The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:02622

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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Full Text
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MORF TOI IRI?T FL TES
Br
HOMEWARD VIA
IS
If fie people hum the truth and the country it $afeu Abraham Lincoln.
33rd YEAR
PANAMA, R. 1 SUNDAY, JULY 1958

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EXPLORER IV W ORBIT
WASHINGTON, July 26 UPI) The Army today
launched a satellite into an orbit extending more than 100
miles into space.
U. 8. scientists announced shortly before 4 p.m. that
the new American satellite, Explorer IV, had completed two
circuits of the earth and that its maximum altitude is
more than 1000 miles.
However, the minimum altitude is still not known with
accuracy, and the life of the satellite could be either long
or short.

Zone Dogs Have
To Get Rabies Shots
Before August 1

Doe owners in the Canal Zone

who failed to have their pets ino inoculated
culated inoculated ana registered against ra rabies
bies rabies during the past three weeks
when the -joint immunization and
registration program was in pro progress,
gress, progress, should do so before Aug. 1,
according to a reminder issued
yesterday by the Health Bureau.
On the Atlantic side these Vac Vaccinations
cinations Vaccinations may be obtained at the
Northern area sanitation office
from 1 to 3 p.m. Monday. On the
Pacific side the injections may be

received at the Corozal Animal

Quarantine Station-Hospital Mon

day through Friday between 2

and 5 p.m. or Saturday from 9
to 12 noon.

the cinatione jill be given

free of charge to thd peter
cioves of the Canal- organisation,

who mav then complete registra registration
tion registration by nftilinB or taking the vac

cination certificate and the $2 fee

to the License Section in the Civil

Affairs Building in Balboa.
In the case of residents of mili military
tary military reservations, the vaccination
certificate must be presented to

military authorities for issuance of

a dog license.
The 1957 dog licenses expire on
July 31. After that date, dogs
which do not have 1958 registra
tion tags attached to their collais
are subject to impounding by the
police.

Segregali

'Witnesses' Run
Largest Convention
On Shoestring
NEW YORK (UPD More than
150,000 Jehovah's Witnesses gath gathered
ered gathered todav for the largest reli

gious convention ever held in New
York and a demonstration on how
such an enterprise can be run on

a shoestring.

The Witnesses, each paying his

own expenses, have come from

all the states and from 122 for

eign lands for the Divine Will In International
ternational International Assembly, ..which opens

today.
' -. i.

Both the Yankee Stadium and

the Polo Grounds will be used

July 27 through Aug. 3 to accom

modate the faithful gathered for

the convention, designed to serve

as an advanced minsterial train
ing program.

The Witnesses, governed by the

Watchtower Bible and Tract so
ciety, have prepared for the con
vention in keening with their he

liefs. They believe that all bap

tized Witnesses are ministers -of

Jehovah and that each is bound

bv conscience and teaching to rte

vote his time, his earnings, and,

in fact, his life to God s work

Witnesses attend religious meet

ings five nights a week and in

addition, make door to door

calls. They use their own funds

for this work, despite the fact

most of them are from low-in

come groups.

Because of the scarcity of funds

and a shoestring budget, planners

of the convention had to resort

to. a huge voluntary program. Sev

eral months ago more than 10,000

volunteer! canvassed private

ho-ien to lind 132,000 rooms for

visitors.

During the convention, 8 700
olunteers will act as Ushers and
tr-"u. iw"rs. COW will c.K
and dispense hot meals and 2,410
will stay alter day long pr
vices to clean the stadiums, elim eliminating
inating eliminating another item of expense.

Hearing On Voting,

ion Laws

Ends In Mississippi

JACKSON, Miss. (UPI)-Three
federal judges today were faced
with unscrambling three davs of

conflicting testimony and vof:;n,ps

oi documents in deciding whether

10 struce down Mississippi s rigid
voter registration reauirpments

ana a 1956 segregation" law.
Trial of an Naaco-financed law

suit aimed at protecting Negroes'
voting rights ended in U.S. dis district
trict district court Thursday. Negroes and
whites packed the courtroom and
others filled the hall during the
three-day hearing.
There can be no decision before
next fall. Attorneys were given up
to 75 days to file additional briefs,
after which the judges will pre prepare
pare prepare their rulings.
Attorneys for-the plaintiff, the

Rev H. D. Barbjfsof PrenUss,

HW mat tue 1954 intendment

to tne state Constitution increas

ing educational requirements for

registering be declared unconsti

tutional. They charged it was

aimert at restricting Negro regis registration.
tration. registration.
They also asked the court to
strike down a 1956 law making it
strike down a 1956 law making it
illegal to bring civil rights suits
in Mississippi with outside aid. It
was admitted Darby and his at

torneys violated that law in filing

me ouu in question,
Jefferson Davis County Circuit
Clerk and Registrar James Pan Pan-iel,
iel, Pan-iel, a defendant in the suit with
State Atty. Gen. Joe Patterson,
was the only defense witness. He
was on the stand most of Thurs

day and denied discriminating

against Negroes in registering

voters.

Darby and 14 other Neerops. in-

eluding a former' school superin
tendent with a master's degree
from Indiana University, tstHipH

Daniel refused to re-register them
after the county board of super supervisors
visors supervisors ordered a new registration

in 1S5B,

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But Rush To Big Confab Slows Dow

US Insists On Strict Conditions

MOSCOW, July 26 (UPI) Western observers here today said Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev will go along
with President Eisenhower's demands that any Summit conference at the United Nations be conducted under Secu Security
rity Security Council Rules.
But in New York, United Nations diplomats said Eisenhower's insistence on these conditions for a conference
appeared to have slowed the rush towards the projected meeting.
Soviet papers today charged the US with stalling on the Summit conference question, but there has as ye

sen iiu uiiiviui ieuviivii io (usnwwfi a huib ru ixnrusncnev insisrmg on iecuriry council procedure.

In Washington, President Eisenhower reaffirmed the

SUZY LEAVES THE HOSPITAL In this first photo since her
accident in Florida six weeks ago, actress Suiy Parker, her left
arm in a sling, leaves the Hospital fer Special Surgery in New
York. Miss Parker ws injured and her father killed when their
auto was hit by trfn near St Petersburg.

U. S. position that the United Nations is the "only ap appropriate
propriate appropriate forum" for Summit discussion of the Middle East
crisis.
At the same time, the United States declared again
determination to withdraw American Forces from Lebanon
as soon as the U. N. acts "to assure the independence and
territorial integrity of that state."
Russia wants an Indochina-type, internationally super supervised
vised supervised non-intervention settlement for embattled Lebanon
and Jordan at the projected Summit conference, a high
Communist diplomatic source revealed in London today.
The Soviet plan proposes withdrawal of United States
and British forces and the setting up of a small mixed
international commission which would supervise a non

intervention
and Jordan.

agreement and early elections in Lebanon

Ernestito Undecided Whether
To Head Panama s UN Tear
President Ernesto de la Guardia Jr. was still undecided
yesterday as to whether he would go to represent Panama
at the United Nations if the Middle East problem is to be
discussed by the Security Council, of which Panama is a
member.
A spokesman for the Panama Foreign Office said no
official announcement will be made by the President until
the Security Council sets the date for the Summit meeting,
which Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev has said he will
attend.
The spokesman indicated that the foreign office is in
constant communication with Dr. Jorge Illueca, Panama's
permanent delegate to the U.N., on the course of develop developments
ments developments in the Security Council regarding the Middle East

yruuiem.

AFSCME Housing Adviser Postpones
Trip To RP; Was Due In Tomorrow

A spokesman for the American
Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employes on the Isth Isthmus
mus Isthmus said that word was received
from Washington this week that
Thomas E. Morgan, director of or organization
ganization organization for AFSCME, and Mar Martin
tin Martin Frank, housing advisor to the
International Union, will not be
arriving on the Isthmus tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow as was formerly scheduled.
The Washington office informed
union sources here that President
Arnold S. Sander wants to meet
with Dr. Milton Eisenhower when
he returns to Washington form his
Central American tour to go over
the issues discussed locally be between
tween between officials of Locals 900 and
907 and Dr. Eisenhower's delega delegation.
tion. delegation. Both Morgan and Frank will
probably be in on this conference,
therefore, they have postponed
their arrival on the Isthmus to set

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up a housing program for non
citizen employes, who are mem
bers of Locals 900 and 907 until
around, the middle of August.

US Army Students
To See Display
Of Small Weaoons

Tentative plans have been an

nounced by the 1st Battle Group,

20th Infantry of Fort Kobbe tor a
weapons dmonstration and dis

play at Empire range late next

month for students of the USAR
CARIB School, Fort Gulick.

Members of B Company are
scheduled to participate in the

live fire exercise, which will lea
ture many small arms weapons.

Arms to be shown will include

the bayonet the smallest wea
non. and the 106 recoilless rii'le-

the largest and most powerful

weapon to be demonstrated. It is

anticipated that the Army's new

MaH rifle, a replacement for three

present small weapons ana a

part of the modem ppntomic Ar

my orgamzauon will aiso De aem

onstrated.

Proiect officer of the demon

stration is Mai. Owen R. Grog an

Jr., battle group operations officer.

Weapons demonstrations re se

mi-annual affairs presented by the

battle group for .Latin American

students of the USARCARIB School

as a part of the regular curricu

lum.

1 Am Selling
A Bullfrog' Said
The Small Voice

"Do vou know anybody who

wants to buy a bullfrog?"

That was the strange request

that came from a small voice o-

ver the telephone on the city d:sk

at the l'anama American today.

The little voice was told that
we couldn't think of anyone off

hand, but suggested that he may

contact the Army s Jungle War
fare Training Center.

With a polite, but somewhat

rilnnriAinfol "IKanlre Hd pAnflAO

IIIU.1I... .....i.
tion was broken before we could

get any additional information as

to the whereabouts of the frog

that is up for sale.

WANTS JUSTICE Wearing a 10-pound padlock chain around
her neck, Angeline diet,. 19, of Waller, Tex., yawns and rubs
her feet after a long day at the U.S. Capitol. She tried unsuc unsuccessfully
cessfully unsuccessfully to see President Eisenhower In an attempt to win back
ownership of half of her mother's 703-acre ranch. Miss Cliett

mailed the padlock key to the President and vowed not to re

move the chain "until I get justice.'

Sum p.m.

BALBOA TIDES
MONDAY, JULY M
Hirh Low

37 a.m. s 7:4 p.m.

S:2Q p.m.

Eisenhower's new statment, un underscoring
derscoring underscoring what he .toJd.Jihriish .toJd.Jihriish-chev
chev .toJd.Jihriish-chev yesterday, was made in a
letter to Brazilian President Jus Jus-celino
celino Jus-celino Kubitschek.
Kubitschek had written th
President on Wednesday urging
that any Summit meeting be
held within the security council
where Latin America is repre represented
sented represented by Colombia and Panama.

The Brazilian president wrote
"to emphasize the necessity' of
Latin America being represented
at such a decisive gathering."
The Indochina settlement reach reached
ed reached at the 1954 Geneva Far East Eastern
ern Eastern conference set up a mixed

commission for Vietnam, Laos and
Cambodia to control the armistice,
the withdrawal and re-grouping of
forces, and to supervise general
elections.
India, Canada and Poland form formed
ed formed the mixed commission in the
Indochina settlement.
The Soviet project evisages simi similar
lar similar commissions to .operate in the
Middle East as the lirst step to
an agreed East-West solution in
which Russia would be one of the
guarantors and thus an acknowl acknowledged
edged acknowledged Middle Eastern power.
In his reply to Kubitschek,
senhower said: .,
senhower said:
"A threat to peace anywhere in
the world is oi concern every everywhere
where everywhere in the world.
"The Latin American republics,
representing such an important a a-rea
rea a-rea of the world in terms of poli political
tical political and cultural significance as
well as in population and mate

rial resources, should be and must
be vitally concerned with the eli

mination of any such threat.
In saying the United Nations
is "the only appropriate forum"
to discuss the Middle Eastern
crisis, the President 'noted that
"Latin America is already re-p----nted
on the Security Council."

..ne new declaration of intent

to withdraw trom Lebanon as

soon as possible was made in a
joint communique issued by Pres

ident Eisenhower and Prime Min

ister Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.

Nkrumah and Eisenhower also
asserted that solution of Middle

East problems "should be fotinM

within the framework of the U-

nited Nations."

"With respect to the particular

situation in Lebanon," the joint
statement said, "the Unite!
States emphasized its desire tr
withdraw its forces just as soon
as the United Nations can act ef
fectively to as.surc me independ independence
ence independence and territorial integrity of
that state."
Meanwhile, President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower was reedy to indict Rus Russia
sia Russia and Natter's United Arab
Republic UAR) on charges ef
subversion and intrigue in the
Middle East it a summit con conference
ference conference it held.
(But Western diplomats predict predicted
ed predicted that S. Khrushchev will try t

scrap the rules at the summit

conference on the Middle East

and force a discussion of wider

East-West issues i
It wat believed that if Hie
Watt tried to held Khruthhev
to the tinqle subject ef the Mid Middle
dle Middle Ratt in formal meetimjt ef
the Security Council, he would
almost certainly take up erne. erne.-subjects
subjects erne.-subjects through the press, re

die and TV. He is a patt mat.
ter t inter vitws and at hog hogging
ging hogging the limelight.
Diplomats who have negotiated
with Khrushchev before said they
doubted the West could pin hm
down to one subject at the Secur Security
ity Security Council summit meeting par particularly
ticularly particularly since the occasion woulJ
provide him with a ready-made
platform to sound off to the world
on Soviet policies.
All indications were that Com Communist
munist Communist propaganda machines
would catt Khrushchev In New
York at a here who forced the
Wett to meet with him.
In. Paris, the government of
Premier Charles de Gaule was

convinced that Khrushchev had
scored a "great victory" in get-
line a summit meeting in New
York.

Stock

Macmillan's Political

Hits All-time High in Britain

The editir -of the Cairo news
paper Al Abram today quoteJ
Khrushchev as saying that 0e U.
S. Sixth Fleet in the Mediterra Mediterranean
nean Mediterranean could be easily destroyed
and turned ihto "molten steel cof coffins"
fins" coffins" by Russian weapons.

Editor Mohammed Hasseinin

Heikal, who accompanied Nasser

on Nasser's secret trip to Mps

cow after tlie U.S. troop landings

in Lebanon, reporter! remarks by

Khrushchev in his paper.

According .to Heika, who often
acts as an unofficial spokesman
for Nasser, Khruschev said "we
are far stronger than they (the
West) ever imagine.
"This Sixth Fleet they are
playing with in the Mediterra Mediterranean
nean Mediterranean like, kids nd whose com command
mand command they gave to an exceed exceedingly
ingly exceedingly foolish admiral (Charlet R.
Brown), how easily it could be
destroyed," Khrushchev wat
destroyed," Khrushchev wat
quoted.
Heikal gave an account of the
two meetings between Khrushchev
and Nasser in Moscow that lasted
a total of eight hours. But he did
not report the substance of the
talks.
He said he "guessed" that Nas Nasser
ser Nasser told Khrushchev the CAR
would fight "side by .side" with
the Iraqi Republic if it were ar ar-tacked.
tacked. ar-tacked. Meanwhile in Beirut, rebel lead

er Saeb balam said today he is
perfectly willing to meet with U.
S. diplomatic trouble-shooter Rob

ert Murphy if asked.
At the tame time, however,
he renewed hit demandt that
the American "aggressor" tore-

Communique
BEIRUT, July H (UPI) A
group of U.S. Marinet and para para-troopers
troopers para-troopers bore the scars today
of their blggett battle to date in
Lebanon a strictly inter service
affair.
The free-for-all apparently de developed
veloped developed when a leepload of Ma Marinet
rinet Marinet near Beirut's International
Airport sounded off their opin opinion
ion opinion er the paratroepert' fighting
qualities and manliness.
There wat no decision, but In
the words ef one paratrooper:
"I wouldn't say they love us now
but I think they've been converted."

LONDON, July 26 (UPI)-Prime
Minister Harold Macmillan's popu
larity rating shot up to an all all-time
time all-time high today as the man most
responsible in thp eyes of his fel fellow
low fellow Britons for getting Nikita
Khrushchev aijd President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower to the summit.
The 66-year-old Conservative
politician, regarded by all as a
stop-gap premier when he first
took office in 1957 after the
Sues crisis, is being acclaimed
today at one of Britain't best
prime minitters of the century.

Macmulan s stock never was

higher among his fellow Conserva Conservatives.
tives. Conservatives. When foreign secretary Selwyn

Lloyd announced to the House of

Commons that Macmillan, without

waiting for Eisenhower or France's

Premier Charles de Gaulle, had

accepted a Middle East, Summit

es be withdrawn if the crisis is
to be solved.
In his round-the clock talks, Mur

phy has met with many major

pposition leaders as well as gov

ernment officials. iBut he has not

vet seen Salam, who heads the

opposition forces in Beirut.

Holed up behind barbed wire,

sand bags and machinegun em

placements in Beirut's Basta dis district,
trict, district, which his men hold, Sa'.arri
said "from what I learn from the

other opposition leaders, Murphy

is sincere.
The rebel leader, however, em emphasized
phasized emphasized that his opposition to

President Camille Chamoun re
mains unchanged.
"There are still two very basic
conditions before I can ever think
about an election: withdrawal of
Chamoun from the presidency and
withdrawal of the American ag
gressor forces," he said.
He said he favored a "cartak-.
er" government acceptable to all
factions and then calling new e e-lections.
lections. e-lections. Asked if there would be trou trouble
ble trouble if the government goes a a-head
head a-head with its plan to hold pres presidential
idential presidential elections Thursday
Salam replied: "I cannot t.ilk
of trouble before it happens."
Chamoun was reported reliably
to be considering creation of a
broad coalition government to end
Lebanon's continuing internal cri

sis.
He was described as physcally
tired and ready for a major ef
fort at conciliation with opposition

political factions. His mam am
was understood to be unanimous
agreement of all factions on a
new president.
Diplomatic sources said Cha

moun has told Murphy that he

wants parliament to reach agree

ment ort one' man before start of

the election scheuled in the 60
member body next Thursday.

Chamoun is prepared, it was

said, to disappear quietly from
the scene following a satisfactory
political solution.

The diplomatic sources said Cha-

is counseling his zealous

meeting, the Conservative ba
benchers raised parliament's

cient rafters with one of the gr
est ovations heard there in vs

The Prime Minster received'

other tremendous ovation in per person
son person Thursday evening when he
addressed a private meeting oi
the so-called "1922 Committee"

a group of Conservative rank ;
1 u v

me uiemuerg oi parliament, ffl

Macmillan spoke for about

minutes, mainly on Summit

pects. tne Middle East ct

and other main issues.

Prospects of the summit

fereiece brought Britain closer

complete national unity

than any issue since World War

II.
The nation was basking for.4h
first time in 13 years in the
warmth of tri partisan; tbrieftfB
policy.
All three of Britain's msini
political groups haUednMacmiitai!
for leading the West in accepting
Khrushchev's invitation.
Macmillan's political stature and

prestige were never higher with
his own ruling Conservative Party,
the Labor Party opposition and
the small Liberal Party.
Observers said there was tittle
doubt it was realization of the
overwhelming demand by British
public opinion for a summit meet meeting
ing meeting that made Macmillan go a a-head
head a-head and accept it even though
the United States still was hang hang-ins
ins hang-ins back,
4-

parliamentary followers to elect a
neutral man to avoid further
deepening of the schism that has
split the country into two rival po political
litical political camps.
Cha moun' s only further de demand
mand demand wat that hit foreign poli policy
cy policy alliance with the West re remain
main remain unchanged. But opposition
leaders want foreign policy shift shifted
ed shifted away from the Wett and
closer to what they consider a
Natser-ttyle positive neutrality.
A rooftop sniper fired three
quick shots into a Marine com command
mand command pot here last night. An A A-merican
merican A-merican officer said it was an at attempt
tempt attempt to create an incident by
making hc Marines Qrt hack
and perhaps hit some innocent
person.

The Marines have strict orders
to hold their fire except in the dir direst
est direst necessity of defense.
In Washington, a top U. S. of official
ficial official at the United Nations said
that American troops may be
withdrawn from Lebanon "quite
soon" providing next week's elec election
tion election goes off smoothly. James J.
Wadsworth, deputy U. S. repre representative
sentative representative to the U. N., told a con
gressional subcommittee that when
the I'.S. force of more than 9flfl
leal s, "we will have proved that
we are a pteople of our word."
On the military front, the Ra Ration
tion Ration was still calm, although the
opposition press reported one per person
son person killed in Beirut and three in
Tripoli in sporadic clashes.

-



??.S.dL.-..w -. x i.

FAGI TWO
SUNDAY AMERICAN
SUWDAt, JI$T 27, H6j

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

BY THK
r NELSON
MAMMOOlo
P O
Ml
ACDfttS. PAN

7. H OTMET

WARM

Oaau

ta.na Central Avcnui ntwiu uth ai

Mm REPREmttTATIVEEi
34B MAOIAON AVE,
IN ACYANCL-
PR an hontiir. in advance.
o tM TEAR. IN ADVANCE

THg TOUI J6UM THE MADIRS OWN COLUMN
The Mai hi kn open torum for reader of Tha Panama American
Letten an received gratefully and are handled la wholly confidential
If you contribute letter don't be impatient If it doean't appear the
est day. Lettera are published in Hi ordat received.
Matte try to keep the letteri limited to one page length
Identity of latter writers it held in itrictcat confidence
This newspaper iSHimtt no responsibility for statements or opinions
axpressed in letters from reader.
THE MAIL BOX

PARAISO MUTUAL AID CLUB

Blr:
' wo cdro tn qqv that. t.hp
n n.-.em.r iMaii Rnv .Tulv

XUliotuuui iA.va.uxA Apvi r
tual Aid Club currently sponsors a four-point program.
i a o,.t(fi,.:ui tea fnr a lariv whn lives in Chiva Cluva,

X. ,11,11 V I'J A tvJIAA 'v5 AW. w
2. Light refreshments for
rv.ua thu, onroit t.hpir
WlUJt trww
Contribution to the Latin
3.

fund;
Construction of a permanent platform at the comme-
mnrgtiuo nlnnllP sit.P at ParaiSO.

It
ic nrnhahiP t.nat in view
r. oi r onmmit.tPP fnr Ain
-""' rJ""v -"

sons, the matter of the arunciai
va could have been dropped irom
tL. nrVint nm; annRftrs to he

the artificial leg was actually

it remained an item on our program, we icgrei m.i
sohing, with its incidental publication, has consttuted an act lor
which we have been exposed to censure.
Frank V. Burke,
Benjamin P. Soley.

CRISTOBAL PIERS SPEED LIMIT
Sir:
There has been much talk recently regarding the enforce enforcement
ment enforcement of speed limit laws on Cristobal piers. 1 have never been
stopped for speeding. I respect the laws no matter who else
breaks them. This viewpoint does not blind me to what appears
to be taking place between some of my co-workers and the law
enforcers. ,
It is fair to stop all people who break the law. I don t know
If the guards or watchmen have orders not to stop people in
supervisory capacities who may be travelling over the 12 mph
speed limit in order to expedite their work. If such an excep exception
tion exception is indeed necessary for the supervisors, why not make
everyone satisfied by increasing the limit to, say, 17 mph?
Certainly the Panama Canal Company is not the only or organization
ganization organization which wants its work expedited. The ship's chan chandlers
dlers chandlers steamship agents, taxi drivers with late passengers they
all could use a little more speed sometimes, provided it is
proven to be safe.
Another Delivery Wagon

LOS RIOS PLAYGROUND
Sir:
Ever drive down any one of the streets in Los Rios? If so,
you will understand the consternation on the part of some of
the residents over the attempt to get up a petition against the
small playground now planned for the space once occupied by
the Army swimming pool. The town is full of kids of all sizes,
and mos., of them seem to play in the middle of the streets,
with little or no regard to vehicular traffic.
For g'ish sake, if a playground will keep only a few f them
from constant danger of getting run over, let's encourage it, not
try to block it. ? 5
Shrieking Brakes

WHO WEARS SHORT SHORTS
The Mail Box has gone to pot!
No more short shorts have they got.
After the headlines and the funnies.
Mall Box short shorts were really honeys.
"Ginger Know It AH" bores us stiff,
All this stuff about jobs and riff.
Just give us short shorts every day,
Long shorts, tight shorts, just anyway.
Navy gals are as sad as can be.
They're not the only ones, so are we
Tall gals, short gals, big gals or lean,
Please more letters. Don't be so mean.
Short-shorted Civilian

LOCAL RATE UNIONISM
Sir:
'' If "100 Percent Unionist" (Mail Box, July 23) is proud, of
giving away his money, that is his headache. But the many
North Americans who know how the 1955 Remon-Eisenhower
treaty hits them must be surprised to know that an individual
Who will benefit from it is ungrateful. Because even if "100
Percent Unionist" is not qualified for skilled jobs, the Civil
Service retirement alone is a big gain.
For my part it hurts my heart that people with the out out-look
look out-look of "100 Percent Unionist" should be getting these gains
which, rather than mere disability cash relief, are due to those
poor men who really built the Canal.
He implies criticism of students, and their part in politics.
As a political leader himself, he would be glad to sell his coun country
try country for pick and shovel jobs and handouts. He seems to know
a little bit about the outside world, but nothing about this
country of which he claims to be a citizen.
I read in the press that the salaries of US-rate school schoolteachers,
teachers, schoolteachers, firemen, policemen and postal workers will be protect protected;
ed; protected; But nothing about the plumbers, mechanics and electricians
I referred to.
i "100 Percent Unionist" claims I wrote that taxpayers and
shippers will pay for local-rate salary increases. As I see it,
and I'm sure the State Department sees it the same way, to
employ 10 skilled Local Raters at $500 or less a month rather
than 10 semi-skilled Gringos at their present $1000 a month or
more will save the taxpayers' money. Along with the semi semi-skilled
skilled semi-skilled Gringos go the contractors at over $15,000 plus various

sorts of inspectors. To get 10 Local Raters to do ail this work
would mean at least a $20,000 saving for Uncle Sammy, and at
the same time an increase for the Local Raters.
The measure of whether a union is successful depends on
the benefits it gets for Us members, especially when they can cannot
not cannot strike. How about sick benefits?
Instead of bleating about the Local Raters' loss of commis commissary
sary commissary privileges, the unions could easily have opened one super supermarket
market supermarket in Panama and another in Colon. It so happens that
til Colon right now the regular retailers sell cheaper than the
so-called supermarkets. While the corner stores are selling rice
at 1 cents a pound, some markets are charging 15 cents. At
J3M cents, the corner stores are selling sugar at half a cent a
pound cheaper than the supermarkets.
So if the unions had gone into the market business, they
could now be talking about building low-cost housing for its
members without stateside help.
"100 Percent Unionist" asks whether there have been any
race riots in Panama, as there have been in the much-older
United States. Discrimination is as old as civilization itself.
'sk any store Indians what the dock workers are, and they'll
tell you they're coolies, not Indians. Moses' brother and sister
fliscriminated against him because he married a negress. In

.'aw ud, wnite Americans ciaim
all -Negro college, discriminates

PANAMA AMERICAN

NOUN
AfttAA,
Bo 194. P.
r or p.
8-O740 IB LINK)
AMERICAN. PANAMA
JOSHUA B POWER.
NEW YOUR. I7 N Y.
T RAIL
3o?
70
9 80
farts set out in the letter by F.
23) are correct. The Paraiso Ma-
-----
tne local-rate retireoj employes
riisahiiit.v relief stipend:
" , I
American schools scholarship
of the ready response of the
to Phvsicallv Handicapped Per-
, - ,,U ,-.V,i
leg xor wie muy m wm
the club's program. However
the illoRical attitude that, till
received by Miss Angelica Sadati,
mai nowara university, an
against them.
Ginger Know All

Peter Edson

In
J. ....
WASHINGTON (NEA) -The old
reliable tobacco barometer to tell
whether business is good, bad or
lncuaerent suu works pretty well.
It is based on estimates of the
number of roll-your-own cigarettes
consumed. It's as simple as A-B-C.
Whenever people are prosperous,
they smoke ready-made cigarettes.
When things get tough, they give
up this luxury. They start buying
"the, makin's" and roll their own
or ei-e they take up pipe smok smokingor
ingor smokingor quit.
The government keeps tab on
this through taxes paid on cigar cigarette
ette cigarette papers and on smoking tobac
co as well as through taxes paid
on manuiactured cigarettes.
About half the cigarette papers
are given aw., on request, wittt
a sack or can of tobacco. No tax
is paid on these papers. But on
the other half of the cigarette pa papers,
pers, papers, sold in books of 150 leaves,
taxes are paid by the manufactur manufacturer.
er. manufacturer. This provides the basis tor
the statistics.
LOOK AT WHAT they show:
In 1929, last year of the Hoover
boom, tax returns on cigarette
paper book sales showed total
roll-your-own consumption was 14
billion cigarettes.
It rose steadily in the depress depressed
ed depressed 1930's reaching a high of 50
billion in 1935-36. The figure droo droo-ped
ped droo-ped as times got better and war
preparedness took hold. During the
war years roll-your-own consump consumption
tion consumption was down to 10 billion.
In postwar readjustment years
rolling-your-own rose from 11 bil billion
lion billion in 1946 to 15 billion in 1948
and 16.5 billion in 1950. This was
a true reflection of the recession
just before the Korean War be began.
gan. began. As soon as the war boom took
hold, rolling-your-own dropped a
gain, to 15.8 billion in 1951, and
13.2 billion in 1952.
Now you Come to a funny one
that makes the barometer look
wrong. There was a recession in
1953-55. But roll-your-own use con continued
tinued continued to decline. It was 12 bil billion
lion billion in 195?,, then 11.8 billion in
1954 and 11.5 billion in 1955.
The explanation is that 1952 was
the year the c'anceV scare began
to take hold. It got worse in 1953
and 1954. It affected sales of roll-your-own
makin's as well as of
manufactured cigarettes. This ex explains
plains explains the discrepancy.
,-:RIADY-
sumption slumped
In 1952 to 38 bill!
368 in 1954. it-
Then the "tailor-made" cigarette
sales began to climb again. They
rose to 409 billion in 1957 and ta
an estimated 206.5 billion for the
first half of 1958 annual rate
413. ,..
This increase again might ap appear
pear appear to prove wrong the theory
that ready-made sales go down in
hard times. But there s an expla explanation
nation explanation offered for this, too.
It is found in th- introduction of
cigarette filters to offset the can cancer
cer cancer scare. The tobacco industry
itself credits its salvation to : fil filters.
ters. filters. About half the cigarettes
now sold have fitters.
But sales of makin's for roll-your-owns
have been going up too,
thus proving the tobacco business
barometer okey.
Tn the 10-month period "from
July 1957, through April, l!).r8,
sales of tax-paid cigarette paper
in books ran 20 per cent higher
than in the same period of 1956 1956-57.
57. 1956-57. A 20 per cent higher than in
the same period of 1956-57. A 20
per cent increase for the full year
would mean roU your own
consumption will again be up over
the 12 billion mark.
THIS FIGURE is also borne out
by inccreased sales of smoking to tobacco,
bacco, tobacco, which goes not 'only to roll-your-owners
but also to ptpe
smokers. Smoking tobacco sales
are up from 69 million pounds in
the 12 months ending June 30,
1958.
Department of Agriculture's to tobacco
bacco tobacco situation report, just issued,
says that "areas particularly af affected
fected affected by the recession are con consuming
suming consuming more and more smoking
tobacco."
The next report on tobacco, ig-
arette and paper consumption will
be issued in December. It should
show whether this recession is o-
ver or not, if nothing else does.
m
The mala nlghtlngaJe it the
singer. His melody is the song
of courtship to hi mate, which
remains silent ia a neighbor neighboring
ing neighboring buah or tree. Some people
ay that th' singing of the
male does not cease until ah
has hatched out her brood. Ha
sings by day at wall at by
night, but because of ether
birds, hit eong it not noticed
to much during the day.
C Brlttnptea Jr. TBWMe?

Washington

mm cigarette con-

m ...... yi at um r

Half a Column
by
FREE AD FOR TIME
MAGAZINE
Bernard M. Auer, is circulation
director lor Time Magazine. Ear Early
ly Early this year he sent out a "Dear
5ubscriDer letter that hasn't had
half enough publicity. I didn't
get one because I'm not even a
"subscriber and hence not "dear
It was a really Timely letter.
However, it cribbed from James
Thwfber's natural "History without
eivine credit. The letter head was
covere"d with queer birds, but not
in. the inimitable inurber style.
The birds mignt have been hatch hatched
ed hatched By one Steinberg of the New
York Times.
"Maybe you've heard about
Time's affair with "the birds," the
letter begins. "It began," the let
tei Continues, "With an otherwise
sober Story in Science where
Time readers spotted a refereuce
to an elusive Alaskan bird called
the "bristle-thighed' curlew.'
And beiore you could chirp
'Ornithology. says the letter.
"Time's eagle eyed readers had,
christened a flock of feathered,
friends tht would delight and!
dazzle -ah Audubon.
"There were the 'No Left Tern,'
the 'Extra-Marital Lark' and 'Ruf
fled Spouse' as well as rarer
specimens like the IBase Canard,'
the 'Vested Interest.'
and the 'Sad-Eyed Regret!'
"I hope he reminds you of the
happy days when Time was deli delivered
vered delivered to your doorstep every
week.
and that by using the inclos inclosed
ed inclosed card you can have Time back
again right away."
Mr. Auer subscribes the letter
"Cordially."
The scurrilous, partisan Demo
cratic Digest, has printed a reply
from Robert F. Shenkkan of Aus
tin, Texas. Maybe Time printed
the same letter, but, if it did I
missed it. Well, not to keep you
waiting, Robert wrote:
Dear Mr. Auer:
I enjoyed your recent letter a a-bout
bout a-bout Time's affair with the biids.
It does indeed remind me of the
days when Time was delivered to
my doorstep every week. ...
but I ain't want Time buck
again.
It may be a rHiny-taled news news-piper,
piper, news-piper, but, unfortunately, each tale
seems to suffer Time's own edi edi-puss
puss edi-puss complex.
And I foimd the 'Base Canard'
and the 'Vested Interest' were
pretty much the Common Tern in
Time.
Now many an Ike-billed Plati Platitude
tude Platitude has strutted your aviary
these six long years. Now the
Great Loon has slipped from fa favor
vor favor and Time is trying to install
the Double-Cross-Tongued Dickie
Bird in his perch
In short it is only lucely called

DISFNADOR INTF.RIORES
Architectural Desigriew
0 Interior Decorators
Cuatom-BuUt Furniture
Carpeting
Draperies
Bedding Box Springs Mattress
Decorative Fabrics
Consult us for planning and etimate$

HOMES OFFICES
jEU3.,a-iw
3-4628

SURE You Know This Gome?"

More or Less

CREDE CALHOUN

a newspiper. You are right though,
it is for the birds."
Personally, I would like to add
the "Hole-id-One" and the "CroSc "CroSc-Eyed
Eyed "CroSc-Eyed name turd" to the list.
THE OLD COPYBOOK MAXIMS
It was General Eisenhower, cam campaigning
paigning campaigning tor his first term as
President of the United Siates,
who said in a speech in St. Louis,
that there should be a return to
the standards outlined in the old
copybook maxims. Then he reeled
off some if them.
Honesty is the best policy.
A man is known by the compa company
ny company he keeps.
He that goes a borrowing goes
a sorrowing. i
A penny saved is peeny, earni
eL
Birds of a feather flock togeth
er.
(higgle Acted Odd
Before Disappearing,
Passengers Report
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)-Navy
investigators today probed the
mysterious disappearance at sea
of Rear Adm. Lynne C. Quiggle,
52, who was en route from the
Far East to a new post in San
Diego.
The captain of the ship on
which Quiggle was a passenger
said he apparently committed
suicide by jumping overboard
about 800 miles out of San Fran-1
cisco. Investigating officers from
12th Naval District headquarters
here went aboard the liner Presi President
dent President Cleveland s when the ship
docked here.
Commodore H. J. Ehman, cap captain
tain captain of the vessel, said Quiggle's
disappearance, early Tuesday
morning "had to be by design,
rather than accidental." He said
the sea was calm and no one
could have fallen overboard.
Fellow passengers said Quiggle
had been acting peculiarly. One,
Gloria Steinem, 24, of Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, D. C, said a ship officer told
her Quiggle was heard to say to
his wife: "You are better off as
a widow."
"The admiral then kissed his
wife and walked slowly from their
stateroom." Miss Steinem said.
Quiggle was returning with his
wife, Anne, from Tokyo where he
was deputy chief of staff of the
Joint Command, U. S. Forces. He
was to become commander of
Amphibious Group 1 at San Diego.
ii
0

CLUBS BANKkS HOTELS
, 8 :.QQ ajrv t?2i0 m.
2:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.

Now and Then

"Where do we stand today (that
was oept. 1952 ) where uoes our
government stand," he asked,
"when measureu against the mor moral
al moral principles, the sacred honor of
our lounders?"
On another occasion he said:
"if anyone ever comes to any
part of this government, ana,
claiming some privilege for e e-ven
ven e-ven to as low as an introduction
to an ouiciai ne wants to meet on
the basis that he is part of my
family or of my friends. .he is
to be thrown out. .
"I cannot believe that anybody
on my staff would ever be guilty
of an indiscretion. But if ever ar
nything came to my attention ;Of
that kind. .that indiiridual Would
be gone. ."
On lifrftiiifflii
same campaign, Ei
that if there was any
in his government, he. Would -not
wait for a Congressionalinvestiga
tion. He aqaea sternly tnat action
would come from the top. His" ac actual
tual actual words were: SJ:
"When it comes to casting but
the crooks and their cronies, I
can promise you that we won't
wait for Congressional prodding
and investigations. The prodding
this time will come from the
top."
Brave words, brave words in indeed,
deed, indeed, but. ...
THAT OLD COMMON COLD
Doctors admit that they can't
cure it. Some things relieve it. A
retired Old Timer I meet occa
sionally at the Balboa Clubhouse
has a cold that has ben hanging
,on. He is 100 per cent American.
having American Indian ancestors,
and his wife came from the fa famous
mous famous Sioux Tribe. She is some something
thing something of a Medicine Woman and
here is what she gives for the
coughing period of the common
cold.
After the concoction has been
well mixed take one tablespoon-
M.
"Now that ain't no cure," my
informant said, "but it sure
helps. Why, I had a grandaughter
who had a cold and coughed so
much she disturbed the class and
the teacher sent her home. 31 v
wife mixed her some of that stuff
and she took it and went back to
school."
Over 40 Hew Judges
Provided By Bill;
One For Canal ione
WASHINGTON, July 26 (UP!)
An administration-backed bill
providing more than 40 new fed federal
eral federal judgeships, one involving the
Canal Zone, will be considered by
the House Judiciary Committee
next Thursday, it was announced.
! The bill is aimed at cutting de delays,
lays, delays, which .sometimes run as
long as else to four years, in try
ing cases l)f providing more judi judicial
cial judicial manpower for the federal
courts. r- w
Attorney General William Rog Rogers
ers Rogers has been prodding Congress to
authorize- extra judges to reduce
the big backlog of cases in many
courts.
As approved by a subcommittee,
the bill would provide: four new
permanent and one temporary cir circuit
cuit circuit judgeships; 30 additional per permanent
manent permanent end: one temporary dis district
trict district judgeships; and make perma permanent
nent permanent four present temporary dis district
trict district posts.
The bill would add the follow following
ing following permaneft circuit judgeships:
Two for the second circuit 'Con 'Connecticut,
necticut, 'Connecticut, New York and Vermont),
one for the fourth circuit (Mary
land, North Carolina, South Caro Carolina,
lina, Carolina, Virginia end West Virginia)
and one for the fifth circuit (Ala
bama. Canal Zone, Florida, Geor Georgia,
gia, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and

1 :
' -1
.w..iii

YDII WQFTrurn DrDQI

WW ..fllalVllhV f wwwwWW I I tf 19 UIV. V .'IV IIIAIVII
of progress, you might have noticed in the paper the
other day, if you weren't drooling over a girlie magazine
or studying science and literature out of a coming book,
that the New Yankees' Casey Stengel is being touted" ffs
the West's secret weapon should Soviet Union premier
Nikita Khrushchev come to the US for the proposed Sum Summit
mit Summit meeting. m0 H1-
This theory war hastily advanced after the fourth
Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile rose a powerful
couple of hundred feet into the air at Cape Canaveral,
then toppled to become an ordinary outfield fly. But before
Expldrer IV became a homer every couple or hours it was
noted that Stengel has several men in his lineup who are
in the habit of propelling a missile at least twicelas that
Cape Canaveral Atlas, except against Lew Burdette.
It Was further noted by Senators who had weathered
such an experience with wobbly ears that a conversazione
with Stengel would send the Kremlin's answer to Yul
Brynner back to Moscow talking to himself, and twitch twitching
ing twitching spastically. ,.! f( ';
Students of the internatipna. scene are of the opinion
that if Khrushchev could be induced to ask Casey Who
was on first base, and why, the resulting confusion ItfuTd
be such that it would give Standard Oil at least five -innings
to adjust its buttons in the Middle East without
the need for more Marines. -. ;, ;i milh
Similarly it -is believed that if Casey gets the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to explain why he likes' to have left-hand-pitching
against right hand hitters, the ballistic experts who
launched Russian's Sputnik will be bewildered by Krush Krushchev's
chev's Krushchev's subsequent orders and requests that the US Will
make up much of the ground it is not "esteemed to have
lost in the space race over the last year.
I was discussing these matters in all appropriate
solemnity with a Canal ZOnian the other dayTo my sur surprise,
prise, surprise, he scoffed at the idea of a Summit meeting at ttfe
United Nations Security Council in New York. He held a
low opinion of the proposal to expose Khrushphev to
Stengelese, an old Russian dialect from the dugout
steppes.
This Zonian contended, between Summit conferences
with the sommelier, that if the West's tactics at the Sun Sun-mit
mit Sun-mit meet were to out-doubletalk Khrushchev, the place
to hold the conference was right here on the Isthmus.
He gave assurance that if security precautions, for
Khrushchev are a problem,, he could be quartered out at
Gamboa. With the bus service to that watering place in
the state it is, no one would ever get there to do him
a mischief unless the conference ran two weeks or more.
And my Zonian friend had some questions he thought
Khrushchev should be coaxed to ask, in furtherance of the
West's tactics of bewilderment and confusion.
The scourge of the kulacks declares himself to be
much preoccupied with the fate of the little man and the
l'"! country, in, tbe 1 lm' ko.marg
individuals and among nations,

.in 'tne tight-ot this,
to lend f.
imam
and
local-born workers ; 'in the
especially to regards to wage
more well-known that Canal

cou d he exDected

itmtmi'mmmm mmam ass.

aggjng over $100 a month iaf 9iA percent of Panama
Canal Cornpart worjters,' constitute ;deedKi oppression
of the caliber so effectively ended in that cellar at fcx fcx-ta.nbe
ta.nbe fcx-ta.nbe It'i, a cinch that Khrushchev, seeking material with
which to underscore this infamy, would inquire as to the
exemplary largesse dispursed by those who so justly and
high-mindediy criticize the Canal Zone's local-rate pay
scales, The latest figures, according to my companion, in indicate
dicate indicate tl)vt by contrast to Panama Canal scales. 78.1 per percent
cent percent of Panamanian wage earners get less than $100
monthly, with 13.2 percent of them scooping in a bounti bountiful
ful bountiful $25 a month, or less.
My statistic-laden friend doubted wher Stengel
. could do more than this to send KhruehMv home
mumbling. ,:
Then they couW taMAlrn to, Caal Zohiekirtine
ginger y round Corbzal where there are men'n white
coats looking forsuch mumblers. and expose him to the
fact that in tMr-PatflmfcCanal- Compittifwhere only an
estimated f(ve percent or less of local raters will move up
or. to US-ratepay scales under the recently-signed Single
Wage Scale BH; security has been much heard of as the
final measure of whether one job or. another can go to a
ltmay be tever his other qualifications to hpld
Yet in the Armed Services, which are supposed to
have some sort of familiarity with security problems, an
estimated 27 percent of Local Raters will ,be moving on
to US rate scales of pay. -'
There Is no orTe more goofily sJcufity conscious than
a Russian. The aytrt priHt thelrewsoaoers in some
strange code, so that nofrfftofe. readvthem. Cyrillic
a phabet it's called, Maybe this SimHe Wage security
play culd he pulled on Khrushchev's bfdtfd-caked security
chief Ivan Sere who puld be alon to check over thl
security setuo if Khrushchev were to come here Thut
would make two mumbline Muscovites. Provderr5ally at
Corozal they have two men with white coats.
a ?rJ my C0,,e&Kl' suggested, we could try the rumdum
of Red Square On the uiry Into the four-death fireTt
Rodman the other day. Maybe there's no smoke without
fire, but judging from the time the Navy, is takinjr to Iret
out an explanation of the affair there', also no flrl n the
"VakV & ,moki,,adoomvCirs n?Vco
It is the opinion of my Army-lining-. associate that if
the Navy takes all this time to decide wWmadVa oot of
paint thinner go up. it wMt tae it much Kr t discover
what makes a Vanguard go up. and staytSr? M
wondered whether Khrushchev would havidlofLati,10
munity to wear short ehorts on Rodman ISed sS
X.akPriyr U?i,on$ e'c and fishfry. would" serS
bering f 8h0rt ,h0rt
..agu7yuXchrM whit: at CorMv' 4
Reviewing his CZ confusion stratagem, I told mv
associate that maybe he had an idea. He said that indeed
he did. Suiting the deed to the word, he again summoned
the sommelier.

PERCY'S PEERLESS PORTENT pays due respect o

the

1540
thousan d dollars the Air Force got last wMk to
strengthen-the Howard Field runways as the first step In
a move from Albrook and, incidentally, from the schools
at Balboa.

rc in h ahva f h. Wa.t.

zoMmimimmm
or
mor
dtiftarc
stcales.lt cpirld scarcely be
SSpne Ipgal-rate wais aver-

1 Mr. K

WalfBal IBivtn, con-

llv Canal Zone. Mora

0

..... ,uL'ih



rrll
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
PACE
SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1958
WABiT Of BRITAIN w

ess B Sro iHk. "V B
I J$&B? B- g & p -4
-Btti-v v MB HH v
$sff

' LONDON, July 28 A middle middle-aged
aged middle-aged traveller from America, com complete
plete complete with .map of the town and
a camera, exchanged grins with
m as we rumbled through the
"tube" tunnel 200 feet below Lon London's
don's London's Piccadilly.
"I guess Ive seen nothng as
good as this," he said, as the
train pulled up in Knightsbridge
Station and the doors slid open
automatically. "Nothing so .good
since I left Kentucky."
I was sorry he got out there.

We Londoners are proud of our

"tubes." I could have told him
so much of their story how they
were the first of their kind in the
world and in many ways remain
unique today.

LONG RUN

kffni istmfnt Pvt Duane C. Smith, left, of Reno, Nev., and Pfc. Alfred M. Medzle t-f
KffiSpa bothigned to United State. Army Garrison. Quarry Heights take theoaifa
ol SuSSmce dS a reenlistment .ceremony at Quarry Heights. The two sold ers both of
whom work with the Caribbean Command, reenlisted for three years and will remain In

r.-, j. ..ifo M0H7 0 to now at nis nome m reiiiisyivauiu uu noit.

Wlelr present; 000451111 ,-.. t-

(U.S. Army Photo)

Cows To Go Church; Monkey Goes
AWOL; Fowl Hitches 20-Mile Ride

must

ATLANTA UPin It

that animals are having tneir
silly season: cows going to
church, a chicken hitching a 20 20-mile
mile 20-mile ride and a monkey going
AWOL. t
The cows four of them broke
loose on a trio to the slaughter

pen, galloped down a busy street
in Montgomery, Ala., and took
refuge in the First Presbyterian
Church. It took stockmen and po police
lice police well over an hour to diag
them out.
The Rev. Merle Patterson
didn't exactly welcome the cows.
"We have an open door policy."
he said, "but they are riot our
'kine'."
This same urge for freedom
struck a chicken belonging to
George Epperson at King, N.C.
The fowl fled its pen, hopped onto
the axle of a truck and traveled

the 20 miles to Winston Salem

before it was recaptured.

And in Atlanta, a monkey

named Bob chose freedom over

be food, darting through the cage

door when an attendant opened 11
to serve his breakfast.

"Three days later Boh showed

up at the home of Mrs. G. SV.
Day, who' invited him in, gave
him a drink of water and called
the zoo. Attendants returned him

to his cage after a wild chase
through the house, and after Bob
had bitten one pursuer on the
hand.

MENDES-FRANCE IN CHINA
TOKYO (UPD Former French
Premier Pierre Mendes France
11 as arrived in Peiping for a
private visit, the Communist New
china News Aeency reported to

day. Mendes France, visiting

flommunist China on invitation of

the cninese Peoples Institute of

Foreign Af airs, came to Peiping

by plane from Moscow.

Animals weren't alone in the
odd behavior department, either.
Example:

Atlanta policemen S. F. Wiggins

and L. F. Burch stopped a car

because the license plate was

covered and found that the driver,

a man they declined to identify,
was completely uncovered.
Adrian Robertson of Little Rock

Ark., proved he is willing to go

a long way to prove a point. He

soent 52 days walking tne tnou

sand miles from Little Rock to

Florence, S.C., demonstrating the

durability of shoes sold in the

store where he is employed.
Two men Droved their own dur

ability, trough not voluntarily.
The first was pedestrian Willie
Youngblood, 23, hit by a train at
Winston Salem, N.C, but only
shaken up.
The second was Wayne Thomas,
"a chronic sleep-walker in Browns Brownsville,
ville, Brownsville, Tenn. Although unhurt in a
plunge from a second 'Storey win window,
dow, window, he pledged: "I will never
sleep npstairs again."

From the file on predicaments:
that of Fulton County, Ga., tax
commissioner Stendish Thompson,
who has a money order for $38.14
and doesn't know what to do with
it. The sender failed to give his
name or to designate what sort
of tax he wished to pay.

Bj-"LEfl ER'Elr EE EJ
TCTe! oaWSBOJ pr HB w

I

'MINX CONVERTIBLI

'Special' Saloon
own in PRICE
OP IN VM.UI

As the train carried me on to

Hammersmith, my friend was al

ready being aloft by swift

escalator which would land him
on the verges of Hyde Park,

scene this month of transport in

its most primitive form men run

ning.

Dr. Roger Bannister, first man

to run a mile in under four min

utes, and champion muer of the

last Empire Games, led a relay

of runners carrying a message

from Queen Elizabeth II to Car Cardiff,
diff, Cardiff, Wales, for the opening of the
1958 British Empire and Common

wealth Games' July 18.

Pursuing above ground almost

the same track as my train down

below, Dr. Bannister and fellow fellow-champions
champions fellow-champions Chataway and Driver

conveyed the missive across Hyde

Park to Kensington Gardens,

where the first of 664 night and
day runners began the journey to

Cardiff Arms Park.
I was reminded of the "tube'
encounter with my "Am r i c a n

friend only two days later when,
sailing down the River Thames to
Greenwish, I passed a little did

circular tower next to 0 w e r
BTridge. It marks the spot where

the worlds first deeD "tube" rait

way as distinct from the familiar
subway just below the street-

was sunk in 1870.

Recently renovated for its job
of carrying water mains, as it

has done lor the past 60 vears.

this ower Tube originally provid

ed a tnree-minute service of passenger-carrying
trains hauled be between
tween between the North and South Banks
of the River by stationary steam
engine.

11 inus preceded Dy 20 years

tne opening of the world's first

electric "tube" railway, the City

ana boutn London line, now an in integral
tegral integral part of the far-flung under

ground system which so impressed

our guest from Kentucky.

The whole system is popularly

Known as tne unaereround. al

though only a third is submerged,

ine rauways coming to tne sur

face as the outskirts of London
are reached. The total of 253
route miles includes the longest

railway tunnel in the world (from

hast Flnchley to Morden) extend
ing 176 miles.
FINE IN ALL WEATHERS

One attraction among many In
London's "tubes," I always think,

is the dependability of their wea
ther."

In a heat wave the elaborate

ventilation system keeps them as
cool as a dairy, and in a cold and
wet spell their general cosiness
tempts one to stay below and en enjoy
joy enjoy soft airs as warm as the Ha Hawaiian
waiian Hawaiian zephyrs)
Resisting subterranean Impulses
last week, I was speeding south southwards
wards southwards by diesel express to Ports Portsmouth
mouth Portsmouth when, part-way through the
county of Surrey, I spotted the
historic motor racing track at
Brooklands.
The old, steeply-banked track,
partly overgrown with shrubs and
trees, is now the" periphery of the
great Vickers-Armstrongs aircaft
works.

Last Sunday Vickers celehrated

craft industry and ten years of
constructing the Vickers Viscount,
the world's first turbo-prop airlin airliner.
er. airliner. Nearly 400 Viscounts of vari various
ous various classes have now been fold
alsmost all over the globe.

Vickers began in 1908 building
airships, but it was the heavier -than-air
machines, begun in 1911,

that made their name in aeronau aeronautics.
tics. aeronautics. Notable was the FB 5. guu-

carrying fighter of World War
and the even more renowned Vic

kers Vimy bomber, and modified

version 01 which was used in 1919
by Aicock and Brown for the first
direct crossing of the North Atlan Atlantic.
tic. Atlantic. OUTSTANDING TRIUMPH

Vickers' outstanding triumph of

World War II was the Spitfire
which, along with the Hurricane,
saved the ree world in the Battle
of Britain.

At Brooklands they are turn

ing out Vanguard turbo prop air airliners,
liners, airliners, to make another big con

tribution to Britain s record avia aviation
tion aviation exports this year.
In the first five months of 1958.
exports of aircraft, totalling $1, $1,-806,000,000,
806,000,000, $1,-806,000,000, were half as much a a-gain
gain a-gain as the corresponding figure

last year. In fact, exports are
nore running at the rate if $434,
000,000 for the year, a huge jump
even over 'the 1957 record total of
$326,200,000.

Things are looking up in more
ways then one. In spite of the $7, $7,-500,000
500,000 $7,-500,000 installment paid in the
Canadian loan and a repayment
of $6,000,000 on Marshall A i d

loans, Britain's gold and dollar
reserves rose in June by $37,000. $37,000.-000
000 $37,000.-000 to $3,076,000,000. Not since Sep

tember 1951 have we soared to

such heights.

" "fl

. . 2

CARRIER-BASED PUNCH This official U.S. Navy photograph gives a striking view of f
the fleet's new A3J-1, the "Vigilante," an all-weather, twin-jet capable of delivering nuclear
weapons on difficult targets at supersonic speeds. Built by North American Aviation Inc the
A3J is powered by two General Electric J79-2 jet engines which can attain more than 24 000
pounds or thrust. S

mm

TRUCK TIRES

50

s- "Slv'KiI

SKY HICH

ALLSTATE

tire buys with down to
earth prices

now

discount

Buy first tire full price
get second at
HALF PRICE

670 x 15
black
Tube Type

tires

NOW

17.80

each In
sets of
four

HILLMM STATION WMOR

3 Youths Set Little

Fire Resulting
In $26,000 Damage
HARTFORD, Conn. (UPI) A
boy who "just wanted to mak
a little fire" was held today foi
setting off an explosion-punctuat
ed inferno that reduced 80 toni
of scrap metal to smoldenhf
ashes.

The boy was picked up yester
day while tons of titanium and
magnesium blazed fiercely at the
Suisman and Blumenthal Scrap

Metal Co. The fire brought pre

dictions of new ordinances for the
storing of such material within
city limits.
The firm estimated damage at
upwards of $26,000.
The fire was brought under con
trol within two hours but was still
smoldering 24 hours later.
Police said a 9 year old boy,

who appeared "very excited and

frightened," reported the three
alarm fire to a cleaning esUb

lishment, then disappeared. He
was traced to bis home and later

implicated a 7 year old and a
12 vear old.

The vouneest boys were sent

home, but the older boy was neld

at the juvenile detention nome
Police said he told them them he
wanted to make a little fire, but

it turned into a big one.

He said he used scraps of wood

and oily rags to set off the blaze
in 75 tons a titanium scrap from

old jet plane engines.

Siie Type "Price Price each Price each Price each
each Two brought Three bought Four bought
1
M M Illlll I II I 1 mi II I I
760 x 15 6 Ply blk. .. 29.95 28.45 26.95 25,45
670 x 15 4 Ply blk. 23.95 22.75 21.55 20.35
670 x 15 4 Ply tubeless 29.95 28.45 26.95 2545
670 x 15 6 Ply tubeless .... 26.95 25.60 24.35 23.00
670 x 15 4 Ply white 29.95 28.45 26.95 25.45
550 x 15 4 Ply bik 16.95 16.10 1525 14.40

QUEEN RECOVERING

LONDON (UPI) Queen Eliza

beth II, slowly recovering from an
attack of catarrhal sinusitis, had

bn ordered bv her doctors to

stay close to Buckingham Palace
and pass up public engagements
until the end of this month.

POPI PIUS WRITING
CASTELGANDOLFO. Italy

(UPD Pope Pius XII yesterday
snent the first morning of his

summer vacation working on two

will broadcast to

addresses he

50 years' connection with the air- day and tomorrow,

5ri

Manumatlc 2-peaat control available as an extra on the Deluxe Saloon,
Convertible and Station Wagon. White-wall tyres, chromium rim rim-ftnttkers
ftnttkers rim-ftnttkers and over-riders available at extras on all models. Bight or
left hand drive available.

CZ. $ 1615.00

COLON MOTORS, Inc

PANAMA
Tel. 2-1669

COLON
Tel. 492-J

Dealer throughout the Republic

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

Great Wliite Fleet
A

New Orleans Service Arriv"

' ir isiuuni

"HIBUERAS"

"YAQTJE"
TJLUA" JJ
"HIBUERAS" Au"- H
TAQUE" uf
ULUA" SeP
Also Handling Refrigerated and Chilled Cargo
' Arrives

New York Service
Cristobal

UMON- inly
"COMAYAGUA" Aug. 4
TARISMINA" Au?-
"SAN JOSE" Aug. 18
"METAPAN" Au?- 2'
"JUNIOR" SeP- 1
CRISTOBALW.C.C.A. FEDDER SERVICE
"TEXITA" Every (15) Day
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle.

SPECIAL ROUND TRIP PASSENGER FARES FROM
CRISTOBAL ANDOR BALBOA:
To New York and Return 1240.00
To Los Angeles arid San Francisco and
Returning from Los Angeles SOT0.M
To Seattle and Return S3S5.H
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2904

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED

OR YOUR MONEY BACK
OPEN FROM 8:00 to 12:00
and from 2:00 to 6:00

SEARS

Panama, Tivoli Ave. . 2-0931
Los Angeles Transthmian

Highway
Colon, Bolivar Ave.

3-195!i

1137

P. A. CLASSIFIEDS

presents tlie royal pair

KINGMATIC-QUEEN MATIC

m

Movado Kingmatic the virtually "in "invulnerable"
vulnerable" "invulnerable" automatic watch self-winding,
28 Morels, with inclusive "S" shock
protecting device and water resistant
Tnattt case.

Movado Queerrmatjo the queen of lady's
automatic watches self-winding, 30
jewels, a true miniature, precise and ss
dainty 1

la lfc 1958 conttit of Iha NcuchaMl Official Swiss Observatory, Movad beat all records for
orformanco regularity in the wrist, chronometer! clasi.

Caa faUlch
CENTRAL AMERICA'S
LEADING JEWELLERS
161 CINTRAL AVENUI

IN COLON COLON JIWfRLY CO. lOtk ST. AND FRONT

1

it
r V ,jf, ""
I

4i. ,: dm- )
I
r if -ret
I

ESEEflEEEEEH



"

HLGe FOOT
THE STJTTOAf AMERICAS
BUN DAT, JULT S7, W51

r

Social
an
B,
Jt Jl L

MISS SAL1,Y MARCKLLA HAKROLD

MISS SALLY MARCKLLA HARROLD ENGAGED
TO MR. WILLIAM JOHN NICKISHER, JR.
Maj. Gen. and Mrs. Thomas L. Harrnld of Washington,
D.C., announce the engagement of their daughter, Sally
Marcella, to Mr. William John Nickisher, Jr., son of Mr. and
Mrs. William J. Nickisher of Diablo Heights, Canal Zone,
formerly of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Miaa Harrold attended the University of Texas and is a
graduate of the Canal Zone Junior College. Mr. Nickisher
attended the Canal Zone Junior College and is currently
employed with the Electrical Division of the Panama Canal
Company.
A November Wedding is planned.

Dinner for Mrs. Callaway
Mrs. L. C. Callaway Jr., form formerly
erly formerly of the Canal Zone and now nf
Miami, Florida is now staying at
th Tlvoll Gueit House with her
two children, Chug and Betty El Ellen.
len. Ellen. While here Mrs. Callaway
has been entertained by many of
her friends. Mr. and Mrs. Ficd
Beauchamp gave a dinner for her
at the Fort Amador Officers' O O-pen
pen O-pen Mess and Mr. and Mrs K.
Lowartde entertained her in their
home in Los Rios.
Cooking Class Of IAWC To
Initiate Years Activities
The Cooking Class ol the in r r r-Amerlcan
Amerlcan r-Amerlcan Women's Club will ini initiate
tiate initiate their year's activities with' a
"Get Together'' luncheon at tne
Panama Golf'Club on Thursday.
July 31. Any member of the Inter Inter-American
American Inter-American Women's Club who de desires
sires desires to join the Cooking Class
should contact the Chairman. Mrs.
Gloria C. Endara, Panama 3-WOO
after 5 p.m., the acting Co Chair Chairman,
man, Chairman, Mrs. Beverlv St. Angelo, Na Navy
vy Navy 2498 of the Club Office.

FRENCH BREAD BUYERS
Thru arrangements made with the
LA TAHONA BAKERY, Panama's foremost
bakers of French bread, the
ATLAS GARDEN
ran now supply you with their
French bread, supplied twice daily
at TEN CF,NTS.each.
Kindly place your order the day before.
Telephones 2-2423 or 2-4830

0f0

Nowl We blend colors. We accent them. And we Creole th one
color that fits yew tlesite, your ntadl for with this sensational new
loux product we can produce literally hundreds of individual
hoircolors-the most lustrous, most natural lookinfl evetl Phone
today, for your appointment for your "personol" hoircolor! We
use Roux Cremo Color according o directions.
IT'S CRIMI-KIND TO YOUR HAIR
ASK FOR IT AT YOUR BEAUTY SALON
Distributors in Panama

JULIO
Second Diagonal (Old
Box No. 297

J Oil,

eraMe
Staff.
fen
J XJ U(J L
nti oitr Manama
2-0 740 WVl-H
El Panama Hilton
To Celebrate "Carnavalito"
Hotel El Panama Hilton's tradi traditional
tional traditional Carnavalito, or little Carni Carnival,
val, Carnival, will take place on Saturday
Almost 23, in the Patio.
This Carnavalito takes place ev every
ery every year during the American col college
lege college vacation period to enable
homecoming students-to enjoy the
same festivities as the yearly Mar Mar-di
di Mar-di Graa. Queens, costumes, merry-making,
dancing will be red redacted
acted redacted in the same fun loving man manner,
ner, manner, i
Lovely Queen Rita OBurrell)
who reigned to successfully this
year during Carnival, will again
preside over the dance tt '-which
costumes are in order. She wit)
enter the Patio with her
conn
of princes' and princesses to ttad
the various costumed groups In
Panama's folk dances, the "Tain "Tain-borlti
borlti "Tain-borlti and Cumbia."
Two orchestra win play for
dancing, Clarence Martin and l.u
eho Azclrraga's CoojwnMi and their
repertoire will be the popular

PERSONALIZED HAIRCOLOR

CUSTOM-BLENDED with
ROUXfVCOlOR

VOS, S. A.
Street) Ne.
Tel. 2-2171
7-r,

134,
anama
U.J prompt t Lt mum
tlwu 8:00
10
Panamanian Carnival melodies
: ola and new, to delight one's ear
and seV one's feet to dancinu
Come ami enjoy Carnavalilo at El
i Panama Hilton.
Fish pry
Tiie U. Frank P. Albrook Post
3822 of the Veterans of Fore,s;ii
Wars in Ancon will have a fish fry
on Saturday evening, August 2
from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m. That eve-
nins there will be a dance begin-
ning at 8.00. Highlight of the Jays
events will be door prizes ami
Karnes for the children. Everyone
is invited to attend.
Mr. and Mrs. Stokes
Return to Ntw York
Mr and Mrs. Nick Stokes
their daughter. Linda Jane,
have been visiting Mr? S
parents Air. and Mrs. Isaac Sa--so
of Colon, have returned to their
home in New' York.
Elbert S. Waid, American
Leoion Auxiliary Meets
Elbert S. Waid Unit No. 2. Ame American
rican American Legion Auxiliary, held its
rpfulpr monthly meeting on
23 in the Legion Hall in Old
tibnl. Mrs. Ida McDade and
Lilia Rozmeski reported on
July
Cris
,V,rs,
the
Fourth of July activities.
Welcomed at the meeting were
Mrs. Mar-belle Waid. Mr. Ms-rv
(Mother) Engelke. and Mrs. Ber Bertha
tha Bertha Brown who has recently re returned
turned returned from a vacation in the
States.
Plans for a rummage sale to be
held in collaboration with oilier
Auxiliary groups on the Atlantic
si''", were discussed.
Following the meeting a surnnae
baby 'bower was tendered Mrs.
Jem Chander. past president of
the Uni1 Refreshments were serv served
ed served by Mrs. Margaret Schuberg
and Mr. LI'' Ponurski.
The White Klephant was won by i
Mrs. Jem Chandler.
Little League
Boys 11 Girls 10
Eleven boys and 10 girls were
born at Gorgas Hospital during
the week which ended at mid
night Monday, July 21, according
lo a report from the Hospital.
During this same period, 217 pa pa-tients
tients pa-tients were admitted and 190 dis discharged.
charged. discharged. Parents of the boy babies are:
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Reichel, of
Los Rios; Sgt. and. Mrs. B. W.
Barbec, of Cocoli; Ir. and Mrs,
MoiSes Mlnas, of Paraiso; Pfc
and Mrs. D. W Elliott, of 3al 3al-boa;
boa; 3al-boa; Lt. and Mrs. J. E McBride
of Albrook Air Force Base; S-opt
and Mrs. R. LaGrange. of vLen vLen-na;
na; vLen-na; Mr, and Mrs. C. F. JosDh,
of Chilibre; Sp3 and Mrs. J. Ks'
of Panama City;. Mr. and Mrs I.
A I nrnip tl n ""I I .. Tit
9hfi r. c maiaoi nt r..i
"nn I'll d. Y . tUI-i'Ct I, UuJ'
boa; and Dr. and "Mrs H. G. Ray,
of Ancon.
Parents of the girl babies are
Mr. nd Mrs. J. M. Thomson,' Jr.,
of Diablo; A2c and Mrs. R. D.
Davis, nf Locona; Mr. and Airs.
V. A. Schloss, Of Panama City;
Pev. and Mrs. John Spear, of
Gamboa; Ale and Mrs. J. H. Lo"
vier. of Loco"- Sn,1 and Mrs. V.
H. Mabrey, of Panma City; Mr,
ir Mr ii. i rtnach, of Panama
City; WO 2 and Mrs. W. O. Har
.; nf p-ort Clayton; Capt. an-t
Mrs R. J Sai. of Albrook Air
fc'orre Base; and Mr. and Mrs
A. A. Shan, of Gambea.
mam
1
ON SALE AT ALL
DRUGSTORES
RtClueWe Distributor
FARMACIA RUIZ
P.O. Hox !! Panama. R.P

&ox

Textile Exec Denies Adams
Used Influence To Help Firm

WASHINGTON (UPI) A textile
executive brushed olf at "ridicul "ridiculous"
ous" "ridiculous" yesterday a charge that Pres Presidential
idential Presidential Assistant Sherman Adams
used improper inlluence to gel the
executive's firm a $41,284 reiund
from the government.
Leo Wolff, who was presideiit'of
the now-defunct Raylaine Wor Worsteds,
steds, Worsteds, Inc., of Manchester, N.H.,
told reporters he never had met
Adams. The White House nts (aid
d,ra8 forwarded inquiries io the
pen,gon for Raylaine as a
mt.tr of inline.
Wol!f relaxed and cheer'ul w
interviewed while waiting to test!
!v Wore a House armed services
in8 tne 1967 Army refund of a
subcommittee which is investigat
Penalty against Raylaine for late
delivery on a 1941 cloth contract.
Acquaintance Denied

and "I don't know anyone in Wash Wash-who
who Wash-who ington, not even the New Hatup
ikei shire people Bridges and who

was that other one, Merrow?"
Wolff told newsmen. This referred
to Sen. Styles Bridges (R-N. H.)
and Rep. Chester E. Merrow (R (R-N.H.)
N.H.) (R-N.H.) who also forwarded queries
to the Pentagon for Raylaine.
Wolff said that Adams, in for forwarding
warding forwarding an inquiry from .lis firm,
did just what a congressman
would do in similar circum circumstances.
stances. circumstances. "He gives you a pat on the back
Paris Hat Parade
Proves Women's
Faces Will Show
. PARIS (UPI) Another round
in the Pans hat parade proved to today
day today that women's faces next sea season
son season will be seen and probaMy
admired.
Brims that hide the face were
considered old-hat by Claude Saint
Cyr, one of the pace setters in
; Parisian millinery.
She called her hats polo cap
but most of them were sti'tiv
I shaped inverted cones Or clochek
I All showed the face.
Afternoon wear emphasmed
! height and softness and minimized
I exaggeration. There were clothes
'n taupes and Velvets and printed
jerseys in warm shades of cocoa,
pink and gold. Some featured vel velvet
vet velvet braiding in contrastine enlm-i
tmy bows and up-turned brlma in
back or at the side.
Color, material and detail chang changed
ed changed but never shape. The ki er
noon hat w;s. either cloche or cap
with supple deep crown.
Saint-Cyr excelled at evening
wear; Her furs and feathers, pro-
canes and tames were worked
witn tne suppleness of satin.
There were elegant multi-colored
feathered toques and brocade eve evening
ning evening hats of the same shape
Bahds of brocade, mink, sable,
btavef and broadtail were fash fashioned
ioned fashioned so skilfully that they appear appeared
ed appeared to be draped.
Climax of the show was a spray
of jewels that fastened a swatch
of -tulle to the wearer's head. This
was considered the apex of ele elegance
gance elegance in evening wear.
MM FRIENDS
Generally speaking, the per,
son who makes the telephone call
is the one' who should bring it to
an end. But if a longwinded talker
Calls you lt is sometimes necessary
to ertd the conversation yoursalr
You can end a phone conver.
sation without seeming rude 'f
you seem reluctant to close the
Conversation but confess yu must
in order to do some specific thing.
000P BRAKES m
A SMALL
IMmTMtHT
...FOKlOrSOF
SAnry

It will cost you loss to have brake Service done before major
repair is necessary, lt coses much more for grinding scored
drums, honing cylinders or even doctor bills.

Where Safety is Concerned
Don't Compromise for Less
Demand The Beif .

Warner

GENU I N I

LOCKHEED HYDRAULIC
BRAKE PARTS as. FLUID

Panama
- Box 1913

-
says I'll take care of it and then
forward it to get nd of it," he
said.
lattte For Settlement
"We wrote to everybody we
coulil think of," Wolff said.-in re recalling
calling recalling his company's liyear ef effort
fort effort to get back pert of the t
111 in late-delivery penalties as assessed
sessed assessed by the Army.
He insisted that final settlement

ot me case last November by rne
Armed rorces Board of Contract
appeals was not due to outside
influences. It resulted instead, he
said, .rom the "legal ability and
constant battling" of his lawyer,
Edwin McDermott ; Philadelphih,
McDermott wis questioned for
more than three hours by the sub sub-Committee.
Committee. sub-Committee. The group, headed by
Hep. f. Edward Hebert (D La.)
is conducting hearings behind
closed doors to determine whether
public sessions should be held Mc
Dermott was the fifth witness.
San Antonio CO-Op
To Meet Tomorrow
The San Antonio de Padua Cred
lt Cooperative will hold a special
meeting tomorrow night at 1:00 in
the French Society Hall here.
The agenda for the meetine in.
ciuaes me reading ol reports from
inr aumimsirauve council, tne
treasurer, manager.loan commii
tee and super ory commillee;
declaration of I idends and elec election
tion election of officers.
in addition, the members of two
study groups will become full
fledged members of the
tive.
coopera-
d3(azinq Sun
a
y OAILI DUOAS
NEW YORK, (NEA) By this
time, almost every woman has a
cotton knit or two in her ward wardrobe.
robe. wardrobe. She'll be adding several as
the summer goes by since they're
idispensable for weather
wear.
The new cotton knits are real
glamor girls with a streak of
practicality. They come in high
fashion colors, paisley mixtures,
stripes and pastels as well as city
black,
For beach, resort of country
wear, they take on a nautical look
and draw themselves up into blat.
ers and blousoni.
When you shop or cotton knits
look for the tag that says they're
all.washable and crease.resistant.
These will look fresh all summer
long no matter how wilting the
heat,
Brass-buttoned blazer (left) is
worn with a sleevelesi cotton knit
shirt. Pants, too, are cotton knit.
Blouson (right) with two-piece
look actually has striped dickey
Inset, it's worn here with white
beachcomber pants.
laid astis fet intiuiin Is tta
eelaMft abeuM be tuawttte' m
tvse-wtitten fotm ene mailed ee
the kes sunbet listed dalh ht
ial and OthtrwMS," er dcHveeed
by hasd te the Wee. Natiesa f
meetings cannot b Meeted b
tlehae.
Rotary Altar Sotiotyt Meat
The regular meeting of the Cos Cos-ary
ary Cos-ary Altar Society of the Miracul Miraculous
ous Miraculous Medal Church, Colon, Will be
held in the Parish Hall at T:3d p.
m. on Monday, July 28.
VPW Department Cevnell
The department council of ad-
of ad
minfitfat on of the Canal Zone VeV
terans of Foreign Wars will Hold
Its first council meeting at
Gen. George W. Goethals No. 330,
COcoll, this morning at 10 a.m.
All department officers are urg
ed to attend.
Auto S. A.
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NEW YORK (NBA) The
Empress Josephine never had it
so good (when she united around
mooning at Napoleon) as yonll
have it this fall in your new eve evening
ning evening gowns.
For tired eyea weary of star
ing at the aack, the new evening
dress With the high waisted look
and the drifty or belled skirts are
welcome relief.
This high-waisted, or Directolre.
look takes expert seaming and
draping in order to look well. The
prettiest versions are those which
are not overly exaggerated.
Keeping pace with the high high-waisted
waisted high-waisted look is the trapeze sil
houtte, done for evening in satin
and brocade and in glowing col colors,
ors, colors, from rose red to gold and
even golden brown.
Much attention is concentrated
at the hemline in the trapeze
silhouette with pouting. pleating
and draping. The ekirt above the
hemline is smooth, shaped and
nevr coy. Obviously, these skirts
are seamed carefully over stiffen stiffening
ing stiffening and linings to give them the
right belled appearance.
The lightly Moused top appears
in short evening dresses above a
smooth, slim .skirt. It's done in
brocades, crepes, layered chiffons
and lame.
One look that all designers seem
to sponsor in common lOr tall is
mat of tne snort evenine own
with its own matched coat. Nearly
all houses that do evening dresses
have these coats and many of them
in truly magnificent fabrics with
elegant linings. The designers ieel
that this gives a woman an ensem-
j ble look that is, in its way, unique
I and stunning.
Can t lJift
Senate Reportedly
With Benson On
WASHINGTON (UPI)-The Sen Senate
ate Senate scheduled an early meeting to today
day today and drew close to key votes
On a major farm bill with heavy
""'
kAnnSoilAnr i r A rli-inii Iiii-a SAdl'ft
"'L """Ja' -""? c
. "I" V"l aieu.""
ILS
(Minn), were reported to have
reached a compromise with Ben
son and administration forces
which would generally favor the
farm secretary's campaign for
looser federal planting contio's
and lower price support mini mini-mums.
mums. mini-mums. The Senate bill would head off
men 1 : all...
naip cms ill i.'.k pi, lining Oliui-J
ments lor cotton and rice, aboilsn
111 federal controls on torn plant plantings
ings plantings and authorize lower supports
for cotton, rice and corn.
In the House, Agriculture Com Committee
mittee Committee Chairman Harold D. Cool Cool-ey
ey Cool-ey said prospects now ere good
for agreement on an omnibus bill
acceptable to i im administration.
Leaders of the House group were
to meet today to draw up a cot cotton
ton cotton bill along the lines of the Sen Senate
ate Senate proposal.
Defense Secretary Nell H. Mc Mc-Elroy
Elroy Mc-Elroy went behinds losed doors
with the Senate Preparedness Sub Subcommittee
committee Subcommittee today to try to prove
the Pentagon is adequately han handling
dling handling its nuclear space age assign assignments.
ments. assignments. Other congressional news: t
(D Ark. i of the House Way, i
Means Committee laid Treasury
Secretary Robert B. Anderson will
appear Defore the committe Mon
permanent debt ceiling be raised
he temporary ceiling oft the fed
ral dlbt. Mills Said he did not
know how much of an increase
Anderson would ask. But other in informants
formants informants said he would ask (he
permanent debt ceiling be raised
from 275 billion o M.t billion' and
the temporary celling from 280
billion to 288 billion.
Homing: The House hanking
subcommittee agreed on I contro controversial
versial controversial bill calling for a vast ex

WhKEL -L 4BMMei J&JMI SflKKlfekK BfcessisitMiWi
BBBB I ' B M

Started ,3t QownA J4iaL

The long and the short lengths appear for autumn in the
new evening gown designs. Both are pretty but the short

length generally gets tne preierence. Tne neauuiui inu-iengtn
gown in coral peau de sole (left) is by Pauline Trigere. This
IS a dress that's a marvel of line. Tt's flatly paneled in front
and side-swept for lovely shaping. From Edward Abbott comes
(right) a shocking pink silk chiffon dance dress with directoire
bodice and short, shirred sleeves.

few (Bolton Jnit aL

Compromising
Farm Support Bill
pansion in the federal govern governments'
ments' governments' role in promoting construc construction
tion construction of housing and classroom fa facilities.
cilities. facilities. The catch-all bill contains
many provisions opposed bu the
administration and faces almost;

certain veto if it reaches the Pres- youth organ Komsomolskayi
ident's desk. 'j 1'ravda reported yesterday.
Defense: Congress swifty andi His two-day trial in a- MoscoV
unanimously sent President Eisen-jcity court came after a string 0
h o w e r compromise legislation drinking offenses for which he hai
granting most of the authority he escaped punishment because o

requested to streamline the na
tion's military machinery. The
de ense reorganization bill, ham
mered out only Wednesday by a
joint, conference committee, was
approved without argument by
voice vote in the House end Sen-
ate.
Taxtlt .The House Ways and
Means Committee voted 14 to 11
to give the nation's one mlllon
railroad workers special tax sav sav-ngs
ngs sav-ngs of up to $27.30 a year now
nd. possibly more later. Disre Disregarding
garding Disregarding administration opposition,
It approved a bill to let the work work-ess
ess work-ess deduct from ther .ederal in
come taxes any sum in excess of
3 per cent which they pay into
their pension fumls. But the close
committee vote icated little
chance the bill would pass in the
rush for adjournment.
Funds: The Senate Appropria Appropriations
tions Appropriations Committee voled to boost
the President's defenlh budget by
$1,200,000,000 despite adminiilra,
tion notice the extri mone"y may
not be spent. It did so in sending
a (40,032,000,000 military spending
bill to the floor. The committee
endorsed House opposition to
ground force ruts and included in
creases in funds for air striking
power.
ANTENNA SYSTEM SOLD
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) JeiV
rold Electronics Corp. announces
today purchase "i! Muscle
Shoals Television Cable Corp., a
community antenna system serv serving
ing serving Florence, Sheffield and Tui Tui-cumbia,
cumbia, Tui-cumbia, Alabama.

'

Popular Russian
Sports Figure
Jailed For Rape
MOSCOW (UPI) Russia's mot
popular sports figure, Eduafi
Streltsov, 20, has been sentence
to 12 years in prison for rape, thi
hit value to his soccer team, aC
cording to earlier newspaper aC
counts.
In telling of his sentencing Frl
day, the Communist yuuth papei
chirged that hit "drinking orgiai
MC companions bore moral n
Sponsibility "for turning the mod
est young worker Streltsov into I
hooligan rapist."
It named his companions as 19
year-old Nina Yefimova, a merrt
ber of the Komsomol yputh or organization,
ganization, organization, nuriei Timira Tirni Tirni-shuk
shuk Tirni-shuk ind Irlni Popovi, ind army
of leer Eduard Karachanov.
Streltsov was centerjforward of
one of the top Soviet teams, "Tor "Torpedo."
pedo." "Torpedo." His loss to the team was
generally regarded as ending Rus Russia's
sia's Russia's chances of wlnnjng this
year's international soccer tourna tournament.
ment. tournament. Streltsov was said to have com committed
mitted committed his last and most serious
Offense just as the Soviet team
wis preparing for the World Cup Cup-play.
play. Cup-play. The factory where he was em employed
ployed employed had sent him to Sochi on
the Black lea for a rest and had
tried to pitch Up his broken mat mat-rag.
rag. mat-rag. But it hadn't worked.
LAST WARNING ISSUED
TOKYO (UPI) -The Japaness
Maritime Safety Board yesterday
warned that an area within .250 .250-milc
milc .250-milc radius of Johnston Island it
the central Pacific will be a dan danger
ger danger sone today because of U.S.
nuclear weapons tests.

1

JS



SUNDAY, JULY 1WI

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THE SUNDAY "AMERICAN

PAGE

, HONORED FOB SERVICE CWO Severin
Hon, U.S. Army Caribbean adjutant general's
of the Commendation Ribbon at a ceremony
C.A. Beall Jr., adjutant general, left, and Lt.
gejieral, made the presentation Which recogniz
quarters commandant for the 4th Infantry Di
Lewis. He served there from November 1956 to
USARCARIB. The citation accompanying the
61 efficiency, harmonious, working relationship
fort," which, were "in the highest traditions

Hurlcn Jr., chief of the mail and records sec
Office, received the second oak leaf cluster
In Fort Amador headquarters this week. Col.
Col. Alfred E. Bonniwell, deputy adjutant
ed Hurlen's service as assistant deputy head head-vision,
vision, head-vision, Pbrf Lewis, Wash, and the post of Fort
Hay 1958, when he left for, assignment to
medal lauded Hurlcn for his high standard
and his "diligent application of time and ef ef-of
of ef-of Army service." (U.S. Army Photo).

LA Seeks To hit Coffee Prices Up
By Uniting To Keep Some Off Markets

. to

Bef!F Li Jifli .M .:H:'lHfll K M

8
L "aw Re? f HnbHttlll em
BSiiiiiiiii I

WASHINGTON (UPI) Latin
American coffee producing na nations,
tions, nations, beset by competitiou from
African growers, will decide is the
next 10 days on a planned Scar Scarcity
city Scarcity program that might send US.,
coffee prices skyward.
he Latin Americans are trying
to persuade their African compe competitors
titors competitors to join them in. withholding
rnfiep from world markets in a

move to reduce huge surpuses and

restore sagging prices.
The task, will not be easy and

may require State Department

pr-isure on the Africans.'
Representatives of 14 Latin
American countries on July 18
r' l-eeu to a. draft convention un-

.der which, during the next crop

' ft li IJ MiULknU in

vear nrazi wuuui wuuuuiu

per cent o Its production, Colom
bia 15 per cent, and the other
producing nations 10 per cent.
However, the draft agreement

Is not binding on the governments!
concerned. They have Aug. 5 to
decide what they will do about it.
Meantime, representatives of
Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, El Sal Salvador
vador Salvador and Costa Rica will seek to

Icfinvince African producers to

agree to a withhold program.
While the meetings at which the
draft agreement was worked out
were secret, it is known that some
of the other Latin American coun countries
tries countries have not been enthusiastic.
Many went alone with the draft
because: (1- It did not definitely
commit their countries; and, (2
they felt they had to go along in
consideration of inter American

solidarity.
If African nations agree to the
withholding program there is little
doubt that the other Latin nations
would also go along. But If agree agree-'"'it
'"'it agree-'"'it is not obtained from the
Africans some may decline to go
along.
The Africans, who have been
increasing their production under
the umbrella of Brazil pricing

schemeg anfl the Mexico City

Policeman Seeks

Submersion Record!

MEMPHIS (UF1) Today is
Policeman Edgar Buffaloe's birth
day, and he's going to celebrate
it In a "wet" way.

Buff aloe. 26-year-old skindiver

agreement, are saturally reluctant will try t bregk the unofficial

10 agree to any cut-DacK progrim. worl(rs record for staying under
A .1ee?l i"1-, B'nk tuudy c.,m' wtr with an aqualung,
mented that failure of the Afri- j ,ittt)M will slip to the bottom
cans to join an agreement would of private swimming pool nere
be a major weakness of the in r m inH

PANAMA AMERICAN
MTANf API

scheme, would be its main bene

ficiaries enjoying both high puces
and unrestricted volume of sales,
and their export expansion would
be watched with uneasiness by all
members of the stabilization
scheme.

State Department in'luence on

beneath the surface until wne

time after 30 seconds after 8 a.m.
Monday.
The existing unofficial record.
34 hours and 30 seconds, is held
by a Portland, Ore., diver.

Buff I oc won t be alone. Three

iuericans stems from the faetlrogman friends will assist him

ui' "c tu irr situation serious seriously
ly seriously deteriorates the United States
in an effort to save the economies
of its neighbors might be foced to
evolve an import quote scheme.

by changing his compressed air
tanks and feeding him through a
bby bottle. He'll be in corned
with the outside world by a radio
microphone attached to his throat.

DA JOB

J:

I

CAH FILL VOI R HEEDS!

FUTURE ADMIRALS? Four Canal Zone youths said "uncle" to Uncle Sam's Navy yester-.
.day and after a last weekend in civvies were scheduled Monday to fly to Great Lakes, 111.,
to try on Navy "boots" for 12 weeks Of training. The new sailors are (from left) Louis J. Bar Bar-bier,
bier, Bar-bier, Jr., 19, of Cocoli; Edward Folse, Jr., 18, of Balboa; James D. Treadway, 17, 6f pUTSiljidu;
and Henry T. McKeowh, 17, of Balboa. (Navy Photo)

Democratic Leader Demands
Defense Progress Not Plans

WASHINGTON (UPI) Senate
Democratic Leader Lyndon B.
Johnsdn bluntly told Defense Sec Secretary
retary Secretary Nell H. McElroy Friday
that "excellent" plans are no sub substitute
stitute substitute in these critical times fer
bohibs, missiles and satellites
The Texan, chairman of the
lUnata nreDaredness subcommit

tee, levelled the charge as McEl McElroy
roy McElroy appeared before the group to
nresent secret data designed to

counter Johnson's earlier chsrue

that the Pentaion lacks a "sense

of urtencv."

Johnson told reporters after the
elnsed-door session that "1 have

not changed the view which I ex ex-presstd
presstd ex-presstd yesterday.
He issued another statement

later, however, conceding there

had been some DroEress in the de

fense program "much of which is

substantial" in the lace oi nus
a's Space challenge and the Mid
e Elst crisis.

"But if Rome had been bull: at

the same rate of speed," Johnson

added, "the streets still, would be

Unpaved."
Noting that "plans are no sub substitute
stitute substitute for military hardware and

trained men," the Dem-cratic

leader said the subcommittee

would feel better if there were

"greater desire" to produce "a

sreparedness wogram second to

none" and not just to catch up

yith Russia..
urgency Lacking

MeElroy. who has been briefing

Die senators on the defense drive

asked for permission to present

we secret data alter Johnson

lambasted the department Thurs

day for failing to have a. "feeling
of grim urgency."
Although the hearing was closed

to newsmen, Johnson made ptib-i
lie thm iavi nt Vii i,,,,,,.,.,,. ,-i..i,. T

ment to the defense secretary.
In it, he sa.i his complaints cen

tered oh the lack of accomplished

facts.

"This committee is not just in interested
terested interested in whether our programs
have been improved," the state statement
ment statement said. "We want to know
whether our defnses have been
improved."

Hay Fever Injection
Fatal To Lawyer
In Medical Oddity
MADISON. Wis. (UPI) The

death of a young attorney from an
injection of ragweed extraction

for the treatment of hay fever

was "extremely are", Dr. Sey

mour Crepea, the head of Wiscon Wisconsin's
sin's Wisconsin's Medical School Allergy Clin Clinic
ic Clinic said today.
Crepea said -the injections are
the most common form of treat treatment
ment treatment against hay fever in use.
"1 don't know how many gallons
of this are given out in a year
but this case is extremely I'are,"
he added.
Dirk Janssen 31, dropped dead
In his doctor s office yesterday
from an "anaphylactic shock, or
exaggerated ruction'', from a
half, cubic centimeter of the ex extraction.
traction. extraction. The doctor, Meade Burke, said
.lanssen hgd been taking shots
since mid January and hid
showed no previous reaction.
Burke ssld the lawyer started
coughing alter the injection. "I
thought he was having a reaction"
the doctor said, "so 1 gave him a
shot of adrenalin. He fell out of

his chair. I called the police am ambulance
bulance ambulance for oxygen artd gave hi.n

a shot of aminophyllin another
stimulant. Nolhine helped,"

FCC Delays Action
On Granting. Permits

For Pay-As-See TV
WAsmivr.Trw rWti Th

Federal Communications Commis

sion bowed to a congressional re request
quest request today and put off of a
year any granting of permit for

pay-as-you-see television.
FCC Chairman John C. Doerfer
announced that no subscription
TV permits would he granted un until
til until the end of the first session of
the new Congress. This probably
would be late Julv or eaflv Au

gust, 1959.

However, Doerfer said the FCC
would accept and process itolt TVj
applications during the next year.
He relayed the commission's;
decision in a letter to Chairman
Oren Harris (D-Ark.) of the

House commerce Committee.
Harris had asked the FCC last
July 3 to "maintain the status
quo" on pay TV until his commit'
tee could study the issue in 1959
during the first session of Hie
86th Congress. ... : j
A number of bills have been in
Iroduced in Congress to prohibit
pay-as-you-watch TV.
Harris explained that he had
been unable to hold hearings on
the question this year because of
te pressure of other duties, m
eluding .his chairmanship, of the
House influenoe-invfsfliatiog sub subcommittee.
committee. subcommittee. (.";; 1
I I H I ll M I tl'll ) 1

W. Ya. Flash Flood

Claims 7 Lives:
Mother, Children
SPENCER. W. Va. (UPI) A

mother and her six 'children
drowned yesterday when a flash
flood Tipped their home from its
foundation and tattered it apart
in a rural area near here.
Following a heavy cloudburst,
a seven-foot wall of water lashed

the home of John Willoughby. 45,
the Only survivor of his family.
Drowned were his wife, Beatrice,

38. and their children, Wilma 9,
Irene I, Wsveline WHllam 4,
Ravirfmfd 3trhd Hazel 2.
Th bodies were recovered sev several
eral several hours later.
Willoughby, dazed and In shock
said he was in a different part
of the house from the rest of his
family when the water struck. He
grabbed an ;ax, chopped through
a wall and climbed on top the
house.
Willoughby said he managed to
grasp the limb of a cherry tre trees
es trees the house was breaking up and
remained in the tree until the
waters receded to the point that
he could wade to higher ground.
He was brought to a Hospital

here.

State police said the Willough Willough-bys
bys Willough-bys apparently were the only vic victims
tims victims of the flood. Their home was
situated lust below the juncture of
two small creeks -t. each usually
shallow enough to walk across.
Willoughby said he feared the
high water after the cloudburst
and had told his family to pie pie-pare
pare pie-pare ti vacate the house: He eaid
Mrs. Willoughby was preparing
food for the children and he went
to a back room, .where church
services sometimes had been held.
Willoughby said he heard the
sound of the water striking fhe
house and the dwelling began
moving. The house was turned
over, but he ssld he managed to
find an ax in the room. When he
climbed to the roof, he slid the

house was breaking up and he
realized he could do nothing to aid
his family.
Searchers found the body of the
mntkal. tknilt 1 Ktti t f r O 111

where the house was located. The

children also were found several
hundred feet a'wafc VOlunteori
had difficulty reaching the scene.
State police said the water rise
to a height of about nine feet at
the floods peak.
The sevett deaths brought to

thb week as-, a direct resnlt of

fUsh floods caused ny tne neavi
est July rainfall in the state" his
tory.

NUN MAY tUt JIT
LOS ANGELES (UPI) v Sister
Mary Aqainai flying nun l mm
Green Bay,, Wis., has been In
vited by the Navy to pint a jat
plane faster than sound. Shi
wants to take up the invitatioii
but has had to turn it down
temporarily because of her -teach'
ing schedule at Loiu iinJuMirii
of Los Angeles. t

Explosions Blamed
On Illinois .
Do It YourseJfer

BELLEVILLE. 111. (UPI')-- A

"do it yotirself" householder may

have hooked up the wrong pipes
that sent propane Ras into water

lines and set off blast that sent

thousands of persons fleeing from

their homes, authorities said 10
day. -.-. 'i

The series M at least i expro

sions yesterday apparently

stemmed from propane gas
which seeped into water mains
eni ta netrhy homes ,nd
nstkutenta. twpchw t wore
ifiiureo,. 1

Investigators .said preliminary

study indicated. the gas may have
been forced Into the wrong mains

by a householder who attached
gas tank to the Wrong pipe.

Four homes, a mall shop and 1

drive-in restaurant were destroyed

or damaged by the blasts and

three small fires broke out.

ALL AMERICA CABLES & RADIO INCORPORATED
ADVISES
That the Panama City Office, formerly located
at Avenida Central 22-135 is now at Calle 22-B
No. 12-17 in the former Panagra Office.

t" r I rhi ialih k ii it inrni-

I tLCrnUINt INUMdCKj AftjlZ AflilT Af1

PANAMA -U74

THE SAME FOR RAPID MESSENGER SERVICE

m jMas .,

6

FRANCE MOTORS, INC.
Appointed Local Dealers For The Sensational "Renault Dauphine" (Dauphine, in French, Means Princess)
The Dauphine Cars Will Be On Display Within Just a Few Days.

RENAULT DAUPHINE IS NEW ADDITION TO
(SMALL CAR FIELD HERE AND RANKS SECOND
IN SALES OF FOREIGN CARS IN THE UNITED
STATES.

Flrlt Imprtwlon of tht ntw Renault Dau Dau-pMlM
pMlM Dau-pMlM rval reral styling ami frteefnl llnM
i lovely at a princMa. Bui )ust drive her
nee. A whole new world of driving pleasure
begins. Driving becomes fun again. The peppy
engine gives maximum speed of over 70 m.p.h.
You'll M pleasantly surprised at th arattlhl
gas mileage. It's actually over u miles on on.
gallon jnl gas. She's hippy tit traffic too, with
steering that's sensitive and xlr ilrk. And,
as'or parking It's a' breett with only ttt
Inches of car length to manage. Whit's more,
Ihe (urnlng circle Is a mere SS feet.
, pgen tht, 4ogr.and.sUde Inside. You'll dis discover
cover discover the Dauphine's as practleal and taste tasteful
ful tasteful Insld as she's i beautiful OH the otiMrte.
Look at the large leg room. The season th
rer engine eliminate the' Hulk? transmission
found on many cars. Feel how relaxed you
are as yon alt in the cMttforubl bucket seals
tvhirh are Individually adjustable too. Glance
In front of you at the welt-rdeslgned Instru
ment panel with speedometer, fuel and water
temperature gauges. Notice the rubber crtsh
padding at the top of th windscreen and low lower
er lower sgs of th instrument panel 8und th
hern. Just think, ysu'v actually two not to
enoos from; n far th city tad oat for th
highway in em French fashion

WATER COOLED ENGINE

Changing tires presents weighty lifting
problem In Dauphine. Simply tilt down the
front license plate tnd pull th spare tire out.
It retta horizontally In compartment behind
th front bumper and below th luggage space.
Ingenious and safe, Isn't iff Now start the
engine. There's n problem with Its fully an
Wmttlc choke. The overhead valv, 4 cylinder
engine Is water cooled. That's tht reason why
It's so silent, even at high speeds. This de dependable
pendable dependable S4S c.c. ongln la rearmounted giv giving
ing giving you thai murhneeded extra traction on
snowy or muddy roads.
A quick run on Ihe highway soon rmphs
tises Hs riding ability and power. You'll be
astounded at the way the Dauphin, pulls on
long grades compared to tae performance of
many ethr small- fined can. At fr th
ri, why with completely iaeaptndaat ens
pension n all fur wheels from U spring,
yu'U tatt float vsr the biggest pot holes
Tit torsion pat at front prevent rolling. You

retain th feel of th road with tuptrsentlttvt

rack and -opinion steering. A fast ear demand
good brakes. Th Dauphin hit (ken. F.r F.r-ful
ful F.r-ful hydraulic brake gtie you slopping power
"plus" with their instantaneous action.
The Dauphin (4 D Sedan) wHI Mil for a a-bout
bout a-bout list fttlly equipped i Ihe Canal Zen.
You have a choice of ( exciting ye ctchin
colors plus smart matching Interior trim from
which to choeae. Just test drive her once snd
you'll see what we mean by driving I fun
again... in a Dauphine.

France Motors is located at the
corner of Cuba Avenue and 26th
Street in Panama City, jut b b-hind
hind b-hind the President Theater.
Mr. Adolfo Fabrega, wall-known
owner of the best Service facil facilities
ities facilities in Panama, it President and
General Manager.

FRANCE MOTORS. INC

Cuba Ave. and 26th Sfreef

Tel 2 1930

1i.
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I



pap
MCE SIX
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
SUNDAY, JULY V,
Republic Of Peru Classic At Racetrack Toda

m

Stiff
Post in

Sett

mg

Excluded From
In Sprint Race

ovon Rrifick nnH nutk Amprirnn threa.vPnr.nlH

iltt will dispute a $2500 purse and a silver trophy this
rtornnnn in rhp nnnnnl renewal of the Remihlir nf Peril

lassie at the President Remon racetrack.

Afredo T. Boyd's classy and
unbeaten Argentina colt Postin is
considered so superior to the op

;ition ttat the tracrs nanaicap nanaicap-has
has nanaicap-has ordered him exclmed

m the betting.

j Postin is a winner of all his four
starts in impressive fashion. Fer Fer-frijindo
frijindo Fer-frijindo Alvarez will guide the
sieedy bay son of Atabor-Proud
ldy.
Scheduled to oppose Postin are
wiifho Cnlripn Ropket. Don Lu-

Bnffnt Spur, arcaman anu

ucinado.

Colden Rocket won his 'ast start
bjf a whisker over Don Lucho and
tSs pair msy go f to ..vmies
iilUhe mutuels. Guillermo S.inchei
v$ guide Golden Rocke! whue Jo
s Talavera will have the leg up
ok Don Lucho.
fright Spur, a highly rated colt
uflMrb has Ihus far tailed to just

." rr ... ...

his advance cuppings win oe

Sdeh by sensational Braulio oac-

z.
; louche, a steadily improving
J'fltingster, will be handicapped by
rvc'k-armed Hector Ruiz.
jCarcaman will be guided by Ru-
hiiii asnii7 white AluiriNiln will

hjve vastly improved Alfredo Vas
q$ez aboard.
'jfhe secondary attraction is a
one mile gallon for the track's
;rst series throughbreds. The 1,
000 race has attracted lour good
routers. Gavilan, Embassy, Hosti Hosti-ifior
ifior Hosti-ifior and Melendez will dispute
tljj; purse.
Hostigador, which returns from a
liyoff, wilj have favorite jockey
BQeza in the saddle Ama-'o Cre Cre-diflio
diflio Cre-diflio will guide Gavilan, Alvarez
will be abor'r'i Kmh'ssy : n d San Sanchez
chez Sanchez will do the botting on Melon
dez.
"TjiS other prospective thrillers
aire included on the program.
...

THE DIIDENDS:
rirst Kace
-Sober View $a.40, $4.60
-oro Purito $6.40
Second Race
-Emily Mary $8.40, $4.60
Matnculado $11.80

First Double: $46.20
Third Race
1 Apache $43.00, $11.60
2 lanara $3.20
One-Two: $866.60
Fourth Race
1 Golden Corn $5.20, $5.80
2 Zutphen $
Quiniela: $6.00
Fifth Race
1 Rosita Maria $3.60, $3.00
2 Sputnik $3.00
Sixth Race
1 Achieved $19.80, $11.80
2 Bodegon $5.20
Seventh Race
1 Hermelina $3.80, $2.80
2 Vespucio $4.20
Second Double: $52.40
Eighth Race
1 Now Then $17.00, $9.20
2 Pangal $12.80
Quiniela: $145 80
Ninth Race
Surumeho, $5. $5.20
2 English Wonder, $18.20
One-Two-. $129.80
Tenth Race
1- Ragazza, $3.20, $3.00
2 Michiripa, $4.00
Eleventh Race
1 Parasol, $3.00, $2.20
2 Bacancito, $4.40
Twelfth Race
1 Jipi Japa, $3.20, $2.20
2 Daniel, $2.40.

Giants Edge Pirates 1-0; Cubs
Stop Milwaukee 7-4 To Create

Tie In Hot National League Race

PITTSBURGH, Juy 26 (UPD (UPD-Johnny
Johnny (UPD-Johnny Antonelli and Marv Gris Gris-som
som Gris-som muzzled Pirate bats as the

San Francisco Giants shut out
Pittsburgh, 1-0 today.
The winners, who were blanked
themselves in their last two

games, ended their .amine in the
third inning when they scored the
ftnlv run nf thu cramp Patrhpr

Bob Schmidt and Antonelli singled
in succession and advanced on a
t .... rifi Wt rinnnv Ci'C n n n 0 1 1

.mviLiiu. tJ J ""J u v V I. v ..
Schmidt then scored on Willie Kirk Kirk-land's
land's Kirk-land's sacrifice fly.

League start, scattered six hits to
gain his first, victory against
three defeats.

MILWAUKEE, Wis., July 26
(UPI) Ernie Banks drove in
three runs and rookie left-hander
l 1 1 i Clic nut in civ inninaE

of shutout relief pitching to lead
the Chicago Cubs to a 1 -4 victory
over the Milwaukee Braves, who
dropped into a tie for first with
the San Francisco Giants.
The Braves and Giants had i i-dentical
dentical i-dentical won-lost records of 51-41
after the day's play in which the
Giants beat Pittsburgh 1-0.

GSTAAD, Switzerland (UPD (UPD-Hugh
Hugh (UPD-Hugh Steard of Pasadena, Calif,
and Budge Patty of Los Anegles
and Paris advanced to the second
round of the men's doubles of the
Swiss international tennis tourna tournament
ment tournament with a 6-1, 6 2, victory over
Stadler and innerman of Switzerland.

CLEVELAND, July 26 (UPI)
The New York Yankees swept to
their seventh straight victory and

stretched tneir American league
lead to an outlandish 15V! games
today by crushing the Cleveland
Indians, 8-3, before 41,400 ians.
flpvplanrl manappr .lop Gordon

used 20 players and tied a Major
League record by employing five
pinch hitters in the seventh in inning.
ning. inning. The game was close until the
ninth when the Yankees shelled
relievers Don Mossi and Morrie
Martin for four runs.

CHICAGO, July 26 (UPI)-The
Chicago White Sox chased right righthander
hander righthander Mike Delock from the

mound for his first defeat of the
season today as they hammered

out 15 hits in an 11-6 victory over
the Boston Red Sox.
Sherm Lollar led the Chicago
attack with a home run a Himihlo

and a single to account for three

runs, and each of his teammaster

except Al Smith collected at least
one hit. Delock, entering the con contest
test contest with an unblemished slate of
11 wins, left in the fifth inning aft
er Lollar belted a two-run double.

Race Track Graded Entries

.P. Hone

Jock., St.

Comment

1st. Race 7th Series Imp. 6 Fgs. Pur $400.00
1st RACE OF. THE DOUBLE

Pool loses 1:00

1 Celestial Fire A. Credidio 105
2 Panicus B. Aguirre 112
3 Jai Alai II M. Hurley no
4 Lark C. Bovil 118
5 Fudge Girl F. Hidalgo 113
6 Atomic Spring B. Baeta 106
7 Lanero J. Jimenez 107
8 Coronation Day A. Reyes 106

Nothing in months
Could surprise
Returns from layoff
Hard to beat here
Nothing to indicate
Dangerous contender
Would pay off
Ran well in last

3- 1
5-1
4- 1
2-1
30-1
5- 2
15-1
4-1

SPOPT8

Editor: CONRAJO SARGEANl

2nd Race "Special" 3-yr-old Imp. Purs $650.00 Pool Close 1:30

2nd RACE OF THE DOUBLE

Mb

Golfing Justice
Remands Case

To Locker Room

1 Cuquita
2 Mi Cautiva
3 Florete
4 Don Cirilo
5 Valdina Jeep
6Brote
7 Voltage
8 Ramo

B. Baeza 110
R. Vasquez 115'
J. Talavera I05x
F. Hidalgo 115
M. Correa 115
A. Alfaro 02x
J. Cadoean 115

B. Aguirre Up

Distance to liking

Seems best here 3-2

Not good enough 10-1

Dangerous (his time 5-2

Good early speed 5-1
Notorious auitter 3-1

Brief early speed 15-1
Should be close up 4-1

3rd Race "G" Natives S F91. Purs $375.00
ONE TWO

Pool Closes 3:00

DETROIT, July 26 (UPI) Al
Kaline today drove in three runs
with a homer, double and single
to lead the Detroit Tigers out of

their five-game losing streak with

a 9-1 victory over the wasningion
Senators.
Kaline's three hits gave him an
even 100 for the season.
Rookie Herb Moford, unsuccess unsuccessful
ful unsuccessful in his only previous American

For GOLFERS
For BOWLERS
for TRAP SHOOTERS
New Shipments arrived
IDEAL PRIZES
ICE BUCKETS
WATER PITCHERS
CENTER PIECES
PAUL REVERE BOWLS
COCKTAIL SHAKERS
For that SPECIAL AWARD see our new
HAMILTON Electric Wrist WATCH
mercurio
Jewellers;
Central AvenuJ

WHITE PLAINS. N.Y. HTPn-

A colfine State Sunrpmp fnnrt

justice has remanded the case of

the aggrieved golfer to the locker
room for adjudication.
At issue in Justice Samuel W

Eager's court was the handicap
of William W. Wacht, 61, a re retired
tired retired New York rcl estate oper operator.
ator. operator. He went to court Thursday
to try to get the Pines Ridge Golf
Club to raise his handicap from
29 to 34.
A handicap, which is based on
players's ability, is the number of
strokes deducted from his gross
score. Wacht, a former president
of the Pines Ridge club, usually
scores between 92 and 120.
Wacht's attorney, Reuben
Chase, contended that the club,
having recently adopted the na na-tonal
tonal na-tonal rules for setting handicaps
was bound to use Wacht's 25 most

recent scorecards in estahlishino

his handicap. This, Chase said,
would make the handicap 34.
iBut club President Morris A.

Marks, a lawyer, challenged the
scorecards, noting that Wacht us usually
ually usually plays better in tournaments
than during informal rounds.
Since the club must pay for costlv

trophies, he said, it should have

tne right to set fair handicaps.
Wacht, he said, already has won
three trophies. Moreover, the club
president added, Wacht has been
playing golf for 35 years.
Eager, who described himself
as a golfing "duffer," finally sug

gested tnat the locker room,
rather han the courtroom,
might be the more logical place
for settlement of the dispute.
He called on the disputants to
try to work out a settlement at
the club Saturday. If they can t,
he asked that they come back to
court next Thursday.

1 Ocean Star
2 Don Pastor
3 Julie
4 Mohicano
5 El Pequeno
6 Bosilongo

bOlltO
8 Guacamaya
9 Filon
10 Folletito

M. Correa 113
J. Talavera 106x-
G. Milord lOlx
B. Baeza 115 -A.
Lourless OOx -A.
Vasquez 113
C. Quiros lO'.x.
A. Alfaro 105x -M.
Guerrero 103
F. Sanchez 103x

-Bad legs hamper 25 1
-Cbuld make it here 3-1
-Lacks early speed 5-1
-Distance may handicap EVEN
-Early speed; no chance 10-1
-Vastly improved 2-1
-Must go back down 10-1
-Not against these 101
-Doesn't seem likely 501
-Usually close up 15.1

4th Race ."H" Natives

$ P9. Purse $75.00
UINIELA

Pool Closes 2:30

1 Full Moon
2 Tanganica
3 Don Manuel
4 Bagdad

5 Okiland

G. Milord 102x Distance may help
A. Alfaro 103x Better this week
J. Talavera H2x Lacks early speed
E. Ortega 106 -Strong effort in last

rt,o xwu uisiance to liking
.IllGrinioni 1 nW xt-ai-i

5-1
2-1
4-1
2-1
2-1
10rl

6-Rock'n RoU F. Justiniani 11

Sth Race H" Natives S F8s. Pur $375.08 Poo, co$ 3:00

NATIONAL
Teema

Milwaukee
San Francisco
Chicago
x-St. Louie
Pittsburgh
x-Cincinnatf
x-Philadelphia
x-Los Angeles
x-Night games no

LIASIIB

W L Pet. 4B

si 41 454
51 41 .554 m
48 48 .500 5
' 44 44 .489 6

45 48 .484
44 47
41 45 .477
42 SO .457
included

ev
eV2

7

1 Noticion

2 Jabalina
3 Silverio
4 Presidente
5 Radical
6 Mayrita

G. Milord HOx -Would pay off
F. Alvarez 110 -Will fight it out
B. Baeza 113 Seems best here
M. Hurley 110 Distance to liking
A. Reyes.R. 108 -Brief early speed
F. Justiniani 103x Returns from layoff

25-1
2-1
45
10-i
151
8-1

4th Race "Special" Imp. 7 Fgs. Purse $650.00
1st RACE OF THE DOUBLE

Pool loses 3:30

1 Pan Tostado
2 Charicleia
3 Mulchen
4 Mi Locura
5 Pastoreo
6 Maese

F. Alvarez 105 Distance to liking
B. Baeza 113 Hard to beat here
G. Milord I05x Fractious, unpredictable
A, Aliaro I03x Could surprise
H. Ruiz 110 Form indicates
R. Vasquez 112 Will fight it out too

4- 1
3-2
10-1
5- 1
2-1
2 1

Vince Martinez
Goes To Hometown
For His Wedding
MIAMI BEACH UPI) IBoxer
Vince Martinez left here yesterday
en route to marry a hometown
sweetheart at Paterson, N. J.
The 29 year-old welterweight,
who recently lost a title fight to
Virgil Akins, said he would wed
Joette de Lorenzo, 21, of Wayne,
N. J., at St. Marys Catholic
Church, Paterson, on Aug. 16.

7th Race 3rd Series Imp. 4 Fgi. Purse $650.00 Pool loses 4:00

1 Gouvernant
2 Lobo
3 Sunfair
4 Joselito
5 Silver Heels
6 Narcotico

B. Baeza 106 Distance suits style
A. redidio 102 Good recent races
Fv Alvarez MS Has strong finish
A. Vasquez 115 Returns in good shape
J. Talavera 110 Could get up too
G. Sanchez 113 Doesn't seem likely

2- 1
5-2
3- 1
5-2
4- 1
5- 1

Sth Race 3-yr-old Imp. 7 Fgs. Purse $2500.00 Pool loses 5:00
"Jepublic of Peru lassie"
UINIELA
1 Mouche H. Ruiz 118 Would pay nice odds 4-1
2 Golden Rocket G. Sanchez 118 May beat Postin 2-1
3 Don Lucho J. Talavera 112 Mutuels favorite 3-2
4 Bright Spur B. Baeza 118 -Jockey will help 4-1
5 Carcaman R. Vasquez 112 Dangerous contender 3-1
6 Alucinado A. Vasquez 112 Handicapped, fractioua 10-1
7 Postin F. Alvarez 112 Excluded from betting XXXX

9th Race 4th Series Imp. 7 Fgs. Purse $600.00
ONE TWO

Pool loses 5:30

1 Paquiro
2 La Generala
3 Canterina
4 Germanio
5 Distingo
6 Riotous
7 Cervecero
8E1 Agheila
9 Fieltro

G. Sanchez 116
J. Talavera HOx
B. Baeza 115
F. Alvarez 116
A. Gonzales 110
C. Bovil 110
A. Alfaro 105x
E. Dario 103
F. Sanchez 102x

Racing to top form
Not against these
Returns from layoff
Will fight it out
Usually close up
Good early speed
(Bad start in last
Early speed only
Ran well in last

2-1
15-1
3 1
2-1
1''
10-1
10 i
25-1
10-.

10th Rac 1st Series Imp. 8 Fgs. Purse $1000.00 Pool Closes .
1 Gavilan A. Credidio 105 Last doesn't count 3-1
2 Embassy F. Alvarez 115 Hard to beat here 3-2

TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Milwaukee
Cincinnati at St. Louis (2)
Los Angeles at Philadelphia (2
San Francisco at Pittsburgh
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
s.f. ooi ooo oooi r o
Pitt. 000 000 0000 8 0
Antonelli, Grissom (7) and
Schmidt: T.9W CR.Qt a'ni4

WP-Antonelli m.w

Chi. 3io ion nti i in a

Mil. 211 nnn nnfta o i

Droit Snlis i ui c ...t

?lfdettJe'ConelX t McMahon
(9) and CrandaS. WP-Solis (14)
LP-Conely (0-6). HRS-Conely 11).

rnompson 12).
(Night Game)
Los Angeles at PhilsriainM.

(Night Game) '

Cincinnati at St. Louis.
Player Of The Day

SAM JONES
Sam Jones, who's called either
"Sad Sam" or "Toothpick" by
his teammates, is alsn irnnum o.

round the National T.pnorun as

the St Louis narriinal. fnn

UH1U1I1UW uvp

piicner.

A 6-fOOt. 4-inch. 210-nounrier

Jones scored his eiehth viftnrv

Thursday when he shutout the

Milwaukee Braves. 4-0. Jones

struck out five and walked four

The 32 -year -old right-hander
went to the Cardinals in iqbr

and last season posted a 12-9

recora. He led tne Nations 1
League in strikeouts in 1955 and
1956.

AMERICAN
Teams
New York
Boston
x-Baltimoro
Chicago
x-Knas City
Detroit
Cleveland
Washinatnn

x-Night game

LEAGUE

W L f. Ga
3 30 477.
47 45 .511 15
44 45 .505 I
J 49 .484 18
47 ,471 18s
47 lVr
44JJ .458 10Vi
, 40 .42124
not included

Racetrack Tips
t By CONRADO
1- Atomlc Spring Lark
2- Mi Cautiva Broto
3- Mohicano Don Pastor
4- Okiland Bagdad
5- Silverio Jabalina
6- Charicleia Maese
7- Gouvernant Joselito
8-Goldtn Rocket Don Lucho

9-Canterina Germanio

lO Melendei 7 Embassy
11- Abolengo Xistuilari
12- Titlta Tuti Fruti

p.h T0DA"S GAMES
Baitlmnro of V T

Boston at Chicago

wirM1! at Ueveland m
Washington at Detroit (2)

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
AMPDirtu

Bos. '""ST

Chi "i0 W 11 I

ey (6), Lown (6), WyaT l 3
(10-D. HRS-ar'SrRivm0,

New York 8

Cleveland 3

Niaht Gam)

Baltimore at Kansas City

Detroit -Washinvtnn
.

Whatever
Happened to...

LOUIS FEUSTEL
Man 0"War was th

tarf hE? h2r? ta American,
turf history, but generally over overlooked
looked overlooked t.hfn in k .J9?

& T5,1111 who trained

r eu5iei- As "Big
SS? ,pid up hUs amazing rec record
ord record of 20 victories in 21 starts,
the man who handled him from
a yearling to his swan song rar
Ld! I menn "r his worfo
All told. Feustel w i

44 years, handlimr strin..

some of the nation's greatest.
$88 Ks finlshed with
UlS Red nnH ha i.-t

with the best.
Whatever hapepend to Loute
Peustel? Now 74. he has a bar
at Rasadena calif., ajd the dev
pictorial history.
CARDS RECALL PITCHER
ST. LOUTH fTrPT Th. qi.

Louis Cardinals have recalled

pitcher Billy Muffett from their
Omaha affiliat In th mHn

Association. Muffett poswil a 2-C,

recora wun omana loiiowlng sw
poor early-season showing with,
the Cardinals.

3 Hostigador
4 Melendez

B. Baeza 110 Favorite distance, rider
G. Sanchez 112 Shoud make it now

3-1
3-2

11th Race 7th Series Imp. 5 Fgs. Purse $400.00

1 Abolengo F. Alvarez 115 Form indicates
2 Xistuilari c. Bovil 113 Rates good chance
f??LTv v. R; y88 115 -Returns in good shape
4- Joes Fiddling A.Credidio 105 -Returns from layoff
5- (King E. Dario 105 Returns from layoff

Peel Close 4:00

EVEN

2-1
10-1
10-1

12th Race "E" Natives 7 Fgs. Purse $375.00 Pool Closes.

1 Desiree
2 Titita
3 Enganoso
4 Tuti FruU
5 Black Bee
6 Naranjazo
7 Ciria

G. Milord 107x Would pay off
B. Baeza 112 Meets arch-rival
J. Baeza 115 -Coqld get up here
J. Rodriguez 113 in fight to finish
F Sancnez 105 Ran well in last
C. Ruiz 115 in good shape now
A. Gonzales 103 Depends on start

15-1
EVEN
81
7 S
10-1
5-1
101".

Today

11

Dedicated to the sister Republic of South America today at the Racetrack
REPUBLIC Or PERU CLASSIC

1st, 2nd 6th, 7th RACES
DUPLETAS
3rd and 9th RACES
ONE-TWO

QUINIET AS
4th and 8th Races

8th RACE 3 years imported
Purse: $2500.00
QUINIELA
1. MOUCHE (1)
2. GOLDEN ROCKET (2)
3. DON LUCHO (4)
4. BRIGHT SPUR 5)
5. CARCAMAN (6)
6. ALUCINADO (7)
7. POSTIN (3)
Note: POSTIN excluded from betting.

7 Fgs.

H. Ruiz
G. Sanchez
J. Talavera
B. Baeza
R. Vasquez
A. Vasquez
F. Alvarez

118
118
112
118
112
112
112

gaWsWBsWBLMBWBBWrMBsMBH
" Today

COLON:
For the convenience
of our patrons we are
now operating both at
the SAVOY.

Children Am TSot
Allowed At The
Race Track

PRESIDENT REMO

N RACE

TRACK

""'J''. 1



-

SUNDAY JULY n, IMSl
TJWE SUNDAY AMERICAN
rnr, set
ins Training Season In Earnest Next We

Pro Grid Loop Beg

ty' HARRY GRAYSON

The eef o Dow Fins Finsterwald
terwald Finsterwald ind Ben Hogan are
strangely parallel. And let me be
first in nrpriirt that the business

man golfer out of Athen, 0., could

be another Hogan.
Finsterwald has one tremendous
advantage. He has just won his
first major national champio champio-ihrp,
ihrp, champio-ihrp, the PGA, ix years oor,fer
that Hogan prevailed in the same
event. Few people realize that Ho Hogan
gan Hogan compi'i his truly fabulous re record
cord record inthe PGA, Masters and the
United State? and British Opens
after he a 34 years of age. The
way golfers develop these days,
Finsterwald, at 29 is just ready
to strike. '1
Finsterwald ris about Hogan's
height and weight and has the
same wiry build. Next to Hogan,
no player has been more dedicat dedicated
ed dedicated to the game or worked at it
harder: Dow ;has Ben's dead pan,
and while not unsociable and with without
out without a sense of quiet numor, has
time only tot those deeply interes interested"
ted" interested" in golf.
Again like the wir.ningest Irish
man ever to come out of Dublin,
Tex., Dow is a bit ot a loner He
goea to dinner alone in the midst
of a tournament and while sur surrounded
rounded surrounded by thousands of admires.
Hogan hit the tournament trail
with a splash by winning three
straight tournments in 1940,
when he Won the Vardon trophy
and was the leading money win winner.
ner. winner. Finsterwald attracted atten attention
tion attention as a peagreen, too, playing
while a member of toe Air Force
from 1952 to '54.

One. mart lika Hogan, KinsWr-
wald was a ooker. ft was three
years ago at Baton Rouge, that
Finsterwald told Jimmy Demaret
he intended to fade the ball. De De-mared
mared De-mared reminded him that many
of the grtats were draw players
hitting the ball from right to left,
but Finsterwald was determined
to go the other way:
As did Hogan, Finsterwald got
the idea of developing the fad to
cure the hook from Demaret, who
was a fader as a kid. And arain
lik Hogan, Finsterwald had e
couulS of migW lean years while
perfecting the ade.
While he hasn't won as often at

the same stage, Finsterwald has
been as consistent "as was HOgnn;
Dow eveh brblte Bert's "record for
total of consecutive times "in the
money, which was 56, from 1939
through 1841 ; Dow was in the
coin iri H'v straight tournaments
or twjtft.jl? BMJfB,
As DemaTet points out, his fin finishing
ishing finishing second IT time' In 31
months give you a fine slant on
how excellent Finsterwald has
been. "' .'
"Finsterwald could have finish finished
ed finished flnrt th'at many times, too
stresses1 Demaret, "for only a shot
of two separate the leader from
the second man and Dow has wen
beaten in play-offs.
"Finsterwald is one of three of
the younger professionals who is
in full command of all the shots.
The other two are Billy Casper
and Ken Venturi. Arnold Palmer
is a strong player, but lacks the
finesse of the other three.
If there are departments of

Finsterwald Could Be
k PI II
Another Ben Hogan

r -- i ii" ii in-"i

mm' wBPV jf
mmr mm Jm LW
mW JjJF :WwmmWmW'

Hp

L

Dow Finsterwald

Finsterwalds's game which stiok

oit they are his fine iron play and
the ability to bounce out of trou

ble. The best golfer has to get into
difficulties, in 72 holes, and the

knack of getting out of bad situa situations
tions situations is a big asset."
Like Dr. Car.y Middlecoff and
practically everybody else, Jim Jimmy
my Jimmy Demaret predicts that a lot
more will be heard of Dow Fin
wald. Once more like Ben Hogan,
winning the PGA Championship
could have lit a fire under him.
Bowler Busy

By EARL WRIGHT
The National Football League
training season, which cuts college
All Americas and other huskies
uu.i to size in a series of sweat

session, begins in earnest next
weex.
The league is selling tickets at
a record, rate ana looks lorwerd
to the best campaign in its J-

ytar history. The veterans and!
rookies who will provide the 1958
thrills for the nation s fastest
growing professional sport will be
picked at training sessions and
exhibition games owing the next
two months.
The Detroit Lions, champions of
the league and Western Division,
held their first practice Friday
in prep i tic o- tne Aug. MS
clash with Otto Graham' Col College
lege College All-Star team at Chicago.
But the majority of the 12
clubs won't begin training until
next week.
Detroit boasts the finest 1-2
quarterback punch in football in

I Bobby Layne ind Tobin Role.

However, the Lions have built
their brilliant record of recent
years in strong defense. Alex
Karras, All-America from Iowa
and one of the team's prize rook rookies,
ies, rookies, is tabbed for A tryout .as a
defensive tackle.
The Cleveland Browns, Eastern
Division champions who have used
defense to build the league's top
won-lost record since entering the
NFL in 1950, staged "advance
classes" for their quarterbacks a
few days ago. Milt Plum, second second-year
year second-year pro from Penn State, and
Jim Ninowski, a rookie from
Michigan State, head the quarter quarterback
back quarterback candidates. Jim Shofner,
Texas Christian halfback, was
Cleveland's! No. 1 draft choice,
and coach Paul Brown will trv
him on both offense and defense.
Other highly publicized rookies
who will bid for jobs include:
King Hill of Rice and John Crow
of Texas A and M. Chicago Car Cardinals;
dinals; Cardinals; Wait Kowalczyk of Mich Mich-igan
igan Mich-igan State Philartelnhia Eagles;
Lou Michaels of Kentucky Los

Angeles Rams; Phil King of
Vanderbilt New York G I a t s;
Leonard Lyles of Louisville Kal
timore Colts and Jim Pace of
Michigan San Francisco Forty Forty-Niners.
Niners. Forty-Niners. Abe Woodson, flleet ilfi ilfi-nois
nois ilfi-nois back who has been in the
service since he was drafted sec second
ond second in 1956. also will try to win
a job with the Forty-Niners.

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WHO WOULDN'T BE? Cigar-puffing James Tamplin is delighted with a 27-inch, 15-pound
catfish caught near Erie, Pa. The beauty may not set a new record, but it's a record for him.

Box Offices, Like Managers,
Wait For NY Yanks On Road

NTWW YORK (NEA1 .Jonnv

King, the bowler, held a fistful of

cigars as he headed for an overseas i
plane at International Airport i
which would start him on a vaca

ftion tour of Europe.

"The way it is going now, ne j

was saymg, "this, may ne me
last summer I'll be able to take
ajiy time off. JJ'-Jtsed o be sum summer
mer summer was the dftra'time'tor a bow bowler,
ler, bowler, But this is about the only time
off I can afford.
"I've got some bowling films to
make in Chicago, four or five ex exhibitions
hibitions exhibitions and some other chances
to pick up money. Next year some some-bodyll
bodyll some-bodyll have a good summer tour tournament
nament tournament going and that'll end all
trios';"
King was the top money win winner
ner winner among bowlers who partici participated
pated participated in television shows this past
season, carrying ott $25,000.
"Three years ago that would
have been enough for three guys,','
he said. "But now a eood bowler
can make himself $30,000. it'll
be more wRen the' summers stsrt
perking up.
"We have an all-year sport now."

Boxing Men Speak Up On What
Would Help Sport The Most

Tht NFL draw record paid
attendance of 2,834,318 in 157
and most of- th clubs will be
qin training this month with
boominq advance salts on les lesson
son lesson tickets. The Forty Miners,
for example, already have sold
mors thsn 34,000 of their 40,
000 available seats for six
horns games, a record of a mil million
lion million dollars.
The Eastern Division clubs ex
peel to do better in the attend attendance
ance attendance derby this year because the
Philadelphia Eagles have moved
from Connie Mack SStadium to the

larger, 60,000 seat Franklin Field

and the Pittsburgh Steelers have

shifted from Forbes Field to 59,-000-sfat
Pitt Stadium.
New coaches are Buck Shaw
with the Eagles, Frank Ivy with
the Chicaco Cardinals and Ray
Scooter Mc Lean with the Green
Bay Packtrs. George Halas, own owner
er owner of the Chicago Bears, has re resumed
sumed resumed as head coach after Urn-

ing the job over, to Paddy Dris
coll the past two seasons.

By JACK CUDDY
LOS ANGELES (UP1) Conver Conversation
sation Conversation among boxing men. here
for the Zora Folley Pete Rade
macher tight, indicated today
a belie? that the sport .would ben benefit
efit benefit much this year from:
The thorough hOusecleaning
now being attempted by the New
York grajttd jury, which has hand handed
ed handed down four indictments and is
preparing rarore. if
ExcitirfH champions in the
middleweight, welterweight, light lightweight
weight lightweight and featherweight divi divi-sions,
sions, divi-sions, at least.
Last Wednesday's great light
weight title fight at Houston. Tex.,
between champion Joe Brown and
Kenny Lane stimulated the talk
about lively competition in the
four divisions.
Despite the demand for a re return
turn return title bout between Brown of

New Orleans and Lane of Muske

gon, Mich., the "insiders" assem assembled
bled assembled in Los Angeles claim Lane
must wait for another shot until
Brown satisfies the world cham championship
pionship championship committee by defending
against Duilio Loi of Italy.
ji Defend Against Loi
It seems that the World Co;n
mittee, an international group

headed by Julius Helfand of New
York sstate, permitted Brown to
make defenses against Ralph Du Dupes
pes Dupes of New Orleans, May 7, and
Lane last Wednesday, with the
definite understanding that t h e
winner in Ma' or Wednesday's
winner would defend against loi.
Loi is the European lightweight
champion and the committee's
No. 1 contender. His name wasn't
mentioned at Houston after the
fight that set new Texas fight fight-crowd
crowd fight-crowd and gate records. Officials

the InternM'onal Rorine Cub

f they would be delighted to

' I 1 1 1 1 1 v I I ; ; I 1
le bout at New York
Meanwhile, the featherweight

imuu in u curiipiii rnam-
wi In Ilosan (Kid) Rasey of

!,. .Affnovgn there, is no

acmg contender for his 120

pound crown right now, he might
step ud a class and challenge for
Brown's diadem.

Virgil Akins if St. Louis, the
new welterw.eiglvt ruler, is. a for
midable boxer puneher who codkl
draw a big gate if matched wi!h
lucky Carmen Basilio, the former
welterweight and middleweight
ruler, who still could challenge for
either title.
Of course, Basilio of Chittcn Chittcn-ango,
ango, Chittcn-ango, N.Y., could qarticipate in
even bigger receipts by engaging
middleweight champion Suar
Ray Robinson in a third title
classic. Basilio wrested the Im Impound
pound Impound crown from Sugar Ray at
Madison Snunre Oarden. hut Rob Robinson
inson Robinson recaptured it at the Chicago
Stadium.
Question Mark
It's natural that the boxing oan
regards heavyweight champion
Floyd Patterson as a question
mark because he's been keot in
mothballs niece last August. He's
made but two title defenses
against washed up Hurric-.ne
Jackson and amateur Rademach Rademach-er,
er, Rademach-er, and was not too impressive In
either.
Floyd will have to be sensation sensational
al sensational against Roy Harris in their Los
Angeles title liKht, Aug. 18, to
convince the skeptic? that he's as
good as manager ('us D'A.nato
rales him.
, Archie Moore, the ancient light
heavyweight champion, has no
dangerous contender. However
he cogld have ah ihteresting and
lucrative title bout ut Montreal
with Canadian Yvdh DurelleBnt-'
ish empire champ. Rough House
Yvon would provide entertamin
competitior iV six or" s e v e I
rounds and then probably he
knocked out.
Concerning the New York In Investigation
vestigation Investigation by District Attorney
Frank Hogan and the grand jury,
the fistic grapevine has it "posi "positive"
tive" "positive" thnt two or' three important
headq will roll .before the indivi indivi-ments
ments indivi-ments and trials are comptcied

Boxing Schedule
Lists Several TV
Fiohts Next Week

NEW YORK (UPI) Middle
weights, heavyweights and welter

weights will be offered on next
week's televised boxing schedule.
Madison Sauare Garden, usually
the host to Friday-night TV bouts,
will have a Wednesday-night video
10-rounder this time. Gene Full Fullmer,
mer, Fullmer, former middleweight cham champion,
pion, champion, meets Franz Szualna' of Gef Gef-manv.
manv. Gef-manv. Their clash will be tele televised
vised televised by ABC at 10 p.m. (E.D.Tj.
Fullmer, from West Jordan,
Utah, will be favored because of
his relentless attack. Gene, who
beat MHo Savage and Jim Hegerle
this year, seeks his 46th victory
n 50 figljL Szuzina, whose 1958
efforts resulted in two defeats by
contender Joey Glardeilo and a
knockout over John Penn, is alter
his 43rd victory in 75 starts.
Friday night's TV-radio (NBC)
fight will be staged at the Syra Syracuse
cuse Syracuse (N.Y.) Auditorium, where
Tony Anthriny o' New York and
Archie McBride o' Trenton, N.J.,
meet in a heavyweight 10-rounder.

i Anthony, a light heavyweight
contender, s fighting as a heavy heavy-:
: heavy-: weight this time and expects to

weigh about 185 ootinds. His show showing
ing showing at that weight may decide

whether he will 50 afler Hbyd
Patterson's heayy crown. He will
he a bpsided favorite over Mc:
Bride.
Anthonv seeks his 35th win In 41

starts; McBride who hasn't

fought this year tries for his
22nd victory in 35 bouts.
At St. Nicholas arena, Monday
night two New York welter
weights Jimmy Archer and Tony
DiBisse meet in a TV Dti Dti-mont)
mont) Dti-mont) 10-rounder. Archee will br
favored because of his aggressive-

By JIMMY BRESLIN
NEW YORK (NEA) Play in
the American League this year has
been in one dreary pattern best
illustrated by the Cleveland dub
in early June.
On a Sunday night, the Indians
rolled down from Yankee Stadi
urn in a bus after winning a double-header.
Anytime you beat the
Yankees twice it is something to
be happy about and the Tribe
players felt good.
But they had used Don Mossi
Ray Narleski, Mudcat Grant, Hoyt
Wilhelm arid Dick Tomanek (since
traded to Kansas City) in other
words the whole front-line pitch pitching
ing pitching staff and used them plenty.
The Tribe took a train for Balti Baltimore
more Baltimore and a four-game series start-
Althea Reaches
Finals In Penn.
Tennis Tourney
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) TVS,

and Wimbledon champion Altnca
Gibson and Sally Moore, 17-yjar-old
Wimbledon junior champion
from Bakersfield, Calif., gained
the finals yesterday of the Penn Pennsylvania
sylvania Pennsylvania Lawn Tennis champion championship.
ship. championship. v

Miss Gibson had little trouble

defeating former badminton queen

Margaret Varner of El PasG, T-.,
6-2. 6-2, in a slow paced match.
Althea broke through for a 4-2

lead in each set and went on to

win easily in the eighth game,
Mrs. Varner double-faulting on the
final point. Both players wera er erratic
ratic erratic at times in the 44 minute
match before 2,500 at the Mcrion
Cricket Club in suburban Haver Haver-ford.
ford. Haver-ford. Miss Moore defeated 17-year-old
Gwyneth Thomas of Shaker
Heights, Ohio, 9-7, 6 4. in one of
the hardest fought matches jf the
tournament which made the Gib-son-Varner
play seem dull by
comparison.

ing the next night. Baltimore
won three of the tour games.

The since-departed Bobby Bra Bra-gan
gan Bra-gan was accosted in the lobbv ot
the Lord Baltimore Hotel alter
his club had lost the last game t
the Oriole series and he muttered,
"You play the Yankees and when
you leave town, you have notliinr;
left. No pitching no pep."
Every other club in the leat"c leat"c-has
has leat"c-has a similar xtory. The Deto';
Tigers, in particular, who have had
moments of glory while pbyinr
the Yankees and days of travail
with sucli as Kansas City.
There seems lo be a new rule a a-round.
round. a-round. Any team that beats t:i
Yankees is automatically entitled
to three losses elsewhere. It re replaces
places replaces ami old Mindby which cal called
led called for a decent contender to split
even with the other bit; teams and
murder the second division clubs.

Pierce. That's no concern of mine
but that's what happens."
That's why, on any given day,
nine games at most separate the

seronu place team from the last

place Washington Senators. Thev

tre all packed together while Ihe

Yankees hum along with as much
lead as they care 10 take.

This leaves the only tangible
interest in the leaeue in the Ipapiio

in the hands oi Bob Fishel of the

Yankees front office, who was ;o ;o-ing
ing ;o-ing over attendance figures
"Last year on the road we drew
11838'.44. which was only a eou eou-Die
Die eou-Die oi thousand less than th :ilt.

tjme major league record," he ob

served. We drew 1.487.000

home. The wy it is going this sea
sun, I'd say we'll do a bit less tha
last year on the road and the sami
at home."

at

"I can sit here," Casey Stengel
rasps, "and tell you right now the
pitching we're Konna see for al almost
most almost every game we. play. Detroit
will give us Frank Lary and Jim
Bunning. The ChicagOs will haw;
Billy Pierce and Dick Donovan

suited up.
"Sure it uses 'em tip: The next
club that plays them gets a break.
In a three-game series maybe the
other club don't even get to see

ihe rival managers, because of
this, ate not the only ones who

point for the Yankees.

the box office crews around

the league wait for the New York
e(s even more. a.

SSSmKmalSmWm WmtMrnm EB H HHSHeHef mm Wm
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new (ire performance & appearance

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And the SAME
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PROVED PERFORMANCE

ANTHONY STEPS UP
Syracuse (NEA) Tony An
thony steps into the heavywer.'ht
class In a match with Archie Me-B'-iHp
vhich will be nationally tel televised
evised televised from Syracuse, Aug. i.

Tough Fight Shooes
Ud In French Lick
Women's Open

FRENCH LICK. Ind. (UPI)
A toush fla;ht shaped up in the
French Lick Women's Ooen golf
tournament today with Betty
Jameson holding a slim, one one-stroke
stroke one-stroke lead going Into the second
round.
Miss Jameson came in with :i
one under -par 73 Thursday on
the 6.770 yard course, dampened
by recent rains. Riuht behind her
with a 74 was Faye Crocker, an another
other another leading money winner
from Uruguay.
Beverly Hanson was in the
third spot with a 75. Madly
Smith and Marlene Bauer Haire
were tied for fourth nlace at 77.
Joyce Vi'kev hnd ? 78. followed
bv Gloria Fecht and Jackie Pung
with 79.

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PAGE FIGHT
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
STJNDAT, JULT VS. 1951
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
THIS SPACE IS FOR SALE
FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 2-0740
r w
I

C L A S S I F I E D S

Automobiles j Apartments
9St Ford Victoria hardtop, pink I RENT: Hew, col 2 bed-
and white, radio, power steering;
2-1891, 2-1895 we.kd.y,, 3- m .partm.nt, tlo,. to mod,rn
W54 night. and Sunday.. i'mI'mT.
. I corned, only $65.00. Call Pana-
FOtt SALE: 1958 Chrysler mj 3-4511 or Balboa 2-1778.
Sara..,., 4 door whit, and gold. FOR RENT:-Fumi.h.d t7
R and H, power steering, brakes,
,,.t.. 6400 mile., cost new ""'. 90 S"' ,6' S"
4800, excellent buy at $3800; '!iV
VNevy 3784. FOR RENT: Nice two bedroom
FOR'SALE: 1957 Bel-Air apartment. Plea.e call 3-2978.
Chevrolet 4-door. Sport sedan
l;y"cs",M "Honest Mistakes"
IjOR SALE : Sportcar 1955 Ford mm
Thunderbird R&H w s w, new 9X6 L V SfifVlf P
J. nylon top overdrive very clean 1 UT fltC
""Duty paid, will trade. Tel. 2- m A "I
Commissioner Quit

FOR SALE: 1953 Hillman. Tel.
2-1872 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1958 Chevrolet 6.
fordor sedan 6000 miles. 124-B
Gamboa. Tel. 6-170.
tip SALE: 1957 Buick Special
' 4-door hardtop. Power brake.,
.feering. White wall tire., radio
and heater. New car condition.
Finance available. House 8510-A,
Margarita, C.Z. 3-241 1.
FOR SALE: 1947 Chevrolet 4
door sedan, good battery, tires
, and motor, $200.00. Tel. Bal Balboa
boa Balboa 2-4304, house 0437 Apt. K.
FOR SALE: 1948 Old.mobila 4
door, sedan, radio, excellent tires,
hydramatic, recently overhauled,
no ru.t hole., clean, $250. Tel.
2-4304, house 0437 Apt. "K".
FOR SALE: 1950 Chevrolet
business coupe, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Phone 83-3227, house
2009-B, Curundu, C. Z.
FOR SALE: Stationwagon. 1953
Ford 9-pass. Country sedan, 5 6 6-ply
ply 6-ply tire., new battery, excellent
Condition. Balboa 2-3480.
Ingrid Bergman
To Meet Daughter
In London
PRESTWICK, Scotland (UPD
Ingrid Bergman's 19 year old
daughter Jennie Lindstrom ar arrived
rived arrived unnoticed from New York
Friday aboard a Scandinavian Air
lines plane and drove off toward
Glasgow.
An SAS official (aid Jennie,
bareheaded and wearing a flower flower-print
print flower-print dress, telephoned her mother
in London. Miss Bergman flew to
'London Thursday night from
Stockholm afler a 10-day holiday
yitfi Swedish producer Lars
Schmidt, whom she plans to mar
Vy. It was believed Jennie would
"fly to London Saturday to meel
her mother.

3 New Officers Complete
Local Logistics Staff

' -

Jf" Colonel
' touls A. Walsh, Jr.

Lt. Col. Edgar R. Poole

" The assignment of three new of of-"flcers,
"flcers, of-"flcers, including a new Caribbean
Command assistant Chief of Stall
' this month brought the logisi
Jfcs staff of the unified command
to full strength, the headquarters
t Quarry Heights announced to
flay.
Col. Louis A. Walsh. Jr.. was
named by Lt. Gen. Ridgely Gaith Gaith-jr,
jr, Gaith-jr, commander in chief Caribbean
to be the new .14 with responsi-'

bility for the coordination and
direction of all logistical activities
for the command.
P
jW Ths includes matters pertaining
i4o supply, maintenance, repair,
Vacua! ion. transportation and
construction In addition, the as
-listant Chief of Staff .14 has res 1
Vtponsibilily for supervision of the
Joint Area Petroleum Office,
comptroller type activities includ includ-illZ
illZ includ-illZ budgeting, and logistical enn
-fleeted with the Military Assistance!
'.program in Latin America
Prior to his assignment with the
Caribbean Command. Walsh serv serv-ed
ed serv-ed is assistant to Gaither. then:
deputy commanding General for:
MMIerve forces at Continental Ar
tnf Command Headquarters at Ft!
Monroe, Va.

$tt He is a graduate of Ihe United
States Military Academy at West
Point, the Army Command and
Oneral Stall School, the Armed

Forces Staff College and the Na-I
.tional War College i
Untie is married to the former
.Louise Jadwin Anthony, and they I

WASHINGTON fUPD Bernnro

L. Flanagan of St. Albans, Vt.,
quit under fire Friday as an in interim
terim interim member of the Civil Serv Service
ice Service Commission because of what
he oalled his "honest mistakes"
on past applications for govern government
ment government jobs.
At Flanagan's request, President
Eisenhower withdrew his nomina nomination
tion nomination of Flangan to the commis commission.
sion. commission. He has heon serving as a
commissioner under a recess ap appointment
pointment appointment for the past seven
months.
The 39-year-old Flanagan, a for
mer Capitol Hill policeman, had
been sharply criticized by mem members
bers members of the Senate Civil Service
Committee for filing misinforma misinformation
tion misinformation in applying for earlier jehs
wilh a variety of gnvernmiait
agencies.
In a letter to the President
Flanagan conceded he "marie
some mistakes" in filling out ap applications
plications applications for jobs with the o'.d
Office of Price Stabilization, ;Le
Veterans Administration and the
('eneral Service Administration
lie said the inaccuracies abou!
his education, past job titles, sal salaries
aries salaries and other matters ''were en entirely
tirely entirely immaterial" to the job;
heed.
"iBut they have been seized upon
and maenified out of all propor proportion
tion proportion to the question of my ability
and fitness to be a civil service
commissioner," he said.
Flanagan said he thought "far
too much" of the Eisenhower ad
ministration "to allow myself to
be used for its political harass harassment."
ment." harassment." He also told the President a
Senate fight over his nomination
would make him "less able in the
future to give you, and the com commission,
mission, commission, service of the very high
order called for in this important
post." i
For these reasons, he said, he;
"regretfully concluded" that he
must ask the President to with withdraw
draw withdraw the" nomination.
The President complied will. out I
delay. In a terse note, devoid of i
Lt. Col
William A Wilson
have two children, a daughter
Gail. 23, who is living in Washing
ion, DC. and a son, I.ouis. A II,
age 5.
The second new officer assign-
ed to .1-4 is Lt. Col. Kdgar R.
Poole, who is serving as logistics!
plans officer. Prior In his assig assig-ment
ment assig-ment with Caribbean Command,
he was also on the s'aff of the
depulv commandinc general fori
reserve forces at Continental Ar Army
my Army Command. Ft Monroe.
Poole, whose basic branch is In Infantry,
fantry, Infantry, graduated from the In Infantry
fantry Infantry School, the Army Com Command
mand Command and General Staff College
and the course at the Armed
forces Special Weinon.s Project
at Sandia liase, N.M.
lie is married to Ihe former
Jeanne L. Slerritf, and they have
one child, I.inila. ace 14
Lt. Col William A Wilson. Jr.,
is the third new officer assigned
tn J. 4. He is serving as Logistics
Operations Officer Trior to this
assignmen' he was director of
material with the inn7th Air In In-tellicenre
tellicenre In-tellicenre Service Croup in Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, DC.
Wilson is a graduate of the Air
Tactical School and the Air Force
Command and Staff College,
where he served as an instruct or
in the schools' Squadron officer
Course for three years afler his
graduation in '9.V?
Married to Ihe former Sara V.
Reaver, he and Mrs Wilson have
three children, Robert, age 15,
Diane, age 11, and Gary, age 9.

LEAVK VOUH AD WITH ONE OK OUR AGENTS OR OUR OFFICES AT 13 37 "H" STREET, PANAMA MBRER1A PRECIADO 7 Street No. IS a) AGENCIAS
INTERNAL OK PUBUCACIONtS No. 3 I .oil try Plain o CASA ZALDO Central Ave. 45 I.OUROES PHARMACY 182 La Carrasaulila FARMACIA LOM LOM-BAKDO
BAKDO LOM-BAKDO No. 26 "B" Street MORRISON -4th of July Ave. & J St. LEWIS SERVICE Ave. Tlvoli No. 4 0 FARMACIA EST ADOS IJNIDOS 143 Central Ave.
FARMACIA LUX-164 Central Avenue HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE J Fco. de la On Ave. No. 41 FOTO DOMY Justo Arosemena Ave. and .11 St. a FAR FARMACIA
MACIA FARMACIA VAN DERJIS 50 Street No. 53 o FARMACIA EL BATURRO Parque Lefevre 7 Street FARMACIA "SAS" Via Porras 111 MOVEDADES ATH1S
Beside the Bella -'Lsta Theatre.

Resorts
PHILLIPS Oceansida Cottage.
Santa Clara R de P. Phone Pa Panama
nama Panama 3-1877 Cristobal 3-1673.
FOSTER'S Cottage, and Largo
Beach House One mile pa.t the
Casino. Phone Balboa 1866.
Houses
FOR REHT: Three month.,
beautiful 3 bedroom residence
in El Cangrejo completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, for information call 3 3-1
1 3-1 167.
FOR RENT: Furnished 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom chalet, maid', room, ga garage,
rage, garage, screened. Calle 50 No. 25.
Bella Vista $115.00. Tel. 2 2-0481.
0481. 2-0481. FOR RENT: Chalet three bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, 2 baths, living-dining-room,
kitchen, garage, fenced
yard. Telephone 4-1241 good
neighborhood.
FOR RENT: Chalet, porch, liv-ing-diningroom,
three bedrooms,
rraid's loom, 3 baths, kitchen,
hot water, garage, fenced yard.
Good neighborhood, 15 Street
Nn. 106 Paifilla.
FOR RENT. Large house, 3
bedrooms, independent servants'
quarters, spacious grounds. Tel.
3-7307.
FOR REN T: In residential
sretion, new, modern chalet.
Three bedrooms. two baths.
Phone 3-3255 from 12-2 p.m.
and from 6-8 p.m.
FCR RENT: 4 bedrooms chalet
2 baths, garden $110.00 Sonny
Boy Via Espana 97 Street Tel. 3 3-3041,
3041, 3-3041, Commercial Sites
FOR RENT: Commercial locale
in Justo Arosemena Ave. No.
37-11. Opposite Cristo Rey
Church. Tel. 2-2341.
the usual Eisenhower expressions
of friendship to departing officials
the President said:
"Dear Mr. Flanagan:
"As you requested in y o u r
letter if July 24, I am today with
drawing your nomination to be a
member" of the Civil Service Cun
mission. I take this opportunity to
thank you for your service a a
member of the commission under
your recess appointment."
BOY PERISHES IN FALL
OSLO. Norway (UPD William
H. Coote. 11-year-old son of Wen Wen-del
del Wen-del B. Coote, first secretary in the
U.S. Embassy in Finland, wis
killed Thursday when he fell into
a waterfall some 250 miles north
of here while trying to take a pic picture.
ture. picture. 8 DAY
LIMA TOUR
Inc. air fare, transfers, tours,
and deluxe lintel
$180
leave every Tues. and Fri.
FIDANQUE TRAVEL
Tel. Panama 2-1GG1

$ for J
35 mm Camera
f. !.) lens 6.50
more for your Dollar.
International Jewelry
155 Central Ave.

LIFE INSURANCE
call
JIM RIlKiE
General Agent
Gibraltar Life Ins. Co..
for rates and Information
Tel. Panama J-0552
The New
S P
NIKON
With bullt-ln Universal
Vlewftnder System
U.MHH
Panama Col6n

Miscellaneous

JUST ARRIVED
Hcby Items including:
Fuels, Paints,
Artist Brushes
Sterling and other
Plane, Boat and, Auto
Models.
Ballistic Missile with
launcher and fuel.
Real Missile performance
150-200 ft.
CRAWFORD AGENCIES CORP.,
Tivoli Ave. No. 18-20
Tel. 2-1905
FOR SALE: Piano Wurlit.er
Spinet. Excellent condition. 8420
Margarita. Cris 2598.
FOR SALE: Nursery school
equipment. House 5507-A, Dia Diablo.
blo. Diablo. Tel. 2-1547 Balboa.
FOR SALE: Spare parts for
cars, trucks, heavy equipment,
radios, motors, electric and
plumbing fixtures, refrigerators,
safe vaults, bolts, steam electric
tables. CONTINENTAL SUPPLY
at 12 and 13 St. Central Ave.
Phone 1 088-B. Colon.
FOR SALE: Hollywood double
bed frame and springs $20.00,
3 pc. livingroom set $95.00,
reclining chair and stool, $25.00,
Kodascope S mm projector
$75.00, 60 cycle 8mm projector
and camera $15.00, bedroom
chair $11.00. Phone Balboa 2 2-3782.
3782. 2-3782. Take Advantage of New York
Bargain Sale.
Let me act as your personal
shopper. Send list and size
of your needs, with check or
money order to:
C. Baranovsky
76 W. 89th Street
New York 244, N.Y.
and your order will receive
prompt and expert attention.
My fee is 15 on purchases up
to 50.00, 10 on higher
amounts.
For references, kindly call
Panama 3-1053 any week day
between 12 noon and 12:30
P.M.
FOR SALE: Frigidaire refrigera refrigerator
tor refrigerator 12 cu. ft. freexer compart compartment
ment compartment across the top. New 60
cycle sealed unit. Price $60.00.
762-C Barneby St Balboa, C. Z.
Phone 2-2824.
Motorcycles
FOR SALE: 1955 Tiger Cub,
200 cc, excellent condition. Belt
offer. 1 English bicycle, 3 model
air planes. Telephone 82-2265,
Quarry Heights.
FOR SALE : 1 957 Moped mo motorbike.
torbike. motorbike. Good condjtion. Phone
Curundu 3192 for question, and
information.
SERVICE CENTER
DIABLO HTS. 2:30, 7:01
Jack Palance
Anthony Perkins
"THE LONELY MAN"
In VistaVislon
MARGARITA
2:30 6:15 8:15
Cameron Mitchell
Glynis Johns
''ALL MINE TO GIVE"
BALBOA
Mi
BRANDO
2a
:t'Hiy r

the Young Lions

SANTA CRUZ 7:00
"Delicate Delinquent"
In VistaVislon!
'Also Showing Sunday
CAMP BIERD
Richard Widmark
"SAINT
PARAISO
Aim. 6
SANTA
An.
CROONERS u
GAY
Rocking

Home Articles

FOR SALE: Beautiful, new din dining
ing dining table with six chair.. Reason Reasonably
ably Reasonably priced. Phone 3-4364.
FOR SALE : Rtf rigerator Weit Weit-inghou.e,
inghou.e, Weit-inghou.e, all porcelain, 9 ft. Lilt Lilted
ed Lilted for conversion. $60. Available
Aug. 4. Phone 2-4224.
FOR SALE: Double bod with
Simmons spring and mattress,
maple wood, upholstered couch,
stvcral stand lamps, 1949 Buick,
sedan, roadmaster. Hou.e 356,
Ancon Apt. 19. Phone 2-3740.
FOR SALE: Carbed or .cat $5;
baby jump teat $3.50; auto automatic
matic automatic bottle tterilixer $3.50;
diaper bag, $1.75; camera $10;
vacuum cleaner w cart, attach attachments,
ments, attachments, $25; automatic ironer
$110.00; 35 feet wire fencing,
$4.00; sewing machine, Tran.itor
radio $35; all excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, 10 K Street El Cangrejo
3-6526.
US Apologizes
For Accusations
Of Swiss Spy Ring
WASHINGTON (UPI) -The
State Department said today that
it 'sincerely regrets any difficulty
or embarrassment" which may
have been caused to Switzerland
by what it described as an "inci "incident"
dent" "incident" involving the quoting of
U. S. Ambassador Henry J. Tay Taylor
lor Taylor concerning Communist spy ac activities
tivities activities in Switzerland.
A department official said tin tin-article
article tin-article in question was a Umted
Press International dispatch ust
week reporting that Switzerland
was a center of Communist aiid
Arab plotting.
They declined to comment on
the accuracy or inaccuracy of the
dispatch.
Taylor said Thursday in Svi'.z
erland that he categorically denied
"having made statements attribut attributed
ed attributed to me which were offensive to
Switzerland or possibly injurious
to the nation."
Lincoln White read the folio
statement to reporters at his reg regular
ular regular midday briefing:
"With reference to the state statement
ment statement Ambassador Henry J. Tay Taylor
lor Taylor made in Berne yesterday, the
department sincerely regrets any
difficulty or embarrassment vhich
may have been caused to a friend friendly
ly friendly country by this incident."
White declined to explain wheth whether
er whether the "incident" referred to the
publication of the story, the quot quoting
ing quoting of Taylor or the embarrass embarrassment
ment embarrassment of the Swiss government.
Other officials also refused to
amplify the statement, saying only
that they regretted "the whole
affair." they said that there was
no intention of recalling Taylor
home from his post. They noted
that the Swiss took very strenuous
exception to the article but de declined
clined declined to say whether they be believes
lieves believes the Swiss displeasure was
justified.
THEATRES TODAY!
GAMBOA 7:00
"THAT NIGHT"
GATUN 2:30 & 7:00
Jane Powell
Cliff Robertson
"THE GIRL MOST
LIKELY"
COCO SOLO 2:30, 7
00
Henry Fonda
Anthonv Perkins
"THE TIN STAR"
In VistaVislon!
Also Showing Monday!
AIR CONDITIONED
2.00 5:70 8:20
Bated on Itir novll by IRWIN SHAW
GnbisiaScopE
PARA1SO 7:00
"UNTIL THEY SAIL"
in CinemaScope!
'Also Showing Monday)
6:15 & 8:25
Richard Todd
JOAN"
CRUZ
7
CAMP BIERD
Aug. 8
On The Islands'!

C1IFT MARTIN 1

Boats b Motors

MpR SALE: 14' new Runabout
65" beam-made for water ski skiing
ing skiing will Mcrifict. Tel. 2-2887,
Ancon, C. Z.
FOR SALE: 12 ft. boat. Good
condition. Must go. Make an of offer.
fer. offer. 790-C, Tavemilla, Balboa,
Tel. 2-2352.
Real Estate
Gbod Bargain. House and land
in Rio Abajo for S3500.OO. Ave.
29-19. Ttl. 3-1016.
Dogs
FOR SALE: Six week Doberman
female, decended from 18 AKC
champion.. Write Llona Sean,
Santa Clara.
ABOUND
BY
t A morning paper reported dur
in g the week tnat -parents were
demanding of the ministry of E
ducation that arrangements be
made whereby the kids again go
to school all day. However, this
seems to be impossible at this
time, as right now there exists a
certain amount of difficulty to ac
comadte the present school popu population,
lation, population, with separate classes in
the morning and afternoons for
different groups.
The "Lords" shared honirs ai
the Salon "W" last Tuesday eve evening
ning evening during the presentation of
the weekly talent show. Lord Co Cobra
bra Cobra and Lord Byron ended the
"big event" in a dead heat ac according
cording according to audience applause me meter.
ter. meter. A real solid time was the re reward
ward reward of all those who attend"! as
they were treated to a iemale ca
lypso vocalist who reaped a stout
applause from the gathering for
her renditions Norma Williams
the name of the dame, and she
seems to be going places.
Next Tuesday everting, will be
no exception, to the we:i arra.'.god
shows that have been coming off
in the nasi several weeks at the
Salon "W."
The baby who happens to he
born on the right nay in Septem September,
ber, September, when Panama is expecting
to have its millionth .citizen -mill
have possibly the balance of his
natural life quite easy, as a lot
of plans are being made bv the
government as well as private
enterprises for this auspicious oc occasion
casion occasion in the history of the repub republic.
lic. republic. However, the (rveceria Na
cional, known for presenting the
unusual, came up with somethinf
very good that is the oldest citi citizen
zen citizen of the country will come heir
to a gift from the Pan liquido out outfit.
fit. outfit. Mrs. Rosa Stewart of the eapi
tal came in for congratulations on
Friday on the occasion of her
birthday anniversary. Late, many
happy returns Rosa.
Over on the Atlantic side Mbf
Edna Cordova also had her day
on Friday when she observed an
othi?r anniversary.
She is a staunch religious and
social worker.
Edmund T. Fearon, a student
of the Abel Bravo high school in
Colon, was in line also last Thi;rs-

IUf "aUIIIUeW U "'.wr' V

TO OUR ADVERTISERS:
With a view toward improving service and correcting
irregularities that occur, involuntarily, from time to time,
THE PANAMA AMERICAN has established a special

CLAIMS SECTION

Please dial Tel.

We will appreciate your call which
to serve you better

EeaoH(oattoM(l8J

Miscellaneous

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DRAWER "A", DIABLO
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL, C.Z.
PHONE BALBOA 3709
Cheap sale, mollas thit week, two
dollar, up, America'. Art. Auto Automobile
mobile Automobile Row,
La.t opportunity, leaving Pana Panama,
ma, Panama, accept be.t offer, 1957 Lin Lincoln
coln Lincoln Premier, 4 door, sedan. Only
6400 mile., duty paid, extras,
excellent condition. Tel. 3-1709
Panamd.
WANTED : 3 or 4
chalet. Call 3-1407.
bedroom.
Lesson
Pittman't shorthand, do you
kow it? Tutoring needed, call
Rote 3-7658.
TOWN
TOM
day for birthday greetings
friends at both terminals.
from
Plans for the Altamira year
book and dance are moving
on solidly. The dance, which will
be held on the Atlantic side wilh
Willie Morrison and his ork in
the stands, is slated for the
Strangers Club.
This celebration is to commemo commemorate
rate commemorate the Club's sixth year of oper operation.
ation. operation. Time approaches. That's theJ
word now for the Castillos dance
to be held at the Casino ViVna del
Mar on Saturday, Aug. 9.
Interest is rinp for this get to to-getfler
getfler to-getfler and a big time it will be
indeed.
The Past, Present and Future
program is on tab Monday for the
Panama Baptist Church, under
the auspices of the "Little
three."
The program is to render pos posthumous
thumous posthumous tribute to Mrs. Lydia
Holder who was one of the most.
celebrated local vocalist and pia
nist.
Grin and Bear it: A fellow pass passing
ing passing through a town stayed for the
night at one of the not-so-ritzy ho
tels. His slumber was disturbed
during the course of the night by
the uninvited presence of bedbugs.
Angrily, next morning he dispatch dispatched
ed dispatched a rather stern letter to the
management of the joint.
The management promptly apo-i
logizen and thanked him for fil filing
ing filing his complaint with them rath
er than making known this disa disagreeable
greeable disagreeable incident to others.
However, it appeared that some-
nony naa forgotten to detach a
piece of paper which was in the
room service department which
said. Send him the bedbug iet
ter I
Thought (for today: Pens are
, A .. i- n i
Miwsi ndiivei uus nuns, more snarpi
ny oons man words, and cut more
keen than whips or rods.
John Taylor
CHARGES INVESTIGATED
JAKARTA (UPI)-A military
court has completed its prelimi
nary investigation of charges
against Allen Lawrence Pope of
Homestead, Fla.. for allegedly fly-
ing bombing raids for the Indo-
nesian rebels. Foreign Minister'
Subandrio said today.

2.3330

kaTJEM

WANTED: Experienced Ap Appliance
pliance Appliance service and repair man,
mutt be bilingual. Send full par particular,
ticular, particular, together with phot to
ADVERTISER 106 APARTADO
819 PANAMA.

Anyone with knowlege ef Portu Portuguese
guese Portuguese grammar or conversation
call Rote 3-7658.
WANTED: Experienced Ap Appliance
pliance Appliance Sala.man, mutt be bilin bilingual.
gual. bilingual. Send full particular, to together
gether together with photo to ADVERTIS ADVERTISER
ER ADVERTISER 106 APARTADO 819 PANA PANAMA.
MA. PANAMA. f SERVICES
3 -minute car wash $1,
cleaning- of mater $5. waxino of
ear. $4. Auto-Bane. Tran.-lsth
mian Highway near Saan.
TELEVISION SERVICE
WE REPAIR IN
YOUR HOME. $3.50
You get service the tame day
WE GUARANTEE OUR WORK
LOS ANGELES trained techni technicians.
cians. technicians. Crawford Agendas. Phono
2-1905 Tivoli Avenue 18-20.
TELEVISION SERVICE
6 MONTHS CUARANTEE
ASK FOR MR. TV
PANAMA 2-3142.
Colombian Beauty
Called On To Rule
Universe For Year
LONG BEACH, July 5 (UPI) (UPI)-Fifteen
Fifteen (UPI)-Fifteen minutes after midnight,
radiant Colombian beauty who
never hoped even to make the fin finals
als finals in the Miss Universe beauty
pageant heard her name called out
by Byron Palmer, the emcee on
the stage of the Long Beach Mu Municipal
nicipal Municipal Auditorium.
Luz Marina Zuloaga froze. Ther
her beautiful mouth opened in a
big, generous, happy smile as she
lifted both arms, put her hands to
her mouth and sent a kiss out to
the world.
The excitement that befe'l the
retiring Miss Universe Vf'ii M
great that she struggled in vain to
affix the crown to Miss Colombia's
head. First, her trembling hands
moved the. crown tew far back.
Then too far onto' Cut Zuloaga'.'
forehead. Emcee Palmer bad to
come to the girl's rescue and set
the crown firmly on the Colom Colombian's
bian's Colombian's head.
The crown, the royal mantle
and the sceptre transformed a
bathing suit-clad girl into a fairy
tale queen. Throwing her eyes tc
the ceiling in a gesture of bewUd
erment, her mouth wide open aJc
laughing, she walked the lengtu. .it
the ramp jutting into the audienc
and back, to the tumultuous ap
plause of the audience.
i
A TIME FOR FUN
BONN, Germany (UPI)Thf
Federal Finance Ministry instruct
ed its tax collectors today to re
frain from spoiling the taxpayers
lun by sending payment notices
during big holidays.
BETTER TO WALK
OKYO (UPI) The Tokyo Con
struction Bureau warned today
pedestrians may be able to move
faster than cars in Tokyo by 1(555
:e u i ,.
if the number of vehicles contin
ues to grow at the current rate
and roads are not improved.
SAVED FROM WELL
RICHMOND, Va. (UPI)-Hef-bert
Sigmund, 12 did some fail
thinking yesterday when his younf
er sister, Barbara Ann, fell into
a 33-foot well. He called for his
mother, lowered the well bucket
and while his mother held the
rope ran a half-mile for help. The
girl was pulled out Safely.
'I
I
,4
for prompt attention
will enable m
- tt.tf

1



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Room-dividing storage chest in
Huminum legs. K has a marble
Hies combine in home furnishings
for fall; to charm the consumer
into making a change or two a a-round
round a-round the house.
Outstanding new trends in de de-sign
sign de-sign were scarce at the summer
home furnishings market in Chi Chicago.
cago. Chicago. Much talk, was directed to
th hio values in furniture.
There is plentiful evidence that
manufacturers and designers are
trying to anticipate what we .might
need or want to make our 'nomes
prettier, more comfortable, more
individual.
Fresh interior design ideas are
suggested in model room settings.
Great emphasis is placed on varied
storage pieces.
Enjoying a revival are such well-!
liked but not always easy-to-find
articles as handsome love seats
and comfortable rocking chairs.
For design interest and or utility,
mnfarile iMim-
you ii see sevcioi iuraiio .-.
bined in one piece.
i In a compact, modern storage
vebinet, for example, walnut and
rosewood for the case are jomed
with a travertine marble top,
brass -finished anodized alumi aluminum
num aluminum legs. The drawer's interior is
of molded plastic.
Incorporated into med.um
priced furniture are design details
SSOCiaiea wivn uiguci yin-c
stea aecoraiions niipuiucu,
H.hfown Hftisfabors. nar'olietry.
Ihys and Carefully detailed hard
ware.
" Added bonuses: sliking trays
sized for' shirts, deep drawers for
handbags, lift-up vanity tops and
dressers that include an electric
outlet for a light of an electric
haver.
Color bathes everytnine in a
ght bright glow. Easycare la larks
rks larks have made it possible to in
dulge one's fancy in gay colors
without paying the penalty of
costly upkeep.
One puzzler to some of the car carpet
pet carpet industry representative. I'd
talked tu is the steady demand for
off-white carpets.
Thos? do soil and there is no
no tres'.ment yet for the fibers
that will prevent dirt from show showing.
ing. showing. ...
A model room setting at the
Merchandise Mart which draws
delighted comment from the la ladies
dies ladies i a pink-ana-white sirring
room.
. It features a white nylon carpet
scattered with rink needlepoint
roses. Tills is not i custom- mi.de
carpet; it's prtsof one company s
standard nW:
New3 in tie white, loveseats is
fiidden tnder he rose upholstery.
New, resilient cushioning ma ma-tarinl
tarinl ma-tarinl i mHp at dacron. fibers
- which are said to resist matting
and moths while providing a soft
teat.
5 OtBer love seats ranged in r':le
from cozy ear y American one to a
Set
By GAILE DUGAS
NEW YORK (NEA) Th
gal who hasn't equipped herself
with at least one new swimsuit
this year had better do it now.
She'll find that designers have
done suits this year that will help
her figure along. Nearly all have
an inner bra. They offer little
pleated skirts to take care of hip
problems' and longer leg lengths
to conceal thighs mrnwt are not
shapely.
Many of them have additional
iigure control Woven into the fab fabric
ric fabric itself. Lastex is combined with
many fabrics to lend shapeliness
where it may not exist.
Some girls prefer their swim swim-suits
suits swim-suits in wool. Some bank on the
fast drying synthetics. Some de demand
mand demand a suit that will not fade or
change color after hours in sua
and salt water.
We show here two suits that
will maintain color despite hours
in pool or sea or on the beach.
Nettie Rosenstein's strapless suit
(left) in white has banding of
black and white and overskirt
, natched to the trim. The over over-klrt
klrt over-klrt cm be worn as a brief cape.
dt
i- Sheath suit (right) is done in
n' iamond jacquar.' weave, has
hi Hatching cap. rtolh suits ate wov
of chromspun acetate which
jes quickly and therefore feels

oa next io me skip

walnut and rosewood rests on
top and mold rd plastic drawer.

regal" Federal model highlighted
with pearl inlay on a black apron.
We'll ue see.ng livelier sugges suggestions
tions suggestions for window treatment (lis
fall. Tucked Austrian-syled shjdes
can now be bought ready-made
at moderate prices.
Reversible cale curtains in more
variety "of patterns and colors, fa
bric-covered shutters, woven
blinds and sliding, translucent
plastic panels promise to give a
lift to windows.
Also bidding for increased at
tention: decorative accessories.
Among them: handsome, framed
mirrors, wall scones and candle
holders, including tall, wrought
iron candelabra, clocks, special
title pictures and tall, slender, mo:
dern, bric-a-hrac holders.
P.
7
and fashions
est a
in
PARIS (UPI) American wom women
en women will look sexy and elegant next
season if the two newcomers to
the Paris fashion scene iiave
their way.
iBoth Michel Goma and Serge
Mata, who will show their first
collections as part of the Paiis
fashion opening next week, are
Latins.-- i i--i i
nd in typical Latin fashion,
they made no bones about the fact
that a woman's curves should be
admired and not disguised by
sacks or tents.
"1 am going to give my models
waists but I can't tell you where,"
said dark-eyed 25-year-old Goma,
who is half Spanish, half French.
He was surrounded by seam seamstresses,
stresses, seamstresses, mannequins, fitters and
bolts o fcloth as he talked intense intensely
ly intensely about the collection that is not
yet finished but that must go be.
fore the world's fashion press
next Thursday.
"I'm very frightened about this
first showing," he said, survey
ing the confusion of the elegant
salon.
"When I 'started designing five
years ago I showed my work to
Dior and he turned it down be
cause I was terribly Spanish and
nad too much individualism for
him. But that is the way this col collection
lection collection is going to be"
His Chilean born colleague,
Mata, who is ten years his senior
at 35, appeared almost stoical in
the face of the forthcoming "bat
tie" with clients, buyers and
press.
"This business is like t bull bullfight,"
fight," bullfight," he said as he perched pre
cariously on a stool in his salon
near the Champs Elysees. v
"What am I going to do with
my collection? I am going to give
back to the woman her ntura
shape."

Style

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By ANN HARVEY
Many people have dream dreamed
ed dreamed about going around the
world. So did Anne Franklin;
Boy.e J
For many of us it wiU al always
ways always be a dream, but two
and a half years ago, when
Miss Boyle arrived in Pan
ama to become Ambassador
Julian F i s k e Harrington's
secretary, she accomplished
her ambition.
"I actually had two ambi ambition.
tion. ambition. I did want to travel and
meet people but I also had
a strong desire to enter the
field of medicine as so many
members of my family had
done so I did take a course
in medical training."
Miss Boye was born and
attended grammer and high
school in Westmi nister,
Maryland. She started to ac accomplish
complish accomplish both her ambitions
by attending Georgetown
Visitation in Washington, D.
C, where she took the med med-dical
dical med-dical course and then return returned
ed returned to her beloved State of
Maryland to become a med med-iical
iical med-iical secretary and adminis administrative
trative administrative assistant in John
Hopkins Hospital.
Patients from all over the
world-, would come to be
treated at Johns Hopkins
and it was Miss Boyle's job
to interview them to deter
mine what section of the hos hospital
pital hospital they should be assigned
to for the proper treatment
and care.
This stirred her taste for
travel even more. Those she
would interview would tell
about their homes and soon
she decided she had to see
these far-off lands. So in
1951 Miss Boyle entered the
Foreign Service.
"With mixed emotions I went
through mv training period and
left for my first post. I had
dreams of Paris or London but
not of Belgrade. In any case that
is where I was assigned and that
is where I spent a very enlighten
ing and pleasant two years."
It is so easy to talk about
leaving homo and learning to
live in now country but when
the time comes, even the strong strongest
est strongest weaken. And so with uncer uncertainty
tainty uncertainty mixed with excitement
Anne Boyle and her only piece
of furniture a hot plate tuck tucked
ed tucked under her arm boarded the

Jke HJorfJ

UPON HER ARRIVAL IN PANAMA Miss Anne Franklins; Boyle
achieved one ot her greatest ambitions. She had made a com com-plete
plete com-plete circuit around the world. Behind her is a copy of a
P Matisse done by Mrs. Julian Fiske Harrington.

Queen Mary and crossed the
Atlantic Ocean.
"1 had read that a hot plate
was an essential household item
and it proved just that. I lived in
iv, vintol Moscow in Belgrade
and before I left I could bake a
cake on it."
While in Belgrade, Miss Bolc
was the secretary for the U S.
Ambassador and the chief deputy
of the U.S. Mission. When Presi
dent Tito moved the Yugoslav
government to Lake Blede each
summer many of the foreign mis missions
sions missions represented in the country
would move part of their staff al also.
so. also. "That is how I spent two de delightful
lightful delightful summers at Lake Blade,''
says Miss Boyle.
While in Yugoslavia she studied
Serbian so she could talk to the
nnmtip sh net on her many trips
thrrurh the countrv. She d i d
hatro a herofut knowledge of j
French as did many of the people
she met.
"We traveled hy every means
of transportation and spent three
weeks sailing along the Dalmatian
Coast and up and down the Pa
nube. One spring I accompanied
three others on a hilarious sight
seeing trio through the country
by Jeep. We had made arrange arrangements
ments arrangements to spend one night in a
monestary. Unfortunately we ar arrived
rived arrived after closing hours so were

3n Jour

forced to make ourselves as com comfortable
fortable comfortable as possible in an adjoin adjoining
ing adjoining Lay stack."
"I cannot begin to discribe the
beauty of the Yugoslav country countryside.
side. countryside. At each turn and each itwn
another new and breath taking
sight greets you."
But, too soon, it was time for
Miss Boyle and her hot plate to
continue their way around the
world. Before going to her next
assignment as secretary to the
U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong,
Julian Fiske Harrington, she did
travel through Europe.
Upon arriving in Hong Koi'g
she decided to start her present
wonderful and interesting collec
tion of furniture and paintings so
she rented an unfurished apart apart-met.
met. apart-met. "I am interested in decoralin:,'.
lutli Wjiiiet Says...
In his newspaper health column
Dr. Edwin V. Jodan recently cal
led his readers' attention to the
following item which first up,
peared in the Jounal of the Amer
ican Medical Association:
"During recent summers a 'new
syndrome has appeared. It is
characterized by the pale
flabby, tired child who has gained
excessive weight during the warm
weather because he has stayed
indoors in an air.conditioned house
watching television most of his
waking hojrs and has indulged in
frequent between-meal snacks
that have spoiled his appetitie for
well-balanced meals."
That's not the half of it. Judg-,
ing from my mail a lot of men are
suffering from the same com complaint.
plaint. complaint. 1
Actually, it is their wives who
are doing the complaining. The
men are just sitting right in
front of the TV set'.
Some of them don't even get up
to go raid the' ice box. They just
ask their wives to bring 'em a
snack during commercials.
Yes, the men are getting pale
and flabby just like the kids. Be Because
cause Because instead of mowing the
lawn when they get an afternoon
of, they are sitting in front of
that TV set again, watching a ball
game and sipping that liquid re refreshment
freshment refreshment that sponsors so many
TV programs.
Just like the kids, they're tired,
too. Too tired to take their wiws
to a movie, too tired to fix a leady
faucet, too tired even to move.
So that makes everybody in the
family tired. And you can bet Ma
ma sure is sick and tired of being"
married to a man who hasn't
enough energy to do anything but
watch. TV.
SEEKS "GOOD" RELATIONS
NEW YORK (UPI-Mousfafa
Kame-I. new United Arab Rep-ib
lie ambassador tn th. tti..j
S jites arrived here yesterday on
.... vvasnmgion. He seid,
nJ lit omeu here t0 Promote
ReVblicP" nd yjm

IJje

ear5
and in furnishing my apartment
i nave iriea to incorporate my
heritage with the country I l:ve
in."
In her present cool and airy
apartment, she has combined
oriental and contemporary suit suited
ed suited tfor the tropics with memen mementos
tos mementos from home such as an ear early
ly early American crystal vase.
While in Hong Kong she once a a-gain
gain a-gain had the chance to continue
one of her favorite hobbies sail sailing.
ing. sailing. Shortly after arriving she
joined 20 otners in a chartered
plane and went to Manila to take
part in ihe annual five-day Inter
port Regtta in Manila By.
In 1955 Miss Boyle went to
Thailand and Indochina before
coming to Panama to join Am
bassador Harrington. By taking
this side trip she had completed
her around the world ambinon
"I hate to use such a tired and
wornout cliche but Panama is a
great crossroads of the world.
You can meet people from every
walk of life, from the many visit
ing government officials and busi business
ness business men to tourists."
Miss Boyle has continued her
decorative art by completely re redoing
doing redoing her present apartment ailer
a great deal of discussion with
the painter. He was very relue-j
iant aooui me wnue wans ior me
large living room and dining
room. But he did not know about
the black and white book case
Miss Boyle was going to build, or
the black and white curtains and
clip covers.
"I enjoy painting and re-finishing
furniture and I find it very
relaxing and satisfying."
Another favorite oastime i s
cooking, and this Miss Boyle
can do to perfection.
"Although I cannot p r e o a r a
such exotic dishes as boi
steak, I do like to experiment
in the kitchen and I enjoy giv giving
ing giving small dinner parties."
At the present ti-ne she is plan planning
ning planning a vacation in September. Ex
ceot for her first trip across the
Atlantic she has always traveled
by air. This time she will go by
boat stopping in Haiti and then
will continue to the States to
spend a few months with her fam family
ily family in Westminister, Md.
"I am an ardent Maryland fan
and am looking forward to a
breath of fall and basseting that
is himtine rabbits bv foot with bas basset
set basset hounds, and old Maryland and
family snort."
Although she does not know
wher her next assignment may
be, Miss Boyle does hope to con continue
tinue continue her travels an1 the many many-opportunities
opportunities many-opportunities it can offer in learn learning
ing learning about the oeonle of the world.
"I try to obtain paintings 'rem
one or two of the leading artist?
in each country I live in so you
see if I want a decent-size cohec
tion I shall have to continue my
travels."
BURROUGH'S
BEEFEATER
GIN
DESTILERIA
CENTRAL, S A.
Exclusive Distributors
Panama, R. de P.

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JB laaHBiwKBBf

IN HER SUMMER STUDIO, Nell Blaine works on a new land landscape
scape landscape against a background of some of her finished paintings.
Miss Blaine, who has come to her present impressionism by
way of abstact painting, is considered one of the leading
younger U.S. artists who have been reaching maturity during
the past decade.

It has been said that the caliber flecked woodland scene, one
of any creative artist may be iudg 150 works accepted from some
ed by the eminence of the teach- 5,000 entries,
er who will accept him as a pu- "1 have a great fondness ior
pil. The fact thai Nell Blaine has plants anu aowers," the artist
studied for two years with Hans says. "My own houseplants aum aum-Hofmann,
Hofmann, aum-Hofmann, one ot the great living ber about 30 anu they are most
teachers of painting in the Unit- often subjects for my paintings
ed States, is indicative of her abi- done in tne winter and spring."
lity and promise. In the summer she usually goes
Miss Blaine is one of the newer to her studio in Vermont. Ihii
generation of American artists who year she varied the routine by vis vis-have
have vis-have been maturing within the iting Mexico to study antiquities
past decade. A serious and origi travel and paint. In 1950 she spew
nal artist, she has come to her six months in France working in
present impressionism by way ot dependently and studying picture)
pure, clear abstracts. j in museums, an experience which
"Nell Baline's art is buttressed she believes has had "an enor
at every point by conspicuously mous impact" on her work ano
sound draftsmanship," said the art notion ot torm.
critic, of "The New York Times"
in 1953 during one of the artist's Miss Blaine, who has been cit
one-man exhibits. "What she at- ed as one ot the younger k &
tempts to do and succeeds in do -, women painters who "have ftror
ing, is to hold firmly to the cha-, acclaim not as notable wbmen ar
acter of a given scene, quicken it tists but as notable artists ntu
with her own vision of it and yet happen to be women," has def:
make a picture exciting in itself." nite theories on the subject o
Just turned 35, she has had women in her art. "The wom?r
eight one-man shows, chiefly in painter," she says, "should no
prominent New York galleries and be in competition with male ar
at the Virginia Museum in Rich- tists. She has inherently a differ
mond. Her paintings have been ent slant, just as every arui:
exhibited in major museums in has, one from another. Peruapi
the States as well as in leading her emphasis is on joie de vure
galleries in England, Denmark, a luxuriant quality. The differenc
Paris, Rome, Munich, Tokyo and es of expression are subtle and
UnnAlllli, A n rt mr mnrte llj,- llir,l t , .,

uuiiuiuiu. juoiv vi mi
bfn purchased by private
U.S.
collectors.
"Since -the age of four, drawing
and 'making things' have given
me special pleasure, Miss Bane
says. 1 was intent on becoming
an artist long before I knew what
it meant. There was never
any
uuuvi auum tin j nwc v
Nell began her professional train-
ing her hometown of Richmond,
Virginia, studying at the Richmond j
School of Art and the Virginia Mu-
seum. Twice winner of the Mu-1
seum's Traveling Fellowship, she
went to New York to study paint-1
ing with Hofmann and later, etch-
ing and engraving with Stanley!
William Hayter. Subsequent schol-'
arships have taken the young ar-
tist to two of the leading U.S. art
colonies MacDowell Colonv and
Yaddo, where talented artists, mu:
sicians and writers work and stu ;
dy for limited periods.
"Oil painting satisfies me most
as the broadest and most sensu-
ous medium," Miss IBlalne 3ayr.
"However, I use almost all media.
Each offers a different tactile si
mulus which often suggests ideas
and influences the expression a
great deal. After oils, I use brush

and ink mbst frequently espe- iier present scholarship
cially for direct expression from term at Yaddo,
nature."
In 1955 she was chosen by, Mv, outside interests are als
Thomas B. Hess, executive editor, related to painting, or in an im
of "Art News." as one of 21 lead-i Prtant way, norish it," the young
ing voting American painters fen 1 arist. svs- "1 'ike to read, vi.;.l
tured in the "Art News Annuel." galler'es. travel and attend the
He wrote: "I feel convinced that '"eater and movies. I also lik" al al-among
among al-among them are artists who will most, eve.ry klnd of music I used

be accepted as internationally im
. . ... i
nnriant ann wi riva anv nionoc
tion of this century
The Poindcxter Gallery of ?.ew
York, in presenting a one man
Show of Mi" Blaine's work in
1956, said, "Here is a fresh cm
cent in na'ure painting, a new
fluidity and freedom in response
to the ou side world It is disci-
plined by the grasp of form which
?r!and A??, Ia?!L,"y .!?lv.vd
from a period of terse, pure ab
tractinn
tw. rZi.i. ..TU. v v.v'
..vl "W,7." ::

torial hedonism an her endearing-! and W
ly gay color are able te make the ...
most of 'hatever she ehooies to Bet laid plans do o im bt
paint. The wonder is that so ln, 1 hon witn "veral chldrei,
much sweet color escapes being pl"mi, eMential for pea. e of
cloying. Her own sensitivity hand- m,nn- A bedtime bathmg routhie,
somely takes care of that as well I for examples, gets the children out
s her eonveryed feeling of the j of be bathroom earlier mornings,
pulsiting life of trees and Aw-! And it gives Dad an opportunity
ers." !to shave undisturbed. --
At the time of that exhibit, the
young artist's versatility was on Those without green thumbs
display in two other local art can be the envy of the neighbor,
shows one, sketches for scener' hood with artificial Mowers. Us.
In an exhibition of theater de ually the many varieties in these
signs; the other, the Museum of flourish inside homes when gar gar-Modem
Modem gar-Modem Art display called "Re- dens are poor. But they also may
cent Drawings, U.S. A." Thr-re dress fable or shelf when garden
Miss Rlaine was represented by ire blooming. Keep them dust.fre
a brilliant ink drawing of a sun- with soap and water.
, ; -. ;1 h ...

piu m uciine, dui tnev an

there.'
. She thinks that total involvemem
-,w icquirea, ana tnat few
women have risked it
in ine past. However," she adds
"generally speaking, I believe (hi
K,u""c." positive one now
. -.r "'v
i .cir nave never io my knovvl
cuee ueen .so many professional
woman. Painters nor so man
Pacing work of vigor and higl
1clf1,?,er; rhlf not tfle story o
l"e 'aoy-artist dilentantism of tin
Vlctoran era. :
...
, AU ,of Blaine's career hai
been, involved in art fine or ap
P'led -;he has been a costume de
s'gner for a modern dance group
Jeanne designer, and sinceX5i
n?s worked as a free-lark i
,slgneL tyilphic layout; Ii
wmittently sine 1M4 sheVthm
tauht painting to interested' be
Sinners m small -classes wlCipm
"I l,wo d;vs a -week in -her tje
, ,w atuaio. Last year she wis i
I i a." 'nstructor m tHe a
: du" Mucatwa program of hi
"ub'ic school m a small Ntn
YorK community and expects te
return next spring when she hai
.J" orums ana once per-
1 form An in n .Ink D;
- ana.
JomemaL
ma
a
,
Hand.wash a drip-dry garment
in iukewarm water and soaor de.
, t sudg Tn t
d u WringiBg or twistinB
i clothes. Rinse garments the-
":,.: ""T
iougiy md arrange on a oon.
staining hanger. Hand iron
by
smoothing eellar. cvtffs, t

t,



I

5 lyjpj ;
7
: r.srs
Giants Nip
v. I
story on page 6
PANAMA CANAL BRIDE
A Story Of Construction Days
By ELIZABETH KITTREDGE PARKER

IB u cs

Deadlock N.L

1 & i i i 1

mmm i i HH
H wast jS&ifcl H I

i:. ,

XIX
THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF
THE CANAL WAS SCHEDULED
for Aug. 15, 1914 Cucaracha Slide
was anxiously watched and dredg.
es continued to work feverishly

to keep the channel open. The Pa Panama
nama Panama Railroad steamship "Ancon"
was to have the honor of making
the first trip from the Atlantic to
the Pacifc. Bu! another transit
Avas planned, one of far more in.
terest to those of us who had liv.
,ed here and worked on 'he con.
agtruction of this famous waterway.
Z On Aug. 3, "Ancon's" sister
ship, "Cristobal," would sail
through the Canal from Cristobal
to Balboa, Colonel (Joethals him.
self had issued the invitations, li limiting
miting limiting them to those who had
served at least eight years of the
construction period, andwiveswere
.included.
- When Charlie brought our invita invitation
tion invitation home. I was all excited. To
4hink that the Canal was an ac-
omplished fact and that were to
e on the first ocean ship to make
e transit It was the chief topic
f conversation for days in the
jUffice, at parties, at the commis commissary.
sary. commissary. The women whose husbands
Were not among the privileged two
TODAY! .75 .40
1: 4:on fi 'o q:no rt.m.
PAUL NEWMAN
JOANNE WOODWARD
ANTHONY FRANCIOSA
ORSON WELLES
ANGELA LANSBCJRY
SIMULTANEOUSLY
75c.
CENTRAL
PANAMA
1:15 3:451 6:23
8:58 p.m.

I FROM THE
H PRODUCER OF
R "PEYTON PLACE"
H A SEARING LOOK
B AT LOVE
m IN TODAY'S SOUTHI
I The
I Long 9
I Hot
Summer
H CNema5cOP

THE BEST PICTURE IN TOWN!
ALLIED ARTISTS Presents
GARY COOPER
AUDREY HEPBURN
MAURICE CHEVALIER

Wlm

LOVE in the AFTERNOON
It's more likely in Paris. . and
I more lovely in the afternoon!
M... frHcd and Dkactl to BILLY WILDER I

hundred were frankly envious of
those who were.
The evenng before the sched.
uled trip, Charlie and I were talk talking
ing talking about it.
"We must go to bed early,"
Charlie cautioned. "The special
train for Cristobal leaves the Bal

boa staton at fve o'clock."
"Oh, yes," I agreed. But you
don't need to worry about that. I
doubt if I sleep a wink tonight
Isn't it thrilling? 'what God nath
joined together, let no man put
asunder. Old Philips argument
was all wrong, wasn't it? Is
there any chance that Cucaracha
will start, sliding tonight?"
Charlie laughed. "Oh, I don't
think so. Comber has his dredges
on the job and he's keeping a close
eye on the Cut."
Just then, we heard a coche
stopping in front of the house.
Charlie went to the door. I heard
him say, "Hello, Bill, when did
you get in?''
My heart sank into my shoes.
I was fond of Bin. He made perio.
die trips to South America and
always came by to see us when
he was in Panama. It usually
meant a gay evening. But tonight
the evening before such an im important
portant important day I just didn't want
to be up late. I wanted to go to
bed and I wanted Charlie to turn
in early, too. However, I greeted
Bill as cordially as I could.
"Come on." he said. "I've got
a coche waiting. Let's go to the
Metropole."
"Oh, Bill," I protested, "do you
know what's going to happen to tomorrow?
morrow? tomorrow? We're going through the
Canal first trip for an ocean lin.
er We've got to take a train for
Cristobal at five o'clock in the
morning. We'd love to go out
with you but I think we shouuld
get to bed early. You stay here
and have a drink with us."
"Nonsense," 'replied Bill. "Come
on and we'll celebrate the great
event."
"Come on, dear." urged Charlie,
"We'll come home early. Let's
go"
So, not wanting to be a kill-joy.
I relented.
We had a jolly time but, in spite
of our good intentions it was the
wee small hours when we turned
in. I cautioned Charlie about the
alarm.
"Are you sure, dear, that the a a-larm
larm a-larm is turned on We don't want
to miss the train."
"You bet we don't,' agreed
Charlie. "You'd better check it,
although I'm sure it's set for plen plenty
ty plenty of time."
I checked it and was satisfied.
Then I went to bed with a clear
conscience. Next thing I knew, I
woke with a start. I unmistakably
heard a train pulling out of the
station down the hill. My heart
stood still.
"Charlie!" I cried, shsking him.
"Charlie The train! We've missed
it! Oh. Charlie, why didnt the a.
larm go of ?"
"It did," he grunted. "The blast blasted
ed blasted thing woke me up and I turn turned
ed turned it off."
"You turned it off" My voice
was flat. "You turned the alarm
off? Do you know what you did?
Do you realize we have missed
the boat through the Canal" Do
you mean to say this day wasn't
more important than a little
sleep? Oh, Charlie"
And I began to cry.
Charlie was wide awake now.
He jumped out of bed and ran to
the telephone. I listened.
(TO BE CONTINUED
NEXT WEEK)
40c. RELEASE'
CARIBE
COLON-

"HONEY", the white-tail Virginia deer lores leaves. At the JWTC Zoo she runs across
the enclosure to gobble mouthfuls of the green stuff held by 1st Lt. George P. Long, in
charge of the zoo. (U.S. Army Photo).

Porky The Tapir Is Affectionate 300

She's an Army girl with all her heart that's Porky the
tapir, 300 pounds of affection at the Jungle Warfare Training
Center Zoo, Fort Sherman.
During a recent tour of the zoo, M Sgt. John Fisher en entered
tered entered Porky s cage with some bananas. The big tapir (not ant
eater, despite popular views) waved her' long sensitive nose
about and trundled over. As Porky took fastidious bites from
the fruit Fisher began to scratch her along her side and
stomach.
Ecstatically Porky relaxed her knees, then sank slowly to
the ground and rolled over playing dead (but still managed to
munch a banana) as Fisher scratched her.

Porky, who was placed in the
zoo by Charles E. Bradley of Hal Hal-boa,
boa, Hal-boa, is one of many animals
which have learned to love their
keepers.
"In fact, when we turn an ani animal
mal animal loose it just retires into the
jungle near our zoo," explain 1st.
Lt. George P. Long HI, "and con continues
tinues continues to hang around the zoo.
Right now we have a fox ioose
in the jungle, but he comes a a-round
round a-round every day. We can see evi evidence.
dence. evidence. Pretty soon we'll bring
him back to the zoo."
When an animal "gets down"
from living in captivity it is al allowed
lowed allowed to roam freely in the jun jungle
gle jungle to dig up roots and leaves,
Long explained. Then when the a
nimal is feeling better he is pick picked
ed picked up by the zoo staff.
The animals in the loo In Include
clude Include "Honey" (a white-tailed
Virginia doe); an ocelot; black
and red spider monkeys; white
race monkeys; marmosets; a
peccary; raccoon; royal turke-, ;
squirrels; parrots; coati mundi
a kit fox; a cayman and sever several
al several varieties of snakes: boa con constrictors,
strictors, constrictors, eyelash vipers, wine
snakes and mango snakes.
At various times the zoo has
had two and three-toed sloths ai'd
a rubber boa snake and expects
to obtain specimens of these a-
gain soon.
The main purpose of the zoo.
Long explains, is to provide ani
mals for the class on snaked ar.d
animals which is conducted for
students at the JVTi as p.irt of
their jung.e orientation.
In particular it is intended tn
dispel the average man's inherent
fear of snakes and to make him
familiar vith the different species
As part of his demonstration
Long customarily ailows a non non-poisonous
poisonous non-poisonous snake to bite him.
First aid treatment for oite of
poisonous and non-poisonous
snakes is included in the instruc instruction.
tion. instruction. However the students also ae
told that any snake may he eaten
for food. The zoo staff notes that
canned ratlesnake is now on the
commercial market in the U.S.
"Most o our students do lose
their fear of animals in the jun jungle,"
gle," jungle," Lonq explains. "However,
in an entire class it is seldom
No, Dahling No!-
NEW YORK (UPI) Tallnlah
Bankhead has taken issue with a
police department version of how
she cut her arm.
According to police, the actress
was going to bed early Thursday
when she tripped over a rug and
fell against a vase.
"Perfectly i d i c u I o u s," ex ex-claime
claime ex-claime Tailulan. "I didn't fall at
all. I was tired. I hadn't rlept
for a couple of days. I went to
bed at 11 p.m. and I went straight
to sleep."
"I was exhausted, dahling. I
woke up about 1:30 a.m. and
reached out my hand to turn out
the light. The thing has a porce
lain vase for a base. There 'f a
rhip out Of the noreelain and it
cut me right on the arm. The citf
was long and deep. It bled ll
over."
While displeased with the police
version of the accident. Talliilah
had adoring words for the attend attending
ing attending officers.
"Three divine policemen all
six feet eight came In," she
said. "They couldn't have been
more charming. They got me this
sweet doctor and he took five
stitches in my arm."

s

that the students see more
than four or five snakes during
their three-week training cycle.
Most of their fear is based on
sensational articles in men's
magazines and on superstition.'
The zoo has long been of inter
est to visitors ana visitors are per
mitteci from 2 to 4 p.m. on Satur Saturdays,
days, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. Two
members of the zoo staff are on
hand during these hours on their
own time.
The busy training schedule at
the JWTC does not allow for lime
off to compensate the staff for
their extra hours of work on week weekends.
ends. weekends. In addition to Fisher, the only
other members of the zoo staff
are Pfc. James LeFleur and Pfc.
Leon L. Snyder.
They make every effort to keep
visitors from molesting the ani animals
mals animals and to assist people and an answer
swer answer their questions. However, it
is difficult for two men to cover
all parts of the zoo simultaneous simultaneously.
ly. simultaneously. Rules of the zoo forbid visi visitors
tors visitors to feed or molest the anipials
and require that children must be
accompanied by their parents.
On a recent Sunday afternoon.
July G, Long found it necessary
to protect a rabbit frim the ef efforts
forts efforts of two visitors.
The rabbit had been given for
dinner to one of the boa constric constrictors
tors constrictors which was shedding and had
not eaten food for many days.
It is normal for a boa not to eat
while shedding. Among o t h e
things it is partially blind at the
time.
However, Long felt that he
should insure that the snake was
given the opportunity to eat. A
supply of rabbits, white mice and
guinea pigs must be kept on h ind
for snake food in order to keep
them alive. After the officer p'ac-
ecl the rabbit in the snake's cage,
he left to prepare materials for
the next day's instruction.
About 20 minutes later the lieu lieutenant
tenant lieutenant returned to find two visi
tors attempting to make the rab rabbit
bit rabbit move closer to the snake. One
was armed with a cigarette light lighter
er lighter which he was emploving to
scorch the rabbit and the other
was prodding it with a short
stick.
The lieutenant instructed the
visitors to stop molesting the rab rabbit,
bit, rabbit, removed the hare from the
snake's cage and returned it to
its own pen.
"It is quite important that we
keep our snakes on their normal
diet of small animals," Mai. Mi
chael C. Chester, commanding of officer
ficer officer of the JWTC explains, "be "because
cause "because we need them for instruct instructing
ing instructing our students. This may save
a life."
In addition the zoo also cm cm-ploys
ploys cm-ploys fresh raw meat for force force-feeding
feeding force-feeding snakes who won't eat.
The snake's jaws are held open
and the fresh meat pushed down
its throat An alternate method is
to use a syringe to force in a mix mixture
ture mixture of hamburger, raw eggs and
milk. SSome snakes refuse to eat
altogether, making force feeling
necessary.
A new diet about to be Intro
duced calls for frozen horse
meat for the carnivorous ani animals.
mals. animals. Some of the other itams
of food are alfalfa hay, angs,
milk, bananas, papaya, oranges,
other citrus Ifrultt, rice, oats,
lettuce, cabbage, cfrott and
bread.
The zoo is allotted about $120
a year for animal food.
Quite an important item is end
liver oil which has been given in
milk to animals such as pumas,
monkeys, raccoons and coati mun mun-dis.
dis. mun-dis. It is essential in keeping howl
er monkeys alive -they will not

Hi ill B Jjjjju ffllfel "BtB hB
ISyilil f jSiiiiiiiiiHBiiiHiHioilaiH w

BBaKaiHBaanMraraamaBal mBKSWSSsSSSKBKBS 3asfK&&6. SaBaiBal
h Bam''' 1 1 Hi H IH BiiiS B

THREE BOA CONSTRICTORS of the JWTC Zoo festooned
Snyder M Sgt. John Fisher and Pfc. James LeFleur. Kneeling

part of the instruction in shakes
chael C. Chester, commanding
live in cages and must be allow-
en to roam tne area.
Long and Fisher have a num number
ber number of times taken sick animals
home to care for them. Recently
they have raised young otters
and grisons (weasel like crea creatures)
tures) creatures) on haby bottles; currently
the officer is raising a baby boa
constrictor.
Many of the animals like to tobacco
bacco tobacco and are given cigarettes,
particularly the monkeys, dear
and ocelot. The monkeys and
the ocelot delight in rubbing
the tobacco into their fur, as it
appears to drive off insects and
parasite.
Unlighled cigarettes or extin-
quiched butts are given to them
however, if a visitor does prof proffer
fer proffer a lighted cigarette, the ani animals
mals animals know which end is lighted
and avoid it.
An Army veterinarian visits the
animals weekly and is on call if
one gets sick.
The zoo receives inquiries al almost
most almost daily from local residents
and soldiers who have placed
their animals, in care of the zoo
staff.
People who have put their pels
in the zoo include iBradley, who
is represented hot only by Porky
the tapir, but also by two kit fox foxes
es foxes and two black spider, mon monkeys
keys monkeys .and Faith Fostw, of Pana Panama,
ma, Panama, who placed two coati mundi
two raccoons and .'Snowball," a
balek spider monkey.
Two white face monkeys CMfte
from D. H. Dare, of Gatim; whii"
"Murphy," a red spider monkey
was placed by Mrs. A. T. Van
Geldcr, of Gamboa.
Among other animals have bsen
parrots placed by Aaron V. Sig
frid, of Curundu and M-Sgi. WIT
liant-E. Rlgsby. of JWTC;
mar-

i 2& Jfl SSI
WjL JUL', shH BaSlfclBBtJIM Rk. SfpSsP wm
MIXSfW

PORKY the tapir relaxes happily as MSgt. John Fisher of the Fort Sherman JWTC
Zoo scratches her tummy. Many people believe Porky is an ant-eater but she isn't. Actually
the tapir is a vegetarian, and eats leaves, roots and fruits. Tipping the scale at 300 pounds
She is the sweetheart of the zoo. Charles E. Bradley of Balboa turned Porky over to the
JWTC. (U.S. Army Photo).

and animals of the jungle to
officer of the JWTC
mosets by Sfc. Fred J. Pine, of
Fort Guhck; and a white face
monkey by Sfc. Duane M. Austin,
of Fort Gulick.
The staff answers many ques questions
tions questions by visitors about the ani animals.
mals. animals. One of the most common:
"Is Porky Tapir and anteater?"
She isn't actually a vegetarian,
the tapir eats leaves, roots and
fruit. When frightened this animal
can hide under water, completely
submerged for as long as five
minutes.
Many people are surprised to
learn that the coati mundi is not
a honey bear. The true honey
bear is a kinkajou, of which the
zoo sometimes has specimns. Coa Coati
ti Coati mundi travel in large groups
of 15 to 50. They can eat anything
meat, small animals, roots and
fruit are examples.
The caym n which is seen occa occasionally
sionally occasionally about Gatun Lake is
commonly supposed to be a cro crocodile,
codile, crocodile, but is actually a separate
species neither croc nor alligatoh
The nearest crocodiles are be believed
lieved believed to be the "white croco crocodiles"
diles" crocodiles" of the Darlen country.
The zoo's cayman was captured
about a year ago near the Fert
Guhck motor pool.
Some visitors do not know there
re foxes in this part of the world
until they see the zoo's kit fox,
which is the smallest member of
the red fox fa mil v.
In addition to the kit for which
is currently flirting with the zoo
after returning to the jungle, i
iaguanmdi who ram off also is oc occasionally
casionally occasionally sighted.
"The other day we saw the' ja ja-guarundi
guarundi ja-guarundi at the UWTC motor
pool," Long said. "We called it
and it almost came hack. Pretty
soon it may get more lonely for
us. "-

- Pound

about the necks of their keepers, left ttf right: Pfc leon L
in front Is 1st. It. George P. Long III. The snakes are a Vital

students at the JWTC. "This
L
U
X
T
H
I
A
T
R
E

ALEC GUINNESS
(The "River Kwai" Man)
IS PACKING THEM UP...

(In

Co-srarring: ODILE VERSOIS

OF COURSE IT'S ANOTHER

0.75

Army Girl

may save a life." savs Mai Mi-
(U.S. Army Photo).

AND YOU MUST SEE HIM

TODAY
In That Hilarious
Jaw-Breaking Comedy
TO PARIS
with LOVE"
Technicolor)

RANK production



I. ......,)...... a-un

NCERJNJ IPuzzles 8c Pastimes

kw LbV

H B .B

I . If W

LOGC VX IMAGINATION

-

LET us imagine the earth U at
a standstill for the purposes
of an experiment. If a perfectly
straight tunnel could be bored
through center from aide to Side,
what would be the course of a
cannonball dropped into the tun tunnel
nel tunnel from one end, under the ac action
tion action of gravity? That is, would
the cannonball fall through or
what Would happen to it? This

thought-provoking question can
stir up a lively session of scien scientific
tific scientific discussion.
ua)i3 aqj ) S3.i pno
H8(M 'p3)SHBqxi SB AS. WHO I))U
( IIJUlV 'J3JJOI4S pU jaj.lOqS BUIOO
-aq pino qid, s sd.ij Suipbsdotk
ui pus (tsi ijy sqi jo pus siieodrto
qi jo joi( pino 9,I1 'ln"
-o oiu jib sqj Xuihk L Pua PU8
uiojj XiBn'unuoo aiuio pino inj8
aq qanojqi pJOq (juuni qSnoJqi
paddojp B1 uouiib.) JBqi pa
-IHB3U1BU1 B ii j8Aoh uiiqo.id qi
pnop BaiqiSuwiui Xubw :jmuv

Insert One Digit in Each Square

TO SOLVE this wits tester, pro proceed
ceed proceed as in a ttrosaword pun
tie, usinr numbers instead 0
letters for the answers. Insert a
single digit m each square. The
trick is to get answers that will
function across rind down.
ACROSS
1. things in life has
ample:
Oood advice and bad
example!
3. Alaska passed into the pos possession
session possession of the U. S. in 18.
8. A flirt: who believes
every man herself.
6. One stone: pounds.
I. She said she just turned
Which was a simple truth
no more;
Evasive, yes, but plain to
see;
Turn the number, it's
DOTS Cf LINES

i y I

THIS game is for two players.
Players draw 10 lines of dots
on a piece of paper (as above).
They take turns in drawing lines
horizontally or vertically to con connect
nect connect ally two dots. Object of the
game it to complete as many
squares as possible. Each time a
player succeeds in drawing the
fourth line of a square, he may
put his initials In it. He scores
one point for each completed
square. Whenever a player fin finishes
ishes finishes square, he must take an another
other another turn at drawing a, line,

ROUND-TRIP MAZE TEST

ISP
jt

BILLY expect to stop at the
homes of three of hit friends
before returning home. How long
will the round-trip take?
To find out, select path at
the bottom of the mate and
make your way to house number
l. Continue from here to the
house number 2; then to house
3 at top right. After you have
reached the third house, follow

9. Novels: Tale of Cities;
North Frederick; More
River.
12. How many vowels In abste abstemiously?
miously? abstemiously? Facetious?
13 The forty billion Transcon Transcontinental
tinental Transcontinental Highway System will
cross how many of the states?
14. Trick: Nine minus one
equals what two digit number?
15. Twenty-four buttons on her
dress. She could fascinate. How
many left unbuttoned ?
DOWN
1. Argument against marriage:
can live as cheaply as but
can't.
2. Square the cube root of 1728.
3. Clue: 10 voters; 4 against.
4. How many letters of the al alphabet
phabet alphabet are used as Roman Nu Numerals
merals Numerals ?
6. How many stars in the flag
of Cuba? Egypt? Turkey?
8. At 4:56, the time is
10. Chang and Won caught ten
fish. Chang ate all ten so there
were
11. Light travels how many
thousand miles a second ?
12. Difference between one
dozen and six dozen ?
14. What one plus one equals
at a wedding.
t-H 09-Cl '9St U 'IHI-01 IZtS ICI-9
i 19-K 'W-S tIi;-l"U"CI 91-SI
Ol-H Sh-EI '59-51 mi5-6 ZHZ L HS)
H-9 is-E tE-t esojiy :"V

the pointed arrow to return to
your starting point via the In Indicated
dicated Indicated path.
Housetops are marked 1, 2 and
3. and must be visited in this
order.
Do not cross any lines or re retrace
trace retrace steps.
If someone else Is to try, cover
the matt with tissue paper be before
fore before you begin.

A Sap and Money
Are Soon Parted
CAP rave Yap as many dol-

lars as Yap already had.

When Yap received this
money, he asked Sap how
much he had left and prompt promptly
ly promptly gave this amount back to
Sap.
Sap, not to be outdone by
Yap's generosity, gave Yap
back as many dollars as Yap
had left, which left poor Sap
dead broke and gave Yap 180
altogether.
How much had each at the
beginning?
jilop Ajjim pq di
ajBiiop Xju pq dig :onnos

3-D FIGURING

Reach a Turning Point?

SEE WHATS COME OVER HIM

O 3 to

"V
X B

a

AN elemental lesson in drawing
is that a box, can be formed
by connecting two overlapping
squares by diagonal lines. The
drawing above is an example. It's
an example, too, of how perspec perspective
tive perspective can literally figure.
Can you arrange digits in the
eight small circles so that the
sum of the digits in the tour
corners of each of the squares is
15? You may use any digit as
many times as necessary. See if
you can do it in less than five
minutes.
E
-oj inoiioq :9 t '9 S-o.i Bippiiu
: I '9 o.i doj "XiiBiuozuoq SuipBa.i
Aqbisod auo S a.'.iq .unu ub aS
o imimj noX ji uomqog l.ia.lJOO B SI
pBiid!Ji IB 'uaaiju .liinwjoi K.isqiupu
ID unHBiiiqmon Xuv ::bui.i9 Biuaui

JO B AJJ)B "UU, l"'H"M'-

A BOOK of matchee provides the makings of this
trick. Next time you're sitting across the table
from someone, place ten of the matches In the out outline
line outline of a house, as above. Be sure you have mem mem-orlied
orlied mem-orlied it correctly before testing friends with it.
Note that the house face to the left.
The problem la to make the house face to the
right by moving only two of the matches. Some
folks have to play around with the matches for
quite a while before "getting': it, though it's really
very simple.
uai puv boo jo pBKU niu pun nai explain
jo Sunaaiu eqj 01 sutu 1! IBqi os punojB iqXis jaquinu
i;.)Biu Suib uaqj, tdoj Jqj jqi pu 01 saqojBiu aqi
8U0 J qj o uai jsquintl qoiiui Bqj DB1J :uoniog
Roadwork in Plain English
AN AMERICAN driver In England may wonder
if there is such a thing as plain English, and
vice versa. How quickly can you select the Ameri American
can American counterpart of each of the following English
term's? American terms are at right.
1. Petrol Crankcase
2. Windscreen Overpaee
3. Spanner Fender
4. Bonnet Parking
5. Banking Hood
6. Demlster Traffic circle
7. Wing- Gasoline
8. Sump Wlndahield
9. Kly-over Defroster
10. Roundabout Wrench
I3JP 3!HJJ, 01
I9AO fl -BiB.nnin.io '8 Mopnaj 'Jaisoijaa '9 'SiniliM ;
pooH qjuJM 8 PWiqP"!Ai Z M0BB0 'I :Juv

SOMETHING NEW IS IN SIGHT

"

PERHAPS our
comedian friend,
right, is craxy With
the heat. At any rate,
he is engaged in a bit
of horseplay that he
hopes will go over
with his audience,
too.
The laugh's on him
to be sure, as you
will discover by com completing
pleting completing the scene.
Note that the hori hori-rontal
rontal hori-rontal and vertical
rows of dots are des designated
ignated designated by letters and
numbers. Using a
sharp pencil, start at
the first point indi indicated
cated indicated below and draw
lines from dot to dot
as stated.
Draw C-l to C-2.
Draw C-7 to C-18.
Draw D-l to D-2.
Draw D-8 to D-l 8.
Draw L-5 to T-5.
Draw 1-5 to 8-N.
Draw J-7 to P-ll
( a p p r o x innately).
Draw 1-8 to Mil.
Draw H- to 0-14
(a p p r o x i mately).
Draw G-10 to K-14.
Draw C-2 to A-5
to F-10 to 1-4 to C-2.
If another person
is present, ask him
or her to read off the

while you fill them in.
Cover the diagram with tissue
paper so someone else can try.
QUIPTO-QUOTE
IN solving this substitution
cipher problem you are asked
to restore the punch line of an
amusing quip. That part of the
quip which you can read gives
you an idea as to what the coded
line Is about. As an added clue,
we'll give you the identity of one
of the letters: wherever the let letter
ter letter M appears, it represents it itself.
self. itself. Now for the quip:
Haughty patron: "Waiter, I
must say I don't like all the flies
In this restaurant."
Conciliatory waller: "RIX'XM,
8L VKA'NN ZAHB BFNN MF
qeSDO KTFH VKA JKT'B
NSYF, S'NN DCXHF BOFM
KAB LKI VKA."
Remember, the letter M repre represents
sents represents itself.
,,'noX .ioj jno maqi sbi(. n.j
'i)jt J.uop noX Rauo qji(M am Ji
jinf H.noX j 'uib.bjv,. :uojnos

a s o 11 12 13 14 is ib n ift

T

r 1 1 in 1 1 i"i 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
i m 1
c ...... J
:: : : : : : f s3p
0 f2 0
a- yH
v ( i3J s
c 'KJ y ( u
- -Vy- J v
:::::T?Vl
t 1 1 t 1 i k

insertions

WXClff'-JCOJOo 10 Ii ui r mJ co

Trick Mental Display

I 1213 4
0 Z
13 t4j5Tj6

y EMORIZE
this and you'll
be able to show
party guests an
interesting trick.
Hand someone
a design like that
b h o w n at left
(numbers one
through 16 in
natural order).
Ask him to select
any one of the
numbers shown
and write it down
done so, he is to

selected and all

both vertical and

8, then

What's Whit With the Angle?
AT WHAT angle do 1 place these sides?" asked
Mr. Bright (who was Duilding a five-sided
swimming pool) of his son, John, an engineering
student.
"Two right angles less four right angles divided
by the number of sides," replied John, without
hesitation.
What was the angle?
'801 ZL 081 P" ''P ZL tinb ipii jo
Mquinu aqi Xq papi.up lSue jqJ inoj sjojajsqj :s9BJBp
D81 isnbe B3Su iqSu OMi qi iaoip 801 :uoSio8

BEANIE BEAR has discovered
something new and Interest Interesting
ing Interesting on the beach. What can it
be?
To find out, draw connecting
lines from dot 1 to dot 2, etc.,
until all of the numbers through
18 have been used. Where two
numbers are beside one dot, use
the dot for both.
Afterwards, color the scene
appropriately with colored pen pencils
cils pencils or crayons.

where you can't See it. Having

strike out the number he has

other nuSfinbers In the same row,

horizorittll. 'Clf for example, he strikes out

he tfluat also cancel 4, 12, 16, 7, 6, and 5.) He
must then take another number from those remain remaining,
ing, remaining, etc., and repeat the process three more times.
He will not have shown you the numbers he
chose or those he marked out, but you can tell him
the sum of the four numbers he selected (the fourth
stands alone) without seeing his addition. It will
always be 34, regardless of his choice.

LITTLE BO-PEEP CUT-OUT TOY

LITTLE BO BO-PEEP,
PEEP, BO-PEEP, right,
is anxious to try
on her new togs.
Color Bopeep,
hat and dress
neatly. Paste dia diagram
gram diagram to heavier
paper. Press un under
der under a book.
Carefully c u t
around outside of
doll, dress and
hat.
Fasten dress
and hat to doll
by bending tabs.
Riddle
WHAT has
only one leg,
no head or body,
and yet wears a
hat?
'UIOOJ
-qsnui v :Mi"V

A CHALLENGING (TjjuiZ-fgltOSSWOKP 8I81C fXfWtfF

Its Your Move

By Eugene Stieffer
HORIZONTAL
1 Charles essayist.
5 Infant's bed.
9 Inquired.
14 Wing-shaped.
15 Piety should first be shown
here (1 Tim. 5:4)
15 Son of Moza (1 Chr. 8:37)
17 Cornbread.
18 Book of the Old Testament
19 Short fishing line.
20 Inborn.
22 Slothfulness.
24 Placers.
26 Function in trigonometry.
27 Nineteenth president of the
U. S.
29 Over.
33 Elusive problem (colloq.)
36 River In France.
38 Tear.
39 Father of Cainan (Gen. 5:9)
40 Gains through effort.
41 Minutes of court proceedings.
42 Anecdotes.
43 Sodom and Gomorrah were
turned into these (2 Pet. 2:8)
44 Church parts.
45 Touches gently again.
47-A bout
49 Those who do this now shall
laugh later (Luke 6:21)
51 Support for vines.
55 Proclaimed.
59 Feminine name.
60 Profit.
61 Tailless lumping amphibian.
83 University in New Haven.
64 Annual income, in France.
65 Gaelic.
66 Above.
67 Krlngle.
88 Peruse.
69 Simon and Andrew forsook
these to follow Jesus (Mark
1:18)
VERTICAL
1 A stone (L.)

2 How did the priest go Into
the secoffd tabernacle? (Heb.
9:7)
8 The Israelites ate this for 40
years, during their wander wanderings
ings wanderings (Ex. 16:35)
4 Respires.
5 Happy.
6 Short for Rosalind.
7 Father of Zaccur (Neh. 3:2)

8 Globules.
9 Mental abstraction.
10 "God be merciful to me a
" (Luke 18:13)
11 Leg joint.
12 Lampreys.
13 Pigeon peas.'
21 Lachrymal drop.
23 Prevaricators.
25 Word used in the Psalms (Ps.
4:2)
28 Afflictions.
30 Grampuses.
31 Location.
32 Mineral springs.
33 There is none of this in love
(1 John 4:18)
34 English queen.
35 Outer garment.
PAR TY STUNTS
PAT the top of your head with
your left hand while you
brush the lower hollow of your
back with your right hand in a
sort of up and down motion. It
sounds easy but try it.
Place a coin on the palm of
your outstretched hand and chal challenge
lenge challenge someone to brush it off
with a soft (hair) clothes brush.
It seldom can be done.
Give these stunts a try at your
next party.
Distributed by King Features Syndicate

37 Insertion. 50 Book of the New Testament.
40 Ancient chariot. 52 Depart.
41 Greek name for the angel of 53 Waterway,
the bottomless pit (Rev. 9:11) 54 Prophets.
43 Greek painter. 55 Listen.
44 Ninety -eight of, his descend- 56 Always.

anis reiuinea 10 Jerusalem di nuiuu quri n.

(Ezra 2:16)

46 Abides.
48 Bartered.

f3

58 French painter.
62 He died in the 41st year of his
reign (2 Chr. 16:13)

1 I2 1 A YW5 b I7 I YX' v I" l'a I'3
ql 6u
1 I" pi
ll II
31
jr W,
Is n 57 Sft 7ff 59
"Mil w 1 imf

T1

I "pp IP III

' ym y,.s'x mm.

Hi Millard Hopper
BLACK'S two kings make him
a formidable opponent, but
White, moving up the board,
moves first and wins In six moves.
See if you can play out the game
to White's satisfaction.
ZZ9Z
H'IM 'lo-U 1.nIH 'So-08 8JIUAL 'At-SI
M'ia 'oS-KZ-91-i -tl'lAV 'U-t Jaia
8 It I!MM 9Z LI i(ia L-Z 01WM
61 9E laBia Z-9 ll'Utt :ifV
x-4

CBOSSWORD PCZZLK SOLUTION



SUNDAY. JULY 27, 195ft

THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
SUNDAY, JULY 21, MH
TERRY AND THE PIRATES
By GEORGE WUNDER j THE STORY OF MARTHA WAYNE
By WILSON SCRUGGS
1
SHtS JEALOUS
V km reWWT WHltH I AM TIRH70F HAVIN6
I AM TO THE FISHERMEN'S VULA6E
TOJSTRATK? BY THIS NEST OF HOBNAIL--
g&OHV YOUR RUNWAY. I AM SUPPOSE? IV
ArtTCO UCflSMAmM'
HELP THOSE POOR PEOPLE IMPKUVE ihwkj
UCM,JOMUV? 7 TOSCOTHK
AEOUTOUE
PHISCILLA'S POP
The Hard Truth
By AI. VERMEEB
FRECKLES AND Hlb rKlLNDS
Guess She Did
By MERRILL BLOSSER

, i ii m

VcTf (JOWMABLAa-
m MK mail me sk
V X. V THAT SHE HAS
Y awdsoou!

ALLEY OOP

CAPTAIN EASY

MORTY MEEKLE

J YIKES.'IMOPE
I VALERIE DIDNT
( Tell DAISY I Tried
V. TO DATE HER.

BA200-Yeh.'S
DAQ-I JMf -rr-

DOVOU MIND, VAL?

BAZOO AND X

iaAi li Pi 1 I 1 1 iiWnPP.

TO BEALOME- STAND.'

X-J

I 1

Quiz Bee

By V. T. HAMLIN

OH, I IMAGINE YOUVE

aOMfc AROUND,

HALF SAVAGE

PRISONERS.

5LA t H OF

A 50R1

Ik WE'VE NO WOMEN

I s'MPLY BECAUSE

Ik YOUVE HFLM :

UBv NONE? O

T

BUI

M.TU CAN'T

ACHIEVE
IMMORTALITY
T H A' WAN.

YOU kNOW

OH. BUT WE
CA.N AND WE

MUST ITS
OUC ONLY

HOPE

L

THEN YOU ARE. AS
WE TMOUOHT.
REFUGEES FROM
ANOTHER
( planet .?

YES BUT
WHO IS
' WE" WHO
ARE YOLO

. WE'VE SEEN NOTHING
LIKE YOU ON THIS .'
EARTHS WHtREP j -V

- . .'. fi? -LA

tj to, M Im

T M mn U Off

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES

Reading a Will

By EDGAR MARTIN

I 1 '!
SW H Bf II I W aT f-JBf'T"

V ML J

I ) BBBR r BlBHBmBBB

Near Death

By LESLIE TURNER

THEN VOU Y&ll5iaN0RB...VETE(lPAY. H6 H6 WAS PULLfD OUT STILL M.WB-.
DID FINP MAD SMASHED HI5 CAR INTO A BUT HB MAY NOT UVB THRU TODAY!,,
CARDOON? I BRIP66 ABUTMENT TH6M 5 HALL I TAKE YOU y
r7fH PRASS6D HIMSELF OUT Of- TO HIS IWPITAlT LJSBfL

BUGS BUNNY

it's Open, Elmer!

Gives Up Easily, Eh?

By DICK CAVALLI

I'M 50 GLAD)
YOU'RE HERE,

AT FIRST MORTY
IM6I5TE0 THAT HE
I COULD FIX IT TOR 7
" M,BUT--

7 HE FINALLY
AGREED THAT I I
SHOULD CALL
r hT NCA BamiM. T.M. f ll. Pat. Off-

OUR BOARDING HOUSE

with

MY DEAR AKS.6ALL.'iLTCN'

1VE 6NCOOMTEC5D ONLY U
OKirt YCACC A.-,-i lk TllE

BOLIVIAN 3UN6Lcf.'
ME HAS INDOCED SV ALTO

5U66E5TI0N A CAT ALirPT I

Og6E5SION Of ODYLIC.

DIWEM5IONS HAKKAPF

FORTUNATELY f V,,

T WMOUl TUP .L,- l'

CURE r-,

. MAJOR
w'r-i i 7 nil ) At 17

v Kiwi I.

D0E9 ALL

THAT

(5AROLIN6

OF YOURS

ME-AN INI

PLAIN

EN6LISW

COUOU

IT UP

H00PLE OCT 01

I'D klNDA ;1

Lr.C il -T5Ct

THAT FAIR IN

KCUS?ELb,

AEDUSA.'

OFOS5- (

THY'V5 GOT

FEfiTRIS r

WHEEL 2

R WAY

BY J. R. WILLIAMS

nfHAT'S' A

C WW

K t it i n n I J M LI

mi r oV im

71. UH V t I TW'l

coiy-r oi ;

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VAIS, WE 8RUN6 7HET CRATE t
G CHICKIN ALOia FER HIM--
HIS STUMaAICX WORM OUT.' TH' 1
I' POC HAS ORDERED HIM OMTO
V A DIET IT' A COOP L6SSIW
TO VBW VAHOOft, WHO 6U2ILE )
AM" JLP LIKE A PACK OP
" '1 """ ""

r ucv CI UCD r'N T HOOPFP A

( SCREWDRIVEP SO'S I CN SET

TH' LID OFF 0' THIS
BbT nAikiT rfttu?

r Ml IN t LMH :

YES UT USE IT
I'LL BE SURE
TO GET IT N
AOO

HERE YA ARE
m Mi AN' THANKS A I

(tkf Qteyt True Life Adventures

SKIP OR SKIM

Will Dnnry PlMhifliM
WeilfJ RjjhU (Mwxl

A VYILU SKIM
A0ONS THE 6URFAT.B NWITH
OMLV HIS TAIL INJ THB WATER.

HE'S THE PURSUER, H6 fs1

SKIPS OVER. THE WAVES, i'T -'.. 1

AND " IT

ht ff k t i ;
DAILY FORTUNE FINDER
To Ittrn your "Foriun" lor today (ram th lUfi. writ ill tho Ixttrt
of th lphbt corrpndint to th numrtl On th lint ( th tin tin-il
il tin-il priod in which you wr born. Yu will And It fun.
t 1 4 5 T t 10 11 M 13 14 15 U 17 II ) JO 12 U 14 IS 1
a i c e i r a h i i k t mho r 4 t I I g vwnt

i am. n-MIW

Ml. IE

MAt.l

MAIL 11-

APR. 10

AH. 11.
MAY 10

MAY 11-JUNI2I

MINI n
JULY 13

JUIT 14-AUC.12

AUG. 13-
HW. ii

SEPT. 14-OCT.1J

OCT. 14 14-NOV.
NOV. 14-NOV. 11

NOV. M.
DtCM
DK.n-
JAN. II

13 1 18 22
a i i Hi

S 12 15 11 it IB IS 6 IB

i 15 IB 5 6 ii 12 19 9 7 14 IB li S

25 15 21 13

14

'

1 20 IB 1 14 3 S 14 15 23 2 IB 15 It S 14

19 25 13 IB 1 20 8 5 20 9 3 14 15 20 5 19

19 15 21 14 4 1 4 32 9 3 5 7 9 22 5 14

23 15 18 18 25 14 13 23 6 1 4 5 19 15 21 20

3 15 13 16 1 14 25 3 15 13 9 14 7 14 15 23

1 19 9 14 19 15 15 14 6 15 18 ,7 9 22 5 14

23 5 4 4 9 14 7 15 6 20 8 18 9 12 12 19

1 16 15 5 13 9 14 19 16 9 18 5 19 25 15 21

19 15 13 5 20 8 9 14 7 14 5 23 20 15 4 15

WHEN

UTERAL.UV

OBSTACLES

LANJ3IM TAIL-FIRST TO RESUME. THE OHASE.
328

SIDE GLANCES

Bv Calbroith

T.M. M. U.. T. 0.

& 0

7-13

1

lln

T.M. .i U.. tt. M.
'Ml k, Kin la
6-4. iMMiMrJVr!

'I've been exiled!'

1 1 4
"They say any intelligent layman can underetand thi
book, but I don't knowmyb I'wjMBtjot a jaytntn!

Faltering Philip!
rhiltp'r UIm it mien with hftdfte.
RTAhra wmM mf hie hone Ittte aew.
. a ChuMrtfletls. tmt Ike rtfht eiMf

PAMMA

MMMI-ST. LOUIS 47 .60
Office Hours: from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

PANAMA
ST. LOUIS

. Today's XV Program

60

7:30 Schlitt Plavheus of SUn
1:00 Ed Sullivan
t:00 Telsnhone Tim
9:80 Phil Silvers
10:00 Wreatlln
11:00 CFN NEWS
11 JS Eneort: Caenr'a Hour

1:00 Lamp Unto My Eet
2:30 Country Muaic Jubilee
3:00 Gam of The Wwk
S 30 No Warning
R no Industry On Parade
:13 CPN NEWS
:30 You Ar Th

7:00 Dennis DayHpt 17 Jul 57
Conrteay Aero viae PananaA Airways
PHONES: PANAMA: 3-1057 3-1698 3-1699
OFFICE HOURS: from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

IgEALSTlPOL
iDlAGNOSl

IP0tTOR

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THE UNIT LEADERS and assistants of Unit I with their group of 16 Brownies on the last day of Seoul day camp at
Diablo. Those who attended with the Scouts are: UnJt Mrs. Peter Bolton, Assistant Leaders, Mrs Mary Kobert son and
Mrs. J. Hunt. Senior afoes: PhyHi. Crook, Jo Ann Keichert, M xin. Bawott, Dia H-chisoa Sartent and I Virwtaa
Maulden. Brownie Scoots: Martha BagKott. Mary Daiton, : borah Goidfein, Ann Goldfem, Peggy Ann Hale, Janet Hunt,
Coilen Kade. Susan Keneally, Patricia Knappert, "Susan Lad wig, Cathy Maclntire, Charlene Rose, Betsy Saxton, Susan
Schroeter, Viky Trifone, Carol YVigg, Jackie Robertson.

f IVTUPM TID IT la HITT H4PPV u.w.w fiMni lnnk nrettv for th nhotorranher at Camn Chalet in Diablo Heights while

waiting for instructions from the camp director Mrs. G.O. Parker on their turn to entertain the parents. Leaders: Mrs l.U.
Aumer, Mrs. C. Jones, (Mrs. C.A. Stewart not shown). Senior Scout Aides; Lynn Botzenmayer. Peggy Morgan. Brownies:
Marian Colclau er, Rosemary Fries, Patricia Green, Kathleen Johnstone, Janet Kelly, Donna Krise, Valerie Mclntire Dar Darken
ken Darken Newman, Gloria Salazar, Gail Saiz, Beverly Senser, Sue Ann Smith, Martha Jane Spinny, Linda Trifone, Kathryn
Warren, Cynthia Boukalis.

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R it own I to sroiTTS UNIT 3 noses for parents on visltin? day at Camo Chalet in Diablo during Brownie Day Camp. Leader:

Mrs. Addle Colclauser. Senior Aides: Patsy Davis, Eileen Cox, Betsy Mallory, Diane Janes. Brownie Scouts: Mary Gae
Boltor. Barbara Inn Anmer, Patricia Ann Brewer, Carol C. Da is, Pamela K. Gross, Palmira Gonzales, Regina Gaspirini, Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Hakey, Gail Harrison, Vera Hicks, Sandy Lee Laird, Meredith Markun, Leonore Olson, Linda Patten, Noralyn Stewart,
Laurel Abraham. ""

Story by EMILY C. BOLTON
Photos by
EARL DUKE, J. FETTLE
And U.S. ARMY
Late last month saw 241 Cakal

Zone Girl Scouts of all ages irora

urownies age seven through mw.n
Intermediates ages (10 through 13)
and Girl Scout Aides (14 through
!,) participated in Outdoor Cahip-
ing.
The day camp for Browniei' on
the Pacilic aide was in the Diablo

School area. Atlantic-side orowmes
were camping in the Civii Coun Coun-sil
sil Coun-sil Quonset area in Gatun, w li'o
the Intermediate Scouts set up
camp in the G a m b o a Union
Church, Gamboa Civic Council

Building, Gamboa benoot ina hum

Scout House area.

Each morning, with tne weatner weatner-man
man weatner-man cooDeratine up to the "last

day, Girl Scouts began their day

with an outdoor nag ceremony,
pledging allegiance to the flag of
the United States of America, rei

terating the Uirl bcoui rromise
and signing songs of greeting, in
the traditional Scout manner,
Next ahealth check of each
scout was made by camp nurses,
Miss Louise Cunningham, Miss
Thelma Headly, Mrs. Betty Sut Sutton,
ton, Sutton, Mrs. Hilman Bay and Mrs.
Crabb, after which the scouts set settled
tled settled down to a full day of new ex experiences,
periences, experiences, new enjoyments, ., and
new accomplishments.
At Camp Chalet, Brownies on
the Pacitic side learned how to

say, "Good Morning" in different
languages, enjoyed Nature ScaVesr

ger hunts to test ineir powers ox
observation.
Mrs. G O. Parker, camp chair chairman,
man, chairman, and her assistants, Mrs. V.

Salazar, Mrs. Uharies Jieiaen, Airs.
Ray Euper. Mrs. M. McColiuJgh

and Miss Patty Davis, had plan planned
ned planned a full program or each day.

The story oi Juliette Gordon

Low, founder of Girl, Scouting,

was read to the Brownies and
many of the arts and crafts at
the camp was patterned? after
Mrs. Low's childhood hobbles.
In keeping with the name of the
Brownifr Day Camp, a Swiss
theme was closely followed. Swiss
alpine hats and gay suspenders
were made by the Brownies and
worn on the last day o camp
when they entertained their par parents
ents parents with Swiss songs and danc
es learned through the week.. Co Coconut
conut Coconut hand bags, bracele-.s, apo apograph
graph apograph books and other handicrafts
were on display that day.
During the week Joe Daly of
the CFN radio and Television
Staff entertained the Brownies
with a history of .he Swiss ,v l
and some SSwis3 yode so, :.-.
Peter J. Barr, of the a lire
station instructed the iiildren in

fire prevention, Sgt. W. A, Alves
of the Balboa police station ex explained
plained explained the care of the fla,g, and

also spoke on bicycle safety rules,
while Mrs. Gilbert Davis entertain entertained
ed entertained the Brownies with movie slides

on Stateside Girl Scout campins.

'A cook out was held at Summit

Gardens where proper camp (:re
procedures were demonstrated by
Mrs. M. McCollough and senior

aide Patty Davis. Leaders and as

sistants of the Brownie units w re

Mrs.vPeter Bolton, Mrs. J. D. Au Aumer,
mer, Aumer, Mrs. W. E. Colclauser, Mrs.
David Markun, Mrs. Mars, Rob Robertson,
ertson, Robertson, Mrs. J. Hunt, Mrs. 0.
Jones, Mrs. R. Stewart, and Mrs.
R. Abraham.
Senior Girl Scout aides were:
Phyllis Crook, Maxine B a g g o r,

Virginia Maulden, Kay argent,
Diane Hutchison, Jo 'Ann Reich Reich-ert(
ert( Reich-ert( Peggy Morgan, Lynn Botzen Botzenmayer,
mayer, Botzenmayer, Betsy Mallory, Eileen Cox Cox-Diane
Diane Cox-Diane Jones, Holly Abraham, Su Susan
san Susan Barrett and Carla Elich.
Skeets of the Summit Garden
staff conducted a tour identifying
trees and shrubs.
At Gamp Brownie elf hut on the
Atlantic side, under the direction
of Mrs. Nellie Graves assisted by
Mrs. Kathryn Killip, the Brownies
were divided into two units, tho
Blue Fairies and the Gold Fair Fairies.
ies. Fairies. They made hobo bags, brace bracelets,
lets, bracelets, paper weights and puppets
which were also displayed on par parent's
ent's parent's day Saturday morning. j
A story narrated by Mrs. Lenor 1

KSUNDAY, JULY 27, 1958

yunwr win "'"fr



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dins bcoiits

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Buti nd enacted by th girl I
with their puppets was a highlight
mS tho rlosinp dav.

Hnrine caniD week a hike to

Catun Locks in time to see a ship
wi.h thrnuirh while C H. Ches

ter explained the procedure w

interesting and educational.
' Annthor hikp tn wonder "C

rmn "the future Girl SS C 0 U t

Troop Camp area, for a cook
ut of hamburgers previously

prepared by the Brownies was
atisfvins event.

rn other da vs. eames. new

ongs, discoveries in nature and
th mrt nt ootrioor tivinp wer eX-

. w w -
berienced. Leaders and their as-
. . r i t u0

Sisiaius were. onuuu, ana.
Dolores Hammitter, Mrs. E. T.
Mrs. Lenor Butz. Mrs.

Use Metzger, Mrs. Paul Cave and
ttoninr aiHe r.arnl Seaman.

Consultants for songs and games
ewre Mrs. Sally Smith assisted
by senior scout aide Karen Coate.

Mrs. Margaret Coate was gener
1 consultant for the camp and al
an wax in phart'p of first aid.

Camp Cazone outdoor camp for

Inter mediate scouts was unaer tne

direction of Mrs. L. Strode of Kob
Sia mnii har oecielahita Mrs Tt P

Schroeter of Diablo. Some 126

Scouts participated in the events

Of tneweeK. Divided into six u
flits with somewhat similar oro

rams the Spools ronrei.tr.ited on

outdoor skills and activities, build building
ing building fires, use of hand axe, tying
(Continued on Page 8,

A.. I Ill 'HI! W.'lBalH

II SLSI bUHH 111 SHk9BMSfJl

BaWalfBalfHiaH

iaBHaBnllaflBlaa.HrliraIHBalB

vniE YFAR-OLn BROWNIE SCOUTS under the direction Of Mrs. D.J. Murium and Mrs. Rodger Abraham awaiting
th2fr Ttt Certain Parents at Camp Ctoalet in Diablo Heights. Senior Aides: Holly Abraham, Susan Barrett, Carla
tttffi mEJ&J- Melaine kststo, BagVott, Belleus, Bey Bernard, Nancy Brown, Sharon
BP Ilillmun" Je'rrilynn Hunt, Sybil Markun, Nancy Nelson, Beth Rose.
Teresa Sanchez, VW1 Shock, Florence Torpert,

LEADERS AND ASSISTANT LEADERS of Camp Cazone at Gamboa. Back row (left to right) : Mrs. J. D Cordine, Mrs. Julia Maynor, Mrs Hazel 1 Brooks
Mrs Mary ConS Mrs. O Gordon and Mrs. Jean Grabbe. Front Row: Mrs. Florence Ashley, Sandy Dunning, senior Scout a.de; Dotty Rose, senior Scout
i G.nj. Mn ft r. Sohrntr Mrs fi'iuinp Kav and Mrs. Elizabeth Seniel.

AIUCr i1 1 .T Ut OUUUV, IT ijm .1

- mm liiilni'ia

INTERMEDIATE SCOUTS resting at Summit Gardens after hiking from the Scout day camp at Gamboa.

:4

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Sunday, jul?, 1958 ftww mfm.

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WSa&tSha



THE PANAMA AMERICAN
WMt tW -Ul WM rMl NAM AMERICAN FBE INC
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HARMOOIO ARIA. tOrTM
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Pen tU MONTH M AnVAN'l

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Washington

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TIT" " irvptoquio: OUR

!, j. ii, a ryptoquips: O
I aLLE GUPPY FREQUENTLY GETS LOST
Large aquaria

IN

Merrv Go- Round

By MEW PEARSON

POETS' CORNER
ELDORADO
By Edgar Allan Poc
Gaily b?dight
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journeed long,
Staging a song,
In Starch of Eldorado.
But he grew old.
This knight so bold,
And o er his hoar: a shadow
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That locked like Eldorado. k

And as his strength
Failed him al length.
He met a pilgrim shadow:
"Shadow," said he,
"Where can it be,
This land of Eldorado?"
'"Over the mountains
Of the Moon,
Down the Valley of the Shadow,
Ride, boldly tide,"
The shade replied,
"If vou seek for Eldorado!"

I Have A Rendezvous With Death
By ALAN SEEGKR
I have a rendezvous with Death
At some tisputed barricade
When fcprins comes bick with rustling shaJe
And apple blossoms fill the air
I have a rendezvous with Death
When spring brings bac c blue days and fair
It .nay be he shall tat"? my hand
And lead me iato hn .rk land
Ami close my eyes ana cuench my breath
It mr.y bo I shall pa ; him still.
I have a r.nrlezvotis vlt'i Death
On some scerred sloTe of battled hill.

Wiicn Spnn comes rou id atain this year
And the fir.-.t meaciow flowers anpeir.
God knows 'twere better to be deep
Pi'lowed in silk and scented down.
When, love throbs out In blissful sleep,
Fx se nigh to pulre, and breath to breath.
Where hushed awakenings are dear
F"t I've b rendezvous with Death
At midnisht in some flaming town.
When Spring trios north again this year.
And I to my nled'zPd word am true,
I shall not fail my rendezvous.
Hwth find solm.on to Sunday Crossword Pz Pz-lc
lc Pz-lc No. ,4f, published today.

WASHINGTON While Sherman delayed salary checks to be cask cask-Adams
Adams cask-Adams was receiving gifts total-, ed years later when income tax taxing
ing taxing over SoOOU .rum one of his es might be lower,
"uearesi mends," Bernard Gold- They. consider it significant that
fine, another case o gift-giving .son b of the chocis uatc back te
was' dealt with more harshly in I'Mi before ?jy as yoti-ge income
the Army. taxes were established. "T
Col. George IthlSer, an engineer- A man in the higher tax brack bracking
ing bracking procurement oiiicer, had re- ets could have his company pay
parted that Arthur Venneri of Easr him a large check and keep it or
Westlield. N.J., handed him an a period of years until either, Con
evelope containing $1600;. gress reduced taxes, or his own
Kibler, who is attached to the income might decrease. Then he
Pentagon, reported the "gratuity" could cash the checks without pay-
in May, 1957, and the following ing high taxes on them.
July tne Gratuities Board prow If this was the Goldfine strate-
sionally suspended Venneri's firm 8. h may "d himself in mere
from lefeme work. It was not un- tax trouble than he is today. For,
til March 13, M58, hawever. that Uui tr the do.tr.ie of construct,, ve
the board iormally determined that receipt, any person who receives
th tinoo wa ?ratuitv for the check must pay taxes on it the

jr.i ne rec-ivcs u, wneintjr ne

cashes it or a-1.
Gold ine has already failed to
file a state income tax return tor
1956, failed to, submit a Fe. l
tax return for the same year, ..js
asked for an extension of time un
his 1957 tax return, and ewes the

purpose of in luenc mg a defense
contract. In accordance with this,
the bo .r officially notified Venne
ri last May j that the would
barred from working for the de defense
fense defense establishments for one year.
Venneri then wrote a pathetic

Higgins aiipeslmg for relief. He ? ?f Boston 9Ul,m in real es

explained that he had come to this la'er ta.xes" . t
country from Italy in 1920, had Ma'be he sh"u,d sPent
worked as a carpenter by day m?re mone? on taxes and less
and gone to night school until he Slfts- Pearl stckpins or plain plain-worked
worked plain-worked his way up to beonae a

cc"stnction suoerintendent an l fi
nally formed his own company.
He had been active in -hurch
and civic affairs, had a fine 'am 'am-ily,
ily, 'am-ily, atid had not meant the $1000
as a bribe. He said be had gen genuinely
uinely genuinely wanted to help the officer
with the education e his son,.
Venneri went on to explain that
almost his entire business wjs
with the government and if he
was susoended from such business
it would almost put him into
bankruptcy.

clothes men, ornate hotel suites,
and liquor and caviar for-new
men.
Or maype he figured that if h
knew the rrg.lt people he wouicj
not be "subject to the same laws
as the rest of us."
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
You can write it down that Sher Sherman
man Sherman Adams will resign daring
the Labor Day weekenfl. Congress
won't be in session then and ,'ii's
figured mat not many people read
the papers at the end of the dog
days. .Jacqueline Cochran (wife
of uall Street tycoon Froyd Od Odium)
ium) Odium) canceled a speaking engage
ment be ore the National Federa Federation
tion Federation of Business and Profession ii
Women's Clubs on a plea that
Eisenhower has appointed her to
a special mission soon to be an announced
nounced announced and that the White House
advised against any speaking ap appearances.
pearances. appearances. She was to have ap appeared
peared appeared on the Mike Wallace IV
show. .Miss Cochran is the lady
who was defeated for Congress
by Judge D. Saund in California's
Imperial Valley in 1956. During
the war she ran the lady iliers
." the Air Corps.

Lire SIjows On Broadi

way

If you
things

By JACK GAVER

NEW YORK -(UPI)
stay around long enouh

always come full circle.
I. seems like only yesterday all
right, it was 27 years ao that Flo
Ziegield imported a South Seas
beauty, named Reri to animate a
grass skirt in his last edition of
the "Follies."
And who should be in town bow
but ano.her suntinted native f
the South Pacific who has been en
ticeel, for the moment, into the
wavs of American show business.
K a mine is her name, and she is

He too claimed riendship with an an 18-year-old Polynesian el en
official of government Sherman gaging smile and graceful move

I Higgins was so impressed with
i the letter that he took it home o o-j
j o-j ver the week end to try to decide
, what to do.
The situation had so ne similari similarities
ties similarities with that of Bernard Goldfine
a".: his guts to Adams. Like "o.u
' fine. Venneri was an immigrant.

Adams, however, had not reDorted

i the much more expensive gits
: from his friend while Kib'er had.
Ac' -is : !o i,' Tve ied v-fiv-ly
for GoWfine's company on 1 at
least three occasions. Kibler had
done the opposite.
Higgins finally n ltd against Vsi Vsi-ner
ner Vsi-ner Tie we v. ir susoension lit lit-wrote
wrote lit-wrote wnld htve to stand.
! Note When Vice President Nix Nixon
on Nixon was in tbe Navy as contract or or-ficer
ficer or-ficer negotiating with the Krco
Conmanv of Maryland, he borrow
1 ed $150 frrm the rompanv. Such
a loan is illeg tl. Unlike Kibler. lie
did not report it.

ANOTHER ROOM BUGGED

Jack l otto, the ex-tNS newsm n
whose rew iob it is- to glamorize
Bernard Goldfine has an interest interesting
ing interesting record. He has written mu -h
of the record himself and it sho-:
that those who live in h s hotel
rooms should not throw s'unes
In an interview nub; shed n E E-ditor
ditor E-ditor and Publisher. Dec. 2 I95t,

two other newsmen, in'chidin

iaie Bert Andrews o' the X e w
York Herald Tribune, bu ;,l tnp
Hotel Conrimoftoyp ro m in jpnJ,
Richard ixon was hoHing ; se
eset confmcfe between hittak-

er Hampers anrf His

men. who is teatured in the torin
coming "Cinerama-South Seas Ad
venture." fifth production in this
pioneer big screen process. Ms
world premiere will be at the
Warner Theater here July 15.
Naturally Ramine dances n in
film. But not .he hula of Ha m
with which most Americans are
familiar.
"It is the hula of Tahiti," Ram
ine explained in her laudable But
French. iccented Enlish. "Much
more faster than Hawaiian hula.

More active. And I do not wear

'grass' skirt. Skirt is made from
shredde 1 bark f a ree."
Learned By Watching
The film covers most of the
vast Sou h Pacific, even se
quences in Australia. It has a
stronger thematic thread than the
preceding Cinerama films, al although
though although it is not an ou and out
plot- ype movie.
Ramine enters into the proceed proceedings
ings proceedings as a champion Tahrian
dancer, which she is, who is ehos
en by journeying Frenchman
as his Polynesian ideal in the

;tid! t'"adition of the paintings ef faul

thp Gauuin.

"My part was ready filmed our
ing Bastille Day celebration last
July 14 m Pa pee c lahiti," Ram Ramine
ine Ramine explained. "Tiwp of team
dance cmistest. Tcims come from

siant raduiun of sharing, the Bu Bu-chins
chins Bu-chins let Ramine to to live with
the Aliens. They have since a a-dopted
dopted a-dopted her.
Allen has pursued a varied ca career
reer career in :he South Seas, and Amer American
ican American til m-makers who have oper operated
ated operated there often have used h i
many skills and knowtede of tne

region. Carl Dudley, who directed

Cinerama South Seas Adven Adventure,"
ture," Adventure," was the latest to employ
him and, of course," he met Ram Ramine.
ine. Ramine. He hired her at once.
The shy but friendly Ramine
and her chaperoning adopted no h h-er
er h-er are qui:e cautious about the
girl's future as an entertainer.
"We have had a number of of offers,"
fers," offers," Mrs. Allen said. "But Ram Ramine
ine Ramine has danced publicly, except
in Tahiti, only at an entcrtain entcrtain-mcn.
mcn. entcrtain-mcn. at i hotel in Honoh.hi
where we now make our home.
She nas never worked ui a night
club cr a thz ter. I suppose there
will p more offers now. We will
have to thin'i about the matter
and discuss it among ourselves."
Ramine said she hoped to be become
come become a good housewife.

many island to driu-e for pvic

Nixon -;isjMiPi,'',r is quite au'..enc.

nr we kncv w'-'- i Twq now roes a laniuan ream
was gam 0n inside" .sai-l nfo d?rntt 4he u mitional m ve
"We cot a hearine'aiH h;mftnts; wti( instates?

the third Noons. Rammo repTtctf. M

the dnor i,r '" watches the parents, he stand-

and tuned in on it k ",.!' narents. One learns by watching.

TU. . .. r"J. T r1nrt o 'r ci'nro 1 vat ttrl

girl."
The methort of Ramine's involve
ment in the movies must be n n-nique.
nique. n-nique. She was one of seven :n

the family Buchin on he coral

island of Bora Bora. Two ship

wrecked Americans landed 'here

when she was three. They were

Igor and Prudence Allen, whr

had worked in the field of child
psychology at Northwestern .'-'
versity and then settled 'n Pa Pa-pette.
pette. Pa-pette. Cautious About Future

Childless, thev bec-iie a'UcheJ
to Ramine, and, in the Pelyne-

The papers had the story by the i
tmtc Nixon t.me out of" the!

Lotto is the man who complain complain-ei
ei complain-ei loiHijv ,nd ostentatiously wh.n
the ex chief investigator o' the
Harris committee placed a listen listening
ing listening device next to Lotto's room in
the Sheraton Carlton Hotel.
MYSTIRIOOS CHECKS
Some members of the Harris
committee are wondering whether
the mysterious uncashed checks
which Bernard Goldfine doesn't
want to talk about may not be

SHIFT IN CAMERA TRADE
WASHINGTON UPI ) The I; S.

Commerce Department reported
impor's of s'ttl f"ieras from
West Germany and Japan were
rown sVf -! ''"ring the' first
three months of 1958, while cam camera
era camera im-vt.v from East Germany
increased.

sis

"K A

i

I TTiinc ii jook 10 yean to
i complete the Panama Canal
(actual digging of the 50-mile
i ditch took only seven years
Preparations for the canal
.work, including sanitary work j
!t make the area free from
yellow fever, rebuilding of
railroad;;, construction of
quarters for workmen and ar arranging
ranging arranging for food and water,
took the other three yean.
Brltannica Jr. Etncyclopadte

rAUhj l-'OUK



Was
s
In New York
Command Decision StentorU mm
Boss Man Odd Makers-Looking Up

fflllUICII

THINGS I NEVER KNEW
'TIL NOW

the headlines about inflation, atom
ic missiles and Asiatic lu). .
Thai Voltaire's real name was.

(Becaust my teacher was such a Francois Marie Arouet. He said

! Ill Uliaitru 11 uvm-
I failure under his old monicker .
That Mark Twain, one of the ma-

flirt)

That Nero didden fiddle while

Rome burned. For one thing, the ny great writers who died broke
fiddle was not yet invented and,! summed it up: Golf u a good
besides, Nero was at his villa in walk spoiled."
Antium (50 miles away) at the i
"me- ,iL. KT. That throughout your life jir

nas t-"uuB.. uapi .V ipars nfvrr stoo erowine. .mat

es. (So don't blame

dy to make aoout iw,u rpmUld. us about snakes

ine numiuuy i ...

.That, according to Science Dt- T'.,: V

whien
the ap-

By DOUGLAS LARSEN and JERRY BENNETT

WASHINGTON (NEA) U. S. day snioking one of his famous
Air Force Headquarters in the cigars. A young airman guard
Pnid.i has been Dretty nervous, seeing this violation of refcula-

' o i i i i m ;...,! "1

la;lv over reDorts ot crashes mm uuua, iianum,

near misses between civilian and
military aircraft and the demands
for better air traffic regulaliuus.

He can't do

that. The plane will explode."
An old master sergeat who o
verheard the remark motioned

ir A'l oh nf i II I 111 1 1 Ic :mH nthpr file-

gest, if your fingers get warmer vibrations 0f the

.l..imn nn I IM ill I 1 d-t LAy Willi J ii.-nv

II Ul 1UK UIV1 "V" T- r

Rut thev not the ultimate reacitne rooKie 10 siay wnere ue wat

tion the other day when a citizen "Be quiet, son, said the s e r r-vvired
vvired r-vvired them from California-. ; geant. "That airplane just wouldn t

n.nariine from Burbanl, cai- aare.

if., on United Airlines via

on tn New York City. Leaving Ju

ly 7 9 p.m. Please ground ali jets
and all other flying craft which
use same route because I want
to reach my destination safiiy.
Thank you for your cooperation.

F'V- A Tht iKa nKjiQtoct num

. ., :J I'lUUIlu. .1111 ui fcv-v .......

rhialirst. it indicates you re avmu. r .... .j l, n c ir

. ,, .a miiuer vi 5UH.1UCB m ic j.. u.

mg me prooieii! i during May and June, which s

the eartn weigns an esl''lc"u'-! Spring, and when you feel most
000 million milton million tons .ft 8 Tat ear, Assyrians be.
(Oh, I weighed it!) .The odds loothaches were caused by
are 7000 to 1 against your being m0,ars That 0IL
struck bv hehtning dunng your ... .. ... !,...

- , i l (... jy it indit' inuauivua uiic huiiii". TICS WHO Claim .jvnw...-
lifetime. A guy could do better Ma,e mosqui,oes Teed largely on its feet on passing legislation

in veg.. the juices of plants. .In 1845 an
is quoted in a mag as saying: lordinance was passed in Boston
probably wont find happiness i in pm bathtub bathing except
marriage because I have an aff.m- tnr.c nrHprl Thai ar

ty for jerks." I cordine to Phvllis I. Rose'nteur;

insomnia is very annoying, but it
is certainly nothing to lose sleep
over. That the first baby born
in the U.S. to become President
was Martin Van Buren.

An unofficial national amateur
martini making contest was hold
here last week with Philadelphia
advertising executive Carl Fnsh
man taking first place.
His mixture was five-to one with
liberal oil of lemon peel "added.

ecu ai pxandfr WILEY has; Washington home builder Henry

- i j i o. r-

That if you don't have a watch,
you can tell the time by kwkng
t a cat's eyes. They ar2 at a
maximum distention at noon and
dilate from then on. (Hey! Wot
time is it by your cat? M i n e's
stopped). .That the plural of
goose (if there are five,) is goos
es. If there are six they become
geese. The best hangover pre preventive
ventive preventive (if you plan getting stiff)
is a pair of aspirins before go going
ing going to bed. (That alone is worfh

the price of admission). . .mat
the German word for wife (Frati)

framd a fool-oroof answer for cr

tics who claim the Senate drags

Th roiorful Wisconsin Itep'ibli

can complains that his colleagues colleagues-simplv
simplv colleagues-simplv can't hear what's going on
in the Senate chamber.

the Battle o" Concord in 1775)

That in Hollywood movie parlance
"M.O.S." on scripts stands for
"mitout sound." (The origin dates

me uerman worn ior w.-e i" back deCades ago to a German
is formed from the German words cameramant used tocal.

He says the lack of a p.lic
address system prevents senators
from hearing the vice president,
majority leader and each other
He also blames poor acoustics
for the small number of visitors
and reporters who have been at

Tti.i it.,. Dritici nt,'i mi i n 1 1 i n i Senate sessions lately.

jmoi i'iki-'u Li., v uuo a r ....

plot of bud in Massachusetts Wiley mooestiv insists mai m.
near Concord Bridge. (It contains is practically the only senatoi
tho o.avpc nf 15 cniHit-rc irittrri inlwho can be heard all the time

by everyDoay. ins i-oueaBucs
gree. One Democrat recen'ly
tracked:
"If -they install a mike at Wi Wiley's
ley's Wiley's desk, it will be sound in

stead of silence mat drives ueu-

Reynolds and San Francisco im importer
porter importer Victor England tied for sec second
ond second with four to-one piixlures.
Washington businessman Fritz
Commons demonstrated the atom atomic
ic atomic martini. This consists of squirt

ine a spray of vermouth into the

air and sticking a glass filled with
ice and gin under the middle of
the mushroom cloud.
A dry atomic martini is made
by placing the glass under h e
edge of the mushroom vermouth
spray.

ghanistan's visitm0 . ...ni ...niter
ter ...niter Prince Pidar Mohammed
Daoud, a guest noticed a round
bulge in the coat pocket of a city
detective who had been assigned
as alsodyguard.

Have you guys stared carry carrying
ing carrying bombs?" he asked.
"No, that's an aople," the de detective
tective detective answered. "At every i:Iit

reception I've attended, I've always

gone home hungry.
What he didn't K"ow w

Afghanistan diplomats had set up

another buffet exn mv
dyguards. When the detective fi finally
nally finally left the oarty. h still iad
the apple in his pocket.
National Capitol De.nocratic C'uh
members are so cocky about the
favorable political outlook that
they have moved from their mod-

At a big embassy party for Af

est diggings of the past few yrsrs
to the most exclusive ho'el n
town. They havo taken over al almost
most almost half the main floor of :'n?
Sheraton-Carleton Hotel.
New club quarters include a
large fancy b;r and a huge din dining
ing dining room v i ich features a ceiling
that sinvdMes lime skies.
'And that's how we feel abtut
Hie whole political outlook in the
U.S.," a member says. "Nothing
but blue skies."

out: "Is diss mitout sound?").

froh and weh. Meaning joy and

- T i rr-i 1 ;

woe. ill riggers;. .inai u yuu ..Mmhic ric.. h

add a few drops of black paint : ma caUed ,.Mjster Crum and
to a can of white pamt, it 1 make the composer (W c Handv) sold
the white paint whiter. (Crazy, a right tQ the song fm $5Q rjeht
ManM j after he wrote it in 1912. .That
Turkish baths aren't Turkish. They
That Brooklyn was once a sep. were originated by the Romans
arately chartered city. It was in That Mother Goose was a real
corporated with New York City j person. She was Elizabeth Foster,
in 1898. (Who needs it?) . .That Born in Boston in 1665. Married
peanUs aren't nuts. They are Isaac Gose m 1693 and wr.it t
beans. (And beans to you, too), the famed rhymes for her grand grand-.
. grand-. .That a tornado usually travels i children. .That plastic urgery
from southwest to northwest nses was practiced by Indians
(Don't say von weren't warned), j 30 years ago and in Italy in
That the legal capital of the U.S. medieval times.

isn t Washington, D.C. but the Dis-

WbaU Do You Read?

pie away. , n nniwi rnt

. j my 4, 1MO IS UiC tint, vi in a i w a iu kc i vau. iil in iii iiiti
PHILIPPINE diploiiMts a r c grapher-novelist Donald, Bart have been apprenhensive. No lack
v,;iio iho arrival of Pilar LapusiChidsev's new book (Crown) a of polish is noticealle in the

trict of Columbia-. (This is bet
ter'n going to night school, na?

Arccording to hearts specialist

That Napoleon chose many of
his generals by their Durantes.

laiiehter is floor! exercise because Because he believed that men

it's a tonic to the nervous am : with large, strong noses were de de-the
the de-the circulatory systems. But .r.ost, termined and aggressive fighters.
o1 the star comedians, now unem (With all the kidding they get,
ployed, wish so one could make they have to be). .That the Mao Mao-them
them Mao-them laugh). t George Wash- jr "f N?w Zealand catch fish by
ington was the wealthiest Ameri. I tackling them. .That Zachary
c ms by the time he was 29... i hat Taylor, our 12th President, never
"intoxicated" ackchelly meui voted in his life. .That the fast fast-"shot
"shot fast-"shot with a poisoned arrow "jest living thing in the world is
(Now he tells me.) tne celhenomyia fly. Habitat New
. j Mexico. It has been clocked at
That you can figure approximate-j 818 miles per hour. .That John
ly how many years you hive left Howard Payne, composer of
to live. By subtracting vol s age "Home, Sweet .lome," never had
from 80, multiplying the remainder, a home in his adult life. He wrote
by 7 and dividing the result by S the song while stranded, penniless,
10. (According to life insurance in Paris. He wandered all his life
actuarial tables). .That males and died homeless in Tunis in
are more sensitive to sunburn 152.

than females. Ulzo, pipple between

as the year's biggest boon to em- jfact crammed concise recreation
bassy entertaining. i ol the four days that summer
, ,. when a Continental Congress put
The charming wife, of the cm-1 together in sweltering Philadelphia
bassy's Armed Forces Attache, is- .. document that has become

mael Lapus, vs praised as tne ensnrined in the hearts and minds
best cook in the Philippines o( men around the world. This lit-
Other night the Lapuses threw tJe book has nQ new acts or dis.
a big dinner party and treated i coveries to offer- just a review
guests to Chicken Adobo. a his oJ exactl how the Declaration of
cious dish that takes two days .to ,nd endence was wriUen, adop
prepare. After dint er U. S. N .v I d u a day.,y-day
val Capt. Sidney dma-i. JJ account f that early Congress,
once served in the Philippines, ex- mood Us fritterinfi

claimed. ,ith r i vi a its sober reflection

wouldn't be surprise,, , H'knew was an historic

III n r linil All inCTOCCilC ( fill I S' .. I I .

.V"r'"r,' Junfca l.arn w I event. Chidsey presents 1 nouns

"T' 7rt;ilhlHTv t ho Jefferson sitting n passing resig-
recipes. She s undoubted v the c

best toon improvisor ... t . edRing u free.

ton. i ..,.1,,,., ,,i what is hailed

iy auu

Thw tall this story on Air Force

Vice Chief of Saff General Curtis

Le May, when he was head ot
Stratecic Air Command:
He walked onto an airfield one

the ages or 21 and 50 burn ore
easily than younger or older folks
. .That complaints about the
younger generation (C3ing to the
dawgs) aren't' new. Two thousand
years ago Ovid complained: "How
different from the present mani s
the youth of earlier days". .That
Arthur Murray, whose dance
schools will gross $60 million this
year, started out as a reporter on
the New Haven Register. (Wotta
comedown )
That the" temperature at the
center of the earth is two to five
times hotter than the surface of
the sun. (Is here anything the
man .doesrt't know?). .That on
the average) someone is killed on
ur highways every 13 minutes.
(Autos killed about 40,000 persons
last year alone). .That a French

pro essor named Laroche (he's

that carrots and spinach drive a

way depression. (Then along come

(Best c&

Fiction

That Dr. Marc J. Musser of the

Univ. of Wisconsin claims that the
person who is chronically weary
or weak is that way because he
is anxious, tense, disin'erested.

bored or frustrated in reaching
goals he has set for himself. (Or
becaue he keeps broding about
how he is going to do good. enough
colyums and a new TV film se.
ries at the same time). .That
Oscar Wilde puled a long ago
Goldwynism when he said: "You
have no idea what a poor opinion
I have of myself, and how little
I deserve it". .The lemons, or.
anges and watermelons aren't

fruit. (They're berries). .That

Mount Everest gets all the publL
city as the highest mountain in

the world bid Ecuador's Mt. Chim-

borazo is 2Vi miles taller. .And

the melody of "Star Spangled
Banner" was originally known as
"Anacreon in Heaven." N

ANATOMY OF A MURDER Rob-Traver

ICE PALACE Edna Ferber

THE WINNTHROP WOMAN-An.

ya Seton
A SUMMER PLACE- Sloan Wil.
son
NORTH FROM ROME Helan
Macinnes
THE GREENGAGE SUMMER
Rumer Godden
SEIDMAN AND SON Elick Moll

Non Fiction
INSIDE RUSSIA TODAY-John
Gunther
MASTER OF DECEIT J. Edgar
Hoover
PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAI DAISIES
SIES DAISIES Jean Kerr
KIDS SAY THE DARNDEST
THINGS Art Linkletter

THE ORDEAL OF WOODROW
WILSON Herbert Hoover
MADISON AVENUE, U.S.A. Mar.

tin Mayer

now as one of the greatest poll

tical documents ever written.

of Perhaps there is nothing more
j that need be said about the Dec

laration today. But with anoin

er July 4 just passed, Chidscy wise
ly leaves it to Woodrow Wilson to

sum it up in a 1907 speecn: it
is not a question of piety. .Ev

ery Fourth of July should be a

time for examining our sianoaras,

our Dumoses. fbr determining a-

frcsh what principles ana wnai
forms of power we think most
likely to effect our safety and
hsnniness. That and that alone

is the obligation the Declaration
lavs lmon us. .It was drawn by

men who thought, and it obliges

those who receive its benefits to

think likewise."

work published here (although
occasionally there is a pass:-
that was obviously meant to be
heard rather than read), and they

provide an excellent reflection of

the urbanely witty personality ot
their author.
Besides the broadcast the col collection
lection collection includes a number of es essays
says essays written during the '20's,
'30's and early '40's. In its pres present
ent present form, the book includes eight
works which did not appear in
the original edition. The .subject
matter ranges from advertise advertisements
ments advertisements to Einstein, but the prce't
is on the past, which is most cas cases
es cases Sir Max preferred to the pres present.
ent. present. Mainly On The Air if nostal

gic in another way, as a memen

to of the wit and s'yle, once com common
mon common in literature, which is all
too difficult to find today.

Mainly On The Air, by Max
Beerbohm (Knopf): The long and
productive life of Sir Max Beer Beerbohm
bohm Beerbohm spanned the years from the
horse and buggy to the hydrogen

bomb. Toward its end (he died in
1956). Sir Max turned from the

parody and satire that had made

mm famous to nostalgia a.iu ic-

The basis for Consciousness in
Concord by Perry Miller (Hough
ton Mifflin) is the long-lost third
volume of Henry David Thureau's
'Journal,' covennq the period
from July 30, 1840 to Jan. 22,
184'1.
Dr. Miller, who is professor of
American literature at Harvard,
calls his book a commentary, and
so it is. There is a great deal
more Miller than Thoreau in the
book 128 pages ot introduction, 86
pages of the Journal, including co copious
pious copious comments on it, and vari various
ous various annotations.
The Journal itself is of a piece

with the remaining 38 volumes,
published early in this century. It
is not a diary, a day-by day rec record
ord record of Thoreau's activities. If is a
polished collection of aphorisms,
bits of philosophy and comments
on friendship, life, death, litera literature
ture literature and of course nature. It was
written when Thoreau, at 23, was
perfecting his style and struggling
for the recognition which never
came in his lifetime.

Dr. Miller has made Volume 3

flection.

Mainlv on The Air as the title

suggests, is largely a collection of the occasion for an analysis, a vi vi-boradcast
boradcast vi-boradcast he made over the BBC vi-section, of Thoreau's literary
durine the 20 years from 1935 toiWorks, his outlook on lie and his

1955. When the nrigmar version

of ine book was published in 194$,
he was apologetic about the fact
that, because they were to be
spoken, he did not polish his
broadcasts as he would a work

character. Naturally it is of great

est interest to one who is faimi faimi-liar
liar faimi-liar with Thoreau's complete Jour Journal
nal Journal and his collected works. But
it is also a most competent commentary.

w-

j?AGE FIVE!
way. ,ULY 1968 '.i.JK4.,i Hi



:

0"
i
t;

BROWNIE SCOUTS at a cook out at Camp Little Elf in
Gatun back to Camera: Barbara GedWer, Irene Campbell.
Facing Camera: Joan DeLapp, Diana Gorina, Robyn Hammet Hammet-tr.
tr. Hammet-tr. Unit Leader: Mrs. Delores Hammetter.
Summer Camps For CZ Brownies

(Continued from Pair- THREE)
knots, making triangular kerchiefs
which could be used as bandages
in emergencies, and learning the
lore of trail signs and the use o
the compass.
Each day the Girl Scouts hiked
to the Gamboa Golf Club where
hot lunches were consumed hearti heartily.
ly. heartily. Swimming at the Gamboa
pool was a part of the daily pro program.
gram. program. Each unit spent one night at
the camp site sleeping in tents
provided bv the U.S. Army and
cooking their own supper and
breakfast. The day started prompt promptly
ly promptly each morning with the arrival
by train of Scouts from both sides
of the Isthmus.
One morning the camp was vis vis-I'
I' vis-I' "1 by Lt. Gov. Hugh Arnold
and P. A. White, chief of the
Dredging Division.
T.M. n,,. U.S. (x,
1l b NCA SM.ic. Inr.
'See! I told you the
to fry

s

Many new crafts were learned,
plaster of paris leaf molds, and
bug hotels were studied, and ma many
ny many other projects were accomplish accomplished.
ed. accomplished. The leaders and assistants for
Camp Cazone were Elizabeth San San-iel,
iel, San-iel, Julia Maynor, Hazel Brooks,
Mary Coklin, Florence Ashley,
Jeanne Jeanne Bay, Gail Metcaif,
G. 'Gordan, Jean Crabb, Mrs. D.
J. Cardine, Dorothy Rose, Judy
McCollough, Sandy Dunning, Caro Carolyn
lyn Carolyn Corn. Kathleen Cox and Ce Cecilia
cilia Cecilia Eggleson.
At the close of each day of
camping tired units formed friend friendship
ship friendship circles around the flag poles
and closing ceremonies were ob observed.
served. observed. Traps were sung and
hand clasps tightened and each
Girl Scout went away ith the
feeling of something gained, some something
thing something accomplished.

sidewalk was hot enough
eggs on!"

HORIZONTAL VERTICAL
X Brilliant 49 Charge 95 A metric I Attempt 45 Complete 85 Denary
lead 50 Sanction weight 2 Go 47 Asiatic 86 Good
glass 54 Leaf of 96 Explosive 3 Discount country promise
T Commune calyx sound 4 Warp. 49 Timber 88 Pace o
In 56 Inorganic 97 Muscular yam tree horse horse-Belgium
Belgium horse-Belgium 60 Indian twitching 5-Slendef 50 Egyptian 91 Curved
10 June-bug weight 99 Rocky 6 Counter snake end of
13 Egyptian 61 Eft pinnacle irritant 51 For each crescent
beetle 63 Impair 100 Twist 7 Con- 52 Official 92 Educated
19 Threefold 64 Upper 103 Sand- curred proof 94 Flower
20 Asiatic shell of piper 8 Roars 53 District 96 Reader
rolled turtle 105 Cap 9 Speed -of Oahu, 98 Restau
tea 65 Support worn 10 Small Hawaii rant
21 Herb 67 Plunderer by quantity 55 Wall 100 Rasp
22 Flaunt 69 Arm of dervish 11 Of us 56 Hawthorn 101 Cowardly
23 Rodent sea 107 Shy 12 Most 57 Raving 102 Refash.
24Dessert 70 Dogma 111 Indian flushed 58 Aviator ioned
26 Speaker 71 Infant 112 Farm 13 Game 59 Suffer 103 Dancer's
27 European 73 Director building 14 Concern 62 Regu- cymbals
mint 75 Article of 1 13 Antarctic 15 Constel- lated 104 Military
28 Impetus clothing mountain lation 64 Ever- cap
30 French 76 Excite 116 Math 16 Having green tree 106 Protrude
painter 78 Choiv term flat 66 Inventor 108 Small
32 Man's 79 Spanish- 117 Butt breast- securing 109 Becomes
name American 118 Balsam bone grant operative
33 Prohibit game 119 Of musical 17 Wor- 68 European 110 Abhor
35 One giving 81 To surge drama sniper bird 112 Pertain Pertain-assent
assent Pertain-assent 84 Again put 121 Tumbler 18 Scold 69 Bengal ing to an
36 U. S. coin to proof of 25 Deflect quince abrasive
37Printing 86 Fowl gunlock 29 Crowd 72 Confer 114 Fresh set
term 87 Sift 122 Incarna- 31 United 74 Cat 115 Bay of
38 Gum 89 Forthwith tion 34 Hebrew 75 Man- sea
resin 90 Cut 124 Like measure servant 118 Chinese
40 Insect deeper 126 Character 36 Spiral, 76 Misjudge dynasty
41 Loop witl; (engrav- 128 Prig 37 Most 77 Opposed 119 Overlook
running ing) 129 Son of Gad sloping to 120 Ruined
knot 91 Public 130 Consumed 39 Constitu- weather town of
43 Cubic house 131 Joins ent of soil 78 Of that G&lilee
meter 93 Point in 132 Strength for orchids woman 123 Sailor
44 Rather orbit of 133 Prepare 42 Ridges 80 Acme 125 Wrath
than moon hemp of drift 82 Female 127 Metal
46 Arid nearest 134 But 43 Legisla- antelope from
48 Rest earth 135 Soundest tive body 83 Sheep Malaya

Average Ume ( solution: 83 minutet.
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For The Best In Fotos & Features
. It's The Sunday American

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1958
H i

Sunday



; Review Of The Week

WORLD-WIDE

ISTHMIAN

SPORTS

PRESIDENT EISENHOWER served notice Friday HS ?
that If the Soviet request for a summit conference thf. TREATY LEGISLATION providing for an equal WORLD LIGHTWEIGHT CHAMPION Joe Brown
on the Middle East was to be met, the conference w f B s and Rate employes in the had to come from behind and stage an all-out fin fin-would
would fin-would have to deal with the broader problems ofrthat c "1 Zone was finally signed into law by President lsh against challenger Kenny Lane to retain his 135 135-troubled
troubled 135-troubled area. Eisenhower on Friday. pound dislem on a close but unanimous decision.
In a new note to Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush- whlch compietes UJ3. legislation obligations There were no knockdowns in the fast 15-round
chev, the President bluntly rejected Khrushchev a contracted under the 1955 treaty between Panama and battle but both the champion and the challenger
suggestion that any summit conference be limited to u g also extends civil Service retirement benefits shook each other up repeatedly.
hu onvM mmniaintji annul Aniilo-American troop ii

Onlv a relatively small percentage 01 ranamamau I'giiwio fimi mc bjuw ni 10174 vuunuo. an.ci h.c
employes will receive substantial increases as a direct bout, Brown promised to give Lane a return match

result of the bill. The raises win Decome enecuve u

mnvpmpnts in T phanon and Jordan.

He said, the securing, of peace In the Middle East
requires solution of the "far broader problems" which
have plagued the area.
He also told Khrushchev it was up to the United
Nations Security Council to decide the date, the
participants, and the ground rules to govern any

meeting of cnieis oi government unaer its buivc.
The president's 1000-word note on the subject was
handed to Soviet ambassador Mikhail Menshikov by
Secretary of State John Foster Dulles. It previously
was shown to U. S. allies.
In making the contents of the letter available to
the press, press secretary James C. Hagerty said that
"of course" the Presidents would attend a Summit
meeting If a satisfactory arrangement could be set
up by the Security Council. It was Hagerty's first
statement to that effect.
The President indirectly suggested to Khrushchev
that, he abandon his practice of writing highly-publicized
letters and allow the ambassador at the
United Nattns to make the arrangements if he sin sincerely
cerely sincerely wants a meeting.
The President spiked any Khrushchev hope of
turning a summit conference into a one-sided propa propaganda
ganda propaganda forum for renewing his charges of U. S. and
British "aggression" in Lebanon and Jordan.
The President did not directly refer to repeated
U. S charges that the Soviet Union ar its Arab
followers have engaged in a long campaign to fo foment
ment foment strife and revolutions in small pro-Western
Middle Eastern nations.
But he told Khrushchev that "I would be lack lacking
ing lacking In candor If I did not make clear that to put
peace and security on a more stable basis In the
Middle East requires far more than merely a con consideration
sideration consideration of Lebanon and Jordan."
"These situations are but isolated manifestations
of far broader problems," he said. "In my opinion,
the instability of peace and security is in large meas measure
ure measure due to the jeopardy in which small nations are
placed."
If a Summit meeting is held, he said, the United
States will discuss Lebanon and Jordan with the
"broad concept" of the troubles of that entire area.
"To do otherwise," he said, "would be to be blind
to the teaching of history."
The President recalled he told Khrushchev last
Tuesday that this country would be willing to parti participate
cipate participate in a U.N. summit conference on the Middle
East "if such a meeting were generally desired."
Khrushchev replied on Wednesday that he would
like to begin such a meeting tomorrow. V proposed
that India and representatives of the Arab nations
be invited to participate.
The President made it Dlain in his latest, note that.

he was in no hurry to rush into a summit meeting
with the Soviet leader.
He said it was "not yet certain that such a meet meeting
ing meeting is In fact 'generally desired,' although that may
prove to be the case." He proposed that the Security
Council poll its members on whether "a meeting of
the kind and under the conditions I suggest is gener generally
ally generally acceptable."
"Tf so, they should also agree upon a date which
would be generally satisfactory," he added. But he
sa'i flatly that tomorrow "would be too early for us
.' s for Khrushchev's su-rgestion that India and Arab
r -sp"tatives narticinate, Eisenhower said the coun council
cil council itself has rules under which non-member nations
m:iy participate in its deliberations.
"It is my earnest hope," the President said, "that
through the United Nations Security Council steps
cm be taken in regard to the Middle East which, by
making neace more secure there will help to promote
it 'sewhere."
He told Khrushchev he had instructed Henry Cabot
Lodse Jr., U.S. ambassador to the United Nations to
work with U.N. Secretary-General Da Hammarskiold
in oolling council members about a summit meeting.
British Prime Minister Harold Macmfllan already
hd said he is willing to attend a summit meeting. Tn
london the British government said it "welcomes"
the President's note on the subject and that the Brit Brit-Is
Is Brit-Is -v.p fUnv consulted on its terms."
Jn Paris. Premier Charles de Gaulle held urgent
conferences with ns cabinet about, whether he should
attend the Mew York meeting He has agreed to a
summit meetlnsr in principle, but has been reluctant
to attend a .wlon in Nw York.
America" officials sH one test of Soviet Inten Intention
tion Intention wov'd hinfe on Khrushchev's reaction to the.
prMnt.Vi sn?lbre.stlon that he allow the regular UN.
8 tv. bo nnors to make arrangements for the proposed
summit meeting.
ev said Khrushchev would cast douht on his sin sincerity
cerity sincerity in seeking a conference of chiefs of "overn "overn-ment,
ment, "overn-ment, If he persisted in exchanging propaganda-style
lettr! with the Western nations.
Three years and ome months after a switcheroo
On basic nolicv which was at the least most astonish astonish-fr
fr astonish-fr President Eisenhower seems la have ione it aen'n.
Three years and hom months ago. as todv the
pnie miest'on was whether the President, should Join
with the other heads of state, in a Summit, meeting.
fhen. as todav. the Eisenhower administration was
pi-niMnus, doubtful. To cm.nlete the naraMe'. then,
todav. pressure from. Db'ovan allies niied un In
fnrc and Eisenhower reluctantly agreed tfi the 1955
summit meeting in Geneva.

days after 11$ signs the executive orders connected

with the biu.
Meanwhile policemen, firemen, teachers and postal
workers saw a pay rise looming on the hroizon as
the senate passed bills providing for raises for their
oDOosite numbers in the District of Columbia, D C.

pay is taken as a base for this class of worker in the
Canal Zone.
Money for the first stage of a long-range plan to
move all flying from-Albrook Air Force Base to Ho Howard
ward Howard Field was approved by the House Appropriation
Committee in Washington.
The committee approved $540,000 which the Air
Force will use for strengthening runways and other
improvements at Howard. For many years there have
been protests about the danger of planes from Albrook
flying low over nearby schools but the main reason
for the plan seems to be that the runway at Albrook
is not capable of being lengthened sufficiently for
jet aircraft and the large type of cargo planes.
Rep. Daniel J. Flood (D-Pa.) had some more to say
about students and sovereignty. In an address to the
House of Representatives, Flood poured cold water on
Panamanian students' proposals for flying the Pana Panamanian
manian Panamanian flag in the Zone, for making Spanish the of official
ficial official language, and for the U S. ceasing business acti activities
vities activities there.
The Canal, Flood said, is an lnter-oceanic public
utility operated by the United States pursuant to
law and treaty and must be protected from further
political extortion.
The Panama Canal Company announced that while
the number Of ships transiting the Canal during the
fiscal year 1958 had been an all-time record, the a a-mount
mount a-mount of cargo carried through dropped from 50, 50,-624,73
624,73 50,-624,73 tons in the previous fiscal year, to 48,916,119
tons.
The lucky baby who will be Panama's millionth in inhabitant
habitant inhabitant looks like having a pretty good start in life.
Many local firms have, announced that they will give
prizes to the child which Is due to be born sometime
in September. Prizes so far assured are from a dairy
rroduce firm which has promised free milk products
for a year for the child.

The National Brewerv. not to be left out of things
d?soite the natural advantage the dairv had over
tv"m for .cnich an event, announced that thev would
a'o mark the occasion by giving a prize to the old-
f- "---'dent.
o
The U.S. Armv Caribbean rejoiced in the success of
is cucreestions nro:ram. The nrotrram calls for sug sug-pations
pations sug-pations bv personnel on improvements in organiza organization
tion organization or method". The Armv announced that, first year
oftrc p-"0""inr to w Kl pr- exnected to aciire
as a resu't of the susaeftions. Military and civilian
r.ni in thP r0mmc. submitted 2436 suggestions,
0f T. i"V, ptr) were adonterl.
o
,y, TP Ontario p Trove TT R. District Court judge
jn t'-" pnoi 7on recei'-ed )oi- annlause when he
r,..t tr.o ci'pr rirn'om 'n '"" Southern States,
r-ov-e. o Knt"c''iqn, W that T Utle Rock is an lso lso-p'ted
p'ted lso-p'ted ca; and that In many olaces. integration is
nrocedinr neacfullv anH the cases In the court up up-boiinor
boiinor up-boiinor Jntecrat'ori are bei"' well received. He was
,c"efHntr to an audience of Local Raters at Paraiso
Hi"h School.
.Tp77 took nrominence 'n the e"trt,ainment sohere.
Th Tnto-naHnnal Festival. 1958 was held at the
Vnrt wvvbbe PTvlce Club. Musicians and ptouos from
tho 7onp anH pnom c'tv nlaved traditional and
modern lazz to large and thunderously applauding
audiences.
Te fourth o"d final victim of a fash fire at Rod Rodman
man Rodman Navi Rtat'n about two wees ao died this
Pt nnras Hopnlfal after his life had hung in
fho bnionno for fniipv Havs o far the Navy has not
aiinnimced a cause of the fire.
Panama's former foreign minister took over his new
Jnh Ps tianemonfan ambassador to Mexico and unon
foin, c fok the nnnortunit" to stato that, he nd not
fppi no-nom re"eiv"d the heneflts wMch in eouity were
entitled to her in the oneration of the Canal.
A f'npl technical conference on the structure of the
nonr pfo-b.ievel bridge across the Canal at Baboa was
h-iM Tfu. week h" Canal officials and renresentaHves
of overdrun pnd Parcef. the fit. Lo"is engineering firm
W-'"h to den1nr th brlrin" and its aonrnaches.
Poftcfflctlon was exnressed on the drllllnsr work
t.tV,i, Vias nlrea'l" been don pnd H wa announced
that. thre ar no major problems to be faced in the
present program.
btoio pntai pnfv-nnitiec flnnoun""d that, a soeclal
ttamn W" in "honor of the Piir"i World Fair wonM

bo mae oer three pnd a half m"1lon colorful stamns
fpotnrnflr tn exhihits of T.atln American and other
countries at the fair will he on sale.
o
Canal Zone residents have been warned aealn a-

as soon as possible.'

Newly-crowned PGA champion Dow Finsterwald re received
ceived received a hero's welcome when he returned to his home
town In Athens, Ohio.
Finsterwald, who won the PGA title at Havertown,
Pennsylvania, Sunday, was greeted by scores of well well-wishers
wishers well-wishers and sings reading "Welcome home PGA
champion." Later, he was whisked away to a parade
and a partv at the Athens Country Club, where he
started playing golf as a teen-ager.
A chief crewman from Portland, Maine, will prob probably
ably probably think twice before he makes any more remarks
about boating.
A few minutes before this week's Junior Sailboat
Regatta got underway at Marblehead, Massachusetts.
David Bellknap said he saw no reason why any craft
should cansize. And be added that he himself had
never been In a boat, that did. Shortlv after the race
started. Belknan and the other crewmen were in the
water when their boat cansized.
Resigned Washington Senators director C. Leo De De-orsey
orsey De-orsey denies that he ouit because of a warning from
American League president Will Harridge.
Deorsey said he had received a warning from Har Har-ridge
ridge Har-ridge but resigned of his own volition. Said Deorsev
"I vattt to feel free to cav What I think is wrong with
baseball and what I think could help correct what is
wrong,"
The United Press International learned that Har Har-ridge
ridge Har-ridge sent Deorsev a telegram last soring accusing him
of an "unwarranted and unjustified" attack on base baseball
ball baseball commissioner Ford Frick. It demanded that the
Washington director cease or desist his outbursts. At
that time Deorsev accused Frick of what he termed
"unwarranted meddling" in the Senators' Internal af affairs.
fairs. affairs. A Iondon bus conductor scored a bi? upset by win win-nine
nine win-nine the middleweie-ht "'eight-lifting title at the Com Commonwealth
monwealth Commonwealth names in Wa'es.
But Blair B'enman needed plenty of help to achieve
his victory. First, a collection was taken up bv his
fellow transnort workers to buv eouinment and train
him. rhairmpn 0f the Cmes had to spend his own
monev to cet confirmation that Blenman could re-

prpeor. mo west mnmn island or Barbados. Another
n'fie'al had to donate to cot accredited paDersj with
tho weia-ht.-ifft.tnor federation. finallv, the letWs
"R--Pf-n-.rj-O-F" were sewed on his track suit by
a f?l!ow worker's wife.

star-studded United ptpt'c team arrived late late-MonHp,,
MonHp,, late-MonHp,, )n Mne0W for the first US-Russian dual tra-k
w-t in hitorv.
The 7fi t"am membar win face an all-star Soviet
fr-ai- fjon ,aygreat'on this weekend. More than
?"1 T?i.ccion ,rs inc'nHjno- Oivmnic. cbanmions
W"r on honrf t() prrppf fino Jnr0ri(,n. 3 the airpo,-t.
tv rneriaonp rr(- phoard three chartered air airliners
liners airliners Trom Helsinki, Finland, in a flight delayed by
bad weather.
technical director Alan Bortholemv of the 1900
Winter oivmnu has re-Ho-riM Committee President
prontio robb Hale cay the former technical director
shauiH have heen fired for incomnetence.
In his recia-nation stptment Hartholemv blasted
pole for what he cai'ed a refusal to heed recommen recommen-f"ttin,
f"ttin, recommen-f"ttin, fornniaai pvnerf.s pnH failure to coooerate
it HV, Tiro1 re'ant In rnonntalri counties. The 1960
Winter Games will b" held at Squaw Valley, Nevada.
Hale denied the chprces and said Bartholemy was
- '"I i tho nost of technical director from execu executive
tive executive director for fnphlhtv to nerfnrm Ms lob.
No successor has been nmed to Bartholemy 's post.
o
T ittle FaMIe T.ebaron hoc rio-ned for his fixth season
with the Washington Redskins.
The c.hib dclined to reveal the monev terms for
tho iKr.ound nnarterhack However. Lebaron is be-
ioyeH to he makinor lfHonariH flnllprc q Reacnn The
cn.nino- of the carterhpek left tho poHckfnq with only
five hnionts Tbo,, po fmarc r)a- Rtnnfe and Red
ptonVienc ha'fhool .Too Rcildero and Tom Runnels
man saM thev pre all evnecfeH to sln before the
pnH reserve onartorhack Rjjriv tiib-ph. A club spokes spokes-tpm.
tpm. spokes-tpm. onens training camn neyt Sunday.
Woavvweiorpt. poyinn camn jriovd ntterson mod-
et'v s"vis hr! isn't a p-reat chamninn like .Toe T mils or
Rod'v arc'ano. He pjves a his reason that he has
pnf I10J n chance to prce htnlalf
Pottorcon arrived at T o Anirgles to be"ln hard
drin for hi nirijt i title defense against Roy Har Har-r1
r1 Har-r1 e Prt. "W Fnnt Texas.
Pat,t.eron toM newsmen now onotlng "T need
more comnetltlon pnd" oner) competition which will
hrlr- nut rat-tar f1arhtr- Po pdoH that "lots Of "OOd
fia-htor e-t disconraqrod Rnd quit because they don't
sp f" future .T."
Patter-1-.n omnh P v'rrt he 1 fiillv behind his man-
rffer c,v r'ato in fighting what he called an
IPC "monoholv" to boxing.
irainct, the dangers of swimming In the vlcfnltv of
fa tun Pnuiwa" wiiere radno- f)ire of water occur,
"eh number of children swimming there is Increasing.

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1958

Sunday American SvMkement

k ; i.l f

PAGE SEVEN

1
. M



CATUN BROWNIES earning their hamburger badge at their day camD cook out.



I REM? K

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OF MY SCIENTIFIC "r
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THOSE SCIENTISTS
ON TELFl;iQW
COMMERCIALS

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USELESS? rAPrAlM

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5RAVy

BCW?

NO, CHILP-THEY PONT MEEP A CAPTAIN HERE ANY MORE.

THE OLP SEA FOAM WILL SOON BE A RESTAURANT.

AMP WHATOOOP WOULP I BE IN AN EATTN HOUSE-

EXCEPT MAYBE WASHIN PISHES.'

rhrfHW 4 ;ANP WHAT GOOD WOULP I BE IM AM EATIN' HOUSEj

HWnHKO gEXCcrT MAYBE WASHIN PtSHefK

Please, mrWi hNT timeLbesipes, I'm kinpa interesthJ
flim6-camt j to talk about in makim6 myself look,
you flmp a it now, kid- important im the eyes of

PONT TALK TO ME- J-M BUSY

TRYlNS TO KEEP HOUSE M ALL

BUILPIN6 MESS .' 60 SE

tLEE about it.'

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YEAH-1 SHOULDA POME THAT

I Si THE FIRST PLACE .' SHE Si

WITH PETER TRIBBLE, THE

KcFORTER, BACK HERE

SOMEPLACE.

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WELL AND MOW'S THE

PRETTIEST" BfSU

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LAMB. CHOP
WE ABE
Going to get
hitched
SOME DAV-
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