The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02658

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
-
TOURIST FLITES
to NEW YORK
AND TO SAO PAULO
RIO BUENOS AIRES
digram's
VO.
CANADIAN
WHISKY
tfc people know the truth and the country is safe' Abraham Lincoln.
Tel. Panama 2-0975
tfad TEJlB
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY SEPTEMBER 1, 1958
FIVE CENTS

SJJJBJJI

i

AN INDEPENDENT HEaDAILY NEWSPAPER

mama pencan

BRANIFF

1 1 1 i ii i ff

RP Guards Armed
But Students All

A false radio report It said to have caused National Guardsmen to be alerted to today
day today for possible clashes with Panama City students.
The guardsmen reportedly Jtad armed themselves with night sticks and fire
hose following a radio report last night that the students planned to hold a rally at
the National Stadium this morning.
The students, however, went to classes as usual this morning and the waiting
guardsmen were not called into action.
Lator today student leaders denied that a rally had been planned for this morn morning
ing morning at the stadium, and branded the false report as plot by the Natiohal Patriotic
Coalition to demoraliie the studefit movement. They said the false report was given
by a government-sponsored radio station.

On the other hand, Panama l(
niversitv students announced to today
day today they would hold a general
assembly this evening "to ratity
CZJC Will Offer
Daytime, Evening
Accounting Courses
The Canal Zone Junior College
wi'l nfe this semester several
eoirse in accountine for the be
aefit of both its fulltime busing
administration students and for
employed adults who wish to tak
accounting courses In its Exten Extension
sion Extension Division (evening classes i.
TWo day-class cours are offer offered,
ed, offered, elementary accountm", which
will meet every day In the week
at :00 Siih. and intermediate ac accounting,
counting, accounting, which will meet on
Mondavi and Thursdays from 4:30
to :2ft .,. Th latter course
- u.j,.i.j ,f fhU (imp to ac-
MMBodate emnloves of the arm armed
ed armed services and the -Panama Ca Canal
nal Canal Company.
BffistMtton for the day elasse
will take place on Wednesday
the .first me S?cl
ft,rt-a naVned will be held
and
th
the
thaalon: Division. Cours-
. 4 tmnrv accounting and
.-snpM accounting will have
fteir first session on Thursday,
Oct. 2. However, registration for
Extension Division courts will be
held' on Monday, Sent. 22. and on only
ly only those courses which attract at
least 10 students will actually be
tmiwmtmirv' accounting cours-
are taught on the assumption
'!. the student has had no pre
Tious training in bookkeemng or
accounting, although students who
have had high school bookkeeping
will have a better background for
jl. -- than others.
Th intermediate accounting
course will utilise the recent pro-
stitute of Certified Public Ac
countents and the American Ac
...t;nK Association.
Advanced accounting will cover
accounting systems ior wars
.,,ness activities. The text wd
had been revised recently to m
corporate the findings
committees on accounting proce procedures.
dures. procedures. Venezuela Ousts
Flyweight Champ;
Was Peron Friend
f CARACAS, Venezuela (UPI) -wnrid
flvweicht champion Pas
cual Perez of Argentina was ar ar-reited
reited ar-reited and expelled from the coun coun-,try
,try coun-,try last night because he al allegedly
legedly allegedly was on a mission for for former
mer former Argentine dictator Juan Pe Pe-ron.
ron. Pe-ron. Peres denied the charges.
The fighter arrived here Friday
from the Dominican Republic,
where Peroh lives in exile and
was arrested 12 hours later In the
Cfistal Hotel. Police put him
aboard a plane bound for Argen Argentine
tine Argentine last nisht.
Police said Perex was expelled
'as a preventive measure order order-ad
ad order-ad hv hiehor authorities nut
added that It was because "his
connections with Peron and other
reasons we would make known in
time." Government sources said
police believed Perec was on a
mission for Peron.
Perez denied he had anything to
do with Peron. He said he came
to Venezuela only to sell his c.t
nd collect some money on a fight
arranged with Venezuelan champ
Ramon Arias for late September.
Berliner Ballet
In Stadium Snow
Tonight, Tomorrow
The Berliner Ballet has schel schel-uled
uled schel-uled performances for tonight ad
tomorrow night at the National
Stadium.
Prices for these performances
hive been set at $1, 50 cents and
2S cents.
Tonight's performance will In Include
clude Include "Rigeletto," "Swan Lake"
"Symphonic Variations" and "Se
nates,' a modern comic dramatic
ballet.

thiir anti-ffnvprnmnt and anti-mil-

itary stand."
Some sources predicted that the
student assembly would also seek
a resolution asking for the resig resignation
nation resignation of Dr. Jaime de la Guar
dia as rector of the University.
The university students' have in
sisted that there are additional
points agreed upon in connection
with the "Hilltop" Agreement
which brought an end to a con conflict
flict conflict between the students and
the government and which were
not revealed at the time of (the
settlement.
However, de la Guardia, who
led the negotiations which led U.
the signing of the agreement, has
come out with a statement deny
ing the existence of any acnauion
al points.
De la Guardia said the only
thing that existed in relation to
-
Bncter Ends Visit
WBmtng Te Reds
TAIPk,.ept. 1 (UPrV-Commu-
nist Chinese artillery ripped the
Quemoy telands for the tenth con
secutive day today, ana u.s- see
reUry of the .Army Wilbur Bruck Bruck-er
er Bruck-er issued a Stern warning to the
Reds from President Chiang Kai Kai-shek's,
shek's, Kai-shek's, capital.-
"The communists must not Hp
.wt ar. in this area." the visit
ing secretary said, for if they do
will be under-estimaung the word
and expression of the government
of the United States,"
After completing a two-day vi
sit to Formosa, Brucker told a
news conference Eisenhower and
Secretary of State John Foster
uuiies.
"It would ill become anyone,
particularly the communists, to
underestimate the force of their
expressions or to toy with wtai
they said," Brucker said.
Red artillery continued to mm
ble at the southern end of the
Formosa straits but, today's bar
rages were relatively light.
Communist shore batteries hill
ed 368 high explosive shells at
three of the Quemoy Islands Big
Wuemoy, Ershtan and Hu Tse
from midnight to early afternoon,
the Defense Ministry reported.

1 r "' JT"

. k roil JH

KNIGHTS OF THE ALTAR At Fort Amador Chapel Sunday morning Aug. 24, Richard and
Larry Francisco and John Holda left to right, were admitted into the Society of the Knights
of the Altar. Conducting the ceremony is Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Gregory R Kennedy Fort Ama Amador
dor Amador catholic chaplain. The Francisco boys are the sons of Sfc. and Mrs. Paul Francisco of
Fort Amador, and the Holda Is the son of Mr. and Mrs: William J. Holda, also of Fort

Amador. (U.S. Photo)

With Hose,

n Classes
the HilltOB Agreement is a list of
(the students' aspirations which
were rejected Dy uie negotiators.
Pumping Gas Pedal
Starts Under-Hood
Blaze In Balboa
Mrs. Jenette Fahrubel backed
her shining new 1958 Chevrolet
cut from the parking space under
her quarters at 807X, jjamoa to today,
day, today, when she got it on the high-
.1.
way me engine swppeu.
So she pumped away at the gas
pedal and pessed the starrer
which produced results but cot
the results she expected. A cloud
of smoke puffed out from under
the hood followed by a roanns
noise.
Strange behavior, jshe thought,
for her cream and green Chev Chev-vy
vy Chev-vy which is only two months old.
She. and her daughter, 13-year-old
Martha, hurriedly got out of
the car to find that the engine
was on fire. A neighbor, see;ns
the smoking car, rushed out with
a fire extinguisher and quenched
fie bjaze before it didYery mu':h
(damage except to tn motor ann
to the paintwork on top of the
hood.
Fire department officials could
not determine the cause of first
examination but thought that ei
ther a faulty coil or something
causing a spark had ignited, gas
flooding the carburetor as Mrs.
Fahrubel pumped ttne accelerator.
Mrs. Fahrubel' s husband David
is employes at Pedro- Miguel
locks.
Hurricane Ella
Pins Cristobal'
In Haitian Port
The Panama liner Cristobal,
already delayed a day through
having- to run into Norfolk,
Va., from the hurricane Daisy
on her voyage from New fork,
has encountered another tem tempestuous
pestuous tempestuous lady.
This tiime the hurricane Ella
swept into the liner's path,
forcing her to wait in safety at
Port-au-Prince. Haitla.
Af ter encountering Daisy last
week, the Cristobal was due to
arrive at the Isthmus tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow night.
But she did not clear Port -au-Prince
till 12:30 p.m. today,
and is now scheduled to get
her load of schoolteachers to
Cristobal 8:30 a.m. Wednesday.

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BACK TO THE BOOKS Diedre Ann Dickson tries to bone up on some school subjects before
classes start on Wednesday. Diedre ,is the daughter of Capt. and Mrs. A. Dickson of Fort Davis
She will enter 6th grade at South Margarita School. (uTs Army Photo)

Canal Zone
Carta! Zonians liave so far a-
chieved one of the quietest holi
day periods on record. Up till
this afternoon, there had been no
leaths, no accidents, no crime,
no incidents of any sort to enliv enliven
en enliven Labor Day for yawning po police.
lice. police. Apparently the populace of the
Canal Zone exhibited more care,
sens or sobriety than fellow
countrymen Stateside where mo motorists
torists motorists are killing themselves at
the rate of more then 4.7 par
hour.
Although one club manger, con contemplating
templating contemplating low returns from a
slow weekend, speculated that the
main reason for the uneventful
holiday is that Canal Zoners stay
home, get drunk and then go to
sieep.
He admitted' however, that It
could be the thousands who have
mtored out to the Interior.
In Chicago, the National Safety
Council called for "common sense,
patience and old fashioned courte
sv" to hold down the number of
deaths.
An 11:30 a.m. count showed 304
persons killed in traffic accidents
since the start of the three-day
Labor Day weekend at 6 p.m. -Friday.
In addition, at least 47 per persons
sons persons drowned, 11 died in plane
crashes, and 52 lest their lives
in miscellaneous accidents for

jresiae irart

.....

Enjoys Quiet
ic ueaths
s
a total holiday death count
of
434.
California led the nation with
at least 36 traffic deaths. Ohio
was next with 20, Illinois with lb.
New York with 16, Texas' with 1 0
nd Wisconsin with 14.
PeKect traffic records were re
ported by Washington, D.C.and
seven states tne xiakotas, Rhode
Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Wash
iogton and Wyoming.
The council had estimated 420
persons would be killed in traffic
accidents, against a non-holiday
period of 350, by midnight to-
night:
Only common sense, vatience
and old fashioned courtesy can
hold, the toll below our estimate,"
a council Spokesman said. "Traf "Traffic
fic "Traffic officers are working around
the clock to keep drivers from
Killing themselves. It seems on
ly fair that the drivers cooper cooperate."
ate." cooperate." British Trawlers
Defy Iceland's New
12-Mile Limits
REYKJAVIK, Iceland, Sept. 1 1-(UPD
(UPD 1-(UPD British fishing trawlers de
fied Iceland's new 12-mile limit
today and sailed into the disput disputed
ed disputed waters, backed by the British
Navy and a "freedom of (he
ses" declaration in London
Iceland's decision to extend the
limits of its territorial water?
from four miles to 12 miles went
into effect at midnight. Shortly
afterwards the British trawler
convpys, protected by four British
ineales. Dcsan crossing mr une,
Renorts that soviet' suDmanne-
were "observing' on me Icelan Icelandic
dic Icelandic coast could not be confirmed.
The Soviets have backed Iceland
in the dispute with Britian.
(The British Broadcasting Cor Corporation
poration Corporation said armed British and
Icelandic ships made contact this
morning but no incidents occur
red.
(An Icelandic gunboat, the tgi.
steamed up to a British trawler
inside the 12-mile zone, circled
the trawler and then hove to
nearby. The British frigate Hits
sell rushed to the scene and the
Icelandic vessel retired without
incident.)
The lone Catalina seaplane of
the Icelandic coast guard circled
over the British vessels today hut
merely kept them under observa observation.
tion. observation. VILLAGERS CROW BEARDS
NEW DELHI (UPI)-The village
ot Kapadani, India, has become
the village of bearded men. In India's
dia's India's wandering holy man,
Acharya Vinoba Bhave, told the
men of the village to boycott tbe
local barber and grow beards be because
cause because the barber refused to shave
untouchables. Bhave, recent win winner
ner winner of a Philippine Magsaysay
prize for his efforts at land redis redistribution
tribution redistribution in India, said the boy boycott
cott boycott might change the attitude of
the caste-conscious barber.

Labor Day;

47 Hourly
Fish Reportedly
in Holiday Mood
Out In RP Bay
. Even the' fish out in Panama
Bay are in holiday mood, reports
Balboa Yacht Club, and are bit
ing at every piece oi oaii neiug
ohered by a sizable ilotilla from
ilic cub.
Commented the commodore, Vir Virgil
gil Virgil Camby, "it is a pity the Pa Panama'
nama' Panama' Rou and Keel v'ub tourna tournament
ment tournament didn't carry on over this
week-end. There would have been
some tremendous catches report reported."
ed." reported." Unluckiest fishing story of the
weesena is tnat oi iviei 'inin.;i:
tearing his hair aboard his
launch La Pinta. Yesieruay ne
hooked no less than 26 sailfish
out only iwo were Ooaied. Jtiis ex explanation
planation explanation crackled in an agitated
way over tne Yacht Uuo raaiJ
"green crew, next time I'll take
Frank Vioiette s grandchildren out
with me."
Not only fish by the hundrn.i
are being hauled on deck but
some unusual ones are also being
caught
A party on the Little Moon has
reported a marlin estimated at
618 lbs. John smith on tn3 Pinas
is excited over what he believes
is a silver mar, in previously
unknown in these waters.
Three years ago, what w&s be believed
lieved believed to be a silver marlin w is
caught in the bay but when sent
to the States for identification,
the International Game Fishing As
sociation identified it a blue mar
lin.
Smith has his fish on ice, .and
it will be sent Stateside too.
frank Thompson's
Memorial Service
Set For Tomorrow
Memorial services for Frank Y
Thompson, retired Canal emp'oye
who died last week, will be he;ci
at 4:30 p.m. tomorrow at tior f
eas Mortuary Chapel. Services wi'l
be conducted by the Sojourners
Lodge, A.F. and A.M.
Mr. Thompson is survived by
his wife, of Gamboa, and one
brother of Bowling Green, Kentuc Kentucky.
ky. Kentucky. His ashes will be sent to Bowl
inn Green.
A Roosevelt Medal holder for
Canal construction-day service. Mr
Thompson first Joined the Canai
organization in 1905 as a conduc conductor
tor conductor on the Panama Railroad. He
tetired in 1945.
BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, SEPT. 2
High Low
fi:io a.m. 12:19 a.m.
6:27 p.m.

cisionSoon

Gov. Faubus Warns

That Integration

Means Bloodshed

LITTLE ROCK, Ark, Sept. 1 (UPI) The Little Rock
school board decides today or tomorrow when to open
Central High School in the face, of a warning by Gov.
Orval Faubus that integration of Negroes will bring
bloodshed.

Faubus said yesterday

Central rather than permit Negro integration. The Arkan Arkansas
sas Arkansas legislature has given him the power to do so.

But the whole key was the timing of Central s open opening.
ing. opening. If the school term began Sept 8, as now scheduled,
it would open all -While. But the U.S. Supreme Court has
delayed a ruling on integration here on the assumption
the date would be Sept. 15.
School Supt. Virgil T. Blossom said last night the
board would meet tomorrow at the latest, possibly today.
Blossom believes the board will delay the opening to Sent.
15 lest it jeopardize the Little Rock case when the. m
preme Court meets Sept. 9.

us, on a nationwide
that it was up to

4' .-:;mm

r to open Central without Nerffes.

wnerne

Meanwhile in. Washington,
Thurgood Marshall, attorney fc
the National Assn. for the Ad Advancement
vancement Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP), criticized as ill-advised
President Eisenhower's recent go
slow statement on school inte integration.
gration. integration. "If we slow down any more,
Marshall said, "we'll be going
backward."
The Negro attorney said he be believes
lieves believes Elsenhower is sincere In
wanting to improve race rela relations
tions relations but that he is not fully ad advised
vised advised of the situation.
"His advisers lust tell him the
slower you go the more chance
you'll have for peace," Marshall
said on a television program.
He added that he thought the
President should nave used his
influence to promote peaceful
school integration "a long time
ago."
The attorney, who argued the
case of Negro students before the
Suoreme Court's special session
last week, referred to the Presi President's
dent's President's remarks at a news confer7
ence last Wednesday that he
might have told friends he fa favors
vors favors a "slower" approach to in integration.
tegration. integration. Marshall said he would like to
sej the Republican and Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic parties "vie with each
other" to see which one can a a-dopt
dopt a-dopt the strongest integration
policies but denied that Negroes
vote as a block.
The NAACP attorney also:
Denied the contention that
education levels are lowered
when schools are integrated.
"It Is much easier to finance
one school system than it is to
finance two," he said, adding
that In the South today nei neither
ther neither Whites nor Negroes get- a
good education.
Said he did not anticipate
bloodshed as schools open this
fall but said the NAACP would
"call on the government to end"
any anti Integration violence.
Asserted that the NAACP
expects a "whole barrage" of new
school cases this year but has
enough staff and enough money
to participate in them.
Faubus said yesterday : "It Is
my feeling that integration
could not be accomplished
without disorder and blood
shed."
He said he has further plans
deal with the situation if lt be
comes more critical, but he re refused
fused refused to disclose them.
"I was reared in the Ozarks,
and I noticed that when a rabbit
went into a hole there were al
ways two ways out," he said.
He said he always tried to
leave himself a way out.
Faubus refused to say wheth whether
er whether he Is an Integrationlst or
segregationist, but he did Insist
he Is one of the most moderate
governors in the South on the
racial Issue.
He said he was required at the
Newport, R I., conference last
September to say that the 1954
Supreme Court decision on inte-

' .(
I ir.-
-. '-'

he "probably" would close
televising interview, said
the 1 lirtlrf Ii igf
and must be obeyed as a basis
for negotiations with the Presi
dent.
"I really haven't changed my
views." he said. "I was renuired
to Issue that statement as a bas basis
is basis for negotiations with the Pres President."
ident." President." Faubus said If the Suoreme
Court upholds the 212-ve.f'
"cooling off" period approved by
Federal Judge Harry J. Lemley,
he could not say whether Inte Integration
gration Integration would be any easier in
1961.
"But it would give the com community
munity community a chance to create aO
attitude of acqulesence or ac acceptance,"
ceptance," acceptance," he said. ''Then t
would have no interest."
Faubus has raised Lemley's
decision but criticized the Eighth
Circuit court of Appeals for
overturning it.
Newsmen asked him if h
thought a governor had the risht
"to pick and choose" whether to
abide by a Federal court's deci decision.
sion. decision. "Only so far as it affects the
beace and order of the state?
Faubus replied.
"There are many precedents
for this," he continued. "Kor
Instance, Abraham Mnroln dis disagreed
agreed disagreed with the Dred Scott
Decision."
He said "millions of AffT&f
cans" do not believe the SuDreanf
Court decision has a basis In left
became Congress has nevjjp
oassed legislation on the integra integration
tion integration issue.
Under questioning, he said if
Consress passed such a law, It
would be "the law of the Jand
but there wou'd still be a diffi difficulty
culty difficulty of enforcement.
"No law cui be enforced unless
there is enough support from the
people," Faubus said.
Meanwhile in New York, James
McBride Dabbs, president of the
Southern Regional Council, said
that he believed President Elsen Elsenhower
hower Elsenhower should take a stand on
the moral issue of segregation.
Dabbs was asked for his
reaction to the "consistent re refusal"
fusal" refusal" of Eisenhower to commit
himself on integration, although
the President has sa;d that he
would enforce the U.S. Sum-em
Court's decision with troops if
necessary.
Dabbs said he was "grateful"
that Eisenhower had made it
clear that he would back the
Federal courts.
"I do regret the fact that the
President doesn't see fit to
take a moral lead In this mat matter,"
ter," matter," he added. "We have had
Presidents who would have ta

ken the lead on one side or the
other. Franklin Rons evelt
would have done It. Wondrow
Wilson would have done It,
"Woodrow Wilson and Prank Prank-in
in Prank-in Roosevelt, too, had the theo theory
ry theory that the President cou'd make
the office about what he PlejH
He was elected, It's true, bv
party, but he becomes the leader
of the nation. Who eldyHB

the land leader except the Prescient?

a



PAGE
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1951
YHE PANAMA AMERICAN
Labor Day of Rest
Labor News
And
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THE MAIL BOX

SINGLE WAGE PLAN

Because the Single Wage plan hurt US Raters and Local

Katers ooin, u wu uwtjw oe w", - -ters
are written by me, "100 Percent Unionist,'' Phillip Malcolm,
.. umrawr i n isn pniov reaaiiiB letters on other

c,.h d i? j vf s svsipm lor beaiina uie lottery, bo 1

tnau my good iriend "100 Percent Unionist" would do better by
writing no more than every week or o, rather than hogging the
limelight daily with his Calypso rhymes. To.make a good point
is one thing, but to harp on a point to the boring extent 100
Percent Unionist" has been doing suggest he is not as sure as
he wou.d like to be of his Own correctness.
feoth "100 Percent Unionist" and "Another 100 Percent Union Unionist"
ist" Unionist" telaim they have attended Panama University. I wonder
whether that is anything to boast about at this time. The stu stu-iienU
iienU stu-iienU gave the college a black mark by throwing the national
flag! all over the Canal Zone in operation Sovereignty. Regard Regard-lesslof
lesslof Regard-lesslof their intentions, such actions are rated as punishable any-
VtefthlTruth, I never liked school myself, and Vm sure
I have plenty of company in this. If there are, say, 50,000 stu students
dents students in the Republic and the Canal Zone toda youd be lucky
to find 10,000 who like school. A handful of tfae students who
rose up in May against the government and especially the min minister
ister minister of education, tried to discuss improvements to the school
system but more than two-thirds of their companions were
Ehing benches, desks, blackboards-all the paraphenalia of
ma "ins --- hmit.lnx "Afuera con escuela!"

education anu vm anmc -- .u,t
Since I didn't like school you'd be safe in betting ; that I didnt

get a college education. Alter reading some oi u
ters of my better-educated countrymen I feel I haven t missed a
For instance, highly-educated "100 Percent Unionist" has
apparent" allowed smart Gov. William Po ter to convince him
that the Panama Canal Company's interpretation of the Single
Wage legislation is preferable to Panama's P".. ?
ichfevement alone makes Potter great, let alone his meet i alk
it tocal-rate civic council meetings when the Local Rters,want
. street wklened-"OK, it'll cost $25,00u"-wr.ile the Grln&os bite
their fingernails, knowing they'll have to pay for It
I notice-that while the many Gringoa who write to the Ma,l
Box W hell to our government and to their own government
Impartially, they never hit their own countrymen for contra contrabanding.
banding. contrabanding. ercent Unlonist- and those like him forget
their college education tor a short while, and take a lesson from
those of us who are poor and dumb.
The thousands of local raters who afre now living in one one-room
room one-room boxes in Panama, having been kicked Jtt ,the Zone, can
urovide one such lessdn. "100 Percent Unionist'.' and his kind
ihould in the light of this unfortunate example, get smart like
so many Gringos have dbne, buy themselves a piece of land In
Panama build a house, and so ensure that when at the end oi
their working days they are kicked off the Zone they will be able
to continue to live in much the same standard of comfort they
were accustomed to In Rainbow City or paraiso.
Under the Civilygervlce Retirement plan local raters will
have a chance of getting good pension-without havlhg to wait
till they are 70. If Duflue comes their way ,i they can stop work
and get into some profitable business. Whatever may be the rea reason
son reason for a Local Rater giving up residence on the Zone, he is a
wise man if he has a good home ready for himself in the republic.
This whole thing about gopds in Panama being of poorer
quality than the cqmmjssary goods is just imagination. The re re-pujlic
pujlic re-pujlic has Mverujjrovlnces without any commissaries anywhere
fteir them. These Is hajdly any sanitation. The natives eat half
a lbaf W corn ftead, wash it down with gallon of river water,
eerfais and all, yt in the allegedly sanitary cities near the com
missaries life-expectancy is down below 70, while there are all
sorts of centenarians doing just fine in the Interior,
' "100 Percent Unionist" is only displaying selfishness when he
says he'll be on a USate salary ultimately uhder the single
Wage plart. If. his salary has jumped 124, a he claims, since
the advent of local-rate unions on the Zone he must have been

a Haborer at the starf. Only laborers and women employes nave
got any benefits from these unions. As a storekeeper In 1940 I

oonthly, as agams sizs xor a uo-raie cierK.

prk got only $175, and most general foremen

jniy. -:. ;

iva nrri marir fnrAiriAn mak no- nvpr s:ifi n nav so

k.A...n Vnnnrt. nrVst rflnpro1 fnrpmon must. opt. Anv Cirnec who

does not make tpore than $300 monthly is eittrtr an apprentice
orm student assistant. There are a handful of Leical Raters, on
a salary you can bet does not exceed $400 monthly, doing jobs for
Which the U8-rate salary is $1000 a month.
If I was.making $67.50 as a storekeeper IP, years ago. and the
samt job today Is paid less than $100, I cannot see much sign of
mthn great gains "100 Percent Unionist" gives his union cred-
Ginger Know All

was making $67.50

A US -rate chief c
less than $200 moi

Today you h

Bv VICTOR RIISIL
A few days and three thousaxd
miles ago l was brieled by men
who had had long conversation?
with Nikita Khrushchev. He threat
ened to kill one of them tor juk
ing too many embarrassing ques questions.
tions. questions. Fortunately for the threaten

ed man, the conversations with

Khrushchev ware held in London,
not Moscow.
The man who had nettled Khrush
was one oi the British Labor Par
ty leaders, George Browne.
Browne also infuriated the Russia
dictator by telling Khrushchev t
20-year-old son not to believe ev everything
erything everything his father told him a
bout the inevitability of a Com
munist victory. Khrushchev over
heard this and called for a quick
translation. Then Khrushchev roaf
ed that in a few yesrs Britai
would be in Soviet Communist
bands.
The British Laborites who brici brici-ed
ed brici-ed me on their spcrpt talks wirh

Khrushchev reported that they are

certain inst ne Russian ruler will
resort to themonuclear war to

control the globe beiore lie 'it-

comes too old to enjoy being the
world's emDeror TWv fnvnA

Khrushchev harder, tnushtpr vn

than Joset Stalin.

In face of this, I was asked by
somt what the U.S. is doing in
cold brutal terms to get Moscow
and other large Russian ctnttrt i
in Mm sights of our big missiles
I said I'd try to report it, and
I wasn't off the sleek TWA air air-liner
liner air-liner two hours when I pieced
this information together.
Within 12 months or so th- IT

S, will have at least six bases

ri&ht inside our own bnrW rum

Uvhich we will bp able to hurl in

tercontinental hydrogen bomb roc rockets
kets rockets at Moscow.

To build these the Pentagon hc

some $500 000,000 in a soecial mis missile
sile missile base construction fund Thi

is merely for the fiscal year ending
in June 1959. This is an officii.

Pentagon figure.
This half hiPinn rlnllart will An

more than merely provide launch

ing sues tor rockets whch vh
replace the Kremlin and even Ni Nikita
kita Nikita Khrushchev w'th a radio ac active
tive active hole. This half billion dollar;,
will fight the Soviets by psever-t-nf
further recession in the U S.
Pentagon officials tell me that
construction of new missile bases
wir create 5,000,000 man dv
worth of jobs for our construction
workers. At least $120,000,000 o
tK half billion will go for w-oi
The rest for the purchase of hea heavy
vy heavy equipment which will mak'
for iobs in other suoply fields.
Money and manpower alr
art going into four basat from
which the 100-ton Atlas intercon intercon-tintntl
tintntl intercon-tintntl ballistic missile cn -n
ho right into Moscow from our
northern and western tate. Ono
such base is at Warren Air field
OutlM Cheynne, Wo. Ru-'
gents have been taking a good
look at this on recently.
Then therp is Fairchild Air For,:
bAse near Spokane, Wash.; O futt
Air Force base "ar Omaha, Neb.
the Strateg'o Air Command head
quarters and Cam" Cook, Cal.
Another type intercontinental
ballistic missile called the Titan
soon will be luanchahle from Low
ry Range outside Denver, Co.
A hydrogen bomb can fit into its
nose cone.
Last January the Air Force be began
gan began buying land at Presque Isle,
Maine, to house a Snark unf:.
"The Snark Is an intercontinel :1
"guided" missile. It's a slow "air "air-breathing"
breathing" "air-breathing" missile which can de

liver an n-oomn s.ooo miles. It

?oes only 600 miles an hour, but
it gets there.

This is onlv the hp?innm Urn

let's tell the world. If we don't,
Khrushchev may win a world wi'b
out ever putttn" his tubby finger
on the push button console wlrcl',
can send his Red birds on the
wing.

Labor Day is like a fresh start.
Alter ad exuberant weekend, the

nation settles down to its norma.'

iune-months-of-the-year routine.

The holiday itself is a glorious

hail and farewell to the warmth

and pleasures of the summers

Parks and pleaure spots are load

ed. Autos jam roads like gr?at
mechanical snakes with everyone

who is here wanting to go tnere

and the Uteres here.

But thP day after, most of us

snakt the sand out of our-hair and

there is a general feeling of let's
get on with it."

In moat families, it is vhe

children that call the tune. It's

back to school for them and, trutn

fully, most ol them are glad to gt

back to a busy routipe. The little

boys like the excitement of seeing

old pals and the little girls want to
wear their new dresses.

So away they go.
Back home, mother has been on

edge due to the unkempt appear

ance of the house, a natural by

product of informal summer life.
There's ininterrupted time now io

dig in and get that Old tiger,

Sir

ANYBODY HERE SEEN BOOTSIE?

Somewhere in Los Rios roams a mother cat and two kittens.

Is our Bootsie, and we want her back. She was taken for a

ride and dropped off In Los Rlos several days ago.

I ask the good resident of Los Rlos to be on the lookout for
dark grey and white Bootsie and her kittens. We just want the
mother cat back, for her kittens probably have homes by now.
Her return would make three little children wry happy. If any any-odb
odb any-odb has Bootsie, will they please call 83-2139 and we'll come bird bird-speed
speed bird-speed and pick her up.
Mrs. Zorn

Sir

HOME POME

The men who designed these paper-thin houses

Must have had brains like little brown mouses.
Especially the type known as 12-famlly quarters
Where husbands and wives live with young sons and daughters;
The entrance disgusts one from the very first minute
The stairways are palntless, It's a trap to be In it;
The bedrooms (they call them) can't boast of a door;
There are squeaks from the ceilings, and groans from the floor;
The bathrooms and kitchens are built rear-to-rear
With all ventilation impossible here.
But living f oes on all around just the same,
And loving must follow, it's part of life's game.
No secrets, no whispers, for all Is In sight
Upstairs, downstairs, to the left, and the right.
No wonder young Teeners are brought up this way
Start drinking, cavorting-rlt's all on display.
From their earliest years when remembrance Is sweet
To the tanMtJve years when one should be discreet.
All th should be' stooped, though already it's late
For this no feneration too soon dissipates;
Respecting their parents Is a hard thing to do
Whn living in quarters that hide naught from view.
They're buildine; new homes in a year, two or three,
Where the next generation will be happy and free,
But who will be housed there, the young or the old?
The seniors, or lunlors, the pick-of-the-fold?
For can't you just tee the young in employ
Being given a hone they can really enjoy!
The folks with small families, the youthful, the gay
Would be lucky, it's tree, but "that'll be the day -How
can this outdated unfairness be curbed?
And this coarse way of living at last be disturbed
It would be a good thing If our Governor kind
WnuM look Into this problem, and bring peace of mind,
, For there's so much dissension of things left undone
As to who will be moved, into what-and which one?
But these chlc!;en-coop houses, where the Hvinr is heard
Belong to Just one breed they're just for the birds."

Blum-Gullion

MS

The idea of the Suez Canal
was first thought of by the an ancient
cient ancient Egyptians. Parts of it
weft dug a thousand years
before the birth of Christ.
Finally, in 1858, a company
was organized to build the
canal. Work began in 1859 and
the 87.5-mile canal opened 10
years later at a cost of about
$136,000,000.

1

1

APPLIANCES
Stoves Refrijreralor

Washing Machines
by
General Electric

Westinghoose

Frlgidalre
Hotoolnt
Norgs

ALL

TOGETHER

APPLIANCE HEADQUARTER

Tropicana
4th ( July Ave. H St.
YES! SANTA IS HERE

STAHT SAVING YOUK TICKETS EOR

OUB XMAS DRAWING YOU CAN
win i,H.H ratE

Lab

or

Day

By JAMES G. CROSSLEY

housework, hipped back into his
cage waere it can be more easily
managed.
Meanwhile, down at the office,
the stresses and strains oi half tne
force being on vacation are over.
You can get people on teiephoi .s
and lis a relief tffat the mat-nine is
again Off half speed.
i.abor Day is always a new start
for business. The puolic's wander
ing attention is again focused on
the home and community life. The
hustle and bustle are back In the
stores and market places.
It is an especially meaning ''tl
rew start Tor business this yaar.

Another page in the great sus

pense story, Boom or Bust, is
being turned. Everyone holds his
breath whilt the cloth mask of the

new model cars are whipped offc

wim a i am arc. wiu Business snap
back by Christmas?
So the nation is vitally interest-

eo as trade ana industry spit on

their hands, get a firm grip on the

hammer and start building he

economic structure for the '58-'59

season.

Another group in our great

American community is singled

Stalwart Star

Answer to Previous Puzzle

ACROSS

3 Fisherman's
apparatus
4 English river
5 Guarantee
Tirade
7 Faith
8 Roman bronze

, .. V Demolish
( 11 Canadian river
, n Originate jservr

lu. IS Organ of

1 Screen
performer,
Richard
( He is on of
moviedom's

ill. .., i a nmi a i r a tni. i

18 Measure of

cloth
IT Undraped
statues
18 Make a
mistake

heariivf

II Low haunt
20 Jeers
21 Frightens
22 Defeat
IS Trieste win

28 Portuguese
coins
28 Volcano in

Sicily

42 Aged
43 Require
44 Essential

being

20 Thoroughfares J4 Coimic ordtr
32 He was ,,,

a r. V-l "WWi v

in new lorn.

I City
I 25 Conclusion
I 26 Solicitude
: 80 Great Lake
1 31 Encourage
i 32 Poker stake
33 Check, ai
a horse
! 34 Rip
35 Perched
1 38 Lohengrin's
bride
j 38 Burlesques
! 43 Individual
I 48 Effective
; 48 Mariner's
1 direction
48 Man's name
81 Plowman
' 83 Wish
84 Ester of
oleic add
j 88 Hollow.
; 88 Birds' homes
1 DOWN
1 Prison roosa
8 Ellipsoidal

Cain (Bib.)

35 Looks fixedly 46 Lath

3 Be sick 47 Hardens,
37 Genus of as cement
marine snails 48 Before
40 Turn aside 50 Metal
41 Rtonan 52 French plural
official article

jnrrrr

rrrrr
e n
i
-lipid

WTWWf ibnn
if f "n f m-
i i ;
4dl kiH-,i

PRE-INVENTORY SALE
Build uauui own

HI-FI
AMPLIFIERS, PRE AMPLIFIERS, SPEAKERS
AND RECORD CHANGERS
t a TREMENDOUS DISCOUNT
PANAMA RADIO CORP.

Across "La Merced" Church. Central Ave. 9-14

out to consider this Labor Day as
a suiting place lor great enueav enueav-ors.
ors. enueav-ors. Anu mat is uie. group uus
noaday is named aiter Lahor
itself.
uus powerful, surging people's
movement wiucii we iioiior touay
uiusi ueuicate ilseil anew to hold
to the traditions ot the past and
tonuuet nselx lor tne general wel
.are. During the past 12. mom as
s.-me inuuiiule black marks have
Leen atiixed to Labor's record,
largely the smeary fingerprints of
too-powenul leaders, irresponsible
anu venal.
The nation hopes that Labor
loo, uus year wiu rally behind the
more mature oi its leaders and gii

on to even gnaier neignis ana
giories in t the name of the Amer Amer-u
u Amer-u an working man.
Okay, D'atner time, we're sun
burneu, tired of hot dog meals
ana ready to settle down to hus-

mess. We want to see wnat s

going to happen. Let s go.

Italy, Too, Having
Contraband Trouble;
Swiss Goods Cheaper

CHIAS0, Italy -(UPI)- "Sun "Sunday
day "Sunday Smugglers" have created a
five and a-half million dollar a
year problem for Italian authori authorities.
ties. authorities. Every Sunday during the sum summer,
mer, summer, at least $14,000 worth of con contraband
traband contraband merchandise is smuggled
through this border town from
Switzerland into Italy, nearly all
of it by normally honest middle. middle.-class
class middle.-class Italians.

With an average of 30,000 Ita
Hans making excursions into Swit Switzerland
zerland Switzerland every Sunday, customs oi oi-ficials
ficials oi-ficials frankly admit they are
fighting a losing battle against the
contraband trade.
Among the items smuggled into
Italy are coffee, sugar, chocolate,
cocoa, toabeco, candy and soap,
tfut perhaps the most popular of
all is gasoline, which costs 40 cents
a gallon in Switzerland, compared
wiih 88 cents in Italy.
Many Italian motorists who ha habitually
bitually habitually visit the Alpine land have
befriended farmers within a mile

or so this side of the frontier.

There, they deposit a couple of
cans.
The costly Italian gasoline, ex except
cept except for a pint or two is sipho siphoned
ned siphoned out of their cars Into the
cans. The motorists then drive in into
to into Switezrland, ."ffl up t'teir tanks
with the cheaper Swiss gasoline
and return to Italy with it.
Italian companies have deman demanded
ded demanded a revision of import" regula regulations
tions regulations to help stem the "Sunday
smuggler" traffic. They claim it
is costing them about $5,800,000
worth of business a year.

WASHINGTON The Supreme
Court probably doesn't know that
it was the threat of a filioustcr
which saved the nine Justkes
from being rebu.fed by Coagrtss.
The public also does not know
how filibusters are born.
When Sen. Wayne Morse of
Oregon appeared on the Senate
floor on Saturday night Just be before
fore before adjournment, he wore a red
rose. His colleagues knew that
this was the signal that he was
ready to talk various bills to death.
Noang the rose, lanky Lyndon
Johnson of Texas, the Democratic
leader, leaned over, and asked
Morse what was up.
"Lyndon," warned the Oregon
liberal who has one of ths long longest
est longest talkathon records in history,
"you're not going to get out of
here until Wednesday. I have no
intention of letting this Congress
adjourn with its last acts an
expression of lack of confidence
in 'he Supreme Court.'
Morse was referring to the Mil Miliary
iary Miliary Bill aimed at overruling a
Court of Appeals decision -a firm firmed
ed firmed by the Supreme Court requir requiring
ing requiring police to arraign prisoner
without delay.
Morse also referred to a pass passport
port passport bill urged by John Foster
Dulles, restoring State Depart Department
ment Department power, previously removed
by the courts, to ban passports
to any American.
Earlier in the day two back backstage
stage backstage incidents had occurred
which didn't leak out to the pa papers.
pers. papers. William B. Macomber, assis assistant
tant assistant to Dulles, had called on
Morse and asked him to remove
his earlier objection to the piss piss-port
port piss-port bill.
"You've got s lot of .guts," re replied
plied replied the fiery Oregonian. "Go
back to Secretary Dulles and tell
him that Wayne Morse will be
talking against that bill until
Wednesday. I feel awfully gowi
I've been out on the farm and
I'm in good shape. I'm a little
hoarse, but I'll be able to talk
until Wednesday."
Morse was not kidding. He had
spent part of the week putting
his Red Devon cattle and prize
roosters in the Gaithersburg Fair,
where he won top honors.
Macomber took one loo at
Morse's wiry physique and re reported
ported reported back to Dulles that the
passport bill was as good as
dead.
CARROLL'S IRISH
About the same time, Sen. John
Carroll of Colorado conferred with
Morse. He and his fellow Demo Democrat,
crat, Democrat, Joe O'Mshoney of Wyoming,
had gone into conference with

'the House of Representatives to

iron 'out differences regarding
the Mallory Bill. O'Mahoney held
the proxies of IHionois' Dirksen
and Mississippi's Eastland in his
pocket.
Result: The House wrote new
wording into the bill hamstring

ing the Supreme Court's rul"U.

Carroll refused to sign. Disappoint Disappointed
ed Disappointed at the way OMahoney had
surrendered, he came to Morse
and they agreed to filibuster. ?
Later Carrooll came back to

Morse, reported that the "sott:

core' Senate liberals urged mm

not to fight.

"I happen to have been here
14 years," chided the Oregonian.
"I'm used to such appeasement.
When you talk to Church (Idaho)

or Clark (Penna.) that s what you
get. But I can tell you that the
only thing the Senate leader? un understand
derstand understand if brute force the brute
force of time. Wc have to whio
'em with time. You've been soft soft-soaped
soaped soft-soaped by the phony liberals who
don't want to fight. Don't try to
sell me their kind of malarkey.
Are you going to -ight or not
Carroll is a good fighter any anyway,,
way,, anyway,, but this got his Irisn up.
He agreed to give two speeches,
alternating with Morse, to keep
the Senate in session for st least
two days.

Sen. Tom Hennings of Missouri,
another Democra-, also areeJ te
give a speech, while Javi Re Republican,
publican, Republican, former Attorney Gene General
ral General of New York, came up with
an important legal glmmic:
"Wayne,! he said, "we can ob object
ject object to wis House wjrdjge un
tier Rule 27, watch tormus the
introduction of new evidence In
a conterence report. We can make
a point ot order."
Carroll agreed to make the
point of oroer, and the leaders
were no.ified that objection would
be made.
By this time it, Was l:a0 a.m.
The Senate was grinning uowly,
sleepily, .oward uie 4:11 a.m.
hour wnen it finally aejomned.
oena.oia had oaeu listening to
the pros and cons of Chicago's
sewage &jrVcm aiiu is tv o(
more Lake Michigan water. Sen.
Froxmire o. Wisconsin was de determined
termined determined that no more wa.er
leave the harbors oi Milwaukee,
Green Bay, ana siheooygan. rbe
opposition still had the votes to
pass the Mallory Bit', but a
quorum was dwindling. Many
Senators, up for re-eieciion, were
leaving town.
Harassed Lyndon Johnson came
over to inorae anu Carrbu. "We re
gomg to accept uur pomi of
wrtoti,' ne sam, you ve won. We
cotuun't get a quorum ture at
10 a.m."
culture Benson as a supporter oi
jtu w no ituvuiia 4i-a
stageu auu soiucuuit ipevtiutttd
Ana that was how toe Supreme
Louri nnaiiy survived tne attacai
ot me sam Congress.
$tW WW i$Pk
MAIL BAG
H.A.B., St. Paul-The speech 1st
in wuicn Senator Inyo ot Min Minnesota
nesota Minnesota extoueu jsecrcary of Agri Agriculture
culture Agriculture Benson as a supporter of
100 per cent parity prices was
ueuvmed jan. i, iu, on paae
46a oi the Congressional Record
as follows: "I am confident that
Beason will wars: tor an agri agricultural
cultural agricultural program- that will provide
100 per cent parity for tne iar iar-mer...l
mer...l iar-mer...l am confident that Ben Benson's
son's Benson's general philosophy and fair fairness
ness fairness are sucn that he will en endeavor
deavor endeavor to establish for the pro producers
ducers producers of our land 100 per cent
of parity in terms, of their in income
come income and their share in the na national
tional national economy. ...in listening to
the interrogation of Benson at
the Committee on Agriculture i
was satisfied that he came out
not only as an able student of
agriculture hut also as o&i who
has integrity and sincerity, and
as one who wiU endeavor with
all his might which is very great
to develop and carry on a ftris"
program which will provide for
100 per cent parity rather than
80 per cent parity."
This is the speech which Sen Senator
ator Senator Thye claims is unfair te
have Congressman McCarthy dig
up and quote in his re-election
campaign.

LsV LflLsBBsVilBBBBBV f
sffcl

Tests Don't Show
If Mem Will Work,
Exoert Contends
CHICAGO (UPI) -An su su-thority
thority su-thority on the hiring of executive
personnel warns the nations's in industry
dustry industry snd business firms to be beware
ware beware of the widely used "Person "Personnel
nel "Personnel Test."
Leon D. Barton, President of
Cadillac Associates, and executive
procurement firm, said:
"So far as I know, no test hss
ye tbeen devised which can give
a potential employer the answer
to the questipn 'Should I hire this
man?' or to the far more impor important
tant important question, 'If I hire him, will
he work?'
Barton believes many business
firms use the personnel tests be because
cause because they are uncertain o their
own judgment In selecting men.

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

Great White Fleet

1

New Orleans Service

Si
'

"ULUA" ....
"HIBUERAS"

xAQUB

"ULUA"
"HIBUERAS"

"YAQUI" Oct. 11

' MO' I

Arrive
Cristobal
.......... ..Sept. 6
Sept. 13
Sept. 20
Sept. 27

Oct. 4

Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo

New York Service

,1

Arrives
Cr stobal

"SAN JOSE" Sept. 1
"HEEEDIA" i Sept I
"ESPARTA" Sept. II

"MM"N" Sent. 28

FiM BERLANOVj

.v...-.".- r

Sept. ZB

CRISTOBALW.C.C.A. FEDDF.R SERVICE

VERACRUZ iWy (151 Days

"mv eaiiinjiB ui iwcive passenger snips 10 new
York. New Orleans, Los Angeles. San Francisco
and Seattle.

Mtf

H

SPECIAL ROUND TRIP PASSENGER PARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New Vork and Return $240.00
To Los Ansreles and San Francisco and
Returning from Us Angeles S210.ee
To Seattle and Return $365.or

rr;

H

TELEPHONES:

CRISTOBAL 2121

PANAMA 2-2904

n



5 I

ONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 195S

I mm LI m

I J8f&;--?S?5':isae fall $ H
Jilli aV I
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TEE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY KtWSP APE v

1 r-

Sir Anthony's Niece

Amelia Eden Plans

rw "; r-,

Ta Marra Morhanir

IV nun i rivvenmiv

LONDON (UPI) Amelia Eden,
fci-year-old niece of former Prime
Minister Anthony Eden, will marry
an Italian ferryboat mechanic next

Sunday, her mother Mid.

Amelia's fiance is Giovanni Bo-

relli, 27, who works for $32 a week
in a ferry that plies between Na Naples
ples Naples and the Isle of Ischia.

Amelia is the daughter of Sir

Timothy Eden, elder brother of
Sir Anthony. She and Borelli met

when she visited Ischia on a va vacation
cation vacation three years ago.
The firl's mother, Lady Patrica
Popn, left Loudon yesterday for
Isehia after telling newsmen,

"Amelia is marrying with our

blessing and love."

The wedding will be a small

family affair in the island's Ro
man Catholic Church.

Lad v Eden said that after the

marriage her daughter would live
with her in-laws Borelli's mother,

father, four sisters and two brotn

ers. ".

Kh. described the BorelHS as

"a nice, charming family. Tr-ey
are simple people, and not world

ly."

L n d n newspapers reported

that Amelia, a member of the
Church of Eneland. will become a

Roman Catholic and is 1 now re
ceiving instructions in the faith.

CHAPLAIN (COt ) SILAS E. DECKER, U.S. Army Caribbean chaplain, welcomes Col. and Mrs.
C A. Bean and younV daughter Cynthia, to, Sunday services at the door of the Fort Amador

Chapel BeaU is US

Chaplain Recalls Do-lt-Yourself Projects
Sire Nothing New For Isthmus-based Soldiers

.

September Sunshine To Be Limited

To Five Hours, CZ Weatherman Says

iy PFC RAUPH 1. HUGHES
Chaplain (Col.) Silas E. fafei&
r who last month returned to
nama after nearly M years,
bsence, finds many changes both
Eographicailf Wa"iy
&ce hi fir tour ofduty here
urlng lhft3i3rs Jt be.oce World
He was herein)? 1839 to 1941,
During that AitM.V declares the
lolonel who- ha returned to the
lanal ZoM.to aisuTOe the ,du ,du-les
les ,du-les of U.S. Armxabea,p
, hul.. uun-s some 50

. hen. .in .uniform, some in ne-

mse of the Canal and others
wd at work training for W
lecorid World War which at that
Ime was imminent.
"There wasn't a highway hr.k hr.k-ig
ig hr.k-ig the Atlantic and Pacific Sides
roop housing was: inadequate (con (conduction
duction (conduction couldn't keep space of
le terrific influx of Army pers personnel
onnel personnel to the Caribbean) and )n
members of a new-

.tni.mH tactic! unit aimed

hemselves with machetes, lum
line materials. kegs

mils and other-items of building
laterials, to disappear, into., m
ungle to hew out an outpost and

iuiici oarravs- uciuic "r.-v
let up Sfcsekeeping. Do-it-5Wr:
lelf prfto wefen't hew to'ithe
Crmy even in those days."
Decker firit came to the Canal
one h$ 199;i,and was assigned
is chaplain of the U:S. ,Ar,my An An-iaircraft
iaircraft An-iaircraft Defenses of W Atlan
Ic.
There were stfme 120 AAA posi
Ions scattered from Fort S'ler
nan to throughout the neighbor,
ng jungles.- He spent five day
i week W th -fte-ld traveling
rom outpost to outpost averaging
nore than te.miles a day. .and
ifoot.
Maj. 6en. SandeKord Jarman,
br Whom Jarman Field, tor,
"Uvtnn was named, was the com

nandinff general of the Army i.

IAA defense, in the Canal Zone.
At this time, 'when the Army
irawled out of it's diaper-sized
antaloons to flex its muscles' anu
10 become nearly 9,000,000 strong
it its peak in World War II, there
vere 125,000 men on the rolls and
ill of 125 ebaplains to serve them

ipiritually. They were commann commann-id
id commann-id by C6t Alvia Braested, then
;hief of Army Chaplains.
Service clubs at this time had
lot been established, and chap
lains in addition to administers
piritual guidance to soldiers, were
also responsible for supplying rec recreation.
reation. recreation. Decker, who was a brand new
faptain without seniority at that
time, had a seven-day work week
to keep him occupied.
Passes were a rarity. About the
nly event troops loo''3d forward
lo at the time was 'be Festival
of The Black Christ, held annual annually
ly annually at Pertobello.
Secular duties would not aii'"
the Array Chaplian to perfom full
i time as a man of the cloth. "I
i was theater orficf gymnasium of
fleer, ven librarian, and most
anyone who dealt With the wol
are of the men."

Caribbean Command Headnuar Headnuar-ters
ters Headnuar-ters in thofce days' was located at

Albrook Ar Force Base, with

Lt. Gen. Frank Andrews of the

Ar Force as commanding gener

e'. Jarman was the- first TTfiAn.

C'ARIB general to be headquarter

ed at Quarry Jdeignts.
Teat cities for men In uniform
vere scattered all over the Am Am-1i(
1i( Am-1i( and Pacific sides. Forts Da Da-,
, Da-, i 0!-inn wPe- infantry:
posts. Gnnnd was being broken
i oy ii('ick. an'l Fort Kobbe
was under construction.
Mosouitoes were in abundance,
new sitea Were being buUt, and and-again
again and-again the sanitation and wealfare
departments of the commatui
could not keep abreast of the ra

pid expansion of troop-occupied a
reas.
"Malaria took its toll in men
hospitalized," says Decker. "Qui

nine was the only preventive me

dicine' at that time'. It was on

mess hall tables, and it was a
continuous process for the meu
to take quinine for five day?

then three days rest crom it. The

taste Of it was always present in
one's mouth," the chaplain says
with a wry face: Now there are
several different wonder drug pre preventives.
ventives. preventives. .
'(lip) f a' !si -. ':
'Au interesting sidelight,," the
chaplain laughed and said, "was
about a Brig. Gen. Barney Old Old-field,
field, Old-field, deputy commanding general
of th AAA, who personally o o-riented
riented o-riented new lieutenants to the
command by taking them into the
jungle and walking their boot
straps off."

Church services were held ji
theaters, gymnasiums and mes
halls. There wasn't such a big at attendance
tendance attendance then as now, according
to the chaplain, because of the u u-nits
nits u-nits being farflUng throughout
the jungle.
Gunnery practice was done with

a 20-inch railway gun. It was kep:
nn the Paciric side Of the Canl,
and when it was to be firsd t'ic
moving o fthe gun into firing po position
sition position and radio and daily buile

tin messages to wives and mess

sergeants to "tie everything down"
were simultaneous.
"One of my libraries was locat located
ed located about 00 yards to the rear r f

the 20-incher," says the colonel.

"and after each day of firing I
SDent the evening picking up books
from the floor and reshelvinir
them."

Decker is a veteran of both'
World War II and Korea. He was
with the 12th Armored Division in
European campaigns, and was I

Corps chaplain in Korea.

While in Korea, his duties took gain."

him to a small town named Ui-

jongbu, destroyed by the Commu Communists.
nists. Communists. Thsy also destroyed t h e
church which, under the supervi supervision
sion supervision of Decker, was financed vand
rebuildt by members of the Corps

Cranite was hauled seme eigm
miles jrom Granite Mountain, in
order to build the new church

which was christened the I Corps
Memorial Church in memory of

the Ameri'nn war dead, and turn turned
ed turned over to the Methodist congre congregation
gation congregation of Uijongbu.
..The Church will seal. 400 per per-'
' per-' ns, in sedition to grcde

.school m one wing which is of

250 capacity and rooms for the
ministers.
On Decker's previous tour of
Isthmian duty, as now, depend

ents attended Canal Zone schools
?nd the Army and life Can;l':

Zone had their commissries and

post exchanges.

Due to the limited emergency,
athletics were not given so much
emphasis. The chaplains were vi

sually athletic officers ina" were
rnonsible for team competitions
First sergeants were chief fore foremen
men foremen during the "do it yourself"
projects of building their own
homes in the jungle. Water tanks
were built at the sites and water
was pumped from the Chagres
River.
Since then traveling over the
Isthmian Highway has made the
Canal Zone a smaller place, and
has made the U.S. Army Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean a closer knit command.
"Travel between the two si'1"''
was limited to an all day trip
trm.rf'i the locks, or an airplane
; you were lucky," says
Deciker.

He summed it all with "Truly
life for the soldier in the Canal
Zone has changed." I am hanv
to be back so that I primarily

mignt De a pastoral cnapiain a

The following weather conditions

are based on past records ana

may be expected to occur in the

Canal Zone and vicinity during

September.
WEATHER: Mostly cloudy and
rainy weather will continue dur during
ing during September and heavy rains
and thunderstorms may be ex expected
pected expected over t he Isthmus at fre fre-quent
quent fre-quent intervals.
RAINFALL: Average ralnafll for
September is 7.83 inches at Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Heights, 10.94 inches at Mad Madden
den Madden Dam and 12.37 inches at Cris Cristobal.
tobal. Cristobal. There is, however, consider considerable
able considerable variation from year to year
and monthly totals have ranged
from 2.62 to 16.38 inches at Bal Balboa
boa Balboa Heights, 5.96 to 18.44 inches

at Madden Dam, and 3.14 to 22 22-99
99 22-99 inches at Cristobal Rainfall
will likely Occur on 20 days di
tributed over 64 hours at Balboa
Heights and 22 days and 83 hours
at Cristobal.
SUNSHINE: There will be an
average of about five hours of
sunshine per day and four or give
days with no sunshine at all.
TEMPERATURE: The monthly
mean air temperature will aver
age about 80 degrees Fahrenheit
on both sides of the Isthmus.. The
maixmum temperature will aver average
age average 86 degrees on both oasts

and the minimum will average

74 degrees on the Pacific coast
and 76 degrees on the Atlantic.
The highest temperature on rec record
ord record for September is 94 degrees

and the lowest 68 degrees. &ucn

extremes, however, are ol lnire-

quent occurrence.

RELATIVE HUMIDITY ; The rel

ative humidity will average close
to 86 per cent on both coasts and
90 per cent in the central sec section
tion section at Madden Dam. The daily
range will be between 95 and 75
per cent on the Pacific and 91 and
75 on the Atlantic.
WINDS: Light ariable winds
will be experienced over the, At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic coast with southerly or off offshore
shore offshore winds predominating. North Northwest
west Northwest winds will prevail on the
Pan ic coast. The average veloci velocity
ty velocity will be about 5 miles per hour
at Balboa Heights, 2 miles per
hour at Madden Dam, and 6
miles per hour at Cristobal.
FOGS: Nighttime and early
morning fogs may be expected

quite freqently over the GaiUard

Cut section of the Canal and the
central -section of the Isthmus a
long the Trans-Isthmian Highway,
but rarely at either Canal en entrance.
trance. entrance. Most of the fogs from a
round midnight and may be ex expected
pected expected to dissipate before 8 30
a.m.

STORMS: Local rain squalls

and thunderstorms will occur quite
freauentlv. and during these lo

cal storms wind velocities ay
reach 30 miles per hour or more
but they are of too short dura duration
tion duration to cause any appreciable
damage. September is the month
of most frequent West Indian hur hurricanes
ricanes hurricanes whose paths cross the
ship lanes of the Caribbean Sea,
but their usual path is too far
north of Panama to cause dam damaging
aging damaging winds on the Isthmus.

NOTICE
To Our Customers and Friend
yftodwia, S. d
Has moved to a larger and more
easily accessible location at
LA LOCERIA, PASADENA
(one half block to the left of the
NATIONAL BREWERY'S Main Gte)
THodsumja, $. &
. r .TEL. 3-2323

Urban Land Institute Reports
On Land Improvement Costs

BEST BET BTESH BEST BET BTESH

REAL ROLE Suzanne Vayda,
17, in a Toronto play, takes the
role of a Hungarian refugee
trying to adjust to life to Can Canada.
ada. Canada. Ifshould be a cinch she''
a refugee from the 1956 Hun Hungarian
garian Hungarian revolt

WASHINGTON (UPI)- A report
by the Urban Land Institute, a
private research organization, as asserts
serts asserts that land development costs
do not necessarily rise as the size
of a residential lot is increased.
More important in determining
capital outlays for development,
the institute found, are such fac factors
tors factors as frontage and the number
of improvements.
According to Max S. Wehrly,
executive director of the institute,
the relation of development costs
to the size of the lot has become

especially signiticant because of

the trend toward single-level or
ranch style homes.
"The trend toward the ranch
style has stretched houses out,"

I
u
03
h
U
CD
H
co
us
CO

Btesh Tailors
Unique Among The Finet Shop$
In The Americas

BEFORE YOU OO BACK TO SCHOOL
OR BUSINESS LOOK YOUR BEST AND
ACHIEVE INDIVIDUALITY AT THE
LOWEST PRICES CONSISTENT WITH
QUALITY. Get yourself a suit tailored
by the famous BTESH TAILORS espe especially
cially especially for you out of the finest import imported
ed imported ENGLISH woolens at less than half
the usual cost In the StaW.

The Btesh Label Is Your Guarantee
52 Central Ave. 11 J Street

I

Ui
CO
h
bi
CD
Ui
CO

BEST BET BTESH BEST BET BTESH

US Plans Series Of Nuclear Blasts
In Next Two Months Before Quitting

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
United States announced tola1
that 10 small nuclear blasts will
be fired in the Nevada desert
during the next two months prior
to the Oct. 31 nuclear test ban
proposed by President Eisenhow Eisenhower.
er. Eisenhower. Announcement of the tests was
made by Defense Secretary Neil
H. McElroy and John A. McCone,
chairman of the Atomic Energy
Commission.
They said several of the Nevada
test shots "Will be contained un un-mrt
mrt un-mrt in tunnels which have

been under construction

eral months."

"The remainder will ne
from balloons or towers,"

said.
More than half of the blasts
will be of less than one kiloton,
they said, and the highest yield
will be in the 20kiloton range. A
kiloton bomb is equal in power to
1,000 tons of TNT.
The president offered to sus suspend
pend suspend U.S. nuclear tests for a year
after the start of negotiations with
Russia aimed at an agreement
on a permanent international test

ban. Negotiations are expected to

beein Oct. 31.

Russia called off further tests storm sewers

after concluding a recent series of
nuclear explosions.

for sev-

firei
they

1111 1
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W J m W isfal lb mm
hV V B JrV v VjlH Blf B
H ill

LKM. SBBSSBBSI

Tht McCone-McElroy statement
said the new Nevada shots would
wind up the 1958 test program
whichhas been in progress at the
Eniwetok Proving Ground and
Johnston Island in the Pacific.
It described the forthcoming
tests as "low yield nuclear deto detonations
nations detonations at the Nevada test site."
The announcement said that
"certain information of interest to
seismologists will be provided in
advance of the underground deto detonations."
nations." detonations." Newsmen, as usual, will
be invited to witness the detonations.

Wehrly said in an interview. Since

the early 1930's, he added, pre predominant
dominant predominant lot size has risen from
4,000-6,000 square feet to the 10. 10.-000
000 10.-000 square feet for the average
lot in new suburban communities
today.
A major contributing factor has
been the popularity of having the
longer dimension of the house par parallel
allel parallel to the treet. Still another
factor has been the two-car ga

rage and the "breezeway" or shel sheltered
tered sheltered connecting passage between
the garage and the house.
Wehrly said that the larger lots
these features require can be de

veloped at little or no more ex expense
pense expense than for smaller lots.
An institute study of the matter

in the Boston area- found that I

"substantial economies can be
achieved for the developer and
home owner in large lot districts

if the requirements for certain im

provements are waived" or are

adjusted to take account of rela

tively low population density.

In low density districts, the

siuay saici, "sanitary sewers,

sidewalks, curbing

and grass strips might safely be

eliminated."

it also suggested narrower

streets where vehicular and oe

destrian traffic is light. But most

communities, Wherly said, do not

take lower population density into

account in setting their standards

and as a result land development

costs are nigner than is necessary
The study rebutted what it de

scribed as the assumption of many
communities that laree lots and

low population density would hold

down future costs lor new schools

and police and fire services. The

study said that on a per eanita

or per dwelling basis, the cost of

tnese necessities was not reduced

The statement said the tests
"will be completed prior to Oct.
31" but did not provide the spe specific
cific specific September and October dates
on which they would be held.
So far in the Pacific tests, 16
shots have been officially con confirmed.
firmed. confirmed. Included were two high
altitude missile borne explosions
at Johnston Island, 700 miles from
Hawaii.
The Russians have asserted that

this country detonated at least 32

nuclear devices since the Pacific

tests started last April, but that

figure is believed far too high.
Following is a breakdown of of officially
ficially officially confirmed nuclear explo explosions
sions explosions by the three atomic powers:
United States 113, U.S.S.R. 39,
Britain 18.

Except for Britain, however,
these totals are admittedly sub substantially
stantially substantially under the actual num number
ber number of shots Best estimates are
that this country has set off abo it
120 atomic explosions and Russia

about 55.

ASTHMA and
BRONCHITIS
RELIEVED
Anthma. and Bronchitis attack, ruin
your alatp, undermlno your tranrth
.nlw."n,'rour hwt- Mandaea
tarta to work thrwif h your blood to
overcome; anthma and bronchitU at attacks.
tacks. attacks. It helps dissolve tranrUH mu mucus
cus mucus and promotaa frae, uy braath braath-inr.
inr. braath-inr. Mendaco's action Is affactlva araa
In old and stubborn cans. Get Man.
dico, from any drugstore today and
Ma how much batter you alaap and
breathe tonlaht, and how much, better
J,.0S.WL1.1 tomorrow. Mend.ee
fljrhta discomforts f Asthma. Bra,
litis and Bay Fever.

DAKS
Br HL! ' '
rcSnsan a saaal saasW
t?ins:'BBaVaBBaSBaBm aftwiunffil Sao
Jyililikf JjlssV WMsaaWEtsl B
3 Ty6 if JtiaM R
imlllpB mam
B v
B

The odd Jacket

Softer, mora "natural

greater variety

line.

of pattern

nd ooUmr t hat s the trend
which owr new Pake porta
jackets express ao brilliantly
this spring. This subtle -change
in style increases both their
comfort and their good-looks.

Into Iti own fain .

Come and see them in beautiful
tweeds, pure lambswools (so
light to wears, homespun
and Shetland. You'll enjoy
wearing a Daks jacket a
much for its individuality
as for it waiting ease. Price
from

MOTTA'S

CLAYTON REINL1STKE Maj. John H. Rooney, left, commanding officer of the U.8Tir U.8Tir-y
y U.8Tir-y aarrison, Fort Clayton and Technical Services Pacific, reenlista Sp4 Paul M. Rich-

FT,

my Army

arda, center, for a period of six years. At the right Is Port Clayton's recruiting NCO, MSgt.

Charles L. Wilkins. Richards, a dental technician with the U.S. Army Technical Service at Fort

Clayton, is a native of Hutchinson, Kans., who has been In the Army for five years. He plans to

rnjaAe- th Army, his, career. The swearing-in ceremony took place In the presence of 78 mem- L3, and the Banana Stevedore So-

udls ui wid u.u. ai ui v Avicuiva.1 aciviuc. iu.o. mmy ruvw;, iciy no.

Lawrence Lynch
Dies At Home ;
Rites Wednesday
Lawrence E. Lynch, a retired
Panama Canal employe, died at
his home on P Street yesterday
afternoon. He was 79 years old.

Funeral services have been.

scheduled for Wednesday, after afternoon
noon afternoon at 4 p.m. at Corinthian
temple on Calidonia, followed at
burial in the Herrera Cemetery.
Mr. Lynch Is survived' by his
wife, HorLencia, and his adopted
children Pearl Warren and Yolan Yolan-da
da Yolan-da Williams.
He was a member of the Star
of Chorrillo Lodge No. 35, HOOF,

the star of Bethlehem Lodge No.

DIAMONDS

.

McteitvT wii JjjjJ

;

-
1
-
-'
I -Si
ft

m



THT PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1. l5t
Social and Otlterwise
Bi Staffers
Be
134,
p.
anama
By OSWALD JACOSY
Written for NIA Service
J wtU, Wrrif, &rlh, PvtiM iJ Drmt JiouJ L muuU fnmpltf It Li-mmLt ileum.
Jt tu If L tivj L, uLfLnu Pm. 2-0740 2-0 741 6:00 MJ tO m.m. .Jf

GF FOt'K

ST.'

REFRESHMENTS, HOLIDAY GOLFING
ARE HIGHLIGHTS AT RODMAN TODAY
The golf club house at Rodman Naval Station wit a scene
fo activity todavs as golfers of the area participated In a holiday
Scotch foursome touranment. Trophies to winners of the Ringers
Tournament as well as to the top golfers in today s play were
to be presented bv Lt. Dan Morse. Special Services Officer. Re Refreshments
freshments Refreshments were being served at the clubhouse from 1(1 this

morning.

Batea Decorating Class Is
Planned for This Month
The third batea decorating
class to be sponsored by the Cri.s
tobal Woman's Club will opei
September 12 at the Margarit:
Service Center. Mr. Arthur Mok
ray, Instructor, has announced
that the course-will include six
lessons.
Fish Fry Today
A Labor L nsh fry, sponsor sponsored
ed sponsored annually by the B.P.O. Elks
1542, commenced this morning at
11, and will continue throughout
the day at the Elks' Home in
Brazo Heights.
Entertainment will continue
throughout the da yat the Elks'
Home in Brazos Heights.

Christian Mission
To Hold Annual
S. School Parley

The annual Sunday School con-

fprpmp nf the Christian Mission

Entertainment will feature j0f pantmi wju take place next

mcine unaer me Kaiicnu aim sundav. in Colon at the uospei

Tabernacle, 4th and Melendez
I streets.

jny rides for the children.

Meeting

I Delegations from four schools

All-Star Circle Meeting on the Paci.ic side will join witn

The regular monthly meeting the Colon school in an all-day busi busi-of
of busi-of the All-Star Circle will be heldlness and devotional concentration.
Wednesday at the Scottish Rite;
rpmnlp in Ralboa A covered-' At the business session which

dish. luncheon will be served at

begins at 9 a.m. several important
issues are on the agenda, and
practical plans and ideas will oe
discussed for counteracting the

un-Christian tendencies of our day,

12:30 p.m. All members and East Eastern
ern Eastern Stars are invited to attend.

Atlantic Side Teenagers will' and attracting youth to the Sun Sun-have
have Sun-have a meeting Tuesday evening, dy School. A fellowship dinner
at 7 at the Teenage Club in coco! will be served at noon.

Solo. All teenagers are urged to
attend.

HELP YOUR

r

HELP YOU

In the afternoon, beginning at I
p.m. a devotional program is be being
ing being prepared with a series of talks
on the theme "Harvest for Heav Heaven"
en" Heaven" by young people, and musical
items rendered by the different
Sunday-schools.
Samuel Miller, a former Sunday
School teacher and church officer
of the La Boca Christian Mission,
and who has recently returned
from studying in the United States,
will be in charge of the afternoon
session. Special features for the
conference will be the following:
Display of religious literature
and wall mottoes for the Christian
home; Address in Spanish by Al Alfred
fred Alfred Legalll, principal of the Pho Phonetic
netic Phonetic School of Chorrillo; Special
address by Samuel Miller, grad graduate
uate graduate of the South Dakota Metho Methodist
dist Methodist Institute and Advisor at
Camp Algonquin, Chicago, 111.;
Singing of the Panamanian na national
tional national anthem by the combined
youth groups.

t gm aw KHgnfflnHHHiH iUH OH
ESJr tpSj jHRLnH 8 I
BBB& "X. -iSt flBKn BsEr JjT al

I Hill 1 In mmm I

"AUNTIE CLAIRE" DECORATED An outstanding event on
Miss Claire Ogden, director of the Children's Home at Bella
The honor, presented by Mr. Mariano Otelza, Panama's deputy
protocol, recognized the outstanding contributions made by Miss
standing guests at the affair were British Ambasador Sir and
the Canal Zone, and other government and diplomatic officials,
the recognition to "Auntie Claire" held a special connotation.

last week's social scene was the impressive ceremony at which
Vista, was decorated with the Order of Vasco Nunez of Balboa,
foreign minister, and Mr. Ricardo Cucalon, deputy director of
Ogden for the homeless children of Panama. Among the out out-Lady
Lady out-Lady Ian Henderson, Mrs. W.E. Potter, wife of the Governor of
Also attending were a number of the Home's alumni, to whom

WINNER, FOURTEENTH AAA TRAFFIC
CONTEST

SAFETY POSTER

850 Boys, Girls Will Save Lives
As Members Of CZ's Safety Patrol

About 850 boys and girls will i "The Safety Patrols are per per-serve
serve per-serve as members of the Canal forming one of the most outsland outsland-Zone
Zone outsland-Zone school safety patrols, helping ing jobs in the entire traffic safe safe-to
to safe-to sav.e the lives of schoolmates ly fie k1 Burrow said. "Their in in-at
at in-at street crossing id u r i n g the fluence on other children has been
school vear starting next week, ac- the most constructive step in re-

that has seduced people into an
inordinate reverence for science.

The quasi-religious belief in sci sci-A
A sci-A special offering envelope will ence per se has produced submis submis-be
be submis-be distributed and collected as an'sion to the "expert.
investment in Sunday Schools. t The very people who claim as

7Ae Pafote flzient
It is the whole attitude of "mas-progress the denial of the tradi
tering" the task of parenthood I tional concepts will accept as un

presi-Canal

cording to Tom E. Burrow

dent of the Panama and

Zone Automobile Club.
In the United States, the mem
bership of the patrol totals more
than 660,000 youngsters, he said.
The AAA club president nd
that a saefty poster illustrating
the theme, "Help Your Safety Pa Patrol,"
trol," Patrol," now is being distributed to
schools in the Canal Zone as part
of the regular salety educ.i'ion
program of the Panama and Can
1 Zone Auto Club.
These usually solemn sentinels
.on corners near school buildings
take their .jobs seriously. Most
children go along with these traf traffic
fic traffic patrols and all children !' ive
been asked to respect and take
advantage of the guidance of these
patrols.
Parents have been asked to ad advise
vise advise their children to do so.

ducing accidents involving school school-age
age school-age children."
Since 1922 when the safety
patrol program was inaugurated,
the traffic death rate o: school school-age
age school-age children has dropped to near nearly
ly nearly one half, while the death rate
of all other age groups has dou doubled.
bled. doubled. Being selected for safety patrol
duty is an honor conferred on the
studen's involved and they do their
very best, in sun or rain. It is a
step toward better citizenship and
teaches the idea of doing some
thing for others a! an early age.
, This year's safely pos'er was
designed by 17 year old Helen Ma
ry Wood of Notre Dame High
School. Moylan, Pa. After winn winning
ing winning first prize in the American Au Au-tomoible
tomoible Au-tomoible Club's 1958 National Con
tes', it was reproduced for distri
bution by AAA clubs everywhere.

REGISTRATION
Beginners Ballroom Dance Classes
(Medal Group)
Balboa Y.M.C.A. Sat. Sept. 6th 9 a.m. to 12 Noon
Classes for all Ages from 6 years to 19 years old
Learn our new dances with
"Modern Jazz" & "Boogie Brakes"
"SPECIAL 24 Hour Lessons $12.00
Including Jamboree Party
CHILDREN & TEENAGERS SPECIALIST
HARNETT & DUNN
BALBOA 2-4239
ALSO GROUP CLASSES AND PRIVATE
LESSONS FOR ADULTS

challangeable truths the pronounce

ments of an expert, even tnougn
on closer appraisal, perception and
reason may disclose them to be
illusions. It is the "scientific meth methods"
ods" methods" or "scientific evidenc3" that
are credited with producing the
magic key to all problems.
People expect from the expert
or habe been taught to expect
the same type of cut-and-dried
prescription for child car, which
they received with their new
washing machine or TV set.
A modern mother may feel just
as guilty if she does not follow
the norm as i: she had been told
that she had committed a "sin"
in the good old-fashioned style.
Words like "average' or "expect
ed" have just as much of a pu punitive,
nitive, punitive, intimidating meaning for
the modern mother who is over overawed
awed overawed by "scientific facts" as
' sin" had for her unenlightened
orthodox ancestor.
It is because of this assumption
that there is such a thing as a
"scientific" normal way of rais raising
ing raising a child that modern young
mothers consult the expert. Even
love is administered on prescrip prescription
tion prescription as a necessary ingredient to-

Here's a California Treat;

Tomatoes Baked in Cream

BY GAYNOR MADDOX, NEA Food and Markets Editor

Ripe tomatoes baked in cream I Here's a party mushroom ring

is a very special dish, acorfling'to serve with cold meat:

to food-loving California cooks.

WEST
Q52
962

NORTH (B)
AAK04
Q5
AJ
AK J74
AST

A 5 2
VAJTI

KIT6

4Q103

SOUTH
A1093
K 984
10841
485
No one vulnerable
North Bast South Wilt
2 Pass 2 NT. Pass
$4 Pass SN.T. Pass
Pass Pass
Opening lead 4) i

Tomatoes in Cream
(Makes 5-6 servings)
Three or 4 large, fresh toma tomatoes,
toes, tomatoes, salt, pepper, nutmeg, 1-3 cup
heavy cream, 1-4 cup sherry wide
(or water with a few drops lem lemon
on lemon juice), 1 tablespoon buttor.
Wash and cut tomatoes in'o medium-thick
slices. Arrange in a
buttered shallow baking dish.

j Sprinkle generously with salt and

pepper and lightly with nu'mtg
hour over the cicam and wine
(or water and lemon) and dot
with butter. Bake in a moderate moderately
ly moderately not oven (375 degrees F. ) for
about 20 minutes, or just until to tomatoes
matoes tomatoes are tender.

sSvTrjPrvjSsvsst mSb Bsj SlSSViiA Jd4BjBi
wl jjULfla b! SsP Sfi SH

m FH9 I HHBKHB

TJTTT' it .

iiuAUi Are Ttnn Master Leo ldcliUier iltrti to lake a

prize Lipiwaner stallion off North German liner. Horse was
' part of a $125,000 shipment of 39 top show horses from Austria.
They were brought over by Tempel Smith of Glenview. III.

ATTENTION
YOUR

FAMILY'S

HEALTH
COMES FIRST!

FROM THE FIRST YEAR of life through School axe.
all children need the vitamins, minerals, and pro protection
tection protection of a good milk.
TO DEVELOP STRONG BONES, healthy teeth and
enjoy good health, every child should drink one
quart of milk daily. (Adults Vi quart).
IDEAL EVAPORATED MILK, a guaranteed NESTLE
product, conserves intact those precious elements
of health. It is elaborated with the best cow's milk.
BECAUSE OF ITS ECONOMY. IDEAL EVAPORATED
MILK solves the problems of milk in vour home.
GIVE YOUR FAMILY the high quality and valuable
nutrition Of IDEAL EVAPORATED MILK which is
available at any grocery Wore or pharmacy In 6
and 14 V cans.
YOU WILL BE SATISFIEDwith the quality or this product

TRADE

A GUARANTEED
NESTLE
PRODUCT

Nestle'i Evaporated Milk
IDEAL

HEALTHFUL, PURE AND SAFE

MARK

ward building up the child's men mental
tal mental health.
It is only when parents stop be being
ing being afraid of their own past that
they can truly integrate the vast
and meaningful insights of mod

ern psychiatry and child psycho psychology
logy psychology into useful knowledge for
their own roles as parents.
In order to give proper early
training, parents must have hn
inner sense of their own value
and worthvvhileness. It is at this
point that "parent education" has
committed the most grievous
faults, namely that of not respect respecting
ing respecting the fundamenal needs of par parents.
ents. parents. Magic solutions can only be of offered
fered offered by fake authorities. My in intent
tent intent in writing my book is to set
in motion independent, genuine
thought and feelings that will per permit
mit permit parents to recognize their
own inner resources and canaci canaci-ty
ty canaci-ty for judgment.

Mushroom Beet Ring with Mint
(Makes 10-12 servings)
Four 4-ounce cans sliced mush mushrooms,
rooms, mushrooms, drained apd biotte, with,
paper towel, 3 tablespoons' djivi
oil, dash salt, dash paprika, A ta tablespoons
blespoons tablespoons (heaping) flour, 2 cups
thin cream (or evaporated milk),
6 eggs yolks (beaten lightly j, 6
egg whites (beaten until stiff),
2 cans tiny beets, lime juice,
pure olive oil, fresh mint (chop (chopped).
ped). (chopped). Saute mushrooms in olive oil
with salt and paprika for 5 min minutes.
utes. minutes. Add flour and stir well. Add
cream. Stir and cook on low heat
until smooth. Add beaten yolks of
eggs. Remove from heat and stir
until mixture begins to thicken
(about 2 minutes). Add the stiff
ly beaten egg whites. Turq into
a well-oiled ring mold and bike
in a very slow oven (325-350 de degrees
grees degrees F.) until firm, about 35 to

40 minutes. Unmold and fill cen center
ter center of ring with tiny beets tossed
with lime juice and olive oil and
chopped fresh mint. Arrange large
crisped potato chips around base
ol ring and serve together.

NORTH'S hand was inst ton

weak for a forcing two bid but

that did not stop him. He open'
ed with two anyway and Scith
would have prebably got away
with the game if the defense
had not been alrt.
West had no satisfactory open
ing lead and finally seltected the
deuce of diamonds. The three ol
hearts would have been a hap happier
pier happier choice but West could not be
sure.
Dummy's jack lost to East's
king and the six spot knocked
out the ace. South had nothing
better to do than play clubs and
hope for the best. He cashed
dummy's ace and king and a
third lead cleared ud the suit and

left East in the lead with the

queen.
At this point East had an ex excellent
cellent excellent opportunity to chuck tha
hand to South. All ne had to do
would be to lead a diamond.
South could play the eight and
West's queen would be forced
out.
East was well aware of this
danger. He knew that his part part-rier
rier part-rier might have been strapped for
a lead and East decided to check
the heart suit first. He placed
the ace of hearts on the table and
West came through with the bos;
signal he could afford the six.
This was enough signal for East.
He continued with the heart suit

and declarer had no way left to

avow trie loss of two more trick
and his contract.

lt

Q The bidding has been:
North East South West
Pass 3 A T
You, South, hold:
A32 VK654 4QS2 AJ4
What do you do?
A Pass. You have a nlee hand
but your dUtribotioa is 4-3-i-S
and any action to toe dangerous.
TODAY'S QUESTION
West passes. North doublet
and East passes.' What do you do
now?
Answer Tomorrow

MASCOT'S NAME CHANGE
TONGGU, Korea ((U(PI) Ths
canine mascot of a U.S. weapons
platoon here was named "Sixty'
after the 60mm mortar used Ly
the soldiers. But now the dog is
confused. The Army gave the
platoon 81mm mortars, and the
little brown mongrel had to have
his name changed accordingly.

7

ram

ion

Clean summer beaded bags be before
fore before storing them. A soft, well well-lathered
lathered well-lathered brush does the best job
since it works dirt from between
the beads. Rinse bag with damp
sponge and wipe dry.
Shoe clios should be as spark
ling as the rest of the shoe.
Often it is difficult to get into
crevices around gay flowers,
beads or jewels. Usually a sudsy
toothbrush takes care of thM
task.

The season's foot comfort still
re lecls an Oriental influence
through the thong sandal. These
run from definite sports models
to jewel encrusted versions for
more formal wear. Inexpensive
versions feature a foam cush cushioned
ioned cushioned innerrole, making a relax
ing shoe for after office or house house-cleaning
cleaning house-cleaning hours.

to

COLLBOi SURVEY
GREENVILLE, Pa. (UP!)
COllete SStur1ntl urhft hlnn

fraternities

higher marks than their fellow
students, according to a recent
survey at Thiel College.
Fraternities chalked up an
average o' 2.453 out of a poss'ble
4.000 in grade-ooint average as
opposed to 2.23B for non fraterni fraterni-ty
ty fraterni-ty men and 2.386 for the entire
male slutlent body.
Sororities did even better. The
over-all average was 2.682 com
pared with 2.645 for non-sororlty
women and 2,770 for all women
students.

Hospital Tests Prove That MEXANA
MEDICATED POWDER Actually Does.

Mm v-4 i ,7 'k

fls fix

I jr- l

PREVENT

DIAPER

RASH

Mexana soothes diaper rash
tar after every change prevents
this torment I Gentle medication
checks irritating skin surface
bacteria. Pure cornstarch base
absorbs moisture, clings close to
guard against chafe,
WORLD'S LARGEST SELLING
MEDICATED FAMILY POWDER
For: Chafe, Collar, GMM Rub
o Minor Rasttts Irrrtatte Feet

fOWDJa

flu
HEfTiiM 'I

Mexana
prevented
diaper rash
in ovar 95
Of the casrat

Medicated Mexana Skin Croam Cools. Heine Hot! Painful Sunburn

- J

I m

3



HE PANAMA AMERICAN A3! HfDEPETOHfT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
FAOE

MLMlB 'B fcaW

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Killgallen

Auto Models For '59 Will Be Stripped
Of Excess Chrome For Lighter Look

-

OOH,
WHAT
SPEED

Josanne Mariani-Brenger, whc
once made the front pages as Mar
Inn Rranrin's bride-to-he (and marie

some of the sexy magazines as a
mi.niirl nin.un tvn) has rt"ir-

eri to th little village in France

wnere ine actor aiscovereo rcr
some years ago. She's writing her
biography starring Marlon, of
course and French publishers ti

Diocung tor me ngnu...ine reai
story of how Barney Baker sot
his job with the Teamsters' Union
hasn't been told, although it's more
dramatic than anything that's
come out about the recently head headlined
lined headlined witness at the Senat rack rackets
ets rackets committee hearings.

AHH
WHAT

FLAVOUR

SUPERB,
CHOCOLATY

Atones

Qsufi

Get ready for t real treatl
Just add 2 heaping teaspoons
of rich QUIK powder to
four glass of cold milk stir
and drink chocolarr,
chocolate flavour all the
way down!
Yoii'll love the way QUIK
mixes inatantly without
beating or bother. Makes a
wonderful hot drink too.
Your grocer has it and it's
economical. Get QUIK
today and treat the family.

000D
frlTH THAT AMOUI

Comedian Jonathan Winters and
sociaflt Charlie Wacker almost
came to blows at Chicago' fam
ed Pump Room a few nights ago.
Friends intervened ...Miifco Tako

heroine of the film "Sayonars.

will seek a divorce from her hus husband,
band, husband, actor Dale Ishamoto. They
have two children, but not many
of her fans know about the mar marriage
riage marriage because the studio thought
if uric in Ifppn Miiko's familv life

in hie background while she was
getting the Big Buildup.

Shirley Macuune may ao a wa

ter brother act with her young

brother, Warren Beatty. They re

wanted for a major TV musical ..

The much-talked-ol novel, ou
to," although panned in the U.S.
in its complete form, has inspire)

the Tin Fan Alley noys. six ui ui-lads
lads ui-lads titled "Lolita" have been co-

ovrichted during the past lon-

night ... Joan Bishop, the pianist
ot Nhmhor One Fifth Avenue, tells

frianric slip's on the receiving end

of long distance calls from Bar

bara Hutton s namasome son,

Reventlow ... Film actor sonny
Tufts is recuperating from a mill.

heart atlacK, resuu oi an ovbiuwc
of sleeping pills.
Local Cubans doubt the reports
of a new offensive against Balis
(., Kurai.s) thav rlaim Fidel Cas

tro's forces are deserting rapioly

and the revolutionary movement
it close to the vanishing point ...

Press photographers nave man
using every trick in the repertoire
t Kiuak candid nictures of Mari

lyn Monroe on the set of "Some
Like It Hot." So far, no luc at
v .. i ...i..n alia

all She JUSt won i prewini

doesn't see the cameras.

The Jack Eigens (he s tne iorm

er New Yors aisc joiiwy

made good in Chicago) nave part parted
ed parted after more than two decades of

marriage... Adore this quote oy
Andre Kostelanetz: "There are
some' people1 who don't like mu music
sic music but love ri-fWelity." ...Ronnie
n.i.irhmiM and his cover girl

wife. Betsy, are knitting tiny gar

ments. He's He's owner oi me As Assembly
sembly Assembly steakery.
Modern music connoisseurs will
want to latch onto "The Weary
Blues" with Langston Hughes. Dr.
Leonard Feather supervised the
poetry-with jazz production in ad addition
dition addition to writing som of the me melodies
lodies melodies .. The heat combined with
her lengthy and strenuous part
caused Sylvia Sidney to miss some
t r. "Auntie Mam" I

rerun IU...V.

she sutterea irom mim "r"
laryngitis.
One of New York's most fam famous
ous famous hotels hushed up a call girl

vice scandal involving us Den

ain, manager ana uniiqun
aeer ..Dancer Johnny Brascia and

Mov ta havp nroKen mi mru

ance again. She's even keemn?
her new address a secret from
him. Frank Fontaine, already -he
father of 10 children, is expecting

the Uth.
u,. i.'vnpci Rnrnine has gather

.j i... u,hni familv around her

in Hollywood to help ner aenur
on divorce settlement terms... sury

Parker is circulating again ou
trn Place, causing considerable

excitement in the neigh nor nooti

when she drops in ai me giwj

and drug storea ...Chickee amcs

the personaiity-pius snowis.i. Mr Mr-known
known Mr-known for her cutie-pie bits at t"e
Latin Quarter is having problems
with her new nightclub project. A
delay !n the liquor license tne
main anag. ..,..
Star material to watch: young
Jan Merlin, who will beseen swash
buckling on ABC TV'f "Rh
Ridefs" program starting Oct. i...
, Mrs. Joe Marsh (h owns toe
Splndletop) In in Harkness Pv Pv-llon
llon Pv-llon after losing the expected hs-
TtoJI at tiip Tiuke of Bedford

hit a new 10 in bathroom humor

with his appearance on - --Paar
Paar --Paar show. If that display of bad
taste doesn't draw protests from
everyone from th British Amiis-

sador to me ioc.i A
we can mark a new era of Any.

linked bao taste P'u""s,

with the Coronlion.-wmn

land Is a religious ceremony m

great slgt lficnce

Maria scnen

Wltn for Frwwh stsret
Carel. It happened while they

were both MMnH:" Z
m.de flicker titled 'The Wreck Wreck-"
" Wreck-" 7a. rt.hnr. Itemed with

:r.u .,hrfv really is

daftyTver Vslirttnt director Joe

(Pepe) Lenn.

TYPHOON HtA OKINAWA

DETROIT UPI) The auto, with chrome on one of its line
industry hopes to transform a but most others will be trimmed
jewel encrusted dowager into judiciously to give the car a
sleek bathing beauty in styling of! "cleaner" look.

its 1959 models. Ford Motor Co. also has moved

The industry recognized it went toward quiet dignity in styling its
too far in 1958 with its heavy use 1959 models,
of chrome trim. It has cut back, j One Ford of.'icial described the
in some cases drastically, in its difference between the company's
1959 models. 1 1958 and 1959 cars this way:
While chrome was used to cover j "The 1958 looked like a big, bul-

heavy. bulky lines oi tne car in sy car. me ia isn i any small

1958, it will be used only to em emphasize
phasize emphasize the long, graceful lines of
most of the 1959 cars.
The changes, of ourse, vary
from maker to maker.
Buick is the best example of the
change.
In its 1958 models, Buick was

one of the heaviest users of

chrome. The 1958 Buick had
rhrnma anlaahad alt m'pr It Ruf

the 1959 Buick will display lei

enrome man any car nas in many

years.

&

eaul

7.

er but it has a 'light on its feet'

appearance. Jt doesn t look like it
would take a giant sized engine
to drag, it away from a stop
light." 1
This new appearance of the
Ford can it achieved again by
using chrome only to highlight
the natural lines of the car: Ford
Will arid in thft phnnoa Iiadiaiiak

by offering two styles of tops on
some of its cars one fashioned
after the sharn-aneled "thunder

bird" top. and the other following

k iuuu tup, aim uie omer lOilOWll
Thp Antv rhrnm nn th sirlp (hp IraHitirtna piitva1 ctvlirm

panels of the 1959 Buick will be a Chrysler Corporation's styling

narrow strip along the natural di-iwas expected to be least changed
vision between the body of the car l of any of the "big three" auto
- J i i b. Ml l J j i I i sea

anu me uns ana anomer narrow maaers. nut nere again, attempts

strip along the crest of the fins, i will be made to make the chrome

Contrary to belief, dandruff
a etna llv results from a too oilv

scalp rather than a dry one. The
oil builds up in layers. When bac bacteria
teria bacteria take residence in this oily
home, inflammation may result.

Thorough brushing ana trequent
shampoos discourage such a scalp
condition.
Massaging the scalp is a double

pleasure. lone properly, mas massage
sage massage relaxes tense nerves at the
pnri of a busy dav. And it stim-

niaips the sraln to contribute to

healthier, prettier hair. u ,, hire a euid for a flat

ratP when vou are on vacation

Am mlA Ia tania nnH 'hin : i. n aijA him a

au iu w n isn l netaaij' i
muscle doen't take much time. tip. But if he is especially good
About 10 or 20 time, open your at his iob and doe more than is

mouth wide, drop your jaw. necesary to give you a pleasant
Then close your mouth. Repeat outing or a good day's fishing, a

this everal times during tne tip in addition to m yj
week You'll anoreciate results rieht.

of this exercise and others as you It is a way of showing your

get older. appreciauou.

Peter Townsend

Postpones Starling
'Round World Tour

PARIS (UPI) Peter Town Town-send,
send, Town-send, who suddenly broke off his
world tour and hurried here from
Venice Saturday, kept to his hotel

room yesterday amid rumors he
planned to return to Britain for
another mee:ing with Princess
Margaret.
The handsome, former fighter
pilot was registered at a hotel
near the Champs Elysees.
Victor Stoloff, a movie producer

Rlliplr Slvlictc CSV (hV ncitlnaH

the 1959 model without any chrome
and then added chrome to em emphasize
phasize emphasize the natural lines of he
cars.
Cadillac will continue to splurge

emphasize the cars' lines rather
than cover them up.
In 1959 the auto stylists hope to
emphasize the beauty of their cars
with chrome, not create beauty
with It.

mux

MOVIS-TELEVt$K)N
by Ertkint Johnson
Nf A Staff Correspondent

. 0

HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Ex
clusively Yours:
"My glow
For Monroe
Now burns
For Bardot."
A Hollywoodsman named Alan
Wilson is tempus fuglting it with
those lines but you'll have to ad admit
mit admit that Marilyn Monroe's return
... PI.n..roi!U Var tils'

movie in two years gave the oldj

town a Pttie zip. witn aiaiog, i
can spill it today, by her play playwright
wright playwright husband Arthur Miller
It was Miller who gave Mari Marilyn
lyn Marilyn "organic" to describe tne
tight white dress she was almost
wearing when she slithered out
of that overnight plane from

New York. Miss Wiggle Hips
wiggled into her career "come "comeback'
back' "comeback' dress in their New York
apartment, as I heard it, and
asked hubby Miller what he
thought.

"Marilyn' he said, "tha"s
what I call a very organic dress."
MM's return to Hollywood for
the film, "some Like It Hot,' had
reverberations involving three
o.' her rivals. Kim Novak rushed
home from New York after it
was announced her studio was
booking her into a Boy Scout
benefit. This left mP wondering
if a Girl Scout benefit might be
safer.

In London Jayne Mansfield
rushed into print with news that
she and her Mickey have dated
the stork. On the home front
TWO (2) new Brigitte Bardot
movie were booked into Holly Hollywood
wood Hollywood and Los Angeles theaters.
Ah, the long hot summer.

of a time waste. It's only an ov

ernignt piane trip to Kome.
So now we know. Dean Mar Martin
tin Martin looked up from his "Rio Bra Bravo'
vo' Bravo' script to answer a friend's
hello.

"It's okay," said Dean, "pull up
a rhair T Vnmi, mi, t'

-- iiij mica i v c
just been sittin' here mixing em
1 1 r

Highway slaughter? They're
killing 'em off faster in TV, ob observes
serves observes Daily Variety. A total of
223 killings on seven TV sta stations
tions stations checked during one week.
Will Oscar Levant be next?

A REAL
AT

HAWAII

JEWELRY STORE

13-90 Central Ave. beside Baiar Espaftol

BARGAINS

who is filming Townsend's current

world trip, said that Townsend
probably would leave Pari today
or Tuesday.
He said that there was no ques question
tion question of cancelling the world tour,
the second Townsend had em embarked
barked embarked on since his romance with
the princess ended in 1955
The 28 year-old princess was va vacationing
cationing vacationing with her sister, Queen
Elizabeth, at Balmoral Cast
north oi London.
Townsend came here by train
Saturday. It was reported he had
gotten into an argument with a
cameraman who was accompany accompanying
ing accompanying him on the tour. He refused
to talk to newsmen who met him"
at the rail terminal.

Master Chief or Amateur?
Tropicana
HOUSEWARES DEPARTMENT
(upstairs)
has everything you need!

were
$ 45.00
100.00
250.00

DIAMOND
RINGS

NOW

Vl'

DIAMOND
EARRINGS

NOW

i".

were

$28.00
65.00
180.00

$59.00

,vif-

Gold Bracelets

before 45.00 NOW 22.00

90.00

iso.oo 95.00
DIAMOND
WATCHES
Irom $35.00

Rogers Silver Trays

before $7.15 NOW 4.50

Gold Rings
for Ladies from 4.00
for Men from 7.00
Gold Charms
from $2.00

Silverplated Pitcher

before $14.50 NOW 9.00

Lay away for Christmas

13-90 CENTRAL AVE.
Beside Bazar Espanol

Silverplated Flatware
for 6 persons

beforeJOjOSlJ

HAWAII

JEWELRY STORE

RICKY NELSON made the big
decision no college while V is
caree' is at such a high neak. He

competes "Rio Bravo" late this

month, then goes on a singing
tour and starts a new picture and
mnra TV hnw in th fall. But

whe does he hav time to count

his monev?

"I'm tired." Jerrv Lewis final'r

caiH it .Trrv. the Mrs. and the

kids leave in August for a Hono

lulu vacation, his first in n

months. whn h comolete "The

Gisha Boy." I'll believe It only

pier I sec his movies of Diamond
Head.

SWISS CHOCOIATI ftAVOUR

Diamonds are a wife's best

friend, too. Hubbies of Shirley

MacTaine and Carolyn Jones,
short on cash when they pro pro-nod
nod pro-nod marriage, just gifted both
dolls with diamond engagement
rinse Throe anrl a half vpar

lat for Shirley, five for Carolyn.

THIS IS HOLLYWOOD Mrs
.Tones: Andre' Henhurn has her
hair chrorn when she becomes a

mm "The Nun's Storv Sn who

played the role of the nun who

did the shearing lob? It was

real sneakv. The "nun' was Au Audrey's
drey's Audrey's hairdresser, Grazia dl
Rossi.

Not In the Script: Karl Mallen

after working in a scene with

tlurv Conner in "The Hanffin?

Tree": "No one underplays Gary
aid no one steals a scene from

h'm. He's lust too natural to

heat."

7 r nUVi. rmr jliic ,Liivi x iu.i. flic iuuru

TOKYO (IJ Fn i7i"mn "": i in HOiiywooo, reo. you Know,
moved toward the V. faeific Talkinf about a don across the

island bastion o' WMa yw-
.!... ...id, tulfirla nn tA 140 OTP

r& u.s: mym

tral said the torm gjwr

west northwest of Guam and waa

moving nortnwrsi a '" r
hour.

NO ENGINEER, NO TRAIN
SEVENOAKS, England (UPI)
The Southern Division o' the atate atate-owned
owned atate-owned British Railways yesterday
cancelled the :08 m. train
from Sevenoaks to London he he-cause
cause he-cause the engineer failed lo show
up for the run.

rnnm .at i Alovietown nartv. Joe

Castro tatd: "Im certain I met

her last year. I can't remember
nar.es. hut I never iorcet a

dress."

RID BUTTONS is being paged
for the "King of Comedy,' Mark

Sennclt tummograpny winin

George Justin Is planning tojro
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my Dorsey vocalist now record
lng for Tender Records people'

are eating 'em?) has been havlng
some tender correspondence with

ivi ftarftner In tlatv. Kaphsn?

ing letters with Ava ii my idea

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,BE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAltT NEWSPAPER
iONDAT, SEPTEMBER 1, ISM
Braves, Yankees Should
ere 500 Pace

Win With M

.

I

In
IS

!
League Leaders Triumph
To Move Closer To Flags
By FRED DOWN
NEW YORK, Sept. 1 (UPI) A mere 500 pace
12 victories in 24 games should be enough to
put both the Milwaukee Braves and New York Yan

kees in their second straig
' The Braves reached the Labor
Day milestone with an 8 Va game
lead when Carlton Wllley shut
out the Pittsburgh Pirates, 2-0,
yesterday while the Yankees re retained
tained retained their lOVi game spread
when Bob Turley scored his 20th
victory in a 7-6 triumph over the
Washington Senators.
Twelve more wins would give
the Braves 89 for the season and
mean either the Pirates or San
Francisco Giants would have to
take 21 of their final 25 games to
tie. A dozen wins would Increase
the Yankee total to 92 and mean
the Chicago White Sox would
have to go at a 23-2 closing pace
to tie.
Willev. brought up from Wl
Chita in late June, pitched a five five-hitter
hitter five-hitter and struck out nine in
falsing his record to 9-4. A sin-
Jle by Red Schoendienst, an ln ln-le)d
le)d ln-le)d out, Ron Kline's wild pitch
and another infield out produc produced
ed produced the Braves' first run in the
first inning and Wes Covington
singled home their other run in
the seventh.
Turley became the majors'
first 20 -game winner of the
season although he was knock knocked
ed knocked out of the box In the sev seventh
enth seventh Inning.
Ryne Duren, Johnny Kucks
and finally Murry Dickson were
rushed to his relief before the
Yankees nailed it down. Hank
Bauer hit a two-fun homer and
Yogi Berra knocked in three runs
with a double and a single to
lead New York's nine-hit attack.
The Olants tied the Pirates for
second place when they crushed
the Los Angeles Dodgers, 14-2,
th Cincinnati Redlegs swept the
Philadelphia Phillies, 6-2 and 7 7-3,
3, 7-3, and the Chicago Cubs beat the
St. Louis Cardinals, 8-5, in the
other National League games.
Jn the other American League
activity, the Chicago White Sox
beat .thp Detroit Timers. 3-0. the
Boston Red Sox shaded the Bal timore
Orioles, 3-2, and the
Cleveland Indians scored an 11 11-lnnlng,
lnnlng, 11-lnnlng, 3-2 win over the Kansas
City Athloties.
Bob Schmidt hit a grand slam
homer. In the first inning and

Basilic Aragon Fight Today
For Shot At Robinson s Crown

NEW YORK (UPI)-Carmen Ba
silio and Art Aragon will fight Fri Friday
day Friday night for a shot at thP middle middleweight
weight middleweight crown, and Tony Anthony
launches his campaign for a
heavyweight title bout Wednesday
night.
Those are the outstanding bouts
on this week's boxing schedule.
Basilio, the ex middleweight
champion from Chittenango, N. Y,
and "Golden Boy" Aragon of Los
neeles are slated for 10 rounds
at Wrigley Field, Los AnReles, at
10 p.m. Friday.
It will be televised and broad broad-east
east broad-east nationally by NBC. Promoter
George Parnassus expects it to at attract
tract attract more than 20,000 and a rec-
Servce Center Theatres
TONIGHT
BALBOA 2:30, 4:30, 6:30, 8:30
Gregory Peck
"THE BRAVADOS"
in Cinemascope & Color
Last Time Today!
COCO SOLO 7:00
Montgomery Cllft
Elizabeth Taylor
"RAINTREE COUNTY"
DIABLO HTS
7:00
George Montgomery
Dianne Brewster
"JOHNNY TROUBLE"
MARGARITA 6:15 & 7:55
"THE MAN IS ARMED"
PARAISO 7:00
"NIGHT PASSAGE"
SANTA CRUZ 7:00
'HOW TO MURDER A RICH
UNCLE" and
"LOVES OF CARMEN"
CAMP BIERD 7:00
James Cagney
"Man of A Thousand Faces"
In Cinemascope!

TODAY theatres

CAPITOLIO
SSe. 20e.
XA
HELEN MORGAN
STORY
with Ann Blyth
- Also:
FORT DOBBS
with Clint Walker

ht World Series.

knocked In a total of six run as
the Giants beat the Dodgers for
the 13th time in 17 tries. Willie
Mays had three hits, Including a
homer, and Orlando Cepeda also
had three hits in San Francisco's
15-r.iw attack. Stu Miller went
the distance to win his first game
since July 18.
Harvey Haddix won his eighth
game and Don Newcombe his
fifth as the Redlegs ran their
longest winning streak of the
season to six games. Johnny
Temple's three-run double and
two homers by Ed Bailey were
fie big blows of the opener and
Jerry Lynch's three-run seventh-
inning homer snapped a 3-3 tie
in the
seventh inning or tne
nightcap. The" double defeat
knocked tha-gaUlles into the NL.
cellar.
The Cubs moved into seventh
place with a three-homer bar barrage
rage barrage fey Tony Taylor, Chuck
Tanner and Walt Moryn that
dealt Billy Muffett his sixth
loss. Taykr Phillips, who work worked
ed worked the middle 3 23 innings,
won his seventh game.
Early Wynn yielded a third third-Inning
Inning third-Inning single to Johnny Groth
and a ninth-inning single to
Harvey Kuenn in posting his
12th win for the White Sox. The
White Sox nicked Jim Bunning
foi two runs in the first inning
on three singles arid a sacrifice
fly and added another in the
third when Jim Landls was hit
by a pitch, stole second and
scored on Earl Battey's single.
Tom Brewer scored his fifth
straight victory and 10th of the
season for the Red Sox when
Jimmy Piersall's seventh-inning
sinele snapped a tie. Hoyt
Wilhelm, who struck 'out six and
yielded only five hits, was the
hard-luck loser for the Orioles.
Minnie Miftoso's 20th homer, lrfl
the top of the nth-inning, gave
Cleveland's Morris Martin his
second victory and Ralph Terry
his 11th loss. Rocky Colavito kept
the Indians In the. game, by, hit hitting
ting hitting his 33rd arid 34th nome runs
while Preston Ward's homer pro produced
duced produced the Kansas City runs.
ord coast gate of more than $235
000.
Basilio, 31, will be making his
first start since March 25, wnen
he lost the middleweight crow;i on
a split decision to Sugar Ray Rob Robinson
inson Robinson in their return fight at Chi Chicago.
cago. Chicago. That was Carmen's" only
sUrt since last Sept. 23.
Aragon, 29, has 15 straight vie
turies, including five this year.
His total record shows 55 knock
outs while winning 81 of his, 101
bouts. He had five draws.
Basilio, favored at 4-1, has a
52-13-7 record that includes 25
knockouts.
For Wednesday's fight at Syra Syracuse,
cuse, Syracuse, N. Y., Tony Anthony of New
York ranked second among light
heavyweight contenders will be begin
gin begin campaigning for a Shot at
Floyd Patterson's heavyweight
title in a bout with heavyweight
Archie McBride of Trenton, N.J.
Their 10-rounder will be tele
vised nationally by ABC.
Anthony, favored at 3-1, has
34-5-1 list that includes 2T kayoes.
The week's boxing schedule in
eludes:
Monday None listed.
Tuesday Miami Be.SQh
Gomero Brennan vs. Guy Sunlin.
Wednesday Syracuse (Audi (Auditorium
torium (Auditorium )'lony Anthony vs. Amie
McBride. (TV)
Thursday Ottawa, Ont. Gale
Kerwin vs. Bobo Fiddler. Albu
querque, N. M. Jimmy Martinee
vs. Bobby Jones. ThompsonviM,
Conn. Charley Powell vs. Lee
Jones,
Friday Los Angeles (Wrigley
Field ) Carmen Basilio vs. Art
Aragon (TV-Radio).
Saturday Muskegon, Mich.
Kenny Lane vs. Orlando Zulueta.
Johannesburg, S.A. Mik Holt
vs. Roque Maravilla.

T I V O L I
35r. toe.
APE MAN
- Also: -TARZAN
AND
THE
LOST SAFARI

VICTORIA
25e, r 15c.
TARZAN FURY
wfth Lex Barker
.- Also:
WESTWARD
WAGON
. with Fess Parker

Scantlebury
Pitches 15th

Victory, 1-0
NEW YORK, Sept. 1 (DPI)
The Columbus jeis are .jaui
geiuug uie good pitcning trey re received
ceived received at the beginning ol the
season as Uiey move to wrap up a
playoff spot In tne International
League.
Columbus won a douDieneaaer
'from th Havana Sugar King
Sundav. 18-6 ana 4-U. io tase a
three-game edge oyer Miami m
the battle for fourth place. Wham Wham-my
my Wham-my Douglas, backed Dy an early
14-run lead, went the distance il
rthe opener to gain his 15th victory
and Bob Kelly pickee up his 2nd
triumph with a complete job in the
stven-inning nightcap. Kelly yield yielded
ed yielded seven hits in aaa.iiing n i s
first shutout ot the season.
The Jets have won ive straight
with five different pitchers cou cou-triouting
triouting cou-triouting complete games.
Toronto kept alive its hopes for
a first-place linish by edging tne
Montreal Koyals, 1-0 in a game
called alter iive innings by rain.
Pat Scantlebury gave up ona
hit for tht Ltafs at he gaind nil
lith victory of the leaton. A
icheduled second contestest was
postponed and Toronto is now
fivi games behind tht Royals.
In other action, Buffalo (ideated
Rochester, 5-2, in an eight inning
game shortended by rain with the
second contest being postponed
and Miami knocked off Richmond,
7-1. in a single game.
LEADING
HITTERS
(Based on 350 official at bats)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
G AB R H
Pet.
Ashburn, Phil
Musial, S.T.
Aaron, Mil.
Mays, S.F.
Skinner, Pitt.
Banks, Chi.
Dark, Chi.
Temple, Cin.
125 501
121 428
129 511
128 501
122 443
82 171 .3U
61 146 .341
93 I'U
95 165 .329
79 140 .316
131 521 105 163 .313
110 444 49 135 .304
126 486 72 147 .302
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Runnels. Bos. 120 460 83 151
328
Kuenn, Det.
Power, Clev.
Cerv, K.C.
Williams, Bos.
Fox, Chi.
Goodman, Chi.
Sievers. Wash.
Jensen, Bos.
Siebern, N.Y.
117 467 61 152
122 500 82 160
116 429 78 137
112 355 71 112
130 527 76 164
326
320
319
315
311
94 351 38 109 .311
122 452 76 140 .310
127 456 77 141 .309
110 375 65 116 .309
HOME RUNS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Banks, Cubs
Thomas, Pirates
Mathews, Braves
Aaron, Braves
Robinson, Redlegs
42
34
29
28
26
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Mantle, Yankees
Sievers, Senators
Colavito, Indians
Jensen, Red Sox
Cerv, Athletics
RUNS BATTED IN
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Banks, Cubs
Thomas, Pirates
Aaron, Braves
Boyer, Cardinals
H. Anderson, Phils
110
104
82
80
80
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Jensen, Red Sox
Colavito, Indians
Sievers, Senators
Cerv, Athletics
Mantle, Yankees
110
95
94
86
83
LEADING
PITCHERS
(Based on 12 decisions)
NATIONAL
LEAGUE
W
Pet.
.692
.652
.643
Willey, Braves
Purkey. Redlegs
Worthington,, Giants
Burdette, Braves
Spahn, Braves
9
15
9
16
17
640
630
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Turley, Yankees
20
12
9
14
14
.769
Delock, Red Sox
Hyde, Senators
McLish, Indians
Ford, Yankees
.750
.750
700
.667
Today tncanto .40 .25
Best njcture of the year!
William Holden
Alec Guinness In
"Bridge over the River Kwai"
- Also: -"Challenger
Kin Tin Tin"
- TODAY
RIO
35c.
In
20c.
Cinemascope!
THE YOUNG LION8
with Marlon Brando
- Also:
ABDOMINABLE
SNOWMAN
with Forrest Tucker

Braulio Baeza Rides

To Thrilling Main

W a .V.
LY ifl W
Vw JHH M
fl K ifi I Sa B
BBS m aBBl BSSS aSaaBk : x s::v '-'vfc,: eH
H UmmKKKB Wtr iw afl H

SUMMER RING Summertime is enclosed by a shadowy
frame of a life preserver of a boat off the islands near Goth Goth-enburg,
enburg, Goth-enburg, on the west coast of Sweden. The sailboat slideV
over sun-spangled water, giving the cameraman a pretty shot

Round Table
New Money
NEW YORK, Sept. 1 (UPI)
Round Table will be out to set
new world's money record to-
i day when he faces nine rivals in
the $140,650 Washington Park Han Handicap
dicap Handicap at Arlington, richest of the
Labor Day feature races.
Kerr Stable's Round Table has
earned $1,215,114 to date", $73,451
short of the record set by Nashua
in 1956. A victory in the eight fur furlong
long furlong classic, which marks the end
of the 97-day meeting of a com combined
bined combined Arlington-Washington Bal Balmoral
moral Balmoral program, would net Round
table $95,175.
Round Table has won 12 of 15
starts this year, finishing out of
the money just once when he ran
fifth in the Equipoise Handicap.
Swoon's Son won that event alio
is expected to provide Round
Table's top opposition. Willie Shoe Shoemaker
maker Shoemaker will ride Round Table and
Dave Erb will be aboard Swoon's
Son.
The $63. tOO Atlantic City Handi
cap has drawn 15 for the mile
and three-sixteenths turf event at
Atlantic City race track. Mrs. S.
Helene Sauicca's A Dragon Kil.'er
has been assigned top irppost of
126 pounds
A Dragon Killer received ths fa favorite's
vorite's favorite's nod on the basis o' vie-

Sensational Feree Tees Off Today
In Quest Of First Goleing Crown

VANCOUVER, B.C. (UPI)
Baby faced Jim Ferree, newest
sensation of golfdom, will tee o f
in the final round of the rich Van Vancouver
couver Vancouver Centennial tournament
today with his heart set on w'n
ning his first championship and
the $6,400 pot of gold that goes
with it.
Ferree, with rounds of 69-61 69
hoids a four-stroke lead over the
linest golfers in the world and has
given no indication that he is
about to wilt under the pressure.
"I think I can win it if I shoot
i a 70 savs iauntv Jim. "If I don't
shoot 70 or better I'll think I'm
playing in bad luck. My nor.
game has been wonderful. An in-
riiratinn is that I've had par or
better on all the par-three holes."
Some of thc other professionals,
are inclined to agree with J'm
that he will win it.
UCLA Grid Coach
Goes To Hospital
For 'Complete Rest'
LOS ANGELES (UPI)-Georc
Dickerson, appointed less than .wo
weeks ago as UCLA football coach
was admitted to the UCLA Medi Medi-r
r Medi-r al fnter Saturday afternoon for
a "comn ete rest a n o s u i i a i
spokesman said Sunday.
Wilbur Johns, athletic director
of UCLA, said Dickerson was sui
fering from "complete exhaustion"
and would undergo medical tests.
"He's just beat worn to a rniz
zle," said Dr. Russell Willinms,
associate administrator of the
UCLA. Medical Center. Willi.ims
blamed the pressure of taking
over the new post, the start of
fall practice, the death of coach
Red Sanders and a recruitment
squabble for excessive pressure on
the new coach.

Out To Set
Mark Today

lories in the Vent?ior and Arlir.g
ton stakes. He will give up four
pounds to Victory Morn, winner of
the Dwyer, six to Grey .Monarch
and seven to Plion, who won the
Lamplighter and Blue Grass
stakes.
At Belmont Park, the 89th run
ning of the $31,250 Jerome1 Hatidi
cap has lured a field of 16 three
year olds for the mile event
strong oy, making an eastern
trek for the Jerome, won the
Westerner at Hollywood Park.
Piano Jim, who won the Travefs
his last time out, rates as strong
competition.
Rockingham Park's 14-racfl uro
gram features the $10,000 Rockirig-
nam special. Bumpy Road is fa
vored to take the six furlonc
event. He set a track record for
the distance on Aug. 23 with a
time of 1:09 3-5.
George Newell' s How Now wilt
be after his eiehtlf straight wifi at
uet Mar, over a two-vear Dlan.
when he heads a field of seven in
the $32,700 Del Mar Handican
over a mile and one-eighth course.
How Now, topweighted at 126
pounds, has won two stakes racf:s
this year, the San Diego and the
Bimg Crosby Handicaps.
"He has so much confidence h
his game right now and is play playing
ing playing so well," said Billy Casper
who is tiod for thiid place, "that
i minK ne n win it.
ferree ias a 199 for the first
54 holes oi play. Thai means h? ,s
ii siroKes unaer par for the
distance. .He took, a four stroke
trad at the end of 36 holes and
man vv.ucnen ine veteran pros
ure ana tan Dack as he retained
tne lean over the next 18. n
Closest on his tail is 34-year-old
Fred Hawkins of El Paso, Tex;
who has been on the tourney trail
iur io years. Hawkins had a fine
64 irt the third round to Dost a 203
Then comes the thundering herd
oi top money-winners. Billy Cas Casper,
per, Casper, Dow" Finsterwald and Ken
Venturi are at 205; Don January,
a 64 shooter Saturday, has 206;
Mike Souchak and Don Whitt 207
and Howie Johnson 208,'
There was no competition Sun
day because the tourney was set
up before British Columbia
changed its "blue" laws.
Rock Misses
Old Archie
MIAMI Fla. (NEA) Does Rocky
Marciano miss the fight btisinesi
much?
"Not really as much as
thought I would," says the it'
tired heavyweight champion nov,
growing potatoes south of Miami.
"I tell you one guy I miss
though, that's old Archie Moore.
There's a guy for you. He sent
me a telegram the morning after
I knocked him out and know
what it said: 'Dear Rock en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed it very much. Let's do it
again toon. We can make a mil million
lion million apiece next time."'

M

elendez

vlF
Braulio :leai" giirffMri. VlaJ-
nia de la "Guardia de Gerbaud's
sluggish
to scone
a' hangup ride
i-length vic-
tory in
11,000 seven
furlon,
at the
ay afternoon
Jelnon racetrack.
Emh
up second ana
Mossadi
another half-
length b;
im ilia wound i up
fourth,
lostadoi: fifth 'Bd
Gavilan
Gra
out: a sizzling pace
with
sy is -'icWwt pursuit-
Embassy took cjamftand in the
unal lurlong when Gramilla sud sudden
den sudden folded but Melendez and Mos Mos-sadeq
sadeq Mos-sadeq advanced,, like a team on
the outside with Meiendez respond responding
ing responding ttxotmm-rMS-tod, urging
of Baeza.
Tho triumph on Molendei was
on of four scor.d by Ba.j. ys ys-terday
terday ys-terday and nino in the last two
days. It gave the poker facad
rider a total of 41 victorias for
on month a nw Isthmian
record. His other wins, all sen sensational,
sational, sensational, were scored on Pillue Pillue-lo,
lo, Pillue-lo, Jackbit and, Pocas Pilchas.
Melendez. a mutaels favnrifp
paid only $4.20 "to win and turned
1:26 1-5 for the seven furlones.
The only longshot winner of the
afternoon was Oliver ($27.80) with
Guillermo Milord in the saddle.
The Oliver-Lucky Sky one two
paid $96.20 tops for the day.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Joe's Fiddling $7.20, $3.
2T-Julio Verne $2.40
SECOND RACE
-Tuti Fruti $7.40, $3.60
j Napa $3.80
First Double: $27.80
1-2-
f I
THIRD RACE
1 Pilluelo $2.60, $2.80
2 Don Vito' $7.60
One-Two: $29.80
FOURTH RACE
1 Vilma P., $10.20, $2.20
2- Shri $2.20
Quiniela; $4
FIFTH RACE
1 Henco $2.40
2 (No place betting)
SIXTH RACE
1 Jackbik $7.60, $4.20
2 Destello $4.60
SEVENTH RACE
-Melendez $4.20-, $2.80
-Embassy $4.40
Second Double: $20
,. EJGHT RACE
1 Arevla $5.2(1 .t
6 T--. "-T-
2 Enganoso $4
Quiniela: $21.80
KlINTH RACE
1 Oliver $27.80, $8.40
2 Lucky Sky $4.
One-Two: $94.20
HiXenth' RACE
1 Carcaman $3.20, $2.20
2 Cypress Bull $4.20
i-LBVENTH RACK
1 Pocas Pilchas $3.80 S
-Bodegon $4.20
1 GIVING ALL -The part of.
j Sam, a laugh-getting pet in the
: movie "Miss Casey Jones," is
a' killer. Here's the 38th lobster 1
to be used, photographed with I
eostars' Doris Day and Jack
1 Iiemmon.
DRIVE-IN
69c.
30c.
TAflftV ?:00
I UUH I
9:00
LAST DAY!

meienaez

a thmliBg ha

the -featured

gStjSesteri

Mr-4a-hird

Editor: CONRADO 8ARCEANT
.. .

9

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Ttams
w l mt. CB
80 50 .615
69 60 .535 10Va
66 61 .S26 12V4
62 65 .488 16Va
New York
Chicaib
Boston
Baltimore
-Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Washington
61 66 .480 17V4
.477 18
59 69 .461 20
54 74 .422 25
TOOAY1 GAM if
Detroit at Kama City ()
Cleveland at Chicago (3)
Baltimore at Washington (2)
Boston at Nueva York (2)
Bait.
000 020 0002
000 020 lOx-S
Bos.
Wilhelm (2-K t...j
Brewer (1040) and D.LV"
Gernert
(19).
N.Y.
Wash.
201-7
H14-. J
T,,.l.
Kucks (8).
Dickson (9).in3i
er, Clevenger ()
14)- W., Bauer (11), Zauchln (IS)
jvemmer
Detroit
Chic.
r flofrood oooo 2
261 000 OOx-S M
son; Wynn (12-13) and Battum.
LP. Bunning (9-10). ;;.. -- p
(11 Innings)
Clev,
000 000 101 01-3 5 l
000 002 000 0 0-2 7 1
K.C
McLish, Mossi (8), Narleski rim
Martin (10) and NtaoTfSyS
hp wd h,itth WG Martin (2-0
HR. Ward (6), Colavito (2 33 and'
34), Mmoso (20).
Rocky Graziano In T.inW.
Boadway expounding on tha maniv
art: "You eotta hav a xtmna
back and a weak mind T i
be the world's greatest.. .Then 1
started thinking and became the
world's hiocinct hi,
Is Navy de-embhasi7.in09 rs r
i"c vine una specimens in nnr
tbern California took the Acade
mys entrance test.", .and exactlv
une passed
The No. 1 gipht ian amog ma major
jor major league ballpuyers is Don Mc Mc-Mahon,
Mahon, Mc-Mahon, the sterling relief pit pitcher
cher pitcher of ths Milwaukee Braves...
who's enough of a walking ency
c'bpedia of tlie yport to challenge
even Dr. Joyce Bothers.. .as a ball ballplayer,
player, ballplayer, McMahon was discobered
on the Parade Grounds in BrooK
lyn by Honey Russell, the Seton
Hall cage coach,. .playing the in
field....
Doesn't it fit right in with Cus
D.'Amato's off-beat approach, to
have the Pike Peak or Bust Ro Rodeo
deo Rodeo outfit promote a champioship
fight next June in Colorado?
Birdie Tebbetts left a legacv of
baseball stories when he severed
himself from Cincinnati ..among
them the capsule interview he
gave after the size of the plub.
er's mound had been cahnged...
"Just what effect will it have on
pitchers, Birdie?" "Well, the
good pitcher will still be good, the
mediocre pitcher will still be me me-diocrc.and
diocrc.and me-diocrc.and the lousy pitcher will
just have another lousy excuse."
The gag among the colleges is
mai me nest way to attain a
post-season bowl game is to be
good enough to go on probation
Norm Van Brocklin was telling
about his first awareness of Chuck
Bednarik (now his Eagle team
mate) as a pro nine years ago.,
the Dutchman's Rams were being
briefed by Ctark Shughnessy for a
Philly tussle...Now Lazetich at
middl guard, you oughta have a
field day. Vie Lindskog, their re regular
gular regular center is hurt. They've got
this big, flat-footed rookie plav plav-ing
ing plav-ing there Bednarik." "And,'' re recalls
calls recalls Van Brocklin, "we. didn't tee
Lazetich for two weeks after the
game. That's how long it took for
him to get out of the hospital."
How careers turn: Jack Curticp
Is in the college grid big-time co
Stanford.. .and sure to give them
an interesting, wide-open offens
...but if his Utah team hadn't
beaten Wyoming last fall, he'd
have had trouble holding on in
Ml TJte scalp...
Perseverance: Emll Dari of
Dayton is a tackle who wanfs to
make All-America in the worsfv
way ...so all summer every day,
he ran up and down the m.mv
steps of the Fiver Stadium to ee
his legs in shape.. .the kicker Is
that although he is the team
captain, the school wouldn't open

000 121

001 000

lArr

NATIONAL iTIAtttM I

W L Ptt. Ol
II'5? !-
m,
ttt.
B.T.
Cin.
vo wl BV1
68 61 .527 8tt
64 67 .489 13V4
61 6 7.477 15
6167 ATI 3
60 71 .458
PK2'18
Los
St. Louis
Chicaeo
Philadelphia
w
Cincimutl at St. Loui, (2)
ChKMo at Milwaukee (2)
Philadelphia at Pittsharfh (J x
L-A. non Ann nmi
i aat nzn n ia n
m h Erta.-') Birrer (2),
McDevitt (7) and Rosetoe; Mi
ler (4-7) and Schmfdf. LP. Koufax
W)' HR"cilm,!t (13)- ?ww
Pjtt. 000-000. 000-0 5 3
Mil. ,y 100 66tf'10x-2 9
P?S(12-13) ,nd HBll. PoM6
(?); Willey (-4) and, Craadall.
Chi.
S.L.
203 000 210-8 f
012 002 mtr irf a
Drabowsky Phillip, (3), Henry
) and S. Tav nr N...
(7)
Maglie, Mab. 4)V- ij
Wight (7). and Green, wplphil''
Hps (7-8). LPMurfet (4-e. m
innghajn (t),Mtajs (Jfe)
(Fir.t Game)
Phil.
000 100 0011 s
000 1flnr a 11
Cin.
Semproch Meyer (7) and Lopa Lopa-ta;
ta; Lopa-ta; Haddix (8-7) andBiKv. LP
aemproeh (13-9). HR-Balley (2
and 10). Z-.TT
Seeowl Gem.)
Phil, f onni inn inn .
www .uv O I Z
Lm. W nm in.
Roberts, Hearn (7) and Saw V
Newcomhe (5-U) and Burgess LP
Roberts. (14-12). HB.-Sawatski a.
ann ."i 1 i vnu . 9
WA jj.v.,! A J. ),
Don McMahon
. .. -
the stadiuni '-to HnutOi he had to
chmb the fence to get in for his
icg exercises.
Frank Gifford is the aiVnAnrUrfo.
ed Hollywood boy of the grid
Geant? ...but. defensive back Lin Lin-don
don Lin-don Crow of the same dub nas
appeared in just as many movies
as, an extra .;.and Both were
speared" through the heart in
"6" w uif r agaii.
Tulane has its fingers crosse
over a sonhomore hairhar-k rr,.,
the caiun countrv nsmH p..
Colon (What, no exclamationl )..
they re planmhg to spoilt soma
commercials on thai enm .,.,-
radio network in Caiu diaWt tn
take in the rooters from the back
bayous.
He s from so far haoir in th.
woods," says Coach Andy Piim."
"be hasn't learned to h M.Kf
yet."
Between vou'n'm h. .n
that talk about Casey Stfentel do
ing back home to southern .li.
forma to manage (Ln nnHoerc cf
llane, also a Ta Anuko. L..A
tired of traveling nnw that n'.
past 0... """if
1
mm w -mmoa

I n

fry. i-.

i

1



(HONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1. U

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER

PAGE SEVEN

BPS ami

Tm Buying, N

ot Gra

bbinaOMalley

TOUCHE! Gianluigi Saccaro, left, of Italy scored a touch to the throat of Cuba's onrush onrush-Blf
Blf onrush-Blf Roberto Jordan during the e pee team competition in the World Fencing Championships
In Philadelphia, but the latter won the match. The ancient sport of dueling still goes big-.

4

Slants

Pros Don't Dig

Which Erdelatz Gave to

Loops
Them

By MURRAY OLDERMAN
I LOS ANGELES (NEA) 'Look'
Eddie Erdelatz squin ed from his'
Serch in the Los Angeles Coli Coli-um
um Coli-um press box, "these pros all
ise the same defense, with the
bur man line and the linebackers
plugging. They never change.
"Show me a single play on
ukiAk3 tlte.tr mvn slant

! On tho turf hclnw a pouDle Ot

ntpeeri his Shoulder, remem-

U. ...... ncaictont I

ith the San Francuco forty j

iners e-voivine new memous i

efensive nlav.

The slant was one of them, with

....... iKd fnrufqprl WD 1 1

pstffna p, airec ion 10 hhxw in

.......... I mov hi. can.

c in a direction away from the

T u- tUn

iav. mp ii im Kiaau iuc iai vi.

mm. -saw-' ;

gjB

a tougn game coming, up wun
Tulane. They use a pro type of'
fense, and 1 see that you've been
containing the other teams very
well. What do you use?"
"Why, Frank, Answered Shaw,
"we're using the Noire Dame de defense.
fense. defense. You know that new stuff
you've put in slants and loops."
"Slants and loops?" echoed
Leahy. "I never heard of them."
An end coach named Eddier'Er Eddier'Er-delatz
delatz Eddier'Er-delatz quietly sneaked out at
Shaw's office.

BY HARRY GRAYSCN
LOS ANGELES (NEA') It i

tificult to imagine Walter Fran Fran-ci
ci Fran-ci O'Malley, the innate Nev
Yorker, in a batebaM Quandary in
os Angeles, and here be is but
apparently confident that the Dod Dodgers
gers Dodgers eventually will win the deci deci-aion
aion deci-aion giving them 314 acres in the
much publicised Chavez Ravine.

oat will happen it in
doesn't obtain the site promised
oy Los Angeles politicians?
"I am an optimist by nature
and not thing along those lines,'
says the plump and stately
U uttlley' seated in his specie' ,v
constructed private box 6ft f&.
behind home plate on the Mcnlo
Avenue, or west end, of the mam
moth Los Angeles MemorW Co!' Co!'-seum.
seum. Co!'-seum. "It is my opinion that we
have an equitable contract ami
fundamentally sound case and

it was confirmed by the voters."

Th onlv time vou let a rise

out of O'Malley is when you re

'fer to the City of Us Angete

giving him the Chavez Ravine
hills and gullies.
"We are paying for it," he cor cor-rrt
rrt cor-rrt That means the city is ge

ting cramped Wrigley Field and

lis ZZ.OW seats in excunngc
314 acres of practically downtown
property.
"WVr buying, not grabbing."
emphasizes tthe unperturbed base
ball owner.
O'MALLEY HAS WHITTLED
the 314 acres down to M us
able ones, and the consensus it
that he will land them one way
r nnther The shrinkage is at

tributed to knocking down hit's,

ferrieinff roadways, a reservoir, a

rertion center and an oil drii

Un site.
On the 98 acres, O'Malley
wants to be the first owner u

O'Malley professes to be con confident
fident confident that Superior Court J-uic
Arnold Pareger'j tucuion declar declaring
ing declaring the original Chavez Rnvini
deal and the subsequent referen referendum
dum referendum improper will be over-ru'.ed
within from tour to six months.

i build a major league beb-.ll
j -rk since the late Col. Jb

nuppen duui YartKee anaium
&5. The cost would be n
million. Iff1 pitr would acccm acccm-modate
modate acccm-modate 50.000 with parking space
tor 2a,000 automobiles.

"The Santa Anita Kace Tr?cr
seats 32.000 and is situated on

100 acres," points oat O'Mai v. MEANWHILE O'MALLEY insists
Hollywood Park aiso seats 3'..to0 'THAT THE Dodgers are not lor
and parks 25,000 cars. So we re sale. Actually O'Malley is seated

quire 98 acres in order not to ; with both nanfls in a Dag o inu-

have to apologize tor a bad park -ney with 17,000 green cusnionea

inf situation. -I "box seats

'box" seats and as many reJ

Golden Boy' To Attempt
To Beat Basilio Friday

cushioned reserved on the play
ing end of the 101,528 seat Co
iiseum. Attendance will hit 1.9
million.
The Coliseum isn't nearly as
bad for baseball as it has been

lainted, despite the 250 foot leu

field foul line and screen. Next

year the wire fence, now 421 feet
in dead center, will be moved in
to compare with other big league
parks. And with any kind of

start the Dodgers win exceed 2

million in attendance.

Does O'Malley, the 55-year-o!d,

cigar smoking Brooklyn nnan-

cier, lawyer, engineer and Dusine:;

man, miss New York?

"Only the cheaters," he says
I have euest privileges at uu

the clubs I belong to in New Yon

and I rarely went there anyway.
I'm a home guy."

THE O'MALLEYS HAVEsuites

here at the Statler and Beverlv

Hills hote.s and a summer home

at Lake Arrowhead

"We see mqre people here than
we did in New Yrok." smiles O' O'Malley,
Malley, O'Malley, in perfect health again

after his late January operat cn
for an intestinal obstruction. "Ev

erybody comes to Los Angeles."
O'Malley entertained the jusii jusii-ces
ces jusii-ces of the state supremt courts,
here for a convention, during the
last Milwaukee series.
The engagement of his daughter,
Terry, to Roland Seidler, Jr., of
nearby San Marino, who is as associated
sociated associated with his father's invest investment
ment investment firm, has jusb een announ-

ed.

"That gives us another tie with
Los Angeles," says Walter F. 0 0-Malley,
Malley, 0-Malley, who is here to stay.'

All There
Was To It

Eddie Erdeiats

rialati tried to sell the slant

7. 1- OL..u thnn nnanhinr) t U P

f t Kf'LK AiiaW. II1CI1 s. WHnssssi, i.i

Ninorc hut Rurk would n t

r ui iv, '
buy 1
'Well," said. Erdelatz, the end

D,?Chta Bl' WnHd.f of a staff confer.
"I'ln that case." aheme-1 Sahaw, ence; Shaw picked up the : phone.

Conference and for the first five

:oames o the season me runj

Niners held the opposition to vir

tually minus yardage

on

tfmavhe VOll'vp JO' 'DP hina

xms was in me 01a ,u-jh-

WupV Shaw."

"Buck? Frank Leahy. We have

Then there's the Erdelatz .who

I coached Navy to as s rong Cotton
j Bowl triumph last yeah The issue
! was put to him bluntly: '!.
How come Tom' Forrestal, the
j kid he insis ed should be every every-I
I every-I body sAU-Amaeritfa quarterback
llast year, was spe'h s nothing
j when he mingled with the College
i All-S ars in August?
"That surprise you? he parried.

uur best all around liivman
last year was Tony StremiC. Ottd

uraham only nut him on the All

iar squad as a favor to me. I

doubt he even ifot in the came

.'KMihii i- 1. .

. rnecic now mucn any tr our

other Navy boys have played in
that kind of com petit ion boys
like George Welsh and Ron Bea-

lle." Hardly at all.
"Mavbe." he adrleri lvlv "inn.

the day you guys' will realize what

we've got to work with at Annap Annapolis.
olis. Annapolis. N "' ; '' '
"We may be all right collective collectively,
ly, collectively, but individually we're not
woth a d. ."

PHILADELPHIA (NEA)- Ray

Semproch credits his making to
Charley Gassaway, his manager

at Wilson. 1M. D.,
Semproch, who this season de developed
veloped developed into the ace of the Ph'l
ties' staff wax havinf bis troubles

with the Miami Marlins early in
the 1957 campaign. The Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia front office asked Gassaway
to observe the kid in ction.
"Gassaway said I was throwing
completely overhand and I should
try about three-quarter sideirm
motion," says Semproch. "That's
all there was to it.'

Semproch went on to win u or
his last 12 decisions with Miami
and this year became Philadel Philadelphia's
phia's Philadelphia's number one" pitcher.
NRIT MAIN EVENT
Philadelphia (NEA) Lea Mat Mat-thews,
thews, Mat-thews, home-grown undefeated
lightweight makes his first start
in a main event against experienc experienced
ed experienced Tommy Tibbs of Boston in
Philadelphia, Sept. 12.

NEW YORK (UPI) Art Ara-

gon, the l alitornia "uoiaen noy

will try to beat lormer weiicr

weight and middleweight chant

pion Carmen Basilio at Los An--eies
in next week's big iv-

radio fight, Friday night.

Wednesday mints rv doui
brings together hght heavyweighi
contender Tony Anthony and heav heavyweight
yweight heavyweight Archie McBride at the
Syracuse, N. Y., Memorial Audi
torium.
When Aragon of Los Angeles
and Basilio o. Chittenango, ti..,
square off for their 10-rounder in
the city of angels, the crowd may
reach 25,000 at Wrigley Field and
the gate $250,000 for a new Pacific
Coast record, according to pro promoter
moter promoter George Parnassus.
Their fight will be televised and
broadcast nationally by NBC, bu'

the Los Angeles area will be
blacked out for TV.
Basilio. 31. will be making lii
first start since March 25, when
he lost the middleweight crown uu
a split decision to Sugar Ray Rob Robinson
inson Robinson in a return bout at Chicago
That was Carmen's only fight
since last Sept. 23.
Aragon, 29, has 15 straight vic

tories, including five this year. At
though Basilio will be favored,
Aragon- is given a chance because
of his punch. He registered 55
knockouts while winning 81 of his
101 bouts. He had five draws. Ba
silio's 52-13-7 record' includes 25
knockouts
In Wednesday's bout at Syra
cuse, light heavyweight contender
Anthony of New York" seeks his
fifth straight knockout victory of
195 against McBride of Trenton

N.J. Their 10-rounder will be lelt
vised nationally by ABC.
McBride hasn't fought since last
Dec. 13, when he lost a decisioi.

to Sweden's unbeaten Ingemar t-

hansson, European champion, ai
Goteborg, Sweden. His 21-13-0 rec record
ord record includes seven kayoes. Antho Anthony's
ny's Anthony's 34-5-1 list had 27 knockouts.
Anthony and McBride were ori
ginally scheduled to fight on Aug.
1, but the New Yorker requested a
postponement because of a virus
infec'ijn.

Everybody
Wants In

ANNAPOLIS Md. (NEA)-When
Navy's 1958 football captain, Dick
Dagampat, first attracted atten attention
tion attention as a sophomore two yesrs
ago. he was referred to as an
Hawaiian.

The first to issue a complaint
was the Mayor 0' Los Angles
listed as a Californian since that
is where he was born and raised
as the son of a Los Angeles bar barber.
ber. barber. Next came correspondence
from ihe Philippine Embassy in
Washington which pu', forth its
claim on the Academy's rampag rampaging
ing rampaging fullback.
"Although Midshipman Dagam Dagam-pat's
pat's Dagam-pat's mother is Hawaiian, and al although
though although he was born in California,
we has'en to point out that the
young man's fa'her, Claudio B.
Dagampat, is a native of Manila.
Therefore, we feel that we should
share in the credit for Dick."
So in an effort to please every everyone.
one. everyone. Navy's 1958 footbajl hand handbook
book handbook lists Midshipman Richard
'Manuals Dagampat is a "califor-nia-Hawaiian-Filipino.'

A-TC-
( I drink Tender Leaf Tea!
V Nothing tittw N diliciousiy refrashlnj A
f ai 1 cup of hot Tandir Ulf Tit. I
f I drink Tender Leaf Tea! I 1
. Thin'i nothing toewiing In the but at I J

frosty glm of lead Tandir Leaf Tm. 1
It hot

(tr ij f- s .r'J y .1
JOK WILLIAMS

The Yankees are rolling to. their
umpteenth championship with a
pitching staff composed, largely p.
store-bought arms. Six of them
came from the same place. Ye
Oulde Friendly Antique Shoppe in
Kansas City. I
rvno nf the incomDatibles of the

Yankee dperatibn, generally ac accepted
cepted accepted as the most ef.icient and
productive in the majors, is the
iparseness of its pitching yield
over the year. If the Yankee, Yankee,-had
had Yankee,-had beeB forced to depend on
home-grown pitching skills they
would have won few champion
hOncYyou get past Lefty Gomex,
Spud Chandler and Vic H
of other days, and Wbitey Ford
of today, you realize, with some something
thing something of a shock, you've practical practically
ly practically run out of names that spe-l
proved, enduring, big league w-
timcitv

Most of the Yankees' pitching

stalwarts hav, been acquired in
trade or by oruchases i Its a

arl Mav BOO snawncv, nrau

rnnock. Red Runmg. joe bjji,

imp Hadley, Monte Pearson, r-a
Ttnat Allie Reynolds, and

T. ii.. T.. T ureon Run

(ore recenuy, wm '"

(irley, Bob Sbanti, Kyne uuxeu.
1 Historical! v. there Is nothing un-

icial about the composition 01'

. JR. f-

. r,ctrnp inn nf the YanKCCS VI V

sent stall, i ms nas oeen auni
nnaratinn with them for close to

40 years, or since '21 when they

won their nrsi cnampionsnip.
Gomez the B$t?

The key stafers then were
Hoyt and Mays (ex-Red Soxers),
Shawkey (a Connie Mack contri contribution)
bution) contribution) and Jack Quinn (with he
courtesy of the White Sox). Most
of the subordinates also bod
started elsewhere.

Sine their first championship

...the ttwen Of which, incidentally
v" speedihr erased by the Giants

who' whomned them m the World
F-rs at the now abandoned Polo
Grounds. ..scarcely a veariha gone
Y- that they haven't gone ?nto
the onea market for for pitching
strength, i R
TVy found the Red Sox of the

-r -1 even more resnonaive te

rv n ferinrv tnan me s -i

In addition to Hoyt and
I!'-" got Pennock and Ruf-

Ins. ', oi'r great pitchers, all from

Lie same ciuu. For years ineas

Ted At 40 Still Hits Like 25,
Still Acts like Ten-Year-Old

talented arms kept the Yankees
in business.
Gomez wasc the first pristine
Yankee pitcher to achieve au,
thentic stardom. And it may ev even
en even be that the ebullient Caballero
was the best they've ever had.
There were four years in which

he won 20 or more, ana nis
career total of 189 victories in

368 games should speak for it

self; this tailing, tne gooa seno..

who is around, will no aouoi ue
happy to oblige.

Chandler and Raschi were also

superlative .perform e r a. We

inouian 1 care 10 try io sum me mi

out for betting dough. In '45

Chandler was supremely th best
with 20 wins, four losses and. a

sparkling ERA of .164 setting me

pace in all three categories. In
four successive years, Raschi was
19-8. 21-10. 21-8, 21-10, a jewel-

litrA nnneieiAnAw no at tH Man 11 Sin f

LI 1ft C iKii.iirt" iivv UV Dii.i,ii iin im

RYankee has attained.

Currently, Ford is the most rea

ssuring reminder that at intervals,

at least. Yankee fans to proditcr

superior pltcmnig material. And
yet the New York-born lefty, iH

his seventh stason, is still lookin;

for his flrst 20-game accomplish

ment.

Lopat a Steal

After the Red Sox deals In the

'20s' the two pitching transaeions

from which the Yankees profited
most involved Reynolds, and Lopat,

separate transfusion of draft

blood, each coming as the monster

had begun to falter.
The Yankees had finished thin

the year before when they got
Reynolds from the Indians. To
get the hardball right-bnder they
had to give up Joe Gordon. slip
this had the aspects of a major
deal.
Reynolds promptly restored, the
Yankees to normalcv and during

his eight-year tenure was a ao
minant factor in fx championslii
five In a row. Lopat came the

next year and was .an even

more remarkable acouisition since

all the White Sox got in return
was cash and a part-time 2f.o

hitting catcher. (h H
The point, if any, here, is that
as long as their spurious riv

are eager to supply their pitching

wants, there is no practical nee:

to be concerned about the compa

rative sterility of their farms.

By BOB SALMON
BOSTON (UPI) ted- WlJliims,
one of baseball's greatest slug
gers, turns 40 Saturday.
He's still hitting like a SS-year-

old. and it times -t.-atjlL' acting
like a 10 year-old.
However, the temperamental
Boston Red Sox liar has begun

snowing some signs ot age. True
he is currently making a "bid for
his sixth American League batting
title. He's just a few percentage

points off the pace with a 3IS

Hyerage. He's whacked 21 homers

tins season, with a month to go.

Ana ne s sun a icarsome tight at
the plate, liia tanned, muscular
arms holding the bat as If It were
a swizzle stick.

But Ted in't what he used to

be. A good many of his hits this
season have lacked the old Ate

he was noted for. Be has hit and

attempted to hit to left field,
against the overshifted infield

more often than ever before. And

bis batting mrk. though plent"

healthy, 18 tar below rM .350 life

lime average. r- X i
,, .," ,tf .' .'v ; ,.y-'
.... i m i ....... Vk JL i: :

wnai ooni Williams fttt tire as

he heads in' o his fifth decade

that will always be the same,
'j'nat's his personality. What o c r
baseball great has ever been fined
to spitting at the fans after halt
a lifetime in the game.

First of all, he'll undoubtedly: bet still problematical.

Griffith Consults
Board 01 Directors
On Possible Change
WASHINGTON (UPI) A board
of directors meeting which virtu virtually
ally virtually amounts to a faro.ly
gathering was expected today to

give Calvin Griffith permission to
try to transfer the Washington

Senators to Minneapolis.
The Washington baseball el-rt
president went r e h i n d eta-"
doors tardy to ask and undoubted

ly gt a green heht to dicker on

tn tram mse move.
' Griffith would still have to seek
Amercan League permission to
make tie shift which would
leave the nation's capital without
a baeb!l team. Whether his
fellow dub owners would ailow
him to move from the "show
case" c'ly of Washington wa?

back next, season. Ho hasn't said

so in as many words, but Ted has
stated often that his last big (tar (target
get (target ia still 500 home runs. F
i
Only three playersin hist6ry
have ever topped the 500 figtjie
Babe Ruth leads with- a. fntastie

?u. .Hmmie Foxx clouted IM, and

Mel ott still leads the Natiekial

League with ail. fiven Lou Gehrig
missed, collecting 494 daring Ibis

Williams ia fifth man in she

standings with 471 The 500 mark

would pe well within his grasp

wHn-nnotner tuii ynrAm:mmir
$100,000 plus salary i nothing to

sneeze at (or spit at).

Ted himself says he'd like to
stay in baseball after his playing
days ate over. He's alao Hid he
wouldn't want a manager's lob,

hut whether h actually means it
is another (mention.

Whatever may change about

Wh
Tinde

Ilo've- er. the stage was set for

Griffith ,to win board permission

to aeotiate when two directors

C. F. Jacobaen and John E.

Powell resigned earner this

month rather than claah with him
over the issue,

This left as board members

Griffith, his sister, Mrs. J-o r
Haynes: his. brother-in-lsw, .loe

Havnes, and non Klativr.

Eucen V. Young.

Before the meeting, even the

suggestion by President Elsen
hower tbat building a better ha I

team rather than a move tr,

Minneapolis might prove mo-"

pro "it ble failed to diminish Giif
tltH's itch to switch.
Eisenhower said at his rmw

conference Wednesday he would

bp willing to attend more gai

here if the eight nlace Senators

would produce a first division

contender

The Washington owner replied

that while w have reached n

conclusions" he nrobably would

acp a bid to move to Mtnnea

erbox Ted there's one tiling polis if the offer were right

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 2060, Sunday, August 31, 1958
The whole ticket has 52 pieces divided In two aeries "A?' & "B" of 2 ptocea each.

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

9150
8706
6866

$ 52,000.00
$ 15,600.00
$ 7,800 00

No. PrlzM No. FtIzm No. Prizes No. Prlzea No. Prim No. Prizes No. Prizes No, Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes
aasa iss.oo its is.m 20M iss.es josh iss.m mm iss.oa soss iss.m m i56.se tese iss.ee sese ise.ee tesa iss.ee
oisa z.see.ee use z.seo.ee 2ise 2,son.oo .use z.see.se use 2,eee.ee sise 2,6M.ee sise 2,se.M 7ise 2,soe.ee sise 2,eoe.ee sise s2,eeo.ee
0250 156.00 1250 156.SS 2250 I5K.00 .12.10 I5K.00 4250 1511.00 5250 158.00 250 ISS.OO 7250 156.00 S250 156.00 9250 ISS.OO
0350 156.00 1350 156.00 2350 156.00 3350 156.00 4350 156.00 5350 156.00 6350 156.00 7350 156.00 S350 156.00 9350 156.00
0450 156.00 1450 156.00 2450 156.00 3450 156.00 4450 156.00 5450 156.00 6450 156.00 7450 156.00 S450 156.00 9450 156 or
0550 1S6.00 1550 156.00 2550 156.00 3550 ISS.OO 4550 156.00 5550 156.00 6550 156.00 7550 156.00 8550 156.00 055(1 I5ti.un
0650 156.00 1650 156.00 2650 156.00 3650 156.00 4650 156.00 5650 156.00 66S0 156.00 7650 156.00 S650 156.00 9650 156.00
0750 156.06 175 156.00 2750 156.06 3750 156.00 4750 156.00 5750 156.00 6750 156.00 7750 156.00 8750 156.00 9750 156.00
0850 156.00 1850 156.00 2850 156.00 3856 156.00 4S50 156.00 5850 156.06 6850 156.00 7850 156.00 8850 156.00 9850 15S.N
0050 1540 19S0 156.00 2950 156.00 3950 156.00 4950 156.00 5950 156.00 6950 156.00 7950 156.00 S9S0 156.00 9950 156.00

Approximations Derived From First Prize

S I SI t S Sit
9141 520.06 I 9143 120.00 9145 520.00 9147 529.00 9149 520.0 9152 520.00 91S4 520.00 0156 526.0 58 57.6.00
9142 520.00 I 9144 520.00 I 914 52. I 914 520.00 9151 520.00 9153 120.00 91SS 520 00 9157 520.00 1 9159 520.06

Approximations Derived From Second Prize

" mm i i
I f S I s t
076 20.00 1706 260.0 2700 266.0 3706 20.00 470 260.00 S70 260.00 6706 260.00 77N 260.00 97 06 260.00
897 130.00 89 130.0 8701 130.00 871 130.00 8705 130.00 8706 130.0 671 130.00 8712 130.00 8714 130.0
88 1M.0 S7M 130.00 1 8702 130.00 S7M IM.M 8707 130.M 1 87M 1M.M 8711 130.M 1713 139.00 I 1715 130,00
Approximations Derived From Third Prize
a i I s s si s t s $
08M 1H.M J 1M j 1 MM 28M 15. 3S66 156.M 4S66 156.00 SM6 156.00 7SM IM.M 886 IM.M 9866 IM.M
S57 104.M I 859 104.M 81 14.00 6863 104.00 8(S 104.00 0868 104.M 7 104.00 im 1M M74 104.00
6858 104.00 MM 1M.M M62 104.M MM 104 00 687 IM.M M69 IM.M M71 IM.M 6873 104.00 0875 104.66

Price-winnint; Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing were so Id at: The 1st. Veraguas, 2nd. Panama and 3rd. in Veratnas.
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in and not included in the above list win Fifty Two Dollars ($52.00) each.
The whole ticket haa fifty.-two nieces which comprises the two series "A" St "B"
Signed by: The Governor of the Province of Panama, JOSE A. A.I Alt ESC ALA
The Representative of the Treasury JOSE MANUEL SILVERA

WITNESSES Carolyn Nancy Doyle
' Vicente A. Carrera Ced. 8-23379

MARIANO SOTO
Notary Public, Panama

PABLO A. PINEL
Secretary

M

kirt-rr, The winning ticket with the last cipher and with the two last
lHJ I C. ciphers apply only to the rirzt Prize.
The First Prize and the 2nd and 3rd Prlzea ere drewn separately. The ap approximation
proximation approximation arc calculated on' the first', Second nd Third prizes. In cose
a ticket should carry the number of each prize, the holder U entitled to
claim payment for eoch.

DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES

Firm Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

Sunday, Augatt 31, 1958
Drawing Number 181
Fraction

. . 50

. 06
. 66

Ticket

$11.00 0220.00
3.00 60.00
2.00 40.00

The prllei will be paid In accordance with the Official List of Panama1 b
PLAN OF ORDINARY DRA WINolvMl" WHICH WILL
TAKE PLACE SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 7, 1958

Divided tr two serle of 2 fractions each
mm pmzr.
1 First Prize, Serle A and B. of 2
1 Second Prize. Series A and B. of 7
1 Third Prize, Series A and B. of 3
10 Approximations, Series A and B, ot
Prizes Serle A and B. of 1
SO Prizes. Series A and B. of

M0 Prizes. Series A and B, of
. ": srrnNn prize
IS Approximations. Series A and B. of S
t PriMf. Series A and R. o
THIRD PRIEK
IS Approximations, Series A and M. Of S
Prizes, Series A end B. of

denominated "A" and

000.00 each aerie
SM 00 each series
000.00 each series
20.00 each series
,300.00 each serle
70 on each series
2 00 each serle

( each series
1.100 each series

12.00 each series
.0 00 each serle

S52.0MM
1S.M0M
7. MOM
0.3M.M
7.1.400 0
t 4 040 ..

t J.I

I.SM.1
JSI

t 1 .071.00
1 404 00

the nffl.ee of the Nallenal Brnefl, lent Lollery situated on Central Avenue.

1074 Prize. Total tno.OSt.OO

Price of a whole ticket $26.00
Price of a fifty-second port ..50

PRIZES ARE PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXIS

3S

1

'18

. .4

i
4

-



5
PAGE EIGHT
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
MONDAY,
i
C L
M.EDS
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2740
- b : 1
IK 7r
,BSH A -
'
'-

s s

1 F

"-pn-? .j-jj-jj-j-
eTv Lwa iiaV I
EaBdnaaadtH sssMMsH LnLnV
,

Resorts

FOSTER'S CottifM and Larfe
Beach HoUM. On mil part (he
Casino. Phona Balboa 1866.
CASINO SANTA CLARA MOTEL
CABINS $4.00 par coupt par
night. Housekeeping Quartan for
Rent: Par night, per week, par
month. If you need housekeep housekeeping
ing housekeeping quartan bring your own linen.
Inquire Casino Santa Clara. Re Reservation
servation Reservation by telephone accepted.
PHILLIPS Oeeanside Cottagea
Santa Clara R. da P. Phone Pa Panama
nama Panama 3-1 877 Crirtobal 3-1673.
Houses
FOR RENT: Spacioui and com comfortable
fortable comfortable chalet, street 94 San
Fr.no.co and 50M. No. 31.
Three bedrooms, iiving-dining-toom,
poreh, kitchen and garage,
maid's room with eetvice inde independent,
pendent, independent, for information, call
phone 2-2037. Can be seen from
5 at 6 p.m.
FOR RENT: Modern two story
residence. 5 bedrooms. Hot wa water
ter water installation. Properly screen screened
ed screened San Francisco de la Caleta
9th. Street No. 39. $175.00.
Miguel Hive Tel. 3-4844.
3-1130.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished chalet, Bella Vista No.
30, 46th Street. Phone 3-1805.
FOR RENT: Furnished three
bedroom-chalet, very reasonable.
Bella Viata. phone 2-3479.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet,
48th Street final, left hand No.
25, after Uruguay Street. Two
bedroom, living, dining room,
perch, ete. Tel. 3-6887.
Russia Steps Up
Plans To Tighten
Red Hold On Army
LONDON (UPH Russi h"
sharply increased its
subject the Red army to tighter
party supervision, Moicow reports
revealed today.
The Soviet authorities have is issued
sued issued new orders for tighter dis discipline
cipline discipline through more effective
party indoctrination. The order
followed recent moves to bring tM
officers corps of the Red army
down from its hitherto privileged
position.
tw. .amoaicn. which began
eautiously after the ouster of Mar-
lhal Georgi aoukov, "
teadily built up iiv recent months
and reached a new pitch recently.
Latest developments were spot spotlighted
lighted spotlighted by criticism from Ool.
Gen. A. Golikov, head of the po political
litical political administration of the Soviet
armed forces, of "serious short shortcomings"
comings" shortcomings" in the indoctrination
eork within the Red army.
Gocikov, in an article in the
Moscow Communist Party news newspaper
paper newspaper Pravda combined his crit criticism
icism criticism with a firm call for tighter
irmy discipline.
The Red Army has been under
fire for its alleged lax discipline
Since Marshal Zhukov was re removed
moved removed for opposing the Commu Communist
nist Communist party's decision to revive po political
litical political controls over the armed
forces and the Stalin-type institu institution
tion institution of political commissars.
' Golikov was appointed hortly
after Zhukov's downfall specifical specifically
ly specifically to foster party indoctrination in
the armed forces with the aim to
subject the Red army to complete
and undisputed party control.
The Red army under Zhukov
had been gaining steadily in pow power
er power and was becoming too strong
and independent a force for party
boss Nikita Khrushchev.
But Khrushchev, mindful of the
powerful role which the army and
its officers corps in particular had
acquired, has been proceding with
marked caution.
But gradually pressure has been
systematically heightened by the
Kremlin in every possible field
with the obvious aim to put the
army back in its place.
PROMPT
COURTEOUS
RADIO
TV-HI-FI
SERVICE
CALL
2-2374
'Till 8 P.M.
All Work
GUARANTEED
J

Apartments

FOR RENT: One bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished apartment. Beautiful
residential lection. Excellent
neighborhood. 43rd Street No.
13.
FOR RENT : Nicely furnished
apartment including refrigerator,
perch, parlor-diningroom, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, kitchen, garage, tilad,
acreened. $55.00 apply house
112, Via Belisario Porras, naar
Roosevelt Theatre.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment, sitting-diningroom,
porch, maid's quarters. Price
5110.00. Phone 3-0351 46th.
St. No. 8.
FOR RENT: Small apartment,
two bedroom independent, near
to the schools of Paitilla, Street
89 or 14 PaitilU No. 88.
FOR RENT: Modern 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, hot water sys system
tem system etc. at El Cangrejo. Further
particulars, call 3-4968 and
after hours, 3-6737, Panama.
FOR RENT: Brand new build building,
ing, building, nicely furnished one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, hot water, Tel.
3-3884.
FOR RENT: Modern furnished
apartment, two bedrooms liv living,
ing, living, dininp room, independent
services. San Francisco 16 Street
No. 6, near to Roosevelt Theatre.
FORRENT: Cool, screened fur furnished
nished furnished apartment, living, dining
room, bedroom, bath, kitchen,
balcony. Tel. 3-6921.
FOR RENT: One bedroom
apartment, living, diningroom,
kitchen, bath, garage, $60.00.
Via Porras No. 60. Tel. 3-1798.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment
ment apartment with light and gas in Vista
Hermosa. Tel. 3-3589.
FOR RENT: Modern furnished
apartment, two bedroom, living,
diningroom, independent serv services.
ices. services. San Francisco 16 Street No.
6, near to Theatre Roosevelt.
FOR RENT: Apartment Via
Porras No. 64 in fren Theatre
Eden, one bedroom, living, din dining
ing dining room, perch, etc. Telephone
3-6187.
$50.00 Furnished apartment,
North American neighbors, Via
Espana. Phona 2-3343.
FOR RENT: Cool, modern, one
bedroom apartment. Phone 3-
1210.
Commercial Sites
Mercedes Building. De luxe com commercial
mercial commercial and office building. Am Ample
ple Ample parking apace. Night watch watchman.
man. watchman. Moderate rents. Balboa
Avenue, next to nuns school.
Ricarde A. Miro S. A. Tel.
2-3436.
PATIENT'S DEATH PROBED
DETROIT (UPI) A post mor mortem
tem mortem will be held for a 24-year-old
man who died after having some
of his teeth extracted, authorities
said today. Arthur Maloney of
Detroit had an undisclosed number
of teeth pulled Thursday. He was
taken to Deaconess Hospital Sat Saturday
urday Saturday after he became ill and
died today.
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Canal Zone
United State District Court For The
District of The Canal Zone
Balboa Division
Esso Standard Oil, S.A., a .Corpora
tion, Plaintiff, v. Alan S. Wallace, De
fendant. Summons Civil No. 4732. Ac
tion brought in the United States Dis District
trict District Court for -the District of the Ca
nal Zone, and Complaint filed in the
uifice of the Cleric of aald Court, in
the Division above given.
To:
The Above Named Defendant:
You are hereby required to appear and
answer the complaint filed against you
in the above-entitled action, on or be before
fore before the 24 day of October, 1958.
And you are hereby notified that un
less you do appear and answer, the
plaintiff will take Judgment for any
money or damages demanded in the
complaint as arising upon contract, or
will apply to the Court for any other
relief demanded In the Complaint.
It Witness Whereof I hereunto set my
hand and affix the seal of the United
States District Court for the District of
the Canal Zone, this 2S day of August,
MM.
era 4a la PeAa
Cleric
SEAL
By Lois K. Harrison
Chief Deputy Clerk
To: Alan S. Wallace, Defendant:
The foregoing summons Is served up upon
on upon you by publication pursuant to the
Order of the
Honorable Guthrie F.
Crowe, Judge of the United States Dis District
trict District Court for the District of the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone, dated August 22, 1958. and
entered and filed In thla action In the
Office of the Clerk of the United Slates
District Court for the Division of Bal Balboa
boa Balboa on August 22. 195S.
Sura de la Pefia
Clerk
By Lola E. Harrison
Chief Deputy Clerk
NEW!
SPEEDLITE 40
ONLY $24.00
BANTAMWEIGHT
ONLY 2.3 Lbsj.

JFanami Col6n

i nvf vnim an with onf. or OUR

INTERNAL DE PUBLIC ACIONES No. 3
BARUU No, 26 "B street 0 MUKK1HUJV
FARMACIA LUX 164 Central Avenue
r ARM AO A VAN DKR-JIS 50 Street No.
A THIS Beside the Bella Vista Theatre
Automobiles
FOR SALE: 1958 Volks Wagon
lew mileage ww tires, car like
new. Duty free. Call 3-1594
7:00 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1955 Pontiac Cara Cara-lina
lina Cara-lina hardtop coupe V-8 engine,
hydramatic, power brakes, radio,
two tones paint, like new tires,
tinted glass and other Deluxe
features. Immaculate throughout,
priced very reasonable. Tel. 2 2-2472,
2472, 2-2472, Balboa.
FOR SALE: Cadillac 4-jloor
sedan 60 Special "Fleetwood"
1957. Green and Black. Just like
new. Telephone 719 Colon,
House No. 10.091 9th. Street.
FOR SALE: One Ton. 1951
Chevrolet Panel Truck, $650.00.
Gcod condition. Tel. 3-1912 or
36-386.
FOR SALE: 1948 Oldsmobile,
available August 29. Hydramatic,
radio, good tires, good condition,
duty paid. Phone Curundu 4213,
Apt. 5. Mr. Fouquette, between
4 and 5:30 p.m.
MUFFLERS
Chevrolet, Plymouth, Ford $9. $9.-95
95 $9.-95 All others $12.95. Free ins installation.
tallation. installation. Tivoli Motors at Tivoli
Crossing. Tel. 2-4222.
FOR SALE: For leaving: Nash
48. 6 cylinders, 4 doors, excel excellent
lent excellent mechanical condition, radio
and tires, $225.00, telephone
3-3977 Panama, from 2 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1950 Chrysler
sedan in good condition. Duty
psid. $280.00. Telephone: Pa Panama
nama Panama 3-3453.
FOR SALE: 1955 Pontiac Ca Ca-talina
talina Ca-talina hardtop, excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, leather upholstery, duty
paid. Can be financed. Phone
Panama 3-7063 or can be aeon
Garage "Elias" Panama. Tel.
2-1995.
FOR SALE: 1951 Buiek Special
convertible, new battery, brake
linings, $450 or belt offer, army
inspected, good condition, duty
hours 85-2177 off duty, Balboa
2-3641.
YOUR FEET HURT?
trained Chiropodist will relieve
any foot trouble, coma, callous
ses, In frown toe nails, toot mas massage,
sage, massage, etc.
Services "SCHOLL'S"
Products
J.' Arosemena Ave, 83-48
Tel. 3-2217
The Magic Super Seasoner
AJI-N0-M0T0
(Mono-sodium Glutamate)
Available now in the
Canal Zone.
Classes in Ballet Tap and
Toe Taitfnt by
DOROTHY CHASE
will be resumed in October.
Registration dates to be
announced later.
August 15 to Sept. 15
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE t
' General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co.,
for rates and Information
Tel. Panama 2-0552
8 DAT
LIMA TOUR
Inc. atr fare, transfers tours, I
and deluxe hotel J
$180
leave every Tues. ant Frl,
F1DANQUE TRAVEL
Tel. Panama 2-1661
International Jewelry
155 Central Ave.
ZOO IN YEARS OLD
FRANKFURT, Germany (UPI)
The Frankfurt Zoo wound up
celebrations of its 100th anniver anniversary
sary anniversary today with a collection aug augmented
mented augmented by birthday gifts from
zoos all over the world. The Mos Moscow
cow Moscow Zoo sent, as a birthday pres
ent, two predatory cats known as
"manuks," which normally inhab
it 6iber.

agents or our oFFirr.s at im n"

tottery Plaza e CASA 2ALDO Central
4in or July Ave. a J SI, a LEWIS
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J. Feo.
53 FARMACIA EL BATURRO Para

COLON OFFICE: 15th Street and Amador Guerrero No. 14,221.

Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Large plate glass
mirror with mahogany frame,
$25.00. Boys bike 24" in $17.
Balboa 2409.
FOR SALE: Completely rebulit
HD-5 ALLIS CHALMERS tractor
with Bulldozer. F. Icaxa y Cia.
Ave. Justo Arosemena.
WANTED
WANTED: 3 bedroom-chalet
or apartment with furnished, all
commodities. Write box 4277
Panama,
British Navy Jet
Crashes To Ground
During Air Show
FARNBOROUGH, End.," Sept. 1
(UPI) A British Navy Sea
Hawk jet fighter crashed today
during an aerobatic demonstration
opening the annual exhibition of
the British society of aircraft con constructors.
structors. constructors. The pilot bailed out by using
his automatic ejector seat. He
was unhurt.
The more than 700-mile an hcur
plane ran into unexplained trua trua-ble
ble trua-ble as it streaked over the heads
of observers irom nearly 100
countries. It was flying with six
others in the first aerobatic dem demonstration
onstration demonstration of the British aviation
industry's annual airshow.
Airshow officials said the crash
would not affect an ambitious

Ike, Dag Open History's
Greatest Atom Exhibit

GENEVA, Switzerland (UPI)
President Eisenhower and Dag
Hammarskjold opened history s
greatest atomic exniDit yesiemay
with Britain and Russia claiming
leadership in two vital nuclear
fields.
Speaking In a message tape re recorded
corded recorded over a 4,000-mile connec connection
tion connection with Washington, Eisenhower
told more than 5,000 scientists
gathered for the second interna international
tional international Atoms-for-Peace Conference
that the atom is "already serving
humanity in many ways."
The President called for a
"fruitful exchange of views"
among the 66 nations taking part
in the conference and added:
"My country, which initiated the
project of this scientific confer conference,
ence, conference, will continue to share its
resources and knowledge with
other countries to the end that the
fullest benefits of nuclear energy
may be enjoyed by all.
Hopes Por Good Results
Eisenhower said "great strides"
had been made in the atoras-for-peace
field since the last Geneva
atomic conference of 1955. He ex expressed
pressed expressed confidence that all partici participating
pating participating nations would "press for forward
ward forward to transform this great nat
ural force from an instrument of
destruction to a power for good in
our own day and for our children
to come after us.
The President's statement fol
lowed an Anglo American an announcement
nouncement announcement Saturday that all se secrecy
crecy secrecy labels were being removed
from U. S. and British projects
for harnessing the H bomb for
peaceiul purposes.
Hammarskjold united Nations
secretary-general who interrupted
a Middle East peace mission to
fly to Geneva Saturday night, said
Sunday the purpose of the parley
is to apply new scientific methods.
The two-week conference offi officially
cially officially begins Monday, but mam mammoth
moth mammoth exhibits of nuclear power
devices covering 00,000 square
feet of floor space in two large
halls were opened to the public
Sunday.
OBJECT TO ALLURMINT
NEW DELHI (UPI) College
girls in Agra, India, have been
ordered not to wear anything that
might prove too alluring to their
male classmates. Nylon saris,
tight fitting brassieres, lipstick
and, rouge topped the list of ta tabooed
booed tabooed items. College authorities in
Agra, 120 miles from New Delhi
in Uttar Pradesh and the home
of the Taj Mahal, decided on the
move after a girl in tight-fitting
brassiere and nylon sari disrupted
a class. The Agra coeds aren't
particularly upset by the ruling.
"We have time and sex on our
side," said' one.
TREMOR SHAKES TOKYO
TOKYO (UPI) A light earth
tremor shook the Tokyo area ear early
ly early yesterday but no casualties or
damage were reported.

ktrsft vamama i.irrfria prkCIADO 7 Street No. IS AGENC1AS

Ave. 4S LOURDES PHARMACY 1 82
SERVICE Ave. TIvoll No. 4 akma-ij
de la Ossa Ave. No. 41 a) F
ue Lefevre 7 Street f.
Home Articles
FOR SALE: Mahogany dining
set, $350.00; table, six chairs,
buffet and service table, all
French Satin finish. Mahogany
bedroom suite, $450.00: twin
beds with large blanket drawers,
twin chests, all master' crafts craftsman
man craftsman made and band' rubbed
finish. House 5407 Harred Place,
Diablo.
FOR SALE: Hay ward Wahefield
3 seater settle coffe table and
lamps, vamboo crystal and other
items, leaving, must sell. House
1553-B. Balsa Street.
FOR SALE: 7 piece mahogany
livingroom furpiture $300.00.
Telephone 25-3184, house
2171 -D Ceceli.
FOR SALE: T.V. 21 inch
MAGNAVOX, like new, $150.
Call, Panama 3-36291.
FOR SALE: Beautiful Vicuna
rug round, brand new. Phono
Curundu 83-5126.
FOR SALE: Washing machine
"Easy" iprind'rier, 60 cycles,
excellent condition $55, house
750-B, Balboa, phone 2-3745.
REFRIGERATOR Nine cu. ft.
Westinghouae, New 60-cycle
unit. $60. 0418 Venado Street.
Balboa 1209.
program planned at the show
throughout the week.
The crash occurred shortly aft after
er after the seven planes ahd looped
the loop. The Sea Hawk broke
formation and started to climb.
As it neared the Zenith of the
maneuver the pilot bailed out.
The plane continued climbing for
several seconds, turned over and
smashed into the ground.
The explosion sent a bank of
thick smoke mushrooming just a
few miles from the airfield.
Hammarskjold said Eisenhower
deserves credit for having given
"initial impetus" to the 1955 and
1958 Atoms-for-Peace Conferences
in a speech before the U. N. As Assembly
sembly Assembly on Dec. 8, 1953. Eisenhow Eisenhower
er Eisenhower at that time proposed a world worldwide
wide worldwide sharing of the atom.
Britain nd Russia, however,
stole the show at Sunday's exhibit
openings because:
The British could show far
more progress toward actual con construction
struction construction of plants o generate
electric power from he torn.
Their exhibit included a model of
the Hinkley point reactor' that in
1960 will begin turning out enough
electricity to serve a city 6t more
than 1,000,000 population.
The Russians have gone farth
est at least in the scale of their
construction in efforts to harness
the H-bomb fusion process or
peacetime wer. Their "oara."
with a reaction chamber 65 feet
long, is the first "factory-sized"
fusion device.
the Russians also announced
that they were, ready to compete
against countries both East and
West of the Iron Curtain for the
murauve wona sales market n
nuclear research reactors and
atomic power equipment.
De Gaulle Prepares
To Lead Followers
Into Battle
PARIS, Sept. 1 (UPI) The tjo
litical true ended in France to
day and Premier Charles de
Gaulle prepared to lead his fol followers
lowers followers into battle for the nation's
new republican constitution.
With most Parisians back from
-vacation over the weekend, French
political parties awoke to fresh ac activity
tivity activity and 12 of them announced
they would hold congress between
Sept. 5-14.
All parties except the Commu Communists
nists Communists are divided over the consti constitutional
tutional constitutional proposal which would es
tablish a presidential regi me in
France with De Gaulle virtually
certain to be the first chief exe executive
cutive executive of the fifth republic.
The majority of the parties how however
ever however were expected to support De
Gaulle's constitution.
The premier opens the electoral
campaign for the Sept. 2sV Cons Constitutional
titutional Constitutional referendum Thursday at
a public rally at the Place de la
Renublicque.
The Communists and. fellow fellow-travelers
travelers fellow-travelers plan to come in large
numbers to cry "no to IV Gaulle
Officials feared there might be
clashes with De Gaulle's follow followers.
ers. followers. De Gaulle chose Thursday for
his first public statement m
France since his election 1 a s t
June 1 to emphasize his attsrh attsrh-ment
ment attsrh-ment to the republic. Sept. 4 is the
anniversary of the proclamation
of th republic after tile fall of
Napoleon III in W70

La Carrasuill FARMACIA LOM-

FOTO DOMY Junto Arosemena Ave. and 33 St.
KARMACIA "SAS" Via PORRAS 111 0 NOVEDADES

uuwn uniyw-iu
Rooms
FOR RENT: Rooms, all com comforts,
forts, comforts, with or Without meals.
4-33, 3 5th Street, phone 3-
7993.
FOR RENT: Furnished room,
first class, one person only, corn corner
er corner uto Arosemena, 31 St Street
No. 9.
FOR RENT: Furnished
first class, one person only, corn corner
er corner Juste Arosemena, 31 Stftiet
No. 9.
Special Air Brakes
Helped Bring Soviet
Dogs Back To Earth
MOSCOW (UPI) Specially
designed air .brakes and a flaring
parachute helped bring Russian
space dogs' back to earth, it was
revealed yesterday.
Th trade union organ Tcud,
printing hitherto undisclosed de details
tails details of the dog-bearing rocket,
said these enabled "the main part
of the rocket containing nstru nstru-ments
ments nstru-ments and animals to descend
successfully," last week.
Trudv in an interview w i t
space scientist A. M. Kasatkin,
supplied these added details on
zoomed two dogs to an altitude of
280 miles and brought them down
safely.
The main part of the rocket was
a hermetically sealed cabin con containing
taining containing the two dogs.
Forward of them was a com compartment
partment compartment of scientific apparatus.
The rocket's tip carried a solar
spectrograph for measuring ultra ultraviolet
violet ultraviolet radiation.
When the rocket reached ts
maximum, planned altitude a n
began falling, the segment contain containing
ing containing the dogs and the apparatus
split off and the special air brakes
went into effect.
These cut the rocket segment,
speed through heavy Uyers of the
atmosphere.
Then, when the dogs and ap apparatus
paratus apparatus had fallen to a height of
some three miles above ground the
Parachute opened and further
eased the rest of the downward
journey.
Scientist Kasatkin said an "in "interesting
teresting "interesting feature" pf the rocket
was its "stabilization on all three
axes." nr-i
Kasatkin said his permitted
scientists to install some eauin-
ment toward the sun and others
on the "shady" side.

WEEKEND SHOPPERS' SPECIAL

YOUR COMMUNITY NETWORK-BOG
Presents the latest dues on the bigest Saturday bargains in town at :
CRAWFORD AGENCIES NOVEDADES CAUFORNIA

BABYLANDIA
BATA SHOE STORE
MADURITO'S

Every Friday from 6:30 to
A 30-minute feature of popular music and

day buys.
r. ..ri
Latch on to some real
WEEKEND
Every

YOUR COMMUNITY NETWORK-HOG

1090 Kcs. Colon

Miscellaneous

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A", DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE ApA 3709
Domestic Employment
WANTED: Maid. Live in, ge genera,!
nera,! genera,! housework, 623 3-B, Los
Riot.
WANTED: English speaking
maid with references. Call 3 3-7243
7243 3-7243 after p.m.
Georgia Pulp Mill
Walkout Deadlocked
But Settlement Seen
JESSUP, Ga. (UPI)-Union and
company representatives at the
Big Rayonier pulp-producing plant
here appeared hopelessly dead deadlocked
locked deadlocked today but both sides ex expressed
pressed expressed an eagerness to end the
four-week old walkout.
The company protested to the
National Labor Relations Board
Friday that the International
Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulfide and
Papermile Union was engaging
in unfair labor practices by de demanding
manding demanding that the plant here and
the one at Fernandina, Fla. nego negotiate
tiate negotiate their grievances jointly.
Union spokesmen Brantley Mc Mc-Manus
Manus Mc-Manus sid the walkout was
kicked off by issues involving
senority rights, supervisor dis discontentment,
contentment, discontentment, overwork and a de demand
mand demand for a "lead man" for
welders from the craft itself.
Company spokesman Fred Doh Doh-erty
erty Doh-erty said the Fernandina plant,
which employes about 400 per persons,
sons, persons, and the local plant were
engaged in "unfair labor prac practices
tices practices which we will never agree
to."
Doherty said the compa
eon eon-rate
rate eon-rate siders the two plants as se:
barganing units."
"We aren't going
t, a
to
what started as an u:
practice,' he asserted
McManus said the local union,
with more than 350 members,
wants:
-A welder to 'lead" the 14
plant welders who are now head headed
ed headed by another craft.
An extra man on each shift
in the production lime kiln.
. Two supervisors replaced by
ones acceptable to the employes
on the production line.
McManus .'"'said several men
have "passed out from over
work" on the lime kiln, and that
two supervisors a ve been abu abusive
sive abusive to some of the employes.
Both aides, the spokesmen said,
are near agreement on the senori senority
ty senority grievance which Doherty laid
was at one time the key issue in

NOVEDADES VICTOR
MERY'S BEAUTY SHOP ?
P. JHANGIMAL T

.
Bargains by listening

SHOPPERS' SP

Friday from 6:30 to
k .'jr

SERVICES

TELEVISION SERVICE
WE REPAIR ill
YOUR HOME, $3.50
You get service the same day'
WE GUARANTEE OUR WORK
LOS ANGELES trained techni technicians.
cians. technicians. Crawford Agencies. Phone
2-1905 Tivoli Avenue 18-20.
NOTICE: Aute lane (Cat
laundry) opens every Sunday at
Transisrh mian Highway I rem
8 a.m. to I p.m. only, rale or
sunshine. Auto Baho conserves
your car ttar.
HOME TV REPAIRS
$5.00 plas parts (local caff
only). No charaa far calls if r
repaired in your home. Phono 1
'607 U. S. Television, Inc. 9:f
a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Till 6:00
m. Saturdays.
PmU L.m. .-J
Prompt scientist treatment on
emergency or monthly budget
basil ToloakAHA Prnnt (...I..
Panama 3-7977 or Celan I 777.
PERSONALS
Mrs. Nona White: Your visit ac accounting
counting accounting department CASA AD ADMIRABLE
MIRABLE ADMIRABLE will be appreciated.
Small But Powerful
W Heads For
Guanlanamo Base
jtvna 14711a AnlV 7sn 1.1101 Wtllt
east of Miami, turned sharply
t.hf nm. hwest todav. crossed oa
.,,:j t 1 rink. im
muuB luffBi u mbjm3 aa wuirn
ilia iiiv 11 naval iiiiite m 1 iwisai
"
1 na xon ion uraoinar minis
located Ella at S a.m. about
si i a L IL.ii -a. a L
mnea wesi vquinweei or ron
in p in a rtn inmn in vniii n ws
bureau said It did not have
rerjortine stations on that
siua ann no snips were in
cmity.
The email but powerful
was moving in a west-nor
erly direction.
The change In eouree vp
ly lifted the danger to the K ;
of Jamaica. ""f
In addition to the Guantan'i
Bar naval, bate, the Cuban cit
mk h Af thfi etAvm it it maini a 1 ni
a northwesterly course.
the disaereement.
A federal mediator from Jack
sonville has attended most of the
meetings, an4'McW""
are ready and available to meet
at any time.
7:00 p.m.
tips on the best Satur
to YCnL
7:00 p.m.
840 Kcs. Panama

V: i

EOAl

Hi tpe i -'T
f m i



dONDAT, SEPTEMBER 1, 195
KE PANAMA AMEPICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSfAPEl
PAGI WHIt
" Mas ,uw (uaiu
m aa m a am mmam m in ivm
By GEORGE WUNDEI I THE 8T0KY OF MARTHA WAVNk
Seed Planted
m WILSON SCRUGGS
ijam
mm
KaH, MAX, HAVE YOuN
tME9JREaarTAIUBUSWSABJ(5 y
HISPBeSOW.lCuni4E ABS ORMO
our. he's a err, 9UU.WE impound
SEEN THE SAR7EN I'VE
KEN BXEAK1NS MY
Back over r
'jfi- LORDWLLBE
1 H
ARKAN6EMBJTS
01
PHISCILLA'S POP
The Barjaln
Br AL VERMEIB

i wiwiJ a walij play, it cozy, i
1 "Tf Of ICE BETWEEN PIKE ij LOVW, ANP WAIT
AMP LEE. GOT TO.jfflfOK A BREAK

I T I LUJD6K1ANDXJU BE A n
WAU0W6TMEKTJLSj f- 8

I V M

i "m n w i 111 i ii n i m s

if?;

ttri
WLLEY OOP
9 r
u' fv.i atJkibkaW
Jlllil.
Ere. -.....,.
to B' .,v..
Vnrtv
buy.
'W, :

tutor : sAjJ
Dar APTAIN EASY
all

MORTY MEEKLB

niniJta ami an mum

Oblivious

Cap; My car.

IS Stuck IM Tup I In i c

By MERRILL BLOSSER

(yawn)

OKAY

DITCH OUT ON

THE

HIGHWAY

37

mm

THERE

SOON

ttyf Hi.11 plain t&-sec Mel
WASNY WATCHIWG TUP t?OAr I

- - -.. nf r

V Hfc WOULCMT HAVE"

oONfc OF

J

" W bur YOUD THIMK HED AT LEAST PAY

Mad Mamma

By V. T. HAMLIN

BUT MAMA TIGER WASNT
TOO LONG SHOWING UP.

( AW THANK 7 AW, 'TWARN'T NUTHINI, f
YOU SO .REALLY... AS LONG AS
vhitwitibA THEBE WASNT NO

MAVW LIKE W
WENT RIGHT F i

BOOTS AND 1KB BUDDIES

Why Not Pjhj?

bbM

MVTHVa6 TO I

ssssj &

i ii "i :

'Puts -nr''vv-- ww

51 IIU

T.M, U.S. Fit. Ofl.

teally in the Hole

m you KNOW A
BBTTBR WAY TO
KM6E THE CA5H

HOP TO IT' BUT t

WANT AW MONCV

WTHIN 2t HOUR. A

WELL, I WON'T STEAL

TO PAY IT! I'M IN ENOUGH

1

Costly Cure

By LESLIE TURNER

iff

YOU'VB AV0I0BO US V lT WOMB THAN
5IWCE LAST NIGHT 1 THAT, HOLLY. I'M,
010 YOU L0B kX. SHAMB0 10 AWAIT
YOU HA.D HJ THAT IT. BUT W THE
POkBR SAIABiM HOLS WRSX000
"- y, x. 1 CAN'T PAY! J

N TfirC BROTHER, r
(that's ) LiToofWti crn cr

k-' NO. 1 WOW

CARLYLE come YOU
vAS BOON ) WEREN'T

AT CITY f BCTM BORN

HOSPITAL 1 AT THE

SAME

PLACE

'a

c -i

OH, YOU KNOW MY S
MOMI SHE LIKES TO )

ft SMOP AgQUNDiJ-

BUGS BUNNY

An Eye for and Eye

lis

0

By EDGAR MARTIN 1 1 (ikfgfote True Life Adventures

rDN and

rROs-C

fHE Olympic
MARMOT has
Ax 6TRONO
?tME OF PLAV.

114E ESUOVS RACINO ANt? BOXING.

ROLLING) POWN HILL
IS KEEN SPORT, TOO.

it

DAILY FORTUNE FINDER
To Item your "FertuM" (or todoy from tko tUn, write in the lttttrt
of the alphabet corrMpondin( to the numoroU on th line of tht MtrO
loficol period in which you wr bom. You will find it fun.
1 2 3 4 3 7 1 f 1011 ItlSUUMII IB If BtttBttSMlStS
AICDEFGHI S K I M N O I S I I I U VWIT I

JAN. 22 22-HI.
HI. 22-HI. 20

fee. 2i-
MAK.20

MAY 21 21-JUHI2I
JUHI2I 21-JUHI2I JUNI22 JUNI22-JULY
JULY JUNI22-JULY 23

JULY 24-AUO.31

AUG. 23-

SOT. 24.
OCT. 21

OCT. 24 24-NOV.
NOV. 24-NOV. 22

By DICK CAVALIJ

ait
mc
up
Mi H
I

COaWCKAGE N- T
ressooMes-- Y -hcz-yes,
ioumw?! i-hic'-am.

OUB BOARDING HOUSE

with

MAJOR IIOOPLB OUT OUR WAY

' i i i 1 i
TWO HUNDRED gff,

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calbraith

BY J. It. WILLIAMS

BALL T WANT IS

CHSFtf jfALAP AND

TEA.VlAJOK.mAYBe

A OISK-OF PUPUINW.

LAPITT& TME: PIRATE

MUST BE SKIPPER
W6RS.6ETTINS Z.QO

E6AD. C0fiSVJLL D0r4Tl

SCAN 1HB PKlCSfe.'--

H0W ABOUT AN EXOTIC

COCKTAIL, A BIT OF

CAVIAR, PERHArS

5WOROF15H STBAiKi

ICJRAUCCULENT

SflUAfff--WAITER,

Y1HAT IS OUK ff51

SAUTERNE ?

HAW.'

BLIWP 1

FLATTEM

. MY
ARCHES

HE AMY

OR05R,

LIGHT

TIP

THERE HE IS, RIOH7 ALL RiaHY,THEM"l )
IN ONT Of YOU- J TRIEP TO LET VOU
1 MAKIM6 f UN Of THB J KNfiW, IN A OUIET,
V PROPLE WHO CALL 6ENTLEMANLY WAY, I
MEUP-ANPOO ) WHO IT IS CALLIN'
LET WIM iSET VOU, BUT MOU POW'T iWmb
i AWAV WITH IT.' J 5EEM TO APPRECIATE 1 Mffll
I A FAVOR, SO I'LL COMS I Ifflli
7 rT RI6HT OUT WITH IT
hereaftbr; it's y ilijkJ

, s

NOV. 23
DK.22
QIC. 23 23-JAN.
JAN. 23-JAN. 21

8 9 7 8 3 15 19

12 21 24 21 18 S 8 IB

25 15 21 18 IB 12 1 14 28 15 18 11 19 15 21 20

7 15 15 4 4 B 1 12 IB 2 18 6 23 9 14 7

20 9 20 8 9 14 7 19 1 20 9 19 6 9 6 19

8 1 18 0 6 18 5 5 10 15 21 18 14 S 35 19

13 15 4 9 19 8 14 5 23 3 15 19 20 21 13 5

16 21 2 12 9 8 5 24 3 9 20 5 18 6 14 20

1 19 1 9 14 20 12 25 18 5 1 8 20 9 15 14

20 18 21 19 20 9 14 7 4 8 22 15 20 B 15 14

IS 21 12 10 9 20 2 18 9 12 12 9 1 14 3 5

18 9 22 15 12 15 21 19 5 22 5 14 B 14 7

20 8 18 9 12 12 9 14 7 12 5 20 20 5 18 19'

2 (3 0

T.M. IMS. P" "
MM k MA

"Batter get the smBHing salts Pop takee my hote )
nrettv hard!" I

"Look at it this way, Harvey it's no mora trouble than
washing your own face three times!"

Faltering Philip.
hUlrf Hie to tilled with kratset
fftilni would leave b home like new.
' A ClaNlfteds (net tke frhl tbf'

AfOVAS PANAMA A ft WAYS
PANAMA-MIAIvll $55.50
MIAMI-PHILADELPHIA 46.00

Philadelphia $
Panama

Today's XV Prgram

00

8:00 Traffic Court
8:30 Dress Blues
B no Men of Annapolis
9:30 Stars of Jan
10:00 St. NI-'- Boxing
11:00 CFN NEWS ,
11 :1S Encore: Wyatt Earp a
Directors Playhouse

3:00 CTN NEWS
3: IS Dinah Shore
3:30 The Reason Why
4:00 OUtlood
4:30 Adventure Tomorrow
S:00 Roy Rogers
S:30 PANORAMA
7-00 Crunch ft Dea Rpt 4 10-57

7:30 Talent Scouts
Courtesy of Aero viae Panama Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1087 3-1698 3-1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Haft
m



Shaffers
Read story on page
CANAL ZONE UNIO
14:
1

Baeza

RP Ji
1 1 :;: i i

Jockey

Record

NS' LABOR

DAY MESSAGES

4-

Local 900 s Low-Cost Housing Project

To Get Going In-Not-too-aistant Future
Local 900's low-cost housing project should be und er way in the not too distant future, the union's chair chairman,
man, chairman, Harold W. Rorrie, said in a Labor Day statement today.
He said he believed, along with many other people, that the project should have long been a reality. But, he
continued, sound financing, social and civic problems, down payments, sewage, water, light and other community
facilities must be worked out before we can ask our m embers to start thinking of buying a low-cost house.

jai these problems are being
studied and worked on, and each
day that passes brings us one
day nearer to that wonderful dav
when our members will be able

TODAY! .75

3:00 4:55 6:55 9:10

.40
p.m.

am GABLE

BURT LANCASTER

TOGETHER!

IN flliTHF
SEVEN SUS
SEVER TWO
UKE THESE!

I TERRIFIC!..

MM MM
ADVENTURE

THE OCEANS EVER

UNLEASHED!

MUSBEBBffo

m

UWTFD ARTISTS

WEDNESDAY
WEEKEND
RELEASE!

John O'Hara's hotly hotly-discussed
discussed hotly-discussed best-seller

.of how
they sinned
against each
other and

against

Ten

North

Frederick:

- y ."
OnemaScOPEt
ss-itoffli

SERALDINE FITZGERAJ.D -TOM TULLY

CHARLES BRACKET!
0rKM fftm Mi owe fcntSSflsti If
PHILIP DUNNE
i n iniiiorHOwc noun

to secure a low-cost house to In Increase
crease Increase his standard of living and
improve his status in his commu community.
nity. community. Rerrie went en to say:
"We recognize the day to day

increase in the cost of living
which hai always been ths en enemy
emy enemy of the working man. We
know the cost of living has
mounted, while wages have lag lagged
ged lagged behind. This is true ev everywhere.
erywhere. everywhere. "But we of organized labor will

continue to review and face tnis
chaflenge by keeping behind our

employers and the powers that

be, demanding more equitable

wage adjustments so that ou.:

people will continue to advance
their standard of living, instead

of going backwards as has been

so true in too many cases.'

"The workers must never for

get, however, that all these
problems can be resolved by the
trade union movement through
the wise and dedicated use of

tyhe machinery of the trade un

ion movement through the wise
and dedicated use of the ma machinery
chinery machinery of the trade union move

ment and by devotion to the
principles of trade unionism,"

Eerrie declared.

"We stand to get nowhere so
long' as there is division among
us, particularly since the labor
movesnent everywhere has be become
come become the target of govern governments,
ments, governments, industries and unscru unscrupulous
pulous unscrupulous politicians.
"We must stand up as intelli

gent workers and fight off these

attacks and protect our sacred

weapon the labor movement

and use it to serve our best in interests,
terests, interests, instead of the whims
and fancies of a few who would

continue to advocate the princi principles
ples principles that only a few should enjoy

while all others should slave a-

way and be fooled into making
those few do as they wish."
Rerrie emphasized that there
was no place in the labor move movement
ment movement for the selfish or the Indi Individual.
vidual. Individual. "We, as a united group,
must strive on and on to do our
best with what we have, and
what we may have, to further
the interests o fthe common
man.
"On Labor Day, 1958, as we
give thanks for those gains we
have made, we are most acute acutely
ly acutely aware of the unresolved
problems of our time those
needs of the people which still
have not been met."
Recalling that during the past
12 months the leaders of Local
900 have actively taken part in
every effort to better the work working
ing working conditions and living stand standards
ards standards of the non-citizen workers
of the canal Company-Government,
particularly in the field of
legislation, Rerrie declared:
"Our officers and representa representatives
tives representatives on the Isthmus did not hes hesitate
itate hesitate to place the cards on the
table before the congressional
committee which c o n d ucted
hearings in the Zone last Decem December
ber December on the treaty legislation.

This action was successfully and
forcefully followed up by our

representatives at the Washing Washington
ton Washington level.
"Now that the United States
Congress has approved this
treaty legislation, even though
the legislation is not what was
expected or does not complete completely
ly completely fulfill our aspirations as
workers, we believe we have
salvaged the best that could
have come out of that legisla legislation
tion legislation and we shall rededicate
our efforts toward building up
on what we have gained and
try to replace the losses we
have suffered."
Rerrie thanked the Panama Panamanian
nian Panamanian government, the canal
Zone Administration and all un union
ion union officials, both here and in

I Washington, who contributed to

ward this achievement in the
field of legislation.

"It is true that we may not

have achieved all that we have
planned to achieve. We may

have committed errors in our ac activities.
tivities. activities. Justified criticisms may
be well in order for the things we

did not do.
"Nonetheless, In the long
run, we are wholly convinced
that the record will prove that
our union has proven its worth,
its merit to exist, and today we
stand prepared to move on
even toward greater achieve achievements
ments achievements and to defend what we
have won and stand UP against
all sinister forces to protect

our organization."
The group of Canal Zone work workers
ers workers who the union has-been priv privileged
ileged privileged to represent may est as assured
sured assured that their problems will
always reach the ears of the
highest officials and authorities
of Panama and the US Govern Government,
ment, Government, he said.

Local 907 Sets Sights On Reducing
30 Tax On Local-rate Retirement

Immediate objectives for Local
907 are a tax agreement with the
US whereby the 30 percent US
tax on Local Raters' retirement
will be reduced and a 10 percent
across-the-board Increase
matching that recently granted
US-rate classified employes for
local raters who will not get
substantial economic benefits
from the Single Wage Plan.
The tax reduction issue is be being
ing being pressed through Panama's
foreign ministry, according" to a
Labor Day statement by Alfredo
J. Morris, Local 907 president.
Noting that Local 907 is four
years old today, Morris said:
"During Its time on the scene,
Local 907 has made Itself felt
both in Panama and the Canal
Zone as a militant force fighting
for the benefits of Armed Forces
workers.
"We have gained numerous
benefits affecting working con conditions
ditions conditions and salaries, the Single
Wage law is passed, the execu executive
tive executive order to implement this
law is in its final stage of ap approval.
proval. approval. "This union has been and is
still alert to all conditions favor

able and unfavorable to employ

es and will continue to give cred

it where credit is deserved and

will continue to fight all unfavo

rable conditions until they are

changed," he continued.

"I want to thank all the mem

bers of this union who from its
inception to tne present have
given us their full and loyal sup support
port support and hope that as time goes

by they will be assisted by the

present non-members in making
this our union the strongest and
most militant union operatingjn

the Canal Zone and the Republic

of Panama."
Morris thanked MaJ. Gen.
Charles L. Dasher, commanding
general, US Army Caribbean;
Rear Adm. George Wales, com commandant,
mandant, commandant, 15th Naval District;
and Ma j. Gen. Truman H. Lan Lan-don,
don, Lan-don, commanding general, Ca Caribbean
ribbean Caribbean Air command, along

with the civilian personnel offi

cers of the three services Ed

ward A- Keiloch, Air Force; S. R.
Davidson, Navy and R. M. Don Donley,
ley, Donley, Army for their cooperation
in advancing the interests of the
employes under their jurisdic jurisdictions.
tions. jurisdictions. Special credit "for the able as assistance
sistance assistance given us with all our
problems" went to President Er Ernesto
nesto Ernesto de la Guardia, Jr., and his
Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mi Miguel
guel Miguel J. Moreno Jr.
He concluded by saying: "I

hope that with continuing coop cooperation
eration cooperation among all of us we will,
for the mutual benefit of all
concerned, be able to solve all
the problems that now confront
us."

700 Isthmians'
Annuities Get
Hike Tomorrow

First checks providing higher

annuities for about 700 Isthmian

Ud Federal employes and surviv survivors
ors survivors who are already on US Civil
Service annuity rolls will be dis distributed
tributed distributed here tomorrow.
The 10 per cent hike in annui annuity
ty annuity checks results from a new law
which became effective Aug. 1
covering employes and survivors
whose annuities are based on
service which terminated before
Oct. l, 1956. (Retirees who ter terminated
minated terminated since that time are al already
ready already receiving the extra money,
so their checks will not go up).

No figures are presently a a-vailable
vailable a-vailable as to the citizenship of

annuitants who will get the 10
percent increase; but it has
been estimated that perhaps
two-thirds of them are non-US-citizens.

The increase that will be
found on many checks tomorrow
should not be confused with an

other new law becoming effective
Oct. 1 which blankets in most
non-US -citizen employes of the

Panama Canal and canal Zone
Government under the Civil

Service Retirement Act.
Monthly checks to be distribut

ed tomorrow under the Cash Dis

ability Relief Act to the Canal's

non-US-citizen retirees will be
the same amount as usual. No

I law has been passed to provide

an increase.
The non-tfS-cltizens whose
checks will be 10 percent high higher
er higher tomorrow are those who
worked for the Army,, Navy or
Air Force and who retired be before
fore before Oct. 1. 1956.

US citizens whose checks go up

include also canal retirees.

The new law also gives annui

ties for the first time to a new
group of widows and widowers; of
certain Federal employes and re

tirees. Individual applications

must be marie to the Civil Serv
ice Commission.

Widows who think they may

be eligible have been advised to

look into their rights.

AFGE Sees No Single Wage Harm

US Employes

Coming To Classified

PA..D. EMPLOYES VISIT BREWERY During a "Know your Brewery" tour of the National
Brewery Friday, employes of PAD, Curundu, enjoy free beer with their host, general manager
Alfredo Aleman. The visitors also include military personnel assigned to PAD.

t

RELEASE

I

LUX

1:20 4:09 5:46 7:23 9:00

TODAY

CENTRAL

1:15 r 4:30 8:09

IT Could Happen In YOUR TOWN

SHAME, The SIN, The SHOCK

ifcte. JaV MnM YttW

AN AtlltP ARTISTS HCTUItt EDWARD BINNS-CW01YW CRAIG .JEANNE CARMEN

Edward Binns, who has been described as Holly Hollywood's
wood's Hollywood's foremost young dramatic actor, shares the top
featured role with Carolyn Craig in "Portland Expose,"
action-jammed story of vice and corruption.

Drama of Strong long longings
ings longings a big story of
big things and big feel feelings.
ings. feelings. THIS IS

0.60T 0.30

IT

EDM
FERBtR

Your last

chance to
go to
Europe:
this week

Via Avianra

' Waknercolor

I ELIZABETH ROCK JAMES

f TAYLOR HUDSON DEAN

M .,-. CAWH6LL OAKtW

'i-4'f
1 ; :'

Lodge .14, American Federation of Government Employee, thai Labor Day sees
no adverse changes in the working conditions of the US-citizen classified employe on
the Canal Zone coming up under the Single Wage Bill, an AFGE spokesman said
today.
He said that Canal Zone Gov. William E. Potter and his staff, have given as assurances
surances assurances that transition to the single wage will be practically imperceptible. Lodge
14 is adopting a "wait and see" policy on the bill.

spoiwman empnasizeo tnat Labor Day, 1958, finds the US government
white collar worker enjoying his first gene ral pay raise m many year.

He stated: "Organized labor,
and the American Federation of
Government Employes in parti particular,
cular, particular, can claim much of the
credit for shepherding the pay
bill through Congress and for

getting a 10 pay increase when

the most optimistic employes

thought lVz would be the max maximum
imum maximum that could be obtained.

"Encouraged by the report
submitted by the President's
committee on Civilian Com Compensation
pensation Compensation in the Executive
Branch of the Federal Govern Government,
ment, Government, the AFGE will seek to
have the recommendations of
this committee to have salary
adjustments in the classified
groups made in a manner sim similar
ilar similar to wage board groups.
President Rufus M. Lovelady
of Lodge 14, is presently attend attending
ing attending the biennial convention of

the AFGE in San Diego. This

convention will plant the legis legislative
lative legislative program of the Federation
for the next two years.
I

High on the agenda are many

resolutions that are designed to
improve retirement and other
benefits that will improve the

working conditions of the gov

eminent employe when adopted.

Local 595
Claims Credit
For Progress

For the past 21 years, Local 595

of the National Federation of

Federal Employes has been in instrumental
strumental instrumental In bettering -wages,

working conditions and privileges

of Federal employes on the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone, a spokesman declared

in a Labor Day statement today.

This federation has also had a

hand in correcting injustices
and adjusting many grievances

lor its members, he added.
"It has consistently supported

Isthmian community projects

and programs; and the better betterments
ments betterments it has instigated or sup supported
ported supported have extended to many
thousands outside its own mem membership,"
bership," membership," the spokesman contin

ued.

Local 595 is composed pri primarily
marily primarily of U.S. citizen employes
of the Army, Navy and Air
Force. Some U.S. citixen em employes
ployes employes of other federal agen agencies
cies agencies on the Zone are members,
and all are eligible for mem-

' bership. The NFFE is the larg

est independent government government-employe
employe government-employe labor organisation.

The National Federation, now

41 years old, has hundreds of lo locals
cals locals in Federal establishments

all over the United States, as

well as abroad. 1
Starting with a few score sep

arate locals, NFFE was formed In
Washington, D.C., In 1917, by a

group of far-visioned men and
women, it stemmed from a grow growing
ing growing conviction, based upon expe expe-rlenc
rlenc expe-rlenc e.that only through a na

tional organization could federal

workers realize their common
objectives.
"Outstanding though progress
along these lines has been in the
past four decades, the NFFE is
well aware that much remains to
be done to reach its original
goals. Each of these goals has
been reaffirmed and broaded re repeatedly
peatedly repeatedly since 1917," today's
spokesmen declared, listing two
highly-important laws affecting
Federal service which were en enacted
acted enacted this year:
1. The retroactive pay in increase
crease increase for Classified Civil Serv Service
ice Service employes, retroactive to
Jan. 1, and
2. The increase in annuities
for Federal employes.
Enactment of both measures
came about organised efforts in
which the NFFE feels it played a
leading and decisive part, the
spokesman said.
Both laws provide the most
graphic evidence of the need for
and value of organized effort on
the part of federal employes, he
declared. tl
Local 596 has a clubhouse on
Chiva Chlva Trail. It has ex extended
tended extended an invitation to all u.s. u.s.-cltlzen
cltlzen u.s.-cltlzen employes of Federal a a-gencies
gencies a-gencies on the canal Zone to at attend
tend attend its monthly meetings.
These are held on the second
Thursday of each month at 7:30

: X.f

Code Of Ethics For

'.(
Sets U.S. Federal

r i

Liupiuycj

Standards

Before the United States Senate adjourned last month,
it passed a concurrent resolution, which had been appprved
in August a year ago by the House of Representatives; (Con (Concerning
cerning (Concerning a code1 of ethics for federal employe;
. Like other concurrent resolutions passed by the U.S.
legislative branch, this one has no legal force, its passage'
was nevertheless considered an important step on the part
of the highest law-making body in the United States.
The resolution read:
It is the sense of the Congress that the following Code
of Ethics shall be adhered to by all Government employes,
including office holders.
Any person in Government service should:
1. Put loyalty to the highest moral principles and to
country above loyalty to persons, party, or Government de department.
partment. department. 2. Uphold the Constitution, laws, and legal regulations
of the United States and of all governments therein and

never be a party to their evasion. v
3. Give a full day's labor for a full day's pay; giving to
the performance of his duties his earnest effort and best
thought, :
.4. Seek to'find and employ more effirient and economical
ways of getting tasks accomplished.
5. Never discriminate unfairly by the dispensing Of ape ape-clal
clal ape-clal favors or privileges to, anyone, whether for remunera remuneration
tion remuneration or not; and never accept, for himself Or his family,
favors or benefits under circumstances which might be

constructed by reasonable persons as influencing the per performance
formance performance of his governmental duties.

. Make no private promises of any kind binding upon

the duties of office, u since Government employes, has no

private word which can be binning on public, duty.

7. Engage in no business with the Government, either
directly or indirectly, which is inconsistent with the con
scientious performance of his governmental duties.
8. Never use any information coming to him confidential confidentially
ly confidentially in the performance of governmental duties as means
for making private profit.

9. Expose corruption wherever discovered.
10. Uphold these principles, ever conscious
office is a public trust."

that pubiie

LUX THEATRE
Special Shows
TODAY and TOMORROW
THE PICTURE THAT COULPN'T
BE SHOWN IN PORTLAND, BUT
THEY CANT STOP IT HERE!

AN AltlfO ARTISTS
MCTUte

EDWARD MNNS

CAROLYN CRAIG JEANNE CARMEN

A LINDSLEY PARSONS Production Associate Producer John H. Burrows
Directed by Harold Schuster Original story and screenplay by Jack DeWitt