The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02777

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
' ' Or- J
r i
ill
Throughout the world ;
- t A' i

-s.

v r7i t

more people buy
Seagram's YO.
than any other
imported whisky. 4

"Sey
v k la i"DEFn:DB3 4pT HEXv
.UILY NEWSPAPER

ffYY THE. CITY OF THE I Vj,
l J I 1 VICEROYS... , r; ;l

ft

r

,

v V ...
4th YEAR
1

" SWIRLING SMOKE TRAILS mark thai path of the -"Minute Men,"; a- famoua Air National
' Guard ureclsioiv flight team from Denver, Colorado." Flying? Sabre3, Hhls team demonstrates
the remarkable -ipabJlitler:(t-ffliOderfVJt-: aircrft.-rTh public, It invited to pratch the "fAln "fAln-'
' "fAln-' iite men" when theyperform Jan 10, -over Fort Davis in the, morninif JjdQyer Albrook'AFB

in the afternoon, rne snow wm
iorces in the Canal Zone.
A
Dniitc iT.lcnri

Ir r ..... .. .' f
' 4 w - :Tm

: Arc Civiiicnsr
- ,x v. i -f v '" 1 ' 1
- c The Minute Men, the of fl-
rial jet precision demonstration
- team-of the Air National Guard
Which will be a feature of the
S Armed Forces Day Show toJbe
I ? held at Albrook Air Force se
r. in the afternoon of Jan. 10 and
' irni-t.nn.vis in-the morning

has ne -marked, difference from
tirr tni let acrobatic
branchea.oi uo
Force,,
, That difference la thatvlin"
like the other teams, the Min Minute
ute Minute Men team d "?
mainly 'of citisen soldiers,
members of the Air National
Guard, who also hold down
full.time civilian Jobs in ad ad--
- ad-- SitVn to their nationally
S.1?" rif 7 Vr.klev Field,
"u" r'int Rbbert C.

'.' CherrV.vh flies the left wing
. gotten 3k the Minute-Men,
and 1st Robert "Bo" Odle,
who fUea the xlght wing.
m,n unio oerfotmer, waj.

-" wvnn Coomer, is a United Air Air-r..r.
r..r. Air-r..r. We- in Denver,
' tCtaU or "slot" position
on the team is flown by 1st w.
nhPi .James., an aeronautical
engineering student at the um
. ?erslty of Colorado. -
,? ." t .TantonvskV. a-Unlt
., a wnn(c fiirht enslneei, w
' alternate solo plloW
.SnCisbdbBi'
: In Cri$l:b:l Cciirl
, ed today for econd time at
. Cristobal Magistrates Court charg
ed with burglarizing the Fort Gu-
hck Exchange on. the night of
rTwo extra chfges of burglary
- Involving the same Incident were
made against the men today and
Judae Joren a. jHuisinger uouim
them over to await trial at AJ.5.
' The Lidians, talaclo topez, -18,
and Carlos 'Hernandez, 20, were
i arrested by the Colon Secret Po-
I', lira anH tnl-nM nvef : to CinSl
I Zone Police. They were taming
merchandise believed vto Deiong
i. to he exchange.1
u The burelars famed entrance
i? to the exchange by cutting the
' ; screen of the cafeteria and .re
' moving' a sash. Once inside the
cafeteria ,they broke several slats
of heavy lattice work forming
. part of the separating wall and
thus gained entry to the- m a 1 n
store. v i
Food Hems and empty contain.
era were strewn about the floor
and various items were missing
. when the robbery, wai discover
id. f v

iL J J U LT'Lf3'

IMTKRMAtlONAI. AjRWAYC

oe v ol.wuu v;b uj

Lbca! 9pp's (Rerrie
dcrnr:c Futnreir

s
i i jjuccU- iruui a: 0wmij.iv
r -...l Ann rttPcnuxTT vf rif 'ii 1.
looks at the year just ended as
pne in wnicu m nn iumuiuw v v-er
er v-er "terrific odds in sustaining a
good -measure of representation"
for Canal Zone local rate work
ers.' t? v r
"Thaf our stewardship has been
Well accounted- for, is a matter
of public record," Harold W. Jter Jter-rie,
rie, Jter-rie, chairman of tne local sa id in
a New Year statement today-
Rerrie said 1958 was filled with
improtant issues which had far far-reaching
reaching far-reaching effects on the lives of"
C. Z. rate" workers.
i'On each of these we gave the
fullest extent of our resources on
behalf of the workers we repre
sent, i We carried on in the best
traditions of organised labor and
our predecessors m the local
field.
Indeed had the support of the
working force been reciprocal,
an' even more productive record
would have been achieved,'1 Rer Rerrie
rie Rerrie declared.
"Without anv attemot to re
cap the activities of the past year
we cannot but recall the out outstanding
standing outstanding gain for Ci Z. raVe work workers
ers workers which waJinally realized in
uctooer, i extension ot me
U.S. Federal Civil Service retire
ment system to the great majori
ty of non-U.S. Citizen employes
of the P. V. vOt and C. Z, govern
ment
This has been a perennial goal
of all labor organizations repre
senting C. Z. rate workers, which
eventually won the support of
many powerful forces, and local
900 is justifiably proud that it
helped to bring to a reality this
great instrument of .security for
the local .workers," the statement
said.
In contrast to this laudable
47 To Begin
Forty-seven volunteers from
Army, Navy and Marine Corps
elements In the Canal Zone will
commence a two-week jungle
orientation course at the Jungle
Warfare "Training Center at
Fort Sherman Monday the
second such course to be offer offered
ed offered to members of all the armnd
forces in the Canal Zone by
JWTCwhich is operated by the
1st Battle Group, 20th infantry.
. This marks the first lime
that members of the. Navy and
Marine Corps from the canal
Zone will have-ttended the
course, although members of
the Marine Corps form the U.8.
were at Fort Sherman lor
lungl orientation last autumn.
The group of volunteers for the
course coming up includes doui
commissioned and enlisted per personnel.
sonnel. personnel.
Recognized as one of the last
remaining places on earth
where members of the armed
forces can learn the art of
jungle warfare, JWTC has been
the site of learning for hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of armed forces members
during the past few years.
Units of the 1st Battle Group,

' ; SLet th people

wmmmmmmm

HHMi

" yj
:-cs Bleak
Mi Mcr
4 the Jwhir econW
C. 1 rate work work-,
, work-, bleak irt rh light
i oliry which was r-
la.
i w
ar,
1IC Sit.
rs is rt
f nw
onced byth Ste.
Irc.ary ef i Army, with the
l I l .... 1 L .1 I
Hwe elan, a product ef the
;1..S Panama-United States
' "This new policy deviates from
nislrations of. raising the stand
ard oi wases paid to C. Z. Me
'worjteutjnorder that they may
cope somewhat better with the in inflationary
flationary inflationary economy under which
ihey work and live.
"It is not in tune with the pre present
sent present progressive trends in man management
agement management of large corporations
and surely is contrary to the po policy
licy policy of the Panama Canal Co. and
its government in past years.
"Among other vital, issue this
one concerning the dismal wage
future of CrZ. rate workers 'is of
paramount concern; to Local 900.
It commands the best in organiz organized
ed organized effort' to effectively counter counteract
act counteract this unfortunate inequity.
','This stark wage policy is the
sour note on which 1958 ends and
represents a great challenge to
u. l. rate workers for -1959,
' "In wishing for all workers in
Panama and the Canal Zone a
prosperous 1959, we cannot but
strongly, admonish that they put
an end to the widespread lethar lethargy
gy lethargy of the past and organize- for
the prosperity they naturally de desire,
sire, desire, and to, which they, are just justly
ly justly entitled as workers in our more
enlightened democratic society in
which, men have learned to-work
and live and aspire towards the
better things of life," Rerrie
stated. .

Jungle Course Monday

20th Infantry, attended "the
course routinely as. part of the
regular training cycle. Last au autumn
tumn autumn the center played host' to
both commissioned and enlisted
students from almost every part
of the Continental Army of the
United states.
Among the volunteers at the
next jungle orientation course
at Fort Sherman will be: 1st
Battle' Group, 20th Infantry;
Headquarters and Headquarters
Company Sp8 James H.
Moulder and Private Ronald A.
Hofman;- Mortar Battery
Sfc Augustin Ranes and Hen Henry
ry Henry McDuffle Jr., Sgta. Harry L.
Ikner, Henry T. Pate and Noah
J; Spence,' Sp5c John F. Trone.
and Roland G. Combs. Cpl.
Loula R. Geary,' and 8pMs TJr.b TJr.b-mas
mas TJr.b-mas G. Cole and John 8. Cole
C Company t- ls Lt. Maury S.
CralleJr. '. -...
From D Company, 34th Ar Armor:
mor: Armor: Sgt. WUliam C. Boyd, 8p4s
Jack R. Provance and Jefferson
D. Swango II.' Pfcs. Craig R,
Church, Roy G. Jackson, Eugene
J. lAndin, Jimmy D., Lee and
Samuel Thomas II.
The only member of V&.

know the truth and the

.- PANAMA, R. P, rRIAXAM ,T t, 1959

Wew Yeor Brings No Deaths
On Isthmian Roads, few Hurf

Th N Tear rot off to a reasonably rood start on Isthmian

hlrhways. No deaths were reported, and iba few highway acci accidents
dents accidents produced no serious easaalties.
Despite the stale aspect of hangover and old beer fames with
which we customarily start the bright New Tear, it appears that
the populace managed to get pie-eyed in decent privacy.
N rirnnk mr .nnrehended over the whole New Tear neriod.

no drunks drirers, nobody fighting. In fact there were no court
appearances on either side of the Canal Zone today involving the

New Tear, period' :
Only one accident .. was report reported
ed reported in the Canal Zone, .- on New
Year's- Eve.- Panama, however,
fared worse. Fifty two people
were' treated for injuries at San Santo
to Santo v7omas hospital. Twelve of
these were Injured in auto acci accidents,
dents, accidents, the rest were victims of
fights and other types A of acci accidents.
dents. accidents. A bus driver and a priv private
ate private motorist were burned i when
their vehicles caught fire. Only
four of the whole casualty list
were detained in hospital. ;
. The Canal Zone eeeidtnt hap happened
pened happened on Gaillard Highway at
10 a.m. on New Year's Eve.
Eighteen-year old Francis W.
Corrigan turned ever his fath-. -er's
car and. Injured himself
and twe teenage passengera,
Joha Brians. 19, of 8059 Marga
rita, and David, Michael Pare,
17, of 234, Catun. j
Corrlean. whose father Is Jo
seph A. Corrigan of 8120 .Marga-J
rita, is still in Gorgas Hospital
where he was taken with a sus suspected"
pected" suspected" fractured skill. ( He was
stated today to be resting com comfortably.
fortably. comfortably. He haa been taken off
the seriously-ill list 'and there
are no complications: s
v ?rpefrtive Tmeed' was the cause
'' .ividenf,, Sptording to po-J
hu p leiiorboiHlne ttoKjnounted the
4riEht Jhand ahouldelSth toad
Just south of Maaden wye, arop
od Into- a sunken Place ana turn:
ed over? coming to' rest about SO
feet from the highway.
. The other two boys were taken
to hospital with superficial in
juries, .lthough Dare was admit
ted for observation, .il s ;f
Yesterday wasn't fray, er
cold, or rainy, lika many a New
On Discarded Trees:
Handle Vilh Care,
Says Fire Division
TH.ntinn tii hn taken bv Ca
naj. Zone residents r e g a r d in g
Christmas j r e e s Durnwg
and the Storage of discarded
Christmas trees has1 again been
issued by the Canal Zone mvi
8?i.!anii nr advised thft bum
ing grass and brush, which includ includes
es includes Christmas trees, is permisable
only with prior approval of pro
per auinorwe.. ... t
"fw winhlnff to hold neigh
whnnd community Christmas
tree burning parties should con contact
tact contact the Community Servicesiv Servicesiv-sion,
sion, Servicesiv-sion, telephone 2-2121 to the Paci Pacific
fic Pacific area and 3-2124 in the Atlantic
area, relative to the location of tne
t i- ... y.'J'
oonnnnai rtf the nearest lire
station should be questioned as to
the proper control measures mew
'"The Fire Division also has .Is .Issued
sued .Issued a warning that discarded
riiriatmii. trees should not V be
tnrH lnsiH the house but at
some safe location away from any
building. -
Armv Technical Services Pad
flc. Fort Clayton, to attend, the
course will be Sn4. Mickey G.
Kocher.
... Seventeen members of the
4th Gun Battalion. 517th Ar
tlllery, I will attena tne course,
and they are: capts. jameg S.
AngeWs, Maurice E. Klnnett and
Joseph X. Muckerman, 1st Lt.
Billy R. Adair, 2nd Lt. Frank R.
8hinn in. MSgt. James H. Cox,
Sf cl. Herbert J. Buberry and
Miguel Soto Mayor-Reyes, 8gts.
Kent D. Behunln, Ramon L. Ce-defto-Martlnei
and Darren L,
Townsend. Sp5 Harry L. Boaz,
Corporal B. Randle; Sp.4 Grant
O. Minton, and Pfca. Arthur E.
Da via, Paul E. Fisher and John
K. Gleneer. t-.-?:-'-'":
' Attendina :the course from
the Marine Corba at Rodman
wUp be Cpla. James L. Lynch
and Thomas IV ciarkA 1
- Six members of the .Naval
Harbor Defense Unit at Cristo Cristobal
bal Cristobal will r. attend, they ; are: Lt.
(lg) Lawrence A." Clarke,; SA
Walter E. Raleigh. ET3 John M M-Garvey,
Garvey, M-Garvey, ET2 Virgil L. Hodges,
SA Raymond E.. Rose,: and FA
Jerry. D. .09JMMttf.

cour.t
Year's morning that Canal Zo Zo-fliian
fliian Zo-fliian remember back heme.
Instead, bright sunshine lent
an aura of false cheer.
As late as nboh'. hardly an ad
ult could be spotted on Canal
Zone streets. Even children were
strangely invisible,
At the usually wmulous Curun-
du center, not a car or a crea creature
ture creature stirred except a pair of vi visitors
sitors visitors bent on a (lass of revivify
ing beer.
- suv a panioi'K neia ugni me
doors of the beer garden.
T ... Jl ...iji if L i ...
; On to Ft. Clayton, where an in
side lock at ''die officers, club dis
couraged all comers. T
At Tivoli Guest House bar. the
fcash-register was clanging; but
not often. Two tables, were occu
pied. .?
A few yards away, In the ball ballroom,
room, ballroom, confetti: terpentine and
paper horns drifted, aimlessly
about under tables and.: tangled
with the ankles ef guest mak making
ing making .their waf to ground floor,
rooms In the? north wing. ;N

DMA

siacKeo. ,pairs on tames; DUTtoei'uge

serpenfiBa' t a a g 1 e d harmlessly
wita tne ..potted palms.
At the newly reopened El Ran Ran-cho
cho Ran-cho garden hardly a car was park
ed. There too. chairs were bot
tom-up. on tables: but much of
the debris had been swept out,
Less than a dozen stalwarts had
gathered, for orotectiom D raf t
beer came promptly.
At Ft. Amador Officers Open
Mess avfew regular were found
on duty beneath the undersea
mural. Many were ordering milk
punches,1 or just plain nvlk. Soon
they were joined by a few would
have; Jeen swimmers who had
started ut for the bathing beach,
but not ouite made it. An army
of waiters seemed to be shifting
tables about for something.
' 'ft
Then 4t was party time, and
white-clad officers and their hat
ted wives began gathering for a
tea dance.
Dr. Shirokov.
Surpen At Comas,
Back From Sweden
Dr. E. P. Shirokov. chief of the
Surgical Service at Gorgas Hospi Hospital,
tal, Hospital, has returned to the Isthmus
after (pending six months study studying
ing studying under D. Vik'ne O. Biork.
famous '5weidsh chest and heart
surgeon
After a short time in Karolinska
Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden.
Shirokov went to the University of
UDosaia in Uoosala. Sweden.
where tie spend most of the six
monin perioa.
Accompanied by his wife, Shir
okov lef for Sweden in June and
returned fo the Canal Zone last
week, HC; will return to his oost
at Gofgas Hospital next week.
CZ Stork Makes
Just One Visit
Foplew Year's
Only one baby wai bren en
New Veer's Day in Canal Zone
hospital and the New Year was
already ever six hours eld when
he checked in at Gorgas Hostl Hostl-tl.
tl. Hostl-tl. ."?'
' iThe flrit 15 baby, bey
Awalgh4iHi tlx p u n d s and
IS ounces arrived at :4e yester yesterday
day yesterday mernmg. He Is the sen of
' Spl. and Mrs. Charles Jackson,
f Ceceti, Jackson It with Head-
' quarters and Headquarters-Com,
pany afFt. Kobbe. The Jacktens
"have ne, ether children.
-No babies were born at Coco lo
le Hospital en New Tear's Day
and the close one to the date
to arrive at the hespitef Is the
daughter wf Mr.' Osboume Hey
of Colon, who errlved at 4:07 in
the morning ef New Year's Eve.
Hey Is' employed with the navi navigation
gation navigation division ef the Canal orga-
nliatlon,'i;i

Abraham Lincoln.

ll

Rjiivls'

Donned

HAVANA, Jan, 2 (LTPI) .Rebel leader Fidel

Manuel Urrutia provisional Presidejrit of Cuba today

u4gcuuu wauBia niu

. The move wos accepted by the armed forces, and the military commander in :
Havana sent, a plane to Santiaab de Cuba to nick un Cntr nA iirmfU

, Cot Ramdn Barquin, head of, the armed forces, announced by radio that he wa$
placing all armed forces of the republic at the disposition of Castro."
RebeJ forces were enterina Havana throuah the

J 11 ? n First rePrts said troops from the Sierra de Escambray region
of Us Villas, province to the east were en route to take over Camp Columbia, gen

erqi neaaquarrerg or me tuDan armed torces.

The firstrebel troops from Las
Villas started moving into the ci city
ty city at 10:30 a,.m.
Castro laid earlier he ahd Urru-
tia would make a triumphal en entry
try entry into mis city, which is com completely
pletely completely paralyzed by rebel-called
general strike, at 2 cm. to.
day. ,.:';
; However rebel sources here
aaid later that Castro would,
not arrive until probably some sometime
time sometime tomorrow from Santiago,
which he nas proclaimed the
provisional capital of the coun country.
try. country. fsnww,
Former president f Carlos Prii
Socarras, deposed ty Batista in
a coup d'e at.'on March 10, 'M5i
arrived in Havanajthis .jnorning
to loin the Castro forces. lie veiA
one of me, 'most active ; 7' a i
ta leaders;'.!;' 'f.
L' "Hfs retoiriiia4 f'-rt "f
out effor w -the r
tes. from abroad.
took off empty from h'
were Sreturning t Ran? 4 o-,
wm Alrnnrt with thm 4 '!-
Rebel iources said followersTof
Prioand all o t b e r Mnsurgfent
Broucs had united behind cas
tro's 26th of Julyf movement,
Havana itself was quiet, save
for the sounds of occasional shots
and minor looting and sacking
activities. py- jt
The city of a, million end a
quarter was paralyied bv the
.general strike,!!; which" Csjr
called for yesterday fa land.
weiaht to his victory. I
There were rio ears -enj the
streets and only a few pedes
trians. Those who mdired about
were stoooed every few yards by
soldiers and" armed rebels who
were patrolling the city to prev
ent any more outmirsi 01 vio
lence.
Before order was restored yes
terday, mobs roamed the streets
in a wild foray ot looting, sacit sacit-ing
ing sacit-ing and destruction.
A series of rebel victories in
cluding the capture of Cuban s
principal ernes oy me revoiuuou.-.
ary 26th of July movement ap appeared
peared appeared to have brought the bloo bloody
dy bloody and costly 2-Mi years of .fight
ing to an end.
Castro, the bearded, 32-year-old
leader of the rebels whose
guerrilla tactics bested the Cu Cuban
ban Cuban army, air force and navy,
received a thunderous ovation
in Santiago when he emerged
from the hills to begin the take take-ovtr
ovtr take-ovtr of government.
Santiago is the capital of Orien Orien-te
te Orien-te province in the extreme east eastern
ern eastern end of Cuba and from the
first was a Castro stronehold. He
said he was making it the provi provisional
sional provisional capital because the city
CZ Car Owners
Have Two Months
For Inspections
Car owners have two months in
which to have their vehicles tested
for operation during the calendar
jear 1959. The annual Inspection
of privately-owned automobiles
will begin in the Canal .Zone today
at. the Motor Transportation Divi,
sion garages in Ancon and Cristo Cristobal.
bal. Cristobal.
The hours for inspection, for privately-owned
vehicles beginning
Friday and until further notice,
will be from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
during the regular work week of
Monday through Friday.
These hours will perniit owners
who work regular office hours and
others who work on a shift basis to
have their cars inspected outside
of the normal work periods.
The annual inspection of motor
vehicles is required for all oriva-tely-owner
cars licensed In the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone and for commercial vehi vehicles
cles vehicles which onerate in the Zone.
. The inspection includes brakes,
K
In
.
lighting system and other operat operating
ing operating narts of the car which pertain
to its sate operating condition.

nn '-.r-

.UiUtia

Dictator

cu iuu exile yesierday. ,

Mi' :f! 9Mmm9m,, Ur-Y

: aMw n .-v,

.&i;:.-uu ,. iiiiili;MWiin.M '.

WINNER AND NEW CHAMP, FIDEL CASTRO

was the "firmest stronghold of
the revolution."
The 40,000 Americans in Cu Cuba
ba Cuba meanwhile appeared save al although
though although many of them in Havana-
were terrified yesterday
when law and order evaporat evaporated
ed evaporated for a while soon af er word
spread that Batista had fled to
the Dominican Republic.
Pan American Airways planned
to send two special planes from
Miami to the Cuban capital this
afternoon to airli't Americans out
at the .reques' of the U.S. embas embassy
sy embassy here. Normal air services are
suspended.
The Castro command in truct truct-ed
ed truct-ed rebel forces not to attack Cu
ban troops based near Onntna-
mo Bay, site of a major U.S. nav naval
al naval bsse in Orienle prwince.
The general strike was mak making
ing making the American tourists un uncomfortable.
comfortable. uncomfortable. Leading ho'el in Havana were
reduced to serving sandwiches
and coffoo when hotel employ-
Freighter Rewes
Emergency Wei
On Leakv Sea Chest
The Industrial Division at Cris Cristobal
tobal Cristobal was called upon to do an
emergency welding job ye: terday
on a freigh er which sprung a
leak as she wa about to leave
Canal Zone waters on New Year's
Sve.
The ship, the Santa Elisa, wl h
a cargo of are from Chile, was
bound for New York.
She transited northbound on
Wedne day and was anchored just
inside the breakwater waiting for
some laundry before leaving
when it was discovered that the
sea chest had sprung a leak:
The sea chest Is, the apparatus
which lets in sea wa'er to, cool
th. ftnoinp and hoPers. On this
occasion, however.i the sea che't
all over the engine room and into
the bilges. ... 1
TbTe hip waa delayed .24 hours.;
ws over-reaiousiy gusmng wmer

ml

i :
I c T- t
t f
' i ... X

nVl CENT!
Replaces
Batista
Castro nrorlaimPrl Tir.
to succeed ousted die'
f
es walked out.
The strike appeared almost to total.
tal. total. Stores, restaurants and movr
ies were shut down. The airoort'
was shut down although the reb reb-es
es reb-es permited several emot
Planes t0 fly to Miami to brintf brintf-in
in brintf-in exiles.
Th-ee other planeloads of exil-"'
es were due in from Venezuela.
communications were snarled and
phonal Iong de,aysln
Revolutionary militia joined po-
..I?,Jr !" Patrollin8 the streets
against yesterday's wanton Vand-
aiism and looting rio'ing by
hooli.eans that coincide wi h ioy ioy-ous
ous ioy-ous horn-blowin; celebration by"
Fidel Castro followers.
Exiled Cubans
Hoist Rebel Flag
At Embassy Here
Exiled rilhun in Piii.mt

i it

celebrated the fall of Batista '!
in the Cuban Embassy bere'r '
with a full acquiesence ol ,L '
charge d'affaires Dr. Eulallo f
Gnerra.
Scores of Cuns reslderti ,!
and members of Panama 8tu- ,. "'.
dent orf animations yesterday 1 s
afternoon marched on the vf 1
Cuban Embassy Wated In the J
area of te Re!far!- Porrss i
flaxa with the expressed in v'

reniron of taking it hy assault, a t
ff "ecCTwry. 1 k )
However, Guerra opened the ,'.
do"rs of the embassy to the
Cuban rebej svmitMirs end ,'
to'd them that at th mo. V 1,
ment he wa-merelv a renre ,k
entative p the people of Cn

DR. -VS
ed and Were granted perm's. ,'
F"n to run u astro'a "l de
Julio" Vat and ft gay; cele.
bretion followed. j
' Before eolnr to the Embas
sy to dfno"tratori etreol

a motorcade thw'out Fan-
ama TH shouting WasMor
Fidel Castro.

i
. s
. !"!!'
i
,1
A r't" I

1

11

'V:



near two

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TW Mail tea h an open forum for fJn of The Panama
Utters art received irerefuHy ana art handled hi a wholly confidential

fv If T OO nr no WTO o lenor mmm mm
war day. Letters ara aublishsd in tht order reserved.
lease try to kata tho lotttrs limited to ona a leato.
Identity of latter writer li keld in strictest confidence.
Thre newtaiper assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions
aaiosssd la letters from readers.

THE MAIL BOX

ARMED FORCES DAY
fir:
I would like to know what jerk planned Armed Forces Day
so soon after Christmas. Probably some dull big shot at one
of those high-powered pubMc relations conferences Iv heard
f' I was sick enough reading those gushy stories about what
great Job tha anna J services did for Panamanians orphans
Now who is going to save us from the landslide of stories
and pictures the Army, Navy and Air Force have prepared lor
us? At least I won't have to read them. I read them last year.
But wlat about the poor slobs who weren't here then?
H0Vseetythe "panama American has already started Printing
the junk. You can have my nickel back when you're finished.
Ill do without the paper 'till then.
Unimpressed.

SPOILED BREAD
1 Has something gone wrong with the Panamanian bread
flately, or is it the effect of the changing weather?
For some reason, during the past two weeks I have had to
: throw away three or four half-loaves of bread, because they
were green with mold. The partial loaves were only two days
f1' Since we have lived on the Zone, I have been buying the
lone aandwich loaves pui in the commissaries by the Pan Panamanian
amanian Panamanian bakery. We like the texture better than the PanCanal

w rM inat had tn aton

waste
I see on the wrapper of the PanCanal bread that some something
thing something called sodium propionate is added "to retard spoilage
X can't read the ingredients on the Panama loaf, but nothing
assembling this sodium stuff Is listed.
if the folks who run the Panama bakeries read this letter,
llkope they will do something to make their bread keep a lit-

It seems like they don't use any

LAWS FOR RICH AND POOE

Ir:

It U a eommon saying that there is a law for the rich aal
a law lot the poor. Ask an American whether this irao,
" ?T -1 J. v ...i tv, tha ti-Mta oil nTi Wiliollv.

ever, anvywu ,wm ov "" ?T"
. Now let ut apply this to the Canal Zone. Much could be said
about the Local Raters' persistent Impression that a good per percentage
centage percentage of Americans who appear In court on more serious
charges manage somehow to get off the hook. When a US rate
Canal Zonian is hauled before the bench, the question I have
more than once heard voiced aloud is not "Will he get off?" but
"How will he get off?" I offer no comment on the propriety of
the question. I merely record that it gets asked.
Leaving that rather embarrassing aspect of the matter
aside, let us examine the thesis that the law treats all men
equally. We had a fine example of this recently, I noticed, when
the bag of Christmas cheer leaders appeared in court. A local -rate
driver was fined the usual $100 for driving under the in influence
fluence influence of drink. This is the fine Imposed in a fine spirit of
Impartiality on all, regardless of citizenship, race or color, t
Consider, however, the impact of this penalty on a Local
Rater compared with a US Rater. To the latter is probably
represents less than a week's salary not much more than a
trifle. To the Local Rater with a large family, it means priva privation
tion privation Therefore- the every fact that the law Is administered impar impar-i
i impar-i tially, makes the system unfair. There should be a law for the
rich and a law for the poor here in the Canal Zone.
When it comes to paying wages. Uncle Sam or his repre representatives
sentatives representatives say with hand over heart "It is only tight there
should be two rates of pay, a high one for us and a low one
for you."
But when it comes to the scales of justice there is only one
" ir&tc
in the Canal Zone, by an Ironic twist, the purpose of law
Is being defeated by what is usually regarded as its greatest
virtue.
Back Bencher

SAN ANTONIO BUGLE

Sir:
This will be my last for the year, and I hope my sight will
Improve so I can keep it up for a while longer. The doctors
here say I am in excellent condition, and I never felt better.
Many will remember when I left the Zone in 1914 to make
my home in Boquete, they said two clean shirts would be all I
would need. And from the supply of shirts I received for Xmas,
someone thinks differently.
In addition to the shirts, I received a fine wool turtle-neck
.i.u uf iror nut tVi mid Tt. ram from mv friend

UUAivVCt lilimv tiuv a v-- K" uuL - - j
Rutii. who I think is the best woman for her country I ever met.

1 when sne graauaiea irom umu wiice wiui ko""
1 v... v navaorA A Hm1nttra tlnn ah tuna fnf

. t ia .vinni

flCW w va,u m Dwiw, v.. ....
where she lives now. It was a success, for which she receives a
pension from the War Department. And they didn't pass out
many pensions in those days.
She informs me she is retiring next year and will take it
easy on her seven acres beside the irrigation ditch.
" Bee my eyes won't let me go any further. Will have to
' thank my friends for the many cards and letters, and especially
- one from Sam Davis giving me a flll-ln on Boquete, and Judy
Parada for her nice presents. I intend to wear the tie to my
next dinner at Christie's.
Hasta El Otro Ano.
Pop Wright

PANAMA

CAH FILL YOUR 1SEEDSI

Y

JUinu B. ruwero. inw.

NEW YORK. I 1 n. I
LOCAL
t 178 S Z SO
mam rr
la go 00
buvina it. These is too much
now.
Moulding and Scolding.
nn on Tnrllon P.ft.ervn.tinn near
AMERICAN

Ruarkous
Comments

By ROBERT C. RUAK
I rnnnot hut hnne that the fra
grant Mr. James Hoffa of Team Teamsters
sters Teamsters Union is gently kidding when
he announces his campaign to or
ganize pouce, in aaaiuon 10 some
10 million other Federal, state, a
couniy civil services.
Bul. knowins Mr. Hoffa. whose
thug-ridden union was expelled
irom the merged labor leaeration
ahoiit a vear affo on charges
of corrupt domination, he'll give
a solid try.
Mr. Hoffa is evidently .operating
en the old theory of "if you can't
lick 'em, join 'em," or, at least,
invite them to join you. He has
said that his union's 37-raillion-dollar
treasury is at the disposal
of an e-iort to upset a Dan on po-
lirn uninniration. laid down in the
City of New York by Commission
er Stephen Kennedy.
There is also a plan to'tesi ine
ruling in cour by having a police
lieutenant, a member of the hon.ir
squad, risk his job by filing a card
tn haw Twrnstir Onion dues paid
by the checkoff system from iiis
police salary. If the lieutenant is
fired, a Teamstei spoKesman sam,
he had been promised a life job
as a union organizer.
No writer i a slapstick burles burlesque
que burlesque sketch would tackle the union unionization
ization unionization of police as theme, but evi-
tartl Hnff.. IC riftll!
Turning over a city's welfare
to a labor union would be almost
as ridiculous as organizing the
armed forces. Would crime take
a holiday in the Christmas season,
when all the brave buckos in blue
decide they need more base pay
t .nomnt a bit of individual
graft, and cat- a grievance airmei
Would someDoay nasn
Wane a ointol made an unseent-
iv huioa in a roDDer's clothes, or
because night work in the snow
and ram was unpleasant r
Wnnlri nm member of the U
nion arrest a union employe if he
caught htm ranging a cupim oi
acid into some dissenter s lace?
Or rhiwVinff a homh irtto a stub
born place of business? Would a
consistent cop arrest a teiiow
member of the izlorious brother
hood of Teamsters?
I know it sounds mad, out a
thousand-word story out of Miami
the other day stresses the serious
IntAnt nf Mi Wftff a anH hi ml
inicured associates to line up the
cops ana me omer civil servants.
A detailed plan to spread out-
wan! fmn Now Vnrlr ia tn hit
drawn up at special conference
next monm or in jj eoruary. u s
said fliat organization of hospital
Drecede the effort to hang a Team
ster button alongside the finest's
badge, tf
Certilnlv. tha idea seems nleht
"
Oven
Imarish,, Sut nothing startles me
overmuca anymore. if you can
organize) everybody.
Orraniza the doctors, aav. sa that
thevsffike against treatment of
sick I ppie u dius aren't paid
Dromodrv Organize the armr so it
wont light except on a 35-hour
weekly basil. Fun's fun. Organize
everybody, and then turn them
loose on each other to see who's
got junsaicuon wnere of what.
n VUJ lfl eiuuui AS II1UCXI DU51-
nofisl hdBlAncrintT in a imUn tr.-ff
mw wavuauoa s UIJIVU 9 ALmtHtl
has to organize the Joint Chiefs
of Staff.
Yet the thhij continues as a ve very
ry very grim jest. 'There is a horiv call.
ed the Patrolmen's Benevolent
Assn. Which hat been aeelrins urlHi
out success to have grievance ap apparatus
paratus apparatus set up in the police de department.
partment. department. One of the Teamstera'
officials is quoted as saying that
n f 1 AApt O AAA U tn Ann I
at iCflOi O.UW Ji Ulf A0,UUU POIICC-
mpn in the P P A im.
joined the Teamsters Union, at
ri9k of dismissal.
It all leaves me a little incre incre-dxjilous,
dxjilous, incre-dxjilous, but I find it not past be-
that So-and-So was so unimportant
he couldn't get himself arrested.
There may come a day before long
When getting anybody arrested
without written permission from
4 Via Anna ImIV. t
w. win iuvui doss is constructed
an niriv rwvil
The eerie thought besets me that
a unionized policeman might even
refuse to cross a picket line to
J uuer' especially if cop-and-kiJler
both belonged to the
same club.
FLAGSHIP NEARS BASK
LONDON (UPIWThe fourth So So-viet
viet So-viet Antarctic expedition's ,.
ship Ob has reached the coastal
ice cover edge near the Russiaa
base at Mirny, the Soviet news
agency Tass reported today.
I Nieolaut Copernicus, a lth
' century Polish astronomer, de-i
cided that the eenturies-otdl
theory on the earth's relation i
ship to the heavens was ia
error. He eoneluded that thei
earth, itself a tiny part of thai
universe, not only rotated eai
its axis, but also, with othar
planets, moved around tha sun.
This theory was a startling
that a statement aeeempaaiad

it saying that It had, no claim
to fact but was enly one man'ii
Idea. Today Ceperaieus' the-,
ery is the foundation ef the1
science of astronomy.
. O Kncycltdla' firitaonloa,

f lfL

.... un,

tad 1 V J '-4-
wM:h

Walter Winchell In

MAN ABOUT TOWN
Lew Ayers and Sterling Hayden
proposed marriage to Joanne uru
...Anna Magnani's current flame
is Anthony Di Bella of one of Ita Italy's
ly's Italy's oldest wine clans ... Danish
model Merete tells New Yo
friends she will marry Sidney
Chaplin... Archie Moore hopes Su Sugar
gar Sugar Ray will agree to a fight. It
would be a "knockout" ... Esther
Williams' ex-husband, Ben Gage,
and Florence Home are steadying
...Ava Gardner told reporters Wal Walter
ter Walter Chiari "is no romance" but
they hold hands at the Embers
till closing-time ... Buster Keaton
bit two Jackpots in a row (adjoin (adjoining
ing (adjoining machines) at the Vegas De Desert
sert Desert Inn ... Sarah Vtughan's big
record hit, "I Ain't Hurtin'," was
written by Fay Tishmn of the
realty-skyscraper tribe.. .The news newspaper
paper newspaper strike fii NYC icoild Have
been prevented by 53 stokers'
votes... Nick the Greek' v gravely
ill at the Beverly-WUshire Hotel.
The renowned gambler, who has
won and lost millions, won't "take
a chance" in a hospital.
Italian actress Silvana Fampani Fampani-nl
nl Fampani-nl is suing an Italian duchess for
$1,500, alleging she was bitten by
the noblewoman's "fierce" poodle
...Allyn McLeery ("Where's Char
lie" etc.) and husband George
Gaines (male lead in "Wonderful
Town") were baby-glrl'd ... Ice
show king John Harris and his
estranged wife (ice star Donna
Atwood) finally agreed on the pro property
perty property settlement ... Lili, star at
House of Vienna, wears those
long, white gloves while perform
ing io-nide a scar from a bullet
she got serving the French Under Under-ground...
ground... Under-ground... Truman Capote may ab
andon us all to dwell on the Greek
Isle of Paros.. .Roberto Rossedini's
ACROBATIC LANGUAGI
DERBY, England (UPI)
French acrobat Lihsarn Barrani
overcame a language barrier
yesterday by standing on his
hands.
He did the hand-stand on a
bank counter when he was unable
to explain his occupation in order
to convert bis francs into pounds.
1
PhysicisMnventor
ACKOSS
1 Physicist Physicist-Inventor,
Inventor, Physicist-Inventor, Alexander
Graham
J
inventions
included the
articulating
telephone
( At Boston
University, he
devoted
himself to
teaching the
12 Bread spread
13 Fruit drink
14 French river
15 Persian coin
16 Rot flax
17 Plastic
ingredient
IS Italian city
30 Menace
12 Fissile rock
34 Tapestry
28 Ridicules
33 Hired
henchman
(Slang)
$4 Correlative
of neither
3 Pigeon
36 Leave out
17 Bitter vatoh
31 German river
39 Church chapel
41 Solitary
43 Viper
44 Make a trip
alUnkeeled
S Mature.,
M Greek letter.
84 Operate solo1:
57 Biblical
garden
58 Distress
signal
60 Trial
61 Observe"
62 Social Insects
DOWN
1 He was
at Edinburgh,
Scotland
2 Pseudonym of
Charles Lamb
3 Jump
4 Dangle
3 Repellent
Fish
7 Colonizers
inflexible
9 Ireland
10 On the ocean
11 Notable deed
19 Worm
2LShe
23 Idolized
14 lager
19 Rave

L. 111

Lome un i vaae,ir ;

Indian lady-friend lives' in small
flat near Paris like, a recluse.
Bob Evans, 20 Century-Fox star.
is "minding" Jill St. John for
Lance Reventlow while both are
making personal appearances at
20th's "Inn of the '6th Happiness
premieres ... Despite the biggest
snowfall this season and no news newspapers,
papers, newspapers, The Music Hall's show
grossed $166,000. "Auntie Mame
is the film. ..Thanks to the- news newspaper
paper newspaper reporter's ass'n for anoth another
er another check to the Runyon Fund.. .The
Senate will stage a major battle
to continue the McClellan Comm.
It ends Jan. 31 and several Union
Chiefs would like to see it perish
...Willie Bryant. Los Angeles dee
jay, and his wife Pat will let a
judge decide matters.. .Mickey Co Cohen's
hen's Cohen's decision to drop his lawsuit
against the Satevepost was the
smartest thing he's done. ..Soviet
Ambassador Mn.shikov "J travels
without a bodyguard;1 The strap strapping
ping strapping fellow with him is his son.
If the Marquis of Milford-Haven
is permitted to marry again (The
British courts will decide if his
Mexican divorce is valid) the
bride will be British mannikin Ca Carolyn
rolyn Carolyn Ponsonby (19), who has giv given
en given up her Paris job to be ready...
Movie star Maria Schell's broth brother
er brother Carl weds Dany Carrel in
Frankfort, Germany. She is a
leading French actress... Gussie
Moran, who made Page One with
those lace-panties when she was
a tennis star, is now ad mgr. of
Tennis World mag...Juanita Hall
and Ed Kenney of "Flower Drum
Song" duet at Casa Cugat...New
torrid romance: Claire Bloom,
star of DeMille's 'The Buccaneer,'
and Rod Steiger...Big Secret: Kim
Novak's New York, address is 325
E. 57th ...17th floor.
Molly Bee, who got a large, rush
from Gary Crosby (before' she
flew with Bob Hope's Yule show
for troops) returned the ring to
Tommy Sands. He gave it to bis
mother, who wears it on a pinky
...Dancer Shirley De Bergh of the
new Gwen Verdon show, "Red "Redhead,"
head," "Redhead," and actor James Steven Stevenson
son Stevenson have that permanent look'.
"Goldilocks" dancer Emelda De
Martin daydreams about Tab Hun
ter, who dreams about Tab Hun Hunter.
ter. Hunter. ..Studio publicity people, book-
Answer to Previous Puzzle
25 Australian
town
26 Vex
27 Against
29 False god
30 Extinct bird
31 Level
43 Expunge
44 Allowance
for waste
45 Be borne
46 Mimics
47 Small
aperture 1
49 Ancient Irish
capital
50 Persia
51 Slight coloring
52 Consumes
35 Pedal digit
32 Withered
34 Unnecessary
40 New Guinea
port
41 Brazilian
macaw

fcjAN iHilslftW lAlallAIR
Sip- klSEalglS
BHfi

rTT" IS I IT II 17 I 7 I0 II
il iJ R
5 I fl
I I I I a- f
h p ti i n h hi 1
5 W. w
r' wzi
M 1 b -t- :' ' 1
rTririr r rpTor
r" Tif 7"r-"-"
jj ff"T"

1 Mi it

4 i a
New York
ing Kathryn Grant on TV to plug
her new film, warned interview
ers not to mention that she is
Bing's wife. How silly can they
get?. ..Senator John Kennedy ask asked
ed asked A.B.C. for Mrs. F.DR s re
marks about him. One of the new
big feuds inside the Democratic
Party.. .Add Don't Invites: Hem
ingway and David 0. Selznick.
When Vies President .Richard
Nixon was in Florida recently, a
friend phoned a nearby Country
Club and asked if it would be okay
to bring a famous man from
Washington, who wanted to play
few holes. ..He didn't- mention
the Veep's name.. .The golf club
exec was polite, but firm... Sor Sorry,"
ry," Sorry," he said, "only members"..
A few moments later someone
called him and said: "You -just
turned down the Vice President
lof- the Unitedv SttteslVitlie 'man
called Nixon's hotel and. pologl-
eu. riease leprae cigni X) vf i
said, we would be nappy m nave
you... wo, tnanKS, ; repneo ,.-ks
Nixon. "I wouldn't want you to
break your rules. If it is for mem
bers only you should keep it that
way' ...In thanking aAi oenusm n
Miami for not givmshim a large
biU Nixon said: I appreciate a.
I'm a noor man. vou know."
Brando, directing his first mm,
keeps the press at a distance.
Can't eet ud close. He has turned
down the Satevepost,)" Look, Life,
Time. Newsweek for interviews.
Prob'ly feels they need tne puo-
licity more than he does..3aron
De Rothschild's daughter Philip
pine (of the famed banking clan)
is now with tne tomeaie ran-
caise ... Actress Barbara Banks
weds N.Y. Knickerbocker hero
Frank Selvy in April...Rae Mac
lean, dancer in "Whoop Up" and
Gene Stanley, manager of Show
case Rehearsal Studios, are way
beyond the rehearsal stage ...
Fnends report that Las Vegas ho ho-telman
telman ho-telman Gus Greenbaum, recently
slain with his wife in Phoenix,
was so ill he wasn't expected to
survive another six months... The
Doug Crawfords expect their first
image in the Spring. Mrs. C. is
Nancy Nugent.. ..Latest busty-gin
singing trio are the Lo-Cuts..,A-j
mazing super-structure.
Hollywood's Susan Cabot ana
shipbuilder James Hanson are
Blazing., He once courted Audrey
Hepburn...Rhonda Fleming s used-
to-be, Tom Lane, dueting with
Sandra Giles.. .Dick Brown, star
of "Stop the Music" and Show
Biz, to be a Cantor in Jencno,
L.I.;.. The Latin Quarter s new
dancing beauty is Beti Seay of
Jacksonville. She has Bob Murray
of Florida State College in a
trance.. .The Raymond Guests of
the polo clan have society pals
confused. Did the reconciliation
take? ... Charles Brottson, hailed
as a great new face, has been in
Hollywood since 1951. ..They laugh
ed 14 albums and his Yule songs
are among the most popular... iV
na Louise's mother, who sassed a
Connecticut cop, may lose her
license.
Rogers and Cowan, public rela
tions, people, shrugged off the
newspaper strike in New YorK.
They mimeographed 10,000 copies
of a sheet listing weekend TV Pro Programs
grams Programs featuring their clients. And
gave them away at subway 'Mit
ranees.. .The Friars honor Steve
Alien in March with a $50 per
plate affair ... Dodgers star Roy
tampaneila is well enough to uke
typing via the electric typweriter
...kua victor scuttled its subsi
diary recording firm (Vik). It
,1,1, tho h.h" nt k lot. IWUr
TB .IIC URUJ Ul HIO lhV AWW
exec Mania Sachs ... Don't invite
British showolkg Margaret Leigh
ton and Peter Glenville to tne
same rock' 'n' roll session.Juat
askin': Isn't the Conde Nsst pub
licstions empire planning big
news? ...Lindy's waiter Jaeger
on the N.Y. -newspaper strike; "1
never saw the subways so clean!"
nkw yiArs copfif
RED", BANRV N.JV (UPD-The
Garden State Parkway iU buy
motorists ."tne or the oad it
the form of tea or-, coffee earlv

WASHINGTON -Never before
had the 'American "melting pot"
been so. evident in the legislative
branch of the government, ine
number of ethnic Americans in
both houses of the 86th Congress
will be the greatest in history.
They range from a R h o d e s
Scholar son of Greek immigrants
to an India-born; naturalized citi
zen, with a sprinkling of many
other foreign extractions,
r Italian-Americans, who occupy
eight seats in the House and one
in the Senate Sen. John Pasore
of Rhode Island have given way
to Polish Americans, with 12
seats. '
Irish-Americans are so populous
in Congress that they no longer
are classified, in a strict, sense,
as an ethnic (foreign extraction)
group; The same applies to German-Americans.
The background of the "melt "melting
ing "melting pot" legislators is as varied
as their religious beliefs.
One of the newcomers certain
to be heard from is Democratic
Rep. John Brademtis of Indisn&v!
a Meuiooist and the son of Greek
immigrants, who has been a pro professor
fessor professor of ..political science at St.
Mary's College, Notre Dame, In-,
uiaua.
However, most of the ethufe.
legislators have European, Catho
lic ancestry.
Brademus. a Rhodes
Scholar,
recently won his spurs in politics
s aanumairauve assistant to sen.
Pat McNamara of Michigan and
Rep. Thomas Ashley of Ohio.
Democratic Rep. D. S. Saund
of California, born in India, now
serving his second term in the
House, is the first Far Eastern Easterner
er Easterner ever elected to Congress.
Besides Saund, California also
boasts a Lebanese American in
its House delegation Democratic
Rep. George Kasem, a law grad graduate
uate graduate Of the University of South South-era
era South-era California, who haoT four
years service with the Army Air
Corp in World War II. Kasem
is a former grocery clerk and
still carries. a card in the Retail
Clerks Union.
Jugoslav and Czech-Americans
in the new Congress will include
such outstanding, veteran legisla legislators
tors legislators as Reps. John Blatnilr of
Minnesota and Charles Vanik of
Ohio.
Of the big Polish American
group in the House, two promis promising
ing promising newcomers are Reps. Ro Roman
man Roman Pucinski of Chicago, a news-
of New York. Stanley Prokon
captain a tne World War II
bombing of Tokyo, and Frank
Kowalski of Connecticut, a West
Point rraduata and Armv unlnnr.)

ahro with fc distlricuished was reeJTSet along' wtthoirt mnvnr

ord.'
Other Polish-Americans who will
answer tne roll when the 86th
Congress convenes in Januarv In-
elude three Detroiters, Reps. John
oingell, Thad Machrowicz ind
jonn Lesmski; John Kluczynskl
Kdward Derwinski and Daniel
Kostenkowski of Illinois; Alvin 0'
Konski of Wiscons!n, Thad Dulski
Democratic Rep. Brooks Hays of
of Pennsylvania and Clement Za-
oiocxi or Wisconsin.
POLITICS AND SEGREGATION
It was announced nublielv that
the House Elections committee
voted 3-to-2 to bar the seating of
Arkansas segregationist Dale
Alford, pending a probe of fraud
icharges in hia wr'te-in defeat nf
Democratic Rep. Brooks hays $
Diiciwn a DrnftTftkiP Men-

n ,-v ; c '- !i S

Irs'x- iyy. a?5tfvst w? :
hhtff,t ;-y. M'-'Mf .-v: ,

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H jt a I'M, fa I WtJ 1 1 J aft ftS'rtl

Tort 5U1, Okla., hoist, a Redstone combat missile into firing
position. The missile is the basic ingredient In the Juplter-C
rocket which has nut three Explorer satellites In orbit

ctH9 WAsmnGTOii
IVlEteGomOUND
' 'n drew PEArtsow -"

Little Rock. But" what wasn't an-"
nounced was the fiery, debate
which took place behind' closed
aoors
Democratic Rep.- Robert 'jones
of Alapama- hotly. challenged the
position oi iOP Rep: : (now senator-elect)
Kenneth Keating of New i
"The gentleman from New York
is inconsistent, to say -the least."
declared Jones. "Two years ago,
be took an 'opposite, position when
the disputed election of -a Repur.
i hcanf : congressman Hale m
i Maine, ; was before this; commit'
tee. The gentleman then -voted
seat'his fellow Republican," pend pending
ing pending an investigation.":
"That was different,", replied
Keating. "There were no charges
of fraud- in that case, as there
are In the Alford matter." V
"Oh, no, the only difference is
tn your position, which was one
way two years ago, another to today.
day. today. "Both you and I agree that aa
investigation- should .be made' of
the Alfrod case, but in my opi opinion
nion opinion he is entitled to take his
seat until the investigation is com completed."
pleted." completed." ;- :
Keating Strongly resented J the
implication that he was playing
politics, tossed back some impli implications
cations implications of his own to the effect
that Jones and the committee
I chairman, Rep. Clifford Davis of
rennessee, were
engaging in
sectional" noutics.
"Listen, I am not Impelled bv
sectional considerations," testily
retorted Jones. "I am lust as de.
termined as you are to have" a
iuu investigation, but I want to
see this case settled on its mer merits,
its, merits, not emotionally or si a poli political
tical political device to be exploited sec-
uonaiiy or for partisan advant advantage."
age." advantage." -
"WeU. I'm not nlavinr nnlifJea
either," bristied Keatine.
in tne snowdown, Keating lined
lin with otiAfliAM 1An.,hi;..n .aA- ;
iavia uennison of onio. and Dem
ocrat Thomas O'Neill of Massa.
chusetts against Davis and Jones.
SENATE SHORTS
Senate Leader Lyndon Johnson'
has sent a confidential investiga investigator
tor investigator around the country to find
out whether President Eisenhow
er neeas au tne new Juderesh ins
he wants to create. Johnson sus
pects the President simply wants
to plant as many worthy Repub Republicans
licans Republicans as possible in the courts
before the 1960 election. ..Tohn.
son's Investigator found that the
judicial work load is : uneveniv
I distrihufd. fhaf h'iinW -u.u
ies if the work wen ahapori
ly,
lUlnols economy minded 'Sen.
Paul Douglas wouldn't permit the
senate to install new Hghting fix fix-tores
tores fix-tores in his office. He said the
old fixture were good enough, so
there was no need to waste the
tixosyers' money. .The sena senators'
tors' senators' faney new office bufldlng has
one feature they woji't-Mike. In
the old building they eould sum summon
mon summon an elevator by buzziiig three
times. The new buiMjni fats ele
vator buttons that Hohf im with
one touch and cannot be given
the triple signal.
m,. .i...i i ii,
ine ri .yi-ior, oqys will nave UO
way of knowing whether the but button
ton button was pressed hv an Npttient
senator or an ordinary, less pri privileged
vileged privileged citizen.
ef an Army missile unit at

..New Year's, Da, v-' 1

.' 1



t fltlBATV JAXPARY jj 1959 s j

TCT PANABIA AMZSICAN JUf INDEPENDENT DAILY XTtrSPAPEBX
PACX

, f- -1

.... ..wwiwiw iwim tt)vwwwl rfjwcwffjaw"

v...
5- 1

'NEW EOXARIANSi-Threff new members weje., Inducted Into the Panama Rotary Club ves ves-toSuriwHpeclal
toSuriwHpeclal ves-toSuriwHpeclal umer-meetin held Vt Hotel El Panama Hilton. Bill Andreve (left)
U &howr;herwearlnK in the new members: L arry JJSSSS
advertlalnic-nianaKer of this newspaper., Sitting at the table Is Carlos da Janon. Maduros

. mpmncraiiip uutwa was yuixicu

Pfeasantesi Monfh Of Year
Off To Gooc Sorf Yesterday

The following weather conditions
are based on past records and
, may? be expected to occw in- W

. CanafcrZone and vicuuty during
January. ,(.
Wathr: January, we arst
month of the dry season, usual usually
ly usually the- most Pleasant of the, whole
' year Occasional short ..showers
may fee expected during the first.
- half of the months particularly a a-long
long a-long the v Atlantic Coast
. Measurable-rain will likely oc oc-euron
euron oc-euron 18 days afc Cristobal ... and
6 days at Balboa Heights, The
. average- total rainfall for, Janua Janua-ry
ry Janua-ry is 3,95.inches at Cristobal, 103
Inches at Madden Dam and 1.10
Inches-at Balboa Heights.
. The range from wettest to dri driest
est driest January on Record at Cnsto Cnsto-bal
bal Cnsto-bal is 19.20 to 0.28 inches, 5.11 to
0.01 inches at Madden Dam and
5.61 inches 4o none at Balboa
J Ttmpirature: The daily highest
and lowest temperature will aver average
age average 88 and 7? degrees at Balboa
Heights and 84 and 7 degrees
at Crintobal; the comparatively
maU i daUy range along the At-
- lantic;Coast,-i.due to
ence of the steady rade wind
-Off the-Caribbean Sea,
The highest and lowest tem tem-.
. tem-. peraturea on record for Jhe Paci-

fie Side are; oj ; "c?1 rii

ik nH .88 nnrt.69 deer

' lantm c. siaert iw
grees on botn coasw anu i
trees at Madden Dam.
. Humidity; The relative humdity
becomes lower- with ie onset, of
ettled dry. weatjier. The. monthly
mean for January is about 79 per
, cent at Balboa Heights and.Cns-
-FlN4CE AWARD -r-Victor G.

fir ,V ,Sr sM, nkmm"" N 1
r wsz mar -4 w H
'.v-U! if'"-

- from Lt. Coi; J. C. KeUy, executive officer, U.S. Army Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Finance and Accounting Office, for an adopted suggestion
t which will save the U.S. government a substantial amount of mo mo-"
" mo-" ney each year? Pupo, whd makes his home at No4 13, 6th Avenue.
'San Francisco de Caleta, is an accounting clerk who has been
T employed by the Army loiT.eisJht years. He received Department
of the Army Suggestion Certificate and a cash award.
; 5 (U.S. Army Photo)
Point 4 Agronomist Who Introduced
Pangola Grass Here, Goes To Ecuador

j Clayton Lr'Schroeder. Point TV
agronomist credited with introduc introducing
ing introducing pangola grass to Panama, will
transfer to Ecuador this month af after
ter after five years service here.
No single development in Pana Panama's
ma's Panama's recent" livestock history has
had a more far a reaching effect
than the ind traduction of this
grasss, according to SICAP live livestock
stock livestock specialists.' Panama needed
a fotage which ffould grow well in.
wet weather land one wmcn coma
withstand drouth, -.Pangoiajmet
both requirements.;,; J
Eaually Imnoimtttj' but less no
tlceable in resultk, has .'been the
steady increase of field trial work
in Chiriqui and Herrera provinces.
The SICAP agronomy section und
Schroeder's direction is an action
group of field technicians who pre prepare
pare prepare the. soil, cultivate, and harv harvest
est harvest the cropa on -plots provided
by cooperating ar mers. TheJaec
tion ig running field trials on va varieties
rieties varieties developed by INA: and en
varieties .brought In from foreign
countries: Also, the technicians
work with DAP Agrieulturai A A-gents
gents A-gents in setting up demonstrations
of nroved nrartJri -n -r

, :' ':.:.... .WI1., .!
i it -U" t i s
r fli 'Ml tj WS
? ? r ST 4 i i & $
I i If s II 1 $
JK-'-Vy jMjJksi&M jtfi i ii it innnmif 1

uu u.y jaao
tobal and 80 per cent at Madden
Dam. There will be considerable
range between daily high and low
except on the Atlantic Coast.
Clouds and Sunshine: The sky
will b& partly cloudy most of the
time and there will be an aver average
age average of 8 to 9 hours of sunshine
per day or about 70 per cent of
the amount possible.
Fogs: Nighttime and early
morning fogs may be expected
occasionally over the Gaillard Cut
section of the Canal and the cen central
tral central section of. the Isthmus along
the Trans-Isthmian Highway but
none are likely, to occur at eith either
er either of 'jhi-fftih! entrances. Most
of-the fogl form around midnight
and may ie expected to dissipate
before 8:30 a.m.
. I
-
Winds and Storms: Fresh north northerly
erly northerly trade winds will prevail.
North and northeast winds aver averaging
aging averaging 12 to 16 miles per hour ve velocity
locity velocity on the Atlantic Coast, 5 to
8 miles per hour in the central
section, and 8 to 2 miles per
hour from the north and north northwest
west northwest on the. Pacific Coast are the
usual Conditions.
.'StorJns of the ''Norther' type
occur mfrequently in January.
These storms are characterized
bv strone northerly winds rang
ing in velocity,, up to 30 miles per
seriously, but ,they. are, usually
accompanied? by neavy seas, ana
swells that at times may prove
.troublesome.
The maximum wind velocity for
5-minute period is not likely to
exceed 35 miles per hour.
Pupo receives congratulations
Out of dozens of these trials have
come such findings as an elephant
grass-kudzu combination for higher
ailage yields, corn variety tests
which have given Panama imporv
ed- varieties, and fertilizer trials
which Have shown the kinds farm farmers
ers farmers can use to increase their in income.
come. income. These trials have demons demonstrated
trated demonstrated the value of fertilizer in Pa Panama
nama Panama soils, and in Chiriqui pro pro-vine
vine pro-vine alone the use by farmers has
increased from practically no
tonage in 1953 to over, two thou thousand
sand thousand tons in 1958.
This: year the SICAP division at
David.'Is ecperimenting on row
and plant spacing, mechinlcal cul cultivation,
tivation, cultivation, and chemical weed and
grass contro;;''S,vt,v','.'',"::'
r 'Tn agronomy iwork iundertsken
here bv Schroeder has been un
der a joint ; project 'agreement by
the government of Panama: and
the United States, The purpose of
Cfedures,iWhiclt .would enable the
ministry oi Agriculture to deter determine
mine determine improved practices that Pa Panamanian
namanian Panamanian farmers can use to in increase
crease increase crop and forage yields,"1.
I Traifling of personnel to conti

Ii .,' aJi

about SO.ode-Tcient force to affect navigation

nue the work -has kept pace with
settihg up .procedures. Soma )r-

Quote Unquote
Pope John XXIII, on dedicated
school teachers
"When" school teacher has
spent all his life in the sacred
mission of teaching, the gates (of
heaven) open wide, To teachers is
reserved the same grace as to the
Christian priest." 'r
Teamsters' President James R.
Hoffa, when asked about his plan
to enroll the nation's police forces
in his union: f: :-
. s '. i'.- r -1 1
"Police organization will be un undertaken
dertaken undertaken by the Teamsters' Union
only if they come to us seeking
such organa ition." 1
School teacher Larry F. Brant
ley, 22, of Louisville, Ky., on his
arrest by Cuban police for al
lege anti-Batista remarks:
"Thau nunn't TO. J.'J-t
tt;gu mvd XUCy UXUI1 i
xacuy smng us up on a pole
ana wftlB us, out they did every everything
thing everything therQuId to be mean and
ugiy.-
Soviet Premier Mkita Khrush
cnev, speaking to fs. Ambassa
aor Lieweiiyn w. Tl ompson at a
New Year's pa- in th Kremlin:
'We are going to overtake you
economically."
Actor Alex Guinnes
Knighted By Queen
Infelefetf1
LONDON (UPI)- Queen Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth today knighted Britain's great
actor Alec Guinness, whose stiff-upper-lip
portrayal ofa British
officer won him the Academy A A-ward
ward A-ward for "the Bridge on the River
Kwai."
The 44-year-old Sir Alec, as he
will be known from now on, was
the most famous, international
name singled out by the Queen for
her annual New Year's honors list.
The list o' persons honored
ranged from the-British ambassa ambassador
dor ambassador m Washington to a lighthouse
keeper in the Sheltlands, and from
the purser on the liner Queen
Elizabeth to the head porter at an
infirmary.
Sir William Edward Rootes, 64.
British automobile manufacturer
ana cnairman of the Dollar Ex Exports
ports Exports Council, and Sir James Tur Turner,
ner, Turner, 50, president of the National
Farmers' Union of England and
Wales, were made barons.
. The Foreign Office honors list
included thename of Sir Harold
cacia, 53, British ambassador to
tne united states sintfe 1956, who
received the Grand Cross of St-.
Michael and St. George.
Guiness joins such famous
stage and movie actors as Sir
John Gielgud, Sir Douglas Fair Fair-banks
banks Fair-banks Jr., and Sir Laurence Olivi Olivier
er Olivier who have been knighted by the
Queen. Fairbanks, as an Ameri American
can American citizen, cannot use the title.
El Panama Club
Comoletes Plans
For Jan. 4 Soiree
Arrangements were completed
today for the "Rainbow Soiree"
and show, to be sponsored by the
El Panama Waiters and Barten Bartenders
ders Bartenders Club on New Year's Sunday
at the bohio of the National Dis Distillers.
tillers. Distillers. This affair, the first of its kind
to be offered in 1959, will include
various forms of entertainment, in
cluding 'a star-studded floor show,
door prizes, and dancine to the
music of the Jets combo frim 4
p.m. until the next mornine. The
floor show will commence at 11
p.m.
This will be one of the manv
functions sponsored towards rais raising
ing raising funds for the "Operation Shel Shel-ter
ter Shel-ter program presently begin con conducted
ducted conducted by the club,
sonnel have already, completed
training n Puerto Rico and the
United States on the Point TV and
Ministry of Agriculture participant
training program. Additional train
ing positions have been established
for similar training of personnel
during the next two years. Those
who completed agronomy courses
during the' past five years worred
with Schroeder for practical field
training.. :v -j:r
During Schroeder's' tenerure here
he was. promoted to the rank of
deputy food and agriculture officer
for Point IV. This it the. position
he will fill in EcuadV ,

5 18th Engineer

15th Anniversary
The t jatti3Bsr?T 'Company'
(Combat), Fort Kobbe, has one of
the most eomplex and vanea
missions of any organization in
United States : Army. Caribbean
Engineer support for USARCAn
RIB. It recently celebrated its 15th
anniversary by doing what it does
every day in- the yeaif Working
around the clock fulfilling its mis
won.' ... h ;ri:.
In Its present tropical role, "the
organization has come a lone way
from1 its original designation as;
we is&tra jMiginger company, wim
duty station in Alaska.' The unit
has undergone many redesign
tions and changes during those
yers, but its mission remains but
stantially the same,
During the past year the unit
employed a squad in layinsr out a
road in the Madden Dam area
which eventuauy will connect with
a proposed boy scout camping;
site. It maintains a water point ati
the. Rio Hato training area in Pa
nama, used by all elements of the
1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry,
and attached units for a regular
training program. In addition it
works closely with the sam units
in tactical training problems', sup supplying
plying supplying needed Engineer support.
xne oiBtn angmeer company re recently
cently recently bad a nlatoon lavinsr out
boat ramps at Fort Kobbe beach
and imine in areas at ths aam
location, and the unit did dis
mounted .drill during the same
time twice a week, fulfilling its
other training requirements above
and beyond tiie Engineer aspect.
During the past few months, the
company demolished old barracks
buildings at Fort Clayton; built a
bridge across the French -Canal in
the Fort Sherman area keeping
open a pontoon bridge at the same
time; constructed still another
bridge in the Mindi fams area on
the Atlantic side of the: Isthmus
and built gun emplacements at
Empire range for use by elements
of the 1st Battle Group," 20th In Infantry,
fantry, Infantry, during a firepower demons demonstration
tration demonstration for students of the USAR USAR-CARIB
CARIB USAR-CARIB School at Fort Gulick.
Company personnel worked on
Nixon Urged
On Changing
WASHINGTON (UPI) Four
anti-filibuster senators urged Vice
President Richard M. ,Nix on
yesterday to hold fast to his. stand
that the Senate may adopt new
rules at i the beginning of each
session of Congress.
Sens. Paul H. Douglas (D-Ill.),
Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Minn.1.
;qiifford PiCasj' (r;n.w., a u-
ft 32-page brief to Nixon arguing
that a rule to curb filibusters may
be approved by a majority of sen senators
ators senators when the 86th Congress or
ganizes next Wednesday.
Nixon issued an informal ruling
two years ago which supported
the theory of the anti-filibuster
forces. But the issue already had
been sidetracked when Nixon an announced
nounced announced his stand in 1957 and the
ruling had lj force.
There is a good chance that
Nixon will be called upon, as pre
siding officer of the Senate, to
make a formal ruling on the ques question
tion question of new rules at the outset of
the anti-filibuster struggle.
Southern defenders of the pres
ent rule on limiting debate claim
the Senate is a "continuing body"

Mikoyan Hopes For Personal
Talk With Dulles, Maybe Ike

TwtiON fUPn Soviet First
Deputy. Premier Anastas Mikoyan
hopes to promote a personal meet meet-ina
ina meet-ina hotwpen Premier Nikita Khru
shchev and President Eisenhower
next spring, Communist diplomats
said yesterday.
TTnilintf that. Mikovan will ex
plore the possibility of other
means of soviet American taiKs
whifh nosnihlv could Dave the way
to a summit conference later this
year.
The Communist diplomatic
sources said these were part of
the aims of the Kremlin's number
one troubleshpoter and close col
laborator of Khrushchev in his
forthcoming visit to the United
States next week.
The visit is listed as a "pri
vate" one. But Mikoyan anti anticipates
cipates anticipates having top-level meetings
with American leaders. He was
understood to be seeking a meet
ing with President Eisenhower
himself, Secretary of State John
Foster Dulles and other political
leaders from both parties.
The communist diplomats were
hinted that Mikoyan would take
with him an "unofficial" overall
peace plan that would reach be
yondthe present immediate- East East-West
West East-West fight over Berlin.
The details of the plan were not
disclosed by the sources, but it
SATINA CARRIES YOU
, THRU THE IRONING
Safina..:
; fhe WO Ironing
W In fheife

Company Observes

Vorking As Usual
varicnis signal .construction pro projects,1
jects,1 projects,1 and found time to rig a si
mulated atom bomb for use during
firepower, demonstrations at Em Empire
pire Empire range which they, them themselves,
selves, themselves, exploded. : .
rAll members of the 'unit, com commanded
manded commanded by 1st it David T.. Lar-sen,'-get-.
intensive engineer train train-ing,
ing, train-ing, because 'they are rotated on
the various projects- in which the
organization is ealled upon to par participate.
ticipate. participate. v
It's an -important part of United
States Army Caribbean as a
great many, people can testify
Who have benefited, so much from
the highly technical work perform
ed by members of the unit. It will
continue, to iulfill its mission ol
engineerisupport for USARCARIB
and it is certain this mission will
be a continuing one as long as ar army.
my. army. 'forces remain in the Canal
Zone'. -,'
Ike Sends, teller
To Syngman Rhee
On iecurllir taw
SEOUL, Jan. 2 -(UPI)- Pre
sident Eisenhower has sent a Der.
sonal letter to South Korean Pre
sident Syngman Rhee voicing con
eern over a new security law
which criticis fear will curtail civil
liberties and freedom of the press,
political sources said today.
They said the letter was convey
ed to Rhee by U. S. Ambassador
Walter C Dowling when he visit visited
ed visited Rhee'S' vacation home at Chi Chi-nhae
nhae Chi-nhae Dec. 27.
There was no immediate confir confirmation
mation confirmation from official U. S. or Re Republic
public Republic of Korea spokesmen.
. The sources said Rhee told liber liberal
al liberal party leaders about the letter
when they visited him on Thurs Thursday
day Thursday to wish him a happy New
Year. These sources did not dis disclose
close disclose the contents of the letter and
would say only that Mr. Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower expressed his concern over
the new law.
To Hold Fast
Senate Rules
and does not have to adopt its
rules at the beginning of each new
session.
Some have said the attempt to
throw out the tradition of Senate
continuity is more dangerous than
the anti-filibuster campaign itself.
Douglas, Humphrey, Case and
Javits are leaders of a Sfrpun of
tSena&.hberals who are reldi to
I launch battle on the opening
day. of Congress to force a change
that would enable a Senate ma
jority, or 50 members, to impose
cloture on, debate.
After such a limitation was
voted, each senator would have
one hour of debate on the issue in
controversy.
Under present Senate rules, de
bate can be limited only when
two-thirds of the full benate n em em-bership
bership em-bership has so voted. Such a vote
is virtually impossible to obtain.
The Senate liberals predict
there will never be a curb on fili filibusters
busters filibusters and consequently little
action on civil rights legislation
unless the rules can be changed
hy a majority vote at the begin
I ning of the session.
was understood they aimed at a
"relaxation of tension" between
Russia and the United States as
a first step in a move toward a
broader conference to end the cold
war.
The reported Mikoyan alms
would tie in with Khrushchev's
long-held desire for a personal
meeting with the President and a
bid to visit the United States. He
had sought a summit meeting lal
year, preferably in New Vork. But
he dropped the idea suddenly fol following
lowing following a secret meeting in Pei Pei-ping
ping Pei-ping with Red Chinese leader Mao
Tse-tung.
Nothing further was heard
about a summit conference from
Moscow until last month. Then the
idea of a heads-of-government
meeting was revived in Soviet
notes sent to the major powers on
the eve of the December meeting
of the NATO council in Paris.
The sources here indicated that
Berlin almost certainly will be
the major topic of discussion in
Mikoyan's meetings with Ameri American
can American leaders. Moscow could well
aford to ease the present tension
over Berlin, and Mikoyan might
use this as a bargaining point in
his search for broader Soviet Soviet-American
American Soviet-American talks.
SMOOTHLY
HOUR!
box.

k'A tMt teftit JpwJtii
0 Swfl :AJ Jfn

BEST MESS AWARD A joint Best Mess Awar
Group, 20th Infantry. Fort Kobbe. Col. Ralph
presented the Best Mess Awards to C Company
gineer Company (Combat), attached to the 20
tront of battle group headquarters at Fort; Kob
Grezaffi. commanding officer. C Company- Sfc
Sj?t. MaJ. Edward Sidberry; MSgt. Jesse' Cain
P. Larsen, commanding officer of the, 5i5th.

f i i a

LT. GEN. RfDGELy GAITfiER, commander in 'chief Caribbean, received Capt. Pierre DartiqueS,
commander of the HSttiCh jStNJiser Jean D'Arc, and Com. Marcel Gamier, commander of the Frigate
La Grandiere, at lfVoffiee athe unified comm and headquarters at Quarry Heights after the two
W$ fJ' :.e weervisit. .wnieWttghf.
are Ens,, .G&affcW affifto Wrtiques, DartiqueSi'-GaitheiC Trench ambas
sador to Panama floral Vasse,? Gamier end his ai de camp, Lt. Bertrand Lenicque. The two-French

warships are on a len-mgnth
Philippines Study
Treaty Revision
On US Assistance
MANILA, Jan. 2 (UPI)
Defense Secretary Jesus Vargas
today urged restudy and revi revision
sion revision of the Philippine military
assistance agreement with the
United States.
vare-as nressed for modifica
tion of the treaty In his annual
report to President Carlos P.
Garcia on the Philippine de defense
fense defense and military establish establishments.
ments. establishments. "ThP Phlllrinine government
should initiate negotions toward
a serious restudy ana eventual
revision of the military as assistant
sistant assistant agreement between the
Philippines and the U.S., with a
view to removing inequitaDie
provisions that block out at attainment,
tainment, attainment, nf rpnsonahlv ideal
defense goals,'' Vargas said.
He said Philippine requests
for accelerated U.S. delivery of
modern arms and the recent
exchange of views between
Philippine defense officials and
a Pentagon team could form
the basis for such negotiations.
The defense chief also sought
"adequate budgetary suppport"
for the armed' forces to ensure
a progressive buildup of Philip Philippine
pine Philippine defenses.

MQTTA'S takes pleasure to announce The Two
WINNERS of their
CHRISTMAS RAFFLE

1st. Prize $1,500
Series 71110
2nd Prize $500
Series 03762

100 approximationsiaffiglln 1 1 0

ALL PRIZES
will be

training cruise with 173 midshipmen aboard.

. .'
CLOSED FOR

Friday the 2nd and Saturday the 3rdVhi

January 1959

Fresh as all Jf.
Outdoors k
.
-t

DORA DE
LISA V,
rtfahiinftfytfo)sM by the

d was presented to two units 'Of the lst BatUi -A.
Jones Jr., battle group commanding officer, -,,
stationed at Fort Gulick, and the 518th En En-th
th En-th Infantry. The brief ceremony took place' In
be. Shown from left to right are: Capt. Joseph -.
James Mays, company mess -sergeant; Jones:
, mess sergeant of the 5it,h onH it r.t rwi

(U.S. Army PhoteY
(U.8. Army Photo)
INVENTORY

VIA ESPASA No. 1
Tel. 3-0383

t t f i
KARDONSKY
DE YCAZA
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of $5.00 eacK
winners rin 9urstof c
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I and Otlierwide
Box 134,
jPanama
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By Slaffm
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NIA Service
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MISS LOUISE TATE

MISS LOUISE TATE'S PARENTS ANNOUNCE
SPER ENGAGEMENT TO MR. GARY DUNSMOOR
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Tate of Gamboa announce the engage engagement
ment engagement of their daughter, Louise to Mr. Gary P. Dunsmoor
on of Mr. and Mrs. Forrest G. Dunsmoor of Balboa Heights.

General And raxDasher
Entertain At Raeptin
Aa outstanding social event of
New Year's Day was a reception

Svea by Major. Gen. Charles L.
asher, commanding general of
USARCARIB, and Mrs. Dasher
from four to six o'clock at the
Fort Amador Officers' Open Mess.
With General and Mrs. Dasher
!n the receiving line was their
daughter, Mrs. Robert A. Hyatt,
and Brig. Gen. Milton Ogden, de deputy
puty deputy commanding general, and
Sirs. Ogden.
The reception was attended by
about 450 guests, including officers
rnmmand and their wives,

representatives of the diplomatic

corps ana omciais ui mimum

peared on a number of TV pro programs
grams programs out of Hollywood.
General and Mrs. Gaither
Host 'At Home' Event
Lt. Gen. Ridgely Gaither, Com Commander
mander Commander in Chief of th eCaribbean
command, and Mrs. Gaither enter entertained
tained entertained at a New Year's Day "at
home" party at their residence,
Qyarters One, at Quarry Heights.
More than 300 guests attended,
including officers of the command
and their wives, ir embers of the
diplomatic corps and officials of
Panama.
Music for the occasion was play played
ed played by Lucho Azcarraga.

Miss Dolores Gregory,
Once of Curundu,
Return For Visit
Miss Dolores Gregory, a former

resident of Curundu who now lives

in Van Nuys, Calif., has returned

to the Isthmus on vacation irom
her advertising business in South Southern
ern Southern California. She is accompani accompanied
ed accompanied by her friend and business part partner,
ner, partner, Miss Dorothy Denny of Los

Angeles.
They spent several days In Mex Mexico
ico Mexico City en route and are stopping
in Panama at Hotel. International.
f
After leaving' hef writer's Job
with the Army on the Canal Zone,
Miss Gregory worked for a time
with the Armv theater unit in

Japan. More recently she has ap-

WW yVv
- f
imiMmmsiXMmmmmmiimmMm,

Mi is Bernadette Lees
Weds In New York
Of interest on the Isthmus Is the
announcement made here of the
recent marriage of Miss Berna-

dette Jacqueline Lees, daughter

of Mr. Roland J. Lees, to Mr
John Belcher Fields III.

The nupt'al vows exchanged at
a nupcial mass at St. Thomas A-

quinas Church in Brooklyn, N. Y.,
on November 29.
The bridegroom was attended by
his brother, Stanley T. Fields,
who traveled from Houma Air force
Station, Houma, La., to particip participate
ate participate in the wedding.
A reception for the newlyweds
was hehld at the Farragut Inn In
Brooklyn.
Cocktail Party Today
Honors Mitt Pace
Dr. and Mrs. Vance Shiflett will

entertain this afternoon from five

to seven o'clock at their home on
Via Brazil at a small cocktail par party
ty party honoring Miss Cherry Pace.
The event will be a bon vayage
compliment to Miss Pace, who will
leave tomorrow for Jacksonville.

Fla., where her marriage to Mr.

Jack Cathell will take place
French Naval Officers
Feed At Luncheon

The Ambassador of France In

Panama Lionel Vassee was hos

at a luncheon this week honoring
Capt. P. Dart'eues, commanding
officer of the Jeanne d'Arc, and

Cdr. M. G. E. Garnier, command commanding
ing commanding officer of La Grandiere.
The two French shins visited the
Isthmu i i part of a round-the-world
trip.

Ambassador Vasse's luncheon

was held at the' Union Club,

'i jt s

I Reports

Socin?Securitv

On $fim( Basis

WASWNGTON (UP!) A spe

cial awisory rouncil reported

yesterday the social security sys

tern is operating on a sound fi financial
nancial financial basis and the method of

financing the program is adequate.

The 13-member advisory coun

cil on social security financing

concluded after a year-long study
that no fundamental changes In
the methods of financing the sys system
tem system are "requ'red or desirable."

bfe&efei

if- H

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NORTH U
AA10I4S
VKI
JI5
J10t
WEST. BAST
A82 aKQtt
V 1087 VJI4S
Q32
753l KQ84
SOUTH (D)
AQ6S
AK10764
A
North and South vulnerable
Sooth West North laat
1 Pass 1 4 Pass
2 V Pass 3 Pass
3N.T. Paw Paaa Pass
Opening lead 4 3

Today's hand ii an old timer,

but it is still on of my favorites.

sat west and for want of any

thing better to do opened the three

of clubs. Dummy played the nine

and my partner, Harold Vander-

out, went into a lu-minuta Bun

dle.

Eventually, he came to the win-

nine decision and played the eight

of clubs. South had to play his sin singleton
gleton singleton ace and when I got in with
the queen of diamonds I was able
to make four clubs tricks and set
the hand.

In an ordinary game, I am sure

that my partner would have play played
ed played the eight of clubs much quicker,
but this was the final session of

the American Whist League's 1934

team chamoionshin and Mr. Van-

derbilt thought the hand might

prove important.

It turned out that it did. At the

oher table our partners had bid

ana maae live diamond!, if Hir.

old had gone up with the queen of
clubs. South would have mad four

or live no trump and won the

Doara lor ms team.
As it was. we won the hnaml

and when the final results were

tamuatea mat board turned out

to De our exact margin of victory,
so this play had decided tine whole
tournament

Q The bidding has been:

West North bat

1 Double Paaa 3 V
Pass 39 Pass ?
Yob, South, hoM:
M4 M AQM4 7lt
What do you dot
A Md foar hearts. Ye km

and have shew a sjatWin a fee,
TODAY'S 4)fJB8TNM
Your partner baa doubled a
one-epade opening and yen hold:
Alt 4 VAKI72 4QIVt Ml
What do you dot
Answer Meada?

MB. AND MRS. JOHN BELCHER FIELDS III are pictured fol-
lowing their recent marriage in New York. Mrs. Fields, the
- former Miss Bernadette Lees, is well-known on the Isthmus.

FAMILY GET TOGETHER
CHICAGO (UPI)-Mrs. Evelyn

De Coste believes families should
get together during the holiday
season, even if it means hiring
a hall.
She hired one for a get-together
of her 9 children, 43 grandchil grandchildren,
dren, grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, plus
an undetermined number of in

laws.

I i 11111 -ii i.m immmmu.-' 1 tj: :

1 '-i'.,

" v ". i ..-::.:.;:v

A xl. aa.i.l a I aL UaIIIsu immh uj net! narftf Wftte

HULIUAY KtV.tr I IUN by canal Zon Gov, and Mr. W. E. Potter ftt tht CoVarnor's House. Cue$t J
moved to the lawn to enjoy traditional musie of the season, presented by students of Prof. Pablo Herrera. Thf
musicians included the Governor's House In a city-wide tour as they traveled on the "musical truck" of Compact
Panamefia de Fuerza y Luz.
-v
w

EL

GABEEN

. and DanS
Dining na
present
LUCH0 MCWR
Every F'i4'

4

7-00 P'm l
6 :30 17 U" V

Your Community Network

HOG

840 KlloeyelM

1 i

I

1090 Kilocycles

COLON

Soothing jfflUfil
EYE-6ENE

(he ey drop that toothca...
clean . refrcahea and
beautiflM th A for

mula oi two
famous c j
apcclallata.

, 1 j li UN

ill

Soothes

Refreshes

Cleans

Beautifies

Always ask tor EYE-GENE
at your favorite drugstore

Firemen Expect
To Control Latest
California Fire

LOS ANGELLS. Jan. t (UPD-

Firefighters expected to bring un under
der under control today souther Califor California's
nia's California's latest brush fire, which has

destroyed 81 homes in its devastat

ing march from Topanga Canyon

to the west.

Norman La Vigne. chief county

fire dispatcher, said "it should be
a routine job from here on in if
the wind doesn't change."

Meanwhile, the Thousands or

residents who fled from the heavi

ly populated area when the blaze

started New Year's eve negan re

turning to their homes.

A second lfre in at oiacKenea
650 acres threatening movie stars'

mansions, was bnught unaer con

trol last night by some wo xire-

men.

La Vitne said the second blace,

in the Topanga-Malibu section
in the ToDanea-Malibu section

of the Santa Monica mountains
wax 60 oer cent under control, anc

added that no structures were im

mediately endangered.

Ha said hat some 800 ruremen

till on the lines were aided in

their battle by low winds nd a

30 per cent humidity.

Then the fire started the numi

dity was extremely low and winds
from 40 to 50 miles an hour drove

th flames over hundreds of acres

of dry brushland at an incredible

apce.
La Viene said the original estim

ate of 10.000 acres destroyed had

been reduced to about o,500 acres.

:;". !L

Bt.."awib vAds-Aimu aAm '.atffha, mn Hniu anrf their hand-made eowni which

OPERATION DOLL were included in Christmas boxes for gifls of Hogar.Marla Auxiliadpra in Chltre. Seat- j
d. from left, are Mrs. Edmund Carter, Mrs.. Ralph R. Will, Mrs. Edward F.' O'Connell and Mrs William R.;
Jones. Standing are Mrs. EdwIfitlhMriftoWirt Bravo, Mrt. Michael Ungford, Ws. Robert A, Manire,
Mrs Robert Avery, Mr.. Porter Claxton, Mrs Raymond Gordon, Mrs Edward H .Marx, Mr. Charles Stevenson,
Mrs. William Stevens, Mrs. HaroM Frederick, Mr. George Jenner, Mrs., Louis Cattonl and Mrs. Elton Ford,

Resolution Breaks

SLOUGH, England (UPI)

Motorist Stanley Cook, charged

with making an illegal turn, wrote

a traffic court yesterday mat "i
made a resolution not to pay any

fines in 1959,

"I do hope the magistrates will
not compel me to break the reso resolution
lution resolution on New Year's Day," Cook
wrote.

He was fined $8.40.

Easy Way To Kill
Roaches And Anh

dmtttts raeonmMd that jm ean.
trel roaeha tad ant th mdn
way with Mutate NO-aOACH.
Bruahtd Jint whara rU want It
(table left, oablneta, tula, aaphalt
tile, etc), th eolorloaa eoatlng kill
thM peats. It', offactiv tor month,
aaaltaiy, and nay to M.
oi. SSe.i pint l.S at SjaUa Vtata

Rovaraurkat, and aU weal
aarlaa,

COMPLIMENT
RETURNED
The youngest girl at Hogar
Maria Auxiliadora presents a
gift to Mrs. Ralph R. Will,
wife of the Point Four flirec
tor. The 63 girls at the home
had Just received gift boxet
from the Point Four wives.
Shown from Uft are Mrs.
Isabel C. de Juarez, direo direo-tress;
tress; direo-tress; Mrs. Louis Gattonl,
secretary-treasurer of Point

Four Wives; Mrs. Will, little
Relna Campos, Raymond Gor Gordon,
don, Gordon, community development

adviser; and Mies Amelia ven

Chong, director 6f Iristitutlone

tor Panama. v

'"v' 1 mvmr iiiiiii'ii.p rM 1 if" 1 i,

. V.:-. X ' I

,-v'.;' .'. S..y,i I "" "' P."aaaiaaiii oawawaSMaa(, y

SBHMGHJHOSJaSBSS



I .-: J-

v.
5

1959

V. ' . : --. lMMMMMIIIMIIIIIIIIIim

ft

If

Swimsuits 0
The latest in swimsuit fashions
on. Sale at

New styles
New colors
New materials
New construction

I ; i fx

i-f -4:1.

4

V

wm i-ii A xi I anI Arm Uiprv iltman ck cut anrl

AiiriEiirnr snv rrienas ana reinvea gamer arounu mi. ...... ...w
SlLVcR NMsVfcRAKl serves the elaborateWe during a party honoring them on their twenty-fifth
Wedding anniversary. Their daughter. Miss Elki AltirW at far right, traveled to Panama from Los Angeles-esp-

Ciaiiy Tor ine nrniivTary. vcmuiauuii.;"

Tzxr

CHUTERS CHATTER

At a dinner meeting of th

Airborne Association, para

troopers talk over old times

before hearing speeches from

, high-ran,KJng military officers

on the Isthmus. (Army
Photo).

I-'- -nt"- v 4 Seam' ',' z'- 'l

iwMiwittWjtjja MtyyfciW!piJIJ!t")1'" Mwimmmuiw n m n "mi
VtKV f if
vs -K & Zf t K
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;! i t'hv it; v45 .V'r'x
,., f h rj ,.....T j j u ( m jj !Uiiiiniii(pnin,ini ihii m1 11 I "" 1 pimj,.,,. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMi.iniiinmntrwmiiimm

. r 'v-.-M.ei -"Tot.;;:

nirv'll LlllfC 1 Dill mempers ot we uanai .on ru pwyy ""' ir'T-'T v
IrltT LL HAYt A BALL p,r in(J t pnning Mlon t eompUt arrngementsrfer,thi 21st nhul Po Po-ileemen'a
ileemen'a Po-ileemen'a Ball The evertt Is slanhed Ut MaraM 2o at the Panama HUtOni'thf Udlis aVe, from lefV-Mftr Robrt

, Blades," Mrs Etenjlmliv A. DafdeA, Mrs; Mlttl Hteila nd Mri. 0. ,McAmlsf Standing are Caorge Jochterman,
. W:'E. Affeltranger, Robart Blades, W. W... fester, Fell pe ; Cajabon, A. R Cettre; Jamas U' P'uin. William
. Ad ArW Robert '.lawyer Daniel Harned, M. I. LaVea, tanlay M. mttt,Rebart Engalka, Anthony Malaguttl,
' dommitteemombert not shown Include David Bithop, Arthur L. ilyitona, Beverly Crael, John S. Gilbert Jr.,
", 6aey Had, William HOeile, Freelahd HiyowOll, Martin Oliert, Honry Perry, W,1 E. Trout, Elmer Bierbaum,
Richard Chesson and Pick Tomford. : .'.

MAIN STORE
No. 22-06 Central Ave.
Phone 2-1773

BRANCH STORE
No. 18-60 Tivoli Ave.
Phone 2-212S

llilillliilii

I

STTDILIL DH1E f

OF LONG AND LOVELY USE

through our convenient
"Buy while you
Earn" plan

wnn'll iiv rommission the iame moment you subscribe in our Club. The FIRST

WEEK IS FREE ANp NO DOWN PAYMENT.
Come... don't mits our "BUY WHILE YOU EARN" PLAN

FURNITURE HARDWARE' -i HOME ARTICLES

.11-18 Central ye. (Beside Amertfor Thaater)

I

II Vi iV 4

I

L,Vv tr uvr;'. -;-. '-r.r.v;- -.WSSSSf 'J
llllililBlililM r
r .w -.ito. .iiliia-iii::f;:iii mi. .iPii:in:i in. .in rTi

WILL IT HAPPEN ACAIN?There are rumblings of a new after the goods had been put Into waiting transport planes
Communist Berlin blockade. The first one, in 1948-49, was bound for Berlin. The planes flew around the clock to bring
made ineffectual by the famed "airlift." This major air effort f to the western sector of the city the essentials food, things
by the Allies is typified by the photo, above, which shows a and people. Now, less than 10 years later, the scenes could
long lint of unloaded truck trailers at a Frankfurt airport I be repeated.

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Everybody Reads Our

Classifieds

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- v .

: fags grr
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER i t-
FRIDAY, JANUARY t, 195
gs Increase Pro League i
nn
o
The Mo(o)re
The Merrier
WEDNESDAY NIGHT'S GAME
All 4 Teams See Action
Editor: CONRAOO SARCEANT
Iti Bargain Bill Tonight

'' : v
"... "V L"- : I '7t
r : TT" -" V.v-..,:.'.-- ' "'

Kin

L

AB R H PO A

( By J. J. HARRISON Jr.
The Kinzs held a commanding three-game lead

in the Panama Professional
as all teams reached the

games played apiece.
' The Kings took that comfortable margin by edg edging
ing edging their closest rivals, the Carta Vieja Yankees, 3-2
last night at the Olympic Stadium.
Tonight Marlboro will engage Carta Vieja in the
first game of a bargain bill, and in the nightcap the
Kings tackle Cerveza Balboa. Game time is 5:30.

- Marlboro, in third place by
four games, will open on the
mound with HUmberto Robin Robin-,gon
,gon Robin-,gon (3-2). His opponent will be
John Anderson (2-3). Both
hurlers are righthanders
The Kings have named their
ace lefthander Dick Luebke (5 (5-l),
l), (5-l), to go against southpaw Pat
Scantlebury (1-3). Luebke
itands alone as the winningest
pitcher in the loop.
Cerveza Balboa is in the cel cellar,
lar, cellar, five games behind the lead lead-srs.
srs. lead-srs. Last night knuckleball artist
Bud Slack scattered seven
hits in going the distance for
his third triumph against no
defeats. The victory was the
fourth straight for the Kings
the longest win streak for any
club this season while the
Yankees suffered their third
consecutive setback.
Jim Tjmbricht. who was seek seeking
ing seeking his fourth triumph, lost his
fourth decision, Instead. The
tall righthander, who worked
eight innings, allowed- all of the
Kings three runs and tneir
eight hits. o
Bill Slack, who came in as a
plnchhitter for Umbritch in the
eighth, retire the side in or order
der order in the ninth.
The Kings scored an unearn unearned
ed unearned run in the second to take
a l-o lead With two outs. Gran Granny
ny Granny Gladstone, a hot hitter these
days doubled to right and ad advanced
vanced advanced to third when Les Peden
reached first pp, ft. throwing er error
ror error by Dave Jacobs, who had
made a brilliant stop of Peden s
bW for a base hit.
Elias Osorio's single to right
followed to send home Glad Gladstone
stone Gladstone before Black file dto
center for th third out.
Tht Yanks eftipe back to tie
the cVnt 1-1 m Wfi tn,rd Blh
ly Shantz singled to center to
lead off and went to second
TODAY-ENCANTO-35-20
Tony Curtis Sidney roiuer
I- in -"THE
DEFIANT ONES"
Dane Clark in
I "OUTLAW'S SON"
Service Center Theatres
-.TONIGHT
BALBOA 6:15 7. 55
Barbara Stanwyck
Barrv Sullivan
"FORTY GUNS"
COCO SOLO 7 00
Frank Love joy
James Best
"Cole Younger, Gunfighter"
In Cinemascope at uoior:
DIABLO HTS.
00
Steve Cochran
Diane Brewster
"QUANTRILL'S RAIDERS
In Cinemascope & Color l
Owl Show 10:30 p.m.
"Beachhead"
GAMBOA 7:00
George Gobels Diana Dors
I MARRIED A WOMAN
GATUN 7 :00
John Wayne Iko Ando
"THE BARBARIAN AND
THE GEISHA"
in Cinemascope fc Color!
MARGARITA 7:00
Dane Clark Ben Copper
"THE OUTLAW'S SON"
Owl Show 10:30 p.m.
"Apache"
PARAISO 7:00
"The Beast of Budapest"
and "THE DESPERADO"
Owl Show 10:30 p.m.
"Pirates of Tripoli"
SANTA CRUZ 7:00
'Challenge To Rin Tin Tin"
"THE MAD MAGICIAN
CAMP BIERD 7:00
Fess Parker
v "THE GREAT
LOCOMOTIVE CHASE"
In Cinemascope & Color!
Owl Show 10:30 p.m
"It Came from Beneath
The Sea"
CAP I TO LI O
25C ; 15c.
HIGH AND THE
' MIGHTY
with John Wayne
- Also:
DAM BUSTER
with Richard Todd
T
25c.

TODAY-TOEAfE3Eg-TODAY

League standings today

half-way mark with 18
when Gail Henley allowed the
ball to get by him for an error.
Umbricht forced Shantz for
the first out, and the pitcher
scored all the way from first
on Tony Bartirome's rousing
triple to right center. Whitey
Schmidt walked to have run runners
ners runners on first and third with
only one out, but Black got out
of the jam by forcing Jacobs to
hit into a fast short-to-second-to-first
doubleplay.
The Kings' two final markers
crossed the plate in the fifth to
make the score 3-1. Black, the
first man up in the inning,
rolled out to short. Frarik Aus Austin
tin Austin singled to left and Bartirome
in a spectacular play, dove on
his sid eto snare a wicked low
liner hit by Pumpsie Green.
While still lying on his side,
Tony made a game, but vain
attempt to throw out Austin,
who advanced to second. Hen Henley,
ley, Henley, a lefty swinger, was walk walked
ed walked intentionally but the strate
gy boomeranged when Ken
Hunt came through with a
run-scoring single to left,
which also moved Henley to
second.
Carlos Heron's single to cen center
ter center followed to score Henley,
before Umbricht induced Glad Gladstone
stone Gladstone to roll.. 'Out, pitcher to
first, and end the frame.
Great fielding olays bv Hen
ley and Hunt in the sixth saved
the night for Black, whose sud sudden
den sudden wildness enabled Carta Vie
ja to plate attainted tally.
aaruromB-was roDCem, or a
basehit when' Henley raced in
from deep Center to take a
sinking liner off his shoP tops
falling and rolling over, for one
out.
Left-handed-hitting Schdidt
dropped a': wrorwifieKL .doable
into left andmoVeTTtfrthird on
a wild pitch with Jacobs at the
plate.
Jacobs watched a third strike
go by for the second out, and
with Bill Parsons at thp plate.
Black thrpw his second wild
pitfh causing Schmidt! to score.
Parsons was safe on Austin's
hobble of a grounder and
Snider WMhelm hit a liner to
lef that was dronninir in
safelv he insant Hunt took
the ball on jt shoestring catch
that spnt thp'lQPV snertators
into r'ning an"'ausp for the
second time in the half of the
frame.
Plack whiffed two batters
arvi permitted onlv otic base on
bail'. Two rally-crushing tw'r tw'r-kilHnes
kilHnes tw'r-kilHnes wero turned in by Tils
mates. Umbricht. who also
hurled a good came, struck out
three and allowed two free
parses.
Gladstone, with a double and
a single i nfour trios; Schmidt,
with a single and double in
three official tries, and Shantz
with two-for-three were the
only players who collected more
than one hit.
Green had a single in four at at-bats
bats at-bats to keep his long batting
streak alive. The Knips' short
stop has now hit safely in 171
straight games.
Wednesday night Clarence
Moore was the batting hero in
the Beermen's 6-4 win over
Marlboro. The shortstop drove
in four runs and had a three-in-five
night as reliever
Chuck Pice took his second
win to make his slate 2-0.
Jim Hardison. the loser, now
owns a 1-3 record.
DRIVE-IN
':00 TAIV 9:00
POPULAR NIGHTI
$1.10 PER CAR!
Charlton HESTON in
THE SAVAGE
In TECHNICOLOR!
TOMORROW
ONF DY RELEASE!
ROD CAMERON
Vera RALSTON in
Spoiler of The Forest
In TECHNICOLOR!
IV Oil

VICTORIA
15C.
WINGS of DANGER

15c.

BANK! $125.00
DOMINGO KID
with Rory Calhoun
- Also:
COWBOY
with Olcnn Ford

UNDER THE

SECOND CHANCE

Shetrone, cf 4 3 1-2 0
Moore, ss ,-5 0 3 1 2
Roberts, lb ....40143
Parris, 3b "..4 1 1 0 0
Lopez, 2b 3 0 1 2 1
Grenald, If ....2 0 0 4 0

Peoples, rf-c .. ..3 0 0 4 0
Kellman, c 1 0 1 6 0
Osorio, P., rf .. .1 1 0 2 0
Maranda, p .... 1 0 0 1 1
Page, p l l 0 l 0
Totals
29 6 8 27 7
P. Osorio ran for
7th.
Kellman in
MARLBORO
AB R H PO A
Napoleon, rf ..5 0 2 1 1
Brathwaite, 2b .. 4 1 1 5 5
Hardaway, 3b .. ..3 0 0 1 2
Gabler, lb 4 0 1 8 0
Altman, If 5 0 1 0 0
Bernard, ss 4 1 1
Flynn, c 3 1 1
Mitchell, cf .. ..4 1 1
Ferguson, p 3 0 0
Hardison, p 1 0 1
Totals 36 4 9 27 17
Score by Innings
Cer. Balboa 100 011 1026 8 1
Marlboro 110 200 0004 9 0
SUMMARY: Errors, Paris.
Runs batted in: Roberts, Harda Hardaway,
way, Hardaway, Ferguson, Napoleon, Moore,
4, Lopez. Earned Runs: Cerve Cerveza
za Cerveza Balboa 6, Marlboro 4. Two
base hits: Shetrone, Moore 2,
Parris. Three Base Hits: Brath Brathwaite;
waite; Brathwaite; Double plays: Bernard,
Brathwaite, Gabler: Stolen base:
Shetrone. Sacrifice Hits: Harda Hardaway,
way, Hardaway, Page. Hit batter: Ferguson,
(Grenald), Struck out by: Ma Maranda
randa Maranda 2, Martinez 3, Hardison
2, Page 6. Bases on Balls off:
Maranda 3. Ferguson 4, Hardi Hardison
son Hardison 3, Page 2. Left on base:
Cerveza Balboa 5, Marlboro 11.
Pitchers record: Maranda 4
runs, 5 hits in 3 2-3 inngs; Fer
guson: 4 runs. 7 hits in seven
innings. Hardison 2 runs 0 hits
in 1 23 innings. Winning Pitch
er Page (2-0). Losing Pitcher:
Hardison (1-3). Umpires: Wil Williams,
liams, Williams, Hilzinger, Harrelson.
Time of game: 2:38.
Nipped
In The Bud
r v
LAST NIGHT'S GAME
Kings L AB R H PO A
Austinf lb . i . .5
Greene ss
ni ss 4
e4,cf 3
V 4
Henle
Hunt
Heron, 3b 4
Gladtsone, rf . .4
Peden, c 3
Osorio, lb 4
Black, p 4
1 10
0 0
Totals
35 3 8 27 12
CARTA VIEJA
Bartirome. lb ... .4 0 1 16 1
Pchmidt, rf .. .. 3 1 2 1 0
Jacobs. 2b 4 0 0 1 3
Parson. If 4 0 0 0 0
Wilhelm, 3b ... .4 0 1 0 3
Kern, cf 4 0. 1 3 O
A'lie. ss .
Shantz c .
Umbricht, o
x-Slack, p .
Totals
0 0 0
0 2 5
1 0 1
0 0 0
33 2 7 27 17
x-Rolled out for Umbricht in
8th.
Score by Innings
Kinsrs 010 020 0003 8 2
C. Vieja 001 001 0002 8 1
SUMMARY: Errors: Jacobs.
Henley, Austin. RBI's: Osorio,
Bartirome. Henley, Hunt. Earn Earned
ed Earned runs: Kings 2, Carta Vieja
1. Two base hits: Gladston. Pe Peden.
den. Peden. Schmidt. Three Base Hits:
Bartirome. Doubleplays: Green,
Austin. Osorio. Black, Green. Oso
rio. Wild pitches: Black 2.
Struck out: By Black 2, Um Umbricht
bricht Umbricht 3, Slack 1. Bases on balls
off: Umbricht 2, Black 1. Left
on base: Kings 8. Carta Viela 5.
Pitchers records: Umbricht 3
runs, R hits in 8 innings. Win Winning
ning Winning Pitcher: Black (3-0), Los Losing
ing Losing picher Umbricht (3-4),
Umpires: Hinds, Methenev,
Thorton. Attedance: 1 9 9 3.
Time of game: 2:16.
BLAIK WINS AWARD
NEW YORK (UPD Coach Earl
CRed) Rlaik of Armv has been
named recipient of the 19th an
nual Touchdown Club of New
York award "for rendering unus
ual service to football." Blaik's
cadet's have won lfi6 games, lost
48 and tied 14 others during his
25-year tenure at West Point.
SIGN TV BOUT
LOUISVILLE. Ky. (UPI) Mid
dleweights Joey GiardeMo and
Ralph (Tiger) Jones have signed
for a nationally televised fight
here Wednesday, Jan. 28. Both
fighters lost their last bouts.
RIO
- Bank Night!
25c.
Gold Prize $500.00
PARDNERS
with Lewis & Martin
. Also: -DR.
CYCLOPS
LAW

ALL HANDS Will Harridge finds himself the target of American League umpires' hand handshakes
shakes handshakes at the circuit's annual party in Chicago. Resigning as president after 28 years,
Harridge is the host for the last time. Joe Cronin of the Boston Red JSox J to succeed him.

Potter To Toss First Ball
For Fastlich League Opener

Ocelots vs Pumas
Game time 9:30 a.m.
flnpninu dav ceremonies for the
inauguration of the 1959 Fastlich
Teenage League baseball season
will take place at the Fastlich Dia Diamond
mond Diamond at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow.
flnvprnnr Potter will toe the
mminrt fnr thp first Ditched ball
while his battery mate, Henry Do-
nnvan will rprpive. At the olate
Adalbert Fastlich, sponsor of the
league, will aim for tne tence
CANDIDA-IE -Frank McKine McKine-ney
ney McKine-ney is one of seven candidates
for the 1958 James E. Sullivan
Award. The winner will be con considered
sidered considered the nation's top ama
teur athlete. The Indianapol's
banker's son won four national
backstroke championships, estab established
lished established two American swimming
records.

4 yK jjNn
. - . Wt' AxV. .5

WINNERS OF THE HI- Fl RAFFLED BY THE
CENTRAL THEATRE

99t fcftM

jjgBi -ypfr?i 17 mom
" X 1 xx ? x "s I

Mr. WILLIAM M. STOCK, (a resident In Curundu and Mr, CONRADOt RIVERA Panamanian,
residing at Third of November street, were the happy winners of the HI-FI that' the Central
Theatre offered its patrons as a Christmas present. The Central Theatre management hopes
thev enjoy listening to good music on this wonderful machine and wish one'and all a very
happy New Year. 1 JL: ? f '"'.H v

while Jack Randall, resident of

the league, will call tne pitcn.
Also scheduled in the pre-game
events is the parade of the ninety
players who make up the six teams
of the loop. Sparkling new uni uniforms
forms uniforms and high enthusiasm mark
the mood ofthis year's teams.
The general public is invitee to
all cramps nlavpri.hv thp Fastlich
Teeners and each week-day after
noon at four tinny a rousing goou
camo is scheduled free of charge.
The players react to enthusiastic
audiences and appreciate the pre presence
sence presence of their fans. The fans will
xee well played ball with good
sportsmanship, competition and
plenty of hustling. The League
from prexy to player invites all
who are interested in the players
and fine baseball.
The managers of the teams of
the opening game, Batterton of
the Ocelots and Mounts of the Pu-
Sports Briefs
SIGN TV BOUT
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) Pro-,
moter Bierman Taylor announced
Tuesday that Eddie Perkins of
Chicago and Cisco Andrade of Los
Angeles will clash in a nationally nationally-televised
televised nationally-televised fight here Wednesday;
Jan. 21.
COLTS HELP YOUNGSTERS
BALTIMORE, Md. (UPI)-The
Baltimore Colls plan to under underwrite
write underwrite a charitable and educational
foundation designed to help young youngsters
sters youngsters acquire college educations.
The new foundation will draw its
I principal income from the organ organisation
isation organisation operating the National
Football League champions.
NBA SCHEDULE CHANGE
NEW YORK (UPI) A schedule
change in the weekly nationally
televised National Basketball As Association
sociation Association game (NBC) finds Syra Syracuse
cuse Syracuse playing at Cincinnati Jan. 25.
The original schedule called for
New York to play the Hawks in
St. Louis.
TO HAVE "DAY"
LAKE CITY, Fla. (UPD-Pat
Su mineral!, the New York Giants'
place-kicking specialist, will be
given a "day" by his home town
Jan. 8.

'

mas, have announced the follow following
ing following tentative line ups:
Ocelots: W. French, p; L.
French, ss; Anderson, lb; K. An Anderson,
derson, Anderson, 2b, Albritton, If; Rudy, cf;
J. Cooke, rf; Dubbs, C; Bettis, 3b.
Pumas: Dempsey, 2b. Corrigan
3b; Bateman, p; Dilfer lb; Potter,
c; Zelnick, rf; Williams, ss; Fraun
heim, cf; Quiros, If.
Cooper To Join
Anderson as Pro
cvnMFV Anstraflia. January 1
(UPI) Ashley Cooper, rated tne j
umrlH'o IpaHin? am ateur tennis
player in 1958, agreed today to
join his countryman, iviai auuci auuci-son,
son, auuci-son, in U.S. promoter Jack Kra Kramer's
mer's Kramer's professional troupe for a
contract that could, earn him over
$100,000. T
The agreements with botw young
Australian utars were reached
after they Ira d given Kramer a.
chance to withdraw his easier of offer
fer offer following their defeat in the
Davis Cup challenge routed at the
hanrls nf thp Americans.
Ttnr Kramer refused to back
out of his end of the bargain,
maintaining the Davis cup set setback
back setback "has not changed-the deal".
It was generally agreed, how however,
ever, however, .the Australians would have
been a. much more attractive draw
on thp nrofessinnal circuit this
year haL they beaten the Ameri-
.1 11 .1
cans m .uie, cnueii&e rouuu.
Cooper is! expected to sign a
contract, tomorrow, fiivine Kra
mer a three-year option on nis
services for 45,000 pounds ($10 ($10-800).
800). ($10-800). Anderson signed his contract
vpstprdav for a minimum of 12.-
500 pounds ($28,000) for the first
year, with 15 percent ot tne gate
for each- match he- plays and a
five percent -bonus every time he he-wins.
wins. he-wins. Thp Australian stars' dpfertion
to the professionals brightened
American hopes' of retaining the
Davis Cup next year. The 22-year-old
Cooper won the Wimbledo;l,
U.S. and Australian champion champion-shin's
shin's champion-shin's in. 1958. The- 23-vpar-old An
derson, who won the 1957, U. S.
singles title, was be behind
hind behind Gooper as an amateur.

PANAMA PROFESSIONAL LEAQUE; I; :
Teams K CV M cr w i dm inn

'Klnes X 3 4
woim vieja ...4 x 3
Marlboro .....;2 3 x
Cerveza Balboa 13 3

Totals ....6 9 10 11 '36 "36 1 "
TONIGHT'S GAMES (2)
At Olympic Stadium: Marlboro (Robinson 3-2)
vs. Carta Vieja (Anderson 2-3)
Kings (Luebke 5-1) vs. Cerveza Balboa (Scantlebury 1-3)
First game: 5:0
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT
At Olympic Stadium:" Kings 3, Carta Vieja, 2
WEDNESDAY NIGHT'S RESULT:
At Olympic StacJium: Cerveza Balboa 6, Marlboro 4

Mathieso

n

Brazos Champ Galindo

Don Mathieson, the some sometimes
times sometimes snent scoi irom the
lianas 01 -tne tiyde, ousted
Aniual Ganndo, irom tne
ianco Coion, in the quarter quarter-lianis
lianis quarter-lianis ol tne jirazos crook
'tiaimao wou this champion champion-snip
snip champion-snip in i954 and ior the past
three years ne has success successfully
fully successfully deiendea his crown. It
seem as though Galindo was
on his way to a neasy victory
wnen he took an early lead
and after seven holes he was
three up. However, he gave
his dour opponent a lease on
life when ne drove into the
jungle at No. 8.
He was still two up going
into the back nine but his
putting touch deserted him
and Scntti Was nn initio; ta
il n r.1 n 1 f ...!lf. 11.
aicyi uj $ ma, witii ine re result
sult result that a steady brand of
golf found him taking the
lead for the first time tthe
15th hole.
Sixteen and 17 were halved
in par figures and Galindo,
going all out for a birdie at
No. 18 in an attempt to tie
up the match, took a bogey to
Mathieson's par.
The dethroned king had no
OLMED6 SEEDED THIRD
PERTH, Australia. (UPI)-Alex
Olmedo, the toast, of the tennis
world, was seeded only third tor
the West Australian tennis cham
pionships. Andres Gimeno of
Spain and Barry MacKay of Day Dayton,
ton, Dayton, Ohio, were rated ahead ot Ol Olmedo
medo Olmedo for the championships start starting
ing starting Sunday.
RACING EDITOR DIES
NEW YORK (UPI) James
Fitzpatrick Milner, 54, natidnal
statistical editor of the Morning
Telegraph and Daily Racing
Form, died Wednesday of. cancer.
RECORD CROWD
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI)-A rec record
ord record crowd of 73,600 attended six
sessions of the 10th annual Dixie
Classic basketball tournament.
An Outdoor Action .Films
Entertainment For
11

RELEASE NE SUNDAY AND MONDAY AT THE,
v "DRIVE-IN" THEATRE-

"PAWNEE," the new film release SUNDAY an4 Mon.-.
day at the "DRIVE-IN,f tells in dramatic term thetory
of a dual conflict, the etnoctonal personality one of white
man raised as an Indian, and the savage one oi red man v
and white In Ute great Southwest of the late 1800's. "PAW "PAWNEE,"
NEE," "PAWNEE," filmed in Technicolor, stars George Montgomery,
Lola Albright and Bill 'Williams, and boasts some of the
best action footage seen on the screen In a long time,". ty

5 12 6 fifi7-

3 9 9
3 8 10
x 7 11
.500 ; 3
.444i 4
.389 ? 6
excuses and Scottie retired for
a quiet session at the "19th
hole." As the evening wore on,
he admitted It was-a "verr
gude day."
Other results Were:
Robin Morland over Mer
French, 2 and 1.
Woody Compton over Bill -Lewis,
3 and
Don Hause over Babe Mar Mar-quard,
quard, Mar-quard, 1 up.
Challenger Lane
Resolved To Win
Lightweight Title
! MIAMrBACH'(trPbJ--"J5bufh-
paw Kenny Lane, who .became a
stand-by challenger on a split de decision
cision decision over Carlos Ortiz, said to today,
day, today, "my New Year's resolution,
is to win the lightweight title in
1959."
Brown-haired Kenny of Muske Muskegon,
gon, Muskegon, Mich., who failed to wrest
the 135-pound crown from Joe
Brown last July 23, will get an another
other another shot at it here in Miami
Beach in April, if Brown defends
successfully against Johnny Busso
at Houston, Tex,, Feb. 11.
Lane, 26, eariied another ptob.
able title chance Wednesday night, night,-by
by night,-by his strong finish against dark-;'
haired Ortiz of New' York in theirs
TV 10-rounder at -the Miamij
Beach Auditorium. P r 0 m 0 X e,?,j
Chris Dundee announced the prou
able AdhI match at the'i ringside:.
The Michigan mauler, weighing
137 pounds to 137 3-4 for Puerto--.
Rico born Ortiz, came on in the the-n'nth
n'nth the-n'nth and 10th rounds to? Wrap up;j
the decision before an estimated
2,000.
Judge Carl Gardner called, thfr
fight even, on a 10-polnt basis,
and gave each 96 points. But Ref
eree Billy Regan favored Laner.
97-96, and Judge Barr Pearlman
also had Kenny ahead, .98-95. The
United Press International scored.
11 vo-w ior Jjaue. . ,
35
That Affords Top
Movie Fans of All ;Ages:
it

Eliminates

0

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I I
4
I
t
IT -if
I
0
l
fl

;&:7' 1

V 'V.



FRIDAY, JANUARY 1859

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDCTENDENT DAILY NIWSPAPEB
PAOK 8EVX5
Thrilling Victory In New Year's Classic

Scores

Siete

Favorite

Second; Ragazza Third
Tti&Slud ulilasirPcrdularib yester yesterday
day yesterday got off on the right foot for 1959 by scoring a
thrilling one-length victory in the $3,000 added New
Year's Classic before a larg crowd at the President
Remon racetrack.
, Mutuels favorite Siete y Medio was second and

Ragazza third.
Perdulario went off a heavily
bet Second choice in the betting
despite his, top weight of 122
pounds and the fact ihat he had
Jose Talavera, not considered one
Of the track's better riders, in the
laddie.
The favorite's role was resery resery-id
id resery-id for newcomer Siete y Medio
shich was ridden by Braulio Bae Bae-ea
ea Bae-ea and was unbeaten in four pre pre-rioua
rioua pre-rioua starts in inferior competi-
ttAt the start, Dependable shot to
the front with Ragazza in closest
pursuit. They continued at a break break-aeck
aeck break-aeck pace some nine or ten
lengths in front of Siete y Medio
ind Perdulario until turning into
fce homestretch where both Siete
r Medio and Perdulario gained
rapidly but Perdulario picked up
more ground when his rider electe"
to take the shortest route home
ind he found an opening along the
the inside rail midway down the
homestretch, pushed through and
Irew out.in the final sixteenth to
icore by slightly more than a
length. "-. .,
Siete y Medio got up to outlast
Rtgazza by .three parts of a length
for the place. Ragazza was four
long lengths in front of the fast
Stopping Dependable and her en en-trymate
trymate en-trymate Informal which wound up
fifth. Constantitno and Michaux
brought up the rear in that order
after never being prominent in the
race.
Perdulario turned the nine fur furlongs
longs furlongs in 1:52 25, far slower than
Polemon's record of 1:50 3 5 tor
the distance. Amado Credidio had
leg up on Ragazza and Fernando
Alvarez did the booting on Depend
able.
Longshot players got the new
year off ir happy mood. La
Fame ($57.40), PhilllpiponJ$56)
and Otorongo ($25) wore th three
Jockeys Guillermo Rivera, Ru-
hen vasquez. amauo ucuiuiu ...
Guillermo Milord won two races
each while last, year's record record-breaking
breaking record-breaking rider-Baeza failed to get
a. single winner home.. ..... t
tomorrow a nine-horse field of
the trick's second series racers

Brennan Stuck To Rules;
Notre Dame Wanted Pro

By JIMMY BRESLIN
NEW ARK (NEAJ-Criticize

) the University oi

YOU migni as ?"h"r iptl
ages, a steady job, .the t Red
Cross, motherhood the public li li-hrsrv
hrsrv li-hrsrv the cop at the school
ffing amdsoup kitchens for
V faD. Notre Dame
walks into the arena of public
opinion with publicity men, busi busies
es busies managers and fund raiser
preceding 40 or so Jerseyed kids
who play football before 585,003
people on 10 Saturday afternoons.
They are acclaimed by people
who read sports pages and have
never been within 1,000 miles ot
the South Bend campus.
This time around, the people
running the school's athletic
program would prefer that a de decision
cision decision to fire Terry Brennan as
head coach -and -replace him with
Joe Kuharich be in the nature of
nrivate lituation.
;But it does not work out that

Ji way. For when you examine me

situation, strip away we f"" f""-tudes
tudes f""-tudes and the Jore,f ou find JNo
tre Dame wants to win football
games the same as Michigan
State or Tennessee or Auburn, a a-ny
ny a-ny place else ''where the sport is
high-pressure business.
I Five years (ago, .the win-it-all
mtyi ibfjf Wrank:, Leahy became
too pot tot the people in South
Bend and young Brennan was
brought, In; ; He was the kind of
coach who ifitted in perfectly at
a Kotre Datne which was inter interested
ested interested in keeping football where it
belongs, y f
Quiet, and with a lawyer's abil-
ity to apeak the language, Ter Terry's
ry's Terry's main interest was in tne
boys,, undef ; him. A third-string-ear
wouldn't, be putting out on
the practice field, so Trry would
drop him .from the traveling
qpad for the next trip. It was
the right thing to do, but the
coach would be walking around
afraid he had just hurt a boy.
At the first opportunity, he'd put
the lad back on the squad,
i "Things like that were on his
mind,"; a Notrt Darner tells you.
'iThey were more important to
him than any all winning rec record
ord record or what have you. In the
, end, that was his trouble.
4 "He was dead honest. He told
sohod he couldn't win with
. the schedule they gave him as
' long as he stayed close tw the
rules and didn't have extra prac
tice sessions and secret tryouts
of prospects like most other big
time coaches. :
i "He flatly refused to resign.
At the end of November he
made it7 clear they would- have
to-fire him. He thought he was
. doing exactly what had been
asked of him." They wanted

Medio
, ..

will battle for the major share
of a $750 purse over seven fur furlongs.
longs. furlongs. Homan is a big favorite
to beat such goou performers as
Double Four, Horacio, Quickie,
Guadalcanalai, Alcaraz, Play Playboy,
boy, Playboy, Al Justo and Critlco. Al Jus Juste
te Juste and Critico will go in an en entry.
try. entry. The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Mi Locura $10.60, $6.20
2 The Gipsy $6
SECOND RACE
1 Red Label $4.80, $3.40
2 Dagon 6.60
First Double: $26.40
THIRD RACE
1 Domitila $12.60, $5
2 Linda Susy $3.20
FOURTH RACE
1 Jump Quick $10.80, $4.80
2 Lady Edna $3.40
Quiniela: $19.20
FIFTH RACE
1 La Fa ma $57.6z, $7.20
2 Magna $2.20
SJXTH RACE
1 Otorongo $25, $12.60
2 Tarasca $21.6o
SEVENTH RACE
1- Mondesir $10.40, $4.20
2 Posiblemente $3.40
Second Double: $207
EIGHTH RACE
1 Philipipon $56, $9
2 Bucalemito $5.20
Quiniela: $98.60
NINTH RACE
1 Perdulario $6.40, $4
2 Siete v Medio $3.40
One-Two: $18.20
TENTH RACE
1 Madame Cucu $6.40, $2.40
2 Mauricio $2.20
ELEVENTH RACE
1 Palave $3.40, ,$2.80 ,
2 Sapristi $3,80
One-Two: $7.80
football on i proper level. That s
what he gave them."
So Brennan wound up sitting
in his living room, with a Christ Christmas
mas Christmas tree in one corner, four kids
spread around the rest of the
place and the. telephone ringing
and people asking him why he
was fired.
There was no outside influ influence.
ence. influence. Brennan was fired direct directly
ly directly by the three priests and two
lay members of the Athletic
board.
Kuharich who came out of a
South Bend high school to be a
tough-nosed guard for Notre
Dame in 1935-37, is used to the
professionals. As the Washing Washington
ton Washington Redskins' coach, he never
worried about dropping a guy
from the squad.
This is no rap at Joe Kuha Kuharich.
rich. Kuharich. His job depended on keep keeping
ing keeping the right players and win winning.
ning. winning. Every indication is that his
Notre Dame position is on the
same plane. The Irish just want
to win and to do it they have to
change policy.
Terry Brennan, who did what
was wanted and was fired dur during
ing during Christmas week, found this
out.
Whatever
Happened to .
TOMMY BRIDGES
Tommy Bridges put in all his
16 major league seasons pitching
for the Detroit Tigers. Small at
160 pounds, Tommy had the best
curve ball in the trade and for
three straight years starting in
1934 he scored 20 or more vic victories.
tories. victories. Tops was 23-11 in 1936.
During, that stretch he led the Ti Tigers
gers Tigers to two pennants and one
world championship (1935). In
World Series play he had a 41
record highlighted by his 1935 vic victory
tory victory In the sixth game against
tye Chicago Cubs. With the score
tied 3-8 in the' ninth, Stan Hack
tripled off Tommy but Bridges
then retired the next thre men,
stranding Hack, and the Tigers
wrapped up the series with me
winning run in their half of the
inning. v .-...
Whatever happened- to tommy
Bridges? Now sa h tin iiv in
Detroit where he is associated
with an auto tire' firm., v
ENDS RECRUIT TBAIklNO
PARRIS ISLAND, S.C. (UPI)
Outfielder Roberto Clemente of
the Pittsburgh Pirates has com completed
pleted completed recruit training at tnls
Marine Corps recruit depot. Cle-
mant ivhn nllntH imrl.r th alv
month reserve training program
xpecta to rejoin the Pirates for

spring training,

Race Track

P. Horn ,ieck ;$.;
1st Race 8th Series Imp. ts.
1st RACI OF
1- Riscal
2- Rutilante
3- The Squire
4- Greco
5- Clarucha
F. Alvarei 114
G. Milord 115
A, Credidio 106
J. Ulloa 119
A.' Ycaza 120
2nd Race 7th Series Imp. 7 Pgs.
2nd RACE OF
1- Mi Cautiva
2- Grimilda
3- Introduction
4- Fifit6
5- Eric
6- Lanero
G. Milord lOOx
A. Credido 105
ft. Cruz 107x
M. Hurley 110
C. Ruiz 113
J. Jimenez 115
3rd Race
1- Pilluelo
2- Solito
3- Folletito
4- Noticion
Nat'ves 6 Fos.
B. Baeza 108
A. Credidio 110
J. Talavera 108
G. Milord 107x

4th Race H Natives 1 Ffl. Purse $375.00
QUINIELA

1- Mohicano
2- Petronila
3- Bagdad
4- Don Manuel
5- (Brac Val
6- (Fjd6n
B. Baeza 118
A. Credidio 10b
G. Milord l"3x
J. Ulloa 115
C Ruiz 110
M. Hurley 110

5th Rac "Special" Natives 8 Fgs.Purse $500.00 Pool Closes 3:00

1- Frijolito A. Credidio 114
2- Engaiioso B. Baeza 113
3- Kalalu G. Milord 102x
4- Don Brigido J. Phillips 108

6th Race "Special" Imp. 7 Fgs.Purse $650.00 Peel Closes 3:40
1st RACE OF THE DOUBLE

1- Porro
2- Sunsque
3- Damajuana
4- Aldar
5- Pepin
R. Visquez 110
R. Cruz lOix
A. Lorless 101X
F. Alvarez 106
J. Talavera 105
7th Race 7th Ssrles Imp. 7 Fgs.
2nd RACK OF
1- Don Cirilo G. Rivera 112
2- Dona Flora M. Hurley 113
3- Corvigua C. Quiros 103s
4- Argyla J. UUoa 110
5- Doble Fija G. Milord 101X
6- Crews Hill A. Perez 115
7- Licenciado A. Ycaza 112
8th Race "C and D" Nat.
1- Tineli J. Ulloa 115
2- Janini B. Baeza 118
3-Dr. Biol F. Sanchez 103x
4 Daniel R. Cruz 101X
5- (Tuti Fruti A. Credidio 104
6- (Blanquita J. Talavera 110
9th Race 2nd Series Imp.
1- Quickie
2- Guadalcanal
3- Alcaraz
4- Play Boy
5- Horacio
6- Double Four
7- Homan
8- (Al Justo
fl-( Critico
B. Baeza 113
A. Lorless 102x
J. Ulloa 112
F. Sanchez 97x
J. Rodriguez 112
A. Perez 118
F. Alvarez 110
A. Gonzales 108
G. Rivera 116

10th Race "Special" Imp. 7 Fgs.Purse $650.00 Peel Closes 5:40
1- Msriman B. Baeza 112 In fight to finish 3-2
2- Luciente F. Sanchez lOix Not against these 25-1
3- Artic Prince G. Milord lllx Last doesn't count 2-1
4- Princesa Gitana F. Alvarez 116 Should score again 4-5
5- Last Dust R. Cruz 99x Handicap in favor 4-1

list Race 5th Series
Imp. 8 Fgs.
ONE
1- Alucinado F. Alvarez 106 1
2- Manuela Pedraza A. Credi. 102
3- Maese B. Baeza 108
4- Martlet R. Cruz 103
5- High Day R. Vasquez 115
6- Neeful A. PereZ 108
7- Nedrey J. TalaVera 105

Your DESTILADORA IIACIOIIAL, S. A.
THE W0MACK AMERICAN WHISKEY CO.

Graded Entries

-. "CeaMMs
Purse $400.00
044
Peel Closes 1:00
THE DOUBLE
Ran well in last 3-1
Could make it here 4-1
Rites chance too 5-1
Hard to beat here EVEN
Has beaten better EVEN
Purse $450.00
THE DOUBLE
Pool Closes 1:3"
Dangerous this time
Usually cloie up
Could score at price
Improving slowly
Disappointed in last
Longshot specialist
2- 1
3- 1
5-1
5-2
3-2
101
Purse $375.00 Peel CIoms 2:00
Jockey may hlep 5-2
Back in top form 3-2
Could make it again 2-1
Form indicates EVEN
Pool Closes 2:30
Much the best
Could be runnerup
Distance my help
Apparently next best
Depends on start
Not good enough
1-10
lOT-1
25-1
5-1
4-1
41
May score again
Distance to liking
Not good t .ough
Would surprise
EVEN
EVEN
8-1
31
Better this week
Ran well in last
Dangerous always
f-Form indicates
' Vastly improved
5-2
2- 1
5-2
3- 2
4- 1
Purse $450."0
Pool Closes 4:10
THE DOUBLE
Enjoying great form 3-2
Rates good chance 31
Must go lower 15-1
Competition seems tough 8-1
Not good enough 10-1
-Reportedly ready 2-1
XCould take it all 5-2

6 Fgs. Purse $425.00
QUINIELA

Pool Closes 4:40
Was never better 2-1
Seems best here 1-2
Would pay otf lo-i
Not good though 251
Early speed only 25-1
Same as entrymate 25-1

7 Fgs.Purse $750.00
ONE TWO

Peel Closes 5:15
Could make it now
Must go lower
Could surprise
Not this time
Contender once more
Returns from layoff
Form indicates
Doesn't seem likely
Seeks repeat victory
41
15-1
3-1
25-1
52
3 1
32
5-1
5-1
Purse $500.00
TWO
Posl Closes
Not in this group 50-1
Losing form now 10 1
Jockey fives chance 3-1
Ran well in last 4-1
Shouldn't miss now 4-5
Not sgainst these 15-1
Distance suits style 5-2

Who's Kidding who around
here? of course we take a
snort occasionally also.
If during the past year,
we have been remiss in any
respect, please forgive us and
let's' start the New Year New
with a Very Special
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU!

Atlantic Little League Opens
Ninth Season Tomorrow P.M.

Governor W. E. Potter is ex
pected to throw out the first ball
when the Atlantic Little League
opens its ninth season of baseball
tomorrow afternoon. The cere
monies are scheduled to begin at
3 p.m. and the members of all six
league teams hove been asked to
be present at the Margarita Little
League Field at 2:45 p.m.
Co-chairmen of the opening day

THE PLAYERS' CHOICE Johnny Unitas, right, hands
the Jim Thorpe Trophy to Jim Brown, elected by the players
as the best player in the National Football League. The
Cleveland fullback set a new record for rushing the ball.
Unitas, the Baltimore quarterback, was last year's winner.

ByAOSCARAFRALEY

By STEVE SNIDER
NEW YORK (UPI) Good as
it was, old 1958 left the world
of sports with many a nasty hang hangover
over hangover on New Year's Day.
Baseball had the biggest head headache
ache headache of all in the form of unfin unfinished
ished unfinished business "hung over" from
the preceding year but no sport
on the calender swung into 1959
with a perfectly clear head.
Among the "aspirin" cases:
Baseball Expansion, realign realignment
ment realignment and player money demands
plague all owners. Pennant mo
nopoly threat Dy tne Ynaicees ana
Braves plague 'em all but the
Yankees and Braves.
Onlv "hot" matches In
prospect are returns of Robinson Robinson-Basilio,
Basilio, Robinson-Basilio, Moore-Durelle and what
ever happened to tloya raiter raiter-sone
sone raiter-sone TnnU Desnitp the spectacu
lar Davis Cup showing in Aus Australia,
tralia, Australia, U.S. men still are either
on the way up or the way down;
U.S. women lost the Wightman
dm in Rritain and Althea Gibson
to a year's retirement; pro pro
moter JacK Kramer, a; oaos wun
AiiBiio hrnss hats, is threatened
with disbarment from playing his
pro troupe in any amateur arena
anywhere in the world.
Service Schools At Odds
College football Pacific Coast
Conference is breaking up; Army,
Navy and Air Force academies
are at odds about playing eacn
other.
Pro football Booming but not
everywhere; costs are up for trav travel,
el, travel, etc.; Chicago Cards and Pitts Pittsburgh
burgh Pittsburgh Steelers need gate hypo
though no one really is complain complaining
ing complaining yet.
Golf Financially great; ar artistically,
tistically, artistically, the rest of the world is
catching up fast and U.S. swing swingers
ers swingers no longer dominate the big
events.
Track and field U. S. men
still great in specialties but here,
too, other nations are, catching up.
Swimming Australia has tak taken
en taken over.
Weight-lifting Dislodging the
Russians as world champs nut
likely soon.
Auto-racing Bad hangover
from that tragic spill at the start
of the '58 500 miler at In Indianapolis.
dianapolis. Indianapolis. Baseball In Turnmell
Baseball, which has had five
major league franchises switched
in the last six years, continues
in a turmoil topping anyrning in
the sports industry.
A snecial committee nas oeen
named to study the expansion of
the majors in the face of a threat
io form a third major league with

program, Bennett G. Pipton aud
Sherman Brooks announced that
the curtain raiser will see the 1958
champions, The Police Pals pitted
against the strong Cofia Coda Club,
last year's runner-up.
The game should feature fine
pitching as manager Frank Mason
of the Police has Kenny Karpinski
and Vernon McNamee in top shape

New York included. Houston and
Minneapolis are among cities
clamoring for the majors.
Will it be 10 teams per league,
a third major league or status
quoe
And with these items hanging
fire from '58, there's the explora exploratory
tory exploratory work done by player repre representatives
sentatives representatives in the matter of moir moir-ey.
ey. moir-ey. First there was a hint the
players wanted a 25 per cent slice
of television revenue. Then, in instead,
stead, instead, a request for a player pay payroll
roll payroll amounting to at least 20 per
cent of each club's gross take.
And none of those hangovers
will be cured by Jan. 2.

THE FRIENDLY SUPERMARKETS
a& (XmiqaA Osd (pmblo

WHERE
11
840 Kilocycles
PANAMA

while Coca Cola manager, Wilder,
has his two veteran twirlers, Ricky
Sanchez and Ralph Bender primed

for the opener.
The program will begin with the
assembly of the six teams and
their sponsors, managers and
coaches. An introduction of the
1959 teams will be followed by a
march to centerfield for the flag-
raising ceremonies. Assisting in
this colorful event will be the
Troop 1, Margarita Bugle Corps of
uie Boy &couts ot America.
KUovernor Potter will then thru
out the ball to officially open three
months' of highly contested base baseball
ball baseball for boys between the ages ot
8 and 12.
Should rain Cause ranrlatinn
of the game, the teams will meet
on Monday afternoon, Jan. 5 at
4:30 p.m. Thereater a game wiP
be plyed on each week-day Mon Monday
day Monday through Friday. All rained-
OUt Cames will be nl a vpH nn Hatuv.
day afternoons.
On Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 6.
Manager Cash Paulson will send
his Legion team against the stron?
Mutual of Omaha Club, while on
Wednesday, Jan. 7, the Piraies
managed by Randy Wikingstal
will open against Milt Sander's
Elks Club.
MOW

The News You've Waited For!

NEW EQUIPMENT FOR

FACTORY

RETREADING

OF
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FOR

EUROPEAN CARS
IN
FIRESTONE TREAD DESIGN

"THE WORLD'S SAFEST TIRE"
TEL. 3-1 50 1
TRANSISTHMIAN HIGHWAY

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Your Community Network

Basketball
Results
EAST
Down East Ciassle
(First Round)

St. Michaels (Vt.) 71 Maine 40
Bates 69 Wesleyan 63
Springfield Tournament
(First Round)
Amherst 60 Newhampshire 57
Springfield 114 Middlebury 56
Albright 68 St. Lawrence 54
Clarkson 68 Union (N.Y.) 54
SOUTH
Carrousel Tournament
(Final)
St. Francis (Pa.) 74 Fordham 71
(Consolation)
Geo. Washington 74 Davidson 49
Bucknedl 95 Pittsburgh 76
Clemson 55 South Carolina 49
Dixie Classic
(Final)
N. Car. St. 70 Michigan St. 81
(Consolation)
N. Carolina 90 Cincinnati 88
Duke 57 Louisville 54
Wake Forest 85 Yale 76
Gulf-South Tournament
(Final)
La. Tech 71 Virginia Tech 68
(Consolation)
Will, i Mary 64 Murray St. 62
Centenary 81 Northwestern La. 7J
N. Tex. St. 87 Spring iill 79
MIDWEST
St. Louis 60 San Francisco 42
Northwestern 102 Notre Dame 6'
SOUTHWEST
East Tex. St. 65 Okila. Central 41
o o o
METHOD
FOR
1091 Kilocycles
COLON



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
FRIDAY, JANJTART t, I95J
S SI F I E
S
1
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
.v.-

AGX EIGHT

G L A
v

D

I Resorts 1 1

Foarar cottagas. barwaan Sanra
Clan and Rio Haro. Naw low
ratas. Phono Balboa 2830.
PHILLIPS Oaaarwlaa Corraaos
Santa Claw R. P.
ama J-1877 Cristobal J-167J.
Baldwin' funiishad apartmonri
at Santa Blara Beach. Talaphono
Smith, Gamboa 302.
Houses
FOR RENT: For thraa or. four
montht. Complatoly rurroshad
heuta in Golf Haiohrs. Living Living-room,
room, Living-room, diningroom. i air condi conditioned
tioned conditioned badroomi with bath, two
maid's roomi and bath. Call Pa Panama
nama Panama 3-4629.
FOR RENT: Furnished room
with private bathroom and en entrance.
trance. entrance. Cooking facilities. 43rd
Stree, No. 13.
FOR RENT: Large
room. Good condition,
Justo Arosemena, 31
fa
furnished
first class.
Street W9.
b w2 BRIEFS 12 30 FM205p
POPE SENDS THANKS
TAIPEI, Formosa (UPI) Pope
John XXIII sent his special bless blessings
ings blessings to President Chiang Kai Kai-shek
shek Kai-shek and the Chinese people in
a letter received here yesterday
The Pontiff's note thanked the Na Nationalist
tionalist Nationalist Chinese leader, a Protes Protestant,
tant, Protestant, for sending Foreign Minis
ter S. K. Huang as special envoy
to the papal coronation at the Vat
ican,

Rooms

Rayburn, Johnson FdrecqsJ

Harmonious 86th Congress

WASHINGTON, Jan. 2 (UPI) (UPI)-Democratic
Democratic (UPI)-Democratic congressional leaders
forecasting a harmonious and re re-ponsible
ponsible re-ponsible session, moved today to
patch up party differences that
" FOR SALE
FRIGETTE
AKB CONDITIONER
FOR AUTOMOBILE
$270.00
RATTAN LUX
FURNITURE
Tel. 3-1293
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co.,
for rates and Information
Tel. Panama 2-0552
Monday thru Friday
9:00 a.m. to 12:00
2:00 p.m. to 5:00
Saturday
9:00 a.m. to 12:00
AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employe
Service Personnel
Finance Tour New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo.
on new cars
AGENCY DEHLINUER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 3-4985 -All
Types of Auto Insurance
IN NICKELCADMl. ...
EVERLASTING BATTERY
Foto International
155 Central Ave.
Corner "K" Street
1 block from Railroad
Station.
The New
NIKON
With built-in Universal
Vlewflnder Syrtem

Jpanami k Colon

Apartments

FOR RENT: Two newjy remo remodeled
deled remodeled apartments in 4rve. Eloy
Alfaro No. 13A57.
FOR RENT: Campo Alegre.
Fully furnished one room apart apartment
ment apartment with hot water. Call 3 3-1789.
1789. 3-1789. FOR RENT: Attractively fur furnished
nished furnished 2 bedroom apartment, hot
water, maid's quarters, Campo
Alegra. Phone 3-5024.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom, 2 bath bathroom,
room, bathroom, dining, living, kitchen, 2
porches, hot water, garage, maid maid-room,
room, maid-room, $135.00. EDIFICIO SOU SOU-SA,
SA, SOU-SA, 44 St. No. 37. Tal. 3-2017.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom, bath,
living, porch, hot water, garage,
baby room, maid" room, $90.00.
Edificlo Soma, 44 St. No. 37,
Tel. 3-2017.
Mamie, Dr. White
Will Cochairman
Heart Campaign
NEW YORK (UPI) Mrs
Dtfight D. Eisenhower and Dr.
Paul Dudley White will serve as
honorary chairmen of the 1959
National Heart Fund campaign, it
was announced yesterdayp
, It will be the second successive
year they have served in that '-ca
pacity. The appointments of Mtsd
Eisenhower and the Boston heatoJ
specialist were announced by
Charles Perry McCormick, Baltl
more industrialist, who is national
campaign chairman.
f
k
threaten to split Democratic anks
in both houses with the opening of
congress next week.
Speaker Sara Raybuhu and Sen Senate
ate Senate Democrat leader Lyndon B.
Johnson,,, backs at the capitol af after
ter after retuTBtof yfsferday from Tex Texas,
as, Texas, settled into "a round of confer
ences with key "members of "the
86th Congress, which convenes
Wednesday.
Rayburn told newsmen;
"I think the Democratic congress
will be a harmonious one. It was
electetron the constructive record
of the 84th and 85th Congresses.
"I think this Congress will folow
the example of the Democratic
84th and 85th Congresses. It will
be a responsible Congress and will
bring forth a legislative program
that is sound and workable."
Rayburn declined to talk about
two Liberal-Conservative issues
that will confront the House on
opening day.
Las night. Democratic National
Chairman Paul M. Butler Said
his party "will not accept the de defeatist
featist defeatist attitude of this Republican
administration that we cannot af afford
ford afford adequate defenses."
He said the mandate of the A A-mencan
mencan A-mencan people expressed at the
polls last November was a pro
gressive and forward looking
program" in all fields, especially
ut-ien.e.
miller said In a vear-end stato.
ment that the new Democratic Con
gress will vote adequate anpronria anpronria-tions
tions anpronria-tions to safeguard our, national se security."
curity." security." "During the past six years of
the Republican administration"
he chareed. "w hv n
lp$fcnomy slow down, our education
ai neens neglected, por health pro programs
grams programs sharply curtailed, and a
series of actions in international
affairs that have lowered our pres prestige
tige prestige in the eyes of the world."
Butler predicted that by, 1960 his
party would have chalked up "a
record, of accomplishment Wat will
have contributed immeasurably
toward our goak,,of a healthier
and prosperous Country pursuing
wnn an vigor g.peacetul and
world for all peoples."
just
Mundt To Support
Year's Extension
Rackets Croup
WASHINGTON (VPVi -Sen
Karl E. Mundt, ranking Republi
ran member of the Senate Rjirk
nts Committee, said yesterday, Jie
will support a year's extensipri of
me comminee s me.
The" special committee, lUldVr
the ehaTmanship of Sen. John L.
McClellan (D-Ark. ), is scheduled
to go out of existence Jan. Jil.i
McClellan said last fall he wortfd
ask the 86th Congress to giye' the
committee art extra year for its
long investigation of improper
practices by labor and manage management
ment management ,
Mundt, who becomes senior Re Republican
publican Republican with the retirement of
Sen. Irving M. Ives (R-W.Y.). said
he will back McClellan's proposal.
"Our investigations art not
completed," Mundt said. "There
is another full year of work
ahead."
Mundt said he had conferred
with McClellan about the new
lease on life for the committee,
and "I don't anticipate any trou trouble"
ble" trouble" in getting apttipstaj from the
Senatt for the additional year.

LEAVE YOTJWAD WITH ONE OF OUR
INTERNAL DE PUBLIC ACIONES No. 3

BARDO No. 26 "B" Street a) MORRISON
FARMACIA LUX-164 Central Avenue
FARMACIA VAN DER-J1S 50 Street No.
ATHIS BesMM the Bella Vista Theatre
Automobiles
FOR SALE: 1957 Buick Special
4 door, hardtop, power steering,
windows, Dynaflow, Custom trim,
dual mufflers, windshield wash washers,
ers, washers, tinted glass, padded dash,
two tone paint. Call Gamboa 6 6-206.
206. 6-206.
FOR SALE: $2600. 1958 Ply Plymouth
mouth Plymouth V-8 Belvedere, 4 -door
hardtop, equipped with MARK
IV air conditioner, dash and trunk
dual unit, two-tone green, radio,
white wall tires, plastic seat cov covert.
ert. covert. Been driven 10,000 miles.
Call Balboa 2-3526 from 7 to
4, and Panama 3-2346 after
6:00 p.m.
FOR SALE: ,1 954 Ford Ranch Ranch-wagon,
wagon, Ranch-wagon, 6 cyl., radio, heater,
overdrive, three new tires, good
condition. Not duty paid. Phone
Albrook 2286.
FOR SALE: $1600. 1956 Mr Mr-cedes
cedes Mr-cedes Benx Sedan, Model 180-D
with L and S.W. Radio, Bucket
reclining seats, new paint and1
rubber, 30,000 miles, 40-45
miles per gallon of diesel. Call
Balboa 2-3526 from 7 to 4, and
Panama 3-2346 after 6:00 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1958 Opel, like
new, 400 miles, 10 days old,
take trade in, duty paid, phone
.86-5240.
S it. '-.
FOR SALf:-il95 Opel, radio,
duty paid, and can be financed.
e aKW
nama 3-
busehold lExcjhange, Pa
49)1
FORf SALE r 1957 Plymouth
Plaia foutdor, automatic trans trans-!
! trans-! mission, 11,000 miles, perfect.
$17,00, will take trade. Call Bal-flbo2-1744.
FOR SALE: 1951 Chevrolet, 3
doosedjn, powerglide, perfect
condition. 47,009-, m(les, new
transmission. SFC Gilliam, Clay Clayton
ton Clayton 87-3204.
FOR KALE: Two model A Ford's
locat&d at Casino, next to Chain
Sinohl Lowest "prices $100 cash.
Telva-2163.
T.
FOR: SALE: 1953 Chevrolet 6
y.,wo door, tedan,-twe tone,
good tires, wradio. 6451.
FOR SALE f 1955 Buick Special,
two tone, two. doer, sedan, radio,
directional tights, back up lights,
Dynaflow, hard top, goodf tires.
6-451.
FOR SALE: 1958 Ford Country
sedan, station wagon, fully equip equipped,
ped, equipped, Ford, air-conditioned, consider
trade. Call Albrook 6223.
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE: Fiberglass boat 15
feet, 35 Evinrude, gator trailer.
Phone Coco Solo 519.
FOR SALE: Terrific buy, brand
new boat 16 foot Coronet 50 h.p.
Johnson motor, call Panama 3 3-6508.
6508. 3-6508. FOR SALE: Boat, motor, trailer
etc. $500.00. Phone 6-368.
CHARLES J. JACKSON, JR.,

' lf v
illlllMiilnilllinilllllllllIWllM in in -ill ill nmmm

sented aybld watch by Gov. W. E. Potter for sub mitting the best employe suggestion during calen calendar
dar calendar year 1958. The award 'ceremony was held in the (Governor's Office at Balboa Heights. The win winning
ning winning suggestion was, for the redtcking of the ferry-boat President Amador with a concrete flooring
which saved the Mirine Bureau $47,953 in mainte nance costs. Jackson is seen holding the watch.
Others, left to riyitjate: Capt. James A. Flenni ken, Balboa port captain; J. G. Maguire, secre secretary
tary secretary df the- Awarrtsxfrmmittee; Lt. Gov. John D. McElheny; Lt. Col. R. D. Brown, Engineering
and Construction Director; John D. Hollrn, chair. man of the Incentive Awards Committee; Potter;
i Walter A.-Oryja, assistant to the Marine Director: and Capt, Warner S. Rodimon, Marine Direc Director,
tor, Director, m . -.
'-,,

AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 13-37 "H"
lifter. Plan CAS A 7. A I. DO Central

4th of July Ave. & J St. a LEWIS SERVlTJ-Ave. TivoU No. 4 a) FARMACIA EST ADOS UNIDOS-JU Central Ave.
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. Fco. do HTOssa Ave. No. 41 a) O'TO DOMYJusto mISStI?'" '3?r..f
53 FARMACIA EL BATURRO Parque Lefevro 7 Street FARMACIA "SAS" Via POKRAS 111 NOVEDADES
COLON OFFICE: 15tb Street and Amador Guerrero No. 14.221.

I
'Home Articles
FOR SALE: Dining room set,
complete. Good condition. 94th
street No. 10, San Francisco da
la Caleta. Phone 3-2196.
FOR SALE: 5 pc. Rattan living living-room
room living-room set $100.00, wooden dres dresser,
ser, dresser, $10.00; 3 pc. Samsonita
Luggage, $20.00; single bed
complete, $15.00; vanity chair,
$1 1 .00 overstuffed chair,
$15.00; baby play table high
'chair combination, $15.00; large
ait compressor with 3 horsepower
motor $180.00; diningroom table,
$30.00 and other items. Make an
offer, phone Balboa 2-3782.
FOR SALE: A D-7 Caterpillar
tractor with less than a year'a
use. Approximate cost of same
new $28,000.00. Presently at
bottom of Chucunaque river, soma
35 miles North of El Real, Da Da-rien.
rien. Da-rien. Make your offer to Max R.
Stempel fir Sons, Ltd., Balboa
Avenue and 32nd Street, phona
Panama 3-0456.
FOR SALE: I Kenmore, 4 burn burner
er burner gas stove, oven and broiler,
used six months, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. House 14, 59th St., up upstairs,
stairs, upstairs, Bella Vista.
FOR SALE: 1950 two door
Plymouth, sedan. Bendix auto automatic
matic automatic washer, Japanese light lightweight
weight lightweight bicycle. G.E. one tube
pre-amplifier. Silvertone "45''
record player. Call Curundu 3295
after 5 o'clock.
Sianley M. Walls
Of CZ Police Goes
On Reserve Duly
A member of the Canal Zone
police Department, Stanley M.
Watts, a chief warrant officer in
the U. S. Army reserve, will en
ter on active duty January 5 and
will be attached to the Provost
Marshal Section, United States Ar Army
my Army Caribbean, for duty.
He began" his ', railitatjr career'
with K Company, 14th Infantry,
Fort Davis, but was discharged
from the service six months be before
fore before Pearl Harbor. After the be beginning
ginning beginning of World War III, he
went to the U.S. and joined the
Army, subsequently serving with
the 91st Infantry Divison in Italy.
Discharged from the Army in
1945, Watts entered the reserves
the same yean From 1945 to the
present, Watts has served in In Infantry,
fantry, Infantry, Engineer and Military Po Police
lice Police elements of the resefves. He
was discharged after World War
II as a first sergeant, and by uti utilization
lization utilization of the reserve training pro
gram was commissioned a chief
warrant officer in 1951."
The Watts family resides at
Diablo. They have one son, 16, who
is now attending Boiles Military
Academy at Jacksonville, Fla.
Period of active duty for the
reservist will be two weeks, after
which he will return to his posi
tion with the Canal Zone police
department.
administrativawoffi cer hi the Marina

STTEET, PANAMA LIBRERIA FRECIADO 7 trt No. 13 AGENCI AS
Avc.45 a LOUBDES PHARMACY 182 La Camsquilla F ASM ACIA LOM-

Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Just arrived from
Holland, Australian parrakeett
$5.00 each ona. 50th Street,
between 94th and 95th. Phona
3-6271.
FOR SALE: 20 ft. fraeier.v
beautiful deluxe Upright, used
less than year, best offer over
$300. Phone Clayton 3293.
FOR SALE: Photographic ca camera
mera camera for aerial survey modal T-5
for 9x9 inches negatives, with
mount, view finder, intervalo intervalo-meter
meter intervalo-meter and 1 0 rolls of film, at
new. Call Tel. Panama 3-7493,
during office hours.
FOR SALE: Sprindry washer 60
cycle new motor $50.00. 18"
stainless steel bar Qq grill com com-stainless
stainless com-stainless steel Bar QG grill com com-635
635 com-635 1-B, Los Rios.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE: 1956 Lambretta
Scooter 6 h.p. 6.60 lbs. capacity
with aluminum compartment In
the back and protective canopy
for the driver. Call from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. 2-0690.
Straus Warns US
Economy Faces
Severe tests
WASHINGTON (UPI) Com
merce Secretary Lewis L. Strauss
Warnerkvesterday the nation'd eco
nomy faces severe tests in the
months ahead despite a generally
favorable outlook for 1959.
Strauss said business had made
a "quick and substantial recov recovery"
ery" recovery" from the recent recession.
"We start the new year from a
position of increasing strength
and of growing confidence," he
said.
But he warned that "while the
expansion in business since last
spring has bee substantial and.
the base of recovery has widened,
some majorielements of demand
or example, Strauss said, in a
year-end statement, there "is as
yet no clear-cut evidence of a re renewed
newed renewed upswing" in business out outlays
lays outlays for new plant and equipment.
'The latest survey of intentions
by businessmen for the first quar quarter
ter quarter of the new year indicates
firming tendencies,' he continued,
"but an investment rate only
slightly in advance of the final
quarter of 1958."
Strauss named two other sectors
of the economy which must show
marked improvement if economic
recovery is to continue unabated.
These were the automobile indus industry
try industry and exports which he said
were "reduced sharply during the
recession.'
"Auto sales have recently Im Improved
proved Improved with the introduction of the
1959 models," he said, adding that
"it is as yet too early to gauge
the size of he curren marke."
est of the auto market should
come in the spring.
Director's Office, has been pre

Real Estate

FOR SALE: Lota 500 and 1.000
meter, in the Nuevo Hip6drema
Urbanixation, across the Ramon
Racetrack. All lots with ttreet
fronts, sewage, water main and
electricity. Call W. McBarnett.
Tel. 3-2567.
New Board Named
For Applicants
To Prep School
A new board to interview appli
cants for the West Point prepara preparatory
tory preparatory school in Fort Belvoir, Va.,
nas been established in this com command,
mand, command, Headquarters, U.S. Army
Caribbean announced.
The board is headed bv Col,
Louis D. Farnsworth Jr., of Head
quarters, USARCARIB. Dates for
the interviews have not been an
noumced.
The board is designed to inter
view only applicants of the Regu
lar Army, Reserve and Air force,
for training at the West Point pre preparatory
paratory preparatory school, with the ultimate
view of an appointement to West
Point for successful applicants.

Iowa, Oklahoma,
Cop Bowl Games;

Air Force Scoreless

NEW YORK. Jan. 2 (UPI)
The Iowa Hawkeyes and
Oklahoma Sooners were the
only college football teams that
lived up to their press notices
in the New Year's Day bowl
games.
Iowa ana OKianoma siunnea
their bowl victims with ipeed to
score esisy victories butLousia butLousia-na
na butLousia-na States national champions
ha dto tiounce on a ftimble to
edee Clemson while favored
Texas Christian fumbled Its way
to a scoreless tie with the Air
Force Academy.
Iowa crushed California, 38
12. in the Rose Bowl at Pasa
dena, Calif.; Oklahoma defeat defeated
ed defeated Syracuse, 21-6, in the Orange
Bowl at Miami, Fla., Louisiana
State blanked Clemson, 7-0, in
the Sugar Bowl at New Orleans,
La.; and the Underdog Air
Force team held T.C.U. to a
scorelese deadlock in the Cotton
Bowl at Dallas, Tex. Prairie
View A and M. national Negro
college champion, def e a t e d
Langston (Okla.), 34-S. In the
Prairie View Bowl t Houston
Tex.
In Wednesday's Sun Bowl
came at El Paso. Tex., Wyom
ing edged Hardln-Simmons, 14-
6.
Iowa, T ith Bob Jeter and
Willie Fleminir bobbing over
Rose Bowl turf like hopped hopped-nn
nn hopped-nn jack rabbits, crushed Ca California
lifornia California to give the Big Ten
its 12fh Tictory in 13 appear appearances'
ances' appearances' In the grand-daddy of
the postseason games. Jeter
was chosen the game's out outstanding
standing outstanding player.
Jeter, a 185-pound Junior
from Wirton, W. Va., and Flem
ing, a 175-pound sophomore
from Detroit thrilled the
297 fans and blasted Califor California's
nia's California's hopes as the big Iowa
line sprung them loose for long
runs. Jeter set two Rose Bowl
records, one fbr the longest run
from scrimmage, an 81 -yard
scoring dash, and one for an
individual rushing high of 194
yards. He averaged 21.5 yards
per rush on nine attempts
Jeter set up Randy Duncan's
seven-yard touchdown pass to
end Jeff Langston with a 41-
yard dash and his springs help
ed produce Duncan's one-yard
scoring plunge. Fleming scored
on runs of 37 and seven yards
Iowa was favored bv 18 12
points.
"It was the home run play
t h a t did it." coach Forest
Evanshevskl of Iowa said, re referring
ferring referring to the lone runs made
by Jeter and Fleming. "Passing
(with All American quarterback
Duncan doing the throwing)
has been our big punch but we
believed we could run ngalnst
this California team. So we
worked o nthat. It paid off."
It was the same story In the
Orange Bowl. Coach Bud Wil Wilkinson's
kinson's Wilkinson's wiry, fast Oklahoma
Sooners for three long-range
touchdown to Humble Svracuse
before 75,281 fans. Prentice
Oautt race 42 yadg to score in
the opening minutes. Boss Coyle
set an Orange Bowl record when
he ran 79 yards to score on a
pass from Brewster Hobby and
Hobby zoomed 40 yards to score
with a,i Syracuse unt. Oklah6 Oklah6-ma
ma Oklah6-ma wasa 13-polnt favorite.
Gautt,, first Neero to nlay for
Oklahoma, and Bob Harrison,
All-America center, were two
of the key players for the win winners.
ners. winners. Gautt blocked brilliantly
during many Oklahoma drives
and teamed with Harrison on

defense to put on a

tuekllng

Miscellaneous

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A", DIABLO
OX 1211. CRISTOBAL, CX
PHONE BALBOA 1709
NURSERY SCHOOL
All parents wishing to enter new
pupils in Nuraary School kinder
register on or before Jan 5th at
house 875 Morgan Avenue. Tal.
Balboa 1214.
SPANISH COURSE AT
UNIVERSITY
Intensive Spanish course for English-speaking
people at Uni University
versity University of Panama from January
7 to February 19. Classes in the
evening: Monday, Wednesday,
Thursday. Beginners: 5:30; In Intermediate:
termediate: Intermediate: 6:30; Advanced:
7:30 p.m. Conversational prac practice.
tice. practice. Registration at Secretary's
office.
Domestic Employment
WANTED: Maid to liv mi
good with children, references.
Ancon 0422-A.
'
LSU
TCU
display that helped stoy Svra
cuse. Halback Mark Weder scor
ed for Syracuse In the fina
period.
Coach Paul Dietzefs jLoulsia-
na state Tigers, voted the na nation's
tion's nation's top team of 1958 by the
United Press International
board of coaches, had tn us nil
their clawsc tcrwibdue OlemsOri
in the Sugar Bowl before 82:-
000. Lousiana state ot the
break it needed late In the third
quarter when center Paul
Snyder bounced a pass off full fullback
back fullback Doug Cline's leg when
Clemson was in nunt formation.
Tackle Duane Leopard recover
ed ior l.S.U. on the Clemson 10.
BHiy Cannon, All-America
halfback for L.S.U., lost two
yards at right tackle. Then he
gained three around left end.
On the next play, he ran to
the right and lofted a pass to
end Mickey Mane;ham in the
end lone for the game's only
touchdown. Cannon, who also
converted, was voted the
game's top player.
L.S.U. (10-0) Wc favnred Vi
15 points but Clemson leH in
rushing, 168 yards to 114, and
In first downs 12 in 0 tv.
"Chinese Bandits," Louisiana
States much-publicized defen-
sive, unt, had to stop Clemson
on the L.S.U. 27 In the noi
minutes to preserve the victory.
"Actually, our defensive unit
won the game," Dietzel said.
The 'Chinese bandits' just went
out mere and took the ball a
way irom them in thetr last.
anve.
Texas Christian was an eight eight-point
point eight-point choice over the A1r Force
in what was billed at the closest
01 inursaay's games. The 75.504
Cotton Bowl fans watched T.C.
U. fumble eight time, while the
Air Force hobbled five times.
Jack Spikes, voted the game's
tap player after gaining 108
yards rushing, failed on two
field goal tries for T.C.U. George
Pupich flubbed three field goal
tries for the Air Force during
me scoriess, iumDle-marred con
test
Scientist Reveal
Pacific Ocean Has
Ore DeDOsits
WASHINGTON fUPD-Scientists
disclosed yesterday that large
areas of the Pacific Ocean floor
may be worth half a million dol
lars a square mile because of ex
tensive ore deposits.
Dr. Hugh Odishaw, executive
director of the U.S. National Com Committee
mittee Committee for the International Geo Geophysical
physical Geophysical Year, made the disclo disclosure
sure disclosure in a report published in
"Science" magazine.
He said studies of the Pacific
floor disclosed extensive areas
covered with a sludge containing
manganese, iron, cobalt and cop copper.
per. copper. He said the concentrations
suggested an ore value of about
$500,000 per square mile.
"Aside from the possible eco economic
nomic economic importance of these ores,"i
Odishaw said, "the understanding
of how these metals were concen concentrated.
trated. concentrated. .will bear out our under understanding
standing understanding of the geochemistry of
the oceans." 1
Odishaw also reported important
developments in weather forecast forecasting.
ing. forecasting.
As a result of IGY studies he
said, daily weather maps of the
entire globe will be1 prepared nd
made available for the first time

Lessons

in the next year or two.

I SERVICES

rroiaet your name and war warty
ty warty against Insect d a f
rrompr sciennnc treatment
emergency or monthly budget
basis. Telephone Pronto Sarvic
Panama 1-7977 or Colon 1777.

CAMERA REPAIRS!' All make, 1 r;

all work guaranteed, Call NAT.
ERS 103, Colon, 8057, 7th St.
Today's Opening
STOCK PRICES
Comtta Do Enero 2 ViemM
ENELDA ENERO; 2
MONDAYS OPENING RUNV M
NEW YORK, Jani 2 (UPI)
Stocks opened 1959 today with
trading lightening- and prieal t
moving in a narrow range. ?
Most issues showed small gains I
although some of the recent lead-
ers like U.S. Steel, General Elee Elee-trie,
trie, Elee-trie, American Telephone, Betble Betble-hem
hem Betble-hem Steel, and Eastman Kodak
either held study for lost fractions.
General Dynamics ran up 1 u 1
points to 65 i to feature the
gainers." Small advances appear-
ed in Reynolds Tobacco, Monsan-
to Chemical, Ford; American Can, ;
International Telephone, Ameri-
can Airlines on 3,000 shares, Rex Rex-aU
aU Rex-aU Drug, American Motors, Arm Arm-co
co Arm-co Steel, Anaconda, and United
Aircraft.
ACF Ind 4814
Advocate Asbestos 320b
Aluminum Ltd 32T4
Amer Cyanamid 51
Amer Motors 39
Am Tel and Tel
Arkansas Fuel
Atlantic Refining
AVCO Mfg.
Bethlehem Steel
Bettinger Corp.
Bicroft Uranium
British Pet r
Burroughs
Canadian Eagle
Celanese
Cerro do Pasco
Chicago Gt. West.
Felmont Pet
22s
88
44tt
lift
52V
8b
101b
7
40
7k)
2834
45
46febe
51V4
83
77
49 -19
27
12f
43
13b
14
46
44b
61
79
82
160
33
44
5
2
48
44
48
78
48
SlV4b
Gen Dynamic
Gen Elec
Gen Motors it
Gen Plywood
Getty -OH
Gulf Oil
Harsco Steel
Hayden Newport
Howe Sound
Imperial Oil
Int Petroleum
Int. Tel and Tel
Lorillard
Martin Co.
New Eng T and T
Northrup
Olin Mathieson
Pancoastal
Pan Israel
Pantepec Pil
Phillips Pet
Pure Oil
RCA
Reynolds Metal
Royal Dutch shell
San Jacinto
Shell T and T
Signal Oil and Gas, A
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobile
Sperry Rand,,.
Stan Oil N.J.
-Sterling Precision
Superior Oil
Texas Gulf Prod
Underwood
United Aircraft
Unit Canso Oil
US Rubber
US Steel
Westinghouse
Wheeling Steel
21
39 B
65
48
24
57
3
1760
32
20b
60b
1
47
95
73
54

Galen W. Lack
Of Philly Eagles
Dies In (rash
PLEASANTON, Calif. (UPI)
GalenW. Laack, lineman for the
Philadelphia Eagles last season, s
was killed last night when hia
ca failed to negotiate a sharp sharp-t)re
t)re sharp-t)re highway patrol reported.
The 27-year-old former College
of Pacific star was dead on ar ar-rival
rival ar-rival at St. Paul's Hospital in Liv Liv-ermore,
ermore, Liv-ermore,

He had been reported en route -from
his Stockton home to the San
Francisco Bav area to visit a olrl

friend. Highway Patrolman Fred

Bieser reported he was traveling
south on the Sunol Pleasanlnn

road 35 miles east of San Fran.

cisco at high speed when he
missed the right-angle curve and
smashed into the tree.
He was traveling alone in the
1959 Mercury automobile.
Laack, from Abbotsford, Wis
was a star fullbaCk for COPi la
his freshman year, but was plav.
ing guard in his three years on
the varsity. He 'starred in ihs
East-West Shrine game of 1956.
He was drafted by the Washinatoa
Redskins after nlivine in eahihi.

fion games last season, then went--.

10 rnuaaeiprua on Oct. 20 as an
offensive guard and linebacker.

PLAN POWIR STATION j
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. (UPI)-
Atlantic City Electric Co. said It"'
plans to build a million dollaf
generating s'ation at Beesleva

Poiat, Cane Majr County, N. J,
with a-ki'owatt capacity of 132.

000. completion
ii expected, U
1963.

1

1

ft



fAGI CIFl

' THE MANAMA AMERICAN AN PTOEPENBtNT DAILY NEWSrAPt
If GEOEGE WUNDEB "THE STORY OF MARTHA WAYNE
root rms
r'wVrAM XH NEATES
3
NONSENSE, LEE. A TOoAT PisAGREE,SW. Mj BY WHICH TIME TOE (IPS WL?fSoO WONT LET THAT HAPPEN, MAJOR
tnncK M i ufiru UDJCV 1 E ANVV THF MFN rHAVF (TTMVINCF37 THF I hrALS I Iff. VEU WILL RESTRICT "rOUK r
tO05E.I. WITH MONEY
IN HIS POCKETS ANP FUN
F ANY OF THE MEN r'HAVE CONVINCED THF LOCALS
6QJ6AY,THE AIR jTHATMSEABAfiUEWSTEAP
' MY MEM ARE
f-THEYU
STAY
10NHI5MIN17MAT0WN
fDUCE WOOL?,. OF PROTECTION. SCJfATOf
, OUT OF TROUBLE
UKETHISISAWALWN5
CORRAL HIM FAST, K ONE ALMOST SUCCESSFUI
; TIME BOWS.
MISSION
5
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UN
fpRISCILLAl TOP
Time's tip I
If AL VEEMEEB

By WILSON fttRlftci
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HORTT MEEELE

Tub For Two

If MERRILL BLOSSES

AVCV0N,HILCA.) LARD BUT

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RFkiru Akin KWr

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TEACHER
, s vy GAVE U
( AND HOW ) -S AN HOUR 7xi
WASTHENT, TODOZONKf
ARITHMETIC ) fT PROBLEMS. ) .)
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TIME FOR

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No Luck

f f. HAMLIN

r w-k .ne nm-f uc' I I f HEKE COMES MR

wwuiit ii urr -i rxjftJN nra pui

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lr MbT. iUU mill

SllVi WHATSX YOUR (I VENTURE TSAY..V StKitW WluwmN:

Au.ll

II II' '-7.

BUGS BUNNT

Sim Lnrut

aHAN FOR
STOPPINS OL'

FWIEND! POMOU
KNOW 50METHINS

ABOUT AACTOPS?

NO, BUT FER A BUCK

I C'N GET VA

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J( SWEAT! )

y ict urn D I IP THAT SI6N

PA5SIN CARS'.".. saAtetoovs

BOUND T STOP

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Itr EDOAB MAETIN

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POST TvWrCK

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tWf aenteyat True life Adventure

UNIQUE
VCNACK
jfHB afrc:AxM
r--iiynTAN

V FOOT HIOH .".'iM.uin ""
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En Route

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SIDE GLANCES

Bv Colbraith

Immobilized

By DICE CAVALIJ

" ;' ""N. HE MU6T HAV&J JILL'SHANOINOONHO ( AND 8HE HA5NY I
THAT GuYtt BEEN I QUITE A LINE ( EVERY WORD. HE5 BEEN I MCWEPAMU9CLE A- i I
I MON0POUZINO0IU.) VZ .iy V TALKING TO HER ALL. -VfQrry JJ'
j

OUR. BOARDING HOUSE

vHk t MAJOR HOOFLB OUT OUR WAI

BY J. R WILLIAMS

-rut en k AotTW AND SEEINkS AS

DAMP AND 5MEUL MON IT WAS
HAGGLED LlkE.GYPSIES,I alK(i yuv VA.T'LlH

0UTANHEM THE ART 'g MM A PEW
DEALER OBSERVED f J,I"lvfo akjp 5P THOSE-

THAT 1 Wt.NpT A Jat TrtPCSE WOUf? f PRESIDENTIAL

BE BLUFFED Hfe. B aM AOO S PICTURES FOR

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( ROBERT) I T ALL RIGHT,
VJr-r V ALL RIGHT -tpfl

HOW PtARIO MV HBAirr AM TMH BCCMCO

POSONT WHM(S TO MV VIEW AM OLP IROM UCKBT, A
KCK-PRrAKlW SUCK6T, AM IVOR IMPT OUCKOT 3twilli
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birtrt Uf n nu !to eraitet

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a. aiflJ. 1w tbt ele

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You're paid to sit with ME Not HIM!'

PANAMA-MIAMI
MIAMI-ATLANTA

.$55.00
.$27.35

PANAMA
ATLANTA

Today's TV Program

1:M CFN NIW8
3:11 EltlJ Sb
J-.S8 M Wluir 2
:(M fOP SHOP
:00 Fury
1:30 PANORAMA
;:00 Stv Cny
:30 Yog t Vur Ul

:00 Country Amnio
1:00 Bot Cununlnp
J SO Cuiwmok
:00 Writlini
11:00 CFN NtWS
ll:l Fri. Night .ThMti
Sherlock Malm
In WjfhlnKton.

Courtesy of AerOTlss Panama Airws
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1 0573-1 6$8r-. 3-1 69d

OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

35

I



as filch

Lea
.Read story on pags

Wffenmf
x - "

Worn o f f 0 w-.

gue

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Ike Takes Arms Length
f o Reds Mew Year Talk

GETTYSBURG Pa Jan.

Berlin what they preach from the Kremlin about peaceful coexittence with the West.
TheXesident, in an exchange of New Year's messages withthe Soviet Union's top
expressed hoe of reducing dangerous international tensions in 1959 was inconsistent
u u- Woetkrn allies eet out of West Berlin by June 1.

Thus Eisenhower took

from the Kremlin late yesterday.

Th President was spending
- loiciroiv New Year's Day with
his grandchildren watching the
Cotton Bowl football game on
television when the White House
in Washicg:o:i notified him
that a mewape had. come to
from Soviet Prime. Minister Ni Ni-kita
kita Ni-kita Khrushchev and Klementi
Voroshilov, chairman of the
presidium of the Supreme so soviet.
viet. soviet. Voroshilov technically is the.
o,...l.2n head of state, but
Khrushchev is the boss.
.,. The message came in by com commercial
mercial commercial cable in Russian and
was sent to the State Depart Department
ment Department for translation. Then it
was relayed to press secretary
lame? C. Hafcerty at temporary
White House cif.ces here.
He jumped in a car and
Blithered through the late af afternoon
ternoon afternoon slush of an earlier ice
storm to deliver the document
to the President.;
Eisenhower fired back his
thanks for the high hopes for
1959 and sent it by Western
Union.
i
. In essence, he informed the
Russians that however ad admirable
mirable admirable peaceful intentions
might be, they should be
-backed up by positive pro pro-'gress.
'gress. pro-'gress. He suggested Berlin as
a prime starting point.
This was as Air Force sources
gaid U.S. intelligence agents in
Berlin have found a network of
finviet. radar and radio lamming
surroundinn that
H
They said the jamming might
mrrrv havoc with any future
kttemDt to ooerate an airlift
tn av Berlin from blockade
Even if the jamming could be
nffsct hv counter-measures, the
mirces said they seriously
doubted whether an air lift
alone could again save Berlin
s in 1948-49. They said the
cargo demands would be at
least two one-half times great greater.
er. greater. A spokesman for the Joint
Chiefs of Staff at the same
ttme indicated the United
"States would favor armed
"ground "convoys" as" a meth meth-ed
ed meth-ed of penetrating any future
blockade that mieht be im imposed
posed imposed against the former Ger-
man capital.
Si Military authorities believe
the West's rejection of the So
viet "free city" proposal leaves
TODAY
(Sad
v Tiro

J? ft) J

' nil 1 n h

m km hah .a. i

$j presents

11

1 irornng
ELIZABETH TAYLOR

RICHARD BROOKS and JAMES POC
94 Dalf -CAT OK A MOT TIN OOOf I
. ( TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
i AN AVON PROOOCTION

a

2 (U PI) President Eisenho
a decided arm's length attitu
open a possibility that the East
German Communists, ironting
for the Russians, might try to
shut off access to Berlin.
A hieh US Air Force official
said that even in 1948 the Rus Russians
sians Russians had considerable jamming
equipment around Berlin. He
said the loss of "a couple" of
American plaices at. the time
may have been due to jamming
operati o n s, although actual
cause of the crashes was un
certain.
The official said there now
is no question but that the
equipment has been greatly
increased, and could be used
to jam : not only Instrument
landing devices in "bad weath weather
er weather but also the ordinary op operations
erations operations of a control tower
and of radio navigation aids.
Intelligence reports on the
Cuban revolutipri also inter interrupted
rupted interrupted the President's leisure-
o
Khrushchev Tells
Russia Will Catch
MOSCOW (UPI) Premier Ni-I
kita Khrushchev, acting as toast toast-master
master toast-master at a gala New Year's party
in the Kremlin, told American
Ambassador Llewtllyn W. Thomp Thompson
son Thompson New Year' Eve "We are
going to overtake you economi economically."
cally." economically." But he passed in silence over
the Berlin issue, according to
Western diplomats who were pres present.
ent. present. Among about 700 guests at the
traditional dinner dance in the
n.arble St. George Hagel that di diplomats
plomats diplomats were interested to see I I-van
van I-van Serov, who recently was re replaced
placed replaced as booss of the Soviet sec security
urity security organization.
Serov. dressed in a four-star
army general's uniform, danced
with his wife, waved to Western
acquaintances and seemed com completely
pletely completely at ease.
Khrushchev and other members
of the Communist Party Presidi
um occupied the head table at the
dinner. The premier offered the
traditional 10 or so toasts includ including
ing including one to the old year, which he
said had been so "wonderful" for
the Soviet Union he hated to see
it go.

PRICES: $1.00 0.50
SHOWS: 12:35 3:19 4:32
6:45 8:58 P. M.

asra
qed a M
Kof

BURLIVES
JACK' CARSON -JUDITH ANDERSON

Jl .

wer today challenged the leaders of Russia to practice in

de toward the New Year's peace message which came

ly New Year's Day down on the
larm.
He received his first report
early in the morning while sleet
still covered his farm on the
edge of the Gettysburg battle-field-
Brig. Gen. Andrew J.
Goodpaster, White House staff
secretary, brought Eisenhower
up to date on the situations of
that hour.
A little later, Goodpaster
telephoned back to report that
President Fulgencio Batista
had fled from Cuba. He also'
transmitted other secret in information
formation information relayed by Earl E.
T. Smith, U.S. ambasador to
Havana, and data gleaned
from U.S. intelligence chan channels.
nels. channels. Hagerty declined to discuss
any of the information because
of its highly' confidential na nature.
ture. nature. But he said Eisenhower
American Envoy
US Economically.
Toasting the Soviet people and
their capacity for hard work, he
said Russia's new seven-year eco economic
nomic economic plan .was, particulaly im important
portant important in view of competition
wil.i the United States.
He leaned in the direction of the
U.S. ambassador, who was sitting
at a nearby table, and added:
"Mr. Thompson, we are going
to overtake you.
Khrushchev said Communism
will triumph not by force but
peacefully as the people of the
world ufnild come to see that it
was a better system man capital
ism. I
But n2her in the toasts, nor in
a brief chat later with Thompson,
did Khrushchev mention the latest
Western note to Berlin in which
the West refused to adopt a policy
of appeasement.
In the course of the toasts
Khrushchev referred to the com coming
ing coming United States visit of Deputy
Premier Anastas Nikoyan, who
was seated at his left. Khrushchev
said, jestingly, "He must promise
he will come back and if he
does not come back, at least he
must promise he will not work
against us."

Cemtral

THE TALK OF THE
TOWN!
THE TALK OF THE
NATION!
Moviegoers are enthralled
with the magnificent screei
production of Tennessee
Williams' Pulitzer-Prize

i u

H J

Attitude
Of Peace

y r.
bosses, said that Russgs
with her Nov. 27 demand
in
kept in touch with develop developments
ments developments throughout the day.
During the day the President
also did a little work on mail
and other official documents,
exchanged messages with a
number of world leaders in ad
dition to Khrushchev, and
played on the glassed-in porch
of the farm-house with his lour
grandchildren.
The exchange of messages inr
volved King Paul and Queen
Fredericka of Greece, President
Amlntore Fanfanl of Italy,
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer of
the Federal German Republic,
and Prime Minister John C
Diefenbaker of Canada.
These dignitaries had writ written
ten written the President congratulat congratulating
ing congratulating the United States on the
success of its latest and big biggest,
gest, biggest, earth satellite which had
broadcast a peace message
from Eisenhower.
On New1 Year's Eve the Presi
dent and Mrs. Eisenhower play
ed host to a small dinner party
and baby-sat with their grand
children while the children's
parents, Maj. and Mrs. John S
Eisenhower, had a free evening
in Washington.
New US Aviation
Agency Takes Over

CAA Group On ZonwS

Yesterday the newly created Fe
deral Aviation Agency (FAA) took
over the nationwide facm
ties, functions, and personnel of
the Civil Aeronautics- Administra
tion that has been under the De Department
partment Department of Commerce for twenty
years.
To the 125 CAA people In the
Canal Zone, this means that while
they will continue their everyday
job in the Zone they will have
a new boss, E. R. (Pete) Quisa
da, Administrador of the Federal
Aviation Agency, and will be mem
bers of an authoritative new inde
pdendent agency.
Essentially this agency has been
cnarced with the vital resDonsibi
lity of, modernizing the federal
airways, directing air traffic con
trol of civil and military aircraft
controlling the allocation of the
diminishing air space and both
issuing and enforcing air safety
rules.
The new Federal Aviation Agen
cy was designed to foster and de develop
velop develop this leadership in the jet ape
while maintaining the maximum
flight safety standards.
ILU2
EXCLUSIVE
TODAY
RELEASE!
PRICES:
Shorn:
2:30 P.
8:30 M.
Adults
$1.50
Children
0.75
CHARLTON YLH. AHNC
HE5T0N BRYNNER BAXTER
tOWAROO YVONNl
ROBINSON'DE CARLO
cra PAGET john DEREK
StRCtDRIC NINA AARTHA
HARDWICKE f OGH XOTT
' MVPOTTBCHNICOLOIT
ALL COURTESY,
PASSES SUSPENDED
INOTE: This production will
not be shown In any
other theatre in the Re Republic
public Republic of Panama dur during
ing during 1959.

i

GOV. W. E. POTTER signs the contract awarded to E. O. Hauke
Construction Company of Col6n for the construction of the new
Junior Senior High School at Coco Solo. The signing took place
in the Governor's Office at Balboa Heights. Hauke Is shown
standing. Bids for the construction of the new school were open opened
ed opened Monday and the contract awarded to Hauke Construction
Company which was low with a bid of, $1,244,000. Work Is ex expected
pected expected to begin immediately so that the building will be ready
for occupancy by the time the school term begins next September.

December Was Sigh-Out M onth For Teacher,
Nurse, Foremen, Supervisor On PC Rolls

Three men and two women,
one with 30 years of Canal
service, were retired from, the
Canal organization during the
month of December.
The names of those retiring,
their positions and length of
service follow:
(
Miss Frances G. Moomaw,
Principal of the North and
South Margarita Elemen t a r y
chools; 28 years, one month
and nine days.
Miss Angela F. Reilly, Staff
Nurse at Coco Solo Hospital; 28
years, nine months and 27 days
Ralph E. Robinson, Forge
Shop Foreman, Industrial Bu
reau; 16 years, nine months,
and 18 days.
Kenneth Slowlck, Chief
foreman Machinist, Industrial
Division; .33 years, t h r e
(months, and 19 days.
1 Lloyd T. Yarbray, Laundry
attdDry Cleaning Plant Super Superintendent,
intendent, Superintendent, r Supply Division; 18
years, four months ant 26 days
Miss Moomaw, a native of
Roanoke, Va came to the
Isthmus in 1921 as an ele elementary
mentary elementary school teacher at Pe Pedro
dro Pedro Miguel, transferring to
Ancon a short time later.
She left the service in 1925,
being reemployed in 1934 as
teacher in Gatun and Cristobal.
Her first job as school prin principal
cipal principal was at Gamboa in 1938,
She was made principal of the
Margarita school in 1941 and
spent a year as principal of the
Cocoli school In 1947. In 1"948
she returned to Margarita,
where she has been principal
of both the North and South
Margarita Elementary Schools
for the past few years. r t
Miss Moomeww ill remain on
the Isthmus until the end of
the present sshool year In June
1959.
Miss Reilly was born in New
York City and has been with
the Canal Zone Health Bureau
stale 1939. She was assigned to
Colon Hospital as a nurse
shortly after her arrivad on the
Isthmus and remained on the
Atlantic side during all the
years of her service. When the
US, Britain, Four
Others Agree
On Pound, Yard
LONDON UPI) Britain, the
United States, ind four other coun countries
tries countries agreed today that a yard is
one yard long and a pound weighs
one pound. p.
A formal international agree agreement
ment agreement announced the adoption Of
an "international yard" and ari
"international pound" by stand standard
ard standard Vvaus in Britain, the U.S.,
Canada, New Zealand, South Afri Africa
ca Africa and Australia.,
According to the agreed defini definition,
tion, definition, an international yard equals
0.9l44 meters exactly the am
a a Canadian yard, but falling
just between the British and
American lengths for a yard.
The pound, also falling between
British and American standards,
is put at 0.45359237 kilograms.
All non-me tri c calibration
made in the labora'ories of the
countries, concerned will use. tha
new International units after
July 1.
Reyenue Agents
To Civedvice
On Income Tax
Dnrintf the earlv Dart of
this
year representatives of the U. &
Internal Revenue Service will be
in Panama and the.,Canal Zone to
advise and' assist in tha prepara preparations
tions preparations of income tax return.

hospital facilities were consoli consolidated
dated consolidated at Coco Solo in 1937 shei
mas made staff nurse at Coco
Solo Hospital
After he rretirement Miss
Reilly will return to New
York and make htfr home in
the Bronx.
Robinson Is a native of Guide
Rock, Neb. He joined the Canal
organization in 1941 as a black blacksmith
smith blacksmith with the former Mecha Mechanical
nical Mechanical Division and, with the
exception of a one-ysar break
In his service, has remained
with the same unit during the
16 years of service. Since 1935
he has been foreman of the In Industrial
dustrial Industrial Division Force Shop in
Cristobal.
Slowcik was born In nagara
Falls,. NX, and had the longest
Canal service of any of tjle em employes
ployes employes who retired in Jaecem
ber. He was emtloyftd as a ma machinist
chinist machinist in the Mechanical Di Division
vision Division in 1928 and has had con continuous
tinuous continuous service in the same u-

Weather Or Not
This weather report for th. 24
hours ending 8 a. m. today I
nrenarefl hv the Meteoroloi'inal
nd Hydrnranhlc Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Crlstoba'
TEMPERATURE :
High ........
- Low .
HUMIDITY:
High
Low
92
70
85
74
96
49
95
68
WIND:
(max- mnh) N-13
NE-?
T
RAIN (inches) 0
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 80
81
BALBOA TIDES
SATURDAY, JAN. 3
High
9:39 a.m.
10:14 p.m.
Low
3:44 a.m.
4:07 p.m.
THE BIG CASTLo

TODAY

v1j

A ifflto mk oft i J

WILLIAM.
IMRS THE
, mooucnoH

CZ MedicaKTariff Revised;
All Ward Room Rates Upped

A general revision of the Health
Bureau medical tariff has beea aa aa-nounced
nounced aa-nounced to become effective Teb.
1 which will' increase charge ii?
practicafly all .categories, of hospi tal
and' medical' servicesi
The new ,ratey constitute Kvthei
first general upward revision of
the medical charges since the,
rates under the present system be became
came became effective jn 1953, Rates were
adjusted in Jtu- W56 when some
charges were reduced, some in increased
creased increased slightly,-and other altera alterations
tions alterations were made in the tariff
structure,
The new rates have been set to
reflect all equitable adjustment In
increased cost of providing health
services, particularly the recent
increase in salaries. Other Increas
ed costs during the past five-year
period have included those for
medical supplies and improved
technical services.
Medical tariffs for company company-government
government company-government employes art es established
tablished established en a slid no scale In di direct
rect direct relation to salaries. Under
'.the existing schedule employe,
are divided into six salary
groups, I though VI. An additio additional
nal additional group, No. VII, will be ad added
ded added under the new schedule,
covering employes with salar salar-ies
ies salar-ies abve $ 13,854.
The charges for visits to both
general and speciality clinics will
be increased 25 cents a visit for
nit for the past 30 years. He
was promoted to Master Ma
chinist in 1944. He was tran transferred
sferred transferred to Cristobal when the
Industrial Division was moved
in 1950, and has been Chief
Foreman Machinist since 1935.
After his retirement, Mr.
and Mrs. Slowick will make
their home in Panama.
Yarbray, a native of Atlanta,
Ga., has been with the Pan
ama canal Laundry since he
was first employed in 1940. He
has been manager of the Ancon
Laundry since 1946 and has
held the title of Laundry and
Dry Cleaning Plant Superin
tendent since 1951.
Mr; and Mrs. Yarbray nlan
to make their future home in
Miami.
Teachers Chapters
Organized On Both
Sides Of Isthmus
Two chapters for teachers were
recen Iy established under the
banner of Local 900, AFSCME.
APL-CIO, one on either side of the
Isthmus.
ine racinc region chapter is
headed by Byron Lee, and Atlant Atlantic
ic Atlantic region chapter chairman is
Arthur Mange.
One of the first acts of the
newly-formed chapters was the
naming of committees to set their
operations in motion.
Foremost among other issues of
interest to the teachers is their
status under the single wage scale,
and this is being pursued through
proper channels, by the local.
In memorandums to the chair chairman
man chairman of Local 900, the teachers re requested
quested requested that the union take im
mediate action to find out what
p-ovisions have been made for
them under this new pay plan.
Other officers of the teachers
chaoters are:
Atlantic region S. Mange, P.
Henry, E. tait, S. S k e e t e, S.
Joseph, H. Cockburn, S. McDonald
Pacific Region E. Wattley, P.
Kirven, F. Wynter, B. Harper, A.
Atwell, K. Josoh. It. BRyce, M.
Heywood, and B. Lee.

PRICES: .75 .40
Shows: 2:45 5:50
9:00 p.m.

THE
BIG STORY!

thb,selB' "tetgroups I though V,
Jffl- vn ?OT ST vi
The chargesXfor all specialized:
EES surgery, are e
tabhshed oti a percsniage of base
rates, these now ranging from 10
per, cent of estbmhed rates tor
groups 1 and II to 50 per cent for
group VI. w
The new rates provide no In Increase
crease Increase for groups I and II; a I
per cent increase for groups II
through VI, and rn increase of
10 per cent in the new rate group
VII employes.
Both ward and private-room:
rates w II be increased for all
wage groups. The ward rates
will be increased 25 cents a
day far groups I through 111, 50
onts for groups IV Hd V- 75
IT fwrMflr,u, -v, VJ9 for
group VII.'
The rates for private accomod accomodates
ates accomodates will be increased $1 a day in
most cases with the cost of.
KSrSfdV!",' b"ng "'
scale For -roup I the charges wiU
be changed from $30 to $32 with
$108 PtnVi,n bTlng "lsed from
thV;i$122' The only increase in
the daily charges for newborn chil-
ta whlle Jhe mother rece
Little League

Boys 14, Girls 9
The girls tied the-boys seven
to seven in the births at oS
gas Hospital during the wSk
SSSS thi midnl8ht Monday
During this same period 127 pa patients
tients patients were admitted and 133
were discharged
-arents of the girls are M
ff -Mrs. Henry L. Cantu,
?Lbr,; Mr- and Mrs. Luis
Lopez, of Panama; Mr. and Mrs
Luis Antonio Nieto, of Panamif
Mr. and Mrs. Bill H. Harris of
Rousseau; Mr. and Mrs. Georw
A. Jackman, of Rio Abajo; Mr.
and Mrs. Allan M. Workman, of
Los Rlos; an4 Mr. and Mrs. Ar Armory
mory Armory Stowe, of Balboa
Boys were born to Mr. and
Mrs. Anthony p. Blbbo, of Rous Rous-seau;
seau; Rous-seau; Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Ber Ber-eeron,
eeron, Ber-eeron, of Rousseau; Mr. and
Mrs. Louis D. Deeena. of Fort
Kobbe; Mr. and Mrs. Fermin E.
Polo, of Panam4; Mr. and Mrs.
Gerard Saltus, Jr., of Fort Kob Kobbe;
be; Kobbe; Mr. and Mrs. Alejandro
rathwaite, of Panama; 'and
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Rish Rish-chynski,
chynski, Rish-chynski, of Panama.
Meanwhile boys outnumbered
?irls seven to two in the births
nt Coco Solo Hosrjital during
the week endlne at midnip-ht
Wednefdav, according to the
hosDital renort. .During this
sa.me neriod. 61 patients were
admitted and 99 were discharg discharged.
ed. discharged. Girls were born to MSet. and
Mrs. Harold Foster, of Ft. Da Da-his
his Da-his and Mr. and Mrs. Alberto
TDosrue, of Rainbow City.
Parents of the boys are Mr.
and Mrs. Jose Valladares, of
Rainbow City; Mr. ind Mrs. Ru Ru-frence
frence Ru-frence Hemmings, of Rainbow
City; Mr. and Mrs. Mario Ceba
Dos, of Col6n: Mr. and Mrs.
A'ncoe TjpVmrmd of RofnVwi
City; Mr. and Mrs. Victor RodrI4
p:uer. of Col6n; Mr. and Mrs.
Arlstldes Lopez, of Col6n; and
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Sobers, of Co-16n.

BELLA VISTA

THE BIG PICTURE!

COUNTRY

i 1

i
4

t 'v