
In the weights, Bill Gibson is ex expected
pected expected to take the discus if his
knee has mended sufficiently from
a recent football injury. George
Trimble has been working with
the heavy ball and is likely to pick
up 5 points in this event.
Lloyd Brown has been practic practicing
ing practicing diligently on the pt,le vault,
nml it he can iron out his from
during the next few practice ses
s ons he could go above 10 ft.
This meet will be the flnal com com-pe
pe com-pe itive warm up for the Pacific
.side boys before the first triangU"
Jar intersholastic meet of the sea sea-I
I sea-I son on Feb. 28 at Balboa Stadium
stargln at 7:00 p.m.

Using a blind for
cost the Gillette two losses to the
Cristobal Police, plus total pin pin-fall.
fall. pin-fall. Corro led the Shavers : wiih
a 499 while Guest topped the
uys wim a ode.
Powells gained a little ground
with a thrpp nnint win u
. ------ .r v uie
Voice of Music. So far the V-M
nas won tnree points. At this
rate they might have 12 po nts
by the end of the half. Hogan led
Powells with a 559 with St. John
icauuig me v-m with a 524.
STANDINGS
Teams
Shriners
Naval Station
Cristobal Police
Aces
Powells
Gillette
W L
12 4
10 6
9 7
9 7
8 8
8 8
6 !0
3 13
Wneht Rrns
Voice of, Music
r -. ; -; si
'2 High for the Week
Class A "Hogan
Class B DeVnli.rnr
559
499
470
wass l
O'Neal
wv. i u
Shriner
Specht
Millspangh
Badders
Judge
Carpenter
Totals
151 148 140 437
13 149 138 420
153 141 154 448
145 152 150 447
155 203 114 447
737 796 696 "?29
34 34 34 102
71 830 730 231
Aces
' HO 117 151 414
118 163 141 422
137 163 159 459
170 164 184 519
129 169 145 44
Hogan (Sub)
iv.oorman
Stilson
Gorski
Spiiiney
'Totals
TUO 776 781 22.)-
Wright Bros.
147 153 169 469
155 137 133 425
141 119 132 392
138 158 164 460
182 134 158 474'
763 701 756 2220
Naval Station
137 130 122 319
125 125 125 373
138 146 154 438
167 168 135 470
138 174 169 m
.ones
Butz
Dcugan
Janssen
Bartram
Totals
Lew's
fBlind)
Thomas
O'Neal
Strong
70S 7ns i.-,
33 33 35 9"'
738 776 738 2252
Gillette
Fernandez 138 139 160 437
Corro 191 158 150 4
Chuljak 158 153 138 6.
H. Tom 139 146 1J
(Blind) 144 144
Yee 154 IV
Totals
770 740 .70 2S
45 45 45 ISA
815 785 815 2415
Cristobal Police
Fertaar 147 173 181. 4M
Tully 129 153 140 42J
Guest 190 179 167 Wfi
Martin 165 170 188 525
Stewart 185 150 136 471
Totals
816 825 792 2433
Voice of Music
DeVoI 139 216 144 49
(Blind) 135 135 135 405
Graham 159 169 141 469
Johnson 191 151 144 m
St. John 191 165 168 524
Totals
760 836 732 2328
22 22 22 66
782 5C 3304
Powells .
182 166 137 48.1
151 143 140 J34
139 174 181 494
188 165 156 509
183 198 178. ,55
145 846 T92 21
Badger
Gibson
Stepp
Brown
Hogan
' Totals

i
is
IC!
V!
;.r!



TUESDAY, FEBRHART S 5

TRS PANAMA AMERICAN AN .INDEPENDENT DAILf NEWSPAPER
PAGE SITKN
Golf Tournament
ariama

Open

Mimfimts -MP it

Y I '
f If
innmiii inMri mm tn-tr'-n-jnn im i iniim'iriiifiinitrB'--':"iY-STf--rirnriTtr-'nr-",V--ir'''rr' "r-rri-rinriioiwiiiiiVf

AMATEUR WINNER Dr. Herb Mitten, who led the amateurs
with a 293 soore, beams as he receives a set of silverware do do-Bated
Bated do-Bated by Pan-American Airways from beautiful PAA steward stewardess
ess stewardess Mary Adams of New York who was on her first trip to
Panama. Master of ceremonies Pico Diaz announces the pre pre-sentatlon.
sentatlon. pre-sentatlon.
Victor Hostin Leads
Amateur Batting Race

By LLOYD BBRTO JOSEPH
Victor Hostin of Joyeria Nueva
York has combined nine bingles
in 23 trios to the plate a

lofty .391 avert g.e and the lead

in the Provincial Amateur League
bitting race. Hostin, who so far
this season barifr ilnglesliso
leads in. runs batted in with ten.:
Colusa's snappy short-stop, Se Segundo
gundo Segundo Padilla has 13 hits in 34
at bats to rank a close second k
the batting race with a .383 mark,
but b holds the lead in most
timai at haU 34 moat hits, 13;
and tied for most runs scored,
10 with Carlos rSosa of Joyeria
Nueva York.
Good field, no bit, Alejandro
Bovelle, considered one of the
but Amateur flychasheri in the
country, tops the league in dou double
ble double three, while hitting at an
remon, who has stolen
home twice this year, is at the
iesd of the base robbers with
nine thefts. The dubious honor of
whiffing the most times, nine,
goes to Cigarrillos Panama's Raul
Jarvis while Domingo Fernandez
of the Jewelers has the same
number of free, passes to top that
department.

Ab R H rbi Ave.

Victor Hostin 23 7 9 10

S. Padilla 34 10 13 7

Anibal Molina
Enrique Perez
R. Rodriguez
Antonio Ramboa
Carlos -Sosa
Carlos John
A. Peterkln
A. Bovelle
Jose Remon
A. Zeballos
A. Castillo

Most Hits: Segundo Padilla,
Coinsa 13.

23 7 9
34 10 13
24 5 9
25 5 9
30 8 10
24 5 8

28 10 9
25 8 8

4 7
7 9

9 10
5 7

3 ?

22
30

35
25

25

,391

.383
.375
.360
.333
.333
.324
.320
.318
.300
.286

.280
.280

Most runs
dilla, Coinsa
Nueva York,

f cored: Segundo Pa Pa-and
and Pa-and Carlos Soa, Joy.
10 each.

Most Runs batted in: Victor
Hostin. Joy. Nueva York, 10
Most Doubles: Alejandro Bo Bovelle,
velle, Bovelle, Centinelas del Tuira, 3..
Most Triples: five players tied
with two each.

Most homeruna: Five players

tied, 1 each.
Most stolen bases: Joe A. Re
mon, Coinsa, 9.

Most bases on ball: Domingo

Fernandez, Joy. Nueva York 9.
Most strike-outs: Raul Jarvis,
Cigarrillos Panama 9.

$aoptpas,A

mi ?,

By

flail
ehi

OSCAR FRALEY

1KEW YORK (UPD-Yes, Vir-

a, there is a heavyweight

mpipn of the world.

All rumored, his name is Floyd
Patteraon. And he came out of
iimbo Thursday to sign for a title
defense ""sometime before Sep September
tember September at a site yet unselected,"
against an Irish-looking heavy heavyweight
weight heavyweight from Sweden named Inge Inge-mar
mar Inge-mar Johansson.
It was a scene reminiscent of
6a stock exchange that wild, fa fa-l
l fa-l afternoon in 1929 when the
bottom, fell out of everything and
people began jumping off the top.
Only this was a day for fat fig figures.
ures. figures. Nobody seemed concerned
with whether either party con concerned
cerned concerned could fight. All they want wanted
ed wanted to know was which city offered
the biggest stadium, how much
the fiehtera were guaranteed,

would it be televised and for how

much and whether ll would draw

than one million 1 dollars.

lltHe T ay
It wasn't until it was all over,

and the two principals were
standing limply Hide by tide near

the wreckage of a smorgasbord

table, -that somebody asked how

the two 'gladiators, expected to

do Inside the ring. ...
"I expect to win," said Johan
ison..,,. ;.

Patterson regarded him calmly

from under raised eyebrows and

interjected; .... -,r

"Me, too."

Beyond that tney would not go

ana tnere were tnose who pined
for the loquacious type sucn as
Tony Galento who would have

proclaimed:
"I'll moider the bum."
Patterson, you possibly may re
member, is the 24-year-old cham

pion who was last seen in August
against a hand picked patsy
named Roy Harris. Before that

he labored against one Pete Rade

macher. and the less said about

that, the better. He has won 34

of 35 "fights."
Resent!.: Trty Krennan
Ineemar. a 26-vear-old Swede.

is a fly fisherman, sports car and
golf addictf one-time poet, flyer,

ex-sireet worker, successful con

tractor and, between times,
heavyweight champion of Europe.
Facially he resembles former No-

tre; Dame football coach Torry

jtrennan

Nobody, it seemed, has had the

privilege of eyinc him in action

But he has won all 21 of his pro
bouts, 12 by knockout, and rumor
has it that his right hand Is dev

astating. He jumped up front by
knocking out Eddie Machen

in one round and -he-won t ever,

ever fight again until he climbs

through the ropes against Patter
son. This ia a contractual pre precaution
caution precaution to preclude the possibility
of having bis lustre knocked off.

By TED W1LBER V
Pete Cooper's winning of the
1959 $10,000 Panama Invitational
Open Golf Championship, played
at the Panama Golf Club from
Jan. 29 through Feb. 1, comes as
n osurprise after an analysis of his
play.
His four rounds, totalling 274.

were composed of under-par fig figures
ures figures in each case His first round
of 69 was a 3-undcr-par 35-34; his
second of 64 an 8-under-par 33-31;
hisr third round of 70 a 2-under par
35-35, and his final round of 71 a
1-under-par .35-36.
Pete Cooper's golf story is that
of a little boy who decided to make
good, as the record shows. A long
time ago, be was riding past the
Miami Country Club, where he
chanced to see Gene Sarazen play
ing. Sarazen went on to win, and
Pete decided to some day accom accomplish
plish accomplish the feat. Fourteen years lat

er, he did.
Since then1 Cooper, who aopren

ticed himself as a golf caddy for
eight years before playing, and
winning,1 almost every Florida golf
as an amateur, has continued to

clean un- the Florida scene each
year.

Cooper, is recognized as one of

the longest hitters off the tee,
though somewhat unsung in the
present day of Bayer, Hervey, Sou Sou-chak,
chak, Sou-chak, and others, but anyone
watching him on the last day, in
company with Bob Watson and
Roberto de Vicenzo, would have

seen a finer exhibition of not only

sheer power, but accuracy as well.

He constantly outdrove the mighty
de Vicenzo, who carries a reputa reputation
tion reputation as a long ball hitter, arid on
No. 3, listed as 497 yards, he hit
the green-five feet from the nin

with his second shot, an uphill'

brassie about 245 yards in length
As a comparison, neither Watson

or de Vicenzo landed on the gren

on their second shots.

Don January of Plainview, Tex Texas
as Texas (playing out of Denver), is an another
other another of the 'returnees' who
mad good after his first at attempt.
tempt. attempt. January on of the best best-known
known best-known and best liked of the
younger group of professionals,
is a tremendous competitor, and
appears to be one who might well
wind up in the top five In the
country in the nxt: few years.
In the close race for the Pana

ma Upen title and the Seagram

Cup award, Don also shot four
sub-par rounds, the first being a

36-33-69, tied with Cooper, the sec second
ond second being an exceptional 33-34-67,

under par. eclipsed only by

Cooper's 33-31-64 the same day.
His third round was a good 1-under-par
71, scored with a 36-35,

and his final round a splendid 2:
under-par 35-35-70, where he picki
ed up one shot on the Lakeland

artist. Considering that January
tied with Cooper the first day with
69, lost a stroke with a 71 to Coop

er's 70 the third day. and gained

a stroke with a 70, to Cooper's 7J

the una lday, it was Cooper s sen sensational
sational sensational 8-under par 64 the second

day that kept January from the

title.
Don's 67 the second day was nor normally
mally normally good enough to slip him in into
to into the first spot, but it takes a
mighty good man to shoot an 8-under-par
64 at the Panama curse
any day, professional or no, and
to catch such a scorer is extreme extremely
ly extremely difficult.
January expressed the hope, as
did many others, that he would be
able to return. He and Ernie
Vossler explained, however, that
with the big tourneys on the west
coast of the United States during
January, including the Bin? Cros Crosby,
by, Crosby, the Thunderbird, the Tia Jua Jua-na,
na, Jua-na, and the Las Vegas Opens.'that
sponsors of the tournaments were

loath to sien waivers permitting
the 'box office stars to go out of
the United States at the same
time.

Bob Watson, the winner of the

1958 Panama Invitational Open
and co-holder of the Panama
course record for 72-holes at 271

with Slammin' Sammy Snead,

threatened early the first day when

he fired a mighty strong 35-32-67

to lead the pack of 37 profession

als in defense of his title. His suc succeeding
ceeding succeeding rounds of 38-33-71; 35-36-

71, and 36-34-70 still gave him a

total of 277, 11 shots under par for
the Panama course, but in the face

of the performance of Cooper and

Ijahuary, it was not enough.

Bob, playing out of th Ards-ly-on-Hudton
Country Club,
bout 40 mile north of Nw York
City, has xprssd a strong da da-sir
sir da-sir to return to' Panama ntxt
yar, and in futur yars. Lik
Cooptr expressed It, h'd lik to
llv her too, som day. ("De ("Depending
pending ("Depending en what my wife says,"
h said, as an asld).
Watson first came to Panama

three years ago sponsored by the

Macneteros' of tne Panama Golf

Club. He came in somewhere near
the end of the list. When he came
back in 1958, fired up his boilers
and steamed around the Panama
course in four sensational subpar
rounds of 68-66-71-66-271 to tie the
course record set In 1954 by Sam

Snead, he established himself as a

player of first-line caliber. This.

with the easy dignity that Bob ex

presses so vividly, has made him
one of the most popular of the
visiting professionals, and the

spectators. As one of the pros ex expressed
pressed expressed it: "Bob Watson has a dig dignity
nity dignity that makes him endeared to
all of us. He has a fine personali personality,
ty, personality, is easy to get along with on or
off the course, and, most of all,
personifies a gentleman." As a
tribute to a fellow player, no more
could be said.
Perhaps the greatest player in
the tournament, though not the
1959 winner, was Dow Flnsterwald,
who attended by special Invitation.
Dow was the 1958 PGA Champion,
and at 29 years of age, the young youngest
est youngest player to ever win the title of
''Professional Golfer of the'Year,"
a title bestowed annually by the
professionals themselves. Finster Finster-wald
wald Finster-wald was feted at the Waldorf As-

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i

3
srf

WINNER'S AWARD President Ernesto de la Guardia Jr. .presents 1959 Panama Open cham champion
pion champion Pete Cooper with a check for $2000' as the winner's share of the $10,000 prize money of offered.
fered. offered. Looking on are Esso Standard Oil (Panama, branch) general manager Clpriano Paz
Rodriguez and Dick Dehlinger, president of the Panama Golf Club and organizer of the Open.

X- V if"-'.'.':; Kj
-- k
4

CONGRATULATIONS Ciprlano Paz Rodriguez (right), gen general
eral general manager of Esso Standard Oil's Panama branch which
sponsored 1959 Panama Open Golf Championship winner Pete
Cooper, congratulates the winner at the end of the gruelling
72-hole $10,000 tourney. Cooper's 274 was three strokes better
than runnerup Don January's 277.

American Legion Baseball

(Continued en Page I!

If it's Westinghouse it's got to

be good! And the westingnouse

team certainly lived up to its
sponsor's motto by soundly de defeating
feating defeating Panama Insurance 26 to

7.

The pennant bound wesungnose

have now won five in a row.

Meanwhile on the Atlantic siae
Spur Cola shut out Orange Kist

6-0 in Saturday s game piayea at
the Mount Hope Stadium.

"Chico" Martin, pitching for

Westinghouse, had an easy time
on the mound in clinching his

3rd victory. Martin, with brilliant

support from his team mates

had a nn hitter going until tne

7th, when Kiamco hit a clean sin

gle to right field, up until mat

time, only 3 msurancemen reacn reacn-ed
ed reacn-ed first bases.

Westinghouse scored in every

inning but tne etn, wnue rana-

ma Insurance collected 4 in tne

8th and 3 in the 9th. BU gun at
the plate for Westinghouse was

Allan Scott, ith 4 hits, includ

ing one oouDie, Amato, carroi,
Allen and Rogers each collected

two.
Spur Cola, In beating Orange
Kist, exploded in the 4th for 5
big iruns on bu' two hits. With
the single run scored in the 1st
inning, the Colamen coasted to
an easy victory. Stromberg, in
notching his second win, struck
out 12 men over the nine innings.
Of the 5 hits garnered by Spur
Cola, second baseman Damini ac accounted
counted accounted for three of them.

The box score:

Orang Kist
Sullivan, J
Matheny, 2b
Cunningham,
Corrigan, ss
Berg, 3b
Hern, lb
Dombrwsky,
Stewart, c
Roe, P
MacLean, p

cf

Ab R H
4 0 0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Totals
Spur Cola
WiU, ef
Damlanl, 2b
Belanger, lb
Weir, c
Hakanson, is

33 0 2 24 16

Ab RH O
8 10 0
4 13 2
3 0 0 10
2 i 0 0 12
6 10 1

Stromberg, p
Hilty, U
Kunkel, if
BorselLio, If
Geddes, 3b
Bowers, ri
Totals

28 6 5 27 23

Hits off: Roe, 3; MacLean, 2;
Stromberg, 2. Struck out by:
Strongerg 12, Roe 3, MacLean 2.
Bases on Balls: Stromberg 1, Roe
2, MacLean 4. Innings Pitched:
Roe 3, MacLean 6, Stromberg 9.
Erros: 3 each team.
Score by innings

Orange Kist
Spur Cola
Westinghouse
Amato, ss
Morris, c
Carroll, If
Allen, cf
Barnes, 2b
Rogers, 3b
Scott, A., lb
Spek, rf
Martin, p
Bradshaw, 2b
Price, rf
Camby, rf

000 000,000-0
100 500 0006
Ab R H CI A

2 S
1 11

0 13
3 4
1 0
0 0

Totals

44 26 14 27 20

lb

ss,

3b

Pearson,

Womble,

Bright, f
Scott, rf, 2b
Amato, c and 2b
Egan, If and c
McNatt, rf
Kiamco, c and p
Dolan 3b and If
Bright, T, p
Rager, p and cf
Forbes, ss
Totals

34 7 4 27 19

Struck out by: Martin 10, F.
Bright 2, T. Bright 4, Rager 2,
Kiamco 6. Bases on balls: Mar Martin
tin Martin 3, F. bright 6, T. Bright 4,
Rager 6, Kiamco 2. Winning
pitcher: Martin Losing pitcher:
F. Bright. Innings pitched by:
Martin 9; F. Bright 1; T. Bright
3; Kiamco 2; Rager 3. Errors:
Westinghouse 8; Panama Insur Insurance
ance Insurance 7.

Whatever
Happened to .
BURT SHOTTON
Burt Shotton, a major league

outfielder from 1909-1923, achieved
his greatest baseball fame while

wearing "civvies. When baseball

Commissioner Happy Chandler
suspended Brooklyn Manager Leo

Durocher in 1947, Shotton an

swered an emergency call from

Branch Rickey and took over the

club. His only concession in the

matter of a uniform was to wear

a Dodger blazer ana oaseDaiicap.
He won the pennant in 1947 and

'retired" again. But next mid-

season, uurocner movea to me
Giants as manager and Shotton
came back again, winning a pen pen-ant
ant pen-ant in 1949 only to be dropped in
1950 in favor of Chuck Dressen.
Shotton earlier managed the Phils
and Cincinnati.

Whatever happened to Burt

Shotton? Now 72, he is living in

another" retirement at Bartow,

Fla.

Wlii H .TVlTi

Four Roses

nnwna

Kentucky Straight Bourbon

That
old-time
flavor

is back!

MtwcKWjf wm mm ft

FOUR ROSES DISTILLERS COMPANY, N.Y.C. KENTUCKY
STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY 86 PROOF AGED 6 YEARS
EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS
CT RCA, SA

PANAMA

COLON

Read Our Classifieds

Westinghouse
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I mm Mm J
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II QMm II
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Fktt dots and tourist
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S your
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or BKANIff
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Tfopnn i-0V7
If niM HiHtn
Ukphwt, 3-1640. 3-4734
I Cfe lOffc St. I front Ay:
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UranUt ttrrt mon motor tltim to iho U.S.A. on
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xrMj

i



CLASS IF I ED A D S

AGENTS:
i si-
. t .-v :.TH1S SPACr W FOR SALE!
1 fr Oft1 INFORMATION mEPHONr0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
LEAVE TOUB AD WITH ONE Of OtlB AGENTS OB OU OFFICE AT 1J-ST "H" STREET, PANAMA UBRERIA FKECIAJDO Street Me. lt ACTENCTAS
INTERNAL. OE PUBLICACIONES Ne. I Lottery Plaza CASA EALDO Central Ave. 45 a) LOURDES PHAKMACY li La Carrasautlla FARMACLA LOM LOMBARD
BARD LOMBARD O -No. tt "B Street MORRISON 4th of July Ave. 1 St LEWIS SERVICE Ave. TtroU Ne. 4 FARMACIA ESTADOS IINUWJS 14 Central Ave.
FARMACIA LUX 1C4 Central Ave. HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. Fee. da la Oaea Ave. No. 41 FOTO DOMY luste Aioaemeaa Ave. and S3 St. ft FAR FARMACIA
MACIA FARMACIA VAN DER J 18 SU Street No. S3 ft FARMACIA EL BATURBO Panne Lefevra T Street ft FARMACIA "S AS" Via PorrM 1U ft. NOVEDADES -ATH1S
Beside the Bella Viata Theatre aad at lis Branch at the Minima Supe Market en Via Espafia at Jwa. Franco.
Fob CSewff
F on1 Sea Do
SERVICE
aneous
V

Resorts

Foster cottages, between Santa
Clara and Rio Hato. New low
ratet. Phono Balboa 1 866.
Baldwin'i furnished apartment
at Santa Blara Beach. Telephone
Smith, Gamboa 302
PHILLIPS Oeeenside Cottages
Santa Oar.
name 8-1877 Cristobal 3-1678.
Houses
FOR INT: Furnished, twa
bedroom, independent house,
with garden, tor two months. Call
San franciseo j-'
FOR RENT: FURNISHED
RESIDENCE, three bedrooms, two
bathrooms, hot water, garage,
with beautiful refrigerator, stove
and washing machine. Next to
"El Cangrejo". For informa
tion phone S-ouu.
FOR RENT: COTTAGE, 3 bed bedrooms
rooms bedrooms air conditioned, furnished,
includes Bendix washer, freeier.
Large livingroom, porch, terrace,
generous patie. Golf Height!
near tea. Separate maid's quart quartan
an quartan bohio. 3 months starting
March, 3250, telephone 4-1391,
and 4-1392.
FOR RENT: For two months,
furnished residence at Lome A A-legre.
legre. A-legre. Phone 4-' 054.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet,
with all conveniences. For three
months, from February Uth.
48th street No. -5.
Rooms
FOR RENT: Furnished room,
itove, refrigerator, double coach,
private bath and entrance. No.
3, 52nd Street. Tel. 3-0638.
FOR RENT: Nicely furnished
one room with private bath. Deli Delicious
cious Delicious meals. Call 3-1789.
US, East German
Red Cross Plan
Negotiating Talks
STUTTGART, Germany (UPI)
An American Red Cross official
will meet the president of the
East German Red Cross in Berlin
Thursday for negotiations bver a
U.S. Army pilot held prisoner by
the Communists for nine weeks,
it was Announced yesterday.
A Red Crosr spokesman said
European operation chief Robert
S. Wilson would confer with Dr.
Werner Ludwig at an unspecified
place in Berlin to discuss an East
German report that Ludwig had
said an agreement might be
reached for the release of Lt.
Richard H. Mackin, Washington,
D.C.
Mackin has been a c$ptive of
the Reds since Dec. 3 when his
liaison plane strayed over the
Iron Curtain and ran out of fuel.

lommeraa

Advertise in this section Ads only cost $25.50 per month
FOR INFORMATION CALL 2-0740

FOR SALE
FRIQETTE
AIR CONDITIONER
FOR AUTOMOBILE
$270.00
RATTAN LUX
FURNITURE
Tel. 3-1293
h iicnfcHJ All ml
EVERLASTING BATTERY
Foto International
155 Central Ave.
Corner "K" Street
1 block from Railroad
Station.
LIKES AMERICAN GIRL
TAIPEI (UPI) The new-spa
per China News noted yesterday
that the on of Deputy Soviet Pre-
pier Anastas Mikoyan told news news-pen
pen news-pen he was moat impressed by
the girls in the United States.
"There may be some hope of rc rc-aabiliting
aabiliting rc-aabiliting those Communists
t." The newspaper said.

Apartments

FOR RENT: Completely fur fur-nishew
nishew fur-nishew two bedroom apartment,
hot water, Campo Alegre, linen,
dishes. Phone 3-5024.
FOR RENT: On 48 street Bella
Vista modern two bedroom Apt.
On 46 street, Riviera Aprs.,
another twa bedroom Apt., din dining,
ing, dining, living, porch, balconias, two
bathrooms, maid's room and ga garage.
rage. garage. Call Panama 2-4696. From
8 a.m. to 12 noon.
FOR RENT : Comfortable, fur furnished,
nished, furnished, small apartment. Air Air-conditioned,
conditioned, Air-conditioned, private bathroom,
telephone, porch, in residential
area. Saul Mendex, 3-3516.
FOR RENT: Small furnished
apartment or independent room.
Beautiful residential section.
43rd Street No. 13.
FOR RENT: Furnished, one
bedroom apartment. Three bed bedroom
room bedroom chalet. 168 Via Belisario
Porras, garage.
Standing of Tea ma
Teams W L Pet
Ocelots 5 1 .833
Pericos 4 2
Macaws 4 2
Pumas 3 4
Conejos 2 4
Palomas 1 6
Yesterday's Rtsults
Pericos 5; Conejos 5.
(8 innings)
667
.667
.429
.333
.143
Today's Gam
Ocelots vs Palomas

PERICOS Ab R H
Bowen R., 2b 4 0 2
Marcum John, p 5 0 0
Ness Dick, C 4 11
S. Rodriguez, ss-lb 3 2 1
Chandler R., 3b 2 0 0
Berger Pete, cf 110
Cross R., rf 4 0 1
Rodriguez J., lb 4 1.1
Totals 30 S 8
CONEJOS Ab R H
Stwdner Cleg, 3b 110
Joyner R., If 111
Hovan Jim, rf 19 0
LAnfors Kim, 2b 4 0 1
Brandon R., ss 8 0 0
Hovan G., C 4 0 0
Dykes Jimmy, P 8 0 0
Hern B., lb 4 0 0
Hare Jeff, rf-lf 4 0 1
Totals 27 S 4
Score by Innings
Pericos 112 000 1 05 8 3
Conejos 200 003 00-5 4 3

SUMMARY
Earned Runs: Pericos 3, Cone Conejos,
jos, Conejos, 1 Erros: Pericos S. Rodriguez
2, Marcum, J. Rodriguez Brandon,
Dykes, Beatwright. Double: Ness,
Cross 2, Joyner, Linfors. RBI: S.
Rodriguez, Bergener 1, Lindors,
Hare. Double play: Linfors to
Brandon, S. Rodriguez to xBowen
to J. Rodriguez. Scarifices: Bow Bow-en,
en, Bow-en, Chandler Stowdner, Hern.
Left on bases: Pericos 10, Cone Conejos
jos Conejos 7. Strikosoufs: Marcum 8,
Dykes 4.' Bases on balls: Marcum
4, Dykes 7. Hit by pitch: Dykes
3 (Chandler, Berger, Ness). Balk:
Dykes 1. Umpires: Robert Smith,
Frank Stewart, Scorer: Palomo.
Time of game: 2:01.
Full day excursion
SAN BLAS
Sn -Hruarv 15
' COPA twin engine
DC-3 Transport
FIDANQUE TRAVEL
Tel. 2-1661
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co.,
for rates and Information
Tel. Panama 2-0552
Monday thru Friday
8:00 a.m. to 12:00
2:00 p.m. to 5:00
Saturday: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00
JUDSON
Super chargers
for your
Volkswagen and Ghia
MQA, Dauphine
50
more power
Ci'a. Islmena de
Auto Servicio, S.A.
Franjipani St
Tel. 2-1870

Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1956 Ford, 4 door
Mainline, standard shift, wsw,
radio. Call 84-4202.
FOR SALE: 1957 Ford station
wagon, 4 door Fordomatic, 8 cyl.
including extras. Qtrs. U-B
Kobbe, phone 84-3138.
FOR SALE: 1958 Chevrolet
Impala, convertible, black w.,
white top. Only 3000 mi., under,
coating, backup lights, pasted
dash, "Wonderbar" radio, white white-walls,
walls, white-walls, dual exhautl system, power
steering, power brakes, best of offer
fer offer over $2550.00. Call Balboa
2-2336.
FOR SALE: 1953 Buick Super,
dynaflow. Call Navy 2226, 8 a.
m. to 4 p.m.
FOR SALE: Dua to urgent trip,
1957 Oldsmobile Super 88 Spe Special,
cial, Special, in perfect condition. Com Completely
pletely Completely equipped with luxurious
extras and factory installed air
condition. Call 3-1630.
'Switch On' Order
Puts Fireworks
In English Homes
CARLECOTES, England (UPI)
Electricians finished connect connecting
ing connecting their cables, stood back and
shouted, "Switch on. Then:
Radio sets burst in flames or
blew up.
Television sets began to
smoke.
Light bulbs popped.
Water heaters exploded.
Every light in this village of
105 people went out.
Yorkshire electricity board area
manager explained that "there
was a break in the neutral con
nection in the three-phasa supply
which became unbalanced."
In less technical terms, the
voltage of the village's electricity
supply was nearly doubled.
The electricity board accepted
full responsibility for all burned
out appliances and other damage.
John L. Lewis
Reported Improved
WASHINGTON, Feb. 8 (UPD (UPD-John
John (UPD-John L, Lewis, 78-year-old presi president
dent president of the United Mine Workers,
was reported to be improved to today
day today from complications which fol followed
lowed followed last week's heart attack.
His physician, Dr. John B.
Minor, said Lewis "had a good
night" at Georgetown University
Hospital and now "looks much
better."
"Things are looking favorable
now, minor said.
The UMW chieftain, who had a
mild heart spasm about a year
ago, entered the hospital last
week after feeling ill for several
days. Minor said tests showed he
had suffered a mild heart attack
Lewis was stricken Sunday with
pneumonia but Minor said he
seems to have responded to treat
ment.
uede
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Tour New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo.
on new cars
AGENCY DEH LINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance
The New
NIKON
With built-in Universal
Viewflnder System
Colon
AGENOA de CAMBIO
Y SERVICIO
We cash checks and Lottery
tickets at any time.
We are located right across
from the Ancon Bus Stop.

Panama

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Modern furniture,
used 3 months. It is a bargain.
Call 2-2680 Mr. Flavin.
FOR SALE: Modern furniture,
lamps and beautiful rags. Deluxe
model mangle ironer. All in ex excellent
cellent excellent condition, phone 3-6775.
FOR SALE: Quartermaster Bad
Complete, Maple Platform Roc Rocker,
ker, Rocker, Electric IBM typewriter 9x
12 and 6x9 Green Rues. Call
Balboa 2-3782.
FOR SALE: Dua to urgent trio.
household furniture, in perfect
condition. Reasonable
Call 3-1630.
FOR SALE: Kalvinator 18 cu.
ft., "Upright" deepfreeze, $280.
Kelvinator clothes dryer, 60
cycle, $100.00. Both in good
condition. 86-5294 Albrook,
quarters 332-B.
BARGAINS (only this week)
HI-FI console radio and record
player 225.00, modern mahoga mahogany
ny mahogany wardrobes 39.00, sideboards
12.50, double bed's waprings
12.50, bunk beds 39.00, China
closets 18.00, cribs complete
29.00, lawn chairs 4.50, kitchen
table 5. 50, coffee tables 9.50,
nita tables 7.50, lovely telephone
tables 19.50, brand new folding
beds 27.50, mattresses 6.50, pil pillows
lows pillows 0.95, HOUSEHOLD EX EXCHANGE
CHANGE EXCHANGE National Ave. No.
41 (Auto Row) Tel. 3-7348 3 3-4911.
4911. 3-4911. FOR SALE: One washing ma machine
chine machine G.E. $50.00, one Perfec Perfection
tion Perfection stove with oven $75.00.
Carlos de Icaza No. 8, room IB
Panama.
FOR SALE: Hollywood bad
with mattress, spring, good con condition
dition condition cheap. TeL 3-6131.
PACIFIC LITTLI IAGUI
Toams W L
Lincoln Lift r j.
ixioraitar IM
Elks 1414 4
Seymour Agency s
Spur Cola 3
Folic 0
Lincoln LHo 7 Polleo I
The lowly Police squad gave
the league leading Lincoln lifers
a scare of their young lives, when
they went down by the margin of
one run, 7 to 6. In the opening in
ning the law enforcement team,
jumped en the offerings of starter
Francis for five hits and four
runs.
This was done in a real come comeback
back comeback role because the Lincolns
first scored three tallies on four
hits. Lincolns tied the ball game
in the second inning on three
bingles and the score remained
that way until the next to the last
inning when Jorge Kiamco open
ed the frame with a homer over
the wall. Before the inning was
over, Lincolns added two more.
However, the scrappy Police
force came out swinging and scor
ed two runs. The Lincolns were
getting worried, and brought in
their ace right hander, Bobby
Ostrea to stop the Cops.
Twenty-six hits rang off the
bats of both teams, 16 for Lincolns
and 10 for Police. Two base blows
were the order of the day, Catron
had two and Micek one for Po
lice, Ostrea and Kiamco also had
one each.
Five of the Lincolns were wear
ing the batting togs, because they
nad three safeties each. W. Thomp Thompson,
son, Thompson, Engelke, Ostrea, Kiamco and
Deming.
The box scores
Lincoln Life Ab R H
W. Thompson, 2b 4 0 3
Engelke, 3b 4 13
Ostrea, ss-p 4 18
Joyner, cf 4 0 0
Kiamco, lb 4 2 3
Deming, t 4 13
Fiancis, p 3 12
Hudgings. rf 10 0
J. Kelley, 11 2 10
Douglas, rf 10 0
Phillips, rf 2 0 0
Lessiak, If 40 0
Riley, p 110
Evans, c 22 2
Micek, 2b 3 12
McGrath, cf 2 10
Catron, lb 3 12
Darden, rf 10 0
Askew, rf 2 12
Doherty, 3b 8 0 1
Brennan, as 2 0 0
CURUNDU LITTLi LIAGUI
Standings
Puerto Ricsn Lions
N. F. F. E.
Club 20
Balboa Lions Club
V. F. W.
6-1
6-2
35
35
2-7
Mondays Results
F. F. I. 5 V. F. W.
N.
In a comeback thriller, N.FFE
edged VFW 5-4 to move one step
closer to the first piace Puerto
Rican Lions The most decisive

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: Baby Grand piane,
in perfect condition $390.00.
DeSoto car 1952 $200.00. Calls
31 No. 4.41.
SINGER electric and treadle
$45.00. Vary good condition.
CASA ADMIRABLE, next to the
Lottery bldf.
Magic wheal NECCHI. slightly
used. Price 325.00; soiling at
210.00; 7.00 par month. CASA
ADMIRABLE; next to Lottery
bldg.
NEWYORKER automatic olac olac-trls
trls olac-trls and treadle sewing machine,
like now. Price 289.00; selling
at 98.00. CASA ADMIRABLE,
next to Lottery building.
Typewriters: Remington 10.00;
Smith Corona 15.00; Underwood
20.00. CASA ADMIRABLE, next
to Lottery.
SERVEL kerosene refrigerator;
used on demonstration only.
Price 612.00; selling for 499.00.
$30.00 par month. CASA AD ADMIRABLE,
MIRABLE, ADMIRABLE, next to Lottery.
FOR SALE: Collins KWM-1
amateur radio trans-ceiver with
accessories. Call 94-2266. 83 83-5160.
5160. 83-5160. FOR SALE: Cheap two montu montu-na
na montu-na shirts. Taka advantage of this
Carnival offer. Phono 3-0860
Panama. 89th street No. 88, Pai Pai-tilla.
tilla. Pai-tilla. FOR SALE: Piano $50.
5-557 Gatun 223-B.
Phono
Dogs
FOR SALE: AKC Boxer pup
pies, tawn house 0154-B, Bal
boa 2-4258.
factor which contributed to N.F
F. B. win was the ruuami re
lief pitching of Jtobin Lane. He
shut the door in V F. W.'s face
by striking out seven in the last
three innings while failing to yield
one hit.
V. F. W. got one run in the first
when Billy Reichart got a base
hifc and then scored on wild pitch pitches.
es. pitches. They picked up two more runs
in the second when they worked
pitcher Mike Moras for four walks
and a base hit by Al Creque. The
final run for V. F; W. came in the
third again on walks. They threat threatened,
ened, threatened, however, in the fourth; but
their hopes died when Al Creque
was tagged out trying to steal
home.
N.-F. F. E. started their come comeback
back comeback in the second scoring two
runs on errors by the V. F. W. in
field. They tied the score in the
third with two runs on a walk and
hits by Charlie Lastinger and Mike
Moras. The winning run came in
the fourth on base hits by Robin
Lane and Charlie Lastinger.
The box scorei
v. r. w.
Taul, lb
Creque, 3b
Reichart, ss
Smail, c
Brown, 2b
Hicks, p

Ab R H
3 0 0
3 0 1
-2 1 1
3 0 0
2 10
2 1 0
110
0 0 0
8 0 0
19 4 2
Ab R H
10 0
2 0 0
2 0 0
10 0
12 1
2 I 1
3 1 2
2 0 0
110
3 0 0
10 0
19 S 4

Fehrenbach,
LeBlanc, If
Donley, rf
Totals
N. F. F. I.
Worsham, If
Price, If
Hayes, 2b
Borrero, rf
Lane, R., c.p
Moras, p, ss
Lastinger, ss, c
Fussell, lb
Worsham, J. 2b, rf
Hunter, cf
Lane, T., 3b
Totals
Horse Talking
To Scotland Yard
Leads To Arrest
LONDON (UPI)-David Hart,
44, was oharged by police yester
day with "wasting electricity" by
telephoning Scotland Yard at 4
a.m. to talk about horses.
Policeman Roland Gray said in
court that he saw Hart in a
phone booth making a call early
yesterday morning. Gray said Hart
was in the act of talking to Scot Scotland
land Scotland Yard and told him later that
"we were talking about horses."
The Scotland Yard men f appar apparently
ently apparently didn't want to talk about
horses at 4 a.m.
Har was booked on charges of
'wasting electricity belonging to
the postmaster-general and send sending
ing sending a false message by telephone
to cause inconvenience ana an-
noyance."

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Lota 500 and 1.000
meters, in the Nuevo Hipodromo
Urbanisation, across the Ronton
Racetrack. All lots with street
fronts, sewsg water main and
electricity. Cad W. McBaraett.
Tel. S-2567.
FOR SALE: Lot 1,066 square
meters in the bast location of
La Cresta, situated between "V")
Street and now street. For inter
nation please call Tel. 2-2170
from I a.m. to 12 noon and from
2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Wonderful poor,
tunity, level lot of land on Golf
Heights -$3.50 square meter,
for quick sale Cuealon ft Cia.
Phono. 3-3330.
FOR SALE: 250 acres best land
in Chiriqui at Sair Andres, on
railroad near highway. Perfect
climate, 2,000 ft. elevation, fa family
mily family orchard, four springs .and
creek. All in good pasture and
stocked with cattle and horses.
Owner no longer in Panama. If
interested contact ROBERT
BOWEN, C.Z. Phone 6-724 or
write George C. Niekle, San An-
Chinqul.
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE. One nearly new 15
foot Fibre-glass boat mark, 25
Mercury motor with electric
starter, bargain price US $800.
Please call Panama 2-0055 or 2 2-2643.
2643. 2-2643. FOR SALE: Cabin Cruiser
"Mansion,? 19 feet, totally cov covered
ered covered with fiber glass, 2 "Evin "Evin-rude"
rude" "Evin-rude" motors, 35 h p. Good me mechanical
chanical mechanical condition. For informal
tion. Bircenas Printing Shop. Can
be seen at "Club de Yares y Pos Poses."
es." Poses." Phone 2-1424.
FOR SALE: 15' runabout, with
controls, rapareund windshield,
has all extras, 40 h.p. motor,
Gater trailer. All like new, full
price $750.00. Will trade. Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2-2887.
FOR SALE: 1958 lohnson 35
h.p, outboard motor $325.00.
Phone Curundu 5J57. Call be
u -d, vurunou.
FOR SALE: 18 ft. Cablncrulsar,
outboard. Call Clayton 6213.
Cuban Rebels Hold
American Suspected
In Plot On Caslro
HAVANA, Feb. 2 (UPH Ed
ward A. Nye, 31, of Chicago and
Coral Gables, Fia., has been held held-for
for held-for more than a month as the.
suspected tnggerman in a plot
to assassinate Fidel Castro, it
was reported today.
Police said the rebels who seiz
ed Wye in eastern' Cuba -Bee. 26
five days before ex President
Fulgendo. Batista fell -r-reported
that he had a rifle with a tele
scopic sight and a pistol m his
possesion at the tame.
Nye, who is being held at a po
lice station here, told UPI that
he never has heard what charg
es have been filed against him
if any. He denied complicity in
any murder plot.
it s ail a big mistaiie," ne
said. "I came to Cuba to Join
Castro, not to kill him.'
Nye, who was a military flier
during World War HV said he
came to Cuba to offer Castro the
benefit of his experience. He said
be was looking for Castro when
the rebels seized him in Santa
Rita.
DOCTOR BRING$ STORK
CHICAGO (UPI) -An eight
pound boy was born to Mrs.
Sheila Stork, 21 in Edgewater
Hospital Sunday night. A doctor
brought tt.

The Pacific Steam Navigation Comoany
(INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1848)
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICE
TO COLOMBIA ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M. "KIENUTA" Feb' 9
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, LA GUAIRA,
KINGSTON. HAVANA, NASSAU, BERMUDA. SPAIN
AND FRANCE
8.S. "REINA DEL MAR" (11,188.28 Tons) .Mar. IT
(Air-conditioned)
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT.
M.V. "FLAMENCO" ...... 4. i;. Feb. 4
M.V. "SALAMANCA" ...... n- Feb. 12
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTDVHOLLAND
AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "LOCH AVON" : Feb. 9
S.S. "DALERDYK" Feb. lt V
'', V. TO UKCONTINENT X
S.S. "DINTELDYK" ,,.Feb. S
S.S. "BRITTANY" ......Feb. IS
XL SAILINGS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICT
TELEPHONES: lM
Criatobtl I-18MI e Panama 1-12578 Balbea 2-ltl

TELEVISION' SERVICf
Wo repair in your homo
wa don't pretend to guarantee
our work. Wo guarantee ft
PHONE THE EXPERTS;
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
. VTL 2-1905
Tivoli Avenue Nt 8-20. "''

Protect your homo and proper property
ty property against insect dam a f ev
Prompt scientific treatment on
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Sarvica,
Panama 8.7977 or Colon 1777.
Highlights Of
(Continued from Page 7
toria Hotel .fit New York City, Mi
presented with his award by the
USPGA Wednesday, January 28th,
and left immediately for Panama,
arriving at u p.m., Wednesday.
Without any practice on the Pana
ma course since 1958, he shot
rounds of 72-67-72-69, finishing with
a total or 280 in fourth place.
uow said, agreeing with the
previously-expressed opinion of
Don January:
"The greens here are different
for us. Here, you use Bermuda
grass, which is tougher, thicker thicker-stemmed,
stemmed, thicker-stemmed, than the "bent? type of
grass used in the United States.
Here, you have to actually hit the
ball to get it up to the cup. In the'
States, it takes a delicate touch
rather than an actual hit. Take a
look at how Pete hung them on
the edge in his last 18 holes. Four
putts hung on the edge and didn't
make the hole. Those putts cost
him strokes perhaps a record.
Those of us who have played here
before should know these things,
but it's tough on the young pros
who have to learn by experience."
Before Finsterwald departed at
11 p.m. Sunday, he said to me
"Ted, in your next article about
the Panama Open, please mention
that we are proud to be invited to
Panama. All of us find it such a
wonderful place, in more ways
than one. Particularly mention thai
we find the people here warm, and
congenial to us.
"Everybody seems to want to
heln us: or entertainius. and; they
all seem so sincere. T can't tell
you how much I personally appre appreciate
ciate appreciate that, because you can under understand
stand understand that In travelling around the
country, we tilfct?3 many place
that people ;iusr become faces to
us, and though they are nice to us,
we never get to know them, trav-
.n:- i--i j.. '
; "In Panama, jwe eef to 'neTson'
ally know people, and we enjoy it
tremendously. I've heard many of
the fellows say the same thing,
and I'd appreciate it If you'd men'
tion it."
The same opinion was expressed:
Monday noon at the Hotel El Pan
ama Hilton by George Hall, teach
ine professional at Cornell Uni
versity and PGA Supervisor of the
Caribbean Golf Tour. "I've heard
some of the American people here
'bitching' because ef the5 service,
I get better service here In the ho hotel,
tel, hotel, and in Panama.' in general,
than in any place I can name.
Here, you eet service with a smile1,
Most phjees in the States, u -Jet;
servke with a guy's hand w youf

"We all like It here m PanamsM

he continued, The people here are'
swell all around. We know we jet
invited a lot of places, but even so,
everyone seems to really be glad
we are here. You can tell every
one for me that I hope I can come
back to Panama every year for
the next 50, and that goes for all
of my pros,, too."
TUNNEY TO MARRY
NEW YORK (UPD-Gene Tun Tun-ney
ney Tun-ney former world heavyweight
champion, and his family left by.
plane Sunday for Holland, where
his son. John, will be mamea
Thursday to Maria Sprehger at
her home in Nigmegen, .Holland.
wins squashTtItli J
BOSTON (UPIVMr. Shefli
Macintosh of Eneland upset Brit
ain' team cantain. Janet Morgan,
15-11, j542 11-15, 15-11, Sunday to
win tne jaassacnuseus siaie worn
en's squash championship.

ALCOHOLICS ANONY'
.WMMA",,AI
SOX 1211. CRISTOBAL
Wi; PHONt BALBOA it
Dr. -Weerfafcak Medical
. opposite Chasa Bank. Co
Aveiruo 18-1 17, Phono 2-34 jyT

Domestic Employment
Male wanted, must live in. tea
eral housework: and earing fat
three children, call at 2605-1,
Cocoli. after 5 Bm.
Today's Opening
STOCK PRICES
NEW YORK. Feb. 3 fUPn
Stocks moved irregularly in mo
erate trading at the opening t
uy- i;
ACFlnd
Advocate Asbestos
Alleghany Corp
Aluminium Ltd.
Amer Gyanamid
Amer Motors
Amer Tel and Tel
: Anaconda Copper
Arkansas Fuel
AVCO Mf ;
Beth Steel
Bettinger Corp
Bicroft Uranium
British Pet
Burroughs
Celanese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Great West
Chrysler
Cities Servke v
Coastal Caribe
Creole Pet
Crown Cork and Seal
Cuban Venezuelan Oil
Dupont
El Paso Natural Gas
Eversharp
Fairchild Engine
Fargo Oil
Felmpnt Pe
Geenerat- Dynamics
General" Electria
General Motors
General Plywood
- Gulf Oil i
, Hapsco Steel :
, Hayden Newport
Howe Sound
Imperial a
lot! Pet i
Intl Tel nei TI
Lorillard
Martin Ce
New Eng Tel and Tel
51
340b
103sb
sm
48i.4b
354
230
67
im
u
54
8ftb
97b
7
89V
28
45
48b
,51
62
m
59
Sib
ll-16b
210V4
37V
2lb
9tt
73-18
T
IV
7f
46
21
ZD124
41b
14
14
45b
40b
57V4
5V4
35
264
Northrop All'
Olin Mathieson
. Fancoastal
rPansraei,
Pantepec Oil
Phillips Pet
Pure Oil
RCA
Reynolds Metal
Royal. Dutch Shell
San Jacinto
Shell Transp
Signal Oil and Gas
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobile
Li. Sporty--Rand
standard Oil NJ
Sterling Precision
Studebaker-Packard
fuperior Oil
exas Gulf Prods
Underwood
United Canso 00
US Rubber
US Steel
Universal Cyclops
Westinghouse Elea
Wheeling Steel
Head Of Asfor Clan
las' 'a m" '-'"'i
w. vincem Astor,
Dies In Hew York
TEW YORK, Feb. 8 (UPI) 1
vmctmi' Apior,- 91 neaa 01 uw 1
erkan branch of the wealthy!
tor family, died in his New V
apartment early today of a fclrv
iT.i.nrsr.
Astor was' the great great
grandson of John Jacob Astor wb
made a fortune in .North Americ
an fur trapping in the 18th centv
ry and pyramided it with ;invtal
His own father,, also John Jacot
died on the Titanic in 1912. Asto
has managed the family's million
since that time. ',
He is survived1y Ws third wife
the former Brooke Russel Mai
shall, to whom he was married ii
1953, and no. children. The prt
sent John Jacob Astor is his ball
brother.
Astor listed as his only'busines
connection his position as chair
man of the noara of Newsweei
masazine, but his name has fe
generations, been synonymou
with some of New York's mos
Prominent landmarks Astoi
lace is .a subway stop; tht
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel combiner
the family name with the CM
man home-town of his imimgraa
great great granarather.
-I i 1 ii
SSNTINCI UNION LEADERS
lOLCRTOUM SnHan ftTPTi
Three union leaders were -sec
tenced Thursday to five years 1'
prison for holding an Illegal meet
ing artd associating with member
of international Communist -orgax
izations.



glnl
p-
li

j5m$DTliTBRlJAitT V 195

.THE PANAMA. AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAttY NEWSPAPER

PAGB WW1

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'W.W ViiaSt ',;V AUOvt MUUIIU. BLOSSER 1 1 GUESS z' HMM! N I (a FOOT-") II JjL. 1
X -t' - v WHAT ME A ( LET ME BALL?
7 i T&5,WDEED WE'LL AU-TMe NSHTSPOIb MOW V WE HURJW AND NEXT, 1 "hfrUAM UNCLEJSfc&t xTV. I JrjT tT3
' WXStfrSra WSfS" WHEN HE CX)ES TOUR TH6 ART (NSn-Jo6UE MOVIE ITbIjTH-W VfTS f oV Mh VM
(v BUGS BUNWT Handy Gadget
. L US11 SOMETHING M Witt PICK MB J V TASTE LIKE f JffcA J oHOP ffjQXl. INS TfsS'

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CAPTAIN BAST

Haadlint Story

Bf LESLIE TURNER

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Friendship Pay

97 DICK CAVALLI

CUSEMEllMTBVINrt

"TO MAKE A NEW FRIEND

EVERV 0y. WOULD VOL! UkE

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MAJOft f OOPU OUT OUR WAt

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AMP MOW HE PUSHES

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WHATZIT? Well, it Isn't a photo of the other side of the
moon snapped from a space vehicle. It's a bird's-eye view of
a scale model of a chapel and detached Sunday school and
other auxiliary rooms. It is proposed for St. Alban's Episcopal
Church, Worland, Wyo., by the Architects' Guild of Casper,
Wyo. The extremely modernistic structure features honeycomb-windowed
walls designed to illuminate the surrounding
landscape with eye-catching light patterns from their hundreds
of small windows pointing in all directions. This effect was
created in the photo by a small flashlight bulb located inside
the model chapel. The heavy black, curved lines are the edges
of cardboard used to simulate the surrounding hilly terrain.

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Talmadge Would Demand Experience
For US Supreme Court Appointees

WASHINGTON, Feb. 3 (UPI) (UPI)-Sen.
Sen. (UPI)-Sen. Herman E. Talmadge urged
Congress today to require that any
appointee to the Supreme Court
must have at least five years of
experience as a judge.
The Georgia Democrat, in a
blisteriiig attack on the present
court, said the constitution is
"comDletely and strangely silent

on the question of the. qualifica

tions lor Supreme Court; Just Justices.
ices. Justices. As worded, he said, it would
let the President "appoint a plum plum-ber...a
ber...a plum-ber...a high school student ... an
al en. .or himself"
Talmadge made his plea in a
speech prepared for Senate delive delivery.
ry. delivery. He introduced a bill to re require
quire require that future justices must
have served five years as an ap appellate
pellate appellate or .district federal judse
or as a justice of the highest court
of a State. '.
The Georgia Senator said onlv

Associate Justice William J. Bren Bren-nan,
nan, Bren-nan, Jr., of the present court
would have qualified under bis
bill.
Talmadge said that under the
present wording of the constitu constitution,
tion, constitution, "we have seen appointments
made on the basis of political per persuasion
suasion persuasion rather than the qualifica qualifications
tions qualifications of the appointees."
Only five. of the present .-nin
justices had any previous judicial
experience, Talmadge said, and
only two ever served as judge of
a State or federal court of gener gener-aj
aj gener-aj jurisdiction. Only one, he said,
was ever an appellate state judge
and only 'nree on federal appel appellate
late appellate courts
"A majority of the .member of
the present court did not even de devote
vote devote their major efforts to the
professional practice of law be.
fore they were appointed," Talm Talm-dage
dage Talm-dage said. The constitution dopf
not require justices to be lawyers.

La Naturaleza es Asi por (fiMBtotet

EL QUE PIERPE,

tA LUC HA ENTRE POS ANIMALS S PSR LA
POSesicfN D6 UNA C0MPAW6RA ES UN RECURSO
Dfi NATURA PARA ?U CL MA's FuCRTE sc J

1

RePRODUZCA. PCRO A

VECES NO L6 PA

RESULTAPO. CNTRE LC$
COYOTES LA PA MA A
VECES ELIOE AL
YENCIPO,

ALL DUNN IP Witn a slight hangover apparent, four-year-old
Sylvan Sundby has had a bellyful of a farm convention
In Madison, Wis. He's snobzed off under a sign marking the
area of Dunn County (Wis.) Farm Bureau, headed by his father.

faltering Philip!
hiMp'r life Is filled w'tb bruise
4Mlr would leave h hnmr like new.
' A ClMirtfled fnirt h rvt-f f loe'

W

AfOV(AS PANAMA A A WAYS
PANAMA-MIAMI $55.00

MIAMI-ATLANTA
PANAMA
ATLANTA

.$27.35

$

SO35

Today' TV
"rogram

5:00 Adventure lit Scott
5:30 PANORAMA
7:0n Otzie and Harriet
7:30 You Bet Your Lift
:00 Kraft TV Theater

9:00 Newi Pulse
9:10 Armchair Theater
Between Two Worlds
11:00 CFN NEWS
11:15 Enc: Caesar's Hour

Courtesy of Aerovias Panama Alrwa
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-10573-1698 3-1 6H
OFFICE HOURS: from 8. a.m. to 6 p.m.



Rhys L

Gdtne

rib
ast
oro

m

ftecs Grab 5 Gs
As Dues Fies
7o Berlin Parley

BERLIN, Feb. 3 (UPI) Armed Soviet border guards
today held five American soldiers captive at a border
checkpoint on the highway from West Berlin.
The Soviets detained the soldiers and their westbound
eenvoy of four trucks at 1 :05 p.m. yesterday and held them
despite two US protests.
- US Army sources denounced the stoppage as illegal
and designed to create an incident.
It emphasized the stranglehold the east has on isolat isolated
ed isolated Berlin's lifelines to the west.

.frhe convoy was held at the
Soviet's Marienborn checkpoint,
at the east-west German border,
HO-miles from West Berlin.
The convoy, carrying jeeps,
passed the Russian Babelsberg
checkpoint just outside West
Berlin without incident, only
to be held up at Marienborn
as it was about to pass into
West Germany.
Mai. Gen. Barksdale Hamlett
Berlin's U.S. commandant, sent
an aide to Soviet headquarters
in East Berlin to deliver what
was described as a strong pro protest
test protest US Army headquarters in
Europe at Heidelberg, in West
Germany, also sent a protest to
Soviet Army headquarters de demanding
manding demanding release of the convoy.
American officials believed
the Soviets hoped to create
an incident on the border to
underline their contention
that unless the West gets out
of Berlin a war could break
out.
It was thought too that the
Soviets wanted to stress the
vulnerability of the lifelines to
pressure, particularly wnen me
Soviets transfer control of
Western allied traffic to East
German Communists May 27.
The incident came as Secre
tary of State John Foster dui
Weather Or Not
This weather report for tba 24
hours ending 8 a. m. today is
prepared by the Meteorological
and Hydrographic Branch of the
Panama canal company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE:
High
IiOW . . .
ftUMIDITY:
rHigh
Low

91 85
72 79
92 85
48 65
2 NE-2G

WIND:
(max. mph) N
RAIN (inches
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors)
79
80
LAKE ELEVATIONS:
Gatun Lake 85.16
Madden Dam .. .. 246.40
BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, FEB. 3
HIGH
Time Ht.
12:23 a.m 13.1 ft.
p.nu 13.3 ft.
LOW
Time
6:44 a.m.
1:11 p.m.
Ht.
1.6 ft.
21. ft.

TEI Tl0lSAlD MYSTERIES SWipLED
ApOlIflD TEM-VIOLENCE EXPLODED

l
. EM HQ BW

n f

1 mmam'ZllT JOSEPH L MANKM

les was to fly to Europe today
in an effort to get agreement,
among the Western allies on
counterproposals to Russia on
the German problem.

On the eve of his departure
from Washington, Dulles was
reported to feel that the
United States should be more
flexible in its stand on Ger Germany
many Germany but pessimistic about
chances of getting the Allies
in ro alone.
His views were relayed to
newsmen bv Sen. J. William
Fulbrieht (D-Ark.), incoming
chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, who con
ferred with Dulles for an hour
late yesterday.
Dulles was scheduled to take
off this afternoon for London.
After conferring, with British
leaders, he will go to Paris and
Bonn for talks with French and
West German policy makers be before
fore before returning to Washington in
about a week.
The Secretary takes with
him the counsel of Fulbright
that- the United States take
the offensive and make some
new offers to Russia on the
overall German situation as
well as the Berlin crisis.
Fulbright told reporters that
the Secretary was "considering
very seriously what can be de developed"
veloped" developed" in the way of counter
proposals. But he said, Dulles
stressed the difficulty of get'
ting the Allies to agree.
Chase Manhattan
Opens New Branch
Bank In Chitre
1
The Chase Mnhattan Bank yes yesterday
terday yesterday opened a new branch of office
fice office in Chitre designed to serve
its customers in the central prov provinces
inces provinces and particularly the many
Chase customers .in Herrera and
Los Santos Provinces.
Enrique A. Real, formerly as
sistant manager of the Chase
branch at David, has been named
to head the new office. While at
the David branch Real was res
ponsible for developing a pro program
gram program of loans to small cattle
ranchers.
Walter E. Rutherford, of the
bank's New York office made the
trip to Panama for the opening
ceremony. He was joined by Louis
A. Gomez, vice-president of the
Chase operation on the Isthmus.
A considerable gathering was on
hand for the inauguration of the
new office. Informed opinion is
agreed that this latest extension
to the provincial banking service
will provide a valuable impetus
to the economic future of the In Interior.
terior. Interior. This is the second Interior
branch of the Chase Mahattan
Bank. The -r is in David.
OPENS
TOMORROW!
TlEip FOOTSTEPS!
fD aW RMH IN BIB IBM

r l m M i

1

lanfjQuMTDunin

L.,1.1 i,.,,..,.....,,)!, wml, t , j L i j milium join .imjLj i. mmiiin um

AN ICEBERG WAITED The Danish freighter Hans Hedtoft is shown prior to the start of her
iriaiden west-east voyage from Greenland. The 2857-ton vessel, carrying 95 persons, struck an
Iceberg in the frigid waters of the North Atlan tic, 37 miles from the coast of Greenland.

Phil Steers Goes
On Active Service
With Lt. Col. Rank
Lt. Col. Philip L, Steers Jr., a
member of the U. S. Army Re Reserves,
serves, Reserves, yesterday commenced a-two-week
tour of active duty with
the Comptroller's Office, U. S.
Army Caribbean at Fort Amador.
He employed as a certified
public accountant, with the Comp
troller. Panama uanai company.
Steers, who resides with his
family at Balboa Heights, was
commissioned a second lieutenant
in October 1941. Ht attained his
present rank in March 1947.
Some of his assignments inciuae
duty with the Office of the Quar-
termater General, Department or
the Army, Washington, D. C;
participation ia the North Afri African
can African campaign of 1943, and with
the military governor's office,
North Africa, Italy, Stouthern
France and Germany.
He is a' graduate with a BS de
gree in accounting trom New
York University and a member
of the American Society of Cer Certified
tified Certified Public Accountants, the
New York State Society of Certi Certified
fied Certified Public Accountants, the Fed Federal
eral Federal Government Accountants' As Association,
sociation, Association, and the American Man Management
agement Management Association.
Weatherman Lists
January Among
Hottest Top Three
January was a warm month on
thp Pacific side this year one of
the three warmest in weather his
tory, according to reports kept by
the Meteorological ana nyarogar
phic Branch.
During the month, there were 24
days out of the 31 when the max
imum temperatures at Balboa
Heights hit 90 degrees or more.
There were three days when the
thermometer registered 94 de degrees.
grees. degrees. Thi was the warmest it has
been during January since 1912
and 1908 when there were 25 days
of above 90 degree temperatures
on the Pacific side.
The Atlantic side, cooled by tne
trade winds, experienced a month
of fresh sunny weather, with maxi maximum
mum maximum temperatures remaining In
the low 80's.
Hours Are Changed
For Rainbow City,
Paraiso Libraries
A chanee of hours for the Rain
bow City and Paraiso Branches
of the Canal Zone Library be becomes
comes becomes effective this week with
the closing .of the Latin Ameri
can Schools for the long dry sea season
son season vacation.
Both libraries are located in
the school buikdings.
During the school vacation pe period,
riod, period, the Rainbow City and Parai
so Branch Library hours will be
4-8 p.m. Monday through Friday
and 9 a.m. to noon on saiuraay.
LAST DAY! .75 -.40
1:35- 3:45 6:25 9:00 P.M.
rhe Picture That Was Filmed
In PANAMA! And The
CANAL ZONE I

Bgg3

The
Judge's Bench

Julio R. Molinar, 43, Panama Panamanian,
nian, Panamanian, was fined $15 this morning
in Balboa Magistrate's Court for
following too closely behind an another
other another vehicle with his bus while
driving on Diablo Road.
Everardo G. Chen, 32, Panama'
nian, was fined $5 for loitering in
the rear of the Personnel Building
at Ancon.
Ricardo Lasso, 47, Panamanian,
was fined $15 for failure to return
promptly to his own lane after
passing a car with his taxi on the
Gaillard Highway.
Drivers' Argument
Mars Ancon Peace;
American Is Fined
Wilbur J. Fleckenstein, 43, V
S. citizen living in Panama, was
fined $10 today by Judge John E.
Deming in Balboa Magistrate's
Court for disturbing the peace
on Frangipani Street in the An Ancon
con Ancon area just beyond the railroad
tracks.
Fleckenstein explained that an another
other another motorist had apparently
been deliberately obstructing his
movement while driving along Au Automobile
tomobile Automobile Row just prior to cross crossing
ing crossing the Canal Zone limits. Fleck
enstein said that after crossing
the limits the other ear was tra
veling only 5 mph, and as Fleck Fleckenstein
enstein Fleckenstein passed him the other mo
torist called out in vile and abu abusive
sive abusive language.
At this point Fleckenstein stop
ped, short ahead of the other car,
leaped out of his own car and of offered
fered offered to settle the argument with
fisticuffs.
In imposing the fine Judge
Deming remarked that at such
moments of provocation the de
fendant might keep in mind the
old adage "sticks and stones
might break my bones, but
words will never hurt me.'
CENTRAL
COLOSSAL

RELEASES

O Also 'S O

' VINCE EDWARDS
AV PHILLIP PINE-HERSCHEL WM'jA
RELEASED MM
BY COLUMBIA PICTURES WA

Thatcher Ferry

Is Halted Again
To Repair Piling
Service onsthe Thatcher Fer
rv will be suspended for a pe
riod of approximately three
weeks beginning Monday, it has
been announced by the Marine
Bureau.
The shut down will be neoes-
sary to permit the replacement
cf new piling ana ottier repairs
to thrf ferry ramps on both sides
of the Canal.
The work will be started Mon Mon-dav
dav Mon-dav bv the contracting firm
of Bildon incorporated, which
holds the contract for the ex extensive
tensive extensive work of replacing pi!, ig
and fenders at the piers in
Cristobal and Balboa. The re replacement
placement replacement of the ferry slip pil piling
ing piling is included In this contract.
During the time that the fer ferry
ry ferry service at Balboa Is suspend suspended,
ed, suspended, L. R. Sommer, the contract contracting
ing contracting firm now working on the
west approach to the Balboa
bridge, will construct a detour
road off Thatcher Highway
which will run around the con construction
struction construction area in the vicinity of
Farfan Hill.
The detour will extend paral parallel
lel parallel alone Thatcher Highway for
approximately 1000 feet and
will be used after ferry service
is resumed at the end of Feb
ruarv.
Vehicular traffic will be rout routed
ed routed over Miraflores Bridge wrrrie
the ferry service is suspended.
Disposal Office
Shifts Bid Date
For Excess Items
The U.S. Army Caribbean
Property Disposal Office has an
nounced a change in the date
of a bid opening originally
scheduled for Monday, Feb. 23.
Bids on 87 items of foreign
excess property instead will be
opened at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 24, at Building 706, Coro Coro-zal.
zal. Coro-zal. The lot Includes repair parts
for musical instruments, power
lawn mower, desks, miscellane miscellaneous
ous miscellaneous hardware and repair parts
lor fixed wing aircraft.
TOMORROW
DOUBLE

IOLUaroriHlRE!

MMBvaaniiiv a XX,V

ft?fiiini?ii
lilVILICIieBU V

Virginia

Legislature

To

RICHMOND, Va. Feb. 3 (UPD Virginia moved into Us second dar of token race mixta
in its public schools today with new promises from the legislature that future integration wtil
be resisted. .
President Eisenhower, Gov. J. Lindsay Almond and other leaders expressed gratificatioa -that
there were no flare ups or violent crowds y esterday when 21 Negroes entered seven prevt- -ously
white schools in Norfolk and Arlington. v y
The day passed without an incident reporte d." It could well have been, a near normal school
day except for the quiet crowds of curious spec tators and the swarm of ; reporters and photo photo-graphers
graphers photo-graphers who gathered at the schools to record the historic event.. ,

. xuere were no jeers, no aisiuroances insiae toe scnoois. Auinontieg preaictea the orderlv
integration would continue Just as it began, peacefully although perhaps, pajnful to the ardent
segregationists. .'.

The diehards in the state legis
lature; unable to override Almond
with some last minute plan to
thwart integration, ..called it a
"Day of Infamy" and served no
tice further race mixing would be
resisted.
Almond, without mentioning the
lowering of the segregation bar barriers
riers barriers in the two cities, told the
General Assembly last night he
was confident that they could
find some new anti-integration
program through cooperation.
He conceded "the way ahead is
fraught with serious difficulties."
Seventeen Negro boys and girls
in the bustling seaport city of
Newport walked into six high and
junior high schools which had
been closed since last summer in
the state's effort at "massive re resistance"
sistance" resistance" to federal court orders.
Four other Negroes entered
Stratford Junior High School in
Arlington, just across the Potomac
River from Washington.
There were no pickets, no
crowds of grownups, no violenr.
no shouting, no catcalls. Whi't
pupils clustered curiously around
the Negroes as they were being
interviewed before school, but
there was not a threatening
move.
This was the first major test of
whether the South would accept
integration in the classrooms since
violence erupted in Little Rock,
Ark., in September, 1957. Yester Yesterday's
day's Yesterday's smooth transition was in
marked contrast to the explosion
that led President Eisenhower to
send paratroopers to the Arkansas
capital.
Dr. Mari Luther King, Mont
gomery. Ala.. Negro leader, call
ed the Virginia integration "the
most significant development m
the area of race relations since the
1954 Supreme Court decision was
rendered."
Neero numls agreed there had
been no incidents in class on the
first day, although some animosi animosity
ty animosity was shown.
"On the whole, tt went preuy
good." Alvarez Gounsouland, 16-
year-old Negro, said.
He was asked u ne maae any
friends.
"I think I made a friend witn
my homeroom teacher at Uast
I hope so," he replied.
Charles Perdue, former Duke
University football star who is now
principal of the big Norview High
School at Norfolk, went on the
school's loud speaker system at
the close of the day and said:
"Continue the wonderful conduct
you halve shown today. Don't hang
around the school. See you tomor tomorrow."
row." tomorrow." In Norfolk, where 10.000 whites
have been without public schools,
city officials were highly pleased.
"I am quite proud of the people
of Norfolk, the way they have
faced up to this," said school Su Superintendent
perintendent Superintendent J. J. Brewbaker.
Total enrollment In tlx Norfolk
schools, however, was far below
normal.
Maury High School, for exam
ple, which last year had more than
1950 students, enrolled only 1185
Blair Junior High admitted 800
compared to 1200 last year.
Many parents kept their children
home to see if any trouble devei
oDed.
Norfolk's Norview High School
had been the place where trouble
was mainly feared, but there was
not the slightest incident. No a
riults appeared except parents
driving their children to school
and only four uniformed police of
ficers, were on hand.
Perhans 1000 whites were wait
ing for the doors to open when the
first two Negroes appeared at 8:40
a.m. They were two girls, Carol
Wellington and Johnnie Rouse,
who had walked from their home
nearby.
2:30 P. M.

HELD OVER
5lh. BIG

TODAY

730 P.M. WEEK! $1 50 75c.

"Mr. DcMIHe'i moving portrayal of THE TIN
COMMANDMENTS will spiritually enrich the Uvea
of all who hi lt." r ;, -j.j- t
FRANCIS CARDINAL SPEIXMAN,
ArchMahop of Naw York

EXCLUSIVE ANDX)ULY RELEASE THIS YEAR!

Read

Promises

Resist Further

The white : children formed a
human corridor down the main
walkway a the Negroes came to
the front door.
A few white students told re reporters
porters reporters they believed violence e e-gaintt
gaintt e-gaintt the Negroes would still
Come. ' :
June Davis, 4, sophomore, said:
. "There is going to be trouble, I
just know. Some of the boys are
going to gang up on them. They
say maybe the parents have given
up, but the Teenagers haven't."
Arlington segregationists failed
to carry out their threats to picket
the school and their call for a boy boycott
cott boycott by white students went almost
ignored.
School officials reported 73 ab absentees,
sentees, absentees, less than normal for the
1076 member student body of
Stratford Junior High School.
For the Negro students, three
boys and a girl, their attendance
at Stratford ended ,a tnree-year
fight. ,
Arlington is largely, a miacne miacne-Income,
Income, miacne-Income, white eo)lr community
located ust across the Potomac
River from the nation's capital.
Its residents include many Federal-
employes who originally
came from other states.
David L. KrupsaW, chairman of
thp Arlington County School eoara
said that peaceful integration of
Stratford Junior High proved
"conclusively that if public offi
cials are sincere and firm, disor disorders
ders disorders and breach of the peace do
not happen."
Rockefeller Wants
NY To Be Example
0( Racial
wjot vrmK. Feb. 3 (UPI)
Rockefeller to'
day told the Federal Civil
Rights Commission that he in intends
tends intends to make New York a "test
ing ground and demonstration
for equal rights for all racial
and minority groups.
"We still have a long way
to eo in achieving our goal oi
making New York state a
shining example of our faith
in freedom and justice for all
man said Rockefeller in a
statement read by Dr. Elmer
Carter, chairman of the State
Commission Against Discrimi-
ngf.inn.
"We know that we have dark
corners of prejudice ana ais-
crimination in our miast.
The coventor's state men
Ar.an4 a t.wn-dav inauirv by
the cornrnissionV wriich will also
hear testimony from" Francis
naf dinar Snellman, Jackie Boo
inson, the former baseball star,
and more than zo owaer wit
T1MSM
The Inquiry will cover discri
mination due to race, coior, re
utrinn nr national origin.
Mayor Robert F. Wagner and
other city omciais are cooper
ating.
The Ren. Theodore M. Hes'
bureh. a member of the com
mission, said a recent study
by the Commission 6n Race
and Housing, a private group,
Indicated that there Is. more
segregation in large Northern
cities than those in the
South.
He said New York had been
selected for hearings, because
the number of races' living i in
the city ought to reflect a na
tional pattern in housing con
dltions.
CECIL B.
DcMILLE's
Production
.

tCDIX

story :; oh- page 6

Integration
Th rabble-rousing element la
bisieaHy cowardly and alwaya
yields when- confronted with
firmness and dignity' he added.
All foar Neero oudUs entered
the seventh grade. They were Ron-
aid Tteelrinc 19- Mihal fl Tn...
12; Lance D. Newman, 13; and
Gloria D. Thompson, 12.
uniy one girl,' 13-year-old. Joann
Potts,, left her classroom after the
Negroes were admitted. Her moth
er, Mrs. Ray; A.. Potts,, promptly
announced "the one-elrl bovcott
would end today.
Karen Can t See
Color Problem.
But Missed School
NORFOLK, Va'., Feb, i (UPT)
Karen Gearreald, a ninth-
grader, Is one of 10,000 Norfolk
teenagers for whom the end of
Virginia's long fight against in-.
tegratlon means a chance to re return
turn return to school.
Karen, a 14-year-old A stu
dent, was not able to detect a
difference in her two new class
mates a Negro boy and girl
whose enrollment caused
Blair Junior High to close last
September.
Karen is blind.
After learning the halls, th
classrooms and the stairs at
Blair through two years, Karen
was told in September she
couldn't go back this year be because
cause because two children there wer
a different color.
She enrolled in a tutoring
class, one of many which sprang
up in Norfolk, at a Methodist
cnurcn. sue .learned ner way
around ,, ie buljainiand she
mllntAified het i Ivlrage.
Yesterday,, she happily ; Trent
back to her school. ', r L;
' "I'm,,-; dverjoyed," tvhe said.
"I'm so glad things will be
ovawig tut viiu t&ou vj, vilv jr cat
I wanted jfche school to be open
all along."
Not even a bund girl la im
mune to the race problems of
turDuient Dixie.
Nobody wants integration.
she said, "but if we have to
make a choice between integra integration
tion integration and public schools I'd take
public schools,";'
Classmate Billy Diehl put it
more directly.
"The two colored oeoole at
Blair will be lost in the- shuf
fle," he predicted.
TODAY A
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