The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02623

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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BOGOTA, Colombia
for a different vacation!
ONLY $7.20 Down Payment
30-day tourist round trip.
AN INDEPENDENT 7fH
Ma
IS M ITiF JF
'Lef tfo peope mot the truth and the country it a" Abraham Lincoln,
PANAMA OFFICE, 2-0975
COLON 779
33rd YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, JULY 2S, 1951

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If New York Means

Khrushchev Says Summit Meet
i
OK by Him Anywhere In E urope
MOSCOW, July 28 (UPI) Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev agreed today to
hold a summit conference in Geneva or "any other city" in Europe if the United States
fears Security would be a problem in New York.
Khrushchev made his offer in letters to the Big Three, formally accepting the sug suggestion
gestion suggestion of French Premier Charles de Gaulle that Europe would be a better place for
the top-level talks.
"The Soviet government agrees to meet in Geneva, Paris, Vienna or any other city
acceptable to all participants," Khrushchev said.
He specifically suggested Moscow as a site and said "the Soviet government would
guarantee full security for the delegations and the necessary conditions for fruitful
work."

Khrushchev's reply to the latest
round of Wester messages was
handed over today by deputy for foreign
eign foreign ministery Vasilev Uznetsov
to the American, British and
French ambassadors here. The
text was released immediately to
newsmen.-
In it Khrushchev said:
"In view of the extraordinary
position of tension in the Middle
East, we still consider that it is
necessary immediately to call a
conference of heads of government
of the U.S.S.R., U.S., Britain,
France and India, with the parti participation
cipation participation of the secretary-general
of the U.N.
"As regards the place of hold holding
ing holding the conference, we, have call called
ed called attention to the suggestion of
the head of the government of
France, Gen. Be GauBe, who in
his message of July88 said that
'fie prete;,,4Mfei4J--CitW8 bc
held in Eaeope.
''waisfw! vs! '-' ijJ
"The itt aownment nver.
earlier pronounced in favor of
holding tho meeting in Europe
and support the .proposal of d"
Gaulle.
"The question of holding the con conference
ference conference of heads of government in
one of the eities of Europe is to
be all the more considered since
among United States diplomats
and the American press there are
voices raised to the effect tnat me
American authorities would en en-counted
counted en-counted difficulties in the matter
of ensuring the security of the
heads of government should the
conference be held in the United
States.
"We would not like to place the
government of the U.S. in a dif difficult
ficult difficult position on this matter.
"Consequently, without objecting
to holding the conference in New
York, the Soviet government a a-grees
grees a-grees to meet in Geneva. Vienna,
Paris or any other place accept acceptable
able acceptable to all participants.
"Wo would alto welcome an
agreement on holding the meet meeting
ing meeting of the heads of governments
in Moscow, and the Soviet gov government
ernment government would guarantee full
security for the delegations and
the necessary conditions for fruit
ful work.
"We are convinced that the So Soviet
viet Soviet people will welcome the emis emissaries
saries emissaries who would come here in
order to take urgent measures to
halt the conflict in the Middle East
and to strengthen universal peace,
and thereby the Soviet people
would demonstrate their unbend unbending
ing unbending devotion to the cause of
peace."
.Earlier the Soviet press bluntly
accused the United States of re resorting
sorting resorting to a new "trick" to avoid
full dress summit discussion of
the Middle East crisis.
Both the government newspaper
"Izvestia" and the Communist
Partv organ "Pravda" accused
the U. S. of "procrastination on
projected summit talks.
Izvestia flatly accused U. S.
"ruling circles" of "placing
possible procedural elmmicks"
in the path of the East West
heads-of-government parley.
Western observers said the So Soviet
viet Soviet press comments probably
foreshadow the tenor of Nikita
Khrushchev's reply to President
Eisenhower's week-end letter on
the summit talks issue.
The Soviet nress charges c
as Defense Minister Rodion Mal-
inovsky ordered Russian
forces to step up their vigilance
and combat readiness to face
184, 185, 186
LONDON, July 28 (UPI)
British newspapers siMM yes yesterday
terday yesterday that Premier Harold
rmilian s summit reply to
let Premier Nlklta 8.
chev last week was
terse. But there was disagree disagreement
ment disagreement as to how terse It was.,
The Sunday Express, The
People, and The Sunday Picto Pictorial
rial Pictorial counted the words and
came up with three different
totals 184, 189, and 186.

So

Ihn,

Security Problems

Anglo-American "aggression" in
the Middle East.
"The tense international situa situation
tion situation provoked by the aggression
of British and U. S. imperialists
in Lebanon and Jordan requires
of all sailors, like all Soviet war warriors,
riors, warriors, a further heightening of
their vigilance and combat pre preparedness,"
paredness," preparedness," Malinovsky said.
Adm. S. Gorsshkov, commander-in-chief
of the Soviet naval forces,
warned in Pravda that the Soviet
navy "possesses the most modern
naval weapons."
Gorsshkov said the navy's weap weapons
ons weapons were "capable of defending
not only the Soviet naval frontiers
but also of destroying the enemy's
forces on se'as and delivering
powerful blows to objects located
on other continents."
vjr i . . A
iwea-nwnne in ijonaon yestereray,
Memorial Services
For James Wright
Set For Tomorrow
Memorial Services for James C
Wrighi, Sr., well known American
arcuitect and engineer who uieu
his home in Panama Saturday
night, will be held tomorrow am.
noon ai 4:30 at St. Luke's Cathe
dral in Ancon.
Religious services will be con con-ducteu
ducteu con-ducteu by the Rev. Edwin Webs
ter and Masonic services will oe
conducted by members of the Da Da-rien
rien Da-rien Lodge of Balooa. Tne lamny
has requested that no flowers be
sent and that those wno wisn maj
contribute to, the Heart Fund.
Well known in both the Canal
Zone and Panama Mr. Wright had
been a resiaent ot rananu since
1911 when he came to the repub republic
lic republic at the request of Presiuem tJe tJe-lisario
lisario tJe-lisario Porras to assist in the es es-tabiisnment
tabiisnment es-tabiisnment o. a public works pro
gram in Panama. This program
included the construction ot isanlo
Tom as Hospital.
He later formed his own engi engineering
neering engineering and architectural compa company
ny company and during this time wem
Cali, Colombia, in 1927 to assist
the Colombian government in
low cost housing project. He also
built the American Embassy i..
Salvador.
Mr. Wright joined the contract
ing firm ot Martinz and Co. in 1930
and remained and with the com
pany until his retirement in 1952.
During the time that he was ac active
tive active in construction in Panama, he
had a part in the building oi t
Foreign Relations building in Pa Pa-nrena
nrena Pa-nrena and the Scottish Kite Temple
in Balboa.
A native of Weedsport, N.Y he
was a graduate ot Pratt Institute
in Brooklyn, N. Y. At the time o.
his death he was 68 years old.
Surviving him are his wife Mrs.
Elizabeth Wright who came to
the Isthmus as a nurse in the C?.i C?.i-al
al C?.i-al one in 1910; a son and daughter-in-law
Mr. and Mrs. John j..
Wright of Panama; a daughter-in-law,
the widow of the he-
James C. Wright, Jr.; and five
grandchildren. He has two sister
who reside in the United States.
He was a member of the Dar
Lodge in Balboa and the Panama
Rotary.
Marijuana Toter
At Cristobal Pier
Fined, Confined
A Panama Canal spaman was
jailed for 15 days and fined $25
by Judge Loren R. Millsingrr at
Cristobal Magistrates Court today
for being in possession of mart
juana.
He was Francis Walker Taylor
37. Police said that last night Tay
lor was arrested as he came out of
the pier gate at Cristobal. He was
searched and found to be carry
ing three good-sized marijuana
cigarettes.

Wage

. .
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles and British Prime Minister
Harold Macmillan agreed that the
East West summit conference
should be held in New York des despite
pite despite French objections, informed
diplomatic sources said.
Dulles conferred with Macmillan
and British Foreign Secretary Sel Sel-wyn
wyn Sel-wyn Lloyd in urgent efforts to re repair
pair repair to Western rift on a. sommit
meeting and help build a new de defense
fense defense line-up to keep Soviet arm armed
ed armed forces out of the Middle East.
The deliberations coincided with
Soviet press eharges that Baghdad
Pact talks Dulles is attending in
London today were designed to
deal a "premeditated blow at the
summit meeting:"
(Continued on Page 18)
,.,
In Way To Heighten
Radioactive Fallout
WASHINGTON (UPI) -Defense
Secretary Neil H. McElroy has in informed
formed informed Congress that some nu nuclear
clear nuclear weapons in the nation's
stockpile have been altered in a
way that increases death-dealing
radioactive fallout over a local
area.
But McElroy, in a letter made
public today hastened to add
Iknt 1 r 1 1 1
umi uiti eaaeu lanoui was only a
by-product of the alteration. Its
main purpose, he said, was to
equip nuclear weapons for surface
ano low-level bursts
McElroy's letter to chairman
Richard B. Russell (D-Ga.) o. the
Senate Armed Services Commit
tee was the latest word is a run
ning dispute over clean versus dir dirty
ty dirty nuclear weapons.
It has featured some stormy ex
changes between Sen. Clinton P.
Anderson (D-N.M.) and Lewis L.
Strauss, his old adversary who
recently resigned as chairman of
We Atomic Lnergy Commission.
McElroy's letter eave some sud
port to Anderson's contention that
the De ense Department had al altered
tered altered some weapons in a way to
increase local fallout.
The defense secretary said some
nuclear weapons had been given
new fuses to equip them lor low low-level
level low-level bursts when it is necessary
to destroy an airfield with a giant
crater or demolish other installa installations,
tions, installations, such as submarine pens.
Low-level explosions, e said,
pick iip dirt and male it radioac
live, increasing local fallout. But
he stressed that total fallout was
not increased.
Russell had posed a number of
questions to McElroy in regard to
nuclear weapons stockpiling.
McElroy's answer, a copy of
which was supplied to Anderson,
said "We are stockpiling bombs
which are essentially 100 per cent
fission and have never made any
statements to the contrary. In our
terminology these are 'normal'
weapons.
But he admitted hat "in the
terminology used in your letter
these are 'dirty' weapons."

CZ Postal Service Announces Issue Of

Advance notice that a new fo w-
cent ordinary stamp will be is-
sued late in August was given to-
day by the Canal Zone Postal Serv
ice to philatelists and others in interested
terested interested in postage stamps.
The new four-cent Istamp which
has as its main subject the SS An Ancon
con Ancon of the Panama Line, will 80
on sale at the Balboa, Post Office
on Aug. 30 and at all -other Canal
Zone Post Officers on Sept. 1
in connection with the plftcc of
tirst rlay oi issue, postal officials
said that the policy followed by
the Canal Zone Postal Service is
the same as that followed by the

Setup About

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MOUSE SPACE PASSENGER Capt. M. E. Griffith, Projects Officer of the Thor-Able project,
hohds the "Mouse House," an aluminum tube in which the white mouse Wickie (right) rode
in the nose cone of a Thor-Able rocket that was fired from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The nose cone
traveled 6000 miles and came down in the vicinity of Ascension Island, near Africa. Air Force
planes and Navy ships are searching for the nose cone and its mouse space passenger.
Explorer IV Whirls Across Soviet Skies,
Radio Signals Coming In Wonderfully'

WASHINGTON, July 28 (UPI) Explorer IV whirled around the world today with its import important
ant important radio signals "coming in wonderfully" and sending back valuable information on deadly ra radiation.
diation. radiation. The largest U.S. satellite was scheduled to pass over Russia again today. It shot across Soviet
skies yesterday marking the first appearance of an American earth moon over that country.
The Naval Research Laboratory said the satellite's course today also will take it over points
In China, New Zealand, French Guiana, England, Australia, Mongolia, France, Yemen, Japan and
Uruguay.
A spokesman at the Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville. Ala., said officials were de

lighted with the, performance of
fc i n ii -. ...
v.i Tfninca irooui, wie earwi
every 110 minutes and carried
what are believed to be the
most delicate instruments ever
devised for radiation detection.
The 38.43-pound, tiullet-shap -ed
satellite may hiive a life ex expectancy
pectancy expectancy cf about live years,
officials said.
The deadly radiation band
the satellite is gathering data
on could stall human space
travel for years unless its
problems are solved.
The Naval Research Labora Laboratory,
tory, Laboratory, which is keeping tabs on
its flight, said the satellite
made its first pass over Russia
slightly north of Stalingrad at
j:47 p.m. Saturday.
An NRL spokesman said It
was "conrjeival-Ie" the Russians
could spot Explorer with tele telescopes
scopes telescopes provided timing and
weather conditions were favor favorable.
able. favorable. Like previous space trav travelers,
elers, travelers, it can best be detected at
dusk or dawn.
Soviet scientists presumably
also were getting the benefit
of information being sent
back by the satellite about
an intense band of radiation
high above earth which might
pose problems for future hu human
man human space travelers.
This country already has
given the international commit
tee of the International Geo-
The
Judge's Bench
Judge John E. Deming today
sentenced a 17 year old Panama Panamanian
nian Panamanian to 45 days jail.
Enrique Zapata was found guil guilty
ty guilty of two charges when he appear
ed at iBalboa Magistrates Court.
He was given 15 days on the first first-being
being first-being found without legitimate
business ot Perico Place, Ancon
and 30 days on the second steal stealing
ing stealing clothing valued at $7.45 from
Eriberto Ramos of Ancon.
Jerome Augustus Phillips, 24
Panamanian, was fined $15 for
loitering at Gamboa Commissary
without authority.
Eduardo Enrique Sierra, 25 Pa Panamanian,
namanian, Panamanian, was fined $15 for
driving without an operators li license.
cense. license. United States and other postal ad-
ministrations where the first day
of. issue is continea to one post
office. Consideration is being g.v-
en to designating on Atlantic fide
post office io ie tirst day of
issue of the Theodore Roosevelt
commemorative stamp in No November
vember November and for some of the em embossed
bossed embossed stamp envelope issues.
Stamp collectors desiring Orst
day cancellations of the stamps
may send addressed envelopes
iu. ii ... ... t .tu. : ..!
me roaimaBiei, uva, in.n
Zone, with money order remit
tance to cover cost of the stamps
to be Affixed. Postage stamps and

Explorer IV. ar

v.

, pnysicai x ea a aewmpuon oi
the instruments aboard th? Ex Explorer
plorer Explorer as we1 as the frequences
cr. wMch its :a';o transmit transmitters
ters transmitters are broadcasting.
This, it was :v.it, shemd en enable
able enable the Russians to intjrp.et
the data b.j ng sent baci; just
the same as American scien-
ticts.
The Army fired the baby
mci. into irbit in a north northeasterly
easterly northeasterly direction "Aith a Jupi-ter-C
rocket irem Cape Cana Canaveral,
veral, Canaveral, Fla., Saturday.
In space, it joined the Army's
Explorer I, the Navy's Vanguard
I, and Russia's Sputnik ill in
an elliptical course around the
globe. Its orbit lay between 51
degrees north latitude and 51
degrees south latitude.
US Sailor Drowns
At Madden Lake
As Wile, Son Watch
A U.S. Navy enlisted man
drowned yesterday n iln pre"
ence of his wife and their five-year-old
son at Madden Lake.
Teleman 2c Fred Lee Moore, 29,
was fishing off the Police Dock
at Madden while his wife Pecola
and son watched.
Deciding to go for a dip, he
swam about 15 feet from the dock
and suddenly went under.
Two outboard motorboats, in res response
ponse response to the screams of Mrs.
Moore, raced to the spot Wi.ere
her husband went under.
Canal one Police Officer W.
Nail and Panamanian Rafael ( al al-deron
deron al-deron were in one boat and in the
other was Canal employee Ro Robert
bert Robert K. Adams and his son, Ro Robert
bert Robert W.
Robert dived and
Moore to the surface
brouyhti
with the
help of othrr rescrers. Moore was
taken to the dock and artificial
respiration applied, but a doctori
who arrived soon afterwards pro
nounced him dead.
Moore was from Mobile, Ala.
and had been on the Isthmus since
April. The family lived at Far;'.
where Moore was attached to the
Naval Radio Station.
Mrs. Moore is making arrange arrangements
ments arrangements for her husband's body to
be flown to the States for burial
personal checks will not be ac
cepted in payment.
Envelopes submitted should be
on ordinary letter size and each
be properly addressed. An enelo
ure of medium weight should be
placed in each envelope and the
flap either turned in or sealed. An
outside envelope must not be sent
for return of first-day covers
Each cover should be be pencil
marlted in the uopcr right nand
corner to show the number and
denomination of stamps to be af
fixed; no letter of instruction,
therefore, need be sent. The en

The laboratory said the
satellite's orbit ranged from
miles above the erth
at its nearest point to 1,373.3
miles at its most distant
point. It was travelling at
speeds ranging from 14,000 to
18,000 mph.

Explorer IV was more than
seven pounds heavier than the
Army Explorer I and more than
30 pounds heavier than the
Navy's tiny but higher-flying
Vanguard I.
But it was small compared
with the 2919-pound Sputnik
III.
Scottish Sea Snake
Makes Appearance
At New Location
DUNDEE, Scotland, Julv 28 -UPI)
Scotland's River re reclaimed
claimed reclaimed a rival today to the fabled
monster of Loch Ness.
The persons reported seeing
what they sai'l looked like "a sea
snake 18 to 20 feet long from the
top of a bust at the nearby New Newport
port Newport termins.
Bus driver Ronald Avery saw it
first and his version was confirm confirmed
ed confirmed by Miss Betty Kay, the "clip "clippie"
pie" "clippie" (ticket-taker) of his bus.
"It was rather misty but about
a mile out from Newport Pier 1
saw quite distinctly a string!
creature in the water with three
humps visible," Avery said.
That was almost exactly what
Scotsmen and tourists on the shor shores
es shores of Loch Ness have claimci1
seeing several times over the
i years.
"It disappeared and then came
up again further on. Avery said
I drew the attention of my con
riiictress to it and together we
watched it move up the river in
the direction of the Tay bridge.
"I don't think I would make a
mistake with porpoises or seals,"
Avery said. "I would say that
what we saw was some kind of
sea snake 18 to 20 feet long."

Stamp Depicting SS Ancon

velope 1o the Postmaste, Balbea.
Canal Zone, should be endorsed
First-Day Covens,
Requests for unusual arrange arrangements
ments arrangements and plate numbers cannot
be granted, according to officials
of the Postal Division. Request for
mint stamps must not be included
with orders for first-day covers
but sent senarately to the ?03t-
master
at Balboa. To insun
prompt shipment, orders should
not include other denominations
The new four-cent stamp shows
the SS Ancon at sea, with the sky
- land ocean as background. The

DA J..

Govt. Agencies
On Zone Await
Ike s Go Ahead

Representatives of the Panama Canal Company-Canal
Zone Government and military commands in the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone announced today that they are in the final stages
of preparation to carry out the legislation signed Friday
by President Eisenhower providing for a single wage scalt
and a Canal Zone merit system as soon as necessary Exe Executive
cutive Executive Orders are issued by the President.
Uniform coverage of eligible employes under the Civil
Service Retirement Act is also authorized.
The military services and the Company-GoverfMndp
are in complete agreement on all action on details to be
taken locally to place into effect the various requirements

established by the new law,
The recently established
sonnel Policy Coordinating

tatives of the Panama Canal Company-Canal Zone Gov Government,
ernment, Government, the Caribbean Command, 15th Naval District,
United States Army Caribbean and the Caribbean Air
Command will monitor those technical aspects of the leg legislation
islation legislation which must be applied uniformly by all U.S agen agencies
cies agencies in the Canal Zone.

canav'-fNfwtir tak tak-"ffiir
"ffiir tak-"ffiir adminkiiiitfUv. Mioa u de
termine the appropriate rate of
pay for each non-u.s. ana u.s.
citizen empioye under the sin single
gle single wage scale.
While In some instances,
salaries paid to certain posi positions
tions positions held by U.S. citizens will
ha considerably reduced, the
incumbents of these positions
will suffer no salary loss since
the legislation provides that
pay rates for individuals al already
ready already on the rolls will be
preserved indefinitely. The
number of those affected is
small.
In general, benefits derived
by non-U.S. citizen employes
include:
1. Coverage under the Civil
Service Retirement Act for all
eligible employes not now re receiving
ceiving receiving retirement coverage;
2. A salary structure for
higher-grade employes based on
wage rates and take-home pay
received by Federal employes
in the United States;
3. Equality of opportunity
under the Canal Zone Merit
System for appointment, reas reassignment
signment reassignment and promotion to all
positions except those which
for security reasons must be
filled by U.S. citizens; and
4. A periodic review and ad adjustment
justment adjustment of those wage rates
which are based on locality
wages.
Both U.S. citizen and non non-U.S.
U.S. non-U.S. citizen employes current currently
ly currently serving in the Excepted Civil
Service in the canal Zone will,
if eligible, be converted to the
Canal Zone Merit System.
Such conversion will permit
U.S. citizens to obtain Federal
emplopment in the United
States and in other overseas
areas in the Competitive Civil
Service where Civil Service
Competitive Status is required
for appointment.
All employes who thus ac acquire
quire acquire Civil Service Competitive
Status will be eligible for inter interagency
agency interagency transfers in the Canal
Zone.
As soon as the necessary
Executive Orders placing the
new single wage legislation
into effect are signed by Mr.
Eisenhower, the detailed ad administrative
ministrative administrative requirements for
operating the merit system
and the single wage plan will
bc anplied by Canal Zone a a-gencies.
gencies. a-gencies. wording Canal Zone Postage, ii
riarkface Roman type, is arrang
ed in one line across the top and
4 cents, in while-face Roman, ap appears
pears appears in the lower left part of th
new stamp. The stamp will be 0 81
by 1.44 inches in dimension, ar
ranged horizontally. It will be
bluish green in color and will be
issued in sheets of 50.
The basic design for the stamp
was drawn by G. A. Doyle, Jr.,
Chief of the Architectural Briw-'i
of the Engineering Division, in
collaboration with members of the
Canal Zone Postal Service Stamp
Advisory Committee.

the announcement stated.

Canal Zone Civilian Per
Board composed of represen
System, plan nave been devel developed
oped developed for Centralized recruitment
and examination from a Cen Central
tral Central Employment Office joint jointly
ly jointly maintained by Canal Zona
agencies.
This office will receive em
ployment applications, conduct
preemployment examinati o n s,
review qualifications, establish
registers of persons qualified
for employment and refer ap applicants
plicants applicants to the employing agen agencies
cies agencies for selection.
The legislation also provides
for the establishment of a Clas
sification Appeals Board which
will be responsible for resolv resolving
ing resolving appeals by employes rela relative
tive relative to the correct grade for
their position.
Close liaison will be main maintained
tained maintained by the Canal Zone a a-gencies
gencies a-gencies with Washington in
order to assure a smooth and
timely transition to the new
employment and salary re requirements.
quirements. requirements. Members of the board are:
E. A. Doolan, for the Panama
Canal Company Canal Zone
Government; Lt. Col. W.
Franks. Caribbean Command;
Col. w. J. Preston, USAR USAR-CARIB;
CARIB; USAR-CARIB; Edward Kieloch, Car Caribbean
ibbean Caribbean Air Command; and Cdr.
R. A. Sexton, 15th Naval Dis District.
trict. District. Electoral Tribunal
To Check Over
New Cedula Cameras
Two models of photographic
cameras submitted by the Securi Security
ty Security Camera Co. of the United
States will be examined by the Pa
nama Electoral Triounal and an
expert to see if they come up to
the specifications required for the
issuance of new identification
cards (cedulas).
The cameras were submitted bv
the company after it entered a
low bid and was awarded the con contract
tract contract by the Electoral Tribunal to
supply the necessary cameras.
Th; expert who will aid the tri tribunal
bunal tribunal in the examination of the
cameras is engineer Louis Baker.
The company's representative.
William McCarter, who arrived
with the cameras yesterday, said
both cameras have the same feat
ures although one is lighter and
more compact.
One- of the two cameras, which
has already been tested and mo mo-dified
dified mo-dified to meet the specifications,
will be put into service in the near
future. x
It is said to be similar to the
model being used in the United
States to issue licenses and other
identification cards.
The first pictures will be taken
of residents of the Ssnta AOs, j
line and Chorrillo boroughs at the
Central Fire Station on West 16th
Street.
It is understood that the first, of
the new cedulas will be issued to
President Ernesto de la Gust,
dia Jr.

hi



PAGE TWO
-
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
M6NDAT, JULY 28, 1951

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

MM e ovoajOMoa ov THt

WW Or NILfON KOUNttVlLl M
HARMOOIO AIA. CBITOH
17. M wrmm o Box 34 Pamama n or
TllWMOXI 2-0740 S LiNeel
Cam.1 taOMW. MNAMBIMCAM. Panama
sM QHei It I7 CINTRA) AVCNUI IttwltK 1 1 tH ANB I3TM talrr
nWW KlPRKtNTATIVU, IOHUA fOWlRI. INC
4B Madiacn A v NOW YOUR. I 17 N V
uMAt 0 UAH
a POT Month, in advahoi i 70 a HO
POP mt MONTH IN SO 13 OO
Fo Nt rtAP IN .DVANCI IB BO 14 OO

THIS IS TOUt FORUM THI
The Mill Sei m aa .pan torum
LaMart rt received gratefully and
If r contribute a leftei don't

Mat dt Letter, era published in tha ordei teceived
Please try heap tha tartar limited to ana page length
Identity at lattei writer! is held in strictest confidence
Thii newspoper assumes ne responsibility tot statements at opinions
expressed in letters train reader,
THE MAIL BOX

LOCAL RATE UNIONS

Sir:
"T iu m

X Was 011c Ol mc iv vji-uhw unc v.. j
Balboa uommisiary. Uniortunately, 1 was not numbered among
tha members oi Local 900 wnen tne thunder of advertisy struct
mC' I was one of about nine who went to the office of Local 900
in Ancon seekng help from the union I was not supporting. We
met with William H. Sinclar, the union's organizer. Sinclar ex explained
plained explained that the union had ruled against representing non-members
He said he was sorry that he could not help us.
Despite this, he was Kind enough to spend nearly two hours
of his time explaining our rights under the personnel procedures,
from a manual he had on his desk. He was the one who suggest suggested
ed suggested to us to hire a lawyer to defend us or get a fellow-worker to
represent us before the grievance committee.
All of us followed the union's courageous fight in defense of
its members. We saw the union put back all its members to wor,:.
We were very happy, indeed.
Charles Ramirez acted as representative for most of us who
were not members. Ramirez told us from the beginning that
We would have been better off with the union defending us. He
gave us a long lecture on why we should all have been in the
pnion. He even contacted the union about the cases. I don t know
What the union people told him.
Outside of the hearings I don't know if Ramirez met with
Canal officials, but all of us know that the union officials were
up and down to Balboa Heights, from the beginning to the end
and they certainly met with Governor Potter and all the other
official concerned.
" The union won all its cases. Ramirez lost most of our cases.
Including mine. He did his best. But at least I feel that if I had
been a union member, maybe I would be back to work as all the
In u i tv mn Tf T over rrpt hack tn work in the

Canal Zone, I will join "100 Per cent Union" in everything he
has been saying, which i the gospel truth. T lust wonder where
!'Mr. X" (Mail Box, July 21) got his facts from.
i Fair is fair. Let's be fair to the union.
Ex-Double X.
l TAXIS ON CRISTOBAL PIERS
T As a taxi driver. I notice that a certain other taxi driver
fepeatedlv goes into the pier area at Cristobal without getting: in
(he taxi line at the pier gate, as is customarv. His excu. is that
One shipping line has sent him to pick up passengers off one of
Ita vessels, but I notice that he pulls the same trick going to ships
Of other lines as well.
I and the other chaufferus who park in line at the pier gate
en.... i iV- .,..(. ,lt cnllnlt noiccnDurt from these Other

hips, unless the customs officer on the dock has phoned the
police booth to have one sent, in which case the police give us our.

only preaK dv sending a can uum mc mic.
But this generally happens only when the driver I mentioned
Is for jsome reason not down on the pier already
7; Col6n Driver.

LONELY
. St tti-i r
i A skntleman named Waller
A WUldClUMIl neuricu "enti
7;,-.. .totinn Mawh 4 Trip
OAieue.iiv.w -M

period July 4, hut no one nas come w pick ma uh "w. "w.-Sals
Sals "w.-Sals at the quarantine station cannot locate Waller because he
4X6 not fill out the dog s ownership questionnaire. All they know
about the owner is that his last name is Waller.
" I would appreciate it very much if he would pick up his
iog. Ner before has a dog been abandoned at the Panama
eVuaranUne station, and I hope he won't make this the first
' Jfise. The dog looks lonely. She gets no exercise at all, since
BO one takes her out. She is cooped up in her room, and just
Bes around.
J 8he will be disposed of in any way the Panama quarantine
rithorlties deem suitable if she Is not picked up within a week,
have asked the officials at the quarantine station to give me
few days to see if It is possible to locate Waller through the
Hail Box. If he does not either the station or pick up his dog
Within at time, they will dispone of her. Therefore I appeal
to Waller to call the quarantine station and let them know
When he plans to pick up his dog.
Velma Medina

' RACETRACK ANNOUNCEMENTS
r:
I should have done this before, but got tied up In other
things. But it's not too late to send congratulations through
the Mall Box to the manager of the President Remon racetrack
for adopting the suggestion of having the announcements over
tho public address system In English and well as Spanish. Al Although
though Although the announcer has a perplexing manner of expressing
Himself with his West Indian accent, my friends and I :igree
it's a great help to us hard-headed gringos who don't under understand
stand understand Spanish. However, we think there should be more trans transitions
itions transitions of what the Spanish announcer says, like the final re results,
sults, results, for Instance.
We also hope the management of track will soon get around
to providing a few chairs and tables near the bar in the grand grandstand
stand grandstand and a rail and some stools for the benefit of barflies like
me and my buddies.
i Incidentally, when Is the much talked about saliva test go going
ing going into effect? Not that we believe that it will make much
difference where the big shots are concerned, but It will be a
step forward. So how about it?
Gringo Fan

gl! ILwlHjparSPflltBr WffSagyMarTliMnT Bt
... c..vfl laH $aB7 Ln
KJi z i LVBoBFrir i
eflBWv ; a?9R9BTWBal BaaTeffPSaiaiBar -: & aaae. ao
aaaa MPaa BMBflB-l laii -i -bVA jlH
frowtfrt iv. laTvVaatfV' bbki tpM
1 Ma 1 r naal aaa

1 "NIBUE-With

''WTk- ,rcn pamier iwaihieu looks ovrr
I wPI!,n "8I Paris exhibit- U's ,n example of "Tachi

X u,k... .u " ,r anion palming
i w lr'ls, J,JEl P"int around ,,nlil "something o-
I I-T' "a,nlf"'s expression suggests he's awaiting develop develop-W
W develop-W !-w'th great confidence.

wiiicm nr crea rrt. H If.

Panama AMKKICAN ma

READERS OWN COLUMN
tot readers ol Th. Panama Amertcen
art handlad in a wholly confidential
be impatient it it doatn't appaai the
ih nmmlsirv shnrtaee in the
DOG
I
brought a dog to trie ranara
wi"s"
riria Mimnleted her Quarantine
""ii .'T. Tu.- TV,- ffi
his Daliesque mustache empha-
our
ism,
-1..1. -r ....... ..

Labor News
And
Comment

By VICTOR RIESEL
PARIS: There is sudden shock
when you take leave of the 'soft 'soft-spoken,
spoken, 'soft-spoken, urbane men of the Inter International
national International Police Interpol and
drive from their quiet building on
an even quieter little street not
far from the Arc de Triomphe
and suddenly realize that the ve
ry same mobs which control the
labor rackets run all "organized
crime'' across the world.
A trusted visitor learns from his
Interpol friends that there is no
intercontinental Mafia headquart
ers in Italy spraying American
criminals with directives. The
power flows the other way from
America outward.
the Malia is now basically an
American outfit which curls its
black hands around U.S. labor and
industry. There is little outside
the U.S., for only in America is
there big-time organized crime.
Outside the U.S. there is essen essentially
tially essentially only a courier system which
contacts narcotics suppliers, banks
and sources who know just which
sailors and world travelers are
willing to smuggle any stuff.
Interpol's gracious men, know knowledgeable
ledgeable knowledgeable among hundreds of thou
sands of cards, fingerprints, pho photos
tos photos and their private intercontinen intercontinental
tal intercontinental radio network, by no means
point any fingers. But their care careful,
ful, careful, scientific answers, when ana analyzed,
lyzed, analyzed, add up to the grim fact that
the U.S. is the world's greatest
supplier of master criminals in
nuilti billion dollar crime. We are
unique in this respect.
There is, for example, no or organized
ganized organized crime .n the Scandinavian
naii, ns. Brila'n has its Soh ) gangs
and debonair thieves, but no co
ordmatcd crime syndicates. Spain
has no gangs at all. There arc
smugglers in A.'.ia and white slav
err in some outlying nations and
a slave trade in Africa and the
Nc East. But no crime cartels
as we in America know them.
if there is anything resembling
a 'mob," it exists on a penny-

ame, cigareue n ck ma myor "togetherness

ui ii 1 1 1 u i ifi i in irtjn., ii. jiv-
v.lu-re else except for the addi additional
tional additional Mafia in Sicily and some
points of the Italian boot. But the
leal power over these men oi Pa Palermo
lermo Palermo is in the U.S. among siich
men as Chicago's "Tough Tony"
Accardo, and New York's Vito Cie Cie-novese.
novese. Cie-novese. There are some mobs in France.
Some are in Corsica, where they
cut up the narcotics in special!
bs. Some of the toughest mobs
re in the rough port city of Mar Marseilles.
seilles. Marseilles. But these, too, are basical basically
ly basically "small-time" cotnpared to ours,
America's crime cartel operates
from Montreal to Cuba, from New
York to Geneva and Tangiers. Ev Everything
erything Everything else is bush-league. When
the mob wants opium and can't
get it in Turkey or the Near East
through couriers dispatched to con contact
tact contact Corsican and Napolitan
sources in the night, it simply dis dispatches
patches dispatches an agent lo the Orient.
There the Communist smugglers
have plenty and are willing to sell
it to the "boys."
This system of couriers is high
ly complex and takes the kind of
corporative crime organization oi
which U.S. mobs are so proud.:
The couriers carry hundreds of,

millions of dollars to Geneva, for.bcxmb in your dessert-type bombe.

example all in cash
is stashed away in
which require only a number, in instead
stead instead of a name, for identifica identification.
tion. identification. Even the banks don't know
the real name of the depositor.
When the American mobs want
to barter one type of loot for an-

to Tangiers. That's an open port too much in the way of travel pro
now run by the Moroccans. motion. I mean to say, old boy, ac-
Until recently, when the boys j tually...
wanted a way-stop between En- As there is now no British Em Em-rope
rope Em-rope and the U.S. they used Cubajbassy in Baghdad, due to a boyish
as a port of call. Now the island is promotional prank to entice Ihe
all this and a haven, too, for the; tourists to believe that you, too,
fnrnion wpII as Amprican smug- can have a do-it-vnuself fireworks

n 1 n r c All unrlof f hn nrnt trt inn nf I
the American Mafia
and allied
crime affiliates.
But the courier system still is
the life-line and money belt of the

mob. To keep the system greased,1'1" wlen they burned

the mob must keep hundreds of
shopkeepers and bar operators and
little factory owners happy so
they'll use their places as narco narcotics
tics narcotics or gold drops.
One way to keep them happy is
to help their friends or relatives
get into the U.S. and land good good-paying
paying good-paying jobs on a construction pro project,
ject, project, or in a shop, or a restaur restaurant.
ant. restaurant. That's where some of the
mob-controlled U.S. unions come
in mighty handy.
Real ingenious, these American
hoods.
BICYCLES ARE GIFT
MANILA (UPD The Japanese
Embassy said today it will pre present
sent present two bicycles to the Philippine
constabulary today in appre appreciation
ciation appreciation of the constabulary's help
in the search for Japanese World
War II stragglers on Lubang
Island in southern Luozn.
EFFECTIVE HELP for
ASTHMA MUCUS
Aethma and Bronchltla attacka ruin
your alaap, undermine your etrenath
and weaken your heart. Mendeee
ataxta to work through your blood to
overcome aethma and bronehltla at attacka.
tacka. attacka. It halpa dlaaolra atransUng m-j-ua
and promotaa free, aaay braath braath-ns.
ns. braath-ns. Mendaoe'a action la effective even
in old and atubborn caaae. Qat Men Men-aeco,
aeco, Men-aeco, from any drugatora today and
e how much better you aleap and
breathe tonight, and how much batter
'iS.wl1.1 tomorrow. Mandaaa
fight e dlecpmforte of Aeihma, Bron Bron-chltle
chltle Bron-chltle and Hay Favar.

' I NEA Service. I nc PEjl g -jEin,

Visit
We are a little slow getting The
New Yorker where 1 live, but 1 was

kind of wryly amused to see on a place to dance in her husband's
Page 105 if the June 14 issue, shar-j home town. Patti's in Home or Pa Pa-ing
ing Pa-ing billing with a Bachrach add ris or someplace while the main

with an aster-
lsk saying "inspired by McLall s,
of course", a ralher flamboyant
advertisement whose headlines,
are:
"Visit the hospitable, historic
United Arab Repubbc Egypt--Syria
You'll be delighted by the gen gentle
tle gentle year-round climate ... by color colorful
ful colorful cosmopolitan cities, gay Med Mediterranean
iterranean Mediterranean resorts, and all the
wonders that have fascinated tra-
velers for over sixthousaUd years
You 11 find luxnous holes and mo modern
dern modern transportation. .and thanks
to favorable exchange rates and
the premium granted on the of official
ficial official exchange rate by the new
tourist pound, the cost of your ho holiday
liday holiday in the hospitable and historic
United Arab Republic is surpri
singly inexpensive. For tourist in
formation see your Travel Agen!
or the United Arabe Republic Tou Tourist
rist Tourist Office."
I pick up a paper today ar.'J see
where the State Department has
advised all travelers not to go :;ear
the Middle East, unless that it s
dreadfully necessary, and that the
State Department and consular
services overseas are being advised
t0 warn all tourists immediately
that the fat's in the spider an I
Vou iust might wind ud with a real

ineie n iow somebody in this togelher togelher-banks
banks togelher-banks ness" business is obviously wrong.

I admit that this is the lour
ist season, and anything goes, but
it seems to me that visitations of
Marines and paratroops into the
Middle East is going to drive prices
up, up, up and that murder-ng
display, and shooting the head
housekeeper for ninching the ealt,
it will be necessary for Brbish
travellers lo Swallow their pride
and check in with the Americans
There was a similar situation in
dow.i
anepneaiu s no e. ,.. ii
pl?!'P th11(Jn th, TlniuH
i i i i' it. .1 f
Arab Republic may be, someone
should really do something a
bout putting a higher tariff on
matches. Making every day the
Fourth of July can become boring
You know the old hosritble Arab
proverb: If you can't kill it, burn
it.
Just what these people are up
to in the way of touristinc it is
hard to say, but I think it's been
a touch overdone. I mean,- where
can a fellow get a hotel room in
Beirut, wilh all those damned
Yankees swarming over the place?
Who can find a table in a niht
club?
Even Patti Chamoun, the wife of

House builtxon a Small

The Middle
By SOB RUARK
o
the president's son, and a mighty
pretty lass, 1 mun say, can't ImJ
murder goes on abroad.
I must just inform the people
i who handle the united Arab Re
public Tourist Office that my bu-
siness is currently lost, because I
oathe noise, and the popping of
flames and the pooping of pist lis
are equally repulsive.
Jhat gentle year-round clima
Prize Winner
ACRO88
1,6 1852 Nobel
Prize winner,
Dr.
1 1 Philippic
12 Rescind
14 Click-beetle
15 All
18 Measures of
cloth
17 British money
of account
19 Loiter
"0 Soothsayers
23 Paid notice In
newspaper
24 Not as much
25 Fears
27 Sprouts
28 Thickness
20 Decade
30 Hail!
31 Noah's boat
32 Iroquolan
Indian
A Pilfers
.7 Nail
38 Italian river
39 Greek letter
41 Craft
42 Collection ol
sayings
14 Babylonian
numeral
(var.)
45 Showered
48 He won the
Nobel award
for new
discoveries
In s
51 Device for
removing
cherry pits
52 Pilots
53 Anoint
54 Worms

DOWN
f Satiated
2 Expungei
S Pillar
4 Fish
5 Dry (comb,
form)
6 "Staff of life"
7 Diminutive
of Leonard
8 Choose
9 Wainscoted
1 0 Distress
11 Golfers'
mounds
13 Lower limbs

OT A
bog
MCDELLIN
year-round
Panamanian
ceesiscy.
PLY NOW

AVtANCA

PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS SISTCM

Rock

East
te and the colirful cosmopolitan
cmes are just loo cluttered up
with corpses and strangers you
know, the noise and the kind of
people you meet, people you'd ne ne-ver
ver ne-ver meet any. place else except in
this gentle year-round climate
1 have decided to live bravely
and visit New York.
If I want to get killed in the
summertime, I will jaywalk Park
I Avenue and save a lot of time and
I money. You can carry together-
ness too far.
Answer to Previous Puzzle
24 Strom? Indian 36 Series of
cheroot steps (pi.)
2fl Stain 37 Obstructions
27 Cap 38 Spanish priest
29 Make lace 40 Circle parts
32 Printing 43 Church recess
mistakes 46 Mariner 1

18 Short-napped 33 Allotment direction
fabric S4 Male offspring 47 Conger
21 Paid back 35 Tenant under 49 Heights (ab.)
22 Ointment a lease 30 Affirmative

rrrr ; p i p i r
1 rr- n
r- r
jnr mi m
r mr-mr h
-IippElfppi-:
1 sr
sr r 1
I I I I I I I I I I LiB

Colombia"

where your DOLLAR GOES FURTHER...
COLOMBIA perhaps the meat purely Spenith et all South Amlrlcan countriei.
BOGOTA always refraihlnaly cool Hike ipringtime U. S. A.I. A ekarminf hlend of the old
world and the new ar reflected in the architecture, customs, and culture. Theufjh Spanish is the
native lanfuega, Enflish ipeakina travelers have n difficulty in makina themselves understood.
Marvelous native dishes and tha finest international cuisine. Recreation to please everyone! And
don't mies tha Salt Cathedral of Zipiquiro, unique in tho world; old pra-Belivar colonial buildings,
Simon Bolivar's homo; and Laguna Guetavitj (sacred lagaoH of the chibchas).

famous for it's orchids. Is one of
and
S, Gtlttni need only Tourist
- PAY LATER

Merry
WASHINGTON An interesting
batue is taking place behind tne
scenes regarding tne biggest uu
der world society in the usA '.lie
Mans, ihe tug of war is between
the Justice wepartmeni and the
Senate Rackets Committee, botn
wanting to get credit lor cracking
down on these kingpins of orgi
niseu crime.
The Mfi has been investigat
ed oacKwaro ano lorward lor a-
bout eight years but still seems to
thrive.
This column first published a
series ol Alalia exposes in Octo
ber 1950, showing how terrorise!
was first employe j in Sicily a
gainst Italian landlords, then used
in the USA to develop overloads
mzed crime.
rouowmg this, Senator eiau
ver uivesu&iu.u uic ..iana -ml
lui a ume nau uieu on tne ruu.
Then Attorney General Jaaie'
Mcuidnery siaiteu a coaipaiu to
uepon me Maxia cnietcams. tie
list-eu over loo iop gaiigsiers ior
uepurtation. his successor, Attor
ney tieneral uiUwueu, taixed a
lot about deportation, oui iew o
the ganLt,L.a aciuaiiy lei L the
USA.
..-ure recently, Paul WiUiar.iS.
able U.S. Attorney in New Yuxk,
nas irieu to &coup tne o e 11 a l c
Rackets Committee and inci inci-ucindi.y
ucindi.y inci-ucindi.y oui... nuiseii up as Re Republican
publican Republican candidate for guvernor guvernor-uy
uy guvernor-uy 1 iiaiimi, luuitiuituva 01 top .vla .vla-fia
fia .vla-fia members. Mtanwnne, hil .
aie KacKeis Committee is holding
daily hearings.
NARCOTICS SMUGGLING
Williams staged a dramatic ar
resi 01 niu u.,uveae, the top iia-
fia leader, and some of his head
men 111 iitvv jo.i.. lie is backed
up by a special task force of Jus
tice OepdiuiitiR investigators.
Simultaneously, counsel 1 Bob
Kcmieuy 01 uie Sena e Racscts
Committee has had his agents
cnecKing on tne Malia.
iBoth sides have learned preilj
much the same thing namely,
that the Mafia has taken o j e r
loose control oi most organized
rackets and the loot from thes
raiKeis nas been invested in legi legitimate
timate legitimate businesses which serve a.
a lro.it to niue tne Malta's secret
income.
j.. biggest Mafia controlled
racket is narcotics smuggling, in
vesitxtoi's nave uncovered evi
dence that the sensational meeting
of gangland leaders at Apalacnin,
N.Y., last November was' called
to shake up tne narcotics organi organization
zation organization and redistribute territory
The shakeup was believed relat related
ed related to the gangland staying of Al
bert Anastasia in a New York ho hotel
tel hotel barbershop and the attempa
slaying ol Frankie Costello. Gene Gene-vase
vase Gene-vase and Costello were rivals in
-sidWthe Ma;ii.-j' 4,
Investigators have also found a
link beiween the Apalachin confer conference
ence conference and Lucky Luciano, now ex
neu to Italy. Luciano s secret con contact
tact contact man, Santo Serge, met with
two Mafia messengers in Pal- i mo,
Sicily, shortly before the Apa'a Apa'a-chin
chin Apa'a-chin conieiei.ic.
This underworld conclave, inci incidentally,
dentally, incidentally, Wis oii.c.iueu by 139
mobsters who came all the way
lrom t iii !ri oa.
The main Mafia headquarters
are located in New York, Chica
go and Miami.
There are or er important Mafia
rings operating in Los Aijgeles,
Las Vegas, uenver. timaha, De Detroit,
troit, Detroit, Philadelphia, Boston, Atlan Atlanta
ta Atlanta and Tampa.
INTERSTATE MURDER
What is needed to curb he Ma
fia, in addition to exposi s is a
i "v permitting the V id lo local
cal local police, based on the fact that
ers cross inter interstate
state interstate boundaries.
usually imported
from out of state; witnesses are
either terrorized or killed; the
getaway cars, usually rigged with
to s stale
lines; the murder weapons, in
, .aiiu'm-
ed, carry no marking that can be
traced.
These Mafia methods make it
almosl impossible ior local police
to cope with them.
As a result, the Mafia has left
a long series of unsolved murders
in its wake. The Chicago police,
medellin

tho garden spots of Colombia with a balmy climata

Cards Igos t
Consult your Travel Agent
or CsH our Offices
TEL. 2-2956
Aeroes treea tha Laslelatlve Palaca

THt OIDIST AlHIHt IN THI AMERICAS

r Washington

Go Round
!.
reporting on some of these m.
ders, noted: "In each of thest
previously cited homicides the
method of assassination was iden identical.
tical. identical. The murderers boldly attack attack-ed
ed attack-ed their victim m -utolic pia. el
kill. The sneil load used in each
brutal in its euect, was sure i
and used a weapon which, while
case was buckshot with large mis missiles
siles missiles and a powerful charge of
powder. .
"It is further believed, in the
light if all investigations made,
that the actual killers in all, these
cases were hired assassins, and
were not necessarily the saute
persons in 'each case."
Most Mafia victims had a defi definite
nite definite appointment with death. Tha
killers seemed to know exae'ly
when to expect their victim at the
murder scene, then would blast
him at close range and flee in a
waiting car before witnesses rea
lized what had happened.
The long list P un0ived mur murders
ders murders shows that tie Mafia execu executioners
tioners executioners "k- to ctrh their victim!
in automobiles. A surprising num.
er of corpses, wh;"H he nollce
knew to be gangland victims,
were found slumned in the front
seat of their cars.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
Secretary of the Treasury Ander Anderson
son Anderson has "Rr--' '-nlynwer that
next year's Federal deficit, will
b double 'his vpar'i. If was three
billion dollars for the fiscal year
iust ended. .Congressman Dick
Simoson of Pennsvlvshla,' the Re Republican
publican Republican Congressional csnvrwion
chairman,- has Sent a virtual ulti ultimatum
matum ultimatum to .' JThlB Vw4 that
Sherman Adams mtst resign for
the food of Republican c-ndidatei
running for re election this year
. .Prime Minister Nehru has
sent s private appeal to Premier
Khrushchev to snare 'bp lives of
Hungarian political prisoners now
facing secret trial in Htingarr.
Henry called for an end of poKr!
c-i "vutions behind the Iron
Cuartaw.
CRACK DOWN ON GIFTS
BFRUN (UPI) -East German
Communist authorities Have start start-ed
ed start-ed criminal action against 271
persons since the end of Mv foil
sending gi't packages to W e s I
Germany, a newSnaoer, the Dres Dresden
den Dresden Saeehsische Zeitung, said to
day.
For a great many years man
has been occupied with map mapping
ping mapping the earth. As early as
523 B.C., Pythagoras believed
the world was round. About
200 years later Aristotle devel developed
oped developed this idea, using arguments
which are still sound. Eratos Eratosthenes,
thenes, Eratosthenes, born in 27 B.G., fig figured
ured figured the distance .around the
earth and came very close to
its actual circumference.
G Britnnnica Jr. Kncyclopedla
To?
The only tenants renting for a
song nowadays ore the birdr (
Co
M7
passport net

1



'W

MONDAY, JULY 1I5 v.

PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDWINDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE THREE

iKHmm y -jGH 1 k nk jfflj lift
M M MHiHIfWIiW
BVBBBBMgraBSrar 4 S H BRmmBI H M Slfe-isSsH
'li 9 bbMS

Fyng Tiger Chennault To Be Buried In Arlington

umii nil FiNS Tnlv 21 TTPT1

Family and friends Oi Lt. Gen.

Clair L. Chennault paid their

last respects tocay to tne famed

in Wasnina.on's Arlineton Nation

al cemetery.

cnennauu, wi, cuea yesterasy o:
lung cancer at Ochsner Clink.
His second wile Anna was at his

sioe.
Tile general had been in grave
condition lor almost two weeks
with a bilateral lung condition.

He- was taken o f the clinic's
critical list three days ago. Doc Doc-tori
tori Doc-tori said he had temporarily re responded
sponded responded to treatments.
The veteran airman had under under-COne
COne under-COne an oneraiion in ISM which

resulted in removal of the upper

mac ui ms ieil mnc. Thirteen

months later, doctors discovered
another spot of cancer in his lung
cavity.
Chennault blazed a path o'
fllorv. both for himself m,i ti,

handful of adventurous aviators

that formed the American volun volunteer
teer volunteer group in the skies over Chi China
na China during the Sino-Japanese war
before the conflict mushroomed in into
to into World War II.
In the brief seven months be

fore Pearl Harbor, the Flying Ti-

gers rougm agamsi impvsiuic

odds and won.
Many times the courageous pi pilots,
lots, pilots, often led by Chennault him himself,
self, himself, scrambled into the Curtiss
P40 fighter planes to take on Ja Japanese
panese Japanese planes outnumbering them
20 to one.
By the time the U.S. entered
the war and the Flying Tigers
were absorbed into the 14th ft
Force commanded by Chennault,

the group, with less tnan iw
planes, accounted for 284 official

kills and many more proDaoies.

me Tigers lost owy is pianes.

The phenomenal success oi me
Flying Tigers was due to Chen Chen-nault's
nault's Chen-nault's brilliance as an air strate strategist.
gist. strategist. Chennaut applied the tricks of
peacetime stunt flying he had
learned in the years between the
two world wars to aerial combat
with deadly efefctiveness.
In the 1930's, temporarily out o'

uniform, the daredevil airman
headed a trio of stunt flyers, known
as the "Three Men on the Flying
Trapeze." One of their favorite
stunts was to perform intricate
maneuvers linked together with
20-foot length of light rope, with without
out without breaikng it, a difficult feat

requiring great flying skill. i
Chennault was born in Com-'
mei'je, Tex., on Sept. 6, 1890, and
was taken to Louisiana when urj
was six months old. His father.
John Stonewall Chennault, was a
cotton planter, and young Claire
planned to ollow in the elder
Chennault's footsteps.
He enrolled in Louisiana Stale
University in 1908 to stufy agri agriculture
culture agriculture but later switched i" teach teaching
ing teaching and taught school for four
years in Athens, La., until A inc.

ca s entry into World war I.
He enlisted as a private but
soon commissioned a second lieu lieutenant
tenant lieutenant and applied for flight train
ing. Ironically, he was rejected.
He persisted and, in 1919, was
awarded the silver wings of an
Army aviator. He left the Armv
the following year, but his love
for 'lying led him back n e
service several months later. Un Until
til Until he formed the "Flying Trap

ezes," Chennault saw duty in Ha
waii and later as an instructor at
several air bases in this country.
Chennault retired to his home
in Waterproof. La., in 1137. bu'
soon tired of his inactive life and
went to China at the urging of
Gen. Mau Pang Tsu, then chief
of the Chinese air force to help

train pilots for the war against
Japan.
Chennault became a colonel ia
the Chinese air force after serv I
briefly as a civilian advisor fr
the Commission o. Aeronautical
Affairs, headed by Mad it
Chiang Kai-shek. twhBM
Then in 1941 be organized tb
Fying Tigers.
TKannoult retired a Pain thlS

time for good in July, 1945, nV
in the post-war years operated tht
Civil Air Tt-ms?'
China and later from Fur meat
afier the . .
Chinese mainland.
The Co i r-
tremendous blow to the outspoke
general, he jecauK .....
critic of what he called the gov government's
ernment's government's "stiff-necked tbeone
in dealing with Red expansion ia
Asia.
He took to the lecture circuit to
push for more 'military and eco economic
nomic economic aid to Chiang Kai-shek'9
Nationalist forces in Formosa!
He himself was eager to lead
an invasion forre onto the Chinpse-

mainland. When the Korean War
broke out in 1950, Chennault urged
dropping atomic bombs on Norta
Korea as a means of "ending t1' -'
conflict in the shortest possible
time."

BJBJPiP M BE :;:s4 &BJ

cuii I CBV ?FNTINELS Trying to match their little strides to the precise pacing of a
Tentrv twr unentified child rerv march before the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers in Arling Arlington
ton Arlington National Cemetery. Virginia. The tots ran off when theenftnaffjried to get their names.

mm saa hour CLUB Proudly displaying their certificates of membership In the 500-Hwr Club are toese emP" J
right, chief of the malaria control and W,vft,,e JSCJTvmtt- Manuel Pereira, Pan Pan-ofgsick
ofgsick Pan-ofgsick leave. They are, from left: Jose Bernal of Pneblo JJSSeffffSJBSiOS: her Panama City

ama vay; isvangeiisia &anjur, juwi 'u. i7c : ;

resident, simno Lopez, aiso receiveq cm,K.-iD.B. Sl-S

For Convention

NEW YORK (UPD The largest
this ritv pot underway yesteraay

with 132,000 Jehovah's Witnesses

jammed into xannee oiauium u
tha Pnln Crnnnris.

IUV VM.V
They came from 84 lands in including
cluding including such remote places as
Siam, Holland, Burma, Nyasaland
and Hawaii for the opening of
their eight-day Divine Will Inter International
national International Assembly.
Parking lots vanished under 32
large tents covering cafeterias
and overflow seating accommoda accommodations.
tions. accommodations. The cafetTias were
equipped to feed 70,000 persons an
hour. The streets in the area
were jammed. A detail of 100 po policemen
licemen policemen as assigned to handle
the crowds and to direct trafifc.
, i tt --ti j : 4 f

the Watch Tower Bible and Tract

Society and convention chairman,
officially opened the assembly at
10:30 a. m. with an address of
welcome.

ALL AMERICA CABLES & RADIO INCORPORATED
ADVISES
That the Panama City Office, formerly located
at Avenida Central 22-135 is now at Calle 22-B
No. 12-17 in the former Panagra Office.

TELEPHONE NUMBERS MA ) AQA7 0I07

PANAMA A-WtW X-WH A-I.H7I

THE SAME FOR RAPID MESSENGER SERVICE

. W HAVE RUN

SUPS

SALE AT W

AMERICAN
BAZAAR!!..

We ran out of sales slips
the very first Day of the Sale
For more than two years now The American Bazaar has
not offered a BARGAIN SALE

SMI

Such was the enormous crowd of customers

r

SEE OUR 99c. and 1.99 counters
TIES I TROUSERS
for 10c for 99c.
Sport Shirts BELTS
for 99c. for 49c.

NOW

SPORT SHIRTS
.",V
Lyon of Troy Cino Terrini and Izod

2.50 1.99 and 99c.

NYLON CORD

before 33.50

39.50

NOW 2 for 1
HASPEL SUITS and OTHER BRANDS
2.99 5.00 10.00
DINNER JACKETS 5.00

TROUSERS

Mjy-'
or

Gabardine and others
Before 10.00 NOW 6.50
Linen Before 14.50 NOW 7.25
White Before 13.50 NOW 6.50

X'' HrHHI

TJ V:'f :M-S.'.

j r. f 'p

American Bazaar

Sth of May Plaza and Cathedral Plaza
JUST SAY CHARGE IT"

'I

tiViiii-i i
r



t

5
PAGE FOt'R
TP1 PANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPENDENT PAILT NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, JULY M, 1MB

I

octal and Kythenvide

5 K

&,
MILLER-WAGNER WEDDING
IK

WELLES LEY, MASSACHUSETTS

Miss Louise Ruth Wagner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Wagner of Balboa, became tne bride of Mr. Wallace
Rhodes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jay 1. Miller of Wellesley, Mas Massachusetts,
sachusetts, Massachusetts, at an afternoon ceremony performed by the Rev.
Arthur Mellanson In the Wellesley Hills Congregational
Church on Saturday, July 19.
The bride, who was given in'
marriage by her fatner, wore a nama to Colombia and Mrs. Care-own
ol white chantilly lace overjlos Lopez Kabrega. Uther gueis
silk organza fashioned with a included the vice-minister of For For-Sabrina
Sabrina For-Sabrina neckline which was stud-leign Relations and Mrs. Mariano
ed With seed pearls and irr.cie! Oteiza; the first secretary of the
cent sequins. The bouffant skirt Colombian Embassy and Mrs. Al Al-eaded
eaded Al-eaded in a chapel tram. Her un berto Garavito; the second secre secre-fier
fier secre-fier tip veil of white illusion was tary of the Embassy Alfonso Ve Ve-held
held Ve-held in place by a juliette cap of naga Leyva; Sra. Paulina L. de

rhantillv and she carried a cas-
,.d. hoimuet o Dhalonopsis or
chids, stephanotis and ivy.
Attending the bride as maid of
honor was Miss Merle Shaw of
Nutley, N J., who wore a yellow
organdie gown trimmed with a
wide cumoerbund and finished
with hutterflv bow at the back.

She wore matcning shoes and car-; party in their residence In honor
lied cascade bouquet ol yellow of the Ambassador o Panama to
roses, white margarites and ivy. the United States and Mrs. Ricar Ricar-Bri'des
Bri'des Ricar-Bri'des maids were Miss Gail do M. Arias who are visiting in
JfeSherry oi Fryeourg, Maine; i Panama.
Miss Bessie Pantos of Southbridge
Mass.: Miss Kav Kigby ot Wcilc Rv. and Mrt. Gussick

ville, Penn. and Miss Sarah Ann
Wacner. sister o; the brine, of Bal
boa. Their dresses were similar to
that of the maid of honor bui in
Nile ereen.
4.f-in wr Minor ac wi
Attending Mr. Miller as best
man wa Mr. .lohn Edsar of Dov-'
er. Mass. and the usners were tne
"
Messrs. James Hammond of
Arookline, Mass.; Christopher Cot Cotton,
ton, Cotton, James Ellison and Warren
McLea all of Wellesley.
The bride is a graduate of Frye Frye-burg
burg Frye-burg Academy, Fryeburg, Maine
and attended Nasson College for
two years. The groom is a grao
uate of Wellesley High School and
also attended Nasson College. He
is now with the U.S. Army at Hull
Mass.
The couple spent their honey honeymoon
moon honeymoon on Cape Cod.
Dinner at Italian Embassy
The Ambassador of Italy lo Pa Panama
nama Panama and Mrs. Mario Majoli pii
tertained at dinner for a group of
their friends at the Embassy res residence.
idence. residence. Mrs. Gustin Entertains
At Buffet Dinner
Mrs. Jaekie Gustin of Curundu
Heights give a buffet dinner in
honor of th Rev. and Mrs. J.
Kimball Renew of Margarita who
are leaving on August 5 for a new
pansn in Dallas, Texas
wwwi guvsis were ine nev
and
mrp. John Spear, Rev. and Mrs.
Edward C. Webster and the Rev.
John A. Spalding.
Colombian Ambassador Gives
Dinner at Union Club
The Ambassador of Colombia
. Panama, Dr. Rafael Rocha
Schlois, was host Saturday eve
Wait a dinner at the Union Club
la honor of the Ambassador of Pa-

A

St.

tuJ Vruft Jtrntl L
A4
2-0 740 w 2-0 74
TAKES PLACE
venegas; tne consul General of
Colombia and Mrs. Hernando Ley
va and the Military Attache, Col.
Luis E. Leyva.
Ambassador and Mrs. Arias
Honored at Cocktail Party
Dr. and Mrs. Erasmo de la
Guardia entertained at a cocktail
Expected Back Today
The Rev.,-, and Airs. Robert Gus Gussick
sick Gussick and their two daughters, are
among the passengers arriving to-
dav
a board llie S.S. Cristobal ironi
a vacalin of several weeks spent
jn Chicago and other narts of thp
,Vh"i rS, a. lner fLiTU. tn.e
I I P 3 HPV l,IICCIolr ic
Pastor of the Redeemer Lutheran
Church in Balboa.
Champanada at Dominican
Republic Embassy
The Ambassador of the Domini Dominican
can Dominican Republic, Hector B. de Cas Castro
tro Castro Noboa, tendered a champana champanada
da champanada at the Embassy residence on
Saturday in honor of the new Am Ambassador
bassador Ambassador of Panama to the Domi Dominican
nican Dominican Republic Eusebio A. Mora Morales.
les. Morales. Members o, the Diplomatic
Corps and Officials attended.
Leaves To Attend
School In Chile
Luis Rodriguez of Panama left
by plane on Saturday night .or Li
ma, Peru, where he will spend a
few days and from where he will
go lo Santiago, Chile, to study bal ballet
let ballet at the Bellas Aries of Santia Santiago.
go. Santiago. Mr. Rodriguez, a student of
the National School of Ballet, is to
study on a Government scholar scholarship.
ship. scholarship. Returns Prom Wait Virginia
Mrs. Ora Ewing returned to her
home In Balboa on Saturday from
s visit of several weeks with rela
tives' in West Virginia.
Bishop Serrano Honored
Bishop Jesus Serrano, CMF, A A-postolic
postolic A-postolic Bishop of Darien, wai
honored recently by the Cristobal
Council 1689, Knights o' Columbus
with an honorary membership cer certificate.
tificate. certificate. The K of C Council entertained

Delicious
MY SODA with
Nestles Condensed Milk

&

134,
ancuna
malftJ prompt It L.
imitt ilnun.
m. ony.
S.00 W 10
the Atlantic Side Catholic Clergy
at a special meeting held in their
honor that night. As part of the
exercises, certificates o. apprecia appreciation
tion appreciation were given to Father Jame
J. Murphy, Father John Tumulty
and Father Edward A. KoslowsKi
for their assistance to the Council
during the pasi years, lnese
Chaplains are leaving this area to
assume duties in otner parishes.
Father Murphy is going to Bal Balboa,
boa, Balboa, Father lumuhy lo Gamooa
and Father Koslowski to Fort
Clayton.
The K of C Council was graced
by the Bishop who attended the
meeting and to whom the Council
presented a Certificate of Honora Honorary
ry Honorary Membership. This is an unusual
and rare honor for a K of C Coun Council
cil Council to be able to perform. The ce ceremonies
remonies ceremonies were fittingly closed by
the Bishop giving the Papal Bless Blessing
ing Blessing to the members and guests
present.
The next regular meeting of the
Council on Tuesday the 12th of
August will be a business meeting.
A special meeting will be held on
the 5th of August for exempli. ica ica-tion
tion ica-tion of the First Degree, All mem members
bers members who are holding application
forms on candidates are urged to
submit them to membership chair chairman
man chairman F., Perez or to Grand Knight
B. K. Levin as soon as possible.
Jaime Santoi Completes
Recruiting Training
Jaime santos, son of Mr. and'
Mrs. Manuel Santos of Cristobal,
completed nis recruit training and
graduated yesterday, June 26 from
t.'.p. Great Lakes Aaval Training
1 Center. During his training period
ne was appointed platoon right
guide of his company and as a re recruit
cruit recruit petty ofiicer was entitled to
wear a miniature rating insignia
as a badge of authority while in
"Boot Camp."
Jaime was chosen for the posi position
tion position in recognition of leadership
qualities displayed while undergo undergoing
ing undergoing recruit training.
Return From California
Mrs. Francisco Wong, her daugh daughter
ter daughter Donna and niece, Miss Hermi Hermi-nia
nia Hermi-nia Kam, returned yesterday from
San Francisco, California, where
they attended the graduation of
Mrs. Wong's daughter, Dr. Fran Francis
cis Francis Wong, from Medical School.
She will intern at King's County
Hospital in New York.
Tarpon Club Has Gala
Opening Of New Building
The Tarpon Club, second oldest
fishing club in the western hemis
phere, held a gala opening of its
new, modern building at the Ga Ga-tun
tun Ga-tun Spillway, yesterday afternoon
and evening. During the ceremo ceremony
ny ceremony the president of the club. Mr,
C. J. Genis, presented certificates
of honorary membership to Lt.
Gov. McElheney and to Judge Lor Lor-en
en Lor-en Hillsinger of Cristobal.
(CONTINUED ON PAGE FIVE)

A nice cold aoda... how refresh refreshing!
ing! refreshing! . still better and more
nutritious with Nestle's Condensed
Milk.
Try this delirious combination!
Serve It to the family today...
see how they g-o for it.
How delicious is soda with.

NESTLE
ConHemed Milk
More Refreshing and
Nuiritioiift

(Dorothy Kilgallen it in vaca vacation.
tion. vacation. Her guest columnist today
is "the champ" Sugar Kay ko ko-binson)
binson) ko-binson) SUGAR RAY ROBINSON
WRITES
When you i ,. prize! lghler,
there are compensations for Dem
.u ..wv. 3ui..i .iieresuug
people and they feel you're on olj
,11.).. u.je mey ve en
you in the "ring.
i uuiu; i vtaS worried auuut
going to Hollywood. All the stars
I'd met ana assured me they'd
won large sums of money oei
ting on me always, of course, in
Hgnts I'd won. 1 figured there had
to be a lot oi siara anu producers
and directors out there who had
bet against me and lost so I had
a batch of ready made enemies
waiting for me. But my matne matne-matics
matics matne-matics were wrong. 'All the tir.ie
Ie was in Hollywood 1 never met
one person who had eyer bet a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst me.
One of Bob Hope's funniest priv private
ate private routines ai least to me is
his description of wagering with
Jackie Gleason on my second
Basilio bout. Gleasbn delivered
the money all beautifully wrapped
as a Christmas present.
Most people in the movie colony
wnated to Know w,iy i wanted to
become en actor. To me, being an
actor is portraying another nuiiv
an being. I believe I can do it.
I want to prove i can do it.
There isn't much difference be between
tween between professional righting and
acting on the stage. There is a
definite advantage in a ring
back ground you get ovc
being self-conscious after hav having
ing having thousands of spectators
watching you dodging and throw
ing punches. As that celebrated
thespian of our time, Rocky
Graiiano, was advised when he
first started: "lit you want to
be an actor, don't try to act."
I've been studying acting fdr a
year and a half with John Cas Cassavetes
savetes Cassavetes and Burt Lane, and 1 was
very flattered when, last Februa February,
ry, February, I learned Reuben Momoulian
was interested in me for an im important
portant important part in a big movie. We
worked together on the role and
eventually he got in touch with the
producer of the film. The pro'.iuo
er hemmed and hawed," then fin
ally came up with the plaintive
question, 'But how do 1 know hnw
Sugar will look after the Basilio
fight?"
JJomemaliin
9
Housewives will find that a
little ironing helps no-iron cloth clothing.
ing. clothing. This is a touch. up pressing
after several washings. A steam
iron is best, although a dry iron
at rayon setting with a damp press
cloth does well. Then you may
launder again several times, be.
fore again pressing the item.
A concentrated soaping of badly
soiled spots helps get clothing
clean. Blouse collars and cuffs are
specially prone to collect heavy
soil. A soft brush also helps clean
these areas when you do the gar.
ment by hand. Launder in fresh
suds after spot cleaning.
Children collect many things
during vacation months chigger
bites, dog bites and scratches.
Washing these irritated areas with
soap and water is a good way to
start the first-aid treatment. Fol
low with proper ointments to
fight infection and head off dis discomfort.
comfort. discomfort. In the case of animal
bites chock with a doctor imme immediately.
diately. immediately. INDONESIAN PAPER BANNED
JAKARTA (UPI)-MiHtary offi officials
cials officials yesterday suspended the in independent
dependent independent newspaper Indonesia
Raya, which earlier this week at attacked
tacked attacked the government's speedy
recognition of the Iraqi Republic.

NOW! 2 Weekly Flights
ONLY NON-STOP

Constellation Servu

MEXICO

TO

ONLY 6 HOURS LOWEST FARES
Connections in Mexico for all of North America
mmfrf CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AG1NT
6Um AER0VIAS MEXIC0.SA.
TELS. 3-1057 & 3-1 W

THE VOICE OF
BROADWAY
by Dorothy Kill gal I en

To most of Hollywood,- all fight fighters
ers fighters are mc wan disarranged xeat
ures vau ,.u ,..jer u give
them an answer disarranged teat-
through those who misconceptions.
hjluid it ucCdlllC t,uuu tiiai 1
wanted to be an actor, I've receiv
cu su'iy,. uvui aia companies,
little companies, Trench, Germau,
itauaii uu juui vo.nui.ics.
Many o them would have been
an i igiu xor d 6tiajuu, uufu or
iourth picture for actor Ray Ko
binsou. loUi i iu Deuig especially
caretul about the first, because
i nave uie leemij; uut iu my
first appearance the motion pict
ure iUauouy .i tie an audi
ence, it will be a jury. 1 nave- to
prove mysei. as au actor or there
won t be any other parts tor me.
One. idea I liked was brought to
me by Carlos Montalban who is
not o.iiy a iauious uexican actor
and director but the only provi provisional
sional provisional ouii ligiu ciuic who nves
in New York. He pointed out me
similarities ueivvcc, uie bull ung
and the; prize fight game, ana out outlined
lined outlined an iuea vvutic m i would et
involved in bullfighting. But he i
a periectionist auout scripts, am,
is waiting to find a writer who
understands oom builtignung aud
boxing to worn on Uie scenario
with mm.
.Most people think when I'm not
getting itauji iur a iifctii 1 ni Hav Having
ing Having a vacation. Not so.
ni si oi an, i ni one of tbe .,
iest of the New York City tou..st
guides, rriends who nave oeen
hospitable to me in their cities
have to see 'my' New tfork. uo uo-ris
ris uo-ris Day and her husband are in
the mood iu see tile jtLi places, so
we put in a big evening listeiimj;
to uie best musicians m tne world
Anna Magnani wants to see Har
lem so we do some aiter-dhik
roadwork along lstn st.
People come to bugar Ray's,
my 7th ave. night club, and na naturally
turally naturally exp.Ci ... an in tor a
little jam session on the drums.
There ie Kzts ,0 D awarded,
hands to shake, parties to attend
and my second most important
activity when I'm at home, my
son Ray jr. s Li,,ie Leagje
baseball team. I'm the sub who
gets to piay w.ien any of the
7-year-oias are sick.
.
This requicres me to be on n.y,
innc if i micc fi no f
small teammates loons at me vwth!
oisaain ana says Man, mat ua
silio sure flit you too naru. '
After nine innings I've usually
had a ami 1 nea on to bed. The
Otner ballplayers afe puz;eo
They warn lo know, "How come
you can fight 15 rounds but you
can't make out in a uouble head header?"
er?" header?" Maying home is far more rest restful
ful restful to me than making a trip iixe
the recent one iu iioliywood
which meant a parade, receptions,
visits to nearby lowns, and a
whole new set of people to meet meet-but
but meet-but I got a lot out of it, and in
turn I had the opportunity to
preach my gospel oi physical fit fitness.
ness. fitness. Being a celebrity requires
good condition just as being a oox oox-er
er oox-er does. I don't know if I was
appreciated, out l intormed one
and all that everybody eats too
much. I hope I persuaded some
of them to stop putting on those
pounds which are so tough to lake
oif a few years later.
I have very deep religious feel feelings
ings feelings which give me great faith ip
myself. Bui along with faith gos
the need for preparing yourself,
as well as you tun, so 1 have Deen
taking singing lessons as "well as
acting lessons with hopes that
they'll come in handy in the near
future. iBoxing has always been as
business to me I fought primar primarily
ily primarily for money but I picked up
experiences which may help me
as an actor.
As an incurable ham, what else
could I do?
ice

No matter how bad your cards
are when you are playing bnags,
ooii t sit ana complain about uem,
hand after hand. Everybody gels
poor earns now and then, so mere
is no reason wny you should com
plain that you never hold good
carus.
i-om paining, ,you sound like a
poor sport, and besides, it is oor
ing to the other players.
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
NORTH
A A 9
AK94
1087
KQ8S
WEST
EAST
A J 10 7 5 3
86 5
None
J 9 7 6 4
AQ42
.
QJ6532
10
SOUTH (D)
AK86
J 102
AK94
A3 2
North and South vulnerable
South
West
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
North
IV
3
3
5N.T.
Pass
Pass
East
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Double
1
1 NT.
3 V
3N.T.
6N.T.
Pass
Opening lead V 8
I am indebted to Troy Green of
Mandan, N.D. for today's hand.
Mr: Green comments on the
fact that the hand
shows the
value of tens, nines
and eiehtsl
and the follv of dnuhline iam

! just because you: hold a few high I tl W,net?,en nur,ses dressed in fa fa-cards.
cards. fa-cards. It also illustrates the point HfifH flw in 'ate Satu'-dy n"t

that f nn lino riu,, i- ...i..
nnt ,rn Inn ( ltl
h '"u a"ulu
fw another one that may.
" Nortn mlSht wn ,nave Pd
i "."i "' "f lv "au l" h""s
but, Squth had certainly shown 15
"r Iess and there nid not appear to
be a five-cardLsuit any-where. As
tor aasi s OBueie, rr., tireen's
comments str Correct.
West opened the eight of hearts
in response to the double. Mr.
Green realized that the hearts
finesse was not going to work and
that clubs were not likely to
break. He won the heart trick, led;
a ciuo to nis nanri ad an other
Dacn to dummy s kmc. East
showed out and the club suit be became
came became hopeless.
This left one slight chance.
East might have both the oueen
and jack of diamonds. Dummy's
eight was led and when East
played low the eight was allowed
to go through. West showed out
and the party was over. Mr.
Green made four diamonds, three
clubs, three hearts (he had to lose
a trick to the queen) and two
spades.
It is possible that Mr. Green
would have made the hand with without
out without the double. In fact' I think it
very likely that he would have,
but the double certainly didn't
do him any harm.
Q-The bidding has" been:
West North Et Sontn
' T 1 Double
Pass Redbl. Pass
Pass
1 A
rass 2 A
Past
xou, bouth, hold-
what do you do?
A7,d to spades. 'There Is
something peculiar rolnf on but
you have far too much to pass.
TODAY'S QUESTION
The bidding has been:
West North East Soufr
1 1 Double
You, South, hold:
VS,V J,I0 J 10 9 4 1
What do you do1 j
Answer Tomorrow
GIVES RECOGNITION
LONDON (UPI) Baghdad
Radio reported last last night
SSaudi Arabia had joined the na nations
tions nations which have recognized the
new Iraqi republic.
Prevents
DIAPER RASH
Ultd after r very
ehanga, Msxana
prerrnti heat rush,
Chafe and galling,
too. Abiorbenl
cornstarch bate
clingi clow, keeps
baby frein, com comfortable.
fortable. comfortable. Medicated Mcteni Skin Cream helps heel
linfal (unburn, lti gentle lanolin unooih!
red detergent hand!." 6Je)

aWRSEaEBH
flPftKWTBsJ

If

Here's What To Dq Until
Trees Can Provide Shade
If Nature didn't endow your lot! the color of the house and, If
with a tree-shaded site for ter- coordinated effect is delink u.

l. uou wale time bemoaning
your not-so-shady outdoor room.
You can substitute man made
sheltering materials and strategic
use of color and potted plants
An outdoor spo. mu s comple
tely open to tbe midsummer gun
will be usib or a greater part of
the day if it's partially shaded
iW ilierent materials such as
a saran and canvas to aluminum
or raiisiucent plastic, Personal
taste will dictate your decision.
r'or the recently Unted yard
where seedlings are atilt measured
as be'ug u, gaily pat
terned awnings provide a bnghi
snot ot color wmie performing
their function of screening.
Awntngs grown to patio cover
size make effective canopies for
an outdoor room and need not be
too costly.
Among newer materials sugges
ted for awnings Is an improved sa saran
ran saran which is c nestle Icbric that
resists rot, mildew, or fading
it's said to, be so durable it ran
remain up the year around, f
Like other fabrics, the woven
plastic ones permit circulation' of
si'. Their difference: moisture is
not absorbed.
The trpnlii"once of plastic cives
a cheerful light even on gray days
and colors "Hude yellow, green,
blue and white.
Rugoed (anvas. a lons-time aw awning
ning awning classic, show up this year in
lovely plaids and such fashionable
colors as azure, coral, pale green
an'1 sandy beiges.
When you're picking a terrace
rovr. It's well n remember that
lighter colors reflect the stm'n
rays more effectively than dark
ones .a consideration if your tor
it.. of he day.
rtisoaiacior in cioior choice is
Nurses Arrive

Sick Call Expected To Rise

bIlirut, Lebanon (UPI) Ma
rine and airborne troop medics
prepared for a sharp rise in sick
call today. The nurses have a a-ived.
ived. a-ived. There are 10,000 leathernecks
and G.I.'s ashore here and without
a doubt the closest look some
W0UM et woman would be
a nurse wllI needle or ther
i mpmeter in their hands.
...... wuaiun.T oci uu
a 400
bed
eVaCUSUOn
hospital
in an
olive
grove within th.
e Marine cle ense
,. .
Perimeter arntinrl Reirnf. Ini...
national Airport
ine nurses, commanded by
Maj. Beata Lieske from Joppa,
Md flew from the Second Gen General
eral General Hospital in Landstuhl, Ger Germany,
many, Germany, together with isft' other
members of that field hospital
unit.
"They told us all to pack and
be ready in 30 minutes. Some of
us were on dntv anrt -ci
I duty but we, were all back on
time and believe me we did take
0I. said Capt. Frances thomas of
ncn mono, va
mune oi us even had i mo t
think about or pack swim suits-
aiiu iook at tnose beautiful beach beaches,
es, beaches, moaned Capt. Mary Pritch Pritch-ard
ard Pritch-ard o" Dansville, Pa.
But although those beaches are
part of the most popular and ex expensive
pensive expensive resort in the Eastern
Mediterranean, the girls know
they -are not here for a picnic.
Hot tired, dirty and hungry
after long waits and long flights,
including a stopover in Turkey
they f,naly reached four acres of
olive grove assigned to their hos hospital.
pital. hospital. They are living like Marines
and airborne troops under can canvas
vas canvas in an arid area of dust clouds
and squad olive trees that offer
the only sparse shade from the
punishing Middle Eastern sun.
Sunday, yards and vards of can canvas
vas canvas were going up like a circus
under the direction of hospital ad ad-ministration
ministration ad-ministration o'ficer Maj. Harry
Jenkins of Bellingham, Wash.
Operating room tents, ward

Otto John Gains Freedom
In Germany, Friend On Trail

MUENSTER, Germany UPI)
former West German counter-
ln'eiugenee cntet into jonn was
released from prison today alter
serving 19 months for conspiring
with the communists. He was re
prieved for the remaining 17
months ol his term.
John was sentenced to four
years at hard labor for, treason
able relation-! w''h i'ie Reds dur
ing an 18-month stay in East
Germany. The ore ear he sp nt
receiving hospital treatment be before
fore before being sentenced counted as
part of his confinement.
Reprieved by West German
President Theodor Heuss, John
walked out of Muenster Peniten Penitentiary
tiary Penitentiary with his lawyer and left at
once for Cologne to loin his wife.
In that city Mrs. John said that
she and John probably would go
to London on business.
Heuss granted the reprieve on
the basis of. a pies by John's
lawyer.
John once was a pillar of the
Bonn government, th? "J. Edgar
Hoover' of West Germany. Be Besides
sides Besides being the head of the In In-ternal
ternal In-ternal Security Organisation, he
was famous having taken par;
in the July ft), 1944 plot on Hitler r
life.
But on the night of July 20
1954, on 'the io h anniversary of
that plot and under circumstance
which still r-hi 'in mvstcriot.s.
John disappeared into East Ber
Itn.
He returned to the West on
Dec, 12, 1955 in a car driven by
a Danish journalist. Eleven dn
, later he was arrested on charges

color oi porch furniture.

To define the area of an out
door room, a floor of conereteTTTel
stone or similar material may bet bet-linei
linei bet-linei with low planters or low
walls.
Low walls can be as expensive
or inexpensive as you choose and
thy are mace m nHer bases for
colorful potted plants.
Such an arri"ewent also per permits
mits permits privacy, which may be dou dou-bly
bly dou-bly important in neighborhoods
where fences are frowned on and
green hedges are still in their in
fancy.
Privacy was no problem for
Yale Burge, a New York interior
designer, who renentlv fixed up
his small, low brick-walled terrace
which look ou' grassy vard
protected by a high brick garden
wall.
But he favors the colorful ef
feet gained by use o? ihHltlceWed
geraniums set in clay pots atop
the low wall, and long stemned
cut flowers sprouting from tall
vases,
i
A green -and -white striped es es-nopy
nopy es-nopy with an arch cu' bonier
shades this inviting spot where the
combinattrt" m-i buck buck-grounds
grounds buck-grounds and simple, graceful fur furniture
niture furniture sets the stage for gav and
unusual table arrangements for
summer entertaining.
On soMal occasions the table
takes a round, white linen cloth
bpMW trimmed in gold and red
ball fringe.
Iced coffee is served in taU go goblets
blets goblets and pewter porringers An An-tioue
tioue An-tioue French motet wlt the ice
cream and cake; a handsome de declaration
claration declaration that outdoor eatlns i
not necessarily synonomous with
- picnic fare only.
In Beirut
o
tents, staff tents all tents.
The evacuation unit is under the
direction of Lt. Col. Hugo Okongi
of Fresno, Calif., a World War 'I
veteran of the famed Nisei Japanese-American
regiments.
Okongi has 12 doctors and six
dentists, 19 female and two male
nurses
The hospital, whirh u
to be operating within 3 hours
would receive only the more se
nous and long-term cases from
battalion clearing stations.
" tne cases
. v. i r. in, l iter
r pmurn C. ..,1
! nosDitahzatlm th.r.5ti u:
n. ..' V '" "c "'"V
There
much work waitinc for ih
ti? a m
who Set up their own equipment
a.ter their tents were in place.
Only after they get set up and
operating will they, be able to take
time off and go a few hundred
yards across rock and sand tq the
beaches for a relaxing swim as
most of the troops do.
"We are planning to section off
a -?i?e!: beach. area for th Sirls
.iui unuea wire, said Jenkins.
May Set Traps
''And maybe a few trip flare
and booby traps to boot' added
Ogonky as he watched a group of
t I. 8 gathered to observe the ar arrival
rival arrival of the first American Fe Females
males Females in the area.
Other nurses were: Capt. Lou Louise
ise Louise Mortensen, Houston, lex. 1st
Lt. Margaret Odell, Pottstown,
Pa. 1st Lt. Agnes ych, Chicago,
Capt Margaret Shea, Port Henrv
N. R., 1st Lt. AlVa McLeod
Miami Fla., 1st Lt. Willie Sand Sanders,
ers, Sanders, Montgomery, Ala.; Capt.
Eleanor Koziol, Columbus Neb
Capt. Margaret Hanley, Law Lawrence,
rence, Lawrence, Mass., Lt. Carol Hanson,
Denver, Col Lt. Sharon Johnston,
Bangor, Maine, Capt. Mury
Pntchard, Dansville. Pa Lt
Margaret Jaskoski. Salem, Ore
Capt. Margaret Fleagle, Walker
Minn.,, Capt. Francis Ward Coate
Madera. Calif., Capt. Martha
ocke, Ma cm, Ga Capf. Fer Fer-mina
mina Fer-mina Golden, San Francisco
Capt. Mary McDonald (town un unknown),
known), unknown), Pa.
of treasonable relations with the
Communis 's.
John claimed he was drugged
by a friend D- Volf"ans Wohl Wohlgemuth,
gemuth, Wohlgemuth, and driven unconscious
into East Berlin. He contended
that during his 18 months in tha
East zone h- nh -I alon with
the Communists only to find an
opportunity to escape.
The feder-l con-' in Karlsruhe
did not believe his story. The
court said th apnarent reason
for John's return was that the
German Pr-'n '': iot show h,m
tbe respect he felt he deserved
The eo-r' : hat althougn
there was no indication that John
himse' -e ,,st he
gave the Reds "false" state se secrets
crets secrets nri mad" Elements about
the Western European defense
treaty Wt GPrrtlan lnteju.
gene which, though untrue, were
damaging.
ewTi1 t I1 at,: Pr0s:ution asked
that Johr h "'rr( to two
years at hard labor, a Sentence
t?!wu """red lifht in view
of the charges.
TV -it- -y uhtt id kid kid-naped
naped kid-naped him is back in West Gar
many, aw'"-" m th- cm.
charges a those brought against
Wohlgemuth, described bv those
who know him as "wiin n'U.
boy," was arresled Feb. 11 when
tie l ettirn- m t 'rlln. Poll
sain ne came back in secret
unr'er rovef n
Wohluemnth denied after his ar arrest
rest arrest that he helned John flee to
the East or that he kidnaped him.



MONDAY, JFLY M, KSI

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAPEB

PAGE

' t ..'. -fife--sKl'

BilBHi fill y :dBytf JHH
1

KNOW ANYONE HERE? Not the new look in Army fashions just members of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battle Group, 20th In In-fantery
fantery In-fantery of Fort Kobbe getting a last minute check on their protective masks before entering the gas chamber. This Chemical, Biological, and Radiological
Training (CBR) is a yearly requirement of all Army personnel. (U.S. Army Photo)

Consider Traffic

In Selecting Rug

CHICAGO (UPD There's more

to choosing carpeting tnan jusi
nielrinff th enlnr.

Homemakers should carefully
consider what they want before
their Durchase. accord

ing to Ruth Homan of the Carpet

Institute.
Miss Homan warned that rooms
U inn haauv traffic need strona-

ucaiuife .-'.'
er fibered carpeting than rooms

which are uaed jusi tor company.
But, she cautioned, "no one fiber
will do everything." And, she said,
it is just as important to think a a-bout
bout a-bout the construction of a carpet
as it is to worry about Ms fiber
components.
For example, she said, nylon 13
a durable fiber, but if it is put into
a loose, shoddy construction, the
carpet won't last.
rarnptino is rhosen for its ap

pearance, its durability and its

serviceability. Today's carpeting
offerings come closer to hitting
the mark in all three categoner
because of the blends between
natural and synthetic fibers.

tv, cvmthotirs nvlnn. ravon

lilt ojiniiv..,.. -
acetate and acrylics take color
Hlv than thp natural fi

bers, according to the expert. She
said nvlon carpeting is durable and
easy to clean, but cautioned that
it is fairly exnensive, depending on

the construction.
Ravon, she continued, is very
economical in carpeting but it is
not as resilient as wool or some of
the acrylic fibers.
Acetate is easty to clean, accord according
ing according to Miss Homan, and often is
colorfast solution dyed.
Most acrylic carpets are a blend
ing of two types of the synthetic
fiber, which most closely resem
bles wool. Also it will bounce back

after being walked on, and taKes to
color perfectly.
Onlv two natural fiber wool and
cotton are in common carpetxg
use. Wool is the classic carpeting
fiber which combines all of the
benefits of synthetics to a balanc
cd degree.
Cotton, is more economical, but
not as resilient.

m m

HHraH. mm

million Zji

rame5

New for sun wear this year are
nylon frames in sunglasses for
women. They appeared for men!
last year ana were highly popular.1
They are light as air and done ;
in beautiful and simple designs.
They're splashed with color, of
course, and some of the nylon j
fashion frames come with silver;
or white wings across the corner
of the frames.
Brand new, too, is the clipover

In nylon. These are teameriigni,
are done in a modified harlequin
frame that's large enough to com completely
pletely completely cover your regular frame,
they're done in pastel pink blue
white and black.
These nylon. frames are unbreak
able a practical feature that a
lot of wotnen are going W .like.
And they're sufficiently, inexpen inexpensive
sive inexpensive so that no one has an excuse
for going about in the sun squint squint-ins
ins squint-ins AJost women like to match their
sunglasses to a favorite costume
bo it swimsuit or dress. This sets
rid of the gaudy Hollywood look
and lends a chic appearance.
it
Man Electrocuted
Finishing Present
For Wife, Family

SADDLE BROOK N.Y, (UPD
- George Magan was known as a
man who lived for his wi e and
children. ,, .
nig family would stand by
watching as he used all his spare
time from two jobs .to complete
a swimming pool for them
in their yard.
Magan, 39, worked as a mail mailman
man mailman by day and a supermarket
clerk in the evenings. But hw
detremined to have the 15-by-30
foot pool finished by next week
He had started it rigtft after
Mother's Day, as a kind oi pres present
ent present not only for his wife, Agnes,
but also his children Jbnn, 12,
Marian 10 and Elizabeth, 8.
Saturday night, Magan borrow borrowed
ed borrowed a pump from the local police
rf.n0rftr.ent to drain rain water

from the pool. His wife and chil-

me D.ircn, wai'ui

9n SunalaAdeS or UJomen

HELP FOR ELDERLY

TORNADO IN POLAND
WARSAW (UPD A tornado
swirled through- central Poland
Thursday, killing two persons, in injuring
juring injuring five others and causing

damaged 30 per cent of the homes' commend ways to meet the needs
in thp niprfipvai ritv nf SanHn-1 and use the skills of the nation's

I mierz.

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
House Labor Committee approved
a bill yesterday calling tor
White House conference to re-

! older citizens.

DIPLOMATS PROMOTED

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras
(UPD President Ramon Villeda
Morales has promoted Francisco
Aleman from consul in Miami,
Fla to ambassador to Cuba. Raul
('acprcs, until recently consul in
I New York, has been named to
' succeed Aleman in Miami.

COL. L. D. FARNSWORTH, JR., G-4, U S Army Caribbean, and
civilian employe Mike Gomez a general engineer of the sec section,
tion, section, study an Outstanding Rating Award certificate, which
the colonel presented .to Gomez at the G-4 office, Fort Ama Amador.
dor. Amador. Gomez, who has been employed by the U.S. Government
since 1941, lives at Curundu with his wife and three children.
The rating covered the period from March 1, 1957, to Feb. 28
this year. (U.S. Army Photo)
: :

This girl reads at the beach in sun and safety wearing clip clip-over
over clip-over sunglasses. These feather-weight nylon frames com completely
pletely completely cover her regular glasses. They come in pastel colors
as well as black, are budget-priced.

Social and Oth

erwiAe

ntinu J

I

Leave For Hong Kong

Mr. and Mrs.. William Lai who

have been residing in Colon left

yesterday afternoon by plane for

,ew York or a short visit after

which they will leave to make

their home in Hong Kong, China

Coral Chapter, OES, Celebrates
38th Birthday With Dinner
Coral Chapter. No. 3. crder of
the Eastern Star of Gatun celeb celebrated
rated celebrated its 38th birthday at a .neet .neet-ing
ing .neet-ing held on Saturday evening at
the Masonic Tempie in tiatun.

Honored at the meeting were the
past matrons and patrons of the)
Phantpr who filled the offices fori.

. vur a I ica r

i ivivh-uju i I vy i 1 1 1
For Coming, Week
M.l.li-.wl n Thp fnllnuiina ar.ivilipc ai'p nrhp

nonl barefooted, to nit out me rresiums was una. mnu.cu ;. "-
P001' f.U,i hprrt him s..thrlnr, nast matron, ol Bal-lduled for the Cristobal YMCA

scream-and then saw him col-1 boa, whose sister, Mrs. Margaret USO Monday July 28. Badminton
scream nu Shlnlev fk the Worthv Mairon. i on the Patio; Tuesday, July 29, In-

1 K 1: ikw failprt tn rp-iPnpm anH tributes were read formal dancing. GSO and Junior

. ... ltirl, ..-kl .in il, hlahliohtc nl Ihp

vive Masan. bo uiu niKu i uiunnu u.

cnapier s umiuiy auu mc ai i"

J.An cinnrl An

men . .. : I ji

ing their pool in tne .inai stages, me evening.
Then Magan stepped lito the

harefooted. to Hit out tne rresiaing was imis.

His family heard lain Sutheclanu

Hospital where he was pro
nounced dead of electrocution.

&A Wi&et Sa

J

5a

trons and patron's terms o ollice.
The Chapter room was beauti beautifully
fully beautifully decorated with white lattice
work, ferns, flowers and branches

painted to represent coral.
II. Annnit in thp Hinjntf I

i 1 1 1 1 1 i nno .ii i v, ii an v.
hall the cenier Uecoration of whicn
was a sparkling fountain; "coral"
branches and red ginger -vere us used
ed used to complete the decorative
scheme.
Mrs. Ethel Fels was in charge

of the decorating and had as her

Hostesses; Wednesday, July 30

Spaghetti feed, USO and Junior
Hostesses and Thursday. July 31,

Billiards and nng Pong at 7 p.m.

When you get a letter from a
leen ager defending going steady'
that's not news
She writes: "I believe that if
tmiav's parents really understood

, i . ui me in'riii.iiMK auu uau ai
why thejr teen-agers want to go, Mr j Gj,
steady there wouldn t be all this

opposition to the idea
ar ,voi- 'teop.e are search,: sible so they keep telling them
Infe for security and steadfast 'I how much fun they could be hav hav-i)
i) hav-i) i, i. tiu, i it in going steady,' Ing while they are young If they
what i so terrible about that? wouldn't let themselves get ser-
"Isn't it just possible that they ions about any one member nf the
will carry this need for security opposite sex
into thek marriage and so make "Yet, It seems to, me, that the
better husbands and wives, than young person who has the most
many of their parents' generation? difficult time settling down to mar-
"Besides, aren't parents actual- riage is the one who has been the

ly trying to keep their children local belle or lite young man who

rom growing up when they tell has given all the girls a rusii.
them they ought to "play the field'' Marriage too often seems dull :ind
instead of dating Just one person? con inlna to those who have had

"Not too far back in our a h 2 wuiri before settling down."

country's past a teen-ager was corf1 Those, of course, are th! very
sidered and adult, capable of mak- areuments the teen-aKers use in

ing decisions and starting to live deiense of steady dating. Funny
his own life' how much more convincing they
"Now parents want to keep their sound when coming from a grand-

children dependent as long as pos- mother!

JEETIifi

S

Each notice (er inclusion in Mill
column should be lubmiHed in
ivol written torm end maiUd o
th box number lilted dally in 'So 'Social
cial 'Social nd Qtherwiie." er delivered
kv hind to the office. Notices at
meetinot cannot be accepted'
tr I'nhene.
a 1 ; r r I..L .,

niiiniK niwi m viuu :
The regular monthly meeting of
the Atlantic Camera Club will be

held on JUiy 28. at 7:45 p.m.

the Club Rooms at Mt. Hope. Mr

Gerard Schear will present hi

.ourth in the series of very inter

est ing European I'ravelogues, th

week on the United Kingdom.
Tiie Color Photography Class

will be held on July 30 in the Club
Rooms beginning at 7:30 p.m.
Those attending should bring cam
eras and exposure, meters. These
classes are for members only.

Ill I jjjj I IZflBBnHnH

Another Great Success for
SUNBEAM RAPIER

1"

2nd 4) 5-7

IN 1,300-1,600 c.c. CLASS
FOR NORMAL SERIES PRODUCTION CARS
Driver- Peter Harper, Tommy Sopwith, Mary Handley-Page, George Hartwell
ALSO
COUPE DES ALPES
(FOR COMPLETING COURSE FREE OF ANY PENALTY)
Drivers: Peter Harper, Peter Jopp
OTHER IMPORTANT AWARDS INCLUDE
(1,300 1,600 c.c.)

Stelvio Cup
(for fastest climb climb-normal
normal climb-normal series production cars)
Drivers: Tommy Sopwith, Dr. E. W. Deane
Stelvio Cup
(for fastest climb climb-modified
modified climb-modified series production cars)
Drivers: Ivor Bueb, Jimmy Ray
Mont Veutoux. Cup
(for fastest climb climb-normal
normal climb-normal scries production cars)

Drivers: Peter Harper, Peter Jopp

Victor Joullie-Duclos Cup
(for fastest time on
J. P. Wimille Circuit)
Drivers: Peter Harper, Peter Jopp
'Le Provencal' Cup
(for normal series production cars)
3rd Ladies"1 Cup
Drivers: Mary Handley-Page,
Lola Grounds

ON DISPLAY

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PANAMA TI66Q COLON 492-J
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PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NIWSPAPE
MONDAY, JULY 28, 19SS
Hammerin' Hank Aaron Keeps Braves In NL Lead

AGE SIX

Homer, Single Pace
Club To 4-1 Victory

By MILTON
NEW YORK, July

hammering?
It's only Hank Aaron keeping the front door
open for the Milwaukee Braves and preventing Na National
tional National League pitchers from getting any sleep.
Aaron did some pretty loud legs nicked loser Bob Mabe for
knocking yesterdav when he drove six hits and seven runs during the
in three runs with a homer and a i 4 2-3 innings he pitched. Joe Cun Cun-single
single Cun-single that beat the Cubs, 4-1, andningham and Frank Robinson each
moved the Braves a full game in hit homers in the opener.
front Over in th American League,
Hammerin' Hank unloaded his the Cleveland Indians halted the

22nd homer with one on in the
first inning off Dave Hillman and
singled home Bill Bruton in the
third. All that hitting brought roo rookie
kie rookie Carlton Willey his fourth vic victory
tory victory although he needed help from
Don McMahon v,hen the Cubs
threatened in the ninth. Lbicago
collected only five hits, all off Wil Willey.
ley. Willey. Pittsburgh nipped San Francu Francu-co,
co, Francu-co, 2-1, in a 14-inning opener and
the second game was suspended
with the score tied 3-3 in the
eighth because of Pennsylvania's
Sunday curfew law.
Dick Groat's sacrifice fly scored
Frank Thomas with the winning
run in the 14th inning of the open opener.
er. opener. Reliever Don Gross was the
winner. Ray Jablonski homered
off starter Ronnie Kline in the sev sev-enth
enth sev-enth and Bob Skinner tied the
store with a homer off Al Worth Worth-ington
ington Worth-ington in the ninth.
The Giants staked Paul Giel to
a 3-0 lead in the nightcap, but the
Pirates scored a run in the fourth
and Thomas belted his 28th homer
if the vear with one on in the
sixth to tie the score. JfiusDurgn
will he hattinsi in the bottom of
the eighth when the game is re
sumed on Sept. 9.
The Phillies and Dodgers wound
up in "suspense," too, in their
twin-bill at Philadelphia.
Philadelphia won the opener,
7-4, with the aid of Willie Jones'
two homers and the second
game was suspended because of
the curfew law with the Phils a a-head,
head, a-head, 21, in the sixth.
Jones' two homers plus a pair
of triples by Solly Hemus and an another
other another homer by Carl Sawatski
gave Robin Roberts his 10th tri triumph
umph triumph in the opener. Don Zimmer,
who homered for the Dodgers in
the first game, also connected off
Curt Simmons in the nightcap to
Rive Los Angeles a 1-0 lead in the
first running. The Phils came back
...ah 4,,,rt in tho eivth hftWPVPr
when rookie Dodger pitcher Bobj
Giallombardo committed two er errors.
rors. errors. Philadelphia still will have
one man on and two out when the
game is resumed in the sixth.
Cincinnati charged back for a
10-1 victory in the nightcap of a
double-dip after St. Louis won the
opener, 4-3 behind Larry Jack Jackson's
son's Jackson's six-hit pitching.
Ex-American Leaguer Alex Kell Kell-ner
ner Kell-ner set the Cards down on seven
hits in the finale while the Red-
Service Center Theatres
TONIGHT
BALBOA 6:15 & 8:40
Marlon Brando
Montgomery Clift
"THE YOUNG LIONS"
in Cinemascope & Color!
COCO SOLO 7:00
Henry Fonda
Anthony Perkins
"THF TIN STAR"
in VlstaVlsion
DIABLO HTS. 7:00
Rodolfo Acosta, James Darren
"THE TIAJI'ANA STORY"
MARGARITA 6:15 & 7:55
John Beal Colleen Gray
"THE VAMPIRE"
PARAISO 7:00
"UNTIL THEY SAIL"
in Cinemascope!
SANTA CRUZ 7:00
"The Kid from Cleveland"
& "Spv Smasher" (Serial)
CAMP BIERD
7:00
Richard Widmark
Richard Todd
"SAINT JOAN"
THE
GAY
CROONERS
ROCKING
ON THE
ISLANDS
k August
6 7 8
CAPITOLIO
IJc. 20c.
THE BLACK TENT
. with A. Steel
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DIED OF SHAME
With Bill Owens

RICHMAN

28
(UPI) Hear all that
New York Yankees' seven-game
winning streak with a pair of i i-dentical
dentical i-dentical 7-2 victories. It was the
Indians' first victories over He
Yanks in Cleveland this season
following seven straight losses
to the league leaders.
Cal McLish gained his ninth tri triumph
umph triumph in the opener by holding the
Yankees to eight hits, including
homers by Gil McDoiyald and
Marv Throneberry. Billy Harrell
and Rocky Colavito connected for
the Tribe. In the nightcap, Jim
(Mudcat) Grant hurled a three three-hitter
hitter three-hitter for his eight victory and Co Colavito
lavito Colavito contributed a grand slam
homer off Bob Turley, who lost
his fourth game against 15 Victo Victories.
ries. Victories. The Red Sox snapped a four-
game losing streak with a flurry
of four home runs that sunk the
White Sox, 7-3. Jackie Jensen hit;
his 29th homer while teammates j
Don Buddin, Frank Malzone and
Jim Piersalr also hit for the cir-j
cuit. Bud Byerly pitched five
scoreless innings to earn the victo victory.
ry. victory. Southpaw Billv Pierce absorb
ea nis sevenin seiDacK against 10
wins.
Roger Maris drove in five runs
while leading Kansas City to an
11-6 decision over Baltimore. Mar
is had a pair of triples and a single
lo pace the Athletics' 16-hit attack
while Bob Cerv collected two sin singles
gles singles to take over the league bat batting
ting batting lead with a .330 average. Chi
co Carrasquel and Joe Demaestri
each homered for the A's, and Bob
Nieman hit a pair for Baltimore.
Ned Garver was the winner and
George Zuverink the loser.
Washington swept a double double-header
header double-header from the skidding De Detroit
troit Detroit Tigers, "4-3 and 4-1, on a
pair of fine pitching perform performances
ances performances by Camilo Pascual and
Pedrp Ramos.
Pascual held Detroit to four
hits in the opener and was backed
y a 13 -hit attaek that included
Norm Zauchin's two run homer
phi? four hits by Roy Sievers. Ra Ramos
mos Ramos checked the Tigers on five
hits in the nightcap, the only run
off him coming as a result of Bob
Hazle's pinch homer in the eighth.
Jim Lemon homered for the Sen Senators,
ators, Senators, who wrapped up the con contest
test contest with a five-run rally in the
second inning off loser Hank A
guirre.
GOING UP Jack Leonard
has been the leading appren apprentice
tice apprentice jockey on New York tracks
this season The 17-year old
will lose his bug in September.
ON THE CHECK
LOS ANGELES ( NEA ) Tickets
for the Floyd Patterson Rov iljr-
ris fight in Los Angeles, Aug IS.
1 may be purchased and charged
through the Diners' Club.

3b Jm HW8K

K I

T IV OLI
35c. 20c.
DON'T GO NEAR
THE WATER
with Glenn Ford
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With E1V1 Presley

VICTORIA
25c 15c.
THE OKLAHOMA
with Joel McCrea
SHOTGUN
with Susan Hayden
PHANTOM OF THE
HILLS

LEADING
HITTERS
(Based en 22$ official at bats)
National League G At It H Pet

Musial St. Louis 8m 319 45 113 354
Mays, San F
92 363 69 126 .317
Ashburn, Phi.
Skinner, Pitt.
,jo 56 118 339
89 335 64 110 .328
7 J18 38 104 327
97 390 65 123 .315
91 370 56 116 .14
97 390 74 121 .3")
92 m 69 114 .309
82 302 47 92 .305
' wills', Chicago
Cepeda, S. F.
Banks, Chi.
Aaron, Mil
Anderson, Phi.
American League
Cerv, K. C. 85 318 61 105 330
Power, Clev. 90 359 62 117 ,32d
Goodman, ehi. tii Si 27 77 ZZ5
Fox, Chicago 97 386 52 125 324
Runnels. Boston 8 57 108 ."24
Kuenn, Detroit 84 329 45 106 .322
Siebern. is Y. 76 255 44 79 .MO
Williams, Boston 87 280 57 86 .307
Malzone. Bos. 94 382 41 117 .306
Jensen, Boston 93 333 56 102 30o
HOME RUNS
National League
Thomas, Pirates
Banks, Cubs
Aaron, Braves
Walls, Cubs
Mathews, Braves
28
27
22
21
20
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Jensen, Red Sox
Mantle, Yankees
Sievers. Senators
Cerv, Athletics
Colavito, Indians
23
2
28
26
21
RUNS BATTED IN
National League
Banks, Cubs
Thomas Pirates
Anderson, Phillies
Cepeda. Giants
Boyer, Cards
SO
79
64
30
19
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Jensen, Red Sox
Cerv, Athletics
Sievers, Senators
Colavito, Indians
Lemon, Senn'ors
Malzone, Red Sox
89
72
65
61
53
59
LEADING
PITCHERS
(Based on 10 decisions)
National League
Semproch, Paillies
Purkey, Rcdlegs
Koufax, Dodgers
Spahn, Braves
Worthington, Giants
W L
12 6
Pet.
.G67
.667
.iiu7
.632
.6; s
12
8
12
8
American League
Delock, Red Sox
Hyde, Senators
Turley, Yankees
Ford, Yankees
Kucks, Yankees
10
8
15
13
7
.90.)
.800
.78!)
.T,.r)
.700
Along The Fairways
SUMMIT MIXED
SCOTCH FOURSOME
Shooting a 93 with a 36 handi handicap
cap handicap allowance Ruth Rigney and
Bill Conger took low not honors
in the mixed scotch foursome gn'f
tournament held at the Summit
Hills Gilf and Country Club, June
26, 1958. Low gross honors went
to Lynne Jones and Sandy Hin
kle the 1957 Isthmian Ama'eur
golf champion, who turned in a
very neat 81.
Trailing Mrs. Rigney and Con Conger
ger Conger by four strokes was the team
of Maxine Hood and George Ri
lev. Wilma Riley and Jim Hood
took third place with their 63.
A spot nrize was won by the
team of Maggi Bailey and Jack

to the team taking
Maggi Bailey and Jack Smith
given to the team taking the most
strokes on any one hole. Maggi
and Jack ran into a little trouble
on No. 5, '"'' took 10 big strokes
to get the ball in the hole.
Immediately following the con conclusion
clusion conclusion of the golf tournament a
barbecued chicken dinner was
served by Summit members Mes
dames Ruth Po"'ell. Mary Ausneh Ausneh-mer,
mer, Ausneh-mer, Dorothy Beuchamp and F F-milv
milv F-milv Johnsoi' 'pie'-r ladies were
assisted by their husbands.
The next mixed scotch foursome
tournament at Summit will be
held Au. 23 with a barbecue
steak dinner party that evening.
f - - "I
noiur in
DRIVE-IN
l
i
30c. TODAY 9: Of
ONE DAY ATTRACTION!
JAMES DEAN
JULY rHARRIS in
EAST OF
EDEN
I
I
I
I In TECHNICOLOR! e
h ...... J
In TECHNICOLOR!
RIO
35c.
ZOc.
In Cinemascope!
GIFT OF LOVE
with Lauren Bacull
- Also:
CHINA GATE
with Gene Barry

amun given 10 me u-am is;,irP awarded on a 5 3-2-1 basis for
the most strokes on any one hole. ; rjrs, ihrnuph fourth nl

Don Lucho Scores

In Republic Of Peru

PeBBI L H H-H
H H-H LY Wr iffllfflK' -' itiMfe
.Bi8aSBBiPHat I
I hb eH BeHFaHH Is
I I afl I

U.S. Outclasses Russia
In First Day Of Track
Meet at Lenin Stadium

By ROBERT MUSEL
MOSCOW (UPI) A mighty
crowd of 75,000 Russians stood at
attention for the Star Spangled
Banner yesterday and then cheer
ed generously while United Stupes
track stars outclassed Soviet ath athletes
letes athletes during the lirst day of the
first dual meet ever held between
the two countries.
Despite the tense political situa situation
tion situation between the two countries,
there was nothing but good
sportsmanship on display in Mos Moscow's
cow's Moscow's magnificent New Lenin
Stadium. Russian officials said
they sold all of the 103,000 tickets
available but threatening weather
held the attendance to 75,000 for
the first clash in a series which
might eventually almost rival
the track events of the Olympics
in importance.
Ira Murchison, the 5-5 sprinter
whom the Russians call i "The
Human Sputnik." won the 100 100-meter
meter 100-meter run in 10.2 seconds to start
the meet and the Yank men won
five events' before the Russians
took a first place. The American
men won seven of 10 events and
Rafer Johnson o Kinesbure
Calif., and UCLA led in the De Decathlon
cathlon Decathlon when the first day's action
ended is the two-day meet.
The United Stales wound up the
day leading in the men's compe competition,
tition, competition, 61 points to 45. The Soviet
women were leading, 30 to 22.
Each country has two entries in
ea.ch individual event and points
Scoring at Issue
The teams are squabbling over
now the meet should be scored.
The Russians are counting it as
one dual meet, lumping together
both men s and women s points.
The U. S. team insists it has.it in
writing from the Russians that it
is two dual meets one between
Russian men and U. S. men, the
other between the women.
The Russians obviously figured
their women would pick up
enough points to enable them to
win the meet. But the underdog
Yank gals may h ave thrown a
monkey wrench into that plan
yesterday when Barbara Jones of
Chicago- won the 100-meter dash
in 11.6 seconds and then ran a
brilliant anchor leg to give the
U. S. a victory in the women's
400-meter relay with a 44.8 second
clocking.
As a result of these upset tri triumphs,
umphs, triumphs, the United States led in
the overall or Russian system of
scoring at the end of the first day,
83 points to 75.
After Murchison won the open opening
ing opening event before the largest
crowd ever to watch a dual
meet, Ancel Robinson of Fresno,
Calif., won the 110-meter hurdles
in 13 9 seconds and Glenn Davis
of Columbus. Ohio, won the 400-
meter run in 45.6 seconds. Mur Murchison
chison Murchison gave his teammates a. five five-yard
yard five-yard lead on the first leg of te
men's 400-meter relay and Ed
Collymore of Camhridge. Mass..
Jim Segrest of Dallas, Tex.,' and
Ira Davis of Philadef ohia went on
to win in 39.6 seconds.
Upset in Pole Vault
In the field events, Parry
O'Hrlen of l'alm Springs, Calif'.,
gol up orf a sick bed and won the
nhot -pnl with a heave of 19. M
meters (62.78 feet); Hal Connolly
uf Roslon won the hammer throw
at 7 28 meters (220 feet, 8 inches)
and Ernie She'bv of Los Angeles
took the broad jump by clearing

26 feet, 5-8 inch, the longest ever
produced in Russia.
Valdimir Bulatov of Russia
pulled a slight upset in the pole
vault, winning by clearing 14 ieet,
9 1-8 inches. Ron Morris of Eur Eur-bank,
bank, Eur-bank, Calif., was second. He
cleared 14.43 feet. Jim Brewer of
Los Angeles was fourth, his 14.10-
foot performance matching that of
vitaly Chemobay, but true Russian
had fewer misses at that height
and took third.
Leonid Spiritsin won the 20-ki
lometer walk in one hour, 33 min
utes, 43.2 seconds, and Evgneny
Zukov took the 10,000 met. run
in 29 minutes, 59.8 seconds for the
other Soviet victories in the men's
events.
Johnson, 200-pound President of
the UCLA student body, edged
past Vassily Kutznetsov after five
of the 10 decathlon events by
winning the 400-meter run in 48 2
seconds. Kutznetsov, was clocked
in 49.6. I his victory in the day's
last event gave Johnson 4,529
points and Kutznetsov was next
ahead of the pace Kutznetsov set
recently while compiling a world
mark of 8,013 points.
Both Flags Fly
Nina Ponomareva won the dis
cus with 170.04 feet, Biruta Zalag
maitite took the javelin throw al
164.52 feet, and Tajsiya Chenchik
captured the high jump at 5 feet
a mcnes to account for Russia's
tnree triumphs in the women's
competition.
Dom teams marched into the
new Lenin Stadium carrying their
iKuuiiai nags, a ter speeches by
nussian and American sports of-
nciais, tne Kussian team present
ed the Americans with bouquets
rf ( ....
The American and Russian
flags flew over the stadium urhich
was decked with two huge signs
i cluing, ureeung to the sports
men ot tne united States of
America and "Glory to the Com
munist Party of the Soviet
union
CENTRAL
75c. 40c.
1:15 3:49
6:25 8:58
PANAMA
CAME
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THE BEST PICTURE...
WITH 3 GREAT STARSJ
GARY COOPER
AUDREY HEPBURN
Maurice CHEVALIER in
LOVE IN THE
AFTERNOON"
presented by
ALLIED ARTISTS

Upset Win

assic
The. Stud Z's promising Chilean
colt Don Lucho yesterday after afternoon
noon afternoon lived up to bis heritage by
scoring a thrilling upset victory
in the $2,500 added Republic
Peru Classic at the President Re
mon racetrack.
Don Lucho went off the second
choice in the mutuels behii'd
Bright Spur while the highly rated
and reportedly expensive Postin
was excluded from the betting be because
cause because of his supposed superiosity
iBut the son of the former Juan
Franco star, The Bath Road, re
minded fans, of his daddy's fight fighting
ing fighting heart when he tackled the big
Argentine-bred Postin entering the
homestretcji and then outdueled
him in the run to the wire to score
by a half-length in the seven fur furlong
long furlong feature. The time was a fast
1:26 3-5 on a good but somewhat
slowed up strip.
Bright Spur came up to finish
third. Carcaman was fourth, Gold Golden
en Golden Rocket fifth, Alucinado sixth
and Mouce last.
Jose Talavera gave Don Lucho
an excellent ride in scoring his
30th victory. By virtue of his vic victory
tory victory Talavera joins the orofession orofession-al
al orofession-al ranks and loses his three pound
apprentice bug.
Don Lucho paid $5.60 to win and
$2.40 to place. This was small
pickings compared to the $67.20
win payoff by El Agheila in the
ninth race. The El Agheila-Fieltro
one-two combination returned hip hippy
py hippy ticket holders $405 per ducat.
But there was an even bigger
one-two payoff in the third rice
when third choice Don Pastor and
rank outsider Solito finished first
and second for a $2,212.60 record
dividend.
Solito was such a longshot that
he paid $123.60 to place.
Braulio Baeza won four races
to be the winningest rider. Talave Talavera
ra Talavera was the runneriip with two tri triumphs.
umphs. triumphs. The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1 Lark $9.80, $3.40
2 Atomic Spring $2.40
SECOND RACE
1 Mi Oautiva $4.40, 2.60
2 Ramn $4.
First Double:
(Lark-bfote) $4.; (lark-Mi Cauti
va) $14.40.
THIRD RACE
Don 'Pastor $15.20, $6.40
Solito $123.60
One-Two: $1212.40
FOURTH RACE
Full Moon $8.20, $4.20
Bagdad S4.40
Quiniela: $20.40
FIFTH RACE
Silverio $?.60. $2.20
Jabalina $2.20
SIXTH RACE
Charielei- S3.20, $2.60
Mulchen $3.
SEVENTH RACE
Lobo 22., S7.R0
Narcotico $4.60
Second Double: $42.20
EIGHTH RACE
Don Lucho $5.60, $2.40
Postin (excluded from
1
2
bet-
ting)
Bright Spur $2.0
Quiniela: $6.40
NINTH RACE
El Agheila $67.20, $11.
Fieltro $9.80
One-Two: $40$.
TENTH RACE
Hostigador $8.20, $3.80
Gavilan $4.40
ELEVENTH RACE
Abolengo 3.,$ 2.20
Kin" S3 ?n
TWELFTH RACE
Titita $3.20,
1
2
1
No place betting
Ageless Safch Paige
Hurls 3-0 Shutout
NEW YORK, July 28 (UPI) -Three
pitrhers shared the spot
light in the International League
Sunday as the hitters saved their
muscles for tonight's all-star same
in Toronto.
Satchel Paige of Miami and
Babe Birrer of Montreal each hurl
ed shutouts yesterday while Colum Columbus'
bus' Columbus' George O'Donnel yielded on only
ly only one run. Montreal defeated "Ha
vana, 2-0, Miami whitewashed To
ronto, 3d. Columbus stopped if if-falo,
falo, if-falo, 3-1, and the Rochester at
Richmond doubleheader was post postponed
poned postponed by rain.
Paige, who is cheerfully strolling
through his second half century of
life, gave up seven hits to the
Maple Leafs as he gained h i s
ninth victory against six losses.
Frank Herrera and Chuck Esse
gian each homered to enable the
Marlins to protect their mt'Kame
load over Columbus for lourth
place.
Montreal increased Us league
lead over Toronto to three games
behind Birrer's strong seven-hitter.
Birrer also hit a homer as he
upped his season record to 12-5.
Columbus scored twice in the
seventh innliu I o break up a pitch
er's duel between O'Donnel .ind
Ihe Bison's John Stadnicki. O'lion-
nell only gave up four hits.
the All star team, headed by
Buffalo manager Phil Cavarefta.
will meet the. Milwaukee Braves
of the National League tonight

SPQOT9

r-f f

Editor: CONRAOO SAKGtAN I

, 0
NATIONAL LEAGUE
w l ct. CB
Milwaukee
fi 41 .559
51 42 J4t
4 .49$
41 .449
w 4 .419
45 48 .414
San Francisco
Chicago
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
PhiladelnhU
1
7
7vs
Al 46
.47)
Los Angeles
43 51 MJ
Today's Games
San Franeispn a,r Uhil.j.; u:
(T-N) ""Jma
Only games scheduled.
Yesterday s Results
(First fianul
S. F. 00U 000 lou OOU 001 3 2
Pitts. 000 000 non nni ni n
Worthington, Miller, Monzant (6 (6-8)
8) (6-8) and Schmidt.
!ine' rtertield, Face, Gross
(3-2) and, Hall, Foiles.
(Second Game)
if00,. 020 W-3 11 0
Pittsburgh 000 102 Ox 3 6 1
mei ana v. Thomas.
B acKburn Porterfield (6) and
nan.
(Curfew, to be completed Sept
").
S.C.
T A I
IMS angeies uoi 010 0114 12 o
rniiaaeipMa 000 013 03x 7 8 0
Williams ((6-6), Kipp, La bine
and Roseboro.
Roberts (10-9) and Sawatski.
(Second Game)
Los Angeles 100 000 1 2 3
Philadelphia 000 002x 2 2 0
Gialloambardo and Pignatano.
Simmons and Lopata.
Curfew, to ho rnmnlfl c-t
x-Two outs when game suspend
Chicago 000 100 000-1 5 2
Milwaukee 201 010 OOx 4 10 1
Hillman (2-2), Henry, Hobbie and
S. Taylor.
Willey (4-3), McMahon and Cran
dall.
First Game)
Cincinnati 010 000 002 3 6
St. Louis 100 021 OOx 4 11
Bah, -6, Acker, Schmidt and
Jackson (7-8) and Smith.
Tonight;
Beermen In
STANDINGS

Nacional

T W L Pet.
Nacional g 3 .727
Cerveza Balboa 7 4 .636
Marlboro 7 4 636
Kent 7 5 .545
Panama 4 .400
Perfection 4 7 .308
Carta Vieja 2 8 .200

Tonight's Games
Nacional vs Panama.
Cerveza Balboa vs Kent
Saturday Night's Results
Perfection 69 Cerveza Balboa 66
Nacional 8- Marlboro 88,
By VICTORY GRAY
League leading Nacional reap reappears
pears reappears tonight against the Zachris Zachris-son
son Zachris-son coached Panama Cigarette
quintet in the first game of the
twin-bill. As the rirruit pnt.or
final week of elimnaton, play at-
tenton is being centered on which
will be the four teams qualifying
for the final round, and to what
club will go the dubious distinc distinction
tion distinction of inishine last.
Kent tonight wili be playng its
lasi cam tor qualification honors.
The Perdomo hrelinpn tspku th
inconsistent Brewers, who, one
and on another like the rankest of
night appear as work beaters
and on another like the rankt. nf
amaterus. A Smoker victory clinch clinches
es clinches the club's participation in the
play-offs, while a defeat will leave
the door ODen for a nnceihl lis
for the fourth spot if Panama
wins its two remaining games.
in ine last meeting between
these two eltlhs. Kent. w the
winner by a 82 to 76 score.
Stovemen topple Brewers
Taking advantage of the minv
errors committed by the Cerveza
Balboa board nf ctratvov RfonrHn
Santos' Perfection quintet trimmed
tne Beermen by a score of 69 to
66, in Saturday night's first
came. Coach Eeheverria. after
seeing his charges overcome a 12 12-pallnt
pallnt 12-pallnt advantage, to go ahead 31
to 26 at half time; figured he had
the match on ice. He then pro proceeded
ceeded proceeded to insert his second team,
only to find out in the final min minutes
utes minutes of the contest that the oppo opposition
sition opposition had things their own way
and his regulars -were unable to
pull the game out of the fire. Per"
pecuon s win gamed mem some
valuable ground in the batthe for
honors aeainat the raiuvenatad
Carta Viefr team.

n

pi
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet. OB
J a .663
o 45 .SI ;i
47 44 .50$ 15 j
25 An i7v
44 41 .471 uvfc
44 il M
51 .457 imt
42 55 .4& p
New York
Boston
Baltimore
Chicago
Kansas City
Cleveland
Detroit
Washington
Today's Games
New York at Kansas City (N)
-" i weiruu I
Washington at Chicago (N)
Only games scheduled
YtiUrday', Results
(Second Game
Cincinnati 000 340 300-10 12 9
M. 'Louis 000 010 000 1 7 ft
KeHoer (2-1) ,nd Bailey.
Pafned0 ? McDanie'
Sfl.4 A.
New York Ann nni ino .
i,. ,. "w urn t J
Howard,Vant Truck
McLish is) and Nixon.
(Second Game)
New York 000 002 000-2 3 0
Cleve and 000 024 lOx 7 9 1
Turley (15-4), Trucks and Berra
Grant (8-8) and Nixon.
Boston ioo 012 3007 8 0
Chicago 102 000 0003 13 j
Whitr"' W,H' Byerly (3 0) nd
LoSfm lm)' Sh,w' StaIey and
BalUmore 300 002 001- 13. 4,,
Kansas City 241 003 Olx 11 16 1
Brown,, Zuverink 22), O'DtH
Beamon, Lehman and Triandn.'
plnsberg.
g Garver (9-7), Diekgon and
Washington 020 010 1004 13 t
Detroit non mo nm .

Pascual (6-5) and Courtney
and Wilson. -.. ;::,p

w (ScihI Game)
Was hinf nn n;n mm mn
Detroit 000 000 eio 1 a
Ramos (8-9V and Korcheck.'
Aguirre v3-0, FoyUck, Morgan.
Fischer and Hegan, Wilson.

Defends Lead
Second Place

2nd Game
Nacional outgenerals Marlboro
The second game of the twin
bill was something for the record
books. As was expected these
two Eleta-owned outfits presented
a contest worthy of any cham championship
pionship championship finale in any part of the
world. The Luzcando coached Na Nacional
cional Nacional club emerged victorious by
the scantiest of margins, one
point, and that, a charity toss
which was dunked in after the fi'
nal gong sounded with the score
deadlocked at 88 all.
The contest started out with
Marlboro moving out with an ear early
ly early lead only to have Nacional ral rally
ly rally to go ahead by a 40 to 36 count
at .half-time. During the second
half, both teams fought it out for
all they were worth, the match
being tied up no less than 13 dif different
ferent different occasions.
Withless than 30 seconds of
play remaining, and the score at
88 points apiece, Nacional had pos possession
session possession of the ball arid using pro proper
per proper basketball strategy kept pass passing
ing passing it around. With five seconds
remaining an attempt of sinking
the winning basket was made. It
mssed and whiie trying to tap in
to tap in the rebound, player player-coach
coach player-coach Luzcando was fouled by the
opposition, the arbiter's whistle
sounding off a split-second before
the final gong.
Marlboro argued loud and long
as to the ref's whistle sounded
after the gong, but to no avail aa
referee Hilsinger stook his gound
and awarded two free shots to
the Nacional captain. Luzacando
sank the first of the two, giving
his club the point which placed
tliem on top in the standings to today.
day. today. Pacing Nacional's attack was
Roman Reyes with 26 polnlr,
Coach Luzcando with v i
turo Afard with 20. Emmett Bry-
mm wan June Anarade both scor scored
ed scored 22 points apiece for the losers.
'
)AY'-ENCANTO-lS.
Spanish DOUBLE I
, Libertad Lamarque In
"CUATROfcOFAS"
ciavmakA pn
vwsniq "auautrrsEwr
lfff Y aftU at W VaTXaO II



r

"DAT, JI LT 28. 1951
THE PANAMA AMEBIC AN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
Rigney, Manager In Outer Space, Flies On Youth And Inexperience

ill

rainers Can Make Ball Club

With Gfanmickstr

Tape

v

war

By JIMMY BRESLIN
NEW YORK (NEA) This was
a few years ago aim Ewell Black Black-well,
well, Black-well, who was the Cincinnati Re is'
big pitcher, slopped in the niii.dle
if the fifth inning, held his right
arm and called to the dugout.
When Wayne Anderson, the
i trainer, recne i mm, Blackie
: grunted, "My arm hurls. Some
: thing snapped in it."

By HARRY GRAYSON
PHILADELPHIA (NEA) -When
Bill Rigney talks basebalk these
days and that is all nV does
the manager of the San Frane Frane-co
co Frane-co Giants becomes excited and

keeps taking off his glasses a m
putting them on the woodwork in
front o. him, then picking them up
and putting them on again.
Rigney is living on the same

cloud he rode as coach of the New

Coupe Des Alpes For Harper

Sunbeam Take Six Major
Awards in Alpine Rally

the trophy for the fastest climb
up the Col du Stelvio for a -normai

series car in the 1300-1600 e.c.
A 2,600 miles penalty-free drive class as did team mate Ivor Hue.
in the international Alpine Rally in the mooine category. In the
has won for Sunbeam Rapier Jn general classification Harper was
vers fe ci eler Jopp placed bin ami aoowith 9th.

Sports Brieis

Yort GTamVhen They Tame from a clss nd coveted Cou J women's team

nowhere to take it all in 1951. The

young Giants are the absolute

Only a fourfiths

shock of the major leagues this;bed ,6-vear old Tommv .w.ih

Miss Mary Hanoi" r"aee and Mrs.

oi a second Lia grounds, looK inird place i i

WEBB REPLACES FULLMER
NEW YORK (UPI) Spider
Webb, Chicago middleweight, has
been named to fight Frank Sxu Sxu-zina
zina Sxu-zina of Germany in a 10-rounder

at Madison Square Garden
Wednesday night. Webb replaced
Gene Tulliricr of "vVest Jordan.
Utah, when the former middle-!
weight champion suffered a cut j

traimng for the Szuzi-

f
compete against the United
States in the North American
one iinals. The South Americana
will play in two tourneys befort
the important five match series
in Rye, N. Y., beginning Aug. 15.

season and with Rigney everything

is great. A club ordinarily consid considers
ers considers itself fortunate when one re recruit
cruit recruit makes good. The Giants have
no fewer than six Jim Daven

port, Leon Wagner, Orlando Ce

Doc Anderson grabbed Black
well's arm and began pulling it

and rubbing it and going throned peda, Willie Kirkland, Felipe Alou

the motions all trainers use. He and Bob Schmidt.
couldn't feel any radical lump in j ....
h. ;tho,' ... i... tur.ui Every time we bring u-a play

1 j"i.6 Hi uciici luijuiuuiis aiuuug me wui si 111 uk; 1 ouu i;ni me international it A t

the discussing tne mstory ot tne veni. uniy zo o; me Kay taken fifth wace in the

also at the wneel of a bunbeam Ra

pier, of winning a similar ho
nour in his tirst Alpine.
Altogether sunDeam Rapiers
took 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th places in
the 1300-ibOo c.c. class and won six
major awards in the six day Kaliy.
Mist, fog ice and loose gravel on

the twisting mountain passes made

(hp Clllirvo Damcc nH f,.rth fy Wnile

place in their class, and Geoijji na Dout-
Hartwell aim It;. Lewis drove their
privatelv entered Rapier into fifth COMING TO U. S.
place in their class. j BUENOS AIRES (UPI) Arge-

tina i Davis Cud tennis sauad

llenge for the European Cha'ii
pionship. Already wis year, the;

3b year old garage proprietor

lrom Mevenage, Herts, has won

for a moment, then began rib

bing again When he tigured

pnener wasn i looKing, ne ;im-

micked his hand around so
j his knuckles popped loudly.
"There, Blackwell said,

' did it. 1 can throw now."
i Anderson went back to the 'nig 'nig-;Out
;Out 'nig-;Out and Blackwell resumed pitch pitch-!
! pitch-! mg.

"that

newest big. gun. Leon Waaner.!58 starters reached the final con

iu.Ijwho until this year never played trol at Marseilles seven of ihet.i

auuvf vJia5 d. vvauner, duhi HKe uiwui peuauy

a oiocKing back, belted 51 home
runs for Danville of the Carolina
League before going into the Ar Army,
my, Army, where he served with Willie
Kirkland, who flanks Willie Mays
on the other side in the outfield.

Monte Carlo Rally and skipper

timed Col d'Alos Test.
These latest successes enhance
the formidable Sunbeam record
in Europe's toughest motor rally. (
From tne previous four vents,
Sunbeam drivers have brouehi

CARTER WINS MATCH
DEAUVILLE, France (UPI)
Nick Carter ol San Francisco and
Mervyn Rose of Australia won first
round matches Thursday in the
Douple de Deauville tennis tour
namenl. Carter eliminated Chris-

of France, 6-4, 6-4,

and Rose deleated Jesus Ribero

o.' Brazil, 6-2. 6-2.

ANNOUNCES COURT PROGRAM

Baseball trainers, if course, didn't
always handle things this way,

CINCINNATI, Ohio (UPI)
Xavier University, National Invi-

ed the winning Rapier team in the! home a Gold Cud. seven r.nurw flotation Tournament chanmion last

Dutch Tulip Rally. j Alpes, two Clupes des Dames and' season, has scheduled 24 game!
Tommy Sopwin. making hi 1 seven other major awards. It is for the 1958-59 basketball pro pro-deDut
deDut pro-deDut in the Sunbeam team an-! also another achievement for thei gram. Coach Jim McCafefrty said
his co driver. Dr. E.W. Deanc. t new Sunbeam Rapier, announced the Muskeeters will make their
made only one error through only six months ago yet with ma j first West Coast appearance when
the Rallv title to a laultv stun-- ior honour? in the R A r mrl T,i. ih. r.L., i cm. it.,;..

Class runner-up Sopwith won watch reading during the tightly- lip Rallies already to its credit. I Feb. 8.

In addition to his Alpine cua and

class win, Harper took awards 101
the fastest climb in his clasj up
Mont Ventoux and for the fastos;

time on the J.P. Wimille circuit

"You know how well Mays can

hut AnHpron' little menial tiirkiPHy. poinis out lorn Sheehan.

is an illustration of the all around chief of the Giants' scouts. "Well
value the man in the white ducksjthe fact that Wagner and Kirkland

has to a club. Ca" carry Mays gives you an i

In some quarters, train t s and

their uselulness have been loosed lout. There are seven guys in the

Johnny Logan, Milwaukee shortstop, and Doc Feron, trainer.

by
Dan Daniel

on with disdain.
Ty Cobb, early this season,
stopped 'alking about his educa educational
tional educational foundation long enough to
snap, "Ballnlayers pamper them

selves today.
"I learned early that the worst
thing you could do was take your yourself
self yourself out ol the lineun. It could cost
you a job. They put somebody in
there who gets on a hit streak.

i You're out. They won't take htm

i out. You upsef vour timing and it
: hurts your hitting. Anybody who
worries about an injury isn't

worth anything.

It

hat

says in
on Sept.

the snorts paces his five Shamrocks, and failed to

zu Uucie Sam will win more than one test. In the

start defending the America 3

.up. Just what type of beakert

Ihis happens to be, and why, at

ready taken up with a lot oi de-

lenses, our Uncle cnooses to oe

tome involved in yet another
ne, are matters which might me
it investigation.

The said Cup, it turns out, was

acquired by a Yankee schooner

named the America on Aug 22,

1851, when it beat 14 r.ngtisn

yachts Ui a 53 mile race amino

the Isle of Wight.

When Commodore John t. Ste

vens, ol tne rmanr- rtew iwip

f-acht. Club, brought the WOO .sil

ver trophy across the 'Atlantic to

its headquarters in rioooKen,

ht was named the America s cup,

ind was offered for challenge.

Ft here have been 16' defenses, fa

king in a total of 50 races, since

11870, and now comes Jonn bun

No make still anotner enori to

Itske the hisihlv ornamental sei-

Idel back to London.

Until 1934. w ien T.-O.M.MPWfUi,

Iwith a lot of airplane money, cha

Ipneed with :ne Fneavour, un

Icle Sam had lost only two races

and those only through defenders

hiving been disabled. That year

I the Endeavor won trie first two

races. IBut the defender Rainbow
th"n soiled off with four in a row.

In 1937, Sopwith, with a second

Endeavour reported to embody

ideas in design.

first race in 1920, the Resolute
became Disabled.
There were those who insisted
the Irishman founu nis eiloi'b pro profitable
fitable profitable financially even though his
Shamrocks became increasingly
the races starting on Sept. 20.
lures undoubtedly spurred Ame American
rican American and British sales of his :eas
In- those days his company liad
not yet gone into the noodle-soup
business.
Be all that as it may, if Lipton
had not built the Shamrocks, the
America's Cup competition un un-oues1Miably
oues1Miably un-oues1Miably wmiM hftve' died hi

the aftermath of the first World

War.
They Say the Sceptre
Won't Make It
The experts say Sceptre Is not
likely to be any more successful
than were the Shamrocks. They
hold that she is built for heav heav-weather,
weather, heav-weather, which is not likely for
the races starting on SSept. 20
Four American 12-meter speed speedsters
sters speedsters are fighting for the right ti
defend the Cup. There is Colum Columbia,
bia, Columbia, which won five out of six
and the 8-year-old Vim, with a
4 and 2 record in tuneups, which
will be resume !n" 16. The East Easterner.
erner. Easterner. Boston's hope, is 0 and 4 so
far. and "'o Weatherly has won
one but of four.
Salt-water dopesters warn s:ib-

dea of how tough this club is to get

batting order who oan knock the
ball out of the park and they are
backed up by hitters like Ray
Jablonski, Hank Sauer, Whitey
Lockman and Bob Speake."
"We're long on youth and inex

perience, but this is a stronger

club than those which won in 1951
and '54," 'comments Wes West-

rum, the former catcher coaching j
the pitchers.
San Francisco's stand-up and-1
cheer kids have given veterans j
who have been traded around new:

leases on life. To Rigney, Danny
O'Connell, batting .247, is now
"out of a book" as a second base baseman
man baseman making the double play with
the matchless Daryl Spencer. "All

I know is that we kept right on
winning when I put O'Connell in
there," says Rig. Jablonski, who

heretofore rcarded fielding a
ground ball as a misdemeanor,
now is "tremendous."

rvftlii'tionarv

r-n. nvpr seain. and lost four: to

.f,.iM ti th Rainier. bad weather, and

,ien came a second World War has been plagued with casual
nd Uncle Sam decided that a j ties in rigging and sails.
inno with the inrn -t4onal Poloi The Columbia bears a name fa-

Cup, the America's Cup could hcjmous

laid away in a vault, never aain

ltratr rlrlare nnt rn.acciimo t tn mu'h

on what H foi'r bo-s have dono and stoP on P P8. ,now

date. There has been a lot f quotes irom Jonnn ami jouh-

tho 'irtin e f ont On S inerapeuuc uses oi Auiin-

sive lpe as it u were a

Marquand novel.

Frank Lane, the Cleveland gen

eral manager, always has snorted

about .the collection of diathermy

machines and whirlpools a big

league club keeps.

"It puis injuries in a guy

mind," Lane says. "Hard workis
the best cure."
Bob Feron, who has been train
ing 16 yem for the Braves start starting
ing starting out w!m they were known as
the Boslon Bees has what could
be the soundest view of all.
"A club," Doc Feron says, "ha
so much money invested in a ball ballplayer
player ballplayer that it can't afford to have
his career shortened by the rais
handling of an injury. :f i i
'Take the biggest names in the
game. Mickey Mantle Hs legs
are held together by adhesive
tape. Red SchOendiest on this
club. Wouldn't it be silly to have
him spit tobacco juice on his arm
and let him ruin himself? V
tape him up, rub him, treat him.
This is a ballplayer who wins
pennants. You have to handle
him.
"Marty Marion, wlien he was
with the Cards, was one tall slack
of wire am tape. This club wt
have this year needs attention,
plenty of it. If we get another
man hurt I don't know what'i.o
in? to happen."
Injuries with the (Braves have

become so tough this trip that ly twice all season, have lost 18

Feron, whose reading tastes start games by one run," sums up Rig

ney. You get a full nine innings
with this club. In our last stand at
home we won eight one-run games,

in the ninth and one in the

The Giants have a deal on for a
veteran American League pitcher.
"One more steady pitching hand
and we'd go all the wav sure

pop," enthuses Rigney. "Ive had
to get innings, rather than games,
out of my pitchers, and am for fortunate
tunate fortunate to have nine good arms in
Johnny Ahtonelli. Mike McCormick
Al Worthington, Ramon, Monsait,
Ruben Gomez, Paul Giel, Stu
Miller, Marv Grissom and Don
Johnson.
"Gomez could be the key. We'd
win hands down if Ruben could
shake his slump. Giel hss won a
couple of big games. Everybody is
so eager to pitch that I have to
fight to keep I he in out of the bull
pen. Antonelli has gone in five
times to protect leads."

With Cepeda, a real big leaguer
at first, and Davenport tighten tightening
ing tightening the defense at third and Mays
steering Wagner and Kirkland in
the outfield, the young Giants at attack
tack attack savagely and run the bases
like race horses.

"We have been beaten badly on

in America's Cup annals.

The 899 defender of that name

was swift enough to continue the
fight in 1901 a"d leave behind a
6 and 0 record unmatched in
yachting history.
The joys o" Cup triumph are ter ter-.Tiric.
.Tiric. ter-.Tiric. But "lore are desperate
privations. For examole, on the
trip across 'he MrnH, the olc"
America, with its hull of five
woods and its saloons of polish
ed rosewood and elegant velvet.

8 days out,

te be taken out except in mo

mentis of nostalgic yearning a:

ter a way of life gone into limoo

Sleeps Cut Down te 47-Foeters
The America's Cup series has

vn .avnri kv drastip change

lt," 0 1 J

in the si's o1' the vHchts invoved.

The old America measured 95 feet
from tem -to stern, and crossed
the Atlantic under her own sail
in liter vears the single sti

cker in Cup competition were of! ran short of 'innm
the 90,foot class. They were tre-l three from Havre!

mendously epxensive. In these
days of hi"h '"coe taxes and
vastly increased costs, resumn resumn-tJan
tJan resumn-tJan of the international cniw'l
tion on that bases would have
been virtualtv ironossib'".
However, the Cup series now

hcomes l'm'ed to the 12 mecr
class, 47-footers.
jTtP .-it 'orfiil noriod in
America's Cup racing took in the
five On liftir." p'Wi n' Sir 1 no nomas
mas nomas Lipton, the genial Irishman
l'e spent millions of dollars on

.lewlfive

! 12th

Fellows like Feron have become Nobody has told the young

important to major league oase- Giants they can't win and they

nan teams iecare u seveim wouldn t pay any attention to any-
reasons, but Dr. George Bennett! one wno did.
of Johns Honk'ns. who operates'

on most seriously injured stars
lists the biggest o e.
"It is unnatural to throw

ne nu

arm is not constructed for it. The
underhand bowing motion is nat.
ural. But throwing a baseball is
entirely unnatural and the ar,i
must get a' great deal of care
Even then it has n suffer injury
some place along the line."

Lead Lighter
Than Jockey

Celler Says Baseball, Grid
Lobbyists 'Descending On
Washington Like Locusts'

WASHINGTON (UPI) Lobby Celer asked the Senate to ap-
ists representing professional base prove his original bill, rejected
ball and football have "descended by the House, which would make
on Washington like locusts" in, a anti trust exemptions for pro
bid for blanket exemption of fessional sports pass the test of
sports irom federal antitrust law! being "reasonalby necesary."
according to Rep. Emanuel Cellar
(D-N.Y.). He protested the current mea
The chairman of the House Ju sure would give a small number
diciarv Committee appeared be- of private club owners "unfetter-

a Senate suoconiunUv Thurs ed control over tne interstate

of professional team

NEW YORK (NEA) -Bold Rul

er's prodigious weight carrying. ior,.

hroucht out the old arguments a-, rlav nri uraed lhat nun to iunk business

bout how much of a load a horse a House-passed bill thatwould give j sports exhibitions." He said House

should carry. sweeping anti-trust exemption to, files on sports legislation hearing
One school of thought, usually: pro. essional baseball, football, bas- are "replete with instances where
held to by trainers, is to keep a! by the play or pay brigade. baseball club owners have abused
limit on high-weighting a horse j Celler said the biggest lobby he their powers."
130 founds preferably and let ever has seen had been mustered t Bert Bell, commissioner o' the
ethers Into the race at a low fig1-1 by the play-forpay brigade. I National Football League, denied

lire, tianmcappers, sucn as New "They descended upon vvasning- professional football was against

.,, libo tofiislu ha s.iir 1 irv n, t,i Ini.mta tt,. !..,..

;- r uic ,,.-, v uii unjcn

. York's .limim Kilme. aimnlv nit- ton like mrilsfs." he said.

sign Ane 13 or 13 pounds the.wwe in every nook and cranny.
feel a horse such at Bold Ruler is Celler accused big league base base-.
. base-. worth. ball owners of trying to become

Strangely, some trainers, not-t "federal lords with the right to

( ably Preston Burch, would prefer
having the weight come in the
lorm of lead inserts in the saddle
Uler than have th? jockey climb

treat their players like ser s"

and maintaining "a public be be-damned
damned be-damned atlliutie."

He noted that many of the base-

aboard at his heaviest. They feel ball nlavers who testified at the

the tj-ad weights, which remain committee hearing were high-

siiii, tare easier to c rry inrtn ine priced s ars an n:i a s.. n

and public. He aaid "we are con convinced
vinced convinced our practices are reason reasonable"
able" reasonable" and that enactment of the
House bill would save the NFL
the costs of proving this in court.
Professional football ha! not
been as adamant as baseball own owners
ers owners in seeking blanket exemptions
from antitrust laws. However, it
doe desire some relief irum

Supreme Court decision which sub

Three Tod Football
Coaches To Testify
Before Senate Group
WASHINGTON (UPI) T!tp
top collce football coaches will
testify before the Seriate anti trust
subcommittee next week on a hill
to exempt professional sports from
anti trust laws, it was announced
Firdav.
Chairman Estes Kefauver (D
Tenn.) said he subcommittee had

se! aside Mondav afternoon to!
hir coaches Rud Wilkinson of j
Oklahoma, Bowden Wvatt of Ten-'
nessee an- Duffy Daugherty of)
Michigan State.
The three college coaches were
added starters to the witness I'st j
for next week. Others scheduled!
to testify include:
Tuesday: C. Leo DeOrsey. for former
mer former member of the board of the
Washlnon Senators snd nreident
Harold E. Felows of the National
A'roc'ation of Broadcasters.

Wednesday: President C S.
Camnbell of the N'tional "ot' -y'
League snd Joseph A. NvilK
General rouncpi of the V. S. t
Trotting Association.
Thr"'av: rident Maurice I
Podoloff of the National Basket-1
ball Association.

SPORTS WHIP""" fnrU A
VErFnAN CFVTPH F:Tni s
PFTPOTT (XT1) rtiter
Frank oatkl of the Deltttft Li Lions
ons Lions snnnvmce'' his retlrnnt,
Wednevv ift,er a 1? stmt
In nro fonhH. Ostskl beran his
career with the C 1 e v eland
Browns Hn 1046 snd moved to the
Tlors lust, seaort. He nlayed In
11 chamnlonshm arnmes.

slutting poundage of a rider. 'canine' loyally to their owners."! jecs it to anti-trust statutes

FINAL Til
NEW Yr The fi
nal te In the American zone cov cov-no'i'io"
no'i'io" cov-no'i'io" t1" r-..i, din.'vill he

i held t the Wetche'tc- Country
J Club, Rye, N. Y., Aug. 1517.

f "ka. VmV

CLfua (facial
THE AIR-CONDITIONED

COOLING REFRESHING MASCULINE

be comfortable anytime
in the humid tropic heat
'he AGUA GLACIAL regularly
Its agreeable scent will
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made by the makers of MENTICOi

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 2055, Sunday, July 27, 1958
The whole ticket has 52 pieces divided in two series "A" ti "B" of 36 pieces each.

First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize

9730
2504
9300

$ 52,000.00
$ 15,600.00
$ 7,800 00

No.
0030
SIM
02:10
0M0
0430
0530
o:io
0730
0K30
0!i:iO

S
Prizes
I. 'ill. 00
150.00
ir.fi. 00
fsr.oo
I5S.00
I5I..00
150.00
?, boo. on
156.00
156.00

Nn.
1030
! 1 311
1230
1330
1 43(1
1530
Ifi.'lO
1730
IH30
1930

$
Prlzen
156.00
156.00
156.00
156.00

156.00
ir.fi .00
156.00
2,600.00
156.00
156.00

No
2030
2130
2230
2330
2430
2530
2630
2730
2830
2030

Prizes

I Mi. 00

151,00
150.00
156.00
156.00
156.011
156.00
2.600 Oil
156.00
156 00

! s s s
No. Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes No. Prizes
3030 156.00 4030 150.00 5030 156.00 6030 156.00 7030 156.00 8030 150.00
3130 156.00 4130 156.00 5130 156.00 1130 156.00 7130 156.00 1130 156 00
3230 156.00 4230 I.V.00 5230 156.00 6230 150.00 7230 150.00 S230 lSfiiofl
3330 156.00 4330 156.00 5330 150.00 0330 156.00 7330 156.00 8330 156.00
3430 156 00 4430 156.00 5430 156.00 6430 156.00 7430 156.00 3430 150.00
3530 156.00 4530 156.00 5530 156.00 0530 150.00 7530 150.00 S530 156.00
3630 156.00 4630 156.00 5030 156.00 0030 156.00 7030 136.00 8630 156.00
3730 2,600.01 4730 2,600.00 S730 2,000.00 (730 2.000.00 7730 2,000.00 8730 2,600 00
3830 136.00 4830 156.00 5830 156.00 0830 156 00 7S30 156.00 3830 15B00
1930 156.00 4030 156.00 5930 156.00 6930 156.00 7930 156.00 1930 150 00

No.
0030
0130
9230
9330
9430
9S30
9630
9730
0S30
9030

S
Prizes
150.00
150.00
156.00
ir.ii.oo
130.00
ir.fi.on
150.00
52.000.00
150.00
ISfiOO

Approximations Derived From First Prize

9721
9722

S
520.00
520.00

9723
0124

520.00
520.00

I I
0725 520.00 9727 520.00
I 0720 320.00 I 9728 520.00 I

9729
9731

s
520.00
520.00

I I I
0732 520.00 0734 520.00
I 0733 S20.00 I 0735 520.00 I

97 36
9737

I
320.00
520.00

9738
9739

520.00
520.00

Approximations Derived From Second Prize

0604 260.00 1504 260.00 I 3504 200.00 I 4504 266 00 5504 260.00 MM0.O0 7504 200.00 I 8504 200.00 f 9504 260.00
2495 130.00 2497 130.00 2409 130.00 2501 130.00 I 2503 130.00 2500 130 00 7sOS 130 00 MUI IIS u T7i '.ZZl
2496 30.00 2408 130.00 2500 130.00 I 2502 30.00 I 2505 130.00 2507 igj g &M I III, Im.JJ gJ JJJ.JJ

Approximations Derived From Third Prize

l '8 M 2304 ,$M M 3300 J56flo 4300 1501 3300 150.00 0300 156 00 7300 1S6.00 8300 150.00
9291 104.00 9793 101.00 0295 104.00 9297 104.00 I 0290 104.00 I 9302 104 00 304 104 00 9306 ,L M i 711
9292 1S4.H : 9294 104 00 9296 104.00 9298 104 00 930. 104.00 I 0303 104 O. 9305 104 M lui 104 O0 I mJJ

PrUe-winnlng Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing were sold at: The 1st Panama. 2nd Panama and 3rd in Colon
The Nine Hundred whole tickets ending in 0 and not Incl uded in the above list win Fifty Two Dollars ($52.00) each
The whole ticket has fift-two pieces which comprises the two series "A" ft "B"
Signed by: The Governor of the Province of Panama, JOSE A. ( AJAR ESCALA
The Representative of the Treasury, JOSE MANUEL SILVERA

WITNESSES: Jose I). Henrique. Ced. 3-1.157
Edgardo R. Bogle O., Ced. 47-32633

JULIO VALDS D.
Notary Public, Panama

JOSE A. ( AJAR
For the Secretary

IklNTC. The winning tickets with the Ust cipher snd with the two lsst
WJ I L. ciphers ftpply only to the First Prbe.
The first Pri7c and the 2nd and 3rd Prizes are drawn separately. The ap
proximatlnns are ca'rulnted on the First. Second and Third prizes In case
a ticket should carrv the numbers of each prize, the holder Is entitled to
claim payment for each.

DRAWING OF THE 3 STRIKES
Sunday, July 27, 1958
Drawing Number 7S6

Fraction

First Prize .30

SeeomI Prize 04 3.00 60.00
Third Prize 00 2.00 40.00

Ticket

$11.00 $220.00

thVomcM r'V' vP,.'id '". lor:,n" ,h Official 1,1st of Fanama In
the offices of (he National Beneficent Lottery situated nn 0..1..1 ,..-

nan r Ordinary Drawing No. 2056 which
take place Sunday. Aurust 3, 195

Divided ir two serli

Will

of 30 fractions each denominated "A" and

URST MIZF.

i rirs! rrlze. Series A and B of
1 Second Prize. Serlas A and B. of
1 Third Prize. Series A and B. o'
IS Approximations Series A and B. of
Prizes Serl A and B of
0 Prizes. Series A arM B. of
000 Prizes Series A and B. of

J2S.OOO 00 each series
7. son 00 each seriaa
3.900.00 each series
200 00 each serlas
1.300.00 each series
70.00 each series
20 0O each seriaa

OS. 00 each series

130.00 each seriaa

SKCO.ND PRIZE

is Approximations Series A and B. of I
0 Prizes. Series A and B. 01

THIRD PRIZff
IS Approximations. Senas A and b. of t 12.00 each series
0 Prires. Series A snd B. f on eseh serlas

Sr.-.'.0(ifl w,
is son on
7 son oi
300 OS
23.400 Or
14.040 t
.SftOe
S J.340 ,,
5.340 r-
I 1 7J
1.4MJ0

1074 Prizes
Price of a wholt ticket .
Price of a fifty-second part

Total

S170.0S0.Oa
mm

...$...50

PRIZKS ARK PAID WITHOUT DISCOUNTS OR TAXBS



yt if
mm
PAGE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, JtTLY W,
C L A S S I F I ED S
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
i JBk Mm 1. ,naeB
' :r'i

el

m

Automobiles

1 955 Ford Victoria hardtop, pink
and whitt, radio, power steering;
2 1891, 2-1895 weekdays, 3 3-5954
5954 3-5954 nights and Sundayi.
FOR SALE: 1958 Chrysler
Saratoga, 4 door white and gold,
R and H, power steering, brakes,
seats. 6400 milei, coit new
$4800. excellent buy at $3800,
Navy 3784.
FOR SALE: Sportcar 1955 Ford
Thunderbird R&H, w s w. new
nylon top, overdrive, very clean.
Duty paid, will trade. Tel. 2 2-2887.
2887. 2-2887. Ancon, C.Z.
FOR SALE: 1958 Chevrolet 6.
fordor sedan, 6000 miles. 124-B
Gamboa. Tel. 6-170.
FOR SALE: 1950 Chevrolet
business coupe, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Phone 83-3227, house
2009-B. Curundu. C. Z.
FOR SALE : Stationwagon. 1953
Fo'd 9-pass. Country sedan. 5 6 6-ply
ply 6-ply tires, new battery, excellent
condition. Balboa 2-3480.
MUFFLERS
Chevrolet, Plymouth, Ford $9. $9.-95
95 $9.-95 All others $12.95. Free ins installation.
tallation. installation. Tivoli Motors at Tivoli
Crossing. Tel. 2-4222.
FOR SALE 1956 Chevrolet 4
doors. Radio. Two tone. White Whiteside
side Whiteside wall tires. Excellent condi condition.
tion. condition. Telephone 3-7837. Justo
Arosemena Ave. 32-21.
FOR SALE 1956 Chevrolet
V-8 Station Wagon 4 door, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition. $1750.00.
Phone 87-2246.
FOR SALE Sports car tans
1931 model A Ford Roadmaster
- good tires and good run running
ning running condition $150.00. Balboa
4134.

Faubus May Run Into Trouble
In Arkansas Democratic Primary

LITTLE ROCK. Ark. (UPI)
Gov. Orval E. Faubus, a self self-styled
styled self-styled "moderate'' on integration,
will try for a third term in the
Arkansas Democratic p r m a r y
tomorrow against two avowed seg segregationists.
regationists. segregationists. Although Faubus ordered nation
al guardsmen out to prevent en entry
try entry of Negro students into Central
High School last fall, he has in insisted
sisted insisted in campaign speeches that
he onlv did ii to avert viole.iee.
President Eisenhower sent fed
eral troons to Little Rock to pro protect
tect protect the Negro children from mob
violence and enforce a federal
court order for their admission
in'o the previously all wliite
school.
A federal judge recently sus suspended
pended suspended integration at the school
for two years. That order is be being
ing being appealed by the National
Assn. for the Advancement of
Colored People.
Faubus has said in his cam campaign
paign campaign speeches: stand now and
always in opposition to integrn integrn-tirm
tirm integrn-tirm by force and at bayonet
ppint. Arkansas has a long rec
nrd of friendly relations between
the races and these relations
should not bp ri'st"rbed by out outside
side outside influences as has been the
case iin rorent months."
With Faubus hewing to a neu
ral attitude on integration, bis
two opponents, Judge Lee Ward
of Paragoiild, and Chris E. Fink Fink-bciner,
bciner, Fink-bciner, a meat packer, are both
s'vnwed s ". "'"'tinpisU.
They have accused Faubus of a
"",;tjc-i 1 '-'nd nlay in the
high school dispute, with the oh
OUT
WORM THIRTY

IV I'M COLLECTIN' TO I L

1, iELLTOTH'JuNKyJ-MISgV (

If FER MY STAMP Jk. JiHTU

1,,, mmr &&?"

r

I COLON
lor Kent

A marnlficent apartment with all modern conveniences.
3 bed-rooms. Z bath rooms, a bif living-dining room,
wide porch, hi kitchen, patio with wash tub.
At Front Street and 11th. For informations appl at

CASA P1MLLOS"
!Mh and rlolivas Street.

Apartments

FOR RENT: Furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 90 Street No. 16, San
Francisco.
FOR RENT: Nice two bedroom
apartment. Please call 3-2978.
FOR RENT: Furnished one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment across from El
Panama Hilton. Apply foto El
Hslcon or call phones 3-1 179 or
3-6082.
FOR RENT: Best located small
furnished apartment. Clean and
independent, 43rd Street No. 13.
FOR RENT: As of August 1st
lovely two bedroom apartment,
exceptionally large sitting and
dining room in El Cangrejo. Must
see it to appreciate it. Call 3 3-0319
0319 3-0319 during office hours.
FOR RENT Two Duplex apart apartments,
ments, apartments, one with furniture. Cam Cam-po
po Cam-po Alegre. Tela. 3-2341 or 3 3-3379.
3379. 3-3379. FOR RENT Modern apart apartment,
ment, apartment, furnished large living living-diring
diring living-diring room, one large bedroom,
kitchen, bath, balconies. $95.00
on Tivoli Ave., across Ancon
School. Information Tivoli Ave.
21A24 Apt. 7 office hours.
FOR RENT High in El Can Cangrejo.
grejo. Cangrejo. Large one bed room a a-partment
partment a-partment elegantly furnished.
Call 3-7453.
WORK STARTS ON APLANT
FRANKFURT, Germany (UP!)
After years of planning work on
West Germany's first atom power
plant has begun. The plant, to he
constructed at an estimated cost
of 10 million dollars, will be com completed
pleted completed by the end of this year at
Khal. near Frankfurt.
vious implication that Faubus !s
luke warm on segregation itself
Faubus will have to take more
than 50 per cent of the total vote
tomorrow to avoid a runoff elc elc-tion
tion elc-tion Aug. 12. The Democratic
nomination in this state is tanta tantamount
mount tantamount to election. There has
been only one governor in Arkan Arkansas
sas Arkansas history to win three terms.
Mrs. Margaret Jackson, prisi
dent of the segregationist Central
High Mothers, predicted that Fau Faubus
bus Faubus would win the primary wil'i
the largest vote for any governor
in the history of the state.
"Finkbeiner will be seend. 1
people of the whole world that
we like Governor Faubus," she
said. "States' rights is the biggest
issue. I would have voted for him
even if this had never come up
because of his past record.
"Finkbeiner will be seeind. 1
don't think Ward will even make
a showing."
"Frankly, I do not believe sane sane-minded
minded sane-minded people will accept Mr.
Faubus," said the Rev. Rolar.d
Smith, a Negro and president of
the Arkansas Christian Movement.
"You know no Negro is going to
vote for him.
"If forced into a runoff, he will
be defeated. It will be .between
Faubus and Ward. If people be believe
lieve believe in lawlessness, they will
siinori Mr subus.
"If they believe the integration
nrobleni must bo resolved by
thoughtful and patient ar'ion,
then they will support Ward, Fink Finkbeiner
beiner Finkbeiner has not addressed himself
to the issues of this campaign."
BY J. R WIMIAMS
ALL TH' BOOKS IN THE
HOME ARE Ft II I nf
PRESSED LEAVER
FLOWERS AMD BUTTER
FLIES --THF DRAWF?i
ARE FULL OF STONE
COLLECTIONS EVERY
JAR ANP VASE HAS
SOME SORT OF COL
LECTION .' THIS IS
YEARS TOO SOOM ,1." w".

LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE Or OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 1J3T "H" STREET, PANAMA LIBRER1A PRECIAOO T S tract No. IS a AGENCIAS
INTERNAL DE PUBLICACIONES No. 3 Lottery Plaza t) CASA ZALDO Central Ave. 4S LOURDES PHARMACY 182 tjl Carrajqullla FARMAClA LOM LOM-BAKDO
BAKDO LOM-BAKDO No. 26 "B" Street MORRISON th of July Ave. i J St. LEWIS SERVICE Ave. Tivoli No. 4 FARMAClA ESTADOS UN I DOS US Central Ave.
FARMAClA LUX-164 Central Avenue HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J Fco. de la Ossa Ave. No. 41 FOTO DOMY Justo Arosemena Ave. and 33 St FAR FARMAClA
MAClA FARMAClA VAN DER JIS 50 Street No. S3 FARMAClA EL BATURRO Parque Letevre 7 Street FARMAClA -SAS" Via Porraus HI at NOTED ADES A THIS
Beside the Bella vista Theatre.

Resorts
FOSTER'S Cottages and Largo
Beach House. One mil past the
Casino Phono Balboa 1866.
PHILLIPS Oceanside Cottage
Santa Clara R -de P. Phone Pa Panama
nama Panama 3- 1877 Cristobal 3-1673.
Houses
FOR RENT: Three months,
beautiful 3-bedtoom residence
in El Cangrejo completely fur furnished.
nished. furnished. For information call 3-
1 167.
FOR RENT: Chalet three bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, 2 baths, living-dining-room,
kitchen, garage, fenced
yard. Telephone 4-1241 good
neighborhood.
FOR RENT. Large house, 3
bedrooms, independent servants'
quarters, spacious grounds. Tel.
3-7307.
FOR REN T: In residential
section, new, modern chalet.
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Phone 3-3255 from 12-2 p.m.
and from 6-8 p.m.
FOR RENT: 4 bedrooms chalet
2 baths, garden $110.00 Sonny
Boy Via Espana 97 Street Tel. 3-
3041.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet,
two bedroom, etc. 61 Street,
Campo Alegre. Tel. 3-2795.
Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Commercial locale
in Justo Arosemena Ave. No.
37-11. Opposite Cristo Rey
Church. Tel. 2-2341.
Rooms
FOR RENT Campo Alegre.
Nicely furnished room. Meals if
desired. Private bath. Call 3 3-1789.
1789. 3-1789. 8 DAY
LIMA TOUR
Inc. air fare, transfers, tours,
and deluxe hotel
$180
leave every Tues. and Frl.
FIDANQUE TRAVEL
Tel. Panama 2-16G1
$ for
35 mm Camera
f. 1.9 lens 6).50
more for your Dollar.
International Jewelry
155 Central Ave.
LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIDGE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co..
for rates and information
Tel. Panama 2-0552
The New
S P
NIKON
With built-in Universal
Viewfindcr System
Vl.lallli.-V
Panama Colon
New SI'de-Lecture
At JWB Tonight
By Diablo Club
'Around the Isthmus in 80 min minutes
utes minutes with the Diablo Camrn Club'
is the next slide-lecture "I the
local camera club that vill be
presented at the tISO JWB Armed
Forres Service Center tonight at
7:30.
A sequel to "Crossroads Por
trail" presented on June 16. this
illustrated talk plans lo continue
the development of interesting
places and people to be seen on
the Isthmus
The program will aid in orient orient-ing
ing orient-ing newcomers to the Isthmus i.-i
an inexpensive manner (Nn
charge) the general public is invited.

EBB

Miscellaneous

JUST ARRIVED
Hoby Items including:
Fuels, Paints,
Artist Brushes
Sterling and other
Plane, Boat and Auto
Models.
Ballistic Missile with
launcher and fuel.
Real Missile performance
150-200 ft.
CRAWFORD AGENCIES CORP.,
Tivoli Ave. No. 18-20
Tel. 2-1905
FOR SALE: Spare parts for
cars, trucks, heavy equipment,
radios, motors, electric and
plumbing fixtures, refrigerators,
safe vaults, bolts, steam electric
tables. CONTINENTAL SUPPLY
at 12 and 13 St. Central Ave.
PhOne 1088-B, Colon.
FOR SALE: Treasure Hunters! 1
Metal locator. Must Sacrifice.
Coco Solo 490.
FOR SALE Frigidaire refrig refrigerator
erator refrigerator 60 cycle. New Unit. Like
new. Call after 4 p.m. Tel. 2 2-1443.
1443. 2-1443. House 0592-D Bayano
St. Ancon.
FOR SALE Zinc, doors and
windows, Colon Hotel, corner B
Street and 12 St. West.
FOR SALE Complete set
1957 Collier's Encyclopedia with
bookcase. Call 2-2752 after 5.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE. 1955 Tiger Cub,
200 cc, excellent condition. Best
offer. 1 English bicycle, 3 model
air planes. Telephone 82-2265,
Quarry Heights.
FOR SALE: 1957 Moped mo motorbike.
torbike. motorbike. Good condition. Phone
Curundu 3192 for question! and
information.

Five and Ten' Causing
War Between Del Mar,
Caliente Racetracks

By JACK CUDDY
LOS ANGELES (UPI)-A bet betting
ting betting gimmick picked up from
Venezuela and adopted by a Mex Mexican
ican Mexican race track is causing a turf
war between Caliente, Mex., and
Del Mark, Calif. on opposite
sides of the border.
Dapper, dark-haired John Ales Ales-sio
sio Ales-sio managing director of the Ca Caliente
liente Caliente track began experimenting
two years ago with what he calls
me live and tea" in which na
trons try to piA the winners of
six races.
Alessio figuted American horse
crossed the bordpr tn
his traCK might likp it hprausp
the gimmick had resulted in
enormous purses in South Ameri America.
ca. America. The success of his experiment
was a golden surprise. Attendance
almost doubled. The pari-mutuei
soared. American dollars poured
in. The pot of gold was a purse
that has run as high as SlOQ.OOO
or more in the "five and ten"
pool.
Winner Gets Big Take
That pool less a 25 per cent
consolation pool goes to the win winner
ner winner or winners who pick the most
horses from the 5th to the 10th
race.
Stories of lucky breaks for win winners
ners winners brought more and more
players to the picturesque Mexi Mexican
can Mexican track stories of the U.S.
sailor who picked up $87,000 in
cash or of housewives winning
from $20,000 to $50,000, etc.
In previous years, Caliente ran
only on Sundays when the near nearby
by nearby Del Mar (Calif.) race track
was operating. But this year,
Alessio felt he must run on both
Saturday and Sunday to prevent
the good horses from being hired
away from his plant.
Accordingly, he offered the
"five and ten" betting on other
clays. That brought an end to 19
seasons of cooperation between
the two tracks, which had vanned
horses back and forth across the
border to fjll programs at the two
establishments.
Del Mar retaliated by hinting
dourly that its stable space would
be available only lo horses (hit
remained at the fashionable little
seaside course. Caliente coun
lered with (1) billboards along
the highways, yelling out (he Sa, Sa,-urday
urday Sa,-urday and Sunday opportunities,
and (2) announcements that pa
Irons of the Caliente track could
wager there on the rival Del Mar
tares through Calienle's foreign
book.
Pays Track Odd
t'nder ils Mexican government
license. Caliente accepts wagers
on all t' S. tracks and pays track
ndtls. In addition, it has every
imaginable device lo intrigue
horse-players: the dally double,
quinclle, one-lwothrec in which

Home Articles 1

FOR SALE: Beautiful, new din dining
ing dining table with six chairs. Reason Reasonably
ably Reasonably priced. Phone 3-4364.
FOR SALE: Refrigerator West West-inghousa,
inghousa, West-inghousa, all porcelain, 9 ft. List Listed
ed Listed for conversion. $60. Available
Aug. 4. Phone 2-4224.
FOR SALE: Double bed with
Simmons spring and mattress,
maple wood, upholstered couch,
several stand lamps, 1949 Buick,
sedan, roadmaster. House 356,
Ancon Apt. 19. Phone 2-3740.
FOR SALE Baby Crib, used
6 weeks, Correct Posture mat mattress.
tress. mattress. $35.00. 2-3405.
Consumers Co-Op
Seeks To Have
Pledges Fulfilled
An attempt to urge members of
the Panama Consumers Coopera Cooperative
tive Cooperative to full, filltheir pledges will
be among the principal items on
the cooperative's agepda at a gen general
eral general assembly scheduled lor to tonight
night tonight at the Sojourners Hall on P
Street.
The meeting is scheduled to
start at 7:30 p.m.
A spokesman for the cooperat cooperative's
ive's cooperative's executive board, emphasized
today that two-thirds of the total
membership must be present at
the meeting for decisions to be
considered valid. Consequently,
all members are being asked to
make a special effort to altend.
Also on the agenda of tonighl's
meeting is the reading of several
reports on the operation of the
cooperative's two ventures and the
nomination and election of new of officers.
ficers. officers. the lucky person picking the
horses in that order collects anv.
where from 35-1 to 100-1. Also
mere is open-track betting, in
addition to the pari-mutdels.
Meanwhile, the publicity con conscious
scious conscious Alessio dreams up periodic
stunts like paying the bus fares
of patrons from Los Angeles, giv giving
ing giving out free souvenirs, publishing
tickets good for half the cost of
a "five and ten" wager, and oth other
er other devices to lure improvers of
the thoroughbred to his emporium.
Del Mar, a conservative outfit
that likes to consider itself the
Saratoga of the West, has refused
to fight back with flamboyant ex exploitation
ploitation exploitation stunts. But it has
stepped up its appeal to society
players, and thoV're responding
in large numbers.
However, horsemen are wonder wondering
ing wondering who will be hurt in the inter international
national international hoss-war. The first Sat
urday of hostilities just passed.
Both sides claimed triumphs, but
the final outcome will not be de
termined until the Del Mar sea sea-soo
soo sea-soo ends Sept. 9 and its gains or
losses are totalled.
$800 MILLION SET ASIDE
NEW YORK (UPI) -About $800
million of life insurance policy
benefits will be set aside this year
by policyholders and beneficiaries
to establish income plans, accord according
ing according to the Institute of Life Insur
ance.
VERSATILE VOICE -Gloria
I Wood, who once dubbed the
l movie singing voice of Marilyn
Monroe, has done some 2,500
singing commercial in her
I time. "A soap ad cartoon hero hero-i
i hero-i ine has to have all of the oomph
I of Marilyn," says Gloria. She's
. the voice, too, for "Minnie
' Mouse" and also makes re re-I
I re-I cordings.

1 Boats b Motors

FOR SALE: 14' new Runabout
65" beam-made for water ski skiing
ing skiing will sacrifice. Tel. 2-2887,
Ancon, C. Z.
Real Estate
Good Bargain. House and land
in Rio Aba jo for S3 500.00. Ave.
29-19. Tel. 3-1016.
FOR SALE: Modern coffee
schop. Includes restaurant and
ice cream equipment. Owner has
other interests te look after.
Fine busines, centrally located.
For information: Decoration "Ro "Roberto"
berto" "Roberto" Via Espana, Tel. 3-4904.
Nights and Sunday 3-6706.
FOR SALE Lots in Rio Abajo
near to Church, from $3.50 per
mt. Tel. 2-1155. Office hours.
Dogs
FOR SALE: Six week Doberman
female, decended from 18 AKC
champions. Write Llona Sears,
Santa Clara.
AT STUD AKC Registered
Cocker Spaniel, Blonde. Call
Curundu 4127 from 5 p.m. on.
US Track Team Off
To Flying Start
At Moscow Meet
MOSCOW, July 28 (UPI) The
United States track team got off
to a flying start against Russia
today in the concluding events of
their two-day meet when Ed Col Col-lymore
lymore Col-lymore of Cambridge, Mass., won
the 200-meter dash in 21.3 seconds.
Collymore, a surprise starter in
the event, finished a yard ahead
of Russia's Yuri Konovalov. Leon Leonid
id Leonid Bartenev finished third and
Jim-egrest of Abiline, Tex.,
aaTast.
"CWlymore's winning time was
considered good over a rain rain-drenched
drenched rain-drenched track at the huge Lenin
Stadium. Konovolov was clocked
in 21.4 seconds.
The U.S. women's team produc produced
ed produced another shocker when Lucinda
Williams of Bloomingdale, Ga
won the 200-meter dash in a photo
finish with Maria ItkinaV, the "Rus "Russia
sia "Russia women's champion. Both girls
were timed in 24.4 seconds. Isa-
Dell Daniels of Jakin, Ga., finish finished
ed finished third and Verv Zahel ma was
fourth.
In the decathlon, Rafer Johnson
of Kingsburg, Calif., opened a 299 299-point
point 299-point lead over Russia's Vassili
Kuznetsov bv winnln? the riisene
and finished second behind com
patriot Dave Estrom of the Univ University
ersity University of Oregon in the 110-meter
high hurdles.
Johnson won the discus with a
toss of 160 feet, 11 incHes. Kuz Kuz-netzov
netzov Kuz-netzov finished second with a toss
of 154 feet, 8.6 inches. In the 110 110-meter
meter 110-meter high hurdles, Edstrom flash
ed home in 14.8 seconds. Johnson
was clocked in 14.9 and Kuznetsov
in 15.1.
SPUTNIK TRAVELS FAR
LONDON (UPI) -Moscow radio
announced yesterday that Russia's
Sputnik III has travelled more
than 46,000,000 kilometers (about
30,000.000 miles) and its highfly highflying
ing highflying laboratory has been in opera operation
tion operation for 1,750 hours. Launched last
May 15. it wac tn CAmnlnlo it.
1,000th trip around the world
yesieraay.

TO OUR ADVERTISERS:
With a view toward improving service and correcting
irregularities that occur, involuntarily, from time to time,
THE PANAMA AMERICAN has established a special

CLAIMS SECTION

Please dial Tel.

We will appreciate your call which
to serve you better

.Miscellaneous
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWIR "A", DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709
Last opportunity, leaving Pana Panama,
ma, Panama, accept best offer, 1957 Lin Lincoln
coln Lincoln Premier, 4 door, sedan. Only
6400 miles, duty paid, extras,
excellent condition. Ttl. 3-1709
Panama.
The Madge Locke Theatre of
dance will ra-open at Cristobal
Y.M.C.A. August 4th Old and
new pupils enloll at front desk.
Every type of dance taught, Bal Ballet
let Ballet to tap, Spanish folk dancing.
Special class for adults. Mist
Locke also specializes in the
routine. If you want dance numb numb-en
en numb-en arranged with appropiat
music and costuming, see Miss
Locke. Notice of opening dates
of Gatun and Margarita to be
announced later.
FOR RENT To responsible
person, The Chicago Canteen,
ituated on Central Avenue and
K Street. Apply in person, to
the Tivoli Agencies office.
Camera de Comercio building.
-JHlliiaL.
WANTED: 3 or 4 bedrooms
chalet. Call 3-1407.
WANTED We pay cash for
used bed springs. Call 3-4911,
3-734B. Household Exchange.
Lesson
Pittman's shorthand, do you
kow it? Tutoring needed, call
Rose 3-7658.

For Easy Space Traveling

Don't Forget
CHICAGO (UPI) Rnfi Mc Mc-Nally
Nally Mc-Nally and Co., which has mapped
practically every spot on earth,
today, presented a "moon map''
lor ine man in inc. street.
The map, based on photo
graphs to assure accuracy, shows
the moon as only astronomers
and scientists have seen it up to
now.
It pinpoints such exotic spots as
the Seas of Serenity and the Bay
of Billows, along with all of the
moon s other important craters,
mountains, oceans and valleys.
Asked if the U.S. Army or the
Air Force should fire a rocket at
the moon and successfully hit the
target, the point of impact would
be easily traced on the new map.
The map provides enough to
whet the appetite of most star star-gazers
gazers star-gazers and moon-lovers.
A profusion of seas, basins and
valleys dot the map, which is
split into two quarter views com comprising
prising comprising 59 per cent of the moon's
surface visible from the arth.
The largest sea is the Ocean of
Storms (oceanus procellarum)
while one of the smallest appears
to be the Sea of Vapours (mare
vaporum).
Other points of interest, include
the Sea of Rains, the Bay of
Billows, the Sea of Clouds, the
Sea of Nectar, the Sea of Fertil Fertility,
ity, Fertility, the Sea of Crises, the Seas
of Serenitv and Tranquility, the
Sea of Cold, and the Lake of the
Dead.
Thousands of craters pock mark
the fa'Ce of the moon, the largest
being Clavius, about 146 miles
wide and 20,000 feet deep. Other
crarers shown include Copernicus,
Tycho, Birt, Ptolemaeus. Eratos
thenes, Macrobius and Endymios.
Aitnougn the moon has been
carefully studied since the time

WAMTtn. K. I .

Wklimmrm ..J
Mutt k- kllaMiial C-J l.-H
tugcrncr wrrn photo
819 PANAMA.
Mpvnni wirn inaw ana a n
e ---- 3-..... ws s,unrcniTlt)
can Rose 3-7658.
WAklTCh. e i
aual Send lull nirtinl...
EK IU6 ArAK 1 ADO 8 1 9 H
MA.
SERVICES
a ... t
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TELEVISION SERVICI
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YOUR HOME 1 A
T A . .
hiiki' rn same an
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LOS ANGELES trained techni-
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TELEVISION SERVICE
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Boston-Miami Technicians
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6 MONTHS AIIAD AkITfBf mi
PARTS INSTALLED. Ask for MR,
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Protect your home and proper property
ty property against insect damage.
Prompt scientific treatment an
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baiit. Telephone Pronto Service,
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HOME TV REPAIRS
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in. An v.ii
iv.uv p.m. i in o:uu p.m. Sa Saturdays.
turdays. Saturdays. Moon Map
of. Galileo and the Invention of
telescope.-it wasn t until 18S0
Ik. 1 C At-
i 1 I
iiivrannc i.irn nt i nam .imit n
servatory at the Universitr
California Enlargement nf !'
cal features, which ring the mat
were maoe trom pnotoeranns ti
ken by the Mount Wilson an!
Mount Palomar observatories.
Because the moon requires rh
same time to circle tne earth a
it does to make one full turn o
its axis, it always turns the sam'
face toward the earth and the ri
verse side is not visible. Bti
slight wobbles in the, moon's r 1
tions account for 59 per cent lis1
ibility from the earth, which tht'
new man envers
Mysteries of the moon are stil
numerous. New fats will eon
tinue to be uncovered.
But for young lovers, nothinj
else is needed other than that thr
moon be big, bright and yellow.
Tn VICIT AIICTDI r;
MOSOW (UPI) Soviet Pr!
mier Nikita Khrushchev has ar'
cepted an invitation from An'
trian Chancellor Julius Raa1) i
visit Austria at an unspetifie
date, it was announced yesterda
Ulglll.
QUEEN'S SINUSITIS CHECKED
ivji-uvji turn inre nnTii.
t-iatis t til r tilt u l n. Tana H
II today to check on the eatar-
. V . .ii.aucui I
rnai sinusitis that has confined
ner Tn Kurlrtntrha.m PsUm
i H iVx
some three weeks.
will enable us

Th



ilffr-ttl
PAGE N1N1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN IN INDEPENDENT DADLT NEWSPAPEB
MONDAY, JULY tt, 1951
By WILSON 8CRUGOS
By GEURGE WUNDER THE STOHY OP MARTHA WAYNE
About Johnny Mallo
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Track Team Trounces Russians
Read story on page

it

BRITISH ANXIOUS FOR

(Continued from Pigi 1)
Dulles had arrived in London
late Saturday evening after a
five-hour stopover in Bonn where
he had talks with West German
Chaacellor Konrad Adenauer
In sharp contrast to Washing Washington's
ton's Washington's reported reluctance to hold
a summit meeting, Dulles found
Macmillan enthusiastic and anxi anxious
ous anxious to get it underway not later
than Aug. 11.
Macmillan was virtually rail railroaded
roaded railroaded into acceptance of the
parley by an overwhelming wave
of British public opinion. Since
he took the initiative at first of
the Western leaders to accept
the Soviet-proposed talks, the
Prime Minister's stock has soar soared
ed soared in this country.
The Macmillan government was
said to be disturhed by U.S. re reluctance
luctance reluctance described by British
newspapers as "heel-dragging."
Macmillan was reported anxious
to work out an agreed Western
policy on the Middle East before
the projected meeting with Khrush Khrushchev.
chev. Khrushchev. From Pans it was reported that
de Gaulle has launched a series
of unexpected pre summit ex exchanges
changes exchanges with France's continental
and North Arfican allies in an
apparent bid to attend an East East-West
West East-West conference as their "third
force" spokesman.
The iirst of the conferences was
held yesterday in Rome between
French foreign minister Maurice
Couve de Murville and Italian pre premier
mier premier foreign minister Amintore
Fanfani. Shortly afterward Fan Fanfani
fani Fanfani flew to Washington.
Sources said De Gaulle's gs-v-ernment
is envisaging a series of
diplomatic soundings with 10 dif different
ferent different European and North Afri African
can African countries, ranging from Bel
gium and the Netherlands lo Tu Tunisia
nisia Tunisia and possibly Greece and
Spain.
Most of these contacts will be
taken through diplomatic channels
and not by personal contact, the
sources said.
IBC FRENCH ARMY
IGten. Andre Marie Zeller, 62,
eaJxwe, is army chief of staff for
France. He replaces resigned
Gen. Henri Lorillot. His ap appointment
pointment appointment is viewed as a vic victory
tory victory for the extreme right-
Jjrjrjgers, m the French army

TODAY! .75 .40
B 1 1 PROM THE
f PRODUCER OF
"peyton pl ace" -H'a
searing look
ft Vim TODAY'S SOUTH I
1 MLong,
I HSutnmer
HCiNewaScopE j
PAUL NIWMAN
JOANNli WOODWARD
I ANTHONY I RANCIOSA
ORSON HI 1,1,1 S
j,,. ANGELA LANSRIIR1'

Thou diplomatic observers be believe
lieve believe the French government
feels it can speak as the voice
of the "third force" of Western
European nations in all major
discussions.
De Gaulle made this point Sat Saturday
urday Saturday in his letter to Khrushchev.
The general said that Russia, as
France, knows that the destiny of
the Middle East is of vital concer.i
to the whole of Europe."
Macmillan said today the "north
ern tier" Baghdad alliance will
continue as "a means of collec collective
tive collective security."
Macmillan delivered this pledge
in a speech opening the fifth ses-

sion of the Baghdad Pact council
in Ixmdon
"We intend to maintain the aims
of our allian.ee." Macmillan de declared,
clared, declared, "and to consider how to do
this in the light of our present si situation."
tuation." situation." By "present situation" he re referred
ferred referred apparently to the recent re revolution
volution revolution in Iraq. The new Iraq
government has not yet quit the
pact but it is expected to do so.
Earlier Dulles informed the
Baghdad Pact nations that the
United States would be ready to
join Russia in an arms embargo
to the Middle East, authorita authoritative
tive authoritative sources said.
But the secretary was said to
have stressed that any such en
bargo would have to be to the
Arab states and perhaps Israel on only.
ly. only. The U.S. could not consider an
arms embargo to her "friends" in
the Middle East specifically Turk,
ey, Iran and Pakistan the sourc sources
es sources said.
NEW IRAQI PREMIER This
is a recent photo of Abdul Ka Ka-rim
rim Ka-rim el-Kassem, the new Pre Premier
mier Premier of Iraq. In Bagdad, quiet
after a week of turmoil, small
boys were doing a big business
selling poster-size pictures of
el-Kassem.
New Iraqui Govt.
Issues 30-ltem
Constitution
BAGHDAD, Iraq June 28 (UPI)
Iraq s revolutionary government
proclaimed a provisional consti constitution
tution constitution calling for land reform and
respect for private ownership.
ine new constitution was an
nounced by Premier Abdul Kenm
Kassem and read oVt the radio
by the acting minister of the in
terior, Col. Abdel Salam Arif.
Announcement of the 30-article
constitution was the latest move
in the rapid consolidation of pow power
er power by the 13-day-old regime which
turned Iraq from a solid western
ally toward neutrally and pan -Arabism.
The constitution's most impor important
tant important point was an article dealing
with land reform.
Although land distribution was
promised as long ago as 1945, it
was never carried out and be became
came became a major grievance against
the monarchy run by strongman
Nuri as-Said.
Article 14 of the new constitu constitution
tion constitution said "agricultural ownership
is limited and regulated. Agricul Agricultural
tural Agricultural ownership rights will re
main until legislation has been
taken to change them."
The article dealing with priv private
ate private ownership of property said
such ownership would be "res "res-pecte0"
pecte0" "res-pecte0" and would not be dis disregarded
regarded disregarded "except for th gen general
eral general interest and then for equit equitable
able equitable compensation."
Other important points wer
guarantees of freedom of beMf
speech "under regulation," that
Islam would b the official relig religion,
ion, religion, that no private military or
paramilitary organizations will be
permitted.
The old regime's laws will re remain
main remain in force until legislated out
of existence and all proclamations
of the new government have the
force of law, il added.
Although the constitution did not
mention political nartirs the news newspaper
paper newspaper Al Akhaher headlined the
constitution storv: "One People,
One Parly." This gave weigh to
the belief (hat a single tirkel ys ys-tem
tem ys-tem would be adopted.
Kassem indicated Saturday
night that this system would be
used when he told a press con conference
ference conference that several parties would
be permitled to ooerate but that
they would consent and agrre on
"unity" of action.
The constitution also guarante guaranteed
ed guaranteed (he Kurdish minority a share
in the government and public
activities.

AT EASE IN LEBANON An M48 tank crew takes It easy on the
tank turret at Beirut, Lebanon. Left to right 1st Lt. John Dono Donovan
van Donovan of Longmeadow, Mass.; Sgt. Joseph Black of Banger,
Maine; Pfc. Joseph Dannenmann of Baltimore, Md.; and Pfc.
Charles McLoughlin of Richmond Hill, N.Y.

Marine Accidentally Shot
By Own Buddy In Lebanon

BEIRUT, July 28 ( UPI) A
U.S. Marine killed yesterday was
accidentally shot by one of his
own buddies while on an un unauthorized
authorized unauthorized v's.t to a small vil village,
lage, village, a Marine spokesman said
today. It had been reported he
was killed by a rebel sniper.
The Marine, a private first
class who was not identified,
was killed by a single bullet
thiough the head arour.ri noon
yesterday. He was in front of
his company position south of
the Beirut international airport.
His body was brought back
f'-om an olive grove by other
Marines.
The Marines were reported
"fighting mad" when news
Circulated that the shooting
was done by rebel snipers in
the hills.
But Marine spokesmen warn warned
ed warned at jumping at conclusions
until an official Investigation
into the shooting had been
completed.
Today, a spokesman an announced:
nounced: announced: 'Four Marines left the air airport
port airport area on an unautnorized
visit to a small village about
half a mil?) iron the airport
perimeter yesterday. At some
time during '.he visit while
climbing over a seven-foot wall,
the revolver of one Marine
banged against the wall and
discharged a bullet which en entered
tered entered the he.iri of the man be below
low below him and killed him in instantly."
stantly." instantly." The men involved have re
quested counsel and the inves
tigation is continuing, the
spokesman added.
The area in which the Marine
was killed has been the con constant
stant constant target of rebel snipers
concealed in the hills overlook
ing the American positions
south of the airport. Only three
of the nights the Marines have
spent in the airport perimeter
have been free of firing inci incidents.
dents. incidents. Several times the rebels
have tried to infiltrate into
the Marines' positions at
night, wearing rubber shoes
and dark clothing. On one
night the Marines used hand
grenades, rocket launchers
and light machineguns to
repel them.
The Marine was the fourth
American servicemen to die in
Lebanon. The first was a Navy
jet pilot whose plane crashed
on a mountainside southeast of
Beirut. A Marine was shot and
killed by one of his own men
when he failed to answer a
sentry challenge, and an Army
paratrooper drowned while
swimming off the Lebanese
coast.
Meanwhile President Eisen
hower gave renewed assurances
that U.S. forces were rushed
heie only to help that nation
tc "presene its independence.''
The Pre.-icent made t..e state
ment In an exrharcpe of le'.urs
with I.eoanese President Camil-
le Chamoun. E'nhowr s let
ter, dated Saturday, also em
phasized the Uf. intervention
was In response to a pie for
aid from Chamoun.
The White House In Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, which made the let letters
ters letters public, gave no reason
for the exchange. But liisen
hower's letter was seen as
laying the groundwork for
the position to bn taken by
this country in any Summit
meeting with Russia on the
Middle East crisis.
Soviet Premier Nlklta S.
Khrushchev, In originally call
ing for a meeting of chiefs of
government, accused this coun
try and Britain til "aggression"
for sending troons to Lebanon
and Jordan.

;
But Eisenhower said th ac
tion was in line "with the In
lierent right of nations to coop
erate for self-de;ens,e.'
Chamoun s letter was dated
July 21. In lt, he expressed
"profound gratitude" for the
U.S. intervention and praised
"the high principles in which
the free world believes and by
which it lives." He also stress stressed
ed stressed that this country answered
"my call for help."
Following are the texts of
Chamoun's July 21 letter to
Eisenhower and the President's
July 25 reply:
"Dear Mr. President:
"I wish to express to you on
my own personal behalf and on
behalf of Lebanon, and through
you to the government and peo people
ple people of the United States, our
profound gratitude frr respond responding;
ing; responding; to my ?it fo- help, based
on a decision by the legiti legitimate
mate legitimate government .of Lebanon,
through the landing of United
States forces In Lebanon to
help us defend our independ independence
ence independence and integrity in conform conformity
ity conformity with Article 51 of the Unit United
ed United Nations Charter.
"I want to assure you. Mr
President, that we are both
happy and honored to find our ourselves
selves ourselves side by side with the
great American nation defend defending
ing defending the great American nation
defending not only our inde independence
pendence independence and integrity against
direct aggression, but the high
principles in which the free
world blieved and by which it
lives.
"Faithfully yours,
Camllle Chamoun."
"Dear Mr. President:
"I wish to thank vou for your
message of July 21 In which
you express personally and on
behalf of Lebanon gratitude for
the United States' affirmative
response to Lebanon's call for
assistance.
ine purpose of our action
was to help your country pre preserve
serve preserve its independence, in ac accord
cord accord with the inherent right of
nations to cooperate for self self-defense.
defense. self-defense. "Our countries have long en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed close and friends rela relations,
tions, relations, and I look forward to
further cooperation between the
American people and the peo people
ple people of Lebanon in furthering
the principles and purposes of
the United Nations Charte
"Sincerely,
Dwight D. Elsenhower
Weather Or Not
This weather report for the 24
hours ending 8 a.m. todav Is
prepared by the Meteorological
and Hydrographic Branch of the
Panama Canal Company:
Balboa Cristobal
TEMPERATURE:
Hight 88 83
Low 74 77
HUMIDITY:
High 100 95
Low 70 85
WIND:
(max. mph) NW-10 NW-lfi
RAIN (inches) 0 .33
WATER TEMP:
(inner harbors) 82 83
BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, JULY 19
High
Low
2:3.1 a.m.
2:49 p.m.
8:43 a.m.
9:12 p.m.

MEET

f

tiff II

woody Hermans inird

To His
Woody Herman, one of the topi

nanci leaders in me united stales
for the last 20 years, will appear
in Panama over the weekend be beginning
ginning beginning Friday night at the Bella
Vista Theater.
Herman and his "Third Herd"
were selected bv the Dpnartmenl
of State to make a musical tour
of Latin American, under the aus
pices of the President s Fund for
Cultural Presentations. Panama
will be the first lee of the tour
The band's second appearance in
Manama win be at the Rio Thea
ter Saturday night. Sunday night
mey win appear at ine rex rnea rnea-ter
ter rnea-ter in Colon.
First there was the "The Band
That Plays the Blues," then there
were the great Herman Herds of
the '40s anf now, Woody Her Herman
man Herman is out in front of the music
business again with his most sen sensational
sational sensational band of all, the Third
Herd.
Verve records, quick to sense
the value of this new and excit exciting
ing exciting band, has signed Woody to an
exclusive recording contract. Co Columbia
lumbia Columbia has issued an album sa saluting
luting saluting all three Herds and Time,
Parade and other publications
have lauded Woody Herman and
the Third Herd for bringing back
dancing.
There are fans all over the
country who say that the First
Herd was the greatest of them
all that's the band which won
blue ribbons in five polls in one
year. There are other whose fa favorite
vorite favorite is "The Band That Plays
The Blues"; there are still others
who believe the band Woody led
in 1948 the band which won the
Down Beat poll after it had been
broken up was the greatest of
mem ail.
Early in 1954. the Thir u
made a one month concert tour of
Europe. "British Leaders Rave O O-ver
ver O-ver Herman Band" headlined the
London newspaper, The M e 1 o d y
Maker. "The Band is as Great
as They Say" reported the New
Musical Express, while band lead leaders
ers leaders and music fans from Oslo to
Munich sang the prases of Woo Woody
dy Woody Herman and the third Herd.
'At last we have heard a truly
great American band" one critic
wrote.
In America as audiences in
town after town, city alter city
in dance halls an I concert halls
hear the Third Herd, the concen concensus
sus concensus is that here is the best band
of them all the band that has
started them dancing again and
has made itself a part of our mu-
CI A 1 I liirtn...
aivai. iiifliuiy,
syndicated columnist Frank Con-
f f 1IMM tl ft rr f ,,,, ThI A 1 .1 t
niff writinff fnr tnt
Service said:
"As one who has taken a dour
view of the contemporary state
of American jazz, I would like to
say that there is nothing wrong
with it that a few more bands like
the new Woody Herman aggrega aggregation
tion aggregation wouldn't cure. .
"Woody has been a well known
figure on the American scene
these past fifteen years. but his
emergence with a big new band
nat successfully integrates t h e
oest features of traditional jazz
with the really good stuff from
the new school may mark an im important
portant important milestone for the music
business."
Conniff had heard the band
broadcasting from the Statler Ho Hotel
tel Hotel in New York. "It was like old
times. Here was musicianship of
a high order, supple but disci disciplined,
plined, disciplined, individualistic yet cleanly
inteerated. tho nt ff .....
dazzling. This kind of music is
oouna to pave the way for a re
naissance of interest in modern
jazz. .it s a great pleasure to re report
port report that American jazz may be
getting back into a' solid groove."
Time Magazine says "Bandlead "Bandleader
er "Bandleader Herman is ready to show a
whole generation what it has been
missing."
Variety the bible of show busi business,
ness, business, says "Herman has a tightly
knit crew that knows how to get
his musical message across,
they dish it out with an ingratiat ingratiating
ing ingratiating zest."
Bob Martin, writing in Down
Bt, tayi "Thi, band just
took off lite varsity football
team staking an undefeated see see-son.
son. see-son. The tension and excitement
caused by these swinging Herds Herdsmen
men Herdsmen was felt throughout the
room and looks of amazement
end then ecstatic acceptance
were passed from table to ta table,
ble, table, night after night. The pa patrons
trons patrons felt it and knew there
wes a re-birth of the band busi business
ness business happening right before
their ears."
George Simon, writing in Metro Metronome
nome Metronome says "This then, is the
great new Woody Herman band,
an astounding, jumping, versatile,
thrilling band, great for listening,
great lor dancing an the ultimate
answer to all those who insist you
have got to play corn on Glenn
Miller music to bring dancers
and dance bands back."
With the critics' typewriters
pounding out p r a i s e and the
cheers of audiences everywhere
ringing in his ears, Woody him himself
self himself says, "It took me about 200
musicians to find the band I was
lookinc for. but now I'm hiniw
al last. This is a fine treat m-nn'i
-.. ..in-, icil kiuuj
of guys. The days of the closed
m 1 1 i r aJ minlc orr. ni.,. TUir
musical minds are over Thi i
a brand new era and I'm thrilled
to be a part of it."
The success of this band with
me critics ana me public il a tri
hute to the integrity, courage and
perserverance of the leader
j., .1, i I.,,, vi iur i r a i i
mgm wnen ine music Business
was at an all-time low, Woody
laid the plans for his re-entry in
uic uta.ia in uia (G-riluy in-
In ( Vi u; ,i ft. 1,1 i
u vig anu i it, u. lea-uftiiiK
that the stresses of the war and
post-war years were over, Woody
foresaw that big bands would

I

i
Determination; Coming

IB
WOODY HERMAN (left! and

Concerto" with the notedVompose
City. Woody and hi, Ttrlrd Hera are ednlefor threprfo"

come back again once the fans
had a chance to hear them. It was
a long, hard struggle, but it has
been worth it to torge a band like
this.
It took a man of broad experi experience
ence experience in the music business to do
what Wooay has done with the
Third Herd. A veteran of the
dance band business, "Woody was
a vaudeville trouper when he was
only nine years old. He did an act
singing and playing he clarinet
and was billed as 'The Boy Won Wonder
der Wonder of the Clarinet." He says,
"I'm still an actor!" and his
taste in fancy footwear betrays
his hooier's heritage. When Woo Woody
dy Woody finished high school he enroll enrolled
ed enrolled in Marquette Musk School in
Milwaukee and after a year of
study- starled working with local
UdUMS. Ill XPdB, iic juuieu 1 UII1 vie-
oanas. in ne joined lorn tie
f un s bttnd' tncn one ot lead-
inn nrnkActcn e
ins orchestras.
With the Griun band, Woody
went to Calif onna, playing in and
around San Francisco .or a num number
ber number of years as featured singer
and instrumentalist with the group.
The band had a couple of other
vocalists then of whom you may
have heard Tony Martin and Gin Gin-ny
ny Gin-ny Simms.
In 1933, Woody joined Isham
Jones, one of the first big swing
bands following the Casa Loma
pattern, and with Jones produced
a series of Victor discs, including
"Dallas Blues," which are now
rare items for the Woody Her Herman
man Herman collector. In 1936, Jones
wanted to retire and a group of
men in the band formed a corpor corporation,
ation, corporation, elected Woody president and
took over the band.
The first years were tough,
bookings were scarce anrl Ihp
band was far from a click. iBm it
was a good band and when it fi finally
nally finally hit, was a solid success.
Count Basie, who made his New
York debut opposite the group at
the Roseland Ballroom, remembers
they frightened him.
When the inroads of the war wartime
time wartime draft became too great, the
corporation dissolved. "The Band
That Plays The Blues" assumed
a new style as new men came in into
to into it. From the big band blues of
"Bishop's Blues" "Blues on Pa Parade'
rade' Parade' nd "Woodchoppers Ball
and the Other sides recorded fnr
Decca in that era, they evolved a
new swing style which led into
the startling series of Columbia
records of the midfortieS 'Caldo-
nla. Your Father's Mustarhp"
"Wildroot." Annie Hnnev' a n H
"Northwest Passage.'
High spot of this band's ca career
reer career was its CarneoU Hall Can.
cert in 1946, when it presented
icaipn Burns' "Summer Se Sequence"
quence" Sequence" and rhe special compo composition
sition composition written for If by Igor
Stravinsky," "Ebony Concerto."
Stravinsky had heerd the band's
records and wag so impressed
he ertered to write a number
for the group. The music of that
famous Carnegie Hall Concert
hat been issued on M-G-M in
two albums.
Although this band was sweep sweeping
ing sweeping the polls in the fan maira7in
was commercially successful, did
an unprecedented series of spon-
buicu uruaacasts to- wildroot
Cream Oil. set an Jl tim ,.,.,-ri
of top attendance at a one nighler
which sun sianas 8500 people in
Birmingham, Ala., Woodv had to
breaJc it up because of illness in
the family.
for a year Woody remained vir virtually
tually virtually inactive hut rstupnnrl in
1947 with a band that featured
-- tt.m. m uauu nirii leaiureu
saxophone stars Stan Gets and
nnt Klmma .n.l .J ,u 1
oot Simms and created the cele
hrated "Four Rrnthr" mind
This was the band that recorded
"Keen and Peahv"
I a I i f-m i!L, .
I- ana uic immortal "JEftHy
Au-
tumn" for Capitol
rv ,.- cuu ui ivw, una group
At tU .1 M m.n
was torceo to disband, too, as the
music business was in such a low
amir H wflail I uuanlUlC lO Keep H
,nrL;nrt ... A
w,riMMK m-iumv nil muiip u hip
after that, Woody worked with his
Seytet and laid plans for his r-
turn to the big band business.

I II 17 wm

Herd is
hi. .,!. ..... ...
aSX'y hTh!8 th,.thep,l"hf,
wanted. The "Four Brothers
sound was preserved, the band
was aimed at dancers and design designed
ed designed to play good dance music and
good jazz as well. Gradually, as
the colleges and universities got to
hear the band, it became more
and more popular.
It takes a long time to build a
good band. Working and living to.
gether on the road and playing
together every night presents a
tremendous psychological as well
as musical problem. The magnifi magnificent
cent magnificent work of a trombone or a sax saxophone
ophone saxophone section like Woody has
now cannot come about overnight.
It takes time and it takes pa patience
tience patience and cooperation.
Tne time has been served and
the patience and cooperation are
paying off. When the Third Herd
went back to New York for its de debut
but debut at the Statler Hotel, the mu
sic business was sitting lipe a ju jury
ry jury listening. They had been alert alerted
ed alerted to the coming of the band by
word of mouth and by Down
Beat. When the night was over

51 Diplomas Issued To Members Of 2
First Aid Classes Over The Weekend

The Volunteers Corps of the Ca Canal
nal Canal Zone Civil Defense Office
graduated two first aid classes
over the weekend with a total cf
51 qualified first aiders.
On Friday night, 25 were grad-j
uate at Pedro Miguel and on Satur
day night, 26 at Santa Cruz.
Tk J. 7.
The graduation Piramnnv of T
dro Miguel was held under the
quarters of Mrs. Carrie Turner
and following the ceremony a
party was held in Mrs. Turner's
home. Al Santa Cruz the gradua graduation
tion graduation and party was held in the
Santa Cruz Service Center.
Philip L. Dade chief of Civil
Defense. nresnnteH tho firct u
certificates and identification
cards at both functions. Wiiiiam
H. Gordon of Paraiso was the in
structor for both classes.
Those who graduated at Pedro
Miguel were:
Amy R. Ramsay, Emelia E.
Flemmings. Minam A.' Farrcll
Pearl E. Farrell, Glenda E. Far Far-rell,
rell, Far-rell, Wilma E. Daniels. Barbara
A.Raphael, Eula E. Williams, Ear
bara A. Burton, Patricia M-. Cal-
ALGIERS BOMB KILLS 12
ALGIERS (TJPn A ot-onan-.
exploded in the teeming Casbah
section oi Algiers yesterday killing
at least 12 persons. Police did not
know who threw the grenade.

LUX THEATRE
3il0 5:06 7:02 8:53 p.m.

An Hilarious

!

i

I ribute

Here Fridai
j ny
"?3
. y vvnviiu,
iLwas obvious the Third Herd wa,
in!
iNow well launched into the1
leadershin of th hnH k,.
for the fourth time, Woody Herl
V as'n proving lt is possible
m yidy gooa jazz and pleas
crowds of DeoDle Whon h
not record' what he wanted to M
a major conmanv ho start k;J
M,r. W .sma?1 c.m.P3ny,
'. yviym signed mm to
record for that lahot lnj u.
has signed with ih vital H
ny headed by Norman Grans
a ft itCtUXUS,
Today all the band business ill
talking about tho c,,,.r,. .., nr.-i I
?iy,-"erH!ln?n5 e Thi Herd.
i,M. i u-le,t "erman and hisl
faith in himself and in the youni
musicians of today. "I look at
use k os ana i had to keep on,"
WOOdV told an inlprvlo,.,,,.. V
Jy wh0 asked wfty he was still in
uusmess aner zo years.
ucies noming wrong with th'
"nu uusiness mat spirit like that
won t cure!
lender, Carrie M. Turner, Sadid
M. Sinclair, Richard E Wil
bams, Gloria J. Davis, Iris T Pit Pit-grim,
grim, Pit-grim, Gloria M, Foster. Amalia E,
Jonson, Marcelina A. Wilson, En-
p W; Manerson. silvia h
KWf Amln a H. Walrond, Loil
ytuU Ilene- Pilgrim, C
role M. HevunnH v;-:-
rD0le.uM- Hey00, Virginia D.
Brathwaite.
Those who received their diplo.
mas at Santa Cruz included: Mar Martha
tha Martha Thomas, Lillian F. Hinds,
Ruby E Wilson. Vincent L. Cum Cum-rungs
rungs Cum-rungs Muriel B. Flatts, Marcels
u, Hofnes: Miennn a u
t i wo ill u.ijn
Joel W. Tappin, Hortencia. T.
Cntchlow. Hazeldawn A. Ailen
Francia De Armas, Milcah E.
Newball, Norma. L. Havers Doril
G.Davis William H. Myri'e Jr
Andora Myrie, Amabelle ),
iBrown, Sherman R. Brown Emily
R. Malcolm. Beulah V. Sm;l!
Pearl O. Johns, Arthur N. Grant'
Winston A. Walters. Fiizabptn Tul'
le, Herman G. Headley, Mildred
E. Davis.
TRUCK OVERTURNS, BURNS
LISBON (UPI) A fruit truck
overturned and rumhi fi. i .u.
in urn
city outskirts yesterday and a 16-
yeair-oid gin trapped inside it Was
burned to death. Eight other per persons
sons persons were injured. All were riding
the overloaded van as passengers.
TODAY I
LAST SHOWINGS
0.75 0.40
Jaw Breaking Comedy
ALEC GUINNESS
ODILE VERSOIS
In

TO PARIS

with LOVE"

(In TECHNICOLOR)
I

Vf i sv

i

It's Another RANK Picture!

4i

ate