The Panama American

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Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02784

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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MLY "NEWSPAPER
THE CITV OF THE
VICEROYS. V;
VVr"
CAYYDIW WHISKY
"umuhmuP
Let the people know the truth and the country is $afen Abraham Lincoln.
tth IEAB
PANAMA, R. P, THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1959
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TAKEN IN FOR QUESTIONING A Cuban civilian Is marched
.way under guard for questioning after he was spotted acting
suspiciously in front of the Presidential Palace in Havana, The I
man was taken into custody shortly before Cuban Provisional
President Urrutla arrived in the city.
Swift War Crimes Trials
Await B a lis ta Followers

HAVANA, Jan. 8 (UPI) Provisional President Manuel Ur Ur-rutia's
rutia's Ur-rutia's regime carried out plans today for swift war crimes trials
against followers of ousted dictator Fulgencio Batista.
At least 20 police and military officers already have been
executed by the rebel forces following courts martial. Another
0 Batista-followers hav &een reported executed by rebel militia militia-min
min militia-min without trials

There are more thaw 1800
suspected, adherents of Batista
; presently held in the greater
. f Havana area alone for investi investi-tM
tM investi-tM gatioru, and,-; possible P"83:
, lion to "war crunevteibunaist

400 members of tht antoy ana.
-yersity Students federation
Th'army andpolice pris prisoner
oner prisoner range in rank from
nrivate to major general., The
students' prisoners are most mostly
ly mostly civilians denounced by their
compatriots,-

Meanwnua reoei wauoi.-
Castro, bolstered by U.S.10-
matic recognition, makes ; his
long-awaited triumphal entry
Into Havana later today at the
head of an armored cavalcade
Jd JM battle-tested guerrillas.
. Snooting was heard in Hava Havana
na Havana during the night, but no
trouble was expected between (
the troops arriving with 1 Castro 1
t.v. thousands of other re

volutionary forces now occupy-
Urrutiacalled a mdinight
meeting of the various rebel
factions to settle minor differ differences
ences differences that developed among
them at the, last minute. The
meeting assured a unanimous
Canal Gets 13
New Employes
During December
TMrteen employes, including a
tadiologist for Crorgas Hospital,
Kined the Canal organization dur dur-g
g dur-g December, according to the
Personnel Bureau.
Thre of the employes were re re-eruited
eruited re-eruited in the United States. They
- are. Doe Bennett, Jr., of Falatka,
Fla'.V railroad and yard locomotive
engineer, and Otho F. Holtzclar, of
Miami, Fla., wood and steel car carman
man carman with the Railroad Division;
and Thomas G. Toda, of Honolulu,
Hawaii, sanitary engineer with the
Engineering and Construction Bu Bu-reau.
reau. Bu-reau.
.Three of those hired locally are
With- the central employment of office.
fice. office. They are Mayra I. Caropre-
wo, of Ancon, qualification rating
clerkj Anbritt E. Pearson, of Chi Chicago,
cago, Chicago, 111., qualification rating
' examiner; and Carl A. WMell, of
V.'st Palm Beach, Fla., superviso supervisory
ry supervisory qualification-rating wxa miner.
Employes hired locally who have
prior canal service are 5neua a,
Fearon, of Panama, staff nurse at
Gorgag Hospital; Virginia. lior lior-don.
don. lior-don. of Bellaire. Ohio, dark typist
with the Personnel Bureau; Bre
Trier L. Zorstad." Of Mcintosh,

. Minn. electrician With the Dred Dred-King
King Dred-King Division: and D wight M. Van

Jtvera, jr of Baltimore, Md., re re-;
; re-; taa giotr supervisor with the Sup Sup-ply
ply Sup-ply Division. ; -, i
, ;j New part-tlmtf employe hired
locally ; are priscllla S. Arias, of
E. Eley,' Nev., clerk at Qorgas
Hospital, and Frances T. Chosson,
; Richmond; Va., ; telephone opera"
i ; tor with .the communications
' branch, -' t-

welcome for the victorious lead

er of the revolt-t
Vrrutia announced at a press
conierence- earner xnai tne i-e
yolutionary -..canital-.-i WouJdre
moved to Havana from Santaa-
go in Oriente province where
the rebels scored their first, vic victories
tories victories against former president
Fulgencio Batista
He also said his government
was opposed to Havana's
gambling casinos because of
gambling's corrupting influ influences
ences influences and be announced that
the revolutionary government
would conduct war criminal
trials of Batista wrongdoers
the "same as the United Na Nations
tions Nations did against the Nazis."
Castro arrived at Matanzas,
50 miles east of Havana, last
night on his triumphant march
across Cuba.
He met with the press at
Cienfuegos and announced
that Cuba no longer wanted
the-services of the U.S. mili military
tary military mission.
"Nothing they taught the
Cuban army was of ;any val value,"
ue," value," he said. In fact, he add added,
ed, added, the "beneficiaries of
American instruction served
to assure -the triumph of the
revolution.
Castro said the Cuban armv
musu pe reorganized complete
"It must be made more acile
and fast moving with modern
tactics ana always be at the
service of the cbuntry and the
rights of its citizens," he said.
The revolutionary leader also
promised foreign investors need
have no fear of confiscation of
tneir Cuban holdings.
"We are not aoine to take
anything away from anybody,"
im saia.
Hindustani Assn.
To Elect Officers
The annual electioh of offi officers
cers officers of the Hindustani Associa
tion of Panama will be held
Sunday morning at 9 o'clock in
the association's Panama City
headquarters, it was announced
today.
ine announcement said re refreshments
freshments refreshments will be served and
all members are being urged to
De present.
Two More Ancon
As CZ Cops Fight

Canal Zone Police have clamped down hard on the
Ancon area, where an outbreak ef minor thievery has been
' felt recently. Two Panamanians were jailed for loitering and
vagrancy in Ancon when they appeared at Balboa Magistrate's
Court today.
. Federlco Gonzalez, 24, was picked up yesterday on Man Man--
- Man-- tanlllo Street without legitimate business there. Judge John
. Deming sent him to jail for IS days.
A ten-day jail term was imposed on Everardo Gulllermo
Chen, 32, He was discovered asleep on a bench at the rear of
the Personnel Office at Ancon today, Just after midnight.
This brings the total of Ancon loiterers convicted in the
last two days to five. Three have been jailed, their total term
being 85 days, and the other two were put on probation.
. Police announced yesterday, Increased vigilance In the
Ancon District after an increase in the number of thefts there;
many of them from clothes lines.

w Wrf

'Security Jobs Under Fire
From Local-rate Unionists
At a meeting of Local 907 (ALF-CIO) last night, union of officials
ficials officials said one of-their major concerns is with respect to the

so-called "security" jobs with US

Zone. The local's membership Is drawn almost wholly from non-US-citizen
civilian employes of the armed services.
Under 1955 Treaty provisions, security jobs will be reserved
for US citizens. However, union officials say the present defini definition
tion definition of such jobs is too loose. They fear it can be applied to ex exclude
clude exclude a large number of Panamanians from jobs they would other otherwise
wise otherwise be qualified to fill.
No indication has been given yet as to the number of posi positions
tions positions that will be classified as requiring security. Some speakers
referred to the question of security jobs as "a gimmick."

Union leaders also called for
more: forceful action ey ine
Panama government and tne
National Assembly In support
of the stand that all Canal Zone
wages should be pegged at
United States rates 01 pay.
One speaker estimated sucn
a move would cost the Unit United
ed United States only $12 million a
year. He said he did not see
why Uncle Sam "should "hag "haggle"
gle" "haggle" over this increase to its
employes since, he added,
most US expenditures in Pan Panama
ama Panama return to the United
States W the form of Amer American
ican American goods imported into the
Republic.
Amonsr advantages for non-
citizens under the new merit
system, the union leaders saia
the major gain is that non non-citizens
citizens non-citizens can compete with US
citizens for all types and grade grade-levels
levels grade-levels of positions, with the ex exception
ception exception of security jobs,
other advantages: reemploy
ment after a break 'to service!
without reexamination, or re
oualif icatton. uriority eonsiaera
tion for reemployment ;separ-
lii.ed bv-reductionLin- Jotce:
transfer ..from one agency w an-j
other, without reexamination;
broadened promotiqn oppurauni
ties; consideration; for "reem "reem-nlnvm'ent
nlnvm'ent "reem-nlnvm'ent based solely on indi
vidual vmerit; centralization of
applications; and opportunity
for appeal to the Civil Service
Commission.
Rank-and-file members were
told that leaders hope non-US-citizen
labor unions will get
two of the five seats to be fill filled
ed filled on the new Canal Zone Ap
peals Board.
The bottom three grades in
the non-manual schedule and
the bottom 10 grades in the
manual schedule will be paid
at Canal Zone rates. US-rates
wages start above these grades,
regardless of the citizenship of
the incumbent.
Union spokesman told the
group that actually a dual
scare will be in effect because
of the security positions. Un Under
der Under the coming pay scale,
they said, a special rate is
provided for US citizens hold holding
ing holding jobs classified as security,
even in grades below the cut-
Panama May Extend
Grade School Years
From Six To Eight
Informed sources were quoted
yesterday as saying that plans
are afoot to the extend the
Deriod of crade schooling in-the
Republic of Panama to eight
years instead of the current six.
The reason for the proposed
change is said to be the fact
that less than half of the grade
school graduates continue study studying
ing studying for a higher education. It is
believed that the extension
would enable grade school stu
dents to get a better education
than is afforded by the present
six-vear term.
Another reason is the fact
that most of the gradeschool
graduates now are children of
12 and 13 years of age who often
are not sunlcientiy mature
mentally to take higher studies.
Loiterers Jailed
Pilfering Wave

Federal agencies on the Canal

off line
rates.
between the two
This was offered as an exam
pie: the proposed starting rate
for non-manual jobs is 56 cents
an hour for non-US citizens, 70
cents for Americans. (The dif
ferences is the tax adjustment
factor and the overseas dif
ferential). But the pay goes up
to $1.78 an hour for Americans
if the job has a security clas classification.
sification. classification. Union spokesmen allege
that difference! in this
spect will range from $1.46 to
$1.82 an hour in the first 10
grades for manual positions,
and from fl.22 to $1.30 an
hour in the first three trades
for non-manual jobs,..
Union leaders also, saw a Job
hazard-in that jobs now graded
at US rates oi nay can be down
graded to locality rates through
tne '"area- or recruitment f ac
tor when the. time cornea that
enough; Panamanians., .become
qualified, to fill all, jobs' to a
certain category
' jvcjjiju"! k a-qawuvn un union
ion union speakers said they blamed
the present situation : of Pan Panamanian
amanian Panamanian worker on the Zone
on the Panamanian, treaty
negotiators,
" r i
Speakers charged thar while
the Panama ; government in
working out the treaty had
gone to bat for businessmen
and industrialists and demand
ed clear-cut provisions for their
claims, this was not dona for
laoor.
As a result, tt was stated,
treaty provisions on wasres ac,
tually will benefit only 400 non-
US citizens out of a group of
IB.WU.
Panama Residents
May Ask Protection
Against Burglars
A group of prominent residents
of Panama city are reportedly
preparing a petition to the Min Minister
ister Minister of Government and Justice
asking for authority to use fire firearms
arms firearms against would-be thieves
and burglars.
The petitioners are prompted
by the wave of robberies', purse purse-snatchings
snatchings purse-snatchings and holdups which
has hit residential areas in the
past few weeks.
The same report, published
yesterday in El Panama America,
said some residents of residen residential
tial residential areas of Panama City are
contemplating a drive to raise
funds to hire special guards to
patrol areas which have little
police vigilance.
Many of the recent robberies
in Panama City have occurred
In broad daylight.
Car For Classwork
Destroyed By Fire
At Rainbow School
A 15-year-old automobile, us used
ed used to demonstrate automobile
repair work to students at the
Rainbow City High School, was
almost totally destroyed by fire
Wednesday morning in the yard
of the school.
The vehicle, a 1942 Plymouth,
was the property of Morris Mc McLean.,
Lean., McLean., a high school shop teach teacher.
er. teacher. He had it set on blocks in
the school yard near the ma manual
nual manual training shop area and us us-sed
sed us-sed It to: Instruct his students.
The fire, of unknown origin,
broke out about 11 a.m. Fireman
from the Cristobal Central Sta Station,
tion, Station, under the command of
Capt. E. L. Cotton, -answered
the alarm and, with the use of
fog riozzles, had tlv fire under
control in a few minutes.
There was no damage to the
school building.

"tnnriiiiii in in !,. - , mirn iiiiiii m i mwiiiium r 1

$?,000,00 PROSPECT for the lucky firm that lands-the contract
for big Canal widenlng-project,' is' viewed by Homer L. Riley
(right) of -the North Carolina firm of Nelio L. Teer Coc Details
of the job are explained by C M. Brandl, assistant chief of the
Civil brarich of the PanCanal Engineering Division.

Panama Firms Listed
For Procurement
Sixty firm and business houses
in Panama are listed in a directory
which has 'been prepared by the
Panama Canal- Storehouse Branch
for the use of personnel engaged
in procurement and supply work.
The directory lists hundreds of
items used by the Canal organiza organization
tion organization which can be secured in Pa Panama.
nama. Panama. The commodities range
from sheet copper and acetylene
gas to tires and typewriter rib ribbons.
bons. ribbons. The Storehouse Branch, which
supplies other Canal units with ma ma-tuial
tuial ma-tuial necessary for the mainte maintenance
nance maintenance and operation of the Pana Panama
ma Panama Sanal, keeps on hand thou thousands
sands thousands of items which are as va varied
ried varied as the functions of the Canal
units.
While a large number are pur purchased
chased purchased as permanent items on the
storehouse inventory, hundreds of
others commodities are purchased
by the Carial Company in Panama.
The directory issued recently is
not complete, it was emphasized
by J. O. Des Londes, acting super superintendent
intendent superintendent of the Storehouse Brench
Fuerza y Luz
Makes Several
Promotions
The Management of the Pana Panama
ma Panama Fuerza y Luz Co. announced
several promotions and one re retirement
tirement retirement effective Jan. 1.
Cyril da Costa was named to fill
the position of superintendent of
electric production for Panama
and Colon.
Replacing Da Costa as supervi supervisor
sor supervisor of the steam electric generat generating
ing generating plant at San Francisco dc la
Caleta, is a A. E. Billingslea.
Other changes include the ap
pointment of A. Pantettas ;uper-visor-iplant
maintenance and Ra
fael Cunningham at electric dis distribution
tribution distribution superintendent for Co Colon.
lon. Colon. Retiring after 31 years of ser service
vice service was George Balin de Abate.
De Abate occupied the position fill
ed Cunnigham prior to his retire
ment.
The personnel involved in these
changes represent a total of 90
years of service with the compa-AT.

PC Widenere

By Canal Company
Of Varied Supplies
in a notice to storehouse personnel.
Those using the directory have
been asked to make known any
additional local supply sources that
may be lound from time to trme
so that tre names of the mer merchants
chants merchants can be included. The di directory,
rectory, directory, Des Londes said, will be
expanded trom time to time as
additional local supply sources
are developed.
At the present time the list of
standard stock items obtained in
Panama includes such merchan merchandise
dise merchandise as storage batteries, ball bear bearings,
ings, bearings, sheet copper, diesel engine
parts, plate glass, lubricating
greases, weed killer, electriclamps
native lumber, machetes, motor
vehicle parts, lead packing, paint,
steel pipe, spark plugs, plywood,
power unit parts, tires, tubes and
tractor and power unit parts.

W; ' Sited Tf$$$k

"JOE" is not a sailor's name; it's a Navy tradition. And one
sailor who always knows where to find a cup of the hot black
brew is a boatswain's mate, in this case Burgew "Boats" Mner
of the Fifteenth Naval District, who wants everybody to know
that Armed Forces Day is Saturday. (Navy Photo)

Contractors Seelc

Skilled Local Men
On $7 Million Job

Contractors bidding for the $7,000,000 or so Canal Canal-widening
widening Canal-widening project stated yesterday that they expected to
recruit the greatest percentage of their labor from Pan Panama.
ama. Panama. And if the kind of labor they require is not imm imm-diately
diately imm-diately available, they will start a training program for
such jobs as heavy equipment operators and drillers and
other skilled trades.
A warning was given, however, that little unskilled
manual labor would be reauired for the two-venr ink f

widening of Paraiso and Cucaracha reaches of Gaillard
Cut.
About 25 firms from the Republic of Panama and
the United States, were represented yesterday at a pre pre-biddmg
biddmg pre-biddmg conference held at the board room at Balboa
Heights, at which the details of the job were thrashed

our.
Later, most of the contractors
took a trio through the Cut in
the craneboat Atlas to see tne
project for themselves.
Homer L. Riley, representa representative
tive representative of one of the large State Stateside
side Stateside firms. Nello L. -Teer Coi
of DnCham N.C said Ms firm's
local labor because It saved
the expense of. setting up
camp, and of paying travelling
expenses from1 the States.
He said he hftd made lnquirles
at union offices and that they
believed most of the labor would
be available locally.
Riley added: "It is our po policy
licy policy to operate training pro program,,
gram,, program,, on a large Job like this
If the trained men are not
immeditely available.
There has been no indication
as yet how man yworkers will
be employed.
Bids will be opened on Mon Monday.
day. Monday. Feb. 2 and it was empha emphasised
sised emphasised at the conference yester yesterday
day yesterday that the blasting an ex excavating
cavating excavating must not in any way
interefere with shipping. Its
safety is the primary considera consideration.
tion. consideration. Ships will not be held up for
hlastine oneratlons. The con
tractor will have to co-ordinate
his blasting with the dispatch dispatching
ing dispatching of ships.
The whole job of considerable
widenine and also deepening
over a mile of the Cut will cost
around 12 million but the con contractor's
tractor's contractor's portion will be in the
neighborhood of 7 million be because
cause because the Panama Canal will be
handling all the underwater
clearing with its dredges.
The widening project Is the
largest part of a short-range

Canal improvement
costing $19 niiinn

Program
.h ei?i5 ls ePected to be car
ried
bass Thim !,ni
traerni- mi 5ive lne cn
ttmL 5umore free,dm at night- ?
time when nn kw. ir
wer conversion work. P
caKsrtVeTob:ftheSpeclfI-
jjry excavation of nBri
ve and a half nii' "255
yards of dry" mate rimuch
of it solid rock that has S S
m 1 01 ari" holes for thp i-f
of a large surrounding area
3 Removal of Cucaracha sig-
Contts,rebUl,dIn
f.ri i f
?ob'rt. n- Br"wn. Jr nre'sMi
veswrdayg conferenc- ni
Jve to have a mir,mum f
?ylJ!Zn Prove our-
there can
'if
v i -i
to any blrif) r V;
and mo font .. Jy
Joe Cook. PBnCanm
engineer said the Fair Labn,
fhp"S act is aPP"ble. sJ
the minimum wage is l ThI
?iUr Iaw a,so op""- Over!
' "st n"d on envwnr,
oyer r hour, a dav or 40 houH
In one woolr
Some eontractnrs a.kM aboul
acromortrtMnR fnr k-pv mpn wh
would sfnt. rinwn from -tH
Ptates Tbev were tolrf -thrl
m" be room for soma famtHt
at Gamhoa. nnd that they
bring trailerc Hnwn nr ftxii
tMr own accnmorfatlnriBwnro
ylrir.f- they stuck at local spect
fictions.
Tt was su?est,Pd that t thrt
shinperf in thMr trailers, tb
COllld c'rlVP thTn honlr qlnnn
Pan Amerifan trighwoy wh'
should be finish tn the State
in two venrs time.
I
C'ifrrriir Mr'-f ...
Panama's new steel milCside."
rurglca Panama, s A. madf news
yesterday when it shlppr6;j
tons of madf-ln-Panamaijwtn-.
forcing sfeel bars to the United"
fciaie. Trie steel, detined for (
California, left aboard the 8.8.1
ane Panama steel will find-a
ready market at a Dries lowet"
than other steel of the samV U
S. specification. 11'!
Panama steel distributors Wiy
v.ct h rnucTie out or xne taci
that they ppv less for the same1
steels since freight char-ft,mi
elkslneted fc bom nroductlaa

7

'i
K



THE PANAMA; AMIMCAN AH INDEPEKDCHT DAIIY NEW8PAPKE.

nor two

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNED AND PUBLISHCD r THK PANAMA AMtMICAM MHI, INC.
OWNED OUNMD y NELTON ONVU. N 121
.. i MARMODIO AWIAS. tOITOM
i r ... IS-S7 H enrerr P. O box 1S4. Panama. R. or P.
M Ann.rx PAN A M ERIC AN. PANAMA

Xloh Orriei, I2J7 Ccnthal Avinui setwhn 12th and iStm Stkeet
JT PO.II.N K.MIIINT.I.-II JOSHUA B POWERS. INC.
if; 345 Madison Avt.. New York M7 N. Y.

i

M Month in Advance
m Six Month in Advance
fw OM Vim in Advance

LOCAL

f 70
9 80
19 SO

MAIL

S 2 SO
13 00
24 00

tHIS IS YOUR FORUM THI RIADERS OWN COLUMN
'it Tfc. Mail Bos it a open forum tor readers ol Th. Panama AmjrieM.
letter art received ratefully and art handled in a wholly confidential
tt'wn contribute a letter don't be impatient if it doetnt appear the
text day. Letters are published in the order received.
5; Pleae try to keep the letter! limited to one paqe lentfh.
jg identity of letter writeri li held In ttrietet confidence.
JS Thit newspaper assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions
expressed in letters from readers.
ff HE MAIL BOX

OF LAWS AND JUSTICE

Bir:

1 -,

The rights or the people are one of the most cd thtag

Labor News
And
Comments

in man long r, .mh rri,d hv what

Se hook. There have been many cynical rmarks passed on the
ClwoerT wants a law in the
LnS Lne o7 fn th T United States, or in Panama hat would
Se the nns lor criminal offenses on a man's ability to pay.
rtturn in his pocket to support a statement of fiscal history
Sn'DraceheCanal Zone magistrates are apt to give an
tfcct the public. Fined
'

Si-

locality RATES

ir:

. .lnm UpVlntr flhmlt

Sftrareaadllobwrmf KanlX him with the following
"Sfvtew of the American Embassy offering a ford auto for
.ti. wrii like all mv countrymen I was there to give it the

SS:K-t5 .ss? rare

feigri staging. rf t me know whether

S11!1: T ,.t'tJ,rnftri from Europe I wtfuld like to get squared

fiway on some of these economic problems.

C.S.

FICTION OR FACT ON PAY RATES?

lL

in .ii cviHofmas season

On this. I've been waiting unui mji "1" Vf a

passed to take up a wrangle mai nao.

wrangle at all. . hJ h one of tne AFSCME
Last December you ran a story in wnicn one iu

UsScardo Artas told union leaders:' -tate.
' '' i?w& tlVoPwee
by US officials. Is a serious cha ny w
, noiuch thing', either 'n fient Ricardo Arias him-
, mT lJ "?hUUin Ms stetement io the National Assembly
8elf,fo dwlthm a mJnth or Two after the treaty was signed
early in 155fitf oueht from the United Slates but not
did not? noiitician is seeking the truth, why
to Stoffl Srfi on the8 treaty riegotia-
t nS unir to keep on mouthing fallacies. But just what
dKesident Arias say to the labor leader.? n

NEW YORK This apparently
exclusive report that indignation
has gone oui of style was ueiiDe ueiiDe-rately
rately ueiiDe-rately held up by this column to
avoiu watering your Christmas
cheer. An outpouring oi pio-tsi
may be a high-buttoned shoe sen sensitivity.
sitivity. sensitivity. But this tale of n.ne fa families
milies families with 18 cnildren in a holi holiday
day holiday week made bleak because
their breadwinner- light for their
rights should be tola.
1 write ot unemployed men,
made jobless because tney fou&at
a local union barony. They are not
workless and payless for lack of
skills. They are strong men who

can handle massive cranes.
They spent pre-holiday days at
quickie odd tasks. One sold pup puppies
pies puppies in a pet store at five dollars
a day. Another delivered Christ

mas packages for a lew nours at
$1.25 for each back-breaking 60
minutes. Others found laborers'
work wherever they could and
some couldn't. Their families ale
less.
I could tell you their names.
But one will do. He is Bill W ns,
one of the "boys" who hit the
beach at Salerno and walked in
the rain through valleys of death.
He wound up in a Nazi prisoner of
war concentration camp so the

swastika would not wave for a 1, 1,-000
000 1,-000 years. He is one of the jobless.

For five years I have watched mm

battle the machine controlling the
Long Island Operating Engineers
Local 138.

Bill was with me on the air the

night I stopped a glass full of con

centrated sulphuric acid. He wept
at my hospital bed because he had
left me an hour too soon.
But there have been no tears
for Bill W Ikins and his good
companions though thty have
fought so hard and so long and
have had at their side, from
time to time, the McClellan Com
mittee, the national AFL- CIO
leaders, the courts, the clergy,
and the labor board. But such
art the laws of the land that the
local union boss, Bill DeKoning
Jr., can control a union h ring
hall and he is not one to regard
.his enemies even at Christmas
time.

So once more the embattled men
began a weary march to the forces

of the state. Yet in this season of

holiday compassion I wonder not

at their angry fight.
I wonder not at the rock hewn,

iron hand in the iron glove Wil

liam DeKoning of the Operating

Engineers. He is their enemy, lie

is the symbol so many have fought

in controlled local unions across
the land. Change the names.

Change the sets. The play's the

same everywhere in locals such as
this one.

Wi nter Sport

c

:'ieA v

u v i mam

Qlie WASIIlF.'GTbll
iviERimGo-Roii
y DnnW FCAWSON

NEA ervkt, Inc.

Walter Winchell In New York

SAN ANTONIO BUGLE

Sir:

the clear so lar, dui h may L""'D,fnlf "hl7". riP9th toll ever
VV The holidays have passed with th blggert death to 1 ever

'sirs a5w

after iney passeoinr i;"" wPre aoina the

rull irX;coS!see "half Uie distance it' would take
10 PLklng for a lot of people at the Fat Stock show, and it
. wouldn't surprise me to see capt. Elliot.

SCHOOL STATISTICS

Sir:

For the leftist Americans who believe in school integrat on
Stateside here are some statistics from the records of the in in-tegratod
tegratod in-tegratod schools in Washington, D.C., covering children from
ai?anc6les- Negro 169, white 16. Total for 12 months, 185.
dtoiw: Negri 883, white 13. Total for 12 months.
896' Who would like their children to attend mixed schools where
,uch conditions exist? More Disgusted

I wonder only that the public
forgets and let men fight alone.
I wonder only at the rank-and-file
of scores of locals who forget
an old labor chant that an injury
to one is an injury to all.

Nor is this wonderment eased by
a report the other day I received

from friends in Connecticut. In

that state the legislature passed a

law requiring all unions to file

annual financial reports. Some 600
unions reported. It was presumed
that the rank-and-file would be
consumed with passionate interest
in what happened to their money.
Towards the ysar's end I
checked. I was told that of the
tens of thousands of workers,
only one man came to Inquire.
I thought of the words of Mr.
Labor h mself, AFL-CIO presi president
dent president George Meany. Not too
long ago hi hit the union con convention
vention convention circuit. Thus he spoke:
". .In finding the answer from
our trade union point of view we
must look at the problem and
say: 'How did these things hap happen?'
pen?' happen?' "I tell you why they happened.

They happened because the unions
got away from the unions. .It

can't happen if union membership
meetings are fully attended and if
reports are made periodically to

those meetings. .

. .We ve got to find some way

to bring about an attendance of
the workers at the meetings un

ions. .there is something fun

damentally wrong in the approach

to the trade union movement by

some of the people who have
come into it in recent years. .

If the concept is that the union Is

some sort of business entity ana

you pay your dues to it and then
look to results, then. .people who

are dishonest and have motives of
their own. .will come in and take
over. ."
Doesn't anybody carei

NEW YORK HEARTBEAT
Celebs About Town: Actress Shel Shelley
ley Shelley Winters strolling along Cen Central
tral Central Park South in mink coat and
plaid slacks. Jane Morgan primp primping
ing primping her pooch at Poodle Boutique
for his teevee debut with Ed 'Mur 'Mur-row.
row. 'Mur-row. .Marlene Dietrich trying
on male leather coats in a 56th
and Lexington shop. .Kim Novak
on a shoe-tihopping sjre$ amus amusing
ing amusing Bloomingdal's salesgirl staff
. .Katharine Hepburn sweeping
out ot The Embers into her wait waiting
ing waiting Caddy limou, the license plate
of which is simply KH (Conn.)...

Commentator Waller Cronkite or ordering
dering ordering French dishes like a native
at Caie St. Denis. .Ginger Ro Rogers
gers Rogers at Bonwit's bandbang count counter
er counter togged in i scarlet mohair
ensemble and sporting a pony tail
with a black velvet dbbon. .Play .Playwright
wright .Playwright Paddy Chayqfsky, now one
of the goatee se . .The Duchess

of Graazano, vote(U,ltaly's .- best best-frocked
frocked best-frocked frail looking over the fash fashions
ions fashions worn by American society
gals at the swanky Colony.
Sallies in ou--. Alley: The report
from London that Rex Hjinrison
and his wife Kay Kendall lost their

savings (backing a flop show) had
the Lindy-Sardi set gabbing. "I
don't know why," said a columnist,
"so many actors want to be pro

ducers when it is so much cheaper
to be -a critic". .Overheard at
Reuben's: "It sure was rough for

New Yorkers going 3 weeks with without
out without newspapers"... "That's tough.

Some show people along B'way go
3 weeks without eating."

gret helping him. .He has paid
her $150,000 a year 20 times.
Memos of a Midnighter: Joni
James got a new mlnkchilla valued
at $10,000 Irom husband Tony
Acquaviva ... George Burns' and
Gracie Allen have, endorsed son
Ronnie's newest rush Powers mo
del Lucille Harding. .Wasn't that
the Eai'l of Onslow with June
Black, daughter of the high court's
Mir, Justice. Black?. .Sammy Da Davis,
vis, Davis, Jr's parties in his Sands' Ho Hotel
tel Hotel apartment, aftei the show, have

established a new record for en endurance.
durance. endurance. Thirty or more guests ev-'
ery all-night fo: 17 nights in a

row to datew .That chauffeured
Rolls-Royce which waits neaf the
"Say, Darling" stage door, belongs
to beauty Kelly Leigh's genilemcn
friend. .George Stevens, Jr., gets
the most mentions in the diary of
Millie Perkins newcomer stair -ff
"The' ; Diary of Anne 'FraBk;t?Pis
dirotordad is happy about the
romance. .They say Lana Turn Turner's
er's Turner's phone bills have risen astro astronomically.
nomically. astronomically. Phones friends all over
the wdrld instead of putting her

thawts down in letters.

Bigtowm Short Story: He is a
wealthy industrialist. .Got his
stai about 20 years ago. .He
nee, ed $150,000 to complete his
first big deal. .His weal hy bride-to-be
loaned him the money. Soon
after the deal went through he

Nov&'et: Lynne Jaffe Levin was
a principal in "Pins and Needles,"
a revue of over 25 years ago. One
of the big hits annually. .When
she married, her husband's busi business
ness business meant that she had to give
up New York for West Miami, Fla.
. .They had a son. .One day

he was seriously injured by a

hit-and-run-j-iver. .To the mo mother's
ther's mother's amazement she learned that
hit-and-runners in that community
got their license revoked for a lit
tie while plus a small fine. She
began a drive with neighbors to
have the law changed. She en en-ence
ence en-ence fl'om State lawmekers ... So
she ran for the City Council in
West Miami and won. .Since her

Cast of Characters: Janice Rule
of "Night Circus" (wnich closed
abruptly) is the latest access to
attack critics. &b popped off on
a radio program. .She dissented
with the higa praise ciritics gave
"Picnic"' in wnich she appeared.
It won the Critic' Prize lor best
play and the Puli.zer. "It wasn't
as good as 'Night Circus' she

screeched. ..Jimm Clauton, croon crooner
er crooner whose big recording nit is "Just

a Dream, is irom Baton Rouge,

La.. He hi.ers in New Yom'a

wannest breeze. Recently 8w his
first snow.. .Lester, the newsstand
man at 50ih and B'way. Passersoy

invariably pau.e u ask him direc

tions iio the Capitol Theater, the
Roxy, Radio Ciiy, etc. He hasn't
seen a movie in 42 years.,.Chick-

ie James, who usually has more

mink coals than enough lood, just
get her 4th from Jerry Lavan. He
postscripts: "And we're not even

Letter from Hollywood: 'Marilyn
Monroe, who lost her second baby,

overworking aad going through

me tortures of looking beaufitul
at 5 a.m. probably has convinced
her colleagues on her recent film
that she was really in. .uui uuui
she lost the baby, they could have

s Jangled Marilyn for this and that

mood,etc. .Director Billy Wild Wilder
er Wilder says 'never again.' He thought
she'd never run out of 'takes'.

Went $500,000 over the budget. It

got go Marilyn stopped calling him
Billy and called him Mr. Wilder.
Well!. .One day she to exasperat

ed Tony Curtis that instead of

pushing a glass out of her hand,
he whacked it hard enough io seno
it flying. .Husband Arthur Miller,
on the set, rushed in and Curtis
went for them both. .Billy Wilder
calmed him down."

ANCHORAGE, Alaska Presi President
dent President iaeufloei wnen first de demurring
murring demurring against statehood for A A-iak,
iak, A-iak, aia h would be very diffi difficult
cult difficult to defend Alaska in case of
war.
, And when you travel over Ui

v inn lareelv uninhabited area

one-iiith the jize of the United

iSmes you can readily unaerMana
why he was t worried.
however Ala-ska at the weekend
became the 49th s-te, an integral

part ot the uhi.eu Stales, ana come

what may it mac oe aeienaea.

One biz Question, inereiort, is wue-

iher U can be defended today any

better than wnen EUenhower. tear
ed tor its defense. iV

The man primarily responsible

for the deiense of the 49.h stale

is Lt. Gen. Frank A. Armstrong

of Nashville, N.C., who made his

tory during Worth War II when be

lea the lir.t daylight air raid ever

made over Axis territory, and lai

er the nrst heavy-bomber raid
over Germany proper dramatical

ly chronicled in the book and mo movie
vie movie "Twelve O'clock High."-

Arms rong is a pleasant per

son with a slight Carolinian drawl

who first served in Alaska in the

days when miliUry -housing con consisted
sisted consisted of improvised shacks, tents

and Quonset nuts. According to

his own description he is a "sour "sourdough."
dough." "sourdough." He likes Alaska, knows Alaska

and has tlown up and down mile
after mile of its plains, its tundra,

and its icy mountain ranges.

Armstronk Is now commander

in chief of all Alaskan forces,
with the Army, Navy and Air Force Force-efficiently
efficiently Force-efficiently cooperating under him.
When I asked hi u what he
thought of President Eisenhower's
worry over the defense of Alaska,

he was inclined to agree.

"All defense is difficult. It
wouldn't be easy' he replied, "but
you've seen the layout1 of our
troops. You've watched ttiem at
wo"k. You know how they 'ane'en
the alert day and night! v ;
ALASKAN-DEFENSES CUT.

broke their engagement, bqt he election they have a new law there
pledged that she would never re-for hit-and-runners. .Jail.

PANAMA AMERICAN

NON-SMOKERS
LANSING, Mich. (UPI) Gov.
G. Mennen Williams, a non-smok

er, presented a cigarette case to
Democratic National Chairman

Paul Butler yesterday as a token
of his appreciation for Butler's
participation in Williams' sixth in inaugural.
augural. inaugural. Butler doesn't smoke, either.

was

' vfe.;Yv-...

& if."! .V J TVvu .r-,Mr.

neb1 HOfiW

tDAOl

iwco roots

CA1S FILL WUil MUDS!

TALENT
NEEDED
i
Announcers
Actors
Actresses
Technicians
Sport casters
News casters
Copy writers
Disc jockeys
Salesman
Vocalist
Instrumentalist
An intensive campaign is starting to develop the
finest radio broadcasting ever heard in Panama. Want
to join the parade? Send photo, experience and
qualifications to P. 0. Box 3145, attention Producer.
Auditions will be arranged.

Manhattan Murals: The French
poodle in the Sutton Place sector,
who has he- name (Fifi) inscribed
in tiny pearls on her blanket. (How
dawggy can you get?). Most fa

mous legs in the world usually
spotted at an Italian shoe store
at 41 East 57th. .The turtle tank

outside a penny arcade which infu

riates passer&by. One li'l turtle

encased in four inches, of solid
ice. .The children's menu in the
Plaza Hotel's Edwardian iroom. It
features: "Smashed potatoes."

"Mary-had a little lamb choD" and

supersonic MerDet". .Perhaps

the only place left in N. Y. where

you can get a nickel cuppa caw-

lee. The East 54ih St. food shop,
not far from 1 Morocco. .Clever
table-cards at Casa Cugat: "Open
up a cha charge account,"

I had to agree. As a sometimes

critical observer, I. had. jeen ,that
morale in the Army, Navy,- and
Air Force in Alaska is excellent.
Troops are in tip top shaipe. The

caliber of men an 1 officers couldn't

be better. .... -. v ...

"Why, if the defense of Alaska

is so difficult," I pressed Arm

strong, "was the size of your force

in Alaska cut last year?"

This was a mean question, be

cause no military officer is permit-;
ted to challenge the hudget given
him by Washing' on.
"We took part of an oveir-all cut,

replied Armstrong- diplomatically.

VThe enure defense budget was
reduced and we had to bear our
roportiortatevhJTfe-. f
- Nevertheless, the' fact remain remained
ed remained that with Russian planes Con Concentrated
centrated Concentrated 56 milej across the Ber Bering
ing Bering Sea from Alaska, with 14.000 14.000-foot
foot 14.000-foot runways constructed in Sibe Siberia,
ria, Siberia, pointing direct at Alaska, the
strength of V.Si forces in Alska
was cut.
It was cut by the White House,

not be the military planne"s, and

it was cut despite the Pre-ident's
own statement that the defense or
Alaska would be difficult.
NO ALASKAN MISSILES
There were aome other matters

which Arms rong could not discus?.

but which I ascertained independ independently.
ently. independently. The most important is the
fact that while Russia has already
built IRBM bases in Siberia, we
have not yet built equivalent mis missile
sile missile bases 'in Alaska.
We plan to do so, but U.S. mis missile
sile missile p-oriuction has been o slow
and so bogged down in Washing Washington
ton Washington that we won't be ready to ship
missiles to Alaska for some
months.

This means thai Russian IRBM's

with a range of around 1200 miles
could easily hit the prime targets
of Alaska, while 'he longer range

misMles which Khrushchev boast

ed to Senator Humphrey about

could Jilt our hig Boeing,nl Dou Douglas
glas Douglas bomoer pianron' the west
coasts .:, ,-; .'. ; li

It it na secret that the United

Sta.ei i lias, approximately jS0t000

It is also no seert thai the II-

nited Sia.es has an armjr H 17
divisions ; while. the Red Army -has

i( divisions, --j 4.

By sheer weight of hnmbers .'.the

Ren Army ou pcraehu.e enoDgh
men into Alaska to overwhelm our

courageous aigwy skilled.'- rela

tively meagre .forcer"

As FresiGen,,; Eisenhower seem

ed:, to. have in the? back; of his

mind, it would not be too: difficult
to take the new 90t state; ji :

MEN ON OUARtf '.
r OutChristmas ; Pa,atched
lonely men of the Air i Force 'far

from home in the Eskimo village

oi unaiaute. on the Bering Sea,
patiently, efficiently watch their
radarscopes for signs of approach approaching
ing approaching planes.'-. -..
They 'had been doing this on
Christmas Eve, and the day be before
fore before Christmas Eve,: and the year
before that, every day, every hour,
every, minuler, lang duJl pgjns-taking",:4iecessry,:job;;'ij':.'-
' This earljr warning station sand
a scare of olhers along t the Ala.
kan-Canadiatf coast,.ha, ve .been oa
the alert and will continue to be on
"the alert. They will not -fail to de detect
tect detect an enemy object tf.'iind when
it approaches. Nothing will 'get
by them.
: But if a missile rather- than a

plane passes their r way & the time
of flight is so fast that the alert

win be aimost eningleSi. There
will be no time to. "Warn or pre prepare,
pare, prepare, j ', t' i

Meanwhile Russia-has the

siles we haven't. , j .

Or when he first missile comes,
some; of Mm would .be aimed
at the Air Force'mcn sitting," wa'ch
ing in theieyearly frarouig sUtfons.
they are helpless "trf retaliate.
They have,' only m riflVrjer man

it-useless iff modern- mt are. They

eairly warning -station", siting pa pa-tienly,
tienly, pa-tienly, efficiently, watching ,the ra ra-darseops
darseops ra-darseops would b one of the firj
targets- i & wa;vomesv
It isn't the fault of the men in
Alaski'tha. ej would be help help-less.;JIt
less.;JIt help-less.;JIt .isn't their f ,ult that no
missile Jases are jto Alaska to
counter mif sile against missile.
It will be the fault of the pro pro-cratinators
cratinators pro-cratinators and red-tape thgle.ri
back home.

I Familiar Folkt i

I 1

TO VISIT, PHJLJPPJNM
MANILA ,UPI) Malayan
Prime Minister Tengku Ab-tul
Rahman Is schedu ; to arrive
here Saturday on. a five-day state
visit to the Philippines h ; ,5

With the help of the pupils
at his school, the Lyceum, the
Greek teacher, writer tndj
philosopher Arts to tile at attempted
tempted attempted to collect an encyclo encyclopedia
pedia encyclopedia of all human knowledge
. up to his time. One of his
pupils placed at his disposal
both money and men to aid
in research. The work was
never completed. But in its un
finished state it was, neverthe-1
less, the basis of most learning .'
through the Middle Ages.
C Encyclopedia Britannic

Answer to Previous Puzzle

The 'Late Show: The late Senator
Bob La Follette's grandotter Sher Sherry
ry Sherry makes her stage debut here in

"Tall Story". .France Nuyen ol
"Suzie Wong" dined with Ted
Morrell of the hit at Monsignore.
Really likes him. But she insists
nobody has heir heart. .Only news
man Marlon talked with on the
set of "One Eeyed Jacks" was
Lloyd Shearer. .Mike Romanoff
got $10,000 advlnce from World
Publishing for-his momoirs, but
can't find anyone to "assist" him.
The big reason is that he sold the
film rights to 20 h, which aban abandoned
doned abandoned the project. .The Mirror's
Joe Iaconas welcomed their third
daughter, duririg the recent news newspaper
paper newspaper strike. .Joy Harmon of
"Make a Milllion" (41-2L-2S) got
five cashmere Sweaters for Christ Christmas.
mas. Christmas. All too small. .Insiders jay
the Ernie Banks (he won the
Nafl v League's "Moit Valuable

award) are striking out, .No won

der Kim Novak's so rich. Cuts and
washes her own hair. .From the
WW-Mutual microphone: "Here's

wishing every New Year's eve

a Happy Adam!"
Sounds in the Night": At the En

voy: "Come on, be a sport. Give
ui the cheataUs! ". .At Cafe L'

Auberge: "H s harder to lose than

a cocktail par.y bore". .At

Maud Chez Elle: "The old, old
story. The 'hand is quicker than

ACROSS
1 former, U.S.
' Postmaster
General,
Farley
4 Poet, Ogden
5 Sacred imaf
12 Shoshonean
Indian
13 Notion
M Ibsen heroine,
IS Eastern stata
ab.)
18 Hymns
IB Party

designations

DOWN
1 the
Obscure
2 Ledger entry
SQueeA
Victoria's
adviser,
Viscount
4 More pleasant
5 British
architect
;reit. -.
7 Headgear
I Peruvian
Indians
Girl's toy

10 Russian city

iiim.

ejg jet
rSpoIT iGrZsgi

20 Shaded walks llgcottWl irt

21 Rowing

Implement
22 Japanese
outcasts

24 Miss
Muller
28 Scent
27 Steal
SO Consented
32 Hairy coat
34 Basked
35 Flifhts of
steps
38 Watch
37 Depend
3D French islands
40 rather
41 Make
mistake
43Wlng-ehaped
45 Sinews
49 Smoke
St Eagle (comb.
form)
82 Always
S3 Microbe
84 Arid
85 Look for
M Lady Jane
87 Chicago's
White-

17Turish inn
19 Burdened
23 Little Eva's
playmate

24 Church St Missive
service 40 World War I!
23 Malarial fever admiral
2s More unusual 41 Foe
27 Means of 42 Skilled filers
transportation 43 Exist
,(pl.) 44 Awry
28 Monster 48 To be (Fr.)
2t Good Queen 47 Fiddling
Roman
31 Weirder 48 Mythical
33 Scottish river t
nobleman 80 Ham's partnet

I 1 k I It I? I J I 18 p It 111
i 5 : T''Z.
r t "tt
r5 WaL
L-J-2i -rf
FT g r iffT
r r"w"W
Si
T--Mmt' r
r ;fr'-r-
I I f FTTc

the knee."



.....

7?
THCJtSDAY,. JANUARY S,495 ;
THE PANAMA AMTXICAil AN
INDEPENDENT DA1LT NEW8PATKE
nai

i
r.-i

jmmmiiiiiimim-,'timmii,ii,iiIiiiii iirmtiiwi'iii -iWMfrpV ill I i fjifvtammmm

, RECEIVES AWARD Carlos E. Levy, who lives at 25th- Street East, 5-16 Apartment 204, Pan Panama
ama Panama C4tr, recently received an Army Suggestion Award Certificate and a cash award of $115
for devising filing system which will save the' UA. Government an appreciable amount of
time and money, Levy,; left, Is employed by the stock control branch signal supply and Main-'
tenano1 Division, USARCARIB, at Madden Wye. He was Tresented with the award by Col.
Walter A. Kneyse: center, Signal officr,USARCARB3, in- the presence of. Capt. John O. Grill,
Jr., chief of the branch byi which Levy is cmployedv-MP.S. Army Pbotoy

f wU? vis?
'

STUDENTS AT WORK Representatives of American nations,
who make up the student body at the U.S. Army Caribbean
School, Tort Gulick, receive instruction in a, variety of mili military
tary military subjects ranging from basic Infantry weapons to highly
technical planning and strategy courses. Communications, automotive-
maintenance hgineedn studies and .even cooking
are among the areas in which officers and men receive in instruction,
struction, instruction, with the aim of disseminating information through throughout
out throughout the hemisphere on the most; modern, up-to-date training.
rh TtsARriARiB flrhno! firoalsare to orovlde unity of action

and methods among armies or
to-ereate- mutual understanding

land. countnes'Thes school? makes a contnoutionme u.o.
Army, as a "Power ior Peace." Here men of different back backgrounds
grounds backgrounds from the American republics learn to live and work
together, all striving toward peace and mutual respect. -Graduates
return to their respective nations -to pass on to those
iindermg40th '1n. the .art of war and lntenja lntenja-tional
tional lntenja-tional iinderstariding!BJifil"'cooperation which they have learn learned.
ed. learned. Because the USARCARIB School enrolls only student of
Central and South America and the Caribbean islands, it en en-Joys
Joys en-Joys the unusual position of being the only U.S. Army-operated
school in the world Engaged exclusively In the training of
foreign nationals. ; In a creed prepared, by students,, the srfhool
is described as' ifmonument to peace and., understanding
among nations," with high ideals which inspire the men from
many lands "to work as"one to achieve greatness foy our
countries." Its mottq is "All for One and One for All."! The
USARCARIB School -will be among the Army units presenting
displays on Amed Forces Day, Saturday. (U.S. Army Photo)

Agents See Alabama Vote Record
Under Terms Of Compromsie Plan

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (UPI) (UPI)-Agents
Agents (UPI)-Agents worked hurriedly in three
central Alabama counties today
bi preparation for a new Federal
Civil Rights Conmission hearing
into alleged discrimination a a-fainst
fainst a-fainst Negroes.
the Investigators moved iwifty
lince theymiisf complete their
examinations of voting records
before Friday under terms of a
"compromise" 'agreement reach reached
ed reached Monday between the commis commission
sion commission and the state.
The state withdrew lt9 defiant
harges .fliat' th commission lias
no right to examine, the records.
The federal agency agreed not o
force Circuit Judge George "Wal "Wallace
lace "Wallace and five rebellious registrars
to testify at a Friday imeefing of
the commission's sub committee.
Specifically,-: the?-' agreement
said: Cdmimlsifion agents have the
"right to inspect official Vioter re registration
gistration registration record. ; hi Barbour,
Bullock and .Macon counties to the
extent they aire, relevant to the
commission'r inquiry and in a
manner consistent with proper
reservation and use. of the
records by state authorities. The
Inspection should be carried out...
In various counties and places
where the records are kept.r
The examination "shall not in interfere
terfere interfere with the proper Judicial
processes of the state of Alaba Alabama."
ma." Alabama." ;
Inspection of the records should
be completed before Friday.,-
Jurisdiction of the case remains
In the hands of the U.'S.' district
court,. here j... s
The surprise agreement was
signed' by Federal Judge Frank
M. Johnson Jr. ,s 'i
' The-Montgomery chapter of the
White CitiienS Council Monday
said President "Eisenhower should
pologtee, to;Alabama, now that!
the state, has agreed toilet civil
tights investigators; see voting
records. ,'v".' X
"An : 'tpologr Is' oue Alabama
from President Elsenhower, the
northernand icslawag editors and
evervone WhA ha hn rrvine fhnt
Alabama" registration officials
engaged in, a reprehensible Jdcf

tne ,, weswrn ttemifipnerc, au

and respect rlamojjg; peppiei
Gov. -elect John Patterson, who
had denounced the commission's
earlier action as a "rank inva invasion
sion invasion of state rights," along with
his, legal counsel iss-ied a state statement,
ment, statement, which said: .,
"We feel that this order ade adequately
quately adequately protects the, interest and
dignity of the,' state, of. Alabama
and its public officials?.
"We have nothing to .hide and
our public officials, have performed-
their- dutjrin a legal and
proper manner, treating all citi citizens
zens citizens equally and impartially."
Justice Department lawyers
said:
"The order represents a sincere
and cooperative effort on the part
of counsel and the. parties con concerned
cerned concerned to reach a solution where whereby
by whereby the rights and obligations of
the United States and the state
of: Alabama- are accommodated."
Soviet Army Paper
Charqes Iran May
Sell Out To West
MOSCOW, Jan. 8 (UPI) The
Soviet Army organ Red Star to today
day today charged Iranian leaders with
preparing to sell out to the West
by signing A military treaty with
the United States.
M,The U.S. imperialists propose
to use Iranian territory and its
oil resource! for their own ag aggressive
gressive aggressive aims, thereby creating a
theat.to the independence and
the Security of that country,"
Red Star said,
"The ruling circles of Iran are
taking Up a strange position. One
can only, msrvel that they do not
see,, or do not, want to see this
threat."; ,-u.
: The' newspaper added that by
preparing.to sign a military trea treaty
ty treaty with1 the United States, Iran Iranian
ian Iranian ;leaderjij "intend to overstep
the Ijmits beyond which there be.
gins :direct',help to U.S. -imperial-is,m
in carrying outfits aggres aggressive
sive aggressive plans ) timed alainat the US
SR and ;the other peace loving

Awards and Recognition
Dinner Scheduled at
Margarita Jan. 23
The annual Awards and Rec
ognition Dinner the .biggest
event of the year for adult
leaders in Boy Scouting will
be held at Margarita! Jan. 23.
More than 200 Den Mothers,
Cub and Scoutmasters, Explorer
advisers, committeemen, insti
tutional representatives. Com
mjssloners. council members
and officers are expected to
attend the adult affair at the
Margarita Clubhouse.
' The Panama Railroad Is
running a special coach from
the Pacific side. It will leave
' Balboa Station at 5 p.m. and
will be met by special bnsea
in Cristobal for the trip to
Margarita.
L. Budd Haberstlck, chairman
of the Boy Scout Council's ac activities
tivities activities committee, noting that
the dinner is- exclusively for
adult Scouters, declared "all
wives, husbands, sweethearts
and other friends of Scouting
are cordially invited."
Capt. Robert Boyd Is In charge
of ticket saleTwhich will be
handled mostly through Insti Institutional
tutional Institutional Representatives. They
will cost $2 each.
Scout Commissioner Lester
Ferguson will present citations
to all Units that attained their
membership goals during 1958.
The main speaker will be Frank
Rogers, head of the Camping
Division of Boy Scout National
Headauarters.
Highlight pf the evening will
be the presentation of awards
to individuals for their out outstanding
standing outstanding work in Scouting dur during
ing during the past year.
A special committee headed
by Carl Widell has decided who
will receive the 12 certificates,
six Scout Statuettes and one
Silver Beaver award to be pre presented
sented presented by the Canal Zone Boy
Scout Council. The Silver Beav Beaver
er Beaver is the highest award the
Council can bestow. The reci recipient
pient recipient of the Silver Beaver" will
not be known until the night
of the dinper.
The committee in charee of
the evening's program, which
will start at 6:45 p.m.. cdnslsts
of chairman C. W. Poopa. W. R.
Price, E. I. Everson. and Al
Benton.

Mr

1.
' If
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Your Community Network

840 Kilocycles
PANAMA
H
11

Bulgamn Denounced
As-Double Ifealer,
frailorlnpeech
MOSCOW fUPIVA aoeech to

r.ntnmnnixt Pirtv leader made
public yesterday denounced form
er Premier wuoiai a. Buigamn as
a traitor and double dealer who
did not tell the truth even in his
confession of error.
The latest public attack on the
goateed army marshal who pre preceded
ceded preceded Nikita S. Khrushchev as
premier was contained in a steno steno-rrnhic
rrnhic steno-rrnhic rpnnrt of the Communist
Party Central Committee meeting
last mnnth lit which Ruleanin Ad
mitted he was a member of the
disgraced "anti-party group.'.
'. Ar.rnrdin? to the reoort. L. P.
Kornitz, president of the state
MmmitfM on rerealx and a high
Soviet official, blasted Bulganin's
admissions as Deing given in insincerely
sincerely insincerely and untruthfully."
"Aetiwllv this is nothine sur
prising," Kornitz said.
"Me is a oouDie-aeaier ana aj
irUnr and does not want to1 tell
the truth even up to the end.'
Tpe Communist rarty news newspaper
paper newspaper Pravda joined in the de-
nunclanon of uuigamn ana me
nther anti.nartv rliaue members
former Premier Georgi Malenkov,
former deputy premier Linr
Kaganovich and ex-Foreign Minis Minister!
ter! Minister! Vvacheslav M. Molotov and
Dmitri T, Shepilov.
Both Pravda ana Kornitz at attacked
tacked attacked the ousted officials for
thetr nnnnitinn in 'Rhnishrhev's
program of agricultural develop-
. j .i .: i o:i
ItldUl oi virgin UUU3 in aiucua.
Song-Leader De Vos
To Direct Music
At Baptist Church
DON d vos
Don DeVos will be the soloist
and music director for the evan evan-gelistie
gelistie evan-gelistie orttsad 'afr the Fhsfc.Bap-
tit Chiirrh atartintf 13. DeVos
has been assisting the Rev. John
Edmund Haggai m ms evangelis
tic campaigns ior ine pasi year.
DeVos took his training with
the Music Department at the
Moody Bible Institute in Chicago
and launched into a music career
which has led him into many
countries of the world. While on
duty in the Navy he organized the
first Youth For Christ rallies out outside
side outside of the United States.
He was selected to be master of
ceremonies at a Dwight D. Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower presidential rally. Radio
station WCFL called him to man manage
age manage the popular "Songs in the
Night" radio broadcast. In Bel Belfast,
fast, Belfast, Ireland, he led a 7000 voice
choir in an evangelistic crusade,
and in Liverpool, England, he
conducted gospel services for chil children
dren children with 10,000 in the auditorium
and other thousands turned a a-way.
way. a-way. DeVos will be singing and di directing
recting directing the music at the First Bap
tist Church at 7:30 each night
from Jan. 13 to 25. Nurseries will
be provided for children. The
church auditorium is air-conditioned.

' -1 r '" u
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iff

PEREIRA
Shoe Store

ABMniA
LUCHO AZCARRAGA
EVERY THURSDAY
from 6:30 to 7:00 pm.

O G: 1090 K1,ocyclfs
V COLON

Vessel Rolling :
In 40-Foot Seas

Two merchant ship, one with a
widening crack in her main deck,
rolled in 40 foot seas off the east
coast of Bermuda today as Coast
Guard cutters stood by.
The 450-foot freitfhter African
Dawn, escorted by the cutter Half
Moon," rode before 50 mile per
hour winds with a crack in her
main deck. The Coast Guard at
Norfolk, Va., reported the crack
was extending despite effort, to
halt it.
The African Dawn an s m.im,
vessel of U.S. registry, radioed
she had given up making her
scheduled destination at Fall Riv River.
er. River. Mass and w.-hM .i.
, ui.cn hi uie
nearest U.S. port or to Bermuda
when weather permitted. The
$st .fuard said she wai about
nines east ot Bermuda.
The British freighter Hillcrest,
With a rrouv nt i ',
, 4 "" WBS eponea
nding rough weather about 230
...C1 uvi-uieasi or Bermuda with
Everyone Is a V.l.P. for Avianca
Air conditioned private waiting
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AVIANCA
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Hirsch Dies

COLUMBUS, Ohio (UPI) Gus Gus-tav
tav Gus-tav Hirsch, 82, internationally
known electronics engineer who
developed a successful television
transmitter 30 years ago, died to today.
day. today. Hirsch, a retired Army colonel,
also transmitted the first radio
message from an Army transmit transmitter
ter transmitter while in the Signal Corps.
He was president of the Sky Skyway
way Skyway Broadcasting Co. which op operate!
erate! operate! radio station WVKO in
Columbus, and a director in 11
Ohio independent telephone com companies.
panies. companies. He was also an official of the
Nprth State Telephone Co. of
High Point, N. C. and the Caro Carolina
lina Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Co.
of Tarboro, N. C.
her engine disabled. The cutter
Mendota, with d line attached to
the Hillcrest, radioed Norfolk she
would tow the vesel in when the
40-foot seas abated.
The Hillcrest was in no danger.
a Coast Guard spokesman said,
dux tne African Dawn could devel
op serious trouble.
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New Airpori Check-in Counter
In order to give you more ef efficient,
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Trouble Expected
From Tribesmen
In Morocco Woods
RABAT. Morocco ( UPI Motor-

ized infantry sealed off the Riff
Mountains today, ready for action
against mutinous Berber tribes
men who had been ordered m
lay down their arms by 1 p.m.
Several battalions of trnonc
moved into pos'tion on the flanks
of the snow-canned ranse stmri.
dling the Mediterranean coast 150
miles northeast of here.
The Riff Berbers, traditional
rebels, took to the woods last
month as a protest against the
trial of Berber chieftain Addi ou
Bihi as an anti-government plot plotter
ter plotter and King Mohammed V's or order
der order for the arrest of Lahcen
Lyoussi, another Berber, on
charges of treason.
lyoussi fled to the Atlas Moun Mountains,
tains, Mountains, where he has been travel traveling
ing traveling under the protection of a
heavily-armed escort.
Experts say the underlying
cause of the trouble is Berber re resentment
sentment resentment of the growing influence
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111



rAGs. rouB

a aw igti

(Social and Otli

xerwide

By Staffm

v

i Ji Jl L If tsLpU P 2-0740 2-OUI U

Box 134,
Panama
tU fmftli U LtimmLr Xnan
mm 8.00 uj 10 M mtf.

ft)T AMADOR OFFICERS' WIVES HONOR
MAXWELL TAYLOR AT LUNCHEON

V.J Mrs. Maxwell D. Taylor, who visited tht M j
Wtek with her husband. General Taylor, Army Chief of Staff,
mi honored at a luncheon alven Tuesday at the Fort Ama-

idor Officers' Open Mess. ,
i Hostesses included elected board members and honorary
nfembers of the Amador Officers Wives Club.

Mrs. Hugh P. Osborne, presi president
dent president of the Amsdor Officeri'
Wives Club, introduced the guest
of honor, who spoke on her favor favorite
ite favorite project, an apartment ctub for
Amy widows and a nursing home
in Disconnection.
Attending the luncheon wen
Mrs! William E. PoUcr, Mrs.
Kldgely Gaither, Mrs. Charles L.
Dasher, Mrs. Milton L. Ogden,
MraV Huh P. Osborne, Mrs. Ralph
A, Jones, Mrs. Cecil Himes, Mrs.
Johi "Moore, Mrs. James Coney,
MrsT Russell Hrchingsr, Mrs. Jo Jo-seph
seph Jo-seph Grezaffi, Mrs William E.
Eckles, M-i. MirusU' Moucha,
iiTft, Willw n r nl.ir.l. m Janiei
Mrs William Grady, Mrs. Max
Turner, Mrs. John Ettershank,
Mrs'. Edmund Heilbronner, Mrs.
Guiflermo Airall and Mrs. Burr
Adams.

Dr. and Mrs. Carlos Pedreschi
oi Boquete have announced the
birth of a daughter at the Gorua Gorua-1
1 Gorua-1 Revilla Clinic in Davi.l on
Christmas morning.
Their second daughter, the has
been named Desiree Honorine. The
second name is that of her great,
grandmother, Mrs. Honorine Jan Jan-SOff,
SOff, Jan-SOff, of Stockholm, Sweden.
School Fashion Show
The nineteenth annual Chez
TJlftisp fashion show will be Dre-

senlea nexi weanesuay evening
at 8, p.m. on the front lawn of Bal Balboa!
boa! Balboa! High School.
Models will be members of the
household arts classes, instructed
Ttf '"MSee TTlnicn Mnnrnp Thpv will

VJ piUIUI. i . J ...
model the clothes they have made

Beiflseives.
David Browne will serve as
master of ceremonies, and enter entertainment
tainment entertainment will be provided by Ve Vena
na Vena .Bennett and Joaline Clare, voc

alists- Geoge Garcia, accordianist;
and Richard Morris, organist.

The public is mvneo. 10 aueun.

M.l.T. Club Plans
Oinntr Mtating Saturday

Tne M.1.1. wun oi rauam u

planned a dinner meeting tor
.mw. .ml their wives Satur

day evening in the Fern Room of

the Tivoli Guest House.
The occasion will, honor H. E.
Bobdell, executive vice president
of the M.l.T. Alumni Association,

and Mrs. Lobdell.

A social hour is planned for sev

en to eight o'clock, followed by a

steak dinner.

Reservations should be made

with C. W. Chase Jr., Balboa 3364,
or Eduardo Icaza, Panama 2-029.

Clayton Officer' Wives
Elec New Officers
The election of officers was the
highlight of the monthly coffee
and business meeting of the Kort
riavtnn Offirers' Wives Club Tues

day at the Clayton Officers' Club.

Officers tor me coming year
will be Mrs. Richard W. Dowcll,
nrPciHent- Mrs Alfred E. Bonni-

well, vice president; Mrs. Irving
. i . w : i

T. aneppara, secretary; airs. Du Duly
ly Duly Adair, treasurer; and Mrs.
Thomas I. Breadhurst, vice trea treasurer.
surer. treasurer. Hostesses for the coffee meet meeting
ing meeting were wives of the 1AGS otii otii-cers,
cers, otii-cers, with Mrs. F. J. Tate chair chairman.
man. chairman. Presiding with her at the
coffee table were Mrs. J. E. Ak Ak-ans,
ans, Ak-ans, Mrs. B. E. Adams and Mrs.
C. ,F. Wines.
New members introduced he
meeting were Mrs. R. 0. Sessions,
Mrs. John Sheets, Mrs. Alvin
Meyer and Mrs. Joseph Cunning Cunningham.
ham. Cunningham. Guests were Mrs. Kenneth

G. Newby, Mrs. Mary E. Jones,
Mrs. William C. Jones, Mrs. E. F.
Cavaleir and Mrs Gussie Garrett.
A short business meeting wis

conducted by the outgoing presi

dent, Mrs. Russell W. riediioger,

who expressed her tnanas ior me
cooperation given ber during the
year by other club officers. The
group includes Mrs. M. Moucha,
vice president; Mrs. John P. Ein Ein-erchank,
erchank, Ein-erchank, secretary; Mrs. Russell
Norris, vice secretary; Mrs. B. E.
Adams, treasurer ana Mrs. George
Carter, vice treasurer.
Reports were made by the sec secretary
retary secretary and welfare chairman De De-fore
fore De-fore Mrs. Hechinger handed he
president's gavel to Mrs. Oowell.

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Kill gal len

Orchid Chapter
Meets Tomorrow
Orchid Chapter One, Order of
the Eastern Star, will hold a stat stated
ed stated meeting Friday evening at the
Scot sh Rite Temple in Baoa.
Refreshments will be served af af-Itr
Itr af-Itr the meeting.

f

m&M LusJ LLfeJ

,1

i'l V S :, I i t

mm iiwf" .1

1 V a m&

if

St. Lvke's Guild
Melts Tomorrcw
The Morning Guild of the Cathe Cathedral
dral Cathedral of St. Luke will meet tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow looming at 'A a.m. ai the

home ot Bishop Gooden.

American Legion Plant

'Moon Lite' Cruise

The American Legion Post One,
Fort Amauor, has announced plans

for its snnual "Moon Lite Cruise"
Janutry 3 aboard the i.nybuat

Presideit Porras.
The Porras will leave Gamboa

at 8 p.m., will cruise to Gatun
and return to Gamboa at mid midnight.
night. midnight. Dancing, free beer and

snacks will be featured.
A limtied number of tickets are
available from Legionnaires or at
the Fort Amador clubhouse.

Engineers' Wives
Meet Tomorrow

The monthly meeting of the En Engineer
gineer Engineer Wives will be held tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow morning at 9:30 at the resid residence
ence residence of Mrs. Robert P. Shimp at
Fort Amador.
All members are requested to
bring old records and bracelets
for patients at the Corozal men mental
tal mental hospital.

Gem and Mineral Society
The Canal, fpue Gem and Min Mineral
eral Mineral Society will have an impor
tant meeting tomorrow evening at
7:30. All members are ureed to

attend.

Blind Students Guests
At British Embassy

Sir Ian and Lady Henderson
gave a tea party and concert Tues

day for students of the Salvation

Army School for the Blind. The
event was held at the residence
of the British, -Embassy.

performing in the concert were

Mrs. Homsberger, Father Wentt
of the Episcopal Church in Parsi Parsi-so
so Parsi-so and Mr. Federlco Garcia of
Panama. They were accompanied
by Lady Henderson at the planio.

Oambea Women's Club
Meeting Ton'ght
The Gamboa Women's Club hns
scheduled a regular meeting for
this evening at 7:30 at the Gam Gamboa
boa Gamboa Civic Center.

JOTTINGS IN PENCIL
Mark) Lanza may appeair at the
Latin Quarter in New York.

There's a hot deal Mewing... m m-san
san m-san Johnson, the star of "Whoop
Up has been suffering from at attacks
tacks attacks of laryngitis...Lan:y Blyden
of "Flower Drum Song" and Car Carol
ol Carol Haney, who did the choreogra choreography,
phy, choreography, are solidly together again.
Carol is wearing a new mink tole
to celeb -ate the reconciliation ...
Although Gisele MacKenzie is ex expecting
pecting expecting a baby, friends predict
she'll join Jack Benny for his
Fontainebleu engagement in Mia Miami
mi Miami Beach in February.
Jimmy Durante' Christmas
cards were signed "Marge Little
and Jimmy Durante," leadin
friends to wonder if he's finally
married Margie, wha's been his
tio.noo fnr urh a lone time. ..Ed

die Fisher's pals say he's round rounding
ing rounding up all the cash he can lay his
hands on so he can arrive at a
settlement with Debbie and rush
into marriage with Elizabeth Tay Taylor.
lor. Taylor.
Kim Novak's trick for achiev achieving
ing achieving anonymity as she slips out of
her midtown apartment is a jet
black wig.
The Duke Ellington musical,
"Jump For Joy," has been call called
ed called off. Money problems... The ex ex-Mrs.
Mrs. ex-Mrs. Vic Damone, Pier Angeli, is
being wooed by art dealer Piero
Tozzi Jir.... Jimmy Stewart's re reward
ward reward to himself for doing such a
bajig-up job in "The FBI Story,"
just completed, is an 11-day va vacation
cation vacation with his family in Hawaii.
One of Broadway's biggest night nightclubs
clubs nightclubs has been losing $5,000 a
week, steadily, leading Main Stem
regulars to wonder how long the
bosses can absorb the red ink ...
Johnny Mercer and Marrice Ry Ry-skind
skind Ry-skind are about to team up for a
Broadway musical.
Lily Pons, divorced from An An-Arc
Arc An-Arc Knstplanplz. still dies maes-

tros. She's been dating L-eopoia

Stokowski, ex-husband of Gloria

Vanderbilt Lumet.

Tyrone Power's widow, Debbie
Minarlos. will return to Europe

as house guest of Jean Pierre Au

mont and Marissa Pavan as soon

as possible after the birth of her

baby this Spring.. .invars oi viu
tioriana will adore "The Remark-

able Mr. Pennypacker," which is

omilent with swags ana uounces

in marvelous color.

Bobo Rockefeller's friends think

shp'll snend most of her time in

California from now on because

New York society, In. her opinion,

"lacks electricity" ... Judy Holli-

day's new date Is TV ctor Ralph
Roberts.. Singer Sandu Scott is up
for a role In the play "44 West,"
by Sylvia Regan who wrote "The
Fifth Season."
If the book and cast are as good
as the score by Jule Styne, the

Ethel Merman show "gypy"
should be a great hit... Sara Lou
Harris, one of the nation's top
Negro models, ii seeking an an annulment
nulment annulment of her marriage to come comedian
dian comedian Buddy Bowser.
French ready-to-war manufactur manufacturers
ers manufacturers are hopping mad alisome of
the leading designers of haute
couture Yves St. Laurent In par particular.
ticular. particular. They claim to have lost
close to 50 million dollars in each
too-rapid switch from shape to

shape. Trends got rolling before
the mass producers were able to
exploit them, and the whole year
has been chaos, -from sack look to
trapeze.
Bing Crosby's P'etty bride,
Kathy Grant, endeared herself to
the New York reporters but didn't
make out quite so well when she
hint the Windy City. Chicago
newsmen resented her "snippy"
answers to their questions. ..Boris
Morros will be ii ihe news again
when his Viking book, "My Ten
Years As A Counter Spy" is pub published.
lished. published. He's been a controversial
figure since his "heroic" exploits
first were trevealel.
Kim Novak's escort on the Lln Lln-dy's
dy's Lln-dy's scene is writer Paddy Chay Chay-evsky...
evsky... Chay-evsky... Ricky Nekon now employs
two former all-American football
stars to help him get through the
crowds when he makes personal

appearances.. .Ex queen Soraya.

who went to Switzerland to see
her mo.her. is eeine a couple of

dashing chaps, too. She's being

courted by South America's -Al

fonso GeraldoTobon and French

millionaire Georges Flxon.

borne 100 advertising agencies

are bidding on the 1960 recruiting

campaign of the U.S. Air Force

.Mickey Rooney it makina a nlav

for Laura Sands, the pretty sing

er at the Tender Trap.

Veteran film actor James Glea Glea-son
son Glea-son is recuperating after major

surgery in a California Hosipital...

Film director Otto Premin

dating Jeanne Rejauniar ... Para

mount executives are fliDDinir ov

er 20-year-old Ina Balin, soon to
be seen as Sophia Loren'i iten.

daughter in "The Black Orchid

ma scored heavily in the tii.

. 1

version oi "compulsion: I
Mrs. Lillian Bryan
Dies; Funeral Set
For Tomorrow At 1
Mrs. Lillian Bryan, a longtime
resident of Panama, died Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night at the Oorgas Hospl-
Mrs. Bryan, who migrated to
the Isthmus during the early
construction period, was a per person
son person of amiable disposition. Her
husband, the late Parky Bryan,
predeceased her about 12 years

ago.

Lefikto mourn her loss are her

daughter Blanche Bryan, Mrs.
Esmelda Phillips, Mrs. Gladys

Cox and Elma (Roses) Bryan;
sons Donald and Vivian, the lat latter
ter latter In the U.S .: sister Mrs. Ger

trude Genes; nieces Dorothy,

reany ana ituoy ; granacniiaren
Dorothy. Alfonso and Stanlev:

grandson Leonard Clement; and
sons-in-law Herman Cox and

Ralph Phillips.

She was a member of Mt. Pls Pls-sah
sah Pls-sah Lddge No. 82, and the Bar

badian Friendly Society.

Interment will take place to

morrow (Friday) at the Corozal
cemetery. Busses will leave the
home, located at Canavaggio

Building, National Avenue, at l
p.m.

Steelworkers Head Hopes' Agreement

On Wage Contract Will Avoid

By OSWALD J ACOBY,
Written for NIA ferviea

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South Wast North East

Pass Pass ,'1 )
3N.T. Pasa.' -iN.T

Pass Psm t
Opening lead 7

Pits,'

Pativ

I .r; r

To paraphrase Bret Harte "-Tor
plays that are dark and :tiick
that are vain, the Chinese are
culiar." .',
"I. T. Sun is responsible for to today's
day's today's defensive gem.
His jack' of clubs held the first
trick and he returned the suit
with dummy'! king winning vthe
trick. A low diamond was led
and South' queen was taken by
West's king. v
Back came a third club pnd Mr.
Sun had no t-ouble abouti throw" throw"-ing
ing throw"-ing away his ao of diamonds.
As you can see by looking at all
the cards, this play effectively
cooked South's goose, Now he
had no way to establish his dia diamond
mond diamond 'suit without letting West
get in to cash a couple of clubs.
The play wis spectacular, but
it also was mighty good bridge.
Mr. Sun would have lost a trick
by his play If South's diamond
suit were headed by queen-Jack-ten
but the trick lost would have
been a mere overtrlck. As it was.

he had accomplished the main

objective of defense and beaten
the contract.
8 V

Q The bidding has been: i
West North East South'
14 Double Pass f
You, South, hold;
AAJ5 V3t AK10937
What di you do?
A Bid either one or two no-,
trump. The two no-trump la bet better,
ter, better, except with a very optlmistk
partner.
TODAY'S QUESTION
You bid two no-trump and
your partner has bid three hearts.
Now what do you doT
. Answer Tomorrow

mjfnr.ktxn (PU Davtd

Mnnairf' nreFident of the ? Unit

ed 1 Steelworkers expressed hope

t o d a 9 -"for" n. early agree agree-ment
ment agree-ment with the lsteel industry oa a
new wage, contract; that will re
plaee the present v one expring

June 30. :' i : v

McDonald told a v news con

ference that there had been some
preliminary tslks with various per persons
sons persons in the 'steel industry," but no
formal discussions yet on the new

Contract and -w dat set for ne
ontltlnn .t V',- v;A..' L'.

t "I certainly want to 'get fan

agreement. I surely do. not want
a shutdown of the basic -steel In Industry.
dustry. Industry. Since jthereaome- evi evidence
dence evidence p recbtervm our cotrntry
trom, the rece'isioa 't would -be
n' sadmistakeifor te tndnry fo
fofce a shutdown." McDonald ssld.
He sa!4 he felt thit a shutdown
also, would be harmful fause He'
felt the. nation 1s in, peril from So So-Viet
Viet So-Viet scientific advances In space
ei'mloration. v
McDdnald's .news conference
camp at the hoon recess of the
meot'njr o' the uh'on's executive
board. McnonsW said ttier na
been no dipiissiorj at th board
meetins of fie .wcnr;ne?oti?'ions.
We, said the board J"d, handed a
"lot of routine matters and an anneals."
neals." anneals." an will consider mor.
He said ther wre no aopesls
from tho'e who have been pro pro-tet'ng
tet'ng pro-tet'ng ne, ,"',
The Wige Polio Committee,
McDonald sal''", wl" mee nome nome-time
time nome-time the snrlnor "We-wiN-ake
our holicy the"." he said. v have
no recomme"lion row."
oreas" of beinst the "onlv ones"
talking Nut the nos'hillty nf a
teel strike t negotiations time.
We fiald he di not know whether
the Industry wW bxrenln auin n
a group, as 't did in whan,
major comnanlei banded together
for bargaininp
"I assume i' we ?et an aeree-

ment with one of he comnni

the re of them will come along,'
he old.
McDonald aid there is still a

"great del" of unemployment

among steel workers, but he lack

ed exacf figures. He said the last
he saw there were 200,000 of .the

USW's 1,250.000 members unem unem-oloved.
oloved. unem-oloved. but this figure was based

on dues rece'pts up to September

of lan year and he doubted that
thev reflected the present picture,

The USW president said he was

eoing to Australia Monday at the

invitation of the Political Science

."-yi--.v';,i? f .... I

would speak ;atS Sydney and aty
Mtibourne universities. He said be
also would attend some meet ngs
pf the' steelworkers union there.

NIw;RC; MOVII
- LONDON; (UPU -.l Soviet the the-aters
aters the-aters are showing .'; new, movie

tmea -was a Satelli e of the
Sim," radio Moscow sid t yester?
day. The -broadcast- heard here

said the movie was a pooular
scientific film which showed '"the

Hflight of a mlfiile through the

eosmos, past Dunning stars, and
buned out celestial bodies' v

Help Yourself Jo
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nakaraol
CampbaU'a Soups

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STARTING TOMORROW 4 DAYS ONLY

Before NOW
HAKATTA DOLLS $ 4.75 2.98
LAMPS 1.98 up
TEA SETS 15.50 2.98
SPINNING ASHTRAYS 95 .59
12" ELECTRIC LAMPS 35.00 24.95
SUIT CASES from .98
PLASTIC SHOPPING BAGS 95 .5Q
LEICA TYPE CAMERAS 7.50 3.49
FLASHLIGHTS .14 up
CABIN TRUNKS 50.00 14.95
ALARM CLOCKS 1.49 up
PLASTIC GARDEN HOSE 2.50 1,49

Before
.25

MOSQUITO DESTROYERS

ELECTRIC IRONS 4.95
LARGE THERMOS BOTTLES 1.50
MAIDENFORM "BRASSIERES" 3.50
SETS OF 5 SAWS . J. 1.25
PHOTO ALBUMS : from
EATON AND OTHER STATIONARY from
WASH BOARDS 2.25
NYLON HOSE 1.75
LEATHER BILLFOLDS : . .'.from
DANISH MOBIL8 ." 3.95
AND THOUSANDS OF OTHER ITEMS

NOW
.17
2.98
.98
1.49
.79
.98 up
.19 up
1.49
.79
.49 up
1.49

Books Less 20 Discount
COSTUME JEWELRY AT DRASTICALLY REDUCED PRICES.

SORRY, No Exchange,
No Oifl Wrapping.
Cash Sales. ONLY!

4TH OF JULY AVENUE AND

gK.'S

"J" STREET

OPEN DURlNd
NOON HOURS
From 9:00 a.m. Till
-7.00 p.m.

W-'ib.,



THURSDAY, 1ANTJAET4, 195

THE FAX IMA AMERICA!? -. AX IKDEPCKDENT. DAILI 2VKW8FAFES
PA6f mr,j

, Dailv W

.Together

oise-

Si

1

" I A U.$-Nvl Communication
Station display shewint ft ac.
'!fual transmission and recaption
f radio messages, maps and
photograph will bo a faatoro
tha Armod Farces Day tala tala-;
; tala-; bratlon Saturday af Albrook Air
Foreo Bat).
Keeping messages flowing over
the air wavei of the free world
Is the 24-hour, never-ending job
of the U.S. Naval Communication
Station in the Canal Zone.
-- It's one of the toughest, unher unheralded
alded unheralded jobs in the Navy Its crew
is also one of the proudest,
Inside massive, five-foot thick
buildings called "bomb- proofs,"
the men who keep t.h.e teletypes
ticking and the mes?a;c moving

j work unseen and unne.ua.
i, .. At the neiv cen'r at JVAma JVAma-S
S JVAma-S dor, they include aieiTI'ke chief
f, radioman Chanes Edwards, chief-

tn-charge of the. communications
center who has bnen a radioman
since he entered the Navy W
years ago. '" v. V
Working with him ar men like
R 1-c. Robert Miles, radioman
first class William Bathurst, T 2-c
John Allen, and R 2-c Solon Skan Skan-damis,
damis, Skan-damis, watch supervisors at the
Ft. Amador station. f
Af FoWn thA ronAlvlntf ntA.

- fVimr iviaIiiHa man lilro nhifet ratlin.

man Edward Sack, veteran of
more than 18 years in Navy com

munications. and chief radioman

Raymond Dube, chief -In-charge of

the communications center wun
more than 1$ years of service.
' At Summit, the transmitting sta station,
tion, station, they include men like chief
radioman Edward Grabowskl, 18-

year Navy veteran in charge' of
operations, and chief radioman
Richard Kelly, day supervisor who

h has been in the Navy jl6 years.
Sleepless nights and noise-filled
days are the occupational bedfel bedfellows
lows bedfellows of these trained men. In 20
years in the Navy they will prob probably
ably probably stand more watches than a
night watchman and lose more
sleep than a mother of 12 chil children.
dren. children. ''
It't the kind of grind that draws
men together, and at .the Navy's

communication station that's been

the story since the first Navy
wireless station was established
, at Colon in 1905.
Two show cases filled with
nearly 50 awards and trophies

won over the years bespeak of

the unity of the Naval Communi Communication
cation Communication Station. The cases bold a
place of honor in the office of -the
commanding officer. Cmdr.

Charles r Concannon.

a-

radio in San Francisco, Concan

son makes his headquarters at

rilled Kdutine Uraivs Men

At Naval Communications
uminmn nmummm imwr i n w wiMMiiiiiiini
imiiir iiin imiihiiiiiiiiiii iiiii mmmmm m iiiiiiii n imi nnni n "urii jilwsss jL.-. 4

BEHIND THE SCENES Inside the five-foot thi ck shell that houses the U.S. Naval Communica Communication
tion Communication Station at Ft. Amador, Navy radio operators keep traffic movins under the supervision of Ens.
C. J. Van Cott (right), assistant traffic circuit officer. The -operators include (from left) T2c sec second
ond second class John W, Allen, R3c James Q. Mason, and R3c Zatt Nosich. (Navy Photo)

Ft. Amador, hub of Navy commu communications
nications communications in the Canal Zone.
The station is one of five pri primary
mary primary relay stations in the Navy.
San Francisco, Guam, Pearl Har Harbor
bor Harbor and Pt. Lyafutey in French
Morocco are itsf partners.
Providing communication sup support
port support to U.S. ships at sea is the
station's primary mission. It can
make radio contact with any ship
in the southern hemisphere with within
in within seconds.
An additional and little known
duty of the station is handling
messages between the Panama
Canal Co. and transiting ships.
Older than the Panama Canal
itself, the U.S. Naval Communi

cation Station originally was built

to communicate with, shins and

tations on the Pacific side of the

A veteran of the early .days. .of .Isthmus. .Today It can. exchange

messages

world.

with any ship in the

Armed Forces Day Displays Feature

- ' m m mi

lerations In Action

Panama

A graphic over-all picture of
the Panama Canal in action
from the dispatching of ships
through the waterway to the can cancellation
cellation cancellation of stamps in a Canal
Zone oostal unit will feature the

11 Company government's participa-

play at Albrook Air Force Base
Saturday.
The Panama Canal's exhibit for
this year's Armed Forces Day
will De far more comprehensive
than any presented in previous
years. A major feature, this year
will be both mobile and static dis displays
plays displays portraying the role ot the
Company-Government as a "serv "service
ice "service agency" to all other govern government
ment government agencies in the Canal Zone.
'Among the many services per performed
formed performed oy the -Company-Government
serving all residents of the
Canal Zone are police and fire
protection schools;' public health
and hospitals; postal and customs
service ; water purification and
distribution; power generation and

distribution; and maintenance of

public hlgnwavs.
Among the Canal units planning
live and static displays are the
Engineering and Construction Bu Bureau:
reau: Bureau: ieaitn Bureau: Civil Af-

fairs Bureiu; Marine Bureau, and

supply and Community services
Bureau.
' Guaranteed to be an ey catch catcher
er catcher will oe a 14-foot traffic control

board to be set up by the Mirine

Bureau wiiicn will show the ac

tual location, dispatching and
movement of ships in the Canal

during tha dv. The board and iht
dispatching of ships will be con

trolled by a marine dispatcher

UfhrtBA ilftlifai h-a nf i"rV lutinna

1 W "uw,v va wwvi-auiHio xm

X.h Itt the Poit Captain's Office in

Balboa.

With the assistance of ship to

shore radio, telephones and oth

er equipment, the display will
duplicate as closely as possible
the operation ot ship dispatching
which takes place every day in
the terminal buildings on both
sides of the Isthmus.
The Postal Division expects to
do a thriving business with the
thousands of Armed Forces Day
Visitors who will be able to buy
stamps, or stamped post cards,
obtain souvenir cancellations, and
mall letters on the spot. The pos postal
tal postal unit will be a duplicate of
those in operation in the Canal
Zona and will be operated during
the day by Canal Zone postal em employes.
ployes. employes.
Finger printing devices and oth other
er other law enforcement equipment will
feature the exhibit to "be set up
by. the Canal Zone police. A po police
lice police officer will be on duty dur during
ing during the day to explain the work workings
ings workings of the various items on dis-
' play.
The Division of Schools will
demonstrate special equipment us used.
ed. used. in the education of the physic physically
ally physically handicapped. The devices
that are now being used in the
'special education program, will
' include an audiometer, braille e-

luipment, and psychological test test-ng
ng test-ng equipment. There also will be

an exhibit of the crafts material

produced by children enrolled in
this program.

The Engineering and' Construc

tion Bureau, responsible for siich

services as water purification,,' el

ectrical power, and construction
in the Canal Zone, will display

charts showing the electrical dis distribution
tribution distribution system: encineerini;

drawings and plans for the new
high level bridge across the can

al aMtalboa, and a magic faucet
Which will pour endless gallons of
water into a bottomless bucket.

Highlight of the Sanitation De

partment display will be an ani animal
mal animal baited insect trap, a device
used in the Canal Zone to collect
insects in various locations so
that charts and studies can be
made of the migration and ha habits
bits habits of mosquitos, flies and other

pests. Colored slides with titles

in Snanish will h shown during

the day to illustrate other Sanita

tion Department activities.

Also included in the Health Bu

reau display will be a representa representative
tive representative group of medical equipment
used in the Canal Zone hospitals.
Bilingual attendants will be pre present
sent present during the day to explain the
various exhibits.

Several of the larger pieces of

equipment used by the Canal or
ganization for maintenance, po

lice work, fire prevention, and

life saving, will be exhibited out
side the hangar on' the runway a
pron.
These will be a hook and lad

der truck and other specialized

tire equipment used by the fire
Divison; a hospital ambulance; a

launch used by the Canal Zone po police
lice police to patrol lakes and rivers; a
police radio patrol car; and a se

lection of machinery used by the
Supply and Community Service

Bureau. Personnel, speaking both

English and Spanish, will be on
hand to answer "questions and

demonstrate the different pieces
of equipment.

-Jiil III ll. i

Hi

Krushchev May Be Sharpening His Axe
For Major Purge Of Anti-Party Group

I Committee with 1 a self-indictment

that brought back the grim recot
lection of the Stalin-Beria tacw tacw-tics.
tics. tacw-tics. r

The autobiography of Field Mar

shal Montgomery is among the

new books piacea in circmuuu

this week by the Canal lone Library.

In the book, wtucn is entitiea

"Memoirs," Mo.ugomery spells
out the military situation that to today
day today confronts the West as well a
the recounts the events of his li
from boyhood through World War

II atd to the present.

Montgomery's career did not
end with the war. He became Chief

of the Imperial General Staff and

his disclosures of what is happen

ing in the War Office and the

councils of NATO taxe up more

than a third of the book.

Also included In the book is the

complete record of the Montgo

mery-Eisenhower cOTresponaence

during World War H.

Also on the list 01 new dooks

it "Qrpiheub," a pastoral tragedy
i v J : k 1 I tflk

oy i J. r aworosn, nwii xugo
School teacher. This book is a

hpoem written in tne classic tra

dition.

The complete list of new books

follows:

NON-FICTION Germany and
Freedom, J. B. Conant; The Three
Edwards, 1. B. Coitain; Science
and the Detection of Crime, C. R.
M. Cuthbert; The Southern Herit Heritage,
age, Heritage, J. M. Dabbs; Marc Chagall,
Walter Erben; Orpheus; a pastor pastoral
al pastoral tragedy, L, J. Fattorosl; The
Science of Engineering Materials,
J. E. Goldman; Young Executive
Wife, Edith Heal; The American
Communist Party, Irving Howe;
Spain, -A Modern History, Salvador
de Madariaga; Memoirs, B. L. M.
Montgomery; Dear Abby, P. F.
Phillips; Cast off the Darkness, Pe Peter
ter Peter Putnam; Central Intelligence
and National Security, H. H. Ran Ransom;
som; Ransom; Mrs. R; the Life of Eleanor
Roosevelt, Alfred Steinberg.
FICTION One to Grow On, Na Nathaniel
thaniel Nathaniel Bentheley; The Violated,
V. N. Bourjaily; The Dead Man's
Knock, J. D. Carr; The Eighth
Circle, Stanley Ellin; Our Man
in Havana, Graham Greene; The
Mountain is Young, Han Suyin The
Ugly American, W. J. Lederer;
So Love Returns, Robert Nathan;
Beware of the Mouse, Leonard

Wibberley.

CHILDREN'S BOOKS Lasso

your Heart, Betty Cavanna; Rifles
for Watie, Harold Keith; Rockets,
Missiles, and Moons, C. I. Coombs:

The First Book of Tropical Mam

mals, H. L. Hoke.

LONDON (UPI) Soviet Pre Premier
mier Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev was
believed yesterday to be setting
the stage for a major purge which
could lead to a trial and even
the execution of ex-rremier Geor Geor-gi
gi Geor-gi M. Malenkov.
Soviet affairs experts said
Khrushchev was preparing the
ground for a rout of his known
and potential opponents.
The forthcoming 21st Commu Communist
nist Communist Party Congress, scheduled to
open in Moscow Jan. 27, was ex expected
pected expected to be the forum for a
major move against Malenkov and
his so-called "anti-party" group.
But the signs were that Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev was aiming at potential op opponents
ponents opponents as well ss at the known
members of the "anti party"
group.
Even Communist dip 1 o m a t s.
well acquainted with tht current
Soviet scene, cautiously hinted
that there was more than met
the eye behind the revival of the
attacks of the group of ousted
leaders.

These diplomats did not rule out

to the death sentence for "ac "acknowledged"
knowledged" "acknowledged" leading opponent.
Observers said there was little
doubt that Khiushchev wes work working
ing working up to a nidior move for which
hf wants the Icrmal approval of
the party congress.
By then, it was believed, he
xpectet" to hsve al the neces necessary
sary necessary "evidence" to prove that he
was r'ght and the others wrong
in whatever hanpened politically
and economically in the post post-Stalin
Stalin post-Stalin era.
Th first indications that some something
thing something W3S sfoo' came. 4st month
when ex Premier Nikolai A, Bul Bul-anin
anin Bul-anin suddenly was included by
the Soviet press in the "ant: "ant:-oarty"
oarty" "ant:-oarty" Kroup. The groun original originally
ly originally included Malenkov, V. M. Mol Mol-otov,
otov, Mol-otov, ex-Deputy Premier Lazar
Kaganovieh and former Foreign
Minister Dmitri Shepilov. all of
.whom were ousted from their gov government
ernment government and party posts In 1957.
Shortly afterward Moscow open opened
ed opened up its guns and in mid-December,
the ae'ng ex-nremier and

one-time close friend of Khrush-

a series of tn;-ls which could lead chev appesred beforev the Central

THEY KEEP THE AIR WAVES BUSY Handling more than 10,000
messages monthly at the Navy's local communication station is a
complex job requiring skilled specialists men like (reading from
front to back) R3c Robert Bearss, R5 John W. Ryan, get Lowell
W. Parks, and R3C Wayne Moore. Tht items they are holding holding-earphones
earphones holding-earphones and telegraph key, teletype tape, voltmeter testing de device,
vice, device, and message file folder represent the four principal tasks
involved in keeping traffic flowing transmiting, receiving, upkeep
"and delivery. (Navy Photo)

Week Of Revival
Meeting Scheduled
Al Bethel Mission

The Bethel Mission Church e
Paraiso will conduct a week of
revival meetings beginning on Sun Sunday
day Sunday until next Friday,, Services
will begin each night at 7:15.
The revival messages will be
the Rev. Elmer O.'Nelipn, pastor
of the Church of the "Nazarene,
Bill Harrison and Russell Cloer.
Special mus' will be rendered
by the King's Four; and other i.
The services .'All bn conducted

by the Rev. Waldaba H. Stewart.

Chicago Daily News
Gels New Owner,
Marshall Field Jr.
CHICAGO (UPI) The purchase
of the Chicago Daily News the
city's second, top newspaper shift
In 28 months today left Chica Chicago's
go's Chicago's four large metropolitan
dailies under two owners.
They are Field Enterp"ises,
Inc., Monday's buyer,, and the Chi Chicago
cago Chicago Tribune, Inc., publishers of
the Tribune and the Chicago
American, purchased from the
Hearst Corp. in October, 1956.
Marshall Field Jr., Field Enter Enterprises
prises Enterprises president, announced the
purchase of the afternoon Daily
News from John S. Knight for $50
a share.
The estimated sale price for the
paper's controlling interest, which
Knight bought in 194 for $2,150,000
was 18 million dollars. The 481,293
outstanding shares of Daily News
stock total more than 24 million
dollars at the $50 figure.
Field said the Daily News would
continue on a basis of "vigorous
competition" with the Field-owned
Sun-Times, the product of a merg merger
er merger between Marshall Field Sr.'s
Chicago Sun and the afternoon

Chicago Times two years after
World War II.
Uiftil Field bought the Times in
1947, Chicago had five major
dailies, all separately owned.
The merchandising heir started
the Sun on Dec. 7, 1941 at the
outbreak of the war and published

it as a morning paper until Janu-

ary, ioo. ine comuinauwii Run RunTimes
Times RunTimes published around-the-clock
for several years.

The Hearst-owned Herald-American
changed Its name in 1953 to
the American, and three years

later was bought' by the Tribune
ownership but continued as an aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon daily.

The,, American was in turn the

product of several Hearst mergers

of the t paper dating back at far
at 1851.
Marshall Field Jr.jJ new editor
cited rising publishing costs for

and publisher of the Dally News,
his purchase decision.

Quote Unquote

WASHINGTON Rep. Joseph W

Martin (R-Mass.) after being de

feated by Rep. Charles A. Hal

leek (R Ind.) for the GOP House

leadership:
"I thought I had commitments

but they didn't all materialize. A

few friends let me down."
FLAT ROCK, N.C. L Poet-phil

osopher Carl Sandburg on deposed

Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista,

an admirer of Abraham Lincoln
"He read all about Lincoln

could tell him and it didn't seem

to do him much good."

MIAMI BEACH Fla. Navy

surgeon general Rear Adm. Bar
tholomew W. Hogan on the treat

ment of victims of an atomic at

tack:
"Those who have hopeless in

juries should not consume the

time of any surgeon who might

be able to spend his time in actu
al life saving procedures."

GOLDSBORO, N.C; Marion

Wilson, who was standipg near
where two fuel tanks dropped
from an F100 jet fighter plane
plummeted Into the ground:
"They went off real sharp, like
dynamite. I didn't see any fire
but there was some smoke com coming
ing coming out of the holes."
LITTLE ROCK, Ark.-Segrega-tionist
Robert W. Laster on the
possibility of a federal judge or ordering
dering ordering this, city's closed public
schools reopened on an integrated
basis:
"We're going to have to be in
contempt of this court or in vi violation
olation violation of the state law."

Belgian Congo Riots

Kill 35r Hurt 130;
Many Are Arrested

LEOPOLDVTLLE, Belgaln Con Congo
go Congo (UPI) New street fighting
erupted today despite concerted

efforts by white and Negro troops

to end rioting which has killed 35
persons and injured more than
130 th's week.

Several leaders of the anti-white
rioters have been arreted, and
warrants have been issued for the

arrest of others.

A white paratroop battalion,

flown in from Kamina, joined
Negro troops in breaking down

barricades thrown across the

streets by the rioters. The soldiers

used gunfire to disperse mobs at

several points, but there was no
imnied;ate report of new casual casual-tics.
tics. casual-tics. It appeared that In most cases

the troons fired into the air over

the heads of the rioters.

Mobs surged through the streets

of the native quarter, shouting

fich slogans as "Belgians, go

home!"
Gov. Gen. Hehrl Bosnians said
all of those killed and more than

100 of those injured in the rioting

were Negroes. Twenty-eight wh'te

men were reported injured.

Most of the rioters were Abako

tribosmpn from the lower Congo

About 600,000 Abskns now work In

or near Leonoldville and their
votes made Arthur Pinzi mayor
of the citv's Kalamu district in
the Congo's first municipal elec elections
tions elections last year.

WASTED TIMI
NEW ORLEANS (UPI)-Ban-dits
were wasting their time when
they bound and gagged bartend bartender
er bartender Jay MMbrougn after robbing
him of $100. ;
Malbrouch, a magician who
specialiie in rope esclpes,
freed himself in a matter of min

utes.

He Never Left Home
COLONTA, N.J. (UPI) Don
Newcombe. who never left home,
was "ready and willing" tod?v to
Mand trial with his two bro'hers
on charges of assaulting a former
po''rpman.
Newcombe, repo-led to he b-rn-s'orm
ne in Vene'.uHo saiH lst
ni"M. "1 haven't lft the city."
His tpa1. scheduled Monday be be-before
before be-before Essex County Judge Wal Walter
ter Walter Conklin. was no'tponed o Jan.
28 because the Cincinnati Redlegs
nitcher was reported In Latin
America.
"I don't know how anybody fig figured
ured figured I was in Venezuela, New Newcombe
combe Newcombe said at his home here.
"When I signed my 1959 contract
with Gabe Paul of the Redlegs
recently, Gabe left for Venezuela
but not me. I haven't left the
city."
Newcombe further explained he
a iked for the postponement be because
cause because he has acaulred a new law lawyer,
yer, lawyer, who wanted more time to
famOiarlze himself with the case.
"I'll be ready and willing to tes testify
tify testify when the time comes," New Newcombe
combe Newcombe added.

Once Again from
1 Panama Hilton

HOG
(PagaqmIa
Clarence Martin's Orchestra
Every Friday & Saturday
from 8:15 to 8:45 p.m.
Your host "Johnny "B" invites all
his friends to join him there
over
Your Community Network

R40 Kilocycles
PANAMA

1090 Kilocycles
COLON

"Thieves
Hit n
Ancon"
Why take chance$?

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form Theft
Policy can
protect you
from costly
losses.
CALL
2-0925
For complete information
of how our Residence
Theft Policy can
protect you!

Agents for
American Fidelity
and Guaranty Co.
PANAMA AMERICA
JANUARY 7, 1959
V
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JMo. 3 "L" Street

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6x9 49.95
8 x10 75.00
9 x12 99.75
KWANLIN
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9 x12 285.00
TAIPEI
6x9 170.00
9 x12 345.00
TUN0SHAN
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rri rf or ry I (

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'i.SA',



f s ; THTRSDAT, JANTARY g, 1959

Cervez&Balboa Out

nn
TB fr. iref
mm
I rr'?imUmbmtmi-m- A
10

-.. "'Mm'---'' '"' f .-'i':"
I v 'iS' I V''"' II

Cellar-Dwellers Tackle
League Leading Kings;
Marlboro Wins Closie
Fast-sinking Cerveza Balboa, groveling; in the
cellar six games off the pace, will get a chance to
gain on the leaders tonight when they play the front front-running
running front-running Kings at the Olympic Stadium.
Last night Alonso Brathwaite'g tenth-inning
the winnincr run from third base to

DULglC Ul i'v --
rive the Marlboro Smokers a 3-2 victory over the
2L i n 1 tii t j.u: I

Beermen. ine loss was
straight.
A battle of lefties looms to tonight
night tonight with Cerveza Balboa's Pat
Sclantlebury (1-3), opposing
Dlti Luebke (5-1).
Scantlebury will be making
his first starting appearance
toce Dec. 28 when he was chas chas-H
H chas-H by the Kings in the second
inning of the game the leaders
won 18-6 In Aguaduke. He has
leen only relief duty since then.
Luebke, who has beaten the
Beermen four times started
against them' last Friday night
but failed to show his usual
mastery in that contest. He last lasted
ed lasted only one and two-third in innings,
nings, innings, giving up three runs and
IlVe hits, and left the game with
his team trailing 3-1. The south southpaw
paw southpaw was taken off the hook,
however, because the Kings Ued
up the game in the third frame
and then went on to win by a
9-8 score.
Last night Leonardo Fergu Fergu-!
! Fergu-! on, who relieved starter Jim
'Haralson in the ninth after
Jim was lifted for a Pjnch Pjnch-hltter,
hltter, Pjnch-hltter, picked up his first win
against no defeats.
George, Maranda, who took
over for Chuck Page in the
ninth, dropped his third decl decl-glbn
glbn decl-glbn as compared to two
triumphs.
The contest was a strange one
which saw Page give up a total
of ten walks and Hardison six,
yet both hurlers almost mira miraculously
culously miraculously managed to hold tne
scoring down to a minimum.
Page permitted five of the
winners' six hits, while Hardi Hardison
son Hardison allowed all of the Beermen s
four safeties.
The Smokers plated the game s
Ilrst marker in the fifth on a
walk to Brathwalte, Page's er error
ror error as he tried to pick Alonso
off first, a free pass to Curt
Hardaway a long fly to right by
Bill Gabler which advanced
Brathwalte to third and George
Altaian's infield out.
In the eighth the Beermen
tied up the game. With one out
Barry Shetrone walked and
moved to second when Hector
Lopez was hit by a Hardison
pitch.
Dave Roberts' single advanc advanced
ed advanced the runners to second and
third but Clyde Parrls forced
Shetrone at home on a roller
Service Center Theatres
TONIGHT
BALBOA 6:15 tc 8:00
Robert Taylor
Richard Widmark
"The Law and Jake Wade"
In Cinemascope & Color!
. Starts SATURDAY!
Clifton Webb
- THE REMARKABLE
MR. PENNYPACKER"
In Cinemascope & Color!
COCO SOLO 7:00
Eddie Fisher
Debbie Reynolds
"BUNDLE OF JOY"
In Color! (Repeat Run)
DIABLO HTS. 7:00
uudy Garland James Mason
"A STAR IS BORN
In Cinemascope & Color!
(Repeat Run)
GATTJN 7:00
David Brian Vera Ralston
"ACCUSED OF MURDER"
MARGARITA
7:00
Danny Kaye
"THE COURT JESTER"
In VistaVision & Color!
(Repeat Run)
PARAISO 7:00
"The Bob Mathias Story"
and
'Man From God's Country"
Note Change In Program!
SANTA CRUZ 7:00
Kenneth More
Diane Cilento
"Th Admirable Crichton"
In Cinemascope & Color!
CAMP BIERD 7:00
'Challenge To Rln Tin Tin"
"THE MAD MAGICIAN
TODAY
CAP IT OLIO
tie. 15c
BANK! $125.00
'LAW of A THIEF
with P. Carey
Also:
DAY OF JUSTICE
: With R. Scott

cerveza naiuua s imru

to third, as Lopez moved to
third and Roberts to second.
Lopez scored when Bill Gabler
dropped catcher Marcos Cobos'
throw to first in an attempt to
double up Parris.
The Beermen took a 2-1 mar margin
gin margin in the top of the ninth. Pe-
pe Osorio walked to lead off
and stole second with Leon Kell Kell-man
man Kell-man at bat. Kellman's infield
out moved Pepe to third and he
came home when Hardaway's
low throw to the plate got away
from Cobos on Page's roller.
In the bottom of the ninth
the Smokers evened the count
2-2 on a single by Hardaway,
a double by Gabler and Ma Ma-nlto
nlto Ma-nlto Bernard's sacrifice fly.
Fereuson retired thp Rpprmpn
in order in the tenth and Hank
Mitchell; the first batter in the
Douom or tne tenth, walked.
Ferguson bunted toward third
for a sacrifice and. when Par Parris
ris Parris bobbled the ball both run runner
ner runner were safe.
Eddie Nanolenn's snirlfl fni
lowed, advancing Mitchell and
Ferguson to third and second
respectively, and Brathwaite's
single to right plated Mitchell
for the winning tally.
10-lnning Squeaker
CERVEZA BALBOA
AB R H PO A
4 0 0 2 2
Moore, ss
Shetrone, cf
Roberts, lb.
Lopez, 2b.
Parris 3fcu
GrenaW,"rf."
Osorio p., rf
Kellman, c.
Page, p.
Maranda, p.
2 0 0
4 0 2
4 2
6 2
4 3
2 1
0
1
.5 ,0.
2" 2
3 1
3 0
4 0
0 0
5 0
5 1
0 2
0 0
Totals 32 2 4 28 14
One out when winning run
scored.
MARLBORO
Napoleon, rf.
Brathwalte, 2b
Hardaway, 3b
Gabler, lb.
Altman. If.
Bernard, ss
Cobos, c
Mitchell, cf
Hardison, p
Prescott
Ferguson, p
Totals
13 0
1 3 2
1 1 6
2 13 1
0 0 0
0 3 4
0 4 1
1 2 1
0 1 3
0 0 0
0 0 0
31 3 6 30 IP,
Prescott Struck nut fnr WorHI.
son In 8th.
Score By Innings:
C Balboa 000 000 011 02 4 4
Marlboro 000 010 001 13 6 2
Summary: Errors: Moore. Page
2, Hardaway. Parris, Gabler
Runs batted in: Altman, Page,
Brathwalte. Earned runs- Cer Cerveza
veza Cerveza Balboa 1, Marlboro 3. Two
base hits: P. Osorio. Double Double-nlays:
nlays: Double-nlays: Shetrone. Kellman. Stolen
base: Altman. P. Osorio. Sacri Sacrifice
fice Sacrifice hits: Hardison, Shetrone,
Bernard, Napoleon, Ferguson.
Hit hatters: Hardison (Lonez).
Struck out: By Hardison 3, Page
3. Base on balls: Off Hardison
6. Ferguson 2. Page 10. Maran Maranda
da Maranda 2. Left on base: Cerveza Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 10, Marlboro 15. Pitchers
record: Hardison 1 run, 4 hits
In 8 innings: Page 2 runs, 5 hits
in 8 13 lnnlnes. Winning pitch pitcher:
er: pitcher: Ferguson (1-0). Losing pitch pitcher:
er: pitcher: Maranda (2-3). Umpires:
Hinds. Thornton Williams. At Attendance;
tendance; Attendance; 810. Time of game:
3:08.
iTODAf-ENCANTn- ??
.15
' WAII00! $115.00
Farley Granger in
"NAKED STREET"
John Payne in
"REBEL IN TOWN"

TfMEflTOES.TQDAY

T I V O tl I
55c. i ii a
Prohibited for Minors
European Pictures!
TRAVESURAS DE
PADRE E HI JO
- Also:
DOS MUJERES

VICTORIA
15c.
BRANDED
with Alan Ladd
- Also:
WHISPERING
SMITH
with Alan Ladd

CFN Begins TV
Baseball Clinics
This Afternoon
Beeinnlnar todav navial v.

youngsters will have the op
portunity oi attending a Daseoau
clinic conducted by some of the
same's creates nlavers from
the comfort of their own living
room.
The American Legion Junior
Baseball League, in coopera cooperation
tion cooperation with the Caribbean Forces
Network will operate a T.V.
Baseball Clinic every Thursday
afternoon at 4:30 p.m. and
continuing for approximately
nine weeks.
This baseball series will con consist
sist consist of nine films covering all
phases of baseball as well as a
short history of the game fea
turing some or tne past big
league stars.
Scheduled for televtalntr i'
"Infield Play 1st and 3rd" which
snows defensive etars in reg regular
ular regular slow motion; "Pitching
Stars of Baseball -nver1nir t.h
fundamentals of pitching dis
played by leading pitchers;
"Circling Thp RAspr" wMnh
stresses the fundamentals of
base runnlns" "Cat.pVilncr star
of Baseball", major league catch
ing as handled by some, of the
all time ereat catchers- "Bat
ting Stars of Baseball", In which
leaamg batters demonstrate
their technique; "Inside Base Baseball",
ball", Baseball", which covers thp Impor
tant plays of baseball; "All Out
ior Baseball" explaining the
fundamentals of b a s e b all ;
"PLAY BALL SON!!", an In
structional film aimed at the
younger baseball player.
Any organization in the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone that would like to
borrow these films should
contact George A. Black,
Chairman, American Legion
Junior Baseball, Box 823, Bal Balboa,
boa, Balboa, c.Z., telephone No. 1524.
Because of commitment t.n
televise all football bowl games
as soon as received (mm thp
UJS., CFN officials advised that
it mignt be necessary to cancel
this weeks baseball clinic in
which event it will he shown
the following week.
Injury May Force
Alex Olmedo Out Of
Aussie Tournament
PERTH, Australia (UPI)-Alex
Olmedo led a three-man American
drive into the semifmal round of
men's singles in the West Austral Australian
ian Australian championships yesterday to
stress the United States' new role
as the dominant world tennis
power, and then reported he may
have to drop out with an injury.
Olmedo was joined in the semi semifinals
finals semifinals by Barry MacKay of Day Dayton,
ton, Dayton, Ohio, and young Earl (Butch)
Buchholz of St. Lou;s, Mo.
The fourth, semifinal berth went
to Aiuires Gimeno of Spain, mark marking
ing marking the first time in tournament
history that no Australian player
has reached the semifinals.
Olmedo, the transplanted Peru Peruvian
vian Peruvian who scored two singles vic victories
tories victories for thp United States in last
week's challenge round w:n over
Australia, was forced to five sets
to heat young, red-haired Rod
Laver of Australia, 6-1, 6-3, 4-6,
3-6. 6-3.
Then Olmedo disclosed he suf suffered
fered suffered a pulled stomach 'muscle
durin? the first set. He was doubt doubtful
ful doubtful "'hether he will be able to play
in the doubles semifinal today
or in the singles semifinal against
Gimeno on Friday.
MacKay scored a 6-2, 6-4, 6-2
victory over former U. S. indoor
champion, Ulf Schmidt in a match
marred by MacKay's dispute with
a heckling fan. Buchholz downed
Luis Arilla of Spain. 7-5, 6-4, 5-7.
6-4. Gimeno beat Tony Ryan of
Australia, 6-2. 6-4. 7-5.
In today's double semi semifinals,
finals, semifinals, the U. S. team of Olmedo
and MacKay is scheduled to meet
the Swedish team of Schmidt and
Jan Erik Lundquist. In the other
match, Laver and Warren Wood Woodcock
cock Woodcock of Australia will oppose the
Spanish team of Gimeno and Aril Aril-la.
la. Aril-la. DRIVE-IN
it: toiav ;;5
A GREAT ATTRACTION!
STEWART GRANGER
Donna REED in
"THE WHOLE TRUTH"
TOMORROW
POPULAR NIGHTI
$1.10 PER CAR!
Jeff CHANDLER in
"WAR ARROW"
In TECHNICOLOR 1
RIO
25c.
15c.
Spanish Program!
CUATRO COPAS
Llbertad Lamarque
- Also:
LOS MUJERIEGOS
with Antonio Badii

GOVERNOR'S AUTOGRAPH The littlest and the biggest watch expactantlyr as," Governor
W. E. Potter autographs a baseball at the opening ceremonies of the Fastlich Teenage League
held Saturday. Watching at the right is Adelbert Fastlich, league sponsor. ; At the left; Is
John Bateman, 15-year-old outfielder and pitcher for the Pumas. Standing between the
Governor and Fastlich is Greg Stoudnor, 13-year-old second baseman of the Conejos. Both
players attend Balboa high school. -,, r-
1 i 'J 1 i i-

Al brook's Greenfield Whiffs
14 To Nip Fort Amador 2-1

Pacific Softball League

By HENRY CLARK
STANDINGS
Tmi W L Pet.
Abemathy Unisport 1 0 1.000
Pan Liquido 1 0 1.000
Ambassadors 0 1 .000
Jantzen 1 .000
TWO-WAY TIE AS PAN
LIQUIDO WINS
Cerceceria Nacional Pan Liqui Liquido
do Liquido made the current PSL into a
two-way tie far first place on
downing Bill Nickersber Jantzen
nine, 8-to-6 in the, jeeod iaone of
the seaton' played 'Tuesday.
Winning pitcher McNair Lane
showed excellent control over
Jantzen until the sixth while
Chas. Carratini, the game's losing
pitcher limited Pan Liquido to
fice hits. Lane allowed eight.
Trailing in the sixth by five runs
Jantzen made a surprising attack
on four hits and runs off Lane
which forced Sam Sattlett's Beer Beermen
men Beermen to gather an inurance run
in the lower sixth.
All Beermen hitting safely were
held to one-hit each as Geo. Ri
ley, Burtie Mead and Cairratini
had two-for-ithree individually for
Jantzen.
Tuesday's game was highlight
ed by Joe Black's brilliant over
run catch at shortstop off Ray
Nes'bitt's bat in the third and
'Big Mac' Lane's five strike-out
victims.
JATNZEN
The boxscore: Ab R H
Gayer 3b 4 11
Cicero 2b 3 0 0
Carr If 4 0 0
Riley cf 3 2 2
Mead c 3 12
Nickisher lb 2 0 0
Espacido lb 0 10
Carratini p 3 12
Simons rf 2 0 0
Lang rf 10 0
Black ss 3 0 1
28 i t
PAN LIQUIDO

McArthur If 2 10
Kosik 3b 3 11
Ostrea cf 3 11
Nesbitt rf 3 10
Lane p 3 11
Carlin Bob ss Zb 2 11
Huertas lb 2 10
McGlade c 3 0 ,0
Morales 2b 2 0 0
Carlin Bill ss 1 1 1
24 8 5

ABERNATHY UNISPORT
WINS PSL OPENER
By HENRY CLARK
Standings
Ttamt W L Pet.
Abernathy Unisport 1 0 1.000
Jantzen 0 0 .000
Pan Liquido 0 0 .000
Ambassadors 0 1 .000
Abarnarhy Uniiport 10
Ambaixdor 2
It was 'play ball' as the Pacific
Softball League got underway at
the league's home-tpark on Gail Gail-lard
lard Gail-lard Highway with umpire-in-chief
M-aiv Metheny behind the
plate and Abernathy Unisport,
'58 chaimpions, against the Am Ambassadors
bassadors Ambassadors as the Unisporters
made a fast one gam lead with
a victorious 10 to 2 score on Mon Monday.
day. Monday. Lev Hilzinger, noted Isthmian
softball hurler, pitched the eleven
hit win over the Ambassadors giv giving
ing giving up four safeties. Pitching con control
trol control marred the Ambassadors
from the first inning with T. Vl Vl-dez
dez Vl-dez relieving ttarter, A. Davila.
Scoring two runs in the first on
a home-irun by L'Hereau, R. He He-rrera's
rrera's He-rrera's Ambassadors were kept

behind close doors as Hilzinger
struck-out seven batters.
The Unisporters thowed condi conditioned
tioned conditioned form by out-hitting theiir op

ponents including Ausmus homer
m the sixth and scoring two runs
in the first and third frames and
three each in thj fifth and sixth
which easily froze the game for
De La Mater's champions.
The league needt your support
games played Monday through
Friday.
BOXSCORE

Ambassadors Ab R H
J. Martinez ss 3 0 1
W. Durkin 3b 2 0 0
M. Trevino 2b 3 11
A. Johnson 2b 0 0 0
L. L'Heureux lb 3 11
R. Herrera If 10 0
T. Valdez p 2 0 0
J. Vargas cf 2 0 0
J. Vairgas cf 2 0 0
L. Robbins cf 10 0
W. Fish rf 3 0 1
J. Anderson c 2 0 0
A. Davila p-lf 2 0 0
24 1 4
ABERNATHY UNISPORT

A. Husted c
3 1 0
L. Jones cf
3 2 1
Ausmus ss
A. Flynn 3b
Taht rf
L. Hilzinger p
L. Chance LF
3 2 2
3 0 1
1 .0 0
2 2 2
2 0 0
W. Woodruf 3b 2 12
W. Trout lb 3 12
B. De La Mater 2b 4 11
F. Cheney RF 2 0 0
D. Roberto If 2 0 0
30 10 11
The linescore:
Ambassadors 200 000 02 5 3
Unifiport 202 033 x 10 11 0
Winning pitche ', Lou Hilzinger
Losing pitcher, T. Valde.
Basketball
Results
East
Connecticut 73 Maine 58
Catholic U. 76 Baltimore U. 57
Massachusetts 71 American Int. 51
Gannon 66 Carnecie Tech 65
Brooklyn Col. 86 St. Fran. '(NY) 85
Dartmouth 52 Yale 51
Niagara 70 Syracuse 55
South
Va. Tech 86 Geo. Washington 81
N. Carolina St. 73 Virginia 68
Richmond 69 Citadel 62
Florida St. 65 Miss. Southern 62
Vanderbilt 75 Kentucky 66
High Point 98 Wofford 73
Midwest
Xavier (Ohio) 85 Miami (Ohio) 79
Valparaiso 95 John Carroll 93
Wash. (Mo.) U. 69 Wayne St. U. 44
Butler 62 Notre Dame 60
Washburn 74 Omaha 56
Southwest
Hard-Simms 70 Trinity (Tex.) 54
Southern MethodistL73 Texts 55
Rice 70 Texas AaM 65
Texas Tech 68 Baylor 65
Arkansas St. 72 Southern U. 70
Wost
College of the Pacific 81 Chlco 53
MILITARY STAR
Quantico, Va. (NEA) Center
Sam Valentine of t he Quantico
Marines was named to the Arm
ed Forces football All-Star first
team.

"

Albrook's "Red" Greenfield wait.
ed in with the winning run in the
last of the ninth last nieht far th
first Albrook win of the season.
Ihe Ft. Amador "Trootoers"
scored with a home run in the
first inning by Irv Haynes, on the
second pitch of the game.' From
mat point on the Troopers" drew
three hits and 14 strikeouts from
Greenfield, "Red also put one
man out unassisted and assisted
in five put outs.
Albrook "Fivers' first innino
was a 1-2-3. and thev started rlirk.
ing in the second irming when John
Taylor got a base hit and x:onti-
nuea on to third by two Troopers
errors. All was nnfpt thpn until
Zimmerman received a two base
hit tp bring Pa.diron in with the
nisi n-jiire ior ine riyers in me,
fourth inning.
With the score tied, both t,ams
settled down and played fine def defensive
ensive defensive hall until Amadnr's rvtrli.
er. Castlerman. allowed Rnh Alii.
son rne first walk of the game in
the last of the eight. The TrooDers
came back in the top of the ninth
by Petting one hit and the nnlv
walk from the Flyers.
The game entered the bottom of
the ninth tied 1 -1 with Albrook at
bat. Zimmerman was put out by
a throw from short, ston to fir't;
Greenfield gained tlhe third walk
of the game; Horoky sacrificed to
advance "Red": at this nnint
Manager Bob Hansen put hard
mmng Aoercrombie in to bat, the
pitcher nuickly walked him and
continued to wnlk the next two
batterf to end the game 2-1 in fav favor
or favor of Albrook.
The stands were narkd with A1.
brook fans and visiting rooters.
The crowd was estimated at 2500.
The box score:

Albrook Flyers Ab R H E
LangeiV cf 5 o 0"'. 0
Padron, 2b 4 110
Allison, 3b 2 0 0 0
Taylor, c 4 0 2 0
Zimmerman, ss 4 0 10
Greenf'eld. p 4 110
Mendes, lb 2 0 11
Roeelio. rf 3 0 0 0
.Tone', If 4 0 0 0
Horoky, lb 0 0 0 0
Abercrombie, rf toon
Totals 33 2 6 1
"Trooptrs"
Haynes, c 4 13 0
Fransen, If 4 0 0 1
Shaw, ss 4 0 0 2
Snellman, rf 4 0 0 0
Williams, lb 4 0 10
Schaefer, 3b 4 0 0 0
Castleman, 2b-p 4 0 0 0
Fritze. cf 3 0 10
Tolbert, p 2 0 0 0
Glasgow, 2b 10 0 0
Totals 34 1 5 3
Whatever

STAN STUi MODZELENSKI
Stan Stutz Modzelewskl, who
changed his name to Stan Stutz
to simplify matters, was the
nottest scorer m college basket'
ball during his career at Rhode
Island' State, playing for Coach
Frank 'Keaney's famed "Fire
Hoss" team, he led the nation
with a 94-polnt average in
193M0. He also broke pank
Lul""tti's carreer record with a
tot' i,73o points lor three
ser i After World War II, he
plr wo seasons for the tro
fessional New York Knicker Knickerbockers
bockers Knickerbockers and one, for the Balti Baltimore
more Baltimore Bullets. He then became a
referee In the pro league for
eight seasons. ',
What ever happened to Stan
Stutz? He now is a ,vlce. pres president
ident president of the "Tuck" cellophane
tape company wit hheadquart hheadquart-ers
ers hheadquart-ers in New York

,.f--:

; i ... baitor: wn,

PANAMA PROFESSIONAL LEAGtyjj

Teams

CV M CB W L
3 4n 6 13 8
x 3 4 11 10
4 x 4 11 10
3 3 x 7 14
1Q 10 1442 42

Kings ......... x
Carta Vieja .. .4
Marlboro ...... 3
Cerveza Balboa 1
Totals ..... 8

T TONIflHT'S GAME

At Olympic Stadium: Cerveza Balboa (Scantlebury 1 -ST
. va, Kings (Luabk 5-1)
'r Came time: 7:30 ; :
'' LAST NIGHT'S RESULT i .t
. At Ofymplf Stadiurn: Marlboro 3, Cerveza Balboa
' (10 innings) '-

DIABLO" MAJOR LEAGUE
Teams W L
RC Nehi 42V4 21 Vs
Wynn's Friction P. 42 22
P.A.A. "Jets" V 33 31
Fuerta y Luz 33 31 1
Luckv Strike 30 34
Seymour Agency 27W 36V4
S. I. Homa 24A 39
Pan Ideal. 23 40W
HIGH AVERAGES
Coffey 189
Balcer 187
Lane 186 t
High team series P. A. A. 2871
High Single game P.A.A. 1042
High Series Balcer 687
High Game Lane 279
The Diablo Major League return
ed to action after a week off. The
two leading teams, RC Nehi and
wynn t riction Proofing had to set
tle for a tie in their matches and
as a result Nehi retianed tneir
Vi game lead over Wynn. Nehi
split with H. I. Homa '.-2 with the
leaders takine the first two sames
and It. I. Homa taking the final
gake by 79 pins and total pintail.
Bud Balcer came through with a
627 which included a 231 came to
increase his average to 187. Bill
Coffey dropped a point but still re
tains the lead in the averages with
189. Phil vescio pouned out a 608
to pace the leaders.
Wynn's Friction Proofing piled
up a 105 pin lead in the first same
which was enough to gain a split
with the red hot P.A.A. "Jets".
Art Graham s 606 was high for
Wynn's. Ted Melanson and Mac
Lane were high for the Jets.
Lucky Strike moved ud to 5th
place by scoring the only shutout
of the night 4 to over Pan -Imperial.
Pepe Damian ha J 580 for the win winner
ner winner and Ed Kunkel's 573 was hieh
for Pan Imperial. In the final
match of the night Fuerza v Luz.
handicapped' by the, absence of
Any Fistomch, scored a 3 to 1
win over the fast fading Seymour
Agency team. Only in the second
game did Seymour show any of
their eany season from. Joe Bie-
ber with 568 paced the winners,
who moved, into a 3rd place tie
with P.A.A. All the Seymour
team just managed to break 500.
RC NEHI 2
Vescio
Klumpp
Allen
177 225 206 608
148 131 122 401
173 169 149 491
Kaelin
180 211 154 545
Coffey
188 181 167 536
864 917 798 2581
P.A.A. 2
Lowande 122 172 214 508
DeLuca 167 183 154 504
VoSS 133 186 173 492
Melanson 179 195 213 587
Lane 196 179 200 575
797 91$ ?54 2666
LUCKY STRIKE 4

Soto 185 168 173 529
Morrow 204 1B4 158 526
Luttenberger 1S5 158 171 I9t
Metzger 164 1G4 177 505
Damian 214 2J5 161 580
9J2 8S9 843 2634
H, I. HOMA 2
Charters 1 189 148 186 523
Schneider 180 18) 168 335
Thomas i2 in m 4 8
Balier ail 20J' 13b 027
Roger 129 154 li7. 440
SI" 875 "7' 2613
WYNN 2

Dube
Hinely
Amato
Graham
Bell
202 165
13'i 160
.'94 J61
167 Kf
13 20!) :ZI 559
m 20!
161 176
02 911
102 (106
83 523
173 2615
JOCKEY ON JUMP
CORAL GABLES, Fla. (NEAV (NEAV-Johnny
Johnny (NEAV-Johnny Sellers is at Uialeah gal
loping horses at, five a.m. ndes
fit TroDical Park in tho bfurnnnn.
studies at night to become a ve veterinarian.
terinarian. veterinarian. ., ; ;..t..;XK;:-j::

; 9?NRAPQ SARCEANf I r,,.;

J t

Pet. QBT
619
PAN IMPERIAL 0
Palm
150 166
182 147
150 r-
123 .180
150
" 146
205 203
120 142
132 45
180 509
, WJ
144 44T
ISft
La Beau
Burgoon
Prusinowski
Burgoon
Pope
139 28
Kunkel
165
760 2421
FUERZA Y.LUZ 3
Winquist
Tarr
Bieber K
143 188
186 189'
'149 219
157 157
177 146
12 899
210. 541
172 54f
200 568
157 471
135 458
S74 2585
Blind
Gliechman
SEYMOUR AGENCY
Bover
Hassier
172 187 158 517
135 212 161 508
144 191 TSi si k
Bates.
Schmidt
Soyster
167 175. 159 501
158 188 171-!5i7l
,5J 833 ISit
V
PACIFIC MINOR LEAGUE $
yA11 Dys attending the Canal
schols between the age
Of 8 throiich 19 nH r-T
terested in playing basebaU;
may obtain registration blanks
"vui me, principals of theiir
resnective xrhnnls. niunk.
or registration is on Monday;
"": "a tne- registrations
must be returned to the prtr.
cipal' not latter tharf today
TrV-Ollt TOlll falrA.mlan. t tv-.
Little League Park of Saturday,
Jan. 10, at 9:30 a.m..
mosewho are unable to re register
gister register at the schools may re register
gister register on the day of try-out.
All boys please bring your base baseball
ball baseball jjloves. Those boys who
played Minor League last- year,
should wear their T shirts arjrj
caps.
PACIFIC LITTLE LEAGUE
. ,.' -w:
Teams ; W L
Elks 1414 1 0 1.000
Gibraltar Life ;i 0 1.000
Lincoln Life -f l -i) l.offljv
Seymour Agency i0 1' .008
Spur Cola 0.1 .000
Pf'ice 01 ,.000
Lincoln Life 4 Stymoor Agsncy T
The two insurance little leagu leaguers
ers leaguers representing Lincoln Life afltf
Seymour put on a pitching duel of 1
a game, in the. young season, ftti
opposing chuckers were Bob"t"
Ostrea for the I.incolns and Pa
ry Keneallv for Seymojir. J
Next to the last inning te sWi
was 2 to 1 in favor of Lincotir;
who in their last turn at the bat'
j--.ci.uicu ura -mure insurance runs.
uoDoy ustrea set down thirteen
of the Seymours .via the strikeqjit
luuip ana B.arry Aeneaijy cnaiReff.
up eight whiff jobs.V; .;:l,i,;:
At he olate, the rightfielder oi.
L'ncoln. A. Jac'obson, led the. ba,
lers with two hit?, and the only
were Johnny cVnavaggid'ahd Ros-
sel Wat nn. "'y: :''
'Harv 7mhitn nf 'Sevmnnr had
busy afternoon when he had ,13"
putouts In right .field garden.
Seymour':. Ab K
Stabler: lb ':2 0
Black, 3b '' 'L'' '?J 0" fl:
cahavaeeso, cr z o I
Robinson, C;. j .-(.-. J ',
Farrell. If ,-. 3 O.-'fl
Kencally, p- ";r',;'-?'' '-''2 l-,.6
Watson, ss: , ,.-3:,,o,,I.
Lincoln Life I's"' -'
Douslas. cf .. 4- fl A.
T)emminew o ... ,
Fneetke." is ..
3 0 0
Ostrea, p..; .': .'-i ':HiM:
Kiamco, lb ('-: Xj vi
joyner,.. u ,, a
Thompson, 3b 3 d-i
Kelley,.2b : 1 0...P
; 'Jacobson,,, rf ; , ', it :

524 2
.524
j333.
' iff'

JbwJim mm

i 1

'8 J
&4

i



r

-
V
f I- i .- S.T
THE' FANAMA AMERICAN il ';.AN INDEPENfiENT DAlLJ NEWSPAPER
PAGE SITCI"4
-2 n h

terscholastic

Game

TpCow Junior Goege JO

I
i

tv

III
(I
1
r
ft

. Pl!2rtoii To Heel

.-tf.'!.:'.'fcif.'.
urtghti fhfflpiott KJojd Patterson
challenger; jr. topper ueais jsnan
Ixndon next week.
. That became an open secret to today
day today during the latest blast from
Cut D'Amato, Patterson's manag manager,
er, manager, against promoter Jack Solo Solomons
mons Solomons of London and ffruman Gib Gib-lon,
lon, Gib-lon, president ofsthe International
Boxing Club;- ,;
D'Amato' told reporters that Sol Sol-mimi
mimi Sol-mimi nrf aihofl r have joined

vx i tniiiif tn ntice Cooper

1 AVI. ICO Ui Ujfufe t
way from "promoter Harry Le Le-.
. Le-. ...... i 4r T.avm m a' Close

v cue ui ijuuuuu. r
friend of D'Amato 'ind champion
Patterson.
Although ingry Cus would make
no outright admission, his yehe yehe-ihent
ihent yehe-ihent tirade left no doubt that he
and Levene had agreed upun
Cooper as the next challenger--eigher
in London or the United
States if Cooper wrests the
t.;tt.k Tnrilra titlo frnrtr T-Ohrlon

v JDllUflll UUlfUV "--w
next Monday night at London.

Cooper knocked out London in
the first round of their previous
fight, May V, 1956; and it is ap apparent
parent apparent that D'Amato believes
Cooper hat' the weapons to beat
him again aMouglr London is now
rated sixta-among world, contend-,
ers by the vJting Magazine, and
Cooper evejith, v. ......
New Vork' bookies say setting Is
"even money" for Monday's fight,
which is being promoted by Solo Solomons.
mons. Solomons. The powerful, British Box Boxing
ing Boxing Board of Control ordered
Cfloper to .challenge London; and
lit the British Isles, boxers ebey.
the BBBC or else. Solomons is
the promoter since he has London
ladder contract."
ew York Yankees 1
Acceleration School
Will Be Curtailed
J.'nEW YORK (UPI)-The New
Vork Y a n k e e b "acceleration
school" a pre-pre-season camp
for promising rookies'- will be
curtailed this spring.
"The worhj champions announced
Msterdav that most of their young
farmhands developed so fast dur during
ing during the new Florida Instructional
League last autumn that they will
Upt-jw asaea wianena we ac acceleration
celeration acceleration ichool'!- this- year.
"The results we achieved in the
FJorida League were ias superior
to. thosa ii the acceleration
aehoolk'-said Jerry Coleman, as assistant
sistant assistant farm i-directot. 'JChekjds
had consUnttoscclojpi
petition under the" best Paying
conditions . and we had a
chance to get a sustainedjook at
them."
'Coleman,' a' former sta'infield sta'infield-r
r sta'infield-r with the Yankees, tabbed .three
youngsters as likely Yankees-of-the-future
on the strength of their
neriormances in the"'. .Florida
League. They5' ani Joe Pepitbtie:
an 18-year-old outfielder pitcher
from' Brooklyn, N.Y., Ed Gary, a
BOryear-old outfielder from Jack Jackson,
son, Jackson, Miss., and Harry Addis,, a
22 year old right-handed pitch pitch-r
r pitch-r from Bnareiiffe, N.Y.

1 Sports Briefs

11 TV BOOT CANCELLED
. PHILADELPHIA, Jan. (UPI)
w A light heavyweight televis televised
ed televised bout scheduled for Jan. 21
at the Arena between Eddie
Perkins and Cisco Andrade has
been cancelled by promoter
Herman Taylor. Taylor cancel
lad the bout, signed by match
maker Pete Moran In his behalf,
upon returning from a trip to
,HONO RAFER JOHNSON
I LOS ANGELES. Jan. (UPI)
i Rafer Johnson, the world
decathlon record holder, will be
uonored at the sportsman of
he year award dinner, sponsor-
en py Bporta illustrated Maea-
iine, Wednesday night Romaln
Gary, French cpnsul general in
Los Angeles, vrfil be the princi
pal apeaner. ,,,,,,,
HODGES UNDER KNIFE
Brooklyn. ,n.y. Jan: (upd
CU Oil Hodges,' Lbs Angeles
pddgers first ; baseman who lyes
Be auring tn oi season,
undereoes minor surgery today
at Lutheran Hospital. HOdges,,
who said the operation ;'certin ;'certin-fyTlsn't
fyTlsn't ;'certin-fyTlsn't a serious one," Is expect expected
ed expected to be discharged from the
Hospital before Friday.
SIGN TV BOUT V V
WASMTicnTirtN ftTPTI LlBht
weights Eddie Perkins of Chicago
and Cisco Andrade of Mexico, City,
Save signed for a 10-rouna we.
Vised bout at Capitol Arena, lib,
HONOR JIMMY BROWN )
"PHILADELPHIA (UPI)-Jlmmy'
Brown, the Cleveland Browns sen sensational
sational sensational fullback who set a Na National
tional National Football League ground -i
gaining record this season, has
been chosen American v Athlete" ot
th Year by the Philadelphia;
Bportswriters Association.
DlSCONTINUI INTEREST
' HALLANDALE, Fla. (UPI) W
- Jackson Dudley and Bonnie Heath
announced Tuesday that their" D,
1 and H. Stable will aoon discontin discontinue
ue discontinue Its racing interest and devote
' full time to thoroughbred breed-

1
Tomorrow
At,. Mt;; ilope
' : ,SIANDINGSI'
Tama''?5f Woa..IiOst Pte.
Balboa High'- 2 jD 1.000
Cristobal High 1 .500
Junior College 0 2 .000
. Tuesday's Results
CHS. 10. J.C. 2.
Friday's game (at Mt. Hope)
, CMS. Vs B.H.S.
By TREVOR SIMONS
The Cristobal Tigers moved
into second place in Inter Inter-scholastlc
scholastlc Inter-scholastlc Baseball and within
striking distance of the pace pace-setting
setting pace-setting Bulldogs when they bat battered
tered battered a pair of Junior College
'pitchers for nine hits scoring an
easv 10 to 2 win.
Jim PalumbO' went the dis
tance for the winners and ef
fectively scattered 6 hits, struck
out 4 k and walked 3 in posting
his first 1959 Interschool win.
The Green Devils were able to
scoJe only one earned run off
the offerings ,.of Palumbo and
that waS' Ray Oakley's towering
home run far into left field to
open the third inning.
Harley started on the hill for
junior .CpUevY was' charged
witn ms; oereat" ms iwmnuiK
tour of dufe? showed a Record of
3 hits, but his defense was
shaky and ..his coOTOTtwas on
as he aipjea tnree wwks ana
was charged with 5 of file Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal 10 runs total.
Harley was lifted with two one
and no outs in the third; but
his successor, Raul Swalm was
greeted with no more respect
than was his Dredecessor. Swalm
was nicked for .6 hits and five
runs. He waiKea 5 papers ira
struck out four.
Donald Humpnrey,..was rea
hot at the tilate.for Cristobal
with three hits in five trips to
the plate, batting in wo runs
and scorinet one nimseii. Don-
ny Bruce had' 8 -for- tnree, in including
cluding including a three base blast Into
right center, ana naa 3 nm.
For Junior College, Burt NWad
had 2 hit In four trie to pace
the lolng effort;'
The Tiger DroKe up a w we
miinklv in i:he" second frame
when Larry wuaer smgiea wun
George Cotton, who had walked
and Don ra-uce, on, witn a mgie,
on second and tWrd. The Tigers
really Iced the decision In the
third frame when then sent 11
fitter to the Plate. The big
blast in that lrininpc was Don
pWiPlrf ?P ,,load-
Tigers Entertain Bulldogs at
Mt. Hope Tomorrow
Cristobal High will have an
importunity to move Into, a first
pla'oe-'tfe wltk 'Balboa. tomorrow
night when thev meet the Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs at Mount Hope Stadium at
7 p.m. Cristobal is expected to
send their ace southpaw. Brian
Lutz back. .to, the mound to
avcrWthe.3 to 1, defeat he suf suffered
fered suffered at the hands of Balboa
earlier this season.
.The Cristobal pitcher allowed
only 4 hits in that game, but a
pair ofi costly, Irst inning er errors
rors errors an4 three of the four hits
bunehed into the third innine
was, the cause of his loss to
Balboa.
The Bulldogs have a good
stable of pitchers to chose from
and might come back with Mor Morgan
gan Morgan Soch, winner against the
Tigers In that Dec. 22 game. If
Horlne decides not to got with
his big right-hander, he has a
pair of good chuckers in either
Kline or Lem Kirkland, the
former one of the leading base base-ballers
ballers base-ballers in Interschool baseball
today.. :
The box score:
Cristobal Hitrh
ABR H POA
Wilder. 2b,
Humphey,
Kulig, ss.
Lutz, lb.
Vinas, cf
Cotton, c.
Bruce, rf.
Tompkins,
5 0 15 1
cf. : 5
. 3
4
4
1
3
2
5
1
AS
2
0
rf
Hemdaz, 3b
Palumbo, p.
Totals 31 10 9 21 9 4
Junior College
AB R H PO A E
A., Gary, If.
Oakley, ss.
Trimble, c.
Mead, B. 3b.
Snurloch. cf
Gibson, lb.
Harley, J-rf.
Casira, 2b.
Dolan, rf-2b.
Swalm, rf ?2b
4
4
4
4
3
3'
3
0
1
P 3
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
6
1
0
10
1
0
2
0
Totals 29 2 6 21 12 2
Score bv Innlnirs:
Cristobal High 1125 0101-10 9
Junior1 College 101 00002
Ing. The D. and H. Stable gained
national recognition when Needles,
won the 1956 Kentucky Derby.
GOLF EDITOR DIES
ATLANTA (UPI) Bert Finck
Prather, 52. Atlanta Constitution
golf editor, died Tuesday follow following
ing following a heart attack. Prather cov covered
ered covered all major southern golf tour tournaments
naments tournaments during' his 18 years with
the newspaper.
DISCUSS AMATEUR STATUS
VIENNA (UPI), Toni Sailer,
former Olympic and world skiing
champion, will aopear at a meet meeting
ing meeting of the international Skiing
Federation at Zurich, Sunday when
his amateur status is discussed.
Sailer currently is acting in a
movie which is being filmed here

11 sli
liilliliiiij

FASTLICH LEAGUE OPENING-A latge, enthusiastic crowd watched the opening ceremonies Saturday morning for the Fast Fast-llch
llch Fast-llch Teenage League In Balboa.. Highlight of tho ceremonies was Governor W. E. Potter pitching out the first ball of the .new
season which promises to be a bright one for the young baseball stars. Above Governor Potter is shown in the pitcher's box
ready to hurl the opening strike against Adelbert Fastlich, League sponsor, at the plate. Catcher is Henry L. Donovan, Civil
Affairs Director,- and baseball fan, while J. C. Randall, Chief of the Community Services Division, acts as umpire behind the
plate. In the lower picture, the teams which make up the Fastlich Teenage League pose with managers and other officials.
The teams have such fascinating and ominous-sounding names as Ocelots, Pumas, Palomas and Conejos.

LPGA Announces
Ten-Member Team
AUGUSTA, Gft'XUPD A 10 10-member
member 10-member 1958 Ladies Professional
Golfers Assn. team, headed by
Mickey Wright, Beverly HanSon
and Patty Berg, was announced
Tuesday by Fred Corcoran,, tour tournament
nament tournament director for the LPGA.
No immediate plans for compet competing
ing competing with foreign teams have been
made but Corcoran said he hoped
to work out a future, clash be,
tween women prtfessnat. golfer
from the United States and teams
from other countries.
The Misses Wright, Hanson and
Berg won automatic berths on the
team as winners of the jour ma major
jor major U.S. championships last sea season.
son. season. Miss Wright of San Diego,
Calif., won the U.S. Women's
Open and LPGA titles. Miss Han
son of lnmo, (Jam., capturea me
titleholders championship and
Miss Berg of Chicago won We
Western Open,
Marie Bauer Hagge of Delray
Beach, Fla.; Louise Suggs of At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, Ga.; Fay Crocker of Mon Montevideo,
tevideo, Montevideo, Uruguay; Betsy Rawls of
Soartanbure. S.C.: Wiffi Smith of
St. Clair, Mich.; Marilynn Smith
of Wichita, Kan., and Betty Jame Jameson
son Jameson of San Antonio, Tex., rounded
out the squad. These players won
berths on the team on the basis
of their 1957 scoring averages.
Kentucky Replaces
Cincinnati As No. 1
US Basketball Team
NEW YORK (UPD The Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky Wildcats, who emerged
from college basketball's holiday
action with an 11-0 record, today
replaced the Cincinnati Bearcats
m the nation's No. 1 team in the
United Press International rat
ings.
Coach Adolph Rupp's Wildcats
took over first place In the UPI
ratines for the first time since
FVh. 1. 1955. Cincinnati, which suf
fered its first two losses of the
oamnaicn last week when it
bowed to North Carolina State and
North Carolina in tM Dixie Clas Classic,
sic, Classic, dropped to sixth.
Cincinnati had topped the ratings
durinff the tirst four weeks ot uie
camoaien. North Carolina State
advanced from sixth to second .in
the biggest upheaval of the sea season
son season among the top 10 teams. St.
John's University of New York
was the only newcomer in the se select
lect select group, taking over 10th place
while Texas Christian slipped
from ninth to 13th.
North Carolina State was sec
ond while Kansas State remained
third. North Carolina was fourtn.
Michigan State, Cincinnati, North Northwestern,
western, Northwestern, Bradley, Auburn and St.
John's rounded out tha top ten.
West Virginia headed. -the sec
ond 10 group. Texas A and M Tex Texas
as Texas Christian, California, Mississip
pi State, Purdue, St. Bonaventure
and Marquette followed in tnai or
der. Utah State and Oklahoma
City tied for 19th place.
SIMPLE SUCCESS
FORMULA
CINCINNATI '(UPI) Rookie
pitcher, Orlando Pena, who had an
11-10 record wltli Havana In the
International League in 1958, has
a simple formula for making good
w th the Cincinnati Redlegs this
year: "Me throw ball and- hope it
hit to Roy McMillan," be says.

by
JOE WILLIAMS

CINCINNATI Army and
Notre Dame will resume on a
home and home basis in '65 and
66... the Irish have had Wash
ington's pro coach, Joe Kuha Kuha-rich,
rich, Kuha-rich, in mind as Terry Bren Bren-na's
na's Bren-na's successor, since '56.
These two newsworthy, items
sifted throueh our -large flut
tering ears as the nation's col college
lege college sports leaders, some 2000,
began to assemble here today
for the annual conclave which
reaches climatic crescendo Fri
day with the Scripps-Howard
Coach Of The Year dinner.-
The new Army-Notre Dame
pact officially quells reports the
twq schools had permanently
ended relations, reports that
that never had a foundation in
fact anyhow. For some years
now Army policy has been to
play the field, with only Navy
as traditional fixture.
The first home-and-home
pact under this policy was con concluded
cluded concluded last year and present
indications are the old rivals
are to meet only at five or six
year intervals in the future.
It Is interesting to note that
m the first of these home-and-homers
Army specified Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia as its home field, whereas
in the one just consummated,
there Is no reference whatever
to this detail. All that's definite
Is that one of the games will be
played in South Bend
Speculation stirred by this
omission centers on two pos
sibilities: (1) by '65 Army may
have found a way to lick a traf traffic
fic traffic problem which now seems
unlickable, and have its own
stadium on thccampusi (2) Col.
Earl (Red) Blaik, whose con contract
tract contract expires in two years, may
be thinking of retiring, hence
has decided to leave the matter
to his successor. There is prob probably
ably probably more substance in the lat latter
ter latter than In for the former.
Blaik functions in the dual
capacity of director of athletics
and head football coach, and
the schedule, of course, is one
of h.ls more robust babies. When
he re-scheduled Notre Dame for
'57 and '58, he had every rea reason
son reason to expect his old sparring
partner, Frank Leahy, would be
in the other corner.
ON BORROWED TIME
But instead of The Master, it
was Terry Brennan, a young youngster
ster youngster who had only recently come
up from high school coaching
to be entrusted with one of the
most important assignments in
the college field. And, because
of the, multitudinous and high highly
ly highly vocal Irish alumni, one- of the
most demanding.
Now Brennan is gone and Joe
Kuharich, a Notre Dame lines linesman
man linesman under Elmer tayden in the
30's, has taken over under a
five-year agreement. Though
Brennan's dismissal, two days
before Christmas, shocked and
surprised, it Is learned now that
he had been living on borrow borrowed
ed borrowed time for the past two sea seasons.
sons. seasons. ,It also develops that the dis dissident
sident dissident forces had the pro coach
of the Redskins tabbed a their
man all alang. In the winter of
'56 after Brennan. In Ws third
year, had lost eight and won
only two, a Notre Dame repre representative
sentative representative discussed Kuharlch's
fitness with a leading Eastern
college coach.
"The impression I got." the
coach told us today, "was that.

Brennan was through as of then.

I also felt the school had set
tled on Kuharich and that he
would be signed within days.
What happened in the mean meantime
time meantime I never heard."
' WASNX' UPTO job? :
Emotional fogs created bv the
Scrooge-like treatment of- a
young father with four children
have lifted somewhat and it is
now possible to, view the Notre
Dame, action in a clearer lieht.
Apparently it boils down to this
Brennan simply wasn't produc producing.
ing. producing. Most coaches, while con continuing
tinuing continuing to deplore the school's
harsh timing, agree Brennan
should have done much better
with the material he had. A
notably fair minded coach com.
mented: "When you can't win
with superior material you've
got to go."
Another respected coach ad added:
ded: added: "Bud Wilkinson saved him
year before last." Translated,
this meant Brennan beat Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma to snap Wilkinson's sen sensational
sational sensational 47-game winning streak.
But on successive, preceding
weekends he had lost to Navy,
6-20, and to Michigan State,
6-34.
The charge that Notre Dame
demands a winner is probably
true, and the marker in which
Brennan was fired remains in
defensible. Thus if the good
fathers got a bad press, they
asked for it. Yet if the material
was there and the coach couldn't
make it work, what other prac practical
tical practical recourse did they have?
Dear Old Harvard gave Lloyd
Jordan the boot for less.
UPI Major College
Basketball Ratings
NEW YORK (UPD The Uni Uni-lege
lege Uni-lege basketball ratings (first-placi?
votes and won lost records
through Jan. 3 in parentheses):
Team Points
1. Kentucky (24) (11 0) 312
2. N. Carolina State (4) (9-1) 276
3. Kansas State (5) (9-1) 243
4. North Carolina (1) (81) 191
5. Michigan State (7-1) 190
6. Cincinnati (6-2) 148
urn Northwestern (81) 127
8. Bradley (8-0) 99
9. Auburn (8-0) 96
10. St. John's (N.Y.) (1) (9-1) 58
Second 10 teams 11, West Vir Virginia,
ginia, Virginia, 30: 12, Texas A&M, 26; 13,
Texas Christian, 19; 14, Califor California.
nia. California. 17; 15 (t e), Mlssissipoi State
and Purdue, 13 each; 17, St. Bon Bonaventure,
aventure, Bonaventure, 10; 18, Marouette, 8; 19
(tie), Utah State and Oklahoma
City, 7 each.
ESTABLISH TENNIS AWARD
SYDNEY. Australia, Jan.
(UPI) An Australian pe petroleum
troleum petroleum company Ampol has
established a cash award of
2,500 pounds $5,612 to be present
ed annually to "the world's
best tenii'.s player." The award
will be open only to profession professional
al professional players and will be made on
the basis of results in 10 tour tournaments,
naments, tournaments, including those at
Forest Hills, N.Y., and Los Angeles.

Weeb Ewbank Voted
Pro 'Coach-01-Year'

NEW YORK (UPI) Wilbur
(Weeb) Ewbank, who climaxed
his "five-year plan" by guiding
the Baltimore Colts to their first
championship, today, -was -named
the National Football League's
"Coach of the Yeai1" for 1958 in
the annual United Press Interna International
tional International poll.
Ewbank won the honor the way
his Colts captured the 1958 West Western
ern Western Division title easily. He re received
ceived received r22'.ef' the1 29 votes-tst by
sports writers who covered the
1958 campaign in the 11 league
Clt'es- -, u ,L u
I Buddy Parker, whose Pittsburgh
j Steelers were unbeaten in their
llast seven games, was a distant
! second in the voting with four
were mentioned on the ballots.
Jim Lee Howell, whose New York
Giants defeated the Cleveland
Browns in a playoff for the
Eastern Division crown, received
two votes. Paul Brown of the
Browns received the other vote.
When Ewbank left Cleveland's
staff to become head coach of the
Colts in 1954, he planned to pro produce
duce produce a champion in five years.
He hit it right on the button but
his Colls needed the first "sud "sudden
den "sudden death" overtime in NFL h s s-tory
tory s-tory to score a 23-17 victory over
the Giants in the championship
game Dec. 28. I
The "Coachof-the-Year" poll
was conducted before the cham-;
pionship game was played. I

PANAF0T0-P0RRAS

r
I'Jv V if
; JTV

'Sleepy Time" Charlie

Report Of Plans To Sell
Calumet Farm 'Ridiculous'

Claims Mrs. Gene Markey

MIAMI BEACH,, Fla. (UP1)-
Mrs. Gene Markey yesterday
branded as "utterly ridiculous" a
report that she planned to sell her
framed Calumet Farm and all its
racing and breeding fock.
A story published in Uie Loitim
bus, Oh,o, Citizen said Mrs. Mar
key,- widow of the laie Warren
Wright who converted Calumet
Farm, (rom a, saddle ?nd harness
horse nursery to a Thorouthbrca
farm? planned to sell to .Ihn W.
Ga,lbreath, owntr of the Pitts
burgh Pirates and Darby Dan
Farm:
"I never once discussed selling
since Mr. Wright died and I never
would," Mrs. Markey mid when
told of the story. "No one in the
world has enough money to buy j
it. There is absolutely no trulh in
it," she added.
Laading SUbU In '58
Reports that Mrs. Markey
planned to sell arcuate frequent frequently.
ly. frequently. Her current husband is a
writer primarily doing movie work
and the couple spend much of
their time on the West Coast.
Markey is only a hike warm horse
fancier.
Mrs, Markey, however, still re retains
tains retains a keen interest in her horses
although she has not been in the
best of health lately. In 1958 Cal Calumet
umet Calumet Farm was the leading stable
in the country for the 12th time.
Its horses earned $946,262 with one
of them, Tim Tarn, giving Calu Calumet
met Calumet Farm, its seventh triumph in
the Kentucky Derby.
It takes about a million dollars
a year to operate Lalume farm.
The stable first was opened in
1926 by William M. Wright, baking
powder king, as 4 harness horse
nursery. Its Calumet Butler won
the Hambletonian Stakes in 1931
but William Wright never knew it.
He suffered a stroke shorily be before
fore before the race and never regained
consciousness.
Convtrtt to Thoroughbreds
After his death in 1931 his son
Warren converted the farm to a
thoroughbred establishment. Ten
years later, after Ben Jones had
taken over as head trainer and
Whirlaway gave Calumet Farm its
first Derby victory, the stable won
its first championship with earn-
BUY: ORLANDO FRANCHISE
ORLANDO, Fla. -(UPI) The
Los Angeles Dodgers have pur purchased
chased purchased the Orlando franchise in
the Florida State League, it was
announced Sunday afier a,meet-
j ing
of league directors.
SATINA CARRIES YOU

THRU THE IRONING HOUR!

Safina...
fJia BIO ironing

eld in fh iffa box.

Across from the Chase Manhattan Bank
Central Ave. 22-37 P. 5 de Mayo

(pJi&MntA

"You askerJ for it"
every Thursday from 9:00 to 9:30 p.m.

Your Communily Network YGI

840 Kilocycles
PANAMA

ings of $475,091. It won almost a
million dollars more than tnat
when it set a record for earnings
of $1,402,436 in 1947.
Pensive, Citation and Ponder fol followed
lowed followed Whirlaway as Kentucky
Derby winners for Calumet while
Warren Wr.ght was alive. Since
his death in 1950, Hill Gail, Iron
Liege and Tim Tarn have won for
Mrs. Markey.
And apparently she intends to
own any future winners produced
at her farm near Lexington, Ky.

Cousy, Schayes
Again Top Pro
Cage All-Stars
NEW YORK (UPI) Bob Cousy.
who has played in every National
Basketball Association all star
game in history, and A d o I p fc
Schayes, who has been named tc
the squad every time but missed
playing once, both w.ll be oi
hand for this year's classic at
Detroit, Jan. 23.
That was assured Tuesday whei
both men were picked on a 10
man squad to represent the East
The 10 players to represent th
West also were named. Five play players
ers players on each team were picked b;
th league coaches and the otnei
five by a vote of sports writer:
and broadcasters.
East players picked by thi
coaches: Schayes, Johnny Kerr
and Larry Costello of Syracuse"
Richie Guern of New Yoik
Woody Sauldsberry of Philadel
phia.
East players picked by the writ
ers: Cousy, Bill Russell, and Bil
Sharman of Boston; Ken Sears o
New York; Paul Arizin of Phila
delphia.
West players picked by thi
coaches: Jack Twyman of Cincin
nati; George Yardley and Dicl
McGuire of Detroit; Larry Fous
and Dick Garmaker of Minneapo
lis.
West players picked by tin
writers: Bob Jettit, Cliff iagan
and Slater Martin of St. Louis
Elgin Baylor of Minneapolis; Gen
Shue of Detroit.
Under rules that specify the all
star teams shall be coached b;
the coaches of last year's divisio;
champion teams, Arnold (Red
Auerbach of Boston will coach th
East and Ed Macauley of St
Louis the West.
SMOOTHLY
KON
1090 Kilocycles
COLON

v r

V



c l Asm-frntm

- t THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE ;
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE i-0740
10R INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE

r 1

' I

I Resorts Apartments

Tii

fi miAM Cetteaea

1.1 77 Cristobal 3-1673.
Baldwin'! furnished apartments
at Santa Blara Beaeh. Telephone
Smith. Gambeii 301-
Foster tottao.es. between
Clara and Ri- H.to New low
ratal. Phona Balboa 2830.

Houses

FOR RENT i Apartment at El
Cangrejo, completely furnished,
two bedrooms, living room, din dining
ing dining room, porch, maid's room
with bathroom, garage. Phone 2 2-2883.
2883. 2-2883. Alberto Navarro street No.
48.

LEAVE YOUB AD WITH ONE OP OUR AGENTS OB OU -OFFICES AT 13 ST H" STTHET, PANAMA L1BREHIA NIEC1ADO T fltreet No M la) AGENCMS
INTERNAL DE PUBLICACIONES-No. 3 Lottery Plaza CASA ZALDO Central Ave. 45 LOUKDE8 PHARMACY 182 La Cjmisquilla FA8MACL4 LOM LOM-BARDO
BARDO LOM-BARDO No. 26 "B" Street MORRlSO.N-4th ot July Ave; & J St. LEWIS SERVICE Ave. Tivoll No. a a) FARMACIA ESTADOS UN1DOS 14 Central Ave.
FARMACIA LUX-164 Central Avenue HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE-J. Fco. de la Ossa Ave. No. l FOTO DOMY-Justo Arowroena Ave. and 33 St
FARMACIA VAN DER-JIS 50 Street No. 53 a FARMACIA EL BATURRO Parq ue Lefevre 7 Street FARMACIA "SAS" Via PORRA9 111 NOVEDAOES
ATHIS Beside the Bella Vista Theatre COLON OFFICE; IStb Street and Amador Guerrero No. 14.221.

Automobiles

FOR RENTi Three bedroom
waidenc. i- Av.. F.d.nco Boyd
and 50th Street near the N ea-
r'.gu.n Embassy. $250.00 Un Un-furnished.
furnished. Un-furnished. Call Panama 3-U0L

FOR RENTi Three bedroom
chalet furnished or unfurnished.

Bella Vista, lei.

OR RENT i Beautiful 3 bed bedroom
room bedroom residence in "U;c'6"
Obarrio". unfurnished $275.00.
furnished $375.00. Call P-a-sna
3-267).

FOR SALE: On 48 street Bella
Vista modern two bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment on 46 Street, Riviera Aprs.,
another two bedroom apartment,
dining, living, porch, balconies,
two bathrooms, maid's room and
garage. Call Panama 2-4696 from
8 to 12 a.m.

FOR RENT: Apartment, eool,
quiet, attractive, one bedroom,
living-dining, kitchen, balcony,
tc. in "Gloriela" building (street
adjoining entrance to Panama
Hilton), $70.00, please inquire
at Foto Halcon in same vicinity.
Tel. 3-1179 or 3-6082.

FOR RENTi Furnished house
for one yea or snore. Phone
1-1971.

Commercial Sites

FOR RENTi Offiee above. Mo.
tores Colpan, S.A, Automobile
How, Centrally located, apacious.
tall 2-0625.

TOP BEER SELLER
ft. LOUIS, Mo. (UPI)-Anheu-triBusch,
Inc., sold more than
6,973,000 barrels of beet during
' nt nn v for the

company but for any singl brew brew-y
y brew-y to fee world, it was an an-nouDoed
nouDoed an-nouDoed today.

ivtn imi sj
. . Vili lie -rill rlleVl

any toot trouble, corns, callous-
. a trui mala

""eervoes "SCHOLL'S"

JL Aaoeemena Ave. 83-4S

xeu i-uu

FOR RENT: Modern apartment
with living room, bedroom, bath bathroom,
room, bathroom, kitchen, big back porch
and two independent entrances.
Price $55.00. Furnished $75.00.
31st street No. 3-41.

FOR RENT: Small apartment,
all conveniencies, well furnished
with refrigerator, gas stove, hot
water. Via Espana No. 20-22 op opposite
posite opposite Pan Ideal, next to Clinica
Popular. $100.00. Tel. 3-4037.

FOR SALE: Late model 1956
Pontiac Safari, 2 door, station
wagon, fully equipped, excellent
condition, 24,000 miles. Phone
25-3723.

FOR SALE:
station wagon,
call 83-5246.

Chevrolet 1954.
A-l condition.

FOR SALE: Immediate sale 54
Ford tudor Fordomatic Six, $600.
Balboa 3550.

FOR SALE: Pontiac 1951. 4
door sedan, hydramatic, where is,
as is, accept best offer. 4-361,
2-2424.

FORiALE: 1951 Mercury 4
door, WSW nylon tires, radio,
standard shift. Runs good, $350.
Phone Balboa 3577.

Home Articles

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: New 1958 Frigi Frigi-daire,
daire, Frigi-daire, deluxe washer and dryer
$40.00. Tel. 2-3324 between
4-6 p.m.

HOUSEHOLD BARGAINS phone
FOR SALE: 5 beds $10-$30,
new sofa, refrigerator, book bookcases
cases bookcases TV, dining room set, 2
sets of China, wardrobe. No rea reasonable
sonable reasonable offer refused. Call Mike
McCaf ferry, 3-0140.

FOR SALE: 1956 Ford four
door. Rood condition. Call 2 2-1338
1338 2-1338 after 6 p.m.

FOR SALE: 1958 Brookwood
station wagon Chevrolet 4 door,
9 passenger V-8, all accessories,
less than 3000 miles. 1930 mod model
el model "A" truck body. Balboa 2 2-3347
3347 2-3347

FOR SALE: Brand new Hi-Fi
radio Philips 295.00; 4 pes. liv liv-ingroom
ingroom liv-ingroom sets 150.00; diningroom
set 49.00; wardrobes 25.00;
China closets 18.00; metal beds
wsprings 15.00; desk 39.00;
swivel chairs 15.00; springs 12. 12.-50;
50; 12.-50; mattresses 8.00; chairs 1. 1.-50;
50; 1.-50; pillows 1.50; etc. Easy pay payments,
ments, payments, Household Exchange, Na National
tional National Avenue 41, Tela. 3-4911,
3-7348.

A

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Air conditioner 'A
h.p. 115-V, $75. Automatic dry dryer
er dryer Kenmore, $75. Phone 4-1370,
Panama.

FOR SALE: 1-ton G.E. air con conditioner
ditioner conditioner 230-V, waecess. Tel.
6-131.

FOR SALE; One ton air condi conditioner1
tioner1 conditioner1 tedders; used 2 months.
Must sell. Will sacrifice. Call
Coco Solo 36-337 after 3:00
P.m.

FOR SALE: Bolex camera pro projector
jector projector case, lenses, etc., cheap,
dial 2-3204. Balboa.

FOR SALE: Hi-Fi, good condi condition.
tion. condition. House 875 Morgan Avenuet
Balboa 1214.

FOR SALE
FRIGETTB
AIR CONDITIONER
FOR AUTOMOBILE
$270.00
RATTAN LUX
FURNITURE
TeL 3-1293

French Wants More
Of Mediterranean
Naval Command

PARIS, Jan. 8 (UPI) France
plans to demand a larger share in

the allied Mediterranean naval
command, it was reported today.
Possible reorganization of the

command was discussed last
night at a special cabinet meet meeting
ing meeting under President Gen. Charles

De Gaulle, informants said.
The government believes that
Franc, which controls a large
part of the "Mediterranean coast
on the European continent and
in North Africa, should have a
larger say in the allied strategy

councils of the island sea, the re

port said.

The Mediterranean command Is

divided into seven sectors. Britajn
holds three and France, Greece,

Italy and Turkey each have one

The commander in chief of the

allied navies is British Adm. C. E
Lambe.

FOR SALE: 1958 Volkswagen
good condition, seen by appoint appointment.
ment. appointment. Phone 5-536 after 3 p.m.

FOR SALE: 1951 Oldsmobile
Super 88, 4 bl., carb. Magna Magna-spark
spark Magna-spark dual ignition, good con condition.
dition. condition. Needs 2 tires. $350.00.
Gamboa 441.

Boats & Motors

FOR SALEi Outboard motor,
Mercury Super 10 Hurricane.
Quick silver unit used in fresh
water only. 9 hours total running
time sjnee new. $150. If not
sold will reduce price $100 per
week. Phone Balboa 1385.

FOR SALE: Evinrude "Fastwin"
15 h.p. used in fresh water only,
with gas tank and hose. $125.
Phone 2-3640.

LIFE INSURANCE
J can
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar life Ins. Co.,
for rates and information
TeL Panama 2-0558
Monday thru Friday
9:00 a.m. to 12:00
2:00 p.m. to 6:00
Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 12:00

AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
, Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo.
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985
AD Types of Auto Insurance

Catholic Preaching Mission
Starting Sunday At Albrook

MACAWS WP PERICOS 5-4

The Macaws edged the Pericos

five to four yesterday in the third

game of the Fastlich Teener
League season. AH six teams in

the League have played now.

Patomas and Pumas, who lost
their opening games, will clash

this afternoon. Ocelots and Cone

jos, who won their first time out,

clash tomorrow.

Four of the Macaw runs result

ed from three homeruns, two by
first baseman Preistre. Bob Smith
accounted for third circuit clout.
Pericos scored three runs in the
first inning.
The decisive run was scored by
Smith, who had received the base
on balls, on an error on a steal.
Fortune thrilled the fans in the
fifth inning by striking out three
batters in a row after filling the
bases on balls.
The box score:

On Sunday, Father Harry F.

Wade, C.Ss.R., a Redemptorist

missionary from Okmulgee, Okla.,
will open a Catholic preaching mis
sion in the chapel at Albrook Air
Force Base. Wade will speak at

the three masses to be offered at

7 a.m. and 12 noon. The fust
of five consecutive evening serv

ices will be held the same day at
7:30 y.mi'. : v
In addition to the evening serv services,
ices, services, there will be a ten minute
mediation at the daily masses to
be offered each weekday through
Thursday at 6 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

The theme for the mission talks
will be "Our Purpose in life the
Hindrances to It the Means to
Attain It." a15$L'
Wade is a former Air Force
Chaplain. During World War II,
while serving in the China-Burma-India
theater, he had to bail out
over the "hump" and was finally
rescued after an eight-day trek
alone through the Burma jungles.
On another occasion he survived
the explosion of a 250 pound bomb
while administering the last rites
to the victims of a C-87 crash.
During the Korean War, he gave
missions to troops actually under
fire in the front lines. In Alaska
he brought comfort and spiritual
help to servicemen stationed in

the remote outposts of the armed

forces.

Wade has also written several

publications including "Five Miles

Closer to Heaven", which des

FOR SALE: Lot 500 and 1.000
meters, in the Nuevo Hipodromo
Urbanisation, across the Remon
Racetrack. All lots with etreet
fronts, sewage, water mala and
electricity. Call W. McBarnett.
"Tel. 3-2567.

FOR SALE: Attractive weekend
cottage in Santa Clara on 600 -meter
lot, near airfield, bargain.
Pleasa call Coffey, Gamboa 466.

FOR SALE: Gramlich't concrete
furnished house at Santa Clara,
very good condition trougout.
Priced for quick tale. Informa Information
tion Information Balboa 4319.

Miscellaneous

.WANTED; On beauty eper eper-ator
ator eper-ator fend on manicurist, at Dia Diablo
blo Diablo Beauty Shea. Phen 2-1322.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A", DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709

Dr. Wendehak Madical clinic
opposite Chat Bank, 18-117
Central Avenue. Phone 2-3479.

Domestic Employment

WANTED: Girl for cleanin
and cooking. Must be neat..
Housa 626e Los Riot,

Lessons

NURSERY SCHOOL
House 875 Balboa. Phone
121,4. Bui provided.

eribes the Army Air Corps in the
CBI during World War II.

He is presently writing a TV

script for the Al Simon's Produc

tion new series called "Flight"..
"Father Wade's experiences",
said Chaplain (Maj.) Bernard F.
Schumacher, Calhulic chaplain at
Albrook, "make him eminently
qualified to conduct this preaching

mission.

IN NICKELCADMU ii
EVERLASTING BATTERY
Foto International
155 Central Ave.
Corner "K" Street
1 block from Railroad
Station.

Perlcoi Ab R H Po A
Bowen, ss 11111
Dillinger, If 110 0 0
Burgers, If 0 0 0 0 0
Ness, c-3b 2 0 1 2 0
S. Rodriguez. 3b 110 0 0
Marcum, p-3b 10 0 14
Berger, cf 2 0 0 0 0
J. Rodriguez, It 2 10 6 0
Cross, rf 2 0 0 1 0
Burton, 2b 2 0 0 1 0
Totals 14 4 2 12 5
' Macaws
Chase, 2b 2 0 0 2 0
Reitchert, ss 3 110 0
Preister, lb 2 2 2 1 0
Smith, c 1 2 1 10 1
Fortune, p 2 0 0 0 1
iFinlenson, cf 2 0 0 1 0
Wilson, J 3b 1 n 0 1 1
Mounts, rf 2 0 10 0
Rnss, rf 2 0 10 0
Berk, If 0 0 0 0 0
Smith D If 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 15 5 6 15 3

"He knows Air Force men and
he has lived Air Force life. We
can expect all of his talks to be
down to earth and aplty suited to

the problems inu spiritual welfars

of oui oar shioners."

Melvin Smith New
Rodman Golf Champ

The New

NIKON
With Iroilt-in Universal
Vlewflnder System

""Panama

Col6n

Score by Innings:
rericos 3 0 0 1 04 2 1

Macaus 3 0 2 0 45 5 1

SUMARY:

Errors: Begor, Fortune. Earned
Runs: Pericos 4, Macaws 4. Home

Puns: Preister 2, Smith. RBI:
Ness, Prpister. Smith, Burgers
Double play: Fortune, Wilson

Preister. Sacrifice: Beck. SB:

Bowen, Marcum. Smith. Left on

bases: P 7, Macaws 4. Strikeouts

Fortune 9, Marcum 2. rlrst on

balls: Fortune 13, Marcum 2. S.
Rodriguez 2. Runs and hits: Mar Marcum
cum Marcum 4 and 4. Winner: For Fortune.
tune. Fortune. Lossing pitcher: Marcum.
Passed ball: Smith 2. Wild pitches
Fortune 2. Umpire: Andres Alon Alon-so,
so, Alon-so, Ed Corrigan. Scorers: Palomo,
Crane. Time of game: 1:36.

Alaska's Senators
Draw Short Terms
For Congress Seals
WASHINGTON (UPI) The luck
of the draw gave Alaska two
short-term senators yesterday.
Sen. Ernest Gruening will rep represent
resent represent the 49th state for four
years and Sen. E. L. (Bob) Bart Bart-lett
lett Bart-lett will serve a two-yeair term.
Both new Democratic senators
missed a chance to win a full six six-year
year six-year term as they performed a
ceremony last held when Arizona
and New Mexico sent their first
senators to Washington 47 years
ago.

Gruening, 71-year old former
territorial governor, drew one of

three slips of paper from a small
box to determine his term. It

made him a four-year senator.

Then Bartlclt, Alaska's 54-year-old

former delegate to Congress, drew
a two-year slip. The six-year slip

remained unchosen.

The draw was necessary to give

Gruening and Bartlett terms of
differing length. The Constitution

requires the Senate membership

to be divided into three classes

with about one-third of the sena senators
tors senators standing for re-election every
two years.
As a result of yesterday's
drawing, Alaskans will vote for
senators again in 1960 and 1962.
The senators elected then will
have full six year terms.
The seating of Alaska's two
senators and lone House member
gave Congress its lairgest mem membership
bership membership ever 98 in the Senate and
436 in the'Housv.. The House, how however,
ever, however, will return to 435 members

when congressional seats are re reapportioned
apportioned reapportioned after the 1960 census.
Rep. Ralph Rive"-, is the new
state's House member. Alaska
was represented in the House by
a non-voting delegate before it
was approved as the largest and
newest member Ox the Union last
year

M V. Smith of Coeoli was at his
best last week and a little too
much for game Charlie Bridges.
The result at the end of 36 holes
of play was Smith being crowned

Rodman's new champ as he finish

ed the match 1 up.
In the first flight Marine Col.
Wallace defeated Lt. Cmdr. D. E.
McGuire. Victor in the Second

Flight was the greatly improved

Mickey Kaplan over CWO R. G,
Lund. In the Third Flight Mrs
Ruth Wallace and Mrs. Betty Mc

Guire proved that the man had no

monopoly on the tropies when they

reached the finals, with Mrs. Wa Wallace
llace Wallace taking top honors over Mrs

McGuire.

Well Digger Caught

In Cave-In Claws
Way To Freedom
BAKERSFIElLD. Calif. (UPD-

A 45-vear-old well-digger trapped

in a cave-in for nearly 13 hours

clawed his wav free from a steel

and sand orison today with the

help of a winch.

Leslie Stafford Jr., once given
up for dead, was trapped at the
20-foot level of a narrow four-

foot diameter sump hole by a
steel strip which pinned his ankle
and prevented rescuers from pull pulling
ing pulling him out after tons of gravel
had been removed from atop him
following the cave-in at 3:22 p.m.
Tuesday.
Gramped conditions and fear of
another cave in made rescuers

virtually stop digging.
Stafford dug with his bar
hands for more than eight hours
before he could be pulled from
the hole at 3:57 a.m.

The terribly tired man, who
had been forced to forego pain pain-easing
easing pain-easing sedatives so he would be
alert enough to dig his way free,
was carried in a stretcher to a
waiting ambulance and taken to
Bakeirsfield Hostoital.

A iarg hook was lowered In
the- hole and connected to the

metal striD holding w tons of

gravel and pressing on his ankle.
A winch to which the hook was
attached by a steel cable man managed
aged managed to lift the metal a few inches.

Stafford was able to Jree his

ankle between the space opened

by the winch and the frantic dig

ging he had done with his hands.
Stafford's wife, Lydia, 54, at

first was told her husband was
dead. She didn't learn he was

alive until nearly five hour after
the cave-in.

"I can't believe it," the happy1
woman said when he was freed.
She had arrived at the scene
after learning he was still alive,
and remained throughout her hus husband's
band's husband's battle with death.
Hot soup and water was fed to
Stafford during his struggle.
About a hundred on-lookers who
had remained into the early
morning hours watching the

struggle let out a cheer of joy
when Stafford was brought up.

LATE LETTER
GELNHA.USEN, Germany (UPI)
Postal officials here said, they
received a letter addressed to a
man who died nearly 300 years
ago. The letter, posted in Jerusa Jerusalem,
lem, Jerusalem, arrived last week. It was

addressed to H.J. Von Grimmel-

shausen. It had- no street address

so postal authorities checked the
registration office. There it was

learned that a. resident of Geln

haushen named Orimmelshausen

had died Aug. 17, 1676. The letter

was returned to the sender.

Piano cresses starting Monday,
11259, beginnon 4:00 p.m.
to 5:00 p.m. American Legion
Club,- Ft. Amador. 6 pupils per
class, $1.00 each pupil. Enroll
Friday and Saturday 4 to 5 p.m.

WANTED

WANTED TO RENT: American
family desires 3 bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment or chalet available for oc occupancy,
cupancy, occupancy, February 1 5th; prefer preferably
ably preferably In El Cangrejo. Phone 3 3-5396.
5396. 3-5396. '-'

SERVICES

Protect your bim and proper,
ty against insect 4 (.
Prompt scientific treatment at)
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Service,
Panama 3-7977 er Colon 1777.

TELEVISION SERVICI
We repair in your homo
we don't pretend to guarantof
our work. Wo guarantee f
PHONE THE EXPERTS;
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
' Tel. 2-1905
Tivoll Avenue No. 1S-20.

I offer my aervices for taking
caro sice people, during nights.
Tel. 3-2507.

I rv A If f -If

-v. ..'. L..W.. i..:).....u.: L.. I

i i it i i. t ii

1 I 1 IX flU i lUvit 1

ii i I i : iu-v ii- i i

'S.1 r

Hope Wanes For
Possible Return
Of Kidnaped Baby
NEW YORK, Jan. 8 (UPI) -Hope
waned today for the possible
return of tir Lisa Rose Chionchio,
kidnaped from a hospital nursery
last Friday less than 2 1-2 hours
after her iirth.
Police, admittedly without sub substantial
stantial substantial elues or leads, searched
sewers, cellars and the Coney Is Island
land Island beachfront in their intensive
hunt for the seven-pound infant.

Detectives planned today to
question a New York City woman
(from the Borough of Queens),
who has been regarded as ont of
two suspects in the mystery. Th
woman, said to, match the descrip description'
tion' description' of the heavv-set bleach.

blonde believed to be the kidnaper a

was located yesterday in an Al Albany,
bany, Albany, N.Y., hospital, where sn
was taken afteri allegedly taking
ah overdose of aspirin.

1 The woman, a former mental
'patient, was reported missing

from her home Sunday by her

nusband.

The only otheri "suspect" has

been, identified: as Mrs. Betty

Jean Benedicto, 31, of Stockton,
Calif., who is wanted by San Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco police for parole violation.
Mrs. Benedicto, .served a year in
prison, for kidnaping a new born
i.infant in 1955.- California authorit authorities'
ies' authorities' lay the,' too; resembles the
woman nurses saw surreptitiously
enter and leave St. Peter's Hospi Hospital
tal Hospital about the time of the kidnap.
"Tips" and crank calls, mean

while, sent police scurrying

bout Brooklyn in vain searches for

the infant

On Friday afternoon at 5:30.

presentation of trophies to the win winners
ners winners and runners up will be made
by Capt. K. W. Hines, Command

ing Olficer, U.S. Naval Station,

Rodman. A beer party commenc

ing at 4 o'clock is open to all

members of the Rodman Golf Club
honoring the new champs.

Poet's Philosophy
On 81st Birthday
Cites Scientists

FLAT ROCK, N. C. (UPI) -Poet
- philosopher Carl Sandburg,
surveying the state of the world
on his 81st birthday, has come to
the conclusion that scientists
"have mwe importance" than
politicians.
"The professors created the
atomic bomb, not the politicians,"
he said. "The politicians had noth nothing
ing nothing to do with developing atomic
power. But it's the politician who

is running ..round getting the
world very dizzy over atomic

power.

Sandburg, whu moved to a farm
near here 13 years ago, celebrated
his birthday Tuesday with a quiet

observance at home.

He called the scientist "the
most unpredictable mart of today
in both the United States and
Russia,.' They c eate terribly de destructive
structive destructive forces, but none of them
ever talk of wair..."
He added that "there would
never be an atomic war" if the
peoples Of the world could lock
up "any lunatics with Hitler ten tendencies."
dencies." tendencies." Noting that deposed Cuban Dic

tator Fulgencio Batista seemed to

admire President Abraham un un-coln,
coln, un-coln, the Lincoln biographer said,
"He iread all about Lincoln I

could tell him and it didn't seem

to do him much good."

Little League
Boys X Girls 2

Mr. and Mrs. Osborne Hoy, of

Colon, are the parents of the last
baby born at Coco Solo Hospital

during 1958, according to the hos hospital
pital hospital report. The baby, a girl, was
born at 4:07 a.m. Dec. 31.
Three other children, two boys
and a girl, were born during the
week ending at midnight, Dec. 31.
Parents of the girl are Mr and
Mrs. Calvin Tiiompson, of Rain Rainbow
bow Rainbow City.
The boys were born to Mr. nd

Mrs. Otilio Delgado, of Colon: and
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald De Vane, of

Rainbow City.
During this same period, 59 pa patients
tients patients were admitted and 48 were
discharged.

GEN. MAXWFXL D. TAYLOR, VS. Army Chief of 8talf, called
on Gov. W. E. Potter this week at his of f ice at -Balboa ijeights.
Taylor arrived in the Canal Zone Sunday for a four day visit,
part of a 10-day trip he is making with his wife and members
of department of the Army Staff "to Puerto Rico, Panama,
and Mexico. Left to right are: Taylor, Potter, and Lt. Gen.
Ridgely Gaither, commander In chief of the Caribbean Command.

Transcontinental Winter Storm
Sweeps Atlantic With Icy Gales

Curundu Church
To Hold Yearly

Business Meeting

The yearly business meeting of

the Curundu Protestant Church
will be held tomorrow evening be beginning
ginning beginning at 6 p.m, with a fellow fellowship
ship fellowship supper.

Each family is requested to
bring covered dishes of meat and
vegetables, salads, and desserts.

Bread, butter ana Deverages
will be furnished by the church.

Immediately following the sup

per the business meeting will be

gin at 7:30 p.m. Every person oi
the congregation is invited to at attend
tend attend and take part in the business
session.
Reports of the past year will be
rcvipwpri and coals for the ore-

sent vear wfll be presented. The

budget for the coming year will be
presented and voted upon. There
will be the election of the officials
of the church for the coming

year.

A transcontinental winter storm
swept into the Atlantic Ocean on
yesterday with an icy gale which
churned up 50-foot waves and dis disabled
abled disabled at least four ships.
In the storm's backwash, ice
plugged up the water supply for
the entire city of North Tonawan Tonawan-day,
day, Tonawan-day, N.Y., and marooned hundreds
of farm families and travellers be behind
hind behind 20-foot snow drifts in Can Canada.
ada. Canada. Another storm, the second of the
week, was poised to hit northern
California. Damage was estimated
st more than a million dollars in

the wake of the earlier onslaught

on the southern part of the state,

where mud slides smashed their
way down mountainsides which
had been stripped of normal water

shrt bv recent brush fires.

The cold wave and storms naa

lastr-rl almost a week in a vast

arpa eoverine much of the nauon

Weather blamed deaths, led By

murderous cold wave fires and

including traffic accidents, exhaus

tion and exposure, rose to at least
80. Since Monday, fires had killed

at Ipast 52.

There were nine weather deaths

in UKianoma, eigni in ivansBs,
seven in New York, six In both
Minnesota and Mississippi, five

each In Ind ana. Missouri and Vir

einia. four in Iowa, three each In

Alabama, Illinois, Massachusetts
and Pennsvlvania. two eRch In

Oeorcia. Maine. North Carolina,

Tennessee and Wisconsin, and one
each in California, Louisiana and

Npw Jersev.

The fires continued to take lives

in wholesale lots. In one of the

latest tragedies. Mark Kelly

45, and his five children, aged 3
to 16, died in their flaming home
at Brandon, Minn,, while the
temppratiire registered near ero.
A Shrewsburyp Mass., widow, Mrs

Fire Takes 8 To 14

Lives In 1-Story

IlQuse In Oklahoma

BOSWELL, Ola., Jan. 8 (UPI)
A ",f ire in a one-story frame
house on the edge of town killed

eight to 14 persons early today.

maKee'Saia me tire was discover discovered
ed discovered about 1:30 a.m. but the struct

ure stilliWas too hot several tours

later- to. 'enter..and the exact num number
ber number od fead was not determined.

The marshal said Booker Gard Gardner,
ner, Gardner, father of the Negro Family,
was away on a hunting 'trip-and
had not been notified of the trage tragedy.
dy. tragedy. He said there were 12 or 13
members of the family and possi possibly
bly possibly two or three guests ftrom Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma City in 'he house.
Shoemake said there were no fir
hydrants near the house and a
tank truck had to fight the braze
as best it could.

Anna Carlson, 72, died screaming

in her blazing home while firemen

watched helplessly. They had no
water because the hydrant had

frozen.

Coast Guard stations reported at

least four ships disabled in their
battle against the storm. Cutters
thrashed through the heavy seas
in a race to aid the stricken ves

sels. ...

The Boston Coast Guard said

two ships, including a cutter, were
in serious trouble off New England
where the waves ran 50 feet high.
The 110-foot Lillian B. Radioed

she was leaking badly, and the
battered cutter McCulloch, which
had already lost one crewman in
tha storm, was making painfully

slow progress toward Argentia,

New Foundland.

Wallows In High Seas
At Norfolk, Va., the Coast Guard

said the freighter African Dawn

was wallowing in 40-foot seas off

the east coast of Bermuda with a

rapidly widening crack in hrr

mala deck.

a coast Guard cutter, mean

while, managed to reach the Brit

ish freishter Hillcrest and radioed

back it would attempt to tow the

shin to shore when the storm died.

On the land, North Tonawanda's;

water service returned to t uro
thirds normal ,after 6,000 gallon
pump and a number, of smaller
oumps were brought Into- opera operation.
tion. operation. V -.;
Across the Canadian border,
road crews were flehtinB to get

through mammoth snows. About

20 families on the St. Lawrence

river had been marooned s'nee

Sunday and were running short of
food, fuel, and water .v Near Na Na-pierville,
pierville, Na-pierville, Quebec, where the tem temperature
perature temperature was 12 below sero, huge
drifts stranded 300 American and
Canadian travelers..

The roof and walls were already

caved in when the braze was dis discovered,
covered, discovered, he said, and firemen con

centrated on saving a nearoy house

which also caught on fire.

He said bodies could be seen pil

ed around a bed. ?

CHUCKLE HEAD

APPROPRIATE CONDITIONS ..
MILWAUKEE, Wie. (UPI)
Conditions were appropriate in

deed when seamstresses at1 tne

Eder Flag Mfg. Co. arrived to
start work on the new "Alaska-style"
49-star fag.
The steam pipes were frozen
and the thermometer read 11 be below.
low. below. BAD NEWS
JACKSON, Miss. (UPI)-There
waa bad jnewf today for young young-steirs
steirs young-steirs who received gasoline-powered
midget uto for Christmas.
Police ruled the vehicles must
be furnished with license platet

and may only De operated ny u u-cened
cened u-cened drivers at least 15 years
of age,
DESIGNER SUGGESTS WIG ..

v LONDON (lyi); uesigneir iea-

dy Tihing, whe designed the lace
panties .that iwon headlines for
American, tennis player "Gobs'
geous Gussie' Moran, today pro pro-posed
posed pro-posed varicolored ,wigs as the ae-'
cessory the wom an tennis player

should .wear in 1959-

STATESMEN. PERHAPS

: ALBANY, iN.Y. (UPI)-An to-

formation booklet Just released
shows that not one of 58 senators
and 149 assemblymen In the New ;
York state Legislature lists his oc occupation
cupation occupation as "politician." ,v7?

If:

I



1 1

THURSDAY, JANUARY S, 1959
THE PANAMA AMFRICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE Nlrfl
P- -f -
Tlttf AM" THf PIRATES
V... .. UJCUKGP. tVUNDtCR"
THE STOHT OP MAP.THA !WN
Too Much
8 WILSON HHlAtUS
TlNHJKN.HIS UNlFOfrtl MAKES HIM OF INTERESTJ
incite re i?
A COOL REI?E,
CTATTSI.
0ENHOOLY
1 HOW ABOUT VOU. MRS. WAVUE I ARE
YUU ALL
THE
ASIATIC
OT7 A
' FASCV'
NATIN5
PLACE-
06HT?

i i

LS?lMCg-ipyv SHg'S ALIVE
pi jyb'-yArT avc me a hand.
I WE'LL CET HR TO

1(&

YW

ALLtT OoV

BOOTS AND HI

CAPTAIN EAff

XORTY MEEKLI

riXCSXU AND US fUKRSS

In Comfort

;PI5jPRR' lTLl-' FEEL 6000
I a" cSpGeT IMPooRS

l MCRJtlLL BLOSSKfc

AWKitsYth-tme
colder. in air
here Than condition
rr 5 er Seems

OUTSIDE.' To Be on

rv

STUMPIE.1

.But. sir surely you wouldn't peprive

jlTHE YOUNG UMS OF AN NDOOR SKATING,

0

MT

.V 1

- S'

BIGS BUNNY

No Dummy

$ mi a; MA SanHsa, Int. T.M. U.S. fal. OH.

Sounds Interesting:

V. T. HAM U.N

" "l YES...TEU. US MORE WEU....COMRARED TO
weu. SO WITH XXI ABOUT THIS CHUNK OOP, WHOSE ZW
IN THI9 ITALIAN OF LIGNITE VOU CALL POUNDS STACK UP
BOUeCT, 0RON9ON,V OREOPITH ECUS TO ABOUT SIX FEET
ast wet a, to vvV, r-m 0RE0'P &E
BE BETTER rT Ut WTTIPa: QUITE SMALL.

v NATURALLY AND PROBABLY
' ...AND A A IF HE'S TEN I A LOT CLOSER
LONG WAVS ) MILLION TO THE MISSINS
DOWN OUR YEARS OLD LINK THAN ANY ANY-v
v ANY-v FAMILY THINS FOUND
TREE n UP TO NOW

iHUH-UH.' l
DON'T BELONG
X? THE MISSING

V

BELONG

E MISSING

LINK 5CHOOL n

OF THOUGHT.'

gUT, SlgE I'mII I'SO WHAT! VAN
HEY, SYLVESTER YkVJ SrL
( SUPPOSED T SLOW t 8
V DOWN -TRAFFIC J Cf7 AHARD

flkrgflaiB True Life Adventures

VWCAAT VST Tvre

TfcURENDV

COOP,

r tt-

The Boss Speaks

rr

BDOAI MAKTIN

Not For Her ;

LESLIE TURNER

WHV DENy X SHE'.NOTSTAfiE-STKUCf

THE KID A yeTilrA' WHY START NOW?
S.KEAK? WITH I WANT TO 5PACR HPIT TUB

YOU COACH HARP KNOCKS I'VE MP 5IHCE

INCS H6K-V i WADE THS WKOUS CHOICB

ANU UBPT HEK FATHER.!

Iyiiii.l.ii,i OH A ELLENi GO WWCH I
femt njewrkWPTHl-,,:ly pOR.BUD AT THE-
THAT l I Mi UM IJ I lifc H

i ARHLk 1 1 ''. km ill m i;;i;i AvMsffi.Wfc,

1 nr vf
TSHE

MAy

THERE'S. A SOY Wrt LOvCft HEK EN0U3H

TO COME HERS AND OPEN WV CYEft TO

WW NEGLECT1 IN A FINN YEARS

THEY CAN BE MhREP...UNLES5 I VOU

9HE.MAKE4 MISTAKE! BB RI9HT.

X SUPPOSE

YOU HEARD

ABOUT AL

HARMON f

R.I

Silencer

CSSSg)!'! GABGAB f!gg2l

By DICK CAVALIJ

L. NOW,THEN,SOU to I h
p-Ov I WERE SAYING? J
: ft 1a Mt StvIc, Inc. T.M. Rtg. U S. Ptl. Off.

OUR BOARDING HOUSE

vltl

WUOI HQOPLi OUT OUR WAV

WfMVL MATCH THE monev, BUT PLAV-
t tkYrnX ..I .TA IC VmiC' CNln OCTLlr 1

EGAD, MY DEARATo A MANiII b . t,-.7t "jl

HWB DONATED SEEROUSLVw ..fiS. .rTuncl-rv

toWaP THE NEEDY FAMILY J ,'5 WMd

DESCKipD.INTHi NEWS- -Sct atws oxml CLOBi.

:avsTO'ffi.:tr-.t-cR be the first

6UPP0f I TURM THS FWtS ) t 2.B Jf"-'

I TU TUit II M

u

TMUCHiR

WORD

TO THE

BY J. R WILLIAMS

MOW X SAW, IM MV f I -T7N ( Tam-uhv )
f DREAM, THAT CHSTlAfSffflf&mvmj O' COURS6
. WEMT MOT 'FORTH ALOME, Wr'm"U IM LIST6MIM7 I
,(o There was one Jt l I gosh does
WHOSE MAME WAS HOPE (El A FELLER
V FUL, fSEIWd MAPE 50" I fe J I HAVETLOOK V"
SAY, VOUMSMAM, g I MISERABLE UrT'
I YOU'RE MOT LISTfM- V TBELISTEM-!?
V INa SIT UP IM PllL IM' i JV1-2

The MOTH and the FLING

TUJTTERIS4- MOTH IS

ATTRACTED T3V OMETHlNcS

SHINW. VENTURING
1 CLjOSER. AM ORJE-.T

, HARP ANP STICKV

V SHE IS OtsUSHT x

13

ei5
WorU i Ma JUMifwt

' 1

Above

is THE

AMERICAN
SOLAS
SPIDER
Whose
1M0ENIOU3

R)LAf3 Pi IK1

OF STkK ,i

THREAP, IS 3
THROWM N
SAUCHO -V:
FASHION.

TJHE African
COUSlM OF

THIS 6PIPER WHIRLS ITS BOLAS

ABOUT TO CATCH

?'- 10-1

Wjtributeil by Kinr Featur-n SyndicaU.

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calhraith

'mm

I L LiJli

i mm

-A UJ ill J;r u'

1 IMT
1 vj

ipiisiiiiii;

vitL'ft MT lilt-

ilfl,

UP AND DOWN BUSINESS It would be difficult to euess

just what this odd-looking device is used for. Of all things, It's
a flagpole painting machine. Its inventor, Arthur Edelberg, ot
Cleveland, Ohio, displays it In opened position. To paint a
pole, the machine is hoisted to the top the same way.tv.flag is.
Sliding back down, it sprays the pole with paint. Two brushes
inside revolve to give a smooth, even coat. Edelberg, a pro professional
fessional professional painter for 30 years, claims his invention can do in
an hour what it normally takes two men a whole' day. Ht
reflects happily on the number of flagpoles there must be in
this country.

T.M f V i. FM. Off.
C I'M r Nf A .. ha.

IZ-ZO

"Are you sure you want to marry him, Jane? He doesn't
seem to have much of a sense of humor!"

nnn I O

aCAK

T M Rg U t. t. Of).
t a, HfA'tanaM. na.

IZ 20

Hi VrfA i-i y-i-a&MZt W-W ,1ia.A. .. iaT ft. inimi-i

NO, IT ISN'T THE MOON -Though this photograph resem resembles
bles resembles the pockmarked surface of the moon, the craters are
actually microscopic. It's a picture of uranium being used as
fuel in an atomic reactor at the Hunford Atomic Products
operation in Richland, Wash. Normally hard like steel, uranium
under high temperatures turns soft, swells and liberates gases.

"They don't stand a chance against our secret
weapon the ice cream scoop!"

A fnA S PA MA MA KS
PANAMA-MIAMI 55 00
MIAMI-CHICAGO 53.35

PANAMA
CHICAGO

3 0(1 C'KN NEWS
n IS Dinah Shore
.l-.Ti Chnsloiihf
4 ni' Ina Rap Hnllnn
4 3n flft Mellon' 'spfirch
-5:00 Shf!rwfKd Affnir
5 .10 TANORAMA
7:00 Calf Slnrm Show

Q35
0.

7:3ii 1 lJ:.ugh
8:0(1 Climax
9 01 Mai' uriMfie Par'y
!1-.V "ht'-
100" r--h ThF 'k
1 tv-- n :''.
11:13 Fn-- Ctnh Ch ': ird

Todny's TV Program
Couitesv ol AeicviN Panama AinvlUn
PHONES: PANAMA: -107 3-1t9o 3 1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

'V,

- 1



' f

Kings

, O -'77 :!
em

s

With Democrats In Overwhelming Control

Ike Plans To Go Over Head Of Democratic Congress,
Se His Program D i redly To People Via Press, TV

Mikoyan

2 WASHINGTON, Jan. 8 (UPI)-President Eisenhower mapped a campaign today to go over the head of the heavily-Democratic Congress to j
S.. 'tf-' was making arrangements to stump for his proposals through radio and tele-
A top wnue nou e nnnearances and personal let ters. No dates have been set.
Vision. pr... -?jESttZLZ!mm Ho e.ig M.nd., nigh, with Voider,. Richard M. Nixon, Repub-
; Eisenhower 0 s8jstant qqp chairman Mrs. Car D. Williamt and others. .,.,.
XX IS" Zt. Ml sia!;:. Program ,.rmal,y in a 0. .... to ft. H.u H. will Oliver ft. fir... hi,

-State of the Union address, to a joint session of Conjress tomorrow.

The new 86th Congress, big biggest
gest biggest in US. history, opened
vefiterday with fireworks pop pop-X
X pop-X over Senate filibusters and
&th new Republican leaders
taking party command in both
hKheavily Democratic
Bouse and Senate convened
for a session that must try to
Sconcile President E.senhow E.senhow-er's
er's E.senhow-er's economy budget with Rus-

la's space chaiien "I"'
iwratic leaders promised res
eonsible service and aim
Jatheic" consideration of tne
resident's proposals.
A House controversy, with ci-
rights overtones, was settled
when Rep. Dale Alford, the Lrt Lrt-Pnrk
Pnrk Lrt-Pnrk Ar segregationist,
S, anowedlo takehis seat by
jfr overwhelming vote
TA House elections ubf
tee had recommended that Al Algid
gid Algid be barred pending an in instigation
stigation instigation of his lte-in-vic-lry
over Rep. Brooks Hays (D-
jloth the House and Senate
ield relatively brief sessions.
ut even so opening day saw
Cre than 2000 bills "t'oduc-
fed in the House including
wo big spending
hich Eisenhower vetoted ias
war for economy reasons.
One would launch a 275 mil-

Seaman Collaoses,
Pies Aboard Ship
At Cristobal Dock

t..t-icsn crewman aboard

T Grace Line ship docked at Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal yesterday suddenly collap collapse)!
se)! collapse)! while oft deck an died a few
minutes later.
He wa Lucius Gwin, Jr., si, a
seaman aboard the Santa Teresa.
Cristobal firemen were called im immediately
mediately immediately he collapsed and ap applied
plied applied a resuscitator, but 1o no a a-ftjL
ftjL a-ftjL An autopsy has been requested.

lion dollar program of Federal

aid for economically -ugh
areas The other would provide
r f 'ion million

dollars a year, for five years to

help communities duuu ;
Democrats labelled them "must
16 FormeTpresident Truman and
a host of luminaries were on
hand to see the opening of the
nfnst overwhelmingly Democra

tic Congress since New Deals

daI?V' .,, u 64

Tne oeiiatc "k
Democrats and 34 Republicans.
in the House, it is 283 Dem Democrats
ocrats Democrats and 153 RePu.icani(,h
The Congress, with which
Eisenhower must deal during
his last two years in the Wh t
House also is the largest in his history
tory history due to the addition of two
senators and a House member
from the new state of Alaska
n ui;nM ennflinrs pmercert

from their leadership contest
without visible scars but bit bitterness
terness bitterness threatened to Hnger
indefinitely among GOP Hous
m'mrJ; nf the deposed

House Renublican leader Joseph
w mrrtin read all sorts oi

. .... -- .

: itA nte cub

j vs Ren Charles A

Halleck. They professed to see

evidence tnat vicc-r
Richard M. Nixon and Thomas

E Dewey, twice tne our res residential
idential residential nominee, had played a

part in Martin s aeieai.
The White House explicitly de-
-i.j u.vtin'i nssprt.lnn that

three White House aides but
not President Eisenhower had
worked for Halleck.
err.oc ninsp to Nixon also

denied that he had taken any

part One informant saiu mii mii-tin
tin mii-tin telephoned Nixon to ask
the Vice President were helping
Halleck and was assured that
Nixon was not encouraging the
anti-Martin campaign.
Conservative Republicans won
their fight to keep Senate party
control by electing Sen. Ever Everett
ett Everett M. Dirksen (111.) as GOP

leader over liberal Sen. John

Sherman Cooper (Ky). The vote
was 20-14.
But the Republicans also
elected liberal Sen .Thomas H.
Kuchel (Calif.) as whip, or as-.

sistant gop leader, oy tne same
vntp This was considered a

concession to the liberal, group

wnicn sougnt to overtnruw con conservative
servative conservative control.
Shortly after the vote was an announced,
nounced, announced, President Eisenhower
sent congratulations to both

Dirksen ana Kucnei.

Cooper said he accepted the
President's statement that "he
was not involved in our situa-

4nn T Irnnw also that the vice

president kept a position which

was correct aim piuyci.

"I fully ana wnoienerawuiy
concur," Dirksen said.
House Speaker Sam Rayburn,
pledged that the heavily Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic Ccfngress will give "at "attentive
tentive "attentive and sympathetic" con consideration
sideration consideration to President Eisen Eisenhower's
hower's Eisenhower's legislative program.
He said the Democrats "are

Liberal Senators Lose First Round
Of Fight To Curb Filibustering

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yyix

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TECHNICOLOR

WASHINGTON, Jan. 8 (UPI)

Anti-filibuster senators, who

lost their first rouna sKirmisn
at the opening of Congress, said
today they had "other weapons
n tviP nrsenal' to use in their

fiirVit tn i-hnni?fi Senate rules.

The controversy tnremeuu w

paralyze the senate m tne msi
Hnvs nf the new session. The

bipartisan liberal bloc which
wants to curb talkathons plan planned
ned planned to take the initiative today

hn io phnmher met.

The liberals said they would
try to set aside a compromise

proposal oiierea Dy oenic

Democratic leaaer j,ynuou a.
Johnson (Tex.) and substitute
a motion by Sen. Clinton P. An

derson (D-N.M.) lor tne sen senate
ate senate to adopt new rules.

With the exception of the
Senate battle, Congress mark marked
ed marked tim untii President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower delivers his State of
the Union message to a joint
session tomorrow. The House
urge in rpness.

Tn the filibuster fiiht. Sen.

Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Minn.,

one of the liberal spoilsmen,
oairt his forces had "other wea

pons in the arsenal" they could

use if the move to set asiue
Johnson's compromise failed. He

did not elaborate.
Vice President Richard M.
Nixon handed backers of a
tough new anti-filibuster rule
a preliminary victory yester yesterday
day yesterday by ruling the Senate can
change its rules at the start
of each new Congress.
Rut. Johnson, who is trying

tn mmnmmis the disnute. won

a one-day postponement In the

start of the impenaing au-uut
fight by forcing through a mo motion
tion motion to adjourn the Senate un

til today.

Johnson's motion, Ditteny op opposed
posed opposed by the liberal forces, was
approved 73-23. Voting to ad

journ were 50 Democrats and

23 Republicans, opposea were

13 Democrats and 10 Republicans.

The action prevented sen.

Clinton B. Anderson (D-N.M.)
from presenting his proposal to
change the Senate rules to per permit,
mit, permit, n maloritv of the full Sen

ate membership to choke off

talkathons after 15 aays oi ae-

bate.

Under present Senate rules,

State Of Union
CFN radio will broadcast an
address by President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower tomorrow when he pre presents
sents presents his annual State of the
Union message to Congress. As
President Eisenhower speaks
in Washington, his words will
be relayed around the world
by the Voice of America and
carried here on CFN regular
channels. The broadcast is to
begin at 12 noon. Highlights
from the address will be re re-broadcast
broadcast re-broadcast tomorrow evening
on the Panorama program.

s US Trade H opes DimmfifJ

By tack Of Saleable Red iprdcluctsf

WASHINGTON, Jan. 8 (UPI) U.S. officials today put the damper on aay hopes that So,,
viet deputy premier Anastas I. Mikoyan may.havt f promotinj big increase in Russlaa-Amerc
lean trade. ... z'.'r- ,., 3;

m Diggesi roaaoiocK in ftiucoyan s pain, tney saia, is na nussia oasicauj- Has nrtaall
nothing to offer that the United States really wants to buy. V. t i..
At the same time, legal and other complications T)lock the possibility f any long-term Af"
merican credits to Russia to permit her to finance tne imports t U.S. equipment nicb 8oTielf
t:i.14.k w i i i i i i i j. : ,? w ... i .. ..

ficniior mini jvuiusncner nas saia ne.,wuwi" r.v, ... ,,s ? v
Officials reported that Mikoyan during his initial' two-day stay In Washington said Very UU
tie about trade in his talks with Secretary of State John Foster Duties and other U.S leaders.
However, they said they expect him to push the subject much harder when he returns th
the capital in about 10 days particularly if he can strip up sentiment among American- bnsttf

utssmcu iv uiurcase iraoe peiween ne w coanirxeB. : , .-,

Some iorm of govttnmental business and industrial leadefl
rroTtrromnrit tjH firton-.Piis.sia.n I In nlpvelavif Tn V1 flraf itm

The Imnrpaclnn. in nffi1ol'

quarters here is that Mikoyan,
during his, swing around the
TTnit.ert States toW trxr to trot

------- -V L-.-J ... W. J hj
American .businessmen interest-

ea enough to bring pressure on
Washington. His principal ob objectives
jectives objectives are believed to be:

-a traae agreement of the
type Russia has concluded with
many countries, promising to

encourage commerce.

arrangement to finance -Russian

purchase of chemical ana jiias jiias-tics
tics jiias-tics equipment. '
Mikoyan, ignoring intensive
anti-Soviet demonstrat Ions;
which included a rock-throwing
incident, urged yesterday
that legislative, barriers be
cleared to vase trade between
the U.s: and' Russian Russian-Speaking
Speaking Russian-Speaking at a r meeting of

a vote of two-thirds 66

Senators of the entire Sen Senate
ate Senate is required to halt fili filibusters,
busters, filibusters, the traditional wea weapon
pon weapon of Southerners for killing
civil rights legislation. ...
The Southerners have vowed

an all-out fight against the bi

partisan move to modify tne

rule.

going to be as non-partisan as
we are allowed to be."
Both Hayburn and Senate
Democratic Leader Lyndon B.

Johnson warned the big uem-

ocratic contingents in tne two
hninu tviot. t.hev are carrvlne

1IUUOI.O .".T "
heavy responsibilities because of

their newiy-won legisi a n v c
strength.

The new Senate was less than
an hniir old when the nrelim-

inarv parliamentary jockeying

o-nt. nnrlerwav. Sen. Jacoh K.

Javits (R-N.Y.), a leader of the

anti-filibuster forces, set oil the

maneuvering by asking Nixon

under what rules the new Sen

ato was nnerat.lnir

Nixon said in a non-bindinfi:

"advlsorv opinion" the Senate

was nneratinir under Its oia

rules of the 85th Congress. But

he said it had the constitution constitutional
al constitutional rjght to adopt new rules by
majority vote at the start of

each new Congress.

In the next hour Nixon came

tn for nerhaDs his rouehest

time In his six years as the
Senate's presiding officer, with
Johnson and Sen. Richard B.
Russell rn-On ). leader of the

Southern forces, peppering him

with neeaung questions.

jonnson sioie a marcn on
the liberals hv offerintr his

compromise motion to change
the rules to permit a two two-thirds
thirds two-thirds vote, of senators present
and voting to limit debate. He
urged the Senate as a, "body

of reasonable men" to con
sider his proposal immediate

ly and get on to "more im im-nnrtant
nnrtant im-nnrtant things."

But Javits and Sen; Clifford
P r!ase (R.-N..T 1 hlnckftri imme

diate consideration of Johnson's
nrrmnsn.1 hv invoking a. rule that

requires a one-day advance, no

tice of any motion to change
the rules.

Anderson then tried to nresent

the more drastic anti-filibuster

proposal of the liberal troops.
But Johnson argued that he
had not yielded the floor to

Anderson. He was upheld by

Nixon.
With Anderson thwa r t .d.
.Tnhnsnn rammed throueh his

motion for adjournment until

today, when his proposal will
officially be the pending business.

CE NTRAL

COMING SOON!

BP
2Aa-.
M-G-M : AS
yif prtsenti in brilllartt
V COLOR 1

A titillating;

TALE OF THE
MATING SEASON I

t .,.;!,.. '. ..(! '.s'u. '".:.'---!;

1 AijJ J if 55 1
Ik I
il T I

IS 1 I

3 r
; ft v j WJ

RFX KAY

HARRISON; KENDALL

r itk

i

Ill

liMiiiiiiiid

u

tfltafnea

JOHN SAXON
SANDRA DEE

LAN6ELA lansbury

MtTROCOCOR
HH HVON PRO0UCTION

ml

m

sir "l"'!

sir. W h.

i

i.'

rt4iTrsn YUL ANNt tDWARDa

HE5T0N BRYNNlR BAXTER ROBINSON
YVONNt DtBRA JOHN
DE CARLO 'PAGET' DM
THE BIBLE BEFORE YOUR EYES
AND EARS!

The Show begins
with the nirture.

No Newsreels, A Paramount!

Shorts or I Picture

Advertisements I

Will be shown!

This Production will
not be shown in
any?other Theatre
in Ahe Republic of
Panama during

1959.

TODAY BELLA VISTA

PRICES: '.75 .40 Shows: 1:35 4:00 6:30 9:00 p.m.
ONCE AGAIN THE WHOLE
WORLD LAUGHS!
THE INCOMPARABLE
CHARLES CHAPLIN
IN-

THE COMEDY
MASTERPIECE!

PRODUCED, WRITTEN AND DIRECTED by
CHARLES CHAPLIN
RELEASED THRU UNITED ARTISTS

in Cleveland -on his first ctoOr rl

in a nation-wide tour, the Rus

Lsian official lso' advocated S

co-existence in -peaca and-,

friendships. ;
- The 63-year-old CommunisL
whoxwas.'the lar,get of a? roc
thrown by a 19-year-old fugi
tiye of Russian tyranny and in
tensive jeers' .by Hungarian

"Trader can-Jielp strengthens Vi
rStxa ao oni) MAn m 4-t Al I

hand creates tha proper -eondl

Mikoyan denied accusation
that Russia ir trying ta un-;
dennine thf world market by
"dumping"; j goods at below:,
market prices.? He' said th th-Soviet
Soviet th-Soviet Unhm wants to- get af,'
high a price for its goods as
possible and wants to buyt

possible.

a.

nn;iiinu vjj. oncLig lovvicur xycyuoy fieuiicr Alias las
Mikoyan offers a piece of candy to six-months-old David Dren Dren-glvitz
glvitz Dren-glvitz during a surprise visit to a Whit Oaks, McL, super
market.

Ike Asks Traditional US Courtesy
For Visiting No. 2 Russian Boss

WASHINGTON, Jan. 8 (UPI)
. President Eisenhower asked

today that Americans receive

Soviet 'deputy premier Anasias
I. Mikovan with 'traditional

courtesy" on his current U.S.

tour:- .x
The President made known
his displeasure over hostila
receptions given Mikoyan by
anti-Soviet demonstrators in
Cleveland and Detroit.
Press secretary James C. Hag Hag-erty
erty Hag-erty said Eisenhower had read
rprinrta of "rncft throwing, eee

.throwing and spitting" in Cleve

land and of the assembly oi ooo

rtownnsT.rnT.nrs ot. iT,rniT,.

Haffprtv said the President

asked him to make -this state

ment:

'Th'p PrpslHent hnnes that

wherever he goes in this coun

try, Mikoyan win De .met witn
the courtesy Americans tradi traditionally
tionally traditionally -show visitors from' a-

broad, 1
"The President wants Mi
koyan to see the real America
so that when he returns

home, he will be able to on on-vey
vey on-vey an accurate picture of
our good manners, as .well as
well, as our strength, our con confidence
fidence confidence and determination in
the cause of freedom and
peace."
Asked 1f It was thn Presi-

rlpnt.'s nnsit.inn that, vnr.nl Und

nhvslr.n.1 nrot.psts no-ninst, Milrn-

yan s, presence did not accurate

ly represent "the real America,"
Hagerty said he would not go

ucjruiia uia. awkcuicuir ;u(,,-

TTn sa1? h -nniTprmfnln bum ...

cusation did not crop upHuitil

tne u.. was in tne miasv oi(
recession, at which time prices
of sonw good dropped. At that
time, however, Russia was ex
porting, practically none ot tbJ
good affected, he stated. -
Mikoyan also pointed out thai
Americans should not be of fenri
prf it Pnssinn hnosts 'that "Wi

araout to catch up and-ovar
take vou" in livintr standards

and productivity.

"A long time ago, lenin told
us to look upon Americans as
the best organizers of busi business,,
ness,, business,, he said., "Ha told ns to
learn, from the Americans'
business-like attitude and
their nhtllt AmnlTa In.

dustry. We lira attemfting t6"
do Just that, ,

ior exampia ,tne jieia -ox
AirrlMilt.iirA.-WA .111 tint' r

to your standards in that field

ana were art many other

fields' in which, we can learn."
peaking of hydrogen bomb
experiments in Russlay Mikoyan
said, "I realize that' one bomb
urnnM Vkn enniiirVi tn" annlfoilatA

everything in on minute,-not
only the fruits of our labor, but
wt ourselves might ba losV.

Weather Or Not

TliU wpaiVipr rpnnrt for tis 24

hours ending 8 a. m. today- is

prepared by tne meteorological

ana nyarograpnic ranun oi ino

Panama canal company

Balboa Cristobal

TEMPERATURE:

High ........
Low .........

HUMIDITY:

High
Low

SECOND TRIUMPHAL VEEIC

TODAY

SHOWS t 12:50 1:37
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PRICES: fl.Oa fl.5B

90
69

93
50

WINDj
(max. moh) N-22

RAIN (inches) 0

WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 79

84
78

' 65
NE-24
T

80

BALBOA TlbK.
FRIDAY, JAK.

High
3:2a a.m.
4:04 p.m.

' Low
0:K1 a.m.

10:12 pjn.

An Oulslanding Event. Ask One Who
Has Seen It: And You Will Wanl
i To See If Too!

It

J) Mi fj

r

brooks WJWffrtt. r

I You Must Se T)f$ Picture From T Bcgjrtnng

lrui- nil li'iln i "i 'in in' 'V .,J?-

1