The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02650

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Full Text
I m
BOGOTA, Colombia
for a different vacation!
ONLY $7.20 Down Payment
30-day, tourist round trip.
IRAN IFF
i-M.'
'Let the people know the truth and the country it safe" Abraham Lincoln.
PANAMA OFFICE, 2-0975 COLpN 779
PANAMA, R. P., SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1858
TEN CENTS
33rd YEAS

. TZeSVNpAY

VcANADlAN WHISKY fi"pl

I
'

Lm PV II
I Lm. 1' WMl

ri'TTlNO IIP Tlcklintt the icing with his toes, Jerome George Kahn makes a stab at cut cut-tin
tin cut-tin p- the birthday cake at the USO-JWB fiesta to welcome Alaska's becoming the 49th state
(see storv and more pictures on back page.) The baby's father is Sp Jerome J. Kahn, Jr., ol
tt! Armv Technical Service, Engineer Section, Tort Clayton, His mother is Mrs. Joan Kahn.
Lf yt I idnin Til fit S trmv Phntn)

Their nome ww i muauciu",
, r

gon Says H-Test

renia

Harmless To US Weapons Program
WASHINGTON, Aug. 23 (UPi) Defense Department officials took the position
today that; a one-year suspension of nuclear tests would be relatively harmless to
the American weapons program. But they said any permanent ban on testing
should come only as part of a general arms control agreement.
One of the department's highest off ic ials in the nuclear weapons field said that
"we always object to anything that interferes with progress" in weapons develop development
ment development but can "take in stride" President Eisenhower's proposal for a one-year test
suspension starting Oct, 31.
Military men pointed out that the United States is "much further along in nu nuclear
clear nuclear weapons development" as a result of the summer series in the Pacific.
Meanwhile the Soviet news. agency Tass today criticized the United States and
Britain for putting of a halt to nuclear weapons tests until Oct. 31.
Tass printed the first Soviet reaction today to the U.S. and British announce announcements
ments announcements yesterday.
As expected, it was critical, and it fu rther, scored the West for not proposing
the beginning of negotiations for nuclear agreement until Oct. 31.

According to a Pentagon source
he summer tests .disclosed pro
zress toward development of war
heds foi; antw-rcra. ndantimis
5iles one of the most advanced
types of nuclear weapons.
The Defon&s Department- tnu
was portray! at much Itsi op
posed to a trBorarv est ban
than it would havt boon when
Adlai Stevenson was proposing
such a stop in the last Presid
ential campaign.
Meanwhile Japanaese foreign
office sources in Tokyo said today
'that Japan will ask the U.N Ge
oeral Assembly, at the regular
session that begins next month tc
-Ml for an immediate ban on nu
clear tests, with no time limit.
These sources said foreign mi
nister Aiichiro Fujiyama, who has
been attending the soecial Ass.m
bly session in New York,, will start
work on a resolution embodying
the test ban as. soon as he re
turns tomorrow.
President Eisenhower announced
on Friday that, the United Spates
would stop testing atomic hydro hydrogen
gen hydrogen weapons for one year startir"
Pet. 3; Wiic'- t"""!) tn nego negotiate
tiate negotiate a oe-rmanent test ban.
Britain, the world's only other
aomlc pow.tr, mod a simitar
proposal.
The President said In a snee'al
statement that" the. suspension
woi'ld be extended on a year to
year basis providing controls were
P tMhori ond-nrocress was made
toward world disarmament.
nrnriosil was sent to Mot
cow for transmission to the Soviet
rein office, as well as to the
North Altantic Treaty Council in
1 P.""' Si
The President said the Kast
West scientific' talks Just concmd concmd-e
e concmd-e l at Geneva indicated that con
trols could be established to eft.
force an international nuclear test
bar.
The United States, the Pri Pri-tirtit
tirtit Pri-tirtit said, was prepared to pro proceed
ceed proceed promptly to neqOti si..i
a ban with Russia and Britain,

'

.......
" '.' ',-
the only other nations which
have tested nuclear weapons.
"Our negotiators," he said
"will be instructed and ready by
Oct. 31 this year to open negotia negotiations
tions negotiations with other similarly instruc instructed
ted instructed negotiators."
The President said that as o1
that date this country would be
willing to halt atomic and hydio
sen weapons tests for one year
"unles testing is resumed by the
Soviet Union."
His proposal would allow this
country to Complete its current
Pacific test serits and also en enable
able enable Britain to carry out shod
uled experiments at Christmas
island in the Pacific
John A. MeCone. newlv-namedi
chairman of Atn"!p Knerev
Commission, announced immedht immedht-elv
elv immedht-elv that the AEC was "nroctedint;
with the necessary action" to con.
elude its programmed tests before
the President's Oct.' 31 cn-off da'e
The Commission has iust a'oou1
wound up its Pacific Vsts. Tt slso
has scheduled some for Nevad;:
this fall.
It was learned the AEC int intends
ends intends to proced with its "Pro.
ject Plowshare" to ftost peace peacetime
time peacetime uses or atomic enemy It
plans to explode a nuclear charge
asibilltv of blasting a harbor on
in a New Mexico salt bed next
summer and is studying! the fe
Alaska's coast with atomic de detonations.
tonations. detonations. McCone said he was supportin'
comnletelv the position announce'
by the President.
Sen Heprv M. Jackson (DWash)
said Thursday that the AEC pm
Defense Department were reluct
ant to agree to the test suspenslo'.
but that the State Deparment, in
sisNjd and won out.
Eisenhower said a nermanent
test ban "is not, in, itself, a mas
ure of disarmament of a limita
!nn of armament." But he si(!
this country hoped more sushstan
Hal agreements covering general
duarmamene would follow.
The one year test ban, he said,

Suspension

could be extended on a year to
year basis "subject to a determ'
nation at the beginning ofe ach
year" that:
"The agreed inspection System
is installed and working effect effectively;
ively; effectively; and satisfactory progress
is bsing made in reachina agree agreements
ments agreements on and implementing ma major
jor major and substantial arms con
trol measures such as the Un; Un;-eH
eH Un;-eH States has lono sought."
The President left the way open
to continue tests to determine
peacetime uses of neclear exnio
sions 'or ctingmn .harbors, reviv ing
oil fields and the like.
In this connection, he said he
test inspection agreement "shol
also neai wnn tne proDiem ot del
onations lor peaceful purposes, in
distinct from weapons tests."
US Faces
ATLANTA (UPI) The nation
is on the threshold of another
bruising, heart rending September
over, the school desegregation is issue.
sue. issue. Arkansas and Virginia hold the
center of a stage where the plot
at this moment still is changing,
where anything could happen.
This is the situation:
In Little Rock, Ark., the school
board is under orders to resume
the integration of Central High
School which was required, wito
violent results, to admit nine
Negroes ill September 1957. At
lease seven Negroes are said to
be prepared to seek enrollment
The pressure was taken o'f that
situation Tuesday, when the 8lh
U.S. Court of Appeals granted a
stay of its court order that had
backed immediate integration in
Little Rock. The stay, granted at
request of the Little Rock School
Board, apnarently would delay
things pending action on a Little

4

TAKE ANOTHER WEEK, KIDS
Hey kids, don't ever say the Panama American is not on your
side. Right now, we hand you an extra week of vacation. Fishing,
swimming, movies, taking the babe around in the family car. Hare
another week of it, all courtesy of us. The extra week will date from
next Wednesday, due to one of the most scholastic booboos since
the fellow told Columbus the world was flat. Yesterday, we named
next Wednesday as opening day for the Canal Zone US-rate schools.
i
So happens we never had enough education to count up to three,
as in Sept. 3. Despite yesterday's headline, that's the date enroll enrollment
ment enrollment starts. Do you all have it right now?
Kids! Sept. 3.
Civil Affairs Bureau Director Henry L. Donovan? Sept. 3,
Schools Division superintendent Sigur E. Esser?Sept. 3.
Shall we take another chorus?

90 Of Local Raters Have Chance
To Get Civil Service Retirement

There is a chance that at least
nino nut, of in cz Government-
Panama 'canal Company local local-rota
rota local-rota wnnlnvps will he covered by
civil service retirement from Oct.
3, personnel records branch chiet
j'nhn Tprrv told a meeting of Lo
cal 900 members Friday night.
The meeting in tne union s oi oi-fices
fices oi-fices at Ancon was the first of a
series the union has called, on
conjunction with the PC person personnel
nel personnel bureau, to explain provisions
of the retirement section of the
Single Wage bill.
Terry said the Company-government
is making every effort
to have as many as possible of
its local-rate employes brought
under civil service retirement,
including WAE and part-time
employes.
Pinal decisions rest with the
US Civil Service commission.
While an employe will have to
pnn t r ihnto t.n the retirement sys
tem for at least one year before
becoming eligible for voluntary
retirement nimseii, employes ie ie-tirlng
tirlng ie-tirlng because of disability, and
TO BE DECORATED Miss
Claire Ogdeh (above), who has
directed the Children's Home
at Bella Vista for many years,
will be decorated next Thurs Thursday
day Thursday by the Panama govern government
ment government with the Order of Vasco
Nunez de Balboa, in recogni recognition
tion recognition of services to thousands
of homeless children.
Another
Pock appeal direct to the U.S.
Supreme Court.
Gov. Orval E. Faubus had ask asked
ed asked the Arkansas Legislature to
stand by for a possible call to
an emergency extra session to
deal with the crisis.
In Virginia, desegregation
orders have been issued for
schools in Charlottesville, home of
the University of Virginia; Arling Arlington,
ton, Arlington, at President Eisenhower's
doorstep, and Norfolk, the seaport
metropolis. Furious maneuvering
by state and school officials to
prevent a crack in the segregation
barrier and at the same ime keep
public schools open is now in pro progress.
gress. progress. Thus,, the battle again is al
most joined between the forces of
segregation and integration, anr
in two states o' widely differing
views on the subject,
Arkansas has made a start at
Integration of both public sr-hoo'm
and colleges. The state now has

' fl B

Raise For

survivors of employes who die
in service, will be entitled to re retirement
tirement retirement coverage after Oct. 5,
regardless of contribution, Terry
said.
He said that employes could, if
they wished, pay into the fund
a sum equal to what their con contributions
tributions contributions would have been in
previous years.
He warned, though, that each
case should he analyzed on its
own merits, as there were
many factors involved. He did
not consider it would be to the
advantage of long-service em employes
ployes employes to make such contribu contributions.
tions. contributions. Resolution Urges
AFJCME Unions
To Fight Color Bars
A resolution urging all labor
unions to fight color discrimina discrimination
tion discrimination has been received on the
Isthmus by Local 907. American
Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employes, CIO-AFL.
from the unions recent rational
convention at Long Beach, Cal.
The resolution calls upon all
unions, councils and central bod
les affiliated with the AFL-CIO
to take appropriate action im immediately
mediately immediately "to ensure that all ci
tizens enjoy the fruits of a bill
of civil rights guaranteeing equal
opportunity and treatment In
emDloyment, housing, education
voting and all other social and
economic areas of life."
The resolution avers that these
rights of all citizens are being a-
bridged, and this threatens the
structure of the democratic la
bor movement and the American
way of life.
It adds "Discrimination on the
basis of creed, color, race or na national
tional national origin does violence to the
God -given and inalienable right
of all citizens to fair and equal
treatment.
The resolution also called up
on the President of the United
States to sponsor legislation for-
a civil bill of rights.

Bruising September

no restrictive laws on the subject
other than pupil assignment stat statutes.
utes. statutes. Virginia is replete with pro prohibitive
hibitive prohibitive acts, including a law that
will close any integrated school.
The state has resisted all integration-
at the public school level
but admits a few Negroes to state
colleges.
Of the Virginia points involved,
Charlottesville schools open Sept.
2, Arlington Sept. 4 and Norfolk
Sept. 8. Classes begin at Little
Rock Sept. 2 but pupils are re
quired to register no later than
Aug. 26,
Here's the background of the!
Little Rock crisis
Remember that, after uch
legal back and forth, nine Negroes
were finally ordered to be trans transferred
ferred transferred from the Horace Mann
(Negro) school to Central HJgh
last September. Faubus called out
the National Guard and finally
ordered integration halted on
grounds the peace was threatened.

To begin the meeting, Terry
sketched the background of the
Civil Service Retirement system
from its establishment in 1920.
Describing it as the best retire retirement
ment retirement system in the world, he
said that old-age security and
survivor benefits are more liber liberal
al liberal than those found in any oth other
er other retirement system.
Along at the meeting with Ter Terry
ry Terry were Daniel J. Paoluccl, Pana Panama
ma Panama Canal labor liaison officer,
and R. D. Kelly, an authority on
the US Civil Service Retirement
system.
Local 900's Pacific region

chairman, Rupert Phillips, pre presided.
sided. presided. Next meeting of the retirement
series is scheduled for the Rain Rainbow
bow Rainbow City gymnasium next Friday
at 7:30 p.m.
Construction Bill
For Armed Forces
Expected To Pass
WASHINGTON, Aug. 23 (UPI)
Congress was exnected to pass
today a $,354,000,000 missile age
construction bill to f 1 n a nee
building for the armed forces
during the current fiscal year.
The total in the comDromise
bill, approved yesterday by
HouseSenate conferees, com
pared with $1,218,000,000 pre previously
viously previously voted by the house and a
si, 720,000,000 appropriation by
the senate.
The administration had asked
Congress to appropriate si, 730, 730,-000,000
000,000 730,-000,000 for the fiscal '59 pro program.
gram. program. The major items In the confer conferees'
ees' conferees' bill were 785 million Hollars
for the Air Force. 295 million
dollars for the Navy and 230 mil million
lion million dollars for the Army.
Included in the Air Force ap appropriation
propriation appropriation was 70 million dol dollars
lars dollars for the Titan ballistic mis-
ile program, a conference com
mittee spoKesman saia.
The conferees approved 20 mil
lion dollars for construction of
Loran stations, eight million
dollars for Navy reserve build
ing: $8,250,000 for National
Guard armories.
Then Eisenhower nationalized
the guard, sent in 1,000 parairoop-;
ers and the Negroes were enrolled I
Under the guns and bayonets of
the troops. That's the way things
stood, with gradually diminishing
tension, until school was over in
May. The troops, by then reduced
to a small number of still national
ized guardsmen, were removed.
Action in Courts
During the summer, U.S. District
Judge Harry Lemley in Little
Rek granted a school board re
Ouest that, because of the pros
ipect or renewed violence, further
integration at Central could be
postponed until midterm of 1961.
He ordered the hoard to woric to toward
ward toward a start beforet hen if ps ps-Kihle,
Kihle, ps-Kihle, and asked for progress re reports.
ports. reports. A committee was being set up
in Little Rock for the purpose
.when the Court of Appeal-, sit
ting in St. Louis, last Monday
1 firmly overruled Lemley a deci

Teachers

House & Senate
Conferees Agree,
Action This Week

News has been received on- the Isthmus that the
teachers pay raise bill has been agreed on by House House-Senate
Senate House-Senate conferees in Washington who have decided on a
14 per cent increase.
This bill will govern wages in the District of Colum Columbia,
bia, Columbia, base for the wages of teachers in the Canal Zone.
The news was received here by Ray Hesch, legislative
representative of the CLU-MTC, from his opposite num number
ber number at the AFL-CIO in Washington.
The conferees appear to have debated on the House
bill because the Senate were insisting on an 18 pr cent
raise.
The raise will mean a sizeable sum in the teachers

pockets when the raise becomes effective, since it will
be retroactive from Jan. 1. The bill is expected to come
before the House and the Senate for final action early
this week.

All Federal Workers.
Now Under Loyally,
Security Program
WASHINGTON (UPI1 The
House passed a compromise bill
yesterday which would apply tin
ltv security
program temporarily to all fede
ral employes, including those in
nonsensitive jobs.
The measure, which temmed
from a 1956 Supreme Court de decision,
cision, decision, now goes to the Senate for
final congressional approval.
The court held that the program,
inaugurated by President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower in 1953, covered only work workers
ers workers directly involved with the na national
tional national security.
The House approved the com compromise
promise compromise version by voice vote, with
a loud objection from Rep. Roy
W. Wier (D-Minn.).
ne nil womo nniiK an yiivcin-.
ment workers under the loyalty-
security program until June 30, i
1959. The cutoff date was put in J
because permanent changes in thei
loyalty security program are
under consideration.
Thp hill alsn would give em
ployes the right to appeal to iiv
Civil Service Commission to review
adverse loyalty or security decis decisions
ions decisions by their own departments.
This provision would not apply to
any case where an employe al already
ready already had been dismissed.
Ike Signs Bill
Granting Free
Travel Through PC
WASHINGTON, Aug. 23 (UPI
President Eisenhower signed
into law today a bill passed by
Congress to permit free transit
of the Panama Canal for vessels
of state nautical schools.

Over Desegregation

sion, thus throwing the case ba.k
to the exact spot it was la&t Sep September.
tember. September. It was at that critical point last
Thursday that the dramatic an announcement
nouncement announcement was made that the
Court of Appeals order had been
stayed.
There is this one additional
point. Eisenhower reiterated on
Wednesday that he has not al altered
tered altered his pisition from what ;t
was in 1957 about the duties of
a state to obey decisions of fed federal
eral federal courts.
There has been widespread in
terpretation that the President
meant he would send troops hack
to Little1 Rock. He did not say
that. He said it was a state s
responsibility to "suppress unlaw
ful forces" that hinder compliance
with court orders.
On the other hand, Faubus has
made it clear that he will not
order his National Guard to en en-torce
torce en-torce integration.

Justice Department

On Asian War Hero
WASHINGTON, Aug.
(UPI) The Justice Department
has withdrawn its $544.89 court
claim against John ,R. Linehan,
the World War II guerrilla hero
who was billed for his fare home
even though he had fought the
Japanese In the Philippines:
Attorney General William P,
Rogers yesterday ordered th
U.S. attorney at San Francisec
to return the claim to the gov government
ernment government accounting office foi
reconsideration "in the light ol
the unusual circumstances in.
volved."
Linehan, now 61, was.a civiliai
employe of the Navy in the Phil Philippines
ippines Philippines when the Japanese at
tacked. He worked under .fin
until Manila fell, then retreatet
tr the hills with his pregnan
wife and young son.
He fought the Japanese as ;
guerrilla for almost three year
before he was evacuated by sub
marine to Australia. The U.S
consul at Brisbane advanced rill
the $544.89 fare from AustraJl
to the United States. LIneha
signed a note for the money.
The Justice Department not:
fied the war hero recently thi
It wou'd take him to court if h
did not repay the money. Th
Department indicated the ca.
had been called to Rogers' atten
tion only recently..
Linehan now wor)is at the Ar
my terminal at OaTtland. Calif.
balboaItoes
MONDAY, AUG. 25
High
12:22 a.m.
12:49 p.m.
Low
6:23 a.m.
7:02 p.m.
Virginia is relying heavily on i
combination of pupil assignment,
placement, test application and
school rezoning laws to forestall
an integration crisis. Failing all
the Legislature might be called
bark for another look at th
"massive resistance" plan which
includes closing of schools.
The state's leadership seemi
pretty well convinced that no prt.
vate school plan pw on. the hori horizon
zon horizon is workable for masses ol
children. But Gov. Lindsay Al Almond
mond Almond insists that public schools
will be closed before they are in in-tegrated.
tegrated. in-tegrated. Federal judges in Norfolk and
Charlottesville have been review reviewing
ing reviewing apnlicn'ions of nenros trying
to register in white Virg'"'
schools. All applicants have been
turned down. But Norfolk School
Board Chairman Paul Schweitier
acknowledged that several Negra
applicants were turned down only
because of race.

1 V .. ,-. I LI V



43 --
WGI TWO

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
8TJNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1951

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

7 H WW

.y TMI PANAMA AMCKICAN

r NSLSON MUNHVU IN
HARMODIO ARIAS. SOITOR

P O BOX 134 PANAMA

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JAB MAMSOM A. NSW YORK. 7 N. V.
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! MONTHS- IR ADVANCS ,1 55
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THIS TOUK FOtUM TNI MADEftS OWN COLUMN
nb MsM Ms sb sorb tsn.. f, -T VSuu

re received trsfStB7 SBO Sfs

If yea contribute s Istter sWt bs impatient

it it

doom t appear the

eat d. Lsttsn sis BublUksd s ths srde. rsts.vse.
.. try ts kssp the letters limited to ess page rSRtB.
tdsntrty ot Isttsi writers it held in rtrietest sontidsncs
expressed Is lettsra tntss reader.
THE MAIL BOX

Ruarkous
Comments

Have a Nice Trip, Fellows"

SINGLE WAGE AT RODMAN

Bir:

US-rate super-

.. .. j hooHs sinri

It seems as u me "r ,.ims residing me

Visors i Kodman are V e eMi up
tingle Wage pian. one group is in Jor 01 i u looks
KW aTcrUp nas some rep-

penes ot meetings at Kooman there are n0 meetings.
Eaised voices have been hea d. When there are a

supervisors can be seen in TeTher On tne approach
MtblSSt Sed aS sickly, and
nWlltfS wPSoPsesl1heSeIinngle Wage Plan

toeatiy and sneei imm" h" tCr emDloves would be frozen at

rkedTrom discussions which took place w--

-the Public Works ,.iwarim. a nTnrnTri u

feus SWaiUttention Safe

.er?). and it s aooui ns of those opposed

L.nn thPmfiP TOR. rceUs! ui v.u

quarr
se ot

Xe plan P esfdent Eisenhower's executive or-

r that UrPS HPni. P.I11COUU UV J " .i

-.;r c0 cnoH rieal of influence on me

iltimed to Eisenhower will have a

(executive order

Sherlock Holmes.

I MINIMUM WAGE FOR JOBLESS.
;'Pir:Wnen President Eisenhower signed the Single We bl J
WJSS Box. AuK. 19) clairns
th. rrPdft Tor his union leaders, and criticizes Panama's gov-
:meS offtelate frC the President down. I suppose he de de-!Ss
!Ss de-!Ss credit for his loyalty to his union leaders, but none for
iamude to the government of Panama.
' Knm thst the Single Wage Bill-has become law, our Pan Pan-;sm4ttan
;sm4ttan Pan-;sm4ttan Svernment must settle down to solve the unemploy unemploy-SdSeconomic
SdSeconomic unemploy-SdSeconomic situation which exists in every prov prov-mriTanfi
mriTanfi prov-mriTanfi town in the republic, except perhaps Panama oity.
Sowever I consider the Canal Zone union leaders have a nerve
for Se establishment of a minimum wage in Panama.
22$ iSLlfled Kesswecutive like President de la Quardia
SSiS ave mought twice before endorsing their demand.
AornA troes for the Chamber of Commerce.
thlw union 'leaders are so concerned about the situation
m&u donJt tuey first ask all Grln08 in Mnpe
!T!T t kTT rvai 7 "n ii thev would be willing to donate at least
lour a month towards those who are out of work "in
Panama? it's no use asking the Local Raters. Governor Potter
once taggested they eontrioute a few cents tp help the poor
uldtirtaeFs who are on Disability Reiiei-the Oldtimers who built
the Cafcal and its Zone. Governor Potter did not get one re response
sponse response to his Plea. t mQ ,uh

If minimum wage law snoum oe cnautcu i '""
the economic situation as it is now, the resulting unemwoymsnt
would brine as big a crime wave as is rolling over the United
biate. Even today many guys are getting themse yes .picked up
on thr Jtone for breaking probation, or for small-time robberies,
just m get in jail where they get something decent to eat and
somewhere decent to sleep.
OUT Colon many merchants and Free Zone firms are keep keeping
ing keeping roof e employes than business warrants, because they have
moreTSuman feelings than to add these surplus employes to
the mass of unemployed. Perhaps they do pay them only $20
monthly, but its better than being out of work altogether. In
Colon there are thousands of us who would be glad to get a
job for $10 a month. If a minimum wage law came into eiiect,
the Colon employers could not afford to keep this surplus help
on.
- -It Is all very well for a man who has a job to talk about
minimum wages', but an unemployed man wants just any job
the salary is secondary. k IT.
As for the complaint bv "Another 100- Percent Unionist
(Mall Box, Aw. 21) that US-rate cashiers have replaced Local
Raters In the Army Exchange as the appll?ati6n of the Single
Wage plan comes nearer, were not US-rate tractor drivers re replaced
placed replaced by Local Raters? Fifty-ffity, ain't it ...
Girwrer Know All.

Call me an old fogey and ever
a warmonger, but I am about to
declare au unlimited war on out
chines. This UNIVAC has got to
go, and I clamor lor a return of
tne pen pals and lonely hearts
columns. Also the rumble seat.
There is a raonstei called Sci Scientific
entific Scientific introduction Service in

rsew iorx wnicn. uses anu eira

trie computer to iniroouce pe:

of like tastes, and a similar oper

ation using UNIVAC tor romar.
tic purposes on the West Coast.
Out of these cardounching com.
putations thousands of introduc
tions have been made, and sev several
eral several hundred enduring marriages
have resulted.
It seems to be very simple.
You get interviewed. You are a
left handed plumber, like peanut
bufter.and.jelly sandwiches shave
every other day, and can speak
hipster talk.
You are looking for a girl who
puts salt on her strawberry short shortcake,
cake, shortcake, owns snowshoes and wi'l
travel. You are only four feet
five inches tall, but would ad admire
mire admire to meet a babe as big as
Lois DeFee.
Nothing to it. Run it through
the puncher and somewhere, just
yearning for you, is a six loot
plus dame with snowshoes, up t
her eyes in salted strawberry
shortcake, pining for a four $oot,
fivejnch lefthanded plumber who
digs the jive and shaves every
other day.
Your transistors match, and
you live happily ever afterward.
Or, if the marriage fails, you can
name a blown fuse as a co.re co.re-spondent.
spondent. co.re-spondent. While this is admirable, it

'lacks a certain salty romance

that the lumberjacks used to en
joy when they were saying:
"Dear Pen Pal: I am nine feet
tall and or the lonely farm farmer's
er's farmer's tender missive to the frus frustrated
trated frustrated schoolmarm.
In my day it was simpler. You
bung around the drugstores or

the local dance hall until a likely
you shot her down in flame
with classy dialogue like: "Hav.

en't 1 seen you some place be

fore?" And you blew her to a

Ktmum nrefl mi p bmlm ?sk bhs

, PEA Service, Inc. 'JT

Half a Column More or Less Now and Then
by CREDE CALHOUN

"The Yssrs with Ross,'
Thurder, A Pre-Rsvisw
It is hard to restrain my admi

ration and enthusiasm, writing a

numbered ten. There was an argu argument
ment argument as to whether or not the
New Yorker is got out by Commun Communists
ists Communists and the spin was five to five."
Thurber adds: "When a colum-

ite living author about my favor

!l ..l miming Thp NfiW

sody pop, and before you knew i'iv,r

The author is James Thurber,
The book, "The Years with Ross"
tells the story of the New Yorker
Magazine from the time it was
started by Harold Ross, until his
death in 1951, caused by that in indiscriminate
discriminate indiscriminate killer, cancer.
First let me stick my neck out
and predict that the book will win
the Pulitzer Prize; will be a "Book
of the Month" choice, and also a
best seller. Put it on your Christ-
r J i. i l ...111 u

mas snopping ust. it win prou prou-a"bfy
a"bfy prou-a"bfy cost not less than $5, but it

you were matching aptitudes

a rumble seat.
For the edification of the
swept.wing generation, a rumbic
seat was a love nest located
where the tailfins are currently
placed. It had no communication'
with the rest of the car, and wa?
the ideal site for the retailing of
hopes and feaTS. It was fine po
liceman for morality, too, be because
cause because anything more serious than

a little light necking was impos J

sible. due to cuts, bruises and

pre-review of a book by my favor- inist spread the report that the

lew I UiKcl was ncu num w

bottom,' 1 wrote Ross that it

wasn't even read from cover to

ter-sweetly recall )

Once settled In the rumble seat,
you learned from the lady that
she admired lefthanded plumb plumbers,
ers, plumbers, doted on peanut butter and
jelly sandwiches, had snowshoes,
would travel, and always salte1'
her short-cake. Whereupon the
moon took over, and before you
knew it, all sorts of troth, wen
plighted, and the wedding bells
clanged.

Cohtusiotis. Aik.Did; he wilT fftgMll worth more than. that in
. T -L .JZ ni4 fourth in rhl cad

chuckles" and Iaughi In this sad
and serious world.
Never had I suspected, until I
read "The Years with Ross" as it
has been published serially by the
Atlantic Monthly, how far the canc cancer
er cancer of McCarthyism had spread.
Thurber calls it the "dark heyday
of McCarthyism."
He qoutes the following excerpt
from' a letter, written to him by
Ross: "Soe "uy 'vt
he was in Ohio in a gathering that

TUITION RATES
As an eight grade student of Balboa Junior High School and

having attended Ancon Elementary acnooi since 1 was nvc nvc-iyeara
iyeara nvc-iyeara old, I feel proud to belong to the student group of the
Canal Zone School. My greatest ambition is to graduate in the
year 1962, following the tradition of my parents, who graduated
In Balboa High School.
I have been affected with the Increase of the school tuition
for non-employed parents. I feel that there should be a provi provision
sion provision of special rates for:
(a) US citizens students whose parents are non-employed
In the Canal Zone;
(b) For Us citizens students (as in my case) whose mother
(a US Citizen) works for the U.S. Government and pays taxes.
I feel that it Is unfair for us US citizens to be treated like
foreigners in our own schools. Under this condition and situa situation
tion situation there should be a fair solution to this problem affecting
many Americans, without Interfering with the policy that Gov.
Fotter'g Canal Zone administration has maintained for fairness
to all.
. Eight Grader

The thing I dislike most about
mechanized introduction and even,
tual romance is that there is ve very
ry very little in the way of nostalgic
reminiscence when the old man
is feeling tender on his 20th an.
nivnrsary.
He positively cannot leer and
say: "You remember, Mama, i'
was the Elks' Club outing, and

nlH fhnrliA Hawkins no It JUti'

Zeke Meekings, I can see it now.
plain as day old Zeke come
up and said: "You seen the new
schoolmarm? Twsntv-three skiri skiri-doo,
doo, skiri-doo, and oh you kid!"
Pa will have to say: "You re recall,
call, recall, darling, that we were two

lost punch.cards, living in limbu
when maaic struck, and suddenly

us card6 were aligned, in lovin?

intimacy by the mere touch of a
stranger's finser.,and Far Samar Samarkand
kand Samarkand was ours."
I am for sticking to Zefc Me
kins, as' the go between, because

who the devil wants a machine

For a best man. in this t ji ot

horror films?

cover, but we shared a serious con concern
cern concern and deep anger about the
reckless charge ot subversion that

then threatened to make a chaos

of the Republic."

Veterans Again Can
Now Buy Life Insurance

At Old WW II Rates

Let us tell you how you can
still apply for an old line legal
reserve life Insurance policy
similar to your old NSLI plan.
If you are under age 45 and
in good health, you may qual qualify
ify qualify (usually withdut physical
examination) for the same basic
low NSLI rates charged by the
Government during W. W. II.
Slightly higher rates -for older
ages.
No obligation, tear out this
ad and mail it today with your
name, address, date of birth
and age to American Life In

surance Co., P. O. Box 0, Diablo

Heights, Canal Zone.

Ross a Communist? Well, Pri

vate Ross of the United States Ar Army,
my, Army, was the editor of "The Stars
and Stripes" in Paris at the age
of 25 years. Thurber gives the oth
er jobs Ross had beiore he start started
ed started the New Yorker, and the Par.a

ma Star and Herald is on the list.
Gerald Typaldos, now retired and
long the manager has no recol recollection
lection recollection of the employment of Ross.
"If he was ever on the payroll of
the Star and Herald,' Gerald told
me, "I am sure that I would re remember
member remember him."
But let's get back to the co columnist
lumnist columnist who wrote that The New
Yorker was "Red from top to
bottom', and match his opinion
with that of the editor of the Lynch Lynch-burgh,
burgh, Lynch-burgh, Virginia, "Advance."
"It is a supposedly 'funny' ma magazine,"
gazine," magazine," he wrote, "doing one of
the most intelligent, honest, pub-lic-sprited
jobs, a service to civi civilization,
lization, civilization, that has ever been render rendered
ed rendered by any one publication."
, Thurber was working as a re reporter
porter reporter on the New York Evening
Post for $40, a week when he got

a jov on The Mew Yorker. Koss
told him he would pay him $75 a
week and that would take care

of anything he wrote for the magaa
zine.
But when Thurber got back to
his apartment Ross tlephoned and
said: "Thurber, your pay will be
$90 a week. Dammit, 1 cant't take
advantage of a newspaper man."
Then when Thurber got his first
check it was for $100.

He became the magazine's
"wheel horse' according to Ralph
Ingersoll, also a staffer, and now
30 years later still helps to make
the magazine great, especially in
f the Town."
Thurbersbook will tell about
many of the men and women I
happen to know slightly two of the
latter) who have helped to make
The New Yorker. A few are still
on the job. The running battle
between Ross and the late Alexand Alexander
er Alexander Woollcott is hilarious.
Did you know that the man who
followed Ross and is the present
editor of the New Yorker, is nam named
ed named Bill Shawn?

Another one of The New York Yorker's
er's Yorker's top staff men, E. B. White,
and another of my avorite authors,
was working for $30 a week, writ writing
ing writing automobile advertising when
Ross started his magazine. Two

years later, in 1926, White bagan

Thurber, who has been blind now
for too many years, had a series
of eye operations in 1940 and 1941.
Ross visited him at the hospital
and snarled: "Goddam it, Thurb Thurber,
er, Thurber, I worry about you and Eng

land.' That was the time England

was gallantly facing the German
blitz.
Once Thurber dedicated one of
his book. to Ross, something like
this: "With growing admiration,
esteem and a fection." Ross took
the book to Thurber, open at the
dedication and with snarl asked
"Affection?"
"Yes, affection," Thurber snap snapped
ped snapped back. "Do you want to make
anything of it?"
"All right, all right, gaddam it,"
Ross growled as he left the room.
Later he sent many .copies of the
book to his friends.
Ross refused to go to the open

ing of Thurber's play, "The Male

Animal," but he didn't go to bed
until he had read the reviews all

of which were favorable. Then he

phoned Thurber, who reports:
"The editor of The New Yorker
began every phone conversation
by announcing, "Ross" A monosyl monosyllable
lable monosyllable into which he was able to
pack the sound and sign of all
his worries and anxieties. His loud
voice seemed to fill the receiver to
overflowing.
,nf
"Well, God bless you. Thurber,'
he said warmly, and then came
the ofd familiar snarl: 'Now, god god-lam
lam god-lam it, maybe you can get some something
thing something .written for the magazine,'
nd he hung up, but I can still

working part, time for The New hear him, over the years, loud and

Yorker, again at $30 a week. snarling, fond and comforting.'

T

I

Slrj

POEM, OR SOMETHING

,Arhat's the reason for all these gripes
That I read In the Mall Box night after night?
I'm tired of looking through the Mail Box now
And reading Unionist's. Malcolm's and Ginger's row.
100 Percent Unionist, Ginger and Malcolm
Are nuisances. How comp they're so welcome?
I'm sick and fed up with reading their views
It' the aame thing each evening I pick up the news.
1 see nothing constructive in this sneering and jeering
I get bored by all this lengthy comparing
Of notes on what Ike did, of what Ernestlto does not,
Of what chumpsi 713 were, of what grit 900 lacks.
There must be somebody to get rid of the chatterbox
Talking nothing but trouble, and swinging his brickbats.
I hope this poem is an effective check,
Or can someone suggest a better cure, by heck"
After all, Uieir views ain't countln' for much,
Just throwing around lots of big words and such.
The unions are always there doing their part,
Midst the sniping of rivals who think they're more smart.
Tf tH you. I'm sick of all this argument
Like talkative members of parliament.
Let them write something else, sing some other song,
The climate, the heat, or why this poem's so long.
Westerman had some deal on low cost housing
I hear no more about it. Where has he gone?
1 I could go on and on and on
But space Is limited o long.
Miss Like A. Change.

bo

of

COLOMBIA MEPELLIN

where your DOLLAR GOES FURTHER...
COLOMBIA perhaps the most purely Spaniih sf sll South American countries.
BOGOTA always refreshingly cool (like springtime U. S. A.). A charming blend si the old
world and the new era reflected in ths architecture, customs, and culture. Though Spanish Is the
native language, English speaking travelers have no difficulty in making themselves understood.
Marvelous native dishes and the finest international cuisine. Recreation ts pleas everyone! And
don't miss the Salt Cathedral of Zipftquiro. unique in the world; old pre -Bolivar colonial buildings,
Simon Bolivar's home; and Laguna Guatavita (sacred ligoon sf ths chibchas)

famous for It's orchids, is one of the garden spots sf Colombia with a balmy climate

MIDILLIN
year-round

Panami
RRCSfU

anians and

S. CMmns "eed only Tourist Cards (good for 90 dsysl
Consult your Travel Agent

Wt NOW -PAY LATER w CH our Offices

TEL. 2-2M6
Aero.. Ireea the Lesjlalatlve Patsc

passport not

AVI A MCA

PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS SISTEM

rut oiofsr amiin' in thamchkas

DESPICABLE WRETCHES, I've be.n gotting, bothort
and starboard ears bruiseo and contused recently by fblk
who are stricken to th quick that's the area rightound
where they wear tha wallet) by the higher tuitfon ties
residents of Panama are being asked to disgorge ft ifteir
progeny to infest Cartas Zone schools this coming yw.
The parental line of reasoning filters through my
caulrf lowered lugs thus: "If Canal Zone tetAChars'ftouWn't
insert an iota of information into Elmer's head at $30 a
month last year, what makes them think they'lf strike oil
instead of salt water this year at $60 a mortlh?"
A good question. Furthermore. Elmer fs not run-of-the-mine
Canal Zone, student He's bright. He can change
the Elvis Presley records on the hi-fi without elthr his
father or mother to help him, and he's only 16. He is not
quite bright enough to step on the records after changing
them.
I have urged these parents not to set! the Canal Zone's
Division of Schools short There i no limit, I assure the
parents, to the, achievements of the students they tur
out. Bottom limit that is.
Up to $50 a month is a lot to pay just to have the
brats go away wreck someone else's furniture all day. The
unemployment situation and wage rates being what they
are in Panama, it would be cheaper just to hire a keeper.
Even so, the considerate spirit of the kids themselves
cannot be overlooked. How Infinitely admirable Is the way
in which, refusing to have Poppa's pocket book bent still
further out of shape by this latest pronunciamento of fh
Canal Zone Government, they unselfishly explain how much
cheaper it would be for Poppa to buy thorn a Jagtiar and
not send them to school at all.
Ignoring such gestures of uplifting nobility (and 'ig 'ignoring
noring 'ignoring all your gestures too vou coarse and shameless

rabble). I offer the thought that by hiking the tuition fee
the Schools Division is swimming stoutly against the tide

of State Department policy.

While the State Department spends millions of the

taxpayers' dollars yearly in transporting foreign students

uncounted leagues (no, not the American and National
Leagues, you loathsome canaille) over desert, ocean and
pedestrian crossings in an effort to win their esteem via
an American education, the schools division hikes the tui tuition
tion tuition rates to a point where the only Panamanian families
who can afford to send their kids to Canal Zone schools
by the same token have enough money to send them State Stateside,
side, Stateside, to Europe, to England, or wherever.
Sen. William J. Fulbright (D-Ark.), whose name Is
not totally divorced from the realm of education, might
have some blistering comments to offer on this achieve achievement.
ment. achievement. This would be the same onetime Rhodes Scholar who
told the Senate last week: "We place a higher economic
value on driving a truck than on teaching school. We ac accord
cord accord greater social prestige to a rock V roH singer than
to a philosopher.
"The only logical inference to be drawn from this fact
is that we... would rather have the luxuries than the
necessities ... we are treating luxuries as necessities and
necessities as luxuries."
The sparkplug of the Fulbright Scholarship scheme, I

choose to think, would regard a systematic effort to win

the understanding and friendship of peoples of other climes

and cultures as a necessity of the American educational
system right about now.
Anyone seen the recent Middle East popularity polls?
Charmingly alphabetic. America can be found listed just
below amoebic dysentery, and somewhat above Britain.
Fulbright might be able to find something to say for
the proposition of taking the money it presently costs the
State Department to send one deserving Panamanian to
the US on some inspection tour or post-graduate ,cour$e.
and with this money giving half a doen Panamanian kids
an equally persuasive insight into US clues and views by
putting them through Canal Zone" schools.
One thing he might say. for instance, is that It is
worth fetching up with six friendly-disposed characters
for the price of one.
Anyhow, these notions stem from a character who
knows more about education than I do. All I can probably

claim to know about education is how to resist it, dogged doggedly
ly doggedly and effectively.
He also insisted that, if any Panamanian students are
to be subsidized through Canal Zone schools, the selec selection
tion selection should take the form of a competitive scholastic
scholarship which pays no heed to the status of the con contestant's
testant's contestant's family, be.. the family's capacity to pay tuition
anyway.
Thus the brightest young people in Panama, rich or
poor, could come to participate in and, it is hoped, to
admire the American Way. These would be the same young
oeople who on their talents figure to rise to positions of
influence and leadership in their country.
My educattbrttsl aide agreed with the American Socie Society
ty Society delegation Which called on Caanl Zone Gov. William E.
Potter the other day.. The delegation's pitch Was that US
kids, even if their parents were not living in the US but
in Panama instead, should get some sort of a break in US
schools, such as those in the Canal Zone.
As for non-US citizen tuition-paying students aparl
frorrY his scholarship notion, he felt that while the fees

should bear some reasonable relationship to the costs, no
increase in the price of education anywhere will do much
to spread wider tolerance and understanding in this al

ready jumpy world,
I drew his attention to gaps in his thinking. Friend

ship is not a one-way business. What about Canal Zone
kids getting to know more about Panama and its students?

Good idea, he said, but how?
I told him there were few aspects of modern educa education
tion education dearer to young Canal Zone hearts than playing
hookey My friendship formula whenever Panamanian
students come out on strike, the Canal Zone kids should
do likewise. 3
"That would build the intimate accord that Dulles
goes sputniking around ahd around the world in search
of," I said.
"Would it?" gruntetl my educationalist friend, depart departing
ing departing for what aopeared to be an urgent appointment he had
fust that Instant remembered.
"
PERCY'S PEERLESS PORTENT this week, still in the
oause of education, is parcelled up between the 27 of Aug August
ust August this paper yesterday tipped at the opening day for Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone schools, and the 03 of September, which has
the wise money on It. Maybe with
2703
you'll be able to find yourself down in that happy line
at the Lottery Office Monday with, for instanoe, Civil. Af

fairs director Henry L. Donovan and Schools Division
superintendent Sigurd E. Esser, both of whom are under-

shrewd note of the interesting dis-

atood to have

crepancy.

MBmm



FAGTK

fUKDAT, AUGUST H, IKS
SUNDAY
Announce Enrollment Dates
For Florida State Classes
The proper use for every glass
SEE THEM ALL DURING

H

i f 9

-SM

GOOD CONDUCT MEDALS... At a bus-side ceremony at Fort Kobbe, Capt. G. Oliver, center commanding officer or aean aean-quarters
quarters aean-quarters and Headquarters Company of the 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, peesented 10 good' conduct medals to departing
members of his unit. The medal Is given for meritorious conduct. Seen here are, left to right, Benjamin Eades, Pfc. Robert
McCormick, Sp4 Robert Seward, Pfc. Anthony Moster, Sp4 Paul Sheahan, Captain Oliver, Sp4 Ralph Cavin, Pfc. Hobart Tudor,
Sp4 Jone Sutherland, Pfc. Vito gumma and Pfc. Bernard Buranelli. Following the ceremony they boarded the bus for depar departure
ture departure from the Isthmus and assignment in the United States. (U.S. Army Photo)

rABiTOf&RITWUW

LONDON, Aug. 23 -The Smith
family of Darley Dale, in the Eng
lish county ol Derbyshire, are on
the right lines this month in set setting
ting setting out for their vacation with
four horses drawing a 140 years years-old
old years-old stage coach.
My only criticism is that they
do not carry the idea far enough.
Obviously they seek "e s ca p e
from automobilism. They want to
do things differently from the
millions of motorists who now
throng our highways and who -according
to the latest report of
the Government Road, Research
Laboratory-will be doubled in
number in the next nine years.
The Smiths are no doubt aware
that great schemes ate afoot for
new motorways and fly-over junc junctionsmeasures
tionsmeasures junctionsmeasures which will add
even more to the fun of motoring
In Britain while making it safer.
In the meantime, however, they
would rather jog along the by byways
ways byways like millions before them.
FOR COMMtRCf
OR PLEASURE
But why, if they seek a change,
could they not try the canals?
Here are peace and beauty of
rare order.
Inland waterways, to give them
their official title, are much in
the news these days. They have
been reported on by a Government-appointed
committee which,
though at variance on certain is issues,
sues, issues, is unanimous that the 1300

miles of waterways in ingianu
should be made "an integrated
and efficient system of inland
navigation."
Why not? Since 1840, when the
golden age of canals was ended
by the advent of railways, the
motor-driven barge has come into
being. It proves its worth today
by working at a profit on 380
miles of waterway waterways
like the Grand Union Canal where
the other morning, at Co p p e r
Mill Lock, near London, I met
the good barge Stanton. Towing
a companion barge, she nosed
her way into the Lock under the
curious gaze of swans, anglers
and small boat operators.
Young Bill, a swarthy 20-years-old
who, with his father and
mother, constituted the entire
personnel, laughed outright when
I hinged he had a nice quiet job.
"Not a dull moment," he said.
"We; meet hundreds of other barg barged
ed barged on the trip and we're all pals
It's a really godd life now- since
British Waterways took over."
Now always certain of a load,
the barge folk have sacrificed
none of their sturdy individualism.
Despite her official "B. W."
badge, the Stanton was painted
as gaily as a farground rounda roundabout.
bout. roundabout. An instrument of commerce, she
yet fitted perfectly into the rural
scene the rushing mill s ream,
the tree-shaded and white-washed
lock house, the old Fisheries Inn
and the men with their beer
mugs sitting outside.
England's canals, though origin originally
ally originally built for commercial purpos purposes,
es, purposes, serve for pleasure, too. More
and more travellers, overseas
guests included, are learning to
navigate launches on these un un-trpubled
trpubled un-trpubled waters.
NAVIGATING ABOVE CLOUDS
Navigation in the air has been
a talking point In Britian with
the news of Pan American Air Airways'
ways' Airways' remarkbable praise for Dec Dec-tra.
tra. Dec-tra. PAA are the first of a number
of international airlines to report
on this new British long range
r.v,'!atlon system. Having trte.l
It on 27 Atlantic crossings by J a
Strafocruwer, they described it
as reliable, highly accurate, sim
pie to operate and providing "a
new concept in the presentation
of navigational fixing through the
flifit log."
Dectra, with mas' er and slave
radio stations, throws a radio
grid over' the area in this ca:e
the Norih Atlantic, extending
from Newfoundland to Ireland and
ram Iceland to the Azores. The

Americans stress that the system
was found superior to standard
navigational methods against
which it was checked.
A Transatlantic thrill we have
all been able to share was the
British Broadcasting Corporation's
"Welcome to London" broadcast
in honor of athletes from 37 coun countries
tries countries who had just taken part in
the Commonwealth Games in
Wales.
Introduced by the world's first
four-minute miler, Roger Bannis Bannister,
ter, Bannister, this rollicking light entertain entertainment
ment entertainment show was heard not only
in Britain but simultaneously
"live" for the first time right a a-cross
cross a-cross Canada by means of the

new Atlantic telephone cable.
PRIZES FOR PHILATELISTS

By a coincidence which seems
to have been overlooked, the
Transatlantic broadcast occurred
almost exactly 100 years after
the completion of ihe first cable
between Britain and America.
News that the United States
are issuing a commemorative

stamp has 'struck a particularly
topical note in Britain. Special is issues
sues issues over here are exceeding exceedingly
ly exceedingly rare. We had scarcely recov recovered
ered recovered from the excitement of spe special
cial special stamps to mark the Com Commonwealth
monwealth Commonwealth Games when for the
first time in our history alon?
came 12 new stamps 'or six dif different
ferent different regions Wales, Scotland,
Northern Ireland, Guernsey, Jer Jersey
sey Jersey and the Isle of Mrr. All bear
the head of Queen Elizabeth II,
but not the name of the country.

.... w w. luuiiipua, aaoiaiani
Postmaster-General, explained this
-'t,jv. "n 0H,er countries pr'rt
the name of the country on the
stamn." he said. "We (the Unit United
ed United Kingdom) are absolvpd from
this because we invented postage
stamps in 1840."

rnru cd Waiinnal TV is eivine. the country a look

at a show that has fascinated Los Angeles for some time. Traf Traffic
fic Traffic Court" is a re-enactment. But it is so cleverly done that one
case when it was a local show, drew 250 phoned offers to help
a defendant, plus $3,750 in cash. "Judge" is Edgar Allen Jones
Jr., of a law school staff. .. i

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service Arrives
' Cristobal
"HIBUERAS" Aug. 23
"TULIVES" Aug. 3f
"ULUA" Sept. G
"HIBUERAS" Sept. 13
"YAQUE" Sept. 20
"ULUA" Sept. 27
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
. Arrives
New York Service Cristobal
"METAPAN" Aug. 25
"SAN JOSE" Sept. 1
"HEREDIA" Sept. 8
"ESPARTA" Sept. 15
"TTMON" Sept. 22
"FRA BERLANGA'' September 29
CRtPTOBALWCCA. FEDDER SERVICE
"VERACRUZ" Every C15) Days

Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle.
SPECIAL ROUND TRIP PASSENGER FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return '. $240.00
To Los Anireles and San Francisco and
Returning from Los Angeles $270.00
To Seattle and Return S365.0P
. TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2 PANAMA 2-2904
H

WEEKLY

CARGO SERVICE FROM NEW YORK AND U.S. ATLANTIC
CARGO SERVICE FROM NEW YORK AND U.S.
ATLANTIC PORTS AUD U.S. PACIFIC PORTS TO
THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA AND CANAL ZONE.
PASSENGER SERVICE TO NEW YORK AND WEST
. COAST SOUTH AMERICA PORTS.
PANAMA AGENCIES, CO.
CRISTOBAL 2131 2135 PANAMA 3-0784 3-7999

BALBOA 2150 2159

m

jJBMlullfff iff al twmt BP!11
H BB jlElK

T?Pcistration for the 1958 Flori

da State University fail term will
bp held in the Canal Zone Sept.

9 12, it was announced this week.

On the Atlantic side, armed
forces personnel may enroll on
Sept. 9 at Building 400, Fort Gu Gu-lick,
lick, Gu-lick, from 6-9 p.m. On the Pacific
side registration .will be held on
Sept. 11 and 12 at the Fort Clay Clayton
ton Clayton Army. Education Center from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
To be eligible- for enrollment
military personnel must have been
graduated from high school or
have a high school equivalency
certificate. Classes will get under underway
way underway at Fort Clayton, Fort Kobbe,
Fort Gulick and at Albrook Air
Force Base on Sept. 15 and 16

and will terminate on Nov, 5 and
6.
The program's new director, Dr.
Merrill A. Symonds, former direc director
tor director of the FSU Armed Forces
Program at Tyndall Air Fore
Base, Fla., will teach the only

course scheduled for Fort Gulick

this year. Great issues of politics,
a three-credit college course, will
be held on Tuesday and Thursday
evenings from 7 to 10.
Eight three-hour courses will be
given on the Pacific side of the
Isthmus, all from 7 to o p.m.
On Monday and Wednesday
evenings the following courses are

scheduled: Written communicati

western civilization, fundamental

mathematics, and the school pro program.
gram. program. The last course listed will

be aught at Fort Clayton by
James F. Magary, Panama Canal

government's phychologist. Latin
American history, regularly sched

uled for Monday and Wednesday,
has been changed to Tuesday
and Thursday.

CoUcm llaebra. Russian lan

guage and principles of economics
are to be held on Tuesday and
Thursday nights.

The school program will inau
gurate, this fall, a new series of
professional courses in education.
These courses are intended for
personnel who wish to fulfill the
tion.
A new sequence In math be beginning
ginning beginning with fundamental mathe

matics and college algebra is
starting with this fall semester.
This sequence will continue dur during
ing during subsequent terms with trigo trigonometry,
nometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry and
calculus I and II.
The fee for each three credit
course is $36. Of this the Army
will pay $22.50 for USARCARIB
military personnel. Students pay
the remainder of the tuition, a-

long with the cost of the books

and a $5 initial enrollment fee.
Enrollment will not be consider considered
ed considered completed until such fees are
paid.

CRYSTAL WEEK

STARTING TOMORROW

Rheumatism
Arthritis, Neurit!, Lumbago, Sci Sciatica,
atica, Sciatica, stiff muscles and swollen
ioints make you miserable, get
tOMIND from your druggist at
once. ROMIND quickly brings fan fantastic
tastic fantastic relief so you can sleep, work
and live in comfort. Don't suffer
needlesnly. Get ROMIND today.

PRE-INVENTORY SALE
Build ifDWt own

AMPLIFIERS, PRE AMPLIFIERS, SPEAKERS
AND RECORD CHANGERS
at a TREMENDOUS DISCOUNT
PANAMA RADIO CORP.
Across "La Merced" Church. Central Ave. 9-14

' T TV P)

1. Coanac (small): 2 Liquor; 3 Martini: 4 Old Fashionedj

5. Sherry; 6, Sauternes; 7. Whisky Sour; 8. Manhattan
8, Cocktail (general); 10. Highball: 11 Gin Fizz: 12 Win;'

13, Champagne; 14, Cognac (large snifter).

land It own mm

GENUINE CRYSTAL

Modern and traditional styles In finefy tchrfiV.

deep cut... and polished crystal
AVAILABLE IN SETS & OPEN STOCK
Free "Chico" de ORO Stamps

Trap

icana

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4th of July Ave. & II St. Tel. J-0725

YES! Santa is here. Start saving your tickets for our

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F YOU CAN'T GET MORE

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Modernly styled box has:
Separate freezer at top holds 101 lbs. of food
Auto cube kit for ice cube storage convenience
Pastel colored porcelain interior
Special foot pedal to open door
One slide out bottle basket shelf
5 year sealed unit guarantee
Fully automatic cycle defrost refrigerator

Air Cooled Cushion
NOW ONLY .. 333
End hot, uncomfortable
driving! Steel coiled allow
air to circulate between
the seat and you -REG
3.95

1 1 i i' i in hi

ELECTRIC FAN

19.95

Special
10 Inches wide
OwilatlnK typo
Safe. Sturdy

KENMORE Washer
Down 30.00 OQQ OO
Monthly ... 6.00 LUm
Reg- 319.95
SAVE 20.07
8 lb. Capacity
5 Year Guarantee

Water Glasses
. T
10 ounces :
N0W 5c
Reg. 12

Sauce
Containers
r

19c.

Reg. 350

NOW

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
OR YOUR MONEY BACK
OPEN FROM 8:30 to 12:00 and from 2:00 to :M

SEARS

PANAMA Tivoli Ave ..... 2-0931
LOS ANGELES Transisth-"
mian Highway 3-1955
COLON Bolivar Ave. 1181

T

,
ft,W



'

PAGE FOLK
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
8UITOAT, AUGUST 14, 1951
Social and Otli
134,
flew yaJfttd Wudt Be QooJi 4nd JdooL Qool, Ooo
erwiSe

& Sla

u J i. uLpkmu

MISS MARIA VALLARINO AND MR. ROBERTO EISENMANN
MARRIED IN CRISTO REY CHURCH SATURDAY EVENING
Mr. and Mrs Ricardo Yallarino announce the marriage u
their daugbt r, Maria Eugenia to Mr. Roberto Eisenmann Jr., sun
f Mr. and Mrs. 1. Roberto Eisenmann of Panama Saturday eve evening
ning evening in the Cristo Rey Church.
Following. .the religious, ceremony a reception was held at the
home of the bride's parents in the Juan franco section of Pan Panama,
ama, Panama, for family and friends. In charge of the flower arrange arrangements
ments arrangements was Mrs. Hortensia Alfaro de Aleman.

JrUss Jullcta Valianno, the
bride s sister was uiaiu ot honor
anu tne bridesmaids were Wynen-
da Eisenmann, Mancla del K..
rio lcaz.a V. and Lupe del Cannci.
Icaza V. The (lower girls Kurj.i
del Carmen Perez G. and Nina
Essie Maduro E. and the pages
were Henry Jorge Ford and Raul
Bscofiery A
David Brandon Eisenmann was
bis brother's best man ana tne
Uhcrs were Eduardo Vallarino ami
Octavio lcaza V.
JThe bride attended Maria In ma j
ORlada School and Idaho S. a
., rnL l,t U.. 1
(JOliegC. ine giuum nicuucu 0.11.
boa High School and Canal Zone
Junior College as well as the L
niversjty of Pennsylvania's Wnar
rm Qjhnnl

Vfter a wedding trip to Costa Amador Officers' Oepn Mess on'UL,s lue Palrlullc sP'nl 01
Rtca, the voung couple will resme Thursday Aug. 28 it 12:30 for country, to foster present friendly
in' El Cangrejo. ; dessert and cards. Members are! rel,ati?ns between Panamanians
'asked to make reservations a an(1 Americans, to assist in de
rkr for Nephew's Wedding Wednesday with one of the host velopmg the commecial and cui
.Dr. Eugene Eisenmann, we U; ess who are Mrs. William H. Al tural, relations between the fio
kiown ornithologist, arrived Satur len, Navv 2420, Mrs. Ethel Ch"' o Pe0P'es and to promote acquair,
diy morning from New York to Balboa 3709 or Mrs A Nita n i 'anccship among our members. 4'

attend the wedding of his nephe-v,
, ; jtoDcn -e
m Fuhrm.n and Mr. Sears

Marr- In New York City if Balboa, left by plane for lv
.Mr. and Mrs. Clarence r'uhrman home in Burbxnk Calif, a'ter
ri, Ha1donfie!d and Ocean C'ty snndinc a month with his son
N)Sw Jersey, have announcer,' the law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs
engagement and approaching mar Freeland Hollowell or Los Kins,
mge of their daughter, Ruthj
Louise, (o Alson Whlttier Sears jSlffh Announcement
son of Mr. Alson Scars ot Mr. ana. Mrs, Rolf C. Arndt or
Sejnta Clara, Panama. j Meriden. Conn., announced t!-,e
'.The wedding will lake place birth of their third ch'ld. second
Saturday Aug. 30. in the Church son. Rolf Bronson. on Aug 4. M;i
at the Transfiguration (Lit i 1 ternal granrinaren's are Mr and
Church Around The Corner), New Mrs. Bronson B. Poweel of D'.i D'.i-Ybrk
Ybrk D'.i-Ybrk City. bio Heights and oaternti grand
Miss Fuhrman is a graduate ol mother is Mrs. Dorothy Arndi ol
the tiankenau Hospital School ol Meriden. Conn.
Nursing, Philadelphia and is cur.
renUy working toward her Bathe : Mr. Skinner and Mr. Hall
lor of Science degree in nursing Guests of Honor at Party
at thev University of Pennsylva The first social gel together o:
nia. the 18 men from the Panama Ca
Mr. Sears was born in Pana- nal organization who have atten-i
ma and a resident of Gold Heicois ed administrative intern progiam
He was educated in the Canalin Washington was held Fridav
Zone -Schooll jhid is remembered night at the Tivoli.

ior we aDiiuy as swimmer, nav
iroj been captain of the Balbo?
High School Team as well as a
member of Panama's Pre.Olum
pic team tn 1954. He was grariua!
A In Inn, f,, 4k. IT-!. ...!..
u ii, ouiiu Hum uit- umvciaui ii,
Pennsylvania wnere ne was a
member of Panama's Pre-Olym-and
Water Polo team and a
member of the 'Varsity swimming
He plans to matriculate in tne
School of Veterinary Medicine, U U-niversity
niversity U-niversity of California, in Septem.
berv
Middleton-Reynolds
Weeding Announcement
Mas Irma Revnods and Mr
Fred R. Middleton were married
in Panama City Aug. 14 ip. a

DOXESE WAITES
SCHOOL OF DANCING
TWELFTH YEAR ON THE ISTHMUS
Reopening September 4th a
Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced Classes for
children of all ages in
BALLET, TOE, TAP, ACROBATIC, MODERN JAZZ
Morning classes for kindergarten and pic-school children.
egistration August 28-29-30 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Knights of Columbus Hall (upstairs) Balboa

'aVaaaaleaaaaaaaaaai aav
I
BaH BjlHaH

NOW! 2 Weekly Flights
ONLY NON-STOP DAY FLIGHT
Constellation Scnicc

MEXICO

TO
ONLY 6 HOURS
Connections in Mexico for
wWm

BUm AEROVIAS MEXICO. A.

TELS. 2-1057

o.r f-unama 2-0 74 0 2-1)7 Jl

quiet ceremony attended by mem
ucrs ol their lainih Witness
were Schaye Wiantzer and Loo.,
J. bpeevak. The' Coupic ave re
turned from a wedding trip to hi
Valle and are now living in bl
boa.
Doctors Wives' Club

To Hav Luncheon
The Doctors Wives Club of tior. WOm,n Auxiliary of The
gas Hospital will -'have lunchcor.a.mae"." n

on Wednesday, Aug 27 at 12 ju
in the livoli Guest House.
will be the first meeting of th.
Club's new year.
. t '.
,
Balboa Womsn's Club
Charity Card Group
The Balboa Woman's Club Cha
rilv ( a rrl frmin mdnt at K.ti
boa 2651.
V reJTstrausmaUv
the occasion was a larewrli
for Ralph K. Skinner and Wil
liam E. Hall, both from the Ol
jfice of the Comptroller, who arc
1 leaving soon to attend a fi v e
. -.
inomn course in nnanciai manner
ment sponsored sy the Civil Serv
ice Commission. The program hi
gins Sept. 11.
The Friday night get together
oegan witn a hospitality hour, toi
lowed by a dinner, and a short
talk by William S. Wigg, acting
head of the General Service Sc
tion of the Administrative Branch
in 1956.
Attending the dinner were the
who took the management course
wives of the men who had tak
en the Washington courses, the
LOWEST FARES
all of North America

CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT

& 3-1697

anama

L,lm H.OO ,J 10 ,.m. Mff.
wives of this year's appointees, h.
J Buinhsm, l'raning O.ficer, and
Mrs Burnham.
The 'iormer interns, now known
as externs, and the years in
which they attended the courses,
are:
OUo W. Hclmcrichs, 1946; Gor
don M. Fnck, 1948; Walter A.
Jryja, 1950; Maenner B. Huff
1950; Paul H. Friedman, 195 0,
Frank Wilder, 1953; Robert A.
Stevens, 1954 Norman B. Uavi
son, 1954; Albert B. Hendricks
1955; Lawrence Barca, Jr., las');
J. Douglas Lord. 1955; Howjfd
W. Osborn, 1956; William S. Wia.
1956; Joseph M. Watson, 1955
Evlyn W. Brandt, 1957; Harrv C.
Egolf, 1957; William J. Powell,
1958; and William A. Wichmann
1958.
ry ot nmmi
iTo Moot
The next meeting of the new
Women's Auxiliary ol the Arheri
can Society of Panama will meet
Sept. 9 at 4:00 p.m. at the Pana.
ma Golf Club.
The purpose o' the Society is
"to keep alive within our men
, ? me organizational mermv.'
ihe wives of the off ceVs' of I
American oci.y would hold .he
mr nosnons in tne Auxiliary a.ts
their husband d0 in Hie Society.
Therefore during the enminr 1
year Mrs Richard L. DehlingW
will serve as nresident of the Aux i
iliarv. Mis. William C. Schmili

vicepresirient. Mrs. Louis A. Ci j House.
mez, trexsurer and Mrs. Myrc.n The Senale approved 'he water water-W.
W. water-W. Pusher as secretary. ed-down b'M bv fit to 15 vote as
Any U.S. citizen residing in Pi.jit dorve toward a possible ad
noma or in ririvate enterprise in : 'oumament o" Coffyress late to

the ("anal Zone is eligible for
pip,nbor;,iip in Ihe Amer;ean Se
ciety. If interesteo, call Mr
tunes .). Plaii. Panama W'
For more in ormation about th' th'-Women's
Women's th'-Women's Auxiliarv eeall Mr,1,
Charles E. Smith. 30377. M r s
Trvinn Bennett. 31344. Mrs. El'.oi
Todd, 30976 or Mrs.
Williams. 37168.
vernon
mmm
Each notice for inclusion in thii
column should be lubmitted in
tvae-writtaa term and mailed ao
the box number lilted dailv in 'So 'Social
cial 'Social and Otherwise." or delivered
by hsnd to the office. Notices of
meetings cannot be accepted by
etiehelfe
Atlantic Camera Club
The Atlantic Camera Club meel
ing will be held on Monday at
7:45 p.m. in the Club Kooms at
Mt. Hope. Mr. C. McG. Brandl o'
Balboa will give a lecture and
show slides on the refacing ol
Contractor's Hill.
J. Henry Bonney Club
The J. W. Henry Bonney Club
which is working towards the es
tablishment of a Mason lodge,
will hold a special meeting in Pa
raiso service centtr room next
Tuesdav evening at 8 o'clock.
A report received from thr
club's delegate will be heard at
this meeting.
ON SALE AT ALL
DRUGSTORES
Exclusive Distributor
FARMACIA RUIZ
P.O. Box 196 PanamA, R.P.

j7 IS
6' ':MffffTnrTairjjai
eainmj Br

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES A. McGLADE were married
on August 9 in St. Anthony's Church in Fort Lauderdale,
Flk. Mrs. McGlade Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. E.
Williams of Balboa and Mr. McGlade is the son of Mrs.
Katherinr McGlade of Balboa and the late Avery O, McGlade.

Senate Approves
To Give Help To
WAoHIlv,rT0N inpn The
'Senate stamped its approval or .
TlrLl
K.
dav aftPr congre:sional conferees
deleted all federal scholarships,
The measure now goes to the
House which wa evpeded to ap-
"rove it and send it to the Whit
urday.
As ori"ina'lv approved by 'he
Sena'e, the four year educpt'on
program would have provided
about 23.000 S250 cholarshins an-
noiiiv. Presiden h'senhower had
called for 10.000 scholarships. But
the House refused to permit any
.i,;,li u. nn
va'led in the final version.
Although the compromise meas measure
ure measure would provide no scholarship
it would au'horize about 295 mil million
lion million dollars in loans to needy col college
lege college sludents over a "our-year pe
riod. The program also would in
rhido riostimiduate fellowshios. im-

proved teacher education, federal r.usnT '"-vf Sen. Frank
assistance for buying science-1 i'l 'D;.0h'I0) "S'ly ac ac-teaching
teaching ac-teaching aids, an other federal -USPLD'r ,t,C
help for education. hllk ?n T J uwt
-Meanwhile, the -House bowed lo:J to PafSage w'thout adequate
President Eisenhower's veto by j y' t
overwhelmingly repassing a six- T . ...
billion-dollar money bill without mh,nvSwa, rvi i '."IS
the civil service retirement funds Slyhl," 'T 2
4u4 w,m r till th Publlc business done' in an order

that prompted him to kill the
first version of the measure.
The $5,993,404,900 bill, carrying
funds to operate 17 independent
government agencies for the 12

months which began July 1, was1.
sent to the Senate TinCM Art Exhibit
Eisenhower vetoed the original j
bill because it contained 589 milho I By Am DO TO PclaciOS

tirement Fund. He said there was
"no justification" for this money.

in reoassine nip veiueu iiiphs-
pension, for ex-Presidents in ac
Piles Hurt You!
Don't suffer frotri painful, itching
Plies another hour without trying
Cnmarold. Upon application Chlnarold
tarts curbing Pile miseries 3 wavs- 1
Eases pain and itching. J. Helps shrink
sore, swollen tissues. 3. Helps nature
neal irritated membranea and allay Pi
Nervousneaa. Ask your Druggist for
Chinarola) today.

ure, the House added $100,000 xlJ

Now! We blend colors. We accent them. And we create the on
color that fits your desire, your need I For with this sensational new
Roux product we can produce literally hundreds of individual
hoircolors-the most lustrous, most natural looking tverl Phone
today, far your appointment for your 'personal'- hoircolorl We
use Roux Creme Color according to directions.
irS CMMI-KIND TO YOUR HAII
ASK FOR IT AT YOUR llAUTY SALON
Diatrlbiitora in Panama
JULIO VOS, S. A.
Second Diagonal (Old "A" Street) No. 7-27
Box No. 297 Tel.. 2-2971

Watered Down Bill
Needy Students

cordance with legislation ,ipprcved
yesterday.
The House also approved and
sent to the Senate compromise
bill to apply the government's
loyalty-security program tempor temporarily
arily temporarily to all federal employes, in including
cluding including those in non-sensitive jobs.
The measure put all yovern
ment workers under the loyi'itv loyi'itv-security
security loyi'itv-security program until Jurr 30
1959. Permanent changes in the
program, now being studied, pre presumably
sumably presumably would be put into effect
by then.
The Supreme Court declared
two years ago that the loyMty loyMty-security
security loyMty-security program, star ed by Eis Eisenhower
enhower Eisenhower in 1953. 'covered only
workers whose jobs invol"o na national
tional national security.
As the lawmakers tiel-d off lei
islation. S"-'-- r iiurn
"seribd -.',
rs as "about the moat frui'
ful" he has server in.
" '.ne sa,e u,e adjournment
ly manner. Johnson told his col
leagues that if they concentrated
on the pending bills the" could go
Underway Here
m,.- . ..
"'n I.T'
opened Friday at the National
Library on Cathedral Plaza and
will be there until Au
Amone the many palntlmrs T"
the exhibit, -which Is sponsored
by the Department of Fine Arts;
are scenes Miss Palacios has
painted of Panama and portraits
of prominent people including
President Ernesto de la Guardli
Jr.

PERSONALIZED HAIRCOIOR

CUSTOM-BLENDED, with
ROXfC0l0R

Y AILIIN SNODDY

NEW Y.0RK (NEA) The mr
who builds a better mousetrap
may not be on the road to fame
and fortune after all.
It may be a better trap func
tionally, but if it doesn't look like
a better one, a housewife won',
buy it.
' And this, says silvery- haired
Montgomery Ferar, is where a
designer steps in. Ferar, and his
partner, Carl Sundberg, have. been
making home tasks easier a
gadgets prettier mr tne last 25
years through appliance designing.-'
r
Design, according to them, is
the articulation of quality for
most people nowadays. And, un unfortunately,
fortunately, unfortunately, if your product is
good but doesn't look good most
shoppers will pass it by.
What is 20od and what Is
new on the counters are two dif-
eirem thurgs, Ferar ppints out.
As he DUts it. "We're all for
newness. But we don't believe
products are new just- because
they're decorated like a Christ
mas Sree."
"In uesigning," Ferar con continued,
tinued, continued, "we work on the theory
that the American public has
good taste. If an item .s in intrinsically
trinsically intrinsically ugly, people will re reject
ject reject it."
He further points out that a
consumer is more likely to pur purchase
chase purchase an item 'hat is an im improvement
provement improvement or evolution from sonn
thing familiar. . like a re
frigerator with sliding oaskets
But, generally, they can't take
the shock of somethin? rum
pletely new.
Which seems a paradox since
in the next breath he admits
Americans expect something new
every day in all areas.
"Americans are more flexible
now than they were 25 years ago.
But, inflexibility does give us a
headache." i
A I i
iaige siumDiing Diock ior
i a designer is1 that people don't i
j like to give up a routine, or
something familiar.
inis established work pattern
plagues us," he says, "in design
ling home appliances. And it is
veiy strong in industry. We fi
workers resis.ing cnanges on
typewriters, or adding machines.
1 for example, even when the
change is good."
Women designers on their staff
l in De roit help Sundberg-Ferar
oevr some pitfalls men might
overlook.
"However, we've found," Ferar
reveals, "a woman needs a logi logical
cal logical reason to justify buying one
item over another. So in deign
ing, you need a demonstrable
gadget on an item for
appeal. Bu' basically appliances
must De use ol.
This can lead to hair.pullinr
tvmcs. when a gooo lU.icUonal aid
j is developed for the housewife
such as a rising basket i n a
reezer-and she won't buy it.
But she does coax her husband
i "j o buying appliances covered
with a multitude of keys and
swucnes, and then use only
Monaco Denies
Rumor That Grace
Expects 3rd Child
MONTE CARLO, Monaco Aue
i T TTT ei
tTZ: rincess Grace and
Prince Rainier of Monaco are
not expecting their third child
early in the new year, a source
close to the royal palace said to today.
day. today. The firm riental v.. il.
u V Li 1C
source appeared to squash ru-
...u.o imn nave oeen Duzzing
round the Mediterranean princi principality
pality principality for the past two weeks
am fCe whose son Prince
",ui:" waa Dorn jasi March
was pregnant again
The couple 'V first child Prin Princess
cess Princess Caroline, will be two In Jan January
uary January Monte Carlo gossips have been
to the royal family since it be-
mm lrnatarv ik.i oi.
rr"" vwr." xiainier and
IIS AlnPl'lPOn.hniM,
Sih ? !L ttir new
- un me Kiviera
coast specially enlarged
farttLX6 also polnted t0 the
l"t'htpfce has expressed
her wish to have "several" chil children
dren children while she still U young

H
I

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even If it works efficiently, a gadget as ugly as this wenM
never fppaal to tbe shopping housewife. )

few of these time-saving attach attachments.
ments. attachments. Coming to their aid Ferar ex explains
plains explains that "most housewives u u-tiliie
tiliie u-tiliie their appliances to the far farthest
thest farthest degree. But, there are a
few gadgets too complicated for
them. We have to include these
gimmicks, though, because cus customers
tomers customers expect them'
In the crystal ball department,
Ferar says true built-ins will
fade away and mobility will be
the magic word in homes'.
"Women," he laughingly com commented,
mented, commented, "go crazy if they can't
move things around."
The kitchen will be integrated
New item in the homemaker'i
nish. It's packared in a spray

iiim

Women Wage Equal Rights Battle -This
Time It s For American Men

TOKYO (UPD Equal rights for
American men?
"A great idea," say the women
of Asia, "they certainly could use
them."
This was the dominant opinion
among the ladies questioned at
eighth Pan-Pacific and Southeast
Asia Women's Con'erence in Tok Tokyo.
yo. Tokyo. They were' commenting on a
report from Los Angeles that a
woman lawyer had proposed equal
rights for men to keep them alive
longer.
"Why, in America, men a are
practically the suppressed sex,"
said Mrs. Shirin Fozdar of Sing Singapore,
apore, Singapore, with a broad smile.
"All of Asia is man's country,"
according to Mrs. Trinidad F. Le
garda of the Philippines,, vice
president of the Pacific and Asian
women's group. "This is not so ih
the United States."

WE ARE PROUD TO BE THE FIRST STORE. INI
PANAMA TO FEATURE COMPLETE STEREO
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LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF

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and a cart rolled to a dining la
ble in a cozy living room atmos
phere.
"Cooking you might say," re
vealed Ferar, "will bt Japaneti
style, right at the table. The ear
ill have surface cooking uni's
with a dishwasher-disposer un
derneath."
As far as the present kitchei
designs are concerned,' they stfl
will appeal to the woman of tht
house.
"If the American male is mov
ing into the kitchea, asstories
say," Ferar commented, "he will
have to adapt to a female kitchen."

armory la a ahleld arainat Ur- ;
on can and Inhibit! oxidation.
Mrs. Legarda, who's done mere
than her share to raise the status
and prestige of women in her own
country by becoming its first wo woman
man woman ambassador she leaves for
Saigon, South Viet Nam next
month explained:
"Women are brought up to give
preferential treatment to men, t(
cater to them. This true al'
over Asia. In the United States
there's more equality."
Mrs. Lili-Punu Malietoa of wes
tern Samoa, a tall, attractivs
leader of women's movements in
her country, summed it up wilt
the devastating phrase, "You pool
hen-pecked things."
"Samoa is a man's country",
she said. "So are Japan and most
of the Asian countries. But Amer America
ica America and Europe they're women's
countries. The women there -they're
tough."
.1

Ml!"'



PAGE rm

SpNPA AUGUST 14, ?5

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN

Push The Buttons For Household He

1Y KAY SHERWOOD

"SAFETY SPEAKNER Cap & I&f&e
held bv tbe U.S. Army Caribbean Signal JTtJtet3Wt the meeting. Captain Dolan, who discussed "Safety About
geffigjg Mny" fS?Xw. CguUwSiril Defense-director. (U.S. Army-Photo)
iiiiir7-iilS I De Gaulle Offers "T.

MOVIES-TELEVISION
by Erskine Johnson
Nf A StcW Correspondent

IB

HOLLYW00D-(NEA)-Behind
the screen Hugh O'Brian, I bet-
Lub to his Wyatt Earp fans. He
had to trusty" .45 stolen from h.s
hols.er by a GIPL!
Even more embarrassing, tt
haDoened while he was, busy k-
Kew what fHM8"MJ BJ
had the draw him with his

own guni

of

when movie

: .ilf gO givW ovei uu

'Jt?i saciiardEgan, and art

may fc-iU bf fering trom .eye.

4 rtJIr ifciinM- vou see, had 79

. -anns ior reversing

.. 'a cwnnnine over a

!, up of visitors to the the 20th
c ;r nry-Fox.;sAudio lot.

The "summer iouiia
three O'Brian" Company WW
Tim were the 79 Miss Un.vete
contestants, on tour in Holly-
WMi Ecuador was the lass with
the sneaky fingers and after
O'Brian't hand went .skyward
for the photographers, the ""'
on her face indicated she was
mighty pleased IHi IHi-dimming
dimming IHi-dimming fallow lik. 0'Brian.
There was no pain on 0 Brians
free cither. Ay least I couldnt
see 'any through all that inter international
national international lipstick decorating it af after
ter after he played studio "host an.l

bussed everyone irom u-.
gentina to Miss Wyoming.
It was the photographers' idea,
but O'Brian didn't .'ight it.
Then he proved himseif the
diplomat of the year.
As the Miss Universe beauties
disappeared into the studios
Cafe de Paris for lunch, O'Brian
spotted their elderly, stern-faced
chaperons trailing in behind
them. .
"Well, hello he beamed,
"You're the gals I've been wait waiting
ing waiting for." ;

AnH O'Brian" kissed some

the chapefOT, ; 1 ,
THE'ElOE NOTE In Anna Maria
Albergluti's off-stage voice is be because
cause because .iSama. Alberghetti is say saying
ing saying 'No, no," to her romance with
Buddy Bregman, the musical whiz
Bob Crosby is Mr. Uniiappy a a-oout
oout a-oout his summer TV subbing for
Perry ComQ. As Bob tells it, I
was hireji,Ji'a star but I find
myself regarded as a stooge.

Nick (No Time for Sergeants)
Adams about the pattern of suc success
cess success in Hollywood today or

vouna actors: ,. . w.

IjuT haven't Uncorded a mg

hk "casting dlfectoM wMi't

speak to y6u.rf

Madagascar Choice

Of 2 Alternatives
TANANARIVE, Madagascar
(UPI) Gen. Charles de Gaulle
yesterday formally offered MuoV

aoci-ar phoice neiween an cuuji

rights" association with France or

a breakaway into total inaepena
ence which he labelled "seces

Speaking to a joint session 0 f

Madagascar s six territorial
,.,v,hi;,.- at Aospmhlv Palalce here

he warned that such "secessirvT
,.i.ni;.oiKr waiiid pnd French

aUlUlllOuvaiij "
economic aid to this big Indian

Ocean island which since less nas

been linked to France.

He made it clear that this was
ik. .hni.o hpfnrp Madagascar's

IIIC i iiun. v ........
voters in the vast referendum 1o
ho hold Spot 28 in France and

all her overseas oossessions. On
that date they will accept oKr oKr-iect
iect oKr-iect the new French cbristitution

De Gaulle ha proposed.

TW ins! .released Brieitte Bar-

Ani mnvip 'The Nieht Heaven

Fell," was directed, you may, re recall,
call, recall, -by her e-husband Roger
Vadim. JlUt mijbe you don't

remember philosopher Baraoi s
comment on their divorce:
"Nothing lasts forever."
I wonder if she feels the same

way about her career.
LOU COSTELLO and screen screenwriter
writer screenwriter Isobel Dawn are polishing
the script of the Fiorello La La-diiarHifl
diiarHifl La-diiarHifl film biocraohy. There's

renewed major studio interest in
in nlavincr New York's one

time major....A casting bugboo
is still haunting Skip Homeier, now
a handsome 27, but still remem remembered
bered remembered in Hollywoods as the mean
widdle Nazi brat in "Tomorrow
the World." TV gave him all-Ame-rican
boy romantic roles but now
that he's in a movie-making mood,

he told me, "All 1 have been
pffered are Russian spies, Russian

youth leaders and Russian military
officers."

m

Whpn warm weather makes

almost any housewoirk a bothar bothar-ome
ome bothar-ome chore, ways to reauce exer exertion
tion exertion find' ready acceptance.
That is the time to try some
of the aids that promise push-;
button ease and effieciency in pol pol-ishing
ishing pol-ishing o f housework. New prod-j
cucts and familiar cleaners, soaps
anri rlpanpr.c in aerosol contain- i

ers, are spraying a clean path
through many tasks at the touch
of a' finger.
Onp newcomer, for examulc.

is a silicone base cleaning agent J

which polishes mirrors, cleans
windows and the painted wooden
frames or window sills in a

tpray-on, wipe-off operation. i
Another relatively new prod

uct in push-button spray cans is

an antidust agent, bprayea on
dust cloths or dry mop heads, the

cleanser collects dust and tiutf in
a heavv lint which is easily 1

shaken into a sack.

If a heavy collection of lint
under beds is a particular prb-1
len in your house as it was in
our rented summer cottage, the
antidust treatment does make
mopping faster and more ellec ellec-tive.
tive. ellec-tive. An alley that promises to
help you win the battle against
tarnish on 'silver or brass with without
out without application of a lot of elbow

grease is another non-lacquer
spray.
At the touch of a finger, a fine
mist coats the clean surace of
the metal. It's formulated to
supply an efective shield against
dust, moisture and other tarnish tarnishing
ing tarnishing agents:
An established commercial pro protector
tector protector for fine office leather fur furniture
niture furniture is now in production for
home use.
A fpw seconds nf snravine. the

I manufacturer tells me, will give

a vpar nroierunn apainsi har

dening, cracking, loss of color or

luster.

Although it's been used for a

vears bv commercial service de

nartments to care for office fur

niture, the increase in use Of

leather furniture for the home

prompted its introduction
cently in home-size cans.

may intrigue you. This pressuriz pressurized
ed pressurized polish shfnes up surfaces as
you dust. To use it you simply
spray it on the cloth or the sur surface
face surface to be polished, and follow
through with a dust cloth.
The romDanv making it points

out that it can be used on any
sur ace. which is helpful where
furniture combines several dif different
ferent different materials in one piece.

Aithougn Me ust pi sport re removers
movers removers and rug cleaners is long, j
one of the newer ones, a foam
spray, may be especially inter inter-estine
estine inter-estine tn owners of lifiht-eovered

carpets or upholstery where spot I
removal is a frequent job.
This foam spray, rriade for use

oa wool of synthetic fibtrjf i

easy to use and 'a said

completely safe.
The solvent is supposed to be
strnn? pnnueh to dislodae erease

stains, but not harsh enough to
harm fibers or leave a ring.

SLIM FAT AWAY
If (at ruins your figure or makei
you short of breath unA ndangS 1
your health, you will find It eaaj
lose weight with the new HollywoeJ
method Formode. No drastic dieting
or exercise. Ask your drugstore (or
Formotfe and start slimming- at one?" 1
- r

If furniture polishing is not

your idea of the way to spend
a sunny afternoon, a new spray

Th Dp Gaulle sDeech was his

first major address so far on the
12,000-mile, six-dav trip he has un undertaken
dertaken undertaken across France's sprawl sprawling
ing sprawling African territories to rally sup support
port support for his constitutional. projccU
"Fnr reenrd's sake." he said,

"let me repeat I am convinced
that they r will hot choose this

(secession) solution.
At the end of his address,' his
entire audience, which included
240 Madagascar assembly repre representatives,
sentatives, representatives, gave him a standing
nvatinn

Observers 'said his welcome
Thursday was one of the greatest
ever accorded a visitor to this island.

ThP nnrnosp of his triD to Mada

gascar and later to otheT French
possessions in Africa was to con
iksm nf the advantages of

continued close ties with France.

I IKE A LOT OF PEOPLE Tucked away In Clinton county,
ner Frankfort, Ind.. is the tiny town. of Fickle. One of many
odd-name towns around the United States, Fickle was named
after an early settler of the 1820s one Isaac Fickle. The town
boasts a population of 1)5, a ost office and a general store.

200-Pounder Found

Guilty Of Beating
Widowed Mother

PHILADELPHIA (UPI) A
200-pound truck driver was found
euilty yesterday of beating his 74-year-old
widowed mother because
she refused to give, him (8me of
her social security money.
Judge Vincent A. Carroll was
so moved by .' the testimony of
white-haired Mrs. leona StoUd,
wheeled into the courtroom pn a
stretcher, that he was unable to
pass immediate sentence on her
m WonrtPll if: who sobbed that

a pet dog had caused the mother's

injuries. f m P w 'J-,
"Don't think your-mealy.mou'y
aA i;c .111,1 i. ii- will hell) VOU.

CU I"-, " -

snapped CarrolU. You re going to
the peniten'iary. I can't sentence
you now, I'm too emotionally dis disturbed."
turbed." disturbed." Detective Richard Kelly told the
judge the wsman was left a per permanent
manent permanent invalid s the result of the
beating in which ?he suffered t
brnken nose, two broken ribs bro.
ken riht knee u nkle, and
pelvic and bck injuries-

Mrs. S'OUa, WHO WwlgnS 1BB5
this 100 pounds, charged that her
sou cama fcpme drunk snd flew
info's rage 'heeaiise' she refused
to "tw Mm 'rny mortey
S oud, p'eding innocent, con con-tjnd
tjnd con-tjnd th 't .mnt'ipr h"d been
nvii'ed hv t o hnun''i. Pollc? laid
he h" "Oly a small beagle and

Ann 'Rlvth. still looking for a

good woman's film script, has a

different complaint about Holly Hollywood.
wood. Hollywood. "I've read dozens ot scripts
and the roles for men are strong,
vital and terrific," she told me.
"The roles of the women, whoever,
are underwritten, underdeveloped

and practically underprivileged."

Look alive, fellas, here .it
comes. Designer Bill Thomas is
whipping up an exposed hipline
evening gown far Cristal'a
personal appearance tour with
the movie, "The Perfect Fur

lough."

8 marvellous days
me

in
COLOMBIA

PANAMA RADIO

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''-HI

Alcorn Refuses

To Grant Hoffa
Voice In GOP
WASHINGTON (UPIVRepubll (UPIVRepubll-can
can (UPIVRepubll-can National Chairman Meade
Al,..,r rodianri VARtprdaV to foil

cede Teamster Union, President
James R. Hofl voice in th.
COP equal to that tof thoer "labor
bosses" in the Democratic Party.

He belittled Hoffa's role in me
GOP during a joint news confer conference
ence conference with Mrs- Glare WilHjms,
newly appointed assistant chair chairman
man chairman of the Republican National
Committee. . .,
Alcorn mil evCT1 -ntotacei
to Walter P. fcwthtr, prtslejettt e
IhfcUnited Automobile Workers,, as

a dominant pnwer u io werao werao-crttic
crttic werao-crttic Party. ws then asked
bout Hoffa. a Republican who his
been under fire from the Senate
Rackets Committee.
Aloorn interjebled that Hoffa
"doesn't control anybody in the
rtepuWicaft Parry Hke Wapr Reu
her does in the Democratic Par
to

i H id Hot eould not tdl him

Sen. Humphrey

Proposes 4-Poinl
Program For Peace
WASHINGTON (Wl) Sen.
Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Minn.)
i..t .iarkt nrnnosed a four P"

jnov ma," r- '
program for peace 'food for

peace, heaitn ior peace, iuus
peace and disarmament for
peace." ...
Humphrs, a member of .the
Senate t-iSt
, fhU rmrntrv faced What

undoubtedly was i m t severest

crisis to itt history. -"y ,. ,

u. M "it i not iutt i

involvinB a ,mwrry ona,

T, M.nhlAr 9 Irt SPfllln m 1 P 3

al, an deological, a ipir i

crisis C,J,'aSl
Humphrey eusd JU ;
programs for peter' 't;p?n
telephoned to- the National Chris-

vdue University, Lafayette, InJ7

He particularly urged expansion
oi programs for ntiliiing agricul agricultural
tural agricultural surpluses abrpad.m connec

tion with tne foreign iiu yros""!:
Humphrey also urged a "fleet ot
surplus American drugs, ind with

surplus jeeps ana iraucrs u. u.-patched
patched u.-patched to the four corners of the
world."
Humphrey also proposed a
stepped-up program of Jow inter interest
est interest loans fir tjnderdeveloped
rea as an important step.

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SEPTEMBER 13 4o 20
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. Dramatio; .exoitirtg blepd
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Always cooi, refreshing.

lut perhsps the mest essratlsl
ef aU, he said, was "the urgency
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to find some wsy out ot the pre
ent alarming deadlock oviy disar disar-mamehty
mamehty disar-mamehty y,

I what to. do and that Democratic
nil n i i I 1 1 :l II Pmil M Butler could

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MEDELLIN.

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'
.



PAfJE SIX

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1951
Racetrack Program

i 1 1 1 1 1 1

$1,000 Handicap deadlines

Lowly 8th Series Racers
-In Five Furlong Sprint
f Eleven lowly eighth series imported thorough thoroughbreds
breds thoroughbreds will match strides this afternoon in a special
$1,000 handicap" over five furlongs, at the President
, Rem on racetrack.

The field includes the track's
irorst horses, including some chro chro-1
1 chro-1 lie bad legged cases. Because of
his, there will be no standout
, iavorite.
J favoritism will probably be
lihared by four or five horses,
' nost likely Panicus, Violin Viejo,
Colmado Achieved and Dagon.
Mso scheduled to participate in
Ihe race are Zutphen, Lucky Test,
il)liplay Song, Camberwell, A A-swat
swat A-swat and Maria Crsitina.
Violin Vlejo. Display Song Maria i
CrisHna and Dagon are return
ing from layof's.
3 All of them underwent
treat
ment of one kind or another for
.rarioiu aliments.
! Dagon, which had lost his sweat,
Is reDortedly cured of the disease
and is v,,st!v imoroved. Braulio
Baezs will guide Dagon
t Fernando Alvarez, recently in in-wiflvefl
wiflvefl in-wiflvefl in some dubious rides, will
pe aboard sneedv Panicus. Gui Gui-llermo
llermo Gui-llermo Milord will ride 'he fast
but ooor starring VioIn Viejo. Her
tor Ruiz wjl' have the leg up on
Achieved. Manuel Correa will
h"ndle the re;ns on Disnltv Son!
hvhile Amado CrediHin will attermtt
to surprise aboard Maria Cristina.
Juno Kodn"ie7 t"e leg :m
n Camberwel', Emi'm D-rio will
in xutnhen'i sarid'e. rnrrim-
d Alfaro rides Lucky, Test and
P'M A&iinre wi" a'temnf 'o per per-fo"n
fo"n per-fo"n th irrioossible on Amat.
Parasol looms an easy winner
the si. 000 six furlonf secondary
Hction for first series rers.
mba'sy. Hostigador and Melen Melen-ez
ez Melen-ez are his only contender.
iOne of the d-v's triot interes'
)?' races should be the seventh
n which unbeaten Evenim stir
fcoes against impressive Zaoazo,
winner o his only local start.
Such o'her good racers as Bright
.Spur, Critico. Geyser, Abo!eno
iind Biicalemito are included in
the fir-Id.
Eight oher prosoective thril thrillers
lers thrillers are on the program.
Way ENCANTO 35c.
Debora Kerr in
"BONJOUR TRISTESSE"
Prohibited for Minors Under!
18 Years Old!
Rlcrmrri Burton in
"BITTER VICTORY"

TODAY-theatres-TODAY
CAPITOLIO I TIVOLI VICTORIA RIO

35c. 20c
European Pictures
Prohibited for Minors
, LA REINA DFX
i STRIP-TEASE
. Also:
BARBA AZVL
DRIVE
A N E M O

THE DIVIDENDS:
First Race
1 Destello $5.20, $3.40

1
I
2 Golden Corn II $4.60
Second Race
1 Double Dee $5.40, $2.20
2 Dependable $2.20
First Double $22.80
Third Race
1 Julio Verne $3.80, $2.40
2 The Squire $2.40
One-Two $11:40
Fourth Race
1 Buscapleitos $3.00,
$2.20
2 Rock 'n Roll $2.20
2 Golden Moon $2.20
Quinlela: Buscapletos-Rock
'n Roll $3.80 Buscaplei-tos-Rock
'n Roll $2.20
' Fifth Race
1 Titita $3.20
2 Enganoso mo place bet betting)'
ting)' betting)' Sixth Race
1 Nogalina $4.20, $3.00
2 Venganz'a 3.00
Seventh Race
1 Romancero $3.60, $2.20
2 Sicabu $2.20
Second n"h'e $8.60
Eighth Race
1 .Taba'tna $3.20, $2.20
2 Sahri $20
Quinlela "0
Ninth Race
iOerprlo $V."o. $6.40
2 r,TVPf"rn V 0
One-Tv-- 0
Ten i,;- W'ce
1 Michtriop .80, $3.20
2 Paquiro '0
Elevnth Race
1 Tnfornial I 20
2 Quickie (No place betting)
STA R &HFRALD TIPS
1 Camnarno'd
2.tdi A'ai II
SSOreHo
Oarme'lta
? ifpbe
fi Violin Viejo
7 Zarnazo
9 Constantino
a rr'is
1 9 coI
IlTatin
OuonHa
NnyaMnn
Mr. Jaick
Narnao
Kalau
E. Star
Corvlylia

35c. 20c.
THE TARNISHED
ANGELS
with Rock Hudson
- Also:
LOVE-SLAVES OF
THE AMAZONS
with Don Taylor

25c
TWO
GREAT
PICTURES!
IN
60c:
30c.

WEEKENJTJ RACTIQN!

T ip H : & VV I

Costly ;y- p;ece 7,rotf es

..... .M I w r

Floyd Patterson
NEW YORK (NEA) One thing
about Flhvd Patterson. He certain
ly isn't easy to promoters. Since
becoming heavv-weight champ-
pion, he has boxed ior three dif
ferent Dromoters Emu Lence
Jack Hurley and Bill Rosensohn.
And all have found him to be a
lacklustre gate draw.
Lence, who promoted the Pat
terson Hurricane Jackson bout at
the Polo Grounds in New York
last year, took a mild financial
bath. Hurley merely represent
ed Pete Rademacher's backers
for their Seattle go and they
went for a good bundle.
And young Bill Rosenshohn, who
put on the Roy Harris bout in
Los Angeles, had his bankroll
singed.
When Floyd's manager, Cus
D'Amato, mentioned he was
thinking of boxing in England,
the fight mob took it casuallyi
"Him and his fighter are look
ing to break the whole world,"
the New York fistic set observed.
"Just coast to coast ain't good
enough for them."
Racetrack Tips
By CONRADO
1 Campemard
2 Nogalino
3 Silver io
4 Carmelite
5 Apache
6 Dagon
7 Zarpazo
8 Constantino
9 Acro-'-'is
10 Parasol
11- Tatin
Cuquita
Lar
Mr. Jack
Don Pistf Pistf-Linda
Linda Pistf-Linda Susy
Colmatio
Evening Star
Carcamti
Behaaer
Embaxsv
Plateno
15c.
35c.
-20c.
DESIRE TINDER
THE ELMS
with Anthony Perkins
' Also:
FOR WHOM THE
BELL TOLLS
with Gary Cooper
TODAY
LAST DAY
STERN;

r f o fiivp I

NEW YORK, Aug. 23 (UPI)
The Chicago White Sox trounc
ed the New York Yankees, 7-1,
today on the six-hit pitching of
Billy Fierce and Ray Boone's
clutch hitting which drove in
four runs.
Bill Skowron's 13th homer in
the seventh inning was the only
run allowed by Pierce, who drew
an ovation from the 23,183 fans
when he pitched his way out
of a none-out, bases-loaded jam
in the eighth by striking 61
Mickey Mantle and getting
Skowron to bounce into a dou double
ble double play.
BOETON, Aug. 23 (UPI)
Three Cleveland home run shots
into Fenway Park's chummy
left-field screen and two bril
liant catches featured an 8-1
Indian victory oyer the Boston
Red sox today.
Rocky Colavito, Minny Mlfio-
so and Randy Jackson supplied
the power that enabled Cal Mc Mc-Lish,
Lish, Mc-Lish, Cleveland's winningast
pitcher, to rack up his 13th
win against six defeats before
1Z.8B5.
BALTIMORE, Aug. 23 (UPI)
AfClcotte's airtight relief pitch
ing gave Detroit a 5-1 victory

Race Track Graded Entries

Horse
Jockey
1st Race
Special" Imp. t Fgs.
1st RACE OF
1 Don Cirilo
2 Bodegon
3 Pangal
4 Voltage
5 Campagnard
6 Cuquita
J. Rodriguez 113
A. Alfaro UOx
A. Reyes.R. 11;,
B. Baeza 108
R. Vasquez 113
F. Alvarez 113
2nd Race 6th Series Imp. S Fgs,
2nd RACE Or
1 Lark 8. Aguirre 115
2 Blue Zulu F. Justiniani UOx
3 Jai Alai II R. Vasquez W.
4 Nogalino A. Vasquez 110
3rd Race "O" Natives 7
fjs.
ONE
1 Mr. Jack H. Ruiz 107
2 Silverio B. Baeza 113
3 Noticion G. Milord nsx
4 Domitila J. Rodriguez 110
5 Solito H. Gustines 10
6 Tingat J. Jimenez 108
4th Race "I and F'

Natives S F. Purse a375.00
QUINIELA

1 Carmeliata
2 Desiree
3 Folletito
4 Jipi Japa
5 Naranjazo
6 Julie
7 Bugaba
8 Don Pastor
9 -Mimi
10 Ciria
H. Gustines 104
G. Milord lOOx
M. Guerrero loo
H. Ruiz 110
J. Ulloa 113
A. Gonzales 10"?
A. AKaro 10.1
F. Ji'tiniani Ix
J. Avila 11 "5
M. Hurley 108
5th Race "A and B' Nat. 8 Fgs.
1 Aoache
2 Kalalu
3 Lind Susy
4 Yosikito
A. Vasquez 115
A. Alfaro if)-v
" Baeza 108
H. Gustines 108
6th Race 8th Series Imp. 5 F
"SPPCIAL
1st RACE OF
1 Zuthpen E. Dario ior.
2 Lucky Test A. Alfaro 102x
3 Dispaly Song M. Correz 113
4 Dagon B. Baeza 113
5 Camberwell J. Rodrigeuz If
6 Viohn Viejo G. Milord UOx
7 Achived H. Ruiz 113
8 Colmado S Carvajal 115
9 Hanicus F. Alvarez us
10 (Amst B. Asuirre 110
11 (Maria Crist. A. Credidio 100
7th Race Sth Series Imp. 7 F-
2nd RACE OF
1 Abolengo
2 Geysei
3 Bright Snur
4 Evening Star
5 Zarnnfo
(Critic
7 (Bucalemito
J. Ulloa 110
IB. Aguirre n
A. Alfaro H2x
A. Vasquez H5
B Bteza 115
A. Perez H"
F. Alvarez 115

Sth Race 4th Series Imp. 8 Fas.i $400.00 Pool Close 4-4C
QUINIELA

1 Cypress Bull
2 Otorongo
3 Colifato
4 Carcaman
5 Constantino
6(Raiah
7 (Ionia's Pet
H. Ruiz 111
O. Bravo 113
S. Oarvajal 10M
H. Gustines 110
R. Vasquez
A. Alfaro 105x
G. Milord I02x
N.
th Race 5th Series Imp. 7
ONE
1 Acropolis
2 Plateado
3 Charicleia
4 Baremo
5 Town's Wall
6 Behader
7 Rosier
8 Oliver

F. Alvarez no Depends on iockey
J. Ulloa IV Ran well in last last-H.
H. last-H. r.n.tjr,,,,, uo Hi good 1Msh
A. Perez n1! -Easy win in laft
G Sanchez 108 Showing improvement
A. Alfaro P, Would surprise
B Baeza 108 Doesn't seem likely
J. Avila no Ran weU in last

10th Rac. 1,t. $ru, m). rgi
1 Hostigsdor
2 Embassy
3 Melendez
4 Parasol
F. Alvarez IV
R. Vasqeuz us
H. Gustines w
B. iBaeza 114
"Hi Rac. "Non-Wlnners
Win
Imp.

1 Plata no
2 Corviglia
3 Tatin
4 Calancha

A.f?.,m 110
G. Milord j
B. Baeza no
Samanieg i u

hicago 7

over Baltimore today and lift lifted
ed lifted the Tigers back into a 4th 4th-place
place 4th-place tie with the Orioles.
cicotte relieved Tiger starter
Paul Fovtack with two out in
the fifth inning -and the bases
loaded and Detroit leading 4-1.
He got dangerous Gus Triandos
on a fly ban to left, then held
the Orioles to two hits the rest
of the way to win his- second
game in five decisions.
CHICAGO, Aug. 23 (UPI)
e BanKs cioutea his 4ist
home run today to pull even
with Babe Ruth's 1927 record-
setting pace but it wasn't
enough to overcome the steady
five-hit pitching of BOD Port Port-erfield
erfield Port-erfield as the Pittsburgh Pirates
beat the Chicago Cubs 6-1.
The Pirate staked Porterfield
SIGNED TO MINORS CONTRACT
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) The
San Francisco Giants have signed
outfielder Charles Teuscher to a
contract with the Springfield club
of the Eastern League. Teuscner,
of Aurora, 111., was a University
of Michigan baseball star
Comment
Odds
Purse $450.00
THE DOUBLE
Peel Closes 1:00
Could make it here 5-1
Beat cheap field 20 1
Has strong finish 5-2
Improved in last 5-1
Form indicates 3-2
Dubious ride in last 3-2
Purse $400.00
Peel Closes 1-3
THE DOUBLE
-Always close up
Would surprise
Vastly improved
Seems best here
2 1
3 1
2- 1
3- 2
Purse $375.00
TWO
Pool Closes 2:00
Rates good chance 2-1
Disappointed in last 3-2
Has strong finish 4-1
Distance handicpas 3-1
Could be upsetter 3-1
Would pay off here 101
Pool Closes 2:30
Distance to liking
Nothing recently
Doesn't seem likely
Distance handicaps
Hard to beat here
Prefers more distance
Could suprise again
Rates good chance
Sharpened for this
Depends on start
2- 1
15-1
25 1
50-1
21
251
10 1
3- 1
3-1
10-1
Purse $500.10 Pool Closes 3:00
Should beat these 3 5
Can win: fractious 3-1
Reportedly imnroved i 81
Seems next best 5 2
.tiano.
HANDICAP"
Pool Closes 3:49
THE DOUBLE
Would pay nice odds
Bad legs hamper
Dangerious contender
Reportedly better
- Distance handicaps
- Depends on start
Seems best here
Rates good chance
Pointed for this
Usually refused
Has shown nothing
15-1
25-1
51
3-1
10-1
2-1
3 2
5-2
5-2,
501
50-1
P-.. IKAO.OO Pool Closes 4-10
THE DOUBLE
-Would pay off
Doesn't seem likely
Gets real test here
i right to finish
Impressive performer
Surttrised in last
Could be ready now
251
25-1
41
3-2
EVEN
3-1
31
. ..
Distance to liking
Must'imnrove plenty
Rra wu in last
in virtual match race
Should score again
Not good enough
Best early speed
S-l
4-1
EVEN
8-1
TWO
$500.00 Pool Clones 5:15
EVEN
41
M
m
I
10-1
furm $1000. 1 Peel CleHa S:40
-Weights hindicap
No. 1 contender
- Distance handicap
-Much the best
81'
SI
4-1
15
Purse $450.00 Peel Closes 6:05

-Wld 0Pn rce
- porm indicates
Jockey should decide
jjqt much goorf.

2-1
21
2-1

Yanks

1 Triumph
to a 6-1 lead by the fifth in
ning, collecting two runs in the
first on successive singles by
BiU.Virdon and Bob- Clemente,
lojiowea oy uick siuari s aou
ble. i
re On
Side 01 Pence
PHILADELPHIA (NEA) When
the last two, days of the world
fencing championships are held
at the University of Pennsylva
nia's .Palestra. Aug. 29-30. there
wiu oe more than normal interest
in what usually is a minor sports
event.
That will be when the individu
al sabre competition begins. En-
terea is a stateless entry of four
Hungarian; refugees who fled from
tneir Ked-dominated countrv.
Three of them. Daniel Masav. At.
uta Aeresztes and Jeno Haraon,
were memoers of the 1956 Hun
garian Olympic sauad. Thfev re
fused to return from Melbourne to
their homes and with Coach
George Piller. came to America.
The lourth member of tfeeir sabre
squaa. rpmas Orley, escaped
from his country during the re revolt
volt revolt against Russian troops.
Their special target in the
championships here will be a trio
of Hungarian fencers who' re returned
turned returned frdm Melbourned to Buda Budapest.
pest. Budapest. They are Pal Kovacs, Aladar
Gervich and Rudolf KaFpati.
The Hungarians here are on the
youthful side. Magay, a chemical
engineering student .at- 4he Unk
versity &lifcrnia, ,wW Ha Ha-mori,
mori, Ha-mori, a chemist in Philadelphia,
? ,9les studying at. Stanford,
is 23. Kr4ites, a Iiis Angeles en
gineer, is oldert at 29 and his
style reflects this. He fences the
waj Jersey Joe Walcott used to
box. He dangles his sabre at his
side inviting an opponent to
attack.
The group worked out at the
Pannonia Athletic Club, San
Francisco, for the world rham.
piunsnips.
FAMILY PROBLEM Mrs.
Frank Stranahan found out, how
her golter.husband feels when
Stranahan plays out of Toledo,
this putt refused to drop. Mrs.
MUNCIE Ind. (NEA) With bow
lers, even the good ones, a 300
came is something you wait .for.
And Tommy Zavakos, who in the
late 1920's was considered one of
the, coming keglihg greats, knows
all about it.
Tommy rolled his first Ameri American
can American Bowling League sanctioned
300 game on Nov. 3.1925. He
was a member of a Dayton, O.,
team that won the ABC five-man
championship a' few years later.
cut rawer than- be a touring
bowling star, Zavakos settled
down to running a bowling cen center
ter center here and waiting for that
next 300 game to come.
From 1925 until January 25,
1957-whcn he finally hit 300
again Tommv averaecd 200 in
league competition. But it took
mm 31 years to, hit a perfect
score..

They

Editor: CONRADO 8ARCEANT

4m

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Teams
OB
lm
14Vi
17Vi
17Vi
1
1
25
New York
Chicago
Boston
7 46 .426
65 57 .53
41 59 .516
Baltimore
58
58
58
57
SI
s
45
64
70
403
Detroit
.403
.471
.471
.411
Cleveland
Kansas City
Washington
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Baltimore
Cleveland at Washington
Detroit at New Nork (2)
Kansas City at Boston (2)
Kansas City 002 000 010-3 4 0
Washington 010 000 0001 6 2
Gnm (3-5) and Chiti; Pascnal,
Hyde (9) and Courtney. P Pas-
cual (7-8).
V.- -Tftj
Detroit
Baltimore
300 100 010-5 U 6
000 010 0001 8 2
Cicotte (5) and Wil.
Foytack,
son
Lehman' (8) and Triandos. WP
Cicotte (2-3). LP & 'Portocarrero
(12-9).
Chicago 001 101 inn tm i
New York 000 000 loo i 2
Pierce (14-8) and Battev VnrA
Mohroe (7), Mais (9). and Howard!
LP- Ford (14-7). Hrs-Boone 11)
Skowron (13).
Cleveland 7
Boston 1

Boating Life

Never yet heart! tell of a man's
being charged by a long-fanged
woouchuck, though from the calib caliber
er caliber of the cannons some of our
citizenry blast at them one might
take Marmota Monax to be a right
ferocious, critter. Not as yet ready
to take the place of the grizzly,
perhaps, desipte his grizzled coat,
but the chuck is a beast of parts
at that.
One bit me pretty violently not
long ago. Indirectly he bit me,
that is. Actually, it was while pros prospecting
pecting prospecting around for 'chucks in New
Jersey pastures that poison ivy bit
me, and the chuck was responsible
only because he lived, or had liv lived
ed lived until I dosed him with a .222
pill, in a stone wall that was load loaded
ed loaded with the stuff. The tri-leafed
poson really sank its teeth into
both ankles, and after four days
of treatment ior acute ivy poison poisoning
ing poisoning I'm not disposed to forget that
tough chuck.
Nobody who goes much afield
can mistake the shiny menace of
the creeper with its three charac characteristic
teristic characteristic leaves. Most outdoors men
learn ivy, sumac, and poison oak
before buying their first pair of
hunting boots but some of us
are so sensitive to these skin irri
tants that mere regognition and
avoidance of the poison plants isn't
enough, We need a cure as well
as prevention.
,
Batting around in midsummer
pastures a good deal and not being
one to refuse a wall just because
it has a bit of ivy decoration, I
pick up my itches with some regu regularity,
larity, regularity, always have.
My sensibility isn't really -4ad
enough for seasonal shots; so I've
YOU'LL LOVE THIS COMEDY!
NOW PLAYING
AT THE
PRESIDENTS
THEATRE
Aub ATTRACTION
"IN OLD VIENNA"
(In COLOR)
About the lives and music of
Beethoven, Schubert 'St Strauss

(No. l Pert Ave.)

mm m wni at KNMt HMO! jRf
HfHi'i'imiiHft Jjr

NATIONAL LEAGUI

Teams
W L
P1.
Milwaukee
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Los Angeles
xSt. Levis
Cincinnati
Chicago
71 SI
64 56
44 57
59 61
50 61
mm
.582
.533
J29
.492
.487
.4(3
.459
I
I4V)
xPhiladelphie
mm
.453
x-Reseult not available.

TODAY'S GAMES
Cincinnati at Los Angeles
Milwaukee at San Francisco
Philadelphia at Chicago (I)
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (2)
Pittsburgh 210 030 000-e 10 1
Chicago 000 100 000-1 5 V
POfterfiold (2-5) and Folles;',
Phuups, Hobbie (2), AnoSoi
L61.),?M, (9 nd S. Taylor. P P-Phillips
Phillips P-Phillips (6-8). HR Ranks ). ;
Los Ahgels 000 302 148 10 1 0
Milwaukee 000 000 010 1 4 l
Pizarro, Robinson 6), Trow,
bridge (8) and Crandall; Drysdah
(9-11) and Pignatano. P- Pizarn
(4-2). HRS-Drysdale 2 (8 and 7)
Pignatano (8), Crandall (16)
Hodges (19). 1 ;
Cincinnati opi OOO l(k)-2 T I
San Francisco 012 001 10X 5 9 i
' Purkey.iV. Schmidt (7) and Dai Dai-ley;
ley; Dai-ley; Monzant, Giel (3) and The-1
mas. G Giel (4-3). P PnNieV
(14-8). HRS-Wagief (9), Mays
(22), Kirkland (11).
Philadelphia at St. Louis
(Result not available)

s

done a lot messfag with ivy ran ran-dies.
dies. ran-dies. Jewel weed works pretty well,
but "the best deal I know of for
killing the itch and drying the blisfc
ers is a dope called Zirnox, 'whiclf
the Bristol Laboratories people
cooked up. Still can't wallow ia
ivy just to get, a jane shot on s
woodchuck, but the Zirnoj takei
care of all reasonable ivy doses. (

Service Center Theatre?
T OO A Y
BALBOA
Air-Conditioned
1:30 I
Tot
bold, daring ckma of
love and conflict t
COCO SOLO t'M
Paul Newman
Joanne
"THE LONG
, in Ciner
(Also
Diablo am tm T it
Van Johnson MaVtine Carol
ACTION P THE TI
GAMBOA
Brian Keith Mala Powers
in ClSaSc Jf ApColorl
OATtN 4 jf:0 T:fJ1
June Allison -vDayid Nlven
"mx MAN GODFREY"
fal CinemaSc ope ft Color
Margarita 2:30, 6:15, 8:20
Karl Maiden Natalie
"RniURCR R.tV"
in Cinemascope & Color
IPP50 im
James Cagney
(Also. Showing MONDAY)
SANTA CRUZ ttH
"STEEL BAYONET"

SmiSri

(Also Showing (onrli!

I

Woodward I

flfcSCOPC! I

Sriowlnit MONDAY) I

-1

m 4

M, HJHji .1

71

i

CAMP.BIERD 6:15 8:25
"A HATFUL OF RAIN"
in Cinemascope!

I '
m

A,



8TTNDAT, AFGCST 24, SS

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN

The Search For AAoe Berg

y JIMMY BRESLIN ,". Berg, for 20 vears a shortstop, bination walking encyclopedia ana
" 'catcher and coach with the White de ective magazine.
NSW YORK tNEA) G&ttttS box ami Red S, speaks eight lan Jessel, however, appears to be

WRJ, WH Siwo impossible giuge.. nas mean -or wur ereni ; wen quauueu

C,As chairman of the ft. S. ueg.ees and wdW urea e a aot When John McGraw was mah

Corantitte tor Baseball is Israel, as jeaa ot an Israeli baseba.r ager of Use New York Giants one

lie was asked to tly to Tel Attv 'scuoqj.

-i.-ii : X-i

with ihr first baseball equipment:

that country had seen. Which wis

I 01. his major aims was tu find a

Jewish ballplayer. The ga'a possi

It is nornrtfUy easier to find newl bili ies, McGraw .igured, would be

sy enough. The hard part came mousy uub jJefg. The Yankees, unlimited with such an attraction,
when hi group asked him & find once seeking Moe tor ah Old Tim-' So when a second baseman nam nam-Moe
Moe nam-Moe Berg the old catcher efs game, ,iatf to, Have Aiei Alien ed Andy Cohen arrived in the 1928

eight months teachi

over fheii' bbw to, play baseball,",; at Orient

George-Was sav. -But how arn 1 with Sfo4 af tkni. But us
going to"' fi mm?-' Mt Ts impossible to locate the

I

m

BALBOA

to spend .request over aa ttnai peepie iook i season, miu i w

jw the gids, ior nnns a npiige. loot.-cuiiecior ueiuus m, ....
TP .7 A '. j ..III- U. onlrl f n nanpHA locaol

M(Bj;'''' i. tame up ; wc, nc iu .v..!,

PJ aitt. Bnt usually a tiiani oaiwoy in uu, nave n

COUl- inaur.

But they started to curve conen
after a time' and one afternoon

Jessel waiehed as Andy struck outJ

lor .he second time with men on"

base and the Giants were routed,
8-0.

After the game he and McGrawi

Playground Sports

help and aidf were threatened b ; hustled 10 Belmont Park to cktch

aoics oi.;we anu muuay ugar.v lasi half of the day's card and

rw Atti ')') T,t (i u ni thp Ralhoa whn had i;it pi .11 in a pi l.ft hitf n, U b ,.,,n idorahlp

T .: "t. .jni "A..rt,,. ... w it ... MM-.n.r .. K i

i.v mn: s m nun i mi auu nu ua i war. it waa uuiiu. hunnia mac nil: fin u nnrxf c

-Play Day?' to termina'.e the ia8 this puase of the Fun Day, thai Dv Sammy Reniek. The house1

Summer Playground Kecrea.iion some very exci.ing incidems took got n0 pgce and McGraw was par
activities. It was a day tif fun and place. i tieularly displeased with Sammy's
in some instances shock .or those First o. aU, a young lady ri(je.
Involved. who was a student assistant, was jessei glumly leaned over to
To Ibegin with, boys ind grls (rf rubied by two. individuals who njm. "John," he said softly, "thejr.
the a group of 10 years anu j.i wish to remain uaknop .(Mint: can't ride, either.""
were splu into wo i ..earns and one a BHS nead loptball coaeh, J
placed at either end of the'Stadiuirt and the othei a recreation assnant "ye never stopped trying," Jes-
field. After the preliminaries had who had bet.er use more "Vigoro sei says. "A couple of years later

btetfUkeh cate of,. Col. Anderson on his wavmg hair), and taken j dug up a gUy named John Levi.

wheeled 6u.t the biggest "Amy to fire hose. Poor Charlotte Herr, He was an Indian from the Has Has-Bsl1"'
Bsl1"' Has-Bsl1"' Available, on the field. When after she ahd been t a k e 1, kpi institute, but McGraw thought

this w's 'done ( the 'le". wateri to tne fire .hose sue pok on the we could put him over. But the'

pouting fare hose was taken into appearance 01 a wet cmcKen, irom boys convering tne ciud oegan 10
custody by "Gen." Hoiiue and his top to bottom. Needless to say, the suspect he wasn't Jewish. The oUb

barbell lifting aide "Capt. Fiesta" two ruffians were also drenched. er batters started to suspect he
Morris. , s The second incident occured a wasn't much of a pitcher."
A few minutes Utfcr,, as a short few minutes later, when a new Schmiel Itzek enthusiastically
blast from a, jthistle sounded, the sprint champion was uncovered endorsed the idea Jessel and Me Me-youngster
youngster Me-youngster let but-whoops, yeis.jfor the first, time, in years. The Graw were trying to put over,
shouts, euuV ahU Jveane'i towards wav in which this new champion Schmiel was a New York charac" charac"-the'
the' charac"-the' lone "Arniy Bll" located in .roovec? was unbelieveable, and the er who was always being kided
the middle 'of the field. It was a ftimor is that she has been in se- afjout his accent. Conscious of it,
though struggle, but in some in- cret training for the Central Am-; Schmiel would answer, "Vat's met met-stances
stances met-stances the bll remained steadies: erican Games, -or the 1960 Olynpic ter? Your mudder and father was
Tw seconds at a time, and finally Games. Whichever she chooses, i Indians?"
the team clad in yellow shir.;, we are sure that Mr.. L. teariger' s f
pushed, pulled, heaved, carried will carry along the two dozen kids j (.i j ii f
and rolled it towards the skins goal and someone who is very adept in ofllf 1111 UH HOI jQOI
lin V; : the art of SDravini? with a fir, hnse WM,,,m w" SM"

. in order to scare her on to victory.
At the goal line, it was easy However, due to her dazzling burst

meat for the yellows; m fact, to 0 speed, sne was able to out man.

oe aescnpiive, jusi as easy a ume uver the whole pack and water
that teams df the likes of Notre, too.

Dam, Oklahoma, eU",, womd Now not being -content with'hav

'

9Hh am.m m

snarpsnooier, wim Harry rownaii

j

George Y. 77

Breaker In

oil O nly Record

George Y. Trail of Balboa was
the only shooter to break a rec record
ord record in the Canal Zone Archery
Tournament at the Balboa Gym Gymnasium
nasium Gymnasium this week.
George, 18-year old son of Capt.
S." P. Trail of Balboa Police
smashed the Junior American rec record
ord record for boys of 18 .years'and un

der by J9uf point with a score o'

record

was formerly

Davison of Ctjs-

score of 527 made in

531. Tfa

held 1
tobal

Arcfiary is k serious hobby fif
George who is always highly
placed in the tournament. In 1958
he broke the Canal Zone record
in the INC A round for boys 14
years and under.
Alter this week's tournament,

George becomes too old for the
playground Archers, so he scd
his equipment- and intends to buy ;
a stronger bow and take up hunt hunting
ing hunting and fiekhKNhery.

Archery

, rKB mm

BIG SHOT Harry Pownall holds Sharpshooter, his big hope
for Hambletonian at Du Quoin, 111., Aug. 27.

As Indians Ponder
MovNi Franchise

have. against a team ot we caii-v, ,ng scared the daylights out of ohe wacuinpton (UPn Ownei
SheRrtLSoldst 4todlCuTGriSS Z WashSton
Efe K4ld,to.J; 3 another victm. ffi$ time it was Senators squirmed on a hot spot

xieuaiwu turn mawi.

R i. I K n -i i i u Ihi.

tion. i'came". 4he vounaer set took ,5wS! .iil" au

over twun a smaller uau

.correc-1 mme 6ther than the

keeper, ans announcement they are con

Lopez Believes White Sox
Can Overhaul The Yankees
Because Of Good Pitching

Tourney
Inca (Boys) Record MlnvJl
George Trail of Balboa with a
score of 720 in 1958.
1st John Cooke, Balboa.-851.
2nd Bill Dockery, MargarTti,
404.
3rd John Forensley, Coco S
lo, 361.
Jr. Colombian ( Girls) jwhecort
held by Joan Gibson of Babvi
with a score of 51$ in 1849V' J?
1st Barbara West, Balbbif,
2nd Edna Varela, Garribda,
136. v
3rd Evelyn Hawthorne, Mar,
garita, 58. 4 .',
Junior American Round (Boy)
(New C.Z. record). ',

2nd Pat Dockery, Mir

zoo,
3rd
193.

Team Shoot (Girls) Jf.Oou
lombian Record held bwiGria.

' tuuai a vv 1111 ,1 Ills, "Hill, i IniWII
A total of 52 part in the tourna- by Robert Hodges 0' Cristobal Heusholder 656 in 1944.
ment with representatives from with a score of 617 in 1949. ist West Cooke WhitnesrBo-

oco Solo, Margarita, Gamboa, 1st Russell Watson, Diablo, herty, Balboa. 539. t,,,!
! Diablo and Balboa Playgrounds. 546. 2nd Hill, Eckoff, PeLapp.
i The final results are as follows: 2nd Robert Bauman, Balboa, Hawthorne, Margarita, 349. if;
i San Bias (Girls) Record 516. Bovs Team Shoot record hold.

hald Ki Tfirfv Paliiivirin nt Cr'tetn. Srrf Donr Paric Puu Cl u.. r .:. m .-i1" t-TZ

Dai witn a score 01 40s in mat. tea. 0 galhi
1st Grace Whitney, Balboa, Inca (Girts) Record held by in 1945.
329. Barbara Hanson of Cristobal with

2nd Nancy De Lapp, Marga- a score of 471 in 1945.
rita, 86. 1st Bernice. Hill. Margarita.
San Bias' (Boys) Record 310.
held by Dick aunivan of Cristo- 2nd Nancy Chadwick, Gam-
bal with a score of 412 in 1943. boa, 205.
1st Roy Wilson Diablo, 342. 3rd Joan Whitney, Balboa,
2nd Roy Shuey, Gamboa, 198.

315.

Austin Smith, Gamboa,

Walker Pruitt, Balboa,

By JACK CUDDY
NEW YORK (UPl)-AI Loc
believes his Wnile Sox can over
uaui the Yankees because
pitching.

"Pitching is largely me answe

to what s happencu to

uubs so far this season," said
during a cnat in die augout be.

fore Thursday mgnta game

3rd
288.

Darien (Girls) Record held
by Joan Doherty of Balboa with
a score of 485 in 1955.
1st Paula Leftridge, Coco
Solo, 438.
2nd Linda Fawcett, Diablo

. 360.
j no w i 3rd Hilma Cooke, Balboa,
continued. "But the Yanks got of 339

to a iiying start, as 1 re

of Balboa with a score of 579

1st Trail, Camby, W hlfI
Cook, Balboa. 505.
2nd P. Dockery, B. nqckAPr,
Williford, Brayton, Margarita,.,

3rd Donaldson, &hj

orns, bmith, Gamboa, 273. ,,n

7T

d.)A

n1

wnicn Michel Johnson, 'After ha v!ng put sidering moving their franchise is Stadium

1 u r 1 e y won his first seven
straight, and Larsen his first
straight. Others were doing well,
too, and Ryne Duren proven ..
unexpectedly fine reliefer, but

Awolhe's out now with, an injured Uv,

I believe."
The White Sox began to fin
themselves about July 18 and

the New Yortcri at Yankee since then they rose from six

4 r t I, V I II III 1 w III I II IL 1 111 U IS IMIHII.H H

under no circumstances was savea on a desperate stand, the dozen tnrMnd hi nwn hand on the same He explained:

from its misery of being rolled, iAs car.ed him off hand 3nd foot, 1 matter. off' to a good start because t

pusnen, carried etc. via the conlinuously spraying hose. : if nri.fith reallv wants to mov

During, this minor skirmish by j All of the frolicing boys trouble! his club to Minneapolis which
thf. yingM t,'iw f the. hirei j-wa:.te--nio-avaiL as Johnson was Thursday he refused to deny

snared frbm a drenching by the he may ,haveto- mve, fa$,t,hefor

awe nose noiaer. the Indians .peat nun. 10 p

01 The Day

place to second and pared the

The Yankees got Yanks' lead over them from 1

Darien (Boys) Record

College Athletic
Leaders In Denver
For 5-Day Session

DENVER (UPI) College ath

Ralph Jordan Says SEC

Football Is Big Business

"I don't have any comment u(t
I won't have", Jordan, said.

I it.

ft M

AUBURN, Ala. (UE1) Rilp'i

Jordan, coach of the sect,.,
heil ranked Auburn Tigers 0; 19j7.

said today Southeastern Loaii 1

ence footuall is "big business"

but is not out Qt nana. ibation twice in recjnt years1.,tolt

Jordan made me comment 111 aiiefied violations of recruitn-!i

hope I don't have to commenk

all." ., it

Auburn has been placed vo.prt''

games to lOVi, at the time Lopez ieuc leaders fro

reDlv to an article ouotin? A

burn all America end Jimmy
Phillips which said "it shoui
be limited and controlled more
closely by the NCAA or some
other national body."
"I'm very fond of big tim
football and 1 don't think recruit

m all over the ing is getting out of hand, Joru.

' -fRNIi'BANKSii; UX
Ernie BinKs has 1iif more tome

ruhVlii a Single season than any

ahortstoo in history ana now

teems a cinch to break that
record in his greatest year yst.
TB Chicago Cubs' toothpie'e
ihortstop smashed No. 39 and
M 40 for the Reason Thursday

in leadine the Cubs to a 5-3 vie.
tory over the Pittsburgh Pirates
He droife. in all five of Chioaeo's
rufiS with those blows, plus a
Joyblei ;.. .V 1
(lantfs now U within str'kinv
Histince of his ,ah time short short-itoh.
itoh. short-itoh. record df 44' homers, set i
1955. He iijst missed that mark
last year With 43.
Also, wtt,h 40 homers m lao
games, he's exatftly' evei With the
nape Wbe f-'tfl "rfr-fW t92f

Babe s sre?t j September -snr

Things settled down after a few m0vel he may. have

laugns, ana everynoay, joined in trouble getting.:- V

rnt c m i i'n n 11 vnrttva- ut n n v iiir '.j-aiv 1

wuic lumv ivra. urm "w ai i i jrom UK
races, duck-walking -races.) wheel-imaf

osrrow races,' ana more 01 mis 1

of races were enjoyed by all, and
prizes were given to the first
three places. Upon completion of

I If he decides he jloes want to games ahead of Chicago betoi

Ditchers were dome much bett-riwas talking

than expected, fiut our start wa Get Hitting Support
. r 11 .. ; .. ., il,.,l .,,t,.l,.,..

pad because our piwnmg was su '"t ".'J' climaxed by the National COllt.. played in America."
iar off par." i Donovan, Moore and Pierce, aided rito A.h,,.,; m.ir.!H

Aitnougn me ranKs were luva uy reiieieis iun wu uu ucu.,

country converged here today 101 said. "It is a big time business
five days of meetings that will be; in the SEC and everywhere it is

OlS O!

111. "HllhA

3ierQt approval.

Wrath Sltf ( hdWPs ;
" ITU f IWffUM

les tne Amer.cpTi

m to wovWB

lea1

clir the

If Grifrrtti as

League for permiss

Minneapolis,, he could dray nega.
five' vdte. hot only frcm the Itt

the relay races, everyone lined npidians but also front the New York

for their ice cream qnd candy Yankee! ''njii-Mf tyrimjv'.ltcp

bare,,-compliments of the Balboa

Gym

Griffith rfi$d M tjeny 4 pub

lished rejsm M wifl aW for

'tat

lrobably puts, his roenrd out o' i real vtired, as in the afternoon.
Ernie's reaeh, but thai. record olthe gymnasium seemed as quiet

14 4 'doomed. as a morgue.

It was a fino dav ofr all of the transfer awjroval as soon thfr

youngsters,, as they seemed to real- Senators .end, their current home
ly be enjoying themselves and : stand On Sept. k

having a grand time at it an.
Thus ended the 1958 Summer Re-1
creation Playground Program at :

the- Balboa Gymnasium, and as has
been mentioned before, some of
the assistants and, help also thought
that their time had run out. It
was truly an enjoyable day for the

kids, and they must have been

CORNER, HELP FOR C ARM 5 N

Thursday night's play, Lopez said
he Was confident of overtakii'
Casey Stengel's outfit "becatlse
since- about mld-Jul'y odf pitctu
has returned to normal," where,
as Yankee flingers have been o.
form.
Sox Pitchers Winning
During that period Don Larsen
scored a single victory and mst
three; Bob Turley went 3 3;
Whitey Ford. 3.2, and Art Ditmar,
4-8.
Meanwhile at least three White
Sox hurlers were zooming, i

Donovan with five wins and one

Staley were the important fat' or,
he said. And they have beer,

Billy Goodman.

r r 11

cute ui iiiiiii'i filers. ,, . j. 1 i

Walter Byers, executive director ; u"" tJZ7 iii.i.fr.tprf

l'UIUIH Al I 't UIV1VB ...MtfV.
article.
f'At AMhurn I don't think 1

talked to Coach Jordan more

than three times in the four year?
I was there," the article fluotod

Phillips, a rangy end during his

of the NCAA, said he will n
....... in iiw. ,,.-..,,i;.,A .......

pay mmv s,n, 'xoa;; -7 un 7k

cis iTr,iinr inti laniamnn mrr r--

. Hb 'einmirT imp .lantamnrt : "f

" ." V -Vri:.".'"i De, tne sue 0

Lopez and, his White Sox had)
won seven straight games before
they started their three contes
series at the stadium Thursday
ni?ht. I

gibnal of the 1959 national colea

ate basketball championship tour
nament.
Approval by the executive
committee will send the event In
lliA o t c 'i t ft n m nnr t r 4 k a tVt'wA

'I ti,;CTir o II.. ''"CM ""

, 7 c;,m ume in the ,nast lour years,
pennant, Al said. I m sti Byers said he will ask the
banking on our pitching. just to Louisville, Ky..

1 ham UCIUIC llic sci f. fh,01.f annual fin.lc M .,!

29-31.

Other regional tournament si tt

practices. It drew two three.year

probations from the NCAA, -supported
by the SEC, which. JcepJil
the Tigers from a howl b4rimf(
bast Janukrv and will keen them

iout of bowl activity for tne Jiffa

inree years.
SEC Commissioner ,Btf
Moore of Birmingham declined to
comment on the article. T
wouldn't comment at all on Ihat"
he said. M

the Midwest re.

opened. This would be a elose

race, indeed, if New York hadn

loss, Ray Moore, 4.0, and 3111 y got off to that big jump and W Bjr,, wi Vnntwend are: Eas:

Pierep 4-2. our Ditching had been norma

... ... .. ; ; I' 1 j I tl 1 I If f lU.

, c iiiDii Siii,, in norma training, aiengei ww auung uie iuh uu w uie ecu

weUerejgM' aTd 't! Ms P'tchmg," Lope Ison."

champion Carmen hssiho ,.ui
have ope ol m best ringside' eye
Ne mets c Aipt Aragon in -m Vi
he meeU. Aft Araion in a 2.J
rounder Sept.' 5. Basilm has 3er
laridicapperl by gashes over lil
eyes m previous bouts.

CLARK GABLE AMD BURT LANCASTER

K'dHTY

OF UNDERSEAS WARFARE

'& sitWal
I I ffnfl mt

Hetch -HHI Lancaster,, that Mopeftdrtit
prOdnctlon outfH that has given Us such
film! ai.'lrty.":"'The Bachelor Party" ha
dene M araln-and In a "completely different
li;-miittttoli--pc1lflfito eaHftR wif'i
nnderaeas warfare. A ndehty drama aUM
n Commander Edward I.. B?achV best best-aelling
aelling best-aelling novel "RUN SILENT, RUN DEEP
which opens on Wednetf liv At the Bella
Vista Theatre through United: Artists release.
It stata "the klnt" Clark Gable and hand handsome,
some, handsome, Burl Lancaster in the moat rueg'rri,

hard-fisted rolea of their caraertt They are
officers aboard the USB Nerka, and nnder nnder-seas
seas nnder-seas craft doing dangerous work against the
Japanese during World -War II. The climax
of the film features one of the moat sna sna-nenseful,
nenseful, sna-nenseful, thrill-laden scenes this reviewer
has ever nil nosed In a ratole: that of a
death battle between two submarines, truiv
a unique experience.
Don't miss mighty drama of undersea
warfare, which opens on Wednesday at the
air-conditioned Bella Vista Theatre.

!

ias amp.ET.F.S fNEAl The Ca I

lifornia Boxing Commission should!

know the reason, exlusive here, tor
Rov Harris' multiple cuts. Botn
Patterson and Harris were us.
ing six-ounce gloves, instead of
the eight.ounce pads prescribed by

law. .because of a mistase oy
the New York manufacturer who

sent them out. .;rne amau muia

cut up a man easier, .

Patterson saved Irving Kahn of

TVlenroniDter $14,000 by knocking

. f. -t

Harris into suomission anei uik

12th round. it would have cost

that much more in line cos u ui

fight went three more minutes..

You can l escape uiai

Malley any place arourw uus
town. Trying to wheel into one

of the choice press parking areai
outside Wrigley Field the 'nrght

of the Patterson Harris smnding.

we were told. "Sorry, mese oeio:i,i

to Mr. O'Malley."-,

Patterson has a riason for doin
strenuous sit.upa the minute he ge.
back to nis dressing room after a

tough fight: "It's good for my sio
mach. .Settle! it.".

Charlotte, N. C: Midea

Nbrthwes'ern University, Evans,
ton, III.; Far West Cow Palac,
San Francisco.
The 50 members to the no-i
policy making "conference pf con
ferences" will study three pro
blems:
The general question of col
lege.proferssional relations, with
particular emphasis on collegi
baseball's relationship with pro
fessional baseball.
Plans for improving the ad
ministration of playing rules.
A proposal that high schools
and colleges join in adopting, con con-tlnuing
tlnuing con-tlnuing rules of eligibility.

Phillins as saving. "It was In

he was the director of a big
company and I was just one oi
his boys in, the of ice. If I had
a football problem, I talked to itv.
end coach If I had a problem
that wasn't football, well that wa. wa.-mv
mv wa.-mv problem."
Jordan told United Press Inter
national th;? comment "wasn't
flattering: ;ut it Is tftree tin
more than I talked .to. my. head
coach and I didn't play football s
Auh'ir"1 when: there was big-time
football."

Thp head coach, who guided the
Tigers to an undefeated seisun
last vesr and to second place in!
tht UPI National Board ol j
Coaches ra''""1. declined com- j
met on Phillips' personal at

tack.

I LANOLIN I ti
H F()f tough. '' : I

I

heavy beard 1

w m mssaa

Walter O'Maller

Sports Briefs

Ui S. PLAYER IN FINAL
ST. MORITZ. Switzerland (Upi)
James Ferrin of Washington
D, C. defeated All Akhtar of
India, 6-0, 6.1, ThuTiday in (he
semi linals of the suvreita tennis
tournjament. Ferrin will meet i'.r
nesi Auirre of Chile in the final.
TWO GAMES ARE SELLOUTS
CqUiMBUS, Ohio (UPI) on
State" University announced Thui.
nay a complete sellout tor u;,,
season's football games with wis.
cqnsin and Michigan'. Only bleaci
er seals remain for the, Pursue
and Southern Methodist contests

,vt"

v4nce was' way down and pulled

in nis nuns iu save pennies
not setting up a press headquart.

s(. lusum possible tnousams

-hi ,.1-wi h,ihr than H.r.t when there weren't'etwugh.tick.t

ri "hecause 1 saw mm looutitt? takers hired at the .ballpark to ac-
m, DeCBUSe 1 saw mm IOOMUS miWiBfc ih, la.l ninilU hnv.ne

naresl way through the "T.h

lnaemar Johannson, the Swe 1

ish neavvweight champ of Europo,1

Will "Ol ue Uie uppviim nuvi --u,iwi "li. a J
w . ...I... I,..,,.......... I nnarnl KAMI urli. m 1 aaw Hull liaill I'llir, rUMI.

1ftmail iai: r HIICI UH IU ijiim.'u j iwa w.ivn ...... -

tin-

only 1 MINUT

Bold

DRI CHARGED

mmmw

mSSmm

for a tille defense . .even if the j Richardsoi in England.

swede geis over r.imu .nar in
Stockholm in September. .moie!

likelv is a guy whose name figuies this corner; Harris ioagm ine

British titlist Bryan London .yaar too goon. and Patterson is

one year away. .Ma.cn i. f I in

TTERIES

I i ":. "r ui

WHEN

' '.fyv.'.'-'x

You gotta like the remark o,'.

s i it
The next mulli million dol ai

Best qoute was Jack Hurleyl to I oxiig i this is the electro-:

faptiops gat together and Pal'ei

son is matched with Sonny Listen

5nu wow l'

(

A

,A good fighter, concedes 'V.
mato). .t" "eXt b'S middle.

Tnhe Harris IRoVs brother T: "We

lost the ilattle of the Alamo h!it (,;Mostr?oniprehcnsive view o. box.! wght attraction is Joe Torres, tfce

we dldn l lose UlC name ol oaii itng Kf kicm. ukuic i. -ni- t,vs.c. iierm mean, sianiemaie m rauer
Jacifltb (which for non:histon Bromberg'i "World's Champs ', whft' kudplied him down in
an-. Texas won to the. battle forl-book' which tells -how Tommy t-ni'l' training. .and could trim birth

lBdeepnaence.'. i .wnraa masier,ca nis iamou crivx Hpnson ana nasiuo ngni now.

A Ctcorw Parnassus fie-up is Cus- t'nishihg vary round in Ms QVh

D'Amato's stated wxcusc for nu corner.

in," y.ora rouey as a fanerson 111 noine in rmuy 10 me accomna'i

fttre. .but he rejects him eve
more "hwsii' he lacks courage

Between vou'n'me. If you thinSt

Tommy snadow. boxed a ,Hfjd. PalterKon's post fieht

section IV wi w-' a ylar

. ."The workst thing a guy coui coui-do
do coui-do in the ring Is emit cold in pnb
He, like Folley did in Nevada ..

tiM-n-' i -Uo Vown'ra-i"!! neve

ment of a phonograph record, that; be ween fishts Is a revelation, re

miiyed exactly threfe minutes, ami read the June nun"1 roi this c-i.

imbedded the time interval m Ins inmn "In a closed huddle, hctw

ihead. weight cham' Kw'n I'ntters'm
A now-it can be told: Bill Rosen- hluntlv told skipper Cus D'A m

isohh, the young 'promoter, pamck he" a minimum of five figMs

land Harris, another Lou V.cus led when the I'ailvrsonHarris uu a year.

'1

Loh

I aaaaaa

sssl

I

I

(or Safe, Dependable

inane e Insist on

to Fan Belt

Radiator
1:89"' i 1
1 Brake

j" .'TV- 1

BraM
Fluid
Spark
fluis

ytAN&LSTHMIAN , HIGH W A Y



n

tit;

ft,
Z
I fro
K "ni
a
P'! Ct
I
far,

PHILLIPS Oceansiae Cartages
Santa Clara R d P Phone Pa Panama
nama Panama 3-177 Criflakal 3-1673.

FOSTER'S Cottages and Lara
Beach House Ont milt past (ha
Cttiaa, Phone Balboa IMC.
Houses
FOR RENT Furnished 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom chalet, maid's room ga gars
rs gars j, screen Call 50 No. '25.
Bail VI,.., $115.00, T.I 2-
o4t.
FOR Rf NT Newly built chalet
trues bcJrfcom, iaift living and
fining icon;, kitchen garage,
maid's ream, big yard. Far in in-termatior.
termatior. in-termatior. hcuss No. 11, B8th
treat, Sar. Francisce.
FOR RENT. Spacious and com comfortable
fortable comfortable chalet, street' 94 San
Francisco and 40th No. 31.
Three bedrooms living-dining-roem,
porch, kitchen and garage,
maid's room with service inde independent,
pendent, independent, for information, call
phone 2-2037. Can be teen from
5 at 6 p.m.
FOR RENT: Furnished house
with three bedrooms, living din diningroom,
ingroom, diningroom, kitchen, garage, maid's
room, for only $125.00. Via Es Es-pana
pana Es-pana on side Radio Miramar.
House white.
Rooms
FOR RENT: Furnished bed bedroom
room bedroom ta single person. Indepen Independent
dent Independent entrance, private bath. 46 46-47
47 46-47 Second Ave. 48th Street)
Bella Vista.
FOR, RENT: Spacious com comfortable
fortable comfortable rooms, new house 15th
street No. 6, San Francisco.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: For office, well
situated near "El Panama Hilton"
with air conditioning. Call 3 3-0702;
0702; 3-0702; 2-2466.
IQsfAlin
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (UPI-A (ui
dance counselor says a child's "IQ"
should never be the sole basis ir
determining if he is an excep exceptional
tional exceptional student.
Miss Gertrude B. Woodward told
a recent Student Personnel Con.
ference at Syracuse University
that such things as family back,
ground, vocational interests, social
relationships and extracurricnlf
activities mnM a'so be consid -red.
Mjss Woodward, a teacher an
couselor in California high school
explained:
"If a child is intellectually
well developed -nH yp' is nol matt-re
emotionally or in social r.
l"tkn'hips bpvond his erade, it
wot'ild be unwise tn put him ahe
a grade no matin- what his IQ"

Labor Department Reports:
Living Cost Hits New High

3 WASHINGTON (UPD The cost
of living climbed to an all-time
'ihigh in July for the 21st lime in
'the past 23 months, the govern-
'meM reported today.
J The: Labor Department's con con-I
I con-I gumer price index rose by one-
fifth of one pet cent to a point
.? ana f iL. K f nr-irn IfOraflP

The rise
vm due rhiefly to in-

8. creases in the cost of ransporta ransporta-I
I ransporta-I tion. some foods ami medical
are.
i However, fin an Clague, the
I tn'raisonf of labor statistics,

E hc-oes mai living eosia
Sieve1 o f soon. 1'e foresaw
of- of price stab's!" thai
persist for "six months,
a year"
fSridex las' month vas 2.6
t nbo e July. 19SV
stents rise in consumer pri-
ught wane ncrease of
e to four cents an hour
e 500.000 workers whose
tries ar .pegged to the gov
i.s price index
tbor Department also re
iihe weeWy take home pay
wry worker with hrer de
s ayeraeed 75.. last
compared with $75.55 in
Pepartment said that the
factor in last month s in
in consumer nrices was ,i
pan' boost in Iransrwrta Iransrwrta-la.
la. Iransrwrta-la. i"W boost stemmed
jump in used onr prices
Increase in "isoiine nrices
ice wars ended in several
tjes also boosted trafnsil
II VER TONIC
Jffjr iMaay lki uaa you to Suiter
.Mror: lrjdlllo)., gas. hff-tiuirn, ron ron-atlpnllnn,
atlpnllnn, ron-atlpnllnn, liemlarh Imil l.i.-nili, Hl Hl-lii
lii Hl-lii w, WtlfMNiier-i- am! Min l.liilnlip..,
gel rtlSHlOll fl'lHII li'li' rli. ml hi.lnl
I li(, Ion I ii li I, .Mi- 1 1 i h. in , ,,,)
H- Hill :-: lliij.'li.,i hi ,, Mr

FOR RENT: Modern furnished
apartmant with two bedrooms, six
clescts, living, dining room,
parch, kitchen and faraga, in 46
street Na. 2-61. For information
call to Ttl. 3-1423.

FOR RENT: Two bedroom
apartment. sitting-diningroom,
porch, maid't quarters. Price
$110.00. Phona 0351.
FOR RENT: Cangrejo develop developments
ments developments modern two bedroom,
apartment, etc. hoi water system,
further, particulars, please call
3-4968, after hours 3-6737.
.
FOR RENT: Modern four bad bad-room
room bad-room apartmant, three ream air
conditioned, power room, bar,
three bathrooms, kitchen with
refrigerator, deep freeze, auto auto-washing
washing auto-washing machine, living room,
dining room, balcony, completely
furnished, two car garage. Cam Cam-po
po Cam-po Alegre area. Length of lease,
indefinite. Phone 6 p.m. to 7
p.m. 3-7192 or 3-7186.
FOR RENT: Furnished modern
one bedroom apartment, $55.00
and unfurnished $50.00 in
concrete building. 2nd Carras Carras-quilla
quilla Carras-quilla Street No. 35. For infor information
mation information Tel. 2-2718.
FOR RENT: Furnished one
bedroom apartment $75.00, 44
Street No. 22, Florida Building.
For information Quijano Tel.
2-2718.
FOR RENT: Two modern apar apar-ment,
ment, apar-ment, two bedreoms, hot water,
maid room, near to Panama Ho Hotel.
tel. Hotel. Campo Alegre, Tel. 2-2341
3-3379.
FOR RENT: Furnished or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished one bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Also room with private
bath and kitchen. Phone' 3-0934.
FOR RENT: Three bedrooms
apartment, near Golf Heights and
Coco del Mar. C.-H 3-2978.
FOR RENT: Completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, two bedrooms apart apartment,
ment, apartment, living,' diningroom, inde independent
pendent independent service. 86th St. No, 6
San Francisco, near Roosevelt
Theatre.
FOR RENT: Furnished two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment Bella Vista, for
months, September, October.
Call 3-3387 after 5 p.m.
FOR RENT: Modern twe bed bed-roe
roe bed-roe m apartmant, 2 baths, large
sitting, dining ream, maid's room
with service, nice pleygreunds,
El Cangrejo, call 3-0319 during
office hours
FOR RENT: Two small bed bedrooms
rooms bedrooms apartmert, for couple
without ehlMrens, street 14, Pai Pai-tilla
tilla Pai-tilla No. 88.
AGREE ON TREATY TEXT
LONDON rtrrT) Rriish and
Iranian officials have reachc
agreement on the provisional text
of a treaty of commerce and
navigation, the British Bnard of
Trade announced last night.
The department's report showed
that food prices rose one-tenth ot
one per cent last month, with in increases
creases increases in pork, eggs and milk
more than offsetting seasonal de declines
clines declines in fresh fruits and vege vegetables.
tables. vegetables. Average food prices in
July were 3.7 per cent above a
year ago.
Fresh fruit and vegetables pri prices
ces prices continued to decline from
their May peak, dipping 1.8 per
cent in July. Coffee prices also
registered a drop.
Bu' processed fruit and vege vegetable
table vegetable prices were generally high higher,
er, higher, mainlv because of an increase
in !hf m ice for frozen and canned
orang juice.
A one halt of one per cent rise
in medical care stemmed mainlv
from substantial boosts in rates
for group hosoi'ili'Dtion in Min Minneapolis.
neapolis. Minneapolis. Philadelphia, and PiMs
burgh. Physicians anrl dentists
alsi boosted their fees.
Rpn; rose one-tenth of one per
cent. Bui lower prices were re reported
ported reported for home renairs. mainten maintenance
ance maintenance and house furnishine
Hicher nrices in barber and
b-aii'y shops prompted a one-fifth
of one per rent increase in per personal
sonal personal care costs. Clothinp prices
remained unchanged for the third
slriiphl month.
The cost of readin and recrea recreation
tion recreation dropned one-tenth of one per
cent. A drop in 'he nricp o snor'.
insr goods and radios more than
offset increases for TV sets and
rpoairs, movie, admissions, and
newspapers.
A1P CONDITIONERS
-GIBSON-
Capacities to fit a.ny require requirements.
ments. requirements. 5 vears (uarantv
Duty free. Trice for C. Z.
residents.
TROPELCO, S A.
4!Hi, f?'. 6-d ,,V.l Rlana
TEI 5-1285

Automobiles

FOR SALE: 1954 Buick Cen Century
tury Century two-door sedan. Perfect
cendition. Tel. Balboa 2194
evenings.
FOR SALE t1 958 Chrysler, 4
door, RxH 7000 miles, white
gold, fully power equipped,
many extras, may accept trade
in, cost new $4 800. Like new
condition at $3,800. Rodman
3784.
FOR SALE: 1953 Dodge 4 4-dcor,
dcor, 4-dcor, two tone Good condition.
$600.00. Phone 2-1552 Bal Balboa
boa Balboa evenings.
FOR SALE: Late model MG-TD,
duty paid, excellent condition,
recent overhaul, motor, brakes,
transmission perfect, top, tires,
upholstery. 10 coats. Hand rub rubber
ber rubber lacquer, can be financed.
Call 2-1870 office hours, 3 3-1252
1252 3-1252 after hours.
FOR SALE: Dodge 1955 hard
top coupe, automatic gear shift.
Duty paid. Tel. 3-7186 or 3 3-7192.
7192. 3-7192. FOR SALE: Buick Super 4 door
sedan, 1953, one owner, 4 new
tires, low mileage, excellent
condition. Dynaflow, radio, heat heater,
er, heater, E-Z Eye glass. Call 83-4122.
FOR SALE: 1955 Oldsmobile
"Super 88" hardtop. Black with
radio, hydramatic and other
Deluxe equipment, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, throughout. Tel. Gatun
5-566 or Cristobal 3-2430.
FOR SALE: Bargain !!! Two Two-tone
tone Two-tone (Black b Cream) 2 door
Chrysler "New Yorker" 1957
automatic (buttcn) power steer steering.
ing. steering. Radio, tires & upholstery
in excellent condition. Low mile mileage
age mileage and duty paid. For infor information
mation information Tel. 3-7478 Panama.
FOR SALE: 1955 Buick Two Two-tone,
tone, Two-tone, hardtop, new tires, new
seats, perfect condition, radio,
airconditioned, duty paid, good
price. Panama 2-5485 before 5
p m. 4-0642 after 5.
FOR SALE: Studebaker 1950,
two door sedan, good condition.
$250.00. Phone Panama 3-4679.
FOR SALE : Studebaker Com Commander
mander Commander V-8 coupe. Starlight
Regal 1954. Property of L. H.
De Vore, deceased, car may be
inspected in the parking lot of
the Credit Union, Balboa, Canal
Zone Tuesday through Friday
August 19 through 22 and Mon Monday
day Monday 9 :00 a.m, to 11:00 a.m.
and 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and
Saturday August 23 from 9:00
a.m. to noon. Keys are in Credit
Union office. Not duty paid.
Bids will be accepted throuqh
August 31, 1958 by mail by the
the undersigned at the below
nildrcM. Terms cish. The right
to reiect any or all bids is reserv reserved.
ed. reserved. Balboa Heichts.
W. H. DE VORE
Executor
Box 253
FOR SALE:! 55 Pontiac hard hardtop.
top. hardtop. Hydromatie, power brakes,
full leather upholstery, under
coated. 5 new tires. Only 12,600
miles, clean new car conditien,
throughout. Phone Balboa 2 2-2850.
2850. 2-2850. Jenner Of Indiana
Gives Farewell
Speech To Senate
WASHINGTON (UPD 'The
jtime has come for me to take my
i leave."
So spoke Sen. William E. Jenne. Jenne.-Ion
Ion Jenne.-Ion the iloor of the Senate yester
day as he began an 11-page "fare "farewell"
well" "farewell" speech. It began softly, as
have many of his speeches in the
I past 12 years?
i But before he was through his
J voice was raised to his customary
hoarse shout and his dark rim rimmed
med rimmed glasses waved ih his hand
at his castigated "wild .eyes so socialists,
cialists, socialists, ambitious intellectuals
power seeking demagogues and
hidden Communists" who he
said had made America "sick
with a sickness that goes very
deep."
An end to the emotion-charged
speeches of the 50-year old In Indiana
diana Indiana Republican will be one of
the most visible and audible audible-evidences
evidences audible-evidences of his retirement from
Congress at the end of this ses session.
sion. session. But his departure more im importantly
portantly importantly marks a thinning in the
ranks of the staunchly right-wing
Republicans who could barely
muster an audience for Jenner'j
farewell speech.
While Jenner has been most
concerned with fight n g com communism
munism communism and lately Supreme Court
decisions, he also has been a bit bitter
ter bitter critic of federal spending pro programs,
grams, programs, foreign aid and many
aspects of American foreign
policy.
The personally amiable and
friendly Jenner, leaving Beats on
(he important Finance and Judici Judiciary
ary Judiciary committees, summed up his
estimate of his last session of
Congress by saying It had en
gaged in by auy Congress.'.'

i

Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: Baldwin Upright
piano. Phone 2-4329.
FOR SALE: Foam rubber mat mattress
tress mattress with box spring $85.00.
Phone Panama 3-4679.
FOR SALE: Photo, hobby, out outfit,
fit, outfit, $20. Dishes, $1. Call 2 2-4497.
4497. 2-4497. Ancon, Bldg. No. 0589-A.
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS EQUIMENT FOR SALE
Sealed bids, for opening in pub public,
lic, public, will be received until 10:30
a.m., August 29, 1958, in the
office of Superintendent; Store Storehouse
house Storehouse Branch, Balboa, for row
boat; clamshell bucket; cash
registers; core drills; engines;
pipe forms for manufacture of
concrete pipe; drill pross; grind grinder;
er; grinder; wrapping machine; scales;
outboard motor; pumps; sofes;
tanks; tires and rubes; winch;
conveyors; cargo trucks; wwald wwald-ino
ino wwald-ino machines; drills; operating
table; basal metabolism ap apparatus;
paratus; apparatus; infant incubator; motor
scooters:, qrindstons; transform transformers;
ers; transformers; and theadinq and pipe cut cut-lino
lino cut-lino machine. For further infor information
mation information and copy of Invitation
No. S-58-418 contact office
of Superintendent, Storehouse
Branch, telephone 2-1086.
TO REDUCE JET SOUND
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Navy says it has ordered $1,400, $1,400,-000
000 $1,400,-000 worth of sound suppressors
designed to muzzle the roar of jet
planes before takeoff.
"GET STREAMLINED"
Excercisinx Machines. Turkish
i tie McLevy way Body Massage,
bath Trained operators tor ladies
nd gentlemen Got results.
MASSAGE SALON
Services "SCHOLL'S"
Products
I. Aioeemena Ave. S3 -IS
Tel. S-2?17
HI-FI RECORDS
CLASSICAI POPULABS JAZZ
33 13 B.P.M.
AGENCIAS DIAZ
37th St. No. fi A
New shipments every week.
Open Thursdays and Saturdays
Nite until 9:06 p.m.
PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR AN I
RECORD YOU WISH.
The Magic Super Seasoner
AM0-M0T0
(Monosodium Glutamate)
Available now in the
Canal Zone.
Classes in Ballet Tap and
Toe Taught by
DOROTHY CHASE
will be resumed in October.
Registration dates to be
announced later.
August 15 to Sept. 15
8 DAY
LIMA TOUR
Inc. air fare, transfers, tours,
and deluxe hotel
$180
leave evev Tues. and Fri.
FIDANQUE TRAVEL
Tel. Panama 2-1GG1
the first and only
transistor
SPEED LIGHT
no more burned out tubes
guaranteed tor life
work on flashlight batteries
angle of To
only $27.50
International Jewelry
155 Central Ave.
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co..
for rates ami Information
Tel. Panama 2 055;
NEW!
SPEEDLITE 40
ONLY $24.00
BAM AM WEIGHT
ONLY 8.3 Lhs.
I I MAIMS II
Panama
Coliin

Home Articles

FOR SALI: 1955 FrPjieUir
washing machine, 60 cycle,
gcod conditien, $125.00. Al Al-brook,
brook, Al-brook, phona 86-2213 Qtrs.
329-B.
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, nine
toot Westing house new, 60 cycle
unit. Simmons couch. 60 cycle
h.p. motor. 0418 Venado
Stieet Ancon, Bslboa 1209.
FOR SALE: Duncan Phyfe Style
blend mahogany diningroom set
consisting ot dropleaf table, buf buf-tel,
tel, buf-tel, six chairs, with tapestry
cushions, and chest for silver and
crystal. Perfect condition. No.
5711-C Snonts Street, Diablo.
FOR SALE: One living room set,
regrigerator and gas stove. Vilta
hermosa, Ricardo Mirb No. 1 5-2.
FOR SALE: Combination China
closet and bullet solid maho mahogany,
gany, mahogany, 6 dining room chairs,
mahogany. Simmons couch. 3
piece Haywood Wakefield bed bedroom
room bedroom suite doble bed chest of
drawers, bureau with mirror. Call
83-4122.
FOR SALE: 3 pc. livingroom
set, 2 end tables, 1 coffee table.
Excellent condition. $75.00. Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2-3307.
FOR SALE: 8 cu. ft. all por porcelain
celain porcelain Frigidaire. new unit for
quick sale, $60.00, 60 cycles,
2 metal beds 34 cotton mat mattress
tress mattress $25.00. 1 metal dresser,
1 bamboo chair 587, Bayano
Street, Ancon.
FOR SALE: Leaving must sell
one 9 piece, dining room set,
cream color, two living room
chain. Ave. Nacional No. 36,
Apto. 9. Tel. 3-3404.
FOR SALE: Easy spindrier, 60
cycle, $70.. 00, chest of drawers,
$6.00, sofa spring frame, $5.00,
all excellent condition, also
small China cabinet, $3.00,
redwood 6 ft porch shade $1.00,
750-B. Balboa Road, Tel. Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 3745.
APPLIANCE
BARGAINS
"AMANA" Built-in Freezer
6.6 cubic foot Can be
placed with or around
your kitchen cabinets
or in any suitable ins installation
tallation installation coppertone
finish New introductory
offer.
Regular $595.00
I Value for ...$399.00 J
I
Used "LEONARD" Electric
Range Apartment size
four hurners very
little use perfect con condition.
dition. condition. Originally $225.00
NOW ... $90.00
"MASTER GRANDE" Small
washing machine ideal for
d i a p ers, handkerchiefs,
children's clothing, etc.;
never used but shopworn.
v Originally $65.00
I
I
i
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
NOW . $25.00
"HOOVER" washing ma machine
chine machine very lii'tle use
perfect condition.
Originally $174.00
NOW . $140.00
"HOOVER" Washing ma machine
chine machine used in perfect
condition Automatic
electric wringer washes
in four minutes.
Originally $174.00
I
I
I
I
I
I NOW . $140.00
I 'LAC fan 24" three speeds
(fan & air extractor) ne never
ver never used hut shopworn.
I Originally $94.00
NOW . $69.00
I "ESKIMO" fan lfi" used
w perfect rnnditlon.
i
I
I Originally $68.00
mow exonn
. . ?H7.VV

Tel. 3-0S83,, I
N. 1 VIA ESPAfM

seaaaaaaaHaaaaaaaaaaaaHU.PieiBH BBBBIllBaar

Boats & Motors

FOR SALE: Motor generator set
complete with voltage regulator
and remote control. 25 cy. to 60
fy., HO Volts, 60 cy, 750 watts.
VoigHander prominant 35 mm.
camera, complete with 100 mm.
telephoto lens, viewfinder, sun sunshade
shade sunshade and filter with case. Phone
Balboa 2-3069.
Lesson
Dorese Waites School of Dancing
Reopening September 4th. Regis Registration
tration Registration August 28th, 29th, 30th;
10:0015 5:00 Knights af Colum Columbus
bus Columbus Hall, Balboa.
Bnllroom dancing included in
all classes. Dorese Waites School
of Dancing.
Learn Spanish with Mrs. Ro Romero's
mero's Romero's Conversational System,
beginners and advanced pupils.
Lessons: Mornings, afternoons
and evenings. 4th of July Ave Avenue
nue Avenue T 1-352, in front of Quar Quarry
ry Quarry Heights.
AROUND
BY
'T'Vlft f 1 J Al

me auiM uuunu oiar ana,n,,f

uciaiu uumpusing room siai-i re remained
mained remained on strike as we prepared
this column. It would seem thai
both sides do have a certain a a-mount
mount a-mount of reason in their argu
ments, however, it is not always
tnat the strong can attempt to
crush the weak without having
ineir. hands lull.
To quote a friend of ours.
"Even after the air is cleared it
is going to be a difficult task to
feel comradeship that once ex existed
isted existed at the century old SandH."
Quite often an ounce of pre prevention
vention prevention is indeed better than a
pound of cure.
The increased tuittbn rates for
the canal Junloj College have
posed a definite; problem for Gov.
Potter, who ltfst week was flood flooded
ed flooded with complaints anent this
matter.
However, we do believe that
the Canal Zone's maximum au
thority will resolve this problem
reai jpronio.
The opening of the Sarita
flower shon next Sunday will be
sparked by a flower show which
will mark the first time that
members of the Pacific Ever
green Garden Club will be dis
playing their talent in Panama
city.
Directed by Mrs. Pat Morgan
since its inauguration several
years ago the Garden Club is
noted for having presented some
of the best flower shows here
abouts.
Birthday honors went out to
Jaime Hamlet last Thursday on
the occasion of his eighth birth
day.
Our condolence goes out at
this time to friends and col
leagues Chelo and Papo Gonza Gonzalez
lez Gonzalez on the demise of their old
man last Monday.
A "Tea Party" was given by
Mr. and Mrs. Afrustns George,
at their residence in Parnne
Lefevre last Tuesday In ce'l ce'l-bration
bration ce'l-bration of their fourth anni anniversary.
versary. anniversary. Attendinr the party were:
Mr. and Mrs. A. George and
son. Mesdames C. Fred. R. Hill,
A. Kidnev. I. Prnfus, t. Miller
nd M. Ford; Misses M. Bent,
J. Woatswain and Messrs O.
Miller and G. Kelly.
Have you received one of the
Club Altamlra's Invites? They
are real gone. On the back of the
invitation as if coming from a
new horizon is a glowing package
of the new filter-tip Panama
clearette. We have been told that
the nersons who attend the
club's anniversary dance, the
main purpose of which Is to raise
funds to sustain its charltabie
activities, will be receiving, a a-r"on
r"on a-r"on other surprises, a pack of
the latest, discovery In the smok smoking
ing smoking industry.
Wilfred Smith, Quartermaster
DiviMon emnloye at Corozal, re returns
turns returns to work tomrorow after
soenrtlng a three-week vacktlon
locally.
Two way birthday greetings
went, out to Mrs. Delflna DuSaire
and her daughter Berta.
On the local political scene, the
bt brass of the National Patrio Patriotic
tic Patriotic CoaHtion Party held a couple
of meetings and according to
published reports were thrashing

WANTED: Female bilinoual

secretary with experience. Good
I'.alery. Hive working day a
week. Box 525, Colon.
WANTED: Bilingual secretary
shorthand, also comptometry.
Servicios y Colocaciones 3-7028,
Camara da Comercio,
WANTED : Three young ladies.
Must be presentable looking.
Easy work. Call apartment No. 8,
Chamber of Commerce Building,
Monday, 8, Co. United Mer Merchants
chants Merchants Organisation.
Would like to place my laun laundress.
dress. laundress. Honest and dependable has
been with present employer 1 1
years. Call 83-4122.
Real Estate
FOR SALE: 3000 meters of
land on Nuevo Arraijon, high highway
way highway Ave. Central 2919. Tel.
3-1016. i
TOWN
TOM
teh "hilltOD" agreement
reached last May in connection
wiwi me student strike.
The Amigas de Caridad cele
uraiea tneir anniversary last
week with a brunch at the
o rangers Club in Colon.
The Women's Activity Club ob
served their tenth year of oper
auon witn a cocktail party.
un,c a gei-iogetner it was.
With music supplied by Oscar
yne ana us 'Ambassadors
guests; seemed to have enjoyed
wiemseives tnoroughiy according
iu unurinauon received.
The personnel of the club are'
Mrs. Cleopatra Lamntte Mrs
Evangeline McDonald, Mrs. Inez
aimpson, Mrs. Josephine Smith
Mrs. Catalina McDonald. Mrs. L
Monlouis, Mrs. Nena Soley, Mrs
Euralda McDonald
A Jamboree night is on tap for
the Longshore Friendly Society
on Monday, Sept. 1, that's Labor
Day. The frolic will be held at
the Rainbow city Lodge hall and
friends of the, organization is
expected to jam the place.
Last Thursday Dorothy Fran Francis
cis Francis departed for the U.S. for
residence in the U.S. and of
course the popular singer takes
with her the best wishes of her
numerous friends to make
good in the land of "opportuni "opportunity."
ty." "opportunity." Grin and Bear it
An old lady not knowing the
technical terms used in bank
negotiations telephoned the bank
and said she wanted to arrange
for the disposal of a thousand thousand-dollar
dollar thousand-dollar bond.
She was asked "is the bond for
redemption or conversion? to
which she hotly retorted "Am I
speaking to the Fifth Municipal
Bank or the Fifth Baptist
Church?''
Thought for Today; Would
you have your songs endure?
Build them on the human heart.
RP7 YOU Looks as if the hot
in Chicago's BrookfleUi koo. At
billed stork mms lo be telling
to get off.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A", DIABLO
BOX 121 1. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709

SERVJCES
TELEVISION SERVICI
STC KcrAlK Sf
YOUR HOME, $3.50
Tou gat service the same day
WE GUARANTEE OUR WORK
LOS ANGELES trained techni-e'"-
Crawford Agencias. Phone
3-19p5 Tivoli Avenue 18-20.
TELEVISION SERVICI
Prompt service
Fair nrir
Boston TcrknM...
- ,
JO years In Immu4.
.
MONTHS GUARANTEE ON
,PARTS INSTALLED. Ask for MR.
TV. Panama 2-3142.
T.V., radio, Hi-Fi, transmitter
repairs. Call Williams & Shirley.
Phone Panama 2-51 IS.
Rules Of Road
DENVER (UPIK"The speel
on country roads will be a secret
and the penalty for every mil in
excess will be ?10."'
This was the of the "RhU.
the Road" which governed traf.
fie in Colorado nearly a half-cen.
tury ago, largely due to the ach
vities of the Farmers' Anti-Autol
nnMMie League.
Other rules in 1912 included:
Autos running on eonnrrv maeta
at night must .send up a skyro skyrocket
cket skyrocket every 150 vards. wait dah
minutes for .the road ahead to
clear, and then Drnceeri with xmi
Hon, blowing the horn, (or ring ringing
ing ringing a bell) and shooting roman
candles.
"In event the road l hetti
used by a horse and said horse
refuses to pass said horseless car carriage,
riage, carriage, the driver of the auto will
dismantle it as duicklv as twMotihifi
and hide it from view in foliagw
RUSSIAN SHIP EXPLODES
VIENNA (UPI) A Russian
tank ship exlpoded in drvdoek a
the Danube Riber near here vea.
terday, injuring five Austrian work.
cis semmsiy.
PLAN LITERATURE STUDY
CHAPEL HILL. N. C. fTIPT-
An international congress on lit literature,
erature, literature, expected to attract mori
than 200 persons prominent in the
field of literature, will be held on
the University of North Carolina
campus Sept, 8-12, it was announc announced
ed announced today. ,-
TWO QUAKES RECORDED
PASADENA. Calif. fUPnTv
earthquakes of "medium" int..
sity about'52,00 miles to the annth.
east were recorder! inAav t,.
California Institute of Technolo Technology's
gy's Technology's Seismological Laboratdry. It
said the quakes probably occurred
beneath the Andes of northern
Chile.
frvsufbody mem
weather hns snt trmnort ii
any rate, this African shoe-
Keener Larry Sharman wherei

i
!,' r .: ...



ft'

page ran

AY, AUGUST U, MM

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN

Si

een

Jarreff,

amouj

inaer

a

Of Oetepkone J4our

By FRANK WTU1URK. iJU
From MUSICAL AMERICA
The applause in New Yprk's
arnegie Hall had died down On
he stage the men in the orcnes
ra were putting away their in
Hruments ana slowly leaving the
stage The Ueht in the radio-con-

irni hnnth nn lnneer burned. It

mac a Mnnriav nieht. and the

broadcast of "The Telepnone
Hnnr" hac iust ended.

As the aauience departea irom
the hall, small, excited your?
man about the age of ten found
his way backstage. There, in the
eenter of a crowd of people who
had comt to congratulate her,
stnnri th artist who bad been

the soloist In the concert. The
. wont nn in her and said wiih

(Hp H rprttiPSK thai oniV a cmi'i

can manage:
"I was the only one in the whole

thpatrp who could say you ar

my mother." ...
Nntine his eves shining with

pride, Eileen Farrell fw she
had been the soloist at this broad broad-east
east broad-east smiled warmly; her son's ap

preciation meant more to her
than any backstage congratulate)

ry words, no matter now sincere.
Today, when we think of the ma

ny celebrities whose life off the
siaee often sounds in print like

their life on the stage, Eillen Far
rell is an exception. No matter
how much she enjoys her high

position in the music, world, her
heart is most of all with ner
family and to sacrifice the priva

cy of her home lor ner career

would b unthinkable.

W a siraneer visited her house

on Staten Island, an hour's jour
upv hv taxi and ferry from the

; heart of Manhattan, tirst. of a'l
l.h would notice the magnifirent

l panorama of New York harbor

that can be seen irom uie ami-,
windows of the living room. Then
'. turning to the tastefully furnished
room Itself (Miss .Farrell recent
wy redecorated the whole house
herself), he would find little ex
cent for a grand piano to indicate
.that the woman who lived here
was a famous Singer.

.H mieht first be greeted by

her husband. Robert Reagan, who
it a member of the Staten Island
police force and president of the
local Community Concert Assopi
t'on. and then he introduced to
their four-year-old daughter, Katfi
leen, who at the moment is mer
rily drawing pictures in the din
lng' room The straneer might be
told that Miss Farrell would soon
1 h nresent. Rieht now she is talk

lng on the. telephone with the dor

tor, for her son Robbie is up
stairs in bed with a slight fever.

Two energetic boxer dogs. Branay
and Shewy, WJShen probably

flftPTB! HrBKF "neocnr neiurr
(the stranger could realize how it
happened, he would feel complete
ly at home.
"You won't find our life much
different from, other. American."
fMi's's Farrell will say after being
.introduced. "In the morning, the
children have to get to school
Then I drive to the market. I love
tn tin shonnine. and I have a real

passion for supermarkets. Then
there are a thousand things to do

around the house. It doesn t seem
inntf hforp it's time to put the

children to bed. We go for drives
Ha. autlnna nn Sundav. So yo"

' top nurs is a normal life. NotH

ina really haODehS to me."

rino should not take the last

Btatpment literally quite a li

h hannened to Eillen Farretl.

And one cannot honestly say .hat
f she leads the life of a typical

' housewife, for she is girted wit.i
'an exceptionally beautiful voice
v Twil hrQinc nf this cift her li e

rannol be as normal as she would

s i!tr nripn shn must leave ner

" family for ber many engagements
fio fn the 1957-58 season In o-

pera, concert, and recital. But.
she tries to arrange her :neauie
so Bhji will jM home one week out
of every three. '"' '
""-One-wed talk with Miss Farrell
only a few minuees to realize
what a natural and unassuming
,m.n chp I. Her oersonality ra

dlates a charm and sincerity that
imediately command attention attention-...hnthnr
...hnthnr attention-...hnthnr .at home or on the con

.t niaifnrm. When she laughs

h. lanohs with gusto; when sne

discusses her career, she speiks
frankly without overdramatizing as
some artists are wont to do. She
is clearly a person who has ic
i wo., iminri ii and eniovs it.

Miss J) arreii oescriueu mi -"""

Eillen to make her first trip to

New York City (in September.
1$3J, so she could audition witb
Merle Alcock, a former Metropo
litan Opera contralto. Atter Miss
Alcock bad heard Eileen, the ex
perienced singer told the young
lady that she had great possibm
ties. Then Miss Farrel began her

first formal training, under tne

guidance of Miss Alcock.
"At first I didn't want to stay

in New York," Miss Farrell says

todav. I was so homesick ami

lonely. I wanted to go nome tney
day after my arrival. But my

mother told me I must stay ana
h was rieht."

Life in those davs was no oei

rnses. as Miss Farrell de

scribes her first 'months of study.

After one year, her money 21) ran

out, and she returned nome to
earn some. To find funds for fur

ther study, she took church jods

and even tried selling mercnan
dise in stores.

liiu

Mill

omens

III N ...

Kew lAJaftpaperS, Jab

I m

a

mc3

furniture

ounqsterS

n

rominen

Wilt Be Site Of

groped

anama

future

Ifjational JPaM

Her first, big opportunity came

in 1941. She was auditioned at lo
lumbia Broadcastfng System by
Lucille Singleton, who them told

Jamec Fassett about tne onner

ful voice she had heard. Sooi

Miss Farrell was signed oy tne
nfttwnrk and began to be heard

regularly on the radio several
times a week. Her success was

so great that after appearing on
a series 0" programs titled "Songs
of the Centuries," she soon had
her own program, "Eileen Far
rell Presents." This was a half
hour show that for five years
was broadcast throughout the V
nited States, Canada, and (by

short wave) Europe, soutn Atner
ica. and the Far East.
What did Eileen Farrell learn

from all this? Obviously through
these numerous appearances -ahe
acauired the assurance and poise
that can come only from the i
perience of knowing that people
are listening to you. But equally
important for her in years to

come was the tremendous reper

tory she was able to build uo bv
nreoarine a program every week.

Always one perat aria was W

quired in addition to tner wonts

This miem sound use a nay,
gering task to a young sineer
and it certainly is But Miss Far
rell does not approach her won?
whether learning a particularly
trying role or an easy song in
terms of difficulty.

hood as normal and, ".'very, ordi
nacv.t' Bom in Wnlmtic, Con

ni$icut;!he was brought- up m
J ioasenWhere muti? was
heard every day. Her parents

were bo professional singef.i,
he motner taught voice-and

n.nn i.ntpr thp family lived in

Norwich, Connecticut, where her
rnotha a church organist and

chdir director. Then came juhoth
er move this time to Woosocjt
et. Rhode Island. It, was here ,F.i

leen was graduated from secoh
dnwr achool.
Recalling her early musical ex
pcriences, Miss Farrell will tell

ns was lust natural

thino I had no ambition to De

come a great singer. I had none

o" the typical "crusnes on opera
stars as many singera do. I io
ah i7.7. and all ooDular music.

.nri T still do. It would he hari

for me to say when mu first pub public
lic public appearance was. When I waa
jour o five. I waa a raindrop, or
something like that, in a school
r a". Uv out performance I par
ticularly loved, was as Buttercup
in my secon larv school's produc
tion of M,S. HNllore'
, After gVadtjetionwem secondary
school. EUtto thought that she

would "r to a art school. There

aoplans lor oecomin

were sti

u siiger. S.ie ta studied pino
hut had never studied voice for

mallv. though her mother had en
couraged her daughter to deve.ip
her voice paturally. It was n"

mother, however, who persuaded

"When I learn something aew.
I don't think about how hard it

is. I just sing it. If I thought of

all the difficulties involved, I d

be nervous wreck before

started to sing.

This philosophy Miss Farrm

owes to Eleanor McLellan. with

whom the singer has worked for

the last eight or .nine years mn

to whom she feels deeply inaeDt

ea.

JTo relate the amazing adap

bility of Eileen Farrell to the va

nous media o' musical periorn

ances U-a way of following her
professional career. For though

she now appears in an neias wn

ra they wer enot approached at
the same time, but rather in grad
ual stages.

First her career was centered

on radio Though she gave an w.

casional concert, she found it lot

possible to coscentrate on oo'i
fields. When radio su fered a sef

back with the development of tel

evision in the 1940's, the opporti
nities on. radio became increasinc

ly fewer and so Miss Farrell he

gan to devote her time ano ener

Uies to the concert world. Soon

she was. appearing irequenuy wn.i
leading conductors and orchestras
including the New York Philhar
monic under Bruno Walter and a
gain under Leopold Stokowski. He'

first extended recital tour was
made in the 194748 season.

During 195051 she estaDiisncu a

record, for she sang 61 times
with the New York Philharmonic

the greatest number of perform

ances in a single year that anv

artist had nn witn me orcnesir
during its 114year existence. When
the orchestra, under Dimitri.M'
tropoulos, journeyed from Carne

ie Han lor a wowee stay
he Roxv Theatre in New York,

she was the soloist.

"We did our snows a ay ana

worked like dogs. There was no
thing routine about those perfosm
ances. Each time1 1 sang Mr. J"

tronoulos made me feel that it

was a new experience.-
However, her duties .were not
completed witb the orchestra at:
er those 55 performances. Belora
the season was over the had
siing Elektra ,. .It". American
premier of MUhaud's "Les- Cnoe
phores," Marie in a- cwicert ver
-: t nin. "UlnMopt" hot'-

under Mitroooulos apd in an
allWagner progrvm conducted b
Victor de Sabata.
An important milestone in her
creer came in the fall of
When she sang the title role in
Cheruhlrrt's "Medea" in a con

cert version with the Ameriean
Opera Society in New York. Her
erfof maiice made such an impact
that manv nanl voiced what
they had wondered all aloi"
Whv doeot F,ilen Farrell appear

in staged opera? It waa not Iopp
be "ore this question was answer
ed, for within the next year sh
had turned to ooera.,In the spring

of 1956 she appeared as Satttii'.zi

in "i avaiierip Knsneana in ram

M. Florida. That fall she mado
Her debut with. the S Franels

co Onera. as Leonora tn "li ith

vatore"' nA rh"in the M575S

season she sings tor tne nrst un.e
with ie rvi"an Tvrlc Opera. In
the title role of "La Gioconds
"I want to sing In ll musiell
fields" is the reason Miss Fane'l
pfves for turnin" to joera. Many
neople have wondered why sh
has not sunc the Wnnerisn roles
ti well as the Italian, lor hei

voice seems nsmtei'iarlv suite.i to
fer the sentimental Italian role,
this composer. V

"Though I fove Wagner, M pre,
classified as a particular typa oi

..Several years ago, Cecl
Heurtematte and three other
prominent women of Panama

decided it was time for their

city to take pride in its looks.

To them it was sad that a
city so beautifully locate!
and one that is considered
the cross road of the world
should not have lovely tree

lined avenues and shady city
Darks where the people of

I "

Panama and visitors could

ait auietlv and enjoy a few

-f
moments of quiet.

And so they formed a civic

oToun and raffled a car. in

T T

order to secure enough mon

ey to start their campaign

to beautify the city

From the proceeds they

were able to line Balboa Ave Avenue
nue Avenue with a double row of
stately royal and Cuban
palms that would sway gent gently
ly gently in trie breeie from the
Pacific Ocean. They planted

bougainvillea around the

Union Club and visitors arriv

ing at Tocumen were greeted

with a fountain of bougain

villea in the circle at the en

trance of the airport.

This eroup was also re

sponsible for the restoration

of the famed "Flat Arch"
and the present grill that
protects it. This famous arch
which was used to wirMhe
argument for Panama over
a hundred of years ago as
to whether the transconti

nental' canal should be built
here or in Nicaragua, was
forgotten in the surounding

broom factory.

Upon reading this, many will
sk what happen sto the

trees along Balboa Avenue ana

sH LLR&&'&jLH dHHKatw. 9n

K9m

kHlliLHiisHH

a VH WbK

R BSSSSSBlSS

MISS CECI HEURTEMATTE, prominent hostess and social;
worker, once tried with others o rouse the Interest of the citi citizens
zens citizens of Panama to build a National Park around the ruins of
Old Panama". She atill hopes that someday this will be
accomplished.

a sloth but we had to give them
awav. The alligator refused to eat.

At present, Miss Heurtematte is

an active memner oi tne uei uei-American
American uei-American Women's Club and is
on the Asilo de Nuestra Sefiora
committee. This committee takes
care of 100 girls in the orphanage
bv organizing outings for them and

each year has some sort of

... . r I

benetit to raise iunas ior me caie
of the girls and the facilities.

She is also a nurse s aid at tne

Children's Hospital. Seberal morn

ings a week she goes to the hos

pital to help organize ways to

amuse the many patients.
One of the most rewarding ven ventures
tures ventures Miss Heurtematte has taken
part in was Former First Lady
Mrs. Cecilia Pinel Remon's health
caravan. Several times a month
a caravan of doctors, dentists and
druggists would go into the inte interior
rior interior of Panama to care for the
many people who needed medical
care and could not obtain it any
other way due to lack of clinics
or money.
"The people would start to
come from all around bearing

their sick in hammocks. I helped
the pharmacist explain to the
people how to take the
medicine perscribed to them by
the doctors. One cannot just say
to them 'take three times dav.'
I had to explain that whent the
sun was getting up to take a

pill and when it was high in the
sky to tako another and when
night came to take the final one."
The name Heurtematte is trench

and was first heard on the Isth.

mus when Maxim Heurtematte
arrived during the building of the

rrench Canal and lounded the
French Bazaar in 1888. Ceci Heur Heur-tematte's
tematte's Heur-tematte's father, the late Robert
Charles, who was born in Panama,
married Elisa Maria Espinosa,
daughter of Manuela Espinosa B.
a Colombian by birth who was
one of the founding fathers of the
Republic Panama.

Her record hobby sets the pattern for this teen-ager s wall- -paper.
She uses scraps to re finish wastebasket to match. u.

Are the children's rooms up Tor a small room can handle, and-the

some renewing? mere are pieniy omer wans can ne uic -w
of new home furnishings beamed quieter, small-scale texturedr Of

toward such renovation. In wall geometric design in a narmoniz-

papers, fabrics' and furniture, you ing colors

fU Mitel Sa.

the fountain, of bougainvillea and
to the group's idea about making

a national park among the ruins

of Old Panama. Why did tne rro rro-gram
gram rro-gram Fail?
Ceci Heurtematte has tried many
times to answer the question and

can only surmise that it was. the,
combination of two things.
"The people had not learned to

share, beauty and perhaps the isoiw

was not rigni. uoutmess juiuws wo

havp enough rain so it was not

the lack of water. Now I believe,
there ate four palm trees left oft
Balboa Avenue of the ones we
planted and, of course, the circle
at the airport is nothing but a
burnt plot of ground."
Does Miss Heurtematte think
that it is worth trying again?
"Yes," is her enthusiastic reply.
"More and more people are able
to travel now and as they, return
to their country they realize how,
much can be done and should be
done to make the capital of their
country among the most beauti-

tul cities of the world. There are;
a great many possibilities and
Old Panama is a perfect spot for
a National Park. It is a must on
any visiter's list and is visited and

revisited many times by residents!

Speaking of travel Mist Hur Hur-tematta
tematta Hur-tematta falls into .he category
of a" well-traveled person end

the een speak several langua languages.
ges. languages. Her last trip took her and
..tier Mother through Europe and
"Into the Middle East.
. They motored through England,

France, Spain, Germany, Austria,
Switzerland and Italy and then

went on to the Middle East. Upon

jreaciing Jerusalem they learned.

that it would Jbe dououm ftney

would be able to continue on to

Cairo, their planned destination.
"But fortunately we did manage
to visit the city and also managed
to leave just before that trouble
began."
The trip Miss Heurtematte re remembers
members remembers with glee is the time shev
and her cousin went to Lima, Pe-'
ru. They had planned to stay a"
couple of months but liked it so

much, they stayed for a year and

a half.
The Heurtematte residence is
enchanting A visitor can wander
in the cool gardens stopping to
chat with the beautiful red and
blue macaws or Bobby's (Miss
Heurtematte's nephew) yellow and
white chicken that was once "so
little and flu.'fy." And then there

is Mambo and his new nameless
companion. Mambo is the pet
monkey who will charm a visitor
with his laugh and stunts and will

cause anyone driving or walking
along Federico Boyd Avenue to

wonder just where he is. It gives

one a strange feeling to hear an
unseen monkey chattering away
in the middle of a busy city.
"W e once had an. aligator and

Educator Claims Too Many

Gals Take Tranquilizers

singer as Wagnerian singers oft

en are.

This chronicle does not take in

to account Miss Farrell's many
other achievements. She is a

member of the Bach Aria Group,

and she was the voice of Marjo

Ha Lawrence in the film Inic

runted Melody." .In the fall of

--r. 1 1 K a i '. I '.' . W

1957 she made ner nrst trip io:
Europe to sing at the opningof
the new Congress Hall in We it
Berlin, under the sponsorship of
the United States Information A
gency. She has some impressive
recordings. She can be heard as
the soprano soloist in Beethoven f
Ninth Symphony, under Arturn
Toscanini; as Marie in the com
nlr-te rccordinc of "Wozzeck": and

as Biwtnhilde in recording of

tli last scene n' "Steffded."

Of course. Eileen Farrell i

nroud of her success In the music

world, but she has alto the secuf

ity of knowing that there will nev,

er be a void in ner me oeiween

concerts. If h "hould ever give

up singing publicly and tnat wu:.
not be for s long time to come as
she has many year of glorious

slnelnE head of ner sne ncs

the satisfaction of knowing that

her life has not heen built on the
glamor of a public career. T-J
her. it is the private success lhat
counts.

INDIANAPOLIS -(UPI) -Too

many American women reach tor,

a tranquilizer instead oi taxing a

walx or a swim.

So says Naomi L. Leyhe, new
chairman of the debar, ment of.

pnysical education ior women a

Indiana umvwaw- UE"
faculty of 10 responsible tor the
physical education instruction of

some 1,40V coeus emu
at tnis major Midwestern Univer;
sity at Bloomiiigtou, souin of
naianapoiis.
Her experience has give .i
her a var.eu geusiamcal acquain acquaintance
tance acquaintance with American women. She
u a former staL member oi Geor

gia State College for Wpmen. She
is also author of two widely
used sports mauuais in oasketball
and volleybalL
She said:
"To my mind, the major prob problem
lem problem among adult women is the

buildup of .unrelieved tension
raosed bv the tempo of modern

Uving, with the resultant reliance

upon tranquilizers ana aiee."
pills. A balance among work, rest

and piay woura mane pu -.'

-rhythms, games and physical con

ditioning activities.

"At the high school level the

same holds true except that where
feasible, greater emphasis should

be placed upon the learning of

the individual and dual sports.

"At the college level, the em emphasis
phasis emphasis should be placed upon the
individual and dual sports with
an eye to usefulness in adult life."

Miss Leyhe, at 44, says that
"my vocation, avocation, and fav

orite form of recreation will at

ways be swimming. Camping

comes as a close second.

On one camping trip she went

into tne new 4th state on a
77-day jaunt to the Yukon and
above the Artie Circle. Her trav.
el has taken her into all 48 states.

Wives are forever complaining

that their husbands don't under

stand or appreciate them and are
completely indifferent to their in interests.
terests. interests. Before a 'wife gets to feeling
too sorry for herself because her
husband seems to take her for
granted she might ask herself- a
few questions to see if, from his
point of view, she appears to be
a bit indifferent, herself.
When your husband gets a hair

cut, wears a new tie, or a new
sports shirt, do you notice and
comment?

When your husband manages to

lose a little weight by dieting, do
you tell him how handsome he
looks?

When your husband brings home

a new suit of clothes do you ad

mire his taste, instead of asking

"Why in the world did you buy

another blue suit?"

When your husband is bragging

about his golf score; the big deal
he pulled off, or is explaining to

you just hpw we landed a big bas.

are you all interested attention,

or do you just pretend to listen?

Have you bothered to learn any anything
thing anything at all about your husband's
current enthusiasm so that you
can, at least, talk about it into)
liupntJv? il -.t .' I

O .-1. m ;
Are you as interested in your
husband's life as you are in the
lives o." your childres?
Are you bored when your husband
talks business?
Do you cooperate, when your
husband wants you to help work
out a family budget or asks
you to try to cut down on the
food or clothing bills? 1
Before you holler that you aren't
appreciaed you ought to be sure

your husband is.

will see much that is youthful but
not childish, sturdy but not clumsy
wellmade but not costly.
Youngsters W(ho are old enough
to' have a voice in the matter

should be pleased by the variety,
too, because many details of fur

niture and design cater to speer.i
interests.
If a room needs repapering, a
teen-ager can .find a wallpaper pat pattern
tern pattern to reflect almost any hobby
or enthusiasm.
The popularity of record collect-

inc craze is aptly illustrated in

one light-hearted p&per made

youngsters.
Pony-tailed teen-agers in various
postures are lightly caricatured in

bright colors against a wnite
ground.
One of the dominating colors is
green also one of the newest col

ors this fall and suggests a new
day bed cover or bedspread in
green accented, perhaps, by butter
yellow cushions or a fluffy rug.
Leftover scraos of paper can be

utilized in several ways, ana a

homemaker will, encourage her
daughter to put her imagination to

work.
Because so many- young-in-heart
papers are boldly patterned, the
growing emphasis on "receding"
designs on companion papers is
good news.

One wall of gaiety is about all

The strone revival of intenest in

early American furnishings wffl bi
reflected in many yburigwers'
rooms.
The wafm 'and homey qtHlHty of
pine and maple furniture has al

ways endeared early American
styles to youth rather than mora
formal design. i
This year, many more furniture
collections shows a Colonial bent,
scaled to modern roomiLjUHi
modest budgests.

Although not designed prllffaiily

for for children, a new Ded-room

grouping by Robert Bergenn "will
certainly find its way into"'' the
growing bpys or girl's room.
Made of solid maple, and finish finished
ed finished in a warm, brown shade, such
pieces as a two-poster bedjwould
thrill many a girl. j
Twin beds that can double as
bunks are sturdy enough for grow
ing'boys and have the sin)plr, clas classic
sic classic lines which make them "-suitable
for any age; i

One of the versatile -piece in
this group is a desk-table witb' two
drawers which can be used as is
It call also e equipped with a
skirt and a mirror if it is to serve
as a vanity.
Another item is a picture frfm
rack fitted with, wooden pegs io be
used as a gun rack if one choosts

Streamlined Beauty Needs
Are Necessary For Jet Age

BURROUGHS
BEEFEATER
GIN

cha has found that feminine

Interest in good health varies lit- tie oi cotton.

tie from one section or me
ed States to the other.
Once a girl ia trained in the
importance of. good health as a
component of beauty she tends to
continue a health ul routine, the
physical education expert believ
es. She discounted the idea that
a serious lapse of inleresHn good
health occurs when a girl leaves
supervised school routine.
"Rather, the neglect of earlier
year results to foot health in la la-tar
tar la-tar vears."

This college administrator thinks

school training in physical educa education
tion education should begin at the elementa elementary
ry elementary or grade school level "with a
diversified, balanced program of

ladhion
The straw.bat circuit means more
than summer. theater this season.
Making the rounds are gay straws
in a variety of shapes. A popular
item, besides the straw boater, is
a rough straw with 14-inch flat rim

and two-inch flat crown. It is

secured with a hair-chin-and-back

Beauty lips

Good grooming is a front and

back affair. However, many wo

men neglect to comb their hair pro properly
perly properly in back. As a result, the
back view is an unbecoming mass
of matted or askew curls or strmgy
hair.

Beaded bags are back stronger
than ever as accessories for the

modern chemise. Although multi multicolored
colored multicolored beads "o well with the
brilliant oranges, blues and
greens, white is i;lill the leader.
Beaded bags, With or without
handles, are at their best when
kept sparkling clean.

There once was a girl who
favored long hair. But she also
didn't like to wash her neck be because
cause because she didn't want o get her
hair wet. Certainly and adiut
shouldn't be caught in such as
trick, but younger persons may
fall into hit-and-miss cleanliness
hhit that detract from their

overall freshness because tney

are so busy witb activities.

NEW TWIST FOR SLAW
LOS ANGELES (UPD- The
test kitchen of the Western Grow Growers'
ers' Growers' Afbciatioh offers this varia variation
tion variation on cole slaw; add celery seed
and cooked shrimp' to finely shred shredded
ded shredded green cabbage. Topa with your
favorite dressing.

AHhfYiiah bovs mar think It

sissy, good grooming should be
part of their .daily routine. It's
surprising how much clean, well well-combed
combed well-combed hair and clean hands and
fingernails improve a young
man's appearance. And from the
hair and nails he is likely to pro progress
gress progress to being neater in hi dress,

'too.

Josephine surely wasn't at ease With little more than the cog cog-in
in cog-in that flying machine of long metics you need to get through a
ago, and you can bet she didn't day at the office, you can face, the
get too far too fast. i world and your new adventures
But many a gal will be taking i as fresh as a daisy. u t

advantage soon of the new jeti ;

Transatlantic flights, which are.

both speedy and the last wora in
comfort. f
Women often admit that they
feel messy and far from fresh
looking when they deplane after
tf loafl flight. vBut if they do, it's
because : therVe Slipped some

where in their wardrobe and
cosmetic plans for air travel.

You need only to look at an
airline stewardess, who works
while you relax, to know that it's
not impossible to make a long
plane trip and still maintain that
bandbox look.
The secret lies mainly in car carrying
rying carrying a small cosmetics case de designed
signed designed for a thorough, but quick
make-up job, and in wearing
wrinkle-resistant fabric wih
loose, rather 4han tight, skirts.
Tieht sheaths show the wear

and tear of a long trip all too
clearly. V
Now, with the inauguration soon
of jet service across the Atlan ic,
women travelers will find their
grooming and- beauty problems

aloft greatly simplified.
Flying time 'to Europe will be
only six and one halJ hours. So
make-up correctly applied be before
fore before the trip will remain intact
and need only a minimum of
freshening before- landing.
Since flying may have a dry drying
ing drying effect on you skin, wear a
thin film of moisture -contorl
cream under your foundation
base. j i .,
It's Pan American World Air-

wavs. that gives us this advice

from the expert who trains their

stewardesses in grooming tor air

travel:

In. a slim traveling purse, carry
a small packet of special tissues
which remove excess oiliness
frof the skin. This will eliminate
the need for cleansing cream.
Use compressed powder for
your trip. It won't spill and will
double as a foundation base.
Tuck into the travel purse a
cramy-base lipstick for those
high altitudes, and fountain pen pen-type
type pen-type mascara holder. .....

Little pillows ot nanu itnivu,
a rnmbination eve liner and eye

brow, pencil, and a small double

duty combination comb a and
brush will complete your needs.

What could be simpler?
Be careful not to wear a girdle
of shoes that are too tight. They
can cause discomfort and, to
turn, frown lines.

mm Ea
fll .' TBI

DESTiLERIA

CENTRAL, SA.
Exclusive Wstributor--Panama,
R. de P

-

i



Beats
7-1
ierce s
s'dBfi
Read story on pags 6
Early. Returns From Outlying Precinct

Six-Hi ft er

Yanks

ISBmHI

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' 4
fey -f ranVc

Cop, "9l 141 T ''

Duu.b.l.d br NEA Strvice, Inc.

THE STORY: Tom Weber, returning to Bar Bar-kerville
kerville Bar-kerville after 11 years, finds that he has been deed deeded
ed deeded a small ranch. He goes to the place and finds the
cabin occupied.

stopped

queaked.

one side

re.

IV
, THE heavy breathing

and rusted bedsprings
Weber stepped back to

tod called again.
"Put on a light," Weber

feated. "I'm coming in."
There was grumbling inside,
ut ieet slithered on the floor
knd after a moment a match was
itruck. Weber waited until it
yas put to a lamp, then shoved
pen the floor.
' A man faced him, scowling.
He was about 35, tall, heavy and
filthev. Ha hadn't shaved in a

week and he had certainly made I
no preoase of cleaning up the j
room ioi more than a month. A
cot stood to one side. The man J
was fully dressed except for

. , i n pa

Boots ana nai ana wppuieuuj hj hanrk

slept that way. A kitchen' table ins, tne

was neajjea wiijj iuuu, uuij ui.cu ui.cu-sils
sils ui.cu-sils and a few odds and ends, in including
cluding including a rather surprisingly
leaii Frontier Model. A shotgun
leaned against the wall near the
bed-.
"This place," said Weber,
'looks like a pigpen."
"Oh, yeah?" sneered the man
facing Weber. "You don't look
so good yourself." His hand
reached out casually for the ta.
ble. Weber raised his foot and
knocked the table over against
the man.
The squatter scrambled clear of
the debris, saw the he could not
Immediately locate his revolver
and, whirling, headed for the

Shotgun.
"Let the gun alone"
Weber.

The man, stopped, hesitated,
then turned. "You got a crust
comin' in here and knockin' my
things around."
"Your things," Weber snapped.
"Well, get together whatever's
yours and clear out. This is my
house."
The squatter stared at Weber
"Ain't no one lived here in
yenrs. ."
"I'm Tom "Weber. I've been a a-way."
way." a-way." "How do T know you're Tom
Weber?" the man demanded.
"All I got's your say-so. Ain't no
one ever seen Tom Weber. I
found this place deserted and fall fall-in,"
in," fall-in," o pieces. I fixed it up"
"Sue me."

"Just about the best there is.
Some think mebbe Tom Fargo's
the best, but 1 don't hold with
that. I happen to know that Par.
tridge once backed down Fargo.'
"You saw him back down Tom
Fargo?"
Hopkins made an abrupt capi capitulation.
tulation. capitulation. "All right, but don't say
I didnt warn you. I'll just get my
duds and
He turned and moved toward
the bed. His too.quick surrender,
his casualness did not fool We Weber.
ber. Weber. As Hopkins stepped up1 to the
bed and lunged for the shotgun,
Weber was springing rorward.
His fist caught Hopkins on the
jaw as the squatter caught up the
shotgun and turned.

Hopkins cried out in sudden
pain. The shotgun dropped from

and he reeled back a-wall.

'I'm going," he mumbled.

"soon's I get my boots on, I'm
goin'.
He stepped wobblingly to the
side of the bed, sat down and be began
gan began drawing on his boots. Weber,
meanwhile, caught up the double,
barreled shotgun, broke it and
exiracted the. shells. He. also
found Hopkiqs's revolver and took
the cartirdges out of it.
He thrust both weapons at the
sciuatter. "You can get the rest
of your stuff tomorrow."
Hopkins took the two weapons,
stood up and shuffled to the door.
There he turned .for a parting
shot. "Vou .ain't seen the last of
me huh1'

, t Weber followed the man to the
snapped ; Hf)0r anH stoo4 there untj, Hop

kins saddled his mount in the
corral and rode off.
Angrily, Weber returned to the
kitchen. He gathered up what whatever
ever whatever clothing there was of Hop Hopkins's
kins's Hopkins's and dumped it in a pile
just outside the kitchen door.

THE man shook his head. "Just
h-aue I'm a sri natter don't
m"?n I ain't got friends."
"Well, I haven't got friends,"
Wpber said, "but this is my
property and you're leaving it.'
"You're making a mistake. A
mistake. My name happens to
bp Tate Hopkins
The man who called h' tself
Tae Hopkins glowered at V ber.
"Mv name don't mpan nothin' to
"you? Well, how about Paul Par.
tr'He? That nvan anythir,'?"
"A gunfighter."

AT 27, Lily Barker Alderton
hart reached the flower of wom womanhood
anhood womanhood Yet something was miss missing
ing missing in her beauty, a light in her
veiled eyes that Jeff Alderton
knew should be there and could
never quite kindle.
He was thinking of that so
much, perhaps, that he did not
remember to get down from the
buckboard to help her step up on
the hub of the wheel. Lily climb climbed
ed climbed in beside him.
The animals slarted off and a
slight frown creased Alderlon's
smooth forehead. She said, "What's
the problem?"
"He gave a slight start. "What
problem. Why?"
"So'Tiething's bothering you."
"I've got a lot on my mind.
Campaigning, glad-handing people
"You like it, Jeff. You know
you do."
He was silent for a moment,
then, "It's rustlers."
(To Be Continued)

Two Canal Zone GIs Vote Yes'
In Alaska's Statehood Ballet

Story by MSgt. BOB GROOVER U.S. Army Photos
When residents of Alaska to to the polk next Tuesday to
cast ballots on three questions of statehood, including one on
whether Alaska shall become the 49th state of the Union, at
least two members of the Armed Forces-In the Canal Zone al already
ready already will have cast their ballots by mail in the primary elec election.
tion. election. The two are Sgt. Howard A. McRae, I'.S. Army Signal Ser

vice, Quarry Heights, and Pfc. Leonard M. Hansen, Jr., a cook

with A Company, 1st Battle Group. 20th Infantry.
If the referendum proposals are approved In the primary
election, a general election will be held Nov. 25. Candidates to
be nominated next Tuesday Include two I'.S. senators, one rep representative
resentative representative to Congress, a irOvernor, secretary of state and the
60 members of the state legislature.

BIG BABY No great help to his mother as she tries to
sign the parchment welcoming Alaska as the 49th state. Jerome
George Kahn symbolizes the guest of honor the United States'
new baby, Alaska. Like Jerome, Alaska is big for its age.

McRoe is from Haines, Alaska

where his retired father, Howard
McRae now resides, while Hansen

is from Fairbanks, Alaska, where

his rnthr, Mrs. Inez May Frantz

now lives.

Both have voted an emphatic
Yes on whether Ala'ka should
become the 49th state of the U.
nion.
McRae's wife, Jean, who re.

sides with the sergeant at Foi

Kobbe, is from Chicago, III., and

has never visited her husband'.

home territory, but she, too. !s

emphatic on admitting Alaska to

the Union.
Hansen is not married, but hr

Red Batteries
Open Bombardment
On Quemoy Islands

TAIPEI, Formosa, Aug. 23
(UPI) Communist nhinese

shore batteries opened a massive
bombardment of the Nationalist
island group of Quemoy last

nteht and fired more than 50,

000 rounds of high explosive

shells, the National Defense Mm
i.stry announced.
It was by far the bieeest bom

bfrdment of any Nationalist
Chinese territory bv the Chinese
communists since Generalissimo
Chrane Kai shek's government

w-s driven into exile in Formo

sa in 1949.

Te Defense Ministry said the
shelling- occurred in a two-hour

period. There were no immedi
ate casualty or damage reports.

A ministry source said "this
may be the beginnins; of fatigue
bombardment. That is night and
dav she'line In an attempt to

wear out the uemoy garrison."

Informed sources said the
shelling was con&entrated on
' Ht' Ptionv r"- of the fOW

is'ands in the group.

TODAY BELLA VISTA

9:00 p.m.

K&K'-?SSmmmmmm!Z31E77. TWKZmm.

mgm JtSSm prices: .75 .40 Shows: 1:05 2:35 4:45 6:50

3wlHH that you will live... sharing
wM i;' every adventure w a ten"
Twj B4 Biiil $M
K mm LsBk 9m wKflSwmmmm Wmm

'yam
W TECHNICOLOR

con DICK YORK VICTOR MANUEL MENOOZA
RICHARD MECKEL JAMES WESTERFIELD
Produclda por JULIAN BLAUSTEIN
Olrlildt pot OELMER DAVES

l.uion o tUMUNU M, NUKII1

A PHOENIX Production A COLUMBIA PICTURE (

WE WELCOME YOU Pfc. Warren Wieckhorst of Head

quarters Company, 1st Battle Group, 20 th Infantry at Fort Kobbe

and his wife Sylvia affix their signature to a parchment which

will be attached, to the proclamation welcominjr Alaska as the

49th state. Both documents will be sent to the governor of Alaska
from the U.S. armed forces stationed in the Canal Zone. The

Wieckhorsts comes from Davenport, Iowa.

reports that his mother and all

his relatives are in favor of the

Statehood idea.
Ballots for voting in the elec
tion were distributed some time
ago to all levels in Armed Forc Forces
es Forces units in the Canal Zone. Not

ing officers were designated to
assure that ballots ware available
to everybody and that everyone

understood the procedure.

'McRae is NCO in charge of the

Missions Radio Sstem atop An
con Hill, where daily contact i i,

provided between United States
Army Caribbean headquarters aid
U?S. Army Missions throughout

Central and South Amenca.

At one time he was fireman

on the naddle.boat "Alive" on

the Yukon River, Before his pres

ent assignment, he served with

the 77h Sier--' Force Group at

Fort Bragg, N.C.

Hansen was last stationed at

U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Rich
ardson, Alaska short dis distance
tance distance from his home in Fair
banks. At one time he worked
with the Boeing Aircraft Compa.
ny at Seattle, Washington.
He says th Panama Canal
looks something Ilka the Yukon
River and that he has seen
many days in Alaska when the
temperature hiohor than it
evr gets here in Panama.
Last Sunday evening, soldiers,

from all the states in the Union

gathered around the table to at
fix their signatures to a parch

ment at the USO-JWB. The parch.

ment will be attached to a pro.

clamation welcoming Alaska as

the 49th state and both documents

will be sent to the governor Oi

Alaska, Michael A. Stepovich.

The proclamation has been es

pecially aecorated by Sp4 Jim

Giampoli, staff artist with C

at Fort Clayton. He used figures
symbolizing the U.S. Armed Fore,
es from he Revolutionary War to
the present day and old English

lettering.

The USO .IWB was decorated for

the occasion with signs sav

"Welcome to Alaska." Old Glory
was hung in a central spot wii.i

the extra star beside it. Inform

tion and maps of the new state

were also displayed.

When questioned about the new

state, both McRae and Hansen
had nothing but good to say abou.

their home territory (or state)

McRae was born and raised in
Anchorage, and his father now

lives on a homestead not a farm.

The homestead is situated about

4

EYES AND EARS OF t'SARCARIB Pfc Leonard M. Hansen, a cook with A Company,
1st Battle (.roup, 20th Infantry, and a resident of Fairbanks, Alaska, is interviewed by MSjft.
Bob Groover, Information Office, USARCARIB, for a sound-on-fllm release to the Palrbanks
television station on the eve of primary elections which will decide, among other Issues,
whether Alabka wUI become the 49th state of the Union. Sfc Guy U. Hall, Signal Pictorial
Division, USARCARIB, is the photographer.

:::-.wv. ; -. ..

' ik iiiiiiiawO iiIhI

ids

VOT$ IN FOR MATIOMj
fDnim im.v t axon

YOU BET I'M GOING TO VOTE That's the reaction oi
Sgt. Howard A. McRae, US.A. Army Signal Service, Quarry
Heights, when asked whether he was going to vote on Alaska
statehood next Tuesday. The sergeant cast his ballot beside a
teletypewriter used in the Missions Radio SvMMm it nui

The system, covers about three thuosands miles of territory in

ovum nuicrma, wmcn maaes li one oi tne largest
communications networks anywhere. T
" N

-v s... -.r.-...... vi wt.vm,.mw., v.-.v vSW- SK-.'.vMvwA'lwA4i.i

NEW STAR IN U.S. CROWN Sp4 Jim Giampaoli, television
artist for CFN, holds up the proclamation he designed to wel welcome
come welcome Alaska as the 49th state. At right Miss Sophie HarroucheL
a hostess at the USO-JWB, is shown behind the birthday cake
which was cut at the Welcome Alaska fiesta last Sunday night

drawing bones to determine
which one would get the saddle.
Both McRae and Hansen see
the same television programs seen
In the U.S,

ten miles out of town near M'
Bay. Mcitae is anions to get
back to the ho me 'lead.
Hansen originally came from
Fort Collins, Colorado, where lie
attended school. At the age of 21
he already has four years in the

Army and he intends to pu1 in

quite a few more,
i At the drop of a hat he wit)

gladly remind you that Alaska

will be the biggest state in the
Union.
To establi'h that Alaskjn
can tell tall stories just as good
as Texan, h will quickly relate
tHe story about two Alaskan
mosquitoes o big they killed
horse, ate him,' than sat around
' ":'..;' TUk? S." W..

tkefe are several radio statioas
near their h()me towns, and
mindful of this fact, the Informa Information
tion Information Office, USARCABIR, already
has, prepared special television
films on the two soldiers for use
on stations in Fairbanks and
Ancorage.
It could be that the two will be
the most southern voters in the
Alaskan primary elections n e x (
Tuesriay. It is certain that their
votes will be two more in what
is believed wilkbe the most af.
firmative election in history.

U vl TODAY Irxm
WEEKEND ,75 -Mft RELEASE!
1:11. :t7. 5:03, 6:57. 8:57 1 1 I:15 3:47 6:19 8:5l1

ITS ONE OF THE MOST
INGENIOUS AND DIA DIABOLICAL
BOLICAL DIABOLICAL MYSTERIES
EVER MADE!

mm ; n

CHASE A
BROOKED
SHADOW

SEE IT FROM
THE BEGINNING

SKY'RE IN A CLASS
BY THEMSELVES I

A v
tmk. L.

m

4

fJIIIIM'JM
vxsWmm.

REMEMBER
YOUR TRIP
TO EUROPE

VIA AVIANCA



t

am. r

.
D
uzzles and Pasti

FAST JUGGUNG MA TCH

rMr W TWj to Sharpen the Wits

SEYMOUR SLEEK, the mysterious magician Above, Is Juggling
nine magical numbers. It la possible to insert these numbers In
the -diagram shown, one In each square, in such a manner that each
row 6T three numbers, across, down and diagonally, will add to ex exactly
actly exactly 33. But you have only two minutes in which to comply. Are
you equal to the task?
1 :Oi uwnioa il 'it "i HeAl pnoass
tl a moj dox 0Oj n jCB)UozJq usquina pMU :oftoOf)

Fancy Figures?

A SURVEY to determine ap approximately
proximately approximately how much water
a nearby lake could be counted
upon for a standby supply was
undertaken by a suburban town.
No running streams entered or
left this lake;' evaporation was
negligible. 5
But when engineers attempted

to wmduct their measurements,
they ran into difficulty.
Depth and shoreline were so
erratic it was practically tmpos-

urements. Then a 'clever young
chemist offered his services, and
provided a solution forthwith.
How was he. a We to do so ?
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pUB llljni.t'l )SMJ Jl 0 BU(l!).lliJ'l
umou)( mM (ijjBduui.) q pnoo ihmJ
m m uiuJj uAHiapmi JO inj.
-hub nuipna jo iujiuo.) m suizaibub
.( IMB S:(d.)M IBJBABg 3H1 W
ij&m SuitfJnjBJ psAOSSip A'iS(no
-johj pBU eAp uBfuo SuiHW
uux "AP -pawjifitouoS e ;o,' Arj
-unb 'pjnB8io Bjtrt n Xuipps pB
s:Bi t(4 IUOIJ l.lS A'triEdB.
uAnu: 10 HB1 SujtUJ A'a sun lJ
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tXDJddB JO poiuattl 1A
Wise-Ward Crypt
WS'LL give you a starting
clue in this substitution
crcpt N Is substituted for Y.V
BKIIH.I H It M N
8 MP T B 8 M r M
E W M J T, M TIE
KM WU KLE BVHYK
M B M N.
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ll.r.M SI 1 1 ;RI .aipjJ Atf UBU1
BBBU1 A Bp JUA31BMM.. ' I)S8

WHEN Miss 'Keen returned to
the classroom after recess,
she found the Janitor just begin beginning
ning beginning to wash the blackboards.
The multiplication problem which
she had left On the board before
recess is shown above.
The Janitor was apologetic
about having erased some of the'
- figures, but Miss Keen reassured
him. She said that it made a
pretty problem aa it was, and
that she would ask the pupils to
restore the missing figures.
Her pupils did restore the
figures. Can you?
It's only t air to tell you that
the janitor's doth wiped away
four figures of the multiplicand
and one of the multiplier, among
. others.
" 1 iflldninui etn zw
. -'BSS'8 1 puandnui aqj, :jmbuv
Boys Are Trouble
EACH of the following feminine
nouns has a masculine coun counterpart.
terpart. counterpart. How many can you
name? Ex.: Spinster Bachelor.
1. Spinster .......... . .....
2. Chairlady ..................
3. Testatrix
4. Mare
5. Goose
6. Aviatrix
7. Jennet ;.. ...
8. Vixen
9. Doe ,4,

10. Abbess ...j..
11. Maharani ....
12. Authoress ...
L 18. Czarina .'..
14. SOW .........

1. Baroness

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ubuiJirho Z JOn3Ba 'X :JaA4nv

Dotograph Poser for Jr. Readers

m

C. D

Or.
4

r u

0.
a'

IP

X .v i

V THERE do these pupa live
" in the city,, ui the country,
or at the seashore? To find the
answer, draw a line from A to B
to .CD. E..EY G, H..L, J K. L,
M, N, O, Pi RrS, -i. O, V. W.
X, Y' ?and; 'lastiv, to letter j Z.
Afterwards, you may Wish to
color the" scene appropriately
with crayons or colored pencils.

HAVE your wits been
refreshed by vacation
time for the school and
work year ahead? You'll
know better after running
through these brain teas teasers,
ers, teasers, which should be
-solved hi about 10 min minutes.
utes. minutes. Ready
L Why do some per persons
sons persons press an elevator
button with the thumb
and some with the fore forefinger?
finger? forefinger? 8. Letters of a new
state are scrambled
among the balloons held
by the youngster at right.
Can you make them out?
S. A certain number is
composed of three figures
Whose sum is 181 The first

ligure is one-halt of the second and one one-third
third one-third of tb third. What Is the number?
4., Mrs. Betty Kranklin had 11 apples
that she divided equally among her seven
sons In one part How did she do this ?
6. When can a married man marry an another
other another pan's wife without committing
bigamy?
6. Doakes' office la lighted by four elec electric
tric electric bulbs, each of a different wattage.
Their total wattage is 220. The wattage
of the largest bulb is five times that of
the smallest The sum of the wattage of
the next to the smallest and the next to

the largest bulbs la equal
to that of the largest bulb
The sum of the wattage
of the smallest and next
to smallest bulbs is equal
to that of the next to
largest bulb. What's the
wattage of each bulb?
7. Everybody has heard
of Shakespeare's play, The

Merchant of Venice. Well,
who was the merchant of
Venice?
8. Mrs. White put a
water lily In her bathtub.
In her surprise, it doubled
in size every day for '13
days, when it covered the
entire surface of the bath bathtub.
tub. bathtub. How long did it take
tt to cover half the bathtub?

9. It may not look it at first glance, but
this is an expression which .might be
heard at a Congressional hearing:
stand oath

u u r
What does it say?
10. What la It a man can use for shav shaving,
ing, shaving, cleaning his clothes and sleeping in?
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V '01 ..'MIbo Japan J noA" pusiejapan noA
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B 'xoiA-qg XON i 'W 00T Pu 09 0 '0Z '9
oja 'uBUiASjat3 'slpnf i.sq naqjn '9 -or.tiBg
add aawBui g "atno xyt sajqx '8 'ajaqi
jb Bjanai aqi axvjUB MSN V "8 "asmoo
to 'joiBAar eqi uouiums ox I nnaiuy

r 1

.........

CUT-OUT DOLLY
BETSY has two new dresses for school, but she
can't make up her mind which one to wear first
Can you help her with her problem?
She can be made to appear in either as follows:
Color the doll and her wardrobe. Cut out the pieces.
Paste the doll to heavy paper or thin cardboard.
Notice, too, that she has a new hairbow to go
with the dresses. Apply a color to this also.

GRANDMA 'S IN STITCHES AGAIN

GR A NOMA'S
at it again.
She's racing the
clock to prepare
a patchwork quilt
and can't seem to
work out the
color scheme.
Perhaps you can,
help her.
Granny would
like the quili to
contain cloth
of three colors,
which 1 simple
enough, but she
insists that simi similar
lar similar colors are not
to adjoin. That is,
she doesn't want
any two adjacent
areas to contain
the same color.
To help her,
you'll need cray crayons
ons crayons or colored
pencils, of course.
Or, If you do not
. have these handy,
you can also
solve the problem
with an ordinary
lead pencil by
writing In t h e
names of colors
or their Initials.

Some Wljys & Wherefores
WHY did William Tell shudder after he
shot the apple from, his son's head?
pB aqi ioj adB.isd mums u )l asnsjag
Why are cats like unskillful surgeons?
BJusuBd, hjb pn a"J-l-"i am otnooag
Why-is a man who carries a watch al always
ways always able to quench his thirst?
)j u 8uJd b BBq ippj itJBAa BinBsaa
Why do carpenters believe there is no
such thing aa' glass ?
11 ubs j9asu ain tsnsoag

Helping Yourself
b $
BRIEF REPORTS on select new
books 0 interest to home
craftsmen, hobbyists and collec collectors.
tors. collectors. Selected by Clarh Kinnaird.
How to Identify Plants, by H.
D. Harrington (Sage Books, 203
pages: $3). What person who
has any affinity for gardening or
nature exploration hasn't wished
for a handy means of classifying
any species of flowers, plants,
shrubbery or trees that may be
encountered in whole or in part?
The book by Mr. Harrington, who
la professor of botany at Colorado
State University, Is a cyclopedic
guide to botanical classification,
with illustrations by L. W. Dur Dur-rea
rea Dur-rea
Gardens and Grounds That
Take Care of Themselves, by
Amelia Leavitt Hill (Prentice (Prentice-Hall:
Hall: (Prentice-Hall: $3.95), has encouragement
for the householder who wants
to enjoy a lovely stretch of wil wilderness
derness wilderness without having to spend
whole weekends taking care of
It Mrs. Hill emphasizes the
plans for trees, shrubbery, flow flowers
ers flowers and lawn which produce de desirable
sirable desirable effects with the minimum
of regular back-breaking labor.
How to Make Good Home
Movies (Random House: $1.95).
Eastman Kodak Co. experts col collaborated
laborated collaborated on this comprehensive
manual on arranging, "shooting,"
and editing full-color or black-and-white
movies. Naturally,
there are hundreds of "stills" il illustrating
lustrating illustrating "do's" and "don'ts."

(D(D
0

Some Family Tree Tags
MANY family names which have come
down through the years were origin originally
ally originally designations of the family trade. Can
you identify these:
1. John's ancestor ground grain.
2. Tom's ancestor made arrows.
3. Jim's ancestor repaired barrels.
4. Ed's ancestor cut timber over a pit
MaXMBg
vadooo t MBttOtJ i Mtum 1 msuv

STRIKE-OUT: A Wits Tester

TO SCORE a
strike in the
diagram at left,
that Is, to suc-
f'PArl In rrnssinp'

Tjl f7 I out al1 of the
T J ID J i 0 J I numbers, you

jorrect numerical
answers to the
iefinitions below.
If the answer to
No. 1, for in instance,
stance, instance, is 0, cross
out 0 In the dia diagram:
gram: diagram: If the an

swer to No. 2 Is 4315, cross out 4, 3, 1 and 5. Etc.
Answers may have as many as five digits. See if
you can bowl a perfect score.
1. Degree In a circle:
2. Office hours: to five.
S. The world la divided Into tune zones.
4. Each time cone corresponds to degrees
of longitude.
5. If a boat travelling westward reaches the In International
ternational International Date Line at noon on Sept. as
soon as It crosses the line the time Is : noon,
Sept.
2;e -das :naA9B -g naaijr.S
a jnoj-jnaMX 'S 'nlN Z '0Jaz xs aajqx I :Jaiav
Just the Type, That's All
PIE poor old typesetter was all out of a certain
letter of the alphabet but he had a good supply
of Xs. Consequently, he always put an X in place
of the letter .he lacked. Sometimes, this produced
bewildering results, as witness below:
MXDXMIMXDXM
Can you replace the Xs in the above sentence
with the mysterious missing letter. When correctly
solved, the sentence will read either backward or
forward.
urepv tu,T urepBH sraAtatry

HELP GUIDE THE PARTY-GOERS

SUZIE, bottom
right, ha of offered
fered offered to guide
three of her
friends to a class classmate's
mate's classmate's birthday
party. Can you
find the route
she'll take to pick
them up in 1, 2,
3 order and then
lead them to the
classmate's house
at upper right?
Susie's path
twists and turns,
but she does not
retrace steps at
any point, nor
does she venture
outside the paths
marked with
heavy lines.

A CHALLENGING ( IZ-(TfcoSS WOK1, ggtf XSMS

It's Your Move

O

EveZttct Science

m HUNDRED hens laid 100

igs in one .hour and forty

minutes. A.V the same rate of
prrd. how long win it take seven
hens to (ay seven eggs?
Be sure to re-read the question
.Before answering.

IS 10 tlJ staff aqi

W 'jaqinetuau 'Sam

4jlq uq mn

iv.. ;pr

-apu

-oaai

A Colorful Stunt
HAVE someone choose a cray crayon
on crayon from a pack uut of sight;"
have them hand the chosen cray crayon
on crayon to you behind your back. Re Return
turn Return the crayon to them without
looking at It and then put your
hands to your eyes. Pause a sec second,
ond, second, then accurately describe the
color.
The trick is this: as you hold
the crayon behind your back,
gently rub the nail of your index,
finger over It so that a small bit
of the color will cling to your
nail. A swift glance at your fin finger
ger finger en routs to your eye, gives
you the answer. I
Of course, your pause is a ruse
to baffle the audience.

I
fly Eugene Shelter
HORIZONTAL
1 The second book at the New
Testament
5 Elkanah lived here (1 Sam 1:
10 Jesus stilled the waves that
beat into this (Mark 4:37)
14 Regiment in Turkish army.
15 Overact.
16 HarmoniM.
17 Decays.
18 Fuels.
19 Gentle breesa
20 School terms.
22 Rulers are not this to good
works Rom. 13:3)
24 Site of ancient Olympic games
?5 To heed.
20 Cups Fr.)
29 Those who are called to this
supper of the Lamb are
blessed (Rev 19:9)
33 Family.
34 Biblical word, probably ot
liturgical meaning (Hab 3:3)
38 How many sons did Job have?
(Job 1:2)
37 Labor.
39 Mount upon which Moses re received
ceived received the Ten Command-
' menta (Ex. 19:20)
41- Cleave
42 Wnrented.
44 Outlook.
,4S City In Brazil.
47 Paul and Barnabas sailed from
here to Cyprus 'Acts 13:4)
49 Rubber.
51 Upholsterer's nail.
52 English street car.
53 Chant.
5B Argued.
60 Naomi's chosen name (Ruth
1:20)
61 Paul or Peter.
63 One of the tribes of Israel

(Num. 1:49)

de-

64 imitator.
65 rHumble.
66 Great Lake.
67 Recompense.
68 Harsh respiratory sound
69 Conveyed.
VERTICAL
1 Planet
2 Plant of lily family.

3 Rodents.

4 These of an enemy are

ceitful (Pr. 27:6)
5 Rebalances.
6 Prayer endinga
7 Extinct birds.
8 Attorney (abbr.)
9 Feminine name.
10 More starlike.
. 11 Jesus said this was at hand
when He should be betrayed
(Mat 26:45)
12 Set of nested boxes.
13 Fleshy fruit
21 Islands (Fr.)
23 Auditory organs.
25 Sounds of mirth.
26 The seventeenth book of the
New Testament
27 Unaccompanied.
28 Aptitude.
29 Craze
30 Avows.
31 A Jinni.
32 Where Saul's witch lived (1
Sam 28:7V
35 Ashy psle.
SB Board lowered on lee side ot
a vessel
40 Repeats
43 -Take new direction,
45 Macaws.
MINI-TEST: Standing on the
starboard side of the deck of
ship facing the bow, la the near nearest
est nearest rail on your right or left?
qij jnoA ao e uMinv
Distributed by Kins Features Syndicate
aw a f fc; V', ;

4ft Give him all that are his. (Mat 56 Monetary unit of Iran.

22:21)

50--Soap plants.
52 Verb form.
53 Mohammedan cleric
54 Back of neck.
55 Oak or pine.

57 Roman emperor.
58 Cain's works were this (1 John
3:12)
59 What happened to Miriam In
Kadesh? (Num. 20:1)
62 -Arabian garment

1 ll m-W-
2a 21 777 22 2
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37 57773?
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mmmm
Ta iJ
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m !m
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VH1TE can afford to be gen-

w

erous, but the give-away.

program he institutes is designed
to defeat Black in seven moves.
White's first, moving upboard.
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CB088WUBO PUZZLE SOLUTION

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in

; .4 '!- '." .1 .. . ... SBmWS .v
SUM) AT, AUGUST 24. 1958 THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN TNDEPEJTDENT DAILY VEWSPAPtk SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, UM
I 1 1 1
RUT AND TBI PIRATES By GEORGE WUNDER (THE STORY OF MARTHA WAYNE Mr. Lord Has Ideas By WILSON SCRUGGS
v J y .
M uajTpWNT A Kouw twc noblest woman N I Phk sauty' OAITI55A has wamwfi TwiTiTwWsi 1 p-ffiKwMoiT... 'wIrriaiD' BuBx 'mtm'i

BJiCULS AND HIS I'RlRNDt Versatile Man By MERRILL BLO&SER ' "jmmmm , j
t 1 , I tfA fwEAVEN I TWstlNlN ( WHERE ) A T0THE
F TiEW 1 I GOSW DID 1 LEAVE TMff TMf CUSTOMERS v( CATFP JO6 IN TOWN FwOLLYMOCKM Mty ) f ?S JuM 5 ,RE-E,Ea C30 151 H V !! V
iEj6ewcy.iftD. m I malt macmwe running out when i 37 riTwousHTjA I GORGEOUS JWf ujs W?' ir
LMLtt) j CRUMPET MUT LOCKtO UP y' jy' QLTO t BE .' -PjJ WALK

11 "W""v" w"
I WWSJ F- s? tk. V: ; 1 i a WrP I waa-. I
r I rs -J I -J I BUGS BUNNY False Alarm

a Saa a -y ,.

1 . I nS--vrmiM r. .wm m., ,

0J.B1 OOP

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

Would Yon, Harmon?

ftp EDGAR MARITN

111 ...I 11
COMM.
71

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1

TO CNWWSW SCWr,
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BEtrO 9k COVSPYTOV

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"HtAJN EASY

Wasting No Words

By LESLIE TURNER

HOBTY MEEKLB

. He's 100 Per Cent Right

By DICK CAVALLI

CHRrSTMAS? it's

NOT CHRWTMA6--IT'S THE

MIDDLE OP SUMMER

with . MAJOR HOOPLB OUT OUR WAY

i 1 1 ia .mm w i i 1 1

s i

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vvn ni a-vf nuuoEi

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;bCA3BA6E VI oM A MERRVI

l I f THAT MOST J SOMETIME?., H

LIKE IT I-"" t a V mt

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

H&V.TM eeiM6

JOLTED OUT OP

MV NORMAL
COMA WlTM AM

IDEA?--LETS

? 60 AND
Kibitz ort

, THE CHAMP-4")

1 Maybe Me

if AM I F A,P AlO

UMFURMlSHed

PLAT IN AN

OLt PIAMO

am

Jiia.''L. jt.uL'i .U..JU- nui-iali

V7 MA-AH.' OH, AAA.' CMfWI oH.VB IT CO IT TAKES kT
f ANP LOOK AT HIM-HE'S MUCH, VIRy WLIC H 1
JUST POIW IT BECAUSE HE 1 XmCKoSr OOOptooSS-- )1
SAW WE COMfHJRTABLE.' J WHEM XSAWTM' LOW- J
J2KJSSS1S r wow stuff she X
SHAKESPEARE BOOKfW WEAPW, I DBCIPBP i
IMA4WE him Shapw' f cNL V tbetter myself--)
1 SHAKE 9 PEARS --AMP V TS V be E o7a
K akivwav it wjEsJJr J u WmSmii T
, T, William
A 6CKlTLtAAU OT UCrftURi
-,- ..II

SIDE CUNCES

By Calbraith

mu f 7-11

4I hate to disturb you, Frd, but I can't find the oil for
the lawn mower!

(jkWtoet True Life Adventures

The CASE of wiLw

( fulfil

r

mi

TFViE KEEM Tx-VBS OP A
SWIFT AKE ATTRATBtt.
W THE W-UT-rTBR)h4 OT
A rasp-wiNaBO' YAOTH. i

HE HaTEKJ6 to INVESTIGATE.

BUT BETORE HE ARWIVES,
H INTBNCTEC HAS
PISAPFSSAJtBP THE INSBCTT
HAS POL.PKP HIS CRAB
OV&RWING6 ACROeS THE

BKVSHT KEO UNCTBRSNIKkSS

ANP BLJENPEP

jNTO A TREE TRUNK.

DtRftSstsd' by KiflJ rVsFtt BAcas,

BBBBBBBBBS SBBBBI 1 Unim (BBBBBBBI SBBBBSV.

ssf A1rerabouswORL'

enr w e
DAILY FORTUNE FINDER
To ham your "Fortuno" for today from the stars, writ in the lotSSf
of tho alpha bM corrttpondin( to the numtraU on tho lino of th aatr.
logical pariod in which you were hot n. You will And it fun.
1 2 3 4 3 7 f till l 13 14 IS U 17 II 10 II it U i$ H
ASCDirGMI JR IMNDPOiSTUVWITX

Man.
FtS.JO

FfS. 21-MMt,3

21-

AM. 21-

MAY 20
MAVlt.
JUNt21

MY4
AUG. 22

AUG. 23-

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SIPI.24.

OCT. 23

OCT. 24-NOV.22

NOV. 23-

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JAM. 21

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a Aaaelfleda. taet the HrBf eltie'

WT V BBBBBBBVST

CUMMINC THE WORKS-Tm Forever Biting Bubbles"
could be the theme song of 14-month-old C&ye Frentzei shown
having fun in her Benson, Minn., home. At fast as her mother,
Mrs. Tom iYentzel, blows up the gum bubbles, Caye bites them.v

BBBBST SSSSSrBBBBBBBBBBBBsS Bssi MW

eOVtAS PANAMA A P WAYS

PANAMA-MIAMI

MIAMI-PHILADELPHIA

. . .$55.50

46.00

Philadelphia
Panama

$ior

XV Program

2:00 Matinee Sactet Tent
3:20 Game of the Week
6 :00 Industry On Parade
6:15 CFN NEWS
:30 You Are There
7:00 Jack Benny
7:30 Sch)ltz Playhouse

8:00 Ed Sullivan
8:00 Telephone Time

9:30 Phil Sllvert

rtltnc

11. '00 CFN IfflWS

9:3

10:00 Wrattllni
1 1 nn cwn un

ll;15 Encore: Chryiler Show.

Courtesy ot Aerovias Panama Airways
PHbNES: PANAMA: 3-1057 i 3-1698 3-1699
OFFICE H0UR8: from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

hi .I mi i ii

1

i



LITTLE BUT MIGHTY, Paul Adams wields his ham

mer in a business-like mann er as he nails two pieces of Aiftl1vftfV

wood to form a sword during the woodworking class W V IV I 1

at Fort GuHdc

. : Supplement

oee rageg a ana o jor nory ana pixj



I'.'iDER THE DIRECTION of Mrs. Eugene Siegfried, bowling instruction is given to boys and girls of age group 10 thru 16. fowling is another of the more popular ac activities
tivities activities of the Summer Recreation. Program. '. i

37 Ff. GucA

Own

Program

AIRS. RUTH WOEGENS (left) and Mrs. Spurgeon Lester (center) instruct the little girls in different
handicrafts. In the sbove picture they are showing the girl how to make candles for decorations.
The handicraft activity is part of the Summer Re creation Program of Fort Gulick.

Story by Sp4
HOWARD M. KR1EGER
Photos by
Sp4 BRUCE O. BLECKERT

Thraa hundred and seventeen

.hiMran ao sir thrnueh 16. hav?

been gathering daily at Fort to

lick in scenes wnicn coiua do w
plicated throughout the Caeal
Zone as the 1858 Summer Rcirea
tionxProgram brovides not only a
,.l,-.,o tnr hsvintf flin hilt llsO an

opportunity for Canal Zone youn

Sters CO learn won bikictsis
and profitable hobbies,
Fort Gulick's program offerei
activities ranging from sports to
handicraft.
The program was established
by the Army Atlantic Summer Re
oral a tinn Council under the direc

torship of Lt. CoL Arthur G. May
anri accisipH hv iant. Jose Vera

Jr., Army Atlantic Special Pr
jects Officer. Council members
were Mrs. James M. Hull, rcpra.

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senting Fort Gulick, Mrs. Florene
Henning, 'representing Fort Davis,
while Mrs. Opal Lambert repre represented
sented represented Coco Solito.
The council conducted a poll ot

the participating children to de

termine what types of activities"
the children desired.
The result was one of the most

interesting and varied programt

imaginable. 1
'.:":" '. i ii
It included enough requests to
result in activities such as rifli

shooting on the Fort Gulick in.

door range, development of a com communications
munications communications activity which taught
the children code, operation of a
military amateur radio station

and telephone communications

A group of boys were given the

opportunity to learn automotive
repair which has included essen essential
tial essential theory combined with hours

and hours of taking apart and put.

ting together auto and truck en-

nes.
Children swarmed over the sn.

pervised reading activities and

swamped volunteer Instructors 'ma
their genuine interest in develop,
ing good reading habits.

Of course, the Fort Gulick Sum Summer
mer Summer Recreation orosram Rccrpa

lion nrncram has it a share of 1ih.

er activities which included bow.
ling swimming instruction, handi handicraft,
craft, handicraft, leathercraft, batea painting

. YOU'RE SAFE!" says MSgt. Samuel Blasingame.' Softball is high on the list of the Summer Recreation Program at Fort Gulick.



Hat 1 ir If I
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Br Kt'!9e-3i Kl9l9lflflf In. v W

'RF VDY X)N THE FIRING LINE Is a familiar phrase heard at Fort Gulick this summer. Rifle shooting is one of the most popular activities of (he Fort Gulick
Summer Recreation Program. From left to right are: Jacqueline Wier, Terry Wilcox, Mike Littleton, Terry Hoch, Yvette Rios, Jose Ortiz, and Mike Metcalf.

Kids Choose
For Summer

if1

nd free movies on Wednesday af
ternoons.
i Rifle shooting, which was offer,
id for the first time this year, at attracted
tracted attracted boys and girls, ged 11

16, who were given meu-

nlotts instruction in range sately

cedures as well as firing tech.

niques. The participants were di-

led into two groups wmcn win

ima their activity with a matca

veen teams representing eacn

action and are competing for Na.

anal Rifle "Association qualifica

tion medals.

The motor mechanic activuy

found boys 12 through 16 vie win?

rmy training films, learning the

use of tools and dismantling mo-

BR sPN! climax oi tnis acttvny

driver instruction which is be.

given to the youngsters.

lie woodworking activity pre

lents a shining example of indus.

try as 67 boys in the 6 to 12 age
bracket busily 'hammer and saw
to their hearts' content. Some cf
the youngsters made practical it

ems such as bird nouses, san.i
boxes, etc. One day all 67 cut eat
the pattern of a wooden subma

chinegun and left the activity a.
midst the roar of 47 small voices

generating the rat-tat tat.tat sound

of home-made guns.

'In the handicraft activity 'he

sirls of the area have been ma';

Rig blouses and embroidering

them.

iBowling has consisted of instrue
tion and league action for the
youngsters.'
The Wednesday afternon movies

are maintaining an attendance of

better than 1000 youngsters per

, (Cont.nued on rase mt&

J Wf frfNH
mk m
I
I

; ... ;
1 Wl HL 1

HOW FAR these two boys got with their sawing we don't know but the possibility of sawing co
pletely through the table was a possibility. Alert adult supervision in the Fort Gulick Summed F
creation Program's woodworking activity prevented 67 eager boys from accomplishing the feat :
well as preventing the youngsters from accumulating injuries.

LSO INCLUDED in the Summer creation Program, is; batea

Minting -which is conducted in separate age groups for boys and

gins one tor cnuciren thru ll ana tl Otner iron li mn

r--

fears. In the picture above, Miss Clara Bray of fort Gulick is
practicing one of Panama ancient arts as she outlines her batea.
painting. ...11 "'

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TtltostR ATI AVTir smE Vfii I MnsT F. R S are' bel n coached in the art of leathercraft by Sp3 Donald

I Taylor. The leathercraft activitp of the Atlantk Side Summer Recreation Program was opened t
children of ages 10 through '6.

. 1

'-"1.39

Lid i wgr "i1-, "
Ameucan Suuolement rAU- hMAJ:
SUNDAY. AUGUf
I9f

fpintnii iifii(lil01llif liilii ii ii i .i.



ERIC AN

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PANAMA. AMMICAN

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POETS9 CORNER
, Vv

TO GIRLS

By Robert Herrick

Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time it still a -flying:
And' this same flower that smiles to-day
To-morrow wHl he dying.
The glorious Lamp of Heaven the Sun,
The higher he's a getting
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he's to setting.

That age is best which is the first,
When youth and blood are warmer;
But bsing spent, the worse, and worst
Times, still succeed the former.

Then be net coy, but use your time;
And while ye may, go marry:
For having lost but once your prime,
You ntiy for ever tarry.

I DIED FOR BEAUTY
By Emily Dickinson
I died for beauty, but was scarce
Adjusted in the tomb,
When one who died for truth was lain
In an adjoining room.
Re questioned softly why 1 failed?
"For beauty," I replied.
"And I for truth, the two are one;
We brethren are," he said.

And so, as kinsmen met at night
We talked between the roms,
Until the moss had reached our lips,
And covered up our names.

NEARING AGAIN THE LEGENDARY ISLE
By C. Day Lewis
Nearing again the legendary isle
Where sirens sang and mariners were skinned,
We wonder what was there to beguile
That such stou) fellows left their bones behind.
Those chorus-girls are surely past their prime
Voices grow shrill and paint is wearing thin,
Lips that sealed up the sense from gnawing time
Now beg the favour with a graveyard grin.
We have no flesh to spare and they can't bite,
Hunger and sweat have stripped us to the bone;
A skeleton crew we toil upon the tide
And mock the theme-song meant tb lure us on:
No need to stop the ears, avert the eyes
From purple rhetoric of evening skies.

Herewith tad solution to Sunday Crossword Pua
kle No. 790, published today.

I I III H.Il'I

slHlAlMlAMPiAISITMTACKMWAp I 1DI

MiHiitfHrii-iaiBi,iririfiaainrrii

5EMHI CME NT E PgR Afflb

Aawwer far Samtey, June S, Cryataajilp: AD MAM
REALIZES OUR RURAL MAGAZINES ARE

OOOD MEDIA. J.

The W

toil JMrry-ijOKound

ty DREW PEARSON 1

UNITED NATIONS, New, York
'lut paid professionals -gaifebt ,.
the United Nations, grey haired
haldine. observers who v.

watched the oipiomatic deaih.

pangs et a score pi peace mv
ings meetings that have star iei
with hope, ended with failure.
Once again, they gather almost
like vultures, to report and i.

the triouiatioos of man s at-

111 pt to get along with mar.

and Russian diplomats and Amer
ican diplomats, not under Uie
dome o. the UN Assembly room,
built by the Rockefeller Ian.
but in the ante-rooms where the
decisions are made. -Not uw
the last minute re the Amen,
can speeches released. If reie-..
earlier, a Communist nwsmaa
would trot them, around to
Russian ante-room to give Fir.

eign Minister tiro my ko a cnanc

to the UN Assembly half fiieJto revise his speecn. Diplomacy

the delegates, aigmnea, unruin.:

The wheels of uiplomscy grind

slow, and they -move with it.
Arabs may be waylaying ofrl.
ciala in the narrow alleys of Bei
rut; Russian jets may be edging
along the borders of Iran and to.
key; sleek American B-47's may
be on the runways of Slidi Si
maine in Morocco, gassed up, rea ready
dy ready to go, carrying more expoi
sive in one small H.bomb than
released in, all of World War i
Yet diplomacy remains dignif ied
and unhurried. .John Foster Uu,
les walks into the chamber; stoon-

ea, grey-haired, weighed dowf.

is siow. He is bent but unc.n

is slow. He is sbent but unc r

cerned.
Beside him walks Henrv Cabof

Lodge, erect, handsome, younger

in appearance man bis acufial
years. His isolationist grandfather

a member of the Senate, -fought

wooarow Wilson's League of Na
tions to the bitter end, deteate
Now his grandson is the fore foremost
most foremost representative of internation international
al international cooperation in the United Na
tions.

SI DATE CHAIRMAN
On the emerald-ermn rmtnim

at the end of the hall sits Sir

lie Monroe of New Zealand, kind kindly,
ly, kindly, unhurried. He represents two
sheep-raising islands in the South
Pacific far removed from Die

hate and murder am)

- wravua vi.
Die Near East.

His countrv has -watarfsiia -,,!

ing rivers and green trees.' The
Near East b (Wort AriA ,,

holes, streams that disappear ir,

me sanus.

Sir Leslie is fare minded am

serene. But for a fluke of fate,
he would be sittine down

and an Arab would be sitting in
Die emerald-green marble rostruir
m his place. Charles Malik, for
eign minister of Lebanon, was al
most elected president last year.

iouay, Manx, graduate of 3ei
rut University, strong friend of
the U.S.A., sits in the Harvar.
Club in New York drinking strong
coffee, answering frantio nhnnn

calls about the religious war be between
tween between his COUntrvmpn II ha

turns to Lebanon he knows he
would be assassinated. . .Above
Sir Leslie on the emerald ereen

rostrum is the insignia of the U-
nited Nations a globe sur
rounded on three sides by an o-

iive oranrn.

The oroblem

UN, and particularly this asseir
bly, Is to make that olive branch
extend all the way around too

globe. .The elohe itself i ni-

tured from the Arctic and from

that view. North and Smith Amor.

lea look relatively small- tho

great land masses of Russia and

Asia ieoK very large.
That eeoeranhlc. view luintn

ing more and more the political

view oi me world today.
BACKSTAGE DIPLOMAT
A UN girl usher keeping the
crowd in line ehews gum. She ap
pears to be an Arab, but she nas
acquired the No. 1 American ha
bit gum chewing. .Big. burlay
!Kahatyred UN guards, born It
Brooklyn, but migrated from Ire Ireland,
land, Ireland, direct the crowd outskte.
If the diplomats- are leisurely,
the spectators are not. They want

io witness iirsi nann now peace

is norn. 'Hiey want to see now
that olive branch that extends
two thirds of -the way around 1,1

united Nations insignia can be

stretched to cover the final ga"
. .Behind the scenes. Dag Ham
marskjold, boyish, slender secn

tary-general of the United Nations, f

nas been trying to stretcn Uie
live branch.
The crowd does not know wti'

is cominp. buthe does. He ha

may be leisurely but it still

the theatrical element surprise.

DIPLOMATIC SURPRtSf
John Foster Dulles stoops oer

his desk and scribbles am fore.

Minister Gromyko speaks. Ambas

sador Lodge leans, over and w
pers in Dulles' ear. Dulles has
one earphone in place, so.be
listen to the English translation

of Gromyko's speech. The ottc.

ear is free to usten to Lo- f : .

Gromyko once a minor et.c!ir

in the Soviet Embassy down 18th
Street from the White House, io

through the usual Moscow routine
of berating the United States.

But then as he comes to the

end, he suddenly changes pact

He reads the Russian resolution.

It is strangely moderate, it tae

the bellicose unreasonableness of

the rest of his speech. It gos ;

long way toward t accepting the

previous proposals ot me vn

States for a UiN tprce in Lebanon

and a UN force in Jordan

tab over from British and A mer.
ican troops.
. There u no criticism of the U U-nited
nited U-nited States for aggression. c :..
ThU im nmthtn0 at a (trnl una.

tic miracle. . .What thetivJ

doesn't know is that both Arab
leaders and Dag Hammarsky'M
have been working behind the
scenes. ;
The Arabs have urged Gromy.
ko to tone down bis prposais.
Hammarskjold has been urging
both the Arabs and the Russians
and the United States to be mod-

agwkt. .In Washington, C a h t
Lodge and C. D. Jackson, the For

tune Magazine publisher now aa aa-vising
vising aa-vising Eisenhower, both have been
urging the Dulles tough policy be
revised to the "soft sell."
Madison Avenue techniques are
now guUding American diploma,
cy. To be sure it is day.to-djiy
diplomacy, but it's better than
dug in, entrenched, unmovable di diplomacy.
plomacy. diplomacy. .Gromyko goes fuf.
Ser- "The Soviet Union," he
says, "does not want to worsen
relations with the United States.
. .If American and British troops
are withdrawn, far from lowering
the prestige of the United States
and the United Kingdom, it would
atwegthea it." From Gromyko;
these are amazing words. .Se
runs the dignified pace of diplo.
macy, unhurried, but somehow
salting progress. Perhaps t ii i s
time there may eventuate a real

step toward peace.

-
Cut Ori Popular Records
' r ii i i if i 1 1 i i i

By ED FITZGERALD
Photographers who get beyond

the "ilxed focus" stage usually
purchase a camera capable of m
ing interchangeable lenses.
Lenses of different focal lengths
greatly increase the flexibility of

any camera, it used property, tor
instance, wide angle lenses will
give unusual perspective, while a

telephoto lens will "zero in" en

distant objects.
Most medium and high-priced
cameras can mount interchange,
able lenses. This applies to movie
cameras as well.
The most popular cameras us.
ing interchangeable lenses are
the 35 mm's. Most of these come

equipped with lenses with a focal

length of 90 mm (two- inches;.
This is regarded as the normal
lens for film of this size.
However, there has been a
tendency among both profession

als and amateurs to regard the

medium wide angle or 35 mm
lens as the best for all around

work.

The wide angle lens gives
greater field of view, especially,
when photographing large groups
and interiors. The 50mm or nor.
mal lens gives a more selective
field, -but it's fine for most gen general
eral general and medium-sized views.
The telephoto lens can be a vaL
uable tool when you are stalkinj

elusive subjects such as birds of

animals. In choosing a telephoto
lens, many photographers select
an 85 mm medium while others
may go a step further and buy
135 mm regular telephoto which
can bring in distant objects wi'.b
great clarity.
An amateur equipped with a
35 mm, a 50 mm and an 85. mm
or 135 mm lens is in a good pos)
lion to handle most distance prq
blems when they occur.
And interchangeable lenses an
particularly valuable when shoot
ing color slides. Several lenset
will enable a color photographe
to show exactly what he want'

lo show when projecting his slide

on the screen.

mmmwttsL

"He must be sleepwalking he still has his blanket

i

mi:

it.,;

been sitting with Arab diplomat
a?4.

Mis

? 1.1 ;
m
wisnawaw
f AGE FOUR
Ml'
Amciican Supplement
Y, AUGUST 24. 158



Lkt Shows On Broadway
Washing ton News Notebook

It

By JACK GAVER
MEW YORK-(UPI)-Piaygoer
will Me a surviving remnant of
the most ambitious drama ic
dream an American playwright
ever had when Eugene O'Neill's
"A Tench of the Poet" opens at

the Helen Hayes Theater in Oc
toner. Appropriately, libs Haye V
wll be in the cast.
This is the last available O'Neill
full-lengih play in producible
form (a qualification that wit be
explained later). Miss Hayes,
Britain's Eric Portman and Kin
Stanley will have the leading
roles.
R was in 1934, after such sue
cesses as Morning Becomes
Elactra" and "Ah, Wilderness".
that the late playwright
Bounced he was about to devote
It years, if need be, to writing
a cycle of slays on American life
that would bear the over all title,
A Tale of Possessors Self -dispos-
teased." The theater was to see

no more of his works until ho
had completed this job.
At first O'Neill figured on five
plays, in the cycle. He rsised this
from time to time until the total
j was to be 11 long plays although
t he himself said he'd never live tt
complete them.

A Touch of the Poet" was the
only cycle play which O'Neill left
in finished form. It was to have
teen about the third item of the
In the will of the late news-
publisher, Joseph Fuht-
i a fund was established for
a gold medal to be awarded
annually for the most disinter
ested and worthy public serv service
ice service by any United States
newspaper, the famed Pulitzer
Prtte. Pulitzer, who was born
in Budapest, Hungary, in 1847,
came to the U.S. in 1804 and
joined the Union army. Later
he purchased newspapers in
St. Louis and New York.
Encyclopedia Britannica
By DELOS SMITH
NEW YORK (UPI) On the
backs of the records jackets, you
arc told that Bach's six Brand Brandenburg
enburg Brandenburg concertos make up "an
encyclopedic treatise" of
18th
century instrumentation.
Hearing the records, therefore,
comes as quite a relief. Charles
Munch, with players from his
Boston symphony, gives 00 indi indication
cation indication from the way he directs
them that he knows he is dealing
with a matter so weighty and
grave.
Munch conducts the concertos
s though they were composed
to be played by musicians for the
fun of it, and listened to with
pleasure. He exercises his talent
for letting light through the
densest ..chords, so the colors
shimmer and sparkle. Munch un
folds the art of Bach, not the
intellect (RCA Victor LM.2182
and LM 2198.
KngUsh singers and players, In
recording Bach's D major. Mag Magnificat
nificat Magnificat and the funeral music
which Purcell composed for Queen
Mary hi 1695, sang and played
them from the heart with sincere

MUSIC, MUSIC MUSIC

.cycle. He started work on it U

m 1933, completed the uiira tne
final draft in 193.
Perhaps be had a premonition
about this tint that the cy.fe
plays several of which he had in
the works would never get finish
ed. p
O'Neill set about writing three
non cycl plays which had bee
haunting him. "The Iceman Co
meth," "Long Day's Journey In
to Night" and "A Moon for the:
Misbegotten." The first and third
of these were produced in Ameri America
ca America before bis death irv 1953, .al .although
though .although "Moon" did not reach
Broadway until four years later.
In the early HMO's, the play-

wright became a victim ot a
palsy type disease that never left
an-'him. Since he wrote in long hand
and felt he could not dictate, he
! created nothing more. He came
back home to supervise the
i Broadway production of "Tim
Iceman Cometh" in 1946 and,
soon after, the abortive touring

try out of "A Moon for the Mis
begotten." That was all.
There remained "Long Day's
Journey Into Night," a franfcu
autobiographical work that ori
ginally bore a 25-years after after-death
death after-death embargo, which the author
Ii-ted. before he died, and A
. .P
The latter had its world pre
miere in the spring of 1957 at the
Swedish Roya Theater in Stock-
horn. O'Neill was partial to tne
Swedes; felt they gave his works
more recognition than .110 nis
own country. The first production
of "Journey" was in Stockholm
lata in 1956.
Drafts of several other plays of
the il-play cycle were destroys 1
by 0 Neill and his wife in ms
last years. He knew he never
would finish them, and he felt
they should not be preserved in
incompleted form. There was one
exception, which is why there
might possibly be one more long
Cmeil play after "A Touch of
the Poetj"
This lay was, and is. "More
Stately Mansions." The original
manuscript was destroyed, but
somehow a typed copy with O' O'Neill's
Neill's O'Neill's revisions was preserved
and wound up in the Yale Uni University
versity University library in 1949.
Mrs. O'Neill has turned this
rather jumbled work over 10 Karl
Ragner Gierow of the Swedish
Royal Theater to see if he can
reduce it to presentable form. If
he succeeds, it eventually will be
produced and published
Mill to be seen is
one-act play entitle
an V em
iiugiiu-.
which he wrote in 1941. The
Swedes probably will do it first.
Meanwhile, the text of "A
Touch of the Poet" has been
available since last September
under .the imprint of the Yale
University Press. i
and simple fervor, with no thought
to musical art or science. The an
tique flavors are an there, but
also thrusts of basic e motions
which can never become antiquat antiquated.
ed. antiquated. These are the Geraint Jones
singers and players who have
done wonders in not trying to
modernize nor intellectualize the
j old musk (Angel-45027)
Igor Markevitch applies his
disciplined cdnductorial style of
tensed but measured precisions
to Beethoven's "Pastorale" sym.
phony. This is the one in which
the master showed us frankly his
pleasure at being in the country.
The Markevitch manner suits the
piece vets well, and vice versa.
(Decca-9976).
To what a low the popularity of
the once popular Alexander Gla Gla-zounov
zounov Gla-zounov has fallen The first re.
presentation of his music on rec.
ords. in many months is of the
short ballet score "Birthday Of.
fering," which assembles bits and
tatters of Glazounov from many
of his scores. But they make
pleasant listening strung together
and played by the Royal Philhar.
monir, with Robert Irving conduct

ing (Angel 35388). ft

HL BsW
'attorn;

3 ',i
f
WASHINGTON (NBA) The oth other
er other afternoon Ike took his grandson
David out to Burning Tree-Coun
try Club to play golf and the wfiOlt
outing ended up who rnmen fan,
ings.
First David became absorbed
in driving the golf cart and be
gan cavorting the thing an over
the fairways. David was
in a
mood to frolic and was
the ball all over the place
hitting
The President, on the other
hand, was hitting the ball excep
tionally well and was obviously
getting more annoyed by the min minute
ute minute with David's dalliance.
At the end of the first nine
Cut t?7 Records
By WILLIAM D. LAFFLfS
NEW YORK (UPI) "The St,
Louis Blues" is so sturdy that it
constantly survives the liberties
taken with its score.
This is adquately proven in
"14 Blue Roads to St. Louis"
(RCA Victor LPM 1714) which
to a variety of interpretations by )
bands that are nere ana oana
that are gone.
No less than 14 versions may
be heard on this LP, one after
the other. Even so, eacn arrange,
ment is different and there is no
reason for boredom.
Benny Goodman's sterilized im improvisations
provisations improvisations begin the one song
concert and Dizzy Gillespie's
screeching horn brings it to a
raucous ending But in between
the euphony of Benny and the
cacophony of Dizzy, there is some
sublime music.
Bands headed by John Kirby,
Louis Armstrong and Jack Tea Tea-garden
garden Tea-garden give "The St. Louis Blues"
a Dixie kick. Duke Ellington gives
it the big band sound and Max
Schaefer's trio the so ter treat treatment.
ment. treatment. Fats Waller and Bennie Payne
show it off as a piano prize and
.jjena Home, Maxme Sullivan and
; jtartna ft.ni expiuu us ijms.
Tr Rpnpke olavs it as a march
nil Pm-e?. Prado rives it a Latin
styhng.
'Kollv" ( Riverside
RLP 12-254) is an easy .going ex
position ot modern jazz. Kelly is
presented in seven selections, in including
cluding including two of his compositions,
with a combo consisting of Ken
ny Burrell, Paul Chambers
Philly Joe Jones.
and
Jazz jambalaya fine boogie
woogie stylings by Whelan Tyne
may be heard in "8 to the Bar"
(United Artists UAL 300002). .
Joe 'Fingers' Carr, one of the top
ragtime piano players, r a co s
through some of the better im.
ports, among them "Third "Man
Theme" and "Poor People o.
Paris" in his latest LP, "Joe
'Fingers' Carr Goes Continental"
(Capitol T.1000).
1 Selected singles: "Are Yon
Really Mine" by Jimmie Rodgers
with Hugo Peretti and. orchestra
(Roulette R.4090), "Beachtime" by
the Survers (Orbit R5158), "Rain "Rain-in',
in', "Rain-in', Rainin' by Ginn and Gina
(Mercury YW16238).
Stereoscope: Walt Disney pion pion-neered
neered pion-neered stereophonic sound, the
new hi-fi craze, some 20 years
ago with a road-show version of
the cartoon "Fantasia." By ar arranging
ranging arranging speakers at vantage
points in the theater he achieved
three.dimensional sound effects.
One of the sections was devoted
to Beethoven's "Pastorale" Sym Symphony.
phony. Symphony. Full-score of -this light
symphony may be heard; on a
stereophonic record- (Vanguard

Club CapersBy Degrees Insigne Insigne-OnionsEntwined
OnionsEntwined Insigne-OnionsEntwined Social Vacuum

y DOUGLAS LASSEN and JERK i' BENNETT

grand ather Ike exploded and told
David he wssn t going to play with
him anymore. He got Burning
Tree pro. Mix Elbin. and asked
Max to give David some lessons.
The concensus at Burning Tree
is that David gets' more fun out
of driving the golf cart than
playing golf.
George V. Allen, boss of the U-
nited States Information Agency,
claims that he s going to set some
kind of a record for receiving edu education
cation education honors in October.
Within one week he's getting an
honorary doctor's degree from
Georgetown University here and
one from Wagner College on
Staten Island, N.Y. He says:
"Of course I'm paying for
them by making a speech at, each
presentation. But I haven't decid decided
ed decided whether this is an inflationa inflationary
ry inflationary or deflationary price.'
1 Friend of ours with Central
tpllicrpnrn A BM1I.V flnM an
In-
in
teres'ine ciearette liehter. On it
is engraved the traditional black I
cloak and dagger figure.
"tly use this lighter when I'm
among friends," he explains.
This same CIA agent tells about
a colleague who has a. new typt
hall point pen which writes
hit
der ground
Ninety-one-year old Sen. Theo Theodore
dore Theodore Francis Green was leaving
the White House the other after afternoon
noon afternoon after a formal luncheon for
a visiting foreign dignitary.
"What did you get for lunch?"
a society reporter asked him as
he left.
"Hash, naturally," Green re replied,
plied, replied, v
Rep. Coya Knutson (D Minn.)
is the most relieved woman in Con
gress about the ending of the
session. She has a chance now to
go home and patch things up with
her husband.
What Do
The Catholic Bible in the St. Pe
iters' Edition (Hawthorn): This
is a new edition containing Hi".
Old Testament in the Douay ver version
sion version annotated by the Rev. Robert
A. Dyson, S.J and the New
Testament and the Psalms in the
Westminster versipn annotaed
by the Rev. Richard J. Foster
There are tables ot mauigentes,
holy days of obligation, sections
to be read on Sundays and feast
days, a table of re'erences and
a table of movable feasts Incl'id
ed is a message rom the f-m
recommencing me new euiuuM u
English speaking Catholics.
The
limited edition of 3,000 cones
published in August sells for $57.
50. A regular edition will be" pub published
lished published in October at $2.95. The
first volume, numbered "1" was
presented to thePope.
Truiillo: Lhtle Caesar f the
Caribbean, by German Orn;
(Nelson): A critical biogri(.hy
well documented from 0 ficial and
other sources which Ornes uses
to indict the Dominican Strom?
man. The generalissimo's life i
traced from humble beginnings
to the present, which finds hiir
in absolute control of more tlmr,
two million peoole Ornes is a
former member of the Domini' an
congress and once published jnl
edited El, Caribe, a Ciudad Tru
jillo dailv new.ner. He is how
an the staff of El Mundo, a Pusrto
Ricah n:spaper.
tho Montel Scandal, by. yVay yVay-land
land yVay-land Young Doubleday): A few
years aso Bevsna-er readers all
over tne world were avraiy ioi
the progress of the Men

if
You'll remember he caused an
.international hullabaloo bv nuhft.
city asking her to give up her po political
litical political career.
She refused his request but she
thinks everything will turn out
all right.
She s also relieved because she
finally won hei big onion fieht.
tier district is loaded with onion
growers who have been hir hir-raised
raised hir-raised over the years oy the b'g
cS.y onion speculators. But 'ie
has beaten this with a bill which
will take onions out from under
futures trading.
"Now," she says triumphantly,
"we're all racing like horses head head-ed
ed head-ed back to the stable."
A visitor in the office of govern
ment official Al Lubin no iced sev several
eral several large balls of twine on his sec
retary's desk.
"What do you do with that
stuff?" the visitor asked Al
ire neeu it Decause everv
th'n -W goes on in
this ofOro
to it," he
hB. strin attached
replied
The bottom has now ot ieially
fallen out of Washington's- sochl
life because Perle Meta and
Gweenn Cafritz the fueditig hos hostesses,
tesses, hostesses, are both out of town for Hie
first time since early last winter.
The truth is, everyone is re relieved
lieved relieved to have the party pressure
off.
Everyone but the town's socie society
ty society writers, that is.
Other day, for example, the vi e
of a third secretary of one of t'-e
embassies had a few friends in
for coctkails and was dumbfound dumbfounded
ed dumbfounded to have a half dozen soci?ty
writers and two phototrapl"i'-s
show up to cover the event Te
affair got top hilling next day on
the society pages.
"It's really so quiet here social socially
ly socially you can hear a faux pas drop,"
one society matron claims.
You Read?
tesi case, which began when
Wilma Montesi's body was !-1 1
on a beach near Rome. The mys mystery
tery mystery surroiuting her death in involved
volved involved a wide range of charur- 3
from call girls to government of officials.
ficials. officials. Young, a former Bri i h
News correspondent in Rome has
pulled together the 1tnrn t s
of this fascinating scandal mys mystery
tery mystery into an absorbing book.
Princess Sophia, by Edison Mar Marshall
shall Marshall (Doubleday): The Alaska
gold rush of 1898 serves as buk-
ijiuiiu, aj
complete with prospectors.
'.1 11 riicii 117 1 n nrncniw ire f-ii-
Ui "11
ers, saloon fights, loose women
blizzards and gold. To hold the
story together is young sourdoi 1
Eric Andersen, wise in the wayj of
the north country but a pushover
for a rre'ty face: the fancy hdy
Fannie Frd; sweet Sophia and
the Wild half t)re:"l girl who want wanted
ed wanted Eric 'ao. Good hammock read read-in
in read-in on a comfortably warm day
way from blizzards and wolf
howls.
The American Peoples Ency-c!orj-
!ia Yearbook for 1958, edited
by" Carroll fiw- rd (distribute.!
by Sears,, Roebuck n Among ihe
'"' fnCts .horonicled by
this single.volume encyclopedia:
TiV atom's submarine Nau i'us
got nearly 70 000 miles out of 2 8
pounds of Uranium 235 the
e-uivalenf of 217 tank cars o
diesel fuel; there were 12Q6 torna tornadoes
does tornadoes in 1967 : shuffleboard clubs
had 60 000 active olavers; dill
nickles outsold candy bars at a
Texas movie This big volume"
teems with historical and satisfy
cal in'tr"?"'5"- tr thousinds 0!
I events which took place in

fnConiA

1 n f

iljPL, WM, w vage five
SUNDAY. AUGUST 9A iqk
m



r-.

... . . .BBpBBIHBBfe

UNDER THE SIGNAL COMMUNICATIONS ACTIVITY, the young
people arc taught Morse Code, field telephone and wire installations,
and operation of an amateur radio station. Here we see MSgt
Clarence W. Peters of the U.S. Army Caribbean School as he in instructs
structs instructs wo new eager radio fans. This activity is conducted in the
Signal Section of the US4RCARIB School every Monday and. Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday.
Gulick Summer Recreation Program

(Continued from Pae THREE)
show as children who are not par.
ticipating in the normal program
swell the attendance.
Climax of the entire eight-wee'e
program was a gigantic picnic last
Friday.
With regular attendance runn

ing at an all time high number
and with a list of activities that
are tremendously educational and
helpful to the children, one only
has to remember that these a:ti
vities were requested by the chil
dren themselves and demonstrate
that seriousness o' purpose is
found in today's children,

-(R BbPtPOP BH jMK-: :

SWIMMING INSTRUCTIONS was offered to youngsters enrolled in
the Fort Gulick Summer Recreation Program. Starting in the wad wading
ing wading pool, the swimming enthusaiets learned fundamentals such as
kicking properly before graduating to the main pool. All instruction
was conducted under the supervision of Red Cross Certified life
guard Sgt. Donald B. Morrill and volunteer assistant Ted Holmes,
the son of MSgt Ted Holmes of Fort Gulick;

BSSBaBSl

'Nf.";"V

.w

W 'X. JK ' .. i

LnohiihMti KonHA rlriAAiViOrtA

C 7 7- i-

v

PmH

ier Sunday Cross-Word Puzzle

7SQ
7T" 7TZ 7" 5 T" To"" 77" 7T" TT" IT" TT" 7T" 77"" 7g"
5T" Zfc" 57 -ge r
W 75 76 77 7 1
; b- 1;
""" w w ";
93 r77TL ?r
. -L--y,
T 7 Z77m toj ob k9
w trr ttb ;
itt" fir iriaz ;i
W rsr
"11 II w 1 W I 1 11 Ml

1 Indian
song
bird
-Ago
10 Small
nail
14 Desert
19 Larger
unit
than
poundal
20 Worthy
22 Hidden
28 Make
satis-
. (action
24 Grander
29 A ge m
26 Nour Nourished
ished Nourished 27 Marauder
of
Scottish -highlands
20 Cattle
farm
31 Fabulous
bird
32 Run
away
34 Unfavor Unfavorable
able Unfavorable i 35 Burmese
spirit
of
wood
$7 Thrice
(music)
38 Canvas
shelter
,29 Ore
vein
.. ; ;ve, i

HORIZONTAL

41 Confined
43 Misplace
45 Long
drawn
speech
48 Set
60 Bay
of
Pacific
. Ocean
54 Improve
55 Dim
56 Sketches
58 Song t
of
joy
60 Twist
60 Voting
place
61 Troubling
63 Border
64 Gnawed
65 Soonest
67 Unmind Unmindful
ful Unmindful 69 Fungus
71 Record
73 Scarcest
74 Tonic
76 Wanting
78 Spread
grass
for
drying
80 Secrete
81 Fireman
83 Parry
84 Pine Pineapple
apple Pineapple J5 Prevent

87 Portable 1 Stave
stove (music)
88 Ensign 2 Public
89 Shelter house
90 Cactace- S Positive
ou ..' pole
plant 4 Fortify
92 Pressed 5 Fish pickle
In ranks 6 Pounding
94 'Regress implement
95 Egress 7 Arch in
97 Alienates a mine
98 Smoke 8 Be pre
99 Lump eminent
of earth 9 Salt of
102 Cut v titanio
down acid (
104 Expire 10 Hindu
105 Color cymbals
106 Float 11 Indian
of perfumed
logs powder
110 Artist's 12 Device
medium to secure
111 Billiards rope
shot 13 Core
113 Scoffed 14 Desire
116 Hindrance 15 Insect
117 Herb of 16 Noise
carrot made in
family. sleep
119 Advancer 17 Insert into
121 Alert mortise
123 Number 18 Upright
124 Calm 21 Household
125 Ancient 28 Assistant
language 30 Harvest
126 Handle 33 South
-127 Stabler African
128 Printing antelope
term 36 White .
129 Indolent ants If;
Ararat Mlstteat W atfaMte.

VERTICAL
88 Capable
of being
held
40 Unusual
41 Dog
42 Lapidary's
instrument
44 Algonquin
45 New Zea Zealand
land Zealand tree
46 Counter
ielt
47 Traitors
48 Summon
49 Heroic
51 Having
tendency
to hold
62 Wet

slightly
63 Charity
55-Havlng
furrows
broader
than inter
vening
ridges
57 Trapping
80 Hurts
61 Garden
plant
62 Splendid
65 Bombyx
66 Made
beloved
68 Work
unit
70r-Fined
72 Firearms
74 Feign
75 Parcels
k of land

77 Peruse f
79 ScandU
navip:
82 Perceived
84 Horse
86 Strain
88 Purity

89 Surround
91 Capital
Peru
93 Grows
H-RvigS i
96 DUH
98 Animal
of weasel
family
99 Shore
100 Ocean
vessel
101 Tree of
antiquity
103 Worm-
eaten i
105 Female i
ruff ; I
107 Diminish
108 Dervish
109 River I
in
England
111 US. :v!
coin
112 Be spirit
less
114 Compile
115 Spanish j
painter
118 Ocean
120 Floating
box for
fish
122-Colorless

CRVPTOQUIP

VO OYH LKYBXPK'N JZL LILYI OYRYPXHKN YLK

R J J O G K O X Y.
' f

ssBBSse

rotes cv reaiures

: .w7- , : .. ., ..

Ihm

-.1

' ; .- j : I EH
ii S "it i iii iwipimtiiiiKi

NiinrlAU

American

fAtiifi-'sil

SUNDAY. AUGUST 24. 1958



Review Of The
ISTHMIAN
WORLD-WIDE
SPORTS
.

W e e :

AIW-iOT KSg i-srsw; SSS 5 2 5ttget busy now' and
by October 1. All the government agencies operating lf1'- Te champion blltered he should have disposed of
In the Canal Zone are working on the draft which 'Thursday that Central will not auow uwni g from Tex the
will be issued by President Elsenhower, er tor the fall term- removed- at Ieast temporari- 12th round Monday night, even though the kayo In
i,TftLgIStS?to3ttad shifted to Washington where that session had tagged the blood smeared challenger
0 & tJ, a for the Advancement of Colored with his first defeat In 23 bouts. :
.. . I11 A5!iorJ,S S T tL snnrerae Flovd's victory before an estimated 17,000 at Wrlgley

Governor William E. Potter sponeoui on me n people Pfeparea "Vf" hlMVto rSSr Field was his 15th knockout In his last 16th lights.

WV W- y w r 7

aiaoa Man at a innaiitv mppt.ine at Pedro Mieuel and

-w - 2, .1 -,

aid that too much unknowing tanc aDouui naa given tne Anwnsas scuwh. wa ov
many people a false impression of the benefits it will Thurgood Marshall, NAACP chief counsel wuex wuex-bring.
bring. wuex-bring. He said it had never been officially suggested pected to file motions see king to ov f
that everyone should be on a U.S. rate wage. The circuit Court of Appeals' stay of its previous order
principle of the bill was that everyone doing similar requiring the school to integrate ., th
work will get the same rate of pay except that U.8. Friday, white students chattered happily ,M f7
citizens doing the same work as Panamians would started registering and talked about almas every every-get
get every-get their 25 per cent tropical allowance and greater thing but the school's racial troubles,
leave allowances. Blossom said Thursday that the records of the Ne-
o gro students will be transferred from Central to the

' An ex-convict and Canal Zone deportee is in Gor Gor-gas
gas Gor-gas Hospital recovering trom a bullet wound in the
head inulcted by a Canal Zone Policeman. Sixto Ma Manuel
nuel Manuel Berguldo, 33, the exconvlct was seen in Rain Rainbow
bow Rainbow City leaning on a fence. When two policemen
approacned him to arrest him for returning to the
Zone, Berguldo ran. During the chase which follow followed,
ed, followed, the Policemen shouted many warnings for him to
stop and fired two marning shots in the air but still
Berguldo ran. Policeman David A. Hope, realising that
Berguldo could run the faster, took careful aim at his
legs with a pistol but shot him in the head. When
Berguldo recovers sufficiently to be released from
hospital he will appear before Cristobal Magistrates
Court charged with returning to the Zone after de deportation.
portation. deportation. A watchman died this week in a fire which de destroyed
stroyed destroyed a paint factory on the Trans-Isthmian High Highway
way Highway and cause $80,000 worth of damage. The body of
the watchman, Gaspar de Gracia, 51, was found in
the ruins the following day still clutching a fire ex extinguished
tinguished extinguished with which he is believed to have been
attempting to quench the outbreak. The factory was
owned by the Fabrlca Panamefia de Plnturas and was
Insured for $100,000. When Panama firemen arrived
they could do little but try to stop the flames spread spreading
ing spreading because th Inflammable paint preparations were
burning so fiercely;.
t- j "" v .... t-
The Air Force at Albrook advertised an fnh. tnr wQi

taters and had 2350 prospective applications in the
following four days. Albrook recruiting office stag staggered
gered staggered under the colossal flow of applications and then
puickly stationed two of Its staff on the man gate

w yiwiiii to uusuiesa. mnety per cent or tne appli

DnniAi Mann Meirrn hieh school.

Civilian guards, wearing pistols strapped to their
sides, prevented news photographers from entering
the building. The guards have been at the school
throughout the summer.
"We are planning to open Central Hlgh this Sep September
tember September as an all-white school," Blossom said Thurs

day.

But he was dissatisf ied with his own trip to the can canvas
vas canvas in the second round and displeased because his
bleeding opponent had survived four knockdowns.
"I want to get busy how," said the 23 year-old
champion.
Harris made a brave stand against the champion
from Mr. Vernon, N.T. but he was outgunned. Pat Patterson's
terson's Patterson's right-hand smashed to the body began
to weaken him as early as the third round.
A right to the chin put Harris down for the count
of eight In the seventh. A left-right combination
dropped him for "seven" and a right for "three" in
the eighth. Another right to the chin floored him for
"nine" in the 12th. And a smashing left hook sent
him reeling acrossrthe ring, Just before the bell end ended
ed ended action in the 12th.
The champion received more than his guaranteed

$210,000 through his percentage provisos, because

He said should the stay of mandate of the appeals late surge s of fans jrrnadjjr.

emirt be in effect when school opens Sept. 2 "we will

tell any Negroes who come to Central the same
The Sjt- Louis court stayed Its Monday reversal of
Federal District Judge Harry J. Lemley's decision to
halt integration at Central until mid-semester of 1961.
Mrs. L. C. (Daisy) Bates, president of the Arkansas
NAACP, declined comment on the stay of mandate.
Gov, Orval E. Faubus, wlio alerted Arkansas leg legislators
islators legislators for a "most likely' emergency session for to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow to consider anti-integration legislation, said
Thursday's ruling "makes a difference."
But two of the state's top officials said the special
session couldnt be avoided.
The circuit court at St. Louis granted a Little Rock
School Board appeal Thursday for a 30-day integra integration
tion integration delay pending the appeal to the nation's highest
court for final disposition;"
The Supreme Court currently Is in recess for the
summer and doesn't plan to reconvene until Oct. 6.
But Justice Charles E. tyhlttaker has Jurisdiction
over emergency appeals from the Eighth Circuit when
the court Is In recess. Justice Department expert
. said Whittaker could vacate the stay, uphold ft, or
refuse to act until the Ml court could review the
petition. '-;
These experts said they cofild find no precedents
for one Judge overruling a circuit court stay without

Sheafing oy tne run court.

Whittaker also could turn tne petition over to uniei

cantTdMnntnr Justice Earl Warren, who has authority to call an

the Air Force got as "many rooIe as TteVded on the erenc "W1 of the High Court. This, too, was

completely mi its -applicant supply files."
In ,the. JI.BuWf Panama have the op opportunity
portunity opportunity of bidding for construction work worth an
eobroximate total of $19,000,000 in the Canal Zone
during the present fiscal year. Sixty nine projects are
to be advertised by the Canal Zone it was announced.
Four of the projects involve the expenditure of over
$ I million including the bulldlnsc of the substuctee
of the new high level bridge over the Canal, at Balboa.
Feftiando Salarar a 23-year-old father from Pana
nn Citv admitted trying to kill his five-vear-old son
by dashing him against the rocks on the seashore
at La Boyedas. The child was found on the beach
near the French Plaza with his feet tied together
with a belt and suffering from a blow on the head.
Snlazar showed uo at Santo TomAs Hosoital later
2LclTli1 n and was immediately arrested by the
Secret Police. He said he had Intended to commit
suicide but ehansed his mind after reading that his
son was still alive.

o

Isthmian weather was fickle this week. On one day
the temperature at Balboa Heights rose to 94 degrees
which was the hottest August temperature recorded
in 44 years. The following day exceptionally high
Winds caused havoc among small-fry shipping on the
canal In the Gatun area. Many boats were damaged
by rolllne- against Dlers and soma lost much of their
cargo of local produce.

o

viewed as unlikely

The St. Louis Appeals court gave the school board
30 days In which to file a petition with the Supreme
Court for a review. Attorneys for the Negro students
would have 30 days to file an answer.
The petitions then would be considered by the Jus Justices
tices Justices meeting in private conference.
After the Supreme Court hands down a final or order,
der, order, the losing party has 25 days In which to seek
reconsideration. The courts mandate also takes about
25 days to reach the lower court and thus become
effective. n6 i
Thus, unless Whittaker grants the stay or the court
Is called into emergency session, the time element
involved In an appeal appeared to ml out admis admission
sion admission of Negro students to Central High until the
soring semester of 1959, in the opinion of court ob observers
servers observers Mfeariwhlle In Norkfolk, Vai, District Judge Walter
E. Hoffman sped up his review of rejected applica applications
tions applications by Negroes for white schools,.
Hoffman, who heard arguments on only four of the
cases Thursday, divided 27 other children into clas classifications
sifications classifications Friday to review their cases in groups.
He expected to make a decision on them tomorrow.
Then Hoffman expected to proceed with still other
cases. So far 53 of the 151 students turned down for
white schools have asked to have their applications

mated gate $200,000 and renorts from the Telepromot-

er Corporation Indicated theatre-TV receiots at 151
theatres in 133 cities would approximate one million
dollars.
Harris received a flat guaranteed $100,000 for his
battering.
The 6-1 underdog was far behind when the bout
was stopped. Mushv Callahan favored Patterson, 117 117-97.
97. 117-97. Judge Tommy Hart agreed, 117-98; likewise, judge
Frankie Van. 108-102. Van stave Harris two rounds,
the first and second. The United Press International
gave him only the seenriD.
It was Patterson's 34th victory in 35 fights and his
25th knockout.
A movement to make the wearing of safety helmets
mandatory while exercising horses received Impetus
today from the death of abnrentlce lockey R"'nh Red
Polichlo, 21. fataiTv injured vhen thrown from his
mnnt and kicked In the head.
The vounar rider d'd M"daV few hours after he
was thrown from War Current during a morning
workout .-, v; t.
th manaeino director nf the Jockey's build. Bert
Thomnson, said he felt, the ne of safety helmets
should be made mandatory for workouts as well as
actual racing.
The United States Davlo Con tennis tam enm enm-pleted
pleted enm-pleted a 5- sween over rrenna Monday In the
f'nnl round of the American Zone eHm'naifons.
The victorv mwlifl-d the tt.s to met Tta'v or the
Philinnines in the interzone finals In Australia in
D"mhr.
Ham Fehardnon of Arlington. V.. needed nnlv 70
minute fn heat w-hiardo P"iio, 6-4. fl-2. 7-s. Then
Tarrw fK"w of Dewton. Ohio oonMned the series
by crushing Enrique Mores. 6-2, 6-2, 6-2.
There wasn't another eolfer who brearudaed blond
Bonnie Randoloh her victory In the $5000 Heart of
American women's golf tournament even Betty
Jameson whom she beat In a sudden-death olayoff.
The other wos cheered londiv Monday when Miss
Randoloh sank an M-foot b'rdie nutt on the first
nlavoff hole, thereby wlnnln hr first tournament in
fHM vear on the nrofpsslonai trail.
The other irtrls wahbed flt-tlme winner and
threw her into the Blue F's Country Club swim-tnlno-
poof clothes and ell but the exuberant

Bonnie didn't seem to mind.
Miss, Rahdolnh and Miss Jameson, tied at 219, six
under paf, i the 54-hole tournament.
The Senate passed Monday a watered-down
bill designed to make the current motor boat boom
a bit safer.
The Senate version would require registration and
numbering by the states or the Coast Guard or all
motorboats of more than 10 horsepower.

A bin the House passed earner would require safety

revieweq. . niimherlng nf all Knata ttflf.h mnrrn than 71 hnrw.

The students were divided into categories in a cios- D0we7 T r
SSSt Sen- orge A. Smathers. D-Fla. .inteoduced the 10

VXrti: erected ZZ X ctoZSS&tfto. H52S5?EL W!? S5? LrM"? y.col"-

fnu .i. ... 1 fl.wrwf.. EIIL. -CSi ii; ,n e fv. .a. r.iild R'amw, uuin smau ato, owners worn uie.ouse ver-

nie oreMses or tne newspaper star and Herald have lluu w vw slom mv y.w3w
been silent all week owing to a typographe1r strike. fl i.wHn. t th. whooi hoard nate measure, returned to the House for ap-
Thev are claiming eight hours pay for seven hours 5?iJ0J imJi ul wmdd in &$L, e change, retained a preyision reauiring
work which prlviledge has been extended to them by wouldJ MfMf wwtfd to Iccideht reports and penalties for operating a motor-
, j-i8 "fwers nave naa a pay raise wWfld-b thatffiar of racial vlotece'vlas not gMuruIi : . w ; J
. 0 for refusal to admit Negroes to while schools. He gency session of the General Assembly.
into,i nut. that pWterfti Jndore Harrv LemlCv's 2V,r Hammarskjold told a news conference that the

nwuj linn

youngest game, tlsheia Jn the "business.

Idreh Frank and Mary Sharp aged 6 arid

on racial violence, hid been reversed.

That reversal, Hoffman said, "may alter the picture."

Norfolk School Board enairman r aui u- Bcnweiec

measure accepted by an 80 to 0 vote in the Assembly
Thursday was "one of the strongest resolutions" ever

passed by the United Nations. :
"Xn my mind," he said, "Thursday was one of those

Tnra- dTlJl?10 'Z5ZSZ Neos. ttonal politics and diplomacy. Tt

He and School Suot. J. J. Brewbaker argued that
jElolence would interfere if the children were

jgagpq to wnne bcuvwib. -''jpSm

, Famed Fisherman Frank Violette returned from him year ''cooling off period." at Little Rock which was

latest trip in the Serl this week. Accompanying him B?, partially

HIS gW

8 resn
over 1

juiette was DrpT.r.v nnt. imi.ct.in ohnnf imn w-i,i.

ta.2 lZL r?01. Lm ontstandtag catch

n'w,TOu i!n uiuws current tou

thetr pay raise. Following a raise of approxln

per cent granted in the District of COlur
tive to January 12, a local application i
raise in the Canal Zone was annrntMut

ttonal politics and diplomacy. The picture we havo
today would not have come about without the services

of this organization.'. X.vfc.-&,
Hammarskjoid saUJ Jt it agreeable to the ipvem
Scfcefflldm for Amman tomor tomor-mnr
mnr tomor-mnr and snend a week at the Jordanian capital. Ha

ft a raise Of nnnrnvlmnfolw 1Q O -J i. j r- f.2J?i-.: a n11trln. matrnA In flanava

Per cent graAted in the District of WSZn&ZZ leffSS $?M Mof to toSal MmmL
tive tq January 12. a local application for a similar l0,d announced Friday that he win jfa tomorrow lor ne .. w&stfi.I -mTBZmm-i6&F:X then

I by Governor VDeace p R return to Amman. i"theggoCjrfro.

; jSTOATr3C0 1958

f



MRS. SPURGEON LESTER of Fort Davis presses the hand of little Nancy Parsons into a nice fresfc
dish of Plaster of Paris. This model of little Nancy's hand will be presented to her mother by Nan
cy as a gift. This is one of the Projects of the Handicraft activity under the supervision of Mrs,

L.esrer ana ornei MTiannc laers.

iml and $ for $tory mnd pix)

"5 ts'

w -w-v wio a C.'r: T vu' lwMUP

, ... .: V

rati



SUMO A Y
Comic supplement

76e

MICE DKV
I ttiiU- FIMD &EHCH
POPEVE, M FRIEND, 1 "Wf IT'S VOU BON1 TH'
F02 U)ALR
m &w we ujvKrt'ti

1

IrCRECS SI CHEESE ARE 6000
UMMPV NNtT MOT
IREMLV &AA BUT HE
ft HOE, bUl THEN ARE TUBCE'T,
luttesTo em; he
DONfT UVE
PJCNlCX"
ID lOORk'i
I UiILL FOLLOID MAN OM
fSCCOUfJT OF HE hMti 60
OFF 6UAM13HERE PsN
EST TH1 CRAOieRSH

1

tar 'l 4fl I

AAOMEMT OF REliWM lOM VUJWkW,

WE6; INDEED, Brr OF RESPITE

FROM C0N6TWT EFFUKlis

MORE BEAUTIFUL.

U)OCLDM

THEM FOR. THE DUCKS IsU
Ml r-- : r-rTi

r .k. I ,r n-L- CTK? TU1 J 1

LEFTffJ HP i

EXCUSE, N6RT I UOWT

BUT I Sfcfc TUU

I CHEESE, MO

WU
WHATEVER
Ck:ER6

1



1

111 Jtmt UBBO ANEW WHATfc WRONG 1 JPgl OSW LOVELY I'LL BET I

V PRESS TO WEAK WI1H JHtS ULW T I t'MA -w ui isc 1 ALU IHfc OIKL win
1 TO MABEL'S PARTVl y ONES YOU BOUGHT I LwST V ONE MASS ARE WEARING
ifflh gg-rtpowC I ft-NT-JHEM THIS SEASOSLj

lac .iiu Mi' WITH YOU I -rci aii Aanur I iM ii-rcocicTCi? TUPV

ii .. i .) i

lONE DAY HIS FAIRY SOD- "SI

MOTHER CAME AMD GAVE I

HIM NOTHING EXCEPT HER. I

DIRTy LAUNDRY TO WASH .'A

WUEN HE GREW UP HE FELL

V IN LUVC V1 I H M WU I irwu
Aiei-. BUT SUE STOLE ALL

HIS MONEY AND RAN OFF TO

MEXICO WITH THfe

MILKMAN.

I BEAT HtM WITH BASEBALL I

IBAT Akin MADE WlM LIVE I. I MOTHER CAME AND GAVE I

Blfc IN THE FIREPLACE.

. .... 1 1 i i

, a i l r- r- i l i 1 1 I

sm CBv w ii .. i i jpr- g&BBMg kbks whmi i i in i i in maun i n i ini i

HI HE WENT OFF TO PARIS "J lJW VOU THE



1 hK SB lfe 9
IH H KkV HHni Br vH is
Pm"! Hi
MASS HYPNOSIS? THEfR MORSES SEEM TO DISAPPEAR- WE WAKffTO hfELP YO(J; J WILL MrW
. MATCH MY MAGIC AGAINST S A WJm
rYp-w fn your TMUM0ER6OP- we i m
( nilvV IIW WILL NOT LET HIM HARM MHr
Pi 1bV AH

S S



l j rm br onfo a its a AfAfw rVll P beat-up
J FThml IrMgg OLD HOTROD

v aw viii.iv v r zv. r-kr'Y 1 i d. m unci m b r'noi .n jm aim

Wl mr wrm rzf iKiDFO the hood, r n a m it ft aoiprira,- sT-at Turm,

IHftmhK, L5V?. ffl flTOPMI. DOESN'T KNOW TME ENGINE

aaews i x. i warn iff arsvx abb

MjBF f

--W1NGEX LOOcTBBByPAT ATSl 1 WHAT A BftEAk: L

mm



. -:. Jt-.tMrr? f; w--v ("vat1,
BB B. IRjB

4I
1
; 1
I
1

'

...AND tf I COUU? SET THE'
MONEY FROAA THe
(30VER.N.WENT... TMtS
ROCKET COULD

1 H

Y .. AN SO V MAKING HiGU-GEADE

I Mtt-K. OUT Of WATER TWt Wat..

I rwLKc we CATS

EMTEl."i7

' mats to Qeruf vou, aeKTuewAN V

53-, '$yZ? I tat I i

IS



B"
Hli

7 ; v t t i an s
I AM AWUSTINS THE FEEPS OF THE ; I I F
1 FUEL UNES INTO THE MIXING CHAMBER I ; fTi i
! aH "0 1N5URE AN EQUALIZE? THRUST JU: J S M
I V STRAI6HTCWNAMI5LCULATlON JC ....r.JJ
k Vw HERE COULP PROVE COSTLY T-B
fl rPfffflMPP

1 If HkM tKI?' Br "I LujkM

: A 1HIS TEST WERE TO M.OW UP "Vt.. JP7 rjWff pS mJJ

I IN THEIR FACES-- THEY AM6HT f iNPlfflF ggK .Vfll'ma : .".m

If 'I flbW ;b,L fl

fl i fl I Bf"

rELL-THATS ALLIOPO- I J IKUH f ,, ,' fM TTI
I'VE TWISTEC SO MANTP.ALS I I If p uPPT '0--IF Jl TZZZZT
I aim uuwM V tftff 14 J a-v-'wi MM WHOLE PLAN i& UPSETZ 5U it. Um:r3r CBJ
5TnAnho5out I II 1 SH

flBNMfl I U 1 1 SI P"i

HSBIHH I ..... r H

Ij f BnlPiKfl tfl

f Nf



-r

SOLLY EE, MR. TRIBBLE

DONTCHA THINK MAYBE

THIS IS HAYSTACK SLOUCH

AT LAST?

i V "'jUI 1 1 nwiiywwyiii .ww ...... g.

V r don't know, i r' Q 1 Wjf

COUNTRY IS CRISSCROSSED

UT WE SHOULD
BE COMING TO
SOME KIND OF

ROAP-SI6M

OH, LOOK- LOOK WE'VE FyOJ'RE RK5HT,
I FOUNP IT AT LAST THE MRS. BLOW.
SIGN SAYS, '6RMPSTVNEJ THIS IS
M J. fes CROSSING. TWO J WHERE WE
ISf 1 TURN OFF,'

OOP HEAVENS,

PETER THIS ROAD,

WAS NEVER MADE

FOR THE MODERN

1 L0W-SLUN5CAR

YOU'LL WRECK IT

CANT HELP IT NOW, LEE.'

X COULPNT TURN AROUND

IF I WANTED TO- SO

SRIh&SrONE CROSSING,

Here we come

WE HOPE?

.--

LOOKIT! ITS SOME
KINDA SAILBOAT COMlN'

ACROSS THE SLOUGH.'

BUT THERES A HORSE

AN' WAGON

IT.'?.'

AMI DREAMING OR

S IT THE REAL THING ?

IT LOOKS LIKE A

SAILING

r

1

A

BL-! BB s9 B-

sCOtiFCUtiD IT MRS. BLOW,

THIS FINE, ABLE CRAFT IS

MY NEW COMMAND ONCE

AOAlN X AM MASTER AND
CAPTAIN OF MY OWN SHl(?

SO BELAY YOUR SNIDE

MMENTS

W CAFTAN BLOW! WHAT ARE YOU ""iSS 1 1 H 7
ID0IN6 ABOARD THAT SILLY CONTRAPTONMjjly JfHl J

4- i