The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02774

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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DtlGriOS AIRES s62.7a
- IXX-KO vltK 20 men.,
ram's
UILY NEWSPAPER
CANADIAN WHISKY

SctflrdjB ?

!' ; "Let Un people hunt the truth and the country i$ $'.' Abraham Lincoln,

I'M ;

Stth TEAB-

PANAMA,' R. MONDAY, DECEMBER 19,1958

rivi cent

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10 West European Countries
Discard Currency Crutches

-tOXDON, Dee. 29 CPD Wert EnroM today' demanstrated
Its postwar economio tecorery by potting Into effect currency
reforms tnat were likened to a ca pian oem able to throw
way hUuerntches, -r'-
- The British pound terlinf and .the currencies of .10 other
West -European nations became "externally convertible." or al almost
most almost free currencies, when markets opened today. There was no
- major reaction, and the currencies remained firm with ho eirn
of panicky buying.
The currency reforms meant that foreign firms which hare
bare sums tied up in pounds sterling or other European cur currencies
rencies currencies could now use them as they see fit and exehang them
for U.S. and Canadian dollars. This was of particular importance
to the U.S. and Canada, and first reaction was thai trade should

step up enormously, f"

- Formerly foreign 1) u 1 new
firms holdings huge sums of
f ounds sterling were forced to
fade only in sterling areas or
face huge losses when they were
converted Into dollars.
-f Britain hopes for full convert convertibility
ibility convertibility duringr 1959 freeing
the use of pounds sterling, for
British purchases abroad..--,;
'
In tondon, th pound ster
ling got off to a i shaky tarf
on the first day of iney
freedom in 80 years, but there
was na panicky rush to buy
gold or sen out paper curren currencies.
cies. currencies. Toreign exchange dealers
said the pound was1 putting
n a firm front to-the world..

In Paris; where the fran(j.un

aerwent lts sevenin poswijr
valuation, prices : o gold nd
gold coins rose expected.
But there: wasaio VxAt buy buy-fag
fag buy-fag of goMtfori hoarding: -tit
mattresses i nd stocBngs-tne
rrenchmtn,s traditional refuge
for Ms sayings to time erlslg.

Juchc's Ccnch
. ' A

A Panamanian defendant
turned up at' Balboa Magis Magistrate.
trate. Magistrate. Court today, Just over
lour jaontha late. '
Marnier de Jesus Delgado, 93,
cave an undertaking to a Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone Policeman toattiena
court not later than Aug. 20
this year to nswer.a charge of
'i.m-Z mw wnj-nlns flares

oTw. tSdU-hfJf -ton truck

on;Bruja.-KDaa.

' Ff thli Offense he.was ed
i4a mnA hit was also fined

atfl-for failing to attend court
within the specified time. On

a further enarge -oi nut.
rristra,tlon nlate cor

rectly illuminated, he was fined

mnouier t
. --v.-

'John Thomas Collins, 28, t!&.

'Mrs Force, was linea io ,ioi

driTlng without a license,

. xHvm riavs In jail and a fine

6t $15 wasT Imposed on Narclso
Balis; (2, Nlcaraguan, who, on
t-h dav after Christmas, was

4-nA riranlr In the -Canal Zone

Salas 'has had one intoxication
conviction per year since 1955,

but this- vear. ha has two a-

galnst nis name.

Harry Earl Walters, 88, Pan Panamanian,
amanian, Panamanian, was put on probation
for. a vear for trespassing- on

that Red. Tank Dumo. Mean

while his sentence has been

suspended.
Bllaa Monteza. 23. Panama

Man taxi driver, was 'fined $10

for having no canai zone u u-tense
tense u-tense and $5 por not display displaying
ing displaying a windshield sticker.
3 Driven Booked
For DruhV Driving V
In bnallbno f-:

i' Three drivers were bookei by

Canal Zone Police over me canst canst-mii
mii canst-mii fMiriiHl for drunken driving.

Otr.il Georee Wilmot 43, Jamai

can was 'caught on Gaillard High-;

way at 4:55 p.m. on uirutmas
Day. This morning Judge John E.
Deming. fiaed- him tho regulation

$100. :
i Attusitionf of excesatvw Christ Christ-maiHpirit
maiHpirit Christ-maiHpirit alio brought an Ameri American
can American woman, Meldrena V Mitchell,
to' eourti She was charged- with
drunk driving at 5:05 p.m. on
Christmas Day on firuja Boad,
Fort Kobbe, but her case was con continued
tinued continued until Wednesday.
.' Also continued until Wednesday

was a similar charge against Vin

cent Christopher -McFarlane, 54,

Jamaican, who was caught: on

Gaillard Highway. -;.V--

In Washington. U A officials

predicted that, the currency re
forms ordered by Western Eu

ropean nations t win stimulate

American trade abroad and

strengthen the economy of Eu
rone.

The 1 teflon taken, iff Britain
and 10 other European nations
in easing monetary restrictions
was praised bv the Internation

al Monetary Fund, the State De
partment and members of Con

gress.
One source explained that
the move will allow buyers to
acquire dollars to pay for U.S.
goods without paying a dis discount
count discount previously required for
. converting foreign currencies
Into dollars.'
: This source' described the- ac

tion as a major forward step to-

wara rreer worm traae ana pre predicted
dicted predicted that other restrictions on
trade will be eased within the

pew year,
1959 7ilf Be Year

Of Unaasy Recovery

TXEVT "YORK (UPD Fifteen

top economists agreed yesterday
1959, will be a year of ."uneasy
recovery"; with the gross national

product rising to, a mw high of

perhaps around 470 billion dol

lars" but with inflation psychology
gaining further support,
Sumarizing their opinions at
the National Industrial Conference

Board a latest meeting of the econ

omic forum, : conference .; board

chief economist Martin It. Gains-

brugh' taid "no one is s highly

enthusiastic about a genuinely

highly prosperous year."
Instead, he added, "it Is a year

perhaps shot -full' of problems- in

sector after sector, we aireaay
begin to see sighs ,n some ln-

stances or retardation."

Echoing this sentiment was Mal

colm P. McN air, retailing profes-

recovery rate Thus far 'is not like-

sor' at Harvard, "who saw tne

ly to be maintained," He added

that "there are signs at the pres present
ent present time of more or less flattening

out."

Ira T. Elis. economist of E. I.

Du Pont de Nemours i Co.. said

1959 'will be a pretty good year

in textiles, partly because, rising

output or durables also requires
a substantial volume of textiles.

Georee P Hitching. Ford Mo

tor Co. economist, said it is still

too early to predict fun return

to the 6 million "normal" car

Market to 1959. But "I would not

rule out the .possibility, of a full

return m autos it the economy

generally shows- good progress

Bradford B. v with. ecinomit

for U.S. .Steel Corp.. said "I

antlctoate- that steel production

for 1959 as a whole will be nearer

-105 million tor 110 million tons
than the 85 million tons of this

ear."

Louis J. Paradise, assistant ai

rector chief statistician of the

Commerce Department s Office in

Business Ecoiomics, said

would seem to be. that a reasona reasonable
ble reasonable estimate-of the ihanee in in inventory
ventory inventory might be plus 3 billion dot.
lars for the next year, as com
pared with a minus 6 billion dol

lars this year. Most of 'the accu

mulation-(would take) place in

the first half.-

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PRIZES for the best Christmas decorations blithe wards and clinics at dorfcas Hospital were given- after members of a spe special
cial special committee selected the most outstanding displays. Nurses 'representing the- winning wards are shown with members of
the committtee. From-left to right are Mrs.-, Gorge Wales, wife of thoCoramandant of the 15th Naval District: Mrs. Tru Truman
man Truman H. Landon; wife of the commander of the Caribbean "'Air; CommandMrs. W, E. Potter wife of the governor of the Canal
ZoneMiss' Marie Brauerv leader of ward 13 which won third, iprizef Mrs, Laurel L. Hayes, leader of Ward 23, winner of first
priae; Mrs.- Ora' Edwards, leader of iWard 28, 'winner of the second prize;... Mrs Charles L. Dasher, wife of tha- commanding
general of vtha -DJSU" Army Caribbean: and Mrs,: JuU4n Hairm ton, wife of the United jLf.ates Ambassador to Panama. v

Costlnslr fJewspapcr Strife ; Endfi As Deliverers; Sinn;

U uays mie vui u,uuu vurKers aye5 Mimun

NEW .YORK. DecMMUPI)--

The giant presses of nine mar

Jor New Yoric city oauies, swuuu

20 days by the costwesi.. sinxe
in newspaper history, -rolled
once more, todayaending forth

sorely-missed p-pers ior. a

news-famished puouc

Newspapers began nuung ine

streets this morning a lew
hours after, the JMall and De Deliverers
liverers Deliverers union last might voted
2,091 to 537 to acept a. new two-

vMp r ftontrarc

.The: reading, public,, which
nnrmallv devours 5:500.000 week

day newspapers, and 8,wj,ouu

on Sundays, eageny snappea up

the papers as-tney reacnea me

news stands. On' all.sides-there

were expressions of relief tnat

the frustrating news Diacxout

was over.- - t '..'

The two morning tabloids
came out with jubilant head'
lines across their front pages.
"We're off and running a-

gain ".the New York Pally News

announced. 1 -

And the New' York Mirror

bannered: "Hello Again!" i

The -prolonged strike had not

onlv gotten on people's nerves

but had dealt, a hard blow to
the city's1 economy. It cost the
publishing business an estimat estimated
ed estimated 25 million dollars in adver advertising
tising advertising and circulation- revenue

and additional rmiions oi col collars
lars collars in .losses to department

stores, specialty shbps, theaters,

movies and other concerns:-r5

Also, about 15,000 newspa-,
per workers editorial em employes,
ployes, employes, printers, pressmen
and others were Idled
without pay for almost three
weeks, losing more than four,
million, dollars In Christmas Christmastime
time Christmastime wages.
The highlights of the, nego

tiations:

1. The union originally .de

manded a-, $10 weekly package,

consisting. of $9 in wages. and

tl in, fringe y benefits i over,;

two-year -period.

, The.i deliverers wanted four

weeks vacation instead of three:

a 35-hour work" week to- replace

the 40-hour week for day work

ers and V7 hour' week for night
workers: and demanded a re

duction of the weight of. bun

dles from 53 pounds So 40.

Thev also demanded 12 -holi

days- during the year instead

of. -eight,' and asked sick, leave
and an . additional leave when

relatives die. j 1

2.,, The publishers rejected

the union's proposals -.and. of offered
fered offered a (7 package -a $4 a

week raise the first year and

$3 more- the second year. They
offered fcv reduction in the1 bun-

dle-slzeifrom 53 pounds to 50,
and three days off witii pay
when An Immediate relative
died.

The -union rejected this' offer
by a vote of 877 to 772, and,? on
a r second occasion, turned it

Jan. 3 Deadline

For Atlantic Side

Schcol llsine Voles
Cristobal High, School stu students
dents students have 'taken a lead in the
weighty problem of what their

new school in coco soio snau
be called.

- A noil was taKen recently a-

monir the students. A majority

of 280, was for ertaining the old
name fif Cristobal HighfichoOl.
Next Was-.Carlbbean High School

witn 1B3 votes. Tnen me -yo-co
Solo. High School with 3d; i

. Amono- the- "also rans were:

Stevens High School, Atlantic,
Gamarco (representing the first

syllables of Gatun Margarita ana
Coco Solo). Roosevelt, Aspin-

wftll.-Gold Coast and Columbus.

,Coc Solo Civic councu nas
organized a poll of public opin opinion
ion opinion to' take in all the commu

nities of the Atlantic side. To To-buted
buted To-buted to all apartments and

day ballot forms were distrl-

houses in coco boio, rTncc
Field and Margarita. Gatun will
be covered tomorrow.
-Ballot boxes will also be set
up' In the service centers and
left tftere until Jan. 3. K
Voters will vote on the names
suggested by the students and
will also have the opportunity
to add fresh names if they can
think of any.

A,"

down-without" submitting it to
a' formal vote. j
3.- The' final settlement: The
publishers held jff irm on their
$7 package but agreed to redis redistribute
tribute redistribute the package so the men
will receive a 13.55 a week raise

the first year, and $1.75 a week.

more the second.' year, maxing
a wage Increase, of $5.30 over
the two-year, period, .
' lit addition, the publishers:
'granted 'other changes. They
cut the" bundles from ,53
pounds to 50; agreed to give!

a mntn ; noiiaay moiumous
Day) beginning the first year;
Of the-'contract. They grant-,
ed a maximum of three days
sick leave, and three days
leave, when relatives die
The publishers also agreed to

extend the territorial jurisdic jurisdiction,
tion, jurisdiction, of the union beyond the
orespnt 50-mile radius from

New York so the Jurisdiction,

would extend into various com

munities in New; Jerseyi almost

tnf the 'Pennsylvania line.

- Newspapers ; involved', in t the

strike' were the Tlmes,k Herald i

Tribune. News, Mirror, Journa

American. World-Telegram 'and

Sun,' Post, Long -Island Press
and Long' Island Star-Journal..
t jfcj.mr i Kit r
TfiatMjschivbus.
Mister. 5moll:
Shows0p Again

; Joscelyn Alfred SmalL 20,

Panamanian, faced Judge John

E. Demlng at Balboa Magis Magistrates
trates Magistrates Court for the third time
this month .when he .appeared

today1 charged with vagrancy
on. Portobello Street, Ancon. He

was sentenced to 30 days In
JUL. v

He started tne season on by

loitering on Dec, 1, and was

nnea iio. c men recently ne

served 10 days jail' for" mallei:

ous mischief whenhe broke a
light globe with a' brick. Now
he ends the month the same
way vh started it in trouble

and -furthermore. In 1ail.

. Small has been known to the
court previously .as Joscelyn

Toppm.

Russian Subs Sold,

forTstlworheads
;LONDON..t)ee. 39 TTPT- Th

tondon Daily Herald said today

aiiea warsmps nave. been alerted
to look out for Russian submarines

"operating secretly in wateri
where the western powers, test

Lthe.r guided missiles."

The newspaper said the task of

the submarines is to -recover

from .the sea the test warheads

of the latest allied guided missil missiles",
es", missiles", ao Soviet scientists can "find

out the secrets of the West's atom

ic guided missiles."

Erfiestito Potter
Are Scheduled
'
To Speak, Dig
The official start of actual construction of the Man.

level bridge across the Canal at Balboa will take place at

1 1 u tiwc Tomorrow morning wnen President trnesto de
la Guardia Jr- and Gov. W. E. Potter lift the first spades spades-ful
ful spades-ful of earth for the west approach.
. Silvered spades are to be used in the public cere ceremony.
mony. ceremony. The contract for construction of the west approach
which will cut across the north face of Farfan Hill has
been awarded to L"R. Sommer, Panama" 'contractor, whp
has been engaged for the past several days In clearing tht
right-of-way preparatory to beginning of actual construc construction.
tion. construction. Arranqements for the formal ceremony to. inaugu inaugurate
rate inaugurate the $20-million project, a United States commitment
in the 1955 Treaty, have all been comof-ted. The cere-;
mony will take place at the junction.of Farfan Road ana
Thatcher Highway. ,,'"'
The general public has been invited to attend.

Only ; a "i brief-program has
been arranged.
Both (the. President an4 CoV CoV-ernor
ernor CoV-ernor will speak bnePy f.om a
speolalf stand erected at the
site. Their speeches vill be fol fol-lpwed
lpwed fol-lpwed I9y ,toe rf-re--'- ii ti"
ln5."fvii.f!tj,t-;pov. f
Ther-e ys ample par.Jg
the site for those who attend.
Members of '"the 'President's
cabinet and other distinguish distinguished
ed distinguished guests 'froth Panama vlll at attend,
tend, attend, as well. as Company-Oov-ertnncct
directors, members of
the Governor's 3taff and repre representatives
sentatives representatives of the Engineering
and Construction Bureau who
arc pn?a(?ed in bridge construe-1
tion plans.
President de la 1 Guardia
and his party will cross the
Canal bv Thatcher Ferry on

the ferryboat leaving the east

Uncle Sam Gets RicKerV Owns As Much' As; He Owes

WASHINGTON' fDPI) Uncle
Sam is geting richer all 'the
time.' At latest count, a House
committee reported today he own owned'
ed' owned' almost -as much as ne owed.
If the recently-acquired Hope
diamond la included and a realis realistic
tic realistic price Is put on such things as
the White House grounds, still
carried at $1,000 because that's
the original cost,, the balance
sheet might- even come outs In
'th .Maeki" '' -?w.:.?i'Jr w

' ? The House Committee on v-i0oy

ernment -operationr, saia it ,'pre ,'pre-nared
nared ,'pre-nared : ;flm-,.- mventory.i for 4 he

fourth straight year, as i sort of
iri-'i. v-1.. f.''":,';-''.!:..t',''.;:'-:1'-

report to the stockholders. On June 30,' 1956, tha figure was
The report showed that as of 235 billion,, and one year before
last Jun, e 30 federal agencies that, 208 billion,
owned land, buildings, and other Although much "of the Increase

things, all' over' the world, ; worth represented -steadily rising assets,

262 btfuon dollar; Onvth same a commmee spokesman saia ear
day the national debt stood at other factor was -that government
about 276 billion dollars. I sgeneies keep turning up property
(That 262 billion dollars comes they didn't know they had.
to about $1,493 for each man, One abashed department head
wotnaBV iand child, in- the country, was, said to have confesed. Just
The. Census Bureau Saturday said after a previous report went I to
that, the U.S. population- surpassed presr that his agency had found
llSMfiM, id 1958.) -?:k4' an etra' one million 'acres ',- of
fin June 30, 195f j: the govern- land. "Well," he was told,". Just
ment owned.--real and v'oersonal renort it next time." r

orobetbr worth 250 billion dollars, h Such an oversight ll easier to

understand when It is realized
that-the government, at the time

of the latest inventory, owned 770

million-acres of land throughout

the world. That is equal to all
the area east of the Miasissipi
plus Arizona, California, and Ore

gon.
i Government-owned land in the
continental United ; States totalled
406 million acres, some of It in
every state.
tr Overall, the governmerit's 26? 26?-hillion
hillion 26?-hillion dollar holdings were bro broken
ken broken down by the committee st 67
billion dollars in real estate and
195 billon -in personal property
-'.-.', .-. ; .,

1 lJT' -4pt h' I
I A!

A "Mt- I -i ft ft X

fciin mfi- ii1,iftiiiiiiiwn

side at It Vetoc.. Tha trip
will be reserved for his nat

and- those with the Governor
M wtl r Laving, the west"
,a'" !" y afpr-the

, J 1.. ,f
fcJiftMCS Of li.i ct t i ti-

Zone .sinq toe "Canal as conv
pleted nearly 45 years aao.

Other individual projects W
Its masniturtev include the
btilldtn? of Mstn Dam, the
Third Locks work.v and

ous .lobs for protectln K'rV'
Canal which were comnet"t
Just before he outbreak of
World War n.
The sisiaing of the contract
with L. R. Sommer marked Ne
oe?innlna! of the constru-- a
period which will reauire t
years before the' first traf traffic
fic traffic will pass over the bridge.
Another ma.1or contract cov covering
ering covering the construction ; of the
longer and more exoensive- east
side apDroach is soon to- be
awarded.

tl-.,' .... ... ,1 i ',:: t,Mr

THESE' DIDN'T GET AWAYMahy tall tales are told about the

"big one that got away." but CWO wumer J. RODinson, inspec inspection
tion inspection Coordinator- at Headquarters, Caribbean- Air Command. Al Al-brookhasigot'the
brookhasigot'the Al-brookhasigot'the proof of his fishing stories. 'These Tarpon
weighed In at a hefty 54 pounds (left and 43 Vt wounds and
wpr tnken with a class rod on SDlnnins: tackle with 15 pound

test monofilament line. Robinson, a veteran ftf 37 years flshina;.
fouRht' these, two for an hour and a half each before brlnelnir
them 'home: tired but content. Both are taken the same after

noon out-orthe' same "hole" in tne Chrres Kiver
ijj .:t ,x (Official USAT Photo'k

To Seek Reversal
Of Passpolrl Riilftg i

W A S H I N GTfW. rieft 29

(UPI)-TfieAmerlcah rivti r.m

erties Union nlanned todav t

Bis roe um. court of Appeals to
reverse a decision that the State
Department cani withhold a

passport under its cowers to

conduct foreign relations.

me appellate court approved
lower court's 'decision in ihm

case of William Worthy, report-

er for the Baltimore (Md.) Afro Afro-American.
American. Afro-American. .Worthy had defied a
State Denartment ban against

travel In Hed China.
The lower court unhelrf thm

ffovernment's contention that
the DeDartment,,ln refusing to

renew worxnys passoort, was
properly exercising the execu executive
tive executive branch's power to conduct
foreign policy.
The A CLU contended in- Jt

brief that "in realltv. travel

control ia. thouaht control." rt
said the restriction violated the J
First Amendment guarantee of .

freedom of the Pres. and alas

the "unenumrated rithtS. pro-
tected, by the Ninth Amend- 1
ment r ...

Worthy visited CommunM

Huneary ami china durinr tth
winter of 195B-57 in violation of

a state Department ban '.'" On
travel by Americans In these
countries. Since then, the. De Department
partment Department has relaxed the ban
and granted permission to a
number of newsmen to visit

China. Bat so far, only one re reporter
porter reporter has- received permission

from Red China to enter, the
country.
The ACUT said the Depart

ment ruled last summer that
Worthy's pasport would, net be
renewed unless he promised, to ...

abide by travel restrictions.
The Department said travel to

barred countries was "prejuui-

rial to the orderly conduct r or
foreign relations and th interr".
ests of. the United SuW';;t.

'.I
V

j! '4

l'i-'



THE fAKAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB

t
tile

THEPPANAMA AMERICAN

OwfllO AND UllHtD Y THB PANAMA AMl-ICA "Ul. tNC
v rouNDto NfLMN weuNSKvcLir in -aaa (' ; f
HARMOOtO ARIAS. EOltoHv f : !'
IS ST H ITDIIT l. O BOK IS4.. PAMA -R. OT.. M-
TtltPHONC 1-0740 9 tints'
CABUl ADDKCS PANAMCRICAN. PANAMA
COt ON OTHCI. 1 I7B CCNTRAL AVfNUI BETWEEN 1 2TH AND 1STH STREtT

rORFIttN REPKISfNTATIVtS JOSHUA B POWSIH. IWfc p ; ;
S49 MADISON. AVI.. NtW YORK 17R., Yv, (

lorn M"ll

t Month m 'nulur' 70
p S MONTH IN 9 p0

t a 90
11 00
4 00-

t"THI$ IS YOUR FORUM THI READERS OWN COLUMN

i TK Mail Bo fcj an open forum lor rtideri of Tilt Panama AmerUa-i
J letter art received grareriill, and ara handled In a jr holly eenriderrtial
LaMtr. -' "ft'';. '.
. If m coNtrjfce a fertir don'f fct imoati" ", TRW,
f aat LcnatOw ewMJrheA in tha order received SfcSr
J Mean try to 1c tea the letreM limited ro one pr leeHi.v '''
V Menfit? of letter wriler. Is held in ft-letesl tonlMonre.
J Thh newoaper iuumi no responsibility for statements or opinions
1 oxpi'ed in letters from readers.

-THE MAIL4PQ3-

RACETRACK CHANGES
Sir:
! I have noticed that the management ;of the President Re Re-fmon
fmon Re-fmon racetrack is instituting quite a number, of innovations for
Ithe coming year, most significant is the selling of tickets at the
ff&m&IOiUt management could
also do for the new year: -orQm
1. Close the pool at the time announced on the program,
inot ten minutes before as is the case when the races are speed speed-led
led speed-led up in order to get in 12 before it too darhJL$ nH
Iwante to make a bet on the second double he shouldn t find
ithe pool closing down before he gets to. the window if he arrives
,'at the track at 3:30 pm, because the; program clearly states
;'pool closes at 3:40 pm." When the first race of the second
double is run at 3:30 instead of 3:40, every other race is run
ten minutes earlier than the time appearing on the program.
2. Check the clock which tells the time on the tote board
iwith some reliable source like the Navy or the Bureau of Stand Standards,
ards, Standards, because it is usually at least two minutes fast. Not much,
lyou might say, but It could be the margin between winning and
losing out on a "hot tip" by not being able to get a ticket in
Another thing, since the ninth and 1.1th races are now "one "one-two"
two" "one-two" races, why not keep the third as a one-two race also.

PANAMA'S POSTAL DELAYS 1
i
' i
Sir:
Over the years 1 have been inconvenienced by the inefficien inefficiency
cy inefficiency 'of the Republic of Panama's postal system, but never have I
ever been so burned up because of the situation as I was over
the repfckndup my mill at Estafeta Institute located at the
corner of Ancon Avenue and "H" Street;
! A son of jnine, who Is a student "Irf Mexico, mailed me a
iverv important letter from Monterrey, Mexico, Dec. 22 and it
arrived in Panama Dec. 24, according to the postal markings
on ..tne haSpected this letter from early in the week so
made trips to the post office several times a day from tat week
Weanesday. u unU1 yesterday. Wny? Because the let
ter, was sent to the Estafeta Justo Arosemena and took four
days to finally get to the Estafeta Institute.
W The explanation for this Is probably the fact that the em employes
ployes employes responsible for the goof were still reeling from the ef effects
fects effects of Christmas celebrations.
Yes. they-celebrated, but my boy's mother,, brother, and sis sister
ter sister and I were a sad lot during the Xmas season because we
had not heard a word from the boy. -:.. mA
The sloppiness of the local postal setup never came home
more to us that It did then. ;,, f ,,
feir:- ' -:)

It would seem that M. Everardo Duque and other Colon
businessmen who began howling at the suggestion Toctoien be
' made a free port for tourist gcods f ailed to get a rounded pic picture
ture picture of what has been suggested.
They complain that permitting tourists to buy duty-free
tftoods at the airport would "ruin" the Colon Free Zone and
l-i ik. MhaklHtaHnn nmnlnn

I Now I do not know what plans the Free zone or other Colon
'neoplH have for enticing In-transit tourists across 50 miles of
'isthmuE while on a quick run to South America. But whatever
' It is, it won't work. If a tourist has some time to spend in Pan Panama
ama Panama he will plan to do so. He will book In at a hotel for at
! least i day, probably two or three. He will take time to see the
i Panama Canal, and do some sightseeing in the Republic, ln ln-Icludinir
Icludinir ln-Icludinir perhaps a shopping trip to Colon. The Gold Coast Is
f quits right to ry to draw tourists to Colon If-the visitors have
time on the Isthmus to make the trip.
, But the tourists who are now overflying Panama will not
'Interrupt their trip to drive 50 miles overland Just to shop In
"'Colon.
' What Panagra Is trying to impress upon the whole Pana Pana-!
! Pana-! ma business community is that thousands of tourists are over overflying
flying overflying Panama every night who might be booked through here
'if;t,iey knew they had the sarne good bargain buys in tourist
i goods at Tocumen that such air travelers can now get In some
! other "Airport Freeports" round the world. Cltleis that are
l creaming off oh this ln-and-out tourist" business i include i Shah Shah-non,
non, Shah-non, Ireland; Amsterdam and Hong Kong, and nearer at hand,
"Curacao.
Unless Panama picks up tne idea, some other South or Cen Central
tral Central American capital is fure t( do so. And the consequent air airline
line airline promotion for a "bargain spot to stop and buy" will go to
another airport. .. .-.
The duty-free liquor at Tocumen must be pretty profitable.
But the only other goods for sale out there now is not such as
to draw any trade just the usual newsstand stuffy
? This duty-free buying at an airport often attracts money
tKat would not otherwise be .'pent. For example: When I flew
tc the States last year, I planned to pick up at Tocumen the
gallon of spirits I could take in duty free. But something came
utl that took all the time until the plane was called. I then
thought rd pick up the liquor in CentraT America. But I
couldn't. Except for Belize, British Honduras, there isn't an an-;
; an-; other f re port airport in the area. So I never bought the liquor
at all -"
How the selling of linens, Jewelry and such at Tocumen Is
i going to ruin the drug and other business of the Free Zone I
'cannot soe.
It would seem the Panamanians better put another eye on
the thousands of tourists already overflying" Tocumen every
month. Some of them could be brought down there, with prop prop-;er
;er prop-;er oait.
Boosting American

OKCHIDS FOB COMMISSARY

Sir:

Walter Winchell
In New York
BROADWAY NIGHTMARES
Performers are constantly beset
by minor tortures. The anxiety a a-bout
bout a-bout securing a Tole, the tensions
induced by critics, the fear of be being
ing being involved in a flop. Another oc occupational
cupational occupational nightmare, however,
exceeds the horrifying aspects of
the foreeoing. They lare certain

CTemlin-like incidents...For exam

Je, when Helen; Hayes onginauy
starred in Barrle's, ?'What Evcrv

Woman Knows." her.leadi"? mar.
was Kenneth MacKennS. On his

fir?t entrance, he cflmffd ihrou?h
window ino $ darkened room.
He lit match and applied it to
eas fivture on stase risht. The

li?ht Ipnited on stage left.. .About

three decade later, wacnenni

ws in tne nrst-mem audience
when Mis Hayes tarred in a re revival
vival revival of the show with Kent Smith.
fimi'h mail li! entrance, ao-

olied his match- to the ctae riffht
fixture. The light glowed on ae
right. The light-Ignited on stnse

left.. .About tnre.oernnp? mer.
MaeKenna was in th first reht
iiani wtiMi VUt Haves star

red in a riviyat of the show with

Kent Sjmuhri;. ; ; ;
Smith made hii-entr' nee,, ao ao-olied
olied ao-olied his raatrh to the t?e rieht
fixture. Thellsht glowed on stage
left viy.r1';-' ..- :'
In'time--il-crf' wi Haves' al alertness
ertness alertness is on a pr with her r r-tistry.
tistry. r-tistry. When'-she starred in "Ma "Mary
ry "Mary of Scotland,!' one the sup supporting
porting supporting -player s'v sctuallv fainted
on stage. Thretwas nudHen nan nan-ic
ic nan-ic backstige,;'The star, howler,
was equal tiHyte moment. Wi'h
barelv a pausrand rninl in
character r she ad-libbed "It 's
iust one of my women. m'Lord
She is subject to these spells.
Hp'o her to my thambpr."
Tl.ey Play continued with none
out front wise .that anything un unusual
usual unusual had occurred.
Another who" icm'eA a
iet-fleet mind in a sl""r inci incident
dent incident is Ethel Merman. whi she

nlnyed the shuroshno'in dMl in
"Annie Get Your, Gn.' one epi-

ode had the str firin? a r'tle in
;he air and a bird w jmnoosed

to fall on the tage. rrin one
"erformance, ohe (1nted the ri rifle,
fle, rifle, pressed the Hffr nd no no-thing
thing no-thing haooened. She tried sain
and discovered that th trier
was jammed. As she lowered the

gtin (h bird sudrieniv prnnie".
Mi Merman was imnerturbed.

LRhe picked io the bird and ex

claimed: "What do you know?
Apoplexy!"

Probably the" most fritenjng

pxDenence for a performer con consists
sists consists of drawing a blnk- forget forgetting
ting forgetting your lines on,stage. The ter terror
ror terror it rpnresents was once detail

ed Vljvl Edward G. RoKlnson: "I
itapr'oiisediil'm tati the tworno-

ter wm civwg me lines, hut I was

LtQo terrified, to hear. I thought of

saying to the audience: 'Ladies
nd gentlemen, please excuse me
for a few moments,' of havin? the
curtain rung down. But then I- got
hold of myself."
Staee-friehlmare has tfc drn.

est eonseoiiP'iees. I" addlMnn to

eart palpitations and r"'rtens'on

it has a nnra'vzing W"t on the
enses. Grioped hv the dread m-tadi-,
some performers cannot

think, see. hear nr cr.e-t...Tn a
drama starring Elis'bpfh Prgn Prgn-er,
er, Prgn-er, she was sunoosed to emit an
a?onizin srrpam at roncln roncln-ion
ion roncln-ion of f1 initial act. TWortnnate
ly, the jittrs hd ti"Venpd her
vocal muscles. When it vs tim

to scream he c""l',"'t. "re cur curtain
tain curtain descended with M'ss Ttergnpr

strivine vBi,,lv to m'' s"e sort

of sound. Thp fnllowin iv, re reviewers
viewers reviewers unanimously h1d hr

nerformne and wf Tppal'"

imnrped hv her portrayal of

"muted agony.; ....

Throughout the rim "Time
"etnen hered" last s""nn. Sman

trBther" w.is haunted hv t" ros--IbiHty
of a harrowin PTriee.

Tn th drama she w rnnired to

tuallv gincer ale. For some

strafe rason. so'' "on fre fre-"uentlv
"uentlv fre-"uentlv f'"e Mi s',v'""'

Mccuos. "I. wag alwavt tprrfd,

he later sid. "th T "'s goln

fo fet mismaced laugh In my
tender love scenes."
Tang-toneuelers are amo the
"ore commn terrors for Covers.
Of roursp. they aye jwrnln A A-mnsino,
mnsino, A-mnsino, that Ss. to evervody ex ex-cent,
cent, ex-cent, the vlctims.i.Ce of he c'as c'as-'cs
'cs c'as-'cs Involves Ttos "Pup", v-n
he anpeared in a rev' of "Ho "Ho-IMw"
IMw" "Ho-IMw" (iome vpr. ao. .Che nlav.
d th mavericV si'tpr -ho rphel rphel-'ed
'ed rphel-'ed at hpr stuffy fami'v. PiMng
one ep'ode she was suonosed to
come down the stairs and tiro tiro-claim:
claim: tiro-claim: "T know what vot've been
-oing. You've been talking be be-hinl
hinl be-hinl rov back."
Miss Russell moved downstairs,

A tremendous bouquet to the management of Corofcsl com commissary.
missary. commissary. They did themselves proud in providing the tradition traditional
al traditional t-lirlstmas fixin's tor holiday dinner 'tables this year:
Other commissaries may have done" is 'well," but since I
shop at Coronal it is to them that I extejuL thanka.--..
Those who have lived on the Zone for a Jong time, or those
who hav? alway lived in the States may have not been unduly
Impressed, but I have spent other Chrlstmases, overseas really
at European stations. Selections were mighty small, and espe especially
cially especially at the holiday season we were lucky to find a respectable-sized
chicken, let alonr a nice plumo turkey. Most of the
time, grocery shopping took or. an adventurous tone. Many of
the canned foods were unlabeled, and at times, the meat was
pre-packaged in plain wrapper, with a hl;t o! the contents
scratched on it.
In contrast, Corozal was prepared for grand-scale eating
this year, ir anyone went in want of the traditional holiday
delicacies it was only due to a deficiency in the billfold, not in
the store Itself. ,
For weeks ahead, rlenty of candles, fruit cakes, nuts and
pie filling were available Even on the day before Christmas,
there was a good stock of fine turkeys at extremely reasonable
prlcps. and nlenty of good-auniity hams.
M' family ate well at Christmas, thanks to the Corozal hoi hoi-id;r
id;r hoi-id;r "i,nolles, First we stuffed the bird, then we stuffed our our-felve?.
felve?. our-felve?. Even if I complain all next year abouf the bony, tough and
it in-' shall be grateful for the goodies which were avail avail-ao.e
ao.e avail-ao.e at this holiday season.
IVell-Fed Shopper

w a

"I'm "Not Intereste'd'i'n'the Wjiole'JJog ; .'.
.. ; i i l Just, Want His Head" : : :,

i ' i ii liii "" 1 i,. .mi... U ,h, v j
NA Service, Inc

faced the others and haughtily
declared: "I know what you've

been doing. You've been talking

about my behind!"

A collection of stage nightmares

must include Martha Raye's ex

perience. She actually broke an
arm on stage. And, in a way, it

was a lucky break.. .Miss Raye

was a little-known ballad singer in
a Broadway- show some time ago.
One night, Ella Logan was too 111
to aopear and Martha replaced
her in a sketch. In the skit, she
was required to walk downstairs

metending to be drunk. While per

forming the routine that made
her a comic overnight she stumb
led and tumbled all the way down.
The audience was hysterical with

glee It wasn't much fun for Mar

tha. In the fall she suffered a frac

tured arm. Ever since, she has

been fracturing audiences.

Ju'lt Harris' bubu happened
when sh had a bit role In art
Old Vie production of "Oadir
pus,' starrlnj $ir Laurence Oli
viar. Her big scene consisted of
one long moan. One night she

forgot to remove her wrist
watch before coming en stage.
After .Jhe performance, Olivier
Greeks did not have wrlirwatch wrlirwatch-reprimanded
reprimanded wrlirwatch-reprimanded Miss Harris.
In his most elegant tones, Sir
Laurence snapped: "Well, my
dear you certainly bitched th't
up."
i". .'"."
Oh, there are numerous pitfalls
for thesplans. Ralph Bellamy was
once supposed to eat a cracker in
a play. One of the fragments
caught in his throat and he al almost
most almost choked to death before he
was able to continue. Another ac actor
tor actor was requirsd to gohhle gum gum-drops
drops gum-drops during a drama. The gooey
confection glued his teeth togeth together
er together and he was unable to speok.
Cornelia Otis Skinner, who is so
delightful tn "The Pleasure of His
Company" click, recently recalled
Lilly Langt'y'3 experience In
Maugham's "The Circle." An ac actor
tor actor was s'lTposeo to tell Miss
Langtry: "Her leauty was such
that it toor Jour breath anvv.'
It icame cttt: "Her fcreathll way;

such that It i (k your beaut f a
way.'w
Ray Bolger launched his show
biz career as a comic. In his ini initial
tial initial show, a high school effort, he
had a comedy monologue After
completing ibis jollies, Bolger, re remained
mained remained rooted in the center of,
the stage. He just didn't know
how to get off. After several em embarrassing
barrassing embarrassing moments, he suddenly
decided to dance off. The applause

his brief hoofing attracted inauJ

gurated his dansationaL career.
Once upon a time there was a
band singer making hi debut' in
a theatm When he walked onto
the stage everything went blank.
He forgot his lmes forgot the
song, forgot, where he" was. When
the hand-leader inquired: "Is there
anvthing wrong?V the singer just
looked at him with glazed eyes.
The audience's, lauehter finally
joited him out of his paralysis
and he was able to sing... The
nervous, young singer is now the

enitome of, the eay-does-it style.

who Is never flustered by any
yiing...Perry ,Como. ,

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nptda.2140 lluc. Justo nrassmena DO 2545-TeL 2-1913
DAVID: Naranjo y Arosemena NTIAfeb: JulioSregll
CH ITRE: Jose Caridc LAS TABLAS S 1 lyerioVillirrcal Jri

MMM ,, .'
jfRSr IN RUDDER -FIRST IN TUDELESS J i

: WASHINGTON A recent col column
umn column in which. I stated that "there
should be no discrimination : a a-eainst
eainst a-eainst a.Catholic lor President ot

the United States has inspired a
storm of maiL.i..vv-'(feA-;':

Some of the letters are careful

ly written, from intelligent

pie. Some are not..' 5

Because uus question apparent

ly is of such import, I should like
to discuss it In one or two furtu
er columns.', ,. .'

One of the most critical letters

comes from ; Brig. Gen... Herbert

C. Holdridge, retired, of Las An.

teles. It is so vituperative that

ordinarily I would ignore it. How

ever, tne general Has reprinted

his letter and mailed it to, sever

al thousand people, who in turn

have, been sending it to my di

tors claiming that my column is

biased and pro-Catholic.

"Miuions oi .aouars worm ot

free propaganda for the forces ot

international Vaticanism!" writes

Holdridge, "For this you should
be exalted to the rank of papal

prince;- is'v' -'V : t;'!,
"You too have made your pit

grimage to Rome to kiss the

ring of ; the Pope, and in return

have received, the 'kiss of death

placed upon the forehead of Rom
an Catholic and Protestant offi

cials and civilians who bend r the
knee to the Pope. You in turn are

expected to Impart the 'kiss of

death'' td the free men of the' u
nited States who still remain.:.

Having donned the ropes of
treason, "of 'McCarthy which .fit

you so snugly, we should not be

surprised if his proteges were now

summoned to take residence at
2810 -Dumbarton- Ave., Wash.,

CALLED ANTI-CATHOLIC

,fn almost, the same mail has

come a series of editorials from

Catholic newspapers highly critic

ai of me in connection with my
understanding that the late Pooe

Plus XII. shortlv before hia death.

permitted a tolerant interpretation

ot ms earner stand on right-to

work legislation, .... ,,,v

Under a headline "Drew Pear

son Exposed," the "Wanderer,"
organ of the St. .Paul Catholic dio

cese, wrote the following lead edi

torial

"Like .the nursery-rhyme, tailors

wno weren t as honest as they

snouia oe ...tne daily newspaper
columnist Drew Pearson has for

many a moon been 'tailoring' the

news and weaving poetry with

prose as one of the leading 'pub
lie opinion' molders in this country.

One of the most artfully wov

en stones by Pearson in which

he tried to make out. inferential-

ly at least, that Pope Pius XII,
Just prior to his recent death, had
declared himself opposed to tne
right-to-work laws inthe United
States was this week exploded
for what it really was: Another
fake and phony, as only Pearson
can manufacture them.;
"Regardless whether or not one
agrees with the late Senator Jo Joseph
seph Joseph R. McCarthy who accused
Pearson of following the Commu Communist
nist Communist or fellow traveler line... Pope
Pius definitely did not declare in
favor of such a thing (opposition
to right-to-work legislation in We
United States)."
Similar news accounts and edi editorials
torials editorials aDDeared in manv nt th

chain of Catholic newspapers which

blanket the united States.
THE FACTS
What aroused this storm of Ca Ca-th'olic
th'olic Ca-th'olic criticism was my report
that Father John Cronin, writing
in -The Catholic Standard, had de denied
nied denied that the Pope's Christmas
message of 1952 bad endorsed
right-to-work legislation.
The Pope, I reported, "had en endorsed
dorsed endorsed in his Christmas message
of 1952 the principle of the right-to-work
movement for Socialist
and Communist -countries but not
for the United States-.' Father
Cronin, I further reported,, ''then
published this explanation in The
Catholic .Standard." ( v
However, I was wrong In the
date of the Cronin Interpretation.
I had been informed by a promi prominent
nent prominent Catholic layman, a close

friend of the priest's that he pub

ty DREW PEARSON1 1

fore the Pope died and after get
ting approval from the Vatican.
My article was read "back to Cro-.
un'S' friend,, who 'proaounced it
completely accurate. f f
Nonetheless it was .wrong xtn K
garding the date. For Father

peo' Cronin's : interpretation -of; the

Pope's message on rlghUo-work

appeared in -Tba CathoUc Stand

ard on Jan. 9, 1953. 7
- At that 'time, however Father
Cronin did clearly and definitely

interpret the Pope as being op

posed to right-to-work legislation
for American trade unionism.-
"The Holy Father, wrote Fath Father
er Father Cronin, '"wrote against a back background,
ground, background, of current problems.,. In
some countries," unions are heavi heavily
ly heavily affected by ideology and poll-
tics, It .would, be a jmoraLiproD-;
lem were a man forced to join a
Marxist t union in order 'to secure
work. t -t ,...
, r t v v,
"Conditions In America are-dif-ferent...For
this reason the bishops
of the United States have.;,otten
given their endorsement to our
major trade union groups .It
does not seem reasonable to as assume
sume assume that the Holy Father, in at-,
tacking current evils, t would have
in mind a custom which Ameri American
can American theologians have found moral morally
ly morally acceptable." i! I -.,
-Yet for being ; wrong onnijr
dates Catholic- newspapers .. car-:
ried lead editorials: "Drew Pear Pearson.
son. Pearson. xpOSed.'.'
" This intolerance of the ( Catholic
press toward; anyone who : makes
an unintentional 5 slip regarding
Catholic dogma is a factor, which
helps breed intolerance toward a
Catholic president.-, -i ,,-t
However, I still feel that there
must be no discrimination against
a' political candidate because of
religion, and in a future column
shall -discuss this further.
2 Cunard Ships
Sfarf Gulf Run
To United Kingdom
MOBILE, Ala., Dec, 29 (UPD (UPD-Two
Two (UPD-Two new Cunard Line freighters
will begin making monthly calls
to Gulf ports in January inaugu inaugurating
rating inaugurating new service between the
United States and London.
J. Frank Jones of Page and
Jones, Inc., Cunard's agent here,
said the Andria and the Alsatia
will load at Houston, Gslveston,
New Orleans, .Mobile and Panama
City, Fla. in addition to other
Gulf ports where cargo is offer offered.
ed. offered. ..,

V ii
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (UPI)
The Yugoslav National Assem
bly approved Thursday a 1959 fed.
eral budget calling for a $58,700.

000 increase in defense spending.

0

On Coconut Day to India.

great numbers of devout Hin-t
dus go in a parade to the near-l
est river ot the sea, where they
throw garlands of flowers and!
many coconuts into the water! I
while the priests ask Varuna,'

. vfu ui witMrs, ior mi
plentiful yield of coconuts dur-
ing the season. To these peo-j

pie 11 is an important ;dayi

oecause coconuts are an exJ

sremeiy important crop

inena 01 tne priests mat nt puo-'- v ...
lished hisj interpretation" just ,be-;, v Kncyclopedi. Britaatitea
: 'v-'i Wi:, :,, ,.,,. ,, ; ,r

' top r.nPATrcr VAttrr f

V., '1. ." li .i

V'.

THE GREATEST VALUE EVER

Offered in Panama -vjsitus.
..vou will be convinced.

rnnD

Central Ave; 9-13 Aoroii( from LA Merced Church

: Telt. ; 2-2566-2-3364 m ,m

PANAMA

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;



MOSDAT, DECEMBER 29 195V,

Tfflt PANAMA AMERICAN -. .AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEE
.PAGE THUS

.

U !-V V...

!" 4 I :

? i r' -i s V $ i l J!er

Financial 4 ExpeflsT See Further
EdsfngOfi BritisllMbney Rules

LONDON (UPIKFiniriciat ex

pert! yesterdey predicted a fur

ther jeisiBg e British monetary
restictioni in the nevr yei. With

other European nations following
Despite. Laborite opposition that

threatens a political row over the

decision Saturday tc restore "ex

ternal convertibility' to the pound

sterling, permitting foreigners to

convert pounds to dollars or oth

'hard' currency in business

deals, the experts said more steps

would be taken to smash the last
postwar monetary shackles.

Tney predicted that in comine

months, the government would al

low increased imports of dollar

goods and step up the foreign

iorisis. ..
Ten other nations in Western
Europe joined Britain Saturday in
making theid currencies external-

A -TICKLISH SITUATION Young Nonl Burnette-, perched on Santa'a knee during his visit to
th Balboa Toyland finds the bearded gentleman a real comedian. Her sister, Carol Ann, shares
the humorotis situationThe girls are the daughters of Mr. and Mrs, Eufus H. Burnette of BaU
boa. ' '" ::' ":

Justice Department Readies
New Civil Rights Laws

WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 (UPD (UPD-The
The (UPD-The Justice Department today
Sressetf toward preparatitn of a
ighly-secret' package of civil
richts .legislative proposals to be

presented to the new Congress.
Attorney General William P.
Rogers has been holding almost
daily conferences,, at the. fltepsjti
ment to work bur the form of the
administration, proposals. He also
has made a number of trips to
the White House.
But the Attorney General has
clamped a lid on any discussions
of the details. Department offi officials
cials officials aaid they did not want a pre-
motnpo. snnAimppmpnt hp f SUSP

111a ku. ......
some measures are not yet "cyrs "cyrs-talized."
talized." "cyrs-talized." The wraps will he taken off the
program by President Eisenhow Eisenhower
er Eisenhower in his State of the Union mes message
sage message to Congress, officials said.
They said 'anything that is pro proposed
posed proposed will be with the serious in intention
tention intention of having it passed by
Congress." Some persons outside
the administration have said they
do "not expect the Department to
make ( any startling new propos proposals.
als. proposals. The administration officials said
they were trying to avoid legis legislation
lation legislation which might have a popu popular
lar popular appeal such as drastic" Anti Anti-bombing
bombing Anti-bombing laws, but which would

not "legally hold water."
Both Rogers and FBI Director
J. Edgar Hoover have insisted
that local police officers are best
equipped to deal with bombing
atrocities. But strong pressure is
building up in Congress for ded ded-eral
eral ded-eral intervention in school and
synagogue bombings. t
Jusitce Department officials al also
so also have sounded out the Ameri American
can American Civil Liberties Union and the
American Jewish Congress for
their views on "hate" mail legis legislation
lation legislation which would fall into the
so-called "mass libel" law cate category..
gory.. category..
Both groups told Justice De Department
partment Department officials they would op oppose
pose oppose such legislation because it
would undermine certain basic
"personal liberties."
Administration officials have
said they would seek hew subpe subpe-na
na subpe-na powers for the Justice De Department.
partment. Department. Such powers, similar
to those held by the Internal Rev Revenue
enue Revenue Service, would give the de department
partment department easier access to records,
including voting registration rolls.
In addition, the administration
is expected to recommend that
Congress prolong the life of the
Civil Rights Commission beyond
the September, 1959, deadline.
The administration may seek to
restore the highly controversial

Frederick Pierre
Dies; Funeral Set
For Tomorrow
Funeral services will be held
at 3:30 tomorrow afternoon in
St. John Baptiste de la Salle
Church for the late Edgar K.
Pierre, who died Saturday while
being taken to the Santo Tonus
Hospital from Chilibre.
A former employe of the Pa Panama
nama Panama Canal Dredging Division
Mr. Pierre was 73 years old. He
retired about 11 years ago after
some 30 years of service,
Burial will take place in the
Purblo Nuevo' Cemetery.
A Lyiah'fe'Pierre-ris''
survived by- his, children, Robert,
Frederick, Joseph, Esther and
Sylvina,' in addition to several
grandchildren. : ,i

Evangelistic Drive

Begins January 13
Al Baplisl Church

part three that was stricken lrom
the 1957 Civil Rights Act. It would
permit the Justice Department to
seek inductions in the whole field
of civil rights ;
Also, Justice Department offi officials
cials officials have been concerned with
ways to ease the transisition to
integrated schools in hard-pressed
southern communities. A recom recommendation
mendation recommendation along this line may be
in the works.

THE REV. S. I. HAGGAI
The First Baptist Church will

conduct an evangelistic crusade

for 12 nights, beginning Tuesday,
Jan. 13, and closing Sunday, Jan.
28. The Rev. John Edmund Hag Hag-gai,
gai, Hag-gai, a 34-year-old evangelist of
Louisville, Ky., will lead the se series
ries series of meetings.
. The young evangelist, the son
of a Baptist pastor, has held pas pas-toratea
toratea pas-toratea in South Carolina, Ten Tennessee,
nessee, Tennessee, and Kentucky. Since en entering
tering entering into the evangelistic field
he has preached from Massachu Massachusetts
setts Massachusetts to Texas and California,
and from Minnesota to Florida.
Em-. has been : popular speaker
in Southern Baptist colleges and
seminary groups.
The Rev. Haggai's last pastor pastorate
ate pastorate was the ninth and 0 Baptist
Church of Louisville, where in
two and oiie-half years 1700 peo people
ple people were ; added to the church, fl flyer
yer flyer 1000; of them by conversion.

The Training Union led the state

in attendance, and over zooo at attended
tended attended the Sunday School.
Traveling to Panama for the
erusade at the First Baptist
Church with the Rev. Haggai are

are his organist ana his song

leader. Don DeVos and Bob An

derson have been in extensive e
vaneelistic work, and are distin

guished in their fields as organist
and pianist, and soloist and song

leader. Devos will lead a large
choir each night of the services.
The crusade is open to the pub-

Ik. Crib room faculties with air-

conditioning will be available each

night for infants, and nurseries
will be open for. children. The au auditorium
ditorium auditorium is also air-conditioned.

FdlLDIl AirauuoiiiiDuces l-joOOo pDeGascace

VIM! lJ U.KIKIliLS&.

tf Cuds (Sceaair AmnniiuiaaD 065
In accordance with National Lottery Drawing, December 28th.
1st Prize $1500.00 "A" Series No. 71110 AURORA TERCOS, Panama.
1st Priz $1500.00 "Bn Series No. 71110 Rl N A DE LA GUARD I A, Panama.
2nd Prize $250.00 "A" Series No. 03762 CYNTHIA OR- Diablo Heights.
2nd Prize $250.00 UBM Series No. 03762 STANTON JACKSON, Colon.
3idri2eJAM Sees;No. 24667 CHASI E E. OCDEN, Bella Vista.
3rd Prize $i00.00 (B" Series No. 24667 pSPERANZA DE FERNANDEZ,

ALS0 162 approximations of $5.00 each which will be announced soon.
All prizes will be merchandise SELECTED PEnSONALLY by winners

ELIX B. MADURO S. A.

MAIN ; STORE; 22-06 Cefltral Ave I

BRANCH STORE: 18-60 Tivoll Ave.

ty convertible. In addition, France
devalued the franc from 420 to
the dollar to 493.70 to the dollar.
By so doing, the continental na nations
tions nations geared themselves for the
opening Jan, 1 of the European
Common Market, an 18-year pro program
gram program that visualizes: an eventual
single trading area among all
Western European states. It will

open Thursday with a 10 per cent
cut in tariffs among the member
states.

Britain will not be a member,
and has opposed the common
market scheme. But the British

pound was adjusted for th hn.

efit of foreism traders on the the-

oiy; that ti e return to "sound

money" would help boom the
economy. Authorities said that

with 3 Willon dollf.rs on hand in

cold and dollars there would be
no drain on cash reserves.
The Laborite opposition, led by
Socialjst Party Leader Hugh Gait Gait-skell,
skell, Gait-skell, bitterly attacked the exter

nal convertibility program which
will go into- effect Monday morn

ing witn the opening of banks and
markets. Gaitskell denounced it as

a Vserious error.'

He t charged that the pound

sterling wou'd become "more vul

nerable to speculation, and that

the situation could become seri
ous for Britain, if "external con
ditfons move aeslnst us."

The Labor Party was expected

to opoose further currency liber liberalizations;
alizations; liberalizations; ;;fiut financial exnerts

areued that the currency adjust

ments won in serve to cause an
upturn in European trade.
Any such Increase Jn trad, they
predicted, wonld hasten the re removal
moval removal of all currency restrictions
still in force.
The European nations quickly
agreed with Britain on converti convertibility
bility convertibility for foreigners. West Ger Germany,
many, Germany, whose Deutsrh marV

firm currency, had been pressing
for such a proeram.

Initially, nine nations Prance,
West Germany, Italy, Sweden,
Norway; Denmark and the Bene Benelux
lux Benelux states loined Britain Satur

day in proclaiming external convertibility.

Switzerland announced hnnr

later that it, too, wouM do the

same. This was, in effect, a
friendly gesture. The Swiss franr

long has been the soundest, most

negotiable currency in Europe.

We shall be closed for inventory
TOMORROW TUESDAY DEC. 30, 1958

f

of he furniture 8r(Ht

4th of July Aye. AHSt

ome OJurntshinq Otore

Tel. 2-0725

8

Novel in style and material
' j L :- v V $tif

LU11

JUST ARRIVED AT
MOTTA'S
O Slacks
O Shorts
O Bermuda Shorts
O Blouses

Everybody Reads Our Classifieds

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OIPEFICENCE
ANj4A,rIlEPtrBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers In the Ordinary Drawing No. 2077,1 Sunday, December 28, 1958
The whole ticket has 52 pieces which comprises the two series "A" and "B"

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

7111
0376
2466

$ 52,000.00
$ 15,600.00
$ 7,800.00

s.
Nil
111
0211
311
Mil
Sll
Mil
711
811
Mil

Prizei
15S.M
2.6W.M
1M.06
1SS.N
1S8.0S
lse.eo
158.M
15.0
15S.MI
1U.M

No. Prizes No. Prices No. Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes No.
1111 156.00 2011 156.00 3011 156.00 4011 156.00 5011 156.00 6011 156.00 7011 156.M 8011 156.00 9011
1111 2,600.00 2111 2,600.00 3111 2,600.00 4111 2,600.00 5111 2,600.00 6111 2,600.00 7111 52,000.00 8111 2,600.00 9111
1211 156.00 2211 156.00 3211 156.00 4211 156.00 5211 156.00 6211 156.00 7211 156.00 8211 156.00 9211
1311 158.00 2311 156.0 3311 156.00 4311 156.60 5311 156.00 6311 156.00 7311 156.00 S31I 156.00 9311
1411 156.00 2411 156.00 3411 156.00 4411 156.00 5411 158.00 6411 156.00 7411 158.00 8411 156.00 4H
1511 156.00 2511 150.00 3511 156.00 4511 156.00 5111 156.00 6511 156.00 7511 156.00 8511 156.00 9511
1611 156.00 2611 156.00 3611 156.00 4611 158.00 5611 156.00 6611 156.00 7611 156.00 8611 156.00 9611
1711 156.00 2711 156.00 3711 156.00 4711 158.00 5711 156.00 6711 156.00 7711 156.00 8711 156.00 9711
1811 156.00 2811 156.00 3811 156.0Q, 4811. 156.00 5811 156.00 6811 156.00 7811 156.00 8811 156.06 9811
1911 156.00 2911 156.00 3911 156.00 4911 156.00 5911 156.00 6911 156.00 7911 156.00 8911 156.00 9911

,
Prizes
156.00
2,600.00
156.00
156.M
156.u0
156.00
156.0
156.00
156.00
156.0

Approximations Derived From First Prize
r7l2 520.0 7104 520.00 710 520.00 710$ 520.00 7110 520.0 7113 520 0 7115 520.00 7117 520.00 7119 52.0 I
7103 520.00 7105 520.00 7107 52.M 710 520 00 711 520.00 7114 520.00 711 520.00 7118 520.00 7120 520.0 I
Approximations Derived From Second Prize
S S S S $ I s
1376 260.00 237S 26.0 337 260.00 4376 260.00 5376 260.00 6376 260.00 7376 260.00 8376 260.00 937 260.00
367 130.0 39 U.00 0371 130.00 0373 130.00 0375 130.00 0378 130.00 0380 130.00 0382 130.00 0384 130.00
38 1M.00 37 13.W 372 130.00 0374 13.0 0377 130.00 0379 130.00 0381 130.00 0383 130.00 0385 130.0
; V, , Approximations Derived From Third Prize
. 7 S $ S S S I S S
046 MS.W 14 156.0 346 156.M 446 156.0 5466 156.00 6466 156.00 7466 156.00 8466 16.00 9466 156.00
J45T 1S4. J45 104.00 2461 104.0 2463 104.00 2485 104.00 2468 104.00 2470 104.00 247? 104.00 2474 104 00
2458 14. 246 14.00 2462 1Q4.00 2464 104.00 2467 104.00 2469 104.00 2471 104.00 2473 ioToo 2475 104.00
. 1 if

Prise-winning lumbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing; were so Id at: The 1st. Panana, 2nd. Panama and 3rd in Panama
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in 1 and not Included In the above list win Fifty Two DoHars ($52.00) each
The whole ticket has fifty-two pieces which comprises the two series "A" It "B"

Signed by: The Governor of the Province of Panama JOSE A. CAJAR ESCALA
The Representative of the Treasury JOSE MANUEL SILVERA

WITNESSES:

Andres Casis Ced. 47-291S3
Lorenzo 0. Robinson Ced. 62-1154

JOSE DOMINGO SOTO
Notary PubUc, Panama

PABLO A. PINEL M.
Secretary x

Mrttr. Th winning ticket with the last cipher and with th two last
NU I E. clphen apply only to the First Prize.
.Th first Prize and the 2nd and Srd Prize are-drawn separately. The ap approximations
proximations approximations are calculated on the First, Second and Third prize. In cas
a ticket should carry th numbers ol each prize, the holder ia entitled to
claim payment lor each. -.

DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, December 28, 1958 v

: JDrtwlns; Number 77S
Fraction, Ticket

ty.

Fim Prize. . ... 11 $11.00 $220.00
onifpriie. . . 76 3.00 60.00

Third Prize . 66

2.00 40.00

PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOUT

Tha prizes will be paid In accordance with the Official Lfcrt of Panam4 hi
the offices of the National Beneflclent Lattery situated oa Central Avenue.
PLAN OF ORDINARY DRAWING No. 2078 WHICH WILL
TAKE PLACE SUNDAY, JANUARY 4, 1958
Divided In two series of 26 Irnctloiw encli denominated "A" and ,-B"

FIRST PRIZF

1 First Prize, Series A and B. of

1 Second' Prize, Series A and B. of
1 Third Prize, Series A and B, of
18 Approximations, Series A and B, of
0 Prizes, Series A and B, of
9 Prizes, Series A and B, of
00 Prltea, Series A and B, of

$26.000 00 each series

7.800 00 each series
3.900 00 each series
260.00 each series
1,300.00 each series
7S 00 each series
26.00 each scries

SECOND PRIZE
IS Approximations. Series A and B. of $
Frizes, Series A and B, of
, THIRD PRIZE
IS Approximations, Series A and B, of t
Prir.es, Series A and B, of

65.00 each aeries
130.00 each series

$52,000 0'
1.V6OO.Q0
7.80 09- -O
.lfiO OO
23.400 00
14.040 00
46,800.09

$ 2.340.00
2.340.00

51 00 each series $ 1,87200
78.00 each series 1,404.0'

174 Prises

Total

$171,85.,

Price of a whole ticket $26.00
Price of a 52nd part 0.50
DISCOUNTS OR TAXES



y MOXDAtL DECEMBER W. 1351 v
i FAGX rOUK
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSP APE
&
Social and Jlherwi&e
By Staffers
m at a w a v
134,
WE VOICE : OF
BROADWAY
; 'S - ,-'.' S i
by Doroihy Killgallen
anama
Jt mff L mxhJl If uLpLo m Pm 2-0740 2 0 741 Utwm 8.00 ,J 10 mif.
I

, "' 1 "MM,.

MISS ROSELENE BRICESO AND MR. BRACK HATTLER
EXCHANGE NUPTIAL VOWS SATURDAY EVENING
In a wedding ceremony at seven o'clock Saturday eve eve-v
v eve-v ning at the Vlrgen del Carmen Church, Miss Roselene The-
rese Briceno, daughter of Col. and Mrs. Julio E. Briceno,
became the bride of Mr. Brack Gillium Hattler, Jr., vm of
Mr. and Mrs. Brack GiUium Hattler of Golf Heights.

A small group or inenas ana reiaucs i w,c
couple attended the ceremony. Tuberoses were used
'altar decorations, and small clusters of the blooms, were
used on1 pews to mark the places of padrfnos and member!

of the families.
The bride, given in marriage
by Jier father, wore a gown de designed
signed designed with a fitted bodice high highly
ly highly embroidered with pearls and
brilliants. The crisp bouffant
skirt, paneled with lace, extend extended
ed extended into a chapel-length train. She
wore white elbow-length mitts, and
a small coronet of pearls from
which the short veil of illusion
cascaded. She carried a bouquet
of gladioli and tuberoses.
The maid of honor, Miss Patri Patricia
cia Patricia Hattler, sister of the bride bridegroom,
groom, bridegroom, jiwore a fitted sheath
dress of Nile green peau de soie
embroidered with pearls. She car carried
ried carried a bouquet of yellow gladio gladioli.
li. gladioli. The bridesmaids. Miss Dolores
Briceno, Miss Ritita Duran and
Miss Pilar del Valle, had dusty
pink gowns of the same design
as the maid of honor's, and they
carried bouquets of green gladio gladioli
li gladioli and tuberoses. All the bride's
attendants had headpieces match matching
ing matching their gowns.
The mothers of the bride and
bridgeroom chose frocks of champagne-colored
lace, and white ac accessories.
cessories. accessories. Serving as flower girl was lit little
tle little Lidia Garcia de Paredcs,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raul
Garcia de Paredes, and ring
bearer was Harmodio Arias III,
son of Dr. and Mrs. Harmodio A A-rias
rias A-rias Jr. Arras bearer was Nino
de la Ossa, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jose A. de la Ossa.
Serving as best man was Mr.
Serein Betanenurt. Ushers wore
Mr. Mario Galindo, Mr. Paul Du Du-,
, Du-, ran Jr. and Mr. Robin Greene.
Besides the parents of the bride
; and groom 'padrinos' were Pana Panama's
ma's Panama's Foreign Minister and Mrs.
Miguel J. Moreno, U.S. Ambas Ambassador
sador Ambassador and Mrs. Julian Fiske Har Harrington,
rington, Harrington, Assemblyman and Mrs.
Aquilino Boyd, Assemblyman and
Mrs. Juan B. Arias, Dr. and Mrs.
NOW
FREE!

Vi-V. I WAV. WW f 77

I v 1 i't

with Adorn

AT YOUR FAVORITE STORE on

Harmodio Arias Jr., Dr. Roberto
Arias and Dame Margot Fonteyn
de Arias, Panama's minister oi
Commerce and Agriculture and
Mrs. Alberto Uoyd, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas E. Ogiesby, Dr. and
Mrs. Guillermo uiapman, Dr. auu
Mrs. Francisco Fabrega, Mr. and
Mrs. Virgilio Perez, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert T. McGram, Mr.
and Mrs. Roy T. Mosher, Mr.
and Mrs. .George Arias, Mr. ana
Mrs. James Plaia, Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Duran, Mr. and Mrs. Irv Irving
ing Irving Bennett, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
F. Martinz, Mr, and Mrs. Henry
Fidanque, Mr. and Mrs. 0. L.
Richard, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Va Va-Uarino,
Uarino, Va-Uarino, Jr, Dr. and Mrs. Frank
J. Raymond, Minister Counsellor
and Mrs. Arturo Gonzalez, and
Mr. and Mrs. William Boyd.
After the wedding, the couple
left for Cerro Campana for a few
days, after which they will spend
their honeymoon in Acapulco, Mex Mexico.
ico. Mexico. They will then fly to New
York City, where Mr. Hattler is
a medical student at Cornell L-niversity.

Admiral and Mrs. Wales
Entertain French Visitors
Rear Admiral George Wales,
Commandant of-the Fifteenth Na Na-VAL
VAL Na-VAL District, and Mrs. Wales will
entertain this afternoon to tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow in honor of the commanding
officers and midshipmen of the
two French ships which are vis visiting
iting visiting here as a part of a round-the-world
cruise.
A tea dance will be hosted by
Admiral and Mrs. Wales this
afternoon from five to seven o' o'clock
clock o'clock at the Tivoli Guest House
in honor of the midshipmen.
Tomorrow afternoon, the French
commanding officers, Capt. P.
Dartigues of the Jeanne d'Arc,
and Cmdr. M. G. E. Gamier ot
the Grandiere, will be honored
From the Most

famous Namo in

Dental
Care

NEWI Push-Button
Tooth Paste by

DR. WEST'S
NEW! Stand-op packagt!
NEWI Flowing tsxturtl
NEW! Tongy fast!
NEWI Clean fasttr!
r

- wan annm

guests at a reception from six to
eight o'clock at Quarters A, Fif Fifteenth
teenth Fifteenth Naval District, residence
of Admiral and Mrs. Wales. ;'

Gamboa Country Club
Plans New Year's Dane
The Gamboa Golf, and Country
Club will be the scene of a tes
tlve New Year's Eva party be
Einnina at 8 p.m. "Wednesday eve
ning. Music lor the bccasiui will
be provided by Panama s l,ouis
Armstrong and his orchestra.
Tickets are available at the
club bar or from committe
members. Noise makers and par party
ty party hats will be provided guests.
Mr. Joseph Kati of Colon
Claims Bride Yesterday
Miss Marjorie Lee Wikler,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Aora Aora-ham
ham Aora-ham Wikler of Lexington, Ky.,
became tne bride of Mr. Joseph
Katz, son of Mr. and Mrs. A A-dolph
dolph A-dolph Katz of Colon, in a Sunday
afternoon ceremony at the Phoa Phoa-n.x
n.x Phoa-n.x Hotel m Lexington.
Rabbi Joseph Rosenbloom of
Lexington's Temple Adath Israel
officiated at the service under
the traditional canopy. Banks oi
palms ferns and loliage plants
were used with wrought iron can candelabra
delabra candelabra -folding the white wed wedding
ding wedding tapers and stand baskets of
white gladioli. Miss Bertha Still Still-well,
well, Still-well, organist, played traditional
nuptial music.
The bride, given in marriage
by her father, wore a waltz waltz-length
length waltz-length gown of white silk talieta
and imported lace, fashioned on
process lines. The fitted bodice
and leng tapering sleeves were
of lace, and the scooped neckline
was appliqud in a rose motif.
Her headdress was a bandeau of
L. : ...l.rAt laaiiAi nnrfar 3 f?tr-
Willlc velvet, icn.vi ---
cular veil of illusion. The bridal
bouquet was a cascade arrue arrue-ment
ment arrue-ment of white butterfly roses
with white violets and streamer
nbbons.
The bride's sister, Miss" Norma
Wikler, served as maid of honor,
wearing -a ballerina-length frock
of embroidered silk organza over
pink taffeta, designed with a
scooped neckline and cap sleeves.
A cummerbund of pink taffeta
accented the Empire lines, anil
draped in wide panels to the
hemline. She carried a bouquet
... i 1 nA ntith
Of pinK carnations ceiueicu vviwi.
pink sweetheart roses.
Mr. Louis Katz of Colon, broth brother
er brother of, the bridegroom, served as
best man.
m 1 -J I lira tlAll
ft the hotel following the cere ceremony.
mony. ceremony.
The newlyweds will mane weir
i l Ui n ctn tirHora hnth ATA
nume m wvagw, m.iv
attending the University of Chica
go.
TVjTr.1- v-t wac nrimittpd to the
University of a scholarship under
tne scnoors eariy cuirnui
gram. Mr. K.atz is a scnwpiauiF
student at the University, major majoring
ing majoring in chemistry.
Mr. and Mrs. Jackson
Announce Daughter's
Engagement
At frariitinnal Christmas Eve
family gathering, Mr. Charles T.
Tar-ircnn and Mrs. L,aura uaicia
Jackson announced tne Deirouiai
thoir riunohtpr Trixie Helen
UL '".
Pefla Jackson, to Mr. Richard
S. Triplett, son of Mr. ana mis.
Clarence E. Triplett of Baltimore,
Md. ...
The date for the wedding nas
not been set.
ling'

'''.( I J

.""booklet

itiMillwiaiw''

There's celebration in the air! So,
comb a "party look" into your

hair. You can do it
with Adorn . and
these six sparkling,
new styling trick.
Available
in medium
1 and conomy
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the -ISTHMUS

..v jj niainiaiininiip iii'11"1"1"1''111 winin'hiiinnni vrrif lw""M""r"MI c" 11
' r" v'
- '. "sF'f"Jl 1 LI
y : i-

CONGRATULATIONS Mr. and Mrs. Brack Gillium Hattler, Jr., receive congratulations fol following
lowing following their wedding Saturday evening at the Virgen del Carmen .Church- Mrs Hattler Is
the former Miss Roselene Therese Briceno. Pictured with: the briflal couple are Mrs. Julian.
F. Harrington and Mr. Harrington, United States Ambassador to Panama, and, at right, Mr.
William Y. Boyd. v (

I', ;i'f'K
n ?''',! Wit M i
FJty.'V- vi
.

MAN AGAINST FISH Force-feeding a 400-pound mola-mola
body's idea of sport, but this diver takes the task in stride at

HATS, HORNS, NOISEMAKERS, MASKS,
SERPENTINES, And All The Other CONFETTI.
ITEMS You NEED For a Gay
NEW YEAR'S PARTY
C 0 M E T 0
- MORRISON'S
4th of July Avenue and "J" Street
CASA ZA1.P0
Near Santa Ana Plaia
CASA ZAI HO il- CalUlonia
Near Tivoli Theatre
T.FWIS SERVICE
Tivoli Avenue, No. 18-52

v I
Lucho Azcirraga
Your Community
840 Kilocycles
PANAMA

V

' s
... ii- L!k

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Dauphins
FRANCE MOTORS
Aye. Cuba end 26 Street
EVERY MONDAY
FROM
6:30 TO 7:00 P.M,
Network1 YCN
1090 Kilocycles
COLON

(ocean sun fish) Is not every- ;
the Miami, Fla., Seaquarium.
By OSWALD JACOB Y
Written for NEA Service
NORTH (D)
AKJ93
Q8
Q4S
A 10 3 3
EAST
4
V 954,3
1096
J874
SOUTH
10
WEST
A 872
10 7
KJ8S
KQ92
A AQ 10 6 5
VAKJt
A78
8
No one vulnerable
North East South Watt
1 Pass a 4k Pan
4 4k Pass 4 N T. Pass
5 Pass 7 4k Pass
Pass Pass
Opening lead 4 K
, How would you play today's
hand at seven spades? You win
the opening club lead with dum
my's ace and count your tricks.
You see four hearts and one in
each minor for a total of six out
side of the trump suit. Hence, you
must get seven trump tricks.
If you play two rounds of trumps
and they break 2-2 your worries
are over, but the odds are against
this favorable event.
When Giff Daniel of Dallas play
ed the hand -he saw that a dummy
reversal would be a far better
play. Accordingly, he ruffed a low
club with the ace of spades at
trick two and led a low trump to
dummy's nine. Both opponents fol followed
lowed followed so he did not have to worry
about a 4-0 trump break.
Now he ruffed another club with
the ten of trumps and led a heart
to dummy's queen. Dummy's lat
club was ruffed with' the queen
and he still had one trump left to
lead to dummy's king. The jock
and. three of trumps were now
playedfrom dummy and since he
had ruffed three times he was able
to discard his two low diamonds.
His three high hearts and ace
of diamonds according for the last
four tricks and the grand slam.
Q Tht bidding has been: ""
North Eut South West
1 Double t
You, South, hold: ",
4QS VK.1 4vQI4l QIS
What do you do?
A B14 n aa-tmmp. Yes
hava nine print ftft4 no-trump
type hand. The time te show this
larlfhtaww.
TODAY'S QUESTION :
West passes and your partner
bids two i spades. East passes.
What do you do nowT

ski

ROADWAY CRAP I YIN I
- v ,-.''"& ;---vii )
Kim Novak's date In- New
York's popular 3rd Ave.- saloon,
P. J. Clarke's, was film director
Richard Qulne. .Much excite excitement
ment excitement resulted in London over the
report that .Elvis Presley would
spend Christmas' there. All con concerned
cerned concerned made a serious effort to

forestall-any riots, keening de
tails oi hlv foitr-dav vtsi; a aeew
secret. .It look like s long wait
for Mickey Boonev nd M nno.
flclal fiancee,' Orolyn Mitchell.
The estranced Mrs. Booney, E E-lalne
lalne E-lalne Mahnkpti hs yet to slen
the property settlement, and she's
exneeted to fiie for divorce on
th West fot. If she noes rle-
c'de on s California parting,' Mte-
''ey won't 1w ah'e to rnaVe It to
the- altar aeam for a wnoie y"r
.Prmnun's l'tev acoinsinnn
in the bck field U Trun'? C-
note litintiv writ'e" "BrpK-
fast st Tiffsnv's. .Dick HV'
man has lmo?t comMetes' It mu mu-lcal
lcal mu-lcal eom'w'v han1! on 3 n e s
vurn"" "''rom F.jh To
TV, ? Moo" pnd "AroM T-"
Mnnn" The ihrpn de-is "'r"
"telHfp fpr in tm C'"'l
War ner'n''. pHm( w'h a-trH
0 the mon t V'cr'ana
manned it. ;i"ene Paul may
prnnncP thp sho"'.
. KnMfhlntf yrltln In hfl W
tt riifiUh. ptrv a r here -1"
vpirurv a sp' 'nnVtp nrr,"'
Tiw'v Of'nnr, P"P 1 onmo to 'tn
Unite'' st" b,1'1",",o "r
pw film "rnviiri Fro-n T"
Vw", ,0" bpt row(tt,,,i Mnrt
hl a"! hi tnana"' Worm"
t!tm, ha VP t fslH" o
'Over a t"pf o' "t',nal,
yprmut pwnlnlflq, P Mn9
npft thpm to ''on out tir 'fl 'fl-"iifje
"iifje 'fl-"iifje vi rrfr returns from
Cn-n rehp'o oini"! a nvs'oHO"
Amrifn nocked h;mslf off as
onal Interview with Ostro. then
"rne o'r secret rebel inform v
t'on to rpnTxl Batista. . .Vic
rnriope is miffing on a very con-
vinri"'; rerformince as a fellow
earning trric torch for ms
er-'ife. the 1p"pIv Pief Angell.
fha .TimMV Dpan Hnw ) OIP
Of dSVt'Tie TV' i"oot. wih pn
'm"resivp alI.Rffri''"d su'yiT"'
harkrro'i'"' an hrMi; Ft It
ws a TtixttT or wri'o pit a a-round
round a-round when h-int Tipp Alppr
(vptpr-in of Olonn MI1W s and
othpr famous prrpstrs0') cnfei-
ed he' np"pr hd an oppslnn to
nlav "AnWI Tn Par' t"l "UPt
tr nrroil Oarnpr ta"0ht It to
him the' other daV. 'Rav with
Hn show and-you'll up to way
Kvervt.hinc," oromfspfl Jlmmv a
''e warmprt tm coimjp o' novel-
Hp'?. .Andy WHliTn, buck fttn
two wpks in London, gvs hp
no on'v pfiioed hf rpcords
wh" thpr but ot laughs a
well, tiv t10- simtile propo of
mumHinp "I only awkpd." An An-narpntly
narpntly An-narpntly th"t llnp the Brlt-
'h J"0 ffUn of laifhtr, jllnpp
lt' thp rofph rhrsipi1 lpntlflpd
wh iriTif,nf fiArte np,w cnni
p, Pernnrd Pr''iit, .5urpn
ft mnpv.cAi th'n. TV'i prpf.
w .Tnli Mii moved Into her
nliietj JSntton P'"Pp yirnt two
"prs p"o, pnd In n ht tiro
hps 8n",t t"o str"'''h' ipV pt
hnm. Tfvp""" srnund fhp rPn rPn-ry
ry rPn-ry for h"' video sponsors fskes
Un triot ft br, pff "mori t'rtip.
The forpomi" ,tii totiA
PO'n'dy. "Tflll Story." will hve
jukp hox c ri"rt o' thp
ry, pud p't'ps'lv pon rluwer! fn
Vippp-ln th trridi;cer- to stnpV
't w''h the'r' im, ,T,p ttifr'g
'ai't'ht.er. .Tpnatl- foljo'lno
in her mphr' thtr'pt oot.
stos. n honor ptnHpnt at P'f P'f-o1iffp.
o1iffp. P'f-o1iffp. she wa! sp'Mpd to i)lsy
'hp, oninio (ti H'rV"1'' rro rro-llipt'on
llipt'on rro-llipt'on Of "Anfhn'jv pd rtonn".
tr," T.oni TiimoVa Pr(ti
pr,or' tt ttr '-vl-F.-n i t t r
have been fan'astically hlch since
Stick with
IIAl PACKAGES quickly,
AaveIKi, TpjUMnavaissA taaa -.
sticks light or a touch I
Avoid substitutes
...insist on
hUlrlhulan! riA. ATI.
"Scotch"! brahd colored tapaa fat 71
in Panama wnn ui nam ana
No. it-OS Cuba Avenut W Phone

the Johnny Stompansto tragedy. ;

She long-distances everyone no
matter how far from home the
happens to be, because she's a?
freid of putting her thoughts into
let.ers.
' The wlvate opinions expressed
by Eddie Fisher's family on the
suhlect of his romance with Liz
Taylor would mke"snopy read.
ing for his fan clubs. His mother,
on s recent vtstt to uros infer s 4
the resort where Ed-fie got hi.
how iigtpis Ptart and where
his lvH wtli i.Ije hppme ,S mat. :
'er 0' nnhUp rironpTty--exnrePi
herse" '"finitelv on Dehie
Reynolds' side, and h'. brother
Is gpid ) bp VPhmoMv dipn
rnvn of f V'PO'P rn'ng,
in thp worVi. to p"h'!,8h
Opnt, f!l'her', 4,rr'ncp of Fo-
ntpn" jn p rtunarfcvrk Hltlp. At-
thoitoh fltnr a r'np fr'wd
of Orace. P" of h" comno"'
on thp. t ytmAUnn : vnvio .'. kint
th A'n''p.' pnd -1ite ;n
wht he wrop pho( hr. t"'g
W4 tiia :hoPV ht p" hr to
Wke him off the" p1ce guest
; rSaOr"1! hr'nc'p "T.Hn T npn"
nlh.tm f th Vit"p ppr hP'S
ever had 'n ..J,pti ;. Aw,".-"fl
l I p"tt It pomilr'v hp's
pln- hnnkpl for a ftir of M rL
ties -in South and Central Ameri America.
ca. America. NEW YORK fUPU Th Rock Rockefeller
efeller Rockefeller Foundation put more than
74 million dollars into the world
wide war etinst dlpse. Ifnor.
ance and hunger d"r)" the 1t
two years, it was disclosed ye-
leraay.
lDean Rusk, foundation rrest-
dent, said in a review of the or
ganization's work fct'r'ng 19fif that
appronriations or 1957 pn-t'iS
totaled $42,798,916 and $M.w -'t.
resoectlvely. The work for 1958
will be reviewed later.
Since the foundation was creatfld
in 1913. annronrhtlons J have to totaled
taled totaled $641,593,900.
REVIVAL.
Cocoll Baptist Church
Dec. 31st through Jan. Sth
Time: 7:30 P.M. v.
Rev. Davis Thompson, gra graduate
duate graduate of the New Orleans Ban Ban-fist
fist Ban-fist Theological Seminary, will
be bringing the messages for
our seviva'. Bro. Thompson s
now attending I.aneuaze School
'n Salt Jose. fr"ita R'p.a, In
Prep"atlon for fima; 101 101-Mon
Mon 101-Mon In Arre"tlna as Porfn
Mte-'ry for the Southern
Baptists. '."
,
AH. H. A
yard roll .'art printed
apecincauoni oy i.ia,
S 11IIT P.O. Box 44M

-m-' I!



o

:

: t '.-7. v ;..

f

y

"V- '
' ' l

a

iiim;ipwglfafei

- MOVING MOUNTAINS Termed th biggest ot U the big top peed of 18 m.p.h. The builders, R. G. LeToximeu,
earth movers, thU new, 100-foot-long behemoth can gobble up Inc., of Longview, Tex., claini that by using 88 such machines J
130 ton of earth, move it to any location and spread it. Pow- and 172 operators the Panama Canal could have been built 1 j
ered by two 600-horsepower diesel engines, the machine has in one-fourth the lime. Cost is in excess of $200,000. I

GOP High Brass Views Labor
As Major Factor In Demo Win

fewta rm&&mii!aMu y.T..--.. ym..,

wTt.ria members arid instructors at a Balboa YUC A -USO basic ekln diving course took time out recently while on.a
""SwSJSm ft mS SmSeS wA. in the water is-BSgt. Bill La Fleur, and on the pier, left to tight, are Mrs.
ffiilft t SSSS Waffon and Mrs. Anna Man. (U.3. Army Photo)

YOUR PET AND MINE

By VILMA MEDINA
Because of th number of calls
I get on different atpectf of dog
matters, I have decided to write
column, twice a montln on mat matters
ters matters that will be o interest to dog
-Twtti begin by pointing out what
you mist expect when you acquire
fffiKSS very efusia,
moan and groan and their
iasm wanes when they realize
the "umber Of Uttle Pf Jj1
adorable little creature
. They lust didn't take that into con-.
gideraium when they bought the

' . :.t. u :.' lASt,riirtive. why

i Ana on, ..,"
U steals iliPPer and anythlngi

- left lying arounu. Ana ue
Ihe tot few nights. Unbeltevable
bow much noise a mali dog can
make.- And feeding a dog three
times a day? Why that is too much

L't i.e. 'It.. These things

will be encountered once you get

; doe and it is up w yvu

your oog io 08 a vici,m iv,"f"

' People are shocked to find out
:.th.t thfira ic mare to it than just

" owning a beau uul dog,, Dog .care
turns 'Out 4 to be more than they
had anticipated. I concur with you
. that 'owning a dog is hard work,
that is, if you are going to-givc

your dog the care ne requires.
I will explain ti the prospective
dog owner the different problems
he will encounter after the dog has
been acquired and how to solve
these problems. Youwill derive
pleasure from dog pwning but
there ar al&o responsibilities in involved.
volved. involved. So if you don't have pa-
. tience, lost of patience, don't get a
dog.- 1
w When ou first buy your puppy
" you will find out that he will most
likely cry the first few nights
itlv i verv few, that

don't cry.) Instead of getting out
of bed and scolding him, be pa patient.
tient. patient. Just remember, that he is
ao little, and misses the warmth
of his mother and litter mates, artd
It is only natural that he should
feel strange and lonely in such .a
big room. -". ;' :
Be kind to htm, talk to him and
tssure him that he will, be. alright
' and that you are theresTO :., take
care of him. Give him some farm
. milk, he might be hungry .Then
put him back to bed. It helps
. you set a clock wrapped in an old
' piece of cloth In his box where bz
Uleeps. The ticking of the clock
makes. Uje puppy think it is his
mother's heart,
However, if this crying continues
iw th ihird niirht vou can be

' sure he is Just after attention in
which-case you should roH a news news-"
" news-" nit hit the wall with it and

say very sternly 'quiet.' This will
' ? break him of the habit since the
' noise that the newspaper makes
noiriot tha wall will scare him.

?i;lButr give him i item 'days,:he
, .u .rina ftr hi nan

been assured that nothing will hep

, pen to him in the Dig enormous
il t v, minnv's uvea we are

like giants nd he wiU be worried
' funtll he Is assured that'Vthese
giants that walk around such a bisj
; ... winrf Unt and won't

I hurt him. Remember that when a

. puppy comes to your nome aw ine

' vM k .unt in ana. thA warmth of

, t his mothers Of course, people and

t an entire house wiu seem an awiui
j lot for him to tcke, so be patient
5 with him. Jry-

j The next thing is naper orsait orsait-,
, orsait-, Ing. We 'are humsn beings with so
' much iinteUlgence and reasoning

powers Dogs cannot reason, they

1 :, are ammais oi naoiu uw u ?
get mad becaust your dog goes
ii A.,aT 4ha hnusn when vou don

i take the time or effort to teach

him differently then mere is de definitely
finitely definitely something wrong with you
and you better start taking stock

of yourself and quit blaming your
dog after all, he is the animal
and vou are lUDDOsedf to be the

intelligent human being.

n i fnroor tnai Dimnies nave

tn riivp themselves resularty and

it is up to you to teach the dog
to go on paper. The way to break
him is as follows:

Set several papers on the floor,
everytime the puppy starts to

squat to got tne Dainroom, set mm
An tha naner and see to it thai

ha .ffnei on Daoer. When he does

praise him. Keep this up for se

veral days. You'll need patience

since you nave io ao ii euuuga w
th&t tho nunnv will tinriarstanri 1ut

exactiy what it is -that you want

aone.

-Never. strike, the ( dog, he will
do more for you if you show
love and affection, your dog wants

ana it penorming on paper manes
vou haDDV he will do lust that for

you. however, you must follow

mm ana De sure to eaten mm ev-

eryume he is going to the bath bathroom.
room. bathroom. It doesn't help if you find
the lutle puddle later, don't scold
him, he won't understand what you
are saying, you have to catch him
in the act.

Planning Group Stresses US Security
Needs Defense Funds, Budget Or No

WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 (UPD (UPD-The
The (UPD-The National Planning Association
says the nation's security de demands
mands demands major increases in defense
spending no. matter how badly it

might wrecK .administration tpians
for a balanced budget. Ir U
Thp sissneiatiMfc-a inbn oolitical-

private research- organization

said last night mat rresiaent jm
senhower's plan to hold the new

dpfpnsH hudeet to near-Dresent

levels could lead to losing the

cold war to Kussia. 4

tf eaUati fnr srvpnHinf Viillinns

more for defense to meet ,the

threat of increasing Russian; mis-

KITljere-are measures, at ieastt

at the planning stage, wnicn, u

2 Solons Call For
Cabinet-Level

Science Department

However,' if you catch him right
after he has finished going on the
floor tell him bad dug and show
him that you are very displeased
witn mm by scolding him, next
time he starts to go pick him up
and put him on paper and praise
him then.

Just remember, everytime you
see him going on the floor, pick
him up gentiy, set him on paper
and wait for him to perform, when
he penorms paper make a fuss
over "him and keep going through
with this over and over again. Af After
ter After the second or third day your
dog should be housebroken if you
do it consistentlv.

A small puppy should be fed

fed three or our times a day de depending
pending depending on his age. He wiU need
lota of milk. Babv food.' hambur

ger meat, dog toou ana nara oonea
eggs are good for him. And start

them early on vnamins. some gwu
vitamins are Vitamycin and Vio

late. '' i '

Keep your puppy way from
J..l. in hit umn't patfh fflld Be

sure to have your dog innoculated

against distemper, some peopie
think that dogs hhould only be in in-nniilatpH
nniilatpH in-nniilatpH tvhan tlipv are three or

four months old. This is not true.

Puppies should be mnocuiatea as
soon as they are taken away from
tHuthar Whiln tha doe is With

the mother he is immune to di

seases (while he is nursing) dui
it soon as, he stops nursing he is

subjected to disease.
AlaA innoculate vour dog against

rabies. Protect your dog by giving
him all the- shots that he needs.

Check your dog against worms.
; -Take a stool specimen to your
veterinarian and have it checked

fnr intestinal oarasites. It won't

nf -vou over 12 and vour dog will

feel better after he has been freed

from intestinal-parasites. ?;
nna a vearva.tr do ihouldbe

Aheokut fm hearlwnrms. This Will

only cost you a dollar ana it me

hertuinrm .are oeieciea in tunc

ilna'a Ufa will he 'saved

These are your responsibilities as

a-dog owner,1 ane -your uog w

your vet. con t "practice on mm.
Let the man who knows his work

attend, your aog. t- y-- K

sour -oog 1 inoiuu po giwincu
dally. In hot weather .your dog
should have a bath once a week an
a daily brushing. This will only
tike about five minutes a, day.

Bathe your dog In a tuo. Doni
put him under 4he shower and let
soapy water dribble down his eyes
Exercise your dog dally. Don't just
walk him around the corner so hs
Mil relievn himielf. Walk him!

noufih so that he gets ; his exer-

When you huy a doe be sur
h. In muwl health and hi eh loi-

rits. Once your dog reaUzes that

you love mm ana are going io ia
eaa of him doing what Is ex-

WASHINGTON. Dec. 29 (UPD-

Two hew Senators have called
fnr pstahliahment of a cabinet-lev

el department of science to co

ordinate U.S. scientuic programs

in tne space age.
fianalnra-alect Kenneth B. Keat

ihg (ft-N.Y.) and Jennings Ran Ran-Hninh
Hninh Ran-Hninh in.u Vj.i aid vesterday

thov holipv siinh a deoartment

would be preferable to the new

Federal Council tor science ai-u

Technology .announced by Fresi

dent Eisenhower baturaay

But Hugh L. Dryden, deputy

IU

Airaninr nf tho National Aerona

.nil Cnnr.a Acrpnov fNASAt.

disagreed. He said on a televi television
sion television program (ABC "College
News Conference") he has ndf
supported the idea of a seprarate
governmental department to co coordinate
ordinate coordinate scientific affairs.

A fellow scientist, ur. josepn
Kaplan, chairman of the U. S.

committee for tne lnternauonm
Geophysical Year (IGY), said that
the role of science in government
must -be reconsidered in the light

of recent advances.

But Kaplan said on another TV
program (CBS "Face The Na Nation"
tion" Nation" that he is not sure that the

creation of a new science .depart

ment would De tne answer to tne
problem, v

Fire Burns Out
Japanese Town
Of Koniya
'rTTV imiml Tulsnil

Japan (UPI) A fire, fanned-by

35 'mile an nour winas, aestroyea
1,500 houses yesterday and burned
nut the timrn ftf Knniva nn thia is.

land. 200 miles south of Japan's
southernmost' Kyushu Island.
There were no deaths, but 10
persons were injured and s some

with only the clothes they wore,
according to police reports lrom
the stricken. town"
TVa lra fj. linrfertarminart rttt.

gin, started about midnight Satur Saturday
day Saturday in a busines section of the

town 1 and razed government of
! J t--:'M...J!M4

If to other areas. The blsxe lasted

six hours.

promptly implemented, would ma materially
terially materially increase the U.S. retalia retaliatory
tory retaliatory capabilities likely to survive
a irnrl.a attack w it flirt

"Undertaken with courage and
determination, they would greatly
reduce the danger, although It
Would be idle to pretend that
they can any longer remove it."

Moreover, tne association said,
studies "have repeatedly shown
the United States could afford
silhKtantiall-7 hiphpr hiiHctetaru V.

npnHitlirAO if natls.no) Dnnunmm

nollfipn Uifira nrlnntn1" fhaf umiiM

I ".'('. j w.iv r. w i
enable the national's economy ful fully
ly fully to achieve its potentially enor

mous growin. i

The PreeiHpUt nnlv lac iiibaIt

said he would send Congress next
month a new budget balanced at
about 77 billion dollars. He said
it would call for defense spend

ing BuincwiiBi iiigiier man uie
present 40 billion dollar program.
. The association, in a 1ft naoe

statement said the "8hce again

the defense of the budget seems

to De mistaKen for tne defense

vi uie naiion
;? The .association said the Amerl-

budget" at this stage of history
but a budget "to insure the suc

cessful conduct of U.S. foreign
policy under the conditions of the

cold war."

It said success of the admin
istration's budget balancers alrea already
dy already has "done immense harm."
House Sace Group
Hails IGY Example

Of Internationalism

washtnrton 'UPIi The Re-

mihiirsn hiuh com and is cred-

itino nrcunrpfl abor with pro

ducing ; about half of the estimat

ed six-million vote rnqjomy
Democratic congressional csndi csndi-dates
dates csndi-dates piled up in the 1958 elections.

in nthpr words. GOP strategists

are convinced that a Democratic

trend would have Jen mem who
a three-million vote deficit in any
.u.nt Hut that lahnr'a onlitical ac

tivity virtually doubled the Dem

ocratic1 majority.

Party managers are gr mg ii
.rAnti,.a pminlar liipa-llfei

51,1116 5lVH,r vw..
before the 1960 presidential elec

tion

Tjr...Kli, hooflnilarlpri is ask-

ntrt U,. mtmhrri whO

nig nw --- .
war. iinsaa ted whv thev tninx

they were defeated. Their replies'
were reported to give less weight
to union political activity than
profeslonals in the national head headquarters
quarters headquarters think it deserves.
Even so, some of the defeated
members viewed labor as a ma major
jor major factor in their losses. More
specificaly. ome candidates
blamed their defeal directly on
the fact that the right to-work is issue
sue issue was on the ballot n their

states. ''V"

t oKnr 1anHor conducted art All-

out fight against right to work
propo; als.f which would outlawJjny
Ion shop contracts, and defeated

them in live oi me
where the Issue was on the ballot,
i. .f hot that the na

il ia a oojc ,-
tlonal GOP. organization will do
all it can iio discourage right-to-

work supporters from puuing uie
Issue on state ballots in future
national elections.

It also apears likely that Re Republican
publican Republican .leaders will encourage
moves, now barely under way, to
...u mnt-a hininpusmpn into or

ganized political a c 1 1 v 1 1 y aa a
cnnnterweiaht to labor. There is

still doubt, however, about how
effective this movement anlong
businessmen may be. f
Some Republicanswantexj

pected of you e will respect and
fnva vaii and vou will be his B0d

that he will look up ,to Don't for for-get,
get, for-get, "Dog is man's best irlend.'

Be the friend your dog expects you
to be.s ;.iM"'i-J,-:,

If you have any questions you
can drop me a line at Box 1375,

Panama. Your questions will be
answered In the next arttble. The
next article will deal on the ad:
vantages of protecting your dog
by frequent Tnedical cneck-ups and
innoculatlons.

WASHTNHTniM The

House Space Committee yesterday
hailed the International Gepphy Gepphy-sical
sical Gepphy-sical Year as a striking example
of the value of international sci scientific
entific scientific cooperation.

ihe committee said a compari

son of the 66-nation IGY program
and scientific efforts of individual!
nations indicates that "coopera

tion Is actually .necessary to cer certain
tain certain scientific achievements.''
It said the IGY should serve as
"an object lesson" for the con conquest
quest conquest of outer space.
Tha elotomDnfo- urai.li nnnf o tn

n.H.viiiLuiii ri It vulllraillCU
in a committee staff reoort sum

marizing tne activities and
"enlevements of the 18 month
IGY which ends Wednesday.
Some 30,000 scientists and techni

cians irom bo countries' partici participated
pated participated In the program.

ine report said the IGY
achieved an "International com comradeship
radeship comradeship of the mind" that sur-

moumea most harriers of lan language,
guage, language, nationality, politics and
even cold war antagonisms.
Hi! I

mien; pun icai nvna cntiin not

Formosa Defenders

Spot Migs Olishore

Hear Quemoy Group

TAIPEI, Formosa (UPI) The
Nationalist Delense Ministry re reported
ported reported yesterday that Chinese

Communist jhiu i
had been spotted near the Que Quemoy
moy Quemoy offshore islands for two
straight days.
from Quemoy said four of the late
model Soviet-made Mig wW

observed flying near me aMuui

ist held

ing

meet. Scientific minrla HI.)

dared.

it de-

Jqd Sfiamen

Missing In Storm ;
.Tananaia a n mi am m...

j V otamra n.. missing
and feared dead yesterday in a

siernr wnicn- nas been lashing the
Japanese Islands Mnce Friday., i

The latest scattered reports
from various areas reaching To Tokyo
kyo Tokyo confirmed at least, one dead
and 59 others missing aboard six
vessels unheard from ince he

storm hit.
Coast Guard authorities held
little hope for the safety of most
of, the men.
The latest vessel reported miss missing
ing missing was the 353-ton freighter Sho Sho-ko
ko Sho-ko Maru with a crew of 13 which
has ben unheard from since it
left Nagoya for Wakayama Pre Prefecture
fecture Prefecture to the south,

island Saturday morn-

The dispatch added, however

that the Bgs made no aiempi
to fly over he Quemoy Island

Tne same raimsuy
that 1 more than 20 Communist
Mifi 29's were operating in the

Quemoy area Friday.

The ueiense ihh
Chinese Communist artillery op op-nnaita
nnaita op-nnaita tha Ouemoys remained si

lent Sunday In observance ol

Pelplng s self imposeu uc-.iia
day ceqse-fire. Red guns Saturday,
t-j nni ii.kan harraee of 158

rounds, the ministry added.

Italian Police
Break Romance
Of Oldster, Girl
-bVbt-m Ti.tw nwu Police

up the June-December "nnc

of a 73-yer-oia man nu m
year-old "fiance." a
f A patrolman, ovrhearmithelr
romantic conversation on Cnrtst-

mas Eve stroll, arrestea
Mbntorone. 73. a wealthy apart-
. i,fi,i.i nivnar and the E1T1

Whose name wss withheld; -.

Botn vowea merwimtu
Th oirt't mother, gave

naxiiu. -" v b
her blessing to the match; f j

But police, said WOmoronra m
grown fons and daughter by :t
previous marriage called the Idea
"madness" and accused the girl
and her mother of achemlng to
get TWontorone's money.
Police settled It by ordering
Montorone out of town. He left
still Insisting he loved the 13-

year-old.

plore the posibilities of new le legal
gal legal restrictions on poll ical activ activity
ity activity hv lahnr. Th outlook for lUL'h

action Is dim in a Congress wlih
an enlarged Democratic majority

elected with la nor help,

Tha Taft Hartley Tjiw already

forbids the direct use of money
collected for union 'dues in polisi polisi-cal
cal polisi-cal campaigns. But this provision
has not kept labor out of politics.

Private surveys nsve persuaaea
Republican leaders that too many
tmlnra raoarri tha COP as the

party of '"big business." Changing

mat puDiic image is ano ner n
the problems facing the party in

its rebuilding plans.
Ike Divides Day

Between Bridge,
Football Game

r.F.TTYSBtlRG. Pa. (UPI)

President Elsenhower aiviaea a
leisurely Sunday between a group
nf niH Vidua. nlavine friends and

the pro looiball championship

game-
The President's favorite bridge
tahia irimnantorts were on hand

George E. Allen of Washington

and Gettysburg, wimam noo noo-inson,
inson, noo-inson, prestont. of (!ca Chta, attd
Gen. Alfred M. Gruenthelf, presi president
dent president of the American Red Cross.
The Chief Executive counted on

the close companionship ano run
nino rnmmentarv of his 10-year

' ,
nlil oranrienn naVin.

Eisenhower drove nere rnaa.v
with his wife and David, and
um-borl fnr limp late Friday on

a preliminary draft of his State

of the Union message.
The Eisenhowers plan to re
main hra ihjMiH'h noxt week end

with the President returning to
the White House in time for a
Ian S maetine with COnfiWSlOnil

leaders of bo h partie on ne

programs he will suDmit to me
Ui,.t artA Conn p Th hioirti-

san meeting will concern itse'f
primarily with foreign policy and

defense needs of the nation.

Economic Adviser
Arthur F. Burns
On Century Fund
mfw vnmr ner. 29 rupn

Arthur V Burns, chairman of

President, Eisenhower s council of

economic advisers from i53 to

1958, has been named to tne

board of trustees of the lwen

tiath Pantiirv Fund I

Burns, a professor of economics
t rViliimhia TTnlvartitv ii raaard-

a l vviHlllvia ..... -
ed as one of the nation's leading

economists.

The Twentieth Century tund

la a nnn.nrnfit foiinnatinn for apt.

antiflr research and oublic edU

cation on current economic ana

social questions.

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1



THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPEW
V. V MONDAY, DECEMBER 29,195
Carta Vieja Plays Last
S;;;;lOBlMt4

"FAGK SIX V

Yanks Aim To Gain Half Game
On Idle League-Leading Kings

The Carta Vieja Yankees, who are now a full
game behind the front-running Kings, will play last-
Slace Cerveza Balboa tonight at the Olympic Sta Sta-ium
ium Sta-ium in an attempt to gain on the iaieleaders.
Yesterday morning at Colon Stadium,, Marlboro
defeated Carta Vieja 5-1, and in an afternoon game
at Jose Antonio Remon Stadium at Aguadulce the
Kings slaughtered Cerveza Balboa 18-6.

Lefty Bill Prout (2-0), will be
the Yankees starting hurler a a-eainst
eainst a-eainst righthander Georges Ma Ma-randa
randa Ma-randa (2-1) tonight. Prout
pitched a seven-hitter in beat beating
ing beating the Beermen and Maranda
3-2 two Saturday nights ago.
Maranda was given a 6-0 lead
against the Kings last Friday
but he could not hold it and
was taken out in the third frame
when he ran into trouble
The Kings went on to win 14 14-8,
8, 14-8, and the loss was charged to
Winston Brown one of the six
pitchers who saw duty for the
Beermen that night.
Yesterday Humberto Robin Robinson,
son, Robinson, who was lifted for a pinch pinch-hitter
hitter pinch-hitter in the ninth, tossed a
nifty three-hitter in picking up
his third victory against two
setbacks.
Robby had a 3-1 lead when
the Smokers went to bat in
the ninth, and the crowd
booed when manager Stanford
Graham sent in Bill Gabler to
hit for the Milwaukee Braves
pitcher.
But the bases were loaded,
there was only one out and
Graham, knowing that the Yan Yankees
kees Yankees are an ever-dangerous
team, had an insurance run or
Giants-Colts
Title Game
Statistics
NEW YORK, Dec. 28 (UPI) -Statistics
of the Giants Colts
game:
NEW YORK BALTIMORE
First Downs 10 27
Rushing Yardage 88 1J
Passing Yardage J7B
Passes Intercepted by 1 0
Punts 6" 4.51
Fumbles Lost
Yards Penalized 5 sz
NEW YORK, Dec. 28 (UPI) -Financial
figures for the Giants Giants-Colts
Colts Giants-Colts game:
Attendance 64,185.
Grogs receipts (including radio
and .Television) $698,646.00.
Taxes and rent $129,894.56.
Game operating expenses $36,
829 20.
Net' receipts $531,872.24.
Players' pool (70 per cent of
net) $372,310.57.
Each winning players share (42
Vi shares) $4,718.77.
Each losing players' share (42-
shres) $3,111.33.
Pool for sectional second place
clubs (Los Angeles and Chicago
Bears, Western Conference; Cleve Cleveland,
land, Cleveland, Eastern Conference) $37, $37,-231.06.
231.06. $37,-231.06. ITODAY ENCANTO 35 201
John Wayne in
"THE BARBARIAN AND
THE GEISHA"
Virginia Field in
"ROCKABILLY BABY"
-
Service Center Theatres
TONIGHT
BALBOA 6:15 & 7:55
Gary Merrill Nancy Davis
"CRASH LANDING"
COCO SOLO 7:00
Robert Mitchum
Robert Wagner
"THE HUNTERS"
in Cinemascope & Color!
DIABLO HTS. 7:00
"ACCUSED OF MURDER"
MARGARITA 7:00
The Abominable Snowman"
PARAISO 7:00
Peter Finch Ian Hunter
"BATTLE OF THE
RIVER PLATE
In Color!
SANTA CRUZ 7:00
keorge Gobels Diana Dors
"I MARRIED A WOMAN
CAMP BIERD 7:00
Paul Newman Lita Milan
'THE LEFT HANDED GUN"
CAPITOLIO
S5. 20c.
TEACHER'S PET
With Clark Gable
.. Also
ANOTHER TIME,
ANOTHER PLACE
with Lana Turner

two in mind. The strategy paid
off after Gabler got on on an
error and before the Smokers
were retired two runs came in.
The Smokers had scored sin single
gle single runs in the first, second and
third off CV starter John An Anderson,
derson, Anderson, and the Yanks plated
their only marker In the sev seventh.
enth. seventh. Anderson dropped his
third decision as compared to
two triumphs. Bill Slack, who
gave up the Smokers' two last
runs, worked the last frame. Jim
Hardison got Yankees out in the
bottom of the ninth.
Outfielder George Altman,
who played first base for the
slumping Gabler for eight in innings
nings innings had a perfect four-for-

four day.
rvor iri' Atrnnriiilrp lefthander
Dick Luebke, who has now
beaten tne Beermen mur umra,
gained his fifth win against on only
ly only one loss. Luebke, who went
the distance and gave up 11
safeties, now stands alone as the
wlnningest hurler In the loop.
His mates pounded out 21
hits off starter and loser Pat
Scantlebury and three other
CB pitchers. Scantlebury's rec record
ord record is now 1-3. He lasted only
one and one-third Innings and
was followed to the hill by
Chuck Page, Anselmo Correa
and Brown.
A total of seven homers were
hit in the game. They were
smashed by Ken Hunt, Pump Pump-sie
sie Pump-sie Gr?en, and Ellas Osorlo for
the winners; and Hector Lopez,
who blasted two, and Reinaldo
Grenald provided the round round-trippers
trippers round-trippers for the losers.
Frank Austin, the veteran
Kings lnfielder, had a five-for-six
afternoon to be the leading
batter of the contest.
US, Australia
Split Opening
Cup Matches
BRISBANE, Australia, Dec. 29
(UPI) The United States split
the opening singles matches of
the Davis Cup challenge round
with Australia today but appear
ed to have lost the. daring gam
ble on which non-playing captain
Perry Jones had pinned his hopes
for final victory.
Alex Olmedo of Los Angeles
gave the United States its first
opening match victory in a chal challenge
lenge challenge round since 1954 when he
beat Mai Anderson, 8-6, 2-6, 9-7,
8-6, before a crowd of 18,000 in
Milton Arena.
But then Ashley Cooper, gener
ally considered the No. 1 ama
teur tennis player in the world,
ruined Jones gamble wnen ne
beat 23-yearold Barry Mackey of
Dayton, Ohio; 4-6, 6-3, 6-2- 6-4, in
the second match of the best-of-five
series, Mone victory each.
The doubles' match is scheduled
for tomorrow with the concluding
singles matches on Wednesday.
MacKay's defeat was a bittler
pill for the 70 year-old Jones, cap
taining his first U.S. Davis Cup
team, because the 6-foot, 3-inch
Dayton power player had been
i i i i ..
picxea ior me singles maicn over
Hamilton Richardson of Arlington,
Va., the United States' No. 1 a a-mateur
mateur a-mateur player. Jones by-passed
Richardson in favor of MacKay
because he thought MacKay's
size and power were better suit suited
ed suited to the gruelling conditions un
der which the challenge round
matches are being played.
Richardson, who watched the o o-pening
pening o-pening matches from the side sidelines,
lines, sidelines, Is expected to team with
Olmedo tomorrow against Ander Anderson
son Anderson and Cooper in the now All All-important
important All-important doubles match. Rich Richardson
ardson Richardson was openly critical of
Jones' so-called "snub" and said
before today's matches that Jones'
reasons foe the shift "are a lot
of baloney."
The opening matche were play
ed in fcegree temeprature on
a court made so slippery by con constant
stant constant rain that referee Cliffe
Sproule permitted the players to
wear spikes. i

7 VOL
35c. 20e.
Spanish Program!
DESNUDATE
LUCRECIA
with Silvia Pinal
- Also:
EL SUPERFLACO
Evangelina Ellzondo

VICTORIA
25c. 15c.
MAGIC RING
with Sabu
Also:
THE TALL
STRANGER
with Joel McCrea

Robbie s Rough

Marlboro
Ab R H Po A
Napoleon, rf , 5
Brathwaite, 2b . 4
Hardaway, 3b
Prescott, If
Hardison. n . n
Altman, lb-lf . 4
Bernardl ss . 3
Cobos, e ...... 3
Mitchell. If ... 3
Robinson, p . 3-
uamer ....... 1
Totals
31 5 8 27 10
Gabler safe on error for Rob Robinson
inson Robinson in the 9th.

Carta Vieja
Bartirome, lb 3 0 0 12 0
Schmidt, rf ... 4 0 0 2 0
Jacobs, 2b .... 4 0 0 0 2
Parsons, If .... 3 1 1 1 0
Wilhelm, 3b ... 4 0 1 1 3
Kern, cf 4 0 0 2 0
Allie, ss 4 0 1 31
Patton, c.,,.,2 0 0 61
Anderson, p . 2 0 0 0 7
Thome 1 0 0 0 0
Slack 0 0 0 0 1

Totals
31 1 3 27 15
Thome srnnnrierl nnt. fnr An.
derson in 9th.
Score By Innings
Marlboro 111000 0025 8 2
Carta Vieja 000 0001001 3 2
SUMMARY Errors: Jacobs,
Brathwaite. Bernard. Allie Runs
batted in: Hardaway, Robinson,
Altman, Allie, Gabler, Napoleon.
Earned runs: Carta Vieja 1,
MariDoro, 4. Two base hits: Alt Alt-man.
man. Alt-man. Parsons. Sacrifice hits-
Brathwaite, Hardaway, Bernard.
Struck out by: Anderson 4, Rob
inson 4, Haralson 2. Base on
balls off: Anderson 2. Robinson
2, Slack 2, Hardison 1. Left on
base: Carta Vie.la 6. Marlboro 6.
Pitchers record: Anderson 3
runs, 6 hits in 8 innings; Robin Robinson
son Robinson 1 run, 3 hits In 8 innings.
Winning pitcher: Robinson (3-
2) Losing pitcher: Anderson (2-
3) Umpires: Matheny, Thorn Thornton,
ton, Thornton, Hinds. Attendance: 2,377.
Time of game: 2:29.
King's Reign
Kings Ab R H Po A
Austin, 2b .... 6 3 5 2" 0
green, ss . . 6 2 2 3 3
enley, cf . . 4 3 1 0 0
Hunt,, If ..... '4 2 3 0 0
Peterkln. If ... 2 1 1 0 0
Heron, 3b .... 6 2 2 1 4
Gladstone, rf . 6 1 4 5 0
Peden; c ..... 2 0 0 4 0
Alston, c 2 1 1 2 0
Osorio E., lb ... 5 2 2 9 1
Luebke, p .... 5 1 0 1 1
Totals
48 18 21 27 9
Cerveza Balboa
Shetrone, cf
Charles, c ..
Roberts, lb
Parris, 3b .
Lopez, 2b
Peeples, rf
Grenald, If
Moore, ss .
Scantlebury,
Page, p .
Correa, n
. 5
. 5
0
0
1
1
3
1
2
2
0
9 e
1 4
1 1
0 1
0 1 0
0 0 0
1
1
Kellman .
Brown, p
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
Total,,
38 6 11 27 10
Kellman grounded out for Co.
rrea in 7th.
Score By Innings
Kings 320060 01618 21 0
C. Balboa 010 002 003 6 11 3
SUMMARY Errors: Shet
rone, Roberts, Peeples. Runs bat.
ted in: Austin, Green 3, Henley,
Hunt 2. Peterkin, Heron 2, Glad Gladstone
stone Gladstone 3. E. Osorlo 3, Lopez 3,
Grenald 3. Two base hits: Aus Austin,
tin, Austin, Green, Roberts, Grenald.
Moore. Home runs: Lonez 2,
Hunt, Green, Henley, E. Osorio,
Grenald. Doubleplays: Parris,
Lopez and Roberts. Passed balls:
Charles. Struck out: By Luebke
6, Scantleburv 1, Page 3, Correa
1, Brown 2. Base on balls: Off
Scantlebury 2, Page 1. Brown 1.
Left on base: Kings 7, Cerveza
Balboa 5. Earned runs: Kings
17, Cerveza Balboa 6. Pitchers
record: Scantlebury 5 runs, 5
hits In 1 53; Page 6 runs. 7
hits In 3; Correa 0 runs, 2 hits
in 2 13; Brown 7 runs, 7 hits in
2 Innings. Winning pitcher:
Luebke (5-1). Losing pitcher:
Scantleburv (1-3). Umolres: Hil.
zinger, Williams, Corrigan. At Attendance:
tendance: Attendance: 3,312. Time of game:
2:38
REPORT CIGARETE SALES ..
NEW YORK (UPI) Business
ween HI B K F A i c
night a record 424 billion cigar cigar-ets
ets cigar-ets wer sold in the United
Stateh this year.
RIO
S5e.
20c.
THE BROTHERS
KARAMAZOV
with Yul Brynner
, Also;;
UNDERWATER
WARRIOR
with Dan Dalley

1

I 1.
15 m ;,--'-

I THE GRIDIRON AND THE CLASSROOM The post-Sputnik era of increased respect for,
. j learning takes concrete form at Asbury Park (NJ.) High School where good scholars as well,
f as varsity athletes are awarded the school letter, Charles Willingham, left, wears his football,
j letter no more proudly than does Ralph Vandersloot his for a 97 scholastic average. The scholar
letter is the same size1 but is distinguishable by a differently colored border and a lamp of
I learning. A 90 nr better average will win the letter.

Miss Patience Scores Easily
In Featured Old Year's Xap

Balboa Brewings

By VICTOR M. CAREW
tt Bnnhincnn's victory
11 11111 ut 1 j -'
over Carta Vieja yesterday was
the rightnanaer s w f"7
ance of the season. Robbie loos loosed
ed loosed especially good against the
.nnthnaw hitters, moreso against
Tony Bartirome.
The Rummen don't seem 10
possess any real effectiv punch
in tneir uncup. i"6"
Shant is probably awaiting Gair
Allie's awakening as the power
hitter his Stateside records indi
cate.
0O0
T.i in IncinC was
, JUI1I1 nuucisuu, ... ... :--o,
not hit hard, but the righhander
wasn't able to pitch himself out
of trouble in most instances. An Anderson
derson Anderson is considered to be one of
i uttv rithjrs in the League,
but he, Uke others of his ratmg,
are having 11 Kimi 01 muBn.
ouv
Over at Aauadolet tkt Brew Brewers
ers Brewers pitching taff again
clobbered by the Kings for the
second straight time. The pa parade
rade parade was led by Pat Scantlebu Scantlebury
ry Scantlebury and included Chuck Psga,
Anselmo Correa and Winston
Brown. The King have now
scored 32 runs against the
Beermen in thir last two
games.
rnntml wasn't the problem yes-
torHov ne Rrpwer Ditching gave
up only four bases on balls as
compared to 13 given uo in last
Friday's 14-8 loss to the Kings.
The Brewer pitching has been
nathetip in the last two games.
Neither the starters nor relievers
are showing any kind of eflec eflec-tiveness.
tiveness. eflec-tiveness. 0O0
RipharH T.uphke racked UD his
fifth win of the season and his
fourth consecutive victory over
the Beermen. In the six games
nlavpH hetween these two teams
th Kings have been th winnrs
on fiv occasions.
The Kings are showing the
most punch in the League, main mainly
ly mainly at the expense of Brewer
pitching. Manager Leon Kellman
is probably feeding on sleeping
Sugar Hail Shouts
For Chance At Title
After Beating Dupas
MTAMT REACH. Fla.. Dec. ifl
(UPI) Young Sugar Hart, up
set conqueror of Kaipn uupas,
yelled for a welterweight title
fight today but probably will be
matched soon with Vince Marti Martinez
nez Martinez for a Philadelphia bout.
Hart of Philadelphia, an 11-5
itnHoritncr wnn a ftnlit 10 rOUlld
decision over speedy Dupas of
New Orleans r rmay nigni Deiore
2,846 paying fans at the Miami
llA.nh ftiwtitnrinm
Tho lnnlrv Philariamhlan. 22. and
ranked second among contenders,
urai ohaA 144 M nnnnds to Dlinas'
Dunas. 23. iii rated third
by the Ring magazine; but he
moo fonnrsri K'rtnsv nitrrr npoausp
n.o . . j o
of his experience ana eiusiveness.
Marty Stein, Hart's manager,
pressed loudly for a shot at
champion Don Jordan. Stein said
ti Warrv Marksnn. msnapinff di
rector of the Internation Boxing
Club, "Let's sign now for a title
fight. Hart's going to be the next
cnampion, anyway.
But Markson replied, "Let's talk
ahntit a nnssihlo match with
Vince Martinez at Philadelphia."
Martinez of Paterson, N. J., is
rated ninth.
Angry Dupas demanded a re-
ttttn Kmit unfH 1714 ITa aaifl lfl
licked him Friday night but I

2

pills in order to get some sleep
at nights.
oOo
Over tha past week the games
have been featured with big;
scores and several cases of
players collecting four, or. five
hits per game. Frank Austin,
in a determined comeback bid,
picked up eight hits in. his -last
two games, Granv lie Gladstone
and Hector Lopez have collect collected
ed collected six apiece.
oOo
Everytime the Brewers lose a
game they make it' harder : for
themselves to get back in conten contention.
tion. contention. They cannot afford to lose
many more and finish in the first
division. .They still have a chance
to show the fans why they.' are
all considered good ballplayers in
their Stateside leagues.
IN THE STRETCH PhU
Jordan extends his six-feet-10
tu its full advantage to hook a
shot over Minneapolis' Larry
Foust, caught, flat-footed at
Madison Square Garden in
New York. Height count here.
PANAMA

oanu ape

CAN FILL YOUR NEEDS.'

" 1

The Stud Maqui's four-year-old
chestnut filly Miss Patience yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon raced to her
most rewarding local victory in
the $1,000 Old Year's Handicap
at the President Remon race racetrack.
track. racetrack. ;
An even money favorite, the
filly got' off to an- excellent start
in the five iurlong dash, chased
pacesetting The Squire to the fi.
nal bend where she pulled along alongside
side alongside then raced away to score by
three lengths in the drive to the
wire.
Riscal, which was closed out
in the first quarter, recovered
and closed with a belated spurt
to hip The Squire by a head for
the place.. Thunderstreak was
fourth, Don Dani fifth and Zut Zut-pheh
pheh Zut-pheh last.
Miss Patience turned the live
panels in 1:03 1-5 and returned
$4.60 to win and $9.40 in the qui
niela with Riscal.,, She was-' ope
of the three winners ridden by
record-breaking jockey Braulio
Baeza.
Cool-headed Braulio had the
fans standing with his excellent
rides aboard Maese and Tatin.
Maese, a fractious colt, came up
under Baeza timely rating ar.d
strong hand ride to whip favorite
Nebrisca in the sixth race at odds
of $10.60 straight. He also beat
an odds on choice when he.
brought up Tatin to set back
High Day in the ninth race. Tatin
paid $6.60 to win. Favorites or
second choices won all the other
races.
Hustling Chilean- jockey Fernan Fernando
do Fernando Alvarez alto pushed home
three winnersall mutuels chqic chqic-es
es chqic-es to share saddle honors with
the brilliant Baeza.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
Don Cirilo $6.80, $3.40
Granadero $3.40
SECOND RACE
Dagon $7.40, $3.80
Town's Wall $5.60
First Double: $29.40
THIRD RACE
Tinela $3.20, $2.60
Dr. Bill $3.40
FOURTH RACE
Folletito $3.40, $2.20
Silver Girl $2.20
- Quintal : $3
FIFTH RACE
Plucky $4., $3.
Camakns $3.
SIXTH RACE
Maese $10.60. $4.80
Nebrisca $4.20
SEVENTH RACE
Princesa GUana $4.40, $43.20
Mariman $3.80
Stcond Double: S29.40
EIGHTH RACE
Miss Patience $4.60, $2.80
Riscul $3.60
Qulnle'a: $9.40
Tatin $6.60, 2.80
High Day 2.40
Ont-Twa: $12.(0
- TENTH RACE
Homan $3., $2.80
-i Emilv Mary M.20
Orw-twe: $14.40
AMERICAN

Editor; CONRAOO SARCtANT-

PANAMA; prjIotSl mm':p:''
Teams K CV M CB ; W 1 L : Pet. OB

wana viejtt .... X 3
Marlboro 2 3 x
Cerveza Balboa 1
! 2

Totals ....67,8 11 ',Z2.i -YESTERDAY'S
RESULTS J

At Colon: Marlboro 5, Carta Vieja, 1 V, '
At Aguadulce: i Kings 18, Cerveza Balboa 6'
- TONIGHT'S GAME"
At Olympic Stadiums Carta Vieja ;(Prbut 2-0) vs.
Cerveza Balboa (Maranda 21) u
Came time: 7:30

St. John's Of NY Can Win 1st
Tourney In 14 Years Tonight

By FRED DOWN
Joe Lanchick. whn inanheH ,'St
John's of New York to the college
ubskciusu ueigius in me laius,, is
within one victory of ending the
Redmen's 14 year tournament
championship famine, ?
Lapchick, who returned to jSt.
John's in 1956 after a nine-year
absence, guided the Redmenanto
the final round nf fhp Hnlirlav
Festival tournament Saturday
nignt via a 76-63 victory over
previously unDeaten Dayton. St.
John's meets St. .Tnspnh's nf Phil
adelphia, 79 65, conqueror of
Utah, in the title game Monday
night at Madison Square Garden-.
A member of the "Original
Celtics," Lapchick led St. 'John's
10 national invitation Tournament
triumohs in 1943 and. 1944. That
1944 NIT is the lasMmainr tmif.
nament St. John's won although
it participated in many various
tourneys unaer toaches f r a n k
jMcjruire ana -Dusty Uf stefano,
Two Brilliant Perfermars
St. John's., alrpartv fankwl 1Sth
nationally, displayed two brilliart
Derformers in Tnnv .Tarlronn anrt
Alan Seiden. Jackson, a' hot hot-shooting
shooting hot-shooting soph, scored 29 points
while Seiden, the team's veteran
back-court star, tallied 21. It was
St. John's seventh victory against
one loss ?na Dayton's first defeat
atter eight triumphs. Syracuse
heat Cornell. 66-60. and Holv .Cross
defeated Niagara, 86-80, in Holi
day Festival consolation games.
furaue took the wrap un of the
Hoosier Class c Saturday night by
beatine Notre Dame. 74-59 Pur.
due led, 34-23, it the half ad
never was in trouble as Wilspn
Eison scored 20 points. -Butler
beat Indiana. 81-76. in the mnn.
lation of the round-robin tourney.
Other Tourneys Continue
In the other tournaments which
still are in progress?
Queen City at Buffalo, N.Y
Dartmouth's Ivy League cha'-i-n'nns
whinnpd Brieham Ynnnff R8-
76, and Canisius downed Seton
Hall, 7?-45. m semifinal g'mes.
Big Eight tourney at Kansas
City, Mo. Nebraska beat Oklaho-
In
BALBOA

JANUARY 1-3-4-5

Jib tie Orleans' favorite lfestival offjnl

BflT CHRISTINE
Wf'fl
V---'.m;h;

I f mm i :i

OUR HEW YEAR'S ATTRACTION

3 9 7 ; ,563 1

3 8 ft 'nrt--'
x
.3T3 :6
ma State, 55-48, and Colorado de defeated
feated defeated Kansas. 63-52. in firstround
games. f 1
Southwest Conference tourney at
Houston, Tex. T e x a s Christian,
13th ranked in the country,, top-
nled Sflilthprn MothvJict 1 an ,4
Texar AaM upser Rrce,, 6(59,

AH;i-ouege ; tournament at .Okla .Oklahoma:
homa: .Oklahoma: City Duqueshfei-paeett W
6-9 SODh Boh SIohnHnilr lrnnot.l

off Bowling, Greeit of Otot,M&,

afiu uivjauuma uiy upset eighm eighm-ranked
ranked eighm-ranked tournament-fayorite Xav4f-
er of Ohio, 81-54. ;,r
In other noh-tournament games,
Bob Ferry scored 33 points to lead 2 1
St. Louis to a 90-79 victory o v e r &
Georgia Tech: Bra dlov holrt t.

foot, 3-inch Claude Lefebvre to 13
points and whipped Gonzaga, no-'!
73; Auburn extended the nat rtn's

longest winning streak to 17 frames "J
with a 104-78 win over Florerjce a:
State:- Gene Tormnhlun' fit
led Tennessee to a -79r59 decisipn

uver ytrgima; ynio state, downed :
Princeton,,. 75-66 and Jim Wwi
land s twft.hanripri of Kt i wn;

. ""Wl 'Til If f
five seconds left I'fted .nr-.n?1E.
atate to a 49-47 win over the Air
Force Academy. ; --..o'-'t
A BIG BANG ,?.
SANTIAGO, Chile, fUPn A
child setoff' a f'recrckerl fi
twn of Isinrynrhm 'f "aUKi4li
Christmas ThirHv and, burned
aown theown hall; 'i '',.
hi P I V F I N
Me. m $
30c. 9:(tn
LAST n.YI
Ar, r -th
NO TIME FOR
SERGEANTS
TOMORROW
0TE DAY-RELEASE!
Brigltte BARDOT In
tit a tin irirkiu
- rMMJILI I y
Xri whtnurnnr rvt t .' I
(Prohibited For Minors)
THEATER
t

didn t get uie aecision."

, . M MM U.X .ttU fH .W .1 .!. -ttkJui O. ..H..,
7



m ui ; ""'M .. V K

ions
-..an .eirt(
TTTouVo Stepping Iritb'A
Ameche Myhia, Unitas
It's an
old friend
ileal Livo One; Suh
Spark Team To Victory
I-,
0-

- lit

;.' by
JOE WILLIAMS

nfW YORK-There Isn't much
.bX nS Dame
d that Joseph Byrne Jr:, prom prom-SSnt
SSnt prom-SSnt Newark alum'aj' tot
veart chairman of. the Port au
Iifrftv iisuaUy doesn't Know. On
banquet cfrcuit he's intjoduc intjoduc-Id
Id intjoduc-Id as "Mr, Notre Dame of the
East."1'
Basketball
Results
East
- HrtMay Fval Nw.York
. (Semifmals)
(Consolations)
Holy Cross 86 Niagara 8ft
Syricuse 66 CoraeU 60
' Qumh City, Buffalo
' (First Round)
Dartmouth 88 Brigham Young 75
Cnisius 72 Seton Hall 45
Connecticut 64 Temple 46 N
Adelphi 66 Lehigh 47 ;
Cortland Tchrs. 87 Hofstra 78
StVPeter's (N.J.) 64 Wagner 62
. South
Tennessee 79 Virginia 59
Florida St.. 8a Louisiana St. 67' t
Auburn 104 Florence St. 78
Grambling 90 Dillard 8 -Southern
V: 78 Xavler (La.) 76
Midwest
Bis B'flM Tiijrv Kant. City
' (First Bound)
Colorado' 68 Kansas". 52
Nebraska Oklahoma St. 48
vantville, Ina., InvlUttonal
(Final) .
Evansville 100 TennesseeTecM 73 73-:";;t
:";;t 73-:";;t (Cbnsolation) mi
: Binary's (Cal.) 71 Wash. (Mo.) 64
Ohio State 75" Princeton 66 i
Detroit 87 North Dakota St. 73
r 6eatUe 70 Loyola (111. ) 49 ; Kn
Marquette 76 MUwU. of Wis. 60
Miami (Ohio) 74 DePaul 67
St. Louis 90 Georgia Tech 79
Butler 81 Indiana 76
Purdue 1 NotrrJDame- 59 i
NorthWern 118 West Va 109
Quincy- CoV70 Illinois Wesleyan ( 1
Western Jllinois 71 Hamline,68 ,;
. Sbulhweat
' Atl-Colltg. Tny.i OM.tlty '-!:
i r Semifinals)
Oklahoma City 81 Xaviet (O.) 51
Duquesne 69 Bowling Green 65 I
Oregoh64 San Francisco S3
Tulsa 80 WichiU 75 ""I
Sounywttt tonrjfiny. nouiwn
! ,Ao (Semiiinala) -.
Texaa ASM 60 Rice 69, ij-'iiv
TCU 74 SMU $i r. .V v
t (Consolations)
" Texaa Tech sa exaa 57 ;s
Arkansas 60 Baylbr 57 : i
Arizona St. 74, San Diego St, 65
West
Par West Clastic Ctrvtlllt, Or.
I (First Round)
Oregon St. 49 Air Force 47
Iowa 82 Wyoming 74. ; J
' Southern Cal. 63 Santa Clara 49
Montana 73 Montana St. 50 '1
Washington 85 Minnesota 63 1
Naho St. 89 Alaska U. 46
California 90 Arizona 46
UCLA 71 Denver 57
Utah St; 69 Idaho 60

r4rxvM 't

Vot 'the dismissal of Terry
Rrpnnan as head football coacn
of the Irish was as astonishing to
him as it ws to---most of the
sports world.,
"First I Heard of it was" on a
late news TV program," said
Byrne. I could hardly believe
my ears. So far as I knew, every
body out there was very nappy
with him.
The following morning Byrno
phoned the suddenly upended
young toach. : 'You know at
muth about this as I do" was
Bronnan's response. "I didn't
have Wit stightest inkling I was
to go."
"How does Moose explain it?"
asked Byrne. Edward JSjause,
director of athletics. 1
i Brennan laughed..."They didn't
bother to take Moose into their
confidence. In fact, he didn't
learn be had a coachless varsity
until late the next day.
So what's behind the story?
Was Brennan the victim of alum alumni
ni alumni pressure? Is this a tacit ad admission
mission admission by Notre Dame "powers
that they erred in entrusting a a-major
major a-major football operation to the
new 30-year-old Milwaukeean, who
was drafted from the high-school
ranks some four years ago? Was
there idssension on the squad?
Byrne expressed strong doubts
the ouster was the result of an
alumni coup. -."True. Brennan
had his critics, but that's not u-
mque in the life of a Notre Dame
coach. Even Rockne bad them.
If there had been an organized
move to get Brennan, I, as well
as scores of others close to the
school, would -surely have been
aware of w'
Brennan had a 6-4 record this
year, only slightly infrerior to his
7,-3, ,f, last, season when he was
Ce-signed' given an Increase in
salary and publicly lauded by
Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C.,
executive vice-president ot t h e
am jo uenuieqa put itjtsaaAinn
board of athletic control, the
same agency which has just giv given
en given him the air. along with, one
fervently hopes, best wishes for
a most-enchantma Christmas. 1
When Frank Leahy's healtb
compelled .hinv to quit coaching,
Father Jovce and other N.D. of
ficials screened with him a list
of prospective successors. And al although
though although Leahy was responsible for
crennans presence on the staff,
having brought him in to handle
the freshmen, he argued, against
the appointment of his protege.,
('"He's too youngV protested) I
ht retiring rpontor. "Wt'r run-'
;ning thin on material, and at
tituatiod K Jiabti to doyolop
her that mlghtt4 wually prove'
Iniuriout to hit L nw, 1 1
hit health.' Glv'h boy more
tifftf to doVolop.'T.; f-;;'V r
' The fact, that jenaVih "wai hir
ed on a 'year-to-year'ihisii would
seem to suggest the rnAvers shar-
ea tany'i, concern, even u tney
handn't beed iwayed fer it at the
time, In this connection, It is in.
teresting to note thstf Brennan's
successdr, Joe Kuharich, lured
from the 'Washington Jpros, ,was
promptly' handed a four-year con
tract.
I Reports of squad discord reach reached
ed reached sensitive reportbrial ears fol following
lowing following Notre Dame's loss to Ar Army,
my, Army, in which the v Irish played
wretchedly, They i centered bn
George Izo, ."He's the best

By ABL WRIGHT ;
NEW YORK. Dec. 28 (UPD-

The Baltimore Colta won their
firsf National Footban League
championship today when Alan
Ameche blasted over for a
touchdown that beat; the New
York Giants, 23-17 in the first,
sudden death overtime in league
history. rii;-i ;v
Baltimore '-won the game and
the title in story-book fashion1.
The Colts' tied the score at! 17
all on Steve Myhra'a O-jard
field goal ,with only seven sec seconds
onds seconds remaining: 5 fa r regulation
time and Ameche then cappea
an ao-yard march in 'byertim
with a one-yard amash'bver
ripht tackle, for the clincher.: I
The Giants, vno puiiea oif au
most incredible ralllesx, all ea
son to reach the championship'.
anneared tvo have' (Won tneir
fifth title when 'thev held the
Colts on the one-yard line 'and
then scored twice in lesa than
five minutes to take a 17-14 lead.
They were still In front with
only two and one-half minutes
to go, xne cows naa to travel
86 yards and only had those few
seconds to do the ot." j ;
But John UniUs, who once
played semi-pro football for
$6 a game, riddled New York's
secondary with passes. He
completed three straight to i
Raymond Berry In the closing
seconds of regulation time to
put the ball on the New York
13.
Myhra then booted a 20-yard
field coal with- time running out
to force the sudden death play playoff
off playoff to the dismay ot New York
rooters in the crowd of 64,185.
The 15,000 Baltimore rooters
in Yankee Stadium then groan groaned
ed groaned when New -York won the toss
to receive In the first overtime overtime-neriod
neriod overtime-neriod in N.F.L. history.
But tne 'Baltimore aeiense,
which had been superb while
the Colts built ud. a 14-3 nan-
time lead, then came through
and forced Don Chandler to
punt. i
The colts startea on ineir zu
and moved 80 yards in 13 Plays
to win the cnampionsnip in
their first playoff appearance.
The passes or unitas plus tne
runnina of Ameche and L. G.
Dupre put the ball on the New
YorK 20; umtas,. gamming nice a
riverboat card snanr, tnen took
a chance on another fpasT and
completed it to Berry on the New
York eight. Ameche picked up
one yard and Unitas passed a
gain, this time to Jim Mutschel Mutschel-ler
ler Mutschel-ler on the New York one.
On the next play, Ameche
slashed over his own right tac
kle to Insure himself and the
rest of the Baltimore players the
victors-cut of $4,718.77. The Gi Giants
ants Giants got losers' shares of $3,-
111.33 each. c
The Giants appeared faeed
with disaster far sooner than
that. The Colts rambled to a
first down on the New York
three late in the third period.
But the Giants held Ameche
in three smashes and one
sneak by Unltai and took ever
on their own five,
passer we got," players were
quoted, "but or some reason
the coach keeps him on the
bench."
Presnetly Izo was playing regu
larly. and pssing sensationally,
but it soon became clear he
wasn't the answer. The Irish
would win one week, lose the
next. There may "be: no mystery
here at all. Brennan was prooa
bly fired for losing. In football
foundries this if routine stuff.
Somehow, a higher approach was
expected at Notre Dame.
JOYERIA
Central Ave. No. 15-107
In

A CALL FROM PAUL"

?g:t'LES PAUL:

Every Tuesday, Thursdayand Saturday
, from 12tl5 to 12:30 p.m.
.ySur YCN

840 Kilocycles
PANAMA

On the-third play alter that.

Charley Conerly heaved far
down the field to Kyle Rote
Rote fumbled when he was nit
by Andy Nelsons But Alex web web-sters
sters web-sters trailing the play, picked
up the ball on the Baltimore 25
and raced to tne one. Met rnp
lett blasted over to make it 14-
io. - --. i
The New York defense, which
hroinrht. waves of cheers -from
the fans during the second half,
immediately forced the Colts to
mint 'New York started on its
19 in' the final minutes of the
final quarter and rolled 81 yards
m lour .plays, to score ano taw
Cbnerly hit Bob fichnelker
with a 46-varder for the big
gainer and then completed a 15 15-yarder
yarder 15-yarder to Frank Gilford to make
it 16-14, Pat Summerall, whose
49-yard field goal in the closing
seconds beat the C 1 e v eland
Browns and forced a Playoff for
eastern honors, hooted tne ex
tra rjolnt. Summerall had given
New York the lead in the first
quarter with a v 36-yard neid
goal.,
Just before' that, linebacker
Sam Huff had blocked Myhra's
first field goal try from the New
York 27.
- The Colts scored twice In the
second quarter to take a 14-3
lead.
' On the first play of the sec second
ond second quarter, Gifford fumbled
and Ray Krous recovered for
Baltimore on the New York 20.
Lenny Moor and Ameche ran
to the on and Ameche plung plunged
ed plunged over for Baltimore's first
touchdown.
The Giants got a break sev several
eral several minutes later when Jackie
Simoson fumbled Chandler's
mint and Mel Guy recovered for
New York on the Baltimore iu.
But Gifford' fumbled Conerly's
nltchbut on the next Play and
Don Joyce recovered ior Balti Baltimore
more Baltimore on its 14.
The Colts, with Unitas throw
ing, faking and running the
team brilliantly, tnen arove oo
yards in 14 plays to get their
" i kSMiA
second toucnaown jus ociurc
the half ended, unitas enaea
the drive with a 15-yard pass to
fserry, who"' was' standinir be-
t.wn fimlen Tunnell and Jim
patton of the Giants in the New
York end Bone.
New York 3 0 7 7 0-17
Baltimore 0 14 0 3 623
Tw York: 1 TD. IriPlett- CI,
plungje),1 Gifford (15, paes from
conerly). Pat. Summerall 2. FG,
Summerall (36) - -i
Baltimore : TD, Ameche 2 (1,
plunge).-Gifford (15, pass from
Conerly). Fat. Summerall J. FG,
Summerall (3ff).
Baltimore: TD, Ameche 2 (1,
plunge; t,t plunge); Berry tie,
nass from Unitas).; Pat, Myh;a
2. ru, Mynra iu;
; Blu-Gry, Mntgomry, Ala.
Blue' 16 Gray 0 v
, Gator Bowl, Jacksonville, Fit.
Mississippi 7 Florida h h--
- h-- Tangerine Bowl, Orlando, Fit.
East Texas St. 26 Missouri Vly
Shrln Gam, San Franeiie
East 26 West 14
r North-South, Miami
South 49 North 20
next to th Fuerza y Luz
and hit Trio
1090 Kilocycles
COLON

CASAL

1 --

K J... W:::::EHSE5

4

Im l"f"V

FIGHT FOR CONTROI Richie Guerin. 9, of New York
and Cincinnati's Jack McCarthy, 26, stand ready at the pro professional
fessional professional Royals' Larry Staverman, 10, and the Knickerbock Knickerbockers'
ers' Knickerbockers' Willie Naulls, 6, fight for ball at Madison Square Garden.

o
DIABLO MAJOR LEAGUE
Teams
RC Nebi
Wynn Friction P.
P.A.A. "Jets"
Fuefza y Luz
W L
iovt lavs
40 20
31
30
29
30
Seymour Agency
26V4 33Vi
26 34
Lucky Strike
Pan Imperial
23Mi 38
Pan Imperial
23 36V4Mi
22Vi 37
Friction
H.I. Homa
RC Nehi and
Wynn
Proofing scored shutouts to pull
further away from the rest o!
the teams in the Diablo Major
League. RC Nehi edged Lucky
Strike -by winning the first game
by 17 pins, the second game by
59 nins and the final game by
just three pins. Bill Coffey, with
a 601,a led the winners and .repe
Damian scored 559 to lead Luc
ky Strike.
Wynn Friction Proofing beat
Seymour Agency 4 to 0 to remain
a galf game behind Nehi. Ted
Keeler, subbing for Ron Amato
paced the winners with a 596.
Bruce Hassler's 582 led the Sey Seymour
mour Seymour team who was handicapped
with two blind scores, Seymour
led the first two games until the
seventh frame and then the roof
fell in as Wynn finished strong.
P.A.A. took over third place in
the loop by scoring a 3 to 1 win
over Fuerza y Luz. The "Jets"
have moved from sixth to third
in just two weeks. Ted Malanson
was high for the Jets with 573
and Roily Gliechman's 558 topped
the losers.
Pan Imperial beat H. I. Homa
3 to 1 to take over 7th place as
H. I. Homa dropped to last place.
Ted Albritton with 541 was high
for the winners. Bud Balcer hd
580 for H. I. Homa's team which
was handicapped by two blind
scores.
Roily Gliechman, league presi president,
dent, president, announced that the league
will not bowl tomorrow. Bowling
will be resumed Jan. 6.
Lucky Strik 0
Soto
Morrow
Blind
Luttenberger
Metzger
Damian
169 149 189. 50'
175 175
158 158 31K
139 166 158 463
166 184 160 510
199 169 191 539
Totals
848 826 856 2520

CommiHee Members
For Panama Open
Dick Dehlinger, chairman of the
Panama Invitational Open Golf
Championship Tournament which
will be played at the Panama
Golf Club the latter part of Jan January
uary January yesterday released the names
of the committee chairmen and
committee members who will han handle
dle handle the complete arrangements for
the Open.
The list follows:
General chairman: Dick Dehlin Dehlinger.
ger. Dehlinger. ;
Co-chairman: Manuel R. Arias.
Asst. to chairman: Jim Ridge.
Publicity: Ted Wilber, C. Paz
Rodriguez. 1
'Ticket chairmen: A. G. Robins.
Bruce Carpenter.
Programs: Jim Ridge, Grace
Dehlinger, Dora Azcarraga.
Finance committee: John West
man, Roberto Torres.
Air Force-Army Coordination:
Lt. Col. C. A. Babb.
Canal Zone Coordination: Jim
Hinckle. i
Sponsorship Committee: Roy
Glickenhaus.
CFN Radio and TV: Jack Waw Waw-kinson.
kinson. Waw-kinson. Tripleta: Gabriel de la Guardia
Felipe Clement.
Calcutta: Alberto Arias, Dr. A.
E. Gerrans, Carlos de la Guardia,
Julio Valdes, Luis Chandeck.
Starters: Gus Medinger. Bob
Lombrola, Jr.
Chief Marshal of the Open:. Ma Manuel
nuel Manuel Esp.nosa.
. .... : t V. in

-

I
4
t t
' J -..-1
RES
RC Nohl 4
Vesclo
Klumpp
Allen
Kaelin
Coffey
189 130 170 539
127 127 135 aatf
178 178 155 511
173 202 184 5:y
198 188 215 601
Tqtals 865 875 859 2598
Seymour Agoncy 0
Beaver
169 155 324
Blind
Blind
152 15?
163 163 163 483
Bates
Hassler
147
170 154 471
215 170 197 582
189 170 168 527
Soyster
Totals
856 842 837 2545
Wynn Friction Proofing 4
Dube
190 194 16& 552
Hinely
Keeler
Graham
Bell
i71 157 157, 485
192 181 223 58
191 184 193 568
177 163 216 556
Totals 921 879 957 2757
Fuena y Luz 1
Blind
Tarr
Bieber
Fistonich
Gliechman
151 151 151 453
111 193 144 448
157 183 185 5W
170 159 176 50')
191 166 201 558
COM ETA DOS DIC 2 Luntt
Totals
780 852 857 2489
P.A.A. 3
Blind
De Luca
King
Melanson
Lane
145 145 145 413
138 195 159 '492
158 192 191 541
198 181 194 573
193 147 153 493
Totals 832 860 842 2594
Pan Imporlal 3

Albritton 173 188 180 511
Prusinowski 165 125 182 472
Palm 186 154 160 500
Burgoon 141 140 158 43B
Kunkel 150 180 158 488
Totals 815 787 838 2440
H.I. Homa 1
Charters 183 196 190 569
Pope 122 169 157 448
Blind 141 141 141 4?3
Balcer 185 210 185 580
Blind 139 139 139 417

Dick Dehlinger
Elected Prexy Of
Panama Golf Club
Dick Dehlinger, well known
Isthmian golfer and chairman of
the Panama Open Invitational Golt
Championship held at the Panama
Golf Club each year, was elected
President of the Panama Golf Club
last week for the year 1959.
With Dehlinger, Julio R. Valdes
was elected vice president, Jim
B. Hinkle form the Canal Zone
was elected secretary, and John
E. Westman carried on in his
'permanent' job as treasurer (a
position he seemingly has held
since the Panama Club was first
organized, back sometime when
you had to ride horseback td get
to the club.)
The new board of directions tor
the Panama Club for 1959 was
elected by the Club membersmp
at the same time. General in
don, of the Caribbean Air Com Command,
mand, Command, was elected to honorary
membership on the board. The
board of directors for the Pana Panama
ma Panama Club is now composed ot:
Jorge M. Boyd, James G. Ridge,
W. C. Sehmitt, Dr. Frank Ray Raymond.
mond. Raymond. Miguel J. Moreno. Jr C.
Paz Rodriguez, Luis Martin., Dr.
Roberto Aleman, Stanely Fidau Fidau-que,
que, Fidau-que, and Raul Arango, N.

TTmr.. ,, in). .. J

'STAND 'FAST
SCOTCH WHISKY 1
-.note in the, J
tall triangular gp
bottl

i. flfBUTORS
MOTTA Y MOTTA, U OA.
PANAMA t COLON

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6-All entries (negatives and copies) will become the
property of Vila Hermanos, S.A.
7.AH print must be in black and white.
THE' PRIZES WILL BE:
v First Prize: round'trip to Costa Rica with expenses paid.
r; : a '"oH Melo'.
Second Prize: A beautiful Agfa Ambi-Sllette Camera, a
Diploma and a Silver Medal
Third Prize: A beautiful Agfa Isolette Camera, a Diploma
and a Silver Medal.
And five more prizes of an Agfa lsola Camera,
Diploma and a Medal each.
ENTRIES SHOULD BE SENT TO ONE OF THE
FOLLOWING:
... i,
v v
Foto tjalcon, near El Panama Hilton Hotel. Vila
Hermanos, Via Espafla, 37-114, Panafoto Porras, :
Plaza 5 de Mayo, and Grecha, S. A., near the
Central Theater.

Classifieds



. -1 i

. ., r
..X MONDAY, DECEMXE3 1351
PAGE EIGHT
TEE PANAMA AMERICAN A5 INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
t THIS SPACE 1S FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
1
1-
i c 'V

( 753 W II

I 1

Resorts

Fearer cettaget, between Sanra
Clara and Rio Hat. Ntw lew
rates. Phene Balboa 2830.

PHILLIPS OeeeneWe Corteges
Santa Claw R. de P.
una 1-K77 Cristobal 1-1673.

Rooms

FOR RENT: Furnished room
with private bathroom and en entrance.
trance. entrance. Cooking facilities. 43 rd
Straat No. 13.

'Fabulous Fishing
To Be Shown Today
Af Balboa USO-JWB
For sportmen In this area, the
USO-JWB offers the Pectacular
color film "Fabulous Fishing in
South America," today at the
Balboa USO-JWB Armed Forces
Service Center beginning at 7.30
p.m.
This film is a dramatic full fo fo-lor
lor fo-lor story about the ones that
didn't get away. Two U.S. ex experts
perts experts travel to the Chilean Lake
Region, to picturesque Uruguay s
east coast and back for salt wa water
ter water thrills of the seaport city of
Iqulque. The deep cold waters of
Chile's high lakes yield 17 hugs
Rainbow trout to our anglers anglers-but
but anglers-but not easily in less than three
hours.
There is added thrills in the
battle between man and a 442
pound marlin landed after repeat repeated
ed repeated 30-feet leaps through the air.
Continuing the USO-JWB arm armchair
chair armchair tour around the world, will
be "Wings to Mexico and Guate Guatemala"
mala" Guatemala" shown on the same eve evening.
ning. evening. This film depicts a bull
fight as well as exhibitions of
Mexican horsemanship. In this
picture will also be shown an au authentic
thentic authentic Indian religious festival as
well as scenes of colorful Guate Guatemala.
mala. Guatemala.
All servicemen and their fami famines
nes famines as well ai residents of the
Canal Zone :ndttw eiM,
Panama re .cordially, mvited to
attend., ;
TITO CITS PIT' r"
f. f
JAKARTA Indonesia (UPI)
Visiting Yugoslav President Tito
had a new pet yesterday-a four
year-old' black panther. The Pan Pan-thV
thV Pan-thV was jift from the people
of Bandung. It was put aboard
Tito's yacht when the Yugoslav
President sailed from Jakarta for
Bali.

. LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co..
for rates and Information
TeL Panama 2-0552
Monday thru Friday
9:00 a.m. to 12:00
2:00 p.m. to 5:00
Saturday
9:00 a.m. to 12:00

AUTOMOBILE FINANCE
Government Employes
Service Personnel
Finance Your New Or
Used Car
GOVERNMENT
EMPLOYES FINANCE Co.
LOW RATES UP TO 36 Mo.
on new ears
AGENCY DEHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row Row-Phone
Phone Row-Phone 3-4984 3-4985
All Types of Auto Insurance

IN NICKELCADMIUM
EVERLASTING BATTERY
Foto International
155 Central Ave.
Corner "K" Street
1 block from Railroad
Station.

The New

NIKON

With built-in Universal
Vlewftnder System

Apartments

WE RENT! One floor apartmant
in recently constructed building
Tha "C" apartmant hat two badf badf-raomi,
raomi, badf-raomi, intida porch, floor larga
living-diningroom, laundreit, good
kitchen, miid'i room and garage.
"Marianala" building in hitta
Arosamana A. For information
call 2-1155 offica hours.

FOR RENT: Two newly remo remo-dcled
dcled remo-dcled apartment! in Ava. Eloy
Alfaro No. I3A57.

FOR RENT: Campo Alegra.
Fully fyrnished ona room apart apartment
ment apartment with hot water. Call 3-
1789. o

FOR RENT: On 48 street, Bella
Vista, modern 2 bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. On 46 street, Riviera Aprs,
another two bedroom apartment,
dining, living, porch, balconies,
two bathrooms, maid's room and
garage. Call Panama 2-4696,
from 8 a.m. to 12 noon.

American Owner
Of Scottish Isle

Set OH Rumpus

EDINBURGH. Scotland (UPIV-

The American owner of a tiny

Scottish island found himself in

the midst of an international rum

pus yesterday because he changed
the name of the island.

Steward Huston, of Coatesville,

Pa., instructed his attorney in
Edinburgh to announce that the
spit of land in the mouth of the

Clyde River known as Holy Island
henceforth would be called St. Mo Mo-laise
laise Mo-laise Isle.

The lawyer, D. D. Walker, de

fended the announcement on
grounds that the name came from

an Irish saint who settled on the
two-mile-long craggy island in ear early
ly early Christian times. He said the is island
land island once had been called St.
Molaise, but became Holy Island
at a later date.
The island is uninhabited. There

is a 200-year-old mansion on it,

but no roads and no telephone.
Residents of nearby islands and
along the ranks of the Firth of
Clyde complained bitterly.
James Bone, a. member of the
council at-Lamlash ori Arran Is Island
land Island said,' "surely in American
can't wipe out one of the most
famous spots on the Clyde with
one wave of his hand."

Replied Walker: "His mind is
made up. It is his island now tiH

he can call it anything he likes.'

Bright Outlook

Seen For Economy

Of US Next Year

NEW YORK (UPI) The out out-lok
lok out-lok for the nation's economy

during fine next 18 months appears
bright,. Fortune magazine said
Sunday!Jn a year-end forecast.
"Thg economy is enterine

new high ground. Seldom has the
immediate business outlook been
charged with so many dynamic

possiDuities," the magazine said.
It said that the eross national

product would approximate 475 bil billion
lion billion dollars in 1959 and probably
500 billion dollars in 1960, making

eacn year a new best year
ever.'
Fortune's economists predicted
a government deficit of 5 to t bil billion
lion billion dollars in fiscal 1960.

LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUB AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT IS-W "H BTTEET,' FANAMA w LIBRERIA MEC1ADO f JHreet Re. IS AGENCMS
INTERNAL OE PUBLIC ACIONES No. 1 Lottery Plata CASA ZALDO Central Ave. 4& LOUBDES PHARMACY 182 La CamsqnUla FARM A CI A LOM LOM-BARDO
BARDO LOM-BARDO No. H "R" Street MORRISON th of July Ave. J St. LEWIS SERVICE Ave. TivoU No. 4 FARMAC1A ESTAOOS UNIDOS US Central Ave.

r ARM A CIA LUX IM Central Avenne HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. Eeo. da U Osaa Ave. No. FOTO UOM 1 JUJW Areeemena Am and S3 St a)
r ARMACIA VAN DER-J1S 58 Street No. 53 FABMACIA EL BATURRO Parana Lefevre 7 Street rARMAOA "SAS- VU PORBAS 1U NOVXOADCS

Ainu i

-Betide the Bella Viata Theatre COLON OFFICE: 15th. Street and Amador Guerrero No. ll21.

Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1958 Chevrolet
Brookwood, 9 passenger, station
wagon, ail aceesorie. 1930
model A. Ttruck body. House
719-R. Phone 2-3347. y

BUY A VOLKSWAGEN

BLACT KILLS SIX

NEW DElkt. India (UPI) -i

Six persons have been killed and

three others injurea in the explo explosion
sion explosion of a gunpowder factory at
Katni in Central India, it was re

ported here yesterday.

Home Articles

FOR SALEBamfeoo) 2 lounge
chairs, settee, coffee table, foot
stool, end table, 2 Ecuadorian
rugs, all wool 8x10, maple plat platform
form platform rocker, 2 ; mahogany end
tables. Tel 2-2108, House
6350-B, Los Rioa.

FOR SALE: Bamboo dining dining-room
room dining-room table, 6 chairs, 3 bamboo
chairs, metal dresser, kitchen
table, night Stand. Phone 25 25-3184,
3184, 25-3184, House' 2471-D, Cocoli.

FOR SALE: Baby crib spring
and mattress, chifforobo, chairs,
household articles. Phone 4164
Balboa.

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: A D-7 Caterpillar
tractor with less than a year's
' use. Approximate cost of same
new $28,000.00. Presently at
bottom of Chucunaque river, some
35 miles North of El Real, Da Da-Hen.
Hen. Da-Hen. Make your offer to Max R.
Stempel V Sons, Ud., Balboa
Avenue and 32nd Street,, phone
Panama 3-0456. :-.v: :- ;;.

FOR SALE : 2 1 table 4nodel
Bandix T.V. with rolling stand,
$100.00. Call Albrook 4203.

FOR SALE; $10.00 preferred
shares Cuentat Comarciales 8
t $9.50 each. Phone 3-7833.

MRS. HELEN STEMPEL, secretary to theoChlef ,of Military Assistance-.Programs,, J-3, Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean Command, this week received thr Department of Army Outstanding performance Award
for her exceptional work during the period of July 1957 to July 1958. The award was based
on her annual rating that described each aspect of her job performance as outstanding and
deserving of special commendation. Mrs. Stempel is shown with the officers of the MAP sec-

ttion after the official presentation by Brig. Gen. George F. Schlatter, assistant chief of staff

j-3. Leu to ngnt are Maj. e. w. Emerson, uar. F. B. sanoorn, Mrs. stempei, and col. Thurio
M. Ashton, Chief of MAP of the unified command J-3 division. (U.S. Army Photo)

Colts'' Win First
Major Baltimore
Title Since 1896
NEW YORK, Dec, 29 (UPI) -When
the Baltimore Colts won
the National Football League ti title
tle title yesterday by defeating the Gi Giants
ants Giants at Yankee Stadium, they
gave the city of Baltimore its
first major sports team champion championship
ship championship since the old Orioles won
the National League baseball
pennant in 1896.
The Colt triumph outranks the
Oriole victory of 62 years ago.
The Colts, western division cham champions,
pions, champions, had. to whip the legue's
eastern division champions to win
their crown. The Oriole victory
wastecorded before major league
baseball split into National and
American Leagues and began its
world series to decide a cham cham-ion.
ion. cham-ion. ;
- i i it.
WOULD MORTGAGE BONUS
ROME (UPI) A classified ad
in yesterday's Rome newspaper,
"II Tempo," read: "Give me
credit. I need funds to reconstruct
family budget ruined by Christ Christmas
mas Christmas holiday. Will mortgage my
annual bonus of 1970

Broiler chicks
Hybrid male
$9.00
for a hundred
delivery Jan. 2nd
PERURENA
GAS STATION
Tel. 3-4514

Spectacle of an Immensity Never Before Seen .
"THE TEN COMMANDMENTS,v
Release January 1st at the LUX" Theatre

fill rrr"
',;f

5s

NINA FOCH
As Bithiah, Daughter of
The Pharaoh

Sir CEDRIC HARDWICK MARTHA SCOTT

As Yochabel, The True
Mother of Moses

As Pharaoh Sethi
the Just

Cecil B. DeMille's Production "THE TEN
COMMANDMENTS" acclaimed by the ad advance
vance advance audience and ministers of all faiths
as an overwhelming motion picture expe experience
rience experience and the all-time pinnacle of movie moviemaking,
making, moviemaking, which opens in exclusive release,
beginning January 1st at the "LUX" Thea Theatre.
tre. Theatre. Ten years in the planning, three years in
research, three years in the writing- and
more than a year in the actual shooting,
the masterwork of the screen's master show showman
man showman is by far the biggest production In film
history. Utilizing the talents of a massive
cast of top stars and the best technicians
the Industry has to offer, the Paramount
picture backgrounds an eternally dramatic
and meaningful story with spectacle that
has been called colossal In its .scope.
. The dramatization of the Book of Exodus
stars Charlton Heston as MoSes, Yul Bryn Bryn-ner
ner Bryn-ner as his implacable enemy, Ramses II,

Anne Baxter, Edward G. Robinson, Yvonne
De Carlo, Debra Paget and John Derek.
Starring also are Sir Cedric Hardwick,
Nina Foch, Martha Scott, Judith Anderson
and Vincent price with even the "support "supporting"
ing" "supporting" roles played by a long list of stars. Ex Extras
tras Extras number upwards of 25,000 and were
hired for the Egyptian location shooting by
the tribe.
Running three hours and thirty-nine min minutes,
utes, minutes, the VistaVision, Techtnicolor film is
the account of the life of Moses from the
time his mother set him afloat On the Nile,
through his years as a mighty general In1
the Pharaoh's army, to his betrayal and
exile to the desert, and finally his deliver deliverance
ance deliverance of the Israelites and his receipt of
God's Commandments. Many scenes were
made on Mount Sinai itself, on the shore of,
the Red Sea and on the very' desert sands
that felt Moses footsteps. Advt.

P. A. CLASSIFIEDS

evssetaKd

Real Estate

Miscellaneous

; FOR SALI LeH 500 anal 1 .000
meters. Itha Nueve HipMreme
UrbanUetiea, across-Hie Ramea
, Racetrack, All lets with street
fronts, sewaae, water male and
: electricity. Call W Mclamett.
Tel. 3-257. . w,

Motorcycles

FOR SALE195I AJS (00 ce.
Call Balboa 2474, lew milaH.
oed condition. -Call after 4:00.

Rainbow Cily High
Releases Lists
Of Honor Students

The fifth martins neriod for the

Rainbow City junior-senior High
School ended on Dec. 12. The tol-

lowing is a list of the students who

made the honor roll.
- Senior High School
"A" Honor Roll: Tyrone Hunter

Annette Cordoba, Edwin Josephs,
Lionel" Fergus, Betty Forte, Rob Rob-er
er Rob-er Pessoa, Arlen Simons, Lloyd

Perkins, Carlton Gittens, Elena

Dale, Gertrude Lowe.

"B" Honor Roll: William Ward,

Cecil Archbold, Barbara Alleyne,

Gasohine. Edwards. Margaret

Smith, Gloria Gordon,. Lionel King,

Kenneth Watson, Fred Ferguson,

Clement McFarlene, A. Rawlins,
Glenville Scott, Thelma Johnson,

Kenneth Drayton,' Winston Gra

ham, James Guerrero, Joyce Muir

Doreen Wilson, Francisco Jolliffe,

Reno Patrick, Kicardo Thompson,

Maurice McLean, Roland, Josephs,

Jos? Moreno, Canute Cockburn.

Junior High School

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS :
DRAWER "A", DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C2V
PHONsV BALBOA 3709

Reward. Lost larga fcriwn camera
case at Santa Clara containing
following).:! Argus C-3, t Rex.,
vara 8m.m 1 G.I. light meter,'
1 pair dark glasses. If found no notify
tify notify Loyd P. Bowman, C.A.A.,
phone 83-2183.

A" Honor Roll: Mitzie Reid.
"B' Honor Roll: Prudencia An-

derson,Antonio Dun Moodie, Ar Arthur
thur Arthur Trottman, Paule McFarlen,

wenaeu; uowaro, juvira BraHi-igaid ;meetihg was "very cor
waite, Leroy Burton, Eunice Clark;, tial" and the discussion dealth

Claudia Cumberbatch, Cecil Spring

er, Kawara tayior, t iiortense

RosemondV George- King, Angela

McKinnoni Sylvia Sewell; France

McKinnon, Lucilda. Smith,. Zeleta
Price, Maria Gordon, -Diana Dale,

Roberto Anderson, Alberto Barbet,

Marcos Beverly, Cbnstancia Bar-

nett, Adrian a Fagette, Joslyn Gue

rrero, Mavis Springer, Earl Wat

son. Jacqueline King, Veronica

Rosemond.

GANG RIOTS ERUPT
SINGAPORE (UPI) At least

six persons, were wounded and
more than 10 arrested last night

in two separate battles be between
tween between police and secret society
members here. In one battle: two

officers- and four detectives were

ambushed by 20 screaming gang
members. The outnumbered nolice

opened fire and. wounded four

men who later were captured and

arrested, in anotner clash, no

nce lntervenea to seize six men

at a dance hall where two rival
gangs were fighting. Twb wound wounded
ed wounded gang fighters were later' found
unconscious in a Singapore suburb.

SLIDE KILLS THREE
LISBON, Portugal (UPI) An
earthslide crushed two shacks on

the edge of Beato yesterday, kill killed"
ed" killed" a sleeping woman, her hus husband
band husband and their little daughter.

The second shack was unoccupied
at the time;

Kobbe Choir Sings

At Corgas Hospital

Members of the Ft. Kobbe Cha

pel Choir presented a program of
Christmas music for the patients

of Gorgas Hospital last week.
Members of the choir who par

ticipated in the program were

Fave Lashley. Warren L. Wieck-

horst, Sylvia L. Wieckhort Tho

mas Peigh. Dora Fortune, Jsvva

Beck with, Dlores Froeschner, Su Susie
sie Susie Nicholson., Judf Berry, Thel

ma Pruitt. Sharon Strode. Juani-

ta Snringer. Ann Cobb. Donna

Grady, Pat Pless, Calvin-Pruitt,

Glen Et Fisher, James K. walk walker.
er. walker. Charles Fortson, Diane' Good

man, James Hoosden Roberta

Covaitt.
TO GET HAT -i
, LISBON, Portugal (UPI) -Fer-nando
Cardinal Cento, papal nun

cio in Lisbon will receive his red
hat from the hands of President

Americo Thomax Tuesday morn morning,
ing, morning, it was announced yesterday.
The ceremony, in Ajuda Palace,
will be preceded by Solemn. High
Mass in the palace chapeL,
RECEIVES NEW AMBASADOR
Baghdad, Iraq (UPI) Pre Premier
mier Premier Abdel Karim Kassem. re received
ceived received Britain's new ambassador,
Sir Humphrey Trevelyan, for the

first time here yesterday in a

two-houtmeepng. uagnaaa naaio

SERVICES

Protect your home and BfopeM

tv aaainst : Inucf 4mm m a m." ..A:,

Prompt aclantifia treatment en

mergeney or. monthly budget f
basis. Telephone Pronto Service, ?

Panama i.7977f Colon 1777.

Domestic Eriploymsnt

;. WANTID-Raliable maid for
general housework,-Must be good
' cook and have references. Apply i
morning only. 5786-B, Sibert
Street, Diablo.

with matters

countries

affecting th two

LONG TREK ENDS

MOSCOW (UPI) Soviet 'Ant 'Antarctic
arctic 'Antarctic explorers have completed
a three-nionth trek to their 'Vos 'Vos-tok"
tok" 'Vos-tok" station near the magnetic
South Pole, the Soviet Tass News
Agency reported Sunday. The
agency said the party returned to
the Rusian Mirny station on the
Antarctic coast after travelling
nearly 2,000 miles acros polar
ice on the mission to suppl the
Vostok base. v

A HAPPY NEW YEAR
OPORTO; Portugal (UPI) -Carlos
lima Garcia, 25-year-old
Portuguese workman, onsidered
himself very lucky when he
scraped together enough money
to emigrate to Canada and luck luck-ier
ier luck-ier still when he saved enough to
come home .to pehd ; christmsis
this yew in. his ;nativi state1 of
Peruselo. On his arrival here,
Garcia botght a state lottery

ticket and it aoid him his

money back. He re-invested the

money in the last lottery drawing
of the year and found himself

richer by $185,000.
continuas. No ha habido que la
FREE-WHELINO THIEF

STONE, England (UPI) An
armed gunman robbed a bank
here yesterday of $840 and made

his escape on a bicycle.

Daily Columnist

Fred Othman s ,i

Funeral Tomorrow

WASHINGTON. Dec. 29 (UPI)

Funeral services will be held to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow for Frederick C. Othman,
53, Washington columnist for' U-

nited Feature syndicate, who died
Saturday night of a heart ail ailment,';
ment,'; ailment,';
The services will be held at
noon -at -Gawlor's funeral home
in Washington. The body will be
taken o Memphis, Tenn.,'for a
private service and burial in For Forest
est Forest Hill cemetery there.
; ,The tfriferr whose daily column
sparkled with his sharp wit. died

in Doctors Hospital where he had
been a patient since suffering. ,a

cornary occuuson on Dee. is.
He was stricken with the heart

attack while' covering the House

Subcommittee investigation Into

the difficulties of defeated Rep.
Coya Knutson CD-Minn.)., ,,'
.
Brigitte Bardot
Wished 'Long
Absence Oblivion

AtONDQN.(UW) The Sundw

Graphic- newspipers wished Bti-

gine- flarac(t a riong absence and
deep oblivpn'Mn the new year.

xu9 paper picked ner as "The
Girl Wej-Can, Most Do Without In

V,,. .1 A

'deferring to her "unkempt hair,
pouting-Jips, uneven teeth," the
Graphie said; -"She
sums up everything" toap-

peiuuiB bdoui me growing tnrl
and adds 29 per eent

Today's Opening
STOCK PRICES

Cherchez Lo Femme

Answer to Previous Puwle

m

ACROSS
t d
My Heart
4A
dozen
. 8 Wing-shaped
13 Cutting
implement
13 Notion
14 Western weed
18 Moral wrong
li Unselfish
ones
18 More severe
20 Girl's
nickname
31 Five-dollar
bill (slang) -S3
Consumes
24 Ireland
36 Greek
mountain
27 La femme ,.
80 Imaginative
32 Fastener for
meat v;".
24 Turn toward
35 Weirder s
88 Watch
37 Lampreys
39 Finishes
40 Opposed
41 Frocen water
42 Southern
; resort dty h
48 Mountain lion
4fl Vituperation
, 81Ae .,,
S3 Former
. : Spanish
province
S3 German rtver
84EquhV
88 Give
temporarily
'86 Impudent
87 River In
, 'Scotland

DOWN
IGo by
' 3 Egress '.'
3 Patron saint
of Paris
4 Girl's name -8
Unemployed
6 Length
measures
7 Hearing organ
8 Otherwise
8 Displaced
10 Deads
U Woman's

nickname
17 Quick on
the
18 French
annuity

23 Donkeys

AINIAI lolAIWI' IIaIIUI

iiillliiil

iiiAir'.iplAiRlriRiQlolpI

28 Feminine 41 Motionless'
wrap 42 Tenth of

26 Group of eight, a cent

27 Pig tender

28 Take notice
29 Goes astray
31 Peaceful

33 Upright
38 Greasy
comnound

34 Heroic poetry 40 Revise

43 Arrow poison

44 Shakespeare's
river
46 State
47 Iroquoian ;
Indian ';
48 Fury
60 Summit -i

nnn : nrnn ti:i
r i -rT-
i r--rr
r j pr -T-
" If 7--1-LJ

ACT IM
Advocate Asbestos
Aluminium Ltd
Amer; Cyanamid
,Amer.-Motors
AntiTel and.Tett
'Anaconda. Cooper
: Arkansas Fuel
Atlantic Refining
AVCO Mfg.
Bethlehem Steel
Bettinger Corp.
Bicroft Uranium
British Pet
Burroughs
Canadian. Eagle
Celanese
Cerro de Pasco
Chicago Gt. West.
Chrysler
Cities Service
Coastal Canbe
Creole Pet
, Crown Corp and Seal
Cuba Venezuela Oil
DuPont
El Paso Nat Gas
Eversharp
Fairchild Eng
Fargo Oa
Felmont Pet
Gen Dynamics
Gen Elec
Gen. Motors
Gen Plywood
Getty Oil , .h
-Gulf Oil
Harsco Steel
i Hayden Newport 1
Howe Sound
'Imperial Oil
" Int Petroleum .,,
Int. Tel and Tel
Lorillard
Martin Co. .,.&

New Eng T and T

Northrup '
: Olint Mathieson
Pancoastal I 1
Pan Israel
Pantepec Oa,
Phillips Pet --..i
Pure Oil
RCA :
- Reynolds Metal
. Royal Dutch Shell
San Jacinto rf,o
, SheU T and T
Signal Oil and Gas, A
Sinclair Oil
Socony Mobile -'
Sperry Rand
Stan Oil NJ. -J
Sterling Precision
Superior Oil
Texas Gulf Prod
Underwood '
United Aircraft
Unit Canso Oil
US Rubber
US Steel i
Wetinghouse
Wheeling Steel

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52
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224
61Va
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84b
79-16
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73 t

Panama

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V

v
MONDAY, DECEMBER 29, 195S
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER s
PAGE ft INI
XZtXJ AND THE PIRATES
By GEOBGEWUNDER
TBI STORY Or UARTHA WAYNB
Back Horn
By WILSON MRUttGS
"TwHCttBOIffflMTO
1
OeKAWDUSW6MV
AN? TOE NINETy-NINTH 5ETTLE5 VOHH
TUU M6, lOllSE, WHAT AZE YOU) S)$TH?S VISA TO 601
IN ITS MAKESHIFT QUARTERS.
60WQ TO DO AFTER HOUSES 10 EN6LAKID.
DOT,
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know vet kiowl
THE SIGHTS
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AN7 COMPLEX
AACHINE5 AACHINE5-ANFWEAPON,
ANFWEAPON, AACHINE5-ANFWEAPON, THE CKOWP
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PRBCVIA'S POP
Youth Wants to Know
By AL VERMUB

rMAyiaweiNTcJFCOujwEK,!! N

A'ilTtra lll VOU A PRESENT...

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DO YOU WISH X- (- CAREER W
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TRACKS, NO NUTHIM RIGHT CAN WE MAKS 1 UXXlN'.'

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.NEW 4ANX : LAST OF OJZ

No Time to lose

By I00A1 MARTIN

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mrti lat ccs i 1 mi if rn

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Not Today

By DICK CAVALL1

GEE, IT GETTING .
3 LATE, AND I HAVtNT jj. -a,,,:",:
1 MADE NEW FRIEND TV
FOR TODAY VeTy

HELLO. I TRY

FRIEND EVERY

DAY, AND ID

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TOLD ME I'D.
I MEET MEN

4 Z.

L rTlT HOW OSNMOU MAKE TVJ
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ll A KEEP RUNNING INTO, II
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' OUR BOARDING HOUSE

vitt V k ; BLUOR HOOPLI OUTOUKWA-I

BY J. B WILLIAMS

WHEREf HB VAMOOSED WITH. 1,17,1 Sa?..
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WHV DO VOfJ J UPON ALLTHE LATEST MELAWCHOLV,

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17

SIDE GLANCES

By Calbraith

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"Herb? You and the rest of the Foggy Five come get get-your
your get-your inetrumente. Mom and Dad are driving me nuttl"

faltering Philip
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5t t

NOW SHOWINCrMen on the scaffolds above aren't readying 1
a new curved panoramic screen for an outdoor movie theater.
They're caulking the surface of a 60-foot parabolic antenna, (
one of many in Alaska's "White Alice" communications sys system.
tem. system. "White A4ice," a telephone and telegraph network,
stretches 3,100 miles- across our newest state, providing com communications
munications communications for the military, Civil Aeronautics Administration
and the public. Huge antennas like this make it possible to j
send messages oyer hundreds of miles of arctic wilderness. 1

SATINA CARRIES YOU SMOOTHLY

THRU THE IRONING HOUR I

tht BIO Ironhg
aid in Ine Unit box.

. AfOVtA PANAMA AfiWAYf

PANAMA
LIMA

0

0

3:00 CITY NEWS
3.H Oinati Short
3:30 Industry On Paraclt
3:45 Coronet Film
4 :W Adventur Tomorrow
4:30 Mrc Wizard
8:90 Roy Rners
5:30 PANORAMA
T.;00. High Rod to Danger

7:30 M t-uld E You
S CO Ji'juei'l V :i ? :n,ry pre:?n
S:D3 Prlre 1 "I- lit
9:30 R un of J
10:00 Ami ')' T"rUr
II no rrs rTiVS
11:15 Enr: Vol nf J"lriton and
SchllU PlnyhouM

Today! Program
Courtesy of Aerovias Panama Al'w.a
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3-1 C9C 3 1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a,.m. to 6 p.rh;

1 '.

'.;a ::;';,;':,; y1
fr:4.:f;vr
;'(:,'.v.;,- :-V'':



Christmas

Passes 500, Sefs No

vfw torK- Dec 29 (UPI) The traffic death toll lumped past the 500 mark last nlrtt
ma thousand, of autos jammed highways In the final hours of the Christmas holiday, but
there was optimism that a new all-time reco rd for traffic deaths would not ;.
When aU figures were in the toll was expected to run higher than the National Safety
Council's advance prediction of 620 fatalities. But the pace of traffic deaths was stUl run run-ntajT
ntajT run-ntajT behind the record rate of the four-day "Black Christmas" holiday of 1956 when 712 per-
Bv&ttoSten at least 516 t raffle j deaths since the holiday period bewn at
p.m. Christmas Eve. There also were 87 deaths in fires, four in plane crashes and 77 from mis miscellaneous
cellaneous miscellaneous causes for an overall toll of 678.

Ten states posted 277 fatals,
more than half of the traffic
toll. California led the highway
laughter with 53 deaths, fol followed
lowed followed by Texas with 44. Illinois
S2, New Yorl? 31, Michigan 22,
Ohio 21, North Carolina and
Pennsylvania 20 each, Florida
18 and Indiana 16.
Five states and the District
f Columbia had no fatal traf traffic
fic traffic accidents. The states were
Delaware, New Hampshire,
Rhode Island, Vermont and
Wyoming.
.The safety council urged mo motorists
torists motorists to exercise patience arid
to avoid reckless driving during
homeward trips.
"With reasonable behavior on
the homeward rush," a council
spokesman said, "there's every
hope that the toll will not set a
new record.
"It still appears that the toll
CHILD'S PARADISE Ready
Palais, Paris, France, for the
small army of wooden soldiers.
workman with a pamt brush.

I'd Ji?5 T 'i J-

11 presents

t 41

varmg
ELIZABETH TAYLOR

Australia

Road Death Toll

will exceed our estimate. But It
would be a wonderful post post-Christmas
Christmas post-Christmas present If every mo motorist
torist motorist could get home safely."
Several multiple fatality acci accidents
dents accidents on Midwest highways
boosted the toll early yesterday.
Near Racine, Wis., four Mil Milwaukee
waukee Milwaukee men were killed and a
fifth Injured seriously when
their auto missed a turn-off on onto
to onto a temporary road and crash crashed
ed crashed into a construction barrier.
Dense fog, which formed over
much of the Mississippi Val Valley,
ley, Valley, was blamed for a two-car
collision near Greenup, 111., in
which four persons including a
Teenage girl and a one-year-old
baby were- killed.
Dense fog also was blamed for
a two-car, head-on auto colli collision
sion collision near Vandalla, 111.
Fair weather over much of
the nation provided a tempta
to guard the halls of the Grand
annual children's show is this
Military shine is assured by a
-
mm

I

if M r

PAULNEWMAN

BURUVE1
JAOCCARSON "JUDITHfANDERSON

RICHARD BROOKS andTJAMS"POe
9tmi 0 tn "CAT ON A HOT TIN HOOT"
JENftESSEE WILLIAMSi'
lANAVQN PHOOUCTIOH, W

mCHARO fe'ROOKSCAWRENGE WEING,

ArrrjHijia

Ipl

Record

tion for many motorists to
take extra chances on their
home bound journeys, the
safety council cautioned.
However, rain over many
eastern states and light snow
over the Northern Rockies,
North Dakota and northern bor border
der border areas of New England slow
ed traffic.
The rain moved out or the
Carolinas and southern Virginia,
but locally heavy downpours
soaked the south Atlantic coast coastal
al coastal plains.
Light snow changed to rain
over soutneasiern rennsyiva-
nia, while slt, snow ana ireez ireez-ing
ing ireez-ing rain warnings were posted
over south-central portions of
the Keystone State.
US Schools To Put
Stress On Science,
Belter Education
WASHINGTON (UPI)- Schools
will put more stress on science
mathematics and students
will work harder to master diffi
cult subjects next year, m na national
tional national Education Assn. predicted
yesterday.
Editors of the association's jour journal
nal journal also forecast an enroUment
- ia w,nitnn fhilHrpn in DUDllC
VL OU
elementary and secondary Schools
in 1959. That would be an increase
i inn nnn nvpr 1958.
Registration in universities and
junior colleges will advance by
nparlv one-auarter of a million
nsvt. vpar the NEA said.
The journal staff made these
nthpr nredictions for the new
year:
High school students will
spend 10 per cent more time oft
mathematics.
Many schools will sdd space
science to tfieir curriculum .and
expand courses in such basic sub
jects as chemistry, pnysics ana
advanced bioloev.
More voun esters will attend
summer school voluntarily to
hone up on English and foreign
languages as well as, absorb eX'
tra science and math instruction
Thpv will be seeking more know
ledge and not making up work or
trving to finish school earlier, the
NKA said.
The NEA also predicted the av
praee teacher' salary would pass
$5,000 for the first time next year.
enfra
THE TALK OF THE
TOWN!
THE TALK OF THE
NATION!
Moviegoers are enthralled
with the magnificent screen
production of Tennessee
tarns Pulitzer-Prize
Play!,

Opening

Machinists End Strike,
But Engineers Continue

MIAMI, Dec. 29 (UPI) A
federal mediator was scheduled to
meet separately' again today with
Eastern Airlines officials and
their striking flight engineers. The
crippling walkout has into its sixth
week. -. ;, ..:;(,
Eastern's mechanics lowered
their picket lines yesterday to
formally end .their strike against
the company, The machinist ban
reached a ) contract agreement
with the giant carrier but refuse
to cross tne engineers picket lin
es. V r, "!.',. ..
: Meanwhile, the, threat of a strike
against j another Vmaior airline
National loomed today. The pos
sibility of a National threat was
announced yesterday by Pat Cain,
international representative of the
Air Lane Agents Assn. (ALAA).
Mediator Wairen Lane has met
separately with eastern and the
flight engineers several times, but
ntue u any progress was made.
Some 16,000 workers have bean
idled by Eastern's work stoppage
wnicn now involves onlythe 550
light engineers. ( :
One of the key issues in the en engineers
gineers engineers dispute was a company
requirement that the third crew-
mcmuer aooara lei airliner re
ceive pilot training. A federal
NATO Council Meets
To Sfudy Veslern
Replies To Russia
PARIS, Dec. 29 (UPD The
permanent NATO council met
today to study an dapprove the
western replies to Russian de demands
mands demands the Allies leave west
Berlin within six month and
make it a "free city" behind the
Iron Curtain.
The 15 NATO delegates got
together under NATO secretary
General Paul-Henri Spaak for
what was expected to be a
prompt approval of the French,
British, American and West
German notes.
Officials said the notes would
be delivered to the Kremlin
within 48 hours. The rough out
line of the documents already
had been approved by the allies
during the NATO Ministerial
Council session in Paris earlier
this month.
Tne western notea were ex
pected to turn down Russia's
ultimatum.
But the Western powers were
expected to leave, the door open
to negotiations over Berlin and
Germany as a whole.
The West German note ar
rived from Bonn last night. It
is a aa-page document explain explaining
ing explaining in detail the events in Ber Berlin
lin Berlin and Germany from the time
of the Nazi capitulation in May
1945 to Soviet Premier Nikita
S. Khrushchev's "free city" plan
oi iasi wov. 27, inrormed sourc
es said.
The Western notes will be de
livered at the same time but
separately by the four coun
tries ambassadors.
Yfm 1
warn mm

STEWART GRANGER

BARBARA RUSH
ANTHONY STEEL
Hw UimtUHUi bat $Nry e
HARRY BLACK
AND
THE fcfeA
TIGER rf:
COLOR
by dc Luxe
CinbmaScop
THURSDAY
GREGORY
JEAN

HCyiHtlOJOKEOlSBIUIS

I

fuiAnWYLERS,
PHOOUCTION
THE
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iudee' ruled the issue out as a ba

sic for striking, but the engineers
continued their strike over otner
issues.
Cain, said about 1,500 ticker
agents and other white collar work
ers wit! strike against National in
the next two weeks. He said the
strike will be called in protest of
what U termed the company's
disregard of an agents board oi
adjustment decision.
J, M. Rosenthal, National senior
vice president in- charge of Indus
trial relations, said any strike
taken by the ALAA would be a
wildcat move.
Small Business
Said Getting Less
Defense Contracts
-WASHINGTON (UPI) r- A Sen
ate-committee charged yesterday
that small business is steadily
getting less and less of its share
nf TWpnRfi Denartment. contracts,
A 28-Daee report by tne smaii
Business Committee said xne per-
rpntaen of contracts awaraeo to
cm nil firm bv the Defense De
partment has fallen off steadily
for several years, -t dropped
from 19.8 per cent in the 1956-57
fiscal year to only 17.1 per cent
for the fiscal year ended June 30,
1958.
The report, based mainly on
hearings earlier this year, was
made public jointly by Chairman
John J. Soarkman (D-Ala.) and
Sen. George A. Smathers (D-Fla.)
of the subcommittee on govern government
ment government trfocurement.
, Thp rommittee said It was not
imnrepsed with Pentagon argu
ments that the type of military
equipment being purchased gov governs
erns governs the amount of contracts that
po to small business.
The group is "interested in me
extent to which procurement pro
cedures, as opposed to military
requirements, militate against
small business." Sparkman and
Smathers said.
The committee also reoortedH
that during the first 10 months of
the 1957 58 fiscal year, smaller
businesses received only 3.2 per
cent of all defense department re
search and development contracts
Above for relaast 4 30 p.m. t.s.t,
Test Tube Babies
Studied In Survey
By Medical Group
LONDON, Dec. 29 (UPI) The
medical association lauched a nation-wide
survey today to deter determine
mine determine the psychological effects of
test tube babies on both the infants
and the family.
It sent questionaries to its 60,000
member doctors asking for details
of the lives of couples whose chil children
dren children have been produced through
artificial insemination by a donor.
PRICES: 75c. 40c
-
TODAY-
4:10 6:40 9:00 p.m.
1:45
JANUARY 1st
O
CARROLL
CHARLTON BURL

A Motion
Picture
So Big Big-It
It Big-It Sweeps
All
Before

Win

a It!
COUNTRY
and TECHNIRAMA
mm mm ma
imi DOWlt tMMILTON
MwNtnllllliTattWI

Pavos Cup: iuia'ktes
s " Read 'story on page 6

East German Communists Warn
Not lofTry RunhirtgAn

BERLIN, Dec. 29 (UPI) -East
German Communists warned the
Western Allies yesterday they
would be "playing with fire" if
they tried to run any navy Berlin
blockade.
Tho Communists threatened
to usa the "most modern" weap weapon
on weapon should Western allied tanks
ttampt to break through to an
isolated Berlin to defend Hi
Wert's occupation riahts.
The new threats were made In
the Communist newspaper "Ber "Berliner
liner "Berliner Zeitung." V
In a hint that the Communists
might interfere with Western al-
llied air and rail traffic to Berlin,
the East German paper again ac accused
cused accused the West of illegally using
transport links through East Ger Germany
many Germany to ship war gods made in
Berlin to the West.
At the same time, the oficial
East German. Corriunist par party
ty party newspapers 'Neues Deutsch Deutsch-Und'
Und' Deutsch-Und' raid that not only would
the Americans have to get out
of West Berlin but eventually
they would have to leave West
Germany, as wt l.
The oficial paper made the
Michigan, Illinois
Potl Offices Now
Work Longer Hours
WASHINGTON (UPI) Post Postmaster
master Postmaster General Arthur E. Sum-
merfield announced yesterday
that post offices in Michigan and
Illinois were now opening earlier
and operating longer hours in line
with a nationwide trend.
He said postal .stations in the
two Midwest states improved their
hours of service after he issued a
directive last August calling on
po't office? to make a survey of
additional mailing needs.
In many cases, the postmaster
general said in a statement, post
offices which did not open for
business until 8:30 a.m. or 9 a.m.
are now- opening for the convenr
ience of early mailers at 8 a.m.
or earlier.
Also he said, where local re requirements
quirements requirements dictate, post offices
which Closed their doors at 5
p.m. are now staying open until
5:30 p.m. or 6 p.m. to accommo accommodate
date accommodate patrons.
Summerfield said the additional
service by hundreds of nost of offices
fices offices throughout the nation was
of "particular assistance" to ear early
ly early Christmas mailers this year.
He said the total effect has been
to provide "one of the most im important
portant important mail service improve improvements
ments improvements in years."
Above for Release 6:30 p.m. e.s.t.
Jef Plane Crashes
Info Horan Area
I P II I Bill!
in tngiisn village
IPSWICH, England, Dec. 29 -(UPI)
One person was killed and
several others injured today when
a flaming U.S. Air Force jet fight fighter
er fighter sliced between a group of hous houses
es houses and slammed into a garage at
Kesgrave near here.
The pilot, 1st. Lt. Charles Pres Pres-cott,
cott, Pres-cott, of Santa Monica, Calif., e e-jected
jected e-jected himself from the F400D
Super Saber and parachuted to
safety before the crash. He was
treated at a local hospital for
shock and minor injuries.
Two houses and the garage
were destroyed by fire, and sev several
eral several others houses and a group of
unoccupied trailers were damaged.
A number of dogs were killed
when debris plunged into their
kennel area.
Airlines To Carry
Six Million More
Passengers In 1959
WASHINGTON, Dec! 29 (UPI (UPI-The
The (UPI-The International Air Transport
Association predicted today that
the( world s airlines will carry a a-bout
bout a-bout six million more passengers
in 1959 then they did this year.
Sir William P. Hildred, director
general of the airline organization
estimated the 1959 passenger traf traffic
fic traffic at 95 million. The 1958 estimate
is 89 million.
Hildred said the average dis distance
tance distance of the air journey will be
longer because of more non-stop
service but faster planes will cut
down of the flying time between
various points.
Twos A Peaceful
Year For Labor,
Says Sec. Mitchell
WASHINGTON, Dec. 29 (UPD (UPD-Secretary
Secretary (UPD-Secretary of Labor James P. Mit Mitchell
chell Mitchell reports that 1958 was one of
the best years for industrial peace.
He said preliminary", estimates
showed that the number of man man-days
days man-days of work lost through strikes
was about the same as in 1951 and
1954 but lower than any other post postwar
war postwar year except 1957.
Mitchell reported yesterday
there were 3,440 strikes this year,
slightly more than the post-war
low in 1948. But only two-tenths of
one percent of estimated working
time was lnat hv wnrk tnnnnff

Srediction in an editorial reiterat reiterat-lg
lg reiterat-lg the East .German rejection of
the recent U.S.' State, Department
memorandum that asered the
West would remain in West Ber Berlin.'
lin.' Berlin.' y-

In Buffalo Murder
Admils Miami Crime
BUFFALO, N.Y., DecM UPJ)
A 33-year-old ', janitor, : charged
with the Christmas Eve slaying
of a young married woman, has
admitted he also took part in the
unsolved murder of a Miami, Fla.,
divorcee, police disclosed today.
William R. Liss was charged
with -first degree manslaughter in
the death of Mrs. Judith M.- Mc-
fCallum, 22, whose frozen body
was discovered- near the Niagara
River in Niagara Falls on Christ Christmas
mas Christmas day.
Det. Chief John J. Whaler said
Liss -walked into a local police
station last night and gave him himself
self himself up. During questioning Liss
admitted he'took part In the "mi "mi-solved
solved "mi-solved slaying of Mrs. Bernice E.
Dodge, 34, a divorcee and former
WAC from Miami, Whalen said.
Miami District Attorney- John
F. Dwyer said the bespectacled
Liss questioned at length and
"made a statement ... describing
circumstances surrounding the
death of the McCallum girl and
admitting participating .in the
death of Bernice Dodge."
Dwyer said Liss would be ques questioned
tioned questioned further in the Dodg case,
but that charges would await dev developments.
elopments. developments. ; j ;
.The nude body of Mrs. Dodge
was found at the bottom of a 70 70-foot
foot 70-foot cliff along Eighteen Mile
Creek, Town of Hamburg, Oct. 12.
1951. Investigation then indicated
her slayer had picked her up atter
she left a Buffalo tavern and kill killed
ed killed her when she- resisted him.
Utile League
Boys 5, Girls 3
Five boys and three girls were
born at Coco Solo Hospital diirini
the period ending at midnight Ded.
17. During this same neriod 77 oa-
tients were admitted and 71 were
discharged, according to the hos
pital report.
Parents of the boys are Mr. and
Mrs. Byron Barriteau, of R a A A-bajo;
bajo; A-bajo; Mr. and Mrs. Abraham
Forcheny, of Cativa; Mr and
Mrs. Rudolph Thompson, of Co Colon;
lon; Colon; Mr. and-Mrs. .Santiago Equi
na, of Colon; and Sgt. and Mrs.
Billy Reese, of Ft. Gulick.
Girls were born to Mr. and Mrs.
Frederick Samuel, of Colon; Sic
and Mrs, Orval Ogden, of Ft; Da
vis; and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Behre, of France Field. :
EXPLOSIVE FARMERS
TOKYO (UPI) .- A Peiping
magazine reported, yesterday, that
Red China's farmers were using
exp'osives for deep plowing. The
"Peking Review".; said farmers
in C'lekiang, Province cut plowing
as much as 50-fold by planting
1.200 small packets of exp'osives
on each acre of farmland, the
series of blasts, it said, churned
up the earth to a depth of 18
inches.
CENTRAL
TODAY
SHOWS:
1:15, 3:81, 5:12; 7:05; :5
The Wfldeet "SNAFU?.
The Army Ever Knew
. . As A Sergeant
"Promotes" Himself
To General!
- MGMi
GLENN FORD
IMITATION
GENERAL
RED BUTTONS
DEAN JONES

Snet Hu i Sr' i

Western Allies

iln Moscow, th Soviet eovern--
ment newspaper said the U S.
memoranaum laued 'to juitify le le-gallythe
gallythe le-gallythe West's determination to' ?
remain in Berlin, it charcreH tht
the continued Western occupation
source of danger to peace inT
5urope.
' West Berlin,' meanwhile, brae
; ed Itself tp met the Communist 1"
threat by planning formation of
city coalition government that 't
would, includ tho Social Dome-:'
ierats-victors In tho Doe. 7 :
oloetlon and tho Chrittlan Do-
moerats.V'-i' va -4
Socialist i Mayor V Wily' Bran di' i
told a convention of the city's So Social
cial Social Democrat Partv that
coalition-was necessary to meet"
the extraordinary, sitatuion aris-!
ingfrom what he called Soviet

war -threats.
Brandt rejected the Soviet pro-X J
posal .to make West Berlin a de-t
militarized "iree cityV as a threat'
against the city's very existence.1
US Catholics Jofn f
InNjfsr For ":
'Jilenl Church'
Washington' (upi Catho-'
lies throughout the United States

joined yesterday in playing God:
to grant strength and succor to
the persecuted Christians of Com-!,
munist countries.
Special prayers were offered ti'
every Catolic Mass for the "itf
lent church" behind the Iron"'
Curtain. ;
U.. S. Catholic bishoes. in a
joint statement proclaiming' the;.
day of prayer, asserted that
Christian s in many Communist!
countries are being "hounded to;
death In grim, silent war of ex
tinction." f
"In sober truth," they said
"this1 is the worst Persecution In
two thousand years of Christian-

Archbishop Patrick A. O'Boyle"'
of Washington elaborated on this"
statement in a sermon preached :
at St Matthews Cathedral here.',
"The early persecutions of the
Roman 3 itnperori, ; weri Indeed
cruel, U 4id. VYet their vie
timi were numbered in the tens of
thousands." The victims of Commu Communist
nist Communist tyranny are1 numbered. In 4ht
hundreds of millions.'

Weather Or Not
This weather report for tbi H
hours ending S a. m, today is;
prepared by the Meteoroloclral
and Hydromphic Branch of the,
Panama Canal Company: ;
Balboa Cristobal.
TEMPERATURE:
High 86
Low 71
HUMIDITY:
High 96
Lew . 60
i ..
WLNT -.
(max. mph) N-12
RAIN (inches) .11
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 80
85
79
82
71
NE-20
01
82
BALBOA TIDES,
TUESDAY, DEC. 3
High
6:18 a.m.
6:47 pan.
Low
12:19 a.m..
12:37 p.m. J
mil
'weekend:
1:22, 2:52, 4:52
I 6:52, 8:55.
THE WHOLE WORLD
. TREMBLES BEFORE
THE NEW
fRArEKSTECi ;
The screams you hear will bt
y i-;- :tj- your, 1 own 1 "V1.1
"THE REVEIiGE Of
FRAKkEIIJlEIU"
; starrlnr Teter qushlnK
Eunice Gayson Francis
Matthews Michael Gwynn
Written by i Jimmy Bangster
Produced by Anthony ; Hinds
.Directed by Terence Fisher.
A pammer jam production

r

ne .aid. rrr